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Sample records for activity cell adhesion

  1. Epac Activation Regulates Human Mesenchymal Stem Cells Migration and Adhesion.

    PubMed

    Yu, Jiao-Le; Deng, Ruixia; Chung, Sookja K; Chan, Godfrey Chi-Fung

    2016-04-01

    How to enhance the homing of human mesenchymal stem cells (hMSCs) to the target tissues remains a clinical challenge nowadays. To overcome this barrier, the mechanism responsible for the hMSCs migration and engraftment has to be defined. Currently, the exact mechanism involved in migration and adhesion of hMSCs remains unknown. Exchange protein directly activated by cAMP (Epac), a novel protein discovered in cAMP signaling pathway, may have a potential role in regulating cells adhesion and migration by triggering the downstream Rap family signaling cascades. However, the exact role of Epac in cells homing is elusive. Our study evaluated the role of Epac in the homing of hMSCs. We confirmed that hMSCs expressed functional Epac and its activation enhanced the migration and adhesion of hMSCs significantly. The Epac activation was further found to be contributed directly to the chemotactic responses induced by stromal cell derived factor-1 (SDF-1) which is a known chemokine in regulating hMSCs homing. These findings suggested Epac is connected to the SDF-1 signaling cascades. In conclusion, our study revealed that Epac plays a role in hMSCs homing by promoting adhesion and migration. Appropriate manipulation of Epac may enhance the homing of hMSCs and facilitate their future clinical applications. PMID:26727165

  2. The de-adhesive activity of matricellular proteins: is intermediate cell adhesion an adaptive state?

    PubMed

    Murphy-Ullrich, J E

    2001-04-01

    The process of cellular de-adhesion is potentially important for the ability of a cell to participate in morphogenesis and to respond to injurious stimuli. Cellular de-adhesion is induced by the highly regulated matricellular proteins TSP1 and 2, tenascin-C, and SPARC. These proteins induce a rapid transition to an intermediate state of adhesiveness characterized by loss of actin-containing stress fibers and restructuring of the focal adhesion plaque that includes loss of vinculin and alpha-actinin, but not of talin or integrin. This process involves intracellular signaling mediators, which are engaged in response to matrix protein-receptor interactions. Each of these proteins employs different receptors and signaling pathways to achieve this common morphologic endpoint. What is the function of this intermediate adhesive state and what is the physiologic significance of this action of the matricellular proteins? Given that matricellular proteins are expressed in response to injury and during development, one can speculate that the intermediate adhesive state is an adaptive condition that facilitates expression of specific genes that are involved in repair and adaptation. Since cell shape is maintained in weakly adherent cells, this state might induce survival signals to prevent apoptosis due to loss of strong cell adhesion, but yet allow for cell locomotion. The three matricellular proteins considered here might each preferentially facilitate one or more aspects of this adaptive response rather than all of these equally. Currently, we have only preliminary data to support the specific ideas proposed in this article. It will be interesting in the next several years to continue to elucidate the biological roles of the intermediate adhesive state induced by these matricellular proteins. and focal adhesions in a cell that nevertheless maintains a spread, extended morphology and integrin clustering. TSP1, tenascin-C, and SPARC induce the intermediate adhesive state, as

  3. Activation of the canonical Wnt/{beta}-catenin pathway enhances monocyte adhesion to endothelial cells

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Dong Kun . E-mail: leedk@memorialhealthsource.com; Nathan Grantham, R.; Trachte, Aaron L.; Mannion, John D.; Wilson, Colleen L.

    2006-08-18

    Monocyte adhesion to vascular endothelium has been reported to be one of the early processes in the development of atherosclerosis. In an attempt to develop strategies to prevent or delay atherosclerosis progression, we analyzed effects of the Wnt/{beta}-catenin signaling pathway on monocyte adhesion to various human endothelial cells. Adhesion of fluorescein-labeled monocytes to various human endothelial cells was analyzed under a fluorescent microscope. Unlike sodium chloride, lithium chloride enhanced monocyte adhesion to endothelial cells in a dose-dependent manner. We further demonstrated that inhibitors for glycogen synthase kinase (GSK)-3{beta} or proteosome enhanced monocyte-endothelial cell adhesion. Results of semi-quantitative reverse transcriptase polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) indicated that activation of Wnt/{beta}-catenin pathway did not change expression levels of mRNA for adhesion molecules. In conclusion, the canonical Wnt/{beta}-catenin pathway enhanced monocyte-endothelial cell adhesion without changing expression levels of adhesion molecules.

  4. Light-triggered in vivo activation of adhesive peptides regulates cell adhesion, inflammation and vascularization of biomaterials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Ted T.; García, José R.; Paez, Julieta I.; Singh, Ankur; Phelps, Edward A.; Weis, Simone; Shafiq, Zahid; Shekaran, Asha; Del Campo, Aránzazu; García, Andrés J.

    2015-03-01

    Materials engineered to elicit targeted cellular responses in regenerative medicine must display bioligands with precise spatial and temporal control. Although materials with temporally regulated presentation of bioadhesive ligands using external triggers, such as light and electric fields, have recently been realized for cells in culture, the impact of in vivo temporal ligand presentation on cell-material responses is unknown. Here, we present a general strategy to temporally and spatially control the in vivo presentation of bioligands using cell-adhesive peptides with a protecting group that can be easily removed via transdermal light exposure to render the peptide fully active. We demonstrate that non-invasive, transdermal time-regulated activation of cell-adhesive RGD peptide on implanted biomaterials regulates in vivo cell adhesion, inflammation, fibrous encapsulation, and vascularization of the material. This work shows that triggered in vivo presentation of bioligands can be harnessed to direct tissue reparative responses associated with implanted biomaterials.

  5. Light-triggered in vivo Activation of Adhesive Peptides Regulates Cell Adhesion, Inflammation and Vascularization of Biomaterials

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Ted T.; García, José R.; Paez, Julieta; Singh, Ankur; Phelps, Edward A.; Weis, Simone; Shafiq, Zahid; Shekaran, Asha; del Campo, Aránzazu; García, Andrés J.

    2014-01-01

    Materials engineered to elicit targeted cellular responses in regenerative medicine must display bioligands with precise spatial and temporal control. Although materials with temporally regulated presentation of bioadhesive ligands using external triggers, such as light and electric fields, have been recently realized for cells in culture, the impact of in vivo temporal ligand presentation on cell-material responses is unknown. Here, we present a general strategy to temporally and spatially control the in vivo presentation of bioligands using cell adhesive peptides with a protecting group that can be easily removed via transdermal light exposure to render the peptide fully active. We demonstrate that non-invasive, transdermal time-regulated activation of cell-adhesive RGD peptide on implanted biomaterials regulates in vivo cell adhesion, inflammation, fibrous encapsulation, and vascularization of the material. This work shows that triggered in vivo presentation of bioligands can be harnessed to direct tissue reparative responses associated with implanted biomaterials. PMID:25502097

  6. p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase interacts with vinculin at focal adhesions during fatty acid-stimulated cell adhesion

    PubMed Central

    George, Margaret D.; Wine, Robert N.; Lackford, Brad; Kissling, Grace E.; Akiyama, Steven K.; Olden, Kenneth; Roberts, John D.

    2014-01-01

    Arachidonic acid stimulates cell adhesion by activating α2β1 integrins in a process that depends on protein kinases, including p38 mitogen activated protein kinase. Here, we describe the interaction of cytoskeletal components with key signaling molecules that contribute to spreading of, and morphological changes in, arachidonic acid-treated MDA-MB-435 human breast carcinoma cells. Arachidonic acid-treated cells showed increased attachment and spreading on collagen type IV as measured by electric cell-substrate impedance sensing. Fatty acid-treated cells displayed short cortical actin filaments associated with an increased number of β1 integrin-containing pseudopodia whereas untreated cells displayed elongated stress fibers and fewer clusters of β1 integrins. Confocal microscopy of arachidonic acid-treated cells showed that vinculin and phospho-p38 both appeared enriched in pseudopodia and at the tips of actin filaments, and fluorescence ratio imaging indicated the increase was specific for the phospho-(active) form of p38. Immunoprecipitates of phospho-p38 from extracts of arachidonic acid-treated cells contained vinculin, and GST-vinculin fusion proteins carrying the central region of vinculin bound phospho-p38, whereas fusion proteins expressing the terminal portions of vinculin did not. These data suggest that phospho-p38 associates with particular domains on critical focal adhesion proteins that are involved in tumor cell adhesion and spreading and that this association can be regulated by factors in the tumor microenvironment. PMID:24219282

  7. Micro-adhesion rings surrounding TCR microclusters are essential for T cell activation.

    PubMed

    Hashimoto-Tane, Akiko; Sakuma, Machie; Ike, Hiroshi; Yokosuka, Tadashi; Kimura, Yayoi; Ohara, Osamu; Saito, Takashi

    2016-07-25

    The immunological synapse (IS) formed at the interface between T cells and antigen-presenting cells represents a hallmark of initiation of acquired immunity. T cell activation is initiated at T cell receptor (TCR) microclusters (MCs), in which TCRs and signaling molecules assemble at the interface before IS formation. We found that each TCR-MC was transiently bordered by a ring structure made of integrin and focal adhesion molecules in the early phase of activation, which is similar in structure to the IS in microscale. The micro-adhesion ring is composed of LFA-1, focal adhesion molecules paxillin and Pyk2, and myosin II (MyoII) and is supported by F-actin core and MyoII activity through LFA-1 outside-in signals. The formation of the micro-adhesion ring was transient but especially sustained upon weak TCR stimulation to recruit linker for activation of T cells (LAT) and SLP76. Perturbation of the micro-adhesion ring induced impairment of TCR-MC development and resulted in impaired cellular signaling and cell functions. Thus, the synapse-like structure composed of the core TCR-MC and surrounding micro-adhesion ring is a critical structure for initial T cell activation through integrin outside-in signals.

  8. Activated leukocyte cell adhesion molecule regulates the interaction between pancreatic cancer cells and stellate cells

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Wei-Wei; Zhan, Shu-Hui; Geng, Chang-Xin; Sun, Xin; Erkan, Mert; Kleeff, Jörg; Xie, Xiang-Jun

    2016-01-01

    Activated leukocyte cell adhesion molecule (ALCAM/CD166) is a transmembrane glycoprotein that is involved in tumor progression and metastasis. In the present study, the expression and functional role of ALCAM in pancreatic cancer cells and pancreatic stellate cells (PSCs) was investigated. Tissue specimens were obtained from patients with pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (n=56) or chronic pancreatitis (CP; n=10), who underwent pancreatic resection, and from normal pancreatic tissue samples (n=10). Immunohistochemistry was used to analyze the localization and expression of ALCAM in pancreatic tissues. Subsequently, reverse transcription-quantitative polymerase chain reaction and immunoblotting were applied to assess the expression of ALCAM in pancreatic cancer Panc-1 and T3M4 cells, as well as in PSCs. An enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay was used to measure ALCAM levels in cell culture medium stimulated by hypoxia, tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α and transforming growth factor-β. Silencing of ALCAM was performed using ALCAM small interfering (si)RNA and immunocytochemistry was used to analyze the inhibition efficiency. An invasion assay and a cell interaction assay were performed to assess the invasive ability and co-cultured adhesive potential of Panc-1 and T3M4 cells, as well as PSCs. Histologically, ALCAM expression was generally weak or absent in pancreatic cancer cells, but was markedly upregulated in PSCs in pancreatic cancer tissues. ALCAM was highly expressed in PSCs from CP tissues and PSCs surrounding pancreatic intraepithelial neoplasias, as well as in pancreatic cancer cells. ALCAM mRNA was highly expressed in PSCs, with a low to moderate expression in T3M4 and Panc-1 cells. Similar to the mRNA expression, immunoblotting demonstrated that ALCAM protein levels were high in PSCs and T3M4 cells, but low in Panc-1 cells. The expression of TNF-α increased, while hypoxia decreased the secretion of ALCAM in pancreatic cancer Panc-1 and T3M4 cells, and also in

  9. PI3K{gamma} activation by CXCL12 regulates tumor cell adhesion and invasion

    SciTech Connect

    Monterrubio, Maria; Mellado, Mario; Carrera, Ana C.

    2009-10-16

    Tumor dissemination is a complex process, in which certain steps resemble those in leukocyte homing. Specific chemokine/chemokine receptor pairs have important roles in both processes. CXCL12/CXCR4 is the most commonly expressed chemokine/chemokine receptor pair in human cancers, in which it regulates cell adhesion, extravasation, metastatic colonization, angiogenesis, and proliferation. All of these processes require activation of signaling pathways that include G proteins, phosphatidylinositol-3 kinase (PI3K), JAK kinases, Rho GTPases, and focal adhesion-associated proteins. We analyzed these pathways in a human melanoma cell line in response to CXCL12 stimulation, and found that PI3K{gamma} regulates tumor cell adhesion through mechanisms different from those involved in cell invasion. Our data indicate that, following CXCR4 activation after CXCL12 binding, the invasion and adhesion processes are regulated differently by distinct downstream events in these signaling cascades.

  10. Matrine inhibits the expression of adhesion molecules in activated vascular smooth muscle cells.

    PubMed

    Liu, Jun; Zhang, Lihua; Ren, Yingang; Gao, Yanli; Kang, Li; Lu, Shaoping

    2016-03-01

    Atherosclerosis is a chronic inflammatory disease associated with increased expression of adhesion molecules in vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMCs). Matrine is a main active ingredient of Sophora flavescens roots, which are used to treat inflammatory diseases. However, the effects of matrine on the expression of adhesion molecules in VSMCs have largely remained elusive. Therefore, the present study investigated the effects of matrine on the expression of adhesion molecules in tumor necrosis factor (TNF)‑α‑stimulated human aortic smooth muscle cells (HASMCs). The results showed that matrine inhibited the expression of vascular cell adhesion molecule‑1 (VCAM‑1) and intercellular adhesion molecule‑1 (ICAM‑1) in TNF‑α‑stimulated HASMCs. Matrine markedly inhibited the TNF‑α‑induced expression of nuclear factor (NF)‑κB p65 and prevented the TNF‑α‑caused degradation of inhibitor of NF‑κB; it also inhibited TNF‑α‑induced activation of mitogen‑activated protein kinases (MAPKs). Furthermore, matrine inhibited the production of intracellular reactive oxygen species (ROS) in TNF‑α‑stimulated HASMCs. In conclusion, the results of the present study demonstrated that matrine inhibited the expression of VCAM‑1 and ICAM‑1 in TNF‑α‑stimulated HASMCs via the suppression of ROS production as well as NF‑κB and MAPK pathway activation. Therefore, matrine may have a potential therapeutic use for preventing the advancement of atherosclerotic lesions.

  11. Kindlin-3 regulates integrin activation and adhesion reinforcement of effector T cells.

    PubMed

    Moretti, Federico A; Moser, Markus; Lyck, Ruth; Abadier, Michael; Ruppert, Raphael; Engelhardt, Britta; Fässler, Reinhard

    2013-10-15

    Activated T cells use very late antigen-4/α4β1 integrin for capture, rolling on, and firm adhesion to endothelial cells, and use leukocyte function-associated antigen-1/αLβ2 integrin for subsequent crawling and extravasation. Inhibition of α4β1 is sufficient to prevent extravasation of activated T cells and is successfully used to combat autoimmune diseases, such as multiple sclerosis. Here we show that effector T cells lacking the integrin activator Kindlin-3 extravasate and induce experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis in mice immunized with autoantigen. In sharp contrast, adoptively transferred autoreactive T cells from Kindlin-3-deficient mice fail to extravasate into the naïve CNS. Mechanistically, autoreactive Kindlin-3-null T cells extravasate when the CNS is inflamed and the brain microvasculature expresses high levels of integrin ligands. Flow chamber assays under physiological shear conditions confirmed that Kindlin-3-null effector T cells adhere to high concentrations of vascular cell adhesion molecule-1 and intercellular adhesion molecule-1, albeit less efficiently than WT T cells. Although these arrested T cells polarize and start crawling, only few remain firmly adherent over time. Our data demonstrate that the requirement of Kindlin-3 for effector T cells to induce α4β1 and αLβ2 integrin ligand binding and stabilization of integrin-ligand bonds is critical when integrin ligand levels are low, but of less importance when integrin ligand levels are high. PMID:24089451

  12. The dendritic cell cytoskeleton promotes T cell adhesion and activation by constraining ICAM-1 mobility

    PubMed Central

    Comrie, William A.; Li, Shuixing; Boyle, Sarah

    2015-01-01

    Integrity of the dendritic cell (DC) actin cytoskeleton is essential for T cell priming, but the underlying mechanisms are poorly understood. We show that the DC F-actin network regulates the lateral mobility of intracellular cell adhesion molecule 1 (ICAM-1), but not MHCII. ICAM-1 mobility and clustering are regulated by maturation-induced changes in the expression and activation of moesin and α-actinin-1, which associate with actin filaments and the ICAM-1 cytoplasmic domain. Constrained ICAM-1 mobility is important for DC function, as DCs expressing a high-mobility ICAM-1 mutant lacking the cytoplasmic domain exhibit diminished antigen-dependent conjugate formation and T cell priming. These defects are associated with inefficient induction of leukocyte functional antigen 1 (LFA-1) affinity maturation, which is consistent with a model in which constrained ICAM-1 mobility opposes forces on LFA-1 exerted by the T cell cytoskeleton, whereas ICAM-1 clustering enhances valency and further promotes ligand-dependent LFA-1 activation. Our results reveal an important new mechanism through which the DC cytoskeleton regulates receptor activation at the immunological synapse. PMID:25666808

  13. Neural cell adhesion molecule modulates mesenchymal stromal cell migration via activation of MAPK/ERK signaling.

    PubMed

    Shi, Yu; Xia, Yin-Yan; Wang, Lei; Liu, Rui; Khoo, King-Shung; Feng, Zhi-Wei

    2012-10-15

    Mesenchymal Stromal Cells (MSCs) represent promising tools for cellular therapy owing to their multipotentiality and ability to localize to injured, inflamed sites and tumor. Various approaches to manipulate expression of MSC surface markers, including adhesion molecules and chemokine receptors, have been explored to enhance homing of MSCs. Recently, Neural Cell Adhesion Molecule (NCAM) has been found to be expressed on MSCs yet its function remains largely elusive. Herein, we show that bone marrow-derived MSCs from NCAM deficient mice exhibit defective migratory ability and significantly impaired adipogenic and osteogenic differentiation potential. We further explore the mechanism governing NCAM mediated migration of MSCs by showing the interplay between NCAM and Fibroblast Growth Factor Receptor (FGFR) induces activation of MAPK/ERK signaling, thereby the migration of MSCs. In addition, re-expression of NCAM180, but not NCAM140, could restore the defective MAPK/ERK signaling thereby the migration of NCAM deficient MSCs. Finally, we demonstrate that NCAM180 expression level could be manipulated by pro-inflammatory cytokine Tumor Necrosis Factor (TNF)-α treatment. Overall, our data reveal the vital function of NCAM in MSCs migration and differentiation thus raising the possibility of manipulating NCAM expression to enhance homing and therapeutic potential of MSCs in cellular therapy.

  14. Platelet-leukocyte interaction in adhesion to endothelial cells induced by platelet-activating factor in vitro.

    PubMed Central

    Hirafuji, M.; Shinoda, H.

    1991-01-01

    1. Platelet-activating factor (PAF, 10 nM) did not induce platelet adhesion to endothelial cells cultured in monolayer but it induced their adhesion to protein-coated plastic. However, PAF induced a marked platelet adhesion to endothelial cells when polymorphonuclear leukocytes (PMNs) were present. Lyso-PAF had no effect. 2. Phase-contrast microscopic examination showed that single platelets rather than their aggregates adhered to the endothelial cell surface around aggregating and adhering PMNs. 3. Significant platelet adhesion was induced by PAF at concentrations higher that 0.01 nM with the maximal response at 10 nM. Platelet adhesion occurred within minutes after PAF addition, reaching a maximum approximately after 30 min. Platelet adhesion also occurred significantly at a PMN:platelet ratio of 1:800, and linearly up to 1:50. 4. The PAF-induced platelet adhesion was suppressed by three structurally unrelated PAF antagonists, WEB 2086, ONO 6240 and BN 52021, in a concentration-dependent manner. 5. PAF also increased PMN adhesion to endothelial cell monolayers, which was further augmented by the presence of platelets. 6. The present study demonstrates that PAF induces platelet adhesion to endothelial cells in vitro when PMNs are present and that there is a close interaction between platelets and PMNs in their adhesion to endothelial cells. The present study further suggests that PMNs could play a central role in platelet adhesion to vascular endothlium in certain pathological conditions. Images Figure 2 PMID:1884095

  15. Cell adhesion force microscopy

    PubMed Central

    Sagvolden, G.; Giaever, I.; Pettersen, E. O.; Feder, J.

    1999-01-01

    The adhesion forces of cervical carcinoma cells in tissue culture were measured by using the manipulation force microscope, a novel atomic force microscope. The forces were studied as a function of time and temperature for cells cultured on hydrophilic and hydrophobic polystyrene substrates with preadsorbed proteins. The cells attached faster and stronger at 37°C than at 23°C and better on hydrophilic than on hydrophobic substrates, even though proteins adsorb much better to the hydrophobic substrates. Because cell adhesion serves to control several stages in the cell cycle, we anticipate that the manipulation force microscope can help clarify some cell-adhesion related issues. PMID:9892657

  16. Chitosan hydrogels enriched with polyphenols: Antibacterial activity, cell adhesion and growth and mineralization.

    PubMed

    Lišková, Jana; Douglas, Timothy E L; Beranová, Jana; Skwarczyńska, Agata; Božič, Mojca; Samal, Sangram Keshari; Modrzejewska, Zofia; Gorgieva, Selestina; Kokol, Vanja; Bačáková, Lucie

    2015-09-20

    Injectable hydrogels for bone regeneration consisting of chitosan, sodium beta-glycerophosphate (Na-β-GP) and alkaline phosphatase (ALP) were enriched with the polyphenols phloroglucinol (PG) and gallic acid (GA) and characterized physicochemically and biologically with respect to properties relevant for applications in bone regeneration, namely gelation kinetics, mineralizability, antioxidant properties, antibacterial activity, cytocompatibility and ability to support adhesion and growth of human osteoblast-like MG63 cells. Enrichment with PG and GA had no negative effect on gelation kinetics and mineralizability. PG and GA both enhanced antioxidant activity of unmineralized hydrogels. Mineralization reduced antioxidant activity of hydrogels containing GA. Hydrogels containing GA, PG and without polyphenols reduced colony forming ability of Escherichia coli after 1h, 3h and 6h incubation and slowed E. coli growth in liquid culture for 150min. Hydrogels containing GA were cytotoxic and supported cell growth more poorly than polyphenol-free hydrogels. PG had no negative effect on cell adhesion and growth.

  17. Suppression of adhesion and invasion of hepatoma cells in culture by tea compounds through antioxidative activity.

    PubMed

    Zhang, G; Miura, Y; Yagasaki, K

    2000-10-31

    To determine the actions of tea components on the invasion of a rat ascites hepatoma cell line of AH109A and to understand their modes of action, the cancer cells were co-cultured with a rat mesentery-derived mesothelial cell monolayer in the presence of tea components. The synergistic effects of (-)-epicatechin (EC) with (-)-epigallocatechin gallate (EGCG) on AH109A invasion were demonstrated. Further study showed that 10 microM of EGCG or theaflavins, or 2.5 microM of ethylenediaminetetra-acetic (EDTA) entirely abolished the increase in AH109A adhesion and invasion stimulated by reactive oxygen species (ROS) from the hypoxanthine-xanthine oxidase system. Our results suggest that (.)OH(-)- and other ROS-scavenging activity of EGCG and theaflavins may be responsible for the inhibition of (.)OH(-)- and related ROS-potentiated AH109A adhesion and invasion to the cultured rat mesothelial cell monolayer. PMID:10996728

  18. Ligand-induced adhesion to activated endothelium and to vascular cell adhesion molecule-1 in lymphocytes transfected with the N-formyl peptide receptor.

    PubMed

    Honda, S; Campbell, J J; Andrew, D P; Engelhardt, B; Butcher, B A; Warnock, R A; Ye, R D; Butcher, E C

    1994-04-15

    Binding of FMLP to the neutrophil N-formyl peptide receptor (FPR) transmits signals through pertussis toxin-sensitive G proteins triggering Ca2+ flux, superoxide production, granule exocytosis, and neutrophil aggregation and adhesion involving the beta 2 (CD18) integrins. Expression of the FPR in mouse fibroblasts or human kidney cells has been shown to confer an N-formyl peptide-inducible Ca2+ flux in transfectants. Here we demonstrate that the transfected receptor can also support ligand-induced alterations in cellular adhesion. We established stable transfectants of mouse L1-2 pre-B cells with cDNA for human FPR (L1-2 FPR cells). The transfectants bind N-formyl-Nle-Leu-Phe-Nle-Tyr-Lys-fluorescein with 1.4 x 10(5) sites per cell and a dissociation constant of 3.3 nM. Stimulation with FMLP induces a transient Ca2+ flux. FMLP also triggers adhesion of L1-2 FPR cells to TNF-alpha- or LPS-activated bEnd3 cells (mouse brain-derived endothelial cells) and to purified mouse VCAM-1. Binding is inhibited by Abs to VCAM-1 and to the alpha-chain of its lymphocyte receptor (the alpha 4 beta 1 integrin, VLA-4). Stimulation with FMLP does not induce a change in cell surface expression of alpha 4. Induced adhesion to VCAM-1 is rapid, detectable at the earliest times measurable (30 to 60 s after FMLP addition), and is inhibited by pertussis toxin. We conclude that FPR can mediate integrin activation not only in neutrophils but also in lymphocytes, and can trigger rapid adhesion via lymphocyte alpha 4 beta 1. The adhesion of lymphocytes is critical to their migration and targeting; our results suggest the possibility of manipulating adhesive responses through expression of chemoattractant receptors in lymphoid cells engineered for cellular therapy, allowing targeted adhesion and potentially migration in response to locally administered ligands.

  19. Ligand-induced adhesion to activated endothelium and to vascular cell adhesion molecule-1 in lymphocytes transfected with the N-formyl peptide receptor.

    PubMed

    Honda, S; Campbell, J J; Andrew, D P; Engelhardt, B; Butcher, B A; Warnock, R A; Ye, R D; Butcher, E C

    1994-04-15

    Binding of FMLP to the neutrophil N-formyl peptide receptor (FPR) transmits signals through pertussis toxin-sensitive G proteins triggering Ca2+ flux, superoxide production, granule exocytosis, and neutrophil aggregation and adhesion involving the beta 2 (CD18) integrins. Expression of the FPR in mouse fibroblasts or human kidney cells has been shown to confer an N-formyl peptide-inducible Ca2+ flux in transfectants. Here we demonstrate that the transfected receptor can also support ligand-induced alterations in cellular adhesion. We established stable transfectants of mouse L1-2 pre-B cells with cDNA for human FPR (L1-2 FPR cells). The transfectants bind N-formyl-Nle-Leu-Phe-Nle-Tyr-Lys-fluorescein with 1.4 x 10(5) sites per cell and a dissociation constant of 3.3 nM. Stimulation with FMLP induces a transient Ca2+ flux. FMLP also triggers adhesion of L1-2 FPR cells to TNF-alpha- or LPS-activated bEnd3 cells (mouse brain-derived endothelial cells) and to purified mouse VCAM-1. Binding is inhibited by Abs to VCAM-1 and to the alpha-chain of its lymphocyte receptor (the alpha 4 beta 1 integrin, VLA-4). Stimulation with FMLP does not induce a change in cell surface expression of alpha 4. Induced adhesion to VCAM-1 is rapid, detectable at the earliest times measurable (30 to 60 s after FMLP addition), and is inhibited by pertussis toxin. We conclude that FPR can mediate integrin activation not only in neutrophils but also in lymphocytes, and can trigger rapid adhesion via lymphocyte alpha 4 beta 1. The adhesion of lymphocytes is critical to their migration and targeting; our results suggest the possibility of manipulating adhesive responses through expression of chemoattractant receptors in lymphoid cells engineered for cellular therapy, allowing targeted adhesion and potentially migration in response to locally administered ligands. PMID:7511663

  20. Decipher the dynamic coordination between enzymatic activity and structural modulation at focal adhesions in living cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, Shaoying; Seong, Jihye; Wang, Yi; Chang, Shiou-Chi; Eichorst, John Paul; Ouyang, Mingxing; Li, Julie Y.-S.; Chien, Shu; Wang, Yingxiao

    2014-07-01

    Focal adhesions (FAs) are dynamic subcellular structures crucial for cell adhesion, migration and differentiation. It remains an enigma how enzymatic activities in these local complexes regulate their structural remodeling in live cells. Utilizing biosensors based on fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET), we developed a correlative FRET imaging microscopy (CFIM) approach to quantitatively analyze the subcellular coordination between the enzymatic Src activation and the structural FA disassembly. CFIM reveals that the Src kinase activity only within the microdomain of lipid rafts at the plasma membrane is coupled with FA dynamics. FA disassembly at cell periphery was linearly dependent on this raft-localized Src activity, although cells displayed heterogeneous levels of response to stimulation. Within lipid rafts, the time delay between Src activation and FA disassembly was 1.2 min in cells seeded on low fibronectin concentration ([FN]) and 4.3 min in cells on high [FN]. CFIM further showed that the level of Src-FA coupling, as well as the time delay, was regulated by cell-matrix interactions, as a tight enzyme-structure coupling occurred in FA populations mediated by integrin αvβ3, but not in those by integrin α5β1. Therefore, different FA subpopulations have distinctive regulation mechanisms between their local kinase activity and structural FA dynamics.

  1. Decipher the dynamic coordination between enzymatic activity and structural modulation at focal adhesions in living cells.

    PubMed

    Lu, Shaoying; Seong, Jihye; Wang, Yi; Chang, Shiou-chi; Eichorst, John Paul; Ouyang, Mingxing; Li, Julie Y-S; Chien, Shu; Wang, Yingxiao

    2014-01-01

    Focal adhesions (FAs) are dynamic subcellular structures crucial for cell adhesion, migration and differentiation. It remains an enigma how enzymatic activities in these local complexes regulate their structural remodeling in live cells. Utilizing biosensors based on fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET), we developed a correlative FRET imaging microscopy (CFIM) approach to quantitatively analyze the subcellular coordination between the enzymatic Src activation and the structural FA disassembly. CFIM reveals that the Src kinase activity only within the microdomain of lipid rafts at the plasma membrane is coupled with FA dynamics. FA disassembly at cell periphery was linearly dependent on this raft-localized Src activity, although cells displayed heterogeneous levels of response to stimulation. Within lipid rafts, the time delay between Src activation and FA disassembly was 1.2 min in cells seeded on low fibronectin concentration ([FN]) and 4.3 min in cells on high [FN]. CFIM further showed that the level of Src-FA coupling, as well as the time delay, was regulated by cell-matrix interactions, as a tight enzyme-structure coupling occurred in FA populations mediated by integrin αvβ₃, but not in those by integrin α₅β₁. Therefore, different FA subpopulations have distinctive regulation mechanisms between their local kinase activity and structural FA dynamics.

  2. [Endothelial cell adhesion molecules].

    PubMed

    Ivanov, A N; Norkin, I A; Puchin'ian, D M; Shirokov, V Iu; Zhdanova, O Iu

    2014-01-01

    The review presents current data concerning the functional role of endothelial cell adhesion molecules belonging to different structural families: integrins, selectins, cadherins, and the immunoglobulin super-family. In this manuscript the regulatory mechanisms and factors of adhesion molecules expression and distribution on the surface of endothelial cells are discussed. The data presented reveal the importance of adhesion molecules in the regulation of structural and functional state of endothelial cells in normal conditions and in pathology. Particular attention is paid to the importance of these molecules in the processes of physiological and pathological angiogenesis, regulation of permeability of the endothelial barrier and cell transmigration.

  3. L1 cell adhesion molecule induces melanoma cell motility by activation of mitogen-activated protein kinase pathways.

    PubMed

    Yi, Young-Su; Baek, Kwang-Soo; Cho, Jae Youl

    2014-06-01

    L1 cell adhesion molecule (L1CAM) is highly expressed in various types of cancer cells and has been implicated in the control of cell proliferation and motility. Recently, L1CAM was reported to induce the motility of melanoma cells, but the mechanism of this induction remains poorly understood. In this study, we investigated the molecular mechanisms by which L1CAM induces the motility of melanoma cells. Unlike other types of cancer cells, B16F10 melanoma cells highly expressed L1CAM at both the RNA and protein levels, and the expression of L1CAM induced AP-1 activity. In accordance to AP-1 activation, MAPK signaling pathways were activated by L1CAM. Inhibition of L1CAM expression by L1CAM-specific siRNA suppressed the activation of MAPKs such as ERK and p38. However, no significant change was observed in JNK activation. As expected, upstream MAP2K, MKK3/6, MAP3K, and TAK1 were also deactivated by the inhibition of L1CAM expression. L1CAM induced the motility of B16F10 cells. Inhibition of L1CAM expression suppressed migration and invasion of B16F10 cells, but no suppressive effect was observed on their proliferation and anti-apoptotic resistance. Treatment of B16F10 cells with U0126, an ERK inhibitor, or SB203580, a p38 inhibitor, suppressed the migration and invasion abilities of B16F10 cells. Taken together, our results suggest that L1CAM induces the motility of B16F10 melanoma cells via the activation of MAPK pathways. This finding provides a more detailed molecular mechanism of L1CAM-mediated induction of melanoma cell motility. PMID:24974583

  4. Microtubules Inhibit E-Cadherin Adhesive Activity by Maintaining Phosphorylated p120-Catenin in a Colon Carcinoma Cell Model

    PubMed Central

    Maiden, Stephanie L.; Petrova, Yuliya I.; Gumbiner, Barry M.

    2016-01-01

    Tight regulation of cadherin-mediated intercellular adhesions is critical to both tissue morphogenesis during development and tissue homeostasis in adults. Cell surface expression of the cadherin-catenin complex is often directly correlated with the level of adhesion, however, examples exist where cadherin appears to be inactive and cells are completely non-adhesive. The state of p120-catenin phosphorylation has been implicated in regulating the adhesive activity of E-cadherin but the mechanism is currently unclear. We have found that destabilization of the microtubule cytoskeleton, independent of microtubule plus-end dynamics, dephosphorylates p120-catenin and activates E-cadherin adhesion in Colo 205 cells. Through chemical screening, we have also identified several kinases as potential regulators of E-cadherin adhesive activity. Analysis of several p120-catenin phosphomutants suggests that gross dephosphorylation of p120-catenin rather than that of specific amino acids may trigger E-cadherin adhesion. Uncoupling p120-catenin binding to E-cadherin at the membrane causes constitutive adhesion in Colo 205 cells, further supporting an inhibitory role of phosphorylated p120-catenin on E-cadherin activity. PMID:26845024

  5. Chitosan hydrogels enriched with polyphenols: Antibacterial activity, cell adhesion and growth and mineralization.

    PubMed

    Lišková, Jana; Douglas, Timothy E L; Beranová, Jana; Skwarczyńska, Agata; Božič, Mojca; Samal, Sangram Keshari; Modrzejewska, Zofia; Gorgieva, Selestina; Kokol, Vanja; Bačáková, Lucie

    2015-09-20

    Injectable hydrogels for bone regeneration consisting of chitosan, sodium beta-glycerophosphate (Na-β-GP) and alkaline phosphatase (ALP) were enriched with the polyphenols phloroglucinol (PG) and gallic acid (GA) and characterized physicochemically and biologically with respect to properties relevant for applications in bone regeneration, namely gelation kinetics, mineralizability, antioxidant properties, antibacterial activity, cytocompatibility and ability to support adhesion and growth of human osteoblast-like MG63 cells. Enrichment with PG and GA had no negative effect on gelation kinetics and mineralizability. PG and GA both enhanced antioxidant activity of unmineralized hydrogels. Mineralization reduced antioxidant activity of hydrogels containing GA. Hydrogels containing GA, PG and without polyphenols reduced colony forming ability of Escherichia coli after 1h, 3h and 6h incubation and slowed E. coli growth in liquid culture for 150min. Hydrogels containing GA were cytotoxic and supported cell growth more poorly than polyphenol-free hydrogels. PG had no negative effect on cell adhesion and growth. PMID:26050898

  6. Cysteine Protease Activity of Feline Tritrichomonas foetus Promotes Adhesion-Dependent Cytotoxicity to Intestinal Epithelial Cells

    PubMed Central

    Tolbert, M. K.; Stauffer, S. H.; Brand, M. D.

    2014-01-01

    Trichomonads are obligate protozoan parasites most renowned as venereal pathogens of the reproductive tract of humans and cattle. Recently, a trichomonad highly similar to bovine venereal Tritrichomonas foetus but having a unique tropism for the intestinal tract was recognized as a significant cause of colitis in domestic cats. Despite a high prevalence, worldwide distribution, and lack of consistently effective drugs for treatment of the infection, the cellular mechanisms of T. foetus pathogenicity in the intestinal tract have not been examined. The aims of this study were to determine the pathogenic effect of feline T. foetus on porcine intestinal epithelial cells, the dependence of T. foetus pathogenicity on adhesion of T. foetus to the intestinal epithelium, and the identity of mediators responsible for these effects. Using an in vitro coculture approach to model feline T. foetus infection of the intestinal epithelium, these studies demonstrate that T. foetus promotes a direct contact-dependent activation of intestinal epithelial cell apoptosis signaling and progressive monolayer destruction. Moreover, these pathological effects were demonstrated to be largely dependent on T. foetus cell-associated cysteine protease activity. Finally, T. foetus cysteine proteases were identified as enabling cytopathic effects by promoting adhesion of T. foetus to the intestinal epithelium. The present studies are the first to examine the cellular mechanisms of pathogenicity of T. foetus toward the intestinal epithelium and support further investigation of the cysteine proteases as virulence factors in vivo and as potential therapeutic targets for ameliorating the pathological effects of intestinal trichomonosis. PMID:24752513

  7. Elevated protein tyrosine phosphatase activity provokes Eph/ephrin-facilitated adhesion of pre-B leukemia cells.

    PubMed

    Wimmer-Kleikamp, Sabine H; Nievergall, Eva; Gegenbauer, Kristina; Adikari, Samantha; Mansour, Mariam; Yeadon, Trina; Boyd, Andrew W; Patani, Neill R; Lackmann, Martin

    2008-08-01

    Signaling by Eph receptors and cell-surface ephrin ligands modulates adhesive cell properties and thereby coordinates cell movement and positioning in normal and oncogenic development. While cell contact-dependent Eph activation frequently leads to cell-cell repulsion, also the diametrically opposite response, cell-cell adhesion, is a probable outcome. However, the molecular principles regulating such disparate functions have remained controversial. We have examined cell-biologic mechanisms underlying this switch by analyzing ephrin-A5-induced cell-morphologic changes of EphA3-positive LK63 pre-B acute lymphoblastic leukemia cells. Their exposure to ephrin-A5 surfaces leads to a rapid conversion from a suspended/nonpolarized to an adherent/polarized cell type, a transition that relies on EphA3 functions operating in the absence of Eph-kinase signaling. Cell morphology change and adhesion of LK63 cells are effectively attenuated by endogenous protein tyrosine phosphatase (PTP) activity, whereby PTP inhibition and productive EphA3-phosphotyrosine signaling reverse the phenotype to nonadherent cells with a condensed cytoskeleton. Our findings suggest that Eph-associated PTP activities not only control receptor phosphorylation levels, but as a result switch the response to ephrin contact from repulsion to adhesion, which may play a role in the pathology of hematopoietic tumors. PMID:18385452

  8. NK cells, displaying early activation, cytotoxicity and adhesion molecules, are associated with mild dengue disease

    PubMed Central

    Azeredo, E L; De Oliveira-Pinto, L M; Zagne, S M; Cerqueira, D I S; Nogueira, R M R; Kubelka, C F

    2006-01-01

    During the innate immune response against infections, Natural Killer (NK) cells are as important effector cells as are Cytotoxic T lymphocytes (CTL) generated after antigenic stimulation in the adaptative response. NK cells increase in numbers, after viral infection or vaccination. We investigated the NK cell and CD8 T lymphocyte status in 55 dengue infected patients. The NK (CD56+CD3−) and CD56+ T cell (CD56+CD3+) rates rise during the acute phase of disease. The majority of NK cells from dengue patients display early markers for activation (CD69, HLA-DR, and CD38) and cell adhesion molecules (CD44, CD11a) during the acute phase of disease. The intracellular cytotoxic granule, TIA-1, is also up-regulated early in NK cells. Most of these markers appear also on CD8+ T lymphocytes but during the late acute phase. Circulating IL-15 is elevated in a significant number of patients during early acute infection and its values were statistically correlated with NK frequencies and cytotoxic markers on NKs. We have therefore shown that dengue virus infection is very likely stimulating a cytotoxic response that may be efficient in controlling the virus in synergism with CD8+ T lymphocytes. Interestingly, the heightened CD56+CD3−, CD56+CD3+, CD56+TIA-1+ and CD56+CD11a+ cell rates are associated with mild dengue clinical manifestations and might indicate a good prognosis of the disease. PMID:16412060

  9. Four molecular pathways of T cell adhesion to endothelial cells: roles of LFA-1, VCAM-1, and ELAM-1 and changes in pathway hierarchy under different activation conditions

    PubMed Central

    1991-01-01

    T cell adhesion to endothelium is critical to lymphocyte recirculation and influx into sites of inflammation. We have systematically analyzed the role of four receptor/ligand interactions that mediate adhesion of peripheral human CD4+ T cells to cultured human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVEC): T cell LFA-1 binding to ICAM-1 and an alternative ligand ("ICAM-X"), T cell VLA-4 binding to VCAM-1, and T cell binding to ELAM-1. Contributions of these four pathways depend on the activation state of both the T cell and HUVEC, and the differentiation state of the T cell. ELAM-1 plays a significant role in mediating adhesion of resting CD4+ T cells to activated HUVEC. LFA-1 adhesion dominates with PMA-activated T cells but the strength and predominant LFA-1 ligand is determined by the activation state of the HUVEC; while ICAM-1 is the dominant ligand on IL-1-induced HUVEC, "ICAM- X" dominates binding to uninduced HUVEC. Adhesion via VLA-4 depends on induction of its ligand VCAM-1 on activated HUVEC; PMA activation of T cells augments VLA-4-mediated adhesion, both in the model of T/HUVEC binding and in a simplified model of T cell adhesion to VCAM-1- transfected L cells. Unlike LFA-1 and VLA-4, ELAM-1-mediated adhesion is not increased by T cell activation. Differential expression of adhesion molecules on CD4+ T cell subsets understood to be naive and memory cells also regulates T/HUVEC adhesion. Naive T cell adhesion to HUVEC is mediated predominantly by LFA-1 with little or no involvement of the VLA-4 and ELAM-1 pathways. In contrast, memory T cells bind better to HUVEC and utilize all four pathways. These studies demonstrate that there are at least four molecular pathways mediating T/HUVEC adhesion and that the dominance/hierarchy of these pathways varies dramatically with the activation state of the interacting cells and the differentiation state of the T cell. PMID:1710227

  10. Impact of simulated microgravity on the secretory and adhesive activity of cultured human vascular endothelial cells.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rudimov, Evgeny; Buravkova, Ludmila; Pogodina, Margarita; Andrianova, Irina

    The layer of vascular endothelial cells (ECs) is a dynamic,disseminated organ that perform the function of an interface between the blood and vascular wall. The endothelial monolayer is able to quickly respond to changes in the microenvironment due to its synthesis of vasoactive substances, chemokines, adhesion molecules expression, etc. ECs are highly sensitive to gravitational changes and capable of short-term and long-term responses (Sangha et al., 2001; Buravkova et al., 2005; Infanger et al., 2006, 2007. However, the question remains how to reflect the impact of microgravity on endothelium under the inflammatory process. Therefore, the aim of this study was to investigate secretory and adhesive activity of human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs) during simulated microgravity and TNF-a activation. HUVECs were isolated according to Gimbrone et al. (1978) in modification A. Antonov (1981) and used for experiments at 2-4 passages. HUVECs were activated by low level of TNF-a (2 ng/ml). Microgravity was generated by Random Positioning Machine (RPM, Dutch Space, Leiden) placed into the thermostat at 37°C. After 24 hours of clinorotation we measured adhesion molecules expression on the cell surface (ICAM-1, VCAM-1, PECAM-1, E-selectin, CD144, endoglin (CD105)) and cell viability using a flow cytometry. To evaluate the level of target gene expression was used the real time RT-PCR. IL-6 and IL-8 concentration was measured in the conditioned medium of HUVECs by using the ELISA test. We found that simulated microgravity within 24 hours caused a decrease of ICAM-1, CD144, and E-selectin expression, at the same time not affect the cell viability, endoglin and PECAM-1 expression on the surface HUVEC. Furthermore, there were no changes of the level of IL-6 and IL-8 gene expression and their products in the culture medium. TNF-activated HUVECs showed an increase in gene expression of interleukins and molecules involved in the adhesion process, which also was confirmed

  11. Ankyrin-binding activity of nervous system cell adhesion molecules expressed in adult brain.

    PubMed

    Davis, J Q; Bennett, V

    1993-01-01

    A family of ankyrin-binding glycoproteins have been identified in adult rat brain that include alternatively spliced products of the same pre-mRNA. A composite sequence of ankyrin-binding glycoprotein (ABGP) shares 72% amino acid sequence identity with chicken neurofascin, a membrane-spanning neural cell adhesion molecule in the Ig super-family expressed in embryonic brain. ABGP polypeptides and ankyrin associate as pure proteins in a 1:1 molar stoichiometry at a site located in the predicted cytoplasmic domain. ABGP polypeptides are expressed late in postnatal development to approximately the same levels as ankyrin, and comprise a significant fraction of brain membrane proteins. Immunofluorescence studies have shown that ABGP polypeptides are co-localized with ankyrinB. Major differences in developmental expression have been reported for neurofascin in embryos compared with the late postnatal expression of ABGP, suggesting that ABGP and neurofascin represent products of gene duplication events that have subsequently evolved in parallel with distinct roles. Predicted cytoplasmic domains of rat ABGP and chicken neurofascin are nearly identical to each other and closely related to a group of nervous system cell adhesion molecules with variable extracellular domains, including L1, Nr-CAM and Ng-CAM of vertebrates, and neuroglian of Drosophila. A hypothesis to be evaluated is that ankyrin-binding activity is shared by all of these proteins.

  12. Quantitative methods for analyzing cell-cell adhesion in development.

    PubMed

    Kashef, Jubin; Franz, Clemens M

    2015-05-01

    During development cell-cell adhesion is not only crucial to maintain tissue morphogenesis and homeostasis, it also activates signalling pathways important for the regulation of different cellular processes including cell survival, gene expression, collective cell migration and differentiation. Importantly, gene mutations of adhesion receptors can cause developmental disorders and different diseases. Quantitative methods to measure cell adhesion are therefore necessary to understand how cells regulate cell-cell adhesion during development and how aberrations in cell-cell adhesion contribute to disease. Different in vitro adhesion assays have been developed in the past, but not all of them are suitable to study developmentally-related cell-cell adhesion processes, which usually requires working with low numbers of primary cells. In this review, we provide an overview of different in vitro techniques to study cell-cell adhesion during development, including a semi-quantitative cell flipping assay, and quantitative single-cell methods based on atomic force microscopy (AFM)-based single-cell force spectroscopy (SCFS) or dual micropipette aspiration (DPA). Furthermore, we review applications of Förster resonance energy transfer (FRET)-based molecular tension sensors to visualize intracellular mechanical forces acting on cell adhesion sites. Finally, we describe a recently introduced method to quantitate cell-generated forces directly in living tissues based on the deformation of oil microdroplets functionalized with adhesion receptor ligands. Together, these techniques provide a comprehensive toolbox to characterize different cell-cell adhesion phenomena during development.

  13. Inhibition of transforming growth factor-β-activated kinase-1 blocks cancer cell adhesion, invasion, and metastasis

    PubMed Central

    Ray, D M; Myers, P H; Painter, J T; Hoenerhoff, M J; Olden, K; Roberts, J D

    2012-01-01

    Background: Tumour cell metastasis involves cell adhesion and invasion, processes that depend on signal transduction, which can be influenced by the tumour microenvironment. N-6 polyunsaturated fatty acids, found both in the diet and in response to inflammatory responses, are important components of this microenvironment. Methods: We used short hairpin RNA (shRNA) knockdown of TGF-β-activated kinase-1 (TAK1) in human tumour cells to examine its involvement in fatty acid-stimulated cell adhesion and invasion in vitro. An in vivo model of metastasis was developed in which cells, stably expressing firefly luciferase and either a control shRNA or a TAK1-specific shRNA, were injected into the mammary fat pads of mice fed diets, rich in n-6 polyunsaturated fatty acids. Tumour growth and spontaneous metastasis were monitored with in vivo and in situ imaging of bioluminescence. Results: Arachidonic acid activated TAK1 and downstream kinases in MDA-MB-435 breast cancer cells and led to increased adhesion and invasion. Knockdown of TAK1 blocked this activation and inhibited both cell adhesion and invasion in vitro. Tumour growth at the site of injection was not affected by TAK1 knockdown, but both the incidence and extent of metastasis to the lung were significantly reduced in mice injected with TAK1 knockdown cells compared with mice carrying control tumour cells. Conclusion: These data demonstrate the importance of TAK1 signalling in tumour metastasis in vivo and suggest an opportunity for antimetastatic therapies. PMID:22644295

  14. Interleukin 3 stimulates proliferation and triggers endothelial-leukocyte adhesion molecule 1 gene activation of human endothelial cells.

    PubMed

    Brizzi, M F; Garbarino, G; Rossi, P R; Pagliardi, G L; Arduino, C; Avanzi, G C; Pegoraro, L

    1993-06-01

    Proliferation and functional activation of endothelial cells within a tissue site of inflammation are regulated by humoral factors released by cells, such as T lymphocytes and monocytes, infiltrating the perivascular space. In the present study we investigated the effects of interleukin 3 (IL-3), an activated T lymphocyte-derived cytokine, on cultured human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVEC). Proliferative activity, evaluated both by estimation of the fraction of cells in the S phase and by direct cell count demonstrated that IL-3, at the dose of 25 ng/ml, enhances more than threefold both DNA synthesis and cell proliferation above baseline control conditions. Binding studies with radioiodinated ligand demonstrated that HUVEC constitutively express a smaller number of IL-3 binding sites (approximately 99 binding sites per cell, with an apparent Kd of 149 pM). Accordingly, molecular analysis showed the presence of transcripts for both alpha and beta subunits of the IL-3 receptor. Functional activation of endothelial cells was evaluated by the expression of the endothelial-leukocyte adhesion molecule 1 (ELAM-1) transcript and by leukocyte adhesion. The ELAM-1 gene transcript was clearly detectable 4 h after IL-3 addition and started to decrease after 12 h. Moreover, IL-3-induced ELAM-1 transcription was followed by enhanced adhesion of neutrophils and CD4+ T cells to HUVEC. The findings that IL-3 can stimulate both proliferation and functional activation of endothelial cells suggest that this cytokine can be involved in sustaining the process of chronic inflammation.

  15. Intracellular reactive oxygen species activate Src tyrosine kinase during cell adhesion and anchorage-dependent cell growth.

    PubMed

    Giannoni, Elisa; Buricchi, Francesca; Raugei, Giovanni; Ramponi, Giampietro; Chiarugi, Paola

    2005-08-01

    Src tyrosine kinases are central components of adhesive responses and are required for cell spreading onto the extracellular matrix. Among other intracellular messengers elicited by integrin ligation are reactive oxygen species, which act as synergistic mediators of cytoskeleton rearrangement and cell spreading. We report that after integrin ligation, the tyrosine kinase Src is oxidized and activated. Src displays an early activation phase, concurrent with focal adhesion formation and driven mainly by Tyr527 dephosphorylation, and a late phase, concomitant with reactive oxygen species production, cell spreading, and integrin-elicited kinase oxidation. In addition, our results suggest that reactive oxygen species are key mediators of in vitro and in vivo v-Src tumorigenic properties, as both antioxidant treatments and the oxidant-insensitive C245A and C487A Src mutants greatly decrease invasivity, serum-independent and anchorage-independent growth, and tumor onset. Therefore we propose that, in addition to the known phosphorylation/dephosphorylation circuitry, redox regulation of Src activity is required during both cell attachment to the extracellular matrix and tumorigenesis.

  16. Numerically bridging lamellipodial and filopodial activity during cell spreading reveals a potentially novel trigger of focal adhesion maturation.

    PubMed

    Loosli, Y; Vianay, B; Luginbuehl, R; Snedeker, J G

    2012-05-01

    We present a novel approach to modeling cell spreading, and use it to reveal a potentially central mechanism regulating focal adhesion maturation in various cell phenotypes. Actin bundles that span neighboring focal complexes at the lamellipodium-lamellum interface were assumed to be loaded by intracellular forces in proportion to bundle length. We hypothesized that the length of an actin bundle (with the corresponding accumulated force at its adhesions) may thus regulate adhesion maturation to ensure cell mechanical stability and morphological integrity. We developed a model to test this hypothesis, implementing a "top-down" approach to simplify certain cellular processes while explicitly incorporating complexity of other key subcellular mechanisms. Filopodial and lamellipodial activities were treated as modular processes with functional spatiotemporal interactions coordinated by rules regarding focal adhesion turnover and actin bundle dynamics. This theoretical framework was able to robustly predict temporal evolution of cell area and cytoskeletal organization as reported from a wide range of cell spreading experiments using micropatterned substrates. We conclude that a geometric/temporal modeling framework can capture the key functional aspects of the rapid spreading phase and resultant cytoskeletal complexity. Hence the model is used to reveal mechanistic insight into basic cell behavior essential for spreading. It demonstrates that actin bundles spanning nascent focal adhesions such that they are aligned to the leading edge may accumulate centripetal endogenous forces along their length, and could thus trigger focal adhesion maturation in a force-length dependent fashion. We suggest that this mechanism could be a central "integrating" factor that effectively coordinates force-mediated adhesion maturation at the lamellipodium-lamellum interface. PMID:22453759

  17. Activity-dependent mobilization of the adhesion molecule polysialic NCAM to the cell surface of neurons and endocrine cells.

    PubMed Central

    Kiss, J Z; Wang, C; Olive, S; Rougon, G; Lang, J; Baetens, D; Harry, D; Pralong, W F

    1994-01-01

    The alpha-2,8-linked sialic acid polymer (PSA) on the neural cell adhesion molecule (NCAM) is an important regulator of cell surface interactions. We have examined the translocation of PSA-NCAM to the surface of cultured cortical neurons and insulin secreting beta cells under different conditions of cell activity. Endoneuraminidase N, an enzyme that specifically cleaves PSA chains, was used to remove pre-existing PSA from the plasma membrane and the re-expression of the molecule was monitored by immunocytochemistry. Punctate PSA immunostaining was restored on the surface of 68% of neurons within 1 h. This recovery was almost completely prevented by tetrodotoxin, suggesting that spontaneous electrical activity is required. K+ depolarization (50 mM) allowed recovery of PSA surface staining in the presence of tetrodotoxin and this effect required the presence of extracellular Ca2+. Rapid redistribution of PSA-NCAM to the surface of beta cells was observed under conditions that stimulate insulin secretion. Ca2+ channel inhibition decreased both PSA-NCAM expression and insulin secretion to control, non-stimulated levels. Finally, subcellular fractionation of an insulin-secreting cell line showed that the secretory vesicle fraction is highly enriched in PSA-NCAM. These results suggest that PSA-NCAM can be translocated to the cell surface via regulated exocytosis. Taken together, our results provide unprecedented evidence linking cell activity and PSA-NCAM expression, and suggest a mechanism for rapid modulation of cell surface interactions. Images PMID:7957094

  18. PROLACTIN-INDUCED TYROSINE PHOSPHORYLATION, ACTIVATION AND RECEPTOR ASSOCIATION OF FOCAL ADHESION KINASE (FAK) IN MAMMARY EPITHELIAL CELLS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Prolactin-Induced Tyrosine Phosphorylation, Activation and Receptor
    Association of Focal Adhesion Kinase (FAK) in Mammary Epithelial Cells.
    Suzanne E. Fenton1 and Lewis G. Sheffield2. 1U.S. Environmental Protection
    Agency, MD-72, Research Triangle Park, NC 27711, and

  19. Suppression of complement regulatory protein C1 inhibitor in vascular endothelial activation by inhibiting vascular cell adhesion molecule-1 action

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Haimou; Qin, Gangjian; Liang, Gang; Li, Jinan; Chiu, Isaac; Barrington, Robert A.; Liu, Dongxu . E-mail: dxliu001@yahoo.com

    2007-07-13

    Increased expression of adhesion molecules by activated endothelium is a critical feature of vascular inflammation associated with the several diseases such as endotoxin shock and sepsis/septic shock. Our data demonstrated complement regulatory protein C1 inhibitor (C1INH) prevents endothelial cell injury. We hypothesized that C1INH has the ability of an anti-endothelial activation associated with suppression of expression of adhesion molecule(s). C1INH blocked leukocyte adhesion to endothelial cell monolayer in both static assay and flow conditions. In inflammatory condition, C1INH reduced vascular cell adhesion molecule (VCAM-1) expression associated with its cytoplasmic mRNA destabilization and nuclear transcription level. Studies exploring the underlying mechanism of C1INH-mediated suppression in VCAM-1 expression were related to reduction of NF-{kappa}B activation and nuclear translocation in an I{kappa}B{alpha}-dependent manner. The inhibitory effects were associated with reduction of inhibitor I{kappa}B kinase activity and stabilization of the NF-{kappa}B inhibitor I{kappa}B. These findings indicate a novel role for C1INH in inhibition of vascular endothelial activation. These observations could provide the basis for new therapeutic application of C1INH to target inflammatory processes in different pathologic situations.

  20. Monocyte exosomes induce adhesion molecules and cytokines via activation of NF-κB in endothelial cells.

    PubMed

    Tang, Norina; Sun, Bing; Gupta, Archana; Rempel, Hans; Pulliam, Lynn

    2016-09-01

    HIV-infected individuals have activated monocytes with an IFNα phenotype and elevated levels of circulating LPS. These individuals also have a risk of premature cardiovascular disease. The effect of activated monocyte exosomes (Exos) on endothelial cells is unknown. To determine whether Exos from immune-activated monocytes could alter endothelial cell expression and contribute to monocyte/macrophage transmigration and adhesion, we isolated Exos from monocytes stimulated with IFNα, LPS, or both (I/L). We show that monocyte Exos contain different inflammatory microRNA cargo depending on stimulation. When LPS Exos or I/L Exos were added to HUVECs, we found a significant increase in adhesion molecule ICAM-1, chemokine ligand (CCL)-2, and cytokine IL-6 mRNAs and proteins compared with cells treated with IFNα Exos or Exos derived from unstimulated monocytes. Inhibition of transcription factor NF-κB, a common inflammatory cytokine pathway, prevented induction of CCL2, IL6, and ICAM1 Inhibition of TLR4 resulted in differential blockage of the targets. Our results demonstrate for the first time that primary human monocyte Exos enter endothelial cells and cause dysfunction via the TLR4 and NF-κB pathways, which may contribute to heart disease in HIV infection and other diseases involving chronic immune activation.-Tang, N., Sun, B., Gupta, A., Rempel, H., Pulliam, L. Monocyte exosomes induce adhesion molecules and cytokines via activation of NF-κB in endothelial cells. PMID:27226520

  1. Regulation of Cell Adhesion Strength by Peripheral Focal Adhesion Distribution

    PubMed Central

    Elineni, Kranthi Kumar; Gallant, Nathan D.

    2011-01-01

    Cell adhesion to extracellular matrices is a tightly regulated process that involves the complex interplay between biochemical and mechanical events at the cell-adhesive interface. Previous work established the spatiotemporal contributions of adhesive components to adhesion strength and identified a nonlinear dependence on cell spreading. This study was designed to investigate the regulation of cell-adhesion strength by the size and position of focal adhesions (FA). The cell-adhesive interface was engineered to direct FA assembly to the periphery of the cell-spreading area to delineate the cell-adhesive area from the cell-spreading area. It was observed that redistributing the same adhesive area over a larger cell-spreading area significantly enhanced cell-adhesion strength, but only up to a threshold area. Moreover, the size of the peripheral FAs, which was interpreted as an adhesive patch, did not directly govern the adhesion strength. Interestingly, this is in contrast to the previously reported functional role of FAs in regulating cellular traction where sizes of the peripheral FAs play a critical role. These findings demonstrate, to our knowledge for the first time, that two spatial regimes in cell-spreading area exist that uniquely govern the structure-function role of FAs in regulating cell-adhesion strength. PMID:22208188

  2. Circulating soluble adhesion molecules in patients with giant cell arteritis. Correlation between soluble intercellular adhesion molecule-1 (sICAM-1) concentrations and disease activity

    PubMed Central

    Coll-Vinent, B.; Vilardell, C.; Font, C.; Oristrell, J.; Hernandez-Rodrigu..., J.; Yague, J.; Urbano-Marquez, A.; Grau, J.; Cid, M.

    1999-01-01

    OBJECTIVE—To evaluate whether changes in concentrations of circulating adhesion molecules are related to disease activity in patients with giant cell arteritis (GCA).
METHODS—A sandwich ELISA was used to measure soluble intercellular adhesion molecule-1 (sICAM-1), sICAM-3, vascular cell adhesion molecule-1 (sVCAM-1), E-selectin (sE-selectin), and L-selectin (sL-selectin) in serum and plasma samples from patients with GCA. A cross sectional study was performed on 64 GCA patients at different activity stages and on 35 age and sex matched healthy donors. Thirteen of these patients were evaluated at the time of diagnosis and serially during follow up.
RESULTS—At the time of diagnosis, sICAM-1 concentrations were significantly higher in active GCA patients than in controls (mean (SD) 360.55 (129.78) ng/ml versus 243.25 (47.43) ng/ml, p<0.001). In contrast, sICAM-3, sVCAM-1, sE-selectin, and sL-selectin values did not differ from those obtained in normal donors. With corticosteroid administration, a decrease in sICAM-1 concentrations was observed, reaching normal values when clinical remission was achieved (263.18 (92.7) ng/ml globally, 293.59 (108.39) ng/ml in the group of patients in recent remission, and 236.83 (70.02) ng/ml in those in long term remission). In the 13 patients followed up longitudinally, sICAM-1 values also normalised with clinical remission (225.87 (64.25) ng/ml in patients in recent remission, and 256.29 (75.15) ng/ml in those in long term remission).
CONCLUSIONS—Circulating sICAM-1 concentrations clearly correlate with clinically apparent disease activity in GCA patients. Differences with results previously found in patients with other vasculitides may indicate that different pathogenic mechanisms contribute to vascular inflammation in different disorders.

 Keywords: adhesion molecules; giant cell arteritis; inflammation PMID:10364919

  3. Cell adhesion molecules as a marker reflecting the reduction of endothelial activation induced by glucocorticoids.

    PubMed

    Leone, Marc; Boutière-Albanèse, Brigitte; Valette, Sarah; Camoin-Jau, Laurence; Barrau, Karine; Albanèse, Jacques; Martin, Claude; Dignat-George, Françoise

    2004-04-01

    In vitro, steroids down-regulate the expression of cell adhesion molecules (CAMs) in endothelial cells stimulated by lipopolysaccharide. Low-dose hydrocortisone is a new treatment of patients with septic shock, a state that is characterized by an endothelial injury. The aim of the present study was to investigate whether the plasma levels of soluble CAMs, reflecting in vivo endothelial activation, could be modulated in patients with septic shock treated by hydrocortisone. This was a prospective and observational study conducted in the intensive care unit at a university hospital. The subjects included 40 patients with septic shock (American College of Chest Physicians Consensus Conference/Society of Critical Care Medicine definition); 45 healthy blood donors served as controls. The patients receiving the standard care ("reference group") during the first 6 months were compared with the patients receiving the hydrocortisone therapy ("hydrocortisone group") for the next 6 months. Measurements of sCAMs were performed on days 1 and 3 of the disease. On day 1, sE-selectin, sP-selectin, sVCAM-1, and sICAM-1 were significantly elevated in patients with septic shock compared with healthy donors. sE-selectin levels significantly decreased between days 1 and 3 in the "hydrocortisone group," whereas there was no significant change in the "reference group". Surprisingly, sICAM-1 levels significantly increased between days 1 and 3 only in patients treated by hydrocortisone. No significant changes were observed for sP-selectin and sVCAM-1 levels in the two groups. In patients with septic shock, glucocorticoids differently affected the pattern of evolution of sCAMs, with sE-selectin being decreased and sICAM-1 being increased. Expression of sP-selectin and sVCAM-1 was not affected.

  4. Lowered Expression of Tumor Suppressor Candidate MYO1C Stimulates Cell Proliferation, Suppresses Cell Adhesion and Activates AKT

    PubMed Central

    Visuttijai, Kittichate; Pettersson, Jennifer; Mehrbani Azar, Yashar; van den Bout, Iman; Örndal, Charlotte; Marcickiewicz, Janusz; Nilsson, Staffan; Hörnquist, Michael; Olsson, Björn; Ejeskär, Katarina

    2016-01-01

    Myosin-1C (MYO1C) is a tumor suppressor candidate located in a region of recurrent losses distal to TP53. Myo1c can tightly and specifically bind to PIP2, the substrate of Phosphoinositide 3-kinase (PI3K), and to Rictor, suggesting a role for MYO1C in the PI3K pathway. This study was designed to examine MYO1C expression status in a panel of well-stratified endometrial carcinomas as well as to assess the biological significance of MYO1C as a tumor suppressor in vitro. We found a significant correlation between the tumor stage and lowered expression of MYO1C in endometrial carcinoma samples. In cell transfection experiments, we found a negative correlation between MYO1C expression and cell proliferation, and MYO1C silencing resulted in diminished cell migration and adhesion. Cells expressing excess of MYO1C had low basal level of phosphorylated protein kinase B (PKB, a.k.a. AKT) and cells with knocked down MYO1C expression showed a quicker phosphorylated AKT (pAKT) response in reaction to serum stimulation. Taken together the present study gives further evidence for tumor suppressor activity of MYO1C and suggests MYO1C mediates its tumor suppressor function through inhibition of PI3K pathway and its involvement in loss of contact inhibition. PMID:27716847

  5. Notch-Mediated Cell Adhesion

    PubMed Central

    Murata, Akihiko; Hayashi, Shin-Ichi

    2016-01-01

    Notch family members are generally recognized as signaling molecules that control various cellular responses in metazoan organisms. Early fly studies and our mammalian studies demonstrated that Notch family members are also cell adhesion molecules; however, information on the physiological roles of this function and its origin is limited. In this review, we discuss the potential present and ancestral roles of Notch-mediated cell adhesion in order to explore its origin and the initial roles of Notch family members dating back to metazoan evolution. We hypothesize that Notch family members may have initially emerged as cell adhesion molecules in order to mediate multicellularity in the last common ancestor of metazoan organisms. PMID:26784245

  6. Adhesion of cells to polystyrene surfaces

    PubMed Central

    1983-01-01

    The surface treatment of polystyrene, which is required to make polystyrene suitable for cell adhesion and spreading, was investigated. Examination of surfaces treated with sulfuric acid or various oxidizing agents using (a) x-ray photoelectron and attenuated total reflection spectroscopy and (b) measurement of surface carboxyl-, hydroxyl-, and sulfur-containing groups by various radiochemical methods showed that sulfuric acid produces an insignificant number of sulfonic acid groups on polystyrene. This technique together with various oxidation techniques that render surfaces suitable for cell culture generated high surface densities of hydroxyl groups. The importance of surface hydroxyl groups for the adhesion of baby hamster kidney cells or leukocytes was demonstrated by the inhibition of adhesion when these groups were blocked: blocking of carboxyl groups did not inhibit adhesion and may raise the adhesion of a surface. These results applied to cell adhesion in the presence and absence of serum. The relative unimportance of fibronectin for the adhesion and spreading of baby hamster kidney cells to hydroxyl-rich surfaces was concluded when cells spread on such surfaces after protein synthesis was inhibited with cycloheximide, fibronectin was removed by trypsinization, and trypsin activity was stopped with leupeptin. PMID:6355120

  7. The Src homology 2 protein Shb promotes cell cycle progression in murine hematopoietic stem cells by regulation of focal adhesion kinase activity

    SciTech Connect

    Gustafsson, Karin; Heffner, Garrett; Wenzel, Pamela L.; Curran, Matthew; Grawé, Jan; McKinney-Freeman, Shannon L.; Daley, George Q.; Welsh, Michael

    2013-07-15

    The widely expressed adaptor protein Shb has previously been reported to contribute to T cell function due to its association with the T cell receptor and furthermore, several of Shb's known interaction partners are established regulators of blood cell development and function. In addition, Shb deficient embryonic stem cells displayed reduced blood cell colony formation upon differentiation in vitro. The aim of the current study was therefore to explore hematopoietic stem and progenitor cell function in the Shb knockout mouse. Shb deficient bone marrow contained reduced relative numbers of long-term hematopoietic stem cells (LT-HSCs) that exhibited lower proliferation rates. Despite this, Shb knockout LT-HSCs responded promptly by entering the cell cycle in response to genotoxic stress by 5-fluorouracil treatment. In competitive LT-HSC transplantations, Shb null cells initially engrafted as well as the wild-type cells but provided less myeloid expansion over time. Moreover, Shb knockout bone marrow cells exhibited elevated basal activities of focal adhesion kinase/Rac1/p21-activated kinase signaling and reduced responsiveness to Stem Cell Factor stimulation. Consequently, treatment with a focal adhesion kinase inhibitor increased Shb knockout LT-HSC proliferation. The altered signaling characteristics thus provide a plausible mechanistic explanation for the changes in LT-HSC proliferation since these signaling intermediates have all been shown to participate in LT-HSC cell cycle control. In summary, the loss of Shb dependent signaling in bone marrow cells, resulting in elevated focal adhesion kinase activity and reduced proliferative responses in LT-HSCs under steady state hematopoiesis, confers a disadvantage to the maintenance of LT-HSCs over time. -- Highlights: • Shb is an adaptor protein operating downstream of tyrosine kinase receptors. • Shb deficiency reduces hematopoietic stem cell proliferation. • The proliferative effect of Shb occurs via increased

  8. Activated peripheral lymphocytes with increased expression of cell adhesion molecules and cytotoxic markers are associated with dengue fever disease.

    PubMed

    Azeredo, Elzinandes L; Zagne, Sonia M O; Alvarenga, Allan R; Nogueira, Rita M R; Kubelka, Claire F; de Oliveira-Pinto, Luzia M

    2006-06-01

    The immune mechanisms involved in dengue fever and dengue hemorrhagic/dengue shock syndrome are not well understood. The ex vivo activation status of immune cells during the dengue disease in patients was examined. CD4 and CD8 T cells were reduced during the acute phase. Interestingly, CD8 T cells co-expressing activation marker HLA-DR, Q, P, and cytolytic granule protein-Tia-1 were significantly higher in dengue patients than in controls. Detection of adhesion molecules indicated that in dengue patients the majority of T cells (CD4 and CD8) express the activation/memory phenotype, characterized as CD44HIGH and lack the expression of the naïve cell marker, CD62L LOW. Also, the levels of T cells co-expressing ICAM-1 (CD54), VLA-4, and LFA-1 (CD11a) were significantly increased. CD8 T lymphocytes expressed predominantly low levels of anti-apoptotic molecule Bcl-2 in the acute phase, possibly leading to the exhibition of a phenotype of activated/effector cells. Circulating levels of IL-18, TGF-b1 and sICAM-1 were significantly elevated in dengue patients. Early activation events occur during acute dengue infection which might contribute to viral clearance. Differences in expression of adhesion molecules among CD4 and CD8 T cells might underlie the selective extravasation of these subsets from blood circulation into lymphoid organs and/or tissues. In addition, activated CD8 T cells would be more susceptible to apoptosis as shown by the alteration in Bcl-2 expression. Cytokines such as IL-18, TGF-b1, and sICAM-1 may be contributing by either stimulating or suppressing the adaptative immune response, during dengue infection, thereby perhaps establishing a relationship with disease severity.

  9. Hydrogen peroxide mediates vascular cell adhesion molecule-1 expression from interleukin-18-activated hepatic sinusoidal endothelium: implications for circulating cancer cell arrest in the murine liver.

    PubMed

    Mendoza, L; Carrascal, T; De Luca, M; Fuentes, A M; Salado, C; Blanco, J; Vidal-Vanaclocha, F

    2001-08-01

    The mechanism of intrasinusoidal arrest of circulating cancer cells, which is a critical step in liver metastasis, appears to be facilitated by tumor-derived proinflammatory factors that increase sinusoidal cell adhesion receptors for cancer cells. However, how this prometastatic microenvironment is up-regulated remains unknown. Using intrasplenically injected B16 melanoma (B16M) cells, we show that the expression of vascular cell adhesion molecule-1 (VCAM-1) significantly increased in hepatic sinusoidal endothelium (HSE) cells over physiologic baseline within the first 24 hours of metastatic cancer cell infiltration in the liver. This correlated with increased in vitro adhesion of B16M cells to HSE cells isolated from B16M cell-injected mice. In vivo VCAM-1 blockade with specific antibodies before B16M cell injection decreased sinusoidal retention of luciferase-transfected B16M cells by 85%, and metastasis development by 75%, indicating that VCAM-1 expression on tumor-activated HSE cells had a prometastatic contribution. Because VCAM-1 expression is oxidative stress-inducible, recombinant catalase was in vivo administered, resulting in a complete abrogation of both VCAM-1 expression and B16M cell adhesion increases in HSE cells isolated from B16M cell-injected mice. Catalase also abrogated the proadhesive response of HSE cells to B16M-conditioned medium (B16M-CM) in vitro, although this did not affect the concomitant release of major proinflammatory cytokines by HSE cells. HSE cells treated with B16M-CM released interleukin (IL)-18 via tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-alpha)-dependent IL-1beta in vitro. In turn, H(2)O(2) production from B16M-CM-treated HSE cells was regulated by IL-18. Thus, liver-infiltrating B16M cells activated their adhesion to HSE through a sequential process involving TNF-alpha-dependent IL-1beta, which induced IL-18 to up-regulate VCAM-1 via H(2)O(2). The pivotal position of H(2)O(2) was further supported by the fact that incubation of HSE

  10. Selenoglycoproteins attenuate adhesion of tumor cells to the brain microvascular endothelium via a process involving NF-κB activation.

    PubMed

    Wrobel, Jagoda K; Choi, Jeong June; Xiao, Rijin; Eum, Sung Yong; Kwiatkowski, Stefan; Wolff, Gretchen; Spangler, Leya; Power, Ronan F; Toborek, Michal

    2015-02-01

    Selenium-containing compounds and selenized yeast have anticancer properties. In order to address possible mechanisms involved in these effects, selenoglycoproteins (SGPs) were extracted from selenium-enriched yeast at pH 4.0 and 6.5 (the fractions are called SGP40 and SGP65, respectively), followed by evaluation of their impact on the interactions of lung and breast tumor cells with human brain microvascular endothelial cells (HBMECs). Extracted SGPs, especially SGP40, significantly inhibited adhesion of tumor cells to HBMECs and their transendothelial migration. Because the active components of SGPs are unknown, small selenium-containing compounds [leucyl-valyl-selenomethionyl-arginine (LVSe-MR) and methylselenoadenosine (M-Se-A)], which are normally present in selenized yeast, were introduced as additional treatment groups. Treatment of HBMECs with SGP40, LVSe-MR and M-Se-A induced changes in gene signatures, which suggested a central involvement of nuclear factor (NF)-κB-dependent pathway. These observations were confirmed in the subsequent analysis of NF-κB DNA binding activity, quantitative measurements of the expression of selected genes and proteins, and tumor cell adhesion assay with a specific NF-κB inhibitor as the additional treatment factor. These findings indicate that specific organic selenium-containing compounds have the ability to inhibit tumor cell adhesion to brain endothelial cells via down-regulation of NF-κB. SGPs appear to be more effective than small selenium-containing compounds, suggesting the role of not only selenium but also the glycoprotein component in the observed protective impact.

  11. Membrane potential and endocytic activity control disintegration of cell-cell adhesion and cell fusion in vinculin-injected MDBK cells.

    PubMed

    Palovuori, Riitta; Myrsky, Essi; Eskelinen, Sinikka

    2004-09-01

    Cell fusion occurs during fertilization and in the formation of organs such as muscles, placenta, and bones. We have developed an experimental model for epithelial cell fusion which permits analysis of the processes during junction disintegration and formation of polykaryons (Palovuori and Eskelinen [2000] Eur. J. Cell. Biol. 79: 961-974). In the present work, we analyzed the process in detail. Cell fusion was achieved by microinjecting into the cytoplasm of kidney epithelial Madin-Darby bovine kidney (MDBK) cells TAMRA-tagged vinculin, which incorporated into lateral membranes, focal adhesions and nucleus, and, prior fusion, induced internalization of actin, cadherin and plakoglobin to small clusters in cytoplasm. Injected vinculin was still visible at lateral membranes after removal of junctional proteins indicating that it was tightly associated and perturbed the cell-cell contact sites resulting in membrane fragmentation. Injection of active Rac together with vinculin induced accumulation of cadherin to the membranes, but did not affect vinculin-membrane association. However, it hampered cell fusion probably by supporting adherens junctions. In order to stop endocytosis, we lowered intracellular pH of vinculin-injected cells to 5.5 with the aid of nigericin in KCl buffer. In acidified cells, injected vinculin delineated lateral membranes as thick layers, cadherin remained in situ, and cell fusion was completely inhibited. Since this treatment also leads to cell depolarization, we checked the vinculin incorporation in a KCl solution containing nigericin at neutral pH. In these circumstances, both endogenous and injected vinculin delineated lateral membranes as very thin discontinuous layers, but still fusion was hampered most likely due to perturbation in the initial vinculin-membrane association. We suggest that vinculin might function as a sensor of the environment triggering cell fusion during development in circumstances where membrane potential and local

  12. Weibel-Palade body size modulates the adhesive activity of its von Willebrand Factor cargo in cultured endothelial cells.

    PubMed

    Ferraro, Francesco; Mafalda Lopes da, Silva; Grimes, William; Lee, Hwee Kuan; Ketteler, Robin; Kriston-Vizi, Janos; Cutler, Daniel F

    2016-01-01

    Changes in the size of cellular organelles are often linked to modifications in their function. Endothelial cells store von Willebrand Factor (vWF), a glycoprotein essential to haemostasis in Weibel-Palade bodies (WPBs), cigar-shaped secretory granules that are generated in a wide range of sizes. We recently showed that forcing changes in the size of WPBs modifies the activity of this cargo. We now find that endothelial cells treated with statins produce shorter WPBs and that the vWF they release at exocytosis displays a reduced capability to recruit platelets to the endothelial cell surface. Investigating other functional consequences of size changes of WPBs, we also report that the endothelial surface-associated vWF formed at exocytosis recruits soluble plasma vWF and that this process is reduced by treatments that shorten WPBs, statins included. These results indicate that the post-exocytic adhesive activity of vWF towards platelets and plasma vWF at the endothelial surface reflects the size of their storage organelle. Our findings therefore show that changes in WPB size, by influencing the adhesive activity of its vWF cargo, may represent a novel mode of regulation of platelet aggregation at the vascular wall. PMID:27576551

  13. Weibel-Palade body size modulates the adhesive activity of its von Willebrand Factor cargo in cultured endothelial cells

    PubMed Central

    Ferraro, Francesco; Mafalda Lopes da, Silva; Grimes, William; Lee, Hwee Kuan; Ketteler, Robin; Kriston-Vizi, Janos; Cutler, Daniel F.

    2016-01-01

    Changes in the size of cellular organelles are often linked to modifications in their function. Endothelial cells store von Willebrand Factor (vWF), a glycoprotein essential to haemostasis in Weibel-Palade bodies (WPBs), cigar-shaped secretory granules that are generated in a wide range of sizes. We recently showed that forcing changes in the size of WPBs modifies the activity of this cargo. We now find that endothelial cells treated with statins produce shorter WPBs and that the vWF they release at exocytosis displays a reduced capability to recruit platelets to the endothelial cell surface. Investigating other functional consequences of size changes of WPBs, we also report that the endothelial surface-associated vWF formed at exocytosis recruits soluble plasma vWF and that this process is reduced by treatments that shorten WPBs, statins included. These results indicate that the post-exocytic adhesive activity of vWF towards platelets and plasma vWF at the endothelial surface reflects the size of their storage organelle. Our findings therefore show that changes in WPB size, by influencing the adhesive activity of its vWF cargo, may represent a novel mode of regulation of platelet aggregation at the vascular wall. PMID:27576551

  14. Matrix fibronectin disruption and altered endothelial cell adhesion induced by activated leukocytes

    SciTech Connect

    Vincent, P.; Richards, P.; Saba, T.; DelVecchio, P.

    1986-03-01

    Sequestration of activated leukocytes (PMN) within the lung may contribute to pulmonary vascular injury following trauma, sepsis, or intravascular coagulation. Monolayers of cultured rat endothelial cells were utilized to evaluate the effect of activated PMNs on endothelial cell attachment and the extracellular fibronectin matrix over a 4 hr incubation interval. Rat endothelial cells were identified by immunofluorescent staining of Factor VIII R:Ag. Endothelial cells were labeled with /sup 51/Cr in order to establish a cell injury assay in which the release of pelletable (cell associated) or non-pelletable activity was measured in the media. PMN activation was verified by chemiluminescence activity. Following phorbol myristate acetate (PMA) the leukocytes aggregated, chemiluminesced, and caused detachment of /sup 51/Cr endothelial cells. Endothelial detachment increased as a function of time with a plateau by 3 hrs. Immunofluorescent analysis of extracellular fibronectin in endothelial cell cultures revealed disruption of the fibrillar matrix fibronectin in association with endothelial cell disadhesion. Matrix fibronectin disruption was not seen with PMNs or PMA alone. Thus, disruption of the fibronectin matrix by released proteases may contribute to endothelial cell detachment.

  15. T cells respond to heat shock protein 60 via TLR2: activation of adhesion and inhibition of chemokine receptors.

    PubMed

    Zanin-Zhorov, Alexandra; Nussbaum, Gabriel; Franitza, Susanne; Cohen, Irun R; Lider, Ofer

    2003-08-01

    Soluble 60 kDa heat shock protein (HSP60) activates macrophages via TLR4. We now report that soluble HSP60 activates T cells via the innate receptor TLR2. HSP60 activated T cell adhesion to fibronectin to a degree similar to other activators: IL-2, SDF-1alpha, and RANTES. T cell type and state of activation was important; nonactivated CD45RA+ and IL-2-activated CD45RO+ T cells responded optimally (1 h) at low concentrations (0.1-1 ng/ml), but nonactivated CD45RO+ T cells required higher concentrations (approximately 1 microg/ml) of HSP60. T cell HSP60 signaling was inhibited specifically by monoclonal antibodies (mAb) to TLR2 but not by a mAb to TLR4. Indeed, T cells from mice with mutated TLR4 could still respond to HSP60, whereas Chinese hamster T cells with mutated TLR2 did not respond. The human T cell response to soluble HSP60 depended on phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase and protein kinase C signaling and involved the phosphorylation of Pyk-2. Soluble HSP60 also inhibited actin polymerization and T cell chemotaxis through extracellular matrix-like gels toward the chemokines SDF-1alpha (CXCL12) or ELC (CCL19). Exposure to HSP60 for longer times (18 h) down-regulated chemokine receptor expression: CXCR4 and CCR7. These results suggest that soluble HSP60, through TLR2-dependent interactions, can regulate T cell behavior in inflammation. PMID:12824285

  16. Cell adhesion: integrating cytoskeletal dynamics and cellular tension

    PubMed Central

    Parsons, J. Thomas; Horwitz, Alan Rick; Schwartz, Martin A.

    2010-01-01

    Cell migration affects all morphogenetic processes and contributes to numerous diseases, including cancer and cardiovascular disease. For most cells in most environments, movement begins with protrusion of the cell membrane followed by the formation of new adhesions at the cell front that link the actin cytoskeleton to the substratum, generation of traction forces that move the cell forwards and disassembly of adhesions at the cell rear. Adhesion formation and disassembly drive the migration cycle by activating Rho GTPases, which in turn regulate actin polymerization and myosin II activity, and therefore adhesion dynamics. PMID:20729930

  17. Ezrin regulates focal adhesion and invadopodia dynamics by altering calpain activity to promote breast cancer cell invasion

    PubMed Central

    Hoskin, Victoria; Szeto, Alvin; Ghaffari, Abdi; Greer, Peter A.; Côté, Graham P.; Elliott, Bruce E.

    2015-01-01

    Up-regulation of the cytoskeleton linker protein ezrin frequently occurs in aggressive cancer types and is closely linked with metastatic progression. However, the underlying molecular mechanisms detailing how ezrin is involved in the invasive and metastatic phenotype remain unclear. Here we report a novel function of ezrin in regulating focal adhesion (FA) and invadopodia dynamics, two key processes required for efficient invasion to occur. We show that depletion of ezrin expression in invasive breast cancer cells impairs both FA and invadopodia turnover. We also demonstrate that ezrin-depleted cells display reduced calpain-mediated cleavage of the FA and invadopodia-associated proteins talin, focal adhesion kinase (FAK), and cortactin and reduced calpain-1–specific membrane localization, suggesting a requirement for ezrin in maintaining proper localization and activity of calpain-1. Furthermore, we show that ezrin is required for cell directionality, early lung seeding, and distant organ colonization but not primary tumor growth. Collectively our results unveil a novel mechanism by which ezrin regulates breast cancer cell invasion and metastasis. PMID:26246600

  18. Arsenic alters vascular smooth muscle cell focal adhesion complexes leading to activation of FAK-src mediated pathways

    SciTech Connect

    Pysher, Michele D. Chen, Qin M.; Vaillancourt, Richard R.

    2008-09-01

    Chronic exposure to arsenic has been linked to tumorigenesis, cardiovascular disease, hypertension, atherosclerosis, and peripheral vascular disease; however, the molecular mechanisms underlying its pathological effects remain elusive. In this study, we investigated arsenic-induced alteration of focal adhesion protein complexes in normal, primary vascular smooth muscle cells. We demonstrate that exposure to environmentally relevant concentrations of arsenic (50 ppb As{sup 3+}) can alter focal adhesion protein co-association leading to activation of downstream pathways. Co-associated proteins were identified and quantitated via co-immunoprecipitation, SDS-PAGE, and Western blot analysis followed by scanning densitometry. Activation of MAPK pathways in total cell lysates was evaluated using phosphor-specific antibodies. In our model, arsenic treatment caused a sustained increase in FAK-src association and activation, and induced the formation of unique signaling complexes (beginning after 3-hour As{sup 3+} exposure and continuing throughout the 12-hour time course studied). The effects of these alterations were manifested as chronic stimulation of downstream PAK, ERK and JNK pathways. Past studies have demonstrated that these pathways are involved in cellular survival, growth, proliferation, and migration in VSMCs.

  19. The vitronectin receptor (alpha v beta 3) is implicated, in cooperation with P-selectin and platelet-activating factor, in the adhesion of monocytes to activated endothelial cells.

    PubMed Central

    Murphy, J F; Bordet, J C; Wyler, B; Rissoan, M C; Chomarat, P; Defrance, T; Miossec, P; McGregor, J L

    1994-01-01

    In this study we have investigated the presence on endothelial cells of potential glycoprotein receptors, other than P-selectin, which are involved in the adhesion of monocytes at the early stages of activation. We report that the majority of cells binding to thrombin-activated endothelial cells from a peripheral blood mononuclear cell (PBMC) preparation are monocytes. The adhesion of PBMC to thrombin-activated, but not resting, endothelial cells was inhibited (66%) by a monoclonal antibody (mAb) directed against alpha v beta 3. Elutriated monocytes or a monocytic cell line (U937) were also inhibited by this antibody, its F(ab)'2 fragments and three other anti-(alpha v beta 3) mAbs. alpha v beta 3 isolated from endothelial-cell lysates significantly inhibited the adhesion of monocytes and U937 cells to endothelial cells. A peptide motif (RGDF) known to interact with alpha v beta 3 inhibited U937 cell adhesion to activated endothelial cells by 53%. Finally, an anti-(P-selectin) mAb (LYP20) or a platelet-activating factor (PAF)-receptor antagonist (WEB 2086) inhibited monocyte adhesion to activated endothelial cells. This study shows for the first time that alpha v beta 3 is implicated, in addition to P-selectin and PAF, in the adhesion of monocytes to activated endothelial cells. PMID:7528011

  20. Physics of cell elasticity, shape and adhesion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Safran, S. A.; Gov, N.; Nicolas, A.; Schwarz, U. S.; Tlusty, T.

    2005-07-01

    adhesion due to the presence of the elastic cytoskeleton and to the fact that active processes (ATP, molecular motors) within the cell modify cytoskeletal elasticity and tension.

  1. Inhibition of focal adhesion kinase (FAK) activity prevents anchorage-independent ovarian carcinoma cell growth and tumor progression

    PubMed Central

    Ward, Kristy K.; Tancioni, Isabelle; Lawson, Christine; Miller, Nichol L.G.; Jean, Christine; Chen, Xiao Lei; Uryu, Sean; Kim, Josephine; Tarin, David; Stupack, Dwayne G.; Plaxe, Steven C.; Schlaepfer, David D.

    2013-01-01

    Recurrence and spread of ovarian cancer is the 5th leading cause of death for women in the United States. Focal adhesion kinase (FAK) is a cytoplasmic protein-tyrosine kinase located on chromosome 8q24.3 (gene is Ptk2), a site commonly amplified in serous ovarian cancer. Elevated FAK mRNA levels in serous ovarian carcinoma are associated with decreased (logrank P = 0.0007, hazard ratio 1.43) patient overall survival, but how FAK functions in tumor progression remains undefined. We have isolated aggressive ovarian carcinoma cells termed ID8-IP after intraperitoneal (IP) growth of murine ID8 cells in C57Bl6 mice. Upon orthotopic implantation within the periovarian bursa space, ID8-IP cells exhibit greater tumor growth, local and distant metastasis, and elevated numbers of ascites-associated cells compared to parental ID8 cells. ID8-IP cells exhibit enhanced growth under non-adherent conditions with elevated FAK and c-Src tyrosine kinase activation compared to parental ID8 cells. In vitro, the small molecule FAK inhibitor (Pfizer, PF562,271, PF-271) at 0.1 uM selectively prevented anchorage-independent ID8-IP cell growth with the inhibition of FAK tyrosine (Y)397 but not c-Src Y416 phosphorylation. Oral PF-271 administration (30 mg/kg, twice daily) blocked FAK but not c-Src tyrosine phosphorylation in ID8-IP tumors. This was associated with decreased tumor size, prevention of peritoneal metastasis, reduced tumor-associated endothelial cell number, and increased tumor cell-associated apoptosis. FAK knockdown and re-expression assays showed that FAK activity selectively promoted anchorage-independent ID8-IP cell survival. These results support the continued evaluation of FAK inhibitors as a promising clinical treatment for ovarian cancer. PMID:23275034

  2. Cell-Substrate Adhesion by Amoeboid Cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Flanders, Bret; Panta, Krishna

    Amoeboid migration is a rapid (10 μm min-1) mode of migration that some tumor cells exhibit. To permit such rapid movement, the adhesive contacts between the cell and the substrate must be relatively short-lived and weak. In this study, we investigate the basic adhesive character of amoeboid cells (D. discoideum) in contact with silanized glass substrates. We observe the initiation and spreading of the adhesive contacts that these cells establish as they settle under gravity onto the substrate and relax towards mechanical equilibrium. The use of interference reflection microscopy and cellular tethering measurements have allowed us to determine the basic adhesive properties of the cell: the membrane-medium interfacial energy; the bending modulus; the equilibrium contact angle; and the work of adhesion. We find the time scale on which settling occurs to be longer than expected. Implications of these results on adhesion and migration will be discussed. The authors are grateful for support from NSF (CBET-1451903) and NIH (1R21EY026392).

  3. Progesterone promotes focal adhesion formation and migration in breast cancer cells through induction of protease-activated receptor-1.

    PubMed

    Diaz, Jorge; Aranda, Evelyn; Henriquez, Soledad; Quezada, Marisol; Espinoza, Estefanía; Bravo, Maria Loreto; Oliva, Bárbara; Lange, Soledad; Villalon, Manuel; Jones, Marius; Brosens, Jan J; Kato, Sumie; Cuello, Mauricio A; Knutson, Todd P; Lange, Carol A; Leyton, Lisette; Owen, Gareth I

    2012-08-01

    Progesterone and progestins have been demonstrated to enhance breast cancer cell migration, although the mechanisms are still not fully understood. The protease-activated receptors (PARs) are a family of membrane receptors that are activated by serine proteases in the blood coagulation cascade. PAR1 (F2R) has been reported to be involved in cancer cell migration and overexpressed in breast cancer. We herein demonstrate that PAR1 mRNA and protein are upregulated by progesterone treatment of the breast cancer cell lines ZR-75 and T47D. This regulation is dependent on the progesterone receptor (PR) but does not require PR phosphorylation at serine 294 or the PR proline-rich region mPRO. The increase in PAR1 mRNA was transient, being present at 3  h and returning to basal levels at 18  h. The addition of a PAR1-activating peptide (aPAR1) to cells treated with progesterone resulted in an increase in focal adhesion (FA) formation as measured by the cellular levels of phosphorylated FA kinase. The combined but not individual treatment of progesterone and aPAR1 also markedly increased stress fiber formation and the migratory capacity of breast cancer cells. In agreement with in vitro findings, data mining from the Oncomine platform revealed that PAR1 expression was significantly upregulated in PR-positive breast tumors. Our observation that PAR1 expression and signal transduction are modulated by progesterone provides new insight into how the progestin component in hormone therapies increases the risk of breast cancer in postmenopausal women.

  4. Systemic endothelial activation occurs in both mild and severe malaria. Correlating dermal microvascular endothelial cell phenotype and soluble cell adhesion molecules with disease severity.

    PubMed

    Turner, G D; Ly, V C; Nguyen, T H; Tran, T H; Nguyen, H P; Bethell, D; Wyllie, S; Louwrier, K; Fox, S B; Gatter, K C; Day, N P; Tran, T H; White, N J; Berendt, A R

    1998-06-01

    Fatal Plasmodium falciparum malaria is accompanied by systemic endothelial activation. To study endothelial activation directly during malaria and sepsis in vivo, the expression of cell adhesion molecules on dermal microvascular endothelium was examined in skin biopsies and correlated with plasma levels of soluble (circulating) ICAM-1, E-selectin, and VCAM-1 and the cytokine tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-alpha. Skin biopsies were obtained from 61 cases of severe malaria, 42 cases of uncomplicated malaria, 10 cases of severe systemic sepsis, and 17 uninfected controls. Systemic endothelial activation, represented by the up-regulation of inducible cell adhesion molecules (CAMs) on endothelium and increased levels of soluble CAMs (sCAMs), were seen in both severe and uncomplicated malaria and sepsis when compared with uninfected controls. Plasma levels of sICAM-1, sVCAM-1, and sE-selectin correlated positively with the severity of malaria whereas TNF-alpha was raised nonspecifically in malaria and sepsis. Immunohistochemical evidence of endothelial activation in skin biopsies did not correlate with sCAM levels or disease severity. This indicates a background of systemic endothelial activation, which occurs in both mild and severe malaria and sepsis. The levels of sCAMs in malaria are thus not an accurate reflection of endothelial cell expression of CAMs in a particular vascular bed, and other factors must influence their levels during disease.

  5. Systemic endothelial activation occurs in both mild and severe malaria. Correlating dermal microvascular endothelial cell phenotype and soluble cell adhesion molecules with disease severity.

    PubMed Central

    Turner, G. D.; Ly, V. C.; Nguyen, T. H.; Tran, T. H.; Nguyen, H. P.; Bethell, D.; Wyllie, S.; Louwrier, K.; Fox, S. B.; Gatter, K. C.; Day, N. P.; Tran, T. H.; White, N. J.; Berendt, A. R.

    1998-01-01

    Fatal Plasmodium falciparum malaria is accompanied by systemic endothelial activation. To study endothelial activation directly during malaria and sepsis in vivo, the expression of cell adhesion molecules on dermal microvascular endothelium was examined in skin biopsies and correlated with plasma levels of soluble (circulating) ICAM-1, E-selectin, and VCAM-1 and the cytokine tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-alpha. Skin biopsies were obtained from 61 cases of severe malaria, 42 cases of uncomplicated malaria, 10 cases of severe systemic sepsis, and 17 uninfected controls. Systemic endothelial activation, represented by the up-regulation of inducible cell adhesion molecules (CAMs) on endothelium and increased levels of soluble CAMs (sCAMs), were seen in both severe and uncomplicated malaria and sepsis when compared with uninfected controls. Plasma levels of sICAM-1, sVCAM-1, and sE-selectin correlated positively with the severity of malaria whereas TNF-alpha was raised nonspecifically in malaria and sepsis. Immunohistochemical evidence of endothelial activation in skin biopsies did not correlate with sCAM levels or disease severity. This indicates a background of systemic endothelial activation, which occurs in both mild and severe malaria and sepsis. The levels of sCAMs in malaria are thus not an accurate reflection of endothelial cell expression of CAMs in a particular vascular bed, and other factors must influence their levels during disease. Images Figure 1 PMID:9626052

  6. Involvement of platelet cyclic GMP but not cyclic AMP suppression in leukocyte-dependent platelet adhesion to endothelial cells induced by platelet-activating factor in vitro.

    PubMed Central

    Hirafuji, M.; Nezu, A.; Shinoda, H.; Minami, M.

    1996-01-01

    1. Incubation of endothelial cells with platelets in the absence or the presence of PAF (10 nM) markedly increased platelet cyclic AMP levels, which were significantly decreased by indomethacin (3 microM). Co-incubation of endothelial cells and platelets with polymorphonuclear leukocytes (PMNs) did not change the platelet cyclic AMP levels. 2. Incubation of endothelial cells with platelets in the absence of PAF increased platelet cyclic GMP levels, which were increased 3.5 fold by PAF. These cyclic GMP levels were significantly decreased by NG-nitro-L-arginine (100 microM), and completely by methylene blue (10 microM). When endothelial cells and platelets were co-incubated with PMNs, the cyclic GMP level in the cell mixture was 42.5 and 65.3% lower than that in endothelial cells and platelets without and with PAF stimulation, respectively. 3. PAF induced platelet adhesion to endothelial cells only when PMNs were present. Methylene blue dose-dependently potentiated the PMN-dependent platelet adhesion induced by PAF, although it had no effect in the absence of PMNs. 4. Sodium nitroprusside and 8-bromo cyclic GMP but not dibutyryl cyclic AMP significantly, although partially, inhibited the platelet adhesion. Inhibition of cyclic GMP-specific phosphodiesterase by zaprinast slightly inhibited the PMN-induced platelet adhesion and potentiated the inhibitory effect of 8-bromo cyclic GMP, while these drugs markedly inhibited the adhesion of platelet aggregates induced by PMN sonicates. 5. These results suggest that the impairment by activated PMNs of EDRF-induced platelet cyclic GMP formation is involved in part in the mechanism of PMN-dependent platelet adhesion to endothelial cells induced by PAF in vitro. The precise mechanism still remains to be clarified. PMID:8789382

  7. White blood cell deformation and firm adhesion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Szatmary, Alex; Eggleton, Charles

    2011-11-01

    For a white blood cell (WBC) to arrive at infection sites, it forms chemical attachments with activated endothelial cells. First, it bonds with P-selectin, which holds it to the wall, but weakly; this allows the WBC to roll under the shear flow of the blood around it. Later, the WBCs bond with the stronger intracellular adhesion molecule-1 (ICAM-1); it is these ICAM bonds that allow the WBCs to fully resist the flow and stop rolling, allowing them to crawl through the endothelial wall. We model this numerically. Our model uses the immersed boundary method to represent the interaction of the shear flow with the deformable cell membrane. Receptors are on the tips of microvilli-little fingers sticking off of the cell membrane. The microvilli also deform. The receptors stochastically form and break bonds with molecules on the wall. Using this method, the history of each microvillus and its bonds can be found, as well as the distribution of the adhesion traction forces and how all of these vary with the deformability of the white blood cell. At higher shear rates, the white blood cell membrane deforms more, increasing its contact area with the surface; this effect is larger for softer membranes. We investigate how the deformability of the WBC affects the ease with which it forms firm adhesion.

  8. Adhesion and protease activity in cell lines from human salivary gland tumors are regulated by the laminin-derived peptide AG73, syndecan-1 and beta1 integrin.

    PubMed

    Gama-de-Souza, Letícia N; Cyreno-Oliveira, Elaine; Freitas, Vanessa M; Melo, Edielle S; Vilas-Boas, Vanessa F; Moriscot, Anselmo S; Jaeger, Ruy G

    2008-06-01

    We studied the induction of protease activity by the laminin alpha1-derived peptide AG73 in cells from adenoid cystic carcinoma (CAC2) and myoepithelioma (M1), respectively a malignant and a benign salivary gland tumors. Laminin alpha1 chain and MMP9 were immunolocalized in adenoid cystic carcinoma and myoepithelioma in vivo and in vitro. Cells grown inside AG73-enriched laminin-111 exhibited large spaces in the extracellular matrix, suggestive of remodeling. The broad spectrum MMP inhibitor GM6001 decreased spaces induced by AG73 in CAC2 and M1 cells. This result strongly suggests that AG73-mediated matrix remodeling involves matrix metalloproteinases. CAC2 and M1 cells cultured on AG73 showed a dose-dependent increase of MMP9 secretion, as detected by zymography. Furthermore, siRNA silencing of MMP9 decreased remodeling in 3D cultures. We searched for AG73 receptors regulating MMP9 activity in our cell lines. CAC2 and M1 cells grown on AG73 exhibited colocalization of syndecan-1 and beta1 integrin. siRNA knockdown of syndecan-1 expression in these cells resulted in decreased adhesion to AG73 and reduced protease and remodeling activity. We investigated syndecan-1 co-receptors in both cell lines. Silencing beta1 integrin inhibited adhesion to AG73, matrix remodeling and protease activity. Double-knockdown experiments were carried out to further explore syndecan-1 and beta1 integrin cooperation. CAC2 cells transfected with both syndecan-1 and beta1 integrin siRNA oligos showed significant decrease in adhesion to AG73. Simultaneous silencing of receptors also induced a decrease in protease activity. Our results suggest that syndecan-1 and beta1 integrin signaling downstream of AG73 regulate adhesion and MMP production by CAC2 and M1 cells.

  9. Plasma polymerization for cell adhesive/anti-adhesive implant coating

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meichsner, Juergen; Testrich, Holger; Rebl, Henrike; Nebe, Barbara

    2015-09-01

    Plasma polymerization of ethylenediamine (C2H8N2, EDA) and perfluoropropane (C3F8, PFP) with admixture of argon and hydrogen, respectively, was studied using an asymmetric 13.56 MHz CCP. The analysis of the plasma chemical gas phase processes for stable molecules revealed consecutive reactions: C2H8N2 consumption, intermediate product NH3, and main final product HCN. In C3F8- H2 plasma the precursor molecule C3F8 and molecular hydrogen are consumed and HF as well as CF4 and C2F6 are found as main gaseous reaction products. The deposited plasma polymer films on the powered electrode are strongly cross-linked due to ion bombardment. The stable plasma polymerized films from EDA are characterized by high content of nitrogen with N/C ratio of about 0.35. The plasma polymerized fluorocarbon film exhibit a reduced F/C ratio of about 1.2. Adhesion tests with human osteoblast cell line MG-63 on coated Ti6Al4V samples (polished) compared with uncoated reference sample yielded both, the enhanced cell adhesion for plasma polymerized EDA and significantly reduced cell adhesion for fluorocarbon coating, respectively. Aging of the plasma polymerized EDA film, in particular due to the reactions with oxygen from air, showed no significant change in the cell adhesion. The fluorocarbon coating with low cell adhesion is of interest for temporary implants. Funded by the Campus PlasmaMed.

  10. Glycan-binding profile and cell adhesion activity of American bullfrog (Rana catesbeiana) oocyte galectin-1.

    PubMed

    Kawsar, Sarkar M A; Matsumoto, Ryo; Fujii, Yuki; Yasumitsu, Hidetaro; Uchiyama, Hideho; Hosono, Masahiro; Nitta, Kazuo; Hamako, Jiharu; Matsui, Taei; Kojima, Noriaki; Ozeki, Yasuhiro

    2009-01-01

    The glycan-binding profile of a beta-galactoside-binding 15 kDa lectin (Galectin-1) purified from the oocytes of the American bullfrog, Rana catesbeiana, was studied using 61 pyridyl-aminated oligosaccharides by frontal affinity chromatography. Human blood type-A-hexasaccharide (GalNAcalpha1-3(Fucalpha1-2)Galbeta;1-4GlcNAcbeta1-4Galbeta1-4Glc) was found to exhibit the strongest ligand binding to the galectin while Forssman antigen (GalNAcalpha1-3GalNAcbeta1-3Galalpha1-4Galbeta1-4Glc) and type-A-tetrasaccharide (GalNAcalpha1-3(Fucalpha1-2)Galbeta1-4GlcNAcbeta1-4Glc) were also extensively recognized. The kinetics of affinity of galectin-1 to type-A oligosaccharide was analysed by surface plasmon resonance using neoglycoprotein with type-A oligosaccharides. R. catesbeiana oocyte galectin adhered to human rhabdomyosarcoma cells dose dependently and the activity was specifically cancelled by the neoglycoprotein. It was concluded that galectin-1 from R. catesbeiana oocytes possesses different and rare glycan-binding properties from typical members in galectin family. PMID:19519529

  11. Glycan-binding profile and cell adhesion activity of American bullfrog (Rana catesbeiana) oocyte galectin-1.

    PubMed

    Kawsar, Sarkar M A; Matsumoto, Ryo; Fujii, Yuki; Yasumitsu, Hidetaro; Uchiyama, Hideho; Hosono, Masahiro; Nitta, Kazuo; Hamako, Jiharu; Matsui, Taei; Kojima, Noriaki; Ozeki, Yasuhiro

    2009-01-01

    The glycan-binding profile of a beta-galactoside-binding 15 kDa lectin (Galectin-1) purified from the oocytes of the American bullfrog, Rana catesbeiana, was studied using 61 pyridyl-aminated oligosaccharides by frontal affinity chromatography. Human blood type-A-hexasaccharide (GalNAcalpha1-3(Fucalpha1-2)Galbeta;1-4GlcNAcbeta1-4Galbeta1-4Glc) was found to exhibit the strongest ligand binding to the galectin while Forssman antigen (GalNAcalpha1-3GalNAcbeta1-3Galalpha1-4Galbeta1-4Glc) and type-A-tetrasaccharide (GalNAcalpha1-3(Fucalpha1-2)Galbeta1-4GlcNAcbeta1-4Glc) were also extensively recognized. The kinetics of affinity of galectin-1 to type-A oligosaccharide was analysed by surface plasmon resonance using neoglycoprotein with type-A oligosaccharides. R. catesbeiana oocyte galectin adhered to human rhabdomyosarcoma cells dose dependently and the activity was specifically cancelled by the neoglycoprotein. It was concluded that galectin-1 from R. catesbeiana oocytes possesses different and rare glycan-binding properties from typical members in galectin family.

  12. Innate Non-Specific Cell Substratum Adhesion

    PubMed Central

    Loomis, William F.; Fuller, Danny; Gutierrez, Edgar; Groisman, Alex; Rappel, Wouter-Jan

    2012-01-01

    Adhesion of motile cells to solid surfaces is necessary to transmit forces required for propulsion. Unlike mammalian cells, Dictyostelium cells do not make integrin mediated focal adhesions. Nevertheless, they can move rapidly on both hydrophobic and hydrophilic surfaces. We have found that adhesion to such surfaces can be inhibited by addition of sugars or amino acids to the buffer. Treating whole cells with αlpha-mannosidase to cleave surface oligosaccharides also reduces adhesion. The results indicate that adhesion of these cells is mediated by van der Waals attraction of their surface glycoproteins to the underlying substratum. Since glycoproteins are prevalent components of the surface of most cells, innate adhesion may be a common cellular property that has been overlooked. PMID:22952588

  13. Matriptase is required for the active form of hepatocyte growth factor induced Met, focal adhesion kinase and protein kinase B activation on neural stem/progenitor cell motility.

    PubMed

    Fang, Jung-Da; Lee, Sheau-Ling

    2014-07-01

    Hepatocyte growth factor (HGF) is a chemoattractant and inducer for neural stem/progenitor (NS/P) cell migration. Although the type II transmembrane serine protease, matriptase (MTP) is an activator of the latent HGF, MTP is indispensable on NS/P cell motility induced by the active form of HGF. This suggests that MTP's action on NS/P cell motility involves mechanisms other than proteolytic activation of HGF. In the present study, we investigate the role of MTP in HGF-stimulated signaling events. Using specific inhibitors of phosphatidylinositol-3-kinase (PI3K), protein kinase B (Akt) or focal adhesion kinase (FAK), we demonstrated that in NS/P cells HGF-activated c-Met induces PI3k-Akt signaling which then leads to FAK activation. This signaling pathway ultimately induces MMP2 expression and NS/P cell motility. Knocking down of MTP in NS/P cells with specific siRNA impaired HGF-stimulation of c-Met, Akt and FAK activation, blocked HGF-induced production of MMP2 and inhibited HGF-stimulated NS/P cell motility. MTP-knockdown NS/P cells cultured in the presence of recombinant protein of MTP protease domain or transfected with the full-length wild-type but not the protease-defected MTP restored HGF-responsive events in NS/P cells. In addition to functioning as HGF activator, our data revealed novel function of MTP on HGF-stimulated c-Met signaling activation.

  14. Cell Adhesion on Amyloid Fibrils Lacking Integrin Recognition Motif.

    PubMed

    Jacob, Reeba S; George, Edna; Singh, Pradeep K; Salot, Shimul; Anoop, Arunagiri; Jha, Narendra Nath; Sen, Shamik; Maji, Samir K

    2016-03-01

    Amyloids are highly ordered, cross-β-sheet-rich protein/peptide aggregates associated with both human diseases and native functions. Given the well established ability of amyloids in interacting with cell membranes, we hypothesize that amyloids can serve as universal cell-adhesive substrates. Here, we show that, similar to the extracellular matrix protein collagen, amyloids of various proteins/peptides support attachment and spreading of cells via robust stimulation of integrin expression and formation of integrin-based focal adhesions. Additionally, amyloid fibrils are also capable of immobilizing non-adherent red blood cells through charge-based interactions. Together, our results indicate that both active and passive mechanisms contribute to adhesion on amyloid fibrils. The present data may delineate the functional aspect of cell adhesion on amyloids by various organisms and its involvement in human diseases. Our results also raise the exciting possibility that cell adhesivity might be a generic property of amyloids. PMID:26742841

  15. The effect of ROCK-1 activity change on the adhesive and invasive ability of Y79 retinoblastoma cells

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Retinoblastoma (Rb) is the most common intraocular tumor in childhood worldwide. It is a deadly pediatric eye cancer. The main cause of death in Rb patients is intracranial and systemic metastasis. ROCK is the main downstream effector of Ras-homologous (Rho) family of GTPases which are involved in many cellular functions, such as cell proliferation, invasion and metastasis. Overexpression of ROCK promotes invasion and metastasis of many solid tumors. However, the effect of ROCK in Rb is largely unknown. Methods ROCK-1 and ROCK-2 mRNA expression in Y79 cell lines were examined by RT-PCR. Protein expression in the Y79 cell line were examined by western blot analyses. ROCK-1 and ROCK-2 siRNA were transfected into Y79 cells with Lipofectamine 2000. Cell proliferation was evaluated by CCK-8 assay after exposure to ROCK inhibitor (Y-27632). We examined the effect of ROCK inhibitors (Y-27632, ROCK-1 and ROCK-2 siRNA) on Y79 cell adhesive capacity by cell adhesion assay. Cell invasion assay through matrigel was used to study the effect of ROCK inhibitors on Y79 cell invasive capacity. Results The expression of mRNA of ROCK-1 was more than that of ROCK-2 in the Y79 cell line. The protein expression levels of ROCK-1 and ROCK-2 were downregulated in the cells transfected with siRNA. Y-27632 treatment didn’t lead to any changes of Y79 cells proliferation. Adhesive ability of Y79 cells was enhanced following Y-27632 or ROCK-1 siRNA treatment. The invasive capacity of Y79 cells showed an inverse relationship with increasing Y-27632 concentration. Invasiveness of Y79 cells also decreased in Y79 cells transfected with ROCK-1 siRNA. However, there was no change in adhesive ability or invasive capacity in Y79 cells transfected with siRNA against ROCK-2. Conclusions The findings of this study demonstrate that ROCK-1 protein plays a key role in regulating metastasis and invasion of Y79 cells, suggesting that the ROCK-1 dependent pathway may be a potential target for

  16. Brain endothelial miR-146a negatively modulates T-cell adhesion through repressing multiple targets to inhibit NF-κB activation

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Dongsheng; Cerutti, Camilla; Lopez-Ramirez, Miguel A; Pryce, Gareth; King-Robson, Josh; Simpson, Julie E; van der Pol, Susanne MA; Hirst, Mark C; de Vries, Helga E; Sharrack, Basil; Baker, David; Male, David K; Michael, Gregory J; Romero, Ignacio A

    2015-01-01

    Pro-inflammatory cytokine-induced activation of nuclear factor, NF-κB has an important role in leukocyte adhesion to, and subsequent migration across, brain endothelial cells (BECs), which is crucial for the development of neuroinflammatory disorders such as multiple sclerosis (MS). In contrast, microRNA-146a (miR-146a) has emerged as an anti-inflammatory molecule by inhibiting NF-κB activity in various cell types, but its effect in BECs during neuroinflammation remains to be evaluated. Here, we show that miR-146a was upregulated in microvessels of MS-active lesions and the spinal cord of mice with experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis. In vitro, TNFα and IFNγ treatment of human cerebral microvascular endothelial cells (hCMEC/D3) led to upregulation of miR-146a. Brain endothelial overexpression of miR-146a diminished, whereas knockdown of miR-146a augmented cytokine-stimulated adhesion of T cells to hCMEC/D3 cells, nuclear translocation of NF-κB, and expression of adhesion molecules in hCMEC/D3 cells. Furthermore, brain endothelial miR-146a modulates NF-κB activity upon cytokine activation through targeting two novel signaling transducers, RhoA and nuclear factor of activated T cells 5, as well as molecules previously identified, IL-1 receptor-associated kinase 1, and TNF receptor-associated factor 6. We propose brain endothelial miR-146a as an endogenous NF-κB inhibitor in BECs associated with decreased leukocyte adhesion during neuroinflammation. PMID:25515214

  17. Synaptic Cell Adhesion Molecules in Alzheimer's Disease

    PubMed Central

    Leshchyns'ka, Iryna

    2016-01-01

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) is a neurodegenerative brain disorder associated with the loss of synapses between neurons in the brain. Synaptic cell adhesion molecules are cell surface glycoproteins which are expressed at the synaptic plasma membranes of neurons. These proteins play key roles in formation and maintenance of synapses and regulation of synaptic plasticity. Genetic studies and biochemical analysis of the human brain tissue, cerebrospinal fluid, and sera from AD patients indicate that levels and function of synaptic cell adhesion molecules are affected in AD. Synaptic cell adhesion molecules interact with Aβ, a peptide accumulating in AD brains, which affects their expression and synaptic localization. Synaptic cell adhesion molecules also regulate the production of Aβ via interaction with the key enzymes involved in Aβ formation. Aβ-dependent changes in synaptic adhesion affect the function and integrity of synapses suggesting that alterations in synaptic adhesion play key roles in the disruption of neuronal networks in AD. PMID:27242933

  18. Free energy landscape of receptor-mediated cell adhesion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Tianyi; Zaman, Muhammad H.

    2007-01-01

    Receptor-mediated cell adhesion plays a critical role in cell migration, proliferation, signaling, and survival. A number of diseases, including cancer, show a strong correlation between integrin activation and metastasis. A better understanding of cell adhesion is highly desirable for not only therapeutic but also a number of tissue engineering applications. While a number of computational models and experimental studies have addressed the issue of cell adhesion to surfaces, no model or theory has adequately addressed cell adhesion at the molecular level. In this paper, the authors present a thermodynamic model that addresses receptor-mediated cell adhesion at the molecular level. By incorporating the entropic, conformational, solvation, and long- and short-range interactive components of receptors and the extracellular matrix molecules, they are able to predict adhesive free energy as a function of a number of key variables such as surface coverage, interaction distance, molecule size, and solvent conditions. Their method allows them to compute the free energy of adhesion in a multicomponent system where they can simultaneously study adhesion receptors and ligands of different sizes, chemical identities, and conformational properties. The authors' results not only provide a fundamental understanding of adhesion at the molecular level but also suggest possible strategies for designing novel biomaterials.

  19. Adhesive curing through low-voltage activation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ping, Jianfeng; Gao, Feng; Chen, Jian Lin; Webster, Richard D.; Steele, Terry W. J.

    2015-08-01

    Instant curing adhesives typically fall within three categories, being activated by either light (photocuring), heat (thermocuring) or chemical means. These curing strategies limit applications to specific substrates and can only be activated under certain conditions. Here we present the development of an instant curing adhesive through low-voltage activation. The electrocuring adhesive is synthesized by grafting carbene precursors on polyamidoamine dendrimers and dissolving in aqueous solvents to form viscous gels. The electrocuring adhesives are activated at -2 V versus Ag/AgCl, allowing tunable crosslinking within the dendrimer matrix and on both electrode surfaces. As the applied voltage discontinued, crosslinking immediately terminated. Thus, crosslinking initiation and propagation are observed to be voltage and time dependent, enabling tuning of both material properties and adhesive strength. The electrocuring adhesive has immediate implications in manufacturing and development of implantable bioadhesives.

  20. Adhesive curing through low-voltage activation

    PubMed Central

    Ping, Jianfeng; Gao, Feng; Chen, Jian Lin; Webster, Richard D.; Steele, Terry W. J.

    2015-01-01

    Instant curing adhesives typically fall within three categories, being activated by either light (photocuring), heat (thermocuring) or chemical means. These curing strategies limit applications to specific substrates and can only be activated under certain conditions. Here we present the development of an instant curing adhesive through low-voltage activation. The electrocuring adhesive is synthesized by grafting carbene precursors on polyamidoamine dendrimers and dissolving in aqueous solvents to form viscous gels. The electrocuring adhesives are activated at −2 V versus Ag/AgCl, allowing tunable crosslinking within the dendrimer matrix and on both electrode surfaces. As the applied voltage discontinued, crosslinking immediately terminated. Thus, crosslinking initiation and propagation are observed to be voltage and time dependent, enabling tuning of both material properties and adhesive strength. The electrocuring adhesive has immediate implications in manufacturing and development of implantable bioadhesives. PMID:26282730

  1. Receptor activator of NF-κB ligand induces cell adhesion and integrin α2 expression via NF-κB in head and neck cancers

    PubMed Central

    Yamada, Tamaki; Tsuda, Masumi; Wagatsuma, Takanori; Fujioka, Yoichiro; Fujioka, Mari; Satoh, Aya O.; Horiuchi, Kosui; Nishide, Shinya; Nanbo, Asuka; Totsuka, Yasunori; Haga, Hisashi; Tanaka, Shinya; Shindoh, Masanobu; Ohba, Yusuke

    2016-01-01

    Cellular interactions with the extracellular matrix play critical roles in tumor progression. We previously reported that receptor activator of NF-κB ligand (RANKL) specifically facilitates head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC) progression in vivo. Here, we report a novel role for RANKL in the regulation of cell adhesion. Among the major type I collagen receptors, integrin α2 was significantly upregulated in RANKL-expressing cells, and its knockdown suppressed cell adhesion. The mRNA abundance of integrin α2 positively correlated with that of RANKL in human HNSCC tissues. We also revealed that RANK-NF-κB signaling mediated integrin α2 expression in an autocrine/paracrine manner. Interestingly, the amount of active integrin β1 on the cell surface was increased in RANKL-expressing cells through the upregulation of integrin α2 and endocytosis. Moreover, the RANK-integrin α2 pathway contributed to RANKL-dependent enhanced survival in a collagen gel and inhibited apoptosis in a xenograft model, demonstrating an important role for RANKL-mediated cell adhesion in three-dimensional environments. PMID:27009236

  2. Hydrogen peroxide activates focal adhesion kinase and c-Src by a phosphatidylinositol 3 kinase-dependent mechanism and promotes cell migration in Caco-2 cell monolayers.

    PubMed

    Basuroy, Shyamali; Dunagan, Mitzi; Sheth, Parimal; Seth, Ankur; Rao, R K

    2010-07-01

    Recent studies showed that c-Src and phosphatidylinositol 3 (PI3) kinase mediate the oxidative stress-induced disruption of tight junctions in Caco-2 cell monolayers. The present study evaluated the roles of PI3 kinase and Src kinase in the oxidative stress-induced activation of focal adhesion kinase (FAK) and acceleration of cell migration. Oxidative stress, induced by xanthine and xanthine oxidase system, rapidly increased phosphorylation of FAK on Y397, Y925, and Y577 in the detergent-insoluble and soluble fractions and increased its tyrosine kinase activity. The PI3 kinase inhibitors, wortmannin and LY294002, and the Src kinase inhibitor, 4-amino-5[chlorophyll]-7-[t-butyl]pyrazolo[3-4-d]pyrimidine, attenuated tyrosine phosphorylation of FAK. Oxidative stress induced phosphorylation of c-Src on Y418 by a PI3 kinase-dependent mechanism, whereas oxidative stress-induced activation of PI3 kinase was independent of Src kinase activity. Hydrogen peroxide accelerated Caco-2 cell migration in a concentration-dependent manner. Promotion of cell migration by hydrogen peroxide was attenuated by LY294002 and PP2. Reduced expression of FAK by siRNA attenuated hydrogen peroxide-induced acceleration of cell migration. The expression of constitutively active c-Src(Y527F) enhanced cell migration, whereas the expression of dominant negative c-Src(K296R/Y528F) attenuated hydrogen peroxide-induced stimulation of cell migration. Oxidative stress-induced activation of c-Src and FAK was associated with a rapid increase in the tyrosine phosphorylation and the levels of paxillin and p130(CAS) in actin-rich, detergent-insoluble fractions. This study shows that oxidative stress activates FAK and accelerates cell migration in an intestinal epithelium by a PI3 kinase- and Src kinase-dependent mechanism. PMID:20378826

  3. P2Y2 nucleotide receptor activation up-regulates vascular cell adhesion molecule-1 [corrected] expression and enhances lymphocyte adherence to a human submandibular gland cell line.

    PubMed

    Baker, Olga J; Camden, Jean M; Rome, Danny E; Seye, Cheikh I; Weisman, Gary A

    2008-01-01

    Sjögren's syndrome (SS) is a chronic inflammatory autoimmune disease that causes salivary and lacrimal gland tissue destruction resulting in impaired secretory function. Although lymphocytic infiltration of salivary epithelium is associated with SS, the mechanisms involved have not been adequately elucidated. Our previous studies have shown that the G protein-coupled P2Y2 nucleotide receptor (P2Y2R) is up-regulated in response to damage or stress of salivary gland epithelium, and in salivary glands of the NOD.B10 mouse model of SS-like autoimmune exocrinopathy. Additionally, we have shown that P2Y2R activation up-regulates vascular cell adhesion molecule-1 (VCAM-1) expression in endothelial cells leading to the binding of monocytes. The present study demonstrates that activation of the P2Y2R in dispersed cell aggregates from rat submandibular gland (SMG) and in human submandibular gland ductal cells (HSG) up-regulates the expression of VCAM-1. Furthermore, P2Y2R activation mediated the up-regulation of VCAM-1 expression in HSG cells leading to increased adherence of lymphocytic cells. Inhibitors of EGFR phosphorylation and metalloprotease activity abolished P2Y2R-mediated VCAM-1 expression and decreased lymphocyte binding to HSG cells. Moreover, silencing of EGFR expression abolished UTP-induced VCAM-1 up-regulation in HSG cells. These results suggest that P2Y2R activation in salivary gland cells increases the EGFR-dependent expression of VCAM-1 and the binding of lymphocytes, a pathway relevant to inflammation associated with SS.

  4. P2Y2 Nucleotide Receptor Activation Up-regulates Vascular Cell Adhesion Molecular-1 Expression and Enhances Lymphocyte Adherence to a Human Submandibular Gland Cell Line

    PubMed Central

    Baker, Olga J.; Camden, Jean M.; Rome, Danny E.; Seye, Cheikh I.; Weisman, Gary A.

    2007-01-01

    Sjögren’s syndrome (SS) is a chronic inflammatory autoimmune disease that causes salivary and lacrimal gland tissue destruction resulting in impaired secretory function. Although lymphocytic infiltration of salivary epithelium is associated with SS, the mechanisms involved have not been adequately elucidated. Our previous studies have shown that the G protein-coupled P2Y2 nucleotide receptor (P2Y2R) is up-regulated in response to damage or stress of salivary gland epithelium, and in salivary glands of the NOD.B10 mouse model of SS-like autoimmune exocrinopathy. Additionally, we have shown that P2Y2R activation up-regulates vascular cell adhesion molecule-1 (VCAM-1) expression in endothelial cells leading to the binding of monocytes. The present study demonstrates that activation of the P2Y2R in dispersed cell aggregates from rat submandibular gland (SMG) and in human submandibular gland ductal cells (HSG) up-regulates the expression of VCAM-1. Furthermore, P2Y2R activation mediated the up-regulation of VCAM-1 expression in HSG cells leading to increased adherence of lymphocytic cells. Inhibitors of EGFR phosphorylation and metalloprotease activity abolished P2Y2R-mediated VCAM-1 expression and decreased lymphocyte binding to HSG cells. Moreover, silencing of EGFR expression abolished UTP-induced VCAM-1 up-regulation in HSG cells. These results suggest that P2Y2R activation in salivary gland cells increases the EGFR-dependent expression of VCAM-1 and the binding of lymphocytes, a pathway relevant to inflammation associated with SS. PMID:17599409

  5. Electrical activity of ferroelectric biomaterials and its effects on the adhesion, growth and enzymatic activity of human osteoblast-like cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vaněk, P.; Kolská, Z.; Luxbacher, T.; García, J. A. L.; Lehocký, M.; Vandrovcová, M.; Bačáková, L.; Petzelt, J.

    2016-05-01

    Ferroelectrics have been, among others, studied as electroactive implant materials. Previous investigations have indicated that such implants induce improved bone formation. If a ferroelectric is immersed in a liquid, an electric double layer and a diffusion layer are formed at the interface. This is decisive for protein adsorption and bioactive behaviour, particularly for the adhesion and growth of cells. The charge distribution can be characterized, in a simplified way, by the zeta potential. We measured the zeta potential in dependence on the surface polarity on poled ferroelectric single crystalline LiNbO3 plates. Both our results and recent results of colloidal probe microscopy indicate that the charge distribution at the surface can be influenced by the surface polarity of ferroelectrics under certain ‘ideal’ conditions (low ionic strength, non-contaminated surface, very low roughness). However, suggested ferroelectric coatings on the surface of implants are far from ideal: they are rough, polycrystalline, and the body fluid is complex and has high ionic strength. In real cases, it can therefore be expected that there is rather low influence of the sign of the surface polarity on the electric diffusion layer and thus on the specific adsorption of proteins. This is supported by our results from studies of the adhesion, growth and the activity of alkaline phosphatase of human osteoblast-like Saos-2 cells on ferroelectric LiNbO3 plates in vitro.

  6. Integrating focal adhesion dynamics, cytoskeleton remodeling, and actin motor activity for predicting cell migration on 3D curved surfaces of the extracellular matrix.

    PubMed

    Kim, Min-Cheol; Kim, Choong; Wood, Levi; Neal, Devin; Kamm, Roger D; Asada, H Harry

    2012-11-01

    An integrative cell migration model incorporating focal adhesion (FA) dynamics, cytoskeleton and nucleus remodeling and actin motor activity is developed for predicting cell migration behaviors on 3-dimensional curved surfaces, such as cylindrical lumens in the 3-D extracellular matrix (ECM). The work is motivated by 3-D microfluidic migration experiments suggesting that the migration speed and direction may vary depending on the cross sectional shape of the lumen along which the cell migrates. In this paper, the mechanical structure of the cell is modeled as double elastic membranes of cell and nucleus. The two elastic membranes are connected by stress fibers, which are extended from focal adhesions on the cell surface to the nuclear membrane. The cell deforms and gains traction as transmembrane integrins distributed over the outer cell membrane bind to ligands on the ECM, form focal adhesions, and activate stress fibers. Probabilities at which integrin ligand-receptor bonds are formed as well as ruptures are affected by the surface geometry, resulting in diverse migration behaviors that depend on the curvature of the surface. Monte Carlo simulations of the integrative model reveal that (a) the cell migration speed is dependent on the cross sectional area of the lumen with a maximum speed at a particular diameter or width, (b) as the lumen diameter increases, the cell tends to spread and migrate around the circumference of the lumen, while it moves in the longitudinal direction as the lumen diameter narrows, (c) once the cell moves in one direction, it tends to stay migrating in the same direction despite the stochastic nature of migration. The relationship between the cell migration speed and the lumen width agrees with microfluidic experimental data for cancer cell migration.

  7. Cell adhesion strength from cortical tension - an integration of concepts.

    PubMed

    Winklbauer, Rudolf

    2015-10-15

    Morphogenetic mechanisms such as cell movement or tissue separation depend on cell attachment and detachment processes, which involve adhesion receptors as well as the cortical cytoskeleton. The interplay between the two components is of stunning complexity. Most strikingly, the binding energy of adhesion molecules is usually too small for substantial cell-cell attachment, pointing to a main deficit in our present understanding of adhesion. In this Opinion article, I integrate recent findings and conceptual advances in the field into a coherent framework for cell adhesion. I argue that active cortical tension is best viewed as an integral part of adhesion, and propose on this basis a non-arbitrary measure of adhesion strength - the tissue surface tension of cell aggregates. This concept of adhesion integrates heterogeneous molecular inputs into a single mechanical property and simplifies the analysis of attachment-detachment processes. It draws attention to the enormous variation of adhesion strengths among tissues, whose origin and function is little understood. PMID:26471994

  8. Cilostazol prevents remnant lipoprotein particle-induced monocyte adhesion to endothelial cells by suppression of adhesion molecules and monocyte chemoattractant protein-1 expression via lectin-like receptor for oxidized low-density lipoprotein receptor activation.

    PubMed

    Park, So Youn; Lee, Jeong Hyun; Kim, Yong Ki; Kim, Chi Dae; Rhim, Byung Yong; Lee, Won Suk; Hong, Ki Whan

    2005-03-01

    This study shows cilostazol effect to prevent remnant lipoprotein particle (RLP)-induced monocyte adhesion to human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs). Upon incubation of HUVECs with RLP (50 microg/ml), adherent monocytes significantly increased by 3.3-fold with increased cell surface expression of vascular cell adhesion molecule-1 (VCAM-1), intercellular adhesion molecule-1, E-selectin, and monocyte chemoattractant protein-1 (MCP-1). Cilostazol ( approximately 1-100 microM) concentration dependently repressed these variables as did (E)3-[(4-t-butylphenyl)sulfonyl]-2-propenenitrile (BAY 11-7085) (10 microM), a specific nuclear factor-kappaB (NF-kappaB) inhibitor. Cilostazol effects were significantly antagonized by iberiotoxin (1 microM), a maxi-K channel blocker. RLP significantly increased expression of lectin-like receptor for oxidized low-density lipoprotein (LDL) (LOX-1) receptor protein. Upon transfection with antisense LOX-1 oligodeoxynucleotide (As-LOX-1), LOX-1 receptor expression was reduced, whereas HUVECs with sense LOX-1 oligodeoxynucleotide did express high LOX-1 receptor. RLP-stimulated superoxide and tumor necrosis factor-alpha levels were significantly lowered with decreased expression of VCAM-1 and MCP-1 by transfection with As-LOX-1 as did polyinosinic acid (10 microg/ml, a LOX-1 receptor inhibitor). RLP significantly degraded inhibitory kappaBalpha in the cytoplasm and activated nuclear factor-kappaB (NF-kappaB) p65 in the nucleus of HUVECs with increased luciferase activity of NF-kappaB, all of which were reversed by cilostazol (10 microM), BAY 11-7085, and polyinosinic acid. Together, cilostazol suppresses RLP-stimulated increased monocyte adhesion to HUVECs by suppression of LOX-1 receptor-coupled NF-kappaB-dependent nuclear transcription via mediation of the maxi-K channel opening.

  9. The structure of cell-matrix adhesions: the new frontier

    PubMed Central

    Hanein, Dorit; Horwitz, Rick

    2012-01-01

    Adhesions between the cell and the extracellular matrix (ECM) are mechanosensitive multi-protein assemblies that transmit force across the cell membrane and regulate biochemical signals in response to the chemical and mechanical environment. These combined functions in force transduction, signaling and mechanosensing contribute to cellular phenotypes that span development, homeostasis and disease. These adhesions form, mature and disassemble in response to actin organization and physical forces that originate from endogenous myosin activity or external forces by the extracellular matrix. Despite advances in our understanding of the protein composition, interactions and regulation, our understanding of matrix adhesion structure and organization, how forces affect this organization, and how these changes dictate specific signaling events is limited. Insights across multiple structural levels are acutely needed to elucidate adhesion structure and ultimately the molecular basis of signaling and mechanotransduction. Here we describe the challenges and recent advances and prospects for unraveling the structure of cell-matrix adhesions and their response to force. PMID:22196929

  10. Regulation of Embryonic Cell Adhesion by the Prion Protein

    PubMed Central

    Schrock, Yvonne; Geiss, Corinna; Luncz, Lydia; Thomanetz, Venus; Stuermer, Claudia A. O

    2009-01-01

    Prion proteins (PrPs) are key players in fatal neurodegenerative disorders, yet their physiological functions remain unclear, as PrP knockout mice develop rather normally. We report a strong PrP loss-of-function phenotype in zebrafish embryos, characterized by the loss of embryonic cell adhesion and arrested gastrulation. Zebrafish and mouse PrP mRNAs can partially rescue this knockdown phenotype, indicating conserved PrP functions. Using zebrafish, mouse, and Drosophila cells, we show that PrP: (1) mediates Ca+2-independent homophilic cell adhesion and signaling; and (2) modulates Ca+2-dependent cell adhesion by regulating the delivery of E-cadherin to the plasma membrane. In vivo time-lapse analyses reveal that the arrested gastrulation in PrP knockdown embryos is due to deficient morphogenetic cell movements, which rely on E-cadherin–based adhesion. Cell-transplantation experiments indicate that the regulation of embryonic cell adhesion by PrP is cell-autonomous. Moreover, we find that the local accumulation of PrP at cell contact sites is concomitant with the activation of Src-related kinases, the recruitment of reggie/flotillin microdomains, and the reorganization of the actin cytoskeleton, consistent with a role of PrP in the modulation of cell adhesion via signaling. Altogether, our data uncover evolutionarily conserved roles of PrP in cell communication, which ultimately impinge on the stability of adherens cell junctions during embryonic development. PMID:19278297

  11. Modular glass chip system measuring the electric activity and adhesion of neuronal cells--application and drug testing with sodium valproic acid.

    PubMed

    Koester, Philipp Julian; Buehler, Sebastian Moritz; Stubbe, Marco; Tautorat, Carsten; Niendorf, Mathias; Baumann, Werner; Gimsa, Jan

    2010-06-21

    We developed a modular neurochip system by combining a small (16x16 mm2) glass neurochip (GNC) with a homemade head stage and commercial data acquisition hardware and software. The system is designed for the detection of the electric activity of cultivated nerve or muscle cells by a 52-microelectrode array (MEA). In parallel, cell adhesion can be registered from the electric impedance of an interdigitated electrode structure (IDES). The GNC was tested with various cell lines and primary cells. It is fully autoclavable and re-useable. Murine embryonic primary cells were used as a model system to correlate the electric activity and adhesion of neuronal networks in a drug test with sodium valproic acid. The test showed the advantage of the parallel IDES and MEA measurements, i.e. the parallel detection of cytotoxic and neurotoxic effects. Toxic exposure of the cells during neuronal network formation allows for the characterization of developmental neurotoxic effects even at drug concentrations below the EC50-value for acute neurotoxic effects. At high drug concentrations, the degree of cytotoxic damage can still be assessed from the IDES data in the event that no electric activity develops. The GNC provides optimal cell culture conditions for up to months in combination with full microscopic observability. The 4'' glass wafer technology allows for a high precision of the GNC structures and an economic production of our new system that can be applied in general and developmental toxicity tests as well as in the search for neuro-active compounds.

  12. Could both vitamin D and geomagnetic activity impact serum levels of soluble cell adhesion molecules in young men?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bleizgys, Andrius; Šapoka, Virginijus

    2016-07-01

    Vitamin D might have a role in diminishing endothelial dysfunction (ED). The initial aim was to test the hypothesis of reciprocity between levels of 25-hydroxyvitamin D (25(OH)D) and levels of soluble endothelial cell adhesion molecules (CAMs) that could serve as biomarkers of ED. Randomly selected men of age 20-39 were examined at February or March (cold season) and reexamined at August or September (warm season). Some lifestyle and anthropometrical data were recorded. Laboratory measurements, including those for serum levels of soluble CAMs—sICAM-1, sVCAM-1, sE-selectin and sP-selectin—were also performed. As some of the results were rather unexpected, indices of geomagnetic activity (GMA), obtained from the online database, were included in further analysis as a confounder. In 2012-2013, 130 men were examined in cold season, and 125 of them were reexamined in warm season. 25(OH)D levels were found to be significantly negatively associated with sVCAM-1 levels ( β = -0.15, p = 0.043 in warm season; β = -0.19, p = 0.007 for changes). Levels of sVCAM-1 and sICAM-1 from the same seasons were notably different between years and have changed in an opposite manner. Soluble P-selectin levels were higher at warm season in both years. GMA was positively associated with sVCAM-1 ( β = 0.17, p = 0.039 in cold season; β = 0.22, p = 0.002 for changes) and negatively with sICAM-1 ( β = -0.30. p < 0.001 in cold season) levels. Vitamin D might play a role in diminishing sVCAM-1 levels. Levels of sVCAM-1 and sICAM-1 were associated with the GMA; this implies a need for further research.

  13. Evaluation of Endothelial Cell Adhesion Molecules and Anti-C1q Antibody in Discriminating between Active and Non-Active Systemic Lupus Erythematosus

    PubMed Central

    Mahayidin, Hasni; Yahya, Nurul Khaiza; Wan Ghazali, Wan Syamimee; Mohd Ismail, Asmahan; Wan Ab Hamid, Wan Zuraida

    2016-01-01

    Background Detecting the active state of systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) is important but challenging. This study aimed to determine the diagnostic accuracy of serum endothelial cell adhesion molecules (ICAM-1 and VCAM-1) and anti-C1q antibody in discriminating between active and non-active SLE. Methods Using SELENA-SLE disease activity index (SLEDAI), 95 SLE patients (45 active and 50 non-active) were assessed. A score above five was considered indicative of active SLE. The blood samples were tested for serum ICAM-1, VCAM-1 and anti-C1q antibody using enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). Results The levels of serum VCAM-1 and anti-C1q antibody were significantly higher in active SLE patients. Both VCAM-1 and anti-C1q were able to discriminate between active and non-active SLE (p-value < 0.001 and 0.005, respectively). From the receiver operating characteristic curves (ROCs) constructed, the optimal cut-off values for VCAM-1 and anti-C1q antibody in discriminating between active and non-active SLE were 30.5 ng/mL (69.0% sensitivity, 60.0% specificity, PPV 58.5%, NPV 66.7%) and 7.86 U/mL (75.6% sensitivity, 80% specificity, PPV 77.3%, NPV 78.4%), respectively. However, serum ICAM-1 level was unable to discriminate between the two groups (p-value = 0.193). Conclusion Anti-C1q antibody demonstrated the best diagnostic accuracy in discriminating between active and non-active SLE patients. PMID:27418866

  14. Diverse evolutionary paths to cell adhesion.

    PubMed

    Abedin, Monika; King, Nicole

    2010-12-01

    The morphological diversity of animals, fungi, plants, and other multicellular organisms stems from the fact that each lineage acquired multicellularity independently. A prerequisite for each origin of multicellularity was the evolution of mechanisms for stable cell-cell adhesion or attachment. Recent advances in comparative genomics and phylogenetics provide critical insights into the evolutionary foundations of cell adhesion. Reconstructing the evolution of cell junction proteins in animals and their unicellular relatives exemplifies the roles of co-option and innovation. Comparative studies of volvocine algae reveal specific molecular changes that accompanied the evolution of multicellularity in Volvox. Comparisons between animals and Dictyostelium show how commonalities and differences in the biology of unicellular ancestors influenced the evolution of adhesive mechanisms. Understanding the unicellular ancestry of cell adhesion helps illuminate the basic cell biology of multicellular development in modern organisms. PMID:20817460

  15. Estrogen and non-genomic upregulation of voltage-gated Na(+) channel activity in MDA-MB-231 human breast cancer cells: role in adhesion.

    PubMed

    Fraser, Scott P; Ozerlat-Gunduz, Iley; Onkal, Rustem; Diss, James K J; Latchman, David S; Djamgoz, Mustafa B A

    2010-08-01

    External (but not internal) application of beta-estradiol (E2) increased the current amplitude of voltage-gated Na(+) channels (VGSCs) in MDA-MB-231 human breast cancer (BCa) cells. The G-protein activator GTP-gamma-S, by itself, also increased the VGSC current whilst the G-protein inhibitor GDP-beta-S decreased the effect of E2. Expression of GPR30 (a G-protein-coupled estrogen receptor) in MDA-MB-231 cells was confirmed by PCR, Western blot and immunocytochemistry. Importantly, G-1, a specific agonist for GPR30, also increased the VGSC current amplitude in a dose-dependent manner. Transfection and siRNA-silencing of GPR30 expression resulted in corresponding changes in GPR30 protein expression but only internally, and the response to E2 was not affected. The protein kinase A inhibitor, PKI, abolished the effect of E2, whilst forskolin, an adenylate cyclase activator, by itself, increased VGSC activity. On the other hand, pre-incubation of the MDA-MB-231 cells with brefeldin A (a trans-Golgi protein trafficking inhibitor) had no effect on the E2-induced increase in VGSC amplitude, indicating that such trafficking ('externalisation') of VGSC was not involved. Finally, acute application of E2 decreased cell adhesion whilst the specific VGSC blocker tetrodotoxin increased it. Co-application of E2 and tetrodotoxin inhibited the effect of E2 on cell adhesion, suggesting that the effect of E2 was mainly through VGSC activity. Pre-treatment of the cells with PKI abolished the effect of E2 on adhesion, consistent with the proposed role of PKA. Potential implications of the E2-induced non-genomic upregulation of VGSC activity for BCa progression are discussed. PMID:20432453

  16. van der Waals forces influencing adhesion of cells

    PubMed Central

    Kendall, K.; Roberts, A. D.

    2015-01-01

    Adhesion molecules, often thought to be acting by a ‘lock and key’ mechanism, have been thought to control the adhesion of cells. While there is no doubt that a coating of adhesion molecules such as fibronectin on a surface affects cell adhesion, this paper aims to show that such surface contamination is only one factor in the equation. Starting from the baseline idea that van der Waals force is a ubiquitous attraction between all molecules, and thereby must contribute to cell adhesion, it is clear that effects from geometry, elasticity and surface molecules must all add on to the basic cell attractive force. These effects of geometry, elasticity and surface molecules are analysed. The adhesion force measured between macroscopic polymer spheres was found to be strongest when the surfaces were absolutely smooth and clean, with no projecting protruberances. Values of the measured surface energy were then about 35 mJ m−2, as expected for van der Waals attractions between the non-polar molecules. Surface projections such as abrasion roughness or dust reduced the molecular adhesion substantially. Water cut the measured surface energy to 3.4 mJ m−2. Surface active molecules lowered the adhesion still further to less than 0.3 mJ m−2. These observations do not support the lock and key concept. PMID:25533101

  17. Endothelial-monocyte activating polypeptide II alters fibronectin based endothelial cell adhesion and matrix assembly via alpha5 beta1 integrin

    SciTech Connect

    Schwarz, Margaret A. . E-mail: m.schwarz@umdnj.edu; Zheng, Hiahua; Liu, Jie; Corbett, Siobhan; Schwarz, Roderich E.

    2005-12-10

    Mature Endothelial-Monocyte Activating Polypeptide (mEMAP) II functions as a potent antiangiogenic peptide. Although the anti-tumor effect of mEMAP II has been described, little is known regarding its mechanism of action. Observations that mEMAP II induced apoptosis only in a subset of migrating and proliferating endothelial cells (EC) suggests a targeted effect on cells engaged in angiogenic activities which are known to rely upon cell adhesion and migration. Indeed, we demonstrate that mEMAP II inhibited fibronectin (FN) dependent microvascular EC (MEC) adhesion and spreading and we show that this depends upon the alpha5 beta1 integrin. Immunofluorescence analysis demonstrated that mEMAP II-dependent blockade of FN-alpha5 beta1 interactions was associated with disassembly of both actin stress fiber networks and FN matrix. These findings suggest that mEMAP II blocks MEC adhesion and spreading on fibronectin, via a direct interaction with the integrin alpha5 beta1, thus implicating that alpha5 integrin may be a mediator of mEMAP II's antiangiogenic function.

  18. Rgnef (p190RhoGEF) Knockout Inhibits RhoA Activity, Focal Adhesion Establishment, and Cell Motility Downstream of Integrins

    PubMed Central

    Miller, Nichol L. G.; Lawson, Christine; Chen, Xiao Lei; Lim, Ssang-Taek; Schlaepfer, David D.

    2012-01-01

    Background Cell migration is a highly regulated process that involves the formation and turnover of cell-matrix contact sites termed focal adhesions. Rho-family GTPases are molecular switches that regulate actin and focal adhesion dynamics in cells. Guanine nucleotide exchange factors (GEFs) activate Rho-family GTPases. Rgnef (p190RhoGEF) is a ubiquitous 190 kDa GEF implicated in the control of colon carcinoma and fibroblast cell motility. Principal Findings Rgnef exon 24 floxed mice (Rgnefflox) were created and crossed with cytomegalovirus (CMV)-driven Cre recombinase transgenic mice to inactivate Rgnef expression in all tissues during early development. Heterozygous RgnefWT/flox (Cre+) crosses yielded normal Mendelian ratios at embryonic day 13.5, but Rgnefflox/flox (Cre+) mice numbers at 3 weeks of age were significantly less than expected. Rgnefflox/flox (Cre+) (Rgnef−/−) embryos and primary mouse embryo fibroblasts (MEFs) were isolated and verified to lack Rgnef protein expression. When compared to wildtype (WT) littermate MEFs, loss of Rgnef significantly inhibited haptotaxis migration, wound closure motility, focal adhesion number, and RhoA GTPase activation after fibronectin-integrin stimulation. In WT MEFs, Rgnef activation occurs within 60 minutes upon fibronectin plating of cells associated with RhoA activation. Rgnef−/− MEF phenotypes were rescued by epitope-tagged Rgnef re-expression. Conclusions Rgnef−/− MEF phenotypes were due to Rgnef loss and support an essential role for Rgnef in RhoA regulation downstream of integrins in control of cell migration. PMID:22649559

  19. Amine-functionalized polypyrrole: inherently cell adhesive conducting polymer

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Jae Y.; Schmidt, Christine E.

    2014-01-01

    Electrically conducting polymers have been recognized as novel biomaterials that can electrically communicate with biological systems. For their tissue engineering applications, conducting polymers have been modified to promote cell adhesion for improved interactions between biomaterials and cells/tissues. Conventional approaches to improve cell adhesion involve the surface modification of conducting polymers with biomolecules, such as physical adsorption of cell adhesive proteins and polycationic polymers, or their chemical immobilization; however, these approaches require additional multiple modification steps with expensive biomolecules. In this study, as a simple and effective alternative to such additional biomolecule treatment, we synthesized amine-functionalized polypyrrole (APPy) that inherently presents cell adhesion-supporting positive charges under physiological conditions. The synthesized APPy provides electrical activity in a moderate range and a hydrophilic surface compared to regular polypyrrole (PPy) homopolymers. Under both serum and serum-free conditions, APPy exhibited superior attachment of human dermal fibroblasts and Schwann cells compared to PPy homopolymer controls. Moreover, Schwann cell adhesion onto the APPy copolymer was at least similar to that on poly-L-lysine treated PPy controls. Our results indicate that amine-functionalized conducting polymer substrates will be useful to achieve good cell adhesion and potentially electrically stimulate various cells. In addition, an amine functionality present on conducting polymers can further serve as a novel and flexible platform to chemically tether various bioactive molecules, such as growth factors, antibodies, and chemical drugs. PMID:25294089

  20. Physics of adhesion and elasticity of biological cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Safran, S. A.

    2006-03-01

    Forces exerted by adherent cells are important for many physiological processes such as wound healing and tissue formation. By pulling on their environment, cells sense rigidity gradients, boundaries and strains induced by the presence of other cells. Many cell types respond to these signals by actively adjusting the magnitude and direction of the adhesions that connect cells to surfaces or to each other. These adhesions are formed from membrane-bound integrin proteins and other cytoplasmic proteins that form condensed domains that grow in the direction of externally applied or internal, cytoskeletal forces. We present a model for the adsorption of adhesion proteins from the cell interior to the adhesion site and the resulting, force-sensitive anisotropic growth. The theory couples the mechanical forces to the non- linear adsorption dynamics and predicts the growth velocities of the back and front of the adhesion in qualitative agreement with experiment. The adhesion forces generated by a collection of cells in a tissue significantly alter the overall elastic response of the system. We model an ensemble of cells by an extension of the treatment of dielectric response of polar molecules to elastic interactions. By introducing the elastic analogy of the dielectric constant of the medium, we are able to predict the average cell polarization, their orientational order, and the effective material constants.

  1. Analytical cell adhesion chromatography reveals impaired persistence of metastatic cell rolling adhesion to P-selectin.

    PubMed

    Oh, Jaeho; Edwards, Erin E; McClatchey, P Mason; Thomas, Susan N

    2015-10-15

    Selectins facilitate the recruitment of circulating cells from the bloodstream by mediating rolling adhesion, which initiates the cell-cell signaling that directs extravasation into surrounding tissues. To measure the relative efficiency of cell adhesion in shear flow for in vitro drug screening, we designed and implemented a microfluidic-based analytical cell adhesion chromatography system. The juxtaposition of instantaneous rolling velocities with elution times revealed that human metastatic cancer cells, but not human leukocytes, had a reduced capacity to sustain rolling adhesion with P-selectin. We define a new parameter, termed adhesion persistence, which is conceptually similar to migration persistence in the context of chemotaxis, but instead describes the capacity of cells to resist the influence of shear flow and sustain rolling interactions with an adhesive substrate that might modulate the probability of extravasation. Among cell types assayed, adhesion persistence to P-selectin was specifically reduced in metastatic but not leukocyte-like cells in response to a low dose of heparin. In conclusion, we demonstrate this as an effective methodology to identify selectin adhesion antagonist doses that modulate homing cell adhesion and engraftment in a cell-subtype-selective manner.

  2. Cell-adhesion molecules in memory formation.

    PubMed

    Schmidt, R

    1995-01-23

    After learning events the CNS of higher organisms selects, which acquired informations are permanently stored as a memory trace. This period of memory consolidation is susceptible to interference by biochemical inhibitors of transcription and translation. Ependymin is a specific CNS glycoprotein functionally involved in memory consolidation in goldfish: after active shock-avoidance conditioning ependymin mRNA is rapidly induced in meningeal fibroblasts followed by enhanced synthesis and secretion of several closely related forms of the protein. Intracranial injections of anti-ependymin antisera or antisense oligodeoxynucleotides interfere specifically with memory consolidation, indicating that only de novo synthesized ependymin molecules are involved. Ependymin is capable of directing the growth of central axons in vitro and participates in neuronal regeneration in situ, presumably by its HNK-1 cell-adhesion epitope. Experiments reviewed in this article suggest a model that involves two regulation mechanisms for the function of ependymin in behavioural plasticity: while hormones appear to determine, how much of this cell adhesion molecule is synthesized after learning, local changes of metal cation concentrations in the micro-environment of activated neurons may polymerize ependymin at those synapses, that have to be consolidated to improve their efficacy for future use.

  3. Inhibition of cell adhesion by high molecular weight kininogen

    PubMed Central

    1992-01-01

    An anti-cell adhesion globulin was purified from human plasma by heparin-affinity chromatography. The purified globulin inhibited spreading of osteosarcoma and melanoma cells on vitronectin, and of endothelial cells, platelets, and mononuclear blood cells on vitronectin or fibrinogen. It did not inhibit cell spreading on fibronectin. The protein had the strongest antiadhesive effect when preadsorbed onto the otherwise adhesive surfaces. Amino acid sequence analysis revealed that the globulin is cleaved (kinin-free) high molecular weight kininogen (HKa). Globulin fractions from normal plasma immunodepleted of high molecular weight kininogen (HK) or from an individual deficient of HK lacked adhesive activity. Uncleaved single- chain HK preadsorbed at neutral pH, HKa preadsorbed at pH greater than 8.0, and HKa degraded further to release its histidine-rich domain had little anti-adhesive activity. These results indicate that the cationic histidine-rich domain is critical for anti-adhesive activity and is somehow mobilized upon cleavage. Vitronectin was not displaced from the surface by HKa. Thus, cleavage of HK by kallikrein results in both release of bradykinin, a potent vasoactive and growth-promoting peptide, and formation of a potent anti-adhesive protein. PMID:1370494

  4. Could both vitamin D and geomagnetic activity impact serum levels of soluble cell adhesion molecules in young men?

    PubMed

    Bleizgys, Andrius; Šapoka, Virginijus

    2016-07-01

    Vitamin D might have a role in diminishing endothelial dysfunction (ED). The initial aim was to test the hypothesis of reciprocity between levels of 25-hydroxyvitamin D (25(OH)D) and levels of soluble endothelial cell adhesion molecules (CAMs) that could serve as biomarkers of ED. Randomly selected men of age 20-39 were examined at February or March (cold season) and reexamined at August or September (warm season). Some lifestyle and anthropometrical data were recorded. Laboratory measurements, including those for serum levels of soluble CAMs-sICAM-1, sVCAM-1, sE-selectin and sP-selectin-were also performed. As some of the results were rather unexpected, indices of geomagnetic activity (GMA), obtained from the online database, were included in further analysis as a confounder. In 2012-2013, 130 men were examined in cold season, and 125 of them were reexamined in warm season. 25(OH)D levels were found to be significantly negatively associated with sVCAM-1 levels (β = -0.15, p = 0.043 in warm season; β = -0.19, p = 0.007 for changes). Levels of sVCAM-1 and sICAM-1 from the same seasons were notably different between years and have changed in an opposite manner. Soluble P-selectin levels were higher at warm season in both years. GMA was positively associated with sVCAM-1 (β = 0.17, p = 0.039 in cold season; β = 0.22, p = 0.002 for changes) and negatively with sICAM-1 (β = -0.30. p < 0.001 in cold season) levels. Vitamin D might play a role in diminishing sVCAM-1 levels. Levels of sVCAM-1 and sICAM-1 were associated with the GMA; this implies a need for further research. PMID:26546313

  5. Sphingosylphosphorylcholine inhibits macrophage adhesion to vascular smooth muscle cells.

    PubMed

    Wirrig, Christiane; McKean, Jenny S; Wilson, Heather M; Nixon, Graeme F

    2016-09-01

    Inflammation in de-endothelialised arteries contributes to the development of cardiovascular diseases. The process that initiates this inflammatory response is the adhesion of monocytes/macrophages to exposed vascular smooth muscle cells, typically stimulated by cytokines such as tumour necrosis factor-α (TNF). The aim of this study was to determine the effect of the sphingolipid sphingosylphosphorylcholine (SPC) on the interaction of monocytes/macrophages with vascular smooth muscle cells. Rat aortic smooth muscle cells and rat bone marrow-derived macrophages were co-cultured using an in vitro assay following incubation with sphingolipids to assess inter-cellular adhesion. We reveal that SPC inhibits the TNF-induced adhesion of macrophages to smooth muscle cells. This anti-adhesive effect was the result of SPC-induced changes to the smooth muscle cells (but not the macrophages) and was mediated, at least partly, via the sphingosine 1-phosphate receptor subtype 2. Lipid raft domains were also required. Although SPC did not alter expression or membrane distribution of the adhesion proteins intercellular adhesion molecule-1 and vascular cellular adhesion protein-1 in smooth muscle cells, SPC preincubation inhibited the TNF-induced increase in inducible nitric oxide synthase (NOS2) resulting in a subsequent decrease in nitric oxide production. Inhibiting NOS2 activation in smooth muscle cells led to a decrease in the adhesion of macrophages to smooth muscle cells. This study has therefore delineated a novel pathway which can inhibit the interaction between macrophages and vascular smooth muscle cells via SPC-induced repression of NOS2 expression. This mechanism could represent a potential drug target in vascular disease.

  6. Sphingosylphosphorylcholine inhibits macrophage adhesion to vascular smooth muscle cells.

    PubMed

    Wirrig, Christiane; McKean, Jenny S; Wilson, Heather M; Nixon, Graeme F

    2016-09-01

    Inflammation in de-endothelialised arteries contributes to the development of cardiovascular diseases. The process that initiates this inflammatory response is the adhesion of monocytes/macrophages to exposed vascular smooth muscle cells, typically stimulated by cytokines such as tumour necrosis factor-α (TNF). The aim of this study was to determine the effect of the sphingolipid sphingosylphosphorylcholine (SPC) on the interaction of monocytes/macrophages with vascular smooth muscle cells. Rat aortic smooth muscle cells and rat bone marrow-derived macrophages were co-cultured using an in vitro assay following incubation with sphingolipids to assess inter-cellular adhesion. We reveal that SPC inhibits the TNF-induced adhesion of macrophages to smooth muscle cells. This anti-adhesive effect was the result of SPC-induced changes to the smooth muscle cells (but not the macrophages) and was mediated, at least partly, via the sphingosine 1-phosphate receptor subtype 2. Lipid raft domains were also required. Although SPC did not alter expression or membrane distribution of the adhesion proteins intercellular adhesion molecule-1 and vascular cellular adhesion protein-1 in smooth muscle cells, SPC preincubation inhibited the TNF-induced increase in inducible nitric oxide synthase (NOS2) resulting in a subsequent decrease in nitric oxide production. Inhibiting NOS2 activation in smooth muscle cells led to a decrease in the adhesion of macrophages to smooth muscle cells. This study has therefore delineated a novel pathway which can inhibit the interaction between macrophages and vascular smooth muscle cells via SPC-induced repression of NOS2 expression. This mechanism could represent a potential drug target in vascular disease. PMID:27402344

  7. Characterizing Cell Adhesion by Using Micropipette Aspiration

    PubMed Central

    Hogan, Brenna; Babataheri, Avin; Hwang, Yongyun; Barakat, Abdul I.; Husson, Julien

    2015-01-01

    We have developed a technique to directly quantify cell-substrate adhesion force using micropipette aspiration. The micropipette is positioned perpendicular to the surface of an adherent cell and a constant-rate aspiration pressure is applied. Since the micropipette diameter and the aspiration pressure are our control parameters, we have direct knowledge of the aspiration force, whereas the cell behavior is monitored either in brightfield or interference reflection microscopy. This setup thus allows us to explore a range of geometric parameters, such as projected cell area, adhesion area, or pipette size, as well as dynamical parameters such as the loading rate. We find that cell detachment is a well-defined event occurring at a critical aspiration pressure, and that the detachment force scales with the cell adhesion area (for a given micropipette diameter and loading rate), which defines a critical stress. Taking into account the cell adhesion area, intrinsic parameters of the adhesion bonds, and the loading rate, a minimal model provides an expression for the critical stress that helps rationalize our experimental results. PMID:26200857

  8. Yielding elastic tethers stabilize robust cell adhesion.

    PubMed

    Whitfield, Matt J; Luo, Jonathon P; Thomas, Wendy E

    2014-12-01

    Many bacteria and eukaryotic cells express adhesive proteins at the end of tethers that elongate reversibly at constant or near constant force, which we refer to as yielding elasticity. Here we address the function of yielding elastic adhesive tethers with Escherichia coli bacteria as a model for cell adhesion, using a combination of experiments and simulations. The adhesive bond kinetics and tether elasticity was modeled in the simulations with realistic biophysical models that were fit to new and previously published single molecule force spectroscopy data. The simulations were validated by comparison to experiments measuring the adhesive behavior of E. coli in flowing fluid. Analysis of the simulations demonstrated that yielding elasticity is required for the bacteria to remain bound in high and variable flow conditions, because it allows the force to be distributed evenly between multiple bonds. In contrast, strain-hardening and linear elastic tethers concentrate force on the most vulnerable bonds, which leads to failure of the entire adhesive contact. Load distribution is especially important to noncovalent receptor-ligand bonds, because they become exponentially shorter lived at higher force above a critical force, even if they form catch bonds. The advantage of yielding is likely to extend to any blood cells or pathogens adhering in flow, or to any situation where bonds are stretched unequally due to surface roughness, unequal native bond lengths, or conditions that act to unzip the bonds.

  9. Adhesion, invasion and intracellular replication of Salmonella typhimurium in a murine hepatocyte cell line. Effect of cytokines and LPS on antibacterial activity of hepatocytes.

    PubMed

    Lajarin, F; Rubio, G; Galvez, J; Garcia-Peñarrubia, P

    1996-11-01

    Elimination of pathogenic microorganisms in the liver may be an important effector mechanism in host defenses. In this paper we describe the adhesion, invasion and multiplication of Salmonella typhimurium in a murine embryonic hepatocyte cell line (ATCC TIB-73). Monolayers of hepatocytes treated with recombinant IFN gamma, IL1 beta, and LPS exhibit antibacterial activity against intracellular Salmonella. The dynamic of the infection process in stimulated vs unstimulated hepatocytes was determined by counting the number of survival bacteria in the cell monolayers at 4 and 28h after gentamicin was added to the infected cells. Salmonella typhimurium is able to adhere, invade and replicate inside the hepatocytes. The maximum number of cell-associated bacteria is approximately 15 bacteria per cell, whereas the invasive capacity of Salmonella is 0.003 bacteria per hepatocyte. Stimulated cultures display antibacterial activity compared to unstimulated controls. The antibacterial activity does not seem to be mediated by nitric oxide (NO) since inhibition of NO production by using NG-Monomethyl-L-Arginine did not revert the antibacterial activity. Also, high amounts of NO induced by adding L-Arginine to the cell cultures did not enhance hepatocyte antibacterial activity.

  10. Optimization of amino group density on surfaces of titanium dioxide nanoparticles covalently bonded to a silicone substrate for antibacterial and cell adhesion activities.

    PubMed

    Okada, Masahiro; Yasuda, Shoji; Kimura, Tsuyoshi; Iwasaki, Mitsunobu; Ito, Seishiro; Kishida, Akio; Furuzono, Tsutomu

    2006-01-01

    A composite consisting of titanium dioxide (TiO2) particle, the surface of which was modified with amino groups, and a silicone substrate through covalent bonding at their interface was developed, and antibacterial and cell adhesion activities of the composite were evaluated. The density of the amino groups on the TiO2 particle surface was controlled by the reaction time of the modification reaction. The degradation rate of CH3CHO in the presence of the TiO2 particles under UV irradiation decreased with an increase in the amino group density on the TiO2 surface. On the other hand, the number of L929 cells adhering on the TiO2/silicone composite increased with an increase in the amino group density. From the above two results, the optimum density of amino groups for both photoreactivity and cell adhesiveness was estimated to be 2.0-4.0 molecules/nm2. The optimum amino group-modified TiO2/silicone composite sheet (amino group density, 3.0 molecules/nm2) showed an effective antibacterial activity for Escherichia coli bacteria under UV irradiation.

  11. A Small Physiological Electric Field Mediated Responses of Extravillous Trophoblasts Derived from HTR8/SVneo Cells: Involvement of Activation of Focal Adhesion Kinase Signaling

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Juan; Ren, Rongmei; Luo, Xuefeng; Fan, Ping; Liu, Xinghui; Liang, Shanshan; Ma, Lei; Yu, Ping; Bai, Huai

    2014-01-01

    Moderate invasion of trophoblast cells into endometrium is essential for the placental development and normal pregnancy. Electric field (EF)-induced effects on cellular behaviors have been observed in many cell types. This study was to investigate the effect of physiological direct current EF (dc EF) on cellular responses such as elongation, orientation and motility of trophoblast cells. Immortalized first trimester extravillous trophoblast cells (HTR-8/SVneo) were exposed to the dc EF at physiological magnitude. Cell images were recorded and analyzed by image analyzer. Cell lysates were used to detect protein expression by Western blot. Cultured in the dc EFs the cells showed elongation, orientation and enhanced migration rate compared with non-EF stimulated cells at field strengths of 100 mV/mm to 200 mV/mm. EF exposure increased focal adhesion kinase (FAK) phosphorylation in a time-dependent manner and increased expression levels of MMP-2. Pharmacological inhibition of FAK impaired the EF-induced responses including motility and abrogated the elevation of MMP-2 expression. However, the expression levels of integrins like integrin α1, α5, αV and β1 were not affected by EF stimulation. Our results demonstrate the importance of FAK activation in migration/motility of trophobalst cells driven by EFs. In addition, it raises the feasibility of using applied EFs to promote placentation through effects on trophoblast cells. PMID:24643246

  12. Studies on the relationship between adhesive activity and haemagglutination by Helicobacter pylori.

    PubMed

    Osaki, T; Yamaguchi, H; Taguchi, H; Kumada, J; Ogata, S; Kamiya, S

    1997-02-01

    The adhesion of Helicobacter pylori to gastric carcinoma cells (MKN45, KatoIII and MKN28) and Intestine-407 cells was tested by flow cytometric analysis. The mean adhesion rates of H. pylori strains to MKN45, KatoIII and Intestine-407 cells were 90.5, 42.7 and 15.1%, respectively. There was no statistical correlation between the adhesion rates to MKN45 cells and haemagglutination (HA) activity of H. pylori strains, although H. pylori strains with high HA activity with human type O erythrocytes tended to adhere effectively to MKN45 cells. No correlation between adhesion and production of vacuolating toxin was observed. PMID:9060870

  13. A role for adherons in neural retina cell adhesion

    PubMed Central

    1983-01-01

    Embryonic chick neural retina cells release glycoprotein complexes, termed adherons, into their culture medium. When absorbed onto the surface of petri dishes, neural retina adherons increase the initial rate of neural retina cell adhesion; they also stimulate the rate of cell-cell aggregation. Adheron-stimulated adhesion is tissue specific, and the spontaneous aggregation of neural retina cells is inhibited by monovalent Fab' fragments prepared from an antiserum against neural retina adherons. Therefore cell surface antigenic determinants shared with adherons are involved in normal cell-cell adhesions. The particles from the heterogeneous neural retina population contain many proteins and several glycosaminoglycans. The adherons migrate as a symmetrical 12S peak on sucrose gradients and are predominantly 15-nm spheres when examined by electron microscopy. Finally, the specific activity of neural retina adherons increases from embryonic days 7 through 12 and then declines. These results suggest that glycoprotein particles may be involved in some of the adhesive interactions between neural retina cells and between the cells and their environment. PMID:6187755

  14. Soluble cell adhesion molecules in hypertriglyceridemia and potential significance on monocyte adhesion.

    PubMed

    Abe, Y; El-Masri, B; Kimball, K T; Pownall, H; Reilly, C F; Osmundsen, K; Smith, C W; Ballantyne, C M

    1998-05-01

    Hypertriglyceridemia may contribute to the development of atherosclerosis by increasing expression of cell adhesion molecules (CAMs). Although the cellular expression of CAMs is difficult to assess clinically, soluble forms of CAMs (sCAMs) are present in the circulation and may serve as markers for CAMs. In this study, we examined the association between sCAMs and other risk factors occurring with hypertriglyceridemia, the effect of triglyceride reduction on sCAM levels, and the role of soluble vascular cell adhesion molecule-1 (sVCAM-1) in monocyte adhesion in vitro. Compared with normal control subjects (n=20), patients with hypertriglyceridemia and low HDL (n=39) had significantly increased levels of soluble intercellular adhesion molecule-1 (sICAM-1) (316+/-28.8 versus 225+/-16.6 ng/mL), sVCAM-1 (743+/-52.2 versus 522+/-43.6 ng/mL), and soluble E-selectin (83+/-5.9 versus 49+/-3.6 ng/mL). ANCOVA showed that the higher sCAM levels in patients occurred independently of diabetes mellitus and other risk factors. In 27 patients who received purified n-3 fatty acid (Omacor) 4 g/d for > or =7 months, triglyceride level was reduced by 47+/-4.6%, sICAM-1 level was reduced by 9+/-3.4% (P=.02), and soluble E-selectin level was reduced by 16+/-3.2% (P<.0001), with the greatest reduction in diabetic patients. These results support previous in vitro data showing that disorders in triglyceride and HDL metabolism influence CAM expression and treatment with fish oils may alter vascular cell activation. In a parallel-plate flow chamber, recombinant sVCAM-1 at the concentration seen in patients significantly inhibited adhesion of monocytes to interleukin-1-stimulated cultured endothelial cells under conditions of flow by 27.5+/-7.2%. Thus, elevated sCAMs may negatively regulate monocyte adhesion.

  15. Cell adhesion during bullet motion in capillaries.

    PubMed

    Takeishi, Naoki; Imai, Yohsuke; Ishida, Shunichi; Omori, Toshihiro; Kamm, Roger D; Ishikawa, Takuji

    2016-08-01

    A numerical analysis is presented of cell adhesion in capillaries whose diameter is comparable to or smaller than that of the cell. In contrast to a large number of previous efforts on leukocyte and tumor cell rolling, much is still unknown about cell motion in capillaries. The solid and fluid mechanics of a cell in flow was coupled with a slip bond model of ligand-receptor interactions. When the size of a capillary was reduced, the cell always transitioned to "bullet-like" motion, with a consequent decrease in the velocity of the cell. A state diagram was obtained for various values of capillary diameter and receptor density. We found that bullet motion enables firm adhesion of a cell to the capillary wall even for a weak ligand-receptor binding. We also quantified effects of various parameters, including the dissociation rate constant, the spring constant, and the reactive compliance on the characteristics of cell motion. Our results suggest that even under the interaction between P-selectin glycoprotein ligand-1 (PSGL-1) and P-selectin, which is mainly responsible for leukocyte rolling, a cell is able to show firm adhesion in a small capillary. These findings may help in understanding such phenomena as leukocyte plugging and cancer metastasis.

  16. Cell adhesion during bullet motion in capillaries.

    PubMed

    Takeishi, Naoki; Imai, Yohsuke; Ishida, Shunichi; Omori, Toshihiro; Kamm, Roger D; Ishikawa, Takuji

    2016-08-01

    A numerical analysis is presented of cell adhesion in capillaries whose diameter is comparable to or smaller than that of the cell. In contrast to a large number of previous efforts on leukocyte and tumor cell rolling, much is still unknown about cell motion in capillaries. The solid and fluid mechanics of a cell in flow was coupled with a slip bond model of ligand-receptor interactions. When the size of a capillary was reduced, the cell always transitioned to "bullet-like" motion, with a consequent decrease in the velocity of the cell. A state diagram was obtained for various values of capillary diameter and receptor density. We found that bullet motion enables firm adhesion of a cell to the capillary wall even for a weak ligand-receptor binding. We also quantified effects of various parameters, including the dissociation rate constant, the spring constant, and the reactive compliance on the characteristics of cell motion. Our results suggest that even under the interaction between P-selectin glycoprotein ligand-1 (PSGL-1) and P-selectin, which is mainly responsible for leukocyte rolling, a cell is able to show firm adhesion in a small capillary. These findings may help in understanding such phenomena as leukocyte plugging and cancer metastasis. PMID:27261363

  17. ADAMTS-10 and -6 differentially regulate cell-cell junctions and focal adhesions

    PubMed Central

    Cain, Stuart A.; Mularczyk, Ewa J.; Singh, Mukti; Massam-Wu, Teresa; Kielty, Cay M.

    2016-01-01

    ADAMTS10 and ADAMTS6 are homologous metalloproteinases with ill-defined roles. ADAMTS10 mutations cause Weill-Marchesani syndrome (WMS), implicating it in fibrillin microfibril biology since some fibrillin-1 mutations also cause WMS. However little is known about ADAMTS6 function. ADAMTS10 is resistant to furin cleavage, however we show that ADAMTS6 is effectively processed and active. Using siRNA, over-expression and mutagenesis, it was found ADAMTS6 inhibits and ADAMTS10 is required for focal adhesions, epithelial cell-cell junction formation, and microfibril deposition. Either knockdown of ADAMTS6, or disruption of its furin processing or catalytic sites restores focal adhesions, implicating its enzyme activity acts on targets in the focal adhesion complex. In ADAMTS10-depleted cultures, expression of syndecan-4 rescues focal adhesions and cell-cell junctions. Recombinant C-termini of ADAMTS10 and ADAMTS6, both of which induce focal adhesions, bind heparin and syndecan-4. However, cells overexpressing full-length ADAMTS6 lack heparan sulphate and focal adhesions, whilst depletion of ADAMTS6 induces a prominent glycocalyx. Thus ADAMTS10 and ADAMTS6 oppositely affect heparan sulphate-rich interfaces including focal adhesions. We previously showed that microfibril deposition requires fibronectin-induced focal adhesions, and cell-cell junctions in epithelial cultures. Here we reveal that ADAMTS6 causes a reduction in heparan sulphate-rich interfaces, and its expression is regulated by ADAMTS10. PMID:27779234

  18. Collective cell streams in epithelial monolayers depend on cell adhesion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Czirók, András; Varga, Katalin; Méhes, Előd; Szabó, András

    2013-07-01

    We report spontaneously emerging, randomly oriented, collective streaming behavior within a monolayer culture of a human keratinocyte cell line, and explore the effect of modulating cell adhesions by perturbing the function of calcium-dependent cell adhesion molecules. We demonstrate that decreasing cell adhesion induces narrower and more anisotropic cell streams, reminiscent of decreasing the Taylor scale of turbulent liquids. To explain our empirical findings, we propose a cell-based model that represents the dual nature of cell-cell adhesions. Spring-like connections provide mechanical stability, while a cellular Potts model formalism represents surface-tension driven attachment. By changing the relevance and persistence of mechanical links between cells, we are able to explain the experimentally observed changes in emergent flow patterns.

  19. Collective cell streams in epithelial monolayers depend on cell adhesion

    PubMed Central

    Czirók, András; Varga, Katalin; Méhes, Előd; Szabó, András

    2013-01-01

    We report a spontaneously emerging, randomly oriented, collective streaming behavior within a monolayer culture of a human keratinocyte cell line, and explore the effect of modulating cell adhesions by perturbing the function of calcium-dependent cell adhesion molecules. We demonstrate that decreasing cell adhesion induces narrower and more anisotropic cell streams, reminiscent of decreasing the Taylor scale of turbulent liquids. To explain our empirical findings, we propose a cell-based model that represents the dual nature of cell-cell adhesions. Spring-like connections provide mechanical stability, while a cellular Potts model formalism represents surface-tension driven attachment. By changing the relevance and persistence of mechanical links between cells, we are able to explain the experimentally observed changes in emergent flow patterns. PMID:24363603

  20. Terbium promotes adhesion and osteogenic differentiation of mesenchymal stem cells via activation of the Smad-dependent TGF-β/BMP signaling pathway.

    PubMed

    Liu, Dan-Dan; Ge, Kun; Jin, Yi; Sun, Jing; Wang, Shu-Xiang; Yang, Meng-Su; Zhang, Jin-Chao

    2014-08-01

    With its special physical and chemical properties, terbium has been widely used, which has inevitably increased the chance of human exposure to terbium-based compounds. It was reported that terbium mainly deposited in bone after introduction into the human body. Although some studies revealed the effects of terbium on bone cell lines, there have been few reports about the potential effect of terbium on adhesion and differentiation of mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs). In this study, we investigated the effects of terbium on the adhesion and osteogenic and adipogenic differentiation of MSCs and the associated molecular mechanisms. Our data reveal that terbium promoted the osteogenic differentiation in a time-dependent manner and conversely inhibited the adipogenic differentiation of MSCs. Meanwhile, the cell-cell or cell-matrix interaction was enhanced by activating adherent-related key factors, which were evaluated by real-time reverse transcriptase polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR). Real-time RT-PCR and Western blot analysis were also performed to further detect osteogenic and adipogenic biomarkers of MSCs. The regulation of terbium on differentiation of MSCs led to the interaction between the transforming growth factor β/bone morphogenetic protein and peroxisome-proliferator-activated receptor γ (PPARγ) signaling pathways, resulting in upregulation of the osteogenic master transcription factors, such as Runt-related transcription factor 2, bone morphogenetic protein 2, collagen I, alkaline phosphatase, and osteocalcin, and downregulation of the adipogenic master transcription factors, such as PPARγ2. The results provide novel evidence to elucidate the mechanisms of bone metabolism by terbium and may be helpful for more rational application of terbium-based compounds in the future.

  1. Three Functions of Cadherins in Cell Adhesion

    PubMed Central

    Maître, Jean-Léon; Heisenberg, Carl-Philipp

    2013-01-01

    Cadherins are transmembrane proteins that mediate cell–cell adhesion in animals. By regulating contact formation and stability, cadherins play a crucial role in tissue morphogenesis and homeostasis. Here, we review the three major functions of cadherins in cell–cell contact formation and stability. Two of those functions lead to a decrease in interfacial tension at the forming cell–cell contact, thereby promoting contact expansion — first, by providing adhesion tension that lowers interfacial tension at the cell–cell contact, and second, by signaling to the actomyosin cytoskeleton in order to reduce cortex tension and thus interfacial tension at the contact. The third function of cadherins in cell–cell contact formation is to stabilize the contact by resisting mechanical forces that pull on the contact. PMID:23885883

  2. Hybrid inverse opals for regulating cell adhesion and orientation.

    PubMed

    Lu, Jie; Zheng, Fuyin; Cheng, Yao; Ding, Haibo; Zhao, Yuanjin; Gu, Zhongze

    2014-09-21

    Cell adhesion and alignment are two important considerations in tissue engineering applications as they can regulate the subsequent cell proliferation activity and differentiation program. Although many effects have been applied to regulate the adhesion or alignment of cells by using physical and chemical methods, it is still a challenge to regulate these cell behaviors simultaneously. Here, we present novel substrates with tunable nanoscale patterned structures for regulating the adhesion and alignment of cells. The substrates with different degrees of pattern orientation were achieved by customizing the amount of stretching applied to polymer inverse opal films. Cells cultured on these substrates showed an adjustable morphology and alignment. Moreover, soft hydrogels, which have poor plasticity and are difficult to cast into patterned structures, were applied to infiltrate the inverse opal structure. We demonstrated that the adhesion ratio of cells could be regulated by these hybrid substrates, as well as adjusting the cell morphology and alignment. These features of functional inverse opal substrates make them suitable for important applications in tissue engineering. PMID:25088946

  3. Hybrid inverse opals for regulating cell adhesion and orientation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, Jie; Zheng, Fuyin; Cheng, Yao; Ding, Haibo; Zhao, Yuanjin; Gu, Zhongze

    2014-08-01

    Cell adhesion and alignment are two important considerations in tissue engineering applications as they can regulate the subsequent cell proliferation activity and differentiation program. Although many effects have been applied to regulate the adhesion or alignment of cells by using physical and chemical methods, it is still a challenge to regulate these cell behaviors simultaneously. Here, we present novel substrates with tunable nanoscale patterned structures for regulating the adhesion and alignment of cells. The substrates with different degrees of pattern orientation were achieved by customizing the amount of stretching applied to polymer inverse opal films. Cells cultured on these substrates showed an adjustable morphology and alignment. Moreover, soft hydrogels, which have poor plasticity and are difficult to cast into patterned structures, were applied to infiltrate the inverse opal structure. We demonstrated that the adhesion ratio of cells could be regulated by these hybrid substrates, as well as adjusting the cell morphology and alignment. These features of functional inverse opal substrates make them suitable for important applications in tissue engineering.

  4. Hybrid inverse opals for regulating cell adhesion and orientation.

    PubMed

    Lu, Jie; Zheng, Fuyin; Cheng, Yao; Ding, Haibo; Zhao, Yuanjin; Gu, Zhongze

    2014-09-21

    Cell adhesion and alignment are two important considerations in tissue engineering applications as they can regulate the subsequent cell proliferation activity and differentiation program. Although many effects have been applied to regulate the adhesion or alignment of cells by using physical and chemical methods, it is still a challenge to regulate these cell behaviors simultaneously. Here, we present novel substrates with tunable nanoscale patterned structures for regulating the adhesion and alignment of cells. The substrates with different degrees of pattern orientation were achieved by customizing the amount of stretching applied to polymer inverse opal films. Cells cultured on these substrates showed an adjustable morphology and alignment. Moreover, soft hydrogels, which have poor plasticity and are difficult to cast into patterned structures, were applied to infiltrate the inverse opal structure. We demonstrated that the adhesion ratio of cells could be regulated by these hybrid substrates, as well as adjusting the cell morphology and alignment. These features of functional inverse opal substrates make them suitable for important applications in tissue engineering.

  5. Expression and cell distribution of the intercellular adhesion molecule, vascular cell adhesion molecule, endothelial leukocyte adhesion molecule, and endothelial cell adhesion molecule (CD31) in reactive human lymph nodes and in Hodgkin's disease.

    PubMed Central

    Ruco, L. P.; Pomponi, D.; Pigott, R.; Gearing, A. J.; Baiocchini, A.; Baroni, C. D.

    1992-01-01

    The immunocytochemical expression of intercellular adhesion molecule (ICAM-1), vascular cell adhesion molecule (VCAM-1), endothelial leukocyte adhesion molecule (ELAM-1), endothelial cell adhesion molecule (EndoCAM CD31), and HLA-DR antigens was investigated in sections of 24 reactive lymph nodes and in 15 cases of Hodgkin's disease. ICAM-1 was detected in sinus macrophages, follicular dendritic reticulum cells (FDRCs), interdigitating reticulum cells (IDRCs), epithelioid macrophages, Hodgkin's cells (HCs), and vascular endothelium. ICAM-1 expression was often associated with that of HLA-DR antigens. VCAM-1 was detected in FDRCs, in fibroblast reticulum cells (FRCs), in macrophages, and in rare blood vessels. EndoCAM (CD31) was constitutively expressed in all types of endothelial cells, sinus macrophages, and in epithelioid granulomas. ELAM-1 was selectively expressed by activated endothelial cells of high endothelium venules (HEVs). When expression of the inducible adhesion molecules ICAM-1, VCAM-1 and ELAM-1 was comparatively evaluated in HEVs, it was found that ICAM-1 + HEVs were present in all reactive and HD nodes, whereas ELAM-1 and/or VCAM-1 were expressed only in those pathologic conditions characterized by high levels of interleukin-1/tumor necrosis factor (IL-1/TNF) production, such as granulomatosis and Hodgkin's disease. In Hodgkin's disease, the expression of ELAM-1/VCAM-1 was more pronounced in cases of nodular sclerosis and was associated with a significantly higher content of perivascular neutrophils. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 PMID:1605306

  6. Anti-Adhesive Activity of Cranberry Phenolic Compounds and Their Microbial-Derived Metabolites against Uropathogenic Escherichia coli in Bladder Epithelial Cell Cultures.

    PubMed

    de Llano, Dolores González; Esteban-Fernández, Adelaida; Sánchez-Patán, Fernando; Martínlvarez, Pedro J; Moreno-Arribas, Maria Victoria; Bartolomé, Begoña

    2015-01-01

    Cranberry consumption has shown prophylactic effects against urinary tract infections (UTI), although the mechanisms involved are not completely understood. In this paper, cranberry phenolic compounds and their potential microbial-derived metabolites (such as simple phenols and benzoic, phenylacetic and phenylpropionic acids) were tested for their capacity to inhibit the adherence of uropathogenic Escherichia coli (UPEC) ATCC®53503™ to T24 epithelial bladder cells. Catechol, benzoic acid, vanillic acid, phenylacetic acid and 3,4-dihydroxyphenylacetic acid showed anti-adhesive activity against UPEC in a concentration-dependent manner from 100-500 µM, whereas procyanidin A2, widely reported as an inhibitor of UPEC adherence on uroepithelium, was only statistically significant (p < 0.05) at 500 µM (51.3% inhibition). The results proved for the first time the anti-adhesive activity of some cranberry-derived phenolic metabolites against UPEC in vitro, suggesting that their presence in the urine could reduce bacterial colonization and progression of UTI. PMID:26023719

  7. Osteoprotegerin (OPG) activates integrin, focal adhesion kinase (FAK), and Akt signaling in ovarian cancer cells to attenuate TRAIL-induced apoptosis

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Resistance to apoptosis is a major problem in ovarian cancer (OC) and correlates with poor prognosis. Osteoprotegerin (OPG) is a soluble secreted factor that acts as a decoy receptor for receptor activator of NF-κB ligand (RANKL) and tumor necrosis factor-related apoptosis-inducing ligand (TRAIL). OPG has been reported to attenuate TRAIL-induced apoptosis in a variety of cancer cells, including OC cells. OPG-mediated protection against TRAIL has been attributed to its decoy receptor function. However, OPG activates integrin/focal adhesion kinase (FAK) signaling in endothelial cells. In OC cells, activation of integrin/FAK signaling inhibits TRAIL-induced apoptosis. Based on these observations, we hypothesized that OPG could attenuate TRAIL-induced apoptosis in OC cells through integrin/FAK signaling. Methods In vitro experiments including immunoblots, colony formation assays, and apoptosis measurements were used to assess the effect of OPG on TRAIL-induced apoptosis. Results Exogenous OPG protected from TRAIL-induced apoptosis in a TRAIL binding-independent manner and OPG protection was αvβ3 and αvβ5 integrin/FAK signaling-dependent. Moreover, OPG-mediated activation of integrin/FAK signaling resulted in the activation of Akt. Inhibition of both integrin/FAK and Akt signaling significantly inhibited OPG-mediated attenuation of TRAIL-induced apoptosis. Although OPG also stimulated ERK1/2 phosphorylation, inhibition of ERK1/2 signaling did not significantly altered OPG protection. Conclusions Our studies provide evidence, for the first time, that OPG can attenuate TRAIL-induced apoptosis in a TRAIL binding-independent manner through the activation of integrin/FAK/Akt signaling in OC cells. PMID:24267510

  8. Antiangiogenesis, Loss of Cell Adhesion and Apoptosis Are Involved in the Antitumoral Activity of Proteases from V. cundinamarcensis (C. candamarcensis) in Murine Melanoma B16F1

    PubMed Central

    Dittz, Dalton; Figueiredo, Cinthia; Lemos, Fernanda O.; Viana, Celso T. R.; Andrade, Silvia P.; Souza-Fagundes, Elaine M.; Fujiwara, Ricardo T.; Salas, Carlos E.; Lopes, Miriam T. P.

    2015-01-01

    The proteolytic enzymes from V. cundinamarcensis latex, (P1G10), display healing activity in animal models following various types of lesions. P1G10 or the purified isoforms act as mitogens on fibroblast and epithelial cells by stimulating angiogenesis and wound healing in gastric and cutaneous ulcers models. Based on evidence that plant proteinases act as antitumorals, we verified this effect on a murine melanoma model. The antitumoral effect analyzed mice survival and tumor development after subcutaneous administration of P1G10 into C57BL/6J mice bearing B16F1 low metastatic melanoma. Possible factors involved in the antitumoral action were assessed, i.e., cytotoxicity, cell adhesion and apoptosis in vitro, haemoglobin (Hb), vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF), tumor growth factor-β (TGF-β), tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α) content and N-acetyl-glucosaminidase (NAG) activity. We observed that P1G10 inhibited angiogenesis measured by the decline of Hb and VEGF within the tumor, and TGF-β displayed a non-significant increase and TNF-α showed a minor non-significant reduction. On the other hand, there was an increase in NAG activity. In treated B16F1 cells, apoptosis was induced along with decreased cell binding to extracellular matrix components (ECM) and anchorage, without impairing viability. PMID:25826531

  9. PKCδ Influences p190 Phosphorylation and Activity: Events Independent of PKCδ-Mediated Regulation of Endothelial Cell Stress Fiber and Focal Adhesion Formation and Barrier Function

    PubMed Central

    Fordjour, Akua K.; Harrington, Elizabeth O.

    2009-01-01

    Background We have shown that protein kinase Cδ (PKCδ) inhibition results in increased endothelial cell (EC) permeability and decreased RhoA activity; which correlated with diminished stress fibers (SF) and focal adhesions (FA). We have also shown co-precipitation of p190RhoGAP (p190) with PKCδ. Here, we investigated if PKCδ regulates p190 and whether PKCδ-mediated changes in SF and FA or permeability were dependent upon p190. Methods Protein-protein interaction and activity analyses were performed using co-precipitation assays. Analysis of p190 phosphorylation was performed using in vitro kinase assays. SF and FA were analyzed by immunofluorescence analyses. EC monolayer permeability was measured using electrical cell impedance sensor (ECIS) technique. Results Inhibition of PKCδ increased p190 activity, while PKCδ overexpression diminished p190 activity. PKCδ bound to and phosphorylated both p190FF and p190GTPase domains. p190 protein overexpression diminished SF and FA formation and RhoA activity. Disruption of SF and FA or increased permeability induced upon PKCδ inhibition, were not attenuated in EC in which the p190 isoforms were suppressed individually or concurrently. Conclusion and General Significance Our findings suggest that while PKCδ can regulate p190 activity, possibly at the FF and/ or GTPase domains, the effect of PKCδ inhibition on SF and FA and barrier dysfunction occurs through a pathway independent of p190. PMID:19632305

  10. Modeling keratinocyte wound healing dynamics: Cell-cell adhesion promotes sustained collective migration.

    PubMed

    Nardini, John T; Chapnick, Douglas A; Liu, Xuedong; Bortz, David M

    2016-07-01

    The in vitro migration of keratinocyte cell sheets displays behavioral and biochemical similarities to the in vivo wound healing response of keratinocytes in animal model systems. In both cases, ligand-dependent Epidermal Growth Factor Receptor (EGFR) activation is sufficient to elicit collective cell migration into the wound. Previous mathematical modeling studies of in vitro wound healing assays assume that physical connections between cells have a hindering effect on cell migration, but biological literature suggests a more complicated story. By combining mathematical modeling and experimental observations of collectively migrating sheets of keratinocytes, we investigate the role of cell-cell adhesion during in vitro keratinocyte wound healing assays. We develop and compare two nonlinear diffusion models of the wound healing process in which cell-cell adhesion either hinders or promotes migration. Both models can accurately fit the leading edge propagation of cell sheets during wound healing when using a time-dependent rate of cell-cell adhesion strength. The model that assumes a positive role of cell-cell adhesion on migration, however, is robust to changes in the leading edge definition and yields a qualitatively accurate density profile. Using RNAi for the critical adherens junction protein, α-catenin, we demonstrate that cell sheets with wild type cell-cell adhesion expression maintain migration into the wound longer than cell sheets with decreased cell-cell adhesion expression, which fails to exhibit collective migration. Our modeling and experimental data thus suggest that cell-cell adhesion promotes sustained migration as cells pull neighboring cells into the wound during wound healing.

  11. Modeling keratinocyte wound healing dynamics: Cell-cell adhesion promotes sustained collective migration.

    PubMed

    Nardini, John T; Chapnick, Douglas A; Liu, Xuedong; Bortz, David M

    2016-07-01

    The in vitro migration of keratinocyte cell sheets displays behavioral and biochemical similarities to the in vivo wound healing response of keratinocytes in animal model systems. In both cases, ligand-dependent Epidermal Growth Factor Receptor (EGFR) activation is sufficient to elicit collective cell migration into the wound. Previous mathematical modeling studies of in vitro wound healing assays assume that physical connections between cells have a hindering effect on cell migration, but biological literature suggests a more complicated story. By combining mathematical modeling and experimental observations of collectively migrating sheets of keratinocytes, we investigate the role of cell-cell adhesion during in vitro keratinocyte wound healing assays. We develop and compare two nonlinear diffusion models of the wound healing process in which cell-cell adhesion either hinders or promotes migration. Both models can accurately fit the leading edge propagation of cell sheets during wound healing when using a time-dependent rate of cell-cell adhesion strength. The model that assumes a positive role of cell-cell adhesion on migration, however, is robust to changes in the leading edge definition and yields a qualitatively accurate density profile. Using RNAi for the critical adherens junction protein, α-catenin, we demonstrate that cell sheets with wild type cell-cell adhesion expression maintain migration into the wound longer than cell sheets with decreased cell-cell adhesion expression, which fails to exhibit collective migration. Our modeling and experimental data thus suggest that cell-cell adhesion promotes sustained migration as cells pull neighboring cells into the wound during wound healing. PMID:27105673

  12. Expression of conformationally constrained adhesion peptide in an antibody CDR loop and inhibition of natural killer cell cytotoxic activity by an antibody antigenized with the RGD motif.

    PubMed Central

    Zanetti, M; Filaci, G; Lee, R H; del Guercio, P; Rossi, F; Bacchetta, R; Stevenson, F; Barnaba, V; Billetta, R

    1993-01-01

    We report that an antibody engineered to express three Arg-Gly-Asp (RGD) repeats in the third complementarity-determining region of the heavy chain (antigenized antibody) efficiently inhibits the lysis of human erythroleukemia K-562 cells by natural killer (NK) cells. Synthetic peptides containing RGD did not inhibit. Inhibition was specific for the (RGD)3-containing loop and required simultaneous occupancy of the Fc receptor (CD16) on effector cells. The antigenized antibody inhibited other forms of cytotoxicity mediated by NK cells but not cytotoxicity mediated by major histocompatibility complex-restricted cytotoxic T lymphocytes (CTL). A three-dimensional model of the engineered antibody loop shows the structure and physicochemical characteristics probably required for the ligand activity. The results indicate that an RGD motif is involved in the productive interaction between NK and target cells. Moreover, they show that peptide expression in the hypervariable loops of an antibody molecule is an efficient procedure for stabilizing oligopeptides within a limited spectrum of tertiary structures. This is a new approach towards imparting ligand properties to antibody molecules and can be used to study the biological function and specificity of short peptide motifs, including those involved in cell adhesion. Images PMID:8223447

  13. Study of the time effect on the strength of cell-cell adhesion force by a novel nano-picker

    SciTech Connect

    Shen, Yajing; Nakajima, Masahiro; Kojima, Seiji; Homma, Michio; Fukuda, Toshio

    2011-06-03

    Highlights: {yields} A nano-picker is developed for single cell adhesion force measurement. {yields} The adhesion of picker-cell has no influence to the cell-cell measurement result. {yields} Cell-cell adhesion force has a rise at the first few minutes and then becomes constant. -- Abstract: Cell's adhesion is important to cell's interaction and activates. In this paper, a novel method for cell-cell adhesion force measurement was proposed by using a nano-picker. The effect of the contact time on the cell-cell adhesion force was studied. The nano-picker was fabricated from an atomic force microscopy (AFM) cantilever by nano fabrication technique. The cell-cell adhesion force was measured based on the deflection of the nano-picker beam. The result suggests that the adhesion force between cells increased with the increasing of contact time at the first few minutes. After that, the force became constant. This measurement methodology was based on the nanorobotic manipulation system inside an environmental scanning electron microscope. It can realize both the observation and manipulation of a single cell at nanoscale. The quantitative and precise cell-cell adhesion force result can be obtained by this method. It would help us to understand the single cell interaction with time and would benefit the research in medical and biological fields potentially.

  14. Deep transcriptional sequencing of mucosal challenge compartment from rhesus macaques acutely infected with simian immunodeficiency virus implicates loss of cell adhesion preceding immune activation.

    PubMed

    Barrenas, Fredrik; Palermo, Robert E; Agricola, Brian; Agy, Michael B; Aicher, Lauri; Carter, Victoria; Flanary, Leon; Green, Richard R; McLain, Randy; Li, Qingsheng; Lu, Wuxun; Murnane, Robert; Peng, Xinxia; Thomas, Matthew J; Weiss, Jeffrey M; Anderson, David M; Katze, Michael G

    2014-07-01

    Pathology resulting from human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection is driven by protracted inflammation; the primary loss of CD4(+) T cells is caused by activation-driven apoptosis. Recent studies of nonhuman primates (NHPs) have suggested that during the acute phase of infection, antiviral mucosal immunity restricts viral replication in the primary infection compartment. These studies imply that HIV achieves systemic infection as a consequence of a failure in host antiviral immunity. Here, we used high-dose intrarectal inoculation of rhesus macaques with simian immunodeficiency virus (SIV) SIVmac251 to examine how the mucosal immune system is overcome by SIV during acute infection. The host response in rectal mucosa was characterized by deep mRNA sequencing (mRNA-seq) at 3 and 12 days postinoculation (dpi) in 4 animals for each time point. While we observed a strong host transcriptional response at 3 dpi, functions relating to antiviral immunity were absent. Instead, we observed a significant number of differentially expressed genes relating to cell adhesion and reorganization of the cytoskeleton. We also observed downregulation of genes encoding members of the claudin family of cell adhesion molecules, which are coexpressed with genes associated with pathology in the colorectal mucosa, and a large number of noncoding transcripts. In contrast, at 12 dpi the differentially expressed genes were enriched in those involved with immune system functions, in particular, functions relating to T cells, B cells, and NK cells. Our findings indicate that host responses that negatively affect mucosal integrity occur before inflammation. Consequently, when inflammation is activated at peak viremia, mucosal integrity is already compromised, potentially enabling rapid tissue damage, driving further inflammation. Importance: The HIV pandemic is one of the major threats to human health, causing over a million deaths per year. Recent studies have suggested that mucosal antiviral

  15. L1 Cell Adhesion Molecule-Specific Chimeric Antigen Receptor-Redirected Human T Cells Exhibit Specific and Efficient Antitumor Activity against Human Ovarian Cancer in Mice.

    PubMed

    Hong, Hao; Brown, Christine E; Ostberg, Julie R; Priceman, Saul J; Chang, Wen-Chung; Weng, Lihong; Lin, Paul; Wakabayashi, Mark T; Jensen, Michael C; Forman, Stephen J

    2016-01-01

    New therapeutic modalities are needed for ovarian cancer, the most lethal gynecologic malignancy. Recent clinical trials have demonstrated the impressive therapeutic potential of adoptive therapy using chimeric antigen receptor (CAR)-redirected T cells to target hematological cancers, and emerging studies suggest a similar impact may be achieved for solid cancers. We sought determine whether genetically-modified T cells targeting the CE7-epitope of L1-CAM, a cell adhesion molecule aberrantly expressed in several cancers, have promise as an immunotherapy for ovarian cancer, first demonstrating that L1-CAM was highly over-expressed on a panel of ovarian cancer cell lines, primary ovarian tumor tissue specimens, and ascites-derived primary cancer cells. Human central memory derived T cells (TCM) were then genetically modified to express an anti-L1-CAM CAR (CE7R), which directed effector function upon tumor antigen stimulation as assessed by in vitro cytokine secretion and cytotoxicity assays. We also found that CE7R+ T cells were able to target primary ovarian cancer cells. Intraperitoneal (i.p.) administration of CE7R+ TCM induced a significant regression of i.p. established SK-OV-3 xenograft tumors in mice, inhibited ascites formation, and conferred a significant survival advantage compared with control-treated animals. Taken together, these studies indicate that adoptive transfer of L1-CAM-specific CE7R+ T cells may offer a novel and effective immunotherapy strategy for advanced ovarian cancer. PMID:26761817

  16. Coupling factor 6 downregulates platelet endothelial cell adhesion molecule-1 via c-Src activation and acts as a proatherogenic molecule.

    PubMed

    Kumagai, Akiko; Osanai, Tomohiro; Katoh, Chisato; Tanaka, Makoto; Tomita, Hirofumi; Morimoto, Takeshi; Murakami, Reiichi; Magota, Koji; Okumura, Ken

    2008-09-01

    Coupling factor 6 (CF6), a component of ATP synthase, suppresses the generation of prostacyclin and nitric oxide (NO). Platelet endothelial cell adhesion molecule-1 (PECAM-1) is involved in shear-induced NO production. To investigate the linkage between the actions of CF6 and PECAM-1, we examined the effects of CF6 on PECAM-1 expression and shear-mediated NO release, comparatively with those of angiotensin II (AngII). Treatment of human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVEC) and aortic endothelial cells (HAEC) with CF6 at 10(-7)M or AngII at 10(-7)M for 24h suppressed PECAM-1 gene and protein expression. CF6 or AngII activated c-Src at 15 min in HUVEC, and blockade of c-Src with PP1, its specific inhibitor, restored them. Efrapeptin, an inhibitor of ATPase, attenuated CF6-induced suppression of PECAM-1 gene expression by blockade of acidification, whereas superoxide dismutase or apocinin, an inhibitor of NADPH oxidase, blocked AngII-induced suppression of PECAM-1. Exposure of the cells to shear stress at 25 dynes/cm(2) for 30 min enhanced phosphorylation of eNOS at Ser(1177) and NO release. Pretreatment with CF6 or AngII for 24h attenuated them in HUVEC and HAEC. These suggest that CF6 downregulates PECAM-1 expression via c-Src activation and attenuates shear-induced NO release presumably by suppressing eNOS phosphorylation. PMID:18243211

  17. Adhesion-related kinase induction of migration requires phosphatidylinositol-3-kinase and ras stimulation of rac activity in immortalized gonadotropin-releasing hormone neuronal cells.

    PubMed

    Nielsen-Preiss, Sheila M; Allen, Melissa P; Xu, Mei; Linseman, Daniel A; Pawlowski, John E; Bouchard, R J; Varnum, Brian C; Heidenreich, Kim A; Wierman, Margaret E

    2007-06-01

    GnRH neurons migrate into the hypothalamus during development. Although migratory defects may result in disordered activation of the reproductive axis and lead to delayed or absent sexual maturation, specific factors regulating GnRH neuronal migration remain largely unknown. The receptor tyrosine kinase, adhesion-related kinase (Ark) (also known as Axl, UFO, and Tyro7), has been implicated in the migration of GnRH neuronal cells. Binding of its ligand, growth arrest-specific gene 6 (Gas6), promotes cytoskeletal remodeling and migration of NLT GnRH neuronal cells via Rac and p38 MAPK. Here, we examined the Axl effectors proximal to Rac in the signaling pathway. Gas6/Axl-induced lamellipodia formation and migration were blocked after phosphatidylinositol-3-kinase (PI3K) inhibition in GnRH neuronal cells. The p85 subunit of PI3K coimmunoprecipitated with Axl and was phosphorylated in a Gas6-sensitive manner. In addition, PI3K inhibition in GnRH neuronal cells diminished Gas6-induced Rac activation. Exogenous expression of a dominant-negative form of Ras also decreased GnRH neuronal lamellipodia formation, migration, and Rac activation. PI3K inhibition blocked Ras in addition to Rac activation and migration. In contrast, pharmacological blockade of the phospholipase C gamma effectors, protein kinase C or calcium/calmodulin protein kinase II, had no effect on Gas6/Axl signaling to promote Rac activation or stimulate cytoskeletal reorganization and migration. Together, these data show that the PI3K-Ras pathway is a major mediator of Axl actions upstream of Rac to induce GnRH neuronal cell migration. PMID:17332061

  18. Proteolysis of neuronal cell adhesion molecule by the tissue plasminogen activator-plasmin system after kainate injection in the mouse hippocampus.

    PubMed

    Endo, A; Nagai, N; Urano, T; Takada, Y; Hashimoto, K; Takada, A

    1999-01-01

    Tissue plasminogen activator (tPA) is a serine protease that converts inactive plasminogen to the active protease plasmin and mediates extracellular metabolism. tPA is transcriptionally induced in the mouse hippocampus by pharmacological or electrical stimulation of neuronal activity and mediates excitotoxin-induced neuronal degeneration. Therefore, we hypothesized that tPA would be induced in the hippocampus after kainic acid (KA) injection into the lateral cerebral ventricle (LCV) and that the activated tPA-plasmin system would degrade the neuronal cell adhesion molecule (NCAM), which is a component of the extracellular matrix. In order to investigate this possibility, we first examined whether NCAM is a substrate for the tPA plasmin system by incubating mouse brain homogenates with tPA and plasminogen at 37 degrees C. Next, we examined the degradation of NCAM and the changes of tPA activity in the mouse hippocampus with immunohistochemical procedures and histological zymography after KA injection into both LCVs. As a result, we observed neuronal atrophy and a decrease of NCAM immunoreactivity along with an increase of tPA activity in the CA3 area of the hippocampus. These results suggest that activation of the tPA plasmin system after KA injection into the LCVs results in the degradation of NCAM in the CA3 area.

  19. Control cell adhesion with dynamic bilayer films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kourouklis, Andreas; Lerum, Ronald; Bermudez, Harry

    2012-02-01

    Interfacially-directed assembly of amphiphilic block copolymers was employed to create ultrathin films having the potential to correlate the dynamics of ECM cues with cell adhesion and cytoskeletally-generated forces. The mobility of the polymeric bilayer films were tuned by the incorporation of hydrophobic homopolymer chains, which are thought to reduce interlayer friction. Labeling of the block copolymer chains with an adhesive peptide ligand (RGD) provided a specific means to study integrin-mediated cellular processes and the corresponding mechanotransduction. By seeding anchorage-dependent cells on ``dynamic'' (laterally mobile) and ``static'' films that display the same amount of RGD, we have found that cells recognize the difference in RGD diffusivity and develop distinct responses over time. We intend to examine changes in cell response by controlling the extent of cytoskeletally-generated forces and the assembly dynamics of focal adhesion complexes. Such films provide a unique platform to unveil the biomechanical signals related with ECM dynamics, and may ultimately facilitate a deeper understanding of cellular processes.

  20. [A mechanism for the anti-inflammatory effect of nedocromil; inhibition of both adhesion molecule expression on eosinophils and endothelial cells, and eosinophil chemotactic activities].

    PubMed

    Okada, T; Sagara, H; Nakano, Y; Hiyama, T; Fukuda, T

    1999-12-01

    The accumulation of eosinophils in the airway is one of the characteristics seen in patients with bronchial asthma. One of the newly developed anti-asthma drugs (controller), nedocromil sodium (nedocromil) is known to suppress the influx of eosinophils into allergic lesions. However, little is known about this mechanism. Therefore, in this report we investigated the effects of nedocromil on Mac-1 expression on PAF-stimulated eosinophils, and adhesion molecule expression on endothelial cells stimulated by either IL-1 beta or IL-4. We also investigated the eosinophil chemotaxis. A significant suppression of the Mac-1 expression on PAF-induced eosinophils was observed at both concentrations of 10(-5) and 10(-7) M of nedocromil. The expression of adhesion molecules, particularly ICAM-1 and E-selectin, on IL-1 beta-stimulated human umbilical vascular endothelial cells (HUVEC) was significantly suppressed at these concentrations, whereas the VCAM-1 expression was not changed. No significant suppression of VCAM-1 expression on IL-4-stimulated HUVEC was observed, although there was a tendency of suppression at these concentrations. On the other hand, the expression of the E-selectin molecule was significantly suppressed by nedocromil even under resting (non-stimulated) condition. PAF-induced eosinophil chemotactic activities were also suppressed at these concentrations in a dose-dependent manner. These results suggested that nedocromil suppressed the influx of eosinophils to inflammatory lesions by inhibiting not only the expression of the Mac-1 on eosinophils and of E-selectin and ICAM-1 molecules on HUVEC, but also the eosinophil chemotactic activities.

  1. How to let go: pectin and plant cell adhesion.

    PubMed

    Daher, Firas Bou; Braybrook, Siobhan A

    2015-01-01

    Plant cells do not, in general, migrate. They maintain a fixed position relative to their neighbors, intimately linked through growth and differentiation. The mediator of this connection, the pectin-rich middle lamella, is deposited during cell division and maintained throughout the cell's life to protect tissue integrity. The maintenance of adhesion requires cell wall modification and is dependent on the actin cytoskeleton. There are developmental processes that require cell separation, such as organ abscission, dehiscence, and ripening. In these instances, the pectin-rich middle lamella must be actively altered to allow cell separation, a process which also requires cell wall modification. In this review, we will focus on the role of pectin and its modification in cell adhesion and separation. Recent insights gained in pectin gel mechanics will be discussed in relation to existing knowledge of pectin chemistry as it relates to cell adhesion. As a whole, we hope to begin defining the physical mechanisms behind a cells' ability to hang on, and how it lets go.

  2. Mitogen-Activated Protein Kinase Phosphorylation of Splicing Factor 45 (SPF45) Regulates SPF45 Alternative Splicing Site Utilization, Proliferation, and Cell Adhesion

    PubMed Central

    Al-Ayoubi, Adnan M.; Zheng, Hui; Liu, Yuying; Bai, Tao

    2012-01-01

    The regulation of alternative mRNA splicing factors by extracellular cues and signal transduction cascades is poorly understood. Using an engineered extracellular signal-regulated kinase 2 (ERK2) that can utilize ATP analogs, we have identified the alternative mRNA splicing factor 45 (SPF45), which is overexpressed in cancer, as a novel coimmunoprecipitating ERK2 substrate. ERK2 phosphorylated SPF45 on Thr71 and Ser222 in vitro and in cells in response to H-RasV12, B-RAF-V600E, and activated MEK1. Jun N-terminal kinase 1 (JNK1) and p38α also phosphorylated SPF45 in vitro and associated with SPF45 in cells. SPF45 was differentially phosphorylated in cells by all three mitogen-activated protein (MAP) kinases in response to phorbol myristate acid (PMA), H2O2, UV, and anisomycin stimulation. ERK and p38 activation decreased SPF45-dependent exon 6 exclusion from fas mRNA in a minigene assay in cells. Stable overexpression of SPF45 in SKOV-3 cells dramatically inhibited cell proliferation in a phosphorylation-dependent manner through inhibition of ErbB2 expression. SPF45 overexpression also induced EDA inclusion into fibronectin transcripts and fibronectin expression in a phosphorylation-dependent and -independent manner, respectively, specifically affecting cellular adhesion to a fibronectin matrix. These data identify SPF45 as the first splicing factor regulated by multiple MAP kinase pathways and show effects of both SPF45 overexpression and phosphorylation. PMID:22615491

  3. L1CAM: Cell adhesion and more.

    PubMed

    Samatov, Timur R; Wicklein, Daniel; Tonevitsky, Alexander G

    2016-08-01

    L1CAM is a cell adhesion molecule of the immunoglobulin superfamily which was originally discovered as a major player in the development of the nervous system. L1CAM was demonstrated to have prognostic value in different cancers and to be a promising target for anti-cancer therapy. Here we overview the present data on L1CAM structure and function, regulation of its expression, role in cancer and therapeutic potential. PMID:27267927

  4. Force nanoscopy of cell mechanics and cell adhesion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dufrêne, Yves F.; Pelling, Andrew E.

    2013-05-01

    Cells are constantly exposed to mechanical stimuli in their environment and have several evolved mechanisms to sense and respond to these cues. It is becoming increasingly recognized that many cell types, from bacteria to mammalian cells, possess a diverse set of proteins to translate mechanical cues into biochemical signalling and to mediate cell surface interactions such as cell adhesion. Moreover, the mechanical properties of cells are involved in regulating cell function as well as serving as indicators of disease states. Importantly, the recent development of biophysical tools and nanoscale methods has facilitated a deeper understanding of the role that physical forces play in modulating cell mechanics and cell adhesion. Here, we discuss how atomic force microscopy (AFM) has recently been used to investigate cell mechanics and cell adhesion at the single-cell and single-molecule levels. This knowledge is critical to our understanding of the molecular mechanisms that govern mechanosensing, mechanotransduction, and mechanoresponse in living cells. While pushing living cells with the AFM tip provides a means to quantify their mechanical properties and examine their response to nanoscale forces, pulling single surface proteins with a functionalized tip allows one to understand their role in sensing and adhesion. The combination of these nanoscale techniques with modern molecular biology approaches, genetic engineering and optical microscopies provides a powerful platform for understanding the sophisticated functions of the cell surface machinery, and its role in the onset and progression of complex diseases.

  5. Focal Adhesion Kinase Inhibitors in Combination with Erlotinib Demonstrate Enhanced Anti-Tumor Activity in Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Howe, Grant A.; Xiao, Bin; Zhao, Huijun; Al-Zahrani, Khalid N.; Hasim, Mohamed S.; Villeneuve, James; Sekhon, Harmanjatinder S.; Goss, Glenwood D.; Sabourin, Luc A.; Dimitroulakos, Jim; Addison, Christina L.

    2016-01-01

    Blockade of epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) activity has been a primary therapeutic target for non-small cell lung cancers (NSCLC). As patients with wild-type EGFR have demonstrated only modest benefit from EGFR tyrosine kinase inhibitors (TKIs), there is a need for additional therapeutic approaches in patients with wild-type EGFR. As a key component of downstream integrin signalling and known receptor cross-talk with EGFR, we hypothesized that targeting focal adhesion kinase (FAK) activity, which has also been shown to correlate with aggressive stage in NSCLC, would lead to enhanced activity of EGFR TKIs. As such, EGFR TKI-resistant NSCLC cells (A549, H1299, H1975) were treated with the EGFR TKI erlotinib and FAK inhibitors (PF-573,228 or PF-562,271) both as single agents and in combination. We determined cell viability, apoptosis and 3-dimensional growth in vitro and assessed tumor growth in vivo. Treatment of EGFR TKI-resistant NSCLC cells with FAK inhibitor alone effectively inhibited cell viability in all cell lines tested; however, its use in combination with the EGFR TKI erlotinib was more effective at reducing cell viability than either treatment alone when tested in both 2- and 3-dimensional assays in vitro, with enhanced benefit seen in A549 cells. This increased efficacy may be due in part to the observed inhibition of Akt phosphorylation when the drugs were used in combination, where again A549 cells demonstrated the most inhibition following treatment with the drug combination. Combining erlotinib with FAK inhibitor was also potent in vivo as evidenced by reduced tumor growth in the A549 mouse xenograft model. We further ascertained that the enhanced sensitivity was irrespective of the LKB1 mutational status. In summary, we demonstrate the effectiveness of combining erlotinib and FAK inhibitors for use in known EGFR wild-type, EGFR TKI resistant cells, with the potential that a subset of cell types, which includes A549, could be particularly

  6. Induction of focal adhesions and motility in Drosophila S2 cells.

    PubMed

    Ribeiro, Susana A; D'Ambrosio, Michael V; Vale, Ronald D

    2014-12-01

    Focal adhesions are dynamic structures that interact with the extracellular matrix on the cell exterior and actin filaments on the cell interior, enabling cells to adhere and crawl along surfaces. We describe a system for inducing the formation of focal adhesions in normally non-ECM-adherent, nonmotile Drosophila S2 cells. These focal adhesions contain the expected molecular markers such as talin, vinculin, and p130Cas, and they require talin for their formation. The S2 cells with induced focal adhesions also display a nonpolarized form of motility on vitronectin-coated substrates. Consistent with findings in mammalian cells, the degree of motility can be tuned by changing the stiffness of the substrate and was increased after the depletion of PAK3, a p21-activated kinase. A subset of nonmotile, nonpolarized cells also exhibited focal adhesions that rapidly assembled and disassembled around the cell perimeter. Such cooperative and dynamic fluctuations of focal adhesions were decreased by RNA interference (RNAi) depletion of myosin II and focal adhesion kinase, suggesting that this behavior requires force and focal adhesion maturation. These results demonstrate that S2 cells, a cell line that is well studied for cytoskeletal dynamics and readily amenable to protein manipulation by RNAi, can be used to study the assembly and dynamics of focal adhesions and mechanosensitive cell motility.

  7. Ionizing radiation increases adhesiveness of human aortic endothelial cells via a chemokine-dependent mechanism.

    PubMed

    Khaled, Saman; Gupta, Kiran B; Kucik, Dennis F

    2012-05-01

    Exposure to radiation from a variety of sources is associated with increased risk of heart disease and stroke. Since radiation also induces inflammation, a possible mechanism is a change in the adhesiveness of vascular endothelial cells, triggering pro-atherogenic accumulation of leukocytes. To investigate this mechanism at the cellular level, the effect of X rays on adhesiveness of cultured human aortic endothelial cells (HAECs) was determined. HAECs were grown as monolayers and exposed to 0 to 30 Gy X rays, followed by measurement of adhesiveness under physiological shear stress using a flow chamber adhesion assay. Twenty-four hours after irradiation, HAEC adhesiveness was increased, with a peak effect at 15 Gy. Radiation had no significant effect on surface expression of the endothelial adhesion molecules ICAM-1 and VCAM-1. Antibody blockade of the leukocyte integrin receptors for ICAM-1 and VCAM-1, however, abolished the radiation-induced adhesiveness. Since these leukocyte integrins can be activated by chemokines presented on the endothelial cell surface, the effect of pertussis toxin (PTX), an inhibitor of chemokine-mediated integrin activation, was tested. PTX specifically inhibited radiation-induced adhesiveness, with no significant effect on nonirradiated cells. Therefore, radiation induces increased adhesiveness of aortic endothelial cells through chemokine-dependent signaling from endothelial cells to leukocytes, even in the absence of increased expression of the adhesion molecules involved.

  8. Functional Na+ Channels in Cell Adhesion probed by Transistor Recording

    PubMed Central

    Schmidtner, Markus; Fromherz, Peter

    2006-01-01

    Cell membranes in a tissue are in close contact to each other, embedded in the extracellular matrix. Standard electrophysiological methods are not able to characterize ion channels under these conditions. Here we consider the area of cell adhesion on a solid substrate as a model system. We used HEK 293 cells cultured on fibronectin and studied the activation of NaV1.4 sodium channels in the adherent membrane with field-effect transistors in a silicon substrate. Under voltage clamp, we compared the transistor response with the whole-cell current. We observed that the extracellular voltage in the cell-chip contact was proportional to the total membrane current. The relation was calibrated by alternating-current stimulation. We found that Na+ channels are present in the area of cell adhesion on fibronectin with a functionality and a density that is indistinguishable from the free membrane. The experiment provides a basis for studying selective accumulation and depletion of ion channels in cell adhesion and also for a development of cell-based biosensoric devices and neuroelectronic systems. PMID:16227504

  9. How to let go: pectin and plant cell adhesion

    PubMed Central

    Daher, Firas Bou; Braybrook, Siobhan A.

    2015-01-01

    Plant cells do not, in general, migrate. They maintain a fixed position relative to their neighbors, intimately linked through growth and differentiation. The mediator of this connection, the pectin-rich middle lamella, is deposited during cell division and maintained throughout the cell’s life to protect tissue integrity. The maintenance of adhesion requires cell wall modification and is dependent on the actin cytoskeleton. There are developmental processes that require cell separation, such as organ abscission, dehiscence, and ripening. In these instances, the pectin-rich middle lamella must be actively altered to allow cell separation, a process which also requires cell wall modification. In this review, we will focus on the role of pectin and its modification in cell adhesion and separation. Recent insights gained in pectin gel mechanics will be discussed in relation to existing knowledge of pectin chemistry as it relates to cell adhesion. As a whole, we hope to begin defining the physical mechanisms behind a cells’ ability to hang on, and how it lets go. PMID:26236321

  10. Cadherin-11 localizes to focal adhesions and promotes cell-substrate adhesion.

    PubMed

    Langhe, Rahul P; Gudzenko, Tetyana; Bachmann, Michael; Becker, Sarah F; Gonnermann, Carina; Winter, Claudia; Abbruzzese, Genevieve; Alfandari, Dominique; Kratzer, Marie-Claire; Franz, Clemens M; Kashef, Jubin

    2016-01-01

    Cadherin receptors have a well-established role in cell-cell adhesion, cell polarization and differentiation. However, some cadherins also promote cell and tissue movement during embryonic development and tumour progression. In particular, cadherin-11 is upregulated during tumour and inflammatory cell invasion, but the mechanisms underlying cadherin-11 stimulated cell migration are still incompletely understood. Here, we show that cadherin-11 localizes to focal adhesions and promotes adhesion to fibronectin in Xenopus neural crest, a highly migratory embryonic cell population. Transfected cadherin-11 also localizes to focal adhesions in different mammalian cell lines, while endogenous cadherin-11 shows focal adhesion localization in primary human fibroblasts. In focal adhesions, cadherin-11 co-localizes with β1-integrin and paxillin and physically interacts with the fibronectin-binding proteoglycan syndecan-4. Adhesion to fibronectin mediated by cadherin-11/syndecan-4 complexes requires both the extracellular domain of syndecan-4, and the transmembrane and cytoplasmic domains of cadherin-11. These results reveal an unexpected role of a classical cadherin in cell-matrix adhesion during cell migration. PMID:26952325

  11. Tuning cell adhesion by direct nanostructuring silicon into cell repulsive/adhesive patterns.

    PubMed

    Premnath, Priyatha; Tavangar, Amirhossein; Tan, Bo; Venkatakrishnan, Krishnan

    2015-09-10

    Developing platforms that allow tuning cell functionality through incorporating physical, chemical, or mechanical cues onto the material surfaces is one of the key challenges in research in the field of biomaterials. In this respect, various approaches have been proposed and numerous structures have been developed on a variety of materials. Most of these approaches, however, demand a multistep process or post-chemical treatment. Therefore, a simple approach would be desirable to develop bio-functionalized platforms for effectively modulating cell adhesion and consequently programming cell functionality without requiring any chemical or biological surface treatment. This study introduces a versatile yet simple laser approach to structure silicon (Si) chips into cytophobic/cytophilic patterns in order to modulate cell adhesion and proliferation. These patterns are fabricated on platforms through direct laser processing of Si substrates, which renders a desired computer-generated configuration into patterns. We investigate the morphology, chemistry, and wettability of the platform surfaces. Subsequently, we study the functionality of the fabricated platforms on modulating cervical cancer cells (HeLa) behaviour. The results from in vitro studies suggest that the nanostructures efficiently repel HeLa cells and drive them to migrate onto untreated sites. The study of the morphology of the cells reveals that cells evade the cytophobic area by bending and changing direction. Additionally, cell patterning, cell directionality, cell channelling, and cell trapping are achieved by developing different platforms with specific patterns. The flexibility and controllability of this approach to effectively structure Si substrates to cell-repulsive and cell-adhesive patterns offer perceptible outlook for developing bio-functionalized platforms for a variety of biomedical devices. Moreover, this approach could pave the way for developing anti-cancer platforms that selectively repel

  12. Tuning cell adhesion by direct nanostructuring silicon into cell repulsive/adhesive patterns.

    PubMed

    Premnath, Priyatha; Tavangar, Amirhossein; Tan, Bo; Venkatakrishnan, Krishnan

    2015-09-10

    Developing platforms that allow tuning cell functionality through incorporating physical, chemical, or mechanical cues onto the material surfaces is one of the key challenges in research in the field of biomaterials. In this respect, various approaches have been proposed and numerous structures have been developed on a variety of materials. Most of these approaches, however, demand a multistep process or post-chemical treatment. Therefore, a simple approach would be desirable to develop bio-functionalized platforms for effectively modulating cell adhesion and consequently programming cell functionality without requiring any chemical or biological surface treatment. This study introduces a versatile yet simple laser approach to structure silicon (Si) chips into cytophobic/cytophilic patterns in order to modulate cell adhesion and proliferation. These patterns are fabricated on platforms through direct laser processing of Si substrates, which renders a desired computer-generated configuration into patterns. We investigate the morphology, chemistry, and wettability of the platform surfaces. Subsequently, we study the functionality of the fabricated platforms on modulating cervical cancer cells (HeLa) behaviour. The results from in vitro studies suggest that the nanostructures efficiently repel HeLa cells and drive them to migrate onto untreated sites. The study of the morphology of the cells reveals that cells evade the cytophobic area by bending and changing direction. Additionally, cell patterning, cell directionality, cell channelling, and cell trapping are achieved by developing different platforms with specific patterns. The flexibility and controllability of this approach to effectively structure Si substrates to cell-repulsive and cell-adhesive patterns offer perceptible outlook for developing bio-functionalized platforms for a variety of biomedical devices. Moreover, this approach could pave the way for developing anti-cancer platforms that selectively repel

  13. Neuropeptides, via specific receptors, regulate T cell adhesion to fibronectin.

    PubMed

    Levite, M; Cahalon, L; Hershkoviz, R; Steinman, L; Lider, O

    1998-01-15

    The ability of T cells to adhere to and interact with components of the blood vessel walls and the extracellular matrix is essential for their extravasation and migration into inflamed sites. We have found that the beta1 integrin-mediated adhesion of resting human T cells to fibronectin, a major glycoprotein component of the extracellular matrix, is induced by physiologic concentrations of three neuropeptides: calcitonin gene-related protein (CGRP), neuropeptide Y, and somatostatin; each acts via its own specific receptor on the T cell membrane. In contrast, substance P (SP), which coexists with CGRP in the majority of peripheral endings of sensory nerves, including those innervating the lymphoid organs, blocks T cell adhesion to fibronectin when induced by CGRP, neuropeptide Y, somatostatin, macrophage inflammatory protein-1beta, and PMA. Inhibition of T cell adhesion was obtained both by the intact SP peptide and by its 1-4 N-terminal and its 4-11, 5-11, and 6-11 C-terminal fragments, used at similar nanomolar concentrations. The inhibitory effects of the parent SP peptide and its fragments were abrogated by an SP NK-1 receptor antagonist, suggesting they all act through the same SP NK-1 receptor. These findings suggest that neuropeptides, by activating their specific T cell-expressed receptors, can provide the T cells with both positive (proadhesive) and negative (antiadhesive) signals and thereby regulate their function. Thus, neuropeptides may influence diverse physiologic processes involving integrins, including leukocyte-mediated migration and inflammation. PMID:9551939

  14. Endoglin regulates mural cell adhesion in the circulatory system.

    PubMed

    Rossi, Elisa; Smadja, David M; Boscolo, Elisa; Langa, Carmen; Arevalo, Miguel A; Pericacho, Miguel; Gamella-Pozuelo, Luis; Kauskot, Alexandre; Botella, Luisa M; Gaussem, Pascale; Bischoff, Joyce; Lopez-Novoa, José M; Bernabeu, Carmelo

    2016-04-01

    The circulatory system is walled off by different cell types, including vascular mural cells and podocytes. The interaction and interplay between endothelial cells (ECs) and mural cells, such as vascular smooth muscle cells or pericytes, play a pivotal role in vascular biology. Endoglin is an RGD-containing counter-receptor for β1 integrins and is highly expressed by ECs during angiogenesis. We find that the adhesion between vascular ECs and mural cells is enhanced by integrin activators and inhibited upon suppression of membrane endoglin or β1-integrin, as well as by addition of soluble endoglin (SolEng), anti-integrin α5β1 antibody or an RGD peptide. Analysis of different endoglin mutants, allowed the mapping of the endoglin RGD motif as involved in the adhesion process. In Eng (+/-) mice, a model for hereditary hemorrhagic telangectasia type 1, endoglin haploinsufficiency induces a pericyte-dependent increase in vascular permeability. Also, transgenic mice overexpressing SolEng, an animal model for preeclampsia, show podocyturia, suggesting that SolEng is responsible for podocytes detachment from glomerular capillaries. These results suggest a critical role for endoglin in integrin-mediated adhesion of mural cells and provide a better understanding on the mechanisms of vessel maturation in normal physiology as well as in pathologies such as preeclampsia or hereditary hemorrhagic telangiectasia. PMID:26646071

  15. Endoglin regulates mural cell adhesion in the circulatory system.

    PubMed

    Rossi, Elisa; Smadja, David M; Boscolo, Elisa; Langa, Carmen; Arevalo, Miguel A; Pericacho, Miguel; Gamella-Pozuelo, Luis; Kauskot, Alexandre; Botella, Luisa M; Gaussem, Pascale; Bischoff, Joyce; Lopez-Novoa, José M; Bernabeu, Carmelo

    2016-04-01

    The circulatory system is walled off by different cell types, including vascular mural cells and podocytes. The interaction and interplay between endothelial cells (ECs) and mural cells, such as vascular smooth muscle cells or pericytes, play a pivotal role in vascular biology. Endoglin is an RGD-containing counter-receptor for β1 integrins and is highly expressed by ECs during angiogenesis. We find that the adhesion between vascular ECs and mural cells is enhanced by integrin activators and inhibited upon suppression of membrane endoglin or β1-integrin, as well as by addition of soluble endoglin (SolEng), anti-integrin α5β1 antibody or an RGD peptide. Analysis of different endoglin mutants, allowed the mapping of the endoglin RGD motif as involved in the adhesion process. In Eng (+/-) mice, a model for hereditary hemorrhagic telangectasia type 1, endoglin haploinsufficiency induces a pericyte-dependent increase in vascular permeability. Also, transgenic mice overexpressing SolEng, an animal model for preeclampsia, show podocyturia, suggesting that SolEng is responsible for podocytes detachment from glomerular capillaries. These results suggest a critical role for endoglin in integrin-mediated adhesion of mural cells and provide a better understanding on the mechanisms of vessel maturation in normal physiology as well as in pathologies such as preeclampsia or hereditary hemorrhagic telangiectasia.

  16. Cell Adhesion on Surface-Functionalized Magnesium.

    PubMed

    Wagener, Victoria; Schilling, Achim; Mainka, Astrid; Hennig, Diana; Gerum, Richard; Kelch, Marie-Luise; Keim, Simon; Fabry, Ben; Virtanen, Sannakaisa

    2016-05-18

    The biocompatibility of commercially pure magnesium-based (cp Mg) biodegradable implants is compromised of strong hydrogen evolution and surface alkalization due to high initial corrosion rates of cp Mg in the physiological environment. To mitigate this problem, the addition of corrosion-retarding alloying elements or coating of implant surfaces has been suggested. In the following work, we explored the effect of organic coatings on long-term cell growth. cp Mg was coated with aminopropyltriehtoxysilane + vitamin C (AV), carbonyldiimidazole (CDI), or stearic acid (SA). All three coatings have been previously suggested to reduce initial corrosion and to enhance protein adsorption and hence cell adhesion on magnesium surfaces. Endothelial cells (DH1+/+) and osteosarcoma cells (MG63) were cultured on coated samples for up to 20 days. To quantify Mg corrosion, electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS) was measured after 1, 3, and 5 days of cell culture. We also investigated the speed of initial cell spreading after seeding using fluorescently labeled fibroblasts (NIH/3T3). Hydrogen evolution after contact with cell culture medium was markedly decreased on AV- and SA-coated Mg compared to uncoated Mg. These coatings also showed improved cell adhesion and spreading after 24 h of culture comparable to tissue-treated plastic surfaces. On AV-coated cp Mg, a confluent layer of endothelial cells formed after 5 days and remained intact for up to 20 days. Together, these data demonstrate that surface coating with AV is a viable strategy for improving long-term biocompatibility of cp Mg-based implants. EIS measurements confirmed that the presence of a confluent cell layer increased the corrosion resistance. PMID:27089250

  17. Light-induced Adhesion of Spirogyra Cells to Glass.

    PubMed

    Nagata, Y

    1977-04-01

    Adhesion of Spirogyra (tentatively, Spirogyra fluviatilis) cells to glass is described. The cells of an algal filament can adhere to a substrate only when they are located at the end of the filament. Rapid adhesion is induced by blue-violet light (blue adhesion) as well as by temperature shift (about 6 C --> about 22 C) or shaking (dark adhesion). Adherent cells detach in 1 hour in the absence of one of these stimuli. Slow adhesion is induced by red light (red adhesion) 1 hour after irradiation, and may be controlled by phytochrome. A cell once caused to adhere by red light does not release from the glass.Adhesion seems to be maintained by a cementing substance, probably qa mucoprotein. A transparent material which appears around the tip of the cell may be the cementing substance.

  18. Cell adhesion defines the topology of endocytosis and signaling

    PubMed Central

    Grossier, Jean-Philippe; Xouri, Georgia; Goud, Bruno; Schauer, Kristine

    2014-01-01

    Preferred sites of endocytosis have been observed in various cell types, but whether they occur randomly or are linked to cellular cues is debated. Here, we quantified the sites of endocytosis of transferrin (Tfn) and epidermal growth factor (EGF) in cells whose adhesion geometry was defined by micropatterns. 3D probabilistic density maps revealed that Tfn was enriched in adhesive sites during uptake, whereas EGF endocytosis was restricted to the dorsal cellular surface. This spatial separation was not due to distributions of corresponding receptors but was regulated by uptake mechanisms. Asymmetric uptake of Tfn resulted from the enrichment of clathrin and adaptor protein 2 at adhesive areas. Asymmetry in EGF uptake was strongly dependent on the actin cytoskeleton and led to asymmetry in EGF receptor activation. Mild alteration of actin dynamics abolished asymmetry in EGF uptake and decreased EGF-induced downstream signaling, suggesting that cellular adhesion cues influence signal propagation. We propose that restriction of endocytosis at distinct sites allows cells to sense their environment in an “outside-in” mechanism. PMID:24366944

  19. Retinoids induce integrin-independent lymphocyte adhesion through RAR-α nuclear receptor activity

    SciTech Connect

    Whelan, Jarrett T.; Wang, Lei; Chen, Jianming; Metts, Meagan E.; Nasser, Taj A.; McGoldrick, Liam J.; Bridges, Lance C.

    2014-11-28

    Highlights: • Transcription and translation are required for retinoid-induced lymphocyte adhesion. • RAR activation is sufficient to induced lymphocyte cell adhesion. • Vitamin D derivatives inhibit RAR-prompted lymphocyte adhesion. • Adhesion occurs through a novel binding site within ADAM disintegrin domains. • RARα is a key nuclear receptor for retinoid-dependent lymphocyte cell adhesion. - Abstract: Oxidative metabolites of vitamin A, in particular all-trans-retinoic acid (atRA), have emerged as key factors in immunity by specifying the localization of immune cells to the gut. Although it is appreciated that isomers of retinoic acid activate the retinoic acid receptor (RAR) and retinoid X receptor (RXR) family of nuclear receptors to elicit cellular changes, the molecular details of retinoic acid action remain poorly defined in immune processes. Here we employ a battery of agonists and antagonists to delineate the specific nuclear receptors utilized by retinoids to evoke lymphocyte cell adhesion to ADAM (adisintegrin and metalloprotease) protein family members. We report that RAR agonism is sufficient to promote immune cell adhesion in both immortal and primary immune cells. Interestingly, adhesion occurs independent of integrin function, and mutant studies demonstrate that atRA-induced adhesion to ADAM members required a distinct binding interface(s) as compared to integrin recognition. Anti-inflammatory corticosteroids as well as 1,25-(OH){sub 2}D{sub 3}, a vitamin D metabolite that prompts immune cell trafficking to the skin, potently inhibited the observed adhesion. Finally, our data establish that induced adhesion was specifically attributable to the RAR-α receptor isotype. The current study provides novel molecular resolution as to which nuclear receptors transduce retinoid exposure into immune cell adhesion.

  20. Overexpressed Down Syndrome Cell Adhesion Molecule (DSCAM) Deregulates P21-Activated Kinase (PAK) Activity in an In Vitro Neuronal Model of Down Syndrome: Consequences on Cell Process Formation and Extension.

    PubMed

    Pérez-Núñez, Ramón; Barraza, Natalia; Gonzalez-Jamett, Arlek; Cárdenas, Ana Maria; Barnier, Jean-Vianney; Caviedes, Pablo

    2016-07-01

    In humans, Down syndrome (DS) is caused by the presence of an extra copy of autosome 21. The most striking finding in DS patients is intellectual disability and the onset of Alzheimer's disease (AD)-like neuropathology in adulthood. Gene overdose is most likely to underlie both developmental impairments, as well as altered neuronal function in DS. Lately, the disruption of cellular signaling and regulatory pathways has been implicated in DS pathophysiology, and many of such pathways may represent common targets for diverse DS-related genes, which could in turn represent attractive therapeutical targets. In this regard, one DS-related gene Down Syndrome Cell Adhesion Molecule (DSCAM), has important functions in neuronal proliferation, maturation, and synaptogenesis. p21-associated kinases (PAKs) appear as a most interesting possibility for study, as DSCAM is known to regulate the PAKs pathway. Hence, in DS, overexpressed DSCAM could deregulate PAKs activity and affect signaling pathways that regulate synaptic plasticity such as dendritic spine dynamics and axon guidance and growth. In the present work, we used an immortalized cell line derived from the cerebral cortex of an animal model of DS such as the trisomy 16 (Ts16) fetal mouse (named CTb), and a similar cell line established from a normal littermate (named CNh), to study the effect of DSCAM in the PAKs pathway. The present study shows that DSCAM is overexpressed in CTb cells by approximately twofold, compared to CNh cells. Congruently, PAK1, as well as its downstream effectors LIMK and cofilin, stay phosphorylated for longer periods after DSCAM activation in the CTb cells, leading to an altered actin dynamics, expressed as an increased basal F/G ratio and reduced neurite growth, in the trisomic condition. The present work presents the correlation between DSCAM gene overexpression and a dysregulation of the PAK pathway, resulting in altered morphological parameters of neuronal plasticity in the trisomic cell

  1. Cooperative inhibitory effects of antisense oligonucleotide of cell adhesion molecules and cimetidine on cancer cell adhesion

    PubMed Central

    Tang, Nan-Hong; Chen, Yan-Ling; Wang, Xiao-Qian; Li, Xiu-Jin; Yin, Feng-Zhi; Wang, Xiao-Zhong

    2004-01-01

    AIM: To explore the cooperative effects of antisense oligonucleotide (ASON) of cell adhesion molecules and cimetidine on the expression of E-selectin and ICAM-1 in endothelial cells and their adhesion to tumor cells. METHODS: After treatment of endothelial cells with ASON and/or cimetidine and induction with TNF-α, the protein and mRNA changes of E-selectin and ICAM-1 in endothelial cells were examined by flow cytometry and RT-PCR, respectively. The adhesion rates of endothelial cells to tumor cells were measured by cell adhesion experiment. RESULTS: In comparison with TNF-α inducing group, lipo-ASON and lipo-ASON/cimetidine could significantly decrease the protein and mRNA levels of E-selectin and ICAM-1 in endothelial cells, and lipo-ASON/cimetidine had most significant inhibitory effect on E-selectin expression (from 36.37 ± 1.56% to 14.23 ± 1.07%, P < 0.001). Meanwhile, cimetidine alone could inhibit the expression of E-selectin (36.37 ± 1.56% vs 27.2 ± 1.31%, P < 0.001), but not ICAM-1 (69.34 ± 2.50% vs 68.07 ± 2.10%, P > 0.05)and the two kinds of mRNA, either. Compared with TNF-α inducing group, the rate of adhesion was markedly decreased in lipo-E-selectin ASON and lipo-E-selectin ASON/cimetidine treated groups(P < 0.05), and lipo-E-selectin ASON/cimetidine worked better than lipo-E-selectin ASON alone except for HepG2/ECV304 group (P < 0.05). However, the decrease of adhesion was not significant in lipo-ICAM-1 ASON and lipo-ICAM-1 ASON/cimetidine treated groups except for HepG2/ECV304 group (P > 0.05). CONCLUSION: These data demonstrate that ASON in combination with cimetidine in vitro can significantly reduce the adhesion between endothelial cells and hepatic or colorectal cancer cells, which is stronger than ASON or cimetidine alone. This study provides some useful proofs for gene therapy of antiadhesion. PMID:14695770

  2. Differential adhesiveness between blood and marrow leukemic cells having similar pattern of VLA adhesion molecule expression.

    PubMed

    Thomas, X; Anglaret, B; Bailly, M; Maritaz, O; Magaud, J P; Archimbaud, E

    1998-10-01

    Functional adhesion of blood and marrow leukemic cells from 14 acute myeloid leukemia patients presenting with hyperleukocytosis was evaluated by performing cytoadhesion assays on purified (extracellular matrix proteins) and non-purified supports (MRC5 fibroblastic cell line). Results, in 30-min chromium release assay, show a mean +/- S.D. adhesion to fibronectin, collagen, and laminin respectively of 30 +/- 17%, 20 +/- 13%, 25 +/- 17% for blood leukemic cells and 18 +/- 11%, 11 +/- 10%, 11 +/- 8% for marrow leukemic cells. These differences between blood and marrow cells were statistically significant (respectively P = 0.005, P = 0.01 and P = 0.002), while no difference was noted regarding adhesion to non-purified supports. The higher adhesion of blood blast cells to purified supports was observed regardless of CD34 expression. No significant difference was observed in the expression of cell surface VLA-molecules (CD29, CD49b, CD49d, CD49e, CD49f) between blood and marrow blast cells. The addition of GM-CSF or G-CSF induced increased adhesion of marrow blasts and decreased adhesion of blood blasts leading to a loss of the difference between blood and marrow cells. In a 60-min chromium release assay, marrow blasts adhered even more than blood leukemic cells to fibronectin. In contrast, marrow blasts from 'aleukemic' acute myeloid leukemia patients did not show any modification regarding their adhesion to extracellular matrix proteins when co-cultured with growth factors. PMID:9766756

  3. Tuning cell adhesion by direct nanostructuring silicon into cell repulsive/adhesive patterns

    SciTech Connect

    Premnath, Priyatha; Venkatakrishnan, Krishnan

    2015-09-10

    Developing platforms that allow tuning cell functionality through incorporating physical, chemical, or mechanical cues onto the material surfaces is one of the key challenges in research in the field of biomaterials. In this respect, various approaches have been proposed and numerous structures have been developed on a variety of materials. Most of these approaches, however, demand a multistep process or post-chemical treatment. Therefore, a simple approach would be desirable to develop bio-functionalized platforms for effectively modulating cell adhesion and consequently programming cell functionality without requiring any chemical or biological surface treatment. This study introduces a versatile yet simple laser approach to structure silicon (Si) chips into cytophobic/cytophilic patterns in order to modulate cell adhesion and proliferation. These patterns are fabricated on platforms through direct laser processing of Si substrates, which renders a desired computer-generated configuration into patterns. We investigate the morphology, chemistry, and wettability of the platform surfaces. Subsequently, we study the functionality of the fabricated platforms on modulating cervical cancer cells (HeLa) behaviour. The results from in vitro studies suggest that the nanostructures efficiently repel HeLa cells and drive them to migrate onto untreated sites. The study of the morphology of the cells reveals that cells evade the cytophobic area by bending and changing direction. Additionally, cell patterning, cell directionality, cell channelling, and cell trapping are achieved by developing different platforms with specific patterns. The flexibility and controllability of this approach to effectively structure Si substrates to cell-repulsive and cell-adhesive patterns offer perceptible outlook for developing bio-functionalized platforms for a variety of biomedical devices. Moreover, this approach could pave the way for developing anti-cancer platforms that selectively repel

  4. Adhesion and migration of avian neural crest cells on fibronectin require the cooperating activities of multiple integrins of the (beta)1 and (beta)3 families.

    PubMed

    Testaz, S; Delannet, M; Duband, J

    1999-12-01

    Based on genetic, functional and histological studies, the extracellular matrix molecule fibronectin has been proposed to play a key role in the migration of neural crest cells in the vertebrate embryo. In the present study, we have analyzed in vitro the repertoire and function of integrin receptors involved in the adhesive and locomotory responses of avian truncal neural crest cells to fibronectin. Immunoprecipitation experiments showed that neural crest cells express multiple integrins, namely (alpha)3(beta)1, (alpha)4(beta)1, (alpha)5(beta)1, (alpha)8(beta)1, (alpha)v(beta)1, (alpha)v(beta)3 and a (beta)8 integrin, as potential fibronectin receptors, and flow cytometry analyses revealed no major heterogeneity among the cell population for expression of integrin subunits. In addition, the integrin repertoire expressed by neural crest cells was found not to change dramatically during migration. At the cellular level, only (alpha)v(beta)1 and (alpha)v(beta)3 were concentrated in focal adhesion sites in connection with the actin microfilaments, whereas the other integrins were predominantly diffuse over the cell surface. In inhibition assays with function-perturbing antibodies, it appeared that complete abolition of cell spreading and migration could be achieved only by blocking multiple integrins of the (beta)1 and (beta)3 families, suggesting possible functional compensations between different integrins. In addition, these studies provided evidence for functional partitioning of integrins in cell adhesion and migration. While spreading was essentially mediated by (alpha)v(beta)1 and (alpha)8(beta)1, migration involved primarily (alpha)4(beta)1, (alpha)v(beta)3 and (alpha)8(beta)1 and, more indirectly, (alpha)3(beta)1. (alpha)5(beta)1 and the (beta)8 integrin were not found to play any major role in either adhesion or migration. Finally, consistent with the results of inhibition experiments, recruitment of (alpha)4(beta)1 and (alpha)v(beta)3, individually or in

  5. Interplay between motility and cell-substratum adhesion in amoeboid cells

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Xiaoying; Bouffanais, Roland; Yue, Dick K. P.

    2015-01-01

    The effective migration of amoeboid cells requires a fine regulation of cell-substratum adhesion. These entwined processes have been shown to be regulated by a host of biophysical and biochemical cues. Here, we reveal the pivotal role played by calcium-based mechanosensation in the active regulation of adhesion resulting in a high migratory adaptability. Using mechanotactically driven Dictyostelium discoideum amoebae, we uncover the existence of optimal mechanosensitive conditions—corresponding to specific levels of extracellular calcium—for persistent directional migration over physicochemically different substrates. When these optimal mechanosensitive conditions are met, noticeable enhancement in cell migration directionality and speed is achieved, yet with significant differences among the different substrates. In the same narrow range of calcium concentrations that yields optimal cellular mechanosensory activity, we uncovered an absolute minimum in cell-substratum adhesion activity, for all considered substrates, with differences in adhesion strength among them amplified. The blocking of the mechanosensitive ion channels with gadolinium—i.e., the inhibition of the primary mechanosensory apparatus—hampers the active reduction in substrate adhesion, thereby leading to the same undifferentiated and drastically reduced directed migratory response. The adaptive behavioral responses of Dictyostelium cells sensitive to substrates with varying physicochemical properties suggest the possibility of novel surface analyses based on the mechanobiological ability of mechanosensitive and guidable cells to probe substrates at the nanometer-to-micrometer level. PMID:26487898

  6. The coffee diterpene kahweol inhibits tumor necrosis factor-{alpha}-induced expression of cell adhesion molecules in human endothelial cells

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, Hyung Gyun; Kim, Ji Young; Hwang, Yong Pil; Lee, Kyung Jin; Lee, Kwang Youl; Kim, Dong Hee; Kim, Dong Hyun; Jeong, Hye Gwang . E-mail: hgjeong@chosun.ac.kr

    2006-12-15

    Endothelial cells produce adhesion molecules after being stimulated with various inflammatory cytokines. These adhesion molecules play an important role in the development of atherogenesis. Recent studies have highlighted the chemoprotective and anti-inflammatory effects of kahweol, a coffee-specific diterpene. This study examined the effects of kahweol on the cytokine-induced monocyte/human endothelial cell interaction, which is a crucial early event in atherogenesis. Kahweol inhibited the adhesion of TNF{alpha}-induced monocytes to endothelial cells and suppressed the TNF{alpha}-induced protein and mRNA expression of the cell adhesion molecules, VCAM-1 and ICAM-1. Furthermore, kahweol inhibited the TNF{alpha}-induced JAK2-PI3K/Akt-NF-{kappa}B activation pathway in these cells. Overall, kahweol has anti-inflammatory and anti-atherosclerotic activities, which occurs partly by down-regulating the pathway that affects the expression and interaction of the cell adhesion molecules on endothelial cells.

  7. Role of the microtubule-targeting drug vinflunine on cell-cell adhesions in bladder epithelial tumour cells

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Vinflunine (VFL) is a microtubule-targeting drug that suppresses microtubule dynamics, showing anti-metastatic properties both in vitro and in living cancer cells. An increasing body of evidence underlines the influence of the microtubules dynamics on the cadherin-dependent cell-cell adhesions. E-cadherin is a marker of epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition (EMT) and a tumour suppressor; its reduced levels in carcinoma are associated with poor prognosis. In this report, we investigate the role of VFL on cell-cell adhesions in bladder epithelial tumour cells. Methods Human bladder epithelial tumour cell lines HT1376, 5637, SW780, T24 and UMUC3 were used to analyse cadherin-dependent cell-cell adhesions under VFL treatment. VFL effect on growth inhibition was measured by using a MTT colorimetric cell viability assay. Western blot, immunofluorescence and transmission electron microscopy analyses were performed to assess the roles of VFL effect on cell-cell adhesions, epithelial-to-mesenchymal markers and apoptosis. The role of the proteasome in controlling cell-cell adhesion was studied using the proteasome inhibitor MG132. Results We show that VFL induces cell death in bladder cancer cells and activates epithelial differentiation of the remaining living cells, leading to an increase of E-cadherin-dependent cell-cell adhesion and a reduction of mesenchymal markers, such as N-cadherin or vimentin. Moreover, while E-cadherin is increased, the levels of Hakai, an E3 ubiquitin-ligase for E-cadherin, were significantly reduced in presence of VFL. In 5637, this reduction on Hakai expression was blocked by MG132 proteasome inhibitor, indicating that the proteasome pathway could be one of the molecular mechanisms involved in its degradation. Conclusions Our findings underscore a critical function for VFL in cell-cell adhesions of epithelial bladder tumour cells, suggesting a novel molecular mechanism by which VFL may impact upon EMT and metastasis. PMID:25012153

  8. Pervanadate-induced adhesion of CD4+ T cell to fibronectin is associated with tyrosine phosphorylation of paxillin.

    PubMed

    Miron, S; Kachalsky, S G; Hershkoviz, R; Lider, O

    1997-09-01

    The initial stages of T cell activation involve tyrosine protein kinase-mediated intracellular signaling events. Integrin-mediated adhesion of CD4+ T lymphocytes to extracellular matrix glycoproteins, such as fibronectin, is an activation-dependent process. The involvement of tyrosine protein kinases in the adhesion of CD4+ T cells to fibronectin was examined using pervanadate, a protein-tyrosine phosphatase inhibitor. Pervanadate induced the adhesion of human CD4+ T cells to immobilized fibronectin in a beta1 integrin-mediated fashion, and adhesion was associated with an increase of protein tyrosine phosphorylation. Tyrosine protein kinase inhibitors abrogated both T cell adhesion and intracellular protein tyrosine phosphorylation. Participation of cytoskeletal proteins in the pervanadate-induced T cell adhesion was indicated because cytoskeleton disruption by cytochalasin B inhibited cell adhesion to fibronectin. We demonstrate that the cytoskeletal protein paxillin underwent time-dependent tyrosine phosphorylation simultaneously with pervanadate-induced T cell adhesion to fibronectin. Tyrosine phosphorylation of paxillin was related to cell adhesion, since pretreatment of T cells with cytochalasin B abrogated both adhesion and phosphorylation. This study demonstrates a correlation between activation of protein tyrosine kinases, tyrosine phosphorylation of paxillin, and integrin-mediated T cell adhesion to extracellular matrix glycoproteins. PMID:9307082

  9. A standardized bamboo leaf extract inhibits monocyte adhesion to endothelial cells by modulating vascular cell adhesion protein-1

    PubMed Central

    Choi, Sunga; Park, Myoung Soo; Lee, Yu Ran; Lee, Young Chul; Kim, Tae Woo; Do, Seon-Gil; Kim, Dong Seon

    2013-01-01

    Bamboo leaves (Phyllostachys pubescens Mazel ex J. Houz (Poacea)) have a long history of food and medical applications in Asia, including Japan and Korea. They have been used as a traditional medicine for centuries. We investigated the mechanism of anti-inflammatory activity of a bamboo leaf extract (BLE) on tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-α)-induced monocyte adhesion in human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs). Exposure of HUVECs to BLE did not inhibit cell viability or cause morphological changes at concentrations ranging from 1 µg/ml to 1 mg/ml. Treatment with 0.1 mg/ml BLE caused 63% inhibition of monocyte adhesion in TNF-α-activated HUVECs, which was associated with 38.4% suppression of vascular cell adhesion molecule-1 expression. Furthermore, TNF-α-induced reactive oxygen species generation was decreased to 47.9% in BLE treated TNF-α-activated HUVECs. BLE (0.05 mg/ml) also caused about 50% inhibition of interleukin-6 secretion from lipopolysaccharide-stimulated monocyte. The results indicate that BLE may be clinically useful as an anti-inflammatory or anti-oxidant for human cardiovascular disease including atherosclerosis. PMID:23422838

  10. Anandamide inhibits adhesion and migration of breast cancer cells

    SciTech Connect

    Grimaldi, Claudia; Pisanti, Simona; Laezza, Chiara; Malfitano, Anna Maria; Santoro, Antonietta; Vitale, Mario; Caruso, Maria Gabriella; Notarnicola, Maria; Iacuzzo, Irma; Portella, Giuseppe; Di Marzo, Vincenzo . E-mail: vdimarzo@icmib.na.cnr.it; Bifulco, Maurizio . E-mail: maubiful@unina.it

    2006-02-15

    The endocannabinoid system regulates cell proliferation in human breast cancer cells. We reasoned that stimulation of cannabinoid CB{sub 1} receptors could induce a non-invasive phenotype in breast mtastatic cells. In a model of metastatic spreading in vivo, the metabolically stable anandamide analogue, 2-methyl-2'-F-anandamide (Met-F-AEA), significantly reduced the number and dimension of metastatic nodes, this effect being antagonized by the selective CB{sub 1} antagonist SR141716A. In MDA-MB-231 cells, a highly invasive human breast cancer cell line, and in TSA-E1 cells, a murine breast cancer cell line, Met-F-AEA inhibited adhesion and migration on type IV collagen in vitro without modifying integrin expression: both these effects were antagonized by SR141716A. In order to understand the molecular mechanism involved in these processes, we analyzed the phosphorylation of FAK and Src, two tyrosine kinases involved in migration and adhesion. In Met-F-AEA-treated cells, we observed a decreased tyrosine phosphorylation of both FAK and Src, this effect being attenuated by SR141716A. We propose that CB{sub 1} receptor agonists inhibit tumor cell invasion and metastasis by modulating FAK phosphorylation, and that CB{sub 1} receptor activation might represent a novel therapeutic strategy to slow down the growth of breast carcinoma and to inhibit its metastatic diffusion in vivo.

  11. Covalent surface modification of titanium oxide with different adhesive peptides: surface characterization and osteoblast-like cell adhesion.

    PubMed

    Dettin, Monica; Bagno, Andrea; Gambaretto, Roberta; Iucci, Giovanna; Conconi, Maria Teresa; Tuccitto, Nunzio; Menti, Anna Michela; Grandi, Claudio; Di Bello, Carlo; Licciardello, Antonino; Polzonetti, Giovanni

    2009-07-01

    A fundamental goal in the field of implantology is the design of innovative devices suitable for promoting implant-to-tissue integration. This result can be achieved by means of surface modifications aimed at optimizing tissue regeneration. In the framework of oral and orthopedic implantology, surface modifications concern both the optimization of titanium/titanium alloy surface roughness and the attachment of biochemical factors able to guide cellular adhesion and/or growth. This article focuses on the covalent attachment of two different adhesive peptides to rough titanium disks. The capability of biomimetic surfaces to increase osteoblast adhesion and the specificity of their biological activity due to the presence of cell adhesion signal-motif have also been investigated. In addition, surface analyses by profilometry, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, and time of flight-secondary ion mass spectrometry have been carried out to investigate the effects and modifications induced by grafting procedures.

  12. Cell adhesion molecules: detection with univalent second antibody

    PubMed Central

    1980-01-01

    Identification of cell surface molecules that play a role in cell-cell adhesion (here called cell adhesion molecules) has been achieved by demonstrating the inhibitory effect of univalent antibodies that bind these molecules in an in vitro assay of cell-cell adhesion. A more convenient reagent, intact (divalent) antibody, has been avoided because it might agglutinate the cells rather than blocking cell-cell adhesion. In this report, we show that intact rabbit immunoglobulin directed against certain cell surface molecules of Dictyostelium discoideum blocks cell-cell adhesion when the in vitro assay is performed in the presence of univalent goat anti-rabbit antibody. Under appropriate experimental conditions, the univalent second antibody blocks agglutination induced by the rabbit antibody without significantly interfering with its effect on cell-cell adhesion. This method promises to be useful for screening monoclonal antibodies raised against potential cell adhesion molecules because: (a) it allows for the screening of large numbers of antibody samples without preparation of univalent fragments; and (b) it requires much less antibody because of the greater affinity of divalent antibodies for antigens. PMID:6970200

  13. Mediation of the migration of endothelial cells and fibroblasts on polyurethane nanocomposites by the activation of integrin-focal adhesion kinase signaling.

    PubMed

    Hung, Huey-Shan; Chu, Mei-Yun; Lin, Chien-Hsun; Wu, Chia-Ching; Hsu, Shan-hui

    2012-01-01

    Model surfaces of polyurethane-gold nanocomposites (PU-Au) were used to examine cell behavior on nanophase-segregated materials. Previously we showed that endothelial cell (EC) migration on these materials was modulated by the PI3K/Akt/eNOS pathway. The present study, investigated the expressions of alpha5/beta3 (α5β3) integrin, focal adhesion kinase (FAK), and other downstream signal molecules such as the Rho family and matrix metalloproteinases 2 (MMP-2) induced by the materials in two different cells, that is bovine arterial endothelial cells (BAEC) and human skin fibroblasts (HSF). Both cells proliferated better on the more phase-separated PU-Au 43.5 ppm than on the less phase-separated controls (PU and PU-Au 174 ppm). On PU-Au 43.5 ppm, BAEC compared to HSF had denser actin fibers and were more extended. BAEC became rounded with Y-27632 treatment and shrunk with LY294002 treatment. Treatment by inhibitors only caused slight changes in HSF. The migration distance of BAEC on PU-Au 43.5 ppm was greater than that of HSF, and was significantly reduced by LY294002 or Y-27632 but not SU-1498. The expressions of p-FAK, p-RhoA, p-Rac/Cdc42, MMP2, and α5β3 integrin induced by PU-Au 43.5 ppm were more pronounced in BAEC versus HSF. Further enhancement in MMP2 and α5β3 integrin expressions by FAK-GFP transfection was more remarkable for cells on PU-Au 43.5 ppm. Our findings suggested that the integrin α5β3/FAK pathway may be induced by nanophase-separated materials in both ECs and fibroblasts to promote their proliferation/migration, while the crosstalk between the PI3K/Akt/eNOS pathway and FAK/Rho-GTPase activation may account for the greater effect in ECs than in fibroblasts.

  14. Role of Differential Adhesion in Cell Cluster Evolution: from Vasculogenesis to Cancer Metastasis

    PubMed Central

    Singh, Jaykrishna; Hussain, Fazle; Decuzzi, Paolo

    2013-01-01

    Cell-cell and cell-matrix adhesions are fundamental to numerous physiological processes, including angiogenesis, tumorigenesis, metastatic spreading, and wound healing. We employ cellular potts model to computationally predict the organization of cells within a 3D matrix. The energy potentials regulating cell-cell (JCC) and cell-matrix (JMC) adhesive interactions are systematically varied to represent different, biologically relevant adhesive conditions. Chemotactically induced cell migration is also addressed. Starting from a cluster of cells, variations in relative cell adhesion alone lead to different cellular patterns such as spreading of metastatic tumors and angiogenesis. The combination of low cell-cell adhesion (high JCC) and high heterotypic adhesion (low JMC) favors the fragmentation of the original cluster into multiple, smaller cell-clusters (metastasis). Conversely, cellular systems exhibiting high homotypic affinity (low JCC) preserve their original configuration, avoiding fragmentation (organogenesis). For intermediate values of JCC and JMC (i.e. JCC/JMC ~ 1), tubular and corrugated structures form. Fully developed vascular trees are assembled only in systems where contact-inhibited-chemotaxis is activated upon cell contact. Also, the rate of secretion, diffusion and sequestration of chemotactic factors, cell deformability and motility; do not significantly affect these trends. Further developments of this computational model will predict the efficacy of therapeutic interventions to modulate the diseased microenvironment by directly altering cell cohesion. PMID:23656190

  15. Polymorphonuclear leukocyte adhesion triggers the disorganization of endothelial cell-to-cell adherens junctions

    PubMed Central

    1996-01-01

    Polymorphonuclear leukocytes (PMN) infiltration into tissues is frequently accompanied by increase in vascular permeability. This suggests that PMN adhesion and transmigration could trigger modifications in the architecture of endothelial cell-to-cell junctions. In the present paper, using indirect immunofluorescence, we found that PMN adhesion to tumor necrosis factor-activated endothelial cells (EC) induced the disappearance from endothelial cell-to-cell contacts of adherens junction (AJ) components: vascular endothelial (VE)-cadherin, alpha-catenin, beta-catenin, and plakoglobin. Immunoprecipitation and Western blot analysis of the VE- cadherin/catenin complex showed that the amount of beta-catenin and plakoglobin was markedly reduced from the complex and from total cell extracts. In contrast, VE-cadherin and alpha-catenin were only partially affected. Disorganization of endothelial AJ by PMN was not accompanied by EC retraction or injury and was specific for VE- cadherin/catenin complex, since platelet/endothelial cell adhesion molecule 1 (PECAM-1) distribution at cellular contacts was unchanged. PMN adhesion to EC seems to be a prerequisite for VE-cadherin/catenin complex disorganization. This phenomenon could be fully inhibited by blocking PMN adhesion with an anti-integrin beta 2 mAb, while it could be reproduced by any condition that induced increase of PMN adhesion, such as addition of PMA or an anti-beta 2-activating mAb. The effect on endothelial AJ was specific for PMN since adherent activated lymphocytes did not induce similar changes. High concentrations of protease inhibitors and oxygen metabolite scavengers were unable to prevent AJ disorganization mediated by PMN. PMN adhesion to EC was accompanied by increase in EC permeability in vitro. This effect was dependent on PMN adhesion, was not mediated by proteases and oxygen- reactive metabolites, and could be reproduced by EC treatment with EGTA. Finally, immunohistochemical analysis showed that VE

  16. Evaluation of soluble cell adhesion molecules in atopic dermatitis.

    PubMed

    Koide, M; Furukawa, F; Tokura, Y; Shirahama, S; Takigawa, M

    1997-02-01

    Recent studies have indicated the importance of cell adhesion molecules (CAMs) between the vascular endothelium and activated leukocytes in various inflammatory skin diseases. Soluble forms of CAMs (sCAMs) have also been detected in sera from such diseases. In order to elucidate the role of the soluble forms in skin inflammation, we determined the serum levels of E-selectin, vascular cell adhesion molecule-1 (VCAM-1), and intercellular adhesion molecule-1 (ICAM-1) in patients with atopic dermatitis (AD). Using an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay, we quantified sCAMs levels in 21 patients with atopic dermatitis and in 16 healthy controls. In severe AD patients, levels of these three types of sCAMs were markedly elevated. sE-selectin was significantly elevated in severe AD over the levels in mild AD. A positive correlation with individual clinical activity was found for changes in the sE-selectin and sVCAM-1 levels. sE-selectin levels were correlated with the serum IgE levels and the number of eosinophils. The sVCAM-1 level was also significantly correlated with the number of monocytes. Among these three molecules, sE-selectin appeared to be the most sensitive clinical parameter in monitoring the clinical course of AD patients.

  17. Adhesion and Fusion of Muscle Cells Are Promoted by Filopodia.

    PubMed

    Segal, Dagan; Dhanyasi, Nagaraju; Schejter, Eyal D; Shilo, Ben-Zion

    2016-08-01

    Indirect flight muscles (IFMs) in Drosophila are generated during pupariation by fusion of hundreds of myoblasts with larval muscle templates (myotubes). Live observation of these muscles during the fusion process revealed multiple long actin-based protrusions that emanate from the myotube surface and require Enabled and IRSp53 for their generation and maintenance. Fusion is blocked when formation of these filopodia is compromised. While filopodia are not required for the signaling process underlying critical myoblast cell-fate changes prior to fusion, myotube-myoblast adhesion appears to be filopodia dependent. Without filopodia, close apposition between the cell membranes is not achieved, the cell-adhesion molecule Duf is not recruited to the myotube surface, and adhesion-dependent actin foci do not form. We therefore propose that the filopodia are necessary to prime the heterotypic adhesion process between the two cell types, possibly by recruiting the cell-adhesion molecule Sns to discrete patches on the myoblast cell surface.

  18. Fer and Fps/Fes participate in a Lyn-dependent pathway from FcepsilonRI to platelet-endothelial cell adhesion molecule 1 to limit mast cell activation.

    PubMed

    Udell, Christian M; Samayawardhena, Lionel A; Kawakami, Yuko; Kawakami, Toshiaki; Craig, Andrew W B

    2006-07-28

    Mast cells express the high affinity IgE receptor FcepsilonRI, which upon aggregation by multivalent antigens elicits signals that cause rapid changes within the mast cell and in the surrounding tissue. We previously showed that FcepsilonRI aggregation caused a rapid increase in phosphorylation of both Fer and Fps/Fes kinases in bone marrow-derived mast cells. In this study, we report that FcepsilonRI aggregation leads to increased Fer/Fps kinase activities and that Fer phosphorylation downstream of FcepsilonRI is independent of Syk, Fyn, and Gab2 but requires Lyn. Activated Fer/Fps readily phosphorylate the C terminus of platelet-endothelial cell adhesion molecule 1 (Pecam-1) on immunoreceptor tyrosine-based inhibitory motifs (ITIMs) and a non-ITIM residue (Tyr(700)) in vitro and in transfected cells. Mast cells devoid of Fer/Fps kinase activities display a reduction in FcepsilonRI aggregation-induced tyrosine phosphorylation of Pecam-1, with no defects in recruitment of Shp1/Shp2 phosphatases observed. Lyn-deficient mast cells display a dramatic reduction in Pecam-1 phosphorylation at Tyr(685) and a complete loss of Shp2 recruitment, suggesting a role as an initiator kinase for Pecam-1. Consistent with previous studies of Pecam-1-deficient mast cells, we observe an exaggerated degranulation response in mast cells lacking Fer/Fps kinases at low antigen dosages. Thus, Lyn and Fer/Fps kinases cooperate to phosphorylate Pecam-1 and activate Shp1/Shp2 phosphatases that function in part to limit mast cell activation. PMID:16731527

  19. Dynamic cell adhesion and migration on nanoscale grooved substrates.

    PubMed

    Lamers, E; te Riet, J; Domanski, M; Luttge, R; Figdor, C G; Gardeniers, J G E; Walboomers, X F; Jansen, J A

    2012-01-01

    Organised nanotopography mimicking the natural extracellular matrix can be used to control morphology, cell motility, and differentiation. However, it is still unknown how specific cell types react with specific patterns. Both initial adhesion and preferential cell migration may be important to initiate and increase cell locomotion and coverage with cells, and thus achieve an enhanced wound healing response around an implantable material. Therefore, the aim of this study was to evaluate how MC3T3-E1 osteoblast initial adhesion and directional migration are influenced by nanogrooves with pitches ranging from 150 nm up to 1000 nm. In this study, we used a multi-patterned substrate with five different groove patterns and a smooth area with either a concentric or radial orientation. Initial cell adhesion measurements after 10 s were performed using atomic force spectroscopy-assisted single-cell force spectroscopy, and demonstrated that nascent cell adhesion was highly induced by a 600 nm pitch and reduced by a 150 nm pitch. Addition of RGD peptide significantly reduced adhesion, indicating that integrins and cell adhesive proteins (e.g. fibronectin or vitronectin) are key factors in specific cell adhesion on nanogrooved substrates. Also, cell migration was highly dependent on the groove pitch; the highest directional migration parallel to the grooves was observed on a 600 nm pitch, whereas a 150 nm pitch restrained directional cell migration. From this study, we conclude that grooves with a pitch of 600 nm may be favourable to enhance fast wound closure, thereby promoting tissue regeneration.

  20. Design, structure and biological activity of beta-turn peptides of CD2 protein for inhibition of T-cell adhesion.

    PubMed

    Jining, Liu; Makagiansar, Irwan; Yusuf-Makagiansar, Helena; Chow, Vincent T K; Siahaan, Teruna J; Jois, Seetharama D S

    2004-07-01

    The interaction between cell-adhesion molecules CD2 and CD58 is critical for an immune response. Modulation or inhibition of these interactions has been shown to be therapeutically useful. Synthetic 12-mer linear and cyclic peptides, and cyclic hexapeptides based on rat CD2 protein, were designed to modulate CD2-CD58 interaction. The synthetic peptides effectively blocked the interaction between CD2-CD58 proteins as demonstrated by antibody binding, E-rosetting and heterotypic adhesion assays. NMR and molecular modeling studies indicated that the synthetic cyclic peptides exhibit beta-turn structure in solution and closely mimic the beta-turn structure of the surface epitopes of the CD2 protein. Docking studies of CD2 peptides and CD58 protein revealed the possible binding sites of the cyclic peptides on CD58 protein. The designed cyclic peptides with beta-turn structure have the ability to modulate the CD2-CD58 interaction.

  1. Cell surface markers for T and B lymphocytes activation and adhesion as putative prognostic biomarkers for head and neck squamous cell carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Andrade, Mariléia Chaves; Ferreira, Shirlene Barbosa Pimentel; Gonçalves, Luciana C; De-Paula, Alfredo Maurício Batista; de Faria, Elaine Speziali; Teixeira-Carvalho, Andréa; Martins-Filho, Olindo Assis

    2013-12-01

    The study population comprised HNSCC patients, risk-positive controls (tabagism and alcoholism habits), and risk-negative controls (without risk factors). Significant increases in the activation status of CD4(+)and CD8(+) T-cells, and higher migration potentials of lymphocytes were observed in HNSCC patients compared with control groups. Although decreased frequency of CD19(+)-B lymphocytes was observed in HSNCC patients, a higher percentage of HLA-DR(+)CD19(+)-B lymphocytes was detected in these individuals as compared with other evaluated groups. Metastasis and tumor grading were the major pathological parameters associated with significant alterations in the expression of activation molecules on circulating CD4(+) and CD8(+) T-cells. A reduced frequency of CD38-expressing CD8(+) T-cells was the most relevant biomarker associated with HNSCC aggressiveness. Performance analysis suggested a cut-off point for the CD8(+)CD38(+)/CD8(+) T-cell ratio of 7.0 for segregating patients according to tumor grading. In contrast, a higher proportion of CD8(+)CD54(+)/CD8(+) T-cells could represent a relevant biomarker associated with metastasis in HNSCC patients, and performance analysis suggested a cut-off point for the CD8(+)CD54(+)/CD8(+) T-cell ratio of 30 for segregating patients according to absence or presence of metastasis. The results obtained can increment immunological aspects of HNSCC and provide tools for the determination of cut-off scores of clinically relevant immunophenotypic prognostic biomarkers. PMID:23994583

  2. Alpha actinin-1 regulates cell-matrix adhesion organization in keratinocytes: consequences for skin cell motility.

    PubMed

    Hamill, Kevin J; Hiroyasu, Sho; Colburn, Zachary T; Ventrella, Rosa V; Hopkinson, Susan B; Skalli, Omar; Jones, Jonathan C R

    2015-04-01

    The migration of keratinocytes in wound healing requires coordinated activities of the motility machinery of a cell, the cytoskeleton, and matrix adhesions. In this study, we assessed the role of alpha actinin-1 (ACTN1), one of the two alpha actinin isoforms expressed in keratinocytes, in skin cell migration via a small hairpin RNA-mediated knockdown approach. Keratinocytes deficient in ACTN1 exhibit changes in their actin cytoskeleton organization, a loss in front-rear polarity, and impaired lamellipodial dynamics. They also display aberrant directed motility and move slower compared with their wild-type counterparts. Moreover, they have abnormally arranged matrix adhesion sites. Specifically, the focal adhesions in ACTN1 knockdown keratinocytes are not organized as distinct entities. Rather, focal adhesion proteins are arranged in a circle subjacent to cortical fibers of actin. In the same cells, hemidesmosome proteins arrange in cat paw patterns, more typical of confluent, stationary cells, and β4 integrin dynamics are reduced in knockdown cells compared with control keratinocytes. In summary, our data suggest a mechanism by which ACTN1 determines the motility of keratinocytes by regulating the organization of the actin cytoskeleton, focal adhesion, and hemidesmosome proteins complexes, thereby modulating cell speed, lamellipodial dynamics, and directed migration. PMID:25431851

  3. Loss of Cell Adhesion Increases Tumorigenic Potential of Polarity Deficient Scribble Mutant Cells

    PubMed Central

    Waghmare, Indrayani

    2016-01-01

    Epithelial polarity genes are important for maintaining tissue architecture, and regulating growth. The Drosophila neoplastic tumor suppressor gene scribble (scrib) belongs to the basolateral polarity complex. Loss of scrib results in disruption of its growth regulatory functions, and downregulation or mislocalization of Scrib is correlated to tumor growth. Somatic scribble mutant cells (scrib-) surrounded by wild-type cells undergo apoptosis, which can be prevented by introduction of secondary mutations that provide a growth advantage. Using genetic tools in Drosophila, we analyzed the phenotypic effects of loss of scrib in different growth promoting backgrounds. We investigated if a central mechanism that regulates cell adhesion governs the growth and invasive potential of scrib mutant cells. Here we show that increased proliferation, and survival abilities of scrib- cells in different genetic backgrounds affect their differentiation, and intercellular adhesion. Further, loss of scrib is sufficient to cause reduced cell survival, activation of the JNK pathway and a mild reduction of cell adhesion. Our data show that for scrib cells to induce aggressive tumor growth characterized by loss of differentiation, cell adhesion, increased proliferation and invasion, cooperative interactions that derail signaling pathways play an essential role in the mechanisms leading to tumorigenesis. Thus, our study provides new insights on the effects of loss of scrib and the modification of these effects via cooperative interactions that enhance the overall tumorigenic potential of scrib deficient cells. PMID:27327956

  4. Adhesion

    MedlinePlus

    ... as the shoulder Eyes Inside the abdomen or pelvis Adhesions can become larger or tighter over time. ... Other causes of adhesions in the abdomen or pelvis include: Appendicitis , most often when the appendix breaks ...

  5. Effect of Linomide on adhesion molecules, TNF-alpha, nitrogen oxide, and cell adhesion.

    PubMed

    Abdul-Hai, A; Hershkoviz, R; Weiss, L; Lider, O; Slavin, S

    2005-02-01

    Linomide (quinoline-3-carboxamide) is an immunomodulator with anti-inflammatory effects in rodents with autoimmune diseases. Its mode of action still remains to be elucidated. We hypothesized that an investigation of T cell interactions with the extracellular matrix (ECM), composed of glycoproteins such as fibronectin (FN) and laminin (LN), might provide better understanding of their in vivo mode of action in extravascular inflammatory sites. We examined the effect of Linomide on T cell adhesion to intact ECM, and separately to LN, and FN, and on the release and production of tumor necrosis factor (TNFalpha) and nitrogen oxide (NO) in relation to adhesive molecules in non-obese diabetic (NOD) female spleen cells, focusing on intracellular adhesion molecule-1 (ICAM-1) and CD44. NOD female mice that developed spontaneous autoimmune insulitis, which destroys pancreatic islets and subsequently leads to insulin-deficient diabetes mellitus, were studied. Linomide, given in the drinking water or added to tissue cultures in vitro, inhibited the beta1 integrin-mediated adhesion of T cells to ECM, FN and LN, as well as the production and release of TNFalpha and NO, which play a major role in the induction and propagation of T cell-mediated insulitis. In addition, exposure of T cells to Linomide resulted in increased expression of CD44 and ICAM-1 molecules on spleen cells of Linomide-treated mice; such an increase in adhesion molecule expression may lead to more effective arrest of T cell migration in vivo. The regulation of T-cell adhesion, adhesion receptor expression, and inhibition of TNFalpha and NO secretion by Linomide may explain its beneficial role and provide a new tool for suppressing self-reactive T cell-dependent autoimmune diseases. PMID:15652754

  6. Cell Adhesion to Plasma-Coated PVC

    PubMed Central

    Rangel, Elidiane C.; de Souza, Eduardo S.; de Moraes, Francine S.; Duek, Eliana A. R.; Lucchesi, Carolina; Schreiner, Wido H.; Durrant, Steven F.; Cruz, Nilson C.

    2014-01-01

    To produce environments suitable for cell culture, thin polymer films were deposited onto commercial PVC plates from radiofrequency acetylene-argon plasmas. The proportion of argon in the plasmas, PAr, was varied from 5.3 to 65.8%. The adhesion and growth of Vero cells on the coated surfaces were examined for different incubation times. Cytotoxicity tests were performed using spectroscopic methods. Carbon, O, and N were detected in all the samples using XPS. Roughness remained almost unchanged in the samples prepared with 5.3 and 28.9% but tended to increase for the films deposited with PAr between 28.9 and 55.3%. Surface free energy increased with increasing PAr, except for the sample prepared at 28.9% of Ar, which presented the least reactive surface. Cells proliferated on all the samples, including the bare PVC. Independently of the deposition condition there was no evidence of cytotoxicity, indicating the viability of such coatings for designing biocompatible devices. PMID:25247202

  7. Gingipains from Porphyromonas gingivalis W83 induce cell adhesion molecule cleavage and apoptosis in endothelial cells.

    PubMed

    Sheets, Shaun M; Potempa, Jan; Travis, James; Casiano, Carlos A; Fletcher, Hansel M

    2005-03-01

    The presence of Porphyromonas gingivalis in the periodontal pocket and the high levels of gingipain activity detected in gingival crevicular fluid could implicate a role for gingipains in the destruction of the highly vascular periodontal tissue. To explore the effects of these proteases on endothelial cells, we exposed bovine coronary artery endothelial cells and human microvascular endothelial cells to gingipain-active extracellular protein preparations and/or purified gingipains from P. gingivalis. Treated cells exhibited a rapid loss of cell adhesion properties that was followed by apoptotic cell death. Cleavage of N- and VE-cadherin and integrin beta1 was observed in immunoblots of cell lysates. There was a direct correlation between the kinetics of cleavage of N- and VE-cadherin and loss of cell adhesion properties. Loss of cell adhesion, as well as N- and VE-cadherin and integrin beta1 cleavage, could be inhibited or significantly delayed by preincubation of P. gingivalis W83 gingipain-active extracellular extracts with the cysteine protease inhibitor Nalpha-p-tosyl-l-lysine chloromethylketone. Furthermore, purified gingipains also induced endothelial cell detachment and apoptosis. Apoptosis-associated events, including annexin V positivity, caspase-3 activation, and cleavage of the caspase substrates poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase and topoisomerase I (Topo I), were observed in endothelial cells after detachment. All of the effects observed were correlated with the different levels of cysteine-dependent proteolytic activity of the extracts tested. Taken together, these results indicate that gingipains from P. gingivalis can alter cell adhesion molecules and induce endothelial cell death, which could have implications for the pathogenicity of this organism. PMID:15731052

  8. Adhesion of single bacterial cells in the micronewton range

    PubMed Central

    Tsang, Peter H.; Li, Guanglai; Brun, Yves V.; Freund, L. Ben; Tang, Jay X.

    2006-01-01

    The adhesion of bacteria to surfaces plays critical roles in the environment, disease, and industry. In aquatic environments, Caulobacter crescentus is one of the first colonizers of submerged surfaces. Using a micromanipulation technique, we measured the adhesion force of single C. crescentus cells attached to borosilicate substrates through their adhesive holdfast. The detachment forces measured for 14 cells ranged over 0.11 to 2.26 μN, averaging 0.59 ± 0.62 μN. Based on the calculation of stress distribution with the finite element analysis method (dividing an object into small grids and calculating relevant parameters for all of the elements), the adhesion strength between the holdfast and the substrate is >68 N/mm2 in the central region of contact. To our knowledge, this strength of adhesion is the strongest ever measured for biological adhesives. PMID:16585522

  9. Adhesive interactions regulate transcriptional diversity in malignant B cells.

    PubMed

    Nadav-Dagan, Liat; Shay, Tal; Dezorella, Nili; Naparstek, Elizabeth; Domany, Eytan; Katz, Ben-Zion; Geiger, Benjamin

    2010-04-01

    The genetic profiling of B-cell malignancies is rapidly expanding, providing important information on the tumorigenic potential, response to treatment, and clinical outcome of these diseases. However, the relative contributions of inherent gene expression versus microenvironmental effects are poorly understood. The regulation of gene expression programs by means of adhesive interactions was studied here in ARH-77 human malignant B-cell variants, derived from the same cell line by selective adhesion to a fibronectin matrix. The populations included cells that adhere to fibronectin and are highly tumorigenic (designated "type A" cells) and cells that fail to adhere to fibronectin and fail to develop tumors in vivo ("type F" cells). To identify genes directly affected by cell adhesion to fibronectin, type A cells deprived of an adhesive substrate (designated "AF cells") were also examined. Bioinformatic analyses revealed a remarkable correlation between cell adhesion and both B-cell differentiation state and the expression of multiple myeloma (MM)-associated genes. The highly adherent type A cells expressed higher levels of NFkappaB-regulated genes, many of them associated with MM. Moreover, we found that the transcription of several MM-related proto-oncogenes is stimulated by adhesion to fibronectin. In contrast, type F cells, which display poor adhesive and tumorigenic properties, expressed genes associated with higher levels of B-cell differentiation. Our findings indicate that B-cell differentiation, as manifested by gene expression profiles, is attenuated by cell adhesion to fibronectin, leading to upregulation of specific genes known to be associated with the pathogenesis of MM.

  10. Calreticulin modulates cell adhesiveness via regulation of vinculin expression

    PubMed Central

    1996-01-01

    Calreticulin is an ubiquitous and highly conserved high capacity Ca(2+)- binding protein that plays a major role in Ca2+ storage within the lumen of the ER. Here, using L fibroblast cell lines expressing different levels of calreticulin, we show that calreticulin plays a role in the control of cell adhesiveness via regulation of expression of vinculin, a cytoskeletal protein essential for cell-substratum and cell-cell attachments. Both vinculin protein and mRNA levels are increased in cells overexpressing calreticulin and are downregulated in cells expressing reduced level of calreticulin. Abundance of actin, talin, alpha 5 and beta 1 integrins, pp125 focal adhesion kinase, and alpha-catenin is not affected by the differential calreticulin expression. Overexpression of calreticulin increases both cell- substratum and cell-cell adhesiveness of L fibroblasts that, most surprisingly, establish vinculin-rich cell-cell junctions. Upregulation of calreticulin also affects adhesion-dependent phenomena such as cell motility (which decreases) and cell spreading (which increases). Downregulation of calreticulin brings about inverse effects. Cell adhesiveness is Ca2+ regulated. The level of calreticulin expression, however, has no effect on either the resting cytoplasmic Ca2+ concentration or the magnitude of FGF-induced Ca2+ transients. Calreticulin, however, participates in Ca2+ homeostasis as its level of expression affects cell viability at low concentrations of extracellular Ca2+. Consequently, we infer that it is not the Ca2+ storage function of calreticulin that affects cell adhesiveness. Neither endogenous calreticulin nor overexpressed green fluorescent protein-calreticulin construct can be detected outside of the ER. Since all of the adhesion-related effects of differential calreticulin expression can be explained by its regulation of vinculin expression, we conclude that it is the ER-resident calreticulin that affects cellular adhesiveness. PMID:8991101

  11. Laminin and Fibronectin in Cell Adhesion: Enhanced Adhesion of Cells from Regenerating Liver to Laminin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carlsson, Roland; Engvall, Eva; Freeman, Aaron; Ruoslahti, Erkki

    1981-04-01

    Laminin, a basement membrane glycoprotein isolated from cultures of mouse endodermal cells and rat yolk sac carcinoma cells, promoted the attachment of liver cells obtained from regenerating mouse liver. Cells from normal mouse liver attached readily to dishes coated with fibronectin but attached poorly to surfaces coated with laminin. Both proteins efficiently promoted the attachment of cells from livers undergoing regeneration. After regeneration, the attachment to laminin returned to the low levels found in animals not subjected to partial hepatectomy but attachment to fibronectin remained high. Immunofluorescent staining of sections of normal liver with antilaminin revealed the presence of laminin in or adjacent to the walls of the bile ducts and blood vessels. After induction of regeneration by partial hepatectomy, increased amounts of laminin appeared in the sinusoidal areas. After carbon tetrachloride poisoning, staining for laminin was especially pronounced in the necrotic and postnecrotic areas around the central veins. This additional expression of laminin was transient. It reached a maximum around 5-6 days after the injury and then gradually disappeared. These findings show that laminin is an adhesive protein. The increase of laminin in regenerating liver and the adhesiveness of cells from such livers to laminin suggest a role for laminin in the maintenance of a proper tissue organization during liver regeneration.

  12. Silencing of VAMP3 inhibits cell migration and integrin-mediated adhesion

    SciTech Connect

    Luftman, Kevin; Hasan, Nazarul; Day, Paul; Hardee, Deborah; Hu Chuan

    2009-02-27

    Integrins are transmembrane receptors for cell adhesion to the extracellular matrix. In cell migration, integrins are endocytosed from the plasma membrane or the cell surface, transported in vesicles and exocytosed actively at the cell front. In the present study, we examined the roles of VAMP3, a SNARE protein that mediates exocytosis, in cell migration and integrin trafficking. Small interfering RNA (siRNA)-induced silencing of VAMP3 inhibited chemotactic cell migration by more than 60% without affecting cell proliferation. VAMP3 silencing reduced the levels of {beta}1 integrin at the cell surface but had no effect on total cellular {beta}1 integrin, indicating that VAMP3 is required for trafficking of {beta}1 integrin to the plasma membrane. Furthermore, VAMP3 silencing diminished cell adhesion to laminin but not to fibronectin or collagen. Taken together, these data suggest that VAMP3-dependent integrin trafficking is crucial in cell migration and cell adhesion to laminin.

  13. Single Cell Adhesion Assay Using Computer Controlled Micropipette

    PubMed Central

    Salánki, Rita; Hős, Csaba; Orgovan, Norbert; Péter, Beatrix; Sándor, Noémi; Bajtay, Zsuzsa; Erdei, Anna; Horvath, Robert; Szabó, Bálint

    2014-01-01

    Cell adhesion is a fundamental phenomenon vital for all multicellular organisms. Recognition of and adhesion to specific macromolecules is a crucial task of leukocytes to initiate the immune response. To gain statistically reliable information of cell adhesion, large numbers of cells should be measured. However, direct measurement of the adhesion force of single cells is still challenging and today’s techniques typically have an extremely low throughput (5–10 cells per day). Here, we introduce a computer controlled micropipette mounted onto a normal inverted microscope for probing single cell interactions with specific macromolecules. We calculated the estimated hydrodynamic lifting force acting on target cells by the numerical simulation of the flow at the micropipette tip. The adhesion force of surface attached cells could be accurately probed by repeating the pick-up process with increasing vacuum applied in the pipette positioned above the cell under investigation. Using the introduced methodology hundreds of cells adhered to specific macromolecules were measured one by one in a relatively short period of time (∼30 min). We blocked nonspecific cell adhesion by the protein non-adhesive PLL-g-PEG polymer. We found that human primary monocytes are less adherent to fibrinogen than their in vitro differentiated descendants: macrophages and dendritic cells, the latter producing the highest average adhesion force. Validation of the here introduced method was achieved by the hydrostatic step-pressure micropipette manipulation technique. Additionally the result was reinforced in standard microfluidic shear stress channels. Nevertheless, automated micropipette gave higher sensitivity and less side-effect than the shear stress channel. Using our technique, the probed single cells can be easily picked up and further investigated by other techniques; a definite advantage of the computer controlled micropipette. Our experiments revealed the existence of a sub

  14. Single cell adhesion assay using computer controlled micropipette.

    PubMed

    Salánki, Rita; Hős, Csaba; Orgovan, Norbert; Péter, Beatrix; Sándor, Noémi; Bajtay, Zsuzsa; Erdei, Anna; Horvath, Robert; Szabó, Bálint

    2014-01-01

    Cell adhesion is a fundamental phenomenon vital for all multicellular organisms. Recognition of and adhesion to specific macromolecules is a crucial task of leukocytes to initiate the immune response. To gain statistically reliable information of cell adhesion, large numbers of cells should be measured. However, direct measurement of the adhesion force of single cells is still challenging and today's techniques typically have an extremely low throughput (5-10 cells per day). Here, we introduce a computer controlled micropipette mounted onto a normal inverted microscope for probing single cell interactions with specific macromolecules. We calculated the estimated hydrodynamic lifting force acting on target cells by the numerical simulation of the flow at the micropipette tip. The adhesion force of surface attached cells could be accurately probed by repeating the pick-up process with increasing vacuum applied in the pipette positioned above the cell under investigation. Using the introduced methodology hundreds of cells adhered to specific macromolecules were measured one by one in a relatively short period of time (∼30 min). We blocked nonspecific cell adhesion by the protein non-adhesive PLL-g-PEG polymer. We found that human primary monocytes are less adherent to fibrinogen than their in vitro differentiated descendants: macrophages and dendritic cells, the latter producing the highest average adhesion force. Validation of the here introduced method was achieved by the hydrostatic step-pressure micropipette manipulation technique. Additionally the result was reinforced in standard microfluidic shear stress channels. Nevertheless, automated micropipette gave higher sensitivity and less side-effect than the shear stress channel. Using our technique, the probed single cells can be easily picked up and further investigated by other techniques; a definite advantage of the computer controlled micropipette. Our experiments revealed the existence of a sub-population of

  15. Simulation of Cell Adhesion using a Particle Transport Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chesnutt, Jennifer

    2005-11-01

    An efficient computational method for simulation of cell adhesion through protein binding forces is discussed. In this method, the cells are represented by deformable elastic particles, and the protein binding is represented by a rate equation. The method is first developed for collision and adhesion of two similar cells impacting on each other from opposite directions. The computational method is then applied in a particle-transport model for a cloud of interacting and colliding cells, each of which are represented by particles of finite size. One application might include red blood cells adhering together to form rouleaux, which are chains of red blood cells that are found in different parts of the circulatory system. Other potential applications include adhesion of platelets to a blood vessel wall or mechanical heart valve, which is a precursor of thrombosis formation, or adhesion of cancer cells to organ walls in the lymphatic, circulatory, digestive or pulmonary systems.

  16. The novel chimeric anti-NCAM (neural cell adhesion molecule) antibody ch.MK1 displays antitumor activity in SCID mice but does not activate complement-dependent cytolysis (CDC).

    PubMed

    Klehr, Martin; Koehl, Ulrike; Mühlenhoff, Martina; Tawadros, Samir; Fischer, Thomas; Schomäcker, Klaus; Heuckmann, Johannes M; Bochennek, Konrad; Jensen, Markus

    2009-06-01

    A monoclonal chimeric antibody ch.MK1 was generated by immunizing F004 mice expressing human instead of murine IgG1/kappa immunoglobulin constant regions. The novel antibody specifically binds cell surface-expressed human neural cell adhesion molecule (NCAM) as shown by immunoprecipitation, flow cytometry and cytospins. Functional analysis revealed nearly complete absence of complement-dependent cytolysis in ch.MK1 and in all other anti-NCAM antibodies tested for reference (UJ13a, ERIC1, 123C3, ch.5A2, B159), indicating an unexpected and group-specific property of anti-NCAM antibodies. As a most plausible mechanism, posttranslational modification of NCAM by complement-inhibiting polysialic acid is discussed. The antibody ch.MK1 demonstrated significant in vivo activity against NCAM-positive neuroblastoma in SCID mice in presence of human peripheral blood mononuclear cell. In absence of human peripheral blood mononuclear cell no distinct antitumor activity of the antibody alone was observed. In ch.MK1 the cellular component of the immune system seems to be the dominant effector mechanism, whereas complement-dependent cytolysis seems not to be necessarily required for antitumor activity. These observations help us to understand immunotherapeutic mechanisms of native anti-NCAM antibodies and may additionally contribute to the understanding of results of currently ongoing clinical studies with conjugated anti-NCAM antibodies.

  17. Apoptotic Endothelial Cells Demonstrate Increased Adhesiveness for Human Mesenchymal Stem Cells

    PubMed Central

    POTAPOVA, IRINA A.; COHEN, IRA S.; DORONIN, SERGEY V.

    2009-01-01

    Mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) participate in the wound healing process in mammalians. Adhesion of MSCs to endothelium is a key step in the homing of MSCs circulating in the bloodstream to the sites of injury and inflammation. Because endothelial cells (ECs) may become apoptotic under certain pro-inflammatory conditions, we investigated the effects of pro-inflammatory, TNF-α and IL-1β, and pro-apoptotic agents, actinomycin D, cycloheximide, okadaic acid, wortmannin, and staurosporine, on human MSCs (hMSCs) adhesion to ECs. Treatment of ECs with pro-apoptotic agents markedly increased adhesion of hMSCs to ECs. This adhesion correlated with reduction of mitochondrial membrane potential, inhibition of NADH dehydrogenases, and release of von Willebrand factor (vWF) by ECs. Treatment of ECs with exogenous vWF also stimulated hMSC adhesion. These data provide evidence that apoptosis of ECs may regulate homing of hMSCs to the sites of tissue injury. These results are consistent with the hypothesis that activation of apoptotic signaling pathways in ECs releases vWF which regulates hMSC adhesion to ECs. PMID:19023868

  18. Expression sequences of cell adhesion molecules.

    PubMed Central

    Crossin, K L; Chuong, C M; Edelman, G M

    1985-01-01

    A reexamination of the expression of cell adhesion molecules (CAMs) during the development of the chicken embryo was carried out using more sensitive immunocytochemical techniques than had been used previously. While the previously determined sequence of CAM expression was confirmed, neural CAM (N-CAM) was also detected on endodermal structures such as the lung epithelium, gut epithelium, and pancreas and on budding structures such as the pancreatic duct and gall bladder. It was also found on ectodermal derivatives of the skin. In most of these sites, N-CAM expression was transient, but in the chicken embryo lung, the epithelium remained positive for N-CAM and liver CAM (L-CAM) into adult life. Thus, at one time or another, both of these primary CAMs can be expressed on derivatives of all three germ layers. At sites of embryonic induction, epithelial cells expressing both L-CAM and N-CAM, or L-CAM only, were apposed to mesenchymal cells expressing N-CAM. Examples included epiblast (NL) and notochord (N); endodermal epithelium (NL) and lung mesenchyme (N); Wolffian duct (NL) and mesonephric mesenchyme (N); apical ectodermal ridge (NL) and limb mesenchyme (N); and feather placode (L) and dermal condensation (N). The cumulative observations indicate that cell surface modulation of the primary CAMs at induction sites can be classified into two modes. In mode I, expression of N-CAM (or both CAMs) in mesenchyme decreases to low amounts at the cell surface, and then N-CAM is reexpressed. In mode II, one or the other CAM disappears from epithelia expressing both CAMs. As a result of the primary processes of development, collectives of cells linked by N-CAM and undergoing modulation mode I are brought into the proximity of collectives of cells linked by L-CAM plus N-CAM or by L-CAM undergoing modulation mode II. Such adjoining cell collectives or CAM couples were found at all sites of embryonic induction examined. Images PMID:3863135

  19. Redundant control of migration and adhesion by ERM proteins in vascular smooth muscle cells

    SciTech Connect

    Baeyens, Nicolas; Latrache, Iman; Yerna, Xavier; Noppe, Gauthier; Horman, Sandrine; Morel, Nicole

    2013-11-22

    Highlights: •The three ERM proteins are expressed in vascular smooth muscle cell. •ERM depletion inhibited PDGF-evoked migration redundantly. •ERM depletion increased cell adhesion redundantly. •ERM depletion did not affect PDGF-evoked Ca signal, Rac1 activation, proliferation. •ERM proteins control PDGF-induced migration by regulating adhesion. -- Abstract: Ezrin, radixin, and moesin possess a very similar structure with a C-terminal actin-binding domain and a N-terminal FERM interacting domain. They are known to be involved in cytoskeleton organization in several cell types but their function in vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMC) is still unknown. The aim of this study was to investigate the role of ERM proteins in cell migration induced by PDGF, a growth factor involved in pathophysiological processes like angiogenesis or atherosclerosis. We used primary cultured VSMC obtained from rat aorta, which express the three ERM proteins. Simultaneous depletion of the three ERM proteins with specific siRNAs abolished the effects of PDGF on cell architecture and migration and markedly increased cell adhesion and focal adhesion size, while these parameters were only slightly affected by depletion of ezrin, radixin or moesin alone. Rac1 activation, cell proliferation, and Ca{sup 2+} signal in response to PDGF were unaffected by ERM depletion. These results indicate that ERM proteins exert a redundant control on PDGF-induced VSMC migration by regulating focal adhesion turn-over and cell adhesion to substrate.

  20. A GTPase controls cell-substrate adhesion in Xenopus XTC fibroblasts.

    PubMed

    Symons, M H; Mitchison, T J

    1992-09-01

    Cell-substrate adhesion is crucial at various stages of development and for the maintenance of normal tissues. Little is known about the regulation of these adhesive interactions. To investigate the role of GTPases in the control of cell morphology and cell-substrate adhesion we have injected guanine nucleotide analogs into Xenopus XTC fibroblasts. Injection of GTP gamma S inhibited ruffling and increased spreading, suggesting an increase in adhesion. To further investigate this, we made use of GRGDSP, a peptide which inhibits binding of integrins to vitronectin and fibronectin. XTC fibroblasts injected with non-hydrolyzable analogs of GTP took much more time to round up than mock-injected cells in response to treatment with GRGDSP, while GDP beta S-injected cells rounded up in less time than controls. Injection with GTP gamma S did not inhibit cell rounding induced by trypsin however, showing that cell contractility is not significantly affected by the activation of GTPases. These data provide evidence for the existence of a GTPase which can control cell-substrate adhesion from the cytoplasm. Treatment of XTC fibroblasts with the phorbol ester 12-o-tetradecanoylphorbol-13-acetate reduced cell spreading and accelerated cell rounding in response to GRGDSP, which is essentially opposite to the effect exerted by non-hydrolyzable GTP analogs. These results suggest the existence of at least two distinct pathways controlling cell-substrate adhesion in XTC fibroblasts, one depending on a GTPase and another one involving protein kinase C.

  1. Hydrogen peroxide regulates cell adhesion through the redox sensor RPSA.

    PubMed

    Vilas-Boas, Filipe; Bagulho, Ana; Tenente, Rita; Teixeira, Vitor H; Martins, Gabriel; da Costa, Gonçalo; Jerónimo, Ana; Cordeiro, Carlos; Machuqueiro, Miguel; Real, Carla

    2016-01-01

    To become metastatic, a tumor cell must acquire new adhesion properties that allow migration into the surrounding connective tissue, transmigration across endothelial cells to reach the blood stream and, at the site of metastasis, adhesion to endothelial cells and transmigration to colonize a new tissue. Hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) is a redox signaling molecule produced in tumor cell microenvironment with high relevance for tumor development. However, the molecular mechanisms regulated by H2O2 in tumor cells are still poorly known. The identification of H2O2-target proteins in tumor cells and the understanding of their role in tumor cell adhesion are essential for the development of novel redox-based therapies for cancer. In this paper, we identified Ribosomal Protein SA (RPSA) as a target of H2O2 and showed that RPSA in the oxidized state accumulates in clusters that contain specific adhesion molecules. Furthermore, we showed that RPSA oxidation improves cell adhesion efficiency to laminin in vitro and promotes cell extravasation in vivo. Our results unravel a new mechanism for H2O2-dependent modulation of cell adhesion properties and identify RPSA as the H2O2 sensor in this process. This work indicates that high levels of RPSA expression might confer a selective advantage to tumor cells in an oxidative environment.

  2. Lipid Raft Is Required for PSGL-1 Ligation Induced HL-60 Cell Adhesion on ICAM-1

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Tingshuang; Liu, Wenai; Luo, Jixian; Li, Chunfeng; Ba, Xueqing; Ampah, Khamal Kwesi; Wang, Xiaoguang; Jiang, Yong; Zeng, Xianlu

    2013-01-01

    P-selectin glycoprotein ligand-1 (PSGL-1) and integrins are adhesion molecules that play critical roles in host defense and innate immunity. PSGL-1 mediates leukocyte rolling and primes leukocytes for integrin-mediated adhesion. However, the mechanism that PSGL-1 as a rolling receptor in regulating integrin activation has not been well characterized. Here, we investigate the function of lipid raft in regulating PSGL-1 induced β2 integrin-mediated HL-60 cells adhesion. PSGL-1 ligation with antibody enhances the β2 integrin activation and β2 integrin-dependent adhesion to ICAM-1. Importantly, with the treatment of methyl-β-cyclodextrin (MβCD), we confirm the role of lipid raft in regulating the activation of β2 integrin. Furthermore, we find that the protein level of PSGL-1 decreased in raft fractions in MβCD treated cells. PSGL-1 ligation induces the recruitment of spleen tyrosine kinase (Syk), a tyrosine kinase and Vav1 (the pivotal downstream effector of Syk signaling pathway involved in cytoskeleton regulation) to lipid raft. Inhibition of Syk activity with pharmacologic inhibitor strongly reduces HL-60 cells adhesion, implicating Syk is crucial for PSGL-1 mediated β2 integrin activation. Taken together, we report that ligation of PSGL-1 on HL-60 cells activates β2 integrin, for which lipid raft integrity and Syk activation are responsible. These findings have shed new light on the mechanisms that connect leukocyte initial rolling with subsequent adhesion. PMID:24312591

  3. Group I PAK Inhibitor IPA-3 Induces Cell Death and Affects Cell Adhesivity to Fibronectin in Human Hematopoietic Cells

    PubMed Central

    Kuželová, Kateřina; Grebeňová, Dana; Holoubek, Aleš; Röselová, Pavla; Obr, Adam

    2014-01-01

    P21-activated kinases (PAKs) are involved in the regulation of multiple processes including cell proliferation, adhesion and migration. However, the current knowledge about their function is mainly based on results obtained in adherent cell types. We investigated the effect of group I PAK inhibition using the compound IPA-3 in a variety of human leukemic cell lines (JURL-MK1, MOLM-7, K562, CML-T1, HL-60, Karpas-299, Jurkat, HEL) as well as in primary blood cells. IPA-3 induced cell death with EC50 ranging from 5 to more than 20 μM. Similar range was found for IPA-3-mediated dephosphorylation of a known PAK downstream effector, cofilin. The cell death was associated with caspase-3 activation, PARP cleavage and apoptotic DNA fragmentation. In parallel, 20 μM IPA-3 treatment induced rapid and marked decrease of the cell adhesivity to fibronectin. Per contra, partial reduction of PAK activity using lower dose IPA-3 or siRNA resulted in a slight increase in the cell adhesivity. The changes in the cell adhesivity were also studied using real-time microimpedance measurement and by interference reflection microscopy. Significant differences in the intracellular IPA-3 level among various cell lines were observed indicating that an active mechanism is involved in IPA-3 transport. PMID:24664099

  4. Variable Nanoparticle-Cell Adhesion Strength Regulates Cellular Uptake

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yuan, Hongyan; Li, Ju; Bao, Gang; Zhang, Sulin

    2010-09-01

    In receptor-mediated endocytosis, cells exercise biochemical control over the mechanics of adhesion to engulf foreign particles, featuring a variable adhesion strength. Here we present a thermodynamic model with which we elucidate that the variable adhesion strength critically governs the cellular uptake, yielding an uptake phase diagram in the space of ligand density and particle size. We identify from the diagram an endocytosed phase with markedly high uptake, encompassed by a lower and an upper phase boundary that are set, respectively, by the enthalpic and entropic limits of the adhesion strength. The phase diagram may provide useful guidance to the rational design of nanoparticle-based therapeutic and diagnostic agents.

  5. Detection of focal adhesion kinase activation at membrane microdomains by fluorescence resonance energy transfer.

    PubMed

    Seong, Jihye; Ouyang, Mingxing; Kim, Taejin; Sun, Jie; Wen, Po-Chao; Lu, Shaoying; Zhuo, Yue; Llewellyn, Nicholas M; Schlaepfer, David D; Guan, Jun-Lin; Chien, Shu; Wang, Yingxiao

    2011-07-26

    Proper subcellular localization of focal adhesion kinase (FAK) is crucial for many cellular processes. It remains, however, unclear how FAK activity is regulated at subcellular compartments. To visualize the FAK activity at different membrane microdomains, we develop a fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET)-based FAK biosensor, and target it into or outside of detergent-resistant membrane (DRM) regions at the plasma membrane. Here we show that, on cell adhesion to extracellular matrix proteins or stimulation by platelet-derived growth factor (PDGF), the FRET responses of DRM-targeting FAK biosensor are stronger than that at non-DRM regions, suggesting that FAK activation can occur at DRM microdomains. Further experiments reveal that the PDGF-induced FAK activation is mediated and maintained by Src activity, whereas FAK activation on cell adhesion is independent of, and in fact essential for the Src activation. Therefore, FAK is activated at membrane microdomains with distinct activation mechanisms in response to different physiological stimuli.

  6. The evaluation of p,p'-DDT exposure on cell adhesion of hepatocellular carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Jin, Xiaoting; Chen, Meilan; Song, Li; Li, Hanqing; Li, Zhuoyu

    2014-08-01

    Many studies have found a positive association between the progression of hepatocellular carcinoma and DDT exposure. These studies mainly focus on the effect of DDT exposure on cell proliferation and epithelial to mesenchymal transition (EMT) promotion. However, the influence of DDT on cell adhesion of hepatocellular carcinoma remains to be unclear. The aim of our study was to determine the effect of p,p'-DDT on cell adhesion of hepatocellular carcinoma in vitro and in vivo. The data showed that p,p'-DDT, exposing HepG2 cells for 6 days, decreased cell-cell adhesion and elevated cell-matrix adhesion. Strikingly, p,p'-DDT increased reactive oxygen species (ROS) content, and this was accompanied by the activation of JAK/STAT3 pathway. Moreover, ROS inhibitor supplement reversed these effects significantly. However, the addition of ER inhibitor, ICI, had no effect on the p,p'-DDT-induced effects. p,p'-DDT altered the mRNA levels of related adhesion molecules, including inhibition of E-cadherin and promotion of N-cadherin along with CD29. Interestingly, the p,p'-DDT-altered adhesion molecules could be reversed with JAK inhibitor or STAT3 inhibitor. Likewise, p,p'-DDT stimulated the JAK/STAT3 pathway in nude mice, as well as altered the mRNA levels of E-cadherin, N-cadherin, and CD29. Taken together, these results indicate that p,p'-DDT profoundly promotes the adhesion process by decreasing cell-cell adhesion and inducing cell-matrix adhesion via the ROS-mediated JAK/STAT3 pathway. All these events account for the carcinogenic potential of p,p'-DDT in liver.

  7. A peptide (P2) derived from the variable heavy chain of an anti-P-selectin monoclonal antibody (LYP20) inhibits leucocyte adhesion to thrombin-activated platelets and endothelial cells.

    PubMed

    Murphy, Joseph F; McGregor, John L

    2003-02-01

    P-selectin, a member of the selectin family of adhesion molecules, is present in endothelial Weibel-Palade bodies and platelet alpha-granules, and is rapidly expressed on their surface upon activation, resulting in leucocyte adhesion. LYP20 is a functional monoclonal antibody previously generated in our laboratory that binds with high affinity and specificity directed against P-selectin. This binding is largely imparted by the specific sequence of amino acids present on the hypervariable portions of the IgG chains. We now show that a peptide derived from the heavy chain of mAb LYP20 dose dependently inhibits the adhesion of poly morphonuclear cells to resting and thrombin-activated endothelial cells (EC) and platelets. The scrambled form of this peptide, identical in amino acid composition to the authentic peptide but with altered sequence, was not inhibitory at corresponding concentrations. Binding studies revealed that this peptide also dose dependently bound to both resting and thrombin-activated EC and platelets. Our results may prove useful for the development of new therapeutic inhibitors to modulate leucocyte interactions in inflammatory disorders. PMID:12588346

  8. Transcriptionally Regulated Cell Adhesion Network Dictates Distal Tip Cell Directionality

    PubMed Central

    Wong, Ming-Ching; Kennedy, William P.; Schwarzbauer, Jean E.

    2015-01-01

    Background The mechanisms that govern directional changes in cell migration are poorly understood. The migratory paths of two distal tip cells (DTC) determine the U-shape of the C. elegans hermaphroditic gonad. The morphogenesis of this organ provides a model system to identify genes necessary for the DTCs to execute two stereotyped turns. Results Using candidate genes for RNAi knockdown in a DTC-specific strain, we identified two transcriptional regulators required for DTC turning: cbp-1, the CBP/p300 transcriptional coactivator homologue, and let-607, a CREBH transcription factor homologue. Further screening of potential target genes uncovered a network of integrin adhesion-related genes that have roles in turning and are dependent on cbp-1 and let-607 for expression. These genes include src-1/Src kinase, tln-1/talin, pat-2/α integrin and nmy-2, a nonmuscle myosin heavy chain. Conclusions Transcriptional regulation by means of cbp-1 and let-607 is crucial for determining directional changes during DTC migration. These regulators coordinate a gene network that is necessary for integrin-mediated adhesion. Overall, these results suggest that directional changes in cell migration rely on the precise gene regulation of adhesion. PMID:24811939

  9. Theoretical study of the competition between cell-cell and cell-matrix adhesions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Guang-Kui; Feng, Xi-Qiao; Zhao, Hong-Ping; Li, Bo

    2009-07-01

    Adhesions between neighboring cells or between cells and their surrounding tissue/matrix play a crucial role in a wide range of biological processes. In order to investigate the competitive mechanisms between cell-cell and cell-matrix adhesions, we here develop a theoretical framework for multiple interacting cells lying on a planar matrix coated with distributed ligands. This model allows us to study, from the viewpoints of energy and statistics, the effects of such physical mechanisms as binding energy of bonds, nonspecific interactions, elastic deformation of cell membranes, and mixing entropy. Our calculations show that cell-matrix adhesion cannot occur when the ligand density on the matrix is lower than a threshold value, and cell-cell adhesion does not happen for a high ligand density. Glycocalyx repulsion plays a more important role in cell-matrix adhesion than in cell-cell adhesion. In addition, it is found that the cell-cell adhesion density decreases as the number of cells increases.

  10. Alpha-tocopherol inhibits agonist-induced monocytic cell adhesion to cultured human endothelial cells.

    PubMed Central

    Faruqi, R; de la Motte, C; DiCorleto, P E

    1994-01-01

    Antioxidants have been proposed to be anti-atherosclerotic agents; however, the mechanisms underlying their beneficial effects are poorly understood. We have examined the effect of alpha-tocopherol (alpha-tcp) on one cellular event in atherosclerotic plaque development, monocyte adhesion to stimulated endothelial cells (ECs). Human umbilical vein ECs were pretreated with alpha-tcp before stimulation with known agonists of monocyte adhesion: IL-1 (10 ng/ml), LPS (10 ng/ml), thrombin (30 U/ml), or PMA (10 nM). Agonist-induced monocytic cell adhesion, but not basal adhesion, was inhibited in a time- and concentration-dependent manner by alpha-tcp. The IC50 of alpha-tcp on an IL-1-induced response was 45 microM. The inhibition correlated with a decrease in steady state levels of E-selectin mRNA and cell surface expression of E-selectin which is consistent with the ability of a monoclonal antibody to E-selectin to inhibit monocytic cell adhesion in this system. Probucol (50 microM) and N-acetylcysteine (20 mM) also inhibited agonist-induced monocytic cell adhesion; whereas, several other antioxidants had no significant effect. Protein kinase C (PKC) does not appear to play a role in the alpha-tcp effect since no suppression of phosphorylation of PKC substrates was observed. Activation of the transcription factor NF-kappa B is reported to be necessary but not sufficient for E-selectin expression in EC. Electrophoretic mobility shift assays failed to show an alpha-tcp-induced decrease in activation of this transcription factor after cytokine stimulation. It has been hypothesized that alpha-tcp acts as an anti-atherosclerotic molecule by inhibiting generation of oxidized LDL--a putative triggering molecule in the atherosclerotic process. Our results point to a novel alternative mechanism of action of alpha-tcp. Images PMID:7518838

  11. The Tat protein of human immunodeficiency virus type 1, a growth factor for AIDS Kaposi sarcoma and cytokine-activated vascular cells, induces adhesion of the same cell types by using integrin receptors recognizing the RGD amino acid sequence.

    PubMed Central

    Barillari, G; Gendelman, R; Gallo, R C; Ensoli, B

    1993-01-01

    Spindle-shaped cells of vascular origin are the probable tumor cells of Kaposi sarcoma (KS). These cells, derived from patients with KS and AIDS, proliferate in response to extracellular Tat protein of human immunodeficiency virus type 1. Normal vascular cells, believed to be the progenitors of AIDS-KS cells, acquire spindle morphology and become responsive to the mitogenic effect of Tat after culture with inflammatory cytokines. Such cytokines are increased in human immunodeficiency virus type 1-infected people, suggesting that immune stimulation (rather than immune deficiency) is a component of AIDS-KS pathogenesis. Here we show that (i) Tat promotes adhesion of AIDS-KS and normal vascular cells; (ii) adhesion of normal vascular cells to Tat is induced by exposure of the cells to the same cytokines; (iii) adhesion is associated with the amino acid sequence RGD of Tat through a specific interaction with the integrin receptors alpha 5 beta 1 and alpha v beta 3, although it is augmented by the basic region; and (iv) the expression of both integrins is increased by the same cytokines that promote these cells to acquire spindle morphology and become responsive to the adhesion and growth effects of Tat. The results also suggest that RGD-recognizing integrins mediate the vascular cell-growth-promoting effect of Tat. Images Fig. 1 Fig. 5 PMID:7690138

  12. Synergistic and hierarchical adhesive and topographic guidance of BHK cells.

    PubMed

    Britland, S; Morgan, H; Wojiak-Stodart, B; Riehle, M; Curtis, A; Wilkinson, C

    1996-11-01

    Guided cell movement is a fundamental process in development and regeneration. We have used microengineered culture substrates to study the interaction between model topographic and adhesive guidance cues in steering BHK cell orientation. Grooves 0.1, 0.5, 1.0, 3.0, and 6.0 microm deep together with pitch-matched aminosilane tracks 5, 12, 25, 50, and 100 microm wide were fabricated on fused silica substrates using photolithographic and dry-etching techniques. The cues were presented to the cells individually, simultaneously in parallel and orthogonally opposed. Cells aligned most strongly to 25-microm-wide adhesive tracks and to 5-microm-wide, 6-microm-deep grooves. Stress fibers and vinculin were found to align with the adhesive tracks and to the grooves and ridges. Cell alignment was profoundly enhanced on all surfaces that presented both cues in parallel. Cells were able to switch alignment from ridges to grooves, and vice versa, depending on the location of superimposed adhesive tracks. Cells aligned preferentially to adhesive tracks superimposed orthogonally over grooves of matched pitch, traversing numerous grooves and ridges. The strength of the cues was more closely matched on narrower 3- and 6-microm-deep gratings with cells showing evidence of alignment to both cues. Confocal fluorescence microscopy revealed two groups of mutually opposed f-actin stress fibers within the same cell, one oriented with the topographic cues and the other with the adhesive cues. However, the adhesive response was consistently dominant. We conclude that cells are able to detect and respond to multiple guidance cues simultaneously. The adhesive and topographic guidance cues modeled here were capable of interacting both synergistically and hierarchically to guide cell orientation. PMID:8912725

  13. Fibronectin Modulates Cell Adhesion and Signaling to Promote Single Cell Migration of Highly Invasive Oral Squamous Cell Carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Ramos, Grasieli de Oliveira; Bernardi, Lisiane; Lauxen, Isabel; Sant'Ana Filho, Manoel; Horwitz, Alan Rick; Lamers, Marcelo Lazzaron

    2016-01-01

    Cell migration is regulated by adhesion to the extracellular matrix (ECM) through integrins and activation of small RhoGTPases, such as RhoA and Rac1, resulting in changes to actomyosin organization. During invasion, epithelial-derived tumor cells switch from laminin-enriched basal membrane to collagen and fibronectin-enriched connective tissue. How this switch affects the tumor migration is still unclear. We tested the hypothesis that ECM dictates the invasiveness of Oral Squamous Cell Carcinoma (OSCC). We analyzed the migratory properties of two OSCC lines, a low invasive cell line with high e-cadherin levels (Linv/HE-cad) or a highly invasive cell line with low e-cadherin levels (Hinv/LE-cad), plated on different ECM components. Compared to laminin, fibronectin induced non-directional collective migration and decreased RhoA activity in Linv/HE-cad OSCC. For Hinv/LE-cad OSCC, fibronectin increased Rac1 activity and induced smaller adhesions, resulting in a fast single cell migration in both 2D and 3D environments. Consistent with these observations, human OSCC biopsies exhibited similar changes in cell-ECM adhesion distribution at the invasive front of the tumor, where cells encounter fibronectin. Our results indicate that ECM composition might induce a switch from collective to single cell migration according to tumor invasiveness due to changes in cell-ECM adhesion and the resulting signaling pathways that alter actomyosin organization. PMID:26978651

  14. Fibronectin Modulates Cell Adhesion and Signaling to Promote Single Cell Migration of Highly Invasive Oral Squamous Cell Carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Ramos, Grasieli de Oliveira; Bernardi, Lisiane; Lauxen, Isabel; Sant’Ana Filho, Manoel; Horwitz, Alan Rick; Lamers, Marcelo Lazzaron

    2016-01-01

    Cell migration is regulated by adhesion to the extracellular matrix (ECM) through integrins and activation of small RhoGTPases, such as RhoA and Rac1, resulting in changes to actomyosin organization. During invasion, epithelial-derived tumor cells switch from laminin-enriched basal membrane to collagen and fibronectin-enriched connective tissue. How this switch affects the tumor migration is still unclear. We tested the hypothesis that ECM dictates the invasiveness of Oral Squamous Cell Carcinoma (OSCC). We analyzed the migratory properties of two OSCC lines, a low invasive cell line with high e-cadherin levels (Linv/HE-cad) or a highly invasive cell line with low e-cadherin levels (Hinv/LE-cad), plated on different ECM components. Compared to laminin, fibronectin induced non-directional collective migration and decreased RhoA activity in Linv/HE-cad OSCC. For Hinv/LE-cad OSCC, fibronectin increased Rac1 activity and induced smaller adhesions, resulting in a fast single cell migration in both 2D and 3D environments. Consistent with these observations, human OSCC biopsies exhibited similar changes in cell-ECM adhesion distribution at the invasive front of the tumor, where cells encounter fibronectin. Our results indicate that ECM composition might induce a switch from collective to single cell migration according to tumor invasiveness due to changes in cell-ECM adhesion and the resulting signaling pathways that alter actomyosin organization. PMID:26978651

  15. Cell adhesion molecules and in vitro fertilization.

    PubMed

    Simopoulou, Maria; Nikolopoulou, Elena; Dimakakos, Andreas; Charalabopoulos, Konstantinos; Koutsilieris, Michael

    2014-01-01

    This review addresses issues regarding the need in the in vitro fertilization (IVF) field for further predictive markers enhancing the standing embryo selection criteria. It aims to serve as a source of defining information for an audience interested in factors related to the wide range of multiple roles played by cell adhesion molecules (CAMs) in several aspects of IVF ultimately associated with the success of an IVF cycle. We begin by stressing the importance of enriching the standing embryo selection criteria available aiming for the golden standard: "extract as much information as possible focusing on non-invasive techniques" so as to guide us towards selecting the embryo with the highest implantation potential. We briefly describe the latest trends on how to best select the right embryo, moving closer towards elective single embryo transfer. These trends are: frozen embryo transfer for all, preimplantation genetic screening, non-invasive selection criteria, and time-lapse imaging. The main part of this review is dedicated to categorizing and presenting published research studies focused on the involvement of CAMs in IVF and its final outcome. Specifically, we discuss the association of CAMs with conditions and complications that arise from performing assisted reproductive techniques, such as ovarian hyperstimulation syndrome, the state of the endometrium, and tubal pregnancies, as well as the levels of CAMs in biological materials available in the IVF laboratory such as follicular fluid, trophectoderm, ovarian granulosa cells, oocytes, and embryos. To conclude, since CAMs have been successfully employed as a diagnostic tool in several pathologies in routine clinical work, we suggest that their multi-faceted nature could serve as a prognostic marker in assisted reproduction, aiming to enrich the list of non-invasive selection and predictive criteria in the IVF setting. We propose that in light of the well-documented involvement of CAMs in the developmental

  16. PAK4: a pluripotent kinase that regulates prostate cancer cell adhesion

    PubMed Central

    Wells, Claire M.; Whale, Andrew D.; Parsons, Maddy; Masters, John R. W.; Jones, Gareth E.

    2010-01-01

    Hepatocyte growth factor (HGF) is associated with tumour progression and increases the invasiveness of prostate carcinoma cells. Migration and invasion require coordinated reorganisation of the actin cytoskeleton and regulation of cell-adhesion dynamics. Rho-family GTPases orchestrate both of these cellular processes. p21-activated kinase 4 (PAK4), a specific effector of the Rho GTPase Cdc42, is activated by HGF, and we have previously shown that activated PAK4 induces a loss of both actin stress fibres and focal adhesions. We now report that DU145 human prostate cancer cells with reduced levels of PAK4 expression are unable to successfully migrate in response to HGF, have prominent actin stress fibres, and an increase in the size and number of focal adhesions. Moreover, these cells have a concomitant reduction in cell-adhesion turnover rates. We find that PAK4 is localised at focal adhesions, is immunoprecipitated with paxillin and phosphorylates paxillin on serine 272. Furthermore, we demonstrate that PAK4 can regulate RhoA activity via GEF-H1. Our results suggest that PAK4 is a pluripotent kinase that can regulate both actin cytoskeletal rearrangement and focal-adhesion dynamics. PMID:20406887

  17. Galectin-1-mediated cell adhesion, invasion and cell death in human anaplastic large cell lymphoma: regulatory roles of cell surface glycans.

    PubMed

    Suzuki, Osamu; Abe, Masafumi

    2014-05-01

    steric hindrance. The adhesive capacity of H-ALCL cells is regulated by phosphatidylinositol 3 phosphate kinase (PI3K) and actin cytoskeleton, and the invasive capacity of H-ALCL cells is regulated by PI3K, mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK), Rho and actin cytoskeleton. Furthermore, galectin-1-induced cell death in H-ALCL cells was accompanied by inhibition of CD45 protein tyrosine phosphatase (PTP) activity. In conclusion, cell adhesion and invasion to galectin-1 appeared to be regulated by cell surface sialylation and N-glycosylation, and galectin-1 regulates cell death through inhibition of CD45 PTP activity of H-ALCL. PMID:24589677

  18. Galectin-1-mediated cell adhesion, invasion and cell death in human anaplastic large cell lymphoma: regulatory roles of cell surface glycans.

    PubMed

    Suzuki, Osamu; Abe, Masafumi

    2014-05-01

    steric hindrance. The adhesive capacity of H-ALCL cells is regulated by phosphatidylinositol 3 phosphate kinase (PI3K) and actin cytoskeleton, and the invasive capacity of H-ALCL cells is regulated by PI3K, mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK), Rho and actin cytoskeleton. Furthermore, galectin-1-induced cell death in H-ALCL cells was accompanied by inhibition of CD45 protein tyrosine phosphatase (PTP) activity. In conclusion, cell adhesion and invasion to galectin-1 appeared to be regulated by cell surface sialylation and N-glycosylation, and galectin-1 regulates cell death through inhibition of CD45 PTP activity of H-ALCL.

  19. Modulation of cell adhesion, proliferation and differentiation on materials designed for body implants.

    PubMed

    Bacakova, Lucie; Filova, Elena; Parizek, Martin; Ruml, Tomas; Svorcik, Vaclav

    2011-01-01

    The interaction of cells and tissues with artificial materials designed for applications in biotechnologies and in medicine is governed by the physical and chemical properties of the material surface. There is optimal cell adhesion to moderately hydrophilic and positively charged substrates, due to the adsorption of cell adhesion-mediating molecules (e.g. vitronectin, fibronectin) in an advantageous geometrical conformation, which makes specific sites on these molecules (e.g. specific amino acid sequences) accessible to cell adhesion receptors (e.g. integrins). Highly hydrophilic surfaces prevent the adsorption of proteins, or these molecules are bound very weakly. On highly hydrophobic materials, however, proteins are adsorbed in rigid and denatured forms, hampering cell adhesion. The wettability of the material surface, particularly in synthetic polymers, can be effectively regulated by physical treatments, e.g. by irradiation with ions, plasma or UV light. The irradiation-activated material surface can be functionalized by various biomolecules and nanoparticles, and this further enhances its attractiveness for cells and its effectiveness in regulating cell functions. Another important factor for cell-material interaction is surface roughness and surface topography. Nanostructured substrates (i.e. substrates with irregularities smaller than 100nm), are generally considered to be beneficial for cell adhesion and growth, while microstructured substrates behave more controversially (e.g. they can hamper cell spreading and proliferation but they enhance cell differentiation, particularly in osteogenic cells). A factor which has been relatively less investigated, but which is essential for cell-material interaction, is material deformability. Highly soft and deformable substrates cannot resist the tractional forces generated by cells during cell adhesion, and cells are not able to attach, spread and survive on such materials. Local variation in the physical and

  20. CKIP-1 ameliorates high glucose-induced expression of fibronectin and intercellular cell adhesion molecule-1 by activating the Nrf2/ARE pathway in glomerular mesangial cells.

    PubMed

    Gong, Wenyan; Chen, Cheng; Xiong, Fengxiao; Yang, Zhiying; Wang, Yu; Huang, Junying; Liu, Peiqing; Huang, Heqing

    2016-09-15

    Glucose and lipid metabolism disorders as well as oxidative stress (OSS) play important roles in diabetic nephropathy (DN). Glucose and lipid metabolic dysfunctions are the basic pathological changes of chronic microvascular complications of diabetes mellitus, such as DN. OSS can lead to the accumulation of extracellular matrix and inflammatory factors which will accelerate the progress of DN. Casein kinase 2 interacting protein-1 (CKIP-1) mediates adipogenesis, cell proliferation and inflammation under many circumstances. However, whether CKIP-1 is involved in the development of DN remains unknown. Here, we show that CKIP-1 is a novel regulator of resisting the development of DN and the underlying molecular mechanism is related to activating the nuclear factor E2-related factor 2 (Nrf2)/antioxidant response element (ARE) antioxidative stress pathway. The following findings were obtained: (1) The treatment of glomerular mesangial cells (GMCs) with high glucose (HG) decreased CKIP-1 levels in a time-dependent manner; (2) CKIP-1 overexpression dramatically reduced fibronectin (FN) and intercellular adhesionmolecule-1 (ICAM-1) expression. Depletion of CKIP-1 further induced the production of FN and ICAM-1; (3) CKIP-1 promoted the nuclear accumulation, DNA binding, and transcriptional activity of Nrf2. Moreover, CKIP-1 upregulated the expression of Nrf2 downstream genes, heme oxygenase (HO-1) and superoxide dismutase 1 (SOD1); and ultimately decreased the levels of reactive oxygen species (ROS). The molecular mechanisms clarify that the advantageous effect of CKIP-1 on DN are well connected with the activation of the Nrf2/ARE antioxidative stress pathway. PMID:27481061

  1. Amplified effect of surface charge on cell adhesion by nanostructures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Li-Ping; Meng, Jingxin; Zhang, Shuaitao; Ma, Xinlei; Wang, Shutao

    2016-06-01

    Nano-biointerfaces with varied surface charge can be readily fabricated by integrating a template-based process with maleimide-thiol coupling chemistry. Significantly, nanostructures are employed for amplifying the effect of surface charge on cell adhesion, as revealed by the cell-adhesion performance, cell morphology and corresponding cytoskeletal organization. This study may provide a promising strategy for developing new biomedical materials with tailored cell adhesion for tissue implantation and regeneration.Nano-biointerfaces with varied surface charge can be readily fabricated by integrating a template-based process with maleimide-thiol coupling chemistry. Significantly, nanostructures are employed for amplifying the effect of surface charge on cell adhesion, as revealed by the cell-adhesion performance, cell morphology and corresponding cytoskeletal organization. This study may provide a promising strategy for developing new biomedical materials with tailored cell adhesion for tissue implantation and regeneration. Electronic supplementary information (ESI) available: Experimental details, SEM, KFM AFM, chemical modification and characterization. See DOI: 10.1039/c6nr00649c

  2. Local 3D matrix microenvironment regulates cell migration through spatiotemporal dynamics of contractility-dependent adhesions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Doyle, Andrew D.; Carvajal, Nicole; Jin, Albert; Matsumoto, Kazue; Yamada, Kenneth M.

    2015-11-01

    The physical properties of two-dimensional (2D) extracellular matrices (ECMs) modulate cell adhesion dynamics and motility, but little is known about the roles of local microenvironmental differences in three-dimensional (3D) ECMs. Here we generate 3D collagen gels of varying matrix microarchitectures to characterize their regulation of 3D adhesion dynamics and cell migration. ECMs containing bundled fibrils demonstrate enhanced local adhesion-scale stiffness and increased adhesion stability through balanced ECM/adhesion coupling, whereas highly pliable reticular matrices promote adhesion retraction. 3D adhesion dynamics are locally regulated by ECM rigidity together with integrin/ECM association and myosin II contractility. Unlike 2D migration, abrogating contractility stalls 3D migration regardless of ECM pore size. We find force is not required for clustering of activated integrins on 3D native collagen fibrils. We propose that efficient 3D migration requires local balancing of contractility with ECM stiffness to stabilize adhesions, which facilitates the detachment of activated integrins from ECM fibrils.

  3. Local 3D matrix microenvironment regulates cell migration through spatiotemporal dynamics of contractility-dependent adhesions.

    PubMed

    Doyle, Andrew D; Carvajal, Nicole; Jin, Albert; Matsumoto, Kazue; Yamada, Kenneth M

    2015-01-01

    The physical properties of two-dimensional (2D) extracellular matrices (ECMs) modulate cell adhesion dynamics and motility, but little is known about the roles of local microenvironmental differences in three-dimensional (3D) ECMs. Here we generate 3D collagen gels of varying matrix microarchitectures to characterize their regulation of 3D adhesion dynamics and cell migration. ECMs containing bundled fibrils demonstrate enhanced local adhesion-scale stiffness and increased adhesion stability through balanced ECM/adhesion coupling, whereas highly pliable reticular matrices promote adhesion retraction. 3D adhesion dynamics are locally regulated by ECM rigidity together with integrin/ECM association and myosin II contractility. Unlike 2D migration, abrogating contractility stalls 3D migration regardless of ECM pore size. We find force is not required for clustering of activated integrins on 3D native collagen fibrils. We propose that efficient 3D migration requires local balancing of contractility with ECM stiffness to stabilize adhesions, which facilitates the detachment of activated integrins from ECM fibrils. PMID:26548801

  4. Local 3D matrix microenvironment regulates cell migration through spatiotemporal dynamics of contractility-dependent adhesions

    PubMed Central

    Doyle, Andrew D.; Carvajal, Nicole; Jin, Albert; Matsumoto, Kazue; Yamada, Kenneth M.

    2015-01-01

    The physical properties of two-dimensional (2D) extracellular matrices (ECMs) modulate cell adhesion dynamics and motility, but little is known about the roles of local microenvironmental differences in three-dimensional (3D) ECMs. Here we generate 3D collagen gels of varying matrix microarchitectures to characterize their regulation of 3D adhesion dynamics and cell migration. ECMs containing bundled fibrils demonstrate enhanced local adhesion-scale stiffness and increased adhesion stability through balanced ECM/adhesion coupling, whereas highly pliable reticular matrices promote adhesion retraction. 3D adhesion dynamics are locally regulated by ECM rigidity together with integrin/ECM association and myosin II contractility. Unlike 2D migration, abrogating contractility stalls 3D migration regardless of ECM pore size. We find force is not required for clustering of activated integrins on 3D native collagen fibrils. We propose that efficient 3D migration requires local balancing of contractility with ECM stiffness to stabilize adhesions, which facilitates the detachment of activated integrins from ECM fibrils. PMID:26548801

  5. Higher-order architecture of cell adhesion mediated by polymorphic synaptic adhesion molecules neurexin and neuroligin.

    PubMed

    Tanaka, Hiroki; Miyazaki, Naoyuki; Matoba, Kyoko; Nogi, Terukazu; Iwasaki, Kenji; Takagi, Junichi

    2012-07-26

    Polymorphic adhesion molecules neurexin and neuroligin (NL) mediate asymmetric trans-synaptic adhesion, which is crucial for synapse development and function. It is not known whether or how individual synapse function is controlled by the interactions between variants and isoforms of these molecules with differing ectodomain regions. At a physiological concentration of Ca(2+), the ectodomain complex of neurexin-1 β isoform (Nrx1β) and NL1 spontaneously assembled into crystals of a lateral sheet-like superstructure topologically compatible with transcellular adhesion. Correlative light-electron microscopy confirmed extracellular sheet formation at the junctions between Nrx1β- and NL1-expressing non-neuronal cells, mimicking the close, parallel synaptic membrane apposition. The same NL1-expressing cells, however, did not form this higher-order architecture with cells expressing the much longer neurexin-1 α isoform, suggesting a functional discrimination mechanism between synaptic contacts made by different isoforms of neurexin variants.

  6. CCN4 induces vascular cell adhesion molecule-1 expression in human synovial fibroblasts and promotes monocyte adhesion.

    PubMed

    Liu, Ju-Fang; Hou, Sheng-Mou; Tsai, Chun-Hao; Huang, Chun-Yin; Hsu, Chin-Jung; Tang, Chih-Hsin

    2013-05-01

    CCN4 is a cysteine-rich protein that belongs to the Cyr61, CTGF, Nov family of matricellular proteins. Here, we investigated the intracellular signaling pathways involved in CCN4-induced vascular cell adhesion molecule-1 expression in human osteoarthritis synovial fibroblasts. Stimulation of OASFs with CCN4 induced VCAM-1 expression. CCN4-induced VCAM-1 expression was attenuated by αvβ5 or α6β1 integrin antibody, Syk inhibitor, PKCδ inhibitor (rottlerin), JNK inhibitor (SP600125), and AP-1 inhibitors (curcumin and tanshinone). Stimulation of cells with CCN4 increased Syk, PKCδ, and JNK activation. Treatment of OASFs with CCN4 also increased c-Jun phosphorylation, AP-1-luciferase activity, and c-Jun binding to the AP-1 element in the VCAM-1 promoter. Moreover, up-regulation of VCAM-1 increased the adhesion of monocytes to OASF monolayers, and this adhesion was attenuated by transfection with a VCAM-1 siRNA. Our results suggest that CCN4 increases VCAM-1 expression in human OASFs via the Syk, PKCδ, JNK, c-Jun, and AP-1 signaling pathways. The CCN4-induced VCAM-1 expression promoted monocyte adhesion to human OASFs. PMID:23313051

  7. Mobilization of NK cells by exercise: downmodulation of adhesion molecules on NK cells by catecholamines.

    PubMed

    Nagao, F; Suzui, M; Takeda, K; Yagita, H; Okumura, K

    2000-10-01

    The change of plasma catecholamine concentration correlates with the change of natural killer (NK) activity and NK cell number in peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) during and after moderate exercise. We studied the causal relation between exercise-induced catecholamine and expression of adhesion molecules on NK cells during and after exercise. The expression of CD44 and CD18 on CD3(-)CD56(+) NK cells was significantly reduced during exercise (P < 0.01). When PBMC were stimulated with 10(-8)M norepinephrine in vitro, the expression of these adhesion molecules on CD3(-)CD56(+) NK cells was downmodulated within 30 min. The binding capacity of NK cells to a CD44 ligand, hyaluronate, was reduced by the stimulation with norepinephrine (P < 0.01). The intravenous injection of norepinephrine in mice decreased the expression of CD44 and CD18 on CD3(-)NK1.1(+) cells (P < 0.01) and increased the number of CD3(-)NK1.1(+) cells in PBMC (P < 0.01). These findings suggest that exercise-induced catecholamines modulate the expression of adhesion molecules on NK cells, resulting in the mobilization of NK cells into the circulation. PMID:11003990

  8. Why do receptor-ligand bonds in cell adhesion cluster into discrete focal-adhesion sites?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gao, Zhiwen; Gao, Yanfei

    2016-10-01

    Cell adhesion often exhibits the clustering of the receptor-ligand bonds into discrete focal-adhesion sites near the contact edge, thus resembling a rosette shape or a contracting membrane anchored by a small number of peripheral forces. The ligands on the extracellular matrix are immobile, and the receptors in the cell plasma membrane consist of two types: high-affinity integrins (that bond to the substrate ligands and are immobile) and low-affinity integrins (that are mobile and not bonded to the ligands). Thus the adhesion energy density is proportional to the high-affinity integrin density. This paper provides a mechanistic explanation for the clustering/assembling of the receptor-ligand bonds from two main points: (1) the cellular contractile force leads to the density evolution of these two types of integrins, and results into a large high-affinity integrin density near the contact edge and (2) the front of a propagating crack into a decreasing toughness field will be unstable and wavy. From this fracture mechanics perspective, the chemomechanical equilibrium is reached when a small number of patches with large receptor-ligand bond density are anticipated to form at the cell periphery, as opposed to a uniform distribution of bonds on the entire interface. Cohesive fracture simulations show that the de-adhesion force can be significantly enhanced by this nonuniform bond density field, but the de-adhesion force anisotropy due to the substrate elastic anisotropy is significantly reduced.

  9. Antcin K, an Active Triterpenoid from the Fruiting Bodies of Basswood-Cultivated Antrodia cinnamomea, Inhibits Metastasis via Suppression of Integrin-Mediated Adhesion, Migration, and Invasion in Human Hepatoma Cells.

    PubMed

    Huang, Ya-Ling; Chu, Yung-Lin; Ho, Chi-Tang; Chung, Jing-Gung; Lai, Chiao-I; Su, Yu-Cheng; Kuo, Yueh-Hsiung; Sheen, Lee-Yan

    2015-05-13

    Previous research demonstrated that the ethyl acetate extract from Antrodia cinnamomea suppresses the invasive potential of human breast and hepatoma cells, but the effective compounds are not identified. The main bioactive compounds of A. cinnamomea are ergostane-type triterpenoids, and the content of antcin K is the highest. The objective of this study was to evaluate the antimetastatic activity and mechanisms of antcin K purified from the fruiting body of basswood-cultivated A. cinnamomea on human liver cancer Hep 3B cells. The results showed that adhesion, migration, and invasion of Hep 3B cells were effectively inhibited by antcin K within 24 h of treatment. Antcin K not only reduced the protein expression and activity of MMP-2 and MMP-9 but also down-regulated vimentin and up-regulated E-cadherin in Hep 3B cells. In depth investigation for the molecular mechanism revealed that antcin K could reduce the protein expression of integrin β1, β3, α5, and αv and suppress phosphorylation of FAK, Src, PI3K, AKT, MEK, ERK, and JNK. These results suggested that antcin K was able to inhibit the metastasis of human hepatoma cells through suppression of integrin-mediated adhesion, migration, and invasion. Coupled with these findings, antcin K has a good potential to reduce the risk of liver cancer metastasis. PMID:25911944

  10. Cell adhesion in zebrafish myogenesis: distribution of intermediate filaments, microfilaments, intracellular adhesion structures and extracellular matrix.

    PubMed

    Costa, Manoel L; Escaleira, Roberta C; Jazenko, Fernanda; Mermelstein, Claudia S

    2008-10-01

    To overcome the limitations of in vitro studies, we have been studying myogenesis in situ in zebrafish embryos, at a sub-cellular level. While in previous works we focused on myofibrillogenesis and some aspects of adhesion structures, here we describe in more detail cell adhesion structures and interactions among cytoskeletal components, membrane and extracellular matrix during zebrafish muscle development. We studied the intermediate filaments, and we describe the full range of desmin distribution in zebrafish development, from perinuclear to striated, until its deposition around the intersomite septa of older somites. This adhesion structure, positive for desmin and actin, has not been previously observed in myogenesis in vitro. We also show that actin is initially located in the intersomite septum region whereas it is confined to the myofibrils later on. While actin localization changes during development, the adhesion complex proteins vinculin, paxillin, talin, dystrophin, laminin and fibronectin always appear exclusively at the intersomite septa, and appear to be co-distributed, even though the extracellular proteins accumulates before the intracellular ones. Contrary to the adhesion proteins, that are continuously distributed, desmin and sarcomeric actin form triangular aggregates among the septa and the cytoskeleton. We studied the cytoskeletal linker plectin as well, and we show that it has a distribution similar to desmin and not to actin. We conclude that the in situ adhesion structures differ from their in vitro counterparts, and that the actual zebrafish embryo myogenesis is quite different than that which occurs in in vitro systems.

  11. Single-cell force spectroscopy of pili-mediated adhesion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sullan, Ruby May A.; Beaussart, Audrey; Tripathi, Prachi; Derclaye, Sylvie; El-Kirat-Chatel, Sofiane; Li, James K.; Schneider, Yves-Jacques; Vanderleyden, Jos; Lebeer, Sarah; Dufrêne, Yves F.

    2013-12-01

    Although bacterial pili are known to mediate cell adhesion to a variety of substrates, the molecular interactions behind this process are poorly understood. We report the direct measurement of the forces guiding pili-mediated adhesion, focusing on the medically important probiotic bacterium Lactobacillus rhamnosus GG (LGG). Using non-invasive single-cell force spectroscopy (SCFS), we quantify the adhesion forces between individual bacteria and biotic (mucin, intestinal cells) or abiotic (hydrophobic monolayers) surfaces. On hydrophobic surfaces, bacterial pili strengthen adhesion through remarkable nanospring properties, which - presumably - enable the bacteria to resist high shear forces under physiological conditions. On mucin, nanosprings are more frequent and adhesion forces larger, reflecting the influence of specific pili-mucin bonds. Interestingly, these mechanical responses are no longer observed on human intestinal Caco-2 cells. Rather, force curves exhibit constant force plateaus with extended ruptures reflecting the extraction of membrane nanotethers. These single-cell analyses provide novel insights into the molecular mechanisms by which piliated bacteria colonize surfaces (nanosprings, nanotethers), and offer exciting avenues in nanomedicine for understanding and controlling the adhesion of microbial cells (probiotics, pathogens).

  12. Regulation of promyogenic signal transduction by cell-cell contact and adhesion

    SciTech Connect

    Krauss, Robert S.

    2010-11-01

    Skeletal myoblast differentiation involves acquisition of the muscle-specific transcriptional program and morphological changes, including fusion into multinucleated myofibers. Differentiation is regulated by extracellular signaling cues, including cell-cell contact and adhesion. Cadherin and Ig adhesion receptors have been implicated in distinct but overlapping stages of myogenesis. N-cadherin signals through the Ig receptor Cdo to activate p38 MAP kinase, while the Ig receptor neogenin signals to activate FAK; both processes promote muscle-specific gene expression and myoblast fusion. M-cadherin activates Rac1 to enhance fusion. Specific Ig receptors (Kirre and Sns) are essential for myoblast fusion in Drosophila, also signaling through Rac, and vertebrate orthologs of Kirre and Sns have partially conserved function. Mice lacking specific cytoplasmic signaling factors activated by multiple receptors (e.g., Rac1) have strong muscle phenotypes in vivo. In contrast, mice lacking individual adhesion receptors that lie upstream of these factors have modest phenotypes. Redundancy among receptors may account for this. Many of the mammalian Ig receptors and cadherins associate with each other, and multivalent interactions within these complexes may require removal of multiple components to reveal dramatic defects in vivo. Nevertheless, it is possible that the murine adhesion receptors rate-limiting in vivo have not yet been identified or fully assessed.

  13. Adhesion of Human B Cells to Germinal Centers in Vitro Involves VLA-4 and INCAM-110

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Freedman, Arnold S.; Munro, J. Michael; Rice, G. Edgar; Bevilacqua, Michael P.; Morimoto, Chikao; McIntyre, Bradley W.; Rhynhart, Kurt; Pober, Jordan S.; Nadler, Lee M.

    1990-08-01

    Human B lymphocytes localize and differentiate within the microenvironment of lymphoid germinal centers. A frozen section binding assay was developed for the identification of those molecules involved in the adhesive interactions between B cells and lymphoid follicles. Activated human B cells and B cell lines were found to selectively adhere to germinal centers. The VLA-4 molecule on the lymphocyte and the adhesion molecule INCAM-110, expressed on follicular dendritic cells, supported this interaction. This cellular interaction model can be used for the study of how B cells differentiate.

  14. Extracellular matrix-anchored serum amyloid A preferentially induces mast cell adhesion.

    PubMed

    Hershkoviz, R; Preciado-Patt, L; Lider, O; Fridkin, M; Dastych, J; Metcalfe, D D; Mekori, Y A

    1997-07-01

    Mast cells are known to accumulate in various inflammatory processes, some of which are known to be associated with increased local and systemic levels of acute-phase reactants such as serum amyloid A (SAA) or with amyloid deposition. The mechanism(s) by which mast cells are recruited to these sites, however, has not been fully elucidated. It has recently been shown that SAA interacts with extracellular matrix (ECM) components and thereby acts as a chemoattractant and regulator of immune cell migration. On the basis of these observations, we examined the effect of SAA on mast cell adhesion to ECM, an essential step in cellular transmigration. We could first demonstrate strong specific binding of recombinant human SAA (rSAA) to murine mast cells using flow cytometry. Moreover, radiolabeled rSAA was found to bind, in a saturable manner, to mast cells, reaching a binding affinity of 10(-8) M. When immobilized by preincubation with ECM, SAA or its proteolytically degraded amyloid A fragment (amino acid residues 2-82), which contains RGD-related adhesion motif but not the COOH-terminal portion of SAA (amino acid residues 77-104), induced the adhesion of resting mast cells to ECM or laminin. SAA and AA, in soluble or immobilized forms, did not activate mast cells to release mediators. Mast cell adhesion to the immobilized ECM-SAA complex appeared to occur through an integrin recognition, inasmuch as adhesion was calcium dependent and could be blocked by an RGD-containing peptide or by anti-CD29 monoclonal antibody. Genistein also inhibited adhesion, indicating that tyrosine kinase activity was involved. These data suggest that SAA bound to ECM may serve as an important inducer of mast cell adhesion, thus regulating mast cell recruitment and accumulation at these sites, which in turn could potentiate further pathology. PMID:9252455

  15. Cell adhesion molecules and in vitro fertilization.

    PubMed

    Simopoulou, Maria; Nikolopoulou, Elena; Dimakakos, Andreas; Charalabopoulos, Konstantinos; Koutsilieris, Michael

    2014-01-01

    This review addresses issues regarding the need in the in vitro fertilization (IVF) field for further predictive markers enhancing the standing embryo selection criteria. It aims to serve as a source of defining information for an audience interested in factors related to the wide range of multiple roles played by cell adhesion molecules (CAMs) in several aspects of IVF ultimately associated with the success of an IVF cycle. We begin by stressing the importance of enriching the standing embryo selection criteria available aiming for the golden standard: "extract as much information as possible focusing on non-invasive techniques" so as to guide us towards selecting the embryo with the highest implantation potential. We briefly describe the latest trends on how to best select the right embryo, moving closer towards elective single embryo transfer. These trends are: frozen embryo transfer for all, preimplantation genetic screening, non-invasive selection criteria, and time-lapse imaging. The main part of this review is dedicated to categorizing and presenting published research studies focused on the involvement of CAMs in IVF and its final outcome. Specifically, we discuss the association of CAMs with conditions and complications that arise from performing assisted reproductive techniques, such as ovarian hyperstimulation syndrome, the state of the endometrium, and tubal pregnancies, as well as the levels of CAMs in biological materials available in the IVF laboratory such as follicular fluid, trophectoderm, ovarian granulosa cells, oocytes, and embryos. To conclude, since CAMs have been successfully employed as a diagnostic tool in several pathologies in routine clinical work, we suggest that their multi-faceted nature could serve as a prognostic marker in assisted reproduction, aiming to enrich the list of non-invasive selection and predictive criteria in the IVF setting. We propose that in light of the well-documented involvement of CAMs in the developmental

  16. Quantifying Cell Adhesion through Impingement of a Controlled Microjet

    PubMed Central

    Visser, Claas Willem; Gielen, Marise V.; Hao, Zhenxia; Le Gac, Séverine; Lohse, Detlef; Sun, Chao

    2015-01-01

    The impingement of a submerged, liquid jet onto a cell-covered surface allows assessing cell attachment on surfaces in a straightforward and quantitative manner and in real time, yielding valuable information on cell adhesion. However, this approach is insufficiently characterized for reliable and routine use. In this work, we both model and measure the shear stress exerted by the jet on the impingement surface in the micrometer-domain, and subsequently correlate this to jet-induced cell detachment. The measured and numerically calculated shear stress data are in good agreement with each other, and with previously published values. Real-time monitoring of the cell detachment reveals the creation of a circular cell-free area upon jet impingement, with two successive detachment regimes: 1), a dynamic regime, during which the cell-free area grows as a function of both the maximum shear stress exerted by the jet and the jet diameter; followed by 2), a stationary regime, with no further evolution of the cell-free area. For the latter regime, which is relevant for cell adhesion strength assessment, a relationship between the jet Reynolds number, the cell-free area, and the cell adhesion strength is proposed. To illustrate the capability of the technique, the adhesion strength of HeLa cervical cancer cells is determined ((34 ± 14) N/m2). Real-time visualization of cell detachment in the dynamic regime shows that cells detach either cell-by-cell or by collectively (for which intact parts of the monolayer detach as cell sheets). This process is dictated by the cell monolayer density, with a typical threshold of (1.8 ± 0.2) × 109 cells/m2, above which the collective behavior is mostly observed. The jet impingement method presents great promises for the field of tissue engineering, as the influence of both the shear stress and the surface characteristics on cell adhesion can be systematically studied. PMID:25564849

  17. Effect of oligosaccharides on the adhesion of gut bacteria to human HT-29 cells.

    PubMed

    Altamimi, M; Abdelhay, O; Rastall, R A

    2016-06-01

    The influence of five oligosaccharides (cellobiose, stachyose, raffinose, lactulose and chito-oligosaccharides) on the adhesion of eight gut bacteria (Bifidobacterium bifidum ATCC 29521, Bacteroides thetaiotaomicron ATCC 29148D-5, Clostridium leptum ATCC 29065, Blautia coccoides ATCC 29236, Faecalibacterium prausnitzii ATCC 27766, Bacteroides fragilis ATCC 23745, Clostridium difficile ATCC 43255 and Lactobacillus casei ATCC 393) to mucous secreting and non-mucous secreting HT-29 human epithelial cells, was investigated. In pure culture, the bacteria showed variations in their ability to adhere to epithelial cells. The effect of oligosaccharides diminished adhesion and the presence of mucus played a major factor in adhesion, likely due to high adhesiveness to mucins present in the native human mucus layer covering the whole cell surface. However, clostridia displayed almost the same level of adhesion either with or without mucus being present. Bl. coccoides adhesion was decreased by stachyose and cellobiose in non-mucus-secreting cells in pure culture, while in mixed faecal culture cellobiose displayed the highest antiadhesive activity with an overall average of 65% inhibition amongst tested oligomers and lactulose displayed the lowest with an average of 47.4%. Bifidobacteria, Bacteroides, lactobacilli and clostridia were inhibited within the following ranges 47-78%, 32-65%, 11.7-58% and 64-85% respectively. This means that clostridia were the most strongly influenced members of the microflora amongst the bacterial groups tested in mixed culture. In conclusion, introducing oligosaccharides which are candidate prebiotics into pure or mixed cultures has affected bacterial adhesion. PMID:27018325

  18. PAK4 promotes kinase-independent stabilization of RhoU to modulate cell adhesion

    PubMed Central

    Dart, Anna E.; Box, Gary M.; Court, William; Gale, Madeline E.; Brown, John P.; Pinder, Sarah E.; Eccles, Suzanne A.

    2015-01-01

    P21-activated kinase 4 (PAK4) is a Cdc42 effector protein thought to regulate cell adhesion disassembly in a kinase-dependent manner. We found that PAK4 expression is significantly higher in high-grade human breast cancer patient samples, whereas depletion of PAK4 modifies cell adhesion dynamics of breast cancer cells. Surprisingly, systematic analysis of PAK4 functionality revealed that PAK4-driven adhesion turnover is neither dependent on Cdc42 binding nor kinase activity. Rather, reduced expression of PAK4 leads to a concomitant loss of RhoU expression. We report that RhoU is targeted for ubiquitination by the Rab40A–Cullin 5 complex and demonstrate that PAK4 protects RhoU from ubiquitination in a kinase-independent manner. Overexpression of RhoU rescues the PAK4 depletion phenotype, whereas loss of RhoU expression reduces cell adhesion turnover and migration. These data support a new kinase-independent mechanism for PAK4 function, where an important role of PAK4 in cellular adhesions is to stabilize RhoU protein levels. Thus, PAK4 and RhoU cooperate to drive adhesion turnover and promote cell migration. PMID:26598620

  19. Crystal violet staining to quantify Candida adhesion to epithelial cells.

    PubMed

    Negri, M; Gonçalves, V; Silva, S; Henriques, M; Azeredo, J; Oliveira, R

    2010-01-01

    In vitro studies of adhesion capability are essential to characterise the virulence of Candida species. However, the assessment of adhesion by traditional methods is time-consuming. The aim of the present study is the development of a simple methodology using crystal violet staining to quantify in vitro adhesion of different Candida species to epithelial cells. The experiments are performed using Candida albicans (ATCC 90028), C. glabrata (ATCC 2001), C. parapsilosis (ATCC 22019) and C. tropicalis (ATCC 750). A human urinary bladder epithelial cell line (TCC-SUP) is used. Yeast and epithelial cells were stained with crystal violet, epithelial cells were then destained using intermediate washing, and the dye in the yeast cells was extracted with acetic acid. The method was validated for the different Candida reference species by comparison with traditional microscope observation and enumeration. The method was then used to assess Candida adhesion to epithelial cells and also to silicone. For all Candida spp. high correlation values (r2= 0.9724-0.9997) between the number of adherent yeasts (microscope enumeration) and absorbance values were obtained for an inoculum concentration >10(6) cells/mL. The proposed technique was easy to perform and reproducible, enabling the determination of adhesion ability of Candida species to an epithelial cell line. PMID:20973406

  20. Vascular Endothelial-Cadherin Regulates Cytoskeletal Tension, Cell Spreading, and Focal Adhesions by Stimulating RhoAD⃞

    PubMed Central

    Nelson, Celeste M.; Pirone, Dana M.; Tan, John L.; Chen, Christopher S.

    2004-01-01

    Changes in vascular endothelial (VE)-cadherin–mediated cell-cell adhesion and integrin-mediated cell-matrix adhesion coordinate to affect the physical and mechanical rearrangements of the endothelium, although the mechanisms for such cross talk remain undefined. Herein, we describe the regulation of focal adhesion formation and cytoskeletal tension by intercellular VE-cadherin engagement, and the molecular mechanism by which this occurs. Increasing the density of endothelial cells to increase cell-cell contact decreased focal adhesions by decreasing cell spreading. This contact inhibition of cell spreading was blocked by disrupting VE-cadherin engagement with an adenovirus encoding dominant negative VE-cadherin. When changes in cell spreading were prevented by culturing cells on a micropatterned substrate, VE-cadherin–mediated cell-cell contact paradoxically increased focal adhesion formation. We show that VE-cadherin engagement mediates each of these effects by inducing both a transient and sustained activation of RhoA. Both the increase and decrease in cell-matrix adhesion were blocked by disrupting intracellular tension and signaling through the Rho-ROCK pathway. In all, these findings demonstrate that VE-cadherin signals through RhoA and the actin cytoskeleton to cross talk with cell-matrix adhesion and thereby define a novel pathway by which cell-cell contact alters the global mechanical and functional state of cells. PMID:15075376

  1. Chloroform extract of aged black garlic attenuates TNF-α-induced ROS generation, VCAM-1 expression, NF-κB activation and adhesiveness for monocytes in human umbilical vein endothelial cells.

    PubMed

    Lee, Eun Na; Choi, Young Whan; Kim, Hye Kyung; Park, Jin Kyeong; Kim, Hyo Jin; Kim, Myoung June; Lee, Hee Woo; Kim, Ki-Hyung; Bae, Sun Sik; Kim, Bong Seon; Yoon, Sik

    2011-01-01

    Aged black garlic is a type of fermented garlic (Allium sativum) which has been used in Oriental countries for a long time because of various biological properties of garlic derivatives. The current study explored the potential of the chloroform extract of aged black garlic (CEABG) in attenuating the activities of adhesion molecules in tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α)-stimulated human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs). The study was performed on HUVECs that were pretreated with 30 μg/mL of CEABG before TNF-α treatment. Treatment of HUVECs with CEABG significantly inhibited TNF-α-induced reactive oxygen species (ROS) formation. HUVECs treated with CEABG showed markedly suppressed TNF-α-induced mRNA expression of VCAM-1, but little alteration in ICAM-1 and E-selectin mRNA expression. CEABG treatment also significantly decreased the TNF-α-induced cell surface and total protein expression of VCAM-1 without affecting ICAM-1 and E-selectin expression. In addition, treatment of HUVECs with CEABG markedly reduced THP-1 monocyte adhesion to TNF-α-stimulated HUVECs. Furthermore, CEABG significantly inhibited NF-κB transcription factor activation in TNF-α-stimulated HUVECs. The data provide new evidence of the antiinflammatory properties of CEABG that may have a potential therapeutic use for the prevention and treatment of vascular diseases such as atherosclerosis through mechanisms involving the inhibition of VCAM-1 expression and NF-κB activation in vascular endothelial cells.

  2. Mutant p53 promotes ovarian cancer cell adhesion to mesothelial cells via integrin β4 and Akt signals

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Jong-Gyu; Ahn, Ji-Hye; Jin Kim, Tae; Ho Lee, Jae; Choi, Jung-Hye

    2015-01-01

    Missense mutations in the TP53 gene resulting in the accumulation of mutant proteins are extremely common in advanced ovarian cancer, which is characterised by peritoneal metastasis. Attachment of cancer cells to the peritoneal mesothelium is regarded as an initial, key step for the metastatic spread of ovarian cancer. In the present study, we investigated the possible role of a p53 mutant in the mesothelial adhesion of ovarian cancer cells. We found that OVCAR-3 cells with the R248 TP53 mutation (p53R248) were more adhesive to mesothelial Met5A cells than were A2780 cells expressing wild-type p53. In addition, ectopic expression of p53R248 in p53-null SKOV-3 cells significantly increased adhesion to Met5A cells. Knockdown of mutant p53 significantly compromised p53R248-induced cell adhesion to Met5A cells. Microarray analysis revealed that several adhesion-related genes, including integrin β4, were markedly up-regulated, and certain signalling pathways, including PI3K/Akt, were activated in p53R248 transfectants of SKOV-3 cells. Inhibition of integrin β4 and Akt signalling using blocking antibody and the inhibitor LY294002, respectively, significantly attenuated p53R248-mediated ovarian cancer-mesothelial adhesion. These data suggest that the p53R248 mutant endows ovarian cancer cells with increased adhesiveness and that integrin β4 and Akt signalling are associated with the mutation-enhanced ovarian cancer-mesothelial cell adhesion. PMID:26223322

  3. The pro-adhesive and pro-survival effects of glucocorticoid in human ovarian cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Yin, Lijuan; Fang, Fang; Song, Xinglei; Wang, Yan; Huang, Gaoxiang; Su, Jie; Hui, Ning; Lu, Jian

    2016-07-01

    Cell adhesion to extracellular matrix (ECM) is controlled by multiple signaling molecules and intracellular pathways, and is pivotal for survival and growth of cells from most solid tumors. Our previous works demonstrated that dexamethasone (DEX) significantly enhances cell adhesion and cell resistance to chemotherapeutics by increasing the levels of integrin β1, α4, and α5 in human ovarian cancer cells. However, it is unclear whether the components of ECM or other membrane molecules are also involved in the pro-adhesive effect of DEX in ovarian cancer cells. In this study, we demonstrated that the treatment of cells with DEX did not change the expression of collagens (I, III, and IV), laminin, CD44, and its principal ligand hyaluronan (HA), but significantly increased the levels of intracellular and secreted fibronectin (FN). Inhibiting the expression of FN with FN1 siRNA or blocking CD44, another FN receptor, with CD44 blocking antibody significantly attenuated the pro-adhesion of DEX, indicating that upregulation of FN mediates the pro-adhesive effect of DEX by its interaction with CD44 besides integrin β1. Moreover, DEX significantly enhanced cell resistance to the chemotherapeutic agent paclitaxel (PTX) by activating PI-3K-Akt pathway. Finally, we found that DEX also significantly upregulated the expression of MUC1, a transmembrane glycoprotein. Inhibiting the expression of MUC1 with MUC1 siRNA significantly attenuated the DEX-induced effects of pro-adhesion, Akt-activation, and pro-survival. In conclusion, these results provide new data that upregulation of FN and MUC1 by DEX contributes to DEX-induced pro-adhesion and protects ovarian cancer cells from chemotherapy. PMID:27151574

  4. The effect of starch-based biomaterials on leukocyte adhesion and activation in vitro.

    PubMed

    Marques, A P; Reis, R L; Hunt, J A

    2005-11-01

    Leukocyte adhesion to biomaterials has long been recognised as a key element to determine their inflammatory potential. Results regarding leukocyte adhesion and activation are contradictory in some aspects of the material's effect in determining these events. It is clear that together with the wettability or hydrophilicity/hydrophobicity, the roughness of a substrate has a major effect on leukocyte adhesion. Both the chemical and physical properties of a material influence the adsorbed proteins layer which in turn determines the adhesion of cells. In this work polymorphonuclear (PMN) cells and a mixed population of monocytes/macrophages and lymphocytes (mononuclear cells) were cultured separately with a range of starch-based materials and composites with hydroxyapatite (HA). A combination of both reflected light microscopy and scanning electron microscopy (SEM) was used in order to study the leukocyte morphology. The quantification of the enzyme lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) was used to determine the number of viable cells adhered to the polymers. Cell adhesion and activation was characterised by immunocytochemistry based on the expression of several adhesion molecules, crucial in the progress of an inflammatory response. This work supports previous in vitro studies with PMN and monocytes/macrophages, which demonstrated that there are several properties of the materials that can influence and determine their biological response. From our study, monocytes/macrophages and lymphocytes adhere in similar amounts to more hydrophobic (SPCL) and to moderately hydrophilic (SEVA-C) surfaces and do not preferentially adhere to rougher substrates (SCA). Contrarily, more hydrophilic surfaces (SCA) induced higher PMN adhesion and lower activation. In addition, the hydroxyapatite reinforcement induces changes in cell behaviour for some materials but not for others. The observed response to starch-based biodegradable polymers was not significantly different from the control

  5. Non-Cell-Adhesive Substrates for Printing of Arrayed Biomaterials

    PubMed Central

    Appel, Eric A.; Larson, Benjamin L.; Luly, Kathryn M.; Kim, Jinseong D.

    2015-01-01

    Cellular microarrays have become extremely useful in expediting the investigation of large libraries of (bio)materials for both in vitro and in vivo biomedical applications. We have developed an exceedingly simple strategy for the fabrication of non-cell-adhesive substrates supporting the immobilization of diverse (bio)material features, including both monomeric and polymeric adhesion molecules (e.g. RGD and polylysine), hydrogels, and polymers. PMID:25430948

  6. Dynamic interplay between adhesion surfaces in carcinomas: Cell-cell and cell-matrix crosstalk

    PubMed Central

    Smith, Yvonne E; Vellanki, Sri HariKrishna; Hopkins, Ann M

    2016-01-01

    Cell-cell and cell-matrix signaling and communication between adhesion sites involve mechanisms which are required for cellular functions during normal development and homeostasis; however these cellular functions and mechanisms are often deregulated in cancer. Aberrant signaling at cell-cell and cell-matrix adhesion sites often involves downstream mediators including Rho GTPases and tyrosine kinases. This review discusses these molecules as putative mediators of cellular crosstalk between cell-cell and cell-matrix adhesion sites, in addition to their attractiveness as therapeutic targets in cancer. Interestingly, inter-junctional crosstalk mechanisms are frequently typified by the way in which bacterial and viral pathogens opportunistically infect or intoxicate mammalian cells. This review therefore also discusses the concept of learning from pathogen-host interaction studies to better understand coordinated communication between cell-cell and cell-matrix adhesion sites, in addition to highlighting the potential therapeutic usefulness of exploiting pathogens or their products to tap into inter-junctional crosstalk. Taken together, we feel that increased knowledge around mechanisms of cell-cell and cell-matrix adhesion site crosstalk and consequently a greater understanding of their therapeutic targeting offers a unique opportunity to contribute to the emerging molecular revolution in cancer biology. PMID:26981196

  7. In vitro and in silico studies on cell adhesion protein peroxinectin from Fenneropenaeus indicus and screening of heme blockers against activity.

    PubMed

    Sivakamavalli, Jeyachandran; Selvaraj, Chandrabose; Singh, Sanjeev Kumar; Vaseeharan, Baskaralingam

    2016-05-01

    In invertebrates, the prophenoloxidase (proPO) pathway is involved in the phenol-like antioxidant production against invading pathogens. Overproduction of melanin and phenolic substances leads to the disruption of hemocytes (own host cells); therefore, there is a prerequisite to regulate the antioxidant production, which is performed by the proteases and proPO-associated cell adhesion protein peroxinectin (PX). PX is a macromolecular structure consisting of protein involved in the proPO pathway, which is a potential target in the regulatory mechanism in crustaceans. In the proPO cascade, pattern recognition proteins initiate the proPO cascade by the consequent reaction, and PX is involved in the key step in the regulatory mechanism of phenoloxidase enzyme synthesis. In the present study, Indian white shrimp Fenneropenaeus indicus PX (Fein-PX) gene sequence was used. Upregulation of Fein-PX was determined using immunostimulants β-glucan (agonists) and examined its expression by quantitative RT-PCR. To find the downregulation or negative regulation of Fein-PX, inhibitors were screened, and its 3D model provides molecular insights into the rationale inhibitor design for developing an effective molecule against Fein-PX. PMID:26686319

  8. Micropatterned surfaces for controlling cell adhesion and rolling under flow.

    PubMed

    Nalayanda, Divya D; Kalukanimuttam, Mahendran; Schmidtke, David W

    2007-04-01

    Cell adhesion and rolling on the vascular wall is critical to both inflammation and thrombosis. In this study we demonstrate the feasibility of using microfluidic patterning for controlling cell adhesion and rolling under physiological flow conditions. By controlling the width of the lines (50-1000 microm) and the spacing between them (50-100 microm) we were able to fabricate surfaces with well-defined patterns of adhesion molecules. We demonstrate the versatility of this technique by patterning surfaces with 3 different adhesion molecules (P-selectin, E-selectin, and von Willebrand Factor) and controlling the adhesion and rolling of three different cell types (neutrophils, Chinese Hamster Ovary cells, and platelets). By varying the concentration of the incubating solution we could control the surface ligand density and hence the cell rolling velocity. Finally by patterning surfaces with both P-selectin and von Willebrand Factor we could control the rolling of both leukocytes and platelets simultaneously. The technique described in this paper provides and effective and inexpensive way to fabricate patterned surfaces for use in cell rolling assays under physiologic flow conditions. PMID:17160704

  9. Mechanisms of lymphocyte adhesion to endothelial cells: studies using a LFA-1-deficient cell line.

    PubMed Central

    Haskard, D O; Strobel, S; Thornhill, M; Pitzalis, C; Levinsky, R J

    1989-01-01

    In order to investigate the role of lymphocyte function-associated antigen 1 (LFA-1) in lymphocyte adhesion to endothelial cells (EC), we have studied the adhesion of a LFA-1-deficient lymphoblastoid cell line, ICH-KM, which has < 10% of the cell surface LFA-1 expressed on a normal lymphoblastoid cell line, ICH-BJ. The adhesion of ICH-KM cells to unstimulated EC was 49.9 +/- 8.6% (mean +/- SD) that of ICH-BJ cells. Moreover, phorbol ester-stimulated ICH-KM cells showed a considerably weaker increase in adhesion to unstimulated EC compared with ICH-BJ cells (mean +/- SD increase in percentage adhesion, 3.8 +/- 2.3 compared with 18.5 +/- 8.0; P<0.025). In contrast, there was no significant difference between the enhanced adhesion of ICH-KM cells and ICH-BJ cells to interleukin-1 (IL-1)-stimulated EC. Thus ICH-KM cells showed a 22.7 +/- 11.0 (mean +/- SD) increase in percentage adhesion to IL-1-stimulated EC compared with the 24.8 +/- 8.5 increase in percentage adhesion of ICH-BJ cells. Anti-LFA-1 monoclonal antibodies had no effect on the enhanced adhesion of ICH-KM and ICH-BJ cells to IL-1-stimulated EC but abolished the differences in adhesion between the two cell lines. The study therefore indicates that although a major part of unstimulated and phorbol ester-stimulated lymphocyte-EC adhesion is dependent upon LFA-1, the enhanced adhesion due to stimulation of EC with IL-1 is not dependent upon this molecule. The data therefore supports the existence of cytokine-inducible LFA-1-independent adhesion molecules for lymphocytes on EC. PMID:15493272

  10. Promotion of neural cell adhesion by electrochemically generated and functionalized polymer films.

    PubMed

    Blau, A; Weinl, C; Mack, J; Kienle, S; Jung, G; Ziegler, C

    2001-11-15

    New strategies for spatially controllable cell adhesion have been developed for brain cells from embryonic chicken. They are based on electrochemically active phenol and pyrrole derivatives, and can be used for the selective coverage of electroconductive substrates. Besides mimicking standard laminin-related adhesion promoting mechanisms by means of an electroactive monomer-linked 18-peptide segment from laminin (SRARKQAASIKVAVSADR), electrochemically generated thin (6-30 nm) polymer films of 3-hydroxybenzyl-hydrazine (3HBH) and 2-(3-hydroxyphenyl)-ethanol (2(3HP)E) with and without mechanically entrapped or covalently linked D-lysine have proved to promote cell adhesion in serum-free medium on indium-doped tin oxide (ITO) substrates during the first 6 culturing days in vitro. The effectiveness of the peptide was strongly density-dependent. Unexpectedly, laminin itself or a combination of laminin and poly-D-lysine (PDL) did not promote cell adhesion and neuron differentiation in serum-free cultures on ITO. However, they worked perfectly well on regular polystyrene substrates in serum-free medium or on ITO when medium with serum was used. This finding might suggest that the adhesion efficiency of laminin does not depend only on the kind of medium supplement but also on the type of substrate. In contrast, the adhesion-promoting properties of "artificial" polymeric films seemed to be based on a more direct cell-film interaction, with the film masking the substrate properties.

  11. The role of endothelial cell adhesion molecules P-selectin, E-selectin and intercellular adhesion molecule-1 in leucocyte recruitment induced by exogenous methylglyoxal.

    PubMed

    Su, Yang; Lei, Xi; Wu, Lingyun; Liu, Lixin

    2012-09-01

    Methylglyoxal (MG) is a reactive dicarbonyl metabolite formed during glucose, protein and fatty acid metabolism. In hyperglycaemic conditions, increased MG level has been linked to the development of diabetes and its vascular complications at the macrovascular and microvascular levels where inflammation plays a role. To study the mechanism of MG-induced inflammation in vivo, we applied MG locally to healthy mice and used intravital microscopy to investigate the role of endothelial cell adhesion molecules in MG-induced leucocyte recruitment in cremasteric microvasculature. Administration of MG (25 and 50 mg/kg) to the tissue dose-dependently induced leucocyte recruitment at 4.0-5.5 hr, with 84-92% recruited cells being neutrophils. Such MG treatment up-regulated the expression of endothelial cell adhesion molecules P-selectin, E-selectin, intercellular adhesion molecule-1, but not vascular cell adhesion molecule-1. Activation of the nuclear factor-κB signalling pathway contributed to MG-induced up-regulation of these adhesion molecules and leucocyte recruitment. The role of the up-regulated endothelial cell adhesion molecules in MG-induced leucocyte recruitment was determined by applying specific functional blocking antibodies to MG-treated animals and observing changes in leucocyte recruitment parameters. Our data demonstrate that the up-regulation of P-selectin, E-selectin and intercellular adhesion molecule-1 contributes to the increased leucocyte rolling flux, reduced leucocyte rolling velocity, and increased leucocyte adhesion, respectively. Our results reveal the role of endothelial cell adhesion molecules in MG-induced leucocyte recruitment in microvasculature, an inflammatory condition related to diabetic vascular complications.

  12. The role of endothelial cell adhesion molecules P-selectin, E-selectin and intercellular adhesion molecule-1 in leucocyte recruitment induced by exogenous methylglyoxal

    PubMed Central

    Su, Yang; Lei, Xi; Wu, Lingyun; Liu, Lixin

    2012-01-01

    Methylglyoxal (MG) is a reactive dicarbonyl metabolite formed during glucose, protein and fatty acid metabolism. In hyperglycaemic conditions, increased MG level has been linked to the development of diabetes and its vascular complications at the macrovascular and microvascular levels where inflammation plays a role. To study the mechanism of MG-induced inflammation in vivo, we applied MG locally to healthy mice and used intravital microscopy to investigate the role of endothelial cell adhesion molecules in MG-induced leucocyte recruitment in cremasteric microvasculature. Administration of MG (25 and 50 mg/kg) to the tissue dose-dependently induced leucocyte recruitment at 4·0–5·5 hr, with 84–92% recruited cells being neutrophils. Such MG treatment up-regulated the expression of endothelial cell adhesion molecules P-selectin, E-selectin, intercellular adhesion molecule-1, but not vascular cell adhesion molecule-1. Activation of the nuclear factor-κB signalling pathway contributed to MG-induced up-regulation of these adhesion molecules and leucocyte recruitment. The role of the up-regulated endothelial cell adhesion molecules in MG-induced leucocyte recruitment was determined by applying specific functional blocking antibodies to MG-treated animals and observing changes in leucocyte recruitment parameters. Our data demonstrate that the up-regulation of P-selectin, E-selectin and intercellular adhesion molecule-1 contributes to the increased leucocyte rolling flux, reduced leucocyte rolling velocity, and increased leucocyte adhesion, respectively. Our results reveal the role of endothelial cell adhesion molecules in MG-induced leucocyte recruitment in microvasculature, an inflammatory condition related to diabetic vascular complications. PMID:22681228

  13. Tie2 Signaling Enhances Mast Cell Progenitor Adhesion to Vascular Cell Adhesion Molecule-1 (VCAM-1) through α4β1 Integrin

    PubMed Central

    Kanemaru, Kazumasa; Noguchi, Emiko; Tokunaga, Takahiro; Nagai, Kei; Hiroyama, Takashi; Nakamura, Yukio; Tahara-Hanaoka, Satoko; Shibuya, Akira

    2015-01-01

    Mast cell (MC) activation contributes considerably to immune responses, such as host protection and allergy. Cell surface immunoreceptors expressed on MCs play an important role in MC activation. Although various immunoreceptors on MCs have been identified, the regulatory mechanism of MC activation is not fully understood. To understand the regulatory mechanisms of MC activation, we used gene expression analyses of human and mouse MCs to identify a novel immunoreceptor expressed on MCs. We found that Tek, which encodes Tie2, was preferentially expressed in the MCs of both humans and mice. However, Tie2 was not detected on the cell surface of the mouse MCs of the peritoneal cavity, ear skin, or colon lamina propria. In contrast, it was expressed on mouse bone marrow–derived MCs and bone marrow MC progenitors (BM-MCps). Stimulation of Tie2 by its ligand angiopoietin-1 induced tyrosine phosphorylation of Tie2 in MEDMC-BRC6, a mouse embryonic stem cell-derived mast cell line, and enhanced MEDMC-BRC6 and mouse BM-MCp adhesion to vascular cell adhesion molecule-1 (VCAM-1) through α4β1 integrin. These results suggest that Tie2 signaling induces α4β1 integrin activation on BM-MCps for adhesion to VCAM-1. PMID:26659448

  14. Heparanase induces inflammatory cell recruitment in vivo by promoting adhesion to vascular endothelium.

    PubMed

    Lever, Rebecca; Rose, Mark J; McKenzie, Edward A; Page, Clive P

    2014-06-15

    Heparanase (HPSE1) is known to be involved in mechanisms of metastatic tumor cell migration. This enzyme selectively cleaves heparan sulfate proteoglycans (HSPG), which are ubiquitously expressed in mammals and are known to be involved in regulating the activity of an array of inflammatory mediators. In the present study, we have investigated the effects of human recombinant heparanase, the inactive precursor of this enzyme (proheparanase) and enzymatically inactivated heparanase, on inflammatory cell recruitment in the rat and on human leukocyte-endothelial adhesion in vitro. Intraperitoneal injection of heparanase (500 μg) induced a significant inflammatory cell infiltrate in the rat, as assessed by peritoneal lavage 4 h later. Intravital microscopy of the mesenteric microcirculation of anesthetized rats showed an increase in rolling and adherent cells in postcapillary venules that was sensitive to heparin, a nonselective inhibitor of heparanase activity. In vitro, heparanase augmented the adhesion of human neutrophils and mononuclear cells to human umbilical vein endothelial cells in a concentration-dependent manner. Proheparanase had similar effects to the active enzyme both with respect to leukocyte accumulation in the peritoneal cavity and adhesion in vitro. However, heat-inactivated heparanase induced cell adhesion in vitro but was without effect in vivo. Together, these data indicate a role for heparanase in inflammatory cell trafficking in vivo that appears to require enzymatic activity.

  15. Cell Adhesion Molecules and Ubiquitination—Functions and Significance

    PubMed Central

    Homrich, Mirka; Gotthard, Ingo; Wobst, Hilke; Diestel, Simone

    2015-01-01

    Cell adhesion molecules of the immunoglobulin (Ig) superfamily represent the biggest group of cell adhesion molecules. They have been analyzed since approximately 40 years ago and most of them have been shown to play a role in tumor progression and in the nervous system. All members of the Ig superfamily are intensively posttranslationally modified. However, many aspects of their cellular functions are not yet known. Since a few years ago it is known that some of the Ig superfamily members are modified by ubiquitin. Ubiquitination has classically been described as a proteasomal degradation signal but during the last years it became obvious that it can regulate many other processes including internalization of cell surface molecules and lysosomal sorting. The purpose of this review is to summarize the current knowledge about the ubiquitination of cell adhesion molecules of the Ig superfamily and to discuss its potential physiological roles in tumorigenesis and in the nervous system. PMID:26703751

  16. Cell adhesion on ligand gradient substrates: a thermodynamic study.

    PubMed

    Sarvestani, Alireza S

    2010-01-01

    Gradient distribution of bio-adhesive proteins can regulate multiple cellular processes, including adhesion, growth, and migration. The ability to control the cell function by changing the surface density of immobilized ligands has become increasingly important in design of implantable medical devices and tissue regenerating scaffolds. Recent techniques in fabrication of substrates with controlled surface properties allow the examination of cell sensitivity to a wide range of adhesion gradients. Understanding the mechanisms by which cells sense and respond to these directional cues warrants a quantitative assessment of macroscopic cellular response to the surface gradients, supported by predictive theoretical models. This article presents a theoretical basis to examine the effect of ligand gradients on cellular adhesion, using an equilibrium thermodynamic model. The model facilitates a systematic investigation of the complex interplay of cell-substrate specific adhesions, non-specific repulsions, and membrane elasticity. This purely mechanistic model predicts a biphasic dependence between the extent of cell spreading and its position across the gradient substrate. PMID:19701944

  17. Disaccharides generated from heparan sulphate or heparin modulate chemokine-induced T-cell adhesion to extracellular matrix.

    PubMed

    Hershkoviz, R; Schor, H; Ariel, A; Hecht, I; Cohen, I R; Lider, O; Cahalon, L

    2000-01-01

    We have found previously that disaccharides (DS) enzymatically generated from heparin or heparan sulphate can modulate tumour necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-alpha) secretion from immune cells in vitro and cell-mediated immune reactions in vivo. Here, we show that such DS can modulate the adhesion and migration of human T cells. We found that certain heparin- and heparan sulphate-derived DS induced, in a dose-dependent manner, the adhesion of human T cells to both extracellular matrix (ECM) and immobilized fibronectin (FN); maximal T-cell adhesion occurred with 1 ng/ml of DS. The levels of T-cell adhesion to ECM that were induced by the tested DS molecules resembled those induced by the prototypic chemokine, macrophage inflammatory protein 1beta (MIP-1beta). However, the kinetics of DS-induced T-cell adhesion to FN resembled that induced by phorbol myristate acetate (PMA), but not that induced by MIP-1beta. This adhesion appeared to involve beta1 integrin recognition and activation, and was associated with specific intracellular activation pathways. Although a first exposure of T cells to certain DS molecules appeared to result in cell adhesion, a subsequent exposure of T cells to pro-adhesive chemokines, such as MIP-1beta or RANTES, but not to other pro-adhesive stimuli, for example interleukin-2 or CD3 cross-linking, resulted in inhibition of T-cell adhesion to and chemotactic migration through FN. Hence, we propose that the breakdown products of tissues generated by inflammatory enzymes are part of an intrinsic functional programme, and not necessarily molecular waste. Moreover, because the DS molecules exert their modulatory functions within a limited time, it appears that the historical encounters of the tissue-invading cells with the constituents of inflamed loci may dictate the cells' behaviour upon subsequent exposure to proinflammatory mediators. PMID:10651945

  18. Fluorescence Interferometry of Neuronal Cell Adhesion on Microstructured Silicon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Braun, Dieter; Fromherz, Peter

    1998-12-01

    We measured the separation of cell membranes from a surface of silica with nanometer precision taking advantage of the fluorescence of an organic dye in the standing modes of light above silicon. For neural cells from rat brain we found about 105 nm on a surface coated with laminin and about 60 nm with fibronectin. No plaques of close adhesion were seen within a lateral resolution of 400 nm. The wide homogeneous cleft raises the question about the nature of the attractive and repulsive forces in cell adhesion.

  19. Cholesteryl butyrate solid lipid nanoparticles inhibit the adhesion and migration of colon cancer cells

    PubMed Central

    Minelli, R; Serpe, L; Pettazzoni, P; Minero, V; Barrera, G; Gigliotti, CL; Mesturini, R; Rosa, AC; Gasco, P; Vivenza, N; Muntoni, E; Fantozzi, R; Dianzani, U; Zara, GP; Dianzani, C

    2012-01-01

    BACKGROUND AND PURPOSE Cholesteryl butyrate solid lipid nanoparticles (cholbut SLN) provide a delivery system for the anti-cancer drug butyrate. These SLN inhibit the adhesion of polymorphonuclear cells to the endothelium and may act as anti-inflammatory agents. As cancer cell adhesion to endothelium is crucial for metastasis dissemination, here we have evaluated the effect of cholbut SLN on adhesion and migration of cancer cells. EXPERIMENTAL APPROACH Cholbut SLN was incubated with a number of cancer cell lines or human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVEC) and adhesion was quantified by a computerized micro-imaging system. Migration was detected by the scratch ‘wound-healing’ assay and the Boyden chamber invasion assay. Expression of ERK and p38 MAPK was analysed by Western blot. Expression of the mRNA for E-cadherin and claudin-1 was measured by RT-PCR. KEY RESULTS Cholbut SLN inhibited HUVEC adhesiveness to cancer cell lines derived from human colon–rectum, breast, prostate cancers and melanoma. The effect was concentration and time-dependent and exerted on both cancer cells and HUVEC. Moreover, these SLN inhibited migration of cancer cells and substantially down-modulated ERK and p38 phosphorylation. The anti-adhesive effect was additive to that induced by the triggering of B7h, which is another stimulus inhibiting both ERK and p38 phosphorylation, and cell adhesiveness. Furthermore, cholbut SLN induced E-cadherin and inhibited claudin-1 expression in HUVEC. CONCLUSION AND IMPLICATIONS These results suggest that cholbut SLN could act as an anti-metastastic agent and they add a new mechanism to the anti-tumour activity of this multifaceted preparation of butyrate. PMID:22049973

  20. Prenylation is required for polar cell elongation, cell adhesion, and differentiation in Physcomitrella patens.

    PubMed

    Thole, Julie M; Perroud, Pierre-Francois; Quatrano, Ralph S; Running, Mark P

    2014-05-01

    Protein prenylation is required for a variety of growth and developmental processes in flowering plants. Here we report the consequences of loss of function of all known prenylation subunits in the moss Physcomitrella patens. As in Arabidopsis, protein farnesyltransferase and protein geranylgeranyltransferase type I are not required for viability. However, protein geranylgeranyltransferase type I activity is required for cell adhesion, polar cell elongation, and cell differentiation. Loss of protein geranylgeranyltransferase activity results in colonies of round, single-celled organisms that resemble unicellular algae. The loss of protein farnesylation is not as severe but also results in polar cell elongation and differentiation defects. The complete loss of Rab geranylgeranyltransferase activity appears to be lethal in P. patens. Labeling with antibodies to cell wall components support the lack of polarity establishment and the undifferentiated state of geranylgeranyltransferase type I mutant plants. Our results show that prenylated proteins play key roles in P. patens development and differentiation processes.

  1. Cell-cell adhesion in the cnidaria: insights into the evolution of tissue morphogenesis.

    PubMed

    Magie, Craig R; Martindale, Mark Q

    2008-06-01

    Cell adhesion is a major aspect of cell biology and one of the fundamental processes involved in the development of a multicellular animal. Adhesive mechanisms, both cell-cell and between cell and extracellular matrix, are intimately involved in assembling cells into the three-dimensional structures of tissues and organs. The modulation of adhesive complexes could therefore be seen as a central component in the molecular control of morphogenesis, translating information encoded within the genome into organismal form. The availability of whole genomes from early-branching metazoa such as cnidarians is providing important insights into the evolution of adhesive processes by allowing for the easy identification of the genes involved in adhesion in these organisms. Discovery of the molecular nature of cell adhesion in the early-branching groups, coupled with comparisons across the metazoa, is revealing the ways evolution has tinkered with this vital cellular process in the generation of the myriad forms seen across the animal kingdom.

  2. Interface Immobilization Chemistry of cRGD-based Peptides Regulates Integrin Mediated Cell Adhesion

    PubMed Central

    Pallarola, Diego; Bochen, Alexander; Boehm, Heike; Rechenmacher, Florian; Sobahi, Tariq R; Spatz, Joachim P; Kessler, Horst

    2014-01-01

    The interaction of specific surface receptors of the integrin family with different extracellular matrix-based ligands is of utmost importance for the cellular adhesion process. A ligand consists of an integrin-binding group, here cyclic RGDfX, a spacer molecule that lifts the integrin-binding group from the surface and a surface anchoring group. c(-RGDfX-) peptides are bound to gold nanoparticle structured surfaces via polyproline, polyethylene glycol or aminohexanoic acid containing spacers of different lengths. Although keeping the integrin-binding c(-RGDfX-) peptides constant for all compounds, changes of the ligand's spacer chemistry and length reveal significant differences in cell adhesion activation and focal adhesion formation. Polyproline-based peptides demonstrate improved cell adhesion kinetics and focal adhesion formation compared with common aminohexanoic acid or polyethylene glycol spacers. Binding activity can additionally be improved by applying ligands with two head groups, inducing a multimeric effect. This study gives insights into spacer-based differences in integrin-driven cell adhesion processes and remarkably highlights the polyproline-based spacers as suitable ligand-presenting templates for surface functionalization. PMID:25810710

  3. Adhesions

    MedlinePlus

    ... surfaces so they can shift easily as the body moves. Adhesions cause tissues and organs to stick together. They might connect the loops of the intestines to each other, to nearby ... can occur anywhere in the body. But they often form after surgery on the ...

  4. Cell-substrate impedance fluctuations of single amoeboid cells encode cell-shape and adhesion dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leonhardt, Helmar; Gerhardt, Matthias; Höppner, Nadine; Krüger, Kirsten; Tarantola, Marco; Beta, Carsten

    2016-01-01

    We show systematic electrical impedance measurements of single motile cells on microelectrodes. Wild-type cells and mutant strains were studied that differ in their cell-substrate adhesion strength. We recorded the projected cell area by time-lapse microscopy and observed irregular oscillations of the cell shape. These oscillations were correlated with long-term variations in the impedance signal. Superposed to these long-term trends, we observed fluctuations in the impedance signal. Their magnitude clearly correlated with the adhesion strength, suggesting that strongly adherent cells display more dynamic cell-substrate interactions.

  5. Epithelial cell adhesion and gastrointestinal colonization of Lactobacillus in poultry.

    PubMed

    Spivey, Megan A; Dunn-Horrocks, Sadie L; Duong, Tri

    2014-11-01

    Administration of probiotic Lactobacillus cultures is an important alternative to the use of antibiotic growth promoters and has been demonstrated to improve animal health, growth performance, and preharvest food safety in poultry production. Whereas gastrointestinal colonization is thought to be critical to their probiotic functionality, factors important to Lactobacillus colonization in chickens are not well understood. In this study we investigate epithelial cell adhesion in vitro and colonization of Lactobacillusin vivo in broiler chickens. Adhesion of Lactobacillus cultures to epithelial cells was evaluated using the chicken LMH cell line. Lactobacillus cultures were able adhere effectively to LMH cells relative to Bacillus subtilis and Salmonella Typhimurium. Epithelial cell adhesion was similar for Lactobacillus crispatus TDCC 75, L. cristpatus TDCC 76, and Lactobacillus gallinarum TDCC 77, and all 3 were more adherent than L. gallinarum TDCC 78. However, when colonization was evaluated in the ileum and cecum of broiler chicks, L. crispatus TDCC 75 and L. gallinarum TDCC 77 were more persistent than L. crispatus TDCC 76 and L. gallinarum TDCC 78. The reduction of growth in medium supplemented with oxgal was greater for L. gallinarum TDCC 78 than L. gallinarum TDCC 77, suggesting that whereas adhesion was similar for the 2 strains, the difference in colonization between L. gallinarum strains may be due in part to their bile sensitivity. This study demonstrates that whereas adhesion to epithelial cells may be important in predicting gastrointestinal colonization, other factors including bile tolerance may also contribute to the colonization of Lactobacillus in poultry. Additionally, the chicken LMH cell line is expected to provide a platform for investigating mechanisms of Lactobacillus adhesion to epithelial tissue and evaluating the probiotic potential Lactobacillus in poultry.

  6. Spatially controlled cell adhesion on three-dimensional substrates.

    PubMed

    Richter, Christine; Reinhardt, Martina; Giselbrecht, Stefan; Leisen, Daniel; Trouillet, Vanessa; Truckenmüller, Roman; Blau, Axel; Ziegler, Christiane; Welle, Alexander

    2010-10-01

    The microenvironment of cells in vivo is defined by spatiotemporal patterns of chemical and biophysical cues. Therefore, one important goal of tissue engineering is the generation of scaffolds with defined biofunctionalization in order to control processes like cell adhesion and differentiation. Mimicking extrinsic factors like integrin ligands presented by the extracellular matrix is one of the key elements to study cellular adhesion on biocompatible scaffolds. By using special thermoformable polymer films with anchored biomolecules micro structured scaffolds, e.g. curved and micro-patterned substrates, can be fabricated. Here, we present a novel strategy for the fabrication of micro-patterned scaffolds based on the "Substrate Modification and Replication by Thermoforming" (SMART) technology: The surface of a poly lactic acid membrane, having a low forming temperature of 60 degrees C and being initially very cell attractive, was coated with a photopatterned layer of poly(L-lysine) (PLL) and hyaluronic acid (VAHyal) to gain spatial control over cell adhesion. Subsequently, this modified polymer membrane was thermoformed to create an array of spherical microcavities with diameters of 300 microm for 3D cell culture. Human hepatoma cells (HepG2) and mouse fibroblasts (L929) were used to demonstrate guided cell adhesion. HepG2 cells adhered and aggregated exclusively within these cavities without attaching to the passivated surfaces between the cavities. Also L929 cells adhering very strongly on the pristine substrate polymer were effectively patterned by the cell repellent properties of the hyaluronic acid based hydrogel. This is the first time cell adhesion was controlled by patterned functionalization of a polymeric substrate with UV curable PLL-VAHyal in thermoformed 3D microstructures.

  7. Spatially controlled cell adhesion on three-dimensional substrates

    PubMed Central

    Richter, Christine; Reinhardt, Martina; Giselbrecht, Stefan; Leisen, Daniel; Trouillet, Vanessa; Truckenmüller, Roman; Blau, Axel; Ziegler, Christiane

    2010-01-01

    The microenvironment of cells in vivo is defined by spatiotemporal patterns of chemical and biophysical cues. Therefore, one important goal of tissue engineering is the generation of scaffolds with defined biofunctionalization in order to control processes like cell adhesion and differentiation. Mimicking extrinsic factors like integrin ligands presented by the extracellular matrix is one of the key elements to study cellular adhesion on biocompatible scaffolds. By using special thermoformable polymer films with anchored biomolecules micro structured scaffolds, e.g. curved and µ-patterned substrates, can be fabricated. Here, we present a novel strategy for the fabrication of µ-patterned scaffolds based on the “Substrate Modification and Replication by Thermoforming” (SMART) technology: The surface of a poly lactic acid membrane, having a low forming temperature of 60°C and being initially very cell attractive, was coated with a photopatterned layer of poly(L-lysine) (PLL) and hyaluronic acid (VAHyal) to gain spatial control over cell adhesion. Subsequently, this modified polymer membrane was thermoformed to create an array of spherical microcavities with diameters of 300 µm for 3D cell culture. Human hepatoma cells (HepG2) and mouse fibroblasts (L929) were used to demonstrate guided cell adhesion. HepG2 cells adhered and aggregated exclusively within these cavities without attaching to the passivated surfaces between the cavities. Also L929 cells adhering very strongly on the pristine substrate polymer were effectively patterned by the cell repellent properties of the hyaluronic acid based hydrogel. This is the first time cell adhesion was controlled by patterned functionalization of a polymeric substrate with UV curable PLL-VAHyal in thermoformed 3D microstructures. PMID:20480241

  8. In-situ coupling between kinase activities and protein dynamics within single focal adhesions

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Yiqian; Zhang, Kaiwen; Seong, Jihye; Fan, Jason; Chien, Shu; Wang, Yingxiao; Lu, Shaoying

    2016-01-01

    The dynamic activation of oncogenic kinases and regulation of focal adhesions (FAs) are crucial molecular events modulating cell adhesion in cancer metastasis. However, it remains unclear how these events are temporally coordinated at single FA sites. Therefore, we targeted fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET)-based biosensors toward subcellular FAs to report local molecular events during cancer cell adhesion. Employing single FA tracking and cross-correlation analysis, we quantified the dynamic coupling characteristics between biochemical kinase activities and structural FA within single FAs. We show that kinase activations and FA assembly are strongly and sequentially correlated, with the concurrent FA assembly and Src activation leading focal adhesion kinase (FAK) activation by 42.6 ± 12.6 sec. Strikingly, the temporal coupling between kinase activation and individual FA assembly reflects the fate of FAs at later stages. The FAs with a tight coupling tend to grow and mature, while the less coupled FAs likely disassemble. During FA disassembly, however, kinase activations lead the disassembly, with FAK being activated earlier than Src. Therefore, by integrating subcellularly targeted FRET biosensors and computational analysis, our study reveals intricate interplays between Src and FAK in regulating the dynamic life of single FAs in cancer cells. PMID:27383747

  9. In-situ coupling between kinase activities and protein dynamics within single focal adhesions.

    PubMed

    Wu, Yiqian; Zhang, Kaiwen; Seong, Jihye; Fan, Jason; Chien, Shu; Wang, Yingxiao; Lu, Shaoying

    2016-01-01

    The dynamic activation of oncogenic kinases and regulation of focal adhesions (FAs) are crucial molecular events modulating cell adhesion in cancer metastasis. However, it remains unclear how these events are temporally coordinated at single FA sites. Therefore, we targeted fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET)-based biosensors toward subcellular FAs to report local molecular events during cancer cell adhesion. Employing single FA tracking and cross-correlation analysis, we quantified the dynamic coupling characteristics between biochemical kinase activities and structural FA within single FAs. We show that kinase activations and FA assembly are strongly and sequentially correlated, with the concurrent FA assembly and Src activation leading focal adhesion kinase (FAK) activation by 42.6 ± 12.6 sec. Strikingly, the temporal coupling between kinase activation and individual FA assembly reflects the fate of FAs at later stages. The FAs with a tight coupling tend to grow and mature, while the less coupled FAs likely disassemble. During FA disassembly, however, kinase activations lead the disassembly, with FAK being activated earlier than Src. Therefore, by integrating subcellularly targeted FRET biosensors and computational analysis, our study reveals intricate interplays between Src and FAK in regulating the dynamic life of single FAs in cancer cells. PMID:27383747

  10. Quantitative measurement of changes in adhesion force involving focal adhesion kinase during cell attachment, spread, and migration.

    PubMed

    Wu, Chia-Ching; Su, Hsiao-Wen; Lee, Chen-Chen; Tang, Ming-Jer; Su, Fong-Chin

    2005-04-01

    Focal adhesion kinase (FAK) is a critical protein for the regulation of integrin-mediated cellular functions and it can enhance cell motility in Madin-Darby canine kidney (MDCK) cells by hepatocyte growth factor (HGF) induction. We utilized optical trapping and cytodetachment techniques to measure the adhesion force between pico-Newton and nano-Newton (nN) for quantitatively investigating the effects of FAK on adhesion force during initial binding (5 s), beginning of spreading (30 min), spreadout (12 h), and migration (induced by HGF) in MDCK cells with overexpressed FAK (FAK-WT), FAK-related non-kinase (FRNK), as well as normal control cells. Optical tweezers was used to measure the initial binding force between a trapped cell and glass coverslide or between a trapped bead and a seeded cell. In cytodetachment, the commercial atomic force microscope probe with an appropriate spring constant was used as a cyto-detacher to evaluate the change of adhesion force between different FAK expression levels of cells in spreading, spreadout, and migrating status. The results demonstrated that FAK-WT significantly increased the adhesion forces as compared to FRNK cells throughout all the different stages of cell adhesion. For cells in HGF-induced migration, the adhesion force decreased to almost the same level (approximately 600 nN) regardless of FAK levels indicating that FAK facilitates cells to undergo migration by reducing the adhesion force. Our results suggest FAK plays a role of enhancing cell adhesive ability in the binding and spreading, but an appropriate level of adhesion force is required for HGF-induced cell migration.

  11. Effect of cancer procoagulant (CP) on the growth and adhesion of MCF-7 cells to vitronectin in vitro.

    PubMed

    Kamocka, Małgorzata; Rózalski, Marek; Krajewska, Urszula; Wierzbicki, Ryszard; Mielicki, Wojciech P

    2005-05-10

    Cancer procoagulant (CP) is a cysteine protease produced by fetal and malignant tissues, activating in vitro blood coagulation factor X. It has been demonstrated that CP is able to stimulate blood platelet adhesion to fibrinogen and collagen. The pro-adhesive properties of CP could play an important role in metastatic spread of cancer as well as in primary tumor growth. Effects of anti-CP antibody on the growth of MCF-7 breast cancer cells and on the cells adhesion to vitronectin have been analyzed in vitro. Addition of polyclonal anti-CP antibody to MCF-7 cell culture resulted in 16-18% (P < 0.001) decrease in the cells viability as compared with the control (other antibody or no antibody in the culture). Preincubation of MCF-7 cells with anti-CP antibody reduced the cells adhesion to vitronectin. Further addition of purified CP (0.5-8 microg/ml) to the MCF-7 cells preincubated with anti-CP antibody resulted in complete recovery of adhesive properties of the cells. However, when high concentration (16 microg/ml) of CP was added to the sample, only partial recovery of the adhesive properties by the cells was observed. Results of the experiments support the hypothesis that CP is involved in the growth of cancer cells, but its pro-coagulative properties are of secondary importance. One of the possible mechanisms of the interactions between CP and malignant cell could be the regulation of the cell adhesion processes.

  12. Intracellular transport and cell surface delivery of the neural cell adhesion molecule (NCAM).

    PubMed

    Leshchyns'ka, Iryna; Sytnyk, Vladimir

    2015-01-01

    The neural cell adhesion molecule (NCAM) regulates differentiation and functioning of neurons by accumulating at the cell surface where it mediates the interactions of neurons with the extracellular environment. NCAM also induces a number of intracellular signaling cascades, which coordinate interactions at the cell surface with intracellular processes including changes in gene expression, transport and cytoskeleton remodeling. Since NCAM functions at the cell surface, its transport and delivery to the cell surface play a critical role. Here, we review recent advances in our understanding of the molecular mechanisms of the intracellular transport and cell surface delivery of NCAM. We also discuss the data suggesting a possibility of cross talk between activation of NCAM at the cell surface and the intracellular transport and cell surface delivery of NCAM.

  13. Adhesion between peptides/antibodies and breast cancer cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meng, J.; Paetzell, E.; Bogorad, A.; Soboyejo, W. O.

    2010-06-01

    Atomic force microscopy (AFM) techniques were used to measure the adhesion forces between the receptors on breast cancer cells specific to human luteinizing hormone-releasing hormone (LHRH) peptides and antibodies specific to the EphA2 receptor. The adhesion forces between LHRH-coated AFM tips and human MDA-MB-231 cells (breast cancer cells) were shown to be about five times greater than those between LHRH-coated AFM tips and normal Hs578Bst breast cells. Similarly, those between EphA2 antibody-coated AFM tips and breast cancer cells were over five times greater than those between EphA2 antibody-coated AFM tips and normal breast cells. The results suggest that AFM can be used for the detection of breast cancer cells in biopsies. The implications of the results are also discussed for the early detection and localized treatment of cancer.

  14. Heterogeneity of cell adhesion molecules in the developing nervous system

    SciTech Connect

    Williams, R.K.

    1985-01-01

    Cell-surface molecules, especially glycoproteins, are believed to mediate interactions between developing neurons and their environment. These interactions include pathfinding by growing processes, recognition of appropriate targets, and formation of synaptic structures. In order to identify neuronal cell-surface molecules, monoclonal antibodies (Mab's) were prepared against synaptic fractions from adult rat brain. From this group three monoclonal antibodies, designated 3C5.59, 3G5.34, and 3G6.41, that react with cell-surface antigens of embryonic neurons were selected for further study. In immunofluoresence experiments each of these antibodies strongly reacted with the processes of cultured granule cell neurons, the major class of small cerebellar neurons, cultured from developing rat cerebellum. Mab's 3C5.59 and 3G5.34 reacted only with neurons in the cerebellar cultures. Mab 3G6.41, however, also reacted with cultured brain astrocytes. On frozen sections Mab's 3G5.34 and 3G6.41 also strongly stained the molecular layer, the site of active granule cell axon growth, in the developing cerebellum. Monoclonal and polyclonal antibodies specific for the neural cell adhesion molecule (N-CAM) were used to compare the two glycoproteins recognized by Mab 3G6.41 with N-CAM. Band 1, another large neuronal cell-surface glycoprotein was originally identified in mouse N18 neuroblastoma cells. In this study /sup 125/I-labeled N18-derived band 1 was tested for binding to 9 plant lectins and Limulus polyphemus agglutinin coupled to agarose beads. Band 1 solubilized from brain also specifically bound to LCA-agarose, indicating that mannose containing sugar moieties are present on band 1 from brain.

  15. Differential regulation of leukocyte function-associated antigen-1/ intercellular adhesion molecules-1-dependent adhesion and aggregation in HL-60 cells.

    PubMed

    Katagiri, K; Kinashi, T; Irie, S; Katagiri, T

    1996-05-15

    Activation of integrin and organization of cytoskeletal proteins are highly regulated in cell adhesion and aggregation. The interaction of leukocyte function-associated antigen-1 (LFA-1) and intercellular adhesion molecules-1 (ICAM-1) mediates cell adhesion and aggregation, which facilitate leukocyte trafficking to inflamed tissues and augment effector functions. We investigated how LFA-1/ICAM-1-mediated adhesion and aggregation are regulated in HL-60 cells induced to differentiate into neutrophils by retinoic acid (RA). Uninduced HL-60 cells did not bind to ICAM-1 even with stimulation by 12-0-tetradecanoyl phorbol-13-acetate, although they express LFA-1 on the cell surface. When cultured with RA for 24 hours, HL-60 cells were able to adhere to ICAM-1 constitutively. The induction of adhesion did not accompany any change in surface density of LFA-1, indicating that the avidity of LFA-1 was increased. The change in its avidity required de novo synthesis of proteins. Although ICAM-1 was intensely expressed on RA-induced HL-60 cells, these cells did not show any cellular aggregation. The HL-60 cells transfected with the active form of Ras (Val12) exhibited LFA-1/ICAM-1-dependent aggregation by RA stimulation without change in the avidity of LFA-1. In these Ras-transfectants, a cytoskeletal protein, paxillin, was tyrosine-phosphorylated, and the level of F-actin increased. Transforming growth factor (TGF) beta, as well as cytochalasin D, prevented both the tyrosine phosphorylation of paxillin and the aggregation without any effects on the avidity of LFA-1. Thus, an increase in the avidity of LFA-1 was not sufficient for the induction of aggregation, which required activation of Ras and reorganization of cytoskeletal proteins. These results suggest that distinct regulatory mechanisms control LFA-1/ICAM-1-dependent adhesion and aggregation in HL-60 cells differentiating into neutrophils.

  16. Improvement of early cell adhesion on Thai silk fibroin surface by low energy plasma.

    PubMed

    Amornsudthiwat, Phakdee; Mongkolnavin, Rattachat; Kanokpanont, Sorada; Panpranot, Joongjai; Wong, Chiow San; Damrongsakkul, Siriporn

    2013-11-01

    Low energy plasma has been introduced to treat the surface of Thai silk fibroin which should be enhanced for cell adhesion due to its native hydrophobic surface. Plasma surface treatment could introduce desirable hydrophilic functionalities on the surface without using any chemicals. In this work, nitrogen glow discharge plasma was generated by a low energy AC50Hz power supply system. The plasma operating conditions were optimized to reach the highest nitrogen active species by using optical emission spectroscopy. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) revealed that amine, hydroxyl, ether, and carboxyl groups were induced on Thai silk fibroin surface after plasma treatment. The results on Fourier transform infrared attenuated total reflection (FTIR-ATR) spectroscopy confirmed that the plasma treated effects were only on the outermost layer since there was no change in the bulk chemistry. The surface topography was insignificantly changed from the detection with atomic force microscopy (AFM). The plasma-treated effects were the improved surface wettability and cell adhesion. After a 90-s treatment, the water contact angle was at 20°, while the untreated surface was at 70°. The early cell adhesion of L929 mouse fibroblast was accelerated. L929 cells only took 3h to reach 100% cell adhesion on 90 s N2 plasma-treated surface, while there was less than 50% cell adhesion on the untreated Thai silk fibroin surface after 6h of culture. The cell adhesion results were in agreement with the cytoskeleton development. L929 F-actin was more evident on 90 s N2 plasma-treated surface than others. It could be concluded that a lower energy AC50Hz plasma system enhanced early L929 mouse fibroblast adhesion on Thai silk fibroin surface without any significant change in surface topography and bulk chemistry. PMID:23893032

  17. Morin, a Flavonoid from Moraceae, Inhibits Cancer Cell Adhesion to Endothelial Cells and EMT by Downregulating VCAM1 and Ncadherin.

    PubMed

    Lee, JeongHee; Jin, Hana; Lee, Won Sup; Nagappan, Arulkumar; Choi, Yung Hyun; Kim, Gon Sup; Jung, JinMyung; Ryu, Chung Ho; Shin, Sung Chul; Hong, Soon Chan; Kim, Hye Jung

    2016-01-01

    Morin, a flavonoid found in figs and other Moraceae species, displays a variety of biological actions, exerting antioxidant, antiinflammatory and anticarcinogenic effects. Here, we investigated the anticancer activity of morin focusing on antiadhesive influence. We performed experiments with MDAMB231 human breast cancer cells. Morin inhibited TNFinduced cancer cell adhesion to human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs) without showing any toxicity. It further inhibited the expression of VCAM1 on MDAMB231 cells as well as HUVECs. Morin also decreased the expression of Ncadherin on MDAMB231 cells. In addition, there was apparent antimetastatic activity in vivo. In conclusion, this study suggested that morin inhibits cancer cell adhesion to HUVECs by reducing VCAM1, and EMT by targeting Ncadherin, and that it features antimetastatic activity in vivo. Further investigation of possible antimetastatic activity of morin against human breast cancer cells is warranted.

  18. Nanoparticle adhesion in proton exchange membrane fuel cell electrodes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    He, Qianping; Joy, David C.; Keffer, David J.

    2013-11-01

    Carbon supported platinum (Pt/C) catalyst remains among the most preferable catalyst materials for Proton Exchange Membrane (PEM) fuel cells. However, platinum (Pt) particles suffer from poor durability and encounter electrochemical surface area (ESA) loss under operation with the accompany of Pt nanoparticle coarsening. Several proposed mechanisms have involved the Pt detachment from its carbonate support as an initial step for the deactivation of Pt nanoparticles. In this study, we investigated the detachment mechanism from the nano-adhesion point of view. Classic molecular dynamics simulations are performed on systems contain Pt nanoparticles of different sizes and shapes. A thin Nafion film (1 nm) at different hydration levels is also included in the system to study the environmental effect on nanoparticle adhesion. We found that the adhesion force strengthens as the Pt size goes up. Pt nanoparticles of tetrahedral shape exhibit relatively stronger connection with the carbon substrate due to its unique ‘anchor-like’ structure. Adhesion is enhanced with the introduction of a Nafion. The humidity level in the Nafion film has a rather complicated effect on the strength of nanoparticle adhesion. The binding energies and maximum adhesive forces are reported for all systems studied.

  19. Cell adhesion: The effect of a surprising cohesive force

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vasseur, H.

    2009-10-01

    When an experimentalist or a biological mechanism applies an external force onto a cell chemically sticking to its substrate, a reacting “suction” force, due to the slow penetration of the surrounding fluid between the cell and the substrate, opposes to the dissociation. This force can overcome other known adhesive forces when the process is sufficiently violent (typically 105pN ). Its maximal contribution to the total adhesive energy of the cell can then be estimated to 2×10-3J/m2 . The physical origin of this effect is quite simple and it may be compared to that leaning a “suction cup” against a bathroom wall. We address the consequences of this effect on (i) the separation energy, (ii) the motion of the fluid surrounding the cell, and more especially on the pumping of the fluid by moving cells, and (iii) the inhibition of cell motion.

  20. Induction of T cell adhesion to extracellular matrix or endothelial cell ligands by soluble or matrix-bound interleukin-7.

    PubMed

    Ariel, A; Hershkoviz, R; Cahalon, L; Williams, D E; Akiyama, S K; Yamada, K M; Chen, C; Alon, R; Lapidot, T; Lider, O

    1997-10-01

    The putative effects of interleukin (IL)-7, operating in the context of extracellular matrix (ECM), on the adhesion of human T cells were examined. Recombinant human, IL-7 was found to bind ECM or fibronectin (FN) with IC50 values of 10-100 nM. Nanogram amounts of both soluble and, especially, FN- or ECM-bound IL-7, which differentially affected the morphologies of FN-adherent T cells, induced the adhesion of resting CD4+ and CD8+ T cells in dose-dependent and beta 1 integrin-dependent manners. Under static and flow conditions, soluble IL-7 also induced the binding of unstimulated T cells to vascular cell adhesion molecule-1, suggesting that this cytokine can also modulate integrin binding to endothelial cell ligands. The effects of affinity modulation by IL-7 of FN-specific beta 1 integrins depend on the presence of soluble FN, which inhibited T cell adhesion to FN induced by FN-bound IL-7 or by an integrin-specific affinity-modulating monoclonal antibody, but not by soluble IL-7 or phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate. These findings provide an example of a major ECM integrin ligand, FN, which is capable of modulating its adhesive interactions with specific immune cells by associating with and presenting a cytokine in a bio-active state. PMID:9368611

  1. CEACAM engagement by human pathogens enhances cell adhesion and counteracts bacteria-induced detachment of epithelial cells.

    PubMed

    Muenzner, Petra; Rohde, Manfred; Kneitz, Susanne; Hauck, Christof R

    2005-08-29

    Exfoliation, which is the detachment of infected epithelial cells, is an innate defense mechanism to prevent bacterial colonization. Indeed, infection with Neisseria gonorrhoeae induced epithelial detachment from an extracellular matrix (ECM) substrate in vitro. Surprisingly, variants of N. gonorrhoeae that bind to human carcinoembryonic antigen-related cell adhesion molecules (CEACAMs) failed to induce detachment and, instead, promoted enhanced host cell adhesion to the ECM. Microarray analysis revealed that CEACAM engagement by several human pathogens triggers expression of CD105. Blockage of CD105 expression by antisense oligonucleotides abolished infection-induced cell adhesion. The expression of full-length CD105 promoted cell adhesion to the ECM and was sufficient to prevent infection-induced detachment. The CD105-mediated increase in cell adhesion was dependent on the presence and function of integrin beta1. CD105 expression did not elevate cellular integrin levels but caused a dramatic increase in the ECM-binding capacity of the cells, suggesting that CD105 affects integrin activity. The exploitation of CEACAMs to trigger CD105 expression and to counteract infection-induced cell detachment represents an intriguing adaptation of pathogens that are specialized to colonize the human mucosa. PMID:16115956

  2. Intercellular adhesion molecule-1 expression by skeletal muscle cells augments myogenesis.

    PubMed

    Goh, Qingnian; Dearth, Christopher L; Corbett, Jacob T; Pierre, Philippe; Chadee, Deborah N; Pizza, Francis X

    2015-02-15

    We previously demonstrated that the expression of intercellular adhesion molecule-1 (ICAM-1) by skeletal muscle cells after muscle overload contributes to ensuing regenerative and hypertrophic processes in skeletal muscle. The objective of the present study is to reveal mechanisms through which skeletal muscle cell expression of ICAM-1 augments regenerative and hypertrophic processes of myogenesis. This was accomplished by genetically engineering C2C12 myoblasts to stably express ICAM-1, and by inhibiting the adhesive and signaling functions of ICAM-1 through the use of a neutralizing antibody or cell penetrating peptide, respectively. Expression of ICAM-1 by cultured skeletal muscle cells augmented myoblast-myoblast adhesion, myotube formation, myonuclear number, myotube alignment, myotube-myotube fusion, and myotube size without influencing the ability of myoblasts to proliferate or differentiate. ICAM-1 augmented myotube formation, myonuclear accretion, and myotube alignment through a mechanism involving adhesion-induced activation of ICAM-1 signaling, as these dependent measures were reduced via antibody and peptide inhibition of ICAM-1. The adhesive and signaling functions of ICAM-1 also facilitated myotube hypertrophy through a mechanism involving myotube-myotube fusion, protein synthesis, and Akt/p70s6k signaling. Our findings demonstrate that ICAM-1 expression by skeletal muscle cells augments myogenesis, and establish a novel mechanism through which the inflammatory response facilitates growth processes in skeletal muscle.

  3. Integrin adhesion in regulation of lacrimal gland acinar cell secretion.

    PubMed

    Andersson, Sofia V; Hamm-Alvarez, Sarah F; Gierow, J Peter

    2006-09-01

    The extracellular microenvironment regulates lacrimal gland acinar cell secretion. Culturing isolated rabbit lacrimal gland acinar cells on different extracellular matrix proteins revealed that laminin enhances carbachol-stimulated secretion to a greater extent than other extracellular matrix proteins investigated. Furthermore, immunofluorescence indicated that integrin subunits, potentially functioning as laminin receptors are present in acinar cells. Among these, the integrin alpha6 and beta1 subunit mRNA expression was also confirmed by RT-PCR and sequence analysis. Secretion assays, which measured beta-hexosaminidase activity released in the culture media, demonstrated that function-blocking integrin alpha6 and beta1 monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) induce a rapid, transient and dose-dependent secretory response in cultured cells. To determine the intracellular pathways by which integrin alpha6 and beta1 mAbs could induce secretion, selected second messenger molecules were inhibited. Although inhibitors of protein kinase C and IP(3)-induced Ca(2+) mobilization attenuated carbachol-stimulated secretion, no effect on integrin mAb-induced release was observed. In addition, protein tyrosine kinases do not appear to have a role in transducing signals arising from mAb interactions. Our data clearly demonstrate, though, that cell adhesion through integrins regulates secretion from lacrimal gland acinar cells. The fact that the integrin mAbs affect the cholinergic response differently and that the integrin beta1 mAb secretion, but not the alpha6, was attenuated by the phosphatase inhibitor, sodium orthovanadate, suggests that each subunit utilizes separate intracellular signaling pathways to induce exocytosis. The results also indicate that the secretory response triggered by the beta1 integrin mAb is generated through dephosphorylation events.

  4. The Role of Crk Adaptor Proteins in T-Cell Adhesion and Migration

    PubMed Central

    Braiman, Alex; Isakov, Noah

    2015-01-01

    Crk adaptor proteins are key players in signal transduction from a variety of cell surface receptors. They are involved in early steps of lymphocyte activation through their SH2-mediated transient interaction with signal transducing effector molecules, such as Cbl, ZAP-70, CasL, and STAT5. In addition, they constitutively associate, via their SH3 domain, with effector molecules, such as C3G, that mediate cell adhesion and regulate lymphocyte extravasation and recruitment to sites of inflammation. Recent studies demonstrated that the conformation and function of CrkII is subjected to a regulation by immunophilins, which also affect CrkII-dependent T-cell adhesion to fibronectin and migration toward chemokines. This article addresses mechanisms that regulate CrkII conformation and function, in general, and emphasizes the role of Crk proteins in receptor-coupled signaling pathways that control T-lymphocyte adhesion and migration to inflammatory sites. PMID:26500649

  5. Understanding dynamic changes in live cell adhesion with neutron reflectometry

    DOE PAGES

    Junghans, Ann; Waltman, Mary Jo; Smith, Hillary L.; Pocivavsek, Luka; Zebda, Noureddine; Birukov, Konstantin; Viapiano, Mariano; Majewski, Jaroslaw

    2014-12-10

    In this study, neutron reflectometry (NR) was used to examine various live cells' adhesion to quartz substrates under different environmental conditions, including flow stress. To the best of our knowledge, these measurements represent the first successful visualization and quantization of the interface between live cells and a substrate with sub-nanometer resolution. In our first experiments, we examined live mouse fibroblast cells as opposed to past experiments using supported lipids, proteins, or peptide layers with no associated cells. We continued the NR studies of cell adhesion by investigating endothelial monolayers and glioblastoma cells under dynamic flow conditions. We demonstrated that neutronmore » reflectometry is a powerful tool to study the strength of cellular layer adhesion in living tissues, which is a key factor in understanding the physiology of cell interactions and conditions leading to abnormal or disease circumstances. Continuative measurements, such as investigating changes in tumor cell — surface contact of various glioblastomas, could impact advancements in tumor treatments. In principle, this can help us to identify changes that correlate with tumor invasiveness. Pursuit of these studies can have significant medical impact on the understanding of complex biological problems and their effective treatment, e.g. for the development of targeted anti-invasive therapies.« less

  6. Understanding dynamic changes in live cell adhesion with neutron reflectometry

    SciTech Connect

    Junghans, Ann; Waltman, Mary Jo; Smith, Hillary L.; Pocivavsek, Luka; Zebda, Noureddine; Birukov, Konstantin; Viapiano, Mariano; Majewski, Jaroslaw

    2014-12-10

    In this study, neutron reflectometry (NR) was used to examine various live cells' adhesion to quartz substrates under different environmental conditions, including flow stress. To the best of our knowledge, these measurements represent the first successful visualization and quantization of the interface between live cells and a substrate with sub-nanometer resolution. In our first experiments, we examined live mouse fibroblast cells as opposed to past experiments using supported lipids, proteins, or peptide layers with no associated cells. We continued the NR studies of cell adhesion by investigating endothelial monolayers and glioblastoma cells under dynamic flow conditions. We demonstrated that neutron reflectometry is a powerful tool to study the strength of cellular layer adhesion in living tissues, which is a key factor in understanding the physiology of cell interactions and conditions leading to abnormal or disease circumstances. Continuative measurements, such as investigating changes in tumor cell — surface contact of various glioblastomas, could impact advancements in tumor treatments. In principle, this can help us to identify changes that correlate with tumor invasiveness. Pursuit of these studies can have significant medical impact on the understanding of complex biological problems and their effective treatment, e.g. for the development of targeted anti-invasive therapies.

  7. Cytotoxic effects of one-step self-etching adhesives on an odontoblast cell line.

    PubMed

    Lee, Yoon; An, So-Youn; Park, Yoon-Jung; Yu, Frank H; Park, Joo-Cheol; Seo, Deog-Gyu

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the cytotoxic effects of one-step self-etching adhesives. Cells from an immortalized mouse odontoblast cell line (MDPC-23) were cultured with six different dental adhesive systems (diluted to concentrations of 0.5% for 4 h): Adper Easy Bond (EB), Xeno V (XV), iBond (IB), AdheSE One (AO), Clearfil SE primer (CS), and Adper Single Bond 2 (SB). MTT (3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide) and flow cytometric apoptosis assays were used to evaluate cell viability and the rate of apoptosis. The odontoblasts were also examined under a scanning electron microscope. While all of the cultures with adhesives showed reduced viability, the viabilities in the IB and SB groups were not significantly different from the control group. Although increased apoptosis rates were observed in all of the cultures with adhesives, the rate in the SB group was not significantly different from the rate in the control. The control group showed the lowest apoptosis rate followed by the SB, AO, IB, EB, XV, and CS groups. When examined under a scanning electron microscope, control odontoblasts and the SB group exhibited relatively large cytoplasmic extensions. In contrast, in the EB and CS groups, fewer fibroblasts remained adhered to the plate surface. Cytoplasmic membrane shrinkage and cell-free areas with residual membrane fragments from dead cells were observed. In conclusion, all cultures with one-step self-etching adhesives showed increased apoptotic activity. SB, an etch-and-rinse adhesive, was comparable to the control group, and CS and EB showed the lowest odontoblast viabilities according to the MTT assay. PMID:26186405

  8. Characterization of hepatocellular carcinoma cell lines based on cell adhesion molecules.

    PubMed

    Jung, Cheol Woong; Song, Tae-Jin; Lee, Kun-Ok; Choi, Sae Byeol; Kim, Wan Bae; Suh, Sung Ock; Kim, Young Chul; Choi, Sang Yong

    2012-06-01

    Many studies which focus on the molecules and mechanisms related to the characteristics of the cancer have been performed. In particular, cell adhesion molecules (CAMs) are known to play a central role in the adhesion of cancer cells to vascular endothelial cells. In this study, the expression of CAMs in hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) cell lines was analyzed and correlated with the characteristics of various HCC cell lines. Eight human HCC cell lines were used in this study. We analyzed the expression of ICAM-1, E-selectin and the integrin subunits of HCC cell lines by western blot analysis and ELISA kit. We estimated the expression of integrin-α5 using western blot analysis and RT-PCR to compare the expression at the gene level with the protein level. In addition, we determined the expression of TGF-β1, as one of the markers for the cellular activity compared to the levels of expression with the expression of integrin-α3 and -α5. ICAM-1 was highly expressed in all of the cell lines except SNU398 and Hep3B, which exhibit a more aggressive nature among the studied HCC cell lines. E-selectin and integrin subunits varied in all HCC cell lines. In particular, integrin-β2 was highly expressed on all HCC cell lines. In conclusion, the levels of expression of the CAMs may not affect cellular activity, morphology or tumorigenicity. However, most HCC cell lines show various expressions of CAMs, suggesting that HCC cell lines expressing the major CAMs remain candidates for molecular targeted therapy, which may need to be patient-tailored for therapy according to the molecular profile.

  9. The Evolutionary Origin of Epithelial Cell-Cell Adhesion Mechanisms

    PubMed Central

    Miller, Phillip W.; Clarke, Donald N.; Weis, William I.; Lowe, Christopher J.; Nelson, W. James

    2014-01-01

    SUMMARY A simple epithelium forms a barrier between the outside and the inside of an organism, and is the first organized multicellular tissue found in evolution. We examine the relationship between the evolution of epithelia and specialized cell-cell adhesion proteins comprising the classical cadherin/β-catenin/α-catenin complex (CCC). A review of the divergent functional properties of the CCC in metazoans and non-metazoans, and an updated phylogenetic coverage of the CCC using recent genomic data reveal: 1) The core CCC likely originated before the last common ancestor of unikonts and their closest bikont sister taxa. 2) Formation of the CCC may have constrained sequence evolution of the classical cadherin cytoplasmic domain and β-catenin in metazoa. 3) The α-catenin binding domain in β-catenin appears to be the favored mutation site for disrupting β-catenin function in the CCC. 4) The ancestral function of the α/β-catenin heterodimer appears to be an actin-binding module. In some metazoan groups, more complex functions of α-catenin were gained by sequence divergence in the non-actin binding (N-, M-) domains. 5) Allosteric regulation of α-catenin, rather than loss of function mutations, may have evolved for more complex regulation of the actin cytoskeleton. PMID:24210433

  10. Kank2 activates talin, reduces force transduction across integrins and induces central adhesion formation.

    PubMed

    Sun, Zhiqi; Tseng, Hui-Yuan; Tan, Steven; Senger, Fabrice; Kurzawa, Laetitia; Dedden, Dirk; Mizuno, Naoko; Wasik, Anita A; Thery, Manuel; Dunn, Alexander R; Fässler, Reinhard

    2016-09-01

    Integrin-based adhesions play critical roles in cell migration. Talin activates integrins and flexibly connects integrins to the actomyosin cytoskeleton, thereby serving as a 'molecular clutch' that transmits forces to the extracellular matrix to drive cell migration. Here we identify the evolutionarily conserved Kank protein family as novel components of focal adhesions (FAs). Kank proteins accumulate at the lateral border of FAs, which we term the FA belt, and in central sliding adhesions, where they directly bind the talin rod domain through the Kank amino-terminal (KN) motif and induce talin and integrin activation. In addition, Kank proteins diminish the talin-actomyosin linkage, which curbs force transmission across integrins, leading to reduced integrin-ligand bond strength, slippage between integrin and ligand, central adhesion formation and sliding, and reduced cell migration speed. Our data identify Kank proteins as talin activators that decrease the grip between the integrin-talin complex and actomyosin to regulate cell migration velocity. PMID:27548916

  11. Beta-catenin-mediated cell-adhesion is vital for embryonic forebrain development.

    PubMed

    Junghans, Dirk; Hack, Iris; Frotscher, Michael; Taylor, Verdon; Kemler, Rolf

    2005-06-01

    Forming a complex structure such as the mammalian brain requires a complex interplay between cells and different signalling cascades during embryonic development. beta-catenin plays pivotal roles in these processes by mediating cadherin-based cell adhesion and Wnt signalling. We show for the first time that beta-catenin functions predominantly as a mediator of cell adhesion during early development of the mammalian telencephalon. Immunohistochemical analysis demonstrates that beta-catenin is localized, together with N-cadherin, to adhesion junctions at the apical lining of the neuroepithelium. The ablation of beta-catenin specifically from the forebrain leads to a disruption of apical adherens junctions and a breakdown of neuroepithelial structures. We show that beta-catenin-deficient neuroepithelial cells delaminate and undergo apoptosis. Newborn beta-catenin mutants lack the entire forebrain and anterior facial structures. Our data also indicate a lack of TCF/LEF-beta-catenin-dependent transcriptional activity in the telencephalon of Wnt reporter embryos. Together with the absence of nuclear beta-catenin, this finding suggests that canonical Wnt signalling is not active during early telencephalic development. In summary, we demonstrate that beta-catenin mediates cell-cell adhesion in the early telencephalon and is vital for maintaining the structural integrity of the neuroepithelium.

  12. Activation of the lutropin/choriogonadotropin receptor (LHR) in MA-10 cells leads to the tyrosine phosphorylation of the focal adhesion kinase (FAK) by a pathway that involves Src family kinases*

    PubMed Central

    Mizutani, Tetsuya; Shiraishi, Koji; Welsh, Toni; Ascoli, Mario

    2006-01-01

    We show that activation of the endogenous or recombinant LHR in mouse Leydig tumor cells (MA-10 cells) leads to the tyrosine phosphorylation of the focal adhesion kinase (FAK) and one of its substrates (paxillin). Using specific antibodies to the five tyrosine residues of FAK that become phosphorylated we show that activation of the LHR increases the phosphorylation of Tyr576 and Tyr577 but it does not affect the phosphorylation of Tyr397, Tyr861 or Tyr925. Because FAK is a prominent substrate for the Src family of tyrosine kinases (SFKs) we tested for their involvement in the LHR-mediated phosphorylation of FAK-Tyr576. Src is not detectable in MA-10 cells, but two other prominent members of this family (Fyn and Yes) are present. The LHR-mediated phosphorylation of FAK-Tyr576 is readily inhibited by PP2 (a pharmacological inhibitor of SFKs) and by dominant-negative mutants of SKFs. Moreover, activation of the LHR in MA-10 cells results in the stimulation of the activity of Fyn and Yes and overexpression of either of these two tyrosine kinases enhances the LHR-mediate phosphorylation of FAK-Tyr576. Studies involving activation of other G protein-coupled receptors, overexpression of the different Gα subunits, and the use of second messenger analogs suggest that the LHR-induced phosphorylation of FAK-Tyr576 in MA-10 cells is mediated by SFKs, and that this family of kinases is, in turn, independently or cooperatively activated by the LHR-induced stimulation of Gs and Gq/11-mediated pathways. PMID:16293639

  13. The ubiquitous neural cell adhesion molecule (N-CAM).

    PubMed

    Weledji, Elroy P; Assob, Jules C

    2014-09-01

    Adhesive interactions are important for cell trafficking, differentiation, function and tissue differentiation. Neural cell adhesion molecule (NCAM) is involved in a diverse range of contact-mediated interactions among neurons, astrocytes, oligodendrocytes, and myotubes. It is widely but transiently expressed in many tissues early in embryogenesis. Four main isoforms exist but there are many other variants resulting from alternative splicing and post-translational modifications. This review discusses the actions and association of N-CAM and variants, PSA CAM. L1CAM and receptor tyrosine kinase. Their interactions with the interstitial cells of Cajal - the pacemaker cells of the gut in the manifestation of gut motility disorders, expression in carcinomas and mesenchymal tumours are discussed. PMID:25568792

  14. On the relation between surface roughness of metallic substrates and adhesion of human primary bone cells.

    PubMed

    Anselme, K; Bigerelle, M

    2014-01-01

    Surface characteristics of materials, whether their topography, chemistry, or surface energy, play an essential part in osteoblast adhesion on biomaterials. Thus, the quality of cell adhesion will influence the cell's capacity to proliferate and differentiate in contact with a biomaterial. We have developed for more than ten years numerous studies on the influence of topography and chemistry of metallic substrates on the response of primary human bone cells. The originality of our approach is that contrary to most of other authors, we quantified the adhesion of primary human bone cells on metallic substrates with perfectly characterized surface topography after some hours but also over 21 days. Moreover, we have developed original statistical approaches for characterizing the relation between surface roughness and cell-adhesion parameters. In this article, we will illustrate different studies we did these last ten years concerning the development of a new adhesion parameter, the adhesion power; the correlation between short-term adhesion, long-term adhesion, and proliferation; the influence of roughness organization on cell adhesion and the development of the order parameter; our modeling approach of cell adhesion on surface topography; the relative influence of surface chemistry and topography on cell adhesion and contact angle; the relation between surface features dimensions and cell adhesion. Further, some considerations will be given on the methods for scanning surface topography for cell-adhesion studies. Finally, perspectives will be given to elucidate these intracellular mechanotransduction mechanisms induced by the deformation of cells on model sinusoidal peaks-or-valleys surfaces.

  15. [Adhesive cell interactions in the biology of cancer].

    PubMed

    Bocharova, O A

    2002-01-01

    The present review describes a hypothesis for a critical role of cell adhesive interactions in tumorigenesis. Dysregulation of tissue cell-cell interactions initiates first of all local (in the tissue) and then general (in whole body) conditions for tumor growth. Otherwise imbalance of tissue-specific adhesion factor at the very beginning of carcinogenesis is considered to trigger a cascade of pathological reactions responsible for more severe adhesive disorders that are in turn critical for the "totalitarian" behavior of a tumor and its "colonization" of other tissues and organs. Impaired disturbance is likely to be the key mechanism of carcinogenesis since it is significantly associated with the main features of a tumor: tissue proliferation control loss, anaplasia, invasion, metastasis, and immune surveillance deficit. The hypothesis is supported by evolutionary, biological, histological, immunological, and clinical arguments whose combination does not characterize any other known mechanisms of oncogenesis. The concept of adhesiveness opens new possibilities for the diagnosis, prevention, and treatment of tumors and also improves a strategy for designing new drugs.

  16. Biomechanics of P-selectin PSGL-1 bonds: Shear threshold and integrin-independent cell adhesion

    SciTech Connect

    Xiao, Zhihua; Goldsmith, Harry L.; MacIntosh, Fiona A.; Shankaran, Harish; Neelamegham, Sriram

    2006-03-01

    Platelet-leukocyte adhesion may contribute to thrombosis and inflammation. We examined the heterotypic interaction between unactivated neutrophils and either thrombin receptor activating peptide (TRAP) stimulated platelets or P-selectin bearing beads (Ps-beads) in suspension. Cone-plate viscometers were used to apply controlled shear rates from 14-3000/s. Platelet-neutrophil and bead-neutrophil adhesion analysis was performed using both flow cytometry and high-speed videomicroscopy. We observed that while blocking antibodies against either P-selectin or P-selectin glycoprotein ligand-1 (PSGL-1) alone inhibited platelet-neutrophil adhesion by ~60% at 140/s, these reagents completely blocked adhesion at 3000/s. Anti-Mac-1 alone did not alter platelet-neutrophil adhesion rates at any shear rate, though in synergy with selectin antagonists it abrogated cell binding. Unstimulated neutrophils avidly bound Ps-beads and activated platelets in an integrin-independent manner, suggesting that purely selectin-dependent cell adhesion is possible. In support of this, antagonists against P-selectin or PSGL-1 dissociated previously formed platelet-neutrophil and Ps-bead neutrophil aggregates under shear in a variety of experimental systems, including in assays performed with whole blood. In studies where medium viscosity and shear rate were varied, a subtle shear threshold for P-selectin PSGL-1 binding was also noted at shear rates<100/s and at force loading rates of ~300pN/sec. Results are discussed in light of biophysical computations that characterize the collision between unequal size particles in linear shear flow. Overall, our studies reveal an integrin-independent regime for cell adhesion that may be physiologically relevant.

  17. Adhesion of Tritrichomonas foetus to bovine vaginal epithelial cells.

    PubMed

    Singh, B N; Lucas, J J; Beach, D H; Shin, S T; Gilbert, R O

    1999-08-01

    An in vitro culture system of bovine vaginal epithelial cells (BVECs) was developed to study the cytopathogenic effects of Tritrichomonas foetus and the role of lipophosphoglycan (LPG)-like cell surface glycoconjugates in adhesion of parasites to host cells. Exposure of BVEC monolayers to T. foetus resulted in extensive damage of monolayers. Host cell disruption was measured quantitatively by a trypan blue exclusion assay and by release of (3)H from [(3)H]thymidine-labeled host cells. Results indicated contact-dependent cytotoxicity of host cells by T. foetus. The cytopathogenic effect was a function of T. foetus density. Metronidazole- or periodate-treated T. foetus showed no damage to BVEC monolayers. A related human trichomonad, Trichomonas vaginalis, showed no cytotoxic effects, indicating species-specific host-parasite interactions. A direct binding assay was developed and used to investigate the role of a major cell surface LPG-like molecule in host-parasite adhesion. The results of competition experiments showed that the binding to BVECs was displaceable, was saturable, and yielded a typical binding curve, suggesting that specific receptor-ligand interactions mediate the attachment of T. foetus to BVECs. Progesterone-treated BVECs showed enhanced parasite binding. T. foetus LPG inhibited the binding of T. foetus to BVECs; the LPG from T. vaginalis and a variety of other glycoconjugates did not. These data imply specificity of LPG on host-parasite adhesion. Periodate-treated parasites showed no adherence to host cells, indicating the involvement of carbohydrate containing molecules in the adhesion process. PMID:10417148

  18. Adhesion of Tritrichomonas foetus to Bovine Vaginal Epithelial Cells

    PubMed Central

    Singh, B. N.; Lucas, J. J.; Beach, D. H.; Shin, S. T.; Gilbert, R. O.

    1999-01-01

    An in vitro culture system of bovine vaginal epithelial cells (BVECs) was developed to study the cytopathogenic effects of Tritrichomonas foetus and the role of lipophosphoglycan (LPG)-like cell surface glycoconjugates in adhesion of parasites to host cells. Exposure of BVEC monolayers to T. foetus resulted in extensive damage of monolayers. Host cell disruption was measured quantitatively by a trypan blue exclusion assay and by release of 3H from [3H]thymidine-labeled host cells. Results indicated contact-dependent cytotoxicity of host cells by T. foetus. The cytopathogenic effect was a function of T. foetus density. Metronidazole- or periodate-treated T. foetus showed no damage to BVEC monolayers. A related human trichomonad, Trichomonas vaginalis, showed no cytotoxic effects, indicating species-specific host-parasite interactions. A direct binding assay was developed and used to investigate the role of a major cell surface LPG-like molecule in host-parasite adhesion. The results of competition experiments showed that the binding to BVECs was displaceable, was saturable, and yielded a typical binding curve, suggesting that specific receptor-ligand interactions mediate the attachment of T. foetus to BVECs. Progesterone-treated BVECs showed enhanced parasite binding. T. foetus LPG inhibited the binding of T. foetus to BVECs; the LPG from T. vaginalis and a variety of other glycoconjugates did not. These data imply specificity of LPG on host-parasite adhesion. Periodate-treated parasites showed no adherence to host cells, indicating the involvement of carbohydrate containing molecules in the adhesion process. PMID:10417148

  19. Intercellular adhesion molecule-1 expression by skeletal muscle cells augments myogenesis

    SciTech Connect

    Goh, Qingnian; Dearth, Christopher L.; Corbett, Jacob T.; Pierre, Philippe; Chadee, Deborah N.; Pizza, Francis X.

    2015-02-15

    We previously demonstrated that the expression of intercellular adhesion molecule-1 (ICAM-1) by skeletal muscle cells after muscle overload contributes to ensuing regenerative and hypertrophic processes in skeletal muscle. The objective of the present study is to reveal mechanisms through which skeletal muscle cell expression of ICAM-1 augments regenerative and hypertrophic processes of myogenesis. This was accomplished by genetically engineering C2C12 myoblasts to stably express ICAM-1, and by inhibiting the adhesive and signaling functions of ICAM-1 through the use of a neutralizing antibody or cell penetrating peptide, respectively. Expression of ICAM-1 by cultured skeletal muscle cells augmented myoblast–myoblast adhesion, myotube formation, myonuclear number, myotube alignment, myotube–myotube fusion, and myotube size without influencing the ability of myoblasts to proliferate or differentiate. ICAM-1 augmented myotube formation, myonuclear accretion, and myotube alignment through a mechanism involving adhesion-induced activation of ICAM-1 signaling, as these dependent measures were reduced via antibody and peptide inhibition of ICAM-1. The adhesive and signaling functions of ICAM-1 also facilitated myotube hypertrophy through a mechanism involving myotube–myotube fusion, protein synthesis, and Akt/p70s6k signaling. Our findings demonstrate that ICAM-1 expression by skeletal muscle cells augments myogenesis, and establish a novel mechanism through which the inflammatory response facilitates growth processes in skeletal muscle. - Highlights: • We examined mechanisms through which skeletal muscle cell expression of ICAM-1 facilitates events of in vitro myogenesis. • Expression of ICAM-1 by cultured myoblasts did not influence their ability to proliferate or differentiate. • Skeletal muscle cell expression of ICAM-1 augmented myoblast fusion, myotube alignment, myotube–myotube fusion, and myotube size. • ICAM-1 augmented myogenic processes through

  20. Topographic cell instructive patterns to control cell adhesion, polarization and migration

    PubMed Central

    Ventre, Maurizio; Natale, Carlo Fortunato; Rianna, Carmela; Netti, Paolo Antonio

    2014-01-01

    Topographic patterns are known to affect cellular processes such as adhesion, migration and differentiation. However, the optimal way to deliver topographic signals to provide cells with precise instructions has not been defined yet. In this work, we hypothesize that topographic patterns may be able to control the sensing and adhesion machinery of cells when their interval features are tuned on the characteristic lengths of filopodial probing and focal adhesions (FAs). Features separated by distance beyond the length of filopodia cannot be readily perceived; therefore, the formation of new adhesions is discouraged. If, however, topographic features are separated by a distance within the reach of filopodia extension, cells can establish contact between adjacent topographic islands. In the latter case, cell adhesion and polarization rely upon the growth of FAs occurring on a specific length scale that depends on the chemical properties of the surface. Topographic patterns and chemical properties may interfere with the growth of FAs, thus making adhesions unstable. To test this hypothesis, we fabricated different micropatterned surfaces displaying feature dimensions and adhesive properties able to interfere with the filopodial sensing and the adhesion maturation, selectively. Our data demonstrate that it is possible to exert a potent control on cell adhesion, elongation and migration by tuning topographic features’ dimensions and surface chemistry. PMID:25253035

  1. A Review of Cell Adhesion Studies for Biomedical and Biological Applications

    PubMed Central

    Ahmad Khalili, Amelia; Ahmad, Mohd Ridzuan

    2015-01-01

    Cell adhesion is essential in cell communication and regulation, and is of fundamental importance in the development and maintenance of tissues. The mechanical interactions between a cell and its extracellular matrix (ECM) can influence and control cell behavior and function. The essential function of cell adhesion has created tremendous interests in developing methods for measuring and studying cell adhesion properties. The study of cell adhesion could be categorized into cell adhesion attachment and detachment events. The study of cell adhesion has been widely explored via both events for many important purposes in cellular biology, biomedical, and engineering fields. Cell adhesion attachment and detachment events could be further grouped into the cell population and single cell approach. Various techniques to measure cell adhesion have been applied to many fields of study in order to gain understanding of cell signaling pathways, biomaterial studies for implantable sensors, artificial bone and tooth replacement, the development of tissue-on-a-chip and organ-on-a-chip in tissue engineering, the effects of biochemical treatments and environmental stimuli to the cell adhesion, the potential of drug treatments, cancer metastasis study, and the determination of the adhesion properties of normal and cancerous cells. This review discussed the overview of the available methods to study cell adhesion through attachment and detachment events. PMID:26251901

  2. A Review of Cell Adhesion Studies for Biomedical and Biological Applications.

    PubMed

    Khalili, Amelia Ahmad; Ahmad, Mohd Ridzuan

    2015-08-05

    Cell adhesion is essential in cell communication and regulation, and is of fundamental importance in the development and maintenance of tissues. The mechanical interactions between a cell and its extracellular matrix (ECM) can influence and control cell behavior and function. The essential function of cell adhesion has created tremendous interests in developing methods for measuring and studying cell adhesion properties. The study of cell adhesion could be categorized into cell adhesion attachment and detachment events. The study of cell adhesion has been widely explored via both events for many important purposes in cellular biology, biomedical, and engineering fields. Cell adhesion attachment and detachment events could be further grouped into the cell population and single cell approach. Various techniques to measure cell adhesion have been applied to many fields of study in order to gain understanding of cell signaling pathways, biomaterial studies for implantable sensors, artificial bone and tooth replacement, the development of tissue-on-a-chip and organ-on-a-chip in tissue engineering, the effects of biochemical treatments and environmental stimuli to the cell adhesion, the potential of drug treatments, cancer metastasis study, and the determination of the adhesion properties of normal and cancerous cells. This review discussed the overview of the available methods to study cell adhesion through attachment and detachment events.

  3. LINKIN, a new transmembrane protein necessary for cell adhesion

    PubMed Central

    Kato, Mihoko; Chou, Tsui-Fen; Yu, Collin Z; DeModena, John; Sternberg, Paul W

    2014-01-01

    In epithelial collective migration, leader and follower cells migrate while maintaining cell–cell adhesion and tissue polarity. We have identified a conserved protein and interactors required for maintaining cell adhesion during a simple collective migration in the developing C. elegans male gonad. LINKIN is a previously uncharacterized, transmembrane protein conserved throughout Metazoa. We identified seven atypical FG–GAP domains in the extracellular domain, which potentially folds into a β-propeller structure resembling the α-integrin ligand-binding domain. C. elegans LNKN-1 localizes to the plasma membrane of all gonadal cells, with apical and lateral bias. We identified the LINKIN interactors RUVBL1, RUVBL2, and α-tubulin by using SILAC mass spectrometry on human HEK 293T cells and testing candidates for lnkn-1-like function in C. elegans male gonad. We propose that LINKIN promotes adhesion between neighboring cells through its extracellular domain and regulates microtubule dynamics through RUVBL proteins at its intracellular domain. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.04449.001 PMID:25437307

  4. Targeting Tumor Necrosis Factor-α with Adalimumab: Effects on Endothelial Activation and Monocyte Adhesion

    PubMed Central

    Oberoi, Raghav; Schuett, Jutta; Schuett, Harald; Koch, Ann-Kathrin; Luchtefeld, Maren

    2016-01-01

    Objective It is well known that atherosclerotic inflammatory vascular disease is critically driven by oxidized lipids and cytokines. In this regard, tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α is known as a crucial mediator of early pro-atherosclerotic events. Epidemiologic data suggest that blockade of TNF-α has beneficial effects on vascular outcomes in patients with rheumatoid arthritis, however, detailed mechanistic studies are still lacking. This study aims to elucidate effects of TNF-α blockade by adalimumab–which is approved for several inflammatory disorders–on endothelial activation and monocyte adhesion under pro-atherosclerotic conditions. Methods and Results Phorbol myristate acetate (PMA) differentiated THP-1 macrophages were stimulated with oxidized low density lipoprotein and subsequent analysis of this conditioned media (oxLDL CM) revealed a strong release of TNF-α. The TNF-α rich supernatant led to activation of human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVEC) as shown by enhanced expression of major adhesion molecules, such as vascular cell adhesion molecule-1 (VCAM-1), intercellular adhesion molecule-1 (ICAM-1) and E-selectin which was suppressed by the TNF-α inhibitor adalimumab. Accordingly, adalimumab effectively prevented THP-1 monocyte adhesion to endothelial cells under static as well as under flow conditions. Furthermore, adalimumab suppressed endothelial leakage as shown by Evan's blue diffusion across a confluent endothelial monolayer. Of note, after intraperitoneal injection we detected abundant deposition of fluorophore-labelled adalimumab in atherosclerotic plaques of hypercholesterolemic mice. Conclusion Our results show that adalimumab prevents major inflammatory effects of TNF-α on endothelial activation, endothelial monocyte adhesion, endothelial leakage and therefore extends the therapeutic options of adalimumab to limit vascular inflammation. PMID:27467817

  5. Cell-cell signaling and adhesion in phagocytosis and early development of Dictyostelium.

    PubMed

    Bracco, E; Pergolizzi, B; Peracino, B; Ponte, E; Balbo, A; Mai, A; Ceccarelli, A; Bozzaro, S

    2000-01-01

    Cell-cell signaling and adhesion regulate transition from the unicellular to the multicellular stage of development in the cellular slime mold Dictyostelium. Essential gene networks involved in these processes have been identified and their interplay dissected. Heterotrimeric G protein-linked signal transduction plays a key role in regulating expression of genes mediating chemotaxis or cell adhesion, as well as coordinating actin-based cell motility during phagocytosis and chemotaxis. Two classes of cell adhesion molecules, one cadherin-like and the second belonging to the IgG superfamily, contribute to the strength of adhesion in Dictyostelium aggregates. The developmental role of genes involved in motility and adhesion, and their degree of redundancy, have been re-assessed by using novel developmental assay conditions which are closer to development in nature. PMID:11061438

  6. Understanding dynamic changes in live cell adhesion with neutron reflectometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Junghans, Ann

    Understanding the structure and functionality of biological systems on a nanometer-resolution and short temporal scales is important for solving complex biological problems, developing innovative treatment, and advancing the design of highly functionalized biomimetic materials. For example, adhesion of cells to an underlying substrate plays a crucial role in physiology and disease development, and has been investigated with great interest for several decades. In the talk, we would like to highlight recent advances in utilizing neutron scattering to study bio-related structures in dynamic conditions (e . g . under the shear flow) including in-situ investigations of the interfacial properties of living cells. The strength of neutron reflectometry is its non-pertubative nature, the ability to probe buried interfaces with nanometer resolution and its sensitivity to light elements like hydrogen and carbon. That allows us to study details of cell - substrate interfaces that are not accessible with any other standard techniques. We studied the adhesion of human brain tumor cells (U251) to quartz substrates and their responses to the external mechanical forces. Such cells are isolated within the central nervous system which makes them difficult to reach with conventional therapies and therefore making them highly invasive. Our results reveal changes in the thickness and composition of the adhesion layer (a layer between the cell lipid membrane and the quartz substrate), largely composed of hyaluronic acid and associated proteoglycans, when the cells were subjected to shear stress. Further studies will allow us to determine more conditions triggering changes in the composition of the bio-material in the adhesion layer. This, in turn, can help to identify changes that correlate with tumor invasiveness, which can have significant medical impact for the development of targeted anti-invasive therapies.

  7. Receptor FGFRL1 does not promote cell proliferation but induces cell adhesion

    PubMed Central

    YANG, XIAOCHEN; STEINBERG, FLORIAN; ZHUANG, LEI; BESSEY, RALPH; TRUEB, BEAT

    2016-01-01

    Fibroblast growth factor receptor (FGFR)-like protein 1 (FGFRL1) is the most recently discovered member of the FGFR family. Owing to the fact that it interacts with FGF ligands, but lacks the intracellular tyrosine kinase domain, several researchers have speculated that it may function as a decoy receptor and exert a negative effect on cell proliferation. In this study, we performed overexpression experiments with TetOn-inducible cell clones and downregulation experiments with siRNA oligonucleotides, and found that FGFRL1 had absolutely no effect on cell growth and proliferation. Likewise, we did not observe any influence of FGFRL1 on ERK1/2 activation and on the phosphorylation of 250 other signaling proteins analyzed by the Kinexus antibody microarray. On the other hand, with bacterial petri dishes, we observed a clear effect of FGFRL1 on cell adhesion during the initial hours after cell seeding. Our results suggest that FGFRL1 is a cell adhesion protein similar to the nectins rather than a signaling receptor similar to FGFR1-FGFR4. PMID:27220341

  8. How to awaken your nanomachines: Site-specific activation of focal adhesion kinases through ligand interactions.

    PubMed

    Walkiewicz, Katarzyna W; Girault, Jean-Antoine; Arold, Stefan T

    2015-10-01

    The focal adhesion kinase (FAK) and the related protein-tyrosine kinase 2-beta (Pyk2) are highly versatile multidomain scaffolds central to cell adhesion, migration, and survival. Due to their key role in cancer metastasis, understanding and inhibiting their functions are important for the development of targeted therapy. Because FAK and Pyk2 are involved in many different cellular functions, designing drugs with partial and function-specific inhibitory effects would be desirable. Here, we summarise recent progress in understanding the structural mechanism of how the tug-of-war between intramolecular and intermolecular interactions allows these protein 'nanomachines' to become activated in a site-specific manner.

  9. Rapid and Localized Mechanical Stimulation and Adhesion Assay: TRPM7 Involvement in Calcium Signaling and Cell Adhesion.

    PubMed

    Nishitani, Wagner Shin; Alencar, Adriano Mesquita; Wang, Yingxiao

    2015-01-01

    A cell mechanical stimulation equipment, based on cell substrate deformation, and a more sensitive method for measuring adhesion of cells were developed. A probe, precisely positioned close to the cell, was capable of a vertical localized mechanical stimulation with a temporal frequency of 207 Hz, and strain magnitude of 50%. This setup was characterized and used to probe the response of Human Umbilical Endothelial Vein Cells (HUVECs) in terms of calcium signaling. The intracellular calcium ion concentration was measured by the genetically encoded Cameleon biosensor, with the Transient Receptor Potential cation channel, subfamily M, member 7 (TRPM7) expression inhibited. As TRPM7 expression also regulates adhesion, a relatively simple method for measuring adhesion of cells was also developed, tested and used to study the effect of adhesion alone. Three adhesion conditions of HUVECs on polyacrylamide gel dishes were compared. In the first condition, the substrate is fully treated with Sulfo-SANPAH crosslinking and fibronectin. The other two conditions had increasingly reduced adhesion: partially treated (only coated with fibronectin, with no use of Sulfo-SANPAH, at 5% of the normal amount) and non-treated polyacrylamide gels. The cells showed adhesion and calcium response to the mechanical stimulation correlated to the degree of gel treatment: highest for fully treated gels and lowest for non-treated ones. TRPM7 inhibition by siRNA on HUVECs caused an increase in adhesion relative to control (no siRNA treatment) and non-targeting siRNA, but a decrease to 80% of calcium response relative to non-targeting siRNA which confirms the important role of TRPM7 in mechanotransduction despite the increase in adhesion.

  10. Microvascular Transport and Tumor Cell Adhesion in the Microcirculation

    PubMed Central

    Fu, Bingmei M.; Liu, Yang

    2016-01-01

    One critical step in tumor metastasis is tumor cell adhesion to the endothelium forming the microvessel wall. Understanding this step may lead to new therapeutic concepts for tumor metastasis. Vascular endothelium forming the microvessel wall and the glycocalyx layer at its surface are the principal barriers to, and regulators of the material exchange between circulating blood and body tissues. The cleft between adjacent ECs (interendothelial cleft) is the principal pathway for water and solutes transport through the microvessel wall in health. It is also suggested to be the pathway for high molecular weight plasma proteins, leukocytes and tumor cells across microvessel walls in disease. Thus the first part of the review introduced the mathematical models for water and solutes transport through the interendothelial cleft. These models, combined with the experimental results from in vivo animal studies and electron microscopic observations, are used to evaluate the role of the endothelial surface glycocalyx, the junction strand geometry in the interendothelial cleft, and the surrounding extracellular matrix and tissue cells, as the determinants of microvascular transport. The second part of the review demonstrated how the microvascular permeability, hydrodynamic factors, microvascular geometry and cell adhesion molecules affect tumor cell adhesion in the microcirculation. PMID:22476895

  11. Focal adhesion molecule Kindlin-1 mediates activation of TGF-β signaling by interacting with TGF-βRI, SARA and Smad3 in colorectal cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Kong, Jinfeng; Du, Juan; Wang, Yunling; Yang, Mingzi; Gao, Jianchao; Wei, Xiaofan; Fang, Weigang; Zhan, Jun; Zhang, Hongquan

    2016-10-20

    Kindlin-1, an integrin-interacting protein, has been implicated in TGF-β/Smad3 signaling. However, the molecular mechanism underlying Kindlin-1 regulation of TGF-β/Smad3 signaling remains elusive. Here, we reported that Kindlin-1 is an important mediator of TGF-β/Smad3 signaling by showing that Kindlin-1 physically interacts with TGF-β receptor I (TβRI), Smad anchor for receptor activation (SARA) and Smad3. Kindlin-1 is required for the interaction of Smad3 with TβRI, Smad3 phosphorylation, nuclear translocation, and finally the activation of TGF-β/Smad3 signaling pathway. Functionally, Kindlin-1 promoted colorectal cancer (CRC) cell proliferation in vitro and tumor growth in vivo, and was also required for CRC cell migration and invasion via an epithelial to mesenchymal transition. Kindlin-1 was found to be increased with the CRC progression from stages I to IV. Importantly, raised expression level of Kindlin-1 correlates with poor outcome in CRC patients. Taken together, we demonstrated that Kindlin-1 promotes CRC progression by recruiting SARA and Smad3 to TβRI and thereby activates TGF-β/Smad3 signaling. Thus, Kindlin-1 is a novel regulator of TGF-β/Smad3 signaling and may also be a potential target for CRC therapeutics.

  12. Dynamic Surfaces for the Study of Mesenchymal Stem Cell Growth through Adhesion Regulation.

    PubMed

    Roberts, Jemma N; Sahoo, Jugal Kishore; McNamara, Laura E; Burgess, Karl V; Yang, Jingli; Alakpa, Enateri V; Anderson, Hilary J; Hay, Jake; Turner, Lesley-Anne; Yarwood, Stephen J; Zelzer, Mischa; Oreffo, Richard O C; Ulijn, Rein V; Dalby, Matthew J

    2016-07-26

    Out of their niche environment, adult stem cells, such as mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs), spontaneously differentiate. This makes both studying these important regenerative cells and growing large numbers of stem cells for clinical use challenging. Traditional cell culture techniques have fallen short of meeting this challenge, but materials science offers hope. In this study, we have used emerging rules of managing adhesion/cytoskeletal balance to prolong MSC cultures by fabricating controllable nanoscale cell interfaces using immobilized peptides that may be enzymatically activated to change their function. The surfaces can be altered (activated) at will to tip adhesion/cytoskeletal balance and initiate differentiation, hence better informing biological mechanisms of stem cell growth. Tools that are able to investigate the stem cell phenotype are important. While large phenotypical differences, such as the difference between an adipocyte and an osteoblast, are now better understood, the far more subtle differences between fibroblasts and MSCs are much harder to dissect. The development of technologies able to dynamically navigate small differences in adhesion are critical in the race to provide regenerative strategies using stem cells. PMID:27322014

  13. Dynamic Surfaces for the Study of Mesenchymal Stem Cell Growth through Adhesion Regulation.

    PubMed

    Roberts, Jemma N; Sahoo, Jugal Kishore; McNamara, Laura E; Burgess, Karl V; Yang, Jingli; Alakpa, Enateri V; Anderson, Hilary J; Hay, Jake; Turner, Lesley-Anne; Yarwood, Stephen J; Zelzer, Mischa; Oreffo, Richard O C; Ulijn, Rein V; Dalby, Matthew J

    2016-07-26

    Out of their niche environment, adult stem cells, such as mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs), spontaneously differentiate. This makes both studying these important regenerative cells and growing large numbers of stem cells for clinical use challenging. Traditional cell culture techniques have fallen short of meeting this challenge, but materials science offers hope. In this study, we have used emerging rules of managing adhesion/cytoskeletal balance to prolong MSC cultures by fabricating controllable nanoscale cell interfaces using immobilized peptides that may be enzymatically activated to change their function. The surfaces can be altered (activated) at will to tip adhesion/cytoskeletal balance and initiate differentiation, hence better informing biological mechanisms of stem cell growth. Tools that are able to investigate the stem cell phenotype are important. While large phenotypical differences, such as the difference between an adipocyte and an osteoblast, are now better understood, the far more subtle differences between fibroblasts and MSCs are much harder to dissect. The development of technologies able to dynamically navigate small differences in adhesion are critical in the race to provide regenerative strategies using stem cells.

  14. Dynamic Surfaces for the Study of Mesenchymal Stem Cell Growth through Adhesion Regulation

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Out of their niche environment, adult stem cells, such as mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs), spontaneously differentiate. This makes both studying these important regenerative cells and growing large numbers of stem cells for clinical use challenging. Traditional cell culture techniques have fallen short of meeting this challenge, but materials science offers hope. In this study, we have used emerging rules of managing adhesion/cytoskeletal balance to prolong MSC cultures by fabricating controllable nanoscale cell interfaces using immobilized peptides that may be enzymatically activated to change their function. The surfaces can be altered (activated) at will to tip adhesion/cytoskeletal balance and initiate differentiation, hence better informing biological mechanisms of stem cell growth. Tools that are able to investigate the stem cell phenotype are important. While large phenotypical differences, such as the difference between an adipocyte and an osteoblast, are now better understood, the far more subtle differences between fibroblasts and MSCs are much harder to dissect. The development of technologies able to dynamically navigate small differences in adhesion are critical in the race to provide regenerative strategies using stem cells. PMID:27322014

  15. Surface deformation and shear flow in ligand mediated cell adhesion.

    PubMed

    Sircar, Sarthok; Roberts, Anthony J

    2016-10-01

    We present a unified, multiscale model to study the attachment/detachment dynamics of two deforming, charged, near spherical cells, coated with binding ligands and subject to a slow, homogeneous shear flow in a viscous, ionic fluid medium. The binding ligands on the surface of the cells experience both attractive and repulsive forces in an ionic medium and exhibit finite resistance to rotation via bond tilting. The microscale drag forces and couples describing the fluid flow inside the small separation gap between the cells, are calculated using a combination of methods in lubrication theory and previously published numerical results. For a selected range of material and fluid parameters, a hysteretic transition of the sticking probability curves (i.e., the function [Formula: see text]) between the adhesion phase (when [Formula: see text]) and the fragmentation phase (when [Formula: see text]) is attributed to a nonlinear relation between the total nanoscale binding forces and the separation gap between the cells. We show that adhesion is favoured in highly ionic fluids, increased deformability of the cells, elastic binders and a higher fluid shear rate (until a critical threshold value of shear rate is reached). Within a selected range of critical shear rates, the continuation of the limit points (i.e., the turning points where the slope of [Formula: see text] changes sign) predict a bistable region, indicating an abrupt switching between the adhesion and the fragmentation regimes. Although, bistability in the adhesion-fragmentation phase diagram of two deformable, charged cells immersed in an ionic aqueous environment has been identified by some in vitro experiments, but until now, has not been quantified theoretically.

  16. Robust adhesive precision bonding in automated assembly cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Müller, Tobias; Haag, Sebastian; Bastuck, Thomas; Gisler, Thomas; Moser, Hansruedi; Uusimaa, Petteri; Axt, Christoph; Brecher, Christian

    2014-03-01

    Diode lasers are gaining importance, making their way to higher output powers along with improved BPP. The assembly of micro-optics for diode laser systems goes along with the highest requirements regarding assembly precision. Assembly costs for micro-optics are driven by the requirements regarding alignment in a submicron and the corresponding challenges induced by adhesive bonding. For micro-optic assembly tasks a major challenge in adhesive bonding at highest precision level is the fact, that the bonding process is irreversible. Accordingly, the first bonding attempt needs to be successful. Today's UV-curing adhesives inherit shrinkage effects crucial for submicron tolerances of e.g. FACs. The impact of the shrinkage effects can be tackled by a suitable bonding area design, such as minimal adhesive gaps and an adapted shrinkage offset value for the specific assembly parameters. Compensating shrinkage effects is difficult, as the shrinkage of UV-curing adhesives is not constant between two different lots and varies even over the storage period even under ideal circumstances as first test results indicate. An up-to-date characterization of the adhesive appears necessary for maximum precision in optics assembly to reach highest output yields, minimal tolerances and ideal beamshaping results. Therefore, a measurement setup to precisely determine the up-to-date level of shrinkage has been setup. The goal is to provide necessary information on current shrinkage to the operator or assembly cell to adjust the compensation offset on a daily basis. Impacts of this information are expected to be an improved beam shaping result and a first-time-right production.

  17. Sickle cell disease biochip: a functional red blood cell adhesion assay for monitoring sickle cell disease

    PubMed Central

    ALAPAN, YUNUS; KIM, CEONNE; ADHIKARI, ANIMA; GRAY, KAYLA E.; GURKAN-CAVUSOGLU, EVREN; LITTLE, JANE A.; GURKAN, UMUT A.

    2016-01-01

    Sickle cell disease (SCD) afflicts millions of people worldwide and is associated with considerable morbidity and mortality. Chronic and acute vaso-occlusion are the clinical hallmarks of SCD and can result in pain crisis, widespread organ damage, and early movtality. Even though the molecular underpinnings of SCD were identified more than 60 years ago, there are no molecular or biophysical markers of disease severity that are feasibly measured in the clinic. Abnormal cellular adhesion to vascular endothelium is at the root of vaso-occlusion. However, cellular adhesion is not currently evaluated clinically. Here, we present a clinically applicable microfluidic device (SCD biochip) that allows serial quantitative evaluation of red blood cell (RBC) adhesion to endothelium-associated protein-immobilized microchannels, in a closed and preprocessing-free system. With the SCD biochip, we have analyzed blood samples from more than 100 subjects and have shown associations between the measured RBC adhesion to endothelium-associated proteins (fibronectin and laminin) and individual RBC characteristics, including hemoglobin content, fetal hemoglobin concentration, plasma lactate dehydrogenase level, and reticulocyte count. The SCD biochip is a functional adhesion assay, reflecting quantitative evaluation of RBC adhesion, which could be used at baseline, during crises, relative to various long-term complications, and before and after therapeutic interventions. PMID:27063958

  18. OSTEOBLAST ADHESION OF BREAST CANCER CELLS WITH SCANNING ACOUSTIC MICROSCOPY

    SciTech Connect

    Chiaki Miyasaka; Robyn R. Mercer; Andrea M. Mastro; Ken L. Telschow

    2005-03-01

    Breast cancer frequently metastasizes to the bone. Upon colonizing bone tissue, the cancer cells stimulate osteoclasts (cells that break bone down), resulting in large lesions in the bone. The breast cancer cells also affect osteoblasts (cells that build new bone). Conditioned medium was collected from a bone-metastatic breast cancer cell line, MDA-MB-231, and cultured with an immature osteoblast cell line, MC3T3-E1. Under these conditions the osteoblasts acquired a changed morphology and appeared to adherer in a different way to the substrate and to each other. To characterize cell adhesion, MC3T3-E1 osteoblasts were cultured with or without MDA-MB-231 conditioned medium for two days, and then assayed with a mechanical scanning acoustic reflection microscope (SAM). The SAM indicated that in normal medium the MC3T3-E1 osteoblasts were firmly attached to their plastic substrate. However, MC3T3-E1 cells cultured with MDA-MB-231 conditioned medium displayed both an abnormal shape and poor adhesion at the substrate interface. The cells were fixed and stained to visualize cytoskeletal components using optical microscopic techniques. We were not able to observe these differences until the cells were quite confluent after 7 days of culture. However, using the SAM, we were able to detect these changes within 2 days of culture with MDA-MB-231 conditioned medium

  19. Mechanics in Mechanosensitivity of Cell Adhesion and its Roles in Cell Migration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhong, Yuan; He, Shijie; Ji, Baohua

    2012-12-01

    Cells sense and respond to external stimuli and properties of their environment through focal adhesion complexes (FACs) to regulate a broad range of physiological and pathological processes, including cell migration. Currently, the basic principles in mechanics of the mechanosensitivity of cell adhesion and migration have not been fully understood. In this paper, an FEM-based mechano-chemical coupling model is proposed for studying the cell migration behaviors in which the dynamics of stability of FACs and the effect of cell shape on cell traction force distribution are considered. We find that the driving force of cell migration is produced by the competition of stability of cell adhesion between the cell front and cell rear, which consequently controls the speed of cell migration. We show that the rigidity gradient of matrix can bias this competition which allows cell to exhibit a durotaxis behavior, i.e. the larger the gradient, the higher the cell speed.

  20. Effect of doxycycline on proliferation, MMP production, and adhesion in LAM-related cells.

    PubMed

    Chang, William Y C; Clements, Debbie; Johnson, Simon R

    2010-09-01

    Matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs) have been implicated in lung cyst formation in lymphangioleiomyomatosis (LAM). As doxycycline inhibits MMP activity in vivo, some patients take doxycycline, as one report has suggested a possible benefit in LAM. However, there have been no randomized controlled clinical trials of doxycycline for LAM, and any mechanism of action is unclear. Here, we examine previously proposed mechanisms of actions. Cell proliferation and adhesion were examined using 3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide (MTT) reduction and Cytomatrix cell adhesion kits. Apoptosis was examined by TdT-mediated dUTP nick end labeling (TUNEL) assay. MMP-2 expression was examined by quantitative real-time PCR and zymography in doxycycline-treated ELT3 cells and tumor growth using angiomyolipoma-derived tumor xenografts in nude mice. In ELT3 cells, >or=25 microg/ml doxycycline decreased proliferation, increased apoptosis, and caused a change in cell morphology associated with redistribution of actin stress filaments. Reduction in proliferation was also seen in human angiomyolipoma-derived cells. Cell adhesion to ECM proteins was decreased by doxycycline at 50 microg/ml and prevented detachment of already adherent cells. There was no effect of doxycycline on MMP-2 expression or activity in vitro. In the xenograft model, doxycycline (30 mg*kg(-1)*day(-1)) had no effect on tumor growth, final tumor weight, or tumor lysate MMP levels. Doxycycline at doses >or= 25 microg/ml inhibited cell proliferation and adhesion, possibly by a toxic effect. Doxycycline had no effect on MMP-2 expression or activity or tumor growth in the xenograft model. Any possible in vivo effect is unlikely to be mediated by MMP-2 or reduced cell proliferation.

  1. Heterotypic binding between neuronal membrane vesicles and glial cells is mediated by a specific cell adhesion molecule

    PubMed Central

    1984-01-01

    By means of a multistage quantitative assay, we have identified a new kind of cell adhesion molecule (CAM) on neuronal cells of the chick embryo that is involved in their adhesion to glial cells. The assay used to identify the binding component (which we name neuron-glia CAM or Ng-CAM) was designed to distinguish between homotypic binding (e.g., neuron to neuron) and heterotypic binding (e.g., neuron to glia). This distinction was essential because a single neuron might simultaneously carry different CAMs separately mediating each of these interactions. The adhesion of neuronal cells to glial cells in vitro was previously found to be inhibited by Fab' fragments prepared from antisera against neuronal membranes but not by Fab' fragments against N-CAM, the neural cell adhesion molecule. This suggested that neuron-glia adhesion is mediated by specific cell surface molecules different from previously isolated CAMs . To verify that this was the case, neuronal membrane vesicles were labeled internally with 6-carboxyfluorescein and externally with 125I-labeled antibodies to N-CAM to block their homotypic binding. Labeled vesicles bound to glial cells but not to fibroblasts during a 30-min incubation period. The specific binding of the neuronal vesicles to glial cells was measured by fluorescence microscopy and gamma spectroscopy of the 125I label. Binding increased with increasing concentrations of both glial cells and neuronal vesicles. Fab' fragments prepared from anti-neuronal membrane sera that inhibited binding between neurons and glial cells were also found to inhibit neuronal vesicle binding to glial cells. The inhibitory activity of the Fab' fragments was depleted by preincubation with neuronal cells but not with glial cells. Trypsin treatment of neuronal membrane vesicles released material that neutralized Fab' fragment inhibition; after chromatography, neutralizing activity was enriched 50- fold. This fraction was injected into mice to produce monoclonal

  2. Targeting the Metastasis Suppressor, N-Myc Downstream Regulated Gene-1, with Novel Di-2-Pyridylketone Thiosemicarbazones: Suppression of Tumor Cell Migration and Cell-Collagen Adhesion by Inhibiting Focal Adhesion Kinase/Paxillin Signaling.

    PubMed

    Wangpu, Xiongzhi; Lu, Jiaoyang; Xi, Ruxing; Yue, Fei; Sahni, Sumit; Park, Kyung Chan; Menezes, Sharleen; Huang, Michael L H; Zheng, Minhua; Kovacevic, Zaklina; Richardson, Des R

    2016-05-01

    Metastasis is a complex process that is regulated by multiple signaling pathways, with the focal adhesion kinase (FAK)/paxillin pathway playing a major role in the formation of focal adhesions and cell motility. N-myc downstream regulated gene-1 (NDRG1) is a potent metastasis suppressor in many solid tumor types, including prostate and colon cancer. Considering the antimetastatic effect of NDRG1 and the crucial involvement of the FAK/paxillin pathway in cellular migration and cell-matrix adhesion, we assessed the effects of NDRG1 on this important oncogenic pathway. In the present study, NDRG1 overexpression and silencing models of HT29 colon cancer and DU145 prostate cancer cells were used to examine the activation of FAK/paxillin signaling and the formation of focal adhesions. The expression of NDRG1 resulted in a marked and significant decrease in the activating phosphorylation of FAK and paxillin, whereas silencing of NDRG1 resulted in an opposite effect. The expression of NDRG1 also inhibited the formation of focal adhesions as well as cell migration and cell-collagen adhesion. Incubation of cells with novel thiosemicarbazones, namely di-2-pyridylketone 4,4-dimethyl-3-thiosemicarbazone and di-2-pyridylketone 4-cyclohexyl-4-methyl-3-thiosemicarbazone, that upregulate NDRG1 also resulted in decreased phosphorylation of FAK and paxillin. The ability of these thiosemicarbazones to inhibit cell migration and metastasis could be mediated, at least in part, through the FAK/paxillin pathway. PMID:26895766

  3. Dystrophin Dp71f associates with the beta1-integrin adhesion complex to modulate PC12 cell adhesion.

    PubMed

    Cerna, Joel; Cerecedo, Doris; Ortega, Arturo; García-Sierra, Francisco; Centeno, Federico; Garrido, Efrain; Mornet, Dominique; Cisneros, Bulmaro

    2006-10-01

    Dystrophin Dp71 is the main product of the Duchenne muscular dystrophy gene in the brain; however, its function is unknown. To study the role of Dp71 in neuronal cells, we previously generated by antisense treatment PC12 neuronal cell clones with decreased Dp71 expression (antisense-Dp71 cells). PC12 cells express two different splicing isoforms of Dp71, a cytoplasmic variant called Dp71f and a nuclear isoform called Dp71d. We previously reported that antisense-Dp71 cells display deficient adhesion to substrate and reduced immunostaining of beta1-integrin in the cell area contacting the substrate. In this study, we isolated additional antisense-Dp71 clones to analyze in detail the potential involvement of Dp71f isoform with the beta1-integrin adhesion system of PC12 cells. Immunofluorescence analyses as well as immunoprecipitation assays demonstrated that the PC12 cell beta1-integrin adhesion complex is composed of beta1-integrin, talin, paxillin, alpha-actinin, FAK and actin. In addition, our results showed that Dp71f associates with most of the beta1-integrin complex components (beta1-integrin, FAK, alpha-actinin, talin and actin). In the antisense-Dp71 cells, the deficiency of Dp71 provokes a significant reduction of the beta1-integrin adhesion complex and, consequently, the deficient adhesion of these cells to laminin. In vitro binding experiments confirmed the interaction of Dp71f with FAK and beta1-integrin. Our data indicate that Dp71f is a structural component of the beta1-integrin adhesion complex of PC12 cells that modulates PC12 cell adhesion by conferring proper complex assembly and/or maintenance.

  4. Dystrophin Dp71f associates with the beta1-integrin adhesion complex to modulate PC12 cell adhesion

    PubMed Central

    Cerna, Joel; Cerecedo, Doris; Ortega, Arturo; García-Sierra, Francisco; Centeno, Federico; Garrido, Efrain; Mornet, Dominique; Cisneros, Bulmaro

    2006-01-01

    Dystrophin Dp71 is the main product of the Duchenne muscular dystrophy gene in the brain; however, its function is unknown. To study the role of Dp71 in neuronal cells, we previously generated by antisense treatment PC12 neuronal cell clones with decreased Dp71 expression (antisense-Dp71 cells). PC12 cells express two different splicing isoforms of Dp71, a cytoplasmic variant called Dp71f and a nuclear isoform called Dp71d. We previously reported that antisense-Dp71 cells display deficient adhesion to substrate and reduced immunostaining of β1-integrin in the cell area contacting the substrate. In this study, we isolated additional antisenseDp71 clones to analyze in detail the potential involvement of Dp71f isoform with the β1-integrin adhesion system of PC12 cells. Immunofluorescence analyses as well as immunoprecipitation assays demonstrated that the PC12 cell β1-integrin adhesion complex is composed of β1-integrin, talin, paxillin, α-actinin, FAK and actin. In addition, our results showed that Dp71f associates with most of the β1-integrin complex components (β1-integrin, FAK, α-actinin, talin and actin). In the antisense-Dp71 cells, the deficiency of Dp71 provokes a significant reduction of the β1-integrin adhesion complex and, consequently, the deficient adhesion of these cells to laminin. In vitro binding experiments confirmed the interaction of Dp71f with FAK and β1-integrin. Our data indicate that Dp71f is a structural component of the β1-integrin adhesion complex of PC12 cells that modulates PC12 cell adhesion by conferring proper complex assembly and/or maintenance. PMID:16935300

  5. Netrin-4 promotes mural cell adhesion and recruitment to endothelial cells

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Netrins are secreted molecules involved in axon guidance and angiogenesis. We previously showed that Netrin-4 acts as an anti-angiogenic factor by inhibiting endothelial cell (EC) functions. In this study, we investigated the effects of Netrin-4 on vascular smooth muscle cell (VSMC) activity in vitro and in vivo. We show that exogenous Netrin-4 stimulated VSMC adhesion and migration, and increased their coverage on EC tubes (grown on a Matrigel substrate). siRNA knock-down of endogenous Netrin-4 expression in VSMC decreased their recruitment to EC tubes. VSMC expressed Netrin-4 and three of the six Netrin-1 cognate receptors: DCC, Neogenin, and Unc5B. Silencing of these receptors reduced Netrin-4 adhesion to VSMC, strongly suggesting that these receptors were involved in the recruitment process. We previously showed that Netrin-4 overexpression in PC3 cancer cells delayed tumor growth in a model of subcutaneous xenograft by reducing tumor vessel density. Here, we show that Netrin-4 overexpression improved tumor blood vessel structure and increased VSMC coverage. Thus, Netrin-4 induced mural cell recruitment may play a role in the inhibition of tumor growth. Our data suggest that Netrin-4 is important for blood vessel normalization through the regulation of both endothelial and perivascular cells. PMID:24472220

  6. Plakophilin 2 Affects Cell Migration by Modulating Focal Adhesion Dynamics and Integrin Protein Expression

    PubMed Central

    Koetsier, Jennifer L.; Amargo, Evangeline V.; Todorović, Viktor; Green, Kathleen J.; Godsel, Lisa M.

    2014-01-01

    Plakophilin 2 (PKP2), a desmosome component, modulates the activity and localization of the small GTPase RhoA at sites of cell–cell contact. PKP2 regulates cortical actin rearrangement during junction formation, and its loss is accompanied by an increase in actin stress fibers. We hypothesized that PKP2 may regulate focal adhesion dynamics and cell migration. Here we show that PKP2-deficient cells bind efficiently to the extracellular matrix, but upon spreading display total cell areas ~30% smaller than control cells. Focal adhesions in PKP2-deficient cells are ~2× larger and more stable than in control cells, and vinculin displays an increased time for fluorescence recovery after photobleaching. Furthermore, β4 and β1 integrin protein and mRNA expression is elevated in PKP2-silenced cells. Normal focal adhesion phenotypes can be restored in PKP2-null cells by dampening the RhoA pathway or silencing β1 integrin. However, integrin expression levels are not restored by RhoA signaling inhibition. These data uncover a potential role for PKP2 upstream of β1 integrin and RhoA in integrating cell–cell and cell–substrate contact signaling in basal keratinocytes necessary for the morphogenesis, homeostasis, and reepithelialization of the stratified epidermis. PMID:23884246

  7. The Microvesicle Component of HIV-1 Inocula Modulates Dendritic Cell Infection and Maturation and Enhances Adhesion to and Activation of T Lymphocytes

    PubMed Central

    Mercier, Sarah K.; Donaghy, Heather; Botting, Rachel A.; Turville, Stuart G.; Harman, Andrew N.; Nasr, Najla; Ji, Hong; Kusebauch, Ulrike; Mendoza, Luis; Shteynberg, David; Sandgren, Kerrie; Simpson, Richard J.; Moritz, Robert L.; Cunningham, Anthony L.

    2013-01-01

    HIV-1 is taken up by immature monocyte derived dendritic cells (iMDDCs) into tetraspanin rich caves from which the virus can either be transferred to T lymphocytes or enter into endosomes resulting in degradation. HIV-1 binding and fusion with the DC membrane results in low level de novo infection that can also be transferred to T lymphocytes at a later stage. We have previously reported that HIV-1 can induce partial maturation of iMDDCs at both stages of trafficking. Here we show that CD45+ microvesicles (MV) which contaminate purified HIV-1 inocula due to similar size and density, affect DC maturation, de novo HIV-1 infection and transfer to T lymphocytes. Comparing iMDDCs infected with CD45-depleted HIV-1BaL or matched non-depleted preparations, the presence of CD45+ MVs was shown to enhance DC maturation and ICAM-1 (CD54) expression, which is involved in DC∶T lymphocyte interactions, while restricting HIV-1 infection of MDDCs. Furthermore, in the DC culture HIV-1 infected (p24+) MDDCs were more mature than bystander cells. Depletion of MVs from the HIV-1 inoculum markedly inhibited DC∶T lymphocyte clustering and the induction of alloproliferation as well as limiting HIV-1 transfer from DCs to T lymphocytes. The effects of MV depletion on these functions were reversed by the re-addition of purified MVs from activated but not non-activated SUPT1.CCR5-CL.30 or primary T cells. Analysis of the protein complement of these MVs and of these HIV-1 inocula before and after MV depletion showed that Heat Shock Proteins (HSPs) and nef were the likely DC maturation candidates. Recombinant HSP90α and β and nef all induced DC maturation and ICAM-1 expression, greater when combined. These results suggest that MVs contaminating HIV-1 released from infected T lymphocytes may be biologically important, especially in enhancing T cell activation, during uptake by DCs in vitro and in vivo, particularly as MVs have been detected in the circulation of HIV-1 infected subjects

  8. Platelet glycoproteins Ia, Ic, and IIa are physicochemically indistinguishable from the very late activation antigens adhesion-related proteins of lymphocytes and other cell types.

    PubMed

    Pischel, K D; Bluestein, H G; Woods, V L

    1988-02-01

    The very late activation antigens (VLA) are a subset of the superfamily of cell surface glycoproteins that serve as receptors from extracellular matrix proteins. One or more of the VLA heterodimers are present on T lymphocytes and most other cell types, including platelets. We have used VLA-specific monoclonal antibodies to isolate the reactive platelet membrane molecules. We have identified them as previously characterized platelet surface glycoproteins and have compared them with VLA molecules isolated from lymphocytes and other cells. Utilizing one-dimensional SDS-PAGE, two-dimensional O'Farrell gel electrophoresis, and nonreduced-reduced two-dimensional gel electrophoresis, we show that reduced VLA molecules of platelets are composed of three chains of molecular weights 165,000, 145,000, and 140,000 that possess the physicochemical properties of platelet glycoproteins GPIa, GPIc alpha, and GPIIa. GPIa corresponds to the VLA 165,000 alpha 2-chain, GPIIa corresponds to a 145,000 Mr VLA beta-chain, and GPIc alpha corresponds to a 140,000 Mr VLA alpha-chain. The polypeptide structure of VLA molecules on platelets and lymphocytes are very similar or identical. Platelet proteins GPIa and GPIIa exist as a mixed heterodimer in detergent lysates and correspond with the VLA-2 heterodimer found on activated T lymphocytes and other cell types. The platelet glycoproteins GPIIa and GPIc form a second mixed heterodimer. The mAb A-1A5, which binds to the VLA beta chain, binds to platelet GPIIa and precipitates both the GPIIa-GPIa and GPIIa-GPIc heterodimers, and binds to 4,926 +/- 740 sites per platelet. A VLA-2-specific mAb, 12F1, which binds to the VLA alpha 2-chain reacts with GPIa and immunoprecipitates only the GPIIa-GPIa heterodimer, and binds to 1,842 +/- 449 sites per platelet. The similarity of VLA chains and platelet GPIIa, GPIa, and GPIc molecules suggests that these molecules may have similar functions on various cell types.

  9. Platelet endothelial cell adhesion molecule-1 and mechanotransduction in vascular endothelial cells.

    PubMed

    Fujiwara, K

    2006-04-01

    Endothelial cells are known to respond to mechanical forces such as fluid shear stress and cyclic stretch, but elucidating the mechanism for mechanosensing has been difficult. Experimental data indicate that there are probably several sensing mechanisms. We have recently proposed a novel mechanoresponse mechanism that involves platelet endothelial cell adhesion molecule-1 (PECAM-1). When endothelial cells are stimulated by fluid shear stress, PECAM-1 is tyrosine phosphorylated and activates the extracellular signal-regulated kinase 1 and 2 (ERK1/2) signalling cascade. The same signalling events occurred when we applied pulling force directly on PECAM-1 on the endothelial cell surface using magnetic beads coated with antibodies against the external domain of PECAM-1. These results appear to indicate that PECAM-1 is a mechanotransduction molecule. To our knowledge, this is the first mammalian molecule that is shown to respond to mechanical force directly exerted to it. PMID:16594905

  10. Screening of immunomodulatory and adhesive Lactobacillus with antagonistic activities against Salmonella from fermented vegetables.

    PubMed

    Feng, Junchang; Liu, Pilong; Yang, Xin; Zhao, Xin

    2015-12-01

    The purpose of this study was to select strains of lactic acid bacteria (LAB) by their in vitro adhesive and immunomodulatory properties for potential use as probiotics. In this study, 16 randomly selected LAB strains from fermented vegetables (sauerkraut, bean and cabbage) were first screened for their tolerance to acid, bile salts, pepsin and pancreatin, bacterial inhibitory activities and abilities to adherence to Caco-2 cells. Then, 4 strains with the highest adhesion abilities were selected for further studies of their immunomodulatory properties and inhibitory effects against Salmonella adhesion and invasion to Caco-2 cells in vitro. The results showed that these 16 LAB strains effectively survived in simulated gastrointestinal condition and inhibited growth of six tested pathogens. Lactobacillus rhamnosus P1, Lactobacillus plantarum P2, Lactobacillus rhamnosus P3 and Lactobacillus casei P4 had the highest abilities to adhere to Caco-2 cells. Furthermore, L. plantarum P2 strain showed higher abilities to induce expression of tumor necrosis factor-α and interleukin-12 by splenic monocytes and strongly inhibited the adhesion and invasion of S. enteritidis ATCC13076 to Caco-2 cells. These results suggest that Lactobacillus strains P2 could be used as a probiotic candidate in food against Salmonella infection.

  11. Nano-clustering of ligands on surrogate antigen presenting cells modulates T cell membrane adhesion and organization.

    PubMed

    Dillard, Pierre; Pi, Fuwei; Lellouch, Annemarie C; Limozin, Laurent; Sengupta, Kheya

    2016-03-14

    We investigate the adhesion and molecular organization of the plasma membrane of T lymphocytes interacting with a surrogate antigen presenting cell comprising glass supported ordered arrays of antibody (α-CD3) nano-dots dispersed in a non-adhesive matrix of polyethylene glycol (PEG). The local membrane adhesion and topography, as well as the distribution of the T cell receptors (TCRs) and the kinase ZAP-70, are influenced by dot-geometry, whereas the cell spreading area is determined by the overall average density of the ligands rather than specific characteristics of the dots. TCR clusters are recruited preferentially to the nano-dots and the TCR cluster size distribution has a weak dot-size dependence. On the patterns, the clusters are larger, more numerous, and more enriched in TCRs, as compared to the homogeneously distributed ligands at comparable concentrations. These observations support the idea that non-ligated TCRs residing in the non-adhered parts of the proximal membrane are able to diffuse and enrich the existing clusters at the ligand dots. However, long distance transport is impaired and cluster centralization in the form of a central supramolecular cluster (cSMAC) is not observed. Time-lapse imaging of early cell-surface contacts indicates that the ZAP-70 microclusters are directly recruited to the site of the antibody dots and this process is concomitant with membrane adhesion. These results together point to a complex interplay of adhesion, molecular organization and activation in response to spatially modulated stimulation.

  12. Amygdalin blocks the in vitro adhesion and invasion of renal cell carcinoma cells by an integrin-dependent mechanism.

    PubMed

    Juengel, Eva; Afschar, Masud; Makarević, Jasmina; Rutz, Jochen; Tsaur, Igor; Mani, Jens; Nelson, Karen; Haferkamp, Axel; Blaheta, Roman A

    2016-03-01

    Information about the natural compound amygdalin, which is employed as an antitumor agent, is sparse and thus its efficacy remains controversial. In this study, to determine whether amygdalin exerts antitumor effects on renal cell carcinoma (RCC) cells, its impact on RCC metastatic activity was investigated. The RCC cell lines, Caki-1, KTC-26 and A498, were exposed to amygdalin from apricot kernels, and adhesion to human vascular endothelium, immobilized collagen or fibronectin was investigated. The influence of amygdalin on chemotactic and invasive activity was also determined, as was the influence of amygdalin on surface and total cellular α and β integrin expression, which are involved in metastasis. We noted that amygdalin caused significant reductions in chemotactic activity, invasion and adhesion to endothelium, collagen and fibronectin. Using FACScan analysis, we noted that amygdalin also induced reductions, particularly in integrins α5 and α6, in all three cell lines. Functional blocking of α5 resulted in significantly diminished adhesion of KTC-26 and A498 to collagen and also in decreased chemotactic behavior in all three cell lines. Blocking α6 integrin significantly reduced chemotactic activity in all three cell lines. Thus, we suggest that exposing RCC cells to amygdalin inhibits metastatic spread and is associated with downregulation of α5 and α6 integrins. Therefore, we posit that amygdalin exerts antitumor activity in vitro, and this may be linked to integrin regulation. PMID:26781971

  13. Evaluating fundamental position-dependent differences in wood cell wall adhesion using nanoindentation

    PubMed Central

    Obersriebnig, Michael; Konnerth, Johannes; Gindl-Altmutter, Wolfgang

    2013-01-01

    Spruce wood specimens were bonded with one-component polyurethane (PUR) and urea-formaldehyde (UF) adhesive, respectively. The adhesion of the adhesives to the wood cell wall was evaluated at two different locations by means of a new micromechanical assay based on nanoindentation. One location tested corresponded to the interface between the adhesive and the natural inner cell wall surface of the secondary cell wall layer 3 (S3), whereas the second location corresponded to the interface between the adhesive and the freshly cut secondary cell wall layer 2 (S2). Overall, a trend towards reduced cell wall adhesion was found for PUR compared to UF. Position-resolved examination revealed excellent adhesion of UF to freshly cut cell walls (S2) but significantly diminished adhesion to the inner cell wall surface (S3). In contrast, PUR showed better adhesion to the inner cell wall surface and less adhesion to freshly cut cell walls. Atomic force microscopy revealed a less polar character for the inner cell wall surface (S3) compared to freshly cut cell walls (S2). It is proposed that differences in the polarity of the used adhesives and the surface chemistry of the two cell wall surfaces examined account for the observed trends. PMID:27570321

  14. Lateral adhesion drives reintegration of misplaced cells into epithelial monolayers.

    PubMed

    Bergstralh, Dan T; Lovegrove, Holly E; St Johnston, Daniel

    2015-11-01

    Cells in simple epithelia orient their mitotic spindles in the plane of the epithelium so that both daughter cells are born within the epithelial sheet. This is assumed to be important to maintain epithelial integrity and prevent hyperplasia, because misaligned divisions give rise to cells outside the epithelium. Here we test this assumption in three types of Drosophila epithelium; the cuboidal follicle epithelium, the columnar early embryonic ectoderm, and the pseudostratified neuroepithelium. Ectopic expression of Inscuteable in these tissues reorients mitotic spindles, resulting in one daughter cell being born outside the epithelial layer. Live imaging reveals that these misplaced cells reintegrate into the tissue. Reducing the levels of the lateral homophilic adhesion molecules Neuroglian or Fasciclin 2 disrupts reintegration, giving rise to extra-epithelial cells, whereas disruption of adherens junctions has no effect. Thus, the reinsertion of misplaced cells seems to be driven by lateral adhesion, which pulls cells born outside the epithelial layer back into it. Our findings reveal a robust mechanism that protects epithelia against the consequences of misoriented divisions. PMID:26414404

  15. Lateral adhesion drives reintegration of misplaced cells into epithelial monolayers

    PubMed Central

    St Johnston, Daniel

    2016-01-01

    Cells in simple epithelia orient their mitotic spindles in the plane of the epithelium so that both daughter cells are born within the epithelial sheet. This is assumed to be important to maintain epithelial integrity and prevent hyperplasia, because misaligned divisions give rise to cells outside the epithelium1,2. Here we test this assumption in three types of Drosophila epithelia; the cuboidal follicle epithelium, the columnar early embryonic ectoderm, and the pseudostratified neuroepithelium. Ectopic expression of Inscuteable in these tissues reorients mitotic spindles, resulting in one daughter cell being born outside of the epithelial layer. Live imaging reveals that these misplaced cells reintegrate into the tissue. Reducing the levels of the lateral homophilic adhesion molecules Neuroglian or Fasciclin 2 disrupts reintegration, giving rise to extra-epithelial cells, whereas disruption of adherens junctions has no effect. Thus, the reinsertion of misplaced cells appears to be driven by lateral adhesion, which pulls cells born outside the epithelia layer back into it. Our findings reveal a robust mechanism that protects epithelia against the consequences of misoriented divisions. PMID:26414404

  16. A practical guide to quantify cell adhesion using single-cell force spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Friedrichs, Jens; Legate, Kyle R; Schubert, Rajib; Bharadwaj, Mitasha; Werner, Carsten; Müller, Daniel J; Benoit, Martin

    2013-04-01

    Quantitative analysis of cellular interactions with the extracellular environment is necessary to gain an understanding of how cells regulate adhesion in the development and maintenance of multicellular organisms, and how changes in cell adhesion contribute to diseases. We provide a practical guide to quantify the adhesive strength of living animal cells to various substrates using atomic force microscopy (AFM)-based single-cell force spectroscopy (SCFS). We describe how to control cell state and attachment to the AFM cantilever, how to functionalize supports for SCFS measurements, how to conduct cell adhesion measurements, and how to analyze and interpret the recorded SCFS data. This guide is intended to assist newcomers in the field to perform AFM-based SCFS measurements. PMID:23396062

  17. A practical guide to quantify cell adhesion using single-cell force spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Friedrichs, Jens; Legate, Kyle R; Schubert, Rajib; Bharadwaj, Mitasha; Werner, Carsten; Müller, Daniel J; Benoit, Martin

    2013-04-01

    Quantitative analysis of cellular interactions with the extracellular environment is necessary to gain an understanding of how cells regulate adhesion in the development and maintenance of multicellular organisms, and how changes in cell adhesion contribute to diseases. We provide a practical guide to quantify the adhesive strength of living animal cells to various substrates using atomic force microscopy (AFM)-based single-cell force spectroscopy (SCFS). We describe how to control cell state and attachment to the AFM cantilever, how to functionalize supports for SCFS measurements, how to conduct cell adhesion measurements, and how to analyze and interpret the recorded SCFS data. This guide is intended to assist newcomers in the field to perform AFM-based SCFS measurements.

  18. Inhibition by Tyroserleutide (YSL) on the Invasion and Adhesion of the Mouse Melanoma Cell

    PubMed Central

    Yao, Zhi; Che, Xu-chun; Lu, Rong; Zheng, Min-na; Zhu, Zhi-feng; Li, Jin-ping; Jian, Xu; Shi, Lin-xi; Liu, Jun-yan; Gao, Wen-yuan

    2007-01-01

    Tyroserleutide (YSL) is an active, low-molecular-weight polypeptide, comprised of three amino acids, that has shown antitumor effects on human hepatocarcinoma BEL-7402 in vitro and in vivo. In this study, we evaluated the inhibition of YSL on invasion and adhesion of the mouse B16-F10 melanoma cell line by injecting B16-F10 cells into the tail veins of C57BL/6 mice to establish an experimental lung metastasis model. YSL inhibited B16-F10 cell metastasis to lung, reducing the number and area of metastasis lesions. When we treated B16-F10 cells with YSL (0.01, 0.1, 1, 10, or 100 μg/mL) in vitro, we found that YSL inhibited the proliferation of B16-F10 cells with a 28.11% rate of inhibition. YSL significantly decreased the adhesiveness of B16-F10 cells to Matrigel with a 29.15% inhibition rate; YSL also significantly inhibited the invasion of B16-F10 cells, producing an inhibition of 35.31%. By analyses with Western blot and real-time RT-PCR, we found that YSL markedly inhibited the expression of ICAM-1 in B16-F10 cells. These data suggest that YSL inhibits the growth, invasion, and adhesion of B16-F10 cells. PMID:17515953

  19. Reversing adhesion with light: a general method for functionalized bead release from cells.

    PubMed

    Goulet-Hanssens, Alexis; Magdesian, Margaret H; Lopez-Ayon, G Monserratt; Grutter, Peter; Barrett, Christopher J

    2016-07-19

    Coated beads retain great importance in the study of cell adhesion and intracellular communication; we present a generally applicable method permitting spatiotemporal control of bead adhesion from cells. Herein we demonstrate in vitro release of a poly-d-lysine (PDL) layer from anionic polystyrene beads, allowing complete bead release from rat cortical neurons post-adhesion. PMID:27165466

  20. Polyelectrolytes Multilayers to Modulate Cell Adhesion: A Study of the Influence of Film Composition and Polyelectrolyte Interdigitation on the Adhesion of the A549 Cell Line.

    PubMed

    Muzzio, Nicolás E; Pasquale, Miguel A; Gregurec, Danijela; Diamanti, Eleftheria; Kosutic, Marija; Azzaroni, Omar; Moya, Sergio E

    2016-04-01

    Polyelectrolyte multilayers (PEMs) with different polycation/polyanion pairs are fabricated by the layer-by-layer technique employing synthetic, natural, and both types of polyelectrolytes. The impact of the chemical composition of PEMs on cell adhesion is assessed by studying cell shape, spreading area, focal contacts, and cell proliferation for the A549 cell line. Cells exhibit good adhesion on PEMs containing natural polycations and poly(sodium 4-styrenesulfonate) (PSS) as polyanion, but limited adhesion is observed on PEMs fabricated from both natural polyelectrolytes. PEMs are then assembled, depositing a block of natural polyelectrolytes on top of a stiffer block with PSS as polyanion. Cell adhesion is enhanced on top of the diblock PEMs compared to purely natural PEMs. This fact could be explained by the interdigitation between polyelectrolytes from the two blocks. Diblock PEM assembly provides a simple means to tune cell adhesion on biocompatible PEMs.

  1. Neurite outgrowth of neuroblastoma cells: dependence on adhesion surface--cell surface interactions

    PubMed Central

    1984-01-01

    Neurite outgrowth of C 1300 neuroblastoma cells, which were dispersed from adherent cultures or grown in suspension, was studied on different protein-coated surfaces. Of 29 different surface structures studied, including surfaces treated with various fibronectins, lectins, glycosidases, or glycosyltransferases capable of stimulating fibroblast spreading, only the surfaces coated with plasma fibronectin or with a protein mixture secreted by C6 glioma cells displayed an extensive activity in the sprouting assay. Neurite outgrowth was inhibited by brain gangliosides and by colominic acid (a sialic acid polymer). A 50% inhibition of neurite outgrowth of N18 neuroblasts induced by the glioma cell proteins was observed at the following approximate concentration: 100 microM (0.2 mg/ml) GD1A ganglioside, 20 microM (0.04 mg/ml) GT1B ganglioside, and 5 mg/ml colominic acid. Specificity of inhibition was suggested by the finding that a few polyanionic substances tested were not inhibitory in the sprouting assay, and that the type of gangliosides inhibiting sprouting were found to be major sialoglycolipids of the neuroblasts. A hypothesis is discussed, according to which neurite outgrowth of neuroblasts is stimulated by adhesion involving interactions of the adhesion-mediating protein with cell surface carbohydrates characteristic of brain gangliosides. PMID:6699078

  2. Aldosterone stimulates nuclear factor-kappa B activity and transcription of intercellular adhesion molecule-1 and connective tissue growth factor in rat mesangial cells via serum- and glucocorticoid-inducible protein kinase-1.

    PubMed

    Terada, Yoshio; Ueda, Satoko; Hamada, Kazu; Shimamura, Yoshiko; Ogata, Koji; Inoue, Kosuke; Taniguchi, Yoshinori; Kagawa, Toru; Horino, Taro; Takao, Toshihiro

    2012-02-01

    Several clinical and experimental data support the hypothesis that aldosterone contributes to the progression of renal injury. To determine the signaling pathway of aldosterone in relation to fibrosis and inflammation in mesangial cells, we investigated the effects of aldosterone on expression and activation of serum- and glucocorticoid-inducible protein kinase-1 (SGK1), the activation of nuclear factor-kappa B (NF-κB activation, and the expressions of intercellular adhesion molecule-1 (ICAM-1) and connective tissue growth factor (CTGF). Aldosterone stimulated SGK1 expression, phosphorylation (Ser-256), and kinase activity. The increments of phosphorylation and expression of SGK1 induced by aldosterone were inhibited by mineralocorticoid receptor (MR) inhibitor (eplerenone). Aldosterone stimulated NF-κB activity measured by NF-κB responsive elements, luciferase assay, and the levels of inhibitor of kappa B (IκB) phosphorylation. This aldosterone-induced activation of NF-κB was inhibited by the transfection of dominant-negative SGK1. Furthermore, aldosterone augmented the promoter activities and protein expressions of ICAM-1 and CTGF. The effects of aldosterone on ICAM-1 and CTGF promoter activities and protein expressions were inhibited by the transfection of dominant-negative SGK1 and dominant-negative IκBα. We also found that the MR antagonist significantly ameliorated the glomerular injury and enhancements in SGK1, ICAM-1, and CTGF expressions induced by 1% sodium chloride and aldosterone in vivo. In conclusion, our findings suggest that aldosterone stimulates ICAM-1 and CTGF transcription via activation of SGK1 and NF-κB, which may be involved in the progression of aldosterone-induced mesangial fibrosis and inflammation. MR antagonists may serve as useful therapeutic targets for the treatment of glomerular inflammatory disease.

  3. A PKA-Csk-pp60Src signaling pathway regulates the switch between endothelial cell invasion and cell-cell adhesion during vascular sprouting

    PubMed Central

    Jin, Hui; Garmy-Susini, Barbara; Avraamides, Christie J.; Stoletov, Konstantin; Klemke, Richard L.

    2010-01-01

    Angiogenesis is controlled by signals that stimulate motility in endothelial cells at the tips of vascular sprouts while maintaining cell-cell adhesion in the stalks of angiogenic sprouts. We show here that Gs-linked G protein–coupled receptor activation of cAMP-dependent protein kinase (PKA) plays an important role in regulating the switch between endothelial cell adhesion and migration by activating C-terminal Src kinase, leading to inhibition of pp60Src. Activated PKA blocks pp60Src-dependent vascular endot helial-cadherin phosphorylation, thereby stimulating cell-cell adhesion while suppressing endothelial cell polarization, motility, angiogenesis, and vascular permeability. Similar to the actions of Notch and Dll4, PKA activation blocks sprouting in newly forming embryonic blood vessels, while PKA inhibition promotes excessive sprouting in these vessels. These findings demonstrate that G protein–coupled receptors and PKA regulate vascular sprouting during angiogenesis by controlling endothelial cell migration and cell-cell adhesion through their actions on pp60Src. PMID:20826718

  4. A PKA-Csk-pp60Src signaling pathway regulates the switch between endothelial cell invasion and cell-cell adhesion during vascular sprouting.

    PubMed

    Jin, Hui; Garmy-Susini, Barbara; Avraamides, Christie J; Stoletov, Konstantin; Klemke, Richard L; Varner, Judith A

    2010-12-16

    Angiogenesis is controlled by signals that stimulate motility in endothelial cells at the tips of vascular sprouts while maintaining cell-cell adhesion in the stalks of angiogenic sprouts. We show here that Gs-linked G protein-coupled receptor activation of cAMP-dependent protein kinase (PKA) plays an important role in regulating the switch between endothelial cell adhesion and migration by activating C-terminal Src kinase, leading to inhibition of pp60Src. Activated PKA blocks pp60Src-dependent vascular endot helial-cadherin phosphorylation, thereby stimulating cell-cell adhesion while suppressing endothelial cell polarization, motility, angiogenesis, and vascular permeability. Similar to the actions of Notch and Dll4, PKA activation blocks sprouting in newly forming embryonic blood vessels, while PKA inhibition promotes excessive sprouting in these vessels. These findings demonstrate that G protein-coupled receptors and PKA regulate vascular sprouting during angiogenesis by controlling endothelial cell migration and cell-cell adhesion through their actions on pp60Src. PMID:20826718

  5. Timescales and Frequencies of Reversible and Irreversible Adhesion Events of Single Bacterial Cells.

    PubMed

    Hoffman, Michelle D; Zucker, Lauren I; Brown, Pamela J B; Kysela, David T; Brun, Yves V; Jacobson, Stephen C

    2015-12-15

    In the environment, most bacteria form surface-attached cell communities called biofilms. The attachment of single cells to surfaces involves an initial reversible stage typically mediated by surface structures such as flagella and pili, followed by a permanent adhesion stage usually mediated by polysaccharide adhesives. Here, we determine the absolute and relative timescales and frequencies of reversible and irreversible adhesion of single cells of the bacterium Caulobacter crescentus to a glass surface in a microfluidic device. We used fluorescence microscopy of C. crescentus expressing green fluorescent protein to track the swimming behavior of individual cells prior to adhesion, monitor the cell at the surface, and determine whether the cell reversibly or irreversibly adhered to the surface. A fluorescently labeled lectin that binds specifically to polar polysaccharides, termed holdfast, discriminated irreversible adhesion events from reversible adhesion events where no holdfast formed. In wild-type cells, the holdfast production time for irreversible adhesion events initiated by surface contact (23 s) was 30-times faster than the holdfast production time that occurs through developmental regulation (13 min). Irreversible adhesion events in wild-type cells (3.3 events/min) are 15-times more frequent than in pilus-minus mutant cells (0.2 events/min), indicating the pili are critical structures in the transition from reversible to irreversible surface-stimulated adhesion. In reversible adhesion events, the dwell time of cells at the surface before departing was the same for wild-type cells (12 s) and pilus-minus mutant cells (13 s), suggesting the pili do not play a significant role in reversible adhesion. Moreover, reversible adhesion events in wild-type cells (6.8 events/min) occur twice as frequently as irreversible adhesion events (3.3 events/min), demonstrating that most cells contact the surface multiple times before transitioning from reversible to

  6. Timescales and Frequencies of Reversible and Irreversible Adhesion Events of Single Bacterial Cells.

    PubMed

    Hoffman, Michelle D; Zucker, Lauren I; Brown, Pamela J B; Kysela, David T; Brun, Yves V; Jacobson, Stephen C

    2015-12-15

    In the environment, most bacteria form surface-attached cell communities called biofilms. The attachment of single cells to surfaces involves an initial reversible stage typically mediated by surface structures such as flagella and pili, followed by a permanent adhesion stage usually mediated by polysaccharide adhesives. Here, we determine the absolute and relative timescales and frequencies of reversible and irreversible adhesion of single cells of the bacterium Caulobacter crescentus to a glass surface in a microfluidic device. We used fluorescence microscopy of C. crescentus expressing green fluorescent protein to track the swimming behavior of individual cells prior to adhesion, monitor the cell at the surface, and determine whether the cell reversibly or irreversibly adhered to the surface. A fluorescently labeled lectin that binds specifically to polar polysaccharides, termed holdfast, discriminated irreversible adhesion events from reversible adhesion events where no holdfast formed. In wild-type cells, the holdfast production time for irreversible adhesion events initiated by surface contact (23 s) was 30-times faster than the holdfast production time that occurs through developmental regulation (13 min). Irreversible adhesion events in wild-type cells (3.3 events/min) are 15-times more frequent than in pilus-minus mutant cells (0.2 events/min), indicating the pili are critical structures in the transition from reversible to irreversible surface-stimulated adhesion. In reversible adhesion events, the dwell time of cells at the surface before departing was the same for wild-type cells (12 s) and pilus-minus mutant cells (13 s), suggesting the pili do not play a significant role in reversible adhesion. Moreover, reversible adhesion events in wild-type cells (6.8 events/min) occur twice as frequently as irreversible adhesion events (3.3 events/min), demonstrating that most cells contact the surface multiple times before transitioning from reversible to

  7. Enhanced cell adhesion on silk fibroin via lectin surface modification.

    PubMed

    Teuschl, Andreas H; Neutsch, Lukas; Monforte, Xavier; Rünzler, Dominik; van Griensven, Martijn; Gabor, Franz; Redl, Heinz

    2014-06-01

    Various tissue engineering (TE) approaches are based on silk fibroin (SF) as scaffold material because of its superior mechanical and biological properties compared to other materials. The translation of one-step TE approaches to clinical application has generally failed so far due to the requirement of a prolonged cell seeding step before implantation. Here, we propose that the plant lectin WGA (wheat germ agglutinin), covalently bound to SF, will mediate cell adhesion in a time frame acceptable to be part of a one-step surgical intervention. After the establishment of a modification protocol utilizing carbodiimide chemistry, we examined the attachment of cells, with a special focus on adipose-derived stromal cells (ASC), on WGA-SF compared to pure native SF. After a limited time frame of 20min the attachment of ASCs to WGA-SF showed an increase of about 17-fold, as compared to pure native SF. The lectin-mediated cell adhesion further showed an enhanced resistance to trypsin (as a protease model) and to applied fluid shear stress (mechanical stability). Moreover, we could demonstrate that the adhesion of ASCs on the WGA-SF does not negatively influence proliferation or differentiation potential into the osteogenic lineage. To test for in vitro immune response, the proliferation of peripheral blood mononuclear cells in contact with the WGA-SF was determined, showing no alterations compared to plain SF. All these findings suggest that the WGA modification of SF offers important benefits for translation of SF scaffolds into clinical applications. PMID:24530561

  8. Cell Adhesion and Growth on the Anodized Aluminum Oxide Membrane.

    PubMed

    Park, Jeong Su; Moon, Dalnim; Kim, Jin-Seok; Lee, Jin Seok

    2016-03-01

    Nanotopological cues are popular tools for in vivo investigation of the extracellular matrix (ECM) and cellular microenvironments. The ECM is composed of multiple components and generates a complex microenvironment. The development of accurate in vivo methods for the investigation of ECM are important for disease diagnosis and therapy, as well as for studies on cell behavior. Here, we fabricated anodized aluminum oxide (AAO) membranes using sulfuric and oxalic acid under controlled voltage and temperature. The membranes were designed to possess three different pore and interpore sizes, AAO-1, AAO-2, and AAO-3 membranes, respectively. These membranes were used as tools to investigate nanotopology-signal induced cell behavior. Cancerous cells, specifically, the OVCAR-8 cell-line, were cultured on porous AAO membranes and the effects of these membranes on cell shape, proliferation, and viability were studied. AAO-1 membranes bearing small sized pores were found to maintain the spreading shape of the cultured cells. Cells cultured on AAO-2 and AAO-3 membranes, bearing large pore-sized AAO membranes, changed shape from spreading to rounding. Furthermore, cellular area decreased when cells were cultured on all three AAO membranes that confirmed decreased levels of focal adhesion kinase (FAK). Additionally, OVCAR-8 cells exhibited increased proliferation on AAO membranes possessing various pore sizes, indicating the importance of the nanosurface structure in regulating cell behaviors, such as cell proliferation. Our results suggest that porous-AAO membranes induced nanosurface regulated cell behavior as focal adhesion altered the intracellular organization of the cytoskeleton. Our results may find potential applications as tools in in vivo cancer research studies. PMID:27280255

  9. Cell Adhesion and Growth on the Anodized Aluminum Oxide Membrane.

    PubMed

    Park, Jeong Su; Moon, Dalnim; Kim, Jin-Seok; Lee, Jin Seok

    2016-03-01

    Nanotopological cues are popular tools for in vivo investigation of the extracellular matrix (ECM) and cellular microenvironments. The ECM is composed of multiple components and generates a complex microenvironment. The development of accurate in vivo methods for the investigation of ECM are important for disease diagnosis and therapy, as well as for studies on cell behavior. Here, we fabricated anodized aluminum oxide (AAO) membranes using sulfuric and oxalic acid under controlled voltage and temperature. The membranes were designed to possess three different pore and interpore sizes, AAO-1, AAO-2, and AAO-3 membranes, respectively. These membranes were used as tools to investigate nanotopology-signal induced cell behavior. Cancerous cells, specifically, the OVCAR-8 cell-line, were cultured on porous AAO membranes and the effects of these membranes on cell shape, proliferation, and viability were studied. AAO-1 membranes bearing small sized pores were found to maintain the spreading shape of the cultured cells. Cells cultured on AAO-2 and AAO-3 membranes, bearing large pore-sized AAO membranes, changed shape from spreading to rounding. Furthermore, cellular area decreased when cells were cultured on all three AAO membranes that confirmed decreased levels of focal adhesion kinase (FAK). Additionally, OVCAR-8 cells exhibited increased proliferation on AAO membranes possessing various pore sizes, indicating the importance of the nanosurface structure in regulating cell behaviors, such as cell proliferation. Our results suggest that porous-AAO membranes induced nanosurface regulated cell behavior as focal adhesion altered the intracellular organization of the cytoskeleton. Our results may find potential applications as tools in in vivo cancer research studies.

  10. Cell surface-expressed moesin-like receptor regulates T cell interactions with tissue components and binds an adhesion-modulating IL-2 peptide generated by elastase.

    PubMed

    Ariel, A; Hershkoviz, R; Altbaum-Weiss, I; Ganor, S; Lider, O

    2001-03-01

    The adhesion of leukocytes to the extracellular matrix (ECM) depends on their responses to variations in the chemotactic signals in their milieu, as well as on the functioning of cytoskeletal and context-specific receptors. Ezrin, radixin, and moesin constitute a family of proteins that link the plasma membrane to the actin cytoskeleton. The surface expression of moesin on T cells and its role in cell adhesion has not been fully elucidated. Recently, we found that IL-2 peptides generated by elastase modified the adhesion of activated T cells to ECM ligands. Here, we further examined the adhesion regulatory effects of EFLNRWIT, one of the IL-2 peptides, as well as the existence and putative function of its receptor on T cells. We found that when presented to T cells in the absence of another activator, the EFLNRWIT peptide induced cell adhesion to vessel wall and ECM components. Binding of a radiolabeled peptide to T cells, precipitation with the immobilized peptide, and amino acid sequencing of the precipitated protein revealed that EFLNRWIT exerts its function via a cell surface-expressed moesin-like moiety, whose constitutive expression on T cells was increased after activation. This notion was further supported by our findings that: 1) anti-moesin mAb inhibited the binding of T cells to the immobilized EFLNRWIT peptide, 2) immobilized recombinant moesin bound the IL-2 peptide, and 3) soluble moesin inhibited the EFLNRWIT-induced T cell adhesion to fibronectin. Interestingly, moesin appears to be generally involved in T cell responses to adhesion-regulating signals. Thus, the IL-2 peptide EFLNRWIT appears to exert its modulating capacities via an adhesion-regulating moesin-like receptor. PMID:11207255

  11. Ion implantation induced nanotopography on titanium and bone cell adhesion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Braceras, Iñigo; Vera, Carolina; Ayerdi-Izquierdo, Ana; Muñoz, Roberto; Lorenzo, Jaione; Alvarez, Noelia; de Maeztu, Miguel Ángel

    2014-08-01

    Permanent endo-osseous implants require a fast, reliable and consistent osseointegration, i.e. intimate bonding between bone and implant, so biomechanical loads can be safely transferred. Among the parameters that affect this process, it is widely admitted that implant surface topography, surface energy and composition play an important role. Most surface treatments to improve osseointegration focus on micro-scale features, as few can effectively control the effects of the treatment at nanoscale. On the other hand, ion implantation allows controlling such nanofeatures. This study has investigated the nanotopography of titanium, as induced by different ion implantation surface treatments, its similarity with human bone tissue structure and its effect on human bone cell adhesion, as a first step in the process of osseointegration. The effect of ion implantation treatment parameters such as energy (40-80 keV), fluence (1-2 e17 ion/cm2) and ion species (Kr, Ar, Ne and Xe) on the nanotopography of medical grade titanium has been measured and assessed by AFM and contact angle. Then, in vitro tests have been performed to assess the effect of these nanotopographies on osteoblast adhesion. The results have shown that the nanostructure of bone and the studied ion implanted surfaces, without surface chemistry modification, are in the same range and that such modifications, in certain conditions, do have a statistically significant effect on bone tissue forming cell adhesion.

  12. The oxidase activity of vascular adhesion protein-1 (VAP-1) is essential for function.

    PubMed

    Noonan, Thomas; Lukas, Susan; Peet, Gregory W; Pelletier, Josephine; Panzenbeck, Mark; Hanidu, Adedayo; Mazurek, Suzanne; Wasti, Ruby; Rybina, Irina; Roma, Teresa; Kronkaitis, Anthony; Shoultz, Alycia; Souza, Donald; Jiang, Huiping; Nabozny, Gerald; Modis, Louise Kelly

    2013-01-01

    Vascular adhesion protein-1 (VAP-1) has been implicated in the pathogenesis of inflammatory diseases and is suggested to play a role in immune cell trafficking. It is not clear whether this effect is mediated by the oxidase activity or by other features of the protein such as direct adhesion. In order to study the role of VAP-1 oxidase activity in vivo, we have generated mice carrying an oxidase activity-null VAP-1 protein. We demonstrate that the VAP-1 oxidase null mutant mice have a phenotype similar to the VAP-1 null mice in animal models of sterile peritonitis and antibody induced arthritis suggesting that the oxidase activity is responsible for the inflammatory function of VAP-1.

  13. Osteoblast adhesion to orthopaedic implant alloys: Effects of cell adhesion molecules and diamond-like carbon coating

    SciTech Connect

    Kornu, R.; Kelly, M.A.; Smith, R.L.; Maloney, W.J.

    1996-11-01

    In total joint arthroplasty, long-term outcomes depend in part on the biocompatibility of implant alloys. This study analyzed effects of surface finish and diamond-like carbon coating on osteoblast cell adhesion to polished titanium-aluminum-vanadium and polished or grit-blasted cobalt-chromium-molybdenum alloys. Osteoblast binding was tested in the presence and absence of the cell adhesion proteins fibronectin, laminin, fibrinogen, and vitronectin and was quantified by measurement of DNA content. Although adherence occurred in serum-free medium, maximal osteoblast binding required serum and was similar for titanium and cobalt alloys at 2 and 12 hours. With the grit-blasted cobalt alloy, cell binding was reduced 48% (p < 0.05) by 24 hours. Coating the alloys with diamond-like carbon did not alter osteoblast adhesion, whereas fibronectin pretreatment increased cell binding 2.6-fold (p < 0.05). In contrast, fibrinogen, vitronectin, and laminin did not enhance cell adhesion. These results support the hypothesis that cell adhesion proteins can modify cell binding to orthopaedic alloys. Although osteoblast binding was not affected by the presence of diamond-like carbon, this coating substance may influence other longer term processes, such as bone formation, and deserves further study. 40 refs., 4 figs.

  14. Amygdalin Regulates Apoptosis and Adhesion in Hs578T Triple-Negative Breast Cancer Cells

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Hye Min; Moon, Aree

    2016-01-01

    Amygdalin, D-mandelonitrile-β-D-glucoside-6-β-glucoside, belongs to aromatic cyanogenic glycoside group derived from rosaceous plant seed. Mounting evidence has supported the anti-cancer effects of amygdalin. However, whether amygdalin indeed acts as an anti-tumor agent against breast cancer cells is not clear. The present study aimed to investigate the effect of amygdalin on the proliferation of human breast cancer cells. Here, we show that amygdalin exerted cytotoxic activities on estrogen receptors (ER)-positive MCF7 cells, and MDA-MB-231 and Hs578T triple-negative breast cancer (TNBC) cells. Amygdalin induced apoptosis of Hs578T TNBC cells. Amygdalin downregulated B-cell lymphoma 2 (Bcl-2), upregulated Bcl-2-associated X protein (Bax), activated of caspase-3 and cleaved poly ADP-ribose polymerase (PARP). Amygdalin activated a pro-apoptotic signaling molecule p38 mitogen-activated protein kinases (p38 MAPK) in Hs578T cells. Treatment of amygdalin significantly inhibited the adhesion of Hs578T cells, in which integrin α5 may be involved. Taken together, this study demonstrates that amygdalin induces apoptosis and inhibits adhesion of breast cancer cells. The results suggest a potential application of amygdalin as a chemopreventive agent to prevent or alleviate progression of breast cancer, especially TNBC. PMID:26759703

  15. Quantifying the effect of electric current on cell adhesion studied by single-cell force spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Jaatinen, Leena; Young, Eleanore; Hyttinen, Jari; Vörös, János; Zambelli, Tomaso; Demkó, László

    2016-03-20

    This study presents the effect of external electric current on the cell adhesive and mechanical properties of the C2C12 mouse myoblast cell line. Changes in cell morphology, viability, cytoskeleton, and focal adhesion structure were studied by standard staining protocols, while single-cell force spectroscopy based on the fluidic force microscopy technology provided a rapid, serial quantification and detailed analysis of cell adhesion and its dynamics. The setup allowed measurements of adhesion forces up to the μN range, and total detachment distances over 40 μm. Force-distance curves have been fitted with a simple elastic model including a cell detachment protocol in order to estimate the Young's modulus of the cells, as well as to reveal changes in the dynamic properties as functions of the applied current dose. While the cell spreading area decreased monotonously with increasing current doses, small current doses resulted only in differences related to cell elasticity. Current doses above 11 As/m(2), however, initiated more drastic changes in cell morphology, viability, cellular structure, as well as in properties related to cell adhesion. The observed differences, eventually leading to cell death toward higher doses, might originate from both the decrease in pH and the generation of reactive oxygen species.

  16. Evaluation of the single yeast cell's adhesion to ITO substrates with various surface energies via ESEM nanorobotic manipulation system.

    PubMed

    Shen, Yajing; Ahmad, Mohd Ridzuan; Nakajima, Masahiro; Kojima, Seiji; Homma, Michio; Fukuda, Toshio

    2011-12-01

    Cell-surface adhesion force is important for cell activities and the development of bio materials. In this paper, a method for in situ single cell (W303) adhesion force measurement was proposed based on nanorobotic manipulation system inside an environment scanning electron microscope (ESEM). An end effector was fabricated from a commercial atomic force microscope (AFM) cantilever by focused ion beam (FIB) etching. The spring constant of it was calibrated by nanomanipulation approach. Three kinds of hydrophilic and hydrophobic ITO plates were prepared by using VUV-irradiation and OTS coating techniques. The shear adhesion strength of the single yeast cell to each substrate was measured based on the deflection of the end effector. The results demonstrated that the cell adhesion force was larger under the wet condition in the ESEM environment than in the aqueous condition. It also showed that the cell adhesion force to hydrophilic surface was larger than that to the hydrophobic surface. Studies of single cell's adhesion on various plate surfaces and environments could give new insights into the tissue engineering and biological field.

  17. IL-12 and IL-18 induce MAP kinase-dependent adhesion of T cells to extracellular matrix components.

    PubMed

    Ariel, Amiram; Novick, Daniela; Rubinstein, Menachem; Dinarello, Charles A; Lider, Ofer; Hershkoviz, Rami

    2002-07-01

    Cytokines and chemokines play an essential role in recruiting leukocytes from the circulation to the peripheral sites of inflammation by modulating cellular interactions with endothelial cell ligands and extracellular matrix (ECM). Herein, we examined regulation of T cell adhesion to ECM ligands by two major proinflammatory cytokines, interleukin (IL)-12 and IL-18. IL-12 and IL-18 induced T cell adhesion to fibronectin (FN) and hyaluronic acid at low (pM) concentrations that were mediated by specific adhesion molecules expressed on the T cell surface, namely, beta(1) integrins and CD44, respectively. The induction of adhesion by IL-12 and IL-18 was inhibited by extracellular signal-regulated kinase and p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase inhibitors (PD098059 and SB203580, respectively). In contrast, IL-12- and IL-18-induced interferon-gamma (INF-gamma) secretion from T cells was inhibited by SB203580, but not by PD098059. It is interesting that low concentrations of IL-12 and IL-18 induced T cell adhesion to FN in a synergistic manner. Thus, in addition to the regulation of late inflammatory functions such as INF-gamma production, IL-12 and IL-18, alone or in combination, regulate early inflammatory events such as T cell adhesion to inflamed sites. PMID:12101280

  18. Zinc oxide nanoparticles-induced intercellular adhesion molecule 1 expression requires Rac1/Cdc42, mixed lineage kinase 3, and c-Jun N-terminal kinase activation in endothelial cells.

    PubMed

    Li, Ching-Hao; Liao, Po-Lin; Shyu, Ming-Kwang; Liu, Chen-Wei; Kao, Chen-Chieh; Huang, Shih-Hsuan; Cheng, Yu-Wen; Kang, Jaw-Jou

    2012-03-01

    The explosive development of nanotechnology has caused an increase in unintended biohazards in humans and in the ecosystem. Similar to particulate matter, nanoparticles (NPs) are strongly correlated with the increase in incidences of cardiovascular diseases, yet the mechanisms behind this correlation remain unclear. Within the testing concentrations of 0.1-10 μg/ml, which did not cause a marked drop in cell viability, zinc oxide NPs (ZnO-NPs) induced intercellular adhesion molecule-1 (ICAM-1) messenger RNA, and protein expression in both concentration- and time-dependent manner in treated human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs). ZnO-NPs treatment cause the activation of Ras-related C3 botulinum toxin substrate 1 (Rac1)/cell division control protein 42 homolog (Cdc42) and protein accumulation of mixed lineage kinase 3 (MLK3), followed by c-Jun N-terminal kinase (JNK) and transcription factor c-Jun activation. Induction of ICAM-1 and phosphorylation of JNK and c-Jun could be inhibited by either JNK inhibitor SP600125 or Rac guanosine triphosphatase inhibitor NSC23766 pretreatment. In addition, pretreatment with NSC23766 significantly reduced MLK3 accumulation, suggesting the involvement of Rac1/Cdc42-MLK3-JNK-c-Jun signaling in the regulation of ZnO-NPs-induced ICAM-1 expression, whereas these signaling factors were not activated in zinc oxide microparticles (ZnO-MPs)-treated HUVECs. The increase of ICAM-1 expression on ZnO-NPs-treated HUVECs enables leukocytes to adhere and has been identified as an indicator of vascular inflammation. Our data are essential for safety evaluation of the clinical usage of ZnO-NPs in daily supplements, cosmetics, and biomedicines.

  19. Migration of adhesive glioma cells: Front propagation and fingering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khain, Evgeniy; Katakowski, Mark; Charteris, Nicholas; Jiang, Feng; Chopp, Michael

    2012-07-01

    We investigate the migration of glioma cells as a front propagation phenomenon both theoretically (by using both discrete lattice modeling and a continuum approach) and experimentally. For small effective strength of cell-cell adhesion q, the front velocity does not depend on q. When q exceeds a critical threshold, a fingeringlike front propagation is observed due to cluster formation in the invasive zone. We show that the experiments correspond to the transient regime, before the regime of front propagation is established. We performed an additional experiment on cell migration. A detailed comparison with experimental observations showed that the theory correctly predicts the maximal migration distance but underestimates the migration of the main mass of cells.

  20. Adhesive disbond detection using piezoelectric wafer active sensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roth, William; Giurgiutiu, Victor

    2015-04-01

    The aerospace industry continues to increase the use of adhesives for structural bonding due to the increased joint efficiency (reduced weight), even distribution of the load path and decreases in stress concentrations. However, the limited techniques for verifying the strength of adhesive bonds has reduced its use on primary structures and requires an intensive inspection schedule. This paper discusses a potential structural health monitoring (SHM) technique for the detection of disbonds through the in situ inspection of adhesive joints. This is achieved through the use of piezoelectric wafer active sensors (PWAS), thin unobtrusive sensors which are permanently bonded to the aircraft structure. The detection method discussed in this study is electromechanical impedance spectroscopy (EMIS), a local vibration method. This method detects disbonds from the change in the mechanical impedance of the structure surrounding the disbond. This paper will discuss how predictive modeling can provide valuable insight into the inspection method, and provide better results than empirical methods alone. The inspection scheme was evaluated using the finite element method, and the results were verified experimentally using a large aluminum test article, and included both pristine and disbond coupons.

  1. 3D surface topology guides stem cell adhesion and differentiation.

    PubMed

    Viswanathan, Priyalakshmi; Ondeck, Matthew G; Chirasatitsin, Somyot; Ngamkham, Kamolchanok; Reilly, Gwendolen C; Engler, Adam J; Battaglia, Giuseppe

    2015-06-01

    Polymerized high internal phase emulsion (polyHIPE) foams are extremely versatile materials for investigating cell-substrate interactions in vitro. Foam morphologies can be controlled by polymerization conditions to result in either open or closed pore structures with different levels of connectivity, consequently enabling the comparison between 2D and 3D matrices using the same substrate with identical surface chemistry conditions. Additionally, here we achieve the control of pore surface topology (i.e. how different ligands are clustered together) using amphiphilic block copolymers as emulsion stabilizers. We demonstrate that adhesion of human mesenchymal progenitor (hES-MP) cells cultured on polyHIPE foams is dependent on foam surface topology and chemistry but is independent of porosity and interconnectivity. We also demonstrate that the interconnectivity, architecture and surface topology of the foams has an effect on the osteogenic differentiation potential of hES-MP cells. Together these data demonstrate that the adhesive heterogeneity of a 3D scaffold could regulate not only mesenchymal stem cell attachment but also cell behavior in the absence of soluble growth factors.

  2. 3D Surface Topology Guides Stem Cell Adhesion and Differentiation

    PubMed Central

    Viswanathan, Priyalakshmi; Ondeck, Matthew G.; Chirasatitsin, Somyot; Nghamkham, Kamolchanok; Reilly, Gwendolen C.; Engler, Adam J.; Battaglia, Giuseppe

    2015-01-01

    Polymerized high internal phase emulsion (polyHIPE) foams are extremely versatile materials for investigating cell-substrate interactions in vitro. Foam morphologies can be controlled by polymerization conditions to result in either open or closed pore structures with different levels of connectivity, consequently enabling the comparison between 2D and 3D matrices using the same substrate with identical surface chemistry conditions. Additionally, here we achieve the control of pore surface topology (i.e. how different ligands are clustered together) using amphiphilic block copolymers as emulsion stabilisers. We demonstrate that adhesion of human mesenchymal progenitor (hES-MP) cells cultured on polyHIPE foams is dependent on foam surface topology and chemistry but is independent of porosity and interconnectivity. We also demonstrate that the interconnectivity, architecture and surface topology of the foams has an effect on the osteogenic differentiation potential of hES-MP cells. Together these data demonstrate that the adhesive heterogeneity of a 3D scaffold could regulate not only mesenchymal stem cell attachment but also cell behavior in the absence of soluble growth factors. PMID:25818420

  3. Wet Chemistry and Peptide Immobilization on Polytetrafluoroethylene for Improved Cell-adhesion.

    PubMed

    Gabriel, Matthias; Niederer, Kerstin; Frey, Holger

    2016-01-01

    Endowing materials surface with cell-adhesive properties is a common strategy in biomaterial research and tissue engineering. This is particularly interesting for already approved polymers that have a long standing use in medicine because these materials are well characterized and legal issues associated with the introduction of newly synthesized polymers may be avoided. Polytetrafluoroethylene (PTFE) is one of the most frequently employed materials for the manufacturing of vascular grafts but the polymer lacks cell adhesion promoting features. Endothelialization, i.e., complete coverage of the grafts inner surface with a confluent layer of endothelial cells is regarded key to optimal performance, mainly by reducing thrombogenicity of the artificial interface. This study investigates the growth of endothelial cells on peptide-modified PTFE and compares these results to those obtained on unmodified substrate. Coupling with the endothelial cell adhesive peptide Arg-Glu-Asp-Val (REDV) is performed via activation of the fluorin-containing polymer using the reagent sodium naphthalenide, followed by subsequent conjugation steps. Cell culture is accomplished using Human Umbilical Vein Endothelial Cells (HUVECs) and excellent cellular growth on peptide-immobilized material is demonstrated over a two-week period. PMID:27584937

  4. TNF-α-mediated adhesion of monocytes to endothelial cells-The role of ephrinA1.

    PubMed

    Ende, Georg; Poitz, David M; Wiedemann, Elisa; Augstein, Antje; Friedrichs, Jens; Giebe, Sindy; Weinert, Sönke; Werner, Carsten; Strasser, Ruth H; Jellinghaus, Stefanie

    2014-12-01

    The ligand ephrin A1 is more often discussed to play a role in the development of the atherosclerotic plaque and in this context especially in the monocyte adhesion to endothelial cells. As tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α) is known to induce monocyte adhesion to endothelium and ephrin A1 expression, the present study focuses on the involvement of ephrin A1 in TNF-α-mediated monocyte adhesion. The analysis of different members of the Eph/ephrin system in TNF-α-treated human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVEC) revealed that especially ephrinA1 was found to be highly regulated by TNF-α compared to other members of the Eph family. This effect is also present in arterial endothelial cells from the umbilical artery and from the coronary artery. This regulation is dependent on NFκB-activation as shown by the expression of a constitutive-active IκB-mutant. By using siRNA-mediated silencing and adenoviral overexpression of ephrinA1 in HUVEC, the involvement of ephrinA1 in the TNF-α triggered monocyte adhesion to endothelial cells could be demonstrated. In addition, these results could be verified by quantitative adhesion measurement using atomic force microscopy-based single-cell force spectroscopy and under flow conditions. Furthermore, this effect is mediated via the EphA4 receptor. EphrinA1 does not influence the mRNA or protein expression of the adhesion receptors VCAM-1 and ICAM-1 in endothelial cells. However, the surface presentation of these adhesion receptors is modulated in an ephrinA1-dependent manner. In conclusion, these data demonstrate that ephrinA1 plays an important role in the TNF-α-mediated adhesion of monocytes to endothelial cells, which might be of great importance in the context of atherosclerosis. PMID:25451169

  5. Adhesive ligand tether length affects the size and length of focal adhesions and influences cell spreading and attachment

    PubMed Central

    Attwood, Simon J.; Cortes, Ernesto; Haining, Alexander William M.; Robinson, Benjamin; Li, Danyang; Gautrot, Julien; del Río Hernández, Armando

    2016-01-01

    Cells are known to respond to physical cues from their microenvironment such as matrix rigidity. Discrete adhesive ligands within flexible strands of fibronectin connect cell surface integrins to the broader extracellular matrix and are thought to mediate mechanosensing through the cytoskeleton-integrin-ECM linkage. We set out to determine if adhesive ligand tether length is another physical cue that cells can sense. Substrates were covalently modified with adhesive arginylglycylaspartic acid (RGD) ligands coupled with short (9.5 nm), medium (38.2 nm) and long (318 nm) length inert polyethylene glycol tethers. The size and length of focal adhesions of human foreskin fibroblasts gradually decreased from short to long tethers. Furthermore, we found cell adhesion varies in a linker length dependent manner with a remarkable 75% reduction in the density of cells on the surface and a 50% reduction in cell area between the shortest and longest linkers. We also report the interplay between RGD ligand concentration and tether length in determining cellular spread area. Our findings show that without varying substrate rigidity or ligand density, tether length alone can modulate cellular behaviour. PMID:27686622

  6. Adhesive ligand tether length affects the size and length of focal adhesions and influences cell spreading and attachment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Attwood, Simon J.; Cortes, Ernesto; Haining, Alexander William M.; Robinson, Benjamin; Li, Danyang; Gautrot, Julien; Del Río Hernández, Armando

    2016-09-01

    Cells are known to respond to physical cues from their microenvironment such as matrix rigidity. Discrete adhesive ligands within flexible strands of fibronectin connect cell surface integrins to the broader extracellular matrix and are thought to mediate mechanosensing through the cytoskeleton-integrin-ECM linkage. We set out to determine if adhesive ligand tether length is another physical cue that cells can sense. Substrates were covalently modified with adhesive arginylglycylaspartic acid (RGD) ligands coupled with short (9.5 nm), medium (38.2 nm) and long (318 nm) length inert polyethylene glycol tethers. The size and length of focal adhesions of human foreskin fibroblasts gradually decreased from short to long tethers. Furthermore, we found cell adhesion varies in a linker length dependent manner with a remarkable 75% reduction in the density of cells on the surface and a 50% reduction in cell area between the shortest and longest linkers. We also report the interplay between RGD ligand concentration and tether length in determining cellular spread area. Our findings show that without varying substrate rigidity or ligand density, tether length alone can modulate cellular behaviour.

  7. Uptake of Marasmius oreades agglutinin disrupts integrin-dependent cell adhesion

    PubMed Central

    Juillot, Samuel; Cott, Catherine; Madl, Josef; Claudinon, Julie; van der Velden, Niels Sebastiaan Johannes; Künzler, Markus; Thuenauer, Roland; Römer, Winfried

    2016-01-01

    Background Fruiting body lectins have been proposed to act as effector proteins in the defense of fungi against parasites and predators. The Marasmius oreades agglutinin (MOA) is a lectin from the fairy ring mushroom with specificity for Galα1-3Gal containing carbohydrates. This lectin is composed of an N-terminal carbohydrate-binding domain and a C-terminal dimerization domain. The dimerization domain of MOA shows in addition calcium-dependent cysteine protease activity, similar to the calpain family. Methods Cell detachment assay, cell viability assay, immunofluorescence, live cell imaging and Western blot using MDCKII cell line. Results In this study, we demonstrate in MDCKII cells that after internalization, MOA protease activity induces profound physiological cellular responses, like cytoskeleton rearrangement, cell detachment and cell death. These changes are preceded by a decrease in FAK phosphorylation and an internalization and degradation of β1-integrin, consistent with a disruption of integrin-dependent cell adhesion signaling. Once internalized, MOA accumulates in late endosomal compartments. Conclusion Our results suggest a possible toxic mechanism of MOA, which consists of disturbing the cell adhesion and the cell viability. General significance After being ingested by a predator, MOA might exert a protective role by diminishing host cell integrity. PMID:26546712

  8. Polysialic Acid Directs Tumor Cell Growth by Controlling Heterophilic Neural Cell Adhesion Molecule Interactions

    PubMed Central

    Seidenfaden, Ralph; Krauter, Andrea; Schertzinger, Frank; Gerardy-Schahn, Rita; Hildebrandt, Herbert

    2003-01-01

    Polysialic acid (PSA), a carbohydrate polymer attached to the neural cell adhesion molecule (NCAM), promotes neural plasticity and tumor malignancy, but its mode of action is controversial. Here we establish that PSA controls tumor cell growth and differentiation by interfering with NCAM signaling at cell-cell contacts. Interactions between cells with different PSA and NCAM expression profiles were initiated by enzymatic removal of PSA and by ectopic expression of NCAM or PSA-NCAM. Removal of PSA from the cell surface led to reduced proliferation and activated extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK), inducing enhanced survival and neuronal differentiation of neuroblastoma cells. Blocking with an NCAM-specific peptide prevented these effects. Combinatorial transinteraction studies with cells and membranes with different PSA and NCAM phenotypes revealed that heterophilic NCAM binding mimics the cellular responses to PSA removal. In conclusion, our data demonstrate that PSA masks heterophilic NCAM signals, having a direct impact on tumor cell growth. This provides a mechanism for how PSA may promote the genesis and progression of highly aggressive PSA-NCAM-positive tumors. PMID:12897159

  9. Quantifying the forces driving cell-cell adhesion in a fungal pathogen

    PubMed Central

    Alsteens, David; Van Dijck, Patrick; Lipke, Peter N.; Dufrêne, Yves F.

    2013-01-01

    Owing to its ability to form biofilms on implanted medical devices, the fungal pathogen Candida albicans causes frequent infections in humans. A hallmark of C. albicans biofilms is the presence of two types of cells, budding yeast cells and growing hyphae, which are bound together and embedded in extracellular matrix material. Although cell-cell adhesion is critical to biofilm formation, architecture and cohesion, we know little about the fundamental forces behind this interaction. Here, we use single-cell force spectroscopy (SCFS) to quantify the forces engaged in yeast-hyphae adhesion, focusing on the role of Als (Agglutinin-like sequence) proteins as prototypes of cell adhesion molecules. We show that adhesion between individual yeast and hyphal cells involves strong, short-range cohesive interactions (1.1 nN ± 0.2 nN; 86 ± 33 nm), and weak, long-range tether interactions (0.4 ± 0.2 nN; 234 ± 81 nm). Control experiments demonstrate that these interactions originate from cell surface proteins that are specific to C. albicans. Using mutant strains deficient for Als expression, we find that Als3 proteins, primarily expressed on the germ tube, play a key role in establishing strong cohesive adhesion. We suggest a model in which cohesive adhesion during biofilm formation originates from tight hydrophobic interactions between Als tandem repeat domains on adjacent cells. When subjected to force, the two interacting cell surfaces detach but the cell bodies remain tethered through macromolecular extensions. Our results represent the first direct, non-invasive measurement of adhesion forces between interacting fungal cells, and provide novel insights into the molecular origin of the cohesive strength of fungal biofilms. PMID:24152214

  10. Temperature-controlled masking/unmasking of cell-adhesive cues with poly(ethylene glycol) methacrylate based brushes.

    PubMed

    Desseaux, Solenne; Klok, Harm-Anton

    2014-10-13

    Thin, thermoresponsive polymer coatings that allow to reversibly modulate cell adhesion and detachment are attractive substrates for cell sheet engineering. Usually, this is accomplished by applying thin poly(N-isopropylacrylamide) (PNIPAM) coatings, which allow cell adhesion via nonspecific interactions above the collapse temperature (T(T)) of the surface-attached polymer and cell detachment upon cooling below T(T). This Article presents an alternative, thermoresponsive polymer platform that is based on 2-(2-methoxyethoxy)ethyl methacrylate (MEO2MA) containing copolymer brushes prepared via surface-initiated atom transfer radical polymerization (SI-ATRP). These brushes are interesting as they gradually collapse and dehydrate upon increasing the temperature from 10 to 40 °C, yet resist nonspecific adhesion of cells over this entire temperature window. The MEO2MA based brushes presented here were modified via a two-step postpolymerization modification protocol to introduce cell-adhesive RGD containing peptide ligands. The possibility to reversibly control the swelling and collapse of these brush films by varying temperature allows to modulate the effectively available surface concentration of these cell-adhesive cues and thus provides a way to mask/unmask their biological activity. As a first proof of concept, this Article demonstrates that these MEO2MA brush copolymer films enable integrin-mediated adhesion of 3T3 fibroblasts at 37 °C and allow release of these cells by cooling to 23 °C. The use of cell-adhesive ligands, which can be thermoreversibly masked/unmasked, is attractive as it enables the use of serum-free cell culture conditions. This is advantageous since it avoids possible concerns regarding eventual toxicity and immunological side effects of serum proteins and also provides opportunities to select for particular cell types and for enhanced control over cell stimulation and differentiation. PMID:25208302

  11. Liprin-α1 and ERC1 control cell edge dynamics by promoting focal adhesion turnover

    PubMed Central

    Astro, Veronica; Tonoli, Diletta; Chiaretti, Sara; Badanai, Sabrina; Sala, Kristyna; Zerial, Marino; de Curtis, Ivan

    2016-01-01

    Liprin-α1 and ERC1 are interacting scaffold proteins regulating the motility of normal and tumor cells. They act as part of plasma membrane-associated platforms at the edge of motile cells to promote protrusion by largely unknown mechanisms. Here we identify an amino-terminal region of the liprin-α1 protein (liprin-N) that is sufficient and necessary for the interaction with other liprin-α1 molecules. Similar to liprin-α1 or ERC1 silencing, expression of the liprin-N negatively affects tumor cell motility and extracellular matrix invasion, acting as a dominant negative by interacting with endogenous liprin-α1 and causing the displacement of the endogenous ERC1 protein from the cell edge. Interfering with the localization of ERC1 at the cell edge inhibits the disassembly of focal adhesions, impairing protrusion. Liprin-α1 and ERC1 proteins colocalize with active integrin β1 clusters distinct from those colocalizing with cytoplasmic focal adhesion proteins, and influence the localization of peripheral Rab7-positive endosomes. We propose that liprin-α1 and ERC1 promote protrusion by displacing cytoplasmic adhesion components to favour active integrin internalization into Rab7-positive endosomes. PMID:27659488

  12. The effect of plasma-nitrided titanium surfaces on osteoblastic cell adhesion, proliferation, and differentiation.

    PubMed

    Ferraz, Emanuela P; Sa, Juliana C; de Oliveira, Paulo T; Alves, Clodomiro; Beloti, Marcio M; Rosa, Adalberto L

    2014-04-01

    In this study, we evaluated the effect of new plasma-nitrided Ti surfaces on the progression of osteoblast cultures, including cell adhesion, proliferation and differentiation. Ti surfaces were treated using two plasma-nitriding protocols, hollow cathode for 3 h (HC 3 h) and 1 h (HC 1 h) and planar for 1 h. Untreated Ti surfaces were used as control. Cells derived from human alveolar and rat calvarial bones were cultured on Ti surfaces for periods of up to 14 days and the following parameters were evaluated: cell morphology, adhesion, spreading and proliferation, alkaline phosphatase (ALP) activity, extracellular matrix mineralization, and gene expression of key osteoblast markers. Plasma-nitriding treatments resulted in Ti surfaces with distinct physicochemical characteristics. The cell adhesion and ALP activity were higher on plasma-nitrided Ti surfaces compared with untreated one, whereas cell proliferation and extracellular matrix mineralization were not affected by the treatments. In addition, the plasma-nitrided Ti surfaces increased the ALP, reduced the osteocalcin and did not affect the Runx2 gene expression. We have shown that HC 3 h and planar Ti surfaces slightly favored the osteoblast differentiation process, and then these surfaces should be considered for further investigation using preclinical models.

  13. Dehydrodiconiferyl alcohol suppresses monocyte adhesion to endothelial cells by attenuation of JNK signaling pathway.

    PubMed

    Tsuneyoshi, Tadamitsu; Kanamori, Yuta; Matsutomo, Toshiaki; Morihara, Naoaki

    2015-09-25

    Several clinical studies have shown that the intake of aged garlic extract improves endothelial dysfunction. Lignan compounds, (+)-(2S,3R)-dehydrodiconiferyl alcohol (DDC) and (-)-(2R,3S)-dihydrodehydrodiconiferyl alcohol (DDDC), have been isolated as antioxidants in aged garlic extract. There is evidence showing the importance of oxidative stress in endothelial dysfunction. In the present study, we examined whether DDC and DDDC enhance endothelial cell function in vitro. Cell adhesion assay was performed using THP-1 monocyte and human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs) which were activated by lipopolysaccharide (LPS) or advanced glycation end products (AGEs)-BSA. Cellular ELISA method was used for the evaluation of vascular cell adhesion molecule 1 (VCAM-1) expression on HUVECs. DDC and DDDC suppressed the adhesion of THP-1 to HUVECs which was activated by LPS or AGEs-BSA. DDC and DDDC also inhibited VCAM-1 expression induced by LPS or AGEs-BSA, but DDDC was less effective than DDC. In addition, the inhibitory effect of DDC on VCAM-1 expression involved suppressing JNK/c-Jun pathway rather than NF-κB pathway. DDC has an inhibitory effect on VCAM-1 expression via JNK pathway in endothelial cells and therefore may serve as a novel pharmacological agent to improve endothelial dysfunction. PMID:26271597

  14. NMU signaling promotes endometrial cancer cell progression by modulating adhesion signaling

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Ting-Yu; Wu, Fang-Ju; Chang, Chia-Lin; Li, Zhongyou; Luo, Ching-Wei

    2016-01-01

    Neuromedin U (NMU) was originally named based on its strong uterine contractile activity, but little is known regarding its signaling/functions in utero. We identified that NMU and one of its receptors, NMUR2, are not only present in normal uterine endometrium but also co-expressed in endometrial cancer tissues, where the NMU level is correlated with the malignant grades and survival of patients. Cell-based assays further confirmed that NMU signaling can promote cell motility and proliferation of endometrial cancer cells derived from grade II tumors. Activation of NMU pathway in these endometrial cancer cells is required in order to sustain expression of various adhesion molecules, such as CD44 and integrin alpha1, as well as production of their corresponding extracellular matrix ligands, hyaluronan and collagen IV; it also increased the activity of SRC and its downstream proteins RHOA and RAC1. Thus, it is concluded that NMU pathway positively controls the adhesion signaling-SRC-Rho GTPase axis in the tested endometrial cancer cells and that changes in cell motility and proliferation can occur when there is manipulation of NMU signaling in these cells either in vitro or in vivo. Intriguingly, this novel mechanism also explains how NMU signaling promotes the EGFR-driven and TGFβ receptor-driven mesenchymal transitions. Through the above axis, NMU signaling not only can promote malignancy of the tested endometrial cancer cells directly, but also helps these cells to become more sensitive to niche growth factors in their microenvironment. PMID:26849234

  15. Cell adhesion and guidance by micropost-array chemical sensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pantano, Paul; Quah, Soo-Kim; Danowski, Kristine L.

    2002-06-01

    An array of ~50,000 individual polymeric micropost sensors was patterned across a glass coverslip by a photoimprint lithographic technique. Individual micropost sensors were ~3-micrometers tall and ~8-micrometers wide. The O2-sensitive micropost array sensors (MPASs) comprised a ruthenium complex encapsulated in a gas permeable photopolymerizable siloxane. The pH-sensitive MPASs comprised a fluorescein conjugate encapsulated in a photocrosslinkable poly(vinyl alcohol)-based polymer. PO2 and pH were quantitated by acquiring MPAS luminescence images with an epifluorescence microscope/charge coupled device imaging system. O2-sensitive MPASs displayed linear Stern-Volmer quenching behavior with a maximum Io/I of ~8.6. pH-sensitive MPASs displayed sigmoidal calibration curves with a pKa of ~5.8. The adhesion of undifferentiated rat pheochromocytoma (PC12) cells across these two polymeric surface types was investigated. The greatest PC12 cell proliferation and adhesion occurred across the poly(vinyl alcohol)-based micropost arrays relative to planar poly(vinyl alcohol)-based surfaces and both patterned and planar siloxane surfaces. An additional advantage of the patterned MPAS layers relative to planar sensing layers was the ability to direct the growth of biological cells. Preliminary data is presented whereby nerve growth factor-differentiated PC12 cells grew neurite-like processes that extended along paths defined by the micropost architecture.

  16. Mechanokinetics of receptor-ligand interactions in cell adhesion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Ning; Lü, Shouqin; Zhang, Yan; Long, Mian

    2015-04-01

    Receptor-ligand interactions in blood flow are crucial to initiate such biological processes as inflammatory cascade, platelet thrombosis, as well as tumor metastasis. To mediate cell adhesion, the interacting receptors and ligands must be anchored onto two apposing surfaces of two cells or a cell and a substratum, i.e., two-dimensional (2D) binding, which is different from the binding of a soluble ligand in fluid phase to a receptor, i.e., three-dimensional (3D) binding. While numerous works have been focused on 3D kinetics of receptor-ligand interactions in the immune system, 2D kinetics and its regulations have been less understood, since no theoretical framework or experimental assays were established until 1993. Not only does the molecular structure dominate 2D binding kinetics, but the shear force in blood flow also regulates cell adhesion mediated by interacting receptors and ligands. Here, we provide an overview of current progress in 2D binding and regulations, mainly from our group. Relevant issues of theoretical frameworks, experimental measurements, kinetic rates and binding affinities, and force regulations are discussed.

  17. Cell adhesion molecule control of planar spindle orientation.

    PubMed

    Tuncay, Hüseyin; Ebnet, Klaus

    2016-03-01

    Polarized epithelial cells align the mitotic spindle in the plane of the sheet to maintain tissue integrity and to prevent malignant transformation. The orientation of the spindle apparatus is regulated by the immobilization of the astral microtubules at the lateral cortex and depends on the precise localization of the dynein-dynactin motor protein complex which captures microtubule plus ends and generates pulling forces towards the centrosomes. Recent developments indicate that signals derived from intercellular junctions are required for the stable interaction of the dynein-dynactin complex with the cortex. Here, we review the molecular mechanisms that regulate planar spindle orientation in polarized epithelial cells and we illustrate how different cell adhesion molecules through distinct and non-overlapping mechanisms instruct the cells to align the mitotic spindle in the plane of the sheet. PMID:26698907

  18. Biological length scale topography enhances cell-substratum adhesion of human corneal epithelial cells

    PubMed Central

    Karuri, Nancy W.; Liliensiek, Sara; Teixeira, Ana I.; Abrams, George; Campbell, Sean; Nealey, Paul F.; Murphy, Christopher J.

    2006-01-01

    Summary The basement membrane possesses a rich 3-dimensional nanoscale topography that provides a physical stimulus, which may modulate cell-substratum adhesion. We have investigated the strength of cell-substratum adhesion on nanoscale topographic features of a similar scale to that of the native basement membrane. SV40 human corneal epithelial cells were challenged by well-defined fluid shear, and cell detachment was monitored. We created silicon substrata with uniform grooves and ridges having pitch dimensions of 400-4000 nm using X-ray lithography. F-actin labeling of cells that had been incubated for 24 hours revealed that the percentage of aligned and elongated cells on the patterned surfaces was the same regardless of pitch dimension. In contrast, at the highest fluid shear, a biphasic trend in cell adhesion was observed with cells being most adherent to the smaller features. The 400 nm pitch had the highest percentage of adherent cells at the end of the adhesion assay. The effect of substratum topography was lost for the largest features evaluated, the 4000 nm pitch. Qualitative and quantitative analyses of the cells during and after flow indicated that the aligned and elongated cells on the 400 nm pitch were more tightly adhered compared to aligned cells on the larger patterns. Selected experiments with primary cultured human corneal epithelial cells produced similar results to the SV40 human corneal epithelial cells. These findings have relevance to interpretation of cell-biomaterial interactions in tissue engineering and prosthetic design. PMID:15226393

  19. Biological length scale topography enhances cell-substratum adhesion of human corneal epithelial cells.

    PubMed

    Karuri, Nancy W; Liliensiek, Sara; Teixeira, Ana I; Abrams, George; Campbell, Sean; Nealey, Paul F; Murphy, Christopher J

    2004-07-01

    The basement membrane possesses a rich 3-dimensional nanoscale topography that provides a physical stimulus, which may modulate cell-substratum adhesion. We have investigated the strength of cell-substratum adhesion on nanoscale topographic features of a similar scale to that of the native basement membrane. SV40 human corneal epithelial cells were challenged by well-defined fluid shear, and cell detachment was monitored. We created silicon substrata with uniform grooves and ridges having pitch dimensions of 400-4000 nm using X-ray lithography. F-actin labeling of cells that had been incubated for 24 hours revealed that the percentage of aligned and elongated cells on the patterned surfaces was the same regardless of pitch dimension. In contrast, at the highest fluid shear, a biphasic trend in cell adhesion was observed with cells being most adherent to the smaller features. The 400 nm pitch had the highest percentage of adherent cells at the end of the adhesion assay. The effect of substratum topography was lost for the largest features evaluated, the 4000 nm pitch. Qualitative and quantitative analyses of the cells during and after flow indicated that the aligned and elongated cells on the 400 nm pitch were more tightly adhered compared to aligned cells on the larger patterns. Selected experiments with primary cultured human corneal epithelial cells produced similar results to the SV40 human corneal epithelial cells. These findings have relevance to interpretation of cell-biomaterial interactions in tissue engineering and prosthetic design.

  20. Paxillin binding to the alpha 4 integrin subunit stimulates LFA-1 (integrin alpha L beta 2)-dependent T cell migration by augmenting the activation of focal adhesion kinase/proline-rich tyrosine kinase-2.

    PubMed

    Rose, David M; Liu, Shouchun; Woodside, Darren G; Han, Jaewon; Schlaepfer, David D; Ginsberg, Mark H

    2003-06-15

    Engagement of very late Ag-4 (integrin alpha(4)beta(1)) by ligands such as VCAM-1 markedly stimulates leukocyte migration mediated by LFA-1 (integrin alpha(L)beta(2)). This form of integrin trans-regulation in T cells requires the binding of paxillin to the alpha(4) integrin cytoplasmic domain. This conclusion is based on the abolition of trans-regulation in Jurkat T cells by an alpha(4) mutation (alpha(4)(Y991A)) that disrupts paxillin binding. Furthermore, cellular expression of an alpha(4)-binding fragment of paxillin that blocks the alpha(4)-paxillin interaction, selectively blocked VCAM-1 stimulation of alpha(L)beta(2)-dependent cell migration. The alpha(4)-paxillin association mediates trans-regulation by enhancing the activation of tyrosine kinases, focal adhesion kinase (FAK) and/or proline-rich tyrosine kinase-2 (Pyk2), based on two lines of evidence. First, disruption of the paxillin-binding site in the alpha(4) tail resulted in much less alpha(4)beta(1)-mediated phosphorylation of Pyk2 and FAK. Second, transfection with cDNAs encoding C-terminal fragments of Pyk2 and FAK, which block the function of the intact kinases, blocked alpha(4)beta(1) stimulation of alpha(L)beta(2)-dependent migration. These results define a proximal protein-protein interaction of an integrin cytoplasmic domain required for trans-regulation between integrins, and establish that augmented activation of Pyk2 and/or FAK is an immediate signaling event required for the trans-regulation of integrin alpha(L)beta(2) by alpha(4)beta(1). PMID:12794117

  1. Cell adhesion on a polymerized peptide-amphiphile monolayer.

    PubMed

    Biesalski, Markus A; Knaebel, Alexandra; Tu, Raymond; Tirrell, Matthew

    2006-03-01

    We report the synthesis and characterization of a stable polymerized monolayer of peptide-amphihiles on a planar solid support that promotes mouse fibroblast cell adhesion and spreading. Peptide-amphiphiles consisting of a polymerizable fatty acid attached to a short RGD containing peptide sequence are self-assembled and polymerized at the water-air interface by means of the Langmuir- Blodgett technique. The surface concentration of the peptide-amphiphile is varied by co-spreading the peptide-amphiphile with an analogous non-modified polymerizable amphiphile at the water/air interface, prior to UV light-induced polymerization. The polymerized monolayer is transferred onto a hydrophobized smooth mica surface and the resulting surfaces have been investigated with respect to directing the cell adhesion and spreading of mouse fibroblast cells in a serum-free medium. Fibroblast cells adhere and spread on surfaces exposing the bioactive ligand but do not spread on reference surfaces without peptide. We find a maximum number of adherent cells at rather high peptide surface concentrations of about 10 mol% in the mixed monolayer, equivalent to more than 50 pmol/cm2 peptide on the surface of the film. We attribute this finding to a limited accessibility of the ligands by the integrins. Because of the stability of the polymerized peptide-amphiphile monolayer, these surfaces can be re-seeded multiple times with cells, i.e. adherent cells can be removed from the surface, the surface can be sterilized and cells can be re-attached. PMID:16157369

  2. Bead Aggregation Assays for the Characterization of Putative Cell Adhesion Molecules

    PubMed Central

    Emond, Michelle R.; Jontes, James D.

    2014-01-01

    Cell-cell adhesion is fundamental to multicellular life and is mediated by a diverse array of cell surface proteins. However, the adhesive interactions for many of these proteins are poorly understood. Here we present a simple, rapid method for characterizing the adhesive properties of putative homophilic cell adhesion molecules. Cultured HEK293 cells are transfected with DNA plasmid encoding a secreted, epitope-tagged ectodomain of a cell surface protein. Using functionalized beads specific for the epitope tag, the soluble, secreted fusion protein is captured from the culture medium. The coated beads can then be used directly in bead aggregation assays or in fluorescent bead sorting assays to test for homophilic adhesion. If desired, mutagenesis can then be used to elucidate the specific amino acids or domains required for adhesion. This assay requires only small amounts of expressed protein, does not require the production of stable cell lines, and can be accomplished in 4 days. PMID:25350770

  3. Homophilic Adhesion Mechanism of Neurofascin, a Member of the L1 Family of Neural Cell Adhesion Molecules

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, Heli; Focia, Pamela J.; He, Xiaolin

    2012-02-13

    The L1 family neural cell adhesion molecules play key roles in specifying the formation and remodeling of the neural network, but their homophilic interaction that mediates adhesion is not well understood. We report two crystal structures of a dimeric form of the headpiece of neurofascin, an L1 family member. The four N-terminal Ig-like domains of neurofascin form a horseshoe shape, akin to several other immunoglobulin superfamily cell adhesion molecules such as hemolin, axonin, and Dscam. The neurofascin dimer, captured in two crystal forms with independent packing patterns, reveals a pair of horseshoes in trans-synaptic adhesion mode. The adhesion interaction is mediated mostly by the second Ig-like domain, which features an intermolecular {beta}-sheet formed by the joining of two individual GFC {beta}-sheets and a large but loosely packed hydrophobic cluster. Mutagenesis combined with gel filtration assays suggested that the side chain hydrogen bonds at the intermolecular {beta}-sheet are essential for the homophilic interaction and that the residues at the hydrophobic cluster play supplementary roles. Our structures reveal a conserved homophilic adhesion mode for the L1 family and also shed light on how the pathological mutations of L1 affect its structure and function.

  4. Homophilic adhesion mechanism of neurofascin, a member of the L1 family of neural cell adhesion molecules.

    PubMed

    Liu, Heli; Focia, Pamela J; He, Xiaolin

    2011-01-01

    The L1 family neural cell adhesion molecules play key roles in specifying the formation and remodeling of the neural network, but their homophilic interaction that mediates adhesion is not well understood. We report two crystal structures of a dimeric form of the headpiece of neurofascin, an L1 family member. The four N-terminal Ig-like domains of neurofascin form a horseshoe shape, akin to several other immunoglobulin superfamily cell adhesion molecules such as hemolin, axonin, and Dscam. The neurofascin dimer, captured in two crystal forms with independent packing patterns, reveals a pair of horseshoes in trans-synaptic adhesion mode. The adhesion interaction is mediated mostly by the second Ig-like domain, which features an intermolecular β-sheet formed by the joining of two individual GFC β-sheets and a large but loosely packed hydrophobic cluster. Mutagenesis combined with gel filtration assays suggested that the side chain hydrogen bonds at the intermolecular β-sheet are essential for the homophilic interaction and that the residues at the hydrophobic cluster play supplementary roles. Our structures reveal a conserved homophilic adhesion mode for the L1 family and also shed light on how the pathological mutations of L1 affect its structure and function. PMID:21047790

  5. Anisotropy of cell adhesive microenvironment governs cell internal organization and orientation of polarity

    PubMed Central

    Théry, Manuel; Racine, Victor; Piel, Matthieu; Pépin, Anne; Dimitrov, Ariane; Chen, Yong; Sibarita, Jean-Baptiste; Bornens, Michel

    2006-01-01

    Control of the establishment of cell polarity is an essential function in tissue morphogenesis and renewal that depends on spatial cues provided by the extracellular environment. The molecular role of cell–cell or cell–extracellular matrix (ECM) contacts on the establishment of cell polarity has been well characterized. It has been hypothesized that the geometry of the cell adhesive microenvironment was directing cell surface polarization and internal organization. To define how the extracellular environment affects cell polarity, we analyzed the organization of individual cells plated on defined micropatterned substrates imposing cells to spread on various combinations of adhesive and nonadhesive areas. The reproducible normalization effect on overall cell compartmentalization enabled quantification of the spatial organization of the actin network and associated proteins, the spatial distribution of microtubules, and the positioning of nucleus, centrosome, and Golgi apparatus. By using specific micropatterns and statistical analysis of cell compartment positions, we demonstrated that ECM geometry determines the orientation of cell polarity axes. The nucleus–centrosome orientations were reproducibly directed toward cell adhesive edges. The anisotropy of the cell cortex in response to the adhesive conditions did not affect the centrosome positioning at the cell centroid. Based on the quantification of microtubule plus end distribution we propose a working model that accounts for that observation. We conclude that, in addition to molecular composition and mechanical properties, ECM geometry plays a key role in developmental processes. PMID:17179050

  6. Why are enteric ganglia so small? Role of differential adhesion of enteric neurons and enteric neural crest cells.

    PubMed Central

    Rollo, Benjamin N.; Zhang, Dongcheng; Simkin, Johanna E.; Menheniott, Trevelyan R.; Newgreen, Donald F.

    2015-01-01

    The avian enteric nervous system (ENS) consists of a vast number of unusually small ganglia compared to other peripheral ganglia. Each ENS ganglion at mid-gestation has a core of neurons and a shell of mesenchymal precursor/glia-like enteric neural crest (ENC) cells. To study ENS cell ganglionation we isolated midgut ENS cells by HNK-1 fluorescence-activated cell sorting (FACS) from E5 and E8 quail embryos, and from E9 chick embryos. We performed cell-cell aggregation assays which revealed a developmentally regulated functional increase in ENS cell adhesive function, requiring both Ca 2+ -dependent and independent adhesion. This was consistent with N-cadherin and NCAM labelling. Neurons sorted to the core of aggregates, surrounded by outer ENC cells, showing that neurons had higher adhesion than ENC cells. The outer surface of aggregates became relatively non-adhesive, correlating with low levels of NCAM and N-cadherin on this surface of the outer non-neuronal ENC cells. Aggregation assays showed that ENS cells FACS selected for NCAM-high and enriched for enteric neurons formed larger and more coherent aggregates than unsorted ENS cells. In contrast, ENS cells of the NCAM-low FACS fraction formed small, disorganised aggregates.  This suggests a novel mechanism for control of ENS ganglion morphogenesis where i) differential adhesion of ENS neurons and ENC cells controls the core/shell ganglionic structure and ii) the ratio of neurons to ENC cells dictates the equilibrium ganglion size by generation of an outer non-adhesive surface. PMID:26064478

  7. Why are enteric ganglia so small? Role of differential adhesion of enteric neurons and enteric neural crest cells.

    PubMed

    Rollo, Benjamin N; Zhang, Dongcheng; Simkin, Johanna E; Menheniott, Trevelyan R; Newgreen, Donald F

    2015-01-01

    The avian enteric nervous system (ENS) consists of a vast number of unusually small ganglia compared to other peripheral ganglia. Each ENS ganglion at mid-gestation has a core of neurons and a shell of mesenchymal precursor/glia-like enteric neural crest (ENC) cells. To study ENS cell ganglionation we isolated midgut ENS cells by HNK-1 fluorescence-activated cell sorting (FACS) from E5 and E8 quail embryos, and from E9 chick embryos. We performed cell-cell aggregation assays which revealed a developmentally regulated functional increase in ENS cell adhesive function, requiring both Ca (2+) -dependent and independent adhesion. This was consistent with N-cadherin and NCAM labelling. Neurons sorted to the core of aggregates, surrounded by outer ENC cells, showing that neurons had higher adhesion than ENC cells. The outer surface of aggregates became relatively non-adhesive, correlating with low levels of NCAM and N-cadherin on this surface of the outer non-neuronal ENC cells. Aggregation assays showed that ENS cells FACS selected for NCAM-high and enriched for enteric neurons formed larger and more coherent aggregates than unsorted ENS cells. In contrast, ENS cells of the NCAM-low FACS fraction formed small, disorganised aggregates.  This suggests a novel mechanism for control of ENS ganglion morphogenesis where i) differential adhesion of ENS neurons and ENC cells controls the core/shell ganglionic structure and ii) the ratio of neurons to ENC cells dictates the equilibrium ganglion size by generation of an outer non-adhesive surface.

  8. Adhesion behavior of endothelial progenitor cells to endothelial cells in simple shear flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gong, Xiao-Bo; Li, Yu-Qing; Gao, Quan-Chao; Cheng, Bin-Bin; Shen, Bao-Rong; Yan, Zhi-Qiang; Jiang, Zong-Lai

    2011-12-01

    The adhesion of endothelial progenitor cells (EPCs) on endothelial cells (ECs) is one of the critical physiological processes for the regenesis of vascular vessels and the prevention of serious cardiovascular diseases. Here, the rolling and adhesion behavior of EPCs on ECs was studied numerically. A two-dimensional numerical model was developed based on the immersed boundary method for simulating the rolling and adhesion of cells in a channel flow. The binding force arising from the catch bond of a receptor and ligand pair was modeled with stochastic Monte Carlo method and Hookean spring model. The effect of tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF- α) on the expression of the number of adhesion molecules in ECs was analyzed experimentally. A flow chamber system with CCD camera was set up to observe the top view of the rolling of EPCs on the substrate cultivated with ECs. Numerical results prove that the adhesion of EPC on ECs is closely related to membrane stiffness of the cell and shear rate of the flow. It also suggests that the adhesion force between EPC and EC by P-selectin glycoprotein ligand-1 only is not strong enough to bond the cell onto vessel walls unless contributions of other catch bond are considered. Experimental results demonstrate that TNF- α enhanced the expressions of VCAM, ICAM, P-selectin and E-selectin in ECs, which supports the numerical results that the rolling velocity of EPC on TNF- α treated EC substrate decreases obviously compared with its velocity on the untreated one. It is found that because the adhesion is affected by both the rolling velocity and the deformability of the cell, an optimal stiffness of EPC may exist at a given shear rate of flow for achieving maximum adhesion rates.

  9. Effect of hydroxyapatite surface morphology on cell adhesion.

    PubMed

    Iwamoto, Takashi; Hieda, Yohki; Kogai, Yasumichi

    2016-12-01

    We obtained hydroxyapatite (HAp) materials as a block by mixing HAp nanoparticles and polymer, and then calcining the mixtures. The surface morphology of the HAp materials was tuned by varying heat treatment conditions. After calcining the mixtures at 1200 or 800°C for 4h, the surface morphology of the HAp materials was flat or convexo-concave, respectively. The flat surface morphology, which showed micrometer-ordered grain boundaries, was formed by the aggregation of HAp nanoparticles. On the other hand, the convexo-concave surface morphology resulted from the agglomeration of HAp nanoparticles after heat treatment at 800°C for 4h with nanometer-ordered particle size. We tested cell adhesion to HAp materials with flat or convexo-concave surface morphology and found that cells adhered well to the flat HAp materials but not to the convexo-concave HAp materials. This technique for selectively preparing HAp materials with flat or convexo-concave surface morphology was very easy because we merely mixed commercial HAp nanoparticles with polymer and then calcined the mixtures. As a result, the heat treatment temperature affected the surface morphology of our HAp materials, and their surface morphologies contributed to cell adhesion independently of other material properties. PMID:27612825

  10. Effect of hydroxyapatite surface morphology on cell adhesion.

    PubMed

    Iwamoto, Takashi; Hieda, Yohki; Kogai, Yasumichi

    2016-12-01

    We obtained hydroxyapatite (HAp) materials as a block by mixing HAp nanoparticles and polymer, and then calcining the mixtures. The surface morphology of the HAp materials was tuned by varying heat treatment conditions. After calcining the mixtures at 1200 or 800°C for 4h, the surface morphology of the HAp materials was flat or convexo-concave, respectively. The flat surface morphology, which showed micrometer-ordered grain boundaries, was formed by the aggregation of HAp nanoparticles. On the other hand, the convexo-concave surface morphology resulted from the agglomeration of HAp nanoparticles after heat treatment at 800°C for 4h with nanometer-ordered particle size. We tested cell adhesion to HAp materials with flat or convexo-concave surface morphology and found that cells adhered well to the flat HAp materials but not to the convexo-concave HAp materials. This technique for selectively preparing HAp materials with flat or convexo-concave surface morphology was very easy because we merely mixed commercial HAp nanoparticles with polymer and then calcined the mixtures. As a result, the heat treatment temperature affected the surface morphology of our HAp materials, and their surface morphologies contributed to cell adhesion independently of other material properties.

  11. hGAAP promotes cell adhesion and migration via the stimulation of store-operated Ca2+ entry and calpain 2

    PubMed Central

    Saraiva, Nuno; Prole, David L.; Carrara, Guia; Johnson, Benjamin F.; Taylor, Colin W.

    2013-01-01

    Golgi antiapoptotic proteins (GAAPs) are highly conserved Golgi membrane proteins that inhibit apoptosis and promote Ca2+ release from intracellular stores. Given the role of Ca2+ in controlling cell adhesion and motility, we hypothesized that human GAAP (hGAAP) might influence these events. In this paper, we present evidence that hGAAP increased cell adhesion, spreading, and migration in a manner that depended on the C-terminal domain of hGAAP. We show that hGAAP increased store-operated Ca2+ entry and thereby the activity of calpain at newly forming protrusions. These hGAAP-dependent effects regulated focal adhesion dynamics and cell migration. Indeed, inhibition or knockdown of calpain 2 abrogated the effects of hGAAP on cell spreading and migration. Our data reveal that hGAAP is a novel regulator of focal adhesion dynamics, cell adhesion, and migration by controlling localized Ca2+-dependent activation of calpain. PMID:23940116

  12. Elucidating the general principles of cell adhesion with a coarse-grained simulation model.

    PubMed

    Chen, Jiawen; Xie, Zhong-Ru; Wu, Yinghao

    2016-01-01

    Cell adhesion plays an indispensable role in coordinating physiological functions in multicellular organisms. During this process, specific types of cell adhesion molecules interact with each other from the opposite sides of neighboring cells. Following this trans-interaction, many cell adhesion molecules further aggregate into clusters through cis interactions. Beyond the molecule level, adhesion can be affected by multiple cellular factors due to the complexity of membrane microenvironments, including its interplay with cell signaling. However, despite tremendous advances in experimental developments, little is understood about the general principles of cell adhesion and its functional impacts. Here a mesoscopic simulation method is developed to tackle this problem. We illustrated that specific spatial patterns of membrane protein clustering are originated from different geometrical arrangements of their binding interfaces, while the size of clusters is closely regulated by molecular flexibility. Different scenarios of cooperation between trans and cis interactions of cell adhesion molecules were further tested. Additionally, impacts of membrane environments on cell adhesion were evaluated, such as the presence of a cytoskeletal meshwork, the membrane tension and the size effect of different membrane proteins on cell surfaces. Finally, by simultaneously simulating adhesion and oligomerization of signaling receptors, we found that the interplay between these two systems can be either positive or negative, closely depending on the spatial and temporal patterns of their molecular interactions. Therefore, our computational model pave the way for understanding the molecular mechanisms of cell adhesion and its biological functions in regulating cell signaling pathways.

  13. Mouse fibroblast cell adhesion studied by neutron reflectometry.

    PubMed

    Smith, Hillary L; Hickey, Joseph; Jablin, Michael S; Trujillo, Antoinette; Freyer, James P; Majewski, Jaroslaw

    2010-03-01

    Neutron reflectometry (NR) was used to examine live mouse fibroblast cells adherent on a quartz substrate in a deuterated phosphate-buffered saline environment at room temperature. These measurements represent the first, to our knowledge, successful visualization and quantization of the interface between live cells and a substrate with subnanometer resolution using NR. NR data, attributable to the adhesion of live cells, were observed and compared with data from pure growth medium. Independently of surface cell density, the average distance between the center of the cell membrane region and the quartz substrate was determined to be approximately 180 A. The membrane region ( approximately 80 A thick) contains the membranes of cells that are inhomogeneously distributed or undulating, likely conforming to the nonplanar geometry of the supporting adherence proteins. A second region of cell membranes at a greater distance from the substrate was not detectable by NR due to the resolution limits of the technique employed. Attachment of the live cell samples was confirmed by interaction with both distilled water and trypsin. Distinct changes in the NR data after exposure indicate the removal of cells from the substrate.

  14. Porcine E. coli: virulence-associated genes, resistance genes and adhesion and probiotic activity tested by a new screening method.

    PubMed

    Schierack, Peter; Rödiger, Stefan; Kuhl, Christoph; Hiemann, Rico; Roggenbuck, Dirk; Li, Ganwu; Weinreich, Jörg; Berger, Enrico; Nolan, Lisa K; Nicholson, Bryon; Römer, Antje; Frömmel, Ulrike; Wieler, Lothar H; Schröder, Christian

    2013-01-01

    We established an automated screening method to characterize adhesion of Escherichia coli to intestinal porcine epithelial cells (IPEC-J2) and their probiotic activity against infection by enteropathogenic E. coli (EPEC). 104 intestinal E. coli isolates from domestic pigs were tested by PCR for the occurrence of virulence-associated genes, genes coding for resistances to antimicrobial agents and metals, and for phylogenetic origin by PCR. Adhesion rates and probiotic activity were examined for correlation with the presence of these genes. Finally, data were compared with those from 93 E. coli isolates from wild boars. Isolates from domestic pigs carried a broad variety of all tested genes and showed great diversity in gene patterns. Adhesions varied with a maximum of 18.3 or 24.2 mean bacteria adherence per epithelial cell after 2 or 6 hours respectively. Most isolates from domestic pigs and wild boars showed low adherence, with no correlation between adhesion/probiotic activity and E. coli genes or gene clusters. The gene sfa/foc, encoding for a subunit of F1C fimbriae did show a positive correlative association with adherence and probiotic activity; however E. coli isolates from wild boars with the sfa/foc gene showed less adhesion and probiotic activity than E. coli with the sfa/foc gene isolated from domestic pigs after 6 hour incubation. In conclusion, screening porcine E. coli for virulence associated genes genes, adhesion to intestinal epithelial cells, and probiotic activity revealed a single important adhesion factor, several probiotic candidates, and showed important differences between E. coli of domestic pigs and wild boars.

  15. Porcine E. coli: Virulence-Associated Genes, Resistance Genes and Adhesion and Probiotic Activity Tested by a New Screening Method

    PubMed Central

    Schierack, Peter; Rödiger, Stefan; Kuhl, Christoph; Hiemann, Rico; Roggenbuck, Dirk; Li, Ganwu; Weinreich, Jörg; Berger, Enrico; Nolan, Lisa K.; Nicholson, Bryon; Römer, Antje; Frömmel, Ulrike; Wieler, Lothar H.; Schröder, Christian

    2013-01-01

    We established an automated screening method to characterize adhesion of Escherichia coli to intestinal porcine epithelial cells (IPEC-J2) and their probiotic activity against infection by enteropathogenic E. coli (EPEC). 104 intestinal E. coli isolates from domestic pigs were tested by PCR for the occurrence of virulence-associated genes, genes coding for resistances to antimicrobial agents and metals, and for phylogenetic origin by PCR. Adhesion rates and probiotic activity were examined for correlation with the presence of these genes. Finally, data were compared with those from 93 E. coli isolates from wild boars. Isolates from domestic pigs carried a broad variety of all tested genes and showed great diversity in gene patterns. Adhesions varied with a maximum of 18.3 or 24.2 mean bacteria adherence per epithelial cell after 2 or 6 hours respectively. Most isolates from domestic pigs and wild boars showed low adherence, with no correlation between adhesion/probiotic activity and E. coli genes or gene clusters. The gene sfa/foc, encoding for a subunit of F1C fimbriae did show a positive correlative association with adherence and probiotic activity; however E. coli isolates from wild boars with the sfa/foc gene showed less adhesion and probiotic activity than E. coli with the sfa/foc gene isolated from domestic pigs after 6 hour incubation. In conclusion, screening porcine E. coli for virulence associated genes genes, adhesion to intestinal epithelial cells, and probiotic activity revealed a single important adhesion factor, several probiotic candidates, and showed important differences between E. coli of domestic pigs and wild boars. PMID:23658605

  16. Histamine reduces GPIbα-mediated adhesion of platelets to TNF-α-activated vascular endothelium.

    PubMed

    Brown, T P; Forouzan, O; Shevkoplyas, S S; Khismatullin, D B

    2013-02-01

    Histamine and tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α) are critical mediators of acute and chronic inflammation that are generated by mast cells and macrophages in atherosclerotic lesions or systemically during allergic attacks. Both of them induce activation of vascular endothelium and thus may play a role in thrombosis. Here we studied the interplay between histamine and TNF-α in glycoprotein (GP) Ibα-mediated platelet adhesion to cultured human vascular endothelial cells under static and shear flow conditions. The stimulation of endothelial cells with histamine or TNF-α increased the number of adherent or slow rolling GP Ibα-coated microbeads or washed human platelets. However, the application of histamine to endothelium pre-activated by TNF-α inhibited GP Ibα-mediated platelet adhesion. These effects were found to be associated with changes in the concentration of ultra large von Willebrand factor (ULVWF) strings anchored to endothelium. The results of this study indicate that histamine released during mast cell degranulation may cause or inhibit thrombosis, depending on whether it acts on resting endothelial cells or on cells pre-activated by other inflammatory stimuli.

  17. Adhesive bond cryogenic lens cell margin of safety test

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stubbs, David M.; Hom, Craig L.; Holmes, Howard C.; Cannon-Morret, Joseph C.; Lindstrom, Obert F.; Irwin, J. Wes; Ryder, Leigh A.; Hix, Troy T.; Bonvallet, Jane A.; Hu, Hsin-Kuei S.; Chapman, Ira V.; Lomax, Curtis; Kvamme, E. Todd; Feller, Gregory S.; Haynes, Mark M.

    2011-09-01

    The Near Infrared Camera (NIRCam) instrument for NASA's James Webb Space Telescope (JWST) has an optical prescription which employs four triplet lens cells. The instrument will operate at 35K after experiencing launch loads at approximately 295K and the optic mounts must accommodate all associated thermal and mechanical stresses, plus maintain an exceptional wavefront during operation. Lockheed Martin Space Systems Company (LMSSC) was tasked to design and qualify the bonded cryogenic lens assemblies for room temperature launch, cryogenic operation, and thermal survival (25K) environments. The triplet lens cell designs incorporated coefficient of thermal expansion (CTE) matched bond pad-to-optic interfaces, in concert with flexures to minimize bond line stress and induced optical distortion. A companion finite element study determined the bonded system's sensitivity to bond line thickness, adhesive modulus, and adhesive CTE. The design team used those results to tailor the bond line parameters, minimizing stress transmitted into the optic. The challenge for the Margin of Safety (MOS) team was to design and execute a test that verified all bond pad/adhesive/ optic substrate combinations had the required safety factor to generate confidence in a very low probability optic bond failure during the warm launch and cryogenic survival conditions. Because the survival temperature was specified to be 25K, merely dropping the test temperature to verify margin was not possible. A shear/moment loading device was conceived that simultaneously loaded the test coupons at 25K to verify margin. This paper covers the design/fab/SEM measurement/thermal conditioning of the MOS test articles, the thermal/structural analysis, the test apparatus, and the test execution/results.

  18. L1 adhesion molecule on mouse leukocytes: regulation and involvement in endothelial cell binding.

    PubMed

    Hubbe, M; Kowitz, A; Schirrmacher, V; Schachner, M; Altevogt, P

    1993-11-01

    L1 is a cell surface glycoprotein of the immunoglobulin superfamily which was initially shown to mediate adhesion between neural cells. Recently we have reported that L1 is expressed by bone marrow cells and the majority of mature lymphocytes (Kowitz et al., Eur. J. Immunol. 1992. 22: 1199-1205). To analyze the function of L1 on leukocytes we studied its regulation following cell activation. In vitro activation of B lymphocytes with lipopolysaccharide or T lymphocytes with phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate/Ca2+ ionophore, concanavalin A or anti-CD3 monoclonal antibody as well as in vivo activation of V beta 8+ T cells with staphylococcal enterotoxin B (SEB) revealed a down-regulation of L1 within 48 h. A rapid loss of L1 expression was seen when mouse neutrophils were activated with PMA alone. This rapid loss paralleled the shedding of L-selectin. We also studied a possible role of L1 in the binding of leukocytes to endothelial cells. ESb-MP lymphoma cells with a high expression of L1 (L1hi) could bind to bend3 endothelioma cells without prior activation with inflammatory cytokines. The interaction was inhibited by anti-L1 antibodies. In contrast, ESb-MP cells with low L1 expression (L1lo) were only marginally bound. Latex beads coated with affinity-isolated L1 antigen were also able to bind to the endothelioma cells in a specific fashion. The binding of ESb-MP lymphoma cells required Ca2+ and Mg2+ ions and was sensitive to cold temperature. Since the endothelioma cells did not express L1 the binding mechanism studied here is distinct from the established L1-L1 homotypic interaction. It is possible that the novel L1-mediated adhesion pathway involves an unidentified ligand and could play a role in leukocyte migration.

  19. L1 adhesion molecule on mouse leukocytes: regulation and involvement in endothelial cell binding.

    PubMed

    Hubbe, M; Kowitz, A; Schirrmacher, V; Schachner, M; Altevogt, P

    1993-11-01

    L1 is a cell surface glycoprotein of the immunoglobulin superfamily which was initially shown to mediate adhesion between neural cells. Recently we have reported that L1 is expressed by bone marrow cells and the majority of mature lymphocytes (Kowitz et al., Eur. J. Immunol. 1992. 22: 1199-1205). To analyze the function of L1 on leukocytes we studied its regulation following cell activation. In vitro activation of B lymphocytes with lipopolysaccharide or T lymphocytes with phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate/Ca2+ ionophore, concanavalin A or anti-CD3 monoclonal antibody as well as in vivo activation of V beta 8+ T cells with staphylococcal enterotoxin B (SEB) revealed a down-regulation of L1 within 48 h. A rapid loss of L1 expression was seen when mouse neutrophils were activated with PMA alone. This rapid loss paralleled the shedding of L-selectin. We also studied a possible role of L1 in the binding of leukocytes to endothelial cells. ESb-MP lymphoma cells with a high expression of L1 (L1hi) could bind to bend3 endothelioma cells without prior activation with inflammatory cytokines. The interaction was inhibited by anti-L1 antibodies. In contrast, ESb-MP cells with low L1 expression (L1lo) were only marginally bound. Latex beads coated with affinity-isolated L1 antigen were also able to bind to the endothelioma cells in a specific fashion. The binding of ESb-MP lymphoma cells required Ca2+ and Mg2+ ions and was sensitive to cold temperature. Since the endothelioma cells did not express L1 the binding mechanism studied here is distinct from the established L1-L1 homotypic interaction. It is possible that the novel L1-mediated adhesion pathway involves an unidentified ligand and could play a role in leukocyte migration. PMID:8223869

  20. Adhesion molecules on the endothelium and mononuclear cells in human atherosclerotic lesions.

    PubMed Central

    van der Wal, A. C.; Das, P. K.; Tigges, A. J.; Becker, A. E.

    1992-01-01

    Atherosclerotic lesions show features of a cell-mediated immune inflammatory process. From this viewpoint, the potential role of arterial endothelium in the recruitment of mononuclear cells (T lymphocytes and macrophages) was studied. The endothelium of diffuse intimal thickening (DIT) and atheromatous plaques (AP) in human coronary arteries and abdominal aortas was characterized for the expression of adhesion molecules ELAM-1, ICAM-1, and the major histocompatibility complex (MHC) class II antigens HLA-DR/DP. A marked increase in expression of ICAM-1 and ELAM-1, and to a lesser extent HLA-DR/DP was observed on endothelial cells that were adjacent to subendothelial infiltrates of T lymphocytes (CD3+, CD11a+, HLA-DR/DP+) and macrophages (CD14+, CD11a+, CD11c+, HLA-DR/DP+). This contrasted with a lower or absent expression of these activation markers at sites without prominent inflammatory cell infiltrates. These findings could be demonstrated in DIT as well as in AP. The observations suggest that cytokines produced by the subintimal infiltrates may activate the endothelium in a similar way as is observed in the microvasculature at sites of immune inflammation. The expression of these activation markers in the microvasculature is associated with enhanced leukocyte adhesion, permeability for macromolecules, and procoagulant activity, features known to occur also in early experimental atherosclerosis. The findings therefore support the concept that arterial endothelium plays an active role in the recruitment of mononuclear cells in atherosclerotic lesions. Images Figure 1 PMID:1281621

  1. Interactions between multiple cell types in parallel microfluidic channels: monitoring platelet adhesion to an endothelium in the presence of an anti-adhesion drug.

    PubMed

    Ku, Chia-Jui; D'Amico Oblak, Teresa; Spence, Dana M

    2008-10-01

    A simple method for immobilizing endothelial cells in the channels of a microfluidic device fabricated with soft lithography is presented that requires no surface oxidation of the substrate material used in conjunction with the microfluidic device and is operable even with a reversible seal. Specifically, optimal conditions for culturing bovine pulmonary artery endothelial cells (bPAECs) to the surface of a Petri dish were investigated. The parameters investigated included fibronectin concentration, temperature, seeding density, and immobilization time. To enhance the utility of the device, all optimization studies, and studies involving platelet adhesion to the immobilized endothelium, were performed in parallel channels, thereby enabling improved throughput over a single channel device. The optimal conditions for cell immobilization included coating the Petri dish with 100 microg/mL fibronectin, a seeding cell density of 1.00 x 10(5) cells mL(-1), and an immobilization time of 90 min at 37 degrees C. The device was then employed to monitor the physical interaction (adhesion) of platelets to the immobilized endothelium in the presence of a known platelet activator (ADP) and a drug inhibitor of platelet activation. The number of platelets adhering to the endothelial cells in the channels increased from 17.0 +/- 2.3 in the absence of ADP to 63.2 +/- 2.4 in the presence of 5.00 microM ADP. Moreover, the data presented here also shows that inhibition of endothelium nitric oxide (NO) production, a recognized inhibitor of platelet adhesion to the endothelium, increased the number of platelets adhering to the surface to 35.4 +/- 1.0. In the presence of NO inhibition and 5.00 microM ADP, the affect on platelet adhesion was further increased to 127 +/- 5.2. Finally, this device was employed to investigate the effect of a drug known to inhibit platelet adhesion (clopidogrel) and, in the presence of the drug, the platelet adhesion due to activation by 5.00 microM ADP

  2. Integrin and glycocalyx mediated contributions to cell adhesion identified by single cell force spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boettiger, D.; Wehrle-Haller, B.

    2010-05-01

    The measurement of cell adhesion using single cell force spectroscopy methods was compared with earlier methods for measuring cell adhesion. This comparison provided a means and rationale for separating components of the measurement retract curve that were due to interactions between the substrate and the glycocalyx, and interactions that were due to cell surface integrins binding to a substrate-bound ligand. The glycocalyx adhesion was characterized by multiple jumps with dispersed jump sizes that extended from 5 to 30 µm from the origin. The integrin mediated adhesion was represented by the Fmax (maximum detachment force), was generally within the first 5 µm and commonly detached with a single rupture cascade. The integrin peak (Fmax) increases with time and the rate of increase shows large cell to cell variability with a peak ~ 50 nN s - 1 and an average rate of increase of 75 pN s - 1. This is a measure of the rate of increase in the number of adhesive integrin-ligand bonds/cell as a function of contact time.

  3. Single-gene tuning of Caulobacter cell cycle period and noise, swarming motility, and surface adhesion

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Yihan; Crosson, Sean; Scherer, Norbert F

    2010-01-01

    Sensor histidine kinases underlie the regulation of a range of physiological processes in bacterial cells, from chemotaxis to cell division. In the gram-negative bacterium Caulobacter crescentus, the membrane-bound histidine kinase, DivJ, is a polar-localized regulator of cell cycle progression and development. We show that DivJ localizes to the cell pole through a dynamic diffusion and capture mechanism rather than by active localization. Analysis of single C. crescentus cells in microfluidic culture demonstrates that controlled expression of divJ permits facile tuning of both the mean and noise of the cell division period. Simulations of the cell cycle that use a simplified protein interaction network capture previously measured oscillatory protein profiles, and recapitulate the experimental observation that deletion of divJ increases the cell cycle period and noise. We further demonstrate that surface adhesion and swarming motility of C. crescentus in semi-solid media can also be tuned by divJ expression. We propose a model in which pleiotropic control of polar cell development by the DivJ–DivK–PleC signaling pathway underlies divJ-dependent tuning of cell swarming and adhesion behaviors. PMID:21179017

  4. FAK phosphorylation at Tyr-925 regulates cross-talk between focal adhesion turnover and cell protrusion

    PubMed Central

    Deramaudt, Therese B.; Dujardin, Denis; Hamadi, Abdelkader; Noulet, Fanny; Kolli, Kaouther; De Mey, Jan; Takeda, Kenneth; Rondé, Philippe

    2011-01-01

    Cell migration is a highly complex process that requires the coordinated formation of membrane protrusion and focal adhesions (FAs). Focal adhesion kinase (FAK), a major signaling component of FAs, is involved in the disassembly process of FAs through phosphorylation and dephosphorylation of its tyrosine residues, but the role of such phosphorylations in nascent FA formation and turnover near the cell front and in cell protrusion is less well understood. In the present study, we demonstrate that, depending on the phosphorylation status of Tyr-925 residue, FAK modulates cell migration via two specific mechanisms. FAK−/− mouse embryonic fibroblasts (MEFs) expressing nonphosphorylatable Y925F-FAK show increased interactions between FAK and unphosphorylated paxillin, which lead to FA stabilization and thus decreased FA turnover and reduced cell migration. Conversely, MEFs expressing phosphomimetic Y925E-FAK display unchanged FA disassembly rates, show increase in phosphorylated paxillin in FAs, and exhibit increased formation of nascent FAs at the cell leading edges. Moreover, Y925E-FAK cells present enhanced cell protrusion together with activation of the p130CAS/Dock180/Rac1 signaling pathway. Together, our results demonstrate that phosphorylation of FAK at Tyr-925 is required for FAK-mediated cell migration and cell protrusion. PMID:21289086

  5. Functional Mineralocorticoid Receptors in Human Vascular Endothelial Cells Regulate ICAM-1 Expression and Promote Leukocyte Adhesion

    PubMed Central

    Caprio, Massimiliano; Newfell, Brenna G.; la Sala, Andrea; Baur, Wendy; Fabbri, Andrea; Rosano, Giuseppe; Mendelsohn, Michael E.; Jaffe, Iris Z.

    2008-01-01

    In clinical trials, aldosterone antagonists decrease cardiovascular mortality and ischemia by unknown mechanisms. The steroid hormone aldosterone acts by binding to the mineralocorticoid receptor (MR), a ligand-activated transcription factor. In humans, aldosterone causes MR-dependent endothelial cell (EC) dysfunction and in animal models, aldosterone increases vascular macrophage infiltration and atherosclerosis. MR antagonists inhibit these effects without changing blood pressure, suggesting a direct role for vascular MR in EC function and atherosclerosis. Whether human vascular EC express functional MR is not known. Here we show that human coronary artery and aortic EC express MR mRNA and protein and that EC MR mediates aldosterone-dependent gene transcription. Human EC also express the enzyme 11-beta hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase-2(11βHSD2) and inhibition of 11βHSD2 in aortic EC enhances gene transactivation by cortisol, supporting that EC 11βHSD2 is functional. Furthermore, aldosterone stimulates transcription of the proatherogenic leukocyte-EC adhesion molecule Intercellular Adhesion Molecule-1(ICAM1) gene and protein expression on human coronary artery EC, an effect inhibited by the MR antagonist spironolactone and by MR knock-down with siRNA. Cell adhesion assays demonstrate that aldosterone promotes leukocyte-EC adhesion, an effect that is inhibited by spironolactone and ICAM1 blocking antibody, supporting that aldosterone induction of EC ICAM1 surface expression via MR mediates leukocyte-EC adhesion. These data show that aldosterone activates endogenous EC MR and proatherogenic gene expression in clinically important human EC. These studies describe a novel mechanism by which aldosterone may influence ischemic cardiovascular events and support a new explanation for the decrease in ischemic events in patients treated with aldosterone antagonists. PMID:18467630

  6. Polyphenols from Artemisia annua L Inhibit Adhesion and EMT of Highly Metastatic Breast Cancer Cells MDA-MB-231.

    PubMed

    Ko, Young Shin; Lee, Won Sup; Panchanathan, Radha; Joo, Young Nak; Choi, Yung Hyun; Kim, Gon Sup; Jung, Jin-Myung; Ryu, Chung Ho; Shin, Sung Chul; Kim, Hye Jung

    2016-07-01

    Recent evidence suggests that polyphenolic compounds from plants have anti-invasion and anti-metastasis capabilities. The Korean annual weed, Artemisia annua L., has been used as a folk medicine for treatment of various diseases. Here, we isolated and characterized polyphenols from Korean A. annua L (pKAL). We investigated anti-metastatic effects of pKAL on the highly metastatic MDA-MB-231 breast cancer cells especially focusing on cancer cell adhesion to the endothelial cell and epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT). Firstly, pKAL inhibited cell viability of MDA-MB-231 cells in a dose-dependent manner, but not that of human umbilical vein endothelial cells (ECs). Polyphenols from Korean A. annua L inhibited the adhesion of MDA-MB-231 cells to ECs through reducing vascular cell adhesion molecule-1 expression of MDA-MB-231 and ECs, but not intracellular adhesion molecule-1 at the concentrations where pKAL did not influence the cell viability of either MDA-MB-231 cells nor EC. Further, pKAL inhibited tumor necrosis factor-activated MDA-MB-231 breast cancer cell invasion through inhibition of matrix metalloproteinase-2 and matrix metalloproteinase-9 and EMT. Moreover, pKAL inhibited phosphorylation of Akt, but not that of protein kinase C. These results suggest that pKAL may serve as a therapeutic agent against cancer metastasis at least in part by inhibiting the cancer cell adhesion to ECs through suppression of vascular cell adhesion molecule-1 and invasion through suppression of EMT. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. PMID:27151203

  7. Inhibition of adhesion and proliferation of peritoneally disseminated tumor cells by pegylated catalase.

    PubMed

    Hyoudou, Kenji; Nishikawa, Makiya; Kobayashi, Yuki; Kuramoto, Yukari; Yamashita, Fumiyoshi; Hashida, Mitsuru

    2006-01-01

    Hydrogen peroxide may aggravate the peritoneal dissemination of tumor cells by activating the expression of a variety of genes. In this study, we used pegylated catalase (PEG-catalase) to examine whether prolonged retention of catalase activity within the peritoneal cavity is effective in inhibiting peritoneal dissemination in mouse models. Murine B16-BL6 cells or colon 26 cells labeled with firefly luciferase gene were inoculated intraperitoneally into syngeneic mice. Compared with unmodified catalase, PEG-catalase was retained in the peritoneal cavity for a long period after intraperitoneal injection. A single injection of PEG-catalase just before tumor inoculation significantly reduced the number of the tumor cells at 1 and 7 days. The changes in the expression of molecules involved in the metastasis were evaluated by real time quantitative PCR analysis. Inoculation of the tumor cells increased the expression of intercellular adhesion molecule (ICAM)-1 in the greater omentum, which was inhibited by PEG-catalase. An injection of PEG-catalase at 3 days after tumor inoculation also reduced the number of the tumor cells, suggesting that processes other than the adhesion of tumor cells to peritoneal organs are also inhibited. Daily doses of PEG-catalase significantly prolonged the survival time of tumor-bearing mice. These results indicate that intraperitoneal injection of PEG-catalase inhibits the multiple processes of peritoneal dissemination of tumor cells by scavenging hydrogen peroxide in the peritoneal cavity. PMID:17086358

  8. Cell adhesion in plants is under the control of putative O-fucosyltransferases

    PubMed Central

    Verger, Stéphane; Chabout, Salem; Gineau, Emilie

    2016-01-01

    Cell-to-cell adhesion in plants is mediated by the cell wall and the presence of a pectin-rich middle lamella. However, we know very little about how the plant actually controls and maintains cell adhesion during growth and development and how it deals with the dynamic cell wall remodeling that takes place. Here we investigate the molecular mechanisms that control cell adhesion in plants. We carried out a genetic suppressor screen and a genetic analysis of cell adhesion-defective Arabidopsis thaliana mutants. We identified a genetic suppressor of a cell adhesion defect affecting a putative O-fucosyltransferase. Furthermore, we show that the state of cell adhesion is not directly linked with pectin content in the cell wall but instead is associated with altered pectin-related signaling. Our results suggest that cell adhesion is under the control of a feedback signal from the state of the pectin in the cell wall. Such a mechanism could be necessary for the control and maintenance of cell adhesion during growth and development. PMID:27317803

  9. Cell adhesion and proliferation on polyethylene grafted with Au nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kasálková, N. Slepičková; Slepička, P.; Kolská, Z.; Sajdl, P.; Bačáková, L.; Rimpelová, S.; Švorčík, V.

    2012-02-01

    Plasma treatment and subsequent Au nano-particles grafting of polyethylene (PE) lead to changes in surface morphology, roughness and wettability, significantly increasing the attractiveness of the material for cells. The PE samples were exposed to argon plasma. Plasma modified PE was chemically grafted by immersion to biphenyldithiol and consequently into solution of Au nano-particles. Changes in chemical structure of the modified PE were studied using X-ray Photoelectron Spectroscopy (XPS) and electrokinetic analysis ( ζ-potential). The surface wettability of the modified PE samples was examined by measurement of the contact angle by standard goniometry. The surface morphology of the plasma modified PE and that grafted with Au nano-particles was studied by Atomic Force Microscopy (AFM). The modified PE samples were seeded with rat vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMCs) and their adhesion and proliferation were studied. Chemically bounded biphenyldithiol increases the number of the incorporated gold nano-particles and changes sample surface properties. The presence of the biphenyldithiol and the gold nano-particles on the PE surface influences dramatically adhesion and proliferation of VSMCs.

  10. Effects of nitric oxide-releasing nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NONO-NSAIDs) on melanoma cell adhesion

    SciTech Connect

    Cheng, Huiwen; Mollica, Molly Y.; Lee, Shin Hee; Wang, Lei; Velázquez-Martínez, Carlos A.; Wu, Shiyong

    2012-10-15

    A new class of nitric oxide (NO•)-releasing nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NONO-NSAIDs) were developed in recent years and have shown promising potential as NSAID substitutes due to their gentle nature on cardiovascular and gastrointestinal systems. Since nitric oxide plays a role in regulation of cell adhesion, we assessed the potential use of NONO-NSAIDs as anti-metastasis drugs. In this regard, we compared the effects of NONO-aspirin and a novel NONO-naproxen to those exerted by their respective parent NSAIDs on avidities of human melanoma M624 cells. Both NONO-NSAIDs, but not the corresponding parent NSAIDs, reduced M624 adhesion on vascular cellular adhesion molecule-1 (VCAM-1) by 20–30% and fibronectin by 25–44% under fluid flow conditions and static conditions, respectively. Only NONO-naproxen reduced (∼ 56%) the activity of β1 integrin, which binds to α4 integrin to form very late antigen-4 (VLA-4), the ligand of VCAM-1. These results indicate that the diazeniumdiolate (NO•)-donor moiety is critical for reducing the adhesion between VLA-4 and its ligands, while the NSAID moiety can impact the regulation mechanism of melanoma cell adhesion. -- Highlights: ► NONO-naproxen, a novel nitric oxide-releasing NSAID, was synthesized. ► NONO-NSAIDs, but not their parent NSAIDs, reduced melanoma adhesion. ► NONO-naproxen, but not NONO-aspirin and NSAIDs, reduced activity of β1 integrin.

  11. Influence of airway wall compliance on epithelial cell injury and adhesion during interfacial flows

    PubMed Central

    Higuita-Castro, Natalia; Mihai, Cosmin; Hansford, Derek J.

    2014-01-01

    Interfacial flows during cyclic airway reopening are an important source of ventilator-induced lung injury. However, it is not known how changes in airway wall compliance influence cell injury during airway reopening. We used an in vitro model of airway reopening in a compliant microchannel to investigate how airway wall stiffness influences epithelial cell injury. Epithelial cells were grown on gel substrates with different rigidities, and cellular responses to substrate stiffness were evaluated in terms of metabolic activity, mechanics, morphology, and adhesion. Repeated microbubble propagations were used to simulate cyclic airway reopening, and cell injury and detachment were quantified via live/dead staining. Although cells cultured on softer gels exhibited a reduced elastic modulus, these cells experienced less plasma membrane rupture/necrosis. Cells on rigid gels exhibited a minor, but statistically significant, increase in the power law exponent and also exhibited a significantly larger height-to-length aspect ratio. Previous studies indicate that this change in morphology amplifies interfacial stresses and, therefore, correlates with the increased necrosis observed during airway reopening. Although cells cultured on stiff substrates exhibited more plasma membrane rupture, these cells experienced significantly less detachment and monolayer disruption during airway reopening. Western blotting and immunofluorescence indicate that this protection from detachment and monolayer disruption correlates with increased focal adhesion kinase and phosphorylated paxillin expression. Therefore, changes in cell morphology and focal adhesion structure may govern injury responses during compliant airway reopening. In addition, these results indicate that changes in airway compliance, as occurs during fibrosis or emphysema, may significantly influence cell injury during mechanical ventilation. PMID:25213636

  12. Reinjury risk of nano-calcium oxalate monohydrate and calcium oxalate dihydrate crystals on injured renal epithelial cells: aggravation of crystal adhesion and aggregation

    PubMed Central

    Gan, Qiong-Zhi; Sun, Xin-Yuan; Bhadja, Poonam; Yao, Xiu-Qiong; Ouyang, Jian-Ming

    2016-01-01

    Background Renal epithelial cell injury facilitates crystal adhesion to cell surface and serves as a key step in renal stone formation. However, the effects of cell injury on the adhesion of nano-calcium oxalate crystals and the nano-crystal-induced reinjury risk of injured cells remain unclear. Methods African green monkey renal epithelial (Vero) cells were injured with H2O2 to establish a cell injury model. Cell viability, superoxide dismutase (SOD) activity, malonaldehyde (MDA) content, propidium iodide staining, hematoxylin–eosin staining, reactive oxygen species production, and mitochondrial membrane potential (Δψm) were determined to examine cell injury during adhesion. Changes in the surface structure of H2O2-injured cells were assessed through atomic force microscopy. The altered expression of hyaluronan during adhesion was examined through laser scanning confocal microscopy. The adhesion of nano-calcium oxalate monohydrate (COM) and calcium oxalate dihydrate (COD) crystals to Vero cells was observed through scanning electron microscopy. Nano-COM and COD binding was quantitatively determined through inductively coupled plasma emission spectrometry. Results The expression of hyaluronan on the cell surface was increased during wound healing because of Vero cell injury. The structure and function of the cell membrane were also altered by cell injury; thus, nano-crystal adhesion occurred. The ability of nano-COM to adhere to the injured Vero cells was higher than that of nano-COD crystals. The cell viability, SOD activity, and Δψm decreased when nano-crystals attached to the cell surface. By contrast, the MDA content, reactive oxygen species production, and cell death rate increased. Conclusion Cell injury contributes to crystal adhesion to Vero cell surface. The attached nano-COM and COD crystals can aggravate Vero cell injury. As a consequence, crystal adhesion and aggregation are enhanced. These findings provide further insights into kidney stone

  13. Edaravone attenuates monocyte adhesion to endothelial cells induced by oxidized low-density lipoprotein.

    PubMed

    Li, Zhijuan; Cheng, Jianxin; Wang, Liping

    2015-10-30

    Oxidized low-density lipoprotein (oxLDL) plays a vital role in recruitment of monocytes to endothelial cells, which is important during early stages of atherosclerosis development. Edaravone, a potent and novel scavenger of free radicals inhibiting hydroxyl radicals, has been clinically used to reduce the neuronal damage following ischemic stroke. In the present study, Edaravone was revealed to markedly reduce oxLDL-induced monocyte adhesion to human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs). The inhibitory mechanism of Edaravone was associated with suppression of the chemokine MCP-1 and adhesion molecule VCAM-1 and ICAM-1 expression. In addition, luciferase reporter assay results revealed that administration of Edaravone attenuated the increase in NF-κB transcriptional activity induced by oxLDL. Notably, it's also shown that Edaravone treatment blocked oxLDL induced p65 nuclear translocation in HUVECs. Results indicate that Edaravone negatively regulates endothelial inflammation.

  14. Proteolysis of cell adhesion molecules by serine proteases: a role in long term potentiation?

    PubMed

    Hoffman, K B; Martinez, J; Lynch, G

    1998-11-16

    Tissue plasminogen activator (tPA), a serine protease endogenous to hippocampal neurons, is shown to recognize a highly conserved sequence in the extracellular domain of cell adhesion molecules (CAMs). When added to brain homogenates, tPA generated a CAM fragment similar in size to that produced in hippocampal slices by brief periods of NMDA receptor stimulation. The serine protease inhibitor 4-(2-Aminoethyl)-benzenesulfonyl fluoride blocked the effects of tPA with an approximately 50% suppression at 250 microM. The inhibitor at this concentration had no evident effect on synaptic responses but caused long term potentiation to decay back to baseline over a 1 h period. These results suggest that extracellular breakdown of cell adhesion molecules initiated by NMDA receptors and mediated by serine proteases contributes to the formation of stable potentiation.

  15. An Adhesion-Dependent Switch between Mechanisms That Determine Motile Cell Shape

    PubMed Central

    Barnhart, Erin L.; Lee, Kun-Chun; Keren, Kinneret; Mogilner, Alex; Theriot, Julie A.

    2011-01-01

    Keratocytes are fast-moving cells in which adhesion dynamics are tightly coupled to the actin polymerization motor that drives migration, resulting in highly coordinated cell movement. We have found that modifying the adhesive properties of the underlying substrate has a dramatic effect on keratocyte morphology. Cells crawling at intermediate adhesion strengths resembled stereotypical keratocytes, characterized by a broad, fan-shaped lamellipodium, clearly defined leading and trailing edges, and persistent rates of protrusion and retraction. Cells at low adhesion strength were small and round with highly variable protrusion and retraction rates, and cells at high adhesion strength were large and asymmetrical and, strikingly, exhibited traveling waves of protrusion. To elucidate the mechanisms by which adhesion strength determines cell behavior, we examined the organization of adhesions, myosin II, and the actin network in keratocytes migrating on substrates with different adhesion strengths. On the whole, our results are consistent with a quantitative physical model in which keratocyte shape and migratory behavior emerge from the self-organization of actin, adhesions, and myosin, and quantitative changes in either adhesion strength or myosin contraction can switch keratocytes among qualitatively distinct migration regimes. PMID:21559321

  16. How cells tiptoe on adhesive surfaces before sticking.

    PubMed

    Pierres, Anne; Benoliel, Anne-Marie; Touchard, Dominique; Bongrand, Pierre

    2008-05-15

    Cell membranes are studded with protrusions that were thoroughly analyzed with electron microscopy. However, the nanometer-scale three-dimensional motions generated by cell membranes to fit the topography of foreign surfaces and initiate adhesion remain poorly understood. Here, we describe the dynamics of surface deformations displayed by monocytic cells bumping against fibronectin-coated surfaces. We observed membrane undulations with typically 5 nm amplitude and 5-10 s lifetime. Cell membranes behaved as independent units of micrometer size. Cells detected the presence of foreign surfaces at 50 nm separation, resulting in time-dependent amplification of membrane undulations. Molecular contact then ensued with apparent cell-membrane separation of 30-40 nm, and this distance steadily decreased during the following tens of seconds. Contact maturation was associated with in-plane egress of bulky molecules and robust membrane fluctuations. Thus, membrane undulations may be the major determinant of cell sensitivity to substrate topography, outcome of interaction, and initial kinetics of contact extension. PMID:18234815

  17. Enhanced cell adhesion on bioinert ceramics mediated by the osteogenic cell membrane enzyme alkaline phosphatase.

    PubMed

    Aminian, Alieh; Shirzadi, Bahareh; Azizi, Zahra; Maedler, Kathrin; Volkmann, Eike; Hildebrand, Nils; Maas, Michael; Treccani, Laura; Rezwan, Kurosch

    2016-12-01

    Functional bone and dental implant materials are required to guide cell response, offering cues that provide specific instructions to cells at the implant/tissue interface while maintaining full biocompatibility as well as the desired structural requirements and functions. In this work we investigate the influence of covalently immobilized alkaline phosphatase (ALP), an enzyme involved in bone mineralization, on the first contact and initial cell adhesion. To this end, ALP is covalently immobilized by carbodiimide-mediated chemoligation on two highly bioinert ceramics, alpha-alumina (Al2O3) and yttria-stabilized zirconia (Y-TZP) that are well-established for load-bearing applications. The physicochemical surface properties are evaluated by profilometry, zeta potential and water contact angle measurements. The initial cell adhesion of human osteoblasts (HOBs), human osteoblast-like cells (MG-63) and mesenchymal stromal cells (hMSCs) was investigated. Cell adhesion was assessed at serum free condition via quantification of percentage of adherent cells, adhesion area and staining of the focal adhesion protein vinculin. Our findings show that after ALP immobilization, the Al2O3 and Y-TZP surfaces gained a negative charge and their hydrophilicity was increased. In the presence of surface-immobilized ALP, a higher cell adhesion, more pronounced cell spreading and a higher number of focal contact points were found. Thereby, this work gives evidence that surface functionalization with ALP can be utilized to modify inert materials for biological conversion and faster bone regeneration on inert and potentially load-bearing implant materials. PMID:27612703

  18. The Regulation of RhoA at Focal Adhesions by StarD13 is Important for Astrocytoma Cell Motility

    PubMed Central

    Khalil, Bassem D.; Hanna, Samer; Saykali, Bechara A.; El-Sitt, Sally; Nasrallah, Anita; Marston, Daniel; El-Sabban, Marwan; Hahn, Klaus M.; Symons, Marc; El-Sibai, Mirvat

    2015-01-01

    Malignant astrocytomas are highly invasive into adjacent and distant regions of the normal brain. Rho GTPases are small monomeric G proteins that play important roles in cytoskeleton rearrangement, cell motility, and tumor invasion. In the present study, we show that the knock down of StarD13, a GTPase activating protein (GAP) for RhoA and Cdc42, inhibits astrocytoma cell migration through modulating focal adhesion dynamics and cell adhesion. This effect is mediated by the resulting constitutive activation of RhoA and the subsequent indirect inhibition of Rac. Using Total Internal Reflection Fluorescence (TIRF)-based Förster Resonance Energy Transfer (FRET), we show that RhoA activity localizes with focal adhesions at the basal surface of astrocytoma cells. Moreover, the knock down of StarD13 inhibits the cycling of RhoA activation at the rear edge of cells, which makes them defective in retracting their tail. This study highlights the importance of the regulation of RhoA activity in focal adhesions of astrocytoma cells and establishes StarD13 as a GAP playing a major role in this process. PMID:24333506

  19. Rapid Reversible Photoswitching of Integrin-Mediated Adhesion at the Single-Cell Level.<