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Sample records for activity card sort

  1. Integration through a Card-Sort Activity

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Green, Kris; Ricca, Bernard P.

    2015-01-01

    Learning to compute integrals via the various techniques of integration (e.g., integration by parts, partial fractions, etc.) is difficult for many students. Here, we look at how students in a college level Calculus II course develop the ability to categorize integrals and the difficulties they encounter using a card sort-resort activity. Analysis…

  2. Development of the Arab Heritage Activity Card Sort

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hamed, Razan; AlHeresh, Rawan; Dahab, Sana Abu; Collins, Brittany; Fryer, Jasmine; Holm, Margo B.

    2011-01-01

    Participation is an indicator of healthy functioning and well-being, as emphasized by the International Classification of Functioning, Disability, and Health (World Health Organization, 2001). The Activity Card Sort (ACS) is a valid and reliable assessment tool that measures participation. This study describes the process of developing the Arab…

  3. Psychometric properties of the Arab Heritage Activity Card Sort.

    PubMed

    Hamed, Razan; Holm, Margo B

    2013-03-01

    The Activity Card Sort is a valid and reliable assessment tool that was created to assess Participation. It has been translated to several languages and adapted to different international cultures. The most recent version of this tool is the Arabic Heritage Activity Card Sort (A-ACS). The purpose of this study was to establish the psychometric properties of the new Arabic version in Jordanian adults. Forty three Jordanian patients with multiple sclerosis (MS) and 62 healthy adults were recruited to test the psychometric properties of the tool. The A-ACS correlated moderately with the participation index of the Mayo-Portland Adaptability Inventory (r = -0.458, p < 0.00) (concurrent validity), was able to discriminate between patients and healthy participants on the current and retained levels of participation (F = 5.09, p < 0.03; F = 6.01, p < 0.02, respectively) (discriminative validity), and correlated moderately with the total scores of the Mayo-Portland Adaptability Inventory (r = -0.458, p < 0.00) and the total score on the Arabic version of the self-report Performance Assessment of Self-care Skills (r = 0.581, p < 0.00) (convergent validity). The tool also showed good test-retest reliability (r = 0.80, p < 0.00) and excellent internal consistency (α = 0.90). The Arabic Heritage of the Activity Card Sort is a valid and reliable tool for Arabic-speaking occupational therapists to use when assessing participation in Jordanian patients with MS or healthy adults. Limitations of this study include using only one diagnostic group from Jordan and examining only the Recovery and Community Versions of the tool. Future studies are needed to examine further psychometric properties for patients with different diagnoses and from different countries in the Arabic region for all three versions of the A-ACS.

  4. Development of the Arab heritage Activity Card Sort.

    PubMed

    Hamed, Razan; Alheresh, Rawan; Dahab, Sana Abu; Collins, Brittany; Fryer, Jasmine; Holm, Margo B

    2011-12-01

    Participation is an indicator of healthy functioning and well-being, as emphasized by the International Classification of Functioning, Disability, and Health (World Health Organization, 2001). The Activity Card Sort (ACS) is a valid and reliable assessment tool that measures participation. This study describes the process of developing the Arab heritage version of the ACS (A-ACS). The original ACS was translated to Arabic using World Health Organization forward-backward translation guidelines, and activities that are common in Arab cultures were nominated using the ACS investigators' guidelines. Participant respondents were 156 Jordanians, from different age groups and socioeconomic classes. The process initially yielded 179 activities common to all international versions of the ACS, 19 of which were unique to the Arab culture. Eighty-eight items were validated for the A-ACS. The A-ACS validated in this study is the first assessment tool, for Arab adults whose heritage is in the Middle-East and North Africa, that measures participation. We expect the tool to have excellent clinical utility not only in Arab countries, but also for immigrants and citizens of Arab origins worldwide.

  5. Kinematics Card Sort Activity: Insight into Students' Thinking

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Berryhill, Erin; Herrington, Deborah; Oliver, Keith

    2016-12-01

    Kinematics is a topic students are unknowingly aware of well before entering the physics classroom. Students observe motion on a daily basis. They are constantly interpreting and making sense of their observations, unintentionally building their own understanding of kinematics before receiving any formal instruction. Unfortunately, when students take their prior conceptions to understand a new situation, they often do so in a way that inaccurately connects their learning. We were motivated to identify strategies to help our students make accurate connections to their prior knowledge and understand kinematics at a deeper level. To do this, we integrated a formative assessment card sort into a kinematic graphing unit within an introductory high school physics course. Throughout the activities, we required students to document and reflect upon their thinking. This allowed their learning to build upon their own previously held conceptual understanding, which provided an avenue for cognitive growth. By taking a more direct approach to eliciting student reasoning, we hoped to improve student learning and guide our assessment of their learning.

  6. Participation in Occupational Performance: Reliability and Validity of the Activity Card Sort.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Katz, Noomi; Karpin, Hanah; Lak, Arit; Furman, Tania; Hartman-Maeir, Adina

    2003-01-01

    A study assessed the reliability and validity of the Activity Card Sort (ACS) within different adult groups (n=263): healthy adults, healthy older adults, Alzheimer's caregivers, multiple sclerosis patients, and stroke survivors. Found that the ACS had high internal consistency for daily living and social-cultural activities and a lower…

  7. Card Sorts, State Tests, and Meaningful Mathematics

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chauvot, Jennifer B.; Benson, Sharon L. D.

    2008-01-01

    This article shares card-sorting activities that involve state-mandated test items to use with prospective and practicing mathematics teachers to teach about accountability measures while exploring reform-minded mathematics instruction recommendations. (Contains 2 figures.)

  8. Personal Wellness Card Sort: A Strategy for Promoting Relational Healing

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lenz, A. Stephen; Roscoe, Lauren J.

    2011-01-01

    The Personal Wellness Card Sort task is presented as a practical tool for mediating a therapeutic impasse when working with clients who have experienced a traumatic event. The authors describe how this activity can assist clients with viewing themselves in a holistic way, regaining disowned aspects of self and initiating movement toward connecting…

  9. Disentangling Dimensions in the Dimensional Change Card-Sorting Task

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kloo, Daniela; Perner, Josef

    2005-01-01

    The dimensional change card-sorting task (DCCS task) is frequently used to assess young children's executive abilities. However, the source of children's difficulty with this task is still under debate. In the standard DCCS task, children have to sort, for example, test cards with a red cherry or a blue banana into two boxes marked with target…

  10. Occu-Sort: Development and Evaluation of an Occupational Card Sort System.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jones, Lawrence K.

    1979-01-01

    Development of the Occu-Sort system, occupational card sorts, self-guided booklet, record sheet, and manual is discussed. Field testing using the cards with the self-guided booklet is reported. There is a moderate relationship between O-S and VPI codes. Thus O-S shows promise as an effective vocational counseling and career development tool.…

  11. Empirical Approach to Interpreting Card-Sorting Data

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wolf, Steven F.; Dougherty, Daniel P.; Kortemeyer, Gerd

    2012-01-01

    Since it was first published 30 years ago, the seminal paper of Chi "et al." on expert and novice categorization of introductory problems led to a plethora of follow-up studies within and outside of the area of physics [Cogn. Sci. 5 121 (1981)]. These studies frequently encompass "card-sorting" exercises whereby the…

  12. Prefrontal cell activities related to monkeys' success and failure in adapting to rule changes in a Wisconsin Card Sorting Test analog.

    PubMed

    Mansouri, Farshad A; Matsumoto, Kenji; Tanaka, Keiji

    2006-03-08

    The cognitive flexibility to select appropriate rules in a changing environment is essential for survival and is assumed to depend on the integrity of prefrontal cortex (PFC). To explore the contribution of the dorsolateral PFC to flexible rule-based behavior, we recorded the activity of cells in this region of monkeys performing a Wisconsin Card Sorting Test (WCST) analog. The monkey had to match a sample to one of three test items by either color or shape. Liquid reward and a discrete visual signal (error signal) were given as feedback to correct and incorrect target selections, respectively. The relevant rule and its frequent changes were not cued, and the monkeys could find it only by interpreting the feedback. In one-third of cells, cellular activity was modulated by the relevant rule, both throughout the trial and between trials. The magnitude of the modulation correlated with the number of errors that the monkeys committed after each rule change in the course of reestablishing high performance. Activity of other cells differed between correct and error trials independently from the rule-related modulation. This difference appeared during actual responses and before the monkeys faced the problems. Many PFC cells responded to the error-signal presentation, and, in some of them, the magnitude of response depended on the relevant rule. These results suggest that the dorsolateral PFC contributes to WCST performance by maintaining the relevant rule across trials, assessing behavioral outcomes, and monitoring the processes that could lead to success and failure in individual trials.

  13. Raman activated cell sorting.

    PubMed

    Song, Yizhi; Yin, Huabing; Huang, Wei E

    2016-08-01

    Single cell Raman spectra (SCRS) are intrinsic biochemical profiles and 'chemical images' of single cells which can be used to characterise phenotypic changes, physiological states and functions of cells. On the base of SCRS, Raman activated cell sorting (RACS) provides a label-free cell sorting approach, which can link single cells to their chemical or phenotypic profiles. Overcoming naturally weak Raman signals, establishing Raman biomarker as sorting criteria to RACS and improving specific sorting technology are three challenges of developing RACS. Advances on Raman spectroscopy such as stimulated Raman scattering (SRS) and pre-screening helped to increase RACS sorting speed. Entire SCRS can be characterised using pattern recognition methods, and specific Raman bands can be extracted as biomarkers for RACS. Recent advances on cell sorting technologies based on microfluidic device and surface-ejection enable accurate and reliable single cell sorting from complex samples. A high throughput RACS will be achievable in near future by integrating fast Raman detection system such as SRS with microfluidic RACS and Raman activated cell ejection (RACE).

  14. Steady-state visually evoked potential topography during the Wisconsin card sorting test.

    PubMed

    Silberstein, R B; Ciorciari, J; Pipingas, A

    1995-01-01

    This paper describes, for the first time, changes in steady-state visually evoked potential (SSVEP) topography associated with the performance of a computerised version of the Wisconsin card sort test (WCS). The SSVEP was recorded from 64 scalp sites and was elicited by a 13 Hz spatially uniform visual flicker presented continuously while 16 subjects performed the WCS. in the WCS, the sort criterion was automatically changed after subjects had sorted 10 cards correctly. Feedback on the 11th card always constituted a cue for a change in the sort criterion. It was found that in the 1-2 sec interval after the occurrence of the cue to change sort criterion, the prefrontal, central and right parieto-temporal regions showed a pronounced attenuation in SSVEP amplitude and an increase in phase lag. These changes, interpreted as an increase in regional cortical activity, are not apparent in the equivalent portions of the WCS when the sort criterion does not need to be changed. These results indicate that the levels of prefrontal and right parieto-temporal activity varied during the performance of the WCS, peaking at the times a change in sort criterion was required.

  15. What about inhibition in the Wisconsin Card Sorting Test?

    PubMed

    Steinmetz, Jean-Paul; Houssemand, Claude

    2011-05-01

    The commercially available Wisconsin Card Sorting Test (WCST) is one of the most commonly used tests for assessing executive functions within clinical settings. Importantly, however, it remains relatively unclear exactly what processes are assessed by the test. Conceptually, increased perseverative errors in sorting cards are usually related to deficient inhibition processes. Empirically, evidence supporting this conclusion is limited. In a sample of 38 healthy adults we addressed the question to what extent inhibition mechanisms assessed by the go/no-go and the stop-signal paradigm are related to WCST performances. Inhibition-related scores were found to predict non-perseverative errors better than perseverative errors. Consequently we conclude that the non-perseverative errors score reflects processes that are partly dependent on inhibition functions.

  16. Enhancing the Executive Functions of 3-Year-Olds in the Dimensional Change Card Sort Task

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Perone, Sammy; Molitor, Stephen J.; Buss, Aaron T.; Spencer, John P.; Samuelson, Larissa K.

    2015-01-01

    Executive functions enable flexible thinking, something young children are notoriously bad at. For instance, in the dimensional change card sort (DCCS) task, 3-year-olds can sort cards by one dimension (shape), but continue to sort by this dimension when asked to switch (to color). This study tests a prediction of a dynamic neural field model that…

  17. Card-Sorting Usability Tests of the WMU Libraries' Web Site

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Whang, Michael

    2008-01-01

    This article describes the card-sorting techniques used by several academic libraries, reports and discusses the results of card-sorting usability tests of the Western Michigan University Libraries' Web site, and reveals how the WMU libraries incorporated the findings into a new Web site redesign, setting the design direction early on. The article…

  18. Empirical approach to interpreting card-sorting data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wolf, Steven F.; Dougherty, Daniel P.; Kortemeyer, Gerd

    2012-06-01

    Since it was first published 30 years ago, the seminal paper of Chi et al. on expert and novice categorization of introductory problems led to a plethora of follow-up studies within and outside of the area of physics [Cogn. Sci. 5, 121 (1981)COGSD50364-021310.1207/s15516709cog0502_2]. These studies frequently encompass “card-sorting” exercises whereby the participants group problems. While this technique certainly allows insights into problem solving approaches, simple descriptive statistics more often than not fail to find significant differences between experts and novices. In moving beyond descriptive statistics, we describe a novel microscopic approach that takes into account the individual identity of the cards and uses graph theory and models to visualize, analyze, and interpret problem categorization experiments. We apply these methods to an introductory physics (mechanics) problem categorization experiment, and find that most of the variation in sorting outcome is not due to the sorter being an expert versus a novice, but rather due to an independent characteristic that we named “stacker” versus “spreader.” The fact that the expert-novice distinction only accounts for a smaller amount of the variation may explain the frequent null results when conducting these experiments.

  19. Perspective Taking and Cognitive Flexibility in the Dimensional Change Card Sorting (DCCS) Task

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kloo, Daniela; Perner, Josef; Aichhorn, Markus; Schmidhuber, Nicola

    2010-01-01

    In a study with 79 3-year-olds, we confirm earlier findings that separating the sorting dimensions improve children's performance on the Dimensional Change Card Sorting (DCCS) task. We also demonstrate that the central reason for this facilitation is that the two sorting dimensions are not integral features of a single object. Spatial separation…

  20. Wisconsin card sorting test in children with temporal lobe epilepsy.

    PubMed

    Igarashi, Kazue; Oguni, Hirokazu; Osawa, Makiko; Awaya, Yutaka; Kato, Motoichiro; Mimura, Masaru; Kashima, Haruo

    2002-04-01

    To search for the origin of frontal lobe dysfunction identified by the Wisconsin card sorting test (WCST) in temporal lobe epilepsy (TLE) patients, we investigated the WCST performance among 19 children with TLE (with hippocampal atrophy (HA group N=12), without structural lesions (NSL group N=7)), 15 patients with frontal lobe epilepsy (FLE group), and age-matched normal controls (N group). The paired verbal association learning test (PVALT) and Benton visual retention test (BVRT) were also performed. HA group and FLE groups achieved significantly fewer categories and demonstrated more perseverative errors on the WCST than NSL and N groups. In addition, category achievement in WCST showed significant inverse correlation to age at the initial status convulsivus in the HA group (P<0.05). The achievement on PVALT and BVRT did not show any significant differences between HA and FLE groups (P>0.05). Thus, the frontal lobe dysfunction in the HA group is found to exist as early as 7 years old, when they seem to have only a short seizure history or to receive a little electrical interference from the temporal lobe focus to the frontal region. These facts would underscore the importance of prefrontal dysfunction persisting from the early insults and only becoming apparent after maturation of the prefrontal region in patients with mesial TLE.

  1. The Effect of Labeling on Preschool Children's Performance in the Dimensional Change Card Sort Task

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Muller, Ulrich; Zelazo, Philip D.; Lurye, Leah E.; Liebermann, Dana P.

    2008-01-01

    Previous research suggests that experimenter-induced labeling of test cards improves preschoolers' performance on the Dimensional Change Card Sort Task (DCCS), a measure of flexible rule use. Three experiments attempted to further clarify how labeling aids performance on the DCCS. Experiment 1 examined the nature of the labeling effect but failed…

  2. Fluorescence activated cell sorting.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bonner, W. A.; Hulett, H. R.; Sweet, R. G.; Herzenberg, L. A.

    1972-01-01

    An instrument has been developed for sorting biological cells. The cells are rendered differentially fluorescent and incorporated into a small liquid stream illuminated by a laser beam. The cells pass sequentially through the beam, and fluorescent light from the cells gives rise to electrical signals. The stream is broken into a series of uniform size drops downstream of the laser. The cell signals are used to give appropriate electrostatic charges to drops containing the cells. The drops then pass between two charged plates and are deflected to appropriate containers. The system has proved capable of providing fractions containing large numbers of viable cells highly enriched in a particular functional type.

  3. Neonatal Intensive-Care Unit Graduates Show Persistent Difficulties in an Intradimensional Shift Card Sort

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kittler, Phyllis M.; Brooks, Patricia J.; Rossi, Vanessa; Karmel, Bernard Z.; Gardner, Judith M.; Flory, Michael J.

    2013-01-01

    Neonatal intensive-care unit (NICU) graduates, a group at risk for attention problems and attention-deficit hyperactivity disorder, performed an intradimensional shift card sort at 34, 42, 51, and 60 months to assess executive function and to examine effects of individual risk factors. In the "silly" game, children sorted cards…

  4. Performance of Children with Autism Spectrum Disorders on the Dimension-Change Card Sort Task

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dichter, Gabriel S.; Radonovich, Krestin J.; Turner-Brown, Lauren M.; Lam, Kristen S. L.; Holtzclaw, Tia N.; Bodfish, James W.

    2010-01-01

    Restricted and repetitive behaviors in autism spectrum disorders have been conceptualized to reflect impaired executive functions. In the present study, we investigated the performance of 6-17-year-old children with and without an autism spectrum disorder on a dimension-change card sort task that explicitly indicated sorting rules on every trial.…

  5. Relations as Rules: The Role of Attention in the Dimensional Change Card Sort Task

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Honomichl, Ryan D.; Chen, Zhe

    2011-01-01

    Preschoolers are typically unable to switch sorting rules during the Dimensional Change Card Sort task. One explanation for this phenomenon is attentional inflexibility (Kirkham, Cruess, & Diamond, 2003). In 4 experiments with 3- to 4-year-olds, we tested this hypothesis by examining the influence of dimensional salience on switching performance.…

  6. On the Historical and Conceptual Background of the Wisconsin Card Sorting Test

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Eling, Paul; Derckx, Kristianne; Maes, Roald

    2008-01-01

    In this paper, we describe the development of the Wisconsin Card Sorting Test (WCST). We trace the history of sorting tasks from the studies of Narziss Ach on the psychology of thinking, via the work of Kurt Goldstein and Adhemar Gelb on brain lesioned patients around 1920 and subsequent developments, up to the actual design of the WCST by Harry…

  7. Age Differences in Perseveration: Cognitive and Neuroanatomical Mediators of Performance on the Wisconsin Card Sorting Test

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Head, Denise; Kennedy, Kristen M.; Rodrigue, Karen M.; Raz, Naftali

    2009-01-01

    Aging effects on the Wisconsin Card Sorting Test (WCST) are fairly well established but the mechanisms of the decline are not clearly understood. In this study, we examined the cognitive and neural mechanisms mediating age-related increases in perseveration on the WCST. MRI-based volumetry and measures of selected executive functions in…

  8. The Dynamics of Development on the Dimensional Change Card Sorting Task

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    van Bers, Bianca M. C. W.; Visser, Ingmar; van Schijndel, Tessa J. P.; Mandell, Dorothy J.; Raijmakers, Maartje E. J.

    2011-01-01

    A widely used paradigm to study cognitive flexibility in preschoolers is the Dimensional Change Card Sorting (DCCS) task. The developmental dynamics of DCCS performance was studied in a cross-sectional design (N = 93, 3 to 5 years of age) using a computerized version of the standard DCCS task. A model-based analysis of the data showed that…

  9. Development of the Biology Card Sorting Task to Measure Conceptual Expertise in Biology

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Smith, Julia I.; Combs, Elijah D.; Nagami, Paul H.; Alto, Valerie M.; Goh, Henry G.; Gourdet, Muryam A. A.; Hough, Christina M.; Nickell, Ashley E.; Peer, Adrian G.; Coley, John D.; Tanner, Kimberly D.

    2013-01-01

    There are widespread aspirations to focus undergraduate biology education on teaching students to think conceptually like biologists; however, there is a dearth of assessment tools designed to measure progress from novice to expert biological conceptual thinking. We present the development of a novel assessment tool, the Biology Card Sorting Task,…

  10. Adolescent Sex Offenders' Rankings of Therapeutic Factors Using the Yalom Card Sort

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sribney, Christine L.; Reddon, John R.

    2008-01-01

    Following 11-98 weeks of inpatient residential treatment, 69 male adolescent sex offenders completed the 60-item, 12-factor Yalom Card Sort. The rank orders were compared to adult sex offenders and a psychiatric adult outpatient group. Relative to adult psychiatric outpatients, the adolescent sex offenders had rated Instillation of Hope three…

  11. The Wisconsin Card Sorting Test and the Cognitive Assessment of Prefrontal Executive Functions: A Critical Update

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nyhus, Erika; Barcelo, Francisco

    2009-01-01

    For over four decades the Wisconsin Card Sorting Test (WCST) has been one of the most distinctive tests of prefrontal function. Clinical research and recent brain imaging have brought into question the validity and specificity of this test as a marker of frontal dysfunction. Clinical studies with neurological patients have confirmed that, in its…

  12. Development of the biology card sorting task to measure conceptual expertise in biology.

    PubMed

    Smith, Julia I; Combs, Elijah D; Nagami, Paul H; Alto, Valerie M; Goh, Henry G; Gourdet, Muryam A A; Hough, Christina M; Nickell, Ashley E; Peer, Adrian G; Coley, John D; Tanner, Kimberly D

    2013-01-01

    There are widespread aspirations to focus undergraduate biology education on teaching students to think conceptually like biologists; however, there is a dearth of assessment tools designed to measure progress from novice to expert biological conceptual thinking. We present the development of a novel assessment tool, the Biology Card Sorting Task, designed to probe how individuals organize their conceptual knowledge of biology. While modeled on tasks from cognitive psychology, this task is unique in its design to test two hypothesized conceptual frameworks for the organization of biological knowledge: 1) a surface feature organization focused on organism type and 2) a deep feature organization focused on fundamental biological concepts. In this initial investigation of the Biology Card Sorting Task, each of six analytical measures showed statistically significant differences when used to compare the card sorting results of putative biological experts (biology faculty) and novices (non-biology major undergraduates). Consistently, biology faculty appeared to sort based on hypothesized deep features, while non-biology majors appeared to sort based on either surface features or nonhypothesized organizational frameworks. Results suggest that this novel task is robust in distinguishing populations of biology experts and biology novices and may be an adaptable tool for tracking emerging biology conceptual expertise.

  13. Problem-solving deficits in alcoholics: evidence from the California Card Sorting Test.

    PubMed

    Beatty, W W; Katzung, V M; Nixon, S J; Moreland, V J

    1993-11-01

    In an attempt to clarify the nature of the problem-solving deficits exhibited by chronic alcoholics, the California Card Sorting Test (CCST) and other measures of abstraction and problem solving were administered to 23 alcoholics and 16 nonalcoholic controls, equated for age, education and vocabulary. On the CCST, the alcoholics exhibited three types of deficits which appeared to be relatively independent. First, the alcoholics generated and identified fewer correct concepts than controls, although they executed concepts normally when cued by the examiner. Second, the alcoholics made more perseverative sorting responses and perseverative verbal explanations for their sorting behavior than did controls. Third, alcoholics provided less complete verbal explanations of the concepts that they correctly generated or identified. The differential importance of these factors on various measures of problem solving may help to explain the varied patterns of inefficient problem solving exhibited by alcoholics.

  14. The Role of Negative Priming in Preschoolers' Flexible Rule Use on the Dimensional Change Card Sort Task

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Muller, Ulrich; Dick, Anthony Steven; Gela, Katherine; Overton, Willis F.; Zelazo, Philip David

    2006-01-01

    Four experiments examined the development of negative priming (NP) in 3-5-year-old children using as a measure of children's executive function (EF) the dimensional change card sort (DCCS) task. In the NP version of the DCCS, the values of the sorting dimension that is relevant during the preswitch phase are removed during the postswitch phase.…

  15. Self-reported coping behavior in health and disease: assessment with a card sort game

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schwartz, C. E.; Peng, C. K.; Lester, N.; Daltroy, L. H.; Goldberger, A. L.

    1998-01-01

    The authors tested the hypothesis that individuals with a variety of severe chronic illnesses and the healthy elderly exhibit a loss of flexibility in their response to a variety of stressors, compared with healthy adults. A card sort game designed to assess self-reported coping behavior under different stressful life situations was used to compare healthy adults with individuals with multiple sclerosis, rheumatoid arthritis, systemic lupus erythematosus, and the elderly. The healthy adults were found to exhibit more variability than any of the illness groups or the elderly. Healthy function is marked by a complex type of variability.

  16. Active droplet sorting in microfluidics: a review.

    PubMed

    Xi, Heng-Dong; Zheng, Hao; Guo, Wei; Gañán-Calvo, Alfonso M; Ai, Ye; Tsao, Chia-Wen; Zhou, Jun; Li, Weihua; Huang, Yanyi; Nguyen, Nam-Trung; Tan, Say Hwa

    2017-02-28

    The ability to manipulate and sort droplets is a fundamental issue in droplet-based microfluidics. Various lab-on-a-chip applications can only be realized if droplets are systematically categorized and sorted. These micron-sized droplets act as ideal reactors which compartmentalize different biological and chemical reagents. Array processing of these droplets hinges on the competence of the sorting and integration into the fluidic system. Recent technological advances only allow droplets to be actively sorted at the rate of kilohertz or less. In this review, we present state-of-the-art technologies which are implemented to efficiently sort droplets. We classify the concepts according to the type of energy implemented into the system. We also discuss various key issues and provide insights into various systems.

  17. The random card sort method and respondent certainty in contingent valuation: an exploratory investigation of range bias.

    PubMed

    Shackley, Phil; Dixon, Simon

    2014-10-01

    Willingness to pay (WTP) values derived from contingent valuation surveys are prone to a number of biases. Range bias occurs when the range of money values presented to respondents in a payment card affects their stated WTP values. This paper reports the results of an exploratory study whose aim was to investigate whether the effects of range bias can be reduced through the use of an alternative to the standard payment card method, namely, a random card sort method. The results suggest that the random card sort method is prone to range bias but that this bias may be mitigated by restricting the analysis to the WTP values of those respondents who indicate they are 'definitely sure' they would pay their stated WTP.

  18. Using the Biology Card Sorting Task to Measure Changes in Conceptual Expertise during Postsecondary Biology Education

    PubMed Central

    Bissonnette, Sarah A.; Combs, Elijah D.; Nagami, Paul H.; Byers, Victor; Fernandez, Juliana; Le, Dinh; Realin, Jared; Woodham, Selina; Smith, Julia I.; Tanner, Kimberly D.

    2017-01-01

    While there have been concerted efforts to reform undergraduate biology toward teaching students to organize their conceptual knowledge like experts, there are few tools that attempt to measure this. We previously developed the Biology Card Sorting Task (BCST), designed to probe how individuals organize their conceptual biological knowledge. Previous results showed the BCST could differentiate between different populations, namely non–biology majors (NBM) and biology faculty (BF). In this study, we administered the BCST to three additional populations, using a cross-sectional design: entering biology majors (EBM), advanced biology majors (ABM), and biology graduate students (BGS). Intriguingly, ABM did not initially sort like experts any more frequently than EBM. However, once the deep-feature framework was revealed, ABM were able to sort like experts more readily than did EBM. These results are consistent with the conclusion that biology education enables advanced biology students to use an expert-like conceptual framework. However, these results are also consistent with a process of “selection,” wherein students who persist in the major may have already had an expert-like conceptual framework to begin with. These results demonstrate the utility of the BCST in measuring differences between groups of students over the course of their undergraduate education. PMID:28213584

  19. Using the Biology Card Sorting Task to Measure Changes in Conceptual Expertise during Postsecondary Biology Education.

    PubMed

    Bissonnette, Sarah A; Combs, Elijah D; Nagami, Paul H; Byers, Victor; Fernandez, Juliana; Le, Dinh; Realin, Jared; Woodham, Selina; Smith, Julia I; Tanner, Kimberly D

    2017-01-01

    While there have been concerted efforts to reform undergraduate biology toward teaching students to organize their conceptual knowledge like experts, there are few tools that attempt to measure this. We previously developed the Biology Card Sorting Task (BCST), designed to probe how individuals organize their conceptual biological knowledge. Previous results showed the BCST could differentiate between different populations, namely non-biology majors (NBM) and biology faculty (BF). In this study, we administered the BCST to three additional populations, using a cross-sectional design: entering biology majors (EBM), advanced biology majors (ABM), and biology graduate students (BGS). Intriguingly, ABM did not initially sort like experts any more frequently than EBM. However, once the deep-feature framework was revealed, ABM were able to sort like experts more readily than did EBM. These results are consistent with the conclusion that biology education enables advanced biology students to use an expert-like conceptual framework. However, these results are also consistent with a process of "selection," wherein students who persist in the major may have already had an expert-like conceptual framework to begin with. These results demonstrate the utility of the BCST in measuring differences between groups of students over the course of their undergraduate education.

  20. Investigation of Biases and Compensatory Strategies Using a Probabilistic Variant of the Wisconsin Card Sorting Test

    PubMed Central

    Craig, Alexis B.; Phillips, Matthew E.; Zaldivar, Andrew; Bhattacharyya, Rajan; Krichmar, Jeffrey L.

    2016-01-01

    The Wisconsin Card Sorting Test (WCST) evaluates a subject’s ability to shift to a new pattern of behavior in response to the presentation of unexpected negative feedback. The present study introduces a novel version of the traditional WCST by integrating a probabilistic component into its traditional rule shifting to add uncertainty to the task, as well as the option to forage for information during any particular trial. These changes transformed a task that is trivial for neurotypical individuals into a challenging environment useful for evaluating biases and compensatory strategizing. Sixty subjects performed the probabilistic WCST at four uncertainty levels to determine the effect of uncertainty on subject performance and strategy. Results revealed that increasing the level of uncertainty during a run of trials correlated with a reduction in rational strategizing in favor of both random choice and information foraging, evoking biases and suboptimal strategies such as satisfaction of search, negativity bias, and probability matching. PMID:26834686

  1. Verbal fluency, trail making, and Wisconsin Card Sorting Test performance following right frontal lobe tumor resection.

    PubMed

    Davidson, Patrick S R; Gao, Fu Qiang; Mason, Warren P; Winocur, Gordon; Anderson, Nicole D

    2008-01-01

    Three commonly used clinical tests of frontal-executive function are verbal fluency, the Trail Making Test, and the Wisconsin Card Sorting Test, but few lesion studies of regional specificity within the frontal lobe (FL) exist for them. We examined 20 patients with right FL tumor resection, and mapped their damage to explore brain-behavior relations with greater precision. Across tests, the patients performed poorly and they also showed a deficit in switching but not clustering in verbal fluency. Within the right FL, however, we found none of the regional differences reported in studies of mixed-etiology FL patients, possibly due to the gradual neural reorganization that can occur with brain tumors. We discuss the importance of etiology in examining brain-behavior relations.

  2. Sequential Learning Models for the Wisconsin Card Sort Task: Assessing Processes in Substance Dependent Individuals

    PubMed Central

    Bishara, Anthony J.; Kruschke, John K.; Stout, Julie C.; Bechara, Antoine; McCabe, David P.; Busemeyer, Jerome R.

    2010-01-01

    The Wisconsin Card Sort Task (WCST) is a commonly used neuropsychological test of executive or frontal lobe functioning. Traditional behavioral measures from the task (e.g., perseverative errors) distinguish healthy controls from clinical populations, but such measures can be difficult to interpret. In an attempt to supplement traditional measures, we developed and tested a family of sequential learning models that allowed for estimation of processes at the individual subject level in the WCST. Testing the model with substance dependent individuals and healthy controls, the model parameters significantly predicted group membership even when controlling for traditional behavioral measures from the task. Substance dependence was associated with a) slower attention shifting following punished trials and b) reduced decision consistency. Results suggest that model parameters may offer both incremental content validity and incremental predictive validity. PMID:20495607

  3. Investigation of Biases and Compensatory Strategies Using a Probabilistic Variant of the Wisconsin Card Sorting Test.

    PubMed

    Craig, Alexis B; Phillips, Matthew E; Zaldivar, Andrew; Bhattacharyya, Rajan; Krichmar, Jeffrey L

    2016-01-01

    The Wisconsin Card Sorting Test (WCST) evaluates a subject's ability to shift to a new pattern of behavior in response to the presentation of unexpected negative feedback. The present study introduces a novel version of the traditional WCST by integrating a probabilistic component into its traditional rule shifting to add uncertainty to the task, as well as the option to forage for information during any particular trial. These changes transformed a task that is trivial for neurotypical individuals into a challenging environment useful for evaluating biases and compensatory strategizing. Sixty subjects performed the probabilistic WCST at four uncertainty levels to determine the effect of uncertainty on subject performance and strategy. Results revealed that increasing the level of uncertainty during a run of trials correlated with a reduction in rational strategizing in favor of both random choice and information foraging, evoking biases and suboptimal strategies such as satisfaction of search, negativity bias, and probability matching.

  4. The Relationship between Working Memory, Inhibition, and Performance on the Wisconsin Card Sorting Test in Children with and without ADHD

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mullane, Jennifer C.; Corkum, Penny V.

    2007-01-01

    The Wisconsin Card Sorting Test (WCST) has frequently been used to assess executive functions in children with attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD). We first compared the performance of 15 children with ADHD to 15 children of a control group (age range 6 to 11) on the WCST and then examined the relationship among working memory,…

  5. Automatic Shifts of Attention in the Dimensional Change Card Sort Task: Subtle Changes in Task Materials Lead to Flexible Switching

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fisher, Anna V.

    2011-01-01

    Two experiments tested a hypothesis that reducing demands on executive control in a Dimensional Change Card Sort task will lead to improved performance in 3-year-olds. In Experiment 1, the shape dimension was represented by two dissimilar values ("stars" and "flowers"), and the color dimension was represented by two similar values ("red" and…

  6. Pinpointing the Deficit in Executive Functions in Adolescents with Dyslexia Performing the Wisconsin Card Sorting Test: An ERP Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Horowitz-Kraus, Tzipi

    2014-01-01

    Adolescents with dyslexia exhibit well-established impairments in executive abilities. The Wisconsin card sorting test (WCST) is an executive test that yields surprisingly inconsistent results with this population. The current study aimed to shed light on the contradictory findings in the literature regarding the performance levels by individuals…

  7. The Impact of Frontal and Non-Frontal Brain Tumor Lesions on Wisconsin Card Sorting Test Performance

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Goldstein, B.; Obrzut, J. E.; John, C.; Ledakis, G.; Armstrong, C. L.

    2004-01-01

    Several lesion and imaging studies have suggested that the Wisconsin Card Sorting Test (WCST) is a measure of executive dysfunction. However, some studies have reported that this measure has poor anatomical specificity because patients with either frontal or non-frontal focal lesions exhibit similar performance. This study examined 25 frontal, 20…

  8. Incomplete Psychometric Equivalence of Scores Obtained on the Manual and the Computer Version of the Wisconsin Card Sorting Test?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Steinmetz, Jean-Paul; Brunner, Martin; Loarer, Even; Houssemand, Claude

    2010-01-01

    The Wisconsin Card Sorting Test (WCST) assesses executive and frontal lobe function and can be administered manually or by computer. Despite the widespread application of the 2 versions, the psychometric equivalence of their scores has rarely been evaluated and only a limited set of criteria has been considered. The present experimental study (N =…

  9. The role of negative priming in preschoolers' flexible rule use on the dimensional change card sort task.

    PubMed

    Müller, Ulrich; Dick, Anthony Steven; Gela, Katherine; Overton, Willis F; Zelazo, Philip David

    2006-01-01

    Four experiments examined the development of negative priming (NP) in 3-5-year-old children using as a measure of children's executive function (EF) the dimensional change card sort (DCCS) task. In the NP version of the DCCS, the values of the sorting dimension that is relevant during the preswitch phase are removed during the postswitch phase. The experiments showed that the NP effect observed in the DCCS decreased during the preschool years, and they clarified the circumstances in which NP occurs. Taken together, the findings suggest that the development of EF in early childhood consists in part in disinhibiting attention to information that has previously been suppressed.

  10. Age effects on EEG correlates of the Wisconsin Card Sorting Test

    PubMed Central

    Dias, Nuno S; Ferreira, Daniela; Reis, Joana; Jacinto, Luís R; Fernandes, Luís; Pinho, Francisco; Festa, Joana; Pereira, Mariana; Afonso, Nuno; Santos, Nadine C; Cerqueira, João J; Sousa, Nuno

    2015-01-01

    Body and brain undergo several changes with aging. One of the domains in which these changes are more remarkable relates with cognitive performance. In the present work, electroencephalogram (EEG) markers (power spectral density and spectral coherence) of age-related cognitive decline were sought whilst the subjects performed the Wisconsin Card Sorting Test (WCST). Considering the expected age-related cognitive deficits, WCST was applied to young, mid-age and elderly participants, and the theta and alpha frequency bands were analyzed. From the results herein presented, higher theta and alpha power were found to be associated with a good performance in the WCST of younger subjects. Additionally, higher theta and alpha coherence were also associated with good performance and were shown to decline with age and a decrease in alpha peak frequency seems to be associated with aging. Additionally, inter-hemispheric long-range coherences and parietal theta power were identified as age-independent EEG correlates of cognitive performance. In summary, these data reveals age-dependent as well as age-independent EEG correlates of cognitive performance that contribute to the understanding of brain aging and related cognitive deficits. PMID:26216431

  11. Wisconsin Card Sorting Test performance in children with developmental coordination disorder.

    PubMed

    Wuang, Yee-Pay; Su, Chwen-Yng; Su, Jui-Hsing

    2011-01-01

    The primary purpose of this study was to investigate and compare the executive functions measured by the Wisconsin Card Sorting Test (WCST) between children with developmental coordination disorder (DCD) and age-matched normal controls. A second purpose was to examine the relations between executive functions and school functions in DCD children. Seventy-one children with DCD and 70 children without motor problems were recruited from 14 public schools. Executive functions and school functions were assessed using the WCST, and the School Function Assessment--Chinese Version (SFA-C) respectively. Univariate analyses demonstrated significant between-group differences in five WCST measures. The logistic regression analysis showed differences between two groups on eight SFA-C subscales, and significant correlation between items measured on WCST and SFA-C was also found. The result of the study provides further evidence of impaired sub-domains of executive functions (i.e., mental shifting, flexibility) in children with DCD. The finding also adds to recent investigations into the relationship between executive functions and school functions in DCD. Implications for rehabilitation professionals and recommendations for further research are discussed.

  12. A Nursery School Activities Card File.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cooper, Dorothy

    This file contains a total of 285 cards describing activities for nursery-school children. It was designed to accompany "The Child-Care Teacher Aide" (ED 147 492), a teacher's guide for vocational training of teacher aides. The file is divided into four main divisions--fall, winter, spring, and summer. Apportioned among the different seasons are…

  13. Wisconsin card sorting test as a measure of executive function impairments in stroke patients.

    PubMed

    Jodzio, Krzysztof; Biechowska, Daria

    2010-10-01

    The Wisconsin Card Sorting Test (WCST) is among the most frequently administered neuropsychological tests. It is assumed that successful completion of this test requires engagement of executive functions (EF). One of the most common origins of EF impairments is ischemic stroke. The present study intends to evaluate the diagnostic use of the WCST as a measure of these impairments in poststroke patients. Forty-four patients (8 women and 36 men) who had recent unilateral stroke (22 left hemisphere, 22 right hemisphere) participated in the study. The overall accuracy of the WCST in classifying stroke survivors as having executive disorders was poor. Nevertheless, statistical analysis revealed its negative predictive power to be greater than positive predictive power (i.e., normal scores on the WCST reliably indicated the absence of executive disorders in 8 or more out of 10). Performance on the WCST is clearly influenced by severity of the executive disorders. Namely, patients with severe impairment of EF (as measured by go/no-go, fluency, and other EF tests) performed more poorly on the WCST than patients with lesser impairment or those with no impairment at all, the latter group's results being indistinguishable. In addition, this study highlights a three-factor solution to the WCST, which accounted for 90.3% of the variance. The scores that most strongly loaded on Factors 1 to 3 were, in order: percentage of conceptual-level responses, number of trials to complete the first category, and failures to maintain the set of responses. Finally, an analysis using multivariate analysis of variance, with the anterior versus posterior site and left versus right side of the lesion as independent variables, revealed a relatively weak effect of lesion location on the WCST performance. In particular, with respect to all test scores, there is only one significant interaction between the site and side of lesion was obtained (F(₁(,)₂₄) = 4.12; p < .05; i.e., the number of

  14. Norms for the Wisconsin Card Sorting Test in 6- to 11-year-old children in Taiwan.

    PubMed

    Shu, B C; Tien, A Y; Lung, F W; Chang, Y Y

    2000-08-01

    The main aims of this study were to develop norms for the Wisconsin Card Sorting Test in 6- to 11-year-old children in Taiwan; to explore the effect of sex, age, birth order, number of siblings, and parental education on WCST performance in 6- to 11-year-old children; and to make a comparison of WCST performance between children in Taiwan and the USA. The results of this comparison of developmental norms of school children in Taiwan and the United States may facilitate the WCST as a clinical or research instrument in combination with other test procedures to assess aspects of cognitive and neuropsychological functioning of school children.

  15. Pinpointing the deficit in executive functions in adolescents with dyslexia performing the Wisconsin card sorting test: an ERP study.

    PubMed

    Horowitz-Kraus, Tzipi

    2014-01-01

    Adolescents with dyslexia exhibit well-established impairments in executive abilities. The Wisconsin card sorting test (WCST) is an executive test that yields surprisingly inconsistent results with this population. The current study aimed to shed light on the contradictory findings in the literature regarding the performance levels by individuals with dyslexia in WCST. We used a computerized-WCST (named the 'Madrid-Card Sorting Test') assessing executive functions using the Event-Related Potentials (ERPs) methodology. Adolescents with dyslexia exhibited a higher error rate and slower reaction times. This was most evident in the later trials of the series. However, differences in ERPs between the two groups were found only in the "target-locked" conditions, where individuals with dyslexia displayed decreased ERP components (N100, P300) compared to skilled readers. The changes between the groups in the "shift" compared to the "stay" conditions suggest the central role of working memory both in basic (e.g., shifting) and higher order (e.g., reading) processes in individuals with dyslexia. These findings suggest the central role of working memory both in basic (e.g., shifting) and higher order (e.g., reading) processes in individuals with dyslexia. The intact shifting mechanism and the working memory deficit may guide the building of more efficient intervention programs for individuals with dyslexia in the future.

  16. An integrated optofluidic platform for Raman-activated cell sorting.

    PubMed

    Lau, Adrian Y; Lee, Luke P; Chan, James W

    2008-07-01

    We report on integrated optofluidic Raman-activated cell sorting (RACS) platforms that combine multichannel microfluidic devices and laser tweezers Raman spectroscopy (LTRS) for delivery, identification, and simultaneous sorting of individual cells. The system allows label-free cell identification based on Raman spectroscopy and automated continuous cell sorting. Two optofluidic designs using hydrodynamic focusing and pinch-flow fractionation are evaluated based on their sorting design and flow velocity effect on the laser trapping efficiency at different laser power levels. A proof-of-principle demonstration of the integrated optofluidic LTRS system for the identification and sorting of two leukemia cell lines is presented. This functional prototype lays the foundation for the development of a label-free cell sorting platform based on intrinsic Raman markers for automated sampling and sorting of a large number of individual cells in solution.

  17. Sensitivity of the Wisconsin Card Sorting Test (64-Card Version) versus the Tower of London (Drexel Version) for detecting executive dysfunction in children with epilepsy.

    PubMed

    MacAllister, William S; Maiman, Moshe; Marsh, Megan; Whitman, Lindsay; Vasserman, Marsha; Cohen, Robyn J; Salinas, Christine M

    2017-01-03

    Executive function deficits are common in children and adolescents with epilepsy. Though the Wisconsin Card Sorting Task (WCST) is often considered the "gold standard" for executive function assessment, its sensitivity-particularly in the case of the 64-card version (WCST-64)-is insufficiently established in pediatric samples, including children and adolescents with epilepsy. The present investigation assesses the sensitivity of the WCST-64 in children and adolescents with epilepsy in comparison to another measure: the Tower of London - Drexel Version (TOL-DX). A total of 88 consecutively referred children and adolescents with epilepsy were administered both the WCST-64 and TOL-DX as part of a comprehensive neuropsychological evaluation. The sensitivity of WCST-64 and TOL-DX variables were established and relations with epilepsy severity measures and other executive function measures were assessed. Of the WCST-64 variables, Perseverative Responses is the most sensitive, but detected executive function impairment in only 19% of this clinically referred sample; in contrast, the TOL-DX Rule Violations detected executive function impairment in half of the sample. Further, TOL-DX performances are more strongly related to epilepsy severity variables and other executive function measures in comparison to the WCST-64. Despite its popularity amongst clinicians, the WCST-64 is not as sensitive to executive dysfunction in comparison to other measures of comparable administration time, such as the TOL-DX.

  18. Pattern matching based active optical sorting of colloids/cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Verma, R. S.; Dasgupta, R.; Ahlawat, S.; Kumar, N.; Uppal, A.; Gupta, P. K.

    2013-08-01

    We report active optical sorting of colloids/cells by employing a cross correlation based pattern matching technique for selection of the desired objects and thereafter sorting using dynamically controllable holographic optical traps. The problem of possible collision between the different sets of objects during sorting was avoided by raising one set of particles to a different plane. We also present the results obtained on using this approach for some representative applications such as sorting of silica particles of two different sizes, of closely packed colloids and of white blood cells and red blood cells from a mixture of the two.

  19. The role of switching, inhibition and working memory in older adults' performance in the Wisconsin Card Sorting Test.

    PubMed

    Gamboz, Nadia; Borella, Erika; Brandimonte, Maria A

    2009-05-01

    The Wisconsin Card Sorting Test (WCST) is considered a typical executive test. However, several interesting questions are still open as to the specific executive processes underlying this task. In the present study, we explored how local and global switching, inhibition and working memory, assessed through the Number-Letter, the Stop Signal and the Reading Span tasks, relate to older adults' performance in the WCST. Results showed that older adults' performance variability in the number of perseverative errors was predicted by the local switch component of the Number-Letter task. Results also showed age-related differences in inhibition, working memory and global switching, while local switching resulted largely spared in aging. This study provides evidence that switching abilities may contribute to performance of older adults in the WCST. It also provides initial evidence suggesting that switching processes, associated with local switch costs, are involved in performance on the WCST, at least in older adults.

  20. Kinematics Card Sort Activity: Insight into Students' Thinking

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Berryhill, Erin; Herrington, Deborah; Oliver, Keith

    2016-01-01

    Kinematics is a topic students are unknowingly aware of well before entering the physics classroom. Students observe motion on a daily basis. They are constantly interpreting and making sense of their observations, unintentionally building their own understanding of kinematics before receiving any formal instruction. Unfortunately, when students…

  1. Using negative feedback to guide behavior: impairments on the first 4 cards of the Wisconsin Card Sorting Test predict negative symptoms of schizophrenia.

    PubMed

    Vogel, Sally J; Strauss, Gregory P; Allen, Daniel N

    2013-12-01

    Research has demonstrated that individuals with schizophrenia fail to appropriately use negative feedback to guide learning. These learning deficits are thought to arise from abnormalities in midbrain dopamine activity. Primary and enduring negative symptoms are also associated with abnormal dopamine activity and are expected to produce more severe deficits in learning when they present in individuals with schizophrenia. The current study examines this matter by comparing individuals with deficit syndrome schizophrenia, which is characterized by primary and enduring negative symptoms, to individuals with nondeficit syndrome schizophrenia and to normal controls in their use of positive feedback and negative feedback to guide learning on the first four cards of the WCST. Participants included 67 individuals with schizophrenia (15 deficit; 52 nondeficit syndrome) and 51 healthy controls. Accuracy data from the first 4 cards of the WCST and measures of global test performance were examined. Individuals with schizophrenia were significantly less accurate than controls in their performance on early (pre-shift) WCST trials, and this impairment was significantly greater in patients with deficit than nondeficit schizophrenia. Additionally, accuracy across the first 4 WCST cards significantly predicted the number of categories completed and percentage of perseverative errors across the entire test. These findings suggest that negative symptoms of schizophrenia are associated with difficulty using negative feedback to adaptively guide behavior, and are consistent with the notion that abnormal DA signaling contributes to the higher-order executive functioning impairments seen in schizophrenia with severe negative symptoms.

  2. Surface free energy activated high-throughput cell sorting.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Xinru; Zhang, Qian; Yan, Tao; Jiang, Zeyi; Zhang, Xinxin; Zuo, Yi Y

    2014-09-16

    Cell sorting is an important screening process in microbiology, biotechnology, and clinical research. Existing methods are mainly based on single-cell analysis as in flow cytometric and microfluidic cell sorters. Here we report a label-free bulk method for sorting cells by differentiating their characteristic surface free energies (SFEs). We demonstrated the feasibility of this method by sorting model binary cell mixtures of various bacterial species, including Pseudomonas putida KT2440, Enterococcus faecalis ATCC 29212, Salmonella Typhimurium ATCC 14028, and Escherichia coli DH5α. This method can effectively separate 10(10) bacterial cells within 30 min. Individual bacterial species can be sorted with up to 96% efficiency, and the cell viability ratio can be as high as 99%. In addition to its capacity of sorting evenly mixed bacterial cells, we demonstrated the feasibility of this method in selecting and enriching cells of minor populations in the mixture (presenting at only 1% in quantity) to a purity as high as 99%. This SFE-activated method may be used as a stand-alone method for quickly sorting a large quantity of bacterial cells or as a prescreening tool for microbial discrimination. Given its advantages of label-free, high-throughput, low cost, and simplicity, this SFE-activated cell sorting method has potential in various applications of sorting cells and abiotic particles.

  3. Sorting out Ideas about Function

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hillen, Amy F.; Malik, LuAnn

    2013-01-01

    Card sorting has the potential to provide opportunities for exploration of a variety of topics and levels. In a card-sorting task, each participant is presented with a set of cards--each of which depicts a relationship--and is asked to sort the cards into categories that make sense to him or her. The concept of function is critical to…

  4. Modulatory effects of psychopathy on Wisconsin Card Sorting Test performance in male offenders with Antisocial Personality Disorder.

    PubMed

    Pera-Guardiola, Vanessa; Batalla, Iolanda; Bosque, Javier; Kosson, David; Pifarré, Josep; Hernández-Ribas, Rosa; Goldberg, Ximena; Contreras-Rodríguez, Oren; Menchón, José M; Soriano-Mas, Carles; Cardoner, Narcís

    2016-01-30

    Neuropsychological deficits in executive functions (EF) have been linked to antisocial behavior and considered to be cardinal to the onset and persistence of severe antisocial and aggressive behavior. However, when psychopathy is present, prior evidence suggests that the dorsolateral prefrontal cortex is unaffected leading to intact EF. Ninety-one male offenders with Antisocial Personality Disorder (ASPD) and 24 controls completed the Wisconsin Card Sorting Test (WCST). ASPD individuals were grouped in three categories according to Psychopathy Checklist-Revised (PCL-R) scores (low, medium and high). We hypothesized that ASPD offenders with high PCL-R scores will not differ from healthy controls in EF and will show better EF performance in comparison with subjects with low PCL-R scores. Results showed that ASPD offenders with low PCL-R scores committed more perseverative errors and responses than controls and offenders with high PCL-R scores, which did not differ from healthy controls. Moreover, scores on Factor 1 and the interpersonal facet of the PCL-R were predictors of better WCST performance. Our results suggest a modulatory role of psychopathy in the cognitive performance of ASPD offenders, and provide further evidence supporting that offenders with ASPD and psychopathy are characterized by a cognitive profile different from those with ASPD without psychopathy.

  5. Combination of Electroencephalography and Near-Infrared Spectroscopy in Evaluation of Mental Concentration during the Mental Focus Task for Wisconsin Card Sorting Test.

    PubMed

    Chen, Che-Wei; Sun, Chia-Wei

    2017-03-23

    Near-infrared spectroscopy (NIRS) is a noninvasive neuroimaging tool for measuring evoked functional changes in brain oxygenation. Electroencephalography (EEG) can be used to evaluate the functionality of cortical connections and obtain information on regional cortical activity. Coregistration of EEG-NIRS is a recent technique that has been applied for measuring changes in electrical and hemodynamic activity in the human brain. EEG-NIRS coregistration facilitates the avoidance of misleading interpretations of NIRS, particularly in the diagnosis of neurological disorders. In this study, we investigated an approach for enhancing accuracy of NIRS by using EEG to monitor physiological activity during a mental focus task. Using the Wisconsin Card Sorting Test for the subjects mental focus task, we identified two trend types in the EEG and NIRS signals of normal subjects. These data can assist in understanding brain activation statuses and enable determining subjects' degree of mental concentration. If the data can be standardized for the diagnosis of neurological disorders, they can provide a new index to improve traditional methods (e.g., questionnaires) to assist clinical doctors in diagnosing cognitive disorders.

  6. Deterministic learning and attempted suicide among older depressed individuals: Cognitive assessment using the Wisconsin Card Sorting Task

    PubMed Central

    McGirr, Alexander; Dombrovski, Alexandre Y.; Butters, Meryl A.; Clark, Luke; Szanto, Katalin

    2011-01-01

    Background Late-life suicide is an under-investigated public health problem. Among the putative vulnerabilities for this complex multifactorial behaviour are deficits in cognitive control, an ability to integrate and prioritize multiple cognitive processes in order to flexibly adapt behaviour and meet situational demands. We investigated cognitive control during rule learning in a complex and changing environment in older individuals with suicide attempts of varying lethality. Method Ninety-three participants over the age of 60 (30 healthy controls, 29 depressed never suicidal, 20 low-lethality suicide attempters, 14 high-lethality suicide attempters) underwent structured clinical and cognitive assessments. Participants then completed the Wisconsin Card Sorting Test (WCST), a well-studied task of cognitive control during rule learning. Results High-lethality attempters demonstrated a pattern of deficits involving poor conceptual reasoning, perseverative errors and total errors. Compared to low-lethality attempters and healthy controls, high-lethality attempters demonstrated poor conceptual reasoning, as well as increased rates of perseverative errors and total errors. Compared to non-suicidal depressed participants, high-lethality attempters also made more conceptual errors. Conclusion High-lethality suicide attempts among older people are associated with impaired cognitive control during rule learning as detected by the WCST. Our data suggest that impairment in cognitive control during rule learning may represent a vulnerability distinct from the impulsive diathesis, typically manifesting in young, low-lethality attempters. This vulnerability may contribute to the high incidence of serious or, often, fatal suicidal acts in old age. PMID:22024486

  7. Sorting Recycled Trash: An Activity for Earth Day 2007

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Harris, Mary E.; Harris, Harold H.

    2007-01-01

    Middle or high school students celebrate Earth Day on April 22, 2007 by participating in the activity to separate commingled recyclable trash to simulate sorting in a recycling center. Students would gain an appreciation for recyclable trash, after it is taken to a recycling center and learn about properties of recyclables.

  8. Trapping and sorting active granular rods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ramaswamy, Sriram; Kumar, Nitin; Soni, Harsh; Gupta, Rahul; Sood, Ajay

    We report experiments and simulations on collective trapping in a horizontal monolayer of tapered granular rods rendered motile by mechanical vibration. A macroscopic fraction of the particles are trapped by a V-shaped obstacle if its opening angle is less than a threshold value of about 120 degrees, consistent with active Brownian simulations [PRL 108, 268307 (2012)]. the transition between trapped and untrapped states becomes sharper with increasing system size in our numerical studies. We offer a theoretical understanding of this nonequilibrium phase transition based on collective noise suppression and an analysis of fluxes. We show also that the trap can serve to separate particles based on their motility and rotational diffusivity. On leave from Dept of Physics, Indian Institute of Science.

  9. The birthday card exercise: Replicating research as active learning.

    PubMed

    Sawchuk, Dana

    2016-10-14

    One means to uncover common attitudes toward aging and older adults is to perform content analyses of popular print media forms such as newspapers, magazines, and even greeting cards. This active learning activity involves small groups of undergraduate students replicating, in a limited way, elements of a published research study on the messages conveyed by age-related birthday cards. In the exercise, each group of students is asked to analyze a set of 15 different birthday cards and to share qualitative and quantitative findings with classmates before submitting a written "discussion section" on their results to the instructor. The author demonstrates how this exercise, because it is aligned with key course learning outcomes as well as with coursework preceding and following the activity, is integrated into the overall learning environment of the course. Comments on student findings, the potential benefits of and modifications to the exercise, and the transferability of the exercise to other course contexts are also provided.

  10. Buoyancy-activated cell sorting using targeted biotinylated albumin microbubbles.

    PubMed

    Liou, Yu-Ren; Wang, Yu-Hsin; Lee, Chia-Ying; Li, Pai-Chi

    2015-01-01

    Cell analysis often requires the isolation of certain cell types. Various isolation methods have been applied to cell sorting, including fluorescence-activated cell sorting and magnetic-activated cell sorting. However, these conventional approaches involve exerting mechanical forces on the cells, thus risking cell damage. In this study we applied a novel isolation method called buoyancy-activated cell sorting, which involves using biotinylated albumin microbubbles (biotin-MBs) conjugated with antibodies (i.e., targeted biotin-MBs). Albumin MBs are widely used as contrast agents in ultrasound imaging due to their good biocompatibility and stability. For conjugating antibodies, biotin is conjugated onto the albumin MB shell via covalent bonds and the biotinylated antibodies are conjugated using an avidin-biotin system. The albumin microbubbles had a mean diameter of 2 μm with a polydispersity index of 0.16. For cell separation, the MDA-MB-231 cells are incubated with the targeted biotin-MBs conjugated with anti-CD44 for 10 min, centrifuged at 10 g for 1 min, and then allowed 1 hour at 4 °C for separation. The results indicate that targeted biotin-MBs conjugated with anti-CD44 antibodies can be used to separate MDA-MB-231 breast cancer cells; more than 90% of the cells were collected in the MB layer when the ratio of the MBs to cells was higher than 70:1. Furthermore, we found that the separating efficiency was higher for targeted biotin-MBs than for targeted avidin-incorporated albumin MBs (avidin-MBs), which is the most common way to make targeted albumin MBs. We also demonstrated that the recovery rate of targeted biotin-MBs was up to 88% and the sorting purity was higher than 84% for a a heterogenous cell population containing MDA-MB-231 cells (CD44(+)) and MDA-MB-453 cells (CD44-), which are classified as basal-like breast cancer cells and luminal breast cancer cells, respectively. Knowing that the CD44(+) is a commonly used cancer-stem-cell biomarker, our

  11. Forest, Trees, Dynamics: Results from a Novel Wisconsin Card Sorting Test Variant Protocol for Studying Global-Local Attention and Complex Cognitive Processes

    PubMed Central

    Cowley, Benjamin; Lukander, Kristian

    2016-01-01

    Background: Recognition of objects and their context relies heavily on the integrated functioning of global and local visual processing. In a realistic setting such as work, this processing becomes a sustained activity, implying a consequent interaction with executive functions. Motivation: There have been many studies of either global-local attention or executive functions; however it is relatively novel to combine these processes to study a more ecological form of attention. We aim to explore the phenomenon of global-local processing during a task requiring sustained attention and working memory. Methods: We develop and test a novel protocol for global-local dissociation, with task structure including phases of divided (“rule search”) and selective (“rule found”) attention, based on the Wisconsin Card Sorting Task (WCST). We test it in a laboratory study with 25 participants, and report on behavior measures (physiological data was also gathered, but not reported here). We develop novel stimuli with more naturalistic levels of information and noise, based primarily on face photographs, with consequently more ecological validity. Results: We report behavioral results indicating that sustained difficulty when participants test their hypotheses impacts matching-task performance, and diminishes the global precedence effect. Results also show a dissociation between subjectively experienced difficulty and objective dimension of performance, and establish the internal validity of the protocol. Contribution: We contribute an advance in the state of the art for testing global-local attention processes in concert with complex cognition. With three results we establish a connection between global-local dissociation and aspects of complex cognition. Our protocol also improves ecological validity and opens options for testing additional interactions in future work. PMID:26941689

  12. Good Thinking! Activity Cards to Reinforce Language and Reasoning Skills

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Barlow Thurman, Kathy

    2006-01-01

    This full-color, kid-pleasing collection of language-arts activities is ideal for K-2 children of all ability levels--and for English language learners too. The practical and easy-to-implement lessons also are convenient for substitute teachers, classroom assistants, and volunteers. Flexible and versatile, these unique cards can be used for guided…

  13. A meta-analysis of the Dimensional Change Card Sort: Implications for developmental theories and the measurement of executive function in children

    PubMed Central

    Doebel, Sabine; Zelazo, Philip David

    2016-01-01

    The Dimensional Change Card Sort (DCCS) is a widely used measure of executive function in children. In the standard version, children are shown cards depicting objects that vary on two dimensions (e.g., colored shapes such as red rabbits and blue boats), and are told to sort them first by one set of rules (e.g., shape) and then by another (e.g., color). Most 3-year-olds persist in sorting by the pre-switch rules, whereas 5-year-olds switch flexibly. We conducted a meta-analysis of standard and experimental versions of the task (N = 69 reports, 426 conditions) to examine the influence of diverse task variations on performance. Age, how the test stimuli were labeled for the child, emphasis on conflict in the verbal introduction of the post-switch rules, and the number of pre-switch trials each independently predicted switching on the standard DCCS, whereas pre-switch feedback, practice, and task modality did not. Increasing the relative salience of the post-switch dimension was associated with higher rates of switching, and, conversely, decreasing post-switch salience was associated with lower rates of switching, and under both kinds of manipulation performance continued to be associated with age. Spatially separating the dimensional values was associated with higher rates of switching, and it was confirmed that the degree of spatial separation matters, with children benefiting most when the dimensional values are fully spatially segregated. Switch rates tended to be higher in versions on which children were prompted to label the stimuli compared to when the experimenter provided labels, and lower when reversal instructions were used in conjunction with the standard task stimuli. Theoretical and practical implications for the study and measurement of executive function in early childhood are discussed. PMID:26955206

  14. Boundaries in gravitational and magnetic activation of cells for sorting.

    PubMed

    Czerlinski, G H

    1991-06-01

    Standard deviations in the distribution of radii of cells and particles are considered to arrive at realistic limits in the use of gravitational and magnetic activation of cells for sorting. Using a specific fractionation design, it is shown that the radius of particles (or cells) may be fractionated down to a precision of +/- 0.76%. Although higher precisions could be obtained with other designs, the number of particles available per fraction is inversely proportional to the precision desired. Thus, one would prefer to keep the precision as moderate as permissible by the experiments.

  15. Analyzing persister physiology with fluorescence activated cell sorting

    PubMed Central

    Orman, Mehmet A.; Henry, Theresa C.; DeCoste, Christina J.; Brynildsen, Mark P.

    2016-01-01

    Bacterial persisters are phenotypic variants that exhibit an impressive ability to tolerate antibiotics. Persisters are hypothesized to cause relapse infections, and therefore, understanding their physiology may lead to novel therapeutics to treat recalcitrant infections. However, persisters have yet to be isolated due to their low abundance, transient nature, and similarity to the more highly abundant viable but non-culturable cells (VBNCs), resulting in limited knowledge of their phenotypic state. This technical hurdle has been addressed through the use of fluorescence activated cell sorting (FACS) and quantification of persister levels in the resulting sorted fractions. These assays provide persister phenotype distributions, which can be compared to the phenotype distributions of the entire population, and can also be used to examine persister heterogeneity. Here we describe two detailed protocols for analysis of persister physiology with FACS. One protocol assays the metabolic state of persisters using a fluorescent metabolic stain, whereas the other assays the growth state of persisters with use of a fluorescent protein. PMID:26468102

  16. Delayed habituation of the skin-conductance orienting response correlates with impaired performance on the Wisconsin Card Sorting Task in schizophrenia.

    PubMed

    Schiffer, R A; Sigal, M; Mintz, M

    1996-11-15

    The skin-conductance orienting response (SCOR) in schizophrenia is often characterized by either nonresponding or delayed habituation to repeated nonsignal tones. These abnormalities are poorly related to other dimensions of schizophrenia. In the present study, we confirmed that about 50% of patients with chronic schizophrenia are SCOR nonresponders. Nonresponders, however, did not differ from responders on postmorbid psychiatric or pharmacological course, and we therefore could not confirm the hypothesis that course of illness follows a more marked pattern of increasing severity in nonresponders. Performance on the Wisconsin Card Sorting Test (WCST) was particularly poor in a subgroup of responders who exhibited either delayed habituation and/or dishabituation of SCORs to tones applied after a short rest period. It is possible that pathology of the prefrontal cortex mediates the SCOR abnormalities that characterize schizophrenic patients who perform poorly on the WCST.

  17. Creating Futures Activity Cards and Teacher Guide.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Klenzman, Elizabeth; Taylor, Paula

    Teachers can use these learning activities to teach about the future in elementary and secondary social studies, science, math, language arts, and arts courses. The purpose of the activities is to help students practice creative-thinking skills, investigate problems relevant to their personal futures, experience the concept of change, and evaluate…

  18. Creation and the empirical validation of the dignity card-sort tool to assess factors influencing erosion of dignity at life's end.

    PubMed

    Periyakoil, Vyjeyanthi S; Kraemer, Helena Chmura; Noda, Arthur

    2009-12-01

    Patients often experience erosion of dignity as they cope with the dying process. Preserving patient dignity is a sentinel premise of palliative care. This study was conducted to gain a better understanding of factors influencing erosion of dignity at the end of life. We conducted an open-ended written survey of 100 multidisciplinary providers (69% response rate) and responses were categorized to identify 18 themes that were used to create a card-sort tool. The initial 18-item tool was administered to nurses (n = 83), nonhospice community-dwelling subjects (n = 190) and hospice patients (n = 26) and a principal component analysis (PCA) was used to identify the 6 primary factors. The key item in each factor as identified by the PCA was used to create the final 6-item dignity card-sort tool (DCT). The DCT was also administered to physicians caring for palliative care patients (n = 21). For each of the final 6 items, the correlation between the respondents (nurses, physicians, nonterminally ill subjects, and subjects receiving hospice care) was calculated using the Spearman's correlation coefficient. The nurses were very highly positively correlated with the physicians (correlation coefficient = 0.94) and the community-dwelling nonterminally ill subjects were highly positively correlated with the subjects receiving hospice care (correlation coefficient = 0.67). More importantly, both the nurses and physicians were negatively correlated with both community dwelling nonterminally ill subjects and the subjects receiving hospice care. The health professionals in the study felt that treating a patient with disrespect and not carrying out their wishes resulted in erosion of dignity. In contrast patients thought that poor medical care and untreated pain were the most important factors leading to erosion of dignity at life's end. The DCT is a promising tool that may help clinicians identify key factors resulting in perceptions of erosion of dignity in adult palliative care

  19. Magnetic activated cell sorting (MACS): utility in assisted reproduction.

    PubMed

    Makker, Kartikeya; Agarwal, Ashok; Sharma, Rakesh K

    2008-07-01

    Assisted reproductive techniques (ART) have now been extensively incorporated in the management of infertile couples. But even after rapid methodological and technological advances the success rates of these procedures have been below expectations. This has led to development of many sperm preparation protocols to obtain an ideal semen sample for artificial reproduction. Sperm apoptosis has been heavily linked to failures in reproductive techniques. One of the earliest changes shown by apoptotic spermatozoa is externalization of phosphatidyl serine. Magnetic activated cell sorting (MACS) is a novel sperm preparation technique that separates apoptotic and non-apoptotic spermatozoa based on the expression of phosphatidylserine. This has led to the incorporation of MACS as a sperm preparation technique. The review highlights the principle and mechanism of this novel technique and enumerates its advantages as a sperm preparation technique. Its utility in ART as an efficient tool for sperm recovery and its application in cryopreservation of semen samples is also explained.

  20. CARD14-Mediated Activation of Paracaspase MALT1 in Keratinocytes: Implications for Psoriasis.

    PubMed

    Van Nuffel, Elien; Schmitt, Anja; Afonina, Inna S; Schulze-Osthoff, Klaus; Beyaert, Rudi; Hailfinger, Stephan

    2017-03-01

    Mutations in caspase recruitment domain-containing protein 14(CARD14) have been linked to susceptibility to psoriasis. CARD14 is an intracellular scaffold protein that regulates proinflammatory gene expression. Recent studies have offered novel insights into the mechanisms of CARD14-mediated signaling in keratinocytes and the molecular impact of psoriasis-associated CARD14 mutations. CARD14 forms a signaling complex with BCL10 and the paracaspase MALT1, and this process is enhanced upon pathogenic CARD14 mutation, culminating in the activation of MALT1 protease activity and psoriasis-associated gene expression. This review summarizes the current knowledge of CARD14/MALT1-mediated signaling in keratinocytes and its therapeutic implications in psoriasis.

  1. Sorting drops and cells with acoustics: acoustic microfluidic fluorescence-activated cell sorter.

    PubMed

    Schmid, Lothar; Weitz, David A; Franke, Thomas

    2014-10-07

    We describe a versatile microfluidic fluorescence-activated cell sorter that uses acoustic actuation to sort cells or drops at ultra-high rates. Our acoustic sorter combines the advantages of traditional fluorescence-activated cell (FACS) and droplet sorting (FADS) and is applicable for a multitude of objects. We sort aqueous droplets, at rates as high as several kHz, into two or even more outlet channels. We can also sort cells directly from the medium without prior encapsulation into drops; we demonstrate this by sorting fluorescently labeled mouse melanoma cells in a single phase fluid. Our acoustic microfluidic FACS is compatible with standard cell sorting cytometers, yet, at the same time, enables a rich variety of more sophisticated applications.

  2. Identification and genetic analysis of cancer cells with PCR-activated cell sorting

    PubMed Central

    Eastburn, Dennis J.; Sciambi, Adam; Abate, Adam R.

    2014-01-01

    Cell sorting is a central tool in life science research for analyzing cellular heterogeneity or enriching rare cells out of large populations. Although methods like FACS and FISH-FC can characterize and isolate cells from heterogeneous populations, they are limited by their reliance on antibodies, or the requirement to chemically fix cells. We introduce a new cell sorting technology that robustly sorts based on sequence-specific analysis of cellular nucleic acids. Our approach, PCR-activated cell sorting (PACS), uses TaqMan PCR to detect nucleic acids within single cells and trigger their sorting. With this method, we identified and sorted prostate cancer cells from a heterogeneous population by performing >132 000 simultaneous single-cell TaqMan RT-PCR reactions targeting vimentin mRNA. Following vimentin-positive droplet sorting and downstream analysis of recovered nucleic acids, we found that cancer-specific genomes and transcripts were significantly enriched. Additionally, we demonstrate that PACS can be used to sort and enrich cells via TaqMan PCR reactions targeting single-copy genomic DNA. PACS provides a general new technical capability that expands the application space of cell sorting by enabling sorting based on cellular information not amenable to existing approaches. PMID:25030902

  3. Micro vapor bubble jet flow for safe and high-rate fluorescence-activated cell sorting.

    PubMed

    de Wijs, Koen; Liu, Chengxun; Dusa, Alexandra; Vercruysse, Dries; Majeed, Bivragh; Tezcan, Deniz Sabuncuoglu; Blaszkiewicz, Kamil; Loo, Josine; Lagae, Liesbet

    2017-03-29

    Safe, high-rate and cost-effective cell sorting is important for clinical cell isolation. However, commercial fluorescence-activated cell sorters (FACS) are expensive and prone to aerosol-induced sample contamination. Here we report a microfluidic cell sorter allowing high rate and fully enclosed cell sorting. The sorter chip consists of an array of micro heating hotspots. Pulsed resistive heating in the hotspots produces numerous micro vapor bubbles with short duration, which gives rise to a rapid jet flow for cell sorting. With this method, we demonstrated high sorting rate comparable to commercial FACS and the significant enrichment of rare cancer cells. This vapor bubble based cell sorting method can be a powerful tool for contamination-free and affordable clinical cell sorting such as circulating tumor cell isolation and cancer cell therapy.

  4. Risk/Reward Decision-Making in Schizophrenia: A Preliminary Examination of the Influence of Tobacco Smoking and Relationship to Wisconsin Card Sorting Task Performance

    PubMed Central

    Yip, Sarah W.; Sacco, Kristi A.; George, Tony P.; Potenza, Marc N.

    2009-01-01

    Background Individuals with schizophrenia show deficits in cognitive functioning, as evidenced by deficits on neurocognitive tasks such as the Wisconsin Card Sorting Task (WCST). Studies of risk/reward decision-making in individuals with schizophrenia have yielded mixed results, and few studies have examined systematically the relationship between these domains and their relationship with clinical factors. Method Thirty-two smokers with schizophrenia, ten non-smokers with schizophrenia, nine non-psychiatric non-smokers and ten non-psychiatric smokers were administered computerized versions of the Iowa Gambling Task (IGT) and the WCST. Smokers were allowed to smoke ad libitum during designated breaks in order to prevent deprivation. Results Subjects with schizophrenia performed significantly worse than non-psychiatric controls on both the IGT and the WCST, and performance on these tasks was significantly correlated across subject groups. Among women with schizophrenia, smokers performed significantly better than non-smokers on the IGT. Conclusions Individuals with schizophrenia performed worse than controls on the IGT, suggesting impairments in risk/reward decision-making. Correlations between IGT and WCST performance suggest a shared element underlying task performance, such as a deficit in set-shifting or perseverance. Further research is needed to establish the relationship between cigarette smoking and IGT performance in schizophrenia. PMID:19269138

  5. Does language dominance affect cognitive performance in bilinguals? Lifespan evidence from preschoolers through older adults on card sorting, Simon, and metalinguistic tasks

    PubMed Central

    Gathercole, Virginia C. Mueller; Thomas, Enlli M.; Kennedy, Ivan; Prys, Cynog; Young, Nia; Viñas Guasch, Nestor; Roberts, Emily J.; Hughes, Emma K.; Jones, Leah

    2014-01-01

    This study explores the extent to which a bilingual advantage can be observed for three tasks in an established population of fully fluent bilinguals from childhood through adulthood. Welsh-English simultaneous and early sequential bilinguals, as well as English monolinguals, aged 3 years through older adults, were tested on three sets of cognitive and executive function tasks. Bilinguals were Welsh-dominant, balanced, or English-dominant, with only Welsh, Welsh and English, or only English at home. Card sorting, Simon, and a metalinguistic judgment task (650, 557, and 354 participants, respectively) reveal little support for a bilingual advantage, either in relation to control or globally. Primarily there is no difference in performance across groups, but there is occasionally better performance by monolinguals or persons dominant in the language being tested, and in one case-in one condition and in one age group-lower performance by the monolinguals. The lack of evidence for a bilingual advantage in these simultaneous and early sequential bilinguals suggests the need for much closer scrutiny of what type of bilingual might demonstrate the reported effects, under what conditions, and why. PMID:24550853

  6. Regulation of synaptic activity by snapin-mediated endolysosomal transport and sorting

    PubMed Central

    Di Giovanni, Jerome; Sheng, Zu-Hang

    2015-01-01

    Recycling synaptic vesicles (SVs) transit through early endosomal sorting stations, which raises a fundamental question: are SVs sorted toward endolysosomal pathways? Here, we used snapin mutants as tools to assess how endolysosomal sorting and trafficking impact presynaptic activity in wild-type and snapin−/− neurons. Snapin acts as a dynein adaptor that mediates the retrograde transport of late endosomes (LEs) and interacts with dysbindin, a subunit of the endosomal sorting complex BLOC-1. Expressing dynein-binding defective snapin mutants induced SV accumulation at presynaptic terminals, mimicking the snapin−/− phenotype. Conversely, over-expressing snapin reduced SV pool size by enhancing SV trafficking to the endolysosomal pathway. Using a SV-targeted Ca2+ sensor, we demonstrate that snapin–dysbindin interaction regulates SV positional priming through BLOC-1/AP-3-dependent sorting. Our study reveals a bipartite regulation of presynaptic activity by endolysosomal trafficking and sorting: LE transport regulates SV pool size, and BLOC-1/AP-3-dependent sorting fine-tunes the Ca2+ sensitivity of SV release. Therefore, our study provides new mechanistic insights into the maintenance and regulation of SV pool size and synchronized SV fusion through snapin-mediated LE trafficking and endosomal sorting. PMID:26108535

  7. Regulation of synaptic activity by snapin-mediated endolysosomal transport and sorting.

    PubMed

    Di Giovanni, Jerome; Sheng, Zu-Hang

    2015-08-04

    Recycling synaptic vesicles (SVs) transit through early endosomal sorting stations, which raises a fundamental question: are SVs sorted toward endolysosomal pathways? Here, we used snapin mutants as tools to assess how endolysosomal sorting and trafficking impact presynaptic activity in wild-type and snapin(-/-) neurons. Snapin acts as a dynein adaptor that mediates the retrograde transport of late endosomes (LEs) and interacts with dysbindin, a subunit of the endosomal sorting complex BLOC-1. Expressing dynein-binding defective snapin mutants induced SV accumulation at presynaptic terminals, mimicking the snapin(-/-) phenotype. Conversely, over-expressing snapin reduced SV pool size by enhancing SV trafficking to the endolysosomal pathway. Using a SV-targeted Ca(2+) sensor, we demonstrate that snapin-dysbindin interaction regulates SV positional priming through BLOC-1/AP-3-dependent sorting. Our study reveals a bipartite regulation of presynaptic activity by endolysosomal trafficking and sorting: LE transport regulates SV pool size, and BLOC-1/AP-3-dependent sorting fine-tunes the Ca(2+) sensitivity of SV release. Therefore, our study provides new mechanistic insights into the maintenance and regulation of SV pool size and synchronized SV fusion through snapin-mediated LE trafficking and endosomal sorting.

  8. Computerized version of the Wisconsin card sorting test in children with high-functioning autistic disorder or attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder.

    PubMed

    Tsuchiya, Emi; Oki, Junichi; Yahara, Nozomi; Fujieda, Kenji

    2005-04-01

    To determine executive dysfunctions in children with autistic disorder or attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD), we investigated high-functioning autistic (full scale IQ score >or==70), ADHD, and control children using the computerized version of the Wisconsin Card Sorting Test. Data were obtained from 17 autistic children (16 boys and 1 girl, mean age+/-SD: 12.5+/-4.3), 22 ADHD children (20 boys and 2 girls, mean age+/-SD 11.3+/-2.6), and 25 control children (13 boys and 12 girls, mean age+/-SD: 12.7+/-3.1). Performances, indicated by mean number of categories achieved (5.4 in autistic, 6.5 in ADHD, and 8.8 in control group), total errors (38.2, 38.4, and 25.6, respectively), perseverative errors (11.4, 13.5, and 5.7), nonperseverative errors (27.1, 25.0, and 19.9), and Nelson type perseverative errors (8.9, 8.4, and 2.3), were significantly poorer in both autistic and ADHD groups than control group (P<0.01). Comparing the autistic group to the ADHD group, there were no significant differences in age, gender, scores of full-scale intelligent quotient (IQ), verbal or performance IQ, number of categories achieved or errors. The ADHD group, however, showed more frequent Milner type perseverative errors than the autistic group (P<0.05). The present study suggests that some kinds of executive function are more impaired in children with ADHD than in those with high-functioning autism, and that Milner type perseverative errors is useful parameter to differentiate the executive dysfunctions between autistic and ADHD children.

  9. Psoriasis mutations disrupt CARD14 autoinhibition promoting BCL10-MALT1-dependent NF-κB activation.

    PubMed

    Howes, Ashleigh; O'Sullivan, Paul A; Breyer, Felix; Ghose, Ashavari; Cao, Li; Krappmann, Daniel; Bowcock, Anne M; Ley, Steven C

    2016-06-15

    Inherited and de novo mutations in the CARD14 gene promote the development of psoriasis, an inflammatory disease of the skin. Caspase recruitment domain-containing protein 14 (CARD14) is a member of the CARMA protein family that includes the structurally related CARD11 adaptor that mediates NF-κB activation by antigen receptors. We investigated the mechanism by which CARD14 mutation in psoriasis activates NF-κB. In contrast with wild-type CARD14, CARD14(E138A) and CARD14(G117S) psoriasis mutants interacted constitutively with BCL10 and MALT1, and triggered BCL10- and MALT1-dependent activation of NF-κB in keratinocytes. These alterations disrupted the inhibitory effect of the CARD14 linker region (LR) on NF-κB activation by facilitating BCL10 binding. Therefore, psoriasis mutations activated CARD14 by a mechanism analogous to oncogenic CARD11 mutations in non-Hodgkin B cell lymphomas. CARD14(E138A) also stimulated MALT1 paracaspase activity and activated both ERK1/2 and p38α MAP kinases. Inhibition of MALT1 with mepazine reduced CARD14(E138A)-induced expression of specific psoriasis-associated transcripts in keratinocytes. Our results establish the mechanism whereby gain-of-function CARD14 variants, which induce psoriatic disease in affected individuals, activate pro-inflammatory signalling.

  10. ALG-2 activates the MVB sorting function of ALIX through relieving its intramolecular interaction.

    PubMed

    Sun, Sheng; Zhou, Xi; Corvera, Joe; Gallick, Gary E; Lin, Sue-Hwa; Kuang, Jian

    2015-01-01

    The modular adaptor protein ALIX is critically involved in endosomal sorting complexes required for transport (ESCRT)-mediated multivesicular body (MVB) sorting of activated epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR); however, ALIX contains a default intramolecular interaction that renders ALIX unable to perform this ESCRT function. The ALIX partner protein ALG-2 is a calcium-binding protein that belongs to the calmodulin superfamily. Prompted by a defined biological function of calmodulin, we determined the role of ALG-2 in regulating ALIX involvement in MVB sorting of activated EGFR. Our results show that calcium-dependent ALG-2 interaction with ALIX completely relieves the intramolecular interaction of ALIX and promotes CHMP4-dependent ALIX association with the membrane. EGFR activation induces increased ALG-2 interaction with ALIX, and this increased interaction is responsible for increased ALIX association with the membrane. Functionally, inhibition of ALIX activation by ALG-2 inhibits MVB sorting of activated EGFR as effectively as inhibition of ALIX interaction with CHMP4 does; however, inhibition of ALIX activation by ALG-2 does not affect cytokinetic abscission or equine infectious anemia virus (EIAV) budding. These findings indicate that calcium-dependent ALG-2 interaction with ALIX is specifically responsible for generating functional ALIX that supports MVB sorting of ubiquitinated membrane receptors.

  11. PCR-Activated Cell Sorting for Cultivation-Free Enrichment and Sequencing of Rare Microbes

    PubMed Central

    Lim, Shaun W.; Tran, Tuan M.; Abate, Adam R.

    2015-01-01

    Microbial systems often exhibit staggering diversity, making the study of rare, interesting species challenging. For example, metagenomic analyses of mixed-cell populations are often dominated by the sequences of the most abundant organisms, while those of rare microbes are detected only at low levels, if at all. To overcome this, selective cultivation or fluorescence-activated cell sorting (FACS) can be used to enrich for the target species prior to sequence analysis; however, since most microbes cannot be grown in the lab, cultivation strategies often fail, while cell sorting requires techniques to uniquely label the cell type of interest, which is often not possible with uncultivable microbes. Here, we introduce a culture-independent strategy for sorting microbial cells based on genomic content, which we term PCR-activated cell sorting (PACS). This technology, which utilizes the power of droplet-based microfluidics, is similar to FACS in that it uses a fluorescent signal to uniquely identify and sort target species. However, PACS differs importantly from FACS in that the signal is generated by performing PCR assays on the cells in microfluidic droplets, allowing target cells to be identified with high specificity with suitable design of PCR primers and TaqMan probes. The PACS assay is general, requires minimal optimization and, unlike antibody methods, can be developed without access to microbial antigens. Compared to non-specific methods in which cells are sorted based on size, granularity, or the ability to take up dye, PACS enables genetic sequence-specific sorting and recovery of the cell genomes. In addition to sorting microbes, PACS can be applied to eukaryotic cells, viruses, and naked nucleic acids. PMID:25629401

  12. Unravelling the pivotal role of Alix in MVB sorting and silencing of the activated EGFR.

    PubMed

    Sun, Sheng; Zhou, Xi; Zhang, Wei; Gallick, Gary E; Kuang, Jian

    2015-03-15

    Endosomal sorting complex required for transport (ESCRT)-III-mediated membrane invagination and scission are a critical step in multivesicular body (MVB) sorting of ubiquitinated membrane receptors, and generally thought to be required for degradation of these receptors in lysosomes. The adaptor protein Alix is critically involved in multiple ESCRT-III-mediated, membrane-remodelling processes in mammalian cells. However, Alix knockdown does not inhibit degradation of the activated epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) in mammalian cell lines, leading to a widely held notion that Alix is not critically involved in MVB sorting of ubiquitinated membrane receptors in mammalian cells. In the present study, we demonstrate that, despite its non-essential role in degradation of the activated EGFR, Alix plays a critical role in its MVB sorting and silencing Epidermal growth factor (EGF) stimulation of mammalian cell lines induces Alix's interaction with the ubiquitinated EGFR via the Alix V domain, and increases Alix's association with membrane-bound charged multivesicular body protein 4 (CHMP4) via the Alix Bro1 domain. Under both continuous and pulse-chase EGF stimulation conditions, inhibition of Alix's interaction with membrane-bound CHMP4, inhibition of Alix dimerization through the V domain or Alix knockdown dramatically inhibits MVB sorting of the activated EGFR and promotes sustained activation of extracellular-signal regulated kinase (ERK)1/2. Under the continuous EGF stimulation conditions, these cell treatments also retard degradation of the activated EGFR. These findings indicate that Alix is critically involved in MVB sorting of ubiquitinated membrane receptors in mammalian cells.

  13. Impact of the Active Healthy Kids Canada report card: a 10-year analysis.

    PubMed

    Tremblay, Mark S; Barnes, Joel D; Cowie Bonne, Jennifer

    2014-05-01

    For 20 years Active Healthy Kids Canada (AHKC) has worked to inspire the country to engage all children and youth in physical activity (PA). The primary vehicle to achieve this is the AHKC Report Card on Physical Activity for Children and Youth, which has been released annually since 2005. Using 10 years of experience with this knowledge translation and synthesis mechanism, this paper aggregates and consolidates diverse evidence demonstrating the impact of the Report Card and related knowledge translation activities. Over the years many evaluations, consultations, assessments, and surveys have helped inform changes in the Report Card to improve its impact. Guided by a logic model, the various assessments have traversed areas related to distribution and reach, meeting stakeholder needs, use of the Report Card, its influence on policy, and advancing the mission of AHKC. In the past 10 years, the Report Card has achieved > 1 billion media impressions, distributed > 120,000 printed copies and > 200,000 electronic copies, and benefited from a collective ad value > $10 million. The Report Card has been replicated in 14 countries, 2 provinces, 1 state and 1 city. AHKC has received consistent positive feedback from stakeholders and end-users, who reported that the Report Card has been used for public awareness/education campaigns and advocacy strategies, to strengthen partnerships, to inform research and program design, and to advance and adjust policies and strategies. Collectively, the evidence suggests that the Report Card has been successful at powering the movement to get kids moving, and in achieving demonstrable success on immediate and intermediate outcomes, although the long-term goal of improving the PA of Canadian children and youth remains to be realized.

  14. Morphological evaluation of sperm from infertile men selected by magnetic activated cell sorting (MACS).

    PubMed

    Curti, Gianni; Skowronek, Fernanda; Vernochi, Rita; Rodriguez-Buzzi, Ana Laura; Rodriguez-Buzzi, Juan Carlos; Casanova, Gabriela; Sapiro, Rossana

    2014-12-01

    Electron microscopy analysis performed in five infertile human subjects after sperm selection by swim-up followed by magnetic activated cell sorting (MACS) demonstrated a decrease in the number of spermatozoa with characteristics compatible with cell death. However, no significant differences were found when the swim-up/MACS semen fraction was compared with swim-up fraction alone.

  15. Fluorescence-Activated Cell Sorting of Live Versus Dead Bacterial Cells and Spores

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bernardini, James N.; LaDuc, Myron T.; Diamond, Rochelle; Verceles, Josh

    2012-01-01

    This innovation is a coupled fluorescence-activated cell sorting (FACS) and fluorescent staining technology for purifying (removing cells from sampling matrices), separating (based on size, density, morphology, and live versus dead), and concentrating cells (spores, prokaryotic, eukaryotic) from an environmental sample.

  16. Oligomerization and activation of caspase-9, induced by Apaf-1 CARD

    PubMed Central

    Shiozaki, Eric N.; Chai, Jijie; Shi, Yigong

    2002-01-01

    Apaf-1 facilitates the proteolytic activation of procaspase-9 and maintains the hyperactive state of the processed caspase-9. The underlying molecular mechanisms for these activities remain poorly characterized. Here we report that the isolated Apaf-1 caspase recruitment domain (CARD) forms a large hetero-oligomer with the active caspase-9. The catalytic activity of caspase-9 is significantly enhanced in this complex, demonstrating that Apaf-1 CARD allosterically up-regulates caspase-9 activity. Point mutations that inactivate the interactions between Apaf-1 CARD and the prodomain of caspase-9 also abolished the formation of this complex. Based on these observations, we discuss the implications of this complex on the observed Apaf-1 function. PMID:11904389

  17. SYBR Green-activated sorting of Arabidopsis pollen nuclei based on different DNA/RNA content.

    PubMed

    Schoft, Vera K; Chumak, Nina; Bindics, János; Slusarz, Lucyna; Twell, David; Köhler, Claudia; Tamaru, Hisashi

    2015-03-01

    Key message: Purification of pollen nuclei. Germ cell epigenetics is a critical topic in plants and animals. The male gametophyte (pollen) of flowering plants is an attractive model to study genetic and epigenetic reprogramming during sexual reproduction, being composed of only two sperm cells contained within, its companion, vegetative cell. Here, we describe a simple and efficient method to purify SYBR Green-stained sperm and vegetative cell nuclei of Arabidopsis thaliana pollen using fluorescence-activated cell sorting to analyze chromatin and RNA profiles. The method obviates generating transgenic lines expressing cell-type-specific fluorescence reporters and facilitates functional genomic analysis of various mutant lines and accessions. We evaluate the purity and quality of the sorted pollen nuclei and analyze the technique's molecular basis. Our results show that both DNA and RNA contents contribute to SYBR Green-activated nucleus sorting and RNA content differences impact on the separation of sperm and vegetative cell nuclei. We demonstrate the power of the approach by sorting wild-type and polyploid mutant sperm and vegetative cell nuclei from mitotic and meiotic mutants, which is not feasible using cell-type-specific transgenic reporters. Our approach should be applicable to pollen nuclei of crop plants and possibly to cell/nucleus types and cell cycle phases of different species containing substantially different amounts of DNA and/or RNA.

  18. Loss of CARD9-mediated innate activation attenuates severe influenza pneumonia without compromising host viral immunity

    PubMed Central

    Uematsu, Takayuki; Iizasa, Ei’ichi; Kobayashi, Noritada; Yoshida, Hiroki; Hara, Hiromitsu

    2015-01-01

    Influenza virus (IFV) infection is a common cause of severe viral pneumonia associated with acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS), which is difficult to control with general immunosuppressive therapy including corticosteroids due to the unfavorable effect on viral replication. Studies have suggested that the excessive activation of the innate immunity by IFV is responsible for severe pathologies. In this study, we focused on CARD9, a signaling adaptor known to regulate innate immune activation through multiple innate sensor proteins, and investigated its role in anti-IFV defense and lung pathogenesis in a mouse model recapitulating severe influenza pneumonia with ARDS. We found that influenza pneumonia was dramatically attenuated in Card9-deficient mice, which showed improved mortality with reduced inflammatory cytokines and chemokines in the infected lungs. However, viral clearance, type-I interferon production, and the development of anti-viral B and T cell immunity were not compromised by CARD9 deficiency. Syk or CARD9-deficient DCs but not macrophages showed impaired cytokine but not type-I interferon production in response to IFV in vitro, indicating a possible role for the Syk-CARD9 pathway in DCs in excessive inflammation of IFV-infected lungs. Therefore, inhibition of this pathway is an ideal therapeutic target for severe influenza pneumonia without affecting viral clearance. PMID:26627732

  19. Brief report: cognitive flexibility and focused attention in children and adolescents with Asperger syndrome or high-functioning autism as measured on the computerized version of the Wisconsin Card Sorting Test.

    PubMed

    Kaland, Nils; Smith, Lars; Mortensen, Erik Lykke

    2008-07-01

    The aim of the present study was to assess mental flexibility and set maintenance of a group of individuals with Asperger syndrome (AS) or high-functioning autism (HFA) (N = 13; mean age 16,4), as compared with a matched group of typically developing children and adolescents (N = 13; mean age 15,6) on the computerized version of the Wisconsin Card Sorting Test (WCST). The participants in the AS/HFA group performed less well than the controls on all categories of the WCST, but the differences did not reach conventional statistical significance on most categories of the WCST. On the category failure to maintain set, however, the AS/HFA participants performed significantly less well than the controls, suggesting a deficit of focused attention.

  20. Tracking heavy water (D2O) incorporation for identifying and sorting active microbial cells.

    PubMed

    Berry, David; Mader, Esther; Lee, Tae Kwon; Woebken, Dagmar; Wang, Yun; Zhu, Di; Palatinszky, Marton; Schintlmeister, Arno; Schmid, Markus C; Hanson, Buck T; Shterzer, Naama; Mizrahi, Itzhak; Rauch, Isabella; Decker, Thomas; Bocklitz, Thomas; Popp, Jürgen; Gibson, Christopher M; Fowler, Patrick W; Huang, Wei E; Wagner, Michael

    2015-01-13

    Microbial communities are essential to the function of virtually all ecosystems and eukaryotes, including humans. However, it is still a major challenge to identify microbial cells active under natural conditions in complex systems. In this study, we developed a new method to identify and sort active microbes on the single-cell level in complex samples using stable isotope probing with heavy water (D2O) combined with Raman microspectroscopy. Incorporation of D2O-derived D into the biomass of autotrophic and heterotrophic bacteria and archaea could be unambiguously detected via C-D signature peaks in single-cell Raman spectra, and the obtained labeling pattern was confirmed by nanoscale-resolution secondary ion MS. In fast-growing Escherichia coli cells, label detection was already possible after 20 min. For functional analyses of microbial communities, the detection of D incorporation from D2O in individual microbial cells via Raman microspectroscopy can be directly combined with FISH for the identification of active microbes. Applying this approach to mouse cecal microbiota revealed that the host-compound foragers Akkermansia muciniphila and Bacteroides acidifaciens exhibited distinctive response patterns to amendments of mucin and sugars. By Raman-based cell sorting of active (deuterated) cells with optical tweezers and subsequent multiple displacement amplification and DNA sequencing, novel cecal microbes stimulated by mucin and/or glucosamine were identified, demonstrating the potential of the nondestructive D2O-Raman approach for targeted sorting of microbial cells with defined functional properties for single-cell genomics.

  1. Isolation of cell type-specific apoptotic bodies by fluorescence-activated cell sorting

    PubMed Central

    Atkin-Smith, Georgia K.; Paone, Stephanie; Zanker, Damien J.; Duan, Mubing; Phan, Than K.; Chen, Weisan; Hulett, Mark D.; Poon, Ivan K. H.

    2017-01-01

    Apoptotic bodies (ApoBDs) are membrane-bound extracellular vesicles that can mediate intercellular communication in physiological and pathological settings. By combining recently developed analytical strategies with fluorescence-activated cell sorting (FACS), we have developed a method that enables the isolation of ApoBDs from cultured cells to 99% purity. In addition, this approach also enables the identification and isolation of cell type-specific ApoBDs from tissue, bodily fluid and blood-derived samples. PMID:28057919

  2. 77 FR 60134 - Agency Information Collection Activities; Application for Identification Card

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-10-02

    ... SECURITY U.S. Customs and Border Protection Agency Information Collection Activities; Application for Identification Card AGENCY: U.S. Customs and Border Protection, Department of Homeland Security. ACTION: 30-Day notice and request for comments; Extension of an existing information collection. SUMMARY: U.S....

  3. Identification and characterization of EGF receptor in individual exosomes by fluorescence-activated vesicle sorting

    PubMed Central

    Higginbotham, James N.; Zhang, Qin; Jeppesen, Dennis K.; Scott, Andrew M.; Manning, H. Charles; Ochieng, Josiah; Franklin, Jeffrey L.; Coffey, Robert J.

    2016-01-01

    Exosomes are small, 40–130 nm secreted extracellular vesicles that recently have become the subject of intense focus as agents of intercellular communication, disease biomarkers and potential vehicles for drug delivery. It is currently unknown whether a cell produces different populations of exosomes with distinct cargo and separable functions. To address this question, high-resolution methods are needed. Using a commercial flow cytometer and directly labelled fluorescent antibodies, we show the feasibility of using fluorescence-activated vesicle sorting (FAVS) to analyse and sort individual exosomes isolated by sequential ultracentrifugation from the conditioned medium of DiFi cells, a human colorectal cancer cell line. EGFR and the exosomal marker, CD9, were detected on individual DiFi exosomes by FAVS; moreover, both markers were identified by high-resolution stochastic optical reconstruction microscopy on individual, approximately 100 nm vesicles from flow-sorted EGFR/CD9 double-positive exosomes. We present evidence that the activation state of EGFR can be assessed in DiFi-derived exosomes using a monoclonal antibody (mAb) that recognizes “conformationally active” EGFR (mAb 806). Using human antigen-specific antibodies, FAVS was able to detect human EGFR and CD9 on exosomes isolated from the plasma of athymic nude mice bearing DiFi tumour xenografts. Multicolour FAVS was used to simultaneously identify CD9, EGFR and an EGFR ligand, amphiregulin (AREG), on human plasma-derived exosomes from 3 normal individuals. These studies demonstrate the feasibility of FAVS to both analyse and sort individual exosomes based on specific cell-surface markers. We propose that FAVS may be a useful tool to monitor EGFR and AREG in circulating exosomes from individuals with colorectal cancer and possibly other solid tumours. PMID:27345057

  4. The functional architecture of the human body: assessing body representation by sorting body parts and activities.

    PubMed

    Bläsing, Bettina; Schack, Thomas; Brugger, Peter

    2010-05-01

    We investigated mental representations of body parts and body-related activities in two subjects with congenitally absent limbs (one with, the other without phantom sensations), a wheelchair sports group of paraplegic participants, and two groups of participants with intact limbs. To analyse mental representation structures, we applied Structure Dimensional Analysis. Verbal labels indicating body parts and related activities were presented in randomized lists that had to be sorted according to a hierarchical splitting paradigm. Participants were required to group the items according to whether or not they were considered related, based on their own body perception. Results of the groups of physically intact and paraplegic participants revealed separate clusters for the lower body, upper body, fingers and head. The participant with congenital phantom limbs also showed a clear separation between upper and lower body (but not between fingers and hands). In the participant without phantom sensations of the absent arms, no such modularity emerged, but the specific practice of his right foot in communication and daily routines was reflected. Sorting verbal labels of body parts and activities appears a useful method to assess body representation in individuals with special body anatomy or function and leads to conclusions largely compatible with other assessment procedures.

  5. Effect of staining and sorting on boar sperm membrane integrity, mitochondrial activity and in vitro blastocyst development.

    PubMed

    Spinaci, M; De Ambrogi, M; Volpe, S; Galeati, G; Tamanini, C; Seren, E

    2005-07-01

    The objective of this study was to determine the effects of staining with Hoechst 33342 and of the entire sorting procedure on boar sperm membrane integrity (using Annexin-V/PI), mitochondrial activity (using JC-1/SYBR/PI) and blastocyst development in vitro; the effect of storage at 17 degrees C for 24h prior to Hoechst staining and sorting was also investigated. The Hoechst staining and the whole sorting procedure reduced the percent of live spermatozoa in both fresh (day 0) and stored (day 1) semen, as determined by both assays; nevertheless, there was no increase in live sperm cells showing signs of early damage (Annexin-V positive, propidium negative), whose percentages remained nearly zero. The majority of Annexin-V positive cells were propidium positive, therefore dead. JC-1 staining evidenced a correlation between mitochondrial activity and viability. However, a significant difference between viable sperm cells and sperm cells with active mitochondria was detected in control and stained sperm, whereas almost all viable sorted spermatozoa had active mitochondria. No significant differences in the in vitro produced blastocysts both on day 0 and 1 were observed. In conclusion, despite the damages induced by sorting procedures, semen sorted as fresh or after storage at 17 degrees C can be successfully used for in vitro production of pig embryos.

  6. Visualizing in situ translational activity for identifying and sorting slow-growing archaeal−bacterial consortia

    PubMed Central

    Hatzenpichler, Roland; Connon, Stephanie A.; Goudeau, Danielle; Malmstrom, Rex R.; Woyke, Tanja; Orphan, Victoria J.

    2016-01-01

    To understand the biogeochemical roles of microorganisms in the environment, it is important to determine when and under which conditions they are metabolically active. Bioorthogonal noncanonical amino acid tagging (BONCAT) can reveal active cells by tracking the incorporation of synthetic amino acids into newly synthesized proteins. The phylogenetic identity of translationally active cells can be determined by combining BONCAT with rRNA-targeted fluorescence in situ hybridization (BONCAT-FISH). In theory, BONCAT-labeled cells could be isolated with fluorescence-activated cell sorting (BONCAT-FACS) for subsequent genetic analyses. Here, in the first application, to our knowledge, of BONCAT-FISH and BONCAT-FACS within an environmental context, we probe the translational activity of microbial consortia catalyzing the anaerobic oxidation of methane (AOM), a dominant sink of methane in the ocean. These consortia, which typically are composed of anaerobic methane-oxidizing archaea (ANME) and sulfate-reducing bacteria, have been difficult to study due to their slow in situ growth rates, and fundamental questions remain about their ecology and diversity of interactions occurring between ANME and associated partners. Our activity-correlated analyses of >16,400 microbial aggregates provide the first evidence, to our knowledge, that AOM consortia affiliated with all five major ANME clades are concurrently active under controlled conditions. Surprisingly, sorting of individual BONCAT-labeled consortia followed by whole-genome amplification and 16S rRNA gene sequencing revealed previously unrecognized interactions of ANME with members of the poorly understood phylum Verrucomicrobia. This finding, together with our observation that ANME-associated Verrucomicrobia are found in a variety of geographically distinct methane seep environments, suggests a broader range of symbiotic relationships within AOM consortia than previously thought. PMID:27357680

  7. High-throughput fluorescence-activated cell sorting for lipid hyperaccumulating Chlamydomonas reinhardtii mutants.

    PubMed

    Xie, Bo; Stessman, Dan; Hart, Jason H; Dong, Haili; Wang, Yingjun; Wright, David A; Nikolau, Basil J; Spalding, Martin H; Halverson, Larry J

    2014-09-01

    The genetically tractable microalga Chlamydomonas reinhardtii has many advantages as a model for renewable bioproducts and/or biofuels production. However, one limitation of C. reinhardtii is its relatively low-lipid content compared with some other algal species. To overcome this limitation, we combined ethane methyl sulfonate mutagenesis with fluorescence-activated cell sorting (FACS) of cells stained with the lipophilic stain Nile Red to isolate lipid hyperaccumulating mutants of C. reinhardtii. By manipulating the FACS gates, we sorted mutagenized cells with extremely high Nile Red fluorescence signals that were rarely detected in nonmutagenized populations. This strategy successfully isolated several putative lipid hyperaccumulating mutants exhibiting 23% to 58% (dry weight basis) higher fatty acid contents than their progenitor strains. Significantly, for most mutants, nitrogen starvation was not required to attain high-lipid content nor was there a requirement for a deficiency in starch accumulation. Microscopy of Nile Red stained cells revealed that some mutants exhibit an increase in the number of lipid bodies, which correlated with TLC analysis of triacyglycerol content. Increased lipid content could also arise through increased biomass production. Collectively, our findings highlight the ability to enhance intracellular lipid accumulation in algae using random mutagenesis in conjunction with a robust FACS and lipid yield verification regime. Our lipid hyperaccumulating mutants could serve as a genetic resource for stacking additional desirable traits to further increase lipid production and for identifying genes contributing to lipid hyperaccumulation, without lengthy lipid-induction periods.

  8. The use of fluorescence-activated cell sorting in studying plant development and environmental responses.

    PubMed

    Carter, Anthony D; Bonyadi, Roxanna; Gifford, Miriam L

    2013-01-01

    Fluorescence-Activated Cell Sorting (FACS) is a powerful tool that enables plant growth and development to be studied at the cellular level. Flow cytometry is used to isolate subpopulations of cells, such as those of specific cell types, or cells at particular developmental stages that have been marked with fluorescent proteins. Transgenic technology has given us the ability to generate plants that express fluorescent proteins, not just constitutively in particular cell types, but also dynamically in response to endogenous or external factors. By processing such transgenic lines with FACS, it is possible to isolate distinct populations of cells in a wide range of likely response states for further analysis. This is particularly useful for investigating biological mechanisms in plants because the control of growth and development is manifest at the cell type level. Furthermore, the specificity of the resulting data enables fine modelling of the transcriptional networks that exert systems-level control of the transcriptome; hence key regulators of responses and processes in the plant can be identified. In this review, the current state of the art for FACS methods in plants is explored by means of case studies of research in which cell sorting allowed us to make significant new discoveries.

  9. Genetic Screening for Bacterial Mutants in Liquid Growth Media By Fluorescence-Activated Cell Sorting

    PubMed Central

    Abuaita, Basel H.; Withey, Jeffrey H.

    2010-01-01

    Many bacterial pathogens have defined in vitro virulence inducing conditions in liquid media which lead to production of virulence factors important during an infection. Identifying mutants that no longer respond to virulence inducing conditions will increase our understanding of bacterial pathogenesis. However, traditional genetic screens require growth on solid media. Bacteria in a single colony are in every phase of the growth curve, which complicates the analysis and make screens for growth phase-specific mutants problematic. Here, we utilize fluorescence-activated cell sorting in conjunction with random transposon mutagenesis to isolate bacteria grown in liquid media that are defective in virulence activation. This method permits analysis of an entire bacterial population in real time and selection of individual bacterial mutants with the desired gene expression profile at any time point after induction. We have used this method to identify Vibrio cholerae mutants defective in virulence induction. PMID:21094189

  10. Wiring harnesses documented by punched-card technique

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hicks, W. W.; Kloezeman, W. G.

    1970-01-01

    Cards representing a connector are punched, sorted, and then used to printout wiring documentation for that connector. When wiring changes are made, new cards are punched and the wiring documentation is reprinted to reflect the latest configuration.

  11. Selection of Intracellularly Functional RNA Mimics of Green Fluorescent Protein Using Fluorescence-Activated Cell Sorting.

    PubMed

    Zou, Jiawei; Huang, Xin; Wu, Lei; Chen, Gangyi; Dong, Juan; Cui, Xin; Tang, Zhuo

    2015-12-01

    Fluorescence-activated cell sorting (FACS) was exploited to isolate Escherichia coli cells that were highly fluorescent due to the expression of RNA aptamers that induce fluorescence of 3,5-difluoro-4-hydroxybenzylidene imidazolinone. Two different aptamers, named ZT-26 and ZT-324, were identified by this method and compared to the fluorescence-signaling properties of Spinach, a previously reported RNA aptamer. Aptamer ZT-26 exhibits significantly enhanced fluorescence over Spinach only in vitro. However, aptamer ZT-324 is 36% brighter than Spinach when expressed in E. coli. The FACS-based selection strategy presented here is attractive for deriving fluorescent RNA aptamers that function in cells as it directly selects for cells with a high level of fluorescence due to the expression of the RNA aptamer.

  12. Purification of interstitial cells of Cajal by fluorescence-activated cell sorting.

    PubMed

    Ordög, Tamás; Redelman, Doug; Miller, Lisa J; Horváth, Viktor J; Zhong, Qiao; Almeida-Porada, Graça; Zanjani, Esmail D; Horowitz, Burton; Sanders, Kenton M

    2004-02-01

    Interstitial cells of Cajal (ICC) in the gastrointestinal tract generate and propagate slow waves and mediate neuromuscular neurotransmission. Although damages to ICC have been described in several gastrointestinal motor disorders, analysis of their gene expression in health and disease has been problematic because of the difficulties in isolating these cells. Our goal was to develop techniques for large-scale purification of ICC. Murine ICC were identified in live gastrointestinal muscles with fluorescent Kit antibodies. Because this technique also labels resident macrophages nonspecifically, we attempted to separate ICC from these cells by fluorescence-activated cell sorting with or without immunomagnetic presorting. Efficacy and specificity of ICC purification were tested by quantitative RT-PCR of cell-specific markers. Fluorescence-based separation of small intestinal ICC from unlabeled cells and macrophages tagged with F4/80 antibodies yielded 30,000-40,000 cells and approximately 60-fold enrichment of c-kit mRNA. However, the macrophage marker CD68 was also enriched approximately 6-fold. Magnetic presorting of ICC did not significantly improve selectivity. After labeling contaminating cells with additional paramagnetic (anti-CD11b, -CD11c) and fluorescent antibodies (anti-CD11b) and depleting them by magnetic presorting, we harvested approximately 2,000-4,000 cells from single gastric corpus-antrum muscles and detected an approximately 30-fold increase in c-kit mRNA, no enrichment of mast cells, and an approximately 4-fold reduction of CD68 expression. Adding labeled anti-CD45 antibody to our cocktail further increased c-kit enrichment and eliminated mast cells and macrophages. Smooth muscle cells and myenteric neurons were also depleted. We conclude that immunofluorescence-based sorting can yield ICC in sufficiently high numbers and purity to permit detailed molecular analyses.

  13. Rapid isolation of antibody from a synthetic human antibody library by repeated fluorescence-activated cell sorting (FACS).

    PubMed

    Yim, Sung Sun; Bang, Hyun Bae; Kim, Young Hwan; Lee, Yong Jae; Jeong, Gu Min; Jeong, Ki Jun

    2014-01-01

    Antibodies and their derivatives are the most important agents in therapeutics and diagnostics. Even after the significant progress in the technology for antibody screening from huge libraries, it takes a long time to isolate an antibody, which prevents a prompt action against the spread of a disease. Here, we report a new strategy for isolating desired antibodies from a combinatorial library in one day by repeated fluorescence-activated cell sorting (FACS). First, we constructed a library of synthetic human antibody in which single-chain variable fragment (scFv) was expressed in the periplasm of Escherichia coli. After labeling the cells with fluorescent antigen probes, the highly fluorescent cells were sorted by using a high-speed cell sorter, and these cells were reused without regeneration in the next round of sorting. After repeating this sorting, the positive clones were completely enriched in several hours. Thus, we screened the library against three viral antigens, including the H1N1 influenza virus, Hepatitis B virus, and Foot-and-mouth disease virus. Finally, the potential antibody candidates, which show K(D) values between 10 and 100 nM against the target antigens, could be successfully isolated even though the library was relatively small (∼ 10(6)). These results show that repeated FACS screening without regeneration of the sorted cells can be a powerful method when a rapid response to a spreading disease is required.

  14. In vivo imaging of alphaherpesvirus infection reveals synchronized activity dependent on axonal sorting of viral proteins.

    PubMed

    Granstedt, Andrea E; Bosse, Jens B; Thiberge, Stephan Y; Enquist, Lynn W

    2013-09-10

    A clinical hallmark of human alphaherpesvirus infections is peripheral pain or itching. Pseudorabies virus (PRV), a broad host range alphaherpesvirus, causes violent pruritus in many different animals, but the mechanism is unknown. Previous in vitro studies have shown that infected, cultured peripheral nervous system (PNS) neurons exhibited aberrant electrical activity after PRV infection due to the action of viral membrane fusion proteins, yet it is unclear if such activity occurs in infected PNS ganglia in living animals and if it correlates with disease symptoms. Using two-photon microscopy, we imaged autonomic ganglia in living mice infected with PRV strains expressing GCaMP3, a genetically encoded calcium indicator, and used the changes in calcium flux to monitor the activity of many neurons simultaneously with single-cell resolution. Infection with virulent PRV caused these PNS neurons to fire synchronously and cyclically in highly correlated patterns among infected neurons. This activity persisted even when we severed the presynaptic axons, showing that infection-induced firing is independent of input from presynaptic brainstem neurons. This activity was not observed after infections with an attenuated PRV recombinant used for circuit tracing or with PRV mutants lacking either viral glycoprotein B, required for membrane fusion, or viral membrane protein Us9, required for sorting virions and viral glycoproteins into axons. We propose that the viral fusion proteins produced by virulent PRV infection induce electrical coupling in unmyelinated axons in vivo. This action would then give rise to the synchronous and cyclical activity in the ganglia and contribute to the characteristic peripheral neuropathy.

  15. Fluorescence-Activated Cell Sorting for Analysis of Cell Type-Specific Responses to Salinity Stress in Arabidopsis and Rice

    PubMed Central

    Evrard, Aurelie; Bargmann, Bastiaan O.R.; Birnbaum, Kenneth D.; Tester, Mark; Baumann, Ute; Johnson, Alexander A.T.

    2014-01-01

    Fluorescence-activated cell sorting (FACS) provides a rapid means of isolating large numbers of fluorescently tagged cells from a heterogeneous mixture of cells. Collections of transgenic plants with cell type-specific expression of fluorescent marker genes such as green fluorescent protein (GFP) are ideally suited for FACS-assisted studies of individual cell types. Here we describe the use of Arabidopsis and rice enhancer trap lines with tissue-specific GFP expression patterns in the root to isolate specific cell types of root tissues using FACS. Additionally, protocols are provided to impose a ramped salinity stress for 48 h prior to cell sorting. PMID:22895766

  16. Constitutively active ESCRT-II suppresses the MVB-sorting phenotype of ESCRT-0 and ESCRT-I mutants.

    PubMed

    Mageswaran, Shrawan Kumar; Johnson, Natalie K; Odorizzi, Greg; Babst, Markus

    2015-02-01

    The endosomal sorting complex required for transport (ESCRT) protein complexes function at the endosome in the formation of intraluminal vesicles (ILVs) containing cargo proteins destined for the vacuolar/lysosomal lumen. The early ESCRTs (ESCRT-0 and -I) are likely involved in cargo sorting, whereas ESCRT-III and Vps4 function to sever the neck of the forming ILVs. ESCRT-II links these functions by initiating ESCRT-III formation in an ESCRT-I-regulated manner. We identify a constitutively active mutant of ESCRT-II that partially suppresses the phenotype of an ESCRT-I or ESCRT-0 deletion strain, suggesting that these early ESCRTs are not essential and have redundant functions. However, the ESCRT-III/Vps4 system alone is not sufficient for ILV formation but requires cargo sorting mediated by one of the early ESCRTs.

  17. Isolation of skeletal muscle stem cells by fluorescence-activated cell sorting.

    PubMed

    Liu, Ling; Cheung, Tom H; Charville, Gregory W; Rando, Thomas A

    2015-10-01

    The prospective isolation of purified stem cell populations has dramatically altered the field of stem cell biology, and it has been a major focus of research across tissues in different organisms. Muscle stem cells (MuSCs) are now among the most intensely studied stem cell populations in mammalian systems, and the prospective isolation of these cells has allowed cellular and molecular characterizations that were not dreamed of a decade ago. In this protocol, we describe how to isolate MuSCs from limb muscles of adult mice by fluorescence-activated cell sorting (FACS). We provide a detailed description of the physical and enzymatic dissociation of mononucleated cells from limb muscles, a procedure that is essential in order to maximize cell yield. We also describe a FACS-based method that is used subsequently to obtain highly pure populations of either quiescent or activated MuSCs (VCAM(+)CD31(-)CD45(-)Sca1(-)). The isolation process takes ∼5-6 h to complete. The protocol also allows for the isolation of endothelial cells, hematopoietic cells and mesenchymal stem cells from muscle tissue.

  18. Identification, visualization, and sorting of translationally active microbial consortia from deep-sea methane seeps

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hatzenpichler, R.; Connon, S. A.; Goudeau, D.; Malmstrom, R.; Woyke, T.; Orphan, V. J.

    2015-12-01

    Within the past few years, great progress has been made in tapping the genomes of individual cells separated from environmental samples. Unfortunately, however, most often these efforts have been target blind, as they did not pre-select for taxa of interest or focus on metabolically active cells that could be considered key species of the system at the time. This problem is particularly pronounced in low-turnover systems such as deep sea sediments. In an effort to tap the genetic potential hidden within functionally active cells, we have recently developed an approach for the in situ fluorescent tracking of protein synthesis in uncultured cells via bioorthogonal non-canonical amino acid-tagging (BONCAT). This technique depends on the incorporation of synthetic amino acids that carry chemically modifiable tags into newly made proteins, which later can be visualized via click chemistry-mediated fluorescence-labeling. BONCAT is thus able to specifically target proteins that have been expressed in reaction to an experimental condition. We are particularly interested in using BONCAT to understand the functional potential of slow-growing syntrophic consortia of anaerobic methanotrophic archaea and sulfate-reducing bacteria which together catalyze the anaerobic oxidation of methane (AOM) in marine methane seeps. In order to specifically target consortia that are active under varying environmental regimes, we are studying different subpopulations of these inter-domain consortia via a combination of BONCAT with rRNA-targeted FISH. We then couple the BONCAT-enabled staining of active consortia with their separation from inactive members of the community via fluorescence-activated cell-sorting (FACS) and metagenomic sequencing of individual consortia. Using this approach, we were able to identify previously unrecognized AOM-partnerships. By comparing the mini-metagenomes obtained from individual consortia with each other we are starting to gain a more hollistic understanding

  19. Isolation of dendritic cells from umbilical cord blood using magnetic activated cell sorting or adherence.

    PubMed

    Bie, Yachun; Xu, Qiuxiang; Zhang, Zhenyu

    2015-07-01

    Dendritic cells (DCs) are a highly specialized type of antigen-presenting cell. The present study describes and compares two methods for preparing DCs from umbilical cord blood. The first method involves the isolation of DCs by magnetic activated cell sorting (MACS). This technique isolates CD34(+) cells from cord blood and induces the formation of DCs by the addition of cytokines, granulocyte macrophage colony-stimulating factor and interleukin-4. The second method involves the generation of large numbers of DCs from cord blood using an adherent method, which isolates umbilical cord blood mononuclear cells and induces DCs in the same conditions as those used in MACS. The DCs were harvested following 7 days of incubation and observed with an inverted microscope. The phenotype of the cells was then analyzed by flow cytometry. The results revealed that, subsequent to 7 days of incubation, the differentiated DCs obtained using the adherent method were more mature than those isolated using MACS. However, these cells were unable to be maintained in culture for more than 9-10 days. By contrast, the DCs derived from CD34(+) cells by MACS were phenotypically stable and could be maintained for up to 3 weeks in culture. Either method produced DCs from cord blood. However, the DCs isolated using the MACS method demonstrated higher homogeneity, yield and viability than those obtained using the adherent method. Due to the various compositions of the monocyte subsets isolated, isolation methods affect the phenotypes and functions of the resultant DCs.

  20. Efficient selective breeding of live oil-rich Euglena gracilis with fluorescence-activated cell sorting.

    PubMed

    Yamada, Koji; Suzuki, Hideyuki; Takeuchi, Takuto; Kazama, Yusuke; Mitra, Sharbanee; Abe, Tomoko; Goda, Keisuke; Suzuki, Kengo; Iwata, Osamu

    2016-05-23

    Euglena gracilis, a microalgal species of unicellular flagellate protists, has attracted much attention in both the industrial and academic sectors due to recent advances in the mass cultivation of E. gracilis that have enabled the cost-effective production of nutritional food and cosmetic commodities. In addition, it is known to produce paramylon (β-1,3-glucan in a crystalline form) as reserve polysaccharide and convert it to wax ester in hypoxic and anaerobic conditions-a promising feedstock for biodiesel and aviation biofuel. However, there remain a number of technical challenges to be solved before it can be deployed in the competitive fuel market. Here we present a method for efficient selective breeding of live oil-rich E. gracilis with fluorescence-activated cell sorting (FACS). Specifically, the selective breeding method is a repetitive procedure for one-week heterotrophic cultivation, staining intracellular lipids with BODIPY(505/515), and FACS-based isolation of top 0.5% lipid-rich E. gracilis cells with high viability, after inducing mutation with Fe-ion irradiation to the wild type (WT). Consequently, we acquire a live, stable, lipid-rich E. gracilis mutant strain, named B1ZFeL, with 40% more lipid content on average than the WT. Our method paves the way for rapid, cost-effective, energy-efficient production of biofuel.

  1. Efficient selective breeding of live oil-rich Euglena gracilis with fluorescence-activated cell sorting

    PubMed Central

    Yamada, Koji; Suzuki, Hideyuki; Takeuchi, Takuto; Kazama, Yusuke; Mitra, Sharbanee; Abe, Tomoko; Goda, Keisuke; Suzuki, Kengo; Iwata, Osamu

    2016-01-01

    Euglena gracilis, a microalgal species of unicellular flagellate protists, has attracted much attention in both the industrial and academic sectors due to recent advances in the mass cultivation of E. gracilis that have enabled the cost-effective production of nutritional food and cosmetic commodities. In addition, it is known to produce paramylon (β-1,3-glucan in a crystalline form) as reserve polysaccharide and convert it to wax ester in hypoxic and anaerobic conditions–a promising feedstock for biodiesel and aviation biofuel. However, there remain a number of technical challenges to be solved before it can be deployed in the competitive fuel market. Here we present a method for efficient selective breeding of live oil-rich E. gracilis with fluorescence-activated cell sorting (FACS). Specifically, the selective breeding method is a repetitive procedure for one-week heterotrophic cultivation, staining intracellular lipids with BODIPY505/515, and FACS-based isolation of top 0.5% lipid-rich E. gracilis cells with high viability, after inducing mutation with Fe-ion irradiation to the wild type (WT). Consequently, we acquire a live, stable, lipid-rich E. gracilis mutant strain, named B1ZFeL, with 40% more lipid content on average than the WT. Our method paves the way for rapid, cost-effective, energy-efficient production of biofuel. PMID:27212384

  2. CARD6 is interferon inducible but not involved in nucleotide-binding oligomerization domain protein signaling leading to NF-kappaB activation.

    PubMed

    Dufner, Almut; Duncan, Gordon S; Wakeham, Andrew; Elford, Alisha R; Hall, Håkan T; Ohashi, Pamela S; Mak, Tak W

    2008-03-01

    We have previously reported the cloning and characterization of CARD6, a caspase recruitment domain (CARD)-containing protein that is structurally related to the interferon (IFN)-inducible GTPases. CARD6 associates with microtubules and with receptor-interacting protein 2 (RIP2). RIP2 mediates NF-kappaB activation induced by the intracellular nucleotide-binding oligomerization domain (NOD) receptors that sense bacterial peptidoglycan. Here we report that the expression of CARD6 and RIP2 in bone marrow-derived macrophages is rapidly induced by beta IFN and gamma IFN. This IFN-induced upregulation of CARD6 is suppressed by lipopolysaccharide (LPS), in contrast to LPS's enhancement of IFN-induced RIP2 upregulation. We generated CARD6-deficient (CARD6(-/-)) mice and carried out extensive analyses of signaling pathways mediating innate and adaptive immune responses, including the NOD pathways, but did not detect any abnormalities. Moreover, CARD6(-/-) mice were just as susceptible as wild-type mice to infection by Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium, Listeria monocytogenes, Candida albicans, lymphocytic choriomeningitis virus, or mouse adenovirus type 1. Thus, although structural and in vitro analyses strongly suggest an important role for CARD6 in immune defense, the physiological function of CARD6 remains obscure.

  3. Characterization of rat hair follicle stem cells selected by vario magnetic activated cell sorting system.

    PubMed

    Huang, Enyi; Lian, Xiaohua; Chen, Wei; Yang, Tian; Yang, Li

    2009-10-30

    Hair follicle stem cells (HfSCs) play crucial roles in hair follicle morphogenesis and hair cycling. These stem cells are self-renewable and have the multi-lineage potential to generate epidermis, sebaceous glands, and hair follicle. The separation and identification of hair follicle stem cells are important for further research in stem cell biology. In this study, we report on the successful enrichment of rat hair follicle stem cells through vario magnetic activated cell sorting (Vario MACS) and the biological characteristics of the stem cells. We chose the HfSCs positive surface markers CD34, alpha 6-integrin and the negative marker CD71 to design four isolation strategies: positive selection with single marker of CD34, positive selection with single marker of alpha 6-integrin, CD71 depletion followed by CD34 positive selection, and CD71 depletion followed by alpha 6-integrin positive selection. The results of flow cytometry analysis showed that all four strategies had ideal effects. Specifically, we conducted a series of researches on HfSCs characterized by their high level of CD34, termed CD34(bri) cells, and low to undetectable expression of CD34, termed CD34(dim) cells. CD34(bri) cells had greater proliferative potential and higher colony-forming ability than CD34(dim) cells. Furthermore, CD34(bri) cells had some typical characteristics as progenitor cells, such as large nucleus, obvious nucleolus, large nuclear:cytoplasmic ratio and few cytoplasmic organelles. Our findings clearly demonstrated that HfSCs with high purity and viability could be successfully enriched with Vario MACS.

  4. Encapsulation of single cells on a microfluidic device integrating droplet generation with fluorescence-activated droplet sorting.

    PubMed

    Wu, Liang; Chen, Pu; Dong, Yingsong; Feng, Xiaojun; Liu, Bi-Feng

    2013-06-01

    Encapsulation of single cells is a challenging task in droplet microfluidics due to the random compartmentalization of cells dictated by Poisson statistics. In this paper, a microfluidic device was developed to improve the single-cell encapsulation rate by integrating droplet generation with fluorescence-activated droplet sorting. After cells were loaded into aqueous droplets by hydrodynamic focusing, an on-flight fluorescence-activated sorting process was conducted to isolate droplets containing one cell. Encapsulation of fluorescent polystyrene beads was investigated to evaluate the developed method. A single-bead encapsulation rate of more than 98 % was achieved under the optimized conditions. Application to encapsulate single HeLa cells was further demonstrated with a single-cell encapsulation rate of 94.1 %, which is about 200 % higher than those obtained by random compartmentalization. We expect this new method to provide a useful platform for encapsulating single cells, facilitating the development of high-throughput cell-based assays.

  5. 77 FR 20889 - Proposed Information Collection (Request One-VA Identification Verification Card) Activity...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-04-06

    ... Identity Verification (PIV) identification card. DATES: Written comments and recommendations on the... Control Number: 2900-0673. Type of Review: Extension of a currently approved collection. Abstract: VA PIV... personalize, print, and issue a PIV card. Affected Public: Federal government. Estimated Annual Burden:...

  6. Predicting performance on the Columbia Card Task: effects of personality characteristics, mood, and executive functions.

    PubMed

    Buelow, Melissa T

    2015-04-01

    Behavioral measures of risky decision making are frequently used by researchers and clinicians; however, most of these measures are strongly associated with personality characteristics and state mood. The present study sought to examine personality, mood, and executive function predictors of performance on a newer measure of decision making, the Columbia Card Task (CCT). Participants were 489 undergraduate students who completed either the hot or cold version of the CCT as well as measures of state mood, impulsive sensation seeking, behavioral inhibition and activation systems, and executive functions (Wisconsin Card Sort Task; Digit Span). Results indicated that performance on the CCT-cold was predicted by Wisconsin Card Sort Task errors, and Digit Span predicted the CCT-hot. In addition, significant correlations were found between the CCT information use variables and the predictor variables. Implications for the utility of the CCT as a clinical instrument and its relationship with other measures of decision making are discussed.

  7. Moraxella catarrhalis induces CEACAM3-Syk-CARD9-dependent activation of human granulocytes.

    PubMed

    Heinrich, A; Heyl, K A; Klaile, E; Müller, M M; Klassert, T E; Wiessner, A; Fischer, K; Schumann, R R; Seifert, U; Riesbeck, K; Moter, A; Singer, B B; Bachmann, S; Slevogt, H

    2016-11-01

    The human restricted pathogen Moraxella catarrhalis is an important causal agent for exacerbations in chronic obstructive lung disease in adults. In such patients, increased numbers of granulocytes are present in the airways, which correlate with bacteria-induced exacerbations and severity of the disease. Our study investigated whether the interaction of M. catarrhalis with the human granulocyte-specific carcinoembryonic antigen-related cell adhesion molecule (CEACAM)-3 is linked to NF-κB activation, resulting in chemokine production. Granulocytes from healthy donors and NB4 cells were infected with M. catarrhalis in the presence of different inhibitors, blocking antibodies and siRNA. The supernatants were analysed by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay for chemokines. NF-κB activation was determined using a luciferase reporter gene assay and chromatin-immunoprecipitation. We found evidence that the specific engagement of CEACAM3 by M. catarrhalis ubiquitous surface protein A1 (UspA1) results in the activation of pro-inflammatory events, such as degranulation of neutrophils, ROS production and chemokine secretion. The interaction of UspA1 with CEACAM3 induced the activation of the NF-κB pathway via Syk and the CARD9 pathway and was dependent on the phosphorylation of the CEACAM3 ITAM-like motif. These findings suggest that the CEACAM3 signalling in neutrophils is able to specifically modulate airway inflammation caused by infection with M. catarrhalis.

  8. The role of audience participation and task relevance on change detection during a card trick.

    PubMed

    Smith, Tim J

    2015-01-01

    Magicians utilize many techniques for misdirecting audience attention away from the secret sleight of a trick. One technique is to ask an audience member to participate in a trick either physically by asking them to choose a card or cognitively by having them keep track of a card. While such audience participation is an established part of most magic the cognitive mechanisms by which it operates are unknown. Failure to detect changes to objects while passively viewing magic tricks has been shown to be conditional on the changing feature being irrelevant to the current task. How change blindness operates during interactive tasks is unclear but preliminary evidence suggests that relevance of the changing feature may also play a role (Triesch et al., 2003). The present study created a simple on-line card trick inspired by Triesch et al.'s (2003) that allowed playing cards to be instantaneously replaced without distraction or occlusion as participants were either actively sorting the cards (Doing condition) or watching another person perform the task (Watching conditions). Participants were given one of three sets of instructions. The relevance of the card color to the task increased across the three instructions. During half of the trials a card changed color (but retained its number) as it was moving to the stack. Participants were instructed to immediately report such changes. Analysis of the probability of reporting a change revealed that actively performing the sorting task led to more missed changes than passively watching the same task but only when the changing feature was irrelevant to the sorting task. If the feature was relevant during either the pick-up or put-down action change detection was as good as during the watching block. These results confirm the ability of audience participation to create subtle dynamics of attention and perception during a magic trick and hide otherwise striking changes at the center of attention.

  9. The role of audience participation and task relevance on change detection during a card trick

    PubMed Central

    Smith, Tim J.

    2015-01-01

    Magicians utilize many techniques for misdirecting audience attention away from the secret sleight of a trick. One technique is to ask an audience member to participate in a trick either physically by asking them to choose a card or cognitively by having them keep track of a card. While such audience participation is an established part of most magic the cognitive mechanisms by which it operates are unknown. Failure to detect changes to objects while passively viewing magic tricks has been shown to be conditional on the changing feature being irrelevant to the current task. How change blindness operates during interactive tasks is unclear but preliminary evidence suggests that relevance of the changing feature may also play a role (Triesch et al., 2003). The present study created a simple on-line card trick inspired by Triesch et al.’s (2003) that allowed playing cards to be instantaneously replaced without distraction or occlusion as participants were either actively sorting the cards (Doing condition) or watching another person perform the task (Watching conditions). Participants were given one of three sets of instructions. The relevance of the card color to the task increased across the three instructions. During half of the trials a card changed color (but retained its number) as it was moving to the stack. Participants were instructed to immediately report such changes. Analysis of the probability of reporting a change revealed that actively performing the sorting task led to more missed changes than passively watching the same task but only when the changing feature was irrelevant to the sorting task. If the feature was relevant during either the pick-up or put-down action change detection was as good as during the watching block. These results confirm the ability of audience participation to create subtle dynamics of attention and perception during a magic trick and hide otherwise striking changes at the center of attention. PMID:25698986

  10. Credit Card Quiz.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Marks, Jeff

    2000-01-01

    Describes an activity in which students design credit cards and discover for themselves the mathematical realities of buying on credit. Employs multiple-intelligence theory to increase the chance that all students will be reached. (YDS)

  11. CARD15 gene overexpression reduces effect of etanercept, infliximab, and adalimumab on cytokine secretion from PMA activated U937 cells.

    PubMed

    Teimourian, Shahram; Masoudzadeh, Nooshin

    2015-09-05

    Crohn's disease (CD), a subcategory of inflammatory bowel disease, is an immune-related disorder characterized by inflammation of the gastrointestinal mucosa, which can take place in any region along the alimentary tract. The most important gene involved in the etiology of CD is NOD2/CARD15 located on chromosome 16. It has been shown that CARD15 is overexpressed in monocytes of CD patients. The common treatment for the disease is anti-TNF-alpha drugs, the most hopeful of which are probably infliximab and etanercept. Infliximab rapidly reduces signs and symptoms of active Crohn's disease. In contrast, etanercept shows no such effect. In the present study, we evaluated the effects of the CARD15 gene overexpression in monocytic cell line U937 in the production of anti-inflammatory cytokine, IL-10, and proinflammatory cytokine, Il-1 beta, produced after incubation with infliximab, adalimumab, and etanercept separately. Our results show that infliximab and adalimumab significantly decreased IL-10 and IL-1beta secretion levels. However, etanercept inhibition of secretion was less compared with infliximab or adalimumab. In all three cases, suppression of cytokine production is reduced by CARD15 overexpression.

  12. 77 FR 38396 - Agency Information Collection (One-VA Identification Verification Card) Activities Under OMB Review

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-06-27

    ... Control Number: 2900-0673. Type of Review: Extension of a currently approved collection. Abstract: VA PIV... personalize, print, and issue a PIV card. An agency may not conduct or sponsor, and a person is not...

  13. Purification of specific cell population by fluorescence activated cell sorting (FACS).

    PubMed

    Basu, Sreemanti; Campbell, Hope M; Dittel, Bonnie N; Ray, Avijit

    2010-07-10

    Experimental and clinical studies often require highly purified cell populations. FACS is a technique of choice to purify cell populations of known phenotype. Other bulk methods of purification include panning, complement depletion and magnetic bead separation. However, FACS has several advantages over other available methods. FACS is the preferred method when very high purity of the desired population is required, when the target cell population expresses a very low level of the identifying marker or when cell populations require separation based on differential marker density. In addition, FACS is the only available purification technique to isolate cells based on internal staining or intracellular protein expression, such as a genetically modified fluorescent protein marker. FACS allows the purification of individual cells based on size, granularity and fluorescence. In order to purify cells of interest, they are first stained with fluorescently-tagged monoclonal antibodies (mAb), which recognize specific surface markers on the desired cell population (1). Negative selection of unstained cells is also possible. FACS purification requires a flow cytometer with sorting capacity and the appropriate software. For FACS, cells in suspension are passed as a stream in droplets with each containing a single cell in front of a laser. The fluorescence detection system detects cells of interest based on predetermined fluorescent parameters of the cells. The instrument applies a charge to the droplet containing a cell of interest and an electrostatic deflection system facilitates collection of the charged droplets into appropriate collection tubes (2). The success of staining and thereby sorting depends largely on the selection of the identifying markers and the choice of mAb. Sorting parameters can be adjusted depending on the requirement of purity and yield. Although FACS requires specialized equipment and personnel training, it is the method of choice for isolation of

  14. Separation of SSEA-4 and TRA-1-60 labelled undifferentiated human embryonic stem cells from a heterogeneous cell population using magnetic-activated cell sorting (MACS) and fluorescence-activated cell sorting (FACS).

    PubMed

    Fong, Chui Yee; Peh, Gary S L; Gauthaman, Kalamegam; Bongso, Ariff

    2009-03-01

    A major concern in human embryonic stem cell (hESC)-derived cell replacement therapy is the risk of tumorigenesis from undifferentiated hESCs residing in the population of hESC-derived cells. Separation of these undifferentiated hESCs from the differentiated derivatives using cell sorting methods may be a plausible approach in overcoming this problem. We therefore explored magnetic activated cell sorting (MACS) and fluorescence activated cell sorting (FACS) to separate labelled undifferentiated hESCs from a heterogeneous population of hESCs and hepatocellular carcinoma cells (HepG2) deliberately mixed respectively at different ratios (10:90, 20:80, 30:70, 40:60 and 50:50) to mimic a standard in vitro differentiation protocol, instead of using a hESC-differentiated cell population, so that we could be sure of the actual number of cells separated. HES-3 and HES-4 cells were labelled in separate experiments for the stem cell markers SSEA-4 and TRA-1-60 using primary antibodies. Anti-PE magnetic microbeads that recognize the PE-conjugated SSEA-4 labelled hESCs was added to the heterogeneous cell mixture and passed through the MACS column. The cells that passed through the column ('flow-through' fraction) and those retained ('labelled' fraction') were subsequently analysed using FACS. The maximum efficacy of hESCs retention using MACS was 81.0 +/- 2.9% (HES-3) and 83.6 +/- 4.2% (HES-4). Using FACS, all the undifferentiated hESCs labelled with the two cell-surface markers could be removed by selective gating. Both hESCs and HepG2 cells in the 'flow-through' fraction following MACS separation were viable in culture whereas by FACS separation only the HepG2 cells were viable. FACS efficiently helps to eliminate the undifferentiated hESCs based on their cell-surface antigens expressed.

  15. Golgi sorting regulates organization and activity of GPI-proteins at apical membranes

    PubMed Central

    Tivodar, Simona; Formiggini, Fabio; Ossato, Giulia; Gratton, Enrico; Tramier, Marc; Coppey-Moisan, Maïté; Zurzolo, Chiara

    2014-01-01

    Here, we combined classical biochemistry with novel biophysical approaches to study with high spatial and temporal resolution the organization of GPI-anchored proteins (GPI-APs) at the plasma membrane of polarized epithelial cells. We show that in polarized MDCK cells, following sorting in the Golgi, each GPI-AP reaches the apical surface in homo-clusters. Golgi-derived homo-clusters are required for their subsequent plasma membrane organization into cholesterol-dependent hetero-clusters. By contrast, in non-polarized MDCK cells GPI-APs are delivered to the surface as monomers in an unpolarized manner and are not able to form hetero-clusters. We further demonstrate that this GPI-AP organization is regulated by the content of cholesterol in the Golgi apparatus and is required to maintain the functional state of the protein at the apical membrane. Thus, different from fibroblasts, in polarized epithelial cells a selective cholesterol-dependent sorting mechanism in the Golgi regulates both the organization and the function of GPI-APs at the apical surface. PMID:24681536

  16. Playing the Smart Card.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zuzack, Christine A.

    1997-01-01

    Enhanced magnetic strip cards and "smart cards" offer varied service options to college students. Enhanced magnetic strip cards serve as cash cards and provide access to services. Smart cards, which resemble credit cards but contain a microchip, can be used as phone cards, bus passes, library cards, admission tickets, point-of-sale debit…

  17. Magnetic-activated cell sorting (MACS) significantly decreases the hybridization efficiency of fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH).

    PubMed

    Kuo, P L; Guo, H R

    2001-05-01

    Fetal cells were enriched from maternal blood using density gradient centrifugation of Histopaque followed by magnetic-activated cell sorting (MACS) to select CD71-positive cells. For each specimen, cells partially purified by Histopaque were split into equal portions, and each portion was subjected to purification by MACS in parallel. Cells before and after MACS were subjected to dual-color fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) analysis with X- and Y-chromosome-specific probes. We found that the hybridization rates were decreased by approximately 10% after MACS based on duplicated analysis for each sample.

  18. Optical painting and fluorescence activated sorting of single adherent cells labelled with photoswitchable Pdots

    PubMed Central

    Kuo, Chun-Ting; Thompson, Alison M.; Gallina, Maria Elena; Ye, Fangmao; Johnson, Eleanor S.; Sun, Wei; Zhao, Mengxia; Yu, Jiangbo; Wu, I-Che; Fujimoto, Bryant; DuFort, Christopher C.; Carlson, Markus A.; Hingorani, Sunil R.; Paguirigan, Amy L.; Radich, Jerald P.; Chiu, Daniel T.

    2016-01-01

    The efficient selection and isolation of individual cells of interest from a mixed population is desired in many biomedical and clinical applications. Here we show the concept of using photoswitchable semiconducting polymer dots (Pdots) as an optical ‘painting' tool, which enables the selection of certain adherent cells based on their fluorescence, and their spatial and morphological features, under a microscope. We first develop a Pdot that can switch between the bright (ON) and dark (OFF) states reversibly with a 150-fold contrast ratio on irradiation with ultraviolet or red light. With a focused 633-nm laser beam that acts as a ‘paintbrush' and the photoswitchable Pdots as the ‘paint', we select and ‘paint' individual Pdot-labelled adherent cells by turning on their fluorescence, then proceed to sort and recover the optically marked cells (with 90% recovery and near 100% purity), followed by genetic analysis. PMID:27118210

  19. A fluorescence-activated cell sorting-based strategy for rapid isolation of high-lipid Chlamydomonas mutants.

    PubMed

    Terashima, Mia; Freeman, Elizabeth S; Jinkerson, Robert E; Jonikas, Martin C

    2015-01-01

    There is significant interest in farming algae for the direct production of biofuels and valuable lipids. Chlamydomonas reinhardtii is the leading model system for studying lipid metabolism in green algae, but current methods for isolating mutants of this organism with a perturbed lipid content are slow and tedious. Here, we present the Chlamydomonas high-lipid sorting (CHiLiS) strategy, which enables enrichment of high-lipid mutants by fluorescence-activated cell sorting (FACS) of pooled mutants stained with the lipid-sensitive dye Nile Red. This method only takes 5 weeks from mutagenesis to mutant isolation. We developed a staining protocol that allows quantification of lipid content while preserving cell viability. We improved separation of high-lipid mutants from the wild type by using each cell's chlorophyll fluorescence as an internal control. We initially demonstrated 20-fold enrichment of the known high-lipid mutant sta1 from a mixture of sta1 and wild-type cells. We then applied CHiLiS to sort thousands of high-lipid cells from a pool of about 60,000 mutants. Flow cytometry analysis of 24 individual mutants isolated by this approach revealed that about 50% showed a reproducible high-lipid phenotype. We further characterized nine of the mutants with the highest lipid content by flame ionization detection and mass spectrometry lipidomics. All mutants analyzed had a higher triacylglycerol content and perturbed whole-cell fatty acid composition. One arbitrarily chosen mutant was evaluated by microscopy, revealing larger lipid droplets than the wild type. The unprecedented throughput of CHiLiS opens the door to a systems-level understanding of green algal lipid biology by enabling genome-saturating isolation of mutants in key genes.

  20. Endothelial cell high-enrichment from endovascular biopsy sample by laser capture microdissection and fluorescence activated cell sorting

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Zhengda; Su, Hua; Long, Brian; Sinclair, Elizabeth; Hetts, Steven W.; Higashida, Randall T.; Dowd, Christopher F.; Halbach, Van V.; Cooke, Daniel L.

    2015-01-01

    Background and purpose Endovascular sampling and characterization from patients can provide very useful information about the pathogenesis of different vascular diseases, but it has been limited by the lack of an effective method of endothelial cell (EC) enrichment. We optimized the EC yield and enrichment from conventional guide wires by laser capture microdissection (LCM) and fluorescence activated cell sorting (FACS) technique, and addressed the feasibility of using these enriched ECs for downstream gene expression detection. Methods Iliac artery endovascular samples from 10 patients undergoing routine catheter angiography were collected using conventional 0.038 in. J-shape guide wires. Each of these samples was equally divided into two parts, which were respectively used for EC enrichment by immunocytochemistry-coupled LCM or multiple color FACS. After RNA extraction and reverse transcription, the amplified cDNA was used for quantitative polymerase chain reaction (qPCR). Results Fixed ECs, with positive CD31 or vWF fluorescent signal and endothelial like nucleus, were successfully separated by LCM and live single ECs were sorted on FACS by a seven color staining panel. EC yields by LCM and FACS were 51 ± 22 and 149 ± 56 respectively (P < 0.001). The minimum number of fixed ECs from ICC-coupled LCM for acceptable qPCR results of endothelial marker genes was 30, while acceptable qPCR results as enriched by FACS were attainable from a single live EC. Conclusion Both LCM and FACS can be used to enrich ECs from conventional guide wires and the enriched ECs can be used for downstream gene expression detection. FACS generated a higher EC yield and the sorted live ECs may be used for single cell gene expression detection. PMID:25450638

  1. Lymphomagenic CARD11/BCL10/MALT1 signaling drives malignant B-cell proliferation via cooperative NF-κB and JNK activation.

    PubMed

    Knies, Nathalie; Alankus, Begüm; Weilemann, Andre; Tzankov, Alexandar; Brunner, Kristina; Ruff, Tanja; Kremer, Marcus; Keller, Ulrich B; Lenz, Georg; Ruland, Jürgen

    2015-12-29

    The aggressive activated B cell-like subtype of diffuse large B-cell lymphoma is characterized by aberrant B-cell receptor (BCR) signaling and constitutive nuclear factor kappa-B (NF-κB) activation, which is required for tumor cell survival. BCR-induced NF-κB activation requires caspase recruitment domain-containing protein 11 (CARD11), and CARD11 gain-of-function mutations are recurrently detected in human diffuse large B-cell lymphoma (DLBCL). To investigate the consequences of dysregulated CARD11 signaling in vivo, we generated mice that conditionally express the human DLBCL-derived CARD11(L225LI) mutant. Surprisingly, CARD11(L225LI) was sufficient to trigger aggressive B-cell lymphoproliferation, leading to early postnatal lethality. CARD11(L225LI) constitutively associated with B-cell CLL/lymphoma 10 (BCL10) and mucosa-associated lymphoid tissue lymphoma translocation gene 1 (MALT1) to simultaneously activate the NF-κB and c-Jun N-terminal kinase (JNK) signaling cascades. Genetic deficiencies of either BCL10 or MALT1 completely rescued the phenotype, and pharmacological inhibition of JNK was, similar to NF-κB blockage, toxic to autonomously proliferating CARD11(L225LI)-expressing B cells. Moreover, constitutive JNK activity was observed in primary human activated B cell-like (ABC)-DLBCL specimens, and human ABC-DLBCL cells were also sensitive to JNK inhibitors. Thus, our results demonstrate that enforced activation of CARD11/BCL10/MALT1 signaling is sufficient to drive transformed B-cell expansion in vivo and identify the JNK pathway as a therapeutic target for ABC-DLBCL.

  2. 78 FR 37561 - Extension of Agency Information Collection Activity Under OMB Review: TSA Customer Comment Card

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-06-21

    ... collection allows customers to provide feedback to TSA about their experiences with TSA's airport security... OMB Review: TSA Customer Comment Card AGENCY: Transportation Security Administration, DHS. ACTION: 30... forwarded the Information Collection Request (ICR), Office of Management and Budget (OMB) control...

  3. Relationships among Information Search Activities When Shopping for a Credit Card.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lee, Jinkook; Hogarth, Jeanne M.

    2000-01-01

    Researchers examined consumer behavior regarding types and numbers of information sources consulted about credit cards and comparison of terms. Results showed that consumers have diverse patterns of information searching that cannot be captured by a global measure or a few single measures of search and strong interdependencies among some search…

  4. Response Cards: A Proven Method for Producing Active Student Engagement during Math Instruction

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cipani, Ennio

    2007-01-01

    This article presents an instructional delivery method, termed response cards, that has received empirical validation in several studies. With various federal and state mandates and measures of accountability, schools are under increasing pressure to use methods that have received validation of their effectiveness in research studies. Response…

  5. Hyper InterActive CAI: Using HyperCard To Develop Computer-Assisted Instruction.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Desberg, Peter

    This hands-on guide shows readers how to use HyperCard software to create instructional programs on the Macintosh computer. The book describes how to choose subject matter, design a program, and determine the method of presentation, including the type of interaction and guiding metaphors that will be used. It explains how to make programs easy for…

  6. Sorting choanoflagellates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marconi, Veronica I.; Miño, Gaston L.; Sparacino, Javier; Banchio, Adolfo J.; Condat, Carlos A.; Koehl, Mimi A. R.; King, Nicole; Stocker, Roman

    2015-03-01

    In freshwater environments, as well as in oceans, environmental conditions are in constant fluctuation. Some heterotrophic plankton must adapt their swimming behavior in order to survive under these conditions. In the case of the choanoflagellate, the closest animal ancestor, the ability to forage for food is given not only by its single flagellum, but also by its differentiation between fast and slow swimmers. The understanding of how these cells with different strategies to swim search for food can give us a better insight into how eukaryotes respond to different stimuli. In this work, we have designed a microfluidic device that sorts choanoflagellates by their speed. The optimal geometry was found by a numerical model using the experimentally determined motilities of each swimmer type.

  7. Precise quantification of cellular uptake of cell-penetrating peptides using fluorescence-activated cell sorting and fluorescence correlation spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Rezgui, Rachid; Blumer, Katy; Yeoh-Tan, Gilbert; Trexler, Adam J; Magzoub, Mazin

    2016-07-01

    Cell-penetrating peptides (CPPs) have emerged as a potentially powerful tool for drug delivery due to their ability to efficiently transport a whole host of biologically active cargoes into cells. Although concerted efforts have shed some light on the cellular internalization pathways of CPPs, quantification of CPP uptake has proved problematic. Here we describe an experimental approach that combines two powerful biophysical techniques, fluorescence-activated cell sorting (FACS) and fluorescence correlation spectroscopy (FCS), to directly, accurately and precisely measure the cellular uptake of fluorescently-labeled molecules. This rapid and technically simple approach is highly versatile and can readily be applied to characterize all major CPP properties that normally require multiple assays, including amount taken up by cells (in moles/cell), uptake efficiency, internalization pathways, intracellular distribution, intracellular degradation and toxicity threshold. The FACS-FCS approach provides a means for quantifying any intracellular biochemical entity, whether expressed in the cell or introduced exogenously and transported across the plasma membrane.

  8. GPCR sorting at multivesicular endosomes.

    PubMed

    Dores, Michael Robert; Trejo, JoAnn

    2015-01-01

    The lysosomal degradation of G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) is essential for receptor signaling and down regulation. Once internalized, GPCRs are sorted within the endocytic pathway and packaged into intraluminal vesicles (ILVs) that bud inward to form the multivesicular endosome (MVE). The mechanisms that control GPCR sorting and ILV formation are poorly understood. Quantitative strategies are important for evaluating the function of adaptor and scaffold proteins that regulate sorting of GPCRs at MVEs. In this chapter, we outline two strategies for the quantification and visualization of GPCR sorting into the lumen of MVEs. The first protocol utilizes a biochemical approach to assay the sorting of GPCRs in a population of cells, whereas the second strategy examines GPCR sorting in individual cells using immunofluorescence confocal microscopy. Combined, these assays can be used to establish the kinetics of activated GPCR lysosomal trafficking in response to specific ligands, as well as evaluate the contribution of endosomal adaptors to GPCR sorting at MVEs. The protocols presented in this chapter can be adapted to analyze GPCR sorting in a myriad of cell types and tissues, and expanded to analyze the mechanisms that regulate MVE sorting of other cargoes.

  9. Isolation of circulating tumor cells by immunomagnetic enrichment and fluorescence-activated cell sorting (IE/FACS) for molecular profiling.

    PubMed

    Magbanua, Mark Jesus M; Park, John W

    2013-12-01

    Circulating tumor cells (CTCs) are cells shed by the primary tumor into the blood stream capable of initiating distant metastasis. In the past decade, numerous assays have been developed to reliably detect these extremely rare cells. However, methods for purification of CTCs with little or no contamination of normal blood cells for molecular profiling are limited. We have developed a novel protocol to isolate CTCs by combining immunomagnetic enrichment and fluorescence-activated cell sorting (IE/FACS). The two-part assay includes (1) immunomagnetic capture using magnetic beads conjugated to monoclonal antibody against an epithelial cell adhesion marker (EpCAM) to enrich for tumor cells; and (2) FACS analysis using EpCAM to purify tumor cells away from mononuclear cells of hematopoietic lineage. Downstream molecular analyses of single and pooled cells confirmed the isolation of highly pure CTCs with characteristics typical that of malignant cells.

  10. Comparative analysis of mitosis-specific antibodies for bulk purification of mitotic populations by fluorescence-activated cell sorting.

    PubMed

    Campbell, Amy E; Hsiung, Chris C-S; Blobel, Gerd A

    2014-01-01

    Mitosis entails complex chromatin changes that have garnered increasing interest from biologists who study genome structure and regulation-fields that are being advanced by high-throughput sequencing (Seq) technologies. The application of these technologies to study the mitotic genome requires large numbers of highly pure mitotic cells, with minimal contamination from interphase cells, to ensure accurate measurement of phenomena specific to mitosis. Here, we optimized a fluorescence-activated cell sorting (FACS)-based method for isolating formaldehyde-fixed mitotic cells--at virtually 100% mitotic purity and in quantities sufficient for high-throughput genomic studies. We compared several commercially available antibodies that react with mitosis-specific epitopes over a range of concentrations and cell numbers, finding antibody MPM2 to be the most robust and cost-effective.

  11. Derivation of sorting programs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Varghese, Joseph; Loganantharaj, Rasiah

    1990-01-01

    Program synthesis for critical applications has become a viable alternative to program verification. Nested resolution and its extension are used to synthesize a set of sorting programs from their first order logic specifications. A set of sorting programs, such as, naive sort, merge sort, and insertion sort, were successfully synthesized starting from the same set of specifications.

  12. IR Cards: Inquiry-Based Introduction to Infrared Spectroscopy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bennett, Jacqueline; Forster, Tabetha

    2010-01-01

    As infrared spectroscopy (IR) is frequently used in undergraduate organic chemistry courses, an inductive introduction to IR spectroscopy that uses index cards printed with spectra, structures, and chemical names is described. Groups of students are given an alphabetized deck of these "IR cards" to sort into functional groups. The students then…

  13. A model of knowledge translation in health: the Active Healthy Kids Canada Report Card on physical activity for children and youth.

    PubMed

    Colley, Rachel C; Brownrigg, Michelle; Tremblay, Mark S

    2012-05-01

    The health of Canadian children and youth has deteriorated in the past few decades and physical inactivity is a powerful contributor. Active Healthy Kids Canada (AHKC; www.activehealthykids.ca) is a national not-for-profit organization with a mission to inspire the nation to engage all children and youth in physical activity by providing expertise and direction to policy makers and the public on how to increase and effectively allocate resources and attention toward physical activity for Canadian children and youth. Annually, for the past 7 years, the AHKC Report Card has consolidated and translated research knowledge to drive social action for policy change relating to physical activity among children and youth. Original published articles and key surveillance data from national and regional surveys are reviewed. A group of content experts from across Canada meet semiannually to review the evidence and assign letter grades. The AHKC Report Card has played a key role in informing discussions that have led to action on physical inactivity in Canada. Further evidence of the Report Card's influence is in the replication of the model in several other jurisdictions, including Saskatchewan and Ontario, Canada; Louisiana, United States; South Africa; Mexico; and Kenya.

  14. Evaluation of the Geotech Smart24 data acquisition system with active Fortezza crypto card data signing and authentication.

    SciTech Connect

    Hart, Darren M.

    2008-05-01

    Sandia National Laboratories has tested and evaluated Geotech Smart24 data acquisition system with active Fortezza crypto card data signing and authentication. The test results included in this report were in response to static and tonal-dynamic input signals. Most test methodologies used were based on IEEE Standards 1057 for Digitizing Waveform Recorders and 1241 for Analog to Digital Converters; others were designed by Sandia specifically for infrasound application evaluation and for supplementary criteria not addressed in the IEEE standards. The objective of this work was to evaluate the overall technical performance of the Geotech Smart24 digitizer with a Fortezza PCMCIA crypto card actively implementing the signing of data packets. The results of this evaluation were compared to relevant specifications provided within manufacturer's documentation notes. The tests performed were chosen to demonstrate different performance aspects of the digitizer under test. The performance aspects tested include determining noise floor, least significant bit (LSB), dynamic range, cross-talk, relative channel-to-channel timing, time-tag accuracy, analog bandwidth and calibrator performance.

  15. Spike sorting of muscle spindle afferent nerve activity recorded with thin-film intrafascicular electrodes.

    PubMed

    Djilas, Milan; Azevedo-Coste, Christine; Guiraud, David; Yoshida, Ken

    2010-01-01

    Afferent muscle spindle activity in response to passive muscle stretch was recorded in vivo using thin-film longitudinal intrafascicular electrodes. A neural spike detection and classification scheme was developed for the purpose of separating activity of primary and secondary muscle spindle afferents. The algorithm is based on the multiscale continuous wavelet transform using complex wavelets. The detection scheme outperforms the commonly used threshold detection, especially with recordings having low signal-to-noise ratio. Results of classification of units indicate that the developed classifier is able to isolate activity having linear relationship with muscle length, which is a step towards online model-based estimation of muscle length that can be used in a closed-loop functional electrical stimulation system with natural sensory feedback.

  16. Word Sorts for General Music Classes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cardany, Audrey Berger

    2015-01-01

    Word sorts are standard practice for aiding children in acquiring skills in English language arts. When included in the general music classroom, word sorts may aid students in acquiring a working knowledge of music vocabulary. The author shares a word sort activity drawn from vocabulary in John Lithgow's children's book "Never Play…

  17. How Many Cards? Let's Ask the LCM.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zerger, Monte J.

    1996-01-01

    Describes an activity in which students deal a deck of cards to 5, then 4, then 3, then 2 players; note the number of cards left over each time; and from this information determine the number of cards in the deck. (MKR)

  18. Current activities of CARD as an international core center for mouse resources.

    PubMed

    Nakagata, Naomi; Yamamura, Ken-Ichi

    2009-07-01

    The Center for Animal Resources and Development (CARD), Institute of Resource Development and Analysis, Kumamoto University was established in 1998 based on recommendations published in the report "Preservation, Supply and Development of Genetically Engineered Animals" by the Ministry of Education, Culture, Sports, Science and Technology. We provide a comprehensive and integrated set of research services designed for the mouse-based biological research community. All services are conducted in accordance with the highest standards of animal health and genetic quality and are delivered to meet researcher's research goals. To promote biological sciences worldwide, we produce genetically engineered mice and exchangeable gene trap ES clones, cryopreserve mouse embryos and sperm, supply these resources, organize training courses to educate people, and form a hub of the domestic and international networks of both mutagenesis and resource centers. Up to now, we have produced more than 600 genetically engineered mouse strains and have more than 1,100 strains and stocks of mice for supply to the scientific community. More than 150 studies using genetically engineered mice produced or supplied by CARD have been published so far. As a founding member of the Federation of International Mouse Resources, the Asian Mouse Mutagenesis and Resource Association, and the International Gene Trap Consortium, we are contributing to the promotion of biological sciences in the world.

  19. New strategy for rapid isolation of stable cell lines from DNA-transformed insect cells using fluorescence activated cell-sorting.

    PubMed

    Kato, Tatsuya; Yoshizuka, Kengo; Park, Enoch Y

    2010-05-17

    A stably transformed insect cell expression system is superior to a baculovirus expression system, since the expression system is sustained and there is no cell lysis, but the isolation of cell lines producing recombinant proteins is time-consuming and laborious. In this study, we developed a technique for the rapid isolation and efficient cultivation of sorted cells in a 24 well deep plate Bioshaker, utilizing the fluorescence activated cell-sorting (FACS) method. TnpXme11 cells, which stably expressed GFP(uv)-beta1,3-N-acetylglucosaminyltransferase2 (GGT2), were transfected with a plasmid vector for the expression of a molecular chaperone (TnpXme11-hCNX6 cell line). The expression levels of GGT2 and the molecular chaperone fused with HcRed were analyzed by FACS. Two cell lines were established by single and double sorting. Sorting of the top 10% of the TnpXme11-hCNX6 cell population with the highest fluorescence yielded the TnpXme11-hCNX6-1 cell line. TnpXme11-hCNX6-2 cells were created in a similar fashion, as mentioned above, by a second sorting of the top 10% of the TnpXme11-hCNX6-1 cell population with the highest fluorescence. The cells thus isolated produced approximately 2-fold higher extracellular activity than that before cell sorting. This procedure can be accomplished in only 2 weeks, including transfection, isolation and analysis of high protein-producing cells, and is a breakthrough strategy for the rapid isolation of a recombinant, stable insect cell line.

  20. Directed evolution of an orthogonal nucleoside analog kinase via fluorescence-activated cell sorting.

    PubMed

    Liu, Lingfeng; Li, Yongfeng; Liotta, Dennis; Lutz, Stefan

    2009-07-01

    Nucleoside analogs (NAs) represent an important category of prodrugs for the treatment of viral infections and cancer, yet the biological potency of many analogs is compromised by their inefficient activation through cellular 2'-deoxyribonucleoside kinases (dNKs). We herein report the directed evolution and characterization of an orthogonal NA kinase for 3'-deoxythymidine (ddT), using a new FACS-based screening protocol in combination with a fluorescent analog of ddT. Four rounds of random mutagenesis and DNA shuffling of Drosophila melanogaster 2'-deoxynucleoside kinase, followed by FACS analysis, yielded an orthogonal ddT kinase with a 6-fold higher activity for the NA and a 20-fold k(cat)/K(M) preference for ddT over thymidine, an overall 10,000-fold change in substrate specificity. The contributions of individual amino acid substitutions in the ddT kinase were evaluated by reverse engineering, enabling a detailed structure-function analysis to rationalize the observed changes in performance. Based on our results, kinase engineering with fluorescent NAs and FACS should prove a highly versatile method for evolving selective kinase:NA pairs and for studying fundamental aspects of the structure-function relationship in dNKs.

  1. Design of a Microfluidic Chip for Magnetic-Activated Sorting of One-Bead-One-Compound Libraries.

    PubMed

    Cho, Choi-Fong; Lee, Kyungheon; Speranza, Maria-Carmela; Bononi, Fernanda C; Viapiano, Mariano S; Luyt, Leonard G; Weissleder, Ralph; Chiocca, E Antonio; Lee, Hakho; Lawler, Sean E

    2016-06-13

    Molecular targeting using ligands specific to disease markers has shown great promise for early detection and directed therapy. Bead-based combinatorial libraries have served as powerful tools for the discovery of novel targeting agents. Screening platforms employing magnetic capture have been used to achieve rapid and efficient identification of high-affinity ligands from one-bead-one-compound (OBOC) libraries. Traditional manual methodologies to isolate magnetized "hit" beads are tedious and lack accuracy, and existing instruments to expedite bead sorting tend to be costly and complex. Here, we describe the design and construction of a simple and inexpensive microfluidic magnetic sorting device using standard photolithography and soft lithography approaches to facilitate high-throughput isolation of magnetized positive hit beads from combinatorial libraries. We have demonstrated that the device is able to sort magnetized beads with superior accuracy compared to conventional manual sorting approaches. This chip offers a very convenient yet inexpensive alternative for screening OBOC libraries.

  2. Starting Right: Using "Biophilia," Organism Cards, & Key Themes in Biology to Introduce Student-Centered Active-Learning Strategies at the Beginning of a Course

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Metzger, Kelsey

    2013-01-01

    To create rich learning experiences, it is important to engage students from the very beginning of a course and lay the foundation for constructing a community of active learners. The activities described here using "organism cards" connect students' previous knowledge to course goals and address key themes in biology while initiating…

  3. Opposing Activities of the Snx3-Retromer Complex and ESCRT Proteins Mediate Regulated Cargo Sorting at a Common Endosome

    PubMed Central

    Strochlic, Todd I.; Schmiedekamp, Briana C.; Lee, Jacqueline; Katzmann, David J.

    2008-01-01

    Endocytosed proteins are either delivered to the lysosome to be degraded or are exported from the endosomal system and delivered to other organelles. Sorting of the Saccharomyces cerevisiae reductive iron transporter, composed of the Fet3 and Ftr1 proteins, in the endosomal system is regulated by available iron; in iron-starved cells, Fet3-Ftr1 is sorted by Snx3/Grd19 and retromer into a recycling pathway that delivers it back to the plasma membrane, but when starved cells are exposed to iron, Fet3-Ftr1 is targeted to the lysosome-like vacuole and is degraded. We report that iron-induced endocytosis of Fet3-Ftr1 is independent of Fet3-Ftr1 ubiquitylation, and after endocytosis, degradation of Fet3-Ftr1 is mediated by the multivesicular body (MVB) sorting pathway. In mutant cells lacking any component of the ESCRT protein-dependent MVB sorting machinery, the Rsp5 ubiquitin ligase, or in wild-type cells expressing Fet3-Ftr1 lacking cytosolic lysyl ubiquitin acceptor sites, Fet3-Ftr1 is constitutively sorted into the recycling pathway independent of iron status. In the presence and absence of iron, Fet3-Ftr1 transits an endosomal compartment where a subunit of the MVB sorting receptor (Vps27), Snx3/Grd19, and retromer proteins colocalize. We propose that this endosome is where Rsp5 ubiquitylates Fet3-Ftr1 and where the recycling and degradative pathways diverge. PMID:18768754

  4. Generation of iPSCs as a Pooled Culture Using Magnetic Activated Cell Sorting of Newly Reprogrammed Cells.

    PubMed

    Yang, Wenli; Liu, Ying; Slovik, Katherine J; Wu, Joseph C; Duncan, Stephen A; Rader, Daniel J; Morrisey, Edward E

    2015-01-01

    Although significant advancement has been made in the induced pluripotent stem cell (iPSC) field, current methods for iPSC derivation are labor intensive and costly. These methods involve manual selection, expansion, and characterization of multiple clones for each reprogrammed cell sample and therefore significantly hampers the feasibility of studies where a large number of iPSCs need to be derived. To develop higher throughput iPSC reprogramming methods, we generated iPSCs as a pooled culture using rigorous cell surface pluripotent marker selection with TRA-1-60 or SSEA4 antibodies followed by Magnetic Activated Cell Sorting (MACS). We observed that pool-selected cells are similar or identical to clonally derived iPSC lines from the same donor by all criteria examined, including stable expression of endogenous pluripotency genes, normal karyotype, loss of exogenous reprogramming factors, and in vitro spontaneous and lineage directed differentiation potential. This strategy can be generalized for iPSC generation using both integrating and non-integrating reprogramming methods. Our studies provide an attractive alternative to clonal derivation of iPSCs using rigorously selected cell pools and is amenable to automation.

  5. Analysis of C. elegans intestinal gene expression and polyadenylation by fluorescence-activated nuclei sorting and 3'-end-seq.

    PubMed

    Haenni, Simon; Ji, Zhe; Hoque, Mainul; Rust, Nigel; Sharpe, Helen; Eberhard, Ralf; Browne, Cathy; Hengartner, Michael O; Mellor, Jane; Tian, Bin; Furger, André

    2012-07-01

    Despite the many advantages of Caenorhabditis elegans, biochemical approaches to study tissue-specific gene expression in post-embryonic stages are challenging. Here, we report a novel experimental approach for efficient determination of tissue-specific transcriptomes involving the rapid release and purification of nuclei from major tissues of post-embryonic animals by fluorescence-activated nuclei sorting (FANS), followed by deep sequencing of linearly amplified 3'-end regions of transcripts (3'-end-seq). We employed these approaches to compile the transcriptome of the developed C. elegans intestine and used this to analyse tissue-specific cleavage and polyadenylation. In agreement with intestinal-specific gene expression, highly expressed genes have enriched GATA-elements in their promoter regions and their functional properties are associated with processes that are characteristic for the intestine. We systematically mapped pre-mRNA cleavage and polyadenylation sites, or polyA sites, including more than 3000 sites that have previously not been identified. The detailed analysis of the 3'-ends of the nuclear mRNA revealed widespread alternative polyA site use (APA) in intestinally expressed genes. Importantly, we found that intestinal polyA sites that undergo APA tend to have U-rich and/or A-rich upstream auxiliary elements that may contribute to the regulation of 3'-end formation in the intestine.

  6. Toward label-free Raman-activated cell sorting of cardiomyocytes derived from human embryonic stem cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pascut, Flavius C.; Goh, Huey T.; George, Vinoj; Denning, Chris; Notingher, Ioan

    2011-04-01

    Raman micro-spectroscopy (RMS) has been recently proposed for label-free phenotypic identification of human embryonic stem cells (hESC)-derived cardiomyocytes. However, the methods used for measuring the Raman spectra led to acquisition times of minutes per cell, which is prohibitive for rapid cell sorting applications. In this study we evaluated two measurement strategies that could reduce the measurement time by a factor of more than 100. We show that sampling individual cells with a laser beam focused to a line could eliminate the need of cell raster scanning and achieve high prediction accuracies (>95% specificity and >96% sensitivity) with acquisition times ~5 seconds per cell. However, the use of commercially-available higher power lasers could potentially lead to sorting speeds of ~10 cells per s. This would start to progress RMS to the field of cell sorting for applications such as enrichment and purification of hESC-derived cardiomyocytes.

  7. Campus Card Tricks.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fickes, Michael

    1999-01-01

    Examines the development of an innovative student identification card system that includes off-campus banking and credit card functions. Finding solutions to bank objections, credit card company rule problems, and software difficulties are discussed. (GR)

  8. A multicenter study to standardize reporting and analyses of fluorescence-activated cell-sorted murine intestinal epithelial cells

    PubMed Central

    Magness, Scott T.; Puthoff, Brent J.; Crissey, Mary Ann; Dunn, James; Henning, Susan J.; Houchen, Courtney; Kaddis, John S.; Kuo, Calvin J.; Li, Linheng; Lynch, John; Martin, Martin G.; May, Randal; Niland, Joyce C.; Olack, Barbara; Qian, Dajun; Stelzner, Matthias; Swain, John R.; Wang, Fengchao; Wang, Jiafang; Wang, Xinwei; Yan, Kelley; Yu, Jian

    2013-01-01

    Fluorescence-activated cell sorting (FACS) is an essential tool for studies requiring isolation of distinct intestinal epithelial cell populations. Inconsistent or lack of reporting of the critical parameters associated with FACS methodologies has complicated interpretation, comparison, and reproduction of important findings. To address this problem a comprehensive multicenter study was designed to develop guidelines that limit experimental and data reporting variability and provide a foundation for accurate comparison of data between studies. Common methodologies and data reporting protocols for tissue dissociation, cell yield, cell viability, FACS, and postsort purity were established. Seven centers tested the standardized methods by FACS-isolating a specific crypt-based epithelial population (EpCAM+/CD44+) from murine small intestine. Genetic biomarkers for stem/progenitor (Lgr5 and Atoh 1) and differentiated cell lineages (lysozyme, mucin2, chromogranin A, and sucrase isomaltase) were interrogated in target and control populations to assess intra- and intercenter variability. Wilcoxon's rank sum test on gene expression levels showed limited intracenter variability between biological replicates. Principal component analysis demonstrated significant intercenter reproducibility among four centers. Analysis of data collected by standardized cell isolation methods and data reporting requirements readily identified methodological problems, indicating that standard reporting parameters facilitate post hoc error identification. These results indicate that the complexity of FACS isolation of target intestinal epithelial populations can be highly reproducible between biological replicates and different institutions by adherence to common cell isolation methods and FACS gating strategies. This study can be considered a foundation for continued method development and a starting point for investigators that are developing cell isolation expertise to study physiology and

  9. Using fluorescence activated cell sorting to examine cell-type-specific gene expression in rat brain tissue.

    PubMed

    Schwarz, Jaclyn M

    2015-05-28

    The brain is comprised of four primary cell types including neurons, astrocytes, microglia and oligodendrocytes. Though they are not the most abundant cell type in the brain, neurons are the most widely studied of these cell types given their direct role in impacting behaviors. Other cell types in the brain also impact neuronal function and behavior via the signaling molecules they produce. Neuroscientists must understand the interactions between the cell types in the brain to better understand how these interactions impact neural function and disease. To date, the most common method of analyzing protein or gene expression utilizes the homogenization of whole tissue samples, usually with blood, and without regard for cell type. This approach is an informative approach for examining general changes in gene or protein expression that may influence neural function and behavior; however, this method of analysis does not lend itself to a greater understanding of cell-type-specific gene expression and the effect of cell-to-cell communication on neural function. Analysis of behavioral epigenetics has been an area of growing focus which examines how modifications of the deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) structure impact long-term gene expression and behavior; however, this information may only be relevant if analyzed in a cell-type-specific manner given the differential lineage and thus epigenetic markers that may be present on certain genes of individual neural cell types. The Fluorescence Activated Cell Sorting (FACS) technique described below provides a simple and effective way to isolate individual neural cells for the subsequent analysis of gene expression, protein expression, or epigenetic modifications of DNA. This technique can also be modified to isolate more specific neural cell types in the brain for subsequent cell-type-specific analysis.

  10. Inhibiting CARD11 translation during BCR activation by targeting the eIF4A RNA helicase.

    PubMed

    Steinhardt, James J; Peroutka, Raymond J; Mazan-Mamczarz, Krystyna; Chen, Qing; Houng, Simone; Robles, Carol; Barth, Rolf N; DuBose, Joseph; Bruns, Brandon; Tesoriero, Ronald; Stein, Deborah; Fang, Raymond; Hanna, Nader; Pasley, Jason; Rodriguez, Carlos; Kligman, Mark D; Bradley, Matthew; Rabin, Joseph; Shackelford, Stacy; Dai, Bojie; Landon, Ari L; Scalea, Thomas; Livak, Ferenc; Gartenhaus, Ronald B

    2014-12-11

    Human diffuse large B-cell lymphomas (DLBCLs) often aberrantly express oncogenes that generally contain complex secondary structures in their 5' untranslated region (UTR). Oncogenes with complex 5'UTRs require enhanced eIF4A RNA helicase activity for translation. PDCD4 inhibits eIF4A, and PDCD4 knockout mice have a high penetrance for B-cell lymphomas. Here, we show that on B-cell receptor (BCR)-mediated p70s6K activation, PDCD4 is degraded, and eIF4A activity is greatly enhanced. We identified a subset of genes involved in BCR signaling, including CARD11, BCL10, and MALT1, that have complex 5'UTRs and encode proteins with short half-lives. Expression of these known oncogenic proteins is enhanced on BCR activation and is attenuated by the eIF4A inhibitor Silvestrol. Antigen-experienced immunoglobulin (Ig)G(+) splenic B cells, from which most DLBCLs are derived, have higher levels of eIF4A cap-binding activity and protein translation than IgM(+) B cells. Our results suggest that eIF4A-mediated enhancement of oncogene translation may be a critical component for lymphoma progression, and specific targeting of eIF4A may be an attractive therapeutic approach in the management of human B-cell lymphomas.

  11. Synergistic activity of Card11 mutant and Bcl6 in the development of diffuse large B-cell lymphoma in a mouse model.

    PubMed

    Takahara, Taishi; Matsuo, Keitaro; Seto, Masao; Nakamura, Shigeo; Tsuzuki, Shinobu

    2016-11-01

    Diffuse large B-cell lymphoma (DLBCL) is the most common subtype of malignant lymphoma; it derives from germinal center B cells. Although DLBCL harbors many genetic alterations, synergistic roles between such alterations in the development of lymphoma are largely undefined. We previously established a mouse model of lymphoma by transplanting gene-transduced germinal center B cells into mice. Here, we chose one of the frequently mutated genes in DLBCL, Card11 mutant, to explore its possible synergy with other genes, using our lymphoma model. Given that BCL6 and BCL2 expression and/or function are often deregulated in human lymphoma, we examined the possible synergy between Card11, Bcl6, and Bcl2. Germinal center B cells were induced in vitro, transduced with Card11 mutant, Bcl6, and Bcl2, and transplanted. Mice rapidly developed lymphomas, with exogenously transduced Bcl2 being dispensable. Although some mice developed lymphoma in the absence of transduced Bcl6, the absence was compensated by elevated expression of endogenous Bcl6. Additionally, the synergy between Card11 mutant and Bcl6 in the development of lymphoma was confirmed by the fact that the combination of Card11 mutant and Bcl6 caused lymphoma or death significantly earlier and with higher penetrance than Card11 mutant or Bcl6 alone. Lymphoma cells expressed interferon regulatory factor 4 and PR domain 1, indicating their differentiation toward plasmablasts, which characterize activated B cell-like DLBCL that represents a clinically aggressive subtype in humans. Thus, our mouse model provides a versatile tool for studying the synergistic roles of altered genes underlying lymphoma development.

  12. Human mammalian cell sorting using a highly integrated micro-fabricated fluorescence-activated cell sorter (microFACS).

    PubMed

    Cho, Sung Hwan; Chen, Chun H; Tsai, Frank S; Godin, Jessica M; Lo, Yu-Hwa

    2010-06-21

    We demonstrate a high performance microfabricated FACS system with highly integrated microfluidics, optics, acoustics, and electronics. Single cell manipulation at a high speed is made possible by the fast response time (approximately 0.1 ms) of the integrated PZT actuator and the nozzle structure at the sorting junction. A Teflon AF-coated optofluidic waveguide along the microfluidic channel guides the illumination light, enabling multi-spot detection, while a novel space-time coding technology enhances the detection sensitivity of the microFACS system. The real-time control loop system is implemented using a field-programmable-gate-array (FPGA) for automated and accurate sorting. The microFACS achieves a high purification enrichment factor: up to approximately 230 fold for both polystyrene microbeads and suspended human mammalian cells (K562) at a high throughput (>1000 cells s(-1)). The sorting mechanism is independent of cell properties such as size, density, and shape, thus the presented system can be applied to sort out any pure sub-populations. This new lab-on-a-chip FACS system, therefore, holds promise to revolutionize microfluidic cytometers to meet cost, size, and performance goals.

  13. Moraxella catarrhalis induces CEACAM3‐Syk‐CARD9‐dependent activation of human granulocytes

    PubMed Central

    Heinrich, A.; Heyl, K.A.; Klaile, E.; Müller, M.M.; Klassert, T.E.; Wiessner, A.; Fischer, K.; Schumann, R.R.; Seifert, U.; Riesbeck, K.; Moter, A.; Singer, B.B.; Bachmann, S.

    2016-01-01

    Summary The human restricted pathogen Moraxella catarrhalis is an important causal agent for exacerbations in chronic obstructive lung disease in adults. In such patients, increased numbers of granulocytes are present in the airways, which correlate with bacteria‐induced exacerbations and severity of the disease. Our study investigated whether the interaction of M. catarrhalis with the human granulocyte‐specific carcinoembryonic antigen‐related cell adhesion molecule (CEACAM)‐3 is linked to NF‐κB activation, resulting in chemokine production. Granulocytes from healthy donors and NB4 cells were infected with M. catarrhalis in the presence of different inhibitors, blocking antibodies and siRNA. The supernatants were analysed by enzyme‐linked immunosorbent assay for chemokines. NF‐κB activation was determined using a luciferase reporter gene assay and chromatin‐immunoprecipitation. We found evidence that the specific engagement of CEACAM3 by M. catarrhalis ubiquitous surface protein A1 (UspA1) results in the activation of pro‐inflammatory events, such as degranulation of neutrophils, ROS production and chemokine secretion. The interaction of UspA1 with CEACAM3 induced the activation of the NF‐κB pathway via Syk and the CARD9 pathway and was dependent on the phosphorylation of the CEACAM3 ITAM‐like motif. These findings suggest that the CEACAM3 signalling in neutrophils is able to specifically modulate airway inflammation caused by infection with M. catarrhalis. PMID:27038042

  14. Identification of microbes from the surfaces of food-processing lines based on the flow cytometric evaluation of cellular metabolic activity combined with cell sorting.

    PubMed

    Juzwa, W; Duber, A; Myszka, K; Białas, W; Czaczyk, K

    2016-09-01

    In this study the design of a flow cytometry-based procedure to facilitate the detection of adherent bacteria from food-processing surfaces was evaluated. The measurement of the cellular redox potential (CRP) of microbial cells was combined with cell sorting for the identification of microorganisms. The procedure enhanced live/dead cell discrimination owing to the measurement of the cell physiology. The microbial contamination of the surface of a stainless steel conveyor used to process button mushrooms was evaluated in three independent experiments. The flow cytometry procedure provided a step towards monitoring of contamination and enabled the assessment of microbial food safety hazards by the discrimination of active, mid-active and non-active bacterial sub-populations based on determination of their cellular vitality and subsequently single cell sorting to isolate microbial strains from discriminated sub-populations. There was a significant correlation (r = 0.97; p < 0.05) between the bacterial cell count estimated by the pour plate method and flow cytometry, despite there being differences in the absolute number of cells detected. The combined approach of flow cytometric CRP measurement and cell sorting allowed an in situ analysis of microbial cell vitality and the identification of species from defined sub-populations, although the identified microbes were limited to culturable cells.

  15. Activating CARD14 Mutations Are Associated with Generalized Pustular Psoriasis but Rarely Account for Familial Recurrence in Psoriasis Vulgaris.

    PubMed

    Berki, Dorottya M; Liu, Lu; Choon, Siew-Eng; Burden, A David; Griffiths, Christopher E M; Navarini, Alexander A; Tan, Eugene S; Irvine, Alan D; Ranki, Annamari; Ogo, Takeshi; Petrof, Gabriela; Mahil, Satveer K; Duckworth, Michael; Allen, Michael H; Vito, Pasquale; Trembath, Richard C; McGrath, John; Smith, Catherine H; Capon, Francesca; Barker, Jonathan N

    2015-12-01

    Caspase recruitment family member 14 (CARD14, also known as CARMA2), is a scaffold protein that mediates NF-κB signal transduction in skin keratinocytes. Gain-of-function CARD14 mutations have been documented in familial forms of psoriasis vulgaris (PV) and pityriasis rubra pilaris (PRP). More recent investigations have also implicated CARD14 in the pathogenesis of pustular psoriasis. Follow-up studies, however, have been limited, so that it is not clear to what extent CARD14 alleles account for the above conditions. Here, we sought to address this question by carrying out a systematic CARD14 analysis in an extended patient cohort (n=416). We observed no disease alleles in subjects with familial PV (n=159), erythrodermic psoriasis (n=23), acral pustular psoriasis (n=100), or sporadic PRP (n=29). Conversely, our analysis of 105 individuals with generalized pustular psoriasis (GPP) identified a low-frequency variant (p.Asp176His) that causes constitutive CARD14 oligomerization and shows a significant association with GPP in Asian populations (P=8.4×10(-5); odds ratio=6.4). These data indicate that the analysis of CARD14 mutations could help stratify pustular psoriasis cohorts but would be mostly uninformative in the context of psoriasis and sporadic PRP.

  16. Snap-Cards: A Dynamic Data Construct of Rapid Information Gathering and Integration for C2 Effectiveness in Homeland Security

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2004-03-24

    adapted. III.4 Wild card and wild matches. Wild card and wild card matches should be allowed and activated in the snap-card system construct...air is presenting). Only a few designated filed of a card can be set wild. Not every filed of a card can be set wild. A wild card match slot in AAP...may be matched with several different snap cards. A wild card is kind of different from the incomplete card where some card entries (fields

  17. Isolation of full-size mRNA from ethanol-fixed cells after cellular immunofluorescence staining and fluorescence-activated cell sorting (FACS)

    SciTech Connect

    Esser, C.; Kremer, J.; Hundeiker, C.; Goettlinger, C.; Radbruch, A.

    1995-12-01

    Preparation of intact, full-size RNA from tissues or cells requires stringent precautions against ubiquitous and rather stable RNases. Fluorescence-activated cell sorting (FACS) usually aims at the isolation of cells according to cell surface markers on living cells, from which RNA can be obtained by standard protocols. The separation of cells according to intracellular immunofluorescence markers, such as intranuclear, intracytoplasmic, or secreted molecules, requires permeation of the cell membrane for the staining antibodies, which is usually achieved by fixation. However, commonly used fixatives such as ethanol, methanol, or formaldehyde do not inactivate RNases completely, thereby hampering the analysis of complete RNA molecules from fixed cells. We report isolation of intact, full size RNA suitable for Northern blotting from cells that were fixed by 95% ethanol/5% acetic acid containing RNase inhibitors, stained intracellularly, and sorted by FACS. 21 refs., 2 figs., 1 tab.

  18. FACS Sorting Mammary Stem Cells.

    PubMed

    Iriondo, Oihana; Rábano, Miriam; Vivanco, María D M

    2015-01-01

    Fluorescent-activated cell sorting (FACS) represents one of the key techniques that have been used to isolate and characterize stem cells, including cells from the mammary gland. A combination of approaches, including recognition of cell surface antigens and different cellular activities, has facilitated the identification of stem cells from the healthy mammary gland and from breast tumors. In this chapter we describe the protocol to use FACS to separate breast cancer stem cells, but most of the general principles discussed could be applied to sort other types of cells.

  19. Comparison The Effects of Two Monocyte Isolation Methods, Plastic Adherence and Magnetic Activated Cell Sorting Methods, on Phagocytic Activity of Generated Dendritic Cells

    PubMed Central

    Delirezh, Nowruz; Shojaeefar, Ehsan; Parvin, Parva; Asadi, Behnaz

    2013-01-01

    Objective: It is believed that monocyte isolation methods and maturation factors affect the phenotypic and functional characteristics of resultant dendritic cells (DC). In the present study, we compared two monocyte isolation methods, including plastic adherence-dendritic cells (Adh-DC) and magnetic activated cell sorting- dendritic cells (MACS-DC), and their effects on phagocytic activity of differentiated immature DCs (immDCs). Materials and Methods: : In this experimental study, immDCs were generated from plastic adherence and MACS isolated monocytes in the presence of granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF) and interleukin 4 (IL-4) in five days. The phagocytic activity of immDCs was analyzed by fluorescein isothiocyanate (FITC)-conjugated latex bead using flow cytometry. One way ANOVA test was used for statistical analysis of differences among experimental groups, including Adh-DC and MACS-DC groups. Results: We found that phagocytic activity of Adh-DC was higher than MACS-DC, whereas the mean fluorescence intensity (MFI) of phagocytic cells was higher in MACS-DC (p<0.05). Conclusion: : We concluded that it would be important to consider phagocytosis parameters of generated DCs before making any decision about monocyte isolation methods to have fully functional DCs. PMID:24027662

  20. A hybrid dielectrophoretic and hydrophoretic microchip for particle sorting using integrated prefocusing and sorting steps.

    PubMed

    Yan, Sheng; Zhang, Jun; Yuan, Yuan; Lovrecz, George; Alici, Gursel; Du, Haiping; Zhu, Yonggang; Li, Weihua

    2015-01-01

    This work explores dielectrophoresis (DEP)-active hydrophoresis in sorting particles and cells. The device consists of prefocusing region and sorting region with great potential to be integrated into advanced lab-on-a-chip bioanalysis devices. Particles or cells can be focused in the prefocusing region and then sorted in the sorting region. The DEP-active hydrophoretic sorting is not only based on size but also on dielectric properties of the particles or cells of interest without any labelling. A mixture of 3 and 10 μm particles were sorted and collected from corresponding outlets with high separation efficiency. According to the different dielectric properties of viable and nonviable Chinese Hamster Ovary (CHO) cells at the medium conductivity of 0.03 S/m, the viable CHO cells were focused well and sorted from cell sample with a high purity.

  1. Meeting Mathematics Standards with a Deck of Playing Cards

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McAllister, Deborah A.; McDonald, Shirley A.; Bothman, Susan M.

    2010-01-01

    The activities contained in this document have been presented at several conference sessions. Participants engaged in hands-on activities for Grades 3 through 8 that utilized a deck of playing cards to meet mathematics content and process standards. Activities included variations of card games, but with a mathematical twist, and other card-based…

  2. Evidence-based recommendations for designing free-sorting experiments.

    PubMed

    Blanchard, Simon J; Banerji, Ishani

    2016-12-01

    The card-sorting task is a flexible research tool that is widely used across many of the subfields of psychology. Yet this same great flexibility requires researchers to make several (seemingly arbitrary) decisions in their designs, such as fixing a sufficient number of objects to sort, setting task requirements, and creating task instructions for participants. In the present research, we provide a systematic empirical investigation of the consequences of typical researcher design choices while administering sorting tasks. Specifically, we studied the effects of seven sorting task design factors by collecting data from over 1,000 online participants assigned to one of 36 sorting tasks, as part of a fractional factorial experimental design. Analyses show the effects of the various researcher decisions on the probability that participants would quit the task, the amount of time spent on the task, the number of piles made, and posttask measures such as satisfaction and depletion. Research design recommendations are provided.

  3. Elementary Environmental Learning Packet K-3, Third Revised Edition. [Primary CEL Blocks, Student Activity Cards].

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brevard County School Board, Cocoa, FL.

    This environmental education program consists of two levels: primary and intermediate. The learning materials are activity based and incorporate process and subject area skills with knowledge and concern for the environment. The program is also interdisciplinary including activities and skills from art, language arts, mathematics, music, science,…

  4. Enhancing Students' Learning: Instant Feedback Cards

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mohrweis, Lawrence C.; Shinham, Kathe M.

    2015-01-01

    This study illustrates an active learning approach using instant feedback cards in the first course in accounting. The objectives of this study are to (1) describe instant feedback cards and (2) show how this tool, when used in an active learning environment, can enhance learning. We examined whether students exposed to immediate feedback…

  5. Lineage sorting in apes.

    PubMed

    Mailund, Thomas; Munch, Kasper; Schierup, Mikkel Heide

    2014-01-01

    Recombination allows different parts of the genome to have different genealogical histories. When a species splits in two, allelic lineages sort into the two descendant species, and this lineage sorting varies along the genome. If speciation events are close in time, the lineage sorting process may be incomplete at the second speciation event and lead to gene genealogies that do not match the species phylogeny. We review different recent approaches to model lineage sorting along the genome and show how it is possible to learn about population sizes, natural selection, and recombination rates in ancestral species from application of these models to genome alignments of great ape species.

  6. Alternative splicing of CARMA2/CARD14 transcripts generates protein variants with differential effect on NF-κB activation and endoplasmic reticulum stress-induced cell death.

    PubMed

    Scudiero, Ivan; Zotti, Tiziana; Ferravante, Angela; Vessichelli, Mariangela; Vito, Pasquale; Stilo, Romania

    2011-12-01

    The caspase recruitment domain (CARD)-containing proteins CARMA1-3 share high degree of sequence, structure and functional homology. Whereas CARMA1 and CARMA3 have been identified as crucial components of signal transduction pathways that lead to activation of NF-κB transcription factor, little is known about the function of CARMA2. Here we report the identification of two splice variants of CARMA2. One transcript, named CARMA2short (CARMA2sh), is predicted to encode for a CARMA2 polypeptide containing the CARD, coiled coil, and a PDZ domains, but lacking the SH3 and the GuK domains. The second variant, CARMA2cardless (CARMA2cl), encodes for a polypeptide lacking the CARD domain and containing only a portion of the coiled coil domain and a linker region. Expression analysis confirmed the presence of the CARMA2 alternatively spliced transcripts in both human cell lines and tissues. Fluorescence microscopy data show that both splice variants localize in the cytosol. Biochemical experiments indicate that CARMA2sh interacts with TRAF2 and activates NF-κB in a TRAF2-dependent manner. Finally, CARMA2sh variant protects cells from apoptosis induced by different stimuli. Taken together, these results demonstrate that multiple transcripts encoding several CARMA2 isoforms exist in vivo and regulate NF-κB activation and apoptosis.

  7. Alternative Splicing of CARMA2/CARD14 Transcripts Generates Protein Variants With Differential Effect on NF-κB Activation and Endoplasmic Reticulum Stress-Induced Cell Death

    PubMed Central

    Scudiero, Ivan; Zotti, Tiziana; Ferravante, Angela; Vessichelli, Mariangela; Vito, Pasquale; Stilo, Romania

    2011-01-01

    The caspase recruitment domain (CARD)-containing proteins CARMA1-3 share high degree of sequence, structure and functional homology. Whereas CARMA1 and CARMA3 have been identified as crucial components of signal transduction pathways that lead to activation of NF-κB transcription factor, little is known about the function of CARMA2. Here we report the identification of two splice variants of CARMA2. One transcript, named CARMA2short (CARMA2sh), is predicted to encode for a CARMA2 polypeptide containing the CARD, coiled coil, and a PDZ domains, but lacking the SH3 and the GuK domains. The second variant, CARMA2cardless (CARMA2cl), encodes for a polypeptide lacking the CARD domain and containing only a portion of the coiled coil domain and a linker region. Expression analysis confirmed the presence of the CARMA2 alternatively spliced transcripts in both human cell lines and tissues. Fluorescence microscopy data show that both splice variants localize in the cytosol. Biochemical experiments indicate that CARMA2sh interacts with TRAF2 and activates NF-κB in a TRAF2-dependent manner. Finally, CARMA2sh variant protects cells from apoptosis induced by different stimuli. Taken together, these results demonstrate that multiple transcripts encoding several CARMA2 isoforms exist in vivo and regulate NF-κB activation and apoptosis. J. Cell. Physiol. 226: 3121–3131, 2011. © 2011 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:21302310

  8. Detection of molecular alterations in methamphetamine-activated Fos-expressing neurons from a single rat dorsal striatum using fluorescence-activated cell sorting (FACS).

    PubMed

    Liu, Qing-Rong; Rubio, Francisco J; Bossert, Jennifer M; Marchant, Nathan J; Fanous, Sanya; Hou, Xingyu; Shaham, Yavin; Hope, Bruce T

    2014-01-01

    Methamphetamine and other drugs activate a small proportion of all neurons in the brain. We previously developed a fluorescence-activated cell sorting (FACS)-based method to characterize molecular alterations induced selectively in activated neurons that express the neural activity marker Fos. However, this method requires pooling samples from many rats. We now describe a modified FACS-based method to characterize molecular alterations in Fos-expressing dorsal striatal neurons from a single rat using a multiplex pre-amplification strategy. Fos and NeuN (a neuronal marker) immunohistochemistry indicate that 5-6% of dorsal striatum neurons were activated 90 min after acute methamphetamine injections (5 mg/kg, i.p.) while less than 0.5% of neurons were activated by saline injections. We used FACS to separate NeuN-labeled neurons into Fos-positive and Fos-negative neurons and assessed mRNA expression using RT-qPCR from as little as five Fos-positive neurons. Methamphetamine induced 3-20-fold increases of immediate early genes arc, homer-2, c-fos, fosB, and its isoforms (ΔfosB and a novel isoform ΔfosB-2) in Fos-positive but not Fos-negative neurons. Immediate early gene mRNA induction was 10-fold lower or absent when assessed in unsorted samples from single dorsal striatum homogenates. Our modified method makes it feasible to study unique molecular alterations in neurons activated by drugs or drug-associated cues in complex addiction models. Methamphetamine and other drugs activate a small proportion of all neurons in the brain. We here report an improved method to characterize molecular alterations induced selectively in activated neurons that express the neural activity marker Fos. We used FACS along with targeted PCR pre-amplification to assess acute methamphetamine-induced gene expression from as few as 5 Fos-expressing neurons from a single rat dorsal striatum. Methamphetamine induced 3-20-fold increases of immediate early genes (IEGs) in Fos-positive but not

  9. Single cell analysis and selection of living retrovirus vector-corrected mucopolysaccharidosis VII cells using a fluorescence-activated cell sorting-based assay for mammalian beta-glucuronidase enzymatic activity.

    PubMed

    Lorincz, M C; Parente, M K; Roederer, M; Nolan, G P; Diwu, Z; Martin, D I; Herzenberg, L A; Wolfe, J H

    1999-01-08

    Mutations in the acid beta-glucuronidase gene lead to systemic accumulation of undegraded glycosaminoglycans in lysosomes and ultimately to clinical manifestations of mucopolysaccharidosis VII (Sly disease). Gene transfer by retrovirus vectors into murine mucopolysaccharidosis VII hematopoietic stem cells or fibroblasts ameliorates glycosaminoglycan accumulation in some affected tissues. The efficacy of gene therapy for mucopolysaccharidosis VII depends on the levels of beta-glucuronidase secreted by gene-corrected cells; therefore, enrichment of transduced cells expressing high levels of enzyme prior to transplantation is desirable. We describe the development of a fluorescence-activated cell sorter-based assay for the quantitative analysis of beta-glucuronidase activity in viable cells. Murine mucopolysaccharidosis VII cells transduced with a beta-glucuronidase retroviral vector can be isolated by cell sorting on the basis of beta-glucuronidase activity and cultured for further use. In vitro analysis revealed that sorted cells have elevated levels of beta-glucuronidase activity and secrete higher levels of cross-correcting enzyme than the population from which they were sorted. Transduced fibroblasts stably expressing beta-glucuronidase after subcutaneous passage in the mucopolysaccharidosis VII mouse can be isolated by cell sorting and expanded ex vivo. A relatively high percentage of these cells maintain stable expression after secondary transplantation, yielding significantly higher levels of enzymatic activity than that generated in the primary transplant.

  10. Increasing Opportunities for Student Responding: Response Cards in the Classroom

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Helf, Shawnna

    2015-01-01

    Response cards are designed to encourage active student engagement during instruction. In this article, the use of response cards is described, along with ways teachers can use the information to inform their work and considerations for implementation.

  11. Fluorescence Activated Cell Sorting (FACS) and Gene Expression Analysis of Fos-expressing Neurons from Fresh and Frozen Rat Brain Tissue.

    PubMed

    Rubio, F Javier; Li, Xuan; Liu, Qing-Rong; Cimbro, Raffaello; Hope, Bruce T

    2016-08-27

    The study of neuroplasticity and molecular alterations in learned behaviors is switching from the study of whole brain regions to the study of specific sets of sparsely distributed activated neurons called neuronal ensembles that mediate learned associations. Fluorescence Activated Cell Sorting (FACS) has recently been optimized for adult rat brain tissue and allowed isolation of activated neurons using antibodies against the neuronal marker NeuN and Fos protein, a marker of strongly activated neurons. Until now, Fos-expressing neurons and other cell types were isolated from fresh tissue, which entailed long processing days and allowed very limited numbers of brain samples to be assessed after lengthy and complex behavioral procedures. Here we found that yields of Fos-expressing neurons and Fos mRNA from dorsal striatum were similar between freshly dissected tissue and tissue frozen at -80 ºC for 3 - 21 days. In addition, we confirmed the phenotype of the NeuN-positive and NeuN-negative sorted cells by assessing gene expression of neuronal (NeuN), astrocytic (GFAP), oligodendrocytic (Oligo2) and microgial (Iba1) markers, which indicates that frozen tissue can also be used for FACS isolation of glial cell types. Overall, it is possible to collect, dissect and freeze brain tissue for multiple FACS sessions. This maximizes the amount of data obtained from valuable animal subjects that have often undergone long and complex behavioral procedures.

  12. 78 FR 26647 - Agency Information Collection Activities: Application To Replace Permanent Resident Card, Form I...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-05-07

    ... SECURITY U.S. Citizenship and Immigration Services Agency Information Collection Activities: Application To... Notice. SUMMARY: The Department of Homeland Security (DHS), U.S. Citizenship and Immigration Services... Security sponsoring the collection: Form I-90, U.S. Citizenship and Immigration Services. (4)...

  13. 78 FR 63236 - Agency Information Collection Activities: Application To Replace Permanent Resident Card, Form...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-10-23

    ... SECURITY U.S. Citizenship and Immigration Services Agency Information Collection Activities: Application To...-Day Notice. SUMMARY: The Department of Homeland Security (DHS), U.S. Citizenship and Immigration Services (USCIS) will be submitting the following information collection request to the Office...

  14. Zinc rescues obesity-induced cardiac hypertrophy via stimulating metallothionein to suppress oxidative stress-activated BCL10/CARD9/p38 MAPK pathway.

    PubMed

    Wang, Shudong; Gu, Junlian; Xu, Zheng; Zhang, Zhiguo; Bai, Tao; Xu, Jianxiang; Cai, Jun; Barnes, Gregory; Liu, Qiu-Ju; Freedman, Jonathan H; Wang, Yonggang; Liu, Quan; Zheng, Yang; Cai, Lu

    2017-02-03

    Obesity often leads to obesity-related cardiac hypertrophy (ORCH), which is suppressed by zinc-induced inactivation of p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase (p38 MAPK). In this study, we investigated the mechanisms by which zinc inactivates p38 MAPK to prevent ORCH. Mice (4-week old) were fed either high fat diet (HFD, 60% kcal fat) or normal diet (ND, 10% kcal fat) containing variable amounts of zinc (deficiency, normal and supplement) for 3 and 6 months. P38 MAPK siRNA and the p38 MAPK inhibitor SB203580 were used to suppress p38 MAPK activity in vitro and in vivo, respectively. HFD activated p38 MAPK and increased expression of B-cell lymphoma/CLL 10 (BCL10) and caspase recruitment domain family member 9 (CARD9). These responses were enhanced by zinc deficiency and attenuated by zinc supplement. Administration of SB203580 to HFD mice or specific siRNA in palmitate-treated cardiomyocytes eliminated the HFD and zinc deficiency activation of p38 MAPK, but did not significantly impact the expression of BCL10 and CARD9. In cultured cardiomyocytes, inhibition of BCL10 expression by siRNA prevented palmitate-induced increased p38 MAPK activation and atrial natriuretic peptide (ANP) expression. In contrast, inhibition of p38 MAPK prevented ANP expression, but did not affect BCL10 expression. Deletion of metallothionein abolished the protective effect of zinc on palmitate-induced up-regulation of BCL10 and phospho-p38 MAPK. HFD and zinc deficiency synergistically induce ORCH by increasing oxidative stress-mediated activation of BCL10/CARD9/p38 MAPK signalling. Zinc supplement ameliorates ORCH through activation of metallothionein to repress oxidative stress-activated BCL10 expression and p38 MAPK activation.

  15. Sorting Carbon Nanotubes.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Ming

    2017-02-01

    Sorting of single-wall carbon nanotubes by their electronic and atomic structures in liquid phases is reviewed in this chapter. We first introduce the sorting problem, and then provide an overview of several sorting methodologies, following roughly the chronological order of their development over the past 15 years or so. Major methods discussed include ion-exchange chromatography, density-gradient ultracentrifugation, selective extraction in organic solvents, gel chromatography, and aqueous two-phase extraction. A main focus of the review is on the common mechanisms underlining all sorting processes. We propose that differences in solvation among different nanotube species are the ultimate driving force of sorting, and we corroborate this proposal by presenting analysis on how the differences are realized in electronic-structure-based sorting and atomic-structure-based sorting. In the end, we offer some suggestions on future directions that may grow out of carbon nanotube sorting. In particular, the prospect of expanding the function of DNA/carbon nanotube hybrid to control inter-particle interactions both inside and outside the nanotube is discussed.

  16. Sorting to Extremes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Baum, Sandy; McPherson, Michael S.

    2011-01-01

    The world of higher education is a world of sorting, selecting, and ranking--on both sides of the market. Colleges select students to recruit and then to admit; students choose where to apply and which offer to accept. The sorting process that gets the most attention is in the higher reaches of the market, where it is not too much to say that…

  17. Breastfeeding Report Card 2014

    MedlinePlus

    ... Weight Breastfeeding Micronutrient Malnutrition State and Local Programs Breastfeeding Report Cards Recommend on Facebook Tweet Share Compartir ... National Immunization Survey data from 2014 and 2015. Breastfeeding Report Card, 2016 Download report [PDF-2.72MB] ...

  18. SmartCard Prototype

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2009-09-01

    prototype. ............................................................................................. 7 Figure 6 Smart Card Prototype main window...a data explorer. Intervention costs Database with a single instance (i.e. one data set). User help framework Figure 6 Smart Card Prototype

  19. Re-Designing Business Card Advertisements.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schaub, Laura

    2001-01-01

    Discusses ways to turn information from a business card into an advertisement to be placed in a student publication. Addresses visual interest, typography, and other design issues. Includes several sample advertisements and a classroom activity involving redesigning a business card into an advertisement. (RS)

  20. Print a Bed Bug Card - (Single Cards)

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    Two sets of business-card-sized lists of tips for recognizing bed bugs and the signs of an infestation, including a photo of bed bugs to assist identification. One card is for general use around home or office, the other for travelers.

  1. Preparation of myeloid derived suppressor cells (MDSC) from naive and pancreatic tumor-bearing mice using flow cytometry and automated magnetic activated cell sorting (AutoMACS).

    PubMed

    Nelson, Nadine; Szekeres, Karoly; Cooper, Denise; Ghansah, Tomar

    2012-06-18

    MDSC are a heterogeneous population of immature macrophages, dendritic cells and granulocytes that accumulate in lymphoid organs in pathological conditions including parasitic infection, inflammation, traumatic stress, graft-versus-host disease, diabetes and cancer. In mice, MDSC express Mac-1 (CD11b) and Gr-1 (Ly6G and Ly6C) surface antigens. It is important to note that MDSC are well studied in various tumor-bearing hosts where they are significantly expanded and suppress anti-tumor immune responses compared to naïve counterparts. However, depending on the pathological condition, there are different subpopulations of MDSC with distinct mechanisms and targets of suppression. Therefore, effective methods to isolate viable MDSC populations are important in elucidating their different molecular mechanisms of suppression in vitro and in vivo. Recently, the Ghansah group has reported the expansion of MDSC in a murine pancreatic cancer model. Our tumor-bearing MDSC display a loss of homeostasis and increased suppressive function compared to naïve MDSC. MDSC percentages are significantly less in lymphoid compartments of naïve vs. tumor-bearing mice. This is a major caveat, which often hinders accurate comparative analyses of these MDSC. Therefore, enriching Gr-1(+) leukocytes from naïve mice prior to Fluorescence Activated Cell Sorting (FACS) enhances purity, viability and significantly reduces sort time. However, enrichment of Gr-1(+) leukocytes from tumor-bearing mice is optional as these are in abundance for quick FACS sorting. Therefore, in this protocol, we describe a highly efficient method of immunophenotyping MDSC and enriching Gr-1(+) leukocytes from spleens of naïve mice for sorting MDSC in a timely manner. Immunocompetent C57BL/6 mice are inoculated with murine Panc02 cells subcutaneously whereas naïve mice receive 1XPBS. Approximately 30 days post inoculation; spleens are harvested and processed into single-cell suspensions using a cell dissociation

  2. Smart card technology

    SciTech Connect

    Nelson, R.A.

    1992-09-01

    This report describes smart card techonology and applications, including the use of smart cards as smart badges. The paper illustrates that smart cards are designed with security features, which makes them suitable for security applications. But smart cards also provide multiple functions, so they can support additional applications. The goal of this paper is to inform about the technology, and to inspire thought about possible applications that would benefit if a smart badge were implemented.

  3. Are We Driving Our Kids to Unhealthy Habits? Results of the Active Healthy Kids Canada 2013 Report Card on Physical Activity for Children and Youth

    PubMed Central

    Gray, Casey E.; Larouche, Richard; Barnes, Joel D.; Colley, Rachel C.; Cowie Bonne, Jennifer; Arthur, Mike; Cameron, Christine; Chaput, Jean-Philippe; Faulkner, Guy; Janssen, Ian; Kolen, Angela M.; Manske, Stephen R.; Salmon, Art; Spence, John C.; Timmons, Brian W.; Tremblay, Mark S.

    2014-01-01

    This article examines the time trends in patterns of school travel mode among Canadian children and youth to inform the Active Transportation (AT) indicator of the 2013 Active Healthy Kids Canada Report Card on Physical Activity for Children and Youth. The AT grade was assigned based on a comprehensive synthesis of the 2000 and 2010 Physical Activity Monitor studies from the Canadian Fitness and Lifestyle Research Institute and the 1992, 1998, 2005, and 2010 General Social Survey from Statistics Canada. The results showed that in 2013, AT was graded a D, because less than half of Canadian children and youth used only active modes of transportation to get to and from school. The proportion of Canadian children and youth who used only inactive modes of transportation for school travel increased significantly from 51% to 62% over the last decade. Children and youth from larger communities and those with lower household income levels were significantly more likely to use AT than those living in smaller communities and those in higher income households, respectively. In conclusion, motorized transport for school travel has increased steadily over the last decade across Canada. Regional and socio-demographic disparities should be considered in efforts to increase the number of children using AT. PMID:24905246

  4. Are we driving our kids to unhealthy habits? Results of the active healthy kids Canada 2013 report card on physical activity for children and youth.

    PubMed

    Gray, Casey E; Larouche, Richard; Barnes, Joel D; Colley, Rachel C; Bonne, Jennifer Cowie; Arthur, Mike; Cameron, Christine; Chaput, Jean-Philippe; Faulkner, Guy; Janssen, Ian; Kolen, Angela M; Manske, Stephen R; Salmon, Art; Spence, John C; Timmons, Brian W; Tremblay, Mark S

    2014-06-05

    This article examines the time trends in patterns of school travel mode among Canadian children and youth to inform the Active Transportation (AT) indicator of the 2013 Active Healthy Kids Canada Report Card on Physical Activity for Children and Youth. The AT grade was assigned based on a comprehensive synthesis of the 2000 and 2010 Physical Activity Monitor studies from the Canadian Fitness and Lifestyle Research Institute and the 1992, 1998, 2005, and 2010 General Social Survey from Statistics Canada. The results showed that in 2013, AT was graded a D, because less than half of Canadian children and youth used only active modes of transportation to get to and from school. The proportion of Canadian children and youth who used only inactive modes of transportation for school travel increased significantly from 51% to 62% over the last decade. Children and youth from larger communities and those with lower household income levels were significantly more likely to use AT than those living in smaller communities and those in higher income households, respectively. In conclusion, motorized transport for school travel has increased steadily over the last decade across Canada. Regional and socio-demographic disparities should be considered in efforts to increase the number of children using AT.

  5. Reading the Cards.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Grills, Caroline M.

    2001-01-01

    Describes trends in the technology and use of "smart cards," cards embedded with computer chips to store information and thereby speed and simplify various business and administrative transactions. Addresses future applications for colleges and universities, American Express'"Blue" card, military and medical applications, the…

  6. Houses of Cards.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cohen, Andrew

    2000-01-01

    Explores how plastic identification cards are key to building security in athletic facilities. Card and identification system technology are addressed as are their benefits and complications. Final comments address security issues that still need consideration even if a card system is used. (GR)

  7. CARD14 expression in dermal endothelial cells in psoriasis.

    PubMed

    Harden, Jamie L; Lewis, Steven M; Pierson, Katherine C; Suárez-Fariñas, Mayte; Lentini, Tim; Ortenzio, Francesca S; Zaba, Lisa C; Goldbach-Mansky, Raphaela; Bowcock, Anne M; Lowes, Michelle A

    2014-01-01

    Mutations in the caspase recruitment domain, family member 14 (CARD14) gene have recently been described in psoriasis patients, and explain the psoriasis susceptibility locus 2 (PSORS2). CARD14 is a scaffolding protein that regulates NF-κB activation, and psoriasis-associated CARD14 mutations lead to enhanced NF-κB signaling. CARD14 is expressed mainly in epidermal keratinocytes, but also in unidentified dermal cells. In this manuscript, the identity of the dermal cell types expressing CARD14, as well the potential functional consequence of overactive CARD14 in these dermal cell types, was determined. Using two-color immunofluorescence, dermal CARD14 did not co-localize with T-cells, dendritic cells, or macrophages. However, dermal CARD14 did highly co-localize with CD31(+) endothelial cells (ECs). CARD14 was also expressed non-dermal endothelial cells, such as aortic endothelial cells, which may indicate a role of CARD14(+)ECs in the systemic inflammation and cardiovascular comorbidities associated with psoriasis. Additionally, phosphorylated NF-κB was found in psoriatic CARD14(+) CD31(+) ECs, demonstrating this pathway is active in dermal ECs in psoriasis. Transfection of dermal ECs with psoriasis-associated CARD14 mutations resulted in increased expression of several chemokines, including CXCL10, IL-8, and CCL2. These results provide preliminary evidence that CARD14 expression in ECs may contribute to psoriasis through increased expression of chemokines and facilitating recruitment of immune cells into skin.

  8. The VPS-20 subunit of the endosomal sorting complex ESCRT-III exhibits an open conformation in the absence of upstream activation.

    PubMed

    Schuh, Amber L; Hanna, Michael; Quinney, Kyle; Wang, Lei; Sarkeshik, Ali; Yates, John R; Audhya, Anjon

    2015-03-15

    Members of the endosomal sorting complex required for transport (ESCRT) machinery function in membrane remodelling processes during multivesicular endosome (MVE) biogenesis, cytokinesis, retroviral budding and plasma membrane repair. During luminal vesicle formation at endosomes, the ESCRT-II complex and the ESCRT-III subunit vacuolar protein sorting (VPS)-20 play a specific role in regulating assembly of ESCRT-III filaments, which promote vesicle scission. Previous work suggests that Vps20 isoforms, like other ESCRT-III subunits, exhibits an auto-inhibited closed conformation in solution and its activation depends on an association with ESCRT-II specifically at membranes [1]. However, we show in the present study that Caenorhabditis elegans ESCRT-II and VPS-20 interact directly in solution, both in cytosolic cell extracts and in using recombinant proteins in vitro. Moreover, we demonstrate that purified VPS-20 exhibits an open extended conformation, irrespective of ESCRT-II binding, in contrast with the closed auto-inhibited architecture of another ESCRT-III subunit, VPS-24. Our data argue that individual ESCRT-III subunits adopt distinct conformations, which are tailored for their specific functions during ESCRT-mediated membrane reorganization events.

  9. Fluorescence Activated Cell Sorting of Rickettsia prowazekii-Infected Host Cells Based on Bacterial Burden and Early Detection of Fluorescent Rickettsial Transformants

    PubMed Central

    Driskell, Lonnie O.; Tucker, Aimee M.; Woodard, Andrew; Wood, Raphael R.; Wood, David O.

    2016-01-01

    Rickettsia prowazekii, the causative agent of epidemic typhus, is an obligate intracellular bacterium that replicates only within the cytosol of a eukaryotic host cell. Despite the barriers to genetic manipulation that such a life style creates, rickettsial mutants have been generated by transposon insertion as well as by homologous recombination mechanisms. However, progress is hampered by the length of time required to identify and isolate R. prowazekii transformants. To reduce the time required and variability associated with propagation and harvesting of rickettsiae for each transformation experiment, characterized frozen stocks were used to generate electrocompetent rickettsiae. Transformation experiments employing these rickettsiae established that fluorescent rickettsial populations could be identified using a fluorescence activated cell sorter within one week following electroporation. Early detection was improved with increasing amounts of transforming DNA. In addition, we demonstrate that heterogeneous populations of rickettsiae-infected cells can be sorted into distinct sub-populations based on the number of rickettsiae per cell. Together our data suggest the combination of fluorescent reporters and cell sorting represent an important technical advance that will facilitate isolation of distinct R. prowazekii mutants and allow for closer examination of the effects of infection on host cells at various infectious burdens. PMID:27010457

  10. Sorting Out Seasonal Allergies

    MedlinePlus

    ... Contact Close ‹ Back to Healthy Living Sorting Out Seasonal Allergies Sneezing, runny nose, nasal congestion. Symptoms of the ... Georgeson. How do I know if I have seasonal allergies? According to Dr. Georgeson, the best way to ...

  11. HyperCard Monitor System.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Harris, Julian; Maurer, Hermann

    An investigation into high level event monitoring within the scope of a well-known multimedia application, HyperCard--a program on the Macintosh computer, is carried out. A monitoring system is defined as a system which automatically monitors usage of some activity and gathers statistics based on what is has observed. Monitor systems can give the…

  12. Fluorescence-activated sorting of fixed nuclei: a general method for studying nuclei from specific cell populations that preserves post-translational modifications.

    PubMed

    Marion-Poll, Lucile; Montalban, Enrica; Munier, Annie; Hervé, Denis; Girault, Jean-Antoine

    2014-04-01

    Long-lasting brain alterations that underlie learning and memory are triggered by synaptic activity. How activity can exert long-lasting effects on neurons is a major question in neuroscience. Signalling pathways from cytoplasm to nucleus and the resulting changes in transcription and epigenetic modifications are particularly relevant in this context. However, a major difficulty in their study comes from the cellular heterogeneity of brain tissue. A promising approach is to directly purify identified nuclei. Using mouse striatum we have developed a rapid and efficient method for isolating cell type-specific nuclei from fixed adult brain (fluorescence-activated sorting of fixed nuclei; FAST-FIN). Animals are quickly perfused with a formaldehyde fixative that stops enzymatic reactions and maintains the tissue in the state it was at the time of death, including nuclear localisation of soluble proteins such as GFP and differences in nuclear size between cell types. Tissue is subsequently dissociated with a Dounce homogeniser and nuclei prepared by centrifugation in an iodixanol density gradient. The purified fixed nuclei can then be immunostained with specific antibodies and analysed or sorted by flow cytometry. Simple criteria allow distinction of neurons and non-neuronal cells. Immunolabelling and transgenic mice that express fluorescent proteins can be used to identify specific cell populations, and the nuclei from these populations can be efficiently isolated, even rare cell types such as parvalbumin-expressing interneurons. FAST-FIN allows the preservation and study of dynamic and labile post-translational protein modifications. It should be applicable to other tissues and species, and allow study of DNA and its modifications.

  13. The Effects of the Activation of Money and Credit Card vs. that of Activation of Spirituality - Which One Prompts Pro-Social Behaviours?

    PubMed

    Wierzbicki, Jakub; Zawadzka, Anna Maria

    2016-01-01

    Pro-social behaviours may be prompted or inhibited depending on the situation. Numerous experiments show that, when exposed to the idea of money, people are less willing to help, devote their time or share their resources with others (Vohs et al. Science, 314, 1154-1156, 2006, Current Directions in Psychological Science, 17(3), 208-212, 2008). Conversely, when exposed to the idea of spirituality, they often cheat less and are more willing to help others (Mazar and Ariely Journal of Marketing Research, 45, 633-644, 2008; Randolph-Seng and Nielsen The International Journal for the Psychology of Religion, 17(4), 303-315, 2007). The aim of this article is to present the results of two experiments in which we activated thoughts about money, i.e. both cash and credit cards, and thoughts about spirituality in order to find out in what way these two kinds of activation may influence pro-social behaviours. In experiment 1, participants, when reminded of money, offered lower donations to others whereas those reminded of spirituality offered higher donations. In experiment 2, those participants reminded of money offered to devote less time to help others whereas those reminded of spirituality offered to devote more time to help others.

  14. Colloidal sorting in dynamic optical lattices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smith, Ryan L.; Spalding, G. C.; Dholakia, K.; MacDonald, M. P.

    2007-08-01

    Passive microfluidic sorting techniques based upon the interaction of particles with an optically defined potential energy landscape have possible advantages over active sorting techniques such as microfluorescence activated cell sorting (FACS), including ease of integration into lab-on-a-chip systems, reconfigurability, and scalability. Rather than analysing and deflecting a single-file stream of particles one by one, a passive approach intrinsically aimed at parallel processing may, ultimately, offer greater potential for high throughput. However attempts to sort many particles simultaneously in high density suspensions are inevitably limited by particle particle interactions, which lead to a reduction in the efficiency of the sorting. In this paper we describe two different approaches aimed at reducing colloidal traffic flow problems. We find that continuous translation of the sorting lattice helps to reduce nearest neighbour particle spacing, providing promise for efficiency improvements in future high throughput applications, and that a flashing lattice yields a reduction in unwanted pile-up and spillover effects which otherwise limit the efficiency of sorting.

  15. Participation in Daily Activities of Young Adults with High Functioning Autism Spectrum Disorder

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McCollum, Mary; LaVesser, Patti; Berg, Christine

    2016-01-01

    Young adults with an autism spectrum disorder (ASD) struggle to assume adult roles. This research assessed the feasibility of using the Adolescent and Young Adult Activity Card Sort (AYA-ACS) with emerging adults with high functioning ASD. Two phases were utilized during this research: (1) comparing the activity participation reported by emerging…

  16. Automated multi-parametric sorting of micron-sized particles via multi-trap laser tweezers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaputa, Daniel S.

    The capabilities of laser tweezers have rapidly expanded since the first demonstration by Ashkin and co-workers in 1970 of the ability to trap particles using optical energy. Laser tweezers have been used to measure piconewton forces in many biological and material science application, sort bacteria, measure DNA bond strength, and even perform microsurgery. The laser tweezers system developed for this dissertation foreshadows the next generation of laser tweezer systems that provide automated particle sorted based upon multiple criteria. Many laser tweezer sorting applications today entail the operator sorting cells from a bulk sample, one by one. This dissertation demonstrates the technologies of pattern recognition and image processing that allow for an entire microscope slide to be sorted without any operator intervention. We already live in an automated world where the cars we drive are built by machines instead of humans. The technology is there, and the only factors limiting the advancements of fully automated biological instrumentation is the lack of developers with the appropriate knowledge sets. This dissertation introduces the concept of sorting particles via a multi-parametric approach where several parameters such as size, fluorescence, and Raman spectra are used as sorting criteria. Since the advent of laser tweezers, several groups have demonstrated the ability to sort cells and other particle by size, or by fluorescence, or by any other parameter, but to our knowledge there does not exist a laser tweezer sorting system that can sort particles based upon multiple parameters. Sorting via a single parameter can be a severe limitation as the method lacks the robustness and class specificity that exists when sorting based upon multiple parameters. Simply put, it makes more sense to determine the worth of a baseball card by considering it's condition as well as it's age, rather then solely upon its condition. By adding another parameter such as the name of

  17. Evaluation of the Geotech SMART24BH 20Vpp/5Vpp data acquisition system with active fortezza crypto card data signing and authentication.

    SciTech Connect

    Rembold, Randy Kai; Hart, Darren M.

    2009-09-01

    Sandia National Laboratories has tested and evaluated Geotech SMART24BH borehole data acquisition system with active Fortezza crypto card data signing and authentication. The test results included in this report were in response to static and tonal-dynamic input signals. Most test methodologies used were based on IEEE Standards 1057 for Digitizing Waveform Recorders and 1241 for Analog to Digital Converters; others were designed by Sandia specifically for infrasound application evaluation and for supplementary criteria not addressed in the IEEE standards. The objective of this work was to evaluate the overall technical performance of two Geotech SMART24BH digitizers with a Fortezza PCMCIA crypto card actively implementing the signing of data packets. The results of this evaluation were compared to relevant specifications provided within manufacturer's documentation notes. The tests performed were chosen to demonstrate different performance aspects of the digitizer under test. The performance aspects tested include determining noise floor, least significant bit (LSB), dynamic range, cross-talk, relative channel-to-channel timing, time-tag accuracy/statistics/drift, analog bandwidth.

  18. Separation of uncompromised whole blood mixtures for single source STR profiling using fluorescently-labeled human leukocyte antigen (HLA) probes and fluorescence activated cell sorting (FACS).

    PubMed

    Dean, Lee; Kwon, Ye Jin; Philpott, M Katherine; Stanciu, Cristina E; Seashols-Williams, Sarah J; Dawson Cruz, Tracey; Sturgill, Jamie; Ehrhardt, Christopher J

    2015-07-01

    Analysis of biological mixtures is a significant problem for forensic laboratories, particularly when the mixture contains only one cell type. Contributions from multiple individuals to biologic evidence can complicate DNA profile interpretation and often lead to a reduction in the probative value of DNA evidence or worse, its total loss. To address this, we have utilized an analytical technique that exploits the intrinsic immunological variation among individuals to physically separate cells from different sources in a mixture prior to DNA profiling. Specifically, we applied a fluorescently labeled antibody probe to selectively bind to one contributor in a mixture through allele-specific interactions with human leukocyte antigen (HLA) proteins that are expressed on the surfaces of most nucleated cells. Once the contributor's cells were bound to the probe, they were isolated from the mixture using fluorescence activated cell sorting (FACS)-a high throughput technique for separating cell populations based on their optical properties-and then subjected to STR analysis. We tested this approach on two-person and four-person whole blood mixtures where one contributor possessed an HLA allele (A*02) that was not shared by other contributors to the mixture. Results showed that hybridization of the mixture with a fluorescently-labeled antibody probe complimentary to the A*02 allele's protein product created a cell population with a distinct optical profile that could be easily differentiated from other cells in the mixture. After sorting the cells with FACS, genetic analysis showed that the STR profile of this cell population was consistent with that of the contributor who possessed the A*02 allele. Minor peaks from the A*02 negative contributor(s) were observed but could be easily distinguished from the profile generated from A*02 positive cells. Overall, this indicates that HLA antibody probes coupled to FACS may be an effective approach for generating STR profiles of

  19. Palmitoylation of protease-activated receptor-1 regulates adaptor protein complex-2 and -3 interaction with tyrosine-based motifs and endocytic sorting.

    PubMed

    Canto, Isabel; Trejo, JoAnn

    2013-05-31

    Protease-activated receptor-1 (PAR1) is a G protein-coupled receptor for the coagulant protease thrombin. Thrombin binds to and cleaves the N terminus of PAR1, generating a new N terminus that functions as a tethered ligand that cannot diffuse away. In addition to rapid desensitization, PAR1 trafficking is critical for the regulation of cellular responses. PAR1 displays constitutive and agonist-induced internalization. Constitutive internalization of unactivated PAR1 is mediated by the clathrin adaptor protein complex-2 (AP-2), which binds to a distal tyrosine-based motif localized within the C-terminal tail (C-tail) domain. Once internalized, PAR1 is sorted from endosomes to lysosomes via AP-3 interaction with a second C-tail tyrosine motif proximal to the transmembrane domain. However, the regulatory processes that control adaptor protein recognition of PAR1 C-tail tyrosine-based motifs are not known. Here, we report that palmitoylation of PAR1 is critical for regulating proper utilization of tyrosine-based motifs and endocytic sorting. We show that PAR1 is basally palmitoylated at highly conserved C-tail cysteines. A palmitoylation-deficient PAR1 mutant is competent to signal and exhibits a marked increase in constitutive internalization and lysosomal degradation compared with wild type receptor. Intriguingly, enhanced constitutive internalization of PAR1 is mediated by AP-2 and requires the proximal tyrosine-based motif rather than the distal tyrosine motif used by wild type receptor. Moreover, palmitoylation-deficient PAR1 displays increased degradation that is mediated by AP-3. These findings suggest that palmitoylation of PAR1 regulates appropriate utilization of tyrosine-based motifs by adaptor proteins and endocytic trafficking, processes that are critical for maintaining appropriate expression of PAR1 at the cell surface.

  20. Sorting by Recursive Partitioning,

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1983-12-01

    asymptotic time-complexity. This paper has the following main parts: First, a Pidgin -Algol version of the algorithm is presented and we discuss the main...those sorted subsets e) end "UsingBin*; end "AdaptSorting. 4 "Figure 1: A condensed Pidgin -Algol version of Adaptsort eiFor some conditions that we will...algorithm which have to be completed in either linear or constant times (these required critical times appear as comments in the Pidgin -Algol version

  1. Print a Bed Bug Card

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    Two sets of business card-sized lists of tips for prevention of bed bug infestations, one for general use around home, the other for travelers. Print a single card or a page of cards for distribution.

  2. The Future of Smart Cards.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fickes, Michael

    2000-01-01

    Discusses the evolution of smart cards from digital signatures and other innovations into the realm of magnetic-stripe cards to expand their applications. Examples of magnetic-strip smart card usage are examined. (GR)

  3. Visual ergonomics interventions in mail sorting facilities.

    PubMed

    Hemphälä, H; Hansson, G-Å; Dahlqvist, C; Eklund, J

    2012-01-01

    This study was performed between 2004 and 2011 at mail sorting facilities in Sweden. During this time, different interventions were performed. The first was a lighting intervention that had a positive impact on the postal workers, especially those with eyestrain. A new lighting system also improved the illuminance and gave better light distribution. The second intervention involved new personal spectacles for the postal workers who needed them and this had a positive effect on eyestrain. The third intervention involved a specific type of sorting spectacles for the postal workers who already used progressive lenses privately. The reading distances that the postal workers had while sorting the mail was inverted to the distances in their regular progressive lenses. The new sorting spectacles had a positive effect on head postures and on muscular activity.

  4. A House of Cards.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kennedy, Mike

    2000-01-01

    Reviews how technologically enhanced ID cards are helping colleges and universities keep their students and staff safe. The benefits of a one-card system for identification, building access, and financial transactions are highlighted as are the liberal use of security phones and security cameras. (GR)

  5. Grading School Report Cards

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jacobson, Rebecca; Saultz, Andrew; Snyder, Jeffrey W.

    2013-01-01

    Recognizing the need for information in public education, Congress mandated in the No Child Left Behind Act (NCLB) that all states create and disseminate annual school performance report cards. A decade after NCLB passed, school report cards are widely available for nearly every school in the country. As the amount of school performance data…

  6. Spatio-Temporal Cellular Dynamics of the Arabidopsis Flagellin Receptor Reveal Activation Status-Dependent Endosomal Sorting[C][W

    PubMed Central

    Beck, Martina; Zhou, Ji; Faulkner, Christine; MacLean, Daniel; Robatzek, Silke

    2012-01-01

    The activity of surface receptors is location specific, dependent upon the dynamic membrane trafficking network and receptor-mediated endocytosis (RME). Therefore, the spatio-temporal dynamics of RME are critical to receptor function. The plasma membrane receptor FLAGELLIN SENSING2 (FLS2) confers immunity against bacterial infection through perception of flagellin (flg22). Following elicitation, FLS2 is internalized into vesicles. To resolve FLS2 trafficking, we exploited quantitative confocal imaging for colocalization studies and chemical interference. FLS2 localizes to bona fide endosomes via two distinct endocytic trafficking routes depending on its activation status. FLS2 receptors constitutively recycle in a Brefeldin A (BFA)–sensitive manner, while flg22-activated receptors traffic via ARA7/Rab F2b– and ARA6/Rab F1–positive endosomes insensitive to BFA. FLS2 endocytosis required a functional Rab5 GTPase pathway as revealed by dominant-negative ARA7/Rab F2b. Flg22-induced FLS2 endosomal numbers were increased by Concanamycin A treatment but reduced by Wortmannin, indicating that activated FLS2 receptors are targeted to late endosomes. RME inhibitors Tyrphostin A23 and Endosidin 1 altered but did not block induced FLS2 endocytosis. Additional inhibitor studies imply the involvement of the actin-myosin system in FLS2 internalization and trafficking. Altogether, we report a dynamic pattern of subcellular trafficking for FLS2 and reveal a defined framework for ligand-dependent endocytosis of this receptor. PMID:23085733

  7. Data storage on holographic memory card

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koppa, Pal; Erdei, Gabor; Ujhelyi, Ferenc; Varhegyi, Peter; Ujvari, T.; Loerincz, Emoeke; Szarvas, Gabor; Hvilsted, Soeren; Ramanujam, P. S.; Richter, Peter I.

    2000-10-01

    Our goal is to develop a re-writable holographic memory card system based on thin film polymer media on credit card size plastic carriers. Data is stored in our system in form of polarization holograms that present high efficiency and excellent suppression of higher orders even for thin material. Data is written on the card in a parallel way using spatial light modulators to encode the object beam that is Fourier transformed by a custom objective lens and interferes with the reference beam (of orthogonal polarization) on the card. We use reflective carrier in order to read out the data from the same side of the card. This allows us to have a compact system and standard ID 1 type carrier card. The optical system and the data organization are optimized to have a data density higher than 1bit/micrometers 2. We expect to pass the limit of 10 bit/micrometers 2 with the introduction of phase coded multiplexing that would provide more than 2Gbyte capacity if using half the card area as active surface.

  8. Passive droplet sorting using viscoelastic flow focusing.

    PubMed

    Hatch, Andrew C; Patel, Apurva; Beer, N Reginald; Lee, Abraham P

    2013-04-07

    We present a study of passive hydrodynamic droplet sorting in microfluidic channels based on intrinsic viscoelastic fluid properties. Sorting is achieved by tuning the droplets' intrinsic viscous and viscoelastic properties relative to the continuous oil phase to achieve a positive or negative lateral migration toward high or low shear gradients in the channel. In the presence of weakly viscoelastic fluid behavior, droplets with a viscosity ratio, κ, between 0.5-10 were found to migrate toward a high shear gradient near the channel walls. For all other κ-values, or Newtonian fluids, droplets would migrate toward a low shear gradient at the channel centerline. It was also found that for strongly viscoelastic fluids with low interfacial tension, droplets would migrate toward the edge even with κ-values lower than 0.5. The resulting bi-directional lateral droplet migration between different droplets allows size-independent sorting. Still, their sorting efficiencies are dependent on droplet size, intrinsic fluid elasticity, viscosity, droplet deformability, and overall fluid shear rates. Based on these findings, we demonstrate >200 Hz passive droplet sorting frequencies and achieve >100 fold enrichment factors without the need to actively sense and/or control active mechanisms. Using a low viscosity oil phase of 6.25 cPs, we demonstrate sorting discrimination of 1 cPs and 5 cPs aqueous droplets with κ-values of 0.2 and 0.8 respectively.

  9. Evidence for TLR4 and FcRγ-CARD9 activation by cholera toxin B subunit and its direct bindings to TREM2 and LMIR5 receptors.

    PubMed

    Phongsisay, Vongsavanh; Iizasa, Ei'ichi; Hara, Hiromitsu; Yoshida, Hiroki

    2015-08-01

    Cholera toxin (CTX) is a virulent factor of Vibrio cholerae that causes life-threatening diarrheal disease. Its non-toxic subunit CTB has been extensively studied for vaccine delivery. In immune cells, CTB induces a number of signaling molecules related to cellular activation and cytokine production. The mechanisms by which CTB exerts its immunological effects are not understood. We report here the immunological targets of CTB. The unexpected finding that GM1 ganglioside inhibited NF-κB activation in human monocytes stimulated with CTX and agonists of Toll-like receptors (TLR) suggests the possibility of CTX-TLR interaction. Indeed, CTX-induced IL-6 production was substantially reduced in MyD88(-/-) or TLR4(-/-) macrophages. Ectopic expression of TLR4 was required for CTX-induced NF-κB activation in HEK 293 cells. Furthermore, the inflammatory capacity of CTB was lost in the absence of TLR4, adaptor protein FcRγ, or its downstream signaling molecule CARD9. Attempts have been made to identify CTB-binding targets from various C-type lectin and immunoglobulin-like receptors. CTB targeted not only GM1 and TLR4 but also TREM2 and LMIR5/CD300b. CTB-TREM2 interaction initiated signal transduction through adaptor protein DAP12. The binding of CTB inhibited LMIR5 activation induced by its endogenous ligand 3-O-sulfo-β-d-galactosylceramide C24:1. In summary, CTB targets TLR4, FcRγ-CARD9, TREM2, and LMIR5. These findings provide new insights into the immunobiology of cholera toxin.

  10. Rab5 activity regulates GLUT4 sorting into insulin-responsive and non-insulin-responsive endosomal compartments: a potential mechanism for development of insulin resistance.

    PubMed

    Tessneer, Kandice L; Jackson, Robert M; Griesel, Beth A; Olson, Ann Louise

    2014-09-01

    Glucose transporter isoform 4 (GLUT4) is the insulin-responsive glucose transporter mediating glucose uptake in adipose and skeletal muscle. Reduced GLUT4 translocation from intracellular storage compartments to the plasma membrane is a cause of peripheral insulin resistance. Using a chronic hyperinsulinemia (CHI)-induced cell model of insulin resistance and Rab5 mutant overexpression, we determined these manipulations altered endosomal sorting of GLUT4, thus contributing to the development of insulin resistance. We found that CHI induced insulin resistance in 3T3-L1 adipocytes by retaining GLUT4 in a Rab5-activity-dependent compartment that is unable to equilibrate with the cell surface in response to insulin. Furthermore, CHI-mediated retention of GLUT4 in this non-insulin-responsive compartment impaired filling of the transferrin receptor (TfR)-positive and TfR-negative insulin-responsive storage compartments. Our data suggest that hyperinsulinemia may inhibit GLUT4 by chronically maintaining GLUT4 in the Rab5 activity-dependent endosomal pathway and impairing formation of the TfR-negative and TfR-positive insulin-responsive GLUT4 pools. This model suggests that an early event in the development of insulin-resistant glucose transport in adipose tissue is to alter the intracellular localization of GLUT4 to a compartment that does not efficiently equilibrate with the cell surface when insulin levels are elevated for prolonged periods of time.

  11. "Semi-straight sort of sex": class and gay community attachment explored within a framework of older homosexually active men.

    PubMed

    Chapple, M J; Kippax, S; Smith, G

    1998-01-01

    Gay Community Attachment has proved a significant predictor of successful behavior change among gay-identifying men in response to HIV/AIDS. Related work at Macquarie University, Sydney, Australia, indicated that attachment to gay community is not a simple issue; rather, complex issues of sexual identity formation, the constraints of social inequality and localized sexual cultures inhibit the process of attachment and, therefore, successful HIV prevention. This paper discusses some of the findings from close-focus (qualitative) research on older homosexually active men which explore in depth the dynamic whereby these men attached themselves to gay community in terms of an analysis of class, generation, and the interplay with self-construction and masculinity.

  12. Chip-based droplet sorting

    SciTech Connect

    Beer, Neil Reginald; Lee, Abraham; Hatch, Andrew

    2014-07-01

    A non-contact system for sorting monodisperse water-in-oil emulsion droplets in a microfluidic device based on the droplet's contents and their interaction with an applied electromagnetic field or by identification and sorting.

  13. Sorting quantum systems efficiently

    PubMed Central

    Ionicioiu, Radu

    2016-01-01

    Measuring the state of a quantum system is a fundamental process in quantum mechanics and plays an essential role in quantum information and quantum technologies. One method to measure a quantum observable is to sort the system in different spatial modes according to the measured value, followed by single-particle detectors on each mode. Examples of quantum sorters are polarizing beam-splitters (PBS) – which direct photons according to their polarization – and Stern-Gerlach devices. Here we propose a general scheme to sort a quantum system according to the value of any d-dimensional degree of freedom, such as spin, orbital angular momentum (OAM), wavelength etc. Our scheme is universal, works at the single-particle level and has a theoretical efficiency of 100%. As an application we design an efficient OAM sorter consisting of a single multi-path interferometer which is suitable for a photonic chip implementation. PMID:27142705

  14. Fluorescent activated cell sorting (FACS) combined with gene expression microarrays for transcription enrichment profiling of zebrafish lateral line cells.

    PubMed

    Gallardo, Viviana E; Behra, Martine

    2013-08-15

    Transgenic lines carrying fluorescent reporter genes like GFP have been of great value in the elucidation of developmental features and physiological processes in various animal models, including zebrafish. The lateral line (LL), which is a fish specific superficial sensory organ, is an emerging organ model for studying complex cellular processes in the context of the whole living animal. Cell migration, mechanosensory cell development/differentiation and regeneration are some examples. This sensory system is made of superficial and sparse small sensory patches called neuromasts, with less than 50 cells in any given patch. The paucity of cells is a real problem in any effort to characterize those cells at the transcriptional level. We describe here a method which we applied to efficiently separate subpopulation of cells of the LL, using two distinct stable transgenic zebrafish lines, Tg(cldnb:gfp) and Tg(tnks1bp1:EGFP). In both cases, the GFP positive (GFP+) cells were separated from the remainder of the animal by using a Fluorescent Activated Cell Sorter (FACS). The transcripts of the GFP+ cells were subsequently analyzed on gene expression microarrays. The combination of FACS and microarrays is an efficient method to establish a transcriptional signature for discrete cell populations which would otherwise be masked in whole animal preparation.

  15. Microfluidic train station: highly robust and multiplexable sorting of droplets on electric rails.

    PubMed

    Frenzel, Daniel; Merten, Christoph A

    2017-03-14

    Fluorescence-activated droplet sorting (FADS) has become a widely used technique for high-throughput screening applications. However, existing methods are very sensitive to fluctuating flow rates at the sorting junction, which can be caused by the pulsing effects of mechanical pumps, droplet aggregates or the accumulation of precipitates during lengthy biological screening applications. Furthermore, existing sorting devices allow only 2-way sorting. We present here a dielectrophoretic sorting system in which the droplets are sorted along multiple electrode pairs that run parallel to the channels. This enables highly reliable sorting (no errors were detected for more than 2000 sorting events) even when inverting the relative flow rates at a 2-way sorting junction from 80 : 20 to 20 : 80. Furthermore, our toolbox is scalable: we demonstrate on the example of a triple-colour sorting experiment with a total of four decoupled electrodes that multi-way sorting is feasible.

  16. Physical characterization and in vitro biological impact of highly aggregated antibodies separated into size-enriched populations by fluorescence-activated cell sorting

    PubMed Central

    Telikepalli, Srivalli; Shinogle, Heather E.; Thapa, Prem S.; Kim, Jae Hyun; Deshpande, Meghana; Jawa, Vibha; Middaugh, C. Russell; Narhi, Linda O.; Joubert, Marisa K.; Volkin, David B.

    2015-01-01

    An IgG2 monoclonal antibody (mAb) solution was subjected to stirring, generating high concentrations of nanometer and subvisible particles, which were then successfully size enriched into different size bins by low speed centrifugation or a combination of gravitational sedimentation and Fluorescence-Activated Cell Sorting (FACS). The size-fractionated mAb particles were assessed for their ability to elicit the release of cytokines from a population of donor-derived human peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) at two phases of the immune response. Fractions enriched in nanometer-sized particles showed a lower response than those enriched in micron-sized particles in this assay. Particles of 5–10 μm in size displayed elevated cytokine release profiles compared to other size ranges. Stir-stressed mAb particles had amorphous morphology, contained protein with partially altered secondary structure, elevated surface hydrophobicity (compared to controls), and trace levels of elemental fluorine. FACS size-enriched the mAb particle samples, yet did not notably alter the overall morphology or composition of particles as measured by Microflow imaging, Transmission Electron Microscopy, and Scanning Electron Microscopy-Energy Dispersive X-ray Spectroscopy. The utility and limitations of FACS for size separation of mAb particles and potential of in-vitro PBMC studies to rank order the immunogenic potential of various types of mAb particles is discussed. PMID:25753756

  17. Isolation of cell surface-specific human monoclonal antibodies using phage display and magnetically-activated cell sorting: applications in immunohematology.

    PubMed

    Siegel, D L; Chang, T Y; Russell, S L; Bunya, V Y

    1997-08-07

    A method is described for the isolation of filamentous phage-displayed human monoclonal antibodies directed at unpurifiable cell surface-expressed molecules. To optimize the capture of antigen-specific phage and minimize the binding of irrelevant phage antibodies, a simultaneous positive and negative selection strategy is employed. Cells bearing the antigen of interest are pre-coated with magnetic beads and diluted into an excess of unmodified antigen-negative cells. Following incubation of the cell admixture with a Fab/phage library, the antigen-positive cell population is retrieved using magnetically-activated cell sorting and antigen-specific Fab/phage are eluted and propagated in bacterial culture. Utilizing this protocol with magnetically-labeled Rh(D)-positive and excess unlabeled Rh(D)-negative human red blood cells and a Fab/phage library constructed from human peripheral blood lymphocytes, dozens of unique clinically-useful gamma 1 kappa and gamma 1 lambda anti-Rh(D) antibodies were isolated from a single alloimmunized individual. This cell-surface selection method is readily adaptable for use in other systems, such as for the identification of putative tumor-specific antigens and provides a rapid (< 1 month), high-yield approach for isolating self-replicative antibody reagents directed at novel or conformationally-dependent cell-surface epitopes.

  18. Magnetic activated cell sorting: an effective method for reduction of sperm DNA fragmentation in varicocele men prior to assisted reproductive techniques.

    PubMed

    Degheidy, T; Abdelfattah, H; Seif, A; Albuz, F K; Gazi, S; Abbas, S

    2015-10-01

    Semen parameters of varicocele men have been usually suspected to exhibit higher levels of abnormalities including DNA fragmentation, reactive oxygen species (ROS) and apoptotic markers. Negative correlation between increased level of DNA fragmentation and assisted reproductive techniques (ART) outcome has been studied by several authors. In the current study, we aim to evaluate the possible value of magnetic activated cell sorting (MACs) technology in reduction of DNA fragmentation in infertile varicocele patients prior to ART. Semen samples, collected from 36 varicocele patients, were prepared by density gradient centrifugation (DGC). Every sample was subsequently divided into two aliquots. One aliquot was kept untouched as pre-MACs control while the other aliquot was subjected to MACs technique, for depletion of apoptotic spermatozoa, and serves as post-MACs test. Sperm count, motility and DNA fragmentations were evaluated for both control and test samples. Post-MACs samples showed no deleterious reduction in total sperm motility (80.64 ± 6.97%) compared with control samples (80.97 ± 7.74%) while sperm DNA fragmentations were significantly reduced in post-MACs samples (9.61 ± 5.62%) compared with pre-MACs controls (12.43 ± 6.29%) (P < 0.05). It can be concluded that MACs technique is a simple, noninvasive, technique that can efficiently reduce DNA fragmentation in infertile varicocele patients prior to ART.

  19. Isolation, purification, culture and characterisation of myoepithelial cells from normal and neoplastic canine mammary glands using a magnetic-activated cell sorting separation system.

    PubMed

    Sánchez-Céspedes, R; Maniscalco, L; Iussich, S; Martignani, E; Guil-Luna, S; De Maria, R; Martín de Las Mulas, J; Millán, Y

    2013-08-01

    Mammary gland tumours, the most common malignant neoplasm in bitches, often display myoepithelial (ME) cell proliferation. The aim of this study was to isolate, purify, culture and characterise ME cells from normal and neoplastic canine mammary glands. Monodispersed cells from three normal canine mammary glands and five canine mammary tumours were incubated with an anti-Thy1 antibody and isolated by magnetic-activated cell sorting (MACS). Cells isolated from two normal glands (cell lines CmME-N1 and CmME-N2) and four tumours (cell lines CmME-K1 from a complex carcinoma, CmME-K2 from a simple tubulopapillary carcinoma, and CmME-K3 and CmME-K4 from two carcinomas within benign tumours) were cultured in supplemented DMEM/F12 media for 40days. Cell purity was >90%. Tumour-derived ME cell lines exhibited heterogeneous morphology, growth patterns and immunocytochemical expression of cytokeratins, whereas cell lines from normal glands retained their morphology and levels of cytokeratin expression during culture. Cell lines from normal glands and carcinomas within benign tumours grew more slowly than those from simple and complex carcinomas. This methodology has the potential to be used for in vitro analysis of the role of ME cells in the growth and progression of canine mammary tumours.

  20. Development of defined microbial population standards using fluorescence activated cell sorting for the absolute quantification of S. aureus using real-time PCR.

    PubMed

    Martinon, Alice; Cronin, Ultan P; Wilkinson, Martin G

    2012-01-01

    In this article, four types of standards were assessed in a SYBR Green-based real-time PCR procedure for the quantification of Staphylococcus aureus (S. aureus) in DNA samples. The standards were purified S. aureus genomic DNA (type A), circular plasmid DNA containing a thermonuclease (nuc) gene fragment (type B), DNA extracted from defined populations of S. aureus cells generated by Fluorescence Activated Cell Sorting (FACS) technology with (type C) or without purification of DNA by boiling (type D). The optimal efficiency of 2.016 was obtained on Roche LightCycler(®) 4.1. software for type C standards, whereas the lowest efficiency (1.682) corresponded to type D standards. Type C standards appeared to be more suitable for quantitative real-time PCR because of the use of defined populations for construction of standard curves. Overall, Fieller Confidence Interval algorithm may be improved for replicates having a low standard deviation in Cycle Threshold values such as found for type B and C standards. Stabilities of diluted PCR standards stored at -20°C were compared after 0, 7, 14 and 30 days and were lower for type A or C standards compared with type B standards. However, FACS generated standards may be useful for bacterial quantification in real-time PCR assays once optimal storage and temperature conditions are defined.

  1. Vibration Damping Circuit Card Assembly

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hunt, Ronald Allen (Inventor)

    2016-01-01

    A vibration damping circuit card assembly includes a populated circuit card having a mass M. A closed metal container is coupled to a surface of the populated circuit card at approximately a geometric center of the populated circuit card. Tungsten balls fill approximately 90% of the metal container with a collective mass of the tungsten balls being approximately (0.07) M.

  2. Recycling and Endosomal Sorting of Protease-activated Receptor-1 Is Distinctly Regulated by Rab11A and Rab11B Proteins*

    PubMed Central

    Grimsey, Neil J.; Coronel, Luisa J.; Cordova, Isabel Canto; Trejo, JoAnn

    2016-01-01

    Protease-activated receptor-1 (PAR1) is a G protein-coupled receptor that undergoes proteolytic irreversible activation by coagulant and anti-coagulant proteases. Given the irreversible activation of PAR1, signaling by the receptor is tightly regulated through desensitization and intracellular trafficking. PAR1 displays both constitutive and agonist-induced internalization. Constitutive internalization of PAR1 is important for generating an internal pool of naïve receptors that replenish the cell surface and facilitate resensitization, whereas agonist-induced internalization of PAR1 is critical for terminating G protein signaling. We showed that PAR1 constitutive internalization is mediated by the adaptor protein complex-2 (AP-2), whereas AP-2 and epsin control agonist-induced PAR1 internalization. However, the mechanisms that regulate PAR1 recycling are not known. In the present study we screened a siRNA library of 140 different membrane trafficking proteins to identify key regulators of PAR1 intracellular trafficking. In addition to known mediators of PAR1 endocytosis, we identified Rab11B as a critical regulator of PAR1 trafficking. We found that siRNA-mediated depletion of Rab11B and not Rab11A blocks PAR1 recycling, which enhanced receptor lysosomal degradation. Although Rab11A is not required for PAR1 recycling, depletion of Rab11A resulted in intracellular accumulation of PAR1 through disruption of basal lysosomal degradation of the receptor. Moreover, enhanced degradation of PAR1 observed in Rab11B-deficient cells is blocked by depletion of Rab11A and the autophagy related-5 protein, suggesting that PAR1 is shuttled to an autophagic degradation pathway in the absence of Rab11B recycling. Together these findings suggest that Rab11A and Rab11B differentially regulate intracellular trafficking of PAR1 through distinct endosomal sorting mechanisms. PMID:26635365

  3. Dynamic Virtual Credit Card Numbers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Molloy, Ian; Li, Jiangtao; Li, Ninghui

    Theft of stored credit card information is an increasing threat to e-commerce. We propose a dynamic virtual credit card number scheme that reduces the damage caused by stolen credit card numbers. A user can use an existing credit card account to generate multiple virtual credit card numbers that are either usable for a single transaction or are tied with a particular merchant. We call the scheme dynamic because the virtual credit card numbers can be generated without online contact with the credit card issuers. These numbers can be processed without changing any of the infrastructure currently in place; the only changes will be at the end points, namely, the card users and the card issuers. We analyze the security requirements for dynamic virtual credit card numbers, discuss the design space, propose a scheme using HMAC, and prove its security under the assumption the underlying function is a PRF.

  4. Utilization of a photoactivatable antigen system to examine B-cell probing termination and the B-cell receptor sorting mechanisms during B-cell activation.

    PubMed

    Wang, Jing; Tang, Shan; Wan, Zhengpeng; Gao, Yiren; Cao, Yiyun; Yi, Junyang; Si, Yanyan; Zhang, Haowen; Liu, Lei; Liu, Wanli

    2016-02-02

    Antigen binding to the B-cell receptor (BCR) induces several responses, resulting in B-cell activation, proliferation, and differentiation. However, it has been difficult to study these responses due to their dynamic, fast, and transient nature. Here, we attempted to solve this problem by developing a controllable trigger point for BCR and antigen recognition through the construction of a photoactivatable antigen, caged 4-hydroxy-3-nitrophenyl acetyl (caged-NP). This photoactivatable antigen system in combination with live cell and single molecule imaging techniques enabled us to illuminate the previously unidentified B-cell probing termination behaviors and the precise BCR sorting mechanisms during B-cell activation. B cells in contact with caged-NP exhibited probing behaviors as defined by the unceasing extension of membrane pseudopods in random directions. Further analyses showed that such probing behaviors are cell intrinsic with strict dependence on F-actin remodeling but not on tonic BCR signaling. B-cell probing behaviors were terminated within 4 s after photoactivation, suggesting that this response was sensitive and specific to BCR engagement. The termination of B-cell probing was concomitant with the accumulation response of the BCRs into the BCR microclusters. We also determined the Brownian diffusion coefficient of BCRs from the same B cells before and after BCR engagement. The analysis of temporally segregated single molecule images of both BCR and major histocompatibility complex class I (MHC-I) demonstrated that antigen binding induced trapping of BCRs into the BCR microclusters is a fundamental mechanism for B cells to acquire antigens.

  5. Multiple sort flow cytometer

    DOEpatents

    Engh, G. van den; Esposito, R.J.

    1996-01-09

    A flow cytometer utilizes multiple lasers for excitation and respective fluorescence of identified dyes bonded to specific cells or events to identify and verify multiple events to be sorted from a sheath flow and droplet stream. Once identified, verified and timed in the sheath flow, each event is independently tagged upon separation from the flow by an electrical charge of +60, +120, or +180 volts and passed through oppositely charged deflection plates with ground planes to yield a focused six way deflection of at least six events in a narrow plane. 8 figs.

  6. Multiple sort flow cytometer

    DOEpatents

    Van den Engh, Ger; Esposito, Richard J.

    1996-01-01

    A flow cytometer utilizes multiple lasers for excitation and respective fluorescence of identified dyes bonded to specific cells or events to identify and verify multiple events to be sorted from a sheath flow and droplet stream. Once identified, verified and timed in the sheath flow, each event is independently tagged upon separation from the flow by an electrical charge of +60, +120, or +180 volts and passed through oppositely charged deflection plates with ground planes to yield a focused six way deflection of at least six events in a narrow plane.

  7. Human Factors Assessment of Respiratory Support Pack (RSP) Cue Card

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Whitmore, Mihriban; Hudy, Cynthia; Smith, Danielle; Byrne, Vicky

    2005-01-01

    The Respiratory Support Pack (RSP) is a medical pack onboard the International Space Station (ISS) that contains much of the necessary equipment for providing aid to a conscious or unconscious crewmember in respiratory distress. Inside the RSP lid pocket is a 5.5 by 11 inch paper cue card, which is used by a Crew Medical Officer as the procedure to set up the equipment and deliver oxygen to a crewmember. In training, crewmembers expressed concerns about the readability and usability of the cue card; consequently, updating the cue card was prioritized as an activity to be completed prior to Space Shuttle return-to-flight. The Usability Testing and Analysis Facility at the Johnson Space Center evaluated the current layout of the cue card, and proposed several new cue card designs based on human factors principals. A series of three studies were performed in order to experimentally compare performance with each of the cue card designs. Nonmedically trained personnel used either a redesigned RSP cue card, or the original card to simulate resuscitation (using a mannequin along with the hardware). Time to completion, errors and subjective ratings were recorded. The addition of pictures, colors, borders, and simplification of the flow of information (making minimal changes to the actual procedure content) elicited great benefits during testing. Time to complete RSP procedures was reduced by as much as three minutes with the final cue card design. Detailed results from these studies, as well as general guidelines for cue card design will be discussed.

  8. A two-channel detection method for autofluorescence correction and efficient on-bead screening of one-bead one-compound combinatorial libraries using the COPAS fluorescence activated bead sorting system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hintersteiner, Martin; Auer, Manfred

    2013-03-01

    One-bead one-compound combinatorial library beads exhibit varying levels of autofluorescence after solid phase combinatorial synthesis. Very often this causes significant problems for automated on-bead screening using TentaGel beads and fluorescently labeled target proteins. Herein, we present a method to overcome this limitation when fluorescence activated bead sorting is used as the screening method. We have equipped the COPAS bead sorting instrument with a high-speed profiling unit and developed a spectral autofluorescence correction method. The correction method is based on a simple algebraic operation using the fluorescence data from two detection channels and is applied on-the-fly in order to reliably identify hit beads by COPAS bead sorting. Our method provides a practical tool for the fast and efficient isolation of hit beads from one-bead one-compound library screens using either fluorescently labeled target proteins or biotinylated target proteins. This method makes hit bead identification easier and more reliable. It reduces false positives and eliminates the need for time-consuming pre-sorting of library beads in order to remove autofluorescent beads.

  9. Deductive sort and climbing sort: new methods for non-dominated sorting.

    PubMed

    McClymont, Kent; Keedwell, Ed

    2012-01-01

    In recent years an increasing number of real-world many-dimensional optimisation problems have been identified across the spectrum of research fields. Many popular evolutionary algorithms use non-dominance as a measure for selecting solutions for future generations. The process of sorting populations into non-dominated fronts is usually the controlling order of computational complexity and can be expensive for large populations or for a high number of objectives. This paper presents two novel methods for non-dominated sorting: deductive sort and climbing sort. The two new methods are compared to the fast non-dominated sort of NSGA-II and the non-dominated rank sort of the omni-optimizer. The results demonstrate the improved efficiencies of the deductive sort and the reductions in comparisons that can be made when applying inferred dominance relationships defined in this paper.

  10. Spin-the-bottle Sort and Annealing Sort: Oblivious Sorting via Round-robin Random Comparisons.

    PubMed

    Goodrich, Michael T

    2014-03-01

    We study sorting algorithms based on randomized round-robin comparisons. Specifically, we study Spin-the-bottle sort, where comparisons are unrestricted, and Annealing sort, where comparisons are restricted to a distance bounded by a temperature parameter. Both algorithms are simple, randomized, data-oblivious sorting algorithms, which are useful in privacy-preserving computations, but, as we show, Annealing sort is much more efficient. We show that there is an input permutation that causes Spin-the-bottle sort to require Ω(n(2) log n) expected time in order to succeed, and that in O(n(2) log n) time this algorithm succeeds with high probability for any input. We also show there is a specification of Annealing sort that runs in O(n log n) time and succeeds with very high probability.

  11. The use of complimentary assays to evaluate the enrichment of human sperm quality in asthenoteratozoospermic and teratozoospermic samples processed with Annexin-V magnetic activated cell sorting.

    PubMed

    Delbes, G; Herrero, M B; Troeung, E-T; Chan, P T K

    2013-09-01

    Sperm chromatin integrity may affect the outcomes of assisted reproductive technology (ART). Developing a clinically reliable strategy to enrich sperm samples with high chromatin quality spermatozoa prior to sperm banking or use in ART would thus be advantageous. The objectives of this study were to: (i) assess the sperm chromatin quality in men with different categories of semen parameters; and (ii) evaluate the extents of Annexin-V magnetic-activated cell sorting (MACS) technology coupled with differential density gradient centrifugation (DGC) in improving sperm chromatin quality. Three categories of men from couples attending a university-based fertility clinic were recruited based on their semen parameters: normozoospermic (n = 13), asthenoteratozoospermic (n = 17) and teratozoospermic (n = 12). For each patient, spermatozoa in semen samples were processed first by DGC to enrich the motility and further by MACS to remove spermatozoa showing apoptotic features. The yield and enrichment of sperm quality was evaluated at each step with conventional semen parameters in conjunction with a combination of five complementary assays, to assess sperm maturity, chromatin structure, compaction and DNA integrity (Hyaluronic Binding Assay, SCSA, chromomycine A3 staining and TUNEL and COMET assays). Our results demonstrated that, compared with normozoospermic samples, raw asthenoteratozoospermic and teratozoospermic samples had a higher proportion of spermatozoa containing DNA breaks, but only asthenoteratozoospermic exhibited altered chromatin structure and decreased binding to hyaluronic acid. Interestingly, the DGC appeared to select for more mature spermatozoa with high DNA compaction. More importantly, in all categories of semen samples, Annexin-V MACS allows enrichment of spermatozoa with good chromatin quality as measured by the TUNEL and SCSA. Because effective treatment modalities to improve sperm DNA damage are limited, our results suggest a potential clinical

  12. Mutant HbpR transcription activator isolation for 2‐chlorobiphenyl via green fluorescent protein‐based flow cytometry and cell sorting

    PubMed Central

    Beggah, Siham; Vogne, Christelle; Zenaro, Elena; Van Der Meer, Jan Roelof

    2008-01-01

    Summary Mutants were produced in the A‐domain of HbpR, a protein belonging to the XylR family of σ54‐dependent transcription activators, with the purpose of changing its effector recognition specificity from 2‐hydroxybiphenyl (2‐HBP, the cognate effector) to 2‐chlorobiphenyl (2‐CBP). Mutations were introduced in the hbpR gene part for the A‐domain via error‐prone polymerase chain reaction, and assembled on a gene circuitry plasmid in Escherichia coli, permitting HbpR‐dependent induction of the enhanced green fluorescent protein (egfp). Cells with mutant HbpR proteins responsive to 2‐CBP were enriched and separated in a flow cytometry‐assisted cell‐sorting procedure. Some 70 mutants were isolated and the A‐domain mutations mapped. One of these had acquired true 2‐CBP recognition but reacted hypersensitively to 2‐HBP (20‐fold more than the wild type), whereas others had reduced sensitivity to 2‐HBP but a gain of 2‐CBP recognition. Sequencing showed that most mutants carried double or triple mutations in the A‐domain gene part, and were not located in previously recognized conserved residues within the XylR family members. Further selection from a new mutant pool prepared of the hypersensitive mutant did not result in increased 2‐CBP or reduced 2‐HBP recognition. Our data thus demonstrate that a one‐step in vitro‘evolutionary’ adaptation of the HbpR protein can result in both enhancement and reduction of the native effector recognition. PMID:21261823

  13. Efficient isolation of sperm with high DNA integrity and stable chromatin packaging by a combination of density-gradient centrifugation and magnetic-activated cell sorting

    PubMed Central

    Kwak, Su-Jin; Kim, Seok-Gi; Kim, Youn-Young; Park, Ji-Young; Yoo, Chang-Seok; Park, Il-Hae; Sun, Hong-Gil; Kim, Jae-Won; Lee, Kyeong-Ho

    2016-01-01

    Objective This study was carried out to investigate the correlations of the sperm DNA fragmentation index (DFI) with semen parameters and apoptosis, and to investigate the effects of density-gradient centrifugation (DGC) and magnetic-activated cell sorting (MACS) on reducing the proportion of sperm with DNA fragmentation and protamine deficiency. Methods Semen analysis and a sperm DNA fragmentation assay were performed to assess the correlations between semen parameters and the DFI in 458 semen samples. Sperm with progressive motility or non-apoptosis were isolated by DGC or MACS, respectively, in 29 normozoospermic semen samples. The effects of DGC or MACS alone and of DGC and MACS combined on reducing the amount of sperm in the sample with DNA fragmentation and protamine deficiency were investigated. Results The sperm DFI showed a significant correlation (r=–0.347, p<0.001) with sperm motility and morphology (r=–0.114, p<0.05) but not with other semen parameters. The DFI (11.5%±2.0%) of semen samples was significantly reduced by DGC (8.1%±4.1%) or MACS alone (7.4%±3.9%) (p<0.05). The DFI was significantly further reduced by a combination of DGC and MACS (4.1%±1.3%, p<0.05). Moreover, the combination of DGC and MACS (1.6%±1.1%, p<0.05) significantly reduced the protamine deficiency rate of semen samples compared to DGC (4.4%±3.2%) or MACS alone (3.4%±2.2%). Conclusion The combination of DGC and MACS may be an effective method to isolate high-quality sperm with progressive motility, non-apoptosis, high DNA integrity, and low protamine deficiency in clinical use. PMID:28090458

  14. Transcriptome analyses of inner cell mass and trophectoderm cells isolated by magnetic-activated cell sorting from bovine blastocysts using single cell RNA-seq.

    PubMed

    Zhao, X-M; Cui, L-S; Hao, H-S; Wang, H-Y; Zhao, S-J; Du, W-H; Wang, D; Liu, Y; Zhu, H-B

    2016-10-01

    Research on bovine embryonic stem cells (bESCs) has been hampered because bESCs are cultured in conditions that are based on information obtained from culturing mouse and human inner cell mass (ICM) cells. The aim of this study was to compare gene expression in ICM and trophectoderm (TE) cell lineages of bovine embryos and to discuss the findings relative to information available for mice and humans. We separated a high-purity (>90%) ICM and TE from bovine blastocysts by magnetic-activated cell sorting and analysed their transcriptomes by single cell RNA-seq. Differentially expressed genes (DEGs) were assessed using Gene Ontology (GO) and Kyoto Encyclopaedia of Genes and Genomes (KEGG) databases. Finally, qRT-PCR was performed to validate the RNA-seq results. From 207 DEGs identified (adjusted p ≤ .05; fold change ≥2), 159 and 48 had greater expression in the ICM and TE cells respectively. We validated 27 genes using qRT-PCR and found their expression patterns were mostly similar to those of RNA-seq, including 12 novel ICM-dominant (HNF4A, CCL24, FGFR4, IFITM3, PTCHD2, GJB5, FN1, KLK7, PRDM14, GRP, FGF19 and GCM1) and two novel TE-dominant (SLC10A1 and WNT4) genes. Bioinformatics analysis showed that these DEGs are involved in many important pathways, such as MAPK and cancer cell pathways, and these pathways have been shown to play essential roles in mouse and human ESCs in the self-renewal and pluripotent maintenance. As a conclusion, there were sufficient differences to allow us to conclude that the control of pluripotency in bovine ICM cells is species-specific.

  15. The proliferation and differentiation of osteoblasts in co-culture with human umbilical vein endothelial cells: An improved analysis using fluorescence-activated cell sorting.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yu; Schedle, Andreas; Matejka, Michael; Rausch-Fan, Xiaohui; Andrukhov, Oleh

    2010-12-01

    The interaction of osteoblasts and endothelial cells plays a pivotal role in osteogenesis. This interaction has been extensively studied using their direct co-culture in vitro. However, co-culture experiments require clear discrimination between the two different cell types in the mixture, but this was rarely achieved. This study is the first to use fluorescence-activated cell sorting (FACS) for the separation and quantitative analysis of the proliferation and differentiation of MG-63 cells grown in direct co-culture with human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs). The cells of the MG-63 cell line have properties consistent with the characteristics of normal osteoblasts. We labeled HUVECs with fluorescent antibody against CD31 and used FACS to measure the proportions of each cell type and to separate them based on their different fluorescence intensities. The rate of proliferation of the MG-63 cells was estimated based on a count of the total viable cells and the proportion of MG-63 cells in the mixture. The mRNA expression levels of the osteoblast differentiation markers alkaline phosphatase (ALP), collagen type 1 (Coll-1) and osteocalcin (OC) in the MG-63 cells were measured via real-time PCR after the separation via FACS. We found that HUVECs stimulated the proliferation of the MG-63 cells after 72 h of co-culture, and inhibited it after 120 h of co-culture. The mRNA expression levels of ALP and Coll-1 significantly increased, whereas that of OC significantly decreased in MG-63 after co-culture with HUVECs. Using FACS for the quantitative analysis of the proliferation and differentiation of osteoblasts directly interacting with endothelial cells could have merit for further co-culture research.

  16. Teleoperated robotic sorting system

    DOEpatents

    Roos, Charles E.; Sommer, Edward J.; Parrish, Robert H.; Russell, James R.

    2000-01-01

    A method and apparatus are disclosed for classifying materials utilizing a computerized touch sensitive screen or other computerized pointing device for operator identification and electronic marking of spatial coordinates of materials to be extracted. An operator positioned at a computerized touch sensitive screen views electronic images of the mixture of materials to be sorted as they are conveyed past a sensor array which transmits sequences of images of the mixture either directly or through a computer to the touch sensitive display screen. The operator manually "touches" objects displayed on the screen to be extracted from the mixture thereby registering the spatial coordinates of the objects within the computer. The computer then tracks the registered objects as they are conveyed and directs automated devices including mechanical means such as air jets, robotic arms, or other mechanical diverters to extract the registered objects.

  17. Teleoperated robotic sorting system

    DOEpatents

    Roos, Charles E.; Sommer, Jr., Edward J.; Parrish, Robert H.; Russell, James R.

    2008-06-24

    A method and apparatus are disclosed for classifying materials utilizing a computerized touch sensitive screen or other computerized pointing device for operator identification and electronic marking of spatial coordinates of materials to be extracted. An operator positioned at a computerized touch sensitive screen views electronic images of the mixture of materials to be sorted as they are conveyed past a sensor array which transmits sequences of images of the mixture either directly or through a computer to the touch sensitive display screen. The operator manually "touches" objects displayed on the screen to be extracted from the mixture thereby registering the spatial coordinates of the objects within the computer. The computer then tracks the registered objects as they are conveyed and directs automated devices including mechanical means such as air jets, robotic arms, or other mechanical diverters to extract the registered objects.

  18. What We Learned from Josh: Sorting Out Word Sorting.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fresch, Mary Jo

    2000-01-01

    Describes how a researcher and an elementary school teacher added a word sorting component to help children work through the complexities of the language as they group words into categories. Describes results as fifth graders thought aloud while they sorted words. Finds a link between children's developmental knowledge of spelling and their…

  19. NOD1CARD Might Be Using Multiple Interfaces for RIP2-Mediated CARD-CARD Interaction: Insights from Molecular Dynamics Simulation

    PubMed Central

    Pradhan, Sukanta Kumar; De, Sachinandan

    2017-01-01

    The nucleotide-binding and oligomerization domain (NOD)-containing protein 1 (NOD1) plays the pivotal role in host-pathogen interface of innate immunity and triggers immune signalling pathways for the maturation and release of pro-inflammatory cytokines. Upon the recognition of iE-DAP, NOD1 self-oligomerizes in an ATP-dependent fashion and interacts with adaptor molecule receptor-interacting protein 2 (RIP2) for the propagation of innate immune signalling and initiation of pro-inflammatory immune responses. This interaction (mediated by NOD1 and RIP2) helps in transmitting the downstream signals for the activation of NF-κB signalling pathway, and has been arbitrated by respective caspase-recruitment domains (CARDs). The so-called CARD-CARD interaction still remained contradictory due to inconsistent results. Henceforth, to understand the mode and the nature of the interaction, structural bioinformatics approaches were employed. MD simulation of modelled 1:1 heterodimeric complexes revealed that the type-Ia interface of NOD1CARD and the type-Ib interface of RIP2CARD might be the suitable interfaces for the said interaction. Moreover, we perceived three dynamically stable heterotrimeric complexes with an NOD1:RIP2 ratio of 1:2 (two numbers) and 2:1. Out of which, in the first trimeric complex, a type-I NOD1-RIP2 heterodimer was found interacting with an RIP2CARD using their type-IIa and IIIa interfaces. However, in the second and third heterotrimer, we observed type-I homodimers of NOD1 and RIP2 CARDs were interacting individually with RIP2CARD and NOD1CARD (in type-II and type-III interface), respectively. Overall, this study provides structural and dynamic insights into the NOD1-RIP2 oligomer formation, which will be crucial in understanding the molecular basis of NOD1-mediated CARD-CARD interaction in higher and lower eukaryotes. PMID:28114344

  20. DOD Common Access Card Information Brief

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-11-02

    12 July, 2001 DoD Common Access Card Information Brief Smart Card Project Managers Group REPORT DOCUMENTATION PAGE Form Approved OMB No. 0704-0188...statistics of DoD’s Common Access Card. 15. SUBJECT TERMS IATAC COLLECTION; smart card ; common access card; issuance; infrastructure 16. SECURITY...and statistics of DoD’s Common Access Card. 14. SUBJECT TERMS IATAC Collection, smart card , common access card, issuance infrastructure, 15. NUMBER OF

  1. Comparative Analysis of Circulating Endothelial Progenitor Cells in Age-Related Macular Degeneration Patients Using Automated Rare Cell Analysis (ARCA) and Fluorescence Activated Cell Sorting (FACS)

    PubMed Central

    Say, Emil Anthony T.; Melamud, Alex; Esserman, Denise Ann; Povsic, Thomas J.; Chavala, Sai H.

    2013-01-01

    Background Patients with age-related macular degeneration (ARMD) begin with non-neovascular (NNV) phenotypes usually associated with good vision. Approximately 20% of NNV-ARMD patients will convert to vision debilitating neovascular (NV) ARMD, but precise timing of this event is unknown. Developing a clinical test predicting impending conversion to NV-ARMD is necessary to prevent vision loss. Endothelial progenitor cells (EPCs), defined as CD34+VEGR2+ using traditional fluorescence activated cell sorting (FACS), are rare cell populations known to be elevated in patients with NV-ARMD compared to NNV-ARMD. FACS has high inter-observer variability and subjectivity when measuring rare cell populations precluding development into a diagnostic test. We hypothesized that automated rare cell analysis (ARCA), a validated and FDA-approved technology for reproducible rare cell identification, can enumerate EPCs in ARMD patients more reliably. This pilot study serves as the first step in developing methods for reproducibly predicting ARMD phenotype conversion. Methods We obtained peripheral venous blood samples in 23 subjects with NNV-ARMD or treatment naïve NV-ARMD. Strict criteria were used to exclude subjects with known angiogenic diseases to minimize confounding results. Blood samples were analyzed in masked fashion in two separate laboratories. EPCs were independently enumerated using ARCA and FACS within 24 hours of blood sample collection, and p<0.2 was considered indicative of a trend for this proof of concept study, while statistical significance was established at 0.05. Results We measured levels of CD34+VEGFR2+ EPCs suggestive of a trend with higher values in patients with NV compared to NNV-ARMD (p = 0.17) using ARCA. Interestingly, CD34+VEGR2+ EPC analysis using FACS did not produce similar results (p = 0.94). Conclusions CD34+VEGR2+ may have predictive value for EPC enumeration in future ARCA studies. EPC measurements in a small sample size were

  2. Store Security. Credit Card Fraud.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brockway, Jerry

    The manual, intended for use by adults and not in the high school classroom situation, presents material directed toward assisting in the reduction of credit card crime. This teaching guide is organized in three sections which deal with the nature of and major reasons for credit card fraud, the types of hot card runners, and methods of reducing…

  3. Follow Up: Credit Card Caution

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cahill, Timothy P.

    2007-01-01

    In "Pushing Plastic," ("The New England Journal of Higher Education", Summer 2007), John Humphrey notes that many college administrators justify their credit card solicitations by suggesting that credit card access will help students learn to manage their own finances. Instead, credit card debt will teach thousands of students…

  4. The Ubiquitin Ligase TRIM62 Regulates CARD9-Mediated Anti-Fungal Immunity and Intestinal Inflammation

    PubMed Central

    Cao, Zhifang; Conway, Kara L.; Heath, Robert J.; Rush, Jason S.; Leshchiner, Elizaveta S.; Ramirez-Ortez, Zaida G.; Nedelsky, Natalia B.; Huang, Hailiang; Ng, Aylwin; Gardet, Agnès; Cheng, Shih-Chin; Shamji, Alykhan F.; Rioux, John D.; Wijmenga, Cisca; Netea, Mihai G.; Means, Terry K.; Daly, Mark J.; Xavier, Ramnik J.

    2015-01-01

    Summary CARD9 is a central component of anti-fungal innate immune signaling via C-type lectin receptors, and several immune-related disorders are associated with CARD9 mutations. Here we used a rare CARD9 variant that confers protection against inflammatory bowel disease as an entry point to investigate CARD9 regulation. We showed that the C-terminal truncated CARD9 protective variant acted in a dominant negative manner for CARD9-mediated cytokine production, indicating an important role for the C terminus in CARD9 signaling. We identified TRIM62 as a CARD9 binding partner and showed that TRIM62 facilitated K27-linked poly-ubiquitination of CARD9. We identified K125 as the ubiquitinated residue on CARD9 and demonstrated that this ubiquitination was essential for CARD9 activity. Furthermore, we showed that Trim62-deficient mice have increased susceptibility to fungal infection, similar to Card9-deficient mice. This study utilizes a rare protective allele to uncover a TRIM62-mediated mechanism for regulation of CARD9 activation. PMID:26488816

  5. The Eggen Card Project

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Silvis, G.

    2014-06-01

    (Abstract only) Olin Eggen, noted astronomer (1919-1998), left to us all his raw observation records recorded on 3x5 cards. This project is to make all this data available as an online resource. History and progress of the project will be presented. Project details available at: https://sites.google.com/site/eggencards/home.

  6. Smart Icon Cards

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dunbar, Laura

    2015-01-01

    Icons are frequently used in the music classroom to depict concepts in a developmentally appropriate way for students. SmartBoards provide music educators yet another way to share these manipulatives with students. This article provides a step-by-step tutorial to create Smart Icon Cards using the folk song "Lucy Locket."

  7. Educational Card Games

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Smith, D. R.; Munro, E.

    2009-01-01

    A number of years have passed since the development of the "Voyager: Satellites" educational card game reported in "Physics Education" in 2003. Since then, a large number of copies of the game have been produced and distributed across the UK, to a warm reception from both pupils and teachers. This article reports on some of the…

  8. It's in the Cards.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kennedy, Mike

    2000-01-01

    Examines how the use of electronic access-control system enables college and universities to provide a safer environment for students and staff. The advantages of no-key doors, adapting entry card systems for multiple uses, and successfully retaining lock and key systems when facilities do not lend themselves to electronic security are discussed.…

  9. The Alumni Credit Card.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Clotfelter, Susan C.

    1987-01-01

    One of the hottest movements in banking right now is affinity credit cards. For banks, they mean a new source of credit customers. For institutions and alumni organizations, they can mean an easy, inexpensive way to keep the institutional name in front of alumni. (MLW)

  10. Elementary Environmental Learning Packet Grades 4-6, Third Revised Edition. [Intermediate CEL Blocks, Student Activity Cards].

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brevard County School Board, Cocoa, FL.

    This environmental education program consists of two levels: primary and intermediate. The learning materials are activity based and incorporate process and subject area skills with knowledge and concern for the environment. The program is also interdisciplinary including activities and skills from several areas. The materials in this set for…

  11. To sort or not to sort: the impact of spike-sorting on neural decoding performance

    PubMed Central

    Todorova, Sonia; Sadtler, Patrick; Batista, Aaron; Chase, Steven; Ventura, Valérie

    2015-01-01

    Objective Brain-computer interfaces (BCIs) are a promising technology for restoring motor ability to paralyzed patients: spiking-based BCIs have successfully been used in clinical trials to control multi-degree-of-freedom robotic devices. Current implementations of these devices require a lengthy spike-sorting step, which is an obstacle to moving this technology from the lab to the clinic. A viable alternative is to avoid spike-sorting, treating all threshold crossings of the voltage waveform on an electrode as coming from one putative neuron. It is not known, however, how much decoding information might be lost by ignoring spike identity. Approach We present a full analysis of the effects of spike-sorting schemes on decoding performance. Specifically, we compare how well two common decoders, the optimal linear estimator and the Kalman filter, reconstruct the arm movements of non-human primates performing reaching tasks, when receiving input from various sorting schemes. The schemes we tested included: using threshold crossings without spike-sorting; expertsorting discarding the noise; expert-sorting, including the noise as if it were another neuron; and automatic spike-sorting using waveform features. We also decoded from a joint statistical model for the waveforms and tuning curves, which does not involve an explicit spike-sorting step. Main results Discarding the threshold crossings that cannot be assigned to neurons degrades decoding: no spikes should be discarded. Decoding based on spike-sorted units outperforms decoding based on electrodes voltage crossings: spike-sorting is useful. The four waveform based spike-sorting methods tested here yield similar decoding efficiencies: a fast and simple method is competitive. Decoding using the joint waveform and tuning model shows promise but is not consistently superior. Significance Our results indicate that simple automated spikesorting performs as well as computationally or manually more intensive methods, which

  12. Insulin activation of vacuolar protein sorting 34 mediates localized phosphatidylinositol 3-phosphate production at lamellipodia and activation of mTOR/S6K1.

    PubMed

    Hirsch, Dianne S; Shen, Yi; Dokmanovic, Milos; Yu, Joyce; Mohan, Nishant; Elzarrad, Mohammed Khair; Wu, Wen Jin

    2014-06-01

    The class III phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase, VPS34, phosphorylates the D3 hydroxyl of inositol generating phosphatidylinositol 3-phosphate (ptdins(3)p). Initial studies suggested that ptdins(3)p solely functioned as a component of vesicular and endosomal membranes and that VPS34 did not function in signal transduction. However, VPS34 has recently been shown to be required for insulin-mediated activation of S6 kinase 1 (S6K1). Whether VPS34 activity is directly regulated by insulin is unclear. It is also not known whether VPS34 activity can be spatially restricted in response to extracellular stimuli. Data presented here demonstrate that in response to insulin, VPS34 is activated and translocated to lamellipodia where it produces ptdins(3)p. The localized production of ptdins(3)p is dependent on Src phosphorylation of VPS34. In cells expressing VPS34 with mutations at Y231 or Y310, which are Src-phosphorylation sites, insulin-stimulated VPS34 translocation to the plasma membrane and lamellipodia formation are blocked. mTOR also colocalizes with VPS34 and ptdins(3)p at lamellipodia following insulin-stimulation. In cells expressing the VPS34-Y231F mutant, which blocks lamellipodia formation, mTOR localization at the plasma membrane and insulin-mediated S6K1 activation are reduced. This suggests that mTOR localization at lamellipodia is important for full activation of S6K1 induced by insulin. These data demonstrate that insulin can spatially regulate VPS34 activity through Src-mediated tyrosine phosphorylation and that this membrane localized activity contributes to lamellipodia formation and activation of mTOR/S6K1signaling.

  13. An Alternative Medium of Social Education--The "Horrors of War" Picture Cards.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nelson, Murry R.

    1997-01-01

    Explores the production, distribution, and content of the, "Horrors of War," a series of trading cards produced between 1938 and 1942. Created by a Baptist advertising executive the cards used graphic images to communicate an antiwar message to young adolescents. Discusses possible learning activities used in conjunction with the cards.…

  14. Label-free density difference amplification-based cell sorting.

    PubMed

    Song, Jihwan; Song, Minsun; Kang, Taewook; Kim, Dongchoul; Lee, Luke P

    2014-11-01

    The selective cell separation is a critical step in fundamental life sciences, translational medicine, biotechnology, and energy harvesting. Conventional cell separation methods are fluorescent activated cell sorting and magnetic-activated cell sorting based on fluorescent probes and magnetic particles on cell surfaces. Label-free cell separation methods such as Raman-activated cell sorting, electro-physiologically activated cell sorting, dielectric-activated cell sorting, or inertial microfluidic cell sorting are, however, limited when separating cells of the same kind or cells with similar sizes and dielectric properties, as well as similar electrophysiological phenotypes. Here we report a label-free density difference amplification-based cell sorting (dDACS) without using any external optical, magnetic, electrical forces, or fluidic activations. The conceptual microfluidic design consists of an inlet, hydraulic jump cavity, and multiple outlets. Incoming particles experience gravity, buoyancy, and drag forces in the separation chamber. The height and distance that each particle can reach in the chamber are different and depend on its density, thus allowing for the separation of particles into multiple outlets. The separation behavior of the particles, based on the ratio of the channel heights of the inlet and chamber and Reynolds number has been systematically studied. Numerical simulation reveals that the difference between the heights of only lighter particles with densities close to that of water increases with increasing the ratio of the channel heights, while decreasing Reynolds number can amplify the difference in the heights between the particles considered irrespective of their densities.

  15. Smart card multiple function badge

    SciTech Connect

    Nelson, R.A.

    1993-06-01

    Smart cards are credit card-sized computers with integrated data storage, an operating system to manage the data, and built-in security features that protect the data. They are used to distribute information to remote sites, providing the same or greater reliability, data integrity, and information security than a network system. However, smart cards may provide greater functionality at a lower cost than network systems. The US Department of Energy Hanford Site is developing the smart card to be used as a multiple function identification badge that will service various data management requirements on the Site. This paper discusses smart card technology and the proposed Hanford Site applications.

  16. REPEAT Card with TRIAL Card for students to improve their thoughts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Uragami, Takuyuki

    2007-05-01

    The TRIAL Card system shows good results in improving achievements in physics classes which involved 650 engineering course students. TRIAL Card system allows students to exchange information on ideas for recitation and on study habits/attitudes. A lecturer suggests skills essential for his learning; to analyze the descriptions in the textbook word by word, to confirm the facts every time by looking into the textbook and your own notebook, to think with key words written just in front of you, and to ask yourself who has ability to judge with help of experience in your childhood are the examples of some skills students wanted. Some students, and increasing number of students particularly in recent few years have shown character to depend on their lecturer. If a lecturer's instruction for them, however, once appears to them inappropriate, they are apt to strongly assert their uniqueness of lifestyle and want to distinguish the differences of thought only to leave opposition to their lecturer in vain. The REPEAT Card, which means to REPEat Active Trial, seems to help us lead students to elaborate points of ambiguities in their thoughts and to bring the points to the attention of the class as an open space. Doubts, better or worse, are to be recorded repeatedly every week in his own REPEAT Card by the student. The TRIAL Card and the REPEAT Card are printed to appear in a sheet of his own, and are now used in laboratory work as well to improve technique and behavior.

  17. To sort or not to sort: the impact of spike-sorting on neural decoding performance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Todorova, Sonia; Sadtler, Patrick; Batista, Aaron; Chase, Steven; Ventura, Valérie

    2014-10-01

    Objective. Brain-computer interfaces (BCIs) are a promising technology for restoring motor ability to paralyzed patients. Spiking-based BCIs have successfully been used in clinical trials to control multi-degree-of-freedom robotic devices. Current implementations of these devices require a lengthy spike-sorting step, which is an obstacle to moving this technology from the lab to the clinic. A viable alternative is to avoid spike-sorting, treating all threshold crossings of the voltage waveform on an electrode as coming from one putative neuron. It is not known, however, how much decoding information might be lost by ignoring spike identity. Approach. We present a full analysis of the effects of spike-sorting schemes on decoding performance. Specifically, we compare how well two common decoders, the optimal linear estimator and the Kalman filter, reconstruct the arm movements of non-human primates performing reaching tasks, when receiving input from various sorting schemes. The schemes we tested included: using threshold crossings without spike-sorting; expert-sorting discarding the noise; expert-sorting, including the noise as if it were another neuron; and automatic spike-sorting using waveform features. We also decoded from a joint statistical model for the waveforms and tuning curves, which does not involve an explicit spike-sorting step. Main results. Discarding the threshold crossings that cannot be assigned to neurons degrades decoding: no spikes should be discarded. Decoding based on spike-sorted units outperforms decoding based on electrodes voltage crossings: spike-sorting is useful. The four waveform based spike-sorting methods tested here yield similar decoding efficiencies: a fast and simple method is competitive. Decoding using the joint waveform and tuning model shows promise but is not consistently superior. Significance. Our results indicate that simple automated spike-sorting performs as well as the more computationally or manually intensive

  18. Deep Dermatophytosis and Inherited CARD9 Deficiency

    PubMed Central

    Vincent, Quentin B.; Liu, Luyan; Cypowyj, Sophie; Prando, Carolina; Migaud, Mélanie; Taibi, Lynda; Ammar-Khodja, Aomar; Stambouli, Omar Boudghene; Guellil, Boumediene; Jacobs, Frederique; Goffard, Jean-Christophe; Schepers, Kinda; del Marmol, Véronique; Boussofara, Lobna; Denguezli, Mohamed; Larif, Molka; Bachelez, Hervé; Michel, Laurence; Lefranc, Gérard; Hay, Rod; Jouvion, Gregory; Chretien, Fabrice; Fraitag, Sylvie; Bougnoux, Marie-Elisabeth; Boudia, Merad

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND Deep dermatophytosis is a severe and sometimes life-threatening fungal infection caused by dermatophytes. It is characterized by extensive dermal and subcutaneous tissue invasion and by frequent dissemination to the lymph nodes and, occasionally, the central nervous system. The condition is different from common superficial dermatophyte infection and has been reported in patients with no known immunodeficiency. Patients are mostly from North African, consanguineous, multiplex families, which strongly suggests a mendelian genetic cause. METHODS We studied the clinical features of deep dermatophytosis in 17 patients with no known immunodeficiency from eight unrelated Tunisian, Algerian, and Moroccan families. Because CARD9 (caspase recruitment domain–containing protein 9) deficiency has been reported in an Iranian family with invasive fungal infections, we also sequenced CARD9 in the patients. RESULTS Four patients died, at 28, 29, 37, and 39 years of age, with clinically active deep dermatophytosis. No other severe infections, fungal or otherwise, were reported in the surviving patients, who ranged in age from 37 to 75 years. The 15 Algerian and Tunisian patients, from seven unrelated families, had a homozygous Q289X CARD9 allele, due to a founder effect. The 2 Moroccan siblings were homozygous for the R101C CARD9 allele. Both alleles are rare deleterious variants. The familial segregation of these alleles was consistent with autosomal recessive inheritance and complete clinical penetrance. CONCLUSIONS All the patients with deep dermatophytosis had autosomal recessive CARD9 deficiency. Deep dermatophytosis appears to be an important clinical manifestation of CARD9 deficiency. (Funded by Agence Nationale pour la Recherche and others.) PMID:24131138

  19. Security infrastructure requirements for electronic health cards communication.

    PubMed

    Pharow, Peter; Blobel, Bernd

    2005-01-01

    Communication and co-operation processes in the healthcare and welfare domain require a security infrastructure based on services describing status and relation of communicating principals as well as corresponding keys and attributes. Additional services provide trustworthy information on dynamic issues of communication and co-operation such as time and location of processes, workflow relations, integrity of archives and record systems, and system behaviour. To provide this communication and co-operation in a shared care environment, smart cards are widely used. Serving as storage media and portable application systems, patient data cards enable patient-controlled exchange and use of personal health data bound to specific purposes such as prescription and disease management. Additionally, patient status data such as the emergency data set or immunization may be stored in, and communicated by, patient data cards. Another deployment field of smart cards is their token functionality within a security framework, supporting basic security services such as identification, authentication, integrity, confidentiality, or accountability using cryptographic algorithms. In that context, keys, certificates, and card holder's attributes might be stored in the card as well. As an example, the German activity of introducing patient health cards and health professional cards is presented. Specification and enrolment aspects are on-going processes.

  20. Commercial Purchase Card Program

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-11-02

    Unless a waiver to the EFT requirement has been approved by the Office of the Secretary of Defense (Comptroller), the preferred method for purchases...maintenance information form . f. Provide accounting/certifying officials with a line of accounting for interest penalties. g. Upon implementation of...4100.33 g. Acknowledge acceptance of his or her appointment as an approving/certifying official and complete DD Form 577, Signature Card (Figure 2

  1. Natural Selection Is a Sorting Process: What Does that Mean?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Price, Rebecca M.

    2013-01-01

    To learn why natural selection acts only on existing variation, students categorize processes as either creative or sorting. This activity helps students confront the misconception that adaptations evolve because species need them.

  2. Increasing Active Student Responding in a University Applied Behavior Analysis Course: The Effect of Daily Assessment and Response Cards on End of Week Quiz Scores

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Malanga, Paul R.; Sweeney, William J.

    2008-01-01

    The study compared the effects of daily assessment and response cards on average weekly quiz scores in an introduction to applied behavior analysis course. An alternating treatments design (Kazdin 1982, "Single-case research designs." New York: Oxford University Press; Cooper et al. 2007, "Applied behavior analysis." Upper Saddle River:…

  3. A Mechanism for Anonymous Credit Card Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tamura, Shinsuke; Yanase, Tatsuro

    This paper proposes a mechanism for anonymous credit card systems, in which each credit card holder can conceal individual transactions from the credit card company, while enabling the credit card company to calculate the total expenditures of transactions of individual card holders during specified periods, and to identify card holders who executed dishonest transactions. Based on three existing mechanisms, i.e. anonymous authentication, blind signature and secure statistical data gathering, together with implicit transaction links proposed here, the proposed mechanism enables development of anonymous credit card systems without assuming any absolutely trustworthy entity like tamper resistant devices or organizations faithful both to the credit card company and card holders.

  4. Comprehensive aerological reference data set (CARDS)

    SciTech Connect

    Eskridge, R.E.; Polansky, A.C.; Alduchov, O.A.

    1997-11-01

    The possibility of anthropogenic climate change has reached the attention of Government officials and researchers. However, one cannot study climate change without climate data. The CARDS project will produce high-quality upper-air data for the research community and for policy-makers. The authors intend to produce a dataset which is: easy to use, as complete as possible, as free of random errors as possible. They will also attempt to identify biases and remove them whenever possible. In this report, they relate progress toward their goal. They created a robust new format for archiving upper-air data, and designed a relational database structure to hold them. The authors have converted 13 datasets to the new format and have archived over 10,000,000 individual soundings from 10 separate data sources. They produce and archive a metadata summary of each sounding they load. They have researched station histories, and have built a preliminary upper-air station history database. They have converted station-sorted data from their primary database into synoptic-sorted data in a parallel database. They have tested and will soon implement an advanced quality-control procedure, capable of detecting and often repairing errors in geopotential height, temperature, humidity, and wind. This unique quality-control method uses simultaneous vertical, horizontal, and temporal checks of several meteorological variables. It can detect errors other methods cannot.

  5. Jefferson Lab's Trim Card II

    SciTech Connect

    Trent Allison; Sarin Philip; C. Higgins; Edward Martin; William Merz

    2005-05-01

    Jefferson Lab's Continuous Electron Beam Accelerator Facility (CEBAF) uses Trim Card I power supplies to drive approximately 1900 correction magnets. These trim cards have had a long and illustrious service record. However, some of the employed technology is now obsolete, making it difficult to maintain the system and retain adequate spares. The Trim Card II is being developed to act as a transparent replacement for its aging predecessor. A modular approach has been taken in its development to facilitate the substitution of sections for future improvements and maintenance. The resulting design has been divided into a motherboard and 7 daughter cards which has also allowed for parallel development. The Trim Card II utilizes modern technologies such as a Field Programmable Gate Array (FPGA) and a microprocessor to embed trim card controls and diagnostics. These reprogrammable devices also provide the versatility to incorporate future requirements.

  6. Metaxins 1 and 2, two proteins of the mitochondrial protein sorting and assembly machinery, are essential for Bak activation during TNF alpha triggered apoptosis.

    PubMed

    Cartron, Pierre-François; Petit, Elise; Bellot, Grégory; Oliver, Lisa; Vallette, François M

    2014-09-01

    The proteins Bax and Bak are central in the execution phase of apoptosis; however, little is known about the partners involved in the control of this complex process. Here, we show that mitochondrial Bak is incorporated into a VDAC2/Mtx1/Mtx2 multi-protein complex in both resting and dying cells. VDAC2 is a porin that has previously been described as a partner of Bak while Mtx1 and Mtx2 are two proteins of the mitochondrial sorting and assembly machinery (SAM) that have been implicated in TNF-induced apoptosis. We show that, after the induction of apoptosis, Bak switches from its association with Mtx2 and VDAC2 to interact with Mtx1.

  7. ALGORITHM FOR SORTING GROUPED DATA

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Evans, J. D.

    1994-01-01

    It is often desirable to sort data sets in ascending or descending order. This becomes more difficult for grouped data, i.e., multiple sets of data, where each set of data involves several measurements or related elements. The sort becomes increasingly cumbersome when more than a few elements exist for each data set. In order to achieve an efficient sorting process, an algorithm has been devised in which the maximum most significant element is found, and then compared to each element in succession. The program was written to handle the daily temperature readings of the Voyager spacecraft, particularly those related to the special tracking requirements of Voyager 2. By reducing each data set to a single representative number, the sorting process becomes very easy. The first step in the process is to reduce the data set of width 'n' to a data set of width '1'. This is done by representing each data set by a polynomial of length 'n' based on the differences of the maximum and minimum elements. These single numbers are then sorted and converted back to obtain the original data sets. Required input data are the name of the data file to read and sort, and the starting and ending record numbers. The package includes a sample data file, containing 500 sets of data with 5 elements in each set. This program will perform a sort of the 500 data sets in 3 - 5 seconds on an IBM PC-AT with a hard disk; on a similarly equipped IBM PC-XT the time is under 10 seconds. This program is written in BASIC (specifically the Microsoft QuickBasic compiler) for interactive execution and has been implemented on the IBM PC computer series operating under PC-DOS with a central memory requirement of approximately 40K of 8 bit bytes. A hard disk is desirable for speed considerations, but is not required. This program was developed in 1986.

  8. Stream processing health card application.

    PubMed

    Polat, Seda; Gündem, Taflan Imre

    2012-10-01

    In this paper, we propose a data stream management system embedded to a smart card for handling and storing user specific summaries of streaming data coming from medical sensor measurements and/or other medical measurements. The data stream management system that we propose for a health card can handle the stream data rates of commonly known medical devices and sensors. It incorporates a type of context awareness feature that acts according to user specific information. The proposed system is cheap and provides security for private data by enhancing the capabilities of smart health cards. The stream data management system is tested on a real smart card using both synthetic and real data.

  9. C-type lectin receptor dectin-3 mediates trehalose 6,6'-dimycolate (TDM)-induced Mincle expression through CARD9/Bcl10/MALT1-dependent nuclear factor (NF)-κB activation.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Xue-Qiang; Zhu, Le-Le; Chang, Qing; Jiang, Changying; You, Yun; Luo, Tianming; Jia, Xin-Ming; Lin, Xin

    2014-10-24

    Previous studies indicate that both Dectin-3 (also called MCL or Clec4d) and Mincle (also called Clec4e), two C-type lectin receptors, can recognize trehalose 6,6'-dimycolate (TDM), a cell wall component from mycobacteria, and induce potent innate immune responses. Interestingly, stimulation of Dectin-3 by TDM can also induce Mincle expression, which may enhance the host innate immune system to sense Mycobacterium infection. However, the mechanism by which Dectin-3 induces Mincle expression is not fully defined. Here, we show that TDM-induced Mincle expression is dependent on Dectin-3-mediated NF-κB, but not nuclear factor of activated T-cells (NFAT), activation, and Dectin-3 induces NF-κB activation through the CARD9-BCL10-MALT1 complex. We found that bone marrow-derived macrophages from Dectin-3-deficient mice were severely defective in the induction of Mincle expression in response to TDM stimulation. This defect is correlated with the failure of TDM-induced NF-κB activation in Dectin-3-deficient bone marrow-derived macrophages. Consistently, inhibition of NF-κB, but not NFAT, impaired TDM-induced Mincle expression, whereas NF-κB, but not NFAT, binds to the Mincle promoter. Dectin-3-mediated NF-κB activation is dependent on the CARD9-Bcl10-MALT1 complex. Finally, mice deficient for Dectin-3 or CARD9 produced much less proinflammatory cytokines and keyhole limpet hemocyanin (KLH)-specific antibodies after immunization with an adjuvant containing TDM. Overall, this study provides the mechanism by which Dectin-3 induces Mincle expression in response to Mycobacterium infection, which will have significant impact to improve adjuvant and design vaccine for antimicrobial infection.

  10. Science Shorts: Sort It out

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Adams, Barbara

    2007-01-01

    Many children enjoy collecting items such as seashells, state quarters, and trading cards. Asking students to think about the ways in which similar items differ, how objects can be grouped by a common characteristic, and how groups can be subsets of a larger category leads to an understanding of fundamental mathematics and science concepts: sets,…

  11. Print a Bed Bug Card - (Page of Cards)

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    For mass distribution: two sets of business-card-sized lists of tips for recognizing bed bugs and signs of an infestation, including a photo of bed bugs to assist identification. One card is for general use around home or office, the other for travelers.

  12. British and American attitudes toward credit cards.

    PubMed

    Yang, Bijou; James, Simon; Lester, David

    2006-04-01

    American university students owned more than twice as many credit cards as British university students. However, scores on a credit card attitude scale predicted the number of cards owned by respondents in both countries.

  13. Parallel mergs sort using comparison matrices. I

    SciTech Connect

    Romm, Y.E.

    1995-05-01

    The topics discussed in this paper are connected with internal merge sorting by a key (in short, M-sorting or M-sort). Originally developed by von Neumann, this is one of the first sorting methods. It still remains one of the fastest, involving Nlog{sub 2}N comparisons. The purpose of our article is to demonstrate the use of comparison matrices (CMs) for merging in M-sort. While preserving the known advantages of the sequential implementation of M-sort. CMs ensure more efficient use of main memory (one of the known weaknesses of M-sort is its large memory requirements) and effective parallelizability.

  14. Flow virometric sorting and analysis of HIV quasispecies from plasma

    PubMed Central

    Jones, Jennifer C.; Keele, Brandon F.; Jenkins, Lisa M. Miller; Demberg, Thorsten

    2017-01-01

    Flow cytometry is utilized extensively for cellular analysis, but technical limitations have prevented its routine application for characterizing virus. The recent introduction of nanoscale fluorescence-activated cytometric cell sorting now allows analysis of individual virions. Here, we demonstrate staining and sorting of infectious HIV. Fluorescent antibodies specific for cellular molecules found on budding virions were used to label CCR5-tropic Bal HIV and CXCR4-tropic NL4.3 HIV Env-expressing pseudovirions made in THP-1 cells (monocyte/macrophage) and H9 cells (T cells), respectively. Using a flow cytometer, we resolved the stained virus beyond isotype staining and demonstrated purity and infectivity of sorted virus populations on cells with the appropriate coreceptors. We subsequently sorted infectious simian/human immunodeficiency virus from archived plasma. Recovery was approximately 0.5%, but virus present in plasma was already bound to viral-specific IgG generated in vivo, likely contributing to the low yield. Importantly, using two broadly neutralizing HIV antibodies, PG9 and VRC01, we also sorted virus from archived human plasma and analyzed the sorted populations genetically and by proteomics, identifying the quasispecies present. The ability to sort infectious HIV from clinically relevant samples provides material for detailed molecular, genetic, and proteomic analyses applicable to future design of vaccine antigens and potential development of personalized treatment regimens. PMID:28239654

  15. Sortilin regulates sorting and secretion of Sonic hedgehog.

    PubMed

    Campbell, Charles; Beug, Shawn; Nickerson, Philip E B; Peng, Jimmy; Mazerolle, Chantal; Bassett, Erin A; Ringuette, Randy; Jama, Fadumo A; Morales, Carlos; Christ, Annabel; Wallace, Valerie A

    2016-10-15

    Sonic Hedgehog (Shh) is a secreted morphogen that is an essential regulator of patterning and growth. The Shh full-length protein undergoes autocleavage in the endoplasmic reticulum to generate the biologically active N-terminal fragment (ShhN), which is destined for secretion. We identified sortilin (Sort1), a member of the VPS10P-domain receptor family, as a new Shh trafficking receptor. We demonstrate that Sort-Shh interact by performing coimmunoprecipitation and proximity ligation assays in transfected cells and that they colocalize at the Golgi. Sort1 overexpression causes re-distribution of ShhN and, to a lesser extent, of full-length Shh to the Golgi and reduces Shh secretion. We show loss of Sort1 can partially rescue Hedgehog-associated patterning defects in a mouse model that is deficient in Shh processing, and we show that Sort1 levels negatively regulate anterograde Shh transport in axons in vitro and Hedgehog-dependent axon-glial interactions in vivo Taken together, we conclude that Shh and Sort1 can interact at the level of the Golgi and that Sort1 directs Shh away from the pathways that promote its secretion.

  16. Microfluidic droplet sorting using integrated bilayer micro-valves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Yuncong; Tian, Yang; Xu, Zhen; Wang, Xinran; Yu, Sicong; Dong, Liang

    2016-10-01

    This paper reports on a microfluidic device capable of sorting microfluidic droplets utilizing conventional bilayer pneumatic micro-valves as sorting controllers. The device consists of two micro-valves placed symmetrically on two sides of a sorting area, each on top of a branching channel at an inclined angle with respect to the main channel. Changes in transmitted light intensity, induced by varying light absorbance by each droplet, are used to divert the droplet from the sorting area into one of the three outlet channels. When no valve is activated, the droplet flows into the outlet channel in the direction of the main channel. When one of the valves is triggered, the flexible membrane of valve will first be deflected. Once the droplet leaves the detection point, the deflected membrane will immediately return to its default flattened position, thereby exerting a drawing pressure on the droplet and deviating it from its original streamline to the outlet on the same side as the valve. This sorting method will be particularly suitable for numerous large-scale integrated microfluidic systems, where pneumatic micro-valves are already used. Only few structural modifications are needed to achieve droplet sorting capabilities in these systems. Due to the mechanical nature of diverting energy applied to droplets, the proposed sorting method may induce only minimal interference to biological species or microorganisms encapsulated inside the droplets that may accompany electrical, optical and magnetic-based techniques.

  17. Sex-sorting sperm using flow cytometry/cell sorting.

    PubMed

    Garner, Duane L; Evans, K Michael; Seidel, George E

    2013-01-01

    The sex of mammalian offspring can be predetermined by flow sorting relatively pure living populations of X- and Y-chromosome-bearing sperm. This method is based on precise staining of the DNA of sperm with the nucleic acid-specific fluorophore, Hoechst 33342, to differentiate between the subpopulations of X- and Y-sperm. The fluorescently stained sperm are then sex-sorted using a specialized high speed sorter, MoFlo(®) SX XDP, and collected into biologically supportive media prior to reconcentration and cryopreservation in numbers adequate for use with artificial insemination for some species or for in vitro fertilization. Sperm sorting can provide subpopulations of X- or Y-bearing bovine sperm at rates in the 8,000 sperm/s range while maintaining; a purity of 90% such that it has been applied to cattle on a commercial basis. The sex of offspring has been predetermined in a wide variety of mammalian species including cattle, swine, horses, sheep, goats, dogs, cats, deer, elk, dolphins, water buffalo as well as in humans using flow cytometric sorting of X- and Y-sperm.

  18. All sorts of options for food product sorting

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Most food products undergo significant processing before arrival at the grocery store or local market. A major component of this processing includes sorting the product according to quality attributes such as size, color, sweetness, and ripeness. In addition, removal of defects or contaminants is a ...

  19. Automated Sorting of Transuranic Waste

    SciTech Connect

    Shurtliff, Rodney Marvin

    2001-03-01

    The HANDSS-55 Transuranic Waste Sorting Module is designed to sort out items found in 55-gallon drums of waste as determined by an operator. Innovative imaging techniques coupled with fast linear motor-based motion systems and a flexible end-effector system allow the operator to remove items from the waste stream by a touch of the finger. When all desired items are removed from the waste stream, the remaining objects are automatically moved to a repackaging port for removal from the glovebox/cell. The Transuranic Waste Sorting Module consists of 1) a high accuracy XYZ Stereo Measurement and Imaging system, 2) a vibrating/tilting sorting table, 3) an XY Deployment System, 4) a ZR Deployment System, 5) several user-selectable end-effectors, 6) a waste bag opening system, 7) control and instrumentation, 8) a noncompliant waste load-out area, and 9) a Human/Machine Interface (HMI). The system is modular in design to accommodate database management tools, additional load-out ports, and other enhancements. Manually sorting the contents of a 55-gallon drum takes about one day per drum. The HANDSS-55 Waste Sorting Module is designed to significantly increase the throughput of this sorting process by automating those functions that are strenuous and tiresome for an operator to perform. The Waste Sorting Module uses the inherent ability of an operator to identify the items that need to be segregated from the waste stream and then, under computer control, picks that item out of the waste and deposits it in the appropriate location. The operator identifies the object by locating the visual image on a large color display and touches the image on the display with his finger. The computer then determines the location of the object, and performing a highspeed image analysis determines its size and orientation, so that a robotic gripper can be deployed to pick it up. Following operator verification by voice or function key, the object is deposited into a specified location.

  20. Applying a Metrics Report Card

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Klubeck, Martin; Langthorne, Michael

    2008-01-01

    In this article, the authors suggest that providing a report card enables an IT department to check its progress and overall performance; communicate the department's effectiveness to university leadership, IT membership, and customers; and make any necessary adjustments. A report card will not show how efficiently the IT department functions, but…

  1. Authentication techniques for smart cards

    SciTech Connect

    Nelson, R.A.

    1994-02-01

    Smart card systems are most cost efficient when implemented as a distributed system, which is a system without central host interaction or a local database of card numbers for verifying transaction approval. A distributed system, as such, presents special card and user authentication problems. Fortunately, smart cards offer processing capabilities that provide solutions to authentication problems, provided the system is designed with proper data integrity measures. Smart card systems maintain data integrity through a security design that controls data sources and limits data changes. A good security design is usually a result of a system analysis that provides a thorough understanding of the application needs. Once designers understand the application, they may specify authentication techniques that mitigate the risk of system compromise or failure. Current authentication techniques include cryptography, passwords, challenge/response protocols, and biometrics. The security design includes these techniques to help prevent counterfeit cards, unauthorized use, or information compromise. This paper discusses card authentication and user identity techniques that enhance security for microprocessor card systems. It also describes the analysis process used for determining proper authentication techniques for a system.

  2. PREL Pacific Region Language Cards.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pacific Region Educational Lab., Honolulu, HI.

    This collection of 10 cue cards presents English translations of common English words and expressions into 10 Pacific Region languages: Palauan, Samoan, Chamorro, Hawaiian, Carolinian, Chuukese, Pohnpeian, Marshallese, Yapese, and Kosraean. The cards translate the following: hello, good morning, good afternoon, good night, thank you, you're…

  3. It's All in the Cards.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Burke, Jim

    2002-01-01

    Describes how the author learned by watching low-achieving students play intricate card games such as "Magic" that they can learn, can remember, and certainly can master information. Realizes that these cards were advanced learning tools, multifaceted texts using color, symbols, images, texts, and metaphor to help create a world of…

  4. Smart Cards and remote entrusting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aussel, Jean-Daniel; D'Annoville, Jerome; Castillo, Laurent; Durand, Stephane; Fabre, Thierry; Lu, Karen; Ali, Asad

    Smart cards are widely used to provide security in end-to-end communication involving servers and a variety of terminals, including mobile handsets or payment terminals. Sometime, end-to-end server to smart card security is not applicable, and smart cards must communicate directly with an application executing on a terminal, like a personal computer, without communicating with a server. In this case, the smart card must somehow trust the terminal application before performing some secure operation it was designed for. This paper presents a novel method to remotely trust a terminal application from the smart card. For terminals such as personal computers, this method is based on an advanced secure device connected through the USB and consisting of a smart card bundled with flash memory. This device, or USB dongle, can be used in the context of remote untrusting to secure portable applications conveyed in the dongle flash memory. White-box cryptography is used to set the secure channel and a mechanism based on thumbprint is described to provide external authentication when session keys need to be renewed. Although not as secure as end-to-end server to smart card security, remote entrusting with smart cards is easy to deploy for mass-market applications and can provide a reasonable level of security.

  5. Pile sorting innovations: exploring gender norms, power and equity in sub-Saharan Africa.

    PubMed

    Bourey, Christine; Stephenson, Rob; Bartel, Doris; Rubardt, Marcie

    2012-01-01

    Understanding gender norms, power and equity is important for developing successful sexual and reproductive health interventions. However, little attention has been given to how to capture the gender ideals and imbalances that inform these relationships in low resource settings. Pile sorting exercises were conducted in four gender-segregated focus groups in Ethiopia and Kenya. Each group received cards illustrated with a man, woman and man and woman together and cards labelled with duties and decisions. Participants discussed and decided together whether men, women or both performed each duty and decision and assigned the cards accordingly. Participants then reflected on and physically manipulated the piles to challenge gender norms, investigate role flexibility and identify agents of social change. Data collected included photographs of the pile sorts and recordings of the discussions. Conducting pile sorting within focus group discussions enabled comparative analyses of gender norms, while enriching data by focusing discussions and encouraging consensus building. Innovative applications facilitated participants' abilities to engage abstract concepts, reflecting on issues of gender norms, power and equity.

  6. The adaptor molecule CARD9 is essential for tuberculosis control.

    PubMed

    Dorhoi, Anca; Desel, Christiane; Yeremeev, Vladimir; Pradl, Lydia; Brinkmann, Volker; Mollenkopf, Hans-Joachim; Hanke, Karin; Gross, Olaf; Ruland, Jürgen; Kaufmann, Stefan H E

    2010-04-12

    The cross talk between host and pathogen starts with recognition of bacterial signatures through pattern recognition receptors (PRRs), which mobilize downstream signaling cascades. We investigated the role of the cytosolic adaptor caspase recruitment domain family, member 9 (CARD9) in tuberculosis. This adaptor was critical for full activation of innate immunity by converging signals downstream of multiple PRRs. Card9(-/-) mice succumbed early after aerosol infection, with higher mycobacterial burden, pyogranulomatous pneumonia, accelerated granulocyte recruitment, and higher abundance of proinflammatory cytokines and granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (G-CSF) in serum and lung. Neutralization of G-CSF and neutrophil depletion significantly prolonged survival, indicating that an exacerbated systemic inflammatory disease triggered lethality of Card9(-/-) mice. CARD9 deficiency had no apparent effect on T cell responses, but a marked impact on the hematopoietic compartment. Card9(-/-) granulocytes failed to produce IL-10 after Mycobacterium tuberculosis infection, suggesting that an absent antiinflammatory feedback loop accounted for granulocyte-dominated pathology, uncontrolled bacterial replication, and, ultimately, death of infected Card9(-/-) mice. Our data provide evidence that deregulated innate responses trigger excessive lung inflammation and demonstrate a pivotal role of CARD9 signaling in autonomous innate host defense against tuberculosis.

  7. Advances in automated nut sorting

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Nuts in general, and tree nuts in particular, are a high value crop in many countries. Products with defects, contamination, insects or fungal damage can cause serious losses to producers, so almost all products are subjected to some level of sorting to remove these undesirable products. This chap...

  8. The Multidimensional Card Selection Task: A new way to measure concurrent cognitive flexibility in preschoolers.

    PubMed

    Podjarny, Gal; Kamawar, Deepthi; Andrews, Katherine

    2017-03-15

    Most executive function research examining preschoolers' cognitive flexibility, the ability to think about something in more than one way, has focused on preschoolers' facility for sequentially switching their attention from one dimension to another (e.g., sorting bivalent cards first by color and then by shape). We know very little about preschoolers' ability to coordinate more than one dimension simultaneously (concurrent cognitive flexibility). Here we report on a new task, the Multidimensional Card Selection Task, which was designed to measure children's ability to consider two dimensions, and then three dimensions, concurrently (e.g., shape and size, and then shape, size, and color). More than half of the preschoolers in our sample of 107 (50 3-year-olds and 57 4-year-olds) could coordinate three dimensions simultaneously and consistently across three test trials. Furthermore, performance on the Multidimensional Card Selection Task was related, but not identical, to performance on other cognitive tasks, including a widely used measure of switching cognitive flexibility (the Dimensional Change Card Sort). The Multidimensional Card Selection Task provides a new way to measure concurrent cognitive flexibility in preschoolers, and opens another avenue for exploring the emergence of early cognitive flexibility development.

  9. Recent progress in multi-electrode spike sorting methods.

    PubMed

    Lefebvre, Baptiste; Yger, Pierre; Marre, Olivier

    2017-03-02

    In recent years, arrays of extracellular electrodes have been developed and manufactured to record simultaneously from hundreds of electrodes packed with a high density. These recordings should allow neuroscientists to reconstruct the individual activity of the neurons spiking in the vicinity of these electrodes, with the help of signal processing algorithms. Algorithms need to solve a source separation problem, also known as spike sorting. However, these new devices challenge the classical way to do spike sorting. Here we review different methods that have been developed to sort spikes from these large-scale recordings. We describe the common properties of these algorithms, as well as their main differences. Finally, we outline the issues that remain to be solved by future spike sorting algorithms.

  10. Punch Card Programmable Microfluidics

    PubMed Central

    Korir, George; Prakash, Manu

    2015-01-01

    Small volume fluid handling in single and multiphase microfluidics provides a promising strategy for efficient bio-chemical assays, low-cost point-of-care diagnostics and new approaches to scientific discoveries. However multiple barriers exist towards low-cost field deployment of programmable microfluidics. Incorporating multiple pumps, mixers and discrete valve based control of nanoliter fluids and droplets in an integrated, programmable manner without additional required external components has remained elusive. Combining the idea of punch card programming with arbitrary fluid control, here we describe a self-contained, hand-crank powered, multiplex and robust programmable microfluidic platform. A paper tape encodes information as a series of punched holes. A mechanical reader/actuator reads these paper tapes and correspondingly executes operations onto a microfluidic chip coupled to the platform in a plug-and-play fashion. Enabled by the complexity of codes that can be represented by a series of holes in punched paper tapes, we demonstrate independent control of 15 on-chip pumps with enhanced mixing, normally-closed valves and a novel on-demand impact-based droplet generator. We demonstrate robustness of operation by encoding a string of characters representing the word “PUNCHCARD MICROFLUIDICS” using the droplet generator. Multiplexing is demonstrated by implementing an example colorimetric water quality assays for pH, ammonia, nitrite and nitrate content in different water samples. With its portable and robust design, low cost and ease-of-use, we envision punch card programmable microfluidics will bring complex control of microfluidic chips into field-based applications in low-resource settings and in the hands of children around the world. PMID:25738834

  11. Punch card programmable microfluidics.

    PubMed

    Korir, George; Prakash, Manu

    2015-01-01

    Small volume fluid handling in single and multiphase microfluidics provides a promising strategy for efficient bio-chemical assays, low-cost point-of-care diagnostics and new approaches to scientific discoveries. However multiple barriers exist towards low-cost field deployment of programmable microfluidics. Incorporating multiple pumps, mixers and discrete valve based control of nanoliter fluids and droplets in an integrated, programmable manner without additional required external components has remained elusive. Combining the idea of punch card programming with arbitrary fluid control, here we describe a self-contained, hand-crank powered, multiplex and robust programmable microfluidic platform. A paper tape encodes information as a series of punched holes. A mechanical reader/actuator reads these paper tapes and correspondingly executes operations onto a microfluidic chip coupled to the platform in a plug-and-play fashion. Enabled by the complexity of codes that can be represented by a series of holes in punched paper tapes, we demonstrate independent control of 15 on-chip pumps with enhanced mixing, normally-closed valves and a novel on-demand impact-based droplet generator. We demonstrate robustness of operation by encoding a string of characters representing the word "PUNCHCARD MICROFLUIDICS" using the droplet generator. Multiplexing is demonstrated by implementing an example colorimetric water quality assays for pH, ammonia, nitrite and nitrate content in different water samples. With its portable and robust design, low cost and ease-of-use, we envision punch card programmable microfluidics will bring complex control of microfluidic chips into field-based applications in low-resource settings and in the hands of children around the world.

  12. Smart Cards in Hostile Environments,

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1995-09-14

    smart card systems still lack effective security for point-of-sale applications. We consider the point-of-sale terminal as a potentially hostile environment to the smart card . Moreover, we discuss several types of modifications that can be made to smart cards to improve their security and address this problem. We prove a set of equivalences among a number of these modifications: (1) private input = private output; (2) trusted input + one-bit trusted output = trusted output + one-bit trusted input; and (3) secure input = secure

  13. Credit Cards. Bulletin No. 721. (Revised.)

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fox, Linda Kirk

    This cooperative extension bulletin provides basic information about credit cards and their use. It covers the following topics: types of credit cards (revolving credit, travel and entertainment, and debit); factors to consider when evaluating a credit card (interest rates, grace period, and annual membership fee); other credit card costs (late…

  14. Sorting fluorescent nanocrystals with DNA

    SciTech Connect

    Gerion, Daniele; Parak, Wolfgang J.; Williams, Shara C.; Zanchet, Daniela; Micheel, Christine M.; Alivisatos, A. Paul

    2001-12-10

    Semiconductor nanocrystals with narrow and tunable fluorescence are covalently linked to oligonucleotides. These biocompounds retain the properties of both nanocrystals and DNA. Therefore, different sequences of DNA can be coded with nanocrystals and still preserve their ability to hybridize to their complements. We report the case where four different sequences of DNA are linked to four nanocrystal samples having different colors of emission in the range of 530-640 nm. When the DNA-nanocrystal conjugates are mixed together, it is possible to sort each type of nanoparticle using hybridization on a defined micrometer -size surface containing the complementary oligonucleotide. Detection of sorting requires only a single excitation source and an epifluorescence microscope. The possibility of directing fluorescent nanocrystals towards specific biological targets and detecting them, combined with their superior photo-stability compared to organic dyes, opens the way to improved biolabeling experiments, such as gene mapping on a nanometer scale or multicolor microarray analysis.

  15. Sorted.

    PubMed

    Towers, S

    1997-04-01

    Each year in Accident and Emergency an increasing number of young people present with acute problems related to social drugs. These problems range from mild symptoms to life-threatening conditions, many of which can be extremely difficult and time consuming for staff to manage. It has become apparent that as with sex the experimental age for taking drugs is getting younger as youths are now far more 'streetwise' than their predecessors. This is one of the main reasons for this paper being written; it is imperative that staff are equipped with the appropriate knowledge to deal with the challenge and are educated about the problems associated with current drug trends. This potentially improves the quality of care and, in turn, good communication improves relationships. Ecstasy is once again becoming increasingly popular within mainstream clubs, as recently highlighted in the media, and with it reappear its problems. This article discusses the historical aspects of Ecstasy and aims to educate staff about its use and effects and provides health promotion advice for those who are involved in the care of people who take Ecstasy.

  16. Sorting of Sperm by Morphology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koh, James; Marcos, Marcos

    2016-11-01

    Many studies have proven that the percentage of morphologically normal sperm is a significant factor in determining the success of assisted reproduction. The velocity of sperm in a microchannel with shear flow subjected to an external field will be explored theoretically. The difference in response between morphologically normal and abnormal sperm will be computed from a statistical approach, to study the feasibility and effectiveness of sorting by an external field to remove abnormal sperm. The full name of this author is Marcos.

  17. Notification: Management of Travel Cards

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    Project #OA-FY15-0156, April 20, 2015. The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA), Office of Inspector General (OIG), plans to begin preliminary research for an audit of the management of travel cards.

  18. Regulatory role of CARD3 in left ventricular remodelling and dysfunction after myocardial infarction.

    PubMed

    Li, Liangpeng; Wang, Xiaodi; Chen, Wen; Qi, Haoyu; Jiang, Ding-Sheng; Huang, Ling; Huang, Fuhua; Wang, Liming; Li, Hongliang; Chen, Xin

    2015-11-01

    Caspase activation and recruitment domain 3 (CARD3) is a caspase recruitment domain (CARD)-containing serine/threonine kinase and plays a pivotal role in apoptosis, immunity, tissue development and proliferation. To date, the causal relationship between CARD3 and myocardial infarction (MI) remains largely unexplored. This study aimed to identify the functional significance of CARD3 in the regulation of cardiac remodelling after MI and the underlying mechanisms of its effects. The levels of CARD3 expression were up-regulated in failing human and mouse post-infarction hearts. In addition, CARD3-knockout (KO) mice and transgenic mice overexpressing CARD3 in the heart were then generated and subjected to MI. Compared with wild-type (WT) control mice, CARD3-KO mice developed smaller infarct sizes, improved survival rates, and preserved left ventricle (LV) function after MI. Significantly, CARD3-KO hearts had less cardiomyocyte apoptosis and inflammatory cell infiltration in the infarct border zone. Attenuated LV remodelling was also observed in the KO hearts following MI, with reduced cardiac hypertrophy and fibrosis. Conversely, CARD3 overexpression resulted in the opposite MI-induced phenotype. Similar results were observed in ex vivo-cultured neonatal rat cardiomyocytes exposed to hypoxia. Mechanistically, we discovered that the CARD3-mediated detrimental effects of MI were associated with the activation of the NF-κB and p38 signalling cascades. Taken together, these data demonstrate that CARD3 serves as a novel positive modulator of ventricular remodelling after MI via the regulation of the NF-κB and p38 signalling. Thus, CARD3 may be a promising therapeutic target for the treatment of heart failure after MI.

  19. Cargo selectivity of yeast sorting nexins.

    PubMed

    Bean, Björn D M; Davey, Michael; Conibear, Elizabeth

    2017-02-01

    Sorting nexins are PX domain-containing proteins that bind phospholipids and often act in membrane trafficking where they help to select cargo. However, the functions and cargo specificities of many sorting nexins are unknown. Here, a high-throughput imaging screen was used to identify new sorting nexin cargo in the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Deletions of 9 different sorting nexins were screened for mislocalization of a set of green fluorescent protein (GFP)-tagged membrane proteins found at the plasma membrane, Golgi or endosomes. This identified 27 proteins that require 1 or more sorting nexins for their correct localization, 23 of which represent novel sorting nexin cargo. Nine hits whose sorting was dependent on Snx4, the sorting nexin-containing retromer complex, or both retromer and Snx3, were examined in detail to search for potential sorting motifs. We identified cytosolic domains of Ear1, Ymd8 and Ymr010w that conferred retromer-dependent sorting on a chimeric reporter and identified conserved residues required for this sorting in a functional assay. This work defined a consensus sequence for retromer and Snx3-dependent sorting.

  20. Householders’ Mental Models of Domestic Energy Consumption: Using a Sort-And-Cluster Method to Identify Shared Concepts of Appliance Similarity

    PubMed Central

    Walker, Ian; Verplanken, Bas; Shaddick, Gavin

    2016-01-01

    If in-home displays and other interventions are to successfully influence people’s energy consumption, they need to communicate about energy in terms that make sense to users. Here we explore householders’ perceptions of energy consumption, using a novel combination of card-sorting and clustering to reveal shared patterns in the way people think about domestic energy consumption. The data suggest that, when participants were asked to group appliances which they felt naturally ‘went together’, there are relatively few shared ideas about which appliances are conceptually related. To the extent participants agreed on which appliances belonged together, these groupings were based on activities (e.g., entertainment) and location within the home (e.g., kitchen); energy consumption was not an important factor in people’s categorisations. This suggests messages about behaviour change aimed at reducing energy consumption might better be tied to social practices than to consumption itself. PMID:27467206

  1. Householders' Mental Models of Domestic Energy Consumption: Using a Sort-And-Cluster Method to Identify Shared Concepts of Appliance Similarity.

    PubMed

    Gabe-Thomas, Elizabeth; Walker, Ian; Verplanken, Bas; Shaddick, Gavin

    2016-01-01

    If in-home displays and other interventions are to successfully influence people's energy consumption, they need to communicate about energy in terms that make sense to users. Here we explore householders' perceptions of energy consumption, using a novel combination of card-sorting and clustering to reveal shared patterns in the way people think about domestic energy consumption. The data suggest that, when participants were asked to group appliances which they felt naturally 'went together', there are relatively few shared ideas about which appliances are conceptually related. To the extent participants agreed on which appliances belonged together, these groupings were based on activities (e.g., entertainment) and location within the home (e.g., kitchen); energy consumption was not an important factor in people's categorisations. This suggests messages about behaviour change aimed at reducing energy consumption might better be tied to social practices than to consumption itself.

  2. Fractal Cards: A Space for Exploration in Geometry and Discrete Mathematics.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Simmt, Elaine; Davis, Brent

    1998-01-01

    Presents an activity using fractal cards--eye-catching pop-up cards--by applying simple iterative processes to single sheets of paper. This activity incorporates the concepts of measurement, number systems, sequences, series, limits, recursion, iteration, self-similarity, and fractional dimensions. Contains 12 references. (ASK)

  3. Structural insights into the MDP binding and CARD-CARD interaction in zebrafish (Danio rerio) NOD2: a molecular dynamics approach.

    PubMed

    Maharana, Jitendra; Patra, Mahesh Chandra; De, Bidhan Chandra; Sahoo, Bikash Ranjan; Behera, Bijay Kumar; De, Sachinandan; Pradhan, Sukanta Kumar

    2014-05-01

    Nucleotide binding and oligomerization domain (NOD2) is a key component of innate immunity that is highly specific for muramyl dipeptide (MDP)-a peptidoglycan component of bacterial cell wall. MDP recognition by NOD2-leucine rich repeat (LRR) domain activates NF-κB signaling through a protein-protein interaction between caspase activating and recruitment domains (CARDs) of NOD2 and downstream receptor interacting and activating protein kinase 2 (RIP2). Due to the lack of crystal/NMR structures, MDP recognition and CARD-CARD interaction are poorly understood. Herein, we have predicted the probable MDP and CARD-CARD binding surfaces in zebrafish NOD2 (zNOD2) using various in silico methodologies. The results show that the conserved residues Phe819, Phe871, Trp875, Trp929, Trp899, and Arg845 located at the concave face of zNOD2-LRR confer MDP recognition by hydrophobic and hydrogen bond (H-bond) interactions. Molecular dynamics simulations reveal a stable association between the electropositive surface on zNOD2-CARDa and the electronegative surface on zRIP2-CARD reinforced mostly by H-bonds and electrostatic interactions. Importantly, a 3.5 Å salt bridge is observed between Arg60 of zNOD2-CARDa and Asp494 of zRIP2-CARD. Arg11 and Lys53 of zNOD2-CARDa and Ser498 and Glu508 of zRIP2-CARD are critical residues for CARD-CARD interaction and NOD2 signaling. The 2.7 Å H-bond between Lys104 of the linker and Glu508 of zRIP2-CARD suggests a possible role of the linker for shaping CARD-CARD interaction. These findings are consistent with existing mutagenesis data. We provide first insight into MDP recognition and CARD-CARD interaction in the zebrafish that will be useful to understand the molecular basis of NOD signaling in a broader perspective.

  4. Mitochondrial staining allows robust elimination of apoptotic and damaged cells during cell sorting.

    PubMed

    Barteneva, Natasha S; Ponomarev, Eugeny D; Tsytsykova, Alla; Armant, Myriam; Vorobjev, Ivan A

    2014-04-01

    High-speed fluorescence-activated cell sorting is relevant for a plethora of applications, such as PCR-based techniques, microarrays, cloning, and propagation of selected cell populations. We suggest a simple cell-sorting technique to eliminate early and late apoptotic and necrotic cells, with good signal-to-noise ratio and a high-purity yield. The mitochondrial potential dye, TMRE (tetramethylrhodamine ethyl ester perchlorate), was used to separate viable and non-apoptotic cells from the cell sorting samples. TMRE staining is reversible and does not affect cell proliferation and viability. Sorted TMRE(+) cells contained a negligible percentage of apoptotic and damaged cells and had a higher proliferative potential as compared with their counterpart cells, sorted on the basis of staining with DNA viability dye. This novel sorting technique using TMRE does not interfere with subsequent functional assays and is a method of choice for the enrichment of functionally active, unbiased cell populations.

  5. Marker-specific sorting of rare cells using dielectrophoresis

    PubMed Central

    Hu, Xiaoyuan; Bessette, Paul H.; Qian, Jiangrong; Meinhart, Carl D.; Daugherty, Patrick S.; Soh, Hyongsok T.

    2005-01-01

    Current techniques in high-speed cell sorting are limited by the inherent coupling among three competing parameters of performance: throughput, purity, and rare cell recovery. Microfluidics provides an alternate strategy to decouple these parameters through the use of arrayed devices that operate in parallel. To efficiently isolate rare cells from complex mixtures, an electrokinetic sorting methodology was developed that exploits dielectrophoresis (DEP) in microfluidic channels. In this approach, the dielectrophoretic amplitude response of rare target cells is modulated by labeling cells with particles that differ in polarization response. Cell mixtures were interrogated in the DEP-activated cell sorter in a continuous-flow manner, wherein the electric fields were engineered to achieve efficient separation between the dielectrophoretically labeled and unlabeled cells. To demonstrate the efficiency of marker-specific cell separation, DEP-activated cell sorting (DACS) was applied for affinity-based enrichment of rare bacteria expressing a specific surface marker from an excess of nontarget bacteria that do not express this marker. Rare target cells were enriched by >200-fold in a single round of sorting at a single-channel throughput of 10,000 cells per second. DACS offers the potential for automated, surface marker-specific cell sorting in a disposable format that is capable of simultaneously achieving high throughput, purity, and rare cell recovery. PMID:16236724

  6. The paracaspase MALT1 mediates CARD14-induced signaling in keratinocytes.

    PubMed

    Afonina, Inna S; Van Nuffel, Elien; Baudelet, Griet; Driege, Yasmine; Kreike, Marja; Staal, Jens; Beyaert, Rudi

    2016-06-01

    Mutations in CARD14 have recently been linked to psoriasis susceptibility. CARD14 is an epidermal regulator of NF-κB activation. However, the ability of CARD14 to activate other signaling pathways as well as the biochemical mechanisms that mediate and regulate its function remain to be determined. Here, we report that in addition to NF-κB signaling, CARD14 activates p38 and JNK MAP kinase pathways, all of which are dependent on the paracaspase MALT1. Mechanistically, we demonstrate that CARD14 physically interacts with paracaspase MALT1 and activates MALT1 proteolytic activity and inflammatory gene expression, which are enhanced by psoriasis-associated CARD14 mutations. Moreover, we show that MALT1 deficiency or pharmacological inhibition of MALT1 catalytic activity inhibits pathogenic mutant CARD14-induced cytokine and chemokine expression in human primary keratinocytes. Collectively, our findings demonstrate a novel role for MALT1 in CARD14-induced signaling and indicate MALT1 as a valuable therapeutic target in psoriasis.

  7. "A Shock of Electricity Just Sort of Goes through My Body": Physical Activity and Embodied Reflexive Practices in Young Female Ballet Dancers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wellard, Ian; Pickard, Angela; Bailey, Richard

    2007-01-01

    Participation in physical activities, in and out of school, remains heavily influenced by social constructions of gendered behaviour. In addition, the body plays a significant part in the presentation of legitimate performances of physical practice and the construction of a physical "identity". The consequence is that in formalized…

  8. Passive microfluidic array card and reader

    DOEpatents

    Dugan, Lawrence Christopher; Coleman, Matthew A.

    2011-08-09

    A microfluidic array card and reader system for analyzing a sample. The microfluidic array card includes a sample loading section for loading the sample onto the microfluidic array card, a multiplicity of array windows, and a transport section or sections for transporting the sample from the sample loading section to the array windows. The microfluidic array card reader includes a housing, a receiving section for receiving the microfluidic array card, a viewing section, and a light source that directs light to the array window of the microfluidic array card and to the viewing section.

  9. Viability and DNA fragmentation in differently sorted boar spermatozoa.

    PubMed

    De Ambrogi, M; Spinaci, M; Galeati, G; Tamanini, C

    2006-11-01

    Sperm cell defense against DNA damage relies on two factors: the tight packaging of chromatin, based on condensation and substitution of histones with protamines, and the antioxidant agents present in seminal plasma. These defenses are extremely important as mature sperm is unable to repair DNA damage and even if a successful fertilization occurs, embryo undergoes apoptosis at the time of genomic activation. Sex-sorting exposes spermatozoa to stress sources such as high pressure, laser beam and electrical charge. The aim of this work was to determine how sorting procedures affect viability and DNA integrity in boar spermatozoa, by using the newly developed Sperm-Sus-Halomax. Four sperm populations were considered: CONTROL (no treatment), REAL (sex-sorted semen), BULK (semen sorted without sex separation) and NO LASER (semen only exposed to the high pressure, but including also cells normally discarded from sex-sorting). A significantly (P=0.019) lower viability in NO LASER (64.71%) than in CONTROL (78.6%) and REAL (80.5%) groups was found; this was accompanied by a significantly (P=0.001) higher DNA fragmentation index (DFI) in NO LASER group (6.86%) respect to CONTROL (3.30%) and REAL (3.42%) groups. BULK group did not show any difference in viability or DFI as compared to the other groups. In conclusion, we may believe that sex-sorting procedure as a whole does not affect either viability or DFI and that shear mechanical forces are a relevant source of DNA damage for sorted semen.

  10. Spike sorting for polytrodes: a divide and conquer approach

    PubMed Central

    Swindale, Nicholas V.; Spacek, Martin A.

    2014-01-01

    In order to determine patterns of neural activity, spike signals recorded by extracellular electrodes have to be clustered (sorted) with the aim of ensuring that each cluster represents all the spikes generated by an individual neuron. Many methods for spike sorting have been proposed but few are easily applicable to recordings from polytrodes which may have 16 or more recording sites. As with tetrodes, these are spaced sufficiently closely that signals from single neurons will usually be recorded on several adjacent sites. Although this offers a better chance of distinguishing neurons with similarly shaped spikes, sorting is difficult in such cases because of the high dimensionality of the space in which the signals must be classified. This report details a method for spike sorting based on a divide and conquer approach. Clusters are initially formed by assigning each event to the channel on which it is largest. Each channel-based cluster is then sub-divided into as many distinct clusters as possible. These are then recombined on the basis of pairwise tests into a final set of clusters. Pairwise tests are also performed to establish how distinct each cluster is from the others. A modified gradient ascent clustering (GAC) algorithm is used to do the clustering. The method can sort spikes with minimal user input in times comparable to real time for recordings lasting up to 45 min. Our results illustrate some of the difficulties inherent in spike sorting, including changes in spike shape over time. We show that some physiologically distinct units may have very similar spike shapes. We show that RMS measures of spike shape similarity are not sensitive enough to discriminate clusters that can otherwise be separated by principal components analysis (PCA). Hence spike sorting based on least-squares matching to templates may be unreliable. Our methods should be applicable to tetrodes and scalable to larger multi-electrode arrays (MEAs). PMID:24574979

  11. PSORS2 is due to mutations in CARD14.

    PubMed

    Jordan, Catherine T; Cao, Li; Roberson, Elisha D O; Pierson, Katherine C; Yang, Chi-Fan; Joyce, Cailin E; Ryan, Caitriona; Duan, Shenghui; Helms, Cynthia A; Liu, Yin; Chen, Yongqing; McBride, Alison A; Hwu, Wuh-Liang; Wu, Jer-Yuarn; Chen, Yuan-Tsong; Menter, Alan; Goldbach-Mansky, Raphaela; Lowes, Michelle A; Bowcock, Anne M

    2012-05-04

    Psoriasis is a common, immune-mediated genetic disorder of the skin and is associated with arthritis in approximately 30% of cases. Previously, we localized PSORS2 (psoriasis susceptibility locus 2) to chromosomal region 17q25.3-qter after a genome-wide linkage scan in a family of European ancestry with multiple cases of psoriasis and psoriatic arthritis. Linkage to PSORS2 was also observed in a Taiwanese family with multiple psoriasis-affected members. In caspase recruitment domain family, member 14 (CARD14), we identified unique gain-of-function mutations that segregated with psoriasis by using genomic capture and DNA sequencing. The mutations c.349G>A (p.Gly117Ser) (in the family of European descent) and c.349+5G>A (in the Taiwanese family) altered splicing between CARD14 exons 3 and 4. A de novo CARD14 mutation, c.413A>C (p.Glu138Ala), was detected in a child with sporadic, early-onset, generalized pustular psoriasis. CARD14 activates nuclear factor kappa B (NF-kB), and compared with wild-type CARD14, the p.Gly117Ser and p.Glu138Ala substitutions were shown to lead to enhanced NF-kB activation and upregulation of a subset of psoriasis-associated genes in keratinocytes. These genes included chemokine (C-C motif) ligand 20 (CCL20) and interleukin 8 (IL8). CARD14 is localized mainly in the basal and suprabasal layers of healthy skin epidermis, whereas in lesional psoriatic skin, it is reduced in the basal layer and more diffusely upregulated in the suprabasal layers of the epidermis. We propose that, after a triggering event that can include epidermal injury, rare gain-of-function mutations in CARD14 initiate a process that includes inflammatory cell recruitment by keratinocytes. This perpetuates a vicious cycle of epidermal inflammation and regeneration, a cycle which is the hallmark of psoriasis.

  12. Quantum Efficiency and Bandgap Analysis for Combinatorial Photovoltaics: Sorting Activity of Cu–O Compounds in All-Oxide Device Libraries

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    All-oxide-based photovoltaics (PVs) encompass the potential for extremely low cost solar cells, provided they can obtain an order of magnitude improvement in their power conversion efficiencies. To achieve this goal, we perform a combinatorial materials study of metal oxide based light absorbers, charge transporters, junctions between them, and PV devices. Here we report the development of a combinatorial internal quantum efficiency (IQE) method. IQE measures the efficiency associated with the charge separation and collection processes, and thus is a proxy for PV activity of materials once placed into devices, discarding optical properties that cause uncontrolled light harvesting. The IQE is supported by high-throughput techniques for bandgap fitting, composition analysis, and thickness mapping, which are also crucial parameters for the combinatorial investigation cycle of photovoltaics. As a model system we use a library of 169 solar cells with a varying thickness of sprayed titanium dioxide (TiO2) as the window layer, and covarying thickness and composition of binary compounds of copper oxides (Cu–O) as the light absorber, fabricated by Pulsed Laser Deposition (PLD). The analysis on the combinatorial devices shows the correlation between compositions and bandgap, and their effect on PV activity within several device configurations. The analysis suggests that the presence of Cu4O3 plays a significant role in the PV activity of binary Cu–O compounds. PMID:24410367

  13. Dietary forage concentration affects the feed sorting behavior of lactating dairy cows.

    PubMed

    Devries, T J; Beauchemin, K A; von Keyserlingk, M A G

    2007-12-01

    The objective of this study was to determine whether the amount of forage in a total mixed ration influences feed sorting by cows and whether the extent of this sorting changes as they adapt to a new diet. Six lactating Holstein cows, individually fed once per day, were provided each of 2 diets in a crossover design (dry matter basis): 1) a higher forage diet (HF; 62.3% forage), and 2) a lower forage diet (LF; 50.7% forage). Dry matter intake, feeding behavior, and sorting activity were monitored for each cow on each diet for 7 d. Fresh feed and orts were sampled daily for each cow and subjected to neutral detergent fiber (NDF) and particle size analysis. The particle size separator contained 2 screens (18 and 9 mm) and a bottom pan, resulting in 3 fractions (long, medium, and short). Sorting activity [for each fraction, NDF and physically effective NDF (peNDF)] was calculated as the actual intake expressed as a percentage of the predicted intake. Overall, sorting activity was greatest on the LF diet, with cows sorting for short particles but against long particles, medium particles, NDF, and peNDF. On the HF diet, cows sorted against long particles, NDF, and peNDF and sorted for short particles. Treatment x day interactions occurred for sorting for short particles and against peNDF, indicating that it took cows 1 d to adjust their sorting behavior to the LF diet. Cows on the LF diet consumed more dry matter but spent less time feeding, which resulted in a greater intake rate compared with cows on the HF diet. These results indicate that cows rapidly adjust their sorting behavior when subjected to a dietary change, and they exhibit more sorting for short particles and against long particles, NDF, and peNDF when fed an LF diet.

  14. The SMile Card: a computerised data card for multiple sclerosis patients. SMile Card Scientific Board.

    PubMed

    Mancardi, G L; Uccelli, M M; Sonnati, M; Comi, G; Milanese, C; De Vincentiis, A; Battaglia, M A

    2000-04-01

    The SMile Card was developed as a means for computerising clinical information for the purpose of transferability, accessibility, standardisation and compilation of a national database of demographic and clinical information about multiple sclerosis (MS) patients. In many European countries, centres for MS are organised independently from one another making collaboration, consultation and patient referral complicated. Only the more highly advanced clinical centres, generally located in large urban areas, have had the possibility to utilise technical possibilities for improving the organisation of patient clinical and research information, although independently from other centres. The information system, developed utilising the Visual Basic language for Microsoft Windows 95, stores information via a 'smart card' in a database which is initiated and updated utilising a microprocessor, located at each neurological clinic. The SMile Card, currently being tested in Italy, permits patients to carry with them all relevant medical information without limitations. Neurologists are able to access and update, via the microprocessor, the patient's entire medical history and MS-related information, including the complete neurological examination and laboratory test results. The SMile Card provides MS patients and neurologists with a complete computerised archive of clinical information which is accessible throughout the country. In addition, data from the SMile Card system can be exported to other database programs.

  15. Learning sorting algorithms through visualization construction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cetin, Ibrahim; Andrews-Larson, Christine

    2016-01-01

    Recent increased interest in computational thinking poses an important question to researchers: What are the best ways to teach fundamental computing concepts to students? Visualization is suggested as one way of supporting student learning. This mixed-method study aimed to (i) examine the effect of instruction in which students constructed visualizations on students' programming achievement and students' attitudes toward computer programming, and (ii) explore how this kind of instruction supports students' learning according to their self-reported experiences in the course. The study was conducted with 58 pre-service teachers who were enrolled in their second programming class. They expect to teach information technology and computing-related courses at the primary and secondary levels. An embedded experimental model was utilized as a research design. Students in the experimental group were given instruction that required students to construct visualizations related to sorting, whereas students in the control group viewed pre-made visualizations. After the instructional intervention, eight students from each group were selected for semi-structured interviews. The results showed that the intervention based on visualization construction resulted in significantly better acquisition of sorting concepts. However, there was no significant difference between the groups with respect to students' attitudes toward computer programming. Qualitative data analysis indicated that students in the experimental group constructed necessary abstractions through their engagement in visualization construction activities. The authors of this study argue that the students' active engagement in the visualization construction activities explains only one side of students' success. The other side can be explained through the instructional approach, constructionism in this case, used to design instruction. The conclusions and implications of this study can be used by researchers and

  16. An Anonymous Credit Card System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Androulaki, Elli; Bellovin, Steven

    Credit cards have many important benefits; however, these same benefits often carry with them many privacy concerns. In particular, the need for users to be able to monitor their own transactions, as well as bank’s need to justify its payment requests from cardholders, entitle the latter to maintain a detailed log of all transactions its credit card customers were involved in. A bank can thus build a profile of each cardholder even without the latter’s consent. In this paper, we present a practical and accountable anonymous credit system based on ecash, with a privacy preserving mechanism for error correction and expense-reporting.

  17. Defense Mechanism Card Pull in TAT Stories.

    PubMed

    Cramer, Phebe

    2017-01-01

    This study investigates the question of whether different Thematic Apperception Test (TAT; Murray, 1943 ) cards are likely to prompt stories that are characterized by different defense mechanisms. This condition is known as card pull and refers to the probability that different TAT cards elicit different personality scores for the same variable. If so, the assessment of defense use would be importantly influenced by the TAT cards used in an assessment. TAT stories from 3 different community samples were examined (Ns = 91, 98, 121), using a statistical method developed by Stein et al ( 2014 ). The results indicated that different TAT cards pull for different defenses, as assessed by the Defense Mechanism Manual (DMM: Cramer, 1991b ). However, the nature of card pull was not always consistent across samples. These dissimilarities could be due to group differences, or to the presence of different TAT cards used in the test battery, indicating that card pull is importantly determined by context.

  18. Application of visible spectroscopy in waste sorting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Spiga, Philippe; Bourely, Antoine

    2011-10-01

    Today, waste recycling, (bottles, papers...), is a mechanical operation: the waste are crushed, fused and agglomerated in order to obtain new manufactured products (e.g. new bottles, clothes ...). The plastics recycling is the main application in the color sorting process. The colorless plastics recovered are more valuable than the colored plastics. Other emergent applications are in the paper sorting, where the main goal is to sort dyed paper from white papers. Up to now, Pellenc Selective Technologies has manufactured color sorting machines based on RGB cameras. Three dimensions (red, green and blue) are no longer sufficient to detect low quantities of dye in the considered waste. In order to increase the efficiency of the color detection, a new sorting machine, based on visible spectroscopy, has been developed. This paper presents the principles of the two approaches and their difference in terms of sorting performance, making visible spectroscopy a clear winner.

  19. Teaching Number Identification to Students with Severe Disabilities Using Response Cards

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Skibo, Holly; Mims, Pamela; Spooner, Fred

    2011-01-01

    Active student responding (ASR) has been shown to be an effective way to improve the mathematical skills of students. One specific method of ASR is the use of response cards. In this study, a system of least prompts combined with response cards was used to increase mathematical knowledge, and number identification, of three elementary students…

  20. Math in Action. Pick a Card, Not Just Any Card.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bresser, Rusty; And Others

    1995-01-01

    This article describes how to play a card game entitled "Is It 10?" which is designed to capture elementary school students' attention while they practice addition, explore number combinations, and learn beginning probability concepts. Suggestions for both primary and older students are provided. (SM)

  1. Acoustic actuation and sorting of droplets and cells at ultrahigh rates in microfluidics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Franke, Thomas; Schmid, Lothar; Braunmueller, Susanne; Wixforth, Achim; Weitz, David A.; Franke Team; Franke/Weitz Team

    2011-03-01

    We direct the motion of droplets in microfluidic channels using a surface acoustic wave device. This method allows individual drops to be directed along separate microchannel paths at high volume flow rates, which is useful for droplet sorting. The same principle can be applied for biological cell sorting which operates in continuous flow at high sorting rates. The device is based on a surface acoustic wave cell-sorting scheme and combines many advantages of fluorescence activated cell sorting (FACS) and fluorescence activated droplet sorting (FADS) in microfluidic channels. It is fully integrated on a PDMS device, and allows fast electronic control of cell diversion. We direct cells (HaCaT, MV3 melanoma, fibroblasts) by acoustic streaming excited by a surface acoustic wave. The device underlying principle works without additional enhancement of the sorting by prior labeling of the cells with responsive markers such as magnetic or polarizable beads. We have combined the acoustic device successfully with a laser based fluorescence detection system and demonstrate sorting of fluorescent labeled drops at rates of several kHz without any false sorting.

  2. Apical sorting of a voltage- and Ca2+-activated K+ channel alpha -subunit in Madin-Darby canine kidney cells is independent of N-glycosylation.

    PubMed

    Bravo-Zehnder, M; Orio, P; Norambuena, A; Wallner, M; Meera, P; Toro, L; Latorre, R; González, A

    2000-11-21

    The voltage- and Ca(2+)-activated K(+) (K(V,Ca)) channel is expressed in a variety of polarized epithelial cells seemingly displaying a tissue-dependent apical-to-basolateral regionalization, as revealed by electrophysiology. Using domain-specific biotinylation and immunofluorescence we show that the human channel K(V,Ca) alpha-subunit (human Slowpoke channel, hSlo) is predominantly found in the apical plasma membrane domain of permanently transfected Madin-Darby canine kidney cells. Both the wild-type and a mutant hSlo protein lacking its only potential N-glycosylation site were efficiently transported to the cell surface and concentrated in the apical domain even when they were overexpressed to levels 200- to 300-fold higher than the density of intrinsic Slo channels. Furthermore, tunicamycin treatment did not prevent apical segregation of hSlo, indicating that endogenous glycosylated proteins (e.g., K(V,Ca) beta-subunits) were not required. hSlo seems to display properties for lipid-raft targeting, as judged by its buoyant distribution in sucrose gradients after extraction with either detergent or sodium carbonate. The evidence indicates that the hSlo protein possesses intrinsic information for transport to the apical cell surface through a mechanism that may involve association with lipid rafts and that is independent of glycosylation of the channel itself or an associated protein. Thus, this particular polytopic model protein shows that glycosylation-independent apical pathways exist for endogenous membrane proteins in Madin-Darby canine kidney cells.

  3. Cards in the Classroom: Mathematics and Methods.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Baker, Robert N.

    This report researches the use of a standard deck of playing cards in entry-level college mathematics classrooms. The study looks at published research on the use of cards, and reviews pedagogic concerns directly related to the implementation of playing cards in the classroom--including the appropriateness of manipulatives, the link to cooperative…

  4. Engineering software development with HyperCard

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Darko, Robert J.

    1990-01-01

    The successful and unsuccessful techniques used in the development of software using HyperCard are described. The viability of the HyperCard for engineering is evaluated and the future use of HyperCard by this particular group of developers is discussed.

  5. Helping Students Design HyperCard Stacks.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dunham, Ken

    1995-01-01

    Discusses how to teach students to design HyperCard stacks. Highlights include introducing HyperCard, developing storyboards, introducing design concepts and scripts, presenting stacks, evaluating storyboards, and continuing projects. A sidebar presents a HyperCard stack evaluation form. (AEF)

  6. Resource Cards on California Schools, 2006

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    EdSource, 2006

    2006-01-01

    These cards give fingertip access to the latest information about California's education system. They are separated into 4 sections that cover related topics: (1) Finance Data; (2) Finance and General Background; (3) Performance/Students; and (4) Staffing/Higher Education. There are a total of 28 cards. Each tan section card includes references to…

  7. HyperCard for Educators. An Introduction.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bull, Glen L.; Harris, Judi

    This guide is designed to provide a quick introduction to the basic elements of HyperCard for teachers who are familiar with other computer applications but may not have worked with hypermedia applications; previous familiarity with HyperCard or with Macintosh computers is not necessary. It is noted that HyperCard is a software construction…

  8. Novel CARD11 Mutations in Human Cutaneous Squamous Cell Carcinoma Lead to Aberrant NF-κB Regulation

    PubMed Central

    Watt, Stephen A.; Purdie, Karin J.; den Breems, Nicoline Y.; Dimon, Michelle; Arron, Sarah T.; McHugh, Angela T.; Xue, Dylan J.; Dayal, Jasbani H.S.; Proby, Charlotte M.; Harwood, Catherine A.; Leigh, Irene M.; South, Andrew P.

    2016-01-01

    NF-κB signaling plays a crucial role in regulating proliferation and differentiation in the epidermis. Alterations in the NF-κB pathway can lead to skin pathologies with a significant burden to human health such as psoriasis and cutaneous squamous cell carcinoma (cSCC). Caspase recruitment domain (CARD)-containing scaffold proteins are key regulators of NF-κB signaling by providing a link between membrane receptors and NF-κB transcriptional subunits. Mutations in the CARD family member, CARD14, have been identified in patients with the inflammatory skin diseases psoriasis and pityriasis rubra pilaris. Here, we describe that the gene coding for another CARD scaffold protein, CARD11, is mutated in more than 38% of 111 cSCCs, and show that novel variants outside of the coiled-coil domain lead to constitutively activated NF-κB signaling. CARD11 protein expression was detectable in normal skin and increased in all cSCCs tested. CARD11 mRNA levels were comparable with CARD14 in normal skin and CARD11 mRNA was increased in cSCC. In addition, we identified CARD11 mutations in peritumoral and sun-exposed skin, suggesting that CARD11-mediated alterations in NF-κB signaling may be an early event in the development of cSCC. PMID:26212909

  9. Accidental mobile phone card ingestion

    PubMed Central

    Dixit, Sudesh; Mekwan, Jayanand; Brayley, Nigel F

    2009-01-01

    Accidental overdose, poisoning and foreign-body ingestion are common presentations to the emergency department. Usually, the ingested material is a common drug or household product. We present an unusual case of accidental ingestion where the foreign body was a mobile phone simulation (SIM) card. PMID:21686554

  10. "Voyager": An Educational Card Game

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Smith, David Ryan

    2003-01-01

    "Voyager" is an educational card game involving scientific satellites, developed for use in schools with children aged 9 to 13 years. The idea of the game is to improve pupils' knowledge about the large number of scientific satellites there are in space in a fun way, while also practising numeracy skills. Several copies of the game were…

  11. Review of Sound Card Photogates

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gingl, Zoltan; Mingesz, Robert; Makra, Peter; Mellar, Janos

    2011-01-01

    Photogates are probably the most commonly used electronic instruments to aid experiments in the field of mechanics. Although they are offered by many manufacturers, they can be too expensive to be widely used in all classrooms, in multiple experiments or even at home experimentation. Today all computers have a sound card--an interface for analogue…

  12. Palmistry, tarot cards, and psychotherapy.

    PubMed

    Pejic, Nicholas G

    2008-01-01

    The author summarizes his experience with palm and Tarot card readers in New Orleans. The history, practice, and psychodynamics of palmistry and Tarot are explored. It's postulated that these practices are forms of archaic psychotherapy, which employ supportive treatment and placebo. These tactics are used to elicit hope for its clients.

  13. Comparing Candidate Hospital Report Cards

    SciTech Connect

    Burr, T.L.; Rivenburgh, R.D.; Scovel, J.C.; White, J.M.

    1997-12-31

    We present graphical and analytical methods that focus on multivariate outlier detection applied to the hospital report cards data. No two methods agree which hospitals are unusually good or bad, so we also present ways to compare the agreement between two methods. We identify factors that have a significant impact on the scoring.

  14. Improving Institutional Report Card Indicators

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McGowan, Veronica

    2016-01-01

    Institutional report cards are increasingly being used by higher educational institutions to present academic outcomes to external audiences of prospective students and parents, as well as program and institutional evaluators. While some prospective students are served by national transparency measures most users mine information from the…

  15. Use of board games, historical calendars, and trading cards in a history of psychology class.

    PubMed

    Abramson, Charles I; Burke-Bergmann, Amanda L; Nolf, Sondra L; Swift, Kristen

    2009-04-01

    This article describes three activities for students created for a history of psychology course: various board games, trading cards, and calendars. Data are provided on their effectiveness. Suggestions for incorporating the activities are described.

  16. A Meta-Analysis of the Wisconsin Card Sort Task in Autism

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Landry, Oriane; Al-Taie, Shems

    2016-01-01

    We conducted a meta-analysis of 31 studies, spanning 30 years, utilizing the WCST in participants with autism. We calculated Cohen's d effect sizes for four measures of performance: sets completed, perseveration, failure-to-maintain-set, and non-perseverative errors. The average weighted effect size ranged from 0.30 to 0.74 for each measure, all…

  17. Rigging the Deck: Selecting Good Problems for Expert-Novice Card-Sorting Experiments

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wolf, Steven F.; Dougherty, Daniel P.; Kortemeyer, Gerd

    2012-01-01

    A seminal study by Chi "et al." firmly established the paradigm that novices categorize physics problems by "surface features" (e.g., "incline," "pendulum," "projectile motion," etc.), while experts use "deep structure" (e.g., "energy conservation," "Newton 2," etc.). Yet, efforts to replicate the study frequently fail, since the ability to…

  18. Thinking Like a Chemist: Development of a Chemistry Card-Sorting Task to Probe Conceptual Expertise

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Krieter, Felicia E.; Julius, Ryan W.; Tanner, Kimberly D.; Bush, Seth D.; Scott, Gregory E.

    2016-01-01

    An underlying goal in most chemistry curricula is to enable students to think like chemists, yet there is much evidence to suggest that students can learn to solve problems without thinking conceptually like a chemist. There are few tools, however, that assess whether students are learning to think like Ph.D. faculty, putative experts in the…

  19. Rigging the deck: Selecting good problems for expert-novice card-sorting experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wolf, Steven F.; Dougherty, Daniel P.; Kortemeyer, Gerd

    2012-12-01

    A seminal study by Chi et al. firmly established the paradigm that novices categorize physics problems by “surface features” (e.g., “incline,” “pendulum,” “projectile motion,” etc.), while experts use “deep structure” (e.g., “energy conservation,” “Newton 2,” etc.). Yet, efforts to replicate the study frequently fail, since the ability to distinguish experts from novices turns out to be highly sensitive to the problem set being used. Exactly what properties of problems are most important in problem sets that discriminate experts from novices in a measurable way? To answer this question, we studied the categorizations by known physics experts and novices using a large, diverse set of problems. This set needed to be large so that we could determine how well experts and novices could be discriminated by considering both small subsets using an exhaustive Monte Carlo approach and larger subsets using simulated annealing. We found that the number of questions required to accurately classify experts and novices can be surprisingly small so long as the problem set is carefully crafted to be composed of problems with particular pedagogical and contextual features. Finally, we found that not only was what you ask (deep structure) important, but also how you ask it (problem context).

  20. Flexibility in Young People with Autism Spectrum Disorders on a Card Sort Task

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Reed, Phil; Watts, Helen; Truzoli, Roberto

    2013-01-01

    Adults with autism spectrum disorders (ASD) have shown deficits in switching between rules governing their behaviour, as have high-functioning children with ASD. However, there are few studies of flexibility in lower-functioning children with ASD. The current study investigated this phenomenon with a group of low-functioning children with ASD…

  1. CARD9 as a potential target in cardiovascular disease

    PubMed Central

    Peterson, Matthew R; Haller, Samantha E; Ren, Jun; Nair, Sreejayan; He, Guanglong

    2016-01-01

    Systemic inflammation and localized macrophage infiltration have been implicated in cardiovascular pathologies, including coronary artery disease, carotid atherosclerosis, heart failure, obesity-associated heart dysfunction, and cardiac fibrosis. Inflammation induces macrophage infiltration and activation and release of cytokines and chemokines, causing tissue dysfunction by instigating a positive feedback loop that further propagates inflammation. Cytosolic adaptor caspase recruitment domain family, member 9 (CARD9) is a protein expressed primarily by dendritic cells, neutrophils, and macrophages, in which it mediates cytokine secretion. The purpose of this review is to highlight the role of CARD9 as a potential target in inflammation-related cardiovascular pathologies. PMID:27920495

  2. Scalable, Multithreaded, Partially-in-Place Sorting

    SciTech Connect

    Haglin, David J.; Adolf, Robert D.; Mackey, Greg E.

    2013-05-20

    A recent trend in hardware development is producing computing systems that are stretching the number of cores and size of shared-memory beyond where most fundamental serial algorithms perform well. The expectation is that this trend will continue. So it makes sense to rethink our fundamental algorithms such as sorting. There are many situations where data that needs to be sorted will actually fit into the shared memory so applications could benefit from an efficient parallel sorting algorithm. When sorting large data (at least hundreds of Gigabytes) in a single shared memory, there are two factors that affect the algorithm choice. First, does the algorithm sort in-place? And second, does the algorithm scale well beyond tens of threads? Surprisingly, existing algorithms posses either one of these factors, but not both. We present an approach that gracefully degrades in performance as the amount of available working memory decreases relative to the size of the input.

  3. Data parallel sorting for particle simulation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dagum, Leonardo

    1992-01-01

    Sorting on a parallel architecture is a communications intensive event which can incur a high penalty in applications where it is required. In the case of particle simulation, only integer sorting is necessary, and sequential implementations easily attain the minimum performance bound of O (N) for N particles. Parallel implementations, however, have to cope with the parallel sorting problem which, in addition to incurring a heavy communications cost, can make the minimun performance bound difficult to attain. This paper demonstrates how the sorting problem in a particle simulation can be reduced to a merging problem, and describes an efficient data parallel algorithm to solve this merging problem in a particle simulation. The new algorithm is shown to be optimal under conditions usual for particle simulation, and its fieldwise implementation on the Connection Machine is analyzed in detail. The new algorithm is about four times faster than a fieldwise implementation of radix sort on the Connection Machine.

  4. Sorting by reciprocal translocations via reversals theory.

    PubMed

    Ozery-Flato, Michal; Shamir, Ron

    2007-05-01

    The understanding of genome rearrangements is an important endeavor in comparative genomics. A major computational problem in this field is finding a shortest sequence of genome rearrangements that transforms, or sorts, one genome into another. In this paper we focus on sorting a multi-chromosomal genome by translocations. We reveal new relationships between this problem and the well studied problem of sorting by reversals. Based on these relationships, we develop two new algorithms for sorting by reciprocal translocations, which mimic known algorithms for sorting by reversals: a score-based method building on Bergeron's algorithm, and a recursive procedure similar to the Berman-Hannenhalli method. Though their proofs are more involved, our procedures for reciprocal translocations match the complexities of the original ones for reversals.

  5. CARD Annual Report, Year Ending June 30, 1986.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Iowa State Univ. of Science and Technology, Ames. Center for Agricultural and Rural Development.

    This report outlines the activities of the Center for Agricultural and Rural Development (CARD), Iowa State University, for the year ending June 30, 1986. Progress was made in expanding and enhancing the policy research program, which comprises four divisions. The natural resources and conservation program participated with the Soil Conservation…

  6. Two Thumbs Way, Way up: Index Card Recap and Review

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Quinn, John; Kavanagh, Brian; Boakes, Norma; Caro, Ronald

    2008-01-01

    A team of authors, including a fourth-grade teacher and his professor from a local graduate school, describe culminating elementary lessons with an index card recap and peer review. In an urban district that traditionally struggles with standardized testing, this activity prompts students to summarize and communicate the day's lesson and key ideas…

  7. Microfluidic cell sorting: a review of the advances in the separation of cells from debulking to rare cell isolation.

    PubMed

    Shields, C Wyatt; Reyes, Catherine D; López, Gabriel P

    2015-03-07

    Accurate and high throughput cell sorting is a critical enabling technology in molecular and cellular biology, biotechnology, and medicine. While conventional methods can provide high efficiency sorting in short timescales, advances in microfluidics have enabled the realization of miniaturized devices offering similar capabilities that exploit a variety of physical principles. We classify these technologies as either active or passive. Active systems generally use external fields (e.g., acoustic, electric, magnetic, and optical) to impose forces to displace cells for sorting, whereas passive systems use inertial forces, filters, and adhesion mechanisms to purify cell populations. Cell sorting on microchips provides numerous advantages over conventional methods by reducing the size of necessary equipment, eliminating potentially biohazardous aerosols, and simplifying the complex protocols commonly associated with cell sorting. Additionally, microchip devices are well suited for parallelization, enabling complete lab-on-a-chip devices for cellular isolation, analysis, and experimental processing. In this review, we examine the breadth of microfluidic cell sorting technologies, while focusing on those that offer the greatest potential for translation into clinical and industrial practice and that offer multiple, useful functions. We organize these sorting technologies by the type of cell preparation required (i.e., fluorescent label-based sorting, bead-based sorting, and label-free sorting) as well as by the physical principles underlying each sorting mechanism.

  8. Microfluidic Cell Sorting: A Review of the Advances in the Separation of Cells from Debulking to Rare Cell Isolation

    PubMed Central

    Shields, C. Wyatt; Reyes, Catherine D.; López, Gabriel P.

    2015-01-01

    Accurate and high throughput cell sorting is a critical enabling technology in molecular and cellular biology, biotechnology, and medicine. While conventional methods can provide high efficiency sorting in short timescales, advances in microfluidics have enabled the realization of miniaturized devices offering similar capabilities that exploit a variety of physical principles. We classify these technologies as either active or passive. Active systems generally use external fields (e.g., acoustic, electric, magnetic, and optical) to impose forces to displace cells for sorting, whereas passive systems use inertial forces, filters, and adhesion mechanisms to purify cell populations. Cell sorting on microchips provides numerous advantages over conventional methods by reducing the size of necessary equipment, eliminating potentially biohazardous aerosols, and simplifying the complex protocols commonly associated with cell sorting. Additionally, microchip devices are well suited for parallelization, enabling complete lab-on-a-chip devices for cellular isolation, analysis, and experimental processing. In this review, we examine the breadth of microfluidic cell sorting technologies, while focusing on those that offer the greatest potential for translation into clinical and industrial practice and that offer multiple, useful functions. We organize these sorting technologies by the type of cell preparation required (i.e., fluorescent label-based sorting, bead-based sorting, and label-free sorting) as well as by the physical principles underlying each sorting mechanism. PMID:25598308

  9. Review of sound card photogates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gingl, Zoltán; Mingesz, Róbert; Makra, Péter; Mellár, János

    2011-07-01

    Photogates are probably the most commonly used electronic instruments to aid experiments in the field of mechanics. Although they are offered by many manufacturers, they can be too expensive to be widely used in all classrooms, in multiple experiments or even at home experimentation. Today all computers have a sound card--an interface for analogue signals. It is possible to make very simple yet highly accurate photogates for cents, while much more sophisticated solutions are also available at a still very low cost. In our paper we show several experimentally tested ways of implementing sound card photogates in detail, and we also provide full-featured, free, open-source photogate software as a much more efficient experimentation tool than the usually used sound recording programs. Further information is provided on a dedicated web page, www.noise.physx.u-szeged.hu/edudev.

  10. An Unsupervised Online Spike-Sorting Framework.

    PubMed

    Knieling, Simeon; Sridharan, Kousik S; Belardinelli, Paolo; Naros, Georgios; Weiss, Daniel; Mormann, Florian; Gharabaghi, Alireza

    2016-08-01

    Extracellular neuronal microelectrode recordings can include action potentials from multiple neurons. To separate spikes from different neurons, they can be sorted according to their shape, a procedure referred to as spike-sorting. Several algorithms have been reported to solve this task. However, when clustering outcomes are unsatisfactory, most of them are difficult to adjust to achieve the desired results. We present an online spike-sorting framework that uses feature normalization and weighting to maximize the distinctiveness between different spike shapes. Furthermore, multiple criteria are applied to either facilitate or prevent cluster fusion, thereby enabling experimenters to fine-tune the sorting process. We compare our method to established unsupervised offline (Wave_Clus (WC)) and online (OSort (OS)) algorithms by examining their performance in sorting various test datasets using two different scoring systems (AMI and the Adamos metric). Furthermore, we evaluate sorting capabilities on intra-operative recordings using established quality metrics. Compared to WC and OS, our algorithm achieved comparable or higher scores on average and produced more convincing sorting results for intra-operative datasets. Thus, the presented framework is suitable for both online and offline analysis and could substantially improve the quality of microelectrode-based data evaluation for research and clinical application.

  11. Manual sorting to eliminate aflatoxin from peanuts.

    PubMed

    Galvez, F C F; Francisco, M L D L; Villarino, B J; Lustre, A O; Resurreccion, A V A

    2003-10-01

    A manual sorting procedure was developed to eliminate aflatoxin contamination from peanuts. The efficiency of the sorting process in eliminating aflatoxin-contaminated kernels from lots of raw peanuts was verified. The blanching of 20 kg of peanuts at 140 degrees C for 25 min in preheated roasters facilitated the manual sorting of aflatoxin-contaminated kernels after deskinning. The manual sorting of raw materials with initially high aflatoxin contents (300 ppb) resulted in aflatoxin-free peanuts (i.e., peanuts in which no aflatoxin was detected). Verification procedures showed that the sorted sound peanuts contained no aflatoxin or contained low levels (<15 ppb) of aflatoxin. The results obtained confirmed that the sorting process was effective in separating contaminated peanuts whether or nor contamination was extensive. At the commercial level, when roasters were not preheated, the dry blanching of 50 kg of peanuts for 45 to 55 min facilitated the proper deskinning and subsequent manual sorting of aflatoxin-contaminated peanut kernels from sound kernels.

  12. Spike sorting of synchronous spikes from local neuron ensembles

    PubMed Central

    Pröpper, Robert; Alle, Henrik; Meier, Philipp; Geiger, Jörg R. P.; Obermayer, Klaus; Munk, Matthias H. J.

    2015-01-01

    Synchronous spike discharge of cortical neurons is thought to be a fingerprint of neuronal cooperativity. Because neighboring neurons are more densely connected to one another than neurons that are located further apart, near-synchronous spike discharge can be expected to be prevalent and it might provide an important basis for cortical computations. Using microelectrodes to record local groups of neurons does not allow for the reliable separation of synchronous spikes from different cells, because available spike sorting algorithms cannot correctly resolve the temporally overlapping waveforms. We show that high spike sorting performance of in vivo recordings, including overlapping spikes, can be achieved with a recently developed filter-based template matching procedure. Using tetrodes with a three-dimensional structure, we demonstrate with simulated data and ground truth in vitro data, obtained by dual intracellular recording of two neurons located next to a tetrode, that the spike sorting of synchronous spikes can be as successful as the spike sorting of nonoverlapping spikes and that the spatial information provided by multielectrodes greatly reduces the error rates. We apply the method to tetrode recordings from the prefrontal cortex of behaving primates, and we show that overlapping spikes can be identified and assigned to individual neurons to study synchronous activity in local groups of neurons. PMID:26289473

  13. The Q sort theory and technique.

    PubMed

    Nyatanga, L

    1989-10-01

    This paper is based on the author's experience of using the Q sort technique with BA Social Sciences (BASS) students, and the community psychiatric nursing (CPN, ENB No 811 course). The paper focuses on two main issues: 1. The theoretical assumptions underpinning the Q Sort technique. Carl Rogers' self theory and some of the values of humanistic psychology are summarised. 2. The actual technique procedure and meaning of results are highlighted. As the Q Sort technique is potentially useful in a variety of sittings some of which are listed in this paper, the emphasis has deliberately been placed in understanding the theoretical underpinning and the operationalisation (sensitive interpretation) of the theory to practice.

  14. An improved infrared technique for sorting pecans

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Graeve, Thorsten; Dereniak, Eustace L.; Lamonica, John A., Jr.

    1991-10-01

    This paper presents the results of a study of pecan spectral reflectances. It describes an experiment for measuring the contrast between several components of raw pecan product to be sorted. An analysis of the experimental data reveals high contrast ratios in the infrared spectrum, suggesting a potential improvement in sorting efficiency when separating pecan meat from shells. It is believed that this technique has the potential to dramatically improve the efficiency of current sorting machinery, and to reduce the cost of processing pecans for the consumer market.

  15. People, Parties and Politics. 35 Jumbo Activity Cards for Teaching Reading/Writing Skills in Social Studies. Designed for Elementary and Middle School.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sandra Schurr Publications, Bloomfield Hills, MI.

    The document presents 35 supplementary activities on American politics. The activities are designed to be used by social studies classroom teachers in elementary and junior high schools. Topics include voting, elections, presidential qualifications, presidential activities, congressional duties, political participation, term of office, political…

  16. 13. SANDSORTING BUILDING, THIRD FLOOR, VIBRATING SCREENS FOR SAND SORTING, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    13. SAND-SORTING BUILDING, THIRD FLOOR, VIBRATING SCREENS FOR SAND SORTING, LOOKING SOUTHWEST - Mill "C" Complex, Sand-Sorting Building, South of Dee Bennet Road, near Illinois River, Ottawa, La Salle County, IL

  17. Intuitive, Image-Based Cell Sorting Using Opto-fluidic Cell Sorting

    PubMed Central

    Kovac, J. R.; Voldman, J.

    2008-01-01

    We present a microfluidic cell sorting device which augments microscopy with the capability to perform facile image-based cell sorting. This combination enables intuitive, complex phenotype sorting based on spatio-temporal fluorescence or cell morphology. The microfluidic device contains a microwell array that can be passively loaded with mammalian cells via sedimentation and can be subsequently inspected with microscopy. After inspection, we use the scattering force from a focused infrared laser to levitate cells of interest from their wells into a flow field for collection. First, we demonstrate image-based sorting predicated on whole-cell fluorescence, which could enable sorting based on temporal whole-cell fluorescence behavior. Second, we demonstrate image-based sorting predicated on fluorescence localization (nuclear vs. whole-cell fluorescence), highlighting the capability of our approach to sort based on imaged sub-cellular events, such as localized protein expression or translocation events. We achieve post-sort purities up to 89%, and up to 155-fold enrichment of target cells. Optical manipulation literature and a direct cell viability assay suggest that cells remain viable after using our technique. The architecture is highly scalable and supports over 10,000 individually addressable trap sites. Our approach enables sorting of significant populations based on sub-cellular spatio-temporal information, which is difficult or impossible with existing widespread sorting technologies. PMID:18004819

  18. Automatic information retrieval of Chinese business card

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shi, GuangShun; Pan, Wumo; Jin, Jianming

    2003-01-01

    Document image understanding techniques have been widely used in many application domains. Various kinds of documents have been researched and different methods are developed for information retrieval purpose. In this paper we present a practical method to extract information items from Chinese business card. Before retrieval information in business card, the image of business card had been segmented into little text regions and each text region had been recognized. Because the typeset of business card is variable, and both English and Chinese characters are used, so there are errors in segmentation and recognition result. We focus on building a robust model that can tolerate errors and extract syntax pattern of each text lines in business card, which using both layout information and logical information. By this model, many errors will be identified and adjusted. Finally, correct property will be assigned to each text region in business card, and recognition errors will be corrected.

  19. Discount medical cards: innovation or illusion?

    PubMed

    Kofman, Mila; Libster, Jennifer; Bangit, Eliza

    2005-03-01

    Discount medical cards have come under increasing scrutiny by regulators and law enforcement officials as a result of mounting consumer-reported problems. For their study, the authors tested five cards available in the Washington, D.C., metro area; interviewed card company representatives, state attorneys general insurance regulators, and insurance agents; and reviewed court and administrative actions. While some cards provide a measure of value, other cards were found to have serious drawbacks, including: high-pressure sales tactics; misleading or inaccurate promotion; exaggerated claims of savings; difficulty finding participating doctors; and providers who failed to give cardholders promised discounts. Some discount card companies are seeking to reform the market through a trade association and voluntary code of conduct. Still, legislative and regulatory interventions will be needed to protect consumers in an unregulated and growing market.

  20. Implementing Smart Cards into the Air Force Reserve

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2001-04-01

    Smart card technology is essentially about a credit card with a brain. Smart cards have an embedded microchip that allows the card to hold digital...gained favor in the United States. The Department of Defense (DoD) also saw the utility in using smart card technology. The DoD began tests with smart

  1. Highly focused high-frequency travelling surface acoustic waves (SAW) for rapid single-particle sorting.

    PubMed

    Collins, David J; Neild, Adrian; Ai, Ye

    2016-02-07

    High-speed sorting is an essential process in a number of clinical and research applications, where single cells, droplets and particles are segregated based on their properties in a continuous flow. With recent developments in the field of microscale actuation, there is increasing interest in replicating the functions available to conventional fluorescence activated cell sorting (FACS) flow cytometry in integrated on-chip systems, which have substantial advantages in cost and portability. Surface acoustic wave (SAW) devices are ideal for many acoustofluidic applications, and have been used to perform such sorting at rates on the order of kHz. Essential to the accuracy of this sorting, however, is the dimensions of the region over which sorting occurs, where a smaller sorting region can largely avoid inaccurate sorting across a range of sample concentrations. Here we demonstrate the use of flow focusing and a highly focused SAW generated by a high-frequency (386 MHz), 10 μm wavelength set of focused interdigital transducers (FIDTs) on a piezoelectric lithium niobate substrate, yielding an effective sorting region only ~25 μm wide, with sub-millisecond pulses generated at up to kHz rates. Furthermore, because of the use of high frequencies, actuation of particles as small as 2 μm can be realized. Such devices represent a substantial step forward in the evolution of highly localized forces for lab-on-a-chip microfluidic applications.

  2. Sorting it out: regulation of exosome loading.

    PubMed

    Villarroya-Beltri, Carolina; Baixauli, Francesc; Gutiérrez-Vázquez, Cristina; Sánchez-Madrid, Francisco; Mittelbrunn, María

    2014-10-01

    Extracellular vesicles (EVs), a term that includes both exosomes of endocytic origin and vesicles derived from plasma membranes, are continuously secreted by cells to the extracellular environment, and represent a novel vehicle for cell-cell communication. Exosomes contain specific repertoires of proteins and RNAs, indicating the existence of mechanisms that control the sorting of molecules into them. Although the molecular mechanisms that regulate the loading of proteins into exosomes have been studied for years, the sorting of RNA has been elusive until recently. Here we review the molecular mechanisms that control the sorting of molecules into exosomes, with special attention to the sorting of RNA. We also discuss how the cellular context affects the composition of exosomes, and thus the outcome of the communication between the exosome-producer and recipient cells, with particular focus on the communication between tumor cells and with cells of the tumor microenvironment.

  3. Filter-less submicron hydrodynamic size sorting.

    PubMed

    Fouet, M; Mader, M-A; Iraïn, S; Yanha, Z; Naillon, A; Cargou, S; Gué, A-M; Joseph, P

    2016-02-21

    We propose a simple microfluidic device able to separate submicron particles (critical size ∼0.1 μm) from a complex sample with no filter (minimum channel dimension being 5 μm) by hydrodynamic filtration. A model taking into account the actual velocity profile and hydrodynamic resistances enables prediction of the chip sorting properties for any geometry. Two design families are studied to obtain (i) small sizes within minutes (low-aspect ratio, two-level chip) and (ii) micron-sized sorting with a μL flow rate (3D architecture based on lamination). We obtain quantitative agreement of sorting performances both with experiments and with numerical solving, and determine the limits of the approach. We therefore demonstrate a passive, filter-less sub-micron size sorting with a simple, robust, and easy to fabricate design.

  4. Flow Analysis and Sorting of Plant Chromosomes.

    PubMed

    Vrána, Jan; Cápal, Petr; Šimková, Hana; Karafiátová, Miroslava; Čížková, Jana; Doležel, Jaroslav

    2016-10-10

    Analysis and sorting of plant chromosomes (plant flow cytogenetics) is a special application of flow cytometry in plant genomics and its success depends critically on sample quality. This unit describes the methodology in a stepwise manner, starting with the induction of cell cycle synchrony and accumulation of dividing cells in mitotic metaphase, and continues with the preparation of suspensions of intact mitotic chromosomes, flow analysis and sorting of chromosomes, and finally processing of the sorted chromosomes. Each step of the protocol is described in detail as some procedures have not been used widely. Supporting histograms are presented as well as hints on dealing with plant material; the utility of sorted chromosomes for plant genomics is also discussed. © 2016 by John Wiley & Sons, Inc.

  5. Glycosaminoglycans: Sorting determinants in intracellular protein traffic.

    PubMed

    Mihov, Deyan; Spiess, Martin

    2015-11-01

    Intracellular transport of proteins to their appropriate destinations is crucial for the maintenance of cellular integrity and function. Sorting information is contained either directly in the amino acid sequence or in a protein's post-translational modifications. Glycosaminoglycans (GAGs) are characteristic modifications of proteoglycans. GAGs are long unbranched polysaccharide chains with unique structural and functional properties also contributing to protein sorting in various ways. By deletion or insertion of GAG attachment sites it has been shown that GAGs affect polarized sorting in epithelial cells, targeting to and storage in secretory granules, and endocytosis. Most recently, the role of GAGs as signals for rapid trans-Golgi-to-cell surface transport, dominant over the cytosolic sorting motifs in the core protein, was demonstrated. Here, we provide an overview on existing data on the roles of GAGs on protein and proteoglycan trafficking.

  6. Developing JAVA Card Application with RMI API

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    JunWu, Xu; JunLing, Liang

    This paper describes research in the use of the RMI to develop Java Card applications. the Java Card RMI (JCRMI), which is based on the J2SE RMI distributed-object model. In the RMI model a server application creates and makes accessible remote objects, and a client application obtains remote references to the server's remote objects, and then invokes remote methods on them. In JCRMI, the Java Card applet is the server, and the host application is the client.

  7. Optical smart card using semipassive communication.

    PubMed

    Glaser, I; Green, Shlomo; Dimkov, Ilan

    2006-03-15

    An optical secure short-range communication system is presented. The mobile unit (optical smart card) of this system utilizes a retroreflector with an optical modulator, using light from the stationary unit; this mobile unit has very low power consumption and can be as small as a credit card. Such optical smart cards offer better security than RF-based solutions, yet do not require physical contact. Results from a feasibility study model are included.

  8. Optical smart card using semipassive communication

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Glaser, I.; Green, Shlomo; Dimkov, Ilan

    2006-03-01

    An optical secure short-range communication system is presented. The mobile unit (optical smart card) of this system utilizes a retroreflector with an optical modulator, using light from the stationary unit; this mobile unit has very low power consumption and can be as small as a credit card. Such optical smart cards offer better security than RF-based solutions, yet do not require physical contact. Results from a feasibility study model are included.

  9. Amphibious Operations: The Operational Wild Card

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1990-05-14

    8217A234 004 J Amphibious Operations: The Operational Wild Card A Monograph by Major Anthony S. Lieto Armor School of Advanced Military Studies United...NO. TITLE (include Serurity Classificatlion) AMPHIBIOUS OPERATIONS: THE OPERATIONAL WILD CARD (U) PERSONAL AUTHOR(S) Major Anthony S. Licto, USA i...Operations: The Operationa! Wild Card Approved by: ..- ( o./J L. Monograph Director LieutenaA Colorel (USMC) Douglas 0. Hendricks, M.A. // 4/Director

  10. Measurement Analysis When Benchmarking Java Card Platforms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paradinas, Pierre; Cordry, Julien; Bouzefrane, Samia

    The advent of the Java Card standard has been a major turning point in smart card technology. With the growing acceptance of this standard, understanding the performance behaviour of these platforms is becoming crucial. To meet this need, we present in this paper, a benchmark framework that enables performance evaluation at the bytecode level. This paper focuses on the validity of our time measurements on smart cards.

  11. Protein sorting at the trans-Golgi network.

    PubMed

    Guo, Yusong; Sirkis, Daniel W; Schekman, Randy

    2014-01-01

    The trans-Golgi network (TGN) is an important cargo sorting station within the cell where newly synthesized proteins are packaged into distinct transport carriers that are targeted to various destinations. To maintain the fidelity of protein transport, elaborate protein sorting machinery is employed to mediate sorting of specific cargo proteins into distinct transport carriers. Protein sorting requires assembly of the cytosolic sorting machinery onto the TGN membrane and capture of cargo proteins. We review the cytosolic and transmembrane sorting machinery that function at the TGN and describe molecular interactions and regulatory mechanisms that enable accurate protein sorting. In addition, we highlight the importance of TGN sorting in physiology and disease.

  12. AP-3 regulates PAR1 ubiquitin-independent MVB/lysosomal sorting via an ALIX-mediated pathway

    PubMed Central

    Dores, Michael R.; Paing, May M.; Lin, Huilan; Montagne, William A.; Marchese, Adriano; Trejo, JoAnn

    2012-01-01

    The sorting of signaling receptors within the endocytic system is important for appropriate cellular responses. After activation, receptors are trafficked to early endosomes and either recycled or sorted to lysosomes and degraded. Most receptors trafficked to lysosomes are modified with ubiquitin and recruited into an endosomal subdomain enriched in hepatocyte growth factor–regulated tyrosine kinase substrate (HRS), a ubiquitin-binding component of the endosomal-sorting complex required for transport (ESCRT) machinery, and then sorted into intraluminal vesicles (ILVs) of multivesicular bodies (MVBs)/lysosomes. However, not all receptors use ubiquitin or the canonical ESCRT machinery to sort to MVBs/lysosomes. This is exemplified by protease-activated receptor-1 (PAR1), a G protein–coupled receptor for thrombin, which sorts to lysosomes independent of ubiquitination and HRS. We recently showed that the adaptor protein ALIX binds to PAR1, recruits ESCRT-III, and mediates receptor sorting to ILVs of MVBs. However, the mechanism that initiates PAR1 sorting at the early endosome is not known. We now report that the adaptor protein complex-3 (AP-3) regulates PAR1 ubiquitin-independent sorting to MVBs through an ALIX-dependent pathway. AP-3 binds to a PAR1 cytoplasmic tail–localized tyrosine-based motif and mediates PAR1 lysosomal degradation independent of ubiquitination. Moreover, AP-3 facilitates PAR1 interaction with ALIX, suggesting that AP-3 functions before PAR1 engagement of ALIX and MVB/lysosomal sorting. PMID:22833563

  13. Expansion and Polarity Sorting in Microtubule-Dynein Bundles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zemel, A.; Mogilner, A.

    Interactions of multiple molecular motors with dynamicpolymers, such as actin and microtubules, form the basis for many processes in the cell cytoskeleton. One example is the active `sorting' of microtubule bundles by dynein molecular motors into aster-like arrays of microtubules; in these bundles dynein motors cross-link and slide neighboring microtubules apart. A number of models have been suggested to quantify the active dynamics of cross-linked bundles of polar filaments. In the case of densely packed bundles, however, a major complication arises from the fact that each microtubule interacts with multiple neighboring filaments. To explicitly take these interactions into account we performed detailed computer simulations in which the equations of motion for all microtubules in the bundle were iteratively solved. Our simulations demonstrate the phenomenon of polarity sorting and reveal the variable-rate of the concurrent bundle expansion and its dependence on the nature of the microtubule-motor interactions.

  14. Control of a brain-computer interface without spike sorting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fraser, George W.; Chase, Steven M.; Whitford, Andrew; Schwartz, Andrew B.

    2009-10-01

    Two rhesus monkeys were trained to move a cursor using neural activity recorded with silicon arrays of 96 microelectrodes implanted in the primary motor cortex. We have developed a method to extract movement information from the recorded single and multi-unit activity in the absence of spike sorting. By setting a single threshold across all channels and fitting the resultant events with a spline tuning function, a control signal was extracted from this population using a Bayesian particle-filter extraction algorithm. The animals achieved high-quality control comparable to the performance of decoding schemes based on sorted spikes. Our results suggest that even the simplest signal processing is sufficient for high-quality neuroprosthetic control.

  15. EduCard. Adult Education Access Card. Policy Option Paper on Strategic Recommendation 4. First Edition.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Porter, Dennis

    One recommendation of the 1989 California Strategic Plan for Adult Education is the use of EduCard. EduCard, the Adult Education Access Card, is a means of giving learners access to information about educational opportunities and providing administrators with machine-readable information on learners' prior education and traiing. Three models are:…

  16. The "Negative" Credit Card Effect: Credit Cards as Spending-Limiting Stimuli in New Zealand

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lie, Celia; Hunt, Maree; Peters, Heather L.; Veliu, Bahrie; Harper, David

    2010-01-01

    The "credit card effect" describes a finding where greater value is given to consumer items if credit card logos are present. One explanation for the effect is that credit cards elicit spending behavior through associative learning. If this is true, social, economic and historical contexts should alter this effect. In Experiment 1, Year…

  17. 26 CFR 301.6311-2 - Payment by credit card and debit card.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ..., additional amounts, and additions to tax. (2) Payments by electronic funds transfer other than payments by credit card and debit card. Provisions relating to payments by electronic funds transfer other than... Electronic Fund Transfer Act (15 U.S.C. 1693a(1)), including any debit card or similar device or means...

  18. Vertical sorting and the morphodynamics of bed-form-dominated rivers: An equilibrium sorting model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blom, Astrid; Parker, Gary; Ribberink, Jan S.; de Vriend, Huib J.

    2006-02-01

    A modeling framework is developed for taking into account the effects of sediment sorting in the morphodynamic modeling of bed-form-dominated rivers for the case of equilibrium or stationary conditions dominated by bed load transport. To this end, the Blom and Parker (2004) framework for sediment continuity is reduced to an equilibrium sorting model. The predicted equilibrium sorting profile is mainly determined by the probability density function (PDF) of bed form trough elevations and by a lee sorting function. The PDF of trough elevations needs to be known from either model predictions or measurements. A simple formulation for the lee sorting function is suggested, yet data on the avalanche mechanism down lee faces of dunes is required so as to improve the function and make it generic. The equilibrium sorting model is calibrated and verified using data from flume experiments. The agreement between the predicted and measured equilibrium sorting profiles is reasonable, although the model does not reproduce an observed coarse top layer. In a hydraulic-morphodynamic model this equilibrium sorting model may be applied instantaneously if the timescale of large-scale morphological changes is much larger than the ones of changes in vertical sorting and dune dimensions.

  19. CARD9 negatively regulates NLRP3-induced IL-1β production on Salmonella infection of macrophages

    PubMed Central

    Pereira, Milton; Tourlomousis, Panagiotis; Wright, John; P. Monie, Tom; Bryant, Clare E.

    2016-01-01

    Interleukin-1β (IL-1β) is a proinflammatory cytokine required for host control of bacterial infections, and its production must be tightly regulated to prevent excessive inflammation. Here we show that caspase recruitment domain-containing protein 9 (CARD9), a protein associated with induction of proinflammatory cytokines by fungi, has a negative role on IL-1β production during bacterial infection. Specifically, in response to activation of the nucleotide oligomerization domain receptor pyrin-domain containing protein 3 (NLRP3) by Salmonella infection, CARD9 negatively regulates IL-1β by fine-tuning pro-IL-1β expression, spleen tyrosine kinase (SYK)-mediated NLRP3 activation and repressing inflammasome-associated caspase-8 activity. CARD9 is suppressed during Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium infection, facilitating increased IL-1β production. CARD9 is, therefore, a central signalling hub that coordinates a pathogen-specific host inflammatory response. PMID:27670879

  20. CARD9 negatively regulates NLRP3-induced IL-1β production on Salmonella infection of macrophages.

    PubMed

    Pereira, Milton; Tourlomousis, Panagiotis; Wright, John; P Monie, Tom; Bryant, Clare E

    2016-09-27

    Interleukin-1β (IL-1β) is a proinflammatory cytokine required for host control of bacterial infections, and its production must be tightly regulated to prevent excessive inflammation. Here we show that caspase recruitment domain-containing protein 9 (CARD9), a protein associated with induction of proinflammatory cytokines by fungi, has a negative role on IL-1β production during bacterial infection. Specifically, in response to activation of the nucleotide oligomerization domain receptor pyrin-domain containing protein 3 (NLRP3) by Salmonella infection, CARD9 negatively regulates IL-1β by fine-tuning pro-IL-1β expression, spleen tyrosine kinase (SYK)-mediated NLRP3 activation and repressing inflammasome-associated caspase-8 activity. CARD9 is suppressed during Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium infection, facilitating increased IL-1β production. CARD9 is, therefore, a central signalling hub that coordinates a pathogen-specific host inflammatory response.

  1. Smart Cards 101: Everything a Beginner Needs To Get Started.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wiens, Janet

    2001-01-01

    Discusses how to implement a smart card system at a college or university, and explains what smart cards are, their potential applications, benefits, and costs. Provides a resource for obtaining additional information about smart cards. (GR)

  2. 48 CFR 13.301 - Governmentwide commercial purchase card.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... commercial purchase card to micro-purchases. Agency procedures should encourage use of the card in greater... Governmentwide commercial purchase card may be used to— (1) Make micro-purchases; (2) Place a task or...

  3. 48 CFR 13.301 - Governmentwide commercial purchase card.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... commercial purchase card to micro-purchases. Agency procedures should encourage use of the card in greater... Governmentwide commercial purchase card may be used to— (1) Make micro-purchases; (2) Place a task or...

  4. 48 CFR 13.301 - Governmentwide commercial purchase card.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... commercial purchase card to micro-purchases. Agency procedures should encourage use of the card in greater... Governmentwide commercial purchase card may be used to— (1) Make micro-purchases; (2) Place a task or...

  5. [Comparison of sorting of fluorescently and magnetically labelled dental pulp stem cells].

    PubMed

    Kerényi, Farkas; Tarapcsák, Szabolcs; Hrubi, Edit; Baráthne, Szabó Ágnes; Hegedüs, Viktória; Balogh, Sára; Bágyi, Kinga; Varga, Gábor; Hegedüs, Csaba

    2016-03-01

    Stem cells are present in many tissues, such as dental pulp. Stem cells can be easily isolated from dental pulp because third molars are often removed from patients. Stem cells could be separated from the tissue derived heterogeneous cell population. There are two main methods to separate a cell type from the other ones: the fluorescence activated cell sorting (FACS) and the magnetic activated cell sorting (MACS). The aim of this study was to compare these methods' effect on cell surviving and population growth after sorting on dental pulp cells. The anti-STRO-1 antibody was used as primary antibody to specifically label stem cells. Two secondary antibodies were used: magnetic or fluorescent labelled. We sorted the cells by MACS or by FACS or by combination of both (MACS-FACS). Our results show that the effectivity of MACS and FACS sorting are comparable while of MACS-FACS was significantly higher (MACS 79.53 ± 5.78%, FACS 88.27 ± 3.70%, MACS-FACS 98.43 ± 0.67%). The cell surviving and the post-sorting population growth, on the contrary, are very different. The cell population is growing on first week after MACS but after FACS did not. Moreover, after MACS-FACS, on first week the cell number of population decreased. Taken together, our results suggest to use MACS instead of FACS, at least in case of sorting dental pulp stem cells with anti-STRO-1 antibody.

  6. Comparative Study of the New Colorimetric VITEK 2 Yeast Identification Card versus the Older Fluorometric Card and of CHROMagar Candida as a Source Medium with the New Card

    PubMed Central

    Aubertine, C. L.; Rivera, M.; Rohan, S. M.; Larone, D. H.

    2006-01-01

    The new VITEK 2 colorimetric card was compared to the previous fluorometric card for identification of yeast. API 20C was considered the “gold standard.” The new card consistently performed better than the older card. Isolates from CHROMagar Candida plates were identified equally as well as those from Sabouraud dextrose agar. PMID:16390976

  7. DNA-Encoded Flagellin Activates Toll-Like Receptor 5 (TLR5), Nod-like Receptor Family CARD Domain-Containing Protein 4 (NRLC4), and Acts as an Epidermal, Systemic, and Mucosal-Adjuvant

    PubMed Central

    Nyström, Sanna; Bråve, Andreas; Falkeborn, Tina; Devito, Claudia; Rissiek, Björn; Johansson, Daniel X.; Schröder, Ulf; Uematsu, Satoshi; Akira, Shizuo; Hinkula, Jorma; Applequist, Steven E.

    2013-01-01

    Eliciting effective immune responses using non-living/replicating DNA vaccines is a significant challenge. We have previously shown that ballistic dermal plasmid DNA-encoded flagellin (FliC) promotes humoral as well as cellular immunity to co-delivered antigens. Here, we observe that a plasmid encoding secreted FliC (pFliC(-gly)) produces flagellin capable of activating two innate immune receptors known to detect flagellin; Toll-like Receptor 5 (TLR5) and Nod-like Receptor family CARD domain-containing protein 4 (NRLC4). To test the ability of pFliC(-gly) to act as an adjuvant we immunized mice with plasmid encoding secreted FliC (pFliC(-gly)) and plasmid encoding a model antigen (ovalbumin) by three different immunization routes representative of dermal, systemic, and mucosal tissues. By all three routes we observed increases in antigen-specific antibodies in serum as well as MHC Class I-dependent cellular immune responses when pFliC(-gly) adjuvant was added. Additionally, we were able to induce mucosal antibody responses and Class II-dependent cellular immune responses after mucosal vaccination with pFliC(-gly). Humoral immune responses elicited by heterologus prime-boost immunization with a plasmid encoding HIV-1 from gp160 followed by protein boosting could be enhanced by use of pFliC(-gly). We also observed enhancement of cross-clade reactive IgA as well as a broadening of B cell epitope reactivity. These observations indicate that plasmid-encoded secreted flagellin can activate multiple innate immune responses and function as an adjuvant to non-living/replicating DNA immunizations. Moreover, the capacity to elicit mucosal immune responses, in addition to dermal and systemic properties, demonstrates the potential of flagellin to be used with vaccines designed to be delivered by various routes. PMID:26344341

  8. In Brief: Arctic Report Card

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Showstack, Randy

    2009-11-01

    The 2009 annual update of the Arctic Report Card, issued on 22 October, indicates that “warming of the Arctic continues to be widespread, and in some cases dramatic. Linkages between air, land, sea, and biology are evident.” The report, a collaborative effort of 71 national and international scientists initiated in 2006 by the Climate Program Office of the U.S. National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA), highlights several concerns, including a change in large-scale wind patterns affected by the loss of summer sea ice; the replacement of multiyear sea ice by first-year sea ice; warmer and fresher water in the upper ocean linked to new ice-free areas; and the effects of the loss of sea ice on Arctic plant, animal, and fish species. “Climate change is happening faster in the Arctic than any other place on Earth-and with wide-ranging consequences,” said NOAA administrator Jane Lubchenco. “This year“s Arctic Report Card underscores the urgency of reducing greenhouse gas pollution and adapting to climate changes already under way.”

  9. State Exemplars of School Accountability "Report Cards"

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Christie, Kathy

    2014-01-01

    This report provides profiles of exemplars of school accountability "report cards" from nine states and the District of Columbia. The exemplars were selected by Education Commission of the States (ECS) researchers and a group of 14 parents selected by ECS staff. This report contains: (1) a main "report card" page with school…

  10. Establishing a Successful Smart Card Program.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wiens, Janet

    2001-01-01

    Discusses how to run a successful smart card program through a comprehensive approach that includes a detailed plan for the present and future, high level support from school administration, and extensive user input. Florida State University is used to illustrate a successfully implemented smart card program. (GR)

  11. The Ornery American: Orson Scott Card

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Oatman, Eric

    2008-01-01

    This article profiles Orson Scott Card, the winner of this year's Margaret A. Edwards Award for his outstanding contributions to teen literature, specifically for Ender's Game and Ender's Shadow (1999, both Tor), a companion tale. Card, the magician behind both of these best sellers, is one of the nation's most prolific--and contentious--authors.…

  12. A Simulation of Coevolution Using Playing Cards

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tatina, Robert

    2007-01-01

    In this article, the author describes a simulation of a coevolutionary "arms race" and introduce a way of teaching it that lets students use the theory of natural selection to explain the outcomes of the simulation. The simulation uses the numerical cards from an UNO[R] playing card deck to represent the speeds of individuals in populations of…

  13. Flash Cards: Common Chinese-Cantonese Characters.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Defense Language Inst., Monterey, CA.

    This set of flash cards is designed to accompany the Defense Language Institute's instructional programs in Cantonese Chinese. Each card displays six Chinese characters, for a total of 1500 characters. Each character is printed two inches tall. Above each character are transcriptions of the Chinese words represented by the character (marked for…

  14. State Report Card, 2009-2010

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Arizona Department of Education, 2010

    2010-01-01

    As part of compliance with with the federal No Child Left Behind Act, this document presents the State Report Card of Arizona for 2009-2010. The report card provides tables relating to percentage of students who passed AIMS in Arizona by subject and grade. The tables shown in this document include: (1) Mathematics Grade 3; (2) Reading Grade 3; (3)…

  15. Three dimensional identification card and applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Changhe; Wang, Shaoqing; Li, Chao; Li, Hao; Liu, Zhao

    2016-10-01

    Three dimensional Identification Card, with its three-dimensional personal image displayed and stored for personal identification, is supposed be the advanced version of the present two-dimensional identification card in the future [1]. Three dimensional Identification Card means that there are three-dimensional optical techniques are used, the personal image on ID card is displayed to be three-dimensional, so we can see three dimensional personal face. The ID card also stores the three-dimensional face information in its inside electronics chip, which might be recorded by using two-channel cameras, and it can be displayed in computer as three-dimensional images for personal identification. Three-dimensional ID card might be one interesting direction to update the present two-dimensional card in the future. Three-dimension ID card might be widely used in airport custom, entrance of hotel, school, university, as passport for on-line banking, registration of on-line game, etc...

  16. College Student Performance and Credit Card Usage.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pinto, Mary Beth; Parente, Diane H.; Palmer, Todd Starr

    2001-01-01

    Examines the relationship between credit card usage, employment, and academic performance among a group of college students with credit cards. Results reveal that the students differed significantly in the level of anxiety felt from carrying debt, perceived need to work, and perceived impact of employment on academic performance. (Contains 57…

  17. Cognitive Credit Cards: Acquiring Learning Strategies.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Edmunds, Alan L.

    1999-01-01

    Describes the Cognitive Credit Card, an individualized approach to helping students with learning disabilities select and apply appropriate learning strategies. The CCC is a credit card-sized laminated set of cognitive or metacognitive cues for a specific topic. Feedback from students, teachers, and parents has been highly positive. (DB)

  18. An Excel-lent Card Trick

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zullo, Holly S.

    2011-01-01

    Card tricks based on mathematical principles can be a great way to get students interested in exploring some important mathematical ideas. In this article, the author discusses a simple spreadsheet implementation that shows students why the card trick works and allows them to explore several variations. As an added bonus, students are introduced…

  19. Neutrophil-specific deletion of the CARD9 gene expression regulator suppresses autoantibody-induced inflammation in vivo

    PubMed Central

    Németh, Tamás; Futosi, Krisztina; Sitaru, Cassian; Ruland, Jürgen; Mócsai, Attila

    2016-01-01

    Neutrophils are terminally differentiated cells with limited transcriptional activity. The biological function of their gene expression changes is poorly understood. CARD9 regulates transcription during antifungal immunity but its role in sterile inflammation is unclear. Here we show that neutrophil CARD9 mediates pro-inflammatory chemokine/cytokine but not lipid mediator release during non-infectious inflammation. Genetic deficiency of CARD9 suppresses autoantibody-induced arthritis and dermatitis in mice. Neutrophil-specific deletion of CARD9 is sufficient to induce that phenotype. Card9−/− neutrophils show defective immune complex-induced gene expression changes and pro-inflammatory chemokine/cytokine release but normal LTB4 production and other short-term responses. In vivo deletion of CARD9 reduces tissue levels of pro-inflammatory chemokines and cytokines but not LTB4. The CARD9-mediated signalling pathway involves Src-family kinases, Syk, PLCγ2, Bcl10/Malt1 and NFκB. Collectively, CARD9-mediated gene expression changes within neutrophils play important roles during non-infectious inflammation in vivo and CARD9 acts as a divergence point between chemokine/cytokine and lipid mediator release. PMID:27032818

  20. ACECARD. Acquire CoOmmodities Easily Card

    SciTech Connect

    Soler, E.E.

    1996-09-01

    Acquire Commodities Easily Card (AceCard) provides an automated end-user method to distribute company credit card charges to internal charge numbers. AceCard will allow cardholders to record card purchases in an on-line order log, enter multiple account distributions per order that can be posted to the General Ledger, track orders, and receipt information, and provide a variety of cardholder and administrative reports. Please note: Customers must contact Ed Soler (423)-576-6151, Lockheed Martin Energy Systems, for help with the installation of the package. The fee for this installation help will be coordinated by the customer and Lockheed Martin and is in addition to cost of the package from ESTSC. Customers should contact Sandy Presley (423)-576-4708 for user help.

  1. Acquire CoOmmodities Easily Card

    SciTech Connect

    Soler, E. E.

    1998-05-29

    Acquire Commodities Easily Card (AceCard) provides an automated end-user method to distribute company credit card charges to internal charge numbers. AceCard will allow cardholders to record card purchases in an on-line order log, enter multiple account distributions per order that can be posted to the General Ledger, track orders, and receipt information, and provide a variety of cardholder and administrative reports. Please note: Customers must contact Ed Soler (423)-576-6151, Lockheed Martin Energy Systems, for help with the installation of the package. The fee for this installation help will be coordinated by the customer and Lockheed Martin and is in addition to cost of the package from ESTSC. Customers should contact Sandy Presley (423)-576-4708 for user help.

  2. Fruit Sorting Using Fuzzy Logic Techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Elamvazuthi, Irraivan; Sinnadurai, Rajendran; Aftab Ahmed Khan, Mohamed Khan; Vasant, Pandian

    2009-08-01

    Fruit and vegetables market is getting highly selective, requiring their suppliers to distribute the goods according to very strict standards of quality and presentation. In the last years, a number of fruit sorting and grading systems have appeared to fulfill the needs of the fruit processing industry. However, most of them are overly complex and too costly for the small and medium scale industry (SMIs) in Malaysia. In order to address these shortcomings, a prototype machine was developed by integrating the fruit sorting, labeling and packing processes. To realise the prototype, many design issues were dealt with. Special attention is paid to the electronic weighing sub-system for measuring weight, and the opto-electronic sub-system for determining the height and width of the fruits. Specifically, this paper discusses the application of fuzzy logic techniques in the sorting process.

  3. Sorting Potatoes for Miss Bonner.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Herreid, Clyde Freeman

    1998-01-01

    Discusses the basis of a classification scheme for types of case studies. Four major classification headings are identified: (1) individual assignment; (2) lecture; (3) discussion; and (4) small group activities. Describes each heading from the point of view of several teaching methods. (DDR)

  4. ROI, Pitfalls and Best Practices with an Enterprise Smart Card Deployment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hoyer, Philip

    This paper will describe the highlights of the ActivIdentity sponsored Datamonitor study into Return On Investment (ROI) when implementing smart cards in the enterprise in the following areas: physical and logical access convergence, remote access when replacing OTP tokens and Enterprise Single Sign-On. It also provides additional information about the pitfalls to avoid when implementing smart cards and describes best practices for deployment.

  5. Order-Sorted Parameterization and Induction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meseguer, José

    Parameterization is one of the most powerful features to make specifications and declarative programs modular and reusable, and our best hope for scaling up formal verification efforts. This paper studies order-sorted parameterization at three different levels: (i) its mathematical semantics; (ii) its operational semantics by term rewriting; and (iii) the inductive reasoning principles that can soundly be used to prove properties about such specifications. It shows that achieving the desired properties at each of these three levels is a considerably subtler matter than for many-sorted specifications, but that such properties can be attained under reasonable conditions.

  6. FPGA mezzanine card DSP module

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Janicki, Tom; Cieszewski, Radosław; Kasprowicz, Grzegorz; Poźniak, Krzystof T.

    2011-10-01

    Today's most sophisticated real-time control systems, such as the LHC or alike, are facing similar problem of processing terabits per second of raw data generated by the diagnostic systems - where in addition most of the data is useless and only generates an empty burden for computing modules. Many approaches have already been adopted to make the realtime control possible under such circumstances including: parallel computing, modularity and data mining. Furthermore many factors determine the real efficiency of the whole system including: transfer rates between components and modules, "slow" memories or architecture and frequency of computing units. This paper presents a concept of realization, architecture, and hardware implementation of a digital signal processing module utilizing modern technologies, standards and approaches in one single card.

  7. Insider protection: a report card

    SciTech Connect

    Al-Ayat, R.A.; Judd, B.R.

    1986-01-01

    Enhanced security measures against external threats (e.g., terrorists, criminals) have been implemented at most facilities that handle special nuclear material, classified information, or other assets critical to national security. Attention is not focussing on insider protection, and safeguards managers are attempting to provide balanced protection against insider and outsider threats. Potential insider threats include attempts by facility employees to steal special nuclear material (SNM), to cause a radiological hazard to the public, to sabotage critical facilities, or to steal property or classified information. This paper presents a report card on the status of insider protection at Department of Energy and Nuclear Regulatory Commission-licensed facilities, with emphasis on SNM theft. We discuss the general trends in insider protection and the limitations of protection measures currently in use. We also discuss the most critical needs for improved procedures, technology, analytical tools, and education for safeguards personnel.

  8. Smart cards for EV billing. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    1998-05-01

    If electric vehicles are to gain widespread popularity, there will need to be public charging stations for refueling away from home. However, public charging raises some potentially complex issues regarding how individual EV owners will be billed for the electricity they use. It`s easy enough to meter the electricity used at a given battery charger, but the utility bill goes to the EV station merchant rather than the driver who consumed the electricity. So far this has not posed a problem, as many early charging sites have either been providing free electricity or billing only nominal flat fees. As the EV market grows, however, an effective point-of-sale (POS) billing mechanism will need to be established. In 1993, an investigation of POS billing systems for different types of non-home EV charging was conducted. Recently, the Cost Subcommittee of the Infrastructure Working Council`s (IWC) Load Management, Distribution, Power Quality Committee requested that an update be performed on the newest of these POS technologies--smart cards. The same size and shape as regular credit cards, smart cards use a microchip instead of a magnetic stripe to store information. The chip can hold significantly more information than a magnetic stripe, enabling greater security and flexible applications. Since 1993, there have been major advances in smart card technology, and smart card use has grown dramatically in both Europe and Asia. The US has been slower to embrace smart cards due to the entrenched infrastructure of traditional magnetic stripe credit cards. This paper reviews smart card technology and related POS transaction structures, and assesses the technical feasibility and economics of using these versatile cards for EV billing.

  9. 'Smart card' speeds triage, boosts safety.

    PubMed

    2008-10-01

    An internally developed 'smart card' and a kiosk equipped with an electronic reader have helped Wellington (FL) Regional Medical Center speed up its triage process considerably. The new technology is extremely popular with the staff, as well as with the patients. Here are some of its benefits: Patients who have the card don't need to provide a detailed history every time they visit the ED. Nurses don't have to type in the patient's medical information. It automatically "populates" their computer screen. Security is maintained, because the information is stored in a database, and not on the card.

  10. Holo-Chidi video concentrator card

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nwodoh, Thomas A.; Prabhakar, Aditya; Benton, Stephen A.

    2001-12-01

    The Holo-Chidi Video Concentrator Card is a frame buffer for the Holo-Chidi holographic video processing system. Holo- Chidi is designed at the MIT Media Laboratory for real-time computation of computer generated holograms and the subsequent display of the holograms at video frame rates. The Holo-Chidi system is made of two sets of cards - the set of Processor cards and the set of Video Concentrator Cards (VCCs). The Processor cards are used for hologram computation, data archival/retrieval from a host system, and for higher-level control of the VCCs. The VCC formats computed holographic data from multiple hologram computing Processor cards, converting the digital data to analog form to feed the acousto-optic-modulators of the Media lab's Mark-II holographic display system. The Video Concentrator card is made of: a High-Speed I/O (HSIO) interface whence data is transferred from the hologram computing Processor cards, a set of FIFOs and video RAM used as buffer for data for the hololines being displayed, a one-chip integrated microprocessor and peripheral combination that handles communication with other VCCs and furnishes the card with a USB port, a co-processor which controls display data formatting, and D-to-A converters that convert digital fringes to analog form. The co-processor is implemented with an SRAM-based FPGA with over 500,000 gates and controls all the signals needed to format the data from the multiple Processor cards into the format required by Mark-II. A VCC has three HSIO ports through which up to 500 Megabytes of computed holographic data can flow from the Processor Cards to the VCC per second. A Holo-Chidi system with three VCCs has enough frame buffering capacity to hold up to thirty two 36Megabyte hologram frames at a time. Pre-computed holograms may also be loaded into the VCC from a host computer through the low- speed USB port. Both the microprocessor and the co- processor in the VCC can access the main system memory used to store control

  11. Sorting of fungal-damaged white sorghum

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    A high-speed, color image-based sorting machine was modified to separate white sorghum with symptoms of fungal damage. Most of the sorghum tested was typically white, but over 27% of the bulk contained grains with fungal damage of various degrees, from severe to very slight. Grains with slight fun...

  12. A multispectral sorting device for wheat kernels

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    A low-cost multispectral sorting device was constructed using three visible and three near-infrared light-emitting diodes (LED) with peak emission wavelengths of 470 nm (blue), 527 nm (green), 624 nm (red), 850 nm, 940 nm, and 1070 nm. The multispectral data were collected by rapidly (~12 kHz) blin...

  13. Credit Scores, Race, and Residential Sorting

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nelson, Ashlyn Aiko

    2010-01-01

    Credit scores have a profound impact on home purchasing power and mortgage pricing, yet little is known about how credit scores influence households' residential location decisions. This study estimates the effects of credit scores on residential sorting behavior using a novel mortgage industry data set combining household demographic, credit, and…

  14. Microwave Conductivity of Sorted CNT Assemblies

    PubMed Central

    Bulmer, John S.; Martens, Jon; Kurzepa, Lukasz; Gizewski, Tomasz; Egilmez, M.; Blamire, M. G.; Yahya, Noorhana; Koziol, Krzysztof K. K.

    2014-01-01

    Recent progress with tailored growth and post-process sorting enables carbon nanotube (CNT) assemblies with predominantly metallic or semi-conducting concentrations. Cryogenic and microwave measurements performed here show transport dimensionality and overall order increasing with increasing metallic concentration, even in atmospheric doping conditions. By 120 GHz, the conductivity of predominantly semi-conducting assemblies grew to 400% its DC value at an increasing growth rate, while other concentrations a growth rate that tapered off. A generalized Drude model fits to the different frequency dependent behaviors and yields useful quality control parameters such as plasma frequency, mean free path, and degree of localization. As one of the first demonstrations of waveguides fabricated from this material, sorted CNTs from both as-made and post-process sources were inserted into sections of practical micro-strip. With both sources, sorted CNT micro-strip increasingly outperformed the unsorted with increasing frequency-- illustrating that sorted CNT assemblies will be important for high frequency applications. PMID:24446019

  15. Systematic Sorting: Teacher Characteristics and Class Assignments

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kalogrides, Demetra; Loeb, Susanna; Beteille, Tara

    2013-01-01

    Although prior research has documented differences in the distribution of teacher characteristics across schools serving different student populations, few studies have examined the extent to which teacher sorting occurs within schools. This study uses data from one large urban school district and compares the class assignments of teachers who…

  16. Fuzzy logic-based spike sorting system.

    PubMed

    Balasubramanian, Karthikeyan; Obeid, Iyad

    2011-05-15

    We present a new method for autonomous real-time spike sorting using a fuzzy logic inference engine. The engine assigns each detected event a 'spikiness index' from zero to one that quantifies the extent to which the detected event is like an ideal spike. Spikes can then be sorted by simply clustering the spikiness indices. The sorter is defined in terms of natural language rules that, once defined, are static and thus require no user intervention or calibration. The sorter was tested using extracellular recordings from three animals: a macaque, an owl monkey and a rat. Simulation results show that the fuzzy sorter performed equal to or better than the benchmark principal component analysis (PCA) based sorter. Importantly, there was no degradation in fuzzy sorter performance when the spikes were not temporally aligned prior to sorting. In contrast, PCA sorter performance dropped by 27% when sorting unaligned spikes. Since the fuzzy sorter is computationally trivial and requires no spike alignment, it is suitable for scaling into large numbers of parallel channels where computational overhead and the need for operator intervention would preclude other spike sorters.

  17. Sorting cells by their dynamical properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Henry, Ewan; Holm, Stefan H.; Zhang, Zunmin; Beech, Jason P.; Tegenfeldt, Jonas O.; Fedosov, Dmitry A.; Gompper, Gerhard

    2016-10-01

    Recent advances in cell sorting aim at the development of novel methods that are sensitive to various mechanical properties of cells. Microfluidic technologies have a great potential for cell sorting; however, the design of many micro-devices is based on theories developed for rigid spherical particles with size as a separation parameter. Clearly, most bioparticles are non-spherical and deformable and therefore exhibit a much more intricate behavior in fluid flow than rigid spheres. Here, we demonstrate the use of cells’ mechanical and dynamical properties as biomarkers for separation by employing a combination of mesoscale hydrodynamic simulations and microfluidic experiments. The dynamic behavior of red blood cells (RBCs) within deterministic lateral displacement (DLD) devices is investigated for different device geometries and viscosity contrasts between the intra-cellular fluid and suspending medium. We find that the viscosity contrast and associated cell dynamics clearly determine the RBC trajectory through a DLD device. Simulation results compare well to experiments and provide new insights into the physical mechanisms which govern the sorting of non-spherical and deformable cells in DLD devices. Finally, we discuss the implications of cell dynamics for sorting schemes based on properties other than cell size, such as mechanics and morphology.

  18. Sorting cells by their dynamical properties

    PubMed Central

    Henry, Ewan; Holm, Stefan H.; Zhang, Zunmin; Beech, Jason P.; Tegenfeldt, Jonas O.; Fedosov, Dmitry A.; Gompper, Gerhard

    2016-01-01

    Recent advances in cell sorting aim at the development of novel methods that are sensitive to various mechanical properties of cells. Microfluidic technologies have a great potential for cell sorting; however, the design of many micro-devices is based on theories developed for rigid spherical particles with size as a separation parameter. Clearly, most bioparticles are non-spherical and deformable and therefore exhibit a much more intricate behavior in fluid flow than rigid spheres. Here, we demonstrate the use of cells’ mechanical and dynamical properties as biomarkers for separation by employing a combination of mesoscale hydrodynamic simulations and microfluidic experiments. The dynamic behavior of red blood cells (RBCs) within deterministic lateral displacement (DLD) devices is investigated for different device geometries and viscosity contrasts between the intra-cellular fluid and suspending medium. We find that the viscosity contrast and associated cell dynamics clearly determine the RBC trajectory through a DLD device. Simulation results compare well to experiments and provide new insights into the physical mechanisms which govern the sorting of non-spherical and deformable cells in DLD devices. Finally, we discuss the implications of cell dynamics for sorting schemes based on properties other than cell size, such as mechanics and morphology. PMID:27708337

  19. 12 CFR 226.12 - Special credit card provisions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... SYSTEM TRUTH IN LENDING (REGULATION Z) Open-End Credit § 226.12 Special credit card provisions. (a... relevant credit card plan against funds of the cardholder held on deposit with the card issuer. (2) This... the following with regard to funds of a cardholder held on deposit with the card issuer if the...

  20. 12 CFR 226.12 - Special credit card provisions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... SYSTEM (CONTINUED) TRUTH IN LENDING (REGULATION Z) Open-End Credit § 226.12 Special credit card... relevant credit card plan against funds of the cardholder held on deposit with the card issuer. (2) This... the following with regard to funds of a cardholder held on deposit with the card issuer if the...

  1. 12 CFR 226.12 - Special credit card provisions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... SYSTEM TRUTH IN LENDING (REGULATION Z) Open-End Credit § 226.12 Special credit card provisions. (a... relevant credit card plan against funds of the cardholder held on deposit with the card issuer. (2) This... the following with regard to funds of a cardholder held on deposit with the card issuer if the...

  2. 12 CFR 1026.12 - Special credit card provisions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 1026.12 Banks and Banking BUREAU OF CONSUMER FINANCIAL PROTECTION TRUTH IN LENDING (REGULATION Z) Open-End Credit § 1026.12 Special credit card provisions. (a) Issuance of credit cards. Regardless of the... relevant credit card plan against funds of the cardholder held on deposit with the card issuer. (2)...

  3. Thermal transfer structures coupling electronics card(s) to coolant-cooled structure(s)

    DOEpatents

    David, Milnes P; Graybill, David P; Iyengar, Madhusudan K; Kamath, Vinod; Kochuparambil, Bejoy J; Parida, Pritish R; Schmidt, Roger R

    2014-12-16

    Cooling apparatuses and coolant-cooled electronic systems are provided which include thermal transfer structures configured to engage with a spring force one or more electronics cards with docking of the electronics card(s) within a respective socket(s) of the electronic system. A thermal transfer structure of the cooling apparatus includes a thermal spreader having a first thermal conduction surface, and a thermally conductive spring assembly coupled to the conduction surface of the thermal spreader and positioned and configured to reside between and physically couple a first surface of an electronics card to the first surface of the thermal spreader with docking of the electronics card within a socket of the electronic system. The thermal transfer structure is, in one embodiment, metallurgically bonded to a coolant-cooled structure and facilitates transfer of heat from the electronics card to coolant flowing through the coolant-cooled structure.

  4. Unsupervised Spike Sorting for Large-Scale, High-Density Multielectrode Arrays.

    PubMed

    Hilgen, Gerrit; Sorbaro, Martino; Pirmoradian, Sahar; Muthmann, Jens-Oliver; Kepiro, Ibolya Edit; Ullo, Simona; Ramirez, Cesar Juarez; Puente Encinas, Albert; Maccione, Alessandro; Berdondini, Luca; Murino, Vittorio; Sona, Diego; Cella Zanacchi, Francesca; Sernagor, Evelyne; Hennig, Matthias Helge

    2017-03-07

    We present a method for automated spike sorting for recordings with high-density, large-scale multielectrode arrays. Exploiting the dense sampling of single neurons by multiple electrodes, an efficient, low-dimensional representation of detected spikes consisting of estimated spatial spike locations and dominant spike shape features is exploited for fast and reliable clustering into single units. Millions of events can be sorted in minutes, and the method is parallelized and scales better than quadratically with the number of detected spikes. Performance is demonstrated using recordings with a 4,096-channel array and validated using anatomical imaging, optogenetic stimulation, and model-based quality control. A comparison with semi-automated, shape-based spike sorting exposes significant limitations of conventional methods. Our approach demonstrates that it is feasible to reliably isolate the activity of up to thousands of neurons and that dense, multi-channel probes substantially aid reliable spike sorting.

  5. Sorting method for radioactive waste

    SciTech Connect

    Prisco, A.J.; Johnson, A.N.

    1988-08-09

    This paper describes a method for detecting radioactive components in dry active waste, comprising the steps of: providing a substantially airtight housing, withdrawing air from the housing, reducing the waste to pieces of substantially uniform size, providing a first conveyor in the housing, the first conveyor having a receiving portion and a discharge portion, discharging the pieces of reduced waste onto the first conveyor, flattening the pieces of reduced waste, detecting radiation emanating from the pieces of reduced waste from a position closely overlying the first conveyor, after the pieces are flattened, removing from the first conveyor the pieces of reduced waste from which radioactive radiation above a determined level is detected, providing a second conveyor in the housing, the second conveyor having a receiving portion and a discharge portion, disposing the second conveyor so that its receiving portion is below and spaced from the discharge portion of the first conveyor, discharging the pieces of reduced waste from the discharge portion of the first conveyor so that they fall onto the receiving portion of the second conveyor; the space between the last named discharge portion and the last named receiving portion being sufficiently great so that the pieces of reduced waste are substantially overturned and dispersed as they fall to the last named receiving portion.

  6. The Smart Card concept applied to access control

    SciTech Connect

    Seidman, S.

    1986-01-01

    Passwords tend to be handled carelessly, and so are easily lost or stolen. Because they are intangible, their loss or theft generally goes unnoticed. Because they are constant, they may be used by anyone for as long as they remain in active use by a legitimate user. A step up in password security is offered by a new range of products which generate a new code each time the device is used. Devices are being produced in packages as small as a standard plastic credit card, including internal battery power, integral keyboard and LCD display. Security features of the Smart Card are reviewed, and several random access code generators currently available in the commercial marketplace are described.

  7. Assistance with Obtaining a Replacement Card Form

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    Form to be submitted to Section 608 Technician Certification Program Manager if a technician wants to replace a certification card, and the record of the original certification is in the data submitted by companies that have gone out of business.

  8. Educational Card Games for Understanding Gastrointestinal Physiology.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Odenweller, Cynthia M.; Hsu, Christopher T.; DiCarlo, Stephen E.

    1998-01-01

    Presents the rules for two educational card-games that provide an opportunity to integrate, analyze, and interpret basic concepts in gastrointestinal physiology. Enhances students' abilities to apply and synthesize. (DDR)

  9. Notification: Purchase Card and Convenience Check Audit

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    Project #OA-FY13-0116, April 11, 2013. The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, Office of Inspector General, is beginning the fieldwork phase of its audit of the agency’s purchase card and convenience check programs.

  10. College Student Credit Card Usage and Debt.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rybka, Kathryn M.

    2001-01-01

    Provides an overview of the concerns related to credit card usage by college students. Offers information student affairs professionals can use to help college students make responsible choices. (Contains 26 references.) (GCP)

  11. 75 FR 55392 - Employment Network Report Card

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-09-10

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office SOCIAL SECURITY ADMINISTRATION Employment Network Report Card AGENCY: Social Security Administration (SSA). ACTION: Notice of... public comments on Employment Network quality assurance, including a ticket consumer Employment...

  12. David Copperfield's Orient Express Card Trick.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kolpas, Sidney J.

    1992-01-01

    Presents the mathematical proof, based on elementary number theory, for a card trick seen by students on television. Provides sources for other mathematical magic tricks that serve as motivational devices. (MDH)

  13. PhySortR: a fast, flexible tool for sorting phylogenetic trees in R

    PubMed Central

    Stephens, Timothy G.; Bhattacharya, Debashish; Ragan, Mark A.

    2016-01-01

    A frequent bottleneck in interpreting phylogenomic output is the need to screen often thousands of trees for features of interest, particularly robust clades of specific taxa, as evidence of monophyletic relationship and/or reticulated evolution. Here we present PhySortR, a fast, flexible R package for classifying phylogenetic trees. Unlike existing utilities, PhySortR allows for identification of both exclusive and non-exclusive clades uniting the target taxa based on tip labels (i.e., leaves) on a tree, with customisable options to assess clades within the context of the whole tree. Using simulated and empirical datasets, we demonstrate the potential and scalability of PhySortR in analysis of thousands of phylogenetic trees without a priori assumption of tree-rooting, and in yielding readily interpretable trees that unambiguously satisfy the query. PhySortR is a command-line tool that is freely available and easily automatable. PMID:27190724

  14. Health smart cards: merging technology and medical information.

    PubMed

    Ward, Sherry R

    2003-01-01

    Smart cards are credit card-sized plastic cards, with an embedded dime-sized Integrated Circuit microprocessor chip. Smart cards can be used for keyless entry, electronic medical records, etc. Health smart cards have been in limited use since 1982 in Europe and the United States, and several barriers including lack of infrastructure, low consumer confidence, competing standards, and cost continue to be addressed.

  15. Correlates of credit card ownership in men and women.

    PubMed

    Yang, Bijou; Lester, David

    2005-06-01

    In a sample of 352 students, correlates of credit card ownership differed by sex. For both men and women, credit card ownership was predicted by their affective attitude toward credit cards. However, whereas for men concern with money as a tactic for gaining power predicted credit card ownership, for women feelings of insecurity about having sufficient money and having a conservative approach to money predicted credit card ownership.

  16. CARDS - comprehensive aerological reference data set. Station history, Version 2.1

    SciTech Connect

    1994-03-01

    The possibility of anthropogenic climate change has reached the attention of Government officials and researchers. However, one cannot study climate change without climate data. The CARDS project will produce high-quality upper-air data for the research community and for policy-makers. The authors intend to produce a dataset which is: easy to use, as complete as possible, as free of random errors as possible. They will also attempt to identify biases and remove them whenever possible. In this report, they relate progress toward their goal. They created a robust new format for archiving upper-air data, and designed a relational database structure to hold them. The authors have converted 13 datasets to the new format and have archived over 10,000,000 individual soundings from 10 separate data sources. They produce and archive a metadata summary of each sounding they load. They have researched station histories, and have built a preliminary upper-air station history database. They have converted station-sorted data from their primary database into synoptic-sorted data in a parallel database. They have tested and will soon implement an advanced quality-control procedure, capable of detecting and often repairing errors in geopotential height, temperature, humidity, and wind. This unique quality-control method uses simultaneous vertical, horizontal, and temporal checks of several meteorological variables. It can detect errors other methods cannot. This report contains the station histories for the CARDS data set.

  17. The sorting of proglucagon to secretory granules is mediated by carboxypeptidase E and intrinsic sorting signals.

    PubMed

    McGirr, Rebecca; Guizzetti, Leonardo; Dhanvantari, Savita

    2013-05-01

    Proglucagon is expressed in pancreatic alpha cells, intestinal L cells and brainstem neurons. Tissue-specific processing of proglucagon yields the peptide hormones glucagon in the alpha cell and glucagon-like peptide (GLP)-1 and GLP-2 in L cells. Both glucagon and GLP-1 are secreted in response to nutritional status and are critical for regulating glycaemia. The sorting of proglucagon to the dense-core secretory granules of the regulated secretory pathway is essential for the appropriate secretion of glucagon and GLP-1. We examined the roles of carboxypeptidase E (CPE), a prohormone sorting receptor, the processing enzymes PC1/3 and PC2 and putative intrinsic sorting signals in proglucagon sorting. In Neuro 2a cells that lacked CPE, PC1/3 and PC2, proglucagon co-localised with the Golgi marker p115 as determined by quantitative immunofluorescence microscopy. Expression of CPE, but not of PC1/3 or PC2, enhanced proglucagon sorting to granules. siRNA-mediated knockdown of CPE disrupted regulated secretion of glucagon from pancreatic-derived alphaTC1-6 cells, but not of GLP-1 from intestinal cell-derived GLUTag cells. Mutation of the PC cleavage site K70R71, the dibasic R17R18 site within glucagon or the alpha-helix of glucagon, all significantly affected the sub-cellular localisation of proglucagon. Protein modelling revealed that alpha helices corresponding to glucagon, GLP-1 and GLP-2, are arranged within a disordered structure, suggesting some flexibility in the sorting mechanism. We conclude that there are multiple mechanisms for sorting proglucagon to the regulated secretory pathway, including a role for CPE in pancreatic alpha cells, initial cleavage at K70R71 and multiple sorting signals.

  18. Human Factors Assessment and Redesign of the ISS Respiratory Support Pack (RSP) Cue Card

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Byrne, Vicky; Hudy, Cynthia; Whitmore, Mihriban; Smith, Danielle

    2007-01-01

    The Respiratory Support Pack (RSP) is a medical pack onboard the International Space Station (ISS) that contains much of the necessary equipment for providing aid to a conscious or unconscious crewmember in respiratory distress. Inside the RSP lid pocket is a 5.5 by 11 inch paper procedural cue card, which is used by a Crew Medical Officer (CMO) to set up the equipment and deliver oxygen to a crewmember. In training, crewmembers expressed concerns about the readability and usability of the cue card; consequently, updating the cue card was prioritized as an activity to be completed. The Usability Testing and Analysis Facility at the Johnson Space Center (JSC) evaluated the original layout of the cue card, and proposed several new cue card designs based on human factors principles. The approach taken for the assessment was an iterative process. First, in order to completely understand the issues with the RSP cue card, crewmember post training comments regarding the RSP cue card were taken into consideration. Over the course of the iterative process, the procedural information was reorganized into a linear flow after the removal of irrelevant (non-emergency) content. Pictures, color coding, and borders were added to highlight key components in the RSP to aid in quickly identifying those components. There were minimal changes to the actual text content. Three studies were conducted using non-medically trained JSC personnel (total of 34 participants). Non-medically trained personnel participated in order to approximate a scenario of limited CMO exposure to the RSP equipment and training (which can occur six months prior to the mission). In each study, participants were asked to perform two respiratory distress scenarios using one of the cue card designs to simulate resuscitation (using a mannequin along with the hardware). Procedure completion time, errors, and subjective ratings were recorded. The last iteration of the cue card featured a schematic of the RSP, colors

  19. Binding Causes of Printed Wiring Assemblies with Card-Loks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Raven, Hans; Eisenhower, Kevin

    2012-01-01

    A document discusses a study that presents the first documented extraction loads, both nominal and worst case, and presents the first comprehensive evaluation of extraction techniques, methodologies, and tool requirements relating to extracting printed wiring assemblies (PWAs) with Card-Loks during EVA (extra vehicular activity). This task was performed for the first time during HST (Hubble Space Telescope) Servicing Mission 4. With impending missions to Mars and to the Moon relying on an astronaut's abilities to perform repair and servicing tasks during EVAs, this study provides some insight into what challenges may be encountered during a repair/replacement of a PWA with Card-Loks. Extraction techniques presented in this study could be applicable to other PWA geometries with similar locking devices. Ground-based extractions also benefit from the techniques and extraction tool requirements presented in the study. The findings highlight techniques that work reliably, efficiently, and provide design requirements for tools necessary for extracting PWAs with Card-Loks on ground.

  20. Parallel integer sorting with medium and fine-scale parallelism

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dagum, Leonardo

    1993-01-01

    Two new parallel integer sorting algorithms, queue-sort and barrel-sort, are presented and analyzed in detail. These algorithms do not have optimal parallel complexity, yet they show very good performance in practice. Queue-sort designed for fine-scale parallel architectures which allow the queueing of multiple messages to the same destination. Barrel-sort is designed for medium-scale parallel architectures with a high message passing overhead. The performance results from the implementation of queue-sort on a Connection Machine CM-2 and barrel-sort on a 128 processor iPSC/860 are given. The two implementations are found to be comparable in performance but not as good as a fully vectorized bucket sort on the Cray YMP.

  1. A mower detector to judge soil sorting

    SciTech Connect

    Bramlitt, E.T.; Johnson, N.R.

    1995-12-31

    Thermo Nuclear Services (TNS) has developed a mower detector as an inexpensive and fast means for deciding potential value of soil sorting for cleanup. It is a shielded detector box on wheels pushed over the ground (as a person mows grass) at 30 ft/min with gamma-ray counts recorded every 0.25 sec. It mirror images detection by the TNS transportable sorter system which conveys soil at 30 ft/min and toggles a gate to send soil on separate paths based on counts. The mower detector shows if contamination is variable and suitable for sorting, and by unique calibration sources, it indicates detection sensitivity. The mower detector has been used to characterize some soil at Department of Energy sites in New Jersey and South Carolina.

  2. Information sharing and sorting in a community

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bhattacherjee, Biplab; Manna, S. S.; Mukherjee, Animesh

    2013-06-01

    We present the results of a detailed numerical study of a model for the sharing and sorting of information in a community consisting of a large number of agents. The information gathering takes place in a sequence of mutual bipartite interactions where randomly selected pairs of agents communicate with each other to enhance their knowledge and sort out the common information. Although our model is less restricted compared to the well-established naming game, the numerical results strongly indicate that the whole set of exponents characterizing this model are different from those of the naming game and they assume nontrivial values. Finally, it appears that in analogy to the emergence of clusters in the phenomenon of percolation, one can define clusters of agents here having the same information. We have studied in detail the growth of the largest cluster in this article and performed its finite-size scaling analysis.

  3. Efficient Sorting on the Tilera Manycore Architecture

    SciTech Connect

    Morari, Alessandro; Tumeo, Antonino; Villa, Oreste; Secchi, Simone; Valero, Mateo

    2012-10-24

    e present an efficient implementation of the radix sort algo- rithm for the Tilera TILEPro64 processor. The TILEPro64 is one of the first successful commercial manycore processors. It is com- posed of 64 tiles interconnected through multiple fast Networks- on-chip and features a fully coherent, shared distributed cache. The architecture has a large degree of flexibility, and allows various optimization strategies. We describe how we mapped the algorithm to this architecture. We present an in-depth analysis of the optimizations for each phase of the algorithm with respect to the processor’s sustained performance. We discuss the overall throughput reached by our radix sort implementation (up to 132 MK/s) and show that it provides comparable or better performance-per-watt with respect to state-of-the art implemen- tations on x86 processors and graphic processing units.

  4. Differential expression of axon-sorting molecules in mouse olfactory sensory neurons.

    PubMed

    Ihara, Naoki; Nakashima, Ai; Hoshina, Naosuke; Ikegaya, Yuji; Takeuchi, Haruki

    2016-08-01

    In the mouse olfactory system, the axons of olfactory sensory neurons that express the same type of odorant receptor (OR) converge to a specific set of glomeruli in the olfactory bulb (OB). It is widely accepted that expressed OR molecules instruct glomerular segregation by regulating the expression of axon-sorting molecules. Although the relationship between the expression of axon-sorting molecules and OR types has been analyzed in detail, those between the expressions of axon-sorting molecules remain to be elucidated. Here we collected the expression profiles of four axon-sorting molecules from a large number of glomeruli in the OB. These molecules demonstrated position-independent mosaic expressions, but their patterns were not identical in the OB. Comparing their expressions identified positive and negative correlations between several pairs of genes even though they showed various expressions. Furthermore, the principal component analysis revealed that the factor loadings in the principal component 1, which explain the largest amount of variation, were most likely to reflect the degree of the cyclic nucleotide-gated (CNG) channel dependence on the expression of axon-sorting molecules. Thus, neural activity generated through the CNG channel is a major component in the generation of a wide variety of expressions of axon-sorting molecules in glomerular segregation.

  5. Population Enrichment and Isolation with Magnetic Sorting

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-09-01

    diposable, microfluidic cartridges. Along with magnetic sorting methods, we detail flow cytometry analysis techniques to quantify cell population...panel. The red signal in each plot is the background cell fluorescence measured in the PE emission channel . Either a histogram of PE-H vs. count or...Recently, the U.S. Army Research Laboratory (ARL) transitioned a microfluidic magnetic sorter (MMS) from Cynvenio Biosystems during an ICB 6.2

  6. How Schwann Cells Sort Axons: New Concepts.

    PubMed

    Feltri, M Laura; Poitelon, Yannick; Previtali, Stefano Carlo

    2016-06-01

    Peripheral nerves contain large myelinated and small unmyelinated (Remak) fibers that perform different functions. The choice to myelinate or not is dictated to Schwann cells by the axon itself, based on the amount of neuregulin I-type III exposed on its membrane. Peripheral axons are more important in determining the final myelination fate than central axons, and the implications for this difference in Schwann cells and oligodendrocytes are discussed. Interestingly, this choice is reversible during pathology, accounting for the remarkable plasticity of Schwann cells, and contributing to the regenerative potential of the peripheral nervous system. Radial sorting is the process by which Schwann cells choose larger axons to myelinate during development. This crucial morphogenetic step is a prerequisite for myelination and for differentiation of Remak fibers, and is arrested in human diseases due to mutations in genes coding for extracellular matrix and linkage molecules. In this review we will summarize progresses made in the last years by a flurry of reverse genetic experiments in mice and fish. This work revealed novel molecules that control radial sorting, and contributed unexpected ideas to our understanding of the cellular and molecular mechanisms that control radial sorting of axons.

  7. Generalized sorting profile of alluvial fans

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miller, Kimberly Litwin; Reitz, Meredith D.; Jerolmack, Douglas J.

    2014-10-01

    Alluvial rivers often exhibit self-similar gravel size distributions and abrupt gravel-sand transitions. Experiments suggest that these sorting patterns are established rapidly, but how—and how fast—this convergence occurs in the field is unknown. We examine the establishment of downstream sorting patterns in a kilometer-scale alluvial fan. The sharp transition from canyon to unconfined, channelized fan provides a well-defined boundary condition. The channel changes from deep and entrenched at the fan apex to shallow and depositional over a short distance, exhibiting nonequilibrium behavior. The resulting gravel-fining profile is not self-similar; the particle size distribution narrows until approximate equal mobility is achieved. Downfan, the gravel-sand transition appears to exhibit a self-similar form; field and laboratory data collapse when downstream distance is normalized by the location of the transition. Results suggest a generalized sorting profile for alluvial fans as a consequence of the threshold of motion and nonequilibrium channels.

  8. Gender Sorting across K-12 Schools in the United States

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Long, Mark C.; Conger, Dylan

    2013-01-01

    This article documents evidence of nonrandom gender sorting across K-12 schools in the United States. The sorting exists among coed schools and at all grade levels, and it is highest in the secondary school grades. We observe some gender sorting across school sectors and types: for instance, males are slightly underrepresented in private schools…

  9. Categorizing Variations of Student-Implemented Sorting Algorithms

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Taherkhani, Ahmad; Korhonen, Ari; Malmi, Lauri

    2012-01-01

    In this study, we examined freshmen students' sorting algorithm implementations in data structures and algorithms' course in two phases: at the beginning of the course before the students received any instruction on sorting algorithms, and after taking a lecture on sorting algorithms. The analysis revealed that many students have insufficient…

  10. My eSorts and Digital Extensions of Word Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zucker, Tricia A.; Invernizzi, Marcia

    2008-01-01

    "My eSorts" is a strategy for helping children learn to read and spell in a socially motivated context. It is based on developmental spelling research and the word study approach to teaching phonics and spelling. "eSorting" employs digital desktop publishing tools that allow children to author their own electronic word sorts and then share these…

  11. The ubiquitin ligase deltex-3l regulates endosomal sorting of the G protein-coupled receptor CXCR4.

    PubMed

    Holleman, Justine; Marchese, Adriano

    2014-06-15

    G protein-coupled receptor (GPCR) sorting into the degradative pathway is important for limiting the duration and magnitude of signaling. Agonist activation of the GPCR CXCR4 induces its rapid ubiquitination and sorting to lysosomes via the endosomal sorting complex required for transport (ESCRT) pathway. We recently reported that ESCRT-0 ubiquitination is linked to the efficiency with which CXCR4 is sorted for lysosomal degradation; however mechanistic insight is lacking. Here we define a novel role for the really interesting new gene-domain E3 ubiquitin ligase deltex-3-like (DTX3L) in regulating CXCR4 sorting from endosomes to lysosomes. We show that DTX3L localizes to early endosomes upon CXCR4 activation and interacts directly with and inhibits the activity of the E3 ubiquitin ligase atrophin-1 interacting protein 4. This serves to limit the extent to which ESCRT-0 is ubiquitinated and is able to sort CXCR4 for lysosomal degradation. Therefore we define a novel role for DTX3L in GPCR endosomal sorting and reveal an unprecedented link between two distinct E3 ubiquitin ligases to control the activity of the ESCRT machinery.

  12. The ubiquitin ligase RNF126 regulates the retrograde sorting of the cation-independent mannose 6-phosphate receptor.

    PubMed

    Smith, Christopher J; McGlade, C Jane

    2014-01-15

    The ubiquitin proteasome system is central to the regulation of a number of intracellular sorting pathways in mammalian cells including quality control at the endoplasmic reticulum and the internalization and endosomal sorting of cell surface receptors. Here we describe that RNF126, an E3 ubiquitin ligase, is involved in the sorting of the cation-independent mannose 6-phosphate receptor (CI-MPR). In cells transiently depleted of RNF126, the CI-MPR is dispersed into Rab4 positive endosomes and the efficiency of retrograde sorting is delayed. Furthermore, the stable knockdown of RNF126 leads to the lysosomal degradation of CI-MPR and missorting of cathepsin D. RNF126 specifically regulates the sorting of the CI-MPR as other cargo that follow the retrograde sorting route including the cholera toxin, furin and TGN38 are unaffected in the absence of RNF126. Lastly we show that the RING finger domain of RNF126 is required to rescue the decrease in CI-MPR levels, suggesting that the ubiquitin ligase activity of RNF126 is required for CI-MPR sorting. Together, our data indicate that the ubiquitin ligase RNF126 has a role in the retrograde sorting of the CI-MPR.

  13. Secretory granule biogenesis and neuropeptide sorting to the regulated secretory pathway in neuroendocrine cells.

    PubMed

    Loh, Y Peng; Kim, Taeyoon; Rodriguez, Yazmin M; Cawley, Niamh X

    2004-01-01

    Neuropeptide precursors synthesized at the rough endoplasmic reticulum are transported and sorted at the trans-Golgi network (TGN) to the granules of the regulated secretory pathway (RSP) of neuroendocrine cells. They are then processed into active peptides and stored in large dense-core granules (LDCGs) until secreted upon stimulation. We have studied the regulation of biogenesis of the LDCGs and the mechanism by which neuropeptide precursors, such as pro-opiomelanocortin (POMC), are sorted into these LDCGs of the RSP in neuroendocrine and endocrine cells. We provide evidence that chromogranin A (CgA), one of the most abundant acidic glycoproteins ubiquitously present in neuroendocrine/endocrine cells, plays an important role in the regulation of LDCG biogenesis. Specific depletion of CgA expression by antisense RNAs in PC12 cells led to a profound loss of secretory granule formation. Exogenously expressed POMC was neither stored nor secreted in a regulated manner in these CgA-deficient PC12 cells. Overexpression of CgA in a CgA- and LDCG-deficient endocrine cell line, 6T3, restored regulated secretion of transfected POMC and the presence of immunoreactive CgA at the tips of the processes of these cells. Unlike CgA, CgB, another granin protein, could not substitute for the role of CgA in regulating LDCG biogenesis. Thus, we conclude that CgA is a key player in the regulation of the biogenesis of LDCGs in neuroendocrine cells. To examine the mechanism of sorting POMC to the LDCGs, we carried out site-directed mutagenesis, transfected the POMC mutants into PC12 cells, and assayed for regulated secretion. Our previous molecular modeling studies predicted a three-dimensional sorting motif in POMC that can bind to a sorting receptor, membrane carboxypeptidase E (CPE). The sorting signal consists of four conserved residues at the N-terminal loop structure of POMC: two acidic residues and two hydrophobic residues. The two acidic residues were predicted to bind to a

  14. [The introduction of the electronic health card in Germany].

    PubMed

    Bales, S

    2005-07-01

    From 2006 onwards all members of the health insurance system in Germany will be issued an electronic health card which will replace the current health insurance card. The new health card will be technically upgraded to also include patient-related health data or provide access to such data in addition to its administrative functions. Therefore, it is evident that the health card be fitted with a microprocessor that permits authentication (electronic identity check), encryption and the electronic digital signature, thus ensuring maximum data safety and security. For easy identification of the insured person, the electronic health card will bear a photograph of the card holder.

  15. Implementing Smart Cards into the Air Force Reserve

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2002-04-01

    Smart card technology is essentially about a credit card with a brain, Smart cards have an embedded microchip that allows the card to hold digital...gained favor in the United States. The Department of Defense (DoD) also saw the utility in using smart card technology, The DoD began tests with smart...research paper is to explore the smart card story, with a particular emphasis on how implementation is effecting DoD, the Air Force, and the RC.

  16. Study of Sort Stories: Leveled Reading Supplement to Words Their Way: Word Sorts for Letter Name-Alphabet Spellers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zugel, Kevin

    2005-01-01

    "Sort Stories: Leveled Reading Supplement to Words Their Way: Word Sorts for Letter Name-Alphabet Spellers" effectiveness was tested using five English language learner (ELL) students in the fifth and sixth grade. "Sort Stories" uses the word lists and accompanying clip-art from "Words Their Way" in developmental, grade-level specific, short read…

  17. Patient health record on a smart card.

    PubMed

    Naszlady, A; Naszlady, J

    1998-02-01

    A validated health questionnaire has been used for the documentation of a patient's history (826 items) and of the findings from physical examination (591 items) in our clinical ward for 25 years. This computerized patient record has been completed in EUCLIDES code (CEN TC/251) for laboratory tests and an ATC and EAN code listing for the names of the drugs permanently required by the patient. In addition, emergency data were also included on an EEPROM chipcard with a 24 kb capacity. The program is written in FOX-PRO language. A group of 5000 chronically ill in-patients received these cards which contain their health data. For security reasons the contents of the smart card is only accessible by a doctor's PIN coded key card. The personalization of each card was carried out in our health center and the depersonalized alphanumeric data were collected for further statistical evaluation. This information served as a basis for a real need assessment of health care and for the calculation of its cost. Code-combined with an optical card, a completely paperless electronic patient record system has been developed containing all three information carriers in medicine: Texts, Curves and Pictures.

  18. COP9-Associated CSN5 Regulates Exosomal Protein Deubiquitination and Sorting

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Yuelong; Shah, Spandan V.; Xiang, Xiaoyu; Wang, Jianhua; Deng, Zhong-bin; Liu, Cunren; Zhang, Liming; Wu, Jianming; Edmonds, Tara; Jambor, Christina; Kappes, John C.; Zhang, Huang-Ge

    2009-01-01

    Ubiquitinated endosomal proteins that are deposited into the lumens of multivesicular bodies are either sorted for lysosomal-mediated degradation or secreted as exosomes into the extracellular milieu. The mechanisms that underlie the sorting of cellular cargo proteins are currently unknown. In this study, we show that the COP9 signalosome (CSN)-associated protein CSN5 quantitatively regulated proteins that were sorted into exosomes. Western blot analysis of exosomal proteins indicated that small interfering (si)RNA knockdown of CSN5 results in increased levels of both ubiquitinated and non-ubiquitinated exosomal proteins, including heat shock protein 70, in comparison with exosomes isolated from the supernatants of 293 cells transfected with scrambled siRNA. Furthermore, 293 cells transfected with JAB1/MPN/Mov34 metalloenzyme domain-deleted CSN5 produced exosomes with higher levels of ubiquitinated heat shock protein 70, which did not affect non-ubiquitinated heat shock protein 70 levels. The loss of COP9-associated deubiquitin activity of CSN5 also led to the enhancement of HIV Gag that was sorted into exosomes as well as the promotion of HIV-1 release, suggesting that COP9-associated CSN5 regulates the sorting of a number of exosomal proteins in both a CSN5 JAB1/MPN/Mov34 metalloenzyme domain-dependent and -independent manner. We propose that COP9-associated CSN5 regulates exosomal protein sorting in both a deubiquitinating activity-dependent and -independent manner, which is contrary to the current idea of ubiquitin-dependent sorting of proteins to exosomes. PMID:19246649

  19. Online sorting of recovered wood waste by automated XRF-technology: part II. Sorting efficiencies.

    PubMed

    Hasan, A Rasem; Solo-Gabriele, Helena; Townsend, Timothy

    2011-04-01

    Sorting of waste wood is an important process practiced at recycling facilities in order to detect and divert contaminants from recycled wood products. Contaminants of concern include arsenic, chromium and copper found in chemically preserved wood. The objective of this research was to evaluate the sorting efficiencies of both treated and untreated parts of the wood waste stream, and metal (As, Cr and Cu) mass recoveries by the use of automated X-ray fluorescence (XRF) systems. A full-scale system was used for experimentation. This unit consisted of an XRF-detection chamber mounted on the top of a conveyor and a pneumatic slide-way diverter which sorted wood into presumed treated and presumed untreated piles. A randomized block design was used to evaluate the operational conveyance parameters of the system, including wood feed rate and conveyor belt speed. Results indicated that online sorting efficiencies of waste wood by XRF technology were high based on number and weight of pieces (70-87% and 75-92% for treated wood and 66-97% and 68-96% for untreated wood, respectively). These sorting efficiencies achieved mass recovery for metals of 81-99% for As, 75-95% for Cu and 82-99% of Cr. The incorrect sorting of wood was attributed almost equally to deficiencies in the detection and conveyance/diversion systems. Even with its deficiencies, the system was capable of producing a recyclable portion that met residential soil quality levels established for Florida, for an infeed that contained 5% of treated wood.

  20. Patient care report cards: an analysis.

    PubMed

    Badger, K A

    1998-01-01

    In the competitive health care market of the 1990s, health care institutions face a significant number of fiscal challenges that threaten their survival. As part of the survival process, institutions must demonstrate--to the public and to regulatory agencies--that they are measuring the effect of their care structures and processes. Institutions must be willing to share these measurements with the public as well as to use them internally to identify performance problems and document the impact of process improvements or other changes. The report card is a simple, easily understood method for reporting quality data and comparing varying aspects of patient care processes and outcomes. However, as measurements, report cards are not robust enough to serve as the sole source of quality-related data, and interinstitutional comparisons may be misleading. This article explores the new phenomenon known as patient care report cards and discusses their usage in quality measurement and improvement.

  1. Familial pityriasis rubra pilaris is caused by mutations in CARD14.

    PubMed

    Fuchs-Telem, Dana; Sarig, Ofer; van Steensel, Maurice A M; Isakov, Ofer; Israeli, Shirli; Nousbeck, Janna; Richard, Katharina; Winnepenninckx, Veronique; Vernooij, Marigje; Shomron, Noam; Uitto, Jouni; Fleckman, Philip; Richard, Gabriele; Sprecher, Eli

    2012-07-13

    Pityriasis rubra pilaris (PRP) is a papulosquamous disorder phenotypically related to psoriasis. The disease has been occasionally shown to be inherited in an autosomal-dominant fashion. To identify the genetic cause of familial PRP, we ascertained four unrelated families affected by autosomal-dominant PRP. We initially mapped PRP to 17q25.3, a region overlapping with psoriasis susceptibility locus 2 (PSORS2 [MIM 602723]). Using a combination of linkage analysis followed by targeted whole-exome sequencing and candidate-gene screening, we identified three different heterozygous mutations in CARD14, which encodes caspase recruitment domain family, member 14. CARD14 was found to be specifically expressed in the skin. CARD14 is a known activator of nuclear factor kappa B signaling, which has been implicated in inflammatory disorders. Accordingly, CARD14 levels were increased, and p65 was found to be activated in the skin of PRP-affected individuals. The present data demonstrate that autosomal-dominant PRP is allelic to familial psoriasis, which was recently shown to also be caused by mutations in CARD14.

  2. Inexpensive Data Acquisition with a Sound Card

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hassan, Umer; Pervaiz, Saad; Anwar, Muhammad Sabieh

    2011-12-01

    Signal generators, oscilloscopes, and data acquisition (DAQ) systems are standard components of the modern experimental physics laboratory. The sound card, a built-in component in the ubiquitous personal computer, can be utilized for all three of these tasks1,2 and offers an attractive option for labs in developing countries such as ours—Pakistan—where affordability is always of prime concern. In this paper, we describe in a recipe fashion how the sound card is used for DAQ and signal generation.

  3. High density electrical card connector system

    DOEpatents

    Haggard, J. Eric; Trotter, Garrett R.

    2000-01-01

    An electrical circuit board card connection system is disclosed which comprises a wedge-operated locking mechanism disposed along an edge portion of the printed circuit board. An extrusion along the edge of the circuit board mates with an extrusion fixed to the card cage having a plurality of electrical connectors. The connection system allows the connectors to be held away from the circuit board during insertion/extraction and provides a constant mating force once the circuit board is positioned and the wedge inserted. The disclosed connection system is a simple solution to the need for a greater number of electrical signal connections.

  4. What's Hot--and Not--in Card Access Systems.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sturgeon, Julie

    2002-01-01

    Describes four uses of newer card access systems on college campuses: stored value, entitlement, access control, and vending. Discusses the continued reluctance of schools to move to cards containing computer chips rather than simply magnetic stripes. (EV)

  5. 1. Post card view of the bridge, c. 1910. Post ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    1. Post card view of the bridge, c. 1910. Post card courtesy Carol Poh Miller. Photocopy by Berni Rich, Score Photographers Cleveland, OH - B & O Railroad Bridge Number 464, Spanning Old Ship Canal & Cuyahoga River, Cleveland, Cuyahoga County, OH

  6. 76 FR 76475 - Employment Network (EN) Report Card

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-12-07

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office SOCIAL SECURITY ADMINISTRATION Employment Network (EN) Report Card AGENCY: Social Security Administration. ACTION: Notice of... Public Comments on Draft Revised Ticket to Work Consumer Employment Network Report Card. SUMMARY: We...

  7. Exosome and exosomal microRNA: trafficking, sorting, and function.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Jian; Li, Sha; Li, Lu; Li, Meng; Guo, Chongye; Yao, Jun; Mi, Shuangli

    2015-02-01

    Exosomes are 40-100 nm nano-sized vesicles that are released from many cell types into the extracellular space. Such vesicles are widely distributed in various body fluids. Recently, mRNAs and microRNAs (miRNAs) have been identified in exosomes, which can be taken up by neighboring or distant cells and subsequently modulate recipient cells. This suggests an active sorting mechanism of exosomal miRNAs, since the miRNA profiles of exosomes may differ from those of the parent cells. Exosomal miRNAs play an important role in disease progression, and can stimulate angiogenesis and facilitate metastasis in cancers. In this review, we will introduce the origin and the trafficking of exosomes between cells, display current research on the sorting mechanism of exosomal miRNAs, and briefly describe how exosomes and their miRNAs function in recipient cells. Finally, we will discuss the potential applications of these miRNA-containing vesicles in clinical settings.

  8. CARD9 knockout ameliorates myocardial dysfunction associated with high fat diet-induced obesity.

    PubMed

    Cao, Li; Qin, Xing; Peterson, Matthew R; Haller, Samantha E; Wilson, Kayla A; Hu, Nan; Lin, Xin; Nair, Sreejayan; Ren, Jun; He, Guanglong

    2016-03-01

    Obesity is associated with chronic inflammation which plays a critical role in the development of cardiovascular dysfunction. Because the adaptor protein caspase recruitment domain-containing protein 9 (CARD9) in macrophages regulates innate immune responses via activation of pro-inflammatory cytokines, we hypothesize that CARD9 mediates the pro-inflammatory signaling associated with obesity en route to myocardial dysfunction. C57BL/6 wild-type (WT) and CARD9(-/-) mice were fed normal diet (ND, 12% fat) or a high fat diet (HFD, 45% fat) for 5months. At the end of 5-month HFD feeding, cardiac function was evaluated using echocardiography. Cardiomyocytes were isolated and contractile properties were measured. Immunofluorescence was performed to detect macrophage infiltration in the heart. Heart tissue homogenates, plasma, and supernatants from isolated macrophages were collected to measure the concentrations of pro-inflammatory cytokines using ELISA kits. Western immunoblotting analyses were performed on heart tissue homogenates and isolated macrophages to explore the underlying signaling mechanism(s). CARD9 knockout alleviated HFD-induced insulin resistance and glucose intolerance, prevented myocardial dysfunction with preserved cardiac fractional shortening and cardiomyocyte contractile properties. CARD9 knockout also significantly decreased the number of infiltrated macrophages in the heart with reduced myocardium-, plasma-, and macrophage-derived cytokines including IL-6, IL-1β and TNFα. Finally, CARD9 knockout abrogated the increase of p38 MAPK phosphorylation, the decrease of LC3BII/LC3BI ratio and the up-regulation of p62 expression in the heart induced by HFD feeding and restored cardiac autophagy signaling. In conclusion, CARD9 knockout ameliorates myocardial dysfunction associated with HFD-induced obesity, potentially through reduction of macrophage infiltration, suppression of p38 MAPK phosphorylation, and preservation of autophagy in the heart.

  9. Bacillus anthracis aerosolization associated with a contaminated mail sorting machine.

    PubMed

    Dull, Peter M; Wilson, Kathy E; Kournikakis, Bill; Whitney, Ellen A S; Boulet, Camille A; Ho, Jim Y W; Ogston, Jim; Spence, Mel R; McKenzie, Megan M; Phelan, Maureen A; Popovic, Tanja; Ashford, David

    2002-10-01

    On October 12, 2001, two envelopes containing Bacillus anthracis spores passed through a sorting machine in a postal facility in Washington, D.C. When anthrax infection was identified in postal workers 9 days later, the facility was closed. To determine if exposure to airborne B. anthracis spores continued to occur, we performed air sampling around the contaminated sorter. One CFU of B. anthracis was isolated from 990 L of air sampled before the machine was activated. Six CFUs were isolated during machine activation and processing of clean dummy mail. These data indicate that an employee working near this machine might inhale approximately 30 B. anthracis-containing particles during an 8-h work shift. What risk this may have represented to postal workers is not known, but this estimate is approximately 20-fold less than a previous estimate of sub-5 micro m B. anthracis-containing particles routinely inhaled by asymptomatic, unvaccinated workers in a goat-hair mill.

  10. Introduction to smart card technology and initial medical application.

    PubMed

    Quick, G

    1994-10-01

    Smart card technology is the name applied to the use of a plastic card with an embedded computer chip. Recent development of smart card software has allowed storage and retrieval of medical information, affording the opportunity to provide a standardized, portable, accessible medical record for use in prehospital and emergency department patient encounters. We describe the smart card concept and its initial deployment in a section of a large Midwestern urban area.

  11. Small Peptide Recognition Sequence for Intracellular Sorting

    PubMed Central

    Pandey, Kailash N.

    2010-01-01

    Increasing evidence indicate that complex arrays of short signals and recognition peptide sequence ensure accurate trafficking and distribution of transmembrane receptors and/or proteins and their ligands into intracellular compartments. Internalization and subsequent trafficking of cell-surface receptors into the cell interior is mediated by specific short-sequence peptide signals within the cytoplasmic domains of these receptor proteins. The short signals usually consist of small linear amino acid sequences, which are recognized by adaptor coat proteins along the endocytic and sorting pathways. In recent years, much has been learned about the function and mechanisms of endocytic pathways responsible for the trafficking and molecular sorting of membrane receptors and their ligands into intracellular compartments, however, the significance and scope of the short sequence motifs in these cellular events is not well understood. Here a particular emphasis has been given to the functions of short-sequence signal motifs responsible for the itinerary and destination of membrane receptors and proteins moving into subcellular compartments. PMID:20817434

  12. Developing Automated Methods of Waste Sorting

    SciTech Connect

    Shurtliff, Rodney Marvin

    2002-08-01

    The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) analyzed the need complex-wide for remote and automated technologies as they relate to the treatment and disposal of mixed wastes. This analysis revealed that several DOE sites need the capability to open drums containing waste, visually inspect and sort the contents, and finally repackage the containers that are acceptable at a waste disposal facility such as the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) in New Mexico. Conditioning contaminated waste so that it is compatible with the WIPP criteria for storage is an arduous task whether the waste is contact handled (waste having radioactivity levels below 200 mrem/hr) or remote handled. Currently, WIPP non-compliant items are removed from the waste stream manually, at a rate of about one 55-gallon drum per day. Issues relating to contamination-based health hazards as well as repetitive motion health hazards are steering industry towards a more user-friendly, method of conditioning or sorting waste.

  13. ImmuSort, a database on gene plasticity and electronic sorting for immune cells

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Pingzhang; Yang, Yehong; Han, Wenling; Ma, Dalong

    2015-01-01

    Gene expression is highly dynamic and plastic. We present a new immunological database, ImmuSort. Unlike other gene expression databases, ImmuSort provides a convenient way to view global differential gene expression data across thousands of experimental conditions in immune cells. It enables electronic sorting, which is a bioinformatics process to retrieve cell states associated with specific experimental conditions that are mainly based on gene expression intensity. A comparison of gene expression profiles reveals other applications, such as the evaluation of immune cell biomarkers and cell subsets, identification of cell specific and/or disease-associated genes or transcripts, comparison of gene expression in different transcript variants and probe set quality evaluation. A plasticity score is introduced to measure gene plasticity. Average rank and marker evaluation scores are used to evaluate biomarkers. The current version includes 31 human and 17 mouse immune cell groups, comprising 10,422 and 3,929 microarrays derived from public databases, respectively. A total of 20,283 human and 20,963 mouse genes are available to query in the database. Examples show the distinct advantages of the database. The database URL is http://202.85.212.211/Account/ImmuSort.html. PMID:25988315

  14. 48 CFR 908.7117 - Tabulating machine cards.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 5 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Tabulating machine cards. 908.7117 Section 908.7117 Federal Acquisition Regulations System DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY COMPETITION... Tabulating machine cards. DOE offices shall acquire tabulating machine cards in accordance with FPMR 41...

  15. 41 CFR 101-26.509 - Tabulating machine cards.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 41 Public Contracts and Property Management 2 2011-07-01 2007-07-01 true Tabulating machine cards... PROGRAM 26.5-GSA Procurement Programs § 101-26.509 Tabulating machine cards. Procurement by Federal agencies of tabulating machine cards shall be made in accordance with the provisions of this § 101-26.509....

  16. 48 CFR 908.7117 - Tabulating machine cards.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 5 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Tabulating machine cards. 908.7117 Section 908.7117 Federal Acquisition Regulations System DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY COMPETITION... Tabulating machine cards. DOE offices shall acquire tabulating machine cards in accordance with FPMR 41...

  17. 48 CFR 908.7117 - Tabulating machine cards.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 5 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Tabulating machine cards. 908.7117 Section 908.7117 Federal Acquisition Regulations System DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY COMPETITION... Tabulating machine cards. DOE offices shall acquire tabulating machine cards in accordance with FPMR 41...

  18. 48 CFR 908.7117 - Tabulating machine cards.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 5 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Tabulating machine cards. 908.7117 Section 908.7117 Federal Acquisition Regulations System DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY COMPETITION... Tabulating machine cards. DOE offices shall acquire tabulating machine cards in accordance with FPMR 41...

  19. 41 CFR 101-26.509 - Tabulating machine cards.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 41 Public Contracts and Property Management 2 2014-07-01 2012-07-01 true Tabulating machine cards... PROGRAM 26.5-GSA Procurement Programs § 101-26.509 Tabulating machine cards. Procurement by Federal agencies of tabulating machine cards shall be made in accordance with the provisions of this § 101-26.509....

  20. 41 CFR 101-26.509 - Tabulating machine cards.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 41 Public Contracts and Property Management 2 2013-07-01 2012-07-01 true Tabulating machine cards... PROGRAM 26.5-GSA Procurement Programs § 101-26.509 Tabulating machine cards. Procurement by Federal agencies of tabulating machine cards shall be made in accordance with the provisions of this § 101-26.509....