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Sample records for activity catalase cat

  1. Do Superoxide Dismutase (SOD) and Catalase (CAT) protect Cells from DNA Damage Induced by Active Arsenicals?

    EPA Science Inventory

    Superoxide dismutase (SOD) catalyzes the conversion of superoxide to hydrogen peroxide, which can be converted to water and oxygen through the action of catalase. Heterozygous mice of strain B6: 129S7-SodltmlLeb/J were obtained from Jackson Laboratories and bred to produce offspr...

  2. CatB is Critical for Total Catalase Activity and Reduces Bactericidal Effects of Phenazine-1-Carboxylic Acid on Xanthomonas oryzae pv. oryzae and X. oryzae pv. oryzicola.

    PubMed

    Pan, Xiayan; Wu, Jian; Xu, Shu; Duan, Yabing; Zhou, Mingguo

    2017-02-01

    Rice bacterial leaf blight, caused by Xanthomonas oryzae pv. oryzae, and rice bacterial leaf streak, caused by X. oryzae pv. oryzicola, are major diseases of rice. Phenazine-1-carboxylic acid (PCA) is a natural product that is isolated from Pseudomonas spp. and is used to control many important rice diseases in China. We previously reported that PCA disturbs the redox balance, which results in the accumulation of reactive oxygen species in X. oryzae pv. oryzae. In this study, we found that PCA significantly upregulated the transcript levels of catB and katE, which encode catalases, and that PCA sensitivity was reduced when X. oryzae pvs. oryzae and oryzicola were cultured with exogenous catalase. Furthermore, catB deletion mutants of X. oryzae pvs. oryzae and oryzicola showed dramatically decreased total catalase activity, increased sensitivity to PCA, and reduced virulence in rice. In contrast, deletion mutants of srpA and katG, which also encode catalases, exhibited little change in PCA sensitivity. The results indicate that catB in both X. oryzae pvs. oryzae and oryzicola encodes a catalase that helps protect the bacteria against PCA-induced stress.

  3. Differential response of maize catalases to abscisic acid: Vp1 transcriptional activator is not required for abscisic acid-regulated Cat1 expression.

    PubMed Central

    Williamson, J D; Scandalios, J G

    1992-01-01

    In this paper we describe the distinctive responses of the maize catalases to the plant growth regulator abscisic acid (ABA). We analyzed RNA and enzyme accumulation in excised maize embryos and found that each catalase responded differently to exogenously applied ABA. Levels of Cat1 transcript and enzyme activity rapidly increased. In contrast, levels of Cat2 transcript and protein decreased, while Cat3 transcript levels were not affected. In developing kernels of the ABA-deficient/biosynthetic viviparous mutant vp5, lower levels of Cat1 RNA correlated with lower endogenous ABA levels when compared to measured levels in comparably aged wild-type siblings from the same ear. The maize vp1 mutant line is morphologically insensitive to normal endogenous levels of ABA. Analysis of the response of Cat1 to exogenously applied ABA in mutant and wild-type vp1 sibling embryos suggests that, unlike other ABA-responsive genes analyzed to date, the Vp1 gene product is not essential for the ABA-mediated regulation of Cat1. The significance of these responses to ABA in defining the roles of the various CATs in maize is discussed. Images PMID:1388272

  4. Isolation and expression of the catA gene encoding the major vegetative catalase in Streptomyces coelicolor Müller.

    PubMed Central

    Cho, Y H; Roe, J H

    1997-01-01

    We isolated the catA gene for the major vegetative catalase from Streptomyces coelicolor Müller. It encodes a polypeptide of 488 residues (55,440 Da) that is highly homologous to typical monofunctional catalases. We investigated catA expression by analyzing both catA mRNA and catalase activity. catA expression was increased by H2O2 treatment but did not increase during stationary phase. A putative catalase (CatB) cross-reactive with anti-CatA antibody appeared during stationary phase and in the aerial mycelium. PMID:9190825

  5. Molecular Cloning and Expression Analysis of a Catalase Gene (NnCAT) from Nelumbo nucifera.

    PubMed

    Dong, Chen; Zheng, Xingfei; Diao, Ying; Wang, Youwei; Zhou, Mingquan; Hu, Zhongli

    2015-11-01

    Rapid amplification cDNA end (RACE) assay was established to achieve the complete cDNA sequence of a catalase gene (NnCAT) from Nelumbo nucifera. The obtained full-length cDNA was 1666 bp in size and contained a 1476-bp open reading frame. The 3D structural model of NnCAT was constructed by homology modeling. The putative NnCAT possessed all the main characteristic amino acid residues and motifs of catalase (CAT) protein family, and the phylogenetic analysis revealed that NnCAT grouped together with high plants. Moreover, recombinant NnCAT showed the CAT activity (758 U/mg) at room temperature, holding high activity during temperature range of 20-50 °C, then the optimal pH of recombinant protein was assessed from pH 4 to pH 11. Additionally, real-time PCR assay demonstrated that NnCAT mRNA was expressed in various tissues of N. nucifera, with the highest expression in young leaf and lowest level in the root, and mRNA level of NnCAT was significantly augmented in response to short-time mechanical wounding. Different expression pattern of NnCAT gene suggested that NnCAT probably played a defensive role in the initial stages of oxidative stress, regulating the level of reactive oxygen species (ROS) by extracellular stimuli such as short-time mechanical wounding.

  6. Catalase and NO CATALASE ACTIVITY1 promote autophagy-dependent cell death in Arabidopsis.

    PubMed

    Hackenberg, Thomas; Juul, Trine; Auzina, Aija; Gwizdz, Sonia; Malolepszy, Anna; Van Der Kelen, Katrien; Dam, Svend; Bressendorff, Simon; Lorentzen, Andrea; Roepstorff, Peter; Lehmann Nielsen, Kåre; Jørgensen, Jan-Elo; Hofius, Daniel; Van Breusegem, Frank; Petersen, Morten; Andersen, Stig Uggerhøj

    2013-11-01

    Programmed cell death often depends on generation of reactive oxygen species, which can be detoxified by antioxidative enzymes, including catalases. We previously isolated catalase-deficient mutants (cat2) in a screen for resistance to hydroxyurea-induced cell death. Here, we identify an Arabidopsis thaliana hydroxyurea-resistant autophagy mutant, atg2, which also shows reduced sensitivity to cell death triggered by the bacterial effector avrRpm1. To test if catalase deficiency likewise affected both hydroxyurea and avrRpm1 sensitivity, we selected mutants with extremely low catalase activities and showed that they carried mutations in a gene that we named NO CATALASE ACTIVITY1 (NCA1). nca1 mutants showed severely reduced activities of all three catalase isoforms in Arabidopsis, and loss of NCA1 function led to strong suppression of RPM1-triggered cell death. Basal and starvation-induced autophagy appeared normal in the nca1 and cat2 mutants. By contrast, autophagic degradation induced by avrRpm1 challenge was compromised, indicating that catalase acted upstream of immunity-triggered autophagy. The direct interaction of catalase with reactive oxygen species could allow catalase to act as a molecular link between reactive oxygen species and the promotion of autophagy-dependent cell death.

  7. Molecular cloning, characterization and gene expression of an antioxidant enzyme catalase (MrCat) from Macrobrachium rosenbergii.

    PubMed

    Arockiaraj, Jesu; Easwvaran, Sarasvathi; Vanaraja, Puganeshwaran; Singh, Arun; Othman, Rofina Yasmin; Bhassu, Subha

    2012-05-01

    In this study, we reported a full length of catalase gene (designated as MrCat), identified from the transcriptome database of freshwater prawn Macrobrachium rosenbergii. The complete gene sequence of the MrCat is 2504 base pairs in length, and encodes 516 amino acids. The MrCat protein contains three domains such as catalase 1 (catalase proximal heme-ligand signature) at 350-358, catalase 2 (catalase proximal active site signature) at 60-76 and catalase 3 (catalase family profile) at 20-499. The mRNA expressions of MrCat in healthy and the infectious hypodermal and hematopoietic necrosis virus (IHHNV) challenged M. rosenbergii were examined using quantitative real time polymerase chain reaction (qRT-PCR). The MrCat is highly expressed in digestive tract and all the other tissues (walking leg, gills, muscle, hemocyte, hepatopancreas, pleopods, brain and eye stalk) of M. rosenbergii taken for analysis. The expression is strongly up-regulated in digestive tract after IHHNV challenge. To understand its biological activity, the recombinant MrCat gene was constructed and expressed in Escherichia coli BL21 (DE3). The recombinant MrCat existed in high thermal stability and broad spectrum of pH, which showed over 95% enzyme activity between pH 5 and 10.5, and was stable from 40 °C to 70 °C, and exhibited 85-100% enzyme activity from 30 °C to 40 °C.

  8. Involvement of OS-2 MAP kinase in regulation of the large-subunit catalases CAT-1 and CAT-3 in Neurospora crassa.

    PubMed

    Yamashita, Kazuhiro; Shiozawa, Azusa; Banno, Shinpei; Fukumori, Fumiyasu; Ichiishi, Akihiko; Kimura, Makoto; Fujimura, Makoto

    2007-08-01

    Neurospora crassa has four catalase genes--cat-1, cat-2, cat-3, and ctt-1/cat-4. cat-1 and cat-3 encode two fungal-specific large-subunit catalases CAT-1 and CAT-3 normally produced in conidia and growing hyphae, respectively. cat-2 encodes CAT-2 catalase-peroxidase normally produced in conidia. ctt-1 (or cat-4), of which expression was controlled by OS-2 MAP kinase (Noguchi et al., Fungal Genet. Biol. 44, 208-218), encodes a small-subunit catalase with unknown function. To clarify the contribution of OS-2 on the regulation of CAT-1, CAT-2, and CAT-3, we performed quantitative RT-PCR and in-gel catalase activity analyses. When the hyphae were treated with a fungicide (1 mug/ml fludioxonil) or subjected to an osmotic stress (1 M sorbitol), cat-1 was strongly upregulated and CAT-1 was reasonably induced in the wild-type strain. Interestingly, fludioxonil caused not only the CAT-1 induction but also a remarkable CAT-3 decrease in the wild-type hyphae, implying of an abnormal stimulation of asexual differentiation. These responses were not observed in an os-2 mutant hyphae, indicating an involvement of OS-2 in the cat-1 expression; however, os-2 was dispensable for the production of CAT-1 in conidia. In contrast, the expression of cat-2 was significantly induced by heat shock (45 degrees C) and that of cat-3 was moderately stimulated by an oxidative stress (50 microg/ml methyl viologen) in both the wild-type strain and the os-2 mutant, and corresponding enzyme activities were detected after the treatments. Although basal levels of transcription of cat-1 and cat-3 in an os-2 mutant hyphae were a few-fold lower than in the wild-type hyphae, the os-2 mutant exhibited a considerably lower levels of CAT-3 activity than the wild-type strain. These findings suggest that OS-2 MAP kinase regulated the expression of cat-1 and cat-3 transcriptionally, and probably that of cat-3 posttranscriptionally, even though the presence of another regulatory system for each of these two

  9. Loss of Catalase-1 (Cat-1) results in decreased conidial viability enhanced by exposure to light in Neurospora crassa.

    PubMed

    Wang, Niyan; Yoshida, Yusuke; Hasunuma, Kohji

    2007-01-01

    Light is one of the most important factors inducing morphogenesis in Neurospora crassa. The reception of light triggers the generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) including hydrogen peroxide (H(2)O(2)). Catalase-1 (Cat-1) is one of three catalases known to detoxify H(2)O(2) into water and oxygen. We reported that the photomorphogenetic characteristics of mutants in nucleoside diphosphate kinase-1 (NDK-1), a light signal transducer, are severely affected, and NDK-1 interacted with Cat-1 in a yeast two-hybrid assay. To disclose the function of Cat-1, we created a Cat-1 loss-of-function mutant (cat-1 ( RIP )) by the repeat induced point-mutation (RIPing) method. No Cat-1 activity was detected in the mutant strain. Forty guanines were replaced with adenines in the cat-1 gene of cat-1 ( RIP ), which caused 30 amino acid substitutions. The mutant strain grew normally, but its conidia and mycelia were more sensitive to H(2)O(2) than those of the wild type. The lack of Cat-1 activity also caused a significant reduction in the conidial germination rate. Furthermore, light enhanced this reduction in cat-1 ( RIP ) more than that in the wild type. Introduction of cat-1 into the mutant reversed all of these defective phenotypes. These results indicate that Cat-1 plays an important role in supporting the survival of conidia under oxidative and light-induced stress.

  10. Biochemical effects of glyphosate based herbicide, Excel Mera 71 on enzyme activities of acetylcholinesterase (AChE), lipid peroxidation (LPO), catalase (CAT), glutathione-S-transferase (GST) and protein content on teleostean fishes.

    PubMed

    Samanta, Palas; Pal, Sandipan; Mukherjee, Aloke Kumar; Ghosh, Apurba Ratan

    2014-09-01

    Effects of glyphosate based herbicide, Excel Mera 71 at a dose of 17.20mg/l on enzyme activities of acetylcholinesterase (AChE), lipid peroxidation (LPO), catalase (CAT), glutathione-S-transferase (GST) and protein content were measured in different tissues of two Indian air-breathing teleosts, Anabas testudineus (Bloch) and Heteropneustes fossilis (Bloch) during an exposure period of 30 days under laboratory condition. AChE activity was significantly increased in all the investigated tissues of both fish species and maximum elevation was observed in brain of H. fossilis, while spinal cord of A. testudineus showed minimum increment. Fishes showed significant increase LPO levels in all the tissues; highest was observed in gill of A. testudineus but lowest LPO level was observed in muscle of H. fossilis. CAT was also enhanced in both the fishes, while GST activity in liver diminished substantially and minimum was observed in liver of A. testudineus. Total protein content showed decreased value in all the tissues, maximum reduction was observed in liver and minimum in brain of A. testudineus and H. fossilis respectively. The results indicated that Excel Mera 71 caused serious alterations in the enzyme activities resulting into severe deterioration of fish health; so, AChE, LPO, CAT and GST can be used as suitable indicators of herbicidal toxicity.

  11. Regulation of catalase activity in leaves of Nicotiana sylvestris by high CO sub 2

    SciTech Connect

    Havir, E.A.; McHale, N.A. )

    1989-03-01

    The effect of high CO{sub 2} (1% CO{sub 2}/21% O{sub 2}) on the activity of specific forms of catalase (CAT-1, -2, and -3) in seedling leaves of tobacco (Nicotiana sylvestris, Nicotiana tabacum) was examined. In high CO{sub 2} total catalase activity decreased by 50% in the first 2 days, followed by a more gradual decline in the next 4 days. The loss of total activity resulted primarily from a decrease in CAT-1 catalase. In contrast, the activity of CAT-3 catalase, a form with enhanced peroxidatic activity, increased 3-fold in high CO{sub 2} relative to air controls after 4 days. Short-term exposure to high CO{sub 2} indicated that the 50% loss of total activity occurs in the firs 12 hours. Catalase levels increased to normal within 12 hours after seedlings were returned to air. When seedlings were transferred to air after prolonged exposure to high CO{sub 2} (13 days), the levels of CAT-1 catalase were partially restored while CAT-3 remained at its elevated level. Levels of superoxide dismutase activity and those of several peroxisomal enzymes were not affected by high CO{sub 2}. Total catalase levels did not decline when seedlings were exposed to atmospheres of 0.04% CO{sub 2}/5% O{sub 2} or 0.04% CO{sub 2}/1% O{sub 2}, indicating that regulation of catalase in high CO{sub 2} is not related directly to suppression of photorespiration. Antibodies prepared against CAT-1 catalase from N. tabacum reacted strongly against CAT-1 catalase from both N. sylvestris and N. tabacum but not against CAT-3 catalase from either species.

  12. Isolation and characterization of a catalase gene "HuCAT3" from pitaya (Hylocereus undatus) and its expression under abiotic stress.

    PubMed

    Nie, Qiong; Gao, Guo-Li; Fan, Qing-jie; Qiao, Guang; Wen, Xiao-Peng; Liu, Tao; Peng, Zhi-Jun; Cai, Yong-Qiang

    2015-05-25

    Abiotic stresses usually cause H2O2 accumulation, with harmful effects, in plants. Catalase may play a key protective role in plant cells by detoxifying this excess H2O2. Pitaya (Hylocereus undatus) shows broad ecological adaptation due to its high tolerance to abiotic stresses, e.g. drought, heat and poor soil. However, involvement of the pitaya catalase gene (HuCAT) in tolerance to abiotic stresses is unknown. In the present study, a full-length HuCAT3 cDNA (1870 bp) was isolated from pitaya based on our previous microarray data and RACE method. The cDNA sequence and deduced amino acid sequence shared 73-77% and 75-80% identity with other plant catalases, respectively. HuCAT3 contains conserved catalase family domain and catalytic sites. Pairwise comparison and phylogenetic analysis indicated that HuCAT3 is most similar to Eriobotrya japonica CAT, followed by Dimocarpus longan CAT and Nicotiana tabacum CAT1. Expression profile analysis demonstrated that HuCAT3 is mainly expressed in green cotyledons and mature stems, and was regulated by H2O2, drought, cold and salt stress, whereas, its expression patterns and maximum expression levels varied with stress types. HuCAT activity increased as exposure to the tested stresses, and the fluctuation of HuCAT activity was consistent with HuCAT3 mRNA abundance (except for 0.5 days upon drought stress). HuCAT3 mRNA elevations and HuCAT activities changes under cold stress were also in conformity with the cold tolerances among the four genotypes. The obtained results confirmed a major role of HuCAT3 in abiotic stress response of pitaya. This may prove useful in understanding pitaya's high tolerance to abiotic stresses at molecular level.

  13. The catalase activity of diiron adenine deaminase

    SciTech Connect

    Kamat S. S.; Swaminathan S.; Holmes-Hampton, G. P.; Bagaria, A.; Kumaran, D.; Tichy, S. E.; Gheyi, T.; Zheng, X.; Bain, K.; Groshong, C.; Emtage, S.; Sauder, J. M.; Burley, S. K.; Lindahl, P. A.; Raushel, F. M.

    2011-12-01

    Adenine deaminase (ADE) from the amidohydrolase superfamily (AHS) of enzymes catalyzes the conversion of adenine to hypoxanthine and ammonia. Enzyme isolated from Escherichia coli was largely inactive toward the deamination of adenine. Molecular weight determinations by mass spectrometry provided evidence that multiple histidine and methionine residues were oxygenated. When iron was sequestered with a metal chelator and the growth medium supplemented with Mn{sup 2+} before induction, the post-translational modifications disappeared. Enzyme expressed and purified under these conditions was substantially more active for adenine deamination. Apo-enzyme was prepared and reconstituted with two equivalents of FeSO{sub 4}. Inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry and Moessbauer spectroscopy demonstrated that this protein contained two high-spin ferrous ions per monomer of ADE. In addition to the adenine deaminase activity, [Fe{sup II}/Fe{sup II}]-ADE catalyzed the conversion of H{sub 2}O{sub 2} to O{sub 2} and H{sub 2}O. The values of k{sub cat} and k{sub cat}/K{sub m} for the catalase activity are 200 s{sup -1} and 2.4 x 10{sup 4} M{sup -1} s{sup -1}, respectively. [Fe{sup II}/Fe{sup II}]-ADE underwent more than 100 turnovers with H{sub 2}O{sub 2} before the enzyme was inactivated due to oxygenation of histidine residues critical for metal binding. The iron in the inactive enzyme was high-spin ferric with g{sub ave} = 4.3 EPR signal and no evidence of anti-ferromagnetic spin-coupling. A model is proposed for the disproportionation of H{sub 2}O{sub 2} by [Fe{sup II}/Fe{sup II}]-ADE that involves the cycling of the binuclear metal center between the di-ferric and di-ferrous oxidation states. Oxygenation of active site residues occurs via release of hydroxyl radicals. These findings represent the first report of redox reaction catalysis by any member of the AHS.

  14. Catalase activity is modulated by calcium and calmodulin in detached mature leaves of sweet potato.

    PubMed

    Afiyanti, Mufidah; Chen, Hsien-Jung

    2014-01-15

    Catalase (CAT) functions as one of the key enzymes in the scavenging of reactive oxygen species and affects the H2O2 homeostasis in plants. In sweet potato, a major catalase isoform was detected, and total catalase activity showed the highest level in mature leaves (L3) compared to immature (L1) and completely yellow, senescent leaves (L5). The major catalase isoform as well as total enzymatic activity were strongly suppressed by ethylene glycol-bis(2-aminoethylether)-N,N,N',N'-tetraacetic acid (EGTA). This inhibition could be specifically and significantly mitigated in mature L3 leaves by exogenous CaCl2, but not MgCl2 or CoCl2. EGTA also inhibited the activity of the catalase isoform in vitro. Furthermore, chlorpromazine (CPZ), a calmodulin (CAM) inhibitor, drastically suppressed the major catalase isoform as well as total enzymatic activity, and this suppression was alleviated by exogenous sweet potato calmodulin (SPCAM) fusion protein in L3 leaves. CPZ also inhibited the activity of the catalase isoform in vitro. Protein blot hybridization showed that both anti-catalase SPCAT1 and anti-calmodulin SPCAM antibodies detect a band at the same position, which corresponds to the activity of the major catalase isoform from unboiled, but not boiled crude protein extract of L3 leaves. An inverse correlation between the major catalase isoform/total enzymatic activity and the H2O2 level was also observed. These data suggest that sweet potato CAT activity is modulated by CaCl2 and SPCAM, and plays an important role in H2O2 homeostasis in mature leaves. Association of SPCAM with the major CAT isoform is required and regulates the in-gel CAT activity band.

  15. A chaperone function of NO CATALASE ACTIVITY1 is required to maintain catalase activity and for multiple stress responses in Arabidopsis.

    PubMed

    Li, Jing; Liu, Juntao; Wang, Guoqiang; Cha, Joon-Yung; Li, Guannan; Chen, She; Li, Zhen; Guo, Jinghua; Zhang, Caiguo; Yang, Yongqing; Kim, Woe-Yeon; Yun, Dae-Jin; Schumaker, Karen S; Chen, Zhongzhou; Guo, Yan

    2015-03-01

    Catalases are key regulators of reactive oxygen species homeostasis in plant cells. However, the regulation of catalase activity is not well understood. In this study, we isolated an Arabidopsis thaliana mutant, no catalase activity1-3 (nca1-3) that is hypersensitive to many abiotic stress treatments. The mutated gene was identified by map-based cloning as NCA1, which encodes a protein containing an N-terminal RING-finger domain and a C-terminal tetratricopeptide repeat-like helical domain. NCA1 interacts with and increases catalase activity maximally in a 240-kD complex in planta. In vitro, NCA1 interacts with CATALASE2 (CAT2) in a 1:1 molar ratio, and the NCA1 C terminus is essential for this interaction. CAT2 activity increased 10-fold in the presence of NCA1, and zinc ion binding of the NCA1 N terminus is required for this increase. NCA1 has chaperone protein activity that may maintain the folding of catalase in a functional state. NCA1 is a cytosol-located protein. Expression of NCA1 in the mitochondrion of the nca1-3 mutant does not rescue the abiotic stress phenotypes of the mutant, while expression in the cytosol or peroxisome does. Our results suggest that NCA1 is essential for catalase activity.

  16. AtMEK1 mediates stress-induced gene expression of CAT1 catalase by triggering H2O2 production in Arabidopsis.

    PubMed

    Xing, Yu; Jia, Wensuo; Zhang, Jianhua

    2007-01-01

    Catalase and hydrogen peroxide (H(2)O(2)) have been extensively studied for their roles in various stress responses. However, little is known about the triggering mechanisms for stress-induced catalase gene expression or about H(2)O(2) production as a stress signal. It is reported here that ABA-, drought-, and salt stress-induced gene expression of CAT1 catalase is mediated by AtMEK1, an Arabidopsis MAPK kinase, by triggering H(2)O(2) signal production. Both CAT1 expression and AtMEK1 activity were activated by ABA, drought, and salt stresses. The mek1 mutant totally blocked stress-induced CAT1 expression and, interestingly, stress-induced H(2)O(2) production was also blocked. Over-expression of AtMEK1 significantly promoted stress-induced CAT1 expression, and also promoted H(2)O(2) production. These results conclusively indicate that stress-induced CAT1 expression is mediated by AtMEK1 and, furthermore, that the triggering of H(2)O(2) production might be involved in this process, as further proved by the observation that CAT1 expression was induced by applied H(2)O(2.) Surprisingly, the signalling mechanisms for stress-induced gene expression of CAT2 and CAT3 were very different from that of CAT1. Except for drought stress, expression of CAT2 or CAT3 was also activated by salt stress or ABA treatment, and AtMEK1 was not proved to be involved in the drought-induced expression of CAT2 or CAT3. Further studies showed that stomatal movement was much less sensitive to ABA in AtMEK1 mutant (mek1), and over-expression of AtMEK1 in Arabidopsis increased plant resistance to drought or salt stress, which further demonstrated that AtMEK1 is a crucial mediator in plant stress signal transduction.

  17. Stimulation of KatG catalase activity by peroxidatic electron donors.

    PubMed

    Ndontsa, Elizabeth N; Moore, Robert L; Goodwin, Douglas C

    2012-09-15

    Catalase-peroxidases (KatGs) use a peroxidase scaffold to support robust catalase activity, an ability no other member of its superfamily possesses. Because catalase turnover requires H(2)O(2) oxidation, whereas peroxidase turnover requires oxidation of an exogenous electron donor, it has been anticipated that the latter should inhibit catalase activity. To the contrary, we report peroxidatic electron donors stimulated catalase activity up to 14-fold, particularly under conditions favorable to peroxidase activity (i.e., acidic pH and low H(2)O(2) concentrations). We observed a "low-" and "high-K(M)" component for catalase activity at pH 5.0. Electron donors increased the apparent k(cat) for the "low-K(M)" component. During stimulated catalase activity, less than 0.008 equivalents of oxidized donor accumulated for every H(2)O(2) consumed. Several classical peroxidatic electron donors were effective stimulators of catalase activity, but pyrogallol and ascorbate showed little effect. Stopped-flow evaluation showed that a Fe(III)-O(2)(·-)-like intermediate dominated during donor-stimulated catalatic turnover, and this intermediate converted directly to the ferric state upon depletion of H(2)O(2). In this respect, the Fe(III)-O(2)(·-) -like species was more prominent and persistent than in the absence of the donor. These results point toward a much more central role for peroxidase substrates in the unusual catalase mechanism of KatG.

  18. The three catalases in Deinococcus radiodurans: Only two show catalase activity.

    PubMed

    Jeong, Sun-Wook; Jung, Jong-Hyun; Kim, Min-Kyu; Seo, Ho Seong; Lim, Heon-Man; Lim, Sangyong

    2016-01-15

    Deinococcus radiodurans, which is extremely resistant to ionizing radiation and oxidative stress, is known to have three catalases (DR1998, DRA0146, and DRA0259). In this study, to investigate the role of each catalase, we constructed catalase mutants (Δdr1998, ΔdrA0146, and ΔdrA0259) of D. radiodurans. Of the three mutants, Δdr1998 exhibited the greatest decrease in hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) resistance and the highest increase in intracellular reactive oxygen species (ROS) levels following H2O2 treatments, whereas ΔdrA0146 showed no change in its H2O2 resistance or ROS level. Catalase activity was not attenuated in ΔdrA0146, and none of the three bands detected in an in-gel catalase activity assay disappeared in ΔdrA0146. The purified His-tagged recombinant DRA0146 did not show catalase activity. In addition, the phylogenetic analysis of the deinococcal catalases revealed that the DR1998-type catalase is common in the genus Deinococcus, but the DRA0146-type catalase was found in only 4 of 23 Deinococcus species. Taken together, these results indicate that DR1998 plays a critical role in the anti-oxidative system of D. radiodurans by detoxifying H2O2, but DRA0146 does not have catalase activity and is not involved in the resistance to H2O2 stress.

  19. Cu/Zn superoxide dismutase (SOD) and catalase (CAT) response to crude oil exposure in the polychaete Perinereis aibuhitensis.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Huan; Li, Wanjuan; Zhao, Xinda; Li, Xu; Yang, Dazuo; Ren, Hongwei; Zhou, Yibing

    2017-01-01

    Cu/Zn superoxide dismutase (SOD) and catalase (CAT) cDNAs from the polychaete Perinereis aibuhitensis were cloned and characterized in order to investigate the relationship between crude oil exposure and stress response in this worm. The full length of PaSOD was 870 bp and PaCAT was 1967 bp encoding 150 and 506 amino acids, respectively. Gene expression and enzyme activity of Cu/Zn SOD and CAT in response to crude oil contaminated soil (500, 1500, and 3000 mg/kg) were measured. The results showed that expression of the CAT gene and enzyme activity in P. aibuhitensis was positively correlated to the concentration of crude oil and reached a maximum at 15 days of exposure to 3000 mg/kg crude oil. The expression of the SOD gene and enzyme activity of SOD in P. aibuhitensis also increased during exposure to crude oil and reached a maximum at 10 days of exposure to 3000 mg/kg crude oil. These results indicated that SOD and CAT are important for maintaining the balance of cellular metabolism and protecting P. aibuhitensis from crude oil toxicity.

  20. Molecular mechanism on cadmium-induced activity changes of catalase and superoxide dismutase.

    PubMed

    Wang, Jing; Zhang, Hao; Zhang, Tong; Zhang, Rui; Liu, Rutao; Chen, Yadong

    2015-01-01

    Cadmium contributes to adverse effects of organisms probably because of its ability to induce oxidative stress via alterations in activities of antioxidant enzymes catalase (CAT) and superoxide dismutase (SOD), but their molecular mechanisms remain unclear. We investigated the molecular mechanism of CAT and SOD response under Cd-induced oxidative stress in the liver of zebrafish. The enzyme activity changes observed in vitro were consistent with those seen in vivo, indicating the direct interaction of CAT and SOD with Cd contributes to their activity change in vivo. Further experiments utilizing multiple spectroscopic methods, isothermal titration calorimetry and a molecular docking study were performed to explore the mechanism of molecular interaction of CAT and SOD with Cd. Different interaction patterns were found that resulted in misfolding and changed the enzyme activities. Taken together, we suggest the misfolding of CAT and SOD contributes to their activity change under Cd-induced oxidative stress in vivo.

  1. Development of a new biosensor for determination of catalase activity.

    PubMed

    Teke, Mustafa

    2014-01-01

    Catalase is one of the major antioxidant enzymes that catalyzes the hydrolysis of H2O2. The aim of this study was to suggest a new method for the assay of catalase activity. For this purpose, an amperometric biosensor based on glucose oxidase for determination of catalase activity was developed. Immobilization of glucose oxidase was made by a cross-linking method with glutaraldehyde on a Clark-type electrode (dissolved oxygen probe). Optimization and characterization properties of the biosensor were studied and determination of catalase activity in defined conditions was investigated in artificial serum solution. The results were compared with a reference method.

  2. Inhibition of catalase activity in vitro by diesel exhaust particles

    SciTech Connect

    Mori, Yoki; Murakami, Sumika; Sagae, Toshiyuki

    1996-02-09

    The effect of diesel exhaust particles (DEP) on the activity of catalase, an intracellular anti-oxidant, was investigated because H{sub 2}O{sub 2} is a cytotoxic oxidant, and catalase released from alveolar cells is an important antioxidant in the epithelial lining fluid in the lung. DEP inhibited the activity of bovine liver catalase dose-dependently, to 25-30% of its original value. The inhibition of catalase by DEP was observed only in the presence of anions such as Cl{sup {minus}}, Br{sup {minus}}, or thiocyanate. Other anions, such as CH{sub 3}COO{sup {minus}} or SO{sub 4}{sup {minus}}, and cations such as K{sup +}, Na{sup +}, Mg{sup 2+}, or Fe{sup 2+}, did not affect the activity of catalase, even in the presence of DEP extract. Catalase from guinea pig alveolar cells and catalase from red blood cells were also inhibited by DEP extracts, as was catalase from bovine liver. These results suggest that DEP taken up in the lung and located on alveolar spaces might cause cell injury by inhibiting the activity of catalase in epithelial lining fluid, enhancing the toxicity of H{sub 2}O{sub 2} generated from cells in addition to that of O{sub 2}{sup {minus}} generated by the chemical reaction of DEP with oxygen. 10 refs., 6 figs.

  3. Inhibition of catalase activity in vitro by diesel exhaust particles.

    PubMed

    Mori, Y; Murakami, S; Sagae, T; Hayashi, H; Sakata, M; Sagai, M; Kumagai, Y

    1996-02-09

    The effect of diesel exhaust particles (DEP) on the activity of catalase, an intracellular antioxidant, was investigated because H2O2 is a cytotoxic oxidant, and catalase released from alveolar cells is an important antioxidant in the epithelial lining fluid in the lung. DEP inhibited the activity of bovine liver catalase dose-dependently, to 25-30% of its original value. The inhibition of catalase by DEP was observed only in the presence of anions such as Cl-,Br-, or thiocyanate. Other anions, such as CH3COO- or SO4-, and cations such as K+, Na+, Mg2+, or Fe2+, did not affect the activity of catalase, even in the presence of DEP extract. Catalase from guinea pig alveolar cells and catalase from red blood cells were also inhibited by DEP extracts, as was catalase from bovine liver. These results suggest that DEP taken up in the lung and located on alveolar spaces might cause cell injury by inhibiting the activity of catalase in epithelial lining fluid, enhancing the toxicity of H2O2 generated from cells in addition to that of O2- generated by the chemical reaction of DEP with oxygen.

  4. Highly Active and Stable Large Catalase Isolated from a Hydrocarbon Degrading Aspergillus terreus MTCC 6324

    PubMed Central

    Vatsyayan, Preety; Goswami, Pranab

    2016-01-01

    A hydrocarbon degrading Aspergillus terreus MTCC 6324 produces a high level of extremely active and stable cellular large catalase (CAT) during growth on n-hexadecane to combat the oxidative stress caused by the hydrocarbon degrading metabolic machinery inside the cell. A 160-fold purification with specific activity of around 66 × 105 U mg−1 protein was achieved. The native protein molecular mass was 368 ± 5 kDa with subunit molecular mass of nearly 90 kDa, which indicates that the native CAT protein is a homotetramer. The isoelectric pH (pI) of the purified CAT was 4.2. BLAST aligned peptide mass fragments of CAT protein showed its highest similarity with the catalase B protein from other fungal sources. CAT was active in a broad range of pH 4 to 12 and temperature 25°C to 90°C. The catalytic efficiency (Kcat/Km) of 4.7 × 108 M−1 s−1 within the studied substrate range and alkaline pH stability (half-life, t1/2 at pH 12~15 months) of CAT are considerably higher than most of the extensively studied catalases from different sources. The storage stability (t1/2) of CAT at physiological pH 7.5 and 4°C was nearly 30 months. The haem was identified as haem b by electrospray ionization tandem mass spectroscopy (ESI-MS/MS). PMID:27057351

  5. Not so monofunctional--a case of thermostable Thermobifida fusca catalase with peroxidase activity.

    PubMed

    Lončar, Nikola; Fraaije, Marco W

    2015-03-01

    Thermobifida fusca is a mesothermophilic organism known for its ability to degrade plant biomass and other organics, and it was demonstrated that it represents a rich resource of genes encoding for potent enzymes for biocatalysis. The thermostable catalase from T. fusca has been cloned and overexpressed in Escherichia coli with a yield of 400 mg/L. Heat treatment of disrupted cells at 60 °C for 1 h resulted in enzyme preparation of high purity; hence, no chromatography steps are needed for large-scale production. Except for catalyzing the dismutation of hydrogen peroxide, TfuCat was also found to catalyze oxidations of phenolic compounds. The catalase activity was comparable to other described catalases while peroxidase activity was quite remarkable with a k obs of nearly 1000 s(-1) for catechol. Site directed mutagenesis was used to alter the ratio of peroxidase/catalase activity. Resistance to inhibition by classic catalase inhibitors and an apparent melting temperature of 74 °C classifies this enzyme as a robust biocatalyst. As such, it could compete with other commercially available catalases while the relatively high peroxidase activity also offers new biocatalytic possibilities.

  6. The effect of catalase on migration and invasion of lung cancer cells by regulating the activities of cathepsin S, L, and K.

    PubMed

    Tsai, Ju-Ying; Lee, Mon-Juan; Dah-Tsyr Chang, Margaret; Huang, Haimei

    2014-04-15

    Abundant clinical evidences indicate that up-regulation of several cathepsins in many human cancers is correlated with malignant progression and poor patient prognosis. In addition, a decrease in catalase activity or accumulation of hydrogen peroxide correlates with cancer metastasis. Recent studies indicate that cathepsin activation and expression can be modulated via H2O2 treatment. However, the actual relationship between catalase and cathepsins is not yet fully understood. In the present study, we found that catalase expression (or activity) was higher, while intracellular and extracellular Cat S, Cat L, and Cat K activities were lower in the non-invasive CL1-0 cells compared to the highly invasive CL1-5 cells. After CL1-0 cells were transfected with catalase-shRNA, the corresponding ROS (H2O2) level and Cat S, Cat L, or Cat K expression (or activity) was up-regulated, accompanied by an increase in cell migration and invasion. On the other hand, ROS (H2O2) level, cathepsin S, L, and K activities, cell migration and invasion were decreased in catalase-overexpressed CL1-5 cells. It is suggested that catalase may regulate cathepsin activity by controlling the production of ROS (H2O2), leading to variation in migration and invasion ability of lung cancer cells.

  7. Growth-dependent catalase localization in Exiguobacterium oxidotolerans T-2-2T reflected by catalase activity of cells.

    PubMed

    Hanaoka, Yoshiko; Takebe, Fumihiko; Nodasaka, Yoshinobu; Hara, Isao; Matsuyama, Hidetoshi; Yumoto, Isao

    2013-01-01

    A psychrotolerant and H2O2-resistant bacterium, Exiguobacterium oxidotolerans T-2-2(T), exhibits extraordinary H2O2 resistance and produces catalase not only intracellularly but also extracellularly. The intracellular and extracellular catalases exhibited the same enzymatic characteristics, that is, they exhibited the temperature-dependent activity characteristic of a cold-adapted enzyme, their heat stabilities were similar to those of mesophilic enzymes and very high catalytic intensity. In addition, catalase gene analysis indicated that the bacterium possessed the sole clade 1 catalase gene corresponding to intracellular catalase. Hence, intracellular catalase is secreted into the extracellular space. In addition to intracellular and extracellular catalases, the inner circumference of the cells showed the localization of catalase in the mid-stationary growth phase, which was observed by immunoelectron microscopy using an antibody against the intracellular catalase of the strain. The cells demonstrated higher catalase activity in the mid-stationary growth phase than in the exponential growth phase. The catalase localized in the inner circumference can be dissociated by treatment with Tween 60. Thus, the localized catalase is not tightly bound to the inner circumference of the cells and may play a role in the oxidative defense of the cells under low metabolic state.

  8. Investigating the active centre of the Scytalidium thermophilum catalase.

    PubMed

    Yuzugullu, Yonca; Trinh, Chi H; Fairhurst, Lucy; Ogel, Zumrut B; McPherson, Michael J; Pearson, Arwen R

    2013-04-01

    Almost all monofunctional haem catalases contain a highly conserved core containing the active site, which is connected to the exterior of the enzyme by three channels. These channels have been identified as potential routes for substrate flow and product release. To further investigate the role of these molecular channels, a series of mutants of Scytalidium thermophilum catalase were generated. The three-dimensional structures of four catalase variants, N155A, V123A, V123C and V123T, have been determined at resolutions of 2.25, 1.93, 1.9 and 1.7 Å, respectively. The V123C variant contains a new covalent bond between the S atom of Cys123 and the imidazole ring of the essential His82. This variant enzyme has only residual catalase activity and contains haem b instead of the normal haem d. The H82A variant demonstrates low catalase and phenol oxidase activities (0.2 and 20% of those of recombinant wild-type catalase-phenol oxidase, respectively). The N155A and N155H variants exhibit 4.5 and 3% of the wild-type catalase activity and contain haem d, showing that Asn155 is essential for catalysis but is not required for the conversion of haem b to haem d. Structural analysis suggests that the cause of the effect of these mutations on catalysis is the disruption of the ability of dioxygen substrates to efficiently access the active site. Additional mutants have been characterized biochemically to further probe the roles of the different channels. Introducing smaller or polar side chains in place of Val123 reduces the catalase activity. The F160V, F161V and F168V mutants show a marked decrease in catalase activity but have a much lower effect on the phenol oxidase activity, despite containing substoichiometric amounts of haem.

  9. Low dose X -ray effects on catalase activity in animal tissue

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Focea, R.; Nadejde, C.; Creanga, D.; Luchian, T.

    2012-12-01

    This study was intended to investigate the effect of low-dose X ray-irradiation upon the activity of catalase (CAT) in freshly excised chicken tissues (liver, kidney, brain, muscle). The tissue samples were irradiated with 0.5Gy and 2Gy respectively, in a 6 MV photon beam produced by a clinical linear accelerator (VARIAN CLINAC 2100SC). The dose rate was of 260.88cGy/min. at 100 cm source to sample distance. The catalase level was assayed spectrophotometrically, based on reaction kinetics, using a catalase UV assay kit (SIGMA). Catalase increased activity in various tissue samples exposed to the studied X ray doses (for example with 24 % in the liver cells, p<0.05) suggested the stimulation of the antioxidant enzyme biosynthesis within several hours after exposure at doses of 0.5 Gy and 2 Gy; the putative enzyme inactivation could also occur (due to the injuries on the hydrogen bonds that ensure the specificity of CAT active site) but the resulted balance of the two concurrent processes indicates the cell ability of decomposing the hydrogen peroxide-with benefits for the cell physiology restoration for the chosen low dose radiation.

  10. The Cryptococcus neoformans catalase gene family and its role in antioxidant defense.

    PubMed

    Giles, Steven S; Stajich, Jason E; Nichols, Connie; Gerrald, Quincy D; Alspaugh, J Andrew; Dietrich, Fred; Perfect, John R

    2006-09-01

    In the present study, we sought to elucidate the contribution of the Cryptococcus neoformans catalase gene family to antioxidant defense. We employed bioinformatics techniques to identify four members of the C. neoformans catalase gene family and created mutants lacking single or multiple catalase genes. Based on a phylogenetic analysis, CAT1 and CAT3 encode putative spore-specific catalases, CAT2 encodes a putative peroxisomal catalase, and CAT4 encodes a putative cytosolic catalase. Only Cat1 exhibited detectable biochemical activity in vitro, and Cat1 activity was constitutive in the yeast form of this organism. Although they were predicted to be important in spores, neither CAT1 nor CAT3 was essential for mating or spore viability. Consistent with previous studies of Saccharomyces cerevisiae, the single (cat1, cat2, cat3, and cat4) and quadruple (cat1 cat2 cat3 cat4) catalase mutant strains exhibited no oxidative-stress phenotypes under conditions in which either exogenous or endogenous levels of reactive oxygen species were elevated. In addition, there were no significant differences in the mean times to mortality between groups of mice infected with C. neoformans catalase mutant strains (the cat1 and cat1 cat2 cat3 cat4 mutants) and those infected with wild-type strain H99. We conclude from the results of this study that C. neoformans possesses a robust antioxidant system, composed of functionally overlapping and compensatory components that provide protection against endogenous and exogenous oxidative stresses.

  11. A novel pyrogallol red-based assay to assess catalase activity: Optimization by response surface methodology.

    PubMed

    Abderrahim, Mohamed; Arribas, Silvia M; Condezo-Hoyos, Luis

    2017-05-01

    Pyrogallol red (PGR) was identified as a novel optical probe for the detection of hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) based on horseradish peroxidase (HRP)-catalyzed oxidation. Response surface methodology (RSM) was applied as a tool to optimize the concentrations of PGR (100µmolL(-1)), HRP (1UmL(-1)) and H2O2 (250µmolL(-1)) and used to develop a sensitive PGR-based catalase (CAT) activity assay (PGR-CAT assay). N-ethylmaleimide -NEM- (102mmolL(-1)) was used to avoid interference produced by thiol groups while protecting CAT activity. Incubation time (30min) for samples or CAT used as standard and H2O2 as well as signal stability (stable between 5 and 60min) were also evaluated. PGR-CAT assay was linear within the range of 0-4UmL(-1) (R(2)=0.993) and very sensitive with limits of detection (LOD) of 0.005UmL(-1) and quantitation (LOQ) of 0.01UmL(-1). PGR-CAT assay showed an adequate intra-day RSD=0.6-9.5% and inter-day RSD=2.4-8.9%. Bland-Altman analysis and Passing-Bablok and Pearson correlation analysis showed good agreement between CAT activity as measured by the PRG-CAT assay and the Amplex Red assay. The PGR-CAT assay is more sensitive than all the other colorimetric assays reported, particularly the Amplex Red assay, and the cost of PGR is a small fraction (about 1/1000) of that of an Amplex Red probe, so it can be expected to find wide use among scientists studying CAT activity in biological samples.

  12. ENVIRONMENTAL EFFECTS ON SUPEROXIDE DISMUTASE AND CATALASE ACTIVITY AND EXPRESSION IN HONEY BEE.

    PubMed

    Nikolić, Tatjana V; Purać, Jelena; Orčić, Snežana; Kojić, Danijela; Vujanović, Dragana; Stanimirović, Zoran; Gržetić, Ivan; Ilijević, Konstantin; Šikoparija, Branko; Blagojević, Duško P

    2015-12-01

    Understanding the cellular stress response in honey bees will significantly contribute to their conservation. The aim of this study was to analyze the response of the antioxidative enzymes superoxide dismutase and catalase in honey bees related to the presence of toxic metals in different habitats. Three locations were selected: (i) Tunovo on the mountain Golija, as control area, without industry and large human impact, (ii) Belgrade as urban area, and (iii) Zajača, as mining and industrial zone. Our results showed that the concentrations of lead (Pb) in whole body of bees vary according to habitat, but there was very significant increase of Pb in bees from investigated industrial area. Bees from urban and industrial area had increased expression of both Sod1 and Cat genes, suggesting adaptation to increased oxidative stress. However, in spite increased gene expression, the enzyme activity of catalase was lower in bees from industrial area suggesting inhibitory effect of Pb on catalase.

  13. Activity of catalase adsorbed to carbon nanotubes: effects of carbon nanotube surface properties.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Chengdong; Luo, Shuiming; Chen, Wei

    2013-09-15

    Nanomaterials have been studied widely as the supporting materials for enzyme immobilization. However, the interactions between enzymes and carbon nanotubes (CNT) with different morphologies and surface functionalities may vary, hence influencing activities of the immobilized enzyme. To date how the adsorption mechanisms affect the activities of immobilized enzyme is not well understood. In this study the adsorption of catalase (CAT) on pristine single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNT), oxidized single-walled carbon nanotubes (O-SWNT), and multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWNT) was investigated. The adsorbed enzyme activities decreased in the order of O-SWNT>SWNT>MWNT. Fourier transforms infrared spectroscopy (FTIR) and circular dichrois (CD) analyses reveal more significant loss of α-helix and β-sheet of MWNT-adsorbed than SWNT-adsorbed CAT. The difference in enzyme activities between MWNT-adsorbed and SWNT-adsorbed CAT indicates that the curvature of surface plays an important role in the activity of immobilized enzyme. Interestingly, an increase of β-sheet content was observed for CAT adsorbed to O-SWNT. This is likely because as opposed to SWNT and MWNT, O-SWNT binds CAT largely via hydrogen bonding and such interaction allows the CAT molecule to maintain the rigidity of enzyme structure and thus the biological function.

  14. Oxidative DNA damage levels and catalase activity in the clam Ruditapes decussatus as pollution biomarkers of Tunisian marine environment.

    PubMed

    Jebali, Jamel; Banni, Mohamed; de Almeida, Eduardo Alves; Boussetta, Hamadi

    2007-01-01

    Levels of the oxidative DNA damage 7, 8-dihydro-8-oxo-2'-deoxyguanosine (8-oxodG) and catalase (CAT) activity were measured in the digestive gland and gills of clams Ruditapes decussatus, related to the presence of pollutants along Tunisian marine environment. Increased levels of CAT were observed in tissues of clams from all the sites studied, compared to control values, and elevated 8-oxodG levels were observed at specific sites. Results obtained in this work indicate that the measurement of 8-oxodG levels and CAT activity in tissues of R. decussatus is promising in pollution monitoring studies of the Tunisian marine environment.

  15. A manganese catalase from Thermomicrobium roseum with peroxidase and catecholase activity.

    PubMed

    Baginski, Robin; Sommerhalter, Monika

    2017-01-01

    An enzyme with catechol oxidase activity was identified in Thermomicrobium roseum extracts via solution assays and activity-stained SDS-PAGE. Yet, the genome of T. roseum does not harbor a catecholase gene. The enzyme was purified with two anion exchange chromatography steps and ultimately identified to be a manganese catalase with additional peroxidase and catecholase activity. Catalase activity (6280 ± 430 IU/mg) clearly dominated over pyrogallol peroxidase (231 ± 53 IU/mg) and catecholase (3.07 ± 0.56 IU/mg) activity as determined at 70 °C. Most enzyme kinetic properties were comparable to previously characterized manganese catalase enzymes. Catalase activity was highest at alkaline pH values and showed inhibition by excess substrate and chloride. The apparent K m and k cat values were 20 mM and 2.02 × 10(4) s(-1) subunit(-1) at 25 °C and pH 7.0.

  16. Increased microglial catalase activity in multiple sclerosis grey matter.

    PubMed

    Gray, Elizabeth; Kemp, Kevin; Hares, Kelly; Redondo, Julianna; Rice, Claire; Scolding, Neil; Wilkins, Alastair

    2014-04-22

    Chronic demyelination, on-going inflammation, axonal loss and grey matter neuronal injury are likely pathological processes that contribute to disease progression in multiple sclerosis (MS). Although the precise contribution of each process and their aetiological substrates is not fully known, recent evidence has implicated oxidative damage as a major cause of tissue injury in MS. The degree of tissue injury caused by oxidative molecules, such as reactive oxygen species (ROS), is balanced by endogenous anti-oxidant enzymes which detoxify ROS. Understanding endogenous mechanisms which protect the brain against oxidative injury in MS is important, since enhancing anti-oxidant responses is a major therapeutic strategy for preventing irreversible tissue injury in the disease. Our aims were to determine expression and activity levels of the hydrogen peroxide-reducing enzyme catalase in MS grey matter (GM). In MS GM, a catalase enzyme activity was elevated compared to control GM. We measured catalase protein expression by immune dot-blotting and catalase mRNA by a real-time polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR). Protein analysis studies showed a strong positive correlation between catalase and microglial marker IBA-1 in MS GM. In addition, calibration of catalase mRNA level with reference to the microglial-specific transcript AIF-1 revealed an increase in this transcript in MS. This was reflected by the extent of HLA-DR immunolabeling in MS GM which was significantly elevated compared to control GM. Collectively, these observations provide evidence that microglial catalase activity is elevated in MS grey matter and may be an important endogenous anti-oxidant defence mechanism in MS.

  17. A simple assay for measuring catalase activity: a visual approach.

    PubMed

    Iwase, Tadayuki; Tajima, Akiko; Sugimoto, Shinya; Okuda, Ken-ichi; Hironaka, Ippei; Kamata, Yuko; Takada, Koji; Mizunoe, Yoshimitsu

    2013-10-30

    In this study, an assay that combines the ease and simplicity of the qualitative approach for measuring catalase activity was developed. The assay reagents comprised only hydrogen peroxide and Triton X-100. The enzyme-generated oxygen bubbles trapped by Triton X-100 were visualized as foam, whose height was estimated. A calibration plot using the defined unit of catalase activity yielded the best linear fit over a range of 20-300 units (U) (y = 0.3794x - 2.0909, r(2) = 0.993). The assay precision and reproducibility at 100 U were 4.6% and 4.8%, respectively. The applicability of the assay for measuring the catalase activity of various samples was assessed using laboratory strains of Escherichia coli, catalase-deficient isogenic mutants, clinically isolated Shiga toxin-producing E. coli, and human cells. The assay generated reproducible results. In conclusion, this new assay can be used to measure the catalase activity of bacterial isolates and human cells.

  18. Molecular mechanism of catalase activity change under sodium dodecyl sulfate-induced oxidative stress in the mouse primary hepatocytes.

    PubMed

    Wang, Jing; Wang, Jiaxi; Xu, Chi; Liu, Rutao; Chen, Yadong

    2016-04-15

    Sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS) contributes to adverse effects of organisms probably because of its ability to induce oxidative stress via changing the activity of antioxidant enzyme catalase (CAT). But the underlying molecular mechanisms still remain unclear. This study characterized the harmful effects of SDS-induced oxidative stress on the mouse primary hepatocytes as well as the structure and function of CAT molecule and investigated the underlying molecular mechanism. After 12h SDS (0.1μM to 0.2mM) exposure, no significant change was observed in CAT activity of the hepatocytes. After 0.5 and 0.8mM SDS exposure, the state of oxidative stress stimulated CAT production in the hepatocytes. The inhibition of CAT activity induced by directly interacting with SDS was unable to catch the synthesis of CAT and therefore resulted in the increased activity and elevated ROS level. Further molecular experiments showed that SDS prefers to bind to the interface with no direct effect on the active site and the structure of heme groups of CAT molecule. When the sites in the interface is saturated, SDS interacts with VAL 73, HIS 74, ASN 147 and PHE 152, the key residues of the enzyme activity, and leads to the decrease of CAT activity.

  19. Catalasic activity in fish liver: improvement of the UV to visible analytic method.

    PubMed

    Paris-Palacios, Séverine; Delahaut, Laurence; Carreras, Alexis; Thomas, Marielle; Biagianti-Risbourg, Sylvie

    2013-08-01

    Antioxidative defenses and more especially catalasic activity (CAT) are studied in a large range of scientific research thematics. In environmental sciences, the problematic of oxidative stress is of great interest as pollutants can induce perturbations of redox homeostasis. Consequently, changes in antioxidative defenses levels in fish tissues and particularly in liver are used as potential biomarkers of pollution. In most studies, the CAT was assayed by following during 5 min the consumption of H2O2 in cytosolic buffered extracts at 240 nm (UV-method). This study proposed a development of this method in the visible, using permanganate and a 525-nm detection, which was more accurate, sensitive, and rapid. Moreover, the hepatic CAT of six different fish species [a cyclidae (Nimbochromis linni), 3 cyprinidae (Brachydanio rerio, Rutilus rutilus, Cyprinus carpio), an anguillidae (Anguilla anguilla), and a percidae (Perca fluviatilus)] was evaluated with the two protocols (UV- and KMnO4-method). The results but also the thermal optimum of the reaction and the interest of CAT as biomarker in ecotoxicology were discussed.

  20. Roles of catalase (CAT) and ascorbate peroxidase (APX) genes in stress response of eggplant (Solanum melongena L.) against Cu(+2) and Zn(+2) heavy metal stresses.

    PubMed

    Soydam-Aydın, Semra; Büyük, İlker; Cansaran-Duman, Demet; Aras, Sümer

    2015-12-01

    Eggplant (Solanum melongena L.) is a good source of minerals and vitamins and this feature makes its value comparable with tomato which is economically the most important vegetable worldwide. Due to its common usage as food and in medicines, eggplant cultivation has a growing reputation worldwide. But genetic yield potential of an eggplant variety is not always attained, and it is limited by some factors such as heavy metal contaminated soils in today's world. Today, one of the main objectives of plant stress biology and agricultural biotechnology areas is to find the genes involved in antioxidant stress response and engineering the key genes to improve the plant resistance mechanisms. In this regard, the current study was conducted to gain an idea on the roles of catalase (CAT) and ascorbate peroxidase (APX) genes in defense mechanism of eggplant (S. melongena L., Pala-49 (Turkish cultivar)) treated with different concentrations of Cu(+2) and Zn(+2). For this aim, the steady-state messenger RNA (mRNA) levels of CAT and APX genes were determined by quantitative real-time PCR (qRT-PCR) in stressed eggplants. The results of the current study showed that different concentrations of Cu(+2) and Zn(+2) stresses altered the mRNA levels of CAT and APX genes in eggplants compared to the untreated control samples. When the mRNA levels of both genes were compared, it was observed that CAT gene was more active than APX gene in eggplant samples subjected to Cu(+2) contamination. The current study highlights the importance of CAT and APX genes in response to Cu(+2) and Zn(+2) heavy metal stresses in eggplant and gives an important knowledge about this complex interaction.

  1. Peroxiredoxin 1 (Prx1) is a dual function enzyme by possessing Cys-independent catalase-like activity.

    PubMed

    Sun, Cen-Cen; Dong, Wei-Ren; Shao, Tong; Li, Jiang-Yuan; Zhao, Jing; Nie, Li; Xiang, Li-Xin; Zhu, Guan; Shao, Jian-Zhong

    2017-02-20

    Peroxiredoxin (Prx) was previously known as a Cys-dependent thioredoxin. However, we unexpected observed that Prx1 from the green spotted puffer fish Tetraodon nigroviridis (TnPrx1) was able to reduce H2O2 in a manner independent on the Cys peroxidation and reductants. This study aimed to validate the novel function for Prx1, delineate the biochemical features and explore its antioxidant role in cells. We have confirmed that Prx1 from the puffer fish and humans truly possesses a catalase-like activity that is independent of Cys residues and reductants, but dependent on iron. We have identified that the GVL motif was essential to the catalase-like (CAT) activity of Prx1, but not to the Cys-dependent thioredoxin peroxidase (POX) activity, and generated mutants lacking POX and/or CAT activities for individual functional validation. We discovered that the TnPrx1 POX and CAT activities possessed different kinetic features in reducing H2O2 The overexpression of wild-type TnPrx1 and mutants differentially regulated the intracellular levels of reactive oxygen species (ROS) and the phosphorylation of p38 in HEK-293T cells treated with H2O2 Prx1 is a dual function enzyme by acting as POX and CAT with varied affinities towards ROS. This study extends our knowledge on Prx1 and provides new opportunities to further study the biological roles of this family of antioxidants.

  2. Effects of Greek legume plant extracts on xanthine oxidase, catalase and superoxide dismutase activities.

    PubMed

    Spanou, Chrysoula I; Veskoukis, Aristidis S; Stagos, Dimitrios; Liadaki, Kalliopi; Aligiannis, Nectarios; Angelis, Apostolos; Skaltsounis, Alexios-Leandros; Anastasiadi, Maria; Haroutounian, Serkos A; Kouretas, Dimitrios

    2012-03-01

    Legumes are considered to have beneficial health implications, which have been attributed to their phytochemical content. Polyphenols are considered the most important phytochemical compounds extensively studied for their antioxidant properties. The aim of the present study was to examine the effects of potent antioxidant legume plant extracts on xanthine oxidase (XO), catalase (CAT) and superoxide dismutase (SOD) activities. XO exerts a dual role, as it is the major contributor of free radicals during exercise while it generates uric acid, the most potent antioxidant molecule in plasma. CAT and SOD are two of the main enzymes of the antioxidant defence of tissues. We demonstrate that the majority of the extracts inhibited XO activity, but they had no effect on CAT inhibition and SOD induction when used at low concentrations. These results imply that the tested extracts may be considered as possible source of novel XO inhibitors. However, we have shown that allopurinol administration, a known XO inhibitor, before exercise reduces performance and induces oxidative stress in rats. Considering the fact that the extracts examined had an inhibitory effect on XO activity, possibly posing a restriction in their characterization as antioxidants, phytochemical antioxidant administration before exercise should probably be reconsidered.

  3. Combining cisplatin with cationized catalase decreases nephrotoxicity while improving antitumor activity.

    PubMed

    Ma, S-F; Nishikawa, M; Hyoudou, K; Takahashi, R; Ikemura, M; Kobayashi, Y; Yamashita, F; Hashida, M

    2007-12-01

    Cisplatin is frequently used to treat solid tumors; however, nephrotoxicity due to its reactive oxygen species-mediated effect limits its use. We tested the ability of cationized catalase, a catalase derivative, to inhibit nephrotoxicity in cisplatin-treated mice. Immunohistochemical analysis showed that the catalase derivative concentrated in the kidney more efficiently than native catalase. Repeated intravenous doses of cationized catalase significantly decreased cisplatin-induced changes in serum creatinine, blood urea nitrogen, nitrite/nitrate levels, lactic dehydrogenase activity, and renal total glutathione and malondialdehyde contents. In addition, cationized catalase effectively blunted cisplatin-induced proximal tubule necrosis but had no significant effect on the cisplatin-induced inhibition of subcutaneous tumor growth. Repeated doses of catalase, especially cationized catalase, significantly increased the survival of cisplatin-treated tumor-bearing mice preventing cisplatin-induced acute death. Our studies suggest that catalase and its derivatives inhibit cisplatin-induced nephrotoxicity, thus improving the efficiency of cisplatin to treat solid tumors.

  4. Effects of sodium nitroprusside on mouse erythrocyte catalase activity and malondialdehyde status.

    PubMed

    Sani, Mamane; Sebai, Hichem; Refinetti, Roberto; Mondal, Mohan; Ghanem-Boughanmi, Néziha; Boughattas, Naceur A; Ben-Attia, Mossadok

    2016-01-01

    There is controversy about the anti- or pro-oxidative effects of the nitric oxide (NO)-donor sodium nitroprusside (SNP). Hence, the activity of the antioxidant enzyme catalase (CAT) and the status of malondialdehyde (MDA) were investigated after a 2.5 mg/kg dose of SNP had been i.p. administered to different and comparable groups of mice (n = 48). The drug was administered at two different circadian times (1 and 13 h after light onset [HALO]). There were, irrespectively of sampling time, no significant differences in the means of CAT activity and MDA status between control and SNP-treated groups, no matter the treatment time. However, CAT activity was significantly (Student's t-test, p < 0.001) increased 1 h following SNP administration at 1 HALO, whereas the significant (p < 0.001) increase in the enzyme activity was found only 3 h after injection at 13 HALO. The drug dosing either at 1 or 13 HALO resulted in no significant differences of MDA status between control and treated groups regardless to the sampling time. Two-way analysis of variance (ANOVA) detected a significant (F0.05(7,88)= 5.3; p < 0.0006) interaction between sampling time and treatment in mice injected at 1 HALO, suggesting the influence of treatment on sampling-time-related changes in CAT activity. However, ANOVA validated no interaction between the two factors in mice treated at 13 HALO, illustrating that the sampling-time differences in enzyme activity were greater. Furthermore, two-way ANOVA revealed no interaction in the variation of MDA status in animals treated either at 1 or 13 HALO. This study indicates that SNP significantly affected the anti-oxidant system.

  5. Catalase-only nanoparticles prepared by shear alone: Characteristics, activity and stability evaluation.

    PubMed

    Huang, Xiao-Nan; Du, Xin-Ying; Xing, Jin-Feng; Ge, Zhi-Qiang

    2016-09-01

    Catalase is a promising therapeutic enzyme; however, it carries risks of inactivation and rapid degradation when it is used in practical bioprocess, such as delivery in vivo. To overcome the issue, we made catalase-only nanoparticles using shear stress alone at a moderate shear rate of 217s(-1) in a coaxial cylinder flow cell. Properties of nanoparticles, including particle size, polydispersity index and zeta potential, were characterized. The conformational changes of pre- and post-sheared catalase were determined using spectroscopy techniques. The results indicated that the conformational changes of catalase and reduction in α-helical content caused by shear alone were less significant than that by desolvation method. Catalase-only nanoparticles prepared by single shear retained over 90% of its initial activity when compared with the native catalase. Catalase nanoparticles lost only 20% of the activity when stored in phosphate buffer solution for 72h at 4°C, whereas native catalase lost 53% under the same condition. Especially, the activity of nanogranulated catalase was decreased only slightly in the simulated intestinal fluid containing α-chymotrypsin during 4h incubation at 37°C, implying that the catalase nanoparticle was more resistant to the degradation of proteases than native catalase molecules. Overall, catalase-only nanoparticles offered a great potential to stabilize enzymes for various pharmaceutical applications.

  6. Copper suppresses abscisic acid catabolism and catalase activity, and inhibits seed germination of rice.

    PubMed

    Ye, Nenghui; Li, Haoxuan; Zhu, Guohui; Liu, Yinggao; Liu, Rui; Xu, Weifeng; Jing, Yu; Peng, Xinxiang; Zhang, Jianhua

    2014-11-01

    Although copper (Cu) is an essential micronutrient for plants, a slight excess of Cu in soil can be harmful to plants. Unfortunately, Cu contamination is a growing problem all over the world due to human activities, and poses a soil stress to plant development. As one of the most important biological processes, seed germination is sensitive to Cu stress. However, little is known about the mechanism of Cu-induced inhibition of seed germination. In the present study, we investigated the relationship between Cu and ABA which is the predominant regulator of seed germination. Cu at a concentration of 30 µM effectively inhibited germination of rice caryopsis. ABA content in germinating seeds under copper stress was also higher than that under control conditions. Quantitative real-time PCR (qRT-PCR) revealed that Cu treatment reduced the expression of OsABA8ox2, a key gene of ABA catabolism in rice seeds. In addition, both malondialdehyde (MDA) and H2O2 contents were increased by Cu stress in the germinating seeds. Antioxidant enzyme assays revealed that only catalase activity was reduced by excess Cu, which was consistent with the mRNA profile of OsCATa during seed germination under Cu stress. Together, our results demonstrate that suppression of ABA catabolism and catalase (CAT) activity by excess Cu leads to the inhibition of seed germination of rice.

  7. Effect of TiO₂ nanoparticles on the structure and activity of catalase.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Hong-Mei; Cao, Jian; Tang, Bo-Ping; Wang, Yan-Qing

    2014-08-05

    TiO₂ nanoparticles are the most widely used metal oxide nanoparticles and have oxidative toxicity. Catalase is an important antioxidant enzyme. Here the understanding of an effect of TiO₂ nanoparticles on the activity and structure of catalase is crucial to characterize the toxicity of TiO₂ nanoparticles. These experimental data revealed that TiO₂ nanoparticles could bind to catalase by the electrostatic and hydrogen bonding forces. On binding TiO₂ nanoparticles, catalase got destabilized with the decrease of α-helices content, the solvent polarity of environment around the fluorescence chromophores on catalase were also affected. In addition, TiO₂ nanoparticles also affected the activity of catalase. TiO₂ nanoparticles acted as an activator of catalase activity at a low molar concentration and as an inhibitor at a higher molar concentration. With regard to human health, the present study could provide a better understanding of the potential nanotoxicity of TiO₂ nanoparticles.

  8. Contribution of the activated catalase to oxidative stress resistance and γ-aminobutyric acid production in Lactobacillus brevis.

    PubMed

    Lyu, Changjiang; Hu, Sheng; Huang, Jun; Luo, Maiqi; Lu, Tao; Mei, Lehe; Yao, Shanjing

    2016-12-05

    Lactic acid bacteria (LAB) are generally sensitive to H2O2, a compound which can paradoxically produce themselves and lead to the growth arrest and cell death. To counteract the potentially toxic effects of this compound, the gene katE encoding a heme-dependent catalase (CAT) belonging to the family of monofunctional CATs was cloned from Lactobacillus brevis CGMCC1306. The enhanced homologous CAT expression was achieved using the NICE system. L. brevis cells with overexpressed CAT showed 685-fold and 823-fold higher survival when exposed to 30mmol/L of H2O2 and long-term aerated stress (after 72h), respectively, than that of the wild type cells. Furtherly, the effects of activated CAT on GABA production in L. brevis were investigated. A GABA production level of 66.4g/L was achieved using two-step biotransformation that successively employed the growing and resting cells derived from engineering L. brevis CAT. These results demonstrated clearly that overexpression of the KatE gene in L. brevis led to a marked increased survival in oxidizing environment, and shed light on a novel feasible approach to enhance the GABA production level by improving the antioxidative properties.

  9. Combined effects of water temperature and copper ion concentration on catalase activity in Crassostrea ariakensis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Hui; Yang, Hongshuai; Liu, Jiahui; Li, Yanhong; Liu, Zhigang

    2015-07-01

    A central composite experimental design and response surface method were used to investigate the combined effects of water temperature (18-34°C) and copper ion concentration (0.1-1.5 mg/L) on the catalase (CAT) activity in the digestive gland of Crassostrea ariakensis. The results showed that the linear effects of temperature were significant ( P<0.01), the quadratic effects of temperature were significant ( P<0.05), the linear effects of copper ion concentration were not significant ( P>0.05), and the quadratic effects of copper ion concentration were significant ( P<0.05). Additionally, the synergistic effects of temperature and copper ion concentration were not significant ( P>0.05), and the effect of temperature was greater than that of copper ion concentration. A model equation of CAT enzyme activity in the digestive gland of C. ariakensis toward the two factors of interest was established, with R 2, Adj. R 2 and Pred. R 2 values as high as 0.943 7, 0.887 3 and 0.838 5, respectively. These findings suggested that the goodness of fit to experimental data and predictive capability of the model were satisfactory, and could be practically applied for prediction under the conditions of the study. Overall, the results suggest that the simultaneous variation of temperature and copper ion concentration alters the activity of the antioxidant enzyme CAT by modulating active oxygen species metabolism, which may be utilized as a biomarker to detect the effects of copper pollution.

  10. Coexpressed Catalase Protects Chimeric Antigen Receptor–Redirected T Cells as well as Bystander Cells from Oxidative Stress–Induced Loss of Antitumor Activity

    PubMed Central

    Ligtenberg, Maarten A.; Mougiakakos, Dimitrios; Mukhopadhyay, Madhura; Witt, Kristina; Lladser, Alvaro; Chmielewski, Markus; Riet, Tobias; Abken, Hinrich

    2016-01-01

    Treatment of cancer patients by adoptive T cell therapy has yielded promising results. In solid tumors, however, T cells encounter a hostile environment, in particular with increased inflammatory activity as a hallmark of the tumor milieu that goes along with abundant reactive oxygen species (ROS) that substantially impair antitumor activity. We present a strategy to render antitumor T cells more resilient toward ROS by coexpressing catalase along with a tumor specific chimeric Ag receptor (CAR) to increase their antioxidative capacity by metabolizing H2O2. In fact, T cells engineered with a bicistronic vector that concurrently expresses catalase, along with the CAR coexpressing catalase (CAR-CAT), performed superior over CAR T cells as they showed increased levels of intracellular catalase and had a reduced oxidative state with less ROS accumulation in both the basal state and upon activation while maintaining their antitumor activity despite high H2O2 levels. Moreover, CAR-CAT T cells exerted a substantial bystander protection of nontransfected immune effector cells as measured by CD3ζ chain expression in bystander T cells even in the presence of high H2O2 concentrations. Bystander NK cells, otherwise ROS sensitive, efficiently eliminate their K562 target cells under H2O2-induced oxidative stress when admixed with CAR-CAT T cells. This approach represents a novel means for protecting tumor-infiltrating cells from tumor-associated oxidative stress–mediated repression. PMID:26673145

  11. Coexpressed Catalase Protects Chimeric Antigen Receptor-Redirected T Cells as well as Bystander Cells from Oxidative Stress-Induced Loss of Antitumor Activity.

    PubMed

    Ligtenberg, Maarten A; Mougiakakos, Dimitrios; Mukhopadhyay, Madhura; Witt, Kristina; Lladser, Alvaro; Chmielewski, Markus; Riet, Tobias; Abken, Hinrich; Kiessling, Rolf

    2016-01-15

    Treatment of cancer patients by adoptive T cell therapy has yielded promising results. In solid tumors, however, T cells encounter a hostile environment, in particular with increased inflammatory activity as a hallmark of the tumor milieu that goes along with abundant reactive oxygen species (ROS) that substantially impair antitumor activity. We present a strategy to render antitumor T cells more resilient toward ROS by coexpressing catalase along with a tumor specific chimeric Ag receptor (CAR) to increase their antioxidative capacity by metabolizing H2O2. In fact, T cells engineered with a bicistronic vector that concurrently expresses catalase, along with the CAR coexpressing catalase (CAR-CAT), performed superior over CAR T cells as they showed increased levels of intracellular catalase and had a reduced oxidative state with less ROS accumulation in both the basal state and upon activation while maintaining their antitumor activity despite high H2O2 levels. Moreover, CAR-CAT T cells exerted a substantial bystander protection of nontransfected immune effector cells as measured by CD3ζ chain expression in bystander T cells even in the presence of high H2O2 concentrations. Bystander NK cells, otherwise ROS sensitive, efficiently eliminate their K562 target cells under H2O2-induced oxidative stress when admixed with CAR-CAT T cells. This approach represents a novel means for protecting tumor-infiltrating cells from tumor-associated oxidative stress-mediated repression.

  12. Endothelin-1 stimulates catalase activity through the PKCδ-mediated phosphorylation of serine 167.

    PubMed

    Rafikov, Ruslan; Kumar, Sanjiv; Aggarwal, Saurabh; Hou, Yali; Kangath, Archana; Pardo, Daniel; Fineman, Jeffrey R; Black, Stephen M

    2014-02-01

    Our previous studies have shown that endothelin-1 (ET-1) stimulates catalase activity in endothelial cells and in lambs with acute increases in pulmonary blood flow (PBF), without altering gene expression. The purpose of this study was to investigate the molecular mechanism by which this occurs. Exposing pulmonary arterial endothelial cells to ET-1 increased catalase activity and decreased cellular hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) levels. These changes correlated with an increase in serine-phosphorylated catalase. Using the inhibitory peptide δV1.1, this phosphorylation was shown to be protein kinase Cδ (PKCδ) dependent. Mass spectrometry identified serine 167 as the phosphorylation site. Site-directed mutagenesis was used to generate a phospho-mimic (S167D) catalase. Activity assays using recombinant protein purified from Escherichia coli or transiently transfected COS-7 cells demonstrated that S167D catalase had an increased ability to degrade H2O2 compared to the wild-type enzyme. Using a phospho-specific antibody, we were able to verify that pS167 catalase levels are modulated in lambs with acute increases in PBF in the presence and absence of the ET receptor antagonist tezosentan. S167 is located on the dimeric interface, suggesting it could be involved in regulating the formation of catalase tetramers. To evaluate this possibility we utilized analytical gel filtration to examine the multimeric structure of recombinant wild-type and S167D catalase. We found that recombinant wild-type catalase was present as a mixture of monomers and dimers, whereas S167D catalase was primarily tetrameric. Further, the incubation of wild-type catalase with PKCδ was sufficient to convert wild-type catalase into a tetrameric structure. In conclusion, this is the first report indicating that the phosphorylation of catalase regulates its multimeric structure and activity.

  13. Evaluation of the serum catalase and myeloperoxidase activities in chronic arsenic-exposed individuals and concomitant cytogenetic damage

    SciTech Connect

    Banerjee, Mayukh; Banerjee, Nilanjana; Ghosh, Pritha; Das, Jayanta K.; Basu, Santanu; Sarkar, Ajoy K.; States, J. Christopher; Giri, Ashok K.

    2010-11-15

    Chronic arsenic exposure through contaminated drinking water is a major environmental health issue. Chronic arsenic exposure is known to exert its toxic effects by a variety of mechanisms, of which generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) is one of the most important. A high level of ROS, in turn, leads to DNA damage that might ultimately culminate in cancer. In order to keep the level of ROS in balance, an array of enzymes is present, of which catalase (CAT) and myeloperoxidase (MPO) are important members. Hence, in this study, we determined the activities of these two enzymes in the sera and chromosomal aberrations (CA) in peripheral blood lymphocytes in individuals exposed and unexposed to arsenic in drinking water. Arsenic in drinking water and in urine was used as a measure of exposure. Our results show that individuals chronically exposed to arsenic have significantly higher CAT and MPO activities and higher incidence of CA. We found moderate positive correlations between CAT and MPO activities, induction of CA and arsenic in urine and water. These results indicate that chronic arsenic exposure causes higher CAT and MPO activities in serum that correlates with induction of genetic damage. We conclude that the serum levels of these enzymes might be used as biomarkers of early arsenic exposure induced disease much before the classical dermatological symptoms of arsenicosis begin to appear.

  14. Embryonic catalase protects against ethanol-initiated DNA oxidation and teratogenesis in acatalasemic and transgenic human catalase-expressing mice.

    PubMed

    Miller, Lutfiya; Shapiro, Aaron M; Wells, Peter G

    2013-08-01

    Reactive oxygen species (ROS) are implicated in fetal alcohol spectrum disorders (FASD) caused by alcohol (ethanol, EtOH). Although catalase detoxifies hydrogen peroxide, embryonic catalase activity is only about 5% of maternal levels. To determine the roles of ROS and embryonic catalase in FASD, pregnant mice with enhanced (expressing human catalase, hCat) or deficient (acatalasemic, aCat) catalase activity, or their respective wild-type (WT) controls, were treated ip on gestational day 9 with 4 or 6g/kg EtOH or its saline vehicle, and embryos and fetuses were, respectively, evaluated for oxidatively damaged DNA and structural anomalies. Untreated hCat and aCat dams had, respectively, more and less offspring than their WT controls. hCat progenies were protected from all EtOH fetal anomalies at the low dose (p < .01) and from reduced head diameter and resorptions at the high dose (p < .001). Conversely, aCat progenies were more sensitive to dose-dependent EtOH fetal anomalies (p < .001) and exhibited a 50% increase in maternal lethality (p < .05) at the high dose. Maternal pretreatment of aCat mice with polyethylene glycol-conjugated catalase (PEG-Cat) reduced EtOH fetal anomalies (p < .001). EtOH-initiated embryonic DNA oxidation was reduced in hCat and WT mice pretreated with PEG-Cat and enhanced in aCat mice. Plasma concentrations of EtOH in catalase-altered mice were similar to controls, precluding a pharmacokinetic basis for altered EtOH teratogenesis. Endogenous embryonic catalase, despite its low level, is an important embryoprotective enzyme for EtOH teratogenesis and a likely determinant of individual risk.

  15. [Effect of protonofore 2,4-dinitrophenol on catalase activity of intact Escherichia coli bacteria].

    PubMed

    Semchyshyn, H M; Lushchak, V I

    2004-01-01

    Catalase activity of intact E. coli bacteria had a broad pH-optimum (4.0-7.5). Addition of protonofore 2,4-dinitrophenol (200 microM) caused pH-dependency modification (6.5-7.0). Both the catalase activity and curves mode of native cells in the presence of dinitrophenol and cell-free extracts are almost identical. The loss of catalase activity at acid pH was caused by cells destruction and dinitrophenol addition, that makes it possible to suppose that this activity is connected with some membrane component functioning. The induction of "acid" catalase by oxidative stress was blocked with addition of chloramphenicol--protein synthesis inhibitor in prokaryotes. Probably this membrane complex is a part of OxyR regulon, because it is activated by hydrogen peroxide. The activation was not detected in the strain E. coli UM202, which is lacked of catalase HPI (H2O2 response). The catalase activity at acid pH was not observed in the strain E. coli AB1157, that produces both catalase forms and probably has the membrane defect. However, known genetic characteristics of AB1157 stain not let to identify a gene responsible for the "acid" catalase activity.

  16. Engineering of a novel tri-functional enzyme with MnSOD, catalase and cell-permeable activities.

    PubMed

    Luangwattananun, Piriya; Yainoy, Sakda; Eiamphungporn, Warawan; Songtawee, Napat; Bülow, Leif; Ayudhya, Chartchalerm Isarankura Na; Prachayasittikul, Virapong

    2016-04-01

    Cooperative function of superoxide dismutase (SOD) and catalase (CAT), in protection against oxidative stress, is known to be more effective than the action of either single enzyme. Chemical conjugation of the two enzymes resulted in molecules with higher antioxidant activity and therapeutic efficacy. However, chemical methods holds several drawbacks; e.g., loss of enzymatic activity, low homogeneity, time-consuming, and the need of chemical residues removal. Yet, the conjugated enzymes have never been proven to internalize into target cells. In this study, by employing genetic and protein engineering technologies, we reported designing and production of a bi-functional protein with SOD and CAT activities for the first time. To enable cellular internalization, cell penetrating peptide from HIV-1 Tat (TAT) was incorporated. Co-expression of CAT-MnSOD and MnSOD-TAT fusion genes allowed simultaneous self-assembly of the protein sequences into a large protein complex, which is expected to contained one tetrameric structure of CAT, four tetrameric structures of MnSOD and twelve units of TAT. The protein showed cellular internalization and superior protection against paraquat-induced cell death as compared to either complex bi-functional protein without TAT or to native enzymes fused with TAT. This study not only provided an alternative strategy to produce multifunctional protein complex, but also gained an insight into the development of therapeutic agent against oxidative stress-related conditions.

  17. Dysregulation of catalase activity in newborn myocytes during hypoxia is mediated by c-Abl tyrosine kinase.

    PubMed

    Cabigas, E Bernadette; Liu, Jie; Boopathy, Archana V; Che, Pao Lin; Crawford, Brian H; Baroi, Gitangali; Bhutani, Srishti; Shen, Ming; Wagner, Mary B; Davis, Michael E

    2015-01-01

    In the adult heart, catalase (CAT) activity increases appropriately with increasing levels of hydrogen peroxide, conferring cardioprotection. This mechanism is absent in the newborn for unknown reasons. In the present study, we examined how the posttranslational modification of CAT contributes to its activation during hypoxia/ischemia and the role of c-Abl tyrosine kinase in this process. Hypoxia studies were carried out using primary cardiomyocytes from adult (>8 weeks) and newborn rats. Following hypoxia, the ratio of phosphorylated to total CAT and c-Abl in isolated newborn rat myocytes did not increase and were significantly lower (1.3- and 4.2-fold, respectively; P < .05) than their adult counterparts. Similarly, there was a significant association (P < .0005) between c-Abl and CAT in adult cells following hypoxia (30.9 ± 8.2 to 70.7 ± 13.1 au) that was absent in newborn myocytes. Although ubiquitination of CAT was higher in newborns compared to adults following hypoxia, inhibition of this did not improve CAT activity. When a c-Abl activator (5-(1,3-diaryl-1H-pyrazol-4-yl)hydantoin [DPH], 200 µmol/L) was administered prior to hypoxia, not only CAT activity was significantly increased (P < .05) but also phosphorylation levels were also significantly improved (P < .01) in these newborn myocytes. Additionally, ischemia-reperfusion (IR) studies were performed using newborn (4-5 days) rabbit hearts perfused in a Langendorff method. The DPH given as an intracardiac injection into the right ventricle of newborn rabbit resulted in a significant improvement (P < .002) in the recovery of developed pressure after IR, a key indicator of cardiac function (from 74.6% ± 6.6% to 118.7% ± 10.9%). In addition, CAT activity was increased 3.92-fold (P < .02) in the same DPH-treated hearts. Addition of DPH to adult rabbits in contrast had no significant effect (from 71.3% ± 10.7% to 59.4% ± 12.1%). Therefore, in the newborn, decreased phosphorylation of CAT by c

  18. Fluctuations in total antioxidant capacity, catalase activity, and hydrogen peroxide levels of follicular fluid during bovine folliculogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Gupta, Sajal; Choi, Audrey; Yu, Hope Y.; Czerniak, Suzanne M.; Holick, Emily A.; Paolella, Louis J.; Agarwal, Ashok; Combelles, Catherine M.H.

    2011-01-01

    Follicular fluid is an important environment for oocyte development, yet current knowledge regarding its in vivo oxidant and antioxidant levels remains limited. Examining follicular fluid oxidants and antioxidants will improve understanding of their changes in vivo and contribute to optimization of in vitro maturation conditions. The aim of our study was to consider select markers, namely catalase (CAT) enzyme activity, total antioxidant capacity (TAC), and hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) in follicular fluid samples (n=503) originating from bovine antral follicles. We measured the dynamic changes in two relevant antioxidant measures and one reactive oxygen species (ROS) through stages of bovine follicular development and the estrous cycle. CAT activity and H2O2 levels decreased significantly as follicle size increased, while TAC increased significantly as follicle size increased. Lower TAC and higher H2O2 in small follicles suggest increased ROS in the initial stages of folliculogenesis. Because CAT levels are highest in follicular fluid of small follicles in the setting of an overall low TAC, CAT may represent a dominant antioxidant defense in the initial stages of folliculogenesis. Future studies must focus on other reactive oxygen species and their various scavenger types during antral folliculogenesis. PMID:21635816

  19. Catalases play differentiated roles in the adaptation of a fungal entomopathogen to environmental stresses.

    PubMed

    Wang, Zheng-Liang; Zhang, Long-Bin; Ying, Sheng-Hua; Feng, Ming-Guang

    2013-02-01

    The catalase family of Beauveria bassiana (fungal entomopathogen) consists of catA (spore-specific), catB (secreted), catP (peroxisomal), catC (cytoplasmic) and catD (secreted peroxidase/catalase), which were distinguished in phylogeny and structure and functionally characterized by constructing single-gene disrupted and rescued mutants for enzymatic and multi-phenotypic analyses. Total catalase activity decreased 89% and 56% in ΔcatB and ΔcatP, corresponding to the losses of upper and lower active bands gel-profiled for all catalases respectively, but only 9-12% in other knockout mutants. Compared with wild type and complement mutants sharing similar enzymatic and phenotypic parameters, all knockout mutants showed significant (9-56%) decreases in the antioxidant capability of their conidia (active ingredients of mycoinsecticides), followed by remarkable phenotypic defects associated with the fungal biocontrol potential. These defects included mainly the losses of 40% thermotolerance (45°C) in ΔcatA, 46-48% UV-B resistance in ΔcatA and ΔcatD, and 33-47% virulence to Spodoptera litura larvae in ΔcatA, ΔcatP and ΔcatD respectively. Moreover, the drastic transcript upregulation of some other catalase genes observed in the normal culture of each knockout mutant revealed functionally complimentary effects among some of the catalase genes, particularly between catB and catC whose knockout mutants displayed little or minor phenotypic changes. However, the five catalase genes functioned redundantly in mediating the fungal tolerance to either hyperosmotic or fungicidal stress. The differentiated roles of five catalases in regulating the B. bassiana virulence and tolerances to oxidative stress, high temperature and UV-B irradiation provide new insights into fungal adaptation to stressful environment and host invasion.

  20. Enzyme activity of catalase immobilized in Langmuir-Blodgett films of phospholipids.

    PubMed

    Goto, Thiago E; Lopez, Ricardo F; Oliveira, Osvaldo N; Caseli, Luciano

    2010-07-06

    A major challenge for producing low cost biosensors based on nanostructured films with control of molecular architectures is to preserve the catalytic activity of the immobilized biomolecules. In this study, we show that catalase (HRP) keeps its activity if immobilized in Langmuir-Blodgett (LB) films of dipalmitoyl phosphatidylglycerol (DPPG). The incorporation of catalase into a DPPG monolayer at the air-water interface was demonstrated with surface pressure and surface potential isotherms, in addition to polarization-modulated infrared reflection absorption spectroscopy (PM-IRRAS). According to the PM-IRRAS data, catalase was not denatured upon adsorption on a preformed DPPG monolayer and could be transferred onto a solid substrate. The catalytic activity of catalase in a mixed LB film with DPPG was ca. 13% higher than in solution. The control of molecular architecture and choice of a suitable phospholipid matrix allows catalase-containing LB films to be used in sensing hydrogen peroxide.

  1. Ethanol intake and motor sensitization: the role of brain catalase activity in mice with different genotypes.

    PubMed

    Correa, M; Sanchis-Segura, C; Pastor, R; Aragon, C M G

    2004-09-15

    The C57BL/6J strain of inbred mice shows a characteristic pattern of ethanol-induced behaviors: very weak acute locomotor stimulation, a lack of locomotor-sensitizing effect of ethanol, and a high level of ethanol intake. This strain has relatively low levels of activity of the ethanol metabolizing enzyme catalase, and it has been proposed that brain catalase plays a role in the modulation of some behavioral effects of ethanol. In the first study of the present paper, we investigated the effects of pharmacological manipulations of brain catalase activity on C57BL/6J mice in acute ethanol-induced locomotion and ethanol intake. Results indicated that the reduction in motor activity produced by ethanol was reversed by pretreatment with catalase potentiators and it was enhanced by catalase inhibitors. In addition, ethanol intake was highly correlated with brain catalase activity in mice treated with a catalase potentiator. In the second study, F1 hybrid mice (SWXB6) from the outbred Swiss-Webster mice and the inbred C57BL/6J mice were used. Basal brain catalase activity levels of F1 mice were intermediate between to those of the two progenitor genotypes. That profile of catalase activity was parallel to the acute-ethanol-induced locomotion and to repeated-ethanol-induced motor sensitization effects observed across the three types of mice. These data suggest that brain catalase activity modifications in the C57BL/6J strain change the pattern of several ethanol-related behaviors in this inbred mouse.

  2. Cardiac-specific overexpression of catalase prevents diabetes-induced pathological changes by inhibiting NF-κB signaling activation in the heart.

    PubMed

    Cong, Weitao; Ruan, Dandan; Xuan, Yuanhu; Niu, Chao; Tao, Youli; Wang, Yang; Zhan, Kungao; Cai, Lu; Jin, Litai; Tan, Yi

    2015-12-01

    Catalase is an antioxidant enzyme that specifically catabolizes hydrogen peroxide (H2O2). Overexpression of catalase via a heart-specific promoter (CAT-TG) was reported to reduce diabetes-induced accumulation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) and further prevent diabetes-induced pathological abnormalities, including cardiac structural derangement and left ventricular abnormity in mice. However, the mechanism by which catalase overexpression protects heart function remains unclear. This study found that activation of a ROS-dependent NF-κB signaling pathway was downregulated in hearts of diabetic mice overexpressing catalase. In addition, catalase overexpression inhibited the significant increase in nitration levels of key enzymes involved in energy metabolism, including α-oxoglutarate dehydrogenase E1 component (α-KGD) and ATP synthase α and β subunits (ATP-α and ATP-β). To assess the effects of the NF-κB pathway activation on heart function, Bay11-7082, an inhibitor of the NF-κB signaling pathway, was injected into diabetic mice, protecting mice against the development of cardiac damage and increased nitrative modifications of key enzymes involved in energy metabolism. In conclusion, these findings demonstrated that catalase protects mouse hearts against diabetic cardiomyopathy, partially by suppressing NF-κB-dependent inflammatory responses and associated protein nitration.

  3. Inhibition of the catalase activity from Phaseolus vulgaris and Medicago sativa by sodium chloride.

    PubMed

    Tejera García, Noel A; Iribarne, Carmen; Palma, Francisco; Lluch, Carmen

    2007-08-01

    Changes in catalase activity during the development of the Rhizobium-legume symbiosis as well as its response in salinized plants of Phaseolus vulgaris and Medicago sativa, was studied. Besides, it was examined the behavior of the enzyme, isolated from leaves and root nodules, during in vitro incubation with NaCl doses. Nodule catalase activities of both legumes were assayed with several enzyme inhibitors and also purified. Leaf catalase activity of Phaseolus vulgaris and Medicago sativa decreased and increased respectively throughout the ontogeny, but root nodule catalase kept a high and stable value. This last result suggests that both legumes require the maintenance of high nodule catalase in nitrogen-fixing nodules. Under salt stress conditions leaf and nodule catalase activity decreased in both, grain and pasture legumes. Because catalase from leaf of Medicago sativa and nodules of Phaseolus vulgaris were relatively sensitive to NaCl during in vitro experiments, the detoxifying role of this enzyme for H(2)O(2) should be limited in such conditions. Both catalases, from determinate and indeterminate nodules, were affected neither by oxygen nor superoxide radicals but showed a strong (Phaseolus vulgaris) or partial (Medicago sativa) inhibition with dithiothreitol, dithionite and beta-mercaptoethanol. Besides, cyanide was the most potent inhibitor of nodule catalases. Finally, catalases partially purified by immobilized metal ion affinity chromatography migrated at 42 (Phaseolus vulgaris) and 46kDa (Medicago sativa) on SDS-PAGE, whereas native forms on sephacryl S-300 columns exhibited a molecular mass of 59 and 48kDa (Phaseolus vulgaris) and 88 and 53kDa (Medicago sativa).

  4. Microbial resistance in relation to catalase activity to oxidative stress induced by photolysis of hydrogen peroxide.

    PubMed

    Nakamura, Keisuke; Kanno, Taro; Mokudai, Takayuki; Iwasawa, Atsuo; Niwano, Yoshimi; Kohno, Masahiro

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of the present study was to evaluate the mechanism of microbial resistance to oxidative stress induced by photolysis of hydrogen peroxide (H(2)O(2)) in relation to microbial catalase activity. In microbicidal tests, Staphylococcus aureus and Candida albicans were killed and this was accompanied by production of hydroxyl radicals. C. albicans was more resistant to hydroxyl radicals generated by photolysis of H(2)O(2) than was S. aureus. A catalase activity assay demonstrated that C. albicans had stronger catalase activity; accordingly, catalase activity could be one of the reasons for the resistance of the fungus to photolysis of H(2)O(2). Indeed, it was demonstrated that C. albicans with strong catalase activity was more resistant to photolysis of H(2)O(2) than that with weak catalase activity. Kinetic analysis using a modified Lineweaver-Burk plot also demonstrated that the microorganisms reacted directly with hydroxyl radicals and that this was accompanied by decomposition of H(2)O(2). The results of the present study suggest that the microbicidal effects of hydroxyl radicals generated by photolysis of H(2)O(2) can be alleviated by decomposition of H(2)O(2) by catalase in microorganisms.

  5. Isolation of catalase-deficient Escherichia coli mutants and genetic mapping of katE, a locus that affects catalase activity.

    PubMed Central

    Loewen, P C

    1984-01-01

    A number of catalase-deficient mutants of Escherichia coli which exhibit no assayable catalase activity were isolated. The only physiological difference between the catalase mutants and their parents was a 50- to 60-fold greater sensitivity to killing by hydrogen peroxide. For comparison, mutations in the xthA and recA genes of the same strains increased the sensitivity of the mutants to hydrogen peroxide by seven- and fivefold, respectively, showing that catalase was the primary defense against hydrogen peroxide. One class of mutants named katE was localized between pfkB and xthA at 37.8 min on the E. coli genome. A second class of catalase mutants was found which did not map in this region. PMID:6319370

  6. Evaluation of Malondialdehyde, Superoxide Dismutase and Catalase Activity in Fetal Cord Blood of Depressed Mothers

    PubMed Central

    Camkurt, Mehmet Akif; Fındıklı, Ebru; Bakacak, Murat; Tolun, Fatma İnanç; Karaaslan, Mehmet Fatih

    2017-01-01

    Objective The umbilical cord consists of two arteries and one vein and it functions in the transport between the maternal and fetal circulation. Biochemical analysis of fetal cord blood (FCB) during delivery could be beneficial in terms of understanding the fetal environment. In this study, we aimed to investigate oxidative parameters like malondialdehyde (MDA), superoxide dismutase (SOD), and catalase (CAT) levels in FCB during delivery. Methods We collected FCB samples during caesarean section. Our study included 33 depressed mothers and 37 healthy controls. We investigated MDA, SOD, and CAT levels in FCB samples. Results We found no significant difference between groups in terms of MDA (p=0.625), SOD (p=0.940), and CAT (p=0.413) levels. Conclusion Our study reveals probable protective effects of the placenta from oxidative stress. Future studies should include larger samples. PMID:28138108

  7. Catalase ameliorates hepatic fibrosis by inhibition of hepatic stellate cells activation.

    PubMed

    Dong, Yuwei; Qu, Ying; Xu, Mingyi; Wang, Xingpeng; Lu, Lungen

    2014-01-01

    Catalase, an endogenous antioxidant enzyme, is thought to have rescue effects on hepatic fibrosis. In this study, the regulation of catalase in CCl₄-induced hepatic fibrogenesis was investigated. Our results indicated that catalase expression was decreased upon CCl₄ treatment in a time-dependent manner, while the expression of several profibrosis and proangiogenic factors, including transforming growth factor (TGF)-beta 1, vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF), and angiopoietin 1 were significantly increased. To assess the role of catalase in hepatic fibrosis, catalase was overexpressed in HSC-T6 cells. This overexpression resulted in the inhibition of cell proliferation, migratory activity, and alpha-smooth muscle actin (alpha-SMA) expression, key features that characterize activation of hepatic stellate cells (HSC). Overexpression of catalase led to a decrease in the secretion of collagen type 1 and angiopoietin 1. These results indicate that loss of catalase activity is involved in the pathogenesis of hepatic fibrosis caused by the activation of HSCs.

  8. The Molecular Mechanism of the Catalase-like Activity in Horseradish Peroxidase.

    PubMed

    Campomanes, Pablo; Rothlisberger, Ursula; Alfonso-Prieto, Mercedes; Rovira, Carme

    2015-09-02

    Horseradish peroxidase (HRP) is one of the most relevant peroxidase enzymes, used extensively in immunochemistry and biocatalysis applications. Unlike the closely related catalase enzymes, it exhibits a low activity to disproportionate hydrogen peroxide (H2O2). The origin of this disparity remains unknown due to the lack of atomistic information on the catalase-like reaction in HRP. Using QM(DFT)/MM metadynamics simulations, we uncover the mechanism for reduction of the HRP Compound I intermediate by H2O2 at atomic detail. The reaction begins with a hydrogen atom transfer, forming a peroxyl radical and a Compound II-like species. Reorientation of the peroxyl radical in the active site, concomitant with the transfer of the second hydrogen atom, is the rate-limiting step, with a computed free energy barrier (18.7 kcal/mol, ∼ 6 kcal/mol higher than the one obtained for catalase) in good agreement with experiments. Our simulations reveal the crucial role played by the distal pocket residues in accommodating H2O2, enabling formation of a Compound II-like intermediate, similar to catalases. However, out of the two pathways for Compound II reduction found in catalases, only one is operative in HRP. Moreover, the hydrogen bond network in the distal side of HRP compensates less efficiently than in catalases for the energetic cost required to reorient the peroxyl radical at the rate-determining step. The distal Arg and a water molecule in the "wet" active site of HRP have a substantial impact on the reaction barrier, compared to the "dry" active site in catalase. Therefore, the lower catalase-like efficiency of heme peroxidases compared to catalases can be directly attributed to the different distal pocket architecture, providing hints to engineer peroxidases with a higher rate of H2O2 disproportionation.

  9. [Relationship between the aggressiveness and catalase activity of Septoria nodorum berk. in wheat].

    PubMed

    Maksimov, I V; Iarullina, L G; Burkhanova, G F; Zaĭkina, E A

    2013-01-01

    A comparative study of hydrogen peroxide (H202) generation, the character of a fungal catalase gene expression, and the catalase activity in wheat plants, infected with Septoria nodorum Berk. strains differing in their aggressiveness, has been carried out. The decreased intensity of H202 accumulation in infected tissues, influenced by an aggressive S. nodorum strain and caused by the enhanced transcriptional activity of the fungal catalase gene and the heightened synthesis of its product, has been revealed to be more expressed compared to a similar decrease influenced by a less aggressive strain. An assumption was made that the expression activity of the catalase gene and, therefore, the activity ofcatalase involved in the regulation of the H202 content in the infected zone represent important factors providing high.aggressiveness and pathogenicity of S. nodorum.

  10. CATALASE ACTIVITY OF TWO STREPTOCOCCUS FAECALIS STRAINS AND ITS ENHANCEMENT BY AEROBIOSIS AND ADDED CATIONS1

    PubMed Central

    Jones, Dorothy; Deibel, R. H.; Niven, C. F.

    1964-01-01

    Jones, Dorothy (American Meat Institute Foundation, Chicago, Ill.), R. H. Deibel, and C. F. Niven, Jr. Catalase activity of two Streptococcus faecalis strains and its enhancement by aerobiosis and added cations. J. Bacteriol. 88:602–610. 1964.—The nature of catalase activity noted in two unusual Streptococcus faecalis strains was determined. Enzyme activity was lost slowly when cultures were maintained by daily transfer in test tubes of broth media. Loss of activity could be prevented by aerobic culture. Supplementation of the growth medium with ferric, manganese, and zinc ions, as well as aerobiosis, enhanced catalase activity. However, addition of these cations to cell suspensions or to cell-free extracts did not increase catalase activity. Although oxygen was observed to be one of the reaction end products, the catalase activity was not inhibited by cyanide or azide, and the iron-porphyrin coenzyme of classical catalase was not detected. The enzyme was purified 185-fold by precipitation with ammonium sulfate, followed by chromotography on a diethylaminoethyl cellulose column. PMID:14208495

  11. Increased activities of both superoxide dismutase and catalase were indicators of acute depressive episodes in patients with major depressive disorder.

    PubMed

    Tsai, Meng-Chang; Huang, Tiao-Lai

    2016-01-30

    Oxidative stress may play an important role in the pathophysiology of major depressive disorder (MDD). The aim of this study was to investigate the serum levels of oxidative stress biomarkers and S100B in patients with MDD in an acute phase, and evaluate the changes in superoxide dismutase (SOD), protein carbonyl content (PCC), glutathione peroxidase (GPX), 8-hydroxy 2'-deoxyguanosine after treatment (8-OHdG), catalase (CAT), thiobarbituric acid reactive substances (TBARS) and S100B. We consecutively enrolled 21 MDD inpatients in an acute phase and 40 healthy subjects. Serum oxidative stress markers were measured with assay kits. Serum SOD and CAT activities in MDD patients in an acute phase were significantly higher than those of healthy subjects, and serum PCC levels were significantly lower. The HAM-D scores had a significantly positive association with S100B levels. Eighteen depressed patients were followed up, and there was no significant difference among all of the markers after treatment. In conclusion, our results suggest that increased activities of both SOD and CAT might be indicators of acute depressive episodes in MDD patients.

  12. Influence of Catalase Activity on Resistance of Coagulase-positive Staphylococci to Hydrogen Peroxide1

    PubMed Central

    Amin, V. M.; Olson, N. F.

    1968-01-01

    Catalase activities of intact cells and cell-free extracts of coagulase-positive staphylococcal cultures 105B and 558D isolated from milk, culture 25042 from a clinical source, and Staphylococcus aureus 196E were determined at 32.2 C. Cultures were treated with 0.025 and 0.05% hydrogen peroxide at 37.8 and 54.4 C and without hydrogen peroxide at 54.4 C to determine the relationship between catalase activity and resistance to these treatments. The relationship held true for cultures 105B and 196E; culture 105B had the lowest catalase activity and lowest resistance to H2O2 at 37.8 C, whereas S. aureus 196E possessed a high catalase activity and was most resistant at 37.8 C. Catalase activities of cell-free extracts of cultures 25042, 558, and 196E were similar, but resistance to H2O2 at 37.8 C was greater for culture 196E. The lower resistance of culture 25042 was related to low catalase activities of whole cells of this culture, which were only one-third that of whole cells of culture 196E. Culture 558 was least resistant to heat treatment at 54.4 C and showed the greatest sensitivity to added H2O2 at this temperature. PMID:5645413

  13. Circadian expression of the maize catalase Cat3 gene is highly conserved among diverse maize genotypes with structurally different promoters.

    PubMed Central

    Polidoros, A N; Scandalios, J G

    1998-01-01

    The Cat3 gene of maize exhibits a transcriptionally regulated circadian rhythm. In the present study we examined the following: (1) the extent of the circadian Cat3 expression between maize genotypes of diverse origin; (2) the functional significance of a Tourist transposable element located in the Cat3 promoter of the inbred line W64A, which harbors putative regulatory elements (GATA repeat, CCAAT boxes) shown to be involved in the light induction and circadian regulation of the Arabidopsis CAB2, as well as other plant genes; and (3) aspects of the physiological role of CAT-3 in maize metabolism. Results confirm that the circadian Cat3 expression is a general phenomenon in maize. Regulation of Cat3 gene expression is not dependent on the presence of the Tourist element in the promoter of the gene nor on the presence of motifs similar to those found significant in the circadian expression of the Arabidopsis CAB2 gene. Structural diversity was revealed in the Cat3 promoters of maize genotypes of diverse origins. However, highly conserved regions with putative regulatory motifs were identified. Relevance of the conserved regions to the circadian regulation of the gene is discussed. Possible physiological roles of CAT-3 are suggested. PMID:9584112

  14. Layer-by-layer assembled multilayers using catalase-encapsulated gold nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Sungwoo; Park, Jeongju; Cho, Jinhan

    2010-09-01

    We introduce a novel and versatile approach for the preparation of multilayers, based on catalase-encapsulated gold nanoparticles (CAT-AuNP), allowing electrostatic charge reversal and structural transformation through pH adjustment. CAT-AuNP, which are synthesized directly from CAT stabilizer, can be electrostatically assembled with anionic and cationic PEs as a result of the charge reversal of the catalase stabilizers through pH control. In particular, at pH 5.2, near the pI of catalase, dispersed CAT-AuNP are structurally transformed into colloidal or network CAT-AuNP nanocomposites. Furthermore, we demonstrate that the layer-by-layer assembled multilayers composed of PEs and CAT-AuNP induce an effective electron transfer between CAT and the electrode as well as a high loading of CAT and AuNP, and resultantly exhibit a highly catalytic activity toward H2O2.

  15. Effect of iron concentration on the expression and activity of catalase-peroxidases in mycobacteria.

    PubMed

    Yeruva, Veena C; Sundaram, C A S Sivagami; Sritharan, Manjula

    2005-02-01

    Mycobacterial catalases are known to exist in different isoforms. We studied the influence of iron concentration on the expression and activity of the different isoforms in Mycobacterium bovis BCG, M. smegmatis, M. fortuitum, M. kansasii and M. vaccae by growing them under iron-sufficient (4 microg Fe/mL) and iron-deficient (0.02 microg Fe/ml) conditions. Upon iron deprivation, significant differences were observed in the catalase/peroxidase activities in both quantitative spectrophotometric assays and in the activity staining in native gels. Notable feature was that the peroxidase activity showed a significant decrease upon iron deprivation in all the mycobacteria, except M. vaccae. Peroxidase activity in all the mycobacteria, irrespective of the iron status was susceptible to heat inactivation. However, the isoforms of catalase showed differences in their heat stability, indicating possible structural differences in these proteins. For example, M. bovis BCG expressed a heat labile catalase under iron-sufficient conditions, while a heat stable catalase band of similar mobility was expressed under iron-deprivation conditions. The study clearly indicates that iron plays an important role in the regulation of expression of the different isoforms of the catalase-peroxidases.

  16. Kinetin increases chromium absorption, modulates its distribution, and changes the activity of catalase and ascorbate peroxidase in Mexican Palo Verde

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Yong; Peralta-Videa, Jose R.; Lopez-Moreno, Martha L.; Ren, Minghua; Saupe, Geoffrey; Gardea-Torresdey, Jorge L

    2015-01-01

    This report shows, for the first time, the effectiveness of the phytohormone kinetin (KN) in increasing Cr translocation from roots to stems in Mexican Palo Verde. Fifteen-day-old seedlings, germinated in soil spiked with Cr(III) and (VI) at 60 and 10 mg kg−1, respectively, were watered every other day for 30 days with a KN solution at 250 μM. Samples were analyzed for catalase (CAT) and ascorbate peroxidase (APOX) activities, Cr concentration, and Cr distribution in tissues. Results showed that KN reduced CAT but increased APOX in the roots of Cr(VI)-treated plants. In the leaves, KN reduced both CAT and APOX in Cr(III) but not in Cr(VI)-treated plants. However, KN increased total Cr concentration in roots, stems, and leaves by 45%, 103%, and 72%, respectively, compared to Cr(III) alone. For Cr(VI), KN increased Cr concentrations in roots, stems, and leaves, respectively, by 53%, 129%, and 168%, compared to Cr(VI) alone. The electron probe microanalyzer results showed that Cr was mainly located at the cortex section in the root, and Cr distribution was essentially homogenous in stems. However, proven through X-ray images, Cr(VI)-treated roots and stems had more Cr accumulation than Cr(III) counterparts. KN increased the Cr translocation from roots to stems. PMID:21174467

  17. Ascorbate Peroxidase and Catalase Activities and Their Genetic Regulation in Plants Subjected to Drought and Salinity Stresses

    PubMed Central

    Sofo, Adriano; Scopa, Antonio; Nuzzaci, Maria; Vitti, Antonella

    2015-01-01

    Hydrogen peroxide (H2O2), an important relatively stable non-radical reactive oxygen species (ROS) is produced by normal aerobic metabolism in plants. At low concentrations, H2O2 acts as a signal molecule involved in the regulation of specific biological/physiological processes (photosynthetic functions, cell cycle, growth and development, plant responses to biotic and abiotic stresses). Oxidative stress and eventual cell death in plants can be caused by excess H2O2 accumulation. Since stress factors provoke enhanced production of H2O2 in plants, severe damage to biomolecules can be possible due to elevated and non-metabolized cellular H2O2. Plants are endowed with H2O2-metabolizing enzymes such as catalases (CAT), ascorbate peroxidases (APX), some peroxiredoxins, glutathione/thioredoxin peroxidases, and glutathione sulfo-transferases. However, the most notably distinguished enzymes are CAT and APX since the former mainly occurs in peroxisomes and does not require a reductant for catalyzing a dismutation reaction. In particular, APX has a higher affinity for H2O2 and reduces it to H2O in chloroplasts, cytosol, mitochondria and peroxisomes, as well as in the apoplastic space, utilizing ascorbate as specific electron donor. Based on recent reports, this review highlights the role of H2O2 in plants experiencing water deficit and salinity and synthesizes major outcomes of studies on CAT and APX activity and genetic regulation in drought- and salt-stressed plants. PMID:26075872

  18. Ascorbate Peroxidase and Catalase Activities and Their Genetic Regulation in Plants Subjected to Drought and Salinity Stresses.

    PubMed

    Sofo, Adriano; Scopa, Antonio; Nuzzaci, Maria; Vitti, Antonella

    2015-06-12

    Hydrogen peroxide (H2O2), an important relatively stable non-radical reactive oxygen species (ROS) is produced by normal aerobic metabolism in plants. At low concentrations, H2O2 acts as a signal molecule involved in the regulation of specific biological/physiological processes (photosynthetic functions, cell cycle, growth and development, plant responses to biotic and abiotic stresses). Oxidative stress and eventual cell death in plants can be caused by excess H2O2 accumulation. Since stress factors provoke enhanced production of H2O2 in plants, severe damage to biomolecules can be possible due to elevated and non-metabolized cellular H2O2. Plants are endowed with H2O2-metabolizing enzymes such as catalases (CAT), ascorbate peroxidases (APX), some peroxiredoxins, glutathione/thioredoxin peroxidases, and glutathione sulfo-transferases. However, the most notably distinguished enzymes are CAT and APX since the former mainly occurs in peroxisomes and does not require a reductant for catalyzing a dismutation reaction. In particular, APX has a higher affinity for H2O2 and reduces it to H2O in chloroplasts, cytosol, mitochondria and peroxisomes, as well as in the apoplastic space, utilizing ascorbate as specific electron donor. Based on recent reports, this review highlights the role of H2O2 in plants experiencing water deficit and salinity and synthesizes major outcomes of studies on CAT and APX activity and genetic regulation in drought- and salt-stressed plants.

  19. Effects of autogamy in Paramecium tetraurelia on catalase activity and on radiosensitivity to natural ionizing radiations

    SciTech Connect

    Croute, F.; Dupouy, D.; Charley, J.P.; Soleilhavoup, J.P.; Planel, H.

    1980-02-01

    Catalase activity of Paramecium tetraurelia decreased during autogamy and recovered to normal 5 days later. Autogamy also caused changes in the ciliate's sensitivity sensitivity to natural ionizing radiations - the decrease in cell growth rate previously described in shielded cultures did not occur when autogamous cells were used. Maximum effect of shielding was observed in 11-day-old postautogamous cells. The role of the catalase in the mechanism of natural irradiation effect is discussed.

  20. A fungal catalase reacts selectively with the 13S fatty acid hydroperoxide products of the adjacent lipoxygenase gene and exhibits 13S-hydroperoxide-dependent peroxidase activity.

    PubMed

    Teder, Tarvi; Boeglin, William E; Schneider, Claus; Brash, Alan R

    2017-03-28

    The genome of the fungal plant pathogen Fusarium graminearum harbors six catalases, one of which has the sequence characteristics of a fatty acid peroxide-metabolizing catalase. We cloned and expressed this hemoprotein (designated as Fg-cat) along with its immediate neighbor, a 13S-lipoxygenase (cf. Brodhun et al., PloS One, e64919, 2013) that we considered might supply a fatty acid hydroperoxide substrate. Indeed, Fg-cat reacts abruptly with the 13S-hydroperoxide of linoleic acid (13S-HPODE) with an initial rate of 700-1300s(-1). By comparison there was no reaction with 9R- or 9S-HPODEs and extremely weak reaction with 13R-HPODE (~0.5% of the rate with 13S-HPODE). Although we considered Fg-cat as a candidate for the allene oxide synthase of the jasmonate pathway in fungi, the main product formed from 13S-HPODE was identified by UV, MS, and NMR as 9-oxo-10E-12,13-cis-epoxy-octadecenoic acid (with no traces of AOS activity). The corresponding analog is formed from the 13S-hydroperoxide of α-linolenic acid along with novel diepoxy-ketones and two C13 aldehyde derivatives, the reaction mechanisms of which are proposed. In a peroxidase assay monitoring the oxidation of ABTS, Fg-cat exhibited robust activity (kcat 550s(-1)) using the 13S-hydroperoxy-C18 fatty acids as the oxidizing co-substrate. There was no detectable peroxidase activity using the corresponding 9S-hydroperoxides, nor with t-butyl hydroperoxide, and very weak activity with H2O2 or cumene hydroperoxide at micromolar concentrations of Fg-cat. Fg-cat and the associated lipoxygenase gene are present together in fungal genera Fusarium, Metarhizium and Fonsecaea and appear to constitute a partnership for oxidations in fungal metabolism or defense.

  1. Generation 9 polyamidoamine dendrimer encapsulated platinum nanoparticle mimics catalase size, shape, and catalytic activity.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xinyu; Zhang, Yincong; Li, Tianfu; Tian, Wende; Zhang, Qiang; Cheng, Yiyun

    2013-04-30

    Poly(amidoamine) (PAMAM) encapsulated platinum nanoparticles were synthesized and used as catalase mimics. Acetylated generation 9 (Ac-G9) PAMAM dendrimer with a molecular size around 10 nm was used as a template to synthesize platinum nanoparticles. The feeding molar ratio of Pt(4+) and Ac-G9 is 2048, and the synthesized platinum nanoparticle (Ac-G9/Pt NP) has an average size of 3.3 nm. Ac-G9/Pt NP has a similar molecular size and globular shape with catalase (~11 nm). The catalytic activity of Ac-G9/Pt NP on the decomposition of H2O2 is approaching that of catalase at 37 °C. Ac-G9/Pt NP shows differential response to the changes of pH and temperature compared with catalase, which can be explained by different catalytic mechanisms of Ac-G9/Pt NP and catalase. Ac-G9/Pt NP also shows horseradish peroxidase activity and is able to scavenge free radicals such as di(phenyl)-(2,4,6-trinitrophenyl)iminoazanium (DPPH). Furthermore, Ac-G9/Pt NP shows excellent biocompatibility on different cell lines and can down-regulate H2O2-induced intracellular reactive oxygen species (ROS) in these cells. These results suggest that dendrimers are promising mimics of proteins with different sizes and Ac-G9/Pt NP can be used as an alternative candidate of catalase to decrease oxidation stress in cells.

  2. Catalase inhibition in the Arcuate nucleus blocks ethanol effects on the locomotor activity of rats.

    PubMed

    Sanchis-Segura, Carles; Correa, Mercé; Miquel, Marta; Aragon, Carlos M G

    2005-03-07

    Previous studies have demonstrated that there is a bidirectional modulation of ethanol-induced locomotion produced by drugs that regulate brain catalase activity. In the present study we have assessed the effect in rats of intraperitoneal, intraventricular or intracraneal administration of the catalase inhibitor sodium azide in the locomotor changes observed after ethanol (1 g/kg) administration. Our results show that sodium azide prevents the effects of ethanol in rats locomotion not only when sodium azide was systemically administered but also when it was intraventricularly injected, then confirming that the interaction between catalase and ethanol takes place in Central Nervous System (CNS). Even more interestingly, the same results were observed when sodium azide administration was restricted to the hypothalamic Arcuate nucleus (ARC), a brain region which has one of the highest levels of expression of catalase. Therefore, the results of the present study not only confirm a role for brain catalase in the mediation of ethanol-induced locomotor changes in rodents but also point to the ARC as a major neuroanatomical location for this interaction. These results are in agreement with our reports showing that ethanol-induced locomotor changes are clearly dependent of the ARC integrity and, especially of the POMc-synthesising neurons of this nucleus. According to these data we propose a model in which ethanol oxidation via catalase could produce acetaldehyde into the ARC and to promote a release of beta-endorphins that would activate opioid receptors to produce locomotion and other ethanol-induced neurobehavioural changes.

  3. Embryonic catalase protects against ethanol embryopathies in acatalasemic mice and transgenic human catalase-expressing mice in embryo culture.

    PubMed

    Miller-Pinsler, Lutfiya; Wells, Peter G

    2015-09-15

    Reactive oxygen species (ROS) have been implicated in the mechanism of ethanol (EtOH) teratogenicity, but the protective role of the embryonic antioxidative enzyme catalase is unclear, as embryonic activity is only about 5% of maternal levels. We addressed this question in a whole embryo culture model. C57BL/6 mouse embryos expressing human catalase (hCat) or their wild-type (C57BL/6 WT) controls, and C3Ga.Cg-Cat(b)/J catalase-deficient, acatalasemic (aCat) mouse embryos or their wild-type C3HeB/FeJ (C3H WT) controls, were explanted on gestational day (GD) 9 (plug=GD 1), exposed for 24h to 2 or 4mg/mL EtOH or vehicle, and evaluated for functional and morphological changes. hCat and C57BL/6 WT vehicle-exposed embryos developed normally, while EtOH was embryopathic in C57BL/6 WT embryos, evidenced by decreases in anterior neuropore closure, somites developed, turning and head length, whereas hCat embryos were protected (p<0.001). Maternal pretreatment of C57BL/6 WT dams with 50kU/kg PEG-catalase (PEG-cat) 8h prior to embryo culture, which increases embryonic catalase activity, blocked all EtOH embryopathies (p<0.001). Vehicle-exposed aCat mouse embryos had lower yolk sac diameters compared to WT controls, suggesting that endogenous ROS are embryopathic. EtOH was more embryopathic in aCat embryos than WT controls, evidenced by reduced head length and somite development (p<0.01), and trends for reduced anterior neuropore closure, turning and crown-rump length. Maternal pretreatment of aCat dams with PEG-Cat blocked all EtOH embryopathies (p<0.05). These data suggest that embryonic catalase is a determinant of risk for EtOH embryopathies.

  4. Protective Effect of an Isoflavone, Tectorigenin, Against Oxidative Stress-induced Cell Death via Catalase Activation

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Rui; Piao, Mei Jing; Oh, Min Chang; Park, Jeong Eon; Shilnikova, Kristina; Moon, Yu Jin; Kim, Dong Hyun; Jung, Uhee; Kim, In Gyu; Hyun, Jin Won

    2016-01-01

    Background Isoflavones are biologically active compounds that occur naturally in a variety of plants, with relatively high levels in soybean. Tectorigenin, an isoflavone, protects against hydrogen peroxide (H2O2)-induced cell damage. However, the underlying mechanism is unknown. Methods The MTT assay was performed to determine cell viability. Catalase activity was assessed by determining the amount of enzyme required to degrade 1 μM H2O2. Protein expression of catalase, phospho-extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK), IκB-α, and NF-κB were evaluated by Western blot analysis. A mobility shift assay was performed to assess the DNA-binding ability of NF-κB. Transient transfection and a NF-κB luciferase assay were performed to assess transcriptional activity. Results Tectorigenin reduced H2O2-induced death of Chinese hamster lung fibroblasts (V79-4). In addition, tectorigenin increased the activity and protein expression of catalase. Blockade of catalase activity attenuated the protective effect of tectorigenin against oxidative stress. Furthermore, tectorigenin enhanced phosphorylation of ERK and nuclear expression of NF-κB, while inhibition of ERK and NF-κB attenuated the protective effect of tectorigenin against oxidative stress. Conclusions Tectorigenin protects cells against oxidative damage by activating catalase and modulating the ERK and NF-κB signaling pathway. PMID:28053960

  5. Embryonic catalase protects against ethanol embryopathies in acatalasemic mice and transgenic human catalase-expressing mice in embryo culture

    SciTech Connect

    Miller-Pinsler, Lutfiya; Wells, Peter G.

    2015-09-15

    Reactive oxygen species (ROS) have been implicated in the mechanism of ethanol (EtOH) teratogenicity, but the protective role of the embryonic antioxidative enzyme catalase is unclear, as embryonic activity is only about 5% of maternal levels. We addressed this question in a whole embryo culture model. C57BL/6 mouse embryos expressing human catalase (hCat) or their wild-type (C57BL/6 WT) controls, and C3Ga.Cg-Cat{sup b}/J catalase-deficient, acatalasemic (aCat) mouse embryos or their wild-type C3HeB/FeJ (C3H WT) controls, were explanted on gestational day (GD) 9 (plug = GD 1), exposed for 24 h to 2 or 4 mg/mL EtOH or vehicle, and evaluated for functional and morphological changes. hCat and C57BL/6 WT vehicle-exposed embryos developed normally, while EtOH was embryopathic in C57BL/6 WT embryos, evidenced by decreases in anterior neuropore closure, somites developed, turning and head length, whereas hCat embryos were protected (p < 0.001). Maternal pretreatment of C57BL/6 WT dams with 50 kU/kg PEG-catalase (PEG-cat) 8 h prior to embryo culture, which increases embryonic catalase activity, blocked all EtOH embryopathies (p < 0.001). Vehicle-exposed aCat mouse embryos had lower yolk sac diameters compared to WT controls, suggesting that endogenous ROS are embryopathic. EtOH was more embryopathic in aCat embryos than WT controls, evidenced by reduced head length and somite development (p < 0.01), and trends for reduced anterior neuropore closure, turning and crown–rump length. Maternal pretreatment of aCat dams with PEG-Cat blocked all EtOH embryopathies (p < 0.05). These data suggest that embryonic catalase is a determinant of risk for EtOH embryopathies. - Highlights: • Ethanol (EtOH) exposure causes structural embryopathies in embryo culture. • Genetically enhanced catalase (hCat) protects against EtOH embryopathies. • Genetically deficient catalase (aCat) exacerbates EtOH embryopathies. • Embryonic catalase is developmentally important. • Et

  6. On the enzymatic activity of catalase: an iron L-edge X-ray absorption study of the active centre.

    PubMed

    Bergmann, Nora; Bonhommeau, Sébastien; Lange, Kathrin M; Greil, Stefanie M; Eisebitt, Stefan; de Groot, Frank; Chergui, Majed; Aziz, Emad F

    2010-05-14

    Catalase and methaemoglobin have very similar haem groups, which are both ferric, yet catalase decomposes hydrogen peroxide to water and oxygen very efficiently, while methaemoglobin does not. Structural studies have attributed this behaviour to their different distal environments. Here we present Fe L(2,3)-edge X-ray absorption spectra of these proteins in physiological solutions, which reveal clear differences in their electronic structures, in that pi back-donation of the Fe atom occurs in catalase, which confers on it a partial ferryl (Fe(4+)) character, while this is not the case in methaemoglobin. The origin of the Fe(4+) character stems from the proximal tyrosine residue. We also find that both systems are in a high spin state. Temperature effects influence the spectra of catalase only weakly, in agreement with previous studies of its chemical activity. We conclude that the high activity of catalase is not only determined by its distal environment but also by its partial ferryl character.

  7. Activation of Peroxisome Proliferator-Activated Receptor Alpha Improves Aged and UV-Irradiated Skin by Catalase Induction

    PubMed Central

    Shin, Mi Hee; Lee, Se-Rah; Kim, Min-Kyoung; Shin, Chang-Yup

    2016-01-01

    Peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor alpha (PPARα) is a nuclear hormone receptor involved in the transcriptional regulation of lipid metabolism, fatty acid oxidation, and glucose homeostasis. Its activation stimulates antioxidant enzymes such as catalase, whose expression is decreased in aged human skin. Here we investigated the expression of PPARα in aged and ultraviolet (UV)-irradiated skin, and whether PPARα activation can modulate expressions of matrix metalloproteinase (MMP)-1 and procollagen through catalase regulation. We found that PPARα mRNA level was significantly decreased in intrinsically aged and photoaged human skin as well as in UV-irradiated skin. A PPARα activator, Wy14643, inhibited UV-induced increase of MMP-1 and decrease of procollagen expression and caused marked increase in catalase expression. Furthermore, production of reactive oxygen species (ROS) was suppressed by Wy14643 in UV-irradiated and aged dermal fibroblasts, suggesting that the PPARα activation-induced upregulation of catalase leads to scavenging of ROS produced due to UV irradiation or aging. PPARα knockdown decreased catalase expression and abolished the beneficial effects of Wy14643. Topical application of Wy14643 on hairless mice restored catalase activity and prevented MMP-13 and inflammatory responses in skin. Our findings indicate that PPARα activation triggers catalase expression and ROS scavenging, thereby protecting skin from UV-induced damage and intrinsic aging. PMID:27611371

  8. Direct measurement of catalase activity in living cells and tissue biopsies.

    PubMed

    Scaglione, Christine N; Xu, Qijin; Ramanujan, V Krishnan

    2016-01-29

    Spatiotemporal regulation of enzyme-substrate interactions governs the decision-making steps in biological systems. Enzymes, being functional units of every living cell, contribute to the macromolecular stability of cell survival, proliferation and hence are vital windows to unraveling the biological complexity. Experimental measurements capturing this dynamics of enzyme-substrate interactions in real time add value to this understanding. Furthermore these measurements, upon validation in realistic biological specimens such as clinical biopsies - can further improve our capability in disease diagnostics and treatment monitoring. Towards this direction, we describe here a novel, high-sensitive measurement system for measuring diffusion-limited enzyme-substrate kinetics in real time. Using catalase (enzyme) and hydrogen peroxide (substrate) as the example pair, we demonstrate that this system is capable of direct measurement of catalase activity in vitro and the measured kinetics follows the classical Michaelis-Menten reaction kinetics. We further demonstrate the system performance by measuring catalase activity in living cells and in very small amounts of liver biopsies (down to 1 μg total protein). Catalase-specific enzyme activity is demonstrated by genetic and pharmacological tools. Finally we show the clinically-relevant diagnostic capability of our system by comparing the catalase activities in liver biopsies from young and old mouse (liver and serum) samples. We discuss the potential applicability of this system in clinical diagnostics as well as in intraoperative surgical settings.

  9. Enhanced antioxidant defense due to extracellular catalase activity in Syrian hamster during arousal from hibernation.

    PubMed

    Ohta, Hitomi; Okamoto, Iwao; Hanaya, Toshiharu; Arai, Shigeyuki; Ohta, Tsunetaka; Fukuda, Shigeharu

    2006-08-01

    Mammalian hibernators are considered a natural model for resistance to ischemia-reperfusion injuries, and protective mechanisms against oxidative stress evoked by repeated hibernation-arousal cycles in these animals are increasingly the focus of experimental investigation. Here we show that extracellular catalase activity provides protection against oxidative stress during arousal from hibernation in Syrian hamster. To examine the serum antioxidant defense system, we first assessed the hibernation-arousal state-dependent change in serum attenuation of cytotoxicity induced by hydrogen peroxide. Serum obtained from hamsters during arousal from hibernation at a rectal temperature of 32 degrees C, concomitant with the period of increased oxidative stress, attenuated the cytotoxicity four-fold more effectively than serum from cenothermic control hamsters. Serum catalase activity significantly increased during arousal, whereas glutathione peroxidase activity decreased by 50%, compared with cenothermic controls. The cytoprotective effect of purified catalase at the concentration found in serum was also confirmed in a hydrogen peroxide-induced cytotoxicity model. Moreover, inhibition of catalase by aminotriazole led to an 80% loss of serum hydrogen peroxide scavenging activity. These results suggest that extracellular catalase is effective for protecting hibernators from oxidative stress evoked by arousal from hibernation.

  10. Direct Measurement of Catalase Activity in Living Cells and Tissue Biopsies

    PubMed Central

    Scaglione, Christine N; Xu, Qijin; Ramanujan, V. Krishnan

    2016-01-01

    Spatiotemporal regulation of enzyme-substrate interactions governs the decision-making steps in biological systems. Enzymes, being functional units of every living cell, contribute to the macromolecular stability of cell survival, proliferation and hence are vital windows to unraveling the biological complexity. Experimental measurements capturing this dynamics of enzyme-substrate interactions in real time add value to this understanding. Furthermore these measurements, upon validation in realistic biological specimens such as clinical biopsies – can further improve our capability in disease diagnostics and treatment monitoring. Towards this direction, we describe here a novel, high-sensitive measurement system for measuring diffusion-limited enzyme-substrate kinetics in real time. Using catalase (enzyme) and hydrogen peroxide (substrate) as the example pair, we demonstrate that this system is capable of direct measurement of catalase activity in vitro and the measured kinetics follows the classical Michaelis-Menten reaction kinetics. We further demonstrate the system performance by measuring catalase activity in living cells and in very small amounts of liver biopsies (down to 1μg total protein). Catalase-specific enzyme activity is demonstrated by genetic and pharamacological tools. Finally we show the clinically-relevant diagnostic capability of our system by comparing the catalase activities in liver biopsies from young and old mouse (liver and serum) samples. We discuss the potential applicability of this system in clinical diagnostics as well as in intraoperative surgical settings. PMID:26772884

  11. Metabolic Interference of sod gene mutations on catalase activity in Escherichia coli exposed to Gramoxone® (paraquat) herbicide.

    PubMed

    Gravina, Fernanda; Dobrzanski, Tatiane; Olchanheski, Luiz R; Galvão, Carolina W; Reche, Péricles M; Pileggi, Sonia A; Azevedo, Ricardo A; Sadowsky, Michael J; Pileggi, Marcos

    2017-05-01

    Herbicides are continuously used to minimize the loss of crop productivity in agricultural environments. They can, however, cause damage by inhibiting the growth of microbiota via oxidative stress, due to the increased production of reactive oxygen species (ROS). Cellular responses to ROS involve the action of enzymes, including superoxide dismutase (SOD) and catalase (CAT). The objective of this study was to evaluate adaptive responses in Escherichia coli K-12 to paraquat, the active ingredient in the herbicide Gramoxone®. Mutant bacterial strains carrying deletions in genes encoding Mn-SOD (sodA) and Fe-SOD (sodB) were used and resulted in distinct levels of hydrogen peroxide production, interference in malondialdehyde, and viability. Mutations also resulted in different levels of interference with the activity of CAT isoenzymes and in the inactivation of Cu/Zn-SOD activity. These mutations may be responsible for metabolic differences among the evaluated strains, resulting in different patterns of antioxidative responses, depending on mutation background. While damage to the ΔsodB strain was minor at late log phase, the reverse was true at mid log phase for the ΔsodA strain. These results demonstrate the important role of these genes in defense against oxidative stress in different periods of growth. Furthermore, the lack of Cu/Zn-SOD activity in both mutant strains indicated that common metal cofactors likely interfere in SOD activity regulation. These results also indicate that E. coli K-12, a classical non-environmental strain, constitutes a model of phenotypic plasticity for adaptation to a redox-cycling herbicide through redundancy of different isoforms of SOD and CAT enzymes.

  12. Diminution of mouse epidermal superoxide dismutase and catalase activities by tumor promotors

    SciTech Connect

    Solanki, V.; Rana, R.S.; Slaga, T.J.

    1981-01-01

    The effects of phorbol ester tumor promoters and related compounds on superoxide dismutase (SOD) and catalase were examined. The treatment of adult mouse skin with 2 ..mu..g 12-0-tetradecanoylphorbol-13-acetate (TPA) resulted in a sustained decrease in the basal levels of both SOD and catalase activities in the epidermis. A decline in SOD activity occurred within 2 h after application and the maximum effect was seen at 16-17 h. The decrease in SOD activity was always accompanied by a similar decline in the epidermal catalase activity. The alterations in both enzymes occurred against a high background of enhanced protein synthesis which indicates that the effect of TPA is selective for SOD and catalase. Other tumor promoters such as phorbol 12,13-dibutyrate and the non-phorbol tumor promoter anthraline also lowered the activities of both the enzymes. Mezerein, a resiniferonol derivative with weak promoting activity but a potent stage-II promoter, appeared to be more potent than TPA in lowering the basal levels. These results indicate that damage which favors neoplastic progression would occur in TPA-treated mouse skin due to the accumulation of free radicals resulting from low levels of SOD and catalase activity. In addition, the TPA-caused decrease in the levels of SOD and catalase was not prevented by either retinoic acid, fluocinolone acetonide, tosyl amino-2-phenylethyl chloromethyl ketone, or butylated hydroxytoluene, suggesting that inhibition of tumor promotion by these agents is not mediated through alterations in the levels of enzymatic activities which decrease free radical concentrations.

  13. Arrhenius activation energy of damage to catalase during spray-drying.

    PubMed

    Schaefer, Joachim; Lee, Geoffrey

    2015-07-15

    The inactivation of catalase during spray-drying over a range of outlet gas temperatures could be closely represented by the Arrhenius equation. From this an activation energy for damage to the catalase could be calculated. The close fit to Arrhenius suggests that the thermally-induced part of inactivation of the catalase during the complex drying and particle-formation processes takes place at constant temperature. These processes are rapid compared with the residence time of the powder in the collecting vessel of the cyclone where dried catalase is exposed to a constant temperature equal to approximately the drying gas outlet temperature. A lower activation energy after spray drying with the ultrasonic nozzle was found than with the 2-fluid nozzle under otherwise identical spray drying conditions. It is feasible that the ultrasonic nozzle when mounted in the lid of the spray dryer heats up toward the drying gas inlet temperature much more that the air-cooled 2-fluid nozzle. Calculation of the Arrhenius activation energy also showed how the stabilizing efficacy of trehalose and mannitol on the catalase varies in strength across the range of drying gas inlet and outlet temperatures examined.

  14. Effect of cimetidine on catalase activity of Pseudomonas aeruginosa: a suggested mechanism of action.

    PubMed

    Masoud, Masoudeh; Ebrahimi, Farnoosh; Minai-Tehrani, Dariush

    2014-01-01

    Catalase is an important enzyme for the degradation of hydrogen peroxide in cells. Bacteria have potent catalase to deal with H2O2 in their medium culture. Any chemicals that inhibit catalase activity can be harmful for cells. Histamine H2 antagonist drugs such as cimetidine and ranitidine are used for the treatment of gastrointestinal tract disorders. The present results showed that cimetidine could inhibit the catalase activity of Pseudomonas aeruginosa in a competitive inhibition. The determination of IC50 value and Ki (6.5 μM) of cimetidine demonstrated that the enzyme binds to the drug with high affinity. Binding of the drug to the enzyme was pH-dependent and no binding was observed at basic pH (>9) and acidic pH (<6). Moreover, the imidazole ring and cyanoguanidine group of cimetidine may play an important role in inhibition by binding to Fe in heme group and glutamic acid 51 residue on the enzyme, respectively. Ranitidine had no effect on the catalase activity.

  15. A comprehensive evaluation of catalase-like activity of different classes of redox-active therapeutics.

    PubMed

    Tovmasyan, Artak; Maia, Clarissa G C; Weitner, Tin; Carballal, Sebastián; Sampaio, Romulo S; Lieb, Dominik; Ghazaryan, Robert; Ivanovic-Burmazovic, Ivana; Ferrer-Sueta, Gerardo; Radi, Rafael; Reboucas, Julio S; Spasojevic, Ivan; Benov, Ludmil; Batinic-Haberle, Ines

    2015-09-01

    Because of the increased insight into the biological role of hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) under physiological and pathological conditions and the role it presumably plays in the action of natural and synthetic redox-active drugs, there is a need to accurately define the type and magnitude of reactions that may occur with this intriguing and key species of redoxome. Historically, and frequently incorrectly, the impact of catalase-like activity has been assigned to play a major role in the action of many redox-active drugs, mostly SOD mimics and peroxynitrite scavengers, and in particular MnTBAP(3-) and Mn salen derivatives. The advantage of one redox-active compound over another has often been assigned to the differences in catalase-like activity. Our studies provide substantial evidence that Mn(III) N-alkylpyridylporphyrins couple with H2O2 in actions other than catalase-related. Herein we have assessed the catalase-like activities of different classes of compounds: Mn porphyrins (MnPs), Fe porphyrins (FePs), Mn(III) salen (EUK-8), and Mn(II) cyclic polyamines (SOD-active M40403 and SOD-inactive M40404). Nitroxide (tempol), nitrone (NXY-059), ebselen, and MnCl2, which have not been reported as catalase mimics, were used as negative controls, while catalase enzyme was a positive control. The dismutation of H2O2 to O2 and H2O was followed via measuring oxygen evolved with a Clark oxygen electrode at 25°C. The catalase enzyme was found to have kcat(H2O2)=1.5×10(6)M(-1) s(-1). The yield of dismutation, i.e., the maximal amount of O2 evolved, was assessed also. The magnitude of the yield reflects an interplay between the kcat(H2O2) and the stability of compounds toward H2O2-driven oxidative degradation, and is thus an accurate measure of the efficacy of a catalyst. The kcat(H2O2) values for 12 cationic Mn(III) N-substituted (alkyl and alkoxyalkyl) pyridylporphyrin-based SOD mimics and Mn(III) N,N'-dialkylimidazolium porphyrin, MnTDE-2-ImP(5+), ranged from 23 to 88M(-1) s

  16. The euryhaline yeast Debaryomyces hansenii has two catalase genes encoding enzymes with differential activity profile.

    PubMed

    Segal-Kischinevzky, Claudia; Rodarte-Murguía, Beatriz; Valdés-López, Victor; Mendoza-Hernández, Guillermo; González, Alicia; Alba-Lois, Luisa

    2011-03-01

    Debaryomyces hansenii is a spoilage yeast able to grow in a variety of ecological niches, from seawater to dairy products. Results presented in this article show that (i) D. hansenii has an inherent resistance to H2O2 which could be attributed to the fact that this yeast has a basal catalase activity which is several-fold higher than that observed in Saccharomyces cerevisiae under the same culture conditions, (ii) D. hansenii has two genes (DhCTA1 and DhCTT1) encoding two catalase isozymes with a differential enzymatic activity profile which is not strictly correlated with a differential expression profile of the encoding genes.

  17. Catalase activity as a potential indicator of the reducer component of small closed ecosystems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sarangova, A. B.; Somova, L. A.; Pisman, T. I.

    1997-01-01

    Dynamics of catalase activity has been shown to reflect the growth curve of microorganisms in batch cultivation (celluloselythic bacteria Bacillus acidocaldarius and bacteria of the associated microflora Chlorella vulgaris). Gas and substrate closure of the three component ecosystems with spatially separated components ``producer-consumer-reducer'' (Chl. vulgaris-Paramecium caudatum-B. acidocaldarius, two bacterial strains isolated from the associated microflora Chl. vulgaris) demonstrated that the functioning of the reducer component can be estimated by the catalase activity of microorganisms of this component.

  18. Iron, copper, and manganese complexes with in vitro superoxide dismutase and/or catalase activities that keep Saccharomyces cerevisiae cells alive under severe oxidative stress.

    PubMed

    Ribeiro, Thales P; Fernandes, Christiane; Melo, Karen V; Ferreira, Sarah S; Lessa, Josane A; Franco, Roberto W A; Schenk, Gerhard; Pereira, Marcos D; Horn, Adolfo

    2015-03-01

    Due to their aerobic lifestyle, eukaryotic organisms have evolved different strategies to overcome oxidative stress. The recruitment of some specific metalloenzymes such as superoxide dismutases (SODs) and catalases (CATs) is of great importance for eliminating harmful reactive oxygen species (hydrogen peroxide and superoxide anion). Using the ligand HPClNOL {1-[bis(pyridin-2-ylmethyl)amino]-3-chloropropan-2-ol}, we have synthesized three coordination compounds containing iron(III), copper(II), and manganese(II) ions, which are also present in the active site of the above-noted metalloenzymes. These compounds were evaluated as SOD and CAT mimetics. The manganese and iron compounds showed both SOD and CAT activities, while copper showed only SOD activity. The copper and manganese in vitro SOD activities are very similar (IC50~0.4 μmol dm(-3)) and about 70-fold higher than those of iron. The manganese compound showed CAT activity higher than that of the iron species. Analyzing their capacity to protect Saccharomyces cerevisiae cells against oxidative stress (H2O2 and the O2(•-) radical), we observed that all compounds act as antioxidants, increasing the resistance of yeast cells mainly due to a reduction of lipid oxidation. Especially for the iron compound, the data indicate complete protection when wild-type cells were exposed to H2O2 or O2(•-) species. Interestingly, these compounds also compensate for both superoxide dismutase and catalase deficiencies; their antioxidant activity is metal ion dependent, in the order iron(III)>copper(II)>manganese(II). The protection mechanism employed by the complexes proved to be independent of the activation of transcription factors (such as Yap1, Hsf1, Msn2/Msn4) and protein synthesis. There is no direct relation between the in vitro and the in vivo antioxidant activities.

  19. Catalase and superoxide dismutase activities as biomarkers of oxidative stress in workers exposed to mercury vapors

    SciTech Connect

    Perrin-Nadif, R.; Dusch, M.; Mur, J.M.; Koch, C.; Schmitt, P.

    1996-06-07

    We investigated the role of three blood antioxidant enzyme activities and total antioxidant status (TAS) as biological markers of oxidative stress in workers exposed to mercury (Hg{degrees}) vapors. Twenty-two female workers took part in the study. Blood and urine sampling for biological analyses was performed. The workers were classified into three subgroups according to their creatinine-corrected Hg concentration in urine. Blood antioxidant enzyme activities and TAS were compared between groups with nonparametric distribution-free methods. A significant difference existed in catalase activity and a slight, but not significant, difference existed in Cu{sup 2+}/Zn{sup 2+} superoxide dismutase (Cu{sup 2+}/Zn{sup 2+} SOD) activity between the three groups. No differences were observed in either the glutathione peroxidase activity or the TAS between these groups. Catalase and Cu{sup 2+}/Zn{sup 2+} SOD activities were increased in the groups of workers with higher creatinine-corrected urinary Hg concentrations when compared with the group of lower creatinine-corrected urinary Hg concentrations. Catalase activity was positively correlated with the creatinine-corrected concentration of Hg in urine, and Cu{sup 2+}/Zn{sup 2+} SOD activity was slightly correlated with the creatinine-corrected concentration of Hg in urine. The role of erythrocyte catalase and Cu{sup 2}/Zn{sup 2+} SOD activities we have measured is in agreement with the hypothesis of the involvement of reactive oxygen species production as an important event in chronic exposure to Hg{degrees} vapors in humans. In spite of the small sample size, results indicate that erythrocyte catalase and Cu{sup 2+}/Zn{sup 2+} SOD activities could be considered as markers of biological effect in workers exposed to Hg{degrees} vapors. 24 refs., 3 figs., 2 tabs.

  20. Development of a new catalase activity assay for biological samples using optical CUPRAC sensor.

    PubMed

    Bekdeşer, Burcu; Özyürek, Mustafa; Güçlü, Kubilay; Alkan, Fulya Üstün; Apak, Reşat

    2014-11-11

    A novel catalase activity assay was developed for biological samples (liver and kidney tissue homogenates) using a rapid and low-cost optical sensor-based 'cupric reducing antioxidant capacity' (CUPRAC) method. The reagent, copper(II)-neocuproine (Cu(II)-Nc) complex, was immobilized onto a cation-exchanger film of Nafion, and the absorbance changes associated with the formation of the highly-colored Cu(I)-Nc chelate as a result of reaction with hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) was measured at 450 nm. When catalase was absent, H2O2 produced the CUPRAC chromophore, whereas catalase, being an effective H2O2 scavenger, completely annihilated the CUPRAC signal due to H2O2. Thus, the CUPRAC absorbance due to H2O2 oxidation concomitant with Cu(I)-Nc formation decreased proportionally with catalase. The developed sensor gave a linear response over a wide concentration range of H2O2 (0.68-78.6 μM). This optical sensor-based method applicable to tissue homogenates proved to be efficient for low hydrogen peroxide concentrations (physiological and nontoxic levels) to which the widely used UV method is not accurately responsive. Thus, conventional problems of the UV method arising from relatively low sensitivity and selectivity, and absorbance disturbance due to gaseous oxygen evolution were overcome. The catalase findings of the proposed method for tissue homogenates were statistically alike with those of HPLC.

  1. Development of a new catalase activity assay for biological samples using optical CUPRAC sensor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bekdeşer, Burcu; Özyürek, Mustafa; Güçlü, Kubilay; Alkan, Fulya Üstün; Apak, Reşat

    2014-11-01

    A novel catalase activity assay was developed for biological samples (liver and kidney tissue homogenates) using a rapid and low-cost optical sensor-based ‘cupric reducing antioxidant capacity' (CUPRAC) method. The reagent, copper(II)-neocuproine (Cu(II)-Nc) complex, was immobilized onto a cation-exchanger film of Nafion, and the absorbance changes associated with the formation of the highly-colored Cu(I)-Nc chelate as a result of reaction with hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) was measured at 450 nm. When catalase was absent, H2O2 produced the CUPRAC chromophore, whereas catalase, being an effective H2O2 scavenger, completely annihilated the CUPRAC signal due to H2O2. Thus, the CUPRAC absorbance due to H2O2 oxidation concomitant with Cu(I)-Nc formation decreased proportionally with catalase. The developed sensor gave a linear response over a wide concentration range of H2O2 (0.68-78.6 μM). This optical sensor-based method applicable to tissue homogenates proved to be efficient for low hydrogen peroxide concentrations (physiological and nontoxic levels) to which the widely used UV method is not accurately responsive. Thus, conventional problems of the UV method arising from relatively low sensitivity and selectivity, and absorbance disturbance due to gaseous oxygen evolution were overcome. The catalase findings of the proposed method for tissue homogenates were statistically alike with those of HPLC.

  2. Relationship between uptake of mercury vapor by mushrooms and its catalase activity

    SciTech Connect

    Ogata, M.; Kenmotsu, K.; Hirota, N.; Naito, M.

    1981-12-01

    The uptake of mercury vapor by mushrooms (Shiitake) artifically grown on an oak tree and the uptake in vitro by catalase extracts prepared from mushroom Hay Bacillus and spinach are reported. Mushrooms were exposed to 1.4 mg/Hg/cu m for 11 days. Measurement of total mercury was as previously described (Ogata et al. 1978, 1979). Levels in mushrooms ranged from 0.4 +/- 0.1 ..mu..g/g at 0.5 days to 4.6 +/- 0.2 ..mu..g/g at 10.5 days and steady-state thereafter. In in vitro studies Hy uptake by mushroom catalase extract was estimated by the perborate method. Uptake was found to parallel catalase activity and was inhibited by potassium cyanide, sodium azide, and 3-amino-1,2,4-triazole. Similar results were obtained with Hay Bacillus and spinach catalase extracts. Results suggest that the level of mercury in the mushroom can be used as an indicator of mercury pollution in the environment. It is also suggested that catalase has an important role in uptake of mercury vapor in the plant. 2 tables (JMT)

  3. Computational study concerning the effect of some pesticides on the Proteus Mirabilis catalase activity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Isvoran, Adriana

    2016-03-01

    Assessment of the effects of the herbicides nicosulfuron and chlorsulfuron and the fungicides difenoconazole and drazoxlone upon catalase produced by soil microorganism Proteus mirabilis is performed using the molecular docking technique. The interactions of pesticides with the enzymes are predicted using SwissDock and PatchDock docking tools. There are correlations for predicted binding energy values for enzyme-pesticide complexes obtained using the two docking tools, all the considered pesticides revealing favorable binding to the enzyme, but only the herbicides bind to the catalytic site. These results suggest the inhibitory potential of chlorsulfuron and nicosulfuron on the catalase activity in soil.

  4. Direct evidence for catalase and peroxidase activities of ferritin-platinum nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Fan, Jia; Yin, Jun-Jie; Ning, Bo; Wu, Xiaochun; Hu, Ye; Ferrari, Mauro; Anderson, Gregory J; Wei, Jingyan; Zhao, Yuliang; Nie, Guangjun

    2011-02-01

    Using apoferritin (apoFt) as a nucleation substrate, we have successfully synthesized 1-2 nm platinum nanoparticles (Pt-Ft) which are highly stable. By directly measuring the products of Pt-Ft-catalyzed reactions, we showed, with no doubt, Pt-Ft possesses both catalase and peroxidase activities. With hydrogen peroxide as substrate, we observed oxygen gas bubbles were generated from hydrogen peroxide decomposed by Pt-Ft; the generation of oxygen gas strongly supports Pt-Ft reacts as catalase, other than peroxidase. While with organic dyes and hydrogen peroxide as substrates, distinctive color products were formed catalyzed by Pt-Ft, which indicates a peroxidase-like activity. Interestingly, these biomimetic properties showed differential response to pH and temperature for different reaction substrates. Pt-Ft showed a significant increase in catalase activity with increasing pH and temperature. The HRP-like activity of Pt-Ft was optimal at physiological temperature and slightly acidic conditions. Our current study demonstrates that Pt-Ft possesses both catalase and peroxidase activities for different substrates under different conditions.

  5. Cats

    MedlinePlus

    ... Patients Infants and Young Children Publications & Materials Announcements Cats Recommend on Facebook Tweet Share Compartir Overview Diseases ... hand washing whenever you play or work with cats Wash your hands with soap and running water ...

  6. The effect of melatonin on lipid peroxidation and nitrite/nitrate levels, and on superoxide dismutase and catalase activities in kainic acid-induced injury.

    PubMed

    Akcay, Yasemin Delen; Yalcin, Ayfer; Sozmen, Eser Yildirim

    2005-01-01

    Kainic acid (KA) initiates neuronal injury and death by inducing oxidative stress and nitric oxide release from various regions of the brain. It was recently shown that melatonin has free radical-scavenging action and may protect against kainate-induced toxicity. In order to assess the possible supportive effect of melatonin treatment in KA-induced injury in the rat brain cortex, we determined malondialdehyde (MDA) levels as an index of lipid peroxidation, and assessed the activities of catalase (CAT) and superoxide dismutase (SOD) and the levels of nitrite/nitrate 35 male rats were divided into five groups, each receiving a different intraperitoneal treatment: saline solution (0.2 ml), kainic acid (15 mg/kg), melatonin (20 mg/kg), KA then melatonin (each as above, 15 min apart), or melatonin then KA (each as above, 30 min apart). Administration of KA caused an about five-fold increase in the catalase activity and an increase in the SOD activity in the cortex relative to the activities for the controls. Treatment with melatonin 15 min after KA injection kept malondialdehyde levels and catalase and superoxide dismutase activities at the normal levels, and led to an increase in the levels of nitrite/nitrate. Our data suggests that melatonin treatment following KA administration has a protective effect on antioxidant enzyme activities and thus supports the role of melatonin and oxidative stress in the regulation of antioxidative enzyme activity.

  7. Structure, recombinant expression and mutagenesis studies of the catalase with oxidase activity from Scytalidium thermophilum.

    PubMed

    Yuzugullu, Yonca; Trinh, Chi H; Smith, Mark A; Pearson, Arwen R; Phillips, Simon E V; Sutay Kocabas, Didem; Bakir, Ufuk; Ogel, Zumrut B; McPherson, Michael J

    2013-03-01

    Scytalidium thermophilum produces a catalase with phenol oxidase activity (CATPO) that catalyses the decomposition of hydrogen peroxide into oxygen and water and also oxidizes various phenolic compounds. A codon-optimized catpo gene was cloned and expressed in Escherichia coli. The crystal structures of native and recombinant S. thermophilum CATPO and two variants, H82N and V123F, were determined at resolutions of 2.7, 1.4, 1.5 and 1.9 Å, respectively. The structure of CATPO reveals a homotetramer with 698 residues per subunit and with strong structural similarity to Penicillium vitale catalase. The haem component is cis-hydroxychlorin γ-spirolactone, which is rotated 180° with respect to small-subunit catalases. The haem-binding pocket contains two highly conserved water molecules on the distal side. The H82N mutation resulted in conversion of the native d-type haem to a b-type haem. Kinetic studies of the H82N and V123F mutants indicate that both activities are likely to be associated with the haem centre and suggest that the secondary oxidase activity may be a general feature of catalases in the absence of hydrogen peroxide.

  8. Catalase activity prevents exercise-induced up-regulation of vasoprotective proteins in venous tissue.

    PubMed

    Dao, Vu Thao-Vi; Floeren, Melanie; Kumpf, Stephanie; Both, Charlotte; Peter, Bärbel; Balz, Vera; Suvorava, Tatsiana; Kojda, Georg

    2011-11-01

    Physical activity induces favourable changes of arterial gene expression and protein activity, although little is known about its effect in venous tissue. Although our understanding of the initiating molecular signals is still incomplete, increased expression of endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS) is considered a key event. This study sought to investigate the effects of two different training protocols on the expression of eNOS and extracellular superoxide dismutase (ecSOD) in venous and lung tissue and to evaluate the underlying molecular mechanisms. C57Bl/6 mice underwent voluntary exercise or forced physical activity. Changes of vascular mRNA and protein levels and activity of eNOS, ecSOD and catalase were determined in aorta, heart, lung and vena cava. Both training protocols similarly increased relative heart weight and resulted in up-regulation of aortic and myocardial eNOS. In striking contrast, eNOS expression in vena cava and lung remained unchanged. Likewise, exercise up-regulated ecSOD in the aorta and in left ventricular tissue but remained unchanged in lung tissue. Catalase expression in lung tissue and vena cava of exercised mice exceeded that in aorta by 6.9- and 10-fold, respectively, suggesting a lack of stimulatory effects of hydrogen peroxide. In accordance, treatment of mice with the catalase inhibitor aminotriazole for 6 weeks resulted in significant up-regulation of eNOS and ecSOD in vena cava. These data suggest that physiological venous catalase activity prevents exercise-induced up-regulation of eNOS and ecSOD. Furthermore, therapeutic inhibition of vascular catalase might improve pulmonary rehabilitation.

  9. Hydrogen peroxide homeostasis: activation of plant catalase by calcium/calmodulin

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yang, T.; Poovaiah, B. W.

    2002-01-01

    Environmental stimuli such as UV, pathogen attack, and gravity can induce rapid changes in hydrogen peroxide (H(2)O(2)) levels, leading to a variety of physiological responses in plants. Catalase, which is involved in the degradation of H(2)O(2) into water and oxygen, is the major H(2)O(2)-scavenging enzyme in all aerobic organisms. A close interaction exists between intracellular H(2)O(2) and cytosolic calcium in response to biotic and abiotic stresses. Studies indicate that an increase in cytosolic calcium boosts the generation of H(2)O(2). Here we report that calmodulin (CaM), a ubiquitous calcium-binding protein, binds to and activates some plant catalases in the presence of calcium, but calcium/CaM does not have any effect on bacterial, fungal, bovine, or human catalase. These results document that calcium/CaM can down-regulate H(2)O(2) levels in plants by stimulating the catalytic activity of plant catalase. Furthermore, these results provide evidence indicating that calcium has dual functions in regulating H(2)O(2) homeostasis, which in turn influences redox signaling in response to environmental signals in plants.

  10. Lead-induced catalase activity differentially modulates behaviors induced by short-chain alcohols.

    PubMed

    Correa, M; Pascual, M; Sanchis-Segura, C; Guerri, C; Aragon, C M G

    2005-11-01

    Acute lead administration produces a transient increase in brain catalase activity. This effect of lead has been used to assess the involvement of brain ethanol metabolism, and therefore centrally formed acetaldehyde, in the behavioral actions of ethanol. In mice, catalase is involved in ethanol and methanol metabolism, but not in the metabolism of other alcohols such as 1-propanol or tert-butanol. In the present study, we assessed the specificity of the effects of lead acetate on catalase-mediated metabolism of alcohols, and the ability of lead to modulate the locomotion and loss of the righting reflex (LRR) induced by 4 different short-chain alcohols. Animals were pretreated i.p. with lead acetate (100 mg/kg) or saline, and 7 days later were injected i.p. with ethanol (2.5 or 4.5 g/kg), methanol (2.5 or 6.0 g/kg), 1-propanol (0.5 or 2.5 g/kg) or tert-butanol (0.5 or 2.0 g/kg) for locomotion and LRR, respectively. Locomotion induced by ethanol was significantly potentiated in lead-treated mice, while methanol-induced locomotion was reduced by lead treatment. The loss of righting reflex induced by ethanol was shorter in lead-treated mice, and lead produced the opposite effect in methanol-treated mice. There was no effect of lead on 1-propanol or tert-butanol-induced behaviors. Lead treatment was effective in inducing catalase activity and protein both in liver and brain. These results support the hypothesis that the effects of lead treatment on ethanol-induced behaviors are related to changes in catalase activity, rather than some nonspecific effect that generalizes to all alcohols.

  11. Structure–Function Relationships in Fungal Large-Subunit Catalases

    SciTech Connect

    Diaz, A.; Valdez, V; Rudino-Pinera, E; Horjales, E; Hansberg, W

    2009-01-01

    Neurospora crassa has two large-subunit catalases, CAT-1 and CAT-3. CAT-1 is associated with non-growing cells and accumulates particularly in asexual spores; CAT-3 is associated with growing cells and is induced under different stress conditions. It is our interest to elucidate the structure-function relationships in large-subunit catalases. Here we have determined the CAT-3 crystal structure and compared it with the previously determined CAT-1 structure. Similar to CAT-1, CAT-3 hydrogen peroxide (H{sub 2}O{sub 2}) saturation kinetics exhibited two components, consistent with the existence of two active sites: one saturated in the millimolar range and the other in the molar range. In the CAT-1 structure, we found three interesting features related to its unusual kinetics: (a) a constriction in the channel that conveys H{sub 2}O{sub 2} to the active site; (b) a covalent bond between the tyrosine, which forms the fifth coordination bound to the iron of the heme, and a vicinal cysteine; (c) oxidation of the pyrrole ring III to form a cis-hydroxyl group in C5 and a cis-{gamma}-spirolactone in C6. The site of heme oxidation marks the starts of the central channel that communicates to the central cavity and the shortest way products can exit the active site. CAT-3 has a similar constriction in its major channel, which could function as a gating system regulated by the H{sub 2}O{sub 2} concentration before the gate. CAT-3 functional tyrosine is not covalently bonded, but has instead the electron relay mechanism described for the human catalase to divert electrons from it. Pyrrole ring III in CAT-3 is not oxidized as it is in other large-subunit catalases whose structure has been determined. Different in CAT-3 from these enzymes is an occupied central cavity. Results presented here indicate that CAT-3 and CAT-1 enzymes represent a functional group of catalases with distinctive structural characteristics that determine similar kinetics.

  12. KatB, a cyanobacterial Mn-catalase with unique active site configuration: Implications for enzyme function.

    PubMed

    Bihani, Subhash C; Chakravarty, Dhiman; Ballal, Anand

    2016-04-01

    Manganese catalases (Mn-catalases), a class of H2O2 detoxifying proteins, are structurally and mechanistically distinct from the commonly occurring catalases, which contain heme. Active site of Mn-catalases can serve as template for the synthesis of catalase mimetics for therapeutic intervention in oxidative stress related disorders. However, unlike the heme catalases, structural aspects of Mn-catalases remain inadequately explored. The genome of the ancient cyanobacterium Anabaena PCC7120, shows the presence of two Mn-catalases, KatA and KatB. Here, we report the biochemical and structural characterization of KatB. The KatB protein (with a C-terminal his-tag) was over-expressed in Escherichia coli and purified by affinity chromatography. On the addition of Mn(2+) to the E. coli growth medium, a substantial increase in production of the soluble KatB protein was observed. The purified KatB protein was an efficient catalase, which was relatively insensitive to inhibition by azide. Crystal structure of KatB showed a hexameric assembly with four-helix bundle fold, characteristic of the Ferritin-like superfamily. With canonical Glu4His2 coordination geometry and two terminal water ligands, the KatB active site was distinctly different from that of other Mn-catalases. Interestingly, the KatB active site closely resembled the active sites of ruberythrin/bacterioferritin, bi-iron members of the Ferritin-like superfamily. The KatB crystal structure provided fundamental insights into the evolutionary relationship within the Ferritin-like superfamily and further showed that Mn-catalases can be sub-divided into two groups, each with a distinct active site configuration.

  13. Catalase evolved to concentrate H2O2 at its active site.

    PubMed

    Domínguez, Laura; Sosa-Peinado, Alejandro; Hansberg, Wilhelm

    2010-08-01

    Catalase is a homo-tetrameric enzyme that has its heme active site deeply buried inside the protein. Its only substrate, hydrogen peroxide (H2O2), reaches the heme through a 45 A-long channel. Large-subunit catalases, but not small-subunit catalases, have a loop (gate loop) that interrupts the major channel. Two accesses lead to a gate that opens the final section of the channel to the heme; gates from the R-related subunits are interconnected. Using molecular dynamic simulations of the Neurospora crassa catalase-1 tetramer in a box of water (48,600 molecules) or 6M H2O2, it is shown that the number of H2O2 molecules augments at the surface of the protein and in the accesses to the gate and the final section of the channel. Increase in H2O2 is due to the prevalence and distribution of amino acids that have an increased residency for H2O2 (mainly histidine, proline and charged residues), which are localized at the protein surface and the accesses to the gate. In the section of the channel from the heme to the gate, turnover rate of water molecules was faster than for H2O2 and increased residence sites for water and H2O2 were determined. In the presence of H2O2, the exclusion of water molecules from a specific site suggests a mechanism that could contend with the competing activity of water, allowing for catalase high kinetic efficiency.

  14. Reactions of the class II peroxidases, lignin peroxidase and Arthromyces ramosus peroxidase, with hydrogen peroxide. Catalase-like activity, compound III formation, and enzyme inactivation.

    PubMed

    Hiner, Alexander N P; Hernández-Ruiz, Josefa; Rodríguez-López, José Neptuno; García-Cánovas, Francisco; Brisset, Nigel C; Smith, Andrew T; Arnao, Marino B; Acosta, Manuel

    2002-07-26

    The reactions of the fungal enzymes Arthromyces ramosus peroxidase (ARP) and Phanerochaete chrysosporium lignin peroxidase (LiP) with hydrogen peroxide (H(2)O(2)) have been studied. Both enzymes exhibited catalase activity with hyperbolic H(2)O(2) concentration dependence (K(m) approximately 8-10 mm, k(cat) approximately 1-3 s(-1)). The catalase and peroxidase activities of LiP were inhibited within 10 min and those of ARP in 1 h. The inactivation constants were calculated using two independent methods; LiP, k(i) approximately 19 x 10(-3) s(-1); ARP, k(i) approximately 1.6 x 10(-3) s(-1). Compound III (oxyperoxidase) was detected as the majority species after the addition of H(2)O(2) to LiP or ARP, and its formation was accompanied by loss of enzyme activity. A reaction scheme is presented which rationalizes the turnover and inactivation of LiP and ARP with H(2)O(2). A similar model is applicable to horseradish peroxidase. The scheme links catalase and compound III forming catalytic pathways and inactivation at the level of the [compound I.H(2)O(2)] complex. Inactivation does not occur from compound III. All peroxidases studied to date are sensitive to inactivation by H(2)O(2), and it is suggested that the model will be generally applicable to peroxidases of the plant, fungal, and prokaryotic superfamily.

  15. Salicylic acid is a modulator of catalase isozymes in chickpea plants infected with Fusarium oxysporum f. sp. ciceri.

    PubMed

    Gayatridevi, S; Jayalakshmi, S K; Sreeramulu, K

    2012-03-01

    The relationship between salicylic acid level catalases isoforms chickpea cv. ICCV-10 infected with Fusarium oxysporum f. sp. ciceri was investigated. Pathogen-treated chickpea plants showed high levels of SA compared with the control. Two isoforms of catalases in shoot extract (CAT-IS and CAT-IIS) and single isoform in root extract (CAT-R) were detected in chickpea. CAT-IS and CAT-R activities were inhibited in respective extracts treated with pathogen whereas, CAT-IIS activity was not inhibited. These isoforms were purified and their kinetic properties studied in the presence or absence of SA. The molecular mass determined by SDS-PAGE of CAT-IS, CAT-IIS and CAT-R was found to be 97, 40 and 66 kDa respectively. Kinetic studies indicated that Km and V(max) of CAT-IS were 0.2 mM and 300 U/mg, 0.53 mM and 180 U/mg for CAT-IIS and 0.25 mM and 280 U/mg for CAT-R, respectively. CAT-IS and CAT-R were found to be more sensitive to SA and 50% of their activities were inhibited at 6 and 4 μM respectively, whereas CAT-IIS was insensitive to SA up to 100 μM. Quenching of the intrinsic tryptophan fluorescence of purified catalases were used to quantitate SA binding; the estimated K(d) value for CAT-IS, CAT-IIS and CAT-R found to be 2.3 μM, 3.1 mM and 2.8 μM respectively. SA is a modulator of catalase isozymes activity, supports its role in establishment of SAR in chickpea plants infected with the pathogen.

  16. Growth, toxin production, active oxygen species and catalase activity of Microcystis aeruginosa (Cyanophyceae) exposed to temperature stress.

    PubMed

    Giannuzzi, Leda; Krock, Bernd; Minaglia, Melina Celeste Crettaz; Rosso, Lorena; Houghton, Christian; Sedan, Daniela; Malanga, Gabriela; Espinosa, Mariela; Andrinolo, Darío; Hernando, Marcelo

    2016-11-01

    Microcystis are known for their potential ability to synthesize toxins, mainly microcystins (MCs). In order to evaluate the effects of temperature on chlorophyll a (Chl a), growth, physiological responses and toxin production of a native Microcystis aeruginosa, we exposed the cells to low (23°C) and high (29°C) temperature in addition to a 26°C control treatment. Exponential growth rate was significantly higher at 29°C compared to 23°C and control, reaching 0.43, 0.32 and 0.33day(-)(1) respectively. In addition, there was a delay of the start of exponential growth at 23°C. However, the intracellular concentration of Chl a decreased significantly due to temperature change. A significant increase in intracellular ROS was observed in coincidence with the activation of enzymatic antioxidant catalase (CAT) during the first two days of exposure to 23° and 29°C in comparison to the control experiment, decreasing thereafter to nearly initial values. Five MCs were determined by LC-MS/MS analysis. In the experiments, the highest MC concentration, 205fg [Leu(1)] MC-LR.cell(-1) expressed as MC-LR equivalent was measured in the beginning of the experiment and subsequently declined to 160fg.cell(-1) on day 2 and 70fg.cell(-1) on day 4 in cells exposed to 29°C. The same trend was observed for all other MCs except for the least abundant MC-LR which showed a continuous increase during exposure time. Our results suggest a high ability of M. aeruginosa to perceive ROS and to rapidly initiate antioxidant defenses with a differential response on MC production.

  17. Catalase overexpression reduces the germination time and increases the pathogenicity of the fungus Metarhizium anisopliae.

    PubMed

    Morales Hernandez, Claudia Erika; Padilla Guerrero, Israel Enrique; Gonzalez Hernandez, Gloria Angelica; Salazar Solis, Eduardo; Torres Guzman, Juan Carlos

    2010-07-01

    Catalases and peroxidases are the most important enzymes that degrade hydrogen peroxide into water and oxygen. These enzymes and superoxide dismutase are the first lines of cell defense against reactive oxygen species. Metarhizium anisopliae displays an increase in catalase-peroxidase activity during germination and growth. To determine the importance of catalase during the invasion process of M. anisopliae, we isolated the cat1 gene. cat1 cDNA expression in Escherichia coli and the subsequent purification of the protein confirmed that the cat1 gene codes for a monofunctional catalase. Expression analysis of this gene by RT-PCR from RNA isolated from fungus grown in liquid cultures showed a decrease in the expression level of the cat1 gene during germination and an increase during mycelium growth. The expression of this gene in the fungus during the infection process of the larvae of Plutella xylostella also showed a significant increase during invasive growth. Transgenic strains overexpressing the cat1 gene had twice the catalase activity of the wild-type strain. This increase in catalase activity was accompanied by a higher level of resistance to exogenous hydrogen peroxide and a reduction in the germination time. This improvement was also observed during the infection of P. xylostella larvae. M. anisopliae transgenic strains overexpressing the cat1 gene grew and spread faster in the soft tissue of the insect, reducing the time to death of the insect by 25% and the dose required to kill 50% of the population 14-fold.

  18. Role of phosphate on stability and catalase mimetic activity of cerium oxide nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Singh, Ragini; Singh, Sanjay

    2015-08-01

    Cerium oxide nanoparticles (CeNPs) have been recently shown to scavenge reactive oxygen and nitrogen species (ROS and RNS) in different experimental model systems. CeNPs (3+) and CeNPs (4+) have been shown to exhibit superoxide dismutase (SOD) and catalase mimetic activity, respectively. Due to their nanoscale dimension, CeNPs are expected to interact with the components of biologically relevant buffers and medium, which could alter their catalytic properties. We have demonstrated earlier that CeNPs (3+) interact with phosphate and lose the SOD activity. However, very little is known about the interaction of CeNPs (4+) with the phosphate and other anions, predominantly present in biological buffers and their effects on the catalase mimetic-activity of these nanoparticles. In this study, we report that catalase mimetic-activity of CeNPs (4+) is resistant to the phosphate anions, pH changes and composition of cell culture media. Given the abundance of phosphate anions in the biological system, it is likely that internalized CeNPs would be influenced by cytoplasmic and nucleoplasmic concentration of phosphate.

  19. Changes in gene expression and catalase activity in Oryza sativa L. under abiotic stress.

    PubMed

    Vighi, I L; Benitez, L C; do Amaral, M N; Auler, P A; Moraes, G P; Rodrigues, G S; da Maia, L C; Pinto, L S; Braga, E J B

    2016-11-03

    Different rice (Oryza sativa L.) genotypes were subjected to high salinity and low temperature (150 mM NaCl and 13°C, respectively) for 0, 6, 24, 48, or 72 h. We evaluated the simultaneous expression of the genes OsCATA, OsCATB, and OsCATC, correlated gene expression with enzyme activity, and verified the regulation of these genes through identification of cis-elements in the promoter region. The hydrogen peroxide content increased in a tolerant genotype and decreased in a sensitive genotype under both stress conditions. Lipid peroxidation increased in the tolerant genotype when exposed to cold, and in the sensitive genotype when exposed to high salinity. Catalase activity significantly increased in both genotypes when subjected to 13°C. In the tolerant genotype, OsCATA and OsCATB were the most responsive to high salinity and cold, while in the sensitive genotype, OsCATA and OsCATC responded positively to saline stress, as did OsCATA and OsCATB to low temperature. Cis-element analysis identified different regulatory sequences in the catalase promoter region of each genotype. The sensitive genotype maintained a better balance between hydrogen oxyacid levels, catalase activity, and lipid peroxidation under low temperature than the resistant genotype. OsCATA and OsCATB were the most responsive in the salt-tolerant genotype to cold, OsCATA and OsCATC were the most responsive to saline stress, and OsCATA and OsCATB were the most responsive to chilling stress in the sensitive genotype. There were positive correlations between catalase activity and OsCATB expression in the tolerant genotype under saline stress and in the sensitive genotype under cold stress.

  20. Optimization of permeabilization process of yeast cells for catalase activity using response surface methodology

    PubMed Central

    Trawczyńska, Ilona; Wójcik, Marek

    2015-01-01

    Biotransformation processes accompanied by whole yeast cells as biocatalyst are a promising area of food industry. Among the chemical sanitizers currently used in food technology, hydrogen peroxide is a very effective microbicidal and bleaching agent. In this paper, permeabilization has been applied to Saccharomyces cerevisiae yeast cells aiming at increased intracellular catalase activity for decomposed H2O2. Ethanol, which is non-toxic, biodegradable and easily available, has been used as permeabilization factor. Response surface methodology (RSM) has been applied in determining the influence of different parameters on permeabilization process. The aim of the study was to find such values of the process parameters that would yield maximum activity of catalase during decomposition of hydrogen peroxide. The optimum operating conditions for permeabilization process obtained by RSM were as follows: 53% (v/v) of ethanol concentration, temperature of 14.8 °C and treatment time of 40 min. After permeabilization, the activity of catalase increased ca. 40 times and its maximum value equalled to 4711 U/g. PMID:26019618

  1. Superoxide dismutase and catalase conjugated to polyethylene glycol increases endothelial enzyme activity and oxidant resistance

    SciTech Connect

    Beckman, J.S.; Minor, R.L. Jr.; White, C.W.; Repine, J.E.; Rosen, G.M.; Freeman, B.A.

    1988-05-15

    Covalent conjugation of superoxide dismutase and catalase with polyethylene glycol (PEG) increases the circulatory half-lives of these enzymes from <10 min to 40 h, reduced immunogenicity, and decreases sensitivity to proteolysis. Because PEG has surface active properties and can induce cell fusion, the authors hypothesized that PEG conjugation could enhance cell binding and association of normally membrane-impermeable enzymes. Incubation of cultured porcine aortic endothelial cells with /sup 125/I-PEG-catalase or /sup 125/I-PEG-superoxide dismutase produced a linear, concentration-dependent increase in cellular enzyme activity and radioactivity. Fluorescently labeled PEG-superoxide dismutase incubated with endothelial cells showed a vesicular localization. Mechanical injury to cell monolayers, which is known to stimulate endocytosis, further increased the uptake of fluorescent PEG-superoxide dismutase. Addition of PEG and PEG-conjugated enzymes perturbed the spin-label binding environment, indicative of producing an increase in plasma membrane fluidity. Thus, PEG conjugation to superoxide dismutase and catalase enhances cell association of these enzymes in a manner which increases cellular enzyme activities and provides prolonged protection from partially reduced oxygen species.

  2. Changes in ascorbate peroxidase, catalase, guaiacol peroxidase and superoxide dismutase activities in common bean (Phaseolus vulgaris) nodules under salt stress.

    PubMed

    Jebara, Salwa; Jebara, Moez; Limam, Férid; Aouani, Mohamed Elarbi

    2005-08-01

    To analyse nodular antioxidant enzyme expression in response to salt stress, Phaseolus vulgaris genotype BAT477 was inoculated with reference strain CIAT899, and treated with 50 mM NaCl. Plant growth, nodulation and nitrogen fixing activity were analysed. Results showed that: (1) all parameters, particularly in nodules, were affected by salt treatments, and (2) confirmed preferential growth allocation to roots. The ARA was significantly decreased by salt treatments. Protein dosage confirmed that nodules were more affected by salt treatment than were roots. We analysed superoxide dismutase, catalase, ascorbate peroxidase and peroxidase in nodules, roots and a free rhizobial strain. Our results indicated that SOD and CAT nodular isozymes had bacterial and root origins. The SOD expressed the same CuZn, Fe and Mn SOD isoforms in nodules and roots, whereas in free rhizobia we found only one Fe and Mn SOD. APX and POX nodule and root profiles had only root origins, as no rhizobial band was detected. Under salt stress, plant growth, nitrogen fixation and activities of antioxidant defense enzymes in nodules were affected. Thus, these enzymes appear to preserve symbiosis from stress turned out that NaCl salinity lead to a differential regulation of distinct SOD and POX isoenzyme. So their levels in nodules appeared to be consistent with a symbiotic nitrogen fixing efficiency hypothesis, and they seem to function as the molecular mechanisms underlying the nodule response to salinity.

  3. Plasma matrix metalloproteinase-9 activity in cats with lymphoma.

    PubMed

    Tamamoto, T; Ohno, K; Takahashi, M; Fukushima, K; Kanemoto, H; Fujino, Y; Tsujimoto, H

    2017-03-01

    In this study, plasma MMP-9 activity was evaluated in cats with lymphoma. Plasma samples were obtained from 26 cats with lymphoma before treatment. From 13 of the included 26 cats, plasma samples were obtained 4 weeks after the initiation of treatment. Plasma samples were also obtained from 10 healthy cats as a control. Plasma MMP-9 activity was examined by gelatin zymography and semi-quantitative value (arbitrary unit; a.u.) for each sample was calculated. Relatively high levels of MMP-9 were observed in cats with lymphoma compared with those in healthy control cats. MMP-9 quantification through zymography showed significantly higher activity in cats with lymphoma (median, 0.63 a.u.; range, 0.23-3.24 a.u.) than in healthy controls (0.22 a.u.; 0.12-0.46 a.u.; P < 0.01). MMP-9 activities were significantly different before (0.73 a.u.; 0.30-3.24 a.u.) and after treatment (0.50 a.u.; 0.14-1.32 a.u.; P = 0.017). Measuring plasma MMP-9 activity in cats with lymphoma may become an appropriate monitoring tool for feline lymphoma.

  4. A Laboratory Experiment Investigating Different Aspects of Catalase Activity in an Inquiry - Based Approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kimbrough, Doris R.; Magoun, Mary Ann; Langfur, Meg

    1997-02-01

    The action of the enzyme catalase on aqueous hydrogen peroxide to generate oxygen gas is a well-established demonstration (1-3). Catalase is typically obtained by aqueous extraction of a potato, and the potato extract is mixed together with 3% hydrogen peroxide. The oxygen that is produced can be collected over water. Variations on the procedure can demonstrate the dependence of catalytic activity on temperature or the presence of inhibitors (1, 2). The University of Colorado at Denver has used a version of this procedure as a laboratory in its second-semester course for nonmajors. Recently, students have been allowed to expand upon the procedures prescribed in the laboratory handout in an open-ended project format. We explored some of these variations in detail, and the results provided here offer ideas, centered around this laboratory, for open-ended projects that can be used in an inquiry-based approach.

  5. Imbalance in SOD/CAT activities in rat skeletal muscles submitted to treadmill training exercise.

    PubMed

    Pinho, Ricardo A; Andrades, Michael E; Oliveira, Marcos R; Pirola, Aline C; Zago, Morgana S; Silveira, Paulo C L; Dal-Pizzol, Felipe; Moreira, José Cláudio F

    2006-10-01

    The association between physical exercise and oxidative damage in the skeletal musculature has been the focus of many studies in literature, but the balance between superoxide dismutase and catalase activities and its relation to oxidative damage is not well established. Thus, the aim of the present study was to investigate the association between regular treadmill physical exercise, oxidative damage and antioxidant defenses in skeletal muscle of rats. Fifteen male Wistar rats (8-12 months) were randomly separated into two groups (trained n=9 and untrained n=6). Trained rats were treadmill-trained for 12 weeks in progressive exercise (velocity, time, and inclination). Training program consisted in a progressive exercise (10 m/min without inclination for 10 min/day). After 1 week the speed, time and inclination were gradually increased until 17 m/min at 10% for 50 min/day. After the training period animals were killed, and gastrocnemius and quadriceps were surgically removed to the determination of biochemical parameters. Lipid peroxidation, protein oxidative damage, catalase, superoxide dismutase and citrate synthase activities, and muscular glycogen content were measured in the isolated muscles. We demonstrated that there is a different modulation of CAT and SOD in skeletal muscle in trained rats when compared to untrained rats (increased SOD/CAT ratio). TBARS levels were significantly decreased and, in contrast, a significant increase in protein carbonylation was observed. These results suggest a non-described adaptation of skeletal muscle against exercise-induced oxidative stress.

  6. Formation of chloroplast protrusions and catalase activity in alpine Ranunculus glacialis under elevated temperature and different CO2/O2 ratios.

    PubMed

    Buchner, Othmar; Moser, Tim; Karadar, Matthias; Roach, Thomas; Kranner, Ilse; Holzinger, Andreas

    2015-11-01

    Chloroplast protrusions (CPs) have frequently been observed in plants, but their significance to plant metabolism remains largely unknown. We investigated in the alpine plant Ranunculus glacialis L. treated under various CO2 concentrations if CP formation is related to photorespiration, specifically focusing on hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) metabolism. Immediately after exposure to different CO2 concentrations, the formation of CPs in leaf mesophyll cells was assessed and correlated to catalase (CAT) and ascorbate peroxidase (APX) activities. Under natural irradiation, the relative proportion of chloroplasts with protrusions (rCP) was highest (58.7 %) after exposure to low CO2 (38 ppm) and was lowest (3.0 %) at high CO2 (10,000 ppm). The same relationship was found for CAT activity, which decreased from 34.7 nkat mg(-1) DW under low CO2 to 18.4 nkat mg(-1) DW under high CO2, while APX activity did not change significantly. When exposed to natural CO2 concentration (380 ppm) in darkness, CP formation was significantly lower (18.2 %) compared to natural solar irradiation (41.3 %). In summary, CP formation and CAT activity are significantly increased under conditions that favour photorespiration, while in darkness or at high CO2 concentration under light, CP formation is significantly lower, providing evidence for an association between CPs and photorespiration.

  7. Disruption of AtWNK8 enhances tolerance of Arabidopsis to salt and osmotic stresses via modulating proline content and activities of catalase and peroxidase.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Baige; Liu, Kaidong; Zheng, Yan; Wang, Yingxiang; Wang, Jinxiang; Liao, Hong

    2013-03-27

    With no lysine kinases (WNKs) play important roles in plant growth and development. However, its role in salt and osmotic stress tolerance is unclear. Here, we report that AtWNK8 is mainly expressed in primary root, hypocotyl, stamen and pistil and is induced by NaCl and sorbitol treatment. Compared to the wild-type, the T-DNA knock-out wnk8 mutant was more tolerant to severe salinity and osmotic stresses, as indicated by 27% and 198% more fresh weight in the NaCl and sorbitol treatment, respectively. The wnk8 mutant also accumulated 1.43-fold more proline than the wild-type in the sorbitol treatment. Under NaCl and sorbitol stresses, catalase (CAT) activity in wnk8 mutant was 1.92- and 3.7-times of that in Col-0, respectively. Similarly, under salt and osmotic stress conditions, peroxidase (POD) activities in wnk8 mutant were 1.81- and 1.58-times of that in Col-0, respectively. Taken together, we revealed that maintaining higher CAT and POD activities might be one of the reasons that the disruption of AtWNK8 enhances the tolerance to salt stress, and accumulating more proline and higher activities of CAT and POD might result in the higher tolerance of WNK8 to osmotic stress.

  8. CXCL12 protects pancreatic β-cells from oxidative stress by a Nrf2-induced increase in catalase expression and activity

    PubMed Central

    DINIĆ, Svetlana; GRDOVIĆ, Nevena; USKOKOVIĆ, Aleksandra; ĐORĐEVIĆ, Miloš; MIHAILOVIĆ, Mirjana; JOVANOVIĆ, Jelena Arambašić; POZNANOVIĆ, Goran; VIDAKOVIĆ, Melita

    2016-01-01

    Due to intrinsically low levels of antioxidant enzyme expression and activity, insulin producing pancreatic β-cells are particularly susceptible to free radical attack. In diabetes mellitus, which is accompanied by high levels of oxidative stress, this feature of β-cells significantly contributes to their damage and dysfunction. In light of the documented pro-survival effect of chemokine C-X-C Ligand 12 (CXCL12) on pancreatic β-cells, we examined its potential role in antioxidant protection. We report that CXCL12 overexpression enhanced the resistance of rat insulinoma (Rin-5F) and primary pancreatic islet cells to hydrogen peroxide (H2O2). CXCL12 lowered the levels of DNA damage and lipid peroxidation and preserved insulin expression. This effect was mediated through an increase in catalase (CAT) activity. By activating downstream p38, Akt and ERK kinases, CXCL12 facilitated Nrf2 nuclear translocation and enhanced its binding to the CAT gene promoter, inducing constitutive CAT expression and activity that was essential for protecting β-cells from H2O2. PMID:27840391

  9. Erythrocyte superoxide dismutase, glutathione peroxidase, and catalase activities and risk of coronary heart disease in generally healthy women: a prospective study.

    PubMed

    Yang, Shuman; Jensen, Majken K; Rimm, Eric B; Willett, Walter; Wu, Tianying

    2014-11-01

    Erythrocyte antioxidant enzymes are major circulating antioxidant enzymes in the oxidative stress defense system. Few prospective studies have assessed the association between these enzymes and the risk of coronary heart disease (CHD) in generally healthy adults. We conducted a prospective nested case-control study of CHD among 32,826 women at baseline with 15 years of follow-up from 1989 to 2004 in the Nurses' Health Study. We investigated the association of baseline erythrocyte superoxide dismutase (SOD), glutathione peroxidase (GPx), and catalase (CAT) activities with the risk of CHD. A total of 365 cases and 728 controls were included in the analysis. Overall, the relative risks of CHD associated with 1-standard deviation higher SOD, GPx, and CAT activities were 1.07 (95% confidence interval (CI): 0.94, 1.22), 1.04 (95% CI: 0.91, 1.18), and 1.04 (95% CI: 0.92, 1.17), respectively. Multivariable adjustments did not change the associations appreciably. Fasting status did not modify the associations, with the exception that SOD activity was positively associated with the risk of CHD among participants who provided blood samples within 12 hours of fasting. Overall, activities of SOD, GPx, and CAT were not associated with CHD among women who were generally healthy at the time of blood collection.

  10. Murine and human b locus pigmentation genes encode a glycoprotein (gp75) with catalase activity

    SciTech Connect

    Halaban, R.; Moellmann, G. )

    1990-06-01

    Melanogenesis is regulated in large part by tyrosinase, and defective tyrosinase leads to albinism. The mechanisms for other pigmentation determinants (e.g., those operative in tyrosinase-positive albinism and in murine coat-color mutants) are not yet known. One murine pigmentation gene, the brown (b) locus, when mutated leads to a brown (b/b) or hypopigmentated (B{sup lt}/B{sup lt}) coat versus the wild-type black (B/B). The authors show that the b locus codes for a glycoprotein with the activity of a catalase (catalase B). Only the c locus protein is a tyrosinase. Because peroxides may be by-products of melanogenic activity and hydrogen peroxide in particular is known to destroy melanin precursors and melanin, they conclude that pigmentation is controlled not only by tyrosinase but also by a hydroperoxidase. The studies indicate that catalase B is identical with gp75, a known human melanosomal glycoprotein; that the b mutation is in a heme-associated domain; and that the B{sup lt} mutation renders the protein susceptible to rapid proteolytic degradation.

  11. Cytoplasmic superoxide dismutase and catalase activity and resistance to radiation lethality in murine tumor cells

    SciTech Connect

    Davy, C.A.; Tesfay, Z.; Jones, J.; Rosenberg, R.C.; McCarthy, C.; Rosenberg, S.O.

    1986-05-01

    Reduced species of molecular oxygen are produced by the interaction of ionizing radiation with aqueous solutions containing molecular oxygen. The enzymes catalase and superoxide dismutase (SOD) are thought to function in vivo as scavengers of metabolically produced peroxide and superoxide respectively. SOD has been shown to protect against the lethal effects of ionizing radiation in vitro and in vivo. The authors have investigated the relationship between the cytosolic SOD catalase content and the sensitivity to radiation lethality of a number of murine cell lines (402AX, EL-4, MB-2T3, MB-4, MEL, P-815, SAI, SP-2, and SV-3T3). K/sub i/(CN/sup -/) for murine Cu-Zn-SOD was determined to be 6.8 x 10/sup -6/ M. No cytosolic Mn-SOD activity was found in any of the cell lines studied. No correlation was found between the cytosolic Cu-Zn-SOD or cytosolic catalase activity and the resistance to radiation lethality or the murine cell lines studied.

  12. Adenosine deaminase, 5'-nucleotidase, xanthine oxidase, superoxide dismutase, and catalase activities in gastric juices from patients with gastric cancer, ulcer, and atrophic gastritis.

    PubMed

    Durak, I; Ormeci, N; Akyol, O; Canbolat, O; Kavutçu, M; Bülbül, M

    1994-04-01

    Adenosine deaminase (ADA), 5'-Nucleotidase (5NT), Xanthine oxidase (XO), Cu-Zn Superoxide dismutase (SOD) and Catalase (CAT) activities were determined in gastric juices from patients with gastric cancer, ulcer, gastritis and from healthy subjects. Enzyme activities were given as units per ml gastric juice and units per mg protein in gastric juice. ADA, 5NT and XO activities were found lower and protein concentrations were found higher in the cancer group than controls. There was however no significant difference between Cu-Zn SOD activities of the cancer and control groups. In all groups including control one, we could not find catalase activities in most of the samples. On the other hand, ADA, 5NT activities and protein concentrations in the gastric juice were lower in the gastritis group than control group. In the ulcer group, we found higher Cu-Zn SOD and XO activities and lower 5NT activity and protein concentrations compared with control values. In an attempt to establish statistical correlations between mean enzyme activities, pH and protein concentrations in the gastric juices of the groups, we found noticeable intra and inter-correlations, which indicated possible relations between DNA and free radical metabolizing enzymes.

  13. Resonance scattering spectral detection of catalase activity using Au@Ag nanoparticle as probe and coupling catalase catalytic reaction with Fenton reaction.

    PubMed

    Liang, Aihui; Liang, Yueyuan; Jiang, Zhiliang; Jiang, Hesheng

    2009-11-01

    The Au(core)Ag(shell) (Au@Ag) nanoparticles in size of 30 nm were prepared using 10 nm gold nanoparticles as seeds at 90 degrees C, and were purified by high-speed centrifugation to remove the excess trisodium citrate to obtain Au@Ag nanoprobe. In the medium of pH 4.0 acetate buffer solution--7.2 micromol/L H2O2--67 micromol/L Fe(II), Au@Ag nanoparticles exhibited a resonance scattering (RS) peak at 538 nm. Upon addition of Catalase (Ct), the system produced hydroxyl radical that oxidized the Au@Ag nanoprobe to form the AuAg nanoparticles with partly bare nanogold. Those AuAg nanoparticles aggregated to large nanoclusters that led to the RS peak wavelength red-shift and its RS peak intensity enhanced. The catalase activity (C) is linear to the enhanced RS intensity (DeltaI) in the range of 6 to 2,800 U/L, with regression equation of DeltaI = 0.168 C-0.2, the correlation coefficient of 0.9952, and detection limit of 2.8 U/L. This method was applied to the detection of serum samples, and the results were agreement with that of the spectrophotometry. A new catalytic mechanism of catalase was proposed with oxywater principle that was agreement with the results of resonance scattering spectroscopy, absorption spectrophotometry, transmission electron microscopy and laser scattering.

  14. Orally supplemented catechin increases heme amounts and catalase activities in rat heart blood mitochondria: a comparison between middle-aged and young rats.

    PubMed

    Cueno, Marni E; Tamura, Muneaki; Imai, Kenichi; Ochiai, Kuniyasu

    2013-11-01

    Orally-administered catechin has long been known to have several beneficial effects on the mammalian host, however, the effects of orally supplemented catechin on the host through gingival tissues have not yet been established. Here, we elucidated the effects of orally supplemented catechin in the rat heart blood mitochondria. We used middle-aged (40 week-old) and young (4 week-old) rats throughout the study. We indirectly verified blood serum catechin levels by measuring O-methyl catechin derivatives using HPLC. Interestingly, we observed higher blood serum O-methyl levels in middle-aged rats as compared to young rats. Subsequently, we isolated blood mitochondria, verified its purity, and measured heme, hydrogen peroxide, and catalase (CAT) levels. We found that catechin induces an increase in blood mitochondrial heme amounts and is associated with an increase in blood mitochondrial CAT activity which is surprisingly higher in middle-aged rats as compared to young rats. This would imply that orally supplemented catechin induces heme increase that preferentially favours CAT activity and is more beneficial to the middle-aged rats.

  15. Investigating catalase activity through hydrogen peroxide decomposition by bacteria biofilms in real time using scanning electrochemical microscopy.

    PubMed

    Abucayon, Erwin; Ke, Neng; Cornut, Renaud; Patelunas, Anthony; Miller, Douglas; Nishiguchi, Michele K; Zoski, Cynthia G

    2014-01-07

    Catalase activity through hydrogen peroxide decomposition in a 1 mM bulk solution above Vibrio fischeri (γ-Protebacteria-Vibrionaceae) bacterial biofilms of either symbiotic or free-living strains was studied in real time by scanning electrochemical microscopy (SECM). The catalase activity, in units of micromoles hydrogen peroxide decomposed per minute over a period of 348 s, was found to vary with incubation time of each biofilm in correlation with the corresponding growth curve of bacteria in liquid culture. Average catalase activity for the same incubation times ranging from 1 to 12 h was found to be 0.28 ± 0.07 μmol H2O2/min for the symbiotic biofilms and 0.31 ± 0.07 μmol H2O2/min for the free-living biofilms, suggesting similar catalase activity. Calculations based on Comsol Multiphysics simulations in fitting experimental biofilm data indicated that approximately (3 ± 1) × 10(6) molecules of hydrogen peroxide were decomposed by a single bacterium per second, signifying the presence of a highly active catalase. A 2-fold enhancement in catalase activity was found for both free-living and symbiotic biofilms in response to external hydrogen peroxide concentrations as low as 1 nM in the growth media, implying a similar mechanism in responding to oxidative stress.

  16. Biodegradable polycaprolactone (PCL) nanosphere encapsulating superoxide dismutase and catalase enzymes.

    PubMed

    Singh, Sushant; Singh, Abhay Narayan; Verma, Anil; Dubey, Vikash Kumar

    2013-12-01

    Biodegradable polycaprolactone (PCL) nanosphere encapsulating superoxide dismutase (SOD) and catalase (CAT) were successfully synthesized using double emulsion (w/o/w) solvent evaporation technique. Characterization of the nanosphere using dynamic light scattering, field emission scanning electron microscope, and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy revealed a spherical-shaped nanosphere in a size range of 812 ± 64 nm with moderate protein encapsulation efficiency of 55.42 ± 3.7 % and high in vitro protein release. Human skin HaCat cells were used for analyzing antioxidative properties of SOD- and CAT-encapsulated PCL nanospheres. Oxidative stress condition in HaCat cells was optimized with exposure to hydrogen peroxide (H2O2; 1 mM) as external stress factor and verified through reactive oxygen species (ROS) analysis using H2DCFDA dye. PCL nanosphere encapsulating SOD and CAT together indicated better antioxidative defense against H2O2-induced oxidative stress in human skin HaCat cells in comparison to PCL encapsulating either SOD or CAT alone as well as against direct supplement of SOD and CAT protein solution. Increase in HaCat cells SOD and CAT activities after treatment hints toward uptake of PCL nanosphere into the human skin HaCat cells. The result signifies the role of PCL-encapsulating SOD and CAT nanosphere in alleviating oxidative stress.

  17. Catalase activity of cytochrome C oxidase assayed with hydrogen peroxide-sensitive electrode microsensor.

    PubMed

    Bolshakov, I A; Vygodina, T V; Gennis, R; Karyakin, A A; Konstantinov, A A

    2010-11-01

    An iron-hexacyanide-covered microelectrode sensor has been used to continuously monitor the kinetics of hydrogen peroxide decomposition catalyzed by oxidized cytochrome oxidase. At cytochrome oxidase concentration ~1 µM, the catalase activity behaves as a first order process with respect to peroxide at concentrations up to ~300-400 µM and is fully blocked by heat inactivation of the enzyme. The catalase (or, rather, pseudocatalase) activity of bovine cytochrome oxidase is characterized by a second order rate constant of ~2·10(2) M(-1)·sec(-1) at pH 7.0 and room temperature, which, when divided by the number of H2O2 molecules disappearing in one catalytic turnover (between 2 and 3), agrees reasonably well with the second order rate constant for H2O2-dependent conversion of the oxidase intermediate F(I)-607 to F(II)-580. Accordingly, the catalase activity of bovine oxidase may be explained by H2O2 procession in the oxygen-reducing center of the enzyme yielding superoxide radicals. Much higher specific rates of H2O2 decomposition are observed with preparations of the bacterial cytochrome c oxidase from Rhodobacter sphaeroides. The observed second order rate constants (up to ~3000 M(-1)·sec(-1)) exceed the rate constant of peroxide binding with the oxygen-reducing center of the oxidized enzyme (~500 M(-1)·sec(-1)) several-fold and therefore cannot be explained by catalytic reaction in the a(3)/Cu(B) site of the enzyme. It is proposed that in the bacterial oxidase, H2O2 can be decomposed by reacting with the adventitious transition metal ions bound by the polyhistidine-tag present in the enzyme, or by virtue of reaction with the tightly-bound Mn2+, which in the bacterial enzyme substitutes for Mg2+ present in the mitochondrial oxidase.

  18. A Catalase-related Hemoprotein in Coral Is Specialized for Synthesis of Short-chain Aldehydes: DISCOVERY OF P450-TYPE HYDROPEROXIDE LYASE ACTIVITY IN A CATALASE.

    PubMed

    Teder, Tarvi; Lõhelaid, Helike; Boeglin, William E; Calcutt, Wade M; Brash, Alan R; Samel, Nigulas

    2015-08-07

    In corals a catalase-lipoxygenase fusion protein transforms arachidonic acid to the allene oxide 8R,9-epoxy-5,9,11,14-eicosatetraenoic acid from which arise cyclopentenones such as the prostanoid-related clavulones. Recently we cloned two catalase-lipoxygenase fusion protein genes (a and b) from the coral Capnella imbricata, form a being an allene oxide synthase and form b giving uncharacterized polar products (Lõhelaid, H., Teder, T., Tõldsepp, K., Ekins, M., and Samel, N. (2014) PloS ONE 9, e89215). Here, using HPLC-UV, LC-MS, and NMR methods, we identify a novel activity of fusion protein b, establishing its role in cleaving the lipoxygenase product 8R-hydroperoxy-eicosatetraenoic acid into the short-chain aldehydes (5Z)-8-oxo-octenoic acid and (3Z,6Z)-dodecadienal; these primary products readily isomerize in an aqueous medium to the corresponding 6E- and 2E,6Z derivatives. This type of enzymatic cleavage, splitting the carbon chain within the conjugated diene of the hydroperoxide substrate, is known only in plant cytochrome P450 hydroperoxide lyases. In mechanistic studies using (18)O-labeled substrate and incubations in H2(18)O, we established synthesis of the C8-oxo acid and C12 aldehyde with the retention of the hydroperoxy oxygens, consistent with synthesis of a short-lived hemiacetal intermediate that breaks down spontaneously into the two aldehydes. Taken together with our initial studies indicating differing gene regulation of the allene oxide synthase and the newly identified catalase-related hydroperoxide lyase and given the role of aldehydes in plant defense, this work uncovers a potential pathway in coral stress signaling and a novel enzymatic activity in the animal kingdom.

  19. Temperature dependence of oxygen evolution through catalase-like activity of horseradish peroxidase

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Popović-Bijelić, A.; Bijelić, G.; Kolar-Anić, Lj.; Vukojević, V.

    2007-09-01

    By experimental investigations of the temperature dependence of catalase-like activity of horseradish peroxidase in the temperature range 278 328 K, different kinetic profiles for oxygen evolution were found below and above 298 K. Extension of the model is proposed to account for these observations. By numeric simulations of the reaction kinetics at different temperatures, it was found that enhanced evaporation of molecular oxygen from the reaction solution is the main root through which oxygen is lost at elevated temperatures in laboratory conditions.

  20. Catalase-like activity studies of the manganese(II) adsorbed zeolites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    ćiçek, Ekrem; Dede, Bülent

    2013-12-01

    Preparation of manganese(II) adsorbed on zeolite 3A, 4A, 5A. AW-300, ammonium Y zeolite, organophilic, molecular sieve and catalase-like enzyme activity of manganese(II) adsorbed zeolites are reported herein. Firstly zeolites are activated at 873 K for two hours before contact manganese(II) ions. In order to observe amount of adsorption, filtration process applied for the solution. The pure zeolites and manganese(II) adsorbed zeolites were analysed by FT-IR. As a result according to the FT-IR spectra, the incorporation of manganese(II) cation into the zeolite structure causes changes in the spectra. These changes are expected particularly in the pseudolattice bands connected with the presence of alumino and silicooxygen tetrahedral rings in the zeolite structure. Furthermore, the catalytic activities of the Mn(II) adsorbed zeolites for the disproportionation of hydrogen peroxide were investigated in the presence of imidazole. The Mn(II) adsorbed zeolites display efficiency in the disproportion reactions of hydrogen peroxide, producing water and dioxygen in catalase-like activity.

  1. Catalase and superoxide dismutase activities and the total protein content of protocorm-like bodies of Dendrobium sonia-28 subjected to vitrification.

    PubMed

    Poobathy, Ranjetta; Sinniah, Uma Rani; Xavier, Rathinam; Subramaniam, Sreeramanan

    2013-07-01

    Dendrobium sonia-28 is an important ornamental orchid in the Malaysian flower industry. However, the genus faces both low germination rates and the risk of producing heterozygous progenies. Cryopreservation is currently the favoured long-term storage method for orchids with propagation problems. Vitrification, a frequently used cryopreservation technique, involves the application of pretreatments and cryoprotectants to protect and recover explants during and after storage in liquid nitrogen. However, cryopreservation may cause osmotic injuries and toxicity to cryopreserved explants from the use of highly concentrated additives, and cellular injuries from thawing, devitrification and ice formation. Reactive oxygen species (ROS), occurring during dehydration and cryopreservation, may also cause membrane damage. Plants possess efficient antioxidant systems such as the superoxide dismutase (SOD) and catalase (CAT) enzymes to scavenge ROS during low temperature stress. In this study, protocorm-like bodies (PLBs) of Dendrobium sonia-28 were assayed for the total protein content, and both SOD and CAT activities, at each stage of a vitrification exercise to observe for deleterious stages in the protocol. The results indicated that cryopreserved PLBs of Dendrobium sonia-28 underwent excessive post-thawing oxidative stress due to decreased levels of the CAT enzyme at the post-thawing recovery stage, which contributed to the poor survival rates of the cryopreserved PLBs.

  2. Catalase and superoxide dismutase activities after heat injury of listeria monocytogenes

    SciTech Connect

    Dallmier, A.W.; Martin, S.E.

    1988-02-01

    Four strains of Listeria monocytogenes were examined for catalase (CA) and superoxide dismutase (SOD) activities. The two strains having the highest CA activities (LCDC and Scott A) also possessed the highest SOD activities. The CA activity of heated cell extracts of all four strains examined decreased sharply between 55 and 60/sup 0/C. SOD was more heat labile than CA. Two L. monocytogenes strains demonstrated a decline in SOD activity after heat treatment at 45/sup 0/C, whereas the other two strains demonstrated a decline at 50/sup 0/C. Sublethal heating of the cells at 55/sup 0/C resulted in increased sensitivity to 5.5% NaCl. Exogenous hydrogen peroxide was added to suspensions of L. monocytogenes; strains producing the highest CA levels showed the greatest H/sub 2/O/sub 2/ resistance.

  3. Production and secretion of Aspergillus nidulans catalase B in filamentous fungi driven by the promoter and signal peptide of the Cladosporium fulvum hydrophobin gene hcf-1.

    PubMed

    Johnson, Hannah; Whiteford, James R; Eckert, Sabine E; Spanu, Pietro D

    2003-11-01

    We describe here the use of sequences from the hydrophobin gene hcf-1 of Cladosporium fulvum to construct pCatBex, a vector for high-level expression and secretion of CatB, a catalase from Aspergillus nidulans. Transformation of C. fulvum with pCatBex results in a 60-fold increase in the mycelial activity in the fungus and the appearance of up to 5.4 mkat/l of catalase in the growth medium. The levels of catalase in the supernatant increased dramatically following removal of nitrogen from the medium. Conversely, the overall specific activity of catalase in the cytoplasm did not change appreciably. This indicates that nitrogen depletion induces greater secretion of protein. The vector pCatBex also directs the expression and secretion of CatB in Magnaporthe grisea and may be a useful vector for the expression of genes in other filamentous fungi.

  4. Catalase activity as a biomarker for mild-stress-induced robustness in Bacillus weihenstephanensis.

    PubMed

    den Besten, Heidy M W; Effraimidou, Styliani; Abee, Tjakko

    2013-01-01

    Microorganisms are able to survive and grow in changing environments by activating stress adaptation mechanisms which may enhance bacterial robustness. Stress-induced enhanced robustness complicates the predictability of microbial inactivation. Using psychrotolerant Bacillus weihenstephanensis strain KBAB4 as a model, we investigated the impact of the culturing temperature on mild-oxidative-stress-induced (cross-)protection toward multiple stresses, including severe oxidative, heat, and acid stresses. Culturing at a refrigeration temperature (7°C) compared to the optimal growth temperature (30°C) affected both the robustness level of B. weihenstephanensis and the oxidative stress adaptive response. Scavengers of reactive oxygen species have a crucial role in adaptation to oxidative stresses, and this points to a possible predictive role in mild-oxidative-stress-induced robustness. Therefore, the catalase activity was determined upon mild oxidative stress treatment and was demonstrated to be significantly correlated with the robustness level of mild-stress-treated cells toward severe oxidative and heat stresses but not toward severe acid stress for cells grown at both refrigeration and optimal temperatures. The quantified correlations supported the predictive quality of catalase activity as a biomarker and also underlined that the predictive quality is stress specific. Biomarkers that are able to predict stress-induced enhanced robustness can be used to better understand stress adaptation mechanisms and might allow the design of effective combinations of hurdles to control microbial behavior.

  5. Catalytic activity of catalase under strong magnetic fields of up to 8 T

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ueno, S.; Iwasaka, M.

    1996-04-01

    The question of whether or not magnetic fields affect enzymatic activity is of considerable interest in biomagnetics and biochemistry. This study focuses on whether magnetically related enzymatic activities can be affected by magnetic fields. We examined the effect of magnetic fields of up to 8 T on catalytic decomposition of hydrogen peroxide (H2O2). We observed changes in absorbance of reaction mixture of hydrogen peroxide and catalase at 240 nm, during and after magnetic field exposures. When the reaction mixture was not treated with nitrogen-gas bubbling, it was observed that the initial reaction rate of the reaction which was exposed to magnetic fields of up to 8 T was 50%-85% lower than the control data. This magnetic field effect was not observed, however, when the reaction mixture was bubbled with nitrogen gas to remove the dissolved oxygen molecules which were produced in the solution. We also measured concentration of dissolved oxygen which was produced by the decomposition of hydrogen peroxide. Dissolved oxygen concentration in the reaction mixture which was exposed to magnetic fields increased 20%-25% compared to the control solution. The results of the present study indicate that magnetic fields affect dynamic movement of oxygen bubbles which are produced in the reaction mixture by the decomposition of hydrogen peroxide, but not the catalytic activity of catalase itself.

  6. Direct electrochemistry and electrocatalytic activity of catalase immobilized onto electrodeposited nano-scale islands of nickel oxide.

    PubMed

    Salimi, Abdollah; Sharifi, Ensiyeh; Noorbakhsh, Abdollah; Soltanian, Saied

    2007-02-01

    Cyclic voltammetry was used for simultaneous formation and immobilization of nickel oxide nano-scale islands and catalase on glassy carbon electrode. Electrodeposited nickel oxide may be a promising material for enzyme immobilization owing to its high biocompatibility and large surface. The catalase films assembled on nickel oxide exhibited a pair of well defined, stable and nearly reversible CV peaks at about -0.05 V vs. SCE at pH 7, characteristic of the heme Fe (III)/Fe (II) redox couple. The formal potential of catalase in nickel oxide film were linearly varied in the range 1-12 with slope of 58.426 mV/pH, indicating that the electron transfer is accompanied by single proton transportation. The electron transfer between catalase and electrode surface, (k(s)) of 3.7(+/-0.1) s(-1) was greatly facilitated in the microenvironment of nickel oxide film. The electrocatalytic reduction of hydrogen peroxide at glassy carbon electrode modified with nickel oxide nano-scale islands and catalase enzyme has been studied. The embedded catalase in NiO nanoparticles showed excellent electrocatalytic activity toward hydrogen peroxide reduction. Also the modified rotating disk electrode shows good analytical performance for amperometric determination of hydrogen peroxide. The resultant catalase/nickel oxide modified glassy carbon electrodes exhibited fast amperometric response (within 2 s) to hydrogen peroxide reduction (with a linear range from 1 microM to 1 mM), excellent stability, long term life and good reproducibility. The apparent Michaelis-Menten constant is calculated to be 0.96(+/-0.05)mM, which shows a large catalytic activity of catalase in the nickel oxide film toward hydrogen peroxide. The excellent electrochemical reversibility of redox couple, high stability, technical simplicity, lake of need for mediators and short preparations times are advantages of this electrode. Finally the activity of biosensor for nitrite reduction was also investigated.

  7. Altered methanol embryopathies in embryo culture with mutant catalase-deficient mice and transgenic mice expressing human catalase

    SciTech Connect

    Miller, Lutfiya; Wells, Peter G.

    2011-04-01

    The mechanisms underlying the teratogenicity of methanol (MeOH) in rodents, unlike its acute toxicity in humans, are unclear, but may involve reactive oxygen species (ROS). Embryonic catalase, although expressed at about 5% of maternal activity, may protect the embryo by detoxifying ROS. This hypothesis was investigated in whole embryo culture to remove confounding maternal factors, including metabolism of MeOH by maternal catalase. C57BL/6 (C57) mouse embryos expressing human catalase (hCat) or their wild-type (C57 WT) controls, and C3Ga.Cg-Catb/J acatalasemic (aCat) mouse embryos or their wild-type C3HeB/FeJ (C3H WT) controls, were explanted on gestational day (GD) 9 (plug = GD 1), exposed for 24 h to 4 mg/ml MeOH or vehicle, and evaluated for functional and morphological changes. hCat and C57 WT vehicle-exposed embryos developed normally. MeOH was embryopathic in C57 WT embryos, evidenced by decreases in anterior neuropore closure, somites developed and turning, whereas hCat embryos were protected. Vehicle-exposed aCat mouse embryos had lower yolk sac diameters compared to C3H WT controls, suggesting that endogenous ROS are embryopathic. MeOH was more embryopathic in aCat embryos than WT controls, with reduced anterior neuropore closure and head length only in catalase-deficient embryos. These data suggest that ROS may be involved in the embryopathic mechanism of methanol, and that embryonic catalase activity may be a determinant of teratological risk.

  8. Catalase-like activity of bovine met-hemoglobin: interaction with the pseudo-catalytic peroxidation of anthracene traces in aqueous medium.

    PubMed

    Paco, Laveille; Galarneau, Anne; Drone, Jullien; Fajula, François; Bailly, Carole; Pulvin, Sylviane; Thomas, Daniel

    2009-10-01

    Hemoglobin is a member of the hemoprotein superfamily whose main role is to transport O(2) in vertebrate organisms. It has two known promiscuous enzymatic activities, peroxidase and oxygenase. Here we show for the first time that bovine hemoglobin also presents a catalase-like activity characterized by a V(max )of 344 microM/min, a K(M )of 24 mM and a k(cat) equal to 115/min. For high anthracene and hemoglobin concentrations and low hydrogen peroxide concentrations, this activity inhibits the expected oxidation of anthracene, which occurs through a peroxidase-like mechanism. Anthracene belongs to the polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon (PAH) family whose members are carcinogenic and persistent pollutants found in industrial waste waters. Our results show that anthracene oxidation by hemoglobin and hydrogen peroxide follows a typical bi-bi ping-pong mechanism with a V(max) equal to 0.250 microM/min, K(M(H2O2) )of 80 microM, K(M(ANT)) of 1.1 microM and k(cat) of 0.17/min. The oxidation of anthracene is shown to be pseudo-catalytic because an excess of hemoglobin and hydrogen peroxide is required to make PAH completely disappear. Thus, bovine hemoglobin presents, in different degrees, all the catalytic activities of the hemoprotein group, which makes it a very interesting protein for biotechnological processes and one with which structure-activity relationships can be studied.

  9. Expression and purification of soluble bio-active rice plant catalase-A from recombinant Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Ray, Mamata; Mishra, Panchanand; Das, Priyanka; Sabat, Surendra Chandra

    2012-01-01

    Catalase in plants is a heme-coordinated tetrameric protein that primarily disproportionates hydrogen peroxide into water and oxygen. It plays an important role in maintaining cellular concentration of hydrogen peroxide to a level, necessary for all aspects of normal plant growth and development. Except for its recombinant expression in transgenic plants and insect cell line, the protein is yet to be synthesized in its bio-active form in prokaryotic expression system. Attempts made in past for recombinant expression of plant catalase in Escherichia coli consistently resulted in formation of insoluble and inactive aggregates of inclusion body. Here we have shown the specific requirement of a thioredoxin fusion partner, the involvement of trigger factor protein and the low temperature treatment during induction period for synthesis of completely solubilized rice plant catalase-A in recombinant E. coli. Furthermore, the bacteria required the supplementation of δ-aminolevulinic acid to produce bio-active recombinant rice catalase-A. The molecular and biochemical properties of the purified recombinant protein showed the characteristic features of a typical mono-functional plant catalase. These results attest to the usefulness of the present protocol for production of plant catalase using E. coli as heterologous expression system.

  10. Fusing catalase to an alkane-producing enzyme maintains enzymatic activity by converting the inhibitory byproduct H2O2 to the cosubstrate O2.

    PubMed

    Andre, Carl; Kim, Sung Won; Yu, Xiao-Hong; Shanklin, John

    2013-02-19

    Biologically produced alkanes represent potential renewable alternatives to petroleum-derived chemicals. A cyanobacterial pathway consisting of acyl-Acyl Carrier Protein reductase and an aldehyde-deformylating oxygenase (ADO) converts acyl-Acyl Carrier Proteins into corresponding n-1 alkanes via aldehyde intermediates in an oxygen-dependent manner (K(m) for O(2), 84 ± 9 µM). In vitro, ADO turned over only three times, but addition of more ADO to exhausted assays resulted in additional product formation. While evaluating the peroxide shunt to drive ADO catalysis, we discovered that ADO is inhibited by hydrogen peroxide (H(2)O(2)) with an apparent K(i) of 16 ± 6 µM and that H(2)O(2) inhibition is of mixed-type with respect to O(2). Supplementing exhausted assays with catalase (CAT) restored ADO activity, demonstrating that inhibition was reversible and dependent on H(2)O(2), which originated from poor coupling of reductant consumption with alkane formation. Kinetic analysis showed that long-chain (C14-C18) substrates follow Michaelis-Menten kinetics, whereas short and medium chains (C8-C12) exhibit substrate inhibition. A bifunctional protein comprising an N-terminal CAT coupled to a C-terminal ADO (CAT-ADO) prevents H(2)O(2) inhibition by converting it to the cosubstrate O(2). Indeed, alkane production by the fusion protein is observed upon addition of H(2)O(2) to an anaerobic reaction mix. In assays, CAT-ADO turns over 225 times versus three times for the native ADO, and its expression in Escherichia coli increases catalytic turnovers per active site by fivefold relative to the expression of native ADO. We propose the term "protection via inhibitor metabolism" for fusion proteins designed to metabolize inhibitors into noninhibitory compounds.

  11. Catalase-like and peroxidase-like catalytic activities of silicon nanowire arrays.

    PubMed

    Wang, Hongwei; Jiang, Wenwen; Wang, Yanwei; Liu, Xiaoli; Yao, Jianlin; Yuan, Lin; Wu, Zhaoqiang; Li, Dan; Song, Bo; Chen, Hong

    2013-01-08

    Silicon nanowire arrays (SiNWAs) were found to have catalytic activities similar to those of biological enzymes catalase and peroxidase. Thus not only can these materials catalyze the decomposition reaction of H(2)O(2) into water and oxygen, but they can also catalyze the oxidation of o-phenylenediamine (OPD), a common substrate for peroxidases, by H(2)O(2). The presence of Si-H bonds and the morphology of the SiNWAs are found to be crucial to the occurrence of such catalytic activity. When the SiNWAs are reacted with H(2)O(2), the data from Raman spectroscopy suggests the formation of (Si-H)(2)···(O species) ((Si-H)(2)···Os), which is presumably responsible for the catalytic activity. These findings suggest the potential use of SiNWAs as enzyme mimics in medicine, biotechnology, and environmental chemistry.

  12. A bifunctional enzyme from Rhodococcus erythropolis exhibiting secondary alcohol dehydrogenase-catalase activities.

    PubMed

    Martinez-Rojas, Enriqueta; Kurt, Tutku; Schmidt, Udo; Meyer, Vera; Garbe, Leif-Alexander

    2014-11-01

    Alcohol dehydrogenases have long been recognized as potential biocatalyst for production of chiral fine and bulk chemicals. They are relevant for industry in enantiospecific production of chiral compounds. In this study, we identified and purified a nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NAD)-dependent secondary alcohol dehydrogenase (SdcA) from Rhodococcus erythropolis oxidizing γ-lactols into γ-lactones. SdcA showed broad substrate specificity on γ-lactols; secondary aliphatic alcohols with 8 and 10 carbon atoms were also substrates and oxidized with (2S)-stereospecificity. The enzyme exhibited moderate stability with a half-life of 5 h at 40 °C and 20 days at 4 °C. Mass spectrometric identification revealed high sequence coverage of SdcA amino acid sequence to a highly conserved catalase from R. erythropolis. The corresponding encoding gene was isolated from genomic DNA and subsequently overexpressed in Escherichia coli BL21 DE3 cells. In addition, the recombinant SdcA was purified and characterized in order to confirm that the secondary alcohol dehydrogenase and catalase activity correspond to the same enzyme.

  13. Dynamics of erythrocyte count, hemoglobin, and catalase activity in rat blood in hypokinesia, muscular activity and restoration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Taneyeva, G. V.; Potapovich, G. M.; Voloshko, N. A.; Uteshev, A. B.

    1980-01-01

    Tests were conducted to prove that muscular exertion (in this instance swimming) of different duration and intensity, as well as hypodynamia, result in an increase of hemoglobin and number of red blood cells in peripheral blood rats. Catalase activity increased with an increase in the duration of swimming, but only up to 6 hr; with 7-9 hr of swimming as well as in hypodynamia, catalase activity decreased. It was also observed that under hypodynamia as well as in 3, 5 and 6 hr exertion (swimming) the color index of blood decreased. Pressure chamber treatment (for 8 min each day for one week), alternating a 2 min negative pressure up to 35 mm Hg with 1 min positive pressure, increased the erythrocyte count and hemoglobin content.

  14. Effects of the seminal plasma zinc content and catalase activity on the semen quality of water buffalo (Bubalus bubalis) bulls.

    PubMed

    Alavi-Shoushtari, S M; Rezai, S Asri; Ansari, M H Kh; Khaki, A

    2009-01-15

    In order to determine zinc and catalase content of seminal plasma in the buffalo and to study their associations with the semen characteristics, 54 semen samples were collected from 10 buffalo bulls; semen volume and sperm concentration, gross and progressive motility and viability were evaluated, seminal plasma was then harvested by centrifugation and its zinc content was estimated by atomic absorption spectrophotometer and its catalase activity determined by using a commercial kit. The zinc content of the seminal plasma (Mean +/- SEM) was recorded as 154.40 +/- 1.74 mg L(-1), while, the mean catalase value was 32.00 +/- 0.42 U mL(-1). The mean zinc values was highly correlated with sperm progressive motility and viability and with catalase values (p = 0.000 for all) and also was associated with gross motility (p = 0.020) and negatively with abnormal morphology (p = 0.049). The catalase values were highly associated with sperm progressive motility, viability and zinc content (p = 0.000 for all) and was associated with sperm gross motility (p = 0.024). For further clarification of these correlations, the samples were categorized in three groups of excellent (Ex, >90% motile, n = 33), good (Go, 80-89% motile, n = 15) and moderate (Mo, <79% motile, n = 6) according to their percentage of sperm motility. The mean progressive motility in Ex group was 92.54 +/- 0.51%, in Go group was 81.66 +/- 0.62% and in Mo group was 71.66 +/- 1.05%. The mean zinc and catalase values were recorded as 161.07 +/- 1.63 mg L(-1) and 33.41 +/- 0.34 U mL(-1) in Ex, 146.70 +/- 1.91 mg L(-1) and 31.01 +/- 0.67 in Go and 136.42 +/- 4.97 mg L(-1) and 26.51 +/- 0.87 U mL(-1) in Mo groups. The mean zinc value in Ex group was highly associated with sperm motility, viability and catalase values, in Go group was associated with catalase values and highly associated with sperm abnormal morphology and in Mo group it was highly associations with catalase values only. The mean catalase value in Ex group

  15. Down-regulation of catalase activity allows transient accumulation of a hydrogen peroxide signal in Chlamydomonas reinhardtii.

    PubMed

    Michelet, Laure; Roach, Thomas; Fischer, Beat B; Bedhomme, Mariette; Lemaire, Stéphane D; Krieger-Liszkay, Anja

    2013-06-01

    In photosynthetic organisms, excess light is a stress that induces production of reactive oxygen species inside the chloroplasts. As a response, the capacity of antioxidative defence mechanisms increases. However, when cells of Chlamydomonas reinhardtii were shifted from dark to high light, a reversible partial inactivation of catalase activity was observed, which correlated with a transient increase in the level of H2 O2 in the 10 μm range. This concentration range seems to be necessary to activate H2 O2 -dependent signalling pathways stimulating the expression of H2 O2 responsive genes, such as the heat shock protein HSP22C. Catalase knock-down mutants had lost the transient accumulation of H2 O2 , suggesting that a decrease in catalase activity was the key element for establishing a transient H2 O2 burst. Catalase was inactivated by a one-electron event consistent with the reduction of a single cysteine. We propose that under high light intensity, the redox state of the photosynthetic electron transport chain is sensed and transmitted to the cytosol to regulate the catalase activity. This allows a transient accumulation of H2 O2 , inducing a signalling event that is transmitted to the nucleus to modulate the expression of chloroplast-directed protection enzymes.

  16. Ultraviolet Light B-Mediated Inhibition of Skin Catalase Activity Promotes Gr-1+CD11b+ Myeloid Cell Expansion

    PubMed Central

    Sullivan, Nicholas J.; Tober, Kathleen L.; Burns, Erin M.; Schick, Jonathan S.; Riggenbach, Judith A.; Mace, Thomas A.; Bill, Matthew A.; Young, Gregory S.; Oberyszyn, Tatiana M.; Lesinski, Gregory B.

    2011-01-01

    Skin cancer incidence and mortality are higher in men compared to women, but the causes of this sex discrepancy remain largely unknown. Ultraviolet light exposure induces cutaneous inflammation and neutralizes cutaneous antioxidants. Gr-1+CD11b+ myeloid cells are heterogeneous bone marrow-derived cells that promote inflammation-associated carcinogenesis. Reduced activity of catalase, an antioxidant present within skin, has been associated with skin carcinogenesis. We utilized the outbred, immune competent Skh-1 hairless mouse model of ultraviolet light B (UVB)-induced inflammation and non-melanoma skin cancer to further define sex discrepancies in UVB-induced inflammation. Our results demonstrated that male skin had relatively lower baseline catalase activity, which was inhibited following acute UVB exposure in both sexes. Further analysis revealed that skin catalase activity inversely correlated with splenic Gr-1+CD11b+ myeloid cell percentage. Acute UVB exposure induced Gr-1+CD11b+ myeloid cell skin infiltration, which was inhibited to a greater extent in males by topical catalase treatment. In chronic UVB studies, we demonstrated that the percentage of splenic Gr-1+CD11b+ myeloid cells was 55% higher in male tumor-bearing mice compared to their female counterparts. Together, our findings indicate that lower skin catalase activity in male mice may at least in part contribute to increased UVB-induced Gr-1+CD11b+ myeloid cells and subsequent skin carcinogenesis. PMID:22030957

  17. Redox regulation of antioxidant enzymes: post-translational modulation of catalase and glutathione peroxidase activity by resveratrol in diabetic rat liver.

    PubMed

    Sadi, Gökhan; Bozan, Davut; Yildiz, Huseyin Bekir

    2014-08-01

    Resveratrol is a strong antioxidant that exhibits blood glucose-lowering effects, which might contribute to its usefulness in preventing complications associated with diabetes. The present study aimed to investigate resveratrol effects on catalase (CAT) and glutathione peroxidase (GPx) gene and protein expression, their phosphorylation states and activities in rat liver of STZ-induced diabetes. Diabetes increased the levels of total protein phosphorylation and p-CAT, while mRNA expression, protein levels, and activity were reduced. Although diabetes induced transcriptional repression over GPx, it did not affect the protein levels and activity. When resveratrol was administered to diabetic rats, an increase in activity was associated with an increase in p-GPx levels. Decrease in Sirtuin1 (SIRT1) and nuclear factor erythroid 2-related factor (Nrf2) and increase in nuclear factor kappa B (NFκB) gene expression in diabetes were associated with a decrease in CAT and GPx mRNA expression. A possible compensatory mechanism for reduced gene expression of antioxidant enzymes is proved to be nuclear translocation of redox-sensitive Nrf2 and NFκB in diabetes which is confirmed by the increase in nuclear and decrease in cytoplasmic protein levels of Nrf2 and NFκB. Taken together, these findings revealed that an increase in the oxidized state in diabetes intricately modified the cellular phosphorylation status and regulation of antioxidant enzymes. Gene regulation of antioxidant enzymes was accompanied by nuclear translocation of Nrf2 and NFκB. Resveratrol administration also activated a coordinated cytoprotective response against diabetes-induced changes in liver tissues.

  18. Effects of molecular oxygen on detection of superoxide radical with nitroblue tetrazolium and on activity stains for catalase

    SciTech Connect

    Clare, D.A.; Duong, M.N.; Darr, D.; Archibald, F.; Fridovich, I.

    1984-08-01

    The usual method of staining polyacrylamide gel electropherograms for superoxide dismutase activity utilizes a photochemical flux of O/sub 2//sup -/ to reduce nitroblue tetrazolium. Superoxide dismutases intercept O/sub 2//sup -/, preventing formazan production and thus causing achromatic bands. In the presence of H/sub 2/O/sub 2/, catalase also yield achromatic bands during this staining procedure. This is due to local elevation of pO/sub 2/ by the catalytic decomposition of H/sub 2/O/sub 2/. O/sub 2/, in turn, inhibits the reduction of the tetrazolium by O/sub 2//sup -/. This phenomenon provides a new activity stain for catalase. A previously described activity stain for catalase has also been reexamined and significantly improved.

  19. Unprecedented access of phenolic substrates to the heme active site of a catalase: substrate binding and peroxidase-like reactivity of Bacillus pumilus catalase monitored by X-ray crystallography and EPR spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Loewen, Peter C; Villanueva, Jacylyn; Switala, Jacek; Donald, Lynda J; Ivancich, Anabella

    2015-05-01

    Heme-containing catalases and catalase-peroxidases catalyze the dismutation of hydrogen peroxide as their predominant catalytic activity, but in addition, individual enzymes support low levels of peroxidase and oxidase activities, produce superoxide, and activate isoniazid as an antitubercular drug. The recent report of a heme enzyme with catalase, peroxidase and penicillin oxidase activities in Bacillus pumilus and its categorization as an unusual catalase-peroxidase led us to investigate the enzyme for comparison with other catalase-peroxidases, catalases, and peroxidases. Characterization revealed a typical homotetrameric catalase with one pentacoordinated heme b per subunit (Tyr340 being the axial ligand), albeit in two orientations, and a very fast catalatic turnover rate (kcat  = 339,000 s(-1) ). In addition, the enzyme supported a much slower (kcat  = 20 s(-1) ) peroxidatic activity utilizing substrates as diverse as ABTS and polyphenols, but no oxidase activity. Two binding sites, one in the main access channel and the other on the protein surface, accommodating pyrogallol, catechol, resorcinol, guaiacol, hydroquinone, and 2-chlorophenol were identified in crystal structures at 1.65-1.95 Å. A third site, in the heme distal side, accommodating only pyrogallol and catechol, interacting with the heme iron and the catalytic His and Arg residues, was also identified. This site was confirmed in solution by EPR spectroscopy characterization, which also showed that the phenolic oxygen was not directly coordinated to the heme iron (no low-spin conversion of the Fe(III) high-spin EPR signal upon substrate binding). This is the first demonstration of phenolic substrates directly accessing the heme distal side of a catalase.

  20. [Transformation of neuronal activity in the cat lateral geniculate body].

    PubMed

    Silakov, V L

    1976-05-01

    The neuronal activity transformations were studied in the cat LGB under the action of nembutal, light stimulation, and micropolarization of geniculate cells. The transformation of single spike activity into bursts was found to reflect the inhibitory state of the neurons. Their excitation entailed a reverse transformation. Short feed-back connections functioning within the microsystems of LGB neurons are supposed to underlie the transformations.

  1. CoCl2-induced biochemical hypoxia down regulates activities and expression of super oxide dismutase and catalase in cerebral cortex of mice.

    PubMed

    Rani, Anupama; Prasad, S

    2014-09-01

    Hypoxia-induced oxidative stress is one of the major hallmark reasons underlying brain dysfunction. In the present manuscript, we have used CoCl2-induced hypoxic mice to investigate alterations in the activities of chief antioxidative stress enzymes- superoxide dismutase (SOD) and catalase (CAT) and expression of their genes Sod1 and Cat in the cerebral cortex as this model has not been routinely used for carrying out such study. Hypoxia mimetic mice model was accordingly developed by oral CoCl2 administration to mice and validated by analyzing alterations in the expression of the hypoxia inducible factor gene Hif-1α and its immediate responsive genes. Our Western blot data demonstrated that a dose of 40 mg/kg BW of CoCl2 was able to generate hypoxia like condition in mice in which Hif-1α and its immediate responsive genes-glutamate transporter-1 (Slc2a1) and erythropoietin (Epo) expression were up regulated. Our in-gel assay data indicated that SOD and CAT activities significantly declined and it was associated with significant down regulation of Sod1 and Epo expression as evident from our semi quantitative RT-PCR and Western blot data, which might be correlated with up regulation of Hif-1α expression in the cerebral cortex of the CoCl2-treated hypoxic mice. Our findings suggest that CoCl2-induced hypoxic mouse model is useful for studying alterations in the anti oxidative enzymes and biochemical/molecular/neurobiological analysis of hypoxia-induced alterations in brain function.

  2. Activity of superoxide dismutase and catalase in people protractedly exposed to lead compounds.

    PubMed

    Kasperczyk, Slawomir; Birkner, Ewa; Kasperczyk, Aleksandra; Zalejska-Fiolka, Jolanta

    2004-01-01

    Lead can modify pro/antioxidant status by influencing antioxidant enzymes. As the results of experimental researches are divergent, the purpose of this research was to evaluate the activity of enzymes that play a vital role in the defence against ROS in blood of people protractedly exposed to lead compounds. The study population included 172 healthy employees of zinc and lead steelworks. Workers exposed to lead (L) were divided into 2 groups: the first included workers with mean lead concentration (PbB) from 25-35 microl/dl (LL group), and the second group of high exposure (HL group)--with PbB over 35 microl/dl. The administration workers were the control group. There were no significant changes in activity of catalase and mitochondrial SOD in the study population. The activity of ZnCu-SOD significantly increased, both in plasma and erythrocytes, but first in plasma in the LL subgroup by about 42% (p=0.044), and then in erythrocytes in the HL subgroup by about 23% (p=0.012) when compared to the control group. Concentration of TBARS-MDA increased both in serum and erythrocytes. In people protractedly exposed to lead (mean 15 +/- 10 years), there is observed an increased activity of SOD in blood, which seems to be an adoptive mechanism against the raised amount of production of reactive oxygen species (ROS) caused by lead.

  3. [Effects of catalase on human umbilical cord mesenchymal stem cells].

    PubMed

    Hu, Lin-Ping; Gao, Ying-Dai; Zheng, Guo-Guang; Shi, Ying-Xu; Xie, Yin-Liang; Liu, Yong-Jun; Yuan, Wei-Ping; Cheng, Tao

    2010-04-01

    This study was aimed to investigate the growth and multiple differentiation potential of human umbilical cord tissue derived mesenchymal stem cells (UC-MSCs) transfected by a retroviral vector with catalase (CAT) gene. The UC-MSCs cultured in vitro were transfected by using pMSCV carrying GFP (pMSCV-GFP) and pMSCV carrying CAT (pMSCV-GFP-CAT) respectively, then the MSC-GFP cell line and MSC-GFP-CAT cell line were obtained by sorting of flow cytometry. The GFP expression was observed by a fluorescent microscopy at 48 hours after CAT gene transfection. The GFP+ cells were sorted by flow cytometry. The activity of CAT in GFP+ cells was detected by catalase assay kit. The proliferative capacity of transfected UC-MSCs was determined by cell counting kit-8. The differentiation ability of gene-transfected GFP+ cells into osteogenesis and adipogenesis was observed by von Kossa and oil red O staining. The results indicated that green fluorescence in UC-MSCs was observed at 48 hours after transfection, and the fluorescence gradually enhanced to a steady level on day 3. The percentage of MSCs-GFP was (25.54+/-8.65)%, while the percentage of MSCs-GFP-CAT was (35.4+/-18.57)%. The activity of catalase in UC-MSCs, MSCs-GFP, MSCs-GFP-CAT cells were 19.5, 20.3, 67.2 U, respectively. The transfected MSCs-GFP-CAT could be induced into osteoblasts and adipocytes. After 21 days, von Kossa staining showed induced osteoblasts. Many lipid droplets with high refractivity occurred in cytoplasm of the transfected UC-MSCs, and showed red fat granules in oil red O staining cells. There were no significant differences between transfected and non-transfected UC-MSCs cells (p>0.05). It is concluded that UC-MSCs are successfully transfected by retrovirus carrying GFP or CAT gene, the activity of catalase increased by 3.4-fold. The transfected UC-MSCs maintain proliferation potential and ability of differentiation into osteoblasts and adipocytes.

  4. Cloning and sequencing of a Candida albicans catalase gene and effects of disruption of this gene.

    PubMed

    Wysong, D R; Christin, L; Sugar, A M; Robbins, P W; Diamond, R D

    1998-05-01

    Catalase plays a key role as an antioxidant, protecting aerobic organisms from the toxic effects of hydrogen peroxide, and in some cases has been postulated to be a virulence factor. To help elucidate the function of catalase in Candida albicans, a single C. albicans-derived catalase gene, designated CAT1, was isolated and cloned. Degenerate PCR primers based on highly conserved areas of other fungal catalase genes were used to amplify a 411-bp product from genomic DNA of C. albicans ATCC 10261. By using this product as a probe, catalase clones were isolated from genomic libraries of C. albicans. Nucleotide sequence analysis revealed an open reading frame encoding a protein of 487 amino acid residues. Construction of a CAT1-deficient mutant was achieved by using the Ura-blaster technique for sequential disruption of multiple alleles by integrative transformation using URA3 as a selectable marker. Resulting mutants exhibited normal morphology and comparable growth rates of both yeast and mycelial forms. Enzymatic analysis revealed an abundance of catalase in the wild-type strain but decreasing catalase activity in heterozygous mutants and no detectable catalase in a homozygous null mutant. In vitro assays showed the mutant strains to be more sensitive to damage by both neutrophils and concentrations of exogenous peroxide that were sublethal for the parental strain. Compared to the parental strain, the homozygous null mutant strain was far less virulent for mice in an intravenous infection model of disseminated candidiasis. Definitive linkage of CAT1 with virulence would require restoration of activity by reintroduction of the gene into mutants. However, initial results in mice, taken together with the enhanced susceptibility of catalase-deficient hyphae to damage by human neutrophils, suggest that catalase may enhance the pathogenicity of C. albicans.

  5. Effects of humic acid-metal complexes on hepatic carnitine palmitoyltransferase, carnitine acetyltransferase and catalase activities

    SciTech Connect

    Fungjou Lu; Youngshin Chen . Dept. of Biochemistry); Tienshang Huang . Dept. of Medicine)

    1994-03-01

    A significant increase in activities of hepatic carnitine palmitoyltransferase and carnitine acetyltransferase was observed in male Balb/c mice intraperitoneally injected for 40 d with 0.125 mg/0.1 ml/d humic acid-metal complexes. Among these complexes, the humic acid-As complex was relatively effective, whereas humic acid-25 metal complex was more effective, and humic acid-26 metal complex was most effective. However, humic acid or metal mixtures, or metal such as As alone, was not effective. Humic acid-metal complexes also significantly decreased hepatic catalase activity. A marked decrease of 60-kDa polypeptide in liver cytoplasm was also observed on SDS-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis after the mice had been injected with the complexes. Morphological analysis of a histopathological biopsy of such treated mice revealed several changes in hepatocytes, including focal necrosis and cell infiltration, mild fatty changes, reactive nuclei, and hypertrophy. Humic acid-metal complexes affect activities of metabolic enzymes of fatty acids, and this results in accumulation of hydrogen peroxide and increase of the lipid peroxidation. The products of lipid peroxidation may be responsible for liver damage and possible carcinogenesis. Previous studies in this laboratory had shown that humic acid-metal complex altered the coagulation system and that humic acid, per se, caused vasculopathy. Therefore, humic acid-metal complexes may be main causal factors of not only so-called blackfoot disease, but also the liver cancer prevailing on the southwestern coast of Taiwan.

  6. Hydrogen peroxide cytotoxicity under conditions of normal or reduced catalase activity in H2O2-sensitive and -resistant Chinese hamster ovary (CHO) cell variants.

    PubMed

    Cantoni, O; Guidarelli, A; Sestili, P; Mannello, F; Gazzanelli, G; Cattabeni, F

    1994-09-01

    H2O2-sensitive and -resistant sublines of Chinese Hamster Ovary (CHO) cells were tested for their sensitivity to the growth inhibitory effect elicited by increasing concentrations of the oxidant under conditions of normal or reduced catalase activity. Experimental results have demonstrated that, under conditions of reduced catalase activity, the cytotoxic action of H2O2 was differentially regulated in resistant and sensitive cells. Indeed, the parental cell line and cells resistant to low concentrations of H2O2 (V 250 cells) depended on catalase to a lower extent than did highly resistant cells (V 850 cells). It is interesting to note that V 250 cells had more catalase, on a per million cell basis, than V 850 cells. We conclude that acquired resistance to oxidative stress is not entirely dependent on catalase and that the contribution of catalase depends on the degree of resistance to the oxidant.

  7. Multiple abiotic stress tolerance of the transformants yeast cells and the transgenic Arabidopsis plants expressing a novel durum wheat catalase.

    PubMed

    Feki, Kaouthar; Kamoun, Yosra; Ben Mahmoud, Rihem; Farhat-Khemakhem, Ameny; Gargouri, Ali; Brini, Faiçal

    2015-12-01

    Catalases are reactive oxygen species scavenging enzymes involved in response to abiotic and biotic stresses. In this study, we described the isolation and functional characterization of a novel catalase from durum wheat, designed TdCAT1. Molecular Phylogeny analyses showed that wheat TdCAT1 exhibited high amino acids sequence identity to other plant catalases. Sequence homology analysis showed that TdCAT1 protein contained the putative calmodulin binding domain and a putative conserved internal peroxisomal targeting signal PTS1 motif around its C-terminus. Predicted three-dimensional structural model revealed the presence of four putative distinct structural regions which are the N-terminal arm, the β-barrel, the wrapping and the α-helical domains. TdCAT1 protein had the heme pocket that was composed by five essential residues. TdCAT1 gene expression analysis showed that this gene was induced by various abiotic stresses in durum wheat. The expression of TdCAT1 in yeast cells and Arabidopsis plants conferred tolerance to several abiotic stresses. Compared with the non-transformed plants, the transgenic lines maintained their growth and accumulated more proline under stress treatments. Furthermore, the amount of H2O2 was lower in transgenic lines, which was due to the high CAT and POD activities. Taken together, these data provide the evidence for the involvement of durum wheat catalase TdCAT1 in tolerance to multiple abiotic stresses in crop plants.

  8. CAT — EDRN Public Portal

    Cancer.gov

    The CAT gene product, catalase, occurs in the peroxisome of almost all respiring organismÃÆ'¢â‚¬â„¢s cells. Catalase is a heme enzyme that converts the reactive oxygen species hydrogen peroxide to water and oxygen, diminishing the toxic effects of hydrogen peroxide on the cell. Catalase promotes growth of cells including T-cells, B-cells, myeloid leukemia cells, melanoma cells, mastocytoma cells and normal and transformed fibroblast cells. Polymorphisms in this gene have been associated with decreases in catalase activity but, to date, acatalasemia is the only disease known to be caused by this gene.

  9. Erythrocyte Catalase Activity in More Frequent Microcytic Hypochromic Anemia: Beta-Thalassemia Trait and Iron Deficiency Anemia

    PubMed Central

    Lazarte, Sandra Stella; Mónaco, María Eugenia; Jimenez, Cecilia Laura; Ledesma Achem, Miryam Emilse; Terán, Magdalena María; Issé, Blanca Alicia

    2015-01-01

    Most common microcytic hypochromic anemias are iron deficiency anemia (IDA) and β-thalassemia trait (BTT), in which oxidative stress (OxS) has an essential role. Catalase causes detoxification of H2O2 in cells, and it is an indispensable antioxidant enzyme. The study was designed to measure erythrocyte catalase activity (ECAT) in patients with IDA (10) or BTT (21), to relate it with thalassemia mutation type (β0 or β+) and to compare it with normal subjects (67). Ninety-eight individuals were analyzed since September 2013 to June 2014 in Tucumán, Argentina. Total blood count, hemoglobin electrophoresis at alkaline pH, HbA2, catalase, and iron status were performed. β-thalassemic mutations were determined by real-time PCR. Normal range for ECAT was 70,0–130,0 MU/L. ECAT was increased in 14% (3/21) of BTT subjects and decreased in 40% (4/10) of those with IDA. No significant difference (p = 0,245) was shown between normal and BTT groups, while between IDA and normal groups the difference was proved to be significant (p = 0,000). In β0 and β+ groups, no significant difference (p = 0,359) was observed. An altered ECAT was detected in IDA and BTT. These results will help to clarify how the catalase activity works in these anemia types. PMID:26527217

  10. Molecular interaction of 2-mercaptobenzimidazole with catalase reveals a potentially toxic mechanism of the inhibitor.

    PubMed

    Teng, Yue; Zou, Luyi; Huang, Ming; Zong, Wansong

    2014-12-01

    2-Mercaptobenzimidazole (MBI) is widely utilized as a corrosion inhibitor, copper-plating brightener and rubber accelerator. The residue of MBI in the environment possesses a potential risk to human health. In this work, the toxic interaction of MBI with the important antioxidant enzyme catalase (CAT) was investigated using spectroscopic and molecular docking methods under physiological conditions. MBI can spontaneously bind with CAT with one binding site through hydrogen bonds and van der Waals forces to form MBI-CAT complex. The molecular docking study revealed that MBI bound into the CAT interface of chains B and C, which led to some conformational and microenvironmental changes of CAT and further resulted in the inhibition of CAT activity. This present study provides direct evidence at a molecular level to show that exposure to MBI could induce changes in the structure and function of the enzyme CAT.

  11. [Superoxide dismutase and catalase activities in carotenoid-synthesizing fungi Blakeslea trispora and Neurospora crassa under the oxidative stress].

    PubMed

    Gessler, N N; Sokolov, A V; Bykhovskiĭ, V Ia; Belozerskaia, T A

    2002-01-01

    The addition of menadione into the medium during cultivation of Neurospora crassa in the dark activated its constitutive superoxide dismutase. Exposure to light not only activated superoxide dismutase and catalase, but also increased the content of neurosporaxanthin. Superoxide dismutase activity in the mixed (+/-) mycelium of Blakeslea trispora synthesizing beta-carotene in the dark was much lower than that in Neurospora crassa. The superoxide dismutase activity further decreased in oxidative stress. The catalase activity decreased with an increase in the content of beta-carotene. Our results indicate that neurosporaxanthin possesses photoprotective properties in Neurospora crassa. In Blakeslea trispora (+/-) fungi, this compound acts as a major antioxidant during inactivation of enzymes that detoxify reactive oxygen species.

  12. Further studies on O sub 2 -resistant photosynthesis and photorespiration in a tobacco mutant with enhanced catalase activity

    SciTech Connect

    Zelitch, I. )

    1990-02-01

    The increase in net photosynthesis in M{sub 4} progeny of an O{sub 2}-resistant tobacco (Nicotiana tabacum) mutant relative to wild-type plants at 21 and 42% O{sub 2} has been confirmed and further investigated. Self-pollination of an M{sub 3} mutant produced M{sub 4} progeny segregating high catalase phenotypes (average 40% greater than wild type) at a frequency of about 60%. The high catalase phenotype cosegregated precisely with O{sub 2}-resistant photosynthesis. About 25% of the F{sub 1} progeny of reciprocal crosses between the same M{sub 3} mutant and wild type had high catalase activity, whether the mutant was used as the maternal or paternal parent, indicating nuclear inheritance. In high-catalase mutants the activity of NADH-hydroxypyruvate reductase, another peroxisomal enzyme, was the same as wild type. The mutants released 15% less photorespiratory CO{sub 2} as a percent of net photosynthesis in CO{sub 2}-free 21% O{sub 2} and 36% less in CO{sub 2}-free 42% O{sub 2} compared with wild type. The mutant leaf tissue also released less {sup 14}CO{sub 2} per (1-{sup 14}C)glycolate metabolized than wild type in normal air, consistent with less photorespiration in the mutant. The O{sub 2}-resistant photosynthesis appears to be caused by a decrease in photorespiration especially under conditions of high O{sub 2} where the stoichiometry of CO{sub 2} release per glycolate metabolized is expected to be enhanced. The higher catalase activity in the mutant may decrease the nonenzymatic peroxidation of keto-acids such as hydroxypyruvate and glyoxylate by photorespiratory H{sub 2}O{sub 2}.

  13. Dichloroacetate- and Trichloroacetate-Induced Modulation of Superoxide Dismutase, Catalase, and Glutathione Peroxidase Activities and Glutathione Level in the livers of Mice after Subacute and Subchronic exposure

    PubMed Central

    Hassoun, Ezdihar A.; Cearfoss, Jacquelyn

    2010-01-01

    Dichloroacetate (DCA) and trichloroacetate (TCA) were previously found to induce various levels of oxidative stress in the hepatic tissues of mice after subacute and subchronic exposure. The cells are known to have several protective mechansims against production of oxidative stress by different xenobiotics. To assess the roles of the antioxidant enzymes and glutathione (GSH) in DCA- and TCA-induced oxidative stress, groups of B6C3F1 mice were administered either DCA or TCA at doses of 7.7, 77, 154 and 410 mg/kg/day, by gavage for 4 weeks (4-W) and 13 weeks (13-W), and superoxide dismutase (SOD) catalase (CAT) and glutathione peroxidase (GSH-Px) activities, as well as GSH were determined in the hepatic tissues. DCA at doses ranging between 7.7-410, and 7.7-77 mg/kg/day, given for 4-W and 13-W, respectively, resulted in either suppression or no change in SOD, CAT and GSH-Px activities, but doses of 154-410 mg DCA/kg/day administered for 13-W were found to result in significant induction of the three enzyme activities. TCA administration on the other hand, resulted in increases in SOD and CAT activities, and suppression of GSH-Px activity in both periods. Except for the DCA doses of 77-154 mg/kg/day administered for 13-W that resulted in significant reduction in GSH levels, all other DCA, as well as TCA treatments produced no changes in GSH. Since these enzymes are involved in the detoxification of the reactive oxygen species (ROS), superoxide anion (SA) and H2O2, it is concluded that SA is the main contributor to DCA-induced oxidative stress while both ROS contribute to that of TCA. The increases in the enzyme activities associated with 154-410 mg DCA/kg/day in the 13-W period suggest their role as protective mechanisms contributing to the survival of cells modified in response to those treatments. PMID:21170174

  14. GT-CATS: Tracking Operator Activities in Complex Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Callantine, Todd J.; Mitchell, Christine M.; Palmer, Everett A.

    1999-01-01

    Human operators of complex dynamic systems can experience difficulties supervising advanced control automation. One remedy is to develop intelligent aiding systems that can provide operators with context-sensitive advice and reminders. The research reported herein proposes, implements, and evaluates a methodology for activity tracking, a form of intent inferencing that can supply the knowledge required for an intelligent aid by constructing and maintaining a representation of operator activities in real time. The methodology was implemented in the Georgia Tech Crew Activity Tracking System (GT-CATS), which predicts and interprets the actions performed by Boeing 757/767 pilots navigating using autopilot flight modes. This report first describes research on intent inferencing and complex modes of automation. It then provides a detailed description of the GT-CATS methodology, knowledge structures, and processing scheme. The results of an experimental evaluation using airline pilots are given. The results show that GT-CATS was effective in predicting and interpreting pilot actions in real time.

  15. Genipin Cross-Linked Glucose Oxidase and Catalase Multi-enzyme for Gluconic Acid Synthesis.

    PubMed

    Cui, Caixia; Chen, Haibin; Chen, Biqiang; Tan, Tianwei

    2017-02-01

    In this work, glucose oxidase (GOD) and catalase (CAT) were used simultaneously to produce gluconic acid from glucose. In order to reduce the distance between the two enzymes, and therefore improve efficiency, GOD and CAT were cross-linked together using genipin. Improvements in gluconic acid production were due to quick removal of harmful intermediate hydrogen peroxide by CAT. GOD activity was significantly affected by the proportion of CAT in the system, with GOD activity in the cross-linked multi-enzyme (CLME) being 10 times higher than that in an un-cross-linked GOD/CAT mixture. The glucose conversion rate after 15 h using 15 % glucose was also 10 % higher using the CLME than was measured using a GOD/CAT mixture.

  16. Catalase and glutathione peroxidase are equally active in detoxification of hydrogen peroxide in human erythrocytes

    SciTech Connect

    Gaetani, G.F.; Galiano, S.; Canepa, L.; Ferraris, A.M.; Kirkman, H.N.

    1989-01-01

    Genetic deficiencies of glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase (G6PD) and NADPH predispose affected erythrocytes to destruction from peroxides. Conversely, genetic deficiencies of catalase do not predispose affected erythrocytes to peroxide-induced destruction. These observations have served to strengthen the assumption that the NADPH/glutathione/glutathione peroxidase pathway is the principal means for disposal of H/sub 2/O/sub 2/ in human erythrocytes. Recently, however, mammalian catalase was found to have tightly bound NADPH and to require NADPH for the prevention and reversal of inactivation by its toxic substrate (H/sub 2/O/sub 2/). Since both catalase and the glutathione pathway are dependent on NADPH for function, this finding raises the possibility that both mechanisms destroy H/sub 2/O/sub 2/ in human erythrocytes. A comparison of normal and acatalasemic erythrocytes in the present study indicated that catalase accounts for more than half of the destruction of H/sub 2/O/sub 2/ when H/sub 2/O/sub 2/ is generated at a rate comparable to that which leads to hemolysis in G6PD- deficient erythrocytes.

  17. Hinokitiol Exerts Anticancer Activity through Downregulation of MMPs 9/2 and Enhancement of Catalase and SOD Enzymes: In Vivo Augmentation of Lung Histoarchitecture.

    PubMed

    Huang, Chien-Hsun; Jayakumar, Thanasekaran; Chang, Chao-Chien; Fong, Tsorng-Harn; Lu, Shing-Hwa; Thomas, Philip Aloysius; Choy, Cheuk-Sing; Sheu, Joen-Rong

    2015-09-25

    Melanoma is extremely resistant to chemotherapy and the death rate is increasing hastily worldwide. Extracellular matrix promotes the migration and invasion of tumor cells through the production of matrix metalloproteinase (MMP)-2 and -9. Evidence has shown that natural dietary antioxidants are capable of inhibiting cancer cell growth. Our recent studies showed that hinokitiol, a natural bioactive compound, inhibited vascular smooth muscle cell proliferation and platelets aggregation. The present study is to investigate the anticancer efficacy of hinokitiol against B16-F10 melanoma cells via modulating tumor invasion factors MMPs, antioxidant enzymes in vitro. An in vivo mice model of histological investigation was performed to study the patterns of elastic and collagen fibers. Hinokitiol inhibited the expression and activity of MMPs-2 and -9 in B16-F10 melanoma cells, as measured by western blotting and gelatin zymography, respectively. An observed increase in protein expression of MMPs 2/9 in melanoma cells was significantly inhibited by hinokitiol. Notably, hinokitiol (1-5 μM) increased the activities of antioxidant enzymes catalase (CAT) and superoxide dismutase (SOD) from the reduction in melanoma cells. Also, hinokitiol (2-10 µM) concentration dependently reduced in vitro Fenton reaction induced hydroxyl radical (OH·) formation. An in vivo study showed that hinokitiol treatment increased elastic fibers (EF), collagens dispersion, and improved alveolar alterations in the lungs of B16/F10 injected mice. Overall, our findings propose that hinokitiol may be a potent anticancer candidate through down regulation of MMPs 9/2, reduction of OH· production and enhancement of antioxidant enzymes SOD and CAT.

  18. Isolation of a Novel Peroxisomal Catalase Gene from Sugarcane, Which Is Responsive to Biotic and Abiotic Stresses

    PubMed Central

    Ling, Hui; Chen, Shanshan; Wang, Shanshan; Xu, Liping; Allan, Andrew C.; Que, Youxiong

    2014-01-01

    Catalase is an iron porphyrin enzyme, which serves as an efficient scavenger of reactive oxygen species (ROS) to avoid oxidative damage. In sugarcane, the enzymatic activity of catalase in a variety (Yacheng05–179) resistant to the smut pathogen Sporisorium scitamineum was always higher than that of the susceptible variety (Liucheng03–182), suggesting that catalase activity may have a positive correlation with smut resistance in sugarcane. To understand the function of catalase at the molecular level, a cDNA sequence of ScCAT1 (GenBank Accession No. KF664183), was isolated from sugarcane infected by S. scitamineum. ScCAT1 was predicted to encode 492 amino acid residues, and its deduced amino acid sequence shared a high degree of homology with other plant catalases. Enhanced growth of ScCAT1 in recombinant Escherichia coli Rosetta cells under the stresses of CuCl2, CdCl2 and NaCl indicated its high tolerance. Q-PCR results showed that ScCAT1 was expressed at relatively high levels in the bud, whereas expression was moderate in stem epidermis and stem pith. Different kinds of stresses, including S. scitamineum challenge, plant hormones (SA, MeJA and ABA) treatments, oxidative (H2O2) stress, heavy metal (CuCl2) and hyper-osmotic (PEG and NaCl) stresses, triggered a significant induction of ScCAT1. The ScCAT1 protein appeared to localize in plasma membrane and cytoplasm. Furthermore, histochemical assays using DAB and trypan blue staining, as well as conductivity measurement, indicated that ScCAT1 may confer the sugarcane immunity. In conclusion, the positive response of ScCAT1 to biotic and abiotic stresses suggests that ScCAT1 is involved in protection of sugarcane against reactive oxidant-related environmental stimuli. PMID:24392135

  19. Isolation of a novel peroxisomal catalase gene from sugarcane, which is responsive to biotic and abiotic stresses.

    PubMed

    Su, Yachun; Guo, Jinlong; Ling, Hui; Chen, Shanshan; Wang, Shanshan; Xu, Liping; Allan, Andrew C; Que, Youxiong

    2014-01-01

    Catalase is an iron porphyrin enzyme, which serves as an efficient scavenger of reactive oxygen species (ROS) to avoid oxidative damage. In sugarcane, the enzymatic activity of catalase in a variety (Yacheng05-179) resistant to the smut pathogen Sporisorium scitamineum was always higher than that of the susceptible variety (Liucheng03-182), suggesting that catalase activity may have a positive correlation with smut resistance in sugarcane. To understand the function of catalase at the molecular level, a cDNA sequence of ScCAT1 (GenBank Accession No. KF664183), was isolated from sugarcane infected by S. scitamineum. ScCAT1 was predicted to encode 492 amino acid residues, and its deduced amino acid sequence shared a high degree of homology with other plant catalases. Enhanced growth of ScCAT1 in recombinant Escherichia coli Rosetta cells under the stresses of CuCl2, CdCl2 and NaCl indicated its high tolerance. Q-PCR results showed that ScCAT1 was expressed at relatively high levels in the bud, whereas expression was moderate in stem epidermis and stem pith. Different kinds of stresses, including S. scitamineum challenge, plant hormones (SA, MeJA and ABA) treatments, oxidative (H2O2) stress, heavy metal (CuCl2) and hyper-osmotic (PEG and NaCl) stresses, triggered a significant induction of ScCAT1. The ScCAT1 protein appeared to localize in plasma membrane and cytoplasm. Furthermore, histochemical assays using DAB and trypan blue staining, as well as conductivity measurement, indicated that ScCAT1 may confer the sugarcane immunity. In conclusion, the positive response of ScCAT1 to biotic and abiotic stresses suggests that ScCAT1 is involved in protection of sugarcane against reactive oxidant-related environmental stimuli.

  20. Characterizing dose-responses of catalase to nitrofurazone exposure in model ciliated protozoan Euplotes vannus for ecotoxicity assessment: enzyme activity and mRNA expression.

    PubMed

    Li, Jiqiu; Zhou, Liang; Lin, Xiaofeng; Yi, Zhenzhen; Al-Rasheid, Khaled A S

    2014-02-01

    In environmental studies, some biological responses, known as biomarkers, have been used as a powerful bioassay tool for more than four decades. Disparity between enzyme activity and mRNA abundance leads to correlation equivocality, which makes the application of biomarkers for environmental risk assessment more complicated. This study investigates this disparity in the case of catalase when used as a biomarker for detecting ecotoxicity induced by antibiotics in aquatic ecosystems. In particular, dose-responses for catalase activity and mRNA expression abundance were investigated in Euplotes vannus which were exposed to graded doses of nitrofurazone for several discrete durations, and dose-response models were developed to characterize the dose-response dynamics. Significant differences were found in both catalase activity and mRNA expression abundance among the E. vannus treated with nitrofurazone. Catalase activity showed a hormetic-like effect in terms of dose-response, characterized by a biphasic relationship which was more clearly evident after a longer exposure period, while mRNA expression abundance increased linearly with the exposure duration. Additionally, the correlation between catalase activity and mRNA expression abundance reversed along with the duration of exposure to nitrofurazone. Taken together, our results demonstrate that catalase mRNA expression offers a more straightforward dose-response model than enzyme activity. Our findings suggest that both catalase enzyme activity and mRNA expression abundance can be used jointly as bioassay tools for detecting ecotoxicity induced by nitrofurazone in aquatic ecosystems.

  1. Transcriptional regulation of the Drosophila catalase gene by the DRE/DREF system.

    PubMed

    Park, So Young; Kim, Young-Shin; Yang, Dong-Jin; Yoo, Mi-Ae

    2004-01-01

    Reactive oxygen species (ROS) cause oxidative stress and aging. The catalase gene is a key component of the cellular antioxidant defense network. However, the molecular mechanisms that regulate catalase gene expression are poorly understood. In this study, we have identified a DNA replication-related element (DRE; 5'-TATCGATA) in the 5'-flanking region of the Drosophila catalase gene. Gel mobility shift assays revealed that a previously identified factor called DREF (DRE- binding factor) binds to the DRE sequence in the Drosophila catalase gene. We used site-directed mutagenesis and in vitro transient transfection assays to establish that expression of the catalase gene is regulated by DREF through the DRE site. To explore the role of DRE/DREF in vivo, we established transgenic flies carrying a catalase-lacZ fusion gene with or without mutation in the DRE. The beta-galactosidase expression patterns of these reporter transgenic lines demonstrated that the catalase gene is upregulated by DREF through the DRE sequence. In addition, we observed suppression of the ectopic DREF-induced rough eye phenotype by a catalase amorphic Cat(n1) allele, indicating that DREF activity is modulated by the intracellular redox state. These results indicate that the DRE/DREF system is a key regulator of catalase gene expression and provide evidence of cross-talk between the DRE/DREF system and the antioxidant defense system.

  2. Protective effects of catalase on retinal ischemia/reperfusion injury in rats.

    PubMed

    Chen, Baihua; Tang, Luosheng

    2011-11-01

    Retinal ischemia/reperfusion (I/R) injury causes profound tissue damage, especially retinal ganglion cell (RGC) death. The aims of the study were to investigate whether catalase (CAT) has a neuroprotective effect on RGC after I/R injury in rats, and to determine the possible antioxidant mechanism. Wistar female rats were randonmized into four groups: normal control group (Control group), retinal I/R with vehicle group (I/R with vehicle group), retinal I/R with AAV-CAT group (I/R with AAV-CAT group), and normal retina with AAV-CAT group (normal with AAV-CAT group). One eye of each rat was pretreated with recombinant adeno-associated virus containing catalase gene (I/R with AAV-CAT group or normal with AAV-CAT group) and recombinant adeno-associated virus containing GFP gene (I/R with vehicle group) by intravitreal injection 21 days before initiation of I/R injury. Retinal I/R injury was induced by elevating intraocular pressure to 100mmHg for 1h. The number of RGC and inner plexiform layer (IPL) thickness were measured by fluorogold retrograde labeling and hematoxylin and eosin staining at 6h, 24h, 72 h and 5d after injury. Hydrogen peroxide (H(2)O(2)), the number of RGC, IPL thickness, malondialdehyde(MDA), 8-hydroxy-2-deoxyguanosine (8-OHdG), CAT activity and nitrotyrosine were measured by fluorescence staining, immunohistochemistry and enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay analysis at 5 days after injury. Electroretinographic (ERG) evaluation was also used. Pretreatment of AAV-CAT significantly decreased the levels of H(2)O(2), MDA, 8-OHdG and nitrotyrosine, increased the catalase activity, and prevented the reduction of a- and b- waves in the I/R with AAV-CAT group compare with the I/R with vehicle group (p<0.01). Catalase attenuated the I/R-induced damage of RGC and IPL and retinal function. Therefore, catalase can protect the rat retina from I/R-induced injury by enhancing the antioxidative ability and reducing oxidative stress, which suggests that catalase may be

  3. Activity changes of the cat paraventricular hypothalamus during stressor exposure.

    PubMed

    Kristensen, Morten P; Rector, David M; Poe, Gina R; Harper, Ronald M

    2004-01-19

    Dorso-medial paraventricular hypothalamus (PVH) activity was assessed by light scattering procedures in freely behaving cats during auditory stressor exposure. Acoustic noise (> 95dB) raised plasma ACTH concentrations, somatic muscle tonus, respiratory frequency and cardiac rates; PVH activity peaked 0.8s following stimulation, and then markedly declined below baseline to a trough at 9.7s. Hypothalamic responses were not uniformly distributed across the recorded PVH field. Activity changes emerged from subregions within the visualized area, and were widespread at the overall activity zenith and nadir. Isolated pixels appeared opposite in activity pattern to overall changes. We suggest that transient activity increases represent initial PVH neural stress responses, and that subsequent profound declines result from neural inhibitory feedback.

  4. Mitochondrial targeted catalase suppresses invasive breast cancer in mice

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Treatment of invasive breast cancer has an alarmingly high rate of failure because effective targets have not been identified. One potential target is mitochondrial generated reactive oxygen species (ROS) because ROS production has been associated with changes in substrate metabolism and lower concentration of anti-oxidant enzymes in tumor and stromal cells and increased metastatic potential. Methods Transgenic mice expressing a human catalase gene (mCAT) were crossed with MMTV-PyMT transgenic mice that develop metastatic breast cancer. All mice (33 mCAT positive and 23 mCAT negative) were terminated at 110 days of age, when tumors were well advanced. Tumors were histologically assessed for invasiveness, proliferation and metastatic foci in the lungs. ROS levels and activation status of p38 MAPK were determined. Results PyMT mice expressing mCAT had a 12.5 per cent incidence of high histological grade primary tumor invasiveness compared to a 62.5 per cent incidence in PyMT mice without mCAT. The histological grade correlated with incidence of metastasis with 56 per cent of PyMT mice positive for mCAT showing evidence of pulmonary metastasis compared to 85.4 per cent of PyMT mice negative for mCAT with pulmonary metastasis (p ≤ 0.05). PyMT tumor cells expressing mCAT had lower ROS levels and were more resistant to hydrogen peroxide-induced oxidative stress than wild type tumor cells, suggesting that mCAT has the potential of quenching intracellular ROS and subsequent invasive behavior. The metastatic tumor burden in PyMT mice expressing mCAT was 0.1 mm2/cm2 of lung tissue compared with 1.3 mm2/cm2 of lung tissue in PyMT mice expressing the wild type allele (p ≤ 0.01), indicating that mCAT could play a role in mitigating metastatic tumor progression at a distant organ site. Expression of mCAT in the lungs increased resistance to hydrogen peroxide-induced oxidative stress that was associated with decreased activation of p38MAPK suggesting ROS signaling

  5. Effects of Dietary Pb and Cd and Their Combination on Glutathion-S-Transferase and Catalase Enzyme Activities in Digestive Gland and Foot of the Green Garden Snail, Cantareus apertus (Born, 1778).

    PubMed

    Mleiki, Anwar; Marigómez, Ionan; El Menif, Najoua Trigui

    2015-06-01

    The present study was focused on the assessment of glutathion-S-transferase (GST) and catalase (CAT) activities in the digestive gland and foot of the land snail, Cantareus apertus (Born, 1778), exposed to different nominal dietary concentrations of Pb (25 and 2500 mg Pb/Kg), Cd (5 and 100 mg Cd/Kg) and their combination (25 mg Pb + 5 mg Cd/Kg and 2500 mg Pb + 100 mg Cd/Kg) for 7 and 60 days. GST activity was significantly increased after 7 and 60 days exposure to the highest concentration of Pb, Cd and their combination. The levels of CAT activity were different in the two studied organs but in both cases it resulted increased after 7 and 60 days of exposure, which varied significantly between metals and dietary concentrations. Therefore, it can be concluded that GST and CAT enzymes in digestive gland and foot of C. apertus are responsive to Cd, Pb and their combination, whereby they are suitable to be included in a battery of biomarkers for ecosystem health assessment in metal polluted soils using this species as sentinel.

  6. Mechanism of pH-switchable peroxidase and catalase-like activities of gold, silver, platinum and palladium.

    PubMed

    Li, Junnan; Liu, Wenqi; Wu, Xiaochun; Gao, Xingfa

    2015-04-01

    Despite being increasingly used as artificial enzymes, little has been known for the origin of the pH-switchable peroxidase-like and catalase-like activities of metals. Using calculations and experiments, we report the mechanisms for both activities and their pH-switchability for metals Au, Ag, Pd and Pt. The calculations suggest that both activities are intrinsic properties of metals, regardless of the surfaces and intersections of facets exposed to environments. The pre-adsorbed OH groups on the surfaces, which are only favorably formed in basic conditions, trigger the switch between both activities and render the pH-switchability. The adsorption energies between H2O2 and metals can be used as convenient descriptors to predict the relative enzyme-like activities of the metals with similar surface morphologies. The results agree with the enzyme-mimic activities that have been experimentally reported for Au, Ag, Pt and predict that Pd should have the similar properties. The prediction, as well as the predicted activity order for the four metals, has been verified by the experimental tests. The results thus provide an in-depth insight into the peroxidase-like and catalase-like activities of the metals and will guide the de novo design, synthesis and application of artificial enzymes based on inorganic materials.

  7. The Genetics of Catalase in Drosophila Melanogaster: Isolation and Characterization of Acatalasemic Mutants

    PubMed Central

    Mackay, W. J.; Bewley, G. C.

    1989-01-01

    Activated oxygen species have been demonstrated to be the important agents in oxygen toxicity by disrupting the structural and functional integrity of cells through lipid peroxidation events, DNA damage and protein inactivation. The biological consequences of free radical damage have long been hypothesized to be a causal agent in many aging-related diseases. Catalase (H(2)O(2):H(2)O(2) oxidoreductase; EC 1.15.1.1) is one of several enzymes involved in the scavenging of oxygen free radicals and free radical derivatives. The structural gene for catalase in Drosophila melanogaster has been localized to region 75D1-76A on chromosome 3L by dosage responses to segmental aneuploidy. This study reports the isolation of a stable deficiency, Df(3L)Cat(DH104)(75C1-2;75F1), that uncovers the catalase locus and the subsequent isolation of six acatalasemic mutants. All catalase mutants are viable under standard culture conditions and recessive lethal mutations within the 75C1-F1 interval have been shown not to affect catalase activity. Two catalase mutations are amorphic while four are hypomorphic alleles of the Cat(+) locus. The lack of intergenic complementation between the six catalase mutations strongly suggests that there is only one functional gene in Drosophila. One acatalesemic mutation was mapped to position 3-47.0 which resides within the catalase dosage sensitive region. While complete loss of catalase activity confers a severe viability effect, residual levels are sufficient to restore viability to wild type levels. These results suggest a threshold effect for viability and offer an explanation for the general lack of phenotypic effects associated with the known mammalian acatalasemics. PMID:2503418

  8. Evaluation of the catalase promoter for expressing the alkaline xylanase gene (alx) in Aspergillus niger.

    PubMed

    Sharma, Ruchika; Katoch, Meenu; Govindappa, Nagraj; Srivastava, P S; Sastry, Kedarnath N; Qazi, Ghulam Nabi

    2012-02-01

    Aspergillus niger represents a promising host for the expression of recombinant proteins, but only a few expression systems are available for this organism. In this study, the inducible catalase promoter (PcatR) from A. niger was characterized. For this, constructs were developed and checked for the expression of the alkaline xylanase gene transcriptionally fused under the cat R promoter. Two versions of the catalase (catR) promoter sequence from A. niger (P(cat300,) P(cat924)) were isolated and tested for their ability to drive expression of the alkaline xylanase (alx) gene. P(cat924) showed better efficiency (more than 10-fold increase in AlX activity compared to P(cat300)) under the optimized culture conditions. Induction of the catR promoter with 0.20% H(2)O(2) and 1.5% CaCO(3) in the culture medium, further increased expression of AlX 2.61- and 2.20-fold, respectively, clarifying its inducible nature. Specific induction or repression of the catR promoter provides the possibility for utilization of this promoter in heterologous protein production.

  9. Investigation of the simultaneous production of superoxide dismutase and catalase enzymes from Rhodotorula glutinis under different culture conditions.

    PubMed

    Unlü, Ayşe Ezgi; Takaç, Serpil

    2012-10-01

    The simultaneous production production of superoxide (SOD) and catalase (CAT) from Rhodotorula glutinis was studied. The effects of temperature, initial medium pH, and carbon source on the enzyme activities were investigated. Temperature and carbon sources were found to have significant effects on the enzyme activities. 10°C provided the highest specific CAT and SOD activities as 22.6 U/mg protein and 170 U/mg protein, respectively. Glycerol was found to be the best carbon source for enzyme activities, providing 113 U/mg protein for CAT and 125 U/mg protein for SOD, which were also the highest activities obtained in the present study.

  10. Expression and Activity of a Novel Cathelicidin from Domestic Cats

    PubMed Central

    Leonard, Brian C.; Chu, Hiutung; Johns, Jennifer L.; Gallo, Richard L.; Moore, Peter F.; Marks, Stanley L.; Bevins, Charles L.

    2011-01-01

    Cathelicidins are small cationic antimicrobial peptides found in many species including primates, mammals, marsupials, birds and even more primitive vertebrates, such as the hagfish. Some animals encode multiple cathelicidins in their genome, whereas others have only one. This report identifies and characterizes feline cathelicidin (feCath) as the sole cathelicidin in domestic cats (Felis catus). Expression of feCath is predominantly found in the bone marrow, with lower levels of expression in the gastrointestinal tract and skin. By immunocytochemistry, feCath localizes to the cytoplasm of neutrophils in feline peripheral blood. Structurally, the mature feCath sequence is most similar to a subgroup of cathelicidins that form linear α-helices. feCath possesses antimicrobial activity against E. coli D31, Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium (IR715), Listeria monocytogenes and Staphylococcus pseudintermedius (clinical isolate) similar to that of the human ortholog, LL-37. In contrast, feCath lacks the DNA binding activity seen with LL-37. Given its similarity in sequence, structure, tissue expression, and antimicrobial activity, the cathelicidin encoded by cats, feCath, belongs to the subgroup of linear cathelicidins found not only in humans, but also non-human primates, dogs, mice, and rats. PMID:21533281

  11. [Effects of catalase activators and inhibitors on ethanol pharmacokinetic characteristics and ethanol and aldehyde-metabolizing enzyme activities in the rat liver and brain].

    PubMed

    Bardina, L R; Pron'ko, P S; Satanovskaia, V I; Alieva, E V

    2010-01-01

    The effects of catalase regulators (aminotriazole, lead acetate, taurine, di-2-ethylhexylphthalate) on the preference for ethanol, its pharmacokinetics, and activities of rat liver and brain ethanol and acetaldehyde-metabolizing enzymes were studied. Lead acetate (100 mg/kg, i.p., 7 days), aminotriazole (1 g/kg, i.p., 7 days), and taurine (650 mg/kg, i.g., 14 days) decreased ethanol consumption under conditions of free choice (10% ethanol water), whereas di-2-ethylhexylphthalate (300 mg/kg, i.g., 7 days) did not exert any effect on this parameter. Taurine, lead acetate and di-2-ethylhexylphthalate significantly activated liver ADH, MEOS and catalase peroxidase activity. Aminotriazole also activated ADH and MEOS, but inhibited liver catalase. The activities of liver and brain A1DH as well as catalase were insignificantly changed by this treatment. The 7-day administration of lead acetate, di-2-ethylhexylphthalate and aminotriazole administrations significantly influenced the ethanol (2 g/kg., i.p.) pharmacokinetic parameters: the area under the pharmacokinetic curve and the elimination half-life time were significantly reduced, whereas the elimination constant and clearance were increased. This unequivocally indicates accelerated ethanol elimination. The 14-day ingestion of taurine insignificantly changed the parameters of ethanol pharmacokinetics in rats.

  12. A Eukaryote without Catalase-Containing Microbodies: Neurospora crassa Exhibits a Unique Cellular Distribution of Its Four Catalases†

    PubMed Central

    Schliebs, Wolfgang; Würtz, Christian; Kunau, Wolf-Hubert; Veenhuis, Marten; Rottensteiner, Hanspeter

    2006-01-01

    Microbodies usually house catalase to decompose hydrogen peroxide generated within the organelle by the action of various oxidases. Here we have analyzed whether peroxisomes (i.e., catalase-containing microbodies) exist in Neurospora crassa. Three distinct catalase isoforms were identified by native catalase activity gels under various peroxisome-inducing conditions. Subcellular fractionation by density gradient centrifugation revealed that most of the spectrophotometrically measured activity was present in the light upper fractions, with an additional small peak coinciding with the peak fractions of HEX-1, the marker protein for Woronin bodies, a compartment related to the microbody family. However, neither in-gel assays nor monospecific antibodies generated against the three purified catalases detected the enzymes in any dense organellar fraction. Furthermore, staining of an N. crassa wild-type strain with 3,3′-diaminobenzidine and H2O2 did not lead to catalase-dependent reaction products within microbodies. Nonetheless, N. crassa does possess a gene (cat-4) whose product is most similar to the peroxisomal type of monofunctional catalases. This novel protein indeed exhibited catalase activity, but was not localized to microbodies either. We conclude that N. crassa lacks catalase-containing peroxisomes, a characteristic that is probably restricted to a few filamentous fungi that produce little hydrogen peroxide within microbodies. PMID:16963632

  13. Effect of compatible and noncompatible osmolytes on the enzymatic activity and thermal stability of bovine liver catalase.

    PubMed

    Sepasi Tehrani, H; Moosavi-Movahedi, A A; Ghourchian, H; Ahmad, F; Kiany, A; Atri, M S; Ariaeenejad, Sh; Kavousi, K; Saboury, A A

    2013-12-01

    Catalase is an important antioxidant enzyme that catalyzes the disproportionation of H2O2 into harmless water and molecular oxygen. Due to various applications of the enzyme in different sectors of industry as well as medicine, the enhancement of stability of the enzyme is important. Effect of various classes of compatible as well as noncompatible osmolytes on the enzymatic activity, disaggregation, and thermal stability of bovine liver catalase have been investigated. Compatible osmolytes, proline, xylitol, and valine destabilize the denatured form of the enzyme and, therefore, increase its disaggregation and thermal stability. The increase in the thermal stability is accompanied with a slight increase of activity in comparison to the native enzyme at 25 °C. On the other hand, histidine, a noncompatible osmolyte stabilizes the denatured form of the protein and hence causes an overall decrease in the thermal stability and enzymatic activity of the enzyme. Chemometric results have confirmed the experimental results and have provided insight into the distribution and number of mole fraction components for the intermediates. The increase in melting temperature (Tm) and enzymatic rate could be further amplified by the intrinsic effect of temperature enhancement on the enzymatic activity for the industrial purposes.

  14. Spectroscopic investigations on the interaction between carbon nanotubes and catalase on molecular level.

    PubMed

    Guan, Jin; Dai, Jingping; Zhao, Xingchen; Liu, Chunhua; Gao, Canzhu; Liu, Rutao

    2014-05-01

    The interactions between well-dispersed multiwalled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) and catalase (CAT) were investigated. The activity of CAT was inhibited with the addition of MWCNTs. After deducting the inner filter effect, the fluorescence spectra revealed that the tryptophan (Trp) residues were exposed and the fluorescence intensities of CAT increased with the increase in the MWCNTs concentration. At the same time, the environment of the Trp residues became more hydrophobic. The results of UV-vis absorption spectroscopy and CD spectra indicated that the secondary structure of CAT had been changed, and the amino acid residues were located in a more hydrophobic environment. Meanwhile, the UV-vis spectra indicated that the conformation of the heme porphyrin rings was changed. The microenvironment of CAT activity sites may be interfered by MWCNTs. This research showed that MWCNTs could not only contribute to the conformational changes of protein but also change the enzyme function.

  15. Enhanced stability of catalase covalently immobilized on functionalized titania submicrospheres.

    PubMed

    Wu, Hong; Liang, Yanpeng; Shi, Jiafu; Wang, Xiaoli; Yang, Dong; Jiang, Zhongyi

    2013-04-01

    In this study, a novel approach combing the chelation and covalent binding was explored for facile and efficient enzyme immobilization. The unique capability of titania to chelate with catecholic derivatives at ambient conditions was utilized for titania surface functionalization. The functionalized titania was then used for enzyme immobilization. Titania submicrospheres (500-600 nm) were synthesized by a modified sol-gel method and functionalized with carboxylic acid groups through a facile chelation method by using 3-(3,4-dihydroxyphenyl) propionic acid as the chelating agent. Then, catalase (CAT) was covalently immobilized on these functionalized titania submicrospheres through 1-ethyl-3-[3-dimethylaminopropyl] carbodiimide hydrochloride/N-hydroxysuccinimide (EDC/NHS) coupling reaction. The immobilized CAT retained 65% of its free form activity with a loading capacity of 100-150 mg/g titania. The pH stability, thermostability, recycling stability and storage stability of the immobilized CAT were evaluated. A remarkable enhancement in enzyme stability was achieved. The immobilized CAT retained 90% and 76% of its initial activity after 10 and 16 successive cycles of decomposition of hydrogen peroxide, respectively. Both the Km and the Vmax values of the immobilized CAT (27.4 mM, 13.36 mM/min) were close to those of the free CAT (25.7 mM, 13.46 mM/min).

  16. [The dynamics of forming an active defensive reflex in cats].

    PubMed

    Fokin, V F

    1975-01-01

    Active defensive reflexes were elaborated in cats with pain stimulations of the forepaw by means of an electrical pricking device with a target attached to it. The elaboration was carried out during action of a flickering light used for the convenience of the EEG analysis. Repeated pain stimulation led to elaboration of an aggressive attacking reaction, chiefly manifested in the paw striking the target. At the beginning of the elaboration, passive-defensive reactions were manifest, which did not completely disappear even after formation of a stable attacking reflex. Two types of active defensive reflexes were elaborated: A-type reflex which helped the animal to get rid of the pain stimulation at the very beginning; B-type reflex which prevented the pain stimulation. The difference beteween these two types is discussed.

  17. Radiation immobilization of catalase and its application

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guanghui, Wang; Hongfei, Ha; Xia, Wang; Jilan, Wu

    Catalase was immobilized by chemical method on porous polyacrylamide particles which produced through radiation polymerization of acrylamide monomer at low temperature (-78°C). Activity of immobilized catalase was enhanced distinctly by joining a chemical "arm" to the support. The method of recovery of catalase activity on immobilized polymer was found by soaking it in certain buffer. The treatment of H 2O 2 both in aqueous solution and alcoholic solution by using the immobilized catalase was performed.

  18. Modification of catalase by chondroitin sulfate.

    PubMed

    Maksimenko, A V; Tischenko, E G

    1997-10-01

    Catalase was chemically modified by sodium chondroitin sulfate using the benzoquinone binding method. Thus, 40-42% of the catalase preparation was modified. Treatment of catalase and superoxide dismutase with benzoquinone-activated chondroitin sulfate results in a bienzymic conjugate with electrophoretically heterogenous composition. The yield of the products and their residual catalytic activity indicate that the method can be used for the preparation of modified catalase and the bienzymic conjugate to study their efficiency in vivo.

  19. Francisella tularensis Catalase Restricts Immune Function by Impairing TRPM2 Channel Activity.

    PubMed

    Shakerley, Nicole L; Chandrasekaran, Akshaya; Trebak, Mohamed; Miller, Barbara A; Melendez, J Andrés

    2016-02-19

    As an innate defense mechanism, macrophages produce reactive oxygen species that weaken pathogens and serve as secondary messengers involved in immune function. The Gram-negative bacterium Francisella tularensis utilizes its antioxidant armature to limit the host immune response, but the mechanism behind this suppression is not defined. Here we establish that F. tularensis limits Ca(2+) entry in macrophages, thereby limiting actin reorganization and IL-6 production in a redox-dependent fashion. Wild type (live vaccine strain) or catalase-deficient F. tularensis (ΔkatG) show distinct profiles in their H2O2 scavenging rates, 1 and 0.015 pm/s, respectively. Murine alveolar macrophages infected with ΔkatG display abnormally high basal intracellular Ca(2+) concentration that did not increase further in response to H2O2. Additionally, ΔkatG-infected macrophages displayed limited Ca(2+) influx in response to ionomycin, as a result of ionophore H2O2 sensitivity. Exogenously added H2O2 or H2O2 generated by ΔkatG likely oxidizes ionomycin and alters its ability to transport Ca(2+). Basal increases in cytosolic Ca(2+) and insensitivity to H2O2-mediated Ca(2+) entry in ΔkatG-infected cells are reversed by the Ca(2+) channel inhibitors 2-aminoethyl diphenylborinate and SKF-96365. 2-Aminoethyl diphenylborinate but not SKF-96365 abrogated ΔkatG-dependent increases in macrophage actin remodeling and IL-6 secretion, suggesting a role for H2O2-mediated Ca(2+) entry through the transient receptor potential melastatin 2 (TRPM2) channel in macrophages. Indeed, increases in basal Ca(2+), actin polymerization, and IL-6 production are reversed in TRPM2-null macrophages infected with ΔkatG. Together, our findings provide compelling evidence that F. tularensis catalase restricts reactive oxygen species to temper macrophage TRPM2-mediated Ca(2+) signaling and limit host immune function.

  20. Cu(II)-disulfide complexes display simultaneous superoxide dismutase- and catalase-like activities.

    PubMed

    Aliaga, Margarita E; Andrade-Acuña, Daniela; López-Alarcón, Camilo; Sandoval-Acuña, Cristián; Speisky, Hernán

    2013-12-01

    Superoxide is a potentially toxic by-product of cellular metabolism. We have addressed here the in vitro ability of complexes formed between copper(II) ions and various biologically-occurring disulfides (RSSR: oxidized glutathione, cystine, homocystine and α-lipoic acid) to react with superoxide. The studied complexes were found to react with superoxide (generated by a xanthine/xanthine oxidase system) at rate constants (kCu(II)-RSSR) close to 10(6)M(-1)s(-1), which are three orders of magnitude lower than that reported for superoxide dismutase (SOD) but comparable to that of several other copper-containing complexes reported as SOD mimetics. The interaction between the tested Cu(II)-RSSR and superoxide, led to the generation and recovery of concentrations of hydrogen peroxide and oxygen that were, respectively, below and above those theoretically-expected from a sole SOD mimetic action. Interestingly, oxygen was generated when the Cu(II)-RSSR complexes were directly incubated with hydrogen peroxide. Taken together, these results reveal that the Cu(II)-RSSR complexes not only have the capacity to dismutate superoxide but also to simultaneously act like catalase mimetic molecules. When added to superoxide-overproducing mitochondria (condition attained by its exposure to diclofenac), three of the tested complexes were able (2-4μM), not only to totally restore, but also to lower below the basal level the mitochondrial production of superoxide. The present study is first in reporting on the potential of Cu(II)-disulfide complexes to act as SOD and catalase like molecules, suggesting a potential for these types of molecules to act as such under physiological and/or oxidative-stress conditions.

  1. Catalase activity is stimulated by H(2)O(2) in rich culture medium and is required for H(2)O(2) resistance and adaptation in yeast.

    PubMed

    Martins, Dorival; English, Ann M

    2014-01-01

    Catalases are efficient scavengers of H2O2 and protect cells against H2O2 stress. Examination of the H2O2 stimulon in Saccharomyces cerevisiae revealed that the cytosolic catalase T (Ctt1) protein level increases 15-fold on H2O2 challenge in synthetic complete media although previous work revealed that deletion of the CCT1 or CTA1 genes (encoding peroxisomal/mitochondrial catalase A) does not increase the H2O2 sensitivity of yeast challenged in phosphate buffer (pH 7.4). This we attributed to our observation that catalase activity is depressed when yeast are challenged with H2O2 in nutrient-poor media. Hence, we performed a systematic comparison of catalase activity and cell viability of wild-type yeast and of the single catalase knockouts, ctt1∆ and cta1∆, following H2O2 challenge in nutrient-rich medium (YPD) and in phosphate buffer (pH 7.4). Ctt1 but not Cta1 activity is strongly induced by H2O2 when cells are challenged in YPD but suppressed when cells are challenged in buffer. Consistent with the activity results, exponentially growing ctt1∆ cells in YPD are more sensitive to H2O2 than wild-type or cta1∆ cells, whereas in buffer all three strains exhibit comparable H2O2 hypersensitivity. Furthermore, catalase activity is increased during adaptation to sublethal H2O2 concentrations in YPD but not in buffer. We conclude that induction of cytosolic Ctt1 activity is vital in protecting yeast against exogenous H2O2 but this activity is inhibited by H2O2 when cells are challenged in nutrient-free media.

  2. Mechanism of catalase activity in aqueous solutions of dimanganese(III,IV) ethylenediamine-N,N prime -diacetate

    SciTech Connect

    Rush, J.D.; Maskos, Z. )

    1990-03-07

    Manganous ions, ligated by ethylenediamine-N,N{prime}-diacetate (edda = L) decompose hydrogen peroxide with a rate law {minus}d(H{sub 2}O{sub 2})/dt = k{sub 17}(Mn(edda))(H{sub 2}O{sub 2}) where k{sub 17} = 5.4 M{sup {minus}1} s{sup {minus}1} at pH 7. The reduction of peroxide to water is initiated by the reaction of Mn{sup II}L with a dinuclear Mn{sup III,IV}L{sub 2}. A subsequent fast reaction between the transient product of this reaction and hydrogen peroxide or tert-butyl hydroperoxide effectively oxidizes Mn(II) to Mn(IV) in a concerted step without formation of the hydroxyl radical. The green mixed-valence complex, which is probably a bis({mu}-oxo)-bridged structure, is stable in neutral aqueous solution and exhibits a 16-line ESR signal in frozen solution. The basis of catalase activity is the autocatalytic formation of this complex when hydrogen peroxide is reduced by manganese(II). The catalase cycle is independent of the formation of oxy radicals. Mononuclear Mn{sup III}edda and Mn{sup II}edda react with superoxide radicals, but the decomposition of peroxide is virtually independent of these reactions. In unbuffered solutions, with a moderate excess of hydrogen peroxide, an oscillation in the concentration of the dinuclear complex is detected. 28 refs., 10 figs., 5 tabs.

  3. Accumulation of selenium and changes in the activity of inulinase and catalase in the cells of Kluyveromyces marxianus on pulsed electric field treatment.

    PubMed

    Pankiewicz, Urszula; Jamroz, Jerzy

    2010-07-01

    Pulsed electric field (PEF) of 1Hz, 1.5 kV, and 1 ms increased the activities of catalase and inulinase over the whole range of applied Se concentrations compared with the non-treated cultures. A significant effect of selenium concentration (in the range of 5-14 microg/ml) on both intra- and extracellular enzyme activities was noted. At a Se concentration of 10 microg/ml, the activities of intra- and extracellular inulinases and extracellular catalase in the PEF-treated cultures reached the maximum of 71 U/g d.m., 46 U/g d.m., and approx. 8 U/ml, respectively. The maximum activity of intracellular catalase of approx. 6 U/ ml (with and without PEF) was recorded at 5 microg Se/ml. Further increasing of selenium concentration caused a decrease in the activity of the enzymes.

  4. The Feline Mystique: Dispelling the Myth of the Independent Cat.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Soltow, Willow

    1984-01-01

    Describes learning activities about cats for primary and intermediate grades. Primary grade activity subjects include cat behavior, needs, breeds, storybook cats, and celestial cats. Intermediate grade activity subjects include cat history, care, language, literary cats, and cats in art. (BC)

  5. [Total Peroxidase and Catalase Activity of Luminous Basidiomycetes Armillaria borealis and Neonothopanus nambi in Comparison with the Level of Light Emission].

    PubMed

    Mogil'naya, O A; Ronzhin, N O; Medvedeva, S E; Bondar, V S

    2015-01-01

    The peroxidase and catalase activities in the mycelium of luminous basidiomycetes Armillaria borealis and Neonothopanus nambi in normal conditions and under stress were compared. An increase in the luminescence level was observed under stress, as well as an increase in peroxidase and catalase activities. Moreover, the peroxidase activity in extracts of A. borealis mycelium was found to be almost one and a half orders of magnitude higher, and the catalase activity more than two orders of magnitude higher in comparison with the N. nambi mycelium. It can be suggested that the difference between the brightly luminescent and dimly luminescent mycelium of N. nambi is due to the content of H2O2 or other peroxide compounds.

  6. The Fungal Sexual Pheromone Sirenin Activates the Human CatSper Channel Complex.

    PubMed

    Syeda, Shameem Sultana; Carlson, Erick J; Miller, Melissa R; Francis, Rawle; Clapham, David E; Lishko, Polina V; Hawkinson, Jon E; Hook, Derek; Georg, Gunda I

    2016-02-19

    The basal fungus Allomyces macrogynus (A. macrogynus) produces motile male gametes displaying well-studied chemotaxis toward their female counterparts. This chemotaxis is driven by sirenin, a sexual pheromone released by the female gametes. The pheromone evokes a large calcium influx in the motile gametes, which could proceed through the cation channel of sperm (CatSper) complex. Herein, we report the total synthesis of sirenin in 10 steps and 8% overall yield and show that the synthetic pheromone activates the CatSper channel complex, indicated by a concentration-dependent increase in intracellular calcium in human sperm. Sirenin activation of the CatSper channel was confirmed using whole-cell patch clamp electrophysiology with human sperm. Based on this proficient synthetic route and confirmed activation of CatSper, analogues of sirenin can be designed as blockers of the CatSper channel that could provide male contraceptive agents.

  7. Humic acid effect on catalase activity and the generation of reactive oxygen species in corn (Zea mays).

    PubMed

    Cordeiro, Flávio Couto; Santa-Catarina, Claudete; Silveira, Vanildo; de Souza, Sonia Regina

    2011-01-01

    Humic acids (HAs) have positive effects on plant physiology, but the molecular mechanisms underlying these events are only partially understood. The induction of root growth and emission of lateral roots (LRs) promoted by exogenous auxin is a natural phenomenon. Exogenous auxins are also associated with HA. Gas nitric oxide (NO) is a secondary messenger produced endogenously in plants. It is associated with metabolic events dependent on auxin. With the application of auxin, NO production is significantly increased, resulting in positive effects on plant physiology. Thus it is possible to evaluate the beneficial effects of the application of HA as an effect of auxin. To investigate the effects of HA the parameters of root growth, Zea mays was studied by evaluating the application of 3 mM C L⁻¹ of HA extracted from Oxisol and 100 µM SNP (sodium nitroprusside) and the NO donor, subject to two N-NO₃⁻, high dose (5.0 mM N-NO₃⁻) and low dose (5.0 mM N-NO₃⁻). Treatments with HA and NO were positively increased, regardless of the N-NO₃⁻ taken, as assessed by fresh weight and dry root, issue of LRs. The effects were more pronounced in the treatment with a lower dose of N-NO₃⁻. Detection of reactive oxygen species (ROS) in vivo and catalase activity were evaluated; these tests were associated with root growth. Under application of the bioactive substances tested, detection of ROS and catalase activity increased, especially in treatments with lower doses of N-NO₃⁻. The results of this experiment indicate that the effects of HA are dependent on ROS generation, which act as a messenger that induces root growth and the emission of LRs.

  8. Loss of stress-induced expression of catalase3 during leaf senescence in Arabidopsis thaliana is restricted to oxidative stress.

    PubMed

    Orendi, G; Zimmermann, P; Baar, C; Zentgraf, U

    2001-07-01

    Different stress conditions can induce changes in the activity of the antioxidant enzymes superoxide dismutase (SOD, EC 1.15.1.1), ascorbate peroxidase (APX, EC 1.11.1.11) and catalase (CAT, EC 1.11.1.6). The enzyme activities of all SOD and APX isoforms detected in young Arabidopsis leaves remained unaffected or slightly decreased after moderate paraquat treatment. While CAT2 activity also remained unaffected under these conditions, CAT3 enzyme activity was enhanced. In contrast to the enzyme activities, mRNA levels of both cat2 and cat3 were enhanced under oxidative stress induced by either paraquat or the fungal toxin cercosporin. This indicates that, with respect to enzyme activity level, CAT3 is the enzyme which is most sensitive to oxidative stress in this developmental stage and that the enzyme activity of CAT2 is possibly regulated at the post-transcriptional level. Interestingly, cat3 mRNA level and CAT3 activity are not elevated by paraquat treatment in senescing leaves. In contrast, the response to other stress conditions, such as water stress induced by flooding of detached leaves and heat stress, is maintained in senescing leaves. Since changes in stress response are not a general phenomenon in leaf senescence but appear to be restricted to oxidative stress, this might be a specific mechanism to promote senescence in Arabidopsis thaliana.

  9. Cat hindlimb motoneurons during locomotion. II. Normal activity patterns.

    PubMed

    Hoffer, J A; Sugano, N; Loeb, G E; Marks, W B; O'Donovan, M J; Pratt, C A

    1987-02-01

    Activity patterns were recorded from 51 motoneurons in the fifth lumbar ventral root of cats walking on a motorized treadmill at a range of speeds between 0.1 and 1.3 m/s. The muscle of destination of recorded motoneurons was identified by spike-triggered averaging of EMG recordings from each of the anterior thigh muscles. Forty-three motoneurons projected to one of the quadriceps (vastus medialis, vastus lateralis, vastus intermedius, or rectus femoris) or sartorius (anterior or medial) muscles of the anterior thigh. Anterior thigh motoneurons always discharged a single burst of action potentials per step cycle, even in multifunctional muscles (e.g., sartorius anterior) that exhibited more than one burst of EMG activity per step cycle. The instantaneous firing rates of most motoneurons were lowest upon recruitment and increased progressively during a burst, as long as the EMG was still increasing. Firing rates peaked midway through each burst and tended to decline toward the end of the burst. The initial, mean, and peak firing rates of single motoneurons typically increased for faster walking speeds. At any given walking speed, early recruited motoneurons typically reached higher firing rates than late recruited motoneurons. In contrast to decerebrated cats, initial doublets at the beginning of bursts were seen only rarely. In the 4/51 motoneurons that showed initial doublets, both the instantaneous frequency of the doublet and the probability of starting a burst with a doublet decreased for faster walking speeds. The modulations in firing rate of every motoneuron were found to be closely correlated to the smoothed electromyogram of its target muscle. For 32 identified motoneurons, the unit's instantaneous frequencygram was scaled linearly by computer to the rectified smoothed EMG recorded from each of the anterior thigh muscles. The covariance between unitary frequencygram and muscle EMG was computed for each muscle. Typically, the EMG profile of the target

  10. Changes in the Activity of Some Hydrolases, Peroxidase, and Catalase in the Rice Seed during Germination 1

    PubMed Central

    Palmiano, Evelyn P.; Juliano, Bienvenido O.

    1973-01-01

    A study was made of the changes in activity of enzymes involved in the breakdown of stored phytin, lipid, and hemicellulose in the aleurone layer of rice seed (Oryza sativa L., variety IR8) during the 1st week of germination in the light. Enzyme assays were made on crude extracts from degermed seed, and activities were expressed on a per seed basis. Phytase activity increased within the 1st day of germination. The increase in activity of most other enzymes—phosphomonoesterase, phosphodiesterase, esterase, lipase, peroxidase, catalase, β-glucosidase, and α- and β-galactosidase—closely followed the increase in protein content. Their peak activities occurred by the 5th to the 7th day. Some enzymes, such as β-1, 3-glucanase and α-amylase, continued to increase in activity after the 7th day. Phytase, β-1, 3-glucanase, and α-amylase followed a similar sequence of production in embryoless seed halves incubated in 0.12 μM gibberellin A3, but the production of lipase was delayed. PMID:16658546

  11. Simultaneous and sequential co-immobilization of glucose oxidase and catalase onto florisil.

    PubMed

    Ozyilmaz, Gul; Tukel, S Seyhan

    2007-06-01

    The co-immobilization of Aspergillus niger glucose oxidase (GOD) with bovine liver catalase (CAT) onto florisil (magnesium silicate-based porous carrier) was investigated to improve the catalytic efficiency of GOD against H2O2 inactivation. The effect of the amount of bound CAT on the GOD activity was also studied for 12 different initial combinations of GOD and CAT, using simultaneous and sequential coupling. The sequentially co-immobilized GOD-CAT showed a higher efficiency than the simultaneously co-immobilized GOD-CAT in terms of the GOD activity and economic costs. The highest activity was shown by the sequentially co-immobilized GOD-CAT when the initial amounts of GOD and CAT were 10 mg and 5 mg per gram of carrier. The optimum pH, buffer concentration, and temperature for GOD activity for the same co-immobilized GOD-CAT sample were then determined as pH 6.5, 50 mM, and 30 degrees C, respectively. When compared with the individually immobilized GOD, the catalytic activity of the co-immobilized GOD-CAT was 70% higher, plus the reusability was more than two-fold. The storage stability of the co-immobilized GOD-CAT was also found to be higher than that of the free form at both 5 degrees C and 25 degrees C. The increased GOD activity and reusability resulting from the co-immobilization process may have been due to CAT protecting GOD from inactivation by H2O2 and supplying additional O2 to the reaction system.

  12. Similarities between catalase and cytosolic epoxide hydrolase.

    PubMed

    Guenthner, T M; Qato, M; Whalen, R; Glomb, S

    1989-01-01

    Cytosolic epoxide hydrolase, measured as trans-stilbene oxide hydrolase activity, was isolated and purified from human and guinea pig liver cytosol. Antiserum to the guinea pig liver preparation reacted strongly with bovine liver catalase. We determined that this lack of selectivity of the antiserum was due to catalase contamination of the epoxide hydrolase preparation. We also determined that several commercial catalase preparations are contaminated with cytosolic epoxide hydrolase. Our human epoxide hydrolase preparation contained no detectable catalase contamination, yet antiserum to this protein also cross-reacted slightly with catalase, indicating some intrinsic similarity between the two enzymes. We conclude that catalase and cytosolic epoxide hydrolase contain some similar immunogenic epitopes, and we surmise that similarities between the subunits of these two enzymes may lead to their partial copurification. Functional similarities between the two enzymes are also demonstrated, as several compounds that inhibit catalase are also shown to inhibit cytosolic epoxide hydrolase activity in the same concentration range and rank order.

  13. A natural xanthone increases catalase activity but decreases NF-kappa B and lipid peroxidation in U-937 and HepG2 cell lines.

    PubMed

    Sahoo, Binay K; Zaidi, Adeel H; Gupta, Pankaj; Mokhamatam, Raveendra B; Raviprakash, Nune; Mahali, Sidhartha K; Manna, Sunil K

    2015-10-05

    Mangiferin, a C-glycosyl xanthone, has shown anti-inflammatory, antioxidant, and anti-tumorigenic activities. In the present study, we investigated the molecular mechanism for the antioxidant property of mangiferin. Considering the role of nuclear transcription factor kappa B (NF-κB) in inflammation and tumorigenesis, we hypothesized that modulating its activity will be a viable therapeutic target in regulating the redox-sensitive ailments. Our results show that mangiferin blocks several inducers, such as tumor necrosis factor (TNF), lypopolysaccharide (LPS), phorbol-12-myristate-13-acetate (PMA) or hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) mediated NF-κB activation via inhibition of reactive oxygen species generation. In silico docking studies predicted strong binding energy of mangiferin to the active site of catalase (-9.13 kcal/mol), but not with other oxidases such as myeloperoxidase, glutathione peroxidase, or inducible nitric oxide synthase. Mangiferin increased activity of catalase by 44%, but had no effect on myeloperoxidase activity in vitro. Fluorescence spectroscopy further revealed the binding of mangiferin to catalase at the single site with binding constant and binding affinity of 3.1×10(-7) M(-1) and 1.046 respectively. Mangiferin also inhibits TNF-induced lipid peroxidation and thereby protects apoptosis. Hence, mangiferin with its ability to inhibit NF-κB and increase the catalase activity may prove to be a potent therapeutic.

  14. In vitro assembly of catalase.

    PubMed

    Baureder, Michael; Barane, Elisabeth; Hederstedt, Lars

    2014-10-10

    Most aerobic organisms contain catalase, which functions to decompose hydrogen peroxide. Typical catalases are structurally complex homo-tetrameric enzymes with one heme prosthetic group buried in each subunit. It is not known how catalase in the cell is assembled from its constituents. The bacterium Enterococcus faecalis cannot synthesize heme but can acquire it from the environment to form a cytoplasmic catalase. We have in E. faecalis monitored production of the enzyme polypeptide (KatA) depending on the availability of heme and used our findings to devise a procedure for the purification of preparative amounts of in vivo-synthesized apocatalase. We show that fully active catalase can be obtained in vitro by incubating isolated apoprotein with hemin. We have characterized features of the assembly process and describe a temperature-trapped hemylated intermediate of the enzyme maturation process. Hemylation of apocatalase does not require auxiliary cell components, but rapid assembly of active enzyme seemingly is assisted in the cell. Our findings provide insight about catalase assembly and offer new experimental possibilities for detailed studies of this process.

  15. The molecular characterization of a catalase from Chinese mitten crab Eriocheir sinensis.

    PubMed

    Wang, M; Wang, L; Zhou, Z; Gao, Y; Wang, L; Shi, X; Gai, Y; Mu, C; Song, L

    2013-06-01

    Catalase (CAT) is an antioxidant enzyme and plays a significant role in the protection against oxidative stress by reducing hydrogen peroxide. The CAT cDNA of Eriocheir sinensis (EsCAT) was cloned via RACE technique. The complete sequence of EsCAT cDNA consisted of a 5' untranslated regions (UTR) of 224 bp, a 3' UTR of 1287 bp with a poly (A) tail and an open reading frame (ORF) of 1542 bp, which encoded a polypeptide of 513 amino acid residues with a calculated molecular mass of approximately 58.86 kDa and a theoretical isoelectric point of 6.880. The deduced amino acid sequence of EsCAT contained a highly conserved proximal active-site signature motif ((60)FDRERIPERVVHAKGAL(76)) and a proximal heme-ligand signature motif ((350)RLFSYNDTH(358)) and exhibited high similarity with other reported CATs. In the phylogenetic tree, EsCAT was clustered with the CATs from Scylla serrata and Portunus trituberculatus. The EsCAT transcripts were constitutively expressed in haepatopancreas, haemocytes, gill, gonad, muscle and heart, with highest expression level in haepatopancreas. The relative expression level of EsCAT mRNA in haemocytes was continuously up-regulated and reached the peak level at 48 h post-Vibrio anguillarum challenge. The purified recombinant EsCAT protein displayed antioxidant activity against hydrogen peroxide with high thermal stability and broad spectrum of pH values. All these results demonstrated that EsCAT was an efficient antioxidant enzyme and potentially involved in the regulation of redox and innate immune response of crabs.

  16. The induction of two biosynthetic enzymes helps Escherichia coli sustain heme synthesis and activate catalase during hydrogen peroxide stress.

    PubMed

    Mancini, Stefano; Imlay, James A

    2015-05-01

    Hydrogen peroxide pervades many natural environments, including the phagosomes that mediate cell-based immunity. Transcriptomic analysis showed that during protracted low-grade H(2)O(2) stress, Escherichia coli responds by activating both the OxyR defensive regulon and the Fur iron-starvation response. OxyR induced synthesis of two members of the nine-step heme biosynthetic pathway: ferrochelatase (HemH) and an isozyme of coproporphyrinogen III oxidase (HemF). Mutations that blocked either adaptation caused the accumulation of porphyrin intermediates, inadequate activation of heme enzymes, low catalase activity, defective clearance of H(2)O(2) and a failure to grow. Genetic analysis indicated that HemH induction is needed to compensate for iron sequestration by the mini-ferritin Dps. Dps activity protects DNA and proteins by limiting Fenton chemistry, but it interferes with the ability of HemH to acquire the iron that it needs to complete heme synthesis. HemF is a manganoprotein that displaces HemN, an iron-sulfur enzyme whose synthesis and/or stability is apparently problematic during H(2)O(2) stress. Thus, the primary responses to H(2)O(2), including the sequestration of iron, require compensatory adjustments in the mechanisms of iron-cofactor synthesis. The results support the growing evidence that oxidative stress is primarily an iron pathology.

  17. Intron loss and gain during evolution of the catalase gene family in angiosperms.

    PubMed Central

    Frugoli, J A; McPeek, M A; Thomas, T L; McClung, C R

    1998-01-01

    Angiosperms (flowering plants), including both monocots and dicots, contain small catalase gene families. In the dicot, Arabidopsis thaliana, two catalase (CAT) genes, CAT1 and CAT3, are tightly linked on chromosome 1 and a third, CAT2, which is more similar to CAT1 than to CAT3, is unlinked on chromosome 4. Comparison of positions and numbers of introns among 13 angiosperm catalase genomic sequences indicates that intron positions are conserved, and suggests that an ancestral catalase gene common to monocots and dicots contained seven introns. Arabidopsis CAT2 has seven introns; both CAT1 and CAT3 have six introns in positions conserved with CAT2, but each has lost a different intron. We suggest the following sequence of events during the evolution of the Arabidopsis catalase gene family. An initial duplication of an ancestral catalase gene gave rise to CAT3 and CAT1. CAT1 then served as the template for a second duplication, yielding CAT2. Intron losses from CAT1 and CAT3 followed these duplications. One subclade of monocot catalases has lost all but the 5'-most and 3'-most introns, which is consistent with a mechanism of intron loss by replacement of an ancestral intron-containing gene with a reverse-transcribed DNA copy of a fully spliced mRNA. Following this event of concerted intron loss, the Oryza sativa (rice, a monocot) CAT1 lineage acquired an intron in a novel position, consistent with a mechanism of intron gain at proto-splice sites. PMID:9584109

  18. Fungal catalases: function, phylogenetic origin and structure.

    PubMed

    Hansberg, Wilhelm; Salas-Lizana, Rodolfo; Domínguez, Laura

    2012-09-15

    Most fungi have several monofunctional heme-catalases. Filamentous ascomycetes (Pezizomycotina) have two types of large-size subunit catalases (L1 and L2). L2-type are usually induced by different stressors and are extracellular enzymes; those from the L1-type are not inducible and accumulate in asexual spores. L2 catalases are important for growth and the start of cell differentiation, while L1 are required for spore germination. In addition, pezizomycetes have one to four small-size subunit catalases. Yeasts (Saccharomycotina) do not have large-subunit catalases and generally have one peroxisomal and one cytosolic small-subunit catalase. Small-subunit catalases are inhibited by substrate while large-subunit catalases are activated by H(2)O(2). Some small-subunit catalases bind NADPH preventing inhibition by substrate. We present a phylogenetic analysis revealing one or two events of horizontal gene transfers from Actinobacteria to a fungal ancestor before fungal diversification, as the origin of large-size subunit catalases. Other possible horizontal transfers of small- and large-subunit catalases genes were detected and one from bacteria to the fungus Malassezia globosa was analyzed in detail. All L2-type catalases analyzed presented a secretion signal peptide. Mucorales preserved only L2-type catalases, with one containing a secretion signal if two or more are present. Basidiomycetes have only L1-type catalases, all lacking signal peptide. Fungal small-size catalases are related to animal catalases and probably evolved from a common ancestor. However, there are several groups of small-size catalases. In particular, a conserved group of fungal sequences resemble plant catalases, whose phylogenetic origin was traced to a group of bacteria. This group probably has the heme orientation of plant catalases and could in principle bind NADPH. From almost a hundred small-subunit catalases only one fourth has a peroxisomal localization signal and in fact many fungi lack

  19. [Heterologous extracellular expression and initial characterization of the peroxisomal catalase from the methylotrophic yeast Hansenula polymorpha in Pichia pastoris].

    PubMed

    2013-01-01

    Catalase is well known to eliminate H2O2 in cells and reduces the toxicity of peroxide compounds. A catalase gene HpCat1 of methylotrophic yeast Hansenula polymorpha without the part coding the native signal peptide was cloned into expression vector pYM3165 and then integrated into genome of Pichia pastoris GS115 by electroporation. The result of the enzyme activity assay and SDS-PAGE demonstrated that the recombinant protein (HpCAT1) of H. polymorpha was extracellularly expressed in P. pastoris. The expressed catalase was recovered from the culture supernatant of P. pastoris GS 115 and purified by (NH4) 2SO4 fractionation and Ni-NTA affinity chromatography. The main biochemical properties of the recombinant protein HpCAT1, such as thermodependence and thermostability, pH optimum and pH stability, as well as the effect of metal ions and chemicals, were characterized. With H2O2 as the substrate, HpCAT1 displayed pH and tem- perature optima of approximately 2.6 and 45°C,respectively. The recombinant HpCAT1 activity was inhibited by 1 mM Hg2+ and Cu2+, but was highly enhanced by 1.0 mM Fe2+.

  20. Direct electrochemistry of Penicillium chrysogenum catalase adsorbed on spectroscopic graphite.

    PubMed

    Dimcheva, Nina; Horozova, Elena

    2013-04-01

    The voltammetric studies of Penicillium chrysogenum catalase (PcCAT) adsorbed on spectroscopic graphite, showed direct electron transfer (DET) between its active site and the electrode surface. Analogous tests performed with the commercially available bovine catalase revealed that mammalian enzyme is much less efficient in the DET process. Both catalases were found capable to catalyse the electrooxidation of phenol, but differed in the specifics of catalytic action. At an applied potential of 0.45V the non-linear regression showed the kinetics of the bioelectrochemical oxidation catalysed by the PcCAT obeyed the Hill equation with a binding constant K=0.034±0.002 M(2) (Hill's coefficient n=2.097±0.083, R(2)=0.997), whilst the catalytic action of the bovine catalase was described by the Michaelis-Menten kinetic model with the following parameters: V(max,app)=7.780±0.509 μA, and K(M,app)=0.068±0.070 mol L(-1). The performance of the electrode reaction was affected by the electrode potential, the pH, and temperature. Based on the effect of pH and temperature on the electrode response in presence of phenol a tentative reaction pathway of its bioelectrocatalytic oxidation has been hypothesised. The possible application of these findings in biosensing phenol up to concentration 30 mM at pHs below 7 and in absence of oxidising agents (oxygen or H(2)O(2)) was considered.

  1. Oxidative status, in vitro iron-induced lipid oxidation and superoxide dismutase, catalase and glutathione peroxidase activities in rhea meat.

    PubMed

    Terevinto, A; Ramos, A; Castroman, G; Cabrera, M C; Saadoun, A

    2010-04-01

    Rhea (Rhea americana) muscles Obturatorius medialis (OM) Iliotibialis lateralis (IL) and Iliofibularis (I), obtained from farmed animals, were evaluated regarding their oxidative/antioxidant status. The mean level of thiobarbituric acid reactive substances (TBARS) expressed as malonaldehyde (MDA) content was of 0.84 mg MDA/kg wet tissue for the three muscles. TBARS level was significantly higher in IL than OM and I, with the two latter showing similar levels. The mean level of carbonyl proteins expressed as dinitrophenylhydrazine (DNPH) was 1.59 nmol DNPH mg(-1). Carbonyl protein levels were significantly different (P<0.05) between the three muscles (IL>OM>I). Iron-induced TBARS generation was not significantly different between the three muscles at any time, nor for each muscle during the 5 h of the experiment. Superoxide dismutase activity in IL muscle was significantly higher (P<0.05) than in I muscle. However, the difference between IL and OM muscles was not significant. The differences between the three muscles became not significant when the results were expressed by mg of protein contained in the extract, instead by g of wet tissue. No differences were found for catalase (micromol of discomposed H(2)O(2) min(-1) g(-1) wet tissue or by mg of protein contained in the extract) and glutathione peroxidase (micromol ol of oxidized NADPH min(-1) g(-1) of wet tissue or by mg of protein contained in the extract) activities between the three muscles.

  2. 1,25-Dihydroxyvitamin D3 and its analogues increase catalase at the mRNA, protein and activity level in a canine transitional carcinoma cell line.

    PubMed

    Middleton, R P; Nelson, R; Li, Q; Blanton, A; Labuda, J A; Vitt, J; Inpanbutr, N

    2015-12-01

    Antioxidant enzymes, such as catalase, superoxide dismutases (SOD), MnSOD and Cu/ZnSOD, protect cells by scavenging reactive oxygen species (ROS). Numerous studies have reported the anti-cancer effects of 1,25-dihydroxyvitamin D3 (calcitriol) and its related analogues, seocalcitol and analogue V. In this study, canine bladder transitional cell carcinoma (cbTCC) cells were used to determine effects of calcitriol and its related analogues on antioxidant enzyme gene expression, protein expression and activity. Catalase mRNA was increased in response to calcitriol (10(-7) M), and seocalcitol (10(-7) and 10(-9) M). MnSOD mRNA was decreased in response to calcitriol at 10(-7) M. Catalase was significantly increased in response to calcitriol (10(-7) and 10(-9) M), and seocalcitol (10(-9) M). Catalase enzymatic activity increased in response to calcitriol, seocalcitol and analogue V (10(-9) M). In addition, global gene expression analysis identified the involvement of mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) signalling in cbTCC's response to calcitriol and seocalcitol treatment.

  3. Thermus thermophilus as a Cell Factory for the Production of a Thermophilic Mn-Dependent Catalase Which Fails To Be Synthesized in an Active Form in Escherichia coli

    PubMed Central

    Hidalgo, Aurelio; Betancor, Lorena; Moreno, Renata; Zafra, Olga; Cava, Felipe; Fernández-Lafuente, Roberto; Guisán, José M.; Berenguer, José

    2004-01-01

    Thermostable Mn-dependent catalases are promising enzymes in biotechnological applications as H2O2-detoxifying systems. We cloned the genes encoding Mn-dependent catalases from Thermus thermophilus HB27 and HB8 and a less thermostable mutant carrying two amino acid replacements (M129V and E293G). When the wild-type and mutant genes were overexpressed in Escherichia coli, unmodified or six-His-tagged proteins of the expected size were overproduced as inactive proteins. Several attempts to obtain active forms or to activate the overproduced proteins were unsuccessful, even when soluble and thermostable proteins were used. Therefore, a requirement for a Thermus-specific activation factor was suggested. To overcome this problem, the Mn-dependent catalase genes were overexpressed directly in T. thermophilus under the control of the Pnar promoter. This promoter belongs to a respiratory nitrate reductase from of T. thermophilus HB8, whose transcription is activated by the combined action of nitrate and anoxia. Upon induction in T. thermophilus HB8, a 20- to 30-fold increase in catalase specific activity was observed, whereas a 90- to 110-fold increase was detected when the laboratory strain T. thermophilus HB27::nar was used as the host. The thermostability of the overproduced wild-type catalase was identical to that previously reported for the native enzyme, whereas decreased stability was detected for the mutant derivative. Therefore, our results validate the use of T. thermophilus as an alternative cell factory for the overproduction of thermophilic proteins that fail to be expressed in well-known mesophilic hosts. PMID:15240253

  4. Adaptation of cat motoneurons to sustained and intermittent extracellular activation.

    PubMed Central

    Spielmann, J M; Laouris, Y; Nordstrom, M A; Robinson, G A; Reinking, R M; Stuart, D G

    1993-01-01

    1. The main purpose of this study was to quantify the adaptation of spinal motoneurons to sustained and intermittent activation, using an extracellular route of stimulating current application to single test cells, in contrast to an intracellular route, as has been used previously. In addition, associations were tested between firing rate properties of the tested cells and other type (size)-related properties of these cells and their motor units. 2. Motoneurons supplying the medial gastrocnemius muscle of the deeply anaesthetized cat were stimulated for 240 s with microelectrodes which passed sustained extracellular current at 1.25 times the threshold for repetitive firing. Many cells were also tested following a rest period with intermittent 1 s current pulses (duration 600 ms) at the same relative stimulus strength. Cell discharge was assessed from the EMG of the motor unit innervated by the test neuron. The motoneurons and their motor units were assigned to four categories (i.e. types FF, FR, S and F; where F = FF + FR) based on conventional criteria. In all, twenty F (16 FF, 4 FR) and fourteen S cells were studied with sustained stimulation. Thirty of these cells (17 F, 13 S) and an additional two cells (1 F, 1 S) were studied with intermittent stimulation. 3. The mean threshold current required for sustained firing for a period of > or = 2 s was not significantly different for F and S cells. However, most of the other measured parameters of motoneuron firing differed significantly for these two cell groups. For example, at 1.25 times the threshold current for repetitive firing, the mean firing duration in response to 240 s of sustained activation was 123 +/- 88 s (+/- S.D.) for F cells vs. 233 +/- 19 s for S cells. These values were significantly longer than those from a comparable, previously reported study that employed intracellular stimulation. With intermittent stimulation, the firing durations of F and S cells were not significantly different from each

  5. ICAM-1 targeted catalase encapsulated PLGA-b-PEG nanoparticles against vascular oxidative stress.

    PubMed

    Sari, Ece; Tunc-Sarisozen, Yeliz; Mutlu, Hulya; Shahbazi, Reza; Ucar, Gulberk; Ulubayram, Kezban

    2015-01-01

    Targeted delivery of therapeutics is the favourable idea, whereas it is possible to distribute the therapeutically active drug molecule only to the site of action. For this purpose, in this study, catalase encapsulated poly(D,L-lactide-co-glycolide)-block-poly(ethylene glycol) (PLGA-b-PEG) nanoparticles were developed and an endothelial target molecule (anti-ICAM-1) was conjugated to this carrier system in order to decrease the oxidative stress level in the target site. According to the enzymatic activity results, initial catalase activity of nanoparticles was increased from 27.39 U/mg to up to 45.66 U/mg by adding 5 mg/mL bovine serum albumin (BSA). After 4 h, initial catalase activity was preserved up to 46.98% while free catalase retained less than 4% of its activity in proteolytic environment. Furthermore, FITC labelled anti-ICAM-1 targeted catalase encapsulated nanoparticles (anti-ICAM-1/CatNPs) were rapidly taken up by cultured endothelial cells and concomitantly endothelial cells were resistant to H2O2 induced oxidative impairment.

  6. Manganese(II) induces cell division and increases in superoxide dismutase and catalase activities in an aging deinococcal culture

    SciTech Connect

    Chou, F.I.; Tan, S.T. )

    1990-04-01

    Addition of Mn(II) at 2.5 microM or higher to stationary-phase cultures of Deinococcus radiodurans IR was found to trigger at least three rounds of cell division. This Mn(II)-induced cell division (Mn-CD) did not occur when the culture was in the exponential or death phase. The Mn-CD effect produced daughter cells proportionally reduced in size, pigmentation, and radioresistance but proportionally increased in activity and amount of the oxygen toxicity defense enzymes superoxide dismutase and catalase. In addition, the concentration of an Mn-CD-induced protein was found to remain high throughout the entire Mn-CD phase. It was also found that an untreated culture exhibited a growth curve characterized by a very rapid exponential-stationary transition and that cells which had just reached the early stationary phase were synchronous. Our results suggest the presence of an Mn(II)-sensitive mechanism for controlling cell division. The Mn-CD effect appears to be specific to the cation Mn(II) and the radioresistant bacteria, deinococci.

  7. Catalase plays a key role in salt stress acclimation induced by hydrogen peroxide pretreatment in maize.

    PubMed

    Gondim, Franklin Aragão; Gomes-Filho, Enéas; Costa, José Hélio; Mendes Alencar, Nara Lídia; Prisco, José Tarquinio

    2012-07-01

    Pretreatment in plants is recognized as a valuable strategy to stimulate plant defenses, leading to better plant development. This study evaluated the effects of H₂O₂ leaf spraying pretreatment on plant growth and investigated the antioxidative mechanisms involved in the response of maize plants to salt stress. It was found that salinity reduced maize seedling growth when compared to control conditions, and H₂O₂ foliar spraying was effective in minimizing this effect. Analysis of the antioxidative enzymes catalase (EC 1.11.1.6), guaiacol peroxidase (EC 1.11.1.7), ascorbate peroxidase (EC 1.11.1.1) and superoxide dismutase (EC 1.15.1.1) revealed that H₂O₂ spraying increased antioxidant enzyme activities. Catalase (CAT) was the most responsive of these enzymes to H₂O₂, with higher activity early (48 h) in the treatment, while guaiacol peroxidase (GPX) and ascorbate peroxidase (APX) were responsive only at later stages (240 h) of treatment. Increased CAT activity appears linked to gene expression regulation. Lower malondialdehyde levels were detected in plants with higher CAT activity, which may result from the protective function of this enzyme. Overall, we can conclude that pretreatment with H₂O₂ leaf spraying was able to reduce the deleterious effects of salinity on seedling growth and lipid peroxidation. These responses could be attributed to the ability of H₂O₂ to induce antioxidant defenses, especially CAT activity.

  8. A teleostan homolog of catalase from black rockfish (Sebastes schlegelii): insights into functional roles in host antioxidant defense and expressional responses to septic conditions.

    PubMed

    Elvitigala, Don Anushka Sandaruwan; Priyathilaka, Thanthrige Thiunuwan; Whang, Ilson; Nam, Bo-Hye; Lee, Jehee

    2015-05-01

    Antioxidative defense renders a significant protection against environmental stress in organisms and maintains the correct redox balance in cells, thereby supporting proper immune function. Catalase is an indispensable antioxidant in organisms that detoxifies hydrogen peroxides produced in cellular environments. In this study, we sought to molecularly characterize a homolog of catalase (RfCat), identified from black rockfish (Sebastes schlegelii). RfCat consists of a 1581 bp coding region for a protein of 527 amino acids, with a predicted molecular weight of 60 kD. The protein sequence of RfCat harbored similar domain architecture to known catalases, containing a proximal active site signature and proximal heme ligand signature, and further sharing prominent homology with its teleostan counterparts. As affirmed by multiple sequence alignments, most of the functionally important residues were well conserved in RfCat. Furthermore, our phylogenetic analysis indicates its common vertebrate ancestral origin and a close evolutionary relationship with teleostan catalases. Recombinantly expressed RfCat demonstrated prominent peroxidase activity that varied with different substrate and protein concentrations, and protected against DNA damage. RfCat mRNA was ubiquitously expressed among different tissues examined, as detected by qPCR. In addition, RfCat mRNA expression was modulated in response to pathogenic stress elicited by Streptococcus iniae and poly I:C in blood and spleen tissues. Collectively, our findings indicate that RfCat may play an indispensable role in host response to oxidative stress and maintain a correct redox balance after a pathogen invasion.

  9. The respiratory burst activity and expression of catalase in white shrimp, Litopenaeus vannamei, during long-term exposure to pH stress.

    PubMed

    Wang, Wei-Na; Li, Bao-Sheng; Liu, Jin-Jian; Shi, Lei; Alam, M J; Su, Shi-Juan; Wu, Juan; Wang, Lei; Wang, An-Li

    2012-08-01

    In this study, changes of reactive oxygen species (ROS) and the mRNA expression of catalase of the Pacific white shrimp, Litopenaeus vannamei, exposed to pH (5.4, 6.7, 8.0, and 9.3) stress was investigated at different stress time (24, 48, 72, 96, and 120 h). Level of malondialdehyde (MDA) in shrimp also were assessed. The results revealed that acidic (pH 5.4 and 6.7) or alkaline exposure (pH 9.3) induced production of ROS hemocytes and increase of MDA level in shrimp. Moreover, the catalase mRNA expression in hepatopancreas of L. vannamei was up-regulated in 24 h at pH 5.4, in 72 h at pH 6.7 and in 48 h at pH 9.3, whereas was down-regulated significantly after 72 h acidic (pH 5.4 and 6.7) or alkaline (pH 9.4) exposure. In the present study, there was the relationship between ROS and catalase mRNA expression under normal acidic and alkaline conditions. At pH 8, the increase of catalase transcripts due to up-regulation by ROS, whereas MDA level did not significantly change, suggesting activation of corresponding protective mechanisms of detoxifying ROS is essential for the proper functioning of cells and the survival of shrimps.

  10. The role played by acid and basic centers in the activity of biomimetic catalysts of the catalase, peroxidase, and monooxidase reactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Magerramov, A. M.; Nagieva, I. T.

    2010-11-01

    The acid-basic centers of heterogeneous carriers of catalase, peroxidase, and monooxigenase biomimetics, in particular, iron protoporphyrin deposited on active or neutral aluminum magnesium silicate, were studied. The catalytic activity of biomimetics was stabilized, which allowed us not only to synthesize fairly effective biomimetics but also to clarify certain details of the mechanism of their action and perform a comparative analysis of the functioning of biomimetics and the corresponding enzymes.

  11. Molecular Insights into the Potential Toxicological Interaction of 2-Mercaptothiazoline with the Antioxidant Enzyme—Catalase

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Zhenxing; Huang, Ming; Mi, Chenyu; Wang, Tao; Chen, Dong; Teng, Yue

    2016-01-01

    2-mercaptothiazoline (2-MT) is widely used in many industrial fields, but its residue is potentially harmful to the environment. In this study, to evaluate the biological toxicity of 2-MT at protein level, the interaction between 2-MT and the pivotal antioxidant enzyme—catalase (CAT) was investigated using multiple spectroscopic techniques and molecular modeling. The results indicated that the CAT fluorescence quenching caused by 2-MT should be dominated by a static quenching mechanism through formation of a 2-MT/CAT complex. Furthermore, the identifications of the binding constant, binding forces, and the number of binding sites demonstrated that 2-MT could spontaneously interact with CAT at one binding site mainly via Van der Waals’ forces and hydrogen bonding. Based on the molecular docking simulation and conformation dynamic characterization, it was found that 2-MT could bind into the junctional region of CAT subdomains and that the binding site was close to enzyme active sites, which induced secondary structural and micro-environmental changes in CAT. The experiments on 2-MT toxicity verified that 2-MT significantly inhibited CAT activity via its molecular interaction, where 2-MT concentration and exposure time both affected the inhibitory action. Therefore, the present investigation provides useful information for understanding the toxicological mechanism of 2-MT at the molecular level. PMID:27537873

  12. Discovery of Catalases in Members of the Chlamydiales Order

    PubMed Central

    Rusconi, Brigida

    2013-01-01

    Catalase is an important virulence factor for survival in macrophages and other phagocytic cells. In Chlamydiaceae, no catalase had been described so far. With the sequencing and annotation of the full genomes of Chlamydia-related bacteria, the presence of different catalase-encoding genes has been documented. However, their distribution in the Chlamydiales order and the functionality of these catalases remain unknown. Phylogeny of chlamydial catalases was inferred using MrBayes, maximum likelihood, and maximum parsimony algorithms, allowing the description of three clade 3 and two clade 2 catalases. Only monofunctional catalases were found (no catalase-peroxidase or Mn-catalase). All presented a conserved catalytic domain and tertiary structure. Enzymatic activity of cloned chlamydial catalases was assessed by measuring hydrogen peroxide degradation. The catalases are enzymatically active with different efficiencies. The catalase of Parachlamydia acanthamoebae is the least efficient of all (its catalytic activity was 2 logs lower than that of Pseudomonas aeruginosa). Based on the phylogenetic analysis, we hypothesize that an ancestral class 2 catalase probably was present in the common ancestor of all current Chlamydiales but was retained only in Criblamydia sequanensis and Neochlamydia hartmannellae. The catalases of class 3, present in Estrella lausannensis and Parachlamydia acanthamoebae, probably were acquired by lateral gene transfer from Rhizobiales, whereas for Waddlia chondrophila they likely originated from Legionellales or Actinomycetales. The acquisition of catalases on several occasions in the Chlamydiales suggests the importance of this enzyme for the bacteria in their host environment. PMID:23729651

  13. Marine teleost ortholog of catalase from rock bream (Oplegnathus fasciatus): molecular perspectives from genomic organization to enzymatic behavior with respect to its potent antioxidant properties.

    PubMed

    Elvitigala, Don Anushka Sandaruwan; Premachandra, H K A; Whang, Ilson; Priyathilaka, Thanthrige Thiunuwan; Kim, Eunmi; Lim, Bong-Soo; Jung, Hyung-Bok; Yeo, Sang-Yeob; Park, Hae-Chul; Lee, Jehee

    2013-10-01

    Catalases are well known antioxidant enzymes that can mainly dismutate hydrogen peroxide into water and oxygen in order to prevent oxidative stress. The complete genomic DNA (gDNA) sequence of the catalase gene from rock bream (Oplegnathus fasciatus) was identified from our custom-constructed BAC genomic DNA library and designated as RbCat. RbCat consists of 13 exons, separated by 12 introns, within a 13,722-bp gDNA sequence. The complete cDNA sequence (3303 bp) of RbCat is comprised of a 1581-bp coding region, encoding a peptide of 527 amino acids (aa) in length, with a predicted molecular mass of 60 kDa and a theoretical isoelectric point of 8.34. The anticipated promoter region of RbCat contains several transcription factor-binding sites, including sites that bind with immune- and antioxidant-responsive signaling molecules, suggesting its substantial transcriptional regulation. RbCat resembles the typical catalase family signature, i.e., it is composed of the catalase proximal active site motif along with a catalase proximal heme-ligand signature motif and shares great homology with its fish counterparts. According to multiple sequence alignment, functionally important amino acids present in RbCat were thoroughly conserved among its vertebrate counterparts. Phylogenetic analysis revealed that RbCat evolved from a vertebrate origin, and further positioned it in the fish clade. Recombinant RbCat had noticeable peroxidase activity against its substrate, hydrogen peroxide, in a dose-dependent manner. However, it demonstrated substantial peroxidase activity within a broad range of temperatures and pH values. Constitutive RbCat mRNA expression of different magnitudes was detected in a tissue-specific manner, suggesting its diverse role in physiology with respect to the tissue type. Moreover, immune challenge experiments using Edwardsiella tarda and rock bream iridovirus (RBIV) as live pathogens and polyinosinic:polycytidylic acid and lipopolysaccharide as mitogens

  14. A catalase from the freshwater mussel Cristaria plicata with cloning, identification and protein characterization.

    PubMed

    Yang, Xilan; Li, Gang; Wen, Chungen; Hu, Baoqing; Deng, Lirong; Pei, Pengzu; Xie, Yanhai

    2011-09-01

    Catalase is an important antioxidant protein which can protect organisms against various oxidative stresses by eliminating hydrogen peroxide. The catalase cDNA of Cristaria plicata (cpCAT) was cloned from the haemocytes using degenerate primers by the method of 3' and 5' rapid amplification of cDNA ends PCR. The gene is 4863 bp long and has a total of two introns and three exons. The precise size and location of the introns and exons have been determined. In addition the full-length cDNA of cpCAT contained 2618 bp, The cDNA contained a 5' untranslated region (UTR) of 136 nucleotides, the 3' UTR of 979 bp with a canonical polyadenylation signal sequence AATAAA and a polyA tail, and an open reading frame (ORF) of 1503 bp, encoding 501 amino acid residues with 56.86 kDa predicted molecular weight. The theoretical isoelectric point was 6.77. BLAST analysis showed that the deduced amino acid sequence of cpCAT had significant homology to catalases from animals, plants and bacteria. The deduced amino acid sequence of cpCAT had characteristic features of catalase family such as catalytic site motif (61FNRERIPERVVHAKGAG77), heme-ligand signature motif (351RLYSYSDTH359), two glycosylation sites (N145, N436), NADPH binding site and the three catalytic amino acid residues (His72, Asn145 and Tyr355). It had no signal peptide. The phylogenetic tree indicated that cpCAT gene was very close to the gene of scallops, Chlamys farreri. The enzymatic activity of purified recombinant cpCAT was 11194.4 ± 40.4 U/mg, it might resist against H(2)O(2). The recombinant enzyme held higher thermal stability, the optimum temperature was 25 °C, it retained more than 82% activity between 25 and 60 °C. The stability of the recombinant enzyme were higher between pH 5 and 10, and the optimal pH value was 7.0. When cpCAT was treated with 2-4 moL/L urea and 1%-3% SDS, the activity was also stable, it kept more than 80% activity.

  15. Cat Batiks.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Buban, Marcia H.

    1998-01-01

    Discusses an art activity where fourth-grade students created backgrounds using melted paraffin and a variety of paints for their cat batik/collage. Explains that after the students created their backgrounds, they assembled their paper cats for the collage using smaller shapes glued together and wax to add texture for fur. (CMK)

  16. Catalase eliminates reactive oxygen species and influences the intestinal microbiota of shrimp.

    PubMed

    Yang, Hui-Ting; Yang, Ming-Chong; Sun, Jie-Jie; Guo, Fang; Lan, Jiang-Feng; Wang, Xian-Wei; Zhao, Xiao-Fan; Wang, Jin-Xing

    2015-11-01

    Intestinal innate immune response is an important defense mechanism of animals and humans against external pathogens. The mechanism of microbiota homeostasis in host intestines has been well studied in mammals and Drosophila. The reactive oxygen species (ROS) and antimicrobial peptides have been reported to play important roles in homeostasis. However, how to maintain the microbiota homeostasis in crustacean intestine needs to be elucidated. In this study, we identified a novel catalase (MjCAT) involved in ROS elimination in kuruma shrimp, Marsupenaeus japonicus. MjCAT mRNA was widely distributed in hemocytes, heart, hepatopancreas, gills, stomach, and intestine. After the shrimp were challenged with pathogenic bacteria via oral infection, the expression level of MjCAT was upregulated, and the enzyme activity was increased in the intestine. ROS level was also increased in the intestine at early time after oral infection and recovered rapidly. When MjCAT was knocked down by RNA interference (RNAi), high ROS level maintained longer time, and the number of bacteria number was declined in the shrimp intestinal lumen than those in the control group, but the survival rate of the MjCAT-RNAi shrimp was declined. Further study demonstrated that the intestinal villi protruded from epithelial lining of the intestinal wall were damaged by the high ROS level in MjCAT-knockdown shrimp. These results suggested that MjCAT participated in the intestinal host-microbe homeostasis by regulating ROS level.

  17. Effects of photoperiod on food intake, activity and metabolic rate in adult neutered male cats.

    PubMed

    Kappen, K L; Garner, L M; Kerr, K R; Swanson, K S

    2014-10-01

    With the continued rise in feline obesity, novel weight management strategies are needed. To date, strategies aimed at altering physical activity, an important factor in weight maintenance, have been lacking. Photoperiod is known to cause physiological changes in seasonal mammals, including changes in body weight (BW) and reproductive status. Thus, our objective was to determine the effect of increased photoperiod (longer days) on voluntary physical activity levels, resting metabolic rate (RMR), food intake required to maintain BW, and fasting serum leptin and ghrelin concentrations in adult cats. Eleven healthy, adult, neutered, male domestic shorthair cats were used in a randomized crossover design study. During two 12-week periods, cats were exposed to either a short-day (SD) photoperiod of 8 h light: 16 h dark or a long-day (LD) photoperiod of 16 h light: 8 h dark. Cats were fed a commercial diet to maintain baseline BW. In addition to daily food intake and twice-weekly BW, RMR (via indirect calorimetry), body composition [via dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry (DEXA)] and physical activity (via Actical activity monitors) were measured at week 0 and 12 of each period. Fasting serum leptin and ghrelin concentrations were measured at week 0, 6 and 12 of each period. Average hourly physical activity was greater (p = 0.008) in LD vs. SD cats (3770 vs. 3129 activity counts/h), which was primarily due to increased (p < 0.001) dark period activity (1188 vs. 710 activity counts/h). This corresponded to higher (p < 0.0001) daily metabolizable energy intake (mean over 12-week period: 196 vs. 187 kcal/day), and increased (p = 0.048) RMR in LD cats (9.02 vs. 8.37 kcal/h). Body composition, serum leptin and serum ghrelin were not altered by photoperiod. More research is needed to determine potential mechanisms by which these physiological changes occurred and how they may apply to weight management strategies.

  18. Evaluation on the Toxic Effects of NanoAg to Catalase.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Bin; Zhai, Wenxin; Liu, Rutao; Yu, Zehua; Shen, Hengmei; Hu, Xinxin

    2015-02-01

    Protein is the functional actor of life. Research on protein damage induced by nanomaterials may give insight into the toxicity mechanisms of nanoparticles. Studying nano silver over the impact of the structure and function of catalase (CAT) at the molecular level, is of great significance for a comprehensive evaluation of their toxic effects. The toxic effects of nanoAg on catalase were thoroughly investigated using steady state and time resolved fluorescence quenching measurements, ultraviolet-visible absorption spectroscopy, resonance light scattering spectroscopy (RLS), circular dichroism spectroscopy (CD) and transmission electron microscopy (TEM). NanoAg could decrease the amount of alpha-helix and increase the beta sheet structure, leading to loose the skeleton structure of catalase. The characteristic fluorescence of catalase was obviously quenched, which showed the exposal of internal hydrophobic amino acids enhanced, and its quenching type is dynamic quenching. The result of RLS and TEM showed that the distribution and size of nanoAg become more uniform and smaller after their interaction, resulting in a decrease of RLS intensity. NanoAg could make the activity of catalase rise. By changing the structure of catalase, nanoAg increases its enzymatic activity to a certain extent, breaking down its balance in vivo, thereby affecting the normal physiological activities. NanoAg has obvious toxic effects on catalase. This paper provided a new perspective and method for the toxic effects of nanoAg to biological macromolecules; provided basic data and reference gist for the hygienics and toxicology studies of nanoAg. It is conducive to the toxicity prevention and control work of nanoAg, promoting nano-technology applied to human production and living better.

  19. The catalase gene family in cucumber: genome-wide identification and organization

    PubMed Central

    Hu, Lifang; Yang, Yingui; Jiang, Lunwei; Liu, Shiqiang

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Catalase (CAT) is a common antioxidant enzyme in almost all living organisms. Currently, detailed reports on cucumber (Cucumis sativus L.) CAT (CsCAT) genes and tissue expression profiling are limited. In the present study, four candidate CsCAT genes were identified in cucumber. Phylogenetic analysis indicated that CsCAT1-CsCAT3 are closely related to Arabidopsis AtCAT1-AtCAT3, but no obvious counterpart was observed for CsCAT4. Intron/exon structure analysis revealed that only one of the 15 positions was completely conserved. Motif analysis showed that, unlike the CAT genes of other species, none of CsCAT genes contained all 10 motifs. Expression data showed that transcripts of all of the CsCAT genes, except CsCAT4, were detected in five tissues. Moreover, their transcription levels displayed differences under different stress treatments. PMID:27560990

  20. Potential toxicity of sarafloxacin to catalase: spectroscopic, ITC and molecular docking descriptions.

    PubMed

    Cao, Zhaozhen; Liu, Rutao; Yang, Bingjun

    2013-11-01

    The interaction between sarafloxacin and catalase (CAT) was studied by fluorescence spectroscopy, UV-visible absorption spectroscopy, circular dichroism (CD) spectroscopy, isothermal titration microcalorimetry (ITC) and molecular docking method. After deducting the inner filter effect, the fluorescence of CAT was quenched regularly by different concentrations of sarafloxacin. The quenching mechanism was studied by lifetime measurement, and it was proved to be mostly due to static quenching. The formation of sarafloxacin-CAT complex alters the micro-environment of amide moieties and tryptophan (Trp) residues, reduces the α-helix content of the enzyme, changes the peripheral substituents on the porphyrin ring of heme and leads to the inhibition of the enzyme activity. Molecular docking study reveals that sarafloxacin is located between two α-helix of CAT near to Trp 182 and Trp 185 residues, which supports the experimental results and helps to have a more clear understanding about the interaction mechanism. The change in the relative position of His 74 to heme induced by the variation of secondary structure is considered to be the major reason for the reduction of CAT activity. Moreover, sarafloxacin binds into a hydrophobic area of CAT mainly through hydrophobic interactions, which is consistent with the ITC analysis.

  1. Potential toxicity of sarafloxacin to catalase: Spectroscopic, ITC and molecular docking descriptions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cao, Zhaozhen; Liu, Rutao; Yang, Bingjun

    2013-11-01

    The interaction between sarafloxacin and catalase (CAT) was studied by fluorescence spectroscopy, UV-visible absorption spectroscopy, circular dichroism (CD) spectroscopy, isothermal titration microcalorimetry (ITC) and molecular docking method. After deducting the inner filter effect, the fluorescence of CAT was quenched regularly by different concentrations of sarafloxacin. The quenching mechanism was studied by lifetime measurement, and it was proved to be mostly due to static quenching. The formation of sarafloxacin-CAT complex alters the micro-environment of amide moieties and tryptophan (Trp) residues, reduces the α-helix content of the enzyme, changes the peripheral substituents on the porphyrin ring of heme and leads to the inhibition of the enzyme activity. Molecular docking study reveals that sarafloxacin is located between two α-helix of CAT near to Trp 182 and Trp 185 residues, which supports the experimental results and helps to have a more clear understanding about the interaction mechanism. The change in the relative position of His 74 to heme induced by the variation of secondary structure is considered to be the major reason for the reduction of CAT activity. Moreover, sarafloxacin binds into a hydrophobic area of CAT mainly through hydrophobic interactions, which is consistent with the ITC analysis.

  2. Extraction of superoxide dismutase, catalase, and carbonic anhydrase from stroma-free red blood cell hemolysate for the preparation of the nanobiotechnological complex of polyhemoglobin-superoxide dismutase-catalase-carbonic anhydrase.

    PubMed

    Guo, C; Gynn, M; Chang, T M S

    2015-06-01

    We report a novel method to simultaneously extract superoxide dismutase (SOD), catalase (CAT), and carbonic anhydrase (CA) from the same sample of red blood cells (RBCs). This avoids the need to use expensive commercial enzymes, thus enabling a cost-effective process for large-scale production of a nanobiotechnological polyHb-SOD-CAT-CA complex, with enhancement of all three red blood cell functions. An optimal concentration of phosphate buffer for ethanol-chloroform treatment results in good recovery of CAT, SOD, and CA after extraction. Different concentrations of the enzymes can be used to enhance the activity of polyHb-SOD-CAT-CA to 2, 4, or 6 times that of RBC.

  3. Genetic polymorphisms in catalase and CYP1B1 determine DNA adduct formation by benzo(a)pyrene ex vivo.

    PubMed

    Schults, Marten A; Chiu, Roland K; Nagle, Peter W; Wilms, Lonneke C; Kleinjans, Jos C; van Schooten, Frederik J; Godschalk, Roger W

    2013-03-01

    Genetic polymorphisms can partially explain the large inter-individual variation in DNA adduct levels following exposure to polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons. Effects of genetic polymorphisms on DNA adduct formation are difficult to assess in human studies because exposure misclassification attenuates underlying relationships. Conversely, ex vivo studies offer the advantage of controlled exposure settings, allowing the possibility to better elucidate genotype-phenotype relationships and gene-gene interactions. Therefore, we exposed lymphocytes of 168 non-smoking volunteers ex vivo to the environmental pollutant benzo(a)pyrene (BaP) and BaP-related DNA adducts were quantified. Thirty-four genetic polymorphisms were assessed in genes involved in carcinogen metabolism, oxidative stress and DNA repair. Polymorphisms in catalase (CAT, rs1001179) and cytochrome P450 1B1 (CYP1B1, rs1800440) were significantly associated with DNA adduct levels, especially when combined. Moreover, reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) analysis in a subset of 30 subjects revealed that expression of catalase correlated strongly with expression of CYP1B1 (R = 0.92, P < 0.001). To further investigate the mechanism by which catalase influences CYP1B1 and how they simultaneously affect BaP-related DNA adduct levels, catalase expression was transiently knocked down in the human lung epithelial cell line A549. Although catalase knockdown did not immediately change CYP1B1 gene expression, recovery of catalase expression 8 h after the knockdown coincided with a 2.2-fold increased expression of CYP1B1 (P < 0.05). We conclude that the genetic polymorphism in the promoter region of CAT may determine the amount and activity of catalase, which may subsequently regulate the expression of CYP1B1. As a result, both genetic polymorphisms modulate DNA adduct levels in lymphocytes by BaP ex vivo.

  4. Electrospun regenerated cellulose nanofibrous membranes surface-grafted with polymer chains/brushes via the atom transfer radical polymerization method for catalase immobilization.

    PubMed

    Feng, Quan; Hou, Dayin; Zhao, Yong; Xu, Tao; Menkhaus, Todd J; Fong, Hao

    2014-12-10

    In this study, an electrospun regenerated cellulose (RC) nanofibrous membrane with fiber diameters of ∼200-400 nm was prepared first; subsequently, 2-hydroxyethyl methacrylate (HEMA), 2-dimethylaminoethyl methacrylate (DMAEMA), and acrylic acid (AA) were selected as the monomers for surface grafting of polymer chains/brushes via the atom transfer radical polymerization (ATRP) method. Thereafter, four nanofibrous membranes (i.e., RC, RC-poly(HEMA), RC-poly(DMAEMA), and RC-poly(AA)) were explored as innovative supports for immobilization of an enzyme of bovine liver catalase (CAT). The amount/capacity, activity, stability, and reusability of immobilized catalase were evaluated, and the kinetic parameters (Vmax and Km) for immobilized and free catalase were determined. The results indicated that the respective amounts/capacities of immobilized catalase on RC-poly(HEMA) and RC-poly(DMAEMA) nanofibrous membranes reached 78 ± 3.5 and 67 ± 2.7 mg g(-1), which were considerably higher than the previously reported values. Meanwhile, compared to that of free CAT (i.e., 18 days), the half-life periods of RC-CAT, RC-poly(HEMA)-CAT, RC-poly(DMAEMA)-CAT, and RC-poly(AA)-CAT were 49, 58, 56, and 60 days, respectively, indicating that the storage stability of immobilized catalase was also significantly improved. Furthermore, the immobilized catalase exhibited substantially higher resistance to temperature variation (tested from 5 to 70 °C) and lower degree of sensitivity to pH value (tested from 4.0 and 10.0) than the free catalase. In particular, according to the kinetic parameters of Vmax and Km, the nanofibrous membranes of RC-poly(HEMA) (i.e., 5102 μmol mg(-1) min(-1) and 44.89 mM) and RC-poly(DMAEMA) (i.e., 4651 μmol mg(-1) min(-1) and 46.98 mM) had the most satisfactory biocompatibility with immobilized catalase. It was therefore concluded that the electrospun RC nanofibrous membranes surface-grafted with 3-dimensional nanolayers of polymer chains/brushes would be

  5. Spectroscopic investigations on the effect of N-Acetyl-L-cysteine-Capped CdTe Quantum Dots on catalase

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Haoyu; Yang, Bingjun; Cui, Erqian; Liu, Rutao

    2014-11-01

    Quantum dots (QDs) are recognized as some of the most promising semiconductor nanocrystals in biomedical applications. However, the potential toxicity of QDs has aroused wide public concern. Catalase (CAT) is a common enzyme in animal and plant tissues. For the potential application of QDs in vivo, it is important to investigate the interaction of QDs with CAT. In this work, the effect of N-Acetyl-L-cysteine-Capped CdTe Quantum Dots with fluorescence emission peak at 612 nm (QDs-612) on CAT was investigated by fluorescence, synchronous fluorescence, fluorescence lifetime, ultraviolet-visible (UV-vis) absorption and circular dichroism (CD) techniques. Binding of QDs-612 to CAT caused static quenching of the fluorescence, the change of the secondary structure of CAT and the alteration of the microenvironment of tryptophan residues. The association constants K were determined to be K288K = 7.98 × 105 L mol-1 and K298K = 7.21 × 105 L mol-1. The interaction between QDs-612 and CAT was spontaneous with 1:1 stoichiometry approximately. The CAT activity was also inhibited for the bound QDs-612. This work provides direct evidence about enzyme toxicity of QDs-612 to CAT in vitro and establishes a new strategy to investigate the interaction between enzyme and QDs at a molecular level, which is helpful for clarifying the bioactivities of QDs in vivo.

  6. Human Protein C produces anticoagulation and increased fibrinolytic activity in the cat

    SciTech Connect

    Burdick, M.D.; Schaub, R.G.

    1986-03-05

    The effect of activated human Protein C (PCa) infusion on the coagulation and fibrinolytic systems of the Nembutal anesthetized cat was assessed. Human Protein C was activated by incubation with thrombin or by passage over a column of thrombin immobilized on CNBr Sepharose 4B. Cats were given bolus i.v. injections of either vehicle or PCa in a dose range of 3-16 ..mu..g/mL of calculated whole body volume. Citrated blood samples (9:1) were taken from a femoral vein prior to and at 5, 10, 20, 30, 60, 120, and 180 min. after PCa. Activated partial thromboplastin time (APTT), thrombin time (TT) euglobulin clot lysis (ECLT) and I-125 fibrin release (FR) was measured. Vehicle treated cats had no change in any parameter. PCa produced a dose and time dependent prolongation of APTT while TT was unchanged. Anticoagulation was evident immediately after PCa infusion and began to normalize within 20 min. Fibrinolytic activity measured by ECLT and FR was also stimulated by PCa but was not evident until 40-60 minutes after PCa injection. The results show that human PCa induces anticoagulation effects in the cat similar to other species. However, stimulation of fibrinolysis requires a longer period of time before expression. This delay of fibrinolytic stimulation should be considered when assessing the effects of human Protein C in other species.

  7. Characterization of OxyR as a negative transcriptional regulator that represses catalase production in Corynebacterium diphtheriae.

    PubMed

    Kim, Ju-Sim; Holmes, Randall K

    2012-01-01

    Corynebacterium diphtheriae and Corynebacterium glutamicum each have one gene (cat) encoding catalase. In-frame Δcat mutants of C. diphtheriae and C. glutamicum were hyper-sensitive to growth inhibition and killing by H(2)O(2). In C. diphtheriae C7(β), both catalase activity and cat transcription decreased ~2-fold during transition from exponential growth to early stationary phase. Prototypic OxyR in Escherichia coli senses oxidative stress and it activates katG transcription and catalase production in response to H(2)O(2). In contrast, exposure of C. diphtheriae C7(β) to H(2)O(2) did not stimulate transcription of cat. OxyR from C. diphtheriae and C. glutamicum have 52% similarity with E. coli OxyR and contain homologs of the two cysteine residues involved in H(2)O(2) sensing by E. coli OxyR. In-frame ΔoxyR deletion mutants of C. diphtheriae C7(β), C. diphtheriae NCTC13129, and C. glutamicum were much more resistant than their parental wild type strains to growth inhibition by H(2)O(2). In the C. diphtheriae C7(β) ΔoxyR mutant, cat transcripts were about 8-fold more abundant and catalase activity was about 20-fold greater than in the C7(β) wild type strain. The oxyR gene from C. diphtheriae or C. glutamicum, but not from E. coli, complemented the defect in ΔoxyR mutants of C. diphtheriae and C. glutamicum and decreased their H(2)O(2) resistance to the level of their parental strains. Gel-mobility shift, DNaseI footprint, and primer extension assays showed that purified OxyR from C. diphtheriae C7(β) bound, in the presence or absence of DTT, to a sequence in the cat promoter region that extends from nucleotide position -55 to -10 with respect to the +1 nucleotide in the cat ORF. These results demonstrate that OxyR from C. diphtheriae or C. glutamicum functions as a transcriptional repressor of the cat gene by a mechanism that is independent of oxidative stress induced by H(2)O(2).

  8. Overexpression of catalase targeted to mitochondria attenuates murine cardiac aging

    PubMed Central

    Dai, Dao-Fu; Santana, Luis F.; Vermulst, Marc; Tomazela, Daniela M.; Emond, M.J.; MacCoss, Michael J.; Gollahon, Katherine; Martin, George M.; Loeb, Lawrence A.; Ladiges, Warren C.; Rabinovitch, Peter S.

    2010-01-01

    Background: Age is a major risk for cardiovascular diseases. Although mitochondrial reactive oxygen species (ROS) have been proposed as one of the causes of aging, their role in cardiac aging remains unclear. We have previously shown that overexpression of catalase targeted to mitochondria (mCAT) prolongs murine median lifespan by 17-21%. Methods and Results: We used echocardiography to study cardiac function in aging cohorts of wild type (WT) and mCAT mice. Changes found in WT mice recapitulate human aging: age-dependent increases in left ventricular mass index (LVMI) and left atrial dimension, worsening of the myocardial performance index (MPI), and a decline in diastolic function. Cardiac aging in mice is accompanied by accumulation of mitochondrial protein oxidation, increased mitochondrial DNA mutations and deletions and mitochondrial biogenesis, increased ventricular fibrosis, enlarged myocardial fiber size, decreased cardiac SERCA2 protein and activation of the calcineurin-NFAT pathway. All of these age-related changes were significantly attenuated in mCAT mice. Analysis of survival of 130 mice demonstrated that echocardiographic cardiac aging risk scores were significant predictors of mortality. The estimated attributable risk to mortality for these two parameters was 55%. Conclusion: This study shows that cardiac aging in the mouse closely recapitulates human aging and demonstrates the critical role of mitochondrial ROS in cardiac aging and the impact of cardiac aging on survival. These findings also support the potential application of mitochondrial antioxidants in ROS-related cardiovascular diseases. PMID:19451351

  9. Acidic pH conditions induce dissociation of the haem from the protein and destabilise the catalase isolated from Aspergillus terreus.

    PubMed

    Vatsyayan, Preety; Goswami, Pranab

    2011-02-01

    The stability (half-life, t(½)) of the large catalase (CAT) isolated from Aspergillus terreus was decreased under acidic conditions (maximum t(½) approximately 8.5 months at pH ≤ 6) versus alkaline conditions (t(½) approximately 15 months at pH 8-12). Acidic conditions induce the dissociation of haem from CAT, as revealed from a reduction in the Soret peak intensity at 405 nm and an increase in the peak current at Fe(3+)/Fe(2+) redox potentials. This increase in current is attributed to the facile electron transfer from the free haem generated on the electrode surface as a result of its disintegration from the insulating protein matrix. The haem isolated from CAT at acidic condition was reconstituted with apo-CAT at alkaline denaturing conditions to regenerate the CAT activity.

  10. Cu/Zn superoxide dismutase and catalase activities in Pinus mugo needles growing at elevated stands in the mountains, and their photochemical efficiency of PSII.

    PubMed

    Miszalski, Zbigniew; Libik, Marta; Surówka, Ewa; Niewiadomska, Ewa

    2005-08-01

    Pinus mugo needles were sampled at different altitudes (1420, 1590 and 1920 m a.s.l.) to analyse levels of oxidative stress and changes in maximum photochemical efficiency of PSII. Polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis demonstrated that almost all superoxide dismutase activity represented Cu/Zn superoxide dismutase, and only 4-6% represents Mn superoxide dismutase. In extracts from plants sampled at 1590 and 1920 m a.s.l., lower activity of Cu/Zn superoxide dismutase was found. Comparing these data with immunoblots, it can be concluded that the differences in superoxide dismutase activity was related to protein amount. In needles from higher altitudes, a decrease in catalase activity was detected, as opposed to the protein amount, which was higher in needles from the higher stands. Considering the decrease in catalase and Cu/Zn superoxide dismutase activities in needles collected at 1590 and 1920 m a.s.l., we suggest that higher levels of oxidative stress may induce changes in photochemical efficiency of PSII.

  11. Expression of a highly active catalase VktA in the cyanobacterium Synechococcus elongatus PCC 7942 alleviates the photoinhibition of photosystem II.

    PubMed

    Jimbo, Haruhiko; Noda, Akiko; Hayashi, Hidenori; Nagano, Takanori; Yumoto, Isao; Orikasa, Yoshitake; Okuyama, Hidetoshi; Nishiyama, Yoshitaka

    2013-11-01

    The repair of photosystem II (PSII) after photodamage is particularly sensitive to reactive oxygen species-such as H2O2, which is abundantly produced during the photoinhibition of PSII. In the present study, we generated a transformant of the cyanobacterium Synechococcus elongatus PCC 7942 that expressed a highly active catalase, VktA, which is derived from a facultatively psychrophilic bacterium Vibrio rumoiensis, and examined the effect of expression of VktA on the photoinhibition of PSII. The activity of PSII in transformed cells declined much more slowly than in wild-type cells when cells were exposed to strong light in the presence of H2O2. However, the rate of photodamage to PSII, as monitored in the presence of chloramphenicol, was the same in the two lines of cells, suggesting that the repair of PSII was protected by the expression of VktA. The de novo synthesis of the D1 protein, which is required for the repair of PSII, was activated in transformed cells under the same stress conditions. Similar protection of the repair of PSII in transformed cells was also observed under strong light at a relatively low temperature. Thus, the expression of the highly active catalase mitigates photoinhibition of PSII by protecting protein synthesis against damage by H2O2 with subsequent enhancement of the repair of PSII.

  12. Self-cloning significantly enhances the production of catalase in Bacillus subtilis WSHDZ-01.

    PubMed

    Xu, Sha; Guo, Yaqiong; Du, Guocheng; Zhou, Jingwen; Chen, Jian

    2014-08-01

    The katA gene that encodes catalase (CAT) in Bacillus subtilis WSHDZ-01 was overexpressed in B. subtilis WB600 and B. subtilis WSHDZ-01. The CAT yield in both transformed strains was significantly improved compared to that in the wild-type WSHDZ-01 in shake flask culture. When cultured in a 3-L stirred tank reactor (STR), the recombinant CAT activity in B. subtilis WSHDZ-01 could be improved by 419 %, reaching up to 39,117 U/mL and was 8,149.4 U/mg dry cell weight, which is the highest activity reported in Bacillus sp. However, the recombinant CAT in B. subtilis WB600 cultured in a 3-L STR was not significantly improved by any of the common means for process optimization, and the highest CAT activity was 3,673.5 U/mg dry cell weight. The results suggest that self-cloning of the complete expression cassette in the original strain is a reasonable strategy to improve the yield of wild-type enzymes.

  13. Combustion products of 1,3-butadiene inhibit catalase activity and induce expression of oxidative DNA damage repair enzymes in human bronchial epithelial cells.

    PubMed

    Kennedy, Christopher H; Catallo, W James; Wilson, Vincent L; Mitchell, James B

    2009-10-01

    1,3-Butadiene, an important petrochemical, is commonly burned off when excess amounts need to be destroyed. This combustion process produces butadiene soot (BDS), which is composed of a complex mixture of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons in particulates ranging in size from <1 microm to 1 mm. An organic extract of BDS is both cytotoxic and genotoxic to normal human bronchial epithelial (NHBE) cells. Based on the oxidizing potential of BDS, we hypothesized that an organic extract of this particulate matter would (1) cause enzyme inactivation due to protein amino acid oxidation and (2) induce oxidative DNA damage in NHBE cells. Thus, our aims were to determine the effect of butadiene soot ethanol extract (BSEE) on both enzyme activity and the expression of proteins involved in the repair of oxidative DNA damage. Catalase was found to be sensitive to BDS as catalase activity was potently diminished in the presence of BSEE. Using Western analysis, both the alpha isoform of human 8-oxoguanine DNA glycosylase (alpha-hOGG1) and human apurinic/apyrimidinic endonuclease (APE-1) were shown to be significantly overexpressed as compared to untreated controls after exposure of NHBE cells to BSEE. Our results indicate that BSEE is capable of effectively inactivating the antioxidant enzyme catalase, presumably via oxidation of protein amino acids. The presence of oxidized biomolecules may partially explain the extranuclear fluorescence that is detected when NHBE cells are treated with an organic extract of BDS. Overexpression of both alpha-hOGG1 and APE-1 proteins following treatment of NHBE cells with BSEE suggests that this mixture causes oxidative DNA damage.

  14. Defects in a quinol oxidase lead to loss of KatC catalase activity in Pseudomonas aeruginosa: KatC activity is temperature dependent and it requires an intact disulphide bond formation system.

    PubMed

    Mossialos, Dimitris; Tavankar, Gholam Reza; Zlosnik, James E A; Williams, Huw D

    2006-03-17

    Mutation or overexpression of the cyanide-insensitive terminal oxidase (CIO) of Pseudomonas aeruginosa leads to temperature-sensitivity, multiple antibiotic sensitivity, and abnormal cell division and failure to produce a temperature-inducible catalase [G.R. Tavankar, D. Mossialos, H.D. Williams, Mutation or overexpression of a terminal oxidase leads to a cell division defect and multiple antibiotic sensitivity in Pseudomonas aeruginosa, J. Biol. Chem. 278 (2003) 4524-4530]. We identify this enzyme as KatC, a newly described catalase from P. aeruginosa. Loss of KatC activity leads to temperature-dependent hydrogen peroxide sensitivity, which correlates with its temperature-inducible expression pattern. This is the first description, to our knowledge, of a temperature-inducible bacterial catalase. The transcription of katC is not affected in strains lacking or overexpressing the CIO, indicating that a post-transcriptional effect leads to loss of KatC activity. Disulphide bond formation is affected in strains lacking or overexpressing the CIO. This is shown by reduced activity of the extracellular enzymes lipase and elastase, and an altered pattern of redox states of DsbA, a key protein in disulphide bond formation in P. aeruginosa, in these strains. Moreover, a dsbA mutant had no detectable KatC activity, demonstrating that an intact disulphide bond formation system is required for KatC activity and thus explaining the loss of this catalase in the cio mutant and overexpressing strains.

  15. Studies on the catalase of Histoplasma capsulatum.

    PubMed Central

    Howard, D H

    1983-01-01

    Factors which control the levels of catalase within yeast cells of Histoplasma capsulatum were studied. Only a small fraction of the total catalase activity could be detected in whole cells. The bulk of the activity was revealed in cell-free extracts or in cells permeabilized with acetone. The formation of the enzyme was regulated by glucose and by oxygen. There were large, consistent differences in the levels of catalase among strains of H. capsulatum. The sensitivity of the strains to H2O2 toxicity also varied remarkably. Peroxidase activity could not be detected in cell-free extracts of the strains. Resistance to H2O2 did not correspond to levels of catalase. There was no obvious correlation of H2O2 sensitivity and virulence among the strains. PMID:6301990

  16. Genetics of Catalase in DROSOPHILA MELANOGASTER: Rates of Synthesis and Degradation of the Enzyme in Flies Aneuploid and Euploid for the Structural Gene

    PubMed Central

    Lubinsky, Sharon; Bewley, Glenn C.

    1979-01-01

    A screen for allelic variants of the enzyme catalase indicated that the Cat+ locus is essentially monomorphic in D. melanogaster. Segmental aneuploidy was used to screen the genome for a dosage-sensitive region for catalase activity. One region, 75D–78A on the polytene chromosome map of 3L, exhibited a hyperploid/euploid ratio of enzyme activity of 1.5. Further dissection localized the region to 75D–76A. We suggest that this region contains the structural locus for catalase in D. melanogaster.Simple methods have been developed using the specific inhibitor, 3-amino-1,2,4-triazole, for the direct analysis of rates of synthesis and degradation of the Cat+ gene product. Based on kinetic studies of catalase synthesis in flies aneuploid and euploid for region 75D–76B, we suggest that these techniques can be readily applied to an examination of mutants that control the expression of the structural gene for catalase in Drosophila. PMID:17248908

  17. Accurate stepping on a narrow path: mechanics, EMG, and motor cortex activity in the cat

    PubMed Central

    Farrell, Brad J.; Bulgakova, Margarita A.; Sirota, Mikhail G.; Prilutsky, Boris I.

    2015-01-01

    How do cats manage to walk so graciously on top of narrow fences or windowsills high above the ground while apparently exerting little effort? In this study we investigated cat full-body mechanics and the activity of limb muscles and motor cortex during walking along a narrow 5-cm path on the ground. We tested the hypotheses that during narrow walking 1) lateral stability would be lower because of the decreased base-of-support area and 2) the motor cortex activity would increase stride-related modulation because of imposed demands on lateral stability and paw placement accuracy. We measured medio-lateral and rostro-caudal dynamic stability derived from the extrapolated center of mass position with respect to the boundaries of the support area. We found that cats were statically stable in the frontal plane during both unconstrained and narrow-path walking. During narrow-path walking, cats walked slightly slower with more adducted limbs, produced smaller lateral forces by hindlimbs, and had elevated muscle activities. Of 174 neurons recorded in cortical layer V, 87% of forelimb-related neurons (from 114) and 90% of hindlimb-related neurons (from 60) had activities during narrow-path walking distinct from unconstrained walking: more often they had a higher mean discharge rate, lower depth of stride-related modulation, and/or longer period of activation during the stride. These activity changes appeared to contribute to control of accurate paw placement in the medio-lateral direction, the width of the stride, rather than to lateral stability control, as the stability demands on narrow-path and unconstrained walking were similar. PMID:26354314

  18. SHORT-ROOT Deficiency Alleviates the Cell Death Phenotype of the Arabidopsis catalase2 Mutant under Photorespiration-Promoting Conditions.

    PubMed

    Waszczak, Cezary; Kerchev, Pavel I; Mühlenbock, Per; Hoeberichts, Frank A; Van Der Kelen, Katrien; Mhamdi, Amna; Willems, Patrick; Denecker, Jordi; Kumpf, Robert P; Noctor, Graham; Messens, Joris; Van Breusegem, Frank

    2016-08-01

    Hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) can act as a signaling molecule that influences various aspects of plant growth and development, including stress signaling and cell death. To analyze molecular mechanisms that regulate the response to increased H2O2 levels in plant cells, we focused on the photorespiration-dependent peroxisomal H2O2 production in Arabidopsis thaliana mutants lacking CATALASE2 (CAT2) activity (cat2-2). By screening for second-site mutations that attenuate the PSII maximum efficiency (Fv'/Fm') decrease and lesion formation linked to the cat2-2 phenotype, we discovered that a mutation in SHORT-ROOT (SHR) rescued the cell death phenotype of cat2-2 plants under photorespiration-promoting conditions. SHR deficiency attenuated H2O2-dependent gene expression, oxidation of the glutathione pool, and ascorbate depletion in a cat2-2 genetic background upon exposure to photorespiratory stress. Decreased glycolate oxidase and catalase activities together with accumulation of glycolate further implied that SHR deficiency impacts the cellular redox homeostasis by limiting peroxisomal H2O2 production. The photorespiratory phenotype of cat2-2 mutants did not depend on the SHR functional interactor SCARECROW and the sugar signaling component ABSCISIC ACID INSENSITIVE4, despite the requirement for exogenous sucrose for cell death attenuation in cat2-2 shr-6 double mutants. Our findings reveal a link between SHR and photorespiratory H2O2 production that has implications for the integration of developmental and stress responses.

  19. Antioxidant Enzyme Responses Induced by Whiteflies in Tobacco Plants in Defense against Aphids: Catalase May Play a Dominant Role

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Haipeng; Sun, Xia; Xue, Ming; Zhang, Xiao; Li, Qingliang

    2016-01-01

    Background Bemisia tabaci MEAM1 (Middle East-Asia Minor 1) feeding alters antioxidative enzyme activity in some plant species. Infestation of B. tabaci nymphs decreases Myzus persicae performance on systemic, but not local leaves of tobacco plants. However, it is unclear if B. tabaci nymphs induced antioxidant activities contributing to the aphid resistance. Methodology/Principal Findings We investigated the relationship between antioxidants induced by nymphs of B. tabaci feeding on tobacco and aphid resistance. The activities of catalase (CAT), peroxidase (POD), superoxide dismutase (SOD) and the concentration of hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) were assayed in tobacco leaves at different feeding times following infestation of B. tabaci nymphs. The infestation altered the activities of CAT and POD, but had no significant effect on SOD activity. The highest CAT activity was observed at 15 d after infestation. This was 98.2% greater than control systemic leaves, but 32.6% lower than the control in local leaves. Higher POD activity was recorded in local vs. systemic leaves after 15 d of infestation. POD activity was 71.0% and 112.9% higher in local and systemic leaves, respectively, than in the controls. The changes of CAT, but not POD or SOD activity were correlated to levels of aphid resistance. H2O2 levels were higher in local than in systemic leaves in contrast to CAT activity. Tobacco curly shoot virus mediated virus-induced gene silencing was employed to determine if CAT activation was involved in the aphid resistance induced by B. tabaci nymphs. B. tabaci induced CAT activity decreased when the Cat1 expression was silenced. The performance assay indicated that Cat1 silencing made B. tabaci infested plants a more suitable host for aphids than infested control plants. The aphid survival rate was reduced by 40.4% in infested control plants, but reduced by only 26.1% in Cat1-silenced plants compared to uninfested controls. Also, qPCR results showed that silencing of Cat1

  20. Role of oxyradicals in the inactivation of catalase by ozone

    SciTech Connect

    Whiteside, C.; Hassan, H.M. )

    1988-01-01

    The antioxidant enzymes, catalase and superoxide dismutase, are inactivated upon exposure to ozone. In this study, the mechanism of this inactivation was examined using catalase as a model system. The data show that the inactivation of catalase is dependent on ozone concentration, time of exposure, and pH. Loss of catalase activity is accompanied with loss of the heme spectra. Tiron, desferal-Mn, trolox-c, and pyruvate protect the enzyme against ozone inactivation. SOD is less effective due to its inactivation by ozone. On the other hand, alcohols do not provide significant protection. The data suggest the possible involvement of superoxide radicals in the inactivation of catalase by ozone.

  1. Role of oxyradicals in the inactivation of catalase by ozone.

    PubMed

    Whiteside, C; Hassan, H M

    1988-01-01

    The antioxidant enzymes, catalase and superoxide dismutase, are inactivated upon exposure to ozone. In this study, the mechanism of this inactivation was examined using catalase as a model system. The data show that the inactivation of catalase is dependent on ozone concentration, time of exposure, and pH. Loss of catalase activity is accompanied with loss of the heme spectra. Tiron, desferal-Mn, trolox-c, and pyruvate protect the enzyme against ozone inactivation. SOD is less effective due to its inactivation by ozone. On the other hand, alcohols do not provide significant protection. The data suggest the possible involvement of superoxide radicals in the inactivation of catalase by ozone.

  2. Ability of recombinant human catalase to suppress inflammation of the murine lung induced by influenza A.

    PubMed

    Shi, Xunlong; Shi, Zhihui; Huang, Hai; Zhu, Hongguang; Zhou, Pei; Zhu, Haiyan; Ju, Dianwen

    2014-06-01

    Influenza A virus pandemics and emerging antiviral resistance highlight the urgent need for novel generic pharmacological strategies that reduce both viral replication and inflammation of the lung. We have previously investigated the therapeutic efficacy of recombinant human catalase (rhCAT) against viral pneumonia in mice, but the protection mechanisms involved were not explored. In the present study, we have performed a more in-depth analysis covering survival, lung inflammation, immune cell responses, production of cytokines, and inflammation signaling pathways in mice. Male imprinting control region mice were infected intranasally with high pathogenicity (H1N1) influenza A virus followed by treatment with recombinant human catalase. The administration of rhCAT resulted in a significant reduction in inflammatory cell infiltration (e.g., macrophages and neutrophils), inflammatory cytokine levels (e.g., IL-2, IL-6, TNF-α, IFN-γ), the level of the intercellular adhesion molecule 1 chemokine and the mRNA levels of toll-like receptors TLR-4, TLR-7, and NF-κB, as well as partially maintaining the activity of the antioxidant enzymes system. These findings indicated that rhCAT might play a key protective role in viral pneumonia of mice via suppression of inflammatory immune responses.

  3. Immobilization of bovine catalase onto magnetic nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Doğaç, Yasemin İspirli; Teke, Mustafa

    2013-01-01

    The scope of this study is to achieve carrier-bound immobilization of catalase onto magnetic particles (Fe₃O₄ and Fe₂O₃NiO₂ · H₂O) to specify the optimum conditions of immobilization. Removal of H2O2 and the properties of immobilized sets were also investigated. To that end, adsorption and then cross-linking methods onto magnetic particles were performed. The optimum immobilization conditions were found for catalase: immobilization time (15 min for Fe₃O₄; 10 min for Fe2O₃NiO₂ · H₂O), the initial enzyme concentration (1 mg/mL), amount of magnetic particles (25 mg), and glutaraldehyde concentration (3%). The activity reaction conditions (optimum temperature, optimum pH, pH stability, thermal stability, operational stability, and reusability) were characterized. Also kinetic parameters were calculated by Lineweaver-Burk plots. The optimum pH values were found to be 7.0, 7.0, and 8.0 for free enzyme, Fe₃O₄-immobilized catalases, and Fe₂O₃NiO₂ · H₂O-immobilized catalases, respectively. All immobilized catalase systems displayed the optimum temperature between 25 and 35°C. Reusability studies showed that Fe₃O₄-immobilized catalase can be used 11 times with 50% loss in original activity, while Fe2O₃NiO₂ · H₂O-immobilized catalase lost 67% of activity after the same number of uses. Furthermore, immobilized catalase systems exhibited improved thermal and pH stability. The results transparently indicate that it is possible to have binding between enzyme and magnetic nanoparticles.

  4. A monoclonal IgM directed against immunodominant catalase B of cell wall of Aspergillus fumigatus exerts anti-A. fumigatus activities.

    PubMed

    Chaturvedi, Ashok K; Kumar, Rohitashw; Kumar, Awanit; Shukla, Praveen K

    2009-11-01

    Aspergillus fumigatus, a ubiquitous fungus, has been reported to cause human diseases like allergic pulmonary aspergillosis, aspergilloma and invasive infection. Limited spectrum and emergence of resistance has become a serious problem with available antifungals. Therefore, an alternative approach is required for successful treatment of mycoses. In the present study, immunogenic protein profile of A. fumigatus cell wall was generated using two-dimensional-gel electrophoresis and three hybridomas producing monoclonal antibodies (MAbs; IgM) were selected after fusion experiments. Of these three MAbs, MAb-7 exhibited potent in vitro inhibitory activity, which was confirmed by MTT assay, fluorescence-activated cell sorter analysis and immuno-fluorescence studies, and the protein was identified as catalase B using MALDI-TOF-MS.

  5. Nitrergic ventro-medial medullary neurons activated during cholinergically induced active (REM) sleep in the cat

    PubMed Central

    Pose, Inés; Sampogna, Sharon; Chase, Michael H.; Morales, Francisco R.

    2010-01-01

    The rostral ventro-medial medullary reticular formation is a complex structure that is involved with a variety of motor functions. It contains glycinergic neurons that are activated during active (REM) sleep (AS); these neurons appear to be responsible for the postsynaptic inhibition of motoneurons that occurs during this state. We have reported that neurons in this same region contain nitric oxide (NO) synthase and that they innervate brainstem motor pools. In the present study we examined the c-fos expression of these neurons after carbachol-induced active sleep (C-AS). Three control and four experimental cats were employed to identify c-fos expressing nitrergic neurons using immunocytochemical techniques to detect the Fos protein together with neuronal nitric oxide synthase (nNOS) or NADPH-diaphorase activity. The classical neurotransmitter content of the nitrergic cells in this region was examined through the combination of immunocytochemical techniques for the detection of glutamate, glycine, choline acetyltransferase (ChAT), tyrosine hydroxilase (TH) or GABA together with nNOS. During C-AS, there was a 1074% increase in the number of nitrergic neurons that expressed c-fos. These neurons did not contain glycine, ChAT, TH or GABA, but a subpopulation (15%) of them displayed glutamate-like immunoreactivity. Therefore, some of these neurons contain both an excitatory neurotransmitter (glutamate) and an excitatory neuromodulator (NO); the neurotransmitter content of the rest of them remains to be determined. Because some of the nitrergic neurons innervate brainstem motoneurons it is possible that they participate in the generation of tonic and excitatory phasic motor events that occur during AS. We also suggest that these nitrergic neurons may be involved in autonomic regulation during this state. In addition, because NO has trophic effects on target neurons, the present findings represent the first, albeit indirect, evidence for a possible trophic function of

  6. Catalase inhibition in diabetic rats potentiates DNA damage and apoptotic cell death setting the stage for cardiomyopathy.

    PubMed

    Ivanović-Matić, Svetlana; Bogojević, Desanka; Martinović, Vesna; Petrović, Anja; Jovanović-Stojanov, Sofija; Poznanović, Goran; Grigorov, Ilijana

    2014-12-01

    Diabetes is a risk factor for cardiovascular disease that has a multifactorial etiology, with oxidative stress as an important component. Our previous observation of a significant diabetes-related increase in rat cardiac catalase (CAT) activity suggested that CAT could play a major role in delaying the development of diabetic cardiomyopathy. Thus, in the present work, we examined the effects of the daily administration of the CAT inhibitor, 3-amino-1,2,4-triazole (1 mg/g), on the hearts of streptozotocin (STZ)-induced diabetic rats. Administration of CAT inhibitor was started from the 15th day after the last STZ treatment (40 mg/kg/5 days), and maintained until the end of the 4th or 6th weeks of diabetes. Compared to untreated diabetic rats, at the end of the observation period, CAT inhibition lowered the induced level of cardiac CAT activity to the basal level and decreased CAT protein expression, mediated through a decline in the nuclear factor erythroid-derived 2-like 2 /nuclear factor-kappa B p65 (Nrf2/NF-κB p65) subunit ratio. The perturbed antioxidant defenses resulting from CAT inhibition promoted increased H₂O₂production (P < 0.05) and lipid peroxidation (P < 0.05). Generated cytotoxic stimuli increased DNA damage (P < 0.05) and activated pro-apoptotic events, observed as a decrease (P < 0.05) in the ratio of the apoptosis regulator proteins Bcl-2/Bax, increased (P < 0.05) presence of the poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase-1 (PARP-1) 85 kDa apoptotic fragment and cytoplasmic levels of cytochrome C. These findings confirm an important function of CAT in the suppression of events leading to diabetes-promoted cardiac dysfunction and cardiomyopathy.

  7. Exposure to low UVA doses increases KatA and KatB catalase activities, and confers cross-protection against subsequent oxidative injuries in Pseudomonas aeruginosa.

    PubMed

    Pezzoni, Magdalena; Tribelli, Paula M; Pizarro, Ramón A; López, Nancy I; Costa, Cristina S

    2016-05-01

    Solar UVA radiation is one of the main environmental stress factors for Pseudomonas aeruginosa. Exposure to high UVA doses produces lethal effects by the action of the reactive oxygen species (ROS) it generates. P. aeruginosa has several enzymes, including KatA and KatB catalases, which provide detoxification of ROS. We have previously demonstrated that KatA is essential in defending P. aeruginosa against high UVA doses. In order to analyse the mechanisms involved in the adaptation of this micro-organism to UVA, we investigated the effect of exposure to low UVA doses on KatA and KatB activities, and the physiological consequences. Exposure to UVA induced total catalase activity; assays with non-denaturing polyacrylamide gels showed that both KatA and KatB activities were increased by radiation. This regulation occurred at the transcriptional level and depended, at least partly, on the increase in H2O2 levels. We demonstrated that exposure to low UVA produced a protective effect against subsequent lethal doses of UVA, sodium hypochlorite and H2O2. Protection against lethal UVA depends on katA, whilst protection against sodium hypochlorite depends on katB, demonstrating that different mechanisms are involved in the defence against these oxidative agents, although both genes can be involved in the global cellular response. Conversely, protection against lethal doses of H2O2 could depend on induction of both genes and/or (an)other defensive factor(s). A better understanding of the adaptive response of P. aeruginosa to UVA is relevant from an ecological standpoint and for improving disinfection strategies that employ UVA or solar irradiation.

  8. Toward "stable-on-the-table" enzymes: improving key properties of catalase by covalent conjugation with poly(acrylic acid).

    PubMed

    Riccardi, Caterina M; Cole, Kyle S; Benson, Kyle R; Ward, Jessamyn R; Bassett, Kayla M; Zhang, Yiren; Zore, Omkar V; Stromer, Bobbi; Kasi, Rajeswari M; Kumar, Challa V

    2014-08-20

    Several key properties of catalase such as thermal stability, resistance to protease degradation, and resistance to ascorbate inhibition were improved, while retaining its structure and activity, by conjugation to poly(acrylic acid) (PAA, Mw 8000) via carbodiimide chemistry where the amine groups on the protein are appended to the carboxyl groups of the polymer. Catalase conjugation was examined at three different pH values (pH 5.0, 6.0, and 7.0) and at three distinct mole ratios (1:100, 1:500, and 1:1000) of catalase to PAA at each reaction pH. The corresponding products are labeled as Cat-PAA(x)-y, where x is the protein to polymer mole ratio and y is the pH used for the synthesis. The coupling reaction consumed about 60-70% of the primary amines on the catalase; all samples were completely water-soluble and formed nanogels, as evidenced by gel electrophoresis and electron microscopy. The UV circular dichroism (CD) spectra indicated substantial retention of protein secondary structure for all samples, which increased to 100% with increasing pH of the synthesis and polymer mole fraction. Soret CD bands of all samples indicated loss of ∼50% of band intensities, independent of the reaction pH. Catalytic activities of the conjugates increased with increasing synthesis pH, where 55-80% and 90-100% activity was retained for all samples synthesized at pH 5.0 and pH 7.0, respectively, and the Km or Vmax values of Cat-PAA(100)-7 did not differ significantly from those of the free enzyme. All conjugates synthesized at pH 7.0 were thermally stable even when heated to ∼85-90 °C, while native catalase denatured between 55 and 65 °C. All conjugates retained 40-90% of their original activities even after storing for 10 weeks at 8 °C, while unmodified catalase lost all of its activity within 2 weeks, under similar storage conditions. Interestingly, PAA surrounding catalase limited access to the enzyme from large molecules like proteases and significantly increased

  9. Loading PEG-Catalase into Filamentous and Spherical Polymer Nanocarriers

    PubMed Central

    Simone, Eric A.; Dziubla, Thomas D.; Arguiri, Evguenia; Vardon, Vanessa; Shuvaev, Vladimir V.; Christofidou-Solomidou, Melpo; Muzykantov, Vladimir R.

    2011-01-01

    Purpose Based on a unique phase alignment that occurs during formulation, we postulated that PEG-ylation of the cargo enzyme would enhance its encapsulation within diblock copolymer nanocarriers and thus resistance to proteases. Methods A freeze–thaw modified double emulsion technique was utilized to encapsulate either the catalytically active enzyme catalase (MW ~250 kDa) or PEG-catalase in PEG–PLA polymer nanocarriers (PNC). Spectrophotometer measurement of substrate depletion was utilized to monitor enzyme activity. Isotope labeling of the enzyme was used in conjunction with activity measurements to determine PNC loading efficiency and PNC-enzyme resistance to proteases. This labeling also enabled blood clearance measurements of PNC-loaded and non-loaded enzymes in mice. Results Non-loaded PEG-catalase exhibited longer circulation times than catalase, but was equally susceptible to proteolysis. Modulation of the ratio of relatively hydrophilic to hydrophobic domains in the diblock PEG–PLA copolymer provided either filamentous or spherical PNC loaded with PEG-catalase. For both PNC geometries, encapsulation and resistance to proteases of the resultant PNC-loaded enzyme were more effective for PEG-catalase than catalase. Isotope tracing showed similar blood levels of PNC-loaded and free PEG-catalase in mice. Conclusions PEGylation enhances active catalase loading within PNC and resistance to protease degradation, relative to unloaded PEG-catalase. PMID:18956141

  10. Coexpression of bile salt hydrolase gene and catalase gene remarkably improves oxidative stress and bile salt resistance in Lactobacillus casei.

    PubMed

    Wang, Guohong; Yin, Sheng; An, Haoran; Chen, Shangwu; Hao, Yanling

    2011-08-01

    Lactic acid bacteria (LAB) encounter various types of stress during industrial processes and gastrointestinal transit. Catalase (CAT) and bile salt hydrolase (BSH) can protect bacteria from oxidative stress or damage caused by bile salts by decomposing hydrogen peroxide (H(2)O(2)) or deconjugating the bile salts, respectively. Lactobacillus casei is a valuable probiotic strain and is often deficient in both CAT and BSH. In order to improve the resistance of L. casei to both oxidative and bile salts stress, the catalase gene katA from L. sakei and the bile salt hydrolase gene bsh1 from L. plantarum were coexpressed in L. casei HX01. The enzyme activities of CAT and BSH were 2.41 μmol H(2)O(2)/min/10(8) colony-forming units (CFU) and 2.11 μmol glycine/min/ml in the recombinant L. casei CB, respectively. After incubation with 8 mM H(2)O(2), survival ratio of L. casei CB was 40-fold higher than that of L. casei CK. Treatment of L. casei CB with various concentrations of sodium glycodeoxycholate (GDCA) showed that ~10(5) CFU/ml cells survived after incubation with 0.5% GDCA, whereas almost all the L. casei CK cells were killed when treaded with 0.4% GDCA. These results indicate that the coexpression of CAT and BSH confers high-level resistance to both oxidative and bile salts stress conditions in L. casei HX01.

  11. Radiation resistance and the CuZn superoxide dismutase, Mn superoxide dismutase, catalase, and glutathione peroxidase activities of seven human cell lines.

    PubMed

    Marklund, S L; Westman, N G; Roos, G; Carlsson, J

    1984-10-01

    CuZn superoxide dismutase, Mn superoxide dismutase, catalase, and glutathione peroxidase form the primary enzymic defense against toxic oxygen reduction metabolites in cells. To test the importance of these protective enzymes in the cellular radiation response, the enzymic activities of seven different human cell lines were determined in parallel with their clonogenic survival characteristics. A positive correlation between the content of glutathione peroxidase in cell lines and their extrapolation numbers (n) and quasithreshold doses (Dq) was detected. Between the cellular contents of the other enzymes and D0, n, and Dq no positive correlations could be established. An interesting finding was a very high Mn superoxide dismutase content in a malignant mesothelioma cell line P7, which had an extremely high D0, 5.0 Gy.

  12. [The role of beta-endorphin in regulating the conditioned reflex activity of cats].

    PubMed

    Karamian, A I; Pankov, Iu A; Protsenko, A L; Sollertinskaia, T N; Kofman, I L

    1990-08-01

    The role of beta-endorphin in regulation of instrumental food conditioning and in more complicated forms of nervous activity in cats was found to involve a facilitating unspecific effect both on positive and negative food conditioning, the latter having a general adaptive character. The influence of the same small doses of beta-endorphin (10 mkg/kg - 15 x 10(-6) mkg/kg) on the choice responses was more complicated and depended on the basic level of conditioning and the typology of animals. Possible mechanism of the beta-endorphin effect on higher nervous activity, is discussed.

  13. Overproduction of superoxide dismutase and catalase confers cassava resistance to Tetranychus cinnabarinus

    PubMed Central

    Lu, Fuping; Liang, Xiao; Lu, Hui; Li, Qian; Chen, Qing; Zhang, Peng; Li, kaimian; Liu, Guanghua; Yan, Wei; Song, Jiming; Duan, Chunfang; Zhang, Linhui

    2017-01-01

    To explore the role of protective enzymes in cassava (Manihot esculenta Crantz) resistance to mites, transgenic cassava lines overproducing copper/zinc superoxide dismutase (MeCu/ZnSOD) and catalase (MeCAT1) were used to evaluate and molecularly confirm cassava resistance to Tetranychus cinnabarinus. Laboratory evaluation demonstrated that, compared with the control cultivar TMS60444 (wild type, WT), the survival, reproduction, development and activities of SOD and CAT in T. cinnabarinus feeding on transgenic cassava lines SC2, SC4, and SC11 significantly inhibited. Furthermore, the activities of SOD and CAT in transgenic cassava lines SC2, SC4, and SC11 damaged by T. cinnabarinus significantly increased. These findings were similar to the results in the mite-resistant cassava cultivars. Besides, field evaluation indicated that the transgenic cassava lines SC2, SC4, and SC11 were slightly damaged as the highly mite-resistant control C1115, while the highly mite-susceptible WT was severely damaged by T. cinnabarinus. Laboratory and field evaluation demonstrated that transgenic cassava lines were resistant to T. cinnabarinus, which directly confirmed that the increase in SOD and CAT activities was positively related to cassava resistance to T. cinnabarinus. These results will help in understanding the antioxidant defense responses in the cassava–mite interaction and molecular breeding of mite-resistant cassava for effective pest control. PMID:28054665

  14. Caribbean yellow band disease compromises the activity of catalase and glutathione S-transferase in the reef-building coral Orbicella faveolata exposed to anthracene.

    PubMed

    Montilla, Luis Miguel; Ramos, Ruth; García, Elia; Cróquer, Aldo

    2016-05-03

    Healthy and diseased corals are threatened by different anthropogenic sources, such as pollution, a problem expected to become more severe in the near future. Despite the fact that coastal pollution and coral diseases might represent a serious threat to coral reef health, there is a paucity of controlled experiments showing whether the response of diseased and healthy corals to xenobiotics differs. In this study, we exposed healthy and Caribbean yellow band disease (CYBD)-affected Orbicella faveolata colonies to 3 sublethal concentrations of anthracene to test if enzymatic responses to this hydrocarbon were compromised in CYBD-affected tissues. For this, a 2-factorial fully orthogonal design was used in a controlled laboratory bioassay, using tissue condition (2 levels: apparently healthy and diseased) and pollutant concentration (4 levels: experimental control, 10, 30 and 100 ppb concentration) as fixed factors. A permutation-based ANOVA (PERMANOVA) was used to test the effects of condition and concentration on the specific activity of 3 enzymatic biomarkers: catalase, glutathione S-transferase, and glutathione peroxidase. We found a significant interaction between the concentration of anthracene and the colony condition for catalase (Pseudo-F = 3.84, df = 3, p < 0.05) and glutathione S-transferase (Pseudo-F = 3.29, df = 3, p < 0.05). Moreover, our results indicated that the enzymatic response to anthracene in CYBD-affected tissues was compromised, as the activity of these enzymes decreased 3- to 4-fold compared to healthy tissues. These results suggest that under a potential scenario of increasing hydrocarbon coastal pollution, colonies of O. faveolata affected with CYBD might become more vulnerable to the deleterious effects of chemical pollution.

  15. Mutation of Arabidopsis CATALASE2 results in hyponastic leaves by changes of auxin levels.

    PubMed

    Gao, Xiang; Yuan, Hong-Mei; Hu, Ye-Qin; Li, Jing; Lu, Ying-Tang

    2014-01-01

    Auxin and H2 O2 play vital roles in plant development and environmental responses; however, it is unclear whether and how H2 O2 modulates auxin levels. Here, we investigate this question using cat2-1 mutant, which exhibits reduced catalase activity and accumulates high levels of H2 O2 under photorespiratory conditions. At a light intensity of 150 μmol m(-2) s(-1) , the mutant exhibited up-curled leaves that have increased H2 O2 contents and decreased auxin levels. At low light intensities (30 μmol m(-2) s(-1)), the leaves of the mutant were normal, but exhibited reduced H2 O2 contents and elevated auxin levels. These findings suggest that H2 O2 modulates auxin levels. When auxin was directly applied to cat2-1 leaves, the up-curled leaves curled downwards. In addition, transformation of cat2-1 plants with pCAT2:iaaM, which increases auxin levels, rescued the hyponastic leaf phenotype. Using qRT-PCR, we demonstrated that the transcription of auxin synthesis-related genes and of genes that regulate leaf curvature is suppressed in cat2-1. Furthermore, application of glutathione rescued the up-curled leaves of cat2-1 and increased auxin levels, but did not change H2 O2 levels. Thus, the hyponastic leaves of cat2-1 reveal crosstalk between H2 O2 and auxin signalling that is mediated by changes in glutathione redox status.

  16. Cat odor causes long-lasting contextual fear conditioning and increased pituitary-adrenal activation, without modifying anxiety.

    PubMed

    Muñoz-Abellán, Cristina; Daviu, Nuria; Rabasa, Cristina; Nadal, Roser; Armario, Antonio

    2009-10-01

    A single exposure to a cat or cat odors has been reported by some groups to induce contextual and auditory fear conditioning and long-lasting changes in anxiety-like behaviour, but there is no evidence for parallel changes in biological stress markers. In the present study we demonstrated in male rats that exposure to a novel environment containing a cloth impregnated with cat fur odor resulted in avoidance of the odor, lower levels of activity and higher pituitary-adrenal (PA) response as compared to those exposed to the novel environment containing a clean cloth, suggesting increased levels of stress in the former animals. When re-exposed 9 days later to the same environment with a clean cloth, previously cat fur exposed rats again showed avoidance of the cloth area and lower levels of activity, suggesting development of contextual fear conditioning, which again was associated with a higher PA activation. In contrast, unaltered both anxiety-like behaviour and PA responsiveness to an elevated plus-maze were found 7 days after cat odor exposure. It is concluded that: (i) PA activation is able to reflect both the stressful properties of cat fur odor and odor-induced contextual fear conditioning; (ii) development of cat odor-induced contextual fear conditioning is independent of the induction of long-lasting changes in anxiety-like behaviour; and (iii) greater PA activation during exposure to the odor context is not explained by non-specific sensitization of the PA axis caused by previous exposure to cat fur odor.

  17. The role of a bifunctional catalase-peroxidase KatA in protection of Agrobacterium tumefaciens from menadione toxicity.

    PubMed

    Prapagdee, Benjaphorn; Vattanaviboon, Paiboon; Mongkolsuk, Skorn

    2004-03-19

    Agrobacterium tumefaciens is an aerobic plant pathogenic bacterium that is exposed to reactive oxygen species produced either as by-products of aerobic metabolism or by the defense systems of host plants. The physiological function of the bifunctional catalase-peroxidase (KatA) in the protection of A. tumefaciens from reactive oxygen species other than H(2)O(2) was evaluated in the katA mutant (PB102). Unexpectedly, PB102 was highly sensitive to the superoxide generator menadione. The expression of katA from a plasmid vector complemented the menadione-hypersensitive phenotype. A. tumefaciens possesses an additional catalase gene, a monofunctional catalase encoded by catE. Neither inactivation nor high-level expression of the catE gene altered the menadione resistance level. Moreover, heterologous expression of the catalase-peroxidase-encoding gene katG from Burkholderia pseudomallei, but not the monofunctional catalase gene katE from Xanthomonas campestris could restore normal levels of menadione resistance to PB102. A recent observation suggests that the menadione resistance phenotype involves increased activities of organic peroxide-metabolizing enzymes. Heterologous expression of X. campestris alkyl hydroperoxide reductase from a plasmid vector failed to complement the menadione-sensitive phenotype of PB102. The level of menadione resistance shows a direct correlation with the level of peroxidase activity of KatA. This is a novel role for KatA and suggests that resistance to menadione toxicity is mediated by a new, and as yet unknown, mechanism in A. tumefaciens.

  18. Effect of lead (Pb) exposure on the activity of superoxide dismutase and catalase in battery manufacturing workers (BMW) of Western Maharashtra (India) with reference to heme biosynthesis.

    PubMed

    Patil, Arun J; Bhagwat, Vinod R; Patil, Jyotsna A; Dongre, Nilima N; Ambekar, Jeevan G; Jailkhani, Rama; Das, Kusal K

    2006-12-01

    The aim of this study was to estimate the activity of superoxide dismutase (SOD) and catalase in erythrocytes and malondialdehyde (MDA) in plasma of battery manufacturing workers (BMW) of Western Maharashtra (India) who were occupationally exposed to lead (Pb) over a long period of time (about 15 years). This study was also aimed to determine the Pb intoxication resulted in a disturbance of heme biosynthesis in BMW group. The blood Pb level of BMW group (n = 28) was found to be in the range of 25.8 - 78.0 microg/dL (mean + SD, 53.63 + 16.98) whereas in Pb unexposed control group (n = 35) the range was 2.8 - 22.0 microg/dL (mean + SD, 12.52 + 4.08). The blood level (Pb-B) and urinary lead level (Pb-U) were significantly increased in BMW group as compared to unexposed control. Though activated d- aminolevulinic acid dehydratase (ALAD) activities in BMW group did not show any significant change when compared to control group but activated / non activated erythrocyte - ALAD activities in BMW group showed a significant increase. Erythrocyte- zinc protoporphyrin (ZPP), urinary daminolevulinic acid (ALA-U) and porphobilinogen (PBG-U) of BMW groups elevated significantly as compared to control. A positive correlation (r = 0.66, p < 0.001) between Pb-B and ALA-U were found in BMW group but no such significant correlation (r = 0.02, p> 1.0) were observed in control group. Hematological study revealed a significant decrease of hemoglobin concentration, packed cell volume (%) and other blood indices and a significant increase of total leucocytes count in BMW group in comparison to control group. The serum MDA content was significantly increased (p < 0.001) and the activities of antioxidant enzymes such as erythrocyte- SOD (p < 0.001) and erythrocytecatalase (p < 0.001) were significantly reduced in BMW group as compared to control group. A positive correlation (r = 0.45, p < 0.02) between Pb-B and serum MDA level was observed in BMW group (Pb-B range 25.8 - 78.0 microg / d

  19. Inhibition of midbrain-evoked tonic and rhythmic motor activity by cutaneous stimulation in decerebrate cats.

    PubMed

    Beyaert, C A; Haouzi, P; Marchal, F

    2003-03-01

    The effect of mechanical and electrical stimulation of cervical cutaneous afferents was analysed on both the centrally induced tonic and rhythmic activities in hindlimb antagonist muscle nerves of 16 decerebrate paralysed cats. Electrical stimulation of dorsal midbrain evoked in the nerve to the tibialis anterior muscle (TAn) either rhythmic discharges (n=14), associated with tonic discharges in ten cats, or only tonic discharges (n=4). Centrally induced activity in the ipsilateral nerve to gastrocnemius medialis (GMn) occurred in fewer cats (n=12) and displayed similar patterns as in TAn. Manual traction of the scruff of the neck reduced the TAn tonic and rhythmic discharges (n=6) by 73% (P<0.05) and 71% (P<0.05), respectively, and reduced only the tonic component of GMn discharges (by 41%, n=3). Electrical stimulation (impulses 0.1-0.5 ms, 50 Hz) of cervical nerves belonging to C5 or C6 dermatomes, the intensity (0.4-4 mA) of which induced minimal inhibition of both TAn and GMn discharges, reduced significantly the tonic component of TAn discharges (by 39%, n=4). At higher intensities of electrical cervical nerve stimulation (2-6 mA) inducing maximal inhibitory effect, both tonic and rhythmic activities in TAn and GMn were both significantly reduced by, respectively, 81% and 94% in TAn (n=7), and by 49% and 43% in GMn (n=7). Electrical cervical nerve stimulation consistently reduced the isolated tonic discharge in TAn by 66% (n=4, P<0.05) and in GMn by 23% (n=3) when present. Thus the tonic component was more sensitive to inhibition than the rhythmic component of hindlimb muscle nerve activity.

  20. The Use of Functional Data Analysis to Evaluate Activity in a Spontaneous Model of Degenerative Joint Disease Associated Pain in Cats

    PubMed Central

    Gruen, Margaret E.; Alfaro-Córdoba, Marcela; Thomson, Andrea E.; Worth, Alicia C.; Staicu, Ana-Maria; Lascelles, B. Duncan X.

    2017-01-01

    Introduction and objectives Accelerometry is used as an objective measure of physical activity in humans and veterinary species. In cats, one important use of accelerometry is in the study of therapeutics designed to treat degenerative joint disease (DJD) associated pain, where it serves as the most widely applied objective outcome measure. These analyses have commonly used summary measures, calculating the mean activity per-minute over days and comparing between treatment periods. While this technique has been effective, information about the pattern of activity in cats is lost. In this study, functional data analysis was applied to activity data from client-owned cats with (n = 83) and without (n = 15) DJD. Functional data analysis retains information about the pattern of activity over the 24-hour day, providing insight into activity over time. We hypothesized that 1) cats without DJD would have higher activity counts and intensity of activity than cats with DJD; 2) that activity counts and intensity of activity in cats with DJD would be inversely correlated with total radiographic DJD burden and total orthopedic pain score; and 3) that activity counts and intensity would have a different pattern on weekends versus weekdays. Results and conclusions Results showed marked inter-cat variability in activity. Cats exhibited a bimodal pattern of activity with a sharp peak in the morning and broader peak in the evening. Results further showed that this pattern was different on weekends than weekdays, with the morning peak being shifted to the right (later). Cats with DJD showed different patterns of activity from cats without DJD, though activity and intensity were not always lower; instead both the peaks and troughs of activity were less extreme than those of the cats without DJD. Functional data analysis provides insight into the pattern of activity in cats, and an alternative method for analyzing accelerometry data that incorporates fluctuations in activity across

  1. Catalase is inhibited by flavonoids.

    PubMed

    Krych, Justyna; Gebicka, Lidia

    2013-07-01

    Catalases, heme enzymes, which catalyze decomposition of hydrogen peroxide to water and molecular oxygen, belong to the antioxidant defense system of the cell. In this work we have shown that catalase from bovine liver is inhibited by flavonoids. The inhibition is, at least partially, due to the formation of hydrogen bonds between catalase and flavonoids. In the presence of some flavonoids the formation of unreactive catalase compound II has been detected. The most potent catalase inhibitors among the tested flavonoids have appeared myricetin, epicatechin gallate and epigallocatechin gallate. The relationship between the degree of enzyme inhibition and molecular structure of flavonoids has been analyzed.

  2. Cat vestibular neurons that exhibit different responses to active and passive yaw head rotations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Robinson, F. R.; Tomko, D. L.

    1987-01-01

    Neurons in the vestibular nuclei were recorded in alert cats during voluntary yaw rotations of the head and during the same rotations delivered with a turntable driven from a record of previous voluntary movements. During both voluntary and passive rotations, 35 percent (6/17) of neurons tested responded at higher rates or for a larger part of the movement during voluntary movements than during the same rotations delivered with the turntable. Neck sensory input was evaluated separately in many of these cells and can account qualitatively for the extra firing present during active movement.

  3. Catalase-positive microbial detection by using different ultrasonic parameters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shukla, S. K.; Durán, C.; Elvira, L.

    2012-12-01

    A method for rapid detection of catalase enzyme activity using ultrasonic parameters is presented in this work. It is based on the detection of the hydrolysis of hydrogen peroxide molecule into water and oxygen induced by the enzyme catalase. A special medium was made to amplify changes produced by catalase enzyme during the hydrolysis process. Enzymatic process can be monitored by means of ultrasonic parameters such as wave amplitude, time of flight (TOF), and backscattering measurements which are sensitive to oxygen bubble production. It is shown that catalase activity of the order of 10-3unit/ml can be detected using different ultrasonic parameters. The sensitivity provided by them is discussed.

  4. Overexpression of Catalase Diminishes Oxidative Cysteine Modifications of Cardiac Proteins.

    PubMed

    Yao, Chunxiang; Behring, Jessica B; Shao, Di; Sverdlov, Aaron L; Whelan, Stephen A; Elezaby, Aly; Yin, Xiaoyan; Siwik, Deborah A; Seta, Francesca; Costello, Catherine E; Cohen, Richard A; Matsui, Reiko; Colucci, Wilson S; McComb, Mark E; Bachschmid, Markus M

    2015-01-01

    Reactive protein cysteine thiolates are instrumental in redox regulation. Oxidants, such as hydrogen peroxide (H2O2), react with thiolates to form oxidative post-translational modifications, enabling physiological redox signaling. Cardiac disease and aging are associated with oxidative stress which can impair redox signaling by altering essential cysteine thiolates. We previously found that cardiac-specific overexpression of catalase (Cat), an enzyme that detoxifies excess H2O2, protected from oxidative stress and delayed cardiac aging in mice. Using redox proteomics and systems biology, we sought to identify the cysteines that could play a key role in cardiac disease and aging. With a 'Tandem Mass Tag' (TMT) labeling strategy and mass spectrometry, we investigated differential reversible cysteine oxidation in the cardiac proteome of wild type and Cat transgenic (Tg) mice. Reversible cysteine oxidation was measured as thiol occupancy, the ratio of total available versus reversibly oxidized cysteine thiols. Catalase overexpression globally decreased thiol occupancy by ≥1.3 fold in 82 proteins, including numerous mitochondrial and contractile proteins. Systems biology analysis assigned the majority of proteins with differentially modified thiols in Cat Tg mice to pathways of aging and cardiac disease, including cellular stress response, proteostasis, and apoptosis. In addition, Cat Tg mice exhibited diminished protein glutathione adducts and decreased H2O2 production from mitochondrial complex I and II, suggesting improved function of cardiac mitochondria. In conclusion, our data suggest that catalase may alleviate cardiac disease and aging by moderating global protein cysteine thiol oxidation.

  5. Feeding frequency, but not dietary water content, affects voluntary physical activity in young lean adult female cats.

    PubMed

    de Godoy, M R C; Ochi, K; de Oliveira Mateus, L F; de Justino, A C C; Swanson, K S

    2015-05-01

    The objective of this study was to investigate whether increased dietary water content and feeding frequency increased voluntary physical activity of young, lean adult female cats. A replicated 4 × 4 Latin square design with a 2 × 2 factorial treatment arrangement (feeding frequency and water content) was used. The 4 treatments consisted of 1 meal daily dry pet food without added water (1D; 12% moisture as is), 1 meal daily dry pet food with added water (1W; 70% total water content), 4 meals daily dry pet food without added water (4D; 12% moisture as is), and 4 meals daily dry pet food with added water (4W; 70% total water content). Eight healthy adult, lean, intact, young, female domestic shorthair cats were used in this experiment. Voluntary physical activity was evaluated using Actical activity monitors placed on collars and worn around the cats' necks for the last 7 d of each experimental period of 14 d. Food anticipatory activity (FAA) was calculated based on 2 h prior to feeding periods and expressed as a percentage of total daily voluntary physical activity. Increased feeding frequency (4 vs. 1 meal daily) resulted in greater average daily activity (P = 0.0147), activity during the light period (P = 0.0023), and light:dark activity ratio (P = 0.0002). In contrast, physical activity during the dark period was not altered by feeding frequency (P > 0.05). Cats fed 4 meals daily had increased afternoon FAA (P= 0.0029) compared with cats fed once daily. Dietary water content did not affect any measure of voluntary physical activity. Increased feeding frequency is an effective strategy to increase the voluntary physical activity of cats. Thus, it may assist in the prevention and management of obesity.

  6. [Immobilization of catalase on Fe (III) modified collagen fiber].

    PubMed

    Chen, Shuang; Song, Na; Liao, Xuepin; Shi, Bi

    2011-07-01

    Fe (III) modified collagen fibers were used to immobilize catalase through the cross-linking of glutaraldehyde. The loading amount of catalase on the supporting matrix was 16.7 mg/g, and 35% enzymatic activity was remained. A series of experiments were conducted on free and immobilized catalase in order to investigate their optimal pH and temperature, and the thermal, storage and operation stability. Results suggest that the free and immobilized catalase prefer similar pH and temperature condition, which were pH 7.0 and 25 degrees C. It should be noted that the thermal stability of catalase was considerably improved after immobilization owing to the fact that the enzyme kept 30% of relative activity after incubation at 75 degrees C for 5 h. On the contrary, the free catalase was completely inactive. As for the storage stability, the immobilized catalase kept 88% of relative activity after stored at room temperature for 12 days while the free one was completely inactive under the same conditions. Moreover, the immobilized catalase preserved 57% of relative activity after being reused 26 times, exhibiting excellent operation stability. Consequently, this investigation suggests that collagen fiber can be used as excellent supporting matrix for the immobilization of catalase, and it is potential to be used for the immobilization of similar enzymes.

  7. Molecular characterization of a catalase from Hydra vulgaris.

    PubMed

    Dash, Bhagirathi; Phillips, Timothy D

    2012-06-15

    Catalase, an antioxidant and hydroperoxidase enzyme protects the cellular environment from harmful effects of hydrogen peroxide by facilitating its degradation to oxygen and water. Molecular information on a cnidarian catalase and/or peroxidase is, however, limited. In this work an apparent full length cDNA sequence coding for a catalase (HvCatalase) was isolated from Hydra vulgaris using 3'- and 5'- (RLM) RACE approaches. The 1859 bp HvCatalase cDNA included an open reading frame of 1518 bp encoding a putative protein of 505 amino acids with a predicted molecular mass of 57.44 kDa. The deduced amino acid sequence of HvCatalase contained several highly conserved motifs including the heme-ligand signature sequence RLFSYGDTH and the active site signature FXRERIPERVVHAKGXGA. A comparative analysis showed the presence of conserved catalytic amino acids [His(71), Asn(145), and Tyr(354)] in HvCatalase as well. Homology modeling indicated the presence of the conserved features of mammalian catalase fold. Hydrae exposed to thermal, starvation, metal and oxidative stress responded by regulating its catalase mRNA transcription. These results indicated that the HvCatalase gene is involved in the cellular stress response and (anti)oxidative processes triggered by stressor and contaminant exposure.

  8. Protection of Bacillus pumilus spores by catalases.

    PubMed

    Checinska, Aleksandra; Burbank, Malcolm; Paszczynski, Andrzej J

    2012-09-01

    Bacillus pumilus SAFR-032, isolated at spacecraft assembly facilities of the National Aeronautics and Space Administration Jet Propulsion Laboratory, is difficult to kill by the sterilization method of choice, which uses liquid or vapor hydrogen peroxide. We identified two manganese catalases, YjqC and BPUM_1305, in spore protein extracts of several B. pumilus strains by using PAGE and mass spectrometric analyses. While the BPUM_1305 catalase was present in six of the B. pumilus strains tested, YjqC was not detected in ATCC 7061 and BG-B79. Furthermore, both catalases were localized in the spore coat layer along with laccase and superoxide dismutase. Although the initial catalase activity in ATCC 7061 spores was higher, it was less stable over time than the SAFR-032 enzyme. We propose that synergistic activity of YjqC and BPUM_1305, along with other coat oxidoreductases, contributes to the enhanced resistance of B. pumilus spores to hydrogen peroxide. We observed that the product of the catalase reaction, gaseous oxygen, forms expanding vesicles on the spore surface, affecting the mechanical integrity of the coat layer, resulting in aggregation of the spores. The accumulation of oxygen gas and aggregations may play a crucial role in limiting further exposure of Bacilli spore surfaces to hydrogen peroxide or other toxic chemicals when water is present.

  9. Protection of Bacillus pumilus Spores by Catalases

    PubMed Central

    Checinska, Aleksandra; Burbank, Malcolm

    2012-01-01

    Bacillus pumilus SAFR-032, isolated at spacecraft assembly facilities of the National Aeronautics and Space Administration Jet Propulsion Laboratory, is difficult to kill by the sterilization method of choice, which uses liquid or vapor hydrogen peroxide. We identified two manganese catalases, YjqC and BPUM_1305, in spore protein extracts of several B. pumilus strains by using PAGE and mass spectrometric analyses. While the BPUM_1305 catalase was present in six of the B. pumilus strains tested, YjqC was not detected in ATCC 7061 and BG-B79. Furthermore, both catalases were localized in the spore coat layer along with laccase and superoxide dismutase. Although the initial catalase activity in ATCC 7061 spores was higher, it was less stable over time than the SAFR-032 enzyme. We propose that synergistic activity of YjqC and BPUM_1305, along with other coat oxidoreductases, contributes to the enhanced resistance of B. pumilus spores to hydrogen peroxide. We observed that the product of the catalase reaction, gaseous oxygen, forms expanding vesicles on the spore surface, affecting the mechanical integrity of the coat layer, resulting in aggregation of the spores. The accumulation of oxygen gas and aggregations may play a crucial role in limiting further exposure of Bacilli spore surfaces to hydrogen peroxide or other toxic chemicals when water is present. PMID:22752169

  10. Alteration of ventilatory activity by intralaryngeal CO2 in the cat.

    PubMed Central

    Bartlett, D; Knuth, S L; Leiter, J C

    1992-01-01

    1. We investigated the responses of phrenic and hypoglossal nerve activities to the addition of 3, 5 and 10% CO2 to a constant flow of warm, humidified air through the isolated upper airway in decerebrate, paralysed, artificially ventilated cats. 2. In bilaterally vagotomized animals, intralaryngeal CO2 caused a dose-related decrease in peak integrated phrenic activity. This response became attenuated with time, but was still discernible after 3 min of continuous intralaryngeal CO2. In the same experiments, intralaryngeal CO2 caused a gradual increase in peak integrated hypoglossal nerve activity. 3. Intermittent pulsing of intralaryngeal CO2 during neural inspiration or expiration resulted in similar, but smaller decreases in the phrenic activity of some animals. Hypoglossal activity was not influenced appreciably by this procedure. 4. Systemic hypercapnia attenuated the phrenic responses to intralaryngeal CO2. The hypoglossal responses were greatly reduced or abolished. 5. In vagally intact cats, ventilated by a servo-respirator in accordance with phrenic nerve activity, intralaryngeal CO2 resulted in only a trace of reduction in phrenic discharge. After bilateral vagotomy, the same animals showed typical responses, as described above. 6. All responses to intralaryngeal CO2 were abolished after bilateral section of the superior laryngeal nerves (SLNs). 7. We conclude that intralaryngeal CO2 acts by way of receptors with afferents in the SLNs to decrease phrenic and increase hypoglossal nerve activities. The responses are not importantly gated during neural inspiration or expiration. The responses to intralaryngeal CO2 are most clearly demonstrable after bilateral vagotomy, suggesting that vagal mechanisms serve to stabilize respiratory motor neural activity in intact animals. PMID:1297832

  11. Molecular Cloning, Characterization, and Expression of a Catalase Gene in the Japanese Scallop Mizuhopecten yessoensis Induced in the Presence of Cadmium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gao, Jialong; Ishizaki, Shoichiro; Nagashima, Yuji

    2016-03-01

    Cadmium (Cd) is known to influence the oxidative status of marine organisms and can induce the formation of reactive oxygen species (ROS). Catalase (CAT) is one of the important enzymes involved in scavenging high levels of ROS. In present study, we cloned CAT cDNA and investigated the response of this enzyme at the transcriptional level in the Japanese scallop Mizuhopecten yessoensis exposed to Cd. The full-length CAT cDNA (MyCAT) of 1,870 nucleotides including a 57 bp 5'-UTR, a coding sequence of 1,500 bp and a 313 bp 3'-UTR were identified from the scallop. The deduced amino acid sequence of MyCAT corresponds to 499 amino acids with predicted molecular weight of 56.48 kDa and contains highly conserved motifs of the proximal heme-binding site RLFSYSTH, proximal active signature FNRERIPERVVHAKGGG and three catalytic amino acid residues His72, Asn145, and Tyr355. Its significant homology to CATs from multiple alignments revealed that MyCAT had a high identity with CATs from other mollusks. CAT mRNA expression analysis revealed that expression level was highest in the digestive gland ( p < 0.01) but weak in muscle. Following exposure to 200 and 400 µg/l of Cd, a high amount of Cd was found to have accumulated in the digestive gland and CAT mRNA expression had significantly increased in this organ among 7-day exposed scallops ( p < 0.001). The result demonstrated that antioxidant enzymes such as CAT play important roles in counteracting Cd stress in M. yessoensis.

  12. Could dietary trans fatty acids induce movement disorders? Effects of exercise and its influence on Na⁺K⁺-ATPase and catalase activity in rat striatum.

    PubMed

    Teixeira, A M; Dias, V T; Pase, C S; Roversi, K; Boufleur, N; Barcelos, R C S; Benvegnú, D M; Trevizol, F; Dolci, G S; Carvalho, N R; Quatrin, A; Soares, F A A; Reckziegel, P; Segat, H J; Rocha, J B T; Emanuelli, T; Bürger, M E

    2012-01-15

    The influence of trans fatty acids (FA) on development of orofacial dyskinesia (OD) and locomotor activity was evaluated. Rats were fed with diets enriched with 20% soybean oil (SO; n-6 FA), lard (L; saturated FA) or hydrogenated vegetable fat (HVF; trans FA) for 60 weeks. In the last 12 weeks each group was subdivided into sedentary and exercised (swimming). Brains of HVF and L-fed rats incorporated 0.33% and 0.20% of trans FA, respectively, while SO-fed group showed no incorporation of trans FA. HVF increased OD, while exercise exacerbated this in L and HVF-fed rats. HVF and L reduced locomotor activity, and exercise did not modify. Striatal catalase activity was reduced by L and HVF, but exercise increased its activity in the HVF-fed group. Na(+)K(+)-ATPase activity was not modified by dietary FA, however it was increased by exercise in striatum of SO and L-fed rats. We hypothesized that movement disorders elicited by HVF and less by L could be related to increased dopamine levels in striatum, which have been related to chronic trans FA intake. Exercise increased OD possibly by increase of brain dopamine levels, which generates pro-oxidant metabolites. Thus, a long-term intake of trans FA caused a small but significant brain incorporation of trans FA, which favored development of movement disorders. Exercise worsened behavioral outcomes of HVF and L-fed rats and increased Na(+)K(+)-ATPase activity of L and SO-fed rats, indicating its benefits. HVF blunted beneficial effects of exercise, indicating a critical role of trans FA in brain neurochemistry.

  13. Differential neural activation of vascular alpha-adrenoceptors in oral tissues of cats.

    PubMed

    Koss, Michael C

    2002-04-05

    The aim of this study was to determine the relative contribution of alpha(1)- and alpha(2)-adrenoceptors involved in sympathetic-evoked vasoconstrictor responses in tissues perfused by the lingual arterial circulation in pentobarbital anesthetized cats. Blood flow in the lingual artery was measured by ultrasonic flowmetry. Laser-Doppler flowmetry was utilized to measure oral tissue vasoconstrictor responses in the maxillary gingiva and from the surface of the tongue. Electrical stimulation of the preganglionic superior cervical sympathetic nerve resulted in frequency-dependent blood flow decreases at all three sites. These responses were stable over time and were uniformly antagonized by administration of phentolamine (0.3 - 3.0 mg kg(-1)). The selective alpha(1)-adrenoceptor antagonist, prazosin (10 - 300 microg kg(-1)), attenuated vasoconstriction in the lingual artery and gingiva, but was ineffective in blocking vasoconstriction in the tongue. Subsequent administration of rauwolscine (300 microg kg(-1)) antagonized remaining vasoconstrictor responses. In contrast, rauwolscine (10 - 300 microg kg(-1)), given alone, blocked evoked vasoconstriction in the tongue, and was without effect on gingival or lingual artery vasoconstrictor responses. Subsequent administration of prazosin (300 microg kg(-1)) largely antagonized remaining neurally elicited responses. These results suggest that neural vasoconstrictor responses in some regional vascular beds in the cat oral cavity are mediated by both alpha(1)- and alpha(2)-adrenoceptors. In contrast, tongue surface vasoconstrictor responses to sympathetic nerve activation appear to be mediated primarily by alpha(2)-adrenoceptors.

  14. Force regulation of ankle extensor muscle activity in freely walking cats.

    PubMed

    Donelan, J M; McVea, D A; Pearson, K G

    2009-01-01

    To gain insight into the relative importance of force feedback to ongoing ankle extensor activity during walking in the conscious cat, we isolated the medial gastrocnemius muscle (MG) by denervating the other ankle extensors and measured the magnitude of its activity at different muscle lengths, velocities, and forces accomplished by having the animals walk up and down a sloped pegway. Mathematical models of proprioceptor dynamics predicted afferent activity and revealed that the changes in muscle activity under our experimental conditions were strongly correlated with Ib activity and not consistently associated with changes in Ia or group II activity. This allowed us to determine the gains within the force feedback pathway using a simple model of the neuromuscular system and the measured relationship between MG activity and force. Loop gain increased with muscle length due to the intrinsic force-length property of muscle. The gain of the pathway that converts muscle force to motoneuron depolarization was independent of length. To better test for a causal relationship between modulation of force feedback and changes in muscle activity, a second set of experiments was performed in which the MG muscle was perturbed during ground contact of the hind foot by dropping or lifting the peg underfoot. Collectively, these investigations support a causal role for force feedback and indicate that about 30% of the total muscle activity is due to force feedback during level walking. Force feedback's role increases during upslope walking and decreases during downslope walking, providing a simple mechanism for compensating for changes in terrain.

  15. Medullary respiratory neural activity during hypoxia in NREM and REM sleep in the cat.

    PubMed

    Lovering, Andrew T; Fraigne, Jimmy J; Dunin-Barkowski, Witali L; Vidruk, Edward H; Orem, John M

    2006-02-01

    Intact unanesthetized cats hyperventilate in response to hypocapnic hypoxia in both wakefulness and sleep. This hyperventilation is caused by increases in diaphragmatic activity during inspiration and expiration. In this study, we recorded 120 medullary respiratory neurons during sleep in hypoxia. Our goal was to understand how these neurons change their activity to increase breathing efforts and frequency in response to hypoxia. We found that the response of medullary respiratory neurons to hypoxia was variable. While the activity of a small majority of inspiratory (58%) and expiratory (56%) neurons was increased in response to hypoxia, the activity of a small majority of preinspiratory (57%) neurons was decreased. Cells that were more active in hypoxia had discharge rates that averaged 183% (inspiratory decrementing), 154% (inspiratory augmenting), 155% (inspiratory), 230% (expiratory decrementing), 191% (expiratory augmenting), and 136% (expiratory) of the rates in normoxia. The response to hypoxia was similar in non-rapid-eye-movement (NREM) and REM sleep. Additionally, changes in the profile of activity were observed in all cell types examined. These changes included advanced, prolonged, and abbreviated patterns of activity in response to hypoxia; for example, some inspiratory neurons prolonged their discharge into expiration during the postinspiratory period in hypoxia but not in normoxia. Although changes in activity of the inspiratory neurons could account for the increased breathing efforts and activity of the diaphragm observed during hypoxia, the mechanisms responsible for the change in respiratory rate were not revealed by our data.

  16. Rapid anterograde spread of premitotic activity along degenerating cat sciatic nerve.

    PubMed

    Oaklander, A L; Miller, M S; Spencer, P S

    1987-01-01

    Peripheral nerve transection triggers a series of phenotypic alterations in Schwann cells distal to the site of injury. Mitosis is one of the earliest and best characterized of these responses, although the mechanism by which axonal damage triggers this critical event is unknown. This study examines the appearance and spatio-temporal spread of premitotic activity in distal stumps of transected cat tibial nerves. Premitotic activity was determined by measuring incorporation of [3H]thymidine (a marker of DNA synthesis during the S-phase of the cell cycle) into consecutive segments of desheathed tibial nerve. Incorporation of [3H]thymidine spread proximo-distally within distal nerve stumps between 3 and 4 days posttransection with an apparent velocity of at least 199 +/- 67 mm/day. This suggests that anterograde fast axonal transport may directly or indirectly be associated with the Schwann cell mitotic response to axon transection.

  17. Synthesis, characterization, and catalytic activity in Suzuki coupling and catalase-like reactions of new chitosan supported Pd catalyst.

    PubMed

    Baran, Talat; Inanan, Tülden; Menteş, Ayfer

    2016-07-10

    The aim of this study is to analyze the synthesis of a new chitosan supported Pd catalyst and examination of its catalytic activity in: Pd catalyst was synthesized using chitosan as a biomaterial and characterized with FTIR, TG/DTG, XRD, (1)H NMR, (13)C NMR, SEM-EDAX, ICP-OES, Uv-vis spectroscopies, and magnetic moment, along with molar conductivity analysis. Biomaterial supported Pd catalyst indicated high activity and long life time as well as excellent turnover number (TON) and turnover frequency (TOF) values in Suzuki reaction. Biomaterial supported Pd catalyst catalyzed H2O2 decomposition reaction with considerable high activity using comparatively small loading catalyst (10mg). Redox potential of biomaterial supported Pd catalyst was still high without negligible loss (13% decrease) after 10 cycles in reusability tests. As a consequence, eco-friendly biomaterial supported Pd catalyst has superior properties such as high thermal stability, long life time, easy removal from reaction mixture and durability to air, moisture and high temperature.

  18. Central command does not decrease cardiac parasympathetic efferent nerve activity during spontaneous fictive motor activity in decerebrate cats.

    PubMed

    Kadowaki, Akito; Matsukawa, Kanji; Wakasugi, Rie; Nakamoto, Tomoko; Liang, Nan

    2011-04-01

    To examine whether withdrawal of cardiac vagal efferent nerve activity (CVNA) predominantly controls the tachycardia at the start of exercise, the responses of CVNA and cardiac sympathetic efferent nerve activity (CSNA) were directly assessed during fictive motor activity that occurred spontaneously in unanesthetized, decerebrate cats. CSNA abruptly increased by 71 ± 12% at the onset of the motor activity, preceding the tachycardia response. The increase in CSNA lasted for 4-5 s and returned to the baseline, even though the motor activity was not ended. The increase of 6 ± 1 beats/min in heart rate appeared with the same time course of the increase in CSNA. In contrast, CVNA never decreased but increased throughout the motor activity, in parallel with a rise in mean arterial blood pressure (MAP). The peak increase in CVNA was 37 ± 9% at 5 s after the motor onset. The rise in MAP gradually developed to 21 ± 2 mmHg and was sustained throughout the spontaneous motor activity. Partial sinoaortic denervation (SAD) blunted the baroreflex sensitivity of the MAP-CSNA and MAP-CVNA relationship to 22-33% of the control. Although partial SAD blunted the initial increase in CSNA to 53% of the control, the increase in CSNA was sustained throughout the motor activity. In contrast, partial SAD almost abolished the increase in CVNA during the motor activity, despite the augmented elevation of 31 ± 1 mmHg in MAP. Because afferent inputs from both muscle receptors and arterial baroreceptors were absent or greatly attenuated in the partial SAD condition, only central command was operating during spontaneous fictive motor activity in decerebrate cats. Therefore, it is likely that central command causes activation of cardiac sympathetic outflow but does not produce withdrawal of cardiac parasympathetic outflow during spontaneous motor activity.

  19. High catalase production by Rhizobium radiobacter strain 2-1.

    PubMed

    Nakayama, Mami; Nakajima-Kambe, Toshiaki; Katayama, Hideki; Higuchi, Kazuhiko; Kawasaki, Yoshio; Fuji, Ryujiro

    2008-12-01

    To promote the application of catalase for treating wastewater containing hydrogen peroxide, bacteria exhibiting high catalase activity were screened. A bacterium, designated strain 2-1, with high catalase activity was isolated from the wastewater of a beverage factory that uses hydrogen peroxide. Strain 2-1 was identified as Rhizobium radiobacter (formerly known as Agrobacterium tumefaciens) on the basis of both phenotypic and genotypic characterizations. Although some strains of R. radiobacter are known plant pathogens, polymerase chain reaction (PCR) analysis showed that strain 2-1 has no phytopathogenic factor. Compared with a type strain of R. radiobacter, the specific catalase activity of strain 2-1 was approximately 1000-fold. Moreover, Strain 2-1 grew faster and exhibited considerably higher catalase activity than other microorganisms that have been used for industrial catalase production. Strain 2-1 is harmless to humans and the environment and produces catalase efficiently, suggesting that strain 2-1 is a good resource for the mass production of catalase for the treatment of hydrogen peroxide-containing wastewater.

  20. Intracellular implantation of enzymes in hollow silica nanospheres for protein therapy: cascade system of superoxide dismutase and catalase.

    PubMed

    Chang, Feng-Peng; Chen, Yi-Ping; Mou, Chung-Yuan

    2014-11-01

    An approach for enzyme therapeutics is elaborated with cell-implanted nanoreactors that are based on multiple enzymes encapsulated in hollow silica nanospheres (HSNs). The synthesis of HSNs is carried out by silica sol-gel templating of water-in-oil microemulsions so that polyethyleneimine (PEI) modified enzymes in aqueous phase are encapsulated inside the HSNs. PEI-grafted superoxide dismutase (PEI-SOD) and catalase (PEI-CAT) encapsulated in HSNs are prepared with quantitative control of the enzyme loadings. Excellent activities of superoxide dismutation by PEI-SOD@HSN are found and transformation of H2 O2 to water by PEI-CAT@HSN. When PEI-SOD and PEI-CAT are co-encapsulated, cascade transformation of superoxide through hydrogen peroxide to water was facile. Substantial fractions of HSNs exhibit endosome escape to cytosol after their delivery to cells. The production of downstream reactive oxygen species (ROS) and COX-2/p-p38 expression show that co-encapsulated SOD/CAT inside the HSNs renders the highest cell protection against the toxicant N,N'-dimethyl-4,4'-bipyridinium dichloride (paraquat). The rapid cell uptake and strong detoxification effect on superoxide radicals by the SOD/CAT-encapsulated hollow mesoporous silica nanoparticles demonstrate the general concept of implanting catalytic nanoreactors in biological cells with designed functions.

  1. Comparison of membrane electrical activity of cat gastric submucosal arterioles and venules.

    PubMed Central

    Morgan, K G

    1983-01-01

    Intracellular electrical recordings were made from arterioles and venules of the cat gastric submucosa. Spontaneous rhythmic fluctuations of the membrane potential were recorded in 54% of the venular preparations. Arteriolar cells showed no spontaneous activity. Excitatory junction potentials were recorded in arterioles but not venules after single shocks to the perivascular nerves. The amplitude of the excitatory junction potential was decreased in the presence of alpha-blockers. Repetitive stimulation of the perivascular nerve caused a biphasic electrical response of venular smooth muscle cells. The depolarizing component was decreased by alpha-adrenergic blockade and the hyperpolarizing component by beta-blockade. Venules contracted in response to smaller depolarizations than did arterioles. The voltage threshold for contraction of venular cells was similar to that for arteriolar cells but the venular cells were significantly more depolarized at rest than were the arteriolar cells. The difference in resting potential provides an explanation for the difference in sensitivity to electrical input. PMID:6663496

  2. Conditioning of cortical neurons in cats with antidromic activation as the unconditioned stimulus.

    PubMed

    O'Brien, J H; Wilder, M B; Stevens, C D

    1977-08-01

    Single-cell activity was recorded from the postcruciate cortex of acutely prepared cats during a differential classical conditioning procedure. The conditioned stimuli (CS) were hind paw stimuli, and the unconditioned stimulus (US) was pyramidal tract stimulation that produced an antidromic response in the recorded cortical neuron. A control group was also examined in which the pyramidal stimulus was set below the threshold to produce an antidromic response. Clear differential conditioning was found for the experimental group, with antidromic activation of the neuron as the US. There was no evidence of differential conditioning in the control group without antidromic activation. Any activation of orthodromic pathways should have been the same in the control and experimental groups. The absence of conditioning in the control group demonstrated that orthodromic pathways were not contributing to the differential conditioning observed in the experimental group. This indicates that it was activation of the neuron produced by antidromic firing which was important for conditioning. All the evidence suggests that the site of learning was in the cortex. It is concluded that the the role of the US in conditioning may be simply to activate the neuron at an appropriate interval following the CS.

  3. Time budget and activity patterns of oncilla cats (Leopardus tigrinus) in captivity.

    PubMed

    Resende, Letícia de Souza; Neto, Glauce Lima e; Carvalho, Patrícia Gonçalves Duarte; Landau-Remy, Gabriella; Ramos-Júnior, Valdir de Almeida; Andriolo, Artur; Genaro, Gelson

    2014-01-01

    Researchers have reported on the diet of Leopardus tigrinus and ecological aspects, but studies of behavior are scarce. The aims of this study were to describe the time budget and activity patterns of 10 captive Leopardus tigrinus individuals. The group had an activity budget of 66% resting, 20.66% moving, 6.08% vigilant, 3.12% feeding, and 4.14% other activities during 720 hr of observations. The activity budgets of the males and females did not differ significantly; however, males ate more than did females. The nonhuman animals spent more time resting during the day than during the night. Moving, socializing, maintenance, and vigilance showed statistically higher mean values at night. Group analysis of the temporal pattern of behavior showed bimodal peaks. Activity levels were high from 5 a.m. to 6 a.m. and decreased through the day only to peak again at 7 p.m. Stereotypic pacing peaked at dawn and at dusk. Patterns of vigilance, feeding, and maintenance were also determined for the group during a 24-hr period. These results may be useful for the development of management plans and effective conservation strategies for captive cats.

  4. Influence of the geometry around the manganese ion on the peroxidase and catalase activities of Mn(III)-Schiff base complexes.

    PubMed

    Vázquez-Fernández, M Ángeles; Bermejo, Manuel R; Fernández-García, M Isabel; González-Riopedre, Gustavo; Rodríguez-Doutón, M Jesús; Maneiro, Marcelino

    2011-12-01

    The peroxidase and catalase activities of eighteen manganese-Schiff base complexes have been studied. A correlation between the structure of the complexes and their catalytic activity is discussed on the basis of the variety of systems studied. Complexes 1-18 have the general formulae [MnL(n)(D)(2)](X)(H(2)O/CH(3)OH)(m), where L(n)=L(1)-L(13); D=H(2)O, CH(3)OH or Cl; m=0-2.5 and X=NO(3)(-), Cl(-), ClO(4)(-), CH(3)COO(-), C(2)H(5)COO(-) or C(5)H(11)COO(-). The dianionic tetradentate Schiff base ligands H(2)L(n) are the result of the condensation of different substituted (OMe-, OEt-, Br-, Cl-) hydroxybenzaldehyde with diverse diamines (1,2-diaminoethane for H(2)L(1)-H(2)L(2); 1,2-diamino-2-methylethane for H(2)L(3)-H(2)L(4); 1,2-diamino-2,2-dimethylethane for H(2)L(5); 1,2-diphenylenediamine for H(2)L(6)-H(2)L(7); 1,3-diaminopropane for H(2)L(8)-H(2)L(11); 1,3-diamino-2,2-dimethylpropane for H(2)L(12)-H(2)L(13)). The new Mn(III) complexes [MnL(1)(H(2)O)Cl](H(2)O)(2.5) (2), [MnL(2)(H(2)O)(2)](NO(3))(H(2)O) (4), [MnL(6)(H(2)O)(2)][MnL(6)(CH(3)OH)(H(2)O)](NO(3))(2)(CH(3)OH) (8), [MnL(6)(H(2)O)(OAc)](H(2)O) (9) and [MnL(7)(H(2)O)(2)](NO(3))(CH(3)OH)(2) (12) were isolated and characterised by elemental analysis, magnetic susceptibility and conductivity measurements, redox studies, ESI spectrometry and UV, IR, paramagnetic (1)H NMR, and EPR spectroscopies. X-ray crystallographic studies of these complexes and of the ligand H(2)L(6) are also reported. The crystal structures of the rest of the complexes have been previously published and herein we have only revised their study by those techniques still not reported (EPR and (1)H NMR for some of these compounds) and which help to establish their structures in solution. Complexes 1-12 behave as more efficient mimics of peroxidase or catalase in contrast with 13-18. The analysis between the catalytic activity and the structure of the compounds emphasises the significance of the existence of a vacant or a labile position in the

  5. Long-term effects of axotomy on neural activity during cat locomotion.

    PubMed Central

    Gordon, T; Hoffer, J A; Jhamandas, J; Stein, R B

    1980-01-01

    1. Neural activity was recorded from cats during locomotion on a treadmill using electrodes in Silastic cuffs placed around the sciatic nerve and the lateral gastrocnemius-soleus, medial gastrocnemius, common peroneal and tibial nerve branches. Each branch gave characteristic patterns of activity which were studied before and after it was cut distal to the recording cuffs. Sensory and motor components were separated and measured using cross-correlation techniques. The amplitude of the cross-correlation peaks was compared with the amplitude of compound action potentials evoked by electrical stimulation and recorded from the same sites in the anaesthetized animal. 2. Sensory activity declined rapidly following axotomy and did not recover unless reinnervation occurred. Sensory activity even 5 months after nerve section and resuture had recovered to only a fraction of the control values. This reduction is attributed to a decline in the evoked compound potentials and to many fibres being unsuccessful in regenerating to appropriate sensory organs. 3. Motor activity declined more than could be accounted for by a decline in evoked potentials over the first month after axotomy. The extra reduction represents a decline in the number of impulses generated by alpha-motoneurones after axotomy. If regeneration was permitted, motor activity recovered to higher levels than did the evoked potentials for the whole nerve. Even if regeneration was prevented by nerve ligation, motoneurones continued to generate activity at a stable level over a period of months during which whole nerve compound potentials continued to decline. 4. The modulation of motor activity in ligated nerves during the step cycle was still appropriate to the required movement. Thus, activity recorded from severed nerves in human amputees may be useful in controlling powered artificial limbs. The persistence of motor activity may be responsible for the lesser degree of atrophy found in motor fibres than in sensory

  6. [Cyclic processes in neuronal populations of the cat somatosensory cortex during extero- and interoceptive activation and in extinction].

    PubMed

    Lavrov, V V

    1991-11-01

    Comparative analysis of the EEG activation responses and multiunit responses in the cortical somatosensory (I) areas revealed a cyclic character of the multiunit discharges in response to light, sound, mechanical and chemical stimuli in alert cats. The fluctuations were reducing to initial values in the course of the stimulation.

  7. Substantia nigra dopaminergic unit activity in behaving cats: effect of arousal on spontaneous discharge and sensory evoked activity.

    PubMed

    Strecker, R E; Jacobs, B L

    1985-12-30

    Single-unit activity of dopaminergic neurons in the substantia nigra was recorded in freely moving cats during a variety of conditions designed to shed light on the hypotheses that these neurons are involved in the regulation of arousal-stress and/or selective attention. Both aversive and non-aversive arousing experimental conditions were used, including tail pinch, immersion of feet in ice-water, white noise, inaccessible food, feeding, grooming, inaccessible rats, and somatosensory stimulation. None of these conditions had an effect on tonic neuronal discharge rate. However, these neurons did exhibit brief excitatory and inhibitory responses to phasic auditory or visual stimuli presented when the cat was sitting quietly. These responses were dramatically attenuated if these stimuli were presented during the aforementioned conditions of behavioral arousal. This sharply contrasts with the inability of these same conditions to influence spontaneous discharge rate. The sensitivity of this neuronal sensory response to the concurrent behavioral condition supports the hypothesis that these neurons are involved in attentional processes or selective responding. The lack of responsiveness of these neurons to a variety of arousal/stress manipulations supports the hypothesis that dopaminergic neurons play a permissive, rather than an active, role in these processes.

  8. The Green Tea Component (-)-Epigallocatechin-3-Gallate Sensitizes Primary Endothelial Cells to Arsenite-Induced Apoptosis by Decreasing c-Jun N-Terminal Kinase-Mediated Catalase Activity.

    PubMed

    Kim, Jee-Youn; Choi, Ji-Young; Lee, Hyeon-Ju; Byun, Catherine Jeonghae; Park, Jung-Hyun; Park, Jae Hoon; Cho, Ho-Seong; Cho, Sung-Jin; Jo, Sangmee Ahn; Jo, Inho

    2015-01-01

    The green tea component (-)-epigallocatechin-3-gallate (EGCG) has been shown to sensitize many different types of cancer cells to anticancer drug-induced apoptosis, although it protects against non-cancerous primary cells against toxicity from certain conditions such as exposure to arsenic (As) or ultraviolet irradiation. Here, we found that EGCG promotes As-induced toxicity of primary-cultured bovine aortic endothelial cells (BAEC) at doses in which treatment with each chemical alone had no such effect. Increased cell toxicity was accompanied by an increased condensed chromatin pattern and fragmented nuclei, cleaved poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase (PARP), activity of the pro-apoptotic enzymes caspases 3, 8 and 9, and Bax translocation into mitochondria, suggesting the involvement of an apoptotic signaling pathway. Fluorescence activated cell sorting analysis revealed that compared with EGCG or As alone, combined EGCG and As (EGCG/As) treatment significantly induced production of reactive oxygen species (ROS), which was accompanied by decreased catalase activity and increased lipid peroxidation. Pretreatment with N-acetyl-L-cysteine or catalase reversed EGCG/As-induced caspase activation and EC toxicity. EGCG/As also increased the phosphorylation of c-Jun N-terminal kinase (JNK), which was not reversed by catalase. However, pretreatment with the JNK inhibitor SP600125 reversed all of the observed effects of EGCG/As, suggesting that JNK may be the most upstream protein examined in this study. Finally, we also found that all the observed effects by EGCG/As are true for other types of EC tested. In conclusion, this is firstly to show that EGCG sensitizes non-cancerous EC to As-induced toxicity through ROS-mediated apoptosis, which was attributed at least in part to a JNK-activated decrease in catalase activity.

  9. The Green Tea Component (-)-Epigallocatechin-3-Gallate Sensitizes Primary Endothelial Cells to Arsenite-Induced Apoptosis by Decreasing c-Jun N-Terminal Kinase-Mediated Catalase Activity

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Hyeon-Ju; Byun, Catherine Jeonghae; Park, Jung-Hyun; Park, Jae Hoon; Cho, Ho-Seong; Cho, Sung-Jin; Jo, Sangmee Ahn; Jo, Inho

    2015-01-01

    The green tea component (-)-epigallocatechin-3-gallate (EGCG) has been shown to sensitize many different types of cancer cells to anticancer drug-induced apoptosis, although it protects against non-cancerous primary cells against toxicity from certain conditions such as exposure to arsenic (As) or ultraviolet irradiation. Here, we found that EGCG promotes As-induced toxicity of primary-cultured bovine aortic endothelial cells (BAEC) at doses in which treatment with each chemical alone had no such effect. Increased cell toxicity was accompanied by an increased condensed chromatin pattern and fragmented nuclei, cleaved poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase (PARP), activity of the pro-apoptotic enzymes caspases 3, 8 and 9, and Bax translocation into mitochondria, suggesting the involvement of an apoptotic signaling pathway. Fluorescence activated cell sorting analysis revealed that compared with EGCG or As alone, combined EGCG and As (EGCG/As) treatment significantly induced production of reactive oxygen species (ROS), which was accompanied by decreased catalase activity and increased lipid peroxidation. Pretreatment with N-acetyl-L-cysteine or catalase reversed EGCG/As-induced caspase activation and EC toxicity. EGCG/As also increased the phosphorylation of c-Jun N-terminal kinase (JNK), which was not reversed by catalase. However, pretreatment with the JNK inhibitor SP600125 reversed all of the observed effects of EGCG/As, suggesting that JNK may be the most upstream protein examined in this study. Finally, we also found that all the observed effects by EGCG/As are true for other types of EC tested. In conclusion, this is firstly to show that EGCG sensitizes non-cancerous EC to As-induced toxicity through ROS-mediated apoptosis, which was attributed at least in part to a JNK-activated decrease in catalase activity. PMID:26375285

  10. Tumour suppressor PTEN enhanced enzyme activity of GPx, SOD and catalase by suppression of PI3K/AKT pathway in non-small cell lung cancer cell lines.

    PubMed

    Akca, Hakan; Demiray, Aydin; Aslan, Mutay; Acikbas, Ibrahim; Tokgun, Onur

    2013-06-01

    Phosphates and tensin homologue deleted on chromosome 10 (PTEN) is a tumour suppressor gene which dephosphorilates phosphoinositol 3,4,5 triphosphates. Therefore PTEN can regulate PI3K/AKT pathway in cells. Because of promoter methylation or gene deletion, PTEN expression is commonly decreased or lost in non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) cell lines. Therefore, we hypothesized that PTEN could regulate the activity of superoxide dismutase (CuZnSOD), glutathione peroxidase (GPx) and catalase. We first recreated PTENwt, G129R and G129E expressions in lung cell lines, in which endogenous PTEN expression was not detected. Then, we showed that PTEN could suppress AKT activity by its lipid phosphatase domain. We then examined the effect of recreated PTEN expressions in NSCLC cells. While PTENwt expression caused enhanced activity of SOD, GPx and catalase in transfected cells lines, neither G129R nor G129E expression effected enzyme activities. These results suggest that PTEN can up-regulate SOD, GPx and catalase activity by inhibition of PI3K/AKT pathway in NSCLC cell lines.

  11. [Extinction of brain activation responses to direct electrical stimulation of its structures in normal awake cats].

    PubMed

    Kratin, Iu G; Andreeva, V N; Iragashev, M S

    1975-03-01

    In unrestrained cats, repeated electric stimulation of the mesencephalic reticular formation (MRF), center median (CM) of the thalamus, and different cortical areas: both the low--and the high--threshold points (in regard to the brain activation), with the threshold strength current evoked similar EEG reactions of activation which diminished and disappeared after 3--5 repetitions of the stimuli. The moderate strength current evoked, apart from the EEG activation, pseudoviolent movements (turning of the head, etc.) and changes in the breathing rate. All these reactions could be extinguidhed by sufficient number of repetitions of stimuli, the effector reactions disappearing first, the EEG changes--last. The essential difference of the stimulation effects emerged when the strong current stimulation was used. In this case, when stimulating the high-threshold cortical points, the EEG and effector reactions could be abolished during long enough repetition of the stimuli, but it was impossible when stimulating the low-threshold cortical points, the MRF or CM: all the reactions stayed intense and stable, the animals became highly irritated. The data obtained are discussed from the point of view of the authors' concept of the interaction between the activating and integrative analysing mechanisms of the brain.

  12. Occurrence of neutral endopeptidase activity in the cat carotid body and its significance in chemoreception.

    PubMed

    Kumar, G K; Runold, M; Ghai, R D; Cherniack, N S; Prabhakar, N R

    1990-05-28

    The carotid body contains both tachykinins and enkephalins. Neutral endopeptidase (NEP, E.C. 3.4.24.11), has been suggested to involve in the metabolism of these neuropeptides in several organs. In the present study we determined neutral endopeptidase activity of the cat carotid body and assessed its significance in chemoreception. The cytosolic and membrane fractions of the carotid body contained NEP-like activity whereas it occurred only in the membrane fractions of the superior cervical and the nodose ganglia. Phosphoramidon, thiorphan and metal ion chelators inhibited NEP-like activity of all the 3 tissues studied; other protease inhibitors, however, were ineffective. Close carotid body administration of phosphoramidon significantly potentiated the carotid body response to low PO2 but not to hypercapnia. The enhanced response to hypoxia following phosphoramidon was further augmented by naloxone, an enkephalin antagonist. These results demonstrate that the glomus tissue contains detectable amounts of NEP-like activity and its inhibition selectively affects the hypoxic response of the carotid body.

  13. Research on acupuncture points and cortical functional activation position in cats by infrared imaging detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Shuwang; Sha, Zhanyou; Wang, Shuhai; Wen, Huanming

    2007-12-01

    The research of the brain cognition is mainly to find out the activation position in brain according to the stimulation at present in the world. The research regards the animals as the experimental objects and explores the stimulation response on the cerebral cortex of acupuncture. It provides a new method, which can detect the activation position on the creatural cerebral cortex directly by middle-far infrared imaging. According to the theory of local temperature situation, the difference of cortical temperature maybe associate with the excitement of cortical nerve cells, the metabolism of local tissue and the local hemal circulation. Direct naked detection of temperature variety on cerebral cortex is applied by middle and far infrared imaging technology. So the activation position is ascertained. The effect of stimulation response is superior to other indirect methods. After removing the skulls on the head, full of cerebral cortex of a cat are exposed. By observing the infrared images and measuring the temperatures of the visual cerebral cortex during the process of acupuncturing, the points are used to judge the activation position. The variety in the cortical functional sections is corresponding to the result of the acupuncture points in terms of infrared images and temperatures. According to experimental results, we know that the variety of a cortical functional section is corresponding to a special acupuncture point exactly.

  14. Two Cytoplasmic Effectors of Phytophthora sojae Regulate Plant Cell Death via Interactions with Plant Catalases1

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Meixiang; Li, Qi; Liu, Tingli; Liu, Li; Shen, Danyu; Zhu, Ye; Liu, Peihan; Zhou, Jian-Min; Dou, Daolong

    2015-01-01

    Plant pathogenic oomycetes, such as Phytophthora sojae, secrete an arsenal of host cytoplasmic effectors to promote infection. We have shown previously that P. sojae PsCRN63 (for crinkling- and necrosis-inducing proteins) induces programmed cell death (PCD) while PsCRN115 blocks PCD in planta; however, they are jointly required for full pathogenesis. Here, we find that PsCRN63 alone or PsCRN63 and PsCRN115 together might suppress the immune responses of Nicotiana benthamiana and demonstrate that these two cytoplasmic effectors interact with catalases from N. benthamiana and soybean (Glycine max). Transient expression of PsCRN63 increases hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) accumulation, whereas PsCRN115 suppresses this process. Transient overexpression of NbCAT1 (for N. benthamiana CATALASE1) or GmCAT1 specifically alleviates PsCRN63-induced PCD. Suppression of the PsCRN63-induced PCD by PsCRN115 is compromised when catalases are silenced in N. benthamiana. Interestingly, the NbCAT1 is recruited into the plant nucleus in the presence of PsCRN63 or PsCRN115; NbCAT1 and GmCAT1 are destabilized when PsCRN63 is coexpressed, and PsCRN115 inhibits the processes. Thus, PsCRN63/115 manipulates plant PCD through interfering with catalases and perturbing H2O2 homeostasis. Furthermore, silencing of catalase genes enhances susceptibility to Phytophthora capsici, indicating that catalases are essential for plant resistance. Taken together, we suggest that P. sojae secretes these two effectors to regulate plant PCD and H2O2 homeostasis through direct interaction with catalases and, therefore, overcome host immune responses. PMID:25424308

  15. [On the effect of immune and normal sera on catalase].

    PubMed

    Shataeva, L K; Zaikina, N A

    1975-01-01

    Effect of specific immune and normal sera on catalase was studied. The sera activated the enzyme, partially protected catalase against UV-irradiation and heating and also against the effect of inhibitors. Antibodies against catalase were observed in the fraction of 7 S gamma-globulins of immune serum. In studies of heat denaturation of catalase the stabilizing effect of immune serum was more distinct than the influence of normal serum and its protein fractions. In presence of serum protein fractions there was a correlation between the enthalpy of heat denaturation of catalase and decrease in specificity of the protein, in respect to the enxyme, associated with it in a complex. Alterations in enthropy compensated completely the decrease in enthalpy.

  16. EFFECT OF CATALASE AND CULTURAL CONDITIONS ON GROWTH OF BEGGIATOA.

    PubMed

    BURTON, S D; MORITA, R Y

    1964-12-01

    Burton, Sheril D. (Oregon State University, Corvallis), and Richard Y. Morita. Effect of catalase and cultural conditions on growth of Beggiatoa. J. Bacteriol. 88:1755-1761. 1964.-The addition of catalase to culture medium increased the period of viability of Beggiatoa from 1 week to 2 months. Addition of catalase also produced a marked increase in cell yield and enzyme activity. Cultures grown without catalase exhibited an absorption peak characteristic of peroxides. This absorption peak was removed by addition of catalase during or after growth. Oxygen was required for growth, but carbon dioxide was not produced. Malate and acetate stimulated growth at low concentrations. Glucose and thiosulfate were not oxidized, and cytochromes were not detectable by spectrophotometric analysis.

  17. Purification of Paracoccidioides brasiliensis catalase P: subsequent kinetic and stability studies.

    PubMed

    Chagas, Ronney Fernandes; Bailão, Alexandre Melo; Fernandes, Kátia Flávia; Winters, Michael S; Pereira, Maristela; Soares, Célia Maria de Almeida

    2010-03-01

    Catalases are essential components of the cellular equipment to cope with oxidative stress. Here we have purified a highly abundant catalase P of Paracoccidioides brasiliensis (PbCatP) that is preferentially expressed in the parasitic yeast phase. This oxidative stress-induced protein was isolated from yeast cells grown in the presence of 15 mM of hydrogen peroxide (H(2)O(2)). We have used consecutive steps of protein precipitation and gel filtration chromatography to achieve the purified protein. Protein purification was validated using matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometry and bioinformatics analysis. The purified enzyme showed strong similarity to small-subunit catalases. Like most monofunctional catalases, PbCatP is a homotetramer, resistant to inactivation by acidic conditions, temperature and denaturants. Furthermore, the kinetic behaviour of catalase P was observed to be different at low compared to high H(2)O(2) concentrations. The results demonstrated that a purified PbCatP is a homotetrameric enzyme, classified as a small subunit catalase.

  18. That Fat Cat

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lambert, Phyllis Gilchrist

    2012-01-01

    This activity began with a picture book, Nurit Karlin's "Fat Cat On a Mat" (HarperCollins; 1998). The author and her students started their project with a 5-inch circular template for the head of their cats. They reviewed shapes as they drew the head and then added the ears and nose, which were triangles. Details to the face were added when…

  19. Coupled expression of Cu/Zn-superoxide dismutase and catalase in cassava improves tolerance against cold and drought stresses.

    PubMed

    Xu, Jia; Duan, Xiaoguang; Yang, Jun; Beeching, John R; Zhang, Peng

    2013-06-01

    Recently we reported that the joint expression of cassava Cu/Zn superoxide dismutase (MeCu/ZnSOD) and catalase (MeCAT1) prolonged the shelf life of cassava storage-roots by the stabilization of reactive oxygen species (ROS) homeostasis after harvest. Since oxidative damage is a major feature of plants exposed to environmental stresses, transgenic cassava showing increased expression of the cytosolic MeCu/ZnSOD and the peroxisomal MeCAT1 should have improved resistance against other abiotic stresses. After cold treatment, the transgenic cassava maintained higher SOD and CAT activities and lower malendialdehyde content than those of wild type plants (WT). Detached leaves of transgenic cassava also showed slower transpirational water loss than those of WT. When plants were not watered for 30 d, transgenic lines exhibited a significant increase in water retention ability, accumulated 13% more proline and 12% less malendialdehyde than WT's, and showed enhanced activity of SOD and CAT. These results imply that manipulation of the antioxidative mechanism allows the development of staple crops with improved tolerance to abiotic stresses.

  20. Use of superoxide dismutase and catalase producing lactic acid bacteria in TNBS induced Crohn's disease in mice.

    PubMed

    LeBlanc, Jean Guy; del Carmen, Silvina; Miyoshi, Anderson; Azevedo, Vasco; Sesma, Fernando; Langella, Philippe; Bermúdez-Humarán, Luis G; Watterlot, Laurie; Perdigon, Gabriela; de Moreno de LeBlanc, Alejandra

    2011-02-10

    Reactive oxygen species are involved in various aspects of intestinal inflammation and tumor development. Decreasing their levels using antioxidant enzymes, such as catalase (CAT) or superoxide dismutase (SOD) could therefore be useful in the prevention of certain diseases. Lactic acid bacteria (LAB) are ideal candidates to deliver these enzymes in the gut. In this study, the anti-inflammatory effects of CAT or SOD producing LAB were evaluated using a trinitrobenzenesulfonic acid (TNBS) induced Crohn's disease murine model. Engineered Lactobacillus casei BL23 strains producing either CAT or SOD, or the native strain were given to mice before and after intrarectal administration of TNBS. Animal survival, live weight, intestinal morphology and histology, enzymatic activities, microbial translocation to the liver and cytokines released in the intestinal fluid were evaluated. The mice that received CAT or SOD-producing LAB showed a faster recovery of initial weight loss, increased enzymatic activities in the gut and lesser extent of intestinal inflammation compared to animals that received the wild-type strain or those that did not receive bacterial supplementation. Our findings suggest that genetically engineered LAB that produce antioxidant enzymes could be used to prevent or decrease the severity of certain intestinal pathologies.

  1. Activity of Caudate Nucleus Neurons in a Visual Fixation Paradigm in Behaving Cats

    PubMed Central

    Nagypál, Tamás; Gombkötő, Péter; Barkóczi, Balázs; Benedek, György; Nagy, Attila

    2015-01-01

    Beside its motor functions, the caudate nucleus (CN), the main input structure of the basal ganglia, is also sensitive to various sensory modalities. The goal of the present study was to investigate the effects of visual stimulation on the CN by using a behaving, head-restrained, eye movement-controlled feline model developed recently for this purpose. Extracellular multielectrode recordings were made from the CN of two cats in a visual fixation paradigm applying static and dynamic stimuli. The recorded neurons were classified in three groups according to their electrophysiological properties: phasically active (PAN), tonically active (TAN) and high-firing (HFN) neurons. The response characteristics were investigated according to this classification. The PAN and TAN neurons were sensitive primarily to static stimuli, while the HFN neurons responded primarily to changes in the visual environment i.e. to optic flow and the offset of the stimuli. The HFNs were the most sensitive to visual stimulation; their responses were stronger than those of the PANs and TANs. The majority of the recorded units were insensitive to the direction of the optic flow, regardless of group, but a small number of direction-sensitive neurons were also found. Our results demonstrate that both the static and the dynamic components of the visual information are represented in the CN. Furthermore, these results provide the first piece of evidence on optic flow processing in the CN, which, in more general terms, indicates the possible role of this structure in dynamic visual information processing. PMID:26544604

  2. Dynamics of single unit activity in the association cortex of waking cats during defensive conditioning.

    PubMed

    Shevko, G N; Bakanova, N F

    1981-01-01

    Responses of neurons in association area 5 during defensive conditioning to acoustic stimulation were studied in chronic experiments on cats. As a rule the neurons responded by excitation to presentation of conditioned and unconditioned stimuli. During the conditioned reflex unit responses usually appeared in the first 50 msec after the beginning of acoustic stimulation, i.e., they were connected with the action of the conditioned stimulus and not with manifestations of conditioned-reflex motion. The most significant changes in responses of cortical association units were observed in the initial period of conditioning. During stabilization of the conditioned reflex, responses of some neurons became stabilized, whereas in other neurons the spontaneous activity and intensity of responses increased, and in a third group the response to one of the stimuli disappeared. This last result indicated a switch during conditioning from polysensory unit responses to monosensory specialized responses. Extinctive inhibition was found to consist of a gradual decrease in the level of the spike discharge and its approximation to spontaneous activity, i.e., to be passive in character.

  3. Selective activation of carotid nerve fibers by acetylcholine applied to the cat petrosal ganglion in vitro.

    PubMed

    Alcayaga, J; Iturriaga, R; Varas, R; Arroyo, J; Zapata, P

    1998-03-09

    The petrosal ganglion innervates carotid body chemoreceptors through the carotid (sinus) nerve. These primary sensory neurons are activated by transmitters released from receptor (glomus) cells, acetylcholine (ACh) having been proposed as one of the transmitters involved in this process. Since the perikarya of primary sensory neurons share several properties with peripheral sensory endings, we studied the electrical responses of the carotid nerve and glossopharyngeal branch to ACh locally applied to the cat petrosal ganglion superfused in vitro. Ganglionar applications of AChCl (1 microg-1 mg) generated bursts of action potentials conducted along the carotid nerve, while only a few spikes were exceptionally recorded from the glossopharyngeal branch in response to the largest doses. Carotid nerve responses to ACh were dose-dependent, the higher doses inducing transient desensitization. Application of nicotine to the petrosal ganglion also evoked dose-dependent excitatory responses in the carotid nerve. Responses to ACh were reversibly antagonized by adding hexamethonium to the superfusate, more intense and prolonged block of ACh responses being produced by mecamylamine. Ganglionar applications of gamma-amino butyric acid and serotonin, in doses of up to 5 mg, did not induce firing of action potentials in any of the branches of the glossopharyngeal nerve. Our results indicate that petrosal ganglion neurons projecting through the carotid nerve are selectively activated by ACh acting on nicotinic ACh receptors located in the somata of these neurons. Thus, cholinosensitivity would be shared by the membranes of peripheral endings and perikarya of primary sensory neurons involved in arterial chemoreception.

  4. Prejunctional inhibition of sympathetically evoked pupillary dilation in cats by activation of histamine H3 receptors.

    PubMed

    Koss, M C; Hey, J A

    1993-08-01

    Frequency-dependent pupillary dilations were evoked by electrical stimulation of the pre- or post-ganglionic cervical sympathetic nerve (sympatho-excitation) or the hypothalamus (parasympatho-inhibition) in sympathectomized anesthetized cats. Systemic administration of the selective histamine H3 receptor agonist (R)-alpha-methylhistamine (R alpha MeHA) produced a dose-dependent depression of mydriasis due to direct neural sympathetic activation but had no effect on responses elicited by parasympathetic withdrawal. The histamine H2 receptor agonist, dimaprit, was inactive. R alpha MeHA was much more effective in depressing sympathetic responses obtained at lower frequencies when compared to higher frequencies of stimulation. Responses evoked both pre- and postganglionically were inhibited by R alpha MeHA. This peripheral sympatho-inhibitory action of R alpha MeHA was antagonized by the histamine H3 receptor blocker thioperamide but not by intravenous pretreatment with the histamine H1 receptor antagonist chlorpheniramine. Histamine H2 receptor blockers cimetidine and ranitidine were also without effect. R alpha MeHA did not depress pupillary responses elicited by i.v. (-)-adrenaline. The results demonstrate that histamine H3 receptors modulate sympathetic activation of the iris at a site proximal to the iris dilator muscle. The predominant mechanism of action appears to the prejunctional inhibition of noradrenaline release from postganglionic sympathetic nerve endings. However, a concomitant ganglionic inhibitory action cannot be excluded.

  5. Activity of pyramidal tract neurons in the cat during standing and walking on an inclined plane.

    PubMed

    Karayannidou, A; Beloozerova, I N; Zelenin, P V; Stout, E E; Sirota, M G; Orlovsky, G N; Deliagina, T G

    2009-08-01

    To keep balance when standing or walking on a surface inclined in the roll plane, the cat modifies its body configuration so that the functional length of its right and left limbs becomes different. The aim of the present study was to assess the motor cortex participation in the generation of this left/right asymmetry. We recorded the activity of fore- and hindlimb-related pyramidal tract neurons (PTNs) during standing and walking on a treadmill. A difference in PTN activity at two tilted positions of the treadmill (+/- 15 deg) was considered a positional response to surface inclination. During standing, 47% of PTNs exhibited a positional response, increasing their activity with either the contra-tilt (20%) or the ipsi-tilt (27%). During walking, PTNs were modulated in the rhythm of stepping, and tilts of the supporting surface evoked positional responses in the form of changes to the magnitude of modulation in 58% of PTNs. The contra-tilt increased activity in 28% of PTNs, and ipsi-tilt increased activity in 30% of PTNs. We suggest that PTNs with positional responses contribute to the modifications of limb configuration that are necessary for adaptation to the inclined surface. By comparing the responses to tilts in individual PTNs during standing and walking, four groups of PTNs were revealed: responding in both tasks (30%); responding only during standing (16%); responding only during walking (30%); responding in none of the tasks (24%). This diversity suggests that common and separate cortical mechanisms are used for postural adaptation to tilts during standing and walking.

  6. The mechanical actions of muscles predict the direction of muscle activation during postural perturbations in the cat hindlimb

    PubMed Central

    Nichols, T. Richard

    2013-01-01

    Humans and cats respond to balance challenges, delivered via horizontal support surface perturbations, with directionally selective muscle recruitment and constrained ground reaction forces. It has been suggested that this postural strategy arises from an interaction of limb biomechanics and proprioceptive networks in the spinal cord. A critical experimental validation of this hypothesis is to test the prediction that the principal directions of muscular activation oppose the directions responding muscles exert their forces on the environment. Therefore, our objective was to quantify the endpoint forces of a diverse set of cat hindlimb muscles and compare them with the directionally sensitive muscle activation patterns generated in the intact and decerebrate cat. We hypothesized that muscles are activated based on their mechanical advantage. Our primary expectation was that the principal direction of muscle activation during postural perturbations will be directed oppositely (180°) from the muscle endpoint ground reaction force. We found that muscle activation during postural perturbations was indeed directed oppositely to the endpoint reaction forces of that muscle. These observations indicate that muscle recruitment during balance challenges is driven, at least in part, by limb architecture. This suggests that sensory sources that provide feedback about the mechanical environment of the limb are likely important to appropriate and effective responses during balance challenges. Finally, we extended the analysis to three dimensions and different stance widths, laying the groundwork for a more comprehensive study of postural regulation than was possible with measurements confined to the horizontal plane and a single stance configuration. PMID:24304861

  7. The mechanical actions of muscles predict the direction of muscle activation during postural perturbations in the cat hindlimb.

    PubMed

    Honeycutt, Claire F; Nichols, T Richard

    2014-03-01

    Humans and cats respond to balance challenges, delivered via horizontal support surface perturbations, with directionally selective muscle recruitment and constrained ground reaction forces. It has been suggested that this postural strategy arises from an interaction of limb biomechanics and proprioceptive networks in the spinal cord. A critical experimental validation of this hypothesis is to test the prediction that the principal directions of muscular activation oppose the directions responding muscles exert their forces on the environment. Therefore, our objective was to quantify the endpoint forces of a diverse set of cat hindlimb muscles and compare them with the directionally sensitive muscle activation patterns generated in the intact and decerebrate cat. We hypothesized that muscles are activated based on their mechanical advantage. Our primary expectation was that the principal direction of muscle activation during postural perturbations will be directed oppositely (180°) from the muscle endpoint ground reaction force. We found that muscle activation during postural perturbations was indeed directed oppositely to the endpoint reaction forces of that muscle. These observations indicate that muscle recruitment during balance challenges is driven, at least in part, by limb architecture. This suggests that sensory sources that provide feedback about the mechanical environment of the limb are likely important to appropriate and effective responses during balance challenges. Finally, we extended the analysis to three dimensions and different stance widths, laying the groundwork for a more comprehensive study of postural regulation than was possible with measurements confined to the horizontal plane and a single stance configuration.

  8. AnkB, a Periplasmic Ankyrin-Like Protein in Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Is Required for Optimal Catalase B (KatB) Activity and Resistance to Hydrogen Peroxide

    PubMed Central

    Howell, Michael L.; Alsabbagh, Eyad; Ma, Ju-Fang; Ochsner, Urs A.; Klotz, Martin G.; Beveridge, Terry J.; Blumenthal, Kenneth M.; Niederhoffer, Eric C.; Morris, Randall E.; Needham, David; Dean, Gary E.; Wani, Maqsood A.; Hassett, Daniel J.

    2000-01-01

    In this study, we have cloned the ankB gene, encoding an ankyrin-like protein in Pseudomonas aeruginosa. The ankB gene is composed of 549 bp encoding a protein of 183 amino acids that possesses four 33-amino-acid ankyrin repeats that are a hallmark of erythrocyte and brain ankyrins. The location of ankB is 57 bp downstream of katB, encoding a hydrogen peroxide-inducible catalase, KatB. Monomeric AnkB is a 19.4-kDa protein with a pI of 5.5 that possesses 22 primarily hydrophobic amino acids at residues 3 to 25, predicting an inner-membrane-spanning motif with the N terminus in the cytoplasm and the C terminus in the periplasm. Such an orientation in the cytoplasmic membrane and, ultimately, periplasmic space was confirmed using AnkB-BlaM and AnkB-PhoA protein fusions. Circular dichroism analysis of recombinant AnkB minus its signal peptide revealed a secondary structure that is ∼65% α-helical. RNase protection and KatB- and AnkB-LacZ translational fusion analyses indicated that katB and ankB are part of a small operon whose transcription is induced dramatically by H2O2, and controlled by the global transactivator OxyR. Interestingly, unlike the spherical nature of ankyrin-deficient erythrocytes, the cellular morphology of an ankB mutant was identical to that of wild-type bacteria, yet the mutant produced more membrane vesicles. The mutant also exhibited a fourfold reduction in KatB activity and increased sensitivity to H2O2, phenotypes that could be complemented in trans by a plasmid constitutively expressing ankB. Our results suggest that AnkB may form an antioxidant scaffolding with KatB in the periplasm at the cytoplasmic membrane, thus providing a protective lattice work for optimal H2O2 detoxification. PMID:10913088

  9. Effects of hippocampal stimulation on retention and extinction of one way active avoidance response in cats.

    PubMed

    Gralewicz, K; Gralewicz, S

    1984-01-01

    We found previously that hippocampal stimulation (HiSt) at 20 cps, 100 mikroA, applied jointly with a tone (500 Hz) CS in the course of retention test, improved the performance and retarded the extinction of one way active avoidance response (AAR) in cats. During this test failures to perform the AAR were not punished in all but two trials it the beginning of each session. The first experiment of the present studies demonstrated that - (i) the AAR facilitating the effect of HiSt might be prevented by m all electrolytic lesions made around the tips of the stimulating electrodes, (ii) large lesions of the hippocampus exerted little effect on the AAR acquisition, but the response was extinguished faster during the retention test. In the second experiment two response prevention trials (non-reinforced presentations of the CS with no possibility to make the AAR) were run at the beginning of each session after the end of training. In these conditions the HiSt resulted in a faster extinction of the AAR as compared with implanted unstimulated animals. Large lesions of the hippocampus had no effect on the extinction rate. We conclude that the facilitation of retrieval from memory may be responsible for the effects of HiSt on conditioned behavior.

  10. Activity of thoracic and lumbar epaxial extensors during postural responses in the cat

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Macpherson, J. M.; Fung, J.; Peterson, B. W. (Principal Investigator)

    1998-01-01

    This study examined the role of trunk extensor muscles in the thoracic and lumbar regions during postural adjustments in the freely standing cat. The epaxial extensor muscles participate in the rapid postural responses evoked by horizontal translation of the support surface. The muscles segregate into two regional groups separated by a short transition zone, according to the spatial pattern of the electromyographic (EMG) responses. The upper thoracic muscles (T5-9) respond best to posteriorly directed translations, whereas the lumbar muscles (T13 to L7) respond best to anterior translations. The transition group muscles (T10-12) respond to almost all translations. Muscles group according to vertebral level rather than muscle species. The upper thoracic muscles change little in their response with changes in stance distance (fore-hindpaw separation) and may act to stabilize the intervertebral angles of the thoracic curvature. Activity in the lumbar muscles increases along with upward rotation of the pelvis (iliac crest) as stance distance decreases. Lumbar muscles appear to stabilize the pelvis with respect to the lumbar vertebrae (L7-sacral joint). The transition zone muscles display a change in spatial tuning with stance distance, responding to many directions of translation at short distances and focusing to respond best to contralateral translations at the long stance distance.

  11. Catalase overexpression does not impair extensor digitorum longus muscle function in normal mice.

    PubMed

    Liu, Mingju; Yue, Yongping; Li, Dejia; Duan, Dongsheng

    2007-12-01

    Catalase is a major antioxidant enzyme. Increasing catalase expression represents a promising avenue to improve muscle function in certain physiological conditions and in some muscle diseases. We hypothesized that catalase overexpression should not impair normal muscle contraction. We delivered a hemagglutinin (HA)-tagged human catalase gene to normal mouse muscle by an adeno-associated viral vector (AAV). Western blot and immunostaining revealed efficient expression of HA-tagged catalase. Enzymatic assay demonstrated an approximately threefold increase in catalase activity in AAV-infected muscles. Catalase overexpression impaired neither twitch nor tetanic tension in the extensor digitorum longus (EDL) muscle. Furthermore, EDL fatigue response was not altered. Taken together, we have developed a novel AAV vector to enhance catalase expression. Lack of apparent toxicity in normal muscle strongly supports further exploration of this vector to reduce oxidative stress-induced muscle damage.

  12. 7 CFR 58.432 - Catalase.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 3 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Catalase. 58.432 Section 58.432 Agriculture... Material § 58.432 Catalase. The catalase preparation shall be a stable, buffered solution, neutral in pH, having a potency of not less than 100 Keil units per milliliter. The source of the catalase,...

  13. 7 CFR 58.432 - Catalase.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 3 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Catalase. 58.432 Section 58.432 Agriculture... Material § 58.432 Catalase. The catalase preparation shall be a stable, buffered solution, neutral in pH, having a potency of not less than 100 Keil units per milliliter. The source of the catalase,...

  14. 7 CFR 58.432 - Catalase.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 3 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Catalase. 58.432 Section 58.432 Agriculture... Material § 58.432 Catalase. The catalase preparation shall be a stable, buffered solution, neutral in pH, having a potency of not less than 100 Keil units per milliliter. The source of the catalase,...

  15. 7 CFR 58.432 - Catalase.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 3 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Catalase. 58.432 Section 58.432 Agriculture... Material § 58.432 Catalase. The catalase preparation shall be a stable, buffered solution, neutral in pH, having a potency of not less than 100 Keil units per milliliter. The source of the catalase,...

  16. 7 CFR 58.432 - Catalase.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 3 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Catalase. 58.432 Section 58.432 Agriculture... Material § 58.432 Catalase. The catalase preparation shall be a stable, buffered solution, neutral in pH, having a potency of not less than 100 Keil units per milliliter. The source of the catalase,...

  17. Inhibition of host cell catalase by Mycoplasma pneumoniae: a possible mechanism for cell injury.

    PubMed Central

    Almagor, M; Yatziv, S; Kahane, I

    1983-01-01

    This study demonstrates that viable Mycoplasma pneumoniae cells inhibit catalase activity in several types of intact human cells as well as in solution. Human erythrocyte catalase was inhibited up to 72%, and the inhibition of catalase in human cultured skin fibroblasts, lung carcinoma epithelial cells, and ciliated epithelial cells from human nasal polyps ranged between 75 and 80%. UV light-killed mycoplasmas failed to inhibit catalase activity both in intact cells and in vitro. After M. pneumoniae infection of human cultured skin fibroblasts, the level of malonyldialdehyde, an indicator for membrane lipid peroxidation, was 3.5 times higher than in control fibroblasts. Virulent M. pneumoniae completely inhibited catalase activity in solution, whereas the nonvirulent strains had a lesser ability to inhibit catalase activity. These findings suggest that as a result of host cell catalase inhibition by M. pneumoniae, the toxicity of the hydrogen peroxide generated by the microorganism and the affected cell is enhanced, thereby inducing host cell damage. PMID:6407999

  18. Electrical activity from smooth muscle of the anal sphincteric area of the cat.

    PubMed Central

    Bouvier, M; Gonella, J

    1981-01-01

    1. The electrical activities of longitudinal and circular smooth muscle of the anal sphincteric area have been studied in the cat. 2. Electromyographic recordings were achieved with extracellular electrodes, in vivo on acute and chronic animals, and in vitro on the isolated organ. In addition, electrical and mechanical activities were recorded from muscle strips with the sucrose gap technique. 3. Circular muscle coat electrical activity consisted exclusively of slow variations of the membrane potential of the smooth muscle cells. Each slow potential variation was followed by a contraction. 4. The electrical activity and the concomitant contractions were tetrodotoxin resistant (10(-6) g/ml.). Both disappeared in Ca-free solution or in the presence of Mn ions (10(-3) M). 5. On circular muscle, noradrenaline (10(-8)-10(-7) g/ml. in vitro, or 0.1-0.15 mg/kg in vivo) had an excitatory effect consisting in an increase of slow potential frequency. The action of noradrenaline was antagonized by phentolamine (10(-6)-10(-5) g/ml. in vitro, or 0.2 mg/kg in vivo). 6. On circular muscle, acetylcholine (10(-8)-10(-6) g/ml.), used exclusively on muscle strips, did never produce any clear cut effect. 7. Longitudinal muscle coat electrical activity consisted of spike potentials superimposed on slow time course depolarizations which were never observed alone. Each spike was followed by a contraction. This electrical activity was tetrodotoxin resistant (10(-6) g/ml.). 8. Longitudinal muscle activity was abolished by noradrenaline (10(-6) g/ml.) and enhanced by acetylcholine (10(-8)-10(-6) g/ml.). The action of noradrenaline was antagonized by propranolol (0.2 mg/kg I.V.; 10(-6) g/ml.) and that of acetylcholine by atropine (10(-7) g/ml.). 9. Electrophysiological and pharmacological data indicate that electromechanical coupling is achieved (1) in circular muscle, through Ca dependent slow variations in membrane potential of the muscle cells and (2) in longitudinal muscle, through spike

  19. Sensory experiences in humans and single-unit activity in cats evoked by polymodal stimulation of the cornea

    PubMed Central

    Acosta, M Carmen; Belmonte, Carlos; Gallar, Juana

    2001-01-01

    The cornea of human subjects and of anaesthetised cats was stimulated with a jet of air of controlled flow, temperature and CO2 concentration delivered by a gas aesthesiometer. In humans, the intensity and magnitude of various components of the sensory experience (intensity of the sensation, degree of irritation, magnitude of burning and stinging pain, magnitude of the cold and warm components of the sensation) were measured using separate visual analog scales. In anaesthetised cats, the impulse response to the same stimuli was recorded from single mechanosensory, polymodal and cold-sensitive corneal fibres in the ciliary nerves. Intensity-response curves for mechanical stimulation showed that all parameters of the sensation experienced by humans increased with the intensity of the stimulus. Mechanical stimuli recruited mainly phasic mechanosensory and polymodal afferents in the cat. Acidic stimulation with gas mixtures of increasing CO2 concentration evoked irritation, burning and to a lesser extent stinging pain of a magnitude roughly proportional to the intensity of the stimulus in humans. CO2 primarily recruited polymodal afferents and weakly excited cold-sensitive fibres in the cat's cornea. Heat stimuli evoked in humans a sensation profile similar to CO2 but accompanied by a warmth component. In the cat's cornea, heat excited only polymodal fibres and silenced cold-sensitive corneal units. Cold stimuli applied to the human cornea elicited a sensation of cooling that became irritant at the lowest temperatures. Corneal cold-sensitive fibres of the cat were activated in a manner proportional to the temperature drop, while polymodal nociceptor fibres were recruited only by the lowest temperatures. Topical menthol (0.2 mm) applied to humans evoked and later eliminated cold sensations produced by cold stimuli while the irritation sensation caused by low temperature stimuli still persisted. Human subjects were able to identify masked mechanical, thermal and chemical

  20. Propranolol, but not naloxone, enhances spinal reflex bladder activity and reduces pudendal inhibition in cats.

    PubMed

    Rogers, Marc J; Xiao, Zhiying; Shen, Bing; Wang, Jicheng; Schwen, Zeyad; Roppolo, James R; de Groat, William C; Tai, Changfeng

    2015-01-01

    This study examined the role of β-adrenergic and opioid receptors in spinal reflex bladder activity and in the inhibition induced by pudendal nerve stimulation (PNS) or tibial nerve stimulation (TNS). Spinal reflex bladder contractions were induced by intravesical infusion of 0.25% acetic acid in α-chloralose-anesthetized cats after an acute spinal cord transection (SCT) at the thoracic T9/T10 level. PNS or TNS at 5 Hz was applied to inhibit these spinal reflex contractions at 2 and 4 times the threshold intensity (T) for inducing anal or toe twitch, respectively. During a cystrometrogram (CMG), PNS at 2T and 4T significantly (P < 0.05) increased bladder capacity from 58.0 ± 4.7% to 85.8 ± 10.3% and 96.5 ± 10.7%, respectively, of saline control capacity, while TNS failed to inhibit spinal reflex bladder contractions. After administering propranolol (3 mg/kg iv, a β₁/β₂-adrenergic receptor antagonist), the effects of 2T and 4T PNS on bladder capacity were significantly (P < 0.05) reduced to 64.5 ± 9.5% and 64.7 ± 7.3%, respectively, of the saline control capacity. However, the residual PNS inhibition (about 10% increase in capacity) was still statistically significant (P < 0.05). Propranolol treatment also significantly (P = 0.0019) increased the amplitude of bladder contractions but did not change the control bladder capacity. Naloxone (1 mg/kg iv, an opioid receptor antagonist) had no effect on either spinal reflex bladder contractions or PNS inhibition. At the end of experiments, hexamethonium (10 mg/kg iv, a ganglionic blocker) significantly (P < 0.05) reduced the amplitude of the reflex bladder contractions. This study indicates an important role of β₁/β₂-adrenergic receptors in pudendal inhibition and spinal reflex bladder activity.

  1. Novel insights in mammalian catalase heme maturation: effect of NO and thioredoxin-1.

    PubMed

    Chakravarti, Ritu; Gupta, Karishma; Majors, Alana; Ruple, Lisa; Aronica, Mark; Stuehr, Dennis J

    2015-05-01

    Catalase is a tetrameric heme-containing enzyme with essential antioxidant functions in biology. Multiple factors including nitric oxide (NO) have been shown to attenuate its activity. However, the possible impact of NO in relation to the maturation of active catalase, including its heme acquisition and tetramer formation, has not been investigated. We found that NO attenuates heme insertion into catalase in both short-term and long-term incubations. The NO inhibition in catalase heme incorporation was associated with defective oligomerization of catalase, such that inactive catalase monomers and dimers accumulated in place of the mature tetrameric enzyme. We also found that GAPDH plays a key role in mediating these NO effects on the structure and activity of catalase. Moreover, the NO sensitivity of catalase maturation could be altered up or down by manipulating the cellular expression level or activity of thioredoxin-1, a known protein-SNO denitrosylase enzyme. In a mouse model of allergic inflammatory asthma, we found that lungs from allergen-challenged mice contained a greater percentage of dimeric catalase relative to tetrameric catalase in the unchallenged control, suggesting that the mechanisms described here are in play in the allergic asthma model. Together, our study shows how maturation of active catalase can be influenced by NO, S-nitrosylated GAPDH, and thioredoxin-1, and how maturation may become compromised in inflammatory conditions such as asthma.

  2. Identification and characteristic analysis of the catalase gene from Locusta migratoria.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Xueyao; Li, Yahong; Wang, Junxiu; Zhang, Tingting; Li, Tao; Dong, Wei; Ma, Enbo; Zhang, Jianzhen

    2016-09-01

    Catalase (CAT) is a ubiquitous antioxidant enzyme in almost all living organisms exposed to atmosphere, which involved in decomposing harmful hydrogen peroxide, into oxygen and water. In this study, a full-length cDNA (1524bp) encoding the catalase gene (LmCAT) from Locusta migratoria was cloned (accession number KT716445). The open reading frame of the LmCAT gene encoded 507 amino acids and shared 57.8%-97.8% amino acid identities with other insect CATs. The coding region was interrupted by 9 introns, while its promoter region contained 15 putative binding sites for 5 kinds of transcriptional regulation factors. For the stage-specific expression profile, LmCAT was highly expressed in the fourth-instar nymphs. For the tissue-specific expression profile, the LmCAT transcripts were highest in the fat bodies, and relatively abundant in the gastric caecum, Malpighian tubules, ovary and integument. Moreover, the result showed that quercetin could significantly induce the expression level of LmCAT. The expression of LmCAT could be silenced by RNAi, but the moralities were not significantly different between control and RNAi groups. Our results would provide valuable information for further study on the ROS regulation mechanism in insect.

  3. Molecular basis for the CAT-2 null phenotype in maize

    SciTech Connect

    Bethards, L.A.; Scandalios, J.G.

    1988-01-01

    Previous reports have described several maize lines whose developmental patterns of catalase gene expression vary from the typical maize line, W64A. Among these variants are the lines A16 and A338, both found to be null for the CAT-2 protein. Identification of a third CAT-2 null line, designated A340, is described. RNA blots and S1 nuclease protection analysis, using (/sup 32/P)-labeled dCTP, indicate that all three CAT-2 null lines produce a similarly shortened Cat2 transcript. The molecular basis for this aberrant Cat2 transcript is discussed.

  4. Regulation of catalase expression in healthy and cancerous cells.

    PubMed

    Glorieux, Christophe; Zamocky, Marcel; Sandoval, Juan Marcelo; Verrax, Julien; Calderon, Pedro Buc

    2015-10-01

    Catalase is an important antioxidant enzyme that dismutates hydrogen peroxide into water and molecular oxygen. The catalase gene has all the characteristics of a housekeeping gene (no TATA box, no initiator element sequence, high GC content in promoter) and a core promoter that is highly conserved among species. We demonstrate in this review that within this core promoter, the presence of DNA binding sites for transcription factors, such as NF-Y and Sp1, plays an essential role in the positive regulation of catalase expression. Additional transcription factors, such as FoxO3a, are also involved in this regulatory process. There is strong evidence that the protein Akt/PKB in the PI3K signaling pathway plays a major role in the expression of catalase by modulating the activity of FoxO3a. Over the past decade, other transcription factors (PPARγ, Oct-1, etc.), as well as genetic, epigenetic, and posttranscriptional processes, have emerged as crucial contributors to the regulation of catalase expression. Altered expression levels of catalase have been reported in cancer tissues compared to their normal counterparts. Deciphering the molecular mechanisms that regulate catalase expression could, therefore, be of crucial importance for the future development of pro-oxidant cancer chemotherapy.

  5. Cloning, Expression, and Characterization of a Novel Thermophilic Monofunctional Catalase from Geobacillus sp. CHB1

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Catalases are widely used in many scientific areas. A catalase gene (Kat) from Geobacillus sp. CHB1 encoding a monofunctional catalase was cloned and recombinant expressed in Escherichia coli (E. coli), which was the first time to clone and express this type of catalase of genus Geobacillus strains as far as we know. This Kat gene was 1,467 bp in length and encoded a catalase with 488 amino acid residuals, which is only 81% similar to the previously studied Bacillus sp. catalase in terms of amino acid sequence. Recombinant catalase was highly soluble in E. coli and made up 30% of the total E. coli protein. Fermentation broth of the recombinant E. coli showed a high catalase activity level up to 35,831 U/mL which was only lower than recombinant Bacillus sp. WSHDZ-01 among the reported catalase production strains. The purified recombinant catalase had a specific activity of 40,526 U/mg and Km of 51.1 mM. The optimal reaction temperature of this recombinant enzyme was 60°C to 70°C, and it exhibited high activity over a wide range of reaction temperatures, ranging from 10°C to 90°C. The enzyme retained 94.7% of its residual activity after incubation at 60°C for 1 hour. High yield and excellent thermophilic properties are valuable features for this catalase in industrial applications. PMID:27579320

  6. Cloning, Expression, and Characterization of a Novel Thermophilic Monofunctional Catalase from Geobacillus sp. CHB1.

    PubMed

    Jia, Xianbo; Chen, Jichen; Lin, Chenqiang; Lin, Xinjian

    2016-01-01

    Catalases are widely used in many scientific areas. A catalase gene (Kat) from Geobacillus sp. CHB1 encoding a monofunctional catalase was cloned and recombinant expressed in Escherichia coli (E. coli), which was the first time to clone and express this type of catalase of genus Geobacillus strains as far as we know. This Kat gene was 1,467 bp in length and encoded a catalase with 488 amino acid residuals, which is only 81% similar to the previously studied Bacillus sp. catalase in terms of amino acid sequence. Recombinant catalase was highly soluble in E. coli and made up 30% of the total E. coli protein. Fermentation broth of the recombinant E. coli showed a high catalase activity level up to 35,831 U/mL which was only lower than recombinant Bacillus sp. WSHDZ-01 among the reported catalase production strains. The purified recombinant catalase had a specific activity of 40,526 U/mg and K m of 51.1 mM. The optimal reaction temperature of this recombinant enzyme was 60°C to 70°C, and it exhibited high activity over a wide range of reaction temperatures, ranging from 10°C to 90°C. The enzyme retained 94.7% of its residual activity after incubation at 60°C for 1 hour. High yield and excellent thermophilic properties are valuable features for this catalase in industrial applications.

  7. Catalase supplementation on thawed bull spermatozoa abolishes the detrimental effect of oxidative stress on motility and DNA integrity.

    PubMed

    Fernández-Santos, M R; Domínguez-Rebolledo, A E; Esteso, M C; Garde, J J; Martínez-Pastor, F

    2009-08-01

    The potential protective effect of catalase supplementation during in vitro culture of frozen/thawed bull spermatozoa was investigated. Frozen/thawed semen collected from three fighting bulls was diluted in phosphate buffered saline (PBS) and incubated at 37 degrees C under different experimental conditions: Control, Catalase (CAT) (200 U/mL), Oxidant (OXI) (100 microm Fe(2+)/1 mm ascorbate), and Catalase + Oxidant (CAT/OXI). We assessed sperm motility, acrosomal integrity, viability and chromatin status (SCSA) at 0, 2 and 6 h of incubation. Our results showed that catalase abolished the effect of the oxidant, protecting spermatozoa against reactive oxygen species, and improving both sperm motility and chromatin status during incubation. The OXI treatment significantly reduced the percentage of motile sperm after 6 h of incubation. The statistical model also showed that there were differences in sperm motility between CAT/OXI (20.8 +/- 2.9%) and OXI (11.6 +/- 7.6%) (p < 0.001). There were no significant effects of OXI on sperm viability, acrosomal status or proportion of abnormal tails. %DFI (spermatozoa with moderate or high DNA Fragmentation Index) was significantly higher on OXI (p < 0.001). Catalase prevented DNA fragmentation even in the presence of the oxidant (%DFI: 30.3 +/- 0.8% OXI vs. 17.4 +/- 0.7% CAT/OXI). We conclude that catalase supplementation after thawing could protect bull spermatozoa against oxidative stress, and it could improve media used for processing thawed spermatozoa.

  8. Improvement of superoxide dismutase and catalase in streptozotocin-nicotinamide-induced type 2-diabetes in mice by berberine and glibenclamide.

    PubMed

    Chatuphonprasert, Waranya; Lao-Ong, Thinnakorn; Jarukamjorn, Kanokwan

    2013-11-05

    Abstract Context: Diabetes mellitus (DM) type 2 is a chronic disease characterized by hyperglycemia and insulin resistance. Oxidative stress participates in development and progression of DM, in which changes of superoxide dismutase (SOD) and catalase (CAT) were noted in DM mice. Berberine has been widely used as an alternative medicine and proved to be effective for the treatment of DM and dyslipidemia. Objective: Impacts of berberine on transcriptional regulation of SOD and CAT and their enzyme activities, including the level of malondialdehyde (MDA) formation, were examined in the DM type 2-induced mice to clarify its antioxidation potential, compared with a common hypoglycemic drug, glibenclamide. Materials and methods: Noninsulin-dependent diabetes was induced in mice by a single intraperitoneal streptozotocin-nicotinamide injection. Diabetic mice were treated daily with glibenclamide (10 mg/kg/d) and/or berberine (100 mg/kg/d) for 2 weeks. The fasting blood glucose and the MDA levels in the mouse liver, brain and kidneys were monitored using Glucometer® (Accu-Check® Advantage II Performa kits, Roche Diagnostics, Germany) and thiobarbituric acid substance assay, respectively. The expression of SOD and CAT mRNA were determined in the mouse liver and the activities of SOD and CAT enzymes were determined in mouse liver, brain and kidneys, respectively. Results: Berberine exhibited similar hypoglycemic potential as glibenclamide to lower area under the curve of the fasting blood glucose. In DM type 2 mice, berberine increased the hepatic CuZn-SOD mRNA expression and the kidney SOD and CAT activities to normal levels. Moreover, DM-induced lipid peroxidation by increasing of MDA levels in both the liver and brain and lipid peroxidation status was restored by berberine. Conclusion: Berberine possessed hypoglycemic properties and strong potential to improve the oxidant-antioxidant balance, though the combination treatment of berberine and glibenclamide did not

  9. Role of biomechanics and muscle activation strategy in the production of endpoint force patterns in the cat hindlimb.

    PubMed

    Lemay, Michel A; Bhowmik-Stoker, Manoshi; McConnell, George C; Grill, Warren M

    2007-01-01

    We used a musculoskeletal model of the cat hindlimb to compare the patterns of endpoint forces generated by all possible combination of 12 hindlimb muscles under three different muscle activation rules: homogeneous activation of muscles based on uniform activation levels, homogeneous activation of muscles based on uniform (normalized) force production, and activation based on the topography of spinal motoneuron pools. Force patterns were compared with the patterns obtained experimentally by microstimulation of the lumbar spinal cord in spinal intact cats. Magnitude and orientation of the force patterns were compared, as well as the proportion of the types found, and the proportions of patterns exhibiting points of zero force (equilibrium points). The force patterns obtained with the homogenous activation and motoneuron topography models were quite similar to those measured experimentally, with the differences being larger for the patterns from the normalized endpoint forces model. Differences in the proportions of types of force patterns between the three models and the experimental results were significant for each model. Both homogeneous activation and normalized endpoint force models produced similar proportions of equilibrium points as found experimentally. The results suggest that muscle biomechanics play an important role in limiting the number of endpoint force pattern types, and that muscle combinations activated at similar levels reproduced best the experimental results obtained with intraspinal microstimulation.

  10. An ancient relative of cyclooxygenase in cyanobacteria is a linoleate 10S-dioxygenase that works in tandem with a catalase-related protein with specific 10S-hydroperoxide lyase activity.

    PubMed

    Brash, Alan R; Niraula, Narayan P; Boeglin, William E; Mashhadi, Zahra

    2014-05-09

    In the course of exploring the scope of catalase-related hemoprotein reactivity toward fatty acid hydroperoxides, we detected a novel candidate in the cyanobacterium Nostoc punctiforme PCC 73102. The immediate neighboring upstream gene, annotated as "cyclooxygenase-2," appeared to be a potential fatty acid heme dioxygenase. We cloned both genes and expressed the cDNAs in Escherichia coli, confirming their hemoprotein character. Oxygen electrode recordings demonstrated a rapid (>100 turnovers/s) reaction of the heme dioxygenase with oleic and linoleic acids. HPLC, including chiral column analysis, UV, and GC-MS of the oxygenated products, identified a novel 10S-dioxygenase activity. The catalase-related hemoprotein reacted rapidly and specifically with linoleate 10S-hydroperoxide (>2,500 turnovers/s) with a hydroperoxide lyase activity specific for the 10S-hydroperoxy enantiomer. The products were identified by NMR as (8E)10-oxo-decenoic acid and the C8 fragments, 1-octen-3-ol and 2Z-octen-1-ol, in ∼3:1 ratio. Chiral HPLC analysis established strict enzymatic control in formation of the 3R alcohol configuration (99% enantiomeric excess) and contrasted with racemic 1-octen-3-ol formed in reaction of linoleate 10S-hydroperoxide with hematin or ferrous ions. The Nostoc linoleate 10S-dioxygenase, the sequence of which contains the signature catalytic sequence of cyclooxygenases and fungal linoleate dioxygenases (YRWH), appears to be a heme dioxygenase ancestor. The novel activity of the lyase expands the known reactions of catalase-related proteins and functions in Nostoc in specific transformation of the 10S-hydroperoxylinoleate.

  11. Synthesis and Characterization of Cobalt(III), Nickel(II) and Copper(II) Mononuclear Complexes with the Ligand 1,3-bis[(2-aminoethyl)amino]-2-propanol and Their Catalase-Like Activity.

    PubMed

    Pires, Bianca M; Silva, Daniel M; Visentin, Lorenzo C; Rodrigues, Bernardo L; Carvalho, Nakédia M F; Faria, Roberto B

    2015-01-01

    In this work, we present the synthesis and characterization of two new mononuclear complexes with the ligand 1,3-bis[(2-aminoethyl)amino]-2-propanol (HL), [Co(L)(H2O)](ClO4)2 (1), [Ni(HL)](ClO4)2 (2), as well as the known complex [Cu(HL)](ClO4)2 (3) for comparison. Their abilities to catalyze the dismutation of H2O2 and the oxidation of cyclohexane were investigated. The complexes were characterized by X-ray diffraction, elemental analysis, electronic and infrared spectroscopy, cyclic voltammetry, electrospray ionization mass spectrometry (ESI-MS) and conductivity measurements. The X-ray structures showed that the nickel (2) and copper (3) complexes are tetracoordinated, with the metal ion bound to the nitrogen atoms of the ligand. On the other hand, the cobalt complex (1) is hexacoordinated, possessing additional bonds to the alkoxo group of the ligand and to a water molecule. Neither of the complexes was able to catalyze the oxidation of cyclohexane, but all of them exhibited catalase-like activity, following Michaelis-Menten kinetics, which suggest resemblance with the catalase natural enzymes. The catalytic activity followed the order: [Ni(HL)](ClO4)2 (2) > [Cu(HL)](ClO4)2 (3) > [Co(L)(H2O)](ClO4)2 (1). As far as we know, this is the first description of a nickel complex presenting a significant catalase-like activity.

  12. Synthesis and Characterization of Cobalt(III), Nickel(II) and Copper(II) Mononuclear Complexes with the Ligand 1,3-bis[(2-aminoethyl)amino]-2-propanol and Their Catalase-Like Activity

    PubMed Central

    Silva, Daniel M.; Visentin, Lorenzo C.; Rodrigues, Bernardo L.

    2015-01-01

    In this work, we present the synthesis and characterization of two new mononuclear complexes with the ligand 1,3-bis[(2-aminoethyl)amino]-2-propanol (HL), [Co(L)(H2O)](ClO4)2 (1), [Ni(HL)](ClO4)2 (2), as well as the known complex [Cu(HL)](ClO4)2 (3) for comparison. Their abilities to catalyze the dismutation of H2O2 and the oxidation of cyclohexane were investigated. The complexes were characterized by X-ray diffraction, elemental analysis, electronic and infrared spectroscopy, cyclic voltammetry, electrospray ionization mass spectrometry (ESI-MS) and conductivity measurements. The X-ray structures showed that the nickel (2) and copper (3) complexes are tetracoordinated, with the metal ion bound to the nitrogen atoms of the ligand. On the other hand, the cobalt complex (1) is hexacoordinated, possessing additional bonds to the alkoxo group of the ligand and to a water molecule. Neither of the complexes was able to catalyze the oxidation of cyclohexane, but all of them exhibited catalase-like activity, following Michaelis-Menten kinetics, which suggest resemblance with the catalase natural enzymes. The catalytic activity followed the order: [Ni(HL)](ClO4)2 (2) > [Cu(HL)](ClO4)2 (3) > [Co(L)(H2O)](ClO4)2 (1). As far as we know, this is the first description of a nickel complex presenting a significant catalase-like activity. PMID:26379038

  13. Identification of a Catalase-Phenol Oxidase in Betalain Biosynthesis in Red Amaranth (Amaranthus cruentus)

    PubMed Central

    Teng, Xiao-Lu; Chen, Ning; Xiao, Xing-Guo

    2016-01-01

    Betalains are a group of nitrogen-containing pigments that color plants in most families of Caryophyllales. Their biosynthesis has long been proposed to begin with hydroxylation of L-tyrosine to L-DOPA through monophenolase activity of tyrosinase, but biochemical evidence in vivo remains lacking. Here we report that a Group 4 catalase, catalase-phenol oxidase (named as AcCATPO), was identified, purified and characterized from leaves of Amaranthus cruentus, a betalain plant. The purified enzyme appeared to be a homotrimeric protein composed of subunits of about 58 kDa, and demonstrated not only the catalase activity toward H2O2, but also the monophenolase activity toward L-tyrosine and diphenolase activity toward L-DOPA. Its catalase and phenol oxidase activities were inhibited by common classic catalase and tyrosinase inhibitors, respectively. All its peptide fragments identified by nano-LC-MS/MS were targeted to catalases, and matched with a cDNA-encoded polypeptide which contains both classic catalase and phenol oxidase active sites. These sites were also present in catalases of non-betalain plants analyzed. AcCATPO transcript abundance was positively correlated with the ratio of betaxanthin to betacyanin in both green and red leaf sectors of A. tricolor. These data shows that the fourth group catalase, catalase-phenol oxidase, is present in plant, and might be involved in betaxanthin biosynthesis. PMID:26779247

  14. Identification of a Catalase-Phenol Oxidase in Betalain Biosynthesis in Red Amaranth (Amaranthus cruentus).

    PubMed

    Teng, Xiao-Lu; Chen, Ning; Xiao, Xing-Guo

    2015-01-01

    Betalains are a group of nitrogen-containing pigments that color plants in most families of Caryophyllales. Their biosynthesis has long been proposed to begin with hydroxylation of L-tyrosine to L-DOPA through monophenolase activity of tyrosinase, but biochemical evidence in vivo remains lacking. Here we report that a Group 4 catalase, catalase-phenol oxidase (named as AcCATPO), was identified, purified and characterized from leaves of Amaranthus cruentus, a betalain plant. The purified enzyme appeared to be a homotrimeric protein composed of subunits of about 58 kDa, and demonstrated not only the catalase activity toward H2O2, but also the monophenolase activity toward L-tyrosine and diphenolase activity toward L-DOPA. Its catalase and phenol oxidase activities were inhibited by common classic catalase and tyrosinase inhibitors, respectively. All its peptide fragments identified by nano-LC-MS/MS were targeted to catalases, and matched with a cDNA-encoded polypeptide which contains both classic catalase and phenol oxidase active sites. These sites were also present in catalases of non-betalain plants analyzed. AcCATPO transcript abundance was positively correlated with the ratio of betaxanthin to betacyanin in both green and red leaf sectors of A. tricolor. These data shows that the fourth group catalase, catalase-phenol oxidase, is present in plant, and might be involved in betaxanthin biosynthesis.

  15. Peroxiredoxin 2, glutathione peroxidase, and catalase in the cytosol and membrane of erythrocytes under H2O2-induced oxidative stress.

    PubMed

    Rocha, S; Gomes, D; Lima, M; Bronze-da-Rocha, E; Santos-Silva, A

    2015-01-01

    Erythrocytes are continuously exposed to risk of oxidative injury due to oxidant oxygen species. To prevent damage, they have antioxidant agents namely, catalase (Cat), glutathione peroxidase (GPx), and peroxiredoxin 2 (Prx2). Our aim was to contribute to a better understanding of the interplay between Prx2, Cat, and GPx under H2O2-induced oxidative stress, by studying their changes in the red blood cell cytosol and membrane, in different conditions. These three enzymes were quantified by immunoblotting. Malondialdehyde, that is, lipoperoxidation (LPO) in the erythrocyte membrane, and membrane-bound hemoglobin (MBH) were evaluated, as markers of oxidative stress. We also studied the erythrocyte membrane protein profile, to estimate how oxidative stress affects the membrane protein structure. We showed that under increasing H2O2 concentrations, inhibition of the three enzymes with or without metHb formation lead to the binding of Prx2 and GPx (but not Cat) to the erythrocyte membrane. Prx2 was detected mainly in its oxidized form and the linkage of metHb to the membrane seems to compete with the binding of Prx2. Catalase played a major role in protecting erythrocytes from high exogenous flux of H2O2, since whenever Cat was active there were no significant changes in any of the studied parameters. When only Cat was inhibited, Prx2 and GPx were unable to prevent H2O2-induced oxidative stress resulting in increasing MBH and membrane LPO. Additionally, the inhibition of one or more of these enzymes induced changes in the anchor/linker proteins of the junctional complexes of the membrane cytoskeleton-lipid bilayer, which might lead to membrane destabilization.

  16. Generating controlled reducing environments in aerobic recombinant Escherichia coli fermentations: effects on cell growth, oxygen uptake, heat shock protein expression, and in vivo CAT activity.

    PubMed

    Gill, R T; Cha, H J; Jain, A; Rao, G; Bentley, W E

    1998-07-20

    The independent control of culture redox potential (CRP) by the regulated addition of a reducing agent, dithiothreitol (DTT) was demonstrated in aerated recombinant Escherichia coli fermentations. Moderate levels of DTT addition resulted in minimal changes to specific oxygen uptake, growth rate, and dissolved oxygen. Excessive levels of DTT addition were toxic to the cells resulting in cessation of growth. Chloramphenicol acetyltransferase (CAT) activity (nmoles/microgram total protein min.) decreased in batch fermentation experiments with respect to increasing levels of DTT addition. To further investigate the mechanisms affecting CAT activity, experiments were performed to assay heat shock protein expression and specific CAT activity (nmoles/microgram CAT min.). Expression of such molecular chaperones as GroEL and DnaK were found to increase after addition of DTT. Additionally, sigma factor 32 (sigma32) and several proteases were seen to increase dramatically during addition of DTT. Specific CAT activity (nmoles/microgram CAT min. ) varied greatly as DTT was added, however, a minimum in activity was found at the highest level of DTT addition in E. coli strains RR1 [pBR329] and JM105 [pROEX-CAT]. In conjunction, cellular stress was found to reach a maximum at the same levels of DTT. Although DTT addition has the potential for directly affecting intracellular protein folding, the effects felt from the increased stress within the cell are likely the dominant effector. That the effects of DTT were measured within the cytoplasm of the cell suggests that the periplasmic redox potential was also altered. The changes in specific CAT activity, molecular chaperones, and other heat shock proteins, in the presence of minimal growth rate and oxygen uptake alterations, suggest that the ex vivo control of redox potential provides a new process for affecting the yield and conformation of heterologous proteins in aerated E. coli fermentations.

  17. Multichannel Detrended Fluctuation Analysis Reveals Synchronized Patterns of Spontaneous Spinal Activity in Anesthetized Cats

    PubMed Central

    Rodríguez, Erika E.; Hernández-Lemus, Enrique; Itzá-Ortiz, Benjamín A.; Jiménez, Ismael; Rudomín, Pablo

    2011-01-01

    The analysis of the interaction and synchronization of relatively large ensembles of neurons is fundamental for the understanding of complex functions of the nervous system. It is known that the temporal synchronization of neural ensembles is involved in the generation of specific motor, sensory or cognitive processes. Also, the intersegmental coherence of spinal spontaneous activity may indicate the existence of synaptic neural pathways between different pairs of lumbar segments. In this study we present a multichannel version of the detrended fluctuation analysis method (mDFA) to analyze the correlation dynamics of spontaneous spinal activity (SSA) from time series analysis. This method together with the classical detrended fluctuation analysis (DFA) were used to find out whether the SSA recorded in one or several segments in the spinal cord of the anesthetized cat occurs either in a random or in an organized manner. Our results are consistent with a non-random organization of the sets of neurons involved in the generation of spontaneous cord dorsum potentials (CDPs) recorded either from one lumbar segment (DFA- mean = 1.040.09) or simultaneously from several lumbar segments (mDFA- mean = 1.010.06), where  = 0.5 indicates randomness while 0.5 indicates long-term correlations. To test the sensitivity of the mDFA method we also examined the effects of small spinal lesions aimed to partially interrupt connectivity between neighboring lumbosacral segments. We found that the synchronization and correlation between the CDPs recorded from the L5 and L6 segments in both sides of the spinal cord were reduced when a lesion comprising the left dorsal quadrant was performed between the segments L5 and L6 (mDFA- = 0.992 as compared to initial conditions mDFA- = 1.186). The synchronization and correlation were reduced even further after a similar additional right spinal lesion (mDFA- = 0.924). In contrast to the classical methods, such as correlation

  18. Intersegmental synchronization of spontaneous activity of dorsal horn neurons in the cat spinal cord.

    PubMed

    Manjarrez, E; Jiménez, I; Rudomin, P

    2003-02-01

    Extracellular recordings of neuronal activity made in the lumbosacral spinal segments of the anesthetized cat have disclosed the existence of a set of neurons in Rexed's laminae III-VI that discharged in a highly synchronized manner during the occurrence of spontaneous negative cord dorsum potentials (nCDPs) and responded to stimulation of low-threshold cutaneous fibers (<1.5x T) with mono- and polysynaptic latencies. The cross-correlation between the spontaneous discharges of pairs of synchronic neurons was highest when they were close to each other, and decreased with increasing longitudinal separation. Simultaneous recordings of nCDPs from several segments in preparations with the peripheral nerves intact have disclosed the existence of synchronized spontaneous nCDPs in segments S1-L4. These potentials lasted between 25 and 70 ms and were usually larger in segments L7-L5, where they attained amplitudes between 50 and 150 micro V. The transection of the intact ipsilateral hindlimb cutaneous and muscle nerves, or the section of the dorsal columns between the L5 and L6, or between the L6 and L7 segments in preparations with already transected nerves, had very small effects on the intersegmental synchronization of the spontaneous nCDPs and on the power spectra of the cord dorsum potentials recorded in the lumbosacral enlargement. In contrast, sectioning the ipsilateral dorsal horn and the dorsolateral funiculus at these segmental levels strongly decoupled the spontaneous nCDPs generated rostrally from those generated caudally to the lesion and reduced the magnitude of the power spectra throughout the whole frequency range. These results indicate that the lumbosacral intersegmental synchronization between the spontaneous nCDPs does not require sensory inputs and is most likely mediated by intra- and intersegmental connections. It is suggested that the occurrence of spontaneous synchronized nCDPs is due to the activation of tightly coupled arrays of neurons, each

  19. Multichannel detrended fluctuation analysis reveals synchronized patterns of spontaneous spinal activity in anesthetized cats.

    PubMed

    Rodríguez, Erika E; Hernández-Lemus, Enrique; Itzá-Ortiz, Benjamín A; Jiménez, Ismael; Rudomín, Pablo

    2011-01-01

    The analysis of the interaction and synchronization of relatively large ensembles of neurons is fundamental for the understanding of complex functions of the nervous system. It is known that the temporal synchronization of neural ensembles is involved in the generation of specific motor, sensory or cognitive processes. Also, the intersegmental coherence of spinal spontaneous activity may indicate the existence of synaptic neural pathways between different pairs of lumbar segments. In this study we present a multichannel version of the detrended fluctuation analysis method (mDFA) to analyze the correlation dynamics of spontaneous spinal activity (SSA) from time series analysis. This method together with the classical detrended fluctuation analysis (DFA) were used to find out whether the SSA recorded in one or several segments in the spinal cord of the anesthetized cat occurs either in a random or in an organized manner. Our results are consistent with a non-random organization of the sets of neurons involved in the generation of spontaneous cord dorsum potentials (CDPs) recorded either from one lumbar segment (DFA-α mean = 1.04[Formula: see text]0.09) or simultaneously from several lumbar segments (mDFA-α mean = 1.01[Formula: see text]0.06), where α = 0.5 indicates randomness while α = 0.5 indicates long-term correlations. To test the sensitivity of the mDFA method we also examined the effects of small spinal lesions aimed to partially interrupt connectivity between neighboring lumbosacral segments. We found that the synchronization and correlation between the CDPs recorded from the L5 and L6 segments in both sides of the spinal cord were reduced when a lesion comprising the left dorsal quadrant was performed between the segments L5 and L6 (mDFA-[Formula: see text] = 0.992 as compared to initial conditions mDFA-α = 1.186). The synchronization and correlation were reduced even further after a similar additional right spinal lesion (mDFA-α = 0.924). In contrast

  20. Activation of silent mechanoreceptive cat C and Adelta sensory neurons and their substance P expression following peripheral inflammation.

    PubMed

    Xu, G Y; Huang, L Y; Zhao, Z Q

    2000-10-15

    The effect of inflammation on the excitability and the level of substance P (SP) in cat mechanoreceptive C and Adelta dorsal root ganglion (DRG) neurons were studied in vivo using intracellular recording and immunocytochemical techniques. Following injections of carrageenan (Carg) into the cat hindpaw, the percentage of C neurons exhibiting spontaneous activity increased from 7.2 to 20.7% and the percentage of Adelta neurons increased from 6.9 to 18.6%. In contrast to most cells from normal cats, which fired regularly below 10 Hz, many cells from Carg-treated cats fired at higher frequencies or in bursts. Inflammation (Carg treatment) also depolarized membrane potentials, increased membrane input resistance, caused the disappearance of inward rectifying currents and lowered the mean current thresholds of tibial nerve-evoked responses in DRG neurons. With inflammation, the percentage of C or Adelta neurons responding to low threshold mechanoreceptive stimuli increased (C neurons: normal, 13%; inflamed, 41%; Adelta neurons: normal, 13 %; inflamed, 39 %), while the percentage of C or Adelta neurons responding to high threshold mechanoreceptive stimuli remained unchanged. Some receptive field (RF)-responsive cells were injected with Lucifer Yellow and their SP immunoreactivity was determined. Following Carg treatment, substantially higher percentages of RF-responsive cells were SP positive (C neurons: normal, 35.7%; inflamed, 60%; Adelta neurons: normal, 18.2%; inflamed, 66.7%). These combined increases in the excitability of DRG neurons and SP-containing RF-responsive neurons could lead to sensitization of sensory neurons, thus contributing to the development of hyperalgesia.

  1. The relationship between soleus and gastrocnemius muscle activity in conscious cats--a model for motor unit recruitment?

    PubMed

    Hodgson, J A

    1983-04-01

    Force and electromyogram (e.m.g.) data were recorded from medial gastrocnemius and soleus muscles of conscious cats using chronically implanted devices. A digital computer was used to take simultaneous samples of the data from both muscles and construct two-dimensional frequency distributions relating the activities in the two muscles. The results show that posture is the only activity where soleus may be active without corresponding activity in the medial gastrocnemius muscle. In locomotion the ratio between soleus and medial gastrocnemius muscle activities changed with treadmill speed, although peak soleus force remained constant at approximately 80% of the isometric tetanic tension measured in terminal experiments. A hypothesis is put forward, associating these findings with the activities of slow and fast motor units and emphasizing the influence of neural activity in the determination of motor unit recruitment.

  2. Influence of catalase gene silencing on the survivability of Sitobion avenae.

    PubMed

    Deng, Fei; Zhao, Zhangwu

    2014-05-01

    Reactive oxygen species (ROS), such as superoxide anions and hydrogen peroxide produced in cell metabolism, result in the disruption of cellular function and structure. Catalase (CAT), an enzyme which exists in almost all organisms including plants, invertebrates and vertebrates, acts in scavenging ROS. In this study, a sequence fragment encoding a CAT-like protein from wheat aphids ( Sitobion avenae) was cloned. Amino acid sequence alignment showed this CAT shared relatively high conservation with CAT sequences from other insects. We detected cat mRNA levels at nymphs of different stages and adults and results showed that cat expression in adults was significantly higher compared to juvenile stages. At the third instar stage, ingestion of dsCAT significantly knocked down CAT expression. Continuous feeding of dsCAT mixed in an artificial diet led to reduced survival rate and ecdysis index. This study indicates that cat, a potential target gene for management of insect pests, is important for maintaining the survival of  S. avenae.

  3. Cloning and characterization of monofunctional catalase from photosynthetic bacterium Rhodospirillum rubrum S1.

    PubMed

    Lee, Dong-Heon; Oh, Duck-Chul; Oh, You-Sung; Malinverni, Juliana C; Kukor, Jerome J; Kahng, Hyung-Yeel

    2007-09-01

    In this study, an approx. 2.5-kb gene fragment including the catalase gene from Rhodospirillum rubrum S1 was cloned and characterized. The determination of the complete nucleotide sequence revealed that the cloned DNA fragment was organized into three open reading frames, designated as ORF1, catalase, and ORF3 in that order. The catalase gene consisted of 1,455 nucleotides and 484 amino acids, including the initiation and stop codons, and was located 326 bp upstream in the opposite direction of ORF1. The catalase was overproduced in Escherichia coli UM255, a catalase-deficient mutant, and then purified for the biochemical characterization of the enzyme. The purified catalase had an estimated molecular mass of 189 kDa, consisting of four identical subunits of 61 kDa. The enzyme exhibited activity over a broad pH range from pH 5.0 to pH 11.0 and temperature range from 20 degrees C to 60 degrees C. The catalase activity was inhibited by 3-amino-1,2,4-triazole, cyanide, azide, and hydroxylamine. The enzyme's K(m) value and V(max) of the catalase for H2O2 were 21.8 mM and 39,960 U/mg, respectively. Spectrophotometric analysis revealed that the ratio of A406 to A280 for the catalase was 0.97, indicating the presence of a ferric component. The absorption spectrum of catalase-4 exhibited a Soret band at 406 nm, which is typical of a heme-containing catalase. Treatment of the enzyme with dithionite did not alter the spectral shape and revealed no peroxidase activity. The combined results of the gene sequence and biochemical characterization proved that the catalase cloned from strain S1in this study was a typical monofunctional catalase, which differed from the other types of catalases found in strain S1.

  4. Preparation of highly efficient manganese catalase mimics.

    PubMed

    Triller, Michael U; Hsieh, Wen-Yuan; Pecoraro, Vincent L; Rompel, Annette; Krebs, Bernt

    2002-10-21

    The series of compounds [Mn(bpia)(mu-OAc)](2)(ClO(4))(2) (1), [Mn(2)(bpia)(2)(muO)(mu-OAc)](ClO(4))(3).CH(3)CN (2), [Mn(bpia)(mu-O)](2)(ClO(4))(2)(PF(6)).2CH(3)CN (3), [Mn(bpia)(Cl)(2)](ClO)(4) (4), and [(Mn(bpia)(Cl))(2)(mu-O)](ClO(4))(2).2CH(3)CN (5) (bpia = bis(picolyl)(N-methylimidazol-2-yl)amine) represents a structural, spectroscopic, and functional model system for manganese catalases. Compounds 3 and 5 have been synthesized from 2 via bulk electrolysis and ligand exchange, respectively. All complexes have been structurally characterized by X-ray crystallography and by UV-vis and EPR spectroscopies. The different bridging ligands including the rare mono-mu-oxo and mono-mu-oxo-mono-mu-carboxylato motifs lead to a variation of the Mn-Mn separation across the four binuclear compounds of 1.50 A (Mn(2)(II,II) = 4.128 A, Mn(2)(III,III) = 3.5326 and 3.2533 A, Mn(2)(III,IV) = 2.624 A). Complexes 1, 2, and 3 are mimics for the Mn(2)(II,II), the Mn(2)(III,III), and the Mn(2)(III,IV) oxidation states of the native enzyme. UV-vis spectra of these compounds show similarities to those of the corresponding oxidation states of manganese catalase from Thermus thermophilus and Lactobacillus plantarum. Compound 2 exhibits a rare example of a Jahn-Teller compression. While complexes 1 and 3 are efficient catalysts for the disproportionation of hydrogen peroxide and contain an N(4)O(2) donor set, 4 and 5 show no catalase activity. These complexes have an N(4)Cl(2) and N(4)OCl donor set, respectively, and serve as mimics for halide inhibited manganese catalases. Cyclovoltammetric data show that the substitution of oxygen donor atoms with chloride causes a shift of redox potentials to more positive values. To our knowledge, complex 1 is the most efficient binuclear functional manganese catalase mimic exhibiting saturation kinetics to date.

  5. Bioaccumulation of fullerene (C60) and corresponding catalase elevation in Lumbriculus variegatus.

    PubMed

    Wang, Jiafan; Wages, Mike; Yu, Shuangying; Maul, Jonathan D; Mayer, Greg; Hope-Weeks, Louisa; Cobb, George P

    2014-05-01

    Fullerene (C(60)), with its unique physical properties and nanometer size, has been mass-produced for many applications in recent decades. The increased likelihood of direct release into the environment has raised interest in understanding both the environmental fate and corresponding biological effects of fullerenes to living organisms. Because few studies have emphasized fullerene uptake and resulting biochemical responses by living organisms, a toxicity screening test and a 28-d bioaccumulation test for Lumbriculus variegatus were performed. No mortality was observed in the range of 0.05 mg C(60) /kg dry sediment to 11.33 mg C(60) /kg dry sediment. A biota-sediment accumulation factor of micron-sized fullerene agglomerates (µ-C(60)) was 0.032 ± 0.008 at day 28, which is relatively low compared with pyrene (1.62 ± 0.22). Catalase (CAT) activity, an oxidative stress indicator, was elevated significantly on day 14 for L. variegatus exposed to µ-C(60) (p = 0.034). This peak CAT activity corresponded to the highest body residues observed in the present study, 199 ± 80 µg C(60) /kg dry weight sediment. Additionally, smaller C(60) agglomerate size increased bioaccumulation potential in L. variegatus. The relationship between C(60) body residue and the increased CAT activity followed a linear regression. All results suggest that C(60) has a lower bioaccumulation potential than pyrene but a higher potential to induce oxidative stress in L. variegatus.

  6. Cloning, characterization, and expression in Escherichia coli of a gene encoding Listeria seeligeri catalase, a bacterial enzyme highly homologous to mammalian catalases.

    PubMed Central

    Haas, A; Brehm, K; Kreft, J; Goebel, W

    1991-01-01

    A gene coding for catalase (hydrogen-peroxide:hydrogen-peroxide oxidoreductase; EC 1.11.1.6) of the gram-positive bacterium Listeria seeligeri was cloned from a plasmid library of EcoRI-digested chromosomal DNA, with Escherichia coli DH5 alpha as a host. The recombinant catalase was expressed in E. coli to an enzymatic activity approximately 50 times that of the combined E. coli catalases. The nucleotide sequence was determined, and the deduced amino acid sequence revealed 43.2% amino acid sequence identity between bovine liver catalase and L. seeligeri catalase. Most of the amino acid residues which are involved in catalytic activity, the formation of the active center accession channel, and heme binding in bovine liver catalase were also present in L. seeligeri catalase at the corresponding positions. The recombinant protein contained 488 amino acid residues and had a calculated molecular weight of 55,869. The predicted isoelectric point was 5.0. Enzymatic and genetic analyses showed that there is most probably a single catalase of this type in L. seeligeri. A perfect 21-bp inverted repeat, which was highly homologous to previously reported binding sequences of the Fur (ferric uptake regulon) protein of E. coli, was detected next to the putative promoter region of the L. seeligeri catalase gene. Images PMID:1860824

  7. Cloning, characterization, and expression in Escherichia coli of a gene encoding Listeria seeligeri catalase, a bacterial enzyme highly homologous to mammalian catalases.

    PubMed

    Haas, A; Brehm, K; Kreft, J; Goebel, W

    1991-08-01

    A gene coding for catalase (hydrogen-peroxide:hydrogen-peroxide oxidoreductase; EC 1.11.1.6) of the gram-positive bacterium Listeria seeligeri was cloned from a plasmid library of EcoRI-digested chromosomal DNA, with Escherichia coli DH5 alpha as a host. The recombinant catalase was expressed in E. coli to an enzymatic activity approximately 50 times that of the combined E. coli catalases. The nucleotide sequence was determined, and the deduced amino acid sequence revealed 43.2% amino acid sequence identity between bovine liver catalase and L. seeligeri catalase. Most of the amino acid residues which are involved in catalytic activity, the formation of the active center accession channel, and heme binding in bovine liver catalase were also present in L. seeligeri catalase at the corresponding positions. The recombinant protein contained 488 amino acid residues and had a calculated molecular weight of 55,869. The predicted isoelectric point was 5.0. Enzymatic and genetic analyses showed that there is most probably a single catalase of this type in L. seeligeri. A perfect 21-bp inverted repeat, which was highly homologous to previously reported binding sequences of the Fur (ferric uptake regulon) protein of E. coli, was detected next to the putative promoter region of the L. seeligeri catalase gene.

  8. Ocular and neural distribution of feline herpesvirus-1 during active and latent experimental infection in cats

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Herpes simplex virus 1 (HSV-1) and varicella zoster virus (VZV) cause extensive intra-ocular and neural infections in humans and are closely related to Felid herpes virus 1 (FeHV-1). We report the extent of intra-ocular replication and the extent and morphological aspects of neural replication during the acute and latent phases of FeHV-1 infection. Juvenile, SPF cats were inoculated with FeHV-1. Additional cats were used as negative controls. Cats were euthanized on days 6, 10, and 30 post-inoculation. Results FeHV-1 was isolated from the conjunctiva, cornea, uveal tract, retina, optic nerve, ciliary ganglion (CG), pterygopalatine ganglion (PTPG), trigeminal ganglion (TG), brainstem, visual cortex, cerebellum, and olfactory bulb of infected cats during the acute phase, but not the cranial cervical ganglion (CCG) and optic chiasm. Viral DNA was detected in all tissues during acute infection by a real-time quantitative PCR assay. On day 30, viral DNA was detected in all TG, all CCG, and 2 PTPG. Histologically mild inflammation and ganglion cell loss were noted within the TG during acute, but not latent infection. Using linear regression, a strong correlation existed between clinical score and day 30 viral DNA copy number within the TG. Conclusions The correlation between clinical score and day 30 viral DNA copy number suggests the severity of the acute clinical infection is related to the quantity of latent viral DNA. The histologic response was similar to that seen during HSV-1 or VZV infection. To the author’s knowledge this is the first report of FeHV-1 infection involving intraocular structures and autonomic ganglia. PMID:24053192

  9. Detection of a novel catalase in extracts of Mycobacterium avium and Mycobacterium intracellulare.

    PubMed Central

    Wayne, L G; Diaz, G A

    1988-01-01

    A novel class of catalase, which differs from the previously described M- and T-catalases of mycobacteria, was detected in strains of Mycobacterium avium and M. intracellulare. Designated A-catalase, this enzyme resisted inactivation at 68 degrees C, was inactivated by 3-amino-1,2,4-triazole (aminotriazole), and exhibited no peroxidase activity. All of these properties distinguished the enzyme from T-catalase. The A-catalase exhibited a Km of 70 mM H2O2, which is between the upper and lower extremes of the ranges reported for T- and M-catalases, respectively. The A-catalase appeared to be more hydrophobic than M-catalase and did not react with antiserum to a representative sample of this class. The banding patterns of T- and M-catalases seen by polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (PAGE) were essentially unaffected by the incorporation of sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS) into the PAGE system, whereas the single band of A-catalase seen by PAGE without SDS resolved into as many as five bands in the presence of SDS; these bands were all of slower mobility than the original band. The banding pattern seen with SDS appeared to be related more to counterion charge effects than to molecular size increases that could be attributed to SDS complexed to the protein. It remains to be determined whether the multiple A-catalase bands reflect different proteins or different SDS micellar complexes of a single protein. Images PMID:3346077

  10. Efficient protection by cationized catalase against H2O2 injury in primary cultured alveolar epithelial cells.

    PubMed

    Nemoto, Takayuki; Kawakami, Shigeru; Yamashita, Fumiyoshi; Hashida, Mitsuru

    2007-08-16

    Increasing evidence suggests that hydrogen peroxide plays an important role in alveolar epithelial injury produced during many inflammatory lung diseases. In this study, the successful prevention of hydrogen peroxide (H(2)O(2))-induced injury in primary cultured rabbit alveolar epithelial cells by cationized catalase is described. Cationized catalase was synthesized by direct chemical modification to enhance its association with alveolar epithelial cells. Cationized catalase exhibited a 22.3-fold higher cellular association at 2 h than native catalase, and incubation of cationized catalase with the cells produced a 2.19-fold intracellular catalase activity, which suggested that cationized catalase distributed both to the cell membrane and into the cell interior. Cationized catalase markedly suppressed H(2)O(2)-induced cell injury. In addition, electron spin resonance spectrometry analysis revealed that cationized catalase effectively eliminated H(2)O(2) produced in the medium by glucose plus glucose oxidase. On the other hand, polyethylene glycol-modified catalase (PEG-catalase) did not have any protective effect against H(2)O(2)-induced cell injury although PEG-catalase exhibited a 2.49-fold higher cellular association at 2 h than native catalase. These results suggest that cationization of catalase is a promising strategy for the treatment of many of inflammatory lung diseases.

  11. Ionic adsorption of catalase on bioskin: kinetic and ultrastructural studies.

    PubMed

    Solas, M T; Vicente, C; Xavier, L; Legaz, M E

    1994-03-15

    Bioskin is a natural polymer produced by Acetobacter xylinum and several yeasts in culture. It contains glucosamine and N-acetyl galactosamine which promote ionic adsorption of catalase at the adequate pH value. High values of ionic strength are required to enzyme desorption. Adsorption of catalase on bioskin fibers has been visualized by scanning electron microscopy associated to a dispersion X-ray analyzer. At low enzyme density, the affinity of the immobilized catalase for hydrogen peroxide was 30% lower than that of the free enzyme. This affinity decreased dramatically at higher density of immobilized enzyme and could not be increased by agitation of the enzyme reaction mixture. Immobilized catalase retains about 70% of its initial activity after 16 d storage, whereas soluble enzyme is completely inactivated after 3 d at room temperature. The haeme group of catalase is not protected after immobilization since it is accessible to both EDTA and phloroglucinol, chelating agents which inactivate catalase by removing the iron atom from the haeme group.

  12. The effect of activation of central adrenergic receptors by clonidine on the excitability of the solitary tract neurons in cats.

    PubMed

    Lipski, J; Solnicka, E

    1976-01-01

    The effect of i.v. administered clonidine (10-15 mug/kg) on the evoked potential recorded in the dosal part of medulla oblongata, during carotid sinus nerve stimulation, was studied in chloralose-urethane anaesthetized cats. Clonidine influenced the amplitude and configuration of the evoked potential and the changes were parallel to the blood pressure depressor response. However, the blood pressure drops, evoked by i.v. infusion of papaverine, did not influence the potential. It is concluded that the synaptic transmission from the carotid sinus nerve to the second order neurons in the solatary tract area can be modulated by the clonidine-induced activation of central adrenergic receptors.

  13. Metal-based superoxide dismutase and catalase mimics reduce oxidative stress biomarkers and extend life span of Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed

    Ribeiro, Thales de P; Fonseca, Fernanda L; de Carvalho, Mariana D C; Godinho, Rodrigo M da C; de Almeida, Fernando Pereira; Saint'Pierre, Tatiana D; Rey, Nicolás A; Fernandes, Christiane; Horn, Adolfo; Pereira, Marcos D

    2017-01-15

    Aging is a natural process characterized by several biological changes. In this context, oxidative stress appears as a key factor that leads cells and organisms to severe dysfunctions and diseases. To cope with reactive oxygen species and oxidative-related damage, there has been increased use of superoxide dismutase (SOD)/catalase (CAT) biomimetic compounds. Recently, we have shown that three metal-based compounds {[Fe(HPClNOL)Cl2]NO3, [Cu(HPClNOL)(CH3CN)](ClO4)2 and Mn(HPClNOL)(Cl)2}, harboring in vitro SOD and/or CAT activities, were critical for protection of yeast cells against oxidative stress. In this work, treating Saccharomyces cerevisiae with these SOD/CAT mimics (25.0 µM/1 h), we highlight the pivotal role of these compounds to extend the life span of yeast during chronological aging. Evaluating lipid and protein oxidation of aged cells, it becomes evident that these mimics extend the life expectancy of yeast mainly due to the reduction in oxidative stress biomarkers. In addition, the treatment of yeast cells with these mimics regulated the amounts of lipid droplet occurrence, consistent with the requirement and protection of lipids for cell integrity during aging. Concerning SOD/CAT mimics uptake, using inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry, we add new evidence that these complexes, besides being bioabsorbed by S. cerevisiae cells, can also affect metal homeostasis. Finally, our work presents a new application for these SOD/CAT mimics, which demonstrate a great potential to be employed as antiaging agents. Taken together, these promising results prompt future studies concerning the relevance of administration of these molecules against the emerging aging-related diseases such as Parkinson's, Alzheimer's and Huntington's.

  14. Comparison of periodontal pathogens between cats and their owners.

    PubMed

    Booij-Vrieling, H E; van der Reijden, W A; Houwers, D J; de Wit, W E A J; Bosch-Tijhof, C J; Penning, L C; van Winkelhoff, A J; Hazewinkel, H A W

    2010-07-29

    The periodontal pathogens Porphyromonas gingivalis and Tannerella forsythia are strongly associated with periodontal disease and are highly prevalent in humans with periodontitis. Porphyromonas and Tannerella spp. have also been isolated from the oral cavity of cats. The oral microflora in animals was compared with those in humans in earlier studies, but no studies are available on the comparison of the oral microflora from pets and their respective owners. The aim of this study was to determine the presence of these bacteria in the oral microflora of cats and their owners, since animal to human transmission, or vice versa, of oral pathogens could have public health implications. This study investigated the prevalence of Porphyromonas gulae, P. gingivalis, and T. forsythia in the oral microflora of cats and their owners, using culture and polymerase chain reaction (PCR). All Porphyromonas isolates from cats (n=64) were catalase positive, whereas the Porphyromonas isolates from owners (n=7) were catalase negative, suggesting that the isolates from cats were P. gulae whereas those from the owners were P. gingivalis. T. forsythia was recovered from both cats (n=63) and owners (n=31); the proportion of T. forsythia relative to the total CFU was higher in cats with periodontitis than in cats without periodontal disease. Genotyping of T. forsythia isolates (n=54) in six cat/owner couples showed that in one cat/owner couple the T. forsythia isolates (n=6) were identical. These T. forsythia isolates were all catalase positive, which led us to hypothesize that transmission from cats to owners had occurred and that cats may be a reservoir of T. forsythia.

  15. Astronomy CATS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brissenden, Gina; Prather, Edward E.; Impey, Chris

    2012-08-01

    The Center for Astronomy Education's (CAE's) NSF-funded Collaboration of Astronomy Teaching Scholars (CATS) Program is a grassroots multi-institutional effort to increase the capacity for astronomy education research and improve science literacy in the United States.Our primary target population is the 500,000 college students who each year enroll in an introductory general education (a breadth requirement for non-science majors) Earth, Astronomy, and Space Science (EASS) course (Fraknoi 2001, AGI 2006).An equally important population for our efforts is the individuals who are, or will be, teaching these students. In this chapter, we will briefly discuss the goals of CAE and CATS, the varied personnel that make up the CATS collective, the diverse projects we've undertaken, and the many challenges we have had to work through to make CATS a success.

  16. Study on the interaction of catalase with pesticides by flow injection chemiluminescence and molecular docking.

    PubMed

    Tan, Xijuan; Wang, Zhuming; Chen, Donghua; Luo, Kai; Xiong, Xunyu; Song, Zhenghua

    2014-08-01

    The interaction mechanisms of catalase (CAT) with pesticides (including organophosphates: disulfoton, isofenphos-methyl, malathion, isocarbophos, dimethoate, dipterex, methamidophos and acephate; carbamates: carbaryl and methomyl; pyrethroids: fenvalerate and deltamethrin) were first investigated by flow injection (FI) chemiluminescence (CL) analysis and molecular docking. By homemade FI-CL model of lg[(I0-I)/I]=lgK+nlg[D], it was found that the binding processes of pesticides to CAT were spontaneous with the apparent binding constants K of 10(3)-10(5) L mol(-1) and the numbers of binding sites about 1.0. The binding abilities of pesticides to CAT followed the order: fenvalerate>deltamethrin>disulfoton>isofenphos-methyl>carbaryl>malathion>isocarbophos>dimethoate>dipterex>acephate>methomyl>methamidophos, which was generally similar to the order of determination sensitivity of pesticides. The thermodynamic parameters revealed that CAT bound with hydrophobic pesticides by hydrophobic interaction force, and with hydrophilic pesticides by hydrogen bond and van der Waals force. The pesticides to CAT molecular docking study showed that pesticides could enter into the cavity locating among the four subdomains of CAT, giving the specific amino acid residues and hydrogen bonds involved in CAT-pesticides interaction. It was also found that the lgK values of pesticides to CAT increased regularly with increasing lgP, Mr, MR and MV, suggesting that the hydrophobicity and steric property of pesticide played essential roles in its binding to CAT.

  17. An Inhibitor of Catalase Induced by Cold in Chilling-Sensitive Plants

    PubMed Central

    Patterson, Brian D.; Payne, Linda A.; Chen, Yi-Zhu; Graham, Douglas

    1984-01-01

    An inhibitor of catalase accumulated when leaves of chilling-sensitive species were stored in the dark at 0°C. The inhibitor could be removed from crude extracts by passing them through a column of Sephadex G-25. After this treatment, the catalase activity of extracts of chilled tissues was found to be equal to that of extracts from unchilled leaves. When chilled tissues were incubated at 20°C, the inhibitor of catalase was lost, unless the tissues had been irreversibly damaged. It specifically inhibited plant catalase, and had no effect on mammalian catalase, plant malic dehydrogenase, or plant superoxide dismutase. Despite the presence of catalase inhibitor in extracts of chilled plants, no increase in the level of H2O2 in chilled tissues was found, suggesting either that the inhibitor is compartmentalized and not in contact with catalase in vivo, or that the level of H2O2 is controlled by means other than through catalase activity. Plant tissues normally contain H2O2 which is destroyed by catalase when they are damaged. After chilling, H2O2 leaking from already injured cells would not be so readily removed by the inhibited catalase, and could contribute to further injury by acting as a source of free radical oxidants. PMID:16663941

  18. Progesterone Accelerates the Completion of Sperm Capacitation and Activates CatSper Channel in Spermatozoa from the Rhesus Macaque1

    PubMed Central

    Sumigama, Shiho; Mansell, Steven; Miller, Melissa; Lishko, Polina V.; Cherr, Gary N.; Meyers, Stuart A.; Tollner, Theodore

    2015-01-01

    During transit through the female reproductive tract, mammalian spermatozoa are exposed to increasing concentrations of progesterone (P4) released by the cumulus oophorus. P4 triggers massive calcium influx into human sperm through activation of the sperm-specific calcium channel CatSper. These properties of human spermatozoa are thought to be unique since CatSper is not progesterone sensitive in rodent sperm. Here, by performing patch clamp recording from spermatozoa from rhesus macaque for the first time, we report that they express P4-sensitive CatSper channel identically to human sperm and react to P4 by inducing responsiveness to zona pellucida, unlike human sperm, which respond directly to P4. We have also determined the physiologic levels of P4 capable of inducing capacitation-associated changes in macaque sperm. Progesterone (1 μM) induced up to a 3-fold increase in the percentage of sperm undergoing the zona pellucida-induced acrosome reaction with the lowest threshold as low as 10 nM of P4. Submicromolar levels of P4 induced a dose-dependent increase in curvilinear velocity and lateral head displacement, while sperm protein tyrosine phosphorylation was not altered. Macaque spermatozoa exposed to 10 μM of P4 developed fully hyperactivated motility. Similar to human sperm, on approaching cumulus mass and binding to zona pellucida, macaque spermatozoa display hyperactivation and undergo an acrosome reaction that coincides with the rise in the sperm intracellular calcium. Taken together, these data indicate that P4 accelerates the completion of capacitation and provides evidence of spermatozoa “priming” as they move into a gradient of progesterone in search for the oocyte. PMID:26490839

  19. Progesterone Accelerates the Completion of Sperm Capacitation and Activates CatSper Channel in Spermatozoa from the Rhesus Macaque.

    PubMed

    Sumigama, Shiho; Mansell, Steven; Miller, Melissa; Lishko, Polina V; Cherr, Gary N; Meyers, Stuart A; Tollner, Theodore

    2015-12-01

    During transit through the female reproductive tract, mammalian spermatozoa are exposed to increasing concentrations of progesterone (P4) released by the cumulus oophorus. P4 triggers massive calcium influx into human sperm through activation of the sperm-specific calcium channel CatSper. These properties of human spermatozoa are thought to be unique since CatSper is not progesterone sensitive in rodent sperm. Here, by performing patch clamp recording from spermatozoa from rhesus macaque for the first time, we report that they express P4-sensitive CatSper channel identically to human sperm and react to P4 by inducing responsiveness to zona pellucida, unlike human sperm, which respond directly to P4. We have also determined the physiologic levels of P4 capable of inducing capacitation-associated changes in macaque sperm. Progesterone (1 μM) induced up to a 3-fold increase in the percentage of sperm undergoing the zona pellucida-induced acrosome reaction with the lowest threshold as low as 10 nM of P4. Submicromolar levels of P4 induced a dose-dependent increase in curvilinear velocity and lateral head displacement, while sperm protein tyrosine phosphorylation was not altered. Macaque spermatozoa exposed to 10 μM of P4 developed fully hyperactivated motility. Similar to human sperm, on approaching cumulus mass and binding to zona pellucida, macaque spermatozoa display hyperactivation and undergo an acrosome reaction that coincides with the rise in the sperm intracellular calcium. Taken together, these data indicate that P4 accelerates the completion of capacitation and provides evidence of spermatozoa "priming" as they move into a gradient of progesterone in search for the oocyte.

  20. Roles of Catalase and Trehalose in the Protection from Hydrogen Peroxide Toxicity in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed

    Nishimoto, Takuto; Watanabe, Takeru; Furuta, Masakazu; Kataoka, Michihiko; Kishida, Masao

    2016-01-01

    The roles of catalase and trehalose in Saccharomyces cerevisiae subject to hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) treatment were examined by measuring the catalase activity and intracellular trehalose levels in mutants lacking catalase or trehalose synthetase. Intracellular trehalose was elevated but the survival rate after H2O2 treatment remained low in mutants with deletion of the Catalase T gene. On the other hand, deletion of the trehalose synthetase gene increased the catalase activity in mutated yeast to levels higher than those in the wild-type strain, and these mutants exhibited some degree of tolerance to H2O2 treatment. These results suggest that Catalase T is critical in the yeast response to oxidative damage caused by H2O2 treatment, but trehalose also plays a role in protection against H2O2 treatment.

  1. Extracellular localization of catalase is associated with the transformed state of malignant cells.

    PubMed

    Böhm, Britta; Heinzelmann, Sonja; Motz, Manfred; Bauer, Georg

    2015-12-01

    Oncogenic transformation is dependent on activated membrane-associated NADPH oxidase (NOX). However, the resultant extracellular superoxide anions are also driving the NO/peroxynitrite and the HOCl pathway, which eliminates NOX-expressing transformed cells through selective apoptosis induction. Tumor progression is dependent on dominant interference with intercellular apoptosis-inducing ROS signaling through membrane-associated catalase, which decomposes H2O2 and peroxynitrite and oxidizes NO. Particularly, the decomposition of extracellular peroxynitrite strictly requires membrane-associated catalase. We utilized small interfering RNA (siRNA)-mediated knockdown of catalase and neutralizing antibodies directed against the enzyme in combination with challenging H2O2 or peroxynitrite to determine activity and localization of catalase in cells from three distinct steps of multistage oncogenesis. Nontransformed cells did not generate extracellular superoxide anions and only showed intracellular catalase activity. Transformed cells showed superoxide anion-dependent intercellular apoptosis-inducing ROS signaling in the presence of suboptimal catalase activity in their membrane. Tumor cells exhibited tight control of intercellular apoptosis-inducing ROS signaling through a high local concentration of membrane-associated catalase. These data demonstrate that translocation of catalase to the outside of the cell membrane is already associated with the transformation step. A strong local increase in the concentration of membrane-associated catalase is achieved during tumor progression and is controlled by tumor cell-derived H2O2 and by transglutaminase.

  2. Effects of changes in chemoreceptor activity on extracellular K+ and Ca2+ activities in the cat carotid body.

    PubMed

    O'Regan, R G; Acker, H

    1988-04-05

    In anaesthetized, paralysed and artificially ventilated cats triple-barrelled ion-selective microelectrodes (ISMs) were inserted into the right carotid body in order to measure extracellular activities of K+ ([K+]o) and Ca2+ ([Ca2+]o) simultaneously. In 3 experiments a method involving iron deposition located the tips of the ISMs in the cellular islands of the organ. A thin cannula inserted into the right carotid artery (i.c.) via the lingual artery was used to infuse Ringer-Locke solutions (0.1-0.5 ml/min) containing either sodium cyanide (NaCN), acetylcholine (ACh) or dopamine (DA). Analysis of the effects of administration of NaCN (20-100 micrograms/min i.c.) showed that during this procedure [K+]o increased and [Ca2+]o decreased by mean values (+/- S.D.) of 0.99 +/- 0.82 and 0.22 +/- 0.06 mM respectively. During administration of ACh (20-50 micrograms/min i.c.) [K+]o increased and [Ca2+]o decreased respectively by mean values (+/- S.D.) of 3.18 +/- 3.0 and 0.31 +/- 0.14 mM. Decreases in [K+]o and [Ca2+]o by mean values (+/- S.D.) of 1.53 +/- 1.64 and 0.34 +/- 0.33 mM respectively were associated with administration of DA (20-50 micrograms/min i.c.). The predominant influences exerted by NaCN and ACh on chemoreceptor activity were excitatory whereas administration of DA caused either inhibition, excitation or a combination of these two effects. Stimulation of the sympathetic supply to the carotid body was associated with either increases, decreases or no reaction of chemosensory activity, [K+]o and [Ca2+]o. The changes in [K+]o associated with the various procedures may reflect the state of polarization within the chemoreceptor complex. Decreases in [Ca2+]o usually accompanied the performance of all procedures and may have resulted from an increased influx of this ion from the interstitial fluids into the cells for the purpose of provoking neurotransmitter release. However, the time course of the changes in [K+]o and [Ca2+]o were considerably slower in onset and

  3. Purification and characterization of catalase from chard (Beta vulgaris var. cicla).

    PubMed

    Dinçer, A; Aydemir, T

    2001-01-01

    Catalase is a major primary antioxidant defence component that primarily catalyses the decomposition of H(2) O(2) to H(2) O. Here we report the purification and characterization of catalase from chard (Beta vulgaris var. cicla). Following a procedure that involved chloroform treatment, ammonium sulfate precipitation and three chromatographic steps (CM-cellulose, Sephadex G-25, and Sephadex G-200), catalase was purified about 250-fold to a final specific activity of 56947 U/mg of protein. The molecular weight of the purified catalase and its subunit were determined to be 235 000 and 58 500 daltons, indicating that the chard catalase is a tetramer. The absorption spectra showed a soret peak at 406 nm, and there was slightly reduction by dithionite. The ratio of absorption at 406 and 275 nanometers was 1.5, the value being similar to that obtained for catalase from other plant sources. In the catalytic reaction, the apparent Km value for chard catalase was 50 mM. The purified protein has a broad pH optimum for catalase activity between 6.0 and 8.0. The enzyme had an optimum reaction temperature at 30 degrees C. Heme catalase inhibitors, such as azide and cyanide, inhibited the enzyme activity markedly and the enzyme was also inactivated by ?-mercaptoethanol, dithiothreitol and iodoacetamide.

  4. Hydrogen sulfide activates the carotid body chemoreceptors in cat, rabbit and rat ex vivo preparations.

    PubMed

    Jiao, Yingfu; Li, Qian; Sun, Biying; Zhang, Guohua; Rong, Weifang

    2015-03-01

    We and others previously reported experimental evidence suggesting an important role for hydrogen sulfide (H2S) in oxygen sensing in murine carotid body chemoreceptors. More recent data implicated abnormal H2S-mediated chemoreceptor signaling in pathological conditions such as chronic heart failure and hypertension. However, the idea of H2S as a mediator of oxygen-sensing in chemoreceptors has been challenged. In particular, it was shown that exogenous H2S inhibited the release of neurotransmitters (ACh and ATP) from the cat carotid body, raising the possibility that there exists significant species difference in H2S-mediated signaling in chemoreceptors. This study was designed specifically to determine the effect of H2S on chemoreceptors in different species. We conducted multiunit extracellular recordings of the sinus nerve in the ex vivo carotid body preparation taken from the rat, the cat and the rabbit. As observed in the mouse carotid body, H2S donors (NaHS or Na2S) evoked qualitatively similar excitatory responses of the afferent sinus nerves of the species studied here. The excitatory effects of the H2S donors were concentration-dependent and reversible. The sinus nerve responses to H2S donors were prevented by blockade of the transmission between type I cells and the afferent terminals, as was the response to hypoxia. These results demonstrate that exogenous H2S exerts qualitatively similar excitatory effects on chemoreceptor afferents of different species. The role of endogenous H2S-mediated signaling in carotid body function in different species awaits further investigation.

  5. Comperative study of catalase immobilization on chitosan, magnetic chitosan and chitosan-clay composite beads.

    PubMed

    Başak, Esra; Aydemir, Tülin; Dinçer, Ayşe; Becerik, Seda Çınar

    2013-12-01

    Catalase was immobilized on chitosan and modified chitosan. Studies were carried out on free-immobilized catalase concerning the determination of optimum temperature, pH, thermal, storage stability, reusability, and kinetic parameters. Optimum temperature and pH for free catalase and catalase immobilized were found as 35°C and 7.0, respectively. After 100 times of repeated tests, the immobilized catalases on chitosan-clay and magnetic chitosan maintain over 50% and 60% of the original activity, respectively. The ease of catalase immobilization on low-cost matrices and good stability upon immobilization in the present study make it a suitable product for further use in the food industry.

  6. Exogenous Melatonin Suppresses Dark-Induced Leaf Senescence by Activating the Superoxide Dismutase-Catalase Antioxidant Pathway and Down-Regulating Chlorophyll Degradation in Excised Leaves of Perennial Ryegrass (Lolium perenne L.)

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Jing; Li, Huibin; Xu, Bin; Li, Jing; Huang, Bingru

    2016-01-01

    Leaf senescence is a typical symptom in plants exposed to dark and may be regulated by plant growth regulators. The objective of this study was to determine whether exogenous application of melatonin (N-acetyl-5-methoxytryptamine) suppresses dark-induced leaf senescence and the effects of melatonin on reactive oxygen species (ROS) scavenging system and chlorophyll degradation pathway in perennial grass species. Mature perennial ryegrass (Lolium perenne L. cv. ‘Pinnacle’) leaves were excised and incubated in 3 mM 2-(N-morpholino) ethanesulfonic buffer (pH 5.8) supplemented with melatonin or water (control) and exposed to dark treatment for 8 days. Leaves treated with melatonin maintained significantly higher endogenous melatonin level, chlorophyll content, photochemical efficiency, and cell membrane stability expressed by lower electrolyte leakage and malondialdehyde (MDA) content compared to the control. Exogenous melatonin treatment also reduced the transcript level of chlorophyll degradation-associated genes and senescence marker genes (LpSAG12.1, Lph36, and Lpl69) during the dark treatment. The endogenous O2- production rate and H2O2 content were significantly lower in these excised leaves treated with melatonin compared to the water control. Exogenous melatonin treatment caused increases in enzymatic activity and transcript levels of superoxide dismutase and catalase but had no significant effects on ascorbate peroxidase, glutathione reductase, dehydroascorbate reductase, and monohydroascorbate reductase. The content of non-enzymatic antioxidants, such as ascorbate and dehydroascorbate, were decreased by melatonin treatment, while the content of glutathione and oxidized glutathione was not affected by melatonin. These results suggest that the suppression of dark-induced leaf senescence by exogenous melatonin may be associated with its roles in regulating ROS scavenging through activating the superoxide dismutase-catalase enzymatic antioxidant pathway and

  7. Polymer-anchored peroxo compounds of vanadium(V) and molybdenum(VI): synthesis, stability, and their activities with alkaline phosphatase and catalase.

    PubMed

    Boruah, Jeena Jyoti; Kalita, Diganta; Das, Siva Prasad; Paul, Saurav; Islam, Nashreen S

    2011-09-05

    We generated a series of new polymer-bound peroxo complexes of vanadium(V) and molybdenum(VI) of the type [VO(O(2))(2)(sulfonate)]-PSS [PSS = poly(sodium 4-styrene sulfonate)] (PV(3)), [V(2)O(2)(O(2))(4)(carboxylate)VO(O(2))(2)(sulfonate)]-PSSM [PSSM = poly(sodium styrene sulfonate-co-maleate)] (PV(4)), [Mo(2)O(2)(O(2))(4)(carboxylate)]-PA [PA = poly(sodium acrylate)] (PMo(1)), [MoO(O(2))(2)(carboxylate)]-PMA [PMA = poly(sodium methacrylate)] (PMo(2)), and [MoO(O(2))(2)(amide)]-PAm [PAm = poly(acrylamide)] (PMo(3)) by reacting V(2)O(5) (for PV(3) and PV(4)) or H(2)MoO(4) (for PMo(1), PMo(2), and PMo(3)) with H(2)O(2) and the respective water-soluble macromolecular ligand at pH 5-6. The compounds were characterized by elemental analysis (CHN and energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy), spectral studies (UV-vis, IR, (13)C NMR, (51)V NMR, and (95) Mo NMR), thermal (TGA) as well as scanning electron micrographs (SEM), and EDX analysis. It has been demonstrated that compounds retain their structural integrity in solutions of a wide range of pH values and are approximately 100 times weaker as substrate to the enzyme catalase relative to H(2)O(2), its natural substrate. The effect of the title compounds, along with previously reported compounds [V(2)O(2)(O(2))(4)(carboxylate)]-PA (PV(1)) and [VO(O(2))(2)(carboxylate)]-PMA (PV(2)) on rabbit intestine alkaline phosphatase (ALP) has been investigated and compared with the effect induced by the free diperoxometallates viz. Na[VO(O(2))(2)(H(2)O)] (DPV), [MoO(O(2))(2)(glycine)(H(2)O)] (DMo(1)), and [MoO(O(2))(2)(asparagine)(H(2)O)] (DMo(2)). It has been observed that although all the compounds tested are potent inhibitors of the enzyme, the polymer-bound and neat complexes act via distinct mechanisms. Each of the macromolecular compounds is a classical noncompetitive inhibitor of ALP. In contrast, the action of neat pV and heteroligand pMo compounds on the enzyme function is consistent with a mixed type of inhibition.

  8. B-cell activation in cats with feline infectious peritonitis (FIP) by FIP-virus-induced B-cell differentiation/survival factors.

    PubMed

    Takano, Tomomi; Azuma, Natsuko; Hashida, Yoshikiyo; Satoh, Ryoichi; Hohdatsu, Tsutomu

    2009-01-01

    It has been suggested that antibody overproduction plays a role in the pathogenesis of feline infectious peritonitis (FIP). However, only a few studies on the B-cell activation mechanism after FIP virus (FIPV) infection have been reported. The present study shows that: (1) the ratio of peripheral blood sIg(+) CD21(-) B-cells was higher in cats with FIP than in SPF cats, (2) the albumin-to-globulin ratio has negative correlation with the ratio of peripheral blood sIg(+) CD21(-) B-cell, (3) cells strongly expressing mRNA of the plasma cell master gene, B-lymphocyte-induced maturation protein 1 (Blimp-1), were increased in peripheral blood in cats with FIP, (4) mRNA expression of B-cell differentiation/survival factors, IL-6, CD40 ligand, and B-cell-activating factor belonging to the tumor necrosis factor family (BAFF), was enhanced in macrophages in cats with FIP, and (5) mRNAs of these B-cell differentiation/survival factors were overexpressed in antibody-dependent enhancement (ADE)-induced macrophages. These data suggest that virus-infected macrophages overproduce B-cell differentiation/survival factors, and these factors act on B-cells and promote B-cell differentiation into plasma cells in FIPV-infected cats.

  9. Cat scratch disease (image)

    MedlinePlus

    Cat scratch disease is an infectious illness associated with cat scratches, bites, or exposure to cat saliva, causing chronic swelling of the lymph nodes. Cat scratch disease is possibly the most common cause of chronic ...

  10. Cat and Dog Bites

    MedlinePlus

    ... Prevention and Wellness Staying Healthy Pets and Animals Cat and Dog Bites Cat and Dog Bites Pets and AnimalsPrevention and WellnessStaying Healthy Share Cat and Dog Bites Cat and dog bites are ...

  11. Cutaneous inputs from the back abolish locomotor-like activity and reduce spastic-like activity in the adult cat following complete spinal cord injury.

    PubMed

    Frigon, Alain; Thibaudier, Yann; Johnson, Michael D; Heckman, C J; Hurteau, Marie-France

    2012-06-01

    Spasticity is a condition that can include increased muscle tone, clonus, spasms, and hyperreflexia. In this study, we report the effect of manually stimulating the dorsal lumbosacral skin on spontaneous locomotor-like activity and on a variety of reflex responses in 5 decerebrate chronic spinal cats treated with clonidine. Cats were spinalized 1 month before the terminal experiment. Stretch reflexes were evoked by stretching the left triceps surae muscles. Crossed reflexes were elicited by electrically stimulating the right tibial or superficial peroneal nerves. Wind-up of reflex responses was evoked by electrically stimulating the left tibial or superficial peroneal nerves. We found that pinching the skin of the back abolished spontaneous locomotor-like activity. We also found that back pinch abolished the rhythmic activity observed during reflex testing without eliminating the reflex responses. Some of the rhythmic episodes of activity observed during reflex testing were consistent with clonus with an oscillation frequency greater than 3 Hz. Pinching the skin of the back effectively abolished rhythmic activity occurring spontaneously or evoked during reflex testing, irrespective of oscillation frequency. The results are consistent with the hypothesis that locomotion and clonus are produced by common central pattern-generators. Stimulating the skin of the back could prove helpful in managing undesired rhythmic activity in spinal cord-injured humans.

  12. Rhythmic activity of neurons in the rostral ventrolateral medulla of conscious cats: effect of removal of vestibular inputs

    PubMed Central

    Barman, Susan M.; Sugiyama, Yoichiro; Suzuki, Takeshi; Cotter, Lucy A.; DeStefino, Vincent J.; Reighard, Derek A.; Cass, Stephen P.

    2011-01-01

    Although it is well established that bulbospinal neurons located in the rostral ventrolateral medulla (RVLM) play a pivotal role in regulating sympathetic nerve activity and blood pressure, virtually all neurophysiological studies of this region have been conducted in anesthetized or decerebrate animals. In the present study, we used time- and frequency-domain analyses to characterize the naturally occurring discharges of RVLM neurons in conscious cats. Specifically, we compared their activity to fluctuations in carotid artery blood flow to identify neurons with cardiac-related (CR) activity; we then considered whether neurons with CR activity also had a higher-frequency rhythmic firing pattern. In addition, we ascertained whether the surgical removal of vestibular inputs altered the rhythmic discharge properties of RVLM neurons. Less than 10% of RVLM neurons expressed CR activity, although the likelihood of observing a neuron with CR activity in the RVLM varied between recording sessions, even when tracking occurred in a very limited area and was higher after vestibular inputs were surgically removed. Either a 10-Hz or a 20- to 30-Hz rhythmic discharge pattern coexisted with the CR discharges in some of the RVLM neurons. Additionally, the firing rate of RVLM neurons, including those with CR activity, decreased after vestibular lesions. These findings raise the prospect that RVLM neurons may or may not express rhythmic firing patterns at a particular time due to a variety of influences, including descending projections from higher brain centers and sensory inputs, such as those from the vestibular system. PMID:21734018

  13. Patterns of spatio-temporal correlations in the neural activity of the cat motor cortex during trained forelimb movements.

    PubMed

    Ghosh, Soumya; Putrino, David; Burro, Bianca; Ring, Alexander

    2009-06-01

    In order to study how neurons in the primary motor cortex (MI) are dynamically linked together during skilled movement, we recorded simultaneously from many cortical neurons in cats trained to perform a reaching and retrieval task using their forelimbs. Analysis of task-related spike activity in the MI of the hemisphere contralateral to the reaching forelimb (in identified forelimb or hindlimb representations) recorded through chronically implanted microwires, was followed by pairwise evaluation of temporally correlated activity in these neurons during task performance using shuffle corrected cross-correlograms. Over many months of recording, a variety of task-related modulations of neural activities were observed in individual efferent zones. Positively correlated activity (mainly narrow peaks at zero or short latencies) was seen during task performance frequently between neurons recorded within the forelimb representation of MI, rarely within the hindlimb area of MI, and never between forelimb and hindlimb areas. Correlated activity was frequently observed between neurons with different patterns of task-related activity or preferential activity during different task elements (reaching, feeding, etc.), and located in efferent zones with dissimilar representation as defined by intracortical microstimulation. The observed synchronization of action potentials among selected but functionally varied groups of MI neurons possibly reflects dynamic recruitment of network connections between efferent zones during skilled movement.

  14. Prevention of pulmonary metastasis from subcutaneous tumors by binary system-based sustained delivery of catalase.

    PubMed

    Hyoudou, Kenji; Nishikawa, Makiya; Ikemura, Mai; Kobayashi, Yuki; Mendelsohn, Adam; Miyazaki, Nobuhiko; Tabata, Yasuhiko; Yamashita, Fumiyoshi; Hashida, Mitsuru

    2009-07-20

    Catalase delivery can be effective in inhibiting reactive oxygen species (ROS)-mediated acceleration of tumor metastasis. Our previous studies have demonstrated that increasing the plasma half-life of catalase by pegylation (PEG-catalase) significantly increases its potency of inhibiting experimental pulmonary metastasis in mice. In the present study, a biodegradable gelatin hydrogel formulation was used to further increase the circulation time of PEG-catalase. Implantation of (111)In-PEG-catalase/hydrogel into subcutaneous tissues maintained the radioactivity in plasma for more than 14 days. Then, the effect of the PEG-catalase/hydrogel on spontaneous pulmonary metastasis of tumor cells was evaluated in mice with subcutaneous tumor of B16-BL6/Luc cells, a murine melanoma cell line stably expressing luciferase. Measuring luciferase activity in the lung revealed that the PEG-catalase/hydrogel significantly (P<0.05) inhibited the pulmonary metastasis compared with PEG-catalase solution. These findings indicate that sustaining catalase activity in the blood circulation achieved by the use of pegylation and gelatin hydrogel can reduce the incidence of tumor cell metastasis.

  15. Attenuation of experimental colitis in glutathione peroxidase 1 and catalase double knockout mice through enhancing regulatory T cell function.

    PubMed

    Kim, Hyung-Ran; Lee, Anbok; Choi, Eun-Jeong; Kie, Jeong-Hae; Lim, Woosung; Lee, Hyeon Kook; Moon, Byung-In; Seoh, Ju-Young

    2014-01-01

    Reactive oxygen species (ROS) have been implicated in the progression of inflammatory diseases including inflammatory bowel diseases (IBD). Meanwhile, several studies suggested the protective role of ROS in immune-mediated inflammatory diseases, and it was recently reported that dextran sodium sulfate (DSS)-induced colitis was attenuated in mice with an elevated level of ROS due to deficiency of peroxiredoxin II. Regulatory T cells (Tregs) are critical in the prevention of IBD and Treg function was reported to be closely associated with ROS level, but it has been investigated only in lowered levels of ROS so far. In the present study, in order to clarify the relationship between ROS level and Treg function, and their role in the pathogenesis of IBD, we investigated mice with an elevated level of ROS due to deficiency of both glutathione peroxidase (GPx)-1 and catalase (Cat) for the susceptibility of DSS-induced colitis in association with Treg function. The results showed that DSS-induced colitis was attenuated and Tregs were hyperfunctional in GPx1-/- × Cat-/- mice. In vivo administration of N-acetylcysteine (NAC) aggravated DSS-induced colitis and decreased Treg function to the level comparable to WT mice. Attenuated Th17 cell differentiation from naïve CD4+ cells as well as impaired production of IL-6 and IL-17A by splenocytes upon stimulation suggested anti-inflammatory tendency of GPx1-/- × Cat-/- mice. Suppression of Stat3 activation in association with enhancement of indoleamine 2,3-dioxygenase and FoxP3 expression might be involved in the immunosuppressive mechanism of GPx1-/- × Cat-/- mice. Taken together, it is implied that ROS level is critical in the regulation of Treg function, and IBD may be attenuated in appropriately elevated levels of ROS.

  16. Synthesis, characterization, and reactivity studies of a water-soluble bis(alkoxo)(carboxylato)-bridged diMn(III) complex modeling the active site in catalase.

    PubMed

    Palopoli, Claudia; Duhayon, Carine; Tuchagues, Jean-Pierre; Signorella, Sandra

    2014-12-07

    A new diMn(III) complex, Na[Mn2(5-SO3-salpentO)(μ-OAc)(μ-OMe)(H2O)]·4H2O, where 5-SO3-salpentOH = 1,5-bis(5-sulphonatosalicylidenamino)pentan-3-ol, has been prepared and characterized. ESI-mass spectrometry, paramagnetic (1)H NMR, EPR and UV-visible spectroscopic studies on freshly prepared solutions of the complex in methanol and 9 : 1 methanol-water mixtures showed that the compound retains the triply bridged bis(μ-alkoxo)(μ-acetato)Mn2(3+) core in solution. In the 9 : 1 methanol-water mixture, slow substitution of acetate by water molecules took place, and after one month, the doubly bridged diMn(III) complex, [Mn2(5-SO3-salpentO)(μ-OMe)(H2O)3]·5H2O, formed and could be characterized by X-ray diffraction analysis. In methanolic or aqueous basic media, acetate shifts from a bridging to a terminal coordination mode, affording the highly stable [Mn2(5-SO3-salpentO)(μ-OMe)(OAc)](-) anion. The efficiency of the complex in disproportionating H2O2 depends on the solvent and correlates with the stability of the complex (towards metal dissociation) in each medium: basic buffer > aqueous base > water. The buffer preserves the integrity of the catalyst and the rate of O2 evolution remains essentially constant after successive additions of excess of H2O2. Turnovers as high as 3000 mol H2O2 per mol of catalyst, without significant decomposition and with an efficiency of k(cat)/K(M) = 1028 M(-1) s(-1), were measured for the complex in aqueous buffers of pH 11. Kinetic and spectroscopic results suggest a catalytic cycle that runs between Mn(III)2 and Mn(IV)2 oxidation states, which is consistent with the low redox potential observed for the Mn(III)2/Mn(III)Mn(IV) couple of the catalyst in basic medium.

  17. Synthesis of catalase in Staphylococcus aureus MF-31.

    PubMed Central

    Martin, S E; Chaven, S

    1987-01-01

    During the growth of Staphylococcus aureus MF-31, initial catalase activity dropped to a reduced level at the onset of exponential phase before increasing. When S. aureus was grown at 25, 32, or 37 degrees C, catalase activity was found to decrease by 80 to 90% within 1 h of inoculation. Two catalase-negative mutants and wild-type S. aureus MF-31 cells were exposed to exogenous 20 mM H2O2 for 15 min. For wild-type S. aureus, there was no effect from H2O2 until min 15, at which time a 10% decrease in CFU was observed. Both mutants showed increased sensitivity to the H2O2, with 56 and 71% reductions in the CFU for mutants C3 and C4, respectively, after a 15-min exposure. Cells of mutant and wild-type S. aureus were subjected to sublethal heating at 52 degrees C for 20 min. The lack of catalase activity in the mutants resulted in large decreases in enumeration. PMID:3606102

  18. Catalase C-262T polymorphism and risk of prostate cancer: evidence from meta-analysis.

    PubMed

    Hu, Jieping; Feng, Fupeng; Zhu, Shimiao; Sun, Libin; Li, Gang; Jiang, Ning; Shang, Zhiqun; Niu, Yuanjie

    2015-03-10

    Catalase is an important endogenous antioxidant enzyme that detoxifies hydrogen peroxide to oxygen and water, thus limiting the deleterious effects of reactive oxygen species. Several studies investigated the role of the Catalase (CAT) C-262T gene polymorphism on the risk of prostate cancer (PCa), but get conflicting results. We performed a meta-analysis based on five studies, to determine whether Catalase C-262T polymorphism contributes to the risk of prostate cancer using odds ratios (OR) with 95% confidence intervals (CI). On the whole, our evidence indicates that CAT C-262T polymorphism significantly increases PCa risk in the allele comparison model (OR=1.094, 95% CI=1.015-1.178, P=0.018). In the stratified analysis by ethnicity, the same results are found among Caucasians (allele model, OR=1.090, 95% CI=1.009-1.177, P=0.028, dominant model, OR=1.108, 95% CI=1.023-1.201, P=0.012, recessive model, OR=1.379, 95% CI=1.158-1.641, P=0.000, homozygous model, OR=1.429, 95% CI=1.196-1.707, P=0.000, and heterozygote model, OR=1.224, 95% CI=1.020-1.469, P=0.030). In conclusion, this meta-analysis suggests a positive correlation between Catalase C-262T polymorphism and the development of PCa.

  19. Effects of thalidomide and pentobarbital on neuronal activity in the preoptic area during sleep and wakefulness in the cat.

    PubMed

    Kaitin, K I

    1985-01-01

    To test the hypothesis that sleep produced by thalidomide, unlike that of pentobarbital, is associated with increased neuronal activity in the preoptic area (POA), the spontaneous activity of 96 POA neurons was recorded in chronically prepared cats during alert wakefulness (W), deep slow-wave sleep (SWS), and REM sleep in a drug-free preparation and after administration of thalidomide (4 mg/kg) and pentobarbital (4 or 8 mg/kg). Thalidomide, unlike pentobarbital, at a dose that significantly increased the amount of SWS, failed to depress neuronal activity in the POA compared to drug-free controls. Mean discharge rates during thalidomide treatment were similar to drug-free rates. In contrast, rates during low-dose pentobarbital treatment were significantly less than those of drug-free and thalidomide-treated animals. Rates during high-dose pentobarbital treatment were significantly less than those in all other groups. Thalidomide, compared with the other groups, in addition to increasing the amount of SWS, significantly increased the total amount of REM sleep as well as REM sleep as a percent of total sleep, but did not produce ataxia or behavioral excitement. These results do not confirm the initial hypothesis, but suggest that hypnotic drugs that do not depress neuronal activity in the POA may be devoid of some of the unwanted side effects often associated with the more commonly prescribed hypnotic medications.

  20. Effects of training on neuronal activity and interactions in primary and higher visual cortices in the alert cat.

    PubMed

    Salazar, Rodrigo F; Kayser, Christoph; König, Peter

    2004-02-18

    The effects of behavioral training on early visual representations have been elusive when assessed with firing rates. Learning-induced changes in performance, however, suggest that representations should encompass early cortical stages. Here, we address the question of whether training-induced effects are pertinent to neuronal activity outside the task proper, which is a requirement if subsequent perceptional processes should profit from training. To search for a neuronal signature of training effects beyond firing rates, we measured local field potentials, multiunit and isolated spike activity during passive viewing of previously learned stimulus response associations (S+ and S-) in areas 17/18 and 21a of two alert cats. Evoked potential responses as well as gamma oscillations even during the first 200 msec were found to be stronger for S+ in both areas. Most importantly, the later parts of the response (>200 msec) not only exhibit a highly significant difference in coherent gamma oscillations for S+ and S- both within and across areas, but are also characterized by a pronounced preference in firing rate for S+ in area 21a, whereas primary cortex shows a nonsignificant trend for weaker spike responses. From these results, we conclude that training-induced plasticity occurs in adult visual cortex for behaviorally relevant stimuli by changing primarily the temporal structure of neuronal activity at early stages of cortical processing, whereas later stages of cortical processing express the increased coherence of their input in elevated firing rates.

  1. Catecholamine secretion and adrenal nerve activity in response to movements of normal and inflamed knee joints in cats.

    PubMed Central

    Sato, A; Sato, Y; Schmidt, R F

    1986-01-01

    The effects of articular stimulation on adrenal catecholamine secretion and adrenal sympathetic nerve activity were studied using halothane anaesthetized cats. Various natural passive movements were applied to the normal and inflamed knee joints. Rhythmic flexions and extensions as well as rhythmic inward and outward rotation of normal knee joints within their physiological range of motion did not change nerve activity or the secretion of adrenal catecholamines. Static outward rotation in the normal working range was also ineffective. However, as soon as this static rotation was extended into the noxious range, significant increases in both of these variables were elicited. In the acutely inflamed knee joint, various passive movements produced increases in both adrenal sympathetic and catecholamine secretion. Especially noteworthy was the finding that movements of the inflamed knee joint that were within the normal range of motion produced increases in all variables. Articularly induced increases in adrenal sympathetic nerve activity were diminished by severing various hind-limb somatic afferent nerves and abolished by complete denervation of the knee joint. Additionally, section of the adrenal sympathetic nerves eliminated the catecholamine secretion response. From these data it was concluded that the responses observed in these experiments were reflexes having an afferent limb in hind-limb nerves and an efferent limb in the adrenal sympathetic nerves. A contribution of supraspinal structures was suggested for the reflex responses of sympatho-adrenal medullary function evoked by knee joint stimulations, since spinal transection at the C2 level completely abolished the responses. PMID:3795070

  2. [Transferring the Suaeda salsa glutathione S-transferase and catalase genes enhances low temperature stress resistance in transgenic rice seedlings].

    PubMed

    Zhao, Feng-Yun; Wang, Xiao-Yun; Zhao, Yan-Xiu; Zhang, Hui

    2006-04-01

    The GST (glutathione S-transferase) and GST+CAT1 (catalase 1) of Suaeda salsa were introduced into a low temperature-sensitive rice cultivar (Oryza sativa cv. Zhonghua No.11) by Agrobacterium tumefaciens-mediated transformation under the control of cauliflower mosaic virus (CaMV) 35S promoter, and the transformed calli and plantlets were screened on Murashige and Skoog (1962) medium supplemented with hygromycin 25 microg/mL and cefotaxime 300 microg/mL. The putative primary transformants (T(0) generation) were acclimatized at 26 degrees C /22 degrees C in a greenhouse for 7 d, and then transplanted to the field, where they grew up to maturity under outdoor conditions. 25 and 14 independent transgenic lines of T(1) generation carrying the GST and GST+CAT1 genes, respectively, were identified by PCR amplification. Transgene expression was monitored by RNA-blot hybridization using total RNA samples from leaf tissues. To investigate whether expressing the Suaeda salsa GST and GST+CAT1 in transgenic rice increased low temperature stress tolerance, the T(4) 14-day-old transgenic and non-transgenic rice seedlings were transferred to a low temperature (day 7 degrees C/night 4 degrees C) growth chamber for 3-6 d. The experimental data showed that expressing the Suaeda salsa GST and GST+CAT1 enhanced low temperature stress resistance in transgenic rice seedlings. When treated with low temperature, both GST and CAT activity increased in the transformants with the time of temperature treatment. These transgenic rice plant seedlings exhibited a higher level of photosynthetic capacity than those of the non-transgenic control seedlings under low temperature treatment. Whereas, there were lower H(2)O(2) and MDA (malondialdehyde) content, and relative electrolyte leakage through the plasma membrane was also lower in transgenic rice seedlings than in the parent line under low temperature condition. The results also indicated that GST+CAT1 co-expression conferred greater level of low

  3. Inhibition of catalase by tea catechins in free and cellular state: a biophysical approach.

    PubMed

    Pal, Sandip; Dey, Subrata Kumar; Saha, Chabita

    2014-01-01

    Tea flavonoids bind to variety of enzymes and inhibit their activities. In the present study, binding and inhibition of catalase activity by catechins with respect to their structure-affinity relationship has been elucidated. Fluorimetrically determined binding constants for (-)-epigallocatechin gallate (EGCG) and (-)-epicatechin gallate (ECG) with catalase were observed to be 2.27×106 M(-1) and 1.66×106 M(-1), respectively. Thermodynamic parameters evidence exothermic and spontaneous interaction between catechins and catalase. Major forces of interaction are suggested to be through hydrogen bonding along with electrostatic contributions and conformational changes. Distinct loss of α-helical structure of catalase by interaction with EGCG was captured in circular dichroism (CD) spectra. Gallated catechins demonstrated higher binding constants and inhibition efficacy than non-gallated catechins. EGCG exhibited maximum inhibition of pure catalase. It also inhibited cellular catalase in K562 cancer cells with significant increase in cellular ROS and suppression of cell viability (IC50 54.5 µM). These results decipher the molecular mechanism by which tea catechins interact with catalase and highlight the potential of gallated catechin like EGCG as an anticancer drug. EGCG may have other non-specific targets in the cell, but its anticancer property is mainly defined by ROS accumulation due to catalase inhibition.

  4. Covalent Immobilization of Catalase onto Regenerated Silk Fibroins via Tyrosinase-Catalyzed Cross-Linking.

    PubMed

    Wang, Ping; Qi, Chenglong; Yu, Yuanyuan; Yuan, Jiugang; Cui, Li; Tang, Gengtie; Wang, Qiang; Fan, Xuerong

    2015-09-01

    Regenerated silk fibroins could be used as medical scaffolds and carrier materials for enzyme immobilization. In the present work, tyrosinase enzyme was used for enzymatic oxidation of silk fibroins, followed by immobilization of catalase onto the fibroin surfaces through physical adsorption and covalent cross-linking as well. Spectrophotometry, SDS-PAGE, and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR) were used to examine the efficiency of enzymatic oxidation and catalase immobilization, respectively. The results indicate that tyrosine residues in silk fibroins could be oxidized and converted to the active o-quinones. Incubating silk fibroins with catalase and tyrosinase led to a noticeable change of molecular weight distribution, indicating the occurrence of the cross-links between silk fibroins and catalase molecules. Two different pathways were proposed for the catalase immobilizations, and the method based on grafting of catalase onto the freeze-dried fibroin membrane is more acceptable. The residual enzyme activity for the immobilized catalase exhibited higher than that of the control after repeated washing cycles. Meanwhile, the thermal stability and alkali resistance were also slightly improved as compared to free catalase. The mechanisms of enzymatic immobilization are also concerned.

  5. Region-specific network plasticity in simulated and living cortical networks: comparison of the center of activity trajectory (CAT) with other statistics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chao, Zenas C.; Bakkum, Douglas J.; Potter, Steve M.

    2007-09-01

    Electrically interfaced cortical networks cultured in vitro can be used as a model for studying the network mechanisms of learning and memory. Lasting changes in functional connectivity have been difficult to detect with extracellular multi-electrode arrays using standard firing rate statistics. We used both simulated and living networks to compare the ability of various statistics to quantify functional plasticity at the network level. Using a simulated integrate-and-fire neural network, we compared five established statistical methods to one of our own design, called center of activity trajectory (CAT). CAT, which depicts dynamics of the location-weighted average of spatiotemporal patterns of action potentials across the physical space of the neuronal circuitry, was the most sensitive statistic for detecting tetanus-induced plasticity in both simulated and living networks. By reducing the dimensionality of multi-unit data while still including spatial information, CAT allows efficient real-time computation of spatiotemporal activity patterns. Thus, CAT will be useful for studies in vivo or in vitro in which the locations of recording sites on multi-electrode probes are important.

  6. Catalase inhibits ionizing radiation-induced apoptosis in hematopoietic stem and progenitor cells.

    PubMed

    Xiao, Xia; Luo, Hongmei; Vanek, Kenneth N; LaRue, Amanda C; Schulte, Bradley A; Wang, Gavin Y

    2015-06-01

    Hematologic toxicity is a major cause of mortality in radiation emergency scenarios and a primary side effect concern in patients undergoing chemo-radiotherapy. Therefore, there is a critical need for the development of novel and more effective approaches to manage this side effect. Catalase is a potent antioxidant enzyme that coverts hydrogen peroxide into hydrogen and water. In this study, we evaluated the efficacy of catalase as a protectant against ionizing radiation (IR)-induced toxicity in hematopoietic stem and progenitor cells (HSPCs). The results revealed that catalase treatment markedly inhibits IR-induced apoptosis in murine hematopoietic stem cells and hematopoietic progenitor cells. Subsequent colony-forming cell and cobble-stone area-forming cell assays showed that catalase-treated HSPCs can not only survive irradiation-induced apoptosis but also have higher clonogenic capacity, compared with vehicle-treated cells. Moreover, transplantation of catalase-treated irradiated HSPCs results in high levels of multi-lineage and long-term engraftments, whereas vehicle-treated irradiated HSPCs exhibit very limited hematopoiesis reconstituting capacity. Mechanistically, catalase treatment attenuates IR-induced DNA double-strand breaks and inhibits reactive oxygen species. Unexpectedly, we found that the radioprotective effect of catalase is associated with activation of the signal transducer and activator of transcription 3 (STAT3) signaling pathway and pharmacological inhibition of STAT3 abolishes the protective activity of catalase, suggesting that catalase may protect HSPCs against IR-induced toxicity via promoting STAT3 activation. Collectively, these results demonstrate a previously unrecognized mechanism by which catalase inhibits IR-induced DNA damage and apoptosis in HSPCs.

  7. Purification and some kinetic properties of catalase from parsley (Petroselinum hortense Hoffm., Apiaceae) leaves.

    PubMed

    Oztürk, Lokman; Bülbül, Metin; Elmastas, Mahfuz; Ciftçi, Mehmet

    2007-01-01

    In this study, catalase (CAT: EC 1.11.1.6) was purified from parsley (Petroselinum hortense) leaves; analysis of the kinetic behavior and some properties of the enzyme were investigated. The purification consisted of three steps, including preparation of homogenate, ammonium sulfate fractionation, and fractionation by DEAE-Sephadex A50 ion exchange chromatography. The enzyme was obtained with a yield of 9.5% and had a specific activity of 1126 U (mg proteins)(-1). The overall purification was about 5.83-fold. A temperature of 4 degrees C was maintained during the purification process. Enzyme activity was spectrophotometrically measured at 240 nm. In order to control the purification of the enzyme, SDS-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis was carried out in 4% and 10% acryl amide for stacking and running gel, respectively. SDS-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis showed a single band for the enzyme. The molecular weight was found to be 183.29 kDa by Sephadex G-200 gel filtration chromatography. The stable pH, optimum pH, and ionic strength were determined for phosphate and Tris-HCl buffer systems. In addition, K(M) and V(max) values for H(2)O(2), at optimum pH and 25 degrees C, were determined by means of Lineweaver-Burk plots.

  8. Study of catalase adsorption on two mixed-mode ligands and the mechanism involved therein.

    PubMed

    Shiva Ranjini, S; Vijayalakshmi, M A

    2012-11-01

    Mixed-mode chromatography sorbents n-hexylamine HyperCel™ (HEA) and phenylpropylamine HyperCel™ (PPA) were evaluated for the study of adsorption of catalase from two different sources. Various parameters such as buffer composition, ionic strength and pH were investigated to study the mechanism of interaction of commercially available pre-purified catalase from Bovine liver, purified catalase from black gram (Vigna mungo) and crude extract of black gram containing catalase with these mixed-mode ligands. A simple and economical screening protocol for identifying optimal buffer conditions for adsorption and desorption of catalase was established with micro volumes of the sorbent in batch mode. With HEA HyperCel, it was observed that pre-purified catalase from both bovine liver and black gram was completely retained at pH 7.0, irrespective of the presence or absence of NaCl in the adsorption buffer, whereas the catalase from crude extract of black gram was completely retained only in the presence of 0.2 M salt in the adsorption buffer. The elution of catalase from both the sources was accomplished by lowering the pH to 4.5 in absence of salt. In case of PPA HyperCel, catalase from both the sources was very strongly adsorbed under different buffer conditions studied, and elution did not yield a significant catalase activity. From the screening experiments, it could be concluded that the interaction of catalase with HEA HyperCel could be dominated by hydrophobic forces with minor contributions from ionic interaction and with PPA HyperCel, it could be a combination of different non-covalent interactions acting on different loci on the surface of the protein.

  9. Activation of spinal locomotor circuits in the decerebrated cat by spinal epidural and/or intraspinal electrical stimulation.

    PubMed

    Lavrov, Igor; Musienko, Pavel E; Selionov, Victor A; Zdunowski, Sharon; Roy, Roland R; Edgerton, V Reggie; Gerasimenko, Yury

    2015-03-10

    The present study was designed to further compare the stepping-like movements generated via epidural (ES) and/or intraspinal (IS) stimulation. We examined the ability to generate stepping-like movements in response to ES and/or IS of spinal lumbar segments L1-L7 in decerebrate cats. ES (5-10 Hz) of the dorsal surface of the spinal cord at L3-L7 induced hindlimb stepping-like movements on a moving treadmill belt, but with no rhythmic activity in the forelimbs. IS (60 Hz) of the dorsolateral funiculus at L1-L3 (depth of 0.5-1.0mm from the dorsal surface of the spinal cord) induced quadrupedal stepping-like movements. Forelimb movements appeared first, followed by stepping-like movements in the hindlimbs. ES and IS simultaneously enhanced the rhythmic performance of the hindlimbs more robustly than ES or IS alone. The differences in the stimulation parameters, site of stimulation, and motor outputs observed during ES vs. IS suggest that different neural mechanisms were activated to induce stepping-like movements. The effects of ES may be mediated more via dorsal structures in the lumbosacral region of the spinal cord, whereas the effects of IS may be mediated via more ventral propriospinal networks and/or brainstem locomotor areas. Furthermore, the more effective facilitation of the motor output during simultaneous ES and IS may reflect some convergence of pathways on the same interneuronal populations involved in the regulation of locomotion.

  10. Soluble epoxide hydrolase contamination of specific catalase preparations inhibits epoxyeicosatrienoic acid vasodilation of rat renal arterioles

    PubMed Central

    Olson, Lauren; Harder, Adam; Isbell, Marilyn; Imig, John D.; Gutterman, David D.; Falck, J. R.; Campbell, William B.

    2011-01-01

    Cytochrome P-450 metabolites of arachidonic acid, the epoxyeicosatrienoic acids (EETs) and hydrogen peroxide (H2O2), are important signaling molecules in the kidney. In renal arteries, EETs cause vasodilation whereas H2O2 causes vasoconstriction. To determine the physiological contribution of H2O2, catalase is used to inactivate H2O2. However, the consequence of catalase action on EET vascular activity has not been determined. In rat renal afferent arterioles, 14,15-EET caused concentration-related dilations that were inhibited by Sigma bovine liver (SBL) catalase (1,000 U/ml) but not Calbiochem bovine liver (CBL) catalase (1,000 U/ml). SBL catalase inhibition was reversed by the soluble epoxide hydrolase (sEH) inhibitor tAUCB (1 μM). In 14,15-EET incubations, SBL catalase caused a concentration-related increase in a polar metabolite. Using mass spectrometry, the metabolite was identified as 14,15-dihydroxyeicosatrienoic acid (14,15-DHET), the inactive sEH metabolite. 14,15-EET hydrolysis was not altered by the catalase inhibitor 3-amino-1,2,4-triazole (3-ATZ; 10–50 mM), but was abolished by the sEH inhibitor BIRD-0826 (1–10 μM). SBL catalase EET hydrolysis showed a regioisomer preference with greatest hydrolysis of 14,15-EET followed by 11,12-, 8,9- and 5,6-EET (Vmax = 0.54 ± 0.07, 0.23 ± 0.06, 0.18 ± 0.01 and 0.08 ± 0.02 ng DHET·U catalase−1·min−1, respectively). Of five different catalase preparations assayed, EET hydrolysis was observed with two Sigma liver catalases. These preparations had low specific catalase activity and positive sEH expression. Mass spectrometric analysis of the SBL catalase identified peptide fragments matching bovine sEH. Collectively, these data indicate that catalase does not affect EET-mediated dilation of renal arterioles. However, some commercial catalase preparations are contaminated with sEH, and these contaminated preparations diminish the biological activity of H2O2 and EETs. PMID:21753077

  11. The kinetic properties producing the perfunctory pH profiles of catalase-peroxidases.

    PubMed

    Moore, Robert L; Powell, Luke J; Goodwin, Douglas C

    2008-06-01

    Many structure-function relationship studies performed on the catalase-peroxidase enzymes are based on limited kinetic data. To provide a more substantive understanding of catalase-peroxidase function, we undertook a more exhaustive evaluation of catalase-peroxidase catalysis as a function of pH. Kinetic parameters across a broad pH range for the catalase and peroxidase activities of E. coli catalase peroxidase (KatG) were obtained, including the separate analysis of the oxidizing and reducing substrates of the peroxidase catalytic cycle. This investigation identified ABTS-dependent inhibition of peroxidase activity, particularly at low pH, unveiling that previously reported pH optima are clearly skewed. We show that turnover and efficiency of peroxidase activity increases with decreasing pH until the protein unfolds. The data also suggest that the catalase pH optimum is more complex than it is often assumed to be. The apparent optimum is in fact the intersection of the optimum for binding (7.00) and the optimum for activity (5.75). We also report the apparent pK(a)s for binding and catalysis of catalase activity as well as approximate values for certain peroxidatic and catalatic steps.

  12. Forchlorfenuron detection based on its inhibitory effect towards catalase immobilized on boron nitride substrate.

    PubMed

    Xu, Qin; Cai, Lijuan; Zhao, Huijie; Tang, Jiaqian; Shen, Yuanyuan; Hu, Xiaoya; Zeng, Haibo

    2015-01-15

    An enzymatic procedure based on a catalase biosensor for the detection of forchlorfenuron (CPPU) has been reported in this work. Catalase was immobilized on boron nitride (BN) sheets dispersed in chitosan by adsorption. The immobilized catalase exhibited direct electron transfer character and excellent electrocatalytic activity towards H2O2 reduction. After introducing CPPU into the H2O2 containing phosphate buffer solution, the catalase-catalyzed H2O2 reduction current decreased. By measuring the current decrease, CPPU can be determined in the range of 0.5-10.0 µM with the detection limit of 0.07 μM. The non-competitive inhibition behavior of CPPU towards catalase was verified by the Lineweaver-Burk plots. Long stability character has been ascribed to this biosensor. Possible use of this biosensor in flow systems is illustrated. The proposed biosensor has been successfully applied to CPPU determination in fruits samples with satisfactory results.

  13. Catalase in testes and epididymidis of wistar rats fed zinc deficient diet.

    PubMed

    Bedwal, S; Prasad, S; Nair, N; Saini, M R; Bedwal, R S

    2009-01-01

    Catalase activities have been evaluated in testes and caput and cauda epididymis of Wistar rats fed on zinc deficient diet for 2 and 4 weeks. The enzyme activity has been measured as chromic acetate formed by heating of dichromate (in acetic acid) in presence of H(2) O(2) with perchromic acid as an unstable intermediate. Observed non-significant increase in catalase activity in testes as well as in caput and cauda epididymis of 2 weeks experiments has been related to low levels of H(2) O(2) produced in two organs whereas significant (P<0.01/0.001) increase in catalase activity in 4-weeks experiments indicate for increased oxidative stress due to phagocytotic activity of Sertoli cells in testes and damaged spermatozoa in epididymis. Thus, zinc deficiency increases catalase activity in testes and epididymis.

  14. Molecular cloning of the feline thymus and activation-regulated chemokine cDNA and its expression in lesional skin of cats with eosinophilic plaque.

    PubMed

    Maeda, Sadatoshi; Okayama, Taro; Ohmori, Keitaro; Masuda, Kenichi; Ohno, Koichi; Tsujimoto, Hajime

    2003-02-01

    Thymus and activation-regulated chemokine (TARC) is a member of CC chemokine and plays an essential role in recruitment of CC chemokine receptor 4 positive Th2 cells to allergic lesion. To investigate the association of TARC in allergic inflammation of cats, a TARC cDNA was cloned from feline thymus by RT-PCR with 3' rapid amplification of cDNA ends (RACE) method. The feline TARC clone contained a full length open reading frame encoding 99 amino acids which shared 80.8%, 72.5%, 65.6% and 67.8% homology with dog, human, mouse and rat homologues, respectively. Expression of TARC mRNA was detected not only in thymus but also in spleen, lung, lymph node, kidney, small intestine, colon and skin of the normal cat tissues examined. Furthermore, it was found that TARC mRNA was strongly expressed in lesional skin of cats with eosinophilic plaque. The present results demonstrated that TARC might be involved in the pathogenesis of eosinophilic plaque in cats.

  15. Glycolytic enzyme activity is essential for domestic cat (Felis catus) and cheetah (Acinonyx jubatus) sperm motility and viability in a sugar-free medium.

    PubMed

    Terrell, Kimberly A; Wildt, David E; Anthony, Nicola M; Bavister, Barry D; Leibo, S P; Penfold, Linda M; Marker, Laurie L; Crosier, Adrienne E

    2011-06-01

    We have previously reported a lack of glucose uptake in domestic cat and cheetah spermatozoa, despite observing that these cells produce lactate at rates that correlate positively with sperm function. To elucidate the role of glycolysis in felid sperm energy production, we conducted a comparative study in the domestic cat and cheetah, with the hypothesis that sperm motility and viability are maintained in both species in the absence of glycolytic metabolism and are fueled by endogenous substrates. Washed ejaculates were incubated in chemically defined medium in the presence/absence of glucose and pyruvate. A second set of ejaculates was exposed to a chemical inhibitor of either lactate dehydrogenase (sodium oxamate) or glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase (alpha-chlorohydrin). Sperm function (motility and acrosomal integrity) and lactate production were assessed, and a subset of spermatozoa was assayed for intracellular glycogen. In both the cat and cheetah, sperm function was maintained without exogenous substrates and following lactate dehydrogenase inhibition. Lactate production occurred in the absence of exogenous hexoses, but only if pyruvate was present. Intracellular glycogen was not detected in spermatozoa from either species. Unexpectedly, glycolytic inhibition by alpha-chlorohydrin resulted in an immediate decline in sperm motility, particularly in the domestic cat. Collectively, our findings reveal an essential role of the glycolytic pathway in felid spermatozoa that is unrelated to hexose metabolism or lactate formation. Instead, glycolytic enzyme activity could be required for the metabolism of endogenous lipid-derived glycerol, with fatty acid oxidation providing the primary energy source in felid spermatozoa.

  16. Marked dissociation between hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal activation and long-term behavioral effects in rats exposed to immobilization or cat odor.

    PubMed

    Muñoz-Abellán, C; Andero, R; Nadal, R; Armario, A

    2008-09-01

    Exposure of rodents to cats or certain cat odors results in long-term behavioral effects reminiscent of enhanced anxiety that have been considered to model post-traumatic stress disorder. However, other severe stressors such as tail-shock or immobilization in wooden boards (IMO) appear to induce shorter lasting changes in anxiety. In addition, there are controversial results regarding the effects of urine/feces odors. In the present work, we studied in two experiments the relationship between the degree of stress experienced by the animals during exposure to IMO, urine odors or fur odors (as assessed by hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal activation and plasma glucose) and the short- and long-term behavioral consequences. In the first experiment, rats were individually exposed for 15 min to a novel environment (white large cages) containing either clean cat litter (controls) or litter soiled by cats (urine odors). Half of the rats in each condition were left to freely explore the environment whereas the others were subjected to immobilization (IMO) within the cages. Although ACTH, corticosterone and glucose responses to IMO were much stronger than those to the white cages with clean litter or urine odors (which did not differ from each other), no effect of treatments on anxiety-like behavior in the elevated plus-maze (EPM) were found one week later. However, previous IMO exposure did cause sensitization of the ACTH response to the EPM. In the second experiment, the response to white large cages containing either no odor (controls), litter soiled by cats (urine odor) or a cloth impregnated with cat odor (fur odor) was compared. Urine and fur odors elicited similar ACTH and corticosterone responses that were higher than those of controls, but plasma glucose levels were slightly higher in rats exposed to fur odor. When compared to controls, activity was only diminished in the novel cages containing fur odor. Similarly, fur odor-exposed rats, but not those exposed to urine

  17. Cat scratch disease

    MedlinePlus

    ... t scratch and bite. Don't allow a cat to lick your skin, eyes, mouth, or open wounds or scratches. Use flea control measures to lower the risk your cat develops the disease. Don't touch feral cats. ...

  18. A simple strategy for the immobilization of catalase on multi-walled carbon nanotube/poly (L-lysine) biocomposite for the detection of H2O2 and iodate.

    PubMed

    Ezhil Vilian, A T; Chen, Shen-Ming; Lou, Bih-Show

    2014-11-15

    Herein, we report a novel third-generation H2O2 and IO3- biosensor, which was fabricated by loading catalase (CAT) onto l-lysine/multiwalled carbon nanotube (PLL/f-MWCNT) film modified glassy carbon electrode (GCE). The UV-visible (UV-vis) and Fourier-transform infrared (FTIR) spectra show that the catalase encapsulated in the PLL/f-MWCNT film can effectively retain its bioactivity. The immobilized CAT retained its bioactivity with a high protein loading of 4.072 × 10(-10) mol cm(-2), thus exhibiting a surface-controlled reversible redox reaction, with a fast heterogeneous electron transfer rate of 5.48 s(-1). The immobilized CAT shows a couple of reversible and well-defined cyclic voltammetry peaks with a formal potential (E(0)) of -0.471 V (vs. Ag/AgCl) in a pH 6.5 phosphate buffer solution (PBS). Moreover, the modified film exhibited high electrocatalytic activity for the reduction of hydrogen peroxide (H2O2). It exhibited a wide linear response to H2O2 in the concentration range of 1 × 10(-6) - 3.6 × 10(-3), with higher sensitivity (392 mA cm(-2) M(-1)) and a lower Michaelis-Menten constant (0.224 mM). It provided high-catalytic activity towards H2O2 in a shorter time (5s), with a detection limit of 8 nM. These results indicate great improvement in the electrochemical and electrocatalytic properties of the CAT/PLL/f-MWCNT biosensor, offering a new idea for the design of third-generation electrochemical biosensors.

  19. Vestibulospinal and reticulospinal neuronal activity during locomotion in the intact cat. II. Walking on an inclined plane.

    PubMed

    Matsuyama, K; Drew, T

    2000-11-01

    The experiments described in this report were designed to determine the contribution of vestibulospinal neurons (VSNs) in Deiters' nucleus and of reticulospinal neurons (RSNs) in the medullary reticular formation to the modifications of the walking pattern that are associated with locomotion on an inclined plane. Neuronal discharge patterns were recorded from 44 VSNs and 63 RSNs in cats trained to walk on a treadmill whose orientation was varied from +20 degrees (uphill) to -10 degrees (downhill), referred to as pitch tilt, and from 20 degrees roll tilt left to 20 degrees roll tilt right. During uphill locomotion, a majority of VSNs (25/44) and rhythmically active RSNs (24/39) showed an increase in peak discharge frequency, above that observed during locomotion on a level surface. VSNs, unlike some of the RSNs, exhibited no major deviations from the overall pattern of the activity recorded during level walking. The relative increase in discharge frequency of the RSNs (on average, 31.8%) was slightly more than twice that observed in the VSNs (on average, 14.4%), although the average absolute change in discharge frequency was similar (18.2 Hz in VSNs and 21.6 Hz in RSNs). Changes in discharge frequency during roll tilt were generally more modest and were more variable, than those observed during uphill locomotion as were the relative changes in the different limb muscle electromyograms that we recorded. In general, discharge frequency in VSNs was more frequently increased when the treadmill was rolled to the right (ear down contralateral to the recording site) than when it was rolled to the left. Most VSNs that showed significant linear relationships with treadmill orientation in the roll plane increased their activity during right roll and decreased activity during left roll. Discharge activity in phasically modulated RSNs was also modified by roll tilt of the treadmill. Modulation of activity in RSNs that discharged twice in each step cycle was frequently

  20. Evoked activity in the hypothalamus and amygdala of the cat in conditions of food-related motivation and emotional tension.

    PubMed

    Pavlova, I V; Vanetsian, G L

    2006-02-01

    The amplitude-time characteristics of potentials evoked by clicks were analyzed in bilateral leads from the lateral hypothalamus and amygdala in cats in conditions of food-related motivation, emotional tension (presentation of dogs), and orientational reactions. In conditions of food-related motivation, as compared with the satiated state, there were decreases in the latent periods and changes in the amplitudes of the P1 and N2 components in the hypothalamus and P1, N2, and N3 in the amygdala. The most marked changes occurred on the left side in both structures. Presentation of dogs induced decreases in the latent periods of all components (including N1) of evoked potentials in the hypothalamus and amygdala, the most marked changes in the hypothalamus occurring on the right side and the most marked changes in the amygdala occurring on the left side. Conversely, orientational reactions to emotionally neutral stimuli induced increases in the latent periods of evoked potentials. It is concluded that there is an increase in sensory reactivity in the hypothalamus and amygdala in motivational-emotional states. It is suggested that the side of dominance in these structures may be associated both with the factor of the activity/passivity of the behavior in conditions of fear and the genesis of the emotion (motivational or informational).

  1. Interaction of SOS2 with nucleoside diphosphate kinase 2 and catalases reveals a point of connection between salt stress and H2O2 signaling in Arabidopsis thaliana.

    PubMed

    Verslues, Paul E; Batelli, Giorgia; Grillo, Stefania; Agius, Fernanda; Kim, Yong-Sig; Zhu, Jianhua; Agarwal, Manu; Katiyar-Agarwal, Surekha; Zhu, Jian-Kang

    2007-11-01

    SOS2, a class 3 sucrose-nonfermenting 1-related kinase, has emerged as an important mediator of salt stress response and stress signaling through its interactions with proteins involved in membrane transport and in regulation of stress responses. We have identified additional SOS2-interacting proteins that suggest a connection between SOS2 and reactive oxygen signaling. SOS2 was found to interact with the H2O2 signaling protein nucleoside diphosphate kinase 2 (NDPK2) and to inhibit its autophosphorylation activity. A sos2-2 ndpk2 double mutant was more salt sensitive than a sos2-2 single mutant, suggesting that NDPK2 and H2O2 are involved in salt resistance. However, the double mutant did not hyperaccumulate H2O2 in response to salt stress, suggesting that it is altered signaling rather than H2O2 toxicity alone that is responsible for the increased salt sensitivity of the sos2-2 ndpk2 double mutant. SOS2 was also found to interact with catalase 2 (CAT2) and CAT3, further connecting SOS2 to H2O2 metabolism and signaling. The interaction of SOS2 with both NDPK2 and CATs reveals a point of cross talk between salt stress response and other signaling factors including H2O2.

  2. Imipramine enhances neuroprotective effect of PEP-1-Catalase against ischemic neuronal damage.

    PubMed

    Kim, Dae Won; Kim, Duk-Soo; Kim, Mi Jin; Kwon, Soon Won; Ahn, Eun Hee; Jeong, Hoon Jae; Sohn, Eun Jeong; Dutta, Suman; Lim, Soon Sung; Cho, Sung-Woo; Lee, Kil Soo; Park, Jinseu; Eum, Won Sik; Hwang, Hyun Sook; Choi, Soo Young

    2011-10-01

    The protein transduction domains have been reported to have potential to deliver the exogenous molecules, including proteins, to living cells. However, poor transduction of proteins limits therapeutic application. In this study, we examined whether imipramine could stimulate the transduction efficiency of PEP-1 fused proteins into astrocytes. PEP-1-catalase (PEP-1- CAT) was transduced into astrocytes in a time- and dose-dependent manner, reducing cellular toxicity induced by H(2)O(2). Additionally, the group of PEP-1-CAT (+) imipramine showed enhancement of transduction efficiency and therefore increased cellular viability than that of PEP-1-CAT alone. In the gerbil ischemia models, PEP-1-CAT displayed significant neuroprotection in the CA1 region of the hippocampus. Interestingly, PEP-1-CAT (+) imipramine prevented neuronal cell death and lipid peroxidation more markedly than PEP-1-CAT alone. Therefore, our results suggest that imipramine can be used as a drug to enhance the transduction of PEP-1 fusion proteins to cells or animals and their efficacies against various disorders.

  3. Catalase prevents maternal diabetes-induced perinatal programming via the Nrf2-HO-1 defense system.

    PubMed

    Chang, Shiao-Ying; Chen, Yun-Wen; Zhao, Xin-Ping; Chenier, Isabelle; Tran, Stella; Sauvé, Alexandre; Ingelfinger, Julie R; Zhang, Shao-Ling

    2012-10-01

    We investigated whether overexpression of catalase (CAT) in renal proximal tubular cells (RPTCs) could prevent the programming of hypertension and kidney disease in the offspring of dams with maternal diabetes. Male offspring of nondiabetic and diabetic dams from two transgenic (Tg) lines (Hoxb7-green fluorescent protein [GFP]-Tg [controls] and Hoxb7/CAT-GFP-Tg, which overexpress CAT in RPTCs) were studied from the prenatal period into adulthood. Nephrogenesis, systolic blood pressure, renal hyperfiltration, kidney injury, and reactive oxygen species (ROS) generation were assessed. Gene expression of transforming growth factor-β1 (TGF-β1), nuclear factor erythroid 2p45-related factor-2 (Nrf2), and heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1) was tested in both in vitro and in vivo studies. Renal dysmorphogenesis was observed in offspring of Hoxb7-GFP-Tg dams with severe maternal diabetes; the affected male offspring displayed higher renal ROS generation and developed hypertension and renal hyperfiltration as well as renal injury with heightened TGF-β1 expression in adulthood. These changes were ameliorated in male offspring of diabetic Hoxb7/CAT-GFP-Tg dams via the Nrf2-HO-1 defense system. CAT promoted Nrf2 nuclear translocation and HO-1 gene expression, seen in both in vitro and in vivo studies. In conclusion, CAT overexpression in the RPTCs ameliorated maternal diabetes-induced perinatal programming, mediated, at least in part, by triggering the Nrf2-HO-1 defense system.

  4. Effects of CO2 and H+ on laryngeal receptor activity in the perfused larynx in anaesthetized cats.

    PubMed

    Wang, Z H; Bradford, A; O'Regan, R G

    1999-09-01

    1. Intralaryngeal CO2 reflexly decreases ventilation and increases upper airway muscle activity. Topical anaesthesia of the laryngeal mucosa or cutting the superior laryngeal nerves (SLNs) abolishes these reflexes, indicating that the receptors responsible are superficially located and that their afferent fibres are in the SLN. Intralaryngeal CO2 affects the activity of receptors recorded from the SLN. 2. An isolated, luminally perfused laryngeal preparation was developed in anaesthetized, paralysed cats in order to compare the effects of solutions with varying levels of pH and PCO2 on pressure-sensitive laryngeal receptor activity. Since the pH of tracheal surface fluid is reported to be approximately 7.0, two neutral (pH 7.4 and 7.0) and two acidic (pH 6.8 and 6.3) solutions were used. 3. Compared with neutral acapnic control solutions, neutral hypercapnic (PCO2 64 mmHg) solutions either excited or inhibited the discharge of 113 out of 211 pressure-sensitive SLN afferents. In 24 receptors, the effects of hypercapnic solutions with either neutral or acidic pH were similar in both direction and magnitude. In 50 receptors affected by neutral hypercapnic solutions, acidic acapnic solutions had no effect on 66 % of units and significantly smaller effects in the remaining units. In 17 receptors, the effects of neutral solutions with a PCO2 of 35 mmHg were significantly less than for neutral solution with a PCO2 of 64 mmHg. 4. These results show that the effects of CO2 on laryngeal pressure-sensitive receptors are independent of the pH of the perfusing media, and suggest that acidification of the receptor cell or its microenvironment is the main mechanism of CO2 chemoreception.

  5. Modulation of synaptic transmission from segmental afferents by spontaneous activity of dorsal horn spinal neurones in the cat.

    PubMed

    Manjarrez, E; Rojas-Piloni, J G; Jimenez, I; Rudomin, P

    2000-12-01

    We examined, in the anaesthetised cat, the influence of the neuronal ensembles producing spontaneous negative cord dorsum potentials (nCDPs) on segmental pathways mediating primary afferent depolarisation (PAD) of cutaneous and group I muscle afferents and on Ia monosynaptic activation of spinal motoneurones. The intraspinal distribution of the field potentials associated with the spontaneous nCDPs indicated that the neuronal ensembles involved in the generation of these potentials were located in the dorsal horn of lumbar segments, in the same region of termination of low-threshold cutaneous afferents. During the occurrence of spontaneous nCDPs, transmission from low-threshold cutaneous afferents to second order neurones in laminae III-VI, as well as transmission along pathways mediating PAD of cutaneous and Ib afferents, was facilitated. PAD of Ia afferents was instead inhibited. Monosynaptic reflexes of flexors and extensors were facilitated during the spontaneous nCDPs. The magnitude of the facilitation was proportional to the amplitude of the 'conditioning' spontaneous nCDPs. This led to a high positive correlation between amplitude fluctuations of spontaneous nCDPs and fluctuations of monosynaptic reflexes. Stimulation of low-threshold cutaneous afferents transiently reduced the probability of occurrence of spontaneous nCDPs as well as the fluctuations of monosynaptic reflexes. It is concluded that the spontaneous nCDPs were produced by the activation of a population of dorsal horn neurones that shared the same functional pathways and involved the same set of neurones as those responding monosynaptically to stimulation of large cutaneous afferents. The spontaneous activity of these neurones was probably the main cause of the fluctuations of the monosynaptic reflexes observed under anaesthesia and could provide a dynamic linkage between segmental sensory and motor pathways.

  6. Modulation of synaptic transmission from segmental afferents by spontaneous activity of dorsal horn spinal neurones in the cat

    PubMed Central

    Manjarrez, E; Rojas-Piloni, J G; Jiménez, I; Rudomin, P

    2000-01-01

    We examined, in the anaesthetised cat, the influence of the neuronal ensembles producing spontaneous negative cord dorsum potentials (nCDPs) on segmental pathways mediating primary afferent depolarisation (PAD) of cutaneous and group I muscle afferents and on Ia monosynaptic activation of spinal motoneurones. The intraspinal distribution of the field potentials associated with the spontaneous nCDPs indicated that the neuronal ensembles involved in the generation of these potentials were located in the dorsal horn of lumbar segments, in the same region of termination of low-threshold cutaneous afferents. During the occurrence of spontaneous nCDPs, transmission from low-threshold cutaneous afferents to second order neurones in laminae III-VI, as well as transmission along pathways mediating PAD of cutaneous and Ib afferents, was facilitated. PAD of Ia afferents was instead inhibited. Monosynaptic reflexes of flexors and extensors were facilitated during the spontaneous nCDPs. The magnitude of the facilitation was proportional to the amplitude of the ‘conditioning’ spontaneous nCDPs. This led to a high positive correlation between amplitude fluctuations of spontaneous nCDPs and fluctuations of monosynaptic reflexes. Stimulation of low-threshold cutaneous afferents transiently reduced the probability of occurrence of spontaneous nCDPs as well as the fluctuations of monosynaptic reflexes. It is concluded that the spontaneous nCDPs were produced by the activation of a population of dorsal horn neurones that shared the same functional pathways and involved the same set of neurones as those responding monosynaptically to stimulation of large cutaneous afferents. The spontaneous activity of these neurones was probably the main cause of the fluctuations of the monosynaptic reflexes observed under anaesthesia and could provide a dynamic linkage between segmental sensory and motor pathways. PMID:11101653

  7. Mechanisms of oxidant generation by catalase

    PubMed Central

    Heck, Diane E.; Shakarjian, Michael; Kim, Hong Duck; Laskin, Jeffrey D.; Vetrano, Anna M.

    2015-01-01

    The enzyme catalase converts solar radiation into reactive oxidant species (ROS). In this study, we report that several bacterial catalases (hydroperoxidases, HP), including Escherichia coli HP-I and HP-II also generate reactive oxidants in response to ultraviolet B light (UVB). HP-I and HP-II are identical except for the presence of NADPH. We found that only one of the catalases, HPI, produces oxidants in response to UVB light, indicating a potential role for the nucleotide in ROS production. This prompts us to speculate that NADPH may act as a cofactor regulating ROS generation by mammalian catalases. Structural analysis of the NADPH domains of several mammalian catalases revealed that the nucleotide is bound in a constrained conformation and that UVB irradiation induces NADPH oxidation and positional changes. Biochemical and kinetic analysis indicate that ROS formation by the enzyme is enhanced by oxidation of the cofactor. Conformational changes following absorption of UVB light by catalase NADPH have the potential to facilitate ROS production by the enzyme. PMID:20716293

  8. Two distinct groups of fungal catalase/peroxidases.

    PubMed

    Zámocký, Marcel; Furtmüller, Paul G; Obinger, Christian

    2009-08-01

    Catalase/peroxidases (KatGs) are bifunctional haem b-containing (Class I) peroxidases with overwhelming catalase activity and substantial peroxidase activity with various one-electron donors. These unique oxidoreductases evolved in ancestral bacteria revealing a complex gene-duplicated structure. Besides being found in numerous bacteria of all phyla, katG genes were also detected in genomes of lower eukaryotes, most prominently of sac and club fungi. Phylogenetic analysis demonstrates the occurrence of two distinct groups of fungal KatGs that differ in localization, structural and functional properties. Analysis of lateral gene transfer of bacterial katGs into fungal genomes reveals that the most probable progenitor was a katG from a bacteroidetes predecessor. The putative physiological role(s) of both fungal KatG groups is discussed with respect to known structure-function relationships in bacterial KatGs and is related with the acquisition of (phyto)pathogenicity in fungi.

  9. A technique for recording the activity of brain-stem neurones in awake, unrestrained cats using microwires and an implantable micromanipulator.

    PubMed

    Banks, D; Kuriakose, M; Matthews, B

    1993-01-01

    A new technique is described which is suitable for long-term recording of the activity of neurones in the brain of an awake, unrestrained cat. By using telescopic electrodes, neurones up to 39 mm from the cranial surface can be reached with a miniature micromanipulator which is small enough to be left in place between recording sessions. The most stable recordings have been obtained with electrodes made from microwire, with which units have been held for up to 8 h.

  10. Occurrence of High Catalase-containing Acinetobacter in Spacecraft Assembly Facilities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McCoy, K. B.; Derecho, I.; La Duc, M. T.; Vaishampayan, P.; Venkateswaran, K. J.; Mogul, R.

    2010-04-01

    In summary, the measurement of high catalase specific activity values for spacecraft-associated Acinetobacter strains is potentially the result of adaptation towards the harsh conditions of the clean rooms and assembly process.

  11. Expression of a bacterial catalase in a strictly anaerobic methanogen significantly increases tolerance to hydrogen peroxide but not oxygen.

    PubMed

    Jennings, Matthew E; Schaff, Cody W; Horne, Alexandra J; Lessner, Faith H; Lessner, Daniel J

    2014-02-01

    Haem-dependent catalase is an antioxidant enzyme that degrades H2O2, producing H2O and O2, and is common in aerobes. Catalase is present in some strictly anaerobic methane-producing archaea (methanogens), but the importance of catalase to the antioxidant system of methanogens is poorly understood. We report here that a survey of the sequenced genomes of methanogens revealed that the majority of species lack genes encoding catalase. Moreover, Methanosarcina acetivorans is a methanogen capable of synthesizing haem and encodes haem-dependent catalase in its genome; yet, Methanosarcina acetivorans cells lack detectable catalase activity. However, inducible expression of the haem-dependent catalase from Escherichia coli (EcKatG) in the chromosome of Methanosarcina acetivorans resulted in a 100-fold increase in the endogenous catalase activity compared with uninduced cells. The increased catalase activity conferred a 10-fold increase in the resistance of EcKatG-induced cells to H2O2 compared with uninduced cells. The EcKatG-induced cells were also able to grow when exposed to levels of H2O2 that inhibited or killed uninduced cells. However, despite the significant increase in catalase activity, growth studies revealed that EcKatG-induced cells did not exhibit increased tolerance to O2 compared with uninduced cells. These results support the lack of catalase in the majority of methanogens, since methanogens are more likely to encounter O2 rather than high concentrations of H2O2 in the natural environment. Catalase appears to be a minor component of the antioxidant system in methanogens, even those that are aerotolerant, including Methanosarcina acetivorans. Importantly, the experimental approach used here demonstrated the feasibility of engineering beneficial traits, such as H2O2 tolerance, in methanogens.

  12. Catalase characterization and implication in bleaching of a symbiotic sea anemone.

    PubMed

    Merle, Pierre-Laurent; Sabourault, Cécile; Richier, Sophie; Allemand, Denis; Furla, Paola

    2007-01-15

    Symbiotic cnidarians are marine invertebrates harboring photosynthesizing microalgae (named zooxanthellae), which produce great amounts of oxygen and free radicals upon illumination. Studying antioxidative balance is then crucial to understanding how symbiotic cnidarians cope with ROS production. In particular, it is suspected that oxidative stress triggers cnidarian bleaching, i.e., the expulsion of zooxanthellae from the animal host, responsible for symbiotic cnidarian mass mortality worldwide. This study therefore investigates catalase antioxidant enzymes and their role in bleaching of the temperate symbiotic sea anemone Anemonia viridis. Using specific separation of animal tissues (ectoderm and endoderm) from the symbionts (zooxanthellae), spectrophotometric assays and native PAGE revealed both tissue-specific and activity pattern distribution of two catalase electrophoretypes, E1 and E2. E1, expressed in all three tissues, presents high sensitivity to the catalase inhibitor aminotriazole (ATZ) and elevated temperatures. The ectodermal E1 form is responsible for 67% of total catalase activity. The E2 form, expressed only within zooxanthellae and their host endodermal cells, displays low sensitivity to ATZ and relative thermostability. We further cloned an ectodermal catalase, which shares 68% identity with mammalian monofunctional catalases. Last, 6 days of exposure of whole sea anemones to ATZ (0.5 mM) led to effective catalase inhibition and initiated symbiont expulsion. This demonstrates the crucial role of this enzyme in cnidarian bleaching, a phenomenon responsible for worldwide climate-change-induced mass mortalities, with catastrophic consequences for marine biodiversity.

  13. Catalase function in plants: a focus on Arabidopsis mutants as stress-mimic models.

    PubMed

    Mhamdi, Amna; Queval, Guillaume; Chaouch, Sejir; Vanderauwera, Sandy; Van Breusegem, Frank; Noctor, Graham

    2010-10-01

    Hydrogen peroxide (H(2)O(2)) is an important signal molecule involved in plant development and environmental responses. Changes in H(2)O(2) availability can result from increased production or decreased metabolism. While plants contain several types of H(2)O(2)-metabolizing proteins, catalases are highly active enzymes that do not require cellular reductants as they primarily catalyse a dismutase reaction. This review provides an update on plant catalase genes, function, and subcellular localization, with a focus on recent information generated from studies on Arabidopsis. Original data are presented on Arabidopsis catalase single and double mutants, and the use of some of these lines as model systems to investigate the outcome of increases in intracellular H(2)O(2) are discussed. Particular attention is paid to interactions with cell thiol-disulphide status; the use of catalase-deficient plants to probe the apparent redundancy of reductive H(2)O(2)-metabolizing pathways; the importance of irradiance and growth daylength in determining the outcomes of catalase deficiency; and the induction of pathogenesis-related responses in catalase-deficient lines. Within the context of strategies aimed at understanding and engineering plant stress responses, the review also considers whether changes in catalase activities in wild-type plants are likely to be a significant part of plant responses to changes in environmental conditions or biotic challenge.

  14. The transcription factors ADR1 or CAT8 are required for RTG pathway activation and evasion from yeast acetic acid-induced programmed cell death in raffinose

    PubMed Central

    Laera, Luna; Guaragnella, Nicoletta; Ždralević, Maša; Marzulli, Domenico; Liu, Zhengchang; Giannattasio, Sergio

    2016-01-01

    Yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae grown on glucose undergoes programmed cell death (PCD) induced by acetic acid (AA-PCD), but evades PCD when grown in raffinose. This is due to concomitant relief of carbon catabolite repression (CCR) and activation of mitochondrial retrograde signaling, a mitochondria-to-nucleus communication pathway causing up-regulation of various nuclear target genes, such as CIT2, encoding peroxisomal citrate synthase, dependent on the positive regulator RTG2 in response to mitochondrial dysfunction. CCR down-regulates genes mainly involved in mitochondrial respiratory metabolism. In this work, we investigated the relationships between the RTG and CCR pathways in the modulation of AA-PCD sensitivity under glucose repression or de-repression conditions. Yeast single and double mutants lacking RTG2 and/or certain factors regulating carbon source utilization, including MIG1, HXK2, ADR1, CAT8, and HAP4, have been analyzed for their survival and CIT2 expression after acetic acid treatment. ADR1 and CAT8 were identified as positive regulators of RTG-dependent gene transcription. ADR1 and CAT8 interact with RTG2 and with each other in inducing cell resistance to AA-PCD in raffinose and controlling the nature of cell death. In the absence of ADR1 and CAT8, AA-PCD evasion is acquired through activation of an alternative factor/pathway repressed by RTG2, suggesting that RTG2 may play a function in promoting necrotic cell death in repressing conditions when RTG pathway is inactive. Moreover, our data show that simultaneous mitochondrial retrograde pathway activation and SNF1-dependent relief of CCR have a key role in central carbon metabolism reprogramming which modulates the yeast acetic acid-stress response. PMID:28357334

  15. [Changes in the phasic activity of neuron microsystems of the somatosensory cortex of the cat during extinction of activation reactions to unreinforced stimuli].

    PubMed

    Kratin, Iu G; Panteleev, S S; Kalinina, N M; Chukova, S V

    1986-01-01

    In chronic experiments on cats, three-phasic responses of neuronal microsystems in the co