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Sample records for activity coefficient corrections

  1. Inferential Procedures for Correlation Coefficients Corrected for Attenuation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hakstian, A. Ralph; And Others

    1988-01-01

    A model and computation procedure based on classical test score theory are presented for determination of a correlation coefficient corrected for attenuation due to unreliability. Delta and Monte Carlo method applications are discussed. A power analysis revealed no serious loss in efficiency resulting from correction for attentuation. (TJH)

  2. Atmospheric Density Corrections Estimated from Fitted Drag Coefficients

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McLaughlin, C. A.; Lechtenberg, T. F.; Mance, S. R.; Mehta, P.

    2010-12-01

    Fitted drag coefficients estimated using GEODYN, the NASA Goddard Space Flight Center Precision Orbit Determination and Geodetic Parameter Estimation Program, are used to create density corrections. The drag coefficients were estimated for Stella, Starlette and GFZ using satellite laser ranging (SLR) measurements; and for GEOSAT Follow-On (GFO) using SLR, Doppler, and altimeter crossover measurements. The data analyzed covers years ranging from 2000 to 2004 for Stella and Starlette, 2000 to 2002 and 2005 for GFO, and 1995 to 1997 for GFZ. The drag coefficient was estimated every eight hours. The drag coefficients over the course of a year show a consistent variation about the theoretical and yearly average values that primarily represents a semi-annual/seasonal error in the atmospheric density models used. The atmospheric density models examined were NRLMSISE-00 and MSIS-86. The annual structure of the major variations was consistent among all the satellites for a given year and consistent among all the years examined. The fitted drag coefficients can be converted into density corrections every eight hours along the orbit of the satellites. In addition, drag coefficients estimated more frequently can provide a higher frequency of density correction.

  3. On Similarity Coefficients for 2x2 Tables and Correction for Chance

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Warrens, Matthijs J.

    2008-01-01

    This paper studies correction for chance in coefficients that are linear functions of the observed proportion of agreement. The paper unifies and extends various results on correction for chance in the literature. A specific class of coefficients is used to illustrate the results derived in this paper. Coefficients in this class, e.g. the simple…

  4. Activity coefficient of aqueous sodium bicarbonate

    SciTech Connect

    Pitzer, Kenneth S.; Peiper, J. Christopher

    1980-09-01

    The determination of the activity coefficient and related properties of sodium bicarbonate presents special problems because of the appreciable vapor pressure of CO2 above such solutions. With the development of reliable equations for the thermodynamic properties of mixed electrolytes, it is possible to determine the parameters for NaHCO3 from cell measurements or NaCl-NaHCO3 mixtures. Literature data are analyzed to illustrate the method and provide interim values, hoever it is noted that further measurements over a wider range of concentrations would yield more definitive results. Lastly, an estimate is also given for the activity coefficient of KHCO3.

  5. Dynamical Correction of Thermoelectric Coefficients for Strongly Interacting Electrons in the Coulomb Blockade Regime

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Kaike

    FOR MOLECULES WEAKLY COUPLED TO LEADS THE EXACT ZERO-BIAS KOHN-SHAM CONDUCTANCE CAN BE ORDERS OF MAGNITUDE LARGER THAN THE TRUE CONDUCTANCE DUE TO THE LACK OF DYNAMICAL EXCHANGE-CORRELATION (XC) EFFECTS. RECENTLY, IT HAS BEEN SHOWN HOW THESE DYNAMICAL XC CORRECTIONS CAN BE CALCULATED USING ONLY QUANTITIES OBTAINED FROM STATIC DENSITY FUNCTIONAL THEORY. HERE, WE INVESTIGATE THE THERMOELECTRIC TRANSPORT AND DERIVE THE XC CORRECTION TO THE SEEBECK COEFFICIENT. WE FIND THAT THE DYNAMICAL CORRECTION TO THE SEEBECK COEFFICIENT IS DETERMINANT IN EVALUATING THE THERMOPOWER: THE ABSOLUTE VALUE OF THE DYNAMICAL CORRECTION FOR THE SEEBECK COEFFICIENT IS, FOR CERTAIN VALUES OF GATE VOLTAGE, MUCH LARGER THAN THAT OF THE KOHN-SHAM TERM. FINALLY, WE COMPARE OUR DENSITY FUNCTIONAL CALCULATIONS TO THE RATE EQUATION AND THE EXPERIMENTAL RESULTS

  6. The influence of edge geometry on end-correction coefficients in micro perforated plates.

    PubMed

    Temiz, Muttalip Aşkın; Lopez Arteaga, Ines; Efraimsson, Gunilla; Åbom, Mats; Hirschberg, Avraham

    2015-12-01

    Global expressions are proposed for end-correction coefficients in micro perforated plates (MPPs) using non-dimensional parameters. MPPs are sound absorbers with small perforation diameters such that the Stokes boundary layers fill up almost the entire perforation. Sound absorption does not only occur within the perforation, but also takes place just outside of it. The latter contribution plus the outside inertia effect on the transfer impedance of the MPP are referred to as end-corrections. In order to determine them, an analytical solution employing the very thin Stokes layer assumption has been derived. However, this assumption requires empirical coefficients in the end-corrections for accurate results. To explore the effects of various parameters a numerical model is used. This model is verified with open-end reflection coefficient measurements. The most prominent result from this study is that compared to plate thickness, the ratio of perforation diameter to Stokes layer thickness (Shear number) and edge geometry affect the end-correction coefficients more significantly. The effect of plate thickness can be neglected for practical purposes, therefore, expressions for the end-corrections in terms of Shear number and edge geometry are provided. The relative error of these expressions is <3% compared to the numerical results. PMID:26723322

  7. The influence of edge geometry on end-correction coefficients in micro perforated plates.

    PubMed

    Temiz, Muttalip Aşkın; Lopez Arteaga, Ines; Efraimsson, Gunilla; Åbom, Mats; Hirschberg, Avraham

    2015-12-01

    Global expressions are proposed for end-correction coefficients in micro perforated plates (MPPs) using non-dimensional parameters. MPPs are sound absorbers with small perforation diameters such that the Stokes boundary layers fill up almost the entire perforation. Sound absorption does not only occur within the perforation, but also takes place just outside of it. The latter contribution plus the outside inertia effect on the transfer impedance of the MPP are referred to as end-corrections. In order to determine them, an analytical solution employing the very thin Stokes layer assumption has been derived. However, this assumption requires empirical coefficients in the end-corrections for accurate results. To explore the effects of various parameters a numerical model is used. This model is verified with open-end reflection coefficient measurements. The most prominent result from this study is that compared to plate thickness, the ratio of perforation diameter to Stokes layer thickness (Shear number) and edge geometry affect the end-correction coefficients more significantly. The effect of plate thickness can be neglected for practical purposes, therefore, expressions for the end-corrections in terms of Shear number and edge geometry are provided. The relative error of these expressions is <3% compared to the numerical results.

  8. Correction for Rhiel's theory for the range estimator of the coefficient of variation for skewed distributions.

    PubMed

    Rhiel, G Steven

    2010-02-01

    In 2007, Rhiel presented a technique to estimate the coefficient of variation from the range when sampling from skewed distributions. To provide an unbiased estimate, a correction factor (a(n)) for the mean was included. Numerical correction factors for a number of skewed distributions were provided. In a follow-up paper, he provided a proof he claimed showed the correction factor was independent of the mean and standard deviation, making the factors useful as these parameters vary; however, that proof did not establish independence. Herein is a proof which establishes the independence.

  9. Kinetic energy and momentum correction coefficients in straight compound channels with vegetated floodplain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hamidifar, H.; Omid, M. H.; Keshavarzi, A.

    2016-06-01

    In this paper, the effect of flow relative depth (ratio of the floodplain to the main channel flow depths) and vegetation density on the kinetic energy and momentum correction coefficients (termed as α and β, respectively) was described based on an experimental study. A series of experiments was run using rigid dowels with seven flow relative depths and four vegetation densities in an asymmetric compound channel. The local flow velocities were measured using an acoustic Doppler velocimeter (ADV). Using regression analysis, velocity data were considered and equations were developed for calculating the kinetic energy and momentum correction coefficients as a function of the flow relative depth and vegetation density. The results show that the values of α and β decrease as the relative depth increases. Also, as the vegetation density increases, the effects of the vegetation on α and β increase too. Finally, by comparing with the findings of the previous researchers, it was found that the average values of the α for asymmetric compound channels with vegetation are 26.5% and 43.3% greater than those for asymmetric and symmetric compound channels without vegetation respectively while these values for β are 12.7% and 18.1%, respectively. Furthermore, the floodplain vegetation can increase the average values of coefficients α and β by 52.8% and 21.6%, respectively, in comparison with single channels.

  10. Light fluence correction for quantitative determination of tissue absorption coefficient using multi-spectral optoacoustic tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brochu, Frederic M.; Joseph, James; Tomaszewski, Michal; Bohndiek, Sarah E.

    2015-07-01

    MultiSpectral Optoacoustic Tomography (MSOT) is a fast developing imaging modality, combining the high resolution and penetration depth of ultrasound with the excellent contrast from optical imaging of tissue. Absorption and scattering of the near infrared excitation light modulates the spectral profile of light as it propagates deep into biological tissue, meaning the images obtained provide only qualitative insight into the distribution of tissue chromophores. The goal of this work is to accurately recover the spectral profile of excitation light by modelling light fluence in the data reconstruction, to enable quantitative imaging. We worked with a commercial small animal MSOT scanner and developed our light fluence correction for its' cylindrical geometry. Optoacoustic image reconstruction pinpoints the sources of acoustic waves detected by the transducers and returns the initial pressure amplitude at these points. This pressure is the product of the dimensionless Grüneisen parameter, the absorption coefficient and the light fluence. Under the condition of constant Grüneisen parameter and well modelled light fluence, there is a linear relationship between the initial pressure amplitude measured in the optoacoustic image and the absorption coefficient. We were able to reproduce this linear relationship in different physical regions of an agarose gel phantom containing targets of known optical absorption coefficient, demonstrating that our light fluence model was working. We also demonstrate promising results of light fluence correction effects on in vivo data.

  11. Broadening of polymer chromatographic signals: Analysis, quantification and correction through effective diffusion coefficients.

    PubMed

    Suárez, Inmaculada; Coto, Baudilio

    2015-08-14

    Average molecular weights and polydispersity indexes are some of the most important parameters considered in the polymer characterization. Usually, gel permeation chromatography (GPC) and multi angle light scattering (MALS) are used for this determination, but GPC values are overestimated due to the dispersion introduced by the column separation. Several procedures were proposed to correct such effect usually involving more complex calibration processes. In this work, a new method of calculation has been considered including diffusion effects. An equation for the concentration profile due to diffusion effects along the GPC column was considered to be a Fickian function and polystyrene narrow standards were used to determine effective diffusion coefficients. The molecular weight distribution function of mono and poly disperse polymers was interpreted as a sum of several Fickian functions representing a sample formed by only few kind of polymer chains with specific molecular weight and diffusion coefficient. Proposed model accurately fit the concentration profile along the whole elution time range as checked by the computed standard deviation. Molecular weights obtained by this new method are similar to those obtained by MALS or traditional GPC while polydispersity index values are intermediate between those obtained by the traditional GPC combined to Universal Calibration method and the MALS method. Values for Pearson and Lin coefficients shows improvement in the correlation of polydispersity index values determined by GPC and MALS methods when diffusion coefficients and new methods are used.

  12. Dependence of the osmotic coefficients and average ionic activity coefficients on hydrophobic hydration in solutions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sergievskii, V. V.; Rudakov, A. M.

    2016-08-01

    The model that considers the nonideality of aqueous solutions of electrolytes with allowance for independent contributions of hydration of ions of various types and electrostatic interactions was substantiated using the cluster ion model. The empirical parameters in the model equations were found to be the hydrophilic and hydrophobic hydration numbers of ions in the standard state and the dispersion of their distribution over the stoichiometric coefficients. A mathematically adequate description of the concentration dependences of the osmotic coefficients and average ion activity coefficients of electrolytes was given for several systems. The difference in the rate of the decrease in the hydrophilic and hydrophobic hydration numbers of ions leads to extremum concentration dependences of the osmotic coefficients, which were determined by other authors from isopiestic data for many electrolytes and did not find explanation.

  13. Thermocouple error correction for measuring the flame temperature with determination of emissivity and heat transfer coefficient.

    PubMed

    Hindasageri, V; Vedula, R P; Prabhu, S V

    2013-02-01

    Temperature measurement by thermocouples is prone to errors due to conduction and radiation losses and therefore has to be corrected for precise measurement. The temperature dependent emissivity of the thermocouple wires is measured by the use of thermal infrared camera. The measured emissivities are found to be 20%-40% lower than the theoretical values predicted from theory of electromagnetism. A transient technique is employed for finding the heat transfer coefficients for the lead wire and the bead of the thermocouple. This method does not require the data of thermal properties and velocity of the burnt gases. The heat transfer coefficients obtained from the present method have an average deviation of 20% from the available heat transfer correlations in literature for non-reacting convective flow over cylinders and spheres. The parametric study of thermocouple error using the numerical code confirmed the existence of a minimum wire length beyond which the conduction loss is a constant minimal. Temperature of premixed methane-air flames stabilised on 16 mm diameter tube burner is measured by three B-type thermocouples of wire diameters: 0.15 mm, 0.30 mm, and 0.60 mm. The measurements are made at three distances from the burner tip (thermocouple tip to burner tip/burner diameter = 2, 4, and 6) at an equivalence ratio of 1 for the tube Reynolds number varying from 1000 to 2200. These measured flame temperatures are corrected by the present numerical procedure, the multi-element method, and the extrapolation method. The flame temperatures estimated by the two-element method and extrapolation method deviate from numerical results within 2.5% and 4%, respectively.

  14. About Correction by the Dimention of Dinamic Coefficient in Transiet Oscillations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sokol, Galyna; Gorbenko, Elizaveta

    2010-05-01

    About the Correction by the Dimension of Dynamic Coefficient in Transient Oscillations Galyna I. Sokol, Elizaveta V. Gorbenko The methodic for describe transient oscillations of Professor I.K. Kosko was carried out. He was an outstanding Ukrainian scientist, doctor of technical sciences. I.K. Kosko developed methodology for determining vibrations at the time of unsteady motion of mechanisms such as aircrafts, machine tools, etc. This paper is devoted to the investigations of dynamic processes at airplane landing. According to I.K. Kosko methods any system can be represented in the form of n masses, linked by elastic connections, which are employed for design scheme development. N masses form in a system described of n-1 equations. These equations determine the relationship at force moments of elasticity and reduced moment of external forces. The procedure design scheme development is elaborated to be simpler and easier in comparison to the previous ones due to recurrent form of the frequency equations. This procedure includes the work with determinants for a definite system of differential equations. When the determinants are found the characteristic equation is formulated. This allows determination of equation for vibration frequencies of the system. The inhomogeneous equation is solved by the amount of static component plus dynamic additive. In first time the vibration motion with static component may be determined by amplitude of oscillations during the steady motion. In second time the assessment of the dynamic impact of external disturbing moments may be carried out. The maximum value of moments at the dynamic processes and the amplitude value of this component at steady motion are determined. The dynamic coefficient is introduced into the methodology for determining vibrations of unsteady motion and find out. The time when transformation processes occur mechanism is working. By selecting the appropriate modes of changes of disturbing forces moments dynamic

  15. What is the correct value for the brain: blood partition coefficient for water

    SciTech Connect

    Herscovitch, P.; Raichle, M.E.

    1984-01-01

    A knowledge of the brain: blood partition coefficient (lambda) for water is usually required for the measurement of cerebral blood flow (CBF) with positron emission tomography (PET) and 0-15 labelled water. The correct calculation of this important parameter from the ratio of brain and blood water contents is reviewed, and the effect of physiological variations in these water contents on lambda is demonstrated. The currently accepted value for whole brain lambda is 0.95-0.96 ml/g, calculated from brain and blood water contents of 77g/100g and 80.5g/100g, respectively. However, this value for lambda is incorrect, because in the calculation the blood water content value was not adjusted for the density of blood. The correct value is 0.91 ml/g. Variations in brain or blood water content affect lambda. Over an hematocrit range of 25% to 55%, lambda varies from 0.86 to 0.93 ml/g, due to a decrease in blood water content. lambda changes with age, and varies regionally in the brain, as brain water content is inversely related to lipid and myelin content. The lambda of the human newborn brain, 1.10 ml/g, is considerably higher than in the adult. Differences in lambda between gray and white matter are well known. However, because of variations in water content, the lambda's of thalamus (0.88 ml/g) and caudate nucleus (0.96 ml/g) are less than that of cerebral cortex (0.99 ml/g), while the lambda of corpus callosum (0.89 ml/g) is greater than that of centrum semiovale (0.83 ml/g). These regional variations in lambda will assume more importance as PET resolution improves. The impact of using an incorrect lambda will depend upon the sensitivity of the particular CBF measurement technique to errors in lambda.

  16. 77 FR 39452 - Substantial Business Activities; Correction

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-07-03

    ..., June 12, 2012 (77 FR 34887) regarding whether a foreign corporation has substantial business activities...- 107889-12), which was the subject of FR. Doc. 2012-14238, is corrected as follows: On page 34887, column.... Lyons, (202) 622-3860; and David A. Levine, (202) 622-3860, and regarding the submission of...

  17. Mean ionic activity coefficients in aqueous NaCl solutions from molecular dynamics simulations

    SciTech Connect

    Mester, Zoltan; Panagiotopoulos, Athanassios Z.

    2015-01-28

    The mean ionic activity coefficients of aqueous NaCl solutions of varying concentrations at 298.15 K and 1 bar have been obtained from molecular dynamics simulations by gradually turning on the interactions of an ion pair inserted into the solution. Several common non-polarizable water and ion models have been used in the simulations. Gibbs-Duhem equation calculations of the thermodynamic activity of water are used to confirm the thermodynamic consistency of the mean ionic activity coefficients. While the majority of model combinations predict the correct trends in mean ionic activity coefficients, they overestimate their values at high salt concentrations. The solubility predictions also suffer from inaccuracies, with all models underpredicting the experimental values, some by large factors. These results point to the need for further ion and water model development.

  18. Temperature and salinity correction coefficients for light absorption by water in the visible to infrared spectral region.

    PubMed

    Röttgers, Rüdiger; McKee, David; Utschig, Christian

    2014-10-20

    The light absorption coefficient of water is dependent on temperature and concentration of ions, i.e. the salinity in seawater. Accurate knowledge of the water absorption coefficient, a, and/or its temperature and salinity correction coefficients, Ψ(T) and Ψ(S), respectively, is essential for a wide range of optical applications. Values are available from published data only at specific narrow wavelength ranges or at single wavelengths in the visible and infrared regions. Ψ(T) and Ψ(S) were therefore spectrophotometrically measured throughout the visible, near, and short wavelength infrared spectral region (400 to ~2700 nm). Additionally, they were derived from more precise measurements with a point-source integrating-cavity absorption meter (PSICAM) for 400 to 700 nm. When combined with earlier measurements from the literature in the range of 2600 - 14000 nm (wavenumber: 3800 - 700 cm(-1)), the coefficients are provided for 400 to 14000 nm (wavenumber: 25000 to 700 cm(-1)).

  19. Correcting Coefficient Alpha for Correlated Errors: Is [alpha][K]a Lower Bound to Reliability?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rae, Gordon

    2006-01-01

    When errors of measurement are positively correlated, coefficient alpha may overestimate the "true" reliability of a composite. To reduce this inflation bias, Komaroff (1997) has proposed an adjusted alpha coefficient, ak. This article shows that ak is only guaranteed to be a lower bound to reliability if the latter does not include correlated…

  20. A FORTRAN Program for Correcting Correlation Coefficients for Restriction in Range for Explicit or Implicit Restriction.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lewis, Mary A.; Boone, James O.

    1979-01-01

    Restriction in range is a measurement problem frequently encountered in research studies that utilize correlation coefficients. A FORTRAN program is described that can compute the estimated unrestricted correlation coefficient in either the explicit or implicit case. The user selects the appropriate formula to be employed from five that are…

  1. Octanol-Water Partition Coefficient from 3D-RISM-KH Molecular Theory of Solvation with Partial Molar Volume Correction.

    PubMed

    Huang, WenJuan; Blinov, Nikolay; Kovalenko, Andriy

    2015-04-30

    The octanol-water partition coefficient is an important physical-chemical characteristic widely used to describe hydrophobic/hydrophilic properties of chemical compounds. The partition coefficient is related to the transfer free energy of a compound from water to octanol. Here, we introduce a new protocol for prediction of the partition coefficient based on the statistical-mechanical, 3D-RISM-KH molecular theory of solvation. It was shown recently that with the compound-solvent correlation functions obtained from the 3D-RISM-KH molecular theory of solvation, the free energy functional supplemented with the correction linearly related to the partial molar volume obtained from the Kirkwood-Buff/3D-RISM theory, also called the "universal correction" (UC), provides accurate prediction of the hydration free energy of small compounds, compared to explicit solvent molecular dynamics [ Palmer , D. S. ; J. Phys.: Condens. Matter 2010 , 22 , 492101 ]. Here we report that with the UC reparametrized accordingly this theory also provides an excellent agreement with the experimental data for the solvation free energy in nonpolar solvent (1-octanol) and so accurately predicts the octanol-water partition coefficient. The performance of the Kovalenko-Hirata (KH) and Gaussian fluctuation (GF) functionals of the solvation free energy, with and without UC, is tested on a large library of small compounds with diverse functional groups. The best agreement with the experimental data for octanol-water partition coefficients is obtained with the KH-UC solvation free energy functional.

  2. Predicting the activity coefficients of free-solvent for concentrated globular protein solutions using independently determined physical parameters.

    PubMed

    McBride, Devin W; Rodgers, Victor G J

    2013-01-01

    The activity coefficient is largely considered an empirical parameter that was traditionally introduced to correct the non-ideality observed in thermodynamic systems such as osmotic pressure. Here, the activity coefficient of free-solvent is related to physically realistic parameters and a mathematical expression is developed to directly predict the activity coefficients of free-solvent, for aqueous protein solutions up to near-saturation concentrations. The model is based on the free-solvent model, which has previously been shown to provide excellent prediction of the osmotic pressure of concentrated and crowded globular proteins in aqueous solutions up to near-saturation concentrations. Thus, this model uses only the independently determined, physically realizable quantities: mole fraction, solvent accessible surface area, and ion binding, in its prediction. Predictions are presented for the activity coefficients of free-solvent for near-saturated protein solutions containing either bovine serum albumin or hemoglobin. As a verification step, the predictability of the model for the activity coefficient of sucrose solutions was evaluated. The predicted activity coefficients of free-solvent are compared to the calculated activity coefficients of free-solvent based on osmotic pressure data. It is observed that the predicted activity coefficients are increasingly dependent on the solute-solvent parameters as the protein concentration increases to near-saturation concentrations.

  3. Molecular radiotherapy: The NUKFIT software for calculating the time-integrated activity coefficient

    SciTech Connect

    Kletting, P.; Schimmel, S.; Luster, M.; Kestler, H. A.; Hänscheid, H.; Fernández, M.; Lassmann, M.; Bröer, J. H.; Nosske, D.; Glatting, G.

    2013-10-15

    Purpose: Calculation of the time-integrated activity coefficient (residence time) is a crucial step in dosimetry for molecular radiotherapy. However, available software is deficient in that it is either not tailored for the use in molecular radiotherapy and/or does not include all required estimation methods. The aim of this work was therefore the development and programming of an algorithm which allows for an objective and reproducible determination of the time-integrated activity coefficient and its standard error.Methods: The algorithm includes the selection of a set of fitting functions from predefined sums of exponentials and the choice of an error model for the used data. To estimate the values of the adjustable parameters an objective function, depending on the data, the parameters of the error model, the fitting function and (if required and available) Bayesian information, is minimized. To increase reproducibility and user-friendliness the starting values are automatically determined using a combination of curve stripping and random search. Visual inspection, the coefficient of determination, the standard error of the fitted parameters, and the correlation matrix are provided to evaluate the quality of the fit. The functions which are most supported by the data are determined using the corrected Akaike information criterion. The time-integrated activity coefficient is estimated by analytically integrating the fitted functions. Its standard error is determined assuming Gaussian error propagation. The software was implemented using MATLAB.Results: To validate the proper implementation of the objective function and the fit functions, the results of NUKFIT and SAAM numerical, a commercially available software tool, were compared. The automatic search for starting values was successfully tested for reproducibility. The quality criteria applied in conjunction with the Akaike information criterion allowed the selection of suitable functions. Function fit

  4. Solubility parameter and activity coefficient of HDEHP dimer in select organic diluents by vapor pressure osmometry

    SciTech Connect

    Gray, M.; Nilsson, M.; Zalupski, P.

    2013-07-01

    A thorough understanding of the non-ideal behavior of the chemical components utilized in solvent extraction contributes to the success of any large-scale spent nuclear fuel treatment. To address this, our current work uses vapor pressure osmometry to characterize the non-ideal behavior of the solvent extraction agent di-(2-ethylhexyl) phosphoric acid (HDEHP), a common extractant in proposed separation schemes. Solubility parameters were fit to data on HDEHP at four temperatures using models based on Scatchard Hildebrand regular solution theory with Flory Huggins entropic corrections. The results are comparable but not identical to the activity coefficients from prior slope analysis in the literature. (authors)

  5. Additions and corrections to the absorption coefficients of CO2 ice - Applications to the Martian south polar cap

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Calvin, Wendy M.

    1990-01-01

    Reflectance spectra of carbon dioxide frosts were calculated using the optical constants provided by Warren (1986) for the wavelength region 2-6 microns. In comparing these calculated spectra to spectra of frosts observed in the laboratory and on the surface of Mars, problems in the optical constants presented by Warren (1986) became apparent. Absorption coefficients for CO2 ice have been derived using laboratory reflectance measurements and the Hapke (1981) model for calculating diffuse reflectance. This provides approximate values in regions where no data were previously available and indicates where corrections to the compilation by Warren (1986) are required. Using these coefficients to calculate the reflectance of CO2 ice at varying grain sizes indicates that a typical Mariner polar cap spectrum is dominated by absorptions due to CO2 frost or ice at grain sizes that are quite large, probably of the order of millimeters to centimeters. There are indications of contamination of water frost or dust, but confirmation will require more precise absorption coefficients for solid CO2 than can be obtained from the method used here.

  6. Upgrading telescopes by active pupil wavefront correction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stacy, J. E.; Meinel, A. B.; Meinel, J. P.

    Exit pupil correction of the Large Deployable Reflector's (a proposed IR to sub-mm space telescope) segmented primary can be done by reimaging it onto a like segmented surface at the exit pupil. This allows the primary to be more flexible, the adaptive element to be smaller, and the supporting structure to be cheaper than if all correction were performed at a stiffly supported primary. Piston, tilt, and decenter errors of an annulus of the primary and the equations for the required corrections are considered. To verify these, the perturbations with spline functions in the lens design program are simulated. Strehl ratios used to measure image quality show that a piston error of 1 mm is fully corrected over a 5 arcmin field for an f/10 system with a 0.7 n.a. primary at 30 micrometers. Limits of correction are also shown for tilt and decenter errors of segments. Tolerances are given for tilt and decenter errors of the remaining optics also.

  7. Transfer having a coupling coefficient higher than its active material

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lesieutre, George A. (Inventor); Davis, Christopher L. (Inventor)

    2001-01-01

    A coupling coefficient is a measure of the effectiveness with which a shape-changing material (or a device employing such a material) converts the energy in an imposed signal to useful mechanical energy. Device coupling coefficients are properties of the device and, although related to the material coupling coefficients, are generally different from them. This invention describes a class of devices wherein the apparent coupling coefficient can, in principle, approach 1.0, corresponding to perfect electromechanical energy conversion. The key feature of this class of devices is the use of destabilizing mechanical pre-loads to counter inherent stiffness. The approach is illustrated for piezoelectric and thermoelectrically actuated devices. The invention provides a way to simultaneously increase both displacement and force, distinguishing it from alternatives such as motion amplification, and allows transducer designers to achieve substantial performance gains for actuator and sensor devices.

  8. Field calibration of multi-scattering correction factor for aethalometer aerosol absorption coefficient during CAPMEX Campaign, 2008

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, J. H.; Kim, S. W.; Yoon, S. C.; Park, R.; Ogren, J. A.

    2014-12-01

    Filter-based instrument, such as aethalometer, is being widely used to measure equivalent black carbon(EBC) mass concentration and aerosol absorption coefficient(AAC). However, many other previous studies have poited that AAC and its aerosol absorption angstrom exponent(AAE) are strongly affected by the multi-scattering correction factor(C) when we retrieve AAC from aethalometer EBC mass concentration measurement(Weingartner et al., 2003; Arnott et al., 2005; Schmid et al., 2006; Coen et al., 2010). We determined the C value using the method given in Weingartner et al. (2003) by comparing 7-wavelngth aethalometer (AE-31, Magee sci.) to 3-wavelength Photo-Acoustic Soot Spectrometer (PASS-3, DMT) at Gosan climate observatory, Korea(GCO) during Cheju ABC plume-asian monsoon experiment(CAPMEX) campaign(August and September, 2008). In this study, C was estimated to be 4.04 ± 1.68 at 532 nm and AAC retrieved with this value was decreased as approximately 100% as than that retrieved with soot case value from Weingartner et al (2003). We compared the AAC determined from aethalomter measurements to that from collocated Continuous Light Absorption Photometer (CLAP) measurements from January 2012 to December 2013 at GCO and found good agreement in both AAC and AAE. This result suggests the determination of site-specific C is crucially needed when we calculate AAC from aethalometer measurements.

  9. Correction.

    PubMed

    2015-11-01

    In the article by Heuslein et al, which published online ahead of print on September 3, 2015 (DOI: 10.1161/ATVBAHA.115.305775), a correction was needed. Brett R. Blackman was added as the penultimate author of the article. The article has been corrected for publication in the November 2015 issue. PMID:26490278

  10. Corrections

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2012-09-01

    The feature article "Material advantage?" on the effects of technology and rule changes on sporting performance (July pp28-30) stated that sprinters are less affected by lower oxygen levels at high altitudes because they run "aerobically". They run anaerobically. The feature about the search for the Higgs boson (August pp22-26) incorrectly gave the boson's mass as roughly 125 MeV it is 125 GeV, as correctly stated elsewhere in the issue. The article also gave a wrong value for the intended collision energy of the Superconducting Super Collider, which was designed to collide protons with a total energy of 40 TeV.

  11. Correction.

    PubMed

    2015-05-22

    The Circulation Research article by Keith and Bolli (“String Theory” of c-kitpos Cardiac Cells: A New Paradigm Regarding the Nature of These Cells That May Reconcile Apparently Discrepant Results. Circ Res. 2015:116:1216-1230. doi: 10.1161/CIRCRESAHA.116.305557) states that van Berlo et al (2014) observed that large numbers of fibroblasts and adventitial cells, some smooth muscle and endothelial cells, and rare cardiomyocytes originated from c-kit positive progenitors. However, van Berlo et al reported that only occasional fibroblasts and adventitial cells derived from c-kit positive progenitors in their studies. Accordingly, the review has been corrected to indicate that van Berlo et al (2014) observed that large numbers of endothelial cells, with some smooth muscle cells and fibroblasts, and more rarely cardiomyocytes, originated from c-kit positive progenitors in their murine model. The authors apologize for this error, and the error has been noted and corrected in the online version of the article, which is available at http://circres.ahajournals.org/content/116/7/1216.full ( PMID:25999426

  12. Activity Coefficient Derivatives of Ternary Systems Based on Scatchard's Neutral Electrolyte description

    SciTech Connect

    Miller, D G

    2007-05-16

    Activity coefficient derivatives with respect to molality are presented for the Scatchard Neutral Electrolyte description of a ternary common-ion electrolyte system. These quantities are needed for the calculation of 'diffusion Onsager coefficients' and in turn for tests of the Onsager Reciprocal Relations in diffusion. The usually-omitted b{sub 23} term is included. The direct SNE binary approximations and a further approximation are discussed. Binary evaluation strategies other than constant ionic strength are considered.

  13. An extended equation for rate coefficients for adsorption of organic vapors and gases on activated carbons in air-purifying respirator cartridges.

    PubMed

    Wood, G O; Lodewyckx, P

    2003-01-01

    Organic vapor adsorption rates in air-purifying respirator cartridges (and other packed beds of activated carbon granules) need to be known for estimating service lives. The correlation of Lodewyckx and Vansant [AIHAJ 61:501-505 (2000)] for mass transfer coefficients for organic vapor adsorption onto activated carbon was tested with additional data from three sources. It was then extended to better describe all the data, including that for gases. The additional parameter that accomplished this was the square root of molar equilibrium capacity of the vapor or gas on the carbon. This change, along with skew corrections when appropriate, resulted in better correlations with all experimental rate coefficients. PMID:14521430

  14. Correcting Radial Velocities for Long-Term Magnetic Activity Variations.

    PubMed

    Saar; Fischer

    2000-05-01

    We study stars in the Lick planetary survey for correlations between simultaneous measurements of high-precision radial velocities vr and magnetic activity (as measured in an SIR emission index from Ca ii lambda8662). We find significant correlations in approximately 30% of the stars. After removing linear trends between SIR and vr, we find that the dispersion in vr in these stars is decreased by an average of 17%, or approximately 45% of the dispersion above the measurement noise. F stars and less active stars with variable Ca ii H and K lines are the most successfully corrected. The magnitude of the slope of the SIR versus vr relations increases proportional to vsini and (excepting M dwarfs) tends to decrease with decreasing Teff. We argue that the main cause of these effects is modification of the mean line bisector shape brought on by long-term, magnetic activity-induced changes in the surface brightness and convective patterns. The correlations can be used to partially correct vr data for the effects of long-term activity variations, potentially permitting study of planets around some (higher mass) younger stars and planets producing smaller stellar reflex velocities. PMID:10790082

  15. Correcting Radial Velocities for Long-Term Magnetic Activity Variations.

    PubMed

    Saar; Fischer

    2000-05-01

    We study stars in the Lick planetary survey for correlations between simultaneous measurements of high-precision radial velocities vr and magnetic activity (as measured in an SIR emission index from Ca ii lambda8662). We find significant correlations in approximately 30% of the stars. After removing linear trends between SIR and vr, we find that the dispersion in vr in these stars is decreased by an average of 17%, or approximately 45% of the dispersion above the measurement noise. F stars and less active stars with variable Ca ii H and K lines are the most successfully corrected. The magnitude of the slope of the SIR versus vr relations increases proportional to vsini and (excepting M dwarfs) tends to decrease with decreasing Teff. We argue that the main cause of these effects is modification of the mean line bisector shape brought on by long-term, magnetic activity-induced changes in the surface brightness and convective patterns. The correlations can be used to partially correct vr data for the effects of long-term activity variations, potentially permitting study of planets around some (higher mass) younger stars and planets producing smaller stellar reflex velocities.

  16. Accelerometer signal-based human activity recognition using augmented autoregressive model coefficients and artificial neural nets.

    PubMed

    Khan, A M; Lee, Y K; Kim, T S

    2008-01-01

    Automatic recognition of human activities is one of the important and challenging research areas in proactive and ubiquitous computing. In this work, we present some preliminary results of recognizing human activities using augmented features extracted from the activity signals measured using a single triaxial accelerometer sensor and artificial neural nets. The features include autoregressive (AR) modeling coefficients of activity signals, signal magnitude areas (SMA), and title angles (TA). We have recognized four human activities using AR coefficients (ARC) only, ARC with SMA, and ARC with SMA and TA. With the last augmented features, we have achieved the recognition rate above 99% for all four activities including lying, standing, walking, and running. With our proposed technique, real time recognition of some human activities is possible.

  17. Simulations of mean ionic activity coefficients and solubilities in aqueous electrolyte solutions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Panagiotopoulos, Athanassios

    Aqueous electrolyte solutions play an important role in industrial, geochemical and biological applications. The mean ionic activity coefficients quantify the deviation of salt chemical potential from ideal solution behavior; experimental measurements are available for many salts over broad ranges of concentration and temperature, but there have been practically no prior simulation results, because if sampling difficulties for explicit-solvent electrolyte solutions. We have developed a new approach for determination of activity coefficients of aqueous electrolytes. Common fixed-point-charge models for water and ions are unable to reproduce simultaneously activity coefficients and solubilities. Polarizable models perform better, but still predict an incorrect temperature dependence of these properties. Work supported by the U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Basic Energy Science.

  18. Influence of dental correction on nociceptive test responses, fecal appearance, body condition score, and apparent digestibility coefficient for dry matter of Zamorano-leones donkeys (Equus asinus).

    PubMed

    Rodrigues, J B; Ferreira, L M; Bastos, E; San Roman, F; Viegas, C; Santos, A S

    2013-10-01

    The influence of dental correction on nociceptive (pressure) test responses, fecal appearance, BCS, and apparent digestibility coefficient for DM was studied in 18 Zamorano-Leonés donkeys, an endangered local breed from the Zamora province in Spain. For this purpose, donkeys were divided into 2 homogeneous control and treatment groups, based on age, BCS, and dental findings. On d 1, 45, 90, and 135, BCS and nociceptive test responses were evaluated in all donkeys. Feed and fecal samples were collected from all donkeys for 3 consecutive days, starting at each of the aforementioned days. Apparent digestibility coefficient for DM was estimated, using ADL as an internal marker. A progressive decrease of positive nociceptive test responses was observed from d 1 up to 90 (P < 0.01) in the treatment group. No difference between groups was observed for BCS. However, BCS at d 90 was greater (P = 0.018) than observed on d 1 or 45, indicating a time influence. Concerning apparent digestibility coefficient for DM, there were differences among collection days in apparent digestibility coefficient for DM (P < 0.05). No differences in fecal appearance were observed between treatments or collection days. This study highlighted the importance of regular dental care for not only Zamorano-Leonés donkeys but also the equid population, in general, to improve their welfare.

  19. Improved AIOMFAC model parameterisation of the temperature dependence of activity coefficients for aqueous organic mixtures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ganbavale, G.; Zuend, A.; Marcolli, C.; Peter, T.

    2014-06-01

    This study presents a new, improved parameterisation of the temperature dependence of activity coefficients in the AIOMFAC (Aerosol Inorganic-Organic Mixtures Functional groups Activity Coefficients) model applicable for aqueous as well as water-free organic solutions. For electrolyte-free organic and organic-water mixtures the AIOMFAC model uses a group-contribution approach based on UNIFAC (UNIversal quasi-chemical Functional-group Activity Coefficients). This group-contribution approach explicitly accounts for interactions among organic functional groups and between organic functional groups and water. The previous AIOMFAC version uses a simple parameterisation of the temperature dependence of activity coefficients, aimed to be applicable in the temperature range from ~275 to ~400 K. With the goal to improve the description of a wide variety of organic compounds found in atmospheric aerosols, we extend the AIOMFAC parameterisation for the functional groups carboxyl, hydroxyl, ketone, aldehyde, ether, ester, alkyl, aromatic carbon-alcohol, and aromatic hydrocarbon to atmospherically relevant low temperatures with the introduction of a new temperature dependence parameterisation. The improved temperature dependence parameterisation is derived from classical thermodynamic theory by describing effects from changes in molar enthalpy and heat capacity of a multicomponent system. Thermodynamic equilibrium data of aqueous organic and water-free organic mixtures from the literature are carefully assessed and complemented with new measurements to establish a comprehensive database, covering a wide temperature range (~190 to ~440 K) for many of the functional group combinations considered. Different experimental data types and their processing for the estimation of AIOMFAC model parameters are discussed. The new AIOMFAC parameterisation for the temperature dependence of activity coefficients from low to high temperatures shows an overall improvement of 25% in comparison to

  20. Activity coefficients of microquantities of lanthanides and actinides in nitric acid solutions

    SciTech Connect

    Vlasov, V.S.; Rozen, A.M.

    1988-09-01

    We carried out calculations on the basis of the Zdanovskii-Mikulin rule. The radii of the ions of the actinides americium and curium(III) (0.099 nm) are closest to the radius of the neodymium ion (0.0995 nm), and the radius of the californium ion (0.0976 nm) is closest to the radius of the promethium ion (0.0979 nm). It may accordingly be assumed that the activity coefficients of americium and curium are approximately equal to the activity coefficients of neodymium and that the values for californium are approximately equal to the values for promethium.

  1. Correcting Thermal Deformations in an Active Composite Reflector

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bradford, Samuel C.; Agnes, Gregory S.; Wilkie, William K.

    2011-01-01

    Large, high-precision composite reflectors for future space missions are costly to manufacture, and heavy. An active composite reflector capable of adjusting shape in situ to maintain required tolerances can be lighter and cheaper to manufacture. An active composite reflector testbed was developed that uses an array of piezoelectric composite actuators embedded in the back face sheet of a 0.8-m reflector panel. Each individually addressable actuator can be commanded from 500 to +1,500 V, and the flatness of the panel can be controlled to tolerances of 100 nm. Measuring the surface flatness at this resolution required the use of a speckle holography interferometer system in the Precision Environmental Test Enclosure (PETE) at JPL. The existing testbed combines the PETE for test environment stability, the speckle holography system for measuring out-of-plane deformations, the active panel including an array of individually addressable actuators, a FLIR thermal camera to measure thermal profiles across the reflector, and a heat source. Use of an array of flat piezoelectric actuators to correct thermal deformations is a promising new application for these actuators, as is the use of this actuator technology for surface flatness and wavefront control. An isogrid of these actuators is moving one step closer to a fully active face sheet, with the significant advantage of ease in manufacturing. No extensive rib structure or other actuation backing structure is required, as these actuators can be applied directly to an easy-to-manufacture flat surface. Any mission with a surface flatness requirement for a panel or reflector structure could adopt this actuator array concept to create lighter structures and enable improved performance on orbit. The thermal environment on orbit tends to include variations in temperature during shadowing or changes in angle. Because of this, a purely passive system is not an effective way to maintain flatness at the scale of microns over several

  2. Correction and update to 'The earth's C21 and S21 gravity coefficients and the rotation of the core'

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wahr, John

    1990-01-01

    Wahr (1987) used satellite constraints on C21 and S21 (the spherical harmonic coefficients of the earth's external gravitational potential) to infer certain properties of the core and core/mantle boundary. It is shown here, contrary to the claim by Wahr, that it is not possible to use C21 and S21 to placed bounds on the core's products of inertia. As a result, Wahr's constraints on the l = 2, m = 1 components of the core/mantle boundary topography and on the angular orientation of the inner core with respect to the earth's rotation vector are not justified. On the other hand, Wahr's conclusions about the time-averaged torque between the core and mantle and the resulting implications for the l = 2, m = 1 components of fluid pressure at the top of the core can be strengthened. Wahr's conclusions about the mean rotational flow in the core are unaltered.

  3. Extending the Diffuse Layer Model of Surface Acidity Behavior: III. Estimating Bound Site Activity Coefficients

    EPA Science Inventory

    Although detailed thermodynamic analyses of the 2-pK diffuse layer surface complexation model generally specify bound site activity coefficients for the purpose of accounting for those non-ideal excess free energies contributing to bound site electrochemical potentials, in applic...

  4. Activity Coefficients of Electrons and Holes in Degenerate Semiconductors with Nonuniform Composition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chang, Kow-Ming; Yeh, Ta-Hsun; Wang, Shih-Wei; Lee, Chi-Hung

    1994-03-01

    A new simple, general and rigorous analytic expression for the equilibrium activity coefficients of electrons and holes in degenerate semiconductors with nonuniform composition is presented. These activity coefficients are functions of the carrier degeneracy (Fermi-Dirac statistics), the band gap, the electron affinity and the density of states which vary with position. The calculation of carrier activity coefficients requires the selection of chemical potential and electrostatic potential references. The choice of these reference states is addressed. The relationships between purely thermodynamic quantities and parameters of the band theory are also presented. Emphasis is also placed on formulating an equation in a simple, Boltzmann-like form in which the nonideal behavior is described by two parameters, the effective band-gap shrinkage, ΔE g, and the effective asymmetry factor, A. In this form the working equations for the carrier densities and activity coefficients are convenient for use in computer-aided analysis and design. The approach presented here allows convenient treatment of nonuniform degenerate semiconductors in a manner that is consistent with thermodynamics as well as with the Poisson-Boltzmann equation for the electrostatic potential.

  5. Activity Coefficients of Acetone-Chloroform Solutions: An Undergraduate Experiment. Undergraduate Experiment.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ozog, J. Z.; Morrison, J. A.

    1983-01-01

    Presents information, laboratory procedures, and results of an undergraduate experiment in which activity coefficients for a two-component liquid-vapor system are determined. Working in pairs, students can perform the experiment with 10 solutions in a given three-hour laboratory period. (Author/JN)

  6. Measurement of activity coefficients of mixtures by head-space gas chromatography: general procedure.

    PubMed

    Luis, Patricia; Wouters, Christine; Van der Bruggen, Bart; Sandler, Stanley I

    2013-08-01

    Head-space gas chromatography (HS-GC) is an applicable method to perform vapor-liquid equilibrium measurements and determine activity coefficients. However, the reproducibility of the data may be conditioned by the experimental procedure concerning to the automated pressure-balanced system. The study developed in this work shows that a minimum volume of liquid in the vial is necessary to ensure the reliability of the activity coefficients since it may become a parameter that influences the magnitude of the peak areas: the helium introduced during the pressurization step may produce significant variations of the results when too small volume of liquid is selected. The minimum volume required should thus be evaluated prior to obtain experimentally the concentration in the vapor phase and the activity coefficients. In this work, the mixture acetonitrile-toluene is taken as example, requiring a sample volume of more than 5mL (about more than 25% of the vial volume). The vapor-liquid equilibrium and activity coefficients of mixtures at different concentrations (0.1, 0.2, 0.3, 0.4, 0.5, 0.6, 0.7, 0.8, 0.9 molar fraction) and four temperatures (35, 45, 55 and 70°C) have been determined. Relative standard deviations (RSD) lower than 5% have been obtained, indicating the good reproducibility of the method when a sample volume larger than 5mL is used. Finally, a general procedure to measure activity coefficients by means of pressure-balanced head-space gas chromatography is proposed. PMID:23809803

  7. Chemical Potentials, Activity Coefficients, and Solubility in Aqueous NaCl Solutions: Prediction by Polarizable Force Fields.

    PubMed

    Moučka, Filip; Nezbeda, Ivo; Smith, William R

    2015-04-14

    We describe a computationally efficient molecular simulation methodology for calculating the concentration dependence of the chemical potentials of both solute and solvent in aqueous electrolyte solutions, based on simulations of the salt chemical potential alone. We use our approach to study the predictions for aqueous NaCl solutions at ambient conditions of these properties by the recently developed polarizable force fields (FFs) AH/BK3 of Kiss and Baranyai (J. Chem. Phys. 2013, 138, 204507) and AH/SWM4-DP of Lamoureux and Roux (J. Phys. Chem. B 2006, 110, 3308 - 3322) and by the nonpolarizable JC FF of Joung and Cheatham tailored to SPC/E water (J. Phys. Chem. B 2008, 112, 9020 - 9041). We also consider their predictions of the concentration dependence of the electrolyte activity coefficient, the crystalline solid chemical potential, the electrolyte solubility, and the solution specific volume. We first highlight the disagreement in the literature concerning calculations of solubility by means of molecular simulation in the case of the JC FF and provide strong evidence of the correctness of our methodology based on recent independently obtained results for this important test case. We then compare the predictions of the three FFs with each other and with experiment and draw conclusions concerning their relative merits, with particular emphasis on the salt chemical potential and activity coefficient vs concentration curves and their derivatives. The latter curves have only previously been available from Kirkwood-Buff integrals, which require approximate numerical integrations over system pair correlation functions at each concentration. Unlike the case of the other FFs, the AH/BK3 curves are nearly parallel to the corresponding experimental curves at moderate and higher concentrations. This leads to an excellent prediction of the water chemical potential via the Gibbs-Duhem equation and enables the activity coefficient curve to be brought into excellent agreement

  8. Chemical Potentials, Activity Coefficients, and Solubility in Aqueous NaCl Solutions: Prediction by Polarizable Force Fields.

    PubMed

    Moučka, Filip; Nezbeda, Ivo; Smith, William R

    2015-04-14

    We describe a computationally efficient molecular simulation methodology for calculating the concentration dependence of the chemical potentials of both solute and solvent in aqueous electrolyte solutions, based on simulations of the salt chemical potential alone. We use our approach to study the predictions for aqueous NaCl solutions at ambient conditions of these properties by the recently developed polarizable force fields (FFs) AH/BK3 of Kiss and Baranyai (J. Chem. Phys. 2013, 138, 204507) and AH/SWM4-DP of Lamoureux and Roux (J. Phys. Chem. B 2006, 110, 3308 - 3322) and by the nonpolarizable JC FF of Joung and Cheatham tailored to SPC/E water (J. Phys. Chem. B 2008, 112, 9020 - 9041). We also consider their predictions of the concentration dependence of the electrolyte activity coefficient, the crystalline solid chemical potential, the electrolyte solubility, and the solution specific volume. We first highlight the disagreement in the literature concerning calculations of solubility by means of molecular simulation in the case of the JC FF and provide strong evidence of the correctness of our methodology based on recent independently obtained results for this important test case. We then compare the predictions of the three FFs with each other and with experiment and draw conclusions concerning their relative merits, with particular emphasis on the salt chemical potential and activity coefficient vs concentration curves and their derivatives. The latter curves have only previously been available from Kirkwood-Buff integrals, which require approximate numerical integrations over system pair correlation functions at each concentration. Unlike the case of the other FFs, the AH/BK3 curves are nearly parallel to the corresponding experimental curves at moderate and higher concentrations. This leads to an excellent prediction of the water chemical potential via the Gibbs-Duhem equation and enables the activity coefficient curve to be brought into excellent agreement

  9. Self-diffusion and activity coefficients of ions in charged disordered media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jardat, Marie; Hribar-Lee, Barbara; Dahirel, Vincent; Vlachy, Vojko

    2012-09-01

    Self-diffusion and single ion activity coefficients of ions of size symmetric electrolytes were studied in the presence of a collection of charged obstacles (called matrix) within a "soft" version of the primitive model of electrolyte solutions. The matrix subsystem possesses a net charge, depending on the concentration and charge of obstacles. The Brownian dynamics method was used to calculate the self-diffusion coefficients of mobile species. The replica Ornstein-Zernike theory for the partly quenched systems was used to calculate the individual activity coefficients of mobile ionic species. The results reflect the competition between attractive (obstacle-counterion, co-ion-counterion), and repulsive (obstacle-co-ion) interactions in these model systems. For the simplest possible system of symmetric monovalent ions the latter effect wins: Co-ions are excluded from the area around obstacles, and this slows down their diffusion compared to that of counterions. Introduction of divalent charges into the system changes this result when the concentration of obstacles is low. We compare these results to those obtained for the corresponding fully annealed systems, i.e., where all the species are mobile. In most cases the self-diffusion and activity coefficients of counterions and co-ions in the presence of charged obstacles follow the trends of the fully annealed solution, which are dictated by the composition of the mixture. In few situations, however, the presence of charged obstacles modifies these trends. Our study allows us to clearly identify the effects due to obstacles, and to separate them from those arising from the composition of the solution. In the case of charge and size symmetric systems, the results for the individual activity coefficients fully support the hypothesis of the "electrostatic excluded volume". Thermodynamic and dynamic results are consistent in explaining the behavior of the systems studied.

  10. A Computationally Efficient Model for Multicomponent Activity Coefficients in Aqueous Solutions

    SciTech Connect

    Zaveri, Rahul A.; Easter, Richard C.; Wexler, Anthony S.

    2004-10-04

    Three-dimensional models of atmospheric inorganic aerosols need an accurate yet computationally efficient parameterization of activity coefficients, which are repeatedly updated in aerosol phase equilibrium and gas-aerosol partitioning calculations. In this paper, we describe the development and evaluation of a new mixing rule for estimating multicomponent activity coefficients of electrolytes typically found in atmospheric aerosol systems containing H(+), NH4(+), Na(+), Ca(2+), SO4(2-), HSO4(-), NO3(-), and Cl(-) ions. The new mixing rule, called MTEM (Multicomponent Taylor Expansion Model), estimates the mean activity coefficient of an electrolyte A in a multicomponent solution from a linear combination of its values in ternary solutions of A-A-H2O, A-B-H2O, A-C-H2O, etc., as the amount of A approaches zero in the mixture at the solution water activity, aw, assuming aw is equal to the ambient relative humidity. Predictions from MTEM are found to be within a factor of 0.8 to 1.25 of the comprehensive Pitzer-Simonson-Clegg (PSC) model over a wide range of water activities, and are shown to be significantly more accurate than the widely used Kusik and Meissner (KM) mixing rule, especially for electrolytes in sulfate-rich aerosol systems and for relatively minor but important aerosol components such as HNO3 and HCl acids. Because the ternary activity coefficient polynomials are parameterized as a function of aw, they have to be computed only once at every grid point at the beginning of every 3-D model time step as opposed to repeated evaluations of the ionic strength dependent binary activity coefficient polynomials in the KM method. Additionally, MTEM also yields a non-iterative solution of the bisulfate ion dissociation in sulfate-rich systems, which is a major computational advantage over other iterative methods as will be shown by a comparison of the CPU time requirements of MTEM for both sulfate-poor and sulfate-rich systems relative to other methods.

  11. Modeling Secondary Organic Aerosols over Europe: Impact of Activity Coefficients and Viscosity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Y.; Sartelet, K.; Couvidat, F.

    2014-12-01

    Semi-volatile organic species (SVOC) can condense on suspended particulate materials (PM) in the atmosphere. The modeling of condensation/evaporation of SVOC often assumes that gas-phase and particle-phase concentrations are at equilibrium. However, recent studies show that secondary organic aerosols (SOA) may not be accurately represented by an equilibrium approach between the gas and particle phases, because organic aerosols in the particle phase may be very viscous. The condensation in the viscous liquid phase is limited by the diffusion from the surface of PM to its core. Using a surrogate approach to represent SVOC, depending on the user's choice, the secondary organic aerosol processor (SOAP) may assume equilibrium or model dynamically the condensation/evaporation between the gas and particle phases to take into account the viscosity of organic aerosols. The model is implemented in the three-dimensional chemistry-transport model of POLYPHEMUS. In SOAP, activity coefficients for organic mixtures can be computed using UNIFAC for short-range interactions between molecules and AIOMFAC to also take into account the effect of inorganic species on activity coefficients. Simulations over Europe are performed and POLYPHEMUS/SOAP is compared to POLYPHEMUS/H2O, which was previously used to model SOA using the equilibrium approach with activity coefficients from UNIFAC. Impacts of the dynamic approach on modeling SOA over Europe are evaluated. The concentrations of SOA using the dynamic approach are compared with those using the equilibrium approach. The increase of computational cost is also evaluated.

  12. Spike detection in human muscle sympathetic nerve activity using the kurtosis of stationary wavelet transform coefficients

    PubMed Central

    Brychta, Robert J.; Shiavi, Richard; Robertson, David; Diedrich, André

    2007-01-01

    The accurate assessment of autonomic sympathetic function is important in the diagnosis and study of various autonomic and cardiovascular disorders. Sympathetic function in humans can be assessed by recording the muscle sympathetic nerve activity, which is characterized by synchronous neuronal discharges separated by periods of neural silence dominated by colored Gaussian noise. The raw nerve activity is generally rectified, integrated, and quantified using the integrated burst rate or area. We propose an alternative quantification involving spike detection using a two-stage stationary wavelet transform (SWT) de-noising method. The SWT coefficients are first separated into noise-related and burst-related coefficients on the basis of their local kurtosis. The noise-related coefficients are then used to establish a threshold to identify spikes within the bursts. This method demonstrated better detection performance than an unsupervised amplitude discriminator and similar wavelet-based methods when confronted with simulated data of varying burst rate and signal to noise ratio. Additional validation on data acquired during a graded head-up tilt protocol revealed a strong correlation between the mean spike rate and the mean integrate burst rate (r = 0.85) and burst area rate (r = 0.91). In conclusion, the kurtosis-based wavelet de-noising technique is a potentially useful method of studying sympathetic nerve activity in humans. PMID:17083982

  13. Spike detection in human muscle sympathetic nerve activity using the kurtosis of stationary wavelet transform coefficients.

    PubMed

    Brychta, Robert J; Shiavi, Richard; Robertson, David; Diedrich, André

    2007-03-15

    The accurate assessment of autonomic sympathetic function is important in the diagnosis and study of various autonomic and cardiovascular disorders. Sympathetic function in humans can be assessed by recording the muscle sympathetic nerve activity, which is characterized by synchronous neuronal discharges separated by periods of neural silence dominated by colored Gaussian noise. The raw nerve activity is generally rectified, integrated, and quantified using the integrated burst rate or area. We propose an alternative quantification involving spike detection using a two-stage stationary wavelet transform (SWT) de-noising method. The SWT coefficients are first separated into noise-related and burst-related coefficients on the basis of their local kurtosis. The noise-related coefficients are then used to establish a threshold to identify spikes within the bursts. This method demonstrated better detection performance than an unsupervised amplitude discriminator and similar wavelet-based methods when confronted with simulated data of varying burst rate and signal to noise ratio. Additional validation on data acquired during a graded head-up tilt protocol revealed a strong correlation between the mean spike rate and the mean integrate burst rate (r=0.85) and burst area rate (r=0.91). In conclusion, the kurtosis-based wavelet de-noising technique is a potentially useful method of studying sympathetic nerve activity in humans.

  14. Criteria for first- and second-order vibrational resonances and correct evaluation of the Darling-Dennison resonance coefficients using the canonical Van Vleck perturbation theory

    SciTech Connect

    Krasnoshchekov, Sergey V.; Isayeva, Elena V.; Stepanov, Nikolay F.

    2014-12-21

    The second-order vibrational Hamiltonian of a semi-rigid polyatomic molecule when resonances are present can be reduced to a quasi-diagonal form using second-order vibrational perturbation theory. Obtaining exact vibrational energy levels requires subsequent numerical diagonalization of the Hamiltonian matrix including the first- and second-order resonance coupling coefficients. While the first-order Fermi resonance constants can be easily calculated, the evaluation of the second-order Darling-Dennison constants requires more complicated algebra for seven individual cases with different numbers of creation-annihilation vibrational quanta. The difficulty in precise evaluation of the Darling-Dennison coefficients is associated with the previously unrecognized interference with simultaneously present Fermi resonances that affect the form of the canonically transformed Hamiltonian. For the first time, we have presented the correct form of the general expression for the evaluation of the Darling-Dennison constants that accounts for the underlying effect of Fermi resonances. The physically meaningful criteria for selecting both Fermi and Darling-Dennison resonances are discussed and illustrated using numerical examples.

  15. Humidity coefficient correction in the calculation equations of air refractive index by He-Ne laser based on phase step interferometry.

    PubMed

    Chen, Qianghua; Liu, Jinghai; He, Yongxi; Luo, Huifu; Luo, Jun; Wang, Feng

    2015-02-10

    The refractive index of air (RIA) is an important parameter in precision measurement. The revisions to Edlen's equations by Boensch and Potulski [Metrologia 35, 133 (1998)] are mostly used to calculate the RIA at present. Since the humidity correction coefficients in the formulas were performed with four wavelengths of a Cd(114) lamp (644.0, 508.7, 480.1, and 467.9 nm) and at the temperature range of 19.6°C-20.1°C, the application is restricted when an He-Ne laser is used as the light source, which is mostly applied in optical precision measurement, and the environmental temperature is far away from 20°C as well. To solve this problem, a measurement system based on phase step interferometry for measuring the effect of the humidity to the RIA is presented, and a corresponding humidity correction equation is derived. The analysis and comparison results show that the uncertainty of the presented equation is better than that of Boensch and Potulski's. It is more suitable in present precision measurements by He-Ne laser, and the application temperature range extends to 14.6°C-24.0°C as well. PMID:25968028

  16. Improved AIOMFAC model parameterisation of the temperature dependence of activity coefficients for aqueous organic mixtures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ganbavale, G.; Zuend, A.; Marcolli, C.; Peter, T.

    2015-01-01

    This study presents a new, improved parameterisation of the temperature dependence of activity coefficients in the AIOMFAC (Aerosol Inorganic-Organic Mixtures Functional groups Activity Coefficients) model applicable for aqueous as well as water-free organic solutions. For electrolyte-free organic and organic-water mixtures the AIOMFAC model uses a group-contribution approach based on UNIFAC (UNIversal quasi-chemical Functional-group Activity Coefficients). This group-contribution approach explicitly accounts for interactions among organic functional groups and between organic functional groups and water. The previous AIOMFAC version uses a simple parameterisation of the temperature dependence of activity coefficients, aimed to be applicable in the temperature range from ~ 275 to ~ 400 K. With the goal to improve the description of a wide variety of organic compounds found in atmospheric aerosols, we extend the AIOMFAC parameterisation for the functional groups carboxyl, hydroxyl, ketone, aldehyde, ether, ester, alkyl, aromatic carbon-alcohol, and aromatic hydrocarbon to atmospherically relevant low temperatures. To this end we introduce a new parameterisation for the temperature dependence. The improved temperature dependence parameterisation is derived from classical thermodynamic theory by describing effects from changes in molar enthalpy and heat capacity of a multi-component system. Thermodynamic equilibrium data of aqueous organic and water-free organic mixtures from the literature are carefully assessed and complemented with new measurements to establish a comprehensive database, covering a wide temperature range (~ 190 to ~ 440 K) for many of the functional group combinations considered. Different experimental data types and their processing for the estimation of AIOMFAC model parameters are discussed. The new AIOMFAC parameterisation for the temperature dependence of activity coefficients from low to high temperatures shows an overall improvement of 28% in

  17. A New Method for Multicomponent Activity Coefficients of Electrolytes in Aqueous Atmospheric Aerosols

    SciTech Connect

    Zaveri, Rahul A.; Easter, Richard C.; Wexler, Anthony S.

    2005-01-21

    Three-dimensional models of atmospheric inorganic aerosols need an accurate yet computationally efficient parameterization of activity coefficients of various electrolytes in multicomponent aqueous solutions. This paper describes the development and application of a new mixing rule for calculating activity coefficients of electrolytes typically found in atmospheric aerosol systems containing H+, NH4+, Na+, Ca2+ SO42-, HSO4-, NO3-, and Cl- ions. The new mixing rule, called MTEM (Multicomponent Taylor Expansion Model), estimates the mean activity coefficient of an electrolyte in a multicomponent solution based on its values in binary solutions of all the electrolytes present in the mixture at the solution water activity aw, assuming aw is equal to the ambient relative humidity. The aerosol water content is calculated using the Zdanovskii-Stokes-Robinson method. For self-consistency, most of the MTEM and Zdanovskii-Stokes-Robinson parameters are derived using the comprehensive Pitzer-Simonson-Clegg model at 298.15 K. MTEM is evaluated for several multicomponent systems representing various continental and marine aerosols, and is contrasted against the mixing rule of Kusik and Meissner and the newer approach of Metzger et al. [2002]. Predictions of MTEM are found to be generally within a factor of 0.8 to 1.25 of the comprehensive Pitzer-Simonson-Clegg model, and are shown to be significantly more accurate than predictions of the other two methods. MTEM also yields a non-iterative solution of the bisulfate ion dissociation in sulfate-rich systems – a major computational advantage over other iterative methods. CPU time requirements of MTEM relative to other methods for sulfate-poor and sulfate-rich systems are also discussed.

  18. Specific activity to H*(10) conversion coefficients for in situ gamma spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Lemercier, M; Gurriaran, R; Bouisset, P; Cagnat, X

    2008-01-01

    The typical situations found in in situ gamma spectrometry have been simulated by Monte Carlo techniques to obtain the energy spectra of the photon fluence rate existing at 1 m above ground. The main difficulty found with the model is its slow convergence. A method to speed up the calculation has been derived. The results of the model have been thoroughly tested against existing data. In a final stage, the specific activity to H*(10) conversion coefficients have been derived for the typical scenarios encountered in the in situ gamma spectrometry. PMID:17942441

  19. Predicting passive and active tissue:plasma partition coefficients: interindividual and interspecies variability.

    PubMed

    Ruark, Christopher D; Hack, C Eric; Robinson, Peter J; Mahle, Deirdre A; Gearhart, Jeffery M

    2014-07-01

    A mechanistic tissue composition model incorporating passive and active transport for the prediction of steady-state tissue:plasma partition coefficients (K(t:pl)) of chemicals in multiple mammalian species was used to assess interindividual and interspecies variability. This approach predicts K(t:pl) using chemical lipophilicity, pKa, phospholipid membrane binding, and the unbound plasma fraction, together with tissue fractions of water, neutral lipids, neutral and acidic phospholipids, proteins, and pH. Active transport K(t:pl) is predicted using Michaelis-Menten transport parameters. Species-specific biological properties were identified from 126 peer reviewed journal articles, listed in the Supporting Information, for mouse, rat, guinea pig, rabbit, beagle dog, pig, monkey, and human species. Means and coefficients of variation for biological properties were used in a Monte Carlo analysis to assess variability. The results show K(t:pl) interspecies variability for the brain, fat, heart, kidney, liver, lung, muscle, red blood cell, skin, and spleen, but uncertainty in the estimates obscured some differences. Compounds undergoing active transport are shown to have concentration-dependent K(t:pl). This tissue composition-based mechanistic model can be used to predict K(t:pl) for organic chemicals across eight species and 10 tissues, and can be an important component in drug development when scaling K(t:pl) from animal models to humans.

  20. Correction of pathlength amplification in the filter-pad technique for measurements of particulate absorption coefficient in the visible spectral region.

    PubMed

    Stramski, Dariusz; Reynolds, Rick A; Kaczmarek, Sławomir; Uitz, Julia; Zheng, Guangming

    2015-08-01

    Spectrophotometric measurement of particulate matter retained on filters is the most common and practical method for routine determination of the spectral light absorption coefficient of aquatic particles, ap(λ), at high spectral resolution over a broad spectral range. The use of differing geometrical measurement configurations and large variations in the reported correction for pathlength amplification induced by the particle/filter matrix have hindered adoption of an established measurement protocol. We describe results of dedicated laboratory experiments with a diversity of particulate sample types to examine variation in the pathlength amplification factor for three filter measurement geometries; the filter in the transmittance configuration (T), the filter in the transmittance-reflectance configuration (T-R), and the filter placed inside an integrating sphere (IS). Relationships between optical density measured on suspensions (ODs) and filters (ODf) within the visible portion of the spectrum were evaluated for the formulation of pathlength amplification correction, with power functions providing the best functional representation of the relationship for all three geometries. Whereas the largest uncertainties occur in the T method, the IS method provided the least sample-to-sample variability and the smallest uncertainties in the relationship between ODs and ODf. For six different samples measured with 1 nm resolution within the light wavelength range from 400 to 700 nm, a median error of 7.1% is observed for predicted values of ODs using the IS method. The relationships established for the three filter-pad methods are applicable to historical and ongoing measurements; for future work, the use of the IS method is recommended whenever feasible. PMID:26368092

  1. 75 FR 66699 - Farm Loan Programs Loan Making Activities; Correction

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-10-29

    ... (voice and TDD). SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION: On September 23, 2010, FSA published a proposed rule (75 FR... Farm Service Agency 7 CFR Parts 761, 763, and 764 RIN 0560-AI03 Farm Loan Programs Loan Making... document contains a correction to the proposed rule titled ``Farm Loan Programs Loan Making...

  2. Effect of fluoroscopic X-ray beam spectrum on air-kerma measurement accuracy: implications for establishing correction coefficients on interventional fluoroscopes with KAP meters.

    PubMed

    Wunderle, Kevin A; Rakowski, Joseph T; Dong, Frank F

    2016-01-01

    The first goal of this study was to investigate the accuracy of the displayed reference plane air kerma (Ka,r) or air kerma-area product (Pk,a) over a broad spectrum of X-ray beam qualities on clinically used interventional fluoroscopes incorporating air kerma-area product meters (KAP meters) to measure X-ray output. The second goal was to investigate the accuracy of a correction coefficient (CC) determined at a single beam quality and applied to the measured Ka,r over a broad spectrum of beam qualities. Eleven state-of-the-art interventional fluoroscopes were evaluated, consisting of eight Siemens Artis zee and Artis Q systems and three Philips Allura FD systems. A separate calibrated 60 cc ionization chamber (external chamber) was used to determine the accuracy of the KAP meter over a broad range of clinically used beam qualities. For typical adult beam qualities, applying a single CC deter-mined at 100 kVp with copper (Cu) in the beam resulted in a deviation of < 5% due to beam quality variation. This result indicates that applying a CC determined using The American Association of Physicists in Medicine Task Group 190 protocol or a similar protocol provides very good accuracy as compared to the allowed ± 35% deviation of the KAP meter in this limited beam quality range. For interventional fluoroscopes dedicated to or routinely used to perform pediatric interventions, using a CC established with a low kVp (~ 55-60 kVp) and large amount of Cu filtration (~ 0.6-0.9 mm) may result in greater accuracy as compared to using the 100 kVp values. KAP meter responses indicate that fluoroscope vendors are likely normalizing or otherwise influencing the KAP meter output data. Although this may provide improved accuracy in some instances, there is the potential for large discrete errors to occur, and these errors may be difficult to identify. PMID:27167287

  3. Activity coefficients and free energies of nonionic mixed surfactant solutions from vapor-pressure and freezing-point osmometry.

    PubMed

    MacNeil, Jennifer A; Ray, Gargi Basu; Leaist, Derek G

    2011-05-19

    The thermodynamic properties of mixed surfactant solutions are widely investigated, prompted by numerous practical applications of these systems and by interest in molecular association and self-organization. General techniques for measuring thermodynamic activities, such as isopiestic equilibration, are well-established for multicomponent solutions. Surprisingly, these techniques have not yet been applied to mixed surfactant solutions, despite the importance of the free energy for micelle stability. In this study, equations are developed for the osmotic coefficients of solutions of nonionic surfactant A + nonionic surfactant B. A mass-action model is used, with virial equations for the activity coefficients of the micelles and free surfactant monomer species. The equations are fitted to osmotic coefficients of aqueous decylsulfobetaine + dodecylsulfobetaine solutions measured by vapor-pressure and freezing-point osmometry. Equilibrium constants for mixed-micelle formation are calculated from the free monomer concentrations at the critical micelle concentrations. The derived activity coefficients of the micelles and free monomers indicate large departures from ideal solution behavior, even for dilute solutions of the surfactants. Stoichiometric activity coefficients of the total surfactant components are evaluated by Gibbs-Duhem integration of the osmotic coefficients. Relatively simple colligative property measurements hold considerable promise for free energy studies of multicomponent surfactant solutions.

  4. Dynamic changes of integrated backscatter, attenuation coefficient and bubble activities during high-intensity focused ultrasound (HIFU) treatment.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Siyuan; Wan, Mingxi; Zhong, Hui; Xu, Cheng; Liao, Zhenzhong; Liu, Huanqing; Wang, Supin

    2009-11-01

    This paper simultaneously investigated the transient characteristics of integrated backscatter (IBS), attenuation coefficient and bubble activities as time traces before, during and after HIFU treatment, with different HIFU parameters (acoustic power and duty cycle) in both transparent tissue-mimicking phantoms and freshly excised bovine livers. These dynamic changes of acoustic parameters and bubble activities were correlated with the visualization of lesion development selected from photos, conventional B-mode ultrasound images and differential IBS images over the whole procedure of HIFU treatment. Two-dimensional radiofrequency (RF) data were acquired by a modified diagnostic ultrasound scanner to estimate the changes of mean IBS and attenuation coefficient averaged in the lesion region, and to construct the differential IBS images and B-mode ultrasound images simultaneously. Bubble activities over the whole procedure of HIFU treatment were investigated by the passive cavitation detection (PCD) method and the changes in subharmonic and broadband noise were correlated with the transient characteristics of IBS and attenuation coefficient. When HIFU was switched on, IBS and attenuation coefficient increased with the appearance of bubble clouds in the B-mode and differential IBS image. At the same time, the level of subharmonic and broadband noise rose abruptly. Then, there was an initial decrease in the attenuation coefficient, followed by an increase when at lower HIFU power. As the lesion appeared, IBS and attenuation coefficient both increased rapidly to a value twice that of normal. Then the changes in IBS and attenuation coefficient showed more complex patterns, but still showed a slower trend of increases with lesion development. Violent bubble activities were visible in the gel and were evident as strongly echogenic regions in the differential IBS images and B-mode images simultaneously. This was detected by a dramatic high level of subharmonic and broadband

  5. Dynamic changes of integrated backscatter, attenuation coefficient and bubble activities during high-intensity focused ultrasound (HIFU) treatment.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Siyuan; Wan, Mingxi; Zhong, Hui; Xu, Cheng; Liao, Zhenzhong; Liu, Huanqing; Wang, Supin

    2009-11-01

    This paper simultaneously investigated the transient characteristics of integrated backscatter (IBS), attenuation coefficient and bubble activities as time traces before, during and after HIFU treatment, with different HIFU parameters (acoustic power and duty cycle) in both transparent tissue-mimicking phantoms and freshly excised bovine livers. These dynamic changes of acoustic parameters and bubble activities were correlated with the visualization of lesion development selected from photos, conventional B-mode ultrasound images and differential IBS images over the whole procedure of HIFU treatment. Two-dimensional radiofrequency (RF) data were acquired by a modified diagnostic ultrasound scanner to estimate the changes of mean IBS and attenuation coefficient averaged in the lesion region, and to construct the differential IBS images and B-mode ultrasound images simultaneously. Bubble activities over the whole procedure of HIFU treatment were investigated by the passive cavitation detection (PCD) method and the changes in subharmonic and broadband noise were correlated with the transient characteristics of IBS and attenuation coefficient. When HIFU was switched on, IBS and attenuation coefficient increased with the appearance of bubble clouds in the B-mode and differential IBS image. At the same time, the level of subharmonic and broadband noise rose abruptly. Then, there was an initial decrease in the attenuation coefficient, followed by an increase when at lower HIFU power. As the lesion appeared, IBS and attenuation coefficient both increased rapidly to a value twice that of normal. Then the changes in IBS and attenuation coefficient showed more complex patterns, but still showed a slower trend of increases with lesion development. Violent bubble activities were visible in the gel and were evident as strongly echogenic regions in the differential IBS images and B-mode images simultaneously. This was detected by a dramatic high level of subharmonic and broadband

  6. Lab-scale experimental strategy for determining micropollutant partition coefficient and biodegradation constants in activated sludge.

    PubMed

    Pomiès, M; Choubert, J M; Wisniewski, C; Miège, C; Budzinski, H; Coquery, M

    2015-03-01

    The nitrifying/denitrifying activated sludge process removes several micropollutants from wastewater by sorption onto sludge and/or biodegradation. The objective of this paper is to propose and evaluate a lab-scale experimental strategy for the determination of partition coefficient and biodegradation constant for micropollutant with an objective of modelling their removal. Four pharmaceutical compounds (ibuprofen, atenolol, diclofenac and fluoxetine) covering a wide hydrophobicity range (log Kow from 0.16 to 4.51) were chosen. Dissolved and particulate concentrations were monitored for 4 days, inside two reactors working under aerobic and anoxic conditions, and under different substrate feed conditions (biodegradable carbon and nitrogen). We determined the mechanisms responsible for the removal of the target compounds: (i) ibuprofen was biodegraded, mainly under aerobic conditions by cometabolism with biodegradable carbon, whereas anoxic conditions suppressed biodegradation; (ii) atenolol was biodegraded under both aerobic and anoxic conditions (with a higher biodegradation rate under aerobic conditions), and cometabolism with biodegradable carbon was the main mechanism; (iii) diclofenac and fluoxetine were removed by sorption only. Finally, the abilities of our strategy were evaluated by testing the suitability of the parameters for simulating effluent concentrations and removal efficiency at a full-scale plant. PMID:25300180

  7. Biodegradation of 4-chlorophenol by acclimated and unacclimated activated sludge-Evaluation of biokinetic coefficients

    SciTech Connect

    Sahinkaya, Erkan; Dilek, Filiz B. . E-mail: fdilek@metu.edu.tr

    2005-10-01

    Unacclimated and acclimated activated sludges were examined for their ability to degrade 4-CP (4-chlorophenol) in the presence and absence of a readily growing substrate using aerobic batch reactors. The effects of 4-CP on the {mu} (specific growth rate), COD removal efficiency, Y (yield coefficient), and q (specific substrate utilization rate) were investigated. It was observed that the toxicity of 4-CP on the culture decreased remarkably after acclimation. For example, the IC{sub 50} value on the basis of {mu} was found to increase from 130 to 218mg/L with the acclimation of the culture. Although an increase in 4-CP concentration up to 300mg/L has no adverse effect on the COD removal efficiency of the acclimated culture, a considerable decrease was observed in the case of an unacclimated culture. Although 4-CP removal was not observed with an unacclimated culture, almost complete removal was achieved with the acclimated culture, up to 300mg/L. The Haldane kinetic model adequately predicted the biodegradation of 4-CP and the kinetic constants obtained were q{sub m}=41.17mg/(gMLVSSh), K{sub s}=1.104mg/L, and K{sub i}=194.4mg/L. The degradation of 4-CP led to formation of 5-chloro-2-hydroxymuconic semialdehyde, which was further metabolized, indicating complete degradation of 4-CP via a meta-cleavage pathway.

  8. EIA Corrects Errors in Its Drilling Activity Estimates Series

    EIA Publications

    1998-01-01

    The Energy Information Administration (EIA) has published monthly and annual estimates of oil and gas drilling activity since 1978. These data are key information for many industry analysts, serving as a leading indicator of trends in the industry and a barometer of general industry status.

  9. EIA Completes Corrections to Drilling Activity Estimates Series

    EIA Publications

    1999-01-01

    The Energy Information Administration (EIA) has published monthly and annual estimates of oil and gas drilling activity since 1978. These data are key information for many industry analysts, serving as a leading indicator of trends in the industry and a barometer of general industry status.

  10. Data correction for seven activity trackers based on regression models.

    PubMed

    Andalibi, Vafa; Honko, Harri; Christophe, Francois; Viik, Jari

    2015-08-01

    Using an activity tracker for measuring activity-related parameters, e.g. steps and energy expenditure (EE), can be very helpful in assisting a person's fitness improvement. Unlike the measuring of number of steps, an accurate EE estimation requires additional personal information as well as accurate velocity of movement, which is hard to achieve due to inaccuracy of sensors. In this paper, we have evaluated regression-based models to improve the precision for both steps and EE estimation. For this purpose, data of seven activity trackers and two reference devices was collected from 20 young adult volunteers wearing all devices at once in three different tests, namely 60-minute office work, 6-hour overall activity and 60-minute walking. Reference data is used to create regression models for each device and relative percentage errors of adjusted values are then statistically compared to that of original values. The effectiveness of regression models are determined based on the result of a statistical test. During a walking period, EE measurement was improved in all devices. The step measurement was also improved in five of them. The results show that improvement of EE estimation is possible only with low-cost implementation of fitting model over the collected data e.g. in the app or in corresponding service back-end. PMID:26736578

  11. Measurement and Modeling of Mean Activity Coefficients of NaCl in an Aqueous Mixed Electrolyte Solution Containing Glycine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sheikholeslami, Paniz; Dehghani, M. R.; Safahieh, Tina

    2016-08-01

    An electrochemical cell with two ion-selective electrodes (Na+ glass) and (Cl- solid state) was used to measure the mean ionic activity coefficient of NaCl in an aqueous mixture containing NaCl, glycine, and NaNO3 at 308.15 K. The experiments were conducted at fixed molality of NaNO3 (0.1 m) and various molalities of glycine (0-1 m) and NaCl (up to 0.8 m). The experimental data were modeled using a modified version of the Pitzer equation. Finally the activity coefficient ratio of glycine was determined based on the Maxwell equation.

  12. The effect of postural correction on muscle activation amplitudes recorded from the cervicobrachial region.

    PubMed

    McLean, Linda

    2005-12-01

    In clinical practice, postural correction is a common treatment approach for individuals with neck and shoulder pain. As chronic static muscle use is thought to be associated with the onset of some neck and shoulder pain syndromes, it is important to understand the impact a postural correction program might have on muscle activation amplitudes in the neck and shoulder regions. Normalized surface electromyographic data were recorded from the levator scapulae, upper trapezius, supraspinatus, posterior deltoid, masseter, rhomboid major, cervical erector spinae, and sternocleidomastoid muscles of the dominant side of each of eighteen healthy subjects. Subjects performed five repetitions of each of four seated typing postures (habitual, corrected, head-forward and slouched) and four standing postures (habitual, corrected, and head-forward and slouched). Repeated-measures analysis of variance models (alpha=0.05) revealed that in sitting postural correction tended to decreased the level of muscle activation required in all muscles studied during seated computer work, however this finding was not statistically significant. Corrected posture in sitting did, however produce a statistically significant reduction in muscle activity compared to forward head posture. Corrected posture in standing required more muscle activity than habitual or forward head posture in the majority of cervicobrachial and jaw muscles, suggesting that a graduated approach to postural correction exercises might be required in order to train the muscles to appropriately withstand the requirements of the task. A surprising finding was that muscle activity levels and postural changes had the largest impact on the masseter muscle, which demonstrated activation levels in the order of 20% maximum voluntary electrical activation. PMID:16150608

  13. System-size corrections for self-diffusion coefficients calculated from molecular dynamics simulations: The case of CO2, n-alkanes, and poly(ethylene glycol) dimethyl ethers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moultos, Othonas A.; Zhang, Yong; Tsimpanogiannis, Ioannis N.; Economou, Ioannis G.; Maginn, Edward J.

    2016-08-01

    Molecular dynamics simulations were carried out to study the self-diffusion coefficients of CO2, methane, propane, n-hexane, n-hexadecane, and various poly(ethylene glycol) dimethyl ethers (glymes in short, CH3O-(CH2CH2O)n-CH3 with n = 1, 2, 3, and 4, labeled as G1, G2, G3, and G4, respectively) at different conditions. Various system sizes were examined. The widely used Yeh and Hummer [J. Phys. Chem. B 108, 15873 (2004)] correction for the prediction of diffusion coefficient at the thermodynamic limit was applied and shown to be accurate in all cases compared to extrapolated values at infinite system size. The magnitude of correction, in all cases examined, is significant, with the smallest systems examined giving for some cases a self-diffusion coefficient approximately 15% lower than the infinite system-size extrapolated value. The results suggest that finite size corrections to computed self-diffusivities must be used in order to obtain accurate results.

  14. System-size corrections for self-diffusion coefficients calculated from molecular dynamics simulations: The case of CO2, n-alkanes, and poly(ethylene glycol) dimethyl ethers.

    PubMed

    Moultos, Othonas A; Zhang, Yong; Tsimpanogiannis, Ioannis N; Economou, Ioannis G; Maginn, Edward J

    2016-08-21

    Molecular dynamics simulations were carried out to study the self-diffusion coefficients of CO2, methane, propane, n-hexane, n-hexadecane, and various poly(ethylene glycol) dimethyl ethers (glymes in short, CH3O-(CH2CH2O)n-CH3 with n = 1, 2, 3, and 4, labeled as G1, G2, G3, and G4, respectively) at different conditions. Various system sizes were examined. The widely used Yeh and Hummer [J. Phys. Chem. B 108, 15873 (2004)] correction for the prediction of diffusion coefficient at the thermodynamic limit was applied and shown to be accurate in all cases compared to extrapolated values at infinite system size. The magnitude of correction, in all cases examined, is significant, with the smallest systems examined giving for some cases a self-diffusion coefficient approximately 15% lower than the infinite system-size extrapolated value. The results suggest that finite size corrections to computed self-diffusivities must be used in order to obtain accurate results. PMID:27544089

  15. Activity coefficients of aqueous sodium chloride from 15° to 50°C measured with a glass electrode

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Truesdell, A.H.

    1968-01-01

    Values of the mean activity coefficient of sodium chloride at 15°, 25°, 38° and 50°C were determined for aqueous NaCl solutions of 0.01 to 1.0 molal from electromotive force measurements on the cell: (sodium-sensitive glass electrode, aqueous sodium chloride, silver chloride-silver).

  16. COMPUTATIONAL CHEMISTRY METHOD FOR PREDICTING VAPOR PRESSURES AND ACTIVITY COEFFICIENTS OF POLAR ORGANIC OXYGENATES IN PM2.5

    EPA Science Inventory

    Parameterizations of interactions of polar multifunctional organic oxygenates in PM2.5 must be included in aerosol chemistry models for evaluating control strategies for reducing ambient concentrations of PM2.5 compounds. Vapor pressures and activity coefficients of these compo...

  17. The elastic modulus correction term in creep activation energies Applied to oxide dispersion strengthened superalloy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Malu, M.; Tien, J. K.

    1975-01-01

    The effect of elastic modulus and the temperature dependence of elastic modulus on creep activation energies for an oxide dispersion strengthened nickel-base superalloy are investigated. This superalloy is commercially known as Inconel Alloy MA 753, strengthened both by gamma-prime precipitates and by yttria particles. It is shown that at intermediate temperatures, say below 1500 F, where elastic modulus is weakly dependent on temperature, the modulus correction term to creep activation energy is small. Accordingly, modulus corrections are insignificant for the superalloy considered, which shows high apparent creep activation energies at this temperature. On the contrary, at very high temperatures, the elastic modulus correction term can be significant, thus reducing the creep activation energy to that of vacancy self-diffusion. In order to obtain high-temperature creep resistance, a high-value elastic modulus with a weak dependence on temperature is required.

  18. Can we better use existing and emerging computing hardware to embed activity coefficient predictions in complex atmospheric aerosol models?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Topping, David; Alibay, Irfan; Ruske, Simon; Hindriksen, Vincent; Noisternig, Michael

    2016-04-01

    To predict the evolving concentration, chemical composition and ability of aerosol particles to act as cloud droplets, we rely on numerical modeling. Mechanistic models attempt to account for the movement of compounds between the gaseous and condensed phases at a molecular level. This 'bottom up' approach is designed to increase our fundamental understanding. However, such models rely on predicting the properties of molecules and subsequent mixtures. For partitioning between the gaseous and condensed phases this includes: saturation vapour pressures; Henrys law coefficients; activity coefficients; diffusion coefficients and reaction rates. Current gas phase chemical mechanisms predict the existence of potentially millions of individual species. Within a dynamic ensemble model, this can often be used as justification for neglecting computationally expensive process descriptions. Indeed, on whether we can quantify the true sensitivity to uncertainties in molecular properties, even at the single aerosol particle level it has been impossible to embed fully coupled representations of process level knowledge with all possible compounds, typically relying on heavily parameterised descriptions. Relying on emerging numerical frameworks, and designed for the changing landscape of high-performance computing (HPC), in this study we show that comprehensive microphysical models from single particle to larger scales can be developed to encompass a complete state-of-the-art knowledge of aerosol chemical and process diversity. We focus specifically on the ability to capture activity coefficients in liquid solutions using the UNIFAC method, profiling traditional coding strategies and those that exploit emerging hardware.

  19. A Biomechanical Model to Estimate Corrective Changes in Muscle Activation Patterns for Stroke Patients

    PubMed Central

    Shao, Qi; Buchanan, Thomas S.

    2008-01-01

    We have created a model to estimate the corrective changes in muscle activation patterns needed for a person who has had a stroke to walk with an improved gait—nearing that of an unimpaired person. Using this model, we examined how different functional electrical stimulation (FES) protocols would alter gait patterns. The approach is based on an electromyographically (EMG) driven model to estimate joint moments. Different stimulation protocols were examined which generated different corrective muscle activation patterns. These approaches grouped the muscles together into flexor and extensor groups (to simulate FES using surface electrodes) or left each muscle to vary independently (to simulate FES using intramuscular electrodes). In addition, we limited the maximal change in muscle activation (to reduce fatigue). We observed that with the two protocols (grouped and ungrouped muscles), the calculated corrective changes in muscle activation yielded improved joint moments nearly matching those of unimpaired subjects. The protocols yielded different muscle activation patterns, which could be selected based on practical condition. These calculated corrective muscle activation changes can be used in studying FES protocols, to determine the feasibility of gait retraining with FES for a given subject and to determine which protocols are most reasonable. PMID:18762296

  20. The effect of a scapular postural correction strategy on trapezius activity in patients with neck pain.

    PubMed

    Wegner, Sally; Jull, Gwendolen; O'Leary, Shaun; Johnston, Venerina

    2010-12-01

    Extensive computer use amongst office workers has lead to an increase in work-related neck pain. Aberrant activity within the three portions of the trapezius muscle and associated changes in scapular posture have been identified as potential contributing factors. This study compared the activity (surface electromyography) of the three portions of the trapezius in healthy controls (n = 20) to a neck pain group with poor scapular posture (n = 18) during the performance of a functional typing task. A scapular postural correction strategy was used to correct scapular orientation in the neck pain group and electromyographic recordings were repeated. During the typing task, the neck pain group generated greater activity in the middle trapezius (MT) (p = 0.02) and less activity in the lower trapezius (LT) (p = 0.03) than the control group. Following correction of the scapula, activity recorded by the neck pain group was similar to the control group for the middle and lower portions (p = 0.09; p = 0.91). These findings indicate that a scapular postural correction exercise may be effective in altering the distribution of activity in the trapezius to better reflect that displayed by healthy individuals. PMID:20663706

  1. The effect of concentration- and temperature-dependent dielectric constant on the activity coefficient of NaCl electrolyte solutions

    SciTech Connect

    Valiskó, Mónika; Boda, Dezső

    2014-06-21

    Our implicit-solvent model for the estimation of the excess chemical potential (or, equivalently, the activity coefficient) of electrolytes is based on using a dielectric constant that depends on the thermodynamic state, namely, the temperature and concentration of the electrolyte, ε(c, T). As a consequence, the excess chemical potential is split into two terms corresponding to ion-ion (II) and ion-water (IW) interactions. The II term is obtained from computer simulation using the Primitive Model of electrolytes, while the IW term is estimated from the Born treatment. In our previous work [J. Vincze, M. Valiskó, and D. Boda, “The nonmonotonic concentration dependence of the mean activity coefficient of electrolytes is a result of a balance between solvation and ion-ion correlations,” J. Chem. Phys. 133, 154507 (2010)], we showed that the nonmonotonic concentration dependence of the activity coefficient can be reproduced qualitatively with this II+IW model without using any adjustable parameter. The Pauling radii were used in the calculation of the II term, while experimental solvation free energies were used in the calculation of the IW term. In this work, we analyze the effect of the parameters (dielectric constant, ionic radii, solvation free energy) on the concentration and temperature dependence of the mean activity coefficient of NaCl. We conclude that the II+IW model can explain the experimental behavior using a concentration-dependent dielectric constant and that we do not need the artificial concept of “solvated ionic radius” assumed by earlier studies.

  2. The effect of concentration- and temperature-dependent dielectric constant on the activity coefficient of NaCl electrolyte solutions.

    PubMed

    Valiskó, Mónika; Boda, Dezső

    2014-06-21

    Our implicit-solvent model for the estimation of the excess chemical potential (or, equivalently, the activity coefficient) of electrolytes is based on using a dielectric constant that depends on the thermodynamic state, namely, the temperature and concentration of the electrolyte, ε(c, T). As a consequence, the excess chemical potential is split into two terms corresponding to ion-ion (II) and ion-water (IW) interactions. The II term is obtained from computer simulation using the Primitive Model of electrolytes, while the IW term is estimated from the Born treatment. In our previous work [J. Vincze, M. Valiskó, and D. Boda, "The nonmonotonic concentration dependence of the mean activity coefficient of electrolytes is a result of a balance between solvation and ion-ion correlations," J. Chem. Phys. 133, 154507 (2010)], we showed that the nonmonotonic concentration dependence of the activity coefficient can be reproduced qualitatively with this II+IW model without using any adjustable parameter. The Pauling radii were used in the calculation of the II term, while experimental solvation free energies were used in the calculation of the IW term. In this work, we analyze the effect of the parameters (dielectric constant, ionic radii, solvation free energy) on the concentration and temperature dependence of the mean activity coefficient of NaCl. We conclude that the II+IW model can explain the experimental behavior using a concentration-dependent dielectric constant and that we do not need the artificial concept of "solvated ionic radius" assumed by earlier studies.

  3. Activity Theory in Spanish Mixed Classrooms: Exploring Corrective Feedback as an Artifact

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Valentín-Rivera, Laura

    2016-01-01

    This study draws upon activity theory to better understand the implications of corrective feedback (CF) as an artifact on (1) the coconstruction of knowledge and (2) the action-oriented decisions of 10 mixed pairs comprising a foreign language learner (FLL) and a heritage language learner (HLL) of Spanish. To this end, the dyads were divided into…

  4. Corrective Feedback via Instant Messenger Learning Activities in NS-NNS and NNS-NNS Dyads

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sotillo, Susana

    2005-01-01

    This exploratory study examines corrective feedback in native speaker-nonnative speaker (NS-NNS) and NNS-NNS dyads while participants were engaged in communicative and problem-solving activities via "Yahoo! Instant Messenger" (YIM). As "negotiation of meaning" studies of the 1990s have shown, linguistic items which learners negotiate in…

  5. Averaging Internal Consistency Reliability Coefficients

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Feldt, Leonard S.; Charter, Richard A.

    2006-01-01

    Seven approaches to averaging reliability coefficients are presented. Each approach starts with a unique definition of the concept of "average," and no approach is more correct than the others. Six of the approaches are applicable to internal consistency coefficients. The seventh approach is specific to alternate-forms coefficients. Although the…

  6. Temperature-dependent solubilities and mean ionic activity coefficients of alkali halides in water from molecular dynamics simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mester, Zoltan; Panagiotopoulos, Athanassios Z.

    2015-07-01

    The mean ionic activity coefficients of aqueous KCl, NaF, NaI, and NaCl solutions of varying concentrations have been obtained from molecular dynamics simulations following a recently developed methodology based on gradual insertions of salt molecules [Z. Mester and A. Z. Panagiotopoulos, J. Chem. Phys. 142, 044507 (2015)]. The non-polarizable ion models of Weerasinghe and Smith [J. Chem. Phys. 119, 11342 (2003)], Gee et al. [J. Chem. Theory Comput. 7, 1369 (2011)], Reiser et al. [J. Chem. Phys. 140, 044504 (2014)], and Joung and Cheatham [J. Phys. Chem. B 112, 9020 (2008)] were used along with the extended simple point charge (SPC/E) water model [Berendsen et al., J. Phys. Chem. 91, 6269 (1987)] in the simulations. In addition to the chemical potentials in solution used to obtain the activity coefficients, we also calculated the chemical potentials of salt crystals and used them to obtain the solubility of these alkali halide models in SPC/E water. The models of Weerasinghe and Smith [J. Chem. Phys. 119, 11342 (2003)] and Gee et al. [J. Chem. Theory Comput. 7, 1369 (2011)] provide excellent predictions of the mean ionic activity coefficients at 298.15 K and 1 bar, but significantly underpredict or overpredict the solubilities. The other two models generally predicted the mean ionic activity coefficients only qualitatively. With the exception of NaF for which the solubility is significantly overpredicted, the model of Joung and Cheatham predicts salt solubilities that are approximately 40%-60% of the experimental values. The models of Reiser et al. [J. Chem. Phys. 140, 044504 (2014)] make good predictions for the NaCl and NaI solubilities, but significantly underpredict the solubilities for KCl and NaF. We also tested the transferability of the models to temperatures much higher than were used to parametrize them by performing simulations for NaCl at 373.15 K and 1 bar, and at 473.15 K and 15.5 bar. All models overpredict the drop in the values of mean ionic

  7. [The estimation of daily physical activity with the coefficient of variation (CV) of heart rates continuously recorded].

    PubMed

    Tono-oka, T; Kaneko, I

    1993-05-01

    The daily level of physical activity was estimated using the heart rate monitor, PE3000 (Polar Electro, Finland). The level was expressed with the coefficient of variation (CV) of heart rates recorded from waking time to dinner time. In the course of a day of intense physical activity, CV was confirmed to rise significantly. Then the CV was estimated and compared among 3 age classes, young (10-18 years), middle-aged (30-47 years), and elderly (62-76 years). The CVs of young people were significantly higher than those of middle-aged (P < 0.001) and elderly (P < 0.01), regardless of sex. However there was no significant sex difference in all age classes. These results suggest that the CV is an accurate index of daily physical activity. Thus clinicians can use the CV of heart rates to estimate the level of physical activity of individuals which closely relates to QOL.

  8. Measurement of gas/water uptake coefficients for trace gases active in the marine environment

    SciTech Connect

    Davidovits, P. . Dept. of Chemistry); Worsnop, D.W.; Zahniser, M.S.; Kolb, C.E. . Center for Chemical and Environmental Physics)

    1992-02-01

    Ocean produced reduced sulfur compounds including dimethylsulfide (DMS), hydrogen sulfide (H{sub 2}S), carbon disulfide (CS{sub 2}), methyl mercaptan (CH{sub 3}CH) and carbonyl sulfide (OCS) deliver a sulfur burden to the atmosphere which is roughly equal to sulfur oxides produced by fossil fuel combustion. These species and their oxidation products dimethyl sulfoxide (DMSO), dimethyl sulfone (DMSO{sub 2}) and methane sulfonic acid (MSA) dominate aerosol and CCN production in clean marine air. Furthermore, oxidation of reduced sulfur species will be strongly influenced by NO{sub x}/O{sub 3} chemistry in marine atmospheres. The multiphase chemical processes for these species must be understood in order to study the evolving role of combustion produced sulfur oxides over the oceans. We have measured the chemical and physical parameters affecting the uptake of reduced sulfur compounds, their oxidation products, ozone, and nitrogen oxides by the ocean's surface, and marine clouds, fogs, and aerosols. These parameters include: gas/surface mass accommodation coefficients; physical and chemically modified (effective) Henry's law constants; and surface and liquid phase reaction constants. These parameters are critical to understanding both the interaction of gaseous trace species with cloud and fog droplets and the deposition of trace gaseous species to dew covered, fresh water and marine surfaces.

  9. Analysis of stimulus-related activity in rat auditory cortex using complex spectral coefficients

    PubMed Central

    Krause, Bryan M.

    2013-01-01

    The neural mechanisms of sensory responses recorded from the scalp or cortical surface remain controversial. Evoked vs. induced response components (i.e., changes in mean vs. variance) are associated with bottom-up vs. top-down processing, but trial-by-trial response variability can confound this interpretation. Phase reset of ongoing oscillations has also been postulated to contribute to sensory responses. In this article, we present evidence that responses under passive listening conditions are dominated by variable evoked response components. We measured the mean, variance, and phase of complex time-frequency coefficients of epidurally recorded responses to acoustic stimuli in rats. During the stimulus, changes in mean, variance, and phase tended to co-occur. After the stimulus, there was a small, low-frequency offset response in the mean and modest, prolonged desynchronization in the alpha band. Simulations showed that trial-by-trial variability in the mean can account for most of the variance and phase changes observed during the stimulus. This variability was state dependent, with smallest variability during periods of greatest arousal. Our data suggest that cortical responses to auditory stimuli reflect variable inputs to the cortical network. These analyses suggest that caution should be exercised when interpreting variance and phase changes in terms of top-down cortical processing. PMID:23657279

  10. Estimation of Organ Activity using Four Different Methods of Background Correction in Conjugate View Method

    PubMed Central

    Shanei, Ahmad; Afshin, Maryam; Moslehi, Masoud; Rastaghi, Sedighe

    2015-01-01

    To make an accurate estimation of the uptake of radioactivity in an organ using the conjugate view method, corrections of physical factors, such as background activity, scatter, and attenuation are needed. The aim of this study was to evaluate the accuracy of four different methods for background correction in activity quantification of the heart in myocardial perfusion scans. The organ activity was calculated using the conjugate view method. A number of 22 healthy volunteers were injected with 17–19 mCi of 99mTc-methoxy-isobutyl-isonitrile (MIBI) at rest or during exercise. Images were obtained by a dual-headed gamma camera. Four methods for background correction were applied: (1) Conventional correction (referred to as the Gates' method), (2) Buijs method, (3) BgdA subtraction, (4) BgdB subtraction. To evaluate the accuracy of these methods, the results of the calculations using the above-mentioned methods were compared with the reference results. The calculated uptake in the heart using conventional method, Buijs method, BgdA subtraction, and BgdB subtraction methods was 1.4 ± 0.7% (P < 0.05), 2.6 ± 0.6% (P < 0.05), 1.3 ± 0.5% (P < 0.05), and 0.8 ± 0.3% (P < 0.05) of injected dose (I.D) at rest and 1.8 ± 0.6% (P > 0.05), 3.1 ± 0.8% (P > 0.05), 1.9 ± 0.8% (P < 0.05), and 1.2 ± 0.5% (P < 0.05) of I.D, during exercise. The mean estimated myocardial uptake of 99mTc-MIBI was dependent on the correction method used. Comparison among the four different methods of background activity correction applied in this study showed that the Buijs method was the most suitable method for background correction in myocardial perfusion scan. PMID:26955568

  11. Estimation of Organ Activity using Four Different Methods of Background Correction in Conjugate View Method.

    PubMed

    Shanei, Ahmad; Afshin, Maryam; Moslehi, Masoud; Rastaghi, Sedighe

    2015-01-01

    To make an accurate estimation of the uptake of radioactivity in an organ using the conjugate view method, corrections of physical factors, such as background activity, scatter, and attenuation are needed. The aim of this study was to evaluate the accuracy of four different methods for background correction in activity quantification of the heart in myocardial perfusion scans. The organ activity was calculated using the conjugate view method. A number of 22 healthy volunteers were injected with 17-19 mCi of (99m)Tc-methoxy-isobutyl-isonitrile (MIBI) at rest or during exercise. Images were obtained by a dual-headed gamma camera. Four methods for background correction were applied: (1) Conventional correction (referred to as the Gates' method), (2) Buijs method, (3) BgdA subtraction, (4) BgdB subtraction. To evaluate the accuracy of these methods, the results of the calculations using the above-mentioned methods were compared with the reference results. The calculated uptake in the heart using conventional method, Buijs method, BgdA subtraction, and BgdB subtraction methods was 1.4 ± 0.7% (P < 0.05), 2.6 ± 0.6% (P < 0.05), 1.3 ± 0.5% (P < 0.05), and 0.8 ± 0.3% (P < 0.05) of injected dose (I.D) at rest and 1.8 ± 0.6% (P > 0.05), 3.1 ± 0.8% (P > 0.05), 1.9 ± 0.8% (P < 0.05), and 1.2 ± 0.5% (P < 0.05) of I.D, during exercise. The mean estimated myocardial uptake of (99m)Tc-MIBI was dependent on the correction method used. Comparison among the four different methods of background activity correction applied in this study showed that the Buijs method was the most suitable method for background correction in myocardial perfusion scan. PMID:26955568

  12. Estimation of Organ Activity using Four Different Methods of Background Correction in Conjugate View Method.

    PubMed

    Shanei, Ahmad; Afshin, Maryam; Moslehi, Masoud; Rastaghi, Sedighe

    2015-01-01

    To make an accurate estimation of the uptake of radioactivity in an organ using the conjugate view method, corrections of physical factors, such as background activity, scatter, and attenuation are needed. The aim of this study was to evaluate the accuracy of four different methods for background correction in activity quantification of the heart in myocardial perfusion scans. The organ activity was calculated using the conjugate view method. A number of 22 healthy volunteers were injected with 17-19 mCi of (99m)Tc-methoxy-isobutyl-isonitrile (MIBI) at rest or during exercise. Images were obtained by a dual-headed gamma camera. Four methods for background correction were applied: (1) Conventional correction (referred to as the Gates' method), (2) Buijs method, (3) BgdA subtraction, (4) BgdB subtraction. To evaluate the accuracy of these methods, the results of the calculations using the above-mentioned methods were compared with the reference results. The calculated uptake in the heart using conventional method, Buijs method, BgdA subtraction, and BgdB subtraction methods was 1.4 ± 0.7% (P < 0.05), 2.6 ± 0.6% (P < 0.05), 1.3 ± 0.5% (P < 0.05), and 0.8 ± 0.3% (P < 0.05) of injected dose (I.D) at rest and 1.8 ± 0.6% (P > 0.05), 3.1 ± 0.8% (P > 0.05), 1.9 ± 0.8% (P < 0.05), and 1.2 ± 0.5% (P < 0.05) of I.D, during exercise. The mean estimated myocardial uptake of (99m)Tc-MIBI was dependent on the correction method used. Comparison among the four different methods of background activity correction applied in this study showed that the Buijs method was the most suitable method for background correction in myocardial perfusion scan.

  13. Prospective active marker motion correction improves statistical power in BOLD fMRI.

    PubMed

    Muraskin, Jordan; Ooi, Melvyn B; Goldman, Robin I; Krueger, Sascha; Thomas, William J; Sajda, Paul; Brown, Truman R

    2013-03-01

    Group level statistical maps of blood oxygenation level dependent (BOLD) signals acquired using functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) have become a basic measurement for much of systems, cognitive and social neuroscience. A challenge in making inferences from these statistical maps is the noise and potential confounds that arise from the head motion that occurs within and between acquisition volumes. This motion results in the scan plane being misaligned during acquisition, ultimately leading to reduced statistical power when maps are constructed at the group level. In most cases, an attempt is made to correct for this motion through the use of retrospective analysis methods. In this paper, we use a prospective active marker motion correction (PRAMMO) system that uses radio frequency markers for real-time tracking of motion, enabling on-line slice plane correction. We show that the statistical power of the activation maps is substantially increased using PRAMMO compared to conventional retrospective correction. Analysis of our results indicates that the PRAMMO acquisition reduces the variance without decreasing the signal component of the BOLD (beta). Using PRAMMO could thus improve the overall statistical power of fMRI based BOLD measurements, leading to stronger inferences of the nature of processing in the human brain.

  14. A Method for Lung Boundary Correction Using Split Bregman Method and Geometric Active Contour Model

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Jianxun; Liang, Rui

    2015-01-01

    In order to get the extracted lung region from CT images more accurately, a model that contains lung region extraction and edge boundary correction is proposed. Firstly, a new edge detection function is presented with the help of the classic structure tensor theory. Secondly, the initial lung mask is automatically extracted by an improved active contour model which combines the global intensity information, local intensity information, the new edge information, and an adaptive weight. It is worth noting that the objective function of the improved model is converted to a convex model, which makes the proposed model get the global minimum. Then, the central airway was excluded according to the spatial context messages and the position relationship between every segmented region and the rib. Thirdly, a mesh and the fractal theory are used to detect the boundary that surrounds the juxtapleural nodule. Finally, the geometric active contour model is employed to correct the detected boundary and reinclude juxtapleural nodules. We also evaluated the performance of the proposed segmentation and correction model by comparing with their popular counterparts. Efficient computing capability and robustness property prove that our model can correct the lung boundary reliably and reproducibly. PMID:26089976

  15. A Method for Lung Boundary Correction Using Split Bregman Method and Geometric Active Contour Model.

    PubMed

    Feng, Changli; Zhang, Jianxun; Liang, Rui

    2015-01-01

    In order to get the extracted lung region from CT images more accurately, a model that contains lung region extraction and edge boundary correction is proposed. Firstly, a new edge detection function is presented with the help of the classic structure tensor theory. Secondly, the initial lung mask is automatically extracted by an improved active contour model which combines the global intensity information, local intensity information, the new edge information, and an adaptive weight. It is worth noting that the objective function of the improved model is converted to a convex model, which makes the proposed model get the global minimum. Then, the central airway was excluded according to the spatial context messages and the position relationship between every segmented region and the rib. Thirdly, a mesh and the fractal theory are used to detect the boundary that surrounds the juxtapleural nodule. Finally, the geometric active contour model is employed to correct the detected boundary and reinclude juxtapleural nodules. We also evaluated the performance of the proposed segmentation and correction model by comparing with their popular counterparts. Efficient computing capability and robustness property prove that our model can correct the lung boundary reliably and reproducibly. PMID:26089976

  16. Measurement error of self-reported physical activity levels in New York City: assessment and correction.

    PubMed

    Lim, Sungwoo; Wyker, Brett; Bartley, Katherine; Eisenhower, Donna

    2015-05-01

    Because it is difficult to objectively measure population-level physical activity levels, self-reported measures have been used as a surveillance tool. However, little is known about their validity in populations living in dense urban areas. We aimed to assess the validity of self-reported physical activity data against accelerometer-based measurements among adults living in New York City and to apply a practical tool to adjust for measurement error in complex sample data using a regression calibration method. We used 2 components of data: 1) dual-frame random digit dialing telephone survey data from 3,806 adults in 2010-2011 and 2) accelerometer data from a subsample of 679 survey participants. Self-reported physical activity levels were measured using a version of the Global Physical Activity Questionnaire, whereas data on weekly moderate-equivalent minutes of activity were collected using accelerometers. Two self-reported health measures (obesity and diabetes) were included as outcomes. Participants with higher accelerometer values were more likely to underreport the actual levels. (Accelerometer values were considered to be the reference values.) After correcting for measurement errors, we found that associations between outcomes and physical activity levels were substantially deattenuated. Despite difficulties in accurately monitoring physical activity levels in dense urban areas using self-reported data, our findings show the importance of performing a well-designed validation study because it allows for understanding and correcting measurement errors.

  17. Measurement Error of Self-Reported Physical Activity Levels in New York City: Assessment and Correction

    PubMed Central

    Lim, Sungwoo; Wyker, Brett; Bartley, Katherine; Eisenhower, Donna

    2015-01-01

    Because it is difficult to objectively measure population-level physical activity levels, self-reported measures have been used as a surveillance tool. However, little is known about their validity in populations living in dense urban areas. We aimed to assess the validity of self-reported physical activity data against accelerometer-based measurements among adults living in New York City and to apply a practical tool to adjust for measurement error in complex sample data using a regression calibration method. We used 2 components of data: 1) dual-frame random digit dialing telephone survey data from 3,806 adults in 2010–2011 and 2) accelerometer data from a subsample of 679 survey participants. Self-reported physical activity levels were measured using a version of the Global Physical Activity Questionnaire, whereas data on weekly moderate-equivalent minutes of activity were collected using accelerometers. Two self-reported health measures (obesity and diabetes) were included as outcomes. Participants with higher accelerometer values were more likely to underreport the actual levels. (Accelerometer values were considered to be the reference values.) After correcting for measurement errors, we found that associations between outcomes and physical activity levels were substantially deattenuated. Despite difficulties in accurately monitoring physical activity levels in dense urban areas using self-reported data, our findings show the importance of performing a well-designed validation study because it allows for understanding and correcting measurement errors. PMID:25855646

  18. Conformal optical elements for correcting wavefront distortions in YAG : Nd{sup 3+} active elements

    SciTech Connect

    Korolkov, V P; Nasyrov, R K; Poleshchuk, A G; Arapov, Yu D; Ivanov, A F

    2013-02-28

    Correction of the wavefront is studied for the light beam passing wide-aperture YAG : Nd3+ single-crystal rods, which are used as active elements in high-power solid-state lasers. A nonideal character of the crystal structure is responsible for the deformation of the wavefront of passing radiation. By using the halftone technology we have developed conformal aberration correctors capable of compensating rod nonuniformities and reducing the laser radiation divergence by an order of magnitude. The results obtained make it possible to employ optically nonuniform active elements in laser constructions. (laser optics 2012)

  19. Piecing together the X-ray background: bolometric corrections for active galactic nuclei

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vasudevan, R. V.; Fabian, A. C.

    2007-11-01

    The X-ray background can be used to constrain the accretion history of supermassive black holes (SMBHs) in active galactic nuclei (AGN), with the SMBH mass density related to the energy density due to accretion. A knowledge of the hard X-ray bolometric correction, κ2-10keV, is a vital input into these studies, as it allows us to constrain the parameters of the accretion responsible for SMBH growth. Earlier studies assumed a constant bolometric correction for all AGN, and more recent work has suggested accounting for a dependence on AGN luminosity. Until recently, the variations in the disc emission in the ultraviolet (UV) have not been taken into account in this calculation; we show that such variations are important by construction of optical-to-X-ray spectral energy distributions for 54 AGN. In particular, we use Far Ultraviolet Spectroscopic Explorer (FUSE) UV and X-ray data from the literature to constrain the disc emission as well as possible. We find evidence for very significant spread in the bolometric corrections, with no simple dependence on luminosity being evident. Populations of AGN such as narrow-line Seyfert 1 nuclei, radio-loud and X-ray-weak AGN may have bolometric corrections which differ systematically from the rest of the AGN population. We identify other sources of uncertainty including intrinsic extinction in the optical-UV, X-ray and UV variability and uncertainties in SMBH mass estimates. Our results suggest a more well-defined relationship between the bolometric correction and Eddington ratio in AGN, with a transitional region at an Eddington ratio of ~0.1, below which the bolometric correction is typically 15-25, and above which it is typically 40-70. We consider the potential-implied parallels with the low/hard and high/soft states in Galactic black hole (GBH) accretion, and present bolometric corrections for the GBH binary GX 339-4 for comparison. Our findings reinforce previous studies proposing a multistate description of AGN

  20. Coefficients of association and activity of cadmium and lead ions in soil solutions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Endovitskii, A. P.; Kalinichenko, V. P.; Il'in, V. B.; Ivanenko, A. A.

    2009-02-01

    The thermodynamic calculations were made for the contents of Pb and Cd compounds in soil solutions and water extracts of the meadow-steppe and meadow solonetzes (Rostov oblast) based on their prescribed analytic concentrations of 3 and 5 μg/l, respectively. The solonetzes studied are characterized by their high carbonate content and high alkalinity. The activity of Pb2+ and Cd2+ was shown to be many times lower than their total concentration in the solution due to the association of these metals with carbonate and other anions and the formation of hydroxocomplexes CdOH+ and PbOH+. This fact is one of the reasons for the low input of Pb2+ and Cd2+ to plants growing on calcareous soils.

  1. Calibration correction of an active scattering spectrometer probe to account for refractive index of stratospheric aerosols

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pueschel, R. F.; Overbeck, V. R.; Snetsinger, K. G.; Russell, P. B.; Ferry, G. V.

    1990-01-01

    The use of the active scattering spectrometer probe (ASAS-X) to measure sulfuric acid aerosols on U-2 and ER-2 research aircraft has yielded results that are at times ambiguous due to the dependence of particles' optical signatures on refractive index as well as physical dimensions. The calibration correction of the ASAS-X optical spectrometer probe for stratospheric aerosol studies is validated through an independent and simultaneous sampling of the particles with impactors; sizing and counting of particles on SEM images yields total particle areas and volumes. Upon correction of calibration in light of these data, spectrometer results averaged over four size distributions are found to agree with similarly averaged impactor results to within a few percent: indicating that the optical properties or chemical composition of the sample aerosol must be known in order to achieve accurate optical aerosol spectrometer size analysis.

  2. On the relation between the activation energy for electron attachment reactions and the size of their thermal rate coefficients.

    PubMed

    Hotop, H; Ruf, M-W; Kopyra, J; Miller, T M; Fabrikant, I I

    2011-02-14

    Rate coefficients k(T) for dissociative electron attachment (DEA) to molecules in many cases exhibit a more or less strong rise with increasing temperature T (the electron temperature T(e) and the molecular temperature T(G) are assumed to be in thermal equilibrium, i.e., T = T(e) = T(G)). This rise is frequently modeled by the Arrhenius equation k(T) = k(A) exp[-E(a)∕(k(B)T)], and an activation energy E(a) is deduced from fits to the experimental data k(T). This behavior reflects the presence of an energy barrier for the anion on its path to the dissociated products. In a recent paper [J. Kopyra, J. Wnorowska, M. Foryś, and I. Szamrej, Int. J. Mass Spectrom. 268, 60 (2007)] it was suggested that the size of the rate coefficients for DEA reactions at room temperature exhibits an exponential dependence on the activation energy, i.e., k(E(a); T ≈ 300 K) = k(1) exp[-E(a)∕E(0)]. More recent experimental data for molecules with high barriers [T. M. Miller, J. F. Friedman, L. C. Schaffer, and A. A. Viggiano, J. Chem. Phys. 131, 084302 (2009)] are compatible with such a correlation. We investigate the validity and the possible origin of this dependence by analyzing the results of R-matrix calculations for temperature-dependent rate coefficients of exothermic DEA processes with intermediate barrier toward dissociation. These include results for model systems with systematically varied barrier height as well as results of molecule-specific calculations for CH(3)Cl, CH(3)Br, CF(3)Cl, and CH(2)Cl(2) (activation energies above 0.2 eV) involving appropriate molecular parameters. A comparison of the experimental and theoretical results for the considered class of molecules (halogenated alkanes) supports the idea that the exponential dependence of k(T = 300 K) on the activation energy reflects a general phenomenon associated with Franck-Condon factors for getting from the initial neutral vibrational levels to the dissociating final anion state in a direct DEA process

  3. EEG activity represents the correctness of perceptual decisions trial-by-trial

    PubMed Central

    Pardo-Vazquez, Jose L.; Padrón, Isabel; Fernández-Rey, José; Acuña, Carlos

    2014-01-01

    Performance monitoring is an executive function, which we depend on for detecting and evaluating the consequences of our behavior. Although event related potentials (ERPs) have revealed the existence of differences after correct and incorrect decisions, it is not known whether there is a trial-by-trial representation of the accuracy of the decision. We recorded the electroencephalographic activity (EEG) while participants performed a perceptual discrimination task, with two levels of difficulty, in which they received immediate feedback. Receiver Operating Characteristic (ROC) analyses were used to reveal two components that convey trial-by-trial representations of the correctness of the decisions. Firstly, the performance monitoring-related negativity (PM-N), a negative deflection whose amplitude is higher (more negative) after incorrect trials. Secondly, the performance monitoring-related positivity (PM-P), a positive deflection whose amplitude is higher after incorrect trials. During the time periods corresponding to these components, trials can be accurately categorized as correct or incorrect by looking at the EEG activity; this categorization is more accurate when based on the PM-P. We further show that the difficulty of the discrimination task has a different effect on each component: after easy trials the latency of the PM-N is shorter and the amplitude of the PM-P is higher than after difficult trials. Consistent with previous interpretations of performance-related ERPs, these results suggest a functional differentiation between these components. The PM-N could be related to an automatic error detection system, responsible for fast behavioral corrections of ongoing actions, while the PM-P could reflect the difference between expected and actual outcomes and be related to long-term changes in the decision process. PMID:24734012

  4. THE ROLE OF THE ACTIVITY COEFFICIENT OF THE HYDROGEN ION IN THE HYDROLYSIS OF GELATIN.

    PubMed

    Northrop, J H

    1921-07-20

    1. The hydrolysis of gelatin at a constant hydrogen ion concentration follows the course of a monomolecular reaction for about one-third of the reaction. 2. If the hydrogen ion concentration is not kept constant the amount of hydrolysis in certain ranges of acidity is proportional to the square root of the time (Schütz's rule). 3. The velocity of hydrolysis in strongly acid solution (pH less than 2.0) is directly proportional to the hydrogen ion concentration as determined by the hydrogen electrode i.e., the "activity;" it is not proportional to the hydrogen ion concentration as determined by the conductivity ratio. 4. The addition of neutral salts increases the velocity of hydrolysis and the hydrogen ion concentration (as determined by the hydrogen electrode) to approximately the same extent. 5. The velocity in strongly alkaline solutions (pH greater than 10) is directly proportional to the hydroxyl ion concentration. 6. Between pH 2.0 and pH 10.0 the rate of hydrolysis is approximately constant and very much greater than would be calculated from the hydrogen and hydroxyl ion concentration. This may be roughly accounted for by the assumption that the uncombined gelatin hydrolyzes much more rapidly than the gelatin salt.

  5. Implementation of advanced matrix corrections for active interrogation of waste drums using the CTEN instrument

    SciTech Connect

    Melton, S.; Estep, R.; Hollas, C.

    1998-12-31

    The combined thermal/epithermal neutron instrument (CTEN) was designed at Los Alamos to improve measurement accuracy and mitigate self shielding effects inherent in the differential dieaway technique (DDT). A major goal in this research effort has been the development of a calibration technique that incorporates recently developed matrix and self-shielding corrections using data generated from additional detectors and new acquisition techniques. A comprehensive data set containing both active and passive measurements was generated using 26 different matrices and comprising a total of 1,400 measurements. In all, 31 flux-and-matrix-dependent parameters, 24 positional parameters, two dieaway times, and a correlated ratio were determined from each of the over 1,400 measurements. A reduced list of matrix indicators, prioritized using the alternating conditional expectation (ACE) algorithm, was used to train a neural network using a generalized regression technique (GRNN) to determine matrix- and position-corrected calibration factors. This paper describes the experimental, analytical, and empirical techniques used to determine the corrected calibration factor for an unknown waste drum. Results from a range of cases are compared with those obtained using a mobile DDT instrument and traditional DDT algorithms.

  6. The influence of triple energy window scatter correction on activity quantification for 1 7 7Lu molecular radiotherapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Robinson, Andrew P.; Tipping, Jill; Cullen, David M.; Hamilton, David

    2016-07-01

    Accurate activity quantification is the foundation for all methods of radiation dosimetry for molecular radiotherapy (MRT). The requirements for patient-specific dosimetry using single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) are challenging, particularly with respect to scatter correction. In this paper data from phantom studies, combined with results from a fully validated Monte Carlo (MC) SPECT camera simulation, are used to investigate the influence of the triple energy window (TEW) scatter correction on SPECT activity quantification for {{}1 7 7} Lu MRT. Results from phantom data show that; (1) activity quantification for the total counts in the SPECT field-of-view demonstrates a significant overestimation in total activity recovery when TEW scatter correction is applied at low activities (≤slant 200 MBq). (2) Applying the TEW scatter correction to activity quantification within a volume-of-interest with no background activity provides minimal benefit. (3) In the case of activity distributions with background activity, an overestimation of recovered activity of up to 30% is observed when using the TEW scatter correction. Data from MC simulation were used to perform a full analysis of the composition of events in a clinically reconstructed volume of interest. This allowed, for the first time, the separation of the relative contributions of partial volume effects (PVE) and inaccuracies in TEW scatter compensation to the observed overestimation of activity recovery. It is shown, that even with perfect partial volume compensation, TEW scatter correction can overestimate activity recovery by up to 11%. MC data is used to demonstrate that even a localized and optimized isotope-specific TEW correction cannot reflect a patient specific activity distribution without prior knowledge of the complete activity distribution. This highlights the important role of MC simulation in SPECT activity quantification.

  7. Determination of Activity Coefficients of di-(2-ethylhexyl) Phosphoric Acid Dimer in Select Organic Solvents Using Vapor Phase Osmometry

    SciTech Connect

    Michael F. Gray; Peter Zalupski; Mikael Nilsson

    2013-08-01

    Effective models for solvent extraction require accurate characterization of the nonideality effects for each component, including the extractants. In this study, the nonideal behavior of the industrial extractant di(2-ethylhexyl) phosphoric acid has been investigated using vapor pressure osmometry (VPO). From the osmometry data, activity coefficients for the HDEHP dimer were obtained based on a formulation of the regular solution theory of Scatchard and Hildebrand, and the Margules two- and three-suffix equations. The results show similarity with a slope-analysis based relation from previous literature, although important differences are highlighted. The work points towards VPO as a useful technique for this type of study, but care must be taken with the choice of standard and method of analysis.

  8. Deuterium in the Dead Sea: Remeasurement and implications for the isotopic activity correction in brines

    SciTech Connect

    Juske Horita Tokyo Institute of Technology ); Gat, J.R. )

    1989-01-01

    Remeasurement of {delta}D in Dead Sea waters, using improved analytical techniques for handling concentrated brines, removed most of the scatter in previous data and showed close parallelism in the enrichment of both {sup 18}O and deuterium as a function of salinity. The {delta}D values for a brine whose salinity is {sigma}{sub 25} = 232{per thousand} is close to +9{per thousand} relative to SMOW. It was further established that the concentration to activity correction (for deuterium) for the above mentioned Dead Sea brine was 17.8{per thousand}.

  9. A two-parameter kinetic model based on a time-dependent activity coefficient accurately describes enzymatic cellulose digestion

    PubMed Central

    Kostylev, Maxim; Wilson, David

    2014-01-01

    Lignocellulosic biomass is a potential source of renewable, low-carbon-footprint liquid fuels. Biomass recalcitrance and enzyme cost are key challenges associated with the large-scale production of cellulosic fuel. Kinetic modeling of enzymatic cellulose digestion has been complicated by the heterogeneous nature of the substrate and by the fact that a true steady state cannot be attained. We present a two-parameter kinetic model based on the Michaelis-Menten scheme (Michaelis L and Menten ML. (1913) Biochem Z 49:333–369), but with a time-dependent activity coefficient analogous to fractal-like kinetics formulated by Kopelman (Kopelman R. (1988) Science 241:1620–1626). We provide a mathematical derivation and experimental support to show that one of the parameters is a total activity coefficient and the other is an intrinsic constant that reflects the ability of the cellulases to overcome substrate recalcitrance. The model is applicable to individual cellulases and their mixtures at low-to-medium enzyme loads. Using biomass degrading enzymes from a cellulolytic bacterium Thermobifida fusca we show that the model can be used for mechanistic studies of enzymatic cellulose digestion. We also demonstrate that it applies to the crude supernatant of the widely studied cellulolytic fungus Trichoderma reesei and can thus be used to compare cellulases from different organisms. The two parameters may serve a similar role to Vmax, KM, and kcat in classical kinetics. A similar approach may be applicable to other enzymes with heterogeneous substrates and where a steady state is not achievable. PMID:23837567

  10. Influence of potassium ions and osmolality on the resting membrane potential of rabbit ventricular papillary muscle with estimation of the activity and the activity coefficient of internal potassium.

    PubMed

    Akiyama, T; Fozzard, H A

    1975-11-01

    Resting membrane potentials of rabbit right ventricular papillary muscles were measured in modified Tyrode's solutions that were isotonic (1.0 X T), hypertonic (1.58 X T), or hypotonic (0.76 X T) at eight different concentrations of external potassium, [K]o, ranging from 0.78 to 100 mM. The amount of hyperpolarization produced by exposure to the hypertonic solutions was relatively constant with an average of 4.6 mv at all levels of [K]o except 0.78 and 1.56 mM. This potential change is much less than the 10.6 mv which would be predicted if the papillary muscles behaved as nearly perfect osmometers and the activity coefficient of intracellular potassium (K) remained constant. The amount of depolarization produced by exposure to the 0.76 X T hypotonic solutions averaged 6.8 mv at all levels of [K]o except 0.78 mM; this value is close to the predicted value of 6.9 mv. Variations in the activity and the activity coefficient of intracellular K were introduced to explain these discrepancies. We estimated that the activity of intracellular K in 1.58 X T hypertonic solution was increased 15-23% compared with that in isotonic solution. This change is much less than the 58% that would be predicted if the papillary muscle behaved as a nearly perfect osmometer. We also estimated that the activity of intracellular K in 0.76 X T hypotonic solution fell 22-26%, which is very close to the predicted value of 24%. The activity coefficient of intracellular K appeared to fall in 1.58 X T hypertonic solution to about 0.76 of its value in isotonic solution. This decline in the estimated activity coefficient of intracellular K could not be attributed to an increase in Coulombic attractive and repulsive forces as predicted by the Debye-Hückel equation for a univalent electrolyte.

  11. Estimation of excess energies and activity coefficients for the penternary Ni-Cr-Co-Al-Mo system and its subsystems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dogan, A.; Arslan, H.; Dogan, T.

    2015-06-01

    Using different prediction methods, such as the General Solution Model of Kohler and Muggianu, the excess energy and activities of molybdenum for the sections of the phase diagram for the penternary Ni-Cr-Co-Al-Mo system with mole ratios xNi/ xMo = 1, xCr/ xMo = 1, xCo/ xMo = 1, and xAl/ xMo = r = 0.5 and 1, were thermodynamically investigated at a temperature of 2000 K, whereas the excess energy and activities of Bi for the section corresponding to the ternary Bi-Ga-Sb system with mole ratio xGa/ xSb = 1/9 were thermodynamically investigated at a temperature of 1073 K. In the case of r = 0.5 and 1 in the alloys Ni-Cr-Co-Al-Mo, a positive deviation in the activity coefficient was revealed, as molybdenum content increased. Moreover, in the calculations performed in Chou's GSM model, the obtained values for excess Gibbs energies are negative in the whole concentration range of bismuth at 1073 K and exhibit the minimum of about -2.2 kJ/mol at the mole ratio xGa/ xSb = 1/9 in the alloy Bi-Ga-Sb.

  12. Assessment of odor activity value coefficient and odor contribution based on binary interaction effects in waste disposal plant

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Chuandong; Liu, Jiemin; Yan, Luchun; Chen, Haiying; Shao, Huiqi; Meng, Tian

    2015-02-01

    Odor activity value (OAV) has been widely used for the assessment of odor pollution from various sources. However, little attention has been paid to the extreme OAV variation and potential inaccuracies of odor contribution assessment caused by odor interaction effects. The objective of this study is to assess the odor interaction effect for precise assessment of odor contribution. In this paper, samples were collected from a food waste disposal plant, and analyzed by instrumental and olfactory method to conclude odorants' occurrence and OAV. Then odor activity value coefficient (γ) was first proposed to evaluate the type and the level of binary interaction effects based on determination of OAV variation. By multiplying OAV and γ, odor activity factor (OAF) was used to reflect the real OAV. Correlation between the sum of OAF and odor concentration reached 80.0 ± 5.7%, which was 10 times higher than the sum of OAV used before. Results showed that hydrogen sulfide contributed most (annual average 66.4 ± 15.8%) to odor pollution in the waste disposal plant. However, as odor intensity of samples in summer rising, odor contribution of trimethylamine increased to 48.3 ± 3.7% by the strong synergistic interaction effect, while odor contribution of phenol decreased to 0.1 ± 0.02% for the increasing antagonistic interaction effect.

  13. Activity of neuromuscular compartments in lateral gastrocnemius evoked by postural corrections during stance.

    PubMed

    Dunbar, D C; Macpherson, J M

    1993-12-01

    1. The electromyographic (EMG) activity of the four neuromuscular compartments in lateral gastrocnemius (LG) of cats was investigated to determine whether these intramuscular subdivisions could be activated differentially during automatic postural corrections. EMG electrodes were surgically implanted into each of the four compartments of left LG-LG1, LG2, LG3, and LGm--in two cats. Electrodes were also implanted into soleus and gluteus medius for comparative purposes. 2. Quiet quadrupedal stance was disturbed first by linearly translating the cats on a movable platform in each of 16 different horizontal directions. Mechanical events during corrections were characterized in terms of the three-dimensional forces exerted by each paw on the platform. EMG and force traces were quantified (area under the curve) and normalized, and tuning curves were constructed that relate muscle response and force change to direction of platform movement. 3. In a second series of trials, translations were presented along one direction only over a series of six velocities ranging from 5 to 16 cm/s. The third series of perturbations, termed the pop-up, consisted of a rapid upward displacement of the support under the left hindlimb only over a series of six amplitudes ranging from 1 to 10 mm. Evoked EMG activity and average change in force were normalized and regressions were computed onto velocity and amplitude, respectively. The slopes of the regressions were compared. 4. EMG tuning curves associated with the multidirectional horizontal translations revealed no differential activity across LG compartments. Similarly, there was no statistical difference among the slopes of the regressions within LG. In contrast, soleus exhibited significantly different slopes from LG for the regressions. Thus it is concluded that LG compartments are not differentially activated during automatic postural responses to perturbations of the support surface.

  14. Active shape correction of a thin glass/plastic x-ray mirror

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Spiga, D.; Barbera, M.; Basso, S.; Civitani, M.; Collura, A.; Dell'Agostino, S.; Lo Cicero, U.; Lullo, G.; Pelliciari, C.; Riva, M.; Salmaso, B.; Sciortino, L.

    2014-09-01

    Optics for future X-ray telescopes will be characterized by very large aperture and focal length, and will be made of lightweight materials like glass or plastic in order to keep the total mass within acceptable limits. Optics based on thin slumped glass foils are currently in use in the NuSTAR telescope and are being developed at various institutes like INAF/OAB, aiming at improving the angular resolution to a few arcsec HEW. Another possibility would be the use of thin plastic foils, being developed at SAO and the Palermo University. Even if relevant progresses in the achieved angular resolution were recently made, a viable possibility to further improve the mirror figure would be the application of piezoelectric actuators onto the non-optical side of the mirrors. In fact, thin mirrors are prone to deform, so they require a careful integration to avoid deformations and even correct forming errors. This however offers the possibility to actively correct the residual deformation. Even if other groups are already at work on this idea, we are pursuing the concept of active integration of thin glass or plastic foils with piezoelectric patches, fed by voltages driven by the feedback provided by X-rays, in intra-focal setup at the XACT facility at INAF/OAPA. In this work, we show the preliminary simulations and the first steps taken in this project.

  15. Personal dose-equivalent conversion coefficients for 1252 radionuclides.

    PubMed

    Otto, Thomas

    2016-01-01

    Dose conversion coefficients for radionuclides are useful for routine calculations in radiation protection in industry, medicine and research. They give a simple and often sufficient estimate of dose rates during production, handling and storage of radionuclide sources, based solely on the source's activity. The latest compilation of such conversion coefficients dates from 20 y ago, based on nuclear decay data published 30 y ago. The present publication provides radionuclide-specific conversion coefficients to personal dose based on the most recent evaluations of nuclear decay data for 1252 radionuclides and fluence-to-dose-equivalent conversion coefficients for monoenergetic radiations. It contains previously unknown conversion coefficients for >400 nuclides and corrects those conversion coefficients that were based on erroneous decay schemes. For the first time, estimates for the protection quantity Hp(3) are included.

  16. Correction: Enhanced photocatalytic activity of a self-stabilized synthetic flavin anchored on a TiO2 surface.

    PubMed

    Pandiri, Manjula; Shaham-Waldmann, Nurit; Hossain, Mohammad S; Foss, Frank W; Rajeshwar, Krishnan; Paz, Yaron

    2016-09-14

    Correction for 'Enhanced photocatalytic activity of a self-stabilized synthetic flavin anchored on a TiO2 surface' by Manjula Pandiri et al., Phys. Chem. Chem. Phys., 2016, 18, 18575-18583. PMID:27509005

  17. The Diet Quality of Competitive Adolescent Male Rugby Union Players with Energy Balance Estimated Using Different Physical Activity Coefficients

    PubMed Central

    Burrows, Tracy; Harries, Simon K.; Williams, Rebecca L.; Lum, Cheryl; Callister, Robin

    2016-01-01

    Objectives: The aims of the current study were to comprehensively assess the dietary intakes and diet quality of a sample of Australian competitive adolescent rugby union players and compare these intakes with National and Sports Dietitians Association (SDA) Recommendations for adolescent athletes. A secondary aim investigated applying different physical activity level (PAL) coefficients to determine total energy expenditure (TEE) in order to more effectively evaluate the adequacy of energy intakes. Design: Cross-sectional. Methods: Anthropometrics and dietary intakes were assessed in 25 competitive adolescent male rugby union players (14 to 18 years old). Diet was assessed using the validated Australian Eating Survey (AES) food frequency questionnaire and diet quality was assessed through the Australian Recommended Food Score. Results: The median dietary intakes of participants met national recommendations for percent energy (% E) from carbohydrate, protein and total fat, but not carbohydrate intake when evaluated as g/day as proposed in SDA guidelines. Median intakes of fibre and micronutrients including calcium and iron also met national recommendations. Overall diet quality was classified as ‘good’ with a median diet quality score of 34 (out of a possible 73); however, there was a lack of variety within key food groups including carbohydrates and proteins. Non-core food consumption exceeded recommended levels at 38% of the daily total energy intake, with substantial contributions from takeaway foods and sweetened beverages. A PAL coefficient of 1.2–1.4 was found to best balance the energy intakes of these players in their pre-season. Conclusions: Adolescent rugby players met the percent energy recommendations for macronutrients and attained an overall ‘good’ diet quality score. However, it was identified that when compared to specific recommendations for athletes, carbohydrate intakes were below recommendations and these players in their pre

  18. Bub1 kinase activity drives error correction and mitotic checkpoint control but not tumor suppression

    PubMed Central

    Ricke, Robin M.; Jeganathan, Karthik B.; Malureanu, Liviu; Harrison, Andrew M.

    2012-01-01

    The mitotic checkpoint protein Bub1 is essential for embryogenesis and survival of proliferating cells, and bidirectional deviations from its normal level of expression cause chromosome missegregation, aneuploidy, and cancer predisposition in mice. To provide insight into the physiological significance of this critical mitotic regulator at a modular level, we generated Bub1 mutant mice that lack kinase activity using a knockin gene-targeting approach that preserves normal protein abundance. In this paper, we uncover that Bub1 kinase activity integrates attachment error correction and mitotic checkpoint signaling by controlling the localization and activity of Aurora B kinase through phosphorylation of histone H2A at threonine 121. Strikingly, despite substantial chromosome segregation errors and aneuploidization, mice deficient for Bub1 kinase activity do not exhibit increased susceptibility to spontaneous or carcinogen-induced tumorigenesis. These findings provide a unique example of a modular mitotic activity orchestrating two distinct networks that safeguard against whole chromosome instability and reveal the differential importance of distinct aneuploidy-causing Bub1 defects in tumor suppression. PMID:23209306

  19. PO-CALC: a novel tool to correct common inconsistencies in the measurement of phenoloxidase activity.

    PubMed

    Kohlmeier, Philip; Dreyer, Heiko; Meunier, Joël

    2015-04-01

    A broad range of physiological and evolutionarily studies requires standard and robust methods to assess the strength and activity of an individual's immune defense. In insects, this goal is generally reached by spectrophotometrically measuring (pro-) phenoloxidase activity, an enzymatic and non-specific process activated after wounding and parasite infections. However, the literature surprisingly lacks a standard method to calculate these values from spectrophotometer data and thus to be able to compare results across studies. In this study, we demonstrated that nine methods commonly used to extract phenoloxidase activities (1) provide inconsistent results when tested on the same data sets, at least partly due to their specific sensitivity to the noise regularly present in enzymatic reaction curves. To circumvent this issue, we then (2) developed a novel, free and simple R-based program called PO-CALC and (3) demonstrated the robustness of its calculations for the different types of noises. Overall, we show that PO-CALC corrects overlooked though important inconsistencies in the measurement of phenoloxidase activities, and claim that its broad use would increase the significance and general validity of studies on invertebrate immunity. PMID:25783957

  20. [Estimation of Diffuse Attenuation Coefficient of Photosynthetically Active Radiation in Xin'anjiang Reservoir Based on Landsat 8 Data].

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yi-bo; Zhang, Yun-lin; Zha, Yong; Shi, Kun; Zhou, Yong-qiang; Liu, Ming-liang

    2015-12-01

    Photosynthetically active radiation (PAR) is defined as the wavelength band of 400 to 700 nm, representing most of the visible solar radiation that could be used for photosynthesis. PAR is attenuated by the absorption and scattering of nonpigment suspended matter, chromophoric dissolved organic matter and phytoplankton, and it plays an important role in determining the density and distribution of aquatic organisms. This study developed an empirical model and presented the spatial-temporal distribution of PAR diffuse attenuation coefficient [Kd (PAR)] for the slightly turbid Xin'anjiang Reservoir based on the in situ ground data and the matching Landsat 8 data. The results showed that the three-hand combinational model of Kd ( PAR) using Band 2, Band 3 and Band 8 could give a reasonable and acceptable estimation accuracy with a determination coefficient of 0. 87. Independent dataset was used to validate the model with a mean relative error of 9.16% and a root mean square error of 0.06 m⁻¹. Therefore, the three-band combination using Landsat 8 data could be used to accurately estimate Kd (PAR) in the slightly turbid Xin'anjiang Reservoir. Kd (PAR) exhibited significant seasonal and spatial differences. Kd (PAR) was higher in autumn (September-November) and summer (June-August) with the average Kd (PAR) of (0.82 ± 0.60) m⁻¹ and (0.77 ± 0.41) m⁻¹, but lower in winter (December-February) and spring (March-May) with the average Kd (PAR) of (0.56 ± 0.50) m⁻¹ and (0.40 ± 0.45 ) m⁻¹, respectively. Spatially, Kd (PAR) ranged from 0.002 to 13.86 m⁻¹ with an average of (0.64 ± 0.49) m⁻¹. The temporal heterogeneity of Kd (PAR) was mainly caused by the seasonal rainfall and seasonal growth of phytoplankton. The spatial heterogeneity was mainly caused by suspended matter concentration derived from watershed inputs and human dredging activity. PMID:27011976

  1. THE CALCULATION OF BURNABLE POISON CORRECTION FACTORS FOR PWR FRESH FUEL ACTIVE COLLAR MEASUREMENTS

    SciTech Connect

    Croft, Stephen; Favalli, Andrea; Swinhoe, Martyn T.

    2012-06-19

    Verification of commercial low enriched uranium light water reactor fuel takes place at the fuel fabrication facility as part of the overall international nuclear safeguards solution to the civilian use of nuclear technology. The fissile mass per unit length is determined nondestructively by active neutron coincidence counting using a neutron collar. A collar comprises four slabs of high density polyethylene that surround the assembly. Three of the slabs contain {sup 3}He filled proportional counters to detect time correlated fission neutrons induced by an AmLi source placed in the fourth slab. Historically, the response of a particular collar design to a particular fuel assembly type has been established by careful cross-calibration to experimental absolute calibrations. Traceability exists to sources and materials held at Los Alamos National Laboratory for over 35 years. This simple yet powerful approach has ensured consistency of application. Since the 1980's there has been a steady improvement in fuel performance. The trend has been to higher burn up. This requires the use of both higher initial enrichment and greater concentrations of burnable poisons. The original analytical relationships to correct for varying fuel composition are consequently being challenged because the experimental basis for them made use of fuels of lower enrichment and lower poison content than is in use today and is envisioned for use in the near term. Thus a reassessment of the correction factors is needed. Experimental reassessment is expensive and time consuming given the great variation between fuel assemblies in circulation. Fortunately current modeling methods enable relative response functions to be calculated with high accuracy. Hence modeling provides a more convenient and cost effective means to derive correction factors which are fit for purpose with confidence. In this work we use the Monte Carlo code MCNPX with neutron coincidence tallies to calculate the influence of Gd

  2. Decreased-activity mutants of phosphoglucose isomerase in the cytosol and chloroplast of Clarkia xantiana. Impact on mass-action ratios and fluxes to sucrose and starch, and estimation of Flux Control Coefficients and Elasticity Coefficients.

    PubMed Central

    Kruckeberg, A L; Neuhaus, H E; Feil, R; Gottlieb, L D; Stitt, M

    1989-01-01

    1. Subcellular-compartment-specific decreased-activity mutants of phosphoglucose isomerase in Clarkia xantiana were used to analyse the control of sucrose and starch synthesis during photosynthesis. Mutants were available in which the plastid phosphoglucose isomerase complement is decreased to 75% or 50% of the wild-type level, and the cytosol complement to 64%, 36% or 18% of the wild-type level. 2. The effects on the [product]/[substrate] ratio and on fluxes to sucrose or starch and the rate of photosynthesis were studied with the use of saturating or limiting light intensity to impose a high or low flux through these pathways. 3. Removal of a small fraction of either phosphoglucose isomerase leads to a significant shift of the [product]/[substrate] ratio away, from equilibrium. We conclude that there is no 'excess' of enzyme over that needed to maintain its reactants reasonably close to equilibrium. 4. Decreased phosphoglucose isomerase activity can also alter the fluxes to starch or sucrose. However, the effect on flux does not correlate with the extent of disequilibrium, and also varies depending on the subcellular compartment and on the conditions. 5. The results were used to estimate Flux Control Coefficients for the chloroplast and cytosolic phosphoglucose isomerases. The chloroplast isoenzyme exerts control on the rate of starch synthesis and on photosynthesis in saturating light intensity and CO2, but not at low light intensity. The cytosolic enzyme only exerts significant control when its complement is decreased 3-5-fold, and differs from the plastid isoenzyme in exerting more control in low light intensity. It has a positive Control Coefficient for sucrose synthesis, and a negative Control Coefficient for starch synthesis. 6. The Elasticity Coefficients in vivo of the cytosolic phosphoglucose isomerase were estimated to lie between 5 and 8 in the wild-type. They decrease in mutants with a lowered complement of cytosolic phosphoglucose isomerase. 7. The

  3. Methods of InSAR atmosphere correction for volcano activity monitoring

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Gong, W.; Meyer, F.; Webley, P.W.; Lu, Zhiming

    2011-01-01

    When a Synthetic Aperture Radar (SAR) signal propagates through the atmosphere on its path to and from the sensor, it is inevitably affected by atmospheric effects. In particular, the applicability and accuracy of Interferometric SAR (InSAR) techniques for volcano monitoring is limited by atmospheric path delays. Therefore, atmospheric correction of interferograms is required to improve the performance of InSAR for detecting volcanic activity, especially in order to advance its ability to detect subtle pre-eruptive changes in deformation dynamics. In this paper, we focus on InSAR tropospheric mitigation methods and their performance in volcano deformation monitoring. Our study areas include Okmok volcano and Unimak Island located in the eastern Aleutians, AK. We explore two methods to mitigate atmospheric artifacts, namely the numerical weather model simulation and the atmospheric filtering using Persistent Scatterer processing. We investigate the capability of the proposed methods, and investigate their limitations and advantages when applied to determine volcanic processes. ?? 2011 IEEE.

  4. Limiting activity coefficients of aqueous flavour systems at 298 K by the group contribution solvation (GCS) model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nanu, Diana E.; de Loos, Theodoor W.

    In this work a new approach for using the GCS model is applied to predict the infinite dilution activity coefficients, γ∞, for aroma compounds in water. It involves the use of a better expression for the combinatorial contribution to γ∞, and a different treatment of the values of the α-scaling factors used in the cavity size definition in the quantum chemical solvation calculations. The α values for each functional group in the solvation calculations in water are optimized based on few experimental data of γ∞. The present approach is applied for describing aqueous systems of n-alkanols and methyl-ketones. The results discussed here show that the predicted γ∞ values are within the experimental accuracy for most of the compounds, and are more accurate than predictions using the classical UNIFAC-type group contribution models. Furthermore, a simple group contribution approach was developed based on quantum-computed quantities, which makes it possible to extend the applicability of the model without expensive quantum calculations. It is shown that such an approach is able to describe γ∞ well, even for larger systems.

  5. EFFECTS OF COVAPORS ON ADSORPTION RATE COEFFICIENTS OF ORGANIC VAPORS ADSORBED ONTO ACTIVATED CARBON FROM FLOWING AIR

    SciTech Connect

    G. WOOD

    2000-12-01

    Published breakthrough time, adsorption rate, and capacity data for components of organic vapor mixtures adsorbed from flows through fixed activated carbon beds have been analyzed. Capacities (as stoichiometric centers of constant pattern breakthrough curves) yielded stoichiometric times {tau}, which are useful for determining elution orders of mixture components. We also calculated adsorption rate coefficients k{sub v} of the Wheeler (or, more general Reaction Kinetic) breakthrough curve equation, when not reported, from breakthrough times and {tau}. Ninety-five k{sub v} (in mixture)/ k{sub v} (single vapor) ratios at similar vapor concentrations were calculated and averaged for elution order categories. For 43 first-eluting vapors the average ratio (1.07) was statistically no different (0.21 standard deviation) than unity, so that we recommend using the single-vapor k{sub v} for such. Forty-seven second-eluting vapor ratios averaged 0.85 (0.24 standard deviation), also not significantly different from unity; however, other evidence and considerations lead us recommend using k{sub v} (in mixture) = 0.85 k{sub v} (single vapor). Five third- and fourth-eluting vapors gave an average of 0.56 (0.16 standard deviation) for a recommended k{sub v} (in mixture) = 0.56 k{sub v} (single vapor) for such.

  6. Vapor-liquid activity coefficients for methanol and ethanol from heat of solution data: application to steam-methane reforming.

    PubMed

    Kunz, R G; Baade, W F

    2001-11-16

    This paper presents equations and curves to calculate vapor-liquid phase equilibria for methanol and ethanol in dilute aqueous solution as a function of temperature, using activity coefficients at infinite dilution. These thermodynamic functions were originally derived to assess the distribution of by-product contaminants in the process condensate and the steam-system deaerator of a hydrogen plant [Paper ENV-00-171 presented at the NPRA 2000 Environmental Conference, San Antonio, TX, 10-12 September 2000], but have general applicability to other systems as well. The functions and calculation method described here are a necessary piece of an overall prediction technique to estimate atmospheric emissions from the deaerator-vent when the process condensate is recycled as boiler feed water (BFW) make-up. Having such an estimation technique is of particular significance at this time because deaerator-vent emissions are already coming under regulatory scrutiny in California [Emissions from Hydrogen Plant Process Vents, Adopted 21 January 2000] followed closely elsewhere in the US, and eventually worldwide. The overall technique will enable a permit applicant to estimate environmental emissions to comply with upcoming regulations, and a regulatory agency to evaluate those estimates. It may also be useful to process engineers as a tool to estimate contaminant concentrations and flow rates in internal process streams such as the steam-generating system. Metallurgists and corrosion engineers might be able to use the results for materials selection.

  7. Effects of methodological variation on assessment of riboflavin status using the erythrocyte glutathione reductase activation coefficient assay.

    PubMed

    Hill, Marilyn H E; Bradley, Angela; Mushtaq, Sohail; Williams, Elizabeth A; Powers, Hilary J

    2009-07-01

    Riboflavin status is usually measured as the in vitro stimulation with flavin adenine dinucleotide of the erythrocyte enzyme glutathione reductase, and expressed as an erythrocyte glutathione reductase activation coefficient (EGRAC). This method is used for the National Diet and Nutrition Surveys (NDNS) of the UK. In the period between the 1990 and 2003 surveys of UK adults, the estimated prevalence of riboflavin deficiency, expressed as an EGRAC value > or = 1.30, increased from 2 to 46 % in males and from 1 to 34 % in females. We hypothesised that subtle but important differences in the detail of the methodology between the two NDNS accounted for this difference. We carried out an evaluation of the performance of the methods used in the two NDNS and compared against an 'in-house' method, using blood samples collected from a riboflavin intervention study. Results indicated that the method used for the 1990 NDNS gave a significantly lower mean EGRAC value than both the 2003 NDNS method and the 'in-house' method (P < 0.0001). The key differences between the methods relate to the concentration of FAD used in the assay and the duration of the period of incubation of FAD with enzyme. The details of the EGRAC method should be standardised for use in different laboratories and over time. Additionally, it is proposed that consideration be given to re-evaluating the basis of the EGRAC threshold for riboflavin deficiency.

  8. MR-based motion correction for PET imaging using wired active MR microcoils in simultaneous PET-MR: Phantom study

    SciTech Connect

    Huang, Chuan; Brady, Thomas J.; El Fakhri, Georges; Ouyang, Jinsong; Ackerman, Jerome L.; Petibon, Yoann

    2014-04-15

    Purpose: Artifacts caused by head motion present a major challenge in brain positron emission tomography (PET) imaging. The authors investigated the feasibility of using wired active MR microcoils to track head motion and incorporate the measured rigid motion fields into iterative PET reconstruction. Methods: Several wired active MR microcoils and a dedicated MR coil-tracking sequence were developed. The microcoils were attached to the outer surface of an anthropomorphic{sup 18}F-filled Hoffman phantom to mimic a brain PET scan. Complex rotation/translation motion of the phantom was induced by a balloon, which was connected to a ventilator. PET list-mode and MR tracking data were acquired simultaneously on a PET-MR scanner. The acquired dynamic PET data were reconstructed iteratively with and without motion correction. Additionally, static phantom data were acquired and used as the gold standard. Results: Motion artifacts in PET images were effectively removed by wired active MR microcoil based motion correction. Motion correction yielded an activity concentration bias ranging from −0.6% to 3.4% as compared to a bias ranging from −25.0% to 16.6% if no motion correction was applied. The contrast recovery values were improved by 37%–156% with motion correction as compared to no motion correction. The image correlation (mean ± standard deviation) between the motion corrected (uncorrected) images of 20 independent noise realizations and static reference was R{sup 2} = 0.978 ± 0.007 (0.588 ± 0.010, respectively). Conclusions: Wired active MR microcoil based motion correction significantly improves brain PET quantitative accuracy and image contrast.

  9. In vivo correction of COX deficiency by activation of the AMPK/PGC-1α axis.

    PubMed

    Viscomi, Carlo; Bottani, Emanuela; Civiletto, Gabriele; Cerutti, Raffaele; Moggio, Maurizio; Fagiolari, Gigliola; Schon, Eric A; Lamperti, Costanza; Zeviani, Massimo

    2011-07-01

    Increased mitochondrial biogenesis by activation of PPAR- or AMPK/PGC-1α-dependent homeostatic pathways has been proposed as a treatment for mitochondrial disease. We tested this hypothesis on three recombinant mouse models characterized by defective cytochrome c-oxidase (COX) activity: a knockout (KO) mouse for Surf1, a knockout/knockin mouse for Sco2, and a muscle-restricted KO mouse for Cox15. First, we demonstrated that double-recombinant animals overexpressing PGC-1α in skeletal muscle on a Surf1 KO background showed robust induction of mitochondrial biogenesis and increase of mitochondrial respiratory chain activities, including COX. No such effect was obtained by treating both Surf1(-/-) and Cox15(-/-) mice with the pan-PPAR agonist bezafibrate, which instead showed adverse effects in either model. Contrariwise, treatment with the AMPK agonist AICAR led to partial correction of COX deficiency in all three models, and, importantly, significant motor improvement up to normal in the Sco2(KO/KI) mouse. These results open new perspectives for therapy of mitochondrial disease. PMID:21723506

  10. Activity of red nucleus neurons in the cat during postural corrections

    PubMed Central

    Zelenin, P. V.; Beloozerova, I. N.; Sirota, M. G.; Orlovsky, G. N.; Deliagina, T. G.

    2010-01-01

    The dorsal-side-up body posture in standing quadrupeds is maintained by the postural system, which includes spinal and supraspinal mechanisms driven by somatosensory inputs from the limbs. A number of descending tracts can transmit suprasinal commands for postural corrections. The first aim of this study was to understand whether the rubrospinal tract participates in their transmission. We recorded activity of red nucleus neurons (RNNs) in the cat maintaining balance on the periodically tilting platform. Most neurons were identified as rubrospinal ones. It was found that many RNNs were profoundly modulated by tilts, suggesting that they transmit postural commands. The second aim of this study was to examine the contribution of sensory inputs from individual limbs to posture-related RNNs modulation. Each RNN was recorded during standing on all four limbs, as well as when two or three limbs were lifted from the platform and could not signal platform displacements. By comparing RNN responses in different tests, we found that the amplitude and phase of responses in the majority of RNNs were determined primarily by sensory input from the corresponding (fore or hind) contralateral limb, whereas inputs from other limbs made a much smaller contribution to RNNs modulation. These findings suggest that the rubrospinal system is primarily involved in the intra-limb postural coordination, i.e., in the feedback control of the corresponding limb and, to a lesser extent, in the inter-limb coordination. This study provides a new insight into the formation of supraspinal motor commands for postural corrections. PMID:20980611

  11. Linear solvation energy relationship of the limiting partition coefficient of organic solutes between water and activated carbon

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Luehrs, Dean C.; Hickey, James P.; Nilsen, Peter E.; Godbole, K.A.; Rogers, Tony N.

    1995-01-01

    A linear solvation energy relationship has been found for 353 values of the limiting adsorption coefficients of diverse chemicals:  log K = −0.37 + 0.0341Vi − 1.07β + D + 0.65P with R = 0.951, s = 0.51, n = 353, and F = 818.0, where Vi is the intrinsic molar volume; β is a measure of the hydrogen bond acceptor strength of the solute; D is an index parameter for the research group which includes the effects of the different types of carbon used, the temperature, and the length of time allowed for the adsorption equilibrium to be established; and P is an index parameter for the flatness of the molecule. P is defined to be unity if there is an aromatic system in the molecule or if there is a double bond or series of conjugated double bonds with no more that one non-hydrogen atom beyond the double bond and zero otherwise. A slightly better fit is obtained if the two-thirds power of Vi is used as a measure of the surface area in place of the volume term:  log K = −1.75 + 0.227V2/3 − 1.10β + D + 0.60P with R = 0.954, s = 0.49, n = 353, and F = 895.39. This is the first quantitative measure of the effect of the shape of the molecule on its tendency to be adsorbed on activated carbon.

  12. Amorphous silica solubilities—III. Activity coefficient relations and predictions of solubility behavior in salt solutions, 0-350°C

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marshall, William L.

    1980-07-01

    Activity coefficients of amorphous silica in added salt solutions, obtained from solubility measurements, were calculated on the basis of concentration (molarity) and composition (molality). The logarithm of the activity coefficients based on concentration when plotted against molarity of added salt, as previous observations would dictate, yielded straight line relations even to 6 M. The use of composition units produced instead curves at the highest molalities and caused divergences in behavior from the single straight lines for 1-1 salts of a common cation. Introduction of the activity of water also caused divergences in behavior. Thus, it might appear that amorphous silica is fully hydrated at 25°C as a solid in equilibrium with solution. Lack of densities of aqueous sodium nitrate necessitated using units of molality in interpretations at high temperatures. Nevertheless, approximately straight line behavior of log activity coefficient vs m was still observed to reasonably high molalities, and allowed a simple equation to describe activity coefficient behavior as a function of both molality of sodium nitrate and temperature. The simplicity of the relation, with some assumptions, might be used to predict solubility of amorphous silica at high temperatures in other added aqueous salt solutions.

  13. [A new correction method for radionuclide formation in neutron activation analysis using a reactor power meter coupled with a microcomputer].

    PubMed

    Hirai, S; Yoshino, Y; Suzuki, S; Horiuchi, N

    1982-05-01

    Neutron flux and irradiation time should be accurately known in neutron activation analysis using very short lived nuclides in which conventional monitoring methods i.e., a comparator method, flux monitor method and so on cannot be used satisfactorily. Especially, fluctuation of neutron flux has not been corrected. We noted a change of reactor power at a pneumatic operation, and found out a new correction method for its correction in activation analysis. In our small nuclear reactor, TRIGA-II, the reactor power increased rapidly a few % when a pneumatic-operated capsule arrived at a core of the reactor, and decreased when the capsule left from the core. If the duration between these two changes of the reactor power is equal to the irradiation time, and that the reactor power is proportional to the neutron flux, we can regard an activity formation as a time integration of the reactor power. Then, the correction system was made of a reactor power meter, a V-F converter (voltage to frequency converter), a clock time, a counter, a microcomputer, electric circuits and so on. The signal of the reactor power during the irradiation was counted through the V-F converter, and was accumulated in a memory of the microcomputer. The neutron fluence was calculated in this microcomputer. This method was examined by means of activation of copper and selenium standard samples by 9-11 sec irradiations. The observed activity involved +/- 10% error. However, the error in the corrected activity was decreased to a few % using this correction method. As a result, we found that this method can be used to obtain accurate value for radionuclide formation.

  14. Control of Dual-Opposed Stirling Convertors with Active Power Factor Correction Controllers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Regan, Timothy F.; Lewandowski, Edward J.; Schreiber, Jeffrey G.

    2006-01-01

    When using recently-developed active power factor correction (APFC) controllers in power systems comprised of dual-opposed free-piston Stirling convertors, a variety of configurations of the convertors and controller(s) can be considered, with configuration ultimately selected based on benefits of efficiency, reliability, and robust operation. The configuration must not only achieve stable control of the two convertors, but also synchronize and regulate motion of the pistons to minimize net dynamic forces. The NASA Glenn Research Center (GRC) System Dynamic Model (SDM) was used to study ten configurations of dual-opposed convertor systems. These configurations considered one controller with the alternators connected in series or in parallel, and two controllers with the alternators not connected (isolated). For the configurations where the alternators were not connected, several different approaches were evaluated to synchronize the two convertors. In addition, two thermodynamic configurations were considered: two convertors with isolated working spaces and convertors with a shared expansion space. Of the ten configurations studied, stable operating modes were found for four. Three of those four had a common expansion space. One stable configuration was found for the dual-opposed convertors with separate working spaces. That configuration required isochronous control of both convertors, and two APFC controllers were used to accomplish this. A frequency/phase control loop was necessary to allow each APFC controller to synchronize its associated convertor with a common frequency.

  15. Control of Dual-Opposed Stirling Convertors with Active Power Factor Correction Controllers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Regan, Timothy F.; Lewandowski, Edward J.; Schreiber, Jeffrey G.

    2007-01-01

    When using recently-developed active power factor correction (APFC) controllers in power systems comprised of dual-opposed free-piston Stirling convertors, a variety of configurations of the convertors and controller(s) can be considered, with configuration ultimately selected based on benefits of efficiency, reliability, and robust operation. The configuration must not only achieve stable control of the two convertors, but also synchronize and regulate motion of the pistons to minimize net dynamic forces. The NASA Glenn Research Center (GRC) System Dynamic Model (SDM) was used to study ten configurations of dual-opposed convertor systems. These configurations considered one controller with the alternators connected in series or in parallel, and two controllers with the alternators not connected (isolated). For the configurations where the alternators were not connected, several different approaches were evaluated to synchronize the two convertors. In addition, two thermodynamic configurations were considered: two convertors with isolated working spaces and convertors with a shared expansion space. Of the ten configurations studied, stable operating modes were found for four. Three of those four had a common expansion space. One stable configuration was found for the dual-opposed convertors with separate working spaces. That configuration required isochronous control of both convertors, and two APFC controllers were used to accomplish this. A frequency/phase control loop was necessary to allow each APFC controller to synchronize its associated convertor with a common frequency.

  16. Intelligent error correction method applied on an active pixel sensor based star tracker

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schmidt, Uwe

    2005-10-01

    Star trackers are opto-electronic sensors used on-board of satellites for the autonomous inertial attitude determination. During the last years star trackers became more and more important in the field of the attitude and orbit control system (AOCS) sensors. High performance star trackers are based up today on charge coupled device (CCD) optical camera heads. The active pixel sensor (APS) technology, introduced in the early 90-ties, allows now the beneficial replacement of CCD detectors by APS detectors with respect to performance, reliability, power, mass and cost. The company's heritage in star tracker design started in the early 80-ties with the launch of the worldwide first fully autonomous star tracker system ASTRO1 to the Russian MIR space station. Jena-Optronik recently developed an active pixel sensor based autonomous star tracker "ASTRO APS" as successor of the CCD based star tracker product series ASTRO1, ASTRO5, ASTRO10 and ASTRO15. Key features of the APS detector technology are, a true xy-address random access, the multiple windowing read out and the on-chip signal processing including the analogue to digital conversion. These features can be used for robust star tracking at high slew rates and under worse conditions like stray light and solar flare induced single event upsets. A special algorithm have been developed to manage the typical APS detector error contributors like fixed pattern noise (FPN), dark signal non-uniformity (DSNU) and white spots. The algorithm works fully autonomous and adapts to e.g. increasing DSNU and up-coming white spots automatically without ground maintenance or re-calibration. In contrast to conventional correction methods the described algorithm does not need calibration data memory like full image sized calibration data sets. The application of the presented algorithm managing the typical APS detector error contributors is a key element for the design of star trackers for long term satellite applications like

  17. Active drag, useful mechanical power output and hydrodynamic force coefficient in different swimming strokes at maximal velocity.

    PubMed

    Kolmogorov, S V; Duplishcheva, O A

    1992-03-01

    By comparing the time of the same distance swum with and without an added resistance, under the assumption of an equal power output in both cases, the drag of 73 top swimmers was estimated. The active drag Fr(a.d.) at maximal swimming velocities varied considerably across strokes and individuals. In the females Fr(a.d.) ranged from 69.78 to 31.16 N in the front-crawl, from 83.04 to 37.78 N in dolphin, from 93.56 to 45.19 N in breaststroke, and from 65.51 to 37.79 N in back-stroke. In the males Fr(a.d.) ranged from 167.11 to 42.23 N in front-crawl, from 156.09 to 46.95 N in dolphin, from 176.87 to 55.61 N in breaststroke, and from 146.28 to 46.36 N in back-stroke. Also, the ratio of Fr(a.d.) to the passive drag Fr(a.d.) as determined for the analogical velocity in a tugging condition (in standard body position-front gliding) shows considerable individual variations. In the female swimmers variations in Fr(a.d.)/Fr(p.d.) ranged from 145.17 to 59.94% in front-crawl, from 192.39 to 85.57% in dolphin, from 298.03 to 124.50% in breaststroke, and from 162.87 to 85.61% in back-stroke. In the male swimmers variations in Fr(a.d.)/Fr(p.d.) ranged from 162.24 to 62.39% in front-crawl, from 191.70 to 70.38% in dolphin, from 295.57 to 102.83% in breaststroke, and from 198.82 to 74.48% in back-stroke. The main reason for such variations is found in the individual features of swimming technique and can be quantitatively estimated with the hydrodynamic force coefficient, which thus provides an adequate index of technique. PMID:1564064

  18. Osmotic and Activity Coefficients of the {xZnCl2 + (1 - x)ZnSO4}(aq) System at 298.15 K

    SciTech Connect

    Ninkovic, R; Miladinovic, J; Todorovic, M; Grujic, S; Rard, J A

    2006-06-27

    Isopiestic vapor pressure measurements were made for (xZnCl{sub 2} + (1 - x)ZnSO{sub 4})(aq) solutions with ZnCl{sub 2} molality fractions of x = (0, 0.3062, 0.5730, 0.7969, and 1) at the temperature 298.15 K, using KCl(aq) as the reference standard. These measurements cover the water activity range 0.901-0.919 {le} a{sub w} {le} 0.978. The experimental osmotic coefficients were used to evaluate the parameters of an extended ion-interaction (Pitzer) model for these mixed electrolyte solutions. A similar analysis was made of the available activity data for ZnCl{sub 2}(aq) at 298.15 K, while assuming the presence of equilibrium amounts of ZnCl{sup +}(aq) ion-pairs, to derive the ion-interaction parameters for the hypothetical pure binary electrolytes (Zn{sup 2+}, 2Cl{sup -}) and (ZnCl{sup +},Cl{sup -}). These parameters are required for the analysis of the mixture results. Although significant concentrations of higher-order zinc chloride complexes may also be present in these solutions, it was possible to represent the osmotic coefficients accurately by explicitly including only the predominant complex ZnCl{sup +}(aq) and the completely dissociated ions. The ionic activity coefficients and osmotic coefficients were calculated over the investigated molality range using the evaluated extended Pitzer model parameters.

  19. Gas-phase rate coefficients for the reactions of NO 3, OH and O 3 with α, β-unsaturated esters and ketones: Structure-activity relations (SARs)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pfrang, Christian; King, Martin D.; Canosa-Mas, Carlos E.; Flugge, Mark; Wayne, Richard P.

    Gas-phase rate coefficients for the atmospherically important reactions of NO 3, OH and O 3 are predicted for 55 α, β-unsaturated esters and ketones. The rate coefficients were calculated using a correlation described previously [Pfrang, C., King, M.D., C. E. Canosa-Mas, C.E., Wayne, R.P., 2006. Atmospheric Environment 40, 1170-1179]. These rate coefficients were used to extend structure-activity relations for predicting the rate coefficients for the reactions of NO 3, OH or O 3 with alkenes to include α, β-unsaturated esters and ketones. Conjugation of an alkene with an α, β-keto or α, β-ester group will reduce the value of a rate coefficient by a factor of ˜110, ˜2.5 and ˜12 for reaction with NO 3, OH or O 3, respectively. The actual identity of the alkyl group, R, in -C(O)R or -C(O)OR has only a small influence. An assessment of the reliability of the SAR is given that demonstrates that it is useful for reactions involving NO 3 and OH, but less valuable for those of O 3 or peroxy nitrate esters.

  20. Warm-up with weighted bat and adjustment of upper limb muscle activity in bat swinging under movement correction conditions.

    PubMed

    Ohta, Yoichi; Ishii, Yasumitsu; Ikudome, Sachi; Nakamoto, Hiroki

    2014-02-01

    The effects of weighted bat warm-up on adjustment of upper limb muscle activity were investigated during baseball bat swinging under dynamic conditions that require a spatial and temporal adjustment of the swinging to hit a moving target. Seven male college baseball players participated in this study. Using a batting simulator, the task was to swing the standard bat coincident with the arrival timing and position of a moving target after three warm-up swings using a standard or weighted bat. There was no significant effect of weighted bat warm-up on muscle activity before impact associated with temporal or spatial movement corrections. However, lower inhibition of the extensor carpi ulnaris muscle activity was observed in a velocity-changed condition in the weighted bat warm-up, as compared to a standard bat warm-up. It is suggested that weighted bat warm-up decreases the adjustment ability associated with inhibition of muscle activation under movement correction conditions.

  1. Oxygen exchange at gas/oxide interfaces: how the apparent activation energy of the surface exchange coefficient depends on the kinetic regime.

    PubMed

    Fielitz, Peter; Borchardt, Günter

    2016-08-10

    In the dedicated literature the oxygen surface exchange coefficient KO and the equilibrium oxygen exchange rate [Fraktur R] are considered to be directly proportional to each other regardless of the experimental circumstances. Recent experimental observations, however, contradict the consequences of this assumption. Most surprising is the finding that the apparent activation energy of KO depends dramatically on the kinetic regime in which it has been determined, i.e. surface exchange controlled vs. mixed or diffusion controlled. This work demonstrates how the diffusion boundary condition at the gas/solid interface inevitably entails a correlation between the oxygen surface exchange coefficient KO and the oxygen self-diffusion coefficient DO in the bulk ("on top" of the correlation between KO and [Fraktur R] for the pure surface exchange regime). The model can thus quantitatively explain the range of apparent activation energies measured in the different regimes: in the surface exchange regime the apparent activation energy only contains the contribution of the equilibrium exchange rate, whereas in the mixed or in the diffusion controlled regime the contribution of the oxygen self-diffusivity has also to be taken into account, which may yield significantly higher apparent activation energies and simultaneously quantifies the correlation KO ∝ DO(1/2) observed for a large number of oxides in the mixed or diffusion controlled regime, respectively.

  2. Oxygen exchange at gas/oxide interfaces: how the apparent activation energy of the surface exchange coefficient depends on the kinetic regime.

    PubMed

    Fielitz, Peter; Borchardt, Günter

    2016-08-10

    In the dedicated literature the oxygen surface exchange coefficient KO and the equilibrium oxygen exchange rate [Fraktur R] are considered to be directly proportional to each other regardless of the experimental circumstances. Recent experimental observations, however, contradict the consequences of this assumption. Most surprising is the finding that the apparent activation energy of KO depends dramatically on the kinetic regime in which it has been determined, i.e. surface exchange controlled vs. mixed or diffusion controlled. This work demonstrates how the diffusion boundary condition at the gas/solid interface inevitably entails a correlation between the oxygen surface exchange coefficient KO and the oxygen self-diffusion coefficient DO in the bulk ("on top" of the correlation between KO and [Fraktur R] for the pure surface exchange regime). The model can thus quantitatively explain the range of apparent activation energies measured in the different regimes: in the surface exchange regime the apparent activation energy only contains the contribution of the equilibrium exchange rate, whereas in the mixed or in the diffusion controlled regime the contribution of the oxygen self-diffusivity has also to be taken into account, which may yield significantly higher apparent activation energies and simultaneously quantifies the correlation KO ∝ DO(1/2) observed for a large number of oxides in the mixed or diffusion controlled regime, respectively. PMID:27460608

  3. Muscle activation characteristics of the front leg during baseball swings with timing correction for sudden velocity decrease.

    PubMed

    Ohta, Yoichi; Nakamoto, Hiroki; Ishii, Yasumitsu; Ikudome, Sachi; Takahashi, Kyohei; Shima, Norihiro

    2014-01-01

    This study aimed to clarify the activation characteristics of the vastus lateralis muscle in the front leg during timing correction for a sudden decrease in the velocity of a target during baseball swings. Eleven male collegiate baseball players performed coincident timing tasks that comprised constant velocity of 8 m/s (unchanged) and a sudden decrease in velocity from 8 to 4 m/s (decreased velocity). Electromyography (EMG) revealed that the muscle activation was typically monophasic when responding unchanged conditions. The type of muscle activation during swings in response to decreased velocity condition was both monophasic and biphasic. When biphasic activation appeared in response to decreased velocity, the impact time and the time to peak EMG amplitude were significantly prolonged and the timing error was significantly smaller than that of monophasic activation. However, the EMG onset from the target start was consistent both monophasic and biphasic activation in response to conditions of decreased velocity. In addition, batters with small timing errors in response to decreased velocity were more likely to generate biphasic EMG activation. These findings indicated that timing correction for a sudden decrease in the velocity of an oncoming target is achieved by modifying the muscle activation characteristics of the vastus lateralis muscle of front leg from monophasic to biphasic to delay reaching peak muscle activation and thus prolong impact time. Therefore, the present findings suggests that the extent of timing errors in response to decreased velocity is influenced by the ability to correct muscle activation after its initiation rather than by delaying the initiation timing of muscle activation during baseball swings.

  4. Muscle activation characteristics of the front leg during baseball swings with timing correction for sudden velocity decrease.

    PubMed

    Ohta, Yoichi; Nakamoto, Hiroki; Ishii, Yasumitsu; Ikudome, Sachi; Takahashi, Kyohei; Shima, Norihiro

    2014-01-01

    This study aimed to clarify the activation characteristics of the vastus lateralis muscle in the front leg during timing correction for a sudden decrease in the velocity of a target during baseball swings. Eleven male collegiate baseball players performed coincident timing tasks that comprised constant velocity of 8 m/s (unchanged) and a sudden decrease in velocity from 8 to 4 m/s (decreased velocity). Electromyography (EMG) revealed that the muscle activation was typically monophasic when responding unchanged conditions. The type of muscle activation during swings in response to decreased velocity condition was both monophasic and biphasic. When biphasic activation appeared in response to decreased velocity, the impact time and the time to peak EMG amplitude were significantly prolonged and the timing error was significantly smaller than that of monophasic activation. However, the EMG onset from the target start was consistent both monophasic and biphasic activation in response to conditions of decreased velocity. In addition, batters with small timing errors in response to decreased velocity were more likely to generate biphasic EMG activation. These findings indicated that timing correction for a sudden decrease in the velocity of an oncoming target is achieved by modifying the muscle activation characteristics of the vastus lateralis muscle of front leg from monophasic to biphasic to delay reaching peak muscle activation and thus prolong impact time. Therefore, the present findings suggests that the extent of timing errors in response to decreased velocity is influenced by the ability to correct muscle activation after its initiation rather than by delaying the initiation timing of muscle activation during baseball swings. PMID:25918848

  5. Muscle Activation Characteristics of the Front Leg During Baseball Swings with Timing Correction for Sudden Velocity Decrease

    PubMed Central

    Ohta, Yoichi; Nakamoto, Hiroki; Ishii, Yasumitsu; Ikudome, Sachi; Takahashi, Kyohei; Shima, Norihiro

    2015-01-01

    This study aimed to clarify the activation characteristics of the vastus lateralis muscle in the front leg during timing correction for a sudden decrease in the velocity of a target during baseball swings. Eleven male collegiate baseball players performed coincident timing tasks that comprised constant velocity of 8 m/s (unchanged) and a sudden decrease in velocity from 8 to 4 m/s (decreased velocity). Electromyography (EMG) revealed that the muscle activation was typically monophasic when responding unchanged conditions. The type of muscle activation during swings in response to decreased velocity condition was both monophasic and biphasic. When biphasic activation appeared in response to decreased velocity, the impact time and the time to peak EMG amplitude were significantly prolonged and the timing error was significantly smaller than that of monophasic activation. However, the EMG onset from the target start was consistent both monophasic and biphasic activation in response to conditions of decreased velocity. In addition, batters with small timing errors in response to decreased velocity were more likely to generate biphasic EMG activation. These findings indicated that timing correction for a sudden decrease in the velocity of an oncoming target is achieved by modifying the muscle activation characteristics of the vastus lateralis muscle of front leg from monophasic to biphasic to delay reaching peak muscle activation and thus prolong impact time. Therefore, the present findings suggests that the extent of timing errors in response to decreased velocity is influenced by the ability to correct muscle activation after its initiation rather than by delaying the initiation timing of muscle activation during baseball swings. PMID:25918848

  6. Role of solvent permittivity in estimation of electrolyte activity coefficients for systems with ion pairing on the basis of the mean spherical approximation. Technical report

    SciTech Connect

    Tikanen, A.C.; Fawcett, R.R.

    1996-10-01

    Mean ionic activity coefficient for aqueous solutions of CdCl2, CuCl2, MgCl2, Na2SO4 and CdSO4, systems for which dielectric relaxation data have recently been obtained, can be estimated accurately on the basis of a modified version of the mean spherical approximation (MSA) for electrolyte solutions with consideration of ion pairing. The modification makes use of the actual solution permittivity rather than the permittivity of the pure solvent. Reasonable ion pairing association constants, Kas, have been determined by fitting the theoretically determined mean ionic activity coefficients to experimentally measured values in the range of concentration for which the dielectric permittivity data exist using one additional adjustable parameter, namely, the restricted diameter for all species involved.

  7. In Operation Detection and Correction of Rotor Imbalance in Jet Engines Using Active Vibration Control

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Manchala, Daniel W.; Palazzolo, Alan B.; Kascak, Albert F.; Montague, Gerald T.; Brown, Gerald V.; Lawrence, Charles; Klusman, Steve

    1994-01-01

    Jet Engines may experience severe vibration due to the sudden imbalance caused by blade failure. This research investigates employment of on board magnetic bearings or piezoelectric actuators to cancel these forces in flight. This operation requires identification of the source of the vibrations via an expert system, determination of the required phase angles and amplitudes for the correction forces, and application of the desired control signals to the magnetic bearings or piezo electric actuators. This paper will show the architecture of the software system, details of the control algorithm used for the sudden imbalance correction project described above, and the laboratory test results.

  8. 75 FR 26962 - Agency Information Collection Activities; Submission for OMB Review; Comment Request; Correction

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-05-13

    ... information collection requirements associated with the Contact Lens Rule (the Rule), 16 CFR part 315. The...-0127. FOR FURTHER INFORMATION CONTACT: Requests for additional information or copies of the proposed..., Washington, DC 20580, (202) 326-2509. Correction In the Federal Register of April 15, 2010, in FR Doc....

  9. 76 FR 9611 - Agency Information Collection Activities: Proposed Collection; Comment Request; Correction

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-02-18

    ... Friday. Correction In the Federal Register of January 31, 2011, in FR Doc. 2011-1960, on page 5406, first... in the Federal Register of January 31, 2011, in FR Doc. 2011- 1960, on page 5407, third column... Foundation--Polar Physical Examination (Antarctica/Arctic/Official Visitors) Medical History, will be used...

  10. 77 FR 15190 - Agency Information Collection Activity under OMB Review: Certification of Change or Correction of...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-03-14

    ... Name, Government Life Insurance AGENCY: Veterans Benefits Administration, Department of Veterans... of Name, Government Life Insurance, VA Form 29-586. OMB Control Number: 2900-0679. Type of Review... change or correction to their name on Government Life Insurance policies. An agency may not conduct...

  11. 78 FR 46003 - Agency Information Collection (Special Notice) Activities Under OMB Review; Correction

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-07-30

    ... Register on July 16, 2013 (78 FR 42593), that contained several errors. The notice announced that the...., Washington, DC 20420, at (202) 632-7492. Correction In FR Doc. 2013-17023, published on July 16, 2013, at... have removed ``(previously 852.210-74)'' from the title. FOR FURTHER INFORMATION CONTACT:...

  12. 75 FR 47589 - Agency Information Collection Activities; Proposed Collection; Comment Request; Correction of...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-08-06

    ... Misreported Chemical Substances on the TSCA Inventory; EPA ICR No. 1741.06, OMB Control No. 2070-0145 AGENCY... (OMB). This ICR, entitled: ``Correction of Misreported Chemical Substances on the TSCA Inventory'' and identified by EPA ICR No. 1741.06 and OMB Control No. 2070-0145, is scheduled to expire on April 30,...

  13. Efficacy Coefficients Determined Using Nail Permeability and Antifungal Activity in Keratin-Containing Media Are Useful for Predicting Clinical Efficacies of Topical Drugs for Onychomycosis.

    PubMed

    Matsuda, Yoshiki; Sugiura, Keita; Hashimoto, Takashi; Ueda, Akane; Konno, Yoshihiro; Tatsumi, Yoshiyuki

    2016-01-01

    Onychomycosis is difficult to treat topically due to the deep location of the infection under the densely keratinized nail plate. In order to obtain an in vitro index that is relevant to the clinical efficacy of topical anti-onychomycosis drugs, we profiled five topical drugs: amorolfine, ciclopirox, efinaconazole, luliconazole, and terbinafine, for their nail permeabilities, keratin affinities, and anti-dermatophytic activities in the presence of keratin. Efinaconazole and ciclopirox permeated full-thickness human nails more deeply than luliconazole. Amorolfine and terbinafine did not show any detectable permeation. The free-drug concentration of efinaconazole in a 5% human nail keratin suspension was 24.9%, which was significantly higher than those of the other drugs (1.1-3.9%). Additionally, efinaconazole was released from human nail keratin at a greater proportion than the other drugs. The MICs of the five drugs for Trichophyton rubrum were determined at various concentrations of keratin (0-20%) in RPMI 1640 medium. The MICs of ciclopirox were not affected by keratin, whereas those of efinaconazole were slightly increased and those of luliconazole and terbinafine were markedly increased in the presence of 20% keratin. Efficacy coefficients were calculated using the nail permeation flux and MIC in media without or with keratin. Efinaconazole showed the highest efficacy coefficient, which was determined using MIC in media with keratin. The order of efficacy coefficients determined using MIC in keratin-containing media rather than keratin-free media was consistent with that of complete cure rates in previously reported clinical trials. The present study revealed that efficacy coefficients determined using MIC in keratin-containing media are useful for predicting the clinical efficacies of topical drugs. In order to be more effective, topical drugs have to possess higher efficacy coefficients. PMID:27441843

  14. Efficacy Coefficients Determined Using Nail Permeability and Antifungal Activity in Keratin-Containing Media Are Useful for Predicting Clinical Efficacies of Topical Drugs for Onychomycosis

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Onychomycosis is difficult to treat topically due to the deep location of the infection under the densely keratinized nail plate. In order to obtain an in vitro index that is relevant to the clinical efficacy of topical anti-onychomycosis drugs, we profiled five topical drugs: amorolfine, ciclopirox, efinaconazole, luliconazole, and terbinafine, for their nail permeabilities, keratin affinities, and anti-dermatophytic activities in the presence of keratin. Efinaconazole and ciclopirox permeated full-thickness human nails more deeply than luliconazole. Amorolfine and terbinafine did not show any detectable permeation. The free-drug concentration of efinaconazole in a 5% human nail keratin suspension was 24.9%, which was significantly higher than those of the other drugs (1.1–3.9%). Additionally, efinaconazole was released from human nail keratin at a greater proportion than the other drugs. The MICs of the five drugs for Trichophyton rubrum were determined at various concentrations of keratin (0–20%) in RPMI 1640 medium. The MICs of ciclopirox were not affected by keratin, whereas those of efinaconazole were slightly increased and those of luliconazole and terbinafine were markedly increased in the presence of 20% keratin. Efficacy coefficients were calculated using the nail permeation flux and MIC in media without or with keratin. Efinaconazole showed the highest efficacy coefficient, which was determined using MIC in media with keratin. The order of efficacy coefficients determined using MIC in keratin-containing media rather than keratin-free media was consistent with that of complete cure rates in previously reported clinical trials. The present study revealed that efficacy coefficients determined using MIC in keratin-containing media are useful for predicting the clinical efficacies of topical drugs. In order to be more effective, topical drugs have to possess higher efficacy coefficients. PMID:27441843

  15. Efficacy Coefficients Determined Using Nail Permeability and Antifungal Activity in Keratin-Containing Media Are Useful for Predicting Clinical Efficacies of Topical Drugs for Onychomycosis.

    PubMed

    Matsuda, Yoshiki; Sugiura, Keita; Hashimoto, Takashi; Ueda, Akane; Konno, Yoshihiro; Tatsumi, Yoshiyuki

    2016-01-01

    Onychomycosis is difficult to treat topically due to the deep location of the infection under the densely keratinized nail plate. In order to obtain an in vitro index that is relevant to the clinical efficacy of topical anti-onychomycosis drugs, we profiled five topical drugs: amorolfine, ciclopirox, efinaconazole, luliconazole, and terbinafine, for their nail permeabilities, keratin affinities, and anti-dermatophytic activities in the presence of keratin. Efinaconazole and ciclopirox permeated full-thickness human nails more deeply than luliconazole. Amorolfine and terbinafine did not show any detectable permeation. The free-drug concentration of efinaconazole in a 5% human nail keratin suspension was 24.9%, which was significantly higher than those of the other drugs (1.1-3.9%). Additionally, efinaconazole was released from human nail keratin at a greater proportion than the other drugs. The MICs of the five drugs for Trichophyton rubrum were determined at various concentrations of keratin (0-20%) in RPMI 1640 medium. The MICs of ciclopirox were not affected by keratin, whereas those of efinaconazole were slightly increased and those of luliconazole and terbinafine were markedly increased in the presence of 20% keratin. Efficacy coefficients were calculated using the nail permeation flux and MIC in media without or with keratin. Efinaconazole showed the highest efficacy coefficient, which was determined using MIC in media with keratin. The order of efficacy coefficients determined using MIC in keratin-containing media rather than keratin-free media was consistent with that of complete cure rates in previously reported clinical trials. The present study revealed that efficacy coefficients determined using MIC in keratin-containing media are useful for predicting the clinical efficacies of topical drugs. In order to be more effective, topical drugs have to possess higher efficacy coefficients.

  16. Active correction of the tilt angle of the surface plane with respect to the rotation axis during azimuthal scan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sereno, M.; Lupone, S.; Debiossac, M.; Kalashnyk, N.; Roncin, P.

    2016-09-01

    A procedure to measure the residual tilt angle τ between a flat surface and the azimuthal rotation axis of the sample holder is described. When the incidence angle θ and readout of the azimuthal angle ϕ are controlled by motors, an active compensation mechanism can be implemented to reduce the effect of the tilt angle during azimuthal motion. After this correction, the effective angle of incidence is kept fixed, and only a small residual oscillation of the scattering plane remains.

  17. 78 FR 76613 - Registration Applications for Pesticide Products Containing New Active Ingredients; Corrections

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-12-18

    ...-Hv1a-SEQ2'' to read ``GS-omega/kappa-Hxtx-Hv1a.'' 2. EPA-HQ-OPP-2012-0391. In FR Doc. 2012-19989... number 3., File Symbol: 88847-E, lines 5 and 6, correct ``GS-U-ACTX-Hv1a- SEQ2'' to read ``GS-omega/kappa...-OPP-2012-0391. In FR Doc. 2012-19989, published in the Federal Register of August 14, 2012 (77...

  18. An Efficient Correction Algorithm for Eliminating Image Misalignment Effects on Co-Phasing Measurement Accuracy for Segmented Active Optics Systems.

    PubMed

    Yue, Dan; Xu, Shuyan; Nie, Haitao; Wang, Zongyang

    2016-01-01

    The misalignment between recorded in-focus and out-of-focus images using the Phase Diversity (PD) algorithm leads to a dramatic decline in wavefront detection accuracy and image recovery quality for segmented active optics systems. This paper demonstrates the theoretical relationship between the image misalignment and tip-tilt terms in Zernike polynomials of the wavefront phase for the first time, and an efficient two-step alignment correction algorithm is proposed to eliminate these misalignment effects. This algorithm processes a spatial 2-D cross-correlation of the misaligned images, revising the offset to 1 or 2 pixels and narrowing the search range for alignment. Then, it eliminates the need for subpixel fine alignment to achieve adaptive correction by adding additional tip-tilt terms to the Optical Transfer Function (OTF) of the out-of-focus channel. The experimental results demonstrate the feasibility and validity of the proposed correction algorithm to improve the measurement accuracy during the co-phasing of segmented mirrors. With this alignment correction, the reconstructed wavefront is more accurate, and the recovered image is of higher quality.

  19. An Efficient Correction Algorithm for Eliminating Image Misalignment Effects on Co-Phasing Measurement Accuracy for Segmented Active Optics Systems

    PubMed Central

    Yue, Dan; Xu, Shuyan; Nie, Haitao; Wang, Zongyang

    2016-01-01

    The misalignment between recorded in-focus and out-of-focus images using the Phase Diversity (PD) algorithm leads to a dramatic decline in wavefront detection accuracy and image recovery quality for segmented active optics systems. This paper demonstrates the theoretical relationship between the image misalignment and tip-tilt terms in Zernike polynomials of the wavefront phase for the first time, and an efficient two-step alignment correction algorithm is proposed to eliminate these misalignment effects. This algorithm processes a spatial 2-D cross-correlation of the misaligned images, revising the offset to 1 or 2 pixels and narrowing the search range for alignment. Then, it eliminates the need for subpixel fine alignment to achieve adaptive correction by adding additional tip-tilt terms to the Optical Transfer Function (OTF) of the out-of-focus channel. The experimental results demonstrate the feasibility and validity of the proposed correction algorithm to improve the measurement accuracy during the co-phasing of segmented mirrors. With this alignment correction, the reconstructed wavefront is more accurate, and the recovered image is of higher quality. PMID:26934045

  20. Political Correctness--Correct?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Boase, Paul H.

    1993-01-01

    Examines the phenomenon of political correctness, its roots and objectives, and its successes and failures in coping with the conflicts and clashes of multicultural campuses. Argues that speech codes indicate failure in academia's primary mission to civilize and educate through talk, discussion, thought,166 and persuasion. (SR)

  1. Measurement of gas/water uptake coefficients for trace gases active in the marine environment. [Annual report

    SciTech Connect

    Davidovits, P.; Worsnop, D.W.; Zahniser, M.S.; Kolb, C.E.

    1992-02-01

    Ocean produced reduced sulfur compounds including dimethylsulfide (DMS), hydrogen sulfide (H{sub 2}S), carbon disulfide (CS{sub 2}), methyl mercaptan (CH{sub 3}CH) and carbonyl sulfide (OCS) deliver a sulfur burden to the atmosphere which is roughly equal to sulfur oxides produced by fossil fuel combustion. These species and their oxidation products dimethyl sulfoxide (DMSO), dimethyl sulfone (DMSO{sub 2}) and methane sulfonic acid (MSA) dominate aerosol and CCN production in clean marine air. Furthermore, oxidation of reduced sulfur species will be strongly influenced by NO{sub x}/O{sub 3} chemistry in marine atmospheres. The multiphase chemical processes for these species must be understood in order to study the evolving role of combustion produced sulfur oxides over the oceans. We have measured the chemical and physical parameters affecting the uptake of reduced sulfur compounds, their oxidation products, ozone, and nitrogen oxides by the ocean`s surface, and marine clouds, fogs, and aerosols. These parameters include: gas/surface mass accommodation coefficients; physical and chemically modified (effective) Henry`s law constants; and surface and liquid phase reaction constants. These parameters are critical to understanding both the interaction of gaseous trace species with cloud and fog droplets and the deposition of trace gaseous species to dew covered, fresh water and marine surfaces.

  2. Transport coefficients of gluonic fluid

    SciTech Connect

    Das, Santosh K.; Alam, Jan-e

    2011-06-01

    The shear ({eta}) and bulk ({zeta}) viscous coefficients have been evaluated for a gluonic fluid. The elastic, gg{yields}gg and the inelastic, number nonconserving, gg{yields}ggg processes have been considered as the dominant perturbative processes in evaluating the viscous coefficients to entropy density (s) ratios. Recently the processes: gg{yields}ggg has been revisited and a correction to the widely used Gunion-Bertsch (GB) formula has been obtained. The {eta} and {zeta} have been evaluated for gluonic fluid with the formula recently derived. At large {alpha}{sub s} the value of {eta}/s approaches its lower bound, {approx}1/4{pi}.

  3. Systematic and practical solvent system selection strategy based on the nonrandom two-liquid segment activity coefficient model for real-life counter-current chromatography separation.

    PubMed

    Ren, Da-Bing; Yi, Lun-Zhao; Qin, Yan-Hua; Yun, Yong-Huan; Deng, Bai-Chuan; Lu, Hong-Mei; Chen, Xiao-Qing; Liang, Yi-Zeng

    2015-05-01

    Solvent system selection is the first step toward a successful counter-current chromatography (CCC) separation. This paper introduces a systematic and practical solvent system selection strategy based on the nonrandom two-liquid segment activity coefficient (NRTL-SAC) model, which is efficient in predicting the solute partition coefficient. Firstly, the application of the NRTL-SAC method was extended to the ethyl acetate/n-butanol/water and chloroform/methanol/water solvent system families. Moreover, the versatility and predictive capability of the NRTL-SAC method were investigated. The results indicate that the solute molecular parameters identified from hexane/ethyl acetate/methanol/water solvent system family are capable of predicting a large number of partition coefficients in several other different solvent system families. The NRTL-SAC strategy was further validated by successfully separating five components from Salvia plebeian R.Br. We therefore propose that NRTL-SAC is a promising high throughput method for rapid solvent system selection and highly adaptable to screen suitable solvent system for real-life CCC separation.

  4. Ion-transfer voltammetry of local anesthetics at an organic solvent/water interface and pharmacological activity vs. ion partition coefficient relationship.

    PubMed

    Kubota, Y; Katano, H; Senda, M

    2001-01-01

    The ion-transfer reaction of local anesthetics at an organic solvent/water interface has been studied using cyclic voltammetry (CV) with a stationary nitrobenzene (NB)/water (W) interface. Procaine and seven other local anesthetics gave reversible or quasi-reversible voltammograms at the NB/W interface in the pH range between 0.9 and 9.6. These drugs are present in aqueous solution in either neutral or ionic form, or both forms. The half-wave potential, as determined by the midpoint potential in CV, vs. pH curves, were determined and analyzed to determine the partition coefficients of both neutral and ionic forms of the drugs between NB and W. The partition coefficients of the ionic forms were derived from their formal potential of transfer at an NB/W interface. The dissociation constants of ionic forms of the drugs in NB were also deduced. A high correlation between the pharmacological activity and the partition coefficient of the ionic form of amide-linked local anesthetics has been shown.

  5. Vapor pressure measurements on non-aqueous electrolyte solutions. Part 2. Tetraalkylammonium salts in methanol. Activity coefficients of various 1-1 electrolytes at high concentrations

    SciTech Connect

    Barthel, J.; Lauermann, G.; Neueder, R.

    1986-10-01

    Precise vapor pressure data for solutions of Et/sub 4/NBr, Bu/sub 4/NBr, Bu/sub 4/Nl, Bu/sub 4/NClO/sub 4/, and Am/sub 4/NBr in methanol at 25/sup 0/C in the concentration range 0.04 < m(mol-(kg of solvent)/sup -1/) < 1.6 are communicated and discussed. Polynomials in molalities are given which may be used for calculating precise vapor pressure depressions of these solutions. Osmotic coefficients are calculated by taking into account the second virial coefficient of methanol vapor. Discussion of the data at low concentrations is based on the chemical model of electrolyte solutions taking into account non-coulombic interactions; ion-pair association constants are compared to those of conductance measurements. Pitzer equations are used to reproduce osmotic and activity coefficient at high concentrations; the set of Pitzer parameters b = 3.2, ..cap alpha../sub 1/ = 2.0 and ..cap alpha../sub 2/ = 20.0 is proposed for methanol solutions.

  6. Active Control of Fan Noise: Feasibility Study. Volume 5; Numerical Computation of Acoustic Mode Reflection Coefficients for an Unflanged Cylindrical Duct

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kraft, R. E.

    1996-01-01

    A computational method to predict modal reflection coefficients in cylindrical ducts has been developed based on the work of Homicz, Lordi, and Rehm, which uses the Wiener-Hopf method to account for the boundary conditions at the termination of a thin cylindrical pipe. The purpose of this study is to develop a computational routine to predict the reflection coefficients of higher order acoustic modes impinging on the unflanged termination of a cylindrical duct. This effort was conducted wider Task Order 5 of the NASA Lewis LET Program, Active Noise Control of aircraft Engines: Feasibility Study, and will be used as part of the development of an integrated source noise, acoustic propagation, ANC actuator coupling, and control system algorithm simulation. The reflection coefficient prediction will be incorporated into an existing cylindrical duct modal analysis to account for the reflection of modes from the duct termination. This will provide a more accurate, rapid computation design tool for evaluating the effect of reflected waves on active noise control systems mounted in the duct, as well as providing a tool for the design of acoustic treatment in inlet ducts. As an active noise control system design tool, the method can be used preliminary to more accurate but more numerically intensive acoustic propagation models such as finite element methods. The resulting computer program has been shown to give reasonable results, some examples of which are presented. Reliable data to use for comparison is scarce, so complete checkout is difficult, and further checkout is needed over a wider range of system parameters. In future efforts the method will be adapted as a subroutine to the GEAE segmented cylindrical duct modal analysis program.

  7. Correct disulfide pairing is required for the biological activity of crustacean androgenic gland hormone (AGH): synthetic studies of AGH.

    PubMed

    Katayama, Hidekazu; Hojo, Hironobu; Ohira, Tsuyoshi; Ishii, Akira; Nozaki, Takamichi; Goto, Kiyomi; Nakahara, Yuko; Takahashi, Tetsuo; Hasegawa, Yuriko; Nagasawa, Hiromichi; Nakahara, Yoshiaki

    2010-03-01

    Androgenic gland hormone (AGH) of the woodlouse, Armadillidium vulgare, is a heterodimeric glycopeptide. In this study, we synthesized AGH with a homogeneous N-linked glycan using the expressed protein ligation method. Unexpectedly, disulfide bridge arrangement of a semisynthetic peptide differed from that of a recombinant peptide prepared in a baculovirus expression system, and the semisynthetic peptide showed no biological activity in vivo. To confirm that the loss of biological activity resulted from disulfide bond isomerization, AGH with a GlcNAc moiety was chemically synthesized by the selective disulfide formation. This synthetic AGH showed biological activity in vivo. These results indicate that the native conformation of AGH is not the most thermodynamically stable form, and correct disulfide linkages are important for conferring AGH activity. PMID:20092253

  8. Correct disulfide pairing is required for the biological activity of crustacean androgenic gland hormone (AGH): synthetic studies of AGH.

    PubMed

    Katayama, Hidekazu; Hojo, Hironobu; Ohira, Tsuyoshi; Ishii, Akira; Nozaki, Takamichi; Goto, Kiyomi; Nakahara, Yuko; Takahashi, Tetsuo; Hasegawa, Yuriko; Nagasawa, Hiromichi; Nakahara, Yoshiaki

    2010-03-01

    Androgenic gland hormone (AGH) of the woodlouse, Armadillidium vulgare, is a heterodimeric glycopeptide. In this study, we synthesized AGH with a homogeneous N-linked glycan using the expressed protein ligation method. Unexpectedly, disulfide bridge arrangement of a semisynthetic peptide differed from that of a recombinant peptide prepared in a baculovirus expression system, and the semisynthetic peptide showed no biological activity in vivo. To confirm that the loss of biological activity resulted from disulfide bond isomerization, AGH with a GlcNAc moiety was chemically synthesized by the selective disulfide formation. This synthetic AGH showed biological activity in vivo. These results indicate that the native conformation of AGH is not the most thermodynamically stable form, and correct disulfide linkages are important for conferring AGH activity.

  9. Warm-up with weighted bat and adjustment of upper limb muscle activity in bat swinging under movement correction conditions.

    PubMed

    Ohta, Yoichi; Ishii, Yasumitsu; Ikudome, Sachi; Nakamoto, Hiroki

    2014-02-01

    The effects of weighted bat warm-up on adjustment of upper limb muscle activity were investigated during baseball bat swinging under dynamic conditions that require a spatial and temporal adjustment of the swinging to hit a moving target. Seven male college baseball players participated in this study. Using a batting simulator, the task was to swing the standard bat coincident with the arrival timing and position of a moving target after three warm-up swings using a standard or weighted bat. There was no significant effect of weighted bat warm-up on muscle activity before impact associated with temporal or spatial movement corrections. However, lower inhibition of the extensor carpi ulnaris muscle activity was observed in a velocity-changed condition in the weighted bat warm-up, as compared to a standard bat warm-up. It is suggested that weighted bat warm-up decreases the adjustment ability associated with inhibition of muscle activation under movement correction conditions. PMID:24724516

  10. Critical Assessment of P2O5 Activity Coefficients in CaO-based Slags during Dephosphorization Process of Iron-based Melts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Xue-min; Li, Jin-yan; Chai, Guo-Ming; Duan, Dong-ping; Zhang, Jian

    2016-08-01

    According to the experimental results of hot metal dephosphorization by CaO-based slags at a commercial-scale hot metal pretreatment station, activity a_{{{{P}}_{ 2} {{O}}_{ 5} }} of P2O5 in the CaO-based slags has been determined using the calculated comprehensive mass action concentration N_{{{{Fe}}t {{O}}}}{} of iron oxides by the ion and molecule coexistence theory (IMCT) for representing the reaction ability of Fe t O, i.e., activity of a_{{{{Fe}}t {{O}}}}{} . The collected ten models from the literature for predicting activity coefficient γ_{{{{P}}_{ 2} {{O}}_{ 5} }} of P2O5 in CaO-based slags have been evaluated based on the determined activity a_{{{{P}}_{ 2} {{O}}_{ 5} }} of P2O5 by the IMCT as the criterion. The collected ten models of activity coefficient γ_{{{{P}}_{ 2} {{O}}_{ 5} }} of P2O5 in CaO-based slags can be described in the form of a linear function as log γ_{{{{P}}_{ 2} {{O}}_{ 5} }} ≡ y = c0 + c1 x , in which independent variable x represents the chemical composition of slags, intercept c0 including the constant term depicts temperature effect and other unmentioned or acquiescent thermodynamic factors, and slope c1 is regressed by the experimental results. Thus, a general approach for obtaining good prediction results of activity a_{{{{P}}_{ 2} {{O}}_{ 5} }} of P2O5 in CaO-based slags is proposed by revising the constant term in intercept c0 for the collected ten models. The better models with an ideal revising possibility or flexibility in the collected ten models have been selected and recommended.

  11. ERRORS IN APPLYING LOW IONIC-STRENGTH ACTIVITY COEFFICIENT ALGORITHMS TO HIGHER IONIC-STRENGTH AQUATIC MEDIA

    EPA Science Inventory

    The toxicological and regulatory communities are currently exploring the use of the free-ion-activity (FIA) model both alone and in conjunction with the biotic ligand model (BLM) as a means of reducing uncertainties in current methods for assessing metals bioavailability from aqu...

  12. ERRORS IN APPLYING LOW ION-STRENGTH ACTIVITY COEFFICIENT ALGORITHMS TO HIGHER IONIC-STRENGTH AQUATIC MEDIA

    EPA Science Inventory

    The toxicological and regulatory communities are currently exploring the use of free-ion-activity- models as a means of reducing uncertainties in current methods for assessing metals bioavailabi- lity from contaminated aquatic media. While most practitioners would support the des...

  13. Diffusion coefficients and activation energies for Zn diffusion into undoped and S-doped InP

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marek, H. S.; Serreze, H. B.

    1987-12-01

    We present results of open tube Zn diffusion into undoped and S-doped n-type InP over the temperature range 550-675 °C. The process yields reproducible results which are consistent with an interstitial-substitutional diffusion model. For the undoped samples, an activation energy of 1.52 eV and a diffusion constant of 4.9×10-2 cm2/s are obtained. For heavily S-doped samples, values of 2.34 eV and 1.4×103 cm2/s, respectively, result. The difference in activation energy which is comparable to the Fermi level difference in the two substrate types is consistent with the different diffusion mechanisms which occur in these two types of InP.

  14. Activation of the biochemical processes in an oil-contaminated soil using a light-correcting film and humic acids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Filatov, D. A.; Ivanov, A. A.; Svarovskaya, L. I.; Yudina, N. V.

    2011-02-01

    It was shown that the use of a light-correcting film as a covering material for an oil-contaminated soil in combination with humic acids increased the number of the main physiological groups of the soil microorganisms responsible for the development of the soil's fertility (heterotrophic bacteria, actinomycetes, and micromycetes) by 60-100 times. The activity of the soil enzymes (catalase, dehydrogenase, polyphenoloxidase, peroxidase, and urease) increased by 3-6 times. The biochemical oxidation of oil hydrocarbons in the soil became significantly more intense.

  15. The nonmonotonic concentration dependence of the mean activity coefficient of electrolytes is a result of a balance between solvation and ion-ion correlations.

    PubMed

    Vincze, Julianna; Valiskó, Mónika; Boda, Dezso

    2010-10-21

    We propose a simple model to explain the nonmonotonic concentration dependence of the mean activity coefficient of simple electrolytes without using any adjustable parameters. The primitive model of electrolytes is used to describe the interaction between ions computed by the adaptive grand canonical Monte Carlo method. For the dielectric constant of the electrolyte, we use experimental concentration dependent values. This is included through a solvation term in our treatment to describe the interaction between ions and water that changes as the dielectric constant changes with concentration. This term is computed by a Born-treatment fitted to experimental hydration energies. Our results for LiCl, NaCl, KCl, CsCl, NaBr, NaI, MgCl(2), CaCl(2), SrCl(2), and BaCl(2) demonstrate that the principal reason of the nonmonotonic behavior of the activity coefficient is a balance between the solvation and ion-ion correlation terms. This conclusion differs from previous studies that assumed that it is the balance of hard sphere repulsion and electrostatic attraction that produces the nonmonotonic behavior. Our results indicate that the earlier assumption that solvation can be taken into account by a larger, "solvated" ionic radius should be reconsidered. To explain second order effects (such as dependence on ionic size), we conclude that explicit water models are needed.

  16. Application of single ion activity coefficients to determine solvent extraction mechanism for components of high level nuclear waste

    SciTech Connect

    Nunez, L.; Vandegrift, G.F.

    1995-12-31

    The TRUEX solvent extraction process is being developed to remove and concentrate transuranic (TRU) elements from high-level and TRU radioactive wastes currently stored at US Department of Energy sites. Phosphoric acid is one of the chemical species of concern at the Hanford site where bismuth phosphate was used to recover plutonium. The mechanism of phosphoric acid extraction with TRUEX-NPH solvent at 25{degrees}C was determined by phosphoric acid distribution ratios, which were measured by using phosphoric acid radiotracer and a variety of aqueous phases containing different concentrations of nitric acid and nitrate ions. A model was developed for predicting phosphoric acid distribution ratios as a function of the thermodynamic activities of nitrate ion and hydrogen ion. The Generic TRUEX Model (GTM) was used to calculate these activities based on the Bromley method. The derived model supports CMPO and TBP extraction of a phosphoric acid-nitric acid complex and a CMPO-phosphoric acid complex in TRUEX-NPH solvent.

  17. 76 FR 78033 - Agency Information Collection Activities: Proposed Collection, Comment Request; Correction

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-12-15

    ... the Department of the Interior established ONRR (the former Minerals Revenue Management, a program... from Indian beneficiaries. The ONRR performs the minerals revenue management functions and assists the... Office of Natural Resources Revenue Agency Information Collection Activities: Proposed...

  18. Factor Scores, Structure Coefficients, and Communality Coefficients

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Goodwyn, Fara

    2012-01-01

    This paper presents heuristic explanations of factor scores, structure coefficients, and communality coefficients. Common misconceptions regarding these topics are clarified. In addition, (a) the regression (b) Bartlett, (c) Anderson-Rubin, and (d) Thompson methods for calculating factor scores are reviewed. Syntax necessary to execute all four…

  19. NAD(+)-dependent activation of Sirt1 corrects the phenotype in a mouse model of mitochondrial disease.

    PubMed

    Cerutti, Raffaele; Pirinen, Eija; Lamperti, Costanza; Marchet, Silvia; Sauve, Anthony A; Li, Wei; Leoni, Valerio; Schon, Eric A; Dantzer, Françoise; Auwerx, Johan; Viscomi, Carlo; Zeviani, Massimo

    2014-06-01

    Mitochondrial disorders are highly heterogeneous conditions characterized by defects of the mitochondrial respiratory chain. Pharmacological activation of mitochondrial biogenesis has been proposed as an effective means to correct the biochemical defects and ameliorate the clinical phenotype in these severely disabling, often fatal, disorders. Pathways related to mitochondrial biogenesis are targets of Sirtuin1, a NAD(+)-dependent protein deacetylase. As NAD(+) boosts the activity of Sirtuin1 and other sirtuins, intracellular levels of NAD(+) play a key role in the homeostatic control of mitochondrial function by the metabolic status of the cell. We show here that supplementation with nicotinamide riboside, a natural NAD(+) precursor, or reduction of NAD(+) consumption by inhibiting the poly(ADP-ribose) polymerases, leads to marked improvement of the respiratory chain defect and exercise intolerance of the Sco2 knockout/knockin mouse, a mitochondrial disease model characterized by impaired cytochrome c oxidase biogenesis. This strategy is potentially translatable into therapy of mitochondrial disorders in humans. PMID:24814483

  20. Correction: Particle shape optimization by changing from an isotropic to an anisotropic nanostructure: preparation of highly active and stable supported Pt catalysts in microemulsions.

    PubMed

    Parapat, Riny Y; Wijaya, Muliany; Schwarze, Michael; Selve, Sören; Willinger, Marc; Schomäcker, Reinhard

    2016-04-01

    Correction for 'Particle shape optimization by changing from an isotropic to an anisotropic nanostructure: preparation of highly active and stable supported Pt catalysts in microemulsions' by Riny Y. Parapat et al., Nanoscale, 2013, 5, 796-805. PMID:26961853

  1. Correction: Particle shape optimization by changing from an isotropic to an anisotropic nanostructure: preparation of highly active and stable supported Pt catalysts in microemulsions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Parapat, Riny Y.; Wijaya, Muliany; Schwarze, Michael; Selve, Sören; Willinger, Marc; Schomäcker, Reinhard

    2016-03-01

    Correction for `Particle shape optimization by changing from an isotropic to an anisotropic nanostructure: preparation of highly active and stable supported Pt catalysts in microemulsions' by Riny Y. Parapat et al., Nanoscale, 2013, 5, 796-805.

  2. 78 FR 45051 - Small Business Size Standards; Support Activities for Mining; Correction

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-07-26

    ... June 20, 2013 (78 FR 37404). The document amended SBA's Small Business Size Regulations by increasing.... SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION: In FR Doc. 2013-14712 appearing on page 37404 in the June 20, 2013 Federal Register... ADMINISTRATION 13 CFR Part 121 RIN 3245-AG44 Small Business Size Standards; Support Activities for...

  3. Stability evaluation and correction of a pulsed neutron generator prompt gamma activation analysis system

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Source output stability is important for accurate measurement in prompt gamma neutron activation. This is especially true when measuring low-concentration elements such as in vivo nitrogen (~2.5% of body weight). We evaluated the stability of the compact DT neutron generator within an in vivo nitrog...

  4. Effect of Silicon on Activity Coefficients of Siderophile Elements (P, Au, Pd, As, Ge, Sb, and In) in Liquid Fe, with Application to Core Formation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Righter, K.; Pando, K.; Danielson, L. R.; Humayun, M.; Righter, M.; Lapen, T.; Boujibar, A.

    2016-01-01

    Earth's core contains approximately 10 percent light elements that are likely a combination of S, C, Si, and O, with Si possibly being the most abundant. Si dissolved into Fe liquids can have a large effect on the magnitude of the activity coefficient of siderophile elements (SE) in Fe liquids, and thus the partitioning behavior of those elements between core and mantle. The effect of Si can be small such as for Ni and Co, or large such as for Mo, Ge, Sb, As. The effect of Si on many siderophile elements is unknown yet could be an important, and as yet unquantified, influence on the core-mantle partitioning of SE. Here we report new experiments designed to quantify the effect of Si on the partitioning of P, Au, Pd, and many other SE between metal and silicate melt. The results will be applied to Earth, for which we have excellent constraints on the mantle siderophile element concentrations.

  5. Mechanisms by Which Interleukin-12 Corrects Defective NK Cell Anticryptococcal Activity in HIV-Infected Patients

    PubMed Central

    Kyei, Stephen K.; Ogbomo, Henry; Li, ShuShun; Timm-McCann, Martina; Xiang, Richard F.; Huston, Shaunna M.; Ganguly, Anutosh; Colarusso, Pina; Gill, M. John

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Cryptococcus neoformans is a pathogenic yeast and a leading cause of life-threatening meningitis in AIDS patients. Natural killer (NK) cells are important immune effector cells that directly recognize and kill C. neoformans via a perforin-dependent cytotoxic mechanism. We previously showed that NK cells from HIV-infected patients have aberrant anticryptococcal killing and that interleukin-12 (IL-12) restores the activity at least partially through restoration of NKp30. However, the mechanisms causing this defect or how IL-12 restores the function was unknown. By examining the sequential steps in NK cell killing of Cryptococcus, we found that NK cells from HIV-infected patients had defective binding of NK cells to C. neoformans. Moreover, those NK cells that bound to C. neoformans failed to polarize perforin-containing granules to the microbial synapse compared to healthy controls, suggesting that binding was insufficient to restore a defect in perforin polarization. We also identified lower expression of intracellular perforin and defective perforin release from NK cells of HIV-infected patients in response to C. neoformans. Importantly, treatment of NK cells from HIV-infected patients with IL-12 reversed the multiple defects in binding, granule polarization, perforin content, and perforin release and restored anticryptococcal activity. Thus, there are multiple defects in the cytolytic machinery of NK cells from HIV-infected patients, which cumulatively result in defective NK cell anticryptococcal activity, and each of these defects can be reversed with IL-12. PMID:27555306

  6. Modeling solubility, acid-base properties and activity coefficients of amoxicillin, ampicillin and (+)6-aminopenicillanic acid, in NaCl(aq) at different ionic strengths and temperatures.

    PubMed

    Crea, Francesco; Cucinotta, Daniela; De Stefano, Concetta; Milea, Demetrio; Sammartano, Silvio; Vianelli, Giuseppina

    2012-11-20

    The total solubility of three penicillin derivatives was determined, in pure water and NaCl aqueous solutions at different salt concentrations (from ∼0.15 to 1.0 mol L(-1) for ampicillin and amoxicillin, and from ∼0.05 to 2.0 mol L(-1) for (+)6-aminopenicillanic acid), using the shake-flask method for generating the saturated solutions, followed by potentiometric analysis. The knowledge of the pH of solubilization and of the protonation constants determined in the same experimental conditions, allowed us to calculate, by means of the mass balance equations, the solubility of the neutral species at different ionic strength values, to model its dependence on the salt concentration and to determine the corresponding values at infinite dilution. The salting parameter and the activity coefficients of the neutral species were calculated by the Setschenow equation. The protonation constants of ampicillin and amoxicillin, determined at different temperatures (from T=288.15 to 318.15K), from potentiometric and spectrophotometric measurements, were used to calculate, by means of the Van't Hoff equation, the temperature coefficients at different ionic strength values and the corresponding protonation entropies. The protonation enthalpies of the (+)6-aminopenicillanic acid were determined by isoperibol calorimetric titrations at T=298.15K and up to I=2.0 mol L(-1). The dependence of the protonation constants on ionic strength was modeled by means of the Debye-Hückel and SIT (Specific ion Interaction Theory) approaches, and the specific interaction parameters of the ionic species were determined. The hydrolysis of the β-lactam ring was studied by spectrophotometric and H NMR investigations as a function of pH, ionic strength and time. Potentiometric measurements carried out on the hydrolyzed (+)6-aminopenicillanic acid allowed us to highlight that the opened and the closed β-lactam forms of the (+)6-aminopenicillanic acid have quite different acid-base properties. An

  7. MAGNETIC LIQUID DEFORMABLE MIRRORS FOR ASTRONOMICAL APPLICATIONS: ACTIVE CORRECTION OF OPTICAL ABERRATIONS FROM LOWER-GRADE OPTICS AND SUPPORT SYSTEM

    SciTech Connect

    Borra, E. F.

    2012-08-01

    Deformable mirrors are increasingly used in astronomy. However, they still are limited in stroke for active correction of high-amplitude optical aberrations. Magnetic liquid deformable mirrors (MLDMs) are a new technology that has the advantages of high-amplitude deformations and low costs. In this paper, we demonstrate extremely high strokes and interactuator strokes achievable by MLDMs which can be used in astronomical instrumentation. In particular, we consider the use of such a mirror to suggest an interesting application for the next generation of large telescopes. We present a prototype 91 actuator deformable mirror made of a magnetic liquid (ferrofluid). This mirror uses a technique that linearizes the response of such mirrors by superimposing a large and uniform magnetic field on the magnetic field produced by an array of small coils. We discuss experimental results that illustrate the performance of MLDMs. A most interesting application of MLDMs comes from the fact they could be used to correct the aberrations of large and lower optical quality primary mirrors held by simple support systems. We estimate basic parameters of the needed MLDMs, obtaining reasonable values.

  8. Dental and skeletal contributions to occlusal correction in patients treated with the high-pull headgear-activator combination.

    PubMed

    Lagerström, L O; Nielsen, I L; Lee, R; Isaacson, R J

    1990-06-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine dental and skeletal changes in patients treated with the high-pull headgear-activator combination. A group of 40 consecutively treated subjects with a Class II molar relationship and a minimum of 5 mm overjet was used for this study. The results showed that Class II correction often was achieved by distal repositioning of the maxillary teeth (mean, 0.07 mm) and mesial repositioning of the mandibular teeth (mean, 3.3 mm) with a wide range of variation. Correlation of maxillary molar repositioning with total interarch occlusal change showed a positive relationship; however, a weak correlation suggested that other variables were contributing factors, in addition to distal upper molar positioning. The change in mandibular molar position compared with the movement of pogonion strongly suggests that forward growth of the mandible is important to the correction of the Class II malocclusion. When total molar repositioning in the upper jaw was correlated with total molar repositioning in the lower jaw, a strong inverse correlation was found, indicating that upper molar movement parallels lower molar movement.

  9. Single-Phase Active Boost Rectifier with Power Factor Correction for Wireless Power Transfer Applications

    SciTech Connect

    Chinthavali, Madhu Sudhan; Onar, Omer C; Miller, John M; Tang, Lixin

    2013-01-01

    Wireless Power Transfer (WPT) technology is a novel research area in the charging technology that bridges utility and the automotive industries. There are various solutions that are currently being evaluated by several research teams to find the most efficient way to manage the power flow from the grid to the vehicle energy storage system. There are different control parameters that can be utilized to compensate for the change in the impedance. To understand the power flow through the system this paper presents a novel approach to the system model and the impact of different control parameters on the load power. The implementation of an active front-end rectifier on the grid side for power factor control and voltage boost capability for load power regulation is also discussed.

  10. [A dynamic model of the extravehicular (correction of extravehicuar) activity space suit].

    PubMed

    Yang, Feng; Yuan, Xiu-gan

    2002-12-01

    Objective. To establish a dynamic model of the space suit base on the particular configuration of the space suit. Method. The mass of the space suit components, moment of inertia, mobility of the joints of space suit, as well as the suit-generated torques, were considered in this model. The expressions to calculate the moment of inertia were developed by simplifying the geometry of the space suit. A modified Preisach model was used to mathematically describe the hysteretic torque characteristics of joints in a pressurized space suit, and it was implemented numerically basing on the observed suit parameters. Result. A dynamic model considering mass, moment of inertia and suit-generated torques was established. Conclusion. This dynamic model provides some elements for the dynamic simulation of the astronaut extravehicular activity.

  11. Second-order perturbative corrections to the restricted active space configuration interaction with the hole and particle approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Casanova, David

    2014-04-01

    Second-order corrections to the restricted active space configuration interaction (RASCI) with the hole and particle truncation of the excitation operator are developed. Theoretically, the computational cost of the implemented perturbative approach, abbreviated as RASCI(2), grows like its single reference counterpart in MP2. Two different forms of RASCI(2) have been explored, that is the generalized Davidson-Kapuy and the Epstein-Nesbet partitions of the Hamiltonian. The preliminary results indicate that the use of energy level shift of a few tenths of a Hartree might systematically improve the accuracy of the RASCI(2) energies. The method has been tested in the computation of the ground state energy profiles along the dissociation of the hydrogen fluoride and N2 molecules, the computation of correlation energy in the G2/97 molecular test set, and in the computation of excitation energies to low-lying states in small organic molecules.

  12. Second-order perturbative corrections to the restricted active space configuration interaction with the hole and particle approach

    SciTech Connect

    Casanova, David

    2014-04-14

    Second-order corrections to the restricted active space configuration interaction (RASCI) with the hole and particle truncation of the excitation operator are developed. Theoretically, the computational cost of the implemented perturbative approach, abbreviated as RASCI(2), grows like its single reference counterpart in MP2. Two different forms of RASCI(2) have been explored, that is the generalized Davidson-Kapuy and the Epstein-Nesbet partitions of the Hamiltonian. The preliminary results indicate that the use of energy level shift of a few tenths of a Hartree might systematically improve the accuracy of the RASCI(2) energies. The method has been tested in the computation of the ground state energy profiles along the dissociation of the hydrogen fluoride and N{sub 2} molecules, the computation of correlation energy in the G2/97 molecular test set, and in the computation of excitation energies to low-lying states in small organic molecules.

  13. Neural activation for conceptual identification of correct versus incorrect tool-object pairs.

    PubMed

    Mizelle, J C; Wheaton, Lewis A

    2010-10-01

    Appropriate tool-object pairing is a natural part of our lives. When preparing to clean our teeth, we know that a toothbrush is useful, but not a screwdriver. The neural correlates of this pairing process remain unclear. We recorded 64-channel electroencephalography to determine neural correlates of identification of tool-object matches and mismatches. Subjects were shown a target tool (e.g. spoon) later paired with an object that was either a conceptual match (e.g. bowl) or mismatch (e.g. wood). To verify that activity was not related to general concept of match-mismatch, in a second condition subjects saw non-tool environmental items (e.g. bird) later paired with a conceptual match (e.g. nest) or mismatch (e.g. spider web). Analysis was focused on time bins after each picture, using standardized low-resolution brain electromagnetic tomography (sLORETA). Tool-object match versus mismatch revealed significant differences in the posterior cingulate, precuneus, left insula and superior temporal gyrus. These patterns were not present for environmental match versus mismatch. This work suggests a specific network in comprehending tool-based pairings, but not extensive to other pairings. The posterior cingulate, precuneus, insula and superior temporal gyrus preferentially differentiates tool-object matching and mismatching, identifying a potential locus related to impairments in comprehending appropriate and inappropriate tool-object relationships that arise after neural injury.

  14. A simple optical model to estimate diffuse attenuation coefficient of photosynthetically active radiation in an extremely turbid lake from surface reflectance.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yunlin; Liu, Xiaohan; Yin, Yan; Wang, Mingzhu; Qin, Boqiang

    2012-08-27

    Accurate estimation of the diffuse attenuation coefficient is critical for our understanding and modelling of key physical, chemical, and biological processes in water bodies. For extremely turbid, shallow, Lake Taihu in China, we synchronously monitored the diffuse attenuation coefficient of photosynthetically active radiation (Kd(PAR)) and the remote sensing reflectance at 134 sites. Kd(PAR)) varied greatly among different sites from 1.62 to 14.68 m(-1) with a mean value of 5.62 ± 2.99 m(-1). A simple optical model from near-infrared remote sensing reflectance of MODIS channels 2 (859 nm) and 15 (748 nm) was calibrated, and validated, to estimate Kd(PAR). With the simple optical model, the root mean square error and mean relative error were 0.95 m(-1) and 17.0% respectively at 748 nm, and 0.98 m(-1) and 17.6% at 859 nm, based on an independent validation data set. Our results showed a good precision of estimation for Kd(PAR) using the new simple optical model, contrasting with the poor estimations derived from existing empirical and semi-analytical models developed in clear, open ocean waters or slightly turbid coastal waters. Although at 748 nm the model had slightly higher precision than at 859 nm, the spatial resolution at 859 nm was four times that at 748 nm. Therefore, we propose a new model based on the MODIS-derived normalized water-leaving radiances at a wavelength of 859 nm, for accurate retrieval of Kd(PAR) in extremely turbid, shallow lakes with Kd(PAR) larger than 1.5 m(-1).

  15. Absorption coefficient instrument for turbid natural waters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Friedman, E.; Cherdak, A.; Poole, L.; Houghton, W.

    1980-01-01

    The paper presents an instrument that directly measures multispectral absorption coefficient of turbid natural water. Attention is given to the design, which is shown to incorporate methods for the compensation of variation in the internal light source intensity, correction of the spectrally dependent nature of the optical elements, and correction for variation in the background light level. In addition, when used in conjunction with a spectrally matched total attenuation instrument, the spectrally dependent scattering coefficient can also be derived. Finally, it is reported that systematic errors associated with multiple scattering have been estimated using Monte Carlo techniques.

  16. Shear viscosity coefficient of liquid lanthanides

    SciTech Connect

    Patel, H. P. Thakor, P. B. Prajapati, A. V.; Sonvane, Y. A.

    2015-05-15

    Present paper deals with the computation of shear viscosity coefficient (η) of liquid lanthanides. The effective pair potential v(r) is calculated through our newly constructed model potential. The Pair distribution function g(r) is calculated from PYHS reference system. To see the influence of local field correction function, Hartree (H), Tailor (T) and Sarkar et al (S) local field correction function are used. Present results are compared with available experimental as well as theoretical data. Lastly, we found that our newly constructed model potential successfully explains the shear viscosity coefficient (η) of liquid lanthanides.

  17. Spatial regulation of Aurora A activity during mitotic spindle assembly requires RHAMM to correctly localize TPX2

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Helen; Mohan, Pooja; Jiang, Jihong; Nemirovsky, Oksana; He, Daniel; Fleisch, Markus C; Niederacher, Dieter; Pilarski, Linda M; Lim, C James; Maxwell, Christopher A

    2014-01-01

    Construction of a mitotic spindle requires biochemical pathways to assemble spindle microtubules and structural proteins to organize these microtubules into a bipolar array. Through a complex with dynein, the receptor for hyaluronan-mediated motility (RHAMM) cross-links mitotic microtubules to provide structural support, maintain spindle integrity, and correctly orient the mitotic spindle. Here, we locate RHAMM to sites of microtubule assembly at centrosomes and non-centrosome sites near kinetochores and demonstrate that RHAMM is required for the activation of Aurora kinase A. Silencing of RHAMM delays the kinetics of spindle assembly, mislocalizes targeting protein for XKlp2 (TPX2), and attenuates the localized activation of Aurora kinase A with a consequent reduction in mitotic spindle length. The RHAMM–TPX2 complex requires a C-terminal basic leucine zipper in RHAMM and a domain that includes the nuclear localization signal in TPX2. Together, our findings identify RHAMM as a critical regulator for Aurora kinase A signaling and suggest that RHAMM ensures bipolar spindle assembly and mitotic progression through the integration of biochemical and structural pathways. PMID:24875404

  18. Gaseous nitrogen oxides stimulate cell cycle progression by retinoblastoma phosphorylation via activation of cyclins/Cdks [correction].

    PubMed

    Chen, Jing-Hsien; Tseng, Tsui-Hwa; Ho, Yung-Chyan; Lin, Hui-Hsuan; Lin, Wea-Lung; Wang, Chau-Jong

    2003-11-01

    Nitrogen oxides (NOx) are important indoor and outdoor air pollutants. Many studies have indicated that NOx gas causes lung tissue damage by its oxidation properties and its free radicals. In a previous study we demonstrated that NOx gas induced proliferation of human lung fibroblast MRC-5 cells. In this study we show that NOx gas stimulates MRC-5 cell proliferation by retinoblastoma (Rb) phosphorylation via activation of cyclin-cell division protein kinase (cdk) complexes [correction]. Western blot and immunoprecipitation data showed that NOx gas increased the expressions of cyclinA/cdk2, cyclinD1/cdk4, and cyclinE/cdk2 complexes in the cells at 9 h after treatment. The levels of phospho-Rb were also increased and cdk inhibitors (CKIs) p27 and p16 were apparently decreased. These data suggested that NOx gas stimulates cell-cycle progression by Rb phosphorylation via activation of cyclin-cdk complexes and inhibition of CKIs. In conclusion, the NOx-gas that induced lung fibroblast cell proliferation by stimulation of cell-cycle progression may contribute to lung fibrosis by NOx pollutants.

  19. Isopiestic Investigation of the Osmotic and Activity Coefficients of {yMgCl2 + (1 - y)MgSO4}(aq) and the Osmotic Coefficients of Na2SO4.MgSO4(aq) at 298.15 K

    SciTech Connect

    Miladinovic, J; Ninkovic, R; Todorovic, M; Rard, J A

    2007-06-06

    Isopiestic vapor pressure measurements were made for {l_brace}yMgCl{sub 2} + (1-y)MgSO{sub 4}{r_brace}(aq) solutions with MgCl{sub 2} ionic strength fractions of y = 0, 0.1997, 0.3989, 0.5992, 0.8008, and (1) at the temperature 298.15 K, using KCl(aq) as the reference standard. These measurements for the mixtures cover the ionic strength range I = 0.9794 to 9.4318 mol {center_dot} kg{sup -1}. In addition, isopiestic measurements were made with NaCl(aq) as reference standard for mixtures of {l_brace}xNa{sub 2}SO{sub 4} + (1-x)MgSO{sub 4}{r_brace}(aq) with the molality fraction x = 0.50000 that correspond to solutions of the evaporite mineral bloedite (astrakanite), Na{sub 2}Mg(SO{sub 4}){sub 2} {center_dot} 4H{sub 2}O(cr). The total molalities, m{sub T} = m(Na{sub 2}SO{sub 4}) + m(MgSO{sub 4}), range from m{sub T} = 1.4479 to 4.4312 mol {center_dot} kg{sup -1} (I = 5.0677 to 15.509 mol {center_dot} kg{sup -1}), where the uppermost concentration is the highest oversaturation molality that could be achieved by isothermal evaporation of the solvent at 298.15 K. The parameters of an extended ion-interaction (Pitzer) model for MgCl2(aq) at 298.15 K, which were required for an analysis of the {l_brace}yMgCl{sub 2} + (1-y)MgSO{sub 4}{r_brace}(aq) mixture results, were evaluated up to I = 12.025 mol {center_dot} kg{sup -1} from published isopiestic data together with the six new osmotic coefficients obtained in this study. Osmotic coefficients of {l_brace}yMgCl{sub 2} + (1-y)MgSO{sub 4}{r_brace}(aq) solutions from the present study, along with critically-assessed values from previous studies, were used to evaluate the mixing parameters of the extended ion-interaction model.

  20. [Correlations between the coefficient of variation of RR intervals and sympathetic nerve activity following superior tilting in normotensive subjects and in patients with essential hypertension].

    PubMed

    Shimazaki, M; Kikuchi, K; Yamaji, I; Kobayakawa, H; Yamamoto, M; Kudo, C; Wada, A; Mukai, H; Iimura, O

    1991-01-01

    The relationship between changes in sympathetic nerve activity and those in parasympathetic tone with a change in position was investigated in patients with essential hypertension using the coefficient of variation of RR intervals on electrocardiograms (CVRR). Mean arterial pressure (MAP), heart rate (HR), plasma noradrenaline concentration (pNA) and CVRR were measured in a supine position at rest and 20 min after having the head tilted 60 degrees superiorly in 10 normotensives (NT: 51.9 +/- 3.0 yrs) and 7 essential hypertensive patients (EHT: 51.0 +/- 2.8 yrs). After changing the position, CVRR decreased significantly in the NT, but not in the EHT; whereas, significant increases of both HR and pNA without significant changes in MAP were shown in both groups. A significant negative correlation between percentage changes in CVRR (% delta CVRR) and pNA (% delta pNA) were observed in the NT, but not in the EHT. However, there was no relationship of % delta CVRR to % delta MAP or to % delta HR in either group. It was suggested from the changes in CVRR that suppression of the parasympathetic tone, which occurs in the NT group corresponding to sympathetic augmentation to present a decrease in blood pressure with a change in position, may be impaired in the EHT group.

  1. Correction of an active space telescope mirror using a deformable mirror in a woofer-tweeter configuration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Allen, Matthew R.; Kim, Jae Jun; Agrawal, Brij N.

    2016-04-01

    The Naval Postgraduate School's segmented mirror telescope (SMT) was developed using prototype silicon carbide active hybrid mirror technology to demonstrate lower cost and rapid manufacture of primary mirror segments for a space telescope. The developmental mirror segments used too few actuators limiting the ability to adequately correct the surface figure error. To address the unintended shortfall of the developmental mirrors, a deformable mirror is added to the SMT and control techniques are developed. The control techniques are similar to woofer-tweeter adaptive optics, where the SMT segment represents the woofer and the deformable mirror represents the tweeter. The optical design of an SMT woofer-tweeter system is presented, and the impacts of field angle magnification on the placement and size of the deformable mirror are analyzed. A space telescope woofer-tweeter wavefront control technique is proposed using a global influence matrix and closed-loop constrained minimization controller. The control technique simultaneously manipulates the woofer and tweeter mirrors. Simulation and experimental results demonstrate a significant improvement in wavefront error of the primary mirror and the control technique shows significant wavefront error improvement compared to sequentially controlling the woofer and tweeter mirrors.

  2. Coefficient Omega Bootstrap Confidence Intervals: Nonnormal Distributions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Padilla, Miguel A.; Divers, Jasmin

    2013-01-01

    The performance of the normal theory bootstrap (NTB), the percentile bootstrap (PB), and the bias-corrected and accelerated (BCa) bootstrap confidence intervals (CIs) for coefficient omega was assessed through a Monte Carlo simulation under conditions not previously investigated. Of particular interests were nonnormal Likert-type and binary items.…

  3. Calculation of the standard partial molal thermodynamic properties of KCl{sup 0} and activity coefficients of aqueous KCl at temperatures and pressures to 1000{degree}C and 5 kbar

    SciTech Connect

    Pokrovskii, V.A.; Helgeson, H.C.

    1997-06-01

    Regression of experimental activity coefficient and dissociation constant data reported in the literature with the Hueckel and Setchenow equations and the revised HKF equations of state generated parameters and thermodynamic properties of dissociated KCl and KCl{sup 0} at 25{degrees}C and bar that can be used to calculate the standard partial molal thermodynamic properties of KCl{sup 0} and the activity coefficients of KCl at temperatures and pressures to 1000{degrees}C and 5 kbar. 46 refs., 6 figs., 4 tabs.

  4. Correction for intravascular activity in the oxygen-15 steady-state technique is independent of the regional hematocrit

    SciTech Connect

    Lammertsma, A.A.; Baron, J.C.; Jones, T.

    1987-06-01

    The oxygen-15 steady-state technique to measure the regional cerebral metabolic rate for oxygen requires a correction for the nonextracted intravascular molecular oxygen-15. To perform this correction, an additional procedure is carried out using RBCs labeled with /sup 11/CO or C/sup 15/O. The previously reported correction method, however, required knowledge of the regional cerebral to large vessel hematocrit ratio. A closer examination of the underlying model eliminated this ratio. Both molecular oxygen and carbon monoxide are carried by RBCs and are therefore similarly affected by a change in hematocrit.

  5. In Silico Calculation of Infinite Dilution Activity Coefficients of Molecular Solutes in Ionic Liquids: Critical Review of Current Methods and New Models Based on Three Machine Learning Algorithms.

    PubMed

    Paduszyński, Kamil

    2016-08-22

    The aim of the paper is to address all the disadvantages of currently available models for calculating infinite dilution activity coefficients (γ(∞)) of molecular solutes in ionic liquids (ILs)-a relevant property from the point of view of many applications of ILs, particularly in separations. Three new models are proposed, each of them based on distinct machine learning algorithm: stepwise multiple linear regression (SWMLR), feed-forward artificial neural network (FFANN), and least-squares support vector machine (LSSVM). The models were established based on the most comprehensive γ(∞) data bank reported so far (>34 000 data points for 188 ILs and 128 solutes). Following the paper published previously [J. Chem. Inf. Model 2014, 54, 1311-1324], the ILs were treated in terms of group contributions, whereas the Abraham solvation parameters were used to quantify an impact of solute structure. Temperature is also included in the input data of the models so that they can be utilized to obtain temperature-dependent data and thus related thermodynamic functions. Both internal and external validation techniques were applied to assess the statistical significance and explanatory power of the final correlations. A comparative study of the overall performance of the investigated SWMLR/FFANN/LSSVM approaches is presented in terms of root-mean-square error and average absolute relative deviation between calculated and experimental γ(∞), evaluated for different families of ILs and solutes, as well as between calculated and experimental infinite dilution selectivity for separation problems benzene from n-hexane and thiophene from n-heptane. LSSVM is shown to be a method with the lowest values of both training and generalization errors. It is finally demonstrated that the established models exhibit an improved accuracy compared to the state-of-the-art model, namely, temperature-dependent group contribution linear solvation energy relationship, published in 2011 [J. Chem

  6. The CPA Equation of State and an Activity Coefficient Model for Accurate Molar Enthalpy Calculations of Mixtures with Carbon Dioxide and Water/Brine

    SciTech Connect

    Myint, P. C.; Hao, Y.; Firoozabadi, A.

    2015-03-27

    Thermodynamic property calculations of mixtures containing carbon dioxide (CO2) and water, including brines, are essential in theoretical models of many natural and industrial processes. The properties of greatest practical interest are density, solubility, and enthalpy. Many models for density and solubility calculations have been presented in the literature, but there exists only one study, by Spycher and Pruess, that has compared theoretical molar enthalpy predictions with experimental data [1]. In this report, we recommend two different models for enthalpy calculations: the CPA equation of state by Li and Firoozabadi [2], and the CO2 activity coefficient model by Duan and Sun [3]. We show that the CPA equation of state, which has been demonstrated to provide good agreement with density and solubility data, also accurately calculates molar enthalpies of pure CO2, pure water, and both CO2-rich and aqueous (H2O-rich) mixtures of the two species. It is applicable to a wider range of conditions than the Spycher and Pruess model. In aqueous sodium chloride (NaCl) mixtures, we show that Duan and Sun’s model yields accurate results for the partial molar enthalpy of CO2. It can be combined with another model for the brine enthalpy to calculate the molar enthalpy of H2O-CO2-NaCl mixtures. We conclude by explaining how the CPA equation of state may be modified to further improve agreement with experiments. This generalized CPA is the basis of our future work on this topic.

  7. In Silico Calculation of Infinite Dilution Activity Coefficients of Molecular Solutes in Ionic Liquids: Critical Review of Current Methods and New Models Based on Three Machine Learning Algorithms.

    PubMed

    Paduszyński, Kamil

    2016-08-22

    The aim of the paper is to address all the disadvantages of currently available models for calculating infinite dilution activity coefficients (γ(∞)) of molecular solutes in ionic liquids (ILs)-a relevant property from the point of view of many applications of ILs, particularly in separations. Three new models are proposed, each of them based on distinct machine learning algorithm: stepwise multiple linear regression (SWMLR), feed-forward artificial neural network (FFANN), and least-squares support vector machine (LSSVM). The models were established based on the most comprehensive γ(∞) data bank reported so far (>34 000 data points for 188 ILs and 128 solutes). Following the paper published previously [J. Chem. Inf. Model 2014, 54, 1311-1324], the ILs were treated in terms of group contributions, whereas the Abraham solvation parameters were used to quantify an impact of solute structure. Temperature is also included in the input data of the models so that they can be utilized to obtain temperature-dependent data and thus related thermodynamic functions. Both internal and external validation techniques were applied to assess the statistical significance and explanatory power of the final correlations. A comparative study of the overall performance of the investigated SWMLR/FFANN/LSSVM approaches is presented in terms of root-mean-square error and average absolute relative deviation between calculated and experimental γ(∞), evaluated for different families of ILs and solutes, as well as between calculated and experimental infinite dilution selectivity for separation problems benzene from n-hexane and thiophene from n-heptane. LSSVM is shown to be a method with the lowest values of both training and generalization errors. It is finally demonstrated that the established models exhibit an improved accuracy compared to the state-of-the-art model, namely, temperature-dependent group contribution linear solvation energy relationship, published in 2011 [J. Chem

  8. Correction: Impact of metallurgical activities on the content of trace elements in the spatial soil and plant parts of Rubus fruticosus L.

    PubMed

    Nujkić, M M; Dimitrijević, M D; Alagić, S Č; Tošić, S B; Petrović, J V

    2016-06-15

    Correction for 'Impact of metallurgical activities on the content of trace elements in the spatial soil and plant parts of Rubus fruticosus L.' by M. M. Nujkićet al., Environ. Sci.: Processes Impacts, 2016, 18, 350-360. PMID:27173003

  9. Correction: Towards the rationalization of catalytic activity values by means of local hyper-softness on the catalytic site: a criticism about the use of net electric charges.

    PubMed

    Martínez-Araya, Jorge Ignacio; Grand, André; Glossman-Mitnik, Daniel

    2016-01-28

    Correction for 'Towards the rationalization of catalytic activity values by means of local hyper-softness on the catalytic site: a criticism about the use of net electric charges' by Jorge Ignacio Martínez-Araya et al., Phys. Chem. Chem. Phys., 2015, DOI: 10.1039/c5cp03822g.

  10. Correction: Towards the rationalization of catalytic activity values by means of local hyper-softness on the catalytic site: a criticism about the use of net electric charges.

    PubMed

    Martínez-Araya, Jorge Ignacio; Grand, André; Glossman-Mitnik, Daniel

    2016-01-28

    Correction for 'Towards the rationalization of catalytic activity values by means of local hyper-softness on the catalytic site: a criticism about the use of net electric charges' by Jorge Ignacio Martínez-Araya et al., Phys. Chem. Chem. Phys., 2015, DOI: 10.1039/c5cp03822g. PMID:26524565

  11. Electroweak Corrections

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barbieri, Riccardo

    2016-10-01

    The test of the electroweak corrections has played a major role in providing evidence for the gauge and the Higgs sectors of the Standard Model. At the same time the consideration of the electroweak corrections has given significant indirect information on the masses of the top and the Higgs boson before their discoveries and important orientation/constraints on the searches for new physics, still highly valuable in the present situation. The progression of these contributions is reviewed.

  12. Combining active-space coupled-cluster methods with moment energy corrections via the CC(P;Q) methodology, with benchmark calculations for biradical transition states.

    PubMed

    Shen, Jun; Piecuch, Piotr

    2012-04-14

    We have recently suggested the CC(P;Q) methodology that can correct energies obtained in the active-space coupled-cluster (CC) or equation-of-motion (EOM) CC calculations, which recover much of the nondynamical and some dynamical electron correlation effects, for the higher-order, mostly dynamical, correlations missing in the active-space CC/EOMCC considerations. It is shown that one can greatly improve the description of biradical transition states, both in terms of the resulting energy barriers and total energies, by combining the CC approach with singles, doubles, and active-space triples, termed CCSDt, with the CC(P;Q)-style correction due to missing triple excitations defining the CC(t;3) approximation.

  13. Measuring Seebeck Coefficient

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Snyder, G. Jeffrey (Inventor)

    2015-01-01

    A high temperature Seebeck coefficient measurement apparatus and method with various features to minimize typical sources of errors is described. Common sources of temperature and voltage measurement errors which may impact accurate measurement are identified and reduced. Applying the identified principles, a high temperature Seebeck measurement apparatus and method employing a uniaxial, four-point geometry is described to operate from room temperature up to 1300K. These techniques for non-destructive Seebeck coefficient measurements are simple to operate, and are suitable for bulk samples with a broad range of physical types and shapes.

  14. Activity and Activity Coefficient of Iron Oxides in the Liquid FeO-Fe2O3-CaO-SiO2 Slag Systems at Intermediate Oxygen Partial Pressures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Henao, Hector M.; Itagaki, Kimio

    2007-10-01

    At present, there is a scarcity of data on the activities of iron oxides in the FeO-Fe2O3-CaO-SiO2 slag system at intermediate oxygen partial pressures and temperatures relevant to sulfide smelting and nonferrous metallurgy. The present study provides relevant data at temperatures between 1573 and 1673 K and partial pressures of oxygen between 10-9 and 10-4 atm. The experiments were carried out by equilibrating the slag in a CO-CO2 gas mixture in a platinum crucible, after which the phases of all the experimental samples, including the platinum foil, were analyzed by electron probe microanalysis (EPMA). Where only liquid phase or liquid phase and tridymite (SiO2) were observed, wet chemical analysis was used to determine the ratio of (mass pct Fe2+)/(mass pct Fe3+). Activity and activity coefficients for FeO (liquid) and FeO1.33 (solid) were calculated. Tendencies of the effect of the (CaO/SiO2) ratio, temperature, and oxygen partial pressure on these thermochemical quantities are discussed in this article.

  15. The Use of Structure Coefficients in Regression Research.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Perry, Lucille N.

    It is recognized that parametric methods (e.g., t-tests, discriminant analysis, and methods based on analysis of variance) are special cases of canonical correlation analysis. In canonical correlation it has been argued that structure coefficients must be computed to correctly interpret results. It follows that structure coefficients may be useful…

  16. Jitter Correction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Waegell, Mordecai J.; Palacios, David M.

    2011-01-01

    Jitter_Correct.m is a MATLAB function that automatically measures and corrects inter-frame jitter in an image sequence to a user-specified precision. In addition, the algorithm dynamically adjusts the image sample size to increase the accuracy of the measurement. The Jitter_Correct.m function takes an image sequence with unknown frame-to-frame jitter and computes the translations of each frame (column and row, in pixels) relative to a chosen reference frame with sub-pixel accuracy. The translations are measured using a Cross Correlation Fourier transformation method in which the relative phase of the two transformed images is fit to a plane. The measured translations are then used to correct the inter-frame jitter of the image sequence. The function also dynamically expands the image sample size over which the cross-correlation is measured to increase the accuracy of the measurement. This increases the robustness of the measurement to variable magnitudes of inter-frame jitter

  17. Corrective Action Plan for CAU No. 95: Area 15 EPA Farm Laboratory Building, Decontamination and Demolition Closure Activities - Nevada Test Site. Rev. 0

    SciTech Connect

    Olson, A.L.; Nacht, S.J.

    1997-11-01

    This Corrective Action Plan (CAP) provides the selected corrective action alternative and proposes the closure implementation methodology for the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) Farm Laboratory Building 15-06 located in Area 15 of the Nevada Test Site (NTS), Nye County, Nevada. The facility is part of the Environmental Restoration Project managed by the U.S. Department of Energy/Nevada Operations Office (DOE/NV) under the Decontamination and Decommissioning (D&D) Subproject which serves to manage and dispose of surplus facilities at the NTS in a manner that will protect personnel, the public, and the environment. It is identified as Corrective Action Unit (CAU) 95 in Appendix III of the Federal Facilities Agreement and Consent Order (FFACO). In July 1997, the DOE/NV verbally requested approval from the Nevada Division of Environmental Protection (NDEP) for the closure schedule to be accelerated. Currently, field activities are anticipated to be completed by September 30, 1997. In order to meet this new schedule NDEP has agreed to review this document as expeditiously as possible. Comments will be addressed in the Closure Report after field activities have been completed, unless significant issues require resolution during closure activities.

  18. Ex-vivo gene therapy restores LEKTI activity and corrects the architecture of Netherton syndrome-derived skin grafts.

    PubMed

    Di, Wei-Li; Larcher, Fernado; Semenova, Ekaterina; Talbot, Gill E; Harper, John I; Del Rio, Marcela; Thrasher, Adrian J; Qasim, Waseem

    2011-02-01

    Netherton syndrome (NS) is a debilitating congenital skin disorder caused by mutations in the SPINK5 gene encoding the lymphoepithelial Kazal-type-related inhibitor (LEKTI). It is characterized by defective keratinization, recurrent infections, and hypernatraemic dehydration with a mortality rate of about 10% in the first year of life. Currently, there are no curative treatments for NS. We have developed a HIV-1 based, self-inactivating lentiviral vector to express SPINK5 in keratinocytes as part of an ex-vivo gene therapy strategy for NS. High transduction efficiency was achieved in NS keratinocytes and reconstitution of LEKTI expression was confirmed in previously deficient cells. These genetically corrected keratinocytes were further tested in an in vitro organotypic culture (OTC) system and in vivo mouse/human skin engraftment model. Results showed correction of epidermal architecture in both OTCs and regenerated skin grafts. Importantly, the results from corrected skin grafts indicated that even where detectable LEKTI expression was restored to a limited numbers of cells, a wider bystander benefit occurred around these small populations. As LEKTI is a secreted protein, the genetically modified graft may provide not only an immediate local protective barrier, but also act as a source of secreted LEKTI providing a generalized benefit following ex-vivo gene therapy.

  19. Ex-vivo Gene Therapy Restores LEKTI Activity and Corrects the Architecture of Netherton Syndrome-derived Skin Grafts

    PubMed Central

    Di, Wei-Li; Larcher, Fernado; Semenova, Ekaterina; Talbot, Gill E; Harper, John I; Del Rio, Marcela; Thrasher, Adrian J; Qasim, Waseem

    2011-01-01

    Netherton syndrome (NS) is a debilitating congenital skin disorder caused by mutations in the SPINK5 gene encoding the lymphoepithelial Kazal-type-related inhibitor (LEKTI). It is characterized by defective keratinization, recurrent infections, and hypernatraemic dehydration with a mortality rate of about 10% in the first year of life. Currently, there are no curative treatments for NS. We have developed a HIV-1 based, self-inactivating lentiviral vector to express SPINK5 in keratinocytes as part of an ex-vivo gene therapy strategy for NS. High transduction efficiency was achieved in NS keratinocytes and reconstitution of LEKTI expression was confirmed in previously deficient cells. These genetically corrected keratinocytes were further tested in an in vitro organotypic culture (OTC) system and in vivo mouse/human skin engraftment model. Results showed correction of epidermal architecture in both OTCs and regenerated skin grafts. Importantly, the results from corrected skin grafts indicated that even where detectable LEKTI expression was restored to a limited numbers of cells, a wider bystander benefit occurred around these small populations. As LEKTI is a secreted protein, the genetically modified graft may provide not only an immediate local protective barrier, but also act as a source of secreted LEKTI providing a generalized benefit following ex-vivo gene therapy. PMID:20877344

  20. Active mirrors warped using Zernike polynomials for correcting off-axis aberrations of fixed primary mirrors. II. Optical testing and performance evaluation.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moretto, G.; Lemaitre, G. R.; Bactivelane, T.; Wang, M.; Ferrari, M.; Mazzanti, S.; di Biagio, B.; Borra, E. F.

    1995-12-01

    We investigate the aspherization of an active mirror for correcting third and fifth-order aberrations. We use a stainless steel AISI 420 mirror with a controlled pressure load, two series of 12-punctual radial positions of force application distributed symmetrically in two concentric rings around the mirror. We obtain the wavefronts for Cv1, Sph3, Coma3, Astm3, Comatri, Astm5 as well as those of the added wavefronts. Although this active prototype mirror has general uses, our goal is to compensate the aberrations of a liquid mirror observing at large angles from the zenith.

  1. Correction of dental artifacts within the anatomical surface in PET/MRI using active shape models and k-nearest-neighbors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ladefoged, Claes N.; Andersen, Flemming L.; Keller, Sune H.; Beyer, Thomas; Højgaard, Liselotte; Lauze, François

    2014-03-01

    In combined PET/MR, attenuation correction (AC) is performed indirectly based on the available MR image information. Metal implant-induced susceptibility artifacts and subsequent signal voids challenge MR-based AC. Several papers acknowledge the problem in PET attenuation correction when dental artifacts are ignored, but none of them attempts to solve the problem. We propose a clinically feasible correction method which combines Active Shape Models (ASM) and k- Nearest-Neighbors (kNN) into a simple approach which finds and corrects the dental artifacts within the surface boundaries of the patient anatomy. ASM is used to locate a number of landmarks in the T1-weighted MR-image of a new patient. We calculate a vector of offsets from each voxel within a signal void to each of the landmarks. We then use kNN to classify each voxel as belonging to an artifact or an actual signal void using this offset vector, and fill the artifact voxels with a value representing soft tissue. We tested the method using fourteen patients without artifacts, and eighteen patients with dental artifacts of varying sizes within the anatomical surface of the head/neck region. Though the method wrongly filled a small volume in the bottom part of a maxillary sinus in two patients without any artifacts, due to their abnormal location, it succeeded in filling all dental artifact regions in all patients. In conclusion, we propose a method, which combines ASM and kNN into a simple approach which, as the results show, succeeds to find and correct the dental artifacts within the anatomical surface.

  2. Path integration of head direction: updating a packet of neural activity at the correct speed using axonal conduction delays.

    PubMed

    Walters, Daniel; Stringer, Simon; Rolls, Edmund

    2013-01-01

    The head direction cell system is capable of accurately updating its current representation of head direction in the absence of visual input. This is known as the path integration of head direction. An important question is how the head direction cell system learns to perform accurate path integration of head direction. In this paper we propose a model of velocity path integration of head direction in which the natural time delay of axonal transmission between a linked continuous attractor network and competitive network acts as a timing mechanism to facilitate the correct speed of path integration. The model effectively learns a "look-up" table for the correct speed of path integration. In simulation, we show that the model is able to successfully learn two different speeds of path integration across two different axonal conduction delays, and without the need to alter any other model parameters. An implication of this model is that, by learning look-up tables for each speed of path integration, the model should exhibit a degree of robustness to damage. In simulations, we show that the speed of path integration is not significantly affected by degrading the network through removing a proportion of the cells that signal rotational velocity.

  3. Active optics for dynamical correction of fluctuations of atmospheric refraction on a differential optical absorption spectroscopy device.

    PubMed

    Fuentes-Inzunza, Rodrigo A; Gutiérrez, Javier; Saavedra, Carlos

    2012-10-20

    We have designed and developed a feedback mechanism for continuous monitoring in a long-pass differential optical absorption spectroscopy (LP-DOAS) setup. This allows one to correct photo-thermal deflection due to the local fluctuations refraction index of the air. For this purpose, using an unbalanced beam splitter, a small fraction of the collected DOAS signal is imaged onto a low-cost CCD camera using a biconvex lens, while the other portion of the signal is coupled into a fiber optic for trace gas detection. By monitoring the registered signal at the CCD camera, a feedback mechanism acting on the transversal position of the lens is able to compensate an arbitrary transversal displacement of the collected signal at the focal plane of the receiver telescope, allowing an optimal coupling into the optical fiber. PMID:23089775

  4. Diffusion coefficient of three-dimensional Yukawa liquids

    SciTech Connect

    Dzhumagulova, K. N.; Ramazanov, T. S.; Masheeva, R. U.

    2013-11-15

    The purpose of this work is an investigation of the diffusion coefficient of the dust component in complex plasma. The computer simulation of the Yukawa liquids was made on the basis of the Langevin equation, which takes into account the influence of buffer plasma on the dust particles dynamics. The Green–Kubo relation was used to calculate the diffusion coefficient. Calculations of the diffusion coefficient for a wide range of the system parameters were performed. Using obtained numerical data, we constructed the interpolation formula for the diffusion coefficient. We also show that the interpolation formula correctly describes experimental data obtained under microgravity conditions.

  5. The one hundredth year of Rudolf Wolf's death: Do we have the correct reconstruction of solar activity?

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hoyt, Douglas V.; Schatten, Kenneth H.; Nesmes-Ribes, Elizabeth

    1994-01-01

    In the one hundred years since Wolf died, little effort has gone into research to see if improved reconstructions of sunspot numbers can be made. We have gathered more than 349,000 observations of daily sunspot group counts from more than 350 observers active from 1610 to 1993. Based upon group counts alone, it is possible to make an objective and homogeneous reconstruction of sunspot numbers. From our study, it appears that the Sun has steadily increased in activity since 1700 with the exception of a brief decrease in the Dalton Minimum (1795-1823). The significant results here are the greater depth of the Dalton Minimum, the generally lower activity throughout the 1700's, and the gradual rise in activity from the Maunder Minimum to the present day. This solar activity reconstruction is quite similar to those Wolf published before 1868 rather than the revised Wolf reconstructions after 1873 which used geomagnetic fluctuations.

  6. A CORRECTION.

    PubMed

    Johnson, D

    1940-03-22

    IN a recently published volume on "The Origin of Submarine Canyons" the writer inadvertently credited to A. C. Veatch an excerpt from a submarine chart actually contoured by P. A. Smith, of the U. S. Coast and Geodetic Survey. The chart in question is Chart IVB of Special Paper No. 7 of the Geological Society of America entitled "Atlantic Submarine Valleys of the United States and the Congo Submarine Valley, by A. C. Veatch and P. A. Smith," and the excerpt appears as Plate III of the volume fist cited above. In view of the heavy labor involved in contouring the charts accompanying the paper by Veatch and Smith and the beauty of the finished product, it would be unfair to Mr. Smith to permit the error to go uncorrected. Excerpts from two other charts are correctly ascribed to Dr. Veatch. PMID:17839404

  7. A CORRECTION.

    PubMed

    Johnson, D

    1940-03-22

    IN a recently published volume on "The Origin of Submarine Canyons" the writer inadvertently credited to A. C. Veatch an excerpt from a submarine chart actually contoured by P. A. Smith, of the U. S. Coast and Geodetic Survey. The chart in question is Chart IVB of Special Paper No. 7 of the Geological Society of America entitled "Atlantic Submarine Valleys of the United States and the Congo Submarine Valley, by A. C. Veatch and P. A. Smith," and the excerpt appears as Plate III of the volume fist cited above. In view of the heavy labor involved in contouring the charts accompanying the paper by Veatch and Smith and the beauty of the finished product, it would be unfair to Mr. Smith to permit the error to go uncorrected. Excerpts from two other charts are correctly ascribed to Dr. Veatch.

  8. A nano-disperse ferritin-core mimetic that efficiently corrects anemia without luminal iron redox activity

    PubMed Central

    Powell, Jonathan J.; Bruggraber, Sylvaine F.A.; Faria, Nuno; Poots, Lynsey K.; Hondow, Nicole; Pennycook, Timothy J.; Latunde-Dada, Gladys O.; Simpson, Robert J.; Brown, Andy P.; Pereira, Dora I.A.

    2014-01-01

    The 2-5 nm Fe(III) oxo-hydroxide core of ferritin is less ordered and readily bioavailable compared to its pure synthetic analogue, ferrihydrite. We report the facile synthesis of tartrate-modified, nano-disperse ferrihydrite of small primary particle size, but with enlarged or strained lattice structure (~ 2.7 Å for the main Bragg peak versus 2.6 Å for synthetic ferrihydrite). Analysis indicated that co-precipitation conditions can be achieved for tartrate inclusion into the developing ferrihydrite particles, retarding both growth and crystallization and favoring stabilization of the cross-linked polymeric structure. In murine models, gastrointestinal uptake was independent of luminal Fe(III) reduction to Fe(II) and, yet, absorption was equivalent to that of ferrous sulphate, efficiently correcting the induced anemia. This process may model dietary Fe(III) absorption and potentially provide a side effect-free form of cheap supplemental iron. From the Clinical Editor Small size tartrate-modified, nano-disperse ferrihydrite was used for efficient gastrointestinal delivery of soluble Fe(III) without the risk for free radical generation in murine models. This method may provide a potentially side effect-free form iron supplementation. PMID:24394211

  9. Corrections and clarifications.

    PubMed

    1994-11-11

    The 1994 and 1995 federal science budget appropriations for two of the activities were inadvertently transposed in a table that accompanied the article "Hitting the President's target is mixed blessing for agencies" by Jeffrey Mervis (News & Comment, 14 Oct., p. 211). The correct figures for Defense Department spending on university research are $1.460 billion in 1994 and $1.279 billion in 1995; for research and development at NASA, the correct figures are $9.455 billion in 1994 and $9.824 billion in 1995.

  10. Effects of lower body positive pressure on muscle sympathetic nerve activity response [correction of respopnse] to head-up tilt.

    PubMed

    Fu, Q; Iwase, S; Niimi, Y; Kamiya, A; Kawanokuchi, J; Cui, J; Mano, T

    2001-07-01

    The benefits of lower body positive pressure (LBPP) are generally accepted for clinical treatment in medical emergencies caused by massive bleeding to maintain the systemic blood pressure. They are also used by NASA post spaceflight for preventing orthostatic hypotension in the astronauts. However, controversy still exists concerning the mechanisms underlying LBPP benefits. The purpose of this study was to test the hypothesis that the baroreflex-mediated enhancement in sympathetic activity would be attenuated by LBPP during an orthostatic challenge in humans. Specifically, we studied 1) the sympathetic activity responses by the microneurographic technique, using direct intraneural measurement of muscle sympathetic nerve activity (MSNA); and 2) the contributions of preload and afterload to the chances in MSNA response during orthostasis on application of LBPP. To accomplish these issues, MSNA was recorded microneurographically along with noninvasive measurement of the cardiovascular variables in all the subjects during exposure to a 70 degrees HUT with 30-mm Hg LBPP.

  11. Interim Closure Activities at Corrective Action Unit 114: Area 25 EMAD Facility, Nevada National Security Site, Nevada

    SciTech Connect

    Boehlecke, R. F.

    2011-10-24

    This letter report documents interim activities that have been completed at CAU 114 to support ongoing access and generate information necessary to plan future closure activities. General housekeeping and cleanup of debris was conducted in the EMAD yard, cold bays, support areas of Building 3900, and postmortem cell tunnel area of the hot bay. All non-asbestos ceiling tiles and loose and broken non-friable asbestos floor tiles were removed from support galleries and office areas. Non-radiologically contaminated piping and equipment in the cold areas of the building and in the two 120-ton locomotives in the yard were tapped, characterized, drained, and verified free of contents.

  12. Does Spinal Fusion and Scoliosis Correction Improve Activity and Participation for Children With GMFCS level 4 and 5 Cerebral Palsy?

    PubMed

    Sewell, Mathew David; Wallace, Charlie; Malagelada, Francesc; Gibson, Alex; Noordeen, Hilali; Tucker, Stewart; Molloy, Sean; Lehovsky, Jan

    2015-12-01

    Spinal fusion is used to treat scoliosis in children with cerebral palsy (CP). Following intervention, the WHO considers activity and participation should be assessed to guide intervention and assess the effects. This study assesses whether spinal fusion for scoliosis improves activity and participation for children with severe CP.Retrospective cohort study of 70 children (39M:31F) with GMFCS level 4/5 CP and significant scoliosis. Thirty-six underwent observational and/or brace treatment as the sole treatment for their scoliosis, and 34 underwent surgery. Children in the operative group were older and had worse scoliosis than those in the observational group. Questionnaire and radiographic data were recorded over a 2-year period. The ASKp was used to measure activity and participation.In the observational group, Cobb angle and pelvic obliquity increased from 51 (40-90) and 10 (0-30) to 70 (43-111) and 14 (0-37). Mean ASKp decreased from 16.3 (1-38) to 14.2 (1-36). In the operative group, Cobb angle and pelvic obliquity decreased from 81 (50-131) and 14 (1-35) to 38 (10-76) and 9 (0-24). Mean ASKp increased from 10.5 (0-29) to 15.9 (3-38). Spinal-related pain correlated most with change in activity and participation in both groups. There was no difference in mobility, GMFCS level, feeding or communication in either group before and after treatment.In children with significant scoliosis and CP classified within GMFCS levels 4 and 5, spinal fusion was associated with an improvement in activity and participation, whereas nonoperative treatment was associated with a small reduction. Pain should be carefully assessed to guide intervention.

  13. Does Spinal Fusion and Scoliosis Correction Improve Activity and Participation for Children With GMFCS level 4 and 5 Cerebral Palsy?

    PubMed Central

    Sewell, Mathew David; Wallace, Charlie; Malagelada, Francesc; Gibson, Alex; Noordeen, Hilali; Tucker, Stewart; Molloy, Sean; Lehovsky, Jan

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Spinal fusion is used to treat scoliosis in children with cerebral palsy (CP). Following intervention, the WHO considers activity and participation should be assessed to guide intervention and assess the effects. This study assesses whether spinal fusion for scoliosis improves activity and participation for children with severe CP. Retrospective cohort study of 70 children (39M:31F) with GMFCS level 4/5 CP and significant scoliosis. Thirty-six underwent observational and/or brace treatment as the sole treatment for their scoliosis, and 34 underwent surgery. Children in the operative group were older and had worse scoliosis than those in the observational group. Questionnaire and radiographic data were recorded over a 2-year period. The ASKp was used to measure activity and participation. In the observational group, Cobb angle and pelvic obliquity increased from 51o (40–90) and 10o (0–30) to 70o (43–111) and 14o (0–37). Mean ASKp decreased from 16.3 (1–38) to 14.2 (1–36). In the operative group, Cobb angle and pelvic obliquity decreased from 81o (50–131) and 14o (1–35) to 38o (10–76) and 9o (0–24). Mean ASKp increased from 10.5 (0–29) to 15.9 (3–38). Spinal-related pain correlated most with change in activity and participation in both groups. There was no difference in mobility, GMFCS level, feeding or communication in either group before and after treatment. In children with significant scoliosis and CP classified within GMFCS levels 4 and 5, spinal fusion was associated with an improvement in activity and participation, whereas nonoperative treatment was associated with a small reduction. Pain should be carefully assessed to guide intervention. PMID:26656322

  14. SiC MOSFET Based Single Phase Active Boost Rectifier with Power Factor Correction for Wireless Power Transfer Applications

    SciTech Connect

    Onar, Omer C; Tang, Lixin; Chinthavali, Madhu Sudhan; Campbell, Steven L; Miller , John M.

    2014-01-01

    Wireless Power Transfer (WPT) technology is a novel research area in the charging technology that bridges the utility and the automotive industries. There are various solutions that are currently being evaluated by several research teams to find the most efficient way to manage the power flow from the grid to the vehicle energy storage system. There are different control parameters that can be utilized to compensate for the change in the impedance due to variable parameters such as battery state-of-charge, coupling factor, and coil misalignment. This paper presents the implementation of an active front-end rectifier on the grid side for power factor control and voltage boost capability for load power regulation. The proposed SiC MOSFET based single phase active front end rectifier with PFC resulted in >97% efficiency at 137mm air-gap and >95% efficiency at 160mm air-gap.

  15. Xeroderma pigmentosum variant (XP-V) correcting protein from HeLa cells has a thymine dimer bypass DNA polymerase activity.

    PubMed Central

    Masutani, C; Araki, M; Yamada, A; Kusumoto, R; Nogimori, T; Maekawa, T; Iwai, S; Hanaoka, F

    1999-01-01

    Xeroderma pigmentosum variant (XP-V) represents one of the most common forms of this cancer-prone DNA repair syndrome. Unlike classical XP cells, XP-V cells are normal in nucleotide excision repair but defective in post-replication repair. The precise molecular defect in XP-V is currently unknown, but it appears to be a protein involved in translesion synthesis. Here we established a sensitive assay system using an SV40 origin-based plasmid to detect XP-V complementation activity. Using this system, we isolated a protein from HeLa cells capable of complementing the defects in XP-V cell extracts. The protein displays novel DNA polymerase activity which replicates cyclobutane pyrimidine dimer-containing DNA templates. The XPV polymerase activity was dependent on MgCl2, sensitive to NEM, moderately sensitive to KCl, resistant to both aphidicolin and ddTTP, and not stimulated by PCNA. In glycerol density gradients, the activity co-sedimented with a 54 kDa polypeptide at 3.5S, indicating that the monomeric form of this polypeptide was responsible for the activity. The protein factor corrected the translesion defects of extracts from three XPV cell strains. Bypass DNA synthesis by the XP-V polymerase occurred only in the presence of dATP, indicating that it can incorporate only dATP to bypass a di-thymine lesion. PMID:10369688

  16. Coefficient of variation calculated from the range for skewed distributions.

    PubMed

    Rhiel, G Steven

    2006-02-01

    In this research a coefficient of variation (CVS(high.low)) is developed that is calculated from the highest and lowest values in a set of data for samples from skewed distributions. A correction factor is determined such that CVS(high-low) is a dose estimate of the population coefficient of variation when sampling from three skewed chi-squared distributions and three skewed empirical distributions. The empirical distributions are from "real-world" data sets in psychology and education.

  17. Critical exponents from cluster coefficients

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rotman, Z.; Eisenberg, E.

    2009-09-01

    For a large class of repulsive interaction models, the Mayer cluster integrals can be transformed into a tridiagonal real symmetric matrix Rmn , whose elements converge to two constants. This allows for an effective extrapolation of the equation of state for these models. Due to a nearby (nonphysical) singularity on the negative real z axis, standard methods (e.g., Padé approximants based on the cluster integrals expansion) fail to capture the behavior of these models near the ordering transition, and, in particular, do not detect the critical point. A recent work [E. Eisenberg and A. Baram, Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. U.S.A. 104, 5755 (2007)] has shown that the critical exponents σ and σ' , characterizing the singularity of the density as a function of the activity, can be exactly calculated if the decay of the R matrix elements to their asymptotic constant follows a 1/n2 law. Here we employ renormalization group (RG) arguments to extend this result and analyze cases for which the asymptotic approach of the R matrix elements toward their limiting value is of a more general form. The relevant asymptotic correction terms (in RG sense) are identified, and we then present a corrected exact formula for the critical exponents. We identify the limits of usage of the formula and demonstrate one physical model, which is beyond its range of validity. The formula is validated numerically and then applied to analyze a number of concrete physical models.

  18. [Quorum sensing systems of regulation, synthesis of phenazine antibiotics, and antifungal (corrected) activity in rhizospheric bacterium Pseudomonas chlororaphis 449].

    PubMed

    Veselova, M a; Klein, Sh; Bass, I A; Lipasova, V A; Metlitskaia, A Z; Ovadis, M I; Chernin, L S; Khmel', I A

    2008-12-01

    Strain Pseudomonas chlororaphis 449, an antagonist of a broad spectrum of phytopathogenic microorganisms isolated from the maize rhizosphere, was shown to produce three phenazine antibiotics: phenazine-1-carboxylic acid (PCA), 2-hydroxylphenazine-1-carboxylic acid (2-OH-PCA), and 2-hydroxylphenazine (2-OH-PHZ). Two Quorum Sensing (QS) systems of regulation were identified: PhzIR and CsaI/R. Genes phzI and csaI were cloned and sequenced. Cells of strain 449 synthesize at least three types of AHL: N-butanoyl-L-homoserine lactone (C4-AHL), N-hexanoyl-L-homoserine lactone (C6-AHL), and N-(3-oxo-hexanoyl)-L-homoserine lactone (30C6-AHL). Transposon mutagenesis was used to generate mutants of strain 449 deficient in synthesis of phenazines, which carried inactivated phzA and phzB genes of the phenazine operon and gene phzO. Mutations phzA- and phzB-caused a drastic reduction in the antagonistic activity of bacteria toward phytopathogenic fungi. Both mutants lost the ability to protect cucumber and leguminous plants against phytopathogenic fungi Rhizoctonia solani and Sclerotinia sclerotiorum. These results suggest a significant role of phenazines in the antagonistic activity of P. chlororaphis 449. PMID:19178080

  19. [Radiometers performance attenuation and data correction in long-term observation of total radiation and photosynthetically active radiation in typical forest ecosystems in China].

    PubMed

    Zhu, Zhi-Lin; Sun, Xiao-Min; Yu, Gui-Rui; Wen, Xue-Fa; Zhang, Yi-Ping; Han, Shi-Jie; Yan, Jun-Hua; Wang, Hui-Min

    2011-11-01

    Based on the total radiation and photosynthetically active radiation (PAR) observations with net radiometer (CNR1) and quantum sensor (Li-190SB) in 4 ChinaFLUX forest sites (Changbaishan, Qianyanzhou, Dinghushan, and Xishuangbanna) in 2003-2008, this paper analyzed the uncertainties and the radiometers performance changes in long-term and continuous field observation. The results showed that the 98% accuracy of the total radiation measured with CNR1 (Q(cNR1)) could satisfy the technical criterion for the sites except Xishuangbanna where the Q(CNR1) was averagely about 7% lower than Q(CM11), the radiation measured with high accuracy pyranometer CM11. For most sites, though the temperature had definite effects on the performance of CNR1, the effects were still within the allowable range of the accuracy of the instrument. Besides temperature, the seasonal fog often occurred in tropical rain forests in Xishuangbanna also had effects on the performance of CNR1. Based on the long-term variations of PAR, especially its ratio to total radiation in the 4 sites, it was found that quantum sensor (Li-190SB) had obvious performance attenuation, with the mean annual attenuation rate being about 4%. To correct the observation error caused by Li-190SB, an attempt was made to give a post-correction of the PAR observations, which could basically eliminate the quantum sensor's performance attenuation due to long-term field measurement.

  20. Towards more reliable long-term indices of geomagnetic activity: correcting a new inhomogeneity problem in early geomagnetic data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Holappa, Lauri; Mursula, Kalevi

    2016-07-01

    For the time before the space era our knowledge of the centennial evolution of solar wind (SW) and interplanetary magnetic field (IMF) is based on proxies derived from geomagnetic indices. The reliability of these proxies is dependent on the homogeneity of magnetic field data. In this paper we study the interhourly (IHV) and interdiurnal (IDV_{1d}) variability indices calculated from the data of two British observatories, Eskdalemuir and Lerwick, and compare them to the corresponding indices of the German Niemegk observatory. We find an excess of about 14 ± 4% (5.8 ± 2%) and 27 ± 10% (15 ± 6%) in the IHV (IDV_{1d}) in the indices of Eskdalemuir and Lerwick in 1935-1969. The timing of this excess accurately coincides with instrument changes made in these observatories, strongly supporting the interpretation that the excess is indeed caused by instrument related inhomogeneities in the data of Eskdalemuir and Lerwick. We show that the detected excess notably modifies the long-term trend of geomagnetic activity and the centennial evolution of IMF strength and solar wind speed estimated using these indices. We note that the detected inhomogeneity problem may not be limited to the data of the two studied observatories, but may be quite common to long series of geomagnetic measurements. These results question the reliability of the present measures of the centennial change in solar wind speed and IMF.

  1. Chronic agomelatine treatment corrects the abnormalities in the circadian rhythm of motor activity and sleep/wake cycle induced by prenatal restraint stress in adult rats.

    PubMed

    Mairesse, Jerome; Silletti, Viviana; Laloux, Charlotte; Zuena, Anna Rita; Giovine, Angela; Consolazione, Michol; van Camp, Gilles; Malagodi, Marithe; Gaetani, Silvana; Cianci, Silvia; Catalani, Assia; Mennuni, Gioacchino; Mazzetta, Alessandro; van Reeth, Olivier; Gabriel, Cecilia; Mocaër, Elisabeth; Nicoletti, Ferdinando; Morley-Fletcher, Sara; Maccari, Stefania

    2013-03-01

    Agomelatine is a novel antidepressant acting as an MT1/MT2 melatonin receptor agonist/5-HT2C serotonin receptor antagonist. Because of its peculiar pharmacological profile, this drug caters the potential to correct the abnormalities of circadian rhythms associated with mood disorders, including abnormalities of the sleep/wake cycle. Here, we examined the effect of chronic agomelatine treatment on sleep architecture and circadian rhythms of motor activity using the rat model of prenatal restraint stress (PRS) as a putative 'aetiological' model of depression. PRS was delivered to the mothers during the last 10 d of pregnancy. The adult progeny ('PRS rats') showed a reduced duration of slow wave sleep, an increased duration of rapid eye movement (REM) sleep, an increased number of REM sleep events and an increase in motor activity before the beginning of the dark phase of the light/dark cycle. In addition, adult PRS rats showed an increased expression of the transcript of the primary response gene, c-Fos, in the hippocampus just prior to the beginning of the dark phase. All these changes were reversed by a chronic oral treatment with agomelatine (2000 ppm in the diet). The effect of agomelatine on sleep was largely attenuated by treatment with the MT1/MT2 melatonin receptor antagonist, S22153, which caused PRS-like sleep disturbances on its own. These data provide the first evidence that agomelatine corrects sleep architecture and restores circadian homeostasis in a preclinical model of depression and supports the value of agomelatine as a novel antidepressant that resynchronizes circadian rhythms under pathological conditions.

  2. Correction of the readings of albedo dosimeters at the MC400 LNR cyclotron with the use of the spherical albedo system and comparison with other correction methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mokrov, Yu. V.; Morozova, S. V.; Timoshenko, G. N.; Krylov, V. A.

    2014-11-01

    The results of correcting the readings of DVGN-01 albedo dosimeters behind the shielding of the MC400 cyclotron at the Laboratory of Nuclear Reactions (LNR) with the use of the spherical albedo system are presented. The formulas approximating the dependences of correction coefficients used to correct the readings on the hardness parameters of low-energy neutron spectra were obtained based on these results and the results of earlier studies. Neutron spectra were measured at three points behind the MC400 shielding, and the correction coefficients for DVGN-01 were calculated based on these spectra. It was demonstrated that these coefficients agree well with the coefficients obtained with the use of the spherical albedo system. This suggests that the obtained correction coefficient values are accurate. The recommended correction coefficient values to be used in the individual dosimetric control at LNR were specified based on the results of the present study and the data given in other papers.

  3. Restoration of the CCAAT box or insertion of the CACCC motif activates [corrected] delta-globin gene expression.

    PubMed

    Tang, D C; Ebb, D; Hardison, R C; Rodgers, G P

    1997-07-01

    Hemoglobin A2 (HbA2), which contains delta-globin as its non-alpha-globin, represents a minor fraction of the Hb found in normal adults. It has been shown recently that HbA2 is as potent as HbF in inhibiting intracellular deoxy-HbS polymerization, and its expression is therefore relevant to sickle cell disease treatment strategies. To elucidate the mechanisms responsible for the low-level expression of the delta-globin gene in adult erythroid cells, we first compared promoter sequences and found that the delta-globin gene differs from the beta-globin gene in the absence of an erythroid Krüppel-like factor (EKLF) binding site, the alteration of the CCAAT box to CCAAC, and the presence of a GATA-1 binding site. Second, serial deletions of the human delta-globin promoter sequence fused to a luciferase (LUC) reporter gene were transfected into K562 cells. We identified both positive and negative regulatory regions in the 5' flanking sequence. Furthermore, a plasmid containing a single base pair (bp) mutation in the CCAAC box of the delta promoter, restoring the CCAAT box, caused a 5.6-fold and 2.4-fold (P < .05) increase of LUC activity in transfected K562 cells and MEL cells, respectively, in comparison to the wild-type delta promoter. A set of substitutions that create an EKLF binding site centered at -85 bp increased the expression by 26.8-fold and 6.5-fold (P < .05) in K562 and MEL cells, respectively. These results clearly demonstrate that the restoration of either an EKLF binding site or the CCAAT box can increase delta-globin gene expression, with potential future clinical benefit.

  4. In vitro and in vivo [corrected] activity of eugenol oil (Eugenia caryophylata) against four important postharvest apple pathogens.

    PubMed

    Amiri, Achour; Dugas, Robert; Pichot, Anne L; Bompeix, Gilbert

    2008-08-15

    The activity of eugenol oil was evaluated in vitro and in vivo against four apple pathogens namely Phlyctema vagabunda, Penicillium expansum, Botrytis cinerea and Monilinia fructigena. The minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) of eugenol incorporated in malt extract agar medium was found to be 2 mg ml(-1). Mycelial growth of the four test pathogens was completely inhibited when treated with 150 microl l(-1) of volatile eugenol whether at 4 or 20 degrees C. Conidia of P. vagabunda, P. expansum, M. fructigena and B. cinerea suspended for 2 min in eugenol solution at 2 mg ml(-1) heated to 50 degrees C germinated at rates of 19, 37, 38 and 39%, respectively. Three different eugenol formulations (Tween 80, ethoxylate and lecithin) were tested for their in vivo efficacy against the tested pathogens on apples. Ethoxylate- and Tween 80-eugenol formulations applied at room temperature were ineffective in reducing disease incidence. When heated to 50 degrees C, both formulations induced phytotoxicity on apple surface and caused cuticle damages as revealed by scanning electronic microscopic observations. A mixture of eugenol at 2 mg ml(-1) and soy lecithin at 50 mg ml(-1) suppressed the phytotoxic symptoms produced by eugenol on apples and reduced the disease incidence of P. expansum, P. vagabunda, B. cinerea and M. fructigena to less than 7, 6, 4 and 2% respectively after 6 months of storage at 2 degrees C. The application of heated lecithin-formulated eugenol could become a successful alternative to the traditional fungicides used in postharvest disease management of apple fruit.

  5. Reference Material for Seebeck Coefficients

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Edler, F.; Lenz, E.; Haupt, S.

    2015-03-01

    This paper describes a measurement method and a measuring system to determine absolute Seebeck coefficients of thermoelectric bulk materials with the aim of establishing reference materials for Seebeck coefficients. Reference materials with known thermoelectric properties are essential to allow a reliable benchmarking of different thermoelectric materials for application in thermoelectric generators to convert thermal into electrical energy or vice versa. A temperature gradient (1 to 8) K is induced across the sample, and the resulting voltage is measured by using two differential Au/Pt thermocouples. On the basis of the known absolute Seebeck coefficients of Au and Pt, the unknown Seebeck coefficient of the sample is calculated. The measurements are performed in inert atmospheres and at low pressure (30 to 60) mbar in the temperature range between 300 K and 860 K. The measurement results of the Seebeck coefficients of metallic and semiconducting samples are presented. Achievable relative measurement uncertainties of the Seebeck coefficient are on the order of a few percent.

  6. High contrast imaging with an arbitrary aperture: active correction of aperture discontinuities: fundamental limits and practical trades offs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pueyo, Laurent; Norman, Colin Arthur; Soummer, Remi; Perrin, Marshall D.; N'Diaye, Mamadou; Choquet, Elodie

    2015-01-01

    In a recent paper we discussed a new method to achieve high-contrast images using segmented and/or on-axis telescopes. Our approach, named Active Compensation of Aperture Discontinuities (ACAD) relies on two sequential Deformable Mirrors to compensate for the large amplitude excursions in the telescope aperture due to secondary support structures and/or segment gaps. In this configuration the parameter landscape of Deformable Mirror Surfaces that yield high contrast Point Spread Functions is not linear, and non-linear methods are needed to find the true minimum. In particular we showed that broadband high contrast solutions can be achieved using realistic surface deformations that are accessible using existing technologies for a variety of telescope pupil geometries. In this paper we first focus on the fundamental limits and practical trade-offs associated with ACAD. In a first part we will study the fundamental limits and practical tradeoffs associated with ACAD, regardless of the downstream coronagraphic architecture. The mathematical techniques to finding ACAD DM shapes require to solve a complex differential equation. We will first discuss the scaling laws underlying this non-linear solution and their impact of DM placement and geometry wishing the optical design of an instrument. We will then consider the sensitivity to low order aberrations: in principle an ACAD solution that comprises large strokes will be more sensitive to these aberrations than one with smaller strokes. As a consequence, we will quantify this sensitive both using analytical models and numerical simulations. We will present diffractive end to end simulations and quantify the ultimate contrast and bandwidth achievable with ACAD, which can be reached by superposing using a classical linear wavefront control algorithms on top of the Monge Ampere solution. Finally, recent work has shown that coronagraph designs can also accommodate for secondary support structures and/or segments gaps, at a

  7. [The effect of carbon tetrachloride poisoning on the activity of digestive proteases in rats and correction of the disorders with vegetable oils].

    PubMed

    Esaulenko, E E; Khil'chuk, M A; Bykov, I M

    2013-01-01

    The results of the study of activity of digestive proteases (pepsin, trypsin, chymotrypsin) in homogenates of stomach, pancreas and duodenum in experimental animals have been presented. Rats were exposed to intoxication with carbon tetrachloride (subcutaneous administration of a 50% oil solution of CCl4 in the dose of 0.5 ml per 100 g body weight) for three days and then they were given analysed oils (black nut, walnut and flax oil) intragastrically by gavage at a dose of 0.2 ml per day within 23 days. Pepsin level in gastric mucosa homogenates and chymotrypsin activity in pancreatic homogenates were determined by method of N.P. Pyatnitskiy based on on the ability of enzymes to coagulate dairy-acetate mixture, respectively, at 25 degrees C and 35 degrees C. Trypsin activity in homogenates of pancreatic was determined by method of Erlanger - Shaternikova colorimetrically. It has been established that intoxication with CCl4 decreased the synthesis of proteolytic enzymes of the stomach (by 51%) and pancreas (by 70-78%). Injections of analysed vegetable oils to animals contributed to the normalization of proteolytic enzymes synthesis. The conclusion that there are prospects of using the analysed vegetable oils containing large quantity of polyunsaturated fatty acids (omega-3 and omega-6) for the correction of detected biochemical abnormalities has been done.

  8. Measurement of Coefficient of Restitution Made Easy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Farkas, N.; Ramsier, R. D.

    2006-01-01

    We present a simple activity that permits students to determine the coefficient of restitution of bouncing balls using only a stopwatch, a metre stick and graphical analysis. The experiment emphasizes that simple models, in combination with careful attention to how students make measurements, can lead to good results in a straightforward way.

  9. Coefficient Alpha: A Reliability Coefficient for the 21st Century?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Yang, Yanyun; Green, Samuel B.

    2011-01-01

    Coefficient alpha is almost universally applied to assess reliability of scales in psychology. We argue that researchers should consider alternatives to coefficient alpha. Our preference is for structural equation modeling (SEM) estimates of reliability because they are informative and allow for an empirical evaluation of the assumptions…

  10. New and extended parameterization of the thermodynamic model AIOMFAC: calculation of activity coefficients for organic-inorganic mixtures containing carboxyl, hydroxyl, carbonyl, ether, ester, alkenyl, alkyl, and aromatic functional groups

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zuend, A.; Marcolli, C.; Booth, A. M.; Lienhard, D. M.; Soonsin, V.; Krieger, U. K.; Topping, D. O.; McFiggans, G.; Peter, T.; Seinfeld, J. H.

    2011-05-01

    We present a new and considerably extended parameterization of the thermodynamic activity coefficient model AIOMFAC (Aerosol Inorganic-Organic Mixtures Functional groups Activity Coefficients) at room temperature. AIOMFAC combines a Pitzer-like electrolyte solution model with a UNIFAC-based group-contribution approach and explicitly accounts for interactions between organic functional groups and inorganic ions. Such interactions constitute the salt-effect, may cause liquid-liquid phase separation, and affect the gas-particle partitioning of aerosols. The previous AIOMFAC version was parameterized for alkyl and hydroxyl functional groups of alcohols and polyols. With the goal to describe a wide variety of organic compounds found in atmospheric aerosols, we extend here the parameterization of AIOMFAC to include the functional groups carboxyl, hydroxyl, ketone, aldehyde, ether, ester, alkenyl, alkyl, aromatic carbon-alcohol, and aromatic hydrocarbon. Thermodynamic equilibrium data of organic-inorganic systems from the literature are critically assessed and complemented with new measurements to establish a comprehensive database. The database is used to determine simultaneously the AIOMFAC parameters describing interactions of organic functional groups with the ions H+, Li+, Na+, K+, NH4+, Mg2+, Ca2+, Cl-, Br-, NO3-, HSO4-, and SO42-. Detailed descriptions of different types of thermodynamic data, such as vapor-liquid, solid-liquid, and liquid-liquid equilibria, and their use for the model parameterization are provided. Issues regarding deficiencies of the database, types and uncertainties of experimental data, and limitations of the model, are discussed. The challenging parameter optimization problem is solved with a novel combination of powerful global minimization algorithms. A number of exemplary calculations for systems containing atmospherically relevant aerosol components are shown. Amongst others, we discuss aqueous mixtures of ammonium sulfate with

  11. New and extended parameterization of the thermodynamic model AIOMFAC: calculation of activity coefficients for organic-inorganic mixtures containing carboxyl, hydroxyl, carbonyl, ether, ester, alkenyl, alkyl, and aromatic functional groups

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zuend, A.; Marcolli, C.; Booth, A. M.; Lienhard, D. M.; Soonsin, V.; Krieger, U. K.; Topping, D. O.; McFiggans, G.; Peter, T.; Seinfeld, J. H.

    2011-09-01

    We present a new and considerably extended parameterization of the thermodynamic activity coefficient model AIOMFAC (Aerosol Inorganic-Organic Mixtures Functional groups Activity Coefficients) at room temperature. AIOMFAC combines a Pitzer-like electrolyte solution model with a UNIFAC-based group-contribution approach and explicitly accounts for interactions between organic functional groups and inorganic ions. Such interactions constitute the salt-effect, may cause liquid-liquid phase separation, and affect the gas-particle partitioning of aerosols. The previous AIOMFAC version was parameterized for alkyl and hydroxyl functional groups of alcohols and polyols. With the goal to describe a wide variety of organic compounds found in atmospheric aerosols, we extend here the parameterization of AIOMFAC to include the functional groups carboxyl, hydroxyl, ketone, aldehyde, ether, ester, alkenyl, alkyl, aromatic carbon-alcohol, and aromatic hydrocarbon. Thermodynamic equilibrium data of organic-inorganic systems from the literature are critically assessed and complemented with new measurements to establish a comprehensive database. The database is used to determine simultaneously the AIOMFAC parameters describing interactions of organic functional groups with the ions H+, Li+, Na+, K+, NH4+, Mg2+, Ca2+, Cl-, Br-, NO3-, HSO4-, and SO42-. Detailed descriptions of different types of thermodynamic data, such as vapor-liquid, solid-liquid, and liquid-liquid equilibria, and their use for the model parameterization are provided. Issues regarding deficiencies of the database, types and uncertainties of experimental data, and limitations of the model, are discussed. The challenging parameter optimization problem is solved with a novel combination of powerful global minimization algorithms. A number of exemplary calculations for systems containing atmospherically relevant aerosol components are shown. Amongst others, we discuss aqueous mixtures of ammonium sulfate with

  12. Enzyme replacement for GM1-gangliosidosis: Uptake, lysosomal activation, and cellular disease correction using a novel β-galactosidase:RTB lectin fusion.

    PubMed

    Condori, Jose; Acosta, Walter; Ayala, Jorge; Katta, Varun; Flory, Ashley; Martin, Reid; Radin, Jonathan; Cramer, Carole L; Radin, David N

    2016-02-01

    New enzyme delivery technologies are required for treatment of lysosomal storage disorders with significant pathologies associated with the so-called "hard-to-treat" tissues and organs. Genetic deficiencies in the GLB1 gene encoding acid β-galactosidase lead to GM1-gangliosidosis or Morquio B, lysosomal diseases with predominant disease manifestation associated with the central nervous system or skeletal system, respectively. Current lysosomal ERTs are delivered into cells based on receptor-mediated endocytosis and do not effectively address several hard-to-treat organs including those critical for GM1-gangliosidosis patients. Lectins provide alternative cell-uptake mechanisms based on adsorptive-mediated endocytosis and thus may provide unique biodistribution for lysosomal disease therapeutics. In the current study, genetic fusions of the plant galactose/galactosamine-binding lectin, RTB, and the human acid β-galactosidase enzyme were produced using a plant-based bioproduction platform. β-gal:RTB and RTB:β-gal fusion products retained both lectin activity and β-galactosidase activity. Purified proteins representing both fusion orientations were efficiently taken up into GM1 patient fibroblasts and mediated the reduction of GM1 ganglioside substrate with activities matching mammalian cell-derived β-galactosidase. In contrast, plant-derived β-gal alone was enzymatically active but did not mediate uptake or correction indicating the need for either lectin-based (plant product) or mannose-6-phosphate-based (mammalian product) delivery. Native β-galactosidase undergoes catalytic activation (cleavage within the C-terminal region) in lysosomes and is stabilized by association with protective protein/cathepsin A. Enzymatic activity and lysosomal protein processing of the RTB fusions were assessed following internalization into GM1 fibroblasts. Within 1-4h, both β-gal:RTB and RTB:β-gal were processed to the ~64kDa "activated" β-gal form; the RTB lectin was

  13. Assessment of ionospheric and tropospheric corrections for PPP-RTK

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Oliveira, Paulo; Fund, François; Morel, Laurent; Monico, João; Durand, Stéphane; Durand, Fréderic

    2016-04-01

    The PPP-RTK is a state of art GNSS (Global Navigation Satellite System) technique employed to determine accurate positions in real-time. To perform the PPP-RTK it is necessary to accomplish the SSR (State Space Representation) of the spatially correlated errors affecting the GNSS observables, such as the tropospheric delay and the ionospheric effect. Using GNSS data of local or regional GNSS active networks, it is possible to determine quite well the atmospheric errors for any position in the network coverage area, by modeling these effects or biases. This work presents the results of tropospheric and ionospheric modeling employed to obtain the respective corrections. The region in the study is France and the Orphéon GNSS active network is used to generate the atmospheric corrections. The CNES (Centre National d'Etudes Spatiales) satellite orbit products are used to perform ambiguity fixing in GNSS processing. Two atmospheric modeling approaches are considered: 1) generation of a priori correction by coefficients estimated using the GNSS network and 2) the use of interpolated ionospheric and tropospheric effects from the closest reference stations to the user's location, as suggested in the second stage of RTCM (Ratio Technical Commission for Maritime) messages development. Finally, the atmospheric corrections are introduced in PPP-RTK as a priori values to allow improvements in ambiguity fixing and to reduce its convergence time. The discussion emphasizes the positive and the negative points of each solution or even the associated use of them.

  14. Ectopic expression of cyclin D3 corrects differentiation of DM1 myoblasts through activation of RNA CUG-binding protein, CUGBP1

    SciTech Connect

    Salisbury, Elizabeth; Sakai, Keiko; Schoser, Benedikt; Huichalaf, Claudia; Schneider-Gold, Christiane; Nguyen, Heather; Wang, Gou-Li; Albrecht, Jeffrey H.; Timchenko, Lubov T.

    2008-07-01

    Differentiation of myocytes is impaired in patients with myotonic dystrophy type 1, DM1. CUG repeat binding protein, CUGBP1, is a key regulator of translation of proteins that are involved in muscle development and differentiation. In this paper, we present evidence that RNA-binding activity of CUGBP1 and its interactions with initiation translation complex eIF2 are differentially regulated during myogenesis by specific phosphorylation and that this regulation is altered in DM1. In normal myoblasts, Akt kinase phosphorylates CUGBP1 at Ser28 and increases interactions of CUGBP1 with cyclin D1 mRNA. During differentiation, CUGBP1 is phosphorylated by cyclinD3-cdk4/6 at Ser302, which increases CUGBP1 binding with p21 and C/EBP{beta} mRNAs. While cyclin D3 and cdk4 are elevated in normal myotubes; DM1 differentiating cells do not increase these proteins. In normal myotubes, CUGBP1 interacts with cyclin D3/cdk4/6 and eIF2; however, interactions of CUGBP1 with eIF2 are reduced in DM1 differentiating cells and correlate with impaired muscle differentiation in DM1. Ectopic expression of cyclin D3 in DM1 cells increases the CUGBP1-eIF2 complex, corrects expression of differentiation markers, myogenin and desmin, and enhances fusion of DM1 myoblasts. Thus, normalization of cyclin D3 might be a therapeutic approach to correct differentiation of skeletal muscle in DM1 patients.

  15. Aberration corrected emittance exchange

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nanni, E. A.; Graves, W. S.

    2015-08-01

    Full exploitation of emittance exchange (EEX) requires aberration-free performance of a complex imaging system including active radio-frequency (rf) elements which can add temporal distortions. We investigate the performance of an EEX line where the exchange occurs between two dimensions with normalized emittances which differ by multiple orders of magnitude. The transverse emittance is exchanged into the longitudinal dimension using a double dogleg emittance exchange setup with a five cell rf deflector cavity. Aberration correction is performed on the four most dominant aberrations. These include temporal aberrations that are corrected with higher order magnetic optical elements located where longitudinal and transverse emittance are coupled. We demonstrate aberration-free performance of an EEX line with emittances differing by four orders of magnitude, i.e., an initial transverse emittance of 1 pm-rad is exchanged with a longitudinal emittance of 10 nm-rad.

  16. Graph characterization via Ihara coefficients.

    PubMed

    Ren, Peng; Wilson, Richard C; Hancock, Edwin R

    2011-02-01

    The novel contributions of this paper are twofold. First, we demonstrate how to characterize unweighted graphs in a permutation-invariant manner using the polynomial coefficients from the Ihara zeta function, i.e., the Ihara coefficients. Second, we generalize the definition of the Ihara coefficients to edge-weighted graphs. For an unweighted graph, the Ihara zeta function is the reciprocal of a quasi characteristic polynomial of the adjacency matrix of the associated oriented line graph. Since the Ihara zeta function has poles that give rise to infinities, the most convenient numerically stable representation is to work with the coefficients of the quasi characteristic polynomial. Moreover, the polynomial coefficients are invariant to vertex order permutations and also convey information concerning the cycle structure of the graph. To generalize the representation to edge-weighted graphs, we make use of the reduced Bartholdi zeta function. We prove that the computation of the Ihara coefficients for unweighted graphs is a special case of our proposed method for unit edge weights. We also present a spectral analysis of the Ihara coefficients and indicate their advantages over other graph spectral methods. We apply the proposed graph characterization method to capturing graph-class structure and clustering graphs. Experimental results reveal that the Ihara coefficients are more effective than methods based on Laplacian spectra.

  17. Total individual ion activity coefficients of calcium and carbonate in seawater at 25°C and 35%. salinity, and implications to the agreement between apparent and thermodynamic constants of calcite and aragonite

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Plummer, L. Neil; Sundquist, Eric T.

    1982-01-01

    We have calculated the total individual ion activity coefficients of carbonate and calcium,  and , in seawater. Using the ratios of stoichiometric and thermodynamic constants of carbonic acid dissociation and total mean activity coefficient data measured in seawater, we have obtained values which differ significantly from those widely accepted in the literature. In seawater at 25°C and 35%. salinity the (molal) values of  and  are 0.038 ± 0.002 and 0.173 ± 0.010, respectively. These values of  and  are independent of liquid junction errors and internally consistent with the value . By defining  and  on a common scale (), the product  is independent of the assigned value of  and may be determined directly from thermodynamic measurements in seawater. Using the value  and new thermodynamic equilibrium constants for calcite and aragonite, we show that the apparent constants of calcite and aragonite are consistent with the thermodynamic equilibrium constants at 25°C and 35%. salinity. The demonstrated consistency between thermodynamic and apparent constants of calcite and aragonite does not support a hypothesis of stable Mg-calcite coatings on calcite or aragonite surfaces in seawater, and suggests that the calcite critical carbonate ion curve of Broecker and Takahashi (1978,Deep-Sea Research25, 65–95) defines the calcite equilibrium boundary in the oceans, within the uncertainty of the data.

  18. 77 FR 72199 - Technical Corrections; Correction

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-12-05

    ...) is correcting a final rule that was published in the Federal Register on July 6, 2012 (77 FR 39899), and effective on August 6, 2012. That final rule amended the NRC regulations to make technical... COMMISSION 10 CFR Part 171 RIN 3150-AJ16 Technical Corrections; Correction AGENCY: Nuclear...

  19. Experimental and modeling study of thermal rate coefficients and cross sections for electron attachment to C(60).

    PubMed

    Viggiano, Albert A; Friedman, Jeffrey F; Shuman, Nicholas S; Miller, Thomas M; Schaffer, Linda C; Troe, Jürgen

    2010-05-21

    Thermal electron attachment to C(60) has been studied by relative rate measurements in a flowing afterglow Langmuir probe apparatus. The rate coefficients of the attachment k(1) are shown to be close to 10(-6) cm(3) s(-1) with a small negative temperature coefficient. These results supersede measurements from the 1990s which led to much smaller values of k(1) with a large positive temperature coefficient suggesting an activation barrier. Theoretical modeling of k(1) in terms of generalized Vogt-Wannier capture theory shows that k(1) now looks more consistent with measurements of absolute attachment cross sections sigma(at) than before. The comparison of capture theory and experimental rate or cross section data leads to empirical correction factors, accounting for "intramolecular vibrational relaxation" or "electron-phonon coupling," which reduce k(1) below the capture results and which, on a partial wave-selected level, decrease with increasing electron energy.

  20. Experimental and modeling study of thermal rate coefficients and cross sections for electron attachment to C(60).

    PubMed

    Viggiano, Albert A; Friedman, Jeffrey F; Shuman, Nicholas S; Miller, Thomas M; Schaffer, Linda C; Troe, Jürgen

    2010-05-21

    Thermal electron attachment to C(60) has been studied by relative rate measurements in a flowing afterglow Langmuir probe apparatus. The rate coefficients of the attachment k(1) are shown to be close to 10(-6) cm(3) s(-1) with a small negative temperature coefficient. These results supersede measurements from the 1990s which led to much smaller values of k(1) with a large positive temperature coefficient suggesting an activation barrier. Theoretical modeling of k(1) in terms of generalized Vogt-Wannier capture theory shows that k(1) now looks more consistent with measurements of absolute attachment cross sections sigma(at) than before. The comparison of capture theory and experimental rate or cross section data leads to empirical correction factors, accounting for "intramolecular vibrational relaxation" or "electron-phonon coupling," which reduce k(1) below the capture results and which, on a partial wave-selected level, decrease with increasing electron energy. PMID:20499963

  1. Experimental and modeling study of thermal rate coefficients and cross sections for electron attachment to C60

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Viggiano, Albert A.; Friedman, Jeffrey F.; Shuman, Nicholas S.; Miller, Thomas M.; Schaffer, Linda C.; Troe, Jürgen

    2010-05-01

    Thermal electron attachment to C60 has been studied by relative rate measurements in a flowing afterglow Langmuir probe apparatus. The rate coefficients of the attachment k1 are shown to be close to 10-6 cm3 s-1 with a small negative temperature coefficient. These results supersede measurements from the 1990s which led to much smaller values of k1 with a large positive temperature coefficient suggesting an activation barrier. Theoretical modeling of k1 in terms of generalized Vogt-Wannier capture theory shows that k1 now looks more consistent with measurements of absolute attachment cross sections σat than before. The comparison of capture theory and experimental rate or cross section data leads to empirical correction factors, accounting for "intramolecular vibrational relaxation" or "electron-phonon coupling," which reduce k1 below the capture results and which, on a partial wave-selected level, decrease with increasing electron energy.

  2. Improved diffusion coefficients generated from Monte Carlo codes

    SciTech Connect

    Herman, B. R.; Forget, B.; Smith, K.; Aviles, B. N.

    2013-07-01

    Monte Carlo codes are becoming more widely used for reactor analysis. Some of these applications involve the generation of diffusion theory parameters including macroscopic cross sections and diffusion coefficients. Two approximations used to generate diffusion coefficients are assessed using the Monte Carlo code MC21. The first is the method of homogenization; whether to weight either fine-group transport cross sections or fine-group diffusion coefficients when collapsing to few-group diffusion coefficients. The second is a fundamental approximation made to the energy-dependent P1 equations to derive the energy-dependent diffusion equations. Standard Monte Carlo codes usually generate a flux-weighted transport cross section with no correction to the diffusion approximation. Results indicate that this causes noticeable tilting in reconstructed pin powers in simple test lattices with L2 norm error of 3.6%. This error is reduced significantly to 0.27% when weighting fine-group diffusion coefficients by the flux and applying a correction to the diffusion approximation. Noticeable tilting in reconstructed fluxes and pin powers was reduced when applying these corrections. (authors)

  3. The effect of early physiotherapy on the recovery of mandibular function after orthognathic surgery for class III correction. Part II: electromyographic activity of masticatory muscles.

    PubMed

    Ko, Ellen Wen-Ching; Teng, Terry Te-Yi; Huang, Chiung Shing; Chen, Yu-Ray

    2015-01-01

    The study was conducted to evaluate the effect of early physical rehabilitation by comparing the differences of surface electromyographic (sEMG) activity in the masseter and anterior temporalis muscles after surgical correction of skeletal class III malocclusion. The prospective study included 63 patients; the experimental groups contained 31 patients who received early systematic physical rehabilitation; the control group (32 patients) did not receive physiotherapy. The amplitude of sEMG in the masticatory muscles reached 72.6-121.3% and 37.5-64.6% of pre-surgical values in the experimental and control groups respectively at 6 weeks after orthognathic surgery (OGS). At 6 months after OGS, the sEMG reached 135.1-233.4% and 89.6-122.5% of pre-surgical values in the experimental and control groups respectively. Most variables in the sEMG examination indicated that recovery of the masticatory muscles in the experimental group was better than the control group as estimated in the early phase (T1 to T2) and the total phase (T1 to T3); there were no significant differences between the mean recovery percentages in the later phase (T2 to T3). Early physical rehabilitative therapy is helpful for early recovery of muscle activity in masticatory muscles after OGS. After termination of physical therapy, no significant difference in recovery was indicated in patients with or without early physiotherapy.

  4. JAIBA, a class-II HD-ZIP transcription factor involved in the regulation of meristematic activity, and important for correct gynoecium and fruit development in Arabidopsis.

    PubMed

    Zúñiga-Mayo, Victor M; Marsch-Martínez, Nayelli; de Folter, Stefan

    2012-07-01

    The gynoecium is one of the most complex organs of a plant. After fertilization, it becomes a fruit, which has two important functions: to protect the seeds while they develop and to disperse them at maturity. The development and patterning of the gynoecium and later fruit must be finely regulated to ensure the survival of the species that produces them. The process that leads to successful fruit formation starts at early stages of floral meristem development and follows a series of chronologically successive events. In this work we report the functional characterization of the class-II homeodomain leucine zipper (HD-ZIP) JAIBA (JAB) gene. Mutant jab plants show sporophytic defects in male and female reproductive development, and combined with crabs claw cause defects in the floral meristem (FM) determination process and gynoecium medial tissue development. This suggests that proper FM determination is required for gynoecium medial tissue development, and indicates that JAB and CRC are necessary for both processes. Furthermore, the JAB protein interacts with transcription factors known to regulate meristematic activity, fruit development, and floral meristem determinacy. The sporophytic effect on pollen and embryo sac development might be an independent and later function of JAB. In summary, we present data that indicates that the JAB gene regulates meristematic activity in different tissues, and that it is necessary for the correct formation of the gynoecium at different stages, contributing to a crucial process in plant life: proper fruit development. PMID:22409594

  5. Early postoperative active mobilisation versus immobilisation following tibialis posterior tendon transfer for foot-drop correction in patients with Hansen's disease.

    PubMed

    Rath, Santosh; Schreuders, Ton A R; Selles, Ruud W

    2010-03-01

    After tibialis posterior tendon transfer surgery for foot-drop correction, the foot is traditionally immobilised for several weeks. To test the feasibility of early mobilisation after this procedure in patients with Hansen's disease, 21 consecutive patients received active mobilisation of the transfer starting on the 5th postoperative day. Transfer insertion strength was enhanced by Pulvertaft weave. The results were compared with a historical cohort of 21 patients receiving 4 weeks of immobilisation. The primary outcomes were active dorsiflexion, active plantar flexion and total active motion at the ankle, tendon-insertion pullout and time until discharge from rehabilitation with independent walking without aid. Assessments at discharge from rehabilitation and the last clinical follow-up at more than 1 year were compared between both groups. The Student's t-test was used to compare data between the groups, and 95% confidence interval of the difference between groups was determined. A p-value of 0.05 was considered statistically significant. The average follow-up was 22 months for both groups. There was no incidence of insertion pullout of the tendon transfer in either group. In addition, there was no difference in active dorsiflexion angle between the groups at discharge (mean difference: 2.2 degrees, p=0.22) and final assessment (mean difference: 2.3 degrees, p=0.42). The plantar flexion angles were similar in both groups at discharge (mean difference: 0.5 degrees, p=0.86) and final assessment (mean difference: 0.5 degrees, p=0.57). In addition, there was no difference in total active motion between the groups at discharge (mean difference: 2 degrees, p=0.54) and final assessment (mean difference: 1 degrees, p=0.49). The patients were discharged from rehabilitation with independent walking at 44.04+/-7.9 days after surgery in the mobilisation group compared to 57.07+/-2.3 days in the immobilisation group. This indicates a significant difference in morbidity (mean

  6. A high isoflavone diet decreases 5' adenosine monophosphate-activated protein kinase activation and does not correct selenium-induced elevations in fasting blood glucose in mice.

    PubMed

    Stallings, Michael T; Cardon, Brandon R; Hardman, Jeremy M; Bliss, Tyler A; Brunson, Scott E; Hart, Chris M; Swiss, Maria D; Hepworth, Squire D; Christensen, Merrill J; Hancock, Chad R

    2014-04-01

    Selenium (Se) has been implicated as a micronutrient that decreases adenosine monophosphate-activated protein kinase (AMPK) signaling and may increase diabetes risk by reducing insulin sensitivity. Soy isoflavones (IF) are estrogen-like compounds that have been shown to attenuate insulin resistance, hyperglycemia, adiposity, and increased AMPK activation. We hypothesized that a high IF (HIF) diet would prevent the poor metabolic profile associated with high Se intake. The purpose of this study was to examine changes in basal glucose metabolism and AMPK signaling in response to an HIF diet and/or supplemental Se in a mouse model. Male FVB mice were divided into groups receiving either a control diet with minimal IF (low IF) or an HIF diet. Each dietary group was further subdivided into groups receiving either water or Se at a dose of 3 mg Se/kg body weight daily, as Se-methylselenocysteine (SMSC). After 5 months, mice receiving SMSC had elevated fasting glucose (P < .05) and a tendency for glucose intolerance (P = .08). The increase in dietary IF did not result in improved fasting blood glucose. Interestingly, after 6 months, HIF-fed mice had decreased basal AMPK activation in liver and skeletal muscle tissue (P < .05). Basal glucose metabolism was changed by SMSC supplementation as evidenced by increased fasting blood glucose and glucose intolerance. High dietary IF levels did not protect against aberrant blood glucose. In FVB mice, decreased basal AMPK activation is not the mechanism through which Se exerts its effect. These results suggest that more research must be done to elucidate the role of Se and IF in glucose metabolism.

  7. Corrective Jaw Surgery

    MedlinePlus

    ... and Craniofacial Surgery Cleft Lip/Palate and Craniofacial Surgery A cleft lip may require one or more ... find out more. Corrective Jaw Surgery Corrective Jaw Surgery Orthognathic surgery is performed to correct the misalignment ...

  8. Cytoplasmic hydrogen ion diffusion coefficient.

    PubMed Central

    al-Baldawi, N F; Abercrombie, R F

    1992-01-01

    The apparent cytoplasmic proton diffusion coefficient was measured using pH electrodes and samples of cytoplasm extracted from the giant neuron of a marine invertebrate. By suddenly changing the pH at one surface of the sample and recording the relaxation of pH within the sample, an apparent diffusion coefficient of 1.4 +/- 0.5 x 10(-6) cm2/s (N = 7) was measured in the acidic or neutral range of pH (6.0-7.2). This value is approximately 5x lower than the diffusion coefficient of the mobile pH buffers (approximately 8 x 10(-6) cm2/s) and approximately 68x lower than the diffusion coefficient of the hydronium ion (93 x 10(-6) cm2/s). A mobile pH buffer (approximately 15% of the buffering power) and an immobile buffer (approximately 85% of the buffering power) could quantitatively account for the results at acidic or neutral pH. At alkaline pH (8.2-8.6), the apparent proton diffusion coefficient increased to 4.1 +/- 0.8 x 10(-6) cm2/s (N = 7). This larger diffusion coefficient at alkaline pH could be explained quantitatively by the enhanced buffering power of the mobile amino acids. Under the conditions of these experiments, it is unlikely that hydroxide movement influences the apparent hydrogen ion diffusion coefficient. PMID:1617134

  9. Activation and dissociation of CO2 on the (001), (011), and (111) surfaces of mackinawite (FeS): A dispersion-corrected DFT study.

    PubMed

    Dzade, N Y; Roldan, A; de Leeuw, N H

    2015-09-01

    Iron sulfide minerals, including mackinawite (FeS), are relevant in origin of life theories, due to their potential catalytic activity towards the reduction and conversion of carbon dioxide (CO2) to organic molecules, which may be applicable to the production of liquid fuels and commodity chemicals. However, the fundamental understanding of CO2 adsorption, activation, and dissociation on FeS surfaces remains incomplete. Here, we have used density functional theory calculations, corrected for long-range dispersion interactions (DFT-D2), to explore various adsorption sites and configurations for CO2 on the low-index mackinawite (001), (110), and (111) surfaces. We found that the CO2 molecule physisorbs weakly on the energetically most stable (001) surface but adsorbs relatively strongly on the (011) and (111) FeS surfaces, preferentially at Fe sites. The adsorption of the CO2 on the (011) and (111) surfaces is shown to be characterized by significant charge transfer from surface Fe species to the CO2 molecule, which causes a large structural transformation in the molecule (i.e., forming a negatively charged bent CO2 (-δ) species, with weaker C-O confirmed via vibrational frequency analyses). We have also analyzed the pathways for CO2 reduction to CO and O on the mackinawite (011) and (111) surfaces. CO2 dissociation is calculated to be slightly endothermic relative to the associatively adsorbed states, with relatively large activation energy barriers of 1.25 eV and 0.72 eV on the (011) and (111) surfaces, respectively.

  10. Fuel Temperature Coefficient of Reactivity

    SciTech Connect

    Loewe, W.E.

    2001-07-31

    A method for measuring the fuel temperature coefficient of reactivity in a heterogeneous nuclear reactor is presented. The method, which is used during normal operation, requires that calibrated control rods be oscillated in a special way at a high reactor power level. The value of the fuel temperature coefficient of reactivity is found from the measured flux responses to these oscillations. Application of the method in a Savannah River reactor charged with natural uranium is discussed.

  11. Wrong Signs in Regression Coefficients

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    McGee, Holly

    1999-01-01

    When using parametric cost estimation, it is important to note the possibility of the regression coefficients having the wrong sign. A wrong sign is defined as a sign on the regression coefficient opposite to the researcher's intuition and experience. Some possible causes for the wrong sign discussed in this paper are a small range of x's, leverage points, missing variables, multicollinearity, and computational error. Additionally, techniques for determining the cause of the wrong sign are given.

  12. Diffusion Coefficients in White Dwarfs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saumon, D.; Starrett, C. E.; Daligault, J.

    2015-06-01

    Models of diffusion in white dwarfs universally rely on the coefficients calculated by Paquette et al. (1986). We present new calculations of diffusion coefficients based on an advanced microscopic theory of dense plasmas and a numerical simulation approach that intrinsically accounts for multiple collisions. Our method is validated against a state-of-the-art method and we present results for the diffusion of carbon ions in a helium plasma.

  13. An Orally Active Phenylaminotetralin-Chemotype Serotonin 5-HT7 and 5-HT1A Receptor Partial Agonist that Corrects Motor Stereotypy in Mouse Models.

    PubMed

    Canal, Clinton E; Felsing, Daniel E; Liu, Yue; Zhu, Wanying; Wood, JodiAnne T; Perry, Charles K; Vemula, Rajender; Booth, Raymond G

    2015-07-15

    Stereotypy (e.g., repetitive hand waving) is a key phenotype of autism spectrum disorder, Fragile X and Rett syndromes, and other neuropsychiatric disorders, and its severity correlates with cognitive and attention deficits. There are no effective treatments, however, for stereotypy. Perturbation of serotonin (5-HT) neurotransmission contributes to stereotypy, suggesting that distinct 5-HT receptors may be pharmacotherapeutic targets to treat stereotypy and related neuropsychiatric symptoms. For example, preclinical studies indicate that 5-HT7 receptor activation corrects deficits in mouse models of Fragile X and Rett syndromes, and clinical trials for autism are underway with buspirone, a 5-HT1A partial agonist with relevant affinity at 5-HT7 receptors. Herein, we report the synthesis, in vitro molecular pharmacology, behavioral pharmacology, and pharmacokinetic parameters in mice after subcutaneous and oral administration of (+)-5-(2'-fluorophenyl)-N,N-dimethyl-1,2,3,4-tetrahydronaphthalen-2-amine ((+)-5-FPT), a new, dual partial agonist targeting both 5-HT7 (Ki = 5.8 nM, EC50 = 34 nM) and 5-HT1A (Ki = 22 nM, EC50 = 40 nM) receptors. Three unique, heterogeneous mouse models were used to assess the efficacy of (+)-5-FPT to reduce stereotypy: idiopathic jumping in C58/J mice, repetitive body rotations in C57BL/6J mice treated with the NMDA antagonist, MK-801, and repetitive head twitching in C57BL/6J mice treated with the 5-HT2 agonist, DOI. Systemic (+)-5-FPT potently and efficaciously reduced or eliminated stereotypy in each of the mouse models without altering locomotor behavior on its own, and additional tests showed that (+)-5-FPT, at the highest behaviorally active dose tested, enhanced social interaction and did not cause behaviors indicative of serotonin syndrome. These data suggest that (+)-5-FPT is a promising medication for treating stereotypy in psychiatric disorders.

  14. Converting Sabine absorption coefficients to random incidence absorption coefficients.

    PubMed

    Jeong, Cheol-Ho

    2013-06-01

    Absorption coefficients measured by the chamber method are referred to as Sabine absorption coefficients, which sometimes exceed unity due to the finite size of a sample and non-uniform intensity in the reverberation chambers under test. In this study, conversion methods from Sabine absorption coefficients to random incidence absorption coefficients are proposed. The overestimations of the Sabine absorption coefficient are investigated theoretically based on Miki's model for porous absorbers backed by a rigid wall or an air cavity, resulting in conversion factors. Additionally, three optimizations are suggested: An optimization method for the surface impedances for locally reacting absorbers, the flow resistivity for extendedly reacting absorbers, and the flow resistance for fabrics. With four porous type absorbers, the conversion methods are validated. For absorbers backed by a rigid wall, the surface impedance optimization produces the best results, while the flow resistivity optimization also yields reasonable results. The flow resistivity and flow resistance optimization for extendedly reacting absorbers are also found to be successful. However, the theoretical conversion factors based on Miki's model do not guarantee reliable estimations, particularly at frequencies below 250 Hz and beyond 2500 Hz.

  15. Adjustments to the correction for attenuation.

    PubMed

    Wetcher-Hendricks, Debra

    2006-06-01

    With respect to the often-present covariance between error terms of correlated variables, D. W. Zimmerman and R. H. Williams's (1977) adjusted correction for attenuation estimates the strength of the pairwise correlation between true scores without assuming independence of error scores. This article focuses on the derivation and analysis of formulas that perform the same function for partial and part correlation coefficients. Values produced by these formulas lie closer to the actual true-score coefficient than do the observed-score coefficients or those obtained by using C. Spearman's (1904) correction for attenuation. The new versions of the formulas thus allow analysts to use hypothetical values for error-score correlations to estimate values for the partial and part correlations between true scores while disregarding the independence-of-errors assumption.

  16. THE DIFFUSION COEFFICIENT OF CRYSTALLINE TRYPSIN

    PubMed Central

    Scherp, Henry W.

    1933-01-01

    The diffusion coefficient of crystalline trypsin in 0.5 saturated magnesium sulfate at 5°C. is 0.020 ±0.001 cm.2 per day, corresponding to a molecular radius of 2.6 x 10–7 cm. The rate of diffusion of the proteolytic activity is the same as that of the protein nitrogen, indicating that these two properties are held together in chemical combination and not in the form of an adsorption complex. PMID:19872740

  17. Rate coefficient for the reaction N + NO

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fox, J. L.

    1994-01-01

    Evidence has been advanced that the rate coefficient for the reaction N + NO right arrow N2 + O has a small positive temperature dependence at the high temperatures (900 to 1500 K) that prevail in the terrestrial middle and upper thermosphere by Siskind and Rusch (1992), and at the low temperatures (100 to 200 K) of the Martian lower thermosphere by Fox (1993). Assuming that the rate coefficient recommended by the Jet Propulsion Laboratory evaluation (DeMore et al., 1992) is accurate at 300 K, we derive here the low temperature value of the activation energy for this reaction and thus the rate coefficient that best fits the Viking 1 measured NO densities. We find that the fit is acceptable for a rate coefficient of about 1.3 x 10(exp -10)(T/300)(exp 0.5)exp(-400/T) and better for a value of about 2.5 x 10(exp -10)(T/300)(exp 0.5)exp(-600/T)cu cm/s.

  18. Isopiestic Determination of the Osmotic and Activity Coefficients of NaCl + SrCl2 + H2O at 298.15 K, and Representation with an Extended Ion-Interaction Model

    SciTech Connect

    Clegg, S L; Rard, J A; Miller, D G

    2004-11-09

    Isopiestic vapor-pressure measurements were made at 298.15 K for aqueous NaCl + SrCl{sub 2} solutions, using NaCl(aq) as the reference standard. The measurements for these ternary solutions were made at NaCl ionic strength fractions of y{sub 1} = 0.17066, 0.47366, and 0.82682 for the water activity range 0.9835 {ge} a{sub w} {ge} 0.8710. Our results, and those from two previous isopiestic studies, were combined and used with previously determined parameters for NaCl(aq) and those for SrCl{sub 2}(aq) determined here to evaluate the mixing parameters{sup S}{Theta}{sub Na,Sr} = (0.0562 {+-} 0.0007) kg {center_dot} mol{sup -1} and {Psi}{sub Na,Sr,Cl} = -(0.00705 {+-} 0.00017) kg{sup 2} {center_dot} mol{sup -2} for an extended form of Pitzer's ion-interaction model. These model parameters are valid for ionic strengths of I {le} 7.0 mol {center_dot} kg{sup -1}, where higher-order electrostatic effects have been included in the mixture model. If the fitting range is extended to the saturated solution molalities, then {sup S}{Theta}{sub Na,Sr} = (0.07885 {+-} 0.00195) kg {center_dot} mol{sup -1} and {Psi}{sub Na,Sr,Cl} = -(0.01230 {+-} 0.00033) kg{sup 2} {center_dot} mol{sup -2}. The extended ion-interaction model parameters obtained from available isopiestic data for SrCl{sub 2}(aq) at 298.15 K yield recommended values of the water activities and osmotic and activity coefficients.

  19. Factors influencing the stream-aquifer flow exchange coefficient.

    PubMed

    Morel-Seytoux, Hubert J; Mehl, Steffen; Morgado, Kyle

    2014-01-01

    Knowledge of river gain from or loss to a hydraulically connected water table aquifer is crucial in issues of water rights and also when attempting to optimize conjunctive use of surface and ground waters. Typically in groundwater models this exchange flow is related to a difference in head between the river and some point in the aquifer, through a "coefficient." This coefficient has been defined differently as well as the location for the head in the aquifer. This paper proposes a new coefficient, analytically derived, and a specific location for the point where the aquifer head is used in the difference. The dimensionless part of the coefficient is referred to as the SAFE (stream-aquifer flow exchange) dimensionless conductance. The paper investigates the factors that influence the value of this new conductance. Among these factors are (1) the wetted perimeter of the cross-section, (2) the degree of penetration of the cross-section, and (3) the shape of the cross-section. The study shows that these factors just listed are indeed ordered in their respective level of importance. In addition the study verifies that the analytical correct value of the coefficient is matched by finite difference simulation only if the grid system is sufficiently fine. Thus the use of the analytical value of the coefficient is an accurate and efficient alternative to ad hoc estimates for the coefficient typically used in finite difference and finite element methods.

  20. Factors influencing the stream-aquifer flow exchange coefficient.

    PubMed

    Morel-Seytoux, Hubert J; Mehl, Steffen; Morgado, Kyle

    2014-01-01

    Knowledge of river gain from or loss to a hydraulically connected water table aquifer is crucial in issues of water rights and also when attempting to optimize conjunctive use of surface and ground waters. Typically in groundwater models this exchange flow is related to a difference in head between the river and some point in the aquifer, through a "coefficient." This coefficient has been defined differently as well as the location for the head in the aquifer. This paper proposes a new coefficient, analytically derived, and a specific location for the point where the aquifer head is used in the difference. The dimensionless part of the coefficient is referred to as the SAFE (stream-aquifer flow exchange) dimensionless conductance. The paper investigates the factors that influence the value of this new conductance. Among these factors are (1) the wetted perimeter of the cross-section, (2) the degree of penetration of the cross-section, and (3) the shape of the cross-section. The study shows that these factors just listed are indeed ordered in their respective level of importance. In addition the study verifies that the analytical correct value of the coefficient is matched by finite difference simulation only if the grid system is sufficiently fine. Thus the use of the analytical value of the coefficient is an accurate and efficient alternative to ad hoc estimates for the coefficient typically used in finite difference and finite element methods. PMID:24010703

  1. Angular Fock coefficients: Refinement and further development

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liverts, Evgeny Z.; Barnea, Nir

    2015-10-01

    The angular coefficients ψk ,p(α ,θ ) of the Fock expansion characterizing the S -state wave function of the two-electron atomic system are calculated in hyperspherical angular coordinates α and θ . To solve the problem the Fock recurrence relations separated into the independent individual equations associated with definite power j of the nucleus charge Z are applied. The "pure" j components of the angular Fock coefficients, orthogonal to the hyperspherical harmonics Yk l, are found for even values of k . To this end, the specific coupling equation is proposed and applied. Effective techniques for solving the individual equations with the simplest nonseparable and separable right-hand sides are proposed. Some mistakes or misprints made earlier in representations of ψ2 ,0, are noted and corrected. All j components of ψ4 ,1 and the majority of components and subcomponents of ψ3 ,0 are calculated and presented. All calculations are carried out with the help of Wolfram Mathematica.

  2. Transport coefficients of heavy baryons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tolos, Laura; Torres-Rincon, Juan M.; Das, Santosh K.

    2016-08-01

    We compute the transport coefficients (drag and momentum diffusion) of the low-lying heavy baryons Λc and Λb in a medium of light mesons formed at the later stages of high-energy heavy-ion collisions. We employ the Fokker-Planck approach to obtain the transport coefficients from unitarized baryon-meson interactions based on effective field theories that respect chiral and heavy-quark symmetries. We provide the transport coefficients as a function of temperature and heavy-baryon momentum, and analyze the applicability of certain nonrelativistic estimates. Moreover we compare our outcome for the spatial diffusion coefficient to the one coming from the solution of the Boltzmann-Uehling-Uhlenbeck transport equation, and we find a very good agreement between both calculations. The transport coefficients for Λc and Λb in a thermal bath will be used in a subsequent publication as input in a Langevin evolution code for the generation and propagation of heavy particles in heavy-ion collisions at LHC and RHIC energies.

  3. Computing confidence intervals for standardized regression coefficients.

    PubMed

    Jones, Jeff A; Waller, Niels G

    2013-12-01

    With fixed predictors, the standard method (Cohen, Cohen, West, & Aiken, 2003, p. 86; Harris, 2001, p. 80; Hays, 1994, p. 709) for computing confidence intervals (CIs) for standardized regression coefficients fails to account for the sampling variability of the criterion standard deviation. With random predictors, this method also fails to account for the sampling variability of the predictor standard deviations. Nevertheless, under some conditions the standard method will produce CIs with accurate coverage rates. To delineate these conditions, we used a Monte Carlo simulation to compute empirical CI coverage rates in samples drawn from 36 populations with a wide range of data characteristics. We also computed the empirical CI coverage rates for 4 alternative methods that have been discussed in the literature: noncentrality interval estimation, the delta method, the percentile bootstrap, and the bias-corrected and accelerated bootstrap. Our results showed that for many data-parameter configurations--for example, sample size, predictor correlations, coefficient of determination (R²), orientation of β with respect to the eigenvectors of the predictor correlation matrix, RX--the standard method produced coverage rates that were close to their expected values. However, when population R² was large and when β approached the last eigenvector of RX, then the standard method coverage rates were frequently below the nominal rate (sometimes by a considerable amount). In these conditions, the delta method and the 2 bootstrap procedures were consistently accurate. Results using noncentrality interval estimation were inconsistent. In light of these findings, we recommend that researchers use the delta method to evaluate the sampling variability of standardized regression coefficients.

  4. Transport coefficients of He(+) ions in helium.

    PubMed

    Viehland, Larry A; Johnsen, Rainer; Gray, Benjamin R; Wright, Timothy G

    2016-02-21

    This paper demonstrates that the transport coefficients of (4)He(+) in (4)He can be calculated over wide ranges of E/N, the ratio of the electrostatic field strength to the gas number density, with the same level of precision as can be obtained experimentally if sufficiently accurate potential energy curves are available for the X(2)Σu (+) and A(2)Σg (+) states and one takes into account resonant charge transfer. We start by computing new potential energy curves for these states and testing their accuracy by calculating spectroscopic values for the separate states. It is established that the potentials obtained by extrapolation of results from d-aug-cc-pVXZ (X = 6, 7) basis sets using the CASSCF+MRCISD approach are each in exceptionally close agreement with the best potentials available and with experiment. The potentials are then used in a new computer program to determine the semi-classical phase shifts and the transport cross sections, and from these the gaseous ion transport coefficients are determined. In addition, new experimental values are reported for the mobilities of (4)He(+) in (4)He at 298.7 K, as a function of E/N, where careful consideration is given to minimizing various sources of uncertainty. Comparison with previously measured values establishes that only one set of previous data is reliable. Finally, the experimental and theoretical ion transport coefficients are shown to be in very good to excellent agreement, once corrections are applied to account for quantum-mechanical effects. PMID:26896985

  5. Transport coefficients of He+ ions in helium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Viehland, Larry A.; Johnsen, Rainer; Gray, Benjamin R.; Wright, Timothy G.

    2016-02-01

    This paper demonstrates that the transport coefficients of 4He+ in 4He can be calculated over wide ranges of E/N, the ratio of the electrostatic field strength to the gas number density, with the same level of precision as can be obtained experimentally if sufficiently accurate potential energy curves are available for the X2Σu+ and A2Σg+ states and one takes into account resonant charge transfer. We start by computing new potential energy curves for these states and testing their accuracy by calculating spectroscopic values for the separate states. It is established that the potentials obtained by extrapolation of results from d-aug-cc-pVXZ (X = 6, 7) basis sets using the CASSCF+MRCISD approach are each in exceptionally close agreement with the best potentials available and with experiment. The potentials are then used in a new computer program to determine the semi-classical phase shifts and the transport cross sections, and from these the gaseous ion transport coefficients are determined. In addition, new experimental values are reported for the mobilities of 4He+ in 4He at 298.7 K, as a function of E/N, where careful consideration is given to minimizing various sources of uncertainty. Comparison with previously measured values establishes that only one set of previous data is reliable. Finally, the experimental and theoretical ion transport coefficients are shown to be in very good to excellent agreement, once corrections are applied to account for quantum-mechanical effects.

  6. Pharmacological activation of group-II metabotropic glutamate receptors corrects a schizophrenia-like phenotype induced by prenatal stress in mice.

    PubMed

    Matrisciano, Francesco; Tueting, Patricia; Maccari, Stefania; Nicoletti, Ferdinando; Guidotti, Alessandro

    2012-03-01

    Prenatal exposure to restraint stress causes long-lasting changes in neuroplasticity that likely reflect pathological modifications triggered by early-life stress. We found that the offspring of dams exposed to repeated episodes of restraint stress during pregnancy (here named 'prenatal restraint stress mice' or 'PRS mice') developed a schizophrenia-like phenotype, characterized by a decreased expression of brain-derived neurotrophic factor and glutamic acid decarboxylase 67, an increased expression of type-1 DNA methyl transferase (DNMT1) in the frontal cortex, and a deficit in social interaction, locomotor activity, and prepulse inhibition. PRS mice also showed a marked decrease in metabotropic glutamate 2 (mGlu2) and mGlu3 receptor mRNA and protein levels in the frontal cortex, which was manifested at birth and persisted in adult life. This decrease was associated with an increased binding of DNMT1 to CpG-rich regions of mGlu2 and mGlu3 receptor promoters and an increased binding of MeCP2 to the mGlu2 receptor promoter. Systemic treatment with the selective mGlu2/3 receptor agonist LY379268 (0.5 mg/kg, i.p., twice daily for 5 days), corrected all the biochemical and behavioral abnormalities shown in PRS mice. Our data show for the first time that PRS induces a schizophrenia-like phenotype in mice, and suggest that epigenetic changes in mGlu2 and mGlu3 receptors lie at the core of the pathological programming induced by early-life stress.

  7. Pharmacological activation of group-II metabotropic glutamate receptors corrects a schizophrenia-like phenotype induced by prenatal stress in mice.

    PubMed

    Matrisciano, Francesco; Tueting, Patricia; Maccari, Stefania; Nicoletti, Ferdinando; Guidotti, Alessandro

    2012-03-01

    Prenatal exposure to restraint stress causes long-lasting changes in neuroplasticity that likely reflect pathological modifications triggered by early-life stress. We found that the offspring of dams exposed to repeated episodes of restraint stress during pregnancy (here named 'prenatal restraint stress mice' or 'PRS mice') developed a schizophrenia-like phenotype, characterized by a decreased expression of brain-derived neurotrophic factor and glutamic acid decarboxylase 67, an increased expression of type-1 DNA methyl transferase (DNMT1) in the frontal cortex, and a deficit in social interaction, locomotor activity, and prepulse inhibition. PRS mice also showed a marked decrease in metabotropic glutamate 2 (mGlu2) and mGlu3 receptor mRNA and protein levels in the frontal cortex, which was manifested at birth and persisted in adult life. This decrease was associated with an increased binding of DNMT1 to CpG-rich regions of mGlu2 and mGlu3 receptor promoters and an increased binding of MeCP2 to the mGlu2 receptor promoter. Systemic treatment with the selective mGlu2/3 receptor agonist LY379268 (0.5 mg/kg, i.p., twice daily for 5 days), corrected all the biochemical and behavioral abnormalities shown in PRS mice. Our data show for the first time that PRS induces a schizophrenia-like phenotype in mice, and suggest that epigenetic changes in mGlu2 and mGlu3 receptors lie at the core of the pathological programming induced by early-life stress. PMID:22089319

  8. Calculation of NaCl, KCl and LiCl Salts Activity Coefficients in Polyethylene Glycol (PEG4000)-Water System Using Modified PHSC Equation of State, Extended Debye-Hückel Model and Pitzer Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marjani, Azam

    2016-07-01

    For biomolecules and cell particles purification and separation in biological engineering, besides the chromatography as mostly applied process, aqueous two-phase systems (ATPS) are of the most favorable separation processes that are worth to be investigated in thermodynamic theoretically. In recent years, thermodynamic calculation of ATPS properties has attracted much attention due to their great applications in chemical industries such as separation processes. These phase calculations of ATPS have inherent complexity due to the presence of ions and polymers in aqueous solution. In this work, for target ternary systems of polyethylene glycol (PEG4000)-salt-water, thermodynamic investigation for constituent systems with three salts (NaCl, KCl and LiCl) has been carried out as PEG is the most favorable polymer in ATPS. The modified perturbed hard sphere chain (PHSC) equation of state (EOS), extended Debye-Hückel and Pitzer models were employed for calculation of activity coefficients for the considered systems. Four additional statistical parameters were considered to ensure the consistency of correlations and introduced as objective functions in the particle swarm optimization algorithm. The results showed desirable agreement to the available experimental data, and the order of recommendation of studied models is PHSC EOS > extended Debye-Hückel > Pitzer. The concluding remark is that the all the employed models are reliable in such calculations and can be used for thermodynamic correlation/predictions; however, by using an ion-based parameter calculation method, the PHSC EOS reveals both reliability and universality of applications.

  9. RECOMBINATION RATE COEFFICIENTS OF Be-LIKE Si

    SciTech Connect

    Orban, I.; Boehm, S.; Schuch, R.; Loch, S. D.

    2010-10-01

    Recombination of Be-like Si{sup 10+} over the 0-43 eV electron-ion energy range is measured at the CRYRING electron cooler. In addition to radiative and dielectronic recombination, the recombination spectrum also shows strong contributions from trielectronic recombination. Below 100 meV, several very strong resonances associated with a spin-flip of the excited electron dominate the spectrum and also dominate the recombination in the photoionized plasma. The resonant plasma rate coefficients corrected for the experimental field ionization are in good agreement with calculated results by Gu and with AUTOSTRUCTURE calculations. All other calculations significantly underestimate the plasma rate coefficients at low temperatures.

  10. Analysis of internal conversion coefficients

    PubMed

    Coursol; Gorozhankin; Yakushev; Briancon; Vylov

    2000-03-01

    An extensive database has been assembled that contains the three most widely used sets of calculated internal conversion coefficients (ICC): [Hager R.S., Seltzer E.C., 1968. Internal conversion tables. K-, L-, M-shell Conversion coefficients for Z = 30 to Z = 103, Nucl. Data Tables A4, 1-237; Band I.M., Trzhaskovskaya M.B., 1978. Tables of gamma-ray internal conversion coefficients for the K-, L- and M-shells, 10 < or = Z < or = 104, Special Report of Leningrad Nuclear Physics Institute; Rosel F., Fries H.M., Alder K., Pauli H.C., 1978. Internal conversion coefficients for all atomic shells, At. Data Nucl. Data Tables 21, 91-289] and also includes new Dirac Fock calculations [Band I.M. and Trzhaskovskaya M.B., 1993. Internal conversion coefficients for low-energy nuclear transitions, At. Data Nucl. Data Tables 55, 43-61]. This database is linked to a computer program to plot ICCs and their combinations (sums and ratios) as a function of Z and energy, as well as relative deviations of ICC or their combinations for any pair of tabulated data. Examples of these analyses are presented for the K-shell and total ICCs of the gamma-ray standards [Hansen H.H., 1985. Evaluation of K-shell and total internal conversion coefficients for some selected nuclear transitions, Eur. Appl. Res. Rept. Nucl. Sci. Tech. 11.6 (4) 777-816] and for the K-shell and total ICCs of high multipolarity transitions (total, K-, L-, M-shells of E3 and M3 and K-shell of M4). Experimental data sets are also compared with the theoretical values of these specific calculations. PMID:10724406

  11. Isopiestic Determination of the Osmotic and Activity Coefficients of Li2SO4(aq) at T = 298.15 and 323.15 K, and Representation with an Extended Ion-interaction (Pitzer) model

    SciTech Connect

    Rard, J A; Clegg, S L; Palmer, D A

    2007-01-03

    Isopiestic vapor-pressure measurements were made for Li{sub 2}SO{sub 4}(aq) from 0.1069 to 2.8190 mol {center_dot} kg{sup -1} at 298.15 K, and from 0.1148 to 2.7969 mol {center_dot} kg{sup -1} at 323.15 K, with NaCl(aq) as the reference standard. Published thermodynamic data for this system were reviewed, recalculated for consistency, and critically assessed. The present results and the more reliable published results were used to evaluate the parameters of an extended version of Pitzer's ion-interaction model with an ionic-strength dependent third virial coefficient, as well as those of the standard Pitzer model, for the osmotic and activity coefficients at both temperatures. Published enthalpies of dilution at 298.15 K were also analyzed to yield the parameters of the ion-interaction models for the relative apparent molar enthalpies of dilution. The resulting models at 298.15 K are valid to the saturated solution molality of the thermodynamically stable phase Li{sub 2}SO{sub 4} {center_dot} H{sub 2}O(cr). Solubilities of Li{sub 2}SO{sub 4} {center_dot} H{sub 2}O(cr) at 298.15 K were assessed, and the selected value of m(sat.) = 3.13 {+-} 0.04 mol {center_dot} kg{sup -1} was used to evaluate the thermodynamic solubility product K{sub s}(Li{sub 2}SO{sub 4} {center_dot} H{sub 2}O, cr, 298.15 K) = (2.62 {+-} 0.19) and a CODATA-compatible standard molar Gibbs energy of formation {Delta}{sub f}G{sub m}{sup o} (Li{sub 2}SO{sub 4} {center_dot} H{sub 2}O, cr, 298.15 K) = -(1564.6 {+-} 0.5) kJ {center_dot} mol{sup -1}.

  12. Yield Coefficient for Surface Penning Ionization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rutherford, G. H.; Asbury, M. J.; Davis, R. A.; Ingram, L. A.; Shepard, G. G.; Zich, R.

    2000-06-01

    Surface Penning Ionization (SPI) occurs when a metastable atom strikes a surface. The yield coefficient γ is defined as the probability of electron ejection per collision with the surface. Knowledge of γ is important in modeling rare gas discharges, in which Penning ionization is an important source of charged particles, especially at the confining surfaces, which may be some distance from the active discharge. We present experimental data and Monte Carlo calculations to extract the yield coefficient for helium metastable atoms on chemically-cleaned copper. The experiment involves measuring the ejected electron current from a pair of fine copper meshes placed in the flowtube of a flowing afterglow apparatus. The downstream mesh is closely spaced and destroys all metastable atoms that reach it. The fraction of metastables surviving the upstream mesh is used in conjunction with Monte Carlo simulations, which give the average number of metastable/mesh collision, to yield a robust value of γ.

  13. Ratings of Job Performance of Georgia Correctional Officers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nosin, Jerome Alan

    Expansion and modification of a 27-item Delphi derived form for assessing campus police performance resulted in a 43-item form to measure job performance of correctional officers in the Georgia Department of Corrections. The self-rating scale, with a reliability coefficient of .995 (n=120) was subjected to factor analysis and varimax rotation and…

  14. Effective Viscosity Coefficient of Nanosuspensions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rudyak, V. Ya.; Belkin, A. A.; Egorov, V. V.

    2008-12-01

    Systematic calculations of the effective viscosity coefficient of nanosuspensions have been performed using the molecular dynamics method. It is established that the viscosity of a nanosuspension depends not only on the volume concentration of the nanoparticles but also on their mass and diameter. Differences from Einstein's relation are found even for nanosuspensions with a low particle concentration.

  15. Aerodynamic coefficients and transformation tables

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ames, Joseph S

    1918-01-01

    The problem of the transformation of numerical values expressed in one system of units into another set or system of units frequently arises in connection with aerodynamic problems. Report contains aerodynamic coefficients and conversion tables needed to facilitate such transformation. (author)

  16. Estimating the Polyserial Correlation Coefficient.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bedrick, Edward J.; Breslin, Frederick C.

    1996-01-01

    Simple noniterative estimators of the polyserial correlation coefficient are developed by exploiting a general relationship between the polyserial correlation and the point polyserial correlation to give extensions of the biserial estimators of K. Pearson (1909), H. E. Brogden (1949), and F. M. Lord (1963) to the multicategory setting. (SLD)

  17. Integer Solutions of Binomial Coefficients

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gilbertson, Nicholas J.

    2016-01-01

    A good formula is like a good story, rich in description, powerful in communication, and eye-opening to readers. The formula presented in this article for determining the coefficients of the binomial expansion of (x + y)n is one such "good read." The beauty of this formula is in its simplicity--both describing a quantitative situation…

  18. Tables of the coefficients A

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chandra, N.

    1974-01-01

    Numerical coefficients required to express the angular distribution for the rotationally elastic or inelastic scattering of electrons from a diatomic molecule were tabulated for the case of nitrogen and in the energy range from 0.20 eV to 10.0 eV. Five different rotational states are considered.

  19. Identities for generalized hypergeometric coefficients

    SciTech Connect

    Biedenharn, L.C.; Louck, J.D.

    1991-01-01

    Generalizations of hypergeometric functions to arbitrarily many symmetric variables are discussed, along with their associated hypergeometric coefficients, and the setting within which these generalizations arose. Identities generalizing the Euler identity for {sub 2}F{sub 1}, the Saalschuetz identity, and two generalizations of the {sub 4}F{sub 3} Bailey identity, among others, are given. 16 refs.

  20. Prediction of stream volatilization coefficients

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Rathbun, Ronald E.

    1990-01-01

    Equations are developed for predicting the liquid-film and gas-film reference-substance parameters for quantifying volatilization of organic solutes from streams. Molecular weight and molecular-diffusion coefficients of the solute are used as correlating parameters. Equations for predicting molecular-diffusion coefficients of organic solutes in water and air are developed, with molecular weight and molal volume as parameters. Mean absolute errors of prediction for diffusion coefficients in water are 9.97% for the molecular-weight equation, 6.45% for the molal-volume equation. The mean absolute error for the diffusion coefficient in air is 5.79% for the molal-volume equation. Molecular weight is not a satisfactory correlating parameter for diffusion in air because two equations are necessary to describe the values in the data set. The best predictive equation for the liquid-film reference-substance parameter has a mean absolute error of 5.74%, with molal volume as the correlating parameter. The best equation for the gas-film parameter has a mean absolute error of 7.80%, with molecular weight as the correlating parameter.

  1. FISICO: Fast Image SegmentatIon COrrection

    PubMed Central

    Valenzuela, Waldo; Ferguson, Stephen J.; Ignasiak, Dominika; Diserens, Gaëlle; Häni, Levin; Wiest, Roland; Vermathen, Peter; Boesch, Chris

    2016-01-01

    Background and Purpose In clinical diagnosis, medical image segmentation plays a key role in the analysis of pathological regions. Despite advances in automatic and semi-automatic segmentation techniques, time-effective correction tools are commonly needed to improve segmentation results. Therefore, these tools must provide faster corrections with a lower number of interactions, and a user-independent solution to reduce the time frame between image acquisition and diagnosis. Methods We present a new interactive method for correcting image segmentations. Our method provides 3D shape corrections through 2D interactions. This approach enables an intuitive and natural corrections of 3D segmentation results. The developed method has been implemented into a software tool and has been evaluated for the task of lumbar muscle and knee joint segmentations from MR images. Results Experimental results show that full segmentation corrections could be performed within an average correction time of 5.5±3.3 minutes and an average of 56.5±33.1 user interactions, while maintaining the quality of the final segmentation result within an average Dice coefficient of 0.92±0.02 for both anatomies. In addition, for users with different levels of expertise, our method yields a correction time and number of interaction decrease from 38±19.2 minutes to 6.4±4.3 minutes, and 339±157.1 to 67.7±39.6 interactions, respectively. PMID:27224061

  2. Eyeglasses for Vision Correction

    MedlinePlus

    ... Stories Español Eye Health / Glasses & Contacts Eyeglasses for Vision Correction Dec. 12, 2015 Wearing eyeglasses is an easy way to correct refractive errors. Improving your vision with eyeglasses offers the opportunity to select from ...

  3. Illinois Corrections Project Report

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hungerford, Jack

    1974-01-01

    The Illinois Corrections Project for Law-Focused Education, which brings law-focused curriculum into corrections institutions, was initiated in 1973 with a summer institute and includes programs in nine particpating institutions. (JH)

  4. Computing connection coefficients of compactly supported wavelets on bounded intervals

    SciTech Connect

    Romine, C.H.; Peyton, B.W.

    1997-04-01

    Daubechies wavelet basis functions have many properties that make them desirable as a basis for a Galerkin approach to solving PDEs: they are orthogonal, with compact support, and their connection coefficients can be computed. The method developed by Latto et al. to compute connection coefficients does not provide the correct inner product near the endpoints of a bounded interval, making the implementation of boundary conditions problematic. Moreover, the highly oscillatory nature of the wavelet basis functions makes standard numerical quadrature of integrals near the boundary impractical. The authors extend the method of Latto et al. to construct and solve a linear system of equations whose solution provides the exact computation of the integrals at the boundaries. As a consequence, they provide the correct inner product for wavelet basis functions on a bounded interval.

  5. A FORTRAN program for ranking and for calculation of Spearman's correlation coefficient.

    PubMed

    Kempi, V

    1985-11-01

    A FORTRAN IV program is presented for ranking data in ascending order. The ranks corrected for ties are printed together with the corresponding raw data, if requested. After ranking, the Spearman's rank correlation coefficient, rs, as well as the corresponding t-value, can be calculated. In these calculations corrections are made for tied values.

  6. Teaching Politically Correct Language

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tsehelska, Maryna

    2006-01-01

    This article argues that teaching politically correct language to English learners provides them with important information and opportunities to be exposed to cultural issues. The author offers a brief review of how political correctness became an issue and how being politically correct influences the use of language. The article then presents…

  7. Research in Correctional Rehabilitation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rehabilitation Services Administration (DHEW), Washington, DC.

    Forty-three leaders in corrections and rehabilitation participated in the seminar planned to provide an indication of the status of research in correctional rehabilitation. Papers include: (1) "Program Trends in Correctional Rehabilitation" by John P. Conrad, (2) "Federal Offenders Rahabilitation Program" by Percy B. Bell and Merlyn Mathews, (3)…

  8. Estimating biokinetic coefficients in the PACT™ system.

    PubMed

    Shen, Zhiyao; Arbuckle, Wm Brian

    2016-02-01

    When powdered activated carbon (PAC) is continuously added to the aeration tank of an activated sludge reactor, the modification is called a PACT™ process (for powdered activated carbon treatment). The PAC provides many benefits, but complicates the determination of biological phenomena. Determination of bio-oxidation kinetics in a PACT system is a key to fully understanding enhanced biological mechanisms resulting from PAC addition. A model is developed to account for the main mechanisms involved in the PACT system -- adsorption, air stripping and bio-oxidation. The model enables the investigation of biokinetic information, including possible synergistic effects. Six parallel reactors were used to treat a synthetic waste; three activated sludge and three PACT. The PACT reactors provided significantly reduced effluent TOC (total organic carbon). Biokinetic coefficients were obtained from steady-state data using averaged reactor data and by using all data (22 points for each reactor). As expected, the PACT reactors resulted in a substantial reduction in the effluent concentration of non-biodegradable total organic carbon. The Monod equation's half-saturation coefficient (Ks) was reduced significantly in the PACT reactors, resulting in higher growth rates at lower concentrations. The maximum specific substrate utilization (qm) rate was also reduced about 25% using the averaged data and remained unchanged using all the data. The substrate utilization values are affected by errors in biomass determination and more research is needed to accurately determine biomass.

  9. Estimating biokinetic coefficients in the PACT™ system.

    PubMed

    Shen, Zhiyao; Arbuckle, Wm Brian

    2016-02-01

    When powdered activated carbon (PAC) is continuously added to the aeration tank of an activated sludge reactor, the modification is called a PACT™ process (for powdered activated carbon treatment). The PAC provides many benefits, but complicates the determination of biological phenomena. Determination of bio-oxidation kinetics in a PACT system is a key to fully understanding enhanced biological mechanisms resulting from PAC addition. A model is developed to account for the main mechanisms involved in the PACT system -- adsorption, air stripping and bio-oxidation. The model enables the investigation of biokinetic information, including possible synergistic effects. Six parallel reactors were used to treat a synthetic waste; three activated sludge and three PACT. The PACT reactors provided significantly reduced effluent TOC (total organic carbon). Biokinetic coefficients were obtained from steady-state data using averaged reactor data and by using all data (22 points for each reactor). As expected, the PACT reactors resulted in a substantial reduction in the effluent concentration of non-biodegradable total organic carbon. The Monod equation's half-saturation coefficient (Ks) was reduced significantly in the PACT reactors, resulting in higher growth rates at lower concentrations. The maximum specific substrate utilization (qm) rate was also reduced about 25% using the averaged data and remained unchanged using all the data. The substrate utilization values are affected by errors in biomass determination and more research is needed to accurately determine biomass. PMID:26613352

  10. ADMINISTRATIVE GUIDE IN SPEECH CORRECTION.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    HEALEY, WILLIAM C.

    WRITTEN PRIMARILY FOR SCHOOL SUPERINTENDENTS, PRINCIPALS, SPEECH CLINICIANS, AND SUPERVISORS, THIS GUIDE OUTLINES THE MECHANICS OF ORGANIZING AND CONDUCTING SPEECH CORRECTION ACTIVITIES IN THE PUBLIC SCHOOLS. IT INCLUDES THE REQUIREMENTS FOR CERTIFICATION OF A SPEECH CLINICIAN IN MISSOURI AND DESCRIBES ESSENTIAL STEPS FOR THE DEVELOPMENT OF A…

  11. Temperature-dependent spectral mismatch corrections

    DOE PAGES

    Osterwald, Carl R.; Campanelli, Mark; Moriarty, Tom; Emery, Keith A.; Williams, Rafell

    2015-11-01

    This study develops the mathematical foundation for a translation of solar cell short-circuit current from one thermal and spectral irradiance operating condition to another without the use of ill-defined and error-prone temperature coefficients typically employed in solar cell metrology. Using the partial derivative of quantum efficiency with respect to temperature, the conventional isothermal expression for spectral mismatch corrections is modified to account for changes of current due to temperature; this modification completely eliminates the need for short-circuit-current temperature coefficients. An example calculation is provided to demonstrate use of the new translation.

  12. Study of Dispersion Coefficient Channel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Akiyama, K. R.; Bressan, C. K.; Pires, M. S. G.; Canno, L. M.; Ribeiro, L. C. L. J.

    2016-08-01

    The issue of water pollution has worsened in recent times due to releases, intentional or not, of pollutants in natural water bodies. This causes several studies about the distribution of pollutants are carried out. The water quality models have been developed and widely used today as a preventative tool, ie to try to predict what will be the concentration distribution of constituent along a body of water in spatial and temporal scale. To understand and use such models, it is necessary to know some concepts of hydraulic high on their application, including the longitudinal dispersion coefficient. This study aims to conduct a theoretical and experimental study of the channel dispersion coefficient, yielding more information about their direct determination in the literature.

  13. Consistent transport coefficients in astrophysics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fontenla, Juan M.; Rovira, M.; Ferrofontan, C.

    1986-01-01

    A consistent theory for dealing with transport phenomena in stellar atmospheres starting with the kinetic equations and introducing three cases (LTE, partial LTE, and non-LTE) was developed. The consistent hydrodynamical equations were presented for partial-LTE, the transport coefficients defined, and a method shown to calculate them. The method is based on the numerical solution of kinetic equations considering Landau, Boltzmann, and Focker-Planck collision terms. Finally a set of results for the transport coefficients derived for a partially ionized hydrogen gas with radiation was shown, considering ionization and recombination as well as elastic collisions. The results obtained imply major changes is some types of theoretical model calculations and can resolve some important current problems concerning energy and mass balance in the solar atmosphere. It is shown that energy balance in the lower solar transition region can be fully explained by means of radiation losses and conductive flux.

  14. High temperature Seebeck coefficient metrology

    SciTech Connect

    Martin, J.; Tritt, T.; Uher, C.

    2010-12-15

    We present an overview of the challenges and practices of thermoelectric metrology on bulk materials at high temperature (300 to 1300 K). The Seebeck coefficient, when combined with thermal and electrical conductivity, is an essential property measurement for evaluating the potential performance of novel thermoelectric materials. However, there is some question as to which measurement technique(s) provides the most accurate determination of the Seebeck coefficient at high temperature. This has led to the implementation of nonideal practices that have further complicated the confirmation of reported high ZT materials. To ensure meaningful interlaboratory comparison of data, thermoelectric measurements must be reliable, accurate, and consistent. This article will summarize and compare the relevant measurement techniques and apparatus designs required to effectively manage uncertainty, while also providing a reference resource of previous advances in high temperature thermoelectric metrology.

  15. Portable vapor diffusion coefficient meter

    DOEpatents

    Ho, Clifford K.

    2007-06-12

    An apparatus for measuring the effective vapor diffusion coefficient of a test vapor diffusing through a sample of porous media contained within a test chamber. A chemical sensor measures the time-varying concentration of vapor that has diffused a known distance through the porous media. A data processor contained within the apparatus compares the measured sensor data with analytical predictions of the response curve based on the transient diffusion equation using Fick's Law, iterating on the choice of an effective vapor diffusion coefficient until the difference between the predicted and measured curves is minimized. Optionally, a purge fluid can forced through the porous media, permitting the apparatus to also measure a gas-phase permeability. The apparatus can be made lightweight, self-powered, and portable for use in the field.

  16. Measurement of attenuation coefficients of the fundamental and second harmonic waves in water

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Shuzeng; Jeong, Hyunjo; Cho, Sungjong; Li, Xiongbing

    2016-02-01

    Attenuation corrections in nonlinear acoustics play an important role in the study of nonlinear fluids, biomedical imaging, or solid material characterization. The measurement of attenuation coefficients in a nonlinear regime is not easy because they depend on the source pressure and requires accurate diffraction corrections. In this work, the attenuation coefficients of the fundamental and second harmonic waves which come from the absorption of water are measured in nonlinear ultrasonic experiments. Based on the quasilinear theory of the KZK equation, the nonlinear sound field equations are derived and the diffraction correction terms are extracted. The measured sound pressure amplitudes are adjusted first for diffraction corrections in order to reduce the impact on the measurement of attenuation coefficients from diffractions. The attenuation coefficients of the fundamental and second harmonics are calculated precisely from a nonlinear least squares curve-fitting process of the experiment data. The results show that attenuation coefficients in a nonlinear condition depend on both frequency and source pressure, which are much different from a linear regime. In a relatively lower drive pressure, the attenuation coefficients increase linearly with frequency. However, they present the characteristic of nonlinear growth in a high drive pressure. As the diffraction corrections are obtained based on the quasilinear theory, it is important to use an appropriate source pressure for accurate attenuation measurements.

  17. Ionization coefficients in gas mixtures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marić, D.; Šašić, O.; Jovanović, J.; Radmilović-Rađenović, M.; Petrović, Z. Lj.

    2007-03-01

    We have tested the application of the common E/N ( E—electric field, N—gas number density) or Wieland approximation [Van Brunt, R.J., 1987. Common parametrizations of electron transport, collision cross section, and dielectric strength data for binary gas mixtures. J. Appl. Phys. 61 (5), 1773-1787.] and the common mean energy (CME) combination of the data for pure gases to obtain ionization coefficients for mixtures. Test calculations were made for Ar-CH4, Ar-N2, He-Xe and CH4-N2 mixtures. Standard combination procedure gives poor results in general, due to the fact that the electron energy distribution is considerably different in mixtures and in individual gases at the same values of E/N. The CME method may be used for mixtures of gases with ionization coefficients that do not differ by more than two orders of magnitude which is better than any other technique that was proposed [Marić, D., Radmilović-Rađenović, M., Petrović, Z.Lj., 2005. On parametrization and mixture laws for electron ionization coefficients. Eur. Phys. J. D 35, 313-321.].

  18. The interpretation of selection coefficients.

    PubMed

    Barton, N H; Servedio, M R

    2015-05-01

    Evolutionary biologists have an array of powerful theoretical techniques that can accurately predict changes in the genetic composition of populations. Changes in gene frequencies and genetic associations between loci can be tracked as they respond to a wide variety of evolutionary forces. However, it is often less clear how to decompose these various forces into components that accurately reflect the underlying biology. Here, we present several issues that arise in the definition and interpretation of selection and selection coefficients, focusing on insights gained through the examination of selection coefficients in multilocus notation. Using this notation, we discuss how its flexibility-which allows different biological units to be identified as targets of selection-is reflected in the interpretation of the coefficients that the notation generates. In many situations, it can be difficult to agree on whether loci can be considered to be under "direct" versus "indirect" selection, or to quantify this selection. We present arguments for what the terms direct and indirect selection might best encompass, considering a range of issues, from viability and sexual selection to kin selection. We show how multilocus notation can discriminate between direct and indirect selection, and describe when it can do so. PMID:25790030

  19. Accuracy of Range Restriction Correction with Multiple Imputation in Small and Moderate Samples: A Simulation Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pfaffel, Andreas; Spiel, Christiane

    2016-01-01

    Approaches to correcting correlation coefficients for range restriction have been developed under the framework of large sample theory. The accuracy of missing data techniques for correcting correlation coefficients for range restriction has thus far only been investigated with relatively large samples. However, researchers and evaluators are…

  20. Analytic expressions for ULF wave radiation belt radial diffusion coefficients

    PubMed Central

    Ozeke, Louis G; Mann, Ian R; Murphy, Kyle R; Jonathan Rae, I; Milling, David K

    2014-01-01

    We present analytic expressions for ULF wave-derived radiation belt radial diffusion coefficients, as a function of L and Kp, which can easily be incorporated into global radiation belt transport models. The diffusion coefficients are derived from statistical representations of ULF wave power, electric field power mapped from ground magnetometer data, and compressional magnetic field power from in situ measurements. We show that the overall electric and magnetic diffusion coefficients are to a good approximation both independent of energy. We present example 1-D radial diffusion results from simulations driven by CRRES-observed time-dependent energy spectra at the outer boundary, under the action of radial diffusion driven by the new ULF wave radial diffusion coefficients and with empirical chorus wave loss terms (as a function of energy, Kp and L). There is excellent agreement between the differential flux produced by the 1-D, Kp-driven, radial diffusion model and CRRES observations of differential electron flux at 0.976 MeV—even though the model does not include the effects of local internal acceleration sources. Our results highlight not only the importance of correct specification of radial diffusion coefficients for developing accurate models but also show significant promise for belt specification based on relatively simple models driven by solar wind parameters such as solar wind speed or geomagnetic indices such as Kp. Key Points Analytic expressions for the radial diffusion coefficients are presented The coefficients do not dependent on energy or wave m value The electric field diffusion coefficient dominates over the magnetic PMID:26167440

  1. Maxwell boundary condition and velocity dependent accommodation coefficient

    SciTech Connect

    Struchtrup, Henning

    2013-11-15

    A modification of Maxwell's boundary condition for the Boltzmann equation is developed that allows to incorporate velocity dependent accommodation coefficients into the microscopic description. As a first example, it is suggested to consider the wall-particle interaction as a thermally activated process with three parameters. A simplified averaging procedure leads to jump and slip boundary conditions for hydrodynamics. Coefficients for velocity slip, temperature jump, and thermal transpiration flow are identified and compared with those resulting from the original Maxwell model and the Cercignani-Lampis model. An extension of the model leads to temperature dependent slip and jump coefficients.

  2. Averaged particle dose conversion coefficients in air crew dosimetry.

    PubMed

    Mares, V; Roesler, S; Schraube, H

    2004-01-01

    The MCNPX Monte Carlo code was used to calculate energy-dependent fluence-to-effective dose conversion coefficients for neutrons, protons, electrons, photons, charged pions and muons. The FLUKA Monte Carlo code was used to calculate the spectral particle fluences of secondary cosmic rays for different altitudes, and for different combinations of solar modulation and vertical cut-off rigidity parameters. The energy-averaged fluence-to-dose conversion coefficients were obtained by folding the particle fluence spectra with the conversion coefficients for effective dose and ambient dose equivalent. They show a slight dependence on altitude, solar activity and location in the geomagnetic field.

  3. Averaged particle dose conversion coefficients in air crew dosimetry.

    PubMed

    Mares, V; Roesler, S; Schraube, H

    2004-01-01

    The MCNPX Monte Carlo code was used to calculate energy-dependent fluence-to-effective dose conversion coefficients for neutrons, protons, electrons, photons, charged pions and muons. The FLUKA Monte Carlo code was used to calculate the spectral particle fluences of secondary cosmic rays for different altitudes, and for different combinations of solar modulation and vertical cut-off rigidity parameters. The energy-averaged fluence-to-dose conversion coefficients were obtained by folding the particle fluence spectra with the conversion coefficients for effective dose and ambient dose equivalent. They show a slight dependence on altitude, solar activity and location in the geomagnetic field. PMID:15353676

  4. Measurements of thermal accommodation coefficients.

    SciTech Connect

    Rader, Daniel John; Castaneda, Jaime N.; Torczynski, John Robert; Grasser, Thomas W.; Trott, Wayne Merle

    2005-10-01

    A previously-developed experimental facility has been used to determine gas-surface thermal accommodation coefficients from the pressure dependence of the heat flux between parallel plates of similar material but different surface finish. Heat flux between the plates is inferred from measurements of temperature drop between the plate surface and an adjacent temperature-controlled water bath. Thermal accommodation measurements were determined from the pressure dependence of the heat flux for a fixed plate separation. Measurements of argon and nitrogen in contact with standard machined (lathed) or polished 304 stainless steel plates are indistinguishable within experimental uncertainty. Thus, the accommodation coefficient of 304 stainless steel with nitrogen and argon is estimated to be 0.80 {+-} 0.02 and 0.87 {+-} 0.02, respectively, independent of the surface roughness within the range likely to be encountered in engineering practice. Measurements of the accommodation of helium showed a slight variation with 304 stainless steel surface roughness: 0.36 {+-} 0.02 for a standard machine finish and 0.40 {+-} 0.02 for a polished finish. Planned tests with carbon-nanotube-coated plates will be performed when 304 stainless-steel blanks have been successfully coated.

  5. Effective Use of Correctives in Mastery Learning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    DeWeese, Sean V.; Randolph, Justus J.

    2011-01-01

    Mastery learning is a formative assessment strategy that involves the use of specific interventions, called correctives, to address the specific comprehension needs of the learner. Effective correctives are crucial for the effectiveness of mastery learning, so it is important that teachers make good decisions about what activities and strategies…

  6. Boomwhackers and End-Pipe Corrections

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ruiz, Michael J.

    2014-01-01

    End-pipe corrections seldom come to mind as a suitable topic for an introductory physics lab. Yet, the end-pipe correction formula can be verified in an engaging and inexpensive lab that requires only two supplies: plastic-tube toys called boomwhackers and a meter-stick. This article describes a lab activity in which students model data from…

  7. Altitude-dependent dose conversion coefficients in EPCARD.

    PubMed

    Mares, V; Leuthold, G

    2007-01-01

    Conversion coefficients that depend on altitude, cutoff rigidity and solar activity were developed and introduced in the European Program Package for the Calculation of Aviation Route Doses (EPCARD). A set of specially chosen long-distance flights were used to compare the new particle effective doses and ambient dose equivalents with those calculated using the previous averaged constant conversion coefficients. The data show very good agreement to each other. The dose differences for the chosen flights are <11%, for typical civil flight levels.

  8. Evaluation and automatic correction of metal-implant-induced artifacts in MR-based attenuation correction in whole-body PET/MR imaging.

    PubMed

    Schramm, G; Maus, J; Hofheinz, F; Petr, J; Lougovski, A; Beuthien-Baumann, B; Platzek, I; van den Hoff, J

    2014-06-01

    The aim of this paper is to describe a new automatic method for compensation of metal-implant-induced segmentation errors in MR-based attenuation maps (MRMaps) and to evaluate the quantitative influence of those artifacts on the reconstructed PET activity concentration. The developed method uses a PET-based delineation of the patient contour to compensate metal-implant-caused signal voids in the MR scan that is segmented for PET attenuation correction. PET emission data of 13 patients with metal implants examined in a Philips Ingenuity PET/MR were reconstructed with the vendor-provided method for attenuation correction (MRMap(orig), PET(orig)) and additionally with a method for attenuation correction (MRMap(cor), PET(cor)) developed by our group. MRMaps produced by both methods were visually inspected for segmentation errors. The segmentation errors in MRMap(orig) were classified into four classes (L1 and L2 artifacts inside the lung and B1 and B2 artifacts inside the remaining body depending on the assigned attenuation coefficients). The average relative SUV differences (ε(rel)(av)) between PET(orig) and PET(cor) of all regions showing wrong attenuation coefficients in MRMap(orig) were calculated. Additionally, relative SUV(mean) differences (ε(rel)) of tracer accumulations in hot focal structures inside or in the vicinity of these regions were evaluated. MRMap(orig) showed erroneous attenuation coefficients inside the regions affected by metal artifacts and inside the patients' lung in all 13 cases. In MRMap(cor), all regions with metal artifacts, except for the sternum, were filled with the soft-tissue attenuation coefficient and the lung was correctly segmented in all patients. MRMap(cor) only showed small residual segmentation errors in eight patients. ε(rel)(av) (mean ± standard deviation) were: (-56 ± 3)% for B1, (-43 ± 4)% for B2, (21 ± 18)% for L1, (120 ± 47)% for L2 regions. ε(rel) (mean ± standard deviation) of hot focal structures were: (-52

  9. Ratios of internal conversion coefficients

    SciTech Connect

    Raman, S.; Ertugrul, M.; Nestor, C.W. . E-mail: CNestorjr@aol.com; Trzhaskovskaya, M.B.

    2006-03-15

    We present here a database of available experimental ratios of internal conversion coefficients for different atomic subshells measured with an accuracy of 10% or better for a number of elements in the range 26 {<=} Z {<=} 100. The experimental set involves 414 ratios for pure and 1096 ratios for mixed-multipolarity nuclear transitions in the transition energy range from 2 to 2300 keV. We give relevant theoretical ratios calculated in the framework of the Dirac-Fock method with and without regard for the hole in the atomic subshell after conversion. For comparison, the ratios obtained within the relativistic Hartree-Fock-Slater approximation are also presented. In cases where several ratios were measured for the same transition in a given isotope in which two multipolarities were involved, we present the mixing ratio {delta} {sup 2} obtained by a least squares fit.

  10. Experimental investigation of factors affecting the absolute recovery coefficients in iodine-124 PET lesion imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jentzen, Walter

    2010-04-01

    The use of recovery coefficients (RCs) in 124I PET lesion imaging is a simple method to correct the imaged activity concentration (AC) primarily for the partial-volume effect and, to a minor extent, for the prompt gamma coincidence effect. The aim of this phantom study was to experimentally investigate a number of various factors affecting the 124I RCs. Three RC-based correction approaches were considered. These approaches differ with respect to the volume of interest (VOI) drawn, which determines the imaged AC and the RCs: a single voxel VOI containing the maximum value (maximum RC), a spherical VOI with a diameter of the scanner resolution (resolution RC) and a VOI equaling the physical object volume (isovolume RC). Measurements were performed using mainly a stand-alone PET scanner (EXACT HR+) and a latest-generation PET/CT scanner (BIOGRAPH mCT). The RCs were determined using a cylindrical phantom containing spheres or rotational ellipsoids and were derived from images acquired with a reference acquisition protocol. For each type of RC, the influence of the following factors on the RC was assessed: object shape, background activity spill in and iterative image reconstruction parameters. To evaluate the robustness of the RC-based correction approaches, the percentage deviation between RC-corrected and true ACs was determined from images acquired with a clinical acquisition protocol of different AC regimes. The observed results of the shape and spill-in effects were compared with simulation data derived from a convolution-based model. The study demonstrated that the shape effect was negligible and, therefore, was in agreement with theoretical expectations. In contradiction to the simulation results, the observed spill-in effect was unexpectedly small. To avoid variations in the determination of RCs due to reconstruction parameter changes, image reconstruction with a pixel length of about one-third or less of the scanner resolution and an OSEM 1 × 32 algorithm or

  11. [Obtaining aerosol backscattering coefficient using pure rotational Raman-Mie scattering spectrum].

    PubMed

    Rong, Wei; Chen, Si-Ying; Zhang, Yin-Chao; Chen, He; Guo, Pan

    2012-11-01

    Both the traditional Klett and Fernald methods used to obtain atmospheric aerosol backscattering coefficient require the hypothesis of relationship between the extinction coefficient and backscattering coefficient, and this will bring error. According to the theory that the pure rotational Raman backscattering coefficient is only related to atmospheric temperature and pressure, a new method is presented for inverting aerosol backscattering coefficient, which needed the intensity of elastic scattering and rotational Raman combined with atmospheric temperature and pressure obtained with the sounding balloons in this article. This method can not only eliminate the errors of the traditional Klett and Fernald methods caused by the hypothesis, but also avoid the error caused by the correction of the overlap. Finally, the aerosol backscattering coefficient was acquired by using this method and the data obtained via the Raman-Mie scattering Lidar of our lab. And the result was compared with that of Klett and Fernald. PMID:23387171

  12. Global orbit corrections

    SciTech Connect

    Symon, K.

    1987-11-01

    There are various reasons for preferring local (e.g., three bump) orbit correction methods to global corrections. One is the difficulty of solving the mN equations for the required mN correcting bumps, where N is the number of superperiods and m is the number of bumps per superperiod. The latter is not a valid reason for avoiding global corrections, since, we can take advantage of the superperiod symmetry to reduce the mN simultaneous equations to N separate problems, each involving only m simultaneous equations. Previously, I have shown how to solve the general problem when the machine contains unknown magnet errors of known probability distribution; we made measurements of known precision of the orbit displacements at a set of points, and we wish to apply correcting bumps to minimize the weighted rms orbit deviations. In this report, we will consider two simpler problems, using similar methods. We consider the case when we make M beam position measurements per superperiod, and we wish to apply an equal number M of orbit correcting bumps to reduce the measured position errors to zero. We also consider the problem when the number of correcting bumps is less than the number of measurements, and we wish to minimize the weighted rms position errors. We will see that the latter problem involves solving equations of a different form, but involving the same matrices as the former problem.

  13. Note on Two Generalizations of Coefficient Alpha.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Raju, Nambury S.

    1979-01-01

    An important relationship is given for two generalizations of coefficient alpha: (1) Rajaratnam, Cronbach, and Gleser's generalizability formula for stratified-parallel tests, and (2) Raju's coefficient beta. (Author/CTM)

  14. Contrast image correction method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schettini, Raimondo; Gasparini, Francesca; Corchs, Silvia; Marini, Fabrizio; Capra, Alessandro; Castorina, Alfio

    2010-04-01

    A method for contrast enhancement is proposed. The algorithm is based on a local and image-dependent exponential correction. The technique aims to correct images that simultaneously present overexposed and underexposed regions. To prevent halo artifacts, the bilateral filter is used as the mask of the exponential correction. Depending on the characteristics of the image (piloted by histogram analysis), an automated parameter-tuning step is introduced, followed by stretching, clipping, and saturation preserving treatments. Comparisons with other contrast enhancement techniques are presented. The Mean Opinion Score (MOS) experiment on grayscale images gives the greatest preference score for our algorithm.

  15. Soccer Ball Lift Coefficients via Trajectory Analysis

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Goff, John Eric; Carre, Matt J.

    2010-01-01

    We performed experiments in which a soccer ball was launched from a machine while two high-speed cameras recorded portions of the trajectory. Using the trajectory data and published drag coefficients, we extracted lift coefficients for a soccer ball. We determined lift coefficients for a wide range of spin parameters, including several spin…

  16. M-Bonomial Coefficients and Their Identities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Asiru, Muniru A.

    2010-01-01

    In this note, we introduce M-bonomial coefficients or (M-bonacci binomial coefficients). These are similar to the binomial and the Fibonomial (or Fibonacci-binomial) coefficients and can be displayed in a triangle similar to Pascal's triangle from which some identities become obvious.

  17. Note on Methodology: The Coefficient of Variation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sheret, Michael

    1984-01-01

    Addresses applications of the coefficient of variation as a measure of educational inequality or as a means of measuring changes of inequality status. Suggests the Gini coefficient has many advantages over the coefficient of variation since it can be used with the Lorenz curve (Lorenz provides detail Gini omits). (BRR)

  18. Is the G Index a Correlation Coefficient?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vegelius, Jan

    1980-01-01

    One argument against the G index is that, unlike phi, it is not a correlation coefficient; yet, G conforms to the Kendall and E-coefficient definitions. The G index is also equal to the Pearson product moment correlation coefficient obtained from double scoring. (Author/CP)

  19. Standards for Standardized Logistic Regression Coefficients

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Menard, Scott

    2011-01-01

    Standardized coefficients in logistic regression analysis have the same utility as standardized coefficients in linear regression analysis. Although there has been no consensus on the best way to construct standardized logistic regression coefficients, there is now sufficient evidence to suggest a single best approach to the construction of a…

  20. Online application for the barometric coefficient calculation of the NMDB stations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paschalis, P.; Mavromichalaki, H.; Yanke, V.; Belov, A.; Eroshenko, E.; Gerontidou, M.; Koutroumpi, I.

    2013-02-01

    The primary processing of the neutron monitor data includes all the necessary actions and procedures that each cosmic ray station follows in order to provide the worldwide neutron monitor network with good quality data. One of the main corrections of the primary data is the pressure correction due to the barometric effect. The barometric effect induces variations to the measured data of the neutron monitors which are related to the variations of the local atmospheric pressure of the stations. This correction requires the definition of the barometric coefficient which is calculated experimentally. The accurate calculation of the coefficient is a prerequisite for the quality of the data. This paper presents the implementation of an online tool which calculates the barometric coefficient of a cosmic ray station, by taking advantage of the fact that most stations publish their data on the Neutron Monitor Data Base.

  1. Correcting Illumina data.

    PubMed

    Molnar, Michael; Ilie, Lucian

    2015-07-01

    Next-generation sequencing technologies revolutionized the ways in which genetic information is obtained and have opened the door for many essential applications in biomedical sciences. Hundreds of gigabytes of data are being produced, and all applications are affected by the errors in the data. Many programs have been designed to correct these errors, most of them targeting the data produced by the dominant technology of Illumina. We present a thorough comparison of these programs. Both HiSeq and MiSeq types of Illumina data are analyzed, and correcting performance is evaluated as the gain in depth and breadth of coverage, as given by correct reads and k-mers. Time and memory requirements, scalability and parallelism are considered as well. Practical guidelines are provided for the effective use of these tools. We also evaluate the efficiency of the current state-of-the-art programs for correcting Illumina data and provide research directions for further improvement.

  2. 75 FR 68405 - Correction

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-11-08

    ...'' (Presidential Sig.) [FR Doc. C1-2010-27668 Filed 11-5-10; 8:45 am] Billing Code 1505-01-D ..., 2010--Continuation of U.S. Drug Interdiction Assistance to the Government of Colombia Correction...

  3. 78 FR 73377 - Correction

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-12-06

    .... Drug Interdiction Assistance to the Government of Colombia''. (Presidential Sig.) [FR Doc. C1-2013...--Continuation of U.S. Drug Interdiction Assistance to the Government of Colombia Correction In...

  4. Correcting Hubble Vision.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shaw, John M.; Sheahen, Thomas P.

    1994-01-01

    Describes the theory behind the workings of the Hubble Space Telescope, the spherical aberration in the primary mirror that caused a reduction in image quality, and the corrective device that compensated for the error. (JRH)

  5. Detection of community structure in networks based on community coefficients

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, Hu; Wei, Hui

    2012-12-01

    Determining community structure in networks is fundamental to the analysis of the structural and functional properties of those networks, including social networks, computer networks, and biological networks. Modularity function Q, which was proposed by Newman and Girvan, was once the most widely used criterion for evaluating the partition of a network into communities. However, modularity Q is subject to a serious resolution limit. In this paper, we propose a new function for evaluating the partition of a network into communities. This is called community coefficient C. Using community coefficient C, we can automatically identify the ideal number of communities in the network, without any prior knowledge. We demonstrate that community coefficient C is superior to the modularity Q and does not have a resolution limit. We also compared the two widely used community structure partitioning methods, the hierarchical partitioning algorithm and the normalized cuts (Ncut) spectral partitioning algorithm. We tested these methods on computer-generated networks and real-world networks whose community structures were already known. The Ncut algorithm and community coefficient C were found to produce better results than hierarchical algorithms. Unlike several other community detection methods, the proposed method effectively partitioned the networks into different community structures and indicated the correct number of communities.

  6. Inbreeding and relatedness coefficients: what do they measure?

    PubMed

    Rousset, F

    2002-05-01

    This paper reviews and discusses what is known about the relationship between identity in state, allele frequency, inbreeding coefficients, and identity by descent in various uses of these terms. Generic definitions of inbreeding coefficients are given, as ratios of differences of probabilities of identity in state. Then some of their properties are derived from an assumption in terms of differences between distributions of coalescence times of different genes. These inbreeding coefficients give an approximate measurement of how much higher the probability of recent coalescence is for some pair of genes relative to another pair. Such a measure is in general not equivalent to identity by descent; rather, it approximates a ratio of differences of probabilities of identity by descent. These results are contrasted with some other formulas relating identity, allele frequency, and inbreeding coefficients. Additional assumptions are necessary to obtain most of them, and some of these assumptions are not always correct, for example when there is localized dispersal. Therefore, definitions based on such formulas are not always well-formulated. By contrast, the generic definitions are both well-formulated and more broadly applicable.

  7. Discharge coefficients of holes angled to the flow direction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hay, N.; Henshall, S. E.; Manning, A.

    1992-06-01

    In the cooling passages of gas turbine blades, branches are often angled to the direction of the internal flow. This is particularly the case with film cooling holes. Accurate knowledge of the discharge coefficient of such holes at the design stage is vital so that the holes are correctly sized thus avoiding wastage of coolant and the formation of hot spots on the blade. This paper describes an experimental investigation to determine the discharge coefficient of 30 deg inclined holes with various degrees of inlet radiusing and with the axis of the hole at various orientation angles to the direction of the flow. Results are given for nominal main flow Mach numbers of 0, 0.15 and 0.3. The effects of radiusing, orientation and cross flow Mach number are quantified in the paper, the general trends are described, and the criteria for optimum performance are identified.

  8. Large Seebeck coefficient in frustrated doped Mott insulators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arsenault, Louis-François; Shastry, B. Sriram; Sémon, Patrick; Tremblay, André-Marie

    2011-03-01

    Since calculations based on the standard Kubo formula have proven extremely difficult for electric and thermal transport, Shastry and co-workers suggested two novel approximate ways to obtain the thermopower (S) in interacting systems. One method is based on the high-frequency limit. The other, based on ideas of Kelvin, is purely thermodynamical. With these we study the Hubbard model on a 3d FCC lattice, a frustrated lattice. The high dimensionality of the problem justifies the use of dynamical mean field theory (DMFT). CTQMC in the hybridization expansion and the fast IPT are the impurity solver. The Seebeck coefficient is obtained as a function of doping and temperature for different U. Within DMFT, vertex corrections vanish for transports coefficients, hence the bubble suffices. This enables us to further assess how both approximate methods compare with each other and with the DC Kubo approach. At low T, results can be interpreted in terms of effective Fermi temperatures and carrier number.

  9. Adaptable DC offset correction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Golusky, John M. (Inventor); Muldoon, Kelly P. (Inventor)

    2009-01-01

    Methods and systems for adaptable DC offset correction are provided. An exemplary adaptable DC offset correction system evaluates an incoming baseband signal to determine an appropriate DC offset removal scheme; removes a DC offset from the incoming baseband signal based on the appropriate DC offset scheme in response to the evaluated incoming baseband signal; and outputs a reduced DC baseband signal in response to the DC offset removed from the incoming baseband signal.

  10. Quantum Error Correction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lidar, Daniel A.; Brun, Todd A.

    2013-09-01

    Prologue; Preface; Part I. Background: 1. Introduction to decoherence and noise in open quantum systems Daniel Lidar and Todd Brun; 2. Introduction to quantum error correction Dave Bacon; 3. Introduction to decoherence-free subspaces and noiseless subsystems Daniel Lidar; 4. Introduction to quantum dynamical decoupling Lorenza Viola; 5. Introduction to quantum fault tolerance Panos Aliferis; Part II. Generalized Approaches to Quantum Error Correction: 6. Operator quantum error correction David Kribs and David Poulin; 7. Entanglement-assisted quantum error-correcting codes Todd Brun and Min-Hsiu Hsieh; 8. Continuous-time quantum error correction Ognyan Oreshkov; Part III. Advanced Quantum Codes: 9. Quantum convolutional codes Mark Wilde; 10. Non-additive quantum codes Markus Grassl and Martin Rötteler; 11. Iterative quantum coding systems David Poulin; 12. Algebraic quantum coding theory Andreas Klappenecker; 13. Optimization-based quantum error correction Andrew Fletcher; Part IV. Advanced Dynamical Decoupling: 14. High order dynamical decoupling Zhen-Yu Wang and Ren-Bao Liu; 15. Combinatorial approaches to dynamical decoupling Martin Rötteler and Pawel Wocjan; Part V. Alternative Quantum Computation Approaches: 16. Holonomic quantum computation Paolo Zanardi; 17. Fault tolerance for holonomic quantum computation Ognyan Oreshkov, Todd Brun and Daniel Lidar; 18. Fault tolerant measurement-based quantum computing Debbie Leung; Part VI. Topological Methods: 19. Topological codes Héctor Bombín; 20. Fault tolerant topological cluster state quantum computing Austin Fowler and Kovid Goyal; Part VII. Applications and Implementations: 21. Experimental quantum error correction Dave Bacon; 22. Experimental dynamical decoupling Lorenza Viola; 23. Architectures Jacob Taylor; 24. Error correction in quantum communication Mark Wilde; Part VIII. Critical Evaluation of Fault Tolerance: 25. Hamiltonian methods in QEC and fault tolerance Eduardo Novais, Eduardo Mucciolo and

  11. Calculation of self-diffusion coefficients in iron

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Baohua

    2014-01-15

    On the basis of available P-V-T equation of state of iron, the temperature and pressure dependence of self-diffusion coefficients in iron polymorphs (α, δ, γ and ε phases) have been successfully reproduced in terms of the bulk elastic and expansivity data by means of a thermodynamical model that interconnects point defects parameters with bulk properties. The calculated diffusion parameters, such as self-diffusion coefficient, activation energy and activation volume over a broad temperature range (500-2500 K) and pressure range (0-100 GPa), compare favorably well with experimental or theoretical ones when the uncertainties are considered.

  12. Distribution Coefficients of Impurities in Metals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pearce, J. V.

    2014-04-01

    Impurities dissolved in very pure metals at the level of parts per million often cause an elevation or depression of the freezing temperature of the order of millikelvins. This represents a significant contribution to the uncertainty of standard platinum resistance thermometer calibrations. An important parameter for characterizing the behavior of impurities is the distribution coefficient , which is the ratio of the solid solubility to liquid solubility. A knowledge of for a given binary system is essential for contemporary methods of evaluating or correcting for the effect of impurities, and it is therefore of universal interest to have the most complete set of values possible. A survey of equilibrium values of (in the low concentration limit) reported in the literature for the International Temperature Scale of 1990 fixed points of Hg, Ga, In, Sn, Zn, Al, Au, Ag, and Cu is presented. In addition, thermodynamic calculations of using MTDATA are presented for 170 binary systems. In total, the combined values of from all available sources for 430 binary systems are presented. In addition, by considering all available values of for impurities in 25 different metal solvents (1300 binary systems) enough data are available to characterize patterns in the value of for a given impurity as a function of its position in the periodic table. This enables prediction of for a significant number of binary systems for which data and calculations are unavailable. By combining data from many sources, values of for solutes (atomic number from 1 to 94) in ITS-90 fixed points from Hg to Cu are suggested, together with some tentative predicted values where literature data and calculations are unavailable.

  13. Relation between spectroscopic constants with limited Dunham coefficients

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chandra, Suresh

    2005-12-01

    Statement of Kaur and Mahajan [1] about the definition of Delta used by Chandra [2] is not correct. Even if we take Delta = mu omega_e^2 r_e^2/2 D_e, the relation between Delta and G(=8 omega_e x_e/B_e) is obtained as Delta = 4.21452856 G, provided the vibrational energy of a diatomic molecule is expressed in terms of limited Dunham coefficients, Y_{10}, Y_{20}, Y_{01} and Y_{11}. This relation is still different from that of Kaur and Mahajan [3].

  14. New formulations between spherical aberration and spherical aberration coefficient using the Abbe sine condition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kang, Songgao; Lu, Kaichang; Zhu, Yafei

    1991-12-01

    The relationship between aberration and the aberration coefficient is the basic formulation in the field of aberration theory. The Seidel's formulations can only be used in the case of low performance (small aperture and small field), so that a set of correct relations between spherical aberration (SA) and spherical aberration coefficient (SAC) must be derived for the application of large aperture and small viewing field.

  15. Inbreeding coefficients and coalescence times.

    PubMed

    Slatkin, M

    1991-10-01

    This paper describes the relationship between probabilities of identity by descent and the distribution of coalescence times. By using the relationship between coalescence times and identity probabilities, it is possible to extend existing results for inbreeding coefficients in regular systems of mating to find the distribution of coalescence times and the mean coalescence times. It is also possible to express Sewall Wright's FST as the ratio of average coalescence times of different pairs of genes. That simplifies the analysis of models of subdivided populations because the average coalescence time can be found by computing separately the time it takes for two genes to enter a single subpopulation and time it takes for two genes in the same subpopulation to coalesce. The first time depends only on the migration matrix and the second time depends only on the total number of individuals in the population. This approach is used to find FST in the finite island model and in one- and two-dimensional stepping-stone models. It is also used to find the rate of approach of FST to its equilibrium value. These results are discussed in terms of different measures of genetic distance. It is proposed that, for the purposes of describing the amount of gene flow among local populations, the effective migration rate between pairs of local populations, M, which is the migration rate that would be estimated for those two populations if they were actually in an island model, provides a simple and useful measure of genetic similarity that can be defined for either allozyme or DNA sequence data.

  16. Disruption of activity in the ventral premotor but not the anterior intraparietal area interferes with on-line correction to a haptic perturbation during grasping.

    PubMed

    Schettino, Luis F; Adamovich, Sergei V; Bagce, Hamid; Yarossi, Mathew; Tunik, Eugene

    2015-02-01

    Replanning ongoing movements following perturbations requires the accurate and immediate estimation of the motor response based on sensory input. Previous studies have used transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) in humans to demonstrate the participation of the anterior intraparietal sulcus (aIPS) and ventral premotor cortex (PMv) in visually mediated state estimation for grasping. Here, we test the role of parietofrontal circuits in processing the corrective responses to haptic perturbations of the finger during prehension. Subjects reached to grasp an object while having to compensate for a novel and unpredictable haptic perturbation of finger extension. TMS-based transient disruptions to the PMv and aIPS were delivered 0, 50, or 100 ms after the perturbation. TMS to the PMv delivered 50 ms after the perturbation (but not 0 or 100 ms, or in unperturbed trials) led to an overestimation of grasp aperture. No effects on grasp aperture were noted for the aIPS. Our results indicate that the PMv (but not aIPS) is involved in the deployment of the compensatory response in the presence of haptic perturbations during prehension. Our data also identify the time window of neural processing in the PMv when reprogramming occurs to be 50-100 ms following the perturbation onset.

  17. A coefficient of agreement as a measure of thematic classification accuracy.

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Rosenfield, G.H.; Fitzpatrick-Lins, K.

    1986-01-01

    The classification error matrix typically contains tabulated results of accuracy evaluation for a thematic classification, such as a land-use and land-cover map. Diagonal elements of the matrix represent counts correct. The usual designation of classification accuracy has been total percent correct. Nondiagonal elements of the matrix have usually been neglected. A coefficient of agreement is determined for the interpreted map as a whole, and individually for each interpreted category. These coefficients utilize all cell values in the matrix.-from Authors

  18. Accumulation of fatty acids in Chlorella vulgaris under heterotrophic conditions in relation to activity of acetyl-CoAcarboxylase, temperature, and co-immobilization with Azospirillum brasilense [corrected].

    PubMed

    Leyva, Luis A; Bashan, Yoav; Mendoza, Alberto; de-Bashan, Luz E

    2014-10-01

    The relation between fatty acid accumulation, activity of acetyl-CoA carboxylase (ACC), and consequently lipid accumulation was studied in the microalgae Chlorella vulgaris co-immobilized with the plant growth-promoting bacterium Azospirillum brasilense under dark heterotrophic conditions with Na acetate as a carbon source. In C. vulgaris immobilized alone, cultivation experiments for 6 days showed that ACC activity is directly related to fatty acid accumulation, especially in the last 3 days. In co-immobilization experiments, A. brasilense exerted a significant positive effect over ACC activity, increased the quantity in all nine main fatty acids, increased total lipid accumulation in C. vulgaris, and mitigated negative effects of nonoptimal temperature for growth. No correlation between ACC activity and lipid accumulation in the cells was established for three different temperatures. This study demonstrated that the interaction between A. brasilense and C. vulgaris has a significant effect on fatty acid and lipid accumulation in the microalgae.

  19. Geological Corrections in Gravimetry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mikuška, J.; Marušiak, I.

    2015-12-01

    Applying corrections for the known geology to gravity data can be traced back into the first quarter of the 20th century. Later on, mostly in areas with sedimentary cover, at local and regional scales, the correction known as gravity stripping has been in use since the mid 1960s, provided that there was enough geological information. Stripping at regional to global scales became possible after releasing the CRUST 2.0 and later CRUST 1.0 models in the years 2000 and 2013, respectively. Especially the later model provides quite a new view on the relevant geometries and on the topographic and crustal densities as well as on the crust/mantle density contrast. Thus, the isostatic corrections, which have been often used in the past, can now be replaced by procedures working with an independent information interpreted primarily from seismic studies. We have developed software for performing geological corrections in space domain, based on a-priori geometry and density grids which can be of either rectangular or spherical/ellipsoidal types with cells of the shapes of rectangles, tesseroids or triangles. It enables us to calculate the required gravitational effects not only in the form of surface maps or profiles but, for instance, also along vertical lines, which can shed some additional light on the nature of the geological correction. The software can work at a variety of scales and considers the input information to an optional distance from the calculation point up to the antipodes. Our main objective is to treat geological correction as an alternative to accounting for the topography with varying densities since the bottoms of the topographic masses, namely the geoid or ellipsoid, generally do not represent geological boundaries. As well we would like to call attention to the possible distortions of the corrected gravity anomalies. This work was supported by the Slovak Research and Development Agency under the contract APVV-0827-12.

  20. Direct Validation of the Wall Interference Correction System of the Ames 11-Foot Transonic Wind Tunnel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ulbrich, Norbert; Boone, Alan R.

    2003-01-01

    Data from the test of a large semispan model was used to perform a direct validation of a wall interference correction system for a transonic slotted wall wind tunnel. At first, different sets of uncorrected aerodynamic coefficients were generated by physically changing the boundary condition of the test section walls. Then, wall interference corrections were computed and applied to all data points. Finally, an interpolation of the corrected aerodynamic coefficients was performed. This interpolation made sure that the corrected Mach number of a given run would be constant. Overall, the agreement between corresponding interpolated lift, drag, and pitching moment coefficient sets was very good. Buoyancy corrections were also investigated. These studies showed that the accuracy goal of one drag count may only be achieved if reliable estimates of the wall interference induced buoyancy correction are available during a test.

  1. Fast Fourier transform to measure pressure coefficient of muons in the GRAPES-3 experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mohanty, P. K.; Ahmad, S.; Antia, H. M.; Arunbabu, K. P.; Chandra, A.; Dugad, S. R.; Gupta, S. K.; Hariharan, B.; Hayashi, Y.; Jagadeesan, P.; Jain, A.; Kawakami, S.; Kojima, H.; Morris, S. D.; Nayak, P. K.; Oshima, A.; Rao, B. S.; Reddy, L. V.; Shibata, S.

    2016-06-01

    The GRAPES-3 large area (560 m2) tracking muon telescope is operating at Ooty in India since 2001. It records 4 × 109 muons of energy ≥ 1 GeV every day. These high statistics data have enabled extremely sensitive measurements of solar phenomena, including the solar anisotropies, Forbush decreases, coronal mass ejections etc. to be made. However, prior to such studies, the variation in observed muon rate caused by changes in atmospheric pressure needs to be corrected. Traditionally, the pressure coefficient (β) for the muon rate was derived from the observed data. But the influence of various solar effects makes the measurement of β somewhat difficult. In the present work, a different approach to circumvent this difficulty was used to measure β, almost independent of the solar activity. This approach exploits a small amplitude (∼1 hPa) periodic (12 h) variation of atmospheric pressure at Ooty that introduces a synchronous variation in the muon rate. By using the fast Fourier transform technique the spectral power distributions at 12 h from the atmospheric pressure, and muon rate were used to measure β. The value of pressure coefficient was found to be β =(- 0.128 ± 0.005) % hPa-1.

  2. Quantum error correction for quantum memories

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Terhal, Barbara M.

    2015-04-01

    Active quantum error correction using qubit stabilizer codes has emerged as a promising, but experimentally challenging, engineering program for building a universal quantum computer. In this review the formalism of qubit stabilizer and subsystem stabilizer codes and their possible use in protecting quantum information in a quantum memory are considered. The theory of fault tolerance and quantum error correction is reviewed, and examples of various codes and code constructions, the general quantum error-correction conditions, the noise threshold, the special role played by Clifford gates, and the route toward fault-tolerant universal quantum computation are discussed. The second part of the review is focused on providing an overview of quantum error correction using two-dimensional (topological) codes, in particular, the surface code architecture. The complexity of decoding and the notion of passive or self-correcting quantum memories are discussed. The review does not focus on a particular technology but discusses topics that will be relevant for various quantum technologies.

  3. Corrections of arterial input function for dynamic H215O PET to assess perfusion of pelvic tumours: arterial blood sampling versus image extraction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lüdemann, L.; Sreenivasa, G.; Michel, R.; Rosner, C.; Plotkin, M.; Felix, R.; Wust, P.; Amthauer, H.

    2006-06-01

    Assessment of perfusion with 15O-labelled water (H215O) requires measurement of the arterial input function (AIF). The arterial time activity curve (TAC) measured using the peripheral sampling scheme requires corrections for delay and dispersion. In this study, parametrizations with and without arterial spillover correction for fitting of the tissue curve are evaluated. Additionally, a completely noninvasive method for generation of the AIF from a dynamic positron emission tomography (PET) acquisition is applied to assess perfusion of pelvic tumours. This method uses a volume of interest (VOI) to extract the TAC from the femoral artery. The VOI TAC is corrected for spillover using a separate tissue TAC and for recovery by determining the recovery coefficient on a coregistered CT data set. The techniques were applied in five patients with pelvic tumours who underwent a total of 11 examinations. Delay and dispersion correction of the blood TAC without arterial spillover correction yielded in seven examinations solutions inconsistent with physiology. Correction of arterial spillover increased the fitting accuracy and yielded consistent results in all patients. Generation of an AIF from PET image data was investigated as an alternative to arterial blood sampling and was shown to have an intrinsic potential to determine the AIF noninvasively and reproducibly. The AIF extracted from a VOI in a dynamic PET scan was similar in shape to the blood AIF but yielded significantly higher tissue perfusion values (mean of 104.0 ± 52.0%) and lower partition coefficients (-31.6 ± 24.2%). The perfusion values and partition coefficients determined with the VOI technique have to be corrected in order to compare the results with those of studies using a blood AIF.

  4. The variation of aerofoil lift and drag coefficients with changes in size and speed

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Diehl, Walter S

    1923-01-01

    This report contains the results of an investigation into the effect of changes in size and speed upon aerofoil lift and drag coefficients. Certain empirical limitations to the interchangeability of v and l in the general equation of fluid resistance are pointed out and the existing methods of correcting for scale are criticized. New methods of correcting for scale by means of simple formulae are derived and checked by comparison with test results.

  5. Response of selected binomial coefficients to varying degrees of matrix sparseness and to matrices with known data interrelationships

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Archer, A.W.; Maples, C.G.

    1989-01-01

    Numerous departures from ideal relationships are revealed by Monte Carlo simulations of widely accepted binomial coefficients. For example, simulations incorporating varying levels of matrix sparseness (presence of zeros indicating lack of data) and computation of expected values reveal that not only are all common coefficients influenced by zero data, but also that some coefficients do not discriminate between sparse or dense matrices (few zero data). Such coefficients computationally merge mutually shared and mutually absent information and do not exploit all the information incorporated within the standard 2 ?? 2 contingency table; therefore, the commonly used formulae for such coefficients are more complicated than the actual range of values produced. Other coefficients do differentiate between mutual presences and absences; however, a number of these coefficients do not demonstrate a linear relationship to matrix sparseness. Finally, simulations using nonrandom matrices with known degrees of row-by-row similarities signify that several coefficients either do not display a reasonable range of values or are nonlinear with respect to known relationships within the data. Analyses with nonrandom matrices yield clues as to the utility of certain coefficients for specific applications. For example, coefficients such as Jaccard, Dice, and Baroni-Urbani and Buser are useful if correction of sparseness is desired, whereas the Russell-Rao coefficient is useful when sparseness correction is not desired. ?? 1989 International Association for Mathematical Geology.

  6. Gas-film coefficients for streams

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Rathbun, R.E.; Tai, D.Y.

    1983-01-01

    Equations for predicting the gas-film coefficient for the volatilization of organic solutes from streams are developed. The film coefficient is a function of windspeed and water temperature. The dependence of the coefficient on windspeed is determined from published information on the evaporation of water from a canal. The dependence of the coefficient on temperature is determined from laboratory studies on the evaporation of water. Procedures for adjusting the coefficients for different organic solutes are based on the molecular diffusion coefficient and the molecular weight. The molecular weight procedure is easiest to use because of the availability of molecular weights. However, the theoretical basis of the procedure is questionable. The diffusion coefficient procedure is supported by considerable data. Questions, however, remain regarding the exact dependence of the film coefficint on the diffusion coefficient. It is suggested that the diffusion coefficient procedure with a 0.68-power dependence be used when precise estimate of the gas-film coefficient are needed and that the molecular weight procedure be used when only approximate estimates are needed.

  7. Trypsin pre-treatment corrects SRID over-estimation of immunologically active, pre-fusion HA caused by mixed immunoprecipitin rings.

    PubMed

    Wen, Yingxia; Palladino, Giuseppe; Xie, Yuhong; Ferrari, Annette; Ma, Xiuwen; Han, Liqun; Dormitzer, Philip R; Settembre, Ethan C

    2016-06-17

    Influenza vaccines are the primary intervention to prevent the substantial health burden of seasonal and pandemic influenza. Subunit and split influenza vaccines are formulated, released for clinical use, and tested for stability based on their content of immunologically active (capable of eliciting functional antibodies) hemagglutinin (HA). Single-radial immunodiffusion (SRID), the standard in vitro potency assay in the field, is believed to specifically detect immunologically active HA. We confirmed that, with conformationally homogeneous HA preparations, SRID specifically detected native, pre-fusion HA, which elicited influenza neutralizing and hemagglutination inhibiting (HI) antibodies in mice, and it did not detect low-pH stressed, post-fusion HA, which was selectively removed from the SRID gel during a blotting step and was significantly less immunologically active. This selective detection was due to the SRID format, not a conformational specificity of the sheep antiserum used in the SRID, as the same antiserum detected non-stressed and low-pH stressed HA similarly when used in an ELISA format. However, when low-pH stressed HA was mixed with non-stressed HA, SRID detected both forms in mixed immunoprecipitin rings, leading to over-quantification of pre-fusion HA. We previously reported that trypsin digestion of antigen samples selectively degrade stressed HA, so that an otherwise conformationally insensitive biophysical quantification technique, reversed-phase high pressure liquid chromatography (RP-HPLC), can specifically quantify trypsin-resistant, immunologically active, pre-fusion HA. Here, we report that trypsin digestion can also improve the specificity of SRID so that it can quantify immunologically active, pre-fusion HA when it is mixed with less immunologically active, post-fusion HA. PMID:27154389

  8. Aureolegraph internal scattering correction.

    PubMed

    DeVore, John; Villanucci, Dennis; LePage, Andrew

    2012-11-20

    Two methods of determining instrumental scattering for correcting aureolegraph measurements of particulate solar scattering are presented. One involves subtracting measurements made with and without an external occluding ball and the other is a modification of the Langley Plot method and involves extrapolating aureolegraph measurements collected through a large range of solar zenith angles. Examples of internal scattering correction determinations using the latter method show similar power-law dependencies on scattering, but vary by roughly a factor of 8 and suggest that changing aerosol conditions during the determinations render this method problematic. Examples of corrections of scattering profiles using the former method are presented for a range of atmospheric particulate layers from aerosols to cumulus and cirrus clouds.

  9. Aureolegraph internal scattering correction.

    PubMed

    DeVore, John; Villanucci, Dennis; LePage, Andrew

    2012-11-20

    Two methods of determining instrumental scattering for correcting aureolegraph measurements of particulate solar scattering are presented. One involves subtracting measurements made with and without an external occluding ball and the other is a modification of the Langley Plot method and involves extrapolating aureolegraph measurements collected through a large range of solar zenith angles. Examples of internal scattering correction determinations using the latter method show similar power-law dependencies on scattering, but vary by roughly a factor of 8 and suggest that changing aerosol conditions during the determinations render this method problematic. Examples of corrections of scattering profiles using the former method are presented for a range of atmospheric particulate layers from aerosols to cumulus and cirrus clouds. PMID:23207299

  10. The effect of IPMC parameters in electromechanical coefficient based on equivalent beam theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Çilingir, Halime Didem; Menceloglu, Yusuf; Papila, Melih

    2008-03-01

    "Effective" electromechanical coupling coefficient for IPMC by equivalent bimorph beam model is studied. The collective effect of the membrane thickness and operating voltage is demonstrated by using a design of experiment of three and four levels of the two factors, respectively. Experiments and finite element analyses using MSC.NASTRAN are used to evaluate the tip displacement and the coupling coefficient for which approximations as function of the thickness and voltage are constructed. Initial curvature of the strips before electrical excitation is also shown to be a factor in "effective" coupling coefficient. A correction factor approach is proposed to include the effect of the preimposed curvature.

  11. P2Y2 nucleotide receptor activation up-regulates vascular cell adhesion molecule-1 [corrected] expression and enhances lymphocyte adherence to a human submandibular gland cell line.

    PubMed

    Baker, Olga J; Camden, Jean M; Rome, Danny E; Seye, Cheikh I; Weisman, Gary A

    2008-01-01

    Sjögren's syndrome (SS) is a chronic inflammatory autoimmune disease that causes salivary and lacrimal gland tissue destruction resulting in impaired secretory function. Although lymphocytic infiltration of salivary epithelium is associated with SS, the mechanisms involved have not been adequately elucidated. Our previous studies have shown that the G protein-coupled P2Y2 nucleotide receptor (P2Y2R) is up-regulated in response to damage or stress of salivary gland epithelium, and in salivary glands of the NOD.B10 mouse model of SS-like autoimmune exocrinopathy. Additionally, we have shown that P2Y2R activation up-regulates vascular cell adhesion molecule-1 (VCAM-1) expression in endothelial cells leading to the binding of monocytes. The present study demonstrates that activation of the P2Y2R in dispersed cell aggregates from rat submandibular gland (SMG) and in human submandibular gland ductal cells (HSG) up-regulates the expression of VCAM-1. Furthermore, P2Y2R activation mediated the up-regulation of VCAM-1 expression in HSG cells leading to increased adherence of lymphocytic cells. Inhibitors of EGFR phosphorylation and metalloprotease activity abolished P2Y2R-mediated VCAM-1 expression and decreased lymphocyte binding to HSG cells. Moreover, silencing of EGFR expression abolished UTP-induced VCAM-1 up-regulation in HSG cells. These results suggest that P2Y2R activation in salivary gland cells increases the EGFR-dependent expression of VCAM-1 and the binding of lymphocytes, a pathway relevant to inflammation associated with SS.

  12. Correction coil cable

    DOEpatents

    Wang, S.T.

    1994-11-01

    A wire cable assembly adapted for the winding of electrical coils is taught. A primary intended use is for use in particle tube assemblies for the Superconducting Super Collider. The correction coil cables have wires collected in wire array with a center rib sandwiched therebetween to form a core assembly. The core assembly is surrounded by an assembly housing having an inner spiral wrap and a counter wound outer spiral wrap. An alternate embodiment of the invention is rolled into a keystoned shape to improve radial alignment of the correction coil cable on a particle tube in a particle tube assembly. 7 figs.

  13. Refraction corrections for surveying

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lear, W. M.

    1979-01-01

    Optical measurements of range and elevation angle are distorted by the earth's atmosphere. High precision refraction correction equations are presented which are ideally suited for surveying because their inputs are optically measured range and optically measured elevation angle. The outputs are true straight line range and true geometric elevation angle. The 'short distances' used in surveying allow the calculations of true range and true elevation angle to be quickly made using a programmable pocket calculator. Topics covered include the spherical form of Snell's Law; ray path equations; and integrating the equations. Short-, medium-, and long-range refraction corrections are presented in tables.

  14. Boomwhackers and End-Pipe Corrections

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ruiz, Michael J.

    2014-02-01

    End-pipe corrections seldom come to mind as a suitable topic for an introductory physics lab. Yet, the end-pipe correction formula can be verified in an engaging and inexpensive lab that requires only two supplies: plastic-tube toys called boomwhackers and a meterstick. This article describes a lab activity in which students model data from plastic tubes to arrive at the end-correction formula for an open pipe. Students also learn the basic mathematics behind the musical scale, and come to appreciate the importance of end-pipe physics in the engineering design of toy musical tubes.

  15. Assessment of Four Typical Topographic Corrections in Landsat TM Data for Snow Cover Areas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Yan; Jiang, He; Wang, Zhe; Yang, Xiaoxia; Geng, Erhui

    2016-06-01

    The accuracy of snow cover information extraction in remote-sensing images dependent on a variety of factors, especially in mountain area with complex terrain. This paper aims at analyzing the accuracy of snow cover information extraction from remot esensing images, using Landsat5 TM images and DEM data, with the study area of Xinjiang Tianshan, measuring topographic correction effects of Cosine correction, C correction, SCS correction, and SCS + C correction from four aspects: visual comparison, standard deviation, correlation analysis and histogram, then extract snow cover area for study area. Results showed that C correction and SCS+C correction performed better among four classic terrain correction models, which indicated changes in snow pixel rat io after correction with variation range of 2% , and correlation coefficient of each band is highest before and after correction.

  16. Coefficients of Productivity for Yellowstone's Grizzly Bear Habitat

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Mattson, David John; Barber, Kim; Maw, Ralene; Renkin, Roy

    2004-01-01

    This report describes methods for calculating coefficients used to depict habitat productivity for grizzly bears in the Yellowstone ecosystem. Calculations based on these coefficients are used in the Yellowstone Grizzly Bear Cumulative Effects Model to map the distribution of habitat productivity and account for the impacts of human facilities. The coefficients of habitat productivity incorporate detailed information that was collected over a 20-year period (1977-96) on the foraging behavior of Yellowstone's bears and include records of what bears were feeding on, when and where they fed, the extent of that feeding activity, and relative measures of the quantity consumed. The coefficients also incorporate information, collected primarily from 1986 to 1992, on the nutrient content of foods that were consumed, their digestibility, characteristic bite sizes, and the energy required to extract and handle each food. Coefficients were calculated for different time periods and different habitat types, specific to different parts of the Yellowstone ecosystem. Stratifications included four seasons of bear activity (spring, estrus, early hyperphagia, late hyperphagia), years when ungulate carrion and whitebark pine seed crops were abundant versus not, areas adjacent to (<100 m) or far away from forest/nonforest edges, and areas inside or outside of ungulate winter ranges. Densities of bear activity in each region, habitat type, and time period were incorporated into calculations, controlling for the effects of proximity to human facilities. The coefficients described in this report and associated estimates of grizzly bear habitat productivity are unique among many efforts to model the conditions of bear habitat because calculations include information on energetics derived from the observed behavior of radio-marked bears.

  17. Issues in Correctional Training and Casework. Correctional Monograph.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wolford, Bruce I., Ed.; Lawrenz, Pam, Ed.

    The eight papers contained in this monograph were drawn from two national meetings on correctional training and casework. Titles and authors are: "The Challenge of Professionalism in Correctional Training" (Michael J. Gilbert); "A New Perspective in Correctional Training" (Jack Lewis); "Reasonable Expectations in Correctional Officer Training:…

  18. Space charge stopband correction

    SciTech Connect

    Huang, Xiaobiao; Lee, S.Y.; /Indiana U.

    2005-09-01

    It is speculated that the space charge effect cause beam emittance growth through the resonant envelope oscillation. Based on this theory, we propose an approach, called space charge stopband correction, to reduce such emittance growth by compensation of the half-integer stopband width of the resonant oscillation. It is illustrated with the Fermilab Booster model.

  19. Counselor Education for Corrections.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Parsigian, Linda

    Counselor education programs most often prepare their graduates to work in either a school setting, anywhere from the elementary level through higher education, or a community agency. There is little indication that counselor education programs have seriously undertaken the task of training counselors to enter the correctional field. If…

  20. Refraction corrections for surveying

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lear, W. M.

    1980-01-01

    Optical measurements of range and elevation angles are distorted by refraction of Earth's atmosphere. Theoretical discussion of effect, along with equations for determining exact range and elevation corrections, is presented in report. Potentially useful in optical site surveying and related applications, analysis is easily programmed on pocket calculator. Input to equation is measured range and measured elevation; output is true range and true elevation.

  1. 75 FR 68409 - Correction

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-11-08

    ... Documents#0;#0; ] Presidential Determination No. 2010-14 of September 3, 2010--Unexpected Urgent Refugee And... on page 67015 in the issue of Monday, November 1, 2010, make the following correction: On page 67015, the Presidential Determination number should read ``2010-14'' (Presidential Sig.) [FR Doc....

  2. 75 FR 68407 - Correction

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-11-08

    ... Documents#0;#0; ] Presidential Determination No. 2010-12 of August 26, 2010--Unexpected Urgent Refugee and... beginning on page 67013 in the issue of Monday, November 1, 2010, make the following correction: On page 67013, the Presidential Determination number should read ``2010-12'' (Presidential Sig.) [FR Doc....

  3. QED Corrections to the Dynamic Polarizability

    SciTech Connect

    Haas, M.; Jentschura, U.D.; Keitel, C.H.

    2005-10-26

    In a relatively weak laser field, atoms interacting with one-photon off-resonant laser fields are dynamically polarized. This perturbation manifests itself in a shift of the atomic energy levels called the 'dynamic Stark effect' or 'AC-Stark effect', which is intensity dependent. The AC-Stark coefficients are therefore of particular importance for high-precision spectroscopy experiments which rely on two-photon processes like the 1S-2S transition in hydrogen, hydrogenlike ions, antihydrogen or similar composite matter-antimatter systems. In addition, the imaginary part of the dynamic polarizability determines the resonant one-photon ionization width for the excited level.Up to now, the dynamic polarizability has been investigated only up to the level of relativistic corrections. In this contribution, we present results for several experimentally relevant transitions in hydrogenlike systems and the leading-order QED radiative corrections.

  4. Entropy of quantum-corrected black holes

    SciTech Connect

    Matyjasek, Jerzy

    2006-11-15

    The approximate renormalized one-loop effective action of the quantized massive scalar, spinor and vector field in a large mass limit, i.e., the lowest order of the DeWitt-Schwinger expansion involves the coincidence limit of the Hadamard-DeWitt coefficient a{sub 3}. Building on this and using Wald's approach we shall construct the general expression describing entropy of the spherically-symmetric static black hole being the solution of the semiclassical field equations. For the concrete case of the quantum-corrected Reissner-Nordstroem black hole this result coincides, as expected, with the entropy obtained by integration of the first law of black hole thermodynamics with a suitable choice of the integration constant. The case of the extremal quantum-corrected black hole is briefly considered.

  5. Bi-Directional Fluorescence Distribution and its Correction for Estimates of Gross Ecosystem Productivity and Photosynthetic Light-Use Efficiency

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Liangyun; Liu, Xinjie

    2015-04-01

    Passive measurement of solar-induced chlorophyll fluorescence (SIF) presents a new way for directly estimating the photosynthetic activities. In this study, one diurnal multi-angular spectral experiment and three independent diurnal flux experiments were carried out on winter wheat and maize to assess directional emission of SIF for estimating photosynthesis activities. Firstly, the Bi-Directional Fluorescence Distribution Function (BFDF) of SIF was investigated. A BFDF shape similar to the red Bi-Directional Reflectance Distribution Function (BRDF) was observed for the directional SIF emissions at 688 nm. Secondly, the relationship between the directional emission of canopy SIF and BRDF reflectance was examined, finding a strict linear correlation between SIF and reflectance at 688 nm, with an R2> 0.80 for all seven BRDF observations on winter wheat. Then, a BFDF correction model for the canopy SIF at 688 nm was presented by dividing by the canopy reflectance, and about 65.3% of the directional variation was successfully removed. Finally, the BFDF-corrected SIF signals were linked to photosynthetic activities, including gross ecosystem productivity (GEP) and photosynthetic light-use efficiency (LUE), and the determination coefficients between photosynthetic activities and the BFDF-corrected SIF increased for most cases. For GEP, the determination coefficients were slightly improved from 0.563, 0.382, and 0.613 (for raw SIF signals) to 0.592, 0.473, and 0.640 for all three diurnal experiments. For LUE, the determination coefficients increased from 0.393, and 0.358 to 0.517, and 0.528 for two experiments, while deceased slightly from 0.695 to 0.607 for one experiment. Therefore, according to the above preliminary results, the canopy SIF cannot be regarded as isotropic, and the directional emission SIF may be an important uncertainty in estimates of GEP and LUE.

  6. Use of starvation promoters to limit growth and selectively enrich expression of trichloroethylene- and phenol-transforming activity in recombinant Escherichia coli [corrected

    PubMed Central

    Matin, A; Little, C D; Fraley, C D; Keyhan, M

    1995-01-01

    The expression of much useful bacterial activity is facilitated by rapid growth. This coupling can create problems in bacterial fermentations and in situ bioremediation. In the latter process, for example, it necessitates addition of large amounts of nutrients to contaminated environments, such as aquifers. This approach, termed biostimulation, can be technically difficult. Moreover, the resulting in situ bacterial biomass production can have undesirable consequences. In an attempt to minimize coupling between expression of biodegradative activity and growth, we used Escherichia coli starvation promoters to control toluene monooxygenase synthesis. This enzyme complex can degrade the environmental contaminants trichloroethylene (TCE) and phenol. Totally starving cell suspensions of such strains degraded phenol and TCE. Furthermore, rapid conversions occurred in the postexponential batch or very slow growth (dilution) rate chemostat cultures, and the nutrient demand and biomass formation for transforming a given amount of TCE or phenol were reduced by 60 to 90%. Strong starvation promoters have recently been clones and characterized in environmentally relevant bacteria like Pseudomonas species; thus, starvation promoter-driven degradative systems can now be constructed in such bacteria and tested for in situ efficacy. PMID:7574643

  7. Correction factors for on-line microprobe analysis of multielement alloy systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Unnam, J.; Tenney, D. R.; Brewer, W. D.

    1977-01-01

    An on-line correction technique was developed for the conversion of electron probe X-ray intensities into concentrations of emitting elements. This technique consisted of off-line calculation and representation of binary interaction data which were read into an on-line minicomputer to calculate variable correction coefficients. These coefficients were used to correct the X-ray data without significantly increasing computer core requirements. The binary interaction data were obtained by running Colby's MAGIC 4 program in the reverse mode. The data for each binary interaction were represented by polynomial coefficients obtained by least-squares fitting a third-order polynomial. Polynomial coefficients were generated for most of the common binary interactions at different accelerating potentials and are included. Results are presented for the analyses of several alloy standards to demonstrate the applicability of this correction procedure.

  8. New analytical approach for neutron beam-hardening correction.

    PubMed

    Hachouf, N; Kharfi, F; Hachouf, M; Boucenna, A

    2016-01-01

    In neutron imaging, the beam-hardening effect has a significant effect on quantitative and qualitative image interpretation. This study aims to propose a linearization method for beam-hardening correction. The proposed method is based on a new analytical approach establishing the attenuation coefficient as a function of neutron energy. Spectrum energy shift due to beam hardening is studied on the basis of Monte Carlo N-Particle (MCNP) simulated data and the analytical data. Good agreement between MCNP and analytical values has been found. Indeed, the beam-hardening effect is well supported in the proposed method. A correction procedure is developed to correct the errors of beam-hardening effect in neutron transmission, and therefore for projection data correction. The effectiveness of this procedure is determined by its application in correcting reconstructed images.

  9. New analytical approach for neutron beam-hardening correction.

    PubMed

    Hachouf, N; Kharfi, F; Hachouf, M; Boucenna, A

    2016-01-01

    In neutron imaging, the beam-hardening effect has a significant effect on quantitative and qualitative image interpretation. This study aims to propose a linearization method for beam-hardening correction. The proposed method is based on a new analytical approach establishing the attenuation coefficient as a function of neutron energy. Spectrum energy shift due to beam hardening is studied on the basis of Monte Carlo N-Particle (MCNP) simulated data and the analytical data. Good agreement between MCNP and analytical values has been found. Indeed, the beam-hardening effect is well supported in the proposed method. A correction procedure is developed to correct the errors of beam-hardening effect in neutron transmission, and therefore for projection data correction. The effectiveness of this procedure is determined by its application in correcting reconstructed images. PMID:26609685

  10. Temperature coefficients of reactivity for the SRS Mark 22 assembly

    SciTech Connect

    George, D.L.; Frost, R.L. )

    1992-01-01

    The nuclear reactors at the Savannah River Site (SRS) are unique in design and operation. In contrast to commercial power reactors, the SRS reactors were designed for isotope production rather than power generation. The SRS reactors are cooled and moderated by heavy water at near-atmospheric pressure, and the fuel assemblies consist of concentric annualar tubes rather than the solid pins typically found in power reactors. These and other factors make the neutronic behavior of SRS reactors unique. Temperature coefficients of reactivity are a measure of the change in core reactivity resulting from a change in the temperature of the reactor components. These coefficients are used in safety analyses and for prediction of reactivity changes with control rod moves during reactor operations. This paper presents the results of an investigation of temperature coefficients for the Mark 22 assembly currently charged to the K Reactor. The Mark 22 assembly is the tritium-producing assembly currently in use at SRS. This assembly contains two concentric fuel tubes of enriched uranium-aluminum alloy located between two concentric target tubes of lithium-aluminum alloy. There are three active coolant channels (cooling both sides of each fuel tube) and two low-flow dead spaces at the center and outside of the assembly. Heavy water flows down the three coolant channels in the Mark 22 assemblies and then jets out into the moderator space (the heavy water region bewteen assemblies). Six regional temperature coefficients are calculated at SRS: fuel, target, coolant, dead space, moderator upflow, and moderator downflow. The first four coefficients correspond to regions of the assembly and are calculated using the GLASS infinite lattice transport code. The two moderator coefficients correspond to reactor core regions and are calculated using the GRIMHX three-dimensional finite lattice diffusion theory code. Assembly coefficients calculated by GLASS have been experimentally verified.

  11. Trace element partition coefficient in ionic crystals.

    PubMed

    Nagasawa, H

    1966-05-01

    Partition coefficient monovalent trace ions between liquids and either solid NaNO(2) or KCl were determined. The isotropic elastic model of ionic crystals was used for calculating the energy change caused by the ionic substitutions. The observed values of partition coefficients in KCl good agreement with calculate values.

  12. Coefficient Alpha and Reliability of Scale Scores

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Almehrizi, Rashid S.

    2013-01-01

    The majority of large-scale assessments develop various score scales that are either linear or nonlinear transformations of raw scores for better interpretations and uses of assessment results. The current formula for coefficient alpha (a; the commonly used reliability coefficient) only provides internal consistency reliability estimates of raw…

  13. Commentary on Coefficient Alpha: A Cautionary Tale

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Green, Samuel B.; Yang, Yanyun

    2009-01-01

    The general use of coefficient alpha to assess reliability should be discouraged on a number of grounds. The assumptions underlying coefficient alpha are unlikely to hold in practice, and violation of these assumptions can result in nontrivial negative or positive bias. Structural equation modeling was discussed as an informative process both to…

  14. Implications of NGA for NEHRP site coefficients

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Borcherdt, Roger D.

    2012-01-01

    Three proposals are provided to update tables 11.4-1 and 11.4-2 of Minimum Design Loads for Buildings and Other Structures (7-10), by the American Society of Civil Engineers (2010) (ASCE/SEI 7-10), with site coefficients implied directly by NGA (Next Generation Attenuation) ground motion prediction equations (GMPEs). Proposals include a recommendation to use straight-line interpolation to infer site coefficients at intermediate values of ̅vs (average shear velocity). Site coefficients are recommended to ensure consistency with ASCE/SEI 7-10 MCER (Maximum Considered Earthquake) seismic-design maps and simplified site-specific design spectra procedures requiring site classes with associated tabulated site coefficients and a reference site class with unity site coefficients. Recommended site coefficients are confirmed by independent observations of average site amplification coefficients inferred with respect to an average ground condition consistent with that used for the MCER maps. The NGA coefficients recommended for consideration are implied directly by the NGA GMPEs and do not require introduction of additional models.

  15. Coefficient Alpha Bootstrap Confidence Interval under Nonnormality

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Padilla, Miguel A.; Divers, Jasmin; Newton, Matthew

    2012-01-01

    Three different bootstrap methods for estimating confidence intervals (CIs) for coefficient alpha were investigated. In addition, the bootstrap methods were compared with the most promising coefficient alpha CI estimation methods reported in the literature. The CI methods were assessed through a Monte Carlo simulation utilizing conditions…

  16. A gain-coefficient switched Alexandrite laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Chris J.; van der Slot, Peter J. M.; Boller, Klaus-J.

    2013-01-01

    We report on a gain-coefficient switched Alexandrite laser. An electro-optic modulator is used to switch between high and low gain states by making use of the polarization dependent gain of Alexandrite. In gain-coefficient switched mode, the laser produces 85 ns pulses with a pulse energy of 240 mJ at a repetition rate of 5 Hz.

  17. Code System to Calculate Correlation & Regression Coefficients.

    1999-11-23

    Version 00 PCC/SRC is designed for use in conjunction with sensitivity analyses of complex computer models. PCC/SRC calculates the partial correlation coefficients (PCC) and the standardized regression coefficients (SRC) from the multivariate input to, and output from, a computer model.

  18. Generation of the invariant coefficients of the characteristic polynomial for an nxn matrix

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Beaudet, P. R.; Maury, J. L.

    1972-01-01

    In theories of numerical stability, roots to a characteristic polynomial are sought, which, in the case of the predictor with iterative correction method of numerical integration, are eigenvalues of a matrix whose elements depend on the coefficients used in the integration process. The characteristic polynomial is displayed explicitly in terms of the elements of the characteristic matrix.

  19. Mutual diffusion coefficients in systems containing the nickel ion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ribeiro, Ana C. F.; Veríssimo, Luis V. M. M.; Gomes, Joselaine C. S.; Santos, Cecilia I. A. V.; Barros, Marisa C. F.; Lobo, Victor M. M.; Sobral, Abílio J. F. N.; Esteso, Miguel A.; Leaist, Derek G.

    2013-04-01

    Mutual diffusion coefficients of nickel chloride in water have been measured at 293.15 K and 303.15 K and at concentrations between 0.020 mol dm-3 and 0.100 mol dm-3, using a conductimetric cell. The experimental mutual diffusion coefficients are discussed on the basis of the Onsager-Fuoss model. The equivalent conductances at infinitesimal concentration of the nickel ion in these solutions at those temperatures have been estimated using these results. In addition, from these data, we have estimated some transport and structural parameters, such as limiting diffusion coefficient, ionic conductance at infinitesimal concentration, hydrodynamic radii and activation energy, contributing this way to a better understanding of the structure of these systems and of their thermodynamic behavior in aqueous solution at different concentrations.

  20. Spectral absorption coefficients and imaginary parts of refractive indices of Saharan dust during SAMUM-1

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Müller, T.; Schladitz, A.; Massling, A.; Kaaden, N.; Kandler, K.; Wiedensohler, A.

    2009-02-01

    ABSTRACT During the SAMUM-1 experiment, absorption coefficients and imaginary parts of refractive indices of mineral dust particles were investigated in southern Morocco. Main absorbing constituents of airborne samples were identified to be iron oxide and soot. Spectral absorption coefficients were measured using a spectral optical absorption photometer (SOAP) in the wavelength range from 300 to 800 nm with a resolution of 50 nm. A new method that accounts for a loading-dependent correction of fibre filter based absorption photometers, was developed. The imaginary part of the refractive index was determined using Mie calculations from 350 to 800 nm. The spectral absorption coefficient allowed a separation between dust and soot absorption. A correlation analysis showed that the dust absorption coefficient is correlated (R2 up to 0.55) with the particle number concentration for particle diameters larger than 0.5 μm, whereas the coefficient of determination R2 for smaller particles is below 0.1. Refractive indices were derived for both the total aerosol and a dust aerosol that was corrected for soot absorption. Average imaginary parts of refractive indices of the entire aerosol are 7.4 × 10-3, 3.4 × 10-3 and 2.0 × 10-3 at wavelengths of 450, 550 and 650 nm. After a correction for the soot absorption, imaginary parts of refractive indices are 5.1 × 10-3, 1.6 × 10-3 and 4.5 × 10-4.

  1. An agreement coefficient for image comparison

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Ji, L.; Gallo, K.

    2006-01-01

    Combination of datasets acquired from different sensor systems is necessary to construct a long time-series dataset for remotely sensed land-surface variables. Assessment of the agreement of the data derived from various sources is an important issue in understanding the data continuity through the time-series. Some traditional measures, including correlation coefficient, coefficient of determination, mean absolute error, and root mean square error, are not always optimal for evaluating the data agreement. For this reason, we developed a new agreement coefficient for comparing two different images. The agreement coefficient has the following properties: non-dimensional, bounded, symmetric, and distinguishable between systematic and unsystematic differences. The paper provides examples of agreement analyses for hypothetical data and actual remotely sensed data. The results demonstrate that the agreement coefficient does include the above properties, and therefore is a useful tool for image comparison. ?? 2006 American Society for Photogrammetry and Remote Sensing.

  2. Estimating Tortuosity Coefficients Based on Hydraulic Conductivity.

    PubMed

    Carey, Grant R; McBean, Edward A; Feenstra, Stan

    2016-07-01

    While the tortuosity coefficient is commonly estimated using an expression based on total porosity, this relationship is demonstrated to not be applicable (and thus is often misapplied) over a broad range of soil textures. The fundamental basis for a correlation between the apparent diffusion tortuosity coefficient and hydraulic conductivity is demonstrated, although such a relationship is not typically considered. An empirical regression for estimating the tortuosity coefficient based on hydraulic conductivity for saturated, unconsolidated soil is derived based on results from 14 previously reported diffusion experiments performed with a broad range of soil textures. Analyses of these experimental results confirm that total porosity is a poor predictor for the tortuosity coefficient over a large range of soil textures. The apparent diffusion tortuosity coefficient is more reliably estimated based on hydraulic conductivity. PMID:27315019

  3. A beam hardening correction method based on HL consistency

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mou, Xuanqin; Tang, Shaojie; Yu, Hengyong

    2006-08-01

    XCT with polychromatic tube spectrum causes artifact called beam hardening effect. The current correction in CT device is carried by apriori polynomial from water phantom experiment. This paper proposes a new beam hardening correction algorithm that the correction polynomial depends on the relativity of projection data in angles, which obeys Helgasson-Ludwig Consistency (HL Consistency). Firstly, a bi-polynomial is constructed to characterize the beam hardening effect based on the physical model of medical x-ray imaging. In this bi-polynomial, a factor r(γ,β) represents the ratio of the attenuation contributions caused by high density mass (bone, etc.) to low density mass (muscle, vessel, blood, soft tissue, fat, etc.) respectively in the projection angle β and fan angle γ. Secondly, let r(γ,β)=0, the bi-polynomial is degraded as a sole-polynomial. The coefficient of this polynomial can be calculated based on HL Consistency. Then, the primary correction is reached, which is also more efficient in theoretical than the correction method in current CT devices. Thirdly, based on the result of a normal CT reconstruction from the corrected projection data, r(γ,β) can be estimated. Fourthly, the coefficient of bi-polynomial can also be calculated based HL Consistency and the final correction are achieved. Experiments of circular cone beam CT indicate this method an excellent property. Correcting beam hardening effect based on HL Consistency, not only achieving a self-adaptive and more precise correction, but also getting rid of regular inconvenient water phantom experiments, will renovate the correction technique of current CT devices.

  4. Immediate error correction process following sleep deprivation.

    PubMed

    Hsieh, Shulan; Cheng, I-Chen; Tsai, Ling-Ling

    2007-06-01

    Previous studies have suggested that one night of sleep deprivation decreases frontal lobe metabolic activity, particularly in the anterior cingulated cortex (ACC), resulting in decreased performance in various executive function tasks. This study thus attempted to address whether sleep deprivation impaired the executive function of error detection and error correction. Sixteen young healthy college students (seven women, nine men, with ages ranging from 18 to 23 years) participated in this study. Participants performed a modified letter flanker task and were instructed to make immediate error corrections on detecting performance errors. Event-related potentials (ERPs) during the flanker task were obtained using a within-subject, repeated-measure design. The error negativity or error-related negativity (Ne/ERN) and the error positivity (Pe) seen immediately after errors were analyzed. The results show that the amplitude of the Ne/ERN was reduced significantly following sleep deprivation. Reduction also occurred for error trials with subsequent correction, indicating that sleep deprivation influenced error correction ability. This study further demonstrated that the impairment in immediate error correction following sleep deprivation was confined to specific stimulus types, with both Ne/ERN and behavioral correction rates being reduced only for trials in which flanker stimuli were incongruent with the target stimulus, while the response to the target was compatible with that of the flanker stimuli following sleep deprivation. The results thus warrant future systematic investigation of the interaction between stimulus type and error correction following sleep deprivation. PMID:17542943

  5. Attenuation correction for small animal PET tomographs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chow, Patrick L.; Rannou, Fernando R.; Chatziioannou, Arion F.

    2005-04-01

    Attenuation correction is one of the important corrections required for quantitative positron emission tomography (PET). This work will compare the quantitative accuracy of attenuation correction using a simple global scale factor with traditional transmission-based methods acquired either with a small animal PET or a small animal x-ray computed tomography (CT) scanner. Two phantoms (one mouse-sized and one rat-sized) and two animal subjects (one mouse and one rat) were scanned in CTI Concorde Microsystem's microPET® Focus™ for emission and transmission data and in ImTek's MicroCAT™ II for transmission data. PET emission image values were calibrated against a scintillation well counter. Results indicate that the scale factor method of attenuation correction places the average measured activity concentration about the expected value, without correcting for the cupping artefact from attenuation. Noise analysis in the phantom studies with the PET-based method shows that noise in the transmission data increases the noise in the corrected emission data. The CT-based method was accurate and delivered low-noise images suitable for both PET data correction and PET tracer localization.

  6. Object image correction using an X-ray dynamical diffraction Fraunhofer hologram.

    PubMed

    Balyan, Minas K

    2014-03-01

    Taking into account background correction and using Fourier analysis, a numerical method of an object image correction using an X-ray dynamical diffraction Fraunhofer hologram is presented. An example of the image correction of a cylindrical beryllium wire is considered. A background correction of second-order iteration leads to an almost precise reconstruction of the real part of the amplitude transmission coefficient and improves the imaginary part compared with that without a background correction. Using Fourier analysis of the reconstructed transmission coefficient, non-physical oscillations can be avoided. This method can be applied for the determination of the complex amplitude transmission coefficient of amplitude as well as phase objects, and can be used in X-ray microscopy.

  7. Correction coil cable

    DOEpatents

    Wang, Sou-Tien

    1994-11-01

    A wire cable assembly (10, 310) adapted for the winding of electrical coils is taught. A primary intended use is for use in particle tube assemblies (532) for the superconducting super collider. The correction coil cables (10, 310) have wires (14, 314) collected in wire arrays (12, 312) with a center rib (16, 316) sandwiched therebetween to form a core assembly (18, 318 ). The core assembly (18, 318) is surrounded by an assembly housing (20, 320) having an inner spiral wrap (22, 322) and a counter wound outer spiral wrap (24, 324). An alternate embodiment (410) of the invention is rolled into a keystoned shape to improve radial alignment of the correction coil cable (410) on a particle tube (733) in a particle tube assembly (732).

  8. Synthesis, spectral characterization, molecular modeling and in vitro antibacterial activity of complexes designed from OO, NO and NN donor Schiff-base ligand [corrected].

    PubMed

    El-Gammal, Ola A; Abu El-Reash, G; Ahmed, S F

    2015-01-25

    A new chelating agent, N'-(4-methoxybenzylidene)-2-oxo-2-(phenylamino)acetohydrazide (H2OMPH) and its complexes with Mn(II), Co(II), Ni(II), Cu(II), Zn(II), Hg(II) and U(IV)O2(2+) ions have been prepared and characterized by conventional techniques. The spectral data indicated that the ligand coordinates as neutral bidentate with Cu(II), Mn(II), U(IV)O2(2+) and Hg(II), neutral tridentate with Ni(II), mononegative tridentate with Co(II) and binegative tetradentate with Zn(II) ions. On basis of magnetic and electronic spectral data an octahedral geometry for Mn(II), Co(II) and Ni(II) complexes and a square planar geometry for Cu(II) complex have been proposed and confirmed by applying geometry optimization and conformational analysis. The protonation constants of H2OMPH and the stepwise stability constants of its complexes are calculated at 298, 308 and 318 k as well as their thermodynamic parameters. Also, the Kinetic parameters (Ea, A, ΔH(*), ΔS(*) and ΔG(*)) were determined for each thermal degradation stage of some complexes using Coats-Redfern and Horowitz-Metzger methods. Moreover, the ligand and some complexes were screened for in vitro antibacterial activity against Staphylococcus epidermalies (St. epid); Streptococcus pyagenies (Strp. py.) as Gram +ve bacteria and Escherichia coli (E. coli); Klebsiella spp. (kleb. spp.) as Gram -ve bacteria using inhibition zone diameter.

  9. Surgical correction of brachymetatarsia.

    PubMed

    Bartolomei, F J

    1990-02-01

    Brachymetatarsia describes the condition of an abnormally short metatarsal. Although the condition has been recorded since antiquity, surgical options to correct the deformity have been available for only two decades. Most published procedures involve metaphyseal lengthening with autogenous grafts from different donor sites. The author discusses one such surgical technique. In addition, the author proposes specific criteria for the objective diagnosis of brachymetatarsia. PMID:2406417

  10. The influence of the atmosphere on geoid and potential coefficient determinations from gravity data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rummel, R.; Rapp, R. H.

    1976-01-01

    For the precise computation of geoid undulations the effect of the attraction of the atmosphere on the solution of the basic boundary value problem of gravimetric geodesy must be considered. This paper extends the theory of Moritz for deriving an atmospheric correction to the case when the undulations are computed by combining anomalies in a cap surrounding the computation point with information derived from potential coefficients. The correction term is a function of the cap size and the topography within the cap. It reaches a value of 3.0 m for a cap size of 30 deg, variations on the decimeter level being caused by variations in the topography. The effect of the atmospheric correction terms on potential coefficients is found to be small, reaching a maximum of 0.0055 millionths at n = 2, m = 2 when terrestrial gravity data are considered. The magnitude of this correction indicates that in future potential coefficient determination from gravity data the atmospheric correction should be made to such data.

  11. Drag and energy accommodation coefficients during sunspot maximum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pardini, Carmen; Anselmo, Luciano; Moe, Kenneth; Moe, Mildred M.

    over 30-day intervals from October 1999 to December 2002, was found to be 2.16. When the measurement was adjusted upward by 12 % to correct for the bias in the density model, the resulting physical drag coefficient became 2.42. Comparison of this result with the calculated dependence of the drag coefficient of SNOE on the energy accommodation coefficient has revealed agreement for α = 0.97. This high an accommodation coefficient implies that a considerable portion of the satellite surface had oxygen atoms adsorbed on it. This is physically reasonable because during sunspot maximum the increased solar UV radiation dissociates more molecular oxygen and the UV heating causes the atmosphere to expand to higher altitudes. The analysis was carried out for several satellites, having perigee altitudes between 300 and 800 km, during the last solar cycle maximum. This sample included a subset of Surrey satellites, for which the main characteristics (i.e. size, shape, mass, attitude, etc.) were known, and some spherical, or nearly spherical, objects.

  12. Is the coefficient of variation a valid measure for detecting sincerity of effort of grip strength?

    PubMed

    Shechtman, Orit

    1999-01-01

    The wide use of the coefficient of variation in detecting sincerity of effort is puzzling since existing research findings regarding its effectiveness are contradictory. The lack of empirical support in the literature raises the question of whether or not the coefficient of variation is a valid measure for detecting sincerity of effort. Many clinicians, especially those who use a computer software to calculate the coefficient of variation, may not understand how the coefficient of variation is derived and what it is based on. The coefficient of variation is a measure of relative variability and would be used correctly only if the average and the standard deviation of grip strength trials increased proportionally. This case study, however, demonstrated that the average and standard deviation of grip strength are independent. Thus, the coefficient of variation is not a valid measure of sincerity of effort. In addition, this study indicated that the coefficient of variation may be inflated in individuals after carpal tunnel release surgery. The author, therefore, cautions clinicians against the use of the coefficient of variation as a measure of sincerity of effort especially in injured individuals with compromised hand strength.

  13. Evaluation of Dimensionality in the Assessment of Internal Consistency Reliability: Coefficient Alpha and Omega Coefficients

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Green, Samuel B.; Yang, Yanyun

    2015-01-01

    In the lead article, Davenport, Davison, Liou, & Love demonstrate the relationship among homogeneity, internal consistency, and coefficient alpha, and also distinguish among them. These distinctions are important because too often coefficient alpha--a reliability coefficient--is interpreted as an index of homogeneity or internal consistency.…

  14. PREDICTION OF THE SOLUBILITY, ACTIVITY COEFFICIENT AND LIQUID/LIQUID PARTITION COEFFICIENT OF ORGANIC COMPOUNDS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Solvation models, based on fundamental chemical structure theory, were developed in the SPARC mechanistic tool box to predict a large array of physical properties of organic compounds in water and in non-aqueous solvents strictly from molecular structure. The SPARC self-interact...

  15. Spreading coefficients of aliphatic hydrocarbons on water

    SciTech Connect

    Takii, Taichi; Mori, Y.H. . Dept. of Mechanical Engineering)

    1993-11-01

    Experiments have been performed to determine the equilibrium spreading coefficients of some aliphatic hydrocarbons (C[sub 6]C[sub 10]) on water. The thickness of a discrete lens of each hydrocarbon sample floating on a stagnant water pool was measured interferometrically and used to calculate the spreading coefficient of the hydrocarbon with the aid of Langmuir's capillarity theory. The dependences of the spreading coefficient, thus observed, on temperature (0--50 C) and on the number of carbon atoms in the hydrocarbon molecule are in qualitative agreement with the predictions based on the Lifshitz theory of van der Waals forces.

  16. Statistical Methods with Varying Coefficient Models

    PubMed Central

    Fan, Jianqing; Zhang, Wenyang

    2008-01-01

    The varying coefficient models are very important tool to explore the dynamic pattern in many scientific areas, such as economics, finance, politics, epidemiology, medical science, ecology and so on. They are natural extensions of classical parametric models with good interpretability and are becoming more and more popular in data analysis. Thanks to their flexibility and interpretability, in the past ten years, the varying coefficient models have experienced deep and exciting developments on methodological, theoretical and applied sides. This paper gives a selective overview on the major methodological and theoretical developments on the varying coefficient models. PMID:18978950

  17. Inferences on the common coefficient of variation.

    PubMed

    Tian, Lili

    2005-07-30

    The coefficient of variation is often used as a measure of precision and reproducibility of data in medical and biological science. This paper considers the problem of making inference about the common population coefficient of variation when it is a priori suspected that several independent samples are from populations with a common coefficient of variation. The procedures for confidence interval estimation and hypothesis testing are developed based on the concepts of generalized variables. The coverage properties of the proposed confidence intervals and type-I errors of the proposed tests are evaluated by simulation. The proposed methods are illustrated by a real life example.

  18. Measuring optical temperature coefficients of Intralipid.

    PubMed

    McGlone, V Andrew; Martinsen, Paul; Künnemeyer, Rainer; Jordan, Bob; Cletus, Biju

    2007-05-01

    The temperature sensitivities of absorption and reduced scattering coefficients in the range 700-1000 nm are determined for the liquid phantom Intralipid using spatially resolved continuous wave measurements. The measurements were conducted on a 10 L heated volume of 1% Intralipid subjected to a 40-30 degrees C cooling regime. The temperature sensitivities of the absorbance coefficients are similar to that expected for pure water. However, the reduced scattering coefficients are more sensitive than can be explained by temperature related density changes, and show an unexpected relationship with wavelength. We have also found that temperature perturbations provide a useful means to evaluate instrument model performance. PMID:17440240

  19. On the emission coefficient of uranium plasmas.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schneider, R. T.; Campbell, H. D.; Mack, J. M.

    1973-01-01

    The emission coefficient for uranium plasmas (temperature: 8000 K) was measured for the wavelength range from 1200 to 6000 A. The results were compared to theoretical calculations and other measurements. Reasonable agreement between theoretical predictions and our measurements was found in the region from 1200 to 2000 A. Although it was difficult to make absolute comparisons among the different reported measurements, considerable disagreement was found for the higher wavelength region. A short discussion regarding the overall comparisons is given, and final suggestions are made as to the most appropriate emission coefficient values to be used in future design calculations. The absorption coefficient for the same wavelength interval is also reported.

  20. Nonperturbative corrections in resummed cross sections

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Korchemsky, Gregory P.; Sterman, George

    1995-02-01

    We show that the resummation of large perturbative corrections in QCD leads to ambiguities in high energy cross sections that are suppressed by powers of large momentum scales. These ambiguities are caused by infrared renormalons, which are a general feature of resummed hardscattering functions in perturbative QCD, even though these functions are infrared safe order-by-order in perturbation theory. As in the case of the operator product expansion, the contributions of infrared renormalons to coefficient functions may be absorbed into the definition of higher-dimensional operators, which induce nonperturbative corrections that are power-suppressed at high energies. The strength of the suppression is determined by the location of the dominant infrared renormalon, which may be identified explicitly in the resummed series. In contrast to the operator product expansion, however, the relevant operators in factorized hadron-hadron scattering and jet cross sections are generally nonlocal in QCD, although they may be expressed as local operators in an effective theory for eikonalized quarks. In this context, we verify and interpret the presence of 1 / Q corrections to the inclusive Drell-Yan cross section with Q the pair mass. In a similar manner, we find exp (- b2 In Q) corrections in the impact parameter space of the transverse momentum distributions of the Drell-Yan process and e +6 - annihilation. We also show that the dominant nonperturbative corrections to cone-based jet cross sections behave as 1 /( Qδ), with δ the opening angle of the jet and Q the center of mass energy.

  1. Heat transfer coefficient of cryotop during freezing.

    PubMed

    Li, W J; Zhou, X L; Wang, H S; Liu, B L; Dai, J J

    2013-01-01

    Cryotop is an efficient vitrification method for cryopreservation of oocytes. It has been widely used owing to its simple operation and high freezing rate. Recently, the heat transfer performance of cryotop was studied by numerical simulation in several studies. However, the range of heat transfer coefficient in the simulation is uncertain. In this study, the heat transfer coefficient for cryotop during freezing process was analyzed. The cooling rates of 40 percent ethylene glycol (EG) droplet in cryotop during freezing were measured by ultra-fast measurement system and calculated by numerical simulation at different value of heat transfer coefficient. Compared with the results obtained by two methods, the range of the heat transfer coefficient necessary for the numerical simulation of cryotop was determined, which is between 9000 W/(m(2)·K) and 10000 W/(m (2)·K).

  2. Friction coefficient dependence on electrostatic tribocharging

    PubMed Central

    Burgo, Thiago A. L.; Silva, Cristiane A.; Balestrin, Lia B. S.; Galembeck, Fernando

    2013-01-01

    Friction between dielectric surfaces produces patterns of fixed, stable electric charges that in turn contribute electrostatic components to surface interactions between the contacting solids. The literature presents a wealth of information on the electronic contributions to friction in metals and semiconductors but the effect of triboelectricity on friction coefficients of dielectrics is as yet poorly defined and understood. In this work, friction coefficients were measured on tribocharged polytetrafluoroethylene (PTFE), using three different techniques. As a result, friction coefficients at the macro- and nanoscales increase many-fold when PTFE surfaces are tribocharged, but this effect is eliminated by silanization of glass spheres rolling on PTFE. In conclusion, tribocharging may supersede all other contributions to macro- and nanoscale friction coefficients in PTFE and probably in other insulating polymers. PMID:23934227

  3. Second coefficient of viscosity in air

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ash, Robert L.; Zuckerwar, Allan J.; Zheng, Zhonquan

    1991-01-01

    Acoustic attenuation measurements in air were analyzed in order to estimate the second coefficient of viscosity. Data over a temperature range of 11 C to 50 C and at relative humidities between 6 percent and 91 percent were used. This analysis showed that the second coefficient of viscosity varied between 1900 and 20,000 times larger than the dynamic or first coefficient of viscosity over the temperature and humidity range of the data. In addition, the data showed that the molecular relaxation effects, which are responsible for the magnitude of the second coefficient of viscosity, place severe limits on the use of time-independent, thermodynamic equations of state. Compressible flows containing large streamwise velocity gradients, like shock waves, which cause significant changes in particle properties to occur during time intervals shorter than hundredths of seconds, must be modeled using dynamic equations of state. The dynamic model approach is described briefly.

  4. Friction coefficient dependence on electrostatic tribocharging.

    PubMed

    Burgo, Thiago A L; Silva, Cristiane A; Balestrin, Lia B S; Galembeck, Fernando

    2013-01-01

    Friction between dielectric surfaces produces patterns of fixed, stable electric charges that in turn contribute electrostatic components to surface interactions between the contacting solids. The literature presents a wealth of information on the electronic contributions to friction in metals and semiconductors but the effect of triboelectricity on friction coefficients of dielectrics is as yet poorly defined and understood. In this work, friction coefficients were measured on tribocharged polytetrafluoroethylene (PTFE), using three different techniques. As a result, friction coefficients at the macro- and nanoscales increase many-fold when PTFE surfaces are tribocharged, but this effect is eliminated by silanization of glass spheres rolling on PTFE. In conclusion, tribocharging may supersede all other contributions to macro- and nanoscale friction coefficients in PTFE and probably in other insulating polymers.

  5. Universal relations of transport coefficients from holography

    SciTech Connect

    Cherman, Aleksey; Nellore, Abhinav

    2009-09-15

    We show that there are universal high-temperature relations for transport coefficients of plasmas described by a wide class of field theories with gravity duals. These theories can be viewed as strongly coupled large-N{sub c} conformal field theories deformed by one or more relevant operators. The transport coefficients we study are the speed of sound and bulk viscosity, as well as the conductivity, diffusion coefficient, and charge susceptibility of probe U(1) charges. We show that the sound bound v{sub s}{sup 2}{<=}1/3 is satisfied at high temperatures in these theories and also discuss bounds on the diffusion coefficient, the conductivity, and the bulk viscosity.

  6. String & Sticky Tape Experiments: Coefficient of Restitution.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Edge, R. D., Ed.

    1988-01-01

    Described is an experiment for measuring the coefficient of restitution with a meter stick, balls of different types, and scraps of material for the plates. Provides the experimental procedure and an apparatus diagram. (YP)

  7. Onboard image correction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Martin, D. R.; Smaulon, A. S.; Hamori, A. S.

    1980-01-01

    A processor architecture for performing onboard geometric and radiometric correction of LANDSAT imagery is described. The design uses a general purpose processor to calculate the distortion values at selected points in the image and a special purpose processor to resample (calculate distortion at each image point and interpolate the intensity) the sensor output data. A distinct special purpose processor is used for each spectral band. Because of the sensor's high output data rate, 80 M bit per second, the special purpose processors use a pipeline architecture. Sizing has been done on both the general and special purpose hardware.

  8. Timebias corrections to predictions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wood, Roger; Gibbs, Philip

    1993-01-01

    The importance of an accurate knowledge of the time bias corrections to predicted orbits to a satellite laser ranging (SLR) observer, especially for low satellites, is highlighted. Sources of time bias values and the optimum strategy for extrapolation are discussed from the viewpoint of the observer wishing to maximize the chances of getting returns from the next pass. What is said may be seen as a commercial encouraging wider and speedier use of existing data centers for mutually beneficial exchange of time bias data.

  9. Bootstrap Standard Error and Confidence Intervals for the Correlation Corrected for Range Restriction: A Simulation Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chan, Wai; Chan, Daniel W.-L.

    2004-01-01

    The standard Pearson correlation coefficient is a biased estimator of the true population correlation, ?, when the predictor and the criterion are range restricted. To correct the bias, the correlation corrected for range restriction, r-sub(c), has been recommended, and a standard formula based on asymptotic results for estimating its standard…

  10. On computing Laplace's coefficients and their derivatives.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gerasimov, I. A.; Vinnikov, E. L.

    The algorithm of computing Laplace's coefficients and their derivatives is proposed with application of recurrent relations. The A.G.M.-method is used for the calculation of values L0(0), L0(1). The FORTRAN-program corresponding to the algorithm is given. The precision control was provided with numerical integrating by Simpsons method. The behavior of Laplace's coefficients and their third derivatives whith varying indices K, n for fixed values of the α-parameter is presented graphically.

  11. Corrective Action Decision Document for Corrective Action Unit 204: Storage Bunkers, Nevada Test Site, Nevada, Rev. No. 0

    SciTech Connect

    Robert Boehlecke

    2004-04-01

    The six bunkers included in CAU 204 were primarily used to monitor atmospheric testing or store munitions. The ''Corrective Action Investigation Plan (CAIP) for Corrective Action Unit 204: Storage Bunkers, Nevada Test Site, Nevada'' (NNSA/NV, 2002a) provides information relating to the history, planning, and scope of the investigation; therefore, it will not be repeated in this CADD. This CADD identifies potential corrective action alternatives and provides a rationale for the selection of a recommended corrective action alternative for each CAS within CAU 204. The evaluation of corrective action alternatives is based on process knowledge and the results of investigative activities conducted in accordance with the CAIP (NNSA/NV, 2002a) that was approved prior to the start of the Corrective Action Investigation (CAI). Record of Technical Change (ROTC) No. 1 to the CAIP (approval pending) documents changes to the preliminary action levels (PALs) agreed to by the Nevada Division of Environmental Protection (NDEP) and DOE, National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Site Office (NNSA/NSO). This ROTC specifically discusses the radiological PALs and their application to the findings of the CAU 204 corrective action investigation. The scope of this CADD consists of the following: (1) Develop corrective action objectives; (2) Identify corrective action alternative screening criteria; (3) Develop corrective action alternatives; (4) Perform detailed and comparative evaluations of corrective action alternatives in relation to corrective action objectives and screening criteria; and (5) Recommend and justify a preferred corrective action alternative for each CAS within CAU 204.

  12. A first-principles methodology for diffusion coefficients in metals and dilute alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mantina, Manjeera

    This work is a study exploring the extent of suitability of static first-principles calculations for studying diffusion in metallic systems. Specifically, vacancy-mediated volume diffusion in pure elements and alloys with dilute concentration of impurities is studied. A novel procedure is discovered for predicting diffusion coefficients that overcomes the shortcomings of the well-known transition state theory, by Vineyard. The procedure that evolves from Eyring's reaction rate theory yields accurate diffusivity results that include anharmonic effects within the quasi-harmonic approximation. Alongside, the procedure is straightforward in its application within the conventional harmonic approximation, from the results of static first-principles calculations. To prove the extensibility of the procedure, diffusivities have been computed for a variety of systems. Over a wide temperature range, the calculated self-diffusion and impurity diffusion coefficients using local density approximation (LDA) of density functional theory (DFT) are seen to be in excellent match with experimental data. Self-diffusion coefficients have been calculated for: (i) fcc Al, Cu, Ni and Ag (ii) bcc W and Mo (v) hcp Mg, Ti and Zn. Impurity diffusion coefficients have been computed for: (i) Mg, Si, Cu, Li, Ag, Mo and 3d transition elements in fcc Al (ii) Mo, Ta in bcc W and Nb, Ta and W in bcc Mo (iii) Sn and Cd in hcp Mg and Al in hcp Ti. It is also an observation from this work, that LDA does not require surface correction for yielding energetics of vacancy-containing system in good comparison with experiments, unlike generalized gradient approximation (GGA). It is known that first-principles' energy minimization procedures based on electronic interactions are suited for metallic systems wherein the valence electrons are freely moving. In this thesis, research has been extended to study suitability of first-principles calculations within LDA/GGA including the localization parameter U, for Al

  13. Smooth eigenvalue correction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hendrikse, Anne; Veldhuis, Raymond; Spreeuwers, Luuk

    2013-12-01

    Second-order statistics play an important role in data modeling. Nowadays, there is a tendency toward measuring more signals with higher resolution (e.g., high-resolution video), causing a rapid increase of dimensionality of the measured samples, while the number of samples remains more or less the same. As a result the eigenvalue estimates are significantly biased as described by the Marčenko Pastur equation for the limit of both the number of samples and their dimensionality going to infinity. By introducing a smoothness factor, we show that the Marčenko Pastur equation can be used in practical situations where both the number of samples and their dimensionality remain finite. Based on this result we derive methods, one already known and one new to our knowledge, to estimate the sample eigenvalues when the population eigenvalues are known. However, usually the sample eigenvalues are known and the population eigenvalues are required. We therefore applied one of the these methods in a feedback loop, resulting in an eigenvalue bias correction method. We compare this eigenvalue correction method with the state-of-the-art methods and show that our method outperforms other methods particularly in real-life situations often encountered in biometrics: underdetermined configurations, high-dimensional configurations, and configurations where the eigenvalues are exponentially distributed.

  14. Complications of auricular correction

    PubMed Central

    Staindl, Otto; Siedek, Vanessa

    2008-01-01

    The risk of complications of auricular correction is underestimated. There is around a 5% risk of early complications (haematoma, infection, fistulae caused by stitches and granulomae, allergic reactions, pressure ulcers, feelings of pain and asymmetry in side comparison) and a 20% risk of late complications (recurrences, telehone ear, excessive edge formation, auricle fitting too closely, narrowing of the auditory canal, keloids and complete collapse of the ear). Deformities are evaluated less critically by patients than by the surgeons, providing they do not concern how the ear is positioned. The causes of complications and deformities are, in the vast majority of cases, incorrect diagnosis and wrong choice of operating procedure. The choice of operating procedure must be adapted to suit the individual ear morphology. Bandaging technique and inspections and, if necessary, early revision are of great importance for the occurence and progress of early complications, in addition to operation techniques. In cases of late complications such as keloids and auricles that are too closely fitting, unfixed full-thickness skin flaps have proved to be the most successful. Large deformities can often only be corrected to a limited degree of satisfaction. PMID:22073079

  15. Complications of auricular correction.

    PubMed

    Staindl, Otto; Siedek, Vanessa

    2007-01-01

    The risk of complications of auricular correction is underestimated. There is around a 5% risk of early complications (haematoma, infection, fistulae caused by stitches and granulomae, allergic reactions, pressure ulcers, feelings of pain and asymmetry in side comparison) and a 20% risk of late complications (recurrences, telehone ear, excessive edge formation, auricle fitting too closely, narrowing of the auditory canal, keloids and complete collapse of the ear). Deformities are evaluated less critically by patients than by the surgeons, providing they do not concern how the ear is positioned. The causes of complications and deformities are, in the vast majority of cases, incorrect diagnosis and wrong choice of operating procedure. The choice of operating procedure must be adapted to suit the individual ear morphology. Bandaging technique and inspections and, if necessary, early revision are of great importance for the occurence and progress of early complications, in addition to operation techniques. In cases of late complications such as keloids and auricles that are too closely fitting, unfixed full-thickness skin flaps have proved to be the most successful. Large deformities can often only be corrected to a limited degree of satisfaction. PMID:22073079

  16. Corrective action management (CAM) process guide

    SciTech Connect

    Lutter, T.M., Westinghouse Hanford

    1996-06-18

    Consistent direction for identification, long-term reporting and trending, and correction of conditions adverse to the environment, safety and health will facilitate a successful transition and follow- on for the Project Hanford Management Contractor (PHMC). Continuity of the corrective action management process is vital. It provides consistency via reporting and trending on corrective action management activities at the Site during the transition process. To ensure success,consideration of the business rules and the Hanford Action Tracking System (HATS), the automated tool that supports them, is essential. This document provides a consolidated synopsis of corrective action management business rules, the process, and the HATS to support the transition process at Hanford. It applies to the baseline of corrective action work the PHMC and its subcontractors will inherit. HATS satisfies the requirement for collection of data that enables long-term reporting and trending. The information contains all originating document, condition,and action data. HATS facilitates consistent tracking,reporting, closure, and trending of the corrective action work in progress across the Site. HATS follows the glossary standard definitions for commitment tracking listed in Appendix A and Site data value standards that are applicable. For long term access and use, HATS data are fed to a full text search and retrieval system called Search Hanford Accessible Reports Electronically(SHARE). An individual, organization, or company has the ability, through SHARE, to pull together the appropriate information as needed.

  17. Contact Lenses for Vision Correction

    MedlinePlus

    ... Contact Lenses Colored Contact Lenses Contact Lenses for Vision Correction Written by: Kierstan Boyd Reviewed by: Brenda ... on the surface of the eye. They correct vision like eyeglasses do and are safe when used ...

  18. PAC91 - PROPERTIES AND COEFFICIENTS 1991

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mcbride, B. J.

    1994-01-01

    The two principal functions of PAC91 are to provide a means of generating theoretical thermodynamic functions from molecular constant data and to supply a means of fitting these functions to empirical equations by using a least-squares fit. The coefficients obtained from the fit may then be used to generate a library of thermodynamic data in a uniform and easy-to-use format for use in other computer codes. Several large compilations of selected or calculated thermodynamic data currently exist. Nevertheless, there is a continuing need for additional calculations due to the discovery of new species, the revision of existing molecular constant data and structural parameters, the need for data at temperatures other than those already published, the availability of new or revised heats of formation, dissociation or transition, and the revision of fundamental constants or atomic weights. Calculations may also be needed to compare the results of assuming various possible forms of the partition function. In addition, there is often a preference for thermodynamic data in functional rather than tabular form. In order to satisfy these needs, the PAC91 program can perform any combination of the following: (1) calculate thermodynamic functions (heat capacity, enthalpy, entropy, and Gibbs energy) for any set of 1 to 202 temperatures, (2) obtain a least-squares fit of the first three of these functions (either individually, two at a time, or all three simultaneously) for up to eight temperature intervals, and (3) calculate, as a function of temperature, heats of formation and equilibrium constants from assigned reference elements. The thermodynamic functions for ideal gases may be calculated from molecular constant data using one of several partition function variations provided by the program. For monatomic gases, one of three partition function cutoff techniques may be selected by the user, and unobserved but predicted electronic energy levels may be included by the program

  19. Scatter corrections for cone beam optical CT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Olding, Tim; Holmes, Oliver; Schreiner, L. John

    2009-05-01

    Cone beam optical computed tomography (OptCT) employing the VISTA scanner (Modus Medical, London, ON) has been shown to have significant promise for fast, three dimensional imaging of polymer gel dosimeters. One distinct challenge with this approach arises from the combination of the cone beam geometry, a diffuse light source, and the scattering polymer gel media, which all contribute scatter signal that perturbs the accuracy of the scanner. Beam stop array (BSA), beam pass array (BPA) and anti-scatter polarizer correction methodologies have been employed to remove scatter signal from OptCT data. These approaches are investigated through the use of well-characterized phantom scattering solutions and irradiated polymer gel dosimeters. BSA corrected scatter solutions show good agreement in attenuation coefficient with the optically absorbing dye solutions, with considerable reduction of scatter-induced cupping artifact at high scattering concentrations. The application of BSA scatter corrections to a polymer gel dosimeter lead to an overall improvement in the number of pixel satisfying the (3%, 3mm) gamma value criteria from 7.8% to 0.15%.

  20. Fuel temperature reactivity coefficient calculation by Monte Carlo perturbation techniques

    SciTech Connect

    Shim, H. J.; Kim, C. H.

    2013-07-01

    We present an efficient method to estimate the fuel temperature reactivity coefficient (FTC) by the Monte Carlo adjoint-weighted correlated sampling method. In this method, a fuel temperature change is regarded as variations of the microscopic cross sections and the temperature in the free gas model which is adopted to correct the asymptotic double differential scattering kernel. The effectiveness of the new method is examined through the continuous energy MC neutronics calculations for PWR pin cell problems. The isotope-wise and reaction-type-wise contributions to the FTCs are investigated for two free gas models - the constant scattering cross section model and the exact model. It is shown that the proposed method can efficiently predict the reactivity change due to the fuel temperature variation. (authors)

  1. The Rational Polynomial Coefficients Modification Using Digital Elevation Models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alidoost, F.; Azizi, A.; Arefi, H.

    2015-12-01

    The high-resolution satellite imageries (HRSI) are as primary dataset for different applications such as DEM generation, 3D city mapping, change detection, monitoring, and deformation detection. The geo-location information of HRSI are stored in metadata called Rational Polynomial Coefficients (RPCs). There are many methods to improve and modify the RPCs in order to have a precise mapping. In this paper, an automatic approach is presented for the RPC modification using global Digital Elevation Models. The main steps of this approach are: relative digital elevation model generation, shift parameters calculation, sparse point cloud generation and shift correction, and rational polynomial fitting. Using some ground control points, the accuracy of the proposed method is evaluated based on statistical descriptors in which the results show that the geo-location accuracy of HRSI can be improved without using Ground Control Points (GCPs).

  2. Radiation camera motion correction system

    DOEpatents

    Hoffer, P.B.

    1973-12-18

    The device determines the ratio of the intensity of radiation received by a radiation camera from two separate portions of the object. A correction signal is developed to maintain this ratio at a substantially constant value and this correction signal is combined with the camera signal to correct for object motion. (Official Gazette)

  3. Political Correctness and Cultural Studies.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Carey, James W.

    1992-01-01

    Discusses political correctness and cultural studies, dealing with cultural studies and the left, the conservative assault on cultural studies, and political correctness in the university. Describes some of the underlying changes in the university, largely unaddressed in the political correctness debate, that provide the deep structure to the…

  4. Job Satisfaction in Correctional Officers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Diehl, Ron J.

    For more than a decade, correctional leaders throughout the country have attempted to come to grips with the basic issues involved in ascertaining and meeting the needs of correctional institutions. This study investigated job satisfaction in 122 correctional officers employed in both rural and urban prison locations for the State of Kansas…

  5. Yearbook of Correctional Education 1989.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Duguid, Stephen, Ed.

    This yearbook contains conference papers, commissioned papers, reprints of earlier works, and research-in-progress. They offer a retrospective view as well as address the mission and perspective of correctional education, its international dimension, correctional education in action, and current research. Papers include "Correctional Education and…

  6. Quantitative Ultrasound Imaging Using Acoustic Backscatter Coefficients.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boote, Evan Jeffery

    Current clinical ultrasound scanners render images which have brightness levels related to the degree of backscattered energy from the tissue being imaged. These images offer the interpreter a qualitative impression of the scattering characteristics of the tissue being examined, but due to the complex factors which affect the amplitude and character of the echoed acoustic energy, it is difficult to make quantitative assessments of scattering nature of the tissue, and thus, difficult to make precise diagnosis when subtle disease effects are present. In this dissertation, a method of data reduction for determining acoustic backscatter coefficients is adapted for use in forming quantitative ultrasound images of this parameter. In these images, the brightness level of an individual pixel corresponds to the backscatter coefficient determined for the spatial position represented by that pixel. The data reduction method utilized rigorously accounts for extraneous factors which affect the scattered echo waveform and has been demonstrated to accurately determine backscatter coefficients under a wide range of conditions. The algorithms and procedures used to form backscatter coefficient images are described. These were tested using tissue-mimicking phantoms which have regions of varying scattering levels. Another phantom has a fat-mimicking layer for testing these techniques under more clinically relevant conditions. Backscatter coefficient images were also formed of in vitro human liver tissue. A clinical ultrasound scanner has been adapted for use as a backscatter coefficient imaging platform. The digital interface between the scanner and the computer used for data reduction are described. Initial tests, using phantoms are presented. A study of backscatter coefficient imaging of in vivo liver was performed using several normal, healthy human subjects.

  7. Juvenile Correctional Facilities. 1998 Minnesota Student Survey.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fulkerson, Jayne A.; Harrison, Patricia A.; Hedger, Scott A.

    This document reports on a voluntary survey designed to compare responses of adolescents in corrections with adolescents in public schools in 1998. Findings are highlighted in sections entitled: (1) "Youth, Their Families, and Their Environment"; (2) "Psychological Distress"; (3) "Sexual Activity"; (4) "School Perceptions"; and (5) "Antisocial and…

  8. Continuous quantum error correction by cooling

    SciTech Connect

    Sarovar, Mohan; Milburn, G.J.

    2005-07-15

    We describe an implementation of quantum error correction that operates continuously in time and requires no active interventions such as measurements or gates. The mechanism for carrying away the entropy introduced by errors is a cooling procedure. We evaluate the effectiveness of the scheme by simulation, and remark on its connections to some recently proposed error prevention procedures.

  9. College Curriculum for Correctional Instructional Personnel.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    EPD Consortium C, Houston, TX.

    The project objective was to gather data for the purpose of identifying the scope and sequence of activities needed by instructional personnel in Texas correctional settings to meet the needs of students in a multidisciplinary setting. Six questionnaires were developed and administered to seven different sample groups: inmates, parolees, teachers,…

  10. A novel method for measuring polymer-water partition coefficients.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Tengyi; Jafvert, Chad T; Fu, Dafang; Hu, Yue

    2015-11-01

    Low density polyethylene (LDPE) often is used as the sorbent material in passive sampling devices to estimate the average temporal chemical concentration in water bodies or sediment pore water. To calculate water phase chemical concentrations from LDPE concentrations accurately, it is necessary to know the LDPE-water partition coefficients (KPE-w) of the chemicals of interest. However, even moderately hydrophobic chemicals have large KPE-w values, making direct measurement experimentally difficult. In this study we evaluated a simple three phase system from which KPE-w can be determined easily and accurately. In the method, chemical equilibrium distribution between LDPE and a surfactant micelle pseudo-phase is measured, with the ratio of these concentrations equal to the LDPE-micelle partition coefficient (KPE-mic). By employing sufficient mass of polymer and surfactant (Brij 30), the mass of chemical in the water phase remains negligible, albeit in equilibrium. In parallel, the micelle-water partition coefficient (Kmic-w) is determined experimentally. KPE-w is the product of KPE-mic and Kmic-w. The method was applied to measure values of KPE-w for 17 polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons, 37 polychlorinated biphenyls, and 9 polybrominated diphenylethers. These values were compared to literature values. Mass fraction-based chemical activity coefficients (γ) were determined in each phase and showed that for each chemical, the micelles and LDPE had nearly identical affinity.

  11. Particle scattering, backscattering, and absorption coefficients: An in situ closure and sensitivity study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wex, Heike; Neusüß, Christian; Wendisch, Manfred; Stratmann, Frank; Koziar, Christian; Keil, Andreas; Wiedensohler, Alfred; Ebert, Martin

    2002-11-01

    Comparisons between measured and calculated aerosol scattering, backscattering, and absorption coefficients were made based on in situ, ground-based measurements during the Melpitz INTensive (MINT) and Lindenberg Aerosol Characterization Experiment 1998 (LACE 98) field studies. Furthermore, airborne measurements made with the same type of instruments are reviewed and compared with the ground-based measurements. Agreement between measured and calculated values is on the order of ±20% for scattering and backscattering coefficients. A sensitivity analysis showed a large influence on the calculated particle scattering and backscattering coefficients resulting from sizing uncertainties in the measured number size distributions. Measured absorption coefficients were significantly smaller than the corresponding calculated values. The largest uncertainty for the calculated absorption coefficients resulted from the size-dependent fraction of elemental carbon (EC) of the aerosol. A correction for the measured fractions of EC could significantly improve the agreement between measured and calculated absorption coefficients. The overall uncertainty of the calculated values was investigated with a Monte Carlo method by simultaneously and randomly varying the input parameters of the calculations, where the variation of each parameter was bounded by its uncertainty. The measurements were mostly found to be within the range of uncertainties of the calculations, with uncertainties for the calculated scattering and backscattering coefficients of about ±20% and for the absorption coefficients of about ±30%. Thus, to increase the accuracy of calculated scattering, backscattering, and absorption coefficients, it is crucial to further reduce the error in particle number size distribution measurement techniques. In addition, further improvement of the techniques for measuring absorption coefficients and further investigation of the measurement of the fraction of EC of the aerosol is

  12. Jet-boundary corrections for reflection-plane models in rectangular wind tunnel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Swanson, Robert S; Toll, Thomas A

    1943-01-01

    A detailed method for determining the jet-boundary corrections for reflection-plane models in rectangular wind tunnels is presented. The method includes the determination of the tunnel span local distribution and the derivation of equations for the corrections to the angle of attack, the lift and drag coefficients, and the pitching-, rolling-, yawing-, and hinge-moment coefficients. The principle effects of aerodynamic induction and of the boundary-induced curvature of the streamlines have been considered. An example is included to illustrate the method. Numerical values of the more important corrections for reflection-plane models in 7 by 10-foot closed wind tunnels are presented.

  13. EDITORIAL: Politically correct physics?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pople Deputy Editor, Stephen

    1997-03-01

    If you were a caring, thinking, liberally minded person in the 1960s, you marched against the bomb, against the Vietnam war, and for civil rights. By the 1980s, your voice was raised about the destruction of the rainforests and the threat to our whole planetary environment. At the same time, you opposed discrimination against any group because of race, sex or sexual orientation. You reasoned that people who spoke or acted in a discriminatory manner should be discriminated against. In other words, you became politically correct. Despite its oft-quoted excesses, the political correctness movement sprang from well-founded concerns about injustices in our society. So, on balance, I am all for it. Or, at least, I was until it started to invade science. Biologists were the first to feel the impact. No longer could they refer to 'higher' and 'lower' orders, or 'primitive' forms of life. To the list of undesirable 'isms' - sexism, racism, ageism - had been added a new one: speciesism. Chemists remained immune to the PC invasion, but what else could you expect from a group of people so steeped in tradition that their principal unit, the mole, requires the use of the thoroughly unreconstructed gram? Now it is the turn of the physicists. This time, the offenders are not those who talk disparagingly about other people or animals, but those who refer to 'forms of energy' and 'heat'. Political correctness has evolved into physical correctness. I was always rather fond of the various forms of energy: potential, kinetic, chemical, electrical, sound and so on. My students might merge heat and internal energy into a single, fuzzy concept loosely associated with moving molecules. They might be a little confused at a whole new crop of energies - hydroelectric, solar, wind, geothermal and tidal - but they could tell me what devices turned chemical energy into electrical energy, even if they couldn't quite appreciate that turning tidal energy into geothermal energy wasn't part of the

  14. Temperature Corrected Bootstrap Algorithm

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Comiso, Joey C.; Zwally, H. Jay

    1997-01-01

    A temperature corrected Bootstrap Algorithm has been developed using Nimbus-7 Scanning Multichannel Microwave Radiometer data in preparation to the upcoming AMSR instrument aboard ADEOS and EOS-PM. The procedure first calculates the effective surface emissivity using emissivities of ice and water at 6 GHz and a mixing formulation that utilizes ice concentrations derived using the current Bootstrap algorithm but using brightness temperatures from 6 GHz and 37 GHz channels. These effective emissivities are then used to calculate surface ice which in turn are used to convert the 18 GHz and 37 GHz brightness temperatures to emissivities. Ice concentrations are then derived using the same technique as with the Bootstrap algorithm but using emissivities instead of brightness temperatures. The results show significant improvement in the area where ice temperature is expected to vary considerably such as near the continental areas in the Antarctic, where the ice temperature is colder than average, and in marginal ice zones.

  15. Electronic measurement correction devices

    SciTech Connect

    Mahns, R.R.

    1984-04-01

    The electronics semi-conductor revolution has touched every industry and home in the nation. The gas industry is no exception. Sophisticated gas measurement instrumentation has been with us for several decades now, but only in the last 10 years or so has it really begun to boom. First marketed were the flow computers dedicated to orifice meter measurement; but with steadily decreasing manufacturing costs, electronic instrumentation is now moving into the area of base volume, pressure and temperature correction previously handled almost solely by mechanical integrating instruments. This paper takes a brief look at some of the features of the newcomers on the market and how they stack up against the old standby mechanical base volume/pressure/temperature correctors.

  16. Test stand for non-uniformity correction of microbolometer focal plane arrays used in thermal cameras

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krupiński, Michał; Bareła, Jaroslaw; Firmanty, Krzysztof; Kastek, Mariusz

    2013-10-01

    Uneven response of particular detectors (pixels) to the same incident power of infrared radiation is an inherent feature of microbolometer focal plane arrays. As a result an image degradation occurs, known as Fixed Pattern Noise (FPN), which distorts the thermal representation of an observed scene and impairs the parameters of a thermal camera. In order to compensate such non-uniformity, several NUC correction methods are applied in digital data processing modules implemented in thermal cameras. Coefficients required to perform the non-uniformity correction procedure (NUC coefficients) are determined by calibrating the camera against uniform radiation sources (blackbodies). Non-uniformity correction is performed in a digital processing unit in order to remove FPN pattern in the registered thermal images. Relevant correction coefficients are calculated on the basis of recorded detector responses to several values of radiant flux emitted from reference IR radiation sources (blackbodies). The measurement of correction coefficients requires specialized setup, in which uniform, extended radiation sources with high temperature stability are one of key elements. Measurement stand for NUC correction developed in Institute of Optoelectronics, MUT, comprises two integrated extended blackbodies with the following specifications: area 200×200 mm, stabilized absolute temperature range +15 °C÷100 °C, and uniformity of temperature distribution across entire surface +/-0.014 °C. Test stand, method used for the measurement of NUC coefficients and the results obtained during the measurements conducted on a prototype thermal camera will be presented in the paper.

  17. Rethinking political correctness.

    PubMed

    Ely, Robin J; Meyerson, Debra E; Davidson, Martin N

    2006-09-01

    Legal and cultural changes over the past 40 years ushered unprecedented numbers of women and people of color into companies' professional ranks. Laws now protect these traditionally underrepresented groups from blatant forms of discrimination in hiring and promotion. Meanwhile, political correctness has reset the standards for civility and respect in people's day-to-day interactions. Despite this obvious progress, the authors' research has shown that political correctness is a double-edged sword. While it has helped many employees feel unlimited by their race, gender, or religion,the PC rule book can hinder people's ability to develop effective relationships across race, gender, and religious lines. Companies need to equip workers with skills--not rules--for building these relationships. The authors offer the following five principles for healthy resolution of the tensions that commonly arise over difference: Pause to short-circuit the emotion and reflect; connect with others, affirming the importance of relationships; question yourself to identify blind spots and discover what makes you defensive; get genuine support that helps you gain a broader perspective; and shift your mind-set from one that says, "You need to change," to one that asks, "What can I change?" When people treat their cultural differences--and related conflicts and tensions--as opportunities to gain a more accurate view of themselves, one another, and the situation, trust builds and relationships become stronger. Leaders should put aside the PC rule book and instead model and encourage risk taking in the service of building the organization's relational capacity. The benefits will reverberate through every dimension of the company's work.

  18. Eucken correction in high-temperature gases with electronic excitation

    SciTech Connect

    Istomin, V. A.; Kustova, E. V. Mekhonoshina, M. A.

    2014-05-14

    In the present paper, thermal conductivity coefficient of high-temperature molecular and atomic gases with excited electronic states is studied using both the kinetic theory algorithm developed by authors earlier and the well known simple expression for the thermal conductivity coefficient proposed by Eucken and generalized by Hirschfelder. The influence of large collision diameters of excited states on the thermal conductivity is discussed. The limit of validity of the Eucken correction is evaluated on the basis of the kinetic theory calculations; an improved model suitable for air species under high-temperature conditions is proposed.

  19. Rulison Site corrective action report

    SciTech Connect

    1996-09-01

    Project Rulison was a joint US Atomic Energy Commission (AEC) and Austral Oil Company (Austral) experiment, conducted under the AEC`s Plowshare Program, to evaluate the feasibility of using a nuclear device to stimulate natural gas production in low-permeability gas-producing geologic formations. The experiment was conducted on September 10, 1969, and consisted of detonating a 40-kiloton nuclear device at a depth of 2,568 m below ground surface (BGS). This Corrective Action Report describes the cleanup of petroleum hydrocarbon- and heavy-metal-contaminated sediments from an old drilling effluent pond and characterization of the mud pits used during drilling of the R-EX well at the Rulison Site. The Rulison Site is located approximately 65 kilometers (40 miles) northeast of Grand Junction, Colorado. The effluent pond was used for the storage of drilling mud during drilling of the emplacement hole for the 1969 gas stimulation test conducted by the AEC. This report also describes the activities performed to determine whether contamination is present in mud pits used during the drilling of well R-EX, the gas production well drilled at the site to evaluate the effectiveness of the detonation in stimulating gas production. The investigation activities described in this report were conducted during the autumn of 1995, concurrent with the cleanup of the drilling effluent pond. This report describes the activities performed during the soil investigation and provides the analytical results for the samples collected during that investigation.

  20. Permeability Coefficients of Lipophilic Compounds Estimated by Computer Simulations.

    PubMed

    Ghaemi, Zhaleh; Alberga, Domenico; Carloni, Paolo; Laio, Alessandro; Lattanzi, Gianluca

    2016-08-01

    The ability of a drug to cross the intestine-blood barrier is a key quantity for drug design and employment and is normally quantified by the permeability coefficient P, often evaluated in the so-called Caco-2 assay. This assay is based on measuring the initial growth rate of the concentration of the drug beyond the cellular barrier but not its steady-state flux through the membrane. This might lead to confusion since, in the case of lipophilic drugs, the initial slope is strongly affected by the retention of the drug in the membrane. This effect is well known but seldom considered in the assay. Here, we exploit all-atoms molecular dynamics and bias exchange metadynamics to calculate the concentration of two lipophilic drugs across a model membrane as a function of time. This allows estimating both the steady-state flux and the initial slope of the concentration growth and comparing Caco-2 and steady-state estimates of P. We show that our computational procedure is able to reproduce the experimental values, although these may differ from the permeability coefficients by orders of magnitude. Our findings are generalized by a simplified one-dimensional model of the permeation process that may act as a roadmap to assess which measure of membrane permeability would be more appropriate and, consequently, whether retention corrections should be included in estimates based on Caco-2 assays. PMID:27392273

  1. Temporal correlation coefficient for directed networks.

    PubMed

    Büttner, Kathrin; Salau, Jennifer; Krieter, Joachim

    2016-01-01

    Previous studies dealing with network theory focused mainly on the static aggregation of edges over specific time window lengths. Thus, most of the dynamic information gets lost. To assess the quality of such a static aggregation the temporal correlation coefficient can be calculated. It measures the overall possibility for an edge to persist between two consecutive snapshots. Up to now, this measure is only defined for undirected networks. Therefore, we introduce the adaption of the temporal correlation coefficient to directed networks. This new methodology enables the distinction between ingoing and outgoing edges. Besides a small example network presenting the single calculation steps, we also calculated the proposed measurements for a real pig trade network to emphasize the importance of considering the edge direction. The farm types at the beginning of the pork supply chain showed clearly higher values for the outgoing temporal correlation coefficient compared to the farm types at the end of the pork supply chain. These farm types showed higher values for the ingoing temporal correlation coefficient. The temporal correlation coefficient is a valuable tool to understand the structural dynamics of these systems, as it assesses the consistency of the edge configuration. The adaption of this measure for directed networks may help to preserve meaningful additional information about the investigated network that might get lost if the edge directions are ignored. PMID:27516936

  2. Calculation of the mass transfer coefficient for the combustion of a carbon particle

    SciTech Connect

    Scala, Fabrizio

    2010-01-15

    In this paper we address the calculation of the mass transfer coefficient around a burning carbon particle in an atmosphere of O{sub 2}, N{sub 2}, CO{sub 2}, CO, and H{sub 2}O. The complete set of Stefan-Maxwell equations is analytically solved under the assumption of no homogeneous reaction in the boundary layer. An expression linking the oxygen concentration and the oxygen flux at the particle surface (as a function of the bulk gas composition) is derived which can be used to calculate the mass transfer coefficient. A very simple approximate explicit expression is also given for the mass transfer coefficient, that is shown to be valid in the low oxygen flux limit or when the primary combustion product is CO{sub 2}. The results are given in terms of a correction factor to the equimolar counter-diffusion mass transfer coefficient, which is typically available in the literature for specific geometries and/or fluid-dynamic conditions. The significance of the correction factor and the accuracy of the different available expressions is illustrated for several cases of practical interest. Results show that under typical combustion conditions the use of the equimolar counter-diffusion mass transfer coefficient can lead to errors up to 10%. Larger errors are possible in oxygen-enriched conditions, while the error is generally low in oxy-combustion. (author)

  3. Block error correction codes for face recognition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hussein, Wafaa R.; Sellahewa, Harin; Jassim, Sabah A.

    2011-06-01

    Face recognition is one of the most desirable biometric-based authentication schemes to control access to sensitive information/locations and as a proof of identity to claim entitlement to services. The aim of this paper is to develop block-based mechanisms, to reduce recognition errors that result from varying illumination conditions with emphasis on using error correction codes. We investigate the modelling of error patterns in different parts/blocks of face images as a result of differences in illumination conditions, and we use appropriate error correction codes to deal with the corresponding distortion. We test the performance of our proposed schemes using the Extended Yale-B Face Database, which consists of face images belonging to 5 illumination subsets depending on the direction of light source from the camera. In our experiments each image is divided into three horizontal regions as follows: region1, three rows above the eyebrows, eyebrows and eyes; region2, nose region and region3, mouth and chin region. By estimating statistical parameters for errors in each region we select suitable BCH error correction codes that yield improved recognition accuracy for that particular region in comparison to applying error correction codes to the entire image. Discrete Wavelet Transform (DWT) to a depth of 3 is used for face feature extraction, followed by global/local binarization of coefficients in each subbands. We shall demonstrate that the use of BCH improves separation of the distribution of Hamming distances of client-client samples from the distribution of Hamming distances of imposter-client samples.

  4. Extinction coefficient determination using target reflectance measurements.

    PubMed

    Smith, R B; Carswell, A L; Ulitsky, A; Houston, J D

    1989-10-01

    Laboratory measurements are reported for optical extinction at a wavelength of 1.06 microm in water droplet clouds. The extinction coefficient, sigma(T), is determined using the two-way attenuation of a target reflected signal and comparing it to the extinction coefficient sigma determined by a single-pass transmission measurement. As well as solid targets, layers of the clouds have been used as a reflector by employing a selective chopping method to provide range-resolved backscattering information and replicate in the laboratory a lidar configu-ration. It is found that multiple scattering can lead to substantial differences between sigma(T) and sigma and that these differences depend upon the properties of the scattering medium and the target as well as on the field of view of the backscatter receiver used for the reflectance measurements. By keeping the field of view very small, the two methods of measuring the extinction coefficient give the same values.

  5. Note: On the relation between Lifson-Jackson and Derrida formulas for effective diffusion coefficient

    PubMed Central

    Kalnin, Juris R.; Berezhkovskii, Alexander M.

    2013-01-01

    The Lifson-Jackson formula provides the effective free diffusion coefficient for a particle diffusing in an arbitrary one-dimensional periodic potential. Its counterpart, when the underlying dynamics is described in terms of an unbiased nearest-neighbor Markovian random walk on a one-dimensional periodic lattice is given by the formula obtained by Derrida. It is shown that the latter formula can be considered as a discretized version of the Lifson-Jackson formula with correctly chosen position-dependent diffusion coefficient. PMID:24320354

  6. Metformin Restores Intermediate-Conductance Calcium-Activated K⁺ Channel- and Small-Conductance Calcium-Activated K⁺ Channel-Mediated Vasodilatation Impaired by Advanced Glycation End Products in Rat Mesenteric Artery. [Corrected].

    PubMed

    Zhao, Li-Mei; Wang, Yan; Yang, Yong; Guo, Rong; Wang, Nan-Ping; Deng, Xiu-Ling

    2014-11-01

    The present study was designed to investigate the effect of metformin on the impairment of intermediate-conductance and small-conductance Ca(2+)-activated potassium channels (IKCa and SKCa)-mediated relaxation in diabetes and the underlying mechanism. The endothelial vasodilatation function of mesenteric arteries was assessed with the use of wire myography. Expression levels of IKCa and SKCa and phosphorylated Thr(172) of AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) were measured using Western blot technology. The channel activity was observed using a whole-cell patch voltage clamp. Reactive oxygen species (ROS) were measured using dihydroethidium and 2',7'-dichlorofluorescein diacetate. Metformin restored the impairment of IKCa- and SKCa-mediated vasodilatation in mesenteric arteries from streptozotocin-induced type 2 diabetic rats and that from normal rats incubated with advanced glycation end products (AGEs) for 3 hours. In cultured human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs), 1 μM metformin reversed AGE-induced increase of ROS and attenuated AGE- and H2O2- induced downregulation of IKCa and SKCa after long-term incubation (>24 hours). Short-term treatment (3 hours) with 1 μM metformin reversed the decrease of IKCa and SKCa currents induced by AGE incubation for 3 hours without changing the channel expression or the AMPK activation in HUVECs. These results are the first to demonstrate that metformin restored IKCa- and SKCa-mediated vasodilatation impaired by AGEs in rat mesenteric artery, in which the upregulation of channel activity and protein expression is likely involved.

  7. Virial expansion coefficients in the harmonic approximation.

    PubMed

    Armstrong, J R; Zinner, N T; Fedorov, D V; Jensen, A S

    2012-08-01

    The virial expansion method is applied within a harmonic approximation to an interacting N-body system of identical fermions. We compute the canonical partition functions for two and three particles to get the two lowest orders in the expansion. The energy spectrum is carefully interpolated to reproduce ground-state properties at low temperature and the noninteracting high-temperature limit of constant virial coefficients. This resembles the smearing of shell effects in finite systems with increasing temperature. Numerical results are discussed for the second and third virial coefficients as functions of dimension, temperature, interaction, and transition temperature between low- and high-energy limits. PMID:23005730

  8. Diffusion and transport coefficients in synthetic opals

    SciTech Connect

    Sofo, J. O.; Mahan, G. D.

    2000-07-15

    Opals are structures composed of close-packed spheres in the size range of nano to micrometers. They are sintered to create small necks at the points of contact. We have solved the diffusion problem in such structures. The relation between the diffusion coefficient and the thermal and electrical conductivity is used to estimate the transport coefficients of opal structures as a function of the neck size and the mean free path of the carriers. The theory presented is also applicable to the diffusion problem in other periodic structures. (c) 2000 The American Physical Society.

  9. Brownian friction coefficient of Kr/graphite.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boutchko, R.

    1998-03-01

    Calculations of the Brownian friction coefficient of fluid Kr/graphite are described. The phonon frequencies and polarization vectors are calculated for a thick graphite slab using the Benedek-Onida bond charge model(G. Benedek and G. Onida, Phys. Rev. B 47), 16471 (1993). The fluctuating forces on the adatom from the substrate are expressed in terms of the graphite fluctuation spectrum. The friction coefficient is expressed in terms of a spectral density to be derived from the slab calculations. The relation of the results to diffusive processes in monolayer fluids(F. Y. Hansen, L. W. Bruch, and H. Taub, Phys. Rev. B 54), 14077 (1996). is discussed.

  10. [Correction of complex deformities in infectious conditions].

    PubMed

    Suger, G; Schmelz, A; Kinzl, L; Liener, U

    2000-01-01

    Skeletal deformities do occur after conservative or operative fracture treatment, as a consequence of congenital growth disturbance and as sequlae after posttraumatic and haematogenous osteomyelitis. In postinfectious deformities the course of the bone and soft tissue infection plays a decisive role when choosing the appropriate operative technique. Even in non active situations with a closed soft tissues envelope and no draining sinus persistence of germs within the bone has to be anticipated. The biological quality of the bone and the soft tissue envelope is often reduced because of local changes and as a result of multiple local revisions. Consequently wide areas of scar tissue and sclerotic bone are often encountered. The apex of the deformity is in most cases identical with the focus of the active or non active infection. The correction of the deformity at the apex can therefore only be accomplished if the infectious bone is also resected. If a correction is not possible at the apex of the deformity, translation at the osteotomy site is necessary to achieve a correct mechanical axis. The later rather complex operative procedure necessitates intensive preoperative planning and an extensive experience with deformity corrections by external fixators. PMID:10663242

  11. Alternate corrections for estimating actual wetland evapotranspiration from potential evapotranspiration

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Barclay, Shoemaker W.; Sumner, D.M.

    2006-01-01

    Corrections can be used to estimate actual wetland evapotranspiration (AET) from potential evapotranspiration (PET) as a means to define the hydrology of wetland areas. Many alternate parameterizations for correction coefficients for three PET equations are presented, covering a wide range of possible data-availability scenarios. At nine sites in the wetland Everglades of south Florida, USA, the relatively complex PET Penman equation was corrected to daily total AET with smaller standard errors than the PET simple and Priestley-Taylor equations. The simpler equations, however, required less data (and thus less funding for instrumentation), with the possibility of being corrected to AET with slightly larger, comparable, or even smaller standard errors. Air temperature generally corrected PET simple most effectively to wetland AET, while wetland stage and humidity generally corrected PET Priestley-Taylor and Penman most effectively to wetland AET. Stage was identified for PET Priestley-Taylor and Penman as the data type with the most correction ability at sites that are dry part of each year or dry part of some years. Finally, although surface water generally was readily available at each monitoring site, AET was not occurring at potential rates, as conceptually expected under well-watered conditions. Apparently, factors other than water availability, such as atmospheric and stomata resistances to vapor transport, also were limiting the PET rate. ?? 2006, The Society of Wetland Scientists.

  12. moco: Fast Motion Correction for Calcium Imaging.

    PubMed

    Dubbs, Alexander; Guevara, James; Yuste, Rafael

    2016-01-01

    Motion correction is the first step in a pipeline of algorithms to analyze calcium imaging videos and extract biologically relevant information, for example the network structure of the neurons therein. Fast motion correction is especially critical for closed-loop activity triggered stimulation experiments, where accurate detection and targeting of specific cells in necessary. We introduce a novel motion-correction algorithm which uses a Fourier-transform approach, and a combination of judicious downsampling and the accelerated computation of many L 2 norms using dynamic programming and two-dimensional, fft-accelerated convolutions, to enhance its efficiency. Its accuracy is comparable to that of established community-used algorithms, and it is more stable to large translational motions. It is programmed in Java and is compatible with ImageJ. PMID:26909035

  13. moco: Fast Motion Correction for Calcium Imaging

    PubMed Central

    Dubbs, Alexander; Guevara, James; Yuste, Rafael

    2016-01-01

    Motion correction is the first step in a pipeline of algorithms to analyze calcium imaging videos and extract biologically relevant information, for example the network structure of the neurons therein. Fast motion correction is especially critical for closed-loop activity triggered stimulation experiments, where accurate detection and targeting of specific cells in necessary. We introduce a novel motion-correction algorithm which uses a Fourier-transform approach, and a combination of judicious downsampling and the accelerated computation of many L2 norms using dynamic programming and two-dimensional, fft-accelerated convolutions, to enhance its efficiency. Its accuracy is comparable to that of established community-used algorithms, and it is more stable to large translational motions. It is programmed in Java and is compatible with ImageJ. PMID:26909035

  14. RCRA corrective action program guide (Interim)

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1993-05-01

    The US Department of Energy (DOE) is responsible for compliance with an increasingly complex spectrum of environmental regulations. One of the most complex programs is the corrective action program proposed by the US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) under the authority of the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) as amended by the Hazardous and Solid Waste Amendments (HSWA). The proposed regulations were published on July 27, 1990. The proposed Subpart S rule creates a comprehensive program for investigating and remediating releases of hazardous wastes and hazardous waste constituents from solid waste management units (SWMUs) at facilities permitted to treat, store, or dispose of hazardous wastes. This proposed rule directly impacts many DOE facilities which conduct such activities. This guidance document explains the entire RCRA Corrective Action process as outlined by the proposed Subpart S rule, and provides guidance intended to assist those persons responsible for implementing RCRA Corrective Action at DOE facilities.

  15. moco: Fast Motion Correction for Calcium Imaging.

    PubMed

    Dubbs, Alexander; Guevara, James; Yuste, Rafael

    2016-01-01

    Motion correction is the first step in a pipeline of algorithms to analyze calcium imaging videos and extract biologically relevant information, for example the network structure of the neurons therein. Fast motion correction is especially critical for closed-loop activity triggered stimulation experiments, where accurate detection and targeting of specific cells in necessary. We introduce a novel motion-correction algorithm which uses a Fourier-transform approach, and a combination of judicious downsampling and the accelerated computation of many L 2 norms using dynamic programming and two-dimensional, fft-accelerated convolutions, to enhance its efficiency. Its accuracy is comparable to that of established community-used algorithms, and it is more stable to large translational motions. It is programmed in Java and is compatible with ImageJ.

  16. CLOSURE REPORT FOR CORRECTIVE ACTION UNIT 214: BUNKERS AND STORAGE AREAS NEVADA TEST SITE, NEVADA

    SciTech Connect

    2006-09-01

    The purpose of this Closure Report is to document that the closure of CAU 214 complied with the Nevada Division of Environmental Protection-approved Corrective Action Plan closure requirements. The closure activities specified in the Corrective Action Plan were based on the approved corrective action alternatives presented in the CAU 214 Corrective Action Decision Document.

  17. Thermodynamics of Error Correction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sartori, Pablo; Pigolotti, Simone

    2015-10-01

    Information processing at the molecular scale is limited by thermal fluctuations. This can cause undesired consequences in copying information since thermal noise can lead to errors that can compromise the functionality of the copy. For example, a high error rate during DNA duplication can lead to cell death. Given the importance of accurate copying at the molecular scale, it is fundamental to understand its thermodynamic features. In this paper, we derive a universal expression for the copy error as a function of entropy production and work dissipated by the system during wrong incorporations. Its derivation is based on the second law of thermodynamics; hence, its validity is independent of the details of the molecular machinery, be it any polymerase or artificial copying device. Using this expression, we find that information can be copied in three different regimes. In two of them, work is dissipated to either increase or decrease the error. In the third regime, the protocol extracts work while correcting errors, reminiscent of a Maxwell demon. As a case study, we apply our framework to study a copy protocol assisted by kinetic proofreading, and show that it can operate in any of these three regimes. We finally show that, for any effective proofreading scheme, error reduction is limited by the chemical driving of the proofreading reaction.

  18. Enzymatic activities of human cytomegalovirus maturational protease assemblin and its precursor (pPR, pUL80a) are comparable: [corrected] maximal activity of pPR requires self-interaction through its scaffolding domain.

    PubMed

    Brignole, Edward J; Gibson, Wade

    2007-04-01

    Herpesviruses encode an essential, maturational serine protease whose catalytic domain, assemblin (28 kDa), is released by self-cleavage from a 74-kDa precursor (pPR, pUL80a). Although there is considerable information about the structure and enzymatic characteristics of assemblin, a potential pharmacologic target, comparatively little is known about these features of the precursor. To begin studying pPR, we introduced five point mutations that stabilize it against self-cleavage at its internal (I), cryptic (C), release (R), and maturational (M) sites and at a newly discovered "tail" (T) site. The resulting mutants, called ICRM-pPR and ICRMT-pPR, were expressed in bacteria, denatured in urea, purified by immobilized metal affinity chromatography, and renatured by a two-step dialysis procedure and by a new method of sedimentation into glycerol gradients. The enzymatic activities of the pPR mutants were indistinguishable from that of IC-assemblin prepared in parallel for comparison, as determined by using a fluorogenic peptide cleavage assay, and approximated rates previously reported for purified assemblin. The percentage of active enzyme in the preparations was also comparable, as determined by using a covalent-binding suicide substrate. An unexpected finding was that, in the absence of the kosmotrope Na2SO4, optimal activity of pPR requires interaction through its scaffolding domain. We conclude that although the enzymatic activities of assemblin and its precursor are comparable, there may be differences in how their catalytic sites become fully activated.

  19. Progress in the determination of the gravitational coefficient of the earth

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ries, J. C.; Eanes, R. J.; Shum, C. K.; Watkins, M. M.

    1992-01-01

    In most of the recent determinations of the geocentric gravitational coefficient (GM) of the earth, the laser ranging data to the Lageos satellite have had the greatest influence on the solution. These data, however, have generally been processed with a small but significant error in one of the range corrections. In a new determination of GM using the corrected center-of-mass offset, a value of 398600.4415 cu km/sq sec (including the mass of the atmosphere) has been obtained, with an estimated uncertainty (1 sigma of 0.0008 cu km/sq sec.

  20. Corrective Action Plan for Corrective Action Unit 417: Central Nevada Test Area Surface, Nevada

    SciTech Connect

    K. Campbell

    2000-04-01

    This Corrective Action Plan provides methods for implementing the approved corrective action alternative as provided in the Corrective Action Decision Document for the Central Nevada Test Area (CNTA), Corrective Action Unit (CAU) 417 (DOE/NV, 1999). The CNTA is located in the Hot Creek Valley in Nye County, Nevada, approximately 137 kilometers (85 miles) northeast of Tonopah, Nevada. The CNTA consists of three separate land withdrawal areas commonly referred to as UC-1, UC-3, and UC-4, all of which are accessible to the public. CAU 417 consists of 34 Corrective Action Sites (CASs). Results of the investigation activities completed in 1998 are presented in Appendix D of the Corrective Action Decision Document (DOE/NV, 1999). According to the results, the only Constituent of Concern at the CNTA is total petroleum hydrocarbons (TPH). Of the 34 CASs, corrective action was proposed for 16 sites in 13 CASs. In fiscal year 1999, a Phase I Work Plan was prepared for the construction of a cover on the UC-4 Mud Pit C to gather information on cover constructibility and to perform site management activities. With Nevada Division of Environmental Protection concurrence, the Phase I field activities began in August 1999. A multi-layered cover using a Geosynthetic Clay Liner as an infiltration barrier was constructed over the UC-4 Mud Pit. Some TPH impacted material was relocated, concrete monuments were installed at nine sites, signs warning of site conditions were posted at seven sites, and subsidence markers were installed on the UC-4 Mud Pit C cover. Results from the field activities indicated that the UC-4 Mud Pit C cover design was constructable and could be used at the UC-1 Central Mud Pit (CMP). However, because of the size of the UC-1 CMP this design would be extremely costly. An alternative cover design, a vegetated cover, is proposed for the UC-1 CMP.

  1. Corrective Action Decision Document/Closure Report for Corrective Action Unit 105: Area 2 Yucca Flat Atmospheric Test Sites, Nevada National Security Site, Nevada, Revision 1

    SciTech Connect

    Matthews, Patrick

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this Corrective Action Decision Document/Closure Report is to provide justification and documentation supporting the recommendation that no further corrective action is needed for CAU 105 based on the implementation of the corrective actions. Corrective action investigation (CAI) activities were performed from October 22, 2012, through May 23, 2013, as set forth in the Corrective Action Investigation Plan for Corrective Action Unit 105: Area 2 Yucca Flat Atmospheric Test Sites; and in accordance with the Soils Activity Quality Assurance Plan, which establishes requirements, technical planning, and general quality practices.

  2. Simple liquid models with corrected dielectric constants.

    PubMed

    Fennell, Christopher J; Li, Libo; Dill, Ken A

    2012-06-14

    Molecular simulations often use explicit-solvent models. Sometimes explicit-solvent models can give inaccurate values for basic liquid properties, such as the density, heat capacity, and permittivity, as well as inaccurate values for molecular transfer free energies. Such errors have motivated the development of more complex solvents, such as polarizable models. We describe an alternative here. We give new fixed-charge models of solvents for molecular simulations--water, carbon tetrachloride, chloroform, and dichloromethane. Normally, such solvent models are parametrized to agree with experimental values of the neat liquid density and enthalpy of vaporization. Here, in addition to those properties, our parameters are chosen to give the correct dielectric constant. We find that these new parametrizations also happen to give better values for other properties, such as the self-diffusion coefficient. We believe that parametrizing fixed-charge solvent models to fit experimental dielectric constants may provide better and more efficient ways to treat solvents in computer simulations.

  3. Ionic molal conductivities, activity coefficients, and dissociation constants of HAsO42 − and H2AsO4− from 5 to 90 °C and ionic strengths from 0.001 up to 3 mol kg− 1 and applications in natural systems

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Zhu, Xiangyu; Nordstrom, D Kirk; McCleskey, R. Blaine; Wang, Rucheng

    2016-01-01

    Arsenic is known to be one of the most toxic inorganic elements, causing worldwide environmental contamination. However, many fundamental properties related to aqueous arsenic species are not well known which will inhibit our ability to understand the geochemical behavior of arsenic (e.g. speciation, transport, and solubility). Here, the electrical conductivity of Na2HAsO4 solutions has been measured over the concentration range of 0.001–1 mol kg− 1 and the temperature range of 5–90 °C. Ionic strength and temperature-dependent equations were derived for the molal conductivity of HAsO42 −and H2AsO4− aqueous ions. Combined with speciation calculations and the approach used by McCleskey et al. (2012b), these equations can be used to calculate the electrical conductivities of arsenic-rich waters having a large range of effective ionic strengths (0.001–3 mol kg− 1) and temperatures (5–90 °C). Individual ion activity coefficients for HAsO42 − and H2AsO4− in the form of the Hückel equation were also derived using the mean salt method and the mean activity coefficients of K2HAsO4 (0.001–1 mol kg− 1) and KH2AsO4 (0.001–1.3 mol kg− 1). A check on these activity coefficients was made by calculating mean activity coefficients for Na2HAsO4 and NaH2AsO4 solutions and comparing them to measured values. At the same time Na-arsenate complexes were evaluated. The NaH2AsO40 ion pair is negligible in NaH2AsO4 solutions up to 1.3 mol kg− 1. The NaHAsO4− ion pair is important in NaHAsO4 solutions > 0.1 mol kg− 1 and the formation constant of 100.69 was confirmed. The enthalpy, entropy, free energy and heat capacity for the second and third arsenic acid dissociation reactions were calculated from pH measurements. These properties have been incorporated into a widely used geochemical calculation code WATEQ4F and applied to natural arsenic waters. For arsenic spiked water samples from Yellowstone National Park, the mean difference

  4. Extending the Constant Coefficient Solution Technique to Variable Coefficient Ordinary Differential Equations

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mohammed, Ahmed; Zeleke, Aklilu

    2015-01-01

    We introduce a class of second-order ordinary differential equations (ODEs) with variable coefficients whose closed-form solutions can be obtained by the same method used to solve ODEs with constant coefficients. General solutions for the homogeneous case are discussed.

  5. Molecular Diffusion Coefficients: Experimental Determination and Demonstration.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fate, Gwendolyn; Lynn, David G.

    1990-01-01

    Presented are laboratory methods which allow the demonstration and determination of the diffusion coefficients of compounds ranging in size from water to small proteins. Included are the procedures involving the use of a spectrometer, UV cell, triterated agar, and oxygen diffusion. Results including quantification are described. (CW)

  6. Pressure viscosity coefficient of vegetable oils

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The elastohydrodynamic (EHD) pressure viscosity coefficient (PVC) of ten vegetable oils from commodity and new crops, and two petroleum-based oils, polyalphaolefin (PAO) and hexadecane, were investigated. PVC was measured using three different methods: the So and Klaus (S-K) procedure from oil visco...

  7. Problems on Divisibility of Binomial Coefficients

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Osler, Thomas J.; Smoak, James

    2004-01-01

    Twelve unusual problems involving divisibility of the binomial coefficients are represented in this article. The problems are listed in "The Problems" section. All twelve problems have short solutions which are listed in "The Solutions" section. These problems could be assigned to students in any course in which the binomial theorem and Pascal's…

  8. Bitplane Image Coding With Parallel Coefficient Processing.

    PubMed

    Auli-Llinas, Francesc; Enfedaque, Pablo; Moure, Juan C; Sanchez, Victor

    2016-01-01

    Image coding systems have been traditionally tailored for multiple instruction, multiple data (MIMD) computing. In general, they partition the (transformed) image in codeblocks that can be coded in the cores of MIMD-based processors. Each core executes a sequential flow of instructions to process the coefficients in the codeblock, independently and asynchronously from the others cores. Bitplane coding is a common strategy to code such data. Most of its mechanisms require sequential processing of the coefficients. The last years have seen the upraising of processing accelerators with enhanced computational performance and power efficiency whose architecture is mainly based on the single instruction, multiple data (SIMD) principle. SIMD computing refers to the execution of the same instruction to multiple data in a lockstep synchronous way. Unfortunately, current bitplane coding strategies cannot fully profit from such processors due to inherently sequential coding task. This paper presents bitplane image coding with parallel coefficient (BPC-PaCo) processing, a coding method that can process many coefficients within a codeblock in parallel and synchronously. To this end, the scanning order, the context formation, the probability model, and the arithmetic coder of the coding engine have been re-formulated. The experimental results suggest that the penalization in coding performance of BPC-PaCo with respect to the traditional strategies is almost negligible.

  9. Coefficient of variation of underwater irradiance fluctuations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weber, V. L.

    2010-06-01

    We consider underwater sunlight fluctuations in the case of a one-dimensional irregular sea surface. Several rigorous and approximate models are proposed, which make it possible to analytically treat and physically explain the dependence of the coefficient of variation of the underwater irradiance on the depth, the wind velocity, and optical parameters of the sea water.

  10. Determination of sedimentation coefficients for small peptides.

    PubMed Central

    Schuck, P; MacPhee, C E; Howlett, G J

    1998-01-01

    Direct fitting of sedimentation velocity data with numerical solutions of the Lamm equations has been exploited to obtain sedimentation coefficients for single solutes under conditions where solvent and solution plateaus are either not available or are transient. The calculated evolution was initialized with the first experimental scan and nonlinear regression was employed to obtain best-fit values for the sedimentation and diffusion coefficients. General properties of the Lamm equations as data analysis tools were examined. This method was applied to study a set of small peptides containing amphipathic heptad repeats with the general structure Ac-YS-(AKEAAKE)nGAR-NH2, n = 2, 3, or 4. Sedimentation velocity analysis indicated single sedimenting species with sedimentation coefficients (s(20,w) values) of 0.37, 0.45, and 0.52 S, respectively, in good agreement with sedimentation coefficients predicted by hydrodynamic theory. The described approach can be applied to synthetic boundary and conventional loading experiments, and can be extended to analyze sedimentation data for both large and small macromolecules in order to define shape, heterogeneity, and state of association. PMID:9449347

  11. A Graphical Interpretation of Probit Coefficients.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Becker, William E.; Waldman, Donald M.

    1989-01-01

    Contends that, when discrete choice models are taught, particularly the probit model, it is the method rather than the interpretation of the results that is emphasized. This article provides a graphical technique for interpretation of an estimated probit coefficient that will be useful in statistics and econometrics courses. (GG)

  12. Experimental Influence Coefficients and Vibration Modes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Weidman, Deene J.; Kordes, Eldon E.

    1959-01-01

    Test results are presented for both symmetrical and antisymmetrical static loading of a wing model mounted on a three-point support system. The first six free-free vibration modes were determined experimentally. A comparison is made of the symmetrical nodal patterns and frequencies with the symmetrical nodal patterns and frequencies calculated from the experimental influence coefficients.

  13. Microcomputer Listens to the Coefficient of Restitution.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Smith, P. A.; And Others

    1981-01-01

    Describes a procedure for determining the coefficient of restitution using a microcomputer which collects and sends data to a large computer where analysis is done and graphical output is generated. The data collection hardware and software are described, and results are illustrated. (Author/SK)

  14. The Seebeck coefficient of superionic conductors

    SciTech Connect

    Mahan, G. D.

    2015-01-28

    We present a theory of the anomalous Seebeck coefficient found in the superionic conductor Cu{sub 2}Se. It has a phase transition at T = 400 K where the cations disorder but the anions do not. This disorder gives a temperature-dependent width to the electronic states in the conduction band. This width provides the anomalous Seebeck contribution.

  15. Pressure-viscosity coefficient of biobased lubricants

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Film thickness is an important tribological property that is dependent on the combined effect of lubricant properties, material property of friction surfaces, and the operating conditions of the tribological process. Pressure-viscosity coefficient (PVC) is one of the lubricant properties that influe...

  16. The Lorenz Curve and the Gini Coefficient.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rycroft, Robert

    2003-01-01

    States that the Lorenz Curve and the Gini Coefficient is a Web-based interactive tutorial developed for students in an upper level, undergraduate, elective economics course about income and wealth distribution, poverty, and discrimination. States that students achieve mastery because they cannot complete the tutorial without adequate understanding…

  17. Computer programs for the concordance correlation coefficient.

    PubMed

    Crawford, Sara B; Kosinski, Andrzej S; Lin, Hung-Mo; Williamson, John M; Barnhart, Huiman X

    2007-10-01

    The CCC macro is presented for computation of the concordance correlation coefficient (CCC), a common measure of reproducibility. The macro has been produced in both SAS and R, and a detailed presentation of the macro input and output for the SAS program is included. The macro provides estimation of three versions of the CCC, as presented by Lin [L.I.-K. Lin, A concordance correlation coefficient to evaluate reproducibility, Biometrics 45 (1989) 255-268], Barnhart et al. [H.X. Barnhart, J.L. Haber, J.L. Song, Overall concordance correlation coefficient for evaluating agreement among multiple observers, Biometrics 58 (2002) 1020-1027], and Williamson et al. [J.M. Williamson, S.B. Crawford, H.M. Lin, Resampling dependent concordance correlation coefficients, J. Biopharm. Stat. 17 (2007) 685-696]. It also provides bootstrap confidence intervals for the CCC, as well as for the difference in CCCs for both independent and dependent samples. The macro is designed for balanced data only. Detailed explanation of the involved computations and macro variable definitions are provided in the text. Two biomedical examples are included to illustrate that the macro can be easily implemented.

  18. Phosphorus Availability Coefficients from Various Organic Sources

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The objectives of this study were to determine Phosphorus Availability Coefficients (PACs) for a variety of organic phosphorus (P) sources, and to examine the relationship between PACs measured in simulated rainfall runoff and alternative soil incubations. PAC is an important parameter in the P-Ind...

  19. Recursive Construction of Operator Product Expansion Coefficients

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Holland, Jan; Hollands, Stefan

    2015-06-01

    We derive a novel formula for the derivative of operator product expansion (OPE) coefficients with respect to a coupling constant. The formula involves just the OPE coefficients themselves but no further input, and is in this sense self-consistent. Furthermore, unlike other formal identities of this general nature in quantum field theory (such as the formal expression for the Lagrangian perturbation of a correlation function), our formula requires no further UV-renormalization, i.e., it is completely well-defined from the start. This feature is a result of a cancelation of UV- and IR-divergences between various terms in our identity. Our proof, and an analysis of the features of the identity, is given for the example of massive, Euclidean theory in 4 dimensional Euclidean space. It relies on the renormalization group flow equation method and is valid to arbitrary, but finite orders in perturbation theory. The final formula, however, makes neither explicit reference to the renormalization group flow, nor to perturbation theory, and we conjecture that it also holds non-perturbatively. Our identity can be applied constructively because it gives a novel recursive algorithm for the computation of OPE coefficients to arbitrary (finite) perturbation order in terms of the zeroth order coefficients corresponding to the underlying free field theory, which in turn are trivial to obtain. We briefly illustrate the relation of this method to more standard methods for computing the OPE in some simple examples.

  20. Partial volume correction using cortical surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blaasvær, Kamille R.; Haubro, Camilla D.; Eskildsen, Simon F.; Borghammer, Per; Otzen, Daniel; Ostergaard, Lasse R.

    2010-03-01

    Partial volume effect (PVE) in positron emission tomography (PET) leads to inaccurate estimation of regional metabolic activities among neighbouring tissues with different tracer concentration. This may be one of the main limiting factors in the utilization of PET in clinical practice. Partial volume correction (PVC) methods have been widely studied to address this issue. MRI based PVC methods are well-established.1 Their performance depend on the quality of the co-registration of the MR and PET dataset, on the correctness of the estimated point-spread function (PSF) of the PET scanner and largely on the performance of the segmentation method that divide the brain into brain tissue compartments.1, 2 In the present study a method for PVC is suggested, that utilizes cortical surfaces, to obtain detailed anatomical information. The objectives are to improve the performance of PVC, facilitate a study of the relationship between metabolic activity in the cerebral cortex and cortical thicknesses, and to obtain an improved visualization of PET data. The gray matter metabolic activity after performing PVC was recovered by 99.7 - 99.8 % , in relation to the true activity when testing on simple simulated data with different PSFs and by 97.9 - 100 % when testing on simulated brain PET data at different cortical thicknesses. When studying the relationship between metabolic activities and anatomical structures it was shown on simulated brain PET data, that it is important to correct for PVE in order to get the true relationship.