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Sample records for activity conclusions results

  1. Conclusion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Arnold, Steven M.; Wong, Terry T.

    2011-01-01

    This compilation of papers in this book represents approximately half of the works discussed at the MS&T 2010 symposium entitled Tools, Models, Databases, and Simulation Tools Developed and Needed to Realize the Vision of Integrated Computational Materials Engineering at Materials Science & Technology wherein five sessions comprised of 33 presentations was organized. The goal of the symposium was two fold To provide a forum in which current state-of-the-art methods for ICME (e.g., information informatics, experimentation, and modeling) could be openly discussed and critiqued by not only materials scientist but also structural engineers/researchers, component designers, industrial leaders and government program managers. To leave the symposium and in particular the panel discussion with a clear idea of the gaps and barriers (both technical, cultural and economical) that must be addressed in order for ICME to fully succeed. The organizers felt that these goals were met, as particularly evident by the standing room only attendance during a lively panel discussion session at the end of the Symposium. However it is the firm belief of the editors of this book that this symposium was merely a start in the right direction, and that subsequent conferences/symposium (e.g., First World Congress on Integrated Computational Materials Engineering to be held July 10-14, 2011 at Seven Springs Mountain Resort in Pennsylvania) must work hard to ensure that a truly diverse, multidisciplinary, community of researchers and practitioners are present and have ample opportunity for interaction. This will ensure that a proper balance between push and pull disciplines and technologies is maintained so that this emerging focus area, Integrated Computational Materials Engineering (ICME), has the greatest potential for success and impact on "system-level" payoffs. Similarly, a pro-active approach is required to reform historical modes of operation in industry, government and the academic

  2. Conclusion: Major Findings and Future Activities.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rosenzweig, Cynthia E.; Hillel, Daniel

    2015-01-01

    The Agricultural Model Intercomparison and Improvement Project (AgMIP) incorporates a number of major advances in the way that climate impacts, vulnerability, and adaptation are being simulated. At its core is a protocol approach that results in impact assessments being more scientifically credible and thus ultimately having greater value to the wide range of agricultural stakeholders. Moreover, the use of the protocol approach enables closer scrutiny and intercomparison of models and methods so that they can be improved over time. By creating a truly trans-disciplinary, systems-based approach, AgMIP impact assessments and evaluation of adaptations become useful to agricultural decision-makers at multiple scales. The chapters in this two-part set demonstrate the use of this approach and represent early steps towards the full realization of these new methods and their application.

  3. Equipment qualification risk scoping analyses: Results and conclusions

    SciTech Connect

    Bustard, L.D.; Kolaczkowski, A.M.

    1989-01-01

    Probabilistic risk assessment (PRA) techniques and insights have been employed during an investigation entitled the Equipment Qualification (EQ)-Risk Scoping Study to assess the risk significance of equipment qualification issues. This approach for evaluating EQ issues suggests that some issues are not risk significant while some have a significant potential to increase risk. For example, EQ issues associated with long term accident equipment operability are not risk significant. Alternatively, there are selected system operations that require equipment not qualified for important accident environments. Though the study demonstrated that PRA does provide insights that modify perceptions regarding the importance of various EQ issues, it should be noted that PRA methods currently cannot define the risk significance for some EQ issues. Additional discussion regarding the study's results and conclusions is provided. 6 refs.

  4. NASA Applied Sciences Program Rapid Prototyping Results and Conclusions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cox, E. L.

    2007-12-01

    NASA's Applied Sciences Program seeks to expand the use of Earth science research results to benefit current and future operational systems tasked with making policy and management decisions. The Earth Science Division within the Science Mission Directorate sponsors over 1000 research projects annually to answer the fundamental research question: How is the Earth changing and what are the consequences for life on Earth? As research results become available, largely from satellite observations and Earth system model outputs, the Applied Sciences Program works diligently with scientists and researchers (internal and external to NASA) , and other government agency officials (USDA, EPA, CDC, DOE, US Forest Service, US Fish and Wildlife Service, DHS, USAID) to determine useful applications for these results in decision-making, ultimately benefiting society. The complexity of Earth science research results and the breadth of the Applied Sciences Program national priority areas dictate a broad scope and multiple approaches available to implement their use in decision-making. Over the past five years, the Applied Sciences Program has examined scientific and engineering practices and solicited the community for methods and steps that can lead to the enhancement of operational systems (Decision Support Systems - DSS) required for decision-making. In November 2006, the Applied Sciences Program launched an initiative aimed at demonstrating the applicability of NASA data (satellite observations, models, geophysical parameters from data archive centers) being incorporated into decision support systems and their related environments at a low cost and quick turnaround of results., i.e. designed rapid prototyping. Conceptually, an understanding of Earth science research (and results) coupled with decision-making requirements and needs leads to a demonstration (experiment) depicting enhancements or improvements to an operational decisions process through the use of NASA data. Five

  5. Structural aging program -- a summary of activities, results, and conclusions

    SciTech Connect

    Naus, D.J.; Oland, C.B.; Ellingwood, B.R.

    1997-01-01

    Research has been conducted by the Oak Ridge National Laboratory to address aging management of nuclear power plant concrete structures. The purpose was to identify potential structural safety issues and acceptance criteria for use in continued service assessments. Primary program accomplishments have included formulation of a Structural Materials Information Center that contains data and information on the time variation of material properties under the influence of pertinent environmental stressors and aging factors for 144 materials, an aging assessment methodology to identify critical structures and degradation factors that can potentially impact their performance, guidelines and evaluation criteria for use in condition assessments of reinforced concrete structures, and a reliability-based methodology for current condition assessments and estimations of future performance of reinforced concrete nuclear power plant structures. In addition, the Structural Aging Program conducted in-depth evaluations of several nondestructive evaluation and repair-related technologies to develop guidance on their applicability.

  6. Financial ties and concordance between results and conclusions in meta-analyses: retrospective cohort study

    PubMed Central

    2007-01-01

    Objective To determine whether financial ties to one drug company are associated with favourable results or conclusions in meta-analyses on antihypertensive drugs. Design Retrospective cohort study. Setting Meta-analyses published up to December 2004 that were not duplicates and evaluated the effects of antihypertensive drugs compared with any comparator on clinical end points in adults. Financial ties were categorised as one drug company compared with all others. Main outcome measures The main outcomes were the results and conclusions of meta-analyses, with both outcomes separately categorised as being favourable or not favourable towards the study drug. We also collected data on characteristics of meta-analyses that the literature suggested might be associated with favourable results or conclusions. Results 124 meta-analyses were included in the study, 49 (40%) of which had financial ties to one drug company. On univariate logistic regression analyses, meta-analyses of better methodological quality were more likely to have favourable results (odds ratio 1.16, 95% confidence interval 1.07 to 1.27). Although financial ties to one drug company were not associated with favourable results, such ties constituted the only characteristic significantly associated with favourable conclusions (4.09, 1.30 to 12.83). When controlling for other characteristics of meta-analyses in multiple logistic regression analyses, meta-analyses that had financial ties to one drug company remained more likely to report favourable conclusions (5.11, 1.54 to 16.92). Conclusion Meta-analyses on antihypertensive drugs and with financial ties to one drug company are not associated with favourable results but are associated with favourable conclusions. PMID:18024482

  7. Results and conclusions: perception sensor study for high speed autonomous operations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schneider, Anne; LaCelle, Zachary; Lacaze, Alberto; Murphy, Karl; Close, Ryan

    2016-05-01

    Previous research has presented work on sensor requirements, specifications, and testing, to evaluate the feasibility of increasing autonomous vehicle system speeds. Discussions included the theoretical background for determining sensor requirements, and the basic test setup and evaluation criteria for comparing existing and prototype sensor designs. This paper will present and discuss the continuation of this work. In particular, this paper will focus on analyzing the problem via a real-world comparison of various sensor technology testing results, as opposed to previous work that utilized more of a theoretical approach. LADAR/LIDAR, radar, visual, and infrared sensors are considered in this research. Results are evaluated against the theoretical, desired perception specifications. Conclusions for utilizing a suite of perception sensors, to achieve the goal of doubling ground vehicle speeds, is also discussed.

  8. Experimental laser anastomosis of the large bowel: conclusive results and future prospect

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kawahara, Masaki; Kuramoto, Shu; Ryan, Peter

    2003-06-01

    Completely sutureless end-to-end large bowel anastomoses were successfully performed in New Zealand white rabbits by using 1064 nm, 0.4-W power pulsating Nd:YAG laser to produce welding. Purpose: The aim of this study was to assess the results of our whole experimental data and summarize our experimental work on laser colon anastomosis. Methods: This experimental study investigated integrity of anastomosis, degree of narrowing, macroscopic appearance, microscopic findings, animal body weight change, and collagen concentration of laser colon anastomoses, compared with those of conventional sutured anastomoses up to ninety postoperative days. Results: Bursting pressures of laser anastomoses were at first low and came to be equivalent at seven days, but the laser group exhibited a consistent narrowing tendency. However, laser anastomoses demonstrated fewer and milder adhesions, and animals showed a better recovery of body weight. Histologically, laser anastomoses showed better layer-to-layer reconstitution without foreign body response and with less fibrosis. Difference in collagen concentration did not reach statistical significance. Conclusion: The technique of laser anastomosis presents a promising alternative to suturing in reconstitution of the large bowel.

  9. Results and Conclusions from the NASA Isokinetic Total Water Content Probe 2009 IRT Test

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reehorst, Andrew; Brinker, David

    2010-01-01

    The NASA Glenn Research Center has developed and tested a Total Water Content Isokinetic Sampling Probe. Since, by its nature, it is not sensitive to cloud water particle phase nor size, it is particularly attractive to support super-cooled large droplet and high ice water content aircraft icing studies. The instrument comprises the Sampling Probe, Sample Flow Control, and Water Vapor Measurement subsystems. Results and conclusions are presented from probe tests in the NASA Glenn Icing Research Tunnel (IRT) during January and February 2009. The use of reference probe heat and the control of air pressure in the water vapor measurement subsystem are discussed. Several run-time error sources were found to produce identifiable signatures that are presented and discussed. Some of the differences between measured Isokinetic Total Water Content Probe and IRT calibration seems to be caused by tunnel humidification and moisture/ice crystal blow around. Droplet size, airspeed, and liquid water content effects also appear to be present in the IRT calibration. Based upon test results, the authors provide recommendations for future Isokinetic Total Water Content Probe development.

  10. Evaluating Behaviorally Oriented Aviation Maintenance Resource Management (MRM) Training and Programs: Methods, Results, and Conclusions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Taylor, James C.; Thomas, Robert L., III

    2003-01-01

    Assessment of the impact of Aviation Resource Management Programs on aviation culture and performance has compelled a considerable body of research (Taylor & Robertson, 1995; Taylor, 1998; Taylor & Patankar, 2001). In recent years new methods have been applied to the problem of maintenance error precipitated by factors such as the need for self-assessment of communication and trust. The present study - 2002 -- is an extension of that past work. This research project was designed as the conclusion of a larger effort to help understand, evaluate and validate the impact of Maintenance Resource Management (MRM) training programs, and other MRM interventions on participant attitudes, opinions, behaviors, and ultimately on enhanced safety performance. It includes research and development of evaluation methodology as well as examination of psychological constructs and correlates of maintainer performance. In particular, during 2002, three issues were addressed. First, the evaluation of two (independent & different) MRM programs for changing behaviors was undertaken. In one case we were able to further apply the approach to measuring written communication developed during 2001 (Taylor, 2002; Taylor & Thomas, 2003). Second, the MRM/TOQ surveys were made available for completion on the internet. The responses from these on-line surveys were automatically linked to a results calculator (like the one developed and described in Taylor, 2002) to aid industry users in analyzing and evaluating their local survey data on the internet. Third, the main trends and themes from our research about MRM programs over the past dozen years were reviewed.

  11. Results and conclusions from the first pressurized-thermal-shock experiment. [Overcooling

    SciTech Connect

    Bryan, R.H.; Bolt, S.E.; Merkle, J.G.; Bass, B.R.; Bryson, J.W.; Robinson, G.C.; Whitman, G.D.

    1984-01-01

    Pretest estimates of fracture toughness are reasonably close to the PTSE-1 values. Furthermore, the ASME Sect. XI toughness relationships are conservative relative to actual material characteristics. The experiment demonstrated that arrest toughness substantially above the 220 MPa...sqrt..m cutoff of Sect. XI could be realized. The arrest values in PTSE-1 also are consistent with arrest measurements made in wide-plate tests and reported by the Japan Welding Council. The highest PTSE-1 value of arrest occurred at a temperature approx. 30 K above the onset of the Charpy upper shelf. This is believed to be very close to the threshold temperature above which cleavage fracture cannot persist. This result also suggests that the methods of linear elastic fracture mechanics have an important role in fracture evaluation at high (upper-shelf) temperatures. The PTSE-1A and -1B transients were a demonstration that simple warm prestressing (K/sub I/ < 0) strongly inhibits crack initiation. With allowance for uncertainty in the true K/sub Ic/ values it is evident that K/sub I/ exceeds K/sub Ic/ during warm prestressing by 50% to 90%. Thus, the effectiveness of simple warm prestressing has now been demonstrated in two experiments with thick cylinders, thermal shock experiment TSE-5A and PTSE-1. In the A transient, simple anti-warm prestressing (K/sub I/ > 0) prevailed during two periods of 40-s and 60-s duration without crack initiation, although K/sub I/ exceeded K/sub Ic/ by 30% to 50%. Clearly simple anti-warm prestressing is not a sufficient condition to alleviate the effects of warm prestressing. A narrow band of ductile tearing formed ahead of the initial cleavage fracture. The conclusions drawn from PTSE-1 suggest that procedures used for evaluating overcooling accidents in pressurized-water reactors should take into consideration realistically the fracture mechanisms that have been clearly demonstrated but not yet generally accepted.

  12. Los Alamos PWR decay-heat-removal studies. Summary results and conclusions

    SciTech Connect

    Boyack, B E; Henninger, R J; Horley, E; Lime, J F; Nassersharif, B; Smith, R

    1986-03-01

    The adequacy of shutdown-decay-heat removal in pressurized water reactors (PWRs) is currently under investigation by the Nuclear Regulatory Commission. One part of this effort is the review of feed-and-bleed procedures that could be used if the normal cooling mode through the steam generators were unavailable. Feed-and-bleed cooling is effected by manually activating the high-pressure injection (HPI) system and opening the power-operated relief valves (PORVs) to release the core decay energy. The feasibility of the feed-and-bleed concept as a diverse mode of heat removal has been evaluated at the Los Alamos National Laboratory. The TRAC-PF1 code has been used to predict the expected performance of the Oconee-1 and Calvert Cliffs-1 reactors of Bobcock and Wilcox and Combustion Engineering, respectively, and the Zion-1 and H.B. Robinson-2 plants of Westinghouse. Feed and bleed was successfully applied in each of the four plants studied, provided it was initiated no later than the time of loss of secondary heat sink. Feed and bleed was successfully applied in two of the plants, Oconee-1 and Zion-1, provided it was initiated no later than the time of primary system saturation. Feed and bleed in Calvert Cliffs-1 when initiated at the time of primary system saturation did result in core dryout; however, the core heatup was eventually terminated by coolant injection. Feed-and-bleed initiation at primary system saturation was not studied for H.B. Robinson-2. Insights developed during the analyses of specific plant transients have been identified and documented. 33 refs., 107 figs., 26 tabs.

  13. The successful conclusion of the Deep Space 1 Mission: important results without a flashy title

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rayman, M. D.

    2002-01-01

    In September 2001, Deep Space 1 (DS1) completed a high-risk and flawless encounter with comet 19P/Borrelly. Its data provide a detailed view of this comet and offere surprising and exciting insights. With this successful conclusion of its extended mission, DS1 undertook a hyperextended mission. Following this period of extremely agressive testing, with no further technology or science objectives, the mission was terminated on December 18, 2001, with the powering off of the spacecraft's trnasmitter, although the receiver was left on. By the end of its mission, DS1 had returned a wealth of important science data and engineering data for future missions.

  14. The Passive Optical Sample Assembly (POSA): I Experiment: First Flight Results and Conclusions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zwiener, James M.; Kamenetzky, Rachel R.; Vaughn, Jason A.; Finckenor, Miria M.

    1998-01-01

    The Passive Optical Sample Assembly-I (POSA-I), part of the Mir Environmental Effects Payload (MEEP), was designed to study the combined effects of contamination, atomic oxygen, ultraviolet radiation, vacuum, thermal cycling, and other constituents of the space environment on spacecraft materials. The MEEP program is a Phase 1 International Space Station Risk Mitigation Experiment. SSP 30258 "Thermal Control Architectural Control Document", section 3.1.2 requires that International Space Station (ISS) external materials meet performance requirements when exposed to the external environment as defined in SSP 30426, "Space Station External Contamination Control Requirements." Contamination control documents call for less than 3 x 10(exp -7) gm/sq cm/yr of molecular contamination on a surface at 300 K at the Prime Measurement Points during quiescent periods and less than 1 x 10(exp-6) gm/sq cm/yr during non-quiescent periods. Assuming a density of 1.0 g/cu cm for the contaminant, this is roughly equivalent to 30-100 A per year. A previous Mir flight experiment (Guillaumon et al. 1991) measured 321-716 A per year. Were this to happen on ISS, the radiators would reach end-of-life properties much sooner than the planned 10 years. Therefore, POSA was proposed to expose ISS-baselined materials (such as Z93 white thermal control paint and chromic acid anodized aluminum) to the Mir environment and determine not only the level of contamination from an orbiting, active space station but also the effect of contamination on thermal optical properties. POSA-I consisted of nearly 400 samples of various candidate materials for ISS. Paint samples flown included Z-93 and YB-71 white thermal control paints and a new inorganic bright yellow paint htat can be utilized for astronaut visual aids.

  15. Ocean services user needs assessment. Volume 1: Survey results, conclusions and recommendations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Montgomery, D. R.; Patton, R. J.; Mccandless, S. W.

    1984-01-01

    An interpretation of environmental information needs of marine users, derived from a direct contact survey of eight important sectors of the marine user community is presented. Findings of the survey and results and recommendations are reported. The findings consist of specific and quantized measurement and derived product needs for each sector and comparisons of these needs with current and planned NOAA data and services. The following supportive and reference material are examined: direct contact interviews with industry members, analyses of current NOAA data gathering and derived product capabilities, evaluations of new and emerging domestic and foreign satellite data gathering capabilities, and a special commercial fishing survey conducted by the Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL).

  16. Research results for the Tornado wind energy system: analysis and conclusions

    SciTech Connect

    Jacobs, E.W.

    1985-02-01

    The Tornado Wind Energy System (TWES) concept utilizes a wind-driven vortex confined by a hollow tower to create a low-pressure core intended to serve as a turbine exhaust reservoir. The turbine inlet flow is provided by a separate ram air supply. Numerous experimental and analytical research efforts have investigated the potential of the TWES as a wind energy conversion system (WECS). The present paper summarizes and analyzes much of the research to date on the TWES. A simplified cost analysis incorporating these research results is also included. Based on these analyses, the TWES does not show any significant promise of improving on either the performance or the cost of energy attainable by conventional WECS. The prospects for achieving either a system power coefficient above 0.20 or a cost of energy less than $0.50/kWh (1979 dollars) appear to be poor.

  17. Research results for the Tornado Wind-Energy system: analysis and conclusions

    SciTech Connect

    Jacobs, E.

    1983-01-01

    The Tornado Wind Energy System (TWES) concept utilizes a wind driven vortex confined by a hollow tower to create a low pressure core intended to serve as a turbine exhaust reservoir. The turbine inlet flow is provided by a separate ram air supply. Numerous experimental and analytical research efforts have investigated the potential of the TWES as a wind energy conversion system (WECS). The present paper summarizes and analyzes much of theresearch to date on the TWES. A simplified cost analysis incorporating these research results is also included. Based on these analyses, the TWES does not show significant promise of improving on either the performance or the cost of energy attainable by conventional WECS. The prospects for achieving either a system power coefficient above 0.20 or a cost of energy less than $0.50/kWh (1979 dollars) appear to be poor.

  18. The shelf edge exchange processes experiment, SEEP-II: an introduction to hypotheses, results and conclusions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Biscaye, Pierre E.; Flagg, Charles N.; Falkowski, Paul G.

    The SEEP (Shelf Edge Exchange Processes)-II experiment was the second of two that took place in the Middle Atlantic Bight (MAB) of the eastern U.S. continental shelf and slope. The experiment included an array of 10 multi-instrumented moorings deployed for 15 months and 10 oceanographic cruises, all designed to address the problem of the fate of continental shelf particulate matter in general, and organic carbon in particular. This paper provides the setting and background for the SEEP Program, the SEEP-II experiment and an introduction to the 18 papers constituting the subject of this special volume. Because those papers lack one of a general nature on the physical oceanographic setting of the experiment, that aspect is treated in somewhat more detail here. The results of the experiment overwhelmingly show that the working hypothesis on which the SEEP Program was undertaken and sponsored by the Department of Energy is not valid. That is, there is not an export to the adjacent slope and open ocean of a large proportion of the particulate matter introduced to and biologically generated in the waters of the continental shelf; most of the biogenic particulate matter is recycled by consumption (bacterial and otherwise) and oxidation on the shelf, and only a small proportion (of order ≪5%) is exported to the adjacent slope. The small amount that is exported appears to be deposited preferentially in the sediments of an area of the slope centered at about 1000 m, and the export and sedimentation to that depocenter appears to increase from the northern to the southern MAB.

  19. Overview of physics results from the conclusive operation of the National Spherical Torus Experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sabbagh, S. A.; Ahn, J.-W.; Allain, J.; Andre, R.; Balbaky, A.; Bastasz, R.; Battaglia, D.; Bell, M.; Bell, R.; Beiersdorfer, P.; Belova, E.; Berkery, J.; Betti, R.; Bialek, J.; Bigelow, T.; Bitter, M.; Boedo, J.; Bonoli, P.; Boozer, A.; Bortolon, A.; Boyle, D.; Brennan, D.; Breslau, J.; Buttery, R.; Canik, J.; Caravelli, G.; Chang, C.; Crocker, N.; Darrow, D.; Davis, B.; Delgado-Aparicio, L.; Diallo, A.; Ding, S.; D'Ippolito, D.; Domier, C.; Dorland, W.; Ethier, S.; Evans, T.; Ferron, J.; Finkenthal, M.; Foley, J.; Fonck, R.; Frazin, R.; Fredrickson, E.; Fu, G.; Gates, D.; Gerhardt, S.; Glasser, A.; Gorelenkov, N.; Gray, T.; Guo, Y.; Guttenfelder, W.; Hahm, T.; Harvey, R.; Hassanein, A.; Heidbrink, W.; Hill, K.; Hirooka, Y.; Hooper, E. B.; Hosea, J.; Humphreys, D.; Indireshkumar, K.; Jaeger, F.; Jarboe, T.; Jardin, S.; Jaworski, M.; Kaita, R.; Kallman, J.; Katsuro-Hopkins, O.; Kaye, S.; Kessel, C.; Kim, J.; Kolemen, E.; Kramer, G.; Krasheninnikov, S.; Kubota, S.; Kugel, H.; La Haye, R. J.; Lao, L.; LeBlanc, B.; Lee, W.; Lee, K.; Leuer, J.; Levinton, F.; Liang, Y.; Liu, D.; Lore, J.; Luhmann, N., Jr.; Maingi, R.; Majeski, R.; Manickam, J.; Mansfield, D.; Maqueda, R.; Mazzucato, E.; McLean, A.; McCune, D.; McGeehan, B.; McKee, G.; Medley, S.; Meier, E.; Menard, J.; Menon, M.; Meyer, H.; Mikkelsen, D.; Miloshevsky, G.; Mueller, D.; Munsat, T.; Myra, J.; Nelson, B.; Nishino, N.; Nygren, R.; Ono, M.; Osborne, T.; Park, H.; Park, J.; Park, Y. S.; Paul, S.; Peebles, W.; Penaflor, B.; Perkins, R. J.; Phillips, C.; Pigarov, A.; Podesta, M.; Preinhaelter, J.; Raman, R.; Ren, Y.; Rewoldt, G.; Rognlien, T.; Ross, P.; Rowley, C.; Ruskov, E.; Russell, D.; Ruzic, D.; Ryan, P.; Schaffer, M.; Schuster, E.; Scotti, F.; Shaing, K.; Shevchenko, V.; Shinohara, K.; Sizyuk, V.; Skinner, C. H.; Smirnov, A.; Smith, D.; Snyder, P.; Solomon, W.; Sontag, A.; Soukhanovskii, V.; Stoltzfus-Dueck, T.; Stotler, D.; Stratton, B.; Stutman, D.; Takahashi, H.; Takase, Y.; Tamura, N.; Tang, X.; Taylor, G.; Taylor, C.; Tritz, K.; Tsarouhas, D.; Umansky, M.; Urban, J.; Untergberg, E.; Walker, M.; Wampler, W.; Wang, W.; Whaley, J.; White, R.; Wilgen, J.; Wilson, R.; Wong, K. L.; Wright, J.; Xia, Z.; Youchison, D.; Yu, G.; Yuh, H.; Zakharov, L.; Zemlyanov, D.; Zimmer, G.; Zweben, S. J.

    2013-10-01

    Research on the National Spherical Torus Experiment, NSTX, targets physics understanding needed for extrapolation to a steady-state ST Fusion Nuclear Science Facility, pilot plant, or DEMO. The unique ST operational space is leveraged to test physics theories for next-step tokamak operation, including ITER. Present research also examines implications for the coming device upgrade, NSTX-U. An energy confinement time, τE, scaling unified for varied wall conditions exhibits a strong improvement of BTτE with decreased electron collisionality, accentuated by lithium (Li) wall conditioning. This result is consistent with nonlinear microtearing simulations that match the experimental electron diffusivity quantitatively and predict reduced electron heat transport at lower collisionality. Beam-emission spectroscopy measurements in the steep gradient region of the pedestal indicate the poloidal correlation length of turbulence of about ten ion gyroradii increases at higher electron density gradient and lower Ti gradient, consistent with turbulence caused by trapped electron instabilities. Density fluctuations in the pedestal top region indicate ion-scale microturbulence compatible with ion temperature gradient and/or kinetic ballooning mode instabilities. Plasma characteristics change nearly continuously with increasing Li evaporation and edge localized modes (ELMs) stabilize due to edge density gradient alteration. Global mode stability studies show stabilizing resonant kinetic effects are enhanced at lower collisionality, but in stark contrast have almost no dependence on collisionality when the plasma is off-resonance. Combined resistive wall mode radial and poloidal field sensor feedback was used to control n = 1 perturbations and improve stability. The disruption probability due to unstable resistive wall modes (RWMs) was surprisingly reduced at very high βN/li > 10 consistent with low frequency magnetohydrodynamic spectroscopy measurements of mode stability. Greater

  20. Sweet Conclusion

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shirley, Britt M.; Wooldridge, Barbara Ross; Camp, Kerri M.

    2012-01-01

    Jen Harrington is the owner and pastry chef of Sweet Conclusion, a bakery in Tampa, Florida. Most of Harrington's business comes from baking wedding cakes, but she has been attempting to attract customers to her retail bakery, where she sells cupcakes, pies, ice cream, and coffee. Nearly four years she opened Sweet Conclusion, the retail part of…

  1. 42 CFR 476.85 - Conclusive effect of QIO initial denial determinations and changes as a result of DRG validations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... MEDICARE & MEDICAID SERVICES, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) QUALITY IMPROVEMENT ORGANIZATIONS UTILIZATION AND QUALITY CONTROL REVIEW Review Responsibilities of Utilization and Quality Control Quality Improvement Organizations (QIOs) Qio Review Functions § 476.85 Conclusive effect of QIO...

  2. 42 CFR 476.85 - Conclusive effect of QIO initial denial determinations and changes as a result of DRG validations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... determinations and changes as a result of DRG validations. 476.85 Section 476.85 Public Health CENTERS FOR... denial determinations and changes as a result of DRG validations. A QIO initial denial determination or change as a result of DRG validation is final and binding unless, in accordance with the procedures...

  3. Evaluating the statistical conclusion validity of weighted mean results in meta-analysis by analysing funnel graph diagrams.

    PubMed

    Elvik, R

    1998-03-01

    The validity of weighted mean results estimated in meta-analysis has been criticized. This paper presents a set of simple statistical and graphical techniques that can be used in meta-analysis to evaluate common points of criticism. The graphical techniques are based on funnel graph diagrams. Problems and techniques for dealing with them that are discussed include: (1) the so-called 'apples and oranges' problem, stating that mean results in meta-analysis tend to gloss over important differences that should be highlighted. A test of the homogeneity of results is described for testing the presence of this problem. If results are highly heterogeneous, a random effects model of meta-analysis is more appropriate than the fixed effects model of analysis. (2) The possible presence of skewness in a sample of results. This can be tested by comparing the mode, median and mean of the results in the sample. (3) The possible presence of more than one mode in a sample of results. This can be tested by forming a frequency distribution of the results and examining the shape of this distribution. (4) The sensitivity of the mean to the possible presence of atypical results (outliers) can be tested by comparing the overall mean to the mean of all results except the one suspected of being atypical. (5) The possible presence of publication bias can be tested by visual inspection of funnel graph diagrams in which data points have been sorted according to statistical significance and direction of effect. (6) The possibility of underestimating the standard error of the mean in meta-analyses by using multiple, correlated results from the same study as the unit of analysis can be addressed by using the jack-knife technique for estimating the uncertainty of the mean. Brief examples, taken from road safety research, are given of all these techniques.

  4. Study for identification of beneficial uses of Space, phase 1. Volume 2, book 2: Technical report: results, conclusions and recommendations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1973-01-01

    A variety of technologies were investigated to determine the benefits to be derived from space activities. The subjects accepted for product development are: (1) eutectics for cold cathodes, (2) higher putiry fiber optics, (3) fluidic wafers, (4) large germanium wafers for gamma ray camera, (5) improved batteries and capacitors, (6) optical filters, (7) corrosion resistant electrodes, (8) high strength carbon-based filaments for plastic reinforcement, and (9) new antibiotics. In addition, three ideas for services, involving disposal of radioactive wastes, blood analysis, and enhanced solar insolation were proposed.

  5. Inconsistent definitions of "urban" result in different conclusions about the size of urban carbon and nitrogen stocks.

    PubMed

    Raciti, Steve M; Hutyra, Lucy R; Rao, Preeti; Finzi, Adrien C

    2012-04-01

    There is conflicting evidence about the importance of urban soils and vegetation in regional C budgets that is caused, in part, by inconsistent definitions of "urban" land use. We quantified urban ecosystem contributions to C stocks in the Boston (Massachusetts, USA) Metropolitan Statistical Area (MSA) using several alternative urban definitions. Development altered aboveground and belowground C and N stocks, and the sign and magnitude of these changes varied by land use and development intensity. Aboveground biomass (live trees, dbh > or = 5 cm) for the MSA was 7.2 +/- 0.4 kg C/m2 (mean +/- SE), reflecting a high proportion of forest cover. Vegetation C was highest in forest (11.6 +/- 0.5 kg C/m2), followed by residential (4.6 +/- 0.5 kg C/m2), and then other developed (2.0 +/- 0.4 kg C/m2) land uses. Soil C (0-10 cm depth) followed the same pattern of decreasing C concentration from forest, to residential, to other developed land uses (4.1 +/- 0.1, 4.0 +/- 0.2, and 3.3 +/- 0.2 kg C/m2, respectively). Within a land use type, urban areas (which we defined as > 25% impervious surface area [ISA] within a 1-km(2) moving window) generally contained less vegetation C, but slightly more soil C, than nonurban areas. Soil N concentrations were higher in urban areas than nonurban areas of the same land use type, except for residential areas, which had similarly high soil N concentrations. When we compared our definition of urban to other commonly used urban extents (U.S. Census Bureau, Global Rural-Urban Mapping Project [GRUMP], and the MSA itself), we found that urban soil (1 m depth) and vegetation C stocks spanned a wide range, from 14.4 +/- 0.8 to 54.5 +/- 3.4 Tg C and from 4.2 +/- 0.4 to 27.3 +/- 3.2 Tg C, respectively. Conclusions about the importance of urban soils and vegetation to regional C and N stocks are very sensitive to the definition of urban used by the investigators. Urban areas, regardless of definition, are rapidly expanding in their extent; a systematic

  6. Portable XRF analysis of occupational air filter samples from different workplaces using different samplers: final results, summary and conclusions.

    PubMed

    Harper, Martin; Pacolay, Bruce; Hintz, Patrick; Bartley, David L; Slaven, James E; Andrew, Michael E

    2007-11-01

    This paper concludes a five-year program on research into the use of a portable X-ray fluorescence (XRF) analyzer for analyzing lead in air sampling filters from different industrial environments, including mining, manufacturing and recycling. The results from four of these environments have already been reported. The results from two additional metal processes are presented here. At both of these sites, lead was a minor component of the total airborne metals and interferences from other elements were minimal. Nevertheless, only results from the three sites where lead was the most abundant metal were used in the overall calculation of method accuracy. The XRF analyzer was used to interrogate the filters, which were then subjected to acid digestion and analysis by inductively-coupled plasma optical-emission spectroscopy (ICP-OES). The filter samples were collected using different filter-holders or "samplers" where the size (diameter), depth and homogeneity of aerosol deposit varied from sampler to sampler. The aerosol collection efficiencies of the samplers were expected to differ, especially for larger particles. The distribution of particles once having entered the sampler was also expected to differ between samplers. Samplers were paired to allow the between-sampler variability to be addressed, and, in some cases, internal sampler wall deposits were evaluated and compared to the filter catch. It was found, rather surprisingly, that analysis of the filter deposits (by ICP-OES) of all the samplers gave equivalent results. It was also found that deposits on some of the sampler walls, which in some protocols are considered part of the sample, could be significant in comparison to the filter deposit. If it is concluded that wall-deposits should be analyzed, then XRF analysis of the filter can only give a minimum estimate of the concentration. Techniques for the statistical analysis of field data were also developed as part of this program and have been reported

  7. OECD Detailed Review Paper (DRP) number 31 on "Cell Transformation Assays for Detection of Chemical Carcinogens": main results and conclusions.

    PubMed

    Vasseur, Paule; Lasne, Claude

    2012-04-11

    The Detailed Review Paper (DRP) number 31 of the Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development (OECD) analyses the performance of the three models used in Cell Transformation Assays (CTAs) to screen the carcinogenic potential of chemicals: the Syrian hamster embryo (SHE) cells, and the mouse cell lines BALB/c 3T3 and C3H10T1/2. The CTA results have been compared to results from recent genotoxicity tests using mammalian and non-mammalian cell systems. The performance of the CTAs in predicting carcinogenic potential has been established on several hundreds of chemicals, comprising organic and inorganic substances. The results have been analysed and the chemicals classified as rodent and/or human carcinogens. Based on this comparison and on their performance - concordance, sensitivity, specificity, positive and negative predictive capacity, and evidence for intra- and inter-laboratory reproducibility - OECD recommended that the CTAs using the SHE cells (carried out at physiological or acidic pH) and the BALB/c 3T3 cell line should be developed into OECD test guidelines. The CTA using the C3H10T1/2 cell line was considered to be useful to elucidate molecular mechanisms of cell transformation at the genomic and transcriptomic level. However, due to the limited data available on reproducibility, a test guideline was not recommended at that time.

  8. [Prospective qualification requirements in nursing care. Results and conclusions of the BMBF research network FreQueNz].

    PubMed

    Schüler, G; Klaes, L; Rommel, A; Schröder, H; Köhler, T

    2013-08-01

    Demographic change, advances in medicine, and innovative health care services are leading to changes in the professional qualification requirements for nursing and care staff. Detecting future trends in relation to these requirements was the focus of a Delphi study developed as part of the BMBF FreQueNz initiative. After qualitative expert interviews, data collection was organized in three consecutive steps, with 243 interviews realized in the second wave. It was found that home care will further diversify in the fields of supporting and counseling services as well as in palliative care, resulting in the necessary expansion of specific qualifications (e.g., intensive care). Moreover, there will be an increased need for interprofessional, intersectoral, and intercultural coordination and communication skills. As a consequence of the delegation of medical tasks, new duties for nonmedical professions in inpatient and outpatient care will also arise. For instance, qualifications need to be tailored to the new demands of assessment, diagnostics, therapy, and patient education and they should take into account evidence-based knowledge as well as clinical practice guidelines. Consequently, the system of care professionals will further diversify through advanced training programs and the continued academization of nursing.

  9. Is the general conclusion justified that higher applicable field strength results in shorter analysis time with organic solvents in CE?

    PubMed

    Téllez, Adolfo; Kenndler, Ernst

    2009-11-01

    In this paper, a widespread opinion in CE with organic solvents for the background electrolyte is critically questioned, namely that in general a shorter analysis time can be achieved due to the higher field strength applicable compared with aqueous electrolyte systems. This view, common in the literature, is based on the supposition that the conductance in organic solvents is lower than in water. Indeed in many organic solvents with higher viscosity than water lower ion mobility is observed, and higher fields can be applied in these cases. However, in this paper the problem is sharper defined and treated two-fold: (i) in all solvents conditions are such that either the same electric power is generated, or (ii) the same temperature increase is taken into account. It was shown that for the same electric power the field strength in the organic solvent can be changed to a less extent than the ionic mobility changes. As a result, the migration velocity of the analytes is lower and the analysis time is longer in most organic solvents compared with water; acetonitrile (MeCN) is an exception (in this solvent the mobilities are higher than in water). The more stringent treatment of the problem takes an equal temperature increase due to Joule heating into account rather than equal electric power. The temperature increase in the capillary depends on the thermal conductivity of the solvent, which is only about one-third of that of water for organic liquids. The consequence is that in none of the organic solvent systems a shorter analysis time can be achieved compared with water (given that the experimental conditions are comparable, e.g. zero EOF). The theoretical predictions were confirmed by measurements with water, methanol, propylenecarbonate, and MeCN as solvents.

  10. Activation in Context: Differential Conclusions Drawn from Cross-Sectional and Longitudinal Analyses of Adolescents' Cognitive Control-Related Neural Activity.

    PubMed

    McCormick, Ethan M; Qu, Yang; Telzer, Eva H

    2017-01-01

    Although immature cognitive control, subserved by late-developing prefrontal regions, has been proposed to underlie increased risk taking during adolescence, it remains unclear what patterns of PFC activation represent mature brain states: more or less activation? One challenge to drawing cogent conclusions from extant work stems from its reliance on single-time point neuroimaging and cross-sectional comparisons, which are ill-suited for assessing the complex changes that characterize adolescence. This necessitates longitudinal fMRI work to track within-subject changes in PFC function and links to risk-taking behavior, which can serve as an external marker for maturation of neural systems involved in cognitive control. In the current study, 20 healthy adolescents (13 males) completed a go/nogo task during two fMRI scans, once at age 14 years and again at age 15 years. We found that the association between cognitive control-related VLPFC activation and risk-taking behavior reversed when examining wave 1 (W1) versus longitudinal change (W2 > W1) and wave 2 (W2) in neural activation, such that increased VLPFC activation at W1 was associated with lower risk taking, whereas longitudinal increases in cognitive control-related VLPFC activation as well as heightened VLPFC activation at W2 were associated with greater risk taking. Several steps were taken to disentangle potential alternative accounts that might explain these disparate results across time. Findings highlight the necessity of considering brain-behavior relationships in the context of ongoing developmental changes and suggests that using neuroimaging data at a single time point to predict behavioral changes can introduce interpretation errors when failing to account for changes in neural trajectories.

  11. Activation in Context: Differential Conclusions Drawn from Cross-Sectional and Longitudinal Analyses of Adolescents’ Cognitive Control-Related Neural Activity

    PubMed Central

    McCormick, Ethan M.; Qu, Yang; Telzer, Eva H.

    2017-01-01

    Although immature cognitive control, subserved by late-developing prefrontal regions, has been proposed to underlie increased risk taking during adolescence, it remains unclear what patterns of PFC activation represent mature brain states: more or less activation? One challenge to drawing cogent conclusions from extant work stems from its reliance on single-time point neuroimaging and cross-sectional comparisons, which are ill-suited for assessing the complex changes that characterize adolescence. This necessitates longitudinal fMRI work to track within-subject changes in PFC function and links to risk-taking behavior, which can serve as an external marker for maturation of neural systems involved in cognitive control. In the current study, 20 healthy adolescents (13 males) completed a go/nogo task during two fMRI scans, once at age 14 years and again at age 15 years. We found that the association between cognitive control-related VLPFC activation and risk-taking behavior reversed when examining wave 1 (W1) versus longitudinal change (W2 > W1) and wave 2 (W2) in neural activation, such that increased VLPFC activation at W1 was associated with lower risk taking, whereas longitudinal increases in cognitive control-related VLPFC activation as well as heightened VLPFC activation at W2 were associated with greater risk taking. Several steps were taken to disentangle potential alternative accounts that might explain these disparate results across time. Findings highlight the necessity of considering brain-behavior relationships in the context of ongoing developmental changes and suggests that using neuroimaging data at a single time point to predict behavioral changes can introduce interpretation errors when failing to account for changes in neural trajectories. PMID:28392763

  12. Structured Teaching and Classroom Management--the Solution for the Decline of Swedish School Results? Conclusions Drawn from a Comparative Meta-Synthesis of Teaching and Learning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Håkansson, Jan

    2015-01-01

    With a basis in conclusions from a comparative meta-synthesis of teaching and learning, the question of structured and teacher-led teaching in Swedish comprehensive schools is discussed and analysed. The aim is to illustrate the development of results and changes in teaching patterns in Swedish comprehensive schools in relation to new regulations…

  13. An investigation of wing buffeting response at subsonic and transonic speeds: Phase 1: F-111A flight data analysis. Volume 1: Summary of technical approach, results and conclusions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Benepe, D. B.; Cunningham, A. M., Jr.; Dunmyer, W. D.

    1978-01-01

    The structural response to aerodynamic buffet during moderate to high-g maneuvers at subsonic and transonic speeds was investigated. The investigation is reported in three volumes. This volume presents a summary of the investigation with a complete description of the technical approach, description of the aircraft, its instrumentation, the data reduction procedures, results and conclusion.

  14. Analysis and optimization of thermal stratification and self-pressurization effects in liquid hydrogen storage systems -- Part 2: Model results and conclusions

    SciTech Connect

    Gursu, S.; Veziroglu, T.N. . Clean Energy Research Inst.); Sherif, S.A. . Dept. of Mechanical Engineering); Sheffield, J.W. . Dept. of Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering and Engineering Mechanics)

    1993-09-01

    Three models capable of predicting the phenomena of thermal stratification and self-pressurization in liquid hydrogen storage systems were presented in Part 1 of this paper. In order to be able to evaluate the performance of the different pressure rise models, the results are compared with experimental data obtained from different tests. The set of experimental data obtained from the Plum Brook B-2 test, in the NASA-Lewis Research Center, represents a very accurately instrumented and closely controlled experimental work performed on the liquid hydrogen storage tank. Another set of data is taken from the experimental study conducted again in the NASA-Lewis Research Center to obtain a correlating parameter which relates the rate of pressure rise to the volume of spherical liquid hydrogen tank. In this paper model results are presented and discussed and general conclusions are reached.

  15. Project Summary and Conclusions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sawin, Charles

    1999-01-01

    A top level summary of activities conducted throughout the course of the EDOMP in response to initial concerns at the outset of the program is provided. Significant findings from the investigations are summarized, together with resulting countermeasures that were implemented and flight rules that were developed in response to these findings. Subsequent paragraphs provide more information; details will be found in the referenced sections.

  16. An Ecological Study of the Lagoons Surrounding the John F. Kennedy Space Center, Brevard County, Florida. Volume I; Experimental Results and Conclusions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nevin, T. A.; Lasater, J. A.; Clark, K. B.; Kalajian, E. H.; Dubbelday, P. S.

    1976-01-01

    The studies reported here are the result of a three year effort to define the major biological, microbiological, chemical and geological characteristics of the water of the Indian River lagoon around the Kennedy Space Center and to determine the movements of those waters within and between the various basins. This work was the result of a jointly funded agreement between the Florida Institute of Technology and John F. Kennedy Space Center, NASA under NASA Grant NGR 10-015-008, dated April 11, 1972. This cost sharing grant was renewed for each of two successive years. Sampling operations were terminated August 31, 1975.

  17. Moving-bed gasification - combined-cycle control study. Volume 2. Results and conclusions, Case 2 - oxygen-blown, slagging-ash operation

    SciTech Connect

    Priestley, R.R.

    1982-10-01

    A computer simulation study has been conducted to investigate the process dynamics and control strategies required for operation of an oxygen-blown, slagging, moving-bed gasifier combined cycle (GCC) power plant in a utility power system. The gasifier modeled is of the modified Lurgi type as developed by the British Gas Corporation. This study is a continuation of a study on moving-bed GCC control analysis. Work reported on previously (EPRI report AP-1740) was for an air-blown, dry-ash Lurgi GCC power plant and results are compared to this study. The simulated GCC plant configuration is similar to that developed in earlier EPRI economic studies (EPRI report AF-642). The computer model used in the air-blown, dry-ash GCC study was re-configured to represent the oxygen-blown slagging GCC cleanup process and a new gasifier model included. Gas turbine-lead and gasifier-lead control modes were evaluated with respect to power system dynamic requirements. The effect of gasifier output fluctuations, as observed in actual gasifier process development unit operation, was modeled and investigated. In comparison to the air-blown GCC power plant, the oxygen-blown fuel process and power generation process are not as integrated, resulting in less system interaction and reduced difficulty of control. As concluded in the air-blown GCC system study, the turbine-lead control mode is the preferred control strategy because it can effectively meet power system requirements. The large storage volume of the cleanup system is used to advantage and control of the combined cycle is maintained close to that of a conventional-fueled combined cycle. The oxygen-blown system is more responsive than the air-blown system and can successfully meet power system requirements.

  18. NGS-based BRCA1/2 mutation testing of high-grade serous ovarian cancer tissue: results and conclusions of the first international round robin trial.

    PubMed

    Endris, Volker; Stenzinger, Albrecht; Pfarr, Nicole; Penzel, Roland; Möbs, Markus; Lenze, Dido; Darb-Esfahani, Silvia; Hummel, Michael; Sabine-Merkelbach-Bruse; Jung, Andreas; Lehmann, Ulrich; Kreipe, Hans; Kirchner, Thomas; Büttner, Reinhard; Jochum, Wolfram; Höfler, Gerald; Dietel, Manfred; Weichert, Wilko; Schirmacher, Peter

    2016-06-01

    With the approval of olaparib as monotherapy treatment in platinum-sensitive, relapsed high-grade serous ovarian cancer by the European Medical Agency (EMA), comprehensive genotyping of BRCA1 and BRCA2 in tumor tissue has become a mandatory pre-therapeutic test. This requires significant advances in routine tumor test methodologies due to the large size of both genes and the lack of mutational hot spots. Classical focused screening approaches, like Sanger sequencing, do not allow for a sensitive, rapid, and economic analysis of tumor tissue. Next-generation sequencing (NGS) approaches employing targeted panels for BRCA1/2 to interrogate formalin-fixed and paraffin-embedded tumor samples from either surgical resection or biopsy specimens can overcome these limitations. Although focused NGS methods have been implemented by few centers in routine molecular diagnostics for the analysis of some druggable oncogenic mutations, the reliable diagnostic testing of the entire coding regions of BRCA1 and BRCA2 was a new challenge requiring extensive technological improvement and quality management. Here, we describe the implementation and results of the first round robin trial for BRCA1/2 mutation testing in tumor tissue that was conducted in central Europe on May 2015, shortly after the approval and prior to the official release of olaparib. The high success rate of 81 % (21/26 test centers) demonstrates that BRCA1/2 multicenter mutation testing is well feasible in FFPE tumor tissue, extending to other tumor entities beyond ovarian cancer. The high number of test centers passing the trial demonstrates the success of the concerted efforts by German, Swiss, and Austrian pathology centers to ensure quality-controlled NGS-based testing and proves the potential of this technology in routine molecular pathology. On the basis of our results, we provide recommendations for predictive testing of tumor tissue for BRCA1/2 to clinical decision making in ovarian cancer patients.

  19. System performance conclusions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Arndt, G. D.

    1980-01-01

    The advantages and disadvantages of reducing power levels and using antennas with diameters smaller than 1 Km were evaluated if rectenna costs and land usage requirements become major factors, operating at 5800 megahertz should be considered. Three sequences (random, incoherent phasing, and concentric rings - center to edge) provided satisfactory performance in that the resultant sidelobe levels during startup/ shutdown were lower than the steady-state levels present during normal operations. Grating lobe peaks and scattered power levels were used to determine the array/subarray mechanical alignment requirements. The antenna alignment requirement is 1 min or 3 min depending on phase control configuration. System error parameters were defined to minimize scattered microwave power.

  20. Conclusions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ahonen, Pasi; Alahuhta, Petteri; Daskala, Barbara; Delaitre, Sabine; Hert, Paul De; Lindner, Ralf; Maghiros, Ioannis; Moscibroda, Anna; Schreurs, Wim; Verlinden, Michiel

    Some say that an increase in security does not necessarily mean a further encroachment on privacy - indeed, security is necessary to protect personal data and our privacy. Networks must be secure, our personal devices, reliable, dependable and trustworthy. But security is a multifaceted term, with many dimensions. We are of the view that an increase in security most likely will encroach upon our privacy in an ambient intelligence world. Surveillance cameras will continue to proliferate. We assume that, whatever the law is, whatever privacy protections government and business say they honour, our telecommunications, e-mails and Internet usage will be monitored to an increasing degree. The same will be true of our interfaces with the world of ambient intelligence.

  1. Conclusion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ivancevic, Vladimir G.; Reid, Darryn J.

    2015-11-01

    It is often held that things should always be made simple, which presumes that either that they can always be made simple or that all the jetisoned logic doesn't matter anyway. Alledgedly, anything should be explainable so that anyone can understand it. Don't get bogged down in dreary details. It should be effortless for the reader: low-dimensional systems exhibit complex behaviour while high-dimensional systems exhibit simple behaviour (to return to our prolegomonal opening), competition is a universal solution, demand must increase as price falls, and everything under the sun neatly fits a power law. Or so the story goes...

  2. Conclusions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Binder, P.-M.; Smith, K.

    If you made it to this point, this is what we have tried to offer you: a view of language like no other book has provided before. It is quite possible that this is one of very few books you have read on the subject; it could even be your first. Chances are that those you have read were written for a general audience. Some of them are very good, but they usually try to push a particular viewpoint of their author. Or you may have followed an introductory linguistics course at the university level. Such courses, and their textbooks, focus on technical aspects of the subject: the details of theories of phonology, syntax, semantics and so on. Knowledge of all of these areas is absolutely necessary for a deep understanding of the subject. But both single-author general books and technical textbooks have the same shortcoming: they do not give the reader a broad and complete account of how language works.

  3. [Results of 2 years of activity].

    PubMed

    Panigazzi, M

    2010-01-01

    Work-related injuries and occupational diseases are a scourge of modern, western societies, which, although technologically advanced, have difficulty in preventing, treating and rehabilitating victims with speed and efficiency. The current hospital neuromotor rehabilitation centres, whether public or accredited private structures, have notable difficulty in meeting the demand, which despite annual fluctuations and variable needs, does not, overall, seem to be decreasing. We present the results of an organization model developed at the "Fondazione Maugeri" Scientific Institute (Pavia, Italy), the criteria used for the activity, the technological innovations employed to determine ability, and the prospects for further development. This model is effective from a health care-rehabilitative point of view, also in the light of the new legislative scenarios, and is sustainable from an economic points of view; overall it is, therefore, efficient.

  4. Tellurium in active volcanic environments: Preliminary results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Milazzo, Silvia; Calabrese, Sergio; D'Alessandro, Walter; Brusca, Lorenzo; Bellomo, Sergio; Parello, Francesco

    2014-05-01

    Tellurium is a toxic metalloid and, according to the Goldschmidt classification, a chalcophile element. In the last years its commercial importance has considerably increased because of its wide use in solar cells, thermoelectric and electronic devices of the last generation. Despite such large use, scientific knowledge about volcanogenic tellurium is very poor. Few previous authors report result of tellurium concentrations in volcanic plume, among with other trace metals. They recognize this element as volatile, concluding that volcanic gases and sulfur deposits are usually enriched with tellurium. Here, we present some results on tellurium concentrations in volcanic emissions (plume, fumaroles, ash leachates) and in environmental matrices (soils and plants) affected by volcanic emissions and/or deposition. Samples were collected at Etna and Vulcano (Italy), Turrialba (Costa Rica), Miyakejima, Aso, Asama (Japan), Mutnovsky (Kamchatka) at the crater rims by using common filtration techniques for aerosols (polytetrafluoroethylene filters). Filters were both eluted with Millipore water and acid microwave digested, and analyzed by inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICP-MS). Volcanic ashes emitted during explosive events on Etna and Copahue (Argentina) were analyzed for tellurium bulk composition and after leaching experiments to evaluate the soluble fraction of tellurium. Soils and leaves of vegetation were also sampled close to active volcanic vents (Etna, Vulcano, Nisyros, Nyiragongo, Turrialba, Gorely and Masaya) and investigated for tellurium contents. Preliminary results showed very high enrichments of tellurium in volcanic emissions comparing with other volatile elements like mercury, arsenic, thallium and bismuth. This suggests a primary transport in the volatile phase, probably in gaseous form (as also suggested by recent studies) and/or as soluble salts (halides and/or sulfates) adsorbed on the surface of particulate particles and ashes. First

  5. [SENTIERI Project: discussion and conclusions].

    PubMed

    Pirastu, Roberta; Ricci, Paolo; Comba, Pietro; Bianchi, Fabrizio; Biggeri, Annibale; Conti, Susanna; Fazzo, Lucia; Forastiere, Francesco; Iavarone, Ivano; Martuzzi, Marco; Musmeci, Loredana; Pasetto, Roberto; Zona, Amerigo; Crocetti, Emanuele

    2014-01-01

    showing the increase, considering latency and the length of the observation period. Of further interest are results relating to diseases of the urinary tract such as kidney failure in the NPCSs of Basso bacino del fiume Chienti, Taranto, Milazzo and Priolo. Overall, the results discussed above are consistent with the previous findings pertaining to mortality for 1995-2002. The present analysis also introduces a new element - the study of cancer incidence and hospital discharges - which can tell us a great deal about diseases with high survival rates or non lethal ones. The first is the case of thyroid cancer, which presents increases in both databases and for both genders in a number of NPCSs (Brescia-Caffaro, Laghi di Mantova, Milazzo, Sassuolo- Scandiano and Taranto). The study of cancer incidence and hospital discharges also revealed cancer excesses for melanoma, breast cancer and non Hodgkin lymphoma in Brescia-Caffaro NPCS where PCBs (Polychlorinated biphenyl) are the site's main pollutant. PCBs, according to the 2013 evaluation of the International Agency for Research on Cancer, are ascertained human carcinogens for melanoma and probable carcinogens for breast cancer and non-Hodgkin lymphoma. The results pertaining to cancer incidence in the 17 NPCSs can also be presented using rankings by area or disease analyzed by a multivariate hierarchical Bayesian model. These rankings reveal an overlapping of credibility intervals, such that it is not possible to speak of a limited number of cancer sites or of certain NPCSs as being particularly affected. Every NPCS, therefore, must be considered individually and ordering them by ranking of cancer incidence wouldn't be appropriate. Data collected concerning some of the NPCSs in the context of the SENTIERI Project is so conclusive that remediation measures can immediately be put in place. This is the case in the Biancavilla and Brescia-Caffaro NPCSs. A similar conclusion can be drawn for complex locations such as Taranto

  6. Standardization activities for harmonization of test results.

    PubMed

    Dati, F; Brand, B

    2000-07-01

    In the last years the search for sensitive and specific markers of renal damage and/or renal function has conducted to the development of laboratory assays for measurement of urinary proteins such as albumin, beta(2)-microglobulin, alpha(1)-microglobulin, cystatin C, etc. Furthermore, there have been new applications of already known markers based on different, reformulated methods which often rely on more advanced technologies. It is evident that such developments are connected with analytical and interpretative problems for laboratory managers and clinicians. In this situation, it is essential that international societies develop comprehensive measures for the quality management of these assays and issue uniform and carefully elaborated guidelines to ensure optimal test utilization. International activities are also directed to the development of optimized and standardized methods as well as to the production and evaluation of appropriate reference materials and, finally, to the establishment of appropriate reference ranges and cut-off values for specific analytes. The main use of reference materials is in the transfer of their accurately assigned values to the calibrators of diagnostic companies for calibration of commercially available test systems. These international standardization activities and strategies will allow a harmonized approach to disease management using a more reliable laboratory testing based on quality and value.

  7. Misapplied survey data and model uncertainty result in incorrect conclusions about the role of predation on alewife population dynamics in Lake Huron: a comment on He et al. (2015)

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Riley, Stephen C.; Dunlop, Erin S.

    2016-01-01

    Drastic recent and ongoing changes to fish populations and food webs in the Great Lakes have been well-described (Riley et al. 2008; Barbiero et al. 2009; Nalepa et al. 2009; Fahnenstiel et al. 2010;Evans et al. 2011; Gobin et al. 2015), and uncertainty regarding their potential effects on fisheries has caused concern among scientists and fishery managers (e.g., Dettmers et al. 2012). In particular, the relative importance of “bottom-up” (e.g., lower trophic level changes) versus “top-down” (e.g., predation) factors to fish community changes in the Great Lakes have been widely debated (e.g.,Barbiero et al. 2011; Eshenroder and Lantry 2012; Bunnell et al. 2014). In Lake Huron, recent ecosystem changes have been particularly profound, and populations of alewife (Alosa pseudoharengus), an offshore pelagic prey fish, collapsed in 2003 and have yet to recover (Riley et al. 2008, 2014). He et al. (2015) recently used a series of linked ecological models to assess the role of predation in the dynamics of the offshore prey fish community in Lake Huron. While we believe that they provide a novel method for combining bioenergetics and stock assessment modeling, we question the validity of their conclusions because of the misapplication of survey data and the lack of critical interpretation of their modeling efforts. Here we describe how He et al. (2015) have misapplied bottom trawl data from Lake Huron, and we provide examples of how this has resulted in erroneous conclusions regarding the importance of predation to the population dynamics and collapse of alewife in Lake Huron.

  8. Client satisfaction. Operations research activities and results.

    PubMed

    1998-06-01

    Operations research (OR) is a major component of the Quality Assurance Project's (QAP) strategy for improving the quality of health care delivery worldwide. QAP's Operations Research Program aims to improve the feasibility, utility, and cost-effectiveness of quality assurance strategies in developing countries. QAP and its field partners work to maximize the utility of each field study's findings. As such, the project hopes to disseminate information on all aspects of important OR projects, from the initial design to implementation and results. Over the course of the project, QAP's staff and their partners will develop studies in 16 technical areas. One key area of interest is the study of client satisfaction with health care delivery. The project currently has two major studies on client satisfaction underway in Niger and Peru. Phase one results from the Niger research and QAP and the Max Salud Institute in Peru are discussed.

  9. Conclusions and Recommendations. Chapter 37

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lamar, John E.; Hummel, Dietrich

    2009-01-01

    This chapter provides a brief wrap-up of the task group report and focuses on the overall conclusions and recommendations for future work for the CAWAPI and VFE-2 facets beyond the task group. The overall conclusion is that the Technology Readiness Level (TRL) of CFD solvers has been improved in predicting the flow-physics of vortex-dominated flows during the work of the task group, by having flight and wind-tunnel data available for comparison. Moreover, like all good scientific studies, this task group has identified flight conditions on the F-16XL airplane or wind-tunnel test conditions for a specific leading-edge radius on the 65 delta-wing model where the TRL still needs to be increased.

  10. Cues Resulting in Desire for Sexual Activity in Women

    PubMed Central

    McCall, Katie; Meston, Cindy

    2010-01-01

    Introduction A number of questionnaires have been created to assess levels of sexual desire in women, but to our knowledge, there are currently no validated measures for assessing cues that result in sexual desire. A questionnaire of this nature could be useful for both clinicians and researchers, because it considers the contextual nature of sexual desire and it draws attention to individual differences in factors that can contribute to sexual desire. Aim The aim of the present study was to create a multidimensional assessment tool of cues for sexual desire in women that is validated in women with and without hypoactive sexual desire disorder (HSDD). Methods Factor analyses conducted on both an initial sample (N = 874) and a community sample (N = 138) resulted in the Cues for Sexual Desire Scale (CSDS) which included four factors: (i) Emotional Bonding Cues; (ii) Erotic/ Explicit Cues; (iii) Visual/Proximity Cues; and (iv) Implicit/Romantic Cues. Main Outcome Measures Scale construction of cues associated with sexual desire and differences between women with and without sexual dysfunction. Results The CSDS demonstrated good reliability and validity and was able to detect significant differences between women with and without HSDD. Results from regression analyses indicated that both marital status and level of sexual functioning predicted scores on the CSDS. The CSDS provided predictive validity for the Female Sexual Function Index desire and arousal domain scores, and increased cues were related to a higher reported frequency of sexual activity in women. Conclusions The findings from the present study provide valuable information regarding both internal and external triggers that can result in sexual desire for women. We believe that the CSDS could be beneficial in therapeutic settings to help identify cues that do and do not facilitate sexual desire in women with clinically diagnosed desire difficulties. PMID:16942529

  11. Results and conclusions test capabilities task group summary report

    SciTech Connect

    Bomber, T.; Pierce, K.; Easterling, R.; Rogers, J.

    1996-12-01

    This annotated briefing documents an economic analysis of Sandia`s system-level test facilities maintained and operated by the Design, Evaluation, and Test Technology Center 9700. The study was divided into four primary sub-tasks: (1) Estimation of the future system-level test workload, (2) Development of a consistent economic model to estimate the cost of maintaining and operating the test facilities, (3) Determination of the availability of viable alternative test sites, and (4) Assessment of the potential savings through reduction of excess capacity under various facility-closure scenarios. The analysis indicated that potential savings from closing all facilities could approach $6 million per year. However, large uncertainties in these savings remove any sound economic arguments for such closure: it is possible that testing at alternative sites could cost more than maintaining the current set of system-level test facilities. Finally, a number of programmatic risks incurred by facility closure were identified. Consideration of facility closure requires a careful weighing of any projected economic benefit against these programmatic risks. This summary report covers the briefing given to upper management. A more detailed discussion of the data and analyses is given in the full report, available for internal use from the technical library.

  12. Plutonium recycle test reactor characterization activities and results

    SciTech Connect

    Cornwell, B.C.

    1997-05-01

    Report contains results of PRTR core and associated structures characterization performed in January and February of 1997. Radiation survey data are presented, along with recommendations for stabilization activities before transitioning to a decontamination and decommissioning function. Recommendations are also made about handling the waste generated by the stabilization activities, and actions suggested by the Decontamination and Decommissioning organization.

  13. Cults and mental health: clinical conclusions.

    PubMed

    Levine, S V

    1981-12-01

    The field of cults and their relation to psychological and psychiatric disorder is reft with rhetoric and opinion. There has been a particular dearth of documentation and substantiated data supporting psychiatric opinion. As a result of considerable research, clinical work, and an extensive literature review, certain conclusions or strongly suggested positions are enunciated. An attempt is made to substantiate each of the ten assertions based on existing data, in the hope that they will clarify the muddy existing data, area, make clinical positions and interventions more soundly based, and inspire debate and heuristic efforts.

  14. Active Aging Promotion: Results from the Vital Aging Program

    PubMed Central

    Caprara, Mariagiovanna; Molina, María Ángeles; Schettini, Rocío; Santacreu, Marta; Orosa, Teresa; Mendoza-Núñez, Víctor Manuel; Rojas, Macarena; Fernández-Ballesteros, Rocío

    2013-01-01

    Active aging is one of the terms in the semantic network of aging well, together with others such as successful, productive, competent aging. All allude to the new paradigm in gerontology, whereby aging is considered from a positive perspective. Most authors in the field agree active aging is a multidimensional concept, embracing health, physical and cognitive fitness, positive affect and control, social relationships and engagement. This paper describes Vital Aging, an individual active aging promotion program implemented through three modalities: Life, Multimedia, and e-Learning. The program was developed on the basis of extensive evidence about individual determinants of active aging. The different versions of Vital Aging are described, and four evaluation studies (both formative and summative) are reported. Formative evaluation reflected participants' satisfaction and expected changes; summative evaluations yielded some quite encouraging results using quasi-experimental designs: those who took part in the programs increased their physical exercise, significantly improved their diet, reported better memory, had better emotional balance, and enjoyed more cultural, intellectual, affective, and social activities than they did before the course, thus increasing their social relationships. These results are discussed in the context of the common literature within the field and, also, taking into account the limitations of the evaluations accomplished. PMID:23476644

  15. First Results of the TIGRE Chromospheric Activity Survey

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mittag, M.; Hempelmann, A.; Gonzalez-Perez, J. N.; Schmitt, J. H. M. M.

    2015-01-01

    We present the first results of the stellar activity survey with TIGRE (Telescopio Internacional de Guanajuato, Robótico-Espectroscópico). This long term program was started in August 2013 with the monitoring of a larger number of stars. We aim at measuring the short- and long-term variability of stellar activity for stars of different spectral types and luminosity classes, using indicators of different spectral lines (mainly Ca II S-Index, Ca II IR triplet, H_α and sodium D). A transformation equation of the TIGRE S-Index into the Mount Wilson S-index was derived in order to compare our results to the vast body of existing S-index measurements. Furthermore, the correlation between the S-index and the lines of the Ca II IR triplet has been studied, based on strictly simultaneous observations.

  16. Human Ebola virus infection results in substantial immune activation.

    PubMed

    McElroy, Anita K; Akondy, Rama S; Davis, Carl W; Ellebedy, Ali H; Mehta, Aneesh K; Kraft, Colleen S; Lyon, G Marshall; Ribner, Bruce S; Varkey, Jay; Sidney, John; Sette, Alessandro; Campbell, Shelley; Ströher, Ute; Damon, Inger; Nichol, Stuart T; Spiropoulou, Christina F; Ahmed, Rafi

    2015-04-14

    Four Ebola patients received care at Emory University Hospital, presenting a unique opportunity to examine the cellular immune responses during acute Ebola virus infection. We found striking activation of both B and T cells in all four patients. Plasmablast frequencies were 10-50% of B cells, compared with less than 1% in healthy individuals. Many of these proliferating plasmablasts were IgG-positive, and this finding coincided with the presence of Ebola virus-specific IgG in the serum. Activated CD4 T cells ranged from 5 to 30%, compared with 1-2% in healthy controls. The most pronounced responses were seen in CD8 T cells, with over 50% of the CD8 T cells expressing markers of activation and proliferation. Taken together, these results suggest that all four patients developed robust immune responses during the acute phase of Ebola virus infection, a finding that would not have been predicted based on our current assumptions about the highly immunosuppressive nature of Ebola virus. Also, quite surprisingly, we found sustained immune activation after the virus was cleared from the plasma, observed most strikingly in the persistence of activated CD8 T cells, even 1 mo after the patients' discharge from the hospital. These results suggest continued antigen stimulation after resolution of the disease. From these convalescent time points, we identified CD4 and CD8 T-cell responses to several Ebola virus proteins, most notably the viral nucleoprotein. Knowledge of the viral proteins targeted by T cells during natural infection should be useful in designing vaccines against Ebola virus.

  17. Continuum Level Results from Particle Simulations of Active Suspensions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Delmotte, Blaise; Climent, Eric; Plouraboue, Franck; Keaveny, Eric

    2014-11-01

    Accurately simulating active suspensions on the lab scale is a technical challenge. It requires considering large numbers of interacting swimmers with well described hydrodynamics in order to obtain representative and reliable statistics of suspension properties. We have developed a computationally scalable model based on an extension of the Force Coupling Method (FCM) to active particles. This tool can handle the many-body hydrodynamic interactions between O (105) swimmers while also accounting for finite-size effects, steady or time-dependent strokes, or variable swimmer aspect ratio. Results from our simulations of steady-stroke microswimmer suspensions coincide with those given by continuum models, but, in certain cases, we observe collective dynamics that these models do not predict. We provide robust statistics of resulting distributions and accurately characterize the growth rates of these instabilities. In addition, we explore the effect of the time-dependent stroke on the suspension properties, comparing with those from the steady-stroke simulations. Authors acknowledge the ANR project Motimo for funding and the Calmip computing centre for technical support.

  18. Active Spacecraft Potential Control: Results From the Double Star Project

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Torkar, K.; Fazakerley, A.; Steiger, W.

    2006-10-01

    The ion emitter instrument "active spacecraft potential control" (ASPOC) has been used successfully in several magnetospheric missions including the European Space Agency Cluster Project. An improved version has been developed for the equatorial spacecraft of the Chinese-European Double Star mission (TC-1) launched in December 2003. The modifications include a new design of the ion emitter modules. As a result, higher currents than in previous missions can be achieved. The main objective of the investigation is the reduction of positive spacecraft potential in order to minimize perturbations to the plasma measurements onboard, in particular to the plasma electron instrument PEACE. These data show an almost complete suppression of photoelectrons when ASPOC is emitting at 30- to 50-muA beam current. The angular distribution of the electrons in the presence of the ion beam is investigated in detail. The measurement of ambient electron distributions is highly improved.

  19. Optimal active vibration absorber: Design and experimental results

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lee-Glauser, Gina; Juang, Jer-Nan; Sulla, Jeffrey L.

    1992-01-01

    An optimal active vibration absorber can provide guaranteed closed-loop stability and control for large flexible space structures with collocated sensors/actuators. The active vibration absorber is a second-order dynamic system which is designed to suppress any unwanted structural vibration. This can be designed with minimum knowledge of the controlled system. Two methods for optimizing the active vibration absorber parameters are illustrated: minimum resonant amplitude and frequency matched active controllers. The Controls-Structures Interaction Phase-1 Evolutionary Model at NASA LaRC is used to demonstrate the effectiveness of the active vibration absorber for vibration suppression. Performance is compared numerically and experimentally using acceleration feedback.

  20. Active Region Oscillations: Results from SOHO JOP 097

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    O'Shea, E.; Fleck, B.; Muglach, K.; Sütterlin, P.

    2001-05-01

    We present here an analysis of data obtained in a sunspot region, using the Coronal Diagnostic Spectrometer (CDS) on SOHO. These data were obtained in the context of the Joint Observing Program (JOP) 97 which, together with CDS, included the Michelson Doppler Imaging (MDI) instrument on SOHO, the TRACE satellite and various ground based observatories, e.g. the DOT on La Palma. Using the lines of Fe XVI 335, Mg IX 368, He I 584, O III 599, Mg X 624 and O V 624 of CDS time series data were obtained in the pore and plage regions of sunspots associated with active regions AR 9166, 9166 and 9169 between September 19-29 2000. In addition to the time series datasets we also obtained 240 arcsec x 240 arcsec raster images of the sunspot regions examined. Using different time series analysis techniques we analyse the different periods of oscillation found in time series datasets and present the results here. This research is part of the European Solar Magnetometry Network supported by the EC through the TMR programme.

  1. ICARUS T600: physics results and future activities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zani, Andrea

    2016-11-01

    The ICARUS T600 detector has proven the effectiveness of Liquid Argon TPC technology with a successful three-year long run at the INFN Gran Sasso National Laboratories (LNGS). ICARUS T600 LNGS data strongly contributed to the global effort in searching for neutrino oscillations mediated by sterile states. A definitive clarification of the sterile neutrino puzzle will come from the new multi-station, Short Baseline Neutrino (SBN) experiment at the Booster Neutrino Beam (BNB) at Fermilab, where a refurbished T600 will act as Far Detector. Presently the T600 detector is located at CERN, undergoing a major overhauling which will allow its participation in the 5 years program of the Fermilab upcoming SBN project. Moreover, ICARUS T600 is also foreseen to collect data with the NUMI Beam to be later exploited in the wider picture of the DUNE Long-Baseline project, recently undertaken by the United States community. This contribution will report the present physics results obtained by the ICARUS Collaboration, as well as describe the overhauling activities and the physics program for the detector in its future deployment at Fermilab.

  2. Assessment Results Following Inquiry and Traditional Physics Laboratory Activities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bryan, Joel Arthur

    2006-01-01

    Preservice elementary teachers in a conceptual physics course were given multiple resources to use during several inquiry activities in order to investigate how materials were chosen, used, and valued. These students performed significantly better on assessment items related to the inquiry physics activities than on items related to traditional…

  3. Do Media Use and Physical Activity Compete in Adolescents? Results of the MoMo Study

    PubMed Central

    Spengler, Sarah; Mess, Filip; Woll, Alexander

    2015-01-01

    Purpose The displacement hypothesis predicts that physical activity and media use compete in adolescents; however, findings are inconsistent. A more differentiated approach at determining the co-occurrence of physical activity and media use behaviors within subjects may be warranted. The aim of this study was to determine the co-occurrence of physical activity and media use by identifying clusters of adolescents with specific behavior patterns including physical activity in various settings (school, sports club, leisure time) and different types of media use (watching TV, playing console games, using PC / Internet). Methods Cross-sectional data of 2,083 adolescents (11–17 years) from all over Germany were collected between 2009 and 2012 in the Motorik-Modul Study. Physical activity and media use were self-reported. Cluster analyses (Ward’s method and K-means analysis) were used to identify behavior patterns of boys and girls separately. Results Eight clusters were identified for boys and seven for girls. The clusters demonstrated that a high proportion of boys (33%) as well as girls (42%) show low engagement in both physical activity and media use, irrespective of setting or type of media. Other adolescents are engaged in both behaviors, but either physical activity (35% of boys, 27% of girls) or media use (31% of boys and girls) predominates. These adolescents belong to different clusters, whereat in most clusters either one specific setting of physical activity or a specific combination of different types of media predominates. Conclusion The results of this study support to some extent the hypothesis that media use and physical activity compete: Very high media use occurred with low physical activity behavior, but very high activity levels co-occurred with considerable amounts of time using any media. There was no evidence that type of used media was related to physical activity levels, neither setting of physical activity was related to amount of media use

  4. Stellar activity and coronal heating: an overview of recent results

    PubMed Central

    Testa, Paola; Saar, Steven H.; Drake, Jeremy J.

    2015-01-01

    Observations of the coronae of the Sun and of solar-like stars provide complementary information to advance our understanding of stellar magnetic activity, and of the processes leading to the heating of their outer atmospheres. While solar observations allow us to study the corona at high spatial and temporal resolution, the study of stellar coronae allows us to probe stellar activity over a wide range of ages and stellar parameters. Stellar studies therefore provide us with additional tools for understanding coronal heating processes, as well as the long-term evolution of solar X-ray activity. We discuss how recent studies of stellar magnetic fields and coronae contribute to our understanding of the phenomenon of activity and coronal heating in late-type stars. PMID:25897087

  5. Stellar activity and coronal heating: an overview of recent results.

    PubMed

    Testa, Paola; Saar, Steven H; Drake, Jeremy J

    2015-05-28

    Observations of the coronae of the Sun and of solar-like stars provide complementary information to advance our understanding of stellar magnetic activity, and of the processes leading to the heating of their outer atmospheres. While solar observations allow us to study the corona at high spatial and temporal resolution, the study of stellar coronae allows us to probe stellar activity over a wide range of ages and stellar parameters. Stellar studies therefore provide us with additional tools for understanding coronal heating processes, as well as the long-term evolution of solar X-ray activity. We discuss how recent studies of stellar magnetic fields and coronae contribute to our understanding of the phenomenon of activity and coronal heating in late-type stars.

  6. Charpy impact test results for low-activation ferritic alloys

    SciTech Connect

    Cannon, N.S.; Hu, W.L.; Gelles, D.S.

    1987-05-01

    The objective of this work is to evaluate the shift of the ductile to brittle transition temperature (DBTT) and the reduction of the upper shelf energy (USE) due to neutron irradiation of low activation ferritic alloys. Six low activation ferritic alloys have been tested following irradiation at 365/sup 0/C to 10 dpa and compared with control specimens in order to assess the effect of irradiation on Charpy impact properties.

  7. Tc-99 Adsorption on Selected Activated Carbons - Batch Testing Results

    SciTech Connect

    Mattigod, Shas V.; Wellman, Dawn M.; Golovich, Elizabeth C.; Cordova, Elsa A.; Smith, Ronald M.

    2010-12-01

    CH2M HILL Plateau Remediation Company (CHPRC) is currently developing a 200-West Area groundwater pump-and-treat system as the remedial action selected under the Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act Record of Decision for Operable Unit (OU) 200-ZP-1. This report documents the results of treatability tests Pacific Northwest National Laboratory researchers conducted to quantify the ability of selected activated carbon products (or carbons) to adsorb technetium-99 (Tc-99) from 200-West Area groundwater. The Tc-99 adsorption performance of seven activated carbons (J177601 Calgon Fitrasorb 400, J177606 Siemens AC1230AWC, J177609 Carbon Resources CR-1240-AW, J177611 General Carbon GC20X50, J177612 Norit GAC830, J177613 Norit GAC830, and J177617 Nucon LW1230) were evaluated using water from well 299-W19-36. Four of the best performing carbons (J177606 Siemens AC1230AWC, J177609 Carbon Resources CR-1240-AW, J177611 General Carbon GC20X50, and J177613 Norit GAC830) were selected for batch isotherm testing. The batch isotherm tests on four of the selected carbons indicated that under lower nitrate concentration conditions (382 mg/L), Kd values ranged from 6,000 to 20,000 mL/g. In comparison. Under higher nitrate (750 mg/L) conditions, there was a measureable decrease in Tc-99 adsorption with Kd values ranging from 3,000 to 7,000 mL/g. The adsorption data fit both the Langmuir and the Freundlich equations. Supplemental tests were conducted using the two carbons that demonstrated the highest adsorption capacity to resolve the issue of the best fit isotherm. These tests indicated that Langmuir isotherms provided the best fit for Tc-99 adsorption under low nitrate concentration conditions. At the design basis concentration of Tc 0.865 µg/L(14,700 pCi/L), the predicted Kd values from using Langmuir isotherm constants were 5,980 mL/g and 6,870 mL/g for for the two carbons. These Kd values did not meet the target Kd value of 9,000 mL/g. Tests

  8. Benchmarking Evaluation Results for Prototype Extravehicular Activity Gloves

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Aitchison, Lindsay; McFarland, Shane

    2012-01-01

    The Space Suit Assembly (SSA) Development Team at NASA Johnson Space Center has invested heavily in the advancement of rear-entry planetary exploration suit design but largely deferred development of extravehicular activity (EVA) glove designs, and accepted the risk of using the current flight gloves, Phase VI, for unique mission scenarios outside the Space Shuttle and International Space Station (ISS) Program realm of experience. However, as design reference missions mature, the risks of using heritage hardware have highlighted the need for developing robust new glove technologies. To address the technology gap, the NASA Game-Changing Technology group provided start-up funding for the High Performance EVA Glove (HPEG) Project in the spring of 2012. The overarching goal of the HPEG Project is to develop a robust glove design that increases human performance during EVA and creates pathway for future implementation of emergent technologies, with specific aims of increasing pressurized mobility to 60% of barehanded capability, increasing the durability by 100%, and decreasing the potential of gloves to cause injury during use. The HPEG Project focused initial efforts on identifying potential new technologies and benchmarking the performance of current state of the art gloves to identify trends in design and fit leading to establish standards and metrics against which emerging technologies can be assessed at both the component and assembly levels. The first of the benchmarking tests evaluated the quantitative mobility performance and subjective fit of four prototype gloves developed by Flagsuit LLC, Final Frontier Designs, LLC Dover, and David Clark Company as compared to the Phase VI. All of the companies were asked to design and fabricate gloves to the same set of NASA provided hand measurements (which corresponded to a single size of Phase Vi glove) and focus their efforts on improving mobility in the metacarpal phalangeal and carpometacarpal joints. Four test

  9. Electrocardiograhic findings resulting in inappropriate cardiac catheterization laboratory activation for ST-segment elevation myocardial infarction

    PubMed Central

    Shamim, Shariq; McCrary, Justin; Wayne, Lori; Gratton, Matthew

    2014-01-01

    Background Prompt reperfusion has been shown to improve outcomes in patients with acute ST-segment elevation myocardial infarction (STEMI) with a goal of culprit vessel patency in <90 minutes. This requires a coordinated approach between the emergency medical services (EMS), emergency department (ED) and interventional cardiology. The urgency of this process can contribute to inappropriate cardiac catheterization laboratory (CCL) activations. Objectives One of the major determinants of inappropriate activations has been misinterpretation of the electrocardiogram (ECG) in the patient with acute chest pain. Methods We report the ECG findings for all CCL activations over an 18-month period after the inception of a STEMI program at our institution. Results There were a total of 139 activations with 77 having a STEMI diagnosis confirmed and 62 activations where there was no STEMI. The inappropriate activations resulted from a combination of atypical symptoms and misinterpretation of the ECG (45% due to anterior ST-segment elevation) on patient presentation. The electrocardiographic abnormalities were particularly problematic in African-Americans with left ventricular hypertrophy. Conclusions In this single-center, prospective observational study, nearly half of the inappropriate STEMI activations were due to the misinterpretation of anterior ST-segment elevation and this finding was commonly seen in African-Americans with left ventricular hypertrophy. PMID:25009790

  10. History Scene Investigations: From Clues to Conclusions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McIntyre, Beverly

    2011-01-01

    In this article, the author introduces a social studies lesson that allows students to learn history and practice reading skills, critical thinking, and writing. The activity is called History Scene Investigation or HSI, which derives its name from the popular television series based on crime scene investigations (CSI). HSI uses discovery learning…

  11. Annoyance resulting from intrusion of aircraft sounds upon various activities

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gunn, W. J.; Shepherd, W. T.; Fletcher, J. L.

    1975-01-01

    An experiment was conducted in which subjects were engaged in TV viewing, telephone listening, or reverie (no activity) for a 1/2-hour session. During the session, they were exposed to a series of recorded aircraft sounds at the rate of one flight every 2 minutes. Within each session, four levels of flyover noise, separated by dB increments, were presented several times in a Latin Square balanced sequence. The peak level of the noisiest flyover in any session was fixed at 95, 90, 85, 75, or 70 dBA. At the end of the test session, subjects recorded their responses to the aircraft sounds, using a bipolar scale which covered the range from very pleasant to extremely annoying. Responses to aircraft noises were found to be significantly affected by the particular activity in which the subjects were engaged. Not all subjects found the aircraft sounds to be annoying.

  12. Conclusions from PISA and TIMSS Testing

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tienken, Christopher H.

    2013-01-01

    Secretary of Education Duncan (2010) lamented the state of U.S. education in 2010 after the release of the results from the 2009 Programme for International Student Assessment (PISA). He wrote: "Unfortunately, the 2009 PISA results show that American students are poorly prepared to compete in today's knowledge economy. President Obama has…

  13. Experimental results using active control of traveling wave power flow

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miller, David W.; Hall, Steven R.

    1991-01-01

    Active structural control experiments conducted on a 24-ft pinned-free beam derived feedback compensators on the basis of a traveling-wave approach. A compensator is thus obtained which eliminates resonant behavior by absorbing all impinging power. A causal solution is derived for this noncausal compensator which mimics its behavior in a given frequency range, using the Wiener-Hopf. This optimal Wiener-Hopf compensator's structure-damping performance is found to exceed any obtainable by means of rate feedback. Performance limitations encompassed the discovery of frequencies above which the sensor and actuator were no longer dual and an inadvertent coupling of the control hardware to unmodeled structure torsion modes.

  14. Towards active capsular endoscopy: preliminary results on a legged platform.

    PubMed

    Menciassi, Arianna; Stefanini, Cesare; Orlandi, Giovanni; Quirini, Marco; Dario, Paolo

    2006-01-01

    This paper illustrates the problem of active locomotion in the gastrointestinal tract for endoscopic capsules. Authors analyze the problem of locomotion in unstructured, flexible and tubular environments and explain the reasons leading to the selection of a legged system. They present a theoretical simulation of legged capsule locomotion, which is used to define the optimal parameters for capsule design and gait selection. Finally, a legged capsule--about 3 cm3 in volume--is presented; it consists of 4 back legs whose actuation is achieved thanks to a miniaturized DC brushless motor. In vitro tests demonstrate good performance in terms of achievable speed (92 mm/min).

  15. Results From the Bipartisan Policy Center's CEO Council Physical Activity Challenge to American Business

    PubMed Central

    Berko, Jeff; Goetzel, Ron Z.; Roemer, Enid Chung; Kent, Karen; Marchibroda, Janet

    2016-01-01

    Objective: The aim of this study was to describe findings from a survey of employees at 10 businesses participating in the “Building Better Health: Physical Activity Challenge,” an effort led by the Bipartisan Policy Center's CEO Council on Health and Innovation. Methods: Employers provided employees with pedometers as part of an 8-week Physical Activity Challenge (Challenge). Employees were then asked to complete a survey about their awareness of, participation in, and satisfaction with the Challenge. Results: One hundred three thousand three hundred eighty-three employees participated in the Challenge, averaging 6886 steps per day per participant. Of the 3820 respondents to an employee survey sent to all workers, 62% reported enrolling in the program, and of those, the majority reported positive impacts on health (76%), fitness (73%), and lifestyle (70%). Conclusion: A brief, workplace-based physical activity challenge can achieve positive self-reported health impacts when supported by senior management of the company. PMID:27930485

  16. Return to sporting activity after Birmingham hip resurfacing arthroplasty: Mid term results

    PubMed Central

    Sandiford, Nemandra; Muirhead-Allwood, SK; Skinner, JA

    2015-01-01

    Background: Hip resurfacing arthroplasty (HRA) is primarily indicated for young, active patients with disabling coxarthrosis who wish to remain active and return to sports after surgery. Relatively few prospective studies have assessed return to sporting activity and impact of gender and age on this. Materials and Methods: Seventy-nine consecutive patients treated with HRA were included. Patients were reviewed clinically and radiologically. Function was assessed using the modified University of California Los Angeles (UCLA) activity score. The Oxford, Harris and WOMAC hip scores were calculated. Results: Average age at the time of surgery was 54.9 years (range 34.5–73.6 years). Average preoperative and postoperative UCLA scores were 4 and 7.6 respectively. Patients were involved in 2 (0–4) sporting activities preoperatively and 2 (0–5) postoperatively. Preoperative and postoperative Oxford Hip Scores, Harris Hip Score and WOMAC scores were 40, 46 and 51 and 16, 94 and 3 respectively (P < 0.0001). Patients returned to sports at an average of 3 months postoperatively. Conclusion: Patients were able to return to sports by 3 months and perform the same number of activities at preoperative intensity. Activity levels are maintained up to the medium term with few complications. PMID:26806965

  17. Hellenic Amateur Astronomy Association's activities: Preliminary results on Perseids 2010

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maravelias, G.

    2011-01-01

    Preliminary results on the Perseids 2010 are presented. Visual and video observations were obtained by the author and a first reduction of the visual data shows that a maximum of ZHR ~120 was reached during the night 12-13 of August 2010. Moreover, a video setup was tested (DMK camera and UFO Capture v2) and the results show that, under some limitations, valuable data can be obtained.

  18. Efficacy of physical activity in the adjunctive treatment of major depressive disorders: preliminary results

    PubMed Central

    2007-01-01

    Background No controlled trials have evaluated the long term efficacy of exercise activity to improve the treatment of patients with Major Depressive Disorders. The aim of the present study was to confirm the efficacy of the adjunctive physical activity in the treatment of major depressive disorders, with a long term follow up (8 months). Methods Trial with randomized naturalistic control. Patients selected from the clinical activity registries of the Psychiatric Unit of the University of Cagliari, Italy. Inclusion criteria: female, between 40 and 60 years, diagnosis of Major Depressive Disorders (DSM-IV TR) resistant to the ongoing treatment. Exclusion criteria: diagnosis of psychotic disorders; any contraindications to physical activity. 30 patients (71.4% of the eligible) participated to the study. Cases: 10 randomized patients undergoing pharmacological treatment plus physical activity. Controls: 20 patients undergoing only pharmacological therapy. The following tools were collected from each patient by two different psychiatric physicians at baseline and 8 month after the beginning of exercise program: SCID-I, HAM-D, CGI (Clinical Global Impression), GAF. Results The patients that made physical activity had their HAM-D, GAF and CGI score improved from T0 to T8, all differences were statistically significant. In the control group HAM-D, GAF and CGI scores do not show any statistically significant differences between T0 and T8. Limits Small sample size limited to female in adult age; control group was not subject to any structured rehabilitation activity or placebo so it was impossible to evaluate if the improvement was due to a non specific therapeutic effect associated with taking part in a social activity. Conclusion Physical activity seems a good adjunctive treatment in the long term management of patients with MDD. Randomized placebo controlled trials are needed to confirm the results. PMID:17620123

  19. Summary of FY15 results of benchmark modeling activities

    SciTech Connect

    Arguello, J. Guadalupe

    2015-08-01

    Sandia is participating in the third phase of an is a contributing partner to a U.S.-German "Joint Project" entitled "Comparison of current constitutive models and simulation procedures on the basis of model calculations of the thermo-mechanical behavior and healing of rock salt." The first goal of the project is to check the ability of numerical modeling tools to correctly describe the relevant deformation phenomena in rock salt under various influences. Achieving this goal will lead to increased confidence in the results of numerical simulations related to the secure storage of radioactive wastes in rock salt, thereby enhancing the acceptance of the results. These results may ultimately be used to make various assertions regarding both the stability analysis of an underground repository in salt, during the operating phase, and the long-term integrity of the geological barrier against the release of harmful substances into the biosphere, in the post-operating phase.

  20. Results of Skylab medical experiment M171: Metabolic activity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Michel, E. L.; Rummel, J. A.; Sawin, C. F.; Buderer, M. C.; Lem, J. D.

    1974-01-01

    The experiment was conducted to establish whether man's ability to perform mechanical work would be progressively altered as a result of exposure to the weightless environment of space flight. The Skylab crewmen exercised on a bicycle ergometer at workloads approximating 25, 50, and 75 percent of their maximum aerobic capacity. The physiological parameters monitored were respiratory gas exchange, blood pressure, and vectorcardiogram/heart rate. The results of these tests indicate that the crewmen had no significant decrement in their responses to exercise during their exposure to zero gravity. The results of the third manned Skylab mission (Skylab 4) are presented and a comparison is made of the overall results obtained from the three successively longer Skylab manned missions. The Skylab 4 crewmembers' 84-day in-flight responses to exercise were no worse and were probably better than the responses of the crewmen on the first two Skylab missions. Indications that exercise was an important contributing factor in maintaining this response are discussed.

  1. The uses and results of active tetanus immunization

    PubMed Central

    Scheibel, Inga

    1955-01-01

    Both in animal experiments and in the course of two world wars active immunization has proved a safe method of protection against tetanus, and a method superior to passive serum prophylaxis. The three types of vaccine—plain, combined, and precipitated or adsorbed—all have their advantages and disadvantages, and the choice between them must be left to individual national health authorities. They should, however, be administered in two or three doses to confer basic immunity. What amount of circulating antitoxin is necessary to give full protection has not been accurately determined, but it is clear that one recall dose should be given about a year after the first injections as part of the routine course of injections. This seems enough to provide a long-lasting immunity, but a dose of vaccine should also be given at the time of injury. General immunization of the population is not practicable, but children, who are among the groups most at risk, can be immunized relatively simply by combined diphtheria and tetanus vaccine; in many countries, indeed, this is being done on an ever-increasing scale. PMID:13270078

  2. Conclusions: environmental change, wildlife conservation and reproduction.

    PubMed

    Holt, William V; Brown, Janine L; Comizzoli, Pierre

    2014-01-01

    Our intention when planning this book was to explore the diverse ways that reproductive science is inextricably tied to many aspects of biodiversity conservation, using the opportunity to present a vast amount of specialised information in a way that forms a coherent and important body of work. Some of the chapters were therefore concerned with understanding how taxonomic groups and species are being affected by globally important environmental changes, mostly caused through anthropogenic influences. Others were more focused on monitoring and understanding the physiology of wild species, with the aim of better understanding mechanisms underlying responses to captive conditions and environmental change, in both wild and captive animals. We also wanted to review advances in technological measures that are being actively developed to support the breeding and management of wildlife. In a few cases we have presented specific case studies that highlight the amount of effort required for the successful development of assisted reproductive technologies for wild species. Viewed overall, the outcome is spectacular; the last decade has seen enormous progress in many aspects of the sciences and technologies relevant to the topic. It is also clear that the boundaries between different scientific disciplines are becoming ever more blurred, and it is no longer easy or even possible to remain focused on a highly specialized topic in reproduction or conservation, without having at least some understanding of allied subjects. Here we present a few concluding comments about what we have learnt, and how the various topics interact with each other. We also emphasize that, as far as we know, no similarly comprehensive consideration of the contribution of reproductive science to wildlife conservation has been published within the last decade.

  3. Modification of Pulsed Electric Field Conditions Results in Distinct Activation Profiles of Platelet-Rich Plasma

    PubMed Central

    Frelinger, Andrew L.; Gerrits, Anja J.; Garner, Allen L.; Torres, Andrew S.; Caiafa, Antonio; Morton, Christine A.; Berny-Lang, Michelle A.; Carmichael, Sabrina L.; Neculaes, V. Bogdan; Michelson, Alan D.

    2016-01-01

    presence of platelet-derived microparticles, platelets, and platelet aggregates whereas SMHEF pulses primarily resulted in platelet-derived microparticles. Microparticles and platelets in PRP activated with SMLEF bipolar pulses had significantly lower annexin V-positivity than those following SMHEF activation. In contrast, the % P-selectin positivity and surface P-selectin expression (MFI) for platelets and microparticles in SMLEF bipolar pulse activated PRP was significantly higher than that in SMHEF-activated PRP, but not significantly different from that produced by thrombin activation. Higher levels of EGF were observed following either SMLEF bipolar pulses or SMHEF pulses of PRP than after bovine thrombin activation while VEGF, PDGF, and PF4 levels were similar with all three activating conditions. Cell proliferation was significantly increased by releasates of both SMLEF bipolar pulse and SMHEF pulse activated PRP compared to plasma alone. Conclusions PEF activation of PRP at bipolar low vs. monopolar high field strength results in differential platelet-derived microparticle production and activation of platelet surface procoagulant markers while inducing similar release of growth factors and similar capacity to induce cell proliferation. Stimulation of PRP with SMLEF bipolar pulses is gentler than SMHEF pulses, resulting in less platelet microparticle generation but with overall activation levels similar to that obtained with thrombin. These results suggest that PEF provides the means to alter, in a controlled fashion, PRP properties thereby enabling evaluation of their effects on wound healing and clinical outcomes. PMID:27556645

  4. Current Results and Proposed Activities in Microgravity Fluid Dynamics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Polezhaev, V. I.

    1996-01-01

    The Institute for Problems in Mechanics' Laboratory work in mathematical and physical modelling of fluid mechanics develops models, methods, and software for analysis of fluid flow, instability analysis, direct numerical modelling and semi-empirical models of turbulence, as well as experimental research and verification of these models and their applications in technological fluid dynamics, microgravity fluid mechanics, geophysics, and a number of engineering problems. This paper presents an overview of the results in microgravity fluid dynamics research during the last two years. Nonlinear problems of weakly compressible and compressible fluid flows are discussed.

  5. Preliminary results and future activities at the GARFIELD apparatus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gramegna, F.; Mastinu, P. F.; Vannucci, L.; Bruno, M.; D'Agostino, M.; Fiandri, L.; Lanchais, A.; Vannini, G.; Casini, G.; Chiari, M.; Nannini, A.; Bonasera, A.; Cavallaro, S.; Cosmano, A.; Moroni, A.; Ordine, A.; Abbondanno, U.; Milazzo, P. M.; Margagliotti, G. M.

    2002-01-01

    A new apparatus has been designed and built to study reaction mechanisms in the energy regime of the ALPI linear accelerator of the Laboratori Nazionali di Legnaro (E/A = 5 - 20 MeV). In this paper the importance of studying these mechanisms will be underlined, no more as a problem limited to a narrow energy range or a single process, but as a continuous trend from low to high energies and from the physics of stable nuclei to that one regarding instabilities. With this remarks in mind, a first experiment has been performed studying the reaction 32S+58Ni at 11AMeV. Preliminary results show that important information can be derived on multi-body emission, which can contribute to renew the interest in this energy regime.

  6. Screening Analysis : Volume 1, Description and Conclusions.

    SciTech Connect

    Bonneville Power Administration; Corps of Engineers; Bureau of Reclamation

    1992-08-01

    The SOR consists of three analytical phases leading to a Draft EIS. The first phase Pilot Analysis, was performed for the purpose of testing the decision analysis methodology being used in the SOR. The Pilot Analysis is described later in this chapter. The second phase, Screening Analysis, examines all possible operating alternatives using a simplified analytical approach. It is described in detail in this and the next chapter. This document also presents the results of screening. The final phase, Full-Scale Analysis, will be documented in the Draft EIS and is intended to evaluate comprehensively the few, best alternatives arising from the screening analysis. The purpose of screening is to analyze a wide variety of differing ways of operating the Columbia River system to test the reaction of the system to change. The many alternatives considered reflect the range of needs and requirements of the various river users and interests in the Columbia River Basin. While some of the alternatives might be viewed as extreme, the information gained from the analysis is useful in highlighting issues and conflicts in meeting operating objectives. Screening is also intended to develop a broad technical basis for evaluation including regional experts and to begin developing an evaluation capability for each river use that will support full-scale analysis. Finally, screening provides a logical method for examining all possible options and reaching a decision on a few alternatives worthy of full-scale analysis. An organizational structure was developed and staffed to manage and execute the SOR, specifically during the screening phase and the upcoming full-scale analysis phase. The organization involves ten technical work groups, each representing a particular river use. Several other groups exist to oversee or support the efforts of the work groups.

  7. Results of mobile gamma scanning activities in Tonawanda, New York

    SciTech Connect

    Cottrell, W.D.; Witt, D.A.; Rodriguez, R.E.; Carrier, R.F.

    1990-12-01

    During the 1940s, the Linde Air Products Division of Union Carbide operated a plant in Tonawanda, New York, for the Manhattan Engineer District (MED) and the Atomic Energy Commission (AEC). Uranium production and some nickel processing were conducted at the site. It is the policy of the US Department of Energy (DOE) to verify that radiological conditions at such sites or facilities comply with current DOE guidelines. Guidelines for release and use of such sites have become more stringent as research has provided more information since previous cleanups. The Formerly Utilized Sites Remedial Action Program (FUSRAP) was established as part of that effort to confirm the closeout status of facilities under contract to agencies preceding DOE during early nuclear energy development. Under the FUSRAP program, the Linde site itself has been previously investigated to determine the extent of on-site radiological contamination. As a precaution to insure that no residual radioactive materials were transported off-site, the Department of Energy requested that ORNL survey the area in the vicinity of the Linde Plant, the waste water treatment facility on Tower Road, the Sheridan Park Fire Station (District 4), and the Tonawanda Landfill to assess whether any residual radioactive material could be detected. The survey was conducted the week of April 3, 1990. Results of analysis of soil samples from the Tonawanda Landfill revealed slightly elevated concentrations of {sup 238}U and {sup 226}Ra suggestive of residuals from former Linde Plant operations. Therefore, it is recommended that additional surveying of the landfill property and of Sheridan Creek from south of the Linde property to its confluence with the Niagara River be conducted. The survey should include the measurement of gamma radiation levels and radionuclide analysis of silt samples. 6 refs., 4 figs., 1 tab.

  8. Maintaining physical activity during head and neck cancer treatment: Results of a pilot controlled trial

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Shuang G.; Alexander, Neil B.; Djuric, Zora; Zhou, Jessica; Tao, Yebin; Schipper, Matthew; Feng, Felix Y.; Eisbruch, Avraham; Worden, Francis P.; Strath, Scott J.; Jolly, Shruti

    2017-01-01

    Background Concurrent chemoradiotherapy (concurrent CRT) to treat head and neck cancer is associated with significant reductions of weight, mobility, and quality of life (QOL). An intervention focusing on functional exercise may attenuate these losses. Methods We allocated patients to a 14-week functional resistance and walking program designed to maintain physical activity during cancer treatment (MPACT group; n = 11), or to usual care (control group; n = 9). Outcomes were assessed at baseline, and 7 and 14 weeks. Results Compared to controls, the MPACT participants had attenuated decline or improvement in several strength, mobility, physical activity, diet, and QOL endpoints. These trends were statistically significant (p < .05) in knee strength, mental health, head and neck QOL, and barriers to exercise. Conclusion In this pilot study of patients with head and neck cancer undergoing concurrent CRT, MPACT training was feasible and maintained or improved function and QOL, thereby providing the basis for larger future interventions with longer follow-up. PMID:26445898

  9. The International Prevalence Study on Physical Activity: results from 20 countries

    PubMed Central

    Bauman, Adrian; Bull, Fiona; Chey, Tien; Craig, Cora L; Ainsworth, Barbara E; Sallis, James F; Bowles, Heather R; Hagstromer, Maria; Sjostrom, Michael; Pratt, Michael

    2009-01-01

    Background Physical activity (PA) is one of the most important factors for improving population health, but no standardised systems exist for international surveillance. The International Physical Activity Questionnaire (IPAQ) was developed for international surveillance. The purpose of this study was a comparative international study of population physical activity prevalence across 20 countries. Methods Between 2002–2004, a standardised protocol using IPAQ was used to assess PA participation in 20 countries [total N = 52,746, aged 18–65 years]. The median survey response rate was 61%. Physical activity levels were categorised as "low", "moderate" and "high". Age-adjusted prevalence estimates are presented by sex. Results The prevalence of "high PA" varied from 21–63%; in eight countries high PA was reported for over half of the adult population. The prevalence of "low PA" varied from 9% to 43%. Males more frequently reported high PA than females in 17 of 20 countries. The prevalence of low PA ranged from 7–41% among males, and 6–49% among females. Gender differences were noted, especially for younger adults, with males more active than females in most countries. Markedly lower physical activity prevalence (10% difference) with increasing age was noted in 11 of 19 countries for males, but only in three countries for women. The ways populations accumulated PA differed, with some reporting mostly vigorous intensity activities and others mostly walking. Conclusion This study demonstrated the feasibility of international PA surveillance, and showed that IPAQ is an acceptable surveillance instrument, at least within countries. If assessment methods are used consistently over time, trend data will inform countries about the success of their efforts to promote physical activity. PMID:19335883

  10. Results.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zemsky, Robert; Shaman, Susan; Shapiro, Daniel B.

    2001-01-01

    Describes the Collegiate Results Instrument (CRI), which measures a range of collegiate outcomes for alumni 6 years after graduation. The CRI was designed to target alumni from institutions across market segments and assess their values, abilities, work skills, occupations, and pursuit of lifelong learning. (EV)

  11. Healthful Eating and Physical Activity in the Home Environment: Results from Multi-Family Focus Groups

    PubMed Central

    Berge, Jerica M.; Arikian, Aimee; Doherty, William J.; Neumark-Sztainer, Dianne

    2012-01-01

    Objective To explore multiple family members’ perceptions of risk and protective factors for healthy eating and physical activity in the home. Design Ten multi-family focus groups were conducted with 26 families. Setting Community setting. Participants Primarily Black and White families. Family members (n = 103) were between the ages of 8–61 years. Analysis A grounded hermeneutic approach. Phenomenon of Interest Risk and protective factors for healthy eating and physical activity in the home environment. Results Ten major themes were identified by family members related to health behaviors in the home environment, including: (a) accessibility to healthy foods and activity, (b) time constraints, (c) stage of youth development, (d) individual investment in health behaviors, (e) family investment in health behaviors, (f) family meals and shared activities, (g) parent modeling, (h) making health behaviors fun, (i) making health behaviors part of the family lifestyle, and (j) community investment in family health behaviors. Conclusions and Implications This study identified the importance of the family system and the reciprocal influences within the home environment on health behaviors. In addition, individual and community-level suggestions were identified. Insights from the families provide leads for future research and ideas for the prevention of youth obesity. PMID:22192951

  12. Field Test Results from a 10 kW Wind Turbine with Active Flow Control

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rice, Thomas; Bychkova, Veronika; Taylor, Keith; Clingman, Dan; Amitay, Michael

    2015-11-01

    Active flow control devices including synthetic jets and dynamic vortex generators were tested on a 10 kW wind turbine at RPI. Previous work has shown that load oscillations caused by dynamic stall could be modified through the use of active flow control by injecting momentum into the flow field near the leading edge of a dynamically pitching model. In this study, this work has been extended to its logical conclusion, field-testing active flow control on a real wind turbine. The blades in the current study have a 0.28m chord and 3.05m span, no twist or taper, and were retrofitted with six synthetic jets on one blade and ten dynamic vortex generators on a second blade. The third blade of this turbine was not modified, in order to serve as a control. Strain gauges were installed on each blade to measure blades' deflection. A simple closed loop control was demonstrated and preliminary results indicate reduced vibrational amplitude. Future testing will be conducted on a larger scale, 600kW machine at NREL, incorporating information collected during this study.

  13. Social support and physical activity change in Latinas: Results from the Seamos Saludables trial

    PubMed Central

    Marquez, Becky; Dunsiger, Shira I.; Pekmezi, Dori; Larsen, Britta A.; Marcus, Bess H.

    2016-01-01

    Objective Family responsibilities and poor social support are barriers to physical activity among Latinas. This study evaluated the effects of a home- and print-based intervention on social support, moderating effects of familial ties on support and moderate-to-vigorous physical activity (MVPA), and mediating effects of support on MVPA. Methods Participants were randomized to receive through the mail either individually tailored physical activity intervention or general wellness print materials. Familial ties and social support were assessed by marital and child status and the social support for physical activity measure, respectively. MVPA was measured using the 7-day Physical Activity Recall Interview and accelerometer. Assessments were conducted at baseline, 6 months post-treatment, and 12 months follow-up. Results Participants (n=266; 40.6 ± 9.9 years old) were mostly immigrant and Spanish-speaking Latinas. The intervention group achieved greater increases in family and friend support compared to the wellness control group from baseline to post-treatment and follow-up (p<0.05). Intervention changes in support did not depend on marital or child status. The intervention also increased minutes per week of MVPA more than the wellness control (p<0.05) and the effect did not depend on marital or child status. There were significant indirect effects of treatment, indicating the intervention achieved greater increases in MVPA by increasing family (ab=5.21, SE=2.94, 95% CI=0.91–14.11) and friend (ab=6.83, SE=5.15, 95% CI=0.16–20.56) support. Conclusions The intervention improved and sustained support from family and friends and MVPA irrespective of familial ties. Social support mediated increases in MVPA. PMID:26863464

  14. Gender, body mass index and rheumatoid arthritis disease activity: results from the QUEST-RA study

    PubMed Central

    Jawaheer, Damini; Olsen, Jørn; Lahiff, Maureen; Forsberg, Sinikka; Lähteenmäki, Jukka; Silveira, Ines Guimaraes da; Rocha, Francisco Airton; Laurindo, Ieda Maria Magalhães; Mota, Licia Maria Henrique da; Drosos, Alexandros A.; Murphy, Eithne; Sheehy, Claire; Quirke, Edel; Cutolo, Maurizio; Rexhepi, Sylejman; Dadoniene, Jolanta; Verstappen, Suzan M.M.; Sokka, Tuulikki

    2010-01-01

    Objective To investigate whether body mass index (BMI), as a proxy for body fat, influences rheumatoid arthritis (RA) disease activity in a gender-specific manner. Methods Consecutive patients with RA were enrolled from 25 countries into the QUEST-RA program between 2005 and 2008. Clinical and demographic data were collected by treating rheumatologists and by patient self-report. Distributions of Disease Activity Scores (DAS28), BMI, age, and disease duration were assessed for each country and for the entire dataset; mean values between genders were compared using Student’s t-tests. An association between BMI and DAS28 was investigated using linear regression, adjusting for age, disease duration and country. Results A total of 5,161 RA patients (4,082 women and 1,079 men) were included in the analyses. Overall, women were younger, had longer disease duration, and higher DAS28 scores than men, but BMI was similar between genders. The mean DAS28 scores increased with increasing BMI from normal to overweight and obese, among women, whereas the opposite trend was observed among men. Regression results showed BMI (continuous or categorical) to be associated with DAS28. Compared to the normal BMI range, being obese was associated with a larger difference in mean DAS28 (0.23, 95% CI: 0.11, 0.34) than being overweight (0.12, 95% CI: 0.03, 0.21); being underweight was not associated with disease activity. These associations were more pronounced among women, and were not explained by any single component of the DAS28. Conclusion BMI appears to be associated with RA disease activity in women, but not in men. PMID:20810033

  15. Immune Activation Resulting from NKG2D/Ligand Interaction Promotes Atherosclerosis

    PubMed Central

    Xia, Mingcan; Guerra, Nadia; Sukhova, Galina K.; Yang, Kangkang; Miller, Carla K.; Shi, Guo-Ping; Raulet, David H.; Xiong, Na

    2012-01-01

    Background The interplay between the immune system and abnormal metabolic conditions sustains and propagates a vicious feedback cycle of chronic inflammation and metabolic dysfunction that is critical for atherosclerotic progression. It is well established that abnormal metabolic conditions, such as dyslipidemia and hyperglycemia, cause various cellular stress responses that induce tissue inflammation and immune cell activation, which in turn exacerbate the metabolic dysfunction. However, molecular events linking these processes are not well understood. Methods and Results Tissues and organs of humans and mice with hyperglycemia and hyperlipidemia were examined for expression of ligands for NKG2D, a potent immune activating receptor expressed by several types of immune cells, and the role of NKG2D in atherosclerosis and metabolic diseases was probed using mice lacking NKG2D or by blocking NKG2D with monoclonal antibodies. NKG2D ligands were upregulated in multiple organs, particularly atherosclerotic aortae and inflamed livers. Ligand upregulation was induced in vitro by abnormal metabolites associated with metabolic dysfunctions. Using ApoE-/- mouse models we demonstrated that preventing NKG2D functions resulted in a dramatic reduction in plaque formation, suppressed systemic and organ inflammation mediated by multiple immune cell types, and alleviated abnormal metabolic conditions. Conclusions The NKG2D/ligand interaction is a critical molecular link in the vicious cycle of chronic inflammation and metabolic dysfunction that promotes atherosclerosis and might be a useful target for therapeutic intervention in the disease. PMID:22104546

  16. National level promotion of physical activity: results from England's ACTIVE for LIFE campaign

    PubMed Central

    Hillsdon, M; Cavill, N; Nanchahal, K; Diamond, A; White, I

    2001-01-01

    STUDY OBJECTIVE—To assess the impact of a national campaign on awareness of the campaign, change in knowledge of physical activity recommendations and self reported physical activity.
DESIGN—three year prospective longitudinal survey using a multi-stage, cluster random probability design to select participants.
SETTING—England.
PARTICIPANTS—A nationally representative sample of 3189 adults aged 16-74 years.
MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES—Awareness of the advertising element of the campaign, changes in knowledge of physical activity recommendations for health and self reported physical activity.
RESULTS—38% of participants were aware of the main advertising images, assessed six to eight months after the main television advertisement. The proportion of participants knowledgeable about moderate physical activity recommendations increased by 3.0% (95% CI: 1.4%, 4.5%) between waves 1 and 2 and 3.7% (95% CI: 2.1%, 5.3%) between waves 1 and 3. The change in proportion of active people between baseline and waves 1 and 2 was
−0.02 (95% CI: −2.0 to +1.7) and between waves 1 and 3 was −9.8 (−7.9 to −11.7).
CONCLUSION—The proportion of participants who were knowledgeable about the new recommendations, increased significantly after the campaign. There was however, no significant difference in knowledge by awareness of the main campaign advertisement. There is no evidence that ACTIVE for LIFE improved physical activity, either overall or in any subgroup.


Keywords: exercise; mass media; follow up studies; health promotion; physical activity PMID:11553661

  17. Hypouricaemic action of mangiferin results from metabolite norathyriol via inhibiting xanthine oxidase activity.

    PubMed

    Niu, Yanfen; Liu, Jia; Liu, Hai-Yang; Gao, Li-Hui; Feng, Guo-Hua; Liu, Xu; Li, Ling

    2016-09-01

    Context Mangiferin has been reported to possess a potential hypouricaemic effect. However, the pharmacokinetic studies in rats showed that its oral bioavailability was only 1.2%, suggesting that mangiferin metabolites might exert the action. Objective The hypouricaemic effect and the xanthine oxidase inhibition of mangiferin and norathyriol, a mangiferin metabolite, were investigated. Inhibition of norathyriol analogues (compounds 3-9) toward xanthine oxidase was also evaluated. Materials and methods For a dose-dependent study, mangiferin (1.5-6.0 mg/kg) and norathyriol (0.92-3.7 mg/kg) were administered intragastrically to mice twice daily for five times. For a time-course study, mice received mangiferin and norathyriol both at a single dose of 7.1 μmol/kg. In vitro, inhibition of test compounds (2.4-2.4 mM) against xanthine oxidase activity was evaluated by the spectrophotometrical method. The inhibition type was identified from Lineweaver-Burk plots. Results Norathyriol (0.92, 1.85 and 3.7 mg/kg) dose dependently decreased the serum urate levels by 27.0, 33.6 and 37.4%, respectively. The action was more potent than that of mangiferin at the low dose, but was equivalent at the higher doses. Additionally, the hypouricaemic action of them exhibited a time dependence. In vitro, norathyriol markedly inhibited the xanthine oxidase activities, with the IC50 value of 44.6 μM, but mangiferin did not. The kinetic studies showed that norathyriol was an uncompetitive inhibitor by Lineweaver-Burk plots. The structure-activity relationships exhibited that three hydroxyl groups in norathyriol at the C-1, C-3 and C-6 positions were essential for maintaining xanthine oxidase inhibition. Discussion and conclusion Norathyriol was responsible for the hypouricaemic effect of mangiferin via inhibiting xanthine oxidase activity.

  18. Oxidative stress status accompanying diabetic bladder cystopathy results in the activation of protein degradation pathways

    PubMed Central

    Kanika, Nirmala; Chang, Jinsook; Tong, Yuehong; Tiplitsky, Scott; Lin, Juan; Yohannes, Elizabeth; Tar, Moses; Chance, Mark; Christ, George J.; Melman, Arnold; Davies, Kelvin

    2010-01-01

    Objectives To investigate the role that oxidative stress plays in the development of diabetic cystopathy. Materials and methods Comparative gene expression in the bladder of non-diabetic and streptozotocin (STZ)-induced 2-month-old diabetic rats was carried out using microarray analysis. Evidence of oxidative stress was investigated in the bladder by analyzing glutathione S-transferase activity, lipid peroxidation, and carbonylation and nitrosylation of proteins. The activity of protein degradation pathways was assessed using western blot analysis. Results Analysis of global gene expression showed that detrusor smooth muscle tissue of STZ-induced diabetes undergoes significant enrichment in targets involved in the production or regulation of reactive oxygen species (P = 1.27 × 10−10). The microarray analysis was confirmed by showing that markers of oxidative stress were all significantly increased in the diabetic bladder. It was hypothesized that the sequelae to oxidative stress would be increased protein damage and apoptosis. This was confirmed by showing that two key proteins involved in protein degradation (Nedd4 and LC3B) were greatly up-regulated in diabetic bladders compared to controls by 12.2 ± 0.76 and 4.4 ± 1.0-fold, respectively, and the apoptosis inducing protein, BAX, was up-regulated by 6.76 ± 0.76-fold. Conclusions Overall, the findings obtained in the present study add to the growing body of evidence showing that diabetic cystopathy is associated with oxidative damage of smooth muscle cells, and results in protein damage and activation of apoptotic pathways that may contribute to a deterioration in bladder function. PMID:21518418

  19. Conclusiveness of natural languages and recognition of images

    SciTech Connect

    Wojcik, Z.M.

    1983-01-01

    The conclusiveness is investigated using recognition processes and one-one correspondence between expressions of a natural language and graphs representing events. The graphs, as conceived in psycholinguistics, are obtained as a result of perception processes. It is possible to generate and process the graphs automatically, using computers and then to convert the resulting graphs into expressions of a natural language. Correctness and conclusiveness of the graphs and sentences are investigated using the fundamental condition for events representation processes. Some consequences of the conclusiveness are discussed, e.g. undecidability of arithmetic, human brain assymetry, correctness of statistical calculations and operations research. It is suggested that the group theory should be imposed on mathematical models of any real system. Proof of the fundamental condition is also presented. 14 references.

  20. Whole Blood Activation Results in Altered T Cell and Monocyte Cytokine Production Profiles by Flow Cytometry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Crucian, Brian E.; Sams, Clarence F.

    2001-01-01

    An excellent monitor of the immune balance of peripheral circulating cells is to determine their cytokine production patterns in response to stimuli. Using flow cytometry, a positive identification of cytokine producing cells in a mixed culture may be achieved. Recently, the ability to assess cytokine production following a whole-blood activation culture has been described. In this study, whole blood activation was compared to traditional PBMC activation and the individual cytokine secretion patterns for both T cells, T cell subsets and monocytes was determined by flow cytometry. RESULTS: For T cell cytokine assessment (IFNg/IL-10 and IL-21/L-4) following PMA +ionomycin activation: (1) a Significantly greater percentages of T cells producing IFNgamma and IL-2 were observed following whole-blood culture and (2) altered T cell cytokine production kinetics were observed by varying whole blood culture times. Four-color analysiS was used to allow assessment of cytokine production by specific T cell subsets. It was found that IFNgamma production was significantly elevated in the CD3+/CD8+ T cell population as compared to the CD3+/CD8- population following five hours of whole blood activation. Conversely, IL-2 and IL-10 production were Significantly elevated in the CD3+/CD8- T cell population as compared to the CD3+/CD8+ population. Monocyte cytokine production was assessed in both culture systems following LPS activation for 24 hours. A three-color flow cytometric was used to assess two cytokines (IL-1a/IL-12 and TNFa/IL-10) in conjunction with CD14. Nearly all monocytes were stimulated to produce IL-1a, IL-12 and TNFa. equally well in both culture systems, however monocyte production of IL-10 was significantly elevated in whole blood culture as compared to PBMC culture. IL-12 producing monocytes appeared to be a distinct subpopulation of the IL-1a producing set, whereas IL-10 and TNFa producing monocytes were largely mutually exclusive. IL-10 and TNFa producing

  1. Results of a workshop concerning impacts of various activities on the functions of bottomland hardwoods

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Roelle, James E.; Auble, Gregor T.; Hamilton, David B.; Horak, Gerald C.; Johnson, Richard L.; Segelquist, Charles A.

    1987-01-01

    characterization of the structure and functions of bottomland hardwoods. The approach to the second workshop, the results of which are described in this report, was therefore modified in response to the conclusions from the first workshop. The focus of the second workshop remained an analysis of the impacts of various activities or the functions of BLH ecosystems. However, as a prerequisite to this analysis, participants were also asked to develop a list of characteristics that determine the extent to which BLH sites perform the important functions. The workshop was organized such that alternating plenary and workgroup sessions allowed ample time for communication while still maintaining a focus on the overall goal. In the initial session, various individuals gave presentations concerning methodologies for evaluating the functions performed by wetlands, factors influencing the conversion of BLH forests to other uses, and the impacts of conversion activities. These were followed by a series of case study presentations designed to familiarize participants with the kinds of issues that are dealt with in the Section 404 program. These presentations are cited in this report as (author, workshop presentation). At the conclusion of these presentations, participants were divided into six workgroups to examine the functions of BLH ecosystems in the areas of hydrology, water quality, fisheries, wildlife, ecosystem processes, and culture/recreation/economics. Each workgroup was asked to undertake the following tasks. 1. Developed a list of functions performed by BLH ecosystems from the perspective of the workgroup's expertise and area of responsibility. 2. Identify those activities (e.g., impoundment construction, conversion to soybean farming) that impact the major functions (e.g., sediment retention, detrital export) performed by BLH ecosystems. 3. Develop a list of characteristics that determine the extent to which a BLH site performs each function and describe the relationship of each

  2. Conclusions from the Image Analysis of the VSOP Survey

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dodson, R.; Fomalont, E.; Wiik, K.

    2009-08-01

    In February 1997, the Japanese radio astronomy satellite HALCA was launched to provide the space-bourne element for the VLBI Space Observatory Programme (VSOP) mission. A significant fraction of the mission time was to be dedicated to the VSOP Survey of bright compact Active Galactic Nuclei (AGN) at 5 GHz, which was lead by ISAS. The VSOP Survey Sources are an unbiased dataset of 294 targets, of which 82% were successfully observed. These are now undergoing statistical analysis to tease out the characteristics of typical AGN sources. We present here the summary of the imaging and conclusions we have reached.

  3. High fat diet feeding results in gender specific steatohepatitis and inflammasome activation

    PubMed Central

    Ganz, Michal; Csak, Timea; Szabo, Gyongyi

    2014-01-01

    AIM: To develop an animal model that encompasses the different facets of non-alcoholic steatohepatitis (NASH), which has been a challenge. METHODS: In this study, we used a high fat diet (HFD) feeding supplemented with fructose and sucrose in the water mimicking the high-fructose corn syrup that is abundant in the diet in the United States. We used C57Bl/6 wild-type mice for short and long-term feedings of 6 and 16 wk respectively, and evaluated the extent of liver damage, steatosis, and inflammasome activation. Our methods included histopathological analysis to assess liver damage and steatosis, which involved H and E and oil-red-o staining; biochemical studies to look at ALT and triglyceride levels; RNA analysis using quantitative polymerase chain reaction; and cytokine analysis, which included the enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay method to look at interleukin (IL)-1β and tumor necrosis factor-α (TNFα) levels. Furthermore, at each length of feeding we also looked at insulin resistance and glucose tolerance using insulin tolerance tests (ITT) and glucose tolerance tests. RESULTS: There was no insulin resistance, steatosis, or inflammasome activation at 6 wk. In contrast, at 16 wk we found significant insulin resistance demonstrated by impaired glucose and ITT in male, but not female mice. In males, elevated alanine aminotransferase and triglyceride levels, indicated liver damage and steatosis, respectively. Increased liver TNFα and monocyte chemoattractant protein-1 mRNA and protein, correlated with steatohepatitis. The inflammasome components, adaptor molecule, Aim2, and NOD-like receptor 4, increased at the mRNA level, and functional inflammasome activation was indicated by increased caspase-1 activity and IL-1β protein levels in male mice fed a long-term HFD. Male mice on HFD had increased α-smooth muscle actin and pro-collagen-1 mRNA indicating evolving fibrosis. In contrast, female mice displayed only elevated triglyceride levels, steatosis, and no

  4. Antineoplastic activity of povidone-iodine on different mesothelioma cell lines: results of in vitro study†

    PubMed Central

    Fiorelli, Alfonso; Pentimalli, Francesca; D'Urso, Vittorio; Di Marzo, Domenico; Forte, Iris Maria; Giordano, Antonio; Di Domenico, Marina; Accardo, Marina; Di Serio, Umberto; Santini, Mario

    2014-01-01

    OBJECTIVE Povidone-iodine (PVP-I) or Betadine, owing to its antineoplastic activity, is also used as an adjuvant during intra-abdominal or intrathoracic surgery. However, the protocol of PVP-I administration has not been optimized to achieve the best antitumoural efficacy. We aimed to determine the optimal concentration of PVP-I, the time of incubation and the mechanism of cell death by analysing the effect of different doses and time of administration of PVP-I on the cell viability of different mesothelioma cell lines. METHODS Four different cell lines (MET 5A/normal mesothelium; H2052/sarcomatoid mesothelioma; ISTMES2/epithelial mesothelioma; MSTO/biphasic mesothelioma) were incubated with increasing concentrations of diluted PVP-I (0.0001; 0.001; 0.01; 0.1; 1%) for 5, 10, 30, 60 min and 24 h, respectively. Cell viability was determined using cell direct cytotoxicity assay and cell death was determined through flow cytometry assay analysis. The superoxide dismutase activity was assessed functionally through a specific inhibitor to evaluate the mechanism of cell death. RESULTS The antiproliferative effect of PVP-I varied largely among different cell lines in a dose- and time-dependent manner. At 0.1% concentration for 10 min of incubation, the percentage of viable cells was 0.5 ± 0.1; 0.8 ± 0.5 and 0% (P < 0.01) for MET5A, ISTMES2 and MSTO, respectively. Conversely, the same concentration did not significantly affect the H2052 cell line which was completely suppressed at a 1% concentration of PVP-I. Double staining of Annexin V and DNA showed that PVP-I induced cell death in all four cell lines via necrosis depending on PVP-I concentration. However, H2052 was found to be more resistant than MSTO, ISTMES2 and MET 5A cells lines. The activity of superoxide dismutase was significantly inhibited in all cell lines. CONCLUSIONS Our results confirmed the anti-neoplastic activity of PVP-I especially on ISTMES2 and MSTO cell lines. With respect to chemotherapy pleural

  5. Balloon-related activities of the IMK/FZK: instruments, activities and results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Friedl-Vallon, Felix; Oelhaf, Hermann; Kleinert, Anne; Lengel, Anton; Maucher, Guido; Nordmeyer, Hans; Stowasser, Markus; Wetzel, Gerald; Fischer, Herbert

    2001-08-01

    The Institut für Meteorologie und Klimaforschung of the Forschungszentrum Karlsruhe (IMK/FZK) is operating a balloon-borne instrument for atmospheric research since the late eighties. The MIPAS-B (Michelson Interferometer for Passive Atmospheric Sounding - Balloon) instrument, a cryogenic Fourier spectrometer for limb emission measurements has flown 13 times in two different versions from France and Sweden. In this time the instrument has participated in three large international campaigns (EASOE, SESAME, THESEO) and several smaller field-activities (CHORUS, CHELOSBA, POSTA) concerning stratospheric chemistry from which important contributions to the understanding of the Arctic ozone depletion mechanisms have been achieved. Additionally, the instrument participated as core payload in the validation of the Japanese ILAS instrument on-board ADEOS and supported the validation of the American CLAES instrument onboard UARS. MIPAS-B data served also to test the level 2 algorithms for the MIPAS-instrument on-board ENVISAT. Present activities focus on the understanding of the composition and role of polar stratospheric clouds. The second centre of attention in the next years will be the validation of the European satellite sensors GOMOS, MIPAS, and SCIAMACHY with the established MIPAS-B version.

  6. 76 FR 67142 - Certain Activated Carbon From the People's Republic of China: Final Results and Partial...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-10-31

    ...-activation chemical treatment (chemical or water washing, chemical impregnation or other treatment), or... dehydrates molecules in the raw material, and results in the formation of water that is removed from the raw... analysis memoranda. \\13\\ CCT submitted Active Carbon India Private Limited's (``Active Carbon'')...

  7. Can leisure-time physical activity improve health checkup results? Evidence from Japanese occupational panel data

    PubMed Central

    Oshio, Takashi; Tsutsumi, Akizumi; Inoue, Akiomi

    2016-01-01

    Objectives: We examined the extent to which changes in worker health, as measured by health checkup items, were associated with increased intensity of leisure-time physical activity (LTPA) after controlling for individual time-invariant attributes. Methods: We used panel data from two to four waves of a Japanese occupational cohort survey, focusing on 30,206 observations of 10,106 individuals (7,669 men and 2,437 women) aged 18-76 years. We estimated first-difference and mean-centered fixed effects models to examine how changes in 10 health checkup items were associated with changes in LTPA intensity. We considered four LTPA intensity levels (none, low, moderate, and vigorous), based on self-reported assessments. Results: For men, low-density lipoprotein cholesterol levels, glycated hemoglobin levels, body mass index, and waist circumference improved when LTPA intensity was increased even at a low level, whereas triglyceride, high-density lipoprotein cholesterol, and fasting blood glucose levels improved when LTPA intensity was increased to moderate or vigorous levels. Blood pressure (both systolic and diastolic) and total cholesterol levels were only modestly responsive to changes in LTPA intensity. For women, blood pressure (both systolic and diastolic) and waist circumference were negatively associated with LTPA intensity, whereas the other variables showed more modest effects. Conclusions: The results suggest that even low- to moderate-intensity LTPA can improve health checkup results; however, the lowest LTPA intensity associated with improvement in health depends on health-risk factors as well as gender. PMID:27265532

  8. 39 CFR 954.18 - Proposed findings and conclusions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 39 Postal Service 1 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Proposed findings and conclusions. 954.18 Section... and conclusions. (a) A party to a proceeding may submit proposed findings of fact and conclusions of... conclusions of law with supporting reasons. When the proposed findings and conclusions are not...

  9. 39 CFR 954.18 - Proposed findings and conclusions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 39 Postal Service 1 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Proposed findings and conclusions. 954.18 Section... and conclusions. (a) A party to a proceeding may submit proposed findings of fact and conclusions of... conclusions of law with supporting reasons. When the proposed findings and conclusions are not...

  10. 39 CFR 954.18 - Proposed findings and conclusions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 39 Postal Service 1 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Proposed findings and conclusions. 954.18 Section... and conclusions. (a) A party to a proceeding may submit proposed findings of fact and conclusions of... conclusions of law with supporting reasons. When the proposed findings and conclusions are not...

  11. 39 CFR 954.18 - Proposed findings and conclusions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 39 Postal Service 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Proposed findings and conclusions. 954.18 Section... and conclusions. (a) A party to a proceeding may submit proposed findings of fact and conclusions of... conclusions of law with supporting reasons. When the proposed findings and conclusions are not...

  12. 39 CFR 954.18 - Proposed findings and conclusions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 39 Postal Service 1 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Proposed findings and conclusions. 954.18 Section... and conclusions. (a) A party to a proceeding may submit proposed findings of fact and conclusions of... conclusions of law with supporting reasons. When the proposed findings and conclusions are not...

  13. Jumping to conclusions in untreated patients with Parkinson's disease

    PubMed Central

    de Rezende Costa, Flavio Henrique; Averbeck, Bruno; O'Sullivan, Sean S.; Vincent, Maurice Borges; Rosso, Ana Lucia; Lees, Andrew J.; Djamshidian, Atbin

    2016-01-01

    Background Jumping to conclusions due to impulsivity has been shown to be a sensitive marker for dopamine dysregulation and addictive behaviour patterns in treated patients with Parkinson's disease (PD). It is unknown whether drug naïve PD patients, who have never received dopaminergic therapy also have deficits in information sampling. Methods Twenty five de novo PD patients and twenty matched healthy controls were recruited and tested on the beads task, which is a validated information sampling task to assess reflection impulsivity and a temporal discounting questionnaire. Results Patients gathered significantly less information and made more irrational choices than matched controls. There was, however, no group difference on the temporal discounting questionnaire. Conclusions Poor information sampling and irrational decision making may be an inherent component of the neuropsychological deficit in Parkinson's disease. These findings suggest that underlying impulsivity detected by a metric task is common in de novo PD. PMID:26956927

  14. [Problems of occupational fitness conclusion on periodic medical examination].

    PubMed

    Alekseev, V B; Vlasova, E M; Nosov, A E; Ponomareva, T A; Kostarev, V G

    2014-01-01

    Additional examination in Occupational Pathology Center are economic loss both for employer and employee, as the employee receives payment for those days when in the examination. Analysis of over 600 cases of occupational fitness examination in Occupational Pathology Center according to referrals given by medical institutions providing periodic medical examination shows that in most cases the conclusion was possible during periodic medical examination. Difficulties in conclusion on workers' fitness for occupation during periodic medical examination, according to our viewpoint, result not from limited diagnostic facilities for adequate examination and unfitness disclosure, but from lack of information in primary medical documentation and inadequacy of occupational factor and work characteristics presented by employer to actual working conditions.

  15. SMART wind turbine rotor. Data analysis and conclusions

    SciTech Connect

    Berg, Jonathan Charles; Barone, Matthew Franklin; Yoder, Nathanael C.

    2014-01-01

    The Wind Energy Technologies department at Sandia National Laboratories has developed and field tested a wind turbine rotor with integrated trailing-edge flaps designed for active control of the rotor aerodynamics. The SMART Rotor project was funded by the Wind and Water Power Technologies Office of the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) and was conducted to demonstrate active rotor control and evaluate simulation tools available for active control research. This report documents the data post-processing and analysis performed to date on the field test data. Results include the control capability of the trailing edge flaps, the combined structural and aerodynamic damping observed through application of step actuation with ensemble averaging, direct observation of time delays associated with aerodynamic response, and techniques for characterizing an operating turbine with active rotor control.

  16. SMART Wind Turbine Rotor: Data Analysis and Conclusions

    SciTech Connect

    Berg, Jonathan C.; Barone, Matthew F.; Yoder, Nathanael C.

    2014-01-29

    This report documents the data post-processing and analysis performed to date on the field test data. Results include the control capability of the trailing edge flaps, the combined structural and aerodynamic damping observed through application of step actuation with ensemble averaging, direct observation of time delays associated with aerodynamic response, and techniques for characterizing an operating turbine with active rotor control.

  17. 17 CFR 10.82 - Proposed findings and conclusions; briefs.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... conclusions; briefs. 10.82 Section 10.82 Commodity and Securities Exchanges COMMODITY FUTURES TRADING COMMISSION RULES OF PRACTICE Hearings § 10.82 Proposed findings and conclusions; briefs. In any proceeding... and conclusions of law. Briefs may be filed in support of proposed findings and conclusions either...

  18. Low dose cadmium poisoning results in sustained ERK phosphorylation and caspase activation

    SciTech Connect

    Martin, Patrick . E-mail: pmartin@unice.fr; Poggi, Marie Christine . E-mail: poggi@unice.fr; Chambard, Jean Claude . E-mail: chambard@unice.fr; Boulukos, Kim E. . E-mail: boulukos@unice.fr; Pognonec, Philippe . E-mail: pognonec@unice.fr

    2006-11-24

    Cadmium poisoning has been known to result in a wide variety of cellular responses, including oxidative stress and kinase activation. It has been reported that ERK is activated following acute cadmium exposure, and this response is commonly seen as a classical ERK survival mechanism. Here, we analyzed different cell types for their responses to low concentrations of cadmium poisoning. We found that there is an association between cell susceptibility to cadmium toxicity and ERK activation. This activation is atypical, since it consists of a sustained ERK phosphorylation, that lasts up to 6 days post stimulation. This activation is associated with the appearance of cleaved caspases 8 and 3, processed PARP, and irreversible damage. Pharmacological inhibition of ERK phosphorylation results in the ability of cells to resist cadmium poisoning. Our data indicate that low cadmium concentrations result in an unconventional ERK sustained phosphorylation, which in turn leads to death signaling.

  19. Exercise improves quality of life in bariatric surgery candidates: Results from the Bari-Active trial

    PubMed Central

    Bond, Dale S.; Thomas, J. Graham; King, Wendy C.; Vithiananthan, Sivamainthan; Trautvetter, Jennifer; Unick, Jessica L.; Ryder, Beth A.; Pohl, Dieter; Roye, G. Dean; Sax, Harry C.; Wing, Rena R.

    2014-01-01

    OBJECTIVE To examine the impact of a pre-bariatric surgery physical activity intervention (PAI), designed to increase bout-related (≥10-minute) moderate-to-vigorous PA (MVPA), on health-related quality of life (HRQoL). METHODS Analyses included 75 adult participants (86.7% female; BMI=45.0±6.5 kg/m2) who were randomly assigned to 6 weeks of PAI (n=40) or standard pre-surgical care (SC; n=35). PAI received six individual weekly counseling sessions to increase walking exercise. Participants wore an objective PA monitor for 7 days and completed the SF-36 Health Survey at baseline and post-intervention to evaluate bout-related MVPA and HRQoL changes, respectively. RESULTS PAI increased bout-related MVPA from baseline to post-intervention (4.4±5.5 to 21.0±21.4 minutes/day) versus no change (7.9±16.6 to 7.6±11.5 minutes/day) for SC (p=0.001). PAI reported greater improvements than SC on all SF-36 physical and mental scales (p<0.05), except role-emotional. In PAI, better baseline scores on the physical function and general health scales predicted greater bout-related MVPA increases (p<0.05), and greater bout-related MVPA increases were associated with greater post-intervention improvements on the physical function, bodily pain, and general health scales (p<0.05). CONCLUSIONS Increasing PA preoperatively improves physical and mental HRQoL in bariatric surgery candidates. Future studies should examine whether this effect improves surgical safety, weight loss outcomes, and postoperative HRQoL. Trial Registration clinicaltrials.gov Identifier: NCT00962325 PMID:25611582

  20. Results of experiments on iodine dissociation in active medium of oxygen-iodine laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zagidullin, Marsel V.; Khvatov, Nickolay A.; Malyshev, Mikhail S.

    2017-01-01

    Results of experiments on dissociation of iodine molecules in the presence of singlet oxygen molecules are presented for wide range of oxygen-iodine media composition. Rate constants values have been obtained: 4.3ṡ10-17cm3/s for the reaction O2(1Δ)+O2(1Δ)->O2(1Σ) +O2(3Σ) - (1), 2.8ṡ10-13 cm3/s for the reactionO2(1Δ)+I(2P1/2)->O2(1Σ)+I(2P3/2) - (4) and 8.3ṡ10-11 cm3/s for the reaction O2(1Σ) +I2->O2(3Σ)+2I - (2). Analysis of experiments shows that for the wide range of oxygen-iodine medium composition the dissociation occurs via the chain of reactions (1), (2), O2(1Δ)+I(2P3/2)->O2(3Σ)+I(2P1/2), (4) and via cascade process I2+I(2P1/2)->I2(v)+I(2P3/2), I2(v)+O2(1Δ)→2I+O2(3Σ). Contributions of each mechanism in the dissociation of the iodine are comparable for the typical composition of the active medium of the supersonic chemical oxygen-iodine laser. The experiments did not reveal the contribution of vibrationally excited oxygen molecules in the dissociation of iodine. Thus, the experiments and the following conclusions are fully confirmed iodine dissociation mechanism previously proposed by Heidner et al. (J. Phys. Chem., 87, 2348 (1983)).

  1. Does Pedometer Goal Setting Improve Physical Activity among Native Elders? Results from a Randomized Pilot Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sawchuk, Craig N.; Russo, Joan E.; Charles, Steve; Goldberg, Jack; Forquera, Ralph; Roy-Byrne, Peter; Buchwald, Dedra

    2011-01-01

    We examined if step-count goal setting resulted in increases in physical activity and walking compared to only monitoring step counts with pedometers among American Indian/Alaska Native elders. Outcomes included step counts, self-reported physical activity and well-being, and performance on the 6-minute walk test. Although no significant…

  2. A Study Of The Radionuclidic Content Of The Environmental Samples Resulting From NIPNE Activities

    SciTech Connect

    Stochioiu, Ana I.; Bercea, Sorin I.; Ivan, Constantin G.; Dumitru, Octavian R.; Pantelica, Ana I.

    2007-04-23

    The results of alpha, beta, gamma global activity measurements and gamma spectrometric measurements are presented. For more detailed characterization of samples, gamma-spectrometric measurement, implying identification of radionuclides and their activities are carried-out on significant ambiental annual samples.

  3. Incomplete suppression of distractor-related activity in the frontal eye field results in curved saccades.

    PubMed

    McPeek, Robert M

    2006-11-01

    Saccades in the presence of distractors show significant trajectory curvature. Based on previous work in the superior colliculus (SC), we speculated that curvature arises when a movement is initiated before competition between the target and distractor goals has been fully resolved. To test this hypothesis, we recorded frontal eye field (FEF) activity for curved and straight saccades in search. In contrast to the SC, activity in FEF is normally poorly correlated with saccade dynamics. However, the FEF, like the SC, is involved in target selection. Thus if curvature is caused by incomplete target selection, we expect to see its neural correlates in the FEF. We found that saccades that curve toward a distractor are accompanied by an increase in perisaccadic activity of FEF neurons coding the distractor location, and saccades that curve away are accompanied by a decrease in activity. In contrast, for FEF neurons coding the target location, there is no significant difference in activity between curved and straight saccades. To establish that the distractor-related activity is causally related to saccade curvature, we applied microstimulation to sites in the FEF before saccades to targets presented without distractors. The stimulation was subthreshold for evoking saccades and the temporal structure of the stimulation train resembled the activity recorded for curved saccades. The resulting movements curved toward the location coded by the stimulation site. These results support the idea that saccade curvature results from incomplete suppression of distractor-related activity during target selection.

  4. Physical activity on prescription schemes (PARS): do programme characteristics influence effectiveness? Results of a systematic review and meta-analyses

    PubMed Central

    Arsenijevic, Jelena; Groot, Wim

    2017-01-01

    Background Physical activity on prescription schemes (PARS) are health promotion programmes that have been implemented in various countries. The aim of this study was to outline the differences in the design of PARS in different countries. This study also explored the differences in the adherence rate to PARS and the self-reported level of physical activity between PARS users in different countries. Method A systematic literature review and meta-analyses were conducted. We searched PubMed and EBASCO in July 2015 and updated our search in September 2015. Studies that reported adherence to the programme and self-reported level of physical activity, published in the English language in a peer-reviewed journal since 2000, were included. The difference in the pooled adherence rate after finishing the PARS programme and the adherence rate before or during the PARS programme was 17% (95% CI 9% to 24%). The difference in the pooled physical activity was 0.93 unit score (95 CI −3.57 to 1.71). For the adherence rate, a meta-regression was conducted. Results In total, 37 studies conducted in 11 different countries met the inclusion criteria. Among them, 31 reported the adherence rate, while the level of physical activity was reported in 17 studies. Results from meta-analyses show that PARS had an effect on the adherence rate of physical activity, while the results from the meta-regressions show that programme characteristics such as type of chronic disease and the follow-up period influenced the adherence rate. Conclusions The effects of PARS on adherence and self-reported physical activity were influenced by programme characteristics and also by the design of the study. Future studies on the effectiveness of PARS should use a prospective longitudinal design and combine quantitative and qualitative data. Furthermore, future evaluation studies should distinguish between evaluating the adherence rate and the self-reported physical activity among participants with different

  5. The Evidence and Conclusion Ontology (ECO): Supporting GO Annotations.

    PubMed

    Chibucos, Marcus C; Siegele, Deborah A; Hu, James C; Giglio, Michelle

    2017-01-01

    The Evidence and Conclusion Ontology (ECO) is a community resource for describing the various types of evidence that are generated during the course of a scientific study and which are typically used to support assertions made by researchers. ECO describes multiple evidence types, including evidence resulting from experimental (i.e., wet lab) techniques, evidence arising from computational methods, statements made by authors (whether or not supported by evidence), and inferences drawn by researchers curating the literature. In addition to summarizing the evidence that supports a particular assertion, ECO also offers a means to document whether a computer or a human performed the process of making the annotation. Incorporating ECO into an annotation system makes it possible to leverage the structure of the ontology such that associated data can be grouped hierarchically, users can select data associated with particular evidence types, and quality control pipelines can be optimized. Today, over 30 resources, including the Gene Ontology, use the Evidence and Conclusion Ontology to represent both evidence and how annotations are made.

  6. Correlates of objectively measured overweight/obesity and physical activity in Kenyan school children: results from ISCOLE-Kenya

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Childhood overweight/obesity and inadequate physical activity burden Western countries, and now, pose a growing threat to the health of children in low and middle income countries. Behavioural transitions toward more sedentary lifestyles coupled with increased consumption of high calorie foods has resulted in rising proportions of overweight/obesity and decreasing levels of physical activity in school-aged children. The objective of this study was to determine the prevalence and to investigate factors associated with overweight/obesity and physical activity in Kenyan children aged 9 to 11 years. Methods Body composition and physical activity measures of participating children were accomplished by anthropometric assessment, accelerometry, and administration of questionnaires related to diet and lifestyle, and the school and neighbourhood environments. Data collection was conducted in the city of Nairobi as part of a larger International Study of Childhood Obesity, Lifestyle and Environment. Results A total of 563 participants (46.5% boys, 53.5% girls) were included in the analyses. Of these, 3.7% were underweight, 14.4% were overweight, and 6.4% were obese based on WHO cut-points. Mean daily sedentary time was 398 minutes, time spent in light physical activity was 463 minutes, and time spent in moderate-to-vigorous physical activity was 36 minutes based on activity cut-points developed by Treuth et al. Only 12.6% of participating children were meeting the recommendation of ≥ 60 minutes of daily moderate-to-vigorous physical activity, and 45.7% of participants used active transportation to/from school. Increasing parental education level, total annual household income, and attending a private rather than public school were associated positively with being overweight/obese and negatively with meeting physical activity guidelines. Conclusions This study provided the evidence for an existing prevalence of childhood overweight/obesity in Nairobi

  7. High Fc Density Particles Result in Binary Complement Activation but Tunable Macrophage Phagocytosis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sulchek, Todd; Pacheco, Patricia; White, David

    2014-03-01

    Macrophage phagocytosis and complement system activation represent two key components of the immune system and both can be activated through the presentation of multiple Fc domains of IgG antibodies. We have created functionalized micro- and nanoparticles with various densities of Fc domains to understand the modulation of the immune system for eventual use as a novel immunomodulation platform. Phagocytosis assays were carried out by adding functionalized particles to macrophage cells and quantitatively determined using fluorescent microscopy and flow cytometry. Complement system activation by the functionalized particles in human serum was quantified with an enzyme immunoassay. Our phagocytosis assay revealed a strong dependence on particle size and Fc density. For small particles, as the Fc density increased, the number of particles phagocytosed also increased. Large particles were phagocytosed at significantly lower levels and showed no dependency on Fc density. Complement was successfully activated at levels comparable to positive controls for small particles at high Fc densities. However at low Fc densities, there is a significant decrease in complement activation. This result suggests a binary response for complement system activation with a threshold density for successful activation. Therefore, varying the Fc density on micro/nanoparticles resulted in a tunable response in macrophage phagocytosis while a more binary response for complement activation.

  8. 31 CFR 8.67 - Proposed findings and conclusions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 31 Money and Finance: Treasury 1 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Proposed findings and conclusions. 8... conclusions. Except in cases when the respondent has failed to answer the complaint or when a party has failed... afford the parties a reasonable opportunity to submit proposed findings and conclusions and...

  9. 49 CFR 511.46 - Proposed findings, conclusions, and order.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 6 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Proposed findings, conclusions, and order. 511.46... Proposed findings, conclusions, and order. Within a reasonable time after the closing of the record and..., including proposed findings of fact, conclusions of law and a proposed order, together with...

  10. 49 CFR 511.46 - Proposed findings, conclusions, and order.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 6 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Proposed findings, conclusions, and order. 511.46... Proposed findings, conclusions, and order. Within a reasonable time after the closing of the record and..., including proposed findings of fact, conclusions of law and a proposed order, together with...

  11. 39 CFR 3001.35 - Proposed findings and conclusions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 39 Postal Service 1 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Proposed findings and conclusions. 3001.35 Section... General Applicability § 3001.35 Proposed findings and conclusions. The Commission or the presiding officer may direct the filing of proposed findings and conclusions with a brief statement of the...

  12. 29 CFR 417.12 - Proposed findings and conclusions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Proposed findings and conclusions. 417.12 Section 417.12... findings and conclusions. Within 10 days following the close of hearings, interested persons may submit proposed findings and conclusions to the Administrative Law Judge, together with supporting...

  13. 19 CFR 111.68 - Proposed findings and conclusions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 19 Customs Duties 1 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Proposed findings and conclusions. 111.68 Section... Monetary Penalty in Lieu of Suspension or Revocation § 111.68 Proposed findings and conclusions. The... record in which to submit proposed findings and conclusions and supporting reasons for the findings...

  14. 39 CFR 957.20 - Proposed findings and conclusions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 39 Postal Service 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Proposed findings and conclusions. 957.20 Section... RELATIVE TO DEBARMENT AND SUSPENSION FROM CONTRACTING § 957.20 Proposed findings and conclusions. (a) Each... the Judicial Officer such is not appropriate, submit proposed findings of fact, conclusions of law...

  15. 16 CFR 1025.46 - Proposed findings, conclusions, and order.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 16 Commercial Practices 2 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Proposed findings, conclusions, and order... PRACTICE FOR ADJUDICATIVE PROCEEDINGS Hearings § 1025.46 Proposed findings, conclusions, and order. Within..., including proposed findings of fact and conclusions of law, as well as a proposed order. The...

  16. 39 CFR 952.23 - Proposed findings and conclusions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 39 Postal Service 1 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Proposed findings and conclusions. 952.23 Section... RELATIVE TO FALSE REPRESENTATION AND LOTTERY ORDERS § 952.23 Proposed findings and conclusions. (a) Each..., conclusions of law, orders and supporting reasons either in oral or written form in the discretion of...

  17. 49 CFR 511.46 - Proposed findings, conclusions, and order.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 6 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Proposed findings, conclusions, and order. 511.46... Proposed findings, conclusions, and order. Within a reasonable time after the closing of the record and..., including proposed findings of fact, conclusions of law and a proposed order, together with...

  18. 47 CFR 1.263 - Proposed findings and conclusions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 1 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Proposed findings and conclusions. 1.263... Proceedings Hearing and Intermediate Decision § 1.263 Proposed findings and conclusions. (a) Each party to the proceeding may file proposed findings of fact and conclusions, briefs, or memoranda of law: Provided,...

  19. 31 CFR 8.67 - Proposed findings and conclusions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 31 Money and Finance: Treasury 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Proposed findings and conclusions. 8... conclusions. Except in cases when the respondent has failed to answer the complaint or when a party has failed... afford the parties a reasonable opportunity to submit proposed findings and conclusions and...

  20. 29 CFR 417.12 - Proposed findings and conclusions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 2 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Proposed findings and conclusions. 417.12 Section 417.12... findings and conclusions. Within 10 days following the close of hearings, interested persons may submit proposed findings and conclusions to the Administrative Law Judge, together with supporting...

  1. 29 CFR 2700.65 - Proposed findings, conclusions and orders.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 9 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Proposed findings, conclusions and orders. 2700.65 Section... COMMISSION PROCEDURAL RULES Hearings § 2700.65 Proposed findings, conclusions and orders. The Judge may require the submission of proposed findings of fact, conclusions of law, and orders, together...

  2. 31 CFR 15.737-24 - Proposed findings and conclusions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 31 Money and Finance: Treasury 1 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Proposed findings and conclusions. 15... conclusions. Except in cases where the respondent has failed to answer the complaint or where a party has... afford the parties a reasonable opportunity to submit proposed findings and conclusions and...

  3. 39 CFR 957.20 - Proposed findings and conclusions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 39 Postal Service 1 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Proposed findings and conclusions. 957.20 Section... RELATIVE TO DEBARMENT AND SUSPENSION FROM CONTRACTING § 957.20 Proposed findings and conclusions. (a) Each... the Judicial Officer such is not appropriate, submit proposed findings of fact, conclusions of law...

  4. 31 CFR 15.737-24 - Proposed findings and conclusions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 31 Money and Finance: Treasury 1 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Proposed findings and conclusions. 15... conclusions. Except in cases where the respondent has failed to answer the complaint or where a party has... afford the parties a reasonable opportunity to submit proposed findings and conclusions and...

  5. 17 CFR 10.82 - Proposed findings and conclusions; briefs.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... conclusions; briefs. 10.82 Section 10.82 Commodity and Securities Exchanges COMMODITY FUTURES TRADING... conclusions; briefs. In any proceeding involving a hearing or an opportunity for hearing, the parties may file written proposed findings of fact and conclusions of law. Briefs may be filed in support of...

  6. 47 CFR 1.263 - Proposed findings and conclusions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 1 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Proposed findings and conclusions. 1.263... Proceedings Hearing and Intermediate Decision § 1.263 Proposed findings and conclusions. (a) Each party to the proceeding may file proposed findings of fact and conclusions, briefs, or memoranda of law: Provided,...

  7. 40 CFR 22.26 - Proposed findings, conclusions, and order.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 1 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Proposed findings, conclusions, and.../TERMINATION OR SUSPENSION OF PERMITS Hearing Procedures § 22.26 Proposed findings, conclusions, and order. After the hearing, any party may file proposed findings of fact, conclusions of law, and a...

  8. 40 CFR 209.29 - Proposed findings, conclusions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 26 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Proposed findings, conclusions. 209.29..., conclusions. (a) Within 20 days of the filing of the record with the hearing clerk as provided in § 209.28, or... consideration of the administrative law judge proposed findings of fact, conclusions of law, and a proposed...

  9. 45 CFR 672.19 - Proposed findings, conclusions, and order.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 45 Public Welfare 3 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Proposed findings, conclusions, and order. 672.19... FOUNDATION ENFORCEMENT AND HEARING PROCEDURES § 672.19 Proposed findings, conclusions, and order. Unless otherwise ordered by the Presiding Officer, any party may submit proposed findings of fact, conclusions...

  10. 37 CFR 251.52 - Proposed findings and conclusions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... conclusions. 251.52 Section 251.52 Patents, Trademarks, and Copyrights COPYRIGHT OFFICE, LIBRARY OF CONGRESS... PROCEDURE Procedures of Copyright Arbitration Royalty Panels § 251.52 Proposed findings and conclusions. (a) Any party to the proceeding may file proposed findings of fact and conclusions, briefs, or...

  11. 16 CFR 1025.46 - Proposed findings, conclusions, and order.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 16 Commercial Practices 2 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Proposed findings, conclusions, and order... PRACTICE FOR ADJUDICATIVE PROCEEDINGS Hearings § 1025.46 Proposed findings, conclusions, and order. Within..., including proposed findings of fact and conclusions of law, as well as a proposed order. The...

  12. 31 CFR 15.737-24 - Proposed findings and conclusions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 31 Money and Finance: Treasury 1 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Proposed findings and conclusions. 15... conclusions. Except in cases where the respondent has failed to answer the complaint or where a party has... afford the parties a reasonable opportunity to submit proposed findings and conclusions and...

  13. 31 CFR 8.67 - Proposed findings and conclusions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 31 Money and Finance: Treasury 1 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Proposed findings and conclusions. 8... conclusions. Except in cases when the respondent has failed to answer the complaint or when a party has failed... afford the parties a reasonable opportunity to submit proposed findings and conclusions and...

  14. 16 CFR 1025.46 - Proposed findings, conclusions, and order.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 16 Commercial Practices 2 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Proposed findings, conclusions, and order... PRACTICE FOR ADJUDICATIVE PROCEEDINGS Hearings § 1025.46 Proposed findings, conclusions, and order. Within..., including proposed findings of fact and conclusions of law, as well as a proposed order. The...

  15. 29 CFR 2700.65 - Proposed findings, conclusions and orders.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 9 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Proposed findings, conclusions and orders. 2700.65 Section... COMMISSION PROCEDURAL RULES Hearings § 2700.65 Proposed findings, conclusions and orders. The Judge may require the submission of proposed findings of fact, conclusions of law, and orders, together...

  16. 39 CFR 957.20 - Proposed findings and conclusions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 39 Postal Service 1 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Proposed findings and conclusions. 957.20 Section... RELATIVE TO DEBARMENT AND SUSPENSION FROM CONTRACTING § 957.20 Proposed findings and conclusions. (a) Each... the Judicial Officer such is not appropriate, submit proposed findings of fact, conclusions of law...

  17. 31 CFR 10.75 - Proposed findings and conclusions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 31 Money and Finance: Treasury 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Proposed findings and conclusions. 10... and conclusions. Except in cases where the respondent has failed to answer the complaint or where a... submit proposed findings and conclusions and their supporting reasons to the Administrative Law Judge....

  18. 20 CFR 901.48 - Proposed findings and conclusions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 20 Employees' Benefits 3 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Proposed findings and conclusions. 901.48... Termination of Enrollment § 901.48 Proposed findings and conclusions. Except in cases where the respondent has... proposed findings and conclusions and supporting reasons therefor....

  19. 16 CFR 3.46 - Proposed findings, conclusions, and order.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 16 Commercial Practices 1 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Proposed findings, conclusions, and order. 3... PRACTICE RULES OF PRACTICE FOR ADJUDICATIVE PROCEEDINGS Hearings § 3.46 Proposed findings, conclusions, and... Secretary for consideration of the Administrative Law Judge proposed findings of fact, conclusions of...

  20. 39 CFR 3001.35 - Proposed findings and conclusions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 39 Postal Service 1 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Proposed findings and conclusions. 3001.35 Section... General Applicability § 3001.35 Proposed findings and conclusions. The Commission or the presiding officer may direct the filing of proposed findings and conclusions with a brief statement of the...

  1. 16 CFR 3.46 - Proposed findings, conclusions, and order.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 16 Commercial Practices 1 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Proposed findings, conclusions, and order. 3... PRACTICE RULES OF PRACTICE FOR ADJUDICATIVE PROCEEDINGS Hearings § 3.46 Proposed findings, conclusions, and... Secretary for consideration of the Administrative Law Judge proposed findings of fact, conclusions of...

  2. 29 CFR 2700.65 - Proposed findings, conclusions and orders.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 9 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Proposed findings, conclusions and orders. 2700.65 Section... COMMISSION PROCEDURAL RULES Hearings § 2700.65 Proposed findings, conclusions and orders. The Judge may require the submission of proposed findings of fact, conclusions of law, and orders, together...

  3. 31 CFR 10.75 - Proposed findings and conclusions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 31 Money and Finance: Treasury 1 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Proposed findings and conclusions. 10... and conclusions. Except in cases where the respondent has failed to answer the complaint or where a... submit proposed findings and conclusions and their supporting reasons to the Administrative Law Judge....

  4. 16 CFR 1025.46 - Proposed findings, conclusions, and order.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 16 Commercial Practices 2 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Proposed findings, conclusions, and order... PRACTICE FOR ADJUDICATIVE PROCEEDINGS Hearings § 1025.46 Proposed findings, conclusions, and order. Within..., including proposed findings of fact and conclusions of law, as well as a proposed order. The...

  5. 31 CFR 8.67 - Proposed findings and conclusions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 31 Money and Finance: Treasury 1 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Proposed findings and conclusions. 8... conclusions. Except in cases when the respondent has failed to answer the complaint or when a party has failed... afford the parties a reasonable opportunity to submit proposed findings and conclusions and...

  6. 40 CFR 22.26 - Proposed findings, conclusions, and order.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 1 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Proposed findings, conclusions, and.../TERMINATION OR SUSPENSION OF PERMITS Hearing Procedures § 22.26 Proposed findings, conclusions, and order. After the hearing, any party may file proposed findings of fact, conclusions of law, and a...

  7. 31 CFR 10.75 - Proposed findings and conclusions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 31 Money and Finance: Treasury 1 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Proposed findings and conclusions. 10... and conclusions. Except in cases where the respondent has failed to answer the complaint or where a... submit proposed findings and conclusions and their supporting reasons to the Administrative Law Judge....

  8. 40 CFR 209.29 - Proposed findings, conclusions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 25 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Proposed findings, conclusions. 209.29..., conclusions. (a) Within 20 days of the filing of the record with the hearing clerk as provided in § 209.28, or... consideration of the administrative law judge proposed findings of fact, conclusions of law, and a proposed...

  9. 39 CFR 952.23 - Proposed findings and conclusions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 39 Postal Service 1 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Proposed findings and conclusions. 952.23 Section... conclusions. (a) Each party to a proceeding, except one who fails to answer the complaint or, having answered... fact, conclusions of law, orders and supporting reasons either in oral or written form in...

  10. 29 CFR 458.87 - Proposed findings and conclusions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 2 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Proposed findings and conclusions. 458.87 Section 458.87... conclusions. Within fifteen (15) days following the close of the hearing, the parties may submit proposed findings and conclusions to the Administrative Law Judge, together with supporting reasons therefor,...

  11. 24 CFR 1720.520 - Proposed findings, conclusions, and order.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 24 Housing and Urban Development 5 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Proposed findings, conclusions, and... PRACTICE Adjudicatory Proceedings Hearings § 1720.520 Proposed findings, conclusions, and order. The... which any party may file with the administrative law judge proposed findings of fact, conclusions of...

  12. 31 CFR 10.75 - Proposed findings and conclusions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 31 Money and Finance: Treasury 1 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Proposed findings and conclusions. 10... and conclusions. Except in cases where the respondent has failed to answer the complaint or where a... submit proposed findings and conclusions and their supporting reasons to the Administrative Law Judge....

  13. 29 CFR 458.87 - Proposed findings and conclusions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 2 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Proposed findings and conclusions. 458.87 Section 458.87... conclusions. Within fifteen (15) days following the close of the hearing, the parties may submit proposed findings and conclusions to the Administrative Law Judge, together with supporting reasons therefor,...

  14. 29 CFR 417.12 - Proposed findings and conclusions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 2 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Proposed findings and conclusions. 417.12 Section 417.12... findings and conclusions. Within 10 days following the close of hearings, interested persons may submit proposed findings and conclusions to the Administrative Law Judge, together with supporting...

  15. 19 CFR 111.68 - Proposed findings and conclusions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 19 Customs Duties 1 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Proposed findings and conclusions. 111.68 Section... Monetary Penalty in Lieu of Suspension or Revocation § 111.68 Proposed findings and conclusions. The... record in which to submit proposed findings and conclusions and supporting reasons for the findings...

  16. 20 CFR 901.48 - Proposed findings and conclusions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 20 Employees' Benefits 4 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Proposed findings and conclusions. 901.48... Termination of Enrollment § 901.48 Proposed findings and conclusions. Except in cases where the respondent has... proposed findings and conclusions and supporting reasons therefor....

  17. 24 CFR 1720.520 - Proposed findings, conclusions, and order.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 24 Housing and Urban Development 5 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Proposed findings, conclusions, and... PRACTICE Adjudicatory Proceedings Hearings § 1720.520 Proposed findings, conclusions, and order. The... which any party may file with the administrative law judge proposed findings of fact, conclusions of...

  18. 39 CFR 959.22 - Proposed findings and conclusions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 39 Postal Service 1 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Proposed findings and conclusions. 959.22 Section... RELATIVE TO THE PRIVATE EXPRESS STATUTES § 959.22 Proposed findings and conclusions. (a) Each party, except..., conclusions of law and supporting reasons either in oral or written form. The presiding officer may...

  19. 39 CFR 952.23 - Proposed findings and conclusions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 39 Postal Service 1 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Proposed findings and conclusions. 952.23 Section... RELATIVE TO FALSE REPRESENTATION AND LOTTERY ORDERS § 952.23 Proposed findings and conclusions. (a) Each..., conclusions of law, orders and supporting reasons either in oral or written form in the discretion of...

  20. 47 CFR 1.263 - Proposed findings and conclusions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Proposed findings and conclusions. 1.263... Proceedings Hearing and Intermediate Decision § 1.263 Proposed findings and conclusions. (a) Each party to the proceeding may file proposed findings of fact and conclusions, briefs, or memoranda of law: Provided,...

  1. 16 CFR 1025.46 - Proposed findings, conclusions, and order.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 16 Commercial Practices 2 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Proposed findings, conclusions, and order... PRACTICE FOR ADJUDICATIVE PROCEEDINGS Hearings § 1025.46 Proposed findings, conclusions, and order. Within..., including proposed findings of fact and conclusions of law, as well as a proposed order. The...

  2. 29 CFR 417.12 - Proposed findings and conclusions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 2 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Proposed findings and conclusions. 417.12 Section 417.12... findings and conclusions. Within 10 days following the close of hearings, interested persons may submit proposed findings and conclusions to the Administrative Law Judge, together with supporting...

  3. 24 CFR 1720.520 - Proposed findings, conclusions, and order.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 24 Housing and Urban Development 5 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Proposed findings, conclusions, and... PRACTICE Adjudicatory Proceedings Hearings § 1720.520 Proposed findings, conclusions, and order. The... which any party may file with the administrative law judge proposed findings of fact, conclusions of...

  4. 20 CFR 901.48 - Proposed findings and conclusions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 20 Employees' Benefits 4 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Proposed findings and conclusions. 901.48... Termination of Enrollment § 901.48 Proposed findings and conclusions. Except in cases where the respondent has... proposed findings and conclusions and supporting reasons therefor....

  5. 40 CFR 22.26 - Proposed findings, conclusions, and order.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 1 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Proposed findings, conclusions, and.../TERMINATION OR SUSPENSION OF PERMITS Hearing Procedures § 22.26 Proposed findings, conclusions, and order. After the hearing, any party may file proposed findings of fact, conclusions of law, and a...

  6. 29 CFR 417.12 - Proposed findings and conclusions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 2 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Proposed findings and conclusions. 417.12 Section 417.12... findings and conclusions. Within 10 days following the close of hearings, interested persons may submit proposed findings and conclusions to the Administrative Law Judge, together with supporting...

  7. 39 CFR 3001.35 - Proposed findings and conclusions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 39 Postal Service 1 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Proposed findings and conclusions. 3001.35 Section... General Applicability § 3001.35 Proposed findings and conclusions. The Commission or the presiding officer may direct the filing of proposed findings and conclusions with a brief statement of the...

  8. 31 CFR 15.737-24 - Proposed findings and conclusions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 31 Money and Finance: Treasury 1 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Proposed findings and conclusions. 15... conclusions. Except in cases where the respondent has failed to answer the complaint or where a party has... afford the parties a reasonable opportunity to submit proposed findings and conclusions and...

  9. 29 CFR 458.87 - Proposed findings and conclusions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Proposed findings and conclusions. 458.87 Section 458.87... conclusions. Within fifteen (15) days following the close of the hearing, the parties may submit proposed findings and conclusions to the Administrative Law Judge, together with supporting reasons therefor,...

  10. 39 CFR 952.23 - Proposed findings and conclusions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 39 Postal Service 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Proposed findings and conclusions. 952.23 Section... RELATIVE TO FALSE REPRESENTATION AND LOTTERY ORDERS § 952.23 Proposed findings and conclusions. (a) Each... discretion of the presiding officer such is not appropriate, submit proposed findings of fact, conclusions...

  11. 47 CFR 1.263 - Proposed findings and conclusions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 1 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Proposed findings and conclusions. 1.263... Proceedings Hearing and Intermediate Decision § 1.263 Proposed findings and conclusions. (a) Each party to the proceeding may file proposed findings of fact and conclusions, briefs, or memoranda of law: Provided,...

  12. 39 CFR 952.23 - Proposed findings and conclusions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 39 Postal Service 1 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Proposed findings and conclusions. 952.23 Section... RELATIVE TO FALSE REPRESENTATION AND LOTTERY ORDERS § 952.23 Proposed findings and conclusions. (a) Each..., conclusions of law, orders and supporting reasons either in oral or written form in the discretion of...

  13. 10 CFR 2.712 - Proposed findings and conclusions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 1 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Proposed findings and conclusions. 2.712 Section 2.712... Adjudications § 2.712 Proposed findings and conclusions. (a) Any party to a proceeding may, or if directed by the presiding officer shall, file proposed findings of fact and conclusions of law, briefs and...

  14. 40 CFR 22.26 - Proposed findings, conclusions, and order.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 1 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Proposed findings, conclusions, and.../TERMINATION OR SUSPENSION OF PERMITS Hearing Procedures § 22.26 Proposed findings, conclusions, and order. After the hearing, any party may file proposed findings of fact, conclusions of law, and a...

  15. 29 CFR 2700.65 - Proposed findings, conclusions and orders.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 9 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Proposed findings, conclusions and orders. 2700.65 Section... COMMISSION PROCEDURAL RULES Hearings § 2700.65 Proposed findings, conclusions and orders. The Judge may require the submission of proposed findings of fact, conclusions of law, and orders, together...

  16. 19 CFR 111.68 - Proposed findings and conclusions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 19 Customs Duties 1 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Proposed findings and conclusions. 111.68 Section... Monetary Penalty in Lieu of Suspension or Revocation § 111.68 Proposed findings and conclusions. The... record in which to submit proposed findings and conclusions and supporting reasons for the findings...

  17. 37 CFR 251.52 - Proposed findings and conclusions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... conclusions. 251.52 Section 251.52 Patents, Trademarks, and Copyrights COPYRIGHT OFFICE, LIBRARY OF CONGRESS... PROCEDURE Procedures of Copyright Arbitration Royalty Panels § 251.52 Proposed findings and conclusions. (a) Any party to the proceeding may file proposed findings of fact and conclusions, briefs, or...

  18. 24 CFR 1720.520 - Proposed findings, conclusions, and order.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 24 Housing and Urban Development 5 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Proposed findings, conclusions, and... PRACTICE Adjudicatory Proceedings Hearings § 1720.520 Proposed findings, conclusions, and order. The... which any party may file with the administrative law judge proposed findings of fact, conclusions of...

  19. 31 CFR 15.737-24 - Proposed findings and conclusions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 31 Money and Finance: Treasury 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Proposed findings and conclusions. 15... conclusions. Except in cases where the respondent has failed to answer the complaint or where a party has... afford the parties a reasonable opportunity to submit proposed findings and conclusions and...

  20. 29 CFR 458.87 - Proposed findings and conclusions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 2 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Proposed findings and conclusions. 458.87 Section 458.87... conclusions. Within fifteen (15) days following the close of the hearing, the parties may submit proposed findings and conclusions to the Administrative Law Judge, together with supporting reasons therefor,...

  1. 49 CFR 511.46 - Proposed findings, conclusions, and order.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 6 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Proposed findings, conclusions, and order. 511.46... Proposed findings, conclusions, and order. Within a reasonable time after the closing of the record and..., including proposed findings of fact, conclusions of law and a proposed order, together with...

  2. 47 CFR 1.263 - Proposed findings and conclusions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 1 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Proposed findings and conclusions. 1.263... Proceedings Hearing and Intermediate Decision § 1.263 Proposed findings and conclusions. (a) Each party to the proceeding may file proposed findings of fact and conclusions, briefs, or memoranda of law: Provided,...

  3. 17 CFR 10.82 - Proposed findings and conclusions; briefs.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... conclusions; briefs. 10.82 Section 10.82 Commodity and Securities Exchanges COMMODITY FUTURES TRADING... conclusions; briefs. In any proceeding involving a hearing or an opportunity for hearing, the parties may file written proposed findings of fact and conclusions of law. Briefs may be filed in support of...

  4. 45 CFR 672.19 - Proposed findings, conclusions, and order.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 45 Public Welfare 3 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Proposed findings, conclusions, and order. 672.19... FOUNDATION ENFORCEMENT AND HEARING PROCEDURES § 672.19 Proposed findings, conclusions, and order. Unless otherwise ordered by the Presiding Officer, any party may submit proposed findings of fact, conclusions...

  5. 16 CFR 3.46 - Proposed findings, conclusions, and order.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 16 Commercial Practices 1 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Proposed findings, conclusions, and order. 3... PRACTICE RULES OF PRACTICE FOR ADJUDICATIVE PROCEEDINGS Hearings § 3.46 Proposed findings, conclusions, and... Secretary for consideration of the Administrative Law Judge proposed findings of fact, conclusions of...

  6. 24 CFR 1720.520 - Proposed findings, conclusions, and order.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 24 Housing and Urban Development 5 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Proposed findings, conclusions, and... PRACTICE Adjudicatory Proceedings Hearings § 1720.520 Proposed findings, conclusions, and order. The... which any party may file with the administrative law judge proposed findings of fact, conclusions of...

  7. 29 CFR 2700.65 - Proposed findings, conclusions and orders.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 9 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Proposed findings, conclusions and orders. 2700.65 Section... COMMISSION PROCEDURAL RULES Hearings § 2700.65 Proposed findings, conclusions and orders. The Judge may require the submission of proposed findings of fact, conclusions of law, and orders, together...

  8. 40 CFR 209.29 - Proposed findings, conclusions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 26 2012-07-01 2011-07-01 true Proposed findings, conclusions. 209.29..., conclusions. (a) Within 20 days of the filing of the record with the hearing clerk as provided in § 209.28, or... consideration of the administrative law judge proposed findings of fact, conclusions of law, and a proposed...

  9. 39 CFR 957.20 - Proposed findings and conclusions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 39 Postal Service 1 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Proposed findings and conclusions. 957.20 Section... RELATIVE TO DEBARMENT AND SUSPENSION FROM CONTRACTING § 957.20 Proposed findings and conclusions. (a) Each... the Judicial Officer such is not appropriate, submit proposed findings of fact, conclusions of law...

  10. 39 CFR 959.22 - Proposed findings and conclusions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 39 Postal Service 1 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Proposed findings and conclusions. 959.22 Section... RELATIVE TO THE PRIVATE EXPRESS STATUTES § 959.22 Proposed findings and conclusions. (a) Each party, except..., conclusions of law and supporting reasons either in oral or written form. The presiding officer may...

  11. 29 CFR 458.87 - Proposed findings and conclusions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 2 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Proposed findings and conclusions. 458.87 Section 458.87... conclusions. Within fifteen (15) days following the close of the hearing, the parties may submit proposed findings and conclusions to the Administrative Law Judge, together with supporting reasons therefor,...

  12. 39 CFR 959.22 - Proposed findings and conclusions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 39 Postal Service 1 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Proposed findings and conclusions. 959.22 Section... RELATIVE TO THE PRIVATE EXPRESS STATUTES § 959.22 Proposed findings and conclusions. (a) Each party, except..., conclusions of law and supporting reasons either in oral or written form. The presiding officer may...

  13. 10 CFR 2.712 - Proposed findings and conclusions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 1 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Proposed findings and conclusions. 2.712 Section 2.712... Adjudications § 2.712 Proposed findings and conclusions. (a) Any party to a proceeding may, or if directed by the presiding officer shall, file proposed findings of fact and conclusions of law, briefs and...

  14. 19 CFR 111.68 - Proposed findings and conclusions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 19 Customs Duties 1 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Proposed findings and conclusions. 111.68 Section... Monetary Penalty in Lieu of Suspension or Revocation § 111.68 Proposed findings and conclusions. The... record in which to submit proposed findings and conclusions and supporting reasons for the findings...

  15. 31 CFR 10.75 - Proposed findings and conclusions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 31 Money and Finance: Treasury 1 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Proposed findings and conclusions. 10... and conclusions. Except in cases where the respondent has failed to answer the complaint or where a... submit proposed findings and conclusions and their supporting reasons to the Administrative Law Judge....

  16. 39 CFR 957.20 - Proposed findings and conclusions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 39 Postal Service 1 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Proposed findings and conclusions. 957.20 Section... RELATIVE TO DEBARMENT AND SUSPENSION FROM CONTRACTING § 957.20 Proposed findings and conclusions. (a) Each... the Judicial Officer such is not appropriate, submit proposed findings of fact, conclusions of law...

  17. 39 CFR 3001.35 - Proposed findings and conclusions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 39 Postal Service 1 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Proposed findings and conclusions. 3001.35 Section... General Applicability § 3001.35 Proposed findings and conclusions. The Commission or the presiding officer may direct the filing of proposed findings and conclusions with a brief statement of the...

  18. 39 CFR 3001.35 - Proposed findings and conclusions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 39 Postal Service 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Proposed findings and conclusions. 3001.35 Section... General Applicability § 3001.35 Proposed findings and conclusions. The Commission or the presiding officer may direct the filing of proposed findings and conclusions with a brief statement of the...

  19. 40 CFR 209.29 - Proposed findings, conclusions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 24 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Proposed findings, conclusions. 209.29..., conclusions. (a) Within 20 days of the filing of the record with the hearing clerk as provided in § 209.28, or... consideration of the administrative law judge proposed findings of fact, conclusions of law, and a proposed...

  20. 40 CFR 22.26 - Proposed findings, conclusions, and order.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Proposed findings, conclusions, and.../TERMINATION OR SUSPENSION OF PERMITS Hearing Procedures § 22.26 Proposed findings, conclusions, and order. After the hearing, any party may file proposed findings of fact, conclusions of law, and a...

  1. 39 CFR 959.22 - Proposed findings and conclusions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 39 Postal Service 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Proposed findings and conclusions. 959.22 Section... RELATIVE TO THE PRIVATE EXPRESS STATUTES § 959.22 Proposed findings and conclusions. (a) Each party, except..., conclusions of law and supporting reasons either in oral or written form. The presiding officer may...

  2. 31 CFR 8.67 - Proposed findings and conclusions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 31 Money and Finance: Treasury 1 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Proposed findings and conclusions. 8... conclusions. Except in cases when the respondent has failed to answer the complaint or when a party has failed... afford the parties a reasonable opportunity to submit proposed findings and conclusions and...

  3. 39 CFR 959.22 - Proposed findings and conclusions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 39 Postal Service 1 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Proposed findings and conclusions. 959.22 Section... RELATIVE TO THE PRIVATE EXPRESS STATUTES § 959.22 Proposed findings and conclusions. (a) Each party, except..., conclusions of law and supporting reasons either in oral or written form. The presiding officer may...

  4. 17 CFR 10.82 - Proposed findings and conclusions; briefs.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... conclusions; briefs. 10.82 Section 10.82 Commodity and Securities Exchanges COMMODITY FUTURES TRADING... conclusions; briefs. In any proceeding involving a hearing or an opportunity for hearing, the parties may file written proposed findings of fact and conclusions of law. Briefs may be filed in support of...

  5. 40 CFR 209.29 - Proposed findings, conclusions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 25 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Proposed findings, conclusions. 209.29..., conclusions. (a) Within 20 days of the filing of the record with the hearing clerk as provided in § 209.28, or... consideration of the administrative law judge proposed findings of fact, conclusions of law, and a proposed...

  6. 17 CFR 10.82 - Proposed findings and conclusions; briefs.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... conclusions; briefs. 10.82 Section 10.82 Commodity and Securities Exchanges COMMODITY FUTURES TRADING... conclusions; briefs. In any proceeding involving a hearing or an opportunity for hearing, the parties may file written proposed findings of fact and conclusions of law. Briefs may be filed in support of...

  7. 20 CFR 901.48 - Proposed findings and conclusions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 20 Employees' Benefits 4 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Proposed findings and conclusions. 901.48... Termination of Enrollment § 901.48 Proposed findings and conclusions. Except in cases where the respondent has... proposed findings and conclusions and supporting reasons therefor....

  8. Influence of mesophase activation conditions on the specific capacitance of the resulting carbons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mora, E.; Ruiz, V.; Santamaría, R.; Blanco, C.; Granda, M.; Menéndez, R.; Juarez-Galán, J. M.; Rodríguez-Reinoso, F.

    Mesophase pitch AR24 was directly activated with KOH using different proportions of the activating agent and activation temperatures, to study the effect on the textural characteristics of the resultant activated carbons and how these characteristics influence their behaviour as electrodes in supercapacitors. The textural properties of the activated carbons were studied by gas adsorption and immersion calorimetry. The results indicate that all the carbons produced were mainly microporous, with pore size around 1 nm. The behaviour of these carbons as electrodes in supercapacitors was studied from galvanostatic charge-discharge cycles. The specific capacitance values obtained were very high, reaching 400 and 200 F g -1 at low and high current densities respectively, for the sample activated with (5:1) KOH to mesophase ratio. Nevertheless, the reasons for this high capacitance values cannot be explained only on the basis of the textural characteristics of the activated carbons, as the results indicated that other factors might be also playing a significant role in their electrochemical behaviour.

  9. A Review of the Reflector Compact Fluorescent Lights Technology Procurement Program: Conclusions and Results

    SciTech Connect

    Sandahl, Linda J.; Gilbride, Theresa L.; Ledbetter, Marc R.; McCullough, Jeffrey J.

    2008-05-19

    This report describes a project sponsored by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) and implemented by the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL), from 2000 to 2007 to improve the performance of reflector type (R-lamp) compact fluorescent lamps (CFLs) and increase their availability throughout the United States by means of a technology development and procurement strategy. In 2000, at the request of the U.S. Department of Energy’s Emerging Technologies Program and its predecessors, the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory undertook a technology procurement seeking R-CFLs that were specifically designed for use in ICAT recessed can fixtures and that met other minimum performance criteria including minimum light output and size restrictions (to ensure they fit in standard residential recessed cans). The technology procurement included two phases. In Phase I, requests for proposals (RFPs) were issued in October 2002 and five manufacturers responded with 12 lamp models. Eight of these models met the minimum requirements and passed the 6-hour short-term test in a simulated ICAT environment. These eight models were subjected to long-term tests of 6,000 or more hours in a simulated ICAT environment. Three of these models passed the short- and long-term tests and were promoted through the program website (www.pnl.gov/rlamps), press releases, and fliers. To increase the number of qualifying models, a second RFP was issued in June 2005. In April 2007, DOE announced that 16 reflector CFL (R-CFL) models by four manufacturers had met all the minimum requirements of Phase 2 of the R-CFL Technology Innovation Competition. PNNL developed both the criteria and the test apparatus design for Elevated Temperature Life Testing (ETLT), which has been included by DOE in its draft ENERGY STAR specifications for the reflector category of CFLs. PNNL promoted the winning lamps through a program website, press releases, and fliers as well as through program partners. PNNL also helped engage distributors including Costco, the Home Depot, Bonneville Power Administration, and utility organizations.

  10. Conclusive quantum steering with superconducting transition-edge sensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smith, Devin H.; Gillett, Geoff; de Almeida, Marcelo P.; Branciard, Cyril; Fedrizzi, Alessandro; Weinhold, Till J.; Lita, Adriana; Calkins, Brice; Gerrits, Thomas; Wiseman, Howard M.; Nam, Sae Woo; White, Andrew G.

    2012-01-01

    Quantum steering allows two parties to verify shared entanglement even if one measurement device is untrusted. A conclusive demonstration of steering through the violation of a steering inequality is of considerable fundamental interest and opens up applications in quantum communication. To date, all experimental tests with single-photon states have relied on post selection, allowing untrusted devices to cheat by hiding unfavourable events in losses. Here we close this 'detection loophole' by combining a highly efficient source of entangled photon pairs with superconducting transition-edge sensors. We achieve an unprecedented ~62% conditional detection efficiency of entangled photons and violate a steering inequality with the minimal number of measurement settings by 48 s.d.s. Our results provide a clear path to practical applications of steering and to a photonic loophole-free Bell test.

  11. Conclusive quantum steering with superconducting transition edge sensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Almeida, Marcelo P.; Smith, Devin H.; Gillett, Geo; Branciard, Cyril; Fedrizzi, Alessandro; Weinhold, Till J.; Lita, Adriana; Calkins, Brice; Gertis, Thomas; Nam, Sae Woo; White, Andrew G.

    2012-02-01

    Quantum steering allows two parties to verify shared entanglement even if one measurement device is untrusted. A conclusive demonstration of steering through the violation of a steering inequality is of considerable fundamental interest and opens up applications in quantum communication. To date all experimental tests with single photon states have relied on post-selection, allowing untrusted devices to cheat by hiding unfavorable events in losses. Here we close this ``detection loophole'' by combining a highly efficient source of entangled photon pairs with superconducting transition edge sensors. We achieve an unprecedented ˜62% conditional detection efficiency of entangled photons and violate a steering inequality with the minimal number of measurement settings by 48 standard deviations. Our results provide a clear path to practical applications of steering and to a photonic loophole-free Bell test.

  12. Post-Knowledge of Results Delay: Effects of Interpolated Activity on Learning and Performance.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Benedetti, Carol; McCullagh, Penny

    1987-01-01

    Experimental evidence strongly supports the assumption that knowledge of results (KR) is necessary for learning to occur. This study compares the effects of KR or no-KR with the effects of an interpolated verbal activity on learning and performance of a timed motor task. Results are presented. (Author/MT)

  13. The ACTIVATE study: results from a group-randomized controlled trial comparing a traditional worksite health promotion program with an activated consumer program.

    PubMed

    Terry, Paul E; Fowles, Jinnet Briggs; Xi, Min; Harvey, Lisa

    2011-01-01

    PURPOSE. This study compares a traditional worksite-based health promotion program with an activated consumer program and a control program DESIGN. Group randomized controlled trial with 18-month intervention. SETTING. Two large Midwestern companies. SUBJECTS. Three hundred and twenty employees (51% response). INTERVENTION. The traditional health promotion intervention offered population-level campaigns on physical activity, nutrition, and stress management. The activated consumer intervention included population-level campaigns for evaluating health information, choosing a health benefits plan, and understanding the risks of not taking medications as prescribed. The personal development intervention (control group) offered information on hobbies. The interventions also offered individual-level coaching for high risk individuals in both active intervention groups. MEASURES. Health risk status, general health status, consumer activation, productivity, and the ability to evaluate health information. ANALYSIS. Multivariate analyses controlled for baseline differences among the study groups. RESULTS. At the population level, compared with baseline performance, the traditional health promotion intervention improved health risk status, consumer activation, and the ability to recognize reliable health websites. Compared with baseline performance, the activated consumer intervention improved consumer activation, productivity, and the ability to recognize reliable health websites. At the population level, however, only the activated consumer intervention improved any outcome more than the control group did; that outcome was consumer activation. At the individual level for high risk individuals, both traditional health coaching and activated consumer coaching positively affected health risk status and consumer activation. In addition, both coaching interventions improved participant ability to recognize a reliable health website. Consumer activation coaching also

  14. Differences between evolution of Titan's and Earth's rivers - further conclusions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Misiura, Katarzyna; Czechowski, Leszek

    2014-05-01

    Titan is the only celestial body, beside the Earth, where liquid is present on the surface. Liquid forms a number of lakes and rivers. In our research we use numerical model of the river to determine differences of evolution of rivers on the Earth and on Titan. We have found that transport of sediments on Titan is more effective than on Earth for the same river geometry and discharge. We have found also the theoretical explanations for this conclusion. 2.Introduction Titan is a very special body in the Solar System. It is the only moon that has dense atmosphere and flowing liquid on its surface. The Cassini-Huygens mission has found on Titan meandering rivers, and indicated processes of erosion, transport of solid material and its sedimentation. This paper is aimed to investigate the similarity and differences between these processes on Titan and the Earth. 3. Basic equations of our model The dynamical analysis of the considered rivers is performed using the package CCHE modified for the specific conditions on Titan. The package is based on the Navier-Stokes equations for depth-integrated two dimensional, turbulent flow and three dimensional convection-diffusion equation of sediment transport. 4. Parameters of the model We considered our model for a few kinds of liquid found on Titan. The liquid that falls as a rain (75% methane, 25% nitrogen) has different properties than the fluid forming lakes (74% ethane, 10% methane, 7% propane, 8.5% butane, 0.5% nitrogen). Other parameters of our model are: inflow discharge, outflow level, grain size of sediments etc. For every calculation performed for Titan's river similar calculations are performed for terrestrial ones. 5. Results and Conclusions The results of our simulation show the differences in behaviour of the flow and of sedimentation on Titan and on the Earth. Our preliminary results indicate that transport of material by Titan's rivers is more efficient than by terrestrial rivers of the same geometry parameters

  15. Inhibition of PHOSPHO1 activity results in impaired skeletal mineralization during limb development of the chick.

    PubMed

    Macrae, Vicky E; Davey, Megan G; McTeir, Lynn; Narisawa, Sonoko; Yadav, Manisha C; Millan, Jose Luis; Farquharson, Colin

    2010-04-01

    PHOSPHO1 is a bone-specific phosphatase implicated in the initiation of inorganic phosphate generation for matrix mineralization. The control of mineralization is attributed to the actions of tissue-nonspecific alkaline phosphatase (TNAP). However, matrix vesicles (MVs) containing apatite crystals are present in patients with hypophosphatasia as well as TNAP null (Akp2(-/-)) mice. It is therefore likely that other phosphatases work with TNAP to regulate matrix mineralization. Although PHOSPHO1 and TNAP expression is associated with MVs, it is not known if PHOSPHO1 and TNAP are coexpressed during the early stages of limb development. Furthermore, the functional in vivo role of PHOSPHO1 in matrix mineralization has yet to be established. Here, we studied the temporal expression and functional role of PHOSPHO1 within chick limb bud mesenchymal micromass cultures and also in wild-type and talpid(3) chick mutants. These mutants are characterized by defective hedgehog signalling and the absence of endochondral mineralization. The ability of in vitro micromass cultures to differentiate and mineralize their matrix was temporally associated with increased expression of PHOSPHO1 and TNAP. Comparable changes in expression were noted in developing embryonic legs (developmental stages 23-36HH). Micromass cultures treated with lansoprazole, a small-molecule inhibitor of PHOSPHO1 activity, or FGF2, an inhibitor of chondrocyte differentiation, resulted in reduced alizarin red staining (P<0.05). FGF2 treatment also caused a reduction in PHOSPHO1 (P<0.001) and TNAP (P<0.001) expression. Expression analysis by whole-mount RNA in situ hybridization correlated with qPCR micromass data and demonstrated the existence of a tightly regulated pattern of Phospho1 and Tnap expression which precedes mineralization. Treatment of developing embryos for 5 days with lansoprazole completely inhibited mineralization of all leg and wing long bones as assessed by alcian blue/alizarin red staining

  16. aPKC Phosphorylation of HDAC6 Results in Increased Deacetylation Activity

    PubMed Central

    Du, Yifeng; Seibenhener, Michael L.; Yan, Jin; Jiang, Jianxiong; Wooten, Michael C.

    2015-01-01

    The Class II histone deacetylase, HDAC6, has been shown to be involved in cell motility, aggresome formation and mitochondria transport. HDAC6 deacetylase activity regulates α-tubulin acetylation levels and thus plays a critical role in these processes. In turn, HDAC6 activity can be regulated by interaction with various proteins including multiple kinases. Kinase mediated phosphorylation of HDAC6 can lead to either increased or reduced activity. Our previous research has shown that sequestosome1/p62 (SQSTM1/p62) interacts with HDAC6 and regulates its activity. As SQSTM1/p62 is a scaffolding protein known to interact directly with the zeta isoform of Protein Kinase C (PKCζ), we sought to examine if HDAC6 could be a substrate for PKCζ phosphorylation and if so, how its activity might be regulated. Our data demonstrate that HDAC6 is not only present in a protein complex with PKCζ but can also be phosphorylated by PKCζ. We also show that specific phosphorylation of HDAC6 by PKCζ increases HDAC6 deacetylase activity resulting in reduced acetylated tubulin levels. Our findings provide novel insight into the molecular mechanism by which HDAC6, PKCζ and SQSTM1/p62 function together in protein aggregate clearance. These results also highlight a new research direction which may prove fruitful for understanding the underlying cause of several neurodegenerative diseases. PMID:25860570

  17. aPKC phosphorylation of HDAC6 results in increased deacetylation activity.

    PubMed

    Du, Yifeng; Seibenhener, Michael L; Yan, Jin; Jiang, Jianxiong; Wooten, Michael C

    2015-01-01

    The Class II histone deacetylase, HDAC6, has been shown to be involved in cell motility, aggresome formation and mitochondria transport. HDAC6 deacetylase activity regulates α-tubulin acetylation levels and thus plays a critical role in these processes. In turn, HDAC6 activity can be regulated by interaction with various proteins including multiple kinases. Kinase mediated phosphorylation of HDAC6 can lead to either increased or reduced activity. Our previous research has shown that sequestosome1/p62 (SQSTM1/p62) interacts with HDAC6 and regulates its activity. As SQSTM1/p62 is a scaffolding protein known to interact directly with the zeta isoform of Protein Kinase C (PKCζ), we sought to examine if HDAC6 could be a substrate for PKCζ phosphorylation and if so, how its activity might be regulated. Our data demonstrate that HDAC6 is not only present in a protein complex with PKCζ but can also be phosphorylated by PKCζ. We also show that specific phosphorylation of HDAC6 by PKCζ increases HDAC6 deacetylase activity resulting in reduced acetylated tubulin levels. Our findings provide novel insight into the molecular mechanism by which HDAC6, PKCζ and SQSTM1/p62 function together in protein aggregate clearance. These results also highlight a new research direction which may prove fruitful for understanding the underlying cause of several neurodegenerative diseases.

  18. Status of data, major results, and plans for geophysical activities, Yucca Mountain Project

    SciTech Connect

    Oliver, H.W.; Hardin, E.L.; Nelson, P.H.

    1990-07-01

    This report describes past and planned geophysical activities associated with the Yucca Mountain Project and is intended to serve as a starting point for integration of geophysical activities. This report relates past results to site characterization plans, as presented in the Yucca Mountain Site Characterization Plan (SCP). This report discusses seismic exploration, potential field methods, geoelectrical methods, teleseismic data collection and velocity structural modeling, and remote sensing. This report discusses surface-based, airborne, borehole, surface-to-borehole, crosshole, and Exploratory Shaft Facility-related activities. The data described in this paper, and the publications discussed, have been selected based on several considerations; location with respect to Yucca Mountain, whether the success or failure of geophysical data is important to future activities, elucidation of features of interest, and judgment as to the likelihood that the method will produce information that is important for site characterization. 65 refs., 19 figs., 12 tabs.

  19. Changes in breath trihalomethane levels resulting from household water-use activities.

    PubMed

    Gordon, Sydney M; Brinkman, Marielle C; Ashley, David L; Blount, Benjamin C; Lyu, Christopher; Masters, John; Singer, Philip C

    2006-04-01

    Common household water-use activities such as showering, bathing, drinking, and washing clothes or dishes are potentially important contributors to individual exposure to trihalomethanes (THMs), the major class of disinfection by-products of water treated with chlorine. Previous studies have focused on showering or bathing activities. In this study, we selected 12 common water-use activities and determined which may lead to the greatest THM exposures and result in the greatest increase in the internal dose. Seven subjects performed the various water-use activities in two residences served by water utilities with relatively high and moderate total THM levels. To maintain a consistent exposure environment, the activities, exposure times, air exchange rates, water flows, water temperatures, and extraneous THM emissions to the indoor air were carefully controlled. Water, indoor air, blood, and exhaled-breath samples were collected during each exposure session for each activity, in accordance with a strict, well-defined protocol. Although showering (for 10 min) and bathing (for 14 min), as well as machine washing of clothes and opening mechanical dishwashers at the end of the cycle, resulted in substantial increases in indoor air chloroform concentrations, only showering and bathing caused significant increases in the breath chloroform levels. In the case of bromodichloromethane (BDCM), only bathing yielded a significantly higher air level in relation to the preexposure concentration. For chloroform from showering, strong correlations were observed for indoor air and exhaled breath, blood and exhaled breath, indoor air and blood, and tap water and blood. Only water and breath, and blood and breath were significantly associated for chloroform from bathing. For BDCM, significant correlations were obtained for blood and air, and blood and water from showering. Neither dibromochloromethane nor bromoform gave measurable breath concentrations for any of the activities

  20. 40 CFR 209.35 - Conclusion of hearing.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 25 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Conclusion of hearing. 209.35 Section 209.35 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) NOISE ABATEMENT PROGRAMS... Hearings for Orders Issued Under Section 11(d) of the Noise Control Act § 209.35 Conclusion of hearing....

  1. 40 CFR 209.35 - Conclusion of hearing.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 25 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Conclusion of hearing. 209.35 Section 209.35 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) NOISE ABATEMENT PROGRAMS... Hearings for Orders Issued Under Section 11(d) of the Noise Control Act § 209.35 Conclusion of hearing....

  2. 40 CFR 209.35 - Conclusion of hearing.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 26 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Conclusion of hearing. 209.35 Section 209.35 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) NOISE ABATEMENT PROGRAMS... Hearings for Orders Issued Under Section 11(d) of the Noise Control Act § 209.35 Conclusion of hearing....

  3. 10 CFR 2.712 - Proposed findings and conclusions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 1 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Proposed findings and conclusions. 2.712 Section 2.712... ORDERS Rules for Formal Adjudications § 2.712 Proposed findings and conclusions. (a) Any party to a proceeding may, or if directed by the presiding officer shall, file proposed findings of fact and...

  4. 40 CFR 209.35 - Conclusion of hearing.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 24 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Conclusion of hearing. 209.35 Section 209.35 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) NOISE ABATEMENT PROGRAMS... Hearings for Orders Issued Under Section 11(d) of the Noise Control Act § 209.35 Conclusion of hearing....

  5. 10 CFR 2.712 - Proposed findings and conclusions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Proposed findings and conclusions. 2.712 Section 2.712... ORDERS Rules for Formal Adjudications § 2.712 Proposed findings and conclusions. (a) Any party to a proceeding may, or if directed by the presiding officer shall, file proposed findings of fact and...

  6. 40 CFR 209.35 - Conclusion of hearing.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 26 2012-07-01 2011-07-01 true Conclusion of hearing. 209.35 Section 209.35 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) NOISE ABATEMENT PROGRAMS... Hearings for Orders Issued Under Section 11(d) of the Noise Control Act § 209.35 Conclusion of hearing....

  7. Move Sequences in Graduate Research Paper Introductions and Conclusions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Madrunio, Marilu Rañosa

    2012-01-01

    Graduate students submit academic papers at the end of the term as part of their coursework. Such papers contain introduction moves which may be troublesome and conclusion moves which may contain sub-moves not really required. This paper is aimed at assessing what particular moves are employed in the introduction and conclusion sections of 21…

  8. 19 CFR 111.68 - Proposed findings and conclusions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 19 Customs Duties 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Proposed findings and conclusions. 111.68 Section 111.68 Customs Duties U.S. CUSTOMS AND BORDER PROTECTION, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY; DEPARTMENT... Monetary Penalty in Lieu of Suspension or Revocation § 111.68 Proposed findings and conclusions....

  9. Jumping to the Right Conclusions, Inferences, and Predictions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Giannattasio, Jack; Bazler, Judith

    2005-01-01

    Writing meaningful conclusions, drawing accurate inferences, and making relevant predictions are essential skills that many adolescents lack. The differences among conclusions, inferences, and predictions, although subtle, must be recognized to accurately analyze and interpret lab data. During one of the authors' 14 years as a physics and…

  10. On symbolic models for Single-Conclusion Logic of Proofs

    SciTech Connect

    Krupski, Vladimir N

    2011-05-31

    In this paper we define symbolic models for Single-Conclusion Logics of Proofs. We prove the soundness and completeness of these logics with respect to the corresponding classes of symbolic models. We apply the semantic methods developed in this paper to justify the use of terms of single-conclusion logic of proofs as notation for derivations in this logic. Bibliography: 17 titles.

  11. Control of a Shunt Active Power Filter with Neural Networks—Theory and Practical Results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Villalva, Marcelo G.; Filho, Ernesto Ruppert

    This paper presents theoretical studies and practical results obtained with a four-wire shunt active power filter fully controlled with neural networks. The paper is focused on a current compensation method based on adaptive linear elements (adalines), which are powerful and easy-to-use neural networks. The reader will find here an introduction about these networks, an explanatory section about the achievement of Fourier series with adalines, and the full description of an adaline-based selective current compensator. The paper also brings a quick discussion about the use of a feedforward neural network in the current controller of the active filter, as well as simulation and experimental results obtained with the prototype of an active power filter.

  12. [The results of the introduction of a protocol of preventive activities in a primary care center].

    PubMed

    Tamayo Marco, B; Deniel Rosanas, J; López Plana, A; Trallero Fort, J C; Lafuente Navarro, A; Lafuente Navarro, C

    1991-04-01

    A sample of 360 people was analyzed. They had received the protocol of preventive activities of the "Unitat Docent de Medicina Familiar i Comunitària de Barcelona" during 1989. The results of those activities directed to the prevention of cardiovascular risk and to the detection of excessive alcohol intake are reported, as they are those with the easiest and widest implementation. Overall results include hypercholesterolemia in 43.9%, abnormal blood pressure in 10.5%, a rate of smokers of 31.7%, 7.7% with an excessive alcohol intake, and 51.9% of obese individuals. The results are also shown by age and sex groups. In the discussion, the results are compared with those expected for our population. It is concluded that preventive measures should be encouraged by primary health are teams.

  13. Are We Driving Our Kids to Unhealthy Habits? Results of the Active Healthy Kids Canada 2013 Report Card on Physical Activity for Children and Youth

    PubMed Central

    Gray, Casey E.; Larouche, Richard; Barnes, Joel D.; Colley, Rachel C.; Cowie Bonne, Jennifer; Arthur, Mike; Cameron, Christine; Chaput, Jean-Philippe; Faulkner, Guy; Janssen, Ian; Kolen, Angela M.; Manske, Stephen R.; Salmon, Art; Spence, John C.; Timmons, Brian W.; Tremblay, Mark S.

    2014-01-01

    This article examines the time trends in patterns of school travel mode among Canadian children and youth to inform the Active Transportation (AT) indicator of the 2013 Active Healthy Kids Canada Report Card on Physical Activity for Children and Youth. The AT grade was assigned based on a comprehensive synthesis of the 2000 and 2010 Physical Activity Monitor studies from the Canadian Fitness and Lifestyle Research Institute and the 1992, 1998, 2005, and 2010 General Social Survey from Statistics Canada. The results showed that in 2013, AT was graded a D, because less than half of Canadian children and youth used only active modes of transportation to get to and from school. The proportion of Canadian children and youth who used only inactive modes of transportation for school travel increased significantly from 51% to 62% over the last decade. Children and youth from larger communities and those with lower household income levels were significantly more likely to use AT than those living in smaller communities and those in higher income households, respectively. In conclusion, motorized transport for school travel has increased steadily over the last decade across Canada. Regional and socio-demographic disparities should be considered in efforts to increase the number of children using AT. PMID:24905246

  14. Are we driving our kids to unhealthy habits? Results of the active healthy kids Canada 2013 report card on physical activity for children and youth.

    PubMed

    Gray, Casey E; Larouche, Richard; Barnes, Joel D; Colley, Rachel C; Bonne, Jennifer Cowie; Arthur, Mike; Cameron, Christine; Chaput, Jean-Philippe; Faulkner, Guy; Janssen, Ian; Kolen, Angela M; Manske, Stephen R; Salmon, Art; Spence, John C; Timmons, Brian W; Tremblay, Mark S

    2014-06-05

    This article examines the time trends in patterns of school travel mode among Canadian children and youth to inform the Active Transportation (AT) indicator of the 2013 Active Healthy Kids Canada Report Card on Physical Activity for Children and Youth. The AT grade was assigned based on a comprehensive synthesis of the 2000 and 2010 Physical Activity Monitor studies from the Canadian Fitness and Lifestyle Research Institute and the 1992, 1998, 2005, and 2010 General Social Survey from Statistics Canada. The results showed that in 2013, AT was graded a D, because less than half of Canadian children and youth used only active modes of transportation to get to and from school. The proportion of Canadian children and youth who used only inactive modes of transportation for school travel increased significantly from 51% to 62% over the last decade. Children and youth from larger communities and those with lower household income levels were significantly more likely to use AT than those living in smaller communities and those in higher income households, respectively. In conclusion, motorized transport for school travel has increased steadily over the last decade across Canada. Regional and socio-demographic disparities should be considered in efforts to increase the number of children using AT.

  15. "Exercise Dependence"--A Problem or Natural Result of High Activity?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Phelan, Suzanne; Bond, Dale S.; Lang, Wei; Jordan, Dustin; Wing, Rena R.

    2011-01-01

    Objectives: To compare physical activity (PA) and exercise dependence (ED) in 267 weight-loss maintainers (WLM) and 213 normal-weight (NW) controls. Methods: PA and ED assessed via accelerometery and the Exercise Dependence Questionnaire. Results: WLM had higher PA levels and ED scores than those of NW (P less than 0.0001). WLM status (P = 0.006)…

  16. Dynamic Docking Test System (DDTS) active table frequency response test results. [Apollo Soyuz Test Project

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gates, R. M.

    1974-01-01

    Results are presented of the frequency response test performed on the dynamic docking test system (DDTS) active table. Sinusoidal displacement commands were applied to the table and the dynamic response determined from measured actuator responses and accelerometers mounted to the table and one actuator.

  17. Social Work Roles and Activities Regarding Psychiatric Medication: Results of a National Survey

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bentley, Kia J.; Walsh, Joseph; Farmer, Rosemary L.

    2005-01-01

    This article reports the findings of a 2001 national survey of social workers regarding their everyday practice roles and activities regarding psychiatric medication. The results of this quantitative study indicate variability in the types of roles carried out by social workers with regard to psychiatric medication, but that perceptions of…

  18. Seasat: - JASIN workshop report. Volume 1: Findings and conclusions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1980-01-01

    Data acquired from the Joint Air-Sea Interaction (JASIN) Experiment and Seasat data from overpasses that covered the JASIN area were compared and evaluated. The JASIN data were used as a high quality withheld data set. The Seasat data were prepared for each instrument: the Seasat-A Satellite Scatterometer (SASS), the Scanning Multichannel microwave radiometer (SMMR), and the synthetic aperture radar (SAR). The following results demonstrate the performance of Seasat: it was possible to identify mesoscale systems with the SASS as well as fronts; the SMMR provided accurate water vapor content of the atmosphere; the SAR showed evidence of helical rolls in the marine boundary layer; a SASS anomaly could be traced back to thunderstorm activity.

  19. [Physical activity: results of the German Health Interview and Examination Survey for Adults (DEGS1)].

    PubMed

    Krug, S; Jordan, S; Mensink, G B M; Müters, S; Finger, J; Lampert, T

    2013-05-01

    Regular physical activity can have a positive effect on health at any age. Today's lifestyles, however, can often be characterised as sedentary. Therefore, the promotion of physical activity and sports has become an integral part of public health measures. The representative data of adults aged 18 to 79 years in Germany obtained from the "German Health Interview and Examination Survey for Adults" (DEGS1) provide an overview of self-estimated current physical activity behaviour. The results show that one third of the adult population claims to pay close attention to reaching a sufficient level of physical activity and one fourth participates in sports for at least 2 h/week on a regular basis. Thus, the percentage of adults regularly engaged in sports has increased compared to the previous "German National Health Interview and Examination Survey 1998". Still, four out of five adults do not achieve at least 2.5 h/week of moderate-intensity physical activity as recommended by the World Health Organisation. Consequently, future individual-level and population-level interventions should focus on target group-specific measures while continuing to promote regular physical activity in all segments of the population. An English full-text version of this article is available at SpringerLink as supplemental.

  20. Sequential activation of ground pads reduces skin heating during radiofrequency tumor ablation: in vivo porcine results.

    PubMed

    Schutt, David J; Swindle, M Michael; Helke, Kristi L; Bastarrika, Gorka; Schwarz, Florian; Haemmerich, Dieter

    2010-03-01

    Skin burns below ground pads during monopolar RF ablation are increasingly prevalent, thereby hindering the development of higher power RF generators capable of creating larger tumor ablation zones in combination with multiple or new applicators. Our goal was to evaluate reduction in skin temperatures via additional ground pads in an in vivo porcine model. Three ground pads placed on the animal's abdomen were activated either simultaneously or sequentially, where activation timing was adjusted to equilibrate skin temperature below each pad. Thirteen RF ablations (n = 4 simultaneous at 300 W, n = 5 sequential at 300 W, and n = 4 sequential at 375 W) were performed for 12 min via two internally cooled cluster electrodes placed in the gluteus maximus of domestic swine. Temperature rise at each pad and burn degree as determined via histology were compared. Ablation zone size was determined via T2-weighted MRI. Maximum temperature rise was significantly higher with simultaneous activation than with either of the sequential activation group (21.4 degrees C versus 8.1 degrees C or 9.6 degrees C, p < 0.01). Ablation zone diameters during simultaneous (300 W) and sequential activations (300 and 375 W) were and 6.9 +/- 0.3, 5.6 +/- 0.3, and 7.5 +/- 0.6 cm, respectively. Sequential activation of multiple ground pads results in significantly lower skin temperatures and less severe burns, as measured by histological examination.

  1. Modulation of fructokinase activity of potato (Solanum tuberosum) results in substantial shifts in tuber metabolism.

    PubMed

    Davies, Howard V; Shepherd, Louise V T; Burrell, Michael M; Carrari, Fernando; Urbanczyk-Wochniak, Ewa; Leisse, Andrea; Hancock, Robert D; Taylor, Mark; Viola, Roberto; Ross, Heather; McRae, Diane; Willmitzer, Lothar; Fernie, Alisdair R

    2005-07-01

    Potato plants (Solanum tuberosum L. cvs Desiree and Record) transformed with sense and antisense constructs of a cDNA encoding the potato fructokinase StFK1 exhibited altered transcription of this gene, altered amount of protein and altered enzyme activities. Measurement of the maximal catalytic activity of fructokinase revealed a 2-fold variation in leaf (from 90 to 180% of wild type activity) and either a 10- or 30-fold variation in tuber (from 10 or 30% to 300% in Record and Desiree, respectively) activity. The comparative effect of the antisense construct in leaf and tuber tissue suggests that this isoform is only a minor contributor to the total fructokinase activity in the leaf but the predominant isoform in the tuber. Antisense inhibition of the fructokinase resulted in a reduced tuber yield; however, its overexpression had no impact on this parameter. The modulation of fructokinase activity had few, consistent effects on carbohydrate levels, with the exception of a general increase in glucose content in the antisense lines, suggesting that this enzyme is not important for the control of starch synthesis. However, when metabolic fluxes were estimated, it became apparent that the transgenic lines display a marked shift in metabolism, with the rate of redistribution of radiolabel to sucrose markedly affected by the activity of fructokinase. These data suggest an important role for fructokinase, acting in concert with sucrose synthase, in maintaining a balance between sucrose synthesis and degradation by a mechanism independent of that controlled by the hexose phosphate-mediated activation of sucrose phosphate synthase.

  2. Neural activity underlying tinnitus generation: results from PET and fMRI.

    PubMed

    Lanting, C P; de Kleine, E; van Dijk, P

    2009-09-01

    Tinnitus is the percept of sound that is not related to an acoustic source outside the body. For many forms of tinnitus, mechanisms in the central nervous system are believed to play an important role in the pathology. Specifically, three mechanisms have been proposed to underlie tinnitus: (1) changes in the level of spontaneous neural activity in the central auditory system, (2) changes in the temporal pattern of neural activity, and (3) reorganization of tonotopic maps. The neuroimaging methods fMRI and PET measure signals that presumably reflect the firing rates of multiple neurons and are assumed to be sensitive to changes in the level of neural activity. There are two basic paradigms that have been applied in functional neuroimaging of tinnitus. Firstly, sound-evoked responses as well as steady state neural activity have been measured to compare tinnitus patients to healthy controls. Secondly, paradigms that involve modulation of tinnitus by a controlled stimulus allow for a within-subject comparison that identifies neural activity that may be correlated to the tinnitus percept. Even though there are many differences across studies, the general trend emerging from the neuroimaging studies, is that tinnitus in humans may correspond to enhanced neural activity across several centers of the central auditory system. Also, neural activity in non-auditory areas including the frontal areas, the limbic system and the cerebellum seems associated with the perception of tinnitus. These results indicate that in addition to the auditory system, non-auditory systems may represent a neural correlate of tinnitus. Although the currently published neuroimaging studies typically show a correspondence between tinnitus and enhanced neural activity, it will be important to perform future studies on subject groups that are closely matched for characteristics such as age, gender and hearing loss in order to rule out the contribution of these factors to the abnormalities specifically

  3. Collaborative Automation Reliably Remediating Erroneous Conclusion Threats (CARRECT)

    PubMed Central

    Lansey, Jonathan C.; Picciano, Paul; Yohai, Ian; Grant, Fred; Gern, Robert

    2013-01-01

    estimated parameters of the model properly accounts for both types of uncertainty (Rubin 1987; King et al. 2001). As a result, MI will lead to valid standard errors and confidence intervals along with unbiased point estimates. In order to compute the joint distribution, CARRECT uses a bootstrapping-based algorithm that gives essentially the same answers as the standard Bayesian Markov Chain Monte Carlo (MCMC) or Expectation Maximization (EM) approaches, is usually considerably faster than existing approaches and can handle many more variables. Results Tests were conducted on one of the proposed methods with an epidemiological dataset from the Integrated Health Interview Series (IHIS) producing verifiably unbiased results despite high missingness rates. In addition, mockups (Figure 1) were created of an intuitive data wizard that guides the user through the analysis processes by analyzing key features of a given dataset. The mockups also show prompts for the user to provide additional substantive knowledge to improve the handling of imperfect datasets, as well as the selection of the most appropriate algorithms and models. Conclusions Our approach and program were designed to make bias mitigation much more accessible to much more than only the statistical elite. We hope that it will have a wide impact on reducing bias in epidemiological studies and provide more accurate information to policymakers.

  4. Disability Weights for Chronic Mercury Intoxication Resulting from Gold Mining Activities: Results from an Online Pairwise Comparisons Survey

    PubMed Central

    Steckling, Nadine; Devleesschauwer, Brecht; Winkelnkemper, Julia; Fischer, Florian; Ericson, Bret; Krämer, Alexander; Hornberg, Claudia; Fuller, Richard; Plass, Dietrich; Bose-O’Reilly, Stephan

    2017-01-01

    In artisanal small-scale gold mining, mercury is used for gold-extraction, putting miners and nearby residents at risk of chronic metallic mercury vapor intoxication (CMMVI). Burden of disease (BoD) analyses allow the estimation of the public health relevance of CMMVI, but until now there have been no specific CMMVI disability weights (DWs). The objective is to derive DWs for moderate and severe CMMVI. Disease-specific and generic health state descriptions of 18 diseases were used in a pairwise comparison survey. Mercury and BoD experts were invited to participate in an online survey. Data were analyzed using probit regression. Local regression was used to make the DWs comparable to the Global Burden of Disease (GBD) study. Alternative survey (visual analogue scale) and data analyses approaches (linear interpolation) were evaluated in scenario analyses. A total of 105 participants completed the questionnaire. DWs for moderate and severe CMMVI were 0.368 (0.261–0.484) and 0.588 (0.193–0.907), respectively. Scenario analyses resulted in higher mean values. The results are limited by the sample size, group of interviewees, questionnaire extent, and lack of generally accepted health state descriptions. DWs were derived to improve the data basis of mercury-related BoD estimates, providing useful information for policy-making. Integration of the results into the GBD DWs enhances comparability. PMID:28075395

  5. Disability Weights for Chronic Mercury Intoxication Resulting from Gold Mining Activities: Results from an Online Pairwise Comparisons Survey.

    PubMed

    Steckling, Nadine; Devleesschauwer, Brecht; Winkelnkemper, Julia; Fischer, Florian; Ericson, Bret; Krämer, Alexander; Hornberg, Claudia; Fuller, Richard; Plass, Dietrich; Bose-O'Reilly, Stephan

    2017-01-10

    In artisanal small-scale gold mining, mercury is used for gold-extraction, putting miners and nearby residents at risk of chronic metallic mercury vapor intoxication (CMMVI). Burden of disease (BoD) analyses allow the estimation of the public health relevance of CMMVI, but until now there have been no specific CMMVI disability weights (DWs). The objective is to derive DWs for moderate and severe CMMVI. Disease-specific and generic health state descriptions of 18 diseases were used in a pairwise comparison survey. Mercury and BoD experts were invited to participate in an online survey. Data were analyzed using probit regression. Local regression was used to make the DWs comparable to the Global Burden of Disease (GBD) study. Alternative survey (visual analogue scale) and data analyses approaches (linear interpolation) were evaluated in scenario analyses. A total of 105 participants completed the questionnaire. DWs for moderate and severe CMMVI were 0.368 (0.261-0.484) and 0.588 (0.193-0.907), respectively. Scenario analyses resulted in higher mean values. The results are limited by the sample size, group of interviewees, questionnaire extent, and lack of generally accepted health state descriptions. DWs were derived to improve the data basis of mercury-related BoD estimates, providing useful information for policy-making. Integration of the results into the GBD DWs enhances comparability.

  6. Hemoglobin induced cell trauma indirectly influences endothelial TLR9 activity resulting in pulmonary vascular smooth muscle cell activation

    PubMed Central

    Loomis, Zoe; Eigenberger, Paul; Redinius, Katherine; Lisk, Christina; Karoor, Vijaya; Nozik-Grayck, Eva; Ferguson, Scott K.; Hassell, Kathryn; Nuss, Rachelle; Stenmark, Kurt; Buehler, Paul; Irwin, David C.

    2017-01-01

    It is now well established that both inherited and acquired forms of hemolytic disease can promote pulmonary vascular disease consequent of free hemoglobin (Hb) induced NO scavenging, elevations in reactive oxygen species and lipid peroxidation. It has recently been reported that oxidative stress can activate NFkB through a toll-like receptor 9 (TLR9) mediated pathway; further, TLR9 can be activated by either nuclear or mitochondrial DNA liberated by stress induced cellular trauma. We hypothesis that Hb induced lipid peroxidation and subsequent endothelial cell trauma is linked to TLR9 activation, resulting in IL-6 mediated pulmonary smooth muscle cell proliferation. We examined the effects of Hb on rat pulmonary artery endothelial and smooth muscle cells (rPAEC and rPASMC, respectively), and then utilized TLR9 and IL6 inhibitors, as well as the Hb and heme binding proteins (haptoglobin (Hp) and hemopexin (Hpx), respectively) to further elucidate the aforementioned mediators. Further, we explored the effects of Hb in vivo utilizing endothelial cell (EC) specific myeloid differentiation primary response gene-88 (MyD88) and TLR9 null mice. Our data show that oxidized Hb induces lipid peroxidation, cellular toxicity (5.5 ± 1.7 fold; p≤0.04), increased TLR9 activation (60%; p = 0.01), and up regulated IL6 expression (1.75±0.3 fold; p = 0.04) in rPAEC. Rat PASMC exhibited a more proliferative state (13 ± 1%; p = 0.01) when co-cultured with Hb activated rPAEC. These effects were attenuated with the sequestration of Hb or heme by Hp and Hpx as well as with TLR9 an IL-6 inhibition. Moreover, in both EC-MyD88 and TLR9 null mice Hb-infusion resulted in less lung IL-6 expression compared to WT cohorts. These results demonstrate that Hb-induced lipid peroxidation can initiate a modest TLR9 mediated inflammatory response, subsequently generating an activated SMC phenotype. PMID:28152051

  7. Epidermal Platelet-activating Factor Receptor Activation and Ultraviolet B Radiation Result in Synergistic Tumor Necrosis Factor-alpha Production

    PubMed Central

    Wolverton, Jay E.; Al-Hassani, Mohammed; Yao, Yongxue; Zhang, Qiwei; Travers, Jeffrey B.

    2010-01-01

    Ultraviolet B radiation (UVB) is a potent stimulator of epidermal cytokine production which has been implicated in photoaggravated dermatoses. In addition to cytokines such as tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α), UVB generates bioactive lipids including platelet-activating factor (PAF). Our previous studies have demonstrated that UVB-mediated production of keratinocyte TNF-α is in part due to PAF. The current studies use a human PAF-receptor (PAF-R) negative epithelial cell line transduced with PAF-Rs and PAF–R-deficient mice to demonstrate that activation of the epidermal PAF-R along with UVB irradiation results in a synergistic production of TNF-α. It should be noted that PAF-R effects are mimicked by the protein kinase C (PKC) agonist phorbol myristic acetate, and are inhibited by pharmacological antagonists of the PKC gamma isoenzyme. These studies suggest that concomitant PAF-R activation and UVB irradiation results in a synergistic production of the cytokine TNF-α which is mediated in part via PKC. These studies provide a novel potential mechanism for photosensitivity responses. PMID:19769579

  8. Results from the Nearby Stars (NStars) Program: Chromospheric Activity in a Sample of Nearby Solar Analogs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Corbally, Christopher J.; J., S.; Gray, R. O.

    2010-01-01

    Since the year 2000, our institutions have been engaged in a study of the nearby dwarf and giant stars earlier than spectral type M0 in the Hipparcos catalog and within 40 parsecs of the Sun (3600 stars). This study has used classification-resolution spectra to provide new, precise spectral types and basic physical parameters (effective temperature, surface gravity and metallicity). In addition, we are providing measures of the chromospheric activity for these stars. Results so far have been published in Gray et al. (2003, 2006). Here we outline the continuation of this study to which recent improvements have been made. These are both to the estimation of chromospheric activity, now closer to the Mount Wilson system, and to the derivation of stellar parameters through use of Kurucz's newer, Atlas12 atmospheric models. For a limited, improved sample, activity and evolutionary age are compared.

  9. A strong strand displacement activity of thermostable DNA polymerase markedly improves the results of DNA amplification.

    PubMed

    Ignatov, Konstantin B; Barsova, Ekaterina V; Fradkov, Arkady F; Blagodatskikh, Konstantin A; Kramarova, Tatiana V; Kramarov, Vladimir M

    2014-08-01

    The sensitivity and robustness of various DNA detection and amplification techniques are to a large extent determined by the properties of the DNA polymerase used. We have compared the performance of conventional Taq and Bst DNA polymerases to a novel Taq DNA polymerase mutant (SD DNA polymerase), which has a strong strand displacement activity, in PCR (including amplification of GC-rich and complex secondary structure templates), long-range PCR (LR PCR), loop-mediated amplification (LAMP), and polymerase chain displacement reaction (PCDR). Our results demonstrate that the strand displacement activity of SD DNA polymerase, in combination with the robust polymerase activity, provides a notable improvement in the sensitivity and efficiency of all these methods.

  10. Preliminary results of systematic sampling of gas manifestations in geodynamically active areas of Greece

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Daskalopoulou, Kyriaki; D'Alessandro, Walter; Calabrese, Sergio; Kyriakopoulos, Konstantinos

    2016-04-01

    Greece is located on a convergent plate boundary comprising the subduction of the African Plate beneath the Eurasian, while the Arabian plate approaches the Eurasian in a northwestward motion. It is considered to be one of the most tectonically active regions of Earth with a complex geodynamic setting, deriving from a long and complicated geological history. Due to this specific geological background, conditions for the formation of many thermal springs are favoured. In the past years, almost all the already known sites of degassing (fumaroles, soil gases, mofettes, gas bubbling in cold and thermal waters) located in the Hellenic area were sampled at least one time. Collected samples were analysed for their chemical (He, Ne, Ar, O2, N2, H2, H2S, CO, CH4 and CO2) and isotopic composition (He, C and N). Some of these sites have been selected for systematic sampling. Four of them have records longer than 10 years with tens of samplings also considering some literature data. Two of the sites are located in active volcanic areas (Santorini and Nisyros) while the other two are close to actively spreading graben structures with intense seismic activity (Gulf of Korinth and Sperchios basin). Results allowed to define long term background values and also some interesting variation related to seismic or volcanic activity.

  11. Silencing of Doublecortin-Like (DCL) Results in Decreased Mitochondrial Activity and Delayed Neuroblastoma Tumor Growth

    PubMed Central

    Verissimo, Carla S.; Elands, Rachel; Cheng, Sou; Saaltink, Dirk-Jan; ter Horst, Judith P.; Alme, Maria N.; Pont, Chantal; van de Water, Bob; Håvik, Bjarte; Fitzsimons, Carlos P.; Vreugdenhil, Erno

    2013-01-01

    Doublecortin-like (DCL) is a microtubule-binding protein crucial for neuroblastoma (NB) cell proliferation. We have investigated whether the anti-proliferative effect of DCL knockdown is linked to reduced mitochondrial activity. We found a delay in tumor development after DCL knockdown in vivo in doxycycline-inducible NB tumor xenografts. To understand the mechanisms underlying this tumor growth retardation we performed a series of in vitro experiments in NB cell lines. DCL colocalizes with mitochondria, interacts with the mitochondrial outer membrane protein OMP25/ SYNJ2BP and DCL knockdown results in decreased expression of genes involved in oxidative phosphorylation. Moreover, DCL knockdown decreases cytochrome c oxidase activity and ATP synthesis. We identified the C-terminal Serine/Proline-rich domain and the second microtubule-binding area as crucial DCL domains for the regulation of cytochrome c oxidase activity and ATP synthesis. Furthermore, DCL knockdown causes a significant reduction in the proliferation rate of NB cells under an energetic challenge induced by low glucose availability. Together with our previous studies, our results corroborate DCL as a key player in NB tumor growth in which DCL controls not only mitotic spindle formation and the stabilization of the microtubule cytoskeleton, but also regulates mitochondrial activity and energy availability, which makes DCL a promising molecular target for NB therapy. PMID:24086625

  12. Uncoupling Malt1 threshold function from paracaspase activity results in destructive autoimmune inflammation.

    PubMed

    Gewies, Andreas; Gorka, Oliver; Bergmann, Hanna; Pechloff, Konstanze; Petermann, Franziska; Jeltsch, Katharina M; Rudelius, Martina; Kriegsmann, Mark; Weichert, Wilko; Horsch, Marion; Beckers, Johannes; Wurst, Wolfgang; Heikenwalder, Mathias; Korn, Thomas; Heissmeyer, Vigo; Ruland, Jürgen

    2014-11-20

    The paracaspase Malt1 is a central regulator of antigen receptor signaling that is frequently mutated in human lymphoma. As a scaffold, it assembles protein complexes for NF-κB activation, and its proteolytic domain cleaves negative NF-κB regulators for signal enforcement. Still, the physiological functions of Malt1-protease are unknown. We demonstrate that targeted Malt1-paracaspase inactivation induces a lethal inflammatory syndrome with lymphocyte-dependent neurodegeneration in vivo. Paracaspase activity is essential for regulatory T cell (Treg) and innate-like B cell development, but it is largely dispensable for overcoming Malt1-dependent thresholds for lymphocyte activation. In addition to NF-κB inhibitors, Malt1 cleaves an entire set of mRNA stability regulators, including Roquin-1, Roquin-2, and Regnase-1, and paracaspase inactivation results in excessive interferon gamma (IFNγ) production by effector lymphocytes that drive pathology. Together, our results reveal distinct threshold and modulatory functions of Malt1 that differentially control lymphocyte differentiation and activation pathways and demonstrate that selective paracaspase blockage skews systemic immunity toward destructive autoinflammation.

  13. Mouse strain-dependent caspase activation during acetaminophen hepatotoxicity does not result in apoptosis or modulation of inflammation

    SciTech Connect

    Williams, C. David; Koerner, Michael R.; Lampe, Jed N.; Farhood, Anwar; Jaeschke, Hartmut

    2011-12-15

    The mechanisms of acetaminophen (APAP)-mediated hepatic oncotic necrosis have been extensively characterized. However, it was recently demonstrated that fed CD-1 mice have a transient caspase activation which initiates apoptosis. To evaluate these findings in more detail, outbred (Swiss Webster, SW) and inbred (C57BL/6) mice were treated with APAP with or without pan-caspase inhibitor and compared to the apoptosis model of galactosamine (GalN)/endotoxin (ET). Fasted or fed APAP-treated C57BL/6 mice showed no evidence of caspase-3 processing or activity. Interestingly, a minor, temporary increase in caspase-3 processing and activity (150% above baseline) was observed after APAP treatment only in fed SW mice. The degree of caspase-3 activation in SW mice after APAP was minor compared to that observed in GalN/ET-treated mice (1600% above baseline). The pancaspase inhibitor attenuated caspase activation and resulted in increased APAP-induced injury (plasma ALT, necrosis scoring). The caspase inhibitor did not affect apoptosis because regardless of treatment only < 0.5% of hepatocytes showed consistent apoptotic morphology after APAP. In contrast, > 20% apoptotic cells were observed in GalN/ET-treated mice. Presence of the caspase inhibitor altered hepatic glutathione levels in SW mice, which could explain the exacerbation of injury. Additionally, the infiltration of hepatic neutrophils was not altered by the fed state of either mouse strain. Conclusion: Minor caspase-3 activation without apoptotic cell death can be observed only in fed mice of some outbred strains. These findings suggest that although the severity of APAP-induced liver injury varies between fed and fasted animals, the mechanism of cell death does not fundamentally change. -- Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer During acetaminophen overdose caspase-3 can be activated in fed mice of certain outbred strains. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Hepatic ATP levels are not the determining factor for caspase

  14. ADAM12 redistributes and activates MMP-14, resulting in gelatin degradation, reduced apoptosis and increased tumor growth.

    PubMed

    Albrechtsen, Reidar; Kveiborg, Marie; Stautz, Dorte; Vikeså, Jonas; Noer, Julie B; Kotzsh, Alexander; Nielsen, Finn Cilius; Wewer, Ulla M; Fröhlich, Camilla

    2013-10-15

    Matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs), in particular MMP-2, MMP-9 and MMP-14, play a key role in various aspects of cancer pathology. Likewise, ADAMs (a disintegrin and metalloproteinases), including ADAM12, are upregulated in malignant tumors and contribute to the pathology of cancers. Here, we show that there is a positive correlation between MMP-14 and ADAM12 expression in human breast cancer. We demonstrated that in 293-VnR and human breast cancer cells expressing ADAM12 at the cell surface, endogenous MMP-14 was recruited to the cell surface, resulting in its activation. Subsequent to this activation, gelatin degradation was stimulated and tumor cell apoptosis was decreased, with reduced expression of the pro-apoptotic proteins BCL2L11 and BIK. The effect on gelatin degradation was abrogated by inhibition of the MMP-14 activity and appeared to be dependent on cell surface αVβ3 integrin localization, but neither the catalytic activity of ADAM12 nor the cytoplasmic tail of ADAM12 were required. The significance of ADAM12-induced activation of MMP-14 was underscored by a reduction in MMP-14-mediated gelatin degradation and abolition of apoptosis-protective effects by specific monoclonal antibodies against ADAM12. Furthermore, orthotopic implantation of ADAM12-expressing MCF7 cells in nude mice produced tumors with increased levels of activated MMP-14 and confirmed that ADAM12 protects tumor cells against apoptosis, leading to increased tumor progression. In conclusion, our data suggest that a ternary protein complex composed of ADAM12, αVβ3 integrin and MMP-14 at the tumor cell surface regulates the function of MMP-14. This interaction might point to a novel concept for the development of MMP-14-targeting drugs in treating cancer.

  15. F-8 digital fly-by-wire flight test results viewed from an active controls perspective

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zalai, K. J.; Deets, D. A.

    1975-01-01

    The results of the NASA F-8 digital fly-by-wire flight test program are presented, along with the implications for active controls applications. The closed loop performance of the digital control system agreed well with the sampled-data system design predictions. The digital fly-by-wire mechanization also met pilot flying qualities requirements. The advantages of mechanizing the control laws in software became apparent during the flight program and were realized without sacrificing overall system reliability. This required strict software management. The F-8 flight test results are shown to be encouraging in light of the requirements that must be met by control systems for flight-critical active controls applications.

  16. Testing and Oxygen Assessment Results for a Next Generation Extravehicular Activity Portable Life Support System Fan

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Paul, Heather L.; Jennings, Mallory A.; Rivera, Fatonia L.; Martin, Devin

    2011-01-01

    NASA is designing a next generation Extravehicular Activity (EVA) Portable Life Support System (PLSS) for use in future surface exploration endeavors. To meet the new requirements for ventilation flow at nominal and buddy modes, a fan has been developed and tested. This paper summarizes the results of the performance and life cycle testing efforts conducted at the NASA Johnson Space Center. Additionally, oxygen compatibility assessment results from an evaluation conducted at White Sands Test Facility (WSTF) are provided, and lessons learned and future recommendations are outlined.

  17. Role of FKBP5 in emotion processing: results on amygdala activity, connectivity and volume.

    PubMed

    Holz, Nathalie E; Buchmann, Arlette F; Boecker, Regina; Blomeyer, Dorothea; Baumeister, Sarah; Wolf, Isabella; Rietschel, Marcella; Witt, Stephanie H; Plichta, Michael M; Meyer-Lindenberg, Andreas; Banaschewski, Tobias; Brandeis, Daniel; Laucht, Manfred

    2015-01-01

    Accumulating evidence suggests a role of FKBP5, a co-chaperone regulating the glucocorticoid receptor sensitivity, in the etiology of depression and anxiety disorders. Based on recent findings of altered amygdala activity following childhood adversity, the present study aimed at clarifying the impact of genetic variation in FKBP5 on threat-related neural activity and coupling as well as morphometric alterations in stress-sensitive brain systems. Functional magnetic resonance imaging during an emotional face-matching task was performed in 153 healthy young adults (66 males) from a high-risk community sample followed since birth. Voxel-based morphometry was applied to study structural alterations and DNA was genotyped for FKBP5 rs1360780. Childhood adversity was measured using retrospective self-report (Childhood Trauma Questionnaire) and by a standardized parent interview assessing childhood family adversity. Depression was assessed by the Beck Depression Inventory. There was a main effect of FKBP5 on the left amygdala, with T homozygotes showing the highest activity, largest volume and increased coupling with the left hippocampus and the orbitofrontal cortex (OFC). Moreover, amygdala-OFC coupling proved to be associated with depression in this genotype. In addition, our results support previous evidence of a gene-environment interaction on right amygdala activity with respect to retrospective assessment of childhood adversity, but clarify that this does not generalize to the prospective assessment. These findings indicated that activity in T homozygotes increased with the level of adversity, whereas the opposite pattern emerged in C homozygotes, with CT individuals being intermediate. The present results point to a functional involvement of FKBP5 in intermediate phenotypes associated with emotional processing, suggesting a possible mechanism for this gene in conferring susceptibility to stress-related disorders.

  18. Activation of hip prostheses in high energy radiotherapy and resultant dose to nearby tissue.

    PubMed

    Keehan, Stephanie; Smith, Ryan L; Millar, Jeremy; Esser, Max; Taylor, Michael L; Lonski, Peta; Kron, Tomas; Franich, Rick D

    2017-03-01

    High energy radiotherapy can produce contaminant neutrons through the photonuclear effect. Patients receiving external beam radiation therapy to the pelvis may have high-density hip prostheses. Metallic materials such as those in hip prostheses, often have high cross-sections for neutron interaction. In this study, Thackray (UK) prosthetic hips have been irradiated by 18 MV radiotherapy beams to evaluate the additional dose to patients from the activation products. Hips were irradiated in- and out-of field at various distances from the beam isocenter to assess activation caused in-field by photo-activation, and neutron activation which occurs both in and out-of-field. NaI(Tl) scintillator detectors were used to measure the subsequent gamma-ray emissions and their half-lives. High sensitivity Mg, Cu, P doped LiF thermoluminescence dosimeter chips (TLD-100H) were used to measure the subsequent dose at the surface of a prosthesis over the 12 h following an in-field irradiation of 10,000 MU to a hip prosthesis located at the beam isocenter in a water phantom. (53) Fe, (56) Mn, and (52) V were identified within the hip following irradiation by radiotherapy beams. The dose measured at the surface of a prosthesis following irradiation in a water phantom was 0.20 mGy over 12 h. The dose at the surface of prostheses irradiated to 200 MU was below the limit of detection (0.05 mGy) of the TLD100H. Prosthetic hips are activated by incident photons and neutrons in high energy radiotherapy, however, the dose resulting from activation is very small.

  19. Results of the pilot proof of the inquiry activities conducted in the science center

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kireš, Marián; BilišÅanská, Mária

    2017-01-01

    The science center SteelPARK Košice offers more than 60 interactive exhibits focused on presenting scientific principles and technical solutions connected to the production and manufacture of steel, research of its properties and its various industrial uses. We are trying to enhance the attractivity of the modern style of the exhibitions and its potential to engage students of ground and middle schools in acquiring new knowledge and capabilities, by means of the inquiry science center. Two laboratory measurements, for 5 three-person teams are provided once a month. During the introductory discussion on the activity, they are asked to answer a series of conceptual questions, which help determine their level of understanding at the beginning of the exercise. The measurements are based in guided inquiry, where the work progress is given a forehand, but the desired result is not. Every activity is focused on developing specific research capabilities. This is being monitored through a self-evaluation card, which every participants is required to fill out immediately after completing the activity. The work is tutored by a lecturer from the students of didactics. During two years and running 15 different activities, we have been able to gather information from more than 6000 students of ground and middle schools. Specific physics measurements, their respective conceptual questions, worksheets and final reports are being presented in this article. We evaluate the present level of conceptual understanding based on the acquired data and give recommendation to teachers on ways to improve the student's capabilities. The teacher, by way of observing the activity, the work of the lecturer and the students, is able to form an understanding of the inquiry activity for their own school practice, for which he/she can use all available methodical and work materials.

  20. How to report results of prothrombin and activated partial thromboplastin times.

    PubMed

    Tripodi, Armando; Lippi, Giuseppe; Plebani, Mario

    2016-02-01

    Prothrombin time (PT) and activated partial thromboplastin time (APTT) are the most widely used tests to investigate coagulation abnormalities. Varied result reporting have been introduced over the years for the two tests, thus making their interpretation rather confusing in different clinical settings. PT results have been reported as clotting time, percentage activity, PT-ratio (patient-to-normal clotting time) and as international normalized ratio (INR). The INR scale has been devised to harmonize results stemming from different thromboplastins from patients on treatment with vitamin K antagonists. Therefore, there are some theoretical and evidence-based considerations that make the INR formally invalid when the test is used to analyze patients in other clinical settings. Unfortunately, this limitation has been frequently overlooked, and the INR has been (and is currently) used as a universal system of results harmonization. The APTT has been historically reported as clotting time or as ratio (patient-to-normal clotting time). In this opinion paper we review the current state-of-the-art for result reporting and attempt to give practical guidance on how PT and APTT should be reported in different clinical conditions for which the tests are requested.

  1. Spectroscopy of asteroid pairs - new observations support previous conclusions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Polishook, David; Oszkiewicz, Dagmara Anna; None Kwiatkowski, Tomasz

    2015-08-01

    Asteroid pairs were split due to fast rotation of a strengthless body. Study them can reveal fundamental principles in asteroid interiors and evolution. We continue our spectroscopic survey of asteroid pairs in the near-IR range (IRTF) and work on completing the spectral coverage in the visible wavelength (SALT, NOT).Our new observations support our previous conclusions (Polishook et al. 2014):1. Primary and secondary members have very similar reflectance spectra supporting the claim that every pair originated from a single progenitor. We measured 2 more pairs that present the same taxonomy (4905-7813, 15107-291188). This increases to 22 the number of asteroid pairs with spectral similarities and supports the claim of a single progenitor for each pair to a significance of over 5 sigma.2. Rotational fission is not a function of the asteroid composition rather the asteroid’s structure. We present new reflectance spectra of S- and C-complex pairs that differ in their composition.3. Some asteroid pairs present spectral parameters that imply a fresh, non-weathered surface. This includes spectral slope, and a deep and wide absorption band at 1 micron. Among these, the asteroid 8306 can now be re-classified as a Q-type asteroid, a common class in the near-Earth environment, but rare in the main belt. 8306 is the 4th Q-type discovered within asteroid pairs (all locate in the main belt).4. A secondary member of an asteroid pair composed of ordinary chondrite (S-complex) might present a reflectance spectrum with lower spectral slope compared to its primary member. This is seen in the new measured reflectance spectrum of secondary 291188). This result supports the theory of Jacobson & Scheeres (2011) of continuous disintegration of the secondaries while still in the vicinity of their primaries.5. With time, the fresh surface becomes weathered. Dynamical calculations limit the disintegration time of the progenitor of the pair 4905-7813 to 1.65 millions years ago, what makes

  2. Evaluation of fine-particle catalysts: Activity testing results and phase identification using Mossbauer spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Stohl, F.V.; Diegert, K.V.; Goodnow, D.; Rao, K.R.P.M.; Huggins, F.; Huffman, G.P.

    1994-10-01

    To evaluate and compare the activities/selectivities of fine- particle size catalysts being developed in the DOE/PETC Advanced Research (AR) Coal Liquefaction program by using standard coal liquefaction activity test procedures. Previously reported results have described the standard test procedure that was developed at Sandia to evaluate fine-particle size iron catalysts being developed in DOE/PETC`s AR Coal Liquefaction Program. This test uses DECS-17 Blind Canyon Coal, phenanthrene as the reaction solvent, and a factorial experimental design that enables evaluation of a catalyst over ranges of temperature (350 to 400{degrees}C), time (20 to 60 minutes), and catalyst loading (0 to 1 wt% on a dmmf coal basis). Testing has been performed on Pacific Northwest Laboratories` (PNL) 6-line ferrihydrite catalyst. Results showed that this catalyst is more active than the University of Pittsburgh`s sulfated iron oxide catalyst that was evaluated previously. PNL has also produced two additional batches of catalyst in an effort to optimize their preparation procedures for larger batches. Sandia has observed significant differences in activities among these three catalysts; these differences might be due to particle size effects, the type of drying procedure, or the amount of moisture present. Mossbauer characterization of the iron phases in the coal, catalyst precursors, and tetrahydrofuran (THF) insoluble material from liquefaction reactions has been performed on the University of Pittsburgh`s catalyst and the first PNL catalyst that was tested at Sandia. The Mossbauer results were obtained at the University of Kentucky and will be presented. Future work will include testing additional catalysts being developed in the AR Coal Liquefaction Program, developing procedures to characterize reaction products, and determining the kinetics of the reactions.

  3. An Activating Mutation in STAT3 Results in Neonatal Diabetes Through Reduced Insulin Synthesis.

    PubMed

    Velayos, Teresa; Martínez, Rosa; Alonso, Milagros; Garcia-Etxebarria, Koldo; Aguayo, Anibal; Camarero, Cristina; Urrutia, Inés; Martínez de LaPiscina, Idoia; Barrio, Raquel; Santin, Izortze; Castaño, Luis

    2017-04-01

    Neonatal diabetes mellitus (NDM) is a rare form of diabetes diagnosed within the first 6 months of life. Genetic studies have allowed the identification of several genes linked to the development of NDM; however, genetic causes for ∼20% of the cases remain to be clarified. Most cases of NDM involve isolated diabetes, but sometimes NDM appears in association with other pathological conditions, including autoimmune diseases. Recent reports have linked activating mutations in STAT3 with early-onset autoimmune disorders that include diabetes of autoimmune origin, but the functional impact of STAT3-activating mutations have not been characterized at the pancreatic β-cell level. By using whole-exome sequencing, we identified a novel missense mutation in the binding domain of the STAT3 protein in a patient with NDM. The functional analyses showed that the mutation results in an aberrant activation of STAT3, leading to deleterious downstream effects in pancreatic β-cells. The identified mutation leads to hyperinhibition of the transcription factor Isl-1 and, consequently, to a decrease in insulin expression. These findings represent the first functional indication of a direct link between an NDM-linked activating mutation in STAT3 and pancreatic β-cell dysfunction.

  4. Activation of thalamus in motor imagery results from gating by hypnosis.

    PubMed

    Müller, Katharina; Bacht, Katrin; Prochnow, Denise; Schramm, Stefanie; Seitz, Rüdiger J

    2013-02-01

    The ability to mentally imagine the performance of automatic movements has been well-established being employed in sports and physiotherapy as a tool for motor learning and rehabilitation. This is probably mediated by engagement of the same brain areas as during real motor performance. Here we investigated the effect of hypnotic trance on the cerebral activation pattern engaged in motor imagery in 16 healthy, right-handed subjects using fMRI. Motor imagery as compared with rest was related to activations in the left medial frontal areas (preSMA/SMA), prefrontal- and frontal areas, putamen and inferior parietal areas. When compared with performance of the same movements motor imagery resulted in activation of the left middle frontal cortex, precuneus, and posterior cingulate. Under hypnotic trance there was one extra-activation in the left thalamus which occurred specifically in the motor imagery condition. The regional beta indices were highly correlated among the areas of the cortical-subcortical motor network. Our data accord with the notion that hypnotic trance enhances the motor control circuit engaged in motor imagery by modulating the gating function of the thalamus.

  5. Activities and geochronology of (137)Cs in lake sediments resulting from sediment resuspension.

    PubMed

    Matisoff, Gerald

    2017-02-01

    In lakes with a large surface area to watershed ratio (137)Cs delivery is primarily by direct atmospheric fallout to the lake surface, where its activity in the sediments has been used to estimate the exposure to organisms and sediment mass deposition rates. Comparison of (137)Cs in the historical atmospheric fallout record with (137)Cs activity profiles in sediment cores reveals that although the general features of a maxima in the fallout deposition can be matched to activity peaks in the core, the general shape of the (137)Cs profile is not an exact replica of the fallout history. Instead, the sediment reflects post-depositional processes such as resuspension, bioturbation, partitioning of (137)Cs between the sediment solids and the pore fluids, and molecular diffusion of (137)Cs through the pore fluids. Presented here is a model that couples these processes to a system time averaging (STA) model that accounts for the time history of (137)Cs fallout and the particle residence time in the water column or in the 'active' surface sediment subject to resuspension. Sediment profiles are examined by comparing reasonable ranges of each of the coefficients of each of these major processes and by applying the model to cores collected from two large, shallow lakes, Lake Erie (USA/Canada) and Lake Winnipeg (Canada). The results indicate that the STA model with molecular diffusion and sediment resuspension best describes the data from these large, shallow lakes.

  6. General conclusions regarding the planetary-solar-terrestrial interaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mörner, N.-A.; Tattersall, R.; Solheim, J.-E.; Charvatova, I.; Scafetta, N.; Jelbring, H.; Wilson, I. R.; Salvador, R.; Willson, R. C.; Hejda, P.; Soon, W.; Velasco Herrera, V. M.; Humlum, O.; Archibald, D.; Yndestad, H.; Easterbrook, D.; Casey, J.; Gregori, G.; Henriksson, G.

    2013-12-01

    In a collection of research papers devoted to the problem of solar variability and its origin in planetary beat, it is demonstrated that the forcing function originates from gravitational and inertial effects on the Sun from the planets and their satellites. This conclusion is shared by nineteen co-authors.

  7. 40 CFR 35.6820 - Conclusion of the SSC.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... STATE AND LOCAL ASSISTANCE Cooperative Agreements and Superfund State Contracts for Superfund Response Actions Requirements for Administering A Superfund State Contract (ssc) § 35.6820 Conclusion of the SSC... all future operation and maintenance as required by CERCLA section 104(c) and addressed in 40 CFR...

  8. 40 CFR 35.6820 - Conclusion of the SSC.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... STATE AND LOCAL ASSISTANCE Cooperative Agreements and Superfund State Contracts for Superfund Response Actions Requirements for Administering A Superfund State Contract (ssc) § 35.6820 Conclusion of the SSC... all future operation and maintenance as required by CERCLA section 104(c) and addressed in 40 CFR...

  9. 40 CFR 35.6820 - Conclusion of the SSC.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... STATE AND LOCAL ASSISTANCE Cooperative Agreements and Superfund State Contracts for Superfund Response Actions Requirements for Administering A Superfund State Contract (ssc) § 35.6820 Conclusion of the SSC... all future operation and maintenance as required by CERCLA section 104(c) and addressed in 40 CFR...

  10. 40 CFR 35.6820 - Conclusion of the SSC.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... STATE AND LOCAL ASSISTANCE Cooperative Agreements and Superfund State Contracts for Superfund Response Actions Requirements for Administering A Superfund State Contract (ssc) § 35.6820 Conclusion of the SSC... all future operation and maintenance as required by CERCLA section 104(c) and addressed in 40 CFR...

  11. 40 CFR 35.6820 - Conclusion of the SSC.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... STATE AND LOCAL ASSISTANCE Cooperative Agreements and Superfund State Contracts for Superfund Response Actions Requirements for Administering A Superfund State Contract (ssc) § 35.6820 Conclusion of the SSC... all future operation and maintenance as required by CERCLA section 104(c) and addressed in 40 CFR...

  12. Area V Vocational Education Planning Conclusions and Recommendations: Third Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Area 5 Vocational Planning Committee, Pleasant Hill, CA.

    Conclusions and recommendations regarding the development of an Area Master Plan to provide maximum coordination between vocational, technical, adult, and continuing education agencies within Alameda and Contra Costa Counties, California, are presented. The Area Five Planning Committee, which developed the Master Plan, based its evaluation and…

  13. 22 CFR 18.18 - Proposed findings and conclusions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 22 Foreign Relations 1 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Proposed findings and conclusions. 18.18 Section 18.18 Foreign Relations DEPARTMENT OF STATE PERSONNEL REGULATIONS CONCERNING POST EMPLOYMENT CONFLICT OF INTEREST Administrative Enforcement Proceedings § 18.18 Proposed findings and...

  14. 22 CFR 18.18 - Proposed findings and conclusions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 22 Foreign Relations 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Proposed findings and conclusions. 18.18 Section 18.18 Foreign Relations DEPARTMENT OF STATE PERSONNEL REGULATIONS CONCERNING POST EMPLOYMENT CONFLICT OF INTEREST Administrative Enforcement Proceedings § 18.18 Proposed findings and...

  15. 22 CFR 18.18 - Proposed findings and conclusions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 22 Foreign Relations 1 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Proposed findings and conclusions. 18.18 Section 18.18 Foreign Relations DEPARTMENT OF STATE PERSONNEL REGULATIONS CONCERNING POST EMPLOYMENT CONFLICT OF INTEREST Administrative Enforcement Proceedings § 18.18 Proposed findings and...

  16. 22 CFR 18.18 - Proposed findings and conclusions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 22 Foreign Relations 1 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Proposed findings and conclusions. 18.18 Section 18.18 Foreign Relations DEPARTMENT OF STATE PERSONNEL REGULATIONS CONCERNING POST EMPLOYMENT CONFLICT OF INTEREST Administrative Enforcement Proceedings § 18.18 Proposed findings and...

  17. 22 CFR 18.18 - Proposed findings and conclusions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 22 Foreign Relations 1 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Proposed findings and conclusions. 18.18 Section 18.18 Foreign Relations DEPARTMENT OF STATE PERSONNEL REGULATIONS CONCERNING POST EMPLOYMENT CONFLICT OF INTEREST Administrative Enforcement Proceedings § 18.18 Proposed findings and...

  18. When Proofs Reflect More on Assumptions than Conclusions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dawkins, Paul Christian

    2014-01-01

    This paper demonstrates how questions of "provability" can help students engaged in reinvention of mathematical theory to understand the axiomatic game. While proof demonstrates how conclusions follow from assumptions, "provability" characterizes the dual relation that assumptions are "justified" when they afford…

  19. 49 CFR 511.46 - Proposed findings, conclusions, and order.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 6 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Proposed findings, conclusions, and order. 511.46 Section 511.46 Transportation Other Regulations Relating to Transportation (Continued) NATIONAL HIGHWAY TRAFFIC SAFETY ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION ADJUDICATIVE PROCEDURES Hearings §...

  20. Overview of human health in the Arctic: conclusions and recommendations

    PubMed Central

    Donaldson, Shawn; Adlard, Bryan; Odland, Jon Øyvind

    2016-01-01

    This article is intended to provide an overview of the key conclusions, knowledge gaps and key recommendations based on the recent 2015 Arctic human health assessment under the Arctic Monitoring and Assessment Program. This assessment was based primarily on data from human health monitoring and research studies and peer-reviewed literature published since the last assessment in 2009. PMID:27974138

  1. 10 CFR 2.712 - Proposed findings and conclusions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 1 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Proposed findings and conclusions. 2.712 Section 2.712 Energy NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION RULES OF PRACTICE FOR DOMESTIC LICENSING PROCEEDINGS AND ISSUANCE OF... proceeding may, or if directed by the presiding officer shall, file proposed findings of fact and...

  2. 20 CFR 901.48 - Proposed findings and conclusions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 20 Employees' Benefits 3 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Proposed findings and conclusions. 901.48 Section 901.48 Employees' Benefits JOINT BOARD FOR THE ENROLLMENT OF ACTUARIES REGULATIONS GOVERNING THE PERFORMANCE OF ACTUARIAL SERVICES UNDER THE EMPLOYEE RETIREMENT INCOME SECURITY ACT OF 1974 Suspension...

  3. Hypothesis, Prediction, and Conclusion: Using Nature of Science Terminology Correctly

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Eastwell, Peter

    2012-01-01

    This paper defines the terms "hypothesis," "prediction," and "conclusion" and shows how to use the terms correctly in scientific investigations in both the school and science education research contexts. The scientific method, or hypothetico-deductive (HD) approach, is described and it is argued that an understanding of the scientific method,…

  4. 45 CFR 672.19 - Proposed findings, conclusions, and order.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 45 Public Welfare 3 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Proposed findings, conclusions, and order. 672.19 Section 672.19 Public Welfare Regulations Relating to Public Welfare (Continued) NATIONAL SCIENCE... law, and a proposed order, together with supporting briefs, within twenty (20) days after the...

  5. 45 CFR 672.19 - Proposed findings, conclusions, and order.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 45 Public Welfare 3 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Proposed findings, conclusions, and order. 672.19 Section 672.19 Public Welfare Regulations Relating to Public Welfare (Continued) NATIONAL SCIENCE... law, and a proposed order, together with supporting briefs, within twenty (20) days after the...

  6. 45 CFR 672.19 - Proposed findings, conclusions, and order.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 45 Public Welfare 3 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Proposed findings, conclusions, and order. 672.19 Section 672.19 Public Welfare Regulations Relating to Public Welfare (Continued) NATIONAL SCIENCE... law, and a proposed order, together with supporting briefs, within twenty (20) days after the...

  7. Increasing Physical Activity in Parks: Results of a Randomized Controlled Intervention Trial Using Community-Based Participatory Research

    PubMed Central

    Cohen, Deborah A.; Han, Bing; Derose, Kathryn Pitkin; Williamson, Stephanie; Marsh, Terry; McKenzie, Thomas L.

    2013-01-01

    Background Physical inactivity is an important health risk factor that could be addressed at the community level. Purpose To determine whether using a community-based participatory approach with park directors and park advisory boards (PABs) could increase physical activity in local parks. We also tested whether involving PABs would be more effective than working with park directors alone. Design Randomized controlled intervention trial from 10/2007-4/2012 with partial blinding of observers to the condition. Setting/Participants Of 183 eligible parks in the City of Los Angeles, 50 neighborhood park/recreation centers serving diverse populations participated. Parks were randomized to three study arms, 1) Park-director intervention (PD-only), 2) Park Advisory Board intervention (PAB/PD), and 3) a control arm. We systematically observed physical activity in each park and interviewed park users and residents living within one mile of the park. Intervention(s) The intervention including assessing park use, obtaining feedback from park users and community residents, offering training on outreach and marketing, and giving each intervention park $4000 to increase park-based physical activity. The PAB/PD arm required participation and concurrence on all purchases by the PAB. Main Outcome Measure(s) Change in the number of park users and change in the level of physical activity, expressed as MET-hours. Results Relative to control parks where physical activity declined, in both the PD-only and PAB/PD parks physical activity increased, generating an estimated average of 600 more person visits/week/park, and 1830 MET-hours more physical activity/week/park. Both residents and park users reported increased frequency of exercise. No differences were noted between the PD-only and PAB/PD study arms. Conclusions Overall, providing feedback on park use and community perspectives and offering park directors training on outreach and marketing with modest discretionary funding increased

  8. Enhancing activated-peroxide formulations for porous materials: Test methods and results

    SciTech Connect

    Krauter, Paula; Tucker, Mark D.; Tezak, Matthew S.; Boucher, Raymond

    2012-12-01

    During an urban wide-area incident involving the release of a biological warfare agent, the recovery/restoration effort will require extensive resources and will tax the current capabilities of the government and private contractors. In fact, resources may be so limited that decontamination by facility owners/occupants may become necessary and a simple decontamination process and material should be available for this use. One potential process for use by facility owners/occupants would be a liquid sporicidal decontaminant, such as pHamended bleach or activated-peroxide, and simple application devices. While pH-amended bleach is currently the recommended low-tech decontamination solution, a less corrosive and toxic decontaminant is desirable. The objective of this project is to provide an operational assessment of an alternative to chlorine bleach for low-tech decontamination applications activated hydrogen peroxide. This report provides the methods and results for activatedperoxide evaluation experiments. The results suggest that the efficacy of an activated-peroxide decontaminant is similar to pH-amended bleach on many common materials.

  9. Modulation of the hormone setting by Rhodococcus fascians results in ectopic KNOX activation in Arabidopsis.

    PubMed

    Depuydt, Stephen; Dolezal, Karel; Van Lijsebettens, Mieke; Moritz, Thomas; Holsters, Marcelle; Vereecke, Danny

    2008-03-01

    The biotrophic actinomycete Rhodococcus fascians has a profound impact on plant development and a common aspect of the symptomatology is the deformation of infected leaves. In Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana), the serrated leaf margins formed upon infection resemble the leaf phenotype of transgenic plants with ectopic expression of KNOTTED-like homeobox (KNOX) genes. Through transcript profiling, we demonstrate that class-I KNOX genes are transcribed in symptomatic leaves. Functional analysis revealed that BREVIPEDICELLUS/KNOTTED-LIKE1 and mainly SHOOT MERISTEMLESS were essential for the observed leaf dissection. However, these results also positioned the KNOX genes downstream in the signaling cascade triggered by R. fascians infection. The much faster activation of ARABIDOPSIS RESPONSE REGULATOR5 and the establishment of homeostatic and feedback mechanisms to control cytokinin (CK) levels support the overrepresentation of this hormone in infected plants due to the secretion by the pathogen, thereby placing the CK response high up in the cascade. Hormone measurements show a net decrease of tested CKs, indicating either that secretion by the bacterium and degradation by the plant are in balance, or, as suggested by the strong reaction of 35S:CKX plants, that other CKs are at play. At early time points of the interaction, activation of gibberellin 2-oxidase presumably installs a local hormonal setting favorable for meristematic activity that provokes leaf serrations. The results are discussed in the context of symptom development, evasion of plant defense, and the establishment of a specific niche by R. fascians.

  10. Incorporation of Cobalt‐Cyclen Complexes into Templated Nanogels Results in Enhanced Activity

    PubMed Central

    Jorge, Ana Rita; Chernobryva, Mariya; Rigby, Stephen E. J.

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Recent advances in nanomaterials have identified nanogels as an excellent matrix for novel biomimetic catalysts using the molecular imprinting approach. Polymerisable Co‐cyclen complexes with phosphonate and carbonate templates have been prepared, fully characterised and used to obtain nanogels that show high activity and turnover with low catalytic load, compared to the free complex, in the hydrolysis of 4‐nitrophenyl phosphate, a nerve agent simulant. This work demonstrates that the chemical structure of the template has an impact on the coordination geometry and oxidation state of the metal centre in the polymerisable complex resulting in very significant changes in the catalytic properties of the polymeric matrix. Both pseudo‐octahedral cobalt(III) and trigonal‐bipyramidal cobalt(II) structures have been used for the synthesis of imprinted nanogels, and the catalytic data demonstrate that: i) the imprinted nanogels can be used in 15 % load and show turnover; ii) the structural differences in the polymeric matrices resulting from the imprinting approach with different templates are responsible for the molecular recognition capabilities and the catalytic activity. Nanogel P1, imprinted with the carbonate template, shows >50 % higher catalytic activity than P2 imprinted with the phosphonate. PMID:26661923

  11. Changes in the cardiac muscle electric activity as a result of Coronary Artery Bypass Graft operation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grajek, Magdalena; Krzyminiewski, Ryszard; Kalawski, Ryszard; Kulczak, Mariusz

    2008-01-01

    Many bioelectric signals have a complex internal structure that can be a rich source of information on the tissue or cell processes. The structure of such signals can be analysed in detail by applying digital methods of signal processing. Therefore, of substantial use in diagnosis of the coronary arterial disease is the method of digital enhancement of increasing signal resolution ECG (NURSE-ECG), permitting detection of temporary changes in the electric potentials in the cardiac muscle in the process of depolarisation. Thanks to the application of NURSE-ECG it has become possible to detect relatively small changes in the electric activity of particular fragments of the cardiac muscle undetectable by the standard ECG method, caused by ischemia, the effect of a drug or infarct. The aim of this study was to identify and analyse changes in the electric activity of the cardiac muscle as a result of the Coronary Artery Bypass Graft (CABG) operation. In this study the method of NURSE-ECG has been applied in order to identify and analyse changes in the electric activity of the cardiac muscle as a result of the CABG operation. In the study performed in cooperation of the Institute of Physics Adam Mickiewicz University and the Strus Hospital, Cardiac Surgery Ward, 37 patients with advanced coronary arterial disease were asked to participate. The patients were examined prior to the operation, on the day after the operation and two months after the operation and a year after the operation. The ECG recordings were subjected to a numerical procedure of resolution enhancement by a NURSE-ECG program to reveal the tentative changes in the electric potential of the cardiac muscle on its depolarisation. Results of the study have shown that the NURSE ECG method can be applied to monitor changes in the electric activity of the cardiac muscle occurring as a result of CABG operation. One the second day after the operation in the majority of patients (70%) a rapid decrease of the total

  12. Effects of geomagnetic activity variations on the physiological and psychological state of functionally healthy humans: Some results of Azerbaijani studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Babayev, Elchin S.; Allahverdiyeva, Aysel A.

    There are collaborative and cross-disciplinary space weather studies in the Azerbaijan National Academy of Sciences conducted with purposes of revealing possible effects of solar, geomagnetic and cosmic ray variability on certain technological, biological and ecological systems. This paper describes some results of the experimental studies of influence of the periodical and aperiodical changes of geomagnetic activity upon human brain, human health and psycho-emotional state. It also covers the conclusions of studies on influence of violent solar events and severe geomagnetic storms of the solar cycle 23 on the mentioned systems in middle-latitude location. It is experimentally established that weak and moderate geomagnetic storms do not cause significant changes in the brain's bioelectrical activity and exert only stimulating influence while severe disturbances of geomagnetic conditions cause negative influence, seriously disintegrate brain's functionality, activate braking processes and amplify the negative emotional background of an individual. It is concluded that geomagnetic disturbances affect mainly emotional and vegetative spheres of human beings while characteristics reflecting personality properties do not undergo significant changes.

  13. TRPA1 activation by lidocaine in nerve terminals results in glutamate release increase

    SciTech Connect

    Piao, L.-H.; Fujita, Tsugumi; Jiang, C.-Y.; Liu Tao; Yue, H.-Y.; Nakatsuka, Terumasa; Kumamoto, Eiichi

    2009-02-20

    We examined the effects of local anesthetics lidocaine and procaine on glutamatergic spontaneous excitatory transmission in substantia gelatinosa (SG) neurons in adult rat spinal cord slices with whole-cell patch-clamp techniques. Bath-applied lidocaine (1-5 mM) dose-dependently and reversibly increased the frequency but not the amplitude of spontaneous excitatory postsynaptic current (sEPSC) in SG neurons. Lidocaine activity was unaffected by the Na{sup +}-channel blocker, tetrodotoxin, and the TRPV1 antagonist, capsazepine, but was inhibited by the TRP antagonist, ruthenium red. In the same neuron, the TRPA1 agonist, allyl isothiocyanate, and lidocaine both increased sEPSC frequency. In contrast, procaine did not produce presynaptic enhancement. These results indicate that lidocaine activates TRPA1 in nerve terminals presynaptic to SG neurons to increase the spontaneous release of L-glutamate.

  14. TRPA1 activation by lidocaine in nerve terminals results in glutamate release increase.

    PubMed

    Piao, Lian-Hua; Fujita, Tsugumi; Jiang, Chang-Yu; Liu, Tao; Yue, Hai-Yuan; Nakatsuka, Terumasa; Kumamoto, Eiichi

    2009-02-20

    We examined the effects of local anesthetics lidocaine and procaine on glutamatergic spontaneous excitatory transmission in substantia gelatinosa (SG) neurons in adult rat spinal cord slices with whole-cell patch-clamp techniques. Bath-applied lidocaine (1-5 mM) dose-dependently and reversibly increased the frequency but not the amplitude of spontaneous excitatory postsynaptic current (sEPSC) in SG neurons. Lidocaine activity was unaffected by the Na(+)-channel blocker, tetrodotoxin, and the TRPV1 antagonist, capsazepine, but was inhibited by the TRP antagonist, ruthenium red. In the same neuron, the TRPA1 agonist, allyl isothiocyanate, and lidocaine both increased sEPSC frequency. In contrast, procaine did not produce presynaptic enhancement. These results indicate that lidocaine activates TRPA1 in nerve terminals presynaptic to SG neurons to increase the spontaneous release of L-glutamate.

  15. Interleukin-1 activates a novel protein kinase cascade that results in the phosphorylation of Hsp27.

    PubMed

    Freshney, N W; Rawlinson, L; Guesdon, F; Jones, E; Cowley, S; Hsuan, J; Saklatvala, J

    1994-09-23

    An IL-1-stimulated protein kinase cascade resulting in phosphorylation of the small heat shock protein hsp27 has been identified in KB cells. It is distinct from the p42 MAP kinase cascade. An upstream activator kinase phosphorylated a 40 kDa kinase (p40) upon threonine and tyrosine residues, which in turn phosphorylated a 50 kDa kinase (p50) upon threonine (and some serine) residues. p50 phosphorylated hsp27 upon serine. p40 and p50 were purified to near homogeneity. All three components were inactivated by protein phosphatase 2A, and p40 was inactivated by protein tyrosine phosphatase 1B. The substrate specificity of p40 differed from that of p42 and p54 MAP kinases. The upstream activator was not a MAP kinase kinase. p50 resembled MAPKAPK-2 and may be identical.

  16. Delta-1 Activation of Notch-1 Signaling Results in HES-1 Transactivation

    PubMed Central

    Jarriault, Sophie; Le Bail, Odile; Hirsinger, Estelle; Pourquié, Olivier; Logeat, Frédérique; Strong, Clare F.; Brou, Christel; Seidah, Nabil G.; Israël, Alain

    1998-01-01

    The Notch receptor is involved in many cell fate determination events in vertebrates and invertebrates. It has been shown in Drosophila melanogaster that Delta-dependent Notch signaling activates the transcription factor Suppressor of Hairless, leading to an increased expression of the Enhancer of Split genes. Genetic evidence has also implicated the kuzbanian gene, which encodes a disintegrin metalloprotease, in the Notch signaling pathway. By using a two-cell coculture assay, we show here that vertebrate Dl-1 activates the Notch-1 cascade. Consistent with previous data obtained with active forms of Notch-1 a HES-1-derived promoter construct is transactivated in cells expressing Notch-1 in response to Dl-1 stimulation. Impairing the proteolytic maturation of the full-length receptor leads to a decrease in HES-1 transactivation, further supporting the hypothesis that only mature processed Notch is expressed at the cell surface and activated by its ligand. Furthermore, we observed that Dl-1-induced HES-1 transactivation was dependent both on Kuzbanian and RBP-J activities, consistent with the involvement of these two proteins in Notch signaling in Drosophila. We also observed that exposure of Notch-1-expressing cells to Dl-1 results in an increased level of endogenous HES-1 mRNA. Finally, coculture of Dl-1-expressing cells with myogenic C2 cells suppresses differentiation of C2 cells into myotubes, as previously demonstrated for Jagged-1 and Jagged-2, and also leads to an increased level of endogenous HES-1 mRNA. Thus, Dl-1 behaves as a functional ligand for Notch-1 and has the same ability to suppress cell differentiation as the Jagged proteins do. PMID:9819428

  17. Highlights and Conclusions of the Unidata OGC Interoperability Day

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Domenico, B.; Davis, E.; Rew, R.; Caron, J.; Nativi, S.; Yang, W.; Falke, S.; Woolf, A.; Tandy, J.

    2007-12-01

    At the OGC (Open Geospatial Consortium) Technical Committee meetings, Unidata hosted a special Interoperability Day workshop to address the use of web services via standard interfaces for accessing a broad range of environmental data. These interfaces include: WCS (Web Coverage Service), WFS (Web Feature Service, SOS (Sensor Observation Service, CS-W/ebRIM (Catalog Service for the Web / electronic business Registry Information Model) for providing access to data currently served via THREDDS (THematic Real-time Environmental Distributed Data Services), OPeNDAP (Open source Project for a Network Data Access Protocol), netCDF-CF (network Common Data Form - Climate and Forecast conventions) and IDD/LDM (Internet Data Distribution / Local Data Manager) technologies. The primary data served includes weather, climate and ocean data from the community sometimes referred to as Fluid Earth Sciences (FES). An international set of representatives from industry, government, and academia, spanning many geosciences disciplines participated actively in the workshop and are committed to continued collaboration. The overall objective for the day was to come up with practical and concrete ideas for how to deliver various classes of FES data via web services through the standard interfaces. The primary focus was on gridded datasets (e.g., forecast model output) and station/observation/point datasets (e.g. the observational data collected at weather stations, ocean buoys, river gaging stations. As time allowed, other categories (profile/trajectory, swath, radial, unstructured grids) were addressed. The main objective was to come up with a realistic plan for dealing with gridded and station/observation/point datasets. Then the remaining categories can be addressed incrementally. This presentation summarizes the highlights of the Interoperability Day and the resulting plans for future implementation and testing.

  18. Long term results of mechanical prostheses for treatment of active infective endocarditis

    PubMed Central

    Guerra, J; Tornos, M; Permanyer-Miralda, G; Almirante, B; Murtra, M; Soler-Soler, J

    2001-01-01

    OBJECTIVE—To analyse the long term results of mechanical prostheses for treating active infective endocarditis.
DESIGN—Prospective cohort study of a consecutive series of patients diagnosed with infective endocarditis and operated on in the active phase of the infection for insertion of a mechanical prosthesis.
SETTING—Tertiary referral centre in a metropolitan area.
RESULTS—Between 1975 and 1997, 637 cases of infective endocarditis were diagnosed in the centre. Of these, 436 were left sided (with overall mortality of 20.3%). Surgical treatment in the active phase of the infection was needed in 141 patients (72% native, 28% prosthetic infective endocarditis). Mechanical prostheses were used in 131 patients. Operative mortality was 30.5% (40 patients). Ninety one survivors were followed up prospectively for (mean (SD)) 5.4 (4.5) years. Thirteen patients developed prosthetic valve dysfunction. Nine patients suffered reinfection: four of these (4%) were early and five were late. The median time from surgery for late reinfection was 1.4 years. During follow up, 12 patients died. Excluding operative mortality, actuarial survival was 86.6% at five years and 83.7% at 10 years; actuarial survival free from death, reoperation, and reinfection was 73.1% at five years and 59.8% at 10 years.
CONCLUSIONS—In patients surviving acute infective endocarditis and receiving mechanical prostheses, the rate of early reinfection compares well with reported results of homografts. In addition, prosthesis dysfunction rate is low and long term survival is good. These data should prove useful for comparison with long term studies, when available, using other types of valve surgery in active infective endocarditis.


Keywords: infective endocarditis; surgery; mechanical prosthesis PMID:11410564

  19. Activation of TLR3/interferon signaling pathway by bluetongue virus results in HIV inhibition in macrophages.

    PubMed

    Dai, Ming; Wang, Xu; Li, Jie-Liang; Zhou, Yu; Sang, Ming; Liu, Jin-Biao; Wu, Jian-Guo; Ho, Wen-Zhe

    2015-12-01

    Bluetongue virus (BTV), a nonenveloped double-stranded RNA virus, is a potent inducer of type Ι interferons in multiple cell systems. In this study, we report that BTV16 treatment of primary human macrophages induced both type I and III IFN expression, resulting in the production of multiple antiviral factors, including myxovirus resistance protein A, 2',5'-oligoadenylate synthetase, and the IFN-stimulated gene 56. Additionally, BTV-treated macrophages expressed increased HIV restriction factors (apolipoprotein B mRNA-editing enzyme catalytic polypeptide 3 G/F/H) and CC chemokines (macrophage inflammatory protein 1-α, macrophage inflammatory protein 1-β, regulated on activation of normal T cell expressed and secreted), the ligands for HIV entry coreceptor CC chemokine receptor type 5. BTV16 also induced the expression of tetherin, which restricts HIV release from infected cells. Furthermore, TLR3 signaling of macrophages by BTV16 resulted in the induction of several anti-HIV microRNAs (miRNA-28, -29a, -125b, -150, -223, and -382). More importantly, the induction of antiviral responses by BTV resulted in significant suppression of HIV in macrophages. These findings demonstrate the potential of BTV-mediated TLR3 activation in macrophage innate immunity against HIV.

  20. Salton Sea Scientific Drilling Project: A summary of drilling and engineering activities and scientific results

    SciTech Connect

    Ross, H.P.; Forsgren, C.K.

    1992-04-01

    The Salton Sea Scientific g Project (SSSDP) completed the first major well in the United States Continental Scientific Drilling Program. The well (State 2-14) was drilled to 10,W ft (3,220 m) in the Salton Sea Geothermal Field in California's Imperial Valley, to permit scientific study of a deep, high-temperature portion of an active geothermal system. The program was designed to investigate, through drilling and testing, the subsurface thermal, chemical, and mineralogical environments of this geothermal area. Extensive samples and data, including cores, cuttings, geothermal fluids and gases, and geophysical logs, were collected for future scientific analysis, interpretation, and publication. Short duration flow tests were conducted on reservoirs at a depth of approximately 6,120 ft (1,865 m) and at 10,136 ft (3,089 m). This report summarizes all major activities of the SSSDP, from project inception in the fall of 1984 through brine-pond cleanup and site restoration, ending in February 1989. This report presents a balanced summary of drilling, coring, logging, and flow-test operations, and a brief summary of technical and scientific results. Frequent reference is made to original records, data, and publication of results. The report also reviews the proposed versus the final well design, and operational summaries, such as the bit record, the casing and cementing program, and the coring program. Summaries are and the results of three flow tests. Several teamed during the project.

  1. Statistical Conclusion Validity: Some Common Threats and Simple Remedies

    PubMed Central

    García-Pérez, Miguel A.

    2012-01-01

    The ultimate goal of research is to produce dependable knowledge or to provide the evidence that may guide practical decisions. Statistical conclusion validity (SCV) holds when the conclusions of a research study are founded on an adequate analysis of the data, generally meaning that adequate statistical methods are used whose small-sample behavior is accurate, besides being logically capable of providing an answer to the research question. Compared to the three other traditional aspects of research validity (external validity, internal validity, and construct validity), interest in SCV has recently grown on evidence that inadequate data analyses are sometimes carried out which yield conclusions that a proper analysis of the data would not have supported. This paper discusses evidence of three common threats to SCV that arise from widespread recommendations or practices in data analysis, namely, the use of repeated testing and optional stopping without control of Type-I error rates, the recommendation to check the assumptions of statistical tests, and the use of regression whenever a bivariate relation or the equivalence between two variables is studied. For each of these threats, examples are presented and alternative practices that safeguard SCV are discussed. Educational and editorial changes that may improve the SCV of published research are also discussed. PMID:22952465

  2. Results from the Nuclear Plant Aging Research Program: Their use in inspection activities

    SciTech Connect

    Gunther, W.; Taylor, J. )

    1990-09-01

    The US NCR's Nuclear Plant Aging Research (NPAR) Program has determined the susceptibility to aging of components and systems, and the potential for aging to impact plant safety and availability. The NPAR Program also identified methods for detecting and mitigating aging in components. This report describes the NPAR results which can enhance NRC inspection activities. Recommendations are provided for communicating pertinent information to NRC inspectors. These recommendations are based on a detailed assessment of the NRC's Inspection Program, and feedback from resident and regional inspectors as described within. Examples of NPAR report summaries and aging inspection guides for components and systems are included. 13 refs., 3 figs., 4 tabs.

  3. Video and film analysis with correlation tracking and active result presentation (Abstract Only)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rowa, Per

    1990-08-01

    Experience with a turnkey analysis system featuring high resolution video input and display, a modular video disc system and a 16 mm cine film scanner with 2600-point resolution, is presented. Tracking is performed with a high-speed correlation process, requiring no special markers. Software packages for evaluating two and three-dimensional results are interactively accessible. Combining the original image sequence with real-time graphic overlays and active drawing of graphic diagrams, provides for an excellent understanding and documentation of the motion sequences.

  4. The working group ``Science with the SRT'': tasks, activities, and results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prandoni, I.; Felli, M.

    The Working Group Science with the SRT was formed in May 2004, with the aim of providing scientific input to the Board of the SRT, in order to plan the focal plane instrumentation development of the SRT. In the present contribution, tasks and activities of the Working Group are outlined, and the main indications and results are briefly summarized. For a detailed discussion we refer to the IRA Internal Report ``The Sardinia Radio Telescope (SRT). Science and Technical Requirements'' produced by the members of the Working Group.

  5. The Formation of CIRs at Stream-Stream Interfaces and Resultant Geomagnetic Activity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Richardson, I. G.

    2005-01-01

    Corotating interaction regions (CIRs) are regions of compressed plasma formed at the leading edges of corotating high-speed solar wind streams originating in coronal holes as they interact with the preceding slow solar wind. Although particularly prominent features of the solar wind during the declining and minimum phases of the 11-year solar cycle, they may also be present at times of higher solar activity. We describe how CIRs are formed, and their geomagnetic effects, which principally result from brief southward interplanetary magnetic field excursions associated with Alfven waves. Seasonal and long-term variations in these effects are briefly discussed.

  6. Active vibration absorber for the CSI evolutionary model - Design and experimental results. [Controls Structures Interaction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bruner, Anne M.; Belvin, W. Keith; Horta, Lucas G.; Juang, Jer-Nan

    1991-01-01

    The development of control of large flexible structures technology must include practical demonstrations to aid in the understanding and characterization of controlled structures in space. To support this effort, a testbed facility has been developed to study practical implementation of new control technologies under realistic conditions. The paper discusses the design of a second order, acceleration feedback controller which acts as an active vibration absorber. This controller provides guaranteed stability margins for collocated sensor/actuator pairs in the absence of sensor/actuator dynamics and computational time delay. Experimental results in the presence of these factors are presented and discussed. The robustness of this design under model uncertainty is demonstrated.

  7. Fluctuations and resulting competing pathways in RNA folding: The activation of splicing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fernández, Ariel

    1991-01-01

    We implement a parallel processing Monte Carlo simulation to explore RNA configuration space that takes into account fluctuations in base-pairing patterns. The choice of folding pathways is biased by the refolding events that occur as the chain is being assembled. We prove that fluctuations in the initial stages of folding might lead to either active or inactive emerging structures. As an illustration, competing pathways that are the result of fluctuation propagation are computed for the splicing YC4 intron (a segment of the mitochondrial RNA from fungi), and the emerging structures are proved to be biologically relevant.

  8. Charpy impact test results for low activation ferritic alloys irradiated to 30 dpa

    SciTech Connect

    Schubert, L.E.; Hamilton, M.L.; Gelles, D.S.

    1996-04-01

    Miniature specimens of six low activation ferritic alloys have been impact field tested following irradiation at 370{degrees}C to 30 dpa. Comparison of the results with those of control specimens and specimens irradiated to 10 dpa indicates that degradation in the impact behavior appears to have saturated by {approx}10 dpa in at least four of these alloys. The 7.5Cr-2W alloy referred to as GA3X appears most promising for further consideration as a candidate structural material in fusion reactor applications, although the 9Cr-1V alloy may also warrant further investigation.

  9. Cosmological Gamma-Ray Bursts and Hypernovae Conclusively Linked

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2003-06-01

    -ray radiation. The team concludes that it is likely to be due to the nearly instantaneous, non-symmetrical collapse of the inner region of a highly developed star (known as the "collapsar" model) . The March 29 gamma-ray burst will pass into the annals of astrophysics as a rare "type-defining event", providing conclusive evidence of a direct link between cosmological gamma-ray bursts and explosions of very massive stars . PR Photo 17a/03 : Image of the optical afterglow of GRB 030329 (VLT FORS1+2). PR Photo 17b/03 : A series of VLT spectra of the optical afterglow of GRB 030329. What are Gamma-Ray Bursts? One of the currently most active fields of astrophysics is the study of the dramatic events known as "gamma-ray bursts (GRBs)" . They were first detected in the late 1960's by sensitive instruments on-board orbiting military satellites, launched for the surveillance and detection of nuclear tests. Originating, not on the Earth, but far out in space, these short flashes of energetic gamma-rays last from less than a second to several minutes. Despite major observational efforts, it is only within the last six years that it has become possible to pinpoint with some accuracy the sites of some of these events. With the invaluable help of comparatively accurate positional observations of the associated X-ray emission by various X-ray satellite observatories since early 1997, astronomers have until now identified about fifty short-lived sources of optical light associated with GRBs (the "optical afterglows"). Most GRBs have been found to be situated at extremely large ("cosmological") distances. This implies that the energy released in a few seconds during such an event is larger than that of the Sun during its entire lifetime of more than 10,000 million years. The GRBs are indeed the most powerful events since the Big Bang known in the Universe, cf. ESO PR 08/99 and ESO PR 20/00 . During the past years circumstantial evidence has mounted that GRBs signal the collapse of massive

  10. The smelling of Hedione results in sex-differentiated human brain activity.

    PubMed

    Wallrabenstein, I; Gerber, J; Rasche, S; Croy, I; Kurtenbach, S; Hummel, T; Hatt, H

    2015-06-01

    A large family of vomeronasal receptors recognizes pheromone cues in many animals including most amphibia, reptiles, rhodents, and other mammals. Humans possess five vomeronasal-type 1 receptor genes (VN1R1-VN1R5), which code for proteins that are functional in recombinant expression systems. We used two different recombinant expression systems and identified Hedione as a ligand for the putative human pheromone receptor VN1R1 expressed in the human olfactory mucosa. Following the ligand identification, we employed functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) in healthy volunteers to characterize the in vivo action of the VN1R1 ligand Hedione. In comparison to a common floral odor (phenylethyl alcohol), Hedione exhibited significantly enhanced activation in limbic areas (amygdala, hippocampus) and elicited a sex-differentiated response in a hypothalamic region that is associated with hormonal release. Utilizing a novel combination of methods, our results indicate that the putative human pheromone receptor VN1R1 is involved in extra-olfactory neuronal activations induced by the odorous substance Hedione. The activation of VN1R1 might play a role in gender-specific modulation of hormonal secretion in humans.

  11. Nighttime instabilities of neurophysiological, cardiovascular, and respiratory activity: integrative modeling and preliminary results

    PubMed Central

    Shusterman, Vladimir; Troy, William C.; Abdelmessih, Medhat; Hoffman, Stacy; Nemec, Jan; Strollo, Patrick J.; London, Barry; Lampert, Rachel

    2015-01-01

    Unstable (cyclical alternating pattern, or CAP) sleep is associated with surges of sympathetic nervous system activity, increased blood pressure and vasoconstriction, heightened baroreflex sensitivity, and unstable heart rhythm and breathing. In susceptible persons, CAP sleep provokes clinically significant events, including hypertensive crises, sleep-disordered breathing, and cardiac arrhythmias. Here we explore the neurophysiology of CAP sleep and its impact on cardiovascular and respiratory functions. We show that: (i) an increase in neurophysiological recovery rate can explain the emergence of slow, self-sustained, hypersynchronized A1 CAP-sleep pattern and its transition to the faster A2-A3 CAP-sleep patterns; (ii) in a two-dimensional, continuous model of cardiac tissue with heterogeneous action potential duration (APD) distribution, heart rate accelerations during CAP sleep may encounter incompletely recovered electrical excitability in cell clusters with longer APD. If the interaction between short cycle length and incomplete, spatially heterogeneous repolarization persists over multiple cycles, irregularities and asymmetry of depolarization front may accumulate and ultimately lead to a conduction block, retrograde conduction, breakup of activation waves, reentrant activity, and arrhythmias; and (iii) these modeling results are consistent with the nighttime data obtained from patients with structural heart disease (N=13) that show clusters of atrial and ventricular premature beats occurring during the periods of unstable heart rhythm and respiration that accompany CAP sleep. In these patients, CAP sleep is also accompanied by delayed adaptation of QT intervals and T-wave alternans. PMID:26341647

  12. Regional distribution pattern of groundwater heavy metals resulting from agricultural activities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nouri, J.; Mahvi, A. H.; Jahed, G. R.; Babaei, A. A.

    2008-09-01

    Contaminations of groundwater by heavy metals due to agricultural activities are growing recently. The objective of this study was to evaluate and map regional patterns of heavy metals (Cd, Zn and Cu) in groundwater on a plain with high agricultural activities. The study was conducted to investigate the concentration of heavy metals and distribution in groundwater in regions of Shush Danial and Andimeshk aquifers in the southern part of Iran. Presently, groundwater is the only appropriate and widely used source of drinking water for rural and urban communities in this region. The region covers an area of 1,100 km2 between the Dez and Karkhe rivers, which lead to the Persian Gulf. For this study, the region was divided into four sub-regions A, B, C and D. Additionally, 168 groundwater samples were collected from 42 water wells during the earlier months of 2004. The flame atomic absorption spectrometry (AAS-Flame) was used to measure the concentration of heavy metals in water samples and the Surfer software was used for determination of the contour map of metal distribution. The results demonstrated that in all of the samples, Cd and Zn concentrations were below the EPA MCLG and EPA secondary standard, respectively. However, the Cu contents of 4.8 % of all samples were higher than EPA MCL. It is also indicated that the concentrations of metals were more pronounced at the southern part of the studied region than at the others. The analysis of fertilizers applied for agricultural activities at this region also indicated that a great majority of the above-mentioned heavy metals were discharged into the environment. Absence of confining layers, proximity to land surface, excess agricultural activities in the southern part and groundwater flow direction that is generally from the north to the southern parts in this area make the southern region of the Shush plain especially vulnerable to pollution by heavy metals than by other contaminants.

  13. Understanding Active Galactic Nuclei using near-infrared high angular resolution polarimetry II: Preliminary results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marin, F.; Grosset, L.; Goosmann, R.; Gratadour, D.; Rouan, D.; Clénet, Y.; Pelat, D.; Rojas Lobos, P. A.

    2016-12-01

    In this second research note of a series of two, we present the first near-infrared results we obtained when modeling Active Galactic Nuclei (AGN). Our first proceedings showed the comparison between the MontAGN and STOKES Monte Carlo codes. Now we use our radiative transfer codes to simulate the polarization maps of a prototypical, NGC 1068-like, type-2 radio-quiet AGN. We produced high angular resolution infrared (1 μm) polarization images to be compared with recent observations in this wavelength range. Our preliminary results already show a good agreement between the models and observations but cannot account for the peculiar linear polarization angle of the torus such as observed. tet{Gratadour2015} found a polarization position angle being perpendicular to the bipolar outflows axis. Further work is needed to improve the models by adding physical phenomena such as dichroism and clumpiness.

  14. Carbon fiber composites inspection and defect characterization using active infrared thermography: numerical simulations and experimental results.

    PubMed

    Fernandes, Henrique; Zhang, Hai; Figueiredo, Alisson; Ibarra-Castanedo, Clemente; Guimarares, Gilmar; Maldague, Xavier

    2016-12-01

    Composite materials are widely used in the aeronautic industry. One of the reasons is because they have strength and stiffness comparable to metals, with the added advantage of significant weight reduction. Infrared thermography (IT) is a safe nondestructive testing technique that has a fast inspection rate. In active IT, an external heat source is used to stimulate the material being inspected in order to generate a thermal contrast between the feature of interest and the background. In this paper, carbon-fiber-reinforced polymers are inspected using IT. More specifically, carbon/PEEK (polyether ether ketone) laminates with square Kapton inserts of different sizes and at different depths are tested with three different IT techniques: pulsed thermography, vibrothermography, and line scan thermography. The finite element method is used to simulate the pulsed thermography experiment. Numerical results displayed a very good agreement with experimental results.

  15. Multi-object active shape model construction for abdomen segmentation: preliminary results.

    PubMed

    Gollmer, Sebastian T; Simon, Martin; Bischof, Arpad; Barkhausen, Jorg; Buzug, Thorsten M

    2012-01-01

    The automatic segmentation of abdominal organs is a pre-requisite for many medical applications. Successful methods typically rely on prior knowledge about the to be segmented anatomy as it is for instance provided by means of active shape models (ASMs). Contrary to most previous ASM based methods, this work does not focus on individual organs. Instead, a more holistic approach that aims at exploiting inter-organ relationships to eventually segment a complex of organs is proposed. Accordingly, a flexible framework for automatic construction of multi-object ASMs is introduced, employed for coupled shape modeling, and used for co-segmentation of liver and spleen based on a new coupled shape/separate pose approach. Our first results indicate feasible segmentation accuracies, whereas pose decoupling leads to substantially better segmentation results and performs in average also slightly better than the standard single-object ASM approach.

  16. First experimental results on active and slim-edge silicon sensors for XFEL

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pancheri, L.; Benkechcache, M. E. A.; Dalla Betta, G.-F.; Xu, H.; Verzellesi, G.; Ronchin, S.; Boscardin, M.; Ratti, L.; Grassi, M.; Lodola, L.; Malcovati, P.; Vacchi, C.; Manghisoni, M.; Re, V.; Traversi, G.; Batignani, G.; Bettarini, S.; Casarosa, G.; Giorgi, M.; Forti, F.; Paladino, A.; Paoloni, E.; Rizzo, G.; Morsani, F.; Fabris, L.

    2016-12-01

    This work presents the first characterization results obtained on a pilot fabrication run of planar sensors, tailored for X-ray imaging applications at FELs, developed in the framework of INFN project PixFEL. Active and slim-edge p-on-n sensors are fabricated on n-type high-resistivity silicon with 450 μm thickness, bonded to a support wafer. Both diodes and pixelated sensors with a pitch of 110 μm are included in the design. Edge structures with different number of guard rings are designed to comply with the large bias voltage required by the application after accumulating an ionizing radiation dose as large as 1GGy. Preliminary results from the electrical characterization of the produced sensors, providing a first assessment of the proposed approach, are discussed. A functional characterization of the sensors with a pulsed infrared laser is also presented, demonstrating the validity of slim-edge configurations.

  17. The Alaska earthquake, March 27, 1964: lessons and conclusions

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Eckel, Edwin B.

    1970-01-01

    local waves. Better earthquake-hazard maps, based on improved knowledge of regional geology, fault behavior, and earthquake mechanisms, are needed for the entire country. Their preparation will require the close collaboration of engineers, seismologists, and geologists. Geologic maps of all inhabited places in earthquake-prone parts of the country are also needed by city planners and others, because the direct relationship between local geology and potential earthquake damage is now well understood. Improved and enlarged nets of earthquake-sensing instruments, sited in relation to known geology, are needed, as are many more geodetic and hydrographic measurements. Every large earthquake, wherever located, should be regarded as a full-scale laboratory experiment whose study can give scientific and engineering information unobtainable from any other source. Plans must be made before the event to insure staffing, funding, and coordination of effort for the scientific and engineering study of future earthquakes. Advice of earth scientists and engineers should be used in the decision-making processes involved in reconstruction after any future disastrous earthquake, as was done after the Alaska earthquake. The volume closes with a selected bibliography and a comprehensive index to the entire series of U.S. Geological Survey Professional Papers 541-546. This is the last in a series of six reports that the U.S. Geological Survey published on the results of a comprehensive geologic study that began, as a reconnaissance survey, within 24 hours after the March 27, 1964, Magnitude 9.2 Great Alaska Earthquake and extended, as detailed investigations, through several field seasons. The 1964 Great Alaska earthquake was the largest earthquake in the U.S. since 1700. Professional Paper 546, in 1 part, describes Lessons and Conclusions.

  18. Efficacy and causal mechanism of an online social media intervention to increase physical activity: Results of a randomized controlled trial

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Jingwen; Brackbill, Devon; Yang, Sijia; Centola, Damon

    2015-01-01

    Objective: To identify what features of social media – promotional messaging or peer networks – can increase physical activity. Method: A 13-week social media-based exercise program was conducted at a large Northeastern university in Philadelphia, PA. In a randomized controlled trial, 217 graduate students from the University were randomized to three conditions: a control condition with a basic online program for enrolling in weekly exercise classes led by instructors of the University for 13 weeks, a media condition that supplemented the basic program with weekly online promotional media messages that encourage physical activity, and a social condition that replaced the media content with an online network of four to six anonymous peers composed of other participants of the program, in which each participant was able to see their peers' progress in enrolling in classes. The primary outcome was the number of enrollments in exercise classes, and the secondary outcomes were self-reported physical activities. Data were collected in 2014. Results: Participants enrolled in 5.5 classes on average. Compared with enrollment in the control condition (mean = 4.5), promotional messages moderately increased enrollment (mean = 5.7, p = 0.08), while anonymous social networks significantly increased enrollment (mean = 6.3, p = 0.02). By the end of the program, participants in the social condition reported exercising moderately for an additional 1.6 days each week compared with the baseline, which was significantly more than an additional 0.8 days in the control condition. Conclusion: Social influence from anonymous online peers was more successful than promotional messages for improving physical activity. Clinical Trial Registration: ClinicalTrials.gov: NCT02267369. PMID:26844132

  19. Alteration of rare earth element distribution as a result of microbial activity and empirical methane injection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Castillo, D. J.; Davies, N. W.; Thurber, A. R.; Haley, B. A.; Colwell, F. S.

    2014-12-01

    As a result of warming, methane is being released into the marine environment in areas that have not historically experienced methane input. While methane is a potent greenhouse gas, microbial oxidation of methane within the sediment greatly limits the role of marine methane sources on atmospheric forcing. However, in these areas of new methane release, consumption of methane prior to its release into the atmosphere is a result of the response of the microbial community to this new input of methane. Further, rare earth elements (REEs) are not currently thought to be involved with microbial activity, but this assumption has not been rigorously tested. Here we test that: (1) microbial communities will rapidly respond to the onset of methane emission, and (2) the microbial response to this methane input will impact the distribution of REEs within the sediment. Undisturbed cores sampled from a tidal flat at Yaquina Bay, OR, were brought back to a lab and injected with anoxic seawater (as a control) or anoxic sea water saturated with methane gas for a total of 2 weeks. Aerobic methanotrophs proliferated over this short time period, becoming an abundant member of the microbial community as identified using fatty acid biomarkers. Excitingly, the experimental injection of methane also shifted the distribution of REEs within the sediment, a trend that appeared to follow the microbial response and that was different from the control cores. Further, the lightest REEs appeared to be used more than the heavier ones, supporting that the REEs are being actively used by the microbes. While we focused on identifying the response of those microbes responsible in methane-cycling, we also identified how the entire microbial community shifts as a result of methane input, and correlating with shifts in REE distribution. Here we have empirically demonstrated the rapid response of methanotrophs to the onset of methane emission and that REE distribution within the sediment is likely

  20. Active Tuberculosis Case Finding in Port-au-Prince, Haiti: Experiences, Results, and Implications for Tuberculosis Control Programs

    PubMed Central

    Delva, Guesly J.; Fort, Dumesle St.

    2016-01-01

    Background. Haiti has the highest tuberculosis (TB) prevalence in the Americas with 254 cases per 100,000 persons. Case detection relies on passive detection and TB services in many regions suffer from poor diagnostic and clinical resources. Methods. Mache Chache (“Go and Seek”) was a TB REACH Wave 3 funded TB case finding project in Port-au-Prince between July 2013 and September 2014, targeting four intervention areas with insufficient TB diagnostic performance. Results. Based on a verbal symptom screen emphasizing the presence of cough, the project identified 11,150 (11.75%) of all screened persons as TB subjects and 2.67% as smear-positive (SS+) TB cases. Enhanced case finding and strengthening of laboratory services led to a 59% increase in bacteriologically confirmed cases in the evaluation population. In addition, smear grades dropped significantly, suggesting earlier case detection. Xpert® MTB/RIF was successfully introduced and improved TB diagnosis in HIV-infected, smear-negative clinic patients, but not in HIV-negative, smear-negative TB suspects in the community. However, the number needed to screen for one additional SS+ case varied widely between clinic and community screening activities. Conclusion. Enhanced and active TB case finding in Haiti can improve TB diagnosis and care. However, screening algorithms have to be tailored to individual settings, necessitating long-term commitment. PMID:27668093

  1. Improving Nutrition and Physical Activity Policies in Afterschool Programs: Results from a Group-Randomized Controlled Trial

    PubMed Central

    Kenney, Erica L.; Giles, Catherine M.; deBlois, Madeleine E.; Gortmaker, Steven L.; Chinfatt, Sherene; Cradock, Angie L.

    2017-01-01

    OBJECTIVE Afterschool programs can be health-promoting environments for children. Written policies positively influence nutrition and physical activity (PA) environments, but effective strategies for building staff capacity to write such policies have not been evaluated. This study measures the comprehensiveness of written nutrition, PA, and screen time policies in afterschool programs and assesses impact of the Out of School Nutrition and Physical Activity (OSNAP) intervention on key policies. METHODS Twenty afterschool programs in Boston, MA participated in a group-randomized, controlled trial from September 2010 to June 2011. Intervention program staff attended learning collaboratives focused on practice and policy change. The Out-of-School Time (OST) Policy Assessment Index evaluated written policies. Inter-rater reliability and construct validity of the measure and impact of the intervention on written policies were assessed. RESULTS The measure demonstrated moderate to excellent inter-rater reliability (Spearman’s r=0.53 to 0.97) and construct validity. OSNAP was associated with significant increases in standards-based policy statements surrounding snacks (+2.6, p=0.003), beverages (+2.3, p=0.008), screen time (+0.8, p=0.046), family communication (+2.2, p=0.002), and a summary index of OSNAP goals (+3.3, p=0.02). CONCLUSIONS OSNAP demonstrated success in building staff capacity to write health-promoting policy statements. Future research should focus on determining policy change impact on practices. PMID:24941286

  2. The no conclusion intervention for couples in conflict.

    PubMed

    Migerode, Lieven

    2014-07-01

    Dealing with difference is central to all couple therapy. This article presents an intervention designed to assist couples in handling conflict. Central to this approach is the acceptance that most conflicts cannot be solved. Couples are in need of a different understanding of couples conflict. This understanding is found in the analysis of love in context and in relational dialectics. Couples are guided through different steps: deciding on the valence of the issue as individuals, helping them decide which differences can be resolved and which issues demand new ways of living with the inevitable, and the introduction in the suggested no conclusion dialogue. This article briefly describes the five day intensive couple therapy program, in which the no intervention is embedded. The theoretical foundation of the intervention, followed by the step by step description of the intervention forms the major part of the article. A case vignette illustrates this approach.

  3. Urinary TMPRSS2:ERG and PCA3 in an active surveillance cohort: results from a baseline analysis in the Canary Prostate Active Surveillance Study

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Daniel W.; Newcomb, Lisa F.; Brown, Elissa C.; Brooks, James D.; Carroll, Peter R.; Feng, Ziding; Gleave, Martin E.; Lance, Raymond S.; Sanda, Martin G.; Thompson, Ian M.; Wei, John T.; Nelson, Peter S.

    2013-01-01

    Purpose Active surveillance is used to manage low risk prostate cancer. Both PCA3 and TMRPSS2-ERG are promising biomarkers that may be associated with aggressive disease. This study examines the correlation of these biomarkers with higher cancer volume and grade determined at the time of biopsy in an active surveillance cohort. Experimental Design Post-DRE urine was collected prospectively as part of the multi-institutional Canary Prostate Active Surveillance Study (PASS). PCA3 and TMPRSS2-ERG levels were analyzed in urine collected at study entry. Biomarker scores were correlated to clinical and pathologic variables. Results In 387 men, both PCA3 and TMPRSS2-ERG scores were significantly associated with higher volume disease. For a negative repeat biopsy, and 1–10%, 11–33%, ≥34% positive cores, median PCA3 and TMPRSS2-ERG scores increased incrementally (P < 0.005). Both PCA3 and TMPRSS2-ERG scores were also significantly associated with presence of high grade disease. For a negative repeat biopsy, Gleason 6 and Gleason ≥7 cancers, the median PCA3 and TMPRSS2-ERG scores also increased incrementally (P = 0.02 and P = 0.001, respectively). Using the marker scores as a continuous variables, the odds ratio for a biopsy in which cancer was detected versus a negative repeat biopsy (ref) on modeling was 1.41 (95% CI 1.07–1.85), P = 0.01 for PCA3 and 1.28 (95% CI 1.10–1.49), P = 0.001 for TMPRSS2-ERG. Conclusions For men on active surveillance both PCA3 and TMPRSS2-ERG appear to stratify risk of having aggressive cancer as defined by tumor volume or Gleason score. PMID:23515404

  4. Twist Model Development and Results from the Active Aeroelastic Wing F/A-18 Aircraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lizotte, Andrew M.; Allen, Michael J.

    2007-01-01

    Understanding the wing twist of the active aeroelastic wing (AAW) F/A-18 aircraft is a fundamental research objective for the program and offers numerous benefits. In order to clearly understand the wing flexibility characteristics, a model was created to predict real-time wing twist. A reliable twist model allows the prediction of twist for flight simulation, provides insight into aircraft performance uncertainties, and assists with computational fluid dynamic and aeroelastic issues. The left wing of the aircraft was heavily instrumented during the first phase of the active aeroelastic wing program allowing deflection data collection. Traditional data processing steps were taken to reduce flight data, and twist predictions were made using linear regression techniques. The model predictions determined a consistent linear relationship between the measured twist and aircraft parameters, such as surface positions and aircraft state variables. Error in the original model was reduced in some cases by using a dynamic pressure-based assumption. This technique produced excellent predictions for flight between the standard test points and accounted for nonlinearities in the data. This report discusses data processing techniques and twist prediction validation, and provides illustrative and quantitative results.

  5. Twist Model Development and Results From the Active Aeroelastic Wing F/A-18 Aircraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lizotte, Andrew; Allen, Michael J.

    2005-01-01

    Understanding the wing twist of the active aeroelastic wing F/A-18 aircraft is a fundamental research objective for the program and offers numerous benefits. In order to clearly understand the wing flexibility characteristics, a model was created to predict real-time wing twist. A reliable twist model allows the prediction of twist for flight simulation, provides insight into aircraft performance uncertainties, and assists with computational fluid dynamic and aeroelastic issues. The left wing of the aircraft was heavily instrumented during the first phase of the active aeroelastic wing program allowing deflection data collection. Traditional data processing steps were taken to reduce flight data, and twist predictions were made using linear regression techniques. The model predictions determined a consistent linear relationship between the measured twist and aircraft parameters, such as surface positions and aircraft state variables. Error in the original model was reduced in some cases by using a dynamic pressure-based assumption and by using neural networks. These techniques produced excellent predictions for flight between the standard test points and accounted for nonlinearities in the data. This report discusses data processing techniques and twist prediction validation, and provides illustrative and quantitative results.

  6. Peptide modification results in the formation of a dimer with a 60-fold enhanced antimicrobial activity

    PubMed Central

    Thamri, Amal; Létourneau, Myriam; Djoboulian, Alex; Chatenet, David; Déziel, Eric; Perreault, Jonathan

    2017-01-01

    Cationic antimicrobial peptides (CAMPs) occur naturally in numerous organisms and are considered as a class of antibiotics with promising potential against multi-resistant bacteria. Herein, we report a strategy that can lead to the discovery of novel small CAMPs with greatly enhanced antimicrobial activity and retained antibiofilm potential. We geared our efforts towards i) the N-terminal cysteine functionalization of a previously reported small synthetic cationic peptide (peptide 1037, KRFRIRVRV-NH2), ii) its dimerization through a disulfide bond, and iii) a preliminary antimicrobial activity assessment of the newly prepared dimer against Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Burkholderia cenocepacia, pathogens responsible for the formation of biofilms in lungs of individuals with cystic fibrosis. This dimer is of high interest as it does not only show greatly enhanced bacterial growth inhibition properties compared to its pep1037 precursor (up to 60 times), but importantly, also displays antibiofilm potential at sub-MICs. Our results suggest that the reported dimer holds promise for its use in future adjunctive therapy, in combination with clinically-relevant antibiotics. PMID:28296935

  7. Increases in Physical Activity Result in Diminishing Increments in Daily Energy Expenditure in Mice.

    PubMed

    O'Neal, Timothy J; Friend, Danielle M; Guo, Juen; Hall, Kevin D; Kravitz, Alexxai V

    2017-02-06

    Exercise is a common component of weight loss strategies, yet exercise programs are associated with surprisingly small changes in body weight [1-4]. This may be due in part to compensatory adaptations, in which calories expended during exercise are counteracted by decreases in other aspects of energy expenditure [1, 5-10]. Here we examined the relationship between a rodent model of voluntary exercise- wheel running- and total daily energy expenditure. Use of a running wheel for 3 to 7 days increased daily energy expenditure, resulting in a caloric deficit of ∼1 kcal/day; however, total daily energy expenditure remained stable after the first week of wheel access, despite further increases in wheel use. We hypothesized that compensatory mechanisms accounted for the lack of increase in daily energy expenditure after the first week. Supporting this idea, we observed a decrease in off-wheel ambulation when mice were using the wheels, indicating behavioral compensation. Finally, we asked whether individual variation in wheel use within a group of mice would be associated with different levels of daily energy expenditure. Despite a large variation in wheel running, we did not observe a significant relationship between the amount of daily wheel running and total daily energy expenditure or energy intake across mice. Together, our experiments support a model in which the transition from sedentary to light activity is associated with an increase in daily energy expenditure, but further increases in physical activity produce diminishingly small increments in daily energy expenditure.

  8. Experimentally activated immune defence in female pied flycatchers results in reduced breeding success.

    PubMed

    Ilmonen, P; Taarna, T; Hasselquist, D

    2000-04-07

    Traditional explanations for the negative fitness consequences of parasitism have focused on the direct pathogenic effects of infectious agents. However, because of the high selection pressure by the parasites, immune defences are likely to be costly and trade off with other fitness-related traits, such as reproductive effort. In a field experiment, we immunized breeding female flycatchers with non-pathogenic antigens (diphtheria-tetanus vaccine), which excluded the direct negative effects of parasites, in order to test the consequences of activated immune defence on hosts' investment in reproduction and self-maintenance. Immunized females decreased their feeding effort and investment in self-maintenance (rectrix regrowth) and had lower reproductive output (fledgling quality and number) than control females injected with saline. Our results reveal the phenotypic cost of immune defence by showing that an activated immune system per se can lower the host's breeding success. This may be caused by an energetic or nutritional trade-off between immune function and physical workload when feeding young or be an adaptive response to 'infection' to avoid physiological disorders such as oxidative stress and immunopathology.

  9. CCN Activity, Hygroscopicity, and Droplet Activation Kinetics of Secondary Organic Aerosol Resulting from the 2010 Gulf Oil Spill

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moore, R.; Lathem, T. L.; Cerully, K.; Bahreini, R.; Brock, C. A.; Langridge, J. M.; Middlebrook, A. M.; Nenes, A.; Calnex Science Team

    2010-12-01

    We present an analysis of the hygroscopicity and droplet activation kinetics of cloud condensation nuclei (CCN) sampled onboard the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration WP-3D aircraft downwind of the Deepwater Horizon oil spill site on June 8th and 10th, 2010. This set of measurements provides a unique case study for assessing in-situ the impact of fresh, hydrocarbonlike aerosols, which are expected to be formed via gas-to-particle conversion of the semi-volatile vapors released from oil evaporation. Similar hydrocarbon-rich aerosols constitute an important local emissions source in urban areas, but often coexist as an external/partially-internal mixture with more-oxidized, aged organic and sulfate aerosol. The DWH site provides the means to study the hygroscopic properties of these less-oxidized organic aerosols above a cleaner environmental background typical of marine environments in order to better discern their contribution to CCN activity and droplet growth. Measurements were performed with a Droplet Measurement Technologies Streamwise, Thermal-Gradient CCN counter, operating both as a counter (s=0.3%) and as a spectrometer (s=0.2-0.6%) using the newly-developed Scanning Flow CCN Analysis (SFCA) technique [1]. The instrument measures both the number concentration of particles able to nucleate droplets and also their resulting droplet sizes. The measured size information combined with a comprehensive computational fluid dynamics instrument model enables us to determine the rate of water uptake onto the particles and parameterize it in terms of an effective mass transfer coefficient [2], a key parameter needed to predict the number of activated droplets in ambient clouds. Non-refractory aerosol chemical composition was measured with an Aerodyne compact time-of-flight aerosol mass spectrometer. It was observed that the aerosols sampled downwind of the site on both days were composed predominantly of organics with a low degree of oxidation and low

  10. Behavioral Economics, Wearable Devices, and Cooperative Games: Results From a Population-Based Intervention to Increase Physical Activity

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    exchanged GOODcoins, the mean balance was 4,000 (95% CI 3850, 4150) at time of redemption, and 50.4% (n=61) of exchanges were for fitness or outdoor products, while 4.1% (n=5) were for food-related items. Participants were most likely to complete challenges when rewards were between 201-300 GOODcoins. Conclusions The purpose of this study is to form a baseline for future research. Overall, results indicate that challenges and incentives may be effective for connected and active members, and may play a role in achieving daily-recommended activity guidelines. Registrants were typically younger, walking was the primary activity, and rewards were mainly exchanged for fitness or outdoor products. Remaining to be determined is whether members were already physically active at time of registration and are representative of healthy adherers, or were previously inactive and were incentivized to change their behavior. As challenges are gamified, there is an opportunity to investigate the role of superusers and healthy adherers, impacts on behavioral norms, and how cooperative games and incentives can be leveraged across stratified populations. Study limitations and future research agendas are discussed. PMID:26821955

  11. Optimal placement of piezoelectric plates for active vibration control of gas turbine blades: experimental results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Botta, F.; Marx, N.; Gentili, S.; Schwingshackl, C. W.; Di Mare, L.; Cerri, G.; Dini, D.

    2012-04-01

    It is well known that the gas turbine blade vibrations can give rise to catastrophic failures and a reduction of the blades life because of fatigue related phenomena[1]-[3] . In last two decades, the adoption of piezoelectric elements, has received considerable attention by many researcher for its potential applicability to different areas of mechanical, aerospace, aeronautical and civil engineering. Recently, a number of studies of blades vibration control via piezoelectric plates and patches have been reported[4]-[6] . It was reported that the use of piezoelectric elements can be very effective in actively controlling vibrations. In one of their previous contributions[7] , the authors of the present manuscript studied a model to control the blade vibrations by piezoelectric elements and validated their results using a multi-physics finite elements package (COMSOL) and results from the literature. An optimal placement method of piezoelectric plate has been developed and applied to different loading scenarios for realistic configurations encountered in gas turbine blades. It has been demonstrated that the optimal placement depends on the spectrum of the load, so that segmented piezoelectric patches have been considered and, for different loads, an optimal combination of sequential and/or parallel actuation and control of the segments has been studied. In this paper, an experimental investigation carried out by the authors using a simplified beam configuration is reported and discussed. The test results obtained by the investigators are then compared with the numerical predictions [7] .

  12. New Activity of Chiron: Results from 5 Years of Photometric Monitoring

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Duffard, René; Lazzaro, Daniela; Pinto, Sandro; Carvano, Jorge; Angeli, Claudia; Alvarez-Candal, Alvaro; Fernández, Silvia

    2002-11-01

    The results of photometric observations of Centaur object Chiron carried out at the Observatório do Pico dos Dias (OPD, Brazil), the Estación Astrofı´sica de Bosque Alegre (EABA, Argentina), and Complejo Astronómico El Leoncito (CASLEO, Argentina) from 1997 to 2001 are presented here. The analysis of the photometric data shows that the brightness of Chiron reached a minimum value in 1999 and began increasing again in 2000. The absolute magnitude, HV, varied from 7.26 in June 1999 to 5.78 in April 2001. The data tend to indicate that Chiron is starting a new outburst of activity which is compatible with a sporadic cometary behavior not related to heliocentric distance.

  13. Fuzzy-logic-based hybrid locomotion mode classification for an active pelvis orthosis: Preliminary results.

    PubMed

    Yuan, Kebin; Parri, Andrea; Yan, Tingfang; Wang, Long; Munih, Marko; Vitiello, Nicola; Wang, Qining

    2015-01-01

    In this paper, we present a fuzzy-logic-based hybrid locomotion mode classification method for an active pelvis orthosis. Locomotion information measured by the onboard hip joint angle sensors and the pressure insoles is used to classify five locomotion modes, including two static modes (sitting, standing still), and three dynamic modes (level-ground walking, ascending stairs, and descending stairs). The proposed method classifies these two kinds of modes first by monitoring the variation of the relative hip joint angle between the two legs within a specific period. Static states are then classified by the time-based absolute hip joint angle. As for dynamic modes, a fuzzy-logic based method is proposed for the classification. Preliminary experimental results with three able-bodied subjects achieve an off-line classification accuracy higher than 99.49%.

  14. Loss of succinate dehydrogenase activity results in dependency on pyruvate carboxylation for cellular anabolism.

    PubMed

    Lussey-Lepoutre, Charlotte; Hollinshead, Kate E R; Ludwig, Christian; Menara, Mélanie; Morin, Aurélie; Castro-Vega, Luis-Jaime; Parker, Seth J; Janin, Maxime; Martinelli, Cosimo; Ottolenghi, Chris; Metallo, Christian; Gimenez-Roqueplo, Anne-Paule; Favier, Judith; Tennant, Daniel A

    2015-11-02

    The tricarboxylic acid (TCA) cycle is a central metabolic pathway responsible for supplying reducing potential for oxidative phosphorylation and anabolic substrates for cell growth, repair and proliferation. As such it thought to be essential for cell proliferation and tissue homeostasis. However, since the initial report of an inactivating mutation in the TCA cycle enzyme complex, succinate dehydrogenase (SDH) in paraganglioma (PGL), it has become clear that some cells and tissues are not only able to survive with a truncated TCA cycle, but that they are also able of supporting proliferative phenotype observed in tumours. Here, we show that loss of SDH activity leads to changes in the metabolism of non-essential amino acids. In particular, we demonstrate that pyruvate carboxylase is essential to re-supply the depleted pool of aspartate in SDH-deficient cells. Our results demonstrate that the loss of SDH reduces the metabolic plasticity of cells, suggesting vulnerabilities that can be targeted therapeutically.

  15. Active vibration absorber for CSI evolutionary model: Design and experimental results

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bruner, Anne M.; Belvin, W. Keith; Horta, Lucas G.; Juang, Jer-Nan

    1991-01-01

    The development of control of large flexible structures technology must include practical demonstration to aid in the understanding and characterization of controlled structures in space. To support this effort, a testbed facility was developed to study practical implementation of new control technologies under realistic conditions. The design is discussed of a second order, acceleration feedback controller which acts as an active vibration absorber. This controller provides guaranteed stability margins for collocated sensor/actuator pairs in the absence of sensor/actuator dynamics and computational time delay. The primary performance objective considered is damping augmentation of the first nine structural modes. Comparison of experimental and predicted closed loop damping is presented, including test and simulation time histories for open and closed loop cases. Although the simulation and test results are not in full agreement, robustness of this design under model uncertainty is demonstrated. The basic advantage of this second order controller design is that the stability of the controller is model independent.

  16. Visualizing changes in circuit activity resulting from denervation and reinnervation using immediate early gene expression.

    PubMed

    Temple, Meredith D; Worley, Paul F; Steward, Oswald

    2003-04-01

    We describe a novel strategy to evaluate circuit function after brain injury that takes advantage of experience-dependent immediate early gene (IEG) expression. When normal rats undergo training or are exposed to a novel environment, there is a strong induction of IEG expression in forebrain regions, including the hippocampus. This gene induction identifies the neurons that are engaged during the experience. Here, we demonstrate that experience-dependent IEG induction is diminished after brain injury in young adult rats (120-200 gm), specifically after unilateral lesions of the entorhinal cortex (EC), and then recovers with a time course consistent with reinnervation. In situ hybridization techniques were used to assess the expression of the activity-regulated cytoskeleton-associated protein Arc at various times after the lesion (4, 8, 12, 16, or 30 d). One group of rats was allowed to explore a complex novel environment for 1 hr; control operated animals remained in their home cage. In unoperated animals, exposure to the novel environment induced Arc mRNA levels in most pyramidal neurons in CA1, in many pyramidal neurons in CA3, and in a small number of dentate granule cells. This characteristic pattern of induction was absent at early time points after unilateral EC lesions (4 and 8 d) but recovered progressively at later time points. The recovery of Arc expression occurred with approximately the same time course as the reinnervation of the dentate gyrus as a result of postlesion sprouting. These results document a novel approach for quantitatively assessing activity-regulated gene expression in polysynaptic circuits after trauma.

  17. Comparison of different models of rat liver carcinogenesis: conclusions from a systemic analysis.

    PubMed

    de Gerlache, J; Lans, M; Préat, V; Taper, H; Roberfroid, M

    1984-01-01

    Different protocols of chemically induced hepatocarcinogenesis were applied to Wistar rats under identical experimental conditions. The following conclusions may be drawn after an analytic comparison of these results. Various chemical carcinogens show different carcinogenic capacities. Diethylnitrosamine is more potent than N-nitrosomorpholine which is more active than 2-acetylaminofluorene. A short-term exposure to such carcinogens is sufficient to initiate but not necessarily to complete the carcinogenic process. It can be promoted to completion by either a noncarcinogenic promoter or a carcinogen. From a systemic point of view, it appears that, as in the skin models, two-step protocols are not always equivalent to protocols using the same agent during the whole treatment. Moreover, the results observed with a multistep protocol indicate that during the initiating phase the carcinogen plays a selective role distinct both from a pure initiating role and from the promoting effect. The results obtained lead to the conclusion that the distinction between initiation and promotion remains purely operational as it still does not correspond to the nature of well-established biologic processes.

  18. White paper updating conclusions of 1998 ILAW performance assessment

    SciTech Connect

    MANN, F.M.

    2000-05-11

    The purpose of this document is to provide a comparison of the estimated immobilized low-activity waste (LAW) disposal system performance against established performance objectives using the beat estimates for parameters and models to describe the system. The principal advances in knowledge since the last performance assessment (known as the 1998 ILAW PA [Mann 1998a]) have been in site specific information and data on the waste form performance for BNFL, Inc. relevant glass formulations. The white paper also estimates the maximum release rates for technetium and other key radionuclides and chemicals from the waste form. Finally, this white paper provides limited information on the impact of changes in waste form loading.

  19. Safety and environmental analyses and conclusions for TIBER-II

    SciTech Connect

    Piet, S.J.; Stasko, R.R.

    1987-01-01

    The safety and environmental characteristics of the TIBER-II (Tokamak Ignition/Burn Experimental Reactor) design have been studied, focusing on innovative design features. Analyses included accident concerns, maintenance exposure, effluent control, and waste management. Unresolved problems include removal of decay heat from the high activation tungsten inboard shield, provision for rapid, passive, and benign plasma shutoff, compatibility between liquid-metal test modules and water-cooled blanket/shield, and elimination of high level wastes. 3 refs., 1 fig., 3 tabs.

  20. Employee counseling services evaluation system: design, issues and conclusions.

    PubMed

    Masi, D A; Teems, L A

    1983-01-01

    Employee Counseling Services (ECS) programs have emerged as an effective method for dealing with employees whose job performance has deteriorated due to personal problems such as alcoholism or drug abuse. It is estimated that 18% of any work force is effected by such problems at any given time and that these employees cost industry billions of dollars annually in lost productivity, abuse of sick leave, etc. One of the critical concerns of this emerging field is the need for comprehensive evaluation that can demonstrate the cost-effectiveness and cost-benefits of ECS programs. This paper will describe the model Federal ECS developed at the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services as well as the components of the evaluation system designed to determine its effectiveness. The system is the first of its kind and will be a valuable contribution to the field. The paper then raises issues and develops conclusions about designing such an evaluation within the context of a large bureaucracy.

  1. The sandflat habitat: Scaling from experiments to conclusions

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Thrush, S.F.; Pridmore, R.D.; Bell, R.G.; Cummings, V.J.; Dayton, P.K.; Ford, R.; Grant, J.; Green, M.O.; Hewitt, J.E.; Hines, A.H.; Hume, T.M.; Lawrie, S.M.; Legendre, P.; McArdle, B.H.; Morrisey, D.; Schneider, Davod C.; Turner, S.J.; Walters, R.A.; Whitlatch, R.B.; Wilkinson, M.R.

    1997-01-01

    Ecological systems are characterised by spatial and temporal variations in the density of organisms and resources, and in the intensity of processes which affect them (e.g. Watt, 1947, Dayton, 1971, Addicot et al., 1987, Kolasa and Pickett, 1991 and Giller et al., 1994). This heterogeneity represents both a difficulty for field study design and statistical testing, and a challenge to describe the spatial structuring of populations, communities and ecosystems (Legendre, 1993). Patterns in ecological and environmental variables are fundamental to developing hypotheses and in designing subsequent field studies, because they determine the spatial and temporal scales of study. Spatial and/or temporal patterns also provide useful stepping stones for addressing issues of scale. Patterns apparent at one scale can collapse to noise when viewed from other scales, indicating that patterns, processes and our perceptions vary in a scale-dependent manner. Perhaps the most important but rarely discussed issue is the question of how to scale-up from small-scale surveys and experiments to conclusions relevant at larger spatial and temporal scales.

  2. Once-daily budesonide MMX in active, mild-to-moderate ulcerative colitis: results from the randomised CORE II study

    PubMed Central

    Travis, Simon P L; Danese, Silvio; Kupcinskas, Limas; Alexeeva, Olga; D'Haens, Geert; Gibson, Peter R; Moro, Luigi; Jones, Richard; Ballard, E David; Masure, Johan; Rossini, Matteo; Sandborn, William J

    2014-01-01

    Objective Budesonide MMX is a novel oral formulation of budesonide that uses Multi-Matrix System (MMX) technology to extend release to the colon. This study compared the efficacy of budesonide MMX with placebo in patients with active, mild-to-moderate ulcerative colitis (UC). Design Patients were randomised 1:1:1:1 to receive budesonide MMX 9 mg or 6 mg, or Entocort EC 9 mg (budesonide controlled ileal-release capsules; reference arm) or placebo once daily for 8 weeks. The primary endpoint was combined clinical and endoscopic remission, defined as UC Disease Activity Index score ≤1 with a score of 0 for rectal bleeding and stool frequency, no mucosal friability on colonoscopy, and a ≥1-point reduction in endoscopic index score from baseline. Results 410 patients were evaluated for efficacy. Combined clinical and endoscopic remission rates with budesonide MMX 9 mg or 6 mg, Entocort EC and placebo were 17.4%, 8.3%, 12.6% and 4.5%, respectively. The difference between budesonide MMX 9 mg and placebo was significant (OR 4.49; 95% CI 1.47 to 13.72; p=0.0047). Budesonide MMX 9 mg was associated with numerically higher rates of clinical (42.2% vs 33.7%) and endoscopic improvement (42.2% vs 31.5%) versus placebo. The rate of histological healing (16.5% vs 6.7%; p=0.0361) and proportion of patients with symptom resolution (23.9% vs 11.2%; p=0.0220) were significantly higher for budesonide MMX 9 mg than placebo. Adverse event profiles were similar across groups. Conclusion Budesonide MMX 9 mg was safe and more effective than placebo at inducing combined clinical and endoscopic remission in patients with active, mild-to-moderate UC. PMID:23436336

  3. Can we use digital life-log images to investigate active and sedentary travel behaviour? Results from a pilot study

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Active travel such as walking and cycling has potential to increase physical activity levels in sedentary individuals. Motorised car travel is a sedentary behaviour that contributes to carbon emissions. There have been recent calls for technology that will improve our ability to measure these travel behaviours, and in particular evaluate modes and volumes of active versus sedentary travel. The purpose of this pilot study is to investigate the potential efficacy of a new electronic measurement device, a wearable digital camera called SenseCam, in travel research. Methods Participants (n = 20) were required to wear the SenseCam device for one full day of travel. The device automatically records approximately 3,600 time-stamped, first-person point-of-view images per day, without any action required by the wearer. Participants also completed a self-report travel diary over the same period for comparison, and were interviewed afterwards to assess user burden and experience. Results There were a total of 105 confirmed journeys in this pilot. The new SenseCam device recorded more journeys than the travel diary (99 vs. 94). Although the two measures demonstrated an acceptable correlation for journey duration (r = 0.92, p < 0.001) self-reported journey duration was over-reported (mean difference 154 s per journey; 95% CI = 89 to 218 s; 95% limits of agreement = 154 ± 598 s (-444 to 752 s)). The device also provided visual data that was used for directed interviews about sources of error. Conclusions Direct observation of travel behaviour from time-stamped images shows considerable potential in the field of travel research. Journey duration derived from direct observation of travel behaviour from time-stamped images appears to suggest over-reporting of self-reported journey duration. PMID:21599935

  4. Metal dispersion resulting from mining activities in coastal environments: a pathways approach

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Koski, Randolph A.

    2012-01-01

    Acid rock drainage (ARD) and disposal of tailings that result from mining activities impact coastal areas in many countries. The dispersion of metals from mine sites that are both proximal and distal to the shoreline can be examined using a pathways approach in which physical and chemical processes guide metal transport in the continuum from sources (sulfide minerals) to bioreceptors (marine biota). Large amounts of metals can be physically transported to the coastal environment by intentional or accidental release of sulfide-bearing mine tailings. Oxidation of sulfide minerals results in elevated dissolved metal concentrations in surface waters on land (producing ARD) and in pore waters of submarine tailings. Changes in pH, adsorption by insoluble secondary minerals (e.g., Fe oxyhydroxides), and precipitation of soluble salts (e.g., sulfates) affect dissolved metal fluxes. Evidence for bioaccumulation includes anomalous metal concentrations in bivalves and reef corals, and overlapping Pb isotope ratios for sulfides, shellfish, and seaweed in contaminated environments. Although bioavailability and potential toxicity are, to a large extent, functions of metal speciation, specific uptake pathways, such as adsorption from solution and ingestion of particles, also play important roles. Recent emphasis on broader ecological impacts has led to complementary methodologies involving laboratory toxicity tests and field studies of species richness and diversity.

  5. Anaerobic homolactate fermentation with Saccharomyces cerevisiae results in depletion of ATP and impaired metabolic activity.

    PubMed

    Abbott, Derek A; van den Brink, Joost; Minneboo, Inge M K; Pronk, Jack T; van Maris, Antonius J A

    2009-05-01

    Conversion of glucose to lactic acid is stoichiometrically equivalent to ethanol formation with respect to ATP formation from substrate-level phosphorylation, redox equivalents and product yield. However, anaerobic growth cannot be sustained in homolactate fermenting Saccharomyces cerevisiae. ATP-dependent export of the lactate anion and/or proton, resulting in net zero ATP formation, is suspected as the underlying cause. In an effort to understand the mechanisms behind the decreased lactic acid production rate in anaerobic homolactate cultures of S. cerevisiae, aerobic carbon-limited chemostats were performed and subjected to anaerobic perturbations in the presence of high glucose concentrations. Intracellular measurements of adenosine phosphates confirmed ATP depletion and decreased energy charge immediately upon anaerobicity. Unexpectedly, readily available sources of carbon and energy, trehalose and glycogen, were not activated in homolactate strains as they were in reference strains that produce ethanol. Finally, the anticipated increase in maximal velocity (V(max)) of glycolytic enzymes was not observed in homolactate fermentation suggesting the absence of protein synthesis that may be attributed to decreased energy availability. Essentially, anaerobic homolactate fermentation results in energy depletion, which, in turn, hinders protein synthesis, central carbon metabolism and subsequent energy generation.

  6. Characteristics of Physical Activity Programs for Older Adults: Results of a Multisite Survey

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hughes, Susan L.; Williams, Barbara; Molina, Lourdes C.; Bayles, Constance; Bryant, Lucinda L.; Harris, Jeffrey R.; Hunter, Rebecca; Ivey, Susan; Watkins, Ken

    2005-01-01

    Purpose: Although increased participation in physical activity by older adults is a major public health goal, little is known about the supply and use of physical activity programs in the United States. Design and Methods: Seven academic centers in diverse geographic areas surveyed physical activity programs for older adults. Five sites conducted…

  7. Physical Education and Physical Activity: Results from the School Health Policies and Programs Study 2006

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lee, Sarah M.; Burgeson, Charlene R.; Fulton, Janet E.; Spain, Christine G.

    2007-01-01

    Background: Comprehensive school-based physical activity programs consist of physical education and other physical activity opportunities including recess and other physical activity breaks, intramurals, interscholastic sports, and walk and bike to school initiatives. This article describes the characteristics of school physical education and…

  8. 78 FR 26748 - Certain Activated Carbon From the People's Republic of China: Preliminary Results of Antidumping...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-05-08

    ... International Trade Administration Certain Activated Carbon From the People's Republic of China: Preliminary... duty order on certain activated carbon from the People's Republic of China (``PRC'') for the period of... The merchandise subject to the order is certain activated carbon.\\1\\ The products are...

  9. Preliminary Results from the iMUSH Active Source Seismic Experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Levander, Alan; Kiser, Eric; Palomeras, Imma; Zelt, Colin; Schmandt, Brandon; Hansen, Steve; Harder, Steven; Creagar, Kenneth; Vidale, John; Abers, Geoffrey

    2015-04-01

    iMUSH (imaging Magma Under Saint Helens) is a US NSF sponsored multi-disciplinary investigation of Mount Saint Helens (MSH), currently the most active volcano in the Cascades arc in the northwestern United States. The project consists of active and passive seismic experiments, extensive magnetotelluric sounding, and geological/geochemical studies involving scientists at 7 institutions in the U.S. and Europe. The long-term goal of the seismic project is to combine analysis of the active source data with that of data from the 70 element broadband seismograph operating from summer 2014 until 2016. Combining seismic and MT analyses with other data, we hope to image the MSH volcanic plumbing system from the surface to the subducting Juan de Fuca slab. Here we describe preliminary results of the iMUSH active source seismic experiment, conducted in July and August 2014. The active source experiment consisted of twenty-three 454 or 908 kg weight shots recorded by ~3500 seismographs deployed at ~6,000 locations. Of these instruments, ~900 Nodal Seismic instruments were deployed continuously for two weeks in an areal array within 10 km of the MSH summit. 2,500 PASSCAL Texan instruments were deployed twice for five days in 3 areal arrays and 2 dense orthogonal linear arrays that extended from MSH to distances > 80 km. Overall the data quality from the shots is excellent. The seismograph arrays also recorded dozens of micro-earthquakes beneath the MSH summit and along the MSH seismic zone, and numerous other local and regional earthquakes. In addition, at least one low frequency event beneath MSH was recorded during the experiment. At this point we have begun various types of analysis of the data set: We have determined an average 1D Vp structure from stacking short-term/long-term average ratios, we have determined the 2-D Vp structure from ray-trace inversions along the two orthogonal profiles (in the NW-SE and NE-SW directions), and we have made low-fold CMP stacks of the

  10. Soil hydrological and soil property changes resulting from termite activity on agricultural fields in Burkina Faso

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mettrop, I.; Cammeraat, L. H.; Verbeeten, E.

    2009-04-01

    Termites are important ecosystem-engineers in subtropical and tropical regions. The effect of termite activity affecting soil infiltration is well documented in the Sahelian region. Most studies find increased infiltration rates on surfaces that are affected by termite activity in comparison to crusted areas showing non-termite presence. Crusted agricultural fields in the Sanmatenga region in Burkina Faso with clear termite activity were compared to control fields without visual ground dwelling termite activity. Fine scale rainfall simulations were carried out on crusted termite affected and control sites. Furthermore soil moisture change, bulk density, soil organic matter as well as general soil characteristics were studied. The top soils in the study area were strongly crusted (structural crust) after the summer rainfall and harvest of millet. They have a loamy sand texture underlain by a shallow sandy loam Bt horizon. The initial soil moisture conditions were significantly higher on the termite plots when compared to control sites. It was found that the amount of runoff produced on the termite plots was significantly higher, and also the volumetric soil moisture content after the experiments was significantly lower if compared to the control plots. Bulk density showed no difference whereas soil organic matter was significantly higher under termite affected areas, in comparison to the control plots. Lab tests showed no significant difference in hydrophobic behavior of the topsoil and crust material. Micro and macro-structural properties of the topsoil did not differ significantly between the termite sites and the control sites. The texture of the top 5 cm of the soil was also found to be not significantly different. The infiltration results are contradictory to the general literature, which reports increased infiltration rates after prolonged termite activity although mostly under different initial conditions. The number of nest entrances was clearly higher in

  11. Mechanical Injury Suppresses Autophagy Regulators and its Pharmacological Activation Results in Chondroprotection

    PubMed Central

    Caramés, Beatriz; Taniguchi, Noboru; Seino, Daisuke; Blanco, Francisco J.; D’Lima, Darryl; Lotz, Martin

    2011-01-01

    Objective Mechanical injury induces cell death in cartilage and triggers a remodeling process that ultimately can manifest as osteoarthritis (OA). Autophagy is a process for turnover of intracellular organelles and macromolecules that protects cells during stress responses. This study determined changes and functions of autophagy following mechanical injury to cartilage. Methods Bovine and human cartilage explants were subjected to mechanical impact (40% strain, 500 ms). Cell viability, sulfated glycosaminoglyan (sGAG) release and changes in autophagy markers ULK1, Beclin1 and LC3 were evaluated. Cartilage explants were also treated with the mTORC1 inhibitor and autophagy inducer rapamycin and tested for protective effects against mechanical injury, the cell death inducers nitric oxide and TNFα+Actinomycin D and the proinflammatory cytokine IL-1α. Results Mechanical injury induced cell death and loss of sGAG in a time-dependent manner. This was associated with significantly decreased ULK1, Beclin1 and LC3 expression in the cartilage superficial zone (P < 0.05) at 48 hours post-injury. The levels of LC3-II were increased at 24 hours post-injury but decreased at 48 and 96 hours. Rapamycin enhanced expression of autophagy regulators and prevented cell death and sGAG loss in mechanically injured explants. Rapamycin also protected against cell death induced by SNP, TNFα+Actinomycin D and prevented sGAG loss induced by IL-1α. Conclusion Mechanical injury leads to suppression of autophagy, predominantly in the superficial zone where most of the cell death occurs. Pharmacological inhibition of mTORC1, at least in part by enhancement of autophagy prevented cell and matrix damage suggesting a novel approach for chondroprotection. PMID:22034068

  12. National Waterways Study: Findings and Conclusions (from Contractor Study Effort).

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1982-05-01

    Coast of phospate and nitrogen (plus unit trains of potash) to central storage and blending facilities. As a result, water flows of primary fertilizers...forecasting methodology, and six sets of commodity flow projections for waterborne commerce. These are presented as national totals and for each of...commodity flows (under six scenarios). This analysis results in a list of navigation system needs to accommodate projected tonnage. VIII - Evaluation of

  13. Addition of prothrombin to plasma can result in a paradoxical increase in activated partial thromboplastin time.

    PubMed

    Hansson, Kenny M; Björkqvist, Jenny; Deinum, Johanna

    2014-12-01

    In the activated partial thromboplastin time (APTT) assay, a variety of nonphysiological reagents is used to induce contact activation. The sensitivity of the APTT response for different thrombin inhibitors has previously been found to be dependent on the used reagent. Recently, infusion of prothrombin (FII) has been used in in-vivo coagulopathy models and its effect has been analyzed in different assays. Therefore, we investigated whether the FII plasma concentration might affect APTT using different commercial reagents, applying both turbidimetry and viscometry. We compared both plasma-derived human FII (pd-hFII) and recombinant human FII (r-hFII). Similar results were found for pd-hFII and r-hFII with different APTT reagents. As expected, no effect on APTT was found by increasing the plasma concentration of FII using APTT reagents consisting of ellagic acid (Actin FS or Actin). Although with Pathromtin SL, consisting of SiO2, only a slight increase was found, with most other commercial APTT reagents, consisting of SiO2 or kaolin, APTT dose-dependently increased by increasing concentration of FII. Therefore, both Pathromtin SL and Actin FS were used to compare r-hFII and pd-hFII by determining the KM at 37C using FII-depleted plasma, providing values of 6 ± 0.3 nmol/l FII for both. Thus, at normal plasma concentrations of FII, the maximal initial thrombin generation rate should be reached and no effect on the coagulation time is expected at higher FII concentrations. To completely avoid the paradoxical effect in the APTT assay at FII concentrations higher than normal, Actin or Actin FS is the preferable reagent.

  14. Repeated Activation of a CS-US-Contingency Memory Results in Sustained Conditioned Responding

    PubMed Central

    Joos, Els; Vansteenwegen, Debora; Vervliet, Bram; Hermans, Dirk

    2013-01-01

    Individuals seem to differ in conditionability, i.e., the ease by which the contingent presentation of two stimuli will lead to a conditioned response. In contemporary learning theory, individual differences in the etiology and maintenance of anxiety disorders are, among others, explained by individual differences in temperamental variables (Mineka and Zinbarg, 2006). One such individual difference variable is how people process a learning experience when the conditioning stimuli are no longer present. Repeatedly thinking about the conditioning experience, as in worry or rumination, might prolong the initial (fear) reactions and as such, might leave certain individuals more vulnerable to developing an anxiety disorder. However, in human conditioning research, relatively little attention has been devoted to the processing of a memory trace after its initial acquisition, despite its potential influences on subsequent performance. Post-acquisition processing can be induced by mental reiteration of a conditioned stimulus-unconditioned stimulus (CS-US)-contingency. Using a human conditioned suppression paradigm, we investigated the effect of repeated activations of a CS-US-contingency memory on the level of conditioned responding at a later test. Results of three experiments showed more sustained responding to a “rehearsed” CS+ as compared to a “non-rehearsed” CS+. Moreover, the second experiment showed no effect of rehearsal when only the CS was rehearsed instead of the CS-US-contingency. The third experiment demonstrated that mental CS-US-rehearsal has the same effect regardless of whether it was cued by the CS and a verbal reference to the US or by a neutral signal, making the rehearsal “purely mental.” In sum, it was demonstrated that post-acquisition activation of a CS-US-contingency memory can impact conditioned responding, underlining the importance of post-acquisition processes in conditioning. This might indicate that individuals who are more prone

  15. Repeated Activation of a CS-US-Contingency Memory Results in Sustained Conditioned Responding.

    PubMed

    Joos, Els; Vansteenwegen, Debora; Vervliet, Bram; Hermans, Dirk

    2013-01-01

    Individuals seem to differ in conditionability, i.e., the ease by which the contingent presentation of two stimuli will lead to a conditioned response. In contemporary learning theory, individual differences in the etiology and maintenance of anxiety disorders are, among others, explained by individual differences in temperamental variables (Mineka and Zinbarg, 2006). One such individual difference variable is how people process a learning experience when the conditioning stimuli are no longer present. Repeatedly thinking about the conditioning experience, as in worry or rumination, might prolong the initial (fear) reactions and as such, might leave certain individuals more vulnerable to developing an anxiety disorder. However, in human conditioning research, relatively little attention has been devoted to the processing of a memory trace after its initial acquisition, despite its potential influences on subsequent performance. Post-acquisition processing can be induced by mental reiteration of a conditioned stimulus-unconditioned stimulus (CS-US)-contingency. Using a human conditioned suppression paradigm, we investigated the effect of repeated activations of a CS-US-contingency memory on the level of conditioned responding at a later test. Results of three experiments showed more sustained responding to a "rehearsed" CS+ as compared to a "non-rehearsed" CS+. Moreover, the second experiment showed no effect of rehearsal when only the CS was rehearsed instead of the CS-US-contingency. The third experiment demonstrated that mental CS-US-rehearsal has the same effect regardless of whether it was cued by the CS and a verbal reference to the US or by a neutral signal, making the rehearsal "purely mental." In sum, it was demonstrated that post-acquisition activation of a CS-US-contingency memory can impact conditioned responding, underlining the importance of post-acquisition processes in conditioning. This might indicate that individuals who are more prone to mentally

  16. Upper Pleistocene - Holocene activity of the Carrascoy Fault (Murcia, SE Spain): preliminary results from paleoseismological research.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martin-Banda, Raquel; Garcia-Mayordomo, Julian; Insua-Arevalo, Juan M.; Salazar, Angel; Rodriguez-Escudero, Emilio; Alvarez-Gomez, Jose A.; Martinez-Diaz, Jose J.; Herrero, Maria J.; Medialdea, Alicia

    2014-05-01

    The Carrascoy Fault is located in the Internal Zones of the Betic Cordillera (Southern Spain). In particular, the Carrascoy Fault is one of the major faults forming the Eastern Betic Shear Zone, the main structure accommodating the convergence between Nubian and Eurasian plates in the westernmost Mediterranean. So far, the Carrascoy Fault has been defined as a left-lateral strike-slip fault. It extends for at least 31 km in a NE-SW trend from the village of Zeneta (Murcia) at its northeastern tip, to the Cañaricos village, controlling the northern edge of the Carrascoy Range and its linkage to the Guadalentin Depression towards the southwest. This is an area of moderate seismic activity, but densely populated, the capital of the region, Murcia, being settled very close to the fault. Hence, the knowledge of the structure and kinematics of the Carrascoy Fault is essential for assessing reliably the seismic hazard of the region. We present a detailed-scale geological and geomorphological map along the fault zone created from a LIDAR DEM combined with fieldwork, and geological and geophysical information. Furthermore, a number of trenches have been dug across the fault at different locations providing insights in the fault most recent activity as well as paleoseismic data. Preliminary results suggest that the Cararscoy Fault has recently changed its kinematic showing a near pure reverse motion. According to this, the fault can be divided into two distinct segments, the eastern one: Zeneta - Fuensanta, and the western one: Fuensanta - Cañaricos, each one having its own characteristic style and geodynamics. Some new active strands of the fault locate at the foot of the very first relief towards the North of the older strand, forming the current southern border of the Guadalentin Depression. These new faults show an increasingly reverse component westwards, so that the Fuensanta - Cañaricos segment is constituted by thrusts, which are blind at its western end

  17. Understanding dog owners' increased levels of physical activity: results from RESIDE.

    PubMed

    Cutt, Hayley; Giles-Corti, Billie; Knuiman, Matthew; Timperio, Anna; Bull, Fiona

    2008-01-01

    We examined the influence of dog ownership on physical activity, independent of demographic, intrapersonal, and perceived environmental factors, in a cross-sectional survey of 1813 adults. Although only 23% of the dog owners walked their dogs 5 or more times per week, the adjusted odds of achieving sufficient physical activity and walking were 57% to 77% higher among dog owners compared with those not owning dogs (P< .05). Dog ownership was independently associated with physical activity and walking. Actively encouraging more dog walking may increase community physical activity levels.

  18. Interest and preferences for using advanced physical activity tracking devices: results of a national cross-sectional survey

    PubMed Central

    Alley, Stephanie; Schoeppe, Stephanie; Guertler, Diana; Jennings, Cally; Vandelanotte, Corneel

    2016-01-01

    Objectives Pedometers are an effective self-monitoring tool to increase users' physical activity. However, a range of advanced trackers that measure physical activity 24 hours per day have emerged (eg, Fitbit). The current study aims to determine people's current use, interest and preferences for advanced trackers. Design and participants A cross-sectional national telephone survey was conducted in Australia with 1349 respondents. Outcome measures Regression analyses were used to determine whether tracker interest and use, and use of advanced trackers over pedometers is a function of demographics. Preferences for tracker features and reasons for not wanting to wear a tracker are also presented. Results Over one-third of participants (35%) had used a tracker, and 16% are interested in using one. Multinomial regression (n=1257) revealed that the use of trackers was lower in males (OR=0.48, 95% CI 0.36 to 0.65), non-working participants (OR=0.43, 95% CI 0.30 to 0.61), participants with lower education (OR=0.52, 95% CI 0.38 to 0.72) and inactive participants (OR=0.52, 95% CI 0.39 to 0.70). Interest in using a tracker was higher in younger participants (OR=1.73, 95% CI 1.15 to 2.58). The most frequently used tracker was a pedometer (59%). Logistic regression (n=445) revealed that use of advanced trackers compared with pedometers was higher in males (OR=1.67, 95% CI 1.01 to 2.79) and younger participants (OR=2.96, 95% CI 1.71 to 5.13), and lower in inactive participants (OR=0.35, 95% CI 0.19 to 0.63). Over half of current or interested tracker users (53%) prefer to wear it on their wrist, 31% considered counting steps the most important function and 30% regarded accuracy as the most important characteristic. The main reasons for not wanting to use a tracker were, ‘I don't think it would help me’ (39%), and ‘I don't want to increase my activity’ (47%). Conclusions Activity trackers are a promising tool to engage people in self-monitoring a physical activity

  19. Physical activity in solid organ transplant recipients: organizational aspects and preliminary results of the Italian project.

    PubMed

    Roi, G S; Stefoni, S; Mosconi, G; Brugin, E; Burra, P; Ermolao, A; Granito, M; Macini, P; Mastrosimone, S; Nacchia, F; Pegoraro, C; Rigotti, P; Sella, G; Sgarzi, S; Tamè, M R; Totti, V; Trerotola, M; Tripi, F; Nanni Costa, A

    2014-09-01

    Most of the difficulties when trying to realize the proposal to prescribe physical activity for transplantation patients come from patient attitudes and cultural beliefs that ignore the benefits of exercise, but there also are organizational aspects arising from the difficulties that these patients face in accessing supervised exercise facilities. To address these difficulties, the Italian study project "Transplant … and Now Sport" was developed based on a model of cooperation among transplantation specialists, sports physicians, and exercise specialists organized as a team combining their specific skills to effectively actuate the physical exercise programs. This preliminary report is based on 26 patients (16 male, 10 female; 47.8±10.0 years old; 21 kidney and 5 liver transplantations; time from transplantation 2.3±1.4 years) who performed prescribed and supervised exercises consisting of 3 sessions per week of aerobic and strengthening exercises for 1 year. Preliminary results show a significant decrease in body mass index (t=1.966; P<.05) and a significant increase in peak aerobic power (t=4.535; P<.01) and maximum workload (t=4.665; P<.01) on the incremental cycling test. Also maximum strength of knee extensors (t=2.933; P<.05) and elbow flexors (t=2.450; P<.05) and countermovement jump performance (t=2.303; P<.05) significantly increased. Creatinine and proteinuria tended to decrease, but the differences were not significant. In health-related quality of life assessed by the SF-36 questionnaire, the Bodily Pain, General Health, Vitality, Social Functioning, and Role Emotional scale scores showed a significant improvement (P<.05). Preliminary results of the study protocol "Transplant…and Now Sport" show the positive effects of the model based on cooperation among transplantation centers, sports medicine centers, and gyms in the administration of a supervised exercise prescription. These data should be considered a contribution to developing and promoting

  20. Conclusions and Recommendations of the Strategy Consulation on Adolescent Fertility.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Population Inst., Washington, DC.

    The problem of adolescent pregnancy and childbearing is addressed. The document is a result of a conference of youth service agencies, family planning organizations, policy makers, health service providers, and leaders in sex education. Following summaries of participants' discussion of the nature of the problem and strategies for program…

  1. An Extension of Holland's Theory to its Unnatural Conclusion

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hollifield, John H.

    1971-01-01

    A factitious description of the destruction of the United States is given with the blame being placed on the author's theory of vocational choice and its disastrous results. The theory is based on dividing all people into personality types and all occupations into categories, and matching the two groups. (CG)

  2. Right ventromedial prefrontal lesions result in paradoxical cardiovascular activation with emotional stimuli.

    PubMed

    Hilz, Max J; Devinsky, Orrin; Szczepanska, Hanna; Borod, Joan C; Marthol, Harald; Tutaj, Marcin

    2006-12-01

    Ventromedial prefrontal cortex (VMPFC) lesions can alter emotional and autonomic responses. In animals, VMPFC activation results in cardiovascular sympathetic inhibition. In humans, VMPFC modulates emotional processing and autonomic response to arousal (e.g. accompanying decision-making). The specific role of the left or right VMPFC in mediating somatic responses to non-arousing, daily-life pleasant or unpleasant stimuli is unclear. To further evaluate VMPFC interaction with autonomic processing of non-stressful emotional stimuli and assess the effects of stimulus valence, we studied patients with unilateral VMPFC lesions and assessed autonomic modulation at rest and during physical challenge, and heart rate (HR) and blood pressure (BP) responses to non-stressful neutral, pleasant and unpleasant visual stimulation (VES) via emotionally laden slides. In 6 patients (54.0 +/- 7.2 years) with left-sided VMPFC lesions (VMPFC-L), 7 patients (43.3 +/- 11.6 years) with right-sided VMPFC lesions (VMPFC-R) and 13 healthy volunteers (44.7 +/- 11.6 years), we monitored HR as R-R interval (RRI), BP, respiration, end-tidal carbon dioxide levels, and oxygen saturation at rest, during autonomic challenge by metronomic breathing, a Valsalva manoeuvre and active standing, and in response to non-stressful pleasant, unpleasant and neutral VES. Pleasantness versus unpleasantness of slides was rated on a 7-point Likert scale. At rest, during physical autonomic challenge, and during neutral VES, parameters did not differ between the patient groups and volunteers. During VES, Likert scores also were similar across the three groups. During pleasant and unpleasant VES, HR decreased (i.e. RRI increased) significantly whereas BP remained unchanged in volunteers. In VMPFC-L patients, HR decrease was insignificant with pleasant and unpleasant VES. BP slightly increased (P = 0.06) with pleasant VES but was stable with unpleasant VES. In contrast, VMPFC-R patients had significant increases in HR

  3. Ten-year study on acid precipitation nears conclusion

    SciTech Connect

    Olem, H. )

    1990-04-01

    Results from the National Acid Precipitation Assessment Program (NAPAP) are discussed. Final results are contained in 26 state of the science reports. Seven of the reports provide information on acid rain and aquatic ecosystems. They describe the current state of acidic surface waters, watershed processes affecting surface water chemistry, historical evidence for surface water acidification, methods for forecasting future changes, and the response of acidic surface water to liming. Six areas of the country were found to be of special interest: southwest Adirondacks, New England, forested areas of the mid-Atlantic highlands, the Atlantic coastal plain, the northern Florida highlands, parts of northeastern Wisconsin and the Upper Peninsula of Michigan. Environmental effects, mitigation efforts and possible legislation are briefly discussed.

  4. Standard spacecraft economic analysis. Volume 2: Findings and conclusions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Harris, E. D.; Large, J. P.

    1976-01-01

    The comparative program costs associated with use of various standardized spacecraft for Air Force space test program missions to be flown on the space shuttle were studied in two phases. In the first phase, a variety of procurement mixes composed of existing or programmed NASA standard spacecraft designs and an Air Force standard spacecraft design were considered. The second phase dealt with additional procurement options using an upgraded version of an existing NASA design. The results of both phases are discussed.

  5. Plasminogen Activator Inhibitor-1 in depression: Results from Animal and Clinical Studies

    PubMed Central

    Jiang, Haitang; Li, Xiaoli; Chen, Suzhen; Lu, Na; Yue, Yingying; Liang, Jinfeng; Zhang, Zhijun; Yuan, Yonggui

    2016-01-01

    Evidence suggests that plasminogen activator inhibitor-1 (PAI-1) is a stress-related factor, and serum PAI-1 levels are increased in patients with major depressive disorders (MDD). Herein, we analysed PAI-1 protein levels in the brain, cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) and serum of rodents exposed to chronic unpredictable mild stress or treated with escitalopram. In addition, we examined PAI-1 concentrations in serum obtained from 17 drug-free depressed patients before and after escitalopram treatment. We found that PAI-1 expression was increased in area 1 of the cingulate cortex and prelimbic cortex of the medial prefrontal cortex as well as in the hippocampal cornu ammonis 3 and dentate gyrus in stressed rats. A downregulation of PAI-1 following chronic escitalopram treatment was also found. PAI-1 levels were higher in the CSF and serum in stressed rats than in controls, although the difference did not reach statistical significance in the serum. Escitalopram treatment significantly decreased PAI-1 levels in the serum, but not in the CSF. MDD patients had significantly greater serum PAI-1 concentrations than controls. Our results suggest that PAI-1 is implicated in the pathophysiology of depression. PMID:27456456

  6. The global unified parallel file system (GUPFS) project: FY 2002 activities and results

    SciTech Connect

    Butler, Gregory F.; Lee, Rei Chi; Welcome, Michael L.

    2003-04-07

    The Global Unified Parallel File System (GUPFS) project is a multiple-phase, five-year project at the National Energy Research Scientific Computing (NERSC) Center to provide a scalable, high performance, high bandwidth, shared file system for all the NERSC production computing and support systems. The primary purpose of the GUPFS project is to make it easier to conduct advanced scientific research using the NERSC systems. This is to be accomplished through the use of a shared file system providing a unified file namespace, operating on consolidated shared storage that is directly accessed by all the NERSC production computing and support systems. During its first year, FY 2002, the GUPFS project focused on identifying, testing, and evaluating existing and emerging shared/cluster file system, SAN fabric, and storage technologies; identifying NERSC user input/output (I/O) requirements, methods, and mechanisms; and developing appropriate benchmarking methodologies and benchmark codes for a parallel environment. This report presents the activities and progress of the GUPFS project during its first year, the results of the evaluations conducted, and plans for near-term and longer-term investigations.

  7. Defective Phagocytic Corpse Processing Results in Neurodegeneration and Can Be Rescued by TORC1 Activation

    PubMed Central

    Etchegaray, Jon Iker; Elguero, Emma J.; Tran, Jennifer A.; Sinatra, Vincent; Feany, Mel B.

    2016-01-01

    The removal of apoptotic cell corpses is important for maintaining homeostasis. Previously, defects in apoptotic cell clearance have been linked to neurodegeneration. However, the mechanisms underlying this are still poorly understood. In this study, we report that the absence of the phagocytic receptor Draper in glia leads to a pronounced accumulation of apoptotic neurons in the brain of Drosophila melanogaster. These dead cells persist in the brain throughout the lifespan of the organism and are associated with age-dependent neurodegeneration. Our data indicate that corpses persist because of defective phagosome maturation, rather than recognition defects. TORC1 activation, or inhibition of Atg1, in glia is sufficient to rescue corpse accumulation as well as neurodegeneration. These results suggest that phagocytosis of apoptotic neurons by glia during development is essential for brain homeostasis in adult flies. Furthermore, it suggests that TORC1 regulates Draper-mediated phagosome maturation. SIGNIFICANCE STATEMENT Previously, defects in dead cell clearance were linked to neurodegeneration, but the exact mechanisms are not well understood. In this study, we report that the absence of an engulfment receptor leads to a pronounced accumulation of dead neurons in the brain of the fruit fly Drosophila melanogaster. These dead cells persist in the brain throughout the lifespan of the organism and are associated with age-dependent neurodegeneration. Our data indicate that corpses persist because of defective degradation of cells rather than recognition of dead cells. PMID:26985028

  8. Granular Activated Carbon Treatment May Result in Higher Predicted Genotoxicity in the Presence of Bromide.

    PubMed

    Krasner, Stuart W; Lee, Tiffany Chih Fen; Westerhoff, Paul; Fischer, Natalia; Hanigan, David; Karanfil, Tanju; Beita-Sandí, Wilson; Taylor-Edmonds, Liz; Andrews, Robert C

    2016-09-06

    Certain unregulated disinfection byproducts (DBPs) are more of a health concern than regulated DBPs. Brominated species are typically more cytotoxic and genotoxic than their chlorinated analogs. The impact of granular activated carbon (GAC) on controlling the formation of regulated and selected unregulated DBPs following chlorine disinfection was evaluated. The predicted cyto- and genotoxicity of DBPs was calculated using published potencies based on the comet assay for Chinese hamster ovary cells (assesses the level of DNA strand breaks). Additionally, genotoxicity was measured using the SOS-Chromotest (detects DNA-damaging agents). The class sum concentrations of trihalomethanes, haloacetic acids, and unregulated DBPs, and the SOS genotoxicity followed the breakthrough of dissolved organic carbon (DOC), however the formation of brominated species did not. The bromide/DOC ratio was higher than the influent through much of the breakthrough curve (GAC does not remove bromide), which resulted in elevated brominated DBP concentrations in the effluent. Based on the potency of the haloacetonitriles and halonitromethanes, these nitrogen-containing DBPs were the driving agents of the predicted genotoxicity. GAC treatment of drinking or reclaimed waters with appreciable levels of bromide and dissolved organic nitrogen may not control the formation of unregulated DBPs with higher genotoxicity potencies.

  9. Active shield technology for space craft protection revisited in new laboratory results and analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bamford, R.; Gibson, K. J.; Thornton, A. T.; Bradford, J.; Bingham, R.; Gargate, L.; Silva, L. O.; Fonseca, R. A.; Hapgood, M.; Norberg, C.; Todd, T.; Stamper, R.

    2009-04-01

    Energetic ions in the solar wind plasma are a known hazard to both spacecraft electronics and to astronaut's health. Of primary concern is the exposure to keV--MeV protons on manned space flights to the Moon and Mars that extend over long periods of time. Attempts to protect the spacecraft include active shields that are reminiscent of Star Trek "deflector" shields. Here we describe a new experiment to test the shielding concept of a dipole-like magnetic field and plasma, surrounding the spacecraft forming a "mini magnetosphere". Initial laboratory experiments have been conducted to determine the effectiveness of a magnetized plasma barrier to be able to expel an impacting, low beta, supersonic flowing energetic plasma representing the Solar Wind. Optical and Langmuir probe data of the plasma density, the plasma flow velocity, and the intensity of the dipole field clearly show the creation of a narrow transport barrier region and diamagnetic cavity virtually devoid of energetic plasma particles. This demonstrates the potential viability of being able to create a small "hole" in a Solar Wind plasma, of the order of the ion Larmor orbit width, in which an inhabited spacecraft could reside in relative safety. The experimental results have been quantitatively compared to a 3D particle-in-cell ‘hybrid' code simulation that uses kinetic ions and fluid electrons, showing good qualitative agreement and excellent quantitative agreement. Together the results demonstrate the pivotal role of particle kinetics in determining generic plasma transport barriers. [1] [1] R Bamford et al., "The interaction of a flowing plasma with a dipole magnetic field: measurements and modelling of a diamagnetic cavity relevant to spacecraft protection." 2008 Plasma Phys. Control. Fusion 50 124025 (11pp) doi: 10.1088/0741-3335/50/12/124025

  10. Associations between Multiple Accelerometry-Assessed Physical Activity Parameters and Selected Health Outcomes in Elderly People – Results from the KORA-Age Study

    PubMed Central

    Ortlieb, Sandra; Gorzelniak, Lukas; Nowak, Dennis; Strobl, Ralf; Grill, Eva; Thorand, Barbara; Peters, Annette; Kuhn, Klaus A.; Karrasch, Stefan; Horsch, Alexander; Schulz, Holger

    2014-01-01

    Introduction Accelerometry is an important method for extending our knowledge about intensity, duration, frequency and patterns of physical activity needed to promote health. This study has used accelerometry to detect associations between intensity levels and related activity patterns with multimorbidity and disability. Moreover, the proportion of people meeting the physical activity recommendations for older people was assessed. Methods Physical activity was measured in 168 subjects (78 males; 65–89 years of age), using triaxial GT3X accelerometers for ten consecutive days. The associations between physical activity parameters and multimorbidity or disability was examined using multiple logistic regression models, which were adjusted for gender, age, education, smoking, alcohol consumption, lung function, nutrition and multimorbidity or disability. Results 35.7% of the participants met the physical activity recommendations of at least 150 minutes of moderate to vigorous activity per week. Only 11.9% reached these 150 minutes, when only bouts of at least 10 minutes were counted. Differences in moderate to vigorous activity between people with and without multimorbidity or disability were more obvious when shorter bouts instead of only longer bouts were included. Univariate analyses showed an inverse relationship between physical activity and multimorbidity or disability for light and moderate to vigorous physical activity. A higher proportion of long activity bouts spent sedentarily was associated with higher risk for multimorbidity, whereas a high proportion of long bouts in light activity seemed to prevent disability. After adjustment for covariates, there were no significant associations, anymore. Conclusions The accumulated time in moderate to vigorous physical activity seems to have a stronger relationship with health and functioning when shorter activity bouts and not only longer bouts were counted. We could not detect an association of the intensity

  11. Activation of platelet-activating factor receptor in SZ95 sebocytes results in inflammatory cytokine and prostaglandin E2 production.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Qiwei; Seltmann, Holger; Zouboulis, Christos C; Travers, Jeffrey B

    2006-10-01

    Platelet-activating factor (PAF) is a group of phosphocholines with various biological effects mediated by the PAF receptor (PAF-R). Activation of the epidermal PAF-R induces the expression of inflammatory mediators, including cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) and prostaglandin E(2) (PGE(2)). The upregulation of COX-2 expression has been shown to be involved in sebocyte proliferation, sebaceous gland inflammation and carcinogenesis. The present study was designed to investigate whether PAF-R activation could induce the expression of COX-2 and production of PGE(2), as well as secretion of the inflammatory cytokine, interleukin-8 (IL-8), in the immortalized sebaceous gland cell line SZ95. Using calcium mobilization studies, we first confirmed that PAF can signal through PAF-R in SZ95 sebocytes. We then found that the production of IL-8 was induced following treatment with PAF-R agonist, however blocked by a specific PAF-R antagonist. Induction of COX-2 expression and increased PGE(2) production were observed in SZ95 sebocytes after PAF-R activation. Finally, it was demonstrated that the production of PGE(2), induced by PAF-R activation and mediated by COX-2 expression, was blocked following PAF-R antagonism in SZ95 sebocytes. These studies suggest that SZ95 sebocytes express functional PAF-Rs and PAF-Rs are involved in regulating the expression of inflammatory mediators, including COX-2, PGE(2) and IL-8.

  12. Do Sedentary Older Adults Benefit from Community-Based Exercise? Results from the Active Start Program

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Yan, Tingjian; Wilber, Kathleen H.; Aguirre, Rosa; Trejo, Laura

    2009-01-01

    Purpose: This study assessed the effectiveness of Active Start, a community-based behavior change and fitness program, designed to promote physical activity among sedentary community-dwelling older adults. Design and Methods: A quasi-experimental design was used. Data were analyzed using a within-group pretest-post-test design to calculate changes…

  13. Exergame Apps and Physical Activity: The Results of the ZOMBIE Trial

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cowdery, Joan; Majeske, Paul; Frank, Rebecca; Brown, Devin

    2015-01-01

    Background: Although there are thousands of health and fitness smartphone apps currently available, little research exists regarding the effects of mobile app technology on physical activity behavior. Purpose: The purpose of this study was to test whether Exergame smartphone applications increase physical activity levels. Methods: This was a…

  14. Cortical Activations during a Computer-Based Fraction Learning Game: Preliminary Results from a Pilot Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Baker, Joseph M.; Martin, Taylor; Aghababyan, Ani; Armaghanyan, Armen; Gillam, Ronald

    2015-01-01

    Advances in educational neuroscience have made it possible for researchers to conduct studies that observe concurrent behavioral (i.e., task performance) and neural (i.e., brain activation) responses to naturalistic educational activities. Such studies are important because they help educators, clinicians, and researchers to better understand the…

  15. [Physical and sporting activity among adults in Germany. Results from the "German Health Update 2009" survey].

    PubMed

    Lampert, T; Mensink, G B M; Müters, S

    2012-01-01

    The study analyses the distribution of physical and sporting activity among the adult population in Germany. The data came from the "German Health Update 2009" survey, which is based on 21,262 telephone interviews conducted by the Robert Koch Institute between July 2008 and June 2009. The study shows that 56% of men aged 18 and over and 38% of women in the same age group engaged in physical activity with an intensity that made them sweat or be out of breath for at least 2.5 h/week. In addition, 64% of both men and women stated that they had actively engaged in sporting activities over the previous 3 months. Comparing 1998 and 2003, participation in sport was observed to have increased among men and women in all age groups over time. Furthermore, socio-economic differences were observed, indicating lower physical activity among higher-status groups and lower sporting activity among lower-status groups. Measures to promote physical activity and sport prove to be especially necessary for people who are not physically active (19% of men and 26% of women) or who do not engage in sport at all (36% of both men and women).

  16. Early results of the Soil Moisture Active Passive Validation Experiment (SMAPVEX15)

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    In August of 2015, the Soil Moisture Active Passive Validation Experiment (SMAPVEX15) was conducted to provide a high resolution soil moisture dataset for the calibration/validation of the Soil Moisture Active Passive Mission (SMAP). The Upper San Pedro River Basin and the USDA-ARS Walnut Gulch LTAR...

  17. Broad Consent For Research With Biological Samples: Workshop Conclusions

    PubMed Central

    Grady, Christine; Eckstein, Lisa; Berkman, Ben; Brock, Dan; Cook-Deegan, Robert; Fullerton, Stephanie M.; Greely, Hank; Hansson, Mats G.; Hull, Sara; Kim, Scott; Lo, Bernie; Pentz, Rebecca; Rodriguez, Laura; Weil, Carol; Wilfond, Benjamin S.; Wendler, David

    2016-01-01

    Different types of consent are used to obtain human biospecimens for future research. This variation has resulted in confusion regarding what research is permitted, inadvertent constraints on future research, and research proceeding without consent. The NIH Clinical Center’s Department of Bioethics held a workshop to consider the ethical acceptability of addressing these concerns by using broad consent for future research on stored biospecimens. Multiple bioethics scholars, who have written on these issues, discussed the reasons for consent, the range of consent strategies, gaps in our understanding, and concluded with a proposal for broad initial consent coupled with oversight and, when feasible, ongoing provision of information to donors. The manuscript describes areas of agreement as well as areas that need more research and dialogue. Given recent proposed changes to the Common Rule, and new guidance regarding storing and sharing data and samples, this is an important and timely topic. PMID:26305750

  18. Coffee, Alcohol, Smoking, Physical Activity and QT Interval Duration: Results from the Third National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Yiyi; Post, Wendy S.; Dalal, Darshan; Blasco-Colmenares, Elena; Tomaselli, Gordon F.; Guallar, Eliseo

    2011-01-01

    Background Abnormalities in the electrocardiographic QT interval duration have been associated with an increased risk of ventricular arrhythmias and sudden cardiac death. However, there is substantial uncertainty about the effect of modifiable factors such as coffee intake, cigarette smoking, alcohol consumption, and physical activity on QT interval duration. Methods We studied 7795 men and women from the Third National Health and Nutrition Survey (NHANES III, 1988–1994). Baseline QT interval was measured from the standard 12-lead electrocardiogram. Coffee and tea intake, alcohol consumption, leisure-time physical activities over the past month, and lifetime smoking habits were determined using validated questionnaires during the home interview. Results In the fully adjusted model, the average differences in QT interval comparing participants drinking ≥6 cups/day to those who did not drink any were −1.2 ms (95% CI −4.4 to 2.0) for coffee, and −2.0 ms (−11.2 to 7.3) for tea, respectively. The average differences in QT interval duration comparing current to never smokers was 1.2 ms (−0.6 to 2.9) while the average difference in QT interval duration comparing participants drinking ≥7 drinks/week to non-drinkers was 1.8 ms (−0.5 to 4.0). The age, race/ethnicity, and RR-interval adjusted differences in average QT interval duration comparing men with binge drinking episodes to non-drinkers or drinkers without binge drinking were 2.8 ms (0.4 to 5.3) and 4.0 ms (1.6 to 6.4), respectively. The corresponding differences in women were 1.1 (−2.9 to 5.2) and 1.7 ms (−2.3 to 5.7). Finally, the average differences in QT interval comparing the highest vs. the lowest categories of total physical activity was −0.8 ms (−3.0 to 1.4). Conclusion Binge drinking was associated with longer QT interval in men but not in women. QT interval duration was not associated with other modifiable factors including coffee and tea intake, smoking, and physical activity. PMID

  19. P15 - Reduced Physical Activity Correlates with Osteopenic or Osteoporotic Status in Postmenopausal Women: Preliminary Results from the Prof Project

    PubMed Central

    Piscitelli, P.; Coli, G.; Argentiero, A.; Neglia, C.; Chitano, G.; Paladini, D.; Mundi, S.; Paladini, L.; Greco, M.; Girasoli, C.; Gianicolo, M. E.; Pantile, V.; Argentiero, D.; De Padova, G.; Pansa, L.; Nibio, L.; Di Giuseppe, P.; Minosi, A.; Cirasino, L.; Laselva, G.; Scialpi, M.; Benvenuto, M.; D’Angela, D.; Brandi, M. L.; Distante, A.

    2010-01-01

    Aims: Italy has a considerable yearly incidence of osteoporotic fractures: about 300,000. In this context, preventive strategies are based mainly on early identification of people at higher risk of fractures and of clinical risk factors. Within the PROF (Prevention of Osteoporotic Fractures) project, i.e. a synergic effort of researchers and clinicians aimed at preventing osteoporotic fractures in Southern Apulia (Salento), a region with an increasing number of elderly people, we investigated the correlation between reduced physical activity and osteopenic or osteoporotic status in postmenopausal women. Methods: During the years 2009–2010, 5665 postmenopausal women (mean age 62 years, range 39 to 86) underwent quantitative bone ultrasound (QUS) measurement at the heel and phalanx. Demographic and anamnestic data were recorded for all the patients, including BMI, nutrition, menopause, physical activity, previous fractures, familial fragility fractures. Three demineralisation categories were identified a priori: a) Demineralisation, when any T-score <−1.0 SD was observed; b) Severe demineralisation, whenever a T-score <−2.0 was observed, corresponding to a higher risk of fracture; c) Osteoporosis, whenever a T-score <−2.5±0.2 (for the heel) or T-score <−3.2±0.2 (for the phalanx) was observed. Descriptive statistical analyses were performed in order to assess the correlation between low physical activity (patients declaring themselves to be completely sedentary) and osteopenic or osteoporotic status. Results: Of the 5665 women, demineralisation was observed in 4487 patients (79%), corresponding to severe osteopenia or osteoporotic status in 2823 women (50% of all the examined subjects) and frank osteoporosis in 846 patients (15%). In total, of the 1255 women with a clinical history of reduced physical activity, 1058 (84.3%) presented demineralisation corresponding at least to an osteopenic status. In addition, demineralisation typical of severe osteopenia

  20. IFNAR signaling directly modulates T lymphocyte activity, resulting in milder experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis development

    PubMed Central

    Kavrochorianou, Nadia; Evangelidou, Maria; Markogiannaki, Melina; Tovey, Michael; Thyphronitis, George; Haralambous, Sylva

    2016-01-01

    Although interferon-β is used as first-line therapy for multiple sclerosis, the cell type-specific activity of type I interferons in multiple sclerosis and its animal model, experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis, remains obscure. In this study, we have elucidated the in vivo immunomodulatory role of type I interferon signaling in T cells during experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis by use of a novel transgenic mouse, carrying a cd2–ifnar1 transgene on a interferon-α/β receptor 1 null genetic background, thus allowing expression of the interferon-α/β receptor 1 and hence, a functional type I interferon receptor exclusively on T cells. These transgenic mice exhibited milder experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis with reduced T cell infiltration, demyelination, and axonal damage in the central nervous system. It is noteworthy that interferon-β administration in transgenic mice generated a more pronounced, protective effect against experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis compared with untreated littermates. In vivo studies demonstrated that before experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis onset, endogenous type I interferon receptor signaling in T cells led to impaired T-helper 17 responses, with a reduced fraction of CCR6+ CD4+ T cells in the periphery. At the acute phase, an increased proportion of interleukin-10- and interferon-γ-producing CD4+ T cells was detected in the periphery of the transgenic mice, accompanied by up-regulation of the interferon-γ-induced gene Irgm1 in peripheral T cells. Together, these results reveal a hitherto unknown T cell-associated protective role of type I interferon in experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis that may provide valuable clues for designing novel therapeutic strategies for multiple sclerosis. PMID:26232452

  1. Muscle metaboreflex activation during dynamic exercise evokes epinephrine release resulting in β2-mediated vasodilation.

    PubMed

    Kaur, Jasdeep; Spranger, Marty D; Hammond, Robert L; Krishnan, Abhinav C; Alvarez, Alberto; Augustyniak, Robert A; O'Leary, Donal S

    2015-03-01

    Muscle metaboreflex-induced increases in mean arterial pressure (MAP) during submaximal dynamic exercise are mediated principally by increases in cardiac output. To what extent, if any, the peripheral vasculature contributes to this rise in MAP is debatable. In several studies, we observed that in response to muscle metaboreflex activation (MMA; induced by partial hindlimb ischemia) a small but significant increase in vascular conductance occurred within the nonischemic areas (calculated as cardiac output minus hindlimb blood flow and termed nonischemic vascular conductance; NIVC). We hypothesized that these increases in NIVC may stem from a metaboreflex-induced release of epinephrine, resulting in β2-mediated dilation. We measured NIVC and arterial plasma epinephrine levels in chronically instrumented dogs during rest, mild exercise (3.2 km/h), and MMA before and after β-blockade (propranolol; 2 mg/kg), α1-blockade (prazosin; 50 μg/kg), and α1 + β-blockade. Both epinephrine and NIVC increased significantly from exercise to MMA: 81.9 ± 18.6 to 141.3 ± 22.8 pg/ml and 33.8 ± 1.5 to 37.6 ± 1.6 ml·min(-1)·mmHg(-1), respectively. These metaboreflex-induced increases in NIVC were abolished after β-blockade (27.6 ± 1.8 to 27.5 ± 1.7 ml·min(-1)·mmHg(-1)) and potentiated after α1-blockade (36.6 ± 2.0 to 49.7 ± 2.9 ml·min(-1)·mmHg(-1)), while α1 + β-blockade also abolished any vasodilation (33.7 ± 2.9 to 30.4 ± 1.9 ml·min(-1)·mmHg(-1)). We conclude that MMA during mild dynamic exercise induces epinephrine release causing β2-mediated vasodilation.

  2. Framework for Human-Automation Collaboration: Conclusions from Four Studies

    SciTech Connect

    Johanna Oxstrand; Katya L. Le Blanc; John O'Hara; Jeffrey C. Joe; April M. Whaley; Heather Medema

    2013-11-01

    The Human Automation Collaboration (HAC) research project is investigating how advanced technologies that are planned for Advanced Small Modular Reactors (AdvSMR) will affect the performance and the reliability of the plant from a human factors and human performance perspective. The HAC research effort investigates the consequences of allocating functions between the operators and automated systems. More specifically, the research team is addressing how to best design the collaboration between the operators and the automated systems in a manner that has the greatest positive impact on overall plant performance and reliability. Oxstrand et al. (2013 - March) describes the efforts conducted by the researchers to identify the research needs for HAC. The research team reviewed the literature on HAC, developed a model of HAC, and identified gaps in the existing knowledge of human-automation collaboration. As described in Oxstrand et al. (2013 – June), the team then prioritized the research topics identified based on the specific needs in the context of AdvSMR. The prioritization was based on two sources of input: 1) The preliminary functions and tasks, and 2) The model of HAC. As a result, three analytical studies were planned and conduced; 1) Models of Teamwork, 2) Standardized HAC Performance Measurement Battery, and 3) Initiators and Triggering Conditions for Adaptive Automation. Additionally, one field study was also conducted at Idaho Falls Power.

  3. Recent Simulation Conclusions for Damped-Oscillation Control

    SciTech Connect

    Kress, R.L.

    2001-02-19

    When suspended payloads are moved with an overhead crane, pendulum like oscillations are naturally introduced. This presents a problem any time a crane is used, especially when expensive and/or delicate objects are moved, when moving in a cluttered and/or hazardous environment, and when objects are to be placed in tight locations. For example, one nuclear waste-handling operation examined by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) is the transportation of heavy objects such as waste storage casks or barrels from one location to another through cluttered process facility environments or storage facilities. Typically, an object is lifted by a crane hook on the end of a cable, creating a pendulum that is free to swing during transit. This swinging motion makes remote positioning of casks or barrels difficult to control precisely and is potentially destructive to facility equipment and to other storage containers. Typically, a crane operator moves objects slowly to minimize induced swinging and allow time for oscillations to dampen, maintaining safety but greatly decreasing the efficiency of operations. Using damped-oscillation control algorithms is one approach to solving this problem. This paper summarizes recent simulation results in damped-oscillation-type control algorithms. It also discusses practical implementation issues including control algorithm robustness to payload length changes, hardware requirements for implementation of the control algorithms, and system limits on Coulomb friction.

  4. Conclusive evidence for panmixia in the American eel.

    PubMed

    Pujolar, Jose M

    2013-04-01

    Eels are unique species in the biological world. The two North Atlantic eel species, the American eel (Anguilla rostrata) and the European eel (A. anguilla), occupy a broad range of habitats from the Caribbean to Greenland in the western Atlantic and from Morocco to Iceland in the eastern Atlantic, respectively. North Atlantic eels have a catadromous life cycle, spawning only in the Sargasso Sea and spending the majority of their lives in continental (fresh, brackish and coastal) waters. Despite such a wide distribution range, North Atlantic eels have been regarded as a textbook example of panmictic species. In contrast with the large amount of population genetic studies testing the panmixia hypothesis in the European eel, a relatively modest effort has been given to study the population structure of the American eel. In this issue of Molecular Ecology, C^ote et al. (2013) present the most comprehensive American eel data set to date, which includes samples of different life stages obtained throughout all its distribution range in North America. Results show a total lack of genetic differentiation among samples and provide decisive evidence for panmixia in the American eel.

  5. Waste dislodging and conveyance testing summary and conclusions to date

    SciTech Connect

    Rinker, M.W.; Hatchell, B.K.; Mullen, O.D.

    1994-09-01

    This document summarizes recent work performed by the Waste Dislodging and Conveyance technology development program to provide assistance with the retrieval of wastes from the Hanford single-shell tanks (SSTs). This work is sponsored by the Underground Storage Tank-Integrated Demonstration (UST-ID) Office with the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Technology Development. A baseline technology of high-pressure water-jet dislodging and pneumatic conveyance integrated as a scarifier is proposed as a means of retrieval. The tests and studies described were performed to demonstrate that at least one robust technology exists that could be effectively used with low water-addition arm-based systems. These results are preliminary and do not represent an optimized baseline. The Waste Dislodging and Conveyance work thus far has demonstrated that waterjet mobilization and air conveyance can mobilize and convey SST waste simulants at the target rates while operating within the space envelope and the dynamic loading constraints of deployment devices. The recommended technologies are well proven in industrial applications and are quite robust, yet lightweight and relatively benign to the retrieval environment. The baseline approach has versatility to continuously dislodge and convey a broad range of waste forms, from hard wastes to soft sludge wastes. The approach also has the major advantage of being noncontact with the waste surface under normal operation.

  6. Baseline Results from Hawaii's Nā Mikiniiki Project: A Physical Activity Intervention Tailored to Multiethnic Postpartum Women

    PubMed Central

    Albright, Cheryl L.; Steffen, Alana D.; Novotny, Rachel; Nigg, Claudio R.; Wilkens, Lynne R.; Saiki, Kara; Yamada, Paulette; Hedemark, Brooke; Maddock, Jason E.; Dunn, Andrea L.; Brown, Wendy J.

    2012-01-01

    During the postpartum period, ethnic minority women have higher rates of inactivity/under-activity than white women. The Nā Mikimiki (“the active ones”) Project is designed to increase moderate-to-vigorous physical activity over 18 months among multiethnic women with infants 2–12 months old. The study was designed to test, via a randomized controlled trial, the effectiveness of a tailored telephone counseling of moderate-to-vigorous physical activity intervention compared to a print/website materials-only condition. Healthy, underactive women (mean age = 32 ± 5.6 years) with a baby (mean age = 5.7 ± 2.8 months) were enrolled from 2008–2009 (N = 278). Of the total sample, 84% were ethnic minority women, predominantly Asian–American and Native Hawaiian. Mean self-reported baseline level of moderate-to-vigorous physical activity was 40 minutes/week with no significant differences by study condition, ethnicity, infant's age, maternal body mass index, or maternal employment. Women had high scores on perceived benefits, self-efficacy, and environmental support for exercise but low scores on social support for exercise. This multiethnic sample's demographic and psychosocial characteristics and their perceived barriers to exercise were comparable to previous physical activity studies conducted largely with white postpartum women. The Nā Mikimiki Project's innovative tailored technology-based intervention and unique population are significant contributions to the literature on moderate-to-vigorous physical activity in postpartum women. PMID:22533900

  7. The relationship between hope and patient activation in consumers with schizophrenia: Results from longitudinal analyses.

    PubMed

    Oles, Sylwia K; Fukui, Sadaaki; Rand, Kevin L; Salyers, Michelle P

    2015-08-30

    Hope (goal-directed thinking) and patient activation (knowledge and skills to manage one's illness) are both important in managing chronic conditions like schizophrenia. The relationship between hope and patient activation has not been clearly defined. However, hope may be viewed as a foundational, motivating factor that can lead to greater involvement in care and feelings of efficacy. The purpose of the present study was to understand the prospective relationship between hope and patient activation in a sample of adults with schizophrenia (N=118). This study was a secondary data analysis from a study on Illness Management and Recovery (IMR) - a curriculum-based approach to schizophrenia self-management. Data were collected at baseline (prior to any intervention), and at 9 and 18-month follow-up. As predicted, hope and patient activation were significantly related with each other, showing large positive concurrent correlations. Demographics and background characteristics were not significantly related to patient activation or hope. Longitudinal analyses found no specific directional effect, yet suggested that hope and patient activation mutually influence each other over time. Our findings add flexibility in designing recovery-based interventions - fostering hope may not be a pre-requisite for activating consumers to be more involved in their own care.

  8. Artificial gravity results in changes in frontal lobe activity measured by EEG tomography.

    PubMed

    Schneider, Stefan; Guardiera, Simon; Abel, Thomas; Carnahan, Heather; Strüder, Heiko K

    2009-08-18

    Mental and perceptual motor performance has been reported to be impaired during hypergravity. Current research has focused on physiological explanations (e.g., deficient proprioceptive feedback) and neglected psycho-physiological effects (e.g., arousal, emotion, cognitive engagement). This study aims at localising changes in brain cortical activity by using a distributed source localisation algorithm (sLORETA) to model the probable neural generators of changes in scalp voltage under hypergravity conditions. Brain cortical activity was measured by EEG before, during and after exposure to three time terrestrial gravity (3G(z)) on ten naive subjects aged 29+/-5 years. Changes in EEG activity were localised using standardised low resolution brain electromagnetic tomography (sLORETA) for alpha-1 [7.5-10 Hz], alpha-2 [10-12.5 Hz], beta-1 [12.5-18 Hz], beta-2 [18-35 Hz] and gamma [35-45 Hz] activities. Individual concentrations of blood cortisol and perceived psychological strain were related to changes in cortical current density. An increase in alpha-1 activity occurred in the right inferior frontal lobe, beta-1 activity was found to be increased in the limbic lobe during 3G(z). Post acceleration alpha-2 and beta-1 activities declined in frontal, temporal and limbic lobes. Changes in blood cortisol concentrations and perceived strain showed a clear relationship to changes in right sided frontal alpha-1 activity. We conclude that frontal activity during hypergravity may serve as a marker of anxiety. This puts a new light on the debate as to whether cognitive and sensorimotor impairments are attributable to primary physiological effects or secondary psychological effects of a hypergravity environment.

  9. Workshop observations, conclusions, and recommendations for moving forward

    SciTech Connect

    1995-12-31

    Bangkok currently has enormous numbers of motorised vehicles. The number of motor vehicles registered in Bangkok in 1993 was about 2.6 million of which over 1 million were cars and around 1.1 million were motorcycles. The vehicle population is noticeably increasing at about 12% over the previous year, despite the traffic congestion which is nearly at gridlock. Overall average traffic speed in the Bangkok metropolitan area is around 10 km/h. However, during peak hours on some main roads in the central business area, the crawl rate is at 1-2 km/h, or only half walking pace. There are, however, several circumstances to be addressed before Bangkok can begin to overcome its air quality and congestion problems. The first is that many of the city`s transport planners that design transport projects, and the policymakers with investment authority appear to be caught in the same conventional transport planning paradigm as many other industrializing and industrialized countries. That paradigm, pioneered in the United States and exported to much of the world, defines the problems as a shortage of road space to meet demand for, private, vehicular mobility. The investment focus is almost exclusively on the construction of large road-based infrastructure to machines instead of people, while de-emphasizing other forms of transport such as rail, water, and non-motorized transport - even if they are a less expensive investment that can meet demand. The predominance of this paradigm results in a persistent myth held by many of Bangkok`s policymakers, transport and urban planners, financiers, and citizens. The myth is that the city does not have enough kilometers of roadways per person, and should focus on road and highway investment in order to solve their air quality and congestion problems.

  10. Studies on free radical scavenging activity in Chinese seaweeds part I. Screening results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yan, Xiao-Jun; Fang, Guo-Ming; Lou, Qing-Xiang

    1999-09-01

    Antioxidants have attracted the attention of researchers due to their beneficial effects as free radical scavengers. Application of a stable free radical named 1, 1-diphenyl-2-picrylhydrazyl(DPPH) to screen the free radical scavenging activity in 27 species of Chinese seaweed showed that 15 of them had significant activity in at least one of the organic solvent extracts. The most interesting seaweed species were Gelidium amansii, Gloiosiphonia capillaris, Polysiphonia urceolata, Sargassum kjellmanianum, Desmarestia viridis, and Rhodomela teres.

  11. Fhl2 deficiency results in osteopenia due to decreased activity of osteoblasts

    PubMed Central

    Günther, Thomas; Poli, Cecilia; Müller, Judith M; Catala-Lehnen, Philip; Schinke, Thorsten; Yin, Na; Vomstein, Sandra; Amling, Michael; Schüle, Roland

    2005-01-01

    Osteoporosis is one of the major health problems today, yet little is known about the loss of bone mass caused by reduced activity of the bone-forming osteoblasts. Here we show that mice deficient for the transcriptional cofactor four and a half LIM domains 2 (Fhl2) exhibit a dramatic decrease of bone mass in both genders. Osteopenia is caused by a reduced bone formation rate that is solely due to the diminished activity of Fhl2-deficient osteoblasts, while their number remains unchanged. The number and activity of the bone-resorbing cells, the osteoclasts, is not altered. Enforced expression of Fhl2 in differentiated osteoblasts boosts mineralization in cell culture and, importantly, enhances bone formation in transgenic animals. Fhl2 increases the transcriptional activity of runt-related transcription factor 2 (Runx2), a key regulator of osteoblast function, and both proteins interact in vitro and in vivo. In summary, we present Fhl2-deficient mice as a unique model for osteopenia due to decreased osteoblast activity. Our data offer a novel concept to fight osteoporosis by modulating the anabolic activity of osteoblasts via Fhl2. PMID:16079911

  12. Increased KGF expression promotes fibroblast activation in a double paracrine manner resulting in cutaneous fibrosis.

    PubMed

    Canady, Johanna; Arndt, Stephanie; Karrer, Sigrid; Bosserhoff, Anja K

    2013-03-01

    Fibrotic disorders of the skin share the characteristic features of increased production and deposition of extracellular matrix components by activated fibroblasts. Their clinical course ranges from benign with localized cutaneous involvement to a systemic, life-threatening disease. The molecular cause for fibroblast activation remains unknown, yet epithelial-mesenchymal interactions draw mounting attention in the research field of fibrogenesis. We examined keratinocyte growth factor (KGF), a crucial molecule in fibroblast-keratinocyte cross talk, exemplarily in keloid and scleroderma, and found its expression to be increased in disease-derived fibroblasts and tissues compared with healthy controls. This overexpression induces fibroblast activation through a double paracrine mode of action. Upon KGF stimulation, the keratinocytes produced and secreted OSM (oncostatin M). Fibroblasts were in turn activated by OSM reacting with the increased expression of collagen type I-α1, fibroblast activation protein, and enhanced migration. The observed increase in collagen expression and fibroblast migration can be traced back to OSM-regulated STAT3 phosphorylation, leading to enhanced urokinase plasminogen activator expression. Hence, we propose a causative loop in the pathogenesis of fibrosing disorders of the skin mediated by the overexpression of KGF in mesenchymal cells.

  13. Recent Reanalysis Activities at ECMWF: Results from ERA-20C and Plans for ERA5

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dragani, R.; Hersbach, H.; Poli, P.; Pebeuy, C.; Hirahara, S.; Simmons, A.; Dee, D.

    2015-12-01

    This presentation will provide an overview of the most recent reanalysis activities performed at the European Centre for Medium-Range Weather Forecasts (ECMWF). A pilot reanalysis of the 20th-century (ERA-20C) has recently been completed. Funded through the European FP7 collaborative project ERA-CLIM, ERA-20C is part of a suite of experiments that also includes a model-only integration (ERA-20CM) and a land-surface reanalysis (ERA-20CL). Its data assimilation system is constrained by only surface observations obtained from ISPD (3.2.6) and ICOADS (2.5.1). Surface boundary conditions are provided by the Hadley Centre (HadISST2.1.0.0) and radiative forcing follows CMIP5 recommended data sets. First-guess uncertainty estimates are based on a 10-member ensemble of Data Assimilations, ERA-20C ensemble, run prior to ERA-20C using ten SST and sea-ice realizations from the Hadley Centre. In November 2014, the European Commission entrusted ECMWF to run on its behalf the Copernicus Climate Change Service (C3S) aiming at producing quality-assured information about the past, current and future states of the climate at both European and global scales. Reanalysis will be one of the main components of the C3S portfolio and the first one to be produced is a global modern era reanalysis (ERA5) covering the period from 1979 onwards. Based on a recent version of the ECMWF data assimilation system, ERA5 will replace the widely used ERA-Interim dataset. This new production will benefit from a much improved model, and better characterized and exploited observations compared to its predecessor. The first part of the presentation will focus on the ERA-20C production, provide an overview of its main characteristics and discuss some of the key results from its assessment. The second part of the talk will give an overview of ERA5, and briefly discuss some of its challenges.

  14. Development of Visualizations and Loggable Activities for the Geosciences. Results from Recent TUES Sponsored Projects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    De Paor, D. G.; Bailey, J. E.; Whitmeyer, S. J.

    2012-12-01

    Our TUES research centers on the role of digital data, visualizations, animations, and simulations in undergraduate geoscience education. Digital hardware (smartphones, tablets, GPSs, GigaPan robotic camera mounts, etc.) are revolutionizing field data collection. Software products (GIS, 3-D scanning and modeling programs, virtual globes, etc.) have truly transformed the way geoscientists teach, learn, and do research. Whilst Google-Earth-style visualizations are famously user-friend for the person browsing, they can be notoriously unfriendly for the content creator. Therefore, we developed tools to help educators create and share visualizations as easily as if posting on Facebook. Anyone whoIf you wish to display geological cross sections on Google Earth, go to digitalplanet.org, upload image files, position them on a line of section, and share with the world through our KMZ hosting service. Other tools facilitate screen overlay and 3-D map symbol generation. We advocate use of such technology to enable undergraduate students to 'publish' their first mapping efforts even while they are working in the field. A second outcome of our TUES projects merges Second-Life-style interaction with Google Earth. We created games in which students act as first responders for natural hazard mitigation, prospectors for natural resource explorations, and structural geologist for map-making. Students are represented by avatars and collaborate by exchange of text messages - the natural mode of communication for the current generation. Teachers view logs showing student movements as well as transcripts of text messages and can scaffold student learning and geofence students to prevent wandering. Early results of in-class testing show positive learning outcomes. The third aspect of our program emphasizes dissemination. Experience shows that great effort is required to overcome activation energy and ensure adoption of new technology into the curriculum. We organized a GSA Penrose

  15. Results from an Investigation into Extra-Vehicular Activity (EVA) Training Related Shoulder Injuries

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnson, Brian J.; Williams, David R.

    2004-01-01

    The number and complexity of extravehicular activities (EVAs) required for the completion and maintenance of the International Space Station (ISS) is unprecedented. The training required to successfully complete this magnitude of space walks presents a real risk of overuse musculoskeletal injuries to the EVA crew population. There was mounting evidence raised by crewmembers, trainers, and physicians at the Johnson Space Center (JSC) between 1999 and 2002 that suggested a link between training in the Neutral - Buoyancy Lab (NBL) and the several reported cases of shoulder injuries. The short- and long-term health consequences of shoulder injury to astronauts in training as well as the potential mission impact associated with surgical intervention to assigned EVA crew point to this as a critical problem that must be mitigated. Thus, a multi-directorate tiger team was formed in December of 2002 led by the EVA Office and Astronaut Office at the JSC. The primary objectives of this Tiger Team were to evaluate the prevalence of these injuries and substantiate the relationship to training in the NBL with the crew person operating in the EVA Mobility Unit (EMU). Between December 2002 and June of 2003 the team collected data, surveyed crewmembers, consulted with a variety of physicians, and performed tests. The results of this effort were combined with the vast knowledge and experience of the Tiger Team members to formulate several findings and over fifty recommendations. This paper summarizes those findings and recommendations as well as the process by which these were determined. The Tiger Team concluded that training in the NBL was directly linked to several major and minor shoulder injuries that had occurred. With the assistance of JSC flight surgeons, outside consultants, and the lead crewmember/physician on the team, the mechanisms of injury were determined. These mechanisms were then linked to specific aspects of the hardware design, operational techniques, and the

  16. Sinuosity change of the Po River near Cremona (Northern Italy) - a result of neotectonic activity?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Petrovszki, Judit; Timár, Gábor

    2010-05-01

    In the map sheets of the Second Military Survey of the Habsburg Empire, Lombardia, Parma, Modena and Venice also can be seen (Timár et al., 2006). This area was surveyed between 1818 and 1829. In these map sheets, we can also follow the river Po from Vaccarizza to the delta. This river reach is about 350 km long. This river reach was digitized and sinuosity values were calculated with different window sizes, and displayed in a spectrum-like diagram (sinuosity spectra; after van Balen et al., 2008). At Cremona, a significante sinuosity change were identified. The sinuosity increasing, and we have high sinuosity values. In the summarizing geological map of Italy (Compagnoni and Calluzzo, 2004), at this place, a tectonic line was identified. So probably this fault line invokes the sinuosity change on the river. The vertical movements indicated on the maps are just the opposite like they would be according to the flume experiments of Ouchi (1985). In the case of the Po River at Cremona, the decrease of the channel slope results higher sinuosity. The reason is that the rate of the slope and water discharge is higher than it is required by the self-organized meandering and the river parameters fell to the range of the unorganized meandering (cf. Timár, 2003). Another possible explanation could be that the northern tributary, the Adda River has significant sediment load that lowers the sinuosity of the trunk river at the confluence. Compagnoni, B., Galluzzo, F. (eds., 2004): Geological Map of Italy. Agenzia per la Protezione dell'Ambiente per I Servizi Tecnici - Dipartimento Difesa del Suolo, Servizio Geologico d'Italia, Rome-Florence-Genoa. Map, scale=1:1250000, especially printed for the 32nd International Geological Congress. Ouchi, S. (1985): Response of alluvial rivers to slow active tectonic movement. Geol. Soc. Am. Bull. 96: 504-515. Timár, G. (2003): Controls on channel sinuosity changes: a case study of the Tisza River, the Great Hungarian Plain. Quaternary

  17. Holocene glacier activity on Kerguelen Island: preliminary results from a novel proglacial lake sediment record

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Støren, Eivind; Bakke, Jostein; Arnaud, Fabien; Poulenard, Jérôme; Fanget, Bernard; Malet, Emmanuel; Sabatier, Pierre

    2016-04-01

    The Polar-regions are changing rapidly as greenhouse warming is continuing with huge impact on e.g. sea ice extent and snow cover. This change triggers teleconnections to low latitude areas challenging societies and human activity. We have, however, very little quantitative information of past climate in the Polar-regions that can be used to evaluate the potential responses and the response patterns to forcing changes and changes in boundary conditions. Whatever anthropogenic changes may occur in the future, they will be superimposed on, and interact with, natural climate variations due to all the forcing we are aware of. This means we need to better document past climate/environmental variability of the Polar-regions. Especially in the Southern Ocean there are few time series recording past climate due to few suitable land areas and the few Sub-Antarctic Islands is remote and has cumbersome logistics. Continuous terrestrial records from this region are therefore urgently needed for constraining future scenarios from earth system models. Glaciers and ice caps are still ubiquitous in the Polar-regions, although they are rapidly shrinking due to the on-going warming. The continuous sedimentary records produced by glaciers, which are stored in downstream lakes, represent supreme archives of past variability wherefrom quantitative information of key climate system components can be extracted. Kerguelen Island is located within the Antarctic Circumpolar Current and the Southern Westerly wind belt and contains several glaciers and smaller ice caps. Terrestrial archives recording past history of the glaciers at Kerguelen thus have a unique potential to record past changes in oceanic and atmospheric circulation patterns from southern mid-latitudes. Here we present preliminary results from the first distal glacier-fed lake that is sampled from Kerguelen Island. A 2.8 m long sediment core was obtained from Lac Guynemer (121masl.) located at the Peninsule Loranchet at the

  18. Loss of putzig Activity Results in Apoptosis during Wing Imaginal Development in Drosophila

    PubMed Central

    Zimmermann, Mirjam; Kugler, Sabrina J.; Schulz, Adriana; Nagel, Anja C.

    2015-01-01

    The Drosophila gene putzig (pzg) encodes a nuclear protein that is an integral component of the Trf2/Dref complex involved in the transcription of proliferation-related genes. Moreover, Pzg is found in a complex together with the nucleosome remodeling factor NURF, where it promotes Notch target gene activation. Here we show that downregulation of pzg activity in the developing wing imaginal discs induces an apoptotic response, accompanied by the induction of the pro-apoptotic gene reaper, repression of Drosophila inhibitor of apoptosis protein accumulation and the activation of the caspases Drice, Caspase3 and Dcp1. As a further consequence ‘Apoptosis induced Proliferation’ (AiP) and ‘Apoptosis induced Apoptosis’ (AiA) are triggered. As expected, the activity of the stress kinase Jun N-terminal kinase (JNK), proposed to mediate both processes, is ectopically induced in response to pzg loss. In addition, the expression of the mitogen wingless (wg) but not of decapentaplegic (dpp) is observed. We present evidence that downregulation of Notch activates Dcp1 caspase and JNK signaling, however, neither induces ectopic wg nor dpp expression. In contrast, the consequences of Dref-RNAi were largely indistinguishable from pzg-RNAi with regard to apoptosis induction. Moreover, overexpression of Dref ameliorated the downregulation of pzg compatible with the notion that the two are required together to maintain cell and tissue homeostasis in Drosophila. PMID:25894556

  19. Early results of the Soil Moisture Active Passive Validation Experiment (SMAPVEX15)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cosh, M. H.; Jackson, T. J.; Colliander, A.; Goodrich, D. C.; Holifield Collins, C.; McKee, L.; Kim, S.; Yueh, S. H.

    2015-12-01

    In August of 2015, the Soil Moisture Active Passive Validation Experiment (SMAPVEX15) was conducted to provide a high resolution soil moisture dataset for the calibration/validation of the Soil Moisture Active Passive Mission (SMAP). The Upper San Pedro River Basin and the USDA-ARS Walnut Gulch LTAR Watershed provides the infrastructure for the experiment with its extensive soil moisture and soil temperature network. A total of seven aircraft flights are planned for the Passive Active L-Band Scanning instrument (PALS) to provide a high resolution soil moisture map for a variety of soil moisture conditions across the domain. Extensive surface roughness, vegetation and soil rock fraction mapping was conducted to provide a ground truth estimate of the many ancillary datasets used in the SMAP soil moisture algorithms. A review of the methodologies employed in the experiment, as well as initial findings will be discussed.

  20. Disease Mutations in Rab7 Result in Unregulated Nucleotide Exchange and Inappropriate Activation

    SciTech Connect

    B McCray; E Skordalakes; J Taylor

    2011-12-31

    Rab GTPases are molecular switches that orchestrate vesicular trafficking, maturation and fusion by cycling between an active, GTP-bound form, and an inactive, GDP-bound form. The activity cycle is coupled to GTP hydrolysis and is tightly controlled by regulatory proteins. Missense mutations of the GTPase Rab7 cause a dominantly inherited axonal degeneration known as Charcot-Marie-Tooth type 2B through an unknown mechanism. We present the 2.8 A crystal structure of GTP-bound L129F mutant Rab7 which reveals normal conformations of the effector binding regions and catalytic site, but an alteration to the nucleotide binding pocket that is predicted to alter GTP binding. Through extensive biochemical analysis, we demonstrate that disease-associated mutations in Rab7 do not lead to an intrinsic GTPase defect, but permit unregulated nucleotide exchange leading to both excessive activation and hydrolysis-independent inactivation. Consistent with augmented activity, mutant Rab7 shows significantly enhanced interaction with a subset of effector proteins. In addition, dynamic imaging demonstrates that mutant Rab7 is abnormally retained on target membranes. However, we show that the increased activation of mutant Rab7 is counterbalanced by unregulated, GTP hydrolysis-independent membrane cycling. Notably, disease mutations are able to rescue the membrane cycling of a GTPase-deficient mutant. Thus, we demonstrate that disease mutations uncouple Rab7 from the spatial and temporal control normally imposed by regulatory proteins and cause disease not by a gain of novel toxic function, but by misregulation of native Rab7 activity.

  1. The surface geometry of inherited joint and fracture trace patterns resulting from active and passive deformation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Podwysocki, M. H.; Gold, D. P.

    1974-01-01

    Hypothetical models are considered for detecting subsurface structure from the fracture or joint pattern, which may be influenced by the structure and propagated to the surface. Various patterns of an initially orthogonal fracture grid are modeled according to active and passive deformation mechanisms. In the active periclinal structure with a vertical axis, fracture frequency increased both over the dome and basin, and remained constant with decreasing depth to the structure. For passive periclinal features such as a reef or sand body, fracture frequency is determined by the arc of curvature and showed a reduction over the reefmound and increased over the basin.

  2. 10 years of cloud droplet activation data from Pallas, Northern Finland - preliminary results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kivekäs, Niku; Asmi, Eija; Brus, David; Komppula, Mika; Lihavainen, Heikki

    2016-04-01

    Activation of atmospheric aerosol particles into cloud droplets has been studied in situ at Pallas measurement station in Finnish Lapland from year 2005 to present day. The site is located on a hill top, about 300 m above the surrounding lowlands, and it is inside a cloud for 15 % of time. Here in-cloud periods are defined as periods when visibility was below 1000 m. There are two parallel Differential Mobility Particle Sizers (DMPS) at the site, measuring the number concentration and dry size distribution of atmospheric aerosol particles. One DMPS is connected to a PM2.5 inlet, the other to a total air inlet with no cut-off diameter. After each inlet the particles are dried to evaporate any water in them. This way it is possible to measure simultaneously the dry number-size-distribution of all particles, and that of particles with wet diameter smaller than 2.5 m. As the latter does not include cloud droplets, the difference between the two measurements represents the number concentration and size distribution of those particles that have activated into cloud droplets. The number concentration of particles at Pallas has a clear seasonal cycle, being highest during summer and lowest during winter. The monthly mean number concentration of particles with diameter larger than 100 nm varied from 38 cm-3 in November to 270 cm-3 in July. During in-cloud periods the monthly mean number concentration of activated particles of this same size class showed a similar pattern, varying from 23 cm-3 (November) to 110 cm-3 in April. The monthly mean D50 activation diameter (diameter at which 50 % of particles activate) varied from 85 nm (February) to 189 nm (July), showing an average 0.1 nm increase for each added particle with diameter > 100 nm. The activated fraction of particles in all sizes decreased sharply when visibility exceeded 1000 m. The highest activated fractions of particles were not observed during the periods of the thickest clouds, but during clouds with in

  3. A novel method for the automatic segmentation of activity data from a wrist worn device: Preliminary results.

    PubMed

    Amor, James D; Ahanathapillai, Vijayalakshmi; James, Christopher J

    2014-01-01

    Activity monitoring is used in a number of fields in order to assess the physical activity of the user. Applications include health and well-being, rehabilitation and enhancing independent living. Data are often gathered from multiple accelerometers and analysis focuses on multi-parametric classification. For longer term monitoring this is unsuitable and it is desirable to develop a method for the precise analysis of activity data with respect to time. This paper presents the initial results of a novel approach to this problem which is capable of segmenting activity data collected from a single accelerometer recording naturalized activity.

  4. Barriers and facilitators to participation in workplace health promotion (WHP) activities: results from a cross-sectional survey of public-sector employees in Tasmania, Australia.

    PubMed

    Kilpatrick, Michelle; Blizzard, Leigh; Sanderson, Kristy; Teale, Brook; Jose, Kim; Venn, Alison

    2017-01-19

    Issue addressed: Workplaces are promising settings for health promotion, yet employee participation in workplace health promotion (WHP) activities is often low or variable. This study explored facilitating factors and barriers associated with participation in WHP activities that formed part of a comprehensive WHP initiative run within the Tasmanian State Service (TSS) between 2009 and 2013.Methods: TSS employee (n=3228) completed surveys in 2013. Data included sociodemographic characteristics, employee-perceived availability of WHP activities, employee-reported participation in WHP activities, and facilitators and barriers to participation. Ordinal log-link regression was used in cross-sectional analyses.Results: Significant associations were found for all facilitating factors and participation. Respondents who felt their organisation placed a high priority on WHP, who believed that management supported participation or that the activities could improve their health were more likely to participate. Time- and health-related barriers were associated with participation in fewer activities. All associations were independent of age, sex, work schedule and employee-perceived availability of programs. Part-time and shift-work patterns, and location of activities were additionally identified barriers.Conclusion: Facilitating factors relating to implementation, peer and environmental support, were associated with participation in more types of activities, time- and health-related barriers were associated with less participation.So what?: Large and diverse organisations should ensure WHP efforts have manager support and adopt flexible approaches to maximise employee engagement.

  5. T-Cell Tumor Elimination as a Result of T-Cell Receptor-Mediated Activation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ashwell, Jonathan D.; Longo, Dan L.; Bridges, Sandra H.

    1987-07-01

    It has recently been shown that activation of murine T-cell hybridomas with antigen inhibits their growth in vitro. The ``suicide'' of these neoplastic T cells upon stimulation with antigen suggested the possibility that activation via the antigen-specific receptor could also inhibit the growth of neoplastic T cells in vivo. To test this, mice were subcutaneously inoculated with antigen-specific T-cell hybridomas and then treated intraperitoneally with antigen. Administration of the appropriate antigen immediately after inoculation with the T-cell hybridoma abrogated tumor formation; antigen administered after tumors had become established decreased the tumor burden and, in a substantial fraction of animals, led to long-term survival. The efficacy of antigen therapy was due to both a direct inhibitory effect on tumor growth and the induction of host immunity. These studies demonstrate the utility of cellular activation as a means of inhibiting neoplastic T-cell growth in vivo and provide a rationale for studying the use of less selective reagents that can mimic the activating properties of antigen, such as monoclonal antibodies, in the treatment of T-cell neoplasms of unknown antigen specificity.

  6. Processes, Procedures, and Methods to Control Pollution Resulting from Silvicultural Activities.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Environmental Protection Agency, Washington, DC. Office of Water Programs.

    This report presents brief documentation of silvicultural practices, both those now in use and those in stages of research and development. A majority of the text is concerned with the specific aspects of silvicultural activities which relate to nonpoint source pollution control methods. Analyzed are existing and near future pollution control…

  7. Achieving Desired Results and Improved Outcomes: Integrating Planning and Assessment throughout Learning Activities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Moore, Donald E., Jr.; Green, Joseph S.; Gallis, Harry A.

    2009-01-01

    Most physicians believe that to provide the best possible care to their patients, they must commit to continuous learning. For the most part, it appears the learning activities currently available to physicians do not provide opportunities for meaningful continuous learning. At the same time there have been increasing concerns about the quality of…

  8. Proteolytic activity alterations resulting from force-feeding in Muscovy and Pekin ducks.

    PubMed

    Awde, S; Marty-Gasset, N; Wilkesman, J; Rémignon, H

    2013-11-01

    We investigated liver protease activity in force-fed and non-force-fed ducks using zymography gels to better understand mechanisms underlying liver steatosis in palmipeds. Male Muscovy and Pekin ducks were slaughtered before and after a short period (13 d) while they were conventionally fed or force fed. The force-fed regimen contained a high level of carbohydrates and was delivered in large doses. Main hepatic proteases (matrix metalloprotease-2, calpains, and cathepsins) were extracted from raw liver and specifically activated within electrophoretic gels. Both force-fed Muscovy and Pekin ducks presented higher liver weights and BW associated with lower matrix metalloprotease-2 and m-calpain hepatic activities. On the other hand, hepatic cathepsin activity was not affected by force feeding. It was concluded that Muscovy and Pekin duck hepatic proteases are affected similarly by the force feeding. Thus, this cannot explain differences observed between Muscovy and Pekin ducks regarding their ability to develop hepatic steatosis generally reported in literature.

  9. Extracurricular Activities and Bullying Perpetration: Results from a Nationally Representative Sample

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Riese, Alison; Gjelsvik, Annie; Ranney, Megan L.

    2015-01-01

    Background: Bullying is a widespread problem for school-aged children and adolescents. Interventions to reduce bullying are not well disseminated. Extracurricular involvement is, however, common. This study aims to examine the relationship between parent-reported participation in extracurricular activities and bullying perpetration. Methods: Using…

  10. Design of a website on nutrition and physical activity for adolescents: results from formative research

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Teens do not meet guidelines for healthy eating and physical activity. The internet may be an effective method for delivering programs that help them adopt healthy behaviors. Our objective was to collect information to design content and structure for a teen-friendly web site promoting healthy eati...

  11. Potentials of Physical Activity Promotion in Preschools--An Overview of Results of an Ethnographic Observation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pape, Natalie; Sterdt, Elena; Azouagh, Karima; Kramer, Silke; Walter, Ulla; Urban, Michael; Werning, Rolf

    2016-01-01

    This article addresses exemplary differences between preschools with systematic physical activity (PA) programmes and preschools without PA programmes in Germany. Two preschools from each group were visited in the context of a focused ethnographic observation to examine the educational practice, PA and social behaviour of preschool children. The…

  12. Physical Activity Related to Depression and Predicted Mortality Risk: Results from the Americans' Changing Lives Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lee, Pai-Lin; Lan, William; Lee, Charles C.-L.

    2012-01-01

    This study examined the association between three types of physical activities (PA) and depression, and the relationship between PA and later mortality. Previous studies rarely assessed these associations in one single study in randomly selected population samples. Few studies have assessed these relations by adjusting the covariate of…

  13. Healthful Eating and Physical Activity in the Home Environment: Results from Multifamily Focus Groups

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Berge, Jerica M.; Arikian, Aimee; Doherty, William J.; Neumark-Sztainer, Dianne

    2012-01-01

    Objective: To explore multiple family members' perceptions of risk and protective factors for healthful eating and physical activity in the home. Design: Ten multifamily focus groups were conducted with 26 families. Setting and Participants: Community setting with primarily black and white families. Family members (n = 103) were aged 8 to 61…

  14. [Innovative activity of dental faculty staff of Omsk State Medical University: results, problems and prospects].

    PubMed

    Novikov, A I; Gudinova, Zh V

    2015-01-01

    The article summarizes innovative activity in Omsk State Medical University (OSMU) and contains the review of innovative developments of staff of dental faculty of OSMU (a line of gels for caries prevetion, the DENTEST diagnostic unit, technology of tooth shape modular restoration, personified therapy.of patients with periodontal disease, caries diagnosis and periodontontal disease prognosis software, a set of the training materials on esthetic modeling of teeth, personification of clinical approaches in oral bioaesthetic rehabilitation, etc.). The analysis of the factors stimulating and complicating innovative detail in medical school, problems of introduction of medical innovations, lack of system of an assessment of medical technologies in Russia, regulations of the organization of innovative activity in medical schools is carried out, the prospects of their solution connected with decision-making at the state level are formulated.

  15. Artemisinins, New Miconazole Potentiators Resulting in Increased Activity against Candida albicans Biofilms

    PubMed Central

    De Cremer, Kaat; Lanckacker, Ellen; Cools, Tanne L.; Bax, Marijke; De Brucker, Katrijn; Cos, Paul; Thevissen, Karin

    2014-01-01

    Mucosal biofilm-related fungal infections are very common, and the incidence of recurrent oral and vulvovaginal candidiasis is significant. As resistance to azoles (the preferred treatment) is occurring, we aimed at identifying compounds that increase the activity of miconazole against Candida albicans biofilms. We screened 1,600 compounds of a drug-repositioning library in combination with a subinhibitory concentration of miconazole. Synergy between the best identified potentiators and miconazole was characterized by checkerboard analyses and fractional inhibitory concentration indices. Hexachlorophene, pyrvinium pamoate, and artesunate act synergistically with miconazole in affecting C. albicans biofilms. Synergy was most pronounced for artesunate and structural homologues thereof. No synergistic effect could be observed between artesunate and fluconazole, caspofungin, or amphotericin B. Our data reveal enhancement of the antibiofilm activity of miconazole by artesunate, pointing to potential combination therapy consisting of miconazole and artesunate to treat C. albicans biofilm-related infections. PMID:25367916

  16. Anthrax Detection: Agencies Need to Validate Sampling Activities in Order to Increase Confidence in Negative Results

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2005-03-01

    validate all activities related to other biothreat agents. In September and October 2001, letters laced with Bacillus anthracis (anthrax) spores were...2001, contaminated letters laced with Bacillus anthracis, or anthrax spores,1 were sent through the mail to two senators, Thomas Daschle and Patrick...report reflects commonly used terminology. Technically, the term refers only to the disease caused by the microorganism Bacillus anthracis, not the

  17. Fetal heart rate and motor activity associations with maternal organochlorine levels: results of an exploratory study.

    PubMed

    DiPietro, Janet A; Davis, Meghan F; Costigan, Kathleen A; Barr, Dana Boyd

    2014-01-01

    Contemporaneous associations between circulating maternal organochlorines (OCs) and measures of fetal heart rate and motor activity were evaluated. A panel of 47 OCs, including pesticides and polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs), was analyzed from serum of 50 pregnant women at 36 weeks gestation. Data were empirically reduced into four factors and six individual compounds. All participants had detectable concentrations of at least one-quarter of the assayed OCs and, in general, higher socioeconomic level was associated with higher OC concentrations. Fetal heart rate measures were not consistently associated with maternal OCs. In contrast, one or more indicators of greater fetal motor activity were significantly associated with higher levels of the DDT and low chlorinated OC factors and five of the six individual compounds (heptachlor epoxide, trans nonachlor, oxychlordane, and PCBs 18 and 52). This preliminary demonstration of associations between fetal motor activity and maternal concentrations of persistent and pervasive environmental contaminants suggests that fetal assessment may be useful in ascertaining the potential early effects of these compounds on development.

  18. [Everyday activities in depression and dementia in the elderly. Results of the Berlin study on aging].

    PubMed

    Klumb, P L; Geiselmann, B; Baltes, M M

    1999-07-01

    We investigated time use of persons assigned to seven groups on the basis of psychiatric diagnoses: (a) no dementia or depression symptoms, (b) individuals with dementia symptoms but no DSM-III-R-diagnosis, (c) individuals with dementia according to DSM-III-R, (d) individuals with depression symptoms but no diagnosis, (e) individuals with depression not further specified (NFS), (f) individuals with depression according to DSM-III-R, and (g) individuals with symptoms of both dementia and depression. In general, time-use parameters were similar across the groups. As expected, however, we found differences in specific dimensions. Demented and depressed individuals differed from others with respect to the duration of passive phases and receptive leisure. Instrumental activities, active leisure, length of the waking day, and time spent alone were indicators with differential validity regarding dementia diagnoses--partly even after controlling for physical morbidity. Moreover, we were able to differentiate between dementia and depression on the basis of instrumental activities after controlling for physical morbidity.

  19. Characterization of fhlA mutations resulting in ligand-independent transcriptional activation and ATP hydrolysis.

    PubMed Central

    Korsa, I; Böck, A

    1997-01-01

    The FhlA protein belongs to the NtrC family of transcriptional regulators. It induces transcription from the -12/-24 promoters of the genes of the formate regulon by sigma54 RNA polymerase. FhlA is activated by binding of the ligand formate and does not require phosphorylation. A mutational analysis of the fhLA gene portion coding for the A and C domains was conducted with the aim of gaining information on the interaction between formate binding and ATP hydrolysis plus transcription activation. Four mutations were identified, all located in the A domain; one of them rendered transcription completely independent from the presence of formate, and the others conferred a semiconstitutive phenotype. The FhlA protein of one of the semiconstitutive variants was purified. Catalytic efficiency of ATP hydrolysis of the mutant FhlA was increased in the absence of formate in the same manner as formate influences the activity of wild-type FhlA. Moreover, in vitro transcription occurred at much lower threshold concentrations of the mutant protein and of nucleoside triphosphates than with the wild-type FhlA. PMID:8981978

  20. N-Terminal Deletion of Peptide:N-Glycanase Results in Enhanced Deglycosylation Activity

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Shengjun; Xin, Fengxue; Liu, Xiaoyue; Wang, Yuxiao; An, Zhenyi; Qi, Qingsheng; Wang, Peng George

    2009-01-01

    Peptide:N-glycanase catalyzes the detachment of N-linked glycan chains from glycopeptides or glycoproteins by hydrolyzing the β-aspartylglucosaminyl bond. Peptide:N-glycanase in yeast binds to Rad23p through its N-terminus. In this study, the complex formed between Peptide:N-glycanase and Rad23p was found to exhibit enhanced deglycosylation activity, which suggests an important role for this enzyme in the misfolded glycoprotein degradation pathway in vivo. To investigate the role of this enzyme in this pathway, we made stepwise deletions of the N-terminal helices of peptide:N-glycanase. Enzymatic analysis of the deletion mutants showed that deletion of the N-terminal H1 helix (Png1p-ΔH1) enhanced the deglycosylation activity of N-glycanase towards denatured glycoproteins. In addition, this mutant exhibited high deglycosylation activity towards native glycoproteins. Dynamic simulations of the wild type and N-terminal H1 deletion mutant implied that Png1p-ΔH1 is more flexible than wild type Png1p. The efficient deglycosylation of Png1p-ΔH1 towards native and non-native glycoproteins offers a potential biotechnological application. PMID:20016784

  1. Fetal heart rate and motor activity associations with maternal organochlorine levels: Results of an exploratory study

    PubMed Central

    DiPietro, Janet A.; Davis, Meghan F.; Costigan, Kathleen A; Barr, Dana Boyd

    2015-01-01

    Contemporaneous associations between circulating maternal organochlorines and measures of fetal heart rate and motor activity were evaluated. A panel of 47 organochlorines (OCs), including pesticides and polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs), was analyzed from serum of 50 pregnant women at 36 weeks gestation. Data were empirically reduced into four factors and six individual compounds. All participants had detectable concentrations of at least one-quarter of the assayed OCs and, in general, higher socioeconomic level was associated with higher OC concentrations. Fetal heart rate measures were not consistently associated with maternal OCs. In contrast, one or more indicators of greater fetal motor activity were significantly associated with higher levels of the DDT and low chlorinated OC factors and five of the six individual compounds (heptachlor epoxide, trans nonachlor, oxychlordane, and PCBs 18 and 52). This preliminary demonstration of associations between fetal motor activity and maternal concentrations of persistent and pervasive environmental contaminants suggests that fetal assessment may be useful in ascertaining the potential early effects of these compounds on development. PMID:23591698

  2. Aggregation and spatial analysis of walking activity in an urban area: results from the Halifax space-time activity survey

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Neatt, K.; Millward, H.; Spinney, J.

    2016-04-01

    This study examines neighborhood characteristics affecting the incidence of walking trips in urban and suburban areas of Halifax, Canada. We employ data from the Space-Time Activity Research (STAR) survey, conducted in 2007-8. Primary respondents completed a two- day time-diary survey, and their movements were tracked using a GPS data logger. Primary respondents logged a total of 5,005 walking trips, specified by 781,205 individual GPS points. Redundant and erroneous points, such as those with zero or excessive speed, were removed. Data points were then imported into ArcGIS, converted from points to linear features, visually inspected for data quality, and cleaned appropriately. From mapped walking tracks we developed hypotheses regarding variations in walking density. To test these, walking distances were aggregated by census tracts (CTs), and expressed as walking densities (per resident, per metre of road, and per developed area). We employed multivariate regression to examine which neighborhood (CT) variables are most useful as estimators of walking densities. Contrary to much of the planning literature, built-environment measures of road connectivity and dwelling density were found to have little estimating power. Office and institutional land uses are more useful estimators, as are the income and age characteristics of the resident population.

  3. Physical activity levels, sport activities, and risk of acute myocardial infarction: results of the INTERHEART study in China.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Xiaoru; Li, Wei; Guo, Jin; Wang, Yang; Gu, Hongqiu; Teo, Koon; Liu, Lisheng; Yusuf, Salim

    2014-02-01

    Physical activity (PA) during leisure time has been inversely associated with cardiovascular disease risk in the Western populations. We evaluated PA at work and leisure time in relation to acute myocardial infarction (AMI) in Chinese population. We conducted a hospital-based case-control study. The cases had first AMI (n = 2909). The controls (n = 2947) were matched to the cases in age and sex. The odds ratios (ORs) of leisure-time PA for strenuous exercise compared to mainly sedentary was 0.74 (95% confidence interval [CI]: 0.61-0.90) and for moderate exercise it was 0.96 (95% CI: 0.85-1.08). Multivariate adjustment did not substantially alter the association. The ORs of work-related PA for heavy PA compared to mainly sedentary was 1.44 (95% CI: 1.06-1.94), for climbing and lifting was 1.00 (95% CI: 0.77-.30), and for walking was 0.90 (95%CI: 0.75-1.07). Leisure-time PA was protective for AMI risk compared to sedentary lifestyles in a population in China.

  4. Can Senior Volunteers Deliver Reminiscence and Creative Activity Interventions? Results of the Legacy Intervention Family Enactment (LIFE) Randomized Controlled Trial

    PubMed Central

    Allen, Rebecca S.; Harris, Grant M.; Burgio, Louis D.; Azuero, Casey B.; Miller, Leslie A.; Shin, Hae Jung; Eichorst, Morgan K.; Csikai, Ellen L.; DeCoster, Jamie; Dunn, Linda L.; Kvale, Elizabeth; Parmelee, Patricia

    2014-01-01

    Context Palliative care patients and their family caregivers may have a foreshortened perspective of time left to live, or the expectation of the patient’s death in the near future. Patients and caregivers may report distress in physical, psychological, or existential/spiritual realms. Objectives To conduct a randomized controlled trial examining the effectiveness of retired senior volunteers (RSVs) in delivering a reminiscence and creative activity intervention aimed at alleviating palliative care patient and caregiver distress. Methods Of the 45 dyads that completed baseline, 28 completed post-intervention and 24 completed follow-up. The intervention group received three home visits by RSVs; control group families received three supportive telephone calls by research staff. Measures included symptom assessment and associated burden, depression, religiousness/spirituality, and meaning in life. Results Patients in the intervention group reported a significantly greater reduction in frequency of emotional symptoms (P = 0.02) and emotional symptom bother (P = 0.04) than the control group, as well as improved spiritual functioning. Family caregivers in the intervention group were more likely than control caregivers to endorse items on the Meaning in Life Scale (P = 0.02). Only improvement in intervention patients’ emotional symptom bother maintained at follow-up after discontinuing RSV contact (P = 0.024). Conclusion Delivery of the intervention by RSVs had a positive impact on palliative care patients’ emotional symptoms and burden and caregivers’ meaning in life. Meaningful prolonged engagement with palliative care patients and caregivers, possibly through alternative modes of treatment delivery such as continued RSV contact, may be necessary for maintenance of therapeutic effects. PMID:24667180

  5. Occupational Physical Activity and Body Mass Index: Results from the Hispanic Community Health Study / Study of Latinos

    PubMed Central

    Singer, Richard H.; Stoutenberg, Mark; Gellman, Marc D.; Archer, Edward; Davis, Sonia M.; Gotman, Nathan; Marquez, David X.; Buelna, Christina; Deng, Yu; Hosgood, H. Dean; Zambrana, Ruth E.

    2016-01-01

    Purpose To examine the associations between overweight/obesity and occupation among Hispanics/Latinos, the largest minority population in the U.S. Methods This study included 7,409 employed individuals in the Hispanic Community Health Study/Study of Latinos (HCHS/SOL), a prospective study of Hispanic/Latino individuals aged 18–74 in four communities in the U.S. We independently examined the relationships between BMI, Occupational Activity (OA), and Total Hours Worked, quantified via self-reported hours worked per week and occupation-assigned Metabolic Equivalents (METs). Results More than three quarters of the participants were either overweight (39.3%) or obese (37.8%). Individuals with a primary occupation and those employed in a secondary occupation worked an average of 36.8 and 14.6 hrs/wk, respectively. The overall adjusted odds for being obese compared to normal weight were 3.2% (AOR = 1.03, 95% CI 1.01, 1.05) and 14.4% (AOR = 1.14 95% Cl 1.07, 1.23) greater for each 10 MET•hrs/wk unit of increased OA, and each 10-hrs/wk unit of Total Hours Worked, respectively. Conclusion This study presents the first findings on the association between OA with overweight/obesity among Hispanic/Latino individuals in the U.S. Increasing OA and Total Hours Worked per week were independently associated with increasing odds of overweight/obesity suggesting that the workplace is only one part of the overall energy expenditure dynamic. Our findings point to the need to emphasize engaging employed individuals in greater levels of PA outside of the work environment to impact overweight/obesity. PMID:27031996

  6. Mission Control Center at conclusion of Apollo 15 lunar landing mission

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1971-01-01

    An overall view of activity in the Mission Operations Control Room in the Mission Control Center at the conclusion of the Apollo 15 lunar landing mission. The television monitor in the right background shows the welcome ceremonies aboard the prime recovery ship, U.S.S. Okinawa, in the mid-Pacific Ocean.

  7. 40 CFR 761.64 - Disposal of wastes generated as a result of research and development activities authorized under...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... result of research and development activities authorized under § 761.30(j) and chemical analysis of PCBs... research and development activities authorized under § 761.30(j) and chemical analysis of PCBs. This... development authorized under § 761.30(j). This section also provides disposal requirements for...

  8. Associations of Physical Activity, Sedentary Time, and Screen Time With Cardiovascular Fitness in United States Adolescents: Results from the NHANES National Youth Fitness Survey (NNYFS).

    PubMed

    Porter, Anna K; Matthews, Krystin J; Salvo, Deborah; Kohl, Harold W

    2017-03-14

    Background Most US adolescents do not meet guidelines of at least 60 daily minutes of moderate- to vigorous-intensity physical activity. Additionally, sedentary behaviors among this age group are of increasing concern. This study examined the association of movement behaviors with cardiovascular fitness among US adolescents. Methods Data from the 2012 NHANES National Youth Fitness Survey were used to assess the association of movement behaviors (physical activity, sedentary time, screen time) with cardiovascular fitness among adolescent males and females. Multiple logistic regressions were used to test the independent and interactive effects of movement behaviors on cardiovascular fitness. Results Among females, physical activity was directly associated with cardiovascular fitness; no significant association was observed between sedentary behaviors and CVF. Among males, sedentary time moderated the relationship between physical activity and cardiovascular fitness, such that a significant, direct association was only observed among those with high sedentary time (OR: 5.01, 95% CI: 1.60, 15.70). Conclusions Results from this cross-sectional analysis suggest that among female US adolescents, physical activity, but not sedentary behavior, is associated with cardiovascular fitness. Among males, the interaction between physical activity and sedentary time seems to be important for cardiovascular fitness. Longitudinal studies are warranted to confirm these findings.

  9. [In vitro antibacterial activity of rokitamycin, a new macrolide antibiotic. Results of a multicenter study].

    PubMed

    Soussy, C J; Le Van Thoi, J; Meyran, M; Joly, B; Derlot, E; Morel, C

    1990-05-01

    Minimal inhibitory concentrations (MIC) of rokitamycin (R) were evaluated by agar dilution for 914 bacterial strain isolated in 4 hospitals and classed as a function of susceptibility and resistance to Macrolides-Lincosamides-Streptogramines group (MLS). MICs of R ranged from 0.06 to 1 microgram/ml (mode MIC 0.25-0.5) on Staphylococci susceptible to MLS and on MLSB inducible strains; R was inactive on MLSB constitutive strains. MICs of R ranged from 0.008 to 0.5 microgram/ml (mode MIC 0.06 to 0.25) for Streptococci and Pneumococci susceptible to erythromycin (E) and from 0.06 to greater than 128 for strains resistant to E. Enterococci susceptible to E were inhibited by 0.06 to 0.5 microgram/ml (mode MIC 0.5) and strains resistant to E by 0.25 to greater than 128. Haemophilus were inhibited by 0.5 to 0.65 microgram/ml (mode MICs of R ranged generally from 0.016 to 0.5 microgram/ml (mode MIC 0.12) for C. perfringens and from 0.016 to 1 (mode MIC 0.06) for B. fragilis. Thus, R was shown to be among macrolide antibiotics of resistance strains. Its activity was superior to that of other products of this group spiramycin, josamycin, miokamycin, particularly on Gram positive cocci. R had a good activity on Neisseria, Branhamella, anaerobes and, as others macrolides, was poorly active on Haemophilus.

  10. [In vitro antibacterial activity of a new macrolide, miokamycin. Results of a multicenter study].

    PubMed

    Soussy, C J; Thabaut, A; Bismuth, R; Morel, C; Berthelot, G; Chanal, M; Derlot, E

    1989-05-01

    Minimal inhibitory concentration (MIC) of miokamycin (M) were evaluated by agar dilution for 1,024 bacterial strains isolated in 6 hospitals and classed as a function of susceptibility and resistance to macrolides, lincosamides, streptogramins group (MLS). MIC of M ranged from 0.25 to 4 micrograms/ml (mode MIC 1-2) on Staphylococcus susceptible to MLS and on MLSB inducible strains; M was inactive on MLSB constitutive strains. MIC of M ranged from 0.016 to 4 micrograms/ml (mode MIC 0.12 to 0.5) for Streptococci and Pneumococci susceptible to erythromycin (E) and from 0.12 to greater than 128 for strains resistant to E. Enterococci susceptible to E were inhibited by 0.5 to 2 micrograms/ml (mode MIC 1) and strains resistant to E by 4 to greater than 128. Haemophilus were inhibited by 2 to 64 micrograms/ml (mode MIC 32), Neisseria by 0.12 to 4 (mode MIC 0.5-1) and B. catarrhalis by 0.12 to 8 (mode MIC 1). L. pneumophila was very susceptible to M: MIC 0.016 to 0.12 (mode MIC 0.06). MIC of M ranged generally from 0.5 to 2 micrograms/ml (mode MIC 1) for C. perfringens and from 0.03 to 2 (mode MIC 1) for B. fragilis. Thus, M was shown to be among macrolide antibiotics of resistance non-inducing type on MLSB inducible resistance strains. Its activity was similar to that of spiramycin slightly superior on Staphylococci, slightly inferior on Streptococci and Enterococci, similar on Pneumococci, very superior on Neisseria, Legionella and anaerobes. M had a good activity on Branhamella and, as others macrolides, was poorly active on Haemophilus.

  11. Mutation in E1, the ubiquitin activating enzyme, reduces Drosophila lifespan and results in motor impairment.

    PubMed

    Liu, Hsiu-Yu; Pfleger, Cathie M

    2013-01-01

    Neurodegenerative diseases cause tremendous suffering for those afflicted and their families. Many of these diseases involve accumulation of mis-folded or aggregated proteins thought to play a causal role in disease pathology. Ubiquitinated proteins are often found in these protein aggregates, and the aggregates themselves have been shown to inhibit the activity of the proteasome. These and other alterations in the Ubiquitin Pathway observed in neurodegenerative diseases have led to the question of whether impairment of the Ubiquitin Pathway on its own can increase mortality or if ongoing neurodegeneration alters Ubiquitin Pathway function as a side-effect. To address the role of the Ubiquitin Pathway in vivo, we studied loss-of-function mutations in the Drosophila Ubiquitin Activating Enzyme, Uba1 or E1, the most upstream enzyme in the Ubiquitin Pathway. Loss of only one functional copy of E1 caused a significant reduction in adult lifespan. Rare homozygous hypomorphic E1 mutants reached adulthood. These mutants exhibited further reduced lifespan and showed inappropriate Ras activation in the brain. Removing just one functional copy of Ras restored the lifespan of heterozygous E1 mutants to that of wild-type flies and increased the survival of homozygous E1 mutants. E1 homozygous mutants also showed severe motor impairment. Our findings suggest that processes that impair the Ubiquitin Pathway are sufficient to cause early mortality. Reduced lifespan and motor impairment are seen in the human disease X-linked Infantile Spinal Muscular Atrophy, which is associated with mutation in human E1 warranting further analysis of these mutants as a potential animal model for study of this disease.

  12. Increasing extracellular potassium results in subthalamic neuron activity resembling that seen in a 6-hydroxydopamine lesion.

    PubMed

    Strauss, Ulf; Zhou, Fu-Wen; Henning, Jeannette; Battefeld, Arne; Wree, Andreas; Köhling, Rüdiger; Haas, Stefan Jean-Pierre; Benecke, Reiner; Rolfs, Arndt; Gimsa, Ulrike

    2008-06-01

    Abnormal neuronal activity in the subthalamic nucleus (STN) plays a crucial role in the pathophysiology of Parkinson's disease (PD). Although altered extracellular potassium concentration ([K+]o) and sensitivity to [K+]o modulates neuronal activity, little is known about the potassium balance in the healthy and diseased STN. In vivo measurements of [K+]o using ion-selective electrodes demonstrated a twofold increase in the decay time constant of lesion-induced [K+]o transients in the STN of adult Wistar rats with a unilateral 6-hydroxydopamine (6-OHDA) median forebrain bundle lesion, employed as a model of PD, compared with nonlesioned rats. Various [K+]o concentrations (1.5-12.5 mM) were applied to in vitro slice preparations of three experimental groups of STN slices from nonlesioned control rats, ipsilateral hemispheres, and contralateral hemispheres of lesioned rats. The majority of STN neurons of nonlesioned rats and in slices contralateral to the lesion fired spontaneously, predominantly in a regular pattern, whereas those in slices ipsilateral to the lesion fired more irregularly or even in bursts. Experimentally increased [K+]o led to an increase in the number of spontaneously firing neurons and action potential firing rates in all groups. This was accompanied by a decrease in the amplitude of post spike afterhyperpolarization (AHP) and the amplitude and duration of the posttrain AHP. Lesion effects in ipsilateral neurons at physiological [K+]o resembled the effects of elevated [K+]o in nonlesioned rats. Our data suggest that changed potassium sensitivity due to conductivity alterations and delayed clearance may be critical for shaping STN activity in parkinsonian states.

  13. Hydrothermal Petroleum in Active Continental Rift: Lake Chapala, Western Mexico, Initial Results.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zarate-del Valle, P. F.; Simoneit, B. R.; Ramirez-Sanchez, H. U.

    2003-12-01

    Lake Chapala in western Mexico is located partially in the Citala Rift, which belongs to the well-known neotectonic Jalisco continental triple junction. The region is characterized by active volcanism (Ceboruco, Volcan de Fuego), tectonic (1995 earthquake, M=8, 40-50 mm to SW) and hydrothermal (San Juan Cosala & Villa Corona spas and La Calera sinter deposit) activities. Hydrothermal petroleum has been described in active continental rift (East African Rift) and marine spreading zones (Guaymas Basin, Gulf of California). In 1868 the Mexican local press reported that manifestations of bitumen were appearing in front of the Columba Cap on the mid south shore of Lake Chapala. This bitumen is linked to the lake bottom and when the water level decreases sufficiently it is possible to access these tar bodies as islands. Because of these manifestations the Mexican oil company (PEMEX) drilled an exploration well (2,348m) at Tizapan El Alto without success. Hydrothermal activity is evident in the tar island zone as three in-shore thermal springs (26.8 m depth, 48.5° C, pH 7.8 and oriented N-S). The preliminary analyses by GC-MS of the tar from these islands indicate hydrothermal petroleum derived from lake sedimentary organic matter, generated at low temperatures (150° -200° C). The tars contain no n-alkanes, no PAH or other aromatics, but a major UCM of branched and cyclic hydrocarbons and mature biomarkers derived from lacustrine biota. The biomarkers consist of mainly 17α (H),21β (H)-hopanes ranging from C27 to C34 (no C28), gammacerane, tricyclic terpanes (C20-C26), carotane and its cracking products, and drimanes (C14-C16). The biomarker composition indicates an organic matter source from bacteria and algae, typical of lacustrine ecosystems. 14C dating of samples from two tar islands yielded ages exceeding 40 kyrs, i.e., old carbon from hydrothermal/tectonic remobilization of bitumen from deeper horizons to the surface. The occurrence of hydrothermal petroleum in

  14. Forensic scientists' conclusions: how readable are they for non-scientist report-users?

    PubMed

    Howes, Loene M; Kirkbride, K Paul; Kelty, Sally F; Julian, Roberta; Kemp, Nenagh

    2013-09-10

    Scientists have an ethical responsibility to assist non-scientists to understand their findings and expert opinions before they are used as decision-aids within the criminal justice system. The communication of scientific expert opinion to non-scientist audiences (e.g., police, lawyers, and judges) through expert reports is an important but under-researched issue. Readability statistics were used to assess 111 conclusions from a proficiency test in forensic glass analysis. The conclusions were written using an average of 23 words per sentence, and approximately half of the conclusions were expressed using the active voice. At an average Flesch-Kincaid Grade level of university undergraduate (Grade 13), and Flesch Reading Ease score of difficult (42), the conclusions were written at a level suitable for people with some tertiary education in science, suggesting that the intended non-scientist readers would find them difficult to read. To further analyse the readability of conclusions, descriptive features of text were used: text structure; sentence structure; vocabulary; elaboration; and coherence and unity. Descriptive analysis supported the finding that texts were written at a level difficult for non-scientists to read. Specific aspects of conclusions that may pose difficulties for non-scientists were located. Suggestions are included to assist scientists to write conclusions with increased readability for non-scientist readers, while retaining scientific integrity. In the next stage of research, the readability of expert reports in their entirety is to be explored.

  15. Activation of EGFR and ERBB2 by Helicobacter pylori Results in Survival of Gastric Epithelial Cells with DNA Damage

    PubMed Central

    Chaturvedi, Rupesh; Asim, Mohammad; Piazuelo, M. Blanca; Yan, Fang; Barry, Daniel P.; Sierra, Johanna Carolina; Delgado, Alberto G.; Hill, Salisha; Casero, Robert A.; Bravo, Luis E.; Dominguez, Ricardo L.; Correa, Pelayo; Polk, D. Brent; Washington, M. Kay; Rose, Kristie L.; Schey, Kevin L.; Morgan, Douglas R.; Peek, Richard M.; Wilson, Keith T.

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND & AIMS The gastric cancer-causing pathogen Helicobacter pylori upregulates spermine oxidase (SMOX) in gastric epithelial cells, causing oxidative stress-induced apoptosis and DNA damage. A subpopulation of SMOXhigh cells are resistant to apoptosis, despite their high levels of DNA damage. Because epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) activation can regulate apoptosis, we determined its role in SMOX-mediated effects. METHODS SMOX, apoptosis, and DNA damage were measured in gastric epithelial cells from H pylori-infected Egfrwa5 mice (which have attenuated EGFR activity), Egfr wild-type mice, or in infected cells incubated with EGFR inhibitors or deficient in EGFR. Phosphoproteomic analysis was performed. Two independent tissue microarrays containing each stage of disease, from gastritis to carcinoma, and gastric biopsies from Colombian and Honduran cohorts were analyzed by immunohistochemistry. RESULTS SMOX expression and DNA damage were decreased, and apoptosis increased in H pylori-infected Egfrwa5 mice. H pylori-infected cells with deletion or inhibition of EGFR had reduced levels of SMOX, DNA damage, and DNA damagehigh apoptosislow cells. Phosphoproteomic analysis revealed increased EGFR and ERBB2 signaling. Immunoblot analysis demonstrated the presence of a phosphorylated (p)EGFR–ERBB2 heterodimer and pERBB2; knockdown of ErbB2 facilitated apoptosis of DNA damagehigh apoptosislow cells. SMOX was increased in all stages of gastric disease, peaking in tissues with intestinal metaplasia, whereas pEGFR, pEGFR–ERBB2, and pERBB2 were increased predominantly in tissues demonstrating gastritis or atrophic gastritis. Principal component analysis separated gastritis tissues from patients with cancer vs those without cancer. pEGFR, pEGFR–ERBB2, pERBB2, and SMOX were increased in gastric samples from patients whose disease progressed to intestinal metaplasia or dysplasia, compared with patients whose disease did not progress. CONCLUSIONS In an analysis

  16. Complex activity patterns in arterial wall: results from a model of calcium dynamics.

    PubMed

    Buchner, Teodor; Pietkun, Jakub; Kuklik, Paweł

    2012-03-01

    Using a dynamical model of smooth muscle cells in an arterial wall, defined as a system of coupled five-dimensional nonlinear oscillators, on a grid with cylindrical symmetry, we compare the admissible activity patterns with those known from the heart tissue. We postulate on numerical basis the possibility to induce a stable spiral wave in the arterial wall. Such a spiral wave can inhibit the propagation of the axial calcium wave and effectively stop the vasomotion. We also discuss the dynamics of the circumferential calcium wave in comparison to rotors in venous ostia that are a common source of supraventricular ectopy. We show that the velocity and in consequence the frequency range of the circumferential calcium wave is by orders of magnitude too small compared to that of the rotors. The mechanism of the rotor is not likely to involve the calcium-related dynamics of the smooth muscle cells. The calcium-related dynamics which is voltage-independent and hard to be reset seems to actually protect the blood vessels against the electric activity of the atria. We also discuss the microreentry phenomenon, which was found in numerical experiments in the studied model.

  17. Association between Natural Resources for Outdoor Activities and Physical Inactivity: Results from the Contiguous United States

    PubMed Central

    Jiang, Yan; Yuan, Yongping; Neale, Anne; Jackson, Laura; Mehaffey, Megan

    2016-01-01

    Protected areas including national/state parks and recreational waters are excellent natural resources that promote physical activity and interaction with Nature, which can relieve stress and reduce disease risk. Despite their importance, however, their contribution to human health has not been properly quantified. This paper seeks to evaluate quantitatively how national/state parks and recreational waters are associated with human health and well-being, taking into account of the spatial dependence of environmental variables for the contiguous U.S., at the county level. First, we describe available natural resources for outdoor activities (ANROA), using national databases that include features from the Protected Areas Database, NAVSTREETS, and ATTAINSGEO 305(b) Waters. We then use spatial regression techniques to explore the association of ANROA and socioeconomic status factors on physical inactivity rates. Finally, we use variance analysis to analyze ANROA’s influence on income-related health inequality. We found a significantly negative association between ANROA and the rate of physical inactivity: ANROA and the spatial effect explained 69%, nationwide, of the variation in physical inactivity. Physical inactivity rate showed a strong spatial dependence—influenced not only by its own in-county ANROA, but also by that of its neighbors ANROA. Furthermore, community groups at the same income level and with the highest ANROA, always had the lowest physical inactivity rate. This finding may help to guide future land use planning and community development that will benefit human health and well-being. PMID:27548195

  18. Results of the survey activities and mobile gamma scanning in Monticello, Utah

    SciTech Connect

    Little, C.A.; Berven, B.A.

    1985-11-01

    The town of Monticello, Utah, was once the site of an active mill which processed vanadium ore (1942 to 1948), and uranium ore (1948 to 1960). Properties in the vicinity of that mill have become contaminated with radioactive material from ore processing. The Radiological Survey Activities (RASA) group at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) was requested by the Division of Remedial Action Projects (DRAP) in the Department of Energy (DOE) to: (1) identify potentially contaminated properties; (2) assess natural background radiation levels; and (3) rapidly assess the magnitude, extent, and type (i.e. ore, tailings, etc.) of contamination present on these properties (if any). This survey was conducted by RASA during April 1983. In addition to the 114 properties previously identified from historical information, the ORNL mobile gamma scanning van located 36 new properties exhibiting anomalous gamma radiation levels. Onsite surveys were conducted on 145 of the 150 total properties identified either historically or with the gamma scanning van. Of these 145 properties, 122 of them appeared to have some type of contaminated material present on them; however, only 48 appeared to be contaminated to the extent where they were in excess of Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) criteria (40 CFR 192). Twenty-one other properties were recommended for additional investigation (indoor gamma scanning and radon daughter measurements); of these, only ten required further analysis. This report provides the detailed data and analyses related to the radiological survey efforts performed by ORNL in Monticello, Utah.

  19. Plasticity of hypothalamic dopamine neurons during lactation results in dissociation of electrical activity and release.

    PubMed

    Romanò, Nicola; Yip, Siew H; Hodson, David J; Guillou, Anne; Parnaudeau, Sébastien; Kirk, Siobhan; Tronche, François; Bonnefont, Xavier; Le Tissier, Paul; Bunn, Stephen J; Grattan, Dave R; Mollard, Patrice; Martin, Agnès O

    2013-03-06

    Tuberoinfundibular dopamine (TIDA) neurons are the central regulators of prolactin (PRL) secretion. Their extensive functional plasticity allows a change from low PRL secretion in the non-pregnant state to the condition of hyperprolactinemia that characterizes lactation. To allow this rise in PRL, TIDA neurons are thought to become unresponsive to PRL at lactation and functionally silenced. Here we show that, contrary to expectations, the electrical properties of the system were not modified during lactation and that the neurons remained electrically responsive to a PRL stimulus, with PRL inducing an acute increase in their firing rate during lactation that was identical to that seen in non-pregnant mice. Furthermore, we show a long-term organization of TIDA neuron electrical activity with an harmonization of their firing rates, which remains intact during lactation. However, PRL-induced secretion of dopamine (DA) at the median eminence was strongly blunted during lactation, at least in part attributable to lack of phosphorylation of tyrosine hydroxylase, the key enzyme involved in DA synthesis. We therefore conclude that lactation, rather than involving electrical silencing of TIDA neurons, represents a condition of decoupling between electrical activity at the cell body and DA secretion at the median eminence.

  20. Loss of rostral brainstem cholinergic activity results in decreased ultrasonic vocalization behavior and altered sensorimotor gating.

    PubMed

    Machold, Robert P

    2013-11-01

    The parabigeminal (PBG), pedunculopontine (PPTg), and laterodorsal tegmental (LDTg) nuclei located in the rostral brainstem are the primary sources of the neurotransmitter acetylcholine (ACh) for the midbrain and thalamus, and as part of the ascending reticular activating system, these cholinergic signaling pathways regulate mouse behavioral responses to sensory stimuli. Here, I report that mice harboring a conditional deletion of ACh synthesis specifically within these nuclei (ChAT(En1 KO)) exhibit decreased ultrasonic vocalizations both as pups and adults, consistent with their previously reported hypoactivity when exploring the novel environment of the open field arena. Furthermore, in prepulse inhibition (PPI) tests, ChAT(En1 KO) animals exhibited increased sensorimotor gating in comparison to control littermates. These data suggest that ACh signaling arising from the rostral brainstem modulates animal behavior in part by tuning the levels of sensorimotor gating. Thus, the net effect of this cholinergic activity is to increase sensitivity to environmental stimuli, and loss of this pathway contributes to the hypoactivity in these mutants by raising the sensory threshold for eliciting exploratory behaviors.

  1. Increased AICD generation does not result in increased nuclear translocation or activation of target gene transcription

    SciTech Connect

    Waldron, Elaine; Isbert, Simone; Kern, Andreas; Jaeger, Sebastian; Martin, Anne M.; Hebert, Sebastien S.; Behl, Christian; Weggen, Sascha; De Strooper, Bart; Pietrzik, Claus U.

    2008-08-01

    A sequence of amyloid precursor protein (APP) cleavages culminates in the sequential release of the APP intracellular domain (AICD) and the amyloid {beta} peptide (A{beta}) and/or p3 fragment. One of the environmental factors favouring the accumulation of AICD appears to be a rise in intracellular pH. Here we further identified the metabolism and subcellular localization of artificially expressed constructs under such conditions. We also co-examined the mechanistic lead up to the AICD accumulation and explored possible significances for its increased expression. We found that most of the AICD generated under pH neutralized conditions is likely cleaved from C83. While the AICD surplus was unable to further activate transcription of a luciferase reporter via a Gal4-DNA-binding domain, it failed entirely via the endogenous promoter regions of proposed target genes, APP and KAI1. The lack of a specific transactivation potential was also demonstrated by the unchanged levels of target gene mRNA. However, rather than translocating to the nucleus, the AICD surplus remains membrane tethered or free in the cytosol where it interacts with Fe65. Therefore we provide strong evidence that an increase in AICD generation does not directly promote gene activation of previously proposed target 0011gen.

  2. Microearthquake activity on the Orozco Fracture Zone: Preliminary results from Project ROSE

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1981-05-10

    We present preliminary hypocenter determinations for 52 earthquakes recorded by a large multiinstitutional network of ocean bottom seismometers and ocean bottom hydrophones in the Orozco Fracture Zone in the eastern Pacific during late February to mid-March 1979. The network was deployed as part of the Rivera Ocean Seismic Experiment, also known as Project ROSE. The Orozco Fracture Zone is Physiographically complex, and the pattern of microearthquake hypocenters at least partly reflects this complexity. All of the well-located epicenters lie within the active transform fault segment of the fracture zone. About half of the recorded earthquakes were aligned along a narrow trough that extends eastward from the northern rise crest intersection in the approximate direction of the Cocos-Pacific relative plate motion; these events appear to be characterized by strike-slip faulting. The second major group of activity occurred in the central portion of the transform fault; the microearthquakes in this group do not display a preferred alignment parallel to the direction of spreading, and several are not obviously associated with distinct topographic features. Hypocentral depth was well resolved for many of the earthquakes reported here. Nominal depths range from 0 to 17 km below the seafloor.

  3. Association between Natural Resources for Outdoor Activities and Physical Inactivity: Results from the Contiguous United States.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Yan; Yuan, Yongping; Neale, Anne; Jackson, Laura; Mehaffey, Megan

    2016-08-17

    Protected areas including national/state parks and recreational waters are excellent natural resources that promote physical activity and interaction with Nature, which can relieve stress and reduce disease risk. Despite their importance, however, their contribution to human health has not been properly quantified. This paper seeks to evaluate quantitatively how national/state parks and recreational waters are associated with human health and well-being, taking into account of the spatial dependence of environmental variables for the contiguous U.S., at the county level. First, we describe available natural resources for outdoor activities (ANROA), using national databases that include features from the Protected Areas Database, NAVSTREETS, and ATTAINSGEO 305(b) Waters. We then use spatial regression techniques to explore the association of ANROA and socioeconomic status factors on physical inactivity rates. Finally, we use variance analysis to analyze ANROA's influence on income-related health inequality. We found a significantly negative association between ANROA and the rate of physical inactivity: ANROA and the spatial effect explained 69%, nationwide, of the variation in physical inactivity. Physical inactivity rate showed a strong spatial dependence-influenced not only by its own in-county ANROA, but also by that of its neighbors ANROA. Furthermore, community groups at the same income level and with the highest ANROA, always had the lowest physical inactivity rate. This finding may help to guide future land use planning and community development that will benefit human health and well-being.

  4. The MATROSHKA experiment: results and comparison from extravehicular activity (MTR-1) and intravehicular activity (MTR-2A/2B) exposure.

    PubMed

    Berger, Thomas; Bilski, Paweł; Hajek, Michael; Puchalska, Monika; Reitz, Günther

    2013-12-01

    Astronauts working and living in space are exposed to considerably higher doses and different qualities of ionizing radiation than people on Earth. The multilateral MATROSHKA (MTR) experiment, coordinated by the German Aerospace Center, represents the most comprehensive effort to date in radiation protection dosimetry in space using an anthropomorphic upper-torso phantom used for radiotherapy treatment planning. The anthropomorphic upper-torso phantom maps the radiation distribution as a simulated human body installed outside (MTR-1) and inside different compartments (MTR-2A: Pirs; MTR-2B: Zvezda) of the Russian Segment of the International Space Station. Thermoluminescence dosimeters arranged in a 2.54 cm orthogonal grid, at the site of vital organs and on the surface of the phantom allow for visualization of the absorbed dose distribution with superior spatial resolution. These results should help improve the estimation of radiation risks for long-term human space exploration and support benchmarking of radiation transport codes.

  5. Atmospheric Deposition of Trace Elements in Ombrotrophic Peat as a Result of Anthropic Activities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fabio Lourençato, Lucio; Cabral Teixeira, Daniel; Vieira Silva-Filho, Emmanoel

    2014-05-01

    Ombrotrophic peat can be defined as a soil rich in organic matter, formed from the partial decomposition of vegetable organic material in a humid and anoxic environment, where the accumulation of material is necessarily faster than the decomposition. From the physical-chemical point of view, it is a porous and highly polar material with high adsorption capacity and cation exchange. The high ability of trace elements to undergo complexation by humic substances happens due to the presence of large amounts of oxygenated functional groups in these substances. Since the beginning of industrialization human activities have scattered a large amount of trace elements in the environment. Soil contamination by atmospheric deposition can be expressed as a sum of site contamination by past/present human activities and atmospheric long-range transport of trace elements. Ombrotrophic peat records can provide valuable information about the entries of trace metals into the atmosphere and that are subsequently deposited on the soil. These trace elements are toxic, non-biodegradable and accumulate in the food chain, even in relatively low quantities. Thus studies on the increase of trace elements in the environment due to human activities are necessary, particularly in the southern hemisphere, where these data are scarce. The aims of this study is to evaluate the concentrations of mercury in ombrotrophic peat altomontanas coming from atmospheric deposition. The study is conducted in the Itatiaia National Park, Brazilian conservation unit, situated between the southeastern state of Rio de Janeiro, São Paulo and Minas Gerais. An ombrotrophic peat core is being sampled in altitude (1980m), to measure the trace elements concentrations of this material. As it is conservation area, the trace elements found in the samples is mainly from atmospheric deposition, since in Brazil don't exist significant lithology of trace elements. The samples are characterized by organic matter content which

  6. Activation of the epidermal growth factor receptor by respiratory syncytial virus results in increased inflammation and delayed apoptosis.

    PubMed

    Monick, Martha M; Cameron, Kelli; Staber, Janice; Powers, Linda S; Yarovinsky, Timur O; Koland, John G; Hunninghake, Gary W

    2005-01-21

    Respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) preferentially infects lung epithelial cells. Infection by RSV leads to an extended inflammatory response, characterized by the release of interleukin-8 (IL-8). Activation of ERK MAP kinase is required for both RSV-induced inflammation and the extended survival of infected cells. In this study, we analyzed the role of the epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) in RSV activation of ERK. We demonstrate for the first time that RSV activates EGFR in lung epithelial cells. Activation of EGFR results in increased ERK activity, contributing to both the inflammatory response (IL-8 release) and prolonging the survival of RSV-infected cells. Inhibition of EGFR with siRNA decreased both ERK activation and IL-8 production after RSV. In analyzing the effect of EGFR activation on survival of RSV-infected cells, we found that EGFR activation by RSV resulted in ERK-dependent alterations in the balance of pro- versus anti-apoptotic Bcl2 proteins. RSV altered the balance between pro- and anti-apoptotic Bcl2 proteins (increased BclxL and decreased BimEL) increasing the relative amount of pro-survival proteins. This occurred in an EGFR-dependent manner. This study supports an important role for EGFR activity in the lifespan and inflammatory potential of RSV-infected epithelial cells.

  7. Deletion of Gpr55 Results in Subtle Effects on Energy Metabolism, Motor Activity and Thermal Pain Sensation.

    PubMed

    Bjursell, Mikael; Ryberg, Erik; Wu, Tingting; Greasley, Peter J; Bohlooly-Y, Mohammad; Hjorth, Stephan

    2016-01-01

    The G-protein coupled receptor 55 (GPR55) is activated by cannabinoids and non-cannabinoid molecules and has been speculated to play a modulatory role in a large variety of physiological and pathological processes, including in metabolically perturbed states. We therefore generated male mice deficient in the gene coding for the cannabinoid/lysophosphatidylinositol (LPI) receptor Gpr55 and characterized them under normal dietary conditions as well as during high energy dense diet feeding followed by challenge with the CB1 receptor antagonist/GPR55 agonist rimonabant. Gpr55 deficient male mice (Gpr55 KO) were phenotypically indistinguishable from their wild type (WT) siblings for the most part. However, Gpr55 KO animals displayed an intriguing nocturnal pattern of motor activity and energy expenditure (EE). During the initial 6 hours of the night, motor activity was significantly elevated without any significant effect observed in EE. Interestingly, during the last 6 hours of the night motor activity was similar but EE was significantly decreased in the Gpr55 KO mice. No significant difference in motor activity was detected during daytime, but EE was lower in the Gpr55 KO compared to WT mice. The aforementioned patterns were not associated with alterations in energy intake, daytime core body temperature, body weight (BW) or composition, although a non-significant tendency to increased adiposity was seen in Gpr55 KO compared to WT mice. Detailed analyses of daytime activity in the Open Field paradigm unveiled lower horizontal activity and rearing time for the Gpr55 KO mice. Moreover, the Gpr55 KO mice displayed significantly faster reaction time in the tail flick test, indicative of thermal hyperalgesia. The BW-decreasing effect of rimonabant in mice on long-term cafeteria diet did not differ between Gpr55 KO and WT mice. In conclusion, Gpr55 deficiency is associated with subtle effects on diurnal/nocturnal EE and motor activity behaviours but does not appear per se

  8. Active ion emission onboard the Double Star TC-1 spacecraft - results from initial science operations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Torkar, K.; Steiger, W.; Narheim, B. T.; Svenes, K.; Fehringer, M.; Escoubet, C. P.; Fazakerley, A. N.; Zhao, H.

    An ion emitter instrument ASPOC (Active Spacecraft Potential Control) belongs to the payload of the Chinese-European Double Star mission (TC-1) launched in December 2003. The instrument is a further development to the ones flown in the Cluster mission. Its objective is a reduction of the spacecraft potential in order to minimise the perturbations to the plasma measurements on board. The operation of the scientific payload began after commissioning in February 2004. Comparisons to Cluster are being made based on data from the first half year of the Double Star mission. The enhanced capabilities of the instrument allow to achieve even lower potentials than on Cluster. Differences to Cluster can also be expected because of the plasma environment at the equatorial orbit of TC-1. The effects of spacecraft potential control on the electron measurements by the instrument PEACE as observed during the first months of science operations are discussed.

  9. Special issue: The changing shapes of active volcanoes: Recent results and advances in volcano geodesy

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Poland, Michael P.; Newman, Andrew V.

    2006-01-01

    The 18 papers herein report on new geodetic data that offer valuable insights into eruptive activity and magma transport; they present new models and modeling strategies that have the potential to greatly increase understanding of magmatic, hydrothermal, and volcano-tectonic processes; and they describe innovative techniques for collecting geodetic measurements from remote, poorly accessible, or hazardous volcanoes. To provide a proper context for these studies, we offer a short review of the evolution of volcano geodesy, as well as a case study that highlights recent advances in the field by comparing the geodetic response to recent eruptive episodes at Mount St. Helens. Finally, we point out a few areas that continue to challenge the volcano geodesy community, some of which are addressed by the papers that follow and which undoubtedly will be the focus of future research for years to come.

  10. The VSOP 5 GHz Active Galactic Nucleus Survey. V. Imaging Results for the Remaining 140 Sources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dodson, R.; Fomalont, E. B.; Wiik, K.; Horiuchi, S.; Hirabayashi, H.; Edwards, P. G.; Murata, Y.; Asaki, Y.; Moellenbrock, G. A.; Scott, W. K.; Taylor, A. R.; Gurvits, L. I.; Paragi, Z.; Frey, S.; Shen, Z.-Q.; Lovell, J. E. J.; Tingay, S. J.; Rioja, M. J.; Fodor, S.; Lister, M. L.; Mosoni, L.; Coldwell, G.; Piner, B. G.; Yang, J.

    2008-04-01

    In 1997 February, the Japanese radio astronomy satellite HALCA was launched to provide the space-bourne element for the VLBI Space Observatory Program (VSOP) mission. Approximately 25% of the mission time was dedicated to the VSOP survey of bright compact active galactic nuclei (AGNs) at 5 GHz. This paper, the fifth in the series, presents images and models for the remaining 140 sources not included in the third paper in the series, which contained 102 sources. For most sources, the plots of the (u,v) coverage, the visibility amplitude versus (u,v) distance, and the high-resolution image are presented. Model fit parameters to the major radio components are determined, and the brightness temperature of the core component for each source is calculated. The brightness temperature distributions for all of the sources in the VSOP AGN survey are discussed.

  11. Results of a European interlaboratory comparison on CO2 sorption on activated carbon and coals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gensterblum, Yves; Busch, Andreas; Krooss, Bernhard; de Weireld, Guy; Billemont, Pierre; van Hemert, Patrick; Wolf, Karl-Heinz

    2013-04-01

    For the assessment of CO2 storage in coal seams or enhanced coalbed methane production (ECBM), the sorption properties of natural coals are important parameters. Since more and more laboratories worldwide are concerned with measurements of gas sorption on coal it is indispensable to establish quality standards for such experiments. The first two interlaboratory studies on CO2 sorption on coal (Goodman et al. 2004, 2007) revealed a poor agreement of sorption isotherms among the participating laboratories, particularly in the high-pressure range. During the MOVECBM (http://www.movecbm.eu/) project funded by the European Commission (6th framework), an interlaboratory comparison of CO2 sorption on selected coals and activated carbon was initiated. Measurements were performed on dry samples at 45° C using the manometric and the gravimetric method. up to a final pressure of 15 MPa. The first set of high-pressure sorption measurements was performed on a Filtrasorb 400 activated carbon sample in order to minimise heterogeneity effects and to optimize the experimental procedures for the individual (manometric or gravimetric) methods (Gensterblum et al. 2009). Since comparability for the activated carbon was excellent, the measurements were continued using natural coals of various rank (anthracite, bituminous coal and lignite) to study the influence of heterogeneities and varying starting conditions on the CO2 sorption properties (Gensterblum et al. 2010). Compared to the poor reproducibility observed in previous interlaboratory studies (Goodman et al., 2004, 2007) this European study showed excellent agreement (<5 % deviation) among the participating laboratories with good repeatability. The sorption data and technical information on the different experimental setups have been used to investigate errors and potential pitfalls in the assessment of high-pressure CO2 sorption isotherms. References Gensterblum Y., P. van Hemert, P. Billemont, A. Busch, B.M. Krooss, G. de

  12. Activation of TREK-1 by morphine results in analgesia without adverse side effects.

    PubMed

    Devilliers, Maïly; Busserolles, Jérôme; Lolignier, Stéphane; Deval, Emmanuel; Pereira, Vanessa; Alloui, Abdelkrim; Christin, Marine; Mazet, Bruno; Delmas, Patrick; Noel, Jacques; Lazdunski, Michel; Eschalier, Alain

    2013-01-01

    Morphine is the gold-standard pain reliever for severe acute or chronic pain but it also produces adverse side effects that can alter the quality of life of patients and, in some rare cases, jeopardize the vital prognosis. Morphine elicits both therapeutic and adverse effects primarily through the same μ opioid receptor subtype, which makes it difficult to separate the two types of effects. Here we show that beneficial and deleterious effects of morphine are mediated through different signalling pathways downstream from μ opioid receptor. We demonstrate that the TREK-1 K(+) channel is a crucial contributor of morphine-induced analgesia in mice, while it is not involved in morphine-induced constipation, respiratory depression and dependence-three main adverse effects of opioid analgesic therapy. These observations suggest that direct activation of the TREK-1 K(+) channel, acting downstream from the μ opioid receptor, might have strong analgesic effects without opioid-like adverse effects.

  13. Application of electrical methods to measure microbial activity in soils: Preliminary microcosm results

    SciTech Connect

    Cox, B.L. Sweet, A.; Majer, E.

    1997-12-01

    The application of the geophysical technique known as self-potential to the measurement of microbial activity was tested on laboratory microcosms containing ferric iron and iron-reducing bacteria Shewanella alga BrY. Measurements of the electrical response of silver-coated copper electrodes distributed along a Teflon probe inserted into sterile and inoculated layers containing either ferric chloride, ferric citrate, or ferric oxide rich soil were recorded over hours or days. Strong electrical signals reached values more negative than {minus}400 mV for all types of inoculated ferric iron layers. Electric signals in sterile control layers, by contrast, rarely reached values more negative than {minus}150 mV. These preliminary experiments indicate that it may be possible to apply the self-potential geophysical method to monitor bioremediation in the field.

  14. EVALUATION OF AN ACTIVE PERSONAL DOSIMETRY SYSTEM IN INTERVENTIONAL RADIOLOGY AND NEURORADIOLOGY: PRELIMINARY RESULTS.

    PubMed

    Mangiarotti, M; D'Ercole, L; Quaretti, P; Moramarco, L; Lafe, E; Zappoli Thyrion, F

    2016-12-01

    Active personal dosimeters (APD) supply real-time data on radiation dose rates and equivalent doses, enabling reduction of operator exposure to radiation in diagnostic and surgical procedures. Data from the use of the Raysafe i2 APD system in an angiography room are reported. Preliminary characterisation of the APD system was first carried out in terms of angular dependence and of Hp(10) response during the simulation of five typical surgical protocols. Reference measurements, simultaneously obtained from TLDs, were used to obtain a correction factor. APD data for patients and for primary and secondary operators were then recorded over 52 surgical procedures. The correlation between kerma air product (KAP) and reference point air kerma (Kar) and operator dose as a function of position with respect to the source of radiation is reported. The data indicate that the APD system could help operators to optimise behaviours and use of room protection to effectively minimise radiation dose.

  15. Oncogene KRAS activates fatty acid synthase, resulting in specific ERK and lipid signatures associated with lung adenocarcinoma.

    PubMed

    Gouw, Arvin M; Eberlin, Livia S; Margulis, Katherine; Sullivan, Delaney K; Toal, Georgia G; Tong, Ling; Zare, Richard N; Felsher, Dean W

    2017-04-11

    KRAS gene mutation causes lung adenocarcinoma. KRAS activation has been associated with altered glucose and glutamine metabolism. Here, we show that KRAS activates lipogenesis, and this activation results in distinct proteomic and lipid signatures. By gene expression analysis, KRAS is shown to be associated with a lipogenesis gene signature and specific induction of fatty acid synthase (FASN). Through desorption electrospray ionization MS imaging (DESI-MSI), specific changes in lipogenesis and specific lipids are identified. By the nanoimmunoassay (NIA), KRAS is found to activate the protein ERK2, whereas ERK1 activation is found in non-KRAS-associated human lung tumors. The inhibition of FASN by cerulenin, a small molecule antibiotic, blocked cellular proliferation of KRAS-associated lung cancer cells. Hence, KRAS is associated with activation of ERK2, induction of FASN, and promotion of lipogenesis. FASN may be a unique target for KRAS-associated lung adenocarcinoma remediation.

  16. Macrophage activation associated with chronic murine cytomegalovirus infection results in more severe experimental choroidal neovascularization.

    PubMed

    Cousins, Scott W; Espinosa-Heidmann, Diego G; Miller, Daniel M; Pereira-Simon, Simone; Hernandez, Eleut P; Chien, Hsin; Meier-Jewett, Courtney; Dix, Richard D

    2012-01-01

    The neovascular (wet) form of age-related macular degeneration (AMD) leads to vision loss due to choroidal neovascularization (CNV). Since macrophages are important in CNV development, and cytomegalovirus (CMV)-specific IgG serum titers in patients with wet AMD are elevated, we hypothesized that chronic CMV infection contributes to wet AMD, possibly by pro-angiogenic macrophage activation. This hypothesis was tested using an established mouse model of experimental CNV. At 6 days, 6 weeks, or 12 weeks after infection with murine CMV (MCMV), laser-induced CNV was performed, and CNV severity was determined 4 weeks later by analysis of choroidal flatmounts. Although all MCMV-infected mice exhibited more severe CNV when compared with control mice, the most severe CNV developed in mice with chronic infection, a time when MCMV-specific gene sequences could not be detected within choroidal tissues. Splenic macrophages collected from mice with chronic MCMV infection, however, expressed significantly greater levels of TNF-α, COX-2, MMP-9, and, most significantly, VEGF transcripts by quantitative RT-PCR assay when compared to splenic macrophages from control mice. Direct MCMV infection of monolayers of IC-21 mouse macrophages confirmed significant stimulation of VEGF mRNA and VEGF protein as determined by quantitative RT-PCR assay, ELISA, and immunostaining. Stimulation of VEGF production in vivo and in vitro was sensitive to the antiviral ganciclovir. These studies suggest that chronic CMV infection may serve as a heretofore unrecognized risk factor in the pathogenesis of wet AMD. One mechanism by which chronic CMV infection might promote increased CNV severity is via stimulation of macrophages to make pro-angiogenic factors (VEGF), an outcome that requires active virus replication.

  17. Physical Activity Level and Sedentary Behaviors among Public School Children in Dakar (Senegal) Measured by PAQ-C and Accelerometer: Preliminary Results

    PubMed Central

    Diouf, Adama; Thiam, Mbeugué; Idohou-Dossou, Nicole; Diongue, Ousmane; Mégné, Ndé; Diallo, Khady; Sembène, Pape Malick; Wade, Salimata

    2016-01-01

    Background: Physical inactivity and sedentary lifestyles are major risk factors of childhood obesity. This study aimed to measure physical activity (PA) levels by accelerometer and Physical Activity Questionnaire for Older Children (PAQ-C) among Senegalese school children and the relation with Body Mass Index (BMI) and body composition. Methodology: 156 pupils 8–11 years old were randomly selected in four elementary public schools of Dakar. BMI z-score was used to categorize children according to their weight status. PA was measured by PAQ-C in the 156 pupils and by accelerometer (Actigraph GT3X+, Pensacola, FL, USA) in a subsample of 42 children. Body composition was determined by deuterium dilution method. Results: PAQ-C results were comparable in the 156 and 42 pupils. The 42 pupils presented a light activity measured by accelerometer, while PAQ-C classified the majority of them (57%; n = 24) in the moderate PA level. Children spent most of their time (min/day) in sedentary activities and light activities than in moderate and intense activity levels. Accumulation of 60 min/day Moderate-to-Vigorous Physical Activity (MVPA) was achieved by 54.8% (n = 23) of the pupils. MVPA decreased in girls in relation to their body fatness. There was a significant difference in MVPA between boys and girls. Similarly, overweight/obese (45 ± 16 min/day) children had lower MVPA than their normal and underweight peers (88 ± 34 and 74 ± 36 min/day, respectively; p = 0.004). Conclusions: The two methods are inconsistent for measuring light and moderate PA levels. Although PAQ-C is an uncomplicated routine method, various activities were not adapted for genuine activities in Senegalese children and therefore needs to be validated in African children. PMID:27735876

  18. A possible long-term activity cycle for ι Horologii: First results from SPI-HKα project

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Flores, Matías G.; Buccino, Andrea P.; Saffe, Carlos E.; Mauas, Pablo J. D.

    2017-02-01

    In order to detect stellar activity cycles and study possible star-planet interactions (SPIs), we have been developing the HKα and SPI-HKα projects since 1999 and 2012 respectively. In this work, we present preliminary results of possible SPIs from studies of chromospheric activity and look for possible correlations between stellar activity and stellar/planetary parameters. We find that for stars with a similar Teff, stellar activity increases with the mass of the planet, similar to results from previous works. However, stellar ages can also play a role, and a larger stellar sample is needed to verify these trends. We also note that some of these stars present a remarkably high level of chromospheric activity, comparable even with RSCvn or BY Dra active stars. In addition, we do not observe any correlation between stellar activity and semi-major axis. We present the first long-term activity study of the star ι Horologii, a young solar-type star that hosts a non-transiting Jovian planet and exhibits a high activity level. We analysed our own spectra, obtained between 2002 and 2015, in conjunction with public HARPS (High Accuracy Radial velocity Planet Searcher) observations. We calculated the Ca II indexes derived from the 987 Complejo Astronómico El Leoncito (CASLEO) and HARPS spectra and converted them to the Mt Wilson scale. We found a long-term activity cycle of ˜5 yr which fits the active sequence of Böhm-Vitense. The amplitude of this longer cycle is irregular, as was also observed for the shorter cycle. This phenomenon could be attributable to an antisymmetric distribution of active regions on the stellar surface.

  19. CHP REGIONAL APPLICATION CENTERS: A PRELIMINARY INVENTORY OF ACTIVITIES AND SELECTED RESULTS

    SciTech Connect

    Schweitzer, Martin

    2009-10-01

    Eight Regional CHP Application Centers (RACs) are funded by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) to facilitate the development and deployment of Combined Heat and Power (CHP) technologies in all 50 states. The RACs build end-user awareness by providing CHP-related information to targeted markets through education and outreach; they work with the states and regulators to encourage the creation and adoption of favorable public policies; and they provide CHP users and prospective users with technical assistance and support on specific projects. The RACs were started by DOE as a pilot program in 2001 to support the National CHP Roadmap developed by industry to accelerate deployment of energy efficient CHP technologies (U.S. Combined Heat and Power Association 2001). The intent was to foster a regional presence to build market awareness, address policy issues, and facilitate project development. Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) has supported DOE with the RAC program since its inception. In 2007, ORNL led a cooperative effort involving DOE and some CHP industry stakeholders to establish quantitative metrics for measuring the RACs accomplishments. This effort incorporated the use of logic models to define and describe key RAC activities, outputs, and outcomes. Based on this detailed examination of RAC operations, potential metrics were identified associated with the various key sectors addressed by the RACs: policy makers; regulatory agencies; investor owned utilities; municipal and cooperative utilities; financiers; developers; and end users. The final product was reviewed by a panel of representatives from DOE, ORNL, RACs, and the private sector. The metrics developed through this effort focus on major RAC activities as well as on CHP installations and related outcomes. All eight RACs were contacted in August 2008 and asked to provide data for every year of Center operations for those metrics on which they kept records. In addition, data on CHP installations and

  20. Computer-based procedure for field activities: Results from three evaluations at nuclear power plants

    SciTech Connect

    Oxstrand, Johanna; bly, Aaron; LeBlanc, Katya

    2014-09-01

    Nearly all activities that involve human interaction with the systems of a nuclear power plant are guided by procedures. The paper-based procedures (PBPs) currently used by industry have a demonstrated history of ensuring safety; however, improving procedure use could yield tremendous savings in increased efficiency and safety. One potential way to improve procedure-based activities is through the use of computer-based procedures (CBPs). Computer-based procedures provide the opportunity to incorporate context driven job aids, such as drawings, photos, just-in-time training, etc into CBP system. One obvious advantage of this capability is reducing the time spent tracking down the applicable documentation. Additionally, human performance tools can be integrated in the CBP system in such way that helps the worker focus on the task rather than the tools. Some tools can be completely incorporated into the CBP system, such as pre-job briefs, placekeeping, correct component verification, and peer checks. Other tools can be partly integrated in a fashion that reduces the time and labor required, such as concurrent and independent verification. Another benefit of CBPs compared to PBPs is dynamic procedure presentation. PBPs are static documents which limits the degree to which the information presented can be tailored to the task and conditions when the procedure is executed. The CBP system could be configured to display only the relevant steps based on operating mode, plant status, and the task at hand. A dynamic presentation of the procedure (also known as context-sensitive procedures) will guide the user down the path of relevant steps based on the current conditions. This feature will reduce the user’s workload and inherently reduce the risk of incorrectly marking a step as not applicable and the risk of incorrectly performing a step that should be marked as not applicable. As part of the Department of Energy’s (DOE) Light Water Reactors Sustainability Program

  1. Little Shrimp, Big Results: A Model of an Integrative, Cross-Curricular Activity

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ackerson, Nicole; Piser, Carol; Walka, Keith

    2010-01-01

    This integrative, cross-curricular lab engages middle school biology students in an exercise involving ecology, arthropod biology, and mathematics. Students research the anatomy and behavioral patterns of a species of brine shrimp, compare the anatomy of adult and juvenile brine shrimp, and graph and interpret results. In this article, the authors…

  2. Thoron detection with an active Radon exposure meter—First results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Irlinger, J.; Wielunski, M.; Rühm, W.

    2014-02-01

    For state-of-the-art discrimination of Radon and Thoron several measurement techniques can be used, such as active sampling, electrostatic collection, delayed coincidence method, and alpha-particle-spectroscopy. However, most of the devices available are bulky and show high power consumption, rendering them unfeasible for personal exposition monitoring. Based on a Radon exposure meter previously realized at the Helmholtz Center Munich (HMGU), a new electronic prototype for Radon/Thoron monitoring is currently being developed, which features small size and weight. Operating with pin-diode detectors, the low-power passive-sampling device can be used for continuous concentration measurements, employing alpha-particle-spectroscopy and coincidence event registration to distinguish decays originating either from Radon or Thoron isotopes and their decay products. In open geometry, preliminary calibration measurements suggest that one count per hour is produced by a 11 Bq m-3 Radon atmosphere or by a 15 Bq m-3 Thoron atmosphere. Future efforts will concentrate on measurements in mixed Radon/Thoron atmospheres.

  3. Adaptive wave field synthesis for active sound field reproduction: experimental results.

    PubMed

    Gauthier, Philippe-Aubert; Berry, Alain

    2008-04-01

    Sound field reproduction has applications in music reproduction, spatial audio, sound environment reproduction, and experimental acoustics. Sound field reproduction can be used to artificially reproduce the spatial character of natural hearing. The objective is then to reproduce a sound field in a real reproduction environment. Wave field synthesis (WFS) is a known open-loop technology which assumes that the reproduction environment is anechoic. The room response thus reduces the quality of the physical sound field reproduction by WFS. In recent research papers, adaptive wave field synthesis (AWFS) was defined as a potential solution to compensate for these quality reductions from which WFS objective performance suffers. In this paper, AWFS is experimentally investigated as an active sound field reproduction system with a limited number of reproduction error sensors to compensate for the response of the listening environment. Two digital signal processing algorithms for AWFS are used for comparison purposes, one of which is based on independent radiation mode control. AWFS performed propagating sound field reproduction better than WFS in three tested reproduction spaces (hemianechoic chamber, standard laboratory space, and reverberation chamber).

  4. HER2 activation results in β-catenin-dependent changes in pulmonary epithelial permeability

    PubMed Central

    Vasu, Vihas T.; Thaikoottathil, Jyoti V.; Mishra, Rangnath; Shatat, Mohammad A.; Mason, Robert J.; Kern, Jeffrey A.

    2014-01-01

    The receptor tyrosine kinase human epidermal growth factor receptor-2 (HER2) is known to regulate pulmonary epithelial barrier function; however, the mechanisms behind this effect remain unidentified. We hypothesized that HER2 signaling alters the epithelial barrier through an interaction with the adherens junction (AJ) protein β-catenin, leading to dissolution of the AJ. In quiescent pulmonary epithelial cells, HER2 and β-catenin colocalized along the lateral intercellular junction. HER2 activation by the ligand neuregulin-1 was associated with tyrosine phosphorylation of β-catenin, dissociation of β-catenin from E-cadherin, and decreased E-cadherin-mediated cell adhesion. All effects were blocked with the HER2 inhibitor lapatinib. β-Catenin knockdown using shRNA significantly attenuated neuregulin-1-induced decreases in pulmonary epithelial resistance in vitro. Our data indicate that HER2 interacts with β-catenin, leading to dissolution of the AJ, decreased cell-cell adhesion, and disruption of the pulmonary epithelial barrier. PMID:25326580

  5. Thoron detection with an active Radon exposure meter—First results

    SciTech Connect

    Irlinger, J. Wielunski, M.; Rühm, W.

    2014-02-15

    For state-of-the-art discrimination of Radon and Thoron several measurement techniques can be used, such as active sampling, electrostatic collection, delayed coincidence method, and alpha-particle-spectroscopy. However, most of the devices available are bulky and show high power consumption, rendering them unfeasible for personal exposition monitoring. Based on a Radon exposure meter previously realized at the Helmholtz Center Munich (HMGU), a new electronic prototype for Radon/Thoron monitoring is currently being developed, which features small size and weight. Operating with pin-diode detectors, the low-power passive-sampling device can be used for continuous concentration measurements, employing alpha-particle-spectroscopy and coincidence event registration to distinguish decays originating either from Radon or Thoron isotopes and their decay products. In open geometry, preliminary calibration measurements suggest that one count per hour is produced by a 11 Bq m{sup −3} Radon atmosphere or by a 15 Bq m{sup −3} Thoron atmosphere. Future efforts will concentrate on measurements in mixed Radon/Thoron atmospheres.

  6. Current activities and results of the Long Duration Exposure Facility Meteoroid and Debris Special Investigation Group

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    See, Thomas H.; Leago, Kimberly S.; Warren, Jack L.; Bernhard, Ronald P.; Zolensky, Michael E.

    1994-01-01

    Fiscal Year 1994 will bring to a close the initial investigative activities associated with the Long Duration Exposure Facility (LDEF). LDEF was a 14-faced spacecraft (i.e., 12-sided cylinder and two ends) which housed 54 different experimental packages in low-Earth orbit (LEO) from Apr. 1984 to Jan. 1990 (i.e., for approx. 5.75 years). Since LDEF's return, the Meteoroid & Debris Special Investigation Group (M&D SIG) has been examining various LDEF components in order to better understand and define the LEO particulate environment. Members of the M&D SIG at JSC in Houston, TX have been contributing to these studies by carefully examining and documenting all impact events found on LDEF's 6061-T6 aluminum Intercostals (i.e., one of the spacecraft's structural frame components). Unlike all other hardware on LDEF, the frame exposed significantly large surface areas of a single homogeneous material in all (i.e., 26) possible LDEF pointing directions. To date, 28 of the 68 Intercostals in the possession of the M&D SIG have been documented. This data, as well as similar information from various LDEF investigators, can be accessed through the M&D SIG Database which is maintained at JSC.

  7. Purification of Ovine Respiratory Complex I Results in a Highly Active and Stable Preparation.

    PubMed

    Letts, James A; Degliesposti, Gianluca; Fiedorczuk, Karol; Skehel, Mark; Sazanov, Leonid A

    2016-11-18

    NADH-ubiquinone oxidoreductase (complex I) is the largest (∼1 MDa) and the least characterized complex of the mitochondrial electron transport chain. Because of the ease of sample availability, previous work has focused almost exclusively on bovine complex I. However, only medium resolution structural analyses of this complex have been reported. Working with other mammalian complex I homologues is a potential approach for overcoming these limitations. Due to the inherent difficulty of expressing large membrane protein complexes, screening of complex I homologues is limited to large mammals reared for human consumption. The high sequence identity among these available sources may preclude the benefits of screening. Here, we report the characterization of complex I purified from Ovis aries (ovine) heart mitochondria. All 44 unique subunits of the intact complex were identified by mass spectrometry. We identified differences in the subunit composition of subcomplexes of ovine complex I as compared with bovine, suggesting differential stability of inter-subunit interactions within the complex. Furthermore, the 42-kDa subunit, which is easily lost from the bovine enzyme, remains tightly bound to ovine complex I. Additionally, we developed a novel purification protocol for highly active and stable mitochondrial complex I using the branched-chain detergent lauryl maltose neopentyl glycol. Our data demonstrate that, although closely related, significant differences exist between the biochemical properties of complex I prepared from ovine and bovine mitochondria and that ovine complex I represents a suitable alternative target for further structural studies.

  8. Coalbed natural gas exploration, drilling activities, and geologic test results, 2007-2010

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Clark, Arthur C.

    2014-01-01

    The U.S. Geological Survey, in partnership with the U.S. Bureau of Land Management, the North Slope Borough, and the Arctic Slope Regional Corporation conducted a four-year study designed to identify, define, and delineate a shallow coalbed natural gas (CBNG) resource with the potential to provide locally produced, affordable power to the community of Wainwright, Alaska. From 2007 through 2010, drilling and testing activities conducted at three sites in or near Wainwright, identified and evaluated an approximately 7.5-ft-thick, laterally continuous coalbed that contained significant quantities of CBNG. This coalbed, subsequently named the Wainwright coalbed, was penetrated at depths ranging from 1,167 ft to 1,300 ft below land surface. Core samples were collected from the Wainwright coalbed at all three drill locations and desorbed-gas measurements were taken from seventeen 1-ft-thick sections of the core. These measurements indicate that the Wainwright coalbed contains enough CBNG to serve as a long-term energy supply for the community. Although attempts to produce viable quantities of CBNG from the Wainwright coalbed proved unsuccessful, it seems likely that with proper well-field design and by utilizing currently available drilling and reservoir stimulation techniques, this CBNG resource could be developed as a long-term economically viable energy source for Wainwright.

  9. Dietary docosahexaenoic acid alleviates autistic-like behaviors resulting from maternal immune activation in mice.

    PubMed

    Weiser, Michael J; Mucha, Brittany; Denheyer, Heather; Atkinson, Devon; Schanz, Norman; Vassiliou, Evros; Benno, Robert H

    2016-03-01

    The prevalence of autism spectrum disorders over the last several decades has risen at an alarming rate. Factors such as broadened clinical definitions and increased parental age only partially account for this precipitous increase, suggesting that recent changes in environmental factors may also be responsible. One such factor could be the dramatic decrease in consumption of anti-inflammatory dietary omega-3 (n-3) polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFAs) relative to the amount of pro-inflammatory omega-6 (n-6) PUFAs and saturated fats in the Western diet. Docosahexaenoic acid (DHA) is the principle n-3 PUFA found in neural tissue and is important for optimal brain development, especially during late gestation when DHA rapidly and preferentially accumulates in the brain. In this study, we tested whether supplementation of a low n-3 PUFA diet with DHA throughout development could improve measures related to autism in a mouse model of maternal immune activation. We found that dietary DHA protected offspring from the deleterious effects of gestational exposure to the viral mimetic polyriboinosinic-polyribocytidilic acid on behavioral measures of autism and subsequent adulthood immune system reactivity. These data suggest that elevated dietary levels of DHA, especially during pregnancy and nursing, may help protect normal neurodevelopment from the potentially adverse consequences of environmental insults like maternal infection.

  10. Experimental Results from the Active Aeroelastic Wing Wind Tunnel Test Program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Heeg, Jennifer; Spain, Charles V.; Florance, James R.; Wieseman, Carol D.; Ivanco, Thomas G.; DeMoss, Joshua; Silva, Walter A.; Panetta, Andrew; Lively, Peter; Tumwa, Vic

    2005-01-01

    The Active Aeroelastic Wing (AAW) program is a cooperative effort among NASA, the Air Force Research Laboratory and the Boeing Company, encompassing flight testing, wind tunnel testing and analyses. The objective of the AAW program is to investigate the improvements that can be realized by exploiting aeroelastic characteristics, rather than viewing them as a detriment to vehicle performance and stability. To meet this objective, a wind tunnel model was crafted to duplicate the static aeroelastic behavior of the AAW flight vehicle. The model was tested in the NASA Langley Transonic Dynamics Tunnel in July and August 2004. The wind tunnel investigation served the program goal in three ways. First, the wind tunnel provided a benchmark for comparison with the flight vehicle and various levels of theoretical analyses. Second, it provided detailed insight highlighting the effects of individual parameters upon the aeroelastic response of the AAW vehicle. This parameter identification can then be used for future aeroelastic vehicle design guidance. Third, it provided data to validate scaling laws and their applicability with respect to statically scaled aeroelastic models.

  11. Sport facility proximity and physical activity: Results from the Study of Community Sports in China.

    PubMed

    Guo, Xiujin; Dai, Jian; Xun, Pengcheng; Jamieson, Lynn M; He, Ka

    2015-01-01

    Increased sport facility proximity is associated with higher likelihood of meeting physical activity (PA) recommendations in western studies, but it is uncertain whether the findings can be generalized to the Chinese population. From September 2012 to December 2012, 3926 participants drawn from China using a multi-stage sampling strategy were invited to participate in the Study of Community Sports in China. Participants' demographics, commuting time to the nearest sport facility and PA levels were assessed. Among 3926 participants included (51.2% female) in the final analysis, 878 (22.4%) of them met the PA recommendation. Participants who spent ≥30 minutes in commuting time had 80% odds [odds ratio (OR): 0.80 (95% CI: 0.65-0.98)] of meeting the PA recommendation compared to those who spent less than 10 minutes. For every 10-minute increment in commuting time, the odds reduced by 6% [OR = 0.94 (0.88-0.99)]. The observed associations were not appreciably modified by age, gender or education level. In this cross-sectional community-based study, we found that residents in China were less likely to meet the PA recommendation if they needed more commuting time to the nearest sport facility. Increasing sport facility proximity may be effective in improving the PA levels in the Chinese population.

  12. Ideological Consumerism in Colombian Elections, 2015: Links Between Political Ideology, Twitter Activity, and Electoral Results.

    PubMed

    Correa, Juan C; Camargo, Jorge E

    2017-01-01

    Propagation of political ideologies in social networks has shown a substantial impact on voting behavior. Both the contents of the messages (the ideology) and the politicians' influence on their online audiences (their followers) have been associated with such an impact. In this study we evaluate which of these factors exerted a major role in deciding electoral results of the 2015 Colombian regional elections by evaluating the linguistic similarity of political ideologies and their influence on the Twitter sphere. The electoral results proved to be strongly associated with tweets and retweets and not with the linguistic content of their ideologies or politicians' followers in Twitter. Finally, suggestions for new ways to analyze electoral processes are discussed.

  13. Skylab experiment M-171 'Metabolic Activity' - Results of the first manned mission

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Michel, E. L.; Rummel, J. A.; Sawin, C. F.

    1975-01-01

    The experiment was performed to ascertain whether man's ability to perform mechanical work would be altered as a result of exposure to the weightless environment. Skylab II crewmen were exercised on a bicycle ergometer at loads approximating 25%, 50%, and 75% of their maximum oxygen uptake while their physiological responses were monitored. The results of these tests indicate that the crewmen had no significant decrement in their response to exercise during their exposure to zero gravity. Immediately postflight, however, all crewmen demonstrated an inability to perform the programmed exercise with the same metabolic effectiveness as they did both preflight and inflight. The most significant changes were elevated heart rates for the same work load and oxygen consumption (decreased oxygen pulse), decreased stroke volume, and decreased cardiac output at the same oxygen consumption level. It is apparent that the changes occurred inflight, but did not manifest themselves until the crewmen attempted to readapt to the 1-G environment.

  14. Application of two design methods for active flutter suppression and wind-tunnel test results

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Newsom, J. R.; Abel, I.; Dunn, H. J.

    1980-01-01

    The synthesis, implementation, and wind tunnel test of two flutter suppression control laws for an aeroelastic model equipped with a trailing edge control surface are presented. One control law is based on the aerodynamic energy method, and the other is based on results of optimal control theory. Analytical methods used to design the control laws and evaluate their performance are described. At Mach 0.6, 0.8, and 0.9, increases in flutter dynamic pressure were obtained but the full 44 percent increase was not achieved. However at Mach 0.95, the 44 percent increase was achieved with both control laws. Experimental results indicate that the performance of the systems is not so effective as that predicted by analysis, and that wind tunnel turbulence plays an important role in both control law synthesis and demonstration of system performance.

  15. Cosmic dust analogue material condensation in microgravity: The Stardust programme - First results and future activities

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ferguson, F.; Lilleleht, L. U.; Nuth, J.; Stephens, J. R.; Bussoletti, E.; Carotenuto, L.; Colangeli, L.; Dell'aversana, P.; Mele, F.; Mennella, V.

    1992-01-01

    Initial results are presented from airborne experiments investigating the vapor phase condensation in microgravity, carried out in the framework of the Stardust international program. Special attention is given to the design and operation of the experimental equipment, which includes the furnace for producing vapors from different materials and the cloud chamber in which the vapor nucleation occurs. A two-part mathematical model was developed to describe the transport processes in the nucleation chamber. Results obtained from three experimental series were conducted with Mg and Zn aboard NASA's KC-135 reduced-gravity research aircraft showed that nucleation front (smoke cloud) was quite different in appearance in microgravity from that typically observed at 1-g condition. The Mg and Zn particles exhibited significant differences in shape; there was some evidence of coagulation.

  16. Ideological Consumerism in Colombian Elections, 2015: Links Between Political Ideology, Twitter Activity, and Electoral Results

    PubMed Central

    Camargo, Jorge E.

    2017-01-01

    Abstract Propagation of political ideologies in social networks has shown a substantial impact on voting behavior. Both the contents of the messages (the ideology) and the politicians' influence on their online audiences (their followers) have been associated with such an impact. In this study we evaluate which of these factors exerted a major role in deciding electoral results of the 2015 Colombian regional elections by evaluating the linguistic similarity of political ideologies and their influence on the Twitter sphere. The electoral results proved to be strongly associated with tweets and retweets and not with the linguistic content of their ideologies or politicians' followers in Twitter. Finally, suggestions for new ways to analyze electoral processes are discussed. PMID:28080152

  17. Outstanding results from one year's activities of the ESA Metric Camera Working Group

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Togliatti, G.

    1985-06-01

    Results of the Spacelab Metric Camera experiment on STS-9 in photogrammetry: (precision, triangulations, point identification and mapping, orthophotos); thematic interpretations; and geological interpretation are summarized. Performance is fairly satisfactory in topographic mapping and in geological and thematic applications, with shortcomings in features identification, mainly due to poor lighting conditions and absence of image motion compensation. The metric accuracy of the images is very good, and in several cases better than expected.

  18. Can testosterone therapy be offered to men on active surveillance for prostate cancer? Preliminary results

    PubMed Central

    Kacker, Ravi; Hult, Mariam; San Francisco, Ignacio F; Conners, William P; Rojas, Pablo A; Dewolf, William C; Morgentaler, Abraham

    2016-01-01

    This report presents our experience with T therapy in a cohort of T-deficient men on active surveillance (AS) for Gleason 3 + 3 and Gleason 3 + 4 prostate cancer (PCa). A retrospective chart review identified 28 men with T deficiency who underwent T therapy (T group) for at least 6 months while on AS for PCa. A comparison group of 96 men on AS for PCa with untreated T deficiency (no-T group) was identified at the same institution. The AS protocol followed a modified Epstein criteria and allowed inclusion of men with a single core of low-volume Gleason 3 + 4 PCa. Mean age was 59.5 and 61.3 years, and mean follow-up was 38.9 and 42.4 months for the T and no-T groups, respectively. Of all 28 men in the T group, 3 (10.7%) men developed an increase in Gleason score while on AS. Of 22 men in the T group with Gleason 3 + 3 disease, 7 (31.8%) men developed biopsy progression including 3 men (13.6%) who developed Gleason 3 + 4 PCa. Of 6 men with Gleason 3 + 4 disease at baseline, 2 (33.3%) men developed an increase in tumor volume, and none developed upgrading beyond Gleason 3 + 4. All 96 men in the no-T group had Gleason 3 + 3 disease at baseline and, 43 (44.7%) developed biopsy progression, including 9 men (9.38%) with upgrading to Gleason 7 (3 + 4). Biopsy progression rates were similar for both groups and historical controls. Biopsy progression in men on AS appears unaffected by T therapy over 3 years. Prospective placebo-controlled trials of T therapy in T-deficient men on AS should be considered given the symptomatic benefits experienced by treated men. PMID:26306850

  19. Marine Hazards, a Result of Naval War Activities in the Pacific 1942-1945?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bernaerts, A.

    2014-12-01

    The clash between the United States and Japan in the Pacific from December 1942 to August 1945 presumably caused marine geohazards exceeding significantly many submarine earthquakes, explosive volcanic eruptions and tsunamis. Most significantly the most pronounced shift in Pacific Decadal Oscillation (PDO) took place within the shortest period of time ever observed, and when the Allies navies approached Japan's coast line two years later, winter air temperatures (December to February 1944/45) fell to the lowest level ever observed. The Naval War in the Pacific from 1943 - 1945 was not only devastating to man and material, but also substantially altered the structure of the sea surface layer down to 100 meter and more, with a subsequent impact on air temperatures, and PDO balance across the Northern Pacific. Until now the question has received little attention although it is obvious that a global rising temperature trend prior the early 1940s turned into a decreasing mode during the time when huge naval war activities took place across the oceans in the Northern Hemisphere that eventually lasted for three decades until the mid-1970s While the impact of screw driven vessels since their invention in the 19th Century on the sea surface structure is difficult to assess, and no investigations have been made yet . The naval war in the Pacific from 1943 - 1945 could be regarded as a huge scale 'field experiment' on manmade marine geohazards due to the suddenness, the magnitude and the intensity, penetrating the ocean to considerable depths. Naval operations and available sea and climate data need to be identified, linked, evaluated and discussed. What kind of impact did the Pacific War have on climate? It seems due time to pay attention to this issue.

  20. Biotransformation of dianabol with the filamentous fungi and β-glucuronidase inhibitory activity of resulting metabolites.

    PubMed

    Khan, Naik T; Zafar, Salman; Noreen, Shagufta; Al Majid, Abdullah M; Al Othman, Zeid A; Al-Resayes, Saud Ibrahim; Atta-ur-Rahman; Choudhary, M Iqbal

    2014-07-01

    Biotransformation of the anabolic steroid dianabol (1) by suspended-cell cultures of the filamentous fungi Cunninghamella elegans and Macrophomina phaseolina was studied. Incubation of 1 with C. elegans yielded five hydroxylated metabolites 2-6, while M. phaseolina transformed compound 1 into polar metabolites 7-11. These metabolites were identified as 6β,17β-dihydroxy-17α-methylandrost-1,4-dien-3-one (2), 15α,17β-dihydroxy-17α-methylandrost-1,4-dien-3-one (3), 11α,17β-dihydroxy-17α-methylandrost-1,4-dien-3-one (4), 6β,12β,17β-trihydroxy-17α-methylandrost-1,4-dien-3-one (5), 6β,15α,17β-trihydroxy-17α-methylandrost-1,4-dien-3-one (6), 17β-hydroxy-17α-methylandrost-1,4-dien-3,6-dione (7), 7β,17β,-dihydroxy-17α-methylandrost-1,4-dien-3-one (8), 15β,17β-dihydroxy-17α-methylandrost-1,4-dien-3-one (9), 17β-hydroxy-17α-methylandrost-1,4-dien-3,11-dione (10), and 11β,17β-dihydroxy-17α-methylandrost-1,4-dien-3-one (11). Metabolite 3 was also transformed chemically into diketone 12 and oximes 13, and 14. Compounds 6 and 12-14 were identified as new derivatives of dianabol (1). The structures of all transformed products were deduced on the basis of spectral analyses. Compounds 1-14 were evaluated for β-glucuronidase enzyme inhibitory activity. Compounds 7, 13, and 14 showed a strong inhibition of β-glucuronidase enzyme, with IC50 values between 49.0 and 84.9 μM.