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Sample records for activity colony-forming units

  1. Circulating colony-forming units of granulocytes and monocytes/macrophages in systemic lupus erythematosus.

    PubMed Central

    López-Karpovitch, X; Cardiel, M; Cardenas, R; Piedras, J; Alarcón-Segovia, D

    1989-01-01

    In systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) patients, in vitro bone marrow (BM) colony-forming units of granulocytes and monocytes/macrophages (CFU-GM) are decreased, suggesting that granulomonopoietic failure may play an important role in the mechanism of peripheral blood (PB) depletion of neutrophils and monocytes. No information concerning CFU-GM in PB of patients with SLE is available. The present study was undertaken in order to determine whether SLE itself and the inactive or active stage of disease would modify the number of GFU-GM in PB samples from 20 treatment-free SLE women, 12 inactive and eight active. CFU-GM growth was significantly decreased in both inactive (P = 0.018) and active (P = 0.008) SLE patients as compared with controls (n = 8). The difference in CFU-GM growth between SLE groups was not significant. These results indicate that the number of circulating CFU-GM is significantly reduced in patients with SLE regardless of disease activity or remission. PMID:2766577

  2. Response of colony-forming units-spleen to heavy charged particles.

    PubMed

    Ainsworth, E J; Kelly, L S; Mahlmann, L J; Schooley, J C; Thomas, R H; Howard, J; Alpen, E L

    1983-10-01

    Survival of colony-forming units-spleen (CFU-S) was measured after single doses of photons or heavy charged particles from the BEVALAC. The purposes were to define the radiosensitivity to heavy ions used medically and to evaluate relationships between relative biological effectiveness (RBE) and dose-averaged linear energy transfer (LET infinity). In in vitro irradiation experiments. CFU-S suspensions were exposed to 220 kVp X rays or to 20Ne (372 MeV/micron) or 40Ar (447 MeV/micron) particles in the plateau portion of the Bragg curve. In in vivo irradiation experiments, donor mice from which CFU-S were harvested were exposed to 12C (400 MeV/micron). 20Ne (400 or 670 MeV/micron), or 40Ar (570 MeV/micron) particles in Bragg peaks spread to 4 or 10 cm by spiral ridge filters. Based on RBE at 10 survival, the maximum RBE of 2.1 was observed for 40Ar particles characterized by an LET infinity of approximately 100 keV/micron. Lower RBEs were determined at lower or higher estimated values of LET infinity and ranged from 1.1 for low energy 40Ar particles to 1.5-1.6 for low energy 12C and 20Ne. The responses of CFU-S are compared with responses of other model systems to heavy charged particles and with the reported sensitivity of CFU-S to neutrons of various energies. The maximum RBE reported here, 2.1 for high energy 40Ar particles, is somewhat lower than values reported for fission-spectrum neutrons, and is appreciably lower than values for monoenergetic 0.43-1.8 MeV neutrons. Low energy 12C and 20Ne particles have RBEs in the range of values reported for 14.7 MeV neutrons. PMID:6622650

  3. Charcoal Rot Disease Assessment of Soybean Genotypes Using a Colony Forming Unit Index

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Charcoal rot [Macrophomina phaseolina (Tassi) Goid] of soybean [Glycine max (L.) Merr.] is a disease of economic significance in the United States and around the world. Yield losses will remain high until resistant genotypes are developed. Progress in developing resistant genotypes is hampered beca...

  4. Matrix rigidity regulates spatiotemporal dynamics of Cdc42 activity and vacuole formation kinetics of endothelial colony forming cells

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Seung Joon; Wan, Qiaoqiao; Cho, Eunhye; Han, Bumsoo; Yoder, Mervin C.; Voytik-Harbin, Sherry L.; Na, Sungsoo

    2014-01-01

    Recent evidence has shown that endothelial colony forming cells (ECFCs) may serve as a cell therapy for improving blood vessel formation in subjects with vascular injury, largely due to their robust vasculogenic potential. The Rho family GTPase Cdc42 is known to play a primary role in this vasculogenesis process, but little is known about how extracellular matrix (ECM) rigidity affects Cdc42 activity during the process. In this study, we addressed two questions: Does matrix rigidity affect Cdc42 activity in ECFC undergoing early vacuole formation? How is the spatiotemporal activation of Cdc42 related to ECFC vacuole formation? A fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET)-based Cdc42 biosensor was used to examine the effects of the rigidity of three-dimensional (3D) collagen matrices on spatiotemporal activity of Cdc42 in ECFCs. Collagen matrix stiffness was modulated by varying the collagen concentration and therefore fibril density. The results showed that soft (150 Pa) matrices induced an increased level of Cdc42 activity compared to stiff (1 kPa) matrices. Time-course imaging and colocalization analysis of Cdc42 activity and vacuole formation revealed that Cdc42 activity was colocalized to the periphery of cytoplasmic vacuoles. Moreover, soft matrices generated faster and larger vacuoles than stiff matrices. The matrix-driven vacuole formation was enhanced by a constitutively active Cdc42 mutant, but significantly inhibited by a dominant-negative Cdc42 mutant. Collectively, the results suggest that matrix rigidity is a strong regulator of Cdc42 activity and vacuole formation kinetics, and that enhanced activity of Cdc42 is an important step in early vacuole formation in ECFCs. PMID:24393843

  5. Radiation sensitivity and cycling status of mouse bone marrow prothymocytes and day 8 colony forming units spleen (CFUs)

    SciTech Connect

    Boersma, W.J.

    1983-11-01

    Mouse bone marrow prothymocytes as determined in an in vivo thymus regeneration assay have an in vitro gamma radiation sensitivity which is different from that of spleen colony forming cells (CFUs). Determination of Do according to in vivo irradiation revealed similar but insignificant differences. Prothymocytes in normal bone marrow maintain a low but slightly different proliferative state as compared to CFUs, according to determinations using the /sup 3/H-TdR suicide technique. In regenerating bone marrow prothymocytes were found to be sensitive to an inhibitory effect of in vitro incubation with cold thymidine. CFUs and normal bone marrow prothymocytes were not affected by cold thymidine. Taking into account the cold thymidine effect it can be concluded that prothymocytes and CFUs in regenerating bone marrow are fully in cycle. These results are best explained when prothymocytes and CFUs are considered to be different cells.

  6. Mesenchymal stromal cells, colony-forming unit fibroblasts, from bone marrow of untreated advanced breast and lung cancer patients suppress fibroblast colony formation from healthy marrow.

    PubMed

    Hofer, Erica Leonor; Labovsky, Vivian; La Russa, Vincent; Vallone, Valeria Fernández; Honegger, Alba Elizabeth; Belloc, Carlos Gabriel; Wen, Huei Chi; Bordenave, Raúl Horacio; Bullorsky, Eduardo Oscar; Feldman, Leonardo; Chasseing, Norma Alejandra

    2010-03-01

    We have shown that bone marrow (BM) from untreated advanced lung and breast cancer patients (LCP and BCP) have a reduced number of colony-forming unit fibroblasts (CFU-Fs) or mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs). Factors that regulate the proliferation and differentiation of CFU-F are produced by the patients' BM microenvironment. We have now examined whether conditioned media (CM) from patients' CFU-F-derived stromal cells also inhibits the colony-forming efficiency (CFE) of CFU-F in primary cultures from healthy volunteers (HV)-BM. Thus the number and proliferation potential of HV-CFU-F were also found to be decreased and similar to colony numbers and colony size of patients' CFU-F. Stromal cells from both of these types of colonies appeared relatively larger and lacked the characteristic spindle morphology typically seen in healthy stromal cells. We developed an arbitrary mesenchymal stromal cell maturational index by taking three measures consisting of stromal cell surface area, longitudinal and horizontal axis. All stromal indices derived from HV-CFU-F grown in patients' CM were similar to those from stromal elements derived from patients' CFU-F. These indices were markedly higher than stromal indices typical of HV-CFU-F cultured in healthy CM or standard medium [alpha-medium plus 20% heat-inactivated fetal bovine serum (FBS)]. Patients' CM had increased concentrations of the CFU-F inhibitor, GM-CSF, and low levels of bFGF and Dkk-1, strong promoters of self-renewal of MSCs, compared to the levels quantified in CM from HV-CFU-F. Moreover, the majority of patients' MSCs were unresponsive in standard medium and healthy CM to give CFU-F, indicating that the majority of mesenchymal stromal cells from patients' CFU-F are locked in maturational arrest. These results show that alterations of GM-CSF, bFGF, and Dkk-1 are associated with deficient cloning and maturation arrest of CFU-F. Defective autocrine and paracrine mechanisms may be involved in the BM microenvironments of

  7. Manufacture of Clinical-Grade Human Clonal Mesenchymal Stem Cell Products from Single Colony Forming Unit-Derived Colonies Based on the Subfractionation Culturing Method.

    PubMed

    Yi, TacGhee; Kim, Si-na; Lee, Hyun-Joo; Kim, Junghee; Cho, Yun-Kyoung; Shin, Dong-Hee; Tak, Sun-Ji; Moon, Sun-Hwa; Kang, Ji-Eun; Ji, In-Mi; Lim, Huyn-Ja; Lee, Dong-Soon; Jeon, Myung-Shin; Song, Sun U

    2015-12-01

    Stem cell products derived from mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) have been widely used in clinical trials, and a few products have been already commercialized. However, the therapeutic effects of clinical-grade MSCs are still controversial owing to mixed results from recent clinical trials. A potential solution to overcome this hurdle may be to use clonal stem cells as the starting cell material to increase the homogeneity of the final stem cell products. We have previously developed an alternative isolation and culture protocol for establishing a population of clonal MSCs (cMSCs) from single colony forming unit (CFU)-derived colonies. In this study, we established a good manufacturing practice (GMP)-compatible procedure for the clinical-grade production of human bone marrow-derived cMSCs based on the subfractionation culturing method. We optimized the culture procedures to expand and obtain a clonal population of final MSC products from single CFU-derived colonies in a GMP facility. The characterization results of the final cMSC products met our preset criteria. Animal toxicity tests were performed in a good laboratory practice facility, and showed no toxicity or tumor formation in vivo. These tests include single injection toxicity, multiple injection toxicity, biodistribution analysis, and tumorigenicity tests in vivo. No chromosomal abnormalities were detected by in situ karyotyping using oligo-fluorescence in situ hydridization (oligo-FISH), providing evidence of genetic stability of the clinical-grade cMSC products. The manufacture and quality control results indicated that our GMP methodology could produce sufficient clonal population of MSC products from a small amount of bone marrow aspirate to treat a number of patients. PMID:26421757

  8. Quantification of Fusarium solani f. sp. glycines isolates in soybean roots by colony-forming unit assays and real-time quantitative PCR.

    PubMed

    Li, S; Hartman, G L; Domier, L L; Boykin, D

    2008-08-01

    Fusarium solani f. sp. glycines (FSG; syn. F. virguliforme Akoi, O'Donnell, Homma & Lattanzi) is a soil-borne fungus that infects soybean roots and causes sudden death syndrome (SDS), a widespread and destructive soybean disease. The goal of this study was to develop and use a real-time quantitative polymerase chain reaction (QPCR) assay to compare the accumulation of genomic DNA among 30 FSG isolates in inoculated soybean roots. Isolates differed significantly (P < or = 0.05) in their DNA accumulation on a susceptible soybean cultivar when detected and quantified using a FSG-specific probe/primers set derived from the sequences of the nuclear-encoded, mitochondrial small subunit ribosomal RNA gene. QPCR results that were normalized as the fold change over the sample collection times after inoculation were significantly (P < or = 0.001) correlated with the log(10) transformed colony-forming unit (CFU) values of FSG obtained from plating of inoculated ground roots on FSG semi-selective agar medium. Several isolates were identified that accumulated more FSG DNA and had higher CFU values than the reference isolate FSG1 (Mont-1). Compared to other isolates, FSG5 was the most aggressive root colonizer based on DNA accumulation and CFU values in infested roots. The described QPCR assay should provide more specificity, greater sensitivity, and less variability than alternatives to the culturing-dependent and time-consuming plating assays. Evaluation of isolate relative DNA differences on host plants using the QPCR approach provides useful information for evaluating isolates based on the extent and/or degree of colonization on soybean roots and for selecting isolates for breeding SDS-resistant soybean lines. PMID:18461301

  9. Sox9 is a β-catenin-regulated transcription factor that enhances the colony-forming activity of squamous cell carcinoma cells.

    PubMed

    Li, Xue Mei; Piao, Yong Jun; Sohn, Kyung-Cheol; Ha, Jeong-Min; Im, Myung; Seo, Young-Joon; Whang, Kyu Uang; Lee, Jeung-Hoon; Lee, Young; Kim, Chang Deok

    2016-07-01

    Squamous cell carcinoma (SCC) is a common skin cancer, of which the incidence is relatively high, ranking second among the non‑melanoma skin cancers. It is known that numerous intracellular signal regulators are involved in the pathogenesis of SCC. The Wnt/β-catenin signaling pathway serves an important role in cancer development. However, the downstream effectors of β‑catenin remain to be clearly elucidated yet. The present study investigated the functional importance of Wnt/β‑catenin signaling in cutaneous SCC. β‑catenin expression was reduced using recombinant adenovirus expressing specific microRNA (miR). Knockdown of β‑catenin resulted in a marked reduction of the colony-forming activity of the SCC cells, SCC12. In an attempt to identify the β‑catenin downstream genes, it was found that Sox9 was regulated by β‑catenin in SCC12 cells. Overexpression of a constitutively active form of β‑catenin led to the induction of Sox9, while knockdown of β‑catenin resulted in downregulation of Sox9. When the expression of Sox9 was reduced using specific miR, colony-forming activity of the SCC12 cells was significantly reduced. When Sox9 was overexpressed in cells where β‑catenin was knocked down, it partially restored the colony‑forming potential. Taken together, the present results suggested that Sox9 is a β-catenin downstream transcription factor and is positively involved in SCC development. PMID:27151141

  10. A motif within the N-terminal domain of TSP-1 specifically promotes the proangiogenic activity of endothelial colony-forming cells.

    PubMed

    Dias, Juliana Vieira; Benslimane-Ahmim, Zahia; Egot, Marion; Lokajczyk, Anna; Grelac, Françoise; Galy-Fauroux, Isabelle; Juliano, Luiz; Le-Bonniec, Bernard; Takiya, Cristina Maeda; Fischer, Anne-Marie; Blanc-Brude, Olivier; Morandi, Verônica; Boisson-Vidal, Catherine

    2012-10-15

    Thrombospondin-1 (TSP-1) gives rise to fragments that have both pro- and anti-angiogenic effects in vitro and in vivo. The TSP-HepI peptide (2.3 kDa), located in the N-terminal domain of TSP-1, has proangiogenic effects on endothelial cells. We have previously shown that TSP-1 itself exhibits a dual effect on endothelial colony-forming cells (ECFC) by enhancing their adhesion through its TSP-HepI fragment while reducing their proliferation and differentiation into vascular tubes (tubulogenesis) in vitro. This effect is likely mediated through CD47 binding to the TSP-1 C-terminal domain. Here we investigated the effect of TSP-HepI peptide on the angiogenic properties of ECFC in vitro and in vivo. TSP-HepI peptide potentiated FGF-2-induced neovascularisation by enhancing ECFC chemotaxis and tubulogenesis in a Matrigel plug assay. ECFC exposure to 20 μg/mL of TSP-HepI peptide for 18 h enhanced cell migration (p < 0.001 versus VEGF exposure), upregulated alpha 6-integrin expression, and enhanced their cell adhesion to activated endothelium under physiological shear stress conditions at levels comparable to those of SDF-1α. The adhesion enhancement appeared to be mediated by the heparan sulfate proteoglycan (HSPG) syndecan-4, as ECFC adhesion was significantly reduced by a syndecan-4-neutralising antibody. ECFC migration and tubulogenesis were stimulated neither by a TSP-HepI peptide with a modified heparin-binding site (S/TSP-HepI) nor when the glycosaminoglycans (GAGs) moieties were removed from the ECFC surface by enzymatic treatment. Ex vivo TSP-HepI priming could potentially serve to enhance the effectiveness of therapeutic neovascularisation with ECFC. PMID:22796565

  11. Monoclonal origin of B lymphocyte colony-forming cells in spleen colonies formed by multipotential hemopoietic stem cells

    PubMed Central

    Lala, PK; Johnson, GR

    1978-01-01

    Spleen colonies produced by transplanting lethally irradiated mice with either 12 day fetal liver or adult bone marrow cells were found to contain B- lymphocyte colony-forming cells (BL-CFC) . The proportion of BL-CFC positive spleen colonies did not increase substantially between 8 and 14 days after transplantation, the range being 18-45 percent. However, the absolute number of BL-CFC per spleen colony varied considerably (between 1 and 10,318), although the majority of colonies contained less than 200 BL-CFC. Irrespective of the time after transplantation, smaller spleen colonies were found to have a higher frequency of BL-CFC than larger spleen colonies. To determine the possible clonal origin of BL-CFC from spleen colony- forming unit (CFU-S), CBA mice were injected with equal numbers of CBA and CBA T(6)/T(6) fetal liver or adult bone marrow cells. Analysis of 7-15-day spleen colonies demonstrated that 90 percent were either exclusively T(6) positive or T(6) negative and approximately equal numbers ofboth colony types were observed. B-lymphocyte colonies were grown and successfully karyotyped from 19 spleen colonies. When compared with the original spleen colony karyotype the B-lymphocyte colony cells karyotype was identical in all 19 cases. In 3 of the 19 colonies analyzed a mixture of T(6) positive and T(6) negative karyotypes was present and identical proportions of the karyotypes were present in the pooled B-lymphocyte colony cells and spleen colony cells. The data indicate that the B-lymphocyte colony-forming cells detected in spleen colonies are genuine members of the hemopoietic clone derived from the initiating hemopoietic stem cell (CFU-S). PMID:309918

  12. Translucent Colony Form of the Gram-Negative, Levan-Producing Bacterium, Aerobacter levanicum

    PubMed Central

    Takeshita, Masaru

    1973-01-01

    A spontaneously occurring variation of Aerobacter levanicum, affecting the appearance of colonies on sucrose agar (opaque to translucent colony form), has been observed and studied. This appears to be a mutation that is accompanied by a significant increase in levansucrase (EC 2.4.1.10) activity, in levan production, and by a change in some of the properties of levansucrase. PMID:4745425

  13. Application of a human tumor colony-forming assay to new drug screening.

    PubMed

    Shoemaker, R H; Wolpert-DeFilippes, M K; Kern, D H; Lieber, M M; Makuch, R W; Melnick, N R; Miller, W T; Salmon, S E; Simon, R M; Venditti, J M

    1985-05-01

    The applicability of a human tumor colony-forming assay to drug screening was investigated in terms of feasibility, validity, and potential for discovering new antitumor drugs. Feasibility was addressed in a pilot study during which basic methods, appropriate assay quality controls, and a standardized protocol for screening were developed. Considerable variability was noted in the availability and colony growth of different tumor types. The majority of the evaluable experiments utilized breast, colorectal, kidney, lung, melanoma, or ovarian tumors. For many tumor types, little evidence of growth was observed, or only rare specimens formed colonies. Colony-forming efficiencies ranged from 0.05 to 0.11% for the six most useful tumors listed above. A set of quality control measures was developed to address technical problems inherent in the assay. Testing of standard agents in the pilot study established that most of these agents could be detected as active. However, it also identified three assay limitations: compounds requiring systemic metabolic activation are inactive; medium constituents may block the activity of certain antimetabolites; and compounds without therapeutic efficacy may be positive in the assay. The assay categorized nontoxic clinically ineffective agents as true negatives with 97% accuracy. Of 79 compounds which were negative in the current National Cancer Institute prescreen (leukemia P388), 14 were active in the assay. Several demonstrated outstanding in vitro activity and are structurally unrelated to compounds already in development or in clinical trials. A subset of these active compounds were found to lack activity in a P388 in vitro colony-forming assay. This indication of differential cytotoxicity to human tumor cells makes this subset of compounds particularly interesting as antitumor drug leads. The demonstrated sensitivity to most standard agents, discrimination of nontoxic compounds, reproducibility of survival values within assays and

  14. Exercise-induced norepinephrine decreases circulating hematopoietic stem and progenitor cell colony-forming capacity.

    PubMed

    Kröpfl, Julia M; Stelzer, Ingeborg; Mangge, Harald; Pekovits, Karin; Fuchs, Robert; Allard, Nathalie; Schinagl, Lukas; Hofmann, Peter; Dohr, Gottfried; Wallner-Liebmann, Sandra; Domej, Wolfgang; Müller, Wolfram

    2014-01-01

    A recent study showed that ergometry increased circulating hematopoietic stem and progenitor cell (CPC) numbers, but reduced hematopoietic colony forming capacity/functionality under normoxia and normobaric hypoxia. Herein we investigated whether an exercise-induced elevated plasma free/bound norepinephrine (NE) concentration could be responsible for directly influencing CPC functionality. Venous blood was taken from ten healthy male subjects (25.3+/-4.4 yrs) before and 4 times after ergometry under normoxia and normobaric hypoxia (FiO2<0.15). The circulating hematopoietic stem and progenitor cell numbers were correlated with free/bound NE, free/bound epinephrine (EPI), cortisol (Co) and interleukin-6 (IL-6). Additionally, the influence of exercise-induced NE and blood lactate (La) on CPC functionality was analyzed in a randomly selected group of subjects (n = 6) in vitro under normoxia by secondary colony-forming unit granulocyte macrophage assays. Concentrations of free NE, EPI, Co and IL-6 were significantly increased post-exercise under normoxia/hypoxia. Ergometry-induced free NE concentrations found in vivo showed a significant impairment of CPC functionality in vitro under normoxia. Thus, ergometry-induced free NE was thought to trigger CPC mobilization 10 minutes post-exercise, but as previously shown impairs CPC proliferative capacity/functionality at the same time. The obtained results suggest that an ergometry-induced free NE concentration has a direct negative effect on CPC functionality. Cortisol may further influence CPC dynamics and functionality. PMID:25180783

  15. Exercise-Induced Norepinephrine Decreases Circulating Hematopoietic Stem and Progenitor Cell Colony-Forming Capacity

    PubMed Central

    Mangge, Harald; Pekovits, Karin; Fuchs, Robert; Allard, Nathalie; Schinagl, Lukas; Hofmann, Peter; Dohr, Gottfried; Wallner-Liebmann, Sandra; Domej, Wolfgang; Müller, Wolfram

    2014-01-01

    A recent study showed that ergometry increased circulating hematopoietic stem and progenitor cell (CPC) numbers, but reduced hematopoietic colony forming capacity/functionality under normoxia and normobaric hypoxia. Herein we investigated whether an exercise-induced elevated plasma free/bound norepinephrine (NE) concentration could be responsible for directly influencing CPC functionality. Venous blood was taken from ten healthy male subjects (25.3+/−4.4 yrs) before and 4 times after ergometry under normoxia and normobaric hypoxia (FiO2<0.15). The circulating hematopoietic stem and progenitor cell numbers were correlated with free/bound NE, free/bound epinephrine (EPI), cortisol (Co) and interleukin-6 (IL-6). Additionally, the influence of exercise-induced NE and blood lactate (La) on CPC functionality was analyzed in a randomly selected group of subjects (n = 6) in vitro under normoxia by secondary colony-forming unit granulocyte macrophage assays. Concentrations of free NE, EPI, Co and IL-6 were significantly increased post-exercise under normoxia/hypoxia. Ergometry-induced free NE concentrations found in vivo showed a significant impairment of CPC functionality in vitro under normoxia. Thus, ergometry-induced free NE was thought to trigger CPC mobilization 10 minutes post-exercise, but as previously shown impairs CPC proliferative capacity/functionality at the same time. The obtained results suggest that an ergometry-induced free NE concentration has a direct negative effect on CPC functionality. Cortisol may further influence CPC dynamics and functionality. PMID:25180783

  16. Peptidoglycolipid nature of the superficial cell wall sheath of smooth-colony-forming mycobacteria.

    PubMed Central

    Barrow, W W; Ullom, B P; Brennan, P J

    1980-01-01

    The most superficial cell wall layer present in smooth-colony-forming mycobacteria was isolated from serovar 20 of the Mycobacterium avium-Mycobacterium intracellulare-Mycobacterium scrofulaceum (MAIS) serocomplex and examined chemically and by electron microscopy. Most (70 to 80%) of the fibrillar material consisted of an array of serologically active, acetylated C-myosidic peptidoglycoplipids with the basic structure (formula, see text) but in which the location of acetyl groups and the arrangement of monosaccharides have not been defined. Apparently, all serovars within the MAIS complex are characterized by structurally related superficies in which the monoglycosyl-lipopeptide portion is invariable but the oligosaccharide attachment is peculiar to each serovar. These unique inert structures may be an important factor in shielding the pathogen within phagolysosomes from lysosomal enzymes. Images PMID:7430072

  17. Identification and enrichment of colony-forming cells from the adult murine pituitary

    SciTech Connect

    Lepore, D.A.; Roeszler, K.; Wagner, J.; Ross, S.A.; Bauer, K.; Thomas, P.Q. , E-Mail: paul.thomas@mcri.edu.au

    2005-08-01

    Stem and progenitor cells have been identified in many adult tissues including bone marrow, the central nervous system, and skin. While there is direct evidence to indicate the activity of a progenitor cell population in the pituitary gland, this putative subpopulation has not yet been identified. Herein we describe the isolation and characterization of a novel clonogenic cell type in the adult murine pituitary, which we have termed Pituitary Colony-Forming Cells (PCFCs). PCFCs constitute 0.2% of pituitary cells, and generate heterogeneous colonies from single cells. PCFCs exhibit variable proliferative potential, and may exceed 11 population doublings in 14 days. Enrichment of PCFCs to 61.5-fold with 100% recovery can be obtained through the active uptake of the fluorescent dipeptide, {beta}-Ala-Lys-N{epsilon}-AMCA. PCFCs are mostly contained within the large, agranular subpopulation of AMCA{sup +} cells, and constitute 28% of this fraction, corresponding to 140.5-fold enrichment. Interestingly, the AMCA{sup +} population contains rare cells that are GH{sup +} or PRL{sup +}. GH{sup +} cells were also identified in PCFC single cell colonies, suggesting that PCFCs have the potential to differentiate into GH{sup +} cells. Together, these data show that the pituitary contains a rare clonogenic population which may correspond to the somatotrope/lactotrope progenitors suggested by previous experiments.

  18. Endoplasmic Reticulum Ca(2+) Handling and Apoptotic Resistance in Tumor-Derived Endothelial Colony Forming Cells.

    PubMed

    Poletto, Valentina; Dragoni, Silvia; Lim, Dmitry; Biggiogera, Marco; Aronica, Adele; Cinelli, Mariapia; De Luca, Antonio; Rosti, Vittorio; Porta, Camillo; Guerra, Germano; Moccia, Francesco

    2016-10-01

    Truly endothelial progenitor cells (EPCs) can be mobilized from bone marrow to support the vascular network of growing tumors, thereby sustaining the metastatic switch. Endothelial colony forming cells (ECFCs) are the only EPC subtype belonging to the endothelial phenotype and capable of incorporating within neovessels. The intracellular Ca(2+) machinery plays a key role in ECFC activation and is remodeled in renal cellular carcinoma-derived ECFCs (RCC-ECFCs). Particularly, RCC-ECFCs seems to undergo a drop in endoplasmic reticulum (ER) Ca(2+) concentration ([Ca(2+) ]ER ). This feature is remarkable when considering that inositol-1,4,5-trisphosphate (InsP3 )-dependent ER-to-mitochondria Ca(2+) transfer regulates the intrinsic apoptosis pathway. Herein, we sought to assess whether: (1) the [Ca(2+) ]ER and the InsP3 -induced ER-mitochondria Ca(2+) shuttle are reduced in RCC-ECFCs; and (2) the dysregulation of ER Ca(2+) handling leads to apoptosis resistance in tumor-derived cells. RCC-ECFCs displayed a reduction both in [Ca(2+) ]ER and in the InsP3 -dependent mitochondrial Ca(2+) uptake, while they expressed normal levels of Bcl-2 and Bak. The decrease in [Ca(2+) ]ER was associated to a remarkable ER expansion in RCC-ECFCs, which is a hallmark of ER stress, and did not depend on the remodeling of the Ca(2+) -transporting and the ER Ca(2+) -storing systems. As expected, RCC-ECFCs were less sensitive to rapamycin- and thapsigargin-induced apoptosis; however, buffering intracellular Ca(2+) levels with BAPTA dampened apoptosis in both cell types. Finally, store-operated Ca(2+) entry was seemingly uncoupled from the apoptotic machinery in RCC-ECFCs. Thus, the chronic underfilling of the ER Ca(2+) pool could confer a survival advantage to RCC-ECFCs and underpin RCC resistance to pharmacological treatment. J. Cell. Biochem. 117: 2260-2271, 2016. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:26917354

  19. The isolation and culture of endothelial colony-forming cells from human and rat lungs.

    PubMed

    Alphonse, Rajesh S; Vadivel, Arul; Zhong, Shumei; Zong, Shumei; McConaghy, Suzanne; Ohls, Robin; Yoder, Mervin C; Thébaud, Bernard

    2015-11-01

    Blood vessels are crucial for the normal development, lifelong repair and homeostasis of tissues. Recently, vascular progenitor cell-driven 'postnatal vasculogenesis' has been suggested as an important mechanism that contributes to new blood vessel formation and organ repair. Among several described progenitor cell types that contribute to blood vessel formation, endothelial colony-forming cells (ECFCs) have received widespread attention as lineage-specific 'true' vascular progenitors. Here we describe a protocol for the isolation of pulmonary microvascular ECFCs from human and rat lung tissue. Our technique takes advantage of an earlier protocol for the isolation of circulating ECFCs from the mononuclear cellular fraction of peripheral blood. We adapted the earlier protocol to isolate resident ECFCs from the distal lung tissue. After enzymatic dispersion of rat or human lung samples into a cellular suspension, CD31-expressing cells are positively selected using magnetic-activated cell sorting and plated in endothelial-specific growth conditions. The colonies arising after 1-2 weeks in culture are carefully separated and expanded to yield pure ECFC cultures after a further 2-3 weeks. The resulting cells demonstrate the defining characteristics of ECFCs such as (i) 'cobblestone' morphology of cultured cell monolayers; (ii) acetylated low-density lipoprotein uptake and Ulex europaeus lectin binding; (iii) tube-like network formation in Matrigel; (iv) expression of endothelial cell-specific surface markers and the absence of hematopoietic or myeloid surface antigens; (v) self-renewal potential displayed by the most proliferative cells; and (vi) contribution to de novo vessel formation in an in vivo mouse implant model. Assuming typical initial cell adhesion and proliferation rates, the entire procedure can be completed within 4 weeks. Isolation and culture of lung vascular ECFCs will allow assessment of the functional state of these cells in experimental and human

  20. Proliferation and colony-forming ability of peritoneal exudate cells in liquid culture.

    PubMed

    Stewart, C C; Lin, H S; Adles, C

    1975-05-01

    Peritoneal exudate cells, obtained from mice injected with thioglycollate medium and cultured in medium containing L-cell-conditioned medium, will proliferate in an exponential fashion for 18 days with a doubling time of 68 h. After a 2 h pulse of tritiated thymidine, labeled adherent cells increased to a maximum of 22-34% during the 1st and 2nd wk of culture. Increasing the cell concentration from 2 times 10-3 to 2 times 10-5 cells/culture reduced exponential growth to 10 days and the doubling time was increased to 81.6 h. Under these culture conditions, peritoneal exudate cells were shown to form colonies on the surface of culture dishes when plated at low density. The cells within the colony were shown to be macrophages using yeast and antibody-coated sheep erythrocytes as a test for phagocytic function. The plating efficiolonies arose from a single precursor cell. The adherent cell population contains the colony-forming precursors. These precursors can be stimulated to form colonies for at least 2 wk by the addition of conditioned medium to cultures at various times after plating. While very few colony-forming cells could be demonstrated in the unstimulated peritoneal lavage, their numbers begin to increase in the exudate 4 h after injection of thioglycollate medium and reach a maximum by day 3 and then decrease. Isolated colonies may be useful in studying the function of macrophages. PMID:1092793

  1. Cooperation between human fibrocytes and endothelial colony forming cells increases angiogenesis via CXCR4 pathway

    PubMed Central

    Smadja, David M.; Dorfmüller, Peter; Bieche, Ivan; Guerin, Coralie; Badoual, Cécile; Boscolo, Elisa; Kambouchner, Marianne; Cazes, Aurélie; Mercier, Olaf; Humbert, Marc; Gaussem, Pascale; Bischoff, Joyce; Israël-Biet, Dominique

    2016-01-01

    Background Fibrotic diseases of the lung are associated with a vascular remodeling process. Fibrocytes (Fy) are a distinct population of blood-borne cells that coexpress hematopoietic cell antigens and fibroblast markers, which have been shown to contribute to organ fibrosis. The purpose of this study was to test the hypothesis that Fy might cooperate with endothelial colony forming cells to induce angiogenesis. Methods/Results We successfully isolated Fy from blood of idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis (IPF) patients, which were further characterized by flow cytometry, Reverse Transcriptase quantitative-PCR (RTQ-PCR), and confocal analysis. We investigated the interaction between Fy and cord blood derived endothelial colony forming cells (ECFC) angiogenic potential in vitro and in vivo in a Matrigel implant model. Compared to fibroblast culture media, secreted media from Fy increase ECFC proliferation and their differentiation ability via SDF-1/CXCR4 pathway. IPF-Fy co-implanted with human ECFC in a matrigel plug in immunodeficient mice formed functional microvascular beds, whereas fibroblasts did not. Evaluation of implants after 2 weeks revealed an extensive network of blood vessels containing erythrocytes. CXCR4 blockade significantly inhibited blood vessel formation in the implants. The clinical relevance of these data was confirmed by the high expression level of CXCR4 in vessels close to fibrotic areas in biopsy specimens from patients with IPF, in contrast to control lungs. Conclusions Circulating Fy might be contribute to the intense remodeling of the pulmonary vasculature in patients with IPF. PMID:25103869

  2. Breakdown of coral colonial form under reduced pH conditions is initiated in polyps and mediated through apoptosis.

    PubMed

    Kvitt, Hagit; Kramarsky-Winter, Esti; Maor-Landaw, Keren; Zandbank, Keren; Kushmaro, Ariel; Rosenfeld, Hanna; Fine, Maoz; Tchernov, Dan

    2015-02-17

    Certain stony corals can alternate between a calcifying colonial form and noncalcifying solitary polyps, supporting the hypothesis that corals have survived through geologic timescale periods of unfavorable calcification conditions. However, the mechanisms enabling this biological plasticity are yet to be identified. Here we show that incubation of two coral species (Pocillopora damicornis and Oculina patagonica) under reduced pH conditions (pH 7.2) simulating past ocean acidification induce tissue-specific apoptosis that leads to the dissociation of polyps from coenosarcs. This in turn leads to the breakdown of the coenosarc and, as a consequence, to loss of coloniality. Our data show that apoptosis is initiated in the polyps and that once dissociation between polyp and coenosarc terminates, apoptosis subsides. After reexposure of the resulting solitary polyps to normal pH (pH 8.2), both coral species regenerated coenosarc tissues and resumed calcification. These results indicate that regulation of coloniality is under the control of the polyp, the basic modular unit of the colony. A mechanistic explanation for several key evolutionarily important phenomena that occurred throughout coral evolution is proposed, including mechanisms that permitted species to survive the third tier of mass extinctions. PMID:25646434

  3. Breakdown of coral colonial form under reduced pH conditions is initiated in polyps and mediated through apoptosis

    PubMed Central

    Kvitt, Hagit; Kramarsky-Winter, Esti; Maor-Landaw, Keren; Zandbank, Keren; Kushmaro, Ariel; Rosenfeld, Hanna; Fine, Maoz; Tchernov, Dan

    2015-01-01

    Certain stony corals can alternate between a calcifying colonial form and noncalcifying solitary polyps, supporting the hypothesis that corals have survived through geologic timescale periods of unfavorable calcification conditions. However, the mechanisms enabling this biological plasticity are yet to be identified. Here we show that incubation of two coral species (Pocillopora damicornis and Oculina patagonica) under reduced pH conditions (pH 7.2) simulating past ocean acidification induce tissue-specific apoptosis that leads to the dissociation of polyps from coenosarcs. This in turn leads to the breakdown of the coenosarc and, as a consequence, to loss of coloniality. Our data show that apoptosis is initiated in the polyps and that once dissociation between polyp and coenosarc terminates, apoptosis subsides. After reexposure of the resulting solitary polyps to normal pH (pH 8.2), both coral species regenerated coenosarc tissues and resumed calcification. These results indicate that regulation of coloniality is under the control of the polyp, the basic modular unit of the colony. A mechanistic explanation for several key evolutionarily important phenomena that occurred throughout coral evolution is proposed, including mechanisms that permitted species to survive the third tier of mass extinctions. PMID:25646434

  4. Ageing and colony-forming efficiency of human hair follicle keratinocytes.

    PubMed

    Lecardonnel, Jennifer; Deshayes, Nathalie; Genty, Gaïanne; Parent, Nathalie; Bernard, Bruno A; Rathman-Josserand, Michelle; Paris, Maryline

    2013-09-01

    The decline of tissue regenerative potential of skin and hair is a hallmark of physiological ageing and may be associated with age-related changes in tissue-specific stem cells and/or their environment. Human hair follicles (hHF) contain keratinocytes having the property of stem cells such as clonogenic potential. Growth capacity of hHF keratinocytes shows that most of the colony-forming cells are classified as holoclones, meroclones or paraclones when analysed in a clonal assay (Cell, Volume 76, page 1063). Despite the well-known impact of ageing on human hair growth, little is known about changes in hHF keratinocyte clonogenic potential with age. This study aimed at assessing the clone-forming efficiency (CFE) of hHF keratinocytes from three age groups of human donors. It demonstrates that ageing affects hHF keratinocyte CFE. PMID:23947676

  5. Enhanced Viability of Endothelial Colony Forming Cells in Fibrin Microbeads for Sensor Vascularization

    PubMed Central

    Gandhi, Jarel K.; Zivkovic, Lada; Fisher, John P.; Yoder, Mervin C.; Brey, Eric M.

    2015-01-01

    Enhanced vascularization at sensor interfaces can improve long-term function. Fibrin, a natural polymer, has shown promise as a biomaterial for sensor coating due to its ability to sustain endothelial cell growth and promote local vascularization. However, the culture of cells, particularly endothelial cells (EC), within 3D scaffolds for more than a few days is challenging due to rapid loss of EC viability. In this manuscript, a robust method for developing fibrin microbead scaffolds for long-term culture of encapsulated ECs is described. Fibrin microbeads are formed using sodium alginate as a structural template. The size, swelling and structural properties of the microbeads were varied with needle gauge and composition and concentration of the pre-gel solution. Endothelial colony-forming cells (ECFCs) were suspended in the fibrin beads and cultured within a perfusion bioreactor system. The perfusion bioreactor enhanced ECFCs viability and genome stability in fibrin beads relative to static culture. Perfusion bioreactors enable 3D culture of ECs within fibrin beads for potential application as a sensor coating. PMID:26393602

  6. Decreased level of cord blood circulating endothelial colony-forming cells in preeclampsia.

    PubMed

    Muñoz-Hernandez, Rocio; Miranda, Maria L; Stiefel, Pablo; Lin, Ruei-Zeng; Praena-Fernández, Juan M; Dominguez-Simeon, Maria J; Villar, Jose; Moreno-Luna, Rafael; Melero-Martin, Juan M

    2014-07-01

    Preeclampsia is a pregnancy-related disorder associated with increased cardiovascular risk for the offspring. Endothelial colony-forming cells (ECFCs) are a subset of circulating endothelial progenitor cells that participate in the formation of vasculature during development. However, the effect of preeclampsia on fetal levels of ECFCs is largely unknown. In this study, we sought to determine whether cord blood ECFC abundance and function are altered in preeclampsia. We conducted a prospective cohort study that included women with normal (n=35) and preeclamptic (n=15) pregnancies. We measured ECFC levels in the umbilical cord blood of neonates and characterized ECFC phenotype, cloning-forming ability, proliferation, and migration toward vascular endothelial growth factor-A and fibroblast growth factor-2, in vitro formation of capillary-like structures, and in vivo vasculogenic ability in immunodeficient mice. We found that the level of cord blood ECFCs was statistically lower in preeclampsia than in control pregnancies (P=0.04), a reduction that was independent of other obstetric factors. In addition, cord blood ECFCs from preeclamptic pregnancies required more time to emerge in culture than control ECFCs. However, once derived in culture, ECFC function was deemed normal and highly similar between preeclampsia and control, including the ability to form vascular networks in vivo. This study demonstrates that preeclampsia affects ECFC abundance in neonates. A reduced level of ECFCs during preeclamptic pregnancies may contribute to an increased risk of developing future cardiovascular events. PMID:24752434

  7. DECREASED LEVEL OF CORD BLOOD CIRCULATING ENDOTHELIAL COLONY-FORMING CELLS IN PREECLAMPSIA

    PubMed Central

    Muñoz-Hernandez, Rocio; Miranda, Maria L.; Stiefel, Pablo; Lin, Ruei-Zeng; Praena-Fernández, Juan M.; Dominguez-Simeon, Maria J.; Villar, Jose; Moreno-Luna, Rafael; Melero-Martin, Juan M.

    2014-01-01

    Preeclampsia is a pregnancy-related disorder associated with increased cardiovascular risk for the offspring. Endothelial colony-forming cells (ECFCs) are a subset of circulating endothelial progenitor cells that participate in the formation of vasculature during development. However, the effect of preeclampsia on fetal levels of ECFCs is largely unknown. In this study, we sought to determine whether cord blood ECFC abundance and function are altered in preeclampsia. We conducted a prospective cohort study that included women with normal (n=35) and preeclamptic (n=15) pregnancies. We measured ECFC levels in the umbilical cord blood of neonates and characterized ECFC phenotype, cloning-forming ability, proliferation and migration towards VEGF-A and FGF-2, in vitro formation of capillary-like structures, and in vivo vasculogenic ability in immunodeficient mice. We found that the level of cord blood ECFCs was statistically lower in preeclampsia than in control pregnancies (P = .04), a reduction that was independent of other obstetric factors. In addition, cord blood ECFCs from preeclamptic pregnancies required more time to emerge in culture than control ECFCs. However, once derived in culture, ECFC function was deemed normal and highly similar between preeclampsia and control, including the ability to form vascular networks in vivo. This study demonstrates that preeclampsia affects ECFC abundance in neonates. A reduced level of ECFCs during preeclamptic pregnancies may contribute to an increased risk of developing future cardiovascular events. PMID:24752434

  8. Maternal Body-Mass Index and Cord Blood Circulating Endothelial Colony-Forming Cells

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Ruei-Zeng; Miranda, Maria L.; Vallejo-Vaz, Antonio J.; Stiefel, Pablo; Praena-Fernández, Juan M.; Bernal-Bermejo, Jose; Jimenez-Jimenez, Luis M.; Villar, Jose; Melero-Martin, Juan M.

    2013-01-01

    Objective Endothelial colony-forming cells (ECFCs) are a subset of circulating endothelial progenitor cells that are particularly abundant in umbilical cord blood. We sought to determine whether ECFC abundance in cord blood is associated with maternal body-mass index (BMI) in non-pathological pregnancies. Study design We measured the level of ECFCs in the cord blood of neonates (n=27) born from non-obese healthy mothers with non-pathological pregnancies and examined whether ECFC abundance correlated with maternal BMI. We also examined the effect of maternal BMI on ECFC phenotype and function using angiogenic and vasculogenic assays. Results We observed variation in ECFC abundance among subjects and found a positive correlation between pre-pregnancy maternal BMI and ECFC content (r=0.51, P=0.007), which was independent of other obstetric factors. Despite this variation, ECFC phenotype and functionality were deemed normal and highly similar between subjects with maternal BMI <25 kg/m2 and BMI between 25–30 kg/m2, including the ability to form vascular networks in vivo. Conclusions This study underlines the need to consider maternal BMI as a potential confounding factor for cord blood levels of ECFCs in future comparative studies between healthy and pathological pregnancies. Endothelial colony-forming cells (ECFCs) are a subset of progenitor cells that circulate in peripheral blood and can give rise to endothelial cells (1,2), contributing to the formation of new vasculature and the maintenance of vascular integrity (3–5). The mechanisms that regulate the abundance of these cells in vivo remain poorly understood. ECFCs are rare in adult peripheral blood (1,2,10). In contrast, there is an elevated number of these cells in fetal blood during the third trimester of pregnancy (11–13). Emerging evidence indicates that deleterious conditions during fetal life can impair ECFC content and function. For instance, offspring of diabetic mothers have been shown to have

  9. Bioluminescence imaging of transplanted human endothelial colony-forming cells in an ischemic mouse model.

    PubMed

    Ding, Jie; Zhao, Zhen; Wang, Chao; Wang, Cong-Xiao; Li, Pei-Cheng; Qian, Cheng; Teng, Gao-Jun

    2016-07-01

    Ischemic strokes are devastating events responsible for high mortality and morbidity worldwide each year. Endothelial colony-forming cell (ECFC) therapy holds promise for stroke treatment; however, grafted ECFCs need to be monitored better understand their biological behavior in vivo, so as to evaluate their safety and successful delivery. The objectives of this study are to visualize the fate of infused human cord blood derived ECFCs via bioluminescence imaging (BLI) in an ischemic stroke mouse model and to determine the therapeutic effects of ECFC transplantation. ECFCs derived from human umbilical cord blood were infected with lentivirus carrying enhanced green fluorescent protein (eGFP) and firefly luciferase (Luc2) double fusion reporter gene. Labeled ECFCs were grafted into a photothrombotic ischemic stroke mouse model via intra-arterial injection though the left cardiac ventricle. The homing of infused cells and functional recovery of stroke mice were evaluated using BLI, neurological scoring, and immunohistochemistry. Significantly, BLI signals were highest in the brain on day 1 and decreased steadily until day 14. GFP-positive cells were also found surrounding infarct border zones in brain sections using immunohistochemical staining, suggesting that ECFCs properly homed to the ischemic brain tissue. Using a modified neurological severity score assay and histological analysis of brain slices with CD31 immunostaining in brain tissue, double cortin analysis, and the TdT-mediated dUTP nick end labeling (TUNEL) assay, we demonstrated functional restoration, improved angiogenesis, neurogenesis, and decreased apoptosis in ischemic mice after ECFC infusion. Collectively, our data support that ECFCs may be a promising therapeutic agent for stroke. PMID:27038754

  10. Smooth muscle progenitor cells from peripheral blood promote the neovascularization of endothelial colony-forming cells

    SciTech Connect

    Joo, Hyung Joon; Seo, Ha-Rim; Jeong, Hyo Eun; Choi, Seung-Cheol; Park, Jae Hyung; Yu, Cheol Woong; Hong, Soon Jun; Chung, Seok; Lim, Do-Sun

    2014-07-11

    Highlights: • Two distinct vascular progenitor cells are induced from adult peripheral blood. • ECFCs induce vascular structures in vitro and in vivo. • SMPCs augment the in vitro and in vivo angiogenic potential of ECFCs. • Both cell types have synergistic therapeutic potential in ischemic hindlimb model. - Abstract: Proangiogenic cell therapy using autologous progenitors is a promising strategy for treating ischemic disease. Considering that neovascularization is a harmonized cellular process that involves both endothelial cells and vascular smooth muscle cells, peripheral blood-originating endothelial colony-forming cells (ECFCs) and smooth muscle progenitor cells (SMPCs), which are similar to mature endothelial cells and vascular smooth muscle cells, could be attractive cellular candidates to achieve therapeutic neovascularization. We successfully induced populations of two different vascular progenitor cells (ECFCs and SMPCs) from adult peripheral blood. Both progenitor cell types expressed endothelial-specific or smooth muscle-specific genes and markers, respectively. In a protein array focused on angiogenic cytokines, SMPCs demonstrated significantly higher expression of bFGF, EGF, TIMP2, ENA78, and TIMP1 compared to ECFCs. Conditioned medium from SMPCs and co-culture with SMPCs revealed that SMPCs promoted cell proliferation, migration, and the in vitro angiogenesis of ECFCs. Finally, co-transplantation of ECFCs and SMPCs induced robust in vivo neovascularization, as well as improved blood perfusion and tissue repair, in a mouse ischemic hindlimb model. Taken together, we have provided the first evidence of a cell therapy strategy for therapeutic neovascularization using two different types of autologous progenitors (ECFCs and SMPCs) derived from adult peripheral blood.

  11. Biophysical Properties of Scaffolds Modulate Human Blood Vessel Formation from Circulating Endothelial Colony-Forming Cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Critser, Paul J.; Yoder, Mervin C.

    A functional vascular system forms early in development and is continually remodeled throughout the life of the organism. Impairment to the regeneration or repair of this system leads to tissue ischemia, dysfunction, and disease. The process of vascular formation and remodeling is complex, relying on local microenvironmental cues, cytokine signaling, and multiple cell types to function properly. Tissue engineering strategies have attempted to exploit these mechanisms to develop functional vascular networks for the generation of artificial tissues and therapeutic strategies to restore tissue homeostasis. The success of these strategies requires the isolation of appropriate progenitor cell sources which are straightforward to obtain, display high proliferative potential, and demonstrate an ability to form functional vessels. Several populations are of interest including endothelial colony-forming cells, a subpopulation of endothelial progenitor cells. Additionally, the development of scaffolds to deliver and support progenitor cell survival and function is crucial for the formation of functional vascular networks. The composition and biophysical properties of these scaffolds have been shown to modulate endothelial cell behavior and vessel formation. However, further investigation is needed to better understand how these mechanical properties and biophysical properties impact vessel formation. Additionally, several other cell populations are involved in neoangiogenesis and formation of tissue parenchyma and an understanding of the potential impact of these cell populations on the biophysical properties of scaffolds will also be needed to advance these strategies. This chapter examines how the biophysical properties of matrix scaffolds can influence vessel formation and remodeling and, in particular, the impact on in vivo human endothelial progenitor cell vessel formation.

  12. Cord blood-derived endothelial colony-forming cell function is disrupted in congenital diaphragmatic hernia.

    PubMed

    Fujinaga, Hideshi; Fujinaga, Hiroko; Watanabe, Nobuyuki; Kato, Tomoko; Tamano, Moe; Terao, Miho; Takada, Shuji; Ito, Yushi; Umezawa, Akihiro; Kuroda, Masahiko

    2016-06-01

    Vascular growth is necessary for normal lung development. Although endothelial progenitor cells (EPCs) play an important role in vascularization, little is known about EPC function in congenital diaphragmatic hernia (CDH), a severe neonatal condition that is associated with pulmonary hypoplasia. We hypothesized that the function of endothelial colony-forming cells (ECFCs), a type of EPC, is impaired in CDH. Cord blood (CB) was collected from full-term CDH patients and healthy controls. We assessed CB progenitor cell populations as well as plasma vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) and stromal cell-derived factor 1α (SDF1α) levels. CB ECFC clonogenicity; growth kinetics; migration; production of VEGF, SDF1α, and nitric oxide (NO); vasculogenic capacity; and mRNA expression of VEGF-A, fms-related tyrosine kinase 1 (FLT1), kinase insert domain receptor (KDR), nitric oxide synthase (NOS) 1-3, SDF1, and chemokine (C-X-C motif) receptor 4 (CXCR4) were also assessed. Compared with controls, CB ECFCs were decreased in CDH. CDH ECFCs had reduced potential for self-renewal, clonogenicity, proliferation, and migration. Their capacity for NO production was enhanced but their response to VEGF was blunted in CDH ECFCs. In vivo potential for de novo vasculogenesis was reduced in CDH ECFCs. There was no difference in CB plasma VEGF and SDF1α concentrations, VEGF and SDF1α production by ECFCs, and ECFC mRNA expression of VEGF-A, FLT1, KDR, NOS1-3, SDF1, and CXCR4 between CDH and control subjects. In conclusion, CB ECFC function is disrupted in CDH, but these changes may be caused by mechanisms other than alteration of VEGF-NO and SDF1-CXCR4 signaling. PMID:27130531

  13. Update: Influenza Activity - United States.

    PubMed

    Smith, Sophie; Blanton, Lenee; Kniss, Krista; Mustaquim, Desiree; Steffens, Craig; Reed, Carrie; Bramley, Anna; Flannery, Brendan; Fry, Alicia M; Grohskopf, Lisa A; Bresee, Joseph; Wallis, Teresa; Garten, Rebecca; Xu, Xiyan; Elal, Anwar Isa Abd; Gubareva, Larisa; Barnes, John; Wentworth, David E; Burns, Erin; Katz, Jacqueline; Jernigan, Daniel; Brammer, Lynnette

    2015-12-11

    CDC collects, compiles, and analyzes data on influenza activity year-round in the United States. The influenza season generally begins in the fall and continues through the winter and spring months; however, the timing and severity of circulating influenza viruses can vary by geographic location and season. Influenza activity in the United States remained low through October and November in 2015. Influenza A viruses have been most frequently identified, with influenza A (H3) viruses predominating. This report summarizes U.S. influenza activity for the period October 4-November 28, 2015. PMID:26656182

  14. Hypothalamic proline-rich polypeptide enhances bone marrow colony-forming cell proliferation and stromal progenitor cell differentiation.

    PubMed

    Galoyan, A A; Korochkin, L I; Rybalkina, E J; Pavlova, G V; Saburina, I N; Zaraiski, E I; Galoyan, N A; Davtyan, T K; Bezirganyan, K B; Revishchin, A V

    2008-01-01

    The AGAPEPAEPAQPGVY proline-rich peptide (PRP-1) was isolated from neurosecretory granules of the bovine neurohypophysis; it is produced by N. supraopticus and N. paraventricularis. It has been shown that PRP-1 has many potentially beneficial biological effects, including immunoregulatory, hematopoietic, antimicrobial, and antineurodegenerative properties. Here we showed that PRP increased colony-forming cell (CFC) proliferation in rat bone marrow (BM) cells in vivo. In PRP-treated rat BM, the CFU number at day 7 and day 14 was considerably increased in comparison with untreated rat BM and no difference was found at day 21 and day 28. The related peptide [arg8]vasopressin did not reveal CFC proliferation. PRP failed to farther increase CFC proliferation in vitro in BM obtained from PRP-treated or untreated rats. After 3-4 days of human BM stromal cell cultivation in the presence of 2-20 microg/ml PRP the appearance of cells expressing CD15, CD10, CD11a, CD11b, CD3, CD4, and CD16 surface antigens did not differ from the untreated cells. PRP increased the appearance of CD14-positive cells upon 3-4-day incubation with both adult and fetal BM stromal cells. Our results suggest a previously undescribed role for the hypothalamic peptide within neurosecretory hypothalamus-bone marrow humoral axis, because PRP enhances BM colony-forming cell proliferation and stromal cell differentiation. PMID:19177842

  15. Enumeration of the colony-forming units–fibroblast from mouse and human bone marrow in normal and pathological conditions

    PubMed Central

    Kuznetsov, Sergei A.; Mankani, Mahesh H.; Bianco, Paolo; Robey, Pamela G.

    2009-01-01

    Bone marrow stromal cell populations, containing a subset of multipotential skeletal stem cells, are increasingly contemplated for use in tissue engineering and stem cell therapy, whereas their involvement in the pathogenetic mechanisms of skeletal disorders is far less recognized. We compared the concentrations of stromal clonogenic cells, colony forming units–fibroblast (CFU-Fs), in norm and pathology. Initially, culture conditions were optimized by demonstrating that fetal bovine serum heat inactivation could significantly repress colony formation. Using non-heat-inactivated fetal bovine serum, the concentration of CFU-Fs (colony-forming efficiency, CFE) ranged from 3.5 ± 1.0 to 11.5 ± 4.0 per 1 × 105 nucleated cells in five inbred mouse strains. In four transgenic lines with profound bone involvement, CFE was either significantly reduced or increased compared to wild-type littermates. In normal human donors, CFE decreased slightly with age and averaged 52.2 ± 4.1 for children and 32.3 ± 3.0 for adults. CFE was significantly altered in patients with several skeletal, metabolic, and hematological disorders: reduced in congenital generalized lipodystrophy, achondroplasia (SADDAN), pseudoachondroplasia, and Paget disease of bone and elevated in alcaptonuria and sickle cell anemia. Our findings indicate that under appropriate culture conditions, CFE values may provide useful insights into bone/bone marrow pathophysiology. PMID:19383412

  16. Maturity effects on colony-forming units of Macrophomina phaseolina infection as measured using near-isogenic lines of soybeans

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Charcoal rot (Macrophomina phaseolina) causes significant yield losses in soybean [Glycine max( L.) Merr.] production worldwide. The effect of maturity on the severity of charcoal rot is not well understood mainly because maturity is generally confounded with genotypic background. Therefore, the re...

  17. The effect of LED-light action on microbial colony forming ability of several species of staphylococcus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tuchina, Elena S.; Permyakova, Natalia F.; Tuchin, Valery V.

    2007-05-01

    Photodynamic therapy (PDT) now is widespread for treatment of the various skin infections caused by Propionibacterium acnes or Staphylococcii spp. We used PDT for influence on opportunistic microflora of human skin presented by Staphylococcus hominis, S. warnery, S. epidermidis S. aureus 209 P, S. aureus 69. Species S. epidermidis, S. aureus 209 P, S. hominis to some extent reduced colonies forming ability under action of dual wavelength LED-light (442 nm and 597 nm). For species S. warnery, S. aureus 69 the increase in CFU number under action of light relative to control was characteristic. Our experiments have shown, that phototherapy can be used for treatment of diseases associated with S. aureus 209 P. The doze 8 J/cm2 caused reduction in CFU of this species on 40% relative to control.

  18. Effects of space vacuum and solar ultraviolet irradiation (254 nanometers) on the colony forming ability of Bacillus subtilis spores

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Buecker, H.; Horneck, G.; Wollenhaupt, H.

    1973-01-01

    Bacillus subtilis spores are highly resistant to harsh environments. Therefore, in the Apollo 16 Microbial Response to Space Environment Experiment (M191), these spores were exposed to space vacuum or solar ultraviolet irradiation, or both, to estimate the change of survival for terrestrial organisms in space. The survival of the spores was determined in terms of colony-forming ability. Comparison of the flight results with results of simulation experiments on earth applying high vacuum or ultraviolet irradiation, or both, revealed no remarkable difference. Simultaneous exposure to both these space factors resulted in a synergistic effect (that is, an ultraviolet supersensitivity). Therefore, the change of survival in space is assumed to depend on the degree of protection against solar ultraviolet irradiation.

  19. Intravenous Administration of Endothelial Colony-Forming Cells Overexpressing Integrin β1 Augments Angiogenesis in Ischemic Legs.

    PubMed

    Goto, Kazuko; Takemura, Genzou; Takahashi, Tomoyuki; Okada, Hideshi; Kanamori, Hiromitsu; Kawamura, Itta; Watanabe, Takatomo; Morishita, Kentaro; Tsujimoto, Akiko; Miyazaki, Nagisa; Ushikoshi, Hiroaki; Kawasaki, Masanori; Mikami, Atsushi; Kosai, Ken-ichiro; Minatoguchi, Shinya

    2016-02-01

    When injected directly into ischemic tissue in patients with peripheral artery disease, the reparative capacity of endothelial progenitor cells (EPCs) appears to be limited by their poor survival. We, therefore, attempted to improve the survival of transplanted EPCs through intravenous injection and gene modification. We anticipated that overexpression of integrin β1 will enable injected EPCs to home to ischemic tissue, which abundantly express extracellular matrix proteins, the ligands for integrins. In addition, integrin β1 has an independent angiogenesis-stimulating function. Human endothelial colony-forming cells (ECFCs; late-outgrowth EPCs) were transduced using a lentiviral vector encoding integrin β1 (ITGB1) or enhanced green fluorescent protein (GFP). We then locally or systemically injected phosphate-buffered saline or the genetically modified ECFCs (GFP-ECFCs or ITGB1-ECFCs; 1 × 10(5) cells each) into NOD/Shi-scid, IL-2Rγnull mice whose right femoral arteries had been occluded 24 hours earlier. Upregulation of extracellular matrix proteins, including fibronectin, was apparent in the ischemic legs. Four weeks later, blood perfusion of the ischemic limb was significantly augmented only in the ITGB1-ECFC group. Scanning electron microscopy of vascular casts revealed increases in the perfused blood vessels in the ischemic legs of mice in the ITGB1-ECFC group and significant increases in the density of both capillaries and arterioles. Transplanted ECFC-derived vessels accounted for 28% ± 4.2% of the vessels in the ITGB1-ECFC group, with no cell fusion. Intravenous administration of ECFCs engineered to home to ischemic tissue appears to efficiently mediate therapeutic angiogenesis in a mouse model of peripheral artery disease. Significance: The intravenous administration of endothelial colony-forming cells (ECFCs) genetically modified to overexpress integrin β1 effectively stimulated angiogenesis in ischemic mouse hindlimbs. Transplanted ECFCs were

  20. Identification of a murine high-proliferative-potential colony-forming cell (HPP-CFC) capable of producing a number of megakaryocytes and replating for secondary HPP-CFCs in culture.

    PubMed

    Han, Z C

    1994-04-01

    The high-proliferative-potential colony-forming cell (HPP-CFC) has been shown to be clearly heterogeneous. Hierarchical subpopulations can be identified by analyzing the kinetics of cell regeneration and the specific cellular requirement for cytokines. In this study, a new type of HPP-CFC, termed high-proliferative potential mixed colony-forming unit-megakaryocyte (HPP-mCFU-MK), was detected in murine bone marrow cell cultures. The HPP-mCFU-MK was able to form macroscopic colonies that fit the criteria of the HPP-CFC colony but contained a number of megakaryocytes. Its growth was stimulated by either aplastic anemia serum (AAS) or a combination of three or more recombinant hematopoietic growth factors but was not inhibited by transforming growth factor-beta 1 (TGF-beta 1) and platelet factor 4 (PF4) in vitro. The recloning of the 12-day-old HPP-mCFU-MK colonies picked up from AAS-stimulated primary cultures caused secondary formation of HPP-CFC colonies. These data suggest that HPP-mCFC-MK is a new subset of stem cell characterized by its ability to produce directly a number of megakaryocytes in response to multifactor stimulation, to generate a secondary set of HPP-CFC in replating culture, and to be unaffected by TGF-beta 1 and PF4 treatment. PMID:8145010

  1. Radioprotection of mice with interleukin-1: Relationship to the number of erythroid and granulocyte-macrophage colony-forming cells

    SciTech Connect

    Schwartz, G.N.; Patchen, M.L.; Neta, R.; MacVittie, T.J.

    1990-01-01

    This report presents the results of an investigation of changes in the number of erythroid and granulocyte-macrophage colony forming cells (GM-CFC) that had occurred in tissues of normal B6D2F1 mice 20 h after administration of a radioprotective dose (150 ng) of human recombinant interleukin-1 (rIL-1). Neutrophilia in the peripheral blood and changes in the tissue distribution of GM-CFC demonstrated that cells were mobilized from the bone marrow in response to rIL-1 injection. For example, 20 h after rIL-1 injection marrow GM-CFC numbers were 80% of the numbers in bone marrow from saline-injected mice. Associated with this decrease there was a twofold increase in the number of peripheral blood and splenic GM-CFC. Also, as determined by hydroxyurea injection, there was an increase in the number of GM-CFC in S phase of the cell cycle in the spleen, but not in the bone marrow. Data in this report suggest that when compared to the spleen, stimulation of granulopoiesis after rIL-1 injection is delayed in the bone marrow.

  2. Cooperation between human fibrocytes and endothelial colony-forming cells increases angiogenesis via the CXCR4 pathway.

    PubMed

    Smadja, David M; Dorfmüller, Peter; Guerin, Coralie L; Bieche, Ivan; Badoual, Cécile; Boscolo, Elisa; Kambouchner, Marianne; Cazes, Aurélie; Mercier, Olaf; Humbert, Marc; Gaussem, Pascale; Bischoff, Joyce; Israël-Biet, Dominique

    2014-11-01

    Fibrotic diseases of the lung are associated with a vascular remodelling process. Fibrocytes (Fy) are a distinct population of blood-borne cells that co-express haematopoietic cell antigens and fibroblast markers, and have been shown to contribute to organ fibrosis. The purpose of this study was to determine whether fibrocytes cooperate with endothelial colony-forming cells (ECFC) to induce angiogenesis. We isolated fibrocytes from blood of patient with idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis (IPF) and characterised them by flow cytometry, quantitative reverse transcriptase PCR (RTQ-PCR), and confocal microscopy. We then investigated the angiogenic interaction between fibrocytes and cord-blood-derived ECFC, both in vitro and in an in vivo Matrigel implant model. Compared to fibroblast culture medium, fibrocyte culture medium increased ECFC proliferation and differentiation via the SDF-1/CXCR4 pathway. IPF-Fy co-implanted with human ECFC in Matrigel plugs in immunodeficient mice formed functional microvascular beds, whereas fibroblasts did not. Evaluation of implants after two weeks revealed an extensive network of erythrocyte-containing blood vessels. CXCR4 blockade significantly inhibited this blood vessel formation. The clinical relevance of these data was confirmed by strong CXCR4 expression in vessels close to fibrotic areas in biopsy specimens from patients with IPF, by comparison with control lungs. In conclusion, circulating fibrocytes might contribute to the intense remodelling of the pulmonary vasculature in patients with idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis. PMID:25103869

  3. Microfluidic Capture of Endothelial Colony-Forming Cells from Human Adult Peripheral Blood: Phenotypic and Functional Validation In Vivo

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Ruei-Zeng; Hatch, Adam; Antontsev, Victor G.; Murthy, Shashi K.

    2015-01-01

    Introduction: Endothelial colony-forming cells (ECFCs) are endothelial progenitors that circulate in peripheral blood and are currently the subject of intensive investigation due to their therapeutic potential. However, in adults, ECFCs comprise a very small subset among circulating cells, which makes their isolation a challenge. Materials and Methods: Currently, the standard method for ECFC isolation relies on the separation of mononuclear cells and erythrocyte lysis, steps that are time consuming and known to increase cell loss. Alternatively, we previously developed a novel disposable microfluidic platform containing antibody-functionalized degradable hydrogel coatings that is ideally suited for capturing low-abundance circulating cells from unprocessed blood. In this study, we reasoned that this microfluidic approach could effectively isolate rare ECFCs by virtue of their CD34 expression. Results: We conducted preclinical experiments with peripheral blood from four adult volunteers and demonstrated that the actual microfluidic capture of circulating CD34+ cells from unprocessed blood was compatible with the subsequent differentiation of these cells into ECFCs. Moreover, the ECFC yield obtained with the microfluidic system was comparable to that of the standard method. Importantly, we unequivocally validated the phenotypical and functional properties of the captured ECFCs, including the ability to form microvascular networks following transplantation into immunodeficient mice. Discussion: We showed that the simplicity and versatility of our microfluidic system could be very instrumental for ECFC isolation while preserving their therapeutic potential. We anticipate our results will facilitate additional development of clinically suitable microfluidic devices by the vascular therapeutic and diagnostic industry. PMID:25091645

  4. Transposed firing activation of motor units

    PubMed Central

    Kline, Joshua C.; Contessa, Paola

    2014-01-01

    Muscles are composed of groups of muscle fibers, called motor units, each innervated by a single motoneuron originating in the spinal cord. During constant or linearly varying voluntary force contractions, motor units are activated in a hierarchical order, with the earlier-recruited motor units having greater firing rates than the later-recruited ones. We found that this normal pattern of firing activation can be altered during oscillatory contractions where the force oscillates at frequencies ≥2 Hz. During these high-frequency oscillations, the activation of the lower-threshold motor units effectively decreases and that of the higher-threshold motor units effectively increases. This transposition of firing activation provides means to activate higher-threshold motor units preferentially. Our results demonstrate that the hierarchical regulation of motor unit activation can be manipulated to activate specific motoneuron populations preferentially. This finding can be exploited to develop new forms of physical therapies and exercise programs that enhance muscle performance or that target the preferential atrophy of high-threshold motor units as a result of aging or motor disorders such as stroke and amyotrophic lateral sclerosis. PMID:24899671

  5. Human endothelial colony-forming cells serve as trophic mediators for mesenchymal stem cell engraftment via paracrine signaling

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Ruei-Zeng; Moreno-Luna, Rafael; Li, Dan; Jaminet, Shou-Ching; Greene, Arin K.; Melero-Martin, Juan M.

    2014-01-01

    Endothelial colony-forming cells (ECFCs) are endothelial precursors that circulate in peripheral blood. Studies have demonstrated that human ECFCs have robust vasculogenic properties. However, whether ECFCs can exert trophic functions in support of specific stem cells in vivo remains largely unknown. Here, we sought to determine whether human ECFCs can function as paracrine mediators before the establishment of blood perfusion. We used two xenograft models of human mesenchymal stem cell (MSC) transplantation and studied how the presence of ECFCs modulates MSC engraftment and regenerative capacity in vivo. Human MSCs were isolated from white adipose tissue and bone marrow aspirates and were s.c. implanted into immunodeficient mice in the presence or absence of cord blood-derived ECFCs. MSC engraftment was regulated by ECFC-derived paracrine factors via platelet-derived growth factor BB (PDGF-BB)/platelet-derived growth factor receptor (PDGFR)-β signaling. Cotransplanting ECFCs significantly enhanced MSC engraftment by reducing early apoptosis and preserving stemness-related properties of PDGFR-β+ MSCs, including the ability to repopulate secondary grafts. MSC engraftment was negligible in the absence of ECFCs and completely impaired in the presence of Tyrphostin AG1296, an inhibitor of PDGFR kinase. Additionally, transplanted MSCs displayed fate-restricted potential in vivo, with adipose tissue-derived and bone marrow-derived MSCs contributing exclusive differentiation along adipogenic and osteogenic lineages, respectively. This work demonstrates that blood-derived ECFCs can serve as paracrine mediators and regulate the regenerative potential of MSCs via PDGF-BB/PDGFR-β signaling. Our data suggest the systematic use of ECFCs as a means to improve MSC transplantation. PMID:24982174

  6. Treprostinil indirectly regulates endothelial colony forming cell angiogenic properties by increasing VEGF-A produced by mesenchymal stem cells.

    PubMed

    Smadja, David M; Levy, Marilyne; Huang, Lan; Rossi, Elisa; Blandinières, Adeline; Israel-Biet, Dominique; Gaussem, Pascale; Bischoff, Joyce

    2015-10-01

    Pulmonary vasodilators and prostacyclin therapy in particular, have markedly improved the outcome of patients with pulmonary hypertension (PH). Endothelial dysfunction is a key feature of PH, and we previously reported that treprostinil therapy increases number and proliferative potential of endothelial colony forming cells (ECFC) isolated from PH patients' blood. In the present study, the objective was to determine how treprostinil contributes to the proangiogenic functions of ECFC. We examined the effect of treprostinil on ECFC obtained from cord blood in terms of colony numbers, proliferative and clonogenic properties in vitro, as well as in vivo vasculogenic properties. Surprisingly, treprostinil inhibited viability of cultured ECFC but did not modify their clonogenic properties or the endothelial differentiation potential from cord blood stem cells. Treprostinil treatment significantly increased the vessel-forming ability of ECFC combined with mesenchymal stem cells (MSC) in Matrigel implanted in nude mice. In vitro, ECFC proliferation was stimulated by conditioned media from treprostinil-pretreated MSC, and this effect was inhibited either by the use of VEGF-A blocking antibodies or siRNA VEGF-A in MSC. Silencing VEGF-A gene in MSC also blocked the pro-angiogenic effect of treprostinil in vivo. In conclusion, increased VEGF-A produced by MSC can account for the increased vessel formation observed during treprostinil treatment. The clinical relevance of these data was confirmed by the high level of VEGF-A detected in plasma from patients with paediatric PH who had been treated with treprostinil. Moreover, our results suggest that VEGF-A level in patients could be a surrogate biomarker of treprostinil efficacy. PMID:26062754

  7. Dysregulation of VEGF-induced proangiogenic Ca2+ oscillations in primary myelofibrosis-derived endothelial colony-forming cells.

    PubMed

    Dragoni, Silvia; Reforgiato, Marta; Zuccolo, Estella; Poletto, Valentina; Lodola, Francesco; Ruffinatti, Federico Alessandro; Bonetti, Elisa; Guerra, Germano; Barosi, Giovanni; Rosti, Vittorio; Moccia, Francesco

    2015-12-01

    Endothelial progenitor cells could be implicated in the aberrant neoangiogenesis that occurs in bone marrow and spleen in patients with primary myelofibrosis (PMF). However, antivascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) monotherapy had only a modest and transient effect in these individuals. Recently it was found that VEGF-induced proangiogenic intracellular Ca(2+) oscillations could be impaired in endothelial progenitor cells of subjects with malignancies. Therefore, we employed Ca(2+) imaging, wavelet analysis, and functional assays to assess whether and how VEGF-induced Ca(2+) oscillations are altered in PMF-derived endothelial progenitor cells. We focused on endothelial colony-forming cells (ECFCs), which are the only endothelial progenitor cell subtype capable of forming neovessels both in vivo and in vitro. VEGF triggers repetitive Ca(2+) spikes in both normal ECFCs (N-ECFCs) and ECFCs obtained from PMF patients (PMF-ECFCs). However, the spiking response to VEGF is significantly weaker in PMF-ECFCs. VEGF-elicited Ca(2+) oscillations are patterned by the interaction between inositol-1,4,5-trisphosphate-dependent Ca(2+) mobilization and store-operated Ca(2+) entry. However, in most PMF-ECFCs, Ca(2+) oscillations are triggered by a store-independent Ca(2+) entry pathway. We found that diacylglycerol gates transient receptor potential canonical 1 channel to trigger VEGF-dependent Ca(2+) spikes by recruiting the phospholipase C/inositol-1,4,5-trisphosphate signaling pathway, reflected as a decrease in endoplasmic reticulum Ca(2+) content. Finally, we found that, apart from being less robust and dysregulated as compared with N-ECFCs, VEGF-induced Ca(2+) oscillations modestly stimulate PMF-ECFC growth and in vitro angiogenesis. These results may explain the modest effect of anti-VEGF therapies in PMF. PMID:26432919

  8. Constitutive Store-Operated Ca(2+) Entry Leads to Enhanced Nitric Oxide Production and Proliferation in Infantile Hemangioma-Derived Endothelial Colony-Forming Cells.

    PubMed

    Zuccolo, Estella; Bottino, Cinzia; Diofano, Federica; Poletto, Valentina; Codazzi, Alessia Claudia; Mannarino, Savina; Campanelli, Rita; Fois, Gabriella; Marseglia, Gian Luigi; Guerra, Germano; Montagna, Daniela; Laforenza, Umberto; Rosti, Vittorio; Massa, Margherita; Moccia, Francesco

    2016-02-15

    Clonal endothelial progenitor cells (EPCs) have been implicated in the aberrant vascular growth that features infantile hemangioma (IH), the most common benign vascular tumor in childhood that may cause ulceration, bleeding, and/or permanent disfigurement. Endothelial colony-forming cells (ECFCs), truly endothelial EPCs endowed with clonal ability and capable of forming patent vessels in vivo, remodel their Ca(2+) toolkit in tumor-derived patients to acquire an adaptive advantage. Particularly, they upregulate the proangiogenic store-operated Ca(2+) entry (SOCE) pathway due to the overexpression of its underlying components, that is, stromal interaction molecule 1 (Stim1), Orai1, and transient receptor potential canonical 1 (TRPC1). The present work was undertaken to assess whether and how the Ca(2+) signalosome is altered in IH-ECFCs by employing Ca(2+) and nitric oxide (NO) imaging, real-time polymerase chain reaction, western blotting, and functional assays. IH-ECFCs display a lower intracellular Ca(2+) release in response to either pharmacological (i.e., cyclopiazonic acid) or physiological (i.e., ATP and vascular endothelial growth factor) stimulation. Conversely, Stim1, Orai1, and TRPC1 transcripts and proteins are normally expressed in these cells and mediate a constitutive SOCE, which is sensitive to BTP-2, La(3+), and Pyr6 and recharges the intracellular Ca(2+) pool. The resting SOCE in IH-ECFCs is also associated to an increase in their proliferation rate and the basal production of NO compared to normal cells. Likewise, the pharmacological blockade of SOCE and NO synthesis block IH-ECFC growth. Collectively, these data indicate that the constitutive SOCE activation enhances IH-ECFC proliferation by augmenting basal NO production and sheds novel light on the molecular mechanisms of IH. PMID:26654173

  9. Modified a colony forming unit microbial adherence to hydrocarbons assay and evaluated cell surface hydrophobicity and biofilm production of Vibrio scophthalmi

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Vibrio scophthalmi has been considered as an opportunistic pathogen of the flat fish. There is little information available on V. scophthalmi adhesion to the host, an important step in the initial infection process. The objectives of this study were to (1) develop a modified Microbial Adherence to H...

  10. Curcumin Veto the Effects of Osteopontin (OPN) Specific Inhibitor on Leukemic Stem Cell Colony Forming Potential via Promotion of OPN Overexpression

    PubMed Central

    Mohammadi, Saeed; Ghaffari, Seyed H.; Shaiegan, Mojgan; Nikogoftar Zarif, Mahin; Nikbakht, Mohsen; Alimoghaddam, Kamran; Ghavamzadeh, Ardeshir

    2016-01-01

    Background: Acute myeloid leukemia (AML) is an immunophenotypically heterogeneous malignant disease, in which CD34 positivity is associated with poor prognosis. Osteopontin (OPN) plays different roles in physiologic and pathologic conditions like: survival, metastasis and cell protection from cytotoxic and apoptotic stimuli. Due to anti-apoptotic effect of OPN in normal and malignant cells, silencing of OPN leads to elevation of sensitivity towards chemotherapeutic agents and attenuates cancer cells migration and invasion. Therefore, the aim of this study was to evaluate OPN roles in modulating curcumin-mediated growth inhibitory on leukemic stem cells (LSCs) colony forming potential and survival in AML cell lines and primary CD34+/CD38- bone marrow-derived AML cells. Materials and Methods: Primary human CD34+/CD38- cells were isolated from bone marrow mononuclear cells of 10 AML patients at initial state of diagnosis, using a CD34 Multi sort kit. The growth inhibitory effects of curcumin (CUR) were evaluated by MTT and colony-formation assays. Apoptosis was analyzed by 7AAD assay in CD34+ KG-1, U937 cell lines and primary isolated cells. Short interfering RNA (siRNA) against OPN was used for OPN silencing in both cell lines and primary AML cells. Then, transfected cells were incubated with/without curcumin. The change in OPN gene expression was examined by Real-time PCR. Results: CUR inhibited proliferation and induced apoptosis in both KG-1 and U937 cells and also primary isolated AML cells. OPN silencing by siRNA increased the susceptibility of KG-1, U937 and primary CD34+/CD38- AML cells to apoptosis. Moreover, soft agar colony assays revealed that silencing of OPN with siRNA significantly decreased colony numbers in LSCs compared with the non-targeting group. Furthermore, CD34+/CD38- populations as a main LSCs compartment through OPN overexpression towards CUR treatment might be nullified the inhibitory effects of OPN siRNA on their survival and colony forming

  11. Epigenetic Regulation of Placenta-Specific 8 Contributes to Altered Function of Endothelial Colony-Forming Cells Exposed to Intrauterine Gestational Diabetes Mellitus.

    PubMed

    Blue, Emily K; Sheehan, BreAnn M; Nuss, Zia V; Boyle, Frances A; Hocutt, Caleb M; Gohn, Cassandra R; Varberg, Kaela M; McClintick, Jeanette N; Haneline, Laura S

    2015-07-01

    Intrauterine exposure to gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM) is linked to development of hypertension, obesity, and type 2 diabetes in children. Our previous studies determined that endothelial colony-forming cells (ECFCs) from neonates exposed to GDM exhibit impaired function. The current goals were to identify aberrantly expressed genes that contribute to impaired function of GDM-exposed ECFCs and to evaluate for evidence of altered epigenetic regulation of gene expression. Genome-wide mRNA expression analysis was conducted on ECFCs from control and GDM pregnancies. Candidate genes were validated by quantitative RT-PCR and Western blotting. Bisulfite sequencing evaluated DNA methylation of placenta-specific 8 (PLAC8). Proliferation and senescence assays of ECFCs transfected with siRNA to knockdown PLAC8 were performed to determine functional impact. Thirty-eight genes were differentially expressed between control and GDM-exposed ECFCs. PLAC8 was highly expressed in GDM-exposed ECFCs, and PLAC8 expression correlated with maternal hyperglycemia. Methylation status of 17 CpG sites in PLAC8 negatively correlated with mRNA expression. Knockdown of PLAC8 in GDM-exposed ECFCs improved proliferation and senescence defects. This study provides strong evidence in neonatal endothelial progenitor cells that GDM exposure in utero leads to altered gene expression and DNA methylation, suggesting the possibility of altered epigenetic regulation. PMID:25720387

  12. Self-Renewal and High Proliferative Colony Forming Capacity of Late-Outgrowth Endothelial Progenitors Is Regulated by Cyclin-Dependent Kinase Inhibitors Driven by Notch Signaling.

    PubMed

    Patel, Jatin; Wong, Ho Yi; Wang, Weili; Alexis, Josue; Shafiee, Abbas; Stevenson, Alexander J; Gabrielli, Brian; Fisk, Nicholas M; Khosrotehrani, Kiarash

    2016-04-01

    Since the discovery of endothelial colony forming cells (ECFC), there has been significant interest in their therapeutic potential to treat vascular injuries. ECFC cultures display significant heterogeneity and a hierarchy among cells able to give rise to high proliferative versus low proliferative colonies. Here we aimed to define molecularly this in vitro hierarchy. Based on flow cytometry, CD34 expression levels distinguished two populations. Only CD34 + ECFC had the capacity to reproduce high proliferative potential (HPP) colonies on replating, whereas CD34- ECFCs formed only small clusters. CD34 + ECFCs were the only ones to self-renew in stringent single-cell cultures and gave rise to both CD34 + and CD34- cells. Upon replating, CD34 + ECFCs were always found at the centre of HPP colonies and were more likely in G0/1 phase of cell cycling. Functionally, CD34 + ECFC were superior at restoring perfusion and better engrafted when injected into ischemic hind limbs. Transcriptomic analysis identified cyclin-dependent kinase (CDK) cell cycle inhibiting genes (p16, p21, and p57), the Notch signaling pathway (dll1, dll4, hes1, and hey1), and the endothelial cytokine il33 as highly expressed in CD34 + ECFC. Blocking the Notch pathway using a γ-secretase inhibitor (DAPT) led to reduced expression of cell cycle inhibitors, increased cell proliferation followed by a loss of self-renewal, and HPP colony formation capacity reflecting progenitor exhaustion. Similarly shRNA knockdown of p57 strongly affected self-renewal of ECFC colonies. ECFC hierarchy is defined by Notch signalling driving cell cycle regulators, progenitor quiescence and self-renewal potential. Stem Cells 2016;34:902-912. PMID:26732848

  13. CD34 expression modulates tube-forming capacity and barrier properties of peripheral blood-derived endothelial colony-forming cells (ECFCs).

    PubMed

    Tasev, Dimitar; Konijnenberg, Lara S F; Amado-Azevedo, Joana; van Wijhe, Michiel H; Koolwijk, Pieter; van Hinsbergh, Victor W M

    2016-07-01

    Endothelial colony-forming cells (ECFC) are grown from circulating CD34(+) progenitors present in adult peripheral blood, but during in vitro expansion part of the cells lose CD34. To evaluate whether the regulation of CD34 characterizes the angiogenic phenotypical features of PB-ECFCs, we investigated the properties of CD34(+) and CD34(-) ECFCs with respect to their ability to form capillary-like tubes in 3D fibrin matrices, tip-cell gene expression, and barrier integrity. Selection of CD34(+) and CD34(-) ECFCs from subcultured ECFCs was accomplished by magnetic sorting (FACS: CD34(+): 95 % pos; CD34(-): 99 % neg). Both fractions proliferated at same rate, while CD34(+) ECFCs exhibited higher tube-forming capacity and tip-cell gene expression than CD3(4-) cells. However, during cell culture CD34(-) cells re-expressed CD34. Cell-seeding density, cell-cell contact formation, and serum supplements modulated CD34 expression. CD34 expression in ECFCs was strongly suppressed by newborn calf serum. Stimulation with FGF-2, VEGF, or HGF prepared in medium supplemented with 3 % albumin did not change CD34 mRNA or surface expression. Silencing of CD34 with siRNA resulted in strengthening of cell-cell contacts and increased barrier function of ECFC monolayers as measured by ECIS. Furthermore, CD34 siRNA reduced tube formation by ECFC, but did not affect tip-cell gene expression. These findings demonstrate that CD34(+) and CD34(-) cells are different phenotypes of similar cells and that CD34 (1) can be regulated in ECFC; (2) is positively involved in capillary-like sprout formation; (3) is associated but not causally related to tip-cell gene expression; and (4) can affect endothelial barrier function. PMID:27043316

  14. United Nations geothermal activities in developing countries

    SciTech Connect

    Beredjick, N.

    1987-07-01

    The United Nations implements technical cooperation projects in developing countries through its Department of Technical Cooperation for Development (DTCD). The DTCD is mandated to explore for and develop natural resources (water, minerals, and relevant infrastructure) and energy - both conventional and new and renewable energy sources. To date, the United Nations has been involved in over 30 geothermal exploration projects (completed or underway) in 20 developing countries: 8 in Africa (Djibouti, Ethiopia, Kenya, Madagascar); 8 in Asia (China, India, Jordan, Philippines, Thailand); 9 in Latin America (Bolivia, Chile, El Salvador, Honduras, Mexico, Nicaragua, Panama) and 6 in Europe (Greece, Romania, Turkey, Yugoslavia). Today, the DTCD has seven UNDP geothermal projects in 6 developing countries. Four of these (Bolivia, China, Honduras, and Kenya) are major exploration projects whose formulation and execution has been possible thanks to the generous contributions under cost-sharing arrangements from the government of Italy. These four projects are summarized.

  15. Tritium activities in the United States

    SciTech Connect

    Anderson, J.L.; LaMarche, P.

    1995-07-01

    There have been many significant changes in the status of tritium activities in the US since the 4th Tritium Conference in October, 1991. The replacement Tritium Facility (RTF) at Savannah River Site and the Weapons Engineering Tritium Facility (WETF) at the Los Alamos National Laboratory are now operational with tritium. The Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor (TFTR) has initiated a highly successful experimental campaign studying DT plasmas, and has produced more than 10 Megawatts (MW) of fusion power in a D-T plasma. Sandia National Laboratory has ceased tritium operations at the Tritium Research Laboratory (TRL) and many of the activities previously performed there have been transferred to Los Alamos and Savannah River. The tritium laboratory at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory has reduced the tritium inventory to <5 grams. The Tritium Systems Test Assembly (TSTA) at Los Alamos continues to be at the forefront of tritium technology and safety development for the fusion energy program.

  16. Obesity, Health, and Physical Activity: Discourses from the United States

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zieff, Susan G.; Veri, Maria J.

    2009-01-01

    This article examines the obesity, health, and physical activity discourses of the past 35 years in the context of the United States with particular reference to five social sectors: the biomedical domain; the popular media; nonprofit foundations, centers and agencies; various national and multinational corporations; and government at all levels.…

  17. Canada and the United States. Perspective. Learning Activity Packet.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Maine Univ., Orono. New England - Atlantic Provinces - Quebec Center.

    The similarities and differences of Canada and the United States are explored in this Learning Activity Packet (LAP). Ten learning objectives are given which encourage students to examine: 1) the misconceptions Americans and Canadians have about each other and their ways of life; 2) the effect and influence of French and English exploration and…

  18. Ute Unit: Study Guide and Follow Up Activities.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    North Conejos School District, Capulin, CO.

    The study guide and follow-up activities were designed primarily to give students a feeling of Ute life in the San Luis Valley in Colorado. The unit begins with six Southern Ute stories about the wolf and coyote, the race between the skunk and the coyote, the frog and the eagle, why the frog croaks, the bear (Que Ye Qat), and the two Indian…

  19. Matriptase Expression and Zymogen Activation in Human Pilosebaceous Unit

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Bai-Yao; Lee, Shiao-Pieng; Hsiao, Hui-Chung; Chiu, Han; Chen, Chi-Yung; Yeo, Yee Hui; Lee, Herng-Sheng; Chen, Ya-Wen; Kaul, Malvika; Kataoka, Hiroaki; Johnson, Michael D.; Lin, Chen-Yong

    2014-01-01

    Studies of human genetic disorders and mouse models reveal the important roles of matriptase in hair growth. Here, we investigate matriptase expression and zymogen activation in hair follicles. We show: 1) layer-dependent distribution patterns, with much higher matriptase expression in cells of the outer root sheath and matrix cells of the hair bulb than in cells of the inner root sheath; 2) cycle-dependent expression patterns, with matriptase expressed in the anagen and catagen phases of the hair lifecycle, but not in the telogen phase; 3) reduced expression of the matriptase inhibitor, HAI-1, in the catagen phase, suggesting increased proteolytic activity in this phase; and 4) definitive matriptase zymogen activation patterns, with the highest matriptase activation observed in matrix cells and outer root sheath cells in the isthmus/bulge region. In sebaceous glands, matriptase is highly expressed in basal and ductal cells, with much lower expression in the differentiated, lipid-filled cells of the interior. We also show that matriptase potently activates hepatocyte growth factor (HGF) in vitro, and that the HGF receptor, c-Met, is co-expressed in those cells that express activated matriptase. Our observations suggest that the matriptase-HGF-c-MET pathway has the potential to be engaged, primarily in proliferative cells rather than terminally differentiated epithelial cells of the human pilosebaceous unit. PMID:24004857

  20. Space activities of the United Nations and international organizations

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1986-01-01

    Covering the period up to mid-1985, this work provides an overview of the organizational structure, past activities, current programs, and future plans of international bodies involved in cooperative efforts in the peaceful uses of outer space. It describes the efforts of the United Nations and several of its specialized agencies, including FAO, UNESCO, the International Civil Aviation Organization, the World Meteorological Organization, and the International Telecommunication Union. Other intergovernmental organizations covered include the European Space Agency, the International Organization of Space Communications, and the Council on International Cooperation in the Study and Utilization of Space. Nongovernmental organizations discussed are the International Council of Scientific Unions and the International Astronautical Union.

  1. Examination of Bacterial Characteristics of Anaerobic Membrane Bioreactors in Three Pilot-Scale Plants for Treating Low-Strength Wastewater by Application of the Colony-Forming-Curve Analysis Method

    PubMed Central

    Kataoka, Naoaki; Tokiwa, Yutaka; Tanaka, Yasuo; Fujiki, Kiichi; Taroda, Hiroyuki; Takeda, Kiyoshi

    1992-01-01

    Characteristic sludge ecosystems arising in anaerobic membrane bioreactors of three pilot-scale plants treating low-strength (less than 1 g of biological oxygen demand per liter) sewage or soybean-processing wastewater were examined by analysis of the colony-forming-curves (CFC) obtained by counting colonies at suitable intervals. The wastewaters, containing high amounts of suspended solids (SS) (SS/chemical oxygen demand ratio, 0.51 to 0.80), were treated by using two types of bioreactors: (i) a hydrolyzation reactor for solubilization and acidification of SS in wastewater and (ii) a methane fermentation reactor for producing methane. The colony counts for the two sewage treatment plants continued to increase even after 3 weeks of incubation, whereas those for soybean-processing wastewater reached an approximately constant level within 3 weeks of incubation. The CFCs were analyzed by correlating the rate of colony appearance on roll tubes with the physiological types of bacteria present in the bioreactors. It was found that there were large numbers of slow-colony-forming anaerobic bacteria within the bioreactors and that the viable populations consisted of a few groups with different growth rates. It is considered that the slow-growing colonies appearing after 10 days of incubation were the dominant microflora in the sewage treated by hydrolyzation reactors. In particular, highly concentrated sludge (30.0 g of mixed-liquor volatile SS per liter) retained by the membrane separation module contained a large number of such bacteria. Slow-growing colonies of these bacteria could be counted by using a sludge extract medium prepared from only the supernatant of autoclaved sludge. In addition, the highest colony counts were almost always obtained with the sludge extract medium, meaning that most of the anaerobic bacteria in these sludges have complex nutrient requirements for growth. This report also indicates the usefulness of application of the CFC analysis method to

  2. Active microchannel fluid processing unit and method of making

    DOEpatents

    Bennett, Wendy D [Kennewick, WA; Martin, Peter M [Kennewick, WA; Matson, Dean W [Kennewick, WA; Roberts, Gary L [West Richland, WA; Stewart, Donald C [Richland, WA; Tonkovich, Annalee Y [Pasco, WA; Zilka, Jennifer L [Pasco, WA; Schmitt, Stephen C [Dublin, OH; Werner, Timothy M [Columbus, OH

    2002-12-10

    The present invention is an active microchannel fluid processing unit and method of making, both relying on having (a) at least one inner thin sheet; (b) at least one outer thin sheet; (c) defining at least one first sub-assembly for performing at least one first unit operation by stacking a first of the at least one inner thin sheet in alternating contact with a first of the at least one outer thin sheet into a first stack and placing an end block on the at least one inner thin sheet, the at least one first sub-assembly having at least a first inlet and a first outlet; and (d) defining at least one second sub-assembly for performing at least one second unit operation either as a second flow path within the first stack or by stacking a second of the at least one inner thin sheet in alternating contact with second of the at least one outer thin sheet as a second stack, the at least one second sub-assembly having at least a second inlet and a second outlet.

  3. Active microchannel fluid processing unit and method of making

    DOEpatents

    Bennett, Wendy D [Kennewick, WA; Martin, Peter M [Kennewick, WA; Matson, Dean W [Kennewick, WA; Roberts, Gary L [West Richland, WA; Stewart, Donald C [Richland, WA; Tonkovich, Annalee Y [Pasco, WA; Zilka, Jennifer L [Pasco, WA; Schmitt, Stephen C [Dublin, OH; Werner, Timothy M [Columbus, OH

    2001-01-01

    The present invention is an active microchannel fluid processing unit and method of making, both relying on having (a) at least one inner thin sheet; (b) at least one outer thin sheet; (c) defining at least one first sub-assembly for performing at least one first unit operation by stacking a first of the at least one inner thin sheet in alternating contact with a first of the at least one outer thin sheet into a first stack and placing an end block on the at least one inner thin sheet, the at least one first sub-assembly having at least a first inlet and a first outlet; and (d) defining at least one second sub-assembly for performing at least one second unit operation either as a second flow path within the first stack or by stacking a second of the at least one inner thin sheet in alternating contact with second of the at least one outer thin sheet as a second stack, the at least one second sub-assembly having at least a second inlet and a second outlet.

  4. Motor unit regulation of mammalian pharyngeal dilator muscle activity.

    PubMed Central

    van Lunteren, E; Dick, T E

    1989-01-01

    The present study examined the cellular regulation of one of the pharyngeal dilator muscles, the geniohyoid, by assessing its motor unit (MU) behavior in anesthetized cats. During spontaneous breathing, MU that (a) were active during inspiration only (I-MU) and (b) were active during both inspiration and expiration (I/E-MU) were identified. I-MU had a later inspiratory onset time and a shorter duration of inspiratory firing than did I/E-MU (P less than 0.002 and P less than 0.0001, respectively). I-MU were usually quiescent whereas I/E-MU were usually active during the last 20% of inspiration. I/E-MU fired more rapidly (P less than 0.00001) and for relatively longer periods of time (P less than 0.00001) during inspiration than during expiration. End-expiratory airway occlusion (preventing lung expansion during inspiration) augmented the inspiratory activity of both I-MU and I/E-MU. Conversely, end-expiratory airway occlusion reduced the absolute and relative firing durations (P less than 0.002 and P less than 0.00002, respectively) and the firing frequency (P less than 0.001) of I/E-MU activity during expiration. These results indicate that (a) the complex pattern of pharyngeal dilator muscle activity is due to the integrated activity of a heterogeneous group of MU, (b) changes in the degree to which pharyngeal dilator muscles are active result from combinations of MU recruitment/decruitment and modulations of the frequency and duration of MU firing, and (c) gating of lung-volume afferent information occurs during the respiratory cycle. PMID:2760202

  5. Long-Term Expansion in Platelet Lysate Increases Growth of Peripheral Blood-Derived Endothelial-Colony Forming Cells and Their Growth Factor-Induced Sprouting Capacity

    PubMed Central

    Tasev, Dimitar; van Wijhe, Michiel H.; Weijers, Ester M.; van Hinsbergh, Victor W. M.; Koolwijk, Pieter

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Efficient implementation of peripheral blood-derived endothelial-colony cells (PB-ECFCs) as a therapeutical tool requires isolation and generation of a sufficient number of cells in ex vivo conditions devoid of animal-derived products. At present, little is known how the isolation and expansion procedure in xenogeneic-free conditions affects the therapeutical capacity of PB-ECFCs. Results The findings presented in this study indicate that human platelet lysate (PL) as a serum substitute yields twice more colonies per mL blood compared to the conventional isolation with fetal bovine serum (FBS). Isolated ECFCs displayed a higher proliferative ability in PL supplemented medium than cells in FBS medium during 30 days expansion. The cells at 18 cumulative population doubling levels (CPDL) retained their proliferative capacity, showed higher sprouting ability in fibrin matrices upon stimulation with FGF-2 and VEGF-A than the cells at 6 CPDL, and displayed low β-galactosidase activity. The increased sprouting of PB-ECFCs at 18 CPDL was accompanied by an intrinsic activation of the uPA/uPAR fibrinolytic system. Induced deficiency of uPA (urokinase-type plasminogen activator) or uPAR (uPA receptor) by siRNA technology completely abolished the angiogenic ability of PB-ECFCs in fibrin matrices. During the serial expansion, the gene induction of the markers associated with inflammatory activation such as VCAM-1 and ICAM-1 did not occur or only to limited extent. While further propagation up to 31 CPDL proceeded at a comparable rate, a marked upregulation of inflammatory markers occurred in all donors accompanied by a further increase of uPA/uPAR gene induction. The observed induction of inflammatory genes at later stages of long-term propagation of PB-ECFCs underpins the necessity to determine the right time-point for harvesting of sufficient number of cells with preserved therapeutical potential. Conclusion The presented isolation method and subsequent cell

  6. Procoagulant activity in stored units of red blood cells.

    PubMed

    Aleshnick, Maya; Foley, Jonathan H; Keating, Friederike K; Butenas, Saulius

    2016-06-10

    The procoagulant activity (PA) of stored units of red blood cells (RBC) increases over time, which is related to the expression/exposure of tissue factor (TF). However, there is a discrepancy between the TF measured and changes in PA observed, suggesting that other blood components contribute to this activity. Our goal was to evaluate changes in PA of stored RBCs and to determine possible contributors to it. RBC units from 4 healthy donors were prepared and stored at 4 °C. On selected days, RBC aliquots were reconstituted with autologous plasma and tested in the thromboelastography assay. Corresponding supernatants were tested in a clotting assay. For all donors, the clotting time (CT) of reconstituted RBC units decreased from ∼3000-4000s on day 1 to ∼1000-1600s on day 30, with the most dramatic changes occurring between days 1 and 5. Anti-TF antibody slightly prolonged the CT. The concentration of TF did not change significantly over time and was within the range of 0.3-2.3 pM. Bovine lactadherin (LTD) prolonged the CT of the RBC (by 2.4-3.4-fold in days 3-5 and by 1.3-1.8-fold at day 30). Anti-TF antibody together with LTD had a cumulative effect on the CT prolongation. CT of supernatants responded to both anti-TF and anti-FXIa antibodies. Three contributors to the PA of stored RBC were identified, i.e. FXIa in solution and phosphatidylserine and TF exposed on blood cells and microparticles. Failure of LTD and antibodies to completely eliminate PA suggests that other components of blood could contribute to it. PMID:27150627

  7. ISS Plasma Contactor Units Operations During Strong Geomagnetic Activity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alred, J.; Mikatarian, R.; Barsamian, H.; Minow, J.; Koontz, S.

    2003-12-01

    The large structure and high voltage arrays of the ISS represent a complex system that interacts with the Earth's ionosphere. To mitigate spacecraft charging problems on the ISS, two Plasma Contactor Units discharge ionized xenon gas to "clamp" the potential of the ISS with respect to the low Earth orbit plasma. The Plasma Interaction Model, a model of ISS plasma interaction developed from the basic physics of the interaction phenomena, includes magnetic induction effects, plasma temperature and density effects, interaction of the high voltage solar arrays with ionospheric plasma, and accounts for other conductive areas on the ISS. To augment this model, the PCU discharge current has been monitored for the ISS in a variety of flight attitudes as well as during the annual seasons. A review of the PCU discharge currents shows a correlation to the geomagnetic activity. The variation in the PCU discharge current during strong geomagnetic activity will be presented. Also, the PCU discharge currents during periods of low geomagnetic activity will be discussed. The presentation will conclude with a comparison of satellite plasma measurements during different stages of geomagnetic activity.

  8. Cholinesterase activity per unit surface area of conducting membranes.

    PubMed

    Brzin, M; Dettbarn, W D; Rosenberg, P; Nachmansohn, D

    1965-08-01

    According to theory, the action of acetylcholine (ACh) and ACh-esterase is essential for the permeability changes of excitable membranes during activity. It is, therefore, pertinent to know the activity of ACh-esterase per unit axonal surface area instead of per gram nerve, as it has been measured in the past. Such information has now been obtained with the newly developed microgasometric technique using a magnetic diver. (1) The cholinesterase (Ch-esterase) activity per mm(2) surface of sensory axons of the walking leg of lobster is 1.2 x 10(-3) microM/hr. (sigma = +/- 0.3 x 10(-3); SE = 0.17 x 10(-3)); the corresponding value for the motor axons isslightly higher: 1.93 x 10(-3) microM/hr. (sigma = +/- 0.41 x 10(-3); SE = +/- 0.14 x 10(-3)). Referred to gram nerve, the Ch-esterase activity of the sensory axons is much higher than that of the motor axons: 741 microM/hr. (sigma = +/- 73.5; SE = +/- 32.6) versus 111.6 microM/hr. (sigma = +/- 28.3; SE = +/- 10). (2) The enzyme activity in the small fibers of the stellar nerve of squid is 3.2 x 10(-4) microM/mm(2)/hr. (sigma = +/- 0.96 x 10(-4); SE = +/- 0.4 x 10(-4)). (3) The Ch-esterase activity per mm(2) surface of squid giant axon is 9.5 x 10(-5) microM/hr. (sigma = +/- 1.55 x 10(-5); SE = +/- 0.38 x 10(-5)). The value was obtained with small pieces of carefully cleaned axons after removal of the axoplasm and exposure to sonic disintegration. Without the latter treatment the figurewas 3.85 x 10(-5) microM/mm(2)/hr. (sigma = +/- 3.24 x 10(-5); SE = +/- 0.93 x 10(-5)). The experiments indicate the existence of permeability barriers in the cell wall surrounding part of the enzyme, since the substrate cannot reach all the enzyme even when small fragments of the cell wall are used without disintegration. (4) On the basis of the data obtained, some tentative approximations are made of the ratio of ACh released to Na ions entering the squid giant axon per cm(2) per impulse. PMID:5865929

  9. Media Unit. ArtsEdge Curricula, Lessons and Activities.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Robertson, Helen

    This "mini" curriculum unit introduces primary children (grades K-3) to the concept of images presented through the media, primarily advertising through print and on television. The unit is divided into three approximately 45-minute lessons. In the unit's first lesson, students will discuss why they like the particular toy they have chosen to…

  10. Mining Claim Activity on Federal Land in the United States

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Causey, J. Douglas

    2007-01-01

    Several statistical compilations of mining claim activity on Federal land derived from the Bureau of Land Management's LR2000 database have previously been published by the U.S Geological Survey (USGS). The work in the 1990s did not include Arkansas or Florida. None of the previous reports included Alaska because it is stored in a separate database (Alaska Land Information System) and is in a different format. This report includes data for all states for which there are Federal mining claim records, beginning in 1976 and continuing to the present. The intent is to update the spatial and statistical data associated with this report on an annual basis, beginning with 2005 data. The statistics compiled from the databases are counts of the number of active mining claims in a section of land each year from 1976 to the present for all states within the United States. Claim statistics are subset by lode and placer types, as well as a dataset summarizing all claims including mill site and tunnel site claims. One table presents data by case type, case status, and number of claims in a section. This report includes a spatial database for each state in which mining claims were recorded, except North Dakota, which only has had two claims. A field is present that allows the statistical data to be joined to the spatial databases so that spatial displays and analysis can be done by using appropriate geographic information system (GIS) software. The data show how mining claim activity has changed in intensity, space, and time. Variations can be examined on a state, as well as a national level. The data are tied to a section of land, approximately 640 acres, which allows it to be used at regional, as well as local scale. The data only pertain to Federal land and mineral estate that was open to mining claim location at the time the claims were staked.

  11. VERIFICATION SURVEY ACTIVITIES IN FS SURVEY UNITS 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 13 & 14 AT THE SEPARATIONS PROCESS RESEARCH UNIT

    SciTech Connect

    M.G. JADICK

    2010-05-26

    FINAL INTERIM REPORT VERIFICATION SURVEY ACTIVITIES IN FINAL STATUS SURVEY UNITS 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 13 AND 14 AT THE SEPARATIONS PROCESS RESEARCH UNIT, Niskayuna, New York 0496-SR-03-0. The Separations Process Research Unit (SPRU) facilities were constructed in the late 1940s to research the chemical separation of plutonium and uranium. SPRU operated between February 1950 and October 1953. The research activities ceased following the successful development of the reduction/oxidation and plutonium/uranium extraction processes that were subsequently used by the Hanford and the Savannah River sites.

  12. Applying activity-based costing to the nuclear medicine unit.

    PubMed

    Suthummanon, Sakesun; Omachonu, Vincent K; Akcin, Mehmet

    2005-08-01

    Previous studies have shown the feasibility of using activity-based costing (ABC) in hospital environments. However, many of these studies discuss the general applications of ABC in health-care organizations. This research explores the potential application of ABC to the nuclear medicine unit (NMU) at a teaching hospital. The finding indicates that the current cost averages 236.11 US dollars for all procedures, which is quite different from the costs computed by using ABC. The difference is most significant with positron emission tomography scan, 463 US dollars (an increase of 96%), as well as bone scan and thyroid scan, 114 US dollars (a decrease of 52%). The result of ABC analysis demonstrates that the operational time (machine time and direct labour time) and the cost of drugs have the most influence on cost per procedure. Clearly, to reduce the cost per procedure for the NMU, the reduction in operational time and cost of drugs should be analysed. The result also indicates that ABC can be used to improve resource allocation and management. It can be an important aid in making management decisions, particularly for improving pricing practices by making costing more accurate. It also facilitates the identification of underutilized resources and related costs, leading to cost reduction. The ABC system will also help hospitals control costs, improve the quality and efficiency of the care they provide, and manage their resources better. PMID:16102243

  13. Lung segmentation from HRCT using united geometric active contours

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Junwei; Li, Chuanfu; Xiong, Jin; Feng, Huanqing

    2007-12-01

    Accurate lung segmentation from high resolution CT images is a challenging task due to various detail tracheal structures, missing boundary segments and complex lung anatomy. One popular method is based on gray-level threshold, however its results are usually rough. A united geometric active contours model based on level set is proposed for lung segmentation in this paper. Particularly, this method combines local boundary information and region statistical-based model synchronously: 1) Boundary term ensures the integrality of lung tissue.2) Region term makes the level set function evolve with global characteristic and independent on initial settings. A penalizing energy term is introduced into the model, which forces the level set function evolving without re-initialization. The method is found to be much more efficient in lung segmentation than other methods that are only based on boundary or region. Results are shown by 3D lung surface reconstruction, which indicates that the method will play an important role in the design of computer-aided diagnostic (CAD) system.

  14. Report to the Congress from The President of the United States. United States Aeronautics and Space Activities 1967.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Johnson, Lyndon B.

    This report extensively reviews the progress of the United States in space during 1967, the tenth year of the space age. The first chapter of the report summarizes the 1967 space activities; and each of the remaining 13 chapters is devoted to reviewing the space-related activities of a particular federal agency (13 agencies included). Appendices…

  15. 78 FR 49553 - Three Mile Island, Unit 2; Post Shutdown Decommissioning Activities Report

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-08-14

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION Three Mile Island, Unit 2; Post Shutdown Decommissioning Activities Report AGENCY: Nuclear...) for Three Mile Island, Unit 2 (TMI-2). The PSDAR provides an overview of GPUN's...

  16. Water-temperature data acquisition activities in the United States

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Pauszek, F.H.

    1972-01-01

    Water Data Coordination, U.S. Geological Survey, and published in the "Catalog of Information on Water Data, Index to Water Quality Section, Edition 1970." This is one of four indexes, each of which is a separate section of the Catalog. Three of the indexes, "Index to Water-Quality Section," "Index to Surface-Water Section," and "Index to Ground-.Water Stations," contain information on data acquired on a recurrent basis at specific locations for a period of 3 years or more. The fourth section, "Index to Areal Investigations and Miscellaneous Activities," is concerned with specific projects or shorter-term data activities that involve field or laboratory measurements or observations not included in any other section of the Catalog. The Catalog is a record of activities throughout the country (and in some places along the international border between the United States and Canada) conducted by Federal and non-Federal agencies engaged in the acquisition of water data and who furnish such information for presentation in the Catalog. The Catalog itself is an outgrowth of an assignment to the Department of the Interior and in turn to the Geological Survey, by the Office of Management and Budget, through the medium of OMB Circular A-67. This Circular states in part that one of the assigned responsibilities will be maintenance of a "central catalog of information on...water data and on Federal activities being planned or conducted to acquire such data." As an extension of this activity, non-Federal agencies are solicited to participate in the program. In this report, information is presented by means of tables and illustrations preceded by brief explanations. It includes the agencies collecting the data, the number of stations located on surface and ground waters where temperature measurements are made, the distribution of stations by States and by the 21 regions of the Water Resources Council (WRC) (a Federal agency created in accordance with the Water Resources Planning Act of

  17. Metal-based biologically active compounds: synthesis, characterization, DNA interaction, antibacterial, cytotoxic and SOD mimic activities.

    PubMed

    Patel, Mohan N; Patel, Chintan R; Joshi, Hardik N

    2013-02-01

    The square pyramidal copper(II) complexes of N, O- donor ligand and ciprofloxacin have been synthesized. Synthesized complexes were characterized by physicochemical parameters like elemental analysis, electronic, FT-IR and LC-MS spectra. The complexes were screened for their antimicrobial activity against Gram(+Ve), i.e. Staphylococcus aureus, Bacillus subtilis, and Gram(-Ve), i.e. Serratia marcescens, Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Escherichia coli, microorganisms in terms of minimum inhibitory concentration and colony-forming unit. To determine the binding mode of complexes with Herring Sperm DNA, absorption titration and viscosity measurement were employed. DNA cleavage activity was carried out by gel electrophoresis experiment using supercoiled form of pUC19 DNA. The complexes were tested for their superoxide dismutase mimic activity in terms of IC(50) value. Synthesized complexes were also screened for their cytotoxicity using brine shrimp lethality assay method. PMID:23306896

  18. The crew activity planning system bus interface unit

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Allen, M. A.

    1979-01-01

    The hardware and software designs used to implement a high speed parallel communications interface to the MITRE 307.2 kilobit/second serial bus communications system are described. The primary topic is the development of the bus interface unit.

  19. Integrated Activities for a Who-Dun-It Unit.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Teaching PreK-8, 1996

    1996-01-01

    Describes how the Rogers Elementary School initiates student-created activities. Includes 33 activities chosen from a total of 60 suggestions from these students. These activities are grouped under two major themes, "Fingerprints" and "Detectives." Explains strategies of which these activities can help students in learning math, science, social…

  20. Japan through Folktales and Activities: A Unit for Kindergarten.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Des Chenes, Kathryn; Bhavnagri, Navaz P.

    This report describes an intervention to improve American kindergarten children's understanding of Japanese culture. The intervention consisted of a curriculum unit presented in a kindergarten class of 14 American and 7 Japanese children in Brookline, Massachusetts. Before and after the intervention, the American children's knowledge of Japanese…

  1. Objectively Assessed Physical Activity among Tongans in the United States

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Behrens, Timothy K.; Moy, Karen; Dinger, Mary K.; Williams, Daniel P.; Harbour, Vanessa J.

    2011-01-01

    Until recently, health statistics data for Native Hawaiians and Pacific Islanders (NHPI) in the United States were almost nonexistent, due to their being historically aggregated into one homogenous group with Asian Americans. However, recent studies on U.S. NHPI highlight a multitude of obesity-related health disparities indicating the necessity…

  2. Infusing Active Learning into the Research Methods Unit

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bluestone, Cheryl

    2007-01-01

    The research methods unit of survey psychology classes introduces important concepts of scientific reasoning and fluency, making it an ideal course in which to deliver enhanced curricula. To increase interest and engagement, the author developed an expanded research methods and statistics module to give students the opportunity to explore…

  3. 36 CFR 9.83 - Coordination of AMRAP activities in National Park System units.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 36 Parks, Forests, and Public Property 1 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Coordination of AMRAP activities in National Park System units. 9.83 Section 9.83 Parks, Forests, and Public Property NATIONAL PARK... Coordination of AMRAP activities in National Park System units. (a) To facilitate compliance with this...

  4. 36 CFR 9.83 - Coordination of AMRAP activities in National Park System units.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 36 Parks, Forests, and Public Property 1 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Coordination of AMRAP activities in National Park System units. 9.83 Section 9.83 Parks, Forests, and Public Property NATIONAL PARK... Coordination of AMRAP activities in National Park System units. (a) To facilitate compliance with this...

  5. 36 CFR 9.83 - Coordination of AMRAP activities in National Park System units.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 36 Parks, Forests, and Public Property 1 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Coordination of AMRAP activities in National Park System units. 9.83 Section 9.83 Parks, Forests, and Public Property NATIONAL PARK... Coordination of AMRAP activities in National Park System units. (a) To facilitate compliance with this...

  6. 36 CFR 9.83 - Coordination of AMRAP activities in National Park System units.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 36 Parks, Forests, and Public Property 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Coordination of AMRAP activities in National Park System units. 9.83 Section 9.83 Parks, Forests, and Public Property NATIONAL PARK... Coordination of AMRAP activities in National Park System units. (a) To facilitate compliance with this...

  7. 36 CFR 9.83 - Coordination of AMRAP activities in National Park System units.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 36 Parks, Forests, and Public Property 1 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Coordination of AMRAP activities in National Park System units. 9.83 Section 9.83 Parks, Forests, and Public Property NATIONAL PARK... Coordination of AMRAP activities in National Park System units. (a) To facilitate compliance with this...

  8. Spatiotemporal release of BMP-2 and VEGF enhances osteogenic and vasculogenic differentiation of human mesenchymal stem cells and endothelial colony-forming cells co-encapsulated in a patterned hydrogel.

    PubMed

    Barati, Danial; Shariati, Seyed Ramin Pajoum; Moeinzadeh, Seyedsina; Melero-Martin, Juan M; Khademhosseini, Ali; Jabbari, Esmaiel

    2016-02-10

    Reconstruction of large bone defects is limited by insufficient vascularization and slow bone regeneration. The objective of this work was to investigate the effect of spatial and temporal release of recombinant human bone morphogenetic protein-2 (BMP2) and vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) on the extent of osteogenic and vasculogenic differentiation of human mesenchymal stem cells (hMSCs) and endothelial colony-forming cells (ECFCs) encapsulated in a patterned hydrogel. Nanogels (NGs) based on polyethylene glycol (PEG) macromers chain-extended with short lactide (L) and glycolide (G) segments were used for grafting and timed-release of BMP2 and VEGF. NGs with 12kDa PEG molecular weight (MW), 24 LG segment length, and 60/40L/G ratio (P12-II, NG(10)) released the grafted VEGF in 10days. NGs with 8kDa PEG MW, 26 LG segment length, and 60/40L/G ratio (P8-I, NG(21)) released the grafted BMP2 in 21days. hMSCs and NG-BMP2 were encapsulated in a patterned matrix based on acrylate-functionalized lactide-chain-extended star polyethylene glycol (SPELA) hydrogel and microchannel patterns filled with a suspension of hMSCs+ECFCs and NG-VEGF in a crosslinked gelatin methacryloyl (GelMA) hydrogel. Groups included patterned constructs without BMP2/VEGF (None), with directly added BMP2/VEGF, and NG-BMP2/NG-VEGF. Based on the results, timed-release of VEGF in the microchannels in 10days from NG(10) and BMP2 in the matrix in 21days from NG(21) resulted in highest extent of osteogenic and vasculogenic differentiation of the encapsulated hMSCs and ECFCs compared to direct addition of VEGF and BMP2. Further, timed-release of VEGF from NG(10) in hMSC+ECFC encapsulating microchannels and BMP2 from NG(21) in hMSC encapsulating matrix sharply increased bFGF expression in the patterned constructs. The results suggest that mineralization and vascularization are coupled by localized secretion of paracrine signaling factors by the differentiating hMSCs and ECFCs. PMID:26721447

  9. Development Activities on an Advanced Propellant Flow Control Unit

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Noci, G.; Siciliano, P.; Fallerini, L.; Kutufa, N.; Rivetti, A.; Galassi, C.; Bruschi, P.; Piotto, M.

    2004-10-01

    A new generation of propellant control equipment for electric propulsion systems is needed in order to improve performance and operating ranges, symplify h/w configuration, reduce mass and dimensions, eliminate mass flow ripple, reduce time response. In this frame, the development of key components, their assembly and experimental investigation/ validation is on-going at Alenia Spazio-Laben/Business Unit Proel Tecnologie ( Proel in the following ) in the frame of an ESA GSTP program. The new components shall support different EP technologies, future EP multi-tasking capability and wide operating ranges. This paper reports about the development effort, its achievements and perspectives. 1. ABBREVIATIONS AND ACRONYMS BOL Beginning of Life CMBR Ceramic multilayer bender ring CTA Constant Temperature Anemometry. DUT Device under test EOL End of Life EP Electric Propulsion GEO Geosyncrhonous Earth Orbit GFCU Gas Flow Control Unit GIT Gridded ion thruster HET Hall Effect Thrusters LEO Low Earth Orbit LPC Low pressure capillary MEOP Maximum Expected Operating Pressure MFS Mass Flow rate Sensor NSSK North-South Station Keeping Pred Reduced pressure Ptank Tank pressure RMT Radiofrequency Magnetic Thruster RMTA Radiofrequency Magnetic Thruster Assembly ROOV Regulation and On-Off Valve SoW Statement of Work SPT Stationary Plasma Thruster.

  10. Sector Activities and Lessons Learned Around Initial Implementation of the United States National Physical Activity Plan

    PubMed Central

    Evenson, Kelly R.; Satinsky, Sara B.

    2016-01-01

    Background National plans are increasingly common but infrequently evaluated. The 2010 United States National Physical Activity Plan (NPAP) provided strategies to increase population levels of physical activity. This paper describes (i) the initial accomplishments of the NPAP sector teams, and (ii) results from a process evaluation to determine how the sectors operated, their cross-sector collaboration, challenges encountered, and positive experiences. Methods During 2011, a quarterly reporting system was developed to capture sector-level activities. A year-end interview derived more detailed information. Interviews with 12 sector leads were recorded, transcribed verbatim, and analyzed for common themes. Results The 6 sectors worked on goals from the implementation plan that focused broadly on education, promotion, intervention, policy, collaboration, and evaluation. Through year-end interviews, themes were generated around operations, goal setting, and cross-sector collaboration. Challenges to the NPAP work included lack of funding and time, the need for marketing and promotion, and organizational support. Positive experiences included collaboration, efficiency of work, enhanced community dynamic, and accomplishments toward NPAP goals. Conclusions These initial results on the NPAP sector teams can be used as a baseline assessment for future monitoring. The lessons learned may be useful to other practitioners developing evaluations around state- or national-level plans. PMID:24176800

  11. Dynamic workflow model for complex activity in intensive care unit.

    PubMed

    Bricon-Souf, N; Renard, J M; Beuscart, R

    1998-01-01

    Cooperation is very important in Medical care, especially in the Intensive Care Unit (ICU) where the difficulties increase which is due to the urgency of the work. Workflow systems are considered as well adapted to modelize productive work in business process. We aim at introducing this approach in the Health Care domain. We have proposed a conversation-based Workflow in order to modelize the therapeutics plan in the ICU [1]. But in such a complex field, the flexibility of the workflow system is essential for the system to be usable. In this paper, we focus on the main points used to increase the dynamicity. We report on affecting roles, highlighting information, and controlling the system We propose some solutions and describe our prototype in the ICU. PMID:10384452

  12. A review of recent activity in the United States.

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Cannon, H.L.; Petrie, W.L.

    1979-01-01

    Either an overabundance or a deficiency of trace metals in the food chain can ultimately affect adversely the health of livestock and man. Increasing interest in the United States in the distribution of metals in the environment and in metal pollutants has led to widespread interdisciplinary research sponsored by governmental, private and academic groups concerning the availability of trace elements for absorption by plants and animals, and the effects of trace elements throughout the food chain. Effects on the environment of coal-fired power plants, the mining and processing of metals, asbestos, and phosphate, and the disposal of industrial and nuclear wastes have also received much attention in the past few years.-Authors

  13. United States Department of Energy Thermally Activated Heat Pump Program

    SciTech Connect

    Fiskum, R.J.; Adcock, P.W.; DeVault, R.C.

    1996-06-01

    The US Department of Energy (DOE) is working with partners from the gas heating and cooling industry to improve energy efficiency using advance absorption technologies, to eliminate chlorofluorocarbons (CFCs) and hydrochlorofluorocarbons (HCFCs), to reduce global warming through more efficient combustion of natural gas, and to impact electric peak demand of air conditioning. To assist industry in developing these gas heating and cooling absorption technologies, the US DOE sponsors the Thermally Activated Heat Pump Program. It is divided into five key activities, addressing residential gas absorption heat pumps, large commercial chillers, advanced absorption fluids, computer-aided design, and advanced ``Hi-Cool`` heat pumps.

  14. Update on nutrition monitoring activities in the United States.

    PubMed

    Kuczmarski, M F; Moshfegh, A; Briefel, R

    1994-07-01

    This article provides an overview of planned and proposed nutrition monitoring activities of the National Nutrition Monitoring and Related Research (NNMRR) Program. Key provisions of the NNMRR Act of 1990 are described, including the roles and responsibilities of the Interagency Board of Nutrition Monitoring and Related Research (IBNMRR) and the National Nutrition Monitoring Advisory Council and the development of the Ten-Year Comprehensive Plan. The Plan, which was developed under the guidance of the IBNMRR and reviewed by the National Nutrition Monitoring Advisory Council, is the basis for planning and coordinating the monitoring activities of 22 federal agencies. Also discussed are the resources generated from nutrition monitoring activities, from publications to conferences, that are available to dietitians and nutritionists. Professionals view the scientific reports that describe the nutritional status of the US population and the directories of federal and state monitoring activities as valuable resources. Suggestions from users of nutrition monitoring data related to their information and research needs have been extremely helpful to federal agencies in the development of future monitoring publications and the Ten-Year Comprehensive Plan. Continued communication between dietitians and the federal agencies responsible for the NNMRR Program is important. PMID:8021417

  15. Use of the United States Census in Social Studies Activities.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hardy, Charles

    1982-01-01

    Discusses how teachers can use U.S. census data in secondary U.S. history classes. Four census-based activities dealing with the themes of social mobility among Detroit and Alabama Blacks, definition of megalopolis, poverty in Boston, and Irish immigrants in Walpole, Massachusetts, in 1850 are described. (AM)

  16. Food, 47 Activities: An Experimental Unit, First Draft.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Denver Univ., CO. Center for Teaching International Relations.

    Supplementary teaching activities at the junior- and senior-high school level on issues and topics involving food are provided. Topics include food production and distribution, nutrition, food shortages, food habits, and meal planning. Students are encouraged to develop perspective on global food concerns as well as understand their own family…

  17. Marine Activity Dynamics (M.A.D.). Unit S.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rhode Island State Dept. of Education, Providence. Education Information Center.

    This curriculum guide describes an activity-oriented marine study program, designed for use with middle school children (grade 5). The content focuses primarily upon the life sciences, with some emphasis on chemistry and geology. Following the development of a rationale for the inclusion of marine sciences in the school curriculum, a middle…

  18. Research on the chemical inactivation of antibiotic activity in assays of sterility and contamination of pharmaceuticals.

    PubMed

    Negretti, F; Casetta, P

    1991-01-01

    Membrane filtration, frequently used for removing antibacterial activity in assays of sterility and contamination of the antibiotics, presents the drawback of adsorption of antibiotic to membrane. The washing with large volumes of peptone water removes partially interferences with microbial growth. We evaluated the inactivating action of some chemical substances (albumin, calcium pantothenate, heparin, hydroxylamine, tri-valent iron) on the antimicrobial activity of membranes employed for antibiotic filtration. The results are not positive for the use of chemical substances in the antibiotic activity neutralization. In fact the per cent reduction of inhibition zones ranges from -61.5% to +20.0% and the inhibiting activity on the growth of colony forming units (CFU) oscillates from 89.6% to 100%. Discovery of new neutralizing substances and severe measures of asepsis in pharmaceutical production are recommended. PMID:12041793

  19. Dynamic workflow model for complex activity in intensive care unit.

    PubMed

    Bricon-Souf, N; Renard, J M; Beuscart, R

    1999-01-01

    Co-operation is very important in Medical care, especially in the Intensive Care Unit (ICU) where the difficulties increase which is due to the urgency of the work. Workflow systems are considered as well adapted to modelize productive work in business process. We aim at introducing this approach in the Health Care domain. We have proposed a conversation-based workflow in order to modelize the therapeutics plan in the ICU [1]. But in such a complex field, the flexibility of the workflow system is essential for the system to be usable. We have concentrated on three main points usually proposed in the workflow models, suffering from a lack of dynamicity: static links between roles and actors, global notification of information changes, lack of human control on the system. In this paper, we focus on the main points used to increase the dynamicity. We report on affecting roles, highlighting information, and controlling the system. We propose some solutions and describe our prototype in the ICU. PMID:10193884

  20. United States radiological health activities: inspection results of mammography facilities

    PubMed Central

    Spelic, DC; Kaczmarek, RV; Hilohi, M; Belella, S

    2007-01-01

    Purpose: The Mammography Quality Standards Act (MQSA) was enacted in 1992 to set national standards for high-quality mammography, including standards for mammographic X-ray equipment, patient dose, clinical image quality, and related technical parameters. The MQSA also requires minimum qualifications for radiologic technologists, interpreting physicians and medical physicists, mandates acceptable practices for quality-control, quality-assurance, and requires processes to audit medical outcomes. This paper presents the findings of MQSA inspections of facilities, which characterize significant factors affecting mammography quality in the United States. Materials and Methods: Trained inspectors collected data regarding X-ray technical factors, made exposure measurements for the determination of mean glandular dose (MGD), evaluated image quality, and inspected the quality of the film-processing environment. The average annual facility and total U.S. screening exam workloads were computed using workload data reported by facilities. Results: Mammography facilities have made technical improvements as evidenced by a narrower distribution of doses, higher phantom-film background optical densities associated with higher phantom image-quality scores, and better film processing. It is estimated that approximately 36 million screening mammography exams were conducted in 2006, a rate that is almost triple the exam volume estimated for 1997. Digital mammography (DM) is now in use at approximately 14% (1,191 of 8,834) of MQSA-certified mammography facilities. The results indicate that DM can offer lower dose to the patient while providing comparable or better image quality. PMID:21614276

  1. 76 FR 61148 - Proposed Information Collection (Application for United States Flag for Burial Purposes) Activity...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-10-03

    ... AFFAIRS Proposed Information Collection (Application for United States Flag for Burial Purposes) Activity... comments on the information needed to determine eligibility for issuance of a burial flag for a deceased... information technology. Title: Application for United States Flag for Burial Purposes, VA Form 21-2008....

  2. Pivoting output unit control systems activated by jacks. [for controlling aircraft flaps

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Belliere, P.

    1978-01-01

    An invention to be used for controlling aircraft flaps is described. It is applicable to control systems with two coaxial output units which pivot simultaneously with respect to two fixed units and which are activated by two opposed, straight coaxial jacks.

  3. Active tectonic studies in the United States, 1987-1990

    SciTech Connect

    Weldon, R.J., II )

    1991-01-01

    The techniques and instrumentation used in active tectonic studies are discussed, and recent results are reviewed. It is suggested that a critical mass of data on several particular regions has been accumulated, making possible critical debates and attempts to assess earthquake hazards. Particular attention is given to studies of the Pacific Northwest region, basin and range deformation studies, and distributed deformation and hidden earthquake sources. Also included is a comprehensive bibliography for the period.

  4. United States-Russia: Environmental management activities, Summer 1998

    SciTech Connect

    1998-09-01

    A Joint Coordinating Committee for Environmental Restoration and Waste Management (JCCEM) was formed between the US and Russia. This report describes the areas of research being studied under JCCEM, namely: Efficient separations; Contaminant transport and site characterization; Mixed wastes; High level waste tank remediation; Transuranic stabilization; Decontamination and decommissioning; and Emergency response. Other sections describe: Administrative framework for cooperation; Scientist exchange; Future actions; Non-JCCEM DOE-Russian activities; and JCCEM publications.

  5. Participating in Political Activities: Political Systems, Unit Three. Comparing Political Experiences, Experimental Edition.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gillespie, Judith A.; Patrick, John J.

    The third unit to the first-semester course, "Comparing Political Experiences," provides 16 activities to help 12th-grade students acquire in-depth knowledge of various kinds of political activities, such as decision making, leadership, communication, and participation. The activities and readings are divided into six sections which stress the…

  6. Motor units in incomplete spinal cord injury: electrical activity, contractile properties and the effects of biofeedback.

    PubMed

    Stein, R B; Brucker, B S; Ayyar, D R

    1990-10-01

    The electrical and contractile properties of hand muscles in a selected population of quadriplegic subjects were studied intensively before and after EMG biofeedback. Spontaneously active motor units and units that could only be slowly and weakly activated were observed in these subjects, in addition to units that were voluntarily activated normally. This suggests a considerable overlap of surviving motor neurons to a single muscle that are below, near or above the level of a lesion. Despite the common occurrence of polyphasic potentials and other signs of neuromuscular reinnervation, the average twitch tension of single motor units in hand muscles of quadriplegic subjects was not significantly different from that in control subjects. Nor did it increase after biofeedback training that typically increased the peak surface EMG by a factor of 2-5 times. The percentage of spontaneously active units was also constant. The surface EMG may be increased during biofeedback by using higher firing rates in motor units that can already be activated, rather than by recruiting previously unavailable motor units. PMID:2266370

  7. Activation process in excitable systems with multiple noise sources: One and two interacting units.

    PubMed

    Franović, Igor; Todorović, Kristina; Perc, Matjaž; Vasović, Nebojša; Burić, Nikola

    2015-12-01

    We consider the coaction of two distinct noise sources on the activation process of a single excitable unit and two interacting excitable units, which are mathematically described by the Fitzhugh-Nagumo equations. We determine the most probable activation paths around which the corresponding stochastic trajectories are clustered. The key point lies in introducing appropriate boundary conditions that are relevant for a class II excitable unit, which can be immediately generalized also to scenarios involving two coupled units. We analyze the effects of the two noise sources on the statistical features of the activation process, in particular demonstrating how these are modified due to the linear or nonlinear form of interactions. Universal properties of the activation process are qualitatively discussed in the light of a stochastic bifurcation that underlies the transition from a stochastically stable fixed point to continuous oscillations. PMID:26764778

  8. United States data collection activities and requirements, volume 1

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hrin, S.; Mcgregor, D.

    1977-01-01

    The potential market for a data collection system was investigated to determine whether the user needs would be sufficient to support a satellite relay data collection system design. The activities of 107,407 data collections stations were studied to determine user needs in agriculture, climatology, environmental monitoring, forestry, geology, hydrology, meteorology, and oceanography. Descriptions of 50 distinct data collections networks are described and used to form the user data base. The computer program used to analyze the station data base is discussed, and results of the analysis are presented in maps and graphs. Information format and coding is described in the appendix.

  9. 40 CFR 60.1855 - What records must I keep for municipal waste combustion units that use activated carbon?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... waste combustion units that use activated carbon? 60.1855 Section 60.1855 Protection of Environment... SOURCES Emission Guidelines and Compliance Times for Small Municipal Waste Combustion Units Constructed on... waste combustion units that use activated carbon? For municipal waste combustion units that...

  10. Dynamic activation model for a glutamatergic neurovascular unit.

    PubMed

    Calvetti, Daniela; Somersalo, Erkki

    2011-04-01

    This article considers a dynamic spatially lumped model for brain energy metabolism and proposes to use the results of a Markov chain Monte Carlo (MCMC) based flux balance analysis to estimate the kinetic model parameters. By treating steady state reaction fluxes and transport rates as random variables we are able to propagate the uncertainty in the steady state configurations to the predictions of the dynamic model, whose responses are no longer individual but ensembles of time courses. The kinetic model consists of five compartments and is governed by kinetic mass balance equations with Michaelis-Menten type expressions for reaction rates and transports between the compartments. The neuronal activation is implemented in terms of the effect of neuronal activity on parameters controlling the blood flow and neurotransmitter transport, and a feedback mechanism coupling the glutamate concentration in the synaptic cleft and the ATP hydrolysis, thus accounting for the energetic cost of the membrane potential restoration in the postsynaptic neurons. The changes in capillary volume follow the balloon model developed for BOLD MRI. The model follows the time course of the saturation levels of the blood hemoglobin, which link metabolism and BOLD FMRI signal. Analysis of the model predictions suggest that stoichiometry alone is not enough to determine glucose partitioning between neuron and astrocyte. Lactate exchange between neuron and astrocyte is supported by the model predictions, but the uncertainty on the direction and rate is rather elevated. By and large, the model suggests that astrocyte produces and effluxes lactate, while neuron may switch from using to producing lactate. The level of ATP hydrolysis in astrocyte is substantially higher than strictly required for neurotransmitter cycling, in agreement with the literature. PMID:21176783

  11. An exploratory analysis of the relationship between psychiatric nurses' perceptions of workload and unit activity.

    PubMed

    Gerolamo, Angela M

    2009-06-01

    Although research exists relative to psychiatric nurses' perceptions of their work conditions, the relationship between nurses' perceptions of their workloads and the activities in which they engage has been unexplored. The purpose of this study is to examine the relationship between unit activity and nurses' perceptions of their workloads. The design is a secondary analysis using two data sources: (a) reports from 36 psychiatric nurses consisting of perceptions of their work conditions (n = 383) and (b) the hospital census and activity and acuity 24-hour shift reports (n = 384). Nurses' perceptions of workloads were related to unit activity; the greater the number of heavy and medium-to-heavy workloads, the higher the unit activity. This evidence contributes to the growing body of research demonstrating that nurses accurately provide information related to the hospital environment. PMID:19446779

  12. Interaction of drug based copper(II) complexes with Herring Sperm DNA and their biological activities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Patel, Mohan N.; Patel, Chintan R.; Joshi, Hardik N.

    2012-11-01

    Square pyramidal Cu(II) complexes with NS donor ligand and ciprofloxacin have been synthesized and characterized using analytical and spectral techniques. The synthesized complexes have been tested for their antimicrobial activity using double dilution technique in terms of minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) and colony forming unit (CFU). The DNA binding ability of the complexes with Sperm Herring DNA has been performed using absorption titration and viscosity measurement. The nuclease activity of complexes with plasmid DNA (pUC19) has been carried out using agarose gel electrophoresis technique. Synthesized complexes have been tested for their SOD mimic activity using NBT/NADH/PMS system. The cytotoxic properties of metal complexes have been evaluated using brine shrimp lethality bioassay.

  13. Interaction of drug based copper(II) complexes with Herring Sperm DNA and their biological activities.

    PubMed

    Patel, Mohan N; Patel, Chintan R; Joshi, Hardik N

    2012-11-01

    Square pyramidal Cu(II) complexes with NS donor ligand and ciprofloxacin have been synthesized and characterized using analytical and spectral techniques. The synthesized complexes have been tested for their antimicrobial activity using double dilution technique in terms of minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) and colony forming unit (CFU). The DNA binding ability of the complexes with Sperm Herring DNA has been performed using absorption titration and viscosity measurement. The nuclease activity of complexes with plasmid DNA (pUC19) has been carried out using agarose gel electrophoresis technique. Synthesized complexes have been tested for their SOD mimic activity using NBT/NADH/PMS system. The cytotoxic properties of metal complexes have been evaluated using brine shrimp lethality bioassay. PMID:22750339

  14. 40 CFR 62.15310 - What records must I keep for municipal waste combustion units that use activated carbon?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... waste combustion units that use activated carbon? 62.15310 Section 62.15310 Protection of Environment... for municipal waste combustion units that use activated carbon? For municipal waste combustion units that use activated carbon to control dioxins/furans or mercury emissions, you must keep records of...

  15. 40 CFR 62.15310 - What records must I keep for municipal waste combustion units that use activated carbon?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... waste combustion units that use activated carbon? 62.15310 Section 62.15310 Protection of Environment... for municipal waste combustion units that use activated carbon? For municipal waste combustion units that use activated carbon to control dioxins/furans or mercury emissions, you must keep records of...

  16. 40 CFR 60.1855 - What records must I keep for municipal waste combustion units that use activated carbon?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... waste combustion units that use activated carbon? 60.1855 Section 60.1855 Protection of Environment... waste combustion units that use activated carbon? For municipal waste combustion units that use activated carbon to control dioxins/furans or mercury emissions, you must keep records of five items:...

  17. 40 CFR 60.1855 - What records must I keep for municipal waste combustion units that use activated carbon?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... waste combustion units that use activated carbon? 60.1855 Section 60.1855 Protection of Environment... waste combustion units that use activated carbon? For municipal waste combustion units that use activated carbon to control dioxins/furans or mercury emissions, you must keep records of five items:...

  18. 40 CFR 60.1370 - What records must I keep for municipal waste combustion units that use activated carbon?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... waste combustion units that use activated carbon? 60.1370 Section 60.1370 Protection of Environment... Recordkeeping § 60.1370 What records must I keep for municipal waste combustion units that use activated carbon? For municipal waste combustion units that use activated carbon to control dioxins/furans or...

  19. 40 CFR 60.1370 - What records must I keep for municipal waste combustion units that use activated carbon?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... waste combustion units that use activated carbon? 60.1370 Section 60.1370 Protection of Environment... Recordkeeping § 60.1370 What records must I keep for municipal waste combustion units that use activated carbon? For municipal waste combustion units that use activated carbon to control dioxins/furans or...

  20. 40 CFR 60.1855 - What records must I keep for municipal waste combustion units that use activated carbon?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... waste combustion units that use activated carbon? 60.1855 Section 60.1855 Protection of Environment... waste combustion units that use activated carbon? For municipal waste combustion units that use activated carbon to control dioxins/furans or mercury emissions, you must keep records of five items:...

  1. 40 CFR 62.15310 - What records must I keep for municipal waste combustion units that use activated carbon?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... waste combustion units that use activated carbon? 62.15310 Section 62.15310 Protection of Environment... for municipal waste combustion units that use activated carbon? For municipal waste combustion units that use activated carbon to control dioxins/furans or mercury emissions, you must keep records of...

  2. 40 CFR 60.1855 - What records must I keep for municipal waste combustion units that use activated carbon?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... waste combustion units that use activated carbon? 60.1855 Section 60.1855 Protection of Environment... waste combustion units that use activated carbon? For municipal waste combustion units that use activated carbon to control dioxins/furans or mercury emissions, you must keep records of five items:...

  3. 40 CFR 62.15310 - What records must I keep for municipal waste combustion units that use activated carbon?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... waste combustion units that use activated carbon? 62.15310 Section 62.15310 Protection of Environment... for municipal waste combustion units that use activated carbon? For municipal waste combustion units that use activated carbon to control dioxins/furans or mercury emissions, you must keep records of...

  4. 40 CFR 60.1370 - What records must I keep for municipal waste combustion units that use activated carbon?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... waste combustion units that use activated carbon? 60.1370 Section 60.1370 Protection of Environment... Recordkeeping § 60.1370 What records must I keep for municipal waste combustion units that use activated carbon? For municipal waste combustion units that use activated carbon to control dioxins/furans or...

  5. 40 CFR 60.1370 - What records must I keep for municipal waste combustion units that use activated carbon?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... waste combustion units that use activated carbon? 60.1370 Section 60.1370 Protection of Environment... Recordkeeping § 60.1370 What records must I keep for municipal waste combustion units that use activated carbon? For municipal waste combustion units that use activated carbon to control dioxins/furans or...

  6. Rectification of SEMG as a tool to demonstrate synchronous motor unit activity during vibration.

    PubMed

    Sebik, Oguz; Karacan, Ilhan; Cidem, Muharrem; Türker, Kemal S

    2013-04-01

    The use of surface electromyography (SEMG) in vibration studies is problematic since motion artifacts occupy the same frequency band with the SEMG signal containing information on synchronous motor unit activity. We hypothesize that using a harsher, 80-500 Hz band-pass filter and using rectification can help eliminate motion artifacts and provide a way to observe synchronous motor unit activity that is phase locked to vibration using SEMG recordings only. Multi Motor Unit (MMU) action potentials using intramuscular electrodes along with SEMG were recorded from the gastrocnemius medialis (GM) of six healthy male volunteers. Data were collected during whole body vibration, using vibration frequencies of 30 Hz, 35 Hz, 40 Hz or 50 Hz. A computer simulation was used to investigate the efficacy of filtering under different scenarios: with or without artifacts and/or motor unit synchronization. Our findings indicate that motor unit synchronization took place during WBV as verified by MMU recordings. A harsh filtering regimen along with rectification proved successful in demonstrating motor unit synchronization in SEMG recordings. Our findings were further supported by the results from the computer simulation, which indicated that filtering and rectification was efficient in discriminating motion artifacts from motor unit synchronization. We suggest that the proposed signal processing technique may provide a new methodology to evaluate the effects of vibration treatments using only SEMG. This is a major advantage, as this non-intrusive method is able to overcome movement artifacts and also indicate the synchronization of underlying motor units. PMID:23098913

  7. Learning Activity Packets for Grinding Machines. Unit I--Grinding Machines.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Oklahoma State Board of Vocational and Technical Education, Stillwater. Curriculum and Instructional Materials Center.

    This learning activity packet (LAP) is one of three that accompany the curriculum guide on grinding machines. It outlines the study activities and performance tasks for the first unit of this curriculum guide. Its purpose is to aid the student in attaining a working knowledge of this area of training and in achieving a skilled or moderately…

  8. Learning Activity Packets for Grinding Machines. Unit II--Surface Grinding.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Oklahoma State Board of Vocational and Technical Education, Stillwater. Curriculum and Instructional Materials Center.

    This learning activity packet (LAP) is one of three that accompany the curriculum guide on grinding machines. It outlines the study activities and performance tasks for the second unit of this curriculum guide. Its purpose is to aid the student in attaining a working knowledge of this area of training and in achieving a skilled or moderately…

  9. Learning Activity Packets for Grinding Machines. Unit III--Cylindrical Grinding.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Oklahoma State Board of Vocational and Technical Education, Stillwater. Curriculum and Instructional Materials Center.

    This learning activity packet (LAP) is one of three that accompany the curriculum guide on grinding machines. It outlines the study activities and performance tasks for the third unit of this curriculum guide. Its purpose is to aid the student in attaining a working knowledge of this area of training and in achieving a skilled or moderately…

  10. Natural Environments, Obesity, and Physical Activity in Nonmetropolitan Areas of the United States

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Michimi, Akihiko; Wimberly, Michael C.

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: To assess the associations of the natural environment with obesity and physical activity in nonmetropolitan areas of the United States among representative samples by using 2 indices of outdoor activity potential (OAP) at the county level. Methods: We used the data from 457,820 and 473,296 noninstitutionalized adults aged over 18 years…

  11. 78 FR 78788 - Nondiscrimination in Programs or Activities Conducted by the United States Department of Agriculture

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-12-27

    ...The United States Department of Agriculture (USDA or Department) proposes to amend its regulation on nondiscrimination in programs or activities conducted by the Department. The changes are proposed to clarify the roles and responsibilities of USDA's Office of the Assistant Secretary for Civil Rights (OASCR) and USDA agencies in enforcing nondiscrimination in programs or activities conducted......

  12. Olfactory bulb units - Activity correlated with inhalation cycles and odor quality.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Macrides, F.; Chorover, S. L.

    1972-01-01

    Single olfactory bulb units were studied in two macrosmatic species of rodents under conditions intended to preserve the cyclical stimulation which normally accompanies nasal breathing. Patterns of unit activity related to the inhalation cycle were observed in all animals, often in the absence of specific stimuli, and could not be explained in simple mechanical terms. Distinctive changes in these patterns occurred in response to certain odors, and were generally independent of changes in the overall firing frequency. These findings indicate that a change in the overall firing frequency of unit discharges is neither a necessary nor sufficient measure of responsiveness to odors in the rodent olfactory bulb, and that stimulus-specific temporal distributions of unit firing may be involved in olfacto-endocrine activities.

  13. Recruitment of rat diaphragm motor units across motor behaviors with different levels of diaphragm activation

    PubMed Central

    Seven, Yasin B.; Mantilla, Carlos B.

    2014-01-01

    Phrenic motor neurons are recruited across a range of motor behaviors to generate varying levels of diaphragm muscle (DIAm) force. We hypothesized that DIAm motor units are recruited in a fixed order across a range of motor behaviors of varying force levels, consistent with the Henneman Size Principle. Single motor unit action potentials and compound DIAm EMG activities were recorded in anesthetized, neurally intact rats across different motor behaviors, i.e., eupnea, hypoxia-hypercapnia (10% O2 and 5% CO2), deep breaths, sustained airway occlusion, and sneezing. Central drive [estimated by root-mean-squared (RMS) EMG value 75 ms after the onset of EMG activity (RMS75)], recruitment delay, and onset discharge frequencies were similar during eupnea and hypoxia-hypercapnia. Compared with eupnea, central drive increased (∼25%) during deep breaths, and motor units were recruited ∼12 ms earlier (P < 0.01). During airway occlusion, central drive was ∼3 times greater, motor units were recruited ∼30 ms earlier (P < 0.01), and motor unit onset discharge frequencies were significantly higher (P < 0.01). Recruitment order of motor unit pairs observed during eupnea was maintained for 98%, 87%, and 84% of the same pairs recorded during hypoxia-hypercapnia, deep breaths, and airway occlusion, respectively. Reversals in motor unit recruitment order were observed primarily if motor unit pairs were recruited <20 ms apart. These results are consistent with DIAm motor unit recruitment order being determined primarily by the intrinsic size-dependent electrophysiological properties of phrenic motor neurons. PMID:25257864

  14. 40 CFR 60.1370 - What records must I keep for municipal waste combustion units that use activated carbon?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... waste combustion units that use activated carbon? 60.1370 Section 60.1370 Protection of Environment... SOURCES Standards of Performance for Small Municipal Waste Combustion Units for Which Construction is... Recordkeeping § 60.1370 What records must I keep for municipal waste combustion units that use activated...

  15. 40 CFR 62.15310 - What records must I keep for municipal waste combustion units that use activated carbon?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... waste combustion units that use activated carbon? 62.15310 Section 62.15310 Protection of Environment... Combustion Units Constructed on or Before August 30, 1999 Recordkeeping § 62.15310 What records must I keep for municipal waste combustion units that use activated carbon? For municipal waste combustion...

  16. Linear Closed-form Solution and Finite-element Analysis of an Active Tensegrity Unit

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kmeť, Stanislav; Platko, Peter

    2012-11-01

    Results of the linear closed form solution of an active or adaptive tensegrity unit, as well as its numerical analysis using finite element method are presented in the paper. The shape of the unit is an octahedral cell with a square base and it is formed by thirteen members (four bottom and four top cables, four edge struts and one central strut). The central strut is designed as an actuator that allows for an adjustment of the shape of the unit which leads to changes of tensile forces in the cables. Due to the diagonal symmetry of the 3D tensegrity unit the closed-form analysis is based on the 2D solution of the equivalent planar biconvex cable system with one central strut under a vertical point load.

  17. Nursing Activities Score: nursing work load in a burns Intensive Care Unit1

    PubMed Central

    Camuci, Marcia Bernadete; Martins, Júlia Trevisan; Cardeli, Alexandrina Aparecida Maciel; Robazzi, Maria Lúcia do Carmo Cruz

    2014-01-01

    Objective to evaluate the nursing work load in a Burns Intensive Care Unit according to the Nursing Activities Score. Method an exploratory, descriptive cross-sectional study with a quantitative approach. The Nursing Activities Score was used for data collection between October 2011 and May 2012, totalling 1,221 measurements, obtained from 50 patients' hospital records. Data for qualitative variables was described in tables; for the quantitative variables, calculations using statistical measurements were used. Results the mean score for the Nursing Activities Score was 70.4% and the median was 70.3%, corresponding to the percentage of the time spent on direct care to the patient in 24 hours. Conclusion the Nursing Activities Score provided information which involves the process of caring for patients hospitalized in a Burns Intensive Care Unit, and indicated that there is a high work load for the nursing team of the sector studied. PMID:26107842

  18. Activation process in excitable systems with multiple noise sources: Large number of units.

    PubMed

    Franović, Igor; Perc, Matjaž; Todorović, Kristina; Kostić, Srdjan; Burić, Nikola

    2015-12-01

    We study the activation process in large assemblies of type II excitable units whose dynamics is influenced by two independent noise terms. The mean-field approach is applied to explicitly demonstrate that the assembly of excitable units can itself exhibit macroscopic excitable behavior. In order to facilitate the comparison between the excitable dynamics of a single unit and an assembly, we introduce three distinct formulations of the assembly activation event. Each formulation treats different aspects of the relevant phenomena, including the thresholdlike behavior and the role of coherence of individual spikes. Statistical properties of the assembly activation process, such as the mean time-to-first pulse and the associated coefficient of variation, are found to be qualitatively analogous for all three formulations, as well as to resemble the results for a single unit. These analogies are shown to derive from the fact that global variables undergo a stochastic bifurcation from the stochastically stable fixed point to continuous oscillations. Local activation processes are analyzed in the light of the competition between the noise-led and the relaxation-driven dynamics. We also briefly report on a system-size antiresonant effect displayed by the mean time-to-first pulse. PMID:26764779

  19. Framing the Activities of Institutions and Academic Development Units in Support of Assessment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hughes, Clair

    2009-01-01

    The assessment-related activities of academic development units (ADU) are driven not only by institutional initiatives and the pursuit of particular research interests but also by less predictable factors including the emerging needs of faculty members and external funding opportunities. When not located within a strong classification framework,…

  20. 75 FR 32959 - Agency Information Collection Activities: United States-Caribbean Basin Trade Partnership Act

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-06-10

    ... information collection was previously published in the Federal Register (75 FR 15446) on March 29, 2010... SECURITY U.S. Customs and Border Protection Agency Information Collection Activities: United States-Caribbean Basin Trade Partnership Act AGENCY: U.S. Customs and Border Protection, Department of...

  1. The Official-Language Movement in the United States: Contexts, Issues, and Activities.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Amorose, Thomas

    1989-01-01

    Central concerns in the movement to make English the official language of the United States are reviewed, publications and activities of two major organizations supporting it are compared, and basic assumptions and directions of the movement are criticized. (21 references) (MSE)

  2. Mountain-Plains Master Course List. Curriculum Areas: Job Titles: Learning Activity Packages: Courses: Units.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mountain-Plains Education and Economic Development Program, Inc., Glasgow AFB, MT.

    The document contains a master listing of all Mountain-Plains curriculum, compiled by job title, course, unit and LAP (Learning Activity Package), and arranged in numerical order by curriculum area. Preceding each curriculum area is a page of explanatory notes describing the curriculum area and including relevant job descriptions. Where a job…

  3. Activation process in excitable systems with multiple noise sources: Large number of units

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Franović, Igor; Perc, Matjaž; Todorović, Kristina; Kostić, Srdjan; Burić, Nikola

    2015-12-01

    We study the activation process in large assemblies of type II excitable units whose dynamics is influenced by two independent noise terms. The mean-field approach is applied to explicitly demonstrate that the assembly of excitable units can itself exhibit macroscopic excitable behavior. In order to facilitate the comparison between the excitable dynamics of a single unit and an assembly, we introduce three distinct formulations of the assembly activation event. Each formulation treats different aspects of the relevant phenomena, including the thresholdlike behavior and the role of coherence of individual spikes. Statistical properties of the assembly activation process, such as the mean time-to-first pulse and the associated coefficient of variation, are found to be qualitatively analogous for all three formulations, as well as to resemble the results for a single unit. These analogies are shown to derive from the fact that global variables undergo a stochastic bifurcation from the stochastically stable fixed point to continuous oscillations. Local activation processes are analyzed in the light of the competition between the noise-led and the relaxation-driven dynamics. We also briefly report on a system-size antiresonant effect displayed by the mean time-to-first pulse.

  4. Teen Sexual Activity, Pregnancy and Childbearing among Latinos in the United States. Fact Sheet.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National Campaign To Prevent Teen Pregnancy, Washington, DC.

    The Latino population is the fastest-growing major racial/ethnic group in the United States. By 2020, approximately 16 percent of the population will be Latino. This increase will be even more pronounced among teens. This fact sheet summarizes data from the National Vital Statistics Reports on reported sexual activity, pregnancy rates, and…

  5. Breaking the Chain of Infection: Dental Unit Water Quality Control

    PubMed Central

    Pawar, Amrita; Mehta, Sonia; Dang, Rajat

    2016-01-01

    Introduction The air–water syringes, ultrasonic scalers, high speed air turbine handpieces are connected to dental units by a network of small-bore plastic tubes through which water and air travel to activate or cool the instruments and it had been shown that this system is extensively contaminated with microbial biofilms and pose a potential risk of infection for patients as well as dental professionals. Aim To evaluate and compare the efficacy of various disinfectants in reducing the microbial colony count in water derived from Dental Unit Waterlines. Materials and Methods Five random dental units were selected and samples were collected before and after intervention with 5 disinfectants (0.02% H2O2 continuously, 0.02% H2O2 continuously with shock treatment with 0.25% H2O2 weekly, 0.12% Chlorohexidine and 12% Ethanol overnight, 1:50 Original Listerine overnight, 2% Sodium Perborate and 2% EDTA 5 minutes in morning) using different disinfection methods for 4 weeks. Samples were cultured on Reasoner’s 2A (R2A) agar for microbial counting. Results Results were recorded as Colony forming units/ml (cfu/ml) and were evaluated statistically. Results showed that all the dental unit waterlines were heavily contaminated with microbes before any intervention. After 1 day of disinfection regime the counts reduced significantly and showed progressive reduction in consecutive weeks. Goals set by ADA & CDC were ultimately achieved at the end of 4 weeks. Conclusion All the disinfectants were equally effective in reducing the microbial colony count of DUWLs, irrespective of their concentration and method of disinfection.

  6. Detection of single unit activity from the rat vagus using cluster analysis of principal components.

    PubMed

    Horn, Charles C; Friedman, Mark I

    2003-01-30

    In vivo recordings from subdiaphragmatic vagal afferent nerves generally lack the resolution to distinguish single unit activity. Several methods for data acquisition and analysis were combined to produce a high degree of reliability in recording electrophysiological signals from gastrointestinal and hepatic afferent fibers in the rat. Recordings with low noise were achieved by paralysis of the respiratory muscles and by pinning the nerve to a recording platform. Single unit activity was isolated using principal component (PC) analysis and cluster cutting of data in multi-dimensional space (1-3 PCs). Cluster assignments were determined by a semi-automated approach using the k-means algorithm. The accuracy of single unit classification was assessed by checking inter-spike intervals (ISIs) to determine the length of the refractory period, and by cross-correlation analysis to assess whether single units were mistakenly split into more than one cluster. These analyses produced up to four isolated single units from each nerve filament (a bundle of nerve fibers), and typically it was possible to further increase yield by recording from several nerve filaments simultaneously using an array of electrodes. PMID:12573473

  7. Oscillations in the premotor cortex: single-unit activity from awake, behaving monkeys.

    PubMed

    Lebedev, M A; Wise, S P

    2000-01-01

    We examined single-unit activity in the dorsal premotor cortex for evidence of fast neuronal oscillations. Four rhesus monkeys performed a task in which visuospatial instruction stimuli indicated the direction of forelimb movement to be executed on each trial. After an instructed delay period of 1.5-3 s, movements to either the right or left of a central origin were triggered by a second visuospatial stimulus. From a database of 579 single units, 78 units (13%) contained periodic peaks in their autocorrelation histograms (ACHs), with oscillation frequencies typically 20-30 Hz (mean 27 Hz). An additional 26 units (5%) had oscillatory features that were identified in joint interspike-interval (ISI) plots. Three observations, taken together, suggest entrainment by rhythmic drive extrinsic to these neurons: shuffling ISIs attenuated ACH peaks, indicating a dependency on serial-order effects; oscillation frequency did not change during either increases or decreases in firing rate; and joint ISI plots contained features consistent with a rhythmicity interrupted by intervening discharges. In some cells, oscillations occurred for only one of the two directions of movement. During the delay period, such directional selectivity was observed in 37 units (60% of delay-period oscillators). For at least 17 of these units, we could exclude the possibility that oscillatory directional selectivity resulted from the difficulty in detecting oscillations due to low discharge rates (for one of the two movement directions). Directional selectivity in fast oscillations shows that they can reflect specific aspects of an intended action. PMID:10672473

  8. Liposome containing cinnamon oil with antibacterial activity against methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus biofilm.

    PubMed

    Cui, Haiying; Li, Wei; Li, Changzhu; Vittayapadung, Saritporn; Lin, Lin

    2016-01-01

    The global burden of bacterial disease remains high and is set against a backdrop of increasing antimicrobial resistance. There is a pressing need for highly effective and natural antibacterial agents. In this work, the anti-biofilm effect of cinnamon oil on methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus was evaluated. Then, cinnamon oil was encapsulated in liposomes to enhance its chemical stability. The anti-biofilm activities of the liposome-encapsulated cinnamon oil against MRSA biofilms on stainless steel, gauze, nylon membrane and non-woven fabrics were evaluated by colony forming unit determination. Scanning electron microscopy and laser scanning confocal microscopy analyses were employed to observe the morphological changes in MRSA biofilms treated with the encapsulated cinnamon oil. As a natural and safe spice, the cinnamon oil exhibited a satisfactory antibacterial performance on MRSA and its biofilms. The application of liposomes further improves the stability of antimicrobial agents and extends the action time. PMID:26838161

  9. Single unit action potentials in humans and the effect of seizure activity

    PubMed Central

    Merricks, Edward M.; Smith, Elliot H.; McKhann, Guy M.; Goodman, Robert R.; Bateman, Lisa M.; Emerson, Ronald G.

    2015-01-01

    Spike-sorting algorithms have been used to identify the firing patterns of isolated neurons (‘single units’) from implanted electrode recordings in patients undergoing assessment for epilepsy surgery, but we do not know their potential for providing helpful clinical information. It is important therefore to characterize both the stability of these recordings and also their context. A critical consideration is where the units are located with respect to the focus of the pathology. Recent analyses of neuronal spiking activity, recorded over extended spatial areas using microelectrode arrays, have demonstrated the importance of considering seizure activity in terms of two distinct spatial territories: the ictal core and penumbral territories. The pathological information in these two areas, however, is likely to be very different. We investigated, therefore, whether units could be followed reliably over prolonged periods of times in these two areas, including during seizure epochs. We isolated unit recordings from several hundred neurons from four patients undergoing video-telemetry monitoring for surgical evaluation of focal neocortical epilepsies. Unit stability could last in excess of 40 h, and across multiple seizures. A key finding was that in the penumbra, spike stereotypy was maintained even during the seizure. There was a net tendency towards increased penumbral firing during the seizure, although only a minority of units (10–20%) showed significant changes over the baseline period, and notably, these also included neurons showing significant reductions in firing. In contrast, within the ictal core territories, regions characterized by intense hypersynchronous multi-unit firing, our spike sorting algorithms failed as the units were incorporated into the seizure activity. No spike sorting was possible from that moment until the end of the seizure, but recovery of the spike shape was rapid following seizure termination: some units reappeared within tens of

  10. Coherence of EMG activity and single motor unit discharge patterns in human rhythmical force production.

    PubMed

    Sosnoff, Jacob J; Vaillancourt, David E; Larsson, Lars; Newell, Karl M

    2005-03-30

    The purpose of this study was to examine the modulation of the motor neuronal pool as a function of task dynamics. Specifically, we investigated the effects of task frequency on the single motor unit discharge pattern, electromyogram (EMG) activity and effector force output. Myoelectric activity and effector force were recorded while young adults isometrically abducted their first dorsal interosseus at five sinusoidal targets (0.5 Hz, 1 Hz, 2 Hz, 3 Hz and 4 Hz) and at two force levels (5% and 25% maximum voluntary contraction (MVC)). Individual motor unit spike trains were isolated from the EMG. Auto-spectral and coherence analyses were performed on the force output, EMG and motor unit spike trains. The frequency of maximal coherence between the EMG and force output closely corresponded to the target frequency in all conditions. There was a broadband distribution of power with multiple peaks in the EMG and motor unit spectrums in the 0.5 Hz and 1 Hz targets. However, the EMG and motor unit spectrums in the 2 Hz, 3 Hz and 4 Hz targets were characterized by an increasingly narrower band of activity with one dominant peak that closely corresponded to the target. There is high coherence between EMG output and target force frequency, but the relative contribution of the fast and slow neuromuscular bands are differentially influenced by the task frequency. The rhythmical organization of neuromuscular output in the 0.5 Hz task is relatively broadband and similar to that shown previously for constant level force output. The frequency structure of neuromuscular organization becomes increasingly more narrowband as the frequency of the target increases (2-4 Hz). The modulation of the motor neuronal pool is adaptive and depends on the relative contribution of feedback and feedforward control processes, which are driven by the task demands. PMID:15698897

  11. Frost Growth CFD Model of an Integrated Active Desiccant Rooftop Unit

    SciTech Connect

    Geoghegan, Patrick J; Petrov, Andrei Y; Vineyard, Edward Allan; Zaltash, Abdolreza; Linkous, Randall Lee

    2008-01-01

    A frost growth model is incorporated into a Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) simulation of a heat pump by means of a user-defined function in FLUENT, a commercial CFD code. The transient model is applied to the outdoor section of an Integrated Active Desiccant Rooftop (IADR) unit in heating mode. IADR is a hybrid vapor compression and active desiccant unit capable of handling 100% outdoor air (dedicated outdoor air system) or as a total conditioning system, handling both outdoor air and space cooling or heating loads. The predicted increase in flow resistance and loss in heat transfer capacity due to frost build-up are compared to experimental pressure drop readings and thermal imaging. The purpose of this work is to develop a CFD model that is capable of predicting frost growth, an invaluable tool in evaluating the effectiveness of defrost-on-demand cycles.

  12. Active Galaxies Educational Unit: An Educator's Guide with Activities in Science and Mathematics.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration, Washington, DC.

    As a part of its educational effort, the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) Education and Public Outreach group at Sonoma State University (SSU) has put together a series of activities based on the science of one of NASA's exciting space missions, the Gamma-ray Large Area Space Telescope (GLAST). GLAST is a NASA satellite planned…

  13. Application of the Activity-Based Costing Method for Unit-Cost Calculation in a Hospital

    PubMed Central

    Javid, Mahdi; Hadian, Mohammad; Ghaderi, Hossein; Ghaffari, Shahram; Salehi, Masoud

    2016-01-01

    Background: Choosing an appropriate accounting system for hospital has always been a challenge for hospital managers. Traditional cost system (TCS) causes cost distortions in hospital. Activity-based costing (ABC) method is a new and more effective cost system. Objective: This study aimed to compare ABC with TCS method in calculating the unit cost of medical services and to assess its applicability in Kashani Hospital, Shahrekord City, Iran. Methods: This cross-sectional study was performed on accounting data of Kashani Hospital in 2013. Data on accounting reports of 2012 and other relevant sources at the end of 2012 were included. To apply ABC method, the hospital was divided into several cost centers and five cost categories were defined: wage, equipment, space, material, and overhead costs. Then activity centers were defined. ABC method was performed into two phases. First, the total costs of cost centers were assigned to activities by using related cost factors. Then the costs of activities were divided to cost objects by using cost drivers. After determining the cost of objects, the cost price of medical services was calculated and compared with those obtained from TCS. Results: The Kashani Hospital had 81 physicians, 306 nurses, and 328 beds with the mean occupancy rate of 67.4% during 2012. Unit cost of medical services, cost price of occupancy bed per day, and cost per outpatient service were calculated. The total unit costs by ABC and TCS were respectively 187.95 and 137.70 USD, showing 50.34 USD more unit cost by ABC method. ABC method represented more accurate information on the major cost components. Conclusion: By utilizing ABC, hospital managers have a valuable accounting system that provides a true insight into the organizational costs of their department. PMID:26234974

  14. 20 CFR 404.417 - Deductions because of noncovered remunerative activity outside the United States; 45 hour and 7...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... activity outside the United States; 45 hour and 7-day work test. 404.417 Section 404.417 Employees' Benefits SOCIAL SECURITY ADMINISTRATION FEDERAL OLD-AGE, SURVIVORS AND DISABILITY INSURANCE (1950... activity outside the United States; 45 hour and 7-day work test. (a) Deductions because of...

  15. Electronic Word of Mouth on Twitter About Physical Activity in the United States: Exploratory Infodemiology Study

    PubMed Central

    Campo, Shelly; Janz, Kathleen F; Eckler, Petya; Yang, Jingzhen; Snetselaar, Linda G; Signorini, Alessio

    2013-01-01

    Background Twitter is a widely used social medium. However, its application in promoting health behaviors is understudied. Objective In order to provide insights into designing health marketing interventions to promote physical activity on Twitter, this exploratory infodemiology study applied both social cognitive theory and the path model of online word of mouth to examine the distribution of different electronic word of mouth (eWOM) characteristics among personal tweets about physical activity in the United States. Methods This study used 113 keywords to retrieve 1 million public tweets about physical activity in the United States posted between January 1 and March 31, 2011. A total of 30,000 tweets were randomly selected and sorted based on numbers generated by a random number generator. Two coders scanned the first 16,100 tweets and yielded 4672 (29.02%) tweets that they both agreed to be about physical activity and were from personal accounts. Finally, 1500 tweets were randomly selected from the 4672 tweets (32.11%) for further coding. After intercoder reliability scores reached satisfactory levels in the pilot coding (100 tweets separate from the final 1500 tweets), 2 coders coded 750 tweets each. Descriptive analyses, Mann-Whitney U tests, and Fisher exact tests were performed. Results Tweets about physical activity were dominated by neutral sentiments (1270/1500, 84.67%). Providing opinions or information regarding physical activity (1464/1500, 97.60%) and chatting about physical activity (1354/1500, 90.27%) were found to be popular on Twitter. Approximately 60% (905/1500, 60.33%) of the tweets demonstrated users’ past or current participation in physical activity or intentions to participate in physical activity. However, social support about physical activity was provided in less than 10% of the tweets (135/1500, 9.00%). Users with fewer people following their tweets (followers) (P=.02) and with fewer accounts that they followed (followings) (P=.04

  16. Validation of clinical activity tracking system in Intensive Care Unit to assess nurse workload distribution.

    PubMed

    Peng Guo; Yeong Shiong Chiew; Shaw, Geoff; Chase, Geoff

    2015-08-01

    Therapeutic Intervention Score System (TISS-28) and the Nursing Activities Score (NAS) are common used to evaluate nursing workload in the Intensive Care Unit (ICU). However, they require experienced researchers to perform, are subject to user bias and experience, and are labor intensive, which all exclude regular use. A Clinical Activities Tracking System (CATS) was developed to evaluate bedside nursing activities automatically. This paper presents the validation of this system in quantifying bedside nursing activities. A total of 30 hours (1 hour/day) of nursing activities were manually recorded by trained researcher. The manually recorded total time spent on bedside nursing activities (Atime) was compared with time recorded using CATS (Ctime). A high correlation was found between Atime and Ctime with R = 0.882, and thus the actual time spent in nursing activity can be estimated using a first order polynomial function. In this study, it was found that the median Atime between 7 am-10 pm is 1.4-1.5 times higher than nursing activities at 10 pm-7 am. Results showed that CATS was able to provide unique and high information on patient bedside nursing activities. PMID:26736298

  17. Economic impacts of anthropogenic activities on coastlines of the United States

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Magoon, Orville T.; Williams, S. Jeffress; Lent, Linda K.; Richmond, James A.; Treadwell, Donald D.; Douglass, Scott L.; Edge, Billy L.; Ewing, Lesley C.; Pratt, Anthony P.

    2004-01-01

    Anthropogenic activities primarily impact coasts by reducing sediment inputs, altering sediment transport processes, and accelerating sediment losses to the offshore. These activities include: sand and gravel extraction, navigation and shore protection works; non-structural shoreline management strategies such as beach nourishment, sand by-passing and beach scraping, dams and flood control works; channel and inlet dredging; subsidence caused by fluid extraction and reduction of carbonate beach material. Although many of these activities have improved the quality of life, they also have had unintended effects on the coast. The issues that arise from human alterations of the coast are common to many coastal regions around the world; this paper draws from several areas of the United States to present an overview and provisional assessment of the economic consequences of anthropogenic activities along the Pacific coast.

  18. Gamma band unit activity and population responses in the pedunculopontine nucleus.

    PubMed

    Simon, Christen; Kezunovic, Nebojsa; Ye, Meijun; Hyde, James; Hayar, A; Williams, D K; Garcia-Rill, E

    2010-07-01

    The pedunculopontine nucleus (PPN) is involved in the activated states of waking and paradoxical sleep, forming part of the reticular activating system (RAS). The studies described tested the hypothesis that single unit and/or population responses of PPN neurons are capable of generating gamma band frequency activity. Whole cell patch clamp recordings (immersion chamber) and population responses (interface chamber) were conducted on 9- to 20-day-old rat brain stem slices. Regardless of cell type (I, II, or III) or type of response to the nonselective cholinergic receptor agonist carbachol (excitation, inhibition, biphasic), almost all PPN neurons fired at gamma band frequency, but no higher, when subjected to depolarizing steps (50 +/- 2 Hz, mean +/- SE). Nonaccommodating neurons fired at 18-100 Hz throughout depolarizing steps, while most accommodating neurons exhibited gamma band frequency of action potentials followed by gamma band membrane oscillations. These oscillations were blocked by the sodium channel blocker tetrodotoxin (TTX), suggesting that at least some are mediated by sodium currents. Population responses in the PPN showed that carbachol induced peaks of activation in the theta and gamma range, while glutamatergic receptor agonists induced overall increases in activity at theta and gamma frequencies, although in differing patterns. Gamma band activity appears to be a part of the intrinsic membrane properties of PPN neurons, and the population as a whole generates different patterns of gamma band activity under the influence of specific transmitters. Given sufficient excitation, the PPN may impart gamma band activation on its targets. PMID:20463196

  19. Gamma Band Unit Activity and Population Responses in the Pedunculopontine Nucleus

    PubMed Central

    Simon, Christen; Kezunovic, Nebojsa; Ye, Meijun; Hyde, James; Hayar, A.; Williams, D. K.

    2010-01-01

    The pedunculopontine nucleus (PPN) is involved in the activated states of waking and paradoxical sleep, forming part of the reticular activating system (RAS). The studies described tested the hypothesis that single unit and/or population responses of PPN neurons are capable of generating gamma band frequency activity. Whole cell patch clamp recordings (immersion chamber) and population responses (interface chamber) were conducted on 9- to 20-day-old rat brain stem slices. Regardless of cell type (I, II, or III) or type of response to the nonselective cholinergic receptor agonist carbachol (excitation, inhibition, biphasic), almost all PPN neurons fired at gamma band frequency, but no higher, when subjected to depolarizing steps (50 ± 2 Hz, mean ± SE). Nonaccommodating neurons fired at 18–100 Hz throughout depolarizing steps, while most accommodating neurons exhibited gamma band frequency of action potentials followed by gamma band membrane oscillations. These oscillations were blocked by the sodium channel blocker tetrodotoxin (TTX), suggesting that at least some are mediated by sodium currents. Population responses in the PPN showed that carbachol induced peaks of activation in the theta and gamma range, while glutamatergic receptor agonists induced overall increases in activity at theta and gamma frequencies, although in differing patterns. Gamma band activity appears to be a part of the intrinsic membrane properties of PPN neurons, and the population as a whole generates different patterns of gamma band activity under the influence of specific transmitters. Given sufficient excitation, the PPN may impart gamma band activation on its targets. PMID:20463196

  20. Action unit classification using active appearance models and conditional random fields.

    PubMed

    van der Maaten, Laurens; Hendriks, Emile

    2012-10-01

    In this paper, we investigate to what extent modern computer vision and machine learning techniques can assist social psychology research by automatically recognizing facial expressions. To this end, we develop a system that automatically recognizes the action units defined in the facial action coding system (FACS). The system uses a sophisticated deformable template, which is known as the active appearance model, to model the appearance of faces. The model is used to identify the location of facial feature points, as well as to extract features from the face that are indicative of the action unit states. The detection of the presence of action units is performed by a time series classification model, the linear-chain conditional random field. We evaluate the performance of our system in experiments on a large data set of videos with posed and natural facial expressions. In the experiments, we compare the action units detected by our approach with annotations made by human FACS annotators. Our results show that the agreement between the system and human FACS annotators is higher than 90% and underlines the potential of modern computer vision and machine learning techniques to social psychology research. We conclude with some suggestions on how systems like ours can play an important role in research on social signals. PMID:21989609

  1. Detection rates of the MODIS active fire product in the United States

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hawbaker, T.J.; Radeloff, V.C.; Syphard, A.D.; Zhu, Z.; Stewart, S.I.

    2008-01-01

    MODIS active fire data offer new information about global fire patterns. However, uncertainties in detection rates can render satellite-derived fire statistics difficult to interpret. We evaluated the MODIS 1??km daily active fire product to quantify detection rates for both Terra and Aqua MODIS sensors, examined how cloud cover and fire size affected detection rates, and estimated how detection rates varied across the United States. MODIS active fire detections were compared to 361 reference fires (??? 18??ha) that had been delineated using pre- and post-fire Landsat imagery. Reference fires were considered detected if at least one MODIS active fire pixel occurred within 1??km of the edge of the fire. When active fire data from both Aqua and Terra were combined, 82% of all reference fires were found, but detection rates were less for Aqua and Terra individually (73% and 66% respectively). Fires not detected generally had more cloudy days, but not when the Aqua data were considered exclusively. MODIS detection rates decreased with fire size, and the size at which 50% of all fires were detected was 105??ha when combining Aqua and Terra (195??ha for Aqua and 334??ha for Terra alone). Across the United States, detection rates were greatest in the West, lower in the Great Plains, and lowest in the East. The MODIS active fire product captures large fires in the U.S. well, but may under-represent fires in areas with frequent cloud cover or rapidly burning, small, and low-intensity fires. We recommend that users of the MODIS active fire data perform individual validations to ensure that all relevant fires are included. ?? 2008 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Detections of Yersinia pestis East of the Known Distribution of Active Plague in the United States.

    PubMed

    Mize, Erica L; Britten, Hugh B

    2016-02-01

    We examined fleas collected from black-tailed prairie dog (Cynomys ludovicianus) burrows from 2009 through 2011 in five national park units east of the known distribution of active plague across the northern Great Plains for the presence of Yersinia pestis. Across all national park units, Oropsylla tuberculata and Oropsylla hirsuta were the most common fleas collected from prairie dog burrows, 42.4% and 56.9%, respectively, of the 3964 fleas collected from burrow swabbing. Using a nested PCR assay, we detected 200 Y. pestis-positive fleas from 3117 assays. In total, 6.4% of assayed fleas were Y. pestis positive and 13.9% of prairie dog burrows swabbed contained Y. pestis-positive fleas. Evidence of the presence of Y. pestis was observed at all national park units except Devils Tower National Monument in Wyoming. We detected the presence of Y. pestis without large die-offs, i.e., enzootic sylvatic plague, east of the known distribution of active plague and near the eastern edge of the present distribution of black-tailed prairie dogs. This study, in combination with previous work suggests that sylvatic plague likely occurs across the range of black-tailed prairie dogs and should now be treated as endemic across this range. PMID:26771845

  3. In vivo DPP-4 inhibition to enhance engraftment of single-unit cord blood transplants in adults with hematological malignancies.

    PubMed

    Farag, Sherif S; Srivastava, Shivani; Messina-Graham, Steven; Schwartz, Jennifer; Robertson, Michael J; Abonour, Rafat; Cornetta, Kenneth; Wood, Lisa; Secrest, Angie; Strother, R Matthew; Jones, David R; Broxmeyer, Hal E

    2013-04-01

    Delayed engraftment is a significant limitation of umbilical cord blood (UCB) transplantation due to low stem cell numbers. Inhibition of dipeptidyl peptidase (DPP)-4 enhanced engraftment in murine transplants. We evaluated the feasibility of systemic DPP-4 inhibition using sitagliptin to enhance engraftment of single-unit UCB grafts in adults with hematological malignancies. Twenty-four patients (21-58 years) received myeloablative conditioning, followed by sitagliptin 600 mg orally days -1 to +2, and single UCB grafts day 0. Seventeen receiving red cell-depleted (RCD) grafts, matched at 4 (n=10) or 5 (n=7) of 6 human leucocyte antigen (HLA) loci with median nucleated cell dose 3.6 (2.5-5.2)×10(7)/kg, engrafted at median of 21 (range, 13-50) days with cumulative incidence of 94% (95% confidence interval, 84%-100%) at 50 days. Plasma DDP-4 activity was reduced to 23%±7% within 2 h. Area under DPP-4 activity-time curve (AUCA) correlated with engraftment; 9 of 11 with AUCA <6,000 activity·h engrafted within ≤21 days, while all 6 with higher AUCA engrafted later (P=0.002). Seven patients receiving red cell replete grafts had 10-fold lower colony forming units after thawing compared with RCD grafts, with poor engraftment. Systemic DPP-4 inhibition was well tolerated and may enhance engraftment. Optimizing sitagliptin dosing to achieve more sustained DPP-4 inhibition may further improve outcome. PMID:23270493

  4. Defects in Hemopoietic Stem Cell Activity in Ikaros Mutant Mice

    PubMed Central

    Nichogiannopoulou, Aliki; Trevisan, Maryanne; Neben, Steve; Friedrich, Christoph; Georgopoulos, Katia

    1999-01-01

    Here we provide evidence that the Ikaros family of DNA binding factors is critical for the activity of hemopoietic stem cells (HSCs) in the mouse. Mice homozygous for an Ikaros null mutation display a >30-fold reduction in long-term repopulation units, whereas mice homozygous for an Ikaros dominant negative mutation have no measurable activity. The defect in HSC activity is also illustrated by the ability of wild-type marrow to repopulate unconditioned Ikaros mutants. A progressive reduction in multipotent CFU-S14 (colony-forming unit-spleen) progenitors and the earliest erythroid-restricted precursors (BFU-E [burst-forming unit-erythroid]) is also detected in the Ikaros mutant strains consistent with the reduction in HSCs. Nonetheless, the more mature clonogenic erythroid and myeloid precursors are less affected, indicating either the action of a compensatory mechanism to provide more progeny or a negative role of Ikaros at later stages of erythromyeloid differentiation. In Ikaros mutant mice, a decrease in expression of the tyrosine kinase receptors flk-2 and c-kit is observed in the lineage-depleted c-kit+Sca-1+ population that is normally enriched for HSCs and may in part contribute to the early hemopoietic phenotypes manifested in the absence of Ikaros. PMID:10544193

  5. Modular feed-forward active noise control units for ventilation ducts.

    PubMed

    Gardonio, P; Rohlfing, J

    2014-12-01

    This paper presents theoretical and experimental work on feed-forward active noise control for a ventilation duct. In particular three single channel control arrangements are investigated: (a) A classical widespread-mid-span configuration, where the control loudspeakers are located approximately half way through the duct and the reference and error microphones are placed close to inlet and outlet duct sections, respectively; (b) a compact-mid-span configuration, where both the reference and error microphones are moved close to the control loudspeakers to form a self-contained control unit, and (c) a compact-outlet configuration where the self-contained control unit is moved to the duct outlet. The two compact configurations offer self-evident practical installation and operation advantages. Moreover, the paper shows that they are characterized by much simpler control filters, which can be effectively implemented on modern audio digital signal processing boards and produce similar control performance to the classical widespread configuration. PMID:25480054

  6. Evaluating amphibian responses in wetlands impacted by mining activities in the western United States

    SciTech Connect

    Linder, G.; Wyant, J.; Meganck, R.; Williams, B.

    1991-01-01

    An increasing awareness of declining amphibian populations in the United States requires that the authors develop strategies for evaluating anthropogenic impacts on wetlands and the biota dependent upon these habitats. For example, in the western United States, mining activities may impact a wetland and its biota directly through habitat destruction or run-off of sediments and contaminants generated during mining operations. Amphibians which frequent these transition zones between terrestrial and aquatic habitats may be key biological indicators of a wetland's status. Through a demonstration project located in the mining regions of western Montana, the authors are currently using laboratory and field methods for a wetland evaluation required within a Superfund ecological risk assessment.

  7. Update: Influenza Activity--United States, October 4, 2015-February 6, 2016.

    PubMed

    Russell, Kate; Blanton, Lenee; Kniss, Krista; Mustaquim, Desiree; Smith, Sophie; Cohen, Jessica; Garg, Shikha; Flannery, Brendan; Fry, Alicia M; Grohskopf, Lisa A; Bresee, Joseph; Wallis, Teresa; Sessions, Wendy; Garten, Rebecca; Xu, Xiyan; Elal, Anwar Isa Abd; Gubareva, Larisa; Barnes, John; Wentworth, David E; Burns, Erin; Katz, Jacqueline; Jernigan, Daniel; Brammer, Lynnette

    2016-02-19

    From October through mid-December 2015, influenza activity remained low in most regions of the United States. Activity began to increase in late December 2015 and continued to increase slowly through early February 2016. Influenza A viruses have been most frequently identified, with influenza A (H3N2) viruses predominating during October until early December, and influenza A (H1N1)pdm09 viruses predominating from mid-December until early February. Most of the influenza viruses characterized during that time are antigenically similar to vaccine virus strains recommended for inclusion in the 2015-16 Northern Hemisphere vaccines. This report summarizes U.S. influenza activity* during October 4, 2015-February 6, 2016, and updates the previous summary (1). PMID:26891596

  8. Physical Activity and Reported Barriers to Activity Among Type 2 Diabetic Patients in the United Arab Emirates

    PubMed Central

    Al-Kaabi, Juma; Al-Maskari, Fatma; Afandi, Bachar; Parkar, Hasratali; Nagelkerke, Nicolaas

    2009-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: This study was designed to assess the physical activity practice among type 2 diabetic patients in the United Arab Emirates (UAE). METHODS: This is a cross-sectional study of type 2 diabetic patients who participated in the outpatient clinics in Al-Ain District, during 2006. The patients completed an interviewer-administered questionnaire, and measurements of blood pressure, body mass index, body fat, abdominal circumference, glycemic control (HbA1c), and fasting lipid profile. RESULTS: Of the 390 patients recruited, only 25% reported an increase in their physical activity levels following the diagnosis of diabetes, and only 3% reported physical activity levels that meet the recommended guidelines. More than half of the study subjects had uncontrolled hypertension (53%) and unacceptable lipid profiles; 71% had a high low-density lipoprotein (LDL), 73% had low high-density lipoprotein (HDL), and 59% had hypertriglyceridemia. Forty-four percent were obese and a further 34% were overweight. Abdominal obesity was also common (59%). Only 32% had an acceptable glycemic control. CONCLUSIONS: The physical activity practice of type 2 diabetic patients in the UAE is largely inadequate to meet the recommended level necessary to prevent or ameliorate diabetic complications. Interventions aiming at overcoming the barriers to physical activity are urgently needed. PMID:20043039

  9. Adults Eligible for Cardiovascular Disease Prevention Counseling and Participation in Aerobic Physical Activity - United States, 2013.

    PubMed

    Omura, John D; Carlson, Susan A; Paul, Prabasaj; Watson, Kathleen B; Loustalot, Fleetwood; Foltz, Jennifer L; Fulton, Janet E

    2015-09-25

    Cardiovascular disease (CVD) is the leading cause of death in the United States, and physical inactivity is a major risk factor (1). Health care professionals have a role in counseling patients about physical activity for CVD prevention. In August 2014, the U.S. Preventive Services Task Force (USPSTF) recommended that adults who are overweight or obese and have additional CVD risk factors be offered or referred to intensive behavioral counseling interventions to promote a healthful diet and physical activity for CVD prevention. Although the USPSTF recommendation does not specify an amount of physical activity, the 2008 Physical Activity Guidelines for Americans state that for substantial health benefits adults should achieve ≥150 minutes per week of moderate-intensity aerobic physical activity or ≥75 minutes per week of vigorous-intensity aerobic activity, or an equivalent combination of moderate- and vigorous-intensity aerobic physical activity. To assess the proportion of adults eligible for intensive behavioral counseling and not meeting the aerobic physical activity guideline, CDC analyzed data from the 2013 Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System (BRFSS). This analysis indicated that 36.8% of adults were eligible for intensive behavioral counseling for CVD prevention. Among U.S. states and the District of Columbia (DC), the prevalence of eligible adults ranged from 29.0% to 44.6%. Nationwide, 19.9% of all adults were eligible and did not meet the aerobic physical activity guideline. These data can inform the planning and implementation of health care interventions for CVD prevention that are based on physical activity. PMID:26401758

  10. Relationship between observed upper mantle structures and recent tectonic activity across the Southeastern United States

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Biryol, C. Berk; Wagner, Lara S.; Fischer, Karen M.; Hawman, Robert B.

    2016-05-01

    The lithospheric structure of the Southeastern United States is a product of earlier episodes of continental collision and breakup. The region is located in the interior of the North American Plate, away from active plate margins. However, there is ongoing tectonism in the region with multiple zones of seismicity, uplifting arches, and Cenozoic intraplate volcanism. The mechanisms controlling this activity and the state of stress remain enigmatic. Two important factors are plate strength and preexisting, inherited structures. Here we present new tomographic images of the upper mantle beneath the Southeastern United States, revealing large-scale structural variations in the upper mantle. Examples include the relatively thick lithospheric mantle of stable North America that abruptly thins beneath the Paleozoic Appalachian orogeny, and the slow upper mantle of the Proterozoic Reelfoot rift. Our results also indicate fast seismic velocity patterns that can be interpreted as ongoing lithospheric foundering. This provides a viable explanation for seismicity, uplifting, and young intraplate volcanism. We postulate that not only tectonic inheritance but also continuing lithospheric foundering may control the ongoing activity of the region long after it became a passive margin. Based on distinct variations in the geometry and thickness of the lithospheric mantle and foundered lithosphere, we propose that piecemeal delamination has occurred beneath the region throughout the Cenozoic, removing a significant amount of reworked/deformed mantle lithosphere. Ongoing lithospheric foundering beneath the eastern margin of stable North America explains significant variations in thickness of lithospheric mantle across the former Grenville deformation front.

  11. Design, Synthesis, Activity and Docking Study of Sorafenib Analogs Bearing Sulfonylurea Unit.

    PubMed

    Wu, Chunjiang; Wang, Min; Tang, Qidong; Luo, Rong; Chen, Le; Zheng, Pengwu; Zhu, Wufu

    2015-01-01

    Two series of novel sorafenib analogs containing a sulfonylurea unit were synthesized and their chemical structures were confirmed by ¹H-NMR, ¹³C-NMR, MS spectrum and elemental analysis. The synthesized compounds were evaluated for the cytotoxicity against A549, Hela, MCF-7, and PC-3 cancer cell lines. Some of the compounds showed moderate cytotoxic activity, especially compounds 1-(2,4-difluorophenylsulfonyl)-3-(4-(2-(methylcarbamoyl)pyridin-4-yloxy)phenyl)urea (6c) and 1-(4-bromophenylsulfonyl)-3-(4-(2-(methylcarbamoyl)pyridin-4-yloxy)phenyl)urea (6f) with the IC50 values against four cancer cell lines ranging from 16.54±1.22 to 63.92±1.81 μM, respectively. Inhibitory rates against vascular endothelial growth factor receptor-2 (VEGFR2/KDR) kinase at 10 μM of target compounds were further carried out in this paper in order to investigate the target of these compounds. Structure-activity relationships (SARs) and docking studies indicated that the sulfonylurea unit was important to these kinds of compounds. None of the substitutions in the phenoxy group and small halogen atoms such as 2,4-difluoro substitution of the aryl group contributed to the activity. The results suggested that sulfonylurea sorafenib analogs are worthy of further study. PMID:26512636

  12. Dynamic trajectory of multiple single-unit activity during working memory task in rats

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Xiaofan; Yi, Hu; Bai, Wenwen; Tian, Xin

    2015-01-01

    Working memory plays an important role in complex cognitive tasks. A popular theoretical view is that transient properties of neuronal dynamics underlie cognitive processing. The question raised here as to how the transient dynamics evolve in working memory. To address this issue, we investigated the multiple single-unit activity dynamics in rat medial prefrontal cortex (mPFC) during a Y-maze working memory task. The approach worked by reconstructing state space from delays of the original single-unit firing rate variables, which were further analyzed using kernel principal component analysis (KPCA). Then the neural trajectories were obtained to visualize the multiple single-unit activity. Furthermore, the maximal Lyapunov exponent (MLE) was calculated to quantitatively evaluate the neural trajectories during the working memory task. The results showed that the neuronal activity produced stable and reproducible neural trajectories in the correct trials while showed irregular trajectories in the incorrect trials, which may establish a link between the neurocognitive process and behavioral performance in working memory. The MLEs significantly increased during working memory in the correctly performed trials, indicating an increased divergence of the neural trajectories. In the incorrect trials, the MLEs were nearly zero and remained unchanged during the task. Taken together, the trial-specific neural trajectory provides an effective way to track the instantaneous state of the neuronal population during the working memory task and offers valuable insights into working memory function. The MLE describes the changes of neural dynamics in working memory and may reflect different neuronal population states in working memory. PMID:26441626

  13. A single PWM section solar array shunt switching unit with an active ripple filter

    SciTech Connect

    Cho, B.H.; Lee, D.H.

    1995-12-31

    A single pulse-width-modulation (PWM) section shunt switching unit (SSU) for multi-kilowatt space power systems is presented. Due to the output capacitance of the solar cell, the PWM section in the array draws a pulsating current, which must be suppressed with a large filter inductor for each section. Proposed design uses a single designated PWM section with an active inductance enhancement filter. This leads to drastic reduction in size and weight of the SSU compared to the existing designs for the Space Station and Earth Observation System (EOS). A prototype has been designed and tested.

  14. Final Report - Independent Verification Survey Activities at the Seperations Process Research Unit Sites, Niskayuna, New York

    SciTech Connect

    Evan Harpenau

    2011-03-15

    The Separations Process Research Unit (SPRU) complex located on the Knolls Atomic Power Laboratory (KAPL) site in Niskayuna, New York, was constructed in the late 1940s to research the chemical separation of plutonium and uranium (Figure A-1). SPRU operated as a laboratory scale research facility between February 1950 and October 1953. The research activities ceased following the successful development of the reduction oxidation and plutonium/uranium extraction processes. The oxidation and extraction processes were subsequently developed for large scale use by the Hanford and Savannah River sites (aRc 2008a). Decommissioning of the SPRU facilities began in October 1953 and continued through the 1990s.

  15. Research and development activities on Three Mile Island Unit Two. Annual report for 1985

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1986-04-01

    The year 1985 was significant in the cleanup of Three Mile Island Unit 2 (TMI-2). Major milestones in the project included lifting the plenum assembly from the reactor vessel and the start of operations to remove the damaged fuel from the reactor. This report summarizes these milestones and other TMI-2 related cleanup, research, and development activities. Other major topics include the following: waste immobilization and management; fuel shipping cask delivery and testing; sample acquisition and evaluation; and decontamination and dose reduction. 26 figs.

  16. Activities of the Climate Forecast Unit (CFU) on regional decadal prediction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guemas, V.; Prodhomme, C.; Doblas-Reyes, F.; Volpi, D.; Caron, L. P.; Davis, M.; Menegoz, M.; Saurral, R. I.; Bellprat, O.

    2014-12-01

    The Climate Forecasting Unit (CFU) is a research unit devoted to develop climate forecast systems to contribute to the creation of climate services that aims to 1) develop climate forecast systems and prediction methodologies, 2) investigate the potential sources of skill and understand the limitation of state-of-the-art forecast systems, 3) formulate reliable climate forecasts that meet specific user needs and 4) contribute to the development of climate services. This presentation will provide an overview of the latest results of this research unit in the field of regional decadal prediction focusing on 1) an assessment of the relative merits of the full-field and the anomaly initialisation techniques, 2) a description of the forecast quality of North Atlantic tropical cyclone activity and South Pacific climate, 3) an evaluation of the impact of volcanic aerosol prescription during decadal forecasts, and 4) the strategy for the development of a climate service to ensure that forecasts are both useful and action-oriented. Results from several European projects, SPECS, PREFACE and EUPORIAS, will be used to illustrate these findings.

  17. An in vivo model of double-unit cord blood transplantation that correlates with clinical engraftment

    PubMed Central

    Eldjerou, Lamis K.; Chaudhury, Sonali; Baisre-de Leon, Ada; He, Mai; Arcila, Maria E.; Heller, Glenn; O'Reilly, Richard J.; Moore, Malcolm A.

    2010-01-01

    Double-unit cord blood transplantation (DCBT) appears to enhance engraftment despite sustained hematopoiesis usually being derived from a single unit. To investigate DCBT biology, in vitro and murine models were established using cells from 39 patient grafts. Mononuclear cells (MNCs) and CD34+ cells from each unit alone and in DCB combination were assessed for colony-forming cell and cobblestone area-forming cell potential, and multilineage engraftment in NOD/SCID/IL2R-γnull mice. In DCB assays, the contribution of each unit was measured by quantitative short tandem repeat region analysis. There was no correlation between colony-forming cell (n = 10) or cobblestone area-forming cell (n = 9) numbers and clinical engraftment, and both units contributed to DCB cocultures. In MNC transplantations in NOD/SCID/IL2R-γnull mice, each unit engrafted alone, but MNC DCBT demonstrated single-unit dominance that correlated with clinical engraftment in 18 of 21 cases (86%, P < .001). In contrast, unit dominance and clinical correlation were lost with CD34+ DCBT (n = 11). However, add-back of CD34− to CD34+ cells (n = 20) restored single-unit dominance with the dominant unit correlating not with clinical engraftment but also with the origin of the CD34− cells in all experiments. Thus, unit dominance is an in vivo phenomenon probably associated with a graft-versus-graft immune interaction mediated by CD34− cells. PMID:20587781

  18. Effect of Relative Arrangement of Cationic and Lipophilic Moieties on Hemolytic and Antibacterial Activities of PEGylated Polyacrylates

    PubMed Central

    Punia, Ashish; Lee, Kevin; He, Edward; Mukherjee, Sumit; Mancuso, Andrew; Banerjee, Probal; Yang, Nan-Loh

    2015-01-01

    Synthetic amphiphilic polymers have been established as potentially efficient agents to combat widespread deadly infections involving antibiotic resistant superbugs. Incorporation of poly(ethylene glycol) (PEG) side chains into amphiphilic copolymers can reduce their hemolytic activity while maintaining high antibacterial activity. Our study found that the incorporation of PEG has substantially different effects on the hemolytic and antibacterial activities of copolymers depending on structural variations in the positions of cationic centers relative to hydrophobic groups. The PEG side chains dramatically reduced the hemolytic activities in copolymers with hydrophobic hexyl and cationic groups on the same repeating unit. However, in case of terpolymers with cationic and lipophilic groups placed on separate repeating units, the presence of PEG has significantly lower effect on hemolytic activities of these copolymers. PEGylated terpolymers displayed substantially lower activity against Staphylococcus aureus (S. aureus) than Escherichia coli (E. coli) suggesting the deterring effect of S. aureus’ peptidoglycan cell wall against the penetration of PEGylated polymers. Time-kill studies confirmed the bactericidal activity of these copolymers and a 5 log reduction in E. coli colony forming units was observed within 2 h of polymer treatment. PMID:26473831

  19. Effect of Relative Arrangement of Cationic and Lipophilic Moieties on Hemolytic and Antibacterial Activities of PEGylated Polyacrylates.

    PubMed

    Punia, Ashish; Lee, Kevin; He, Edward; Mukherjee, Sumit; Mancuso, Andrew; Banerjee, Probal; Yang, Nan-Loh

    2015-01-01

    Synthetic amphiphilic polymers have been established as potentially efficient agents to combat widespread deadly infections involving antibiotic resistant superbugs. Incorporation of poly(ethylene glycol) (PEG) side chains into amphiphilic copolymers can reduce their hemolytic activity while maintaining high antibacterial activity. Our study found that the incorporation of PEG has substantially different effects on the hemolytic and antibacterial activities of copolymers depending on structural variations in the positions of cationic centers relative to hydrophobic groups. The PEG side chains dramatically reduced the hemolytic activities in copolymers with hydrophobic hexyl and cationic groups on the same repeating unit. However, in case of terpolymers with cationic and lipophilic groups placed on separate repeating units, the presence of PEG has significantly lower effect on hemolytic activities of these copolymers. PEGylated terpolymers displayed substantially lower activity against Staphylococcus aureus (S. aureus) than Escherichia coli (E. coli) suggesting the deterring effect of S. aureus' peptidoglycan cell wall against the penetration of PEGylated polymers. Time-kill studies confirmed the bactericidal activity of these copolymers and a 5 log reduction in E. coli colony forming units was observed within 2 h of polymer treatment. PMID:26473831

  20. Prevalence and correlates of local health department activities to address mental health in the United States.

    PubMed

    Purtle, Jonathan; Klassen, Ann C; Kolker, Jennifer; Buehler, James W

    2016-01-01

    Mental health has been recognized as a public health priority for nearly a century. Little is known, however, about what local health departments (LHDs) do to address the mental health needs of the populations they serve. Using data from the 2013 National Profile of Local Health Departments - a nationally representative survey of LHDs in the United States (N=505) - we characterized LHDs' engagement in eight mental health activities, factors associated with engagement, and estimated the proportion of the U.S. population residing in jurisdictions where these activities were performed. We used Handler's framework of the measurement of public health systems to select variables and examined associations between LHD characteristics and engagement in mental health activities using bivariate analyses and multilevel, multivariate logistic regression. Assessing gaps in access to mental healthcare services (39.3%) and implementing strategies to improve access to mental healthcare services (32.8%) were the most common mental health activities performed. LHDs that provided mental healthcare services were significantly more likely to perform population-based mental illness prevention activities (adjusted odds ratio: 7.1; 95% CI: 5.1, 10.0) and engage in policy/advocacy activities to address mental health (AOR: 3.9; 95% CI: 2.7, 5.6). Our study suggests that many LHDs are engaged in activities to address mental health, ranging from healthcare services to population-based interventions, and that LHDs that provide healthcare services are more likely than others to perform mental health activities. These findings have implications as LHDs reconsider their roles in the era of the Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act and LHD accreditation. PMID:26582210

  1. E.E.G. and multiple unit activity during ketamine and barbiturate anaesthesia.

    PubMed

    Tamásy, V; Korányi, L; Tekeres, M

    1975-12-01

    Cortical e.e.g. and multiple unit activity (m.u.a.) of the mesencephalic reticular formation, the anterior hypothalamic area, the basal nuclear group of the amygdala and the dorsal hippocampus were studied before and following i.p. injection of different doses of ketamine hydrochloride and a barbiturate in cats with chronically implanted electrodes. Barbiturate administration resulted in a rapid decrease in m.u.a. in the mesencephalic reticular formation which was accompanied by a significant decrease of activity in the limbic structures. No m.u.a. response was observed to visual, acoutic or somatosensory stimulation or to pain. The m.u.a. of the mesencephalic reticular formation and limbic structures increased gradually following ketamine injection. Intermittent or continuous hypersynchronous activity was characteristic in the cortical e.e.g. During the hypersynchronous activity the responsiveness of m.u.a. in the mesencephalic reticular formation, to visual and acoustic stimuli, was blocked. Somatosensory and painful stimulation, however, resulted in a significant increase in the activity both of the mesencephalic reticular formation and of the limbic neuronal pools. PMID:1218162

  2. 12 CFR 347.113 - Restrictions applicable to activities by a foreign organization in the United States.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ...) Activities that are permissible for an Edge corporation in the United States under 12 CFR 211.6; or (ii... foreign organization in the United States. 347.113 Section 347.113 Banks and Banking FEDERAL DEPOSIT INSURANCE CORPORATION REGULATIONS AND STATEMENTS OF GENERAL POLICY INTERNATIONAL BANKING §...

  3. 12 CFR 347.113 - Restrictions applicable to activities by a foreign organization in the United States.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ...) Activities that are permissible for an Edge corporation in the United States under 12 CFR 211.6; or (ii... foreign organization in the United States. 347.113 Section 347.113 Banks and Banking FEDERAL DEPOSIT INSURANCE CORPORATION REGULATIONS AND STATEMENTS OF GENERAL POLICY INTERNATIONAL BANKING §...

  4. 12 CFR 347.113 - Restrictions applicable to activities by a foreign organization in the United States.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ...) Activities that are permissible for an Edge corporation in the United States under 12 CFR 211.6; or (ii... foreign organization in the United States. 347.113 Section 347.113 Banks and Banking FEDERAL DEPOSIT INSURANCE CORPORATION REGULATIONS AND STATEMENTS OF GENERAL POLICY INTERNATIONAL BANKING §...

  5. 12 CFR 347.113 - Restrictions applicable to activities by a foreign organization in the United States.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ...) Activities that are permissible for an Edge corporation in the United States under 12 CFR 211.6; or (ii... foreign organization in the United States. 347.113 Section 347.113 Banks and Banking FEDERAL DEPOSIT INSURANCE CORPORATION REGULATIONS AND STATEMENTS OF GENERAL POLICY INTERNATIONAL BANKING §...

  6. 12 CFR 347.113 - Restrictions applicable to activities by a foreign organization in the United States.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ...) Activities that are permissible for an Edge corporation in the United States under 12 CFR 211.6; or (ii... foreign organization in the United States. 347.113 Section 347.113 Banks and Banking FEDERAL DEPOSIT INSURANCE CORPORATION REGULATIONS AND STATEMENTS OF GENERAL POLICY INTERNATIONAL BANKING §...

  7. Answers to frequently asked questions about cleanup activities at Three Mile Island, Unit 2. Public information report

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1980-09-01

    The document presents answers to frequently asked questions about plans for cleanup and decontamination activities at Three Mile Island, Unit 2. Answers to the questions asked are based on information in the NRC 'Draft Programmatic Environmental Impact Statement related to decontamination and disposal of radioactive wastes resulting from March 28, 1979, accident, Three Mile Island Nuclear Station, Unit 2,' NUREG-0683.

  8. In Vivo Recording of Single-Unit Activity during Singing in Zebra Finches

    PubMed Central

    Okubo, Tatsuo S.; Mackevicius, Emily L.; Fee, Michale S.

    2015-01-01

    The zebra finch is an important model for investigating the neural mechanisms that underlie vocal production and learning. Previous anatomical and gene expression studies have identified an interconnected set of brain areas in this organism that are important for singing. To advance our understanding of how these various brain areas act together to learn and produce a highly stereotyped song, it is necessary to record the activity of individual neurons during singing. Here, we present a protocol for recording single-unit activity in freely moving zebra finches during singing using a miniature, motorized microdrive. It includes procedures for both the microdrive implant surgery and the electrophysiological recordings. There are several advantages of this technique: (1) high-impedance electrodes can be used in the microdrive to obtain well-isolated single units; (2) a motorized microdrive is used to remotely control the electrode position, allowing neurons to be isolated without handling the bird, and (3) a lateral positioner is used to move electrodes into fresh tissue before each penetration, allowing recordings from well-isolated neurons over the course of several weeks. We also describe the application of the antidromic stimulation and the spike collision test to identify neurons based on the axonal projection patterns. PMID:25342072

  9. Walking Associated With Public Transit: Moving Toward Increased Physical Activity in the United States

    PubMed Central

    Banerjee, Shailendra N.; Dannenberg, Andrew L.; Wendel, Arthur M.

    2013-01-01

    Objectives. We assessed changes in transit-associated walking in the United States from 2001 to 2009 and documented their importance to public health. Methods. We examined transit walk times using the National Household Travel Survey, a telephone survey administered by the US Department of Transportation to examine travel behavior in the United States. Results. People are more likely to transit walk if they are from lower income households, are non-White, and live in large urban areas with access to rail systems. Transit walkers in large urban areas with a rail system were 72% more likely to transit walk 30 minutes or more per day than were those without a rail system. From 2001 to 2009, the estimated number of transit walkers rose from 7.5 million to 9.6 million (a 28% increase); those whose transit-associated walking time was 30 minutes or more increased from approximately 2.6 million to 3.4 million (a 31% increase). Conclusions. Transit walking contributes to meeting physical activity recommendations. Study results may contribute to transportation-related health impact assessment studies evaluating the impact of proposed transit systems on physical activity, potentially influencing transportation planning decisions. PMID:23327281

  10. High efficiency pure blue thermally activated delayed fluorescence molecules having 10H-phenoxaborin and acridan units.

    PubMed

    Numata, Masaki; Yasuda, Takuma; Adachi, Chihaya

    2015-06-11

    Highly efficient blue thermally activated delayed fluorescence molecules having 10H-phenoxaborin and acridan units were reported. Pure blue emission peaking at around 450 nm with a high external electroluminescence quantum efficiency of around 20% was demonstrated. PMID:25959457

  11. Management and climate contributions to satellite-derived active fire trends in the contiguous United States

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Hsiao-Wen; McCarty, Jessica L.; Wang, Dongdong; Rogers, Brendan M.; Morton, Douglas C.; Collatz, G. James; Jin, Yufang; Randerson, James T.

    2014-04-01

    Fires in croplands, plantations, and rangelands contribute significantly to fire emissions in the United States, yet are often overshadowed by wildland fires in efforts to develop inventories or estimate responses to climate change. Here we quantified decadal trends, interannual variability, and seasonality of Terra Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) observations of active fires (thermal anomalies) as a function of management type in the contiguous U.S. during 2001-2010. We used the Monitoring Trends in Burn Severity database to identify active fires within the perimeter of large wildland fires and land cover maps to identify active fires in croplands. A third class of fires defined as prescribed/other included all residual satellite active fire detections. Large wildland fires were the most variable of all three fire types and had no significant annual trend in the contiguous U.S. during 2001-2010. Active fires in croplands, in contrast, increased at a rate of 3.4% per year. Cropland and prescribed/other fire types combined were responsible for 77% of the total active fire detections within the U.S and were most abundant in the south and southeast. In the west, cropland active fires decreased at a rate of 5.9% per year, likely in response to intensive air quality policies. Potential evaporation was a dominant regulator of the interannual variability of large wildland fires, but had a weaker influence on the other two fire types. Our analysis suggests it may be possible to modify landscape fire emissions within the U.S. by influencing the way fires are used in managed ecosystems.

  12. Management and climate contributions to satellite-derived active fire trends in the contiguous United States

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Hsiao-Wen; McCarty, Jessica L; Wang, Dongdong; Rogers, Brendan M; Morton, Douglas C; Collatz, G James; Jin, Yufang; Randerson, James T

    2014-01-01

    Fires in croplands, plantations, and rangelands contribute significantly to fire emissions in the United States, yet are often overshadowed by wildland fires in efforts to develop inventories or estimate responses to climate change. Here we quantified decadal trends, interannual variability, and seasonality of Terra Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) observations of active fires (thermal anomalies) as a function of management type in the contiguous U.S. during 2001–2010. We used the Monitoring Trends in Burn Severity database to identify active fires within the perimeter of large wildland fires and land cover maps to identify active fires in croplands. A third class of fires defined as prescribed/other included all residual satellite active fire detections. Large wildland fires were the most variable of all three fire types and had no significant annual trend in the contiguous U.S. during 2001–2010. Active fires in croplands, in contrast, increased at a rate of 3.4% per year. Cropland and prescribed/other fire types combined were responsible for 77% of the total active fire detections within the U.S and were most abundant in the south and southeast. In the west, cropland active fires decreased at a rate of 5.9% per year, likely in response to intensive air quality policies. Potential evaporation was a dominant regulator of the interannual variability of large wildland fires, but had a weaker influence on the other two fire types. Our analysis suggests it may be possible to modify landscape fire emissions within the U.S. by influencing the way fires are used in managed ecosystems. Key Points Wildland, cropland, and prescribed fires had different trends and patterns Sensitivity to climate varied with fire type Intensity of air quality regulation influenced cropland burning trends PMID:26213662

  13. Cancer Internet Search Activity on a Major Search Engine, United States 2001-2003

    PubMed Central

    Cooper, Crystale Purvis; Mallon, Kenneth P; Leadbetter, Steven; Peipins, Lucy A

    2005-01-01

    Background To locate online health information, Internet users typically use a search engine, such as Yahoo! or Google. We studied Yahoo! search activity related to the 23 most common cancers in the United States. Objective The objective was to test three potential correlates of Yahoo! cancer search activity—estimated cancer incidence, estimated cancer mortality, and the volume of cancer news coverage—and to study the periodicity of and peaks in Yahoo! cancer search activity. Methods Yahoo! cancer search activity was obtained from a proprietary database called the Yahoo! Buzz Index. The American Cancer Society's estimates of cancer incidence and mortality were used. News reports associated with specific cancer types were identified using the LexisNexis “US News” database, which includes more than 400 national and regional newspapers and a variety of newswire services. Results The Yahoo! search activity associated with specific cancers correlated with their estimated incidence (Spearman rank correlation, ρ = 0.50, P = .015), estimated mortality (ρ = 0.66, P = .001), and volume of related news coverage (ρ = 0.88, P < .001). Yahoo! cancer search activity tended to be higher on weekdays and during national cancer awareness months but lower during summer months; cancer news coverage also tended to follow these trends. Sharp increases in Yahoo! search activity scores from one day to the next appeared to be associated with increases in relevant news coverage. Conclusions Media coverage appears to play a powerful role in prompting online searches for cancer information. Internet search activity offers an innovative tool for passive surveillance of health information–seeking behavior. PMID:15998627

  14. Compounds extracted from feverfew that have anti-secretory activity contain an alpha-methylene butyrolactone unit.

    PubMed

    Groenewegen, W A; Knight, D W; Heptinstall, S

    1986-09-01

    Extracts of feverfew inhibit secretion of granular contents from platelets and neutrophils and this may be relevant to the therapeutic value of feverfew in migraine and other conditions. In this investigation we fractionated an extract of feverfew and obtained eleven fractions with antisecretory activity. The activity. The active fractions, together with two fractions that were devoid of anti-secretory activity, were examined using 1H NMR and infrared spectroscopy. All the active fractions (but neither of the inactive fractions) contained compounds with an alpha-methylene butyrolactone unit. Five compounds that contain this unit were identified as parthenolide, 3-beta-hydroxyparthenolide, secotanapartholide A, canin and artecanin, all of which are sesquiterpene lactones. It is very likely that these and other sesquiterpene lactones that contain an alpha-methylene butyrolactone unit are responsible for the anti-secretory activity in extracts of feverfew. PMID:2877077

  15. [Community vegetable gardens as a health promotion activity: an experience in Primary Healthcare Units].

    PubMed

    Costa, Christiane Gasparini Araújo; Garcia, Mariana Tarricone; Ribeiro, Silvana Maria; Salandini, Marcia Fernanda de Sousa; Bógus, Cláudia Maria

    2015-10-01

    Urban and peri-urban agriculture (UPA) is being practiced in different settings, contributing to the improvement of health in communities and healthier environments. In order to identify the meanings and implications of the practice of UPA in Primary Healthcare Units (PHU) as an activity of health promotion (HP), and to what extent its therapeutic dimension characterizes it as an activity aligned with complementary and integrative practices (CIP), a qualitative cross-sectional study was performed in Embu das Artes, State of São Paulo. From the analysis, the following main themes arose: health concept, health outcomes, the return to traditional practices and habits and the reorientation of health services. It was possible to identify the close link between the cultivation of vegetable gardens and HP guidelines and fields of action, such as creating healthier environments, boosting community actions, developing personal skills, stimulating autonomy and empowerment and demands for the reorientation of services. The garden activities, set up in PHU areas, proved to be an implementation strategy of CIP. The conclusion reached is that vegetable gardening activities in community gardens are seen to be health promotion practices that integrate key elements of CIP. PMID:26465852

  16. BDNF contributes to IBS-like colonic hypersensitivity via activating the enteroglia-nerve unit

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Peng; Du, Chao; Chen, Fei-Xue; Li, Chang-Qing; Yu, Yan-Bo; Han, Ting; Akhtar, Suhail; Zuo, Xiu-Li; Tan, Xiao-Di; Li, Yan-Qing

    2016-01-01

    The over-expressed colonic brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) has been reported to be associated with abdominal pain in patients with irritable bowel syndrome (IBS). However, the neuropathological mechanism is unclear. We here investigated the involvement of enteroglial cells (EGCs) and enteric nerves in IBS-like visceral hypersensitivity. We showed that glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP), tyrosine receptor kinase B (TrkB) and substance P (SP) were significantly increased in the colonic mucosa of IBS patients. The upregulation of those proteins was also observed in the colon of mice with visceral hypersensitivity, but not in the colon of BDNF+/− mice. Functionally, TrkB or EGC inhibitors, or BDNF knockdown significantly suppressed visceral hypersensitivity in mice. Using the EGC cell line, we found that recombinant human BDNF (r-HuBDNF) could directly activate EGCs via the TrkB-phospholipase Cγ1 pathway, thereby inducing a significant upregulation of SP. Moreover, supernatants from r-HuBDNF-activated EGC culture medium, rather than r-HuBDNF alone, triggered markedly augmented discharges in isolated intestinal mesenteric afferent nerves. r-HuBDNF alone could cause mesenteric afferent mechanical hypersensitivity independently, and this effect was synergistically enhanced by activated EGCs. We conclude that EGC-enteric nerve unit may be involved in IBS-like visceral hypersensitivity, and this process is likely initiated by BDNF-TrkB pathway activation. PMID:26837784

  17. Control of Hydroid Colony Form by Surface Heterogeneity

    PubMed Central

    Buss, Leo W.; Buss, Evan D.; Anderson, Christopher P.; Power, Michael; Zinter, Joseph

    2016-01-01

    The colonial hydroid Podocoryna carnea grows adherent to surfaces progressing along them by a motile stolon tip. We here ask whether the stolon tip grows preferentially within grooves etched in silicon wafers. In a series of pilot experiments, we varied the dimensions of grooves and found that stolons did not utilize grooves with a width:depth of 5:5 μm or 10:10 μm, occasionally followed grooves 25:25 μm in size, and preferentially grew within grooves of a width:depth of 50:50 μm and 100:50 μm. We then grew colonies in grids, with fixed 50:50 μm width:depth channels intersecting at 90° every 950, 700, 450, or 150 μm. We find that stolons grew within grooves early in colony ontogeny, but remained restricted to them only in the grid pattern with channel intersections every 150 μm. Finally, we created a grid in the shape of the Yale Y logo, with channels of 50:50 μm width:depth and intersections every 100 μm. The resulting colonies conformed to that of the logo. Our findings demonstrate that stolons respond to surface heterogeneity and that surface etching can be used to fabricate microfluidic circuits comprised of hydroid perisarc. PMID:27257948

  18. Acute two-photon imaging of the neurovascular unit in the cortex of active mice

    PubMed Central

    Tran, Cam Ha T.; Gordon, Grant R.

    2015-01-01

    In vivo two-photon scanning fluorescence imaging is a powerful technique to observe physiological processes from the millimeter to the micron scale in the intact animal. In neuroscience research, a common approach is to install an acute cranial window and head bar to explore neocortical function under anesthesia before inflammation peaks from the surgery. However, there are few detailed acute protocols for head-restrained and fully awake animal imaging of the neurovascular unit during activity. This is because acutely performed awake experiments are typically untenable when the animal is naïve to the imaging apparatus. Here we detail a method that achieves acute, deep-tissue two-photon imaging of neocortical astrocytes and microvasculature in behaving mice. A week prior to experimentation, implantation of the head bar alone allows mice to train for head-immobilization on an easy-to-learn air-supported ball treadmill. Following just two brief familiarization sessions to the treadmill on separate days, an acute cranial window can subsequently be installed for immediate imaging. We demonstrate how running and whisking data can be captured simultaneously with two-photon fluorescence signals with acceptable movement artifacts during active motion. We also show possible applications of this technique by (1) monitoring dynamic changes to microvascular diameter and red blood cells in response to vibrissa sensory stimulation, (2) examining responses of the cerebral microcirculation to the systemic delivery of pharmacological agents using a tail artery cannula during awake imaging, and (3) measuring Ca2+ signals from synthetic and genetically encoded Ca2+ indicators in astrocytes. This method will facilitate acute two-photon fluorescence imaging in awake, active mice and help link cellular events within the neurovascular unit to behavior. PMID:25698926

  19. Single-Unit Muscle Sympathetic Nerve Activity Reflects Sleep Apnea Severity, Especially in Severe Obstructive Sleep Apnea Patients.

    PubMed

    Hamaoka, Takuto; Murai, Hisayoshi; Kaneko, Shuichi; Usui, Soichiro; Okabe, Yoshitaka; Tokuhisa, Hideki; Kato, Takeshi; Furusho, Hiroshi; Sugiyama, Yu; Nakatsumi, Yasuto; Takata, Shigeo; Takamura, Masayuki

    2016-01-01

    Obstructive sleep apnea syndrome (OSAS) is associated with augmented sympathetic nerve activity, as assessed by multi-unit muscle sympathetic nerve activity (MSNA). However, it is still unclear whether single-unit MSNA is a better reflection of sleep apnea severity according to the apnea-hypopnea index (AHI). One hundred and two OSAS patients underwent full polysomnography and single- and multi-unit MSNA measurements. Univariate and multivariate regression analysis were performed to determine which parameters correlated with OSAS severity, which was defined by the AHI. Single- and multi-unit MSNA were significantly and positively correlated with AHI severity. The AHI was also significantly correlated with multi-unit MSNA burst frequency (r = 0.437, p < 0.0001) and single-unit MSNA spike frequency (r = 0.632, p < 0.0001). Multivariable analysis revealed that SF was correlated most significantly with AHI (T = 7.27, p < 0.0001). The distributions of multiple single-unit spikes per one cardiac interval did not differ between patients with an AHI of <30 and those with and AHI of 30-55 events/h; however, the pattern of each multiple spike firing were significantly higher in patients with an AHI of >55. These results suggest that sympathetic nerve activity is associated with sleep apnea severity. In addition, single-unit MSNA is a more accurate reflection of sleep apnea severity with alternation of the firing pattern, especially in patients with very severe OSAS. PMID:26973534

  20. Single-Unit Muscle Sympathetic Nerve Activity Reflects Sleep Apnea Severity, Especially in Severe Obstructive Sleep Apnea Patients

    PubMed Central

    Hamaoka, Takuto; Murai, Hisayoshi; Kaneko, Shuichi; Usui, Soichiro; Okabe, Yoshitaka; Tokuhisa, Hideki; Kato, Takeshi; Furusho, Hiroshi; Sugiyama, Yu; Nakatsumi, Yasuto; Takata, Shigeo; Takamura, Masayuki

    2016-01-01

    Obstructive sleep apnea syndrome (OSAS) is associated with augmented sympathetic nerve activity, as assessed by multi-unit muscle sympathetic nerve activity (MSNA). However, it is still unclear whether single-unit MSNA is a better reflection of sleep apnea severity according to the apnea-hypopnea index (AHI). One hundred and two OSAS patients underwent full polysomnography and single- and multi-unit MSNA measurements. Univariate and multivariate regression analysis were performed to determine which parameters correlated with OSAS severity, which was defined by the AHI. Single- and multi-unit MSNA were significantly and positively correlated with AHI severity. The AHI was also significantly correlated with multi-unit MSNA burst frequency (r = 0.437, p < 0.0001) and single-unit MSNA spike frequency (r = 0.632, p < 0.0001). Multivariable analysis revealed that SF was correlated most significantly with AHI (T = 7.27, p < 0.0001). The distributions of multiple single-unit spikes per one cardiac interval did not differ between patients with an AHI of <30 and those with and AHI of 30–55 events/h; however, the pattern of each multiple spike firing were significantly higher in patients with an AHI of >55. These results suggest that sympathetic nerve activity is associated with sleep apnea severity. In addition, single-unit MSNA is a more accurate reflection of sleep apnea severity with alternation of the firing pattern, especially in patients with very severe OSAS. PMID:26973534

  1. 31 CFR 538.531 - Official activities of the United States Government and international organizations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... the official business of the United States Government or the United Nations by contractors or grantees... conduct of the official business of the United Nations specialized agencies, programmes, and funds by... States Government or the United Nations, or its specialized agencies, programmes, and funds, to any...

  2. Altered firing pattern of single-unit muscle sympathetic nerve activity during handgrip exercise in chronic heart failure

    PubMed Central

    Murai, Hisayoshi; Takamura, Masayuki; Maruyama, Michirou; Nakano, Manabu; Ikeda, Tatsunori; Kobayashi, Daisuke; Otowa, Kan-ichi; Ootsuji, Hiroshi; Okajima, Masaki; Furusho, Hiroshi; Takata, Shigeo; Kaneko, Shuichi

    2009-01-01

    Sympathetic activation in chronic heart failure (CHF) is greatly augmented at rest but the response to exercise remains controversial. We previously demonstrated that single-unit muscle sympathetic nerve activity (MSNA) provides a more detailed description of the sympathetic response to physiological stress than multi-unit nerve recordings. The purpose of this study was to determine whether the reflex response and discharge properties of single-unit MSNA are altered during handgrip exercise (HG, 30% of maximum voluntary contraction for 3 min) in CHF patients (New York Heart Association functional class II or III, n= 16) compared with age-matched healthy control subjects (n= 13). At rest, both single-unit and multi-unit indices of sympathetic outflow were augmented in CHF compared with controls (P < 0.05). However, the percentage of cardiac intervals that contained one, two, three or four single-unit spikes were not different between the groups. Compared to the control group, HG elicited a larger increase in multi-unit total MSNA (Δ1002 ± 50 compared with Δ636 ± 76 units min−1, P < 0.05) and single-unit MSNA spike incidence (Δ27 ± 5 compared with Δ8 ± 2 spikes (100 heart beats)−1), P < 0.01) in the CHF patients. More importantly, the percentage of cardiac intervals that contained two or three single-unit spikes was increased (P < 0.05) during exercise in the CHF group only (Δ8 ± 2% and Δ5 ± 1% for two and three spikes, respectively). These results suggest that the larger multi-unit total MSNA response observed during HG in CHF is brought about in part by an increase in the probability of multiple firing of single-unit sympathetic neurones. PMID:19403612

  3. Increasing eolian dust deposition in the western United States linked to human activity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Neff, J. C.; Ballantyne, A. P.; Farmer, G. L.; Mahowald, N. M.; Conroy, J. L.; Landry, C. C.; Overpeck, J. T.; Painter, T. H.; Lawrence, C. R.; Reynolds, R. L.

    2008-03-01

    Mineral aerosols from dust are an important influence on climate and on marine and terrestrial biogeochemical cycles. These aerosols are generated from wind erosion of surface soils. The amount of dust emission can therefore be affected by human activities that alter surface sediments. However, changes in regional- and global-scale dust fluxes following the rapid expansion of human populations and settlements over the past two centuries are not well understood. Here we determine the accumulation rates and geochemical properties of alpine lake sediments from the western interior United States for the past 5,000 years. We find that dust load levels increased by 500% above the late Holocene average following the increased western settlement of the United States during the nineteenth century. We suggest that the increased dust deposition is caused by the expansion of livestock grazing in the early twentieth century. The larger dust flux, which persists into the early twenty-first century, results in a more than fivefold increase in inputs of K, Mg, Ca, N and P to the alpine ecosystems, with implications for surface-water alkalinity, aquatic productivity and terrestrial nutrient cycling.

  4. Prolonged activity evokes potentiation and the "sag" phenomenon in slow motor units of rat soleus.

    PubMed

    Drzymała-Celichowska, Hanna; Raikova, Rositsa; Krutki, Piotr

    2016-01-01

    Slow motor units (MUs) have no sag in their unfused tetani. This study in anesthetized rats shows that the sag can be observed in slow soleus MUs after prolonged activity. Twitches and unfused tetanic contractions were recorded from male (n=35) and female (n=39) MUs before and after the four minutes of the fatigue test (trains of 13 pulses at 40 Hz repeated every second). After this activity twitch contractions potentiated and a shift in the steep part of the force-frequency curve towards lower frequencies was observed in both sexes. Initially no sag was visible in unfused tetani, but after the fatigue test the phenomenon was observed in 77% of male, while in 13% of female MUs, the result consistent with the previously reported higher content of IIa myosin and faster contraction of MUs in male soleus. The decomposition of tetani with sag into trains of twitch-shape responses to consecutive stimuli revealed higher forces of initial decomposed twitches than later. The revealed alterations the force development due to long-lasting activation of slow MUs were sex-related and more pronounced in male soleus. PMID:27373952

  5. Improving post-intensive care unit neuropsychiatric outcomes: understanding cognitive effects of physical activity.

    PubMed

    Hopkins, Ramona O; Suchyta, Mary R; Farrer, Thomas J; Needham, Dale

    2012-12-15

    Critical illness and its treatment often result in long-term neuropsychiatric morbidities. Consequently, there is a need to focus on means to prevent or ameliorate these morbidities. Animal models provide important data regarding the neurobiological effects of physical activity, including angiogenesis, neurogenesis, and release of neurotrophic factors that enhance plasticity. Studies in noncritically ill patients demonstrate that exercise is associated with increased cerebral blood flow, neurogenesis, and brain volume, which are associated with improved cognition. Clinically, research in both healthy and diseased human subjects suggests that exercise improves neuropsychiatric outcomes. In the critical care setting, early physical rehabilitation and mobilization are safe and feasible, with demonstrated improvements in physical functional outcomes. Such activity may also reduce the duration of delirium in the intensive care unit (ICU) and improve neuropsychiatric outcomes, although data are limited. Barriers exist regarding implementing ICU rehabilitation in routine care, including use of sedatives and lack of awareness of post-ICU cognitive impairments. Further research is necessary to determine whether prior animal and human research, in conjunction with preliminary results from existing ICU studies, can translate into improvements for neuropsychiatric outcomes in critically ill patients. Studies are needed to evaluate biological mechanisms, risk factors, the role of pre-ICU functional level, and the timing, duration, and type of physical activity for optimal patient outcomes. PMID:23065013

  6. 3-d Brownian dynamics simulations of the smallest units of an active biological material

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luettmer-Strathmann, Jutta; Paudyal, Nabina; Adeli Koudehi, Maral

    Motor proteins generate stress in a cytoskeletal network by walking on one strand of the network while being attached to another one. A protein walker in contact with two elements of the network may be considered the smallest unit of an active biological material. In vitro experiments, mathematical modeling and computer simulations have provided important insights into active matter on large and on very small length and time scales. However, it is still difficult to model the effects of local environment and interactions at intermediate scales. Recently, we developed a coarse-grained, three-dimensional model for a motor protein transporting cargo by walking on a substrate. In this work, we simulate a tethered motor protein pulling a substrate with elastic response. As the walker progresses, the retarding force due to the substrate tension increases until contact fails. We present simulation results for the effect of motor-protein activity on the tension in the substrate and the effect of the retarding force on the processivity of the molecular motor.

  7. Neck motor unit activities induced by inputs from periodontal mechanoreceptors in rats.

    PubMed

    Zeredo, J L; Toda, K; Soma, K

    2002-01-01

    Clinical evidence suggests that head movements may be coupled with oro-facial functions, which are predominantly controlled by somatosensory inputs from the oro-facial area. However, the effects of specific modalities of sensory inputs on the neck muscles' motor activity are still unclear. In the present study, natural pressure stimulation was applied to the rat's upper first molars, while motor unit electromyographic activity was recorded from the dorsal neck splenius muscle. During the hold phase of pressure stimulation, clear tonic discharges were elicited in the splenius muscles on both sides. Mean threshold values were 622.3 mN (+/- 19.6 SEM, n = 39) and 496.8 mN (+/- 26.4 SEM, n = 43) for ipsi- and contralateral sides, respectively (p < 0.001, Mann-Whitney U test). Analysis of our data suggests that periodontal inputs may play an important role in controlling the motor activity of neck muscles, in addition to its well-known coordination of the masticatory function. PMID:11820365

  8. Role of Inflammasome Activation in the Pathophysiology of Vascular Diseases of the Neurovascular Unit

    PubMed Central

    Mohamed, Islam N.; Ishrat, Tauheed; Fagan, Susan C.

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Significance: Inflammation is the standard double-edged defense mechanism that aims at protecting the human physiological homeostasis from devastating threats. Both acute and chronic inflammation have been implicated in the occurrence and progression of vascular diseases. Interference with components of the immune system to improve patient outcome after ischemic injury has been uniformly unsuccessful. There is a need for a deeper understanding of the innate immune response to injury in order to modulate, rather than to block inflammation and improve the outcome for vascular diseases. Recent Advances: Nucleotide-binding oligomerization domain-like receptors or NOD-like receptor proteins (NLRPs) can be activated by sterile and microbial inflammation. NLR family plays a major role in activating the inflammasome. Critical Issues: The aim of this work is to review recent findings that provided insights into key inflammatory mechanisms and define the place of the inflammasome, a multi-protein complex involved in instigating inflammation in neurovascular diseases, including retinopathy, neurodegenerative diseases, and stroke. Future Directions: The significant contribution of NLRP-inflammasome activation to vascular disease of the neurovascular unit in the brain and retina suggests that therapeutic strategies focused on specific targeting of inflammasome components could significantly improve the outcomes of these diseases. Antioxid. Redox Signal. 22, 1188–1206. PMID:25275222

  9. Survival and catabolic activity of natural and genetically engineered bacteria in a laboratory-scale activated-sludge unit

    SciTech Connect

    McClure, N.C.; Fry, J.C.; Weightman, A.J. )

    1991-02-01

    The survival of selected naturally occurring and genetically engineered bacteria in a fully functional laboratory-scale activated-sludge unit (ASU) was investigated. The effect of the presence of 3-chlorobenzoate (3CB) on the survival of Pseudomonas putida UWC1, with or without a chimeric plasmid, pD10, which encodes 3CB catabolism, was determined. P. putida UWC1(pD10) did not enhance 3CB breakdown in the ASU, even following inoculation at a high concentration (3 x 10(8) CFU/ml). The emergence of a natural, 3CB-degrading population appeared to have a detrimental effect on the survival of strain UWC1 in the ASU. The fate of two 3CB-utilizing bacteria, derived from activated-sludge microflora, was studied in experiments in which these strains were inoculated into the ASU. Both strains, AS2, an unmanipulated natural isolate which flocculated readily in liquid media, and P. putida ASR2.8, a transconjugant containing the recombinant plasmid pD10, survived for long periods in the ASU and enhanced 3CB breakdown at 15 degrees C. The results reported in this paper illustrate the importance of choosing strains which are well adapted to environmental conditions if the use of microbial inoculants for the breakdown of target pollutants is to be successful.

  10. Air pollution information activities at state and local agencies--United States, 1992

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1993-01-08

    Because air pollution is a pervasive environmental health problem in the United States, one of the national health objectives for the year 2000 is to increase from 49.7% to 85.0% the proportion of persons who live in counties that have not exceeded any air quality standard during the previous 12 months (1). Public support for air pollution control efforts is critical if this national health objective is to be achieved. To characterize public health information activities related to air pollution, in 1992, the State and Territorial Air Pollution Program Administrators (STAPPA) and the Association of Local Air Pollution Control Officials (ALAPCO), with the assistance of CDC, conducted a survey of state and local air pollution control agencies. This report summarizes the findings of that survey.

  11. Resources for physical activity in cancer centers in the United States.

    PubMed

    Karvinen, Kristina H; Carr, Lucas J; Stevinson, Clare

    2013-12-01

    Physical activity (PA) has many benefits for cancer survivors. However, the available PA resources for survivors at cancer centers throughout the United States are undocumented. The current study surveyed major cancer centers concerning the availability and types (e.g., facilities, programs, counseling, information resources) of PA resources available. Of supportive care services, PA resources were the least commonly reported. Significant correlations were found among availability of PA resources and other supportive care services. Although many cancer centers reported offering PA programming, formal and informal PA guidance and support seem to fall on oncology nurses and other clinicians. Oncology nurses should be reminded that they may be one of the only sources of PA guidance available to survivors at cancer centers. PMID:24305494

  12. Extensive site-directed mutagenesis reveals interconnected functional units in the alkaline phosphatase active site.

    PubMed

    Sunden, Fanny; Peck, Ariana; Salzman, Julia; Ressl, Susanne; Herschlag, Daniel

    2015-01-01

    Enzymes enable life by accelerating reaction rates to biological timescales. Conventional studies have focused on identifying the residues that have a direct involvement in an enzymatic reaction, but these so-called 'catalytic residues' are embedded in extensive interaction networks. Although fundamental to our understanding of enzyme function, evolution, and engineering, the properties of these networks have yet to be quantitatively and systematically explored. We dissected an interaction network of five residues in the active site of Escherichia coli alkaline phosphatase. Analysis of the complex catalytic interdependence of specific residues identified three energetically independent but structurally interconnected functional units with distinct modes of cooperativity. From an evolutionary perspective, this network is orders of magnitude more probable to arise than a fully cooperative network. From a functional perspective, new catalytic insights emerge. Further, such comprehensive energetic characterization will be necessary to benchmark the algorithms required to rationally engineer highly efficient enzymes. PMID:25902402

  13. Answers to frequently asked questions about cleanup activities at Three Mile Island, Unit 2

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1984-03-01

    This question-and-answer report provides answers in nontechnical language to frequently asked questions about the status of cleanup activities at Three Mile Island, Unit 2. The answers update information first prepared in 1981, shortly after the cleanup got under way. Since then, a variety of important developments in the cleanup has occurred. The information in the report should be read in conjunction with NUREG 1060, a discussion of increased occupational exposure estimates for the cleanup. The questions and answers in this report cover purpose and community involvement, decontamination of water and reactor, fuel removal, radwaste transport, environmental impact, social and economic effects, worker exposures and safety, radiation monitoring, potential for accidents, and schedule and funding.

  14. Bactericidal, virucidal, and mycobactericidal activities of reused alkaline glutaraldehyde in an endoscopy unit.

    PubMed Central

    Mbithi, J N; Springthorpe, V S; Sattar, S A; Pacquette, M

    1993-01-01

    Baths with 2% alkaline glutaraldehyde are often reused for 14 days to decontaminate flexible fiberoptic endoscopes (FFEs) between patients, but the effect of such reuse on the disinfectant's activity has not been known. Many busy endoscopy units also disinfect FFEs with contact times shorter than those recommended by the disinfectant manufacturer. We therefore collected samples of the disinfectant over the 14-day reuse period from two manual and one automatic bath used for bronchoscopes and gastroscopes at a local hospital. Control samples were also collected from a manual bath of 2% alkaline glutaraldehyde which did not receive any endoscopes. The germicidal activities of the samples were assessed in a carrier test against a mixture of hepatitis A virus, poliovirus 1 (Sabin), and Pseudomonas aeruginosa; the mixture also contained either Mycobacterium bovis or Mycobacterium gordonae. Bovine serum (5%) was the organic load. The criterion of efficacy was a minimum of a 3-log10-unit reduction in the infectivity titers of the organisms tested. The initial disinfectant concentration in all the baths was nearly 2.25%; it became about 1.8% in the control bath and fell to approximately 1% in the three test baths after 14 days. No protein was detected in the control bath, while its concentration rose gradually in the test baths to a maximum of 1,267 micrograms/ml after 14 days. With a contact time of 10 min at 20 +/- 2 degrees C, all the samples from the control bath were effective against all the test organisms and all the samples from all the test baths were also effective against P. aeruginosa. With a contact time of 10 or 20 min at 20+/-2 degrees C, the virucidal and mycobactericidal activities of the samples from the test baths showed broad-spectrum germicidal activity when the contact time was increased to 45 min and the temperature was raised to 25 degrees C. These findings emphasize the care needed in the disinfection of FFEs, especially in view of the increasing

  15. The activities of hospital nursing unit managers and quality of patient care in South African hospitals: a paradox?

    PubMed Central

    Armstrong, Susan J.; Rispel, Laetitia C.; Penn-Kekana, Loveday

    2015-01-01

    Background Improving the quality of health care is central to the proposed health care reforms in South Africa. Nursing unit managers play a key role in coordinating patient care activities and in ensuring quality care in hospitals. Objective This paper examines whether the activities of nursing unit managers facilitate the provision of quality patient care in South African hospitals. Methods During 2011, a cross-sectional, descriptive study was conducted in nine randomly selected hospitals (six public, three private) in two South African provinces. In each hospital, one of each of the medical, surgical, paediatric, and maternity units was selected (n=36). Following informed consent, each unit manager was observed for a period of 2 hours on the survey day and the activities recorded on a minute-by-minute basis. The activities were entered into Microsoft Excel, coded into categories, and analysed according to the time spent on activities in each category. The observation data were complemented by semi-structured interviews with the unit managers who were asked to recall their activities on the day preceding the interview. The interviews were analysed using thematic content analysis. Results The study found that nursing unit managers spent 25.8% of their time on direct patient care, 16% on hospital administration, 14% on patient administration, 3.6% on education, 13.4% on support and communication, 3.9% on managing stock and equipment, 11.5% on staff management, and 11.8% on miscellaneous activities. There were also numerous interruptions and distractions. The semi-structured interviews revealed concordance between unit managers’ recall of the time spent on patient care, but a marked inflation of their perceived time spent on hospital administration. Conclusion The creation of an enabling practice environment, supportive executive management, and continuing professional development are needed to enable nursing managers to lead the provision of consistent and high

  16. Earth Observing System/Advanced Microwave SoundingUnit-A (EOS/AMSU-A): Acquisition activities plan

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schwantje, Robert

    1994-01-01

    This is the acquisition activities plan for the software to be used in the Earth Observing System (EOS) Advanced Microwave Sounding Unit-A (AMSU-A) system. This document is submitted in response to Contract NAS5-323 14 as CDRL 508. The procurement activities required to acquire software for the EOS/AMSU-A program are defined.

  17. A Window into Different Cultural Worlds: Young Children's Everyday Activities in the United States, Brazil, and Kenya

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tudge, Jonathan R. H.; Doucet, Fabienne; Odero, Dolphine; Sperb, Tania M.; Piccinini, Cesar A.; Lopes, Rita S.

    2006-01-01

    A powerful means to understand young children's normative development in context is to examine their everyday activities. The daily activities of 79 children (3 years old) were observed, for 20 hr each, in their usual settings. Children were selected from 4 cultural groups: European American and African American (Greensboro, United States), Luo…

  18. Active Surveillance for Influenza A Virus among Swine, Midwestern United States, 2009–2011

    PubMed Central

    Corzo, Cesar A.; Juleen, Kevin; Stigger-Rosser, Evelyn; Ducatez, Mariette F.; Webby, Richard J.; Lowe, James F.

    2013-01-01

    Veterinary diagnostic laboratories identify and characterize influenza A viruses primarily through passive surveillance. However, additional surveillance programs are needed. To meet this need, an active surveillance program was conducted at pig farms throughout the midwestern United States. From June 2009 through December 2011, nasal swab samples were collected monthly from among 540 groups of growing pigs and tested for influenza A virus by real-time reverse transcription PCR. Of 16,170 samples, 746 were positive for influenza A virus; of these, 18.0% were subtype H1N1, 16.0% H1N2, 7.6% H3N2, and 14.5% (H1N1)pdm09. An influenza (H3N2) and (H1N1)pdm09 virus were identified simultaneously in 8 groups. This active influenza A virus surveillance program provided quality data and increased the understanding of the current situation of circulating viruses in the midwestern US pig population. PMID:23735740

  19. Predictability of Operant Behavior of Rats by Prefrontal Multiple Unit Activities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fujiwara, Sei-Etsu; Akema, Tatsuo; Izaki, Yoshinori

    To investigate the possibility of a brain computer interface (BCI) constructed using activities of the prefrontal cortex (PFC), we analyzed PFC multiple unit activities (MUAs) during a delayed reinforcement (DRF) lever press task in rats. In the DRF task, each trial consisted of two lever press responses (R1, R2): R1 as the trial initiation, R2 as a pre-conditioned response to a stimulus (buzzer) for a reward. Between R1 and the buzzer, rats were required to inhibit the lever press (waiting phase). The trial was evaluated as incorrect if rats pressed the lever during the waiting phase. Results show that the mean firing rate (MFR) was significantly lower around the time of R1 compared with the pre-trial time in correct trials, although no significant changes were found in incorrect trials. From a neuroengineering perspective, the MFR of each single trial was calculated. Most correct trials showed decreasing MFR around the time of R1. The PFC MUA might be useful for BCI.

  20. Comparison of Mercury Measurement Methods Using Two Active Filter Measurement Methods and a Tekran Speciation Unit

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pierce, A.; Gustin, M. S.; Huang, J.; Heidecorn, K.

    2014-12-01

    Three active mercury (Hg) measurement methods were operated side by side at an urban site (University of Nevada, Reno College of Agriculture Greenhouse facility, elev. 1370 m) in Reno, and at a high elevation site (Peavine Peak, elev. 2515 m) adjacent to Reno from December 2013 to October 2014. A model 602 BetaPlus Teledyne Advanced Pollution Instrumentation (TAPI, San Diego, CA USA) particulate measurement system was used to collect particulate matter on a 47 mm diameter cation exchange membrane (CEM, PN# MSTGS3R Mustang S, Pall Corp. Port Washington, NY) at a rate of 16.7 lpm for 24 hours to four days. Particulate concentrations were calculated using beta attenuation across the filters (non-destructive to filter material); the CEM filters were then analyzed for total Hg on a Tekran Total Hg Analysis system (model 2600, Tekran Instruments Corp. Knoxville, TN, USA). Concurrently, samples were collected on an active Hg membrane system. The active Hg membrane system consisted of 3 CEM filters sampling at a rate of 1 lpm for one to two weeks. CEM filters were then analyzed on the Tekran 2600. A Tekran speciation unit (model 1130, 1135, 2537) was also in operation and ambient air samples were analyzed for gaseous elemental Hg (GEM), gaseous oxidized Hg (GOM), and particulate bound Hg (PBM). Both the 602 BetaPlus system and the active Hg membrane system should collect RM on the CEM filters. The active Hg membrane system most likely captures mainly GOM based on previous tests with the Teflon inlet setup that indicated there was high static electricity effective in removing particulate matter. Flow rate and length of measurement (24 hours vs. four days) affected the Hg concentrations on the 602 BetaPlus system. Based on these measurements we hypothesize that, due to the high flow rate, and therefore short retention time, the 602 BetaPlus only captured PBM. It is also possible that there was loss of Hg to inlet walls due to the longer inlet on the 602 BetaPlus system

  1. Structure-Activity Relationship of Oligomeric Flavan-3-ols: Importance of the Upper-Unit B-ring Hydroxyl Groups in the Dimeric Structure for Strong Activities.

    PubMed

    Hamada, Yoshitomo; Takano, Syota; Ayano, Yoshihiro; Tokunaga, Masahiro; Koashi, Takahiro; Okamoto, Syuhei; Doi, Syoma; Ishida, Masahiko; Kawasaki, Takashi; Hamada, Masahiro; Nakajima, Noriyuki; Saito, Akiko

    2015-01-01

    Proanthocyanidins, which are composed of oligomeric flavan-3-ol units, are contained in various foodstuffs (e.g., fruits, vegetables, and drinks) and are strongly biologically active compounds. We investigated which element of the proanthocyanidin structure is primarily responsible for this functionality. In this study, we elucidate the importance of the upper-unit of 4-8 condensed dimeric flavan-3-ols for antimicrobial activity against Saccharomyces cerevisiae (S. cerevisiae) and cervical epithelioid carcinoma cell line HeLa S3 proliferation inhibitory activity. To clarify the important constituent unit of proanthocyanidin, we synthesized four dimeric compounds, (-)-epigallocatechin-[4,8]-(+)-catechin, (-)-epigallocatechin-[4,8]-(-)-epigallocatechin, (-)-epigallocatechin-[4,8]-(-)-epigallocatechin-3-O-gallate, and (+)-catechin-[4,8]-(-)-epigallocatechin and performed structure-activity relationship (SAR) studies. In addition to antimicrobial activity against S. cerevisiae and proliferation inhibitory activity on HeLa S3 cells, the correlation of 2,2-diphenyl-l-picrylhydrazyl radical scavenging activity with the number of phenolic hydroxyl groups was low. On the basis of the results of our SAR studies, we concluded that B-ring hydroxyl groups of the upper-unit of the dimer are crucially important for strong and effective activity. PMID:26501251

  2. Learning Activities and Resource Units: Intermediate 4-8. [Arizona] Migrant Child Institute.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wheelock, Warren H., Ed.

    A requirement of Arizona's Migrant Teacher Institutes was the preparation of instructional resource units. Development of these units was a key element in the three-stage recommendations related to individualizing instruction in both reading and oral language. The three stages were: Room Organization--Realistic Learning Centers, Unit Themes and…

  3. Direct stroke unit admission of intravenous tissue plasminogen activator: safety, clinical outcome, and hospital cost savings

    PubMed Central

    Alexandrov, Anne W.; Coleman, Kisha C.; Palazzo, Paola; Shahripour, Reza Bavarsad; Alexandrov, Andrei V.

    2016-01-01

    Background: In the USA, stable intravenous tissue plasminogen activator (IV tPA) patients have traditionally been cared for in an intensive care unit (ICU). We examined the safety of using an acuity-adaptable stroke unit (SU) to manage IV tPA patients. Methods: We conducted an observational study of consecutive patients admitted to our acuity-adaptable SU over the first 3 years of operation. Safety was assessed by symptomatic intracerebral hemorrhage (sICH) rates, systemic hemorrhage (SH) rates, tPA-related deaths, and transfers from SU to ICU; cost savings and length of stay (LOS) were determined. Results: We admitted 333 IV tPA patients, of which 302 were admitted directly to the SU. A total of 31 (10%) patients had concurrent systemic hemodynamic or pulmonary compromise warranting direct ICU admission. There were no differences in admission National Institutes of Health Stroke Scale scores between SU and ICU patients (9.0 versus 9.5, respectively). Overall sICH rate was 3.3% (n = 10) and SH rate was 2.9 (n = 9), with no difference between SU and ICU patients. No tPA-related deaths occurred, and no SU patients required transfer to the ICU. Estimated hospital cost savings were US$362,400 for ‘avoided’ ICU days, and hospital LOS decreased significantly (p = 0.001) from 9.8 ± 15.6 days (median 5) in year 1, to 5.2 ± 4.8 days (median 3) by year 3. Conclusions: IV tPA patients may be safely cared for in a SU when nurses undergo extensive education to ensure clinical competence. Use of the ICU solely for monitoring may constitute significant overuse of system resources at an expense that is not associated with additional safety benefit. PMID:27366237

  4. Study of active noise control system for a commercial HVAC unit

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Devineni, Naga

    Acoustic noise is a common problem in everyday life. If the appliances that are present in the work and living areas generate noise then it's a serious problem. One such appliance is the Heating, Ventilation and Air-conditioning system (HVAC) in which blower fan and compressor units are housed together. Operation of a HVAC system creates two kinds of noise. One is the noise due to the air flow and the other is the result of the compressor. Both of them exhibit different signal properties and need different strategies to control them. There has been previous efforts in designing noise control systems that can control noise from the HVAC system. These include passive methods which use sound absorption materials to attenuate noise and active methods which cancel noise by generating anti-noise. Passive methods are effective in limiting the high frequency noise, but are inefficient in controlling low frequency noise from the compressor. Compressor noise is one of the strong low frequency components that propagate through the walls, therefore there is need for deploying active signal processing methods that consider the signal properties into consideration to cancel the noise acoustically. The quasi periodic nature of the compressor noise is exploited in noise modeling which aids in implementing an adaptive linear prediction filter in estimating the anti noise [12]. In this thesis, a multi channel architecture has been studied for a specific HVAC system in order to improve noise cancellation by creating larger quiet zone. In addition to the multi-channel architecture, a real time narrow band Active Noise Control (ANC) was employed to cancel noise under practical conditions.

  5. Development of the Self-Powered Extravehicular Mobility Unit Extravehicular Activity Data Recorder

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bernard, Craig; Hill, Terry R.; Murray, Sean; Wichowski, Robert; Rosenbush, David

    2012-01-01

    The Self-Powered Extravehicular Mobility Unit (EMU) Extravehicular Activity (EVA) Data Recorder (SPEEDR) is a field-programmable gate array (FPGA)-based device designed to collect high-rate EMU Primary Life Support Subsystem (PLSS) data for download at a later time. During EVA, the existing EMU PLSS data downlink capability is one data packet every 2 minutes and is subject to bad packets or loss of signal. Higher-rate PLSS data is generated by the Enhanced Caution and Warning System but is not normally captured or distributed. Access to higher-rate data will increase the capability of EMU anomaly resolution team to pinpoint issues remotely, saving crew time by reducing required call-down Q&A and on-orbit diagnostic activities. With no Space Shuttle flights post Fiscal Year 2011 (FY11), and potentially limited down-mass capability, the ISS crew and ground support personnel will have to be capable of on-orbit operations to maintain, diagnose, repair, and return to service EMU hardware, possibly through 2028. Collecting high-rate EMU PLSS data during both intravehicular activity (IVA) and EVA operations will provide trending analysis for life extension and/or predictive performance. The SPEEDR concept has generated interest as a tool/technology that could be used for other International Space Station subsystems or future exploration-class space suits where hardware reliability/availability is critical and low/variable bandwidth may require store then forward methodology. Preliminary work in FY11 produced a functional prototype consisting of an FPGA evaluation board, custom memory/interface circuit board, and custom software. The SPEEDR concept includes a stand-alone battery that is recharged by a computer Universal Serial Bus (USB) port while data are being downloaded.

  6. [A non-traditional occupational health unit. Evaluation after a year's activity].

    PubMed

    Moen, B E; Torp, S; Hollund, B E

    1995-01-20

    An Occupational Health Care Unit has been established for 23 car repair workshops. The unit consists of a central unit connected to an Institute of Occupational Medicine, consisting of a coordinating occupational physician, a physiotherapist and an occupational hygienist. This unit cooperates with 11 general practitioners in the district. The unit was evaluated by the employer and one employee in each car repair shop after one year. In general, they were satisfied with their occupational health care, and several improvements to the working environment had been carried out. PMID:7855820

  7. High gamma power in ECoG reflects cortical electrical stimulation effects on unit activity in layers V/VI

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yazdan-Shahmorad, Azadeh; Kipke, Daryl R.; Lehmkuhle, Mark J.

    2013-12-01

    Objective. Cortical electrical stimulation (CES) has been used extensively in experimental neuroscience to modulate neuronal or behavioral activity, which has led this technique to be considered in neurorehabilitation. Because the cortex and the surrounding anatomy have irregular geometries as well as inhomogeneous and anisotropic electrical properties, the mechanism by which CES has therapeutic effects is poorly understood. Therapeutic effects of CES can be improved by optimizing the stimulation parameters based on the effects of various stimulation parameters on target brain regions. Approach. In this study we have compared the effects of CES pulse polarity, frequency, and amplitude on unit activity recorded from rat primary motor cortex with the effects on the corresponding local field potentials (LFP), and electrocorticograms (ECoG). CES was applied at the surface of the cortex and the unit activity and LFPs were recorded using a penetrating electrode array, which was implanted below the stimulation site. ECoGs were recorded from the vicinity of the stimulation site. Main results. Time-frequency analysis of LFPs following CES showed correlation of gamma frequencies with unit activity response in all layers. More importantly, high gamma power of ECoG signals only correlated with the unit activity in lower layers (V-VI) following CES. Time-frequency correlations, which were found between LFPs, ECoGs and unit activity, were frequency- and amplitude-dependent. Significance. The signature of the neural activity observed in LFP and ECoG signals provides a better understanding of the effects of stimulation on network activity, representative of large numbers of neurons responding to stimulation. These results demonstrate that the neurorehabilitation and neuroprosthetic applications of CES targeting layered cortex can be further improved by using field potential recordings as surrogates to unit activity aimed at optimizing stimulation efficacy. Likewise, the signatures

  8. Flowsheet development studies for the decontamination of high-activity-level water at Three Mile Island Unit 2

    SciTech Connect

    Collins, E.D.; Bigelow, J.E.; Campbell, D.O.; King, L.J.; Knauer, J.B.

    1980-01-01

    Several chemical processing flowsheets were considered for the decontamination of high-activity-level water at the Three Mile Island (TMI) Unit 2. A zeolite ion exchange process was evaluated and recommended for absorption of the bulk of the highly radioactive cesium and strontium. Standard organic ion-exchange resins were selected to remove the remaining traces of radioactive nuclides (except tritium which cannot be removed by any practical process). Process conditions were evaluated using both synthetic, tracer-level solutions and samples of actual, high-activity level water from TMI Unit 2.

  9. Chronic neural probe for simultaneous recording of single-unit, multi-unit, and local field potential activity from multiple brain sites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pothof, F.; Bonini, L.; Lanzilotto, M.; Livi, A.; Fogassi, L.; Orban, G. A.; Paul, O.; Ruther, P.

    2016-08-01

    Objective. Drug resistant focal epilepsy can be treated by resecting the epileptic focus requiring a precise focus localisation using stereoelectroencephalography (SEEG) probes. As commercial SEEG probes offer only a limited spatial resolution, probes of higher channel count and design freedom enabling the incorporation of macro and microelectrodes would help increasing spatial resolution and thus open new perspectives for investigating mechanisms underlying focal epilepsy and its treatment. This work describes a new fabrication process for SEEG probes with materials and dimensions similar to clinical probes enabling recording single neuron activity at high spatial resolution. Approach. Polyimide is used as a biocompatible flexible substrate into which platinum electrodes and leads are integrated with a minimal feature size of 5 μm. The polyimide foils are rolled into the cylindrical probe shape at a diameter of 0.8 mm. The resulting probe features match those of clinically approved devices. Tests in saline solution confirmed the probe stability and functionality. Probes were implanted into the brain of one monkey (Macaca mulatta), trained to perform different motor tasks. Suitable configurations including up to 128 electrode sites allow the recording of task-related neuronal signals. Main results. Probes with 32 and 64 electrode sites were implanted in the posterior parietal cortex. Local field potentials and multi-unit activity were recorded as early as one hour after implantation. Stable single-unit activity was achieved for up to 26 days after implantation of a 64-channel probe. All recorded signals showed modulation during task execution. Significance. With the novel probes it is possible to record stable biologically relevant data over a time span exceeding the usual time needed for epileptic focus localisation in human patients. This is the first time that single units are recorded along cylindrical polyimide probes chronically implanted 22 mm deep into the

  10. Heat stress control in the TMI-2 (Three Mile Island Unit 2) defueling and decontamination activities

    SciTech Connect

    Schork, J.S.; Parfitt, B.A.

    1988-01-01

    During the initial stages of the Three Mile Island Unit 2 (TMI-2) defueling and decontamination activities for the reactor building, it was realized that the high levels of loose radioactive contamination would require the use of extensive protective clothing by entry personnel. While there was no doubt that layered protective clothing protects workers from becoming contaminated, it was recognized that these same layers of clothing would impose a very significant heat stress burden. To prevent the potentially serious consequences of a severe reaction to heat stress by workers in the hostile environment of the TMI-2 reactor building and yet maintain the reasonable work productivity necessary to perform the recovery adequately, an effective program of controlling worker exposure to heat stress had to be developed. Body-cooling devices produce a flow of cool air, which is introduced close to the skin to remove body heat through convection and increased sweat evaporation. The cooling effect produced by the Vortex tube successfully protected the workers from heat stress, however, there were several logistical and operational problems that hindered extensive use of these devices. The last type of cooling garment examined was the frozen water garment (FWG) developed by Elizier Kamon at the Pennsylvania State University as part of an Electric Power Research Institute research grant. Personal protection, i.e., body cooling, engineering controls, and administrative controls, have been implemented successfully.

  11. Active Immunization in the United States: Developments over the Past Decade

    PubMed Central

    Dennehy, Penelope H.

    2001-01-01

    The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention has identified immunization as the most important public health advance of the 20th century. The purpose of this article is to review the changes that have taken place in active immunization in the United States over the past decade. Since 1990, new vaccines have become available to prevent five infectious diseases: varicella, rotavirus, hepatitis A, Lyme disease, and Japanese encephalitis virus infection. Improved vaccines have been developed to prevent Haemophilus influenzae type b, pneumococcus, pertussis, rabies, and typhoid infections. Immunization strategies for the prevention of hepatitis B, measles, meningococcal infections, and poliomyelitis have changed as a result of the changing epidemiology of these diseases. Combination vaccines are being developed to facilitate the delivery of multiple antigens, and improved vaccines are under development for cholera, influenza, and meningococcal disease. Major advances in molecular biology have enabled scientists to devise new approaches to the development of vaccines against diseases ranging from respiratory viral to enteric bacterial infections that continue to plague the world's population. PMID:11585789

  12. Active surveillance for multidrug-resistant Gram-negative bacteria in the intensive care unit.

    PubMed

    Abbott, Iain J; Jenney, Adam W J; Spelman, Denis W; Pilcher, David V; Sidjabat, Hanna E; Richardson, Leisha J; Paterson, David L; Peleg, Anton Y

    2015-10-01

    A short-term program of performing serial active screening cultures (ASC) in the intensive care unit was instituted to establish a method for the detection of antibiotic-resistant Gram-negative bacteria (GNB) and the local rates of colonisation. Of all submitted ASC, 25.9% (30/116 collected swabs) isolated an antibiotic-resistant GNB. ChromID ESBL agar (bioMérieux, France) identified the majority of these organisms, with the additional antibiotic-impregnated media [MacConkey agar (MCA) with ciprofloxacin, MCA with gentamicin and MCA with ceftazidime] adding limited benefit. Compared to swabs performed on admission, 37.8% (14/37) of patients cultured a new antibiotic-resistant isolate on discharge. Serial screening in intensive care has the ability to identify patients with unrecognised colonisation with antibiotic-resistant GNB; however, the increase in the laboratory workload and logistical challenges in the collection of the surveillance swabs may limit this program's expansion. PMID:26308128

  13. Design and Certification of the Extravehicular Activity Mobility Unit (EMU) Water Processing Jumper

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Peterson, Laurie J.; Neumeyer, Derek J.; Lewis, John F.

    2006-01-01

    The Extravehicular Mobility Units (EMUs) onboard the International Space Station (ISS) experienced a failure due to cooling water contamination from biomass and corrosion byproducts forming solids around the EMU pump rotor. The coolant had no biocide and a low pH which induced biofilm growth and corrosion precipitates, respectively. NASA JSC was tasked with building hardware to clean the ionic, organic, and particulate load from the EMU coolant loop before and after Extravehicular Activity (EVAs). Based on a return sample of the EMU coolant loop, the chemical load was well understood, but there was not sufficient volume of the returned sample to analyze particulates. Through work with EMU specialists, chemists, (EVA) Mission Operations Directorate (MOD) representation, safety and mission assurance, astronaut crew, and team engineers, requirements were developed for the EMU Water Processing hardware (sometimes referred to as the Airlock Coolant Loop Recovery [A/L CLR] system). Those requirements ranged from the operable level of ionic, organic, and particulate load, interfaces to the EMU, maximum cycle time, operating pressure drop, flow rate, and temperature, leakage rates, and biocide levels for storage. Design work began in February 2005 and certification was completed in April 2005 to support a return to flight launch date of May 12, 2005. This paper will discuss the details of the design and certification of the EMU Water Processing hardware and its components

  14. Dynamics of effluent treatment plant during commissioning of activated sludge process unit.

    PubMed

    Bafana, Amit; Kumar, Gulshan; Kashyap, Sanjay M; Kanade, Gajanan S; Shinde, Vilas M

    2015-03-01

    Industrial effluent treatment plants (ETPs) are very important in protecting the environment and different life forms from harmful industrial waste. Hence, the efficiency of ETPs must be regularly monitored, particularly after major repair or replacement work. Present study evaluated the performance of an ETP over a period of 4 months, during which aeration tank (T1) of the activated sludge unit was replaced with a new one (T2). System had to be maintained operational during this transition, which warranted close monitoring of the system performance due to the daily load of hazardous industrial wastewater. Analysis showed that the raw wastewater was highly variable in composition and contained many hazardous organic and inorganic pollutants, such as heavy metals, bisphenol A and cyanoacetylurea. It showed significant toxicity against HepG2 cells in vitro. However, the ETP was found to successfully treat and detoxify the wastewater. Denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis (DGGE) analysis showed large temporal fluctuations in the ETP microbial community, which is consistent with the variable composition of wastewater. It indicated that functional stability of the ETP was not associated with stability of the microbial community, probably due to high microbial biodiversity and consequently high functional redundancy. In conclusion, the CETP showed consistent level of detoxification and microbial community dynamics after switching to T2, indicating successful development, acclimatization and commissioning of T2. PMID:25249053

  15. Kinetic energy budget during strong jet stream activity over the eastern United States

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fuelberg, H. E.; Scoggins, J. R.

    1980-01-01

    Kinetic energy budgets are computed during a cold air outbreak in association with strong jet stream activity over the eastern United States. The period is characterized by large generation of kinetic energy due to cross-contour flow. Horizontal export and dissipation of energy to subgrid scales of motion constitute the important energy sinks. Rawinsonde data at 3 and 6 h intervals during a 36 h period are used in the analysis and reveal that energy fluctuations on a time scale of less than 12 h are generally small even though the overall energy balance does change considerably during the period in conjunction with an upper level trough which moves through the region. An error analysis of the energy budget terms suggests that this major change in the budget is not due to random errors in the input data but is caused by the changing synoptic situation. The study illustrates the need to consider the time and space scales of associated weather phenomena in interpreting energy budgets obtained through use of higher frequency data.

  16. Cost of reactive nitrogen release from human activities to the environment in the United States

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sobota, Daniel J.; Compton, Jana E.; McCrackin, Michelle L.; Singh, Shweta

    2015-02-01

    Leakage of reactive nitrogen (N) from human activities to the environment can cause human health and ecological problems. Often these harmful effects are not reflected in the costs of food, fuel, and fiber that derive from N use. Spatial analyses of damage costs attributable to source at management-relevant scales could inform decisions in areas where anthropogenic N leakage causes harm. We used recently compiled data describing N inputs in the conterminous United States (US) to assess potential damage costs associated with anthropogenic N. We estimated fates of N leaked to the environment (air/deposition, surface freshwater, groundwater, and coastal zones) in the early 2000s by multiplying watershed-level N inputs (8-digit US Geologic Survey Hydrologic Unit Codes; HUC8s) with published coefficients describing nutrient uptake efficiency, leaching losses, and gaseous emissions. We scaled these N leakage estimates with mitigation, remediation, direct damage, and substitution costs associated with human health, agriculture, ecosystems, and climate (per kg of N) to calculate annual damage cost (US dollars in 2008 or as reported) of anthropogenic N per HUC8. Estimates of N leakage by HUC8 ranged from <1 to 125 kg N ha-1 yr-1, with most N leaked to freshwater ecosystems. Estimates of potential damages (based on median estimates) ranged from 1.94 to 2255 ha-1 yr-1 across watersheds, with a median of 252 ha-1 yr-1. Eutrophication of freshwater ecosystems and respiratory effects of atmospheric N pollution were important across HUC8s. However, significant data gaps remain in our ability to fully assess N damages, such as damage costs from harmful algal blooms and drinking water contamination. Nationally, potential health and environmental damages of anthropogenic N in the early 2000s totaled 210 billion yr-1 USD (range: 81-441 billion yr-1). While a number of gaps and uncertainties remain in these estimates, overall this work represents a starting point to inform decisions

  17. China: Past and Present. A Supplemental Activity Unit on Chinese Culture for Grades 7-12.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Parisi, Lynn

    Designed as a supplement to the classroom text, this unit contains 14 lessons on Chinese culture and society. Students are encouraged to compare the cultures of traditional and modern China as well as those of China and the United States. Materials are divided into two sections. The first section contains lesson outlines, including teaching plans,…

  18. How Outpatient Substance Abuse Treatment Unit Director Activities May Affect Provision of Community Outreach Services

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chuang, Emmeline; Wells, Rebecca; Alexander, Jeffrey; Green, Sherri

    2013-01-01

    Aims: Community outreach services play an important role in infectious disease prevention and engaging drug users not currently in treatment. However, fewer than half of US substance abuse treatment units provide these services and many have little financial incentive to do so. Unit directors generally have latitude about scope of services,…

  19. 77 FR 13618 - Agency Information Collection Activities: Dominican Republic-Central America-United States Free...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-03-07

    ...-Central America-United States Free Trade Agreement (CAFTA-DR). This is a proposed extension of an... was approved by Congress in section 101(a) of the Dominican Republic- Central America-United States... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF...

  20. The Animals Around Us. Language Arts Theme Units: Cross-Curricular Activities for Primary Grades.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McAllister, Elizabeth A.; Hildebrand, Joan M.; Ericson, Joann H.

    This book is part of a series of books presenting ready-to-use instructional units on themes typically taught in the primary grades. The topics focus on science, math, social studies or literature, but use language arts skills consistently in each unit. Each book in the series also uses as many frames of mind or intelligences as possible. Within a…

  1. 10 CFR 50.13 - Attacks and destructive acts by enemies of the United States; and defense activities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 1 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Attacks and destructive acts by enemies of the United States; and defense activities. 50.13 Section 50.13 Energy NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION DOMESTIC... the effects of (a) attacks and destructive acts, including sabotage, directed against the facility...

  2. 10 CFR 50.13 - Attacks and destructive acts by enemies of the United States; and defense activities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 1 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Attacks and destructive acts by enemies of the United States; and defense activities. 50.13 Section 50.13 Energy NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION DOMESTIC... the effects of (a) attacks and destructive acts, including sabotage, directed against the facility...

  3. 10 CFR 50.13 - Attacks and destructive acts by enemies of the United States; and defense activities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 1 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Attacks and destructive acts by enemies of the United States; and defense activities. 50.13 Section 50.13 Energy NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION DOMESTIC... the effects of (a) attacks and destructive acts, including sabotage, directed against the facility...

  4. 10 CFR 50.13 - Attacks and destructive acts by enemies of the United States; and defense activities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 1 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Attacks and destructive acts by enemies of the United States; and defense activities. 50.13 Section 50.13 Energy NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION DOMESTIC... the effects of (a) attacks and destructive acts, including sabotage, directed against the facility...

  5. 10 CFR 50.13 - Attacks and destructive acts by enemies of the United States; and defense activities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Attacks and destructive acts by enemies of the United States; and defense activities. 50.13 Section 50.13 Energy NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION DOMESTIC... the effects of (a) attacks and destructive acts, including sabotage, directed against the facility...

  6. Methods of Calculating Unit Activity and Output Costs in French Universities. Technical Report. Programme on Institutional Management in Higher Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Babeau, Andre; And Others

    Proposals for calculating unit costs are advocated that are based on a body of methods common to the member universities. Production inputs and cost components in French universities are studied in terms of resources at the disposal of the university, and staffing, capital, operating, and transfer costs. Identification of activities and…

  7. Mangroves Build Land. "Mangroves are a Valuable Resource." Grades 7 and 8. A Two Lesson Unit. Student Learning Activity Module.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Frank, James

    This module is an activity and film-oriented unit focusing on the importance of mangroves in the South Florida ecosystem. The module is part of a series designed to be used by teachers, students, and community members to help them utilize community resources in developing and teaching environmental concepts and responsibility, and in seeking ways…

  8. Influence of Negotiations between Preservice Teachers and Pupils on Instruction within Multi-Activity and Sport Education Units

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wahl-Alexander, Zachary; Curtner-Smith, Matthew D.

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine the influence of negotiations between pupils and preservice teachers (PTs) on PTs' instruction within multi-activity (MA) teaching and sport education (SE). Participants were 17 PTs engaged in a secondary early field experience in which they taught 12-lesson MA and SE soccer units. Data were collected using…

  9. Federal Statistics. A Special Report on the Statistical Programs and Activities of the United States Government, Fiscal Year 1987.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Office of Management and Budget, Washington, DC. Statistical Policy Div.

    This report on the statistical programs and activities of the Federal Government covers some 70 Federal agencies or separate departmental units budgeting at least $500,000 in any of fiscal years 1985-87. The budgets of agencies whose sole mission is statistical represent less than half the $1.6 billion that the Federal Government will spend on…

  10. Activity of 10 antimicrobial agents against intracellular Rhodococcus equi.

    PubMed

    Giguère, Steeve; Berghaus, Londa J; Lee, Elise A

    2015-08-01

    Studies with facultative intracellular bacterial pathogens have shown that evaluation of the bactericidal activity of antimicrobial agents against intracellular bacteria is more closely associated with in vivo efficacy than traditional in vitro susceptibility testing. The objective of this study was to determine the relative activity of 10 antimicrobial agents against intracellular Rhodococcus equi. Equine monocyte-derived macrophages were infected with virulent R. equi and exposed to erythromycin, clarithromycin, azithromycin, rifampin, ceftiofur, gentamicin, enrofloxacin, vancomycin, imipenem, or doxycycline at concentrations achievable in plasma at clinically recommended dosages in foals. The number of intracellular R. equi was determined 48h after infection by counting colony forming units (CFUs). The number of R. equi CFUs in untreated control wells were significantly higher than those of monolayers treated with antimicrobial agents. Numbers of R. equi were significantly lower in monolayers treated with enrofloxacin followed by those treated with gentamicin, and vancomycin, when compared to monolayers treated with other antimicrobial agents. Numbers of R. equi in monolayers treated with doxycycline were significantly higher than those of monolayers treated with other antimicrobial agents. Differences in R. equi CFUs between monolayers treated with other antimicrobial agents were not statistically significant. Enrofloxacin, gentamicin, and vancomycin are the most active drugs in equine monocyte-derived macrophages infected with R. equi. Additional studies will be needed to determine if these findings correlate with in vivo efficacy. PMID:26051479

  11. Scientific activity and needs among medical oncology units in sicily: a survey of the italian association of medical oncology.

    PubMed

    Amadio, P; Bordonaro, R; Borsellino, N; Butera, A; Caruso, M; Ferraù, F; Russello, R; Savio, G; Valenza, R; Zerilli, F; Gebbia, V

    2010-02-01

    In the era of targeted therapies and combined modalities of treatment, scientific research plays a role of paramount importance in improving knowledge of cancer treatment. The aim of this survey was to review the scientific activity of medical oncology units in Sicily and to analyze their needs and possible pitfalls in order to improve future scientific cooperation.The regional section of the Italian Association of medical Oncology (AIOM) approved this survey in November, 2007. A systematic review of scientific activity produced by medical oncology units in Sicily during the last 5 years has been reviewed. papers dealing with solid tumors reported in the pubmed web site have been included in the analysis. Data were reported as absolute number of published papers and impact factor per medical oncology unit and also as a ratio between global impact factor and the number of personnel working in each single unit to analyze scientific production according to the workforce of each institution.We identified a total of 283 papers reported in pubmed between 2004 and march, 2009. The mean number of publications/unit was 10.9 with a range of 0-50. The mean number of publications/year was 11.7 with a range of 0.2-10. The 15 units included in the impact factor evaluation published 252 papers with a total impact factor of 1014.6 points in 5 years with a mean of 63.4 points per institution and a mean of 4.02 points/paper. However only four medical oncology units reported a cumulative 5-year impact factor >100 points.This survey has shown that a minority of medical oncology units in Sicily is constantly involved in clinical research although at different levels of activity. Overall the percentage of patients enrolled in clinical trials is very low. The main reasons for lack of participation in clinical trials include insufficient medical personnel, the absence of a specifically dedicated research unit inside the medical oncology structures and in some cases lack of research

  12. Workshop Physics Activity Guide, The Core Volume with Module 1: Mechanics I: Kinematics and Newtonian Dynamics (Units 1-7)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Laws, Priscilla W.

    2004-02-01

    The Workshop Physics Activity Guide is a set of student workbooks designed to serve as the foundation for a two-semester calculus-based introductory physics course. It consists of 28 units that interweave text materials with activities that include prediction, qualitative observation, explanation, equation derivation, mathematical modeling, quantitative experiments, and problem solving. Students use a powerful set of computer tools to record, display, and analyze data, as well as to develop mathematical models of physical phenomena. The design of many of the activities is based on the outcomes of physics education research.

  13. The effect of fast and slow motor unit activation on whole-muscle mechanical performance: the size principle may not pose a mechanical paradox

    PubMed Central

    Holt, N. C.; Wakeling, J. M.; Biewener, A. A.

    2014-01-01

    The output of skeletal muscle can be varied by selectively recruiting different motor units. However, our knowledge of muscle function is largely derived from muscle in which all motor units are activated. This discrepancy may limit our understanding of in vivo muscle function. Hence, this study aimed to characterize the mechanical properties of muscle with different motor unit activation. We determined the isometric properties and isotonic force–velocity relationship of rat plantaris muscles in situ with all of the muscle active, 30% of the muscle containing predominately slower motor units active or 20% of the muscle containing predominately faster motor units active. There was a significant effect of active motor unit type on isometric force rise time (p < 0.001) and the force–velocity relationship (p < 0.001). Surprisingly, force rise time was longer and maximum shortening velocity higher when all motor units were active than when either fast or slow motor units were selectively activated. We propose this is due to the greater relative effects of factors such as series compliance and muscle resistance to shortening during sub-maximal contractions. The findings presented here suggest that recruitment according to the size principle, where slow motor units are activated first and faster ones recruited as demand increases, may not pose a mechanical paradox, as has been previously suggested. PMID:24695429

  14. Single-unit activity, threshold crossings, and local field potentials in motor cortex differentially encode reach kinematics.

    PubMed

    Perel, Sagi; Sadtler, Patrick T; Oby, Emily R; Ryu, Stephen I; Tyler-Kabara, Elizabeth C; Batista, Aaron P; Chase, Steven M

    2015-09-01

    A diversity of signals can be recorded with extracellular electrodes. It remains unclear whether different signal types convey similar or different information and whether they capture the same or different underlying neural phenomena. Some researchers focus on spiking activity, while others examine local field potentials, and still others posit that these are fundamentally the same signals. We examined the similarities and differences in the information contained in four signal types recorded simultaneously from multielectrode arrays implanted in primary motor cortex: well-isolated action potentials from putative single units, multiunit threshold crossings, and local field potentials (LFPs) at two distinct frequency bands. We quantified the tuning of these signal types to kinematic parameters of reaching movements. We found 1) threshold crossing activity is not a proxy for single-unit activity; 2) when examined on individual electrodes, threshold crossing activity more closely resembles LFP activity at frequencies between 100 and 300 Hz than it does single-unit activity; 3) when examined across multiple electrodes, threshold crossing activity and LFP integrate neural activity at different spatial scales; and 4) LFP power in the "beta band" (between 10 and 40 Hz) is a reliable indicator of movement onset but does not encode kinematic features on an instant-by-instant basis. These results show that the diverse signals recorded from extracellular electrodes provide somewhat distinct and complementary information. It may be that these signal types arise from biological phenomena that are partially distinct. These results also have practical implications for harnessing richer signals to improve brain-machine interface control. PMID:26133797

  15. Modeling complexity in pathologist workload measurement: the Automatable Activity-Based Approach to Complexity Unit Scoring (AABACUS).

    PubMed

    Cheung, Carol C; Torlakovic, Emina E; Chow, Hung; Snover, Dale C; Asa, Sylvia L

    2015-03-01

    Pathologists provide diagnoses relevant to the disease state of the patient and identify specific tissue characteristics relevant to response to therapy and prognosis. As personalized medicine evolves, there is a trend for increased demand of tissue-derived parameters. Pathologists perform increasingly complex analyses on the same 'cases'. Traditional methods of workload assessment and reimbursement, based on number of cases sometimes with a modifier (eg, the relative value unit (RVU) system used in the United States), often grossly underestimate the amount of work needed for complex cases and may overvalue simple, small biopsy cases. We describe a new approach to pathologist workload measurement that aligns with this new practice paradigm. Our multisite institution with geographically diverse partner institutions has developed the Automatable Activity-Based Approach to Complexity Unit Scoring (AABACUS) model that captures pathologists' clinical activities from parameters documented in departmental laboratory information systems (LISs). The model's algorithm includes: 'capture', 'export', 'identify', 'count', 'score', 'attribute', 'filter', and 'assess filtered results'. Captured data include specimen acquisition, handling, analysis, and reporting activities. Activities were counted and complexity units (CUs) generated using a complexity factor for each activity. CUs were compared between institutions, practice groups, and practice types and evaluated over a 5-year period (2008-2012). The annual load of a clinical service pathologist, irrespective of subspecialty, was ∼40,000 CUs using relative benchmarking. The model detected changing practice patterns and was appropriate for monitoring clinical workload for anatomical pathology, neuropathology, and hematopathology in academic and community settings, and encompassing subspecialty and generalist practices. AABACUS is objective, can be integrated with an LIS and automated, is reproducible, backwards compatible

  16. Apparent discrepancy between single-unit activity and (/sup 14/C)deoxyglucose labeling in optic tectum of the rattlesnake

    SciTech Connect

    Auker, C.R.; Meszler, R.M.; Carpenter, D.O.

    1983-06-01

    Autoradiographic analysis of (1-/sup 14/C)2-deoxy-D-glucose-6-phosphate ((/sup 14/C)2-DG-P) accumulation in the rattlesnake brain stem and optic tectum was used in an effort to map infrared and visual neuronal pathways. Visual stimulation with a standard stimulus (a heat lamp) resulted in dense labeling of the superficial layers of the optic tectum. Infrared stimulation resulted in labeling at the first synaptic relay, the lateral descending nucleus of the trigeminal tract, but not at higher levels. Responses of infrared units in one hemitectum and visual units in the other were analyzed. There were no clear differences in the number, maximal density, spread, or rates of accommodation of visual units and infrared units, although the locus of maximal density was more superficial for visual units. In general, infrared units generated a greater number of action potentials. All infrared units responded to onset but they varied greatly in their ability to maintain discharge for the duration of the stimulus. Infrared stimuli generated single, large, triphasic on-responses, whereas visual stimulation generated complex multiphasic and long-lasting on- and off-responses. The major infrared-on peak reached maximal amplitude at greater depths and was larger than the major visual-on peak. Amplitude of the infrared peak fell off more rapidly with distance than did amplitude of the visual peak. These observations are consistent with the view that infrared stimulation is effective in discharging neurons but is not associated with intense synaptic excitation. Our observations suggest that 2-deoxy-D-glucose uptake is not necessarily correlated with the degree of action potential activation of specific neuronal pathways. The amount of (/sup 14/C)2-DG-P labeling may reflect the metabolic requirements for support of synaptic depolarization as well as that supporting action potentials.

  17. Detecting bladder fullness through the ensemble activity patterns of the spinal cord unit population in a somatovisceral convergence environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, Jae Hong; Kim, Chang-Eop; Shin, Jaewoo; Im, Changkyun; Koh, Chin Su; Seo, In Seok; Kim, Sang Jeong; Shin, Hyung-Cheul

    2013-10-01

    Objective. Chronic monitoring of the state of the bladder can be used to notify patients with urinary dysfunction when the bladder should be voided. Given that many spinal neurons respond both to somatic and visceral inputs, it is necessary to extract bladder information selectively from the spinal cord. Here, we hypothesize that sensory information with distinct modalities should be represented by the distinct ensemble activity patterns within the neuronal population and, therefore, analyzing the activity patterns of the neuronal population could distinguish bladder fullness from somatic stimuli. Approach. We simultaneously recorded 26-27 single unit activities in response to bladder distension or tactile stimuli in the dorsal spinal cord of each Sprague-Dawley rat. In order to discriminate between bladder fullness and tactile stimulus inputs, we analyzed the ensemble activity patterns of the entire neuronal population. A support vector machine (SVM) was employed as a classifier, and discrimination performance was measured by k-fold cross-validation tests. Main results. Most of the units responding to bladder fullness also responded to the tactile stimuli (88.9-100%). The SVM classifier precisely distinguished the bladder fullness from the somatic input (100%), indicating that the ensemble activity patterns of the unit population in the spinal cord are distinct enough to identify the current input modality. Moreover, our ensemble activity pattern-based classifier showed high robustness against random losses of signals. Significance. This study is the first to demonstrate that the two main issues of electroneurographic monitoring of bladder fullness, low signals and selectiveness, can be solved by an ensemble activity pattern-based approach, improving the feasibility of chronic monitoring of bladder fullness by neural recording.

  18. Microbial contamination in dental unit waterlines.

    PubMed

    Souza-Gugelmin, Maria Cristina Monteiro de; Lima, Carolina Della Torre; Lima, Sergio Narciso Marques de; Mian, Henis; Ito, Izabel Yoko

    2003-01-01

    The quality of water in a dental unit is of considerable importance because patients and dental staff are regularly exposed to water and aerosol generated from the dental unit. The aim of this study was to evaluate the occurrence of microbial contamination in dental unit waterlines. Water samples were collected aseptically from the waterlines (reservoir, triple-syringe, high-speed) of 15 dental units. After serial dilution to 1:10(6) in APHA, the samples were seeded by the pour-plate technique and cultured in plate count agar (Difco) for 48 h at 32 degrees C. Analysis was based on the number of colony forming units (CFU). The Wilcoxon non-parametric test indicated that the levels of water contamination were highest in the triple-syringe (13 of 15) and in the high-speed (11 of 15); both levels were higher than those of the water reservoir. There was no significant statistical difference between the level of contamination in the triple-syringe and the high-speed as determined by the Mann-Whitney test [p(H0) = 40.98%; Z = - 0.2281]. Because biofilm forms on solid surfaces constantly bathed by liquid where microorganisms are present, these results indicate that the water in the dental unit may be contaminated by biofilm that forms in these tubules. PMID:12656466

  19. Joint United States and People`s Republic of China clean coal activities. Annual report, April 1994--December 1995

    SciTech Connect

    1996-06-01

    The United States Department of Energy (U.S. DOE) and the Ministry of Coal Industry of the People`s Republic of China (China) signed a protocol in the field of fossil energy research and development in April 1985. An annex to this agreement, Annex IX, was signed in April 1994 for cooperation between the U.S. DOE and China`s State Science and Technology Commission (SSTC) in the area of clean coal utilization. Article III of Annex IX requires the United States and China jointly to prepare an annual report i describing the work performed and results achieved. This report, in compliance with Article III, is a description of the activities conducted under Annex IX during the period from April 1994 through December 1995. The report also contains the plans for future activities for the next 12 months, or through December 1996.

  20. [Conditions of professional activity of the staff of units and formations of special support and its medical and psychological support].

    PubMed

    Poluboyarinov, V N; Grabskii, Yu V; Zemlyannikov, D A; Kushchev, G G

    2016-02-01

    In the field of special support of nuclear- and radiation-dangerous objects "human factor" is highlighted, which means that psychological status of crew is at the first place. The authors analysed conditions of professional activity, determined morbidity rates and psychologically important labour characteristics for military specialists working at nuclear- and radiation-dangerous objects. The staff working at these objects undergoes irradiation, hostility of inhabitation and high psychological pressure. The authors presented data on peculiarities of health status and morbidity rate among military servicemen of the given category: the frequency of digestive apparatus diseases, diseases of nervous and circulatory systems is higher than in auxiliary subunits of the same military units. The authors determined the main principles and structure of measures of medical and psychological support of professional activity of the staff of military units of special support. PMID:27263211

  1. 77 FR 69650 - Agency Information Collection Activities: Holders or Containers Which Enter the United States...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-11-20

    ... request for Office of Management and Budget (OMB) approval. All comments will become a matter of public...: None. Abstract: All articles that are brought into the United States are subject to duty unless they... as 19 U.S.C. 1202. Item 9801.00.10 (HTSUS) provides that articles that were manufactured in the...

  2. 78 FR 23280 - Agency Information Collection Activities: United States-Caribbean Basin Trade Partnership Act...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-04-18

    ...-Caribbean Basin Trade Partnership Act (CBTPA) AGENCY: U.S. Customs and Border Protection (CBP), Department... collection requirement concerning the United States-Caribbean Basin Trade Partnership Act (CBTPA). This... Rulings, Office of International Trade, 90 K Street NE., 10th Floor, Washington, DC 20229- 1177, at...

  3. Travel On! Mini-Units and Learning Activities on Transportation for Grades 4-6.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lawson, Jane; And Others

    One of a series of eleven curriculum manuals which cover the four transportation topics of public transportation, transportation and the environment, transportation safety, and bicycles for elementary, secondary, and adult levels, this manual for grades 4-6 covers all four topics. Materials in four chapters comprising fourteen mini-units cover…

  4. Travel On! Mini-Units and Learning Activities on Transportation for Grades K-3.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lawson, Jane; And Others

    One of a series of eleven curriculum manuals which cover the four transportation topics of public transportation, transportation and the environment, transportation safety, and bicycles for elementary, secondary, and adult levels, this manual for grades K-3 covers all four topics. Materials in the thirteen mini-units present different aspects of…

  5. The Navajo Way of Life: A Resource Unit with Activities for Grades 4-6.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cordova, Dahlia

    A resource unit on the Navajo way of life, for grades 4-6, contains sections on Navajo history, art, and crafts, homes, music, poetry and games; Navajo and Pueblo cookery (including recipes); traditional Navajo dress, ceremony and legends; and successful Navajos, past and present. Sections include text, vocabulary words, drawings, maps, and…

  6. Intriguing Animals. Language Arts Theme Units, Volume IV. Cross Curricular Activities for Primary Grades.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McAllister, Elizabeth A.; Hildebrand, Joan M.; Ericson, Joann H.

    Suggesting that students in the primary grades can explore the world around them and practice valuable skills in spelling, reading, writing, communication, and language, this book presents cross-curricular units on intriguing animals that reach diverse needs by working through emotional memory, deductive reasoning, and multiple intelligences.…

  7. People Around Us. Language Arts Theme Units, Volume V. Cross Curricular Activities for Primary Grades.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McAllister, Elizabeth A.; Hildebrand, Joan M.; Ericson, Joann H.

    Suggesting that students in the primary grades can explore the world around them and practice valuable skills in spelling, reading, writing, communication, and language, this book presents cross-curricular units on "people around us" that reach diverse needs by working through emotional memory, deductive reasoning, and multiple intelligences.…

  8. Our Environment. Language Arts Theme Units, Volume I. Cross Curricular Activities for Primary Grades.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McAllister, Elizabeth A.; Hildebrand, Joan M.; Ericson, Joann H.

    Suggesting that students in the primary grades can explore the world around them and practice valuable skills in spelling, reading, writing, communication, and language, this book presents cross-curricular units on the environment that reach diverse needs by working through emotional memory, deductive reasoning, and multiple intelligences.…

  9. Harriet Tubman Integrated Unit. ArtsEdge Curricula, Lessons and Activities.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Van Der Woude, Gladys

    Harriet Tubman, a famous Civil War freedom fighter from Maryland, is the focus of this unit that integrates the arts and history. Students will learn about Harriet Tubman through music, art, dance, literature, and reference materials. The five lessons will be models and a springboard for the research projects that the students will complete about…

  10. Learning Projects of the Active Aging Eighty-Five and Over Population in the United States.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Main, Keith; Schaefer, Chris

    Despite the fact that people in the United States are living longer, research on the learning projects of the population of individuals 85 years old or older remains sparse and sporadic. The literature that does exist debunks a number of common myths about aging and learning by establishing the following: adults aged 65 and over are a highly…

  11. Antibacterial and residual antimicrobial activities against Enterococcus faecalis biofilm: A comparison between EDTA, chlorhexidine, cetrimide, MTAD and QMix.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Rui; Chen, Min; Lu, Yan; Guo, Xiangjun; Qiao, Feng; Wu, Ligeng

    2015-01-01

    We compared the antibacterial and residual antimicrobial activities of five root canal irrigants (17% EDTA,2% chlorhexidine,0.2% cetrimide, MTAD, and QMix) in a model of Enterococcus faecalis biofilm formation. Sixty dentin blocks with 3-week E. faecalis biofilm were divided into six equal groups and flushed with irrigant for 2 min or left untreated. A blank control group was also established. Antibacterial activities of the irrigants were evaluated by counting colony forming units. To test residual antimicrobial activities, 280 dentin blocks were divided into seven equal groups and flushed with irrigant for 2 min or left untreated and then incubated with E. faecalis suspension for 48 h, or used as a blank. No bacteria were observed in the blank control group. The number of viable E. faecalis was significantly fewer in the irrigant-treated groups compared with the untreated control (P < 0.05). Among the five irrigants, QMix had the strongest antibacterial activity. Residual antimicrobial activities of CHX were significantly higher at 12 h, 24 h and 36 h compared to untreated control (P < 0.05). All five root canal irrigants were effective to some extent against E. faecalis, but QMix and CHX had the strongest, and CHX the longest (up to 36 h), antimicrobial activity. PMID:26245711

  12. Antibacterial and residual antimicrobial activities against Enterococcus faecalis biofilm: A comparison between EDTA, chlorhexidine, cetrimide, MTAD and QMix

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Rui; Chen, Min; Lu, Yan; Guo, Xiangjun; Qiao, Feng; Wu, Ligeng

    2015-01-01

    We compared the antibacterial and residual antimicrobial activities of five root canal irrigants (17% EDTA,2% chlorhexidine,0.2% cetrimide, MTAD, and QMix) in a model of Enterococcus faecalis biofilm formation. Sixty dentin blocks with 3-week E. faecalis biofilm were divided into six equal groups and flushed with irrigant for 2 min or left untreated. A blank control group was also established. Antibacterial activities of the irrigants were evaluated by counting colony forming units. To test residual antimicrobial activities, 280 dentin blocks were divided into seven equal groups and flushed with irrigant for 2 min or left untreated and then incubated with E. faecalis suspension for 48 h, or used as a blank. No bacteria were observed in the blank control group. The number of viable E. faecalis was significantly fewer in the irrigant-treated groups compared with the untreated control (P < 0.05). Among the five irrigants, QMix had the strongest antibacterial activity. Residual antimicrobial activities of CHX were significantly higher at 12 h, 24 h and 36 h compared to untreated control (P < 0.05). All five root canal irrigants were effective to some extent against E. faecalis, but QMix and CHX had the strongest, and CHX the longest (up to 36 h), antimicrobial activity. PMID:26245711

  13. Antibacterial and residual antimicrobial activities against Enterococcus faecalis biofilm: A comparison between EDTA, chlorhexidine, cetrimide, MTAD and QMix

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Rui; Chen, Min; Lu, Yan; Guo, Xiangjun; Qiao, Feng; Wu, Ligeng

    2015-08-01

    We compared the antibacterial and residual antimicrobial activities of five root canal irrigants (17% EDTA,2% chlorhexidine,0.2% cetrimide, MTAD, and QMix) in a model of Enterococcus faecalis biofilm formation. Sixty dentin blocks with 3-week E. faecalis biofilm were divided into six equal groups and flushed with irrigant for 2 min or left untreated. A blank control group was also established. Antibacterial activities of the irrigants were evaluated by counting colony forming units. To test residual antimicrobial activities, 280 dentin blocks were divided into seven equal groups and flushed with irrigant for 2 min or left untreated and then incubated with E. faecalis suspension for 48 h, or used as a blank. No bacteria were observed in the blank control group. The number of viable E. faecalis was significantly fewer in the irrigant-treated groups compared with the untreated control (P < 0.05). Among the five irrigants, QMix had the strongest antibacterial activity. Residual antimicrobial activities of CHX were significantly higher at 12 h, 24 h and 36 h compared to untreated control (P < 0.05). All five root canal irrigants were effective to some extent against E. faecalis, but QMix and CHX had the strongest, and CHX the longest (up to 36 h), antimicrobial activity.

  14. Task-dependent activity of motor unit populations in feline ankle extensor muscles

    PubMed Central

    Hodson-Tole, Emma F.; Pantall, Annette; Maas, Huub; Farrell, Brad; Gregor, Robert J.; Prilutsky, Boris I.

    2012-01-01

    SUMMARY Understanding the functional significance of the morphological diversity of mammalian skeletal muscles is limited by technical difficulties of estimating the contribution of motor units with different properties to unconstrained motor behaviours. Recently developed wavelet and principal components analysis of intramuscular myoelectric signals has linked signals with lower and higher frequency contents to the use of slower and faster motor unit populations. In this study we estimated the relative contributions of lower and higher frequency signals of cat ankle extensors (soleus, medial and lateral gastrocnemii, plantaris) during level, downslope and upslope walking and the paw-shake response. This was done using the first two myoelectric signal principal components (PCI, PCII), explaining over 90% of the signal, and an angle θ, a function of PCI/PCII, indicating the relative contribution of slower and faster motor unit populations. Mean myoelectric frequencies in all walking conditions were lowest for slow soleus (234 Hz) and highest for fast gastrocnemii (307 and 330 Hz) muscles. Motor unit populations within and across the studied muscles that demonstrated lower myoelectric frequency (suggesting slower populations) were recruited during tasks and movement phases with lower mechanical demands on the ankle extensors – during downslope and level walking and in early walking stance and paw-shake phases. With increasing mechanical demands (upslope walking, mid-phase of paw-shake cycles), motor unit populations generating higher frequency signals (suggesting faster populations) contributed progressively more. We conclude that the myoelectric frequency contents within and between feline ankle extensors vary across studied motor behaviours, with patterns that are generally consistent with muscle fibre-type composition. PMID:22811250

  15. Task-dependent activity of motor unit populations in feline ankle extensor muscles.

    PubMed

    Hodson-Tole, Emma F; Pantall, Annette; Maas, Huub; Farrell, Brad; Gregor, Robert J; Prilutsky, Boris I

    2012-11-01

    Understanding the functional significance of the morphological diversity of mammalian skeletal muscles is limited by technical difficulties of estimating the contribution of motor units with different properties to unconstrained motor behaviours. Recently developed wavelet and principal components analysis of intramuscular myoelectric signals has linked signals with lower and higher frequency contents to the use of slower and faster motor unit populations. In this study we estimated the relative contributions of lower and higher frequency signals of cat ankle extensors (soleus, medial and lateral gastrocnemii, plantaris) during level, downslope and upslope walking and the paw-shake response. This was done using the first two myoelectric signal principal components (PCI, PCII), explaining over 90% of the signal, and an angle θ, a function of PCI/PCII, indicating the relative contribution of slower and faster motor unit populations. Mean myoelectric frequencies in all walking conditions were lowest for slow soleus (234 Hz) and highest for fast gastrocnemii (307 and 330 Hz) muscles. Motor unit populations within and across the studied muscles that demonstrated lower myoelectric frequency (suggesting slower populations) were recruited during tasks and movement phases with lower mechanical demands on the ankle extensors--during downslope and level walking and in early walking stance and paw-shake phases. With increasing mechanical demands (upslope walking, mid-phase of paw-shake cycles), motor unit populations generating higher frequency signals (suggesting faster populations) contributed progressively more. We conclude that the myoelectric frequency contents within and between feline ankle extensors vary across studied motor behaviours, with patterns that are generally consistent with muscle fibre-type composition. PMID:22811250

  16. Antimicrobial activity of iodoquinol 1%-hydrocortisone acetate 2% gel against ciclopirox and clotrimazole.

    PubMed

    Burnett, Bruce P; Mitchell, Calvin M

    2008-10-01

    Commercially available topical formulations consisting of iodoquinol 1%-hydrocortisone acetate 2%, ciclopirox 0.77%, and clotrimazole 1%-betamethasone dipropionate 0.5% were assessed for their antimicrobial activity against cultures of Micrococcus luteus, Propionibacterium acnes, methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA), Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Corynebacterium aquaticum, Trichophyton mentagrophytes, Malassezia furfur, Microsporum canis, Candida albicans, Trichophyton rubrum, or Epidermophyton floccosum. At 1 and 5 minutes following inoculation into suspensions of each product, aliquots were removed, serially diluted, and plated onto appropriate agar to determine the log reduction in colony-forming units (CFUs) for each organism. Iodoquinol 1% produced the broadest and greatest antimicrobial activity as measured by a 3-log reduction of CFU, active against all microbes tested following incubation times of 1 or 5 minutes, except M luteus. By contrast, ciclopirox 0.77% and clotrimazole 1% showed activity against P aeruginosa and T rubrum, with ciclopirox also killing M luteus, P acnes, M canis, C albicans, and E floccosum at 5 minutes. Iodoquinol 1%-hydrocortisone acetate 2% also was the only product that showed effective antibacterial reduction of MRSA at 1 minute. PMID:19055171

  17. Association of proximity and density of parks and objectively measured physical activity in the United States: A systematic review.

    PubMed

    Bancroft, Carolyn; Joshi, Spruha; Rundle, Andrew; Hutson, Malo; Chong, Catherine; Weiss, Christopher C; Genkinger, Jeanine; Neckerman, Kathryn; Lovasi, Gina

    2015-08-01

    One strategy for increasing physical activity is to create and enhance access to park space. We assessed the literature on the relationship of parks and objectively measured physical activity in population-based studies in the United States (US) and identified limitations in current built environment and physical activity measurement and reporting. Five English-language scholarly databases were queried using standardized search terms. Abstracts were screened for the following inclusion criteria: 1) published between January 1990 and June 2013; 2) US-based with a sample size greater than 100 individuals; 3) included built environment measures related to parks or trails; and 4) included objectively measured physical activity as an outcome. Following initial screening for inclusion by two independent raters, articles were abstracted into a database. Of 10,949 abstracts screened, 20 articles met the inclusion criteria. Five articles reported a significant positive association between parks and physical activity. Nine studies found no association, and six studies had mixed findings. Our review found that even among studies with objectively measured physical activity, the association between access to parks and physical activity varied between studies, possibly due to heterogeneity of exposure measurement. Self-reported (vs. independently-measured) neighborhood park environment characteristics and smaller (vs. larger) buffer sizes were more predictive of physical activity. We recommend strategies for further research, employing standardized reporting and innovative study designs to better understand the relationship of parks and physical activity. PMID:26043433

  18. Vigorous physical activity among high school students--United States, 1990.

    PubMed

    1992-01-24

    Vigorous physical activity can improve the health of both adults and children. Among adults, regular physical activity can reduce risk for chronic diseases such as coronary heart disease, hypertension, noninsulin-dependent diabetes mellitus, colon cancer, and depression, as well as lower all-cause death rates (1,2). Among children, regular physical activity can reduce chronic disease risk factors such as obesity, elevated cholesterol, and hypertension (3). Physical activity patterns established during childhood may extend into adulthood (4). This report examines the prevalence of vigorous physical activity among U.S. students in grades 9-12. PMID:1731178

  19. Oscillatory activity of single units in a somatosensory cortex of an awake monkey and their possible role in texture analysis.

    PubMed Central

    Ahissar, E; Vaadia, E

    1990-01-01

    Neuronal activity was extracellularly recorded in the cortex of an awake monkey (Macaca fascicularis). Single units displaying oscillatory firing patterns were found in the upper bank of the lateral sulcus in a region where most of the neurons responded to somatosensory stimuli. The spectral energies of the oscillating activity were distributed in a trimodal fashion--0-15, 15-50, and 80-250 Hz--with the most common frequencies around 30 Hz. The oscillatory activity was not affected by anesthesia, but it was often reduced by tactile stimulation or self-initiated movements. Analysis of the spike trains suggests that the majority of oscillatory activity was intrinsically generated by the neurons. A neural model of texture analysis is offered based on a corticothalamic phase-locked loop. The newly identified oscillators play a key role in this model. The relevance of the model to physiological, anatomical, and psychophysical data, as well as testable predictions, are discussed. Images PMID:2247469

  20. Imperfect Unit.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McCarthy, Katherine

    This unit provides visual activities to engage students in learning the imperfect tense in Spanish. Upon completion of the unit, students will be able to do the following: identify imperfect tense conjugation in children's books; conjugate verbs in the imperfect tense; list uses of the imperfect tense; discriminate between the imperfect tense and…

  1. UNIT, PETROLOGY.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Louisiana Arts and Science Center, Baton Rouge.

    THIS TEACHER'S GUIDE FOR A UNIT ON PETROLOGY IS SUITABLE FOR ADAPTATION AT EITHER THE UPPER ELEMENTARY OR THE JUNIOR HIGH SCHOOL LEVELS. THE UNIT BEGINS WITH A STORY THAT INTRODUCES VOLCANIC ACTION AND IGNEOUS ROCK FORMATION. SELECTED CONCEPTS ARE LISTED FOLLOWED BY SUGGESTED ACTIVITIES. A BIBLIOGRAPHY, FILM LIST, VOCABULARY LIST, AND QUESTION AND…

  2. Rapid detection of Nocardia amarae in the activated sludge process using enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA).

    PubMed

    Iwahori, K; Miyata, N; Morisada, S; Suzuki, N

    2000-01-01

    Nocardia amarae, a mycolic acid-containing bacterium, has often been reported to cause foaming of activated sludge in wastewater treatment plants. In this study, the number of N. amarae cells in the activated sludge process was estimated by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) with anti-N. amarae polyclonal antibody. Use of the antibody enabled N. amarae to be detected at levels of 10(4) to 10(7) colony forming units. On the other hand, the antibody reacted with only a small portion of activated sludge, in which no N. amarae cells were detected by the plate count method. Competitive ELISA was employed to estimate the N. amarae cells in samples taken from a municipal wastewater treatment plant, including raw wastewater and activated sludge foam. The cell numbers estimated by competitive ELISA corresponded well with those obtained by plate counts. Hence, the antibody produced in this study was shown to be effective for the rapid monitoring of N. amarae in the activated sludge process. PMID:16232779

  3. Influenza Activity - United States, 2015-16 Season and Composition of the 2016-17 Influenza Vaccine.

    PubMed

    Davlin, Stacy L; Blanton, Lenee; Kniss, Krista; Mustaquim, Desiree; Smith, Sophie; Kramer, Natalie; Cohen, Jessica; Cummings, Charisse Nitura; Garg, Shikha; Flannery, Brendan; Fry, Alicia M; Grohskopf, Lisa A; Bresee, Joseph; Wallis, Teresa; Sessions, Wendy; Garten, Rebecca; Xu, Xiyan; Elal, Anwar Isa Abd; Gubareva, Larisa; Barnes, John; Wentworth, David E; Burns, Erin; Katz, Jacqueline; Jernigan, Daniel; Brammer, Lynnette

    2016-01-01

    During the 2015-16 influenza season (October 4, 2015-May 21, 2016) in the United States, influenza activity* was lower and peaked later compared with the previous three seasons (2012-13, 2013-14, and 2014-15). Activity remained low from October 2015 until late December 2015 and peaked in mid-March 2016. During the most recent 18 influenza seasons (including this season), only two other seasons have peaked in March (2011-12 and 2005-06). Overall influenza activity was moderate this season, with a lower percentage of outpatient visits for influenza-like illness (ILI),(†) lower hospitalization rates, and a lower percentage of deaths attributed to pneumonia and influenza (P&I) compared with the preceding three seasons. Influenza A(H1N1)pdm09 viruses predominated overall, but influenza A(H3N2) viruses were more commonly identified from October to early December, and influenza B viruses were more commonly identified from mid-April through mid-May. The majority of viruses characterized this season were antigenically similar to the reference viruses representing the recommended components of the 2015-16 Northern Hemisphere influenza vaccine (1). This report summarizes influenza activity in the United States during the 2015-16 influenza season (October 4, 2015-May 21, 2016)(§) and reports the vaccine virus components recommended for the 2016-17 Northern Hemisphere influenza vaccines. PMID:27281364

  4. 4-H Horticulture Project Activity Guides. Leader's Guide and Units 1-3.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Illinois Univ., Urbana. Cooperative Extension Service.

    This document, concerning the 4-H horticulture project, includes a leader's guide and three youth activity guides. The leader's guide can be used to plan group project meetings that are both fun and educational. Activities can be adapted to various age groups. The leader's guide includes basic information for growing plants indoors and outdoors,…

  5. Learning Activity Packets for Milling Machines. Unit III--Vertical Milling Machines.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Oklahoma State Board of Vocational and Technical Education, Stillwater. Curriculum and Instructional Materials Center.

    This learning activity packet (LAP) outlines the study activities and performance tasks covered in a related curriculum guide on milling machines. The course of study in this LAP is intended to help students learn to set up and operate a vertical mill. Tasks addressed in the LAP include mounting and removing cutters and cutter holders for vertical…

  6. Learning Activity Packets for Milling Machines. Unit I--Introduction to Milling Machines.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Oklahoma State Board of Vocational and Technical Education, Stillwater. Curriculum and Instructional Materials Center.

    This learning activity packet (LAP) outlines the study activities and performance tasks covered in a related curriculum guide on milling machines. The course of study in this LAP is intended to help students learn to identify parts and attachments of vertical and horizontal milling machines, identify work-holding devices, state safety rules, and…

  7. Public Education: Commercial Activities in Schools. United States General Accounting Office Report to Congressional Requesters.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shaul, Marnie S.

    Commercial activities in U.S. public elementary and secondary schools have been growing in visibility throughout the last decade, a period characterized by tightened school budgets. As visibility has increased, so have concerns about commercial activities that generate cash, equipment, or other types of assistance and their potential effects on…

  8. Learning Activity Packets for Milling Machines. Unit II--Horizontal Milling Machines.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Oklahoma State Board of Vocational and Technical Education, Stillwater. Curriculum and Instructional Materials Center.

    This learning activity packet (LAP) outlines the study activities and performance tasks covered in a related curriculum guide on milling machines. The course of study in this LAP is intended to help students learn to set up and operate a horizontal mill. Tasks addressed in the LAP include mounting style "A" or "B" arbors and adjusting arbor…

  9. Muscle-Strengthening Activities and Participation among Adults in the United States

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Loustalot, Fleetwood; Carlson, Susan A.; Kruger, Judy; Buchner, David M.; Fulton, Janet E.

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: To describe those who reported meeting the "2008 Physical Activity Guidelines for Americans" ("2008 Guidelines") muscle-strengthening standard of 2 or more days per week, including all seven muscle groups, and to assess the type and location of muscle-strengthening activities performed. Method: Data from HealthStyles…

  10. Ictal onset patterns of local field potentials, high frequency oscillations, and unit activity in human mesial temporal lobe epilepsy

    PubMed Central

    Weiss, Shennan Aibel; Alvarado-Rojas, Catalina; Bragin, Anatol; Behnke, Eric; Fields, Tony; Fried, Itzhak; Engel, Jerome; Staba, Richard

    2016-01-01

    Summary Objective To characterize local field potentials, high frequency oscillations, and single unit firing patterns in microelectrode recordings of human limbic onset seizures. Methods Wide bandwidth local field potential recordings were acquired from microelectrodes implanted in mesial temporal structures during spontaneous seizures from six patients with mesial temporal lobe epilepsy. Results In the seizure onset zone, distinct epileptiform discharges were evident in the local field potential prior to the time of seizure onset in the intracranial EEG. In all three seizures with hypersynchronous (HYP) seizure onset, fast ripples with incrementally increasing power accompanied epileptiform discharges during the transition to the ictal state (p < 0.01). In a single low voltage fast (LVF) onset seizure a triad of evolving HYP LFP discharges, increased single unit activity, and fast ripples of incrementally increasing power were identified ~20 s prior to seizure onset (p < 0.01). In addition, incrementally increasing fast ripples occurred after seizure onset just prior to the transition to LVF activity (p < 0.01). HYP onset was associated with an increase in fast ripple and ripple rate (p < 0.05) and commonly each HYP discharge had a superimposed ripple followed by a fast ripple. Putative excitatory and inhibitory single units could be distinguished during limbic seizure onset, and heterogeneous shifts in firing rate were observed during LVF activity. Significance Epileptiform activity is detected by microelectrodes before it is detected by depth macroelectrodes, and the one clinically identified LVF ictal onset was a HYP onset at the local level. Patterns of incrementally increasing fast ripple power are consistent with observations in rats with experimental hippocampal epilepsy, suggesting that limbic seizures arise when small clusters of synchronously bursting neurons increase in size, coalesce, and reach a critical mass for propagation. PMID:26611159

  11. Motor unit activity during different functional states of the neuromuscular system.

    PubMed

    Gantchev, G N; Gatev, P; Ivanova, T; Tankov, N

    1986-01-01

    The study showed that the mean interspike interval (ISI) and the variability of ISIs increased with fatigue for both low and high threshold motor units (MUs). The recruitment threshold tension decreased for both the low and high threshold MUs while the recruitment threshold in % of maximal voluntary contraction changed selectively because of decrease of muscle force. During ischaemia after an initial decrease of mean ISI and ISIs' variability there was an essential increase of variability of ISIs at almost the same mean ISI followed by a considerable final increase of both parameters. MUs' recruitment thresholds lowered with ischaemia more rapidly in the beginning and especially in the final stage of ischaemia. PMID:3964248

  12. Pancreas transplantation: differences in activity between Europe and the United States

    PubMed Central

    Manuel González-Posada, José; Marrero, Domingo; Hernández, Domingo; Coll, Elisabeth; Pérez Tamajón, Lourdes; Gutiérrez, Pedro; Martín, Eduardo; Bravo, Alberto; Alarcó, Antonio; Matesanz, Rafael

    2009-01-01

    Background. Although pancreas transplantation (PT) is the treatment of choice in selected diabetic patients, the International Pancreas Transplant Registry (IPTR) has reported important differences in activity between USA and Europe. Of all cases reported, 75% are from USA and only 23% from Europe. Therefore, an analysis of PT activity in selected European countries (SEC) and USA was performed. Materials and methods. We compared national data reports (2002–06) of deceased donors (DD) and deceased solid organ transplantation (DSOT), with special attention to PT activity from 13 SEC countries (375 million inhabitants) and USA (298 million inhabitants). Results. The number of PT performed in USA was 2-fold higher than in SEC, with the annual rate >2.4 times higher in USA [5.08–4.64 versus 1.61–1.91 per million population (p.m.p.)]. DD and other DSOT activity rates were only slightly higher in USA. In SEC, important differences in PT activity rate were found between countries in the same year (0–6.21 p.m.p.) and in the same country between different years (6.21–2.47 p.m.p.), unrelated to DD or other DSOT activity rate. PT activity rate increased in SEC from 1.61 to 1.91 p.m.p. but decreased in six countries. The waiting list for PT at the end of 2006 was almost 2-fold higher in USA than in SEC. Conclusions. Differences in PT activity rate between 13 SEC countries and USA were not related to DD or other DSOT activity. Different waiting list inclusion criteria or incidence of diabetes complications may be considered in more specific studies. PMID:19920003

  13. Miniature multichannel preamplifier for extracellular recordings of single unit activity in freely moving and swimming small animals.

    PubMed

    Korshunov, Victor A

    2012-04-30

    The design of a miniature multichannel preamplifier for extracellular recordings of single unit activity in freely moving and swimming small animals is presented. The advantages of this design include perfect protection of the critical components and electric contacts from water. Thus, neuronal activity and EEG may be recorded differentially in any kinds of behavioral tasks including swimming in Morris water maze. Recordings are stable even if an animal is diving and swimming under the water surface. The reusable dismountable base can adopt different types of chronically implanted fine wire electrodes and movable arrays. Electrodes may be implanted to any desired depth. The assembly weight is less than 240 mg. Thus, the construction is light enough even for mice. This work is the first successful attempt for multichannel recording of neuronal activity in mice performing spatial task in Morris water maze. PMID:22348856

  14. The comparative activity of twelve 4-quinolone antimicrobials and sulphadiazine against Neisseria meningitidis.

    PubMed

    Felmingham, D; Wall, R A

    1985-01-01

    The minimal inhibitory concentrations (MICs) of twelve 4-quinolone antimicrobials and sulphadiazine were determined for 160 clinical isolates of Neisseria meningitidis. The bacteria were recovered from nasopharyngeal carriers and cases of meningitis examined in The Gambia, West Africa, during the 1982-83 dry season. MICs were determined using an agar dilution technique in Mueller-Hinton agar supplemented with 10% lysed horse blood. The inoculum used was approximately 10(4) colony-forming units of each organism, contained in 10 microliters of Mueller-Hinton broth, which was applied to the agar plates using a multipoint inoculator. Following inoculation, plates were incubated for 18 h at 37 degrees C in an atmosphere enriched to 5% carbon dioxide. The MIC of each antimicrobial for each isolate examined was determined as the lowest concentration of the antimicrobial which completely inhibited growth of the inoculum. The minimum concentrations of each antimicrobial required to inhibit 50% (MIC50) and 90% (MIC90) of the isolates examined were also determined. The more recently synthesised 4-quinolones were very active against the isolates of Neisseria meningitidis, ciprofloxacin being marginally the most active (MIC90 0.008 micrograms/ml). The activity of the 4-quinolone antimicrobials was unaffected by the MICs of sulphadiazine required by the organisms, which ranged from 0.5- greater than 64 micrograms/ml. PMID:3939218

  15. On the Enhanced Antibacterial Activity of Antibiotics Mixed with Gold Nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burygin, G. L.; Khlebtsov, B. N.; Shantrokha, A. N.; Dykman, L. A.; Bogatyrev, V. A.; Khlebtsov, N. G.

    2009-08-01

    The bacterial action of gentamicin and that of a mixture of gentamicin and 15-nm colloidal-gold particles on Escherichia coli K12 was examined by the agar-well-diffusion method, enumeration of colony-forming units, and turbidimetry. Addition of gentamicin to colloidal gold changed the gold color and extinction spectrum. Within the experimental errors, there were no significant differences in antibacterial activity between pure gentamicin and its mixture with gold nanoparticles (NPs). Atomic absorption spectroscopy showed that upon application of the gentamicin-particle mixture, there were no gold NPs in the zone of bacterial-growth suppression in agar. Yet, free NPs diffused into the agar. These facts are in conflict with the earlier findings indicating an enhancement of the bacterial activity of similar gentamicin-gold nanoparticle mixtures. The possible causes for these discrepancies are discussed, and the suggestion is made that a necessary condition for enhancement of antibacterial activity is the preparation of stable conjugates of NPs coated with the antibiotic molecules.

  16. Antibacterial and antioxidant activities of derriobtusone A isolated from Lonchocarpus obtusus.

    PubMed

    Vasconcelos, Mayron Alves; Arruda, Francisco Vassiliepe Sousa; de Alencar, Daniel Barroso; Saker-Sampaio, Silvana; Albuquerque, Maria Rose Jane Ribeiro; Dos Santos, Hélcio Silva; Bandeira, Paulo Nogueira; Pessoa, Otília Deusdênia Loiola; Cavada, Benildo Sousa; Henriques, Mariana; Pereira, Maria Olivia; Teixeira, Edson Holanda

    2014-01-01

    This study evaluated the effect of derriobtusone A, a flavonoid isolated from Lonchocarpus obtusus, on two important pathogenic bacteria, Staphylococcus aureus and Escherichia coli, as well as its antioxidant activity and toxicity. Planktonic growth assays were performed, and the inhibition of biofilm formation was evaluated. In addition, antioxidant activity was assessed by DPPH radical scavenging assay, ferrous ion chelating assay, ferric-reducing antioxidant power assay, and β -carotene bleaching assay. Toxicity was evaluated by the brine shrimp lethality test. Results showed that derriobtusone A completely inhibited the planktonic growth of S. aureus at 250 and 500  μ g/mL; however, it did not have the same activity on E. coli. Derriobtusone A reduced the biomass and colony-forming unit (cfu) of S. aureus biofilm at concentrations of 250 and 500  μ g/mL. In various concentrations, it reduced the biofilm biomass of E. coli, and, in all concentrations, it weakly reduced the cfu. Derriobtusone A showed highly efficient antioxidant ability in scavenging DPPH radical and inhibiting β -carotene oxidation. The compound showed no lethality to Artemia sp. nauplii. In conclusion, derriobtusone A may be an effective molecule against S. aureus and its biofilm, as well as a potential antioxidant compound with no toxicity. PMID:24991543

  17. Antibacterial and Antioxidant Activities of Derriobtusone A Isolated from Lonchocarpus obtusus

    PubMed Central

    Vasconcelos, Mayron Alves; Arruda, Francisco Vassiliepe Sousa; de Alencar, Daniel Barroso; Saker-Sampaio, Silvana; Albuquerque, Maria Rose Jane Ribeiro; dos Santos, Hélcio Silva; Bandeira, Paulo Nogueira; Pessoa, Otília Deusdênia Loiola; Cavada, Benildo Sousa; Teixeira, Edson Holanda

    2014-01-01

    This study evaluated the effect of derriobtusone A, a flavonoid isolated from Lonchocarpus obtusus, on two important pathogenic bacteria, Staphylococcus aureus and Escherichia coli, as well as its antioxidant activity and toxicity. Planktonic growth assays were performed, and the inhibition of biofilm formation was evaluated. In addition, antioxidant activity was assessed by DPPH radical scavenging assay, ferrous ion chelating assay, ferric-reducing antioxidant power assay, and β-carotene bleaching assay. Toxicity was evaluated by the brine shrimp lethality test. Results showed that derriobtusone A completely inhibited the planktonic growth of S. aureus at 250 and 500 μg/mL; however, it did not have the same activity on E. coli. Derriobtusone A reduced the biomass and colony-forming unit (cfu) of S. aureus biofilm at concentrations of 250 and 500 μg/mL. In various concentrations, it reduced the biofilm biomass of E. coli, and, in all concentrations, it weakly reduced the cfu. Derriobtusone A showed highly efficient antioxidant ability in scavenging DPPH radical and inhibiting β-carotene oxidation. The compound showed no lethality to Artemia sp. nauplii. In conclusion, derriobtusone A may be an effective molecule against S. aureus and its biofilm, as well as a potential antioxidant compound with no toxicity. PMID:24991543

  18. Comparing the antibacterial activity of gaseous ozone and chlorhexidine solution on a tooth cavity model

    PubMed Central

    Öztaş, Nurhan; Sümer, Zeynep

    2013-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate the antibacterial activity of gaseous ozone and chlorhexidine solution on a tooth cavity model. Study Design: Twenty-one human molars were divided into 3 groups. Cavities were then cut into the teeth (4 per tooth, 28 cavities per group). After sterilization, the teeth were left in broth cultures of 106 colony-forming units (CFU) ml-1 of Streptococcus mutans (S. mutans) at 36°C for 48 h. The appropriate treatment followed (group A, control; group B, 2% chlorhexidine solution; and group C, 80s of treatment with ozone, and the cavities were then filled with composite resin. After 72h, the restorations were removed, dentin chips were collected with an excavator, and the total number of microorganisms was determined. Results: Both of the treatments significantly reduced the number of S. mutans present compared with the control group and there was a significant difference between the all groups in terms of the amount of the microorganisms grown (p < 0.05). Group B was beter than group C; and group C was better than group A. Moreover, it was found that the amount of the growth in the group of chlorhexidine was significantly less than that of the ozone group (p < 0.05). Conclusion: Chlorhexidine solution was the antibacterial treatment most efficacious on S. mutans; however, ozone application could be an anlternative cavity disinfection method because of ozone’s cavity disinfection activity. Key words:Antibacterial activity, chlorhexidine, ozone, streptococcus mutans, tooth cavity. PMID:24455068

  19. Silver nanoparticles with antimicrobial activities against Streptococcus mutans and their cytotoxic effect.

    PubMed

    Pérez-Díaz, Mario Alberto; Boegli, Laura; James, Garth; Velasquillo, Cristina; Sánchez-Sánchez, Roberto; Martínez-Martínez, Rita-Elizabeth; Martínez-Castañón, Gabriel Alejandro; Martinez-Gutierrez, Fidel

    2015-10-01

    Microbial resistance represents a challenge for the scientific community to develop new bioactive compounds. The goal of this research was to evaluate the antimicrobial activity of silver nanoparticles (AgNPs) against a clinical isolate of Streptococcus mutans, antibiofilm activity against mature S. mutans biofilms and the compatibility with human fibroblasts. The antimicrobial activity of AgNPs against the planktonic clinical isolate was size and concentration dependent, with smaller AgNPs having a lower minimum inhibitory concentration. A reduction of 2.3 log in the number of colony-forming units of S. mutans was observed when biofilms grown in a CDC reactor were exposed to 100 ppm of AgNPs of 9.5±1.1 nm. However, AgNPs at high concentrations (>10 ppm) showed a cytotoxic effect upon human dermal fibroblasts. AgNPs effectively inhibited the growth of a planktonic S. mutans clinical isolate and killed established S. mutans biofilms, which suggests that AgNPs could be used for prevention and treatment of dental caries. Further research and development are necessary to translate this technology into therapeutic and preventive strategies. PMID:26117766

  20. On the Enhanced Antibacterial Activity of Antibiotics Mixed with Gold Nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Burygin, G L; Khlebtsov, B N; Shantrokha, A N; Dykman, L A; Bogatyrev, V A; Khlebtsov, N G

    2009-01-01

    The bacterial action of gentamicin and that of a mixture of gentamicin and 15-nm colloidal-gold particles on Escherichia coli K12 was examined by the agar-well-diffusion method, enumeration of colony-forming units, and turbidimetry. Addition of gentamicin to colloidal gold changed the gold color and extinction spectrum. Within the experimental errors, there were no significant differences in antibacterial activity between pure gentamicin and its mixture with gold nanoparticles (NPs). Atomic absorption spectroscopy showed that upon application of the gentamicin-particle mixture, there were no gold NPs in the zone of bacterial-growth suppression in agar. Yet, free NPs diffused into the agar. These facts are in conflict with the earlier findings indicating an enhancement of the bacterial activity of similar gentamicin-gold nanoparticle mixtures. The possible causes for these discrepancies are discussed, and the suggestion is made that a necessary condition for enhancement of antibacterial activity is the preparation of stable conjugates of NPs coated with the antibiotic molecules. PMID:20596384

  1. Effect of AOT-assisted multi-walled carbon nanotubes on antibacterial activity.

    PubMed

    Bai, Yu; Park, Il Song; Lee, Sook Jeong; Wen, Pu Shan; Bae, Tae Sung; Lee, Min Ho

    2012-01-01

    The dispersing power of surfactant-modified multiwalled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) and their effect on the antibacterial activity were examined. The MWCNTs were modified using a dioctyl sodium sulfosuccinate (AOT) surfactant. UV-vis spectroscopy and transmission electron microscopy (TEM) were used to characterize the dispersion of MWCNTs in the aqueous phase. Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy confirmed the results of UV-vis spectroscopy and TEM, indicating that the AOT molecules had been adsorbed successfully onto the MWCNT surface. The highly dispersed AOT-modified MWCNTs showed strong antibacterial activity to Streptococcus mutans. The fluorescence images showed that the AOT-modified MWCNTs were capable of capturing bacteria and forming cell aggregates as well as killing them. The optical density growth curves and colony-forming units assays confirmed that the antibacterial activity of the AOT-modified MWCNTs was concentration-dependent and treatment time-dependent. This finding might be useful for applications of AOT-modified MWCNTs as an antibacterial agent to eliminate pathogens from a biocontaminated water phase. PMID:21958539

  2. Regular physical activity has differential association with reduced obesity among diverse youth in the United States.

    PubMed

    Fradkin, Chris; Wallander, Jan L; Elliott, Marc N; Cuccaro, Paula; Schuster, Mark A

    2016-08-01

    This study examined whether daily or almost daily lower-intensity physical activity was associated with reduced obesity, among 4824 African American, Hispanic, and White youth assessed in fifth and seventh grades. Regular lower-intensity physical activity was associated with reduced obesity only among Hispanic and White males and only in seventh grade, and not among youth in fifth grade, females, or African American males or females. Findings from this study suggest that the reduced obesity risk generally attributed to physical activity may not be consistent across racial/ethnic and gender groups of early adolescents. PMID:25476573

  3. Workshop Physics Activity Guide, Module 2: Mechanics II, Momentum, Energy, Rotational and Harmonic Motion, and Chaos (Units 8 - 15)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Laws, Priscilla W.

    2004-05-01

    The Workshop Physics Activity Guide is a set of student workbooks designed to serve as the foundation for a two-semester calculus-based introductory physics course. It consists of 28 units that interweave text materials with activities that include prediction, qualitative observation, explanation, equation derivation, mathematical modeling, quantitative experiments, and problem solving. Students use a powerful set of computer tools to record, display, and analyze data, as well as to develop mathematical models of physical phenomena. The design of many of the activities is based on the outcomes of physics education research. The Workshop Physics Activity Guide is supported by an Instructor's Website that: (1) describes the history and philosophy of the Workshop Physics Project; (2) provides advice on how to integrate the Guide into a variety of educational settings; (3) provides information on computer tools (hardware and software) and apparatus; and (4) includes suggested homework assignments for each unit. Log on to the Workshop Physics Project website at http://physics.dickinson.edu/ Workshop Physics is a component of the Physics Suite--a collection of materials created by a group of educational reformers known as the Activity Based Physics Group. The Physics Suite contains a broad array of curricular materials that are based on physics education research, including:

      Understanding Physics, by Cummings, Laws, Redish and Cooney (an introductory textbook based on the best-selling text by Halliday/Resnick/Walker) RealTime Physics Laboratory Modules Physics by Inquiry (intended for use in a workshop setting) Interactive Lecture Demonstration Tutorials in Introductory Physics Activity Based Tutorials (designed primarily for use in recitations)

    • Altered Activation of the Tibialis Anterior in Individuals with Pompe Disease: Implications for Motor Unit Dysfunction

      PubMed Central

      Corti, Manuela; Smith, Barbara K; Falk, Darin J; Lawson, Lee Ann; Fuller, David D; Subramony, S.H.; Byrne, Barry J; Christou, Evangelos A

      2014-01-01

      Introduction Pompe disease is a progressive disease that affects skeletal muscles and leads to loss of ambulation. We investigated the activation of the tibialis anterior (TA) in late onset Pompe disease (LOPD) individuals during maximal voluntary contraction (MVC) and evoked involuntary responses. Methods Four LOPD patients and matched control subjects performed MVC of the TA using dorsiflexion and TA evoked responses. Activation of the TA was recorded with surface EMG. Results The Pompe patients exhibited greater power at frequencies below 60 Hz and reduced power above 100 Hz. They exhibited reduced increase in M-wave and prolonged M-wave latency and duration in response to stimulation. Discussion These results provide evidence that LOPD individuals have an altered activation pattern of the TA during maximal contractions. The observed activation pattern may reflect impairments in voluntary command, neuromuscular junction pathology, or compensatory drive due to a reduced number of functional motoneurons. PMID:25186912

    • Are variations in rates of attending cultural activities associated with population health in the United States?

      PubMed Central

      Wilkinson, Anna V; Waters, Andrew J; Bygren, Lars Olov; Tarlov, Alvin R

      2007-01-01

      Background Population studies conducted in Sweden have revealed an association between attendance at cultural activities and health. Using data from US residents, we examined whether the association could be observed in the US. Methods Participants in the current study included 1,244 individuals who participated in the 1998 General Social Survey. Results A significant association between cultural activities and self-reported health (SRH) was observed, even after controlling for age, gender, marital status, race, number of children, subjective social class, employment status, household income, and educational attainment. Specifically, the more cultural activities people reported attending, the better was their SRH. Conclusion The data confirm that an association between cultural activity and health is present in a US sample. The data do not mean that the association is causal, but they suggest that further longitudinal research is warranted. PMID:17764546

    • Disparities in Adolescents' Residence in Neighborhoods Supportive of Physical Activity - United States, 2011-2012.

      PubMed

      Watson, Kathleen B; Harris, Carmen D; Carlson, Susan A; Dorn, Joan M; Fulton, Janet E

      2016-01-01

      In 2013, only 27% of adolescents in grades 9-12 met the current federal guideline for aerobic physical activity (at least 60 minutes of physical activity each day*), and sex and racial/ethnic disparities in meeting the guideline exist (1). The Community Preventive Services Task Force has recommended a range of community-level evidence-based approaches(†) to increase physical activity by improving neighborhood supports for physical activity.(§) To assess the characteristics of adolescents who live in neighborhoods that are supportive of physical activity, CDC analyzed data on U.S. children and adolescents aged 10-17 years (defined as adolescents for this report) from the 2011-2012 National Survey of Children's Health (NSCH). Overall, 65% of U.S. adolescents live in neighborhoods supportive of physical activity, defined as neighborhoods that are perceived as safe and have sidewalks or walking paths and parks, playgrounds, or recreation centers. Adolescents who were Hispanic and non-Hispanic black race/ethnicity; who lived in lower-income households, households with less educated parents, and rural areas; or who were overweight or obese were less likely to live in neighborhoods supportive of physical activity than were white adolescents and adolescents from higher income households, with a more highly educated parent, living in urban areas, and not overweight or obese. Within demographic groups, the largest disparity in the percentage of adolescents living in these neighborhoods was observed between adolescents living in households with a family income <100% of the Federal Poverty Level (FPL) (51%) and adolescents living in households with a family income ≥400% of the FPL (76%). Efforts to improve neighborhood supports, particularly in areas with a substantial percentage of low-income and minority residents, might increase physical activity among adolescents and reduce health disparities. PMID:27309671

    • Trends in water market activity and price in the western United States

      NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

      Brown, Thomas C.

      2006-09-01

      Over 2000 water market transactions that occurred in the western United States from 1990 to 2003 were examined to learn who sold to whom and for what purpose, how much water was involved, and how much it sold for. The transactions show that much more water changes hands via leases than via sales of water rights. Public agencies and irrigators are the most common lessors, with lessees being fairly evenly distributed across types of buyers. However, with water rights sales, irrigators are by far the most common sellers and municipalities the most common buyers. Across the West in general, the number of leases has been rising in recent years, as have their prices. The prices of water right sales have also been rising, but the number of sales has not. The price of water is highly variable both within and between western states, reflecting the localized nature of the factors that affect water prices.

    • Light-Intensity Physical Activities and Mortality in the United States General Population and CKD Subpopulation

      PubMed Central

      Wei, Guo; Marcus, Robin L.; Chonchol, Michel; Greene, Tom

      2015-01-01

      Background and objectives Sedentary behavior is associated with increased mortality in the general population. Whether replacing sedentary behavior with low- or light-intensity activities confers a survival benefit in the general or CKD populations is unknown. Design, setting, participants, & measurements This observational analysis of the 2003–2004 National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey examined the associations of low- and light-intensity activities with mortality. On the basis of the number of counts/min recorded by an accelerometer, durations of sedentary (<100/min), low (100–499/min), light (500–2019/min), and moderate/vigorous (≥2020/min) activity were defined and normalized to 60 minutes. The mortality associations of 2 min/hr less sedentary duration in conjunction with 2 min/hr more (tradeoff) spent in one of the low, light, or moderate/vigorous activity durations while controlling for the other two activity durations were examined in multivariable Cox regression models in the entire cohort and in the CKD subgroup. Results Of the 3626 participants included, 383 had CKD. The mean sedentary duration was 34.4±7.9 min/hr in the entire cohort and 40.8±6.8 in the CKD subgroup. Tradeoff of sedentary duration with low activity duration was not associated with mortality in the entire cohort or the CKD subgroup. Tradeoff of sedentary duration with light activity duration was associated with a lower hazard of death in the entire cohort (hazard ratio, 0.67; 95% confidence interval, 0.48 to 0.93) and CKD subgroup (hazard ratio, 0.59; 95% confidence interval, 0.35 to 0.98). Tradeoff of sedentary duration with moderate/vigorous activity duration had a nonsignificant lower hazard in the entire cohort and CKD subgroup. Conclusions Patients with CKD are sedentary nearly two thirds of the time. Interventions that replace sedentary duration with an increase in light activity duration might confer a survival benefit. PMID:25931456

    • Clinical-scale cultures of cord blood CD34(+) cells to amplify committed progenitors and maintain stem cell activity.

      PubMed

      Ivanovic, Zoran; Duchez, Pascale; Chevaleyre, Jean; Vlaski, Marija; Lafarge, Xavier; Dazey, Bernard; Robert-Richard, Elodie; Mazurier, Frédéric; Boiron, Jean-Michel

      2011-01-01

      We developed a clinical-scale cord blood (CB) cell ex vivo procedure to enable an extensive expansion of committed progenitors--colony-forming cells (CFCs) without impairing very primitive hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs). CD34(++) cells, selected from previously cryopreserved and thawed CB units, were cultured in two steps (diluted 1:4 after 6 days) in the presence of stem cell factor (SCF), fms-related tyrosine kinase 3 ligand (Flt-3L), megakaryocyte growth and development factor (MGDF) (100 ng/ml each), granulocyte-colony stimulating factor (G-CSF) (10 ng/ml) in HP01 serum-free medium. HSC activity was evaluated in a serial transplantation assay, by detection of human cells (CD45, CD33, CD19 and CFC of human origin) in bone marrow (BM) of primary and secondary recipient NOD/SCID mice 6-8 weeks after transplantation. A wide amplification of total cells (∼350-fold), CD34(+) cells (∼100-fold), and CFC (∼130-fold) without impairing the HSC activity was obtained. The activity of a particular HSC subpopulation (SRC(CFC)) was even enhanced.Thus, an extensive ex vivo expansion of CFCs is feasible without impairing the activity of HSCs. This result was enabled by associating antioxidant power of medium with an appropriate cytokine cocktail (i.e., mimicking physiologic effects of a weak oxygenation in hematopoietic environment). PMID:21294956

    • Adaptive step ODE algorithms for the 3D simulation of electric heart activity with graphics processing units.

      PubMed

      Garcia-Molla, V M; Liberos, A; Vidal, A; Guillem, M S; Millet, J; Gonzalez, A; Martinez-Zaldivar, F J; Climent, A M

      2014-01-01

      In this paper we studied the implementation and performance of adaptive step methods for large systems of ordinary differential equations systems in graphics processing units, focusing on the simulation of three-dimensional electric cardiac activity. The Rush-Larsen method was applied in all the implemented solvers to improve efficiency. We compared the adaptive methods with the fixed step methods, and we found that the fixed step methods can be faster while the adaptive step methods are better in terms of accuracy and robustness. PMID:24377685

    • An atomic orbital-based formulation of the complete active space self-consistent field method on graphical processing units

      SciTech Connect

      Hohenstein, Edward G.; Luehr, Nathan; Ufimtsev, Ivan S.; Martínez, Todd J.

      2015-06-14

      Despite its importance, state-of-the-art algorithms for performing complete active space self-consistent field (CASSCF) computations have lagged far behind those for single reference methods. We develop an algorithm for the CASSCF orbital optimization that uses sparsity in the atomic orbital (AO) basis set to increase the applicability of CASSCF. Our implementation of this algorithm uses graphical processing units (GPUs) and has allowed us to perform CASSCF computations on molecular systems containing more than one thousand atoms. Additionally, we have implemented analytic gradients of the CASSCF energy; the gradients also benefit from GPU acceleration as well as sparsity in the AO basis.

    • Engineering analysis activities in support of susquehanna unit 1 startup testing and cycle 1 operations

      SciTech Connect

      Miller, G.D.; Kukielka, C.A.; Olson, L.M.; Refling, J.G.; Roscioli, A.J.; Somma, S.A.

      1985-07-01

      The engineering analysis group is responsible for all nuclear plant systems analysis and reactor analysis activities, excluding fuel management analysis, at Pennsylvania Power and Light Company. These activities include making pretest and posttest predictions of startup tests; analyzing unplanned or unexpected transient events; providing technical training to plant personnel; assisting in the development of emergency drill scenarios; providing engineering evaluations to support design and technical specification changes, and evaluating, assessing, and resolving a number of license conditions. Many of these activities have required the direct use of RETRAN models. Two RETRAN analyses that were completed to support plant operations - a pretest analysis of the turbine trip startup test, and a posttest analysis of the loss of startup transformer event - are investigated. For each case, RETRAN results are compared with available plant data and comparisons are drawn on the acceptability of the performance of the plant systems.

    • Characterization of fatty acid modifying enzyme activity in staphylococcal mastitis isolates and other bacteria

      PubMed Central

      2012-01-01

      Background Fatty acid modifying enzyme (FAME) has been shown to modify free fatty acids to alleviate their bactericidal effect by esterifying fatty acids to cholesterol or alcohols. Although it has been shown in previous studies that FAME is required for Staphylococcus aureus survival in skin abscesses, FAME is poorly studied compared to other virulence factors. FAME activity had also been detected in coagulase-negative staphylococci (CNS). However, FAME activity was only surveyed after a bacterial culture was grown for 24 h. Therefore if FAME activity was earlier in the growth phase, it would not have been detected by the assay and those strains would have been labeled as FAME negative. Results Fifty CNS bovine mastitis isolates and several S. aureus, Escherichia coli, and Streptococcus uberis strains were assayed for FAME activity over 24 h. FAME activity was detected in 54% of CNS and 80% S. aureus strains surveyed but none in E. coli or S. uberis. While some CNS strains produced FAME activity comparable to the lab strain of S. aureus, the pattern of FAME activity varied among strains and across species of staphylococci. All CNS that produced FAME activity also exhibited lipase activity. Lipase activity relative to colony forming units of these CNS decreased over the 24 h growth period. No relationship was observed between somatic cell count in the milk and FAME activity in CNS. Conclusions Some staphylococcal species surveyed produced FAME activity, but E. coli and S. uberis strains did not. All FAME producing CNS exhibited lipase activity which may indicate that both these enzymes work in concert to alter fatty acids in the bacterial environment. PMID:22726316

    • Literature Links: Thematic Units Linking Read-Alouds and Computer Activities

      ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

      Labbo, Linda D.; Love, Mary Susan; Park Prior, Miri; Hubbard, Betty P.; Ryan, Tammy

      2006-01-01

      This book gives the reader ideas for providing primary-grade students with literacy learning opportunities that integrate conventional literacies, such as phonics and comprehension, with new literacies, such as multimedia composition and hyperlink navigation. The reader will find a variety of linked activities, including reading children's books,…

    • Sports Management Faculty External Grant-Writing Activities in the United States

      ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

      DeVinney, Timothy P.

      2012-01-01

      This study was conducted to fill a void in information, provide relevant, current data for faculty members related to external grant-writing activities related to the academic field of sport management and serve as a tool that may aid in the advancement of external grant-writing efforts within the field of sport management. All data is specific to…

    • Trends in No Leisure-Time Physical Activity--United States, 1988-2010

      ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

      Moore, Latetia V.; Harris, Carmen D.; Carlson, Susan A.; Kruger, Judy; Fulton, Janet E.

      2012-01-01

      Purpose: The aim of this study was to examine trends in the prevalence of no leisure-time physical activity (LTPA) from 1988 to 2010. Method: Using the Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System data, 35 states and the District of Columbia reported information on no LTPA from 1988 to 1994; all states reported no LTPA from 1996 to 2010. Results: No…

    • 78 FR 9720 - Agency Information Collection Activities: Holders or Containers Which Enter the United States...

      Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

      2013-02-11

      ... collection was previously published in the Federal Register (77 FR 69650) on November 20, 2012, allowing for... SECURITY U.S. Customs and Border Protection Agency Information Collection Activities: Holders or Containers... review and approval in accordance with the Paperwork Reduction Act: Holders or Containers which enter...

    • Television watching, diet quality, and physical activity and diabetes among three ethnicities in the United States.

      PubMed

      Huffman, Fatma G; Vaccaro, Joan A; Exebio, Joel C; Zarini, Gustavo G; Katz, Timothy; Dixon, Zisca

      2012-01-01

      Diabetes is a world-wide epidemic associated with multiple environmental factors. Prolonged television viewing (TV) time has been related to increased risk of obesity and type 2 diabetes in several studies. TV viewing has been positively associated with cardiovascular disease risk factors, lower energy expenditure, over-eating high-calorie and high-fat foods. The objective of this study was to assess the associations of hours of TV viewing with dietary quality, obesity and physical activity for three ethnic minorities with and without type 2 diabetes. Diet quality and physical activity were inversely related to prolonged TV viewing. African Americans and participants with type 2 diabetes were more likely to watch more than 4 hours of TV per day as compared to their counterparts. Diet quality was inversely associated with physical activity level. Future studies are needed to establish the risk factors of prolonged TV watching in adult populations for the development of diabetes or diabetes-related complications. Although strategies to reduce TV watching have been proven effective among children, few trials have been conducted in adults. Intervention trials aimed at reducing TV viewing targeting people with type 2 diabetes may be beneficial to improve dietary quality and physical activity, which may reduce diabetes complications. PMID:22851980

    • Ride On! Mini-Units and Learning Activities on Public Transportation for Grades 6 through 9.

      ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

      Finn, Peter; And Others

      One of a series of eleven curriculum manuals which cover the four transportation topics of public transportation, transportation and the environment, transportation safety, and bicycles for elementary, secondary, and adult levels, this manual covers the public transportation topic for grades 6-9. It contains forty-two learning activities grouped…

    • Ride On! Mini-Units and Learning Activities on Public Transportation for Grades 9 through 12.

      ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

      Finn, Peter; And Others

      One of a series of eleven curriculum manuals which cover the four transportation topics of public transportation, transportation and the environment, transportation safety, and bicycles for elementary, secondary, and adult levels, this manual covers the public transportation topic for grades 9-12. It contains forty-nine learning activities grouped…

  1. Summaries of Research and Development Activities in Agricultural Education, 1979-1980, United States of America.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cheek, Jimmy G., Comp.

    This sixth annual national compilation of research and development activities in agricultural education contains abstracts of 181 studies completed during the period July 1, 1979, to June 30, 1980. Thirty-five of the completed studies represent staff research, 79 represent master's studies, and 67 represent doctoral dissertations and one…

  2. 12 CFR 211.6 - Permissible activities of Edge and agreement corporations in the United States.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... Regulation D (12 CFR part 204). (3) Credit activities. An Edge or agreement corporation may: (i) Finance the..., and other depository institutions (as described in Regulation D (12 CFR part 204)); or (G) Are... depository institutions (as described in Regulation D (12 CFR part 204)); (ii) Issue obligations to...

  3. Program Evaluation Project Report, 1969-1973. Chapter Two: Activities of the Follow-Up Unit.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Audette, Donna M.

    The P.E.P. Report 1969-1973 focuses on the various findings and activities of the Program Evaluation Project. Followup is an integral part of a goal oriented evaluation, providing the opportunity for the collection of various forms of outcome data as well as consumer satisfaction information. This chapter discusses the history and implementation…

  4. Cost of reactive nitrogen release from human activities to the environment in the United States

    EPA Science Inventory

    The leakage of reactive nitrogen (N) from human activities to the environment can cause human health and ecological problems. Often these harmful effects are not reflected in the costs of food, fuel, and fiber that derive from N use. Spatial analyses of economic costs and benef...

  5. Television Watching, Diet Quality, and Physical Activity and Diabetes among Three Ethnicities in the United States

    PubMed Central

    Huffman, Fatma G.; Vaccaro, Joan A.; Exebio, Joel C.; Zarini, Gustavo G.; Katz, Timothy; Dixon, Zisca

    2012-01-01

    Diabetes is a world-wide epidemic associated with multiple environmental factors. Prolonged television viewing (TV) time has been related to increased risk of obesity and type 2 diabetes in several studies. TV viewing has been positively associated with cardiovascular disease risk factors, lower energy expenditure, over-eating high-calorie and high-fat foods. The objective of this study was to assess the associations of hours of TV viewing with dietary quality, obesity and physical activity for three ethnic minorities with and without type 2 diabetes. Diet quality and physical activity were inversely related to prolonged TV viewing. African Americans and participants with type 2 diabetes were more likely to watch more than 4 hours of TV per day as compared to their counterparts. Diet quality was inversely associated with physical activity level. Future studies are needed to establish the risk factors of prolonged TV watching in adult populations for the development of diabetes or diabetes-related complications. Although strategies to reduce TV watching have been proven effective among children, few trials have been conducted in adults. Intervention trials aimed at reducing TV viewing targeting people with type 2 diabetes may be beneficial to improve dietary quality and physical activity, which may reduce diabetes complications. PMID:22851980

  6. 12 CFR 211.6 - Permissible activities of Edge and agreement corporations in the United States.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ..., and other depository institutions (as described in Regulation D (12 CFR part 204)); or (G) Are... 12 Banks and Banking 2 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Permissible activities of Edge and agreement... permitted by section 25A(6) of the FRA (12 U.S.C. 615) and are incidental to international or...

  7. 12 CFR 211.6 - Permissible activities of Edge and agreement corporations in the United States.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ..., and other depository institutions (as described in Regulation D (12 CFR part 204)); or (G) Are... 12 Banks and Banking 2 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Permissible activities of Edge and agreement... permitted by section 25A(6) of the FRA (12 U.S.C. 615) and are incidental to international or...

  8. Analyzing Science Activities in Force and Motion Concepts: A Design of an Immersion Unit

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ayar, Mehmet C.; Aydeniz, Mehmet; Yalvac, Bugrahan

    2015-01-01

    In this paper, we analyze the science activities offered at 7th grade in the Turkish science and technology curriculum along with addressing the curriculum's original intent. We refer to several science education researchers' ideas, including Chinn & Malhotra's (Science Education, 86:175--218, 2002) theoretical framework and…

  9. 12 CFR 347.105 - Permissible financial activities outside the United States.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ..., subject to compliance with any attendant restrictions in 12 CFR 225.28(b). (9) General insurance agency... compliance with any attendant restrictions in 12 CFR 225.28(b). (5) Underwriting credit life, credit accident... 12 Banks and Banking 4 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Permissible financial activities outside...

  10. Dental Charting. Learning Activities, Unit Tests, Progress Chart, and Work Sheet.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Texas Univ., Austin. Center for Occupational Curriculum Development.

    These materials are part of a series dealing with skills and information needed by students in dental assisting. The individualized student materials are suitable for classroom, laboratory, or cooperative training programs. These student materials, designed to be used with the Dental Charting Student Manual, consist of learning activities, unit…

  11. ASSESSMENT OF ESTROGENIC ACTIVITY IN EFFLUENTS FROM SEWAGE TREATMENT PLANTS IN THE UNITED STATES

    EPA Science Inventory

    Newly developed molecular biology methods have been used for the measurement of estrogenic activity in source-biased studies of sewage treatment plants. Studies in Texas and New Mexico have shown the utility of the measurement of changes in vitellogenin gene expression in fathea...

  12. Pedal On! Mini-Units and Learning Activities on Bicycling for Grades 9 through 12.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Finn, Peter; And Others

    One of a series of eleven curriculum manuals which cover the four transportation topics of public transportation, transportation and the environment, transportation safety, and bicycles for elementary, secondary, and adult levels, this manual covers bicycling for grades 9-12. It contains forty-four learning activities grouped into eight…

  13. Pedal On! Mini-Units and Learning Activities on Bicycles for Grades 6 through 9.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Finn, Peter; And Others

    One of a series of eleven curriculum manuals which cover the four transportation topics of public transportation, transportation and the environment, transportation safety, and bicycles for elementary, secondary and adult levels, this manual covers the topic of bicycling for grades 6-9. The manual contains forty-seven learning activities grouped…

  14. Mining claim activity on federal land in the contiguous United States, 1976 through 2004

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Causey, J. Douglas; Frank, David G.

    2006-01-01

    The data show how mining claim activity has changed in intensity, space, and time. Variations can be examined on a state, as well as a national level. The data are tied to a section of land, approximately 640 acres, which allows it to be used at regional, as well as local scale. It is restricted in that it only encompasses Federal land.

  15. Multivariable analysis of the association between fathers’ and youths’ physical activity in the United States

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Although the benefits of physical activity have been well-established, a significant number of children and adolescents in the U.S. do not meet the recommended levels of daily physical activity. Parental influences such as parents’ physical activity participation may play an important role in affecting youths’ physical activity. Methods This study used the Child Development Supplement of the Panel Study of Income Dynamics to examine the associations between fathers’ vigorous physical activity (VPA) and VPA participation (>0 day(s)/week) and frequency (days/week) of 887 youths aged 10 through 18 based on a nationally representative sample of families in the US. Logistic and negative binomial regression analyses were used to examine the association between past frequency (times/week) and an indicator of recommended (≥3 times/week) frequency of father’s VPA and youth’s VPA participation and youths’ VPA frequency, respectively. We examined the sensitivity to the inclusion of various youth, family, mother’s VPA, and contextual control measures. Analyses also were undertaken by gender. Results Father’s past VPA frequency was positively associated with both youths’ VPA participation and with youths’ VPA frequency for the full and female samples of youths, even after the inclusion of demographic, socio-economic, and local area characteristics. Father’s past recommended VPA frequency was positively associated with youths’ VPA participation in the full sample only and with youths’ VPA frequency in the female sub-sample only. Simulation results showed that an increase in father’s past weekly VPA frequency from zero to the minimum recommended level (three times per week) was associated with an increased predicted probability of youths’ weekly VPA participation from approximately 67% to 74% for the full sample (61% to 73% for females and 74% to 77% for males). Conclusion The results from this study suggest that environmental and

  16. Antibacterial activity of soil-bound antibiotics.

    PubMed

    Chander, Yogesh; Kumar, Kuldip; Goyal, Sagar M; Gupta, Satish C

    2005-01-01

    There is some concern that antibiotic residues in land-applied manure may promote the emergence of antibiotic resistant bacteria in the environment. The goal of this study was to determine whether or not soil bound antibiotics are still active against bacteria. The procedure involved sorbing various amounts of tetracycline or tylosin on two different textured soils (Webster clay loam [fine-loamy, mixed, superactive, mesic Typic Endoaquolls] and Hubbard loamy sand [sandy, mixed, frigid Entic Hapludolls]), incubating these soils with three different bacterial cultures (an antibiotic resistant strain of Salmonella sp. [Salmonella(R)], an antibiotic sensitive strain of Salmonella sp. [Salmonella(S)], and Escherichia coli ATCC 25922), and then enumerating the number of colony forming units relative to the control. Incubation was done under both static and dynamic conditions. Soil-adsorbed antibiotics were found to retain their antimicrobial properties since both antibiotics inhibited the growth of all three bacterial species. Averaged over all other factors, soil adsorbed antimicrobial activity was higher for Hubbard loamy sand than Webster clay loam, most likely due to higher affinity (higher clay content) of the Webster soil for antibiotics. Similarly, there was a greater decline in bacterial growth with tetracycline than tylsoin, likely due to greater amounts of soil-adsorbed tetracycline and also due to lower minimum inhibitory concentration of most bacteria for tetracycline than tylosin. The antimicrobial effect of tetracycline was also greater under dynamic than static growth conditions, possibly because agitation under dynamic growth conditions helped increase tetracycline desorption and/or increase contact between soil adsorbed tetracycline and bacteria. We conclude that even though antibiotics are tightly adsorbed by clay particles, they are still biologically active and may influence the selection of antibiotic resistant bacteria in the terrestrial environment

  17. In-depth interviews with state public health practitioners on the United States National Physical Activity Plan

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background The United States National Physical Activity Plan (NPAP; 2010), the country’s first national plan for physical activity, provides strategies to increase population-level physical activity to complement the 2008 physical activity guidelines. This study examined state public health practitioner awareness, dissemination, use, challenges, and recommendations for the NPAP. Methods In 2011–2012, we interviewed 27 state practitioners from 25 states. Interviews were recorded and transcribed verbatim. Transcripts were coded using a standard protocol, verified and reconciled by an independent coder, and input into qualitative software to facilitate development of common themes. Results NPAP awareness was high among state practitioners; dissemination to local constituents varied. Development of state-level strategies and goals was the most frequently reported use of the NPAP. Some respondents noted the usefulness of the NPAP for coalitions and local practitioners. Challenges to the plan included implementation cost, complexity, and consistency with other policies. The most frequent recommendation made was to directly link examples of implementation activities to the plan. Conclusions These results provide early evidence of NPAP dissemination and use, along with challenges encountered and suggestions for future iterations. Public health is one of eight sectors in the NPAP. Further efforts are needed to understand uptake and use by other sectors, as well as to monitor long-term relevance, progress, and collaboration across sectors. PMID:23731829

  18. Infectious Diseases (ID) Learning Unit: How Rapidly to Evaluate for Active Tuberculosis Disease in Low-Prevalence Settings.

    PubMed

    Chida, Natasha; Shah, Maunank

    2016-03-01

    With declining tuberculosis (TB) incidence in low-prevalence settings, many clinicians are likely unaware that the approach to diagnosing active TB is evolving with newer technologies. Rapid molecular assays are commercially available, and more are likely to enter the market in the coming years. These tests, such as the Xpert MTB/RIF, which can detect TB and drug-resistance in 2 hours, are increasingly used in settings with higher TB prevalence; however, uptake has been slower in low-prevalence settings. Newer algorithms incorporating rapid TB diagnostics have the ability to alter current clinical and infection control practice patterns. In this learning unit, we review current and newly available tests for the detection of active TB disease and their usage in low-prevalence settings. PMID:27186583

  19. Infectious Diseases (ID) Learning Unit: How Rapidly to Evaluate for Active Tuberculosis Disease in Low-Prevalence Settings

    PubMed Central

    Chida, Natasha; Shah, Maunank

    2016-01-01

    With declining tuberculosis (TB) incidence in low-prevalence settings, many clinicians are likely unaware that the approach to diagnosing active TB is evolving with newer technologies. Rapid molecular assays are commercially available, and more are likely to enter the market in the coming years. These tests, such as the Xpert MTB/RIF, which can detect TB and drug-resistance in 2 hours, are increasingly used in settings with higher TB prevalence; however, uptake has been slower in low-prevalence settings. Newer algorithms incorporating rapid TB diagnostics have the ability to alter current clinical and infection control practice patterns. In this learning unit, we review current and newly available tests for the detection of active TB disease and their usage in low-prevalence settings. PMID:27186583

  20. Fishy Activities for Your Small Fry. A Unit Plan in Fish Biology for Grades Kindergarten through Sixth. Educational Series Number 28.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sparrow, Mary E.; And Others

    This unit in fish biology is suitable for kindergarten through sixth grade. Provided in the unit are: (1) behavioral objectives for grades K-3 and 4-6; (2) an overview of activities and instructional strategies; (3) background information on fishes; (4) diagrams of internal/external fish structure; (5) list of key vocabulary words; (6) discussion…

  1. Factors associated with self-care activities among adults in the United Kingdom: a systematic review

    PubMed Central

    Ryan, Angela; Wilson, Sue; Taylor, Aliki; Greenfield, Sheila

    2009-01-01

    Background The Government has promoted self-care. Our aim was to review evidence about who uses self-tests and other self-care activities (over-the-counter medicine, private sector, complementary and alternative medicine (CAM), home blood pressure monitors). Methods During April 2007, relevant bibliographic databases (Medline, Embase, Cumulative Index to Nursing and Allied Health Literature, Applied Social Sciences Index and Abstracts, PsycINFO, British Nursing Index, Allied and Complementary Medicine Database, Sociological Abstracts, International Bibliography of the Social Sciences, Arthritis and Complementary Medicine Database, Complementary and Alternative Medicine and Pain Database) were searched, and potentially relevant studies were reviewed against eligibility criteria. Studies were included if they were published during the last 15 years and identified factors, reasons or characteristics associated with a relevant activity among UK adults. Two independent reviewers used proformas to assess the quality of eligible studies. Results 206 potentially relevant papers were identified, 157 were excluded, and 49 papers related to 46 studies were included: 37 studies were, or used data from questionnaire surveys, 36 had quality scores of five or more out of 10, and 27 were about CAM. Available evidence suggests that users of CAM and over-the-counter medicine are female, middle-aged, affluent and/or educated with some measure of poor health, and that people who use the private sector are affluent and/or educated. Conclusion People who engage in these activities are likely to be affluent. Targeted promotion may, therefore, be needed to ensure that use is equitable. People who use some activities also appear to have poorer measures of health than non-users or people attending conventional services. It is, therefore, also important to ensure that self-care is not used as a second choice for people who have not had their needs met by conventional services. PMID:19344526

  2. Middle Miocene hiatus in volcanic activity in the Great Basin area of the Western United States

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    McKee, E.H.; Noble, D.C.; Silberman, M.L.

    1970-01-01

    A summary of potassium-argon dates shows that a high level of igneous activity in the Great Basin and adjacent regions during middle Tertiary time (40 to 20 my ago) was followed by a period of relative quiescence in middle Miocene time that lasted for several million years (from 20 to 17 my ago). Volcanism resumed 16 my ago mainly at the margins of the region and has continued to the present. ?? 1970.

  3. Considering the antibacterial activity of Zataria multiflora Boiss essential oil treated with gamma-irradiation in vitro and in vivo systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Faezeh, Fatema; Salome, Dini; Abolfazl, Dadkhah; Reza, Zolfaghari Mohammad

    2015-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to evaluate the antibacterial activities of essential oils (EOs) obtained from the aerial parts of Zataria multiflora Boiss against Bacillus cereus, Pseudomonas aeroginosa, Escherichia coli and Staphylococcus aureus by in vivo and in vitro methods. Also, the effects of gamma-irradiation (0, 10 and 25 kGy) as a new microbial decontamination on the antibacterial activities of Z. multiflora were examined. For this purpose, the collected herbs were exposed to radiation at doses of 0, 10 and 25 kGy following essential oil (EOs) extraction by steam distillation. Then, the in vitro antibacterial potency of the irradiated and non-irradiated oils was determined by using disc diffusion, agar well diffusion and MIC and MBC determination assays. The in vivo antibacterial activity was also studied in sepsis model induced by CLP surgery by Colony forming units (CFUs) determination. The results showed that the extracted oils were discovered to be effective against all the gram positive and gram negative pathogens in vitro system. In addition, the oil significantly diminished the increased CFU count observed in CLP group. Moreover, the irradiated samples were found to possess the antibacterial activities as the non-irradiated ones both in vitro and in vivo systems. These data indicated the potential use of gamma-irradiation as a safe technique for preservation of Z. multiflora as a medicinal plant with effective antibacterial activities.

  4. Antimicrobial activity of iron oxide nanoparticle upon modulation of nanoparticle-bacteria interface

    PubMed Central

    Arakha, Manoranjan; Pal, Sweta; Samantarrai, Devyani; Panigrahi, Tapan K.; Mallick, Bairagi C.; Pramanik, Krishna; Mallick, Bibekanand; Jha, Suman

    2015-01-01

    Investigating the interaction patterns at nano-bio interface is a key challenge for safe use of nanoparticles (NPs) to any biological system. The study intends to explore the role of interaction pattern at the iron oxide nanoparticle (IONP)-bacteria interface affecting antimicrobial propensity of IONP. To this end, IONP with magnetite like atomic arrangement and negative surface potential (n-IONP) was synthesized by co-precipitation method. Positively charged chitosan molecule coating was used to reverse the surface potential of n-IONP, i.e. positive surface potential IONP (p-IONP). The comparative data from fourier transform infrared spectroscope, XRD, and zeta potential analyzer indicated the successful coating of IONP surface with chitosan molecule. Additionally, the nanocrystals obtained were found to have spherical size with 10–20 nm diameter. The BacLight fluorescence assay, bacterial growth kinetic and colony forming unit studies indicated that n-IONP (<50 μM) has insignificant antimicrobial activity against Bacillus subtilis and Escherichia coli. However, coating with chitosan molecule resulted significant increase in antimicrobial propensity of IONP. Additionally, the assay to study reactive oxygen species (ROS) indicated relatively higher ROS production upon p-IONP treatment of the bacteria. The data, altogether, indicated that the chitosan coating of IONP result in interface that enhances ROS production, hence the antimicrobial activity. PMID:26437582

  5. Antimicrobial activity of iron oxide nanoparticle upon modulation of nanoparticle-bacteria interface.

    PubMed

    Arakha, Manoranjan; Pal, Sweta; Samantarrai, Devyani; Panigrahi, Tapan K; Mallick, Bairagi C; Pramanik, Krishna; Mallick, Bibekanand; Jha, Suman

    2015-01-01

    Investigating the interaction patterns at nano-bio interface is a key challenge for safe use of nanoparticles (NPs) to any biological system. The study intends to explore the role of interaction pattern at the iron oxide nanoparticle (IONP)-bacteria interface affecting antimicrobial propensity of IONP. To this end, IONP with magnetite like atomic arrangement and negative surface potential (n-IONP) was synthesized by co-precipitation method. Positively charged chitosan molecule coating was used to reverse the surface potential of n-IONP, i.e. positive surface potential IONP (p-IONP). The comparative data from fourier transform infrared spectroscope, XRD, and zeta potential analyzer indicated the successful coating of IONP surface with chitosan molecule. Additionally, the nanocrystals obtained were found to have spherical size with 10-20 nm diameter. The BacLight fluorescence assay, bacterial growth kinetic and colony forming unit studies indicated that n-IONP (<50 μM) has insignificant antimicrobial activity against Bacillus subtilis and Escherichia coli. However, coating with chitosan molecule resulted significant increase in antimicrobial propensity of IONP. Additionally, the assay to study reactive oxygen species (ROS) indicated relatively higher ROS production upon p-IONP treatment of the bacteria. The data, altogether, indicated that the chitosan coating of IONP result in interface that enhances ROS production, hence the antimicrobial activity. PMID:26437582

  6. Antimicrobial activity of iron oxide nanoparticle upon modulation of nanoparticle-bacteria interface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arakha, Manoranjan; Pal, Sweta; Samantarrai, Devyani; Panigrahi, Tapan K.; Mallick, Bairagi C.; Pramanik, Krishna; Mallick, Bibekanand; Jha, Suman

    2015-10-01

    Investigating the interaction patterns at nano-bio interface is a key challenge for safe use of nanoparticles (NPs) to any biological system. The study intends to explore the role of interaction pattern at the iron oxide nanoparticle (IONP)-bacteria interface affecting antimicrobial propensity of IONP. To this end, IONP with magnetite like atomic arrangement and negative surface potential (n-IONP) was synthesized by co-precipitation method. Positively charged chitosan molecule coating was used to reverse the surface potential of n-IONP, i.e. positive surface potential IONP (p-IONP). The comparative data from fourier transform infrared spectroscope, XRD, and zeta potential analyzer indicated the successful coating of IONP surface with chitosan molecule. Additionally, the nanocrystals obtained were found to have spherical size with 10-20 nm diameter. The BacLight fluorescence assay, bacterial growth kinetic and colony forming unit studies indicated that n-IONP (<50 μM) has insignificant antimicrobial activity against Bacillus subtilis and Escherichia coli. However, coating with chitosan molecule resulted significant increase in antimicrobial propensity of IONP. Additionally, the assay to study reactive oxygen species (ROS) indicated relatively higher ROS production upon p-IONP treatment of the bacteria. The data, altogether, indicated that the chitosan coating of IONP result in interface that enhances ROS production, hence the antimicrobial activity.

  7. Inversion of Multi-Station Schumann Resonance Background Records for Global Lightning Activity in Absolute Units

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Williams, E. R.; Mushtak, V. C.; Guha, A.; Boldi, R. A.; Bor, J.; Nagy, T.; Satori, G.; Sinha, A. K.; Rawat, R.; Hobara, Y.; Sato, M.; Takahashi, Y.; Price, C. G.; Neska, M.; Alexander, K.; Yampolski, Y.; Moore, R. C.; Mitchell, M. F.; Fraser-Smith, A. C.

    2014-12-01

    Every lightning flash contributes energy to the TEM mode of the natural global waveguide that contains the Earth's Schumann resonances. The modest attenuation at ELF (0.1 dB/Mm) allows for the continuous monitoring of the global lightning with a small number of receiving stations worldwide. In this study, nine ELF receiving sites (in Antarctica (3 sites), Hungary, India, Japan, Poland, Spitsbergen and USA) are used to provide power spectra at 12-minute intervals in two absolutely calibrated magnetic fields and occasionally, one electric field, with up to five resonance modes each. The observables are the extracted modal parameters (peak intensity, peak frequency and Q-factor) for each spectrum. The unknown quantities are the geographical locations of three continental lightning 'chimneys' and their lightning source strengths in absolute units (C2 km2/sec). The unknowns are calculated from the observables by the iterative inversion of an evolving 'sensitivity matrix' whose elements are the partial derivatives of each observable for all receiving sites with respect to each unknown quantity. The propagation model includes the important day-night asymmetry of the natural waveguide. To overcome the problem of multiple minima (common in inversion problems of this kind), location information from the World Wide Lightning Location Network has been used to make initial guess solutions based on centroids of stroke locations in each chimney. Results for five consecutive days in 2009 (Jan 7-11) show UT variations with the African chimney dominating on four of five days, and America dominating on the fifth day. The amplitude variations in absolute source strength exceed that of the 'Carnegie curve' of the DC global circuit by roughly twofold. Day-to-day variations in chimney source strength are of the order of tens of percent. Examination of forward calculations performed with the global inversion solution often show good agreement with the observed diurnal variations at

  8. Flare-antenna unit for system in which flare is remotely activated by radio

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hiltz, Frederick F.; Wilson, Charles E.

    1995-06-01

    A flare-antenna assembly has flare material enclosed in a cylindrical antenna and forms part of a marker beacon. The flare aids in the search for the marker beacon by providing means for both visual and infrared detection. The flare is actuated in response to a specific remote radio signal being received by the antenna. The received signal is decoded by the electronic system within the marker beacon. If the received signal meets the necessary criteria the electronic system generates an electrical signal that detonates a squib embedded in the flare material. The detonation of the squib activates the flare.

  9. Antimicrobial activity of n-6, n-7 and n-9 fatty acids and their esters for oral microorganisms

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Chifu B.; George, Brian; Ebersole, Jeffery L.

    2010-01-01

    Objective This study is to assess the antibacterial activity of omega-6, -7, -9 (n-6, n-7, n-9) fatty acids against various oral microorganisms. Methods The n-6, n-7, n-9 fatty acids, such as γ-linoleic acid (GLA), linoleic acid (LA), arachidonic acid (ARA), palmitoleic acid (PA), and oleic acid (OA), their fatty acid ethyl esters, GLA-EE, LA-EE, ARA-EE, PA-EE, OA-EE, and their fatty acid methyl esters, GLA-ME, LA-ME, ARA-ME, PA-ME, OA-ME were investigated for antimicrobial activity against oral pathogens Streptococcus mutans, Candida albicans, Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans, Fusobacterium nucleatum, and Porphyromonas gingivalis. Various concentrations of the fatty acids, their methyl and ethyl esters were tested against various oral pathogens in 96-well plates and blood-agar plate. The plates were incubated anaerobically or aerobically at 37°C for 48 hours, and the colony forming units (CFU) were determined. Results The data demonstrated that select n-6, n-7, n-9 fatty acids and their esters exhibited strong antimicrobial activity against these oral microorganisms, demonstrating some specificity for individual microbial species. Conclusion The potential use or the combinations of the n-6, n-7, n-9 fatty acids and/or their esters, provided in a local delivery vehicle to infected sites in the oral cavity, could be considered as an additional therapeutic approach to improving oral health. PMID:20541177

  10. Effects of Hanseniaspora opuntiae C21 on the growth and digestive enzyme activity of juvenile sea cucumber Apostichopus japonicas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ma, Yuexin; Liu, Zhiming; Yang, Zhiping; Bao, Pengyun; Zhang, Congyao; Ding, Jianfeng

    2014-07-01

    The effects of a diet containing Hanseniaspora opuntiae C21 on growth and digestive enzyme activity were estimated in juvenile Apostichopus japonicus. Groups of sea cucumbers were fed diets containing H. opuntiae C21 at 0 (control), 104, 105, and 106 CFU (colony-forming units)/g feed. Results showed that after 45 d the specific growth rate (SGR) of sea cucumbers fed a C21-supplemented diet at 10 4 CFU/g feed was significantly higher than that of the control ( P < 0.05). Intestinal trypsin and lipase activities were significantly enhanced by C21 administration at 104 and 105 CFU/g feed compared with the control ( P < 0.05). After feeding for 23-42 d, C21 was demonstrated by denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis to be present in the intestine of sea cucumbers. In addition, after feeding the C21-supplemented diets for 15 d, the sea cucumbers were switched to an unsupplemented diet and C21 was confirmed to be capable of colonizing the intestine for at least 31 d after cessation of feeding. In conclusion, C21 was shown to successfully colonize the intestine of juvenile A. japonicus via dietary supplementation, and improve growth and digestive enzyme activity.

  11. Association between Natural Resources for Outdoor Activities and Physical Inactivity: Results from the Contiguous United States

    PubMed Central

    Jiang, Yan; Yuan, Yongping; Neale, Anne; Jackson, Laura; Mehaffey, Megan

    2016-01-01

    Protected areas including national/state parks and recreational waters are excellent natural resources that promote physical activity and interaction with Nature, which can relieve stress and reduce disease risk. Despite their importance, however, their contribution to human health has not been properly quantified. This paper seeks to evaluate quantitatively how national/state parks and recreational waters are associated with human health and well-being, taking into account of the spatial dependence of environmental variables for the contiguous U.S., at the county level. First, we describe available natural resources for outdoor activities (ANROA), using national databases that include features from the Protected Areas Database, NAVSTREETS, and ATTAINSGEO 305(b) Waters. We then use spatial regression techniques to explore the association of ANROA and socioeconomic status factors on physical inactivity rates. Finally, we use variance analysis to analyze ANROA’s influence on income-related health inequality. We found a significantly negative association between ANROA and the rate of physical inactivity: ANROA and the spatial effect explained 69%, nationwide, of the variation in physical inactivity. Physical inactivity rate showed a strong spatial dependence—influenced not only by its own in-county ANROA, but also by that of its neighbors ANROA. Furthermore, community groups at the same income level and with the highest ANROA, always had the lowest physical inactivity rate. This finding may help to guide future land use planning and community development that will benefit human health and well-being. PMID:27548195

  12. Association between Natural Resources for Outdoor Activities and Physical Inactivity: Results from the Contiguous United States.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Yan; Yuan, Yongping; Neale, Anne; Jackson, Laura; Mehaffey, Megan

    2016-01-01

    Protected areas including national/state parks and recreational waters are excellent natural resources that promote physical activity and interaction with Nature, which can relieve stress and reduce disease risk. Despite their importance, however, their contribution to human health has not been properly quantified. This paper seeks to evaluate quantitatively how national/state parks and recreational waters are associated with human health and well-being, taking into account of the spatial dependence of environmental variables for the contiguous U.S., at the county level. First, we describe available natural resources for outdoor activities (ANROA), using national databases that include features from the Protected Areas Database, NAVSTREETS, and ATTAINSGEO 305(b) Waters. We then use spatial regression techniques to explore the association of ANROA and socioeconomic status factors on physical inactivity rates. Finally, we use variance analysis to analyze ANROA's influence on income-related health inequality. We found a significantly negative association between ANROA and the rate of physical inactivity: ANROA and the spatial effect explained 69%, nationwide, of the variation in physical inactivity. Physical inactivity rate showed a strong spatial dependence-influenced not only by its own in-county ANROA, but also by that of its neighbors ANROA. Furthermore, community groups at the same income level and with the highest ANROA, always had the lowest physical inactivity rate. This finding may help to guide future land use planning and community development that will benefit human health and well-being. PMID:27548195

  13. Preliminary results of 2009 pandemic influenza surveillance in the United States using the Aggregate Hospitalization and Death Reporting Activity

    PubMed Central

    Jhung, Michael A.; Davidson, Heidi; McIntyre, Anne; Gregg, William J.; Dasgupta, Sharoda; D’Mello, Tiffany; White, Victoria; Fowlkes, Ashley; Brammer, Lynnette; Finelli, Lyn

    2011-01-01

    Please cite this paper as: Jhung et al. (2011) Preliminary results of 2009 pandemic influenza surveillance in the United States using the Aggregate Hospitalization and Death Reporting Activity. Influenza and Other Respiratory Viruses 5(5), 321–327. Background  To augment established influenza surveillance systems in the United States, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention and the Council of State and Territorial Epidemiologists implemented the Aggregate Hospitalization and Death Reporting Activity (AHDRA) in August 2009. The AHDRA was designed to meet increased demands for timely and detailed information describing illness severity during the 2009 H1N1 influenza A (pH1N1) pandemic response. Objectives  We describe the implementation of AHDRA and provide preliminary results from this new surveillance activity. Methods  All 50 US states were asked to report influenza‐associated hospitalizations and deaths to AHDRA each week using either a laboratory‐confirmed or syndromic surveillance definition. Aggregate counts were used to calculate age‐specific weekly and cumulative rates per 100 000, and laboratory‐confirmed reports were used to estimate the age distribution of pH1N1 influenza‐associated hospitalizations and deaths. Results  From August 30, 2009, through April 6, 2010, AHDRA identified 41 689 laboratory‐confirmed influenza‐associated hospitalizations and 2096 laboratory‐confirmed influenza‐associated deaths. Aggregate Hospitalization and Death Reporting Activity rates peaked earlier than hospitalization and death rates seen in previous influenza seasons with other surveillance systems, and the age distribution of cases revealed a tendency for hospitalizations and deaths to occur in persons <65 years for age. Conclusions  Aggregate Hospitalization and Death Reporting Activity laboratory‐confirmed reports provided important information during the 2009 pandemic response. Aggregate Hospitalization and Death Reporting

  14. Slow potentials and spike unit activity of the cerebral cortex of rabbits exposed to microwaves

    SciTech Connect

    Chizhenkova, R.A.

    1988-01-01

    Unanesthetized rabbits exposed to 12.5-cm microwaves at a field intensity of 40 mW/cm/sup 2/ in the region of the head showed an increase in the number of slow waves and spindle-shaped firings in the EEG and a change in the discharge frequency of neurons in the visual cortex in 41-52% of the cases. An enhancement of the evoked response of visual cortex neurons to light was observed in 61% of the cases and a facilitation of the driving response in 80% of all cases. It is concluded that the evoked response is a more sensitive indicator of the microwave effect than background activity. The effects of the fields were most distinctly observed with the driving response.

  15. Oil atlas: National Petroleum Technology Office activities across the United States

    SciTech Connect

    Tiedemann, H.A.

    1998-03-01

    Petroleum imports account for the largest share of the US trade deficit. Over one-third of the 1996 merchandise trade deficit is attributed to imported oil. The good news is that substantial domestic oil resources, both existing and yet-to-be-discovered, can be recovered using advanced petroleum technologies. The Energy Information Agency estimates that advanced technologies can yield 10 billion additional barrels, equal to $240 billion in import offsets. The US Department of Energy`s National Petroleum Technology Office works with industry to develop advanced petroleum technologies and to transfer successful technologies to domestic oil producers. This publication shows the locations of these important technology development efforts and lists DOE`s partners in this critical venture. The National Petroleum Technology Office has 369 active technology development projects grouped into six product lines: Advanced Diagnostics and Imaging Systems; Advanced Drilling, Completion, and Stimulation; Reservoir Life Extension and Management; Emerging Processing Technology Applications; Effective Environmental Protection; and Crosscutting Program Areas.

  16. Combined Active and Passive Seismic Methods To Characterize Strongmotion Sites in Washington and Oregon, United States

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pileggi, D.; Cakir, R.; Lunedei, E.; Albarello, D.; Walsh, T. J.

    2011-12-01

    Knowledge of the shear-wave velocity profile at strongmotion station sites is important for calibrating accelerograms in terms of local site effects. Surface-wave seismic prospecting methods (both in active and passive configurations) provide an effective tool for an inexpensive and deep penetrating seismic characterization of subsoil. We used a combination of active (Multi-channel Analysis of Surface Waves, MASW) and passive (Extended Spectral AutoCorrelation, ESAC) array techniques along with the single-station ambient vibration measurements (Horizontal-to-Vertical Spectral Ratios - HVSR) to characterize strong-motion sites in Washington and Oregon. The MASW analysis was used to better constrain the shallowest part of the Vs profile, while effective dispersion curve provided by ESAC and HVSR data allow us to extend the survey downwards (up to hundred meters of depth). The combined use of these data in the frame of global-search inversion algorithms (Genetic Algorithms) allows us to manage the extreme non-linearity of the inverse problem and mitigate problems associated with the non-uniqueness of the solution. A strict synergy between geologic surveys, boreholes (when the latter was available) and seismic surveys allows a further reduction of relevant uncertainties. Preliminary results show that; i) this combined methodology is a practical, inexpensive, and fast way to characterize multiple strong motion sites; ii) local geology and/or borehole information was combined to better constrain the inversion and to reduce the uncertainty in velocity profiles; and, iii) this combined methodology gives additional information of shear-wave velocities at greater depths.

  17. Adoptive T-cell therapy for cancer in the United kingdom: a review of activity for the British Society of Gene and Cell Therapy annual meeting 2015.

    PubMed

    Gilham, David Edward; Anderson, John; Bridgeman, John Stephen; Hawkins, Robert Edward; Exley, Mark Adrian; Stauss, Hans; Maher, John; Pule, Martin; Sewell, Andrew Kelvin; Bendle, Gavin; Lee, Steven; Qasim, Waseem; Thrasher, Adrian; Morris, Emma

    2015-05-01

    Adoptive T-cell therapy is delivering objective clinical responses across a number of cancer indications in the early phase clinical setting. Much of this clinical activity is taking place at major clinical academic centers across the United States. This review focuses upon cancer-focused cell therapy activity within the United Kingdom as a contribution to the 2015 British Society of Gene and Cell Therapy annual general meeting. This overview reflects the diversity and expansion of clinical and preclinical studies within the United Kingdom while considering the background context of this work against new infrastructural developments and the requirements of nationalized healthcare delivery within the UK National Health Service. PMID:25860661

  18. Adoptive T-Cell Therapy for Cancer in the United Kingdom: A Review of Activity for the British Society of Gene and Cell Therapy Annual Meeting 2015

    PubMed Central

    Anderson, John; Bridgeman, John Stephen; Hawkins, Robert Edward; Exley, Mark Adrian; Stauss, Hans; Maher, John; Pule, Martin; Sewell, Andrew Kelvin; Bendle, Gavin; Lee, Steven; Qasim, Waseem; Thrasher, Adrian; Morris, Emma

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Adoptive T-cell therapy is delivering objective clinical responses across a number of cancer indications in the early phase clinical setting. Much of this clinical activity is taking place at major clinical academic centers across the United States. This review focuses upon cancer-focused cell therapy activity within the United Kingdom as a contribution to the 2015 British Society of Gene and Cell Therapy annual general meeting. This overview reflects the diversity and expansion of clinical and preclinical studies within the United Kingdom while considering the background context of this work against new infrastructural developments and the requirements of nationalized healthcare delivery within the UK National Health Service. PMID:25860661

  19. Holocene relative sea levels and related prehistoric activity in the Forth lowland, Scotland, United Kingdom

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smith, D. E.; Davies, M. H.; Brooks, C. L.; Mighall, T. M.; Dawson, S.; Rea, B. R.; Jordan, J. T.; Holloway, L. K.

    2010-08-01

    Changes in relative sea level (RSL) and their effect on the distribution of human activity in the Forth lowland, Scotland, UK between ca 11,700 and ca 2000 calibrated years before present (BP) are examined. Block uplift of shorelines occurred over a longer period than previously thought, continuing to at least around 4700 BP. New graphs of RSL change, based upon an analysis of previous work and evidence from new sites using standard morphological and stratigraphical analyses, support a fall in RSL in the early Holocene during which buried estuarine surfaces were formed, followed by a marked reversal on a centennial, perhaps even decadal, scale sometime around 9900-9500 BP from a falling sequence to a rising one. There may have been a short-lived fluctuation in the rising RSL ca 8300 BP, and the Holocene Storegga Slide tsunami of ca 8100 BP was widespread in the lowland. The rising RSL culminated at the Main Postglacial Shoreline, reached ca 7800 BP, when Mean High Water Spring Tides (MHWS) lay within the range 14.6-16.5 m British Ordnance Datum (OD) in the western lowland. This is the highest published Holocene RSL in Britain and Ireland. The subsequent fall in RSL stabilised at a second shoreline, the Blairdrummond Shoreline, from which regression was occurring at ca 4700 BP. RSL later fell to a lower shoreline at ca 3900 BP before reaching present levels within the last three millennia. Comparison between the empirical evidence for RSL change in this area and glacial isostatic adjustment models indicates both similarities and differences. Records of archaeological sites and artefacts in the lowland and surrounding areas are discussed. Maps showing the evolution of the estuary are compared with the distribution of Mesolithic, Neolithic, Bronze Age and Iron Age activity. Evidence for Mesolithic people indicates the opportunistic use of available resources as RSL rose and the estuary expanded to its maximum extent. Neolithic people were also attracted to the estuary

  20. Estimating Active Transportation Behaviors to Support Health Impact Assessment in the United States

    PubMed Central

    Mansfield, Theodore J.; Gibson, Jacqueline MacDonald

    2016-01-01

    Health impact assessment (HIA) has been promoted as a means to encourage transportation and city planners to incorporate health considerations into their decision-making. Ideally, HIAs would include quantitative estimates of the population health effects of alternative planning scenarios, such as scenarios with and without infrastructure to support walking and cycling. However, the lack of baseline estimates of time spent walking or biking for transportation (together known as “active transportation”), which are critically related to health, often prevents planners from developing such quantitative estimates. To address this gap, we use data from the 2009 US National Household Travel Survey to develop a statistical model that estimates baseline time spent walking and biking as a function of the type of transportation used to commute to work along with demographic and built environment variables. We validate the model using survey data from the Raleigh–Durham–Chapel Hill, NC, USA, metropolitan area. We illustrate how the validated model could be used to support transportation-related HIAs by estimating the potential health benefits of built environment modifications that support walking and cycling. Our statistical model estimates that on average, individuals who commute on foot spend an additional 19.8 (95% CI 16.9–23.2) minutes per day walking compared to automobile commuters. Public transit riders walk an additional 5.0 (95% CI 3.5–6.4) minutes per day compared to automobile commuters. Bicycle commuters cycle for an additional 28.0 (95% CI 17.5–38.1) minutes per day compared to automobile commuters. The statistical model was able to predict observed transportation physical activity in the Raleigh–Durham–Chapel Hill region to within 0.5 MET-hours per day (equivalent to about 9 min of daily walking time) for 83% of observations. Across the Raleigh–Durham–Chapel Hill region, an estimated 38 (95% CI 15–59) premature deaths potentially could

  1. Estimating Active Transportation Behaviors to Support Health Impact Assessment in the United States.

    PubMed

    Mansfield, Theodore J; Gibson, Jacqueline MacDonald

    2016-01-01

    Health impact assessment (HIA) has been promoted as a means to encourage transportation and city planners to incorporate health considerations into their decision-making. Ideally, HIAs would include quantitative estimates of the population health effects of alternative planning scenarios, such as scenarios with and without infrastructure to support walking and cycling. However, the lack of baseline estimates of time spent walking or biking for transportation (together known as "active transportation"), which are critically related to health, often prevents planners from developing such quantitative estimates. To address this gap, we use data from the 2009 US National Household Travel Survey to develop a statistical model that estimates baseline time spent walking and biking as a function of the type of transportation used to commute to work along with demographic and built environment variables. We validate the model using survey data from the Raleigh-Durham-Chapel Hill, NC, USA, metropolitan area. We illustrate how the validated model could be used to support transportation-related HIAs by estimating the potential health benefits of built environment modifications that support walking and cycling. Our statistical model estimates that on average, individuals who commute on foot spend an additional 19.8 (95% CI 16.9-23.2) minutes per day walking compared to automobile commuters. Public transit riders walk an additional 5.0 (95% CI 3.5-6.4) minutes per day compared to automobile commuters. Bicycle commuters cycle for an additional 28.0 (95% CI 17.5-38.1) minutes per day compared to automobile commuters. The statistical model was able to predict observed transportation physical activity in the Raleigh-Durham-Chapel Hill region to within 0.5 MET-hours per day (equivalent to about 9 min of daily walking time) for 83% of observations. Across the Raleigh-Durham-Chapel Hill region, an estimated 38 (95% CI 15-59) premature deaths potentially could be avoided if the entire

  2. Effect of zirconium oxide and zinc oxide nanoparticles on physicochemical properties and antibiofilm activity of a calcium silicate-based material.

    PubMed

    Guerreiro-Tanomaru, Juliane Maria; Trindade-Junior, Adinael; Costa, Bernardo Cesar; da Silva, Guilherme Ferreira; Drullis Cifali, Leonardo; Basso Bernardi, Maria Inês; Tanomaru-Filho, Mario

    2014-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to evaluate the antibiofilm activity against Enterococcus faecalis, compressive strength. and radiopacity of Portland cement (PC) added to zirconium oxide (ZrO2), as radiopacifier, with or without nanoparticulated zinc oxide (ZnO). The following experimental materials were evaluated: PC, PC + ZrO2, PC + ZrO2 + ZnO (5%), and PC + ZrO2 + ZnO (10%). Antibiofilm activity was analyzed by using direct contact test (DCT) on Enterococcus faecalis biofilm, for 5 h or 15 h. The analysis was conducted by using the number of colony-forming units (CFU/mL). The compressive strength was performed in a mechanical testing machine. For the radiopacity tests, the specimens were radiographed together with an aluminium stepwedge. The results were submitted to ANOVA and Tukey tests, with level of significance at 5%. The results showed that all materials presented similar antibiofilm activity (P > 0.05). The addition of nanoparticulated ZnO decreased the compressive strength of PC. All materials presented higher radiopacity than pure PC. It can be concluded that the addition of ZrO2 and ZnO does not interfere with the antibiofilm activity and provides radiopacity to Portland cement. However, the presence of ZnO (5% or 10%) significantly decreased the compressive strength of the materials. PMID:25431798

  3. Effect of Zirconium Oxide and Zinc Oxide Nanoparticles on Physicochemical Properties and Antibiofilm Activity of a Calcium Silicate-Based Material

    PubMed Central

    Guerreiro-Tanomaru, Juliane Maria; Trindade-Junior, Adinael; Cesar Costa, Bernardo; da Silva, Guilherme Ferreira; Drullis Cifali, Leonardo; Basso Bernardi, Maria Inês

    2014-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to evaluate the antibiofilm activity against Enterococcus faecalis, compressive strength. and radiopacity of Portland cement (PC) added to zirconium oxide (ZrO2), as radiopacifier, with or without nanoparticulated zinc oxide (ZnO). The following experimental materials were evaluated: PC, PC + ZrO2, PC + ZrO2 + ZnO (5%), and PC + ZrO2 + ZnO (10%). Antibiofilm activity was analyzed by using direct contact test (DCT) on Enterococcus faecalis biofilm, for 5 h or 15 h. The analysis was conducted by using the number of colony-forming units (CFU/mL). The compressive strength was performed in a mechanical testing machine. For the radiopacity tests, the specimens were radiographed together with an aluminium stepwedge. The results were submitted to ANOVA and Tukey tests, with level of significance at 5%. The results showed that all materials presented similar antibiofilm activity (P > 0.05). The addition of nanoparticulated ZnO decreased the compressive strength of PC. All materials presented higher radiopacity than pure PC. It can be concluded that the addition of ZrO2 and ZnO does not interfere with the antibiofilm activity and provides radiopacity to Portland cement. However, the presence of ZnO (5% or 10%) significantly decreased the compressive strength of the materials. PMID:25431798

  4. Online sexual activity: cross-national comparison between United States and Peruvian college students.

    PubMed

    Velezmoro, Rodrigo; Negy, Charles; Livia, Jose

    2012-08-01

    The current generation of college students commonly uses the Internet for myriad sexually-related purposes. Yet, it has been suggested that usage of the Internet for sexual purposes might lead to psychological problems. In this study, undergraduate students from a public university in the U.S. (n = 320) and Peru (n = 251) completed questionnaires addressing their online sexual activity (OSA), psychological adjustment, and family environment and communication. Results indicated that Peruvians used the Internet significantly more than U.S. students to view sexually-explicit material (SEM), find sexual partners, and search for sex-related information. Men, irrespective of nationality, used the Internet to view SEM significantly more than women. Social support, religiosity, and erotophilia were found to moderate the relations between nationality and OSA. In absolute terms, both national groups, on average, engaged in OSA a relatively low number of hours each week. Further, no differences were found in maladjustment between those who engage in OSA and those who do not, suggesting that concerns over OSA are probably unwarranted. PMID:22083655

  5. Survey on Astrobiology Research and Teaching Activities Within the United Kingdom

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dartnell, Lewis R.; Burchell, Mark J.

    2009-10-01

    While astrobiology is apparently growing steadily around the world, in terms of the number of researchers drawn into this interdisciplinary area and teaching courses provided for new students, there have been very few studies conducted to chart this expansion quantitatively. To address this deficiency, the Astrobiology Society of Britain (ASB) conducted a questionnaire survey of universities and research institutions nationwide to ascertain the current extent of astrobiology research and teaching in the UK. The aim was to provide compiled statistics and an information resource for those who seek research groups or courses of study, and to facilitate new interdisciplinary collaborations. The report here summarizes details gathered on 33 UK research groups, which involved 286 researchers (from undergraduate project students to faculty members). The survey indicates that around 880 students are taking university-level courses, with significant elements of astrobiology included, every year in the UK. Data are also presented on the composition of astrobiology students by their original academic field, which show a significant dominance of physics and astronomy students. This survey represents the first published systematic national assessment of astrobiological academic activity and indicates that this emerging field has already achieved a strong degree of penetration into the UK academic community.

  6. KRAS promoter oligonucleotide with decoy activity dimerizes into a unique topology consisting of two G-quadruplex units

    PubMed Central

    Podbevšek, Peter; Plavec, Janez

    2016-01-01

    Mutations of the KRAS proto-oncogene are associated with several tumor types, which is why it is being considered as a target for anti-cancer drug development. The human KRAS promoter contains a nuclease hypersensitive element (NHE), which can bind to nuclear proteins and is believed to form G-quadruplex structures. Previous studies showed that a 32-nt oligonucleotide (32R-3n) mimicking the KRAS NHE can reduce gene transcription by sequestering MAZ, a crucial transcription factor. Here we show that 32R-3n has to dimerize in order to fold into a G-quadruplex structure. Individual 5′- and 3′-end G-quadruplex units are formed and both feature a symmetric head-to-head topology with edge-type loops. The MAZ binding sequence is located within the 3′-end unit. Nuclear magnetic resonance data complemented by CD and UV spectra show that nucleotides of the MAZ binding G-rich motif are dynamic and could be available for sequence or structure based recognition. Both stable G-quadruplex structures could protect 5′- and 3′-ends of 32R-3n and enhance its anti-cancer activity. Single stranded genomic KRAS NHE including nucleotides flanking the 32R-3n sequence could favor a different monomeric fold, which remains unknown. PMID:26656490

  7. KRAS promoter oligonucleotide with decoy activity dimerizes into a unique topology consisting of two G-quadruplex units.

    PubMed

    Podbevšek, Peter; Plavec, Janez

    2016-01-29

    Mutations of the KRAS proto-oncogene are associated with several tumor types, which is why it is being considered as a target for anti-cancer drug development. The human KRAS promoter contains a nuclease hypersensitive element (NHE), which can bind to nuclear proteins and is believed to form G-quadruplex structures. Previous studies showed that a 32-nt oligonucleotide (32R-3n) mimicking the KRAS NHE can reduce gene transcription by sequestering MAZ, a crucial transcription factor. Here we show that 32R-3n has to dimerize in order to fold into a G-quadruplex structure. Individual 5'- and 3'-end G-quadruplex units are formed and both feature a symmetric head-to-head topology with edge-type loops. The MAZ binding sequence is located within the 3'-end unit. Nuclear magnetic resonance data complemented by CD and UV spectra show that nucleotides of the MAZ binding G-rich motif are dynamic and could be available for sequence or structure based recognition. Both stable G-quadruplex structures could protect 5'- and 3'-ends of 32R-3n and enhance its anti-cancer activity. Single stranded genomic KRAS NHE including nucleotides flanking the 32R-3n sequence could favor a different monomeric fold, which remains unknown. PMID:26656490

  8. Selectivity of physiotherapist programs in the United States does not differ by institutional funding source or research activity level

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: This study aimed to compare selectivity characteristics among institution characteristics to determine differences by institutional funding source (public vs. private) or research activity level (research vs. non-research). Methods: This study included information provided by the Commission on Accreditation in Physical Therapy Education (CAPTE) and the Federation of State Boards of Physical Therapy. Data were extracted from all students who graduated in 2011 from accredited physical therapy programs in the United States. The public and private designations of the institutions were extracted directly from the classifications from the ‘CAPTE annual accreditation report,’ and high and low research activity was determined based on Carnegie classifications. The institutions were classified into four groups: public/research intensive, public/non-research intensive, private/research intensive, and private/non-research intensive. Descriptive and comparison analyses with post hoc testing were performed to determine whether there were statistically significant differences among the four groups. Results: Although there were statistically significant baseline grade point average differences among the four categorized groups, there were no significant differences in licensure pass rates or for any of the selectivity variables of interest. Conclusion: Selectivity characteristics did not differ by institutional funding source (public vs. private) or research activity level (research vs. non-research). This suggests that the concerns about reduced selectivity among physiotherapy programs, specifically the types that are experiencing the largest proliferation, appear less warranted. PMID:27079201

  9. International Heliophysical Year and Astronomy and Space Science Activities in Arab States: Concentration on United Arab Emirates and Iraq

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Al-Naimiy, Hamid M. K.; Al-Douri, Ala A. J.

    2008-12-01

    This paper summarizes International Heliophysical Year (IHY), astronomy and space sciences (ASS) activities in many Arab countries with the concentration on Iraq and UAE. The level and type of these activities differ in each country. -The paper shows also the current activities on topics related to IHY in different countries, following are suggested future Astronomy and Space Science (ASS) plans in some of these countries: -UAE Research Centre for Solar Physics, Astronomy and Space Sciences: A proposal under consideration for building a Solar Physics and Space Research Centre that may contain: Solar, radio and optical observatories, and Very Low Frequency (VLF) Receiver for remote sensing the Ionosphere on UAE region. The proposed research project will facilitate the establishment and conduct of VLF observations in the United Arab Emirate (UAE) as a part of Asia sector, thus providing a basis for comparison to facilitate global extrapolations and conclusions. -Iraqi National Astronomical Observatory (INAO): The Kurdistan Government/Universities planning to rebuilt INAO which has been destroyed during the two wars. Proposed suggestion is to build a 5-6 meters optical telescope and small solar telescope on the tope of Korek Mountain, which has excellent observing conditions.

  10. Vocalization characteristics of North Atlantic right whale surface active groups in the calving habitat, southeastern United States.

    PubMed

    Trygonis, Vasilis; Gerstein, Edmund; Moir, Jim; McCulloch, Stephen

    2013-12-01

    Passive acoustic surveys were conducted to assess the vocal behavior of North Atlantic right whales (Eubalaena glacialis) in the designated critical calving habitat along the shallow coastal waters of southeastern United States. Underwater vocalizations were recorded using autonomous buoys deployed in close proximity to surface active groups (SAGs). Nine main vocalization types were identified with manual inspection of spectrograms, and standard acoustic descriptors were extracted. Classification trees were used to examine the distinguishing characteristics of calls and quantify their variability within the SAG vocal repertoire. The results show that descriptors of frequency, bandwidth, and spectral disorder are the most important parameters for partitioning the SAG repertoire, contrary to duration-related measures. The reported source levels and vocalization statistics provide sound production data vital to inform regional passive acoustic monitoring and conservation for this endangered species. PMID:25669262

  11. Park availability and physical activity, TV time, and overweight and obesity among women: Findings from Australia and the United States.

    PubMed

    Veitch, Jenny; Abbott, Gavin; Kaczynski, Andrew T; Wilhelm Stanis, Sonja A; Besenyi, Gina M; Lamb, Karen E

    2016-03-01

    This study examined relationships between three measures of park availability and self-reported physical activity (PA), television viewing (TV) time, and overweight/obesity among women from Australia and the United States. Having more parks near home was the only measure of park availability associated with an outcome. Australian women (n=1848) with more parks near home had higher odds of meeting PA recommendations and lower odds of being overweight/obese. In the US sample (n=489), women with more parks near home had lower odds of watching >4h TV per day. A greater number of parks near home was associated with lower BMI among both Australian and US women. Evidence across diverse contexts provides support to improve park availability to promote PA and other health behaviors. PMID:26828409

  12. Current activities in standardization of high-temperature, low-cycle-fatigue testing techniques in the United States

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Verrilli, Michael J.; Ellis, J. Rodney; Swindeman, Robert W.

    1990-01-01

    The American Society for Testing and Materials (ASTM) standard E606-80 is the most often used recommended testing practice for low-cycle-fatigue (LCF) testing in the United States. The standard was first adopted in 1977 for LCF testing at room temperature and was modified in 1980 to include high-temperature testing practices. Current activity within ASTM is aimed at extending the E606-80 recommended practices to LCF under thermomechanical conditions, LCF in high-pressure hydrogen, and LCF in metal-matrix composite materials. Interlaboratory testing programs conducted to generate a technical base for modifying E606-80 for the aforementioned LCF test types are discussed.

  13. Increased resistance of contact lens related bacterial biofilms to antimicrobial activity of soft contact lens care solutions

    PubMed Central

    Szczotka-Flynn, Loretta B.; Imamura, Yoshifumi; Chandra, Jyotsna; Yu, Changping; Mukherjee, Pranab K.; Pearlman, Eric; Ghannoum, Mahmoud A.

    2014-01-01

    PURPOSE To determine if clinical and reference strains of Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Serratia marcescens, and Staphylococcus aureus form biofilms on silicone hydrogel contact lenses, and ascertain antimicrobial activities of contact lens care solutions. METHODS Clinical and American Type Culture Collection (ATCC) reference strains of Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Serratia marcescens, and Staphylococcus aureus were incubated with lotrafilcon A lenses under conditions that facilitate biofilm formation. Biofilms were quantified by quantitative culturing (colony forming units, CFUs), and gross morphology and architecture were evaluated using scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and confocal microscopy. Susceptibilities of the planktonic and biofilm growth phases of the bacteria to five common multipurpose contact lens care solutions and one hydrogen peroxide care solution were assessed. RESULTS P. aeruginosa, S. marcescens, and S. aureus reference and clinical strains formed biofilms on lotrafilcon A silicone hydrogel contact lenses, as dense networks of cells arranged in multiple layers with visible extracellular matrix. The biofilms were resistant to commonly used biguanide preserved multipurpose care solutions. P. aeruginosa and S. aureus biofilms were susceptible to a hydrogen peroxide and a polyquaternium preserved care solution, whereas S. marcescens biofilm was resistant to a polyquaternium preserved care solution but susceptible to hydrogen peroxide disinfection. In contrast, the planktonic forms were always susceptible. CONCLUSIONS P. aeruginosa, S. marcescens, and S. aureus form biofilms on lotrafilcon A contact lenses, which in contrast to planktonic cells, are resistant to the antimicrobial activity of several soft contact lens care products. PMID:19654521

  14. Candida tropicalis Biofilms: Biomass, Metabolic Activity and Secreted Aspartyl Proteinase Production.

    PubMed

    Negri, Melyssa; Silva, Sónia; Capoci, Isis Regina Grenier; Azeredo, Joana; Henriques, Mariana

    2016-04-01

    According to epidemiological data, Candida tropicalis has been related to urinary tract infections and haematological malignancy. Several virulence factors seem to be responsible for C. tropicalis infections, for example: their ability to adhere and to form biofilms onto different indwelling medical devices; their capacity to adhere, invade and damage host human tissues due to enzymes production such as proteinases. The main aim of this work was to study the behaviour of C. tropicalis biofilms of different ages (24-120 h) formed in artificial urine (AU) and their ability to express aspartyl proteinase (SAPT) genes. The reference strain C. tropicalis ATCC 750 and two C. tropicalis isolates from urine were used. Biofilms were evaluated in terms of culturable cells by colony-forming units enumeration; total biofilm biomass was evaluated using the crystal violet staining method; metabolic activity was evaluated by XTT assay; and SAPT gene expression was determined by real-time PCR. All strains of C. tropicalis were able to form biofilms in AU, although with differences between strains. Candida tropicalis biofilms showed a decrease in terms of the number of culturable cells from 48 to 72 h. Generally, SAPT3 was highly expressed. C. tropicalis strains assayed were able to form biofilms in the presence of AU although in a strain- and time-dependent way, and SAPT genes are expressed during C. tropicalis biofilm formation. PMID:26572148

  15. Antimicrobial activities of Eugenia caryophyllata extract and its major chemical constituent eugenol against Streptococcus pneumoniae.

    PubMed

    Yadav, Mukesh Kumar; Park, Seok-Won; Chae, Sung-Won; Song, Jae-Jun; Kim, Ho Chul

    2013-12-01

    In this study, we investigate the antimicrobial activities of both Eugenia caryophyllata (Ec) extract and its major component eugenol (4-allyl-2-methoxyphenol) against Streptococcus pneumoniae. The minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) and minimum bactericidal concentration (MBC) were determined by microdilution method. Pneumococcal biofilms were detected by crystal-violet microtiter plate assay, followed by colony-forming unit counts and visualized by scanning electron microscope (SEM). The synergistic effect of eugenol and penicillin was determined by checker-board method. Both the eugenol and the Ec extract inhibited pneumococcal growth in a concentration-dependent manner. The MIC and MBC of eugenol were 0.06% and 0.12%, respectively. Eugenol at a concentration of 0.12% completely killed S. pneumoniae within 60 min of exposure. The kill rate of planktonic cells was most rapid during the first 15 min of contact with eugenol. The addition of eugenol or Ec extract inhibited in vitro biofilm formation. In already established biofilms, the inhibitory effect of eugenol or Ec extract was more significant in terms of cell viability than in terms of disruption of the biofilm matrix. SEM analysis revealed non-viable and disruptive action of eugenol on the cell membrane of bacteria of biofilms. It was found that eugenol and penicillin produced a synergistic effect against S. pneumoniae. In conclusion, eugenol and Ec extract efficiently inhibited S. pneumoniae in planktonic growth and within biofilms. PMID:23594212

  16. Antibacterial activity of Baccharis dracunculifolia in planktonic cultures and biofilms of Streptococcus mutans.

    PubMed

    Pereira, Cristiane A; Costa, Anna Carolina B Pereira; Liporoni, Priscila Christiane S; Rego, Marcos A; Jorge, Antonio Olavo C

    2016-01-01

    Streptococcus mutans is an important cariogenic microorganism, and alternative methods for its elimination are required. Different concentrations of Baccharis dracunculifolia essential oil (EO) were tested to determine its minimal inhibitory concentration (MIC) in planktonic cultures, and this concentration was used in S. mutans biofilms. Additionally, we assessed the effect of a 0.12% chlorhexidine (CHX) and saline solution in S. mutans biofilms. The biofilms were grown in discs of composite resin for 48h and exposed to B. dracunculifolia, CHX or saline solution for 5min. The viability of the biofilms was determined by counting the colony-forming units per milliliter (CFU/ml) in agar, which was statistically significant (P<0.05). The MIC of the B. dracunculifolia EO to planktonic growth of S. mutans was 6%. In biofilms of S. mutans clinical isolates, B. dracunculifolia EO (6%) and CHX resulted in reductions of 53.3-91.1% and 79.1-96.6%, respectively. For the biofilm formed by the S. mutans reference strain, the reductions achieved with B. dracunculifolia EO and CHX were, respectively, 39.3% and 88.1%. It was concluded that B. dracunculifolia EO showed antibacterial activity and was able to control this oral microorganism, which otherwise causes dental caries. PMID:26614752

  17. Evaluation of the antifungal activity of four solutions used as a final rinse in vitro.

    PubMed

    Mohammadi, Zahed; Giardino, Luciano; Palazzi, Flavio

    2013-04-01

    The aim of the study was to compare the antifungal activity of 1.3% sodium hypochlorite (NaOCl), 2% chlorhexidine (CHX), MTAD and Tetraclean as a final rinse against Candida albicans in a human tooth model in vitro. Ninety extracted human maxillary central and lateral incisor teeth were randomly divided into four groups each with 20 teeth, a positive and a negative control each with five teeth. After preparing the root canals, teeth were inoculated with Candida albicans (ATCC 10261) and incubated for 72 h. Teeth were divided into four experimental groups according to the irrigation solution as follows: NaOCl, CHX, MTAD and Tetraclean. After culturing aliquots from the experimental teeth on Sabouraud 4% dextrose agar, colony-forming units were counted. The results showed that 1.3% NaOCl and 2% CHX were equally effective and significantly superior to MTAD and Tetraclean (P < 0.05). Furthermore, antifungal efficacy of Tetraclean was significantly superior to MTAD (P < 0.05). PMID:23551511

  18. TNFα-Damaged-HUVECs Microparticles Modify Endothelial Progenitor Cell Functional Activity

    PubMed Central

    Luna, Carlos; Carmona, Andrés; Alique, Matilde; Carracedo, Julia; Ramirez, Rafael

    2015-01-01

    Endothelial progenitor cells (EPCs) have an important role in the maintenance of vascular integrity and homeostasis. While there are many studies that explain EPCs mechanisms action, there are few studies that demonstrate how they interact with other emerging physiological elements such as Endothelial Microparticles (EMPs). EMPs are membranous structures with a size between 100 and 1000 nm that act as molecular information transporter in biological systems and are known as an important elements in develop different pathologies; moreover a lot of works explains that are novel biomarkers. To elucidate these interactions, we proposed an in vitro model of endothelial damage mediated by TNFalpha, in which damaged EMPs and EPCs are in contact to assess EPCs functional effects. We have observed that damaged EMPs can modulate several EPCs classic factors as colony forming units (CFUs), contribution to repair a physically damaged endothelium (wound healing), binding to mature endothelium, and co-adjuvants to the formation of new vessels in vitro (angiogenesis). All of these in a dose-dependent manner. Damaged EMPs at a concentration of 103 MPs/ml have an activating effect of these capabilities, while at concentrations of 105 MPs/ml these effects are attenuated or reduced. This in vitro model helps explain that in diseases where there is an imbalance between these two elements (EPCs and damaged EMPs), the key cellular elements in the regeneration and maintenance of vascular homeostasis (EPCs) are not fully functional, and could explain, at least in part, endothelial dysfunction associated in various pathologies. PMID:26733886

  19. Antimicrobial activity and substantivity of Uncaria tomentosa in infected root canal dentin.

    PubMed

    Herrera, Daniel Rodrigo; Durand-Ramirez, Jorge Enrique; Falcão, Amanda; Silva, Emmanuel João Leal Nogueira da; Santos, Elizabete Brasil Dos; Gomes, Brenda Paula Figueiredo de Almeida

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this study was to analyze the antimicrobial activity and substantivity of Uncaria tomentosa Willd DC (cat's claw, CC) in root dentin contaminated with Enterococcus faecalis. Forty-eight human premolars were contaminated with E. faecalis (ATCC 29212) and randomly divided into four groups according to the irrigant used during chemomechanical preparation (CMP): CC group: 2% CC gel; CHX group: 2% chlorhexidine digluconate gel (CHX); NaOCl group: 5.25% sodium hypochlorite (NaOCl); and SS group: sterile saline (SS). Microbiological samples were collected before (S1) and after (S2) CMP and after 7 days (S3). Colony-forming units (CFU/mL) at the different sampling times and comparisons among the groups were statistically analyzed by Wilcoxon and Kruskal-Wallis tests (p < 0.05). Significant bacterial reduction was achieved in all groups after CMP (p < 0.05). Results show no significant difference between S3 and S2 (p > 0.05) in the CC and CHX groups. Bacterial load was higher in S3 than in S2 samples (p < 0.05) in the NaOCl and SS groups. Our results suggest antibacterial effect of 2% CC gel against E. faecalis in infected dentin, in addition to antibacterial substantivity of 2% CC and 2% CHX up to 7 days. PMID:27119588

  20. Antimicrobial activity of a temporary sealant used in endodontic treatment: An in vitro study

    PubMed Central

    Domingos, Helena Baruffaldi; Gonçalves, Lucio Souza; de Uzeda, Milton

    2015-01-01

    Objective: The present study is aimed to evaluate the antimicrobial action of Coltosol® in direct contact with human saliva. Materials and Methods: Twelve different individuals were selected. Saliva samples were evaluated at four different time periods: Baseline 1 (T1-initial control), T2 (2 h), T4 (24 h after contact with a standardized sample of a coronary sealer) and baseline 2 (T3-final control). Seeded plates were incubated at 37°C in a bacterial incubator for a period of 48–72 h. After the incubation period, the colony forming units were counted, and the results compared. Results: Differences were statistically significant. There was an inhibition of bacterial growth after the first 2 h of contact and an increase in the number of bacteria after 24 h of direct contact between the material and the saliva. Coltosol® presented bacterial growth inhibition in direct contact with saliva. This inhibitory effect tended to decrease over time, as shown by the two periods when the material was in contact with different samples of saliva. Conclusions: The antimicrobial activity of the material is an important feature; however, other physical and chemical properties of the coronary temporary sealer should be considered. PMID:26430372

  1. Growth, ethanol production, and inulinase activity on various inulin substrates by mutant Kluyveromyces marxianus strains NRRL Y-50798 and NRRL Y-50799.

    PubMed

    Galindo-Leva, Luz Ángela; Hughes, Stephen R; López-Núñez, Juan Carlos; Jarodsky, Joshua M; Erickson, Adam; Lindquist, Mitchell R; Cox, Elby J; Bischoff, Kenneth M; Hoecker, Eric C; Liu, Siqing; Qureshi, Nasib; Jones, Marjorie A

    2016-07-01

    Economically important plants contain large amounts of inulin. Disposal of waste resulting from their processing presents environmental issues. Finding microorganisms capable of converting inulin waste to biofuel and valuable co-products at the processing site would have significant economic and environmental impact. We evaluated the ability of two mutant strains of Kluyveromyces marxianus (Km7 and Km8) to utilize inulin for ethanol production. In glucose medium, both strains consumed all glucose and produced 0.40 g ethanol/g glucose at 24 h. In inulin medium, Km7 exhibited maximum colony forming units (CFU)/mL and produced 0.35 g ethanol/g inulin at 24 h, while Km8 showed maximum CFU/mL and produced 0.02 g ethanol/g inulin at 96 h. At 24 h in inulin + glucose medium, Km7 produced 0.40 g ethanol/g (inulin + glucose) and Km8 produced 0.20 g ethanol/g (inulin + glucose) with maximum CFU/mL for Km8 at 72 h, 40 % of that for Km7 at 36 h. Extracellular inulinase activity at 6 h for both Km7 and Km8 was 3.7 International Units (IU)/mL. PMID:27130462

  2. Impact of hydroquinone used as a redox effector model on potential denitrification, microbial activity and redox condition of a cultivable soil.

    PubMed

    Perotti, Elda B R

    2015-01-01

    In this microcosm study, we analyzed the effect produced by hydroquinone on the expression of soil biological denitrification, in relation to the redox state of the soil, both in terms of intensity factor (Eh') and capacity factor (amount of oxidized or reduced compounds). The supplementation of an Argiudoll soil with hydroquinone decreased the soil apparent reduction potential (Eh') and soil dehydrogenase activity (formazan production from tetrazolium chloride reduction; redox capacity factor), the relationship between both factors being highly significative, r=0.99 (p<0.001). The bacterial population (measured by colony forming units) increased, and the production of N2O was greater (p<0.001) at 200 and 400μg/g dry soil doses. Furthermore, there was an inverse relationship between soil dehydrogenase activity and the number of bacteria (r=-0.82; p<0.05), increased denitrification activity and changes in the CO2/N2O ratio value. These results suggest that hydroquinone at supplemented doses modified the soil redox state and the functional structure of the microbial population. Acetate supplementation on soil with hydroquinone, to ensure the availability of an energy source for microbial development, confirmed the tendency of the results obtained with the supplementation of hydroquinone alone. The differences observed at increased doses of hydroquinone might be explained by differences on the hydroquinone redox species between treatments. PMID:26364186

  3. Evaluation of antibacterial activity and osteoblast-like cell viability of TiN, ZrN and (Ti1-xZrx)N coating on titanium

    PubMed Central

    Park, Sang-Won; Lee, Kwangmin; Kang, In-Chol; Kim, Hyun-Seung

    2015-01-01

    PURPOSE The aim of this study was to evaluate antibacterial activity and osteoblast-like cell viability according to the ratio of titanium nitride and zirconium nitride coating on commercially pure titanium using an arc ion plating system. MATERIALS AND METHODS Polished titanium surfaces were used as controls. Surface topography was observed by scanning electron microscopy, and surface roughness was measured using a two-dimensional contact stylus profilometer. Antibacterial activity was evaluated against Streptococcus mutans and Porphyromonas gingivalis with the colony-forming unit assay. Cell compatibility, mRNA expression, and morphology related to human osteoblast-like cells (MG-63) on the coated specimens were determined by the XTT assay and reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction. RESULTS The number of S. mutans colonies on the TiN, ZrN and (Ti1-xZrx)N coated surface decreased significantly compared to those on the non-coated titanium surface (P<0.05). CONCLUSION The number of P. gingivalis colonies on all surfaces showed no significant differences. TiN, ZrN and (Ti1-xZrx)N coated titanium showed antibacterial activity against S. mutans related to initial biofilm formation but not P. gingivalis associated with advanced periimplantitis, and did not influence osteoblast-like cell viability. PMID:25932316

  4. Piscidin is Highly Active against Carbapenem-Resistant Acinetobacter baumannii and NDM-1-Producing Klebsiella pneumonia in a Systemic Septicaemia Infection Mouse Model

    PubMed Central

    Pan, Chieh-Yu; Chen, Jian-Chyi; Chen, Te-Li; Wu, Jen-Leih; Hui, Cho-Fat; Chen, Jyh-Yih

    2015-01-01

    This study was designed to investigate the antimicrobial activity of two synthetic antimicrobial peptides from an aquatic organism, tilapia piscidin 3 (TP3) and tilapia piscidin 4 (TP4), in vitro and in a murine sepsis model, as compared with ampicillin, tigecycline, and imipenem. Mice were infected with (NDM-1)-producing K. pneumonia and multi-drug resistant Acinetobacter baumannii, and subsequently treated with TP3, TP4, or antibiotics for different periods of time (up to 168 h). Mouse survival and bacterial colony forming units (CFU) in various organs were measured after each treatment. Toxicity was determined based on observation of behavior and measurement of biochemical parameters. TP3 and TP4 exhibited strong activity against K. pneumonia and A. baumannii in vitro. Administration of TP3 (150 μg/mouse) or TP4 (50 μg/mouse) 30 min after infection with K. pneumonia or A. baumannii significantly increased survival in mice. TP4 was more effective than tigecycline at reducing CFU counts in several organs. TP3 and TP4 were shown to be non-toxic, and did not affect mouse behavior. TP3 and TP4 are able at potentiate anti-Acinetobacter baumannii or anti-Klebsiella pneumonia drug activity, reduce bacterial load, and prevent drug resistance, indicating their potential for use in combating multidrug-resistant bacteria. PMID:25874924

  5. Single-unit activity in cortical area MST associated with disparity-vergence eye movements: evidence for population coding.

    PubMed

    Takemura, A; Inoue, Y; Kawano, K; Quaia, C; Miles, F A

    2001-05-01

    Single-unit discharges were recorded in the medial superior temporal area (MST) of five behaving monkeys. Brief (230-ms) horizontal disparity steps were applied to large correlated or anticorrelated random-dot patterns (in which the dots had the same or opposite contrast, respectively, at the two eyes), eliciting vergence eye movements at short latencies [65.8 +/- 4.5 (SD) ms]. Disparity tuning curves, describing the dependence of the initial vergence responses (measured over the period 50-110 ms after the step) on the magnitude of the steps, resembled the derivative of a Gaussian, the curves obtained with correlated and anticorrelated patterns having opposite sign. Cells with disparity-related activity were isolated using correlated stimuli, and disparity tuning curves describing the dependence of these initial neuronal responses (measured over the period of 40-100 ms) on the magnitude of the disparity step were constructed (n = 102 cells). Using objective criteria and the fuzzy c-means clustering algorithm, disparity tuning curves were sorted into four groups based on their shapes. A post hoc comparison indicated that these four groups had features in common with four of the classes of disparity-selective neurons in striate cortex, but three of the four groups appeared to be part of a continuum. Most of the data were obtained from two monkeys, and when the disparity tuning curves of all the individual neurons recorded from either monkey were summed together, they fitted the disparity tuning curve for that same animal's vergence responses remarkably well (r(2): 0.93, 0.98). Fifty-six of the neurons recorded from these two monkeys were also tested with anticorrelated patterns, and all showed significant modulation of their activity (P < 0.005, 1-way ANOVA). Further, when all of the disparity tuning curves obtained with these patterns from either monkey were summed together, they too fitted the disparity tuning curve for that same animal's vergence responses very

  6. Ensemble projections of wildfire activity and carbonaceous aerosol concentrations over the western United States in the mid-21st century

    PubMed Central

    Yue, Xu; Mickley, Loretta J.; Logan, Jennifer A.; Kaplan, Jed O.

    2013-01-01

    We estimate future wildfire activity over the western United States during the mid-21st century (2046–2065), based on results from 15 climate models following the A1B scenario. We develop fire prediction models by regressing meteorological variables from the current and previous years together with fire indexes onto observed regional area burned. The regressions explain 0.25–0.60 of the variance in observed annual area burned during 1980–2004, depending on the ecoregion. We also parameterize daily area burned with temperature, precipitation, and relative humidity. This approach explains ~0.5 of the variance in observed area burned over forest ecoregions but shows no predictive capability in the semi-arid regions of Nevada and California. By applying the meteorological fields from 15 climate models to our fire prediction models, we quantify the robustness of our wildfire projections at mid-century. We calculate increases of 24–124% in area burned using regressions and 63–169% with the parameterization. Our projections are most robust in the southwestern desert, where all GCMs predict significant (p<0.05) meteorological changes. For forested ecoregions, more GCMs predict significant increases in future area burned with the parameterization than with the regressions, because the latter approach is sensitive to hydrological variables that show large inter-model variability in the climate projections. The parameterization predicts that the fire season lengthens by 23 days in the warmer and drier climate at mid-century. Using a chemical transport model, we find that wildfire emissions will increase summertime surface organic carbon aerosol over the western United States by 46–70% and black carbon by 20–27% at midcentury, relative to the present day. The pollution is most enhanced during extreme episodes: above the 84th percentile of concentrations, OC increases by ~90% and BC by ~50%, while visibility decreases from 130 km to 100 km in 32 Federal Class 1

  7. A Historical Perspective on Breast Cancer Activism in the United States: From Education and Support to Partnership in Scientific Research

    PubMed Central

    Silk, Kami; Price, Carole; Barlow, Janice; Miller, Karen; Hernick, Ann; Fonfa, Ann

    2012-01-01

    Abstract Breast cancer remained a hidden disease among women in the United States until the 20th century. It was initially brought into the open with public revelations from individual women, which was followed by the development of support groups and ultimately the formation of political activist groups with various priorities. Those concerned with toxic environmental exposures as a potential cause of breast cancer organized, demonstrated, and lobbied for research funding and eventually became partners in the research that arose from their efforts. One representative example was the Breast Cancer and Environment Research Centers (BCERC) Project (2003–2010), supported by the National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences (NIEHS) and the National Cancer Institute (NCI). The BCERC embedded a Community Outreach and Translational Core into its formal organizational infrastructure to ensure advocate involvement in the standing scientific subcommittees of BCERC, the first project funded by NIEHS and NCI to do so. The formal integration of advocates as partners in scientific studies focused on breast cancer is embedded in a rich history of action on the part of many courageous women. This article describes the historical evolution of breast cancer activism in the United States, which provided a critical foundation for the formation of BCERC. This description is followed by a discussion of BCERC as an example of the transdisciplinary research model, a paradigm that strives for inclusion of multiple stakeholders and increased interaction between scientists from a wide spectrum of disciplines, advocates, and lay audiences in order to more effectively conduct critical research and to translate and disseminate its findings. PMID:22132763

  8. Ensemble projections of wildfire activity and carbonaceous aerosol concentrations over the western United States in the mid-21st century

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yue, Xu; Mickley, Loretta J.; Logan, Jennifer A.; Kaplan, Jed O.

    2013-10-01

    We estimate future wildfire activity over the western United States during the mid-21st century (2046-2065), based on results from 15 climate models following the A1B scenario. We develop fire prediction models by regressing meteorological variables from the current and previous years together with fire indexes onto observed regional area burned. The regressions explain 0.25-0.60 of the variance in observed annual area burned during 1980-2004, depending on the ecoregion. We also parameterize daily area burned with temperature, precipitation, and relative humidity. This approach explains ˜0.5 of the variance in observed area burned over forest ecoregions but shows no predictive capability in the semi-arid regions of Nevada and California. By applying the meteorological fields from 15 climate models to our fire prediction models, we quantify the robustness of our wildfire projections at midcentury. We calculate increases of 24-124% in area burned using regressions and 63-169% with the parameterization. Our projections are most robust in the southwestern desert, where all GCMs predict significant (p < 0.05) meteorological changes. For forested ecoregions, more GCMs predict significant increases in future area burned with the parameterization than with the regressions, because the latter approach is sensitive to hydrological variables that show large inter-model variability in the climate projections. The parameterization predicts that the fire season lengthens by 23 days in the warmer and drier climate at midcentury. Using a chemical transport model, we find that wildfire emissions will increase summertime surface organic carbon aerosol over the western United States by 46-70% and black carbon by 20-27% at midcentury, relative to the present day. The pollution is most enhanced during extreme episodes: above the 84th percentile of concentrations, OC increases by ˜90% and BC by ˜50%, while visibility decreases from 130 km to 100 km in 32 Federal Class 1 areas in

  9. Ensemble projections of wildfire activity and carbonaceous aerosol concentrations over the western United States in the mid-21st century.

    PubMed

    Yue, Xu; Mickley, Loretta J; Logan, Jennifer A; Kaplan, Jed O

    2013-10-01

    We estimate future wildfire activity over the western United States during the mid-21(st) century (2046-2065), based on results from 15 climate models following the A1B scenario. We develop fire prediction models by regressing meteorological variables from the current and previous years together with fire indexes onto observed regional area burned. The regressions explain 0.25-0.60 of the variance in observed annual area burned during 1980-2004, depending on the ecoregion. We also parameterize daily area burned with temperature, precipitation, and relative humidity. This approach explains ~0.5 of the variance in observed area burned over forest ecoregions but shows no predictive capability in the semi-arid regions of Nevada and California. By applying the meteorological fields from 15 climate models to our fire prediction models, we quantify the robustness of our wildfire projections at mid-century. We calculate increases of 24-124% in area burned using regressions and 63-169% with the parameterization. Our projections are most robust in the southwestern desert, where all GCMs predict significant (p<0.05) meteorological changes. For forested ecoregions, more GCMs predict significant increases in future area burned with the parameterization than with the regressions, because the latter approach is sensitive to hydrological variables that show large inter-model variability in the climate projections. The parameterization predicts that the fire season lengthens by 23 days in the warmer and drier climate at mid-century. Using a chemical transport model, we find that wildfire emissions will increase summertime surface organic carbon aerosol over the western United States by 46-70% and black carbon by 20-27% at midcentury, relative to the present day. The pollution is most enhanced during extreme episodes: above the 84(th) percentile of concentrations, OC increases by ~90% and BC by ~50%, while visibility decreases from 130 km to 100 km in 32 Federal Class 1 areas in

  10. Influence of light curing unit and ceramic thickness on temperature rise during resin cement photo-activation.

    PubMed

    Guiraldo, Ricardo Danil; Consani, Simonides; Mastrofrancisco, Sarina; Consani, Rafael Leonardo Xediek; Sinhoreti, Mario Alexandre Coelho; Correr-Sobrinho, Lourenço

    2008-11-01

    The aim of this study was to determine the effect of different ceramic thickness on heat generation during resin cement photo-activation by QTH (quartz-tungsten-halogen), LED (light emitting diode), and PAC (plasma arc-curing) LCUs (light curing units). The resin cement used was Rely X ARC (3M-ESPE), and the ceramic was IPS Empress Esthetic (Ivoclar-Vivadent), of which 0.7-, 1.4- and 2.0-mm thick disks, 0.8 mm in diameter were made. Temperature increase was recorded with a type-K thermocouple connected to a digital thermometer (Iopetherm 46). An acrylic resin base was built to guide the thermocouple and support the 1.0-mm thick dentin disk. A 0.1-mm thick black adhesive paper matrix with a perforation 6 mm in diameter was placed on the dentin to contain the resin cement and support the ceramic disks of different thicknesses. Three LCUs were used: QTH, LED and PAC. Nine groups were formed (n=10) according to the interaction: 3 ceramic thicknesses, 1 resin cement and 3 photo-activation methods. Temperature increase data were submitted to Tukey's test (5%). For all ceramic thicknesses, a statistically significant difference in temperature increase was observed among the LCUs, with the highest mean value for the QTH LCU (p<0.05). For all the LCUs, a thickness of 0.7 mm produced the highest temperatures (1.4 and 2.0mm, p<0.05). There was no difference in temperature values between the latter two thicknesses (p>0.05). The interaction of higher energy density with smaller ceramic thickness showed higher temperature increase values. PMID:19420877

  11. Single-Unit Activity during Natural Vision: Diversity, Consistency, and Spatial Sensitivity among AF Face Patch Neurons

    PubMed Central

    Russ, Brian E.; Elnaiem, Heba D.; Kurnikova, Anastasia I.; Leopold, David A.

    2015-01-01

    Several visual areas within the STS of the macaque brain respond strongly to faces and other biological stimuli. Determining the principles that govern neural responses in this region has proven challenging, due in part to the inherently complex stimulus domain of dynamic biological stimuli that are not captured by an easily parameterized stimulus set. Here we investigated neural responses in one fMRI-defined face patch in the anterior fundus (AF) of the STS while macaques freely view complex videos rich with natural social content. Longitudinal single-unit recordings allowed for the accumulation of each neuron's responses to repeated video presentations across sessions. We found that individual neurons, while diverse in their response patterns, were consistently and deterministically driven by the video content. We used principal component analysis to compute a family of eigenneurons, which summarized 24% of the shared population activity in the first two components. We found that the most prominent component of AF activity reflected an interaction between visible body region and scene layout. Close-up shots of faces elicited the strongest neural responses, whereas far away shots of faces or close-up shots of hindquarters elicited weak or inhibitory responses. Sensitivity to the apparent proximity of faces was also observed in gamma band local field potential. This category-selective sensitivity to spatial scale, together with the known exchange of anatomical projections of this area with regions involved in visuospatial analysis, suggests that the AF face patch may be specialized in aspects of face perception that pertain to the layout of a social scene. PMID:25855170

  12. Novel approach for computing photosynthetically active radiation for productivity modeling using remotely sensed images in the Great Plains, United States

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Singh, Ramesh K.; Liu, Shu-Guang; Tieszen, Larry L.; Suyker, Andrew E.; Verma, Shashi B.

    2012-01-01

    Gross primary production (GPP) is a key indicator of ecosystem performance, and helps in many decision-making processes related to environment. We used the Eddy covariancelight use efficiency (EC-LUE) model for estimating GPP in the Great Plains, United States in order to evaluate the performance of this model. We developed a novel algorithm for computing the photosynthetically active radiation (PAR) based on net radiation. A strong correlation (R2=0.94,N=24) was found between daily PAR and Landsat-based mid-day instantaneous net radiation. Though the Moderate Resolution Spectroradiometer (MODIS) based instantaneous net radiation was in better agreement (R2=0.98,N=24) with the daily measured PAR, there was no statistical significant difference between Landsat based PAR and MODIS based PAR. The EC-LUE model validation also confirms the need to consider biological attributes (C3 versus C4 plants) for potential light use efficiency. A universal potential light use efficiency is unable to capture the spatial variation of GPP. It is necessary to use C3 versus C4 based land use/land cover map for using EC-LUE model for estimating spatiotemporal distribution of GPP.

  13. Condom acquisition and preferences within a sample of sexually active gay and bisexual men in the southern United States.

    PubMed

    Rhodes, Scott D; Hergenrather, Kenneth C; Yee, Leland J; Wilkin, Aimee M; Clarke, Thomas L; Wooldredge, Rich; Brown, Monica; Davis, A Bernard

    2007-11-01

    Health departments, community-based organizations (CBOs), and AIDS service organizations (ASOs) in the United States and abroad distribute large quantities of free condoms to sexually active individuals; however, little is known about where individuals who use condoms actually acquire them. This community-based participatory research (CBPR) study was designed to identify factors associated with the use of free condoms during most recent anal intercourse among self-identifying gay and bisexual men who reported condom use. Data were collected using targeted intercept interviewing during North Carolina Pride Festival events in Fall 2006, using the North Carolina Condom Acquisition and Preferences Assessment (NC-CAPA). Of the 606 participants who completed the assessment, 285 met the inclusion criteria. Mean age of participants was 33 (+/-10.8) years. The sample was predominantly white (80%), 50% reported being single or not dating anyone special, and 38% reported the use of free condoms during most recent anal intercourse. In multivariable analysis, participants who reported using free condoms during most recent anal sex were more likely to report increased age; dating someone special or being partnered; and having multiple male sexual partners in the past 3 months. These participants were less likely to report ever having had a sexually transmitted disease. Despite being in the third decade of the HIV epidemic, little is known about condom acquisition among, and condom preferences of, gay and bisexual men who use condoms. Although more research is needed, our findings illustrate the importance of free condom distribution. PMID:18240895

  14. Carbon Dioxide as an Indicator of Biogenic Activity and Biomass Burning Emissions in the Southeast United States

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beyersdorf, A. J.; Choi, Y.; Vadrevu, K. P.; Yang, M. M.; Diskin, G. S.; Mikoviny, T.; Wisthaler, A.; Ziemba, L. D.

    2014-12-01

    The NASA SEAC4RS mission (utilizing the NASA DC-8 in August-September 2013) was intended to give a broad survey of the atmospheric composition of the southeastern United States including emissions from vegetation, biomass burning and anthropogenic activity. Carbon dioxide in conjunction with other gas-phase and aerosol tracers can be used to differentiate these sources. Isoprene emissions were heavily dependent on vegetation type and temperature, with largest emissions over deciduous forests in Southeastern Missouri. Carbon dioxide uptake, however, was less dependent on vegetation type and more dependent on time of year with largest uptake in August. Emissions of other volatile organic compounds will be analyzed based on land use classification and meteorological conditions. For periods with strong biomass burning influence, variations in emissions are studied with respect to source fuel (from land use imagery) and combustion efficiency (from in situ CO and CO2 measurements). Agricultural fires (in the Mississippi River Valley) were found to have lower combustion efficiencies than wildfires indicating smoldering conditions. This resulted in higher particulate emissions & lower single scattering albedos.

  15. Susceptibility to Aspergillus Infections in Rats with Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease via Deficiency Function of Alveolar Macrophages and Impaired Activation of TLR2.

    PubMed

    Wu, Yuting; Xu, Hong; Li, Li; Yuan, Weifeng; Zhang, Deming; Huang, Wenjie

    2016-08-01

    Clinical evidence indicates that patients with severe chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) are more susceptible to Aspergillus. However, the exact mechanisms underlying this effect are not known. In this study, we used cigarette smoke exposure to generate COPD rat model. colony-forming units (CFU) count assessment and phagocytosis were applied to evaluate the defense function of COPD rats against Aspergillus challenge. ELISA, western blotting, and GST-Rac1 pull-down assays were conducted to determine the expressions of cytokines and TLR2-associated signaling pathway. Our data showed that Aspergillus burdens increased, phagocytosis of Aspergillus as well as the expressions of inflammatory cytokines from alveolar macrophages (AMs) were impaired in COPD rats compared with normal rats. Though TLR2 signaling-related proteins were induced in response to the stimulation of Aspergillus or Pam3csk4 (TLR2 agonist), the activation of TLR2-associated signaling pathway was apparently interfered in rats with COPD, compared to that in normal rats. Taken together, our study demonstrated that COPD caused the deficiency of AMs function and impaired the activation of TLR2/PI3K/Rac 1 signaling pathway, leading to invasion of Aspergillus infection, which also provides a future basis for the infection control in COPD patients. PMID:27312383

  16. A Bayesian Nonlinear Mixed-Effects Regression Model for the Characterization of Early Bactericidal Activity of Tuberculosis Drugs

    PubMed Central

    Burger, Divan Aristo; Schall, Robert

    2015-01-01

    Trials of the early bactericidal activity (EBA) of tuberculosis (TB) treatments assess the decline, during the first few days to weeks of treatment, in colony forming unit (CFU) count of Mycobacterium tuberculosis in the sputum of patients with smear-microscopy-positive pulmonary TB. Profiles over time of CFU data have conventionally been modeled using linear, bilinear, or bi-exponential regression. We propose a new biphasic nonlinear regression model for CFU data that comprises linear and bilinear regression models as special cases and is more flexible than bi-exponential regression models. A Bayesian nonlinear mixed-effects (NLME) regression model is fitted jointly to the data of all patients from a trial, and statistical inference about the mean EBA of TB treatments is based on the Bayesian NLME regression model. The posterior predictive distribution of relevant slope parameters of the Bayesian NLME regression model provides insight into the nature of the EBA of TB treatments; specifically, the posterior predictive distribution allows one to judge whether treatments are associated with monolinear or bilinear decline of log(CFU) count, and whether CFU count initially decreases fast, followed by a slower rate of decrease, or vice versa. PMID:25322214

  17. In Vivo Chemoprotective Activity of Bovine Dialyzable Leukocyte Extract in Mouse Bone Marrow Cells against Damage Induced by 5-Fluorouracil

    PubMed Central

    Coronado-Cerda, Erika Evangelina; Franco-Molina, Moisés Armides; Mendoza-Gamboa, Edgar; Prado-García, Heriberto; Rivera-Morales, Lydia Guadalupe; Zapata-Benavides, Pablo; Rodríguez-Salazar, María del Carmen; Caballero-Hernandez, Diana; Tamez-Guerra, Reyes Silvestre; Rodríguez-Padilla, Cristina

    2016-01-01

    Chemotherapy treatments induce a number of side effects, such as leukopenia neutropenia, peripheral erythropenia, and thrombocytopenia, affecting the quality of life for cancer patients. 5-Fluorouracil (5-FU) is wieldy used as myeloablative model in mice. The bovine dialyzable leukocyte extract (bDLE) or IMMUNEPOTENT CRP® (ICRP) is an immunomodulatory compound that has antioxidants and anti-inflammatory effects. In order to investigate the chemoprotection effect of ICRP on bone marrow cells in 5-FU treated mice, total bone marrow (BM) cell count, bone marrow colony forming units-granulocyte/macrophage (CFU-GM), cell cycle, immunophenotypification, ROS/superoxide and Nrf2 by flow cytometry, and histological and hematological analyses were performed. Our results demonstrated that ICRP increased BM cell count and CFU-GM number, arrested BM cells in G0/G1 phase, increased the percentage of leukocyte, granulocytic, and erythroid populations, reduced ROS/superoxide formation and Nrf2 activation, and also improved hematological levels and weight gain in 5-FU treated mice. These results suggest that ICRP has a chemoprotective effect against 5-FU in BM cells that can be used in cancer patients. PMID:27191003

  18. Behçet Syndrome Manifestations and Activity in the United States versus Turkey — A Cross-sectional Cohort Comparison

    PubMed Central

    Sibley, Cailin; Yazici, Yusuf; Tascilar, Koray; Khan, Nafiz; Bata, Yasmin; Yazici, Hasan; Goldbach-Mansky, Raphaela; Hatemi, Gulen

    2015-01-01

    Objective To compare clinical manifestations and activity of Behçet syndrome (BS) in the United States versus Turkey using validated outcome measures. Methods Consecutive patients with BS from the US National Institutes of Health (NIH), New York University, and the University of Istanbul were evaluated. Disease activity was measured using the Behçet’s Syndrome Activity Scale (BSAS) and the Behçet’s Disease Current Activity Form (BDCAF) with quality of life measured by the Behçet Disease Quality of Life (BDQOL) form. One-way ANOVA, t-tests, and multivariate regression analyses were performed. Results Mean age did not differ between sites; however, more women were seen in the United States versus in Turkey (p < 0.001), and disease duration was longer in the United States (p = 0.02). Organ manifestations were similar for oral and genital ulcers, skin disease, arthralgia, eye disease, and thrombosis. However, more gastrointestinal (p < 0.001) and neurologic disease (p = 0.003) was seen in the United States. BSAS and BDCAF scores were worse in the United States compared to Turkey (p = 0.013 and < 0.001, respectively). Worse mean BDQOL scores were observed at the NIH compared to Istanbul (not significant). Multivariable regression models showed worse scores in ethnically atypical patients for BSAS and BDCAF (p = 0.04 and p = 0.001), American patients for BDCAF (p = 0.01), older age for BDCAF (p = 0.005), and women for BDQOL (p = 0.01). Conclusion Demographic and clinical manifestations of BS differ between sites with higher disease activity in the United States compared to Turkey. Referral patterns, age, sex, ethnicity, and country of origin may be important in these differences. These observations raise the question of whether pathogenic mechanisms differ in Turkish and American patients. PMID:24931953

  19. Microbial contamination of dental unit waterlines: the scientific argument.

    PubMed

    Pankhurst, C L; Johnson, N W; Woods, R G

    1998-08-01

    The quality of dental unit water is of considerable importance since patients and dental staff are regularly exposed to water and aerosols generated from the dental unit. The unique feature of dental chair water lines is the capacity for rapid development of a biofilm on the dental water supply lines combined with the generation of potentially contaminated aerosols. The biofilm, which is derived from bacteria in the incoming water and is intrinsically resistant to most biocides, then becomes the primary reservoir for continued contamination of the system. Dental water may become heavily contaminated with opportunistic respiratory pathogens such as Legionella and Mycobacterium spp. The significance of such exposure to patients and the dental team is discussed. There is at the present time, no evidence of a widespread public health problem from exposure to dental unit water. Nevertheless, the goal of infection control is to minimise the risk from exposure to potential pathogens and to create a safe working environment in which to treat patients. This paper evaluates the range of currently available infection control methods and prevention strategies which are designed to reduce the impact of the biofilm on dental water contamination, and are suitable for use in general practice. Bacterial load in dental unit water can be kept at or below recommended guidelines for drinking water (less than 200 colony forming units/ml) using a combination of readily available measures and strict adherence to maintenance protocols. Sterile water should be employed for all surgical treatments. PMID:9779119

  20. Ensemble projections of wildfire activity and carbonaceous aerosol concentrations over the western United States in the mid-21st century

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yue, X.; Mickley, L. J.; Logan, J. A.

    2010-12-01

    We estimate future wildfire activity over the western United States during the mid-21st century (2046-2065), based on ensemble results from 16 models following the IPCC A1B scenario. Regression models and a parameterization model of area burned (AB) are developed for the projection. The ecoregion-based regression models consider the meteorological impacts from both the current and previous years on the regional AB; the correlation coefficients between the predicted and observed annual AB range from 0.59 to 0.85 during 1981-2000 for six ecoregions. The parameterization model calculates the effects of temperature, precipitation, and relative humidity on daily AB; the predicted monthly total AB over the western US is highly correlated with observations with a normal (logarithmic) correlation coefficient of 0.73 (0.90) for 300 months (1980-2004). The meteorological fields under the A1B scenario from 15 IPCC models and a general circulation model (NASA/GISS GCM 3) are applied to the fire models to estimate AB during 2046-2065. We calculate that the annual AB will increase by 21~124% (regression models) and 40~198% (parameterization) over six ecoregions in the western US at midcentury relative to present day; the length of fire season will extend by 11.1% for the warmer and drier climate. We also examine the impact of the changing climate on the fuel load with a dynamic vegetation model LPJ driven by future meteorology from the GISS GCM 3; it shows that the fuel load over western US experiences small changes because of the short time period from 2000 to 2050. Based on the projected fuel load and the AB calculations, we estimate that the annual total biomass burning over western US will increase by 68% (regression models) or as much as 161% (parameterization). We further investigate the impact of the changing fire emission on the carbonaceous aerosol concentrations over the western United States in the mid-21st century using the chemistry transport model GEOS-Chem driven

  1. In Vitro and In Vivo antifungal activities of selected Cameroonian dietary spices

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Spices and herbs have been used in food since ancient times to give taste and flavor and also as food preservatives and disease remedies. In Cameroon, the use of spices and other aromatic plants as food flavoring is an integral part of dietary behavior, but relatively little is known about their antifungal potential. The present work was designed to assess the antifungal properties of extracts from spices used in Cameroonian dietary. Methods The in vitro antifungal activities of twenty three extracts from twenty one spices were assessed by the broth micro-dilution method against eight fungi. Also, the in vivo activity of Olax subscorpioidea extract (the most active extract) was evaluated in rat model of disseminated candidiasis due to Candida albicans by estimating the fungal burden in blood and kidney. Results Seven extracts (30%) exhibited moderate to significant antifungal activities, inhibiting the growth of the microorganisms at concentrations ranging from 0.048 to 0.39 mg/mL. Olax subscorpioidea extract exhibited the highest antifungal activity particularly against Candida albicans and Candida tropicalis (MIC of 0.097 mg/mL and 0.048 mg/mL respectively). Sixteen extracts (70%) were weakly active (MICs > 6.25 mg/mL). Oral administration of O. subscorpioidea extract at the dose 2 g/kg of body weight (bw) to artificially infected rats revealed a drop in the number of colony forming units per milliliter (cfu/mL) of Candida albicans cells in the blood below the detection limit (100 cfu/mL) while a modest decrease was observed in the kidney. Conclusion The present work shows that some of the spices studied possess interesting antifungal properties and could be used to treat candidiasis. Among the plant species tested, Olax subscorpioidea displayed the most promising result. PMID:24533718

  2. In Vivo Activity of the Benzothiazinones PBTZ169 and BTZ043 against Nocardia brasiliensis

    PubMed Central

    González-Martínez, Norma Alejandra; Lozano-Garza, Hector Gerardo; Castro-Garza, Jorge; De Osio-Cortez, Alexandra; Vargas-Villarreal, Javier; Cavazos-Rocha, Norma; Ocampo-Candiani, Jorge; Makarov, Vadim; Cole, Stewart T.; Vera-Cabrera, Lucio

    2015-01-01

    Background Mycetoma is a neglected, chronic, and deforming infectious disease caused by fungi and actinomycetes. In Mexico, N. brasiliensis is the predominant etiologic agent. Therapeutic alternatives are necessary because the current drug regimens have several disadvantages. Benzothiazinones (BTZ) are a new class of candidate drugs that inhibit decaprenyl-phosphoribose-epimerase (DprE1), an essential enzyme involved in the cell wall biosynthesis of Corynebacterineae. Methodology/Principal findings In this study, the in vitro activity of the next generation BTZ, PBTZ169, was tested against thirty Nocardia brasiliensis isolates. The MIC50 and MIC90 values for PBTZ169 were 0.0075 and 0.03 μg/mL, respectively. Because Nocardia is a potential intracellular bacterium, a THP-1 macrophage monolayer was infected with N. brasiliensis HUJEG-1 and then treated with PBTZ169, resulting in a decrease in the number of colony-forming units (CFUs) at a concentration of 0.25X the in vitro value. The in vivo activity was evaluated after infecting female BALB/c mice in the right hind food-pad. After 6 weeks, treatment was initiated with PBTZ169 and its activity was compared with the first generation compound, BTZ043. Both BTZ compounds were administered at 100 mg/kg twice daily by gavage, and sulfamethoxazole/trimethoprim (SXT), at 100 mg/kg sulfamethoxazole, was used as a positive control. After 22 weeks of therapy, only PBTZ169 and SXT displayed statistically significant activity. Conclusion These results indicate that DprE1 inhibitors may be useful for treating infections of Nocardia and may therefore be active against other actinomycetoma agents. We must test combinations of these compounds with other antimicrobial agents, such as linezolid, tedizolid or SXT, that have good to excellent in vivo activity, as well as new DprE1 inhibitors that can achieve higher plasma levels. PMID:26474057

  3. Application of simultaneous active and reactive power modulation of superconducting magnetic energy storage unit to damp turbine-generator subsynchronous oscillations

    SciTech Connect

    Wu, Chijui; Lee, Yuangshung )

    1993-03-01

    An active and reactive power (P-Q) simultaneous control scheme which is based on a superconducting magnetic energy storage (SMES) unit is designed to damp out the subsynchronous resonant (SSR) oscillations of a turbine-generator unit. In order to suppress unstable torsional mode oscillations, a proportional-integral-derivative (PID) controller is employed to modulate the active and reactive power input/output of the SMES unit according to speed deviation of the generator shaft. The gains of the proposed PID controller are determined by pole assignment approach based on modal control theory. Eigenvalue analysis of the studied system shows that the PID controller is quite effective over a wide range of operating conditions. Dynamic simulations using the nonlinear system model are also performed to demonstrate the damping effect of the proposed control scheme under disturbance conditions.

  4. 20 CFR 404.418 - “Noncovered remunerative activity outside the United States,” defined.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... United States,â defined. 404.418 Section 404.418 Employees' Benefits SOCIAL SECURITY ADMINISTRATION... (b) He carries on a trade or business outside the United States (other than the performance of... earnings from self-employment (see § 404.1052) if the trade or business were carried on in the...

  5. The Non-innocent Phenalenyl Unit: An Electronic Nest to Modulate the Catalytic Activity in Hydroamination Reaction

    PubMed Central

    Mukherjee, Arup; Sen, Tamal K.; Ghorai, Pradip Kr; Mandal, Swadhin K.

    2013-01-01

    The phenalenyl unit has played intriguing role in different fields of research spanning from chemistry, material chemistry to device physics acting as key electronic reservoir which has not only led to the best organic single component conductor but also created the spin memory device of next generation. Now we show the non-innocent behaviour of phenalenyl unit in modulating the catalytic behaviour in a homogeneous organic transformation. The present study establishes that the cationic state of phenalenyl unit can act as an organic Lewis acceptor unit to influence the catalytic outcome of intermolecular hydroamination reaction of carbodiimides. For the present study, we utilized organoaluminum complexes of phenalenyl ligands in which the phenalenyl unit maintains the closed shell electronic state. The DFT calculation reveals that the energy of LUMO of the catalyst is mainly controlled by phenalenyl ligands which in turn determines the outcome of the catalysis. PMID:24084653

  6. A Year of Hands-on Science: Exciting Theme Units with More Than 100 Activities, Projects, and Experiments To Make Science Come Alive.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kepler, Lynne; Novelli, Joan, Ed.

    This book contains 18 themed teaching units with 2 themes per chapter, organized seasonally around the traditional school year. Each theme includes natural connections and hands-on science activities that correspond to what children are already observing in their world. Each chapter begins with highlights of the month and a reproducible "Science…

  7. T & I--Air Conditioning, Refrigeration, and Heating--Heating Units. Kit No. 87. Instructor's Manual [and] Student Learning Activity Guide.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Simmons, Mike

    An instructor's manual and student activity guide on air conditioning, refrigeration, and heating units are provided in this set of prevocational education materials which focuses on the vocational area of trade and industry. (This set of materials is one of ninety-two prevocational education sets arranged around a cluster of seven vocational…

  8. SUMMARIES OF RESEARCH AND DEVELOPMENT ACTIVITIES PERFORMED IN RACINE R/I UNITS DURING THE 1966-67 SCHOOL YEAR. (TITLE SUPPLIED).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    QUILLING, MARY R.

    THE ACTIVITIES OF THE RACINE, WISCONSIN, R/I UNITS INCLUDED A CREATIVITY STUDY, LANGUAGE DEVELOPMENT EXPERIMENTS, TWO EXPERIMENTS IN INDIVIDUALIZING HANDWRITING, AN ANALYSIS OF THE EFFECTS OF INCREASED HOME-SCHOOL CONTACT ON PARENT ATTITUDE AND STUDENT ACHIEVEMENT, THREE EXPERIMENTS IN INDIVIDUALIZED ARITHMETIC INSTRUCTION, AND RESEARCH AND…

  9. Sunflower/Girasol: Spanish/English Elementary School Science Activity Curriculum. Evaluation of the Educational Efficacy of the Plant and Water Units.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Intercultural Center for Research in Education, Arlington, MA.

    The Sunflower/Girasol program is a Spanish/English bilingual science discovery program for Hispanic children in grades 2-6, designed to improve science instruction and educational opportunity for this group. The report describes the program's proposed activities and products, progress to date, and results of an evaluation of the first two units of…

  10. Synthesis of the Repeating Unit of Capsular Polysaccharide Staphylococcus aureus Type 5 To Study Chemical Activation and Conjugation of Native CP5.

    PubMed

    Yasomanee, Jagodige P; Visansirikul, Satsawat; Pornsuriyasak, Papapida; Thompson, Melissa; Kolodziej, Stephen A; Demchenko, Alexei V

    2016-07-15

    The chemical synthesis of the repeating unit of S. aureus capsular polysaccharide type 5 equipped with capping methyl groups at the points of propagation of the polysaccharide sequence is described. This model compound was designed to study activation of the full length polysaccharide for conjugation to a carrier protein. PMID:27305525

  11. A Comparative Study of Antifungal Activity of Endodontic Irrigants

    PubMed Central

    Mohammadi, Zahed; Asgary, Saeed

    2015-01-01

    Introduction: The purpose of this in vitro study was to assess the antifungal activity of final canal rinse with either three concentrations of sodium hypochlorite (NaOCl) (0.5, 2.6 and 6%), two concentrations of chlorhexidine (CHX) (2% and 0.2%), MTAD, Tetraclean, Hypoclean and Chlor-Xtra on Candida albicans (C. albicans) in a human tooth model. Methods and Materials: Two hundred and thirty five extracted human maxillary central and lateral incisors were used in this study. Teeth were randomly divided into nine test groups (n=25) and positive and a negative control groups (n=5). After cleaning and shaping, teeth were contaminated with C. albicans and incubated for 72 h. The irrigation solution in nine experimental groups included: 6% NaOCl, 2.6% NaOCl, 0.5% NaOCl, 2% CHX, 0.2% CHX, MTAD, Tetraclean, Hypoclean and Chlor-Xtra. After culturing on Sabouraud 4% dextrose agar, colony-forming units (CFU) were counted. Results: 6% NaOCl, 2% CHX and Chlor-Xtra were equally effective (P>0.05) and significantly superior to MTAD and Tetraclean (P<0.05). In addition, the effectiveness of Tetraclean and MTAD was significantly less than Hypoclean, NaOCl at all concentrations (6% 2.6% and 0.5%), MTAD and 0.2% CHX (P<0.05). Furthermore, Tetraclean was significantly more effective than MTAD (P<0.05). Conclusion: Antifungal activity of 6% NaOCl, Chlor-Xtra and 2% CHX was significantly greater than 2.6% NaOCl, 0.5% NaOCl, MTAD, 0.2% CHX and Tetraclean. PMID:25834602

  12. Myelostimulatory activity of recombinant human interleukin-2 in mice

    SciTech Connect

    Talmadge, J.E.; Schneider, M.; Keller, J.; Ruscetti, F.; Longo, D.; Pennington, R.; Bowersox, O.; Tribble, H.

    1989-05-01

    In a series of studies designed to extend our understanding of interleukin-2 (IL-2) and to study the effect of biologic response modifiers on bone marrow, we observed that administering recombinant human (rH) IL-2 to normal mice resulted in an increase in the frequency of colony-forming units-culture (CFU-C) in bone marrow. In addition, rH IL-2 was able to accelerate host recovery from cyclophosphamide (CTX)- or radiation-induced bone marrow depression and peripheral blood leukopenia. Not only can rH IL-2 accelerate, in a dose-dependent manner, the return of bone marrow, peripheral blood cellularity, and CFU-C frequency to normal levels following cytoreduction by CTX or irradiation, but it also significantly increases CFU-C frequency to greater than normal levels. Furthermore, rH IL-2 can significantly prolong survival of animals receiving a lethal dose of irradiation or CTX. Thus, multiple mechanisms are responsible for the synergistic therapeutic activity associated with rH IL-2 and CTX. rH IL-2 does not act only as an immunomodulatory agent in the presence or absence of suppressor T cells, but also accelerates host recovery from cytoreductive agents, resulting in decreased leukopenia and perhaps resistances to secondary infection. Thus, rH IL-2 plus chemotherapy may increase therapeutic activity against neoplastic disease, not only by adding immune stimulation to the direct antitumor effect of the drug but also by allowing delivery of higher, more effective doses of chemotherapy.

  13. Determination of ATP-activity as a useful tool for monitoring microbial load in aqueous humidifier samples.

    PubMed

    Liebers, Verena; Bachmann, Dieter; Franke, Gabriele; Freundt, Susanne; Stubel, Heike; Düser, Maria; Kendzia, Benjamin; Böckler, Margret; Brüning, Thomas; Raulf, Monika

    2015-03-01

    Air humidifier water tanks are potential sources of microbial contaminants. Aerosolization of these contaminants is associated with the development of airway and lung diseases; therefore, implementation of preventive strategies including monitoring of the microbial contamination is recommended. So far, culture-based methods that include measuring colony forming units (CFU) are widely used to monitor microbial load. However, these methods are time consuming and have considerable drawbacks. As a result, alternative methods are needed which provide not only clear and accurate results concerning microbial load in water samples, but are also rapid and easy to use in the field. This paper reports on a rapid test for ATP quantification as an alternative method for microbial monitoring, including its implementation, validation and application in the field. For this purpose, 186 water samples were characterized with different methods, which included ATP analysis, culture-based methods, endotoxin activity (common and rapid test), pyrogenic activity and number of particles. Half of the samples was measured directly in the field and the other half one day later in the laboratory. The results of both tests are highly correlated. Furthermore, to check how representative the result from one sample of a water source is, a second sample of the same water tank were collected and measured. Bioluminescence results of the undiluted samples covered a range between 20 and 25,000 relative light units (RLU) and correlated with the results obtained using the other methods. The highest correlation was found between bioluminescence and endotoxin activity (rs=0.79) as well as pyrogenic activity (rs=0.75). Overall, the results of this study indicate that ATP measurement using bioluminescence is a suitable tool to obtain rapid, reproducible and sensitive information on the microbial load of water samples, and is suitable to use in the field. However, to use ATP measurement as an indicator of

  14. Bacterial Enteric Infections Among Older Adults in the United States: Foodborne Diseases Active Surveillance Network, 1996–2012

    PubMed Central

    Scallan, Elaine; Crim, Stacy M.; Runkle, Arthur; Henao, Olga L.; Mahon, Barbara E.; Hoekstra, Robert M.; Griffin, Patricia M.

    2015-01-01

    Background A growing segment of the population—adults aged ≥65 years—is more susceptible than younger adults to certain enteric (including foodborne) infections and experience more severe disease. Materials and Methods Using data on laboratory-confirmed infections from the Foodborne Diseases Active Surveillance Network (FoodNet), we describe trends in the incidence of Campylobacter spp., Escherichia coli O157, Listeria monocytogenes, and nontyphoidal Salmonella infections in adults aged ≥65 years over time and by age group and sex. We used data from FoodNet and other sources to estimate the total number of illnesses, hospitalizations, and deaths in the United States caused by these infections each year using a statistical model to adjust for underdiagnosis (taking into account medical care-seeking, stool sample submission, laboratory practices, and test sensitivity). Results From 1996 to 2012, 4 pathogens caused 21,405 laboratory-confirmed infections among older adults residing in the FoodNet surveillance area; 49.3% were hospitalized, and 2.6% died. The average annual rate of infection was highest for Salmonella (12.8/100,000) and Campylobacter (12.1/100,000). Salmonella and Listeria led as causes of death. Among older adults, rates of laboratory-confirmed infection and the percentage of patients who were hospitalized and who died generally increased with age. A notable exception was the rate of Campylobacter infections, which decreased with increasing age. Adjusting for underdiagnosis, we estimated that these pathogens caused about 226,000 illnesses (~600/100,000) annually among U.S. adults aged ≥65 years, resulting in ~9700 hospitalizations and ~500 deaths. Conclusion Campylobacter, E. coli O157, Listeria, and Salmonella are major contributors to illness in older adults, highlighting the value of effective and targeted intervention. PMID:26067228

  15. An analysis in vivo of intracanal bacterial load before and after chemo-mechanical preparation: A comparative analysis of two irrigants and two activation techniques

    PubMed Central

    Rico-Romano, Cristina; Zubizarreta-Macho, Álvaro; Baquero-Artigao, María-Rosario

    2016-01-01

    Background The goals of this randomized double-blind trial were to assess the antimicrobial activity in vivo of Sodium hypochlorite (NaOCl) vs. chlorhexidine gluconate (CHX) used in combination either with EndoActivator® or IRRI S® files in patients with apical periodontitis. Material and Methods A total of 120 patients with apical periodontitis (in single or multiple root canals) were randomly assigned to the four irrigation protocols outlined below: Group A: 5.25% sodium hypochlorite (NaOCl) + EndoActivator®; Group B: 5.25% NaOCl + IRRI S® files; Group C: 2% chlorhexidine gluconate (CHX) + EndoActivator®; Group D: 2% CHX + IRRI S® files. Paper points were used to collect microbiological samples before (1A samples) and after (1B samples) irrigation. Viable colony-forming units (CFU) were quantified twice: (1) without speciation, and (2) only for Enterococcus Faecalis(EF). Statistical analysis was performed using SPSS 22.0 for Windows. Results No significant differences were observed between NaOCl and CHX in the reduction of CFU; in fact, reduction was < 93% for the two irrigants. Conversely, statistically significant differences were found between the two activation techniques (sonic and ultrasonic) in the reduction of Enterococcus Faecalis(EF). Thus, the effectiveness of ultrasonic activation was significantly higher (< 93%; p=0.012) as compared to sonic activation. Following the combination of the two irrigants with the two activation techniques (groups A, B, C and D), significant differences were observed between group A and B (p=0.025) in the reduction of EF populations, reaching up to 94%. Conclusions NaClO and CHX are effective in reducing intracanal bacterial load. Ultrasonic activation is the most effective activation technique in reducing EF populations. Key words:Chlorhexidine gluconate, sodium hypochlorite, ultrasonic irrigation, sonic irrigation, apical periodontitis, Enterococcus faecalis. PMID:26855714

  16. Structural Analysis and Anticoagulant Activities of the Novel Sulfated Fucan Possessing a Regular Well-Defined Repeating Unit from Sea Cucumber

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Mingyi; Xu, Li; Zhao, Longyan; Xiao, Chuang; Gao, Na; Luo, Lan; Yang, Lian; Li, Zi; Chen, Lingyun; Zhao, Jinhua

    2015-01-01

    Sulfated fucans, the complex polysaccharides, exhibit various biological activities. Herein, we purified two fucans from the sea cucumbers Holothuria edulis and Ludwigothurea grisea. Their structures were verified by means of HPGPC, FT-IR, GC–MS and NMR. As a result, a novel structural motif for this type of polymers is reported. The fucans have a unique structure composed of a central core of regular (1→2) and (1→3)-linked tetrasaccharide repeating units. Approximately 50% of the units from L. grisea (100% for H. edulis fucan) contain sides of oligosaccharides formed by nonsulfated fucose units linked to the O-4 position of the central core. Anticoagulant activity assays indicate that the sea cucumber fucans strongly inhibit human blood clotting through the intrinsic pathways of the coagulation cascade. Moreover, the mechanism of anticoagulant action of the fucans is selective inhibition of thrombin activity by heparin cofactor II. The distinctive tetrasaccharide repeating units contribute to the anticoagulant action. Additionally, unlike the fucans from marine alga, although the sea cucumber fucans have great molecular weights and affluent sulfates, they do not induce platelet aggregation. Overall, our results may be helpful in understanding the structure-function relationships of the well-defined polysaccharides from invertebrate as new types of safer anticoagulants. PMID:25871288

  17. In vitro and in vivo activity of 4-thio-uridylate against JY cells, a model for human acute lymphoid leukemia

    SciTech Connect

    Berenyi, Erika; Benko, Ilona; Vamosi, Gyoergy; Research Center for Molecular Medicine, Medical and Health Science Center, University of Debrecen, 98 Nagyerdei Krt., Debrecen 4032 ; Geresi, Krisztina; Tarkanyi, Ilona; Szegedi, Istvan; Lukacs, Levente; Juhasz, Istvan; Kiss, Csongor; Fesues, Laszlo; Research Center for Molecular Medicine, Medical and Health Science Center, University of Debrecen, 98 Nagyerdei Krt., Debrecen 4032 ; and others

    2011-07-08

    Highlights: {yields} s{sup 4}UMP a naturally occurring thiolated nucleotide, effectively inhibited the proliferation of JY cells in vitro and in vivo. {yields} s{sup 4}UMP decreased the cell number and colony forming activity of leukemia cells in SCID mice. {yields} The effect of s{sup 4}UMP was undetectable on the bone marrow of healthy mice. {yields} The biochemical changes of the treated cells suggested that s{sup 4}UMP induced apoptosis. -- Abstract: We have previously reported the in vitro anti-proliferative effect of 4-thio-uridylate (s{sup 4}UMP) on OCM-1 uveal melanoma cells. Here, we assessed the efficacy of s{sup 4}UMP on JY cells. Treatment of JY cells with s{sup 4}UMP suppressed their colony forming activity and induced apoptosis; healthy human bone marrow granulocyte-macrophage progenitor cells were 14-fold less sensitive to the nucleotide. In vivo effectiveness of s{sup 4}UMP was determined using xenograft SCID mouse model. s{sup 4}UMP decreased the cell number and colony forming activity of the total cell content of the femur of SCID mice transplanted with JY cells without affecting the bone marrow of healthy mice. These results suggest that s{sup 4}UMP alone or in combination with other clinically approved anti-leukemic remedies should be further explored as a potential novel therapeutic agent.

  18. Pituitary adenylate cyclase-activating polypeptide (PACAP) contributes to the proliferation of hematopoietic progenitor cells in murine bone marrow via PACAP-specific receptor

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Zhifang; Ohtaki, Hirokazu; Watanabe, Jun; Miyamoto, Kazuyuki; Murai, Norimitsu; Sasaki, Shun; Matsumoto, Minako; Hashimoto, Hitoshi; Hiraizumi, Yutaka; Numazawa, Satoshi; Shioda, Seiji

    2016-01-01

    Pituitary adenylate cyclase-activating polypeptide (PACAP, encoded by adcyap1) plays an important role in ectodermal development. However, the involvement of PACAP in the development of other germ layers is still unclear. This study assessed the expression of a PACAP-specific receptor (PAC1) gene and protein in mouse bone marrow (BM). Cells strongly expressing PAC1+ were large in size, had oval nuclei, and merged with CD34+ cells, suggesting that the former were hematopoietic progenitor cells (HPCs). Compared with wild-type mice, adcyap1−/− mice exhibited lower multiple potential progenitor cell populations and cell frequency in the S-phase of the cell cycle. Exogenous PACAP38 significantly increased the numbers of colony forming unit-granulocyte/macrophage progenitor cells (CFU-GM) with two peaks in semi-solid culture. PACAP also increased the expression of cyclinD1 and Ki67 mRNAs. These increases were completely and partially inhibited by the PACAP receptor antagonists, PACAP6-38 and VIP6-28, respectively. Little or no adcyap1 was expressed in BM and the number of CFU-GM colonies was similar in adcyap1−/− and wild-type mice. However, PACAP mRNA and protein were expressed in paravertebral sympathetic ganglia, which innervate tibial BM, and in the sympathetic fibers of BM cavity. These results suggested that sympathetic nerve innervation may be responsible for PACAP-regulated hematopoiesis in BM, mainly via PAC1. PMID:26925806

  19. The microbiological activity and toxicity of oil-polluted playa solonchaks and filled grounds within the Severnye Buzachi Oil Field (Kazakhstan)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tynybaeva, T. G.; Kostina, N. V.; Terekhov, A. M.; Kurakov, A. V.

    2008-10-01

    The number of colony-forming units of microorganisms, the viable biomass, and also the intensity of the microbiological processes (respiration, nitrogen fixation, denitrification, and cellulose decomposition) in playa solonchaks and sandy-loamy filled grounds in the territory of the Severnye Buzachi Oilfields (Kazakhstan) were much lower than in other soil types attesting to the limited capability of these substrates for selfpurification. Upon pollution by oil at concentrations of 100 600 mg/kg, the number of copiotrophic bacteria increased, whereas the actinomycetal and fungal populations were reduced and the biomass pool, the rates of CO2 emission, the potential nitrogen fixation, and denitrification became higher. The microbial communities of the playa solonchaks were weakly active and consumed few applied substrates. The biotesting with Artemia salina L. showed that some areas belonged to the lands of the 4th danger class, although the majority of the soil and substrate samples were not toxic. The germination of Lepidium sativum L. seeds was suppressed because of the salt toxicity, which is not related to the oil concentration (30 to 600 mg/kg).

  20. Essential Oil from Berries of Lebanese Juniperus excelsa M. Bieb Displays Similar Antibacterial Activity to Chlorhexidine but Higher Cytocompatibility with Human Oral Primary Cells.

    PubMed

    Azzimonti, Barbara; Cochis, Andrea; Beyrouthy, Marc El; Iriti, Marcello; Uberti, Francesca; Sorrentino, Rita; Landini, Manuela Miriam; Rimondini, Lia; Varoni, Elena Maria

    2015-01-01

    Chlorhexidine (CHX), one of the most effective drugs administered for periodontal treatment, presents collateral effects including toxicity when used for prolonged periods; here, we have evaluated the bactericidal potency and the cytocompatibility of Juniperus excelsa M. Bieb essential oil (EO) in comparison with 0.05% CHX. The EO was extracted from berries by hydrodistillation and components identified by gas chromatography and mass spectrometry. Bacterial inhibition halo analysis, quantitative cell viability 2,3-bis(2-methoxy-4-nitro-5-sulphophenyl)-5-[(phenyl amino) carbonyl]-2H-tetrazolium hydroxide assay (XTT), and colony forming unit (CFU) count were evaluated against the two biofilm formers Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans and Streptococcus mutans. Finally, cytocompatibility was assessed with human primary gingival fibroblasts (HGF) and mucosal keratinocytes (HK). The resulting EO was mainly composed of monoterpene hydrocarbons and oxygenated monoterpenes. An inhibition halo test demonstrated that both bacteria were sensitive to the EO; XTT analysis and CFU counts confirmed that 10-fold-diluted EO determined a statistically significant (p < 0.05) reduction in bacteria count and viability towards both biofilm and planktonic forms in a comparable manner to those obtained with CHX. Moreover, EO displayed higher cytocompatibility than CHX (p < 0.05). In conclusion, EO exhibited bactericidal activity similar to CHX, but a superior cytocompatibility, making it a promising antiseptic alternative to CHX. PMID:26007187

  1. Potentiation of mitomycin C and porfiromycin antitumor activity in solid tumor models by recombinant human interleukin 1 alpha.

    PubMed

    Braunschweiger, P G; Jones, S A; Johnson, C S; Furmanski, P

    1991-10-15

    The time- and dose-dependent effects of recombinant human interleukin 1 alpha (IL-1 alpha) on the antitumor activity of mitomycin C (MMC) and porfiromycin (PORF) were studied in RIF-1 and Panc02 solid tumor model systems. IL-1 alpha produced dose-dependent sensitization of clonogenic RIF-1 tumor cells to MMC in vivo. IL-1 alpha chemosensitization was highly schedule dependent, and the most efficacious schedules produced dose-modifying factors of 3.6 and 5.1 for MMC and PORF, respectively. More than additive clonogenic cell kill after IL-1 alpha-chemotherapy combinations reflected increased cellular sensitivity to MMC and PORF. The combinations also produced marked decreases in the yield of viable tumor cells, suggesting that the bioreductive drugs may have also potentiated the microvascular injury and ischemia produced by IL-1 alpha. Dexamethasone inhibited and ketoconazole, an inhibitor of corticosterone biosynthesis, enhanced IL-1 alpha-mediated chemosensitization in these models. IL-1 alpha mediated chemosensitization to MMC, and PORF was also demonstrated by tumor growth inhibition in the RIF-1 model and increased survival of mice in the spontaneously metastasizing Panc02 system. Chemosensitization of bone marrow spleen colony-forming units was not seen. IL-1 alpha (1000 units/ml) had no effect on MMC and PORF cytotoxicity in RIF-1 and PORF cell lines in vitro. The results indicate that the tumor-specific IL-1 alpha-induced pathophysiologies can sensitize solid tumors to agents which are preferentially activated, retained, and cytotoxic to cells under hypoxic conditions. Our results suggest that strategies combining bioreductively activated hypoxic cell cytotoxins and biological agents might offer efficacious alternatives or adjuvants to conventional combination approaches. PMID:1913664

  2. Radioprotective and cytoprotective activity of Tinospora cordifolia stem enriched extract containing cordifolioside-A

    PubMed Central

    Patel, Arti; Bigoniya, Papiya; Singh, Chandra Shekhar; Patel, Narayan Singh

    2013-01-01

    Objectives: The present study was undertaken to evaluate the radioprotective and cytoprotective potential of cordifolioside-A, a primary active constituent of n-butanol fraction of Tinospora Cordifolia (NBTC) against 4 Gy-γ radiation in mice and cyclophosphamide induced genotoxicity. Materials and Methods: Presence of cordifolioside-A in NBTC stem ethanolic extract was confirmed by high performance thin layer chromatography (HPTLC) analysis. Radioprotective activity was evaluated at 80 and 120 mg/kg, intraperitoneal (i.p.) dose of NBTC administered 15 days prior to whole body radiation exposure by observing survival rate, change in body weight, hematology, spleen colony forming unit (CFU), and micronucleus (MN) expression. Cytoprotective activity of NBTC was evaluated at 5, 10, and 15 mg/ml concentrations on Allium cepa root meristem growth against cyclophosphamide. Results: HPTLC analysis of standard cordifolioside A, and NBTC confirmed the presence of cordifolioside-A in NBTC with the retention factor value of 0.86. Administration of NBTC (120 mg/kg, i.p.) produced significant protection against radiation in terms of increased survival rate, body weight retention, hematological parameters, spleen CFU assay (P < 0.01), and decreased MN expression (P < 0.01). Cytoprotectivity was observed maximally at 10 mg/ml NBTC concentration with significant increase in root growth (P < 0.01), non-toxic mitotic index (MI) (65.9%) and lesser chromosomal aberrations (15.4%). NBTC at 10 mg/ml concentration showed very few C-anaphase compared to aberrations like fragmentation, C-anaphase, multipolarity and sticky chromosome in cyclophosphamide alone. Conclusion: The results suggest that enriched NBTC containing cordifolioside-A has a potential in vivo radioprotective effect as well as in vitro cytoprotective activity. PMID:23833365

  3. Testing the applicability of rapid on-site enzymatic activity detection for surface water monitoring

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stadler, Philipp; Vogl, Wolfgang; Juri, Koschelnik; Markus, Epp; Maximilian, Lackner; Markus, Oismüller; Monika, Kumpan; Peter, Strauss; Regina, Sommer; Gabriela, Ryzinska-Paier; Farnleitner Andreas, H.; Matthias, Zessner

    2015-04-01

    On-site detection of enzymatic activities has been suggested as a rapid surrogate for microbiological pollution monitoring of water resources (e.g. using glucuronidases, galactosidases, esterases). Due to the possible short measuring intervals enzymatic methods have high potential as near-real time water quality monitoring tools. This presentation describes results from a long termed field test. For twelve months, two ColiMinder devices (Vienna Water Monitoring, Austria) for on-site determination of enzymatic activity were tested for stream water monitoring at the experimental catchment HOAL (Hydrological Open Air Laboratory, Center for Water Resource Systems, Vienna University of Technology). The devices were overall able to follow and reflect the diverse hydrological and microbiological conditions of the monitored stream during the test period. Continuous data in high temporal resolution captured the course of enzymatic activity in stream water during diverse rainfall events. The method also proofed sensitive enough to determine diurnal fluctuations of enzymatic activity in stream water during dry periods. The method was able to capture a seasonal trend of enzymatic activity in stream water that matches the results gained from Colilert18 analysis for E. coli and coliform bacteria of monthly grab samples. Furthermore the comparison of ColiMinder data with measurements gained at the same test site with devices using the same method but having different construction design (BACTcontrol, microLAN) showed consistent measuring results. Comparative analysis showed significant differences between measured enzymatic activity (modified fishman units and pmol/min/100ml) and cultivation based analyses (most probable number, colony forming unit). Methods of enzymatic activity measures are capable to detect ideally the enzymatic activity caused by all active target bacteria members, including VBNC (viable but nonculturable) while cultivation based methods cannot detect VBNC

  4. Antibacterial Activity of Ti3C2Tx MXene.

    PubMed

    Rasool, Kashif; Helal, Mohamed; Ali, Adnan; Ren, Chang E; Gogotsi, Yury; Mahmoud, Khaled A

    2016-03-22

    MXenes are a family of atomically thin, two-dimensional (2D) transition metal carbides and carbonitrides with many attractive properties. Two-dimensional Ti3C2Tx (MXene) has been recently explored for applications in water desalination/purification membranes. A major success indicator for any water treatment membrane is the resistance to biofouling. To validate this and to understand better the health and environmental impacts of the new 2D carbides, we investigated the antibacterial properties of single- and few-layer Ti3C2Tx MXene flakes in colloidal solution. The antibacterial properties of Ti3C2Tx were tested against Escherichia coli (E. coli) and Bacillus subtilis (B. subtilis) by using bacterial growth curves based on optical densities (OD) and colonies growth on agar nutritive plates. Ti3C2Tx shows a higher antibacterial efficiency toward both Gram-negative E. coli and Gram-positive B. subtilis compared with graphene oxide (GO), which has been widely reported as an antibacterial agent. Concentration dependent antibacterial activity was observed and more than 98% bacterial cell viability loss was found at 200 μg/mL Ti3C2Tx for both bacterial cells within 4 h of exposure, as confirmed by colony forming unit (CFU) and regrowth curve. Antibacterial mechanism investigation by scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and transmission electron microscopy (TEM) coupled with lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) release assay indicated the damage to the cell membrane, which resulted in release of cytoplasmic materials from the bacterial cells. Reactive oxygen species (ROS) dependent and independent stress induction by Ti3C2Tx was investigated in two separate abiotic assays. MXenes are expected to be resistant to biofouling and offer bactericidal properties. PMID:26909865

  5. Punica granatum (pomegranate) extract is active against dental plaque.

    PubMed

    Menezes, Silvana M S; Cordeiro, Luciana Nunes; Viana, Glauce S B

    2006-01-01

    In the present work, we studied the effect of the hydroalcoholic extract (HAE) from Punica granatum (pomegranate) fruits on dental plaque microorganisms. The study was conducted on 60 healthy patients (33 females and 27 males, with age ranging from 9 to 25 years) using fixed orthodontic appliances, and randomly distributed into 3 groups of 20 patients each. The first group (control) used distilled water, while the second and third groups used chlorhexidine (standard) and HAE as mouth-rinses, respectively. The dental plaque material was collected from each patient, before and after a 1-min mouth-rinse with 15 ml of either distilled water, chlorhexidine or HAE. In both dental plaque collections, the material was removed from patients without oral hygiene, for 24 h (no tooth brushing). Dental plaque samples were diluted in phosphate buffered saline (PBS) plated on Mueller-Hinton agar, and incubated for 48 h, at 37 degrees C. Results, expressed as the number of colony forming units per milliliter (CFU/mL), show that the HAE was very effective against dental plaque microorganisms, decreasing the CFU/ml by 84% (CFU x 10(5)), before mouth-rinse: 154.0 +/- 41.18; after mouthrinse: 25.4 +/- 7.76). While similar values were observed with chlorhexidine, used as standard and positive control (79% inhibition), only an 11% inhibition of CFU/ml was demonstrated in the distilled water group, negative control (CFU x 10(5)), before mouth-rinse: chlorhexidine, 208.7 +/- 58.81 and distilled water, 81.1 +/- 10.12; after mouth-rinse: chlorhexidine, 44.0 +/- 15.85 and distilled water, 71.9 +/- 8.68). The HAE presented also an antibacterial activity against selected microorganisms, and may be a possible alternative for the treatment of dental plaque bacteria. PMID:17182487

  6. RCRA Part A Permit Application for Waste Management Activities at the Nevada Test Site, Part B Permit Application Hazardous Waste Storage Unit, Nevada Test Site, and Part B Permit Application - Explosives Ordnance Disposal Unit (EODU)

    SciTech Connect

    NSTec Environmental Programs

    2010-06-17

    The Area 5 Hazardous Waste Storage Unit (HWSU) was established to support testing, research, and remediation activities at the Nevada Test Site (NTS), a large-quantity generator of hazardous waste. The HWSU, located adjacent to the Area 5 Radioactive Waste Management Site (RWMS), is a prefabricated, rigid steel-framed, roofed shelter used to store hazardous nonradioactive waste generated on the NTS. No offsite generated wastes are managed at the HWSU. Waste managed at the HWSU includes the following categories: Flammables/Combustibles; Acid Corrosives; Alkali Corrosives; Oxidizers/Reactives; Toxics/Poisons; and Other Regulated Materials (ORMs). A list of the regulated waste codes accepted for storage at the HWSU is provided in Section B.2. Hazardous wastes stored at the HWSU are stored in U.S. Department of Transportation (DOT) compliant containers, compatible with the stored waste. Waste transfer (between containers) is not allowed at the HWSU and containers remain closed at all times. Containers are stored on secondary containment pallets and the unit is inspected monthly. Table 1 provides the metric conversion factors used in this application. Table 2 provides a list of existing permits. Table 3 lists operational Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) units at the NTS and their respective regulatory status.

  7. Oxidative stress promotes the increase of matrix metalloproteinases-2 and -9 activities in the feto-placental unit of diabetic rats.

    PubMed

    Pustovrh, María Carolina; Jawerbaum, Alicia; Capobianco, Evangelina; White, Verónica; Martínez, Nora; López-Costa, Juan José; González, Elida

    2005-12-01

    Maternal diabetes increases the risk of congenital malformations, placental dysfunction and diseases in both the neonate and the offspring's later life. Oxidative stress has been involved in the etiology of these abnormalities. Matrix metalloproteases (MMPs), involved in multiple developmental pathways, are increased in the fetus and placenta from diabetic experimental models. As oxidants could be involved in the activation of latent MMPs, we investigated a putative relationship between MMPs activities and oxidative stress in the feto-placental unit of diabetic rats at midgestation. We found that H2O2 enhanced and that superoxide dismutase (SOD) reduced MMPs activities in the maternal side of the placenta and in the fetuses from control and diabetic rats. MMPs were not modified by oxidative status in the fetal side of the placenta. Lipid peroxidation was enhanced in the maternal and fetal sides of the placenta and in the fetus from diabetic rats when compared to controls, and gradually decreased from the maternal placental side to the fetus in diabetic animals. The activities of the antioxidant enzymes SOD and catalase were decreased in the maternal placental side, catalase activity was enhanced in the fetal placental side and both enzymes were increased in the fetuses from diabetic rats when compared to controls. Our data demonstrate changes in the oxidative balance and capability of oxidants to upregulate MMPs activity in the feto-placental unit from diabetic rats, a basis to elucidate links between oxidative stress and alterations in the developmental pathways in which MMPs are involved. PMID:16298858

  8. Global Visions. Teaching Suggestions and Activity Masters for Unit 3: Economic Freedom: Who's Got It, Who Doesn't.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Procter and Gamble Educational Services, Cincinnati, OH.

    This is a classroom-ready program that examines the worldwide push for economic freedom as a way of helping students understand its relationship to economic growth. This program is designed to supplement social studies courses in economics, government, U.S. and world history, world cultures, and geography. The unit contains a newsletter for…

  9. Look in the Mythic Mirror: 10-Week Middle School Curriculum Unit. ArtsEdge Curricula, Lessons and Activities.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ashburn, Jennifer; Ayers, Mary Jane; Born-Ozment, Susan; Karsten, Jayne; Maeda, Sheri

    This 10-week middle school curriculum unit for grades 6-8, integrating concepts, materials, and content from language arts, music, and visual arts, provides a set of specific instructional plans relative to the study of myths (often a content area in middle school grades across the country). All the sample lessons and examples in the curriculum…

  10. Evaluation of the Submerged Demineralizer System (SDS) flowsheet for decontamination of high-activity-level water at the Three Mile Island Unit 2 Nuclear Power Station

    SciTech Connect

    Campbell, D. O.; Collins, E. D.; King, L. J.; Knauer, J. B.

    1980-07-01

    This report discusses the Submerged Demineralizer System (SDS) flowsheet for decontamination of the high-activity-level water at the Three Mile Island Unit 2 Nuclear Power Station was evaluated at Oak Ridge National Laboratory in a study that included filtration tests, ion exchange column tests, and ion exchange distribution tests. The contaminated waters, the SDS flowsheet, and the experiments made are described. The experimental results were used to predict the SDS performance and to indicate potential improvements.

  11. 26 CFR 31.3401(a)(1)-1 - Remuneration of members of the Armed Forces of the United States for active service in combat...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 26 Internal Revenue 15 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Remuneration of members of the Armed Forces of the United States for active service in combat zone or while hospitalized as a result of such service. 31.3401(a)(1)-1 Section 31.3401(a)(1)-1 Internal Revenue INTERNAL REVENUE SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY (CONTINUED) EMPLOYMENT TAXES...

  12. The Masticatory Contractile Load Induced Expression and Activation of Akt1/PKBα in Muscle Fibers at the Myotendinous Junction within Muscle-Tendon-Bone Unit

    PubMed Central

    Korkmaz, Yüksel; Klinz, Franz J.; Moghbeli, Mehrnoush; Addicks, Klaus; Raab, Wolfgang H. -M.; Bloch, Wilhelm

    2010-01-01

    The cell specific detection of enzyme activation in response to the physiological contractile load within muscle-tendon-bone unit is essential for understanding of the mechanical forces transmission from muscle cells via tendon to the bone. The hypothesis that the physiological mechanical loading regulates activation of Akt1/PKBα at Thr308 and at Ser473 in muscle fibers within muscle-tendon-bone unit was tested using quantitative immunohistochemistry, confocal double fluorescence analysis, and immunoblot analysis. In comparison to the staining intensities in peripheral regions of the muscle fibers, Akt1/PKBα was detected with a higher staining intensity in muscle fibers at the myotendinous junction (MTJ) areas. In muscle fibers at the MTJ areas, Akt1/PKBα is dually phosphorylated at Thr308 and Ser473. The immunohistochemical results were confirmed by immunoblot analysis. We conclude that contractile load generated by masticatory muscles induces local domain-dependent expression of Akt1/PKBα as well as activation by dually phosphorylation at Thr308 and Ser473 in muscle fibers at the MTJ areas within muscle-tendon-bone unit. PMID:20454577

  13. Antibacterial activity of Syzygium aromaticum seed: Studies on oxidative stress biomarkers and membrane permeability.

    PubMed

    Ajiboye, T O; Mohammed, A O; Bello, S A; Yusuf, I I; Ibitoye, O B; Muritala, H F; Onajobi, I B

    2016-06-01

    Oxidative stress and membrane permeability as mode of antibacterial activity of aqueous extract of Syzygium aromaticum seeds against Escherichia coli, Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Staphylococcus aureus was investigated. The concentration of phytochemical constituents of Syzygium aromaticum was determined using gas chromatography. Syzygium aromaticum seeds contain eugenol acetate > β-carophyllene > eugenin > eugenol > methyl salicylate > β-humulene > rhamnatin > fernesol > α-copeane > β-ylangene > kaempferol > cinnamic acid > oleanolic acid > benzaldehyde > α-humulene > vanillin > α-cubebene > carvicol > benzoic acid. Syzygium aromaticum showed antimicrobial activity with minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) and minimum bactericidal concentration (MBC) values as 0.06 and 0.10 mg/mL respectively. Time kill susceptibility by Syzygium aromaticum at MBC values showed significant decrease in the optical density and colony-forming unit (CFU) of Escherichia coli, Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Staphylococcus aureus. Superoxide anion radical content of the bacterial cells increased significantly following exposure to the extract. In a similar vein, superoxide dismutase and catalase activities increased significantly, while the level of reduced glutathione reduced, malondialdehyde increased significantly in bacterial cells exposed to the extract. The extract at MBC also enhanced the leakage of 260 nm absorbing materials and outer membrane permeability. It is evident from the data generated from this study that aqueous extract of Syzygium aromaticum seeds enhanced membrane permeability and oxidative stress in Escherichia coli, Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Staphylococcus aureus. PMID:27038843

  14. Insects: An Interdisciplinary Unit

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Leger, Heather

    2007-01-01

    The author talks about an interdisciplinary unit on insects, and presents activities that can help students practice communication skills (interpersonal, interpretive, and presentational) and learn about insects with hands-on activities.

  15. Multiple representations of information in the primary auditory cortex of cats. I. Stability and change in slow components of unit activity after conditioning with a click conditioned stimulus.

    PubMed

    Woody, C D; Zotova, E; Gruen, E

    2000-06-16

    Recordings of activity were made from 647 single units of the A(I) cortex of awake cats to evaluate behavioral state-dependent changes in the population response to a 70-dB click. Averages of PST histograms of unit activity were used to assess the changes in response. This report focuses on slow components of the responses disclosed by averages employing bin widths of 16 ms. Responses were compared before and after a Pavlovian blink CR was produced by forward pairing of click conditioned stimuli (CSs) with USs. A backward-paired 70-dB hiss was presented as a discriminative stimulus. Studies were also done after backward pairing of the click CSs (backward conditioning) that produced weak sensitization instead of a conditioned response. There were four main findings. First, components of activity elicited 32-160 ms after presenting the hiss decreased significantly after conditioning and after backward conditioning. The decreases after conditioning represented the most pronounced changes in activity evoked by either clicks or hisses in this behavioral state. Second, baseline firing decreased after both conditioning and backward conditioning. The direction of baseline change was opposite that found in adjacent cortical regions and in A(I) cortex after operant conditioning employing an acoustic cue. Third, prior to conditioning, unit activity in response to the hiss declined before the sound of the hiss reached its peak or terminated. This decrease was thought to represent a habituatory adaptation of response to a prolonged acoustic stimulus. This type of habituation to a lengthy stimulus has been recognized, behaviorally, but has not been observed previously in the activity of units of the auditory receptive cortex. Fourth, the percentage of click responsive units did not change significantly after the click was used as a CS for conditioning, and despite the accompanying changes in baseline activity, the absolute levels of activity summed in the first 16 ms after click

  16. Photodynamic Inactivation of Root Canal Bacteria by Light Activation through Human Dental Hard and Simulated Surrounding Tissue

    PubMed Central

    Cieplik, Fabian; Pummer, Andreas; Leibl, Christoph; Regensburger, Johannes; Schmalz, Gottfried; Buchalla, Wolfgang; Hiller, Karl-Anton; Maisch, Tim

    2016-01-01

    Introduction: Photodynamic inactivation of bacteria (PIB) may be a supportive antimicrobial approach for use in endodontics, but sufficient activation of photosensitizers (PS) in root canals is a critical point. Therefore, aim of this study was to evaluate the ability of PS absorbing blue (TMPyP) or red light (Methylene Blue; MB) for light activation through human dental hard and simulated surrounding tissue to inactivate root canal bacteria. Methods: A tooth model was fabricated with a human premolar and two molars in an acrylic resin bloc simulating the optical properties of a porcine jaw. The distal root canal of the first molar was enlarged to insert a glass tube (external diameter 2 mm) containing PS and stationary-phase Enterococcus faecalis. Both PS (10 μM) were irradiated for 120 s with BlueV (20 mW/cm2; λem = 400–460 nm) or PDT 1200L (37.8 mW/cm2; λem = 570–680 nm; both: Waldmann Medizintechnik), respectively. Irradiation parameters ensured identical numbers of photons absorbed by each PS. Three setups were chosen: irradiating the glass pipette only (G), the glass pipette inside the single tooth without (GT) and with (GTM) simulated surrounding tissues. Colony forming units (CFU) were evaluated. Transmission measurements of the buccal halves of hemisected mandibular first molars were performed by means of a photospectrometer. Results: PIB with both PS led to reduction by ≥ 5 log10 of E. faecalis CFU for each setup. From transmission measurements, a threshold wavelength λth for allowing an amount of light transmission for sufficient activation of PS was determined to be 430 nm. Conclusion: This study can be seen as proof of principle that light activation of given intra-canal PS from outside a tooth may be possible at wavelengths ≥ 430 nm, facilitating clinical application of PIB in endodontics. PMID:27379059

  17. The Dynamic Interplay between Spatialization of Written Units in Writing Activity and Functions of Tools on the Computer

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Huh, Joo Hee

    2012-01-01

    I criticize the typewriting model and linear writing structure of Microsoft Word software for writing in the computer. I problematize bodily movement in writing that the error of the software disregards. In this research, writing activity is viewed as bodily, spatial and mediated activity under the premise of the unity of consciousness and…

  18. Extra-Curricular Activity and the Transition from Higher Education to Work: A Survey of Graduates in the United Kingdom

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tchibozo, Guy

    2007-01-01

    This paper focuses on the effects of extra-curricular activity on graduates' transition from higher education to the labour market. The study is based on a survey of 119 graduates conducted in 2004 in the UK. The data gathered cover a large range of social and leisure activities that the graduates carried on while students at their universities.…

  19. Making Meaning of Everyday Practices: Parents' Attitudes toward Children's Extracurricular Activities in the United States and in Italy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kremer-Sadlik, Tamar; Izquierdo, Carolina; Fatigante, Marilena

    2010-01-01

    This article focuses on children's engagement in extracurricular activities from the perspective of middle-class parents in Rome, Italy, and Los Angeles, California. Analysis of parents' accounts captured in interviews and ethnographic fieldwork reveals that both sets of parents perceive activities as important for children's success. Yet Roman…

  20. Environmental Awareness Activities for Librarians and Teachers: 20 Interdisciplinary Units for Use in Grades 2-8.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Simpson, Martha Seif

    This activity book was written for the purposes of: (1) increasing students' awareness of nature and environmental issues; (2) providing an interdisciplinary curriculum for environmental issues; (3) encouraging students to use a variety of current nonfiction sources to research activities; and (4) encouraging students to work together in small…

  1. Participating in politics resembles physical activity: general action patterns in international archives, United States archives, and experiments.

    PubMed

    Noguchi, Kenji; Handley, Ian M; Albarracín, Dolores

    2011-02-01

    A series of studies examined whether political participation can emerge from general patterns of indiscriminate activity. In the first two studies, general action tendencies were measured by combining national and state-level indicators of high activity (e.g., impulsiveness, pace of life, and physical activity) from international and U.S. data. This action-tendency index positively correlated with a measure of political participation that consisted of voting behaviors and participation in political demonstrations. The following two experimental studies indicated that participants exposed to action words (e.g., go, move) had stronger intentions to vote in an upcoming election and volunteered more time to make phone calls on behalf of a university policy than participants exposed to inaction words did (e.g., relax, stop). These studies suggest that political participation can be predicted from general tendencies toward activity present at the national and state levels, as well as from verbal prompts suggestive of activity. PMID:21177515

  2. Participating in Politics Resembles Physical Activity: General Action Patterns in International Archives, United States Archives, and Experiments

    PubMed Central

    Noguchi, Kenji; Handley, Ian M.; Albarracín, Dolores

    2016-01-01

    A series of studies examined whether political participation can emerge from general patterns of indiscriminate activity. In the first two studies, general action tendencies were measured by combining national and state-level indicators of high activity (e.g., impulsiveness, pace of life, and physical activity) from international and U.S. data. This action-tendency index positively correlated with a measure of political participation that consisted of voting behaviors and participation in political demonstrations. The following two experimental studies indicated that participants exposed to action words (e.g., go, move) had stronger intentions to vote in an upcoming election and volunteered more time to make phone calls on behalf of a university policy than participants exposed to inaction words did (e.g., relax, stop). These studies suggest that political participation can be predicted from general tendencies toward activity present at the national and state levels, as well as from verbal prompts suggestive of activity. PMID:21177515

  3. Antioxidant activity and polyphenol and procyanidin contents of selected commercially available cocoa-containing and chocolate products in the United States.

    PubMed

    Miller, Kenneth B; Stuart, David A; Smith, Nancy L; Lee, Chang Y; McHale, Nancy L; Flanagan, Judith A; Ou, Boxin; Hurst, W Jeffrey

    2006-05-31

    In the United States, commercially available foods, including cocoa and chocolate, are being marketed with statements referring to the level of antioxidant activity and polyphenols. For cocoa-containing foods, there has been no comprehensive survey of the content of these and other chemistries. A survey of cocoa and chocolate-containing products marketed in the United States was conducted to determine antioxidant activity and polyphenol and procyanidin contents. Commercially available samples consisted of the top market share products in each of the following six categories: natural cocoa, unsweetened baking chocolate, dark chocolate, semisweet baking chips, milk chocolate, and chocolate syrup. Composite samples were characterized using four different methods: oxygen radical absorbance capacity (ORAC), vitamin C equivalence antioxidant capacity (VCEAC), total polyphenols, and procyanidins. All composite lots were further characterized for percent nonfat cocoa solids (NFCS) and percent fat. Natural cocoas had the highest levels of antioxidant activities, total polyphenols, and procyanidins followed by baking chocolates, dark chocolates and baking chips, and finally milk chocolate and syrups. The results showed a strong linear correlation between NFCS and ORAC (R (2) = 0.9849), total polyphenols (R (2) = 0.9793), and procyanidins (R (2) = 0.946), respectively. On the basis of principal component analysis, 81.4% of the sample set was associated with NFCS, antioxidant activity, total polyphenols, and procyanidins. The results indicated that, regardless of the product category, NFCS were the primary factor contributing to the level of cocoa antioxidants in the products tested. Results further suggested that differences in cocoa bean blends and processing, with the possible exception of Dutching, are minor factors in determining the level of antioxidants in commercially available cocoa-containing products in the United States. PMID:16719535

  4. Microbial Characterization of Internal Active Thermal Control System (IATCS) Hardware Surfaces after Five Years of Operation in the International Space Station

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Roman, Monsi C.; Weir, Natalee E.; Wilson, Mark E.; Pyle, Barry H.

    2006-01-01

    A flex hose assembly containing aqueous coolant from the International Space Station (ISS) Internal Active Thermal Control System (IATCS) consisting of a 2 foot section of Teflon hose and quick disconnects (QDs) and a Special Performance Checkout Unit (SPCU) heat exchanger containing separate channels of IATCS coolant and iodinated water used to cool spacesuits and Extravehicular Mobility Units (EMUS) were returned for destructive analyses on Shuttle return to flight mission STS-114. The original aqueous IATCS coolant used in Node 1, the Laboratory Module, and the Airlock consisted of water, borate (pH buffer), phosphate (corrosion control), and silver sulfate (microbiological control) at a pH of 9.5 +/- 0.5. Chemical changes occurred after on-orbit implementation including a decrease to pH 8.4 due to the diffusion of carbon dioxide through the Teflon hoses, an increase in nickel ions due to general corrosion of heat exchanger braze coatings, a decrease in phosphate concentration due to precipitation of nickel phosphate, and the rapid disappearance of silver ions due to deposition on hardware surfaces. Also associated with the coolant chemistry changes was an increase in planktonic microorganisms from less than 100 colony forming units (CFU) per 100 ml to approximately 1 million CFU per 100 ml. Attachment and growth of microorganisms to the system surfaces (biofilm) was suspected due to the levels of planktonic microorganisms in the coolant. Biofilms can reduce coolant flow, reduce heat transfer, amplify degradation of system materials initiated by chemical corrosion, and enhance mineral scale formation.

  5. The importance of culturally meaningful activity for health benefits among older Korean immigrant living in the United States

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Junhyoung; Kim, May; Han, Areum; Chin, Seungtae

    2015-01-01

    Research indicates that participation in culturally meaningful activity is beneficial for immigrants’ health and well-being, yet older Korean immigrants struggle with accepting new cultural perspectives, which can negatively affect their health and well-being. Using in-depth interviews, this study was designed to capture the value of culturally meaningful activities for health among older Korean immigrants. Three themes were identified: (a) improved psychological well-being, (b) enhanced positive emotions and feelings, and (c) social connections developed with others. The findings suggest that by engaging in various culturally meaningful activities, older Korean immigrants gain a sense of social, cultural, and psychological significance in life. This study also provided evidence that older Korean immigrants maintain and develop their cultural identity through culturally meaningful activities. PMID:26084272

  6. The importance of culturally meaningful activity for health benefits among older Korean immigrant living in the United States.

    PubMed

    Kim, Junhyoung; Kim, May; Han, Areum; Chin, Seungtae

    2015-01-01

    Research indicates that participation in culturally meaningful activity is beneficial for immigrants' health and well-being, yet older Korean immigrants struggle with accepting new cultural perspectives, which can negatively affect their health and well-being. Using in-depth interviews, this study was designed to capture the value of culturally meaningful activities for health among older Korean immigrants. Three themes were identified: (a) improved psychological well-being, (b) enhanced positive emotions and feelings, and (c) social connections developed with others. The findings suggest that by engaging in various culturally meaningful activities, older Korean immigrants gain a sense of social, cultural, and psychological significance in life. This study also provided evidence that older Korean immigrants maintain and develop their cultural identity through culturally meaningful activities. PMID:26084272

  7. Regeneration of spent powdered activated carbon saturated with inorganic ions by cavitation united with ion exchange method.

    PubMed

    Li, Gang; Gao, Hong; Li, Yansheng; Yang, Huixin

    2011-06-01

    Using ion exchange resin as transfer media, regenerate powdered activated carbon (PAC) adsorbed inorganic ions by cavitation to enhance the transfer; we studied how the regeneration time and the mass ratio of resin and PAC influence the regeneration rate respectively through re-adsorption. The result showed that the effective regeneration of PAC saturated with inorganic ions was above 90% using ion exchange resin as media and transfer carrier, the quantity of PAC did not reduced but activated in the process. PMID:25084579

  8. The promotion of physical activity in the United States population: the status of programs in medical, worksite, community, and school settings.

    PubMed Central

    Iverson, D C; Fielding, J E; Crow, R S; Christenson, G M

    1985-01-01

    While the medical care encounter is considered an ideal situation in which patients are encouraged to increase their physical activity levels, very little research has been conducted in this setting. In fact, with the exception of the physical activity components of cardiac rehabilitation programs, few formal physical activity programs are available in medical care settings. Although the workplace is currently the focus of the greatest interest by those persons who implement physical activity programs, there is little precision in defining what constitutes a worksite physical activity program. A number of researchers and authors, using program experience rather than empirical findings, have described what they believe to be the important components of successful worksites health promotion and physical education programs. The greatest variety of physical activity programs are found in community settings. They are offered by a number of nonprofit private organizations, nonprofit public agencies, and for-profit organizations. While relatively little research has been done concerning changes in the community environment, it is clear that such changes can effect community participation. Community campaigns to increase physical activity have been studied, and it appears that they clearly affect residents' interest and awareness in physical activity, but they do not have a major effect on behavioral changes in the short term. It appears that a major opportunity to influence favorable physical activity in the United States is being missed in schools. A large majority of students are enrolled in physical education classes, but the classes appear to have little effect on the current physical fitness levels of children and, furthermore, have little impact on developing life-long physical activity skills. PMID:3920720

  9. Effect of Different Obturation Materials on Residual Antimicrobial Activity of 2% Chlorhexidine in Dentin at Different Time Intervals: An Ex Vivo Study

    PubMed Central

    Bolhari, Behnam; Dehghan, Somayyeh; Sharifian, Mohammad Reza; Bahador, Abbas

    2015-01-01

    Objectives: The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of gutta percha/AH26 and Resilon/RealSeal SE on residual antimicrobial activity of chlorhexidine (CHX) in human root dentin and suggest the best filling material when CHX is used as final irrigant. Materials and Methods: One-hundred and forty-four single-rooted human teeth were selected for this study. Canals were instrumented to the apical size #35. Smear layer was removed using 5.25% NaOCl and 17% EDTA and then 108 teeth were irrigated with 2% CHX and randomly divided into three groups of gutta percha/AH26, Resilon/RealSeal SE and positive controls. Each group was divided into three subgroups for different time intervals (one, three and six weeks). Thirty-six teeth, as negative controls, were irrigated with saline and obturated with gutta percha/AH26 and Resilon/RealSeal SE. Dentin powder was prepared at the afore-mentioned intervals. After exposure to Enterococcus faecalis for 24 hours, colony forming units (CFUs) were counted and residual antimicrobial activity was calculated. The data were analyzed using the Kruskal Wallis test and one-way ANOVA. The significance level was set at P<0.05. Results: The antimicrobial activity of CHX gradually decreased in a time-dependent manner but it maintained over 95% of its antimicrobial activity after six weeks. Moreover, Resilon/RealSeal SE significantly decreased the antimicrobial activity of CHX in comparison with gutta-percha/AH26 (P<0.05). Conclusion: After a final irrigation with CHX, gutta-percha/AH26 is a better choice for root canal obturation. PMID:27252755

  10. An optimized colony forming assay for low-dose-radiation cell survival measurement

    SciTech Connect

    Zhu J.; Sutherland B.; Hu W.; Ding N.; Ye C.; Usikalu M.; Li S.; Hu B.; Zhou G.

    2011-11-01

    The aim of this study is to develop a simple and reliable method to quantify the cell survival of low-dose irradiations. Two crucial factors were considered, the same number of cells plated in each flask and an appropriate interval between cell plating and irradiation. For the former, we optimized cell harvest with trypsin, diluted cells in one container, and directly seeded cells on the bottom of flasks in a low density before irradiation. Reproducible plating efficiency was obtained. For the latter, we plated cells on the bottom of flasks and then monitored the processing of attachment, cell cycle variations, and the plating efficiency after exposure to 20 cGy of X-rays. The results showed that a period of 4.5 h to 7.5 h after plating was suitable for further treatment. In order to confirm the reliability and feasibility of our method, we also measured the survival curves of these M059K and M059J glioma cell lines by following the optimized protocol and obtained consistent results reported by others with cell sorting system. In conclusion, we successfully developed a reliable and simple way to measure the survival fractions of human cells exposed to low dose irradiation, which might be helpful for the studies on low-dose radiation biology.

  11. Competitive interactions between corals and turf algae depend on coral colony form.

    PubMed

    Swierts, Thomas; Vermeij, Mark Ja

    2016-01-01

    Turf algae are becoming more abundant on coral reefs worldwide, but their effects on other benthic organisms remain poorly described. To describe the general characteristics of competitive interactions between corals and turf algae, we determined the occurrence and outcomes of coral-turf algal interactions among different coral growth forms (branching, upright, massive, encrusting, plating, and solitary) on a shallow reef in Vietnam. In total, the amount of turf algal interaction, i.e., the proportion of the coral boundary directly bordering turf algae, was quantified for 1,276 coral colonies belonging to 27 genera and the putative outcome of each interaction was noted. The amount of turf algal interaction and the outcome of these interactions differed predictably among the six growth forms. Encrusting corals interacted most often with turf algae, but also competed most successfully against turf algae. The opposite was observed for branching corals, which rarely interacted with turf algae and rarely won these competitive interactions. Including all other growth forms, a positive relationship was found between the amount of competitive interactions with neighboring turf algae and the percentage of such interaction won by the coral. This growth form dependent ability to outcompete turf algae was not only observed among coral species, but also among different growth forms in morphologically plastic coral genera (Acropora, Favia, Favites, Montastrea, Montipora, Porites) illustrating the general nature of this relationship. PMID:27190707

  12. Competitive interactions between corals and turf algae depend on coral colony form

    PubMed Central

    Vermeij, Mark JA

    2016-01-01

    Turf algae are becoming more abundant on coral reefs worldwide, but their effects on other benthic organisms remain poorly described. To describe the general characteristics of competitive interactions between corals and turf algae, we determined the occurrence and outcomes of coral–turf algal interactions among different coral growth forms (branching, upright, massive, encrusting, plating, and solitary) on a shallow reef in Vietnam. In total, the amount of turf algal interaction, i.e., the proportion of the coral boundary directly bordering turf algae, was quantified for 1,276 coral colonies belonging to 27 genera and the putative outcome of each interaction was noted. The amount of turf algal interaction and the outcome of these interactions differed predictably among the six growth forms. Encrusting corals interacted most often with turf algae, but also competed most successfully against turf algae. The opposite was observed for branching corals, which rarely interacted with turf algae and rarely won these competitive interactions. Including all other growth forms, a positive relationship was found between the amount of competitive interactions with neighboring turf algae and the percentage of such interaction won by the coral. This growth form dependent ability to outcompete turf algae was not only observed among coral species, but also among different growth forms in morphologically plastic coral genera (Acropora, Favia, Favites, Montastrea, Montipora, Porites) illustrating the general nature of this relationship. PMID:27190707

  13. Antibacterial activity of plastics coated with silver-doped organic-inorganic hybrid coatings prepared by sol-gel processes.

    PubMed

    Marini, M; De Niederhausern, S; Iseppi, R; Bondi, M; Sabia, C; Toselli, M; Pilati, F

    2007-04-01

    Silver-doped organic-inorganic hybrid coatings were prepared starting from tetraethoxysilane- and triethoxysilane-terminated poly(ethylene glycol)-block-polyethylene by the sol-gel process. They were applied as a thin layer (0.6-1.1 microm) to polyethylene (PE) and poly(vinyl chloride) (PVC) films and the antibacterial activity of the coated films was tested against Gram-negative (Escherichia coli ATCC 25922) and Gram-positive (Staphylococcus aureus ATCC 6538) bacteria. The effect of several factors (such as organic-inorganic ratio, type of catalyst, time of post-curing, silver ion concentration, etc.) was investigated. Measurements at different contact times showed a rapid decrease of the viable count for both tested strains. The highest antibacterial activity [more than 6 log reduction within 6 h starting from 106 colony-forming units (cfu) mL-1] was obtained for samples with an organic-inorganic weight ratio of 80:20 and 5 wt % silver salt with respect to the coating. For the coatings prepared by an acid-catalyzed process, a high level of permanence of the antibacterial activity of the coated films was demonstrated by repeatedly washing the samples in warm water or by immersion in physiological saline solution at 37 degrees C for 3 days. The release of silver ions per square meter of coating is very similar to that previously observed for polyamides filled with metallic silver nanoparticles; however, when compared on the basis of Ag content, the concentration of silver ions released from the coating is much higher than that released from 1 mm thick specimens of polyamide (PA) filled with silver nanoparticles. Transparency and good adhesion of the coating to PE and PVC plastic substrates without any previous surface treatment are further interesting features. PMID:17335284

  14. Consumption of Bifidobacterium lactis Bi-07 by healthy elderly adults enhances phagocytic activity of monocytes and granulocytes.

    PubMed

    Maneerat, Sujira; Lehtinen, Markus J; Childs, Caroline E; Forssten, Sofia D; Alhoniemi, Esa; Tiphaine, Milin; Yaqoob, Parveen; Ouwehand, Arthur C; Rastall, Robert A

    2013-01-01

    Elderly adults have alterations in their gut microbiota and immune functions that are associated with higher susceptibility to infections and metabolic disorders. Probiotics and prebiotics, and their synbiotic combinations are food supplements that have been shown to improve both gut and immune function. The objective of this randomised, double-blind, placebo-controlled, cross-over human clinical trial was to study immune function and the gut microbiota in healthy elderly adults. Volunteers (n 37) consumed prebiotic galacto-oligosaccharides (GOS; 8 g/d), probiotic Bifidobacterium lactis Bi-07 (Bi-07; 10(9) colony-forming units/d), their combination (Bi-07 + GOS) and maltodextrin control (8 g/d) in four 3-week periods separated by 4-week wash-out periods. Immune function was analysed by determining the phagocytic and oxidative burst activity of monocytes and granulocytes, whole-blood response to lipopolysaccharide, plasma chemokine concentrations and salivary IgA levels. Gut microbiota composition and faecal SCFA content were determined using 16S ribosomal RNA fluorescence in situ hybridisation and HPLC, respectively. Primary statistical analyses indicated the presence of carry-over effects and thus measurements from only the first supplementation period were considered valid. Subsequent statistical analysis showed that consumption of Bi-07 improved the phagocytic activity of monocytes (P < 0·001) and granulocytes (P = 0·02). Other parameters were unchanged. We have for the first time shown that the probiotic Bi-07 may provide health benefits to elderly individuals by improving the phagocytic activity of monocytes and granulocytes. The present results also suggest that in the elderly, the effects of some probiotics and prebiotics may last longer than in adults. PMID:25191600

  15. Effect of staff migration on kidney transplant activity in United Network for Organ Sharing region 1 transplant centers.

    PubMed

    Saidi, Reza F; Khaksari, Sahriar; Ko, Dicken S C

    2014-09-01

    Organ shortage is unquestionably the greatest challenge facing the field of transplantation today. Transplant centers are constantly competing with one another for limited numbers of organs for their recipients. Recruitment of specialized transplant surgical expertise and leadership is thought to enable a center to grow in volume and thus profitability in the increasingly difficult world of health care reimbursement. In this study, the pattern of kidney transplants at 13 different centers in the United Network for Organ Sharing's region 1 is examined: the comparison is between transplant volume before and after changes in the centers' leadership between 2000 and 2011. Each center's kidney transplant volume showed a significant increase after a leadership change that ultimately regressed to the center's baseline. This study is the first to show that behavioral changes in transplant center competition cause transient increases in transplant volume that quickly regress back to mean levels. PMID:25193733

  16. Synthesis and Enantiomeric Recognition Studies of Optically Active Pyridino-Crown Ethers Containing an Anthracene Fluorophore Unit.

    PubMed

    Szemenyei, Balázs; Móczár, Ildikó; Pál, Dávid; Kocsis, Ivett; Baranyai, Péter; Huszthy, Péter

    2016-07-01

    Novel enantiopure pyridino-18-crown-6 ether-based sensor molecules containing an anthracene fluorophore unit were synthesized. Their enantiomeric recognition abilities toward the enantiomers of 1-phenylethylamine hydrogen perchlorate (PhEt), 1-(1-naphthyl)ethylamine hydrogen perchlorate (NapEt), phenylglycine methyl ester hydrogen perchlorate (PhgOMe), and phenylalanine methyl ester hydrogen perchlorate (PheOMe) were examined in acetonitrile using fluorescence spectroscopy. The sensor molecules showed appreciable enantiomeric recognition toward the enantiomers of NapEt, PhEt, and PhgOMe. The highest enantioselectivity was found in the case of crown ether containing isobutyl groups in the macroring and the enantiomers of NapEt. Chirality 28:562-568, 2016. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:27349957

  17. IS1397 is active for transposition into the chromosome of Escherichia coli K-12 and inserts specifically into palindromic units of bacterial interspersed mosaic elements.

    PubMed

    Clément, J M; Wilde, C; Bachellier, S; Lambert, P; Hofnung, M

    1999-11-01

    We demonstrate that IS1397, a putative mobile genetic element discovered in natural isolates of Escherichia coli, is active for transposition into the chromosome of E. coli K-12 and inserts specifically into palindromic units, also called repetitive extragenic palindromes, the basic element of bacterial interspersed mosaic elements (BIMEs), which are found in intergenic regions of enterobacteria closely related to E. coli and Salmonella. We could not detect transposition onto a plasmid carrying BIMEs. This unprecedented specificity of insertion into a well-characterized chromosomal intergenic repeated element and its evolutionary implications are discussed. PMID:10559158

  18. REVISED FINAL REPORT – INDEPENDENT VERIFICATION SURVEY ACTIVITIES AT THE SEPARATIONS PROCESS RESEARCH UNIT SITES, NISKAYUNA, NEW YORK – DCN 0496-SR-06-1

    SciTech Connect

    Evan Harpenau

    2011-10-10

    The Separations Process Research Unit (SPRU) complex located on the Knolls Atomic Power Laboratory (KAPL) site in Niskayuna, New York, was constructed in the late 1940s to research the chemical separation of plutonium and uranium (Figure A-1). SPRU operated as a laboratory scale research facility between February 1950 and October 1953. The research activities ceased following the successful development of the reduction oxidation and plutonium/uranium extraction processes. The oxidation and extraction processes were subsequently developed for large scale use by the Hanford and Savannah River sites (aRc 2008a). Decommissioning of the SPRU facilities began in October 1953 and continued through the 1990s.

  19. Prevalence and trends in physical activity among older adults in the United States: A comparison across three national surveys.

    PubMed

    Keadle, Sarah Kozey; McKinnon, Robin; Graubard, Barry I; Troiano, Richard P

    2016-08-01

    This paper examined how many older adults (65+years) are meeting physical activity (PA) Guidelines (PAG; 150min/week of moderate-to-vigorous PA) using data from three leading national surveys (NHANES, BRFSS and NHIS). The proportion of individuals meeting aerobic PAG was determined for the most recent cycle available for each survey (NHANES 2011-12, NHIS and BRFSS 2013). We also assessed whether PAG adherence has changed over time. Predicted margins from multinomial logistic regression were computed after adjusting for age, race/ethnicity and gender and sample weights. The proportion of older adults meeting PAG was 27.3% for NHANES, 35.8% for NHIS and 44.3% for BRFSS. Across all surveys, men reported higher levels of activity than women, Non-Hispanic whites reported higher levels than Non-Hispanic blacks and Hispanics, activity declined with age and was lower in those with functional limitations, all P<0.05. The proportion of older adults meeting PAG in the NHIS survey, the only survey where PA questions remained the same over time, increased from 25.7% in 1998 to 35.8% in 2013 (P<0.01). Point-estimates for activity levels are different between surveys but they consistently identify sub-groups who are less active. Although older adults are reporting more activity over time, adherence to aerobic and strength training PAG remains low in this population and there is a need for effective interventions to prevent age-related declines in PA and address health disparities among older adults. PMID:27196146

  20. Interim Closure Activities at Corrective Action Unit 114: Area 25 EMAD Facility, Nevada National Security Site, Nevada

    SciTech Connect

    Boehlecke, R. F.

    2011-10-24

    This letter report documents interim activities that have been completed at CAU 114 to support ongoing access and generate information necessary to plan future closure activities. General housekeeping and cleanup of debris was conducted in the EMAD yard, cold bays, support areas of Building 3900, and postmortem cell tunnel area of the hot bay. All non-asbestos ceiling tiles and loose and broken non-friable asbestos floor tiles were removed from support galleries and office areas. Non-radiologically contaminated piping and equipment in the cold areas of the building and in the two 120-ton locomotives in the yard were tapped, characterized, drained, and verified free of contents.

  1. The Effects of Young Children's Everyday Activities: A Longitudinal Study in the United States, Russia, and Estonia.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tudge, J.; Tammeveski, P.; Meltsas, M.; Kulakova, N.; Snezhkova, I.

    Noting that it is by studying children's regular activities and their roles and interpersonal relationships that we come to understand how children develop as members of their cultural groups, this study examined children growing up in urban settings in a variety of societies. The study used an ecological perspective largely based on…

  2. Incidence of Norovirus-Associated Medical Encounters among Active Duty United States Military Personnel and Their Dependents

    PubMed Central

    Rha, Brian; Lopman, Benjamin A.; Alcala, Ashley N.; Riddle, Mark S.; Porter, Chad K.

    2016-01-01

    Background Norovirus is a leading cause of gastroenteritis episodes and outbreaks in US military deployments, but estimates of endemic disease burden among military personnel in garrison are lacking. Methods Diagnostic codes from gastroenteritis-associated medical encounters of active duty military personnel and their beneficiaries from July 1998–June 2011 were obtained from the Armed Forces Health Surveillance Center. Using time-series regression models, cause-unspecified encounters were modeled as a function of encounters for specific enteropathogens. Model residuals (representing unexplained encounters) were used to estimate norovirus-attributable medical encounters. Incidence rates were calculated using population data for both active duty and beneficiary populations. Results The estimated annual mean rate of norovirus-associated medically-attended visits among active duty personnel and their beneficiaries was 292 (95% CI: 258 to 326) and 93 (95% CI: 80 to 105) encounters per 10,000 persons, respectively. Rates were highest among beneficiaries <5 years of age with a median annual rate of 435 (range: 318 to 646) encounters per 10,000 children. Norovirus was estimated to cause 31% and 27% of all-cause gastroenteritis encounters in the active duty and beneficiary populations, respectively, with over 60% occurring between November and April. There was no evidence of any lag effect where norovirus disease occurred in one population before the other, or in one beneficiary age group before the others. Conclusions Norovirus is a major cause of medically-attended gastroenteritis among non-deployed US military active duty members as well as in their beneficiaries. PMID:27115602

  3. Recent Temporal Trends in Parent-Reported Physical Activity in Children in the United States, 2009 to 2014.

    PubMed

    Loprinzi, Paul D; Davis, Robert E

    2016-04-01

    The objective of this study was to provide recent temporal trends in parent-reported physical activity in children (6-11 years) between 2009 and 2014. Data from the 2009 to 2014 National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey were used. The analytic sample included 3946 children. Parent proxy of child physical activity at each of the 3 2-year cycles was assessed. For the entire sample, there was a quadratic trend, with the number of days children engaged in at least 60 min/d of physical activity increasing in the period 2011 to 2012 (6.12 days) when compared with the period 2009 to 2010 (5.96 days) and then decreasing in the period 2013 to 2014 (5.83 days). A similar quadratic trend was evident for boys, those above the poverty level, non-Hispanic whites (particularly boys), and those with less than the 85th body mass index-for-age percentile based on sex. A negative linear trend was observed for those above the poverty level and non-Hispanic whites (particularly girls). In conclusion, these findings provide suggestive evidence that over the past 6 years (1999-2014), parents report that children's physical activity has slightly decreased in the latest years, with this observation being most pronounced in boys, those above the poverty level, non-Hispanic whites, and those with less than the 85th body mass index-for-age and sex percentile. Encouragingly, however, across all evaluated subpopulations, most children (55%-82%), as determined by their parents, engaged in 60 min/d of physical activity (consistent with government recommendations). PMID:26876728

  4. Environmental Assessment for DOE permission for off-loading activities to support the movement of Millstone Unit 2 steam generator sub-assemblies across the Savannah River Site

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1992-10-01

    The Department of Energy (DOE) has prepared an Environmental Assessment (EA), for the proposed granting of DOE permission of offloading activities to support the movement Millstone Unit 2 steam generator sub-assemblies (SGSAs) across the Savannah River Site (SRS). Based on the analyses in the EA, DOE has determined that the proposed action is not a major Federal action significantly affecting the quality of the human environment within the meaning of the National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) of 1969. Therefore, an environmental impact statement is not required, and the Department is issuing this Finding of No Significant Impact. On the basis of the floodplain/wetlands assessment in the EA, DOE has determined that there is no practicable alternative to the proposed activities and that the proposed action has been designed to minimize potential harm to or within the floodplain of the SRS boat ramp. No wetlands on SRS would be affected by the proposed action.

  5. Incorporating human activities into an earth system model of the Northeastern United States: socio-hydrology at the regional scale

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rosenzweig, B.; Vorosmarty, C. J.; Miara, A.; Stewart, R.; Wollheim, W. M.; Lu, X.; Kicklighter, D. W.; Ehsani, N.; Shikhmacheva, K.; Yang, P.

    2013-12-01

    The Northeastern United States is one of the most urbanized regions of the world and its 70 million residents will be challenged by climate change as well as competing demands for land and water through the remainder of the 21st Century. The strategic management decisions made in the next few years will have major impacts on the region's future water resources, but planners have had limited quantitative information to support their decision-making. We have developed a Northeast Regional Earth System Model (NE-RESM), which allows for the testing of future scenarios of climate change, land use change and infrastructure management to better understand their implications for the region's water resources and ecosystem services. Human features of the water cycle - including thermoelectric power plants, wastewater treatment plants interbasin transfers and changes in impervious cover with different patterns of urban development - are explicitly represented in our modeling. We are currently engaged in a novel, participatory scenario design process with regional stakeholders to ensure the policy relevancy of our modeling experiments. The NE-RESM hydrologic modeling domain. Figure by Stanley Glidden and Rob Stewart

  6. Trends in late-life activity limitations in the United States: an update from five national surveys.

    PubMed

    Freedman, Vicki A; Spillman, Brenda C; Andreski, Patti M; Cornman, Jennifer C; Crimmins, Eileen M; Kramarow, Ellen; Lubitz, James; Martin, Linda G; Merkin, Sharon S; Schoeni, Robert F; Seeman, Teresa E; Waidmann, Timothy A

    2013-04-01

    This article updates trends from five national U.S. surveys to determine whether the prevalence of activity limitations among the older population continued to decline in the first decade of the twenty-first century. Findings across studies suggest that personal care and domestic activity limitations may have continued to decline for those ages 85 and older from 2000 to 2008, but generally were flat since 2000 for those ages 65-84. Modest increases were observed for the 55- to 64-year-old group approaching late life, although prevalence remained low for this age group. Inclusion of the institutional population is important for assessing trends among those ages 85 and older in particular. PMID:23104207

  7. A comparison of multiple-unit activity in the medial prefrontal and agranular insular cortices during Pavlovian heart rate conditioning in rabbits.

    PubMed

    Gibbs, C M; Prescott, L B; Powell, D A

    1992-01-01

    Multiple-unit activity (MUA) was recorded from chronically implanted electrodes in the medial prefrontal cortex (PFCm) and the agranular insular cortex (Iag) in separate groups of rabbits during habituation training, followed by aversive Pavlovian conditioning and subsequent extinction training. Control animals received explicitly unpaired presentations of the tone conditioned stimulus (CS) and eye-shock unconditioned stimulus (US). Both the cardiac orientating reflex and the conditioned heart rate response (HR CR) consisted of bradycardia, whereas tone-evoked tachycardia was observed in animals that received unpaired stimuli. Short-latency (less than 20-60 ms), tone-evoked increases in PFCm MUA were observed during the initial trials of habituation training, with their magnitude declining predictably across repeated tone-alone presentations. Subsequent CS/US pairings, however, served systematically to reinstate and enhance this CS-evoked MUA, while both non-associative (unpaired CS/US) and extinction (CS alone) training resulted in significant attenuation of such activity. Unconditioned tone-evoked increases in MUA were also observed in the Iag during habituation; however, such unit responses appeared to be more variable than their PFCm counterparts and were of considerably lesser magnitude. Moreover, in striking contrast to the above PFCm findings, conditioning and non-associative training did not differentially affect overall mean evoked MUA in the Iag, although different post-tone patterns of activity were obtained with the two procedures. The contrasting training effects observed in animals with PFCm vs. Iag electrode placements did not appear to be attributable to differences in regional sensitivity to the US, since excitatory patterns of MUA were elicited by unsignalled presentations of eye-shock at most placements within each cortical field. Accordingly, the present findings are consistent with our previous lesion data in suggesting that, although training

  8. A wedge-based approach to estimating health co-benefits of climate change mitigation activities in the United States

    SciTech Connect

    Balbus, John M.; Greenblatt, Jeffery B.; Chari, Ramya; Millstein, Dev; Ebi, Kristie L.

    2015-02-01

    While it has been recognized that actions reducing greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions can have significant positive and negative impacts on human health through reductions in ambient fine particulate matter (PM2.5) concentrations, these impacts are rarely taken into account when analyzing specific policies. This study presents a new framework for estimating the change in health outcomes resulting from implementation of specific carbon dioxide (CO2) reduction activities, allowing comparison of different sectors and options for climate mitigation activities. Our estimates suggest that in the year 2020, the reductions in adverse health outcomes from lessened exposure to PM2.5 would yield economic benefits in the range of $6 to $14 billion (in 2008 USD), depending on the specific activity. This equates to between $40 and $93 per metric ton of CO2 in health benefits. Specific climate interventions will vary in the health co-benefits they provide as well as in potential harms that may result from their implementation. Rigorous assessment of these health impacts is essential for guiding policy decisions as efforts to reduce GHG emissions increase in scope and intensity.

  9. Setting up an outpatient parenteral antimicrobial therapy (OPAT) unit in Switzerland: review of the first 18 months of activity.

    PubMed

    Gardiol, C; Voumard, R; Cochet, C; de Vallière, S

    2016-05-01

    Outpatient parenteral antimicrobial therapy (OPAT) has been recognised as a useful, cost-effective and safe alternative to inpatient treatment, but no formal OPAT unit existed in Switzerland until recently. In December 2013 an OPAT unit was established at Lausanne University Hospital. We review here the experience of this new OPAT unit after 18 months of activity. Patient characteristics, clinical activities and outcomes were recorded prospectively. Need and acceptance was evaluated as number of OPAT courses administered and number of patients refusing OPAT. Safety and efficacy were evaluated as: (1) adverse events linked to antimicrobials and catheters, (2) re-admission to hospital, (3) rate of treatment failures and (4) mortality. Over 18 months, 179 courses of OPAT were administered. Acceptance was high with only four patients refusing OPAT. Urinary tract infections with resistant bacteria and musculoskeletal infections were the most common diagnoses. Self-administration of antibiotics using elastomeric pumps became rapidly the most frequently used approach. Sixteen patients presented with adverse events linked to antimicrobials and catheters. OPAT-related readmissions occurred in nine patients. The overall cure rate was 94 %. This study shows that OPAT is very well accepted by patients and medical staff, even in a setting which has not used this type of treatment approach until now. Self-administration using elastomeric pumps proved to be particularly useful, safe and efficient. OPAT offers a good alternative to hospitalisation for patients presenting with infections due to resistant bacteria that cannot be treated orally anymore and for difficult to treat infections. PMID:26886452

  10. Integral field unit spectroscopy of 10 early-type galactic nuclei - I. Principal component analysis Tomography and nuclear activity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ricci, T. V.; Steiner, J. E.; Menezes, R. B.

    2014-05-01

    Most massive galaxies show emission lines that can be characterized as LINERs. To what extent this emission is related to AGNs or to stellar processes is still an open question. In this paper, we analysed a sample of such galaxies to study the central region in terms of nuclear and circumnuclear emission lines, as well as the stellar component properties. For this reason, we selected 10 massive (σ > 200 km s-1) nearby (d < 31 Mpc) galaxies and observed them with the IFU/GMOS (integral field unit/Gemini Multi-Object Spectrograph) spectrograph on the Gemini South Telescope. The data were analysed with principal component analysis (PCA) Tomography to assess the main properties of the objects. Two spectral regions were analysed: a yellow region (5100-5800 Å), adequate to show the properties of the stellar component, and a red region (6250-6800 Å), adequate to analyse the gaseous component. We found that all objects previously known to present emission lines have a central AGN-type emitting source. They also show gaseous and stellar kinematics typical of discs. Such discs may be co-aligned (NGC 1380 and ESO 208 G-21), in counter-rotation (IC 1459 and NGC 7097) or misaligned (IC 5181 and NGC 4546). We also found one object with a gaseous disc but no stellar disc (NGC 2663), one with a stellar disc but no gaseous disc (NGC 1404), one with neither stellar nor gaseous disc (NGC 1399) and one with probably ionization cones (NGC 3136). PCA Tomography is an efficient method for detecting both the central AGN and gaseous and stellar discs. In the two cases (NGC 1399 and NGC 1404) in which no lines were previously reported, we found no evidence of either nuclear or circumnuclear emission, using PCA Tomography only.

  11. Anti-Helicobacter pylori activity of crude N-acetylneuraminic acid isolated from glycomacropeptide of whey

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Dong-Jae; Kang, Min-Jung; Choi, Jin-A; Na, Dae-Seung; Kim, Jin-Beom; Na, Chun-Soo

    2016-01-01

    Helicobacter pylori colonizes the gastric mucosa of about half of the world's population, causing chronic gastritis and gastric cancer. An increasing emergence of antibiotic-resistant H. pylori arouses demand on alternative non-antibiotic-based therapies. In this study, we freshly prepared crude N-acetylneuraminic acid obtained from glycomacropeptide (G-NANA) of whey through a neuraminidase-mediated reaction and evaluated its antibacterial ability against H. pylori and H. felis. Overnight cultures of the H. pylori were diluted with fresh media and different concentrations (1-150 mg/mL) of crude G-NANA were added directly to the culture tube. Bacterial growth was evaluated by measuring the optical density of the culture medium and the number of viable bacteria was determined by a direct count of the colony forming units (CFU) on agar plates. For the in vivo study, mice were orally infected with 100 µL (5×108 cfu/mL) of H. felis four times at a day's interval, accompanied by a daily administration of crude G-NANA or vehicle. A day after the last infection, the mice were daily administered the crude G-NANA (0, 75, and 300 mg/mL) for 10 days and euthanized. Their stomachs were collected and bacterial colonization was determined by quantitative real-time PCR. Crude G-NANA inhibited H. pylori's growth and reduced the number of viable bacteria in a dose-dependent manner. Furthermore, crude G-NANA inhibited bacterial colonization in the mice. These results showed that crude G-NANA has antibacterial activity against Helicobacter and demonstrated its therapeutic potential for the prevention of chronic gastritis and gastric carcinogenesis induced by Helicobacter infection in humans. PMID:27382378

  12. Comparative antifungal efficacy of light-activated disinfection and octenidine hydrochloride with contemporary endodontic irrigants.

    PubMed

    Eldeniz, Ayce Unverdi; Guneser, Mehmet Burak; Akbulut, Makbule Bilge

    2015-02-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the antifungal effects of light-activated disinfection (LAD) in comparison with contemporary root canal irrigation solutions: sodium hypochlorite and 2% chlorhexidine gluconate and a new wound antiseptic, octenidine hydrochloride. Seventy extracted teeth having single root canals were contaminated with Candida albicans for 14 days. The samples were divided into five experimental (n = 10) and two control (positive and negative) groups (n = 10): (1) LAD with toluidine blue O, (2) octenidine hydrochloride (OCT), (3) 2.5% sodium hypochlorite (2.5% NaOCl), (4) 5.25% sodium hypochlorite (5.25% NaOCl) and (5) 2% chlorhexidine. Five millilitres of each test solution was applied for 3 min, and irradiation time used for LAD was 30 s. After treatment, the dentin chips were collected from inner canal walls into vials containing phosphate buffered saline, vortexed, serially diluted, seeded on Tryptic Soy Agar plates and incubated (37 °C, 48 h). The number of colony-forming units was then counted. Differences between LAD group and positive control group were statistically significant (P < 0.05). All Candida cells were totally eliminated in root canals irrigated with OCT, 2.5% NaOCl, 5.25% NaOCl and 2% chlorhexidine groups (CFU = 0). Within the limitations of this ex vivo study, LAD had minimal antimicrobial effect on C. albicans when used 30 s, and further modifications in LAD protocol are required to improve its antifungal capability. A new wound antiseptic, octenidine hydrochloride, demonstrated better potential than LAD in elimination of Candida albicans cells and may be a promising alternative to NaOCl and chlorhexidine solutions in future. PMID:23884903

  13. Microbiological Characterization and Concerns of the International Space Station Internal Active Thermal Control System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Roman, Monsi C.; Wieland, Paul O.

    2005-01-01

    Since January 1999, the chemical the International Space Station Thermal Control System (IATCS) and microbial state of (ISS) Internal Active fluid has been monitored by analysis of samples returned to Earth. Key chemical parameters have changed over time, including a drop in pH from the specified 9.5 +/- 0.5 ta = 58.4, an increase in the level of total inorganic carbon (TIC), total organic carbon (TOC) and dissolved nickel (Ni) in the fluid, and a decrease in the phosphate (PO,) level. In addition, silver (AS) ion levels in the fluid decreased rapidly as Ag deposited on internal metallic surfaces of the system. The lack of available Ag ions coupled with changes in the fluid chemistry has resulted in a favorable environment for microbial growth. Counts of heterotrophic bacteria have increased from less than 10 colony-forming units (CFUs)/l00 mL to l0(exp 6) to l0(exp 7) CFUs/100 mL. The increase of the microbial population is of concern because uncontrolled microbiological growth in the IATCS can contribute to deterioration in the performance of critical components within the system and potentially impact human health if opportunistic pathogens become established and escape into the cabin atmosphere. Micro-organisms can potentially degrade the coolant chemistry; attach to surfaces and form biofilms; lead to biofouling of filters, tubing, and pumps; decrease flow rates; reduce heat transfer; initiate and accelerate corrosion; and enhance mineral scale formation. The micro- biological data from the ISS IATCS fluid, and approaches to addressing the concerns, are summarized in this paper.

  14. Expected years of life free of chronic condition-induced activity limitations - United States, 1999-2008.

    PubMed

    Molla, Michael T

    2013-11-22

    Over the 20th century, the U.S. population has witnessed major changes in fatal and nonfatal health outcomes. Mortality has declined, and life expectancy has increased continuously; chronic conditions have replaced acute diseases as leading causes of both illness and death. During 1900-2008, average life expectancy at birth for the total U.S. population increased from 47.3 years in 1900 to 78.1 years in 2008, a gain of 30.8 years. In addition, an increasing proportion of the U.S. population is aged >65 years. According to the U.S. Census Bureau estimates, at the beginning of the 20th century, the U.S. population aged >65 years constituted only 4.1 percent of the total population; by 2008, the percentage of the total U.S. population aged >65 years was 12.8%. However, declines in mortality are not necessarily associated with declines in morbidity or the consequences of chronic conditions on life activities. The possibility that longer life might be accompanied by poor health makes it essential to develop measures that account for both mortality and morbidity at the same time. Hence, over the past 40 years, a new set of health measures (e.g., "healthy life expectancies") have been developed that account for both mortality and life spent free of the consequences of ill health. One of these newly developed set of measures (called "active life expectancy") is the average number of years expected to be lived without activity limitations. PMID:24264496

  15. Theme Unit: Veggie Power.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Flagg, Ann

    2000-01-01

    Presents a selection of activities for a cross-curricular unit based on vegetables. Activities address vocabulary, language arts, social studies, and health education. A student reproducible presents a tossed salad game. Game cards can be incorporated into the other activities. A poster describes plant parts that are edible. A sidebar offers…

  16. Dinuclear Ruthenium Complex Based on a π-Extended Bridging Ligand with Redox-Active Tetrathiafulvalene and 1,10-Phenanthroline Units.

    PubMed

    Chen, Bin; Lv, Zhong-Peng; Hua, Carol; Leong, Chanel F; Tuna, Floriana; D'Alessandro, Deanna M; Collison, David; Zuo, Jing-Lin

    2016-05-01

    The synthesis of a π-extended bridging ligand with both redox-active tetrathiafulvalene (TTF) and 1,10-phenanthroline (phen) units, namely, bis(1,10-phenanthro[5,6-b])tetrathiafulvalene (BPTTF), was realized via a self-coupling reaction. Using this ligand and Ru(tbbpy)2Cl2 (tbbpy = 4,4'-di-tert-butyl-2,2'-bipyridine), the dinuclear ruthenium(II) compound [{Ru(tbbpy)2}2(BPTTF)](PF6)4 (1) has been obtained by microwave-assisted synthesis. Structural characterization of 1 revealed a crossed arrangement of the TTF moieties on adjacent dimers within the crystal structure. The optical and redox properties of 1 were investigated using electrochemical, spectroelectrochemical, electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR), and absorption spectroscopic studies combined with theoretical calculations. One exhibits a rich electrochemical behavior owing to the multiple redox-active centers. Interestingly, both the ligand BPTTF and the ruthenium compound 1 are EPR-active in the solid state owing to intramolecular charge-transfer processes. The results demonstrate that the TTF-annulated bis(phen) ligand is a promising bridging ligand to construct oligomeric or polymeric metal complexes with multiple redox-active centers. PMID:27070295

  17. Concerning Units.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wadlinger, Robert L.

    1983-01-01

    SI units come in two distinct types: fundamental (kilogram, meter) and descriptive (atom, molecule). Proper/improper uses of atom/molecule from historical cases are presented followed by a re-introduction of a light "wave (cycle)" unit and the clearly defined photon model which is deduced. Also examines omission of the fundamental unit "radon."…

  18. Protective effects of activated protein C on neurovascular unit in a rat model of intrauterine infection-induced neonatal white matter injury.

    PubMed

    Jin, Sheng-juan; Liu, Yan; Deng, Shi-hua; Lin, Tu-lian; Rashid, Abid; Liao, Li-hong; Ning, Qin; Luo, Xiao-ping

    2015-12-01

    Activated protein C (APC), a natural anticoagulant, has been reported to exert direct vasculoprotective, neural protective, anti-inflammatory, and proneurogenic activities in the central nervous system. This study was aimed to explore the neuroprotective effects and potential mechanisms of APC on the neurovascular unit of neonatal rats with intrauterine infection-induced white matter injury. Intraperitoneal injection of 300 μg/kg lipopolysaccharide (LPS) was administered consecutively to pregnant Sprague-Dawley rats at embryonic days 19 and 20 to establish the rat model of intrauterine infection- induced white matter injury. Control rats were injected with an equivalent amount of sterile saline on the same time. APC at the dosage of 0.2 mg/kg was intraperitoneally injected to neonatal rats immediately after birth. Brain tissues were collected at postnatal day 7 and stained with hematoxylin and eosin (H&E). Immunohistochemistry was used to evaluate myelin basic protein (MBP) expression in the periventricular white matter region. Blood-brain barrier (BBB) permeability and brain water content were measured using Evens Blue dye and wet/dry weight method. Double immunofluorescence staining and real-time quantitative PCR were performed to detect microglial activation and the expression of protease activated receptor 1 (PAR1). Typical pathological changes of white matter injury were observed in rat brains exposed to LPS, and MBP expression in the periventricular region was significantly decreased. BBB was disrupted and the brain water content was increased. Microglia were largely activated and the mRNA and protein levels of PAR1 were elevated. APC administration ameliorated the pathological lesions of the white matter and increased MBP expression. BBB permeability and brain water content were reduced. Microglia activation was inhibited and the PAR1 mRNA and protein expression levels were both down-regulated. Our results suggested that APC exerted neuroprotective effects

  19. Hourly photosynthetically active radiation estimation in Midwestern United States from artificial neural networks and conventional regressions models.

    PubMed

    Yu, Xiaolei; Guo, Xulin

    2016-08-01

    The relationship between hourly photosynthetically active radiation (PAR) and the global solar radiation (R s ) was analyzed from data gathered over 3 years at Bondville, IL, and Sioux Falls, SD, Midwestern USA. These data were used to determine temporal variability of the PAR fraction and its dependence on different sky conditions, which were defined by the clearness index. Meanwhile, models based on artificial neural networks (ANNs) were established for predicting hourly PAR. The performance of the proposed models was compared with four existing conventional regression models in terms of the normalized root mean square error (NRMSE), the coefficient of determination (r (2)), the mean percentage error (MPE), and the relative standard error (RSE). From the overall analysis, it shows that the ANN model can predict PAR accurately, especially for overcast sky and clear sky conditions. Meanwhile, the parameters related to water vapor do not improve the prediction result significantly. PMID:26715137

  20. Hourly photosynthetically active radiation estimation in Midwestern United States from artificial neural networks and conventional regressions models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Xiaolei; Guo, Xulin

    2016-08-01

    The relationship between hourly photosynthetically active radiation (PAR) and the global solar radiation ( R s ) was analyzed from data gathered over 3 years at Bondville, IL, and Sioux Falls, SD, Midwestern USA. These data were used to determine temporal variability of the PAR fraction and its dependence on different sky conditions, which were defined by the clearness index. Meanwhile, models based on artificial neural networks (ANNs) were established for predicting hourly PAR. The performance of the proposed models was compared with four existing conventional regression models in terms of the normalized root mean square error (NRMSE), the coefficient of determination ( r 2), the mean percentage error (MPE), and the relative standard error (RSE). From the overall analysis, it shows that the ANN model can predict PAR accurately, especially for overcast sky and clear sky conditions. Meanwhile, the parameters related to water vapor do not improve the prediction result significantly.

  1. Hourly photosynthetically active radiation estimation in Midwestern United States from artificial neural networks and conventional regressions models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Xiaolei; Guo, Xulin

    2015-12-01

    The relationship between hourly photosynthetically active radiation (PAR) and the global solar radiation (R s ) was analyzed from data gathered over 3 years at Bondville, IL, and Sioux Falls, SD, Midwestern USA. These data were used to determine temporal variability of the PAR fraction and its dependence on different sky conditions, which were defined by the clearness index. Meanwhile, models based on artificial neural networks (ANNs) were established for predicting hourly PAR. The performance of the proposed models was compared with four existing conventional regression models in terms of the normalized root mean square error (NRMSE), the coefficient of determination (r 2), the mean percentage error (MPE), and the relative standard error (RSE). From the overall analysis, it shows that the ANN model can predict PAR accurately, especially for overcast sky and clear sky conditions. Meanwhile, the parameters related to water vapor do not improve the prediction result significantly.

  2. Monitoring Influenza Activity in the United States: A Comparison of Traditional Surveillance Systems with Google Flu Trends

    PubMed Central

    Ortiz, Justin R.; Zhou, Hong; Shay, David K.; Neuzil, Kathleen M.; Fowlkes, Ashley L.; Goss, Christopher H.

    2011-01-01

    Background Google Flu Trends was developed to estimate US influenza-like illness (ILI) rates from internet searches; however ILI does not necessarily correlate with actual influenza virus infections. Methods and Findings Influenza activity data from 2003–04 through 2007–08 were obtained from three US surveillance systems: Google Flu Trends, CDC Outpatient ILI Surveillance Network (CDC ILI Surveillance), and US Influenza Virologic Surveillance System (CDC Virus Surveillance). Pearson's correlation coefficients with 95% confidence intervals (95% CI) were calculated to compare surveillance data. An analysis was performed to investigate outlier observations and determine the extent to which they affected the correlations between surveillance data. Pearson's correlation coefficient describing Google Flu Trends and CDC Virus Surveillance over the study period was 0.72 (95% CI: 0.64, 0.79). The correlation between CDC ILI Surveillance and CDC Virus Surveillance over the same period was 0.85 (95% CI: 0.81, 0.89). Most of the outlier observations in both comparisons were from the 2003–04 influenza season. Exclusion of the outlier observations did not substantially improve the correlation between Google Flu Trends and CDC Virus Surveillance (0.82; 95% CI: 0.76, 0.87) or CDC ILI Surveillance and CDC Virus Surveillance (0.86; 95%CI: 0.82, 0.90). Conclusions This analysis demonstrates that while Google Flu Trends is highly correlated with rates of ILI, it has a lower correlation with surveillance for laboratory-confirmed influenza. Most of the outlier observations occurred during the 2003–04 influenza season that was characterized by early and intense influenza activity, which potentially altered health care seeking behavior, physician testing practices, and internet search behavior. PMID:21556151

  3. Assessment of Diet and Physical Activity in Paediatric Non-Alcoholic Fatty Liver Disease Patients: A United Kingdom Case Control Study

    PubMed Central

    Gibson, Philippa S.; Lang, Sarah; Gilbert, Marianne; Kamat, Deepa; Bansal, Sanjay; Ford-Adams, Martha E.; Desai, Ashish P.; Dhawan, Anil; Fitzpatrick, Emer; Moore, J. Bernadette; Hart, Kathryn H.

    2015-01-01

    Non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) is the most common cause of chronic liver disease in children, with prevalence rising alongside childhood obesity rates. This study aimed to characterise the habitual diet and activity behaviours of children with NAFLD compared to obese children without liver disease in the United Kingdom (UK). Twenty-four biopsy-proven paediatric NAFLD cases and eight obese controls without biochemical or radiological evidence of NAFLD completed a 24-h dietary recall, a Physical Activity Questionnaire (PAQ), a Dutch Eating Behavior Questionnaire (DEBQ) and a 7-day food and activity diary (FAD), in conjunction with wearing a pedometer. Groups were well matched for age and gender. Obese children had higher BMI z-scores (p = 0.006) and BMI centiles (p = 0.002) than participants with NAFLD. After adjusting for multiple hypotheses testing and controlling for differences in BMI, no differences in macro- or micronutrient intake were observed as assessed using either 24-h recall or 7-day FAD (p > 0.001). Under-reporting was prevalent (NAFLD 75%, Obese Control 87%: p = 0.15). Restrained eating behaviours were significantly higher in the NAFLD group (p = 0.005), who also recorded more steps per day than the obese controls (p = 0.01). In conclusion, this is the first study to assess dietary and activity patterns in a UK paediatric NAFLD population. Only a minority of cases and controls were meeting current dietary and physical activity recommendations. Our findings do not support development of specific dietary/ physical activity guidelines for children with NAFLD; promoting adherence with current general paediatric recommendations for health should remain the focus of clinical management. PMID:26703719

  4. Assessment of Diet and Physical Activity in Paediatric Non-Alcoholic Fatty Liver Disease Patients: A United Kingdom Case Control Study.

    PubMed

    Gibson, Philippa S; Lang, Sarah; Gilbert, Marianne; Kamat, Deepa; Bansal, Sanjay; Ford-Adams, Martha E; Desai, Ashish P; Dhawan, Anil; Fitzpatrick, Emer; Moore, J Bernadette; Hart, Kathryn H

    2015-12-01

    Non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) is the most common cause of chronic liver disease in children, with prevalence rising alongside childhood obesity rates. This study aimed to characterise the habitual diet and activity behaviours of children with NAFLD compared to obese children without liver disease in the United Kingdom (UK). Twenty-four biopsy-proven paediatric NAFLD cases and eight obese controls without biochemical or radiological evidence of NAFLD completed a 24-h dietary recall, a Physical Activity Questionnaire (PAQ), a Dutch Eating Behavior Questionnaire (DEBQ) and a 7-day food and activity diary (FAD), in conjunction with wearing a pedometer. Groups were well matched for age and gender. Obese children had higher BMI z-scores (p = 0.006) and BMI centiles (p = 0.002) than participants with NAFLD. After adjusting for multiple hypotheses testing and controlling for differences in BMI, no differences in macro- or micronutrient intake were observed as assessed using either 24-h recall or 7-day FAD (p > 0.001). Under-reporting was prevalent (NAFLD 75%, Obese Control 87%: p = 0.15). Restrained eating behaviours were significantly higher in the NAFLD group (p = 0.005), who also recorded more steps per day than the obese controls (p = 0.01). In conclusion, this is the first study to assess dietary and activity patterns in a UK paediatric NAFLD population. Only a minority of cases and controls were meeting current dietary and physical activity recommendations. Our findings do not support development of specific dietary/ physical activity guidelines for children with NAFLD; promoting adherence with current general paediatric recommendations for health should remain the focus of clinical management. PMID:26703719

  5. Lethal effect of blue light-activated hydrogen peroxide, curcumin and erythrosine as potential oral photosensitizers on the viability of Porphyromonas gingivalis and Fusobacterium nucleatum

    PubMed Central

    Habiboallh, Ghanbari; Mahbobeh, Naderi Nasab; Mina, Zareian Jahromi; Majid, Zakeri; Nooshin, Arjmand

    2015-01-01

    Objectives: Recently, photodynamic therapy (PDT) has been introduced as a new modality in oral bacterial decontamination. Current research aims to evaluate the effect of photodynamic killing of visible blue light in the presence of hydrogen peroxide, curcumin and erythrosine as potential oral photosensitizers on Porphyromonas gingivalis associated with periodontal bone loss and Fusobacterium nucleatum associated with soft tissue inflammation. Materials and methods: Standard suspension of P. gingivalis and F. nucleatum were exposed to Light Emitting Diode (LED) (440–480 nm) in combination with erythrosine (22 µm), curcumin (60 µM) and hydrogen peroxide (0.3 mM) for 5 min. Bacterial samples from each treatment groups (radiation-only group, photosensitizer-only group and blue light-activated photosensitizer group) were subcultured onto the surface of agar plates. Survival of these bacteria was determined by counting the number of colony forming units (CFU) after incubation. Results: Results for antibacterial assays on P. gingivalis confirmed that curcumin, Hydrogen peroxide and erythrosine alone exerted a moderate bactericidal effect which enhanced noticeably in conjugation with visible light. The survival rate of P. gingivalis reached zero present when the suspension exposed to blue light-activated curcumin and hydrogen peroxide for 2 min. Besides, curcumin exerted a remarkable antibacterial activity against F. nucleatum in comparison with erythrosine and hydrogen peroxide (P=0.00). Furthermore, the bactericidal effect of visible light alone on P. gingivalis as black-pigmented bacteria was significant. Conclusion: Our result suggested that visible blue light in the presence of erythrosine, curcumin and hydrogen peroxide would be consider as a potential approach of PDT to kill the main gramnegative periodontal pathogens. From a clinical standpoint, this regimen could be established as an additional minimally invasive antibacterial treatment of plaque induced

  6. Diet and Physical Activity in Rural vs Urban Children and Adolescents in the United States: A Narrative Review.

    PubMed

    McCormack, Lacey Arneson; Meendering, Jessica

    2016-03-01

    Current research suggests that the prevalence of obesity is higher among rural youth than urban youth. Due to the health implications that are associated with child and adolescent obesity, it is critical to understand systematic differences in diet and physical activity (PA) behaviors that may be contributing to this disparity in weight. However, varying definitions of rural and inconsistencies in study tools and methodologies may limit the generalizability of findings from research in this area. The objective of this narrative review was to synthesize and critically evaluate existing literature comparing diet and PA behaviors between rural and urban children and adolescents, providing recommendations for future research. Only five studies were found that reported on measures of diet in rural vs urban youth, whereas 16 were found that reported on measures of PA. Dietary assessment tools were generally standard and acceptable; however, differences existed in how dietary outcomes were defined. Few studies used assessment tools that objectively measured PA, and definitions for meeting PA recommendations varied among studies. Very few studies defined rural using the same criteria. Future research on the rural youth obesity disparity should focus on including a high-quality assessment of both diet and PA (as opposed to one or the other) and on using an appropriate and consistent definition of rural. PMID:26685123

  7. Radioactive and other environmental threats to the United States and the Arctic resulting from past Soviet activities

    SciTech Connect

    1993-12-31

    Earlier this year the Senate Intelligence Committee began to receive reports from environmental and nuclear scientists in Russia detailing the reckless nuclear waste disposal practices, nuclear accidents and the use of nuclear detonations. We found that information disturbing to say the least. Also troubling is the fact that 15 Chernobyl style RBMK nuclear power reactors continue to operate in the former Soviet Union today. These reactors lack a containment structure and they`re designed in such a way that nuclear reaction can actually increase when the reactor overheats. As scientists here at the University of Alaska have documented, polar air masses and prevailing weather patterns provide a pathway for radioactive contaminants from Eastern Europe and Western Russia, where many of these reactors are located. The threats presented by those potential radioactive risks are just a part of a larger Arctic pollution problem. Every day, industrial activities of the former Soviet Union continue to create pollutants. I think we should face up to the reality that in a country struggling for economic survival, environment protection isn`t necessarily the high priority. And that could be very troubling news for the Arctic in the future.

  8. Physical activity levels and perceived benefits and barriers to physical activity in HIV-infected women living in the deep south of the United States.

    PubMed

    Rehm, Kristina E; Konkle-Parker, Deborah

    2016-09-01

    Engaging in regular physical activity (PA) is important in maintaining health and increasing the overall quality of life of people living with HIV (PLWH). The deep south of the USA is known for its high rate of sedentary behavior although data on the activity levels and perceptions of the benefits and barriers to exercise in women living with HIV in the deep south are lacking. Understanding the perceived benefits and barriers to exercise can guide the development of PA interventions. We conducted a cross-sectional study to determine the PA levels and perceived benefits and barriers to exercise associated with both age and depression level in a group of HIV+ women living in the deep south. We recruited a total of 50 participants from a cohort site for the Women's Interagency HIV Study. Depression was assessed using the Center for Epidemiological Studies Depression Scale (CES-D) and benefits/barriers to exercise were measured using the Exercise Benefits and Barriers Scale (EBBS). We measured PA both subjectively and objectively using the International Physical Activity Questionnaire (IPAQ) and a Fitbit PA monitor, respectively. Our sample was predominantly African-American (96%) and the mean ±SD age, body mass index, and CES-D score were 42 ± 8.8 years, 36.6 ± 11.5 kg/m(2), and 15.6 ± 11.4, respectively. Both subjective and objective measures of PA indicated that our participants were sedentary. The greatest perceived benefit to exercise was physical performance and the greatest barrier to exercise was physical exertion. Higher overall perceived benefits were reported by women ≥43 years and women reporting higher levels of depression. There was no difference in overall barriers associated with age and depression level, but women with depression felt more fatigued by exercise. The results of this study can be helpful when designing and implementing PA interventions in women living with HIV in the deep south. PMID:27023306

  9. Update: influenza activity--United States and worldwide, 2003-04 season, and composition of the 2004-05 influenza vaccine.

    PubMed

    2004-07-01

    During the 2003-04 influenza season, influenza A (H1), A (H3N2), and B viruses co-circulated worldwide, and influenza A (H3N2) viruses predominated. Several Asian countries reported widespread outbreaks of avian influenza A (H5N1) among poultry. In Vietnam and Thailand, these outbreaks were associated with severe illnesses and deaths among humans. In the United States, the 2003-04 influenza season began earlier than most seasons, peaked in December, was moderately severe in terms of its impact on mortality, and was associated predominantly with influenza A (H3N2) viruses. This report 1) summarizes information collected by World Health Organization (WHO) and National Respiratory and Enteric Virus Surveillance System (NREVSS) collaborating laboratories, state and local health departments, health-care providers, vital statistics registries, and CDC and 2) describes influenza activity in the United States and worldwide during the 2003-04 influenza season and the composition of the 2004-05 influenza vaccine. PMID:15229411

  10. Socioeconomic and Demographic Factors for Spousal Resemblance in Obesity Status and Habitual Physical Activity in the United States

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Yinghui; Wang, Youfa

    2014-01-01

    Studies suggested that the married population has an increased risk of obesity and assimilation between spouses' body weight. We examined what factors may affect married spouses' resemblance in weight status and habitual physical activity (HPA) and the association of obesity/HPA with spouses' sociodemoeconomic characteristics and lifestyles. Medical Expenditure Panel Survey data of 11,403 adult married couples in the US during years 2006–2008 were used. Absolute-scale difference and relative-scale resemblance indices (correlation and kappa coefficients) in body mass index (BMI) and HPA were estimated by couples' socioeconomic and demographic characteristics. We found that spousal difference in BMI was smaller for couples with a lower household income, for who were both unemployed, and for older spouses. Correlation coefficient between spouses' BMI was 0.24, differing by race/ethnicity and family size. Kappa coefficient for weight status (obesity: BMI ≥ 30, overweight: 30 > BMI ≥ 25) was 0.11 and 0.35 for HPA. Never-working women's husbands had lower odds of obesity than employed women's husbands (OR = 0.69 (95% CI = 0.53–0.89)). Men's unemployment status was associated with wives' greater odds of obesity (OR = 1.31 (95% CI = 1.01–1.71)). HPA was associated with men's employment status and income level, but not with women's. The population representative survey showed that spousal resemblance in weight status and HPA varied with socioeconomic and demographic factors. PMID:25332834

  11. Cool-weather activity of the forensically important hairy maggot blow fly Chrysomya rufifacies (Macquart) (Diptera: Calliphoridae) on carrion in Upstate South Carolina, United States.

    PubMed

    Cammack, Jonathan A; Nelder, Mark P

    2010-02-25

    The hairy maggot blow fly Chrysomya rufifacies (Macquart) (Diptera: Calliphoridae) has expanded its range in the United States since its introduction into Texas (ca. 1980) and has been collected in 15 states. We investigated the bionomics of immature and adult C. rufifacies collected from carcasses of a raccoon Procyon lotor (Linnaeus) and white-tailed deer Odocoileus virginianus Zimmerman in Upstate South Carolina during November 2007, and used these insects to estimate the minimum period of insect activity. Puparia of C. rufifacies were collected from deer carrion; 28% were parasitized by Nasonia vitripennis (Walker) (Hymenoptera: Pteromalidae). The mean daily ambient temperature during this study was 11.4+/-1.02 degrees C, representing the lowest recorded mean temperature for adult activity of C. rufifacies; adults of C. rufifacies were observed flying among the carcasses at 9.0 degrees C. Although C. rufifacies is considered a warm-weather blow fly, researchers should be aware of its activity at suboptimal conditions, behavior that might aid its expansion into more northern areas. PMID:20042303

  12. Association of hormonal contraceptive use with reduced levels of depressive symptoms: a national study of sexually active women in the United States.

    PubMed

    Keyes, Katherine M; Cheslack-Postava, Keely; Westhoff, Carolyn; Heim, Christine M; Haloossim, Michelle; Walsh, Kate; Koenen, Karestan

    2013-11-01

    An estimated 80% of sexually active young women in the United States use hormonal contraceptives during their reproductive years. Associations between hormonal contraceptive use and mood disturbances remain understudied, despite the hypothesis that estrogen and progesterone play a role in mood problems. In this study, we used data from 6,654 sexually active nonpregnant women across 4 waves of the National Longitudinal Study of Adolescent Health (1994-2008), focusing on women aged 25-34 years. Women were asked about hormonal contraceptive use in the context of a current sexual partnership; thus, contraceptive users were compared with other sexually active women who were using either nonhormonal contraception or no contraception. Depressive symptoms were assessed with the Center for Epidemiologic Studies Depression Scale. At ages 25-34 years, hormonal contraceptive users had lower mean levels of concurrent depressive symptoms (β = -1.04, 95% confidence interval: -1.73, -0.35) and were less likely to report a past-year suicide attempt (odds ratio = 0.37, 95% confidence interval: 0.14, 0.95) than women using low-efficacy contraception or no contraception, in models adjusted for propensity scores for hormonal contraceptive use. Longitudinal analyses indicated that associations between hormonal contraception and depressive symptoms were stable. Hormonal contraception may reduce levels of depressive symptoms among young women. Systematic investigation of exogenous hormones as a potential preventive factor in psychiatric epidemiology is warranted. PMID:24043440

  13. Numerical simulation on the adaptation of forms in trabecular bone to mechanical disuse and basic multi-cellular unit activation threshold at menopause

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gong, He; Fan, Yubo; Zhang, Ming

    2008-04-01

    The objective of this paper is to identify the effects of mechanical disuse and basic multi-cellular unit (BMU) activation threshold on the form of trabecular bone during menopause. A bone adaptation model with mechanical- biological factors at BMU level was integrated with finite element analysis to simulate the changes of trabecular bone structure during menopause. Mechanical disuse and changes in the BMU activation threshold were applied to the model for the period from 4 years before to 4 years after menopause. The changes in bone volume fraction, trabecular thickness and fractal dimension of the trabecular structures were used to quantify the changes of trabecular bone in three different cases associated with mechanical disuse and BMU activation threshold. It was found that the changes in the simulated bone volume fraction were highly correlated and consistent with clinical data, and that the trabecular thickness reduced significantly during menopause and was highly linearly correlated with the bone volume fraction, and that the change trend of fractal dimension of the simulated trabecular structure was in correspondence with clinical observations. The numerical simulation in this paper may help to better understand the relationship between the bone morphology and the mechanical, as well as biological environment; and can provide a quantitative computational model and methodology for the numerical simulation of the bone structural morphological changes caused by the mechanical environment, and/or the biological environment.

  14. Activity of 5-chloro-pyrazinamide in mice infected with Mycobacterium tuberculosis or Mycobacterium bovis

    PubMed Central

    Ahmad, Zahoor; Tyagi, Sandeep; Minkowski, Austin; Almeida, Deepak; Nuermberger, Eric L.; Peck, Kaitlin M.; Welch, John T.; Baughn, Anthony D.; Jacobs, Williams R.; Grosset, Jacques H.

    2012-01-01

    Background & objectives: Pyrazinamide is an essential component of first line anti-tuberculosis regimen as well as most of the second line regimens. This drug has a unique sterilizing activity against Mycobacterium tuberculosis. Its unique role in tuberculosis treatment has lead to the search and development of its structural analogues. One such analogue is 5-chloro-pyrazinamide (5-Cl-PZA) that has been tested under in vitro conditions against M. tuberculosis. The present study was designed with an aim to assess the activity of 5-Cl-PZA, alone and in combination with first-line drugs, against murine tuberculosis. Methods: The minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) of 5-Cl-PZA in Middlebrook 7H9 broth (neutral pH) and the inhibitory titre of serum from mice that received a 300 mg/kg oral dose of 5-Cl-PZA 30 min before cardiac puncture were determined. To test the tolerability of orally administered 5-Cl-PZA, uninfected mice received doses up to 300 mg/kg for 2 wk. Four weeks after low-dose aerosol infection either with M. tuberculosis or M. bovis, mice were treated 5 days/wk with 5-Cl-PZA, at doses ranging from 37.5 to 150 mg/kg, either alone or in combination with isoniazid and rifampicin. Antimicrobial activity was assessed by colony-forming unit counts in lungs after 4 and 8 wk of treatment. Results: The MIC of 5-Cl-PZA against M. tuberculosis was between 12.5 and 25 μg/ml and the serum inhibitory titre was 1:4. Under the same experimental conditions, the MIC of pyrazinamide was >100 μg/ml and mouse serum had no inhibitory activity after a 300 mg/kg dose; 5-Cl-PZA was well tolerated in uninfected and infected mice up to 300 and 150 mg/kg, respectively. While PZA alone and in combination exhibited its usual antimicrobial activity in mice infected with M. tuberculosis and no activity in mice infected with M. bovis, 5-Cl-PZA exhibited antimicrobial activity neither in mice infected with M. tuberculosis nor in mice infected with M. bovis. Interpretation

  15. Antistaphylococcal activity of bacteriophage derived chimeric protein P128

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Bacterial drug resistance is one of the most significant challenges to human health today. In particular, effective antibacterial agents against methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) are urgently needed. A causal relationship between nasal commensal S. aureus and infection has been reported. Accordingly, elimination of nasal S. aureus reduces the risk of infection. Enzymes that degrade bacterial cell walls show promise as antibacterial agents. Bacteriophage-encoded bacterial cell wall-degrading enzymes exhibit intrinsic bactericidal activity. P128 is a chimeric protein that combines the lethal activity of the phage tail-associated muralytic enzyme of Phage K and the staphylococcal cell wall targeting-domain (SH3b) of lysostaphin. Here we report results of in vitro studies evaluating the susceptibility of staphylococcal strains to this novel protein. Results Using the broth microdilution method adapted for lysostaphin, we found that P128 is effective against S. aureus clinical strains including MRSA, methicillin-sensitive S. aureus (MSSA), and a mupirocin-resistant S. aureus. Minimum bactericidal concentrations and minimum inhibitory concentrations of P128 (1-64 μg/mL) were similar across the 32 S. aureus strains tested, demonstrating its bactericidal nature. In time-kill assays, P128 reduced colony-forming units by 99.99% within 1 h and inhibited growth up to 24 h. In an assay simulating topical application of P128 to skin or other biological surfaces, P128 hydrogel was efficacious when layered on cells seeded on solid media. P128 hydrogel was lethal to Staphylococci recovered from nares of healthy people and treated without any processing or culturing steps, indicating its in situ efficacy. This methodology used for in vitro assessment of P128 as an agent for eradicating nasal carriage is unique. Conclusions The novel chimeric protein P128 is a staphylococcal cell wall-degrading enzyme under development for clearance of S. aureus nasal

  16. Persea americana Glycolic Extract: In Vitro Study of Antimicrobial Activity against Candida albicans Biofilm and Cytotoxicity Evaluation

    PubMed Central

    Jesus, D.; Oliveira, J. R.; Oliveira, F. E.; Higa, K. C.; Junqueira, J. C.; Jorge, A. O. C.; Back-Brito, G. N.; Oliveira, L. D.

    2015-01-01

    This study evaluated the antifungal activity of Persea americana extract on Candida albicans biofilm and its cytotoxicity in macrophage culture (RAW 264.7). To determine the minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC), microdilution in broth (CLSI M27-S4 protocol) was performed. Thereafter, the concentrations of 12.5, 25, 50, 100, and 200 mg/mL (n = 10) with 5 min exposure were analyzed on mature biofilm in microplate wells for 48 h. Saline was used as control (n = 10). After treatment, biofilm cells were scraped off and dilutions were plated on Sabouraud dextrose agar. After incubation (37°C/48 h), the values of colony forming units per milliliter (CFU/mL) were converted to log10 and analyzed (ANOVA and Tukey test, 5%). The cytotoxicity of the P. americana extract was evaluated on macrophages by MTT assay. The MIC of the extract was 6.25 mg/mL and with 12.5 mg/mL there was elimination of 100% of planktonic cultures. Regarding the biofilms, a significant reduction (P < 0.001) of the biofilm at concentrations of 50 (0.580 ± 0.209 log10), 100 (0.998 ± 0.508 log10), and 200 mg/mL (1.093 ± 0.462 log10) was observed. The concentrations of 200 and 100 mg/mL were cytotoxic for macrophages, while the concentrations of 50, 25, and 12.5 mg/mL showed viability higher than 55%. PMID:26605376

  17. The enhanced in vitro hematopoietic activity of leridistim, a chimeric dual G-CSF and IL-3 receptor agonist.

    PubMed

    Abegg, A L; Vickery, L E; Bremer, M E; Donnelly, A M; Doshi, P D; Evans, M L; Thurman, T L; Braford, S R; Caparon, M H; Bauer, S C; Giri, J G; Welply, J K; McKearn, J P; Smith, W G

    2002-03-01

    The in vitro activity of leridistim was characterized for cell proliferation, generation of colony-forming units (CFU) and differentiation of CD34+ cells. In AML-193.1.3 cells, leridistim exhibited a significant increase in potency compared to rhG-CSF, SC-65303 (an IL-3 receptor agonist) or an equimolar combination of rhG-CSF and SC-65303. CFU-GM assays demonstrated that at 50% of the maximum response, the relative potency of leridistim was 12-fold greater than the combination of rhG-CSF and rhIL-3 and 44-fold more potent than rhG-CSF alone. In multi-lineage CFU assays, a combination of erythropoietin (rhEPO) and leridistim resulted in greater numbers of BFU-E, CFU-GEMM and CFU-Mk than rhEPO alone. Ex vivo culture of peripheral blood or bone marrow CD34+ cells with leridistim substantially increased total viable cells over cultures stimulated with rhG-CSF, SC-65303, or a combination of rhG-CSF and SC-65303. Culture with leridistim, resulted in a greater increase in myeloid (CD15+/CD11b+), monocytic (CD41-/CD14+) and megakaryocytic (CD41+/CD14-) precursor cells without depleting the progenitor pool (CD34+/CD15-/CD11b-). These results demonstrate that leridistim is a more potent stimulator of hematopoietic proliferation and differentiation than the single receptor agonists (rhG-CSF and SC-65303) either alone or combined. These unique attributes suggest that leridistim may enhance hematopoietic reconstitution following myelosuppressive chemotherapy. PMID:11896534

  18. Persea americana Glycolic Extract: In Vitro Study of Antimicrobial Activity against Candida albicans Biofilm and Cytotoxicity Evaluation.

    PubMed

    Jesus, D; Oliveira, J R; Oliveira, F E; Higa, K C; Junqueira, J C; Jorge, A O C; Back-Brito, G N; Oliveira, L D

    2015-01-01

    This study evaluated the antifungal activity of Persea americana extract on Candida albicans biofilm and its cytotoxicity in macrophage culture (RAW 264.7). To determine the minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC), microdilution in broth (CLSI M27-S4 protocol) was performed. Thereafter, the concentrations of 12.5, 25, 50, 100, and 200 mg/mL (n = 10) with 5 min exposure were analyzed on mature biofilm in microplate wells for 48 h. Saline was used as control (n = 10). After treatment, biofilm cells were scraped off and dilutions were plated on Sabouraud dextrose agar. After incubation (37°C/48 h), the values of colony forming units per milliliter (CFU/mL) were converted to log10 and analyzed (ANOVA and Tukey test, 5%). The cytotoxicity of the P. americana extract was evaluated on macrophages by MTT assay. The MIC of the extract was 6.25 mg/mL and with 12.5 mg/mL there was elimination of 100% of planktonic cultures. Regarding the biofilms, a significant reduction (P < 0.001) of the biofilm at concentrations of 50 (0.580 ± 0.209 log10), 100 (0.998 ± 0.508 log10), and 200 mg/mL (1.093 ± 0.462 log10) was observed. The concentrations of 200 and 100 mg/mL were cytotoxic for macrophages, while the concentrations of 50, 25, and 12.5 mg/mL showed viability higher than 55%. PMID:26605376

  19. Precursor B Cells Increase in the Lung during Airway Allergic Inflammation: A Role for B Cell-Activating Factor

    PubMed Central

    Malmhäll, Carina; Rådinger, Madeleine; Ramos-Ramirez, Patricia; Lu, You; Deák, Tünde; Semitekolou, Maria; Gaga, Mina; Sjöstrand, Margareta; Lötvall, Jan; Bossios, Apostolos

    2016-01-01

    Background B cells, key cells in allergic inflammation, differentiate in the bone marrow and their precursors include pro-B, pre-B and immature B cells. Eosinophil progenitor cells increase in the lung after allergen exposure. However, the existence and possible role of B cell precursors in the lung during allergic inflammation remains elusive. Methods A BALB/c mouse model of allergic airway inflammation was utilized to perform phenotypic and quantification analyses of pro-B and pre-B cells in the lung by flow cytometry. B cell maturation factors IL-7 and B cell-activating factor (BAFF) and their receptors (CD127 and BAFFR, BCMA, TACI, respectively) were also evaluated in the lung and serum. The effect of anti-BAFF treatment was investigated both in vivo (i.p. administration of BAFF-R-Ig fusion protein) and in vitro (colony forming cell assay). Finally, BAFF levels were examined in the bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) of asthmatic patients and healthy controls. Results Precursor pro and pre-B cells increase in the lung after allergen exposure, proliferate in the lung tissue in vivo, express markers of chemotaxis (CCR10 and CXCR4) and co-stimulation (CD40, CD86) and are resistant to apoptosis (Bax). Precursor B cells express receptors for BAFF at baseline, while after allergen challenge both their ligand BAFF and the BCMA receptor expression increases in B cell precursors. Blocking BAFFR in the lung in vivo decreases eosinophils and proliferating precursor B cells. Blocking BAFFR in bone marrow cultures in vitro reduces pre-B colony formation units. BAFF is increased in the BAL of severe asthmatics. Conclusion Our data support the concept of a BAFF-mediated role for B cell precursors in allergic airway inflammation. PMID:27513955

  20. Diversity of cultivated and metabolically active aerobic anoxygenic phototrophic bacteria along an oligotrophic gradient in the Mediterranean Sea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jeanthon, C.; Boeuf, D.; Dahan, O.; Le Gall, F.; Garczarek, L.; Bendif, E. M.; Lehours, A.-C.

    2011-07-01

    Aerobic anoxygenic phototrophic (AAP) bacteria play significant roles in the bacterioplankton productivity and biogeochemical cycles of the surface ocean. In this study, we applied both cultivation and mRNA-based molecular methods to explore the diversity of AAP bacteria along an oligotrophic gradient in the Mediterranean Sea in early summer 2008. Colony-forming units obtained on three different agar media were screened for the production of bacteriochlorophyll-a (BChl-a), the light-harvesting pigment of AAP bacteria. BChl-a-containing colonies represented a low part of the cultivable fraction. In total, 54 AAP strains were isolated and the phylogenetic analyses based on their 16S rRNA and pufM genes showed that they were all affiliated to the Alphaproteobacteria. The most frequently isolated strains belonged to Citromicrobium bathyomarinum, and Erythrobacter and Roseovarius species. Most other isolates were related to species not reported to produce BChl-a and/or may represent novel taxa. Direct extraction of RNA from seawater samples enabled the analysis of the expression of pufM, the gene coding for the M subunit of the reaction centre complex of aerobic anoxygenic photosynthesis. Clone libraries of pufM gene transcripts revealed that most phylotypes were highly similar to sequences previously recovered from the Mediterranean Sea and a large majority (~94 %) was affiliated to the Gammaproteobacteria. The most abundantly detected phylotypes occurred in the western and eastern Mediterranean basins. However, some were exclusively detected in the eastern basin, reflecting the highest diversity of pufM transcripts observed in this ultra-oligotrophic region. To our knowledge, this is the first study to document extensively the diversity of AAP isolates and to unveil the active AAP community in an oligotrophic marine environment. By pointing out the discrepancies between culture-based and molecular methods, this study highlights the existing gaps in the understanding