Science.gov

Sample records for activity correlated negatively

  1. Forming a negative impression of another person correlates with activation in medial prefrontal cortex and amygdala.

    PubMed

    Iidaka, Tetsuya; Harada, Tokiko; Sadato, Norihiro

    2011-09-01

    Neural correlates involved in the formation of negative impression from face were investigated using event-related functional magnetic resonance imaging and a partial conditioning paradigm. Eighteen normal volunteers underwent imaging while they viewed the faces of two unfamiliar individuals: one individual's face was partially accompanied by negative emotion but the other's was not. After the volunteers learned the relationship between the faces and the emotion, they formed a more negative impression of the person's face when the emotion was presented. Subtraction analysis of the individuals' neutral faces revealed activation in the dorsal anterior cingulate cortex and superior temporal sulcus, but this activity did not correlate with the change of impression from face. On the other hand, the response in the left amygdala negatively correlated with the change of impression from face in the first run. Time modulation analysis revealed that activity in the dorsomedial prefrontal cortex associated with negative emotion was the largest in the initial part of the acquisition. These results suggest that a negative impression from face may be formed by orchestrated activity in the dorsomedial prefrontal cortex, dorsal anterior cingulate cortex and amygdala, and that the activity has a prominent role in the initial acquisition of negative emotion. PMID:20693390

  2. Forming a negative impression of another person correlates with activation in medial prefrontal cortex and amygdala.

    PubMed

    Iidaka, Tetsuya; Harada, Tokiko; Sadato, Norihiro

    2011-09-01

    Neural correlates involved in the formation of negative impression from face were investigated using event-related functional magnetic resonance imaging and a partial conditioning paradigm. Eighteen normal volunteers underwent imaging while they viewed the faces of two unfamiliar individuals: one individual's face was partially accompanied by negative emotion but the other's was not. After the volunteers learned the relationship between the faces and the emotion, they formed a more negative impression of the person's face when the emotion was presented. Subtraction analysis of the individuals' neutral faces revealed activation in the dorsal anterior cingulate cortex and superior temporal sulcus, but this activity did not correlate with the change of impression from face. On the other hand, the response in the left amygdala negatively correlated with the change of impression from face in the first run. Time modulation analysis revealed that activity in the dorsomedial prefrontal cortex associated with negative emotion was the largest in the initial part of the acquisition. These results suggest that a negative impression from face may be formed by orchestrated activity in the dorsomedial prefrontal cortex, dorsal anterior cingulate cortex and amygdala, and that the activity has a prominent role in the initial acquisition of negative emotion.

  3. Positive and negative symptom scores are correlated with activation in different brain regions during facial emotion perception in schizophrenia patients: a voxel-based sLORETA source activity study.

    PubMed

    Kim, Do-Won; Kim, Han-Sung; Lee, Seung-Hwan; Im, Chang-Hwan

    2013-12-01

    Schizophrenia is one of the most devastating of all mental illnesses, and has dimensional characteristics that include both positive and negative symptoms. One problem reported in schizophrenia patients is that they tend to show deficits in face emotion processing, on which negative symptoms are thought to have stronger influence. In this study, four event-related potential (ERP) components (P100, N170, N250, and P300) and their source activities were analyzed using EEG data acquired from 23 schizophrenia patients while they were presented with facial emotion picture stimuli. Correlations between positive and negative syndrome scale (PANSS) scores and source activations during facial emotion processing were calculated to identify the brain areas affected by symptom scores. Our analysis demonstrates that PANSS positive scores are negatively correlated with major areas of the left temporal lobule for early ERP components (P100, N170) and with the right middle frontal lobule for a later component (N250), which indicates that positive symptoms affect both early face processing and facial emotion processing. On the other hand, PANSS negative scores are negatively correlated with several clustered regions, including the left fusiform gyrus (at P100), most of which are not overlapped with regions showing correlations with PANSS positive scores. Our results suggest that positive and negative symptoms affect independent brain regions during facial emotion processing, which may help to explain the heterogeneous characteristics of schizophrenia.

  4. Neural Correlates of Attitude Change Following Positive and Negative Advertisements

    PubMed Central

    Kato, Junko; Ide, Hiroko; Kabashima, Ikuo; Kadota, Hiroshi; Takano, Kouji; Kansaku, Kenji

    2009-01-01

    Understanding changes in attitudes towards others is critical to understanding human behaviour. Neuropolitical studies have found that the activation of emotion-related areas in the brain is linked to resilient political preferences, and neuroeconomic research has analysed the neural correlates of social preferences that favour or oppose consideration of intrinsic rewards. This study aims to identify the neural correlates in the prefrontal cortices of changes in political attitudes toward others that are linked to social cognition. Functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) experiments have presented videos from previous electoral campaigns and television commercials for major cola brands and then used the subjects' self-rated affinity toward political candidates as behavioural indicators. After viewing negative campaign videos, subjects showing stronger fMRI activation in the dorsolateral prefrontal cortex lowered their ratings of the candidate they originally supported more than did those with smaller fMRI signal changes in the same region. Subjects showing stronger activation in the medial prefrontal cortex tended to increase their ratings more than did those with less activation. The same regions were not activated by viewing negative advertisements for cola. Correlations between the self-rated values and the neural signal changes underscore the metric representation of observed decisions (i.e., whether to support or not) in the brain. This indicates that neurometric analysis may contribute to the exploration of the neural correlates of daily social behaviour. PMID:19503749

  5. Neural correlates of attitude change following positive and negative advertisements.

    PubMed

    Kato, Junko; Ide, Hiroko; Kabashima, Ikuo; Kadota, Hiroshi; Takano, Kouji; Kansaku, Kenji

    2009-01-01

    Understanding changes in attitudes towards others is critical to understanding human behaviour. Neuropolitical studies have found that the activation of emotion-related areas in the brain is linked to resilient political preferences, and neuroeconomic research has analysed the neural correlates of social preferences that favour or oppose consideration of intrinsic rewards. This study aims to identify the neural correlates in the prefrontal cortices of changes in political attitudes toward others that are linked to social cognition. Functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) experiments have presented videos from previous electoral campaigns and television commercials for major cola brands and then used the subjects' self-rated affinity toward political candidates as behavioural indicators. After viewing negative campaign videos, subjects showing stronger fMRI activation in the dorsolateral prefrontal cortex lowered their ratings of the candidate they originally supported more than did those with smaller fMRI signal changes in the same region. Subjects showing stronger activation in the medial prefrontal cortex tended to increase their ratings more than did those with less activation. The same regions were not activated by viewing negative advertisements for cola. Correlations between the self-rated values and the neural signal changes underscore the metric representation of observed decisions (i.e., whether to support or not) in the brain. This indicates that neurometric analysis may contribute to the exploration of the neural correlates of daily social behaviour.

  6. Negative Correlations and Entanglement in Higher-Spin Dicke States

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Xiaoqian; Zhong, Wei; Wang, Xiaoguang

    2016-10-01

    We consider entanglement criteria based on the spin squeezing inequalities for arbitrary spin systems. Here we use the negative correlations to detect the entanglement in the system with exchange symmetry. For arbitrary spin systems, we can find that the state is entangled, when the minimal pairwise correlation is negative. Then we give a parameter which is defined by the collective angular momentum operator, to detect the entanglement for the Dicke state with N spin -1 particles, and the results are as the same as negative correlation. We also consider the directions of negative correlation, the state is entangled in two orthogonal directions for the superposition of Dicke state without parity.

  7. Onset of negative interspike interval correlations in adapting neurons.

    PubMed

    Urdapilleta, Eugenio

    2011-10-01

    Negative serial correlations in single spike trains are an effective method to reduce the variability of spike counts. One of the factors contributing to the development of negative correlations between successive interspike intervals is the presence of adaptation currents. In this work, based on a hidden Markov model and a proper statistical description of conditional responses, we obtain analytically these correlations in an adequate dynamical neuron model resembling adaptation. We derive the serial correlation coefficients for arbitrary lags, under a small adaptation scenario. In this case, the behavior of correlations is universal and depends on the first-order statistical description of an exponentially driven time-inhomogeneous stochastic process.

  8. Neural correlates of processing negative and sexually arousing pictures.

    PubMed

    Bailey, Kira; West, Robert; Mullaney, Kellie M

    2012-01-01

    Recent work has questioned whether the negativity bias is a distinct component of affective picture processing. The current study was designed to determine whether there are different neural correlates of processing positive and negative pictures using event-related brain potentials. The early posterior negativity and late positive potential were greatest in amplitude for erotic pictures. Partial Least Squares analysis revealed one latent variable that distinguished erotic pictures from neutral and positive pictures and another that differentiated negative pictures from neutral and positive pictures. The effects of orienting task on the neural correlates of processing negative and erotic pictures indicate that affective picture processing is sensitive to both stimulus-driven, and attentional or decision processes. The current data, together with other recent findings from our laboratory, lead to the suggestion that there are distinct neural correlates of processing negative and positive stimuli during affective picture processing.

  9. Neural correlates of processing negative and sexually arousing pictures.

    PubMed

    Bailey, Kira; West, Robert; Mullaney, Kellie M

    2012-01-01

    Recent work has questioned whether the negativity bias is a distinct component of affective picture processing. The current study was designed to determine whether there are different neural correlates of processing positive and negative pictures using event-related brain potentials. The early posterior negativity and late positive potential were greatest in amplitude for erotic pictures. Partial Least Squares analysis revealed one latent variable that distinguished erotic pictures from neutral and positive pictures and another that differentiated negative pictures from neutral and positive pictures. The effects of orienting task on the neural correlates of processing negative and erotic pictures indicate that affective picture processing is sensitive to both stimulus-driven, and attentional or decision processes. The current data, together with other recent findings from our laboratory, lead to the suggestion that there are distinct neural correlates of processing negative and positive stimuli during affective picture processing. PMID:23029071

  10. Binding affinity between dietary polyphenols and β-lactoglobulin negatively correlates with the protein susceptibility to digestion and total antioxidant activity of complexes formed.

    PubMed

    Stojadinovic, Marija; Radosavljevic, Jelena; Ognjenovic, Jana; Vesic, Jelena; Prodic, Ivana; Stanic-Vucinic, Dragana; Cirkovic Velickovic, Tanja

    2013-02-15

    Non-covalent interactions between β-lactoglobulin (BLG) and polyphenol extracts of teas, coffee and cocoa were studied by fluorescence and CD spectroscopy at pH values of the gastrointestinal tract (GIT). The biological implications of non-covalent binding of polyphenols to BLG were investigated by in vitro pepsin and pancreatin digestibility assay and ABTS radical scavenging activity of complexes formed. The polyphenol-BLG systems were stable at pH values of the GIT. The most profound effect of pH on binding affinity was observed for polyphenol extracts rich in phenolic acids. Stronger non-covalent interactions delayed pepsin and pancreatin digestion of BLG and induced β-sheet to α-helix transition at neutral pH. All polyphenols tested protected protein secondary structure at an extremely acidic pH of 1.2. A positive correlation was found between the strength of protein-polyphenol interactions and (a) half time of protein decay in gastric conditions (R(2)=0.85), (b) masking of total antioxidant capacity of protein-polyphenol complexes (R(2)=0.95).

  11. Revealing quantum correlation by negativity of the Wigner function

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Taghiabadi, Razieh; Akhtarshenas, Seyed Javad; Sarbishaei, Mohsen

    2016-05-01

    We analyze two two-mode continuous variable separable states with the same marginal states. We adopt the definition of classicality in the form of well-defined positive Wigner function describing the state and find that although the states possess positive local Wigner functions, they exhibit negative Wigner functions for the global states. Using the negativity of Wigner function as an indicator of nonclassicality, we show that despite these states possess different negativities of the Wigner function, they do not reveal this difference as phase space nonclassicalities such as negativity of the Mandel Q parameter or quadrature squeezing. We then concentrate on quantum correlation of these states and show that quantum discord and local quantum uncertainty, as two well-defined measures of quantum correlation, manifest the difference between negativity of the Wigner functions. The non-Gaussianity of these states is also examined and show that the difference in behavior of their non-Gaussianity is the same as the difference between negativity of their Wigner functions. We also investigate the influence of correlation rank criterion and find that when the states can be produced locally from classical states, the Wigner functions cannot reveal their quantum correlations.

  12. Methamphetamine-induced stereotypy correlates negatively with patch-enhanced prodynorphin and arc mRNA expression in the rat caudate putamen: the role of mu opioid receptor activation.

    PubMed

    Horner, Kristen A; Noble, Erika S; Gilbert, Yamiece E

    2010-06-01

    Amphetamines induce stereotypy, which correlates with patch-enhanced c-Fos expression the patch compartment of caudate putamen (CPu). Methamphetamine (METH) treatment also induces patch-enhanced expression of prodynorphin (PD), arc and zif/268 in the CPu. Whether patch-enhanced activation of any of these genes correlates with METH-induced stereotypy is unknown, and the factors that contribute to this pattern of expression are poorly understood. Activation of mu opioid receptors, which are expressed by the neurons of the patch compartment, may underlie METH-induced patch-enhanced gene expression and stereotypy. The current study examined whether striatal mu opioid receptor blockade altered METH-induced stereotypy and patch-enhanced gene expression, and if there was a correlation between the two responses. Animals were intrastriatally infused with the mu antagonist CTAP (10 microg/microl), treated with METH (7.5 mg/kg, s.c.), placed in activity chambers for 3h, and then sacrificed. CTAP pretreatment attenuated METH-induced increases in PD, arc and zif/268 mRNA expression and significantly reduced METH-induced stereotypy. Patch-enhanced PD and arc mRNA expression in the dorsolateral CPu correlated negatively with METH-induced stereotypy. These data indicate that mu opioid receptor activation contributes to METH-induced gene expression in the CPu and stereotypy, and that patch-enhanced PD and arc expression may be a homeostatic response to METH treatment.

  13. Confidence and memory: assessing positive and negative correlations.

    PubMed

    Roediger, Henry L; DeSoto, K Andrew

    2014-01-01

    The capacity to learn and remember surely evolved to help animals solve problems in their quest to reproduce and survive. In humans we assume that metacognitive processes also evolved, so that we know when to trust what we remember (i.e., when we have high confidence in our memories) and when not to (when we have low confidence). However this latter feature has been questioned by researchers, with some finding a high correlation between confidence and accuracy in reports from memory and others finding little to no correlation. In two experiments we report a recognition memory paradigm that, using the same materials (categorised lists), permits the study of positive correlations, zero correlations, and negative correlations between confidence and accuracy within the same procedure. We had subjects study words from semantic categories with the five items most frequently produced in norms omitted from the list; later, subjects were given an old/new recognition test and made confidence ratings on their judgements. Although the correlation between confidence and accuracy for studied items was generally positive, the correlation for the five omitted items was negative in some methods of analysis. We pinpoint the similarity between lures and targets as creating inversions between confidence and accuracy in memory. We argue that, while confidence is generally a useful indicant of accuracy in reports from memory, in certain environmental circumstances even adaptive processes can foster illusions of memory. Thus understanding memory illusions is similar to understanding perceptual illusions: Processes that are usually adaptive can go awry under certain circumstances.

  14. Myopic decisions under negative emotions correlate with altered time perception

    PubMed Central

    Guan, Shuchen; Cheng, Lu; Fan, Ying; Li, Xianchun

    2015-01-01

    Previous studies have obtained inconsistent findings about emotional influence on inter-temporal choice (IC). In the present study, we first examined the effect of temporary emotional priming induced by affective pictures in a trial-to-trial paradigm on IC. The results showed that negative priming resulted in much higher percentages of trials during which smaller-but-sooner reward (SS%) were chosen compared with positive and neutral priming. Next, we attempted to explore the possible mechanisms underlying such emotional effects. When participants performed a time reproduction task, mean reaction times in negative priming condition were significantly shorter than those in the other two emotional contexts, which indicated that negative emotional priming led to overestimation of time. Moreover, such overestimation was negatively correlated with performance in the IC task. In contrast, temporary changes of emotional contexts did not alter performances in a Go/NoGo task (including commission errors and omission errors). In sum, our present findings suggested that myopic decisions under negative emotions were associated with altered time perception but not response inhibition. PMID:25941508

  15. [Correlation between Sensory Gating P50, Mismatch Negativity, and Reaction Time].

    PubMed

    Aleksandrov, A A; Dmitrieva, E S; Stankevich, L N

    2015-01-01

    This paper is about the correlation pre-attentive processes, such as P50 sensory gating (SG P50) and mismatch negativity (MMN) with each other and with sensorimotor reaction time (RT). SG P50 data were obtained in the standard paired-click paradigm, MMN was measured in the passive odd-ball paradigm sensorimotor reaction time was studied in an active odd-ball paradigm. Was obtained positive correlation sensory gating P50 with amplitude mismatch negativity, amplitude mismatch negativity with sensorimotor reaction time, sensory gating P50 with sensorimotor reaction time.

  16. Negative genetic correlation between male sexual attractiveness and survival.

    PubMed

    Brooks, R

    2000-07-01

    Indirect selection of female mating preferences may result from a genetic association between male attractiveness and offspring fitness. The offspring of attractive males may have enhanced growth, fecundity, viability or attractiveness. However, the extent to which attractive males bear genes that reduce other fitness components has remained unexplored. Here I show that sexual attractiveness in male guppies (Poecilia reticulata) is heritable and genetically correlated with ornamentation. Like ornamentation, attractiveness may be substantially Y-linked. The benefit of mating with attractive males, and thus having attractive sons, is opposed by strong negative genetic correlation between attractiveness and both offspring survival and the number of sons maturing. Such correlations suggest either antagonistic pleiotropy between attractiveness and survival or linkage disequilibrium between attractive and deleterious alleles. The presence of many colour pattern genes on or near the non-recombining section of the Y chromosome may facilitate the accumulation of deleterious mutations by genetic hitchhiking. These findings show that genes enhancing sexual attractiveness may be associated with pleiotropic costs or heavy mutational loads.

  17. Negative Correlation Learning for Customer Churn Prediction: A Comparison Study

    PubMed Central

    Faris, Hossam

    2015-01-01

    Recently, telecommunication companies have been paying more attention toward the problem of identification of customer churn behavior. In business, it is well known for service providers that attracting new customers is much more expensive than retaining existing ones. Therefore, adopting accurate models that are able to predict customer churn can effectively help in customer retention campaigns and maximizing the profit. In this paper we will utilize an ensemble of Multilayer perceptrons (MLP) whose training is obtained using negative correlation learning (NCL) for predicting customer churn in a telecommunication company. Experiments results confirm that NCL based MLP ensemble can achieve better generalization performance (high churn rate) compared with ensemble of MLP without NCL (flat ensemble) and other common data mining techniques used for churn analysis. PMID:25879060

  18. Negative correlation learning for customer churn prediction: a comparison study.

    PubMed

    Rodan, Ali; Fayyoumi, Ayham; Faris, Hossam; Alsakran, Jamal; Al-Kadi, Omar

    2015-01-01

    Recently, telecommunication companies have been paying more attention toward the problem of identification of customer churn behavior. In business, it is well known for service providers that attracting new customers is much more expensive than retaining existing ones. Therefore, adopting accurate models that are able to predict customer churn can effectively help in customer retention campaigns and maximizing the profit. In this paper we will utilize an ensemble of Multilayer perceptrons (MLP) whose training is obtained using negative correlation learning (NCL) for predicting customer churn in a telecommunication company. Experiments results confirm that NCL based MLP ensemble can achieve better generalization performance (high churn rate) compared with ensemble of MLP without NCL (flat ensemble) and other common data mining techniques used for churn analysis. PMID:25879060

  19. Negative correlation learning for customer churn prediction: a comparison study.

    PubMed

    Rodan, Ali; Fayyoumi, Ayham; Faris, Hossam; Alsakran, Jamal; Al-Kadi, Omar

    2015-01-01

    Recently, telecommunication companies have been paying more attention toward the problem of identification of customer churn behavior. In business, it is well known for service providers that attracting new customers is much more expensive than retaining existing ones. Therefore, adopting accurate models that are able to predict customer churn can effectively help in customer retention campaigns and maximizing the profit. In this paper we will utilize an ensemble of Multilayer perceptrons (MLP) whose training is obtained using negative correlation learning (NCL) for predicting customer churn in a telecommunication company. Experiments results confirm that NCL based MLP ensemble can achieve better generalization performance (high churn rate) compared with ensemble of MLP without NCL (flat ensemble) and other common data mining techniques used for churn analysis.

  20. Body size is negatively correlated with trophic position among cyprinids

    PubMed Central

    Burress, Edward D.; Holcomb, Jordan M.; Bonato, Karine Orlandi; Armbruster, Jonathan W.

    2016-01-01

    Body size has many ecological and evolutionary implications that extend across multiple levels of organization. Body size is often positively correlated with species traits such as metabolism, prey size and trophic position (TP) due to physiological and mechanical constraints. We used stable isotope analysis to quantify TP among minnows across multiple assemblages that differed in their species composition, diversity and food web structure. Body size significantly predicted TP across different lineages and assemblages, and indicated a significant negative relationship. The observed negative relationship between body size and TP is contrary to conventional knowledge, and is likely to have arisen owing to highly clade-specific patterns, such that clades consist of either large benthic species or small pelagic species. Cyprinids probably subvert the physiological and mechanical constraints that generally produce a positive relationship between body size and TP using anatomical modifications and by consuming small-bodied prey, respectively. The need for herbivorous cyprinids to digest cellulose-rich foods probably selected for larger bodies to accommodate longer intestinal tracts and thereby to facilitate digestion of nutrient-poor resources, such as algae. Therefore, body size and TP are likely to have coevolved in cyprinids in association with specialization along the benthic to pelagic resource axis. PMID:27293777

  1. Body size is negatively correlated with trophic position among cyprinids.

    PubMed

    Burress, Edward D; Holcomb, Jordan M; Bonato, Karine Orlandi; Armbruster, Jonathan W

    2016-05-01

    Body size has many ecological and evolutionary implications that extend across multiple levels of organization. Body size is often positively correlated with species traits such as metabolism, prey size and trophic position (TP) due to physiological and mechanical constraints. We used stable isotope analysis to quantify TP among minnows across multiple assemblages that differed in their species composition, diversity and food web structure. Body size significantly predicted TP across different lineages and assemblages, and indicated a significant negative relationship. The observed negative relationship between body size and TP is contrary to conventional knowledge, and is likely to have arisen owing to highly clade-specific patterns, such that clades consist of either large benthic species or small pelagic species. Cyprinids probably subvert the physiological and mechanical constraints that generally produce a positive relationship between body size and TP using anatomical modifications and by consuming small-bodied prey, respectively. The need for herbivorous cyprinids to digest cellulose-rich foods probably selected for larger bodies to accommodate longer intestinal tracts and thereby to facilitate digestion of nutrient-poor resources, such as algae. Therefore, body size and TP are likely to have coevolved in cyprinids in association with specialization along the benthic to pelagic resource axis. PMID:27293777

  2. Negative correlates of computer game play in adolescents.

    PubMed

    Colwell, J; Payne, J

    2000-08-01

    There is some concern that playing computer games may be associated with social isolation, lowered self-esteem, and aggression among adolescents. Measures of these variables were included in a questionnaire completed by 204 year eight students at a North London comprehensive school. Principal components analysis of a scale to assess needs fulfilled by game play provided some support for the notion of 'electronic friendship' among boys, but there was no evidence that game play leads to social isolation. Play was not linked to self-esteem in girls, but a negative relationship was obtained between self-esteem and frequency of play in boys. However, self-esteem was not associated with total exposure to game play. Aggression scores were not related to the number of games with aggressive content named among three favourite games, but they were positively correlated with total exposure to game play. A multiple regression analysis revealed that sex and total game play exposure each accounted for a significant but small amount of the variance in aggression scores. The positive correlation between playing computer games and aggression provides some justification for further investigation of the causal hypothesis, and possible methodologies are discussed.

  3. Correlates of negative physical health in call center shift workers.

    PubMed

    Rameshbabu, Anjali; Reddy, Diane M; Fleming, Raymond

    2013-05-01

    The call center industry, a burgeoning sector is characterized by unique job demands, which render it susceptible to high attrition rates and negative health concerns. This study examined the relationship between job stress from interpersonal factors, job stress from work factors, coping, inadequate sleep, and negative physical health reports among call center shift workers (n = 239), a relatively under-researched population. Inadequate sleep and job stress from interpersonal factors were associated with negative physical health outcome for the participants in this study. Further, spending longer in the call center industry was associated with negative health outcome for the shift worker participants.

  4. The neural correlates of regulating positive and negative emotions in medication-free major depression.

    PubMed

    Greening, Steven G; Osuch, Elizabeth A; Williamson, Peter C; Mitchell, Derek G V

    2014-05-01

    Depressive cognitive schemas play an important role in the emergence and persistence of major depressive disorder (MDD). The current study adapted emotion regulation techniques to reflect elements of cognitive behavioural therapy (CBT) and related psychotherapies to delineate neurocognitive abnormalities associated with modulating the negative cognitive style in MDD. Nineteen non-medicated patients with MDD and 19 matched controls reduced negative or enhanced positive feelings elicited by emotional scenes while undergoing functional magnetic resonance imaging. Although both groups showed significant emotion regulation success as measured by subjective ratings of affect, the controls were significantly better at modulating both negative and positive emotion. Both groups recruited regions of dorsolateral prefrontal cortex and ventrolateral prefrontal cortex (VLPFC) when regulating negative emotions. Only in controls was this accompanied by reduced activity in sensory cortices and amygdala. Similarly, both groups showed enhanced activity in VLPFC and ventral striatum when enhancing positive affect; however, only in controls was ventral striatum activity correlated with regulation efficacy. The results suggest that depression is associated with both a reduced capacity to achieve relief from negative affect despite recruitment of ventral and dorsal prefrontal cortical regions implicated in emotion regulation, coupled with a disconnect between activity in reward-related regions and subjective positive affect.

  5. The neural correlates of regulating positive and negative emotions in medication-free major depression

    PubMed Central

    Greening, Steven G.; Osuch, Elizabeth A.; Williamson, Peter C.

    2014-01-01

    Depressive cognitive schemas play an important role in the emergence and persistence of major depressive disorder (MDD). The current study adapted emotion regulation techniques to reflect elements of cognitive behavioural therapy (CBT) and related psychotherapies to delineate neurocognitive abnormalities associated with modulating the negative cognitive style in MDD. Nineteen non-medicated patients with MDD and 19 matched controls reduced negative or enhanced positive feelings elicited by emotional scenes while undergoing functional magnetic resonance imaging. Although both groups showed significant emotion regulation success as measured by subjective ratings of affect, the controls were significantly better at modulating both negative and positive emotion. Both groups recruited regions of dorsolateral prefrontal cortex and ventrolateral prefrontal cortex (VLPFC) when regulating negative emotions. Only in controls was this accompanied by reduced activity in sensory cortices and amygdala. Similarly, both groups showed enhanced activity in VLPFC and ventral striatum when enhancing positive affect; however, only in controls was ventral striatum activity correlated with regulation efficacy. The results suggest that depression is associated with both a reduced capacity to achieve relief from negative affect despite recruitment of ventral and dorsal prefrontal cortical regions implicated in emotion regulation, coupled with a disconnect between activity in reward-related regions and subjective positive affect. PMID:23482626

  6. Parental Reactions to Toddlers' Negative Emotions and Child Negative Emotionality as Correlates of Problem Behavior at the Age of Three

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Engle, Jennifer M.; McElwain, Nancy L.

    2011-01-01

    Parent-reported reactions to children's negative emotions and child negative emotionality were investigated as correlates of internalizing and externalizing behaviors. Children (N = 107) and their parents participated in a short-term longitudinal study of social development. Mothers and fathers independently completed questionnaires assessing…

  7. Analysis of the enhanced negative correlation between electron density and electron temperature related to earthquakes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shen, X. H.; Zhang, X.; Liu, J.; Zhao, S. F.; Yuan, G. P.

    2015-04-01

    Ionospheric perturbations in plasma parameters have been observed before large earthquakes, but the correlation between different parameters has been less studied in previous research. The present study is focused on the relationship between electron density (Ne) and temperature (Te) observed by the DEMETER (Detection of Electro-Magnetic Emissions Transmitted from Earthquake Regions) satellite during local nighttime, in which a positive correlation has been revealed near the equator and a weak correlation at mid- and low latitudes over both hemispheres. Based on this normal background analysis, the negative correlation with the lowest percent in all Ne and Te points is studied before and after large earthquakes at mid- and low latitudes. The multiparameter observations exhibited typical synchronous disturbances before the Chile M8.8 earthquake in 2010 and the Pu'er M6.4 in 2007, and Te varied inversely with Ne over the epicentral areas. Moreover, statistical analysis has been done by selecting the orbits at a distance of 1000 km and ±7 days before and after the global earthquakes. Enhanced negative correlation coefficients lower than -0.5 between Ne and Te are found in 42% of points to be connected with earthquakes. The correlation median values at different seismic levels show a clear decrease with earthquakes larger than 7. Finally, the electric-field-coupling model is discussed; furthermore, a digital simulation has been carried out by SAMI2 (Sami2 is Another Model of the Ionosphere), which illustrates that the external electric field in the ionosphere can strengthen the negative correlation in Ne and Te at a lower latitude relative to the disturbed source due to the effects of the geomagnetic field. Although seismic activity is not the only source to cause the inverse Ne-Te variations, the present results demonstrate one possibly useful tool in seismo-electromagnetic anomaly differentiation, and a comprehensive analysis with multiple parameters helps to

  8. Presupposition Processing and the (Re)activation of Negated Concepts

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Autry, Kevin S.; Levine, William H.

    2014-01-01

    Negated words take longer to recognize than non-negated words following sentences with negation, suggesting that negated concepts are less active. The present experiments tested the possibility that this reduced activation would not persist beyond immediate testing. Experiment 1 used a probe task and materials similar to those used in previous…

  9. High-Stakes & Assessment Innovation: A Negative Correlation? Research Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ananda, Sri; Rabinowitz, Stanley

    This paper makes the case that, as implemented so far, there has been an inverse correlation between innovation and accountability in statewide assessment systems. The higher the stakes attached to the assessment results, the more conservative the assessment methodology ultimately used. Case studies of two state assessment programs were carried…

  10. 15 CFR 930.35 - Negative determinations for proposed activities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 15 Commerce and Foreign Trade 3 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Negative determinations for proposed... Federal Agency Activities § 930.35 Negative determinations for proposed activities. (a) If a Federal... agencies with a negative determination for a Federal agency activity: (1) Identified by a State agency...

  11. 15 CFR 930.35 - Negative determinations for proposed activities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 15 Commerce and Foreign Trade 3 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Negative determinations for proposed... Federal Agency Activities § 930.35 Negative determinations for proposed activities. (a) If a Federal... agencies with a negative determination for a Federal agency activity: (1) Identified by a State agency...

  12. 15 CFR 930.35 - Negative determinations for proposed activities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 15 Commerce and Foreign Trade 3 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Negative determinations for proposed... Federal Agency Activities § 930.35 Negative determinations for proposed activities. (a) If a Federal... agencies with a negative determination for a Federal agency activity: (1) Identified by a State agency...

  13. Correlating thalamocortical connectivity and activity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    da Fontoura Costa, Luciano; Sporns, Olaf

    2006-07-01

    The segregated regions of the mammalian cerebral cortex and thalamus form an extensive and complex network, whose structure and function are still only incompletely understood. The present letter describes an application of the concepts of complex networks and random walks that allows the identification of nonrandom, highly structured features of thalamocortical connections and their potential effects on dynamic interactions between cortical areas in the cat brain. Utilizing large-scale anatomical data sets of this thalamocortical system, we investigate uniform random walks in such a network by considering the steady state eigenvector of the respective stochastic matrix. It is shown that thalamocortical connections are organized in such a way as to guarantee strong correlation between the outdegree and occupancy rate (a stochastic measure potentially related to activation) of each cortical area. Possible organizational principles underlying this effect are identified and discussed.

  14. Social jetlag negatively correlates with academic performance in undergraduates.

    PubMed

    Haraszti, Réka Ágnes; Ella, Krisztina; Gyöngyösi, Norbert; Roenneberg, Till; Káldi, Krisztina

    2014-06-01

    Discrepancies between sleep timing on workdays and weekends, also known as social jetlag (SJL), affect the majority of the population and have been found to be associated with increased health risk and health-impairing behaviors. In this study, we explored the relationship between SJL and academic performance in a sample of undergraduates of the Semmelweis University. We assessed SJL and other sleep-related parameters with the Munich ChronoType Questionnaire (MCTQ) (n = 753). Academic performance was measured by the average grade based on weekly test results as well as scores acquired on the final test (n = 247). The average mid-sleep point on free days in the Hungarian sample fits well the regression line plotted for longitudes within the Central European Time Zone and chronotypes, confirming that sunlight has a major impact on chronotype. Multivariate analysis showed negative effect of SJL on the weekly average grade (p = 0.028, n = 247) during the lecture term with its highly regular teaching schedules, while this association disappeared in the exam period (p = 0.871, n = 247) when students had no scheduled obligations (lower SJL). We also analyzed the relationship between the time of the weekly tests and academic performance and found that students with later sleep times on free days achieved worse in the morning (p = 0.017, n = 129), while the inverse tendency was observed for the afternoon test-takers (p = 0.10, n = 118). We did not find significant association between academic performance and sleep duration or sleep debt on work days. Our data suggest that circadian misalignment can have a significant negative effect on academic performance. One possible reason for this misalignment is socially enforced sleep times.

  15. Attachment-style differences in the ability to suppress negative thoughts: exploring the neural correlates.

    PubMed

    Gillath, Omri; Bunge, Silvia A; Shaver, Phillip R; Wendelken, Carter; Mikulincer, Mario

    2005-12-01

    Beginning in infancy, people can be characterized in terms of two dimensions of attachment insecurity: attachment anxiety (i.e., fear of rejection and abandonment) and attachment avoidance (distancing oneself from close others, shunning dependency; Bowlby, J., 1969/1982. Attachment and loss: Vol. 1. Attachment, 2nd ed., Basic Books, New York). The capacity for emotion regulation varies with attachment style, such that attachment-anxious individuals become highly emotional when threatened with social rejection or relationship loss, whereas avoidant individuals tend to distance themselves or disengage from emotional situations. In the present study, 20 women participated in an fMRI experiment in which they thought about--and were asked to stop thinking about--various relationship scenarios. When they thought about negative ones (conflict, breakup, death of partner), their level of attachment anxiety was positively correlated with activation in emotion-related areas of the brain (e.g., the anterior temporal pole, implicated in sadness) and inversely correlated with activation in a region associated with emotion regulation (orbitofrontal cortex). This suggests that anxious people react more strongly than non-anxious people to thoughts of loss while under-recruiting brain regions normally used to down-regulate negative emotions. Participants high on avoidance failed to show as much deactivation as less avoidant participants in two brain regions (subcallosal cingulate cortex; lateral prefrontal cortex). This suggests that the avoidant peoples' suppression was less complete or less efficient, in line with results from previous behavioral experiments. These are among the first findings to identify some of the neural processes underlying adult attachment orientations and emotion regulation.

  16. Active temperature and velocity correlations produced by a swimmer suspension

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Parra-Rojas, C.; Soto, R.

    2013-05-01

    The agitation produced in a fluid by a suspension of microswimmers in the low Reynolds number limit is studied. In this limit, swimmers are modeled as force dipoles all with equal strength. The agitation is characterized by the active temperature defined, as in kinetic theory, as the mean square velocity, and by the equal-time spatial correlations. Considering the phase in which the swimmers are homogeneously and isotropically distributed in the fluid, it is shown that the active temperature and velocity correlations depend on a single scalar correlation function of the dipole-dipole correlation function. By making a simple medium-range order model, in which the dipole-dipole correlation function is characterized by a single correlation length k0-1 it is possible to make quantitative predictions. It is found that the active temperature depends on the system size, scaling as L4-d at large correlation lengths L≪k0-1, while in the opposite limit it saturates in three dimensions and diverges logarithmically with the system size in two dimensions. In three dimensions the velocity correlations decay as 1/r for small correlation lengths, while at large correlation lengths the transverse correlation function becomes negative at maximum separation r˜L/2, an effect that disappears as the system increases in size.

  17. Negative symptoms of schizophrenia correlate with impairment on the University of Pennsylvania smell identification test.

    PubMed

    Ishizuka, Koko; Tajinda, Katsunori; Colantuoni, Carlo; Morita, Masahiko; Winicki, Jessica; Le, Cindy; Lin, Sandra; Schretlen, David; Sawa, Akira; Cascella, Nicola G

    2010-01-01

    Deficits in odor identification have been most frequently described in schizophrenia (SZ). A relationship between dysfunction in odor identification and negative symptoms of SZ has also been reported. Furthermore, deficit SZ (a subtype of the illness with primary, enduring negative symptoms) has been found to be associated with a particularly poor performance on odor identification tests indicating that deficits in smell identification could be differentially expressed in some subtypes of SZ. We describe correlations of performance on smell identification with positive and negative symptoms of SZ. Patients with SZ (n=15) and normal controls (n=19) were tested by the University of Pennsylvania Smell Identification Test (UPSIT). Psychopathology was assessed with the Scales for the Assessment of Positive and Negative Symptoms (SAPS and SANS). SZ patients performed more poorly on the UPSIT test than did normal controls. Consistent with previous findings, we observed a correlation of SANS with UPSIT performance. In particular, specific subdomains of SANS, such as blunted affect, apathy and anhedonia, were associated with odor identification deficits. Furthermore, UPSIT score predicts these subdomains of negative symptoms. No correlation was observed between positive symptom and odor identification deficits. Our study further reinforces a relation between olfactory identification deficit and negative symptoms in SZ and suggests that smell identification could be a candidate endophenotype relevant to negative symptoms of SZ.

  18. Development and Pilot Investigation of Behavioral Activation for Negative Symptoms

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mairs, Hilary; Lovell, Karina; Campbell, Malcolm; Keeley, Philip

    2011-01-01

    Negative symptoms cause functional impairment and impede recovery from psychosis, not least, because of limited developments in empirically validated treatments. This article details a pilot evaluation of a behavioral activation (BA) treatment with eight people presenting with psychosis and marked negative symptoms. The rationale for this…

  19. Negative correlation does not imply a tradeoff between growth and reproduction in California oaks

    PubMed Central

    Knops, Johannes M. H.; Koenig, Walter D.; Carmen, William J.

    2007-01-01

    A tradeoff between growth and reproduction, often inferred from an inverse correlation between these two variables, is a fundamental paradigm of life-history evolution. Oak species provide a unique test of this relationship because different species mature acorns either in the year of pollination or in the year after pollination. This difference allows for an interspecific comparison testing whether the apparent tradeoff is causal or the result of confounding factors influencing growth and reproduction independently. Based on 13 years of data on five California oak species, we found significant negative correlations between radial growth and seed production in the three species that produce acorns the same year in which pollination occurs, but not in two species that mature acorns the year after pollination. Rainfall, which correlates positively with radial growth and correlates negatively with acorn production (based on the year of pollination), appears to be driving this pattern. We conclude that the observed negative correlations are not causal, but rather a consequence of growth and reproduction being dependent, in opposite ways, on environmental conditions. Thus, contrary to the current consensus, growth and reproduction in these species are apparently largely independent of each other. In contrast, tradeoffs between current and future reproduction appear to be much more important in the life-history evolution of these long-lived plants. We also conclude that a negative correlation does not necessarily imply a causal mechanism and should not be used as the only evidence supporting a tradeoff. PMID:17940035

  20. On the possibility of negative activation energies in bimolecular reactions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jaffe, R. L.

    1978-01-01

    The temperature dependence of the rate constants for model reacting systems was studied to understand some recent experimental measurements which imply the existence of negative activation energies. A collision theory model and classical trajectory calculations are used to demonstrate that the reaction probability can vary inversely with collision energy for bimolecular reactions occurring on attractive potential energy surfaces. However, this is not a sufficient condition to ensure that the rate constant has a negative temperature dependence. On the basis of these calculations, it seems unlikely that a true bimolecular reaction between neutral molecules will have a negative activation energy.

  1. Vorticity, defects and correlations in active turbulence

    PubMed Central

    Thampi, Sumesh P.; Golestanian, Ramin; Yeomans, Julia M.

    2014-01-01

    We describe a numerical investigation of a continuum model of an active nematic, concentrating on the regime of active turbulence. Results are presented for the effect of three parameters, activity, elastic constant and rotational diffusion constant, on the order parameter and flow fields. Defects and distortions in the director field act as sources of vorticity, and thus vorticity is strongly correlated to the director field. In particular, the characteristic length of decay of vorticity and order parameter correlations is controlled by the defect density. By contrast, the decay of velocity correlations is determined by a balance between activity and dissipation. We highlight the role of microscopic flow generation mechanisms in determining the flow patterns and characteristic scales of active turbulence and contrast the behaviour of extensile and contractile active nematics. PMID:25332382

  2. The negativity of Wigner function as a measure of quantum correlations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Siyouri, F.; El Baz, M.; Hassouni, Y.

    2016-10-01

    In this paper, we study comparatively the behaviors of Wigner function and quantum correlations for two quasi-Werner states formed with two general bipartite superposed coherent states. We show that the Wigner function can be used to detect and quantify the quantum correlations. However, we show that it is in fact not sensitive to all kinds of quantum correlations but only to entanglement. Then, we analyze the measure of non-classicality of quantum states based on the volume occupied by the negative part of the Wigner function.

  3. Active motion assisted by correlated stochastic torques.

    PubMed

    Weber, Christian; Radtke, Paul K; Schimansky-Geier, Lutz; Hänggi, Peter

    2011-07-01

    The stochastic dynamics of an active particle undergoing a constant speed and additionally driven by an overall fluctuating torque is investigated. The random torque forces are expressed by a stochastic differential equation for the angular dynamics of the particle determining the orientation of motion. In addition to a constant torque, the particle is supplemented by random torques, which are modeled as an Ornstein-Uhlenbeck process with given correlation time τ(c). These nonvanishing correlations cause a persistence of the particles' trajectories and a change of the effective spatial diffusion coefficient. We discuss the mean square displacement as a function of the correlation time and the noise intensity and detect a nonmonotonic dependence of the effective diffusion coefficient with respect to both correlation time and noise strength. A maximal diffusion behavior is obtained if the correlated angular noise straightens the curved trajectories, interrupted by small pirouettes, whereby the correlated noise amplifies a straightening of the curved trajectories caused by the constant torque.

  4. Reliability of negative BOLD in ipsilateral sensorimotor areas during unimanual task activity.

    PubMed

    McGregor, Keith M; Sudhyadhom, Atchar; Nocera, Joe; Seff, Ari; Crosson, Bruce; Butler, Andrew J

    2015-06-01

    Research using functional magnetic resonance imaging has for numerous years now reported the existence of a negative blood oxygenation level dependent (BOLD) response. Based on accumulating evidence, this negative BOLD signal appears to represent an active inhibition of cortical areas in which it is found during task activity. This particularly important with respect to motor function given that it is fairly well-established that, in younger adults, the ipsilateral sensorimotor cortex exhibits negative BOLD during unimanual movements in fMRI. This interhemispheric suppression of cortical activity may have useful implications for our understanding of both basic motor function and rehabilitation of injury or disease. However, to date, we are aware of no study that has tested the reliability of evoked negative BOLD in ipsilateral sensorimotor cortex in individuals across sessions. The current study employs a unimanual finger opposition task previously shown to evoke negative BOLD in ipsilateral sensorimotor cortex across three sessions. Reliability metrics across sessions indicates that both the magnitude and location of ipsilateral sensorimotor negative BOLD response is relatively stable over each of the three sessions. Moreover, the volume of negative BOLD in ipsilateral cortex was highly correlated with volume of positive BOLD activity in the contralateral primary motor cortex. These findings show that the negative BOLD signal can be reliably evoked in unimanual task paradigms, and that the signal dynamic could represent an active suppression of the ipsilateral sensorimotor cortex originating from the contralateral motor areas.

  5. Correlation of nighttime MF signal strength with solar activity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kohata, Hiroki; Kimura, Iwane; Wakai, Noboru; Ogawa, Tadahiko

    Observations of the signal strength of MF broadcasting signals (774/770 kHz) transmitted from Akita, Japan, on board the Japanese Antarctic ice breaker Fuji, bound from Japan to Syowa station, Antarctica, have revealed an interesting positive correlation between strengths of long distance signals propagating at night and solar activity. It is already known that MF propagation characteristics in North America show a negative correlation with solar activity. The present paper, interprets the results by using the multihop method with full-wave analysis. The difference in correlation with solar activity between the results of Fuji and those in North America can be elucidated if it is assumed that there is a ledge in the electron-density profile around an altitude range of 85 to 90 km and that the density of the ledge is smaller in the North American region than in the equatorial region.

  6. Data for default network reduced functional connectivity in meditators, negatively correlated with meditation expertise.

    PubMed

    Berkovich-Ohana, Aviva; Harel, Michal; Hahamy, Avital; Arieli, Amos; Malach, Rafael

    2016-09-01

    FMRI data described here was recorded during resting-state in Mindfulness Meditators (MM) and control participants (see "Task-induced activity and resting-state fluctuations undergo similar alterations in visual and DMN areas of long-term meditators" Berkovich-Ohana et al. (2016) [1] for details). MM participants were also scanned during meditation. Analyses focused on functional connectivity within and between the default mode network (DMN) and visual network (Vis). Here we show data demonstrating that: 1) Functional connectivity within the DMN and the Visual networks were higher in the control group than in the meditators; 2) Data show an increase for the functional connectivity between the DMN and the Visual networks in the meditators compared to controls; 3) Data demonstrate that functional connectivity both within and between networks reduces during meditation, compared to the resting-state; and 4) A significant negative correlation was found between DMN functional connectivity and meditation expertise. The reader is referred to Berkovich-Ohana et al. (2016) [1] for further interpretation and discussion. PMID:27508242

  7. Correlated activity supports efficient cortical processing

    PubMed Central

    Hung, Chou P.; Cui, Ding; Chen, Yueh-peng; Lin, Chia-pei; Levine, Matthew R.

    2015-01-01

    Visual recognition is a computational challenge that is thought to occur via efficient coding. An important concept is sparseness, a measure of coding efficiency. The prevailing view is that sparseness supports efficiency by minimizing redundancy and correlations in spiking populations. Yet, we recently reported that “choristers”, neurons that behave more similarly (have correlated stimulus preferences and spontaneous coincident spiking), carry more generalizable object information than uncorrelated neurons (“soloists”) in macaque inferior temporal (IT) cortex. The rarity of choristers (as low as 6% of IT neurons) indicates that they were likely missed in previous studies. Here, we report that correlation strength is distinct from sparseness (choristers are not simply broadly tuned neurons), that choristers are located in non-granular output layers, and that correlated activity predicts human visual search efficiency. These counterintuitive results suggest that a redundant correlational structure supports efficient processing and behavior. PMID:25610392

  8. Characterization of active metamaterials based on negative impedance converters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rajab, K. Z.; Fan, Y. F.; Hao, Y.

    2012-11-01

    Negative impedance converters (NICs) are used to create impedance loads that can effectively cancel the inductive properties of magnetic dipoles, resulting in active metamaterials with increased bandwidth and reduced loss for μ-near-zero (MNZ) and negative-Re(μ) (MNG) media. We demonstrate techniques for analyzing the stability and characterizing the magnetic properties of effective media loaded with NICs. Specifically, we apply the Nyquist criterion to validate the stability of sample active metamaterials. It is shown that the practical NIC-loaded metamaterial may maintain stability and reduce dispersion, albeit with reduced performance as compared to the ideal NIC load.

  9. Gene-environment correlation underlying the association between parental negativity and adolescent externalizing problems.

    PubMed

    Marceau, Kristine; Horwitz, Briana N; Narusyte, Jurgita; Ganiban, Jody M; Spotts, Erica L; Reiss, David; Neiderhiser, Jenae M

    2013-01-01

    Studies of adolescent or parent-based twins suggest that gene-environment correlation (rGE) is an important mechanism underlying parent-adolescent relationships. However, information on how parents' and children's genes and environments influence correlated parent and child behaviors is needed to distinguish types of rGE. The present study used the novel Extended Children of Twins model to distinguish types of rGE underlying associations between negative parenting and adolescent (age 11-22 years) externalizing problems with a Swedish sample of 909 twin parents and their adolescent offspring and a U.S.-based sample of 405 adolescent siblings and their parents. Results suggest that evocative rGE, not passive rGE or direct environmental effects of parenting on adolescent externalizing, explains associations between maternal and paternal negativity and adolescent externalizing problems.

  10. A Classroom Activity To Demonstrate the Principle of Negative Reinforcement.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gillespie, David; Simmons, Sharanne

    This paper describes a classroom activity to demonstrate to undergraduate psychology students studying learning principles the principle of negative reinforcement. The students (n=25) were either enrolled in an introductory psychology course at a business college or the students (n=21) were enrolled in an educational psychology course at a state…

  11. Negative emotions boost user activity at BBC forum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chmiel, Anna; Sobkowicz, Pawel; Sienkiewicz, Julian; Paltoglou, Georgios; Buckley, Kevan; Thelwall, Mike; Hołyst, Janusz A.

    2011-08-01

    We present an empirical study of user activity in online BBC discussion forums, measured by the number of posts written by individual debaters and the average sentiment of these posts. Nearly 2.5 million posts from over 18 thousand users were investigated. Scale-free distributions were observed for activity in individual discussion threads as well as for overall activity. The number of unique users in a thread normalized by the thread length decays with thread length, suggesting that thread life is sustained by mutual discussions rather than by independent comments. Automatic sentiment analysis shows that most posts contain negative emotions and the most active users in individual threads express predominantly negative sentiments. It follows that the average emotion of longer threads is more negative and that threads can be sustained by negative comments. An agent-based computer simulation model has been used to reproduce several essential characteristics of the analyzed system. The model stresses the role of discussions between users, especially emotionally laden quarrels between supporters of opposite opinions, and represents many observed statistics of the forum.

  12. Spontaneous and task-evoked brain activity negatively interact

    PubMed Central

    He, Biyu J.

    2013-01-01

    A widely held assumption is that spontaneous and task-evoked brain activity sum linearly, such that the recorded brain response in each single trial is the algebraic sum of the constantly changing ongoing activity and the stereotypical evoked activity. Using functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) signals acquired from normal humans, we show that this assumption is invalid. Across widespread cortices, evoked activity interacts negatively with ongoing activity, such that higher prestimulus baseline results in less activation or more deactivation. As a consequence of this negative interaction, trial-to-trial variability of cortical activity decreases following stimulus onset. We further show that variability reduction follows overlapping but distinct spatial pattern from that of task activation/deactivation and it contains behaviorally relevant information. These results favor an alternative perspective to the traditional dichotomous framework of ongoing and evoked activity – one that views the brain as a nonlinear dynamical system whose trajectory is tighter when performing a task; further, incoming sensory stimuli modulate the brain’s activity in a manner that depends on its initial state. We propose that across-trial variability may provide a new approach to brain mapping in the context of cognitive experiments. PMID:23486941

  13. Hippocampal volume correlates with attenuated negative psychotic symptoms irrespective of antidepressant medication

    PubMed Central

    Bernasconi, Raffaele; Smieskova, Renata; Schmidt, André; Harrisberger, Fabienne; Raschle, Nora Maria; Lenz, Claudia; Walter, Anna; Simon, Andor; Riecher-Rössler, Anita; Radue, Ernst-Wilhelm; Lang, Undine E.; Fusar-Poli, Paolo; Borgwardt, Stefan J.

    2015-01-01

    Background Individuals with at-risk mental state for psychosis (ARMS) often suffer from depressive and anxiety symptoms, which are clinically similar to the negative symptomatology described for psychosis. Thus, many ARMS individuals are already being treated with antidepressant medication. Objectives To investigate clinical and structural differences between psychosis high-risk individuals with or without antidepressants. Methods We compared ARMS individuals currently receiving antidepressants (ARMS-AD; n = 18), ARMS individuals not receiving antidepressants (ARMS-nonAD; n = 31) and healthy subjects (HC; n = 24), in terms of brain structure abnormalities, using voxel-based morphometry. We also performed region of interest analysis for the hippocampus, anterior cingulate cortex, amygdala and precuneus. Results The ARMS-AD had higher ‘depression’ and lower ‘motor hyperactivity’ scores than the ARMS-nonAD. Compared to HC, there was significantly less GMV in the middle frontal gyrus in the whole ARMS cohort and in the superior frontal gyrus in the ARMS-AD subgroup. Compared to ARMS-nonAD, the ARMS-AD group showed more gray matter volume (GMV) in the left superior parietal lobe, but less GMV in the left hippocampus and the right precuneus. We found a significant negative correlation between attenuated negative symptoms and hippocampal volume in the whole ARMS cohort. Conclusion Reduced GMV in the hippocampus and precuneus is associated with short-term antidepressant medication and more severe depressive symptoms. Hippocampal volume is further negatively correlated with attenuated negative psychotic symptoms. Longitudinal studies are needed to distinguish whether hippocampal volume deficits in the ARMS are related to attenuated negative psychotic symptoms or to antidepressant action. PMID:26110110

  14. Negative correlation between porosity and hydraulic conductivity in sand-and-gravel aquifers at Cape Cod, Massachusetts, USA

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Morin, R.H.

    2006-01-01

    Although it may be intuitive to think of the hydraulic conductivity K of unconsolidated, coarse-grained sediments as increasing monotonically with increasing porosity ??, studies have documented a negative correlation between these two parameters under certain grain-size distributions and packing arrangements. This is confirmed at two sites on Cape Cod, Massachusetts, USA, where groundwater investigations were conducted in sand-and-gravel aquifers specifically to examine the interdependency of several aquifer properties using measurements from four geophysical well logs. Along with K and ??, the electrical resistivity R0 and the natural gamma activity ?? of saturated deposits were determined as functions of depth. Qualitative examination of results from the first site implies a negative correlation between K and ?? that is substantiated by a rigorous multivariate analysis of log data collected from the second site. A principal components analysis describes an over-determined system of inversion equations, with approximately 92% of the cumulative proportion of the total variance being accounted for by only three of the four eigenvectors. A subsequent R-mode factor analysis projects directional trends among the four variables (K, ??, R0 and ??), and a negative correlation between K and ?? emerges as the primary result. ?? 2005 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  15. Corrugator activity confirms immediate negative affect in surprise.

    PubMed

    Topolinski, Sascha; Strack, Fritz

    2015-01-01

    The emotion of surprise entails a complex of immediate responses, such as cognitive interruption, attention allocation to, and more systematic processing of the surprising stimulus. All these processes serve the ultimate function to increase processing depth and thus cognitively master the surprising stimulus. The present account introduces phasic negative affect as the underlying mechanism responsible for this switch in operating mode. Surprising stimuli are schema-discrepant and thus entail cognitive disfluency, which elicits immediate negative affect. This affect in turn works like a phasic cognitive tuning switching the current processing mode from more automatic and heuristic to more systematic and reflective processing. Directly testing the initial elicitation of negative affect by surprising events, the present experiment presented high and low surprising neutral trivia statements to N = 28 participants while assessing their spontaneous facial expressions via facial electromyography. High compared to low surprising trivia elicited higher corrugator activity, indicative of negative affect and mental effort, while leaving zygomaticus (positive affect) and frontalis (cultural surprise expression) activity unaffected. Future research shall investigate the mediating role of negative affect in eliciting surprise-related outcomes.

  16. Corrugator activity confirms immediate negative affect in surprise

    PubMed Central

    Topolinski, Sascha; Strack, Fritz

    2015-01-01

    The emotion of surprise entails a complex of immediate responses, such as cognitive interruption, attention allocation to, and more systematic processing of the surprising stimulus. All these processes serve the ultimate function to increase processing depth and thus cognitively master the surprising stimulus. The present account introduces phasic negative affect as the underlying mechanism responsible for this switch in operating mode. Surprising stimuli are schema-discrepant and thus entail cognitive disfluency, which elicits immediate negative affect. This affect in turn works like a phasic cognitive tuning switching the current processing mode from more automatic and heuristic to more systematic and reflective processing. Directly testing the initial elicitation of negative affect by surprising events, the present experiment presented high and low surprising neutral trivia statements to N = 28 participants while assessing their spontaneous facial expressions via facial electromyography. High compared to low surprising trivia elicited higher corrugator activity, indicative of negative affect and mental effort, while leaving zygomaticus (positive affect) and frontalis (cultural surprise expression) activity unaffected. Future research shall investigate the mediating role of negative affect in eliciting surprise-related outcomes. PMID:25762956

  17. The Negative Mode Proteome with Activated Ion Negative Electron Transfer Dissociation (AI-NETD)*

    PubMed Central

    Riley, Nicholas M.; Rush, Matthew J. P.; Rose, Christopher M.; Richards, Alicia L.; Kwiecien, Nicholas W.; Bailey, Derek J.; Hebert, Alexander S.; Westphall, Michael S.; Coon, Joshua J.

    2015-01-01

    The field of proteomics almost uniformly relies on peptide cation analysis, leading to an underrepresentation of acidic portions of proteomes, including relevant acidic posttranslational modifications. Despite the many benefits negative mode proteomics can offer, peptide anion analysis remains in its infancy due mainly to challenges with high-pH reversed-phase separations and a lack of robust fragmentation methods suitable for peptide anion characterization. Here, we report the first implementation of activated ion negative electron transfer dissociation (AI-NETD) on the chromatographic timescale, generating 7,601 unique peptide identifications from Saccharomyces cerevisiae in single-shot nLC-MS/MS analyses of tryptic peptides—a greater than 5-fold increase over previous results with NETD alone. These improvements translate to identification of 1,106 proteins, making this work the first negative mode study to identify more than 1,000 proteins in any system. We then compare the performance of AI-NETD for analysis of peptides generated by five proteases (trypsin, LysC, GluC, chymotrypsin, and AspN) for negative mode analyses, identifying as many as 5,356 peptides (1,045 proteins) with LysC and 4,213 peptides (857 proteins) with GluC in yeast—characterizing 1,359 proteins in total. Finally, we present the first deep-sequencing approach for negative mode proteomics, leveraging offline low-pH reversed-phase fractionation prior to online high-pH separations and peptide fragmentation with AI-NETD. With this platform, we identified 3,467 proteins in yeast with trypsin alone and characterized a total of 3,730 proteins using multiple proteases, or nearly 83% of the expressed yeast proteome. This work represents the most extensive negative mode proteomics study to date, establishing AI-NETD as a robust tool for large-scale peptide anion characterization and making the negative mode approach a more viable platform for future proteomic studies. PMID:26193884

  18. Personality Correlates of the Jenkins Activity Survey.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schiraldi, Glenn R.; Beck, Kenneth H.

    1988-01-01

    Administered Jenkins Activity Survey (JAS) and 11 other personality scales to over 700 college students to identify JAS personality correlates. Results revealed that, relative to subjects identified as Type B, those classified as Type A exhibited significantly greater status concern, less alexithymia, more misanthropy, and greater life…

  19. Negative Modulation of Androgen Receptor Transcriptional Activity by Daxx

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Ding-Yen; Fang, Hsin-I; Ma, Ai-Hong; Huang, Yen-Sung; Pu, Yeong-Shiau; Jenster, Guido; Kung, Hsing-Jien; Shih, Hsiu-Ming

    2004-01-01

    The transcriptional activity of the androgen receptor (AR) modulated by positive or negative regulators plays a critical role in controlling the growth and survival of prostate cancer cells. Although numerous positive regulators have been identified, negative regulators of AR are less well understood. We report here that Daxx functions as a negative AR coregulator through direct protein-protein interactions. Overexpression of Daxx suppressed AR-mediated promoter activity in COS-1 and LNCaP cells and AR-mediated prostate-specific antigen expression in LNCaP cells. Conversely, downregulation of endogenous Daxx expression by RNA interference enhances androgen-induced prostate-specific antigen expression in LNCaP cells. In vitro and in vivo interaction studies revealed that Daxx binds to both the amino-terminal and the DNA-binding domain of the AR. Daxx proteins interfere with the AR DNA-binding activity both in vitro and in vivo. Moreover, sumoylation of AR at its amino-terminal domain is involved in Daxx interaction and trans-repression. Together, these findings not only provide a novel role of Daxx in controlling AR transactivation activity but also uncover the mechanism underlying sumoylation-dependent transcriptional repression of the AR. PMID:15572661

  20. Identifying Crucial Parameter Correlations Maintaining Bursting Activity

    PubMed Central

    Doloc-Mihu, Anca; Calabrese, Ronald L.

    2014-01-01

    Recent experimental and computational studies suggest that linearly correlated sets of parameters (intrinsic and synaptic properties of neurons) allow central pattern-generating networks to produce and maintain their rhythmic activity regardless of changing internal and external conditions. To determine the role of correlated conductances in the robust maintenance of functional bursting activity, we used our existing database of half-center oscillator (HCO) model instances of the leech heartbeat CPG. From the database, we identified functional activity groups of burster (isolated neuron) and half-center oscillator model instances and realistic subgroups of each that showed burst characteristics (principally period and spike frequency) similar to the animal. To find linear correlations among the conductance parameters maintaining functional leech bursting activity, we applied Principal Component Analysis (PCA) to each of these four groups. PCA identified a set of three maximal conductances (leak current, Leak; a persistent K current, K2; and of a persistent Na+ current, P) that correlate linearly for the two groups of burster instances but not for the HCO groups. Visualizations of HCO instances in a reduced space suggested that there might be non-linear relationships between these parameters for these instances. Experimental studies have shown that period is a key attribute influenced by modulatory inputs and temperature variations in heart interneurons. Thus, we explored the sensitivity of period to changes in maximal conductances of Leak, K2, and P, and we found that for our realistic bursters the effect of these parameters on period could not be assessed because when varied individually bursting activity was not maintained. PMID:24945358

  1. Kinase activity profiling of gram-negative pneumonia.

    PubMed

    Hoogendijk, Arie J; Diks, Sander H; Peppelenbosch, Maikel P; Van Der Poll, Tom; Wieland, Catharina W

    2011-01-01

    Pneumonia is a severe disease with high morbidity and mortality. A major causative pathogen is the Gram-negative bacterium Klebsiella (K.) pneumoniae. Kinases play an integral role in the transduction of intracellular signaling cascades and regulate a diverse array of biological processes essential to immune cells. The current study explored signal transduction events during murine Gram-negative pneumonia using a systems biology approach. Kinase activity arrays enable the analysis of 1,024 consensus sequences of protein kinase substrates. Using a kinase activity array on whole lung lysates, cellular kinase activities were determined in a mouse model of K. pneumoniae pneumonia. Notable kinase activities also were validated with phospho-specific Western blots. On the basis of the profiling data, mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) signaling via p42 mitogen-activated protein kinase (p42) and p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase (p38) and transforming growth factor β (TGFβ) activity were reduced during infection, whereas v-src sarcoma (Schmidt-Ruppin A-2) viral oncogene homolog (avian) (SRC) activity generally was enhanced. AKT signaling was represented in both metabolic and inflammatory (mitogen-activated protein kinase kinase 2 [MKK], apoptosis signal-regulating kinase/mitogen-activated protein kinase kinase kinase 5 [ASK] and v-raf murine sarcoma viral oncogene homolog B1 [b-RAF]) context. This study reaffirms the importance of classic inflammation pathways, such as MAPK and TGFβ signaling and reveals less known involvement of glycogen synthase kinase 3β (GSK-3β), AKT and SRC signaling cassettes in pneumonia.

  2. Correlates of Emotional Support and Negative Interaction Among African Americans and Caribbean Blacks

    PubMed Central

    Lincoln, Karen D.; Taylor, Robert Joseph; Chatters, Linda M.

    2015-01-01

    This study explores the relationship of family and demographic factors to the frequency of receiving emotional support and the frequency of engaging in negative interactions with family members (i.e., criticism, burden, and being taken advantage of). The study uses the ambivalence framework and data from the National Survey of American Life, a national sample of African Americans and Caribbean Blacks (Caribbean Blacks). Overall, no significant differences were found between African Americans and Caribbean Blacks in the frequency of emotional support or negative interaction; several significant correlates (e.g., age, family closeness) were found for both groups. However, a number of unique associations were also demonstrated (e.g., marital status, frequency of family contact), indicating differences in the ways that these variables operate within the two populations. These and other findings are discussed in relation to the ambivalence framework and subgroup differences in family phenomena within the Black population. PMID:26617426

  3. Positive illusions: positively correlated with subjective well-being, negatively correlated with a measure of personal growth.

    PubMed

    Brookings, Jeffrey B; Serratelli, Andrew J

    2006-04-01

    Psychologists have long debated the benefits and costs of self-deceptive enhancement or positive illusions. Accurate perception of reality is central to the definitions of mental health proposed by many personality and clinical psychologists, but Taylor and Brown have suggested that having positive illusions is associated with increased happiness and satisfaction with life. One explanation for the conflicting assertions is that mental health, broadly defined, includes both subjective well-being and personal growth, distinguishable factors which are differentially related to positive illusions. For this study, 81 college students completed measures of positive illusions (Balanced Inventory of Desirable Responding Self-deceptive Positivity and How I See Myself Questionnaire), subjective well-being (Satisfaction With Life Scale and Existential Anxiety Scale), and moral reasoning (Defining Issues Test) as an index of personal growth. As predicted, positive illusion composite scores were positively correlated with scores on the subjective well-being composite (r=.40) but negatively correlated with Defining Issues Test scores (r=-.25). The quadratic relationship between these measures of positive illusion and subjective well-being composites was not significant, indicating no support for an "optimal margin of illusion."

  4. The Mn-Fe negative correlation in olivines in ALHA 77257 ureilite

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miyamoto, M.; Furuta, T.; Fujii, N.; Mckay, D. S.; Lofgren, G. E.; Duke, M. B.

    1993-01-01

    An electron probe microanalyzer is used to measure the Mn, Fe, and oxygen zoning profiles of olivines in the ALHA 77257 ureilite. This is done to study the effects of reduction on the Mn-Fe value, as ureilite olivines exhibit thin reduced rims. Since the Mn content gradually increases toward the rim of ureilite olivines, while the Fa (= 100 x Fe/(Mg + Fe), mol percent) component decreases, the Mn-Fe content of olivine is likely related to redox conditions. The results of melting experiments suggest that the Mn-Fe positive correlation is related to temperature and that the negative correlation of Mn-Fe in olivine and low-Ca pyroxene is related to reduction.

  5. Disease duration of episodic migraine correlates with modified amplitudes and habituation of contingent negative variation.

    PubMed

    Kropp, Peter; Wallasch, Thomas-Martin; Müller, Britta; Meyer, Bianca; Darabaneanu, Stephanie; Bosse, Christoph; Keller, Armin; Meyer, Wolfgang; Gerber, Wolf-Dieter

    2015-06-01

    Cortical habituation in episodic migraine patients without medication overuse headache (MOH), recorded by contingent negative variation (CNV), is often reduced compared with healthy controls. There is evidence that with longer duration of migraine disease (DOD) amplitudes and habituation of CNV become progressively abnormal. The aim of the study was to examine habituation characteristics of contingent negative variation in episodic migraine patients suffering from short- and long-lasting migraine compared to matched healthy controls. 32 migraine patients without aura and without MOH diagnosed according to the revised ICHD-II criteria and 16 age- and sex-matched healthy controls were included. According to DOD, the total sample of migraine patients was divided into two groups (group a: DOD <121 months, n = 17 subjects, group b: DOD >120 months, n = 15 subjects). Both migraine groups did not differ in the number of days of migraine and the duration of attacks. Overall CNV and initial CNV differed significantly between migraine patients and controls, whereas the former produced more negative amplitudes. In the migraine group lack of or deficient habituation occurred, whilst controls showed habituation. There were middle range correlations between the DOD and overall CNV, initial CNV, and y-intercept. Patients suffering from long-lasting migraine produced higher CNV amplitudes with a higher y-intercept. The results are interpreted as "maladaptive plasticity" with a risen intercept in long-lasting migraine. PMID:25432434

  6. Carotid-femoral pulse wave velocity is negatively correlated with aortic diameter.

    PubMed

    Bailey, Marc A; Davies, Jennifer M; Griffin, Kathryn J; Bridge, Katherine I; Johnson, Anne B; Sohrabi, Soroush; Baxter, Paul D; Scott, D Julian A

    2014-10-01

    Cardiovascular events pose significant morbidity and mortality burden to abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA) patients. Arterial stiffness as measured by pulse wave velocity (PWV) is an independent predictor of cardiovascular risk. We investigated the relationship between aortic diameter and PWV. Consecutive patients with AAA were invited to participate. Patients completed a health questionnaire, received aortic ultrasound and carotid-femoral PWV (cfPWV) recordings with a Vicorder. Thirty patients were used for reproducibility assessment. A linear regression model was used to identify significant predictors of cfPWV. Observer variation was assessed using Bland and Altman analysis and the intraclass correlation coefficient. Three hundred and nine patients were included-148 with AAA and 161 controls. The mean difference for repeated cfPWV between observers was 0.11 ms(-1). cfPWV was positively correlated with age (r=0.24, P<0.001) and systolic blood pressure (r=0.29, P<0.001) and negatively correlated with aortic diameter (r=-0.15, P=0.008). There was no difference in cfPWV between AAA and control groups (9.75±2.3 ms(-1) vs. 9.55±2.3 ms(-1), P=0.43). Aortic diameter (P=0.003) and systolic blood pressure (P<0.001) were significant predictors of cfPWV independent of age, aspirin usage and a history of myocardial infarction. Patients with large AAA (>5 cm) had decreased cfPWV compared with patients with small AAA (P=0.02) or normal diameter aorta (P=0.02). Vicorder measurements of cfPWV are repeatable. cfPWV is negatively associated with infra-renal aortic diameter and reduced in large AAA. cfPWV is likely invalid for accurate arterial stiffness assessment in patients with AAA owing to the apparent confounding effect of aortic size.

  7. The Alternative Omen Effect: Illusory negative correlation between the outcomes of choice options.

    PubMed

    Marciano-Romm, Déborah; Romm, Assaf; Bourgeois-Gironde, Sacha; Deouell, Leon Y

    2016-01-01

    In situations of choice between uncertain options, one might get feedback on both the outcome of the chosen option and the outcome of the unchosen option ("the alternative"). Extensive research has shown that when both outcomes are eventually revealed, the alternative's outcome influences the way people evaluate their own outcome. In a series of experiments, we examined whether the outcome of the alternative plays an additional role in the decision-making process by creating expectations regarding the outcome of the chosen option. Specifically, we hypothesized that people see a good (bad) alternative's outcome as a bad (good) sign regarding their own outcome when the two outcomes are in fact uncorrelated, a phenomenon we call the "Alternative Omen Effect" (ALOE). Subjects had to repeatedly choose between two boxes, the outcomes of which were then sequentially revealed. In Experiments 1 and 2 the alternative's outcome was presented first, and we assessed the individual's prediction of their own outcome. In Experiment 3, subjects had to predict the alternative's outcome after seeing their own. We find that even though the two outcomes were in fact uncorrelated, people tended to see a good (bad) alternative outcome as a bad (good) sign regarding their own outcome. Importantly, this illusory negative correlation affected subsequent behavior and led to irrational choices. Furthermore, the order of presentation was critical: when the outcome of the chosen option was presented first, the effect disappeared, suggesting that this illusory negative correlation is influenced by self-relevance. We discuss the possible sources of this illusory correlation as well as its implications for research on counterfactual thinking.

  8. N30 Somatosensory Evoked Potential Is Negatively Correlated with Motor Function in Parkinson’s Disease

    PubMed Central

    Kang, Suk Yun; Ma, Hyeo-Il

    2016-01-01

    Objective The aim of this study was to investigate frontal N30 status in Parkinson’s disease (PD) and to examine the correlation between the amplitude of frontal N30 and the severity of motor deficits. Methods The frontal N30 was compared between 17 PD patients and 18 healthy volunteers. Correlations between the amplitude of frontal N30 and the Unified Parkinson’s Disease Rating Scale (UPDRS) motor score of the more severely affected side was examined. Results The mean latency of the N30 was not significantly different between patients and healthy volunteers (p = 0.981), but the mean amplitude was lower in PD patients (p < 0.025). There was a significant negative correlation between the amplitude of N30 and the UPDRS motor score (r = -0.715, p = 0.013). Conclusions The frontal N30 status indicates the motor severity of PD. It can be a useful biomarker reflecting dopaminergic deficits and an objective measurement for monitoring the clinical severity of PD. PMID:26828214

  9. Uric formaldehyde levels are negatively correlated with cognitive abilities in healthy older adults.

    PubMed

    Yu, Jing; Su, Tao; Zhou, Ting; He, Yingge; Lu, Jing; Li, Juan; He, Rongqiao

    2014-04-01

    Recent studies have shown that the abnormal accumulation of endogenous formaldehyde could be a critical factor in age-related cognitive decline. The aim of this study was to estimate the correlation between uric formaldehyde and general cognitive abilities in a community-based elderly population, and to measure the extent and direction in which the correlation varied with demographic characteristics. Using a double-blind design, formaldehyde in human urine was analyzed by high-performance liquid chromatography (n = 604), and general cognitive abilities were measured using the Montreal Cognitive Assessment (MoCA). Demographic characteristics, in terms of age, gender, residential region, and education were taken into consideration. We found that uric formaldehyde levels were inversely correlated with the MoCA score, and the concentration varied with demographic features: higher odds of a high formaldehyde level occurred among the less educated and those living in old urban or rural areas. In cytological experiments, the level of cellular formaldehyde released into the medium increased as SH-SY5Y and BV2 cells were incubated for three days. Formaldehyde in excess impaired the processes of N2a cells and neurites of primary cultured rat hippocampal cells. However, removal of formaldehyde markedly rescued and regenerated the processes of N2a cells. These results demonstrated a negative correlation between the endogenous formaldehyde and general cognitive abilities. High formaldehyde levels could be a risk factor for cognitive impairment in older adults, and could be developed as a non-invasive marker for detection and monitoring of age-related cognitive impairment.

  10. Wolbachia infections in natural Anopheles populations affect egg laying and negatively correlate with Plasmodium development

    PubMed Central

    Shaw, W. Robert; Marcenac, Perrine; Childs, Lauren M.; Buckee, Caroline O.; Baldini, Francesco; Sawadogo, Simon P.; Dabiré, Roch K.; Diabaté, Abdoulaye; Catteruccia, Flaminia

    2016-01-01

    The maternally inherited alpha-proteobacterium Wolbachia has been proposed as a tool to block transmission of devastating mosquito-borne infectious diseases like dengue and malaria. Here we study the reproductive manipulations induced by a recently identified Wolbachia strain that stably infects natural mosquito populations of a major malaria vector, Anopheles coluzzii, in Burkina Faso. We determine that these infections significantly accelerate egg laying but do not induce cytoplasmic incompatibility or sex-ratio distortion, two parasitic reproductive phenotypes that facilitate the spread of other Wolbachia strains within insect hosts. Analysis of 221 blood-fed A. coluzzii females collected from houses shows a negative correlation between the presence of Plasmodium parasites and Wolbachia infection. A mathematical model incorporating these results predicts that infection with these endosymbionts may reduce malaria prevalence in human populations. These data suggest that Wolbachia may be an important player in malaria transmission dynamics in Sub-Saharan Africa. PMID:27243367

  11. Thermoelectric materials by using two-dimensional materials with negative correlation between electrical and thermal conductivity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Myoung-Jae; Ahn, Ji-Hoon; Sung, Ji Ho; Heo, Hoseok; Jeon, Seong Gi; Lee, Woo; Song, Jae Yong; Hong, Ki-Ha; Choi, Byeongdae; Lee, Sung-Hoon; Jo, Moon-Ho

    2016-06-01

    In general, in thermoelectric materials the electrical conductivity σ and thermal conductivity κ are related and thus cannot be controlled independently. Previously, to maximize the thermoelectric figure of merit in state-of-the-art materials, differences in relative scaling between σ and κ as dimensions are reduced to approach the nanoscale were utilized. Here we present an approach to thermoelectric materials using tin disulfide, SnS2, nanosheets that demonstrated a negative correlation between σ and κ. In other words, as the thickness of SnS2 decreased, σ increased whereas κ decreased. This approach leads to a thermoelectric figure of merit increase to 0.13 at 300 K, a factor ~1,000 times greater than previously reported bulk single-crystal SnS2. The Seebeck coefficient obtained for our two-dimensional SnS2 nanosheets was 34.7 mV K-1 for 16-nm-thick samples at 300 K.

  12. The Negative Correlation between Fiber Color and Quality Traits Revealed by QTL Analysis.

    PubMed

    Feng, Hongjie; Guo, Lixue; Wang, Gaskin; Sun, Junling; Pan, Zhaoe; He, Shoupu; Zhu, Heqin; Sun, Jie; Du, Xiongming

    2015-01-01

    Naturally existing colored cotton was far from perfection due to having genetic factors for lower yield, poor fiber quality and monotonous color. These factors posed a challenge to colored cotton breeding and innovation. To identify novel quantitative trait loci (QTL) for fiber color along with understanding of correlation between fiber color and quality in colored cotton, a RIL and two F2 populations were generated from crosses among Zong128 (Brown fiber cotton) and two white fiber cotton lines which were then analyzed in four environments. Two stable and major QTLs (qLC-7-1, qFC-7-1) for fiber lint and fuzz color were detected accounting for 16.01%-59.85% of the phenotypic variation across multiple generations and environments. Meanwhile, some minor QTLs were also identified on chromosomes 5, 14, 21 and 24 providing low phenotypic variation (<5%) from only F2 populations, not from the RILs population. Especially, a multiple-effect locus for fiber color and quality has been detected between flanking markers NAU1043 and NAU3654 on chromosome 7 (A genome) over multiple environments. Of which, qLC-7-1, qFC-7-1 were responsible for positive effects and improved fiber color in offsprings. Meanwhile, the QTLs (qFL-7-1, qFU-7-1, qFF-7-1, qFE-7-1, and qFS-7-1) for fiber quality had negative effects and explained 2.19%-8.78% of the phenotypic variation. This multiple-effect locus for fiber color and quality may reveal the negative correlation between the two types of above traits, so paving the way towards cotton genetic improvement. PMID:26121363

  13. Sustained hypertension in Dahl rats. Negative correlation of agonist response to blood pressure.

    PubMed

    Kong, J Q; Taylor, D A; Fleming, W W

    1995-01-01

    The perfused mesenteric vasculature of Dahl salt-sensitive rats on a high salt diet for 5 days (prehypertensive or early hypertensive) is selectively supersensitive to norepinephrine. The present goal was to determine whether that supersensitivity was maintained as hypertension developed. Littermates of salt-sensitive and salt-resistant rats (Dahl Brookhaven strain) were followed on low or high salt for up to 6 weeks. Systolic blood pressure was elevated in the salt-sensitive, high salt rats after 3 or 6 weeks but not after 5 days of the diet. The perfused mesenteric vascular beds from salt-sensitive rats were supersensitive to norepinephrine and nerve stimulation but not to potassium chloride when the rats had been maintained for 5 days or 3 weeks on the high salt diet. However, responses to norepinephrine declined after 6 weeks of the high salt diet. To determine whether sustained high blood pressure has a negative effect on mesenteric vascular responses, we conducted additional experiments with perfused mesenteric vascular beds from salt-sensitive Brookhaven (high salt, 5 weeks) and Rapp (high salt, 6 weeks) animals. Both groups exhibited significant negative correlations between in vivo systolic pressure and maximal responses of mesenteric vessels to norepinephrine and potassium chloride. We suggest that sustained hypertension in Dahl rats has a negative effect on the contractility of the mesenteric arterial system that, by 5 to 6 weeks, masks the initial supersensitivity to norepinephrine. No effects of any diet on the dilating responses of the mesenteric vessels to acetylcholine were observed in any group. PMID:7843745

  14. Correlations of regional postmortem enzyme activities with premortem local glucose metabolic rates in Alzheimer's disease.

    PubMed

    McGeer, E G; McGeer, P L; Harrop, R; Akiyama, H; Kamo, H

    1990-12-01

    Correlations were sought between local cerebral metabolic rates (LCMRs) for glucose in various regions of the cortex, determined in premortem PET scans, with the regional activities of choline acetyltransferase (ChAT), acetylcholinesterase (AChE), beta-glucuronidase (Gluc, a probable index of reactive gliosis), and phosphate-activated glutaminase (PAG, a possible indice of the large pyramidal neurons) measured on postmortem tissue. Significant negative correlations between LCMRs and Gluc activities were found in 6 PET-scanned cases of Alzheimer disease (AD), and positive correlations of LCMRs with PAG were found in 5. By contrast, a positive correlation with ChAT and AChE was found in only 1. The results are consistent with the metabolic deficits in AD being primarily a reflection of local neuronal loss and gliosis. Similar data on two cases of Huntington's disease showed no significant correlations, while 1 patient with Parkinson dementia showed a significant (negative) correlation only with Gluc.

  15. Bacterial lipopolysaccharide activates CD57-negative human NK cells.

    PubMed

    Kanevskiy, L M; Erokhina, S A; Streltsova, M A; Telford, W G; Sapozhnikov, A M; Kovalenko, E I

    2014-12-01

    NK cells play an important regulatory role in sepsis by induction and augmentation of proinflammatory reactions in early stages of the septic process and by suppression of immune response in later stages of inflammation. The present work was aimed at the effect of bacterial lipopolysaccharide (LPS), the main pathogenic factor of sepsis development, on human NK cells ex vivo. We show that LPS activates immature CD57-negative NK cells, which typically constitute less than half of the normal NK cell population in human peripheral blood. Under conditions of NK cell stimulation with IL-2, addition of LPS provokes an increase in IFN-γ production. However, LPS both increased and inhibited NK cell cytotoxic activity. It is important to note that the activation of NK cells on LPS addition was observed in the absence of TLR4 on the NK cell surface. These results confirm our previous data arguing for a direct interaction of LPS with NK cells and evidence an atypical mechanism of LPS-induced NK cell activation without the involvement of surface TLR4.

  16. Staufen Negatively Modulates MicroRNA Activity in Caenorhabditis elegans

    PubMed Central

    Ren, Zhiji; Veksler-Lublinsky, Isana; Morrissey, David; Ambros, Victor

    2016-01-01

    The double-stranded RNA-binding protein Staufen has been implicated in various posttranscriptional gene regulatory processes. Here, we demonstrate that the Caenorhabditis elegans homolog of Staufen, STAU-1, functionally interacts with microRNAs. Loss-of-function mutations of stau-1 significantly suppress phenotypes of let-7 family microRNA mutants, a hypomorphic allele of dicer, and a lsy-6 microRNA partial loss-of-function mutant. Furthermore, STAU-1 modulates the activity of lin-14, a target of lin-4 and let-7 family microRNAs, and this modulation is abolished when the 3′ untranslated region of lin-14 is removed. Deep sequencing of small RNA cDNA libraries reveals no dramatic change in the levels of microRNAs or other small RNA populations between wild-type and stau-1 mutants, with the exception of certain endogenous siRNAs in the WAGO pathway. The modulation of microRNA activity by STAU-1 does not seem to be associated with the previously reported enhanced exogenous RNAi (Eri) phenotype of stau-1 mutants, since eri-1 exhibits the opposite effect on microRNA activity. Altogether, our results suggest that STAU-1 negatively modulates microRNA activity downstream of microRNA biogenesis, possibly by competing with microRNAs for binding on the 3′ untranslated region of target mRNAs. PMID:26921297

  17. Staufen Negatively Modulates MicroRNA Activity in Caenorhabditis elegans.

    PubMed

    Ren, Zhiji; Veksler-Lublinsky, Isana; Morrissey, David; Ambros, Victor

    2016-01-01

    The double-stranded RNA-binding protein Staufen has been implicated in various posttranscriptional gene regulatory processes. Here, we demonstrate that the Caenorhabditis elegans homolog of Staufen, STAU-1, functionally interacts with microRNAs. Loss-of-function mutations of stau-1 significantly suppress phenotypes of let-7 family microRNA mutants, a hypomorphic allele of dicer, and a lsy-6 microRNA partial loss-of-function mutant. Furthermore, STAU-1 modulates the activity of lin-14, a target of lin-4 and let-7 family microRNAs, and this modulation is abolished when the 3' untranslated region of lin-14 is removed. Deep sequencing of small RNA cDNA libraries reveals no dramatic change in the levels of microRNAs or other small RNA populations between wild-type and stau-1 mutants, with the exception of certain endogenous siRNAs in the WAGO pathway. The modulation of microRNA activity by STAU-1 does not seem to be associated with the previously reported enhanced exogenous RNAi (Eri) phenotype of stau-1 mutants, since eri-1 exhibits the opposite effect on microRNA activity. Altogether, our results suggest that STAU-1 negatively modulates microRNA activity downstream of microRNA biogenesis, possibly by competing with microRNAs for binding on the 3' untranslated region of target mRNAs. PMID:26921297

  18. Correlates of trading sex for methamphetamine in a sample of HIV-negative heterosexual methamphetamine users.

    PubMed

    Semple, Shirley J; Strathdee, Steffanie A; Zians, Jim; Patterson, Thomas L

    2011-01-01

    While many studies have examined correlates of trading sex for money, few have examined factors associated with exclusive trading of sex for drugs. We identified sociodemographic, behavioral, and psychological correlates of trading sex for methamphetamine in a sample of HIV-negative heterosexual men and women who were enrolled in a sexual risk reduction intervention in San Diego, California. Of 342 participants, 26% overall (21% of males and 31% of females) reported trading sex for methamphetamine in the past two months. Multiple logistic regression analysis revealed that recently trading sex for methamphetamine was independently associated with being female, homeless, binging on methamphetamine, sexual victimization in the past two months, engaging in anal sex 24 or more times in the past two months, and higher sexual compulsivity scores. Effective interventions for this high-risk population should consider gender-focused counseling for sexual abuse, motivational enhancement therapy, social-cognitive skills training, as well as enhanced access and utilization of social services, including drug treatment.

  19. ERP Energy and Cognitive Activity Correlates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schillaci, Michael Jay; Vendemia, Jennifer M. C.

    2014-03-01

    We propose a novel analysis approach for high-density event related scalp potential (ERP) data where the integrated channel-power is used to attain an energy density functional state for channel-clusters of neurophysiological significance. The method is applied to data recorded during a two-stimulus, directed lie paradigm and shows that deceptive responses emit between 8% and 10% less power. A time course analysis of these cognitive activity measures over posterior and anterior regions of the cortex suggests that neocortical interactions, reflecting the differing workload demands during executive and semantic processes, take about 50% longer for the case of deception. These results suggest that the proposed method may provide a useful tool for the analysis of ERP correlates of high-order cognitive functioning. We also report on a possible equivalence between the energy functional distribution and near-infrared signatures that have been measured with other modalities.

  20. Activity of the antiseptic polyhexanide against gram-negative bacteria.

    PubMed

    Fabry, Werner Hugo Karl; Kock, Hans-Jürgen; Vahlensieck, Winfried

    2014-04-01

    The activity of the antiseptic polyhexanide was tested against 250 gram-negative clinical isolates, that is, 50 isolates each of Escherichia coli, Klebsiella pneumoniae, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Moraxella catarrhalis, and Haemophilus influenzae. Minimal inhibitory concentrations (MICs) and minimal bactericidal concentrations (MBCs) were determined by using a serial broth microdilution technique according to DIN 58940. Time-kill studies were performed for reference stains E. coli ATCC 25922, K. pneumoniae ATCC 4352, P. aeruginosa ATCC 15442, M. catarrhalis ATCC 43617, and H. influenzae ATCC 49247. All tested isolates had MICs and MBCs within a range of 1-32 mg/L and were regarded as susceptible to polyhexanide. The highest values were found for P. aeruginosa and H. influenzae with MICs and MBCs of 32 mg/L. Addition of up to 4% albumin to the test medium did not change MICs and MBCs. Time-kill studies of the reference strains showed reduction rates from 3 log10 colony forming units (CFU)/ml to more than 5 log10 CFU/ml for 200 and 400 mg/L polyhexanide within 5-30 min. Testing of polyhexanide in combination with antibiotics showed indifference with amoxicillin, cefotaxime, imipenem, gentamicin, and ciprofloxacin; no antagonism was found. As no resistance and no antagonism with antibiotics were detected, polyhexanide is regarded as suitable agent for topical eradication of gram-negative bacteria.

  1. Severity of negative symptoms in schizophrenia correlated to hyperactivity of the left globus pallidus and the right claustrum. A PET study.

    PubMed

    Galeno, Roxana; Molina, Mario; Guirao, Manuel; Isoardi, Roberto

    2004-01-01

    Schizophrenia has been characterized as a complex disease, in which various cerebral regions may be affected. The purpose of this study was to compare the cerebral regions that are involved in mild and severe negative symptoms, and to determine whether the degree of severity can be related to specific dysfunctional areas of the brain. The PANS Scale was used to form two groups of patients with prevalence of negative symptoms: Mildly Affected (MA), and Severely Affected (SA). Brain PETs were obtained in resting conditions, and SPM (Statistical Parametric Mapping) was used to perform statistical comparisons. The MA-group showed increased activity in: posterior cingulate gyrus, middle frontal gyrus, precentral gyrus, middle occipital gyrus, cuneus and post-central gyrus; decreased activity in inferior frontal gyrus, orbitofrontal and fusiform gyrus. The SA-group showed increased activity in: globus pallidus, insular cortex, cuneus, claustrum, post-central gyrus and pre-central gyrus; decreased activity in fusiform gyrus and superior temporal gyri. These results permit correlation of negative symptomatology with abnormalities in the cortico-striato-pallido-thalamic neural circuit. Severity of negative symptoms is clearly correlated to abnormal left external pallidal activation, evidencing the relevance of this nucleus for cognitive, planning and social capabilities. Specific therapeutic strategies might be derived from pallidal neurotransmitter systems studies. Key words: schizophrenia, negative symptoms, severity, PET, globus pallidus, claustrum.

  2. Experience of stress in childhood negatively correlates with plasma oxytocin concentration in adult men.

    PubMed

    Opacka-Juffry, Jolanta; Mohiyeddini, Changiz

    2012-01-01

    Early life experience is known to affect responses to stress in adulthood. Adverse experience in childhood and/or adolescence sensitises to life events that precipitate depression in later life. Published evidence suggests a relationship between depression and oxytocin (OT), but the extent to which early life experience influences OT disposition in adulthood deserves further exploration. This study hypothesised that early life stress (ELS) has a long-term negative effect on OT system activity. The study was performed on 90 male volunteers (18-56 years; mean ± standard deviation = 27.7 ± 7.09 years). Several questionnaires were used to assess: health, early life stressful experiences in childhood (ELS-C, up to 12 years) and early life stressful adolescence (13-18 years), recent stressful life events, depressive symptoms, state-trait anxiety and social desirability. Plasma OT concentration was estimated by means of a competitive enzyme immunoassay. Lower OT concentrations were significantly associated with higher levels of ELS-C (p < 0.01), and with depressive symptoms and trait anxiety (both p < 0.05). The interaction between ELS-C and trait anxiety was significant (p < 0.05), indicating that the link between ELS-C and plasma OT concentration is moderated by trait anxiety. These results contribute to the evidence that early life adverse experience is negatively associated with OT system activity in adulthood, and offer further insight into mediator and moderator effects on this link.

  3. Evidence of successful modulation of brain activation and subjective experience during reappraisal of negative emotion in unmedicated depression.

    PubMed

    Dillon, Daniel Gerard; Pizzagalli, Diego Andrea

    2013-05-30

    Functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) was used to examine cognitive regulation of negative emotion in 12 unmedicated patients with major depressive disorder (MDD) and 24 controls. The participants used reappraisal to increase (real condition) and reduce (photo condition) the personal relevance of negative and neutral pictures during fMRI as valence ratings were collected; passive viewing (look condition) served as a baseline. Reappraisal was not strongly affected by MDD. Ratings indicated that both groups successfully reappraised negative emotional experience. Both groups also showed better memory for negative vs. neutral pictures 2 weeks later. Across groups, increased brain activation was observed on negative/real vs. negative/look and negative/photo trials in left dorsolateral prefrontal cortex (DLPFC), rostral anterior cingulate, left parietal cortex, caudate, and right amygdala. Depressive severity was inversely correlated with activation modulation in the left DLPFC, right amygdala, and right cerebellum during negative reappraisal. The lack of group differences suggests that depressed adults can modulate the brain activation and subjective experience elicited by negative pictures when given clear instructions. However, the negative relationship between depression severity and effects of reappraisal on brain activation indicates that group differences may be detectable in larger samples of more severely depressed participants.

  4. Negative regulation of lymphocyte activation by the adaptor protein LAX.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Minghua; Granillo, Olivia; Wen, Renren; Yang, Kaiyong; Dai, Xuezhi; Wang, Demin; Zhang, Weiguo

    2005-05-01

    The membrane-associated adaptor protein LAX is a linker for activation of T cells (LAT)-like molecule that is expressed in lymphoid tissues. Upon stimulation of T or B cells, it is phosphorylated and interacts with Grb2 and the p85 subunit of PI3K. LAX, however, is not capable of replacing LAT in the TCR signaling pathway. In this study we report that upon T or B cell activation, the LAX protein was up-regulated dramatically. Although disruption of the LAX gene by homologous recombination had no major impact on lymphocyte development, it caused a significant reduction in CD23 expression on mature B cells. Interestingly, naive LAX(-/-) mice had spontaneous germinal center formation. Compared with normal T and B cells, LAX(-/-) T and B cells were hyperresponsive and had enhanced calcium flux, protein tyrosine phosphorylation, MAPK and Akt activation, and cell survival upon engagement of the T or B AgRs. Our data demonstrate that LAX functions as a negative regulator in lymphocyte signaling.

  5. Vitamin D Status Is Negatively Correlated with Insulin Resistance in Chinese Type 2 Diabetes.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Jie; Ye, Jianhong; Guo, Gang; Lan, Zhenhao; Li, Xing; Pan, Zhiming; Rao, Xianming; Zheng, Zongji; Luo, Fangtao; Lin, Luping; Lin, Zhihua; Xue, Yaoming

    2016-01-01

    Objectives. Vitamin D deficiency plays a role in insulin resistance and the pathogenesis of type 2 diabetes mellitus. Little information is available about the association between vitamin D status and insulin resistance in the Chinese population. Currently, vitamin D status is evaluated by the concentrations of serum 25-hydroxyvitamin D [25(OH)D]. This study explores the relationship between insulin resistance and serum 25-hydroxyvitamin D concentrations in Chinese patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus. Subjects and Methods. This study included 117 patients with type 2 diabetes. The following variables were measured: 25-hydroxyvitamin D [25(OH)D], glycosylated hemoglobin A1c (HbA1c), fasting blood glucose (FBS), fasting blood insulin (FINS), fasting blood C-peptide, serum creatinine (SCr), glomerular filtration rate (eGFR), body mass index (BMI), and homeostatic model estimates of insulin resistance (HOMA-IR). Results. The cases were divided into three groups: Group 1 (G1) with 25(OH)D ≤ 20 ng/mL [≤50 nmol/L], Group 2 (G2) with 25(OH)D values from 20 ng/mL [50 nmol/L] to 30 ng/mL [75 nmol/L], and Group 3 (G3) with 25(OH)D ≥ 30 ng/mL [≥75 nmol/L], with 52.6%, 26.3%, and 21.1% of subjects in Groups 1-3, respectively. There was a negative correlation between 25(OH)D and HOMA-IR (β = -0.314, p = 0.001) adjusted by age, BMI, and eGFR. Conclusion. Better vitamin D status may be protective of glucose homeostasis since 25(OH)D was negatively associated with insulin resistance in Chinese patients with type 2 diabetes. PMID:27413370

  6. Vitamin D Status Is Negatively Correlated with Insulin Resistance in Chinese Type 2 Diabetes

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Jie; Ye, Jianhong; Guo, Gang; Lan, Zhenhao; Li, Xing; Pan, Zhiming; Rao, Xianming; Luo, Fangtao; Lin, Luping; Lin, Zhihua; Xue, Yaoming

    2016-01-01

    Objectives. Vitamin D deficiency plays a role in insulin resistance and the pathogenesis of type 2 diabetes mellitus. Little information is available about the association between vitamin D status and insulin resistance in the Chinese population. Currently, vitamin D status is evaluated by the concentrations of serum 25-hydroxyvitamin D [25(OH)D]. This study explores the relationship between insulin resistance and serum 25-hydroxyvitamin D concentrations in Chinese patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus. Subjects and Methods. This study included 117 patients with type 2 diabetes. The following variables were measured: 25-hydroxyvitamin D [25(OH)D], glycosylated hemoglobin A1c (HbA1c), fasting blood glucose (FBS), fasting blood insulin (FINS), fasting blood C-peptide, serum creatinine (SCr), glomerular filtration rate (eGFR), body mass index (BMI), and homeostatic model estimates of insulin resistance (HOMA-IR). Results. The cases were divided into three groups: Group 1 (G1) with 25(OH)D ≤ 20 ng/mL [≤50 nmol/L], Group 2 (G2) with 25(OH)D values from 20 ng/mL [50 nmol/L] to 30 ng/mL [75 nmol/L], and Group 3 (G3) with 25(OH)D ≥ 30 ng/mL [≥75 nmol/L], with 52.6%, 26.3%, and 21.1% of subjects in Groups 1–3, respectively. There was a negative correlation between 25(OH)D and HOMA-IR (β = −0.314, p = 0.001) adjusted by age, BMI, and eGFR. Conclusion. Better vitamin D status may be protective of glucose homeostasis since 25(OH)D was negatively associated with insulin resistance in Chinese patients with type 2 diabetes. PMID:27413370

  7. Serum Sclerostin Levels Negatively Correlate with Parathyroid Hormone Levels and Free Estrogen Index in Postmenopausal Women

    PubMed Central

    Mirza, Faryal S.; Padhi, I. Desmond; Raisz, Lawrence G.; Lorenzo, Joseph A.

    2010-01-01

    Context: Sclerostin is a negative regulator of bone formation. Objective: The aim of the study was to compare serum sclerostin levels in premenopausal and postmenopausal women and evaluate its relationship to estrogen, TH, bone turnover, and bone mass. Design, Setting, and Participants: We conducted a cross-sectional observational study of healthy community-dwelling pre- and postmenopausal women. Intervention(s): There were no interventions. Main Outcome Measure(s): We compared serum sclerostin levels in pre- and postmenopausal women and correlated sclerostin levels with female sex hormones, calciotropic hormones, bone turnover markers, and bone mineral density. Results: Premenopausal women were 26.8 yr old, and postmenopausal women were 56.8 yr old. Postmenopausal women had lower values for estradiol (30 ± 23 vs. 10 ± 4 pg/ml; P < 0.001), estrone (61 ± 24 vs. 29 ± 10 pg/ml; P <0.001), and free estrogen index (FEI) (6 ± 4 vs. 3 ± 2 pmol/nmol; P = 0.008) and significantly lower bone mineral density at all sites compared to premenopausal women, with no significant differences in levels of PTH, 25-hydroxy or 1,25-dihydroxy vitamin D levels. Postmenopausal women had significantly higher serum sclerostin levels (1.16 ± 0.38 ng/ml vs. 0.48 ± 0.15 ng/ml; P < 0.001). Because most of the premenopausal women were on oral contraceptives, subsequent analyses were limited to postmenopausal women. There were significant negative correlations between sclerostin and FEI and sclerostin and PTH in this group. Using multiple regression analysis, both FEI (β = −0.629; P = 0.002) and PTH (β = −0.554; P = 0.004) were found to be independent predictors of sclerostin levels in postmenopausal women. Conclusions: Our findings suggest that serum sclerostin levels are regulated by both estrogens and PTH in postmenopausal women. These findings need to be explored further in larger prospective studies. PMID:20156921

  8. Robust activation method for negative electron affinity photocathodes

    DOEpatents

    Mulhollan, Gregory A.; Bierman, John C.

    2011-09-13

    A method by which photocathodes(201), single crystal, amorphous, or otherwise ordered, can be surface modified to a robust state of lowered and in best cases negative, electron affinity has been discovered. Conventional methods employ the use of Cs(203) and an oxidizing agent(207), typically carried by diatomic oxygen or by more complex molecules, for example nitrogen trifluoride, to achieve a lowered electron affinity(404). In the improved activation method, a second alkali, other than Cs(205), is introduced onto the surface during the activation process, either by co-deposition, yo-yo, or sporadic or intermittent application. Best effect for GaAs photocathodes has been found through the use of Li(402) as the second alkali, though nearly the same effect can be found by employing Na(406). Suitable photocathodes are those which are grown, cut from boules, implanted, rolled, deposited or otherwise fabricated in a fashion and shape desired for test or manufacture independently supported or atop a support structure or within a framework or otherwise affixed or suspended in the place and position required for use.

  9. Negative Urgency Mediates the Relationship between Amygdala and Orbitofrontal Cortex Activation to Negative Emotional Stimuli and General Risk-Taking

    PubMed Central

    Cyders, Melissa A.; Dzemidzic, Mario; Eiler, William J.; Coskunpinar, Ayca; Karyadi, Kenny A.; Kareken, David A.

    2015-01-01

    The tendency toward impulsive behavior under emotional duress (negative and positive urgency) predicts a wide range of maladaptive risk-taking and behavioral disorders. However, it remains unclear how urgency relates to limbic system activity as induced from emotional provocation. This study used functional magnetic resonance imaging to examine the relationship between brain responses to visual emotional stimuli and urgency traits. Twenty-seven social drinkers (mean age = 25.2, 14 males) viewed negative (Neg), neutral (Neu), and positive (Pos) images during 6 fMRI scans. Brain activation was extracted from a priori limbic regions previously identified in studies of emotional provocation. The right posterior orbitofrontal cortex (OFC) and left amygdala were activated in the [Neg>Neu] contrast, whereas the left posterior OFC was activated in the [Pos>Neu] contrast. Negative urgency was related to the right lateral OFC (r = 0.43, P = 0.03) and the left amygdala (r = 0.39, P = 0.04) [Neg>Neu] activation. Negative urgency also mediated the relationship between [Neg>Neu] activation and general risk-taking (regression weights = 3.42 for right OFC and 2.75 for the left amygdala). Emotional cue-induced activation in right lateral OFC and left amygdala might relate to emotion-based risk-taking through negative urgency. PMID:24904065

  10. 'Negativity bias' in risk for depression and anxiety: brain-body fear circuitry correlates, 5-HTT-LPR and early life stress.

    PubMed

    Williams, Leanne M; Gatt, Justine M; Schofield, Peter R; Olivieri, Gloria; Peduto, Anthony; Gordon, Evian

    2009-09-01

    The INTEGRATE Model draws on the framework of 'integrative neuroscience' to bring together brain-body and behavioral concepts of emotion, thinking and feeling and their regulation. The key organizing principle is the drive to 'minimize danger and maximize reward' that determines what is significant to us at each point in time. Traits of 'negativity bias' reflect the tendency to perceive danger rather than reward related information, and this bias influences emotion, thinking and feeling processes. Here, we examined a self-report measure of Negativity Bias in relation to its impact on brain and body correlates of emotion processing. The contributions of the serotonin transporter (5-HTT-LPR) allelic variants and early life stress to both negativity bias and these correlates were also examined. Data were accessed in collaboration with the Brain Resource International Database (BRID) which provides standardized data across these domains of measurement. From an initial sample of 303 nonclinical subjects from the BRID, subjects scoring one standard deviation below (n=55) and above (n=47) the mean on the measure of negativity bias were identified as 'Negativity Bias' and 'Positivity Bias' groups for analysis, respectively. These subjects had been genotyped for 5-HTT-LPR Short allele versus LL homozygote status, and completed the early life stress scale, and recording of startle responses and heart rate for conscious and nonconscious fear conditions. A matched subset (n=39) of BRID subjects completed functional MRI with the same facial emotion tasks. The Negativity Bias (compared to Positivity Bias) group was distinguished by both arousal and brain function correlates: higher startle amplitude, higher heart rate for conscious and nonconscious fear conditions, and heightened activation in neural circuitry for both fear conditions. Regions of heightened activation included brainstem and bilateral amygdala, anterior cingulate and ventral and dorsal medial prefrontal cortex (m

  11. Correlation of oxacillin MIC with mecA gene carriage in coagulase-negative staphylococci.

    PubMed

    Hussain, Z; Stoakes, L; Massey, V; Diagre, D; Fitzgerald, V; El Sayed, S; Lannigan, R

    2000-02-01

    The National Committee for Clinical Laboratory Standards has recently changed the oxacillin breakpoint from >/=4 mg/liter to >/=0. 5 mg/liter to detect methicillin-resistant coagulase-negative staphylococci (CoNS) because the previous breakpoint lacked sensitivity. To determine the correlation between the new oxacillin breakpoint and the presence of the mecA gene, 493 CoNS of 11 species were tested. The presence of the mecA gene was determined by PCR, and oxacillin susceptibility was determined by the agar dilution method with Mueller-Hinton agar containing 2% NaCl and oxacillin (0. 125 to 4.0 mg/liter). The new breakpoint correctly classified all CoNS strains with mecA as methicillin resistant and strains of Staphylococcus epidermidis, S. haemolyticus, and S. hominis without mecA as methicillin susceptible. The breakpoint of >/=0.5 mg/liter was not specific for S. cohnii, S. lugdunensis, S. saprophyticus, S. warneri, and S. xylosus, in that it categorized 70 of 74 strains of these species without mecA (94.6%) as methicillin resistant. The results of this study indicate that the new oxacillin breakpoint accurately identifies strains of CoNS with mecA but is not specific for strains of certain species of CoNS without mecA.

  12. Thermoelectric materials by using two-dimensional materials with negative correlation between electrical and thermal conductivity.

    PubMed

    Lee, Myoung-Jae; Ahn, Ji-Hoon; Sung, Ji Ho; Heo, Hoseok; Jeon, Seong Gi; Lee, Woo; Song, Jae Yong; Hong, Ki-Ha; Choi, Byeongdae; Lee, Sung-Hoon; Jo, Moon-Ho

    2016-01-01

    In general, in thermoelectric materials the electrical conductivity σ and thermal conductivity κ are related and thus cannot be controlled independently. Previously, to maximize the thermoelectric figure of merit in state-of-the-art materials, differences in relative scaling between σ and κ as dimensions are reduced to approach the nanoscale were utilized. Here we present an approach to thermoelectric materials using tin disulfide, SnS2, nanosheets that demonstrated a negative correlation between σ and κ. In other words, as the thickness of SnS2 decreased, σ increased whereas κ decreased. This approach leads to a thermoelectric figure of merit increase to 0.13 at 300 K, a factor ∼1,000 times greater than previously reported bulk single-crystal SnS2. The Seebeck coefficient obtained for our two-dimensional SnS2 nanosheets was 34.7 mV K(-1) for 16-nm-thick samples at 300 K. PMID:27323662

  13. Thermoelectric materials by using two-dimensional materials with negative correlation between electrical and thermal conductivity

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Myoung-Jae; Ahn, Ji-Hoon; Sung, Ji Ho; Heo, Hoseok; Jeon, Seong Gi; Lee, Woo; Song, Jae Yong; Hong, Ki-Ha; Choi, Byeongdae; Lee, Sung-Hoon; Jo, Moon-Ho

    2016-01-01

    In general, in thermoelectric materials the electrical conductivity σ and thermal conductivity κ are related and thus cannot be controlled independently. Previously, to maximize the thermoelectric figure of merit in state-of-the-art materials, differences in relative scaling between σ and κ as dimensions are reduced to approach the nanoscale were utilized. Here we present an approach to thermoelectric materials using tin disulfide, SnS2, nanosheets that demonstrated a negative correlation between σ and κ. In other words, as the thickness of SnS2 decreased, σ increased whereas κ decreased. This approach leads to a thermoelectric figure of merit increase to 0.13 at 300 K, a factor ∼1,000 times greater than previously reported bulk single-crystal SnS2. The Seebeck coefficient obtained for our two-dimensional SnS2 nanosheets was 34.7 mV K−1 for 16-nm-thick samples at 300 K. PMID:27323662

  14. Correlation of oxacillin MIC with mecA gene carriage in coagulase-negative staphylococci.

    PubMed

    Hussain, Z; Stoakes, L; Massey, V; Diagre, D; Fitzgerald, V; El Sayed, S; Lannigan, R

    2000-02-01

    The National Committee for Clinical Laboratory Standards has recently changed the oxacillin breakpoint from >/=4 mg/liter to >/=0. 5 mg/liter to detect methicillin-resistant coagulase-negative staphylococci (CoNS) because the previous breakpoint lacked sensitivity. To determine the correlation between the new oxacillin breakpoint and the presence of the mecA gene, 493 CoNS of 11 species were tested. The presence of the mecA gene was determined by PCR, and oxacillin susceptibility was determined by the agar dilution method with Mueller-Hinton agar containing 2% NaCl and oxacillin (0. 125 to 4.0 mg/liter). The new breakpoint correctly classified all CoNS strains with mecA as methicillin resistant and strains of Staphylococcus epidermidis, S. haemolyticus, and S. hominis without mecA as methicillin susceptible. The breakpoint of >/=0.5 mg/liter was not specific for S. cohnii, S. lugdunensis, S. saprophyticus, S. warneri, and S. xylosus, in that it categorized 70 of 74 strains of these species without mecA (94.6%) as methicillin resistant. The results of this study indicate that the new oxacillin breakpoint accurately identifies strains of CoNS with mecA but is not specific for strains of certain species of CoNS without mecA. PMID:10655380

  15. Self-reported impulsivity is negatively correlated with amygdalar volumes in cocaine dependence

    PubMed Central

    Mei, Songli; Xu, Jiansong; Carroll, Kathleen M.; Potenza, Marc N.

    2015-01-01

    Although impulsivity has been associated with cocaine dependence and other addictive behaviors, the biological factors underlying impulsivity have yet to be precisely determined. This study aimed to examine relationships between impulsivity and volumes of the amygdala and hippocampus in cocaine-dependent and healthy comparison individuals. The Barratt Impulsiveness Scale (BIS-11) was used to assess impulsivity. FreeSurfer was used to assess amygdalar and hippocampal volumes from high-resolution structural magnetic resonance images. Relative to healthy comparison subjects, cocaine-dependent individuals scored higher on all three subscales of BIS-11 but did not differ from healthy comparison subjects in amygdalar or hippocampal volumes. Cocaine-dependent individuals showed significant negative correlations between amygdalar volumes and scores on the BIS-11 Attentional subscale, and this relationship differed significantly from the non-significant relationship in healthy comparison subjects. As individual differences in amygdalar structure may contribute to the high impulsivity observed in cocaine-dependent individuals, the findings suggest that future studies should assess the extent to which therapies that target impulsivity in cocaine dependence may operate through the amygdala or alter its structure or function. PMID:26187551

  16. Thermoelectric materials by using two-dimensional materials with negative correlation between electrical and thermal conductivity.

    PubMed

    Lee, Myoung-Jae; Ahn, Ji-Hoon; Sung, Ji Ho; Heo, Hoseok; Jeon, Seong Gi; Lee, Woo; Song, Jae Yong; Hong, Ki-Ha; Choi, Byeongdae; Lee, Sung-Hoon; Jo, Moon-Ho

    2016-06-21

    In general, in thermoelectric materials the electrical conductivity σ and thermal conductivity κ are related and thus cannot be controlled independently. Previously, to maximize the thermoelectric figure of merit in state-of-the-art materials, differences in relative scaling between σ and κ as dimensions are reduced to approach the nanoscale were utilized. Here we present an approach to thermoelectric materials using tin disulfide, SnS2, nanosheets that demonstrated a negative correlation between σ and κ. In other words, as the thickness of SnS2 decreased, σ increased whereas κ decreased. This approach leads to a thermoelectric figure of merit increase to 0.13 at 300 K, a factor ∼1,000 times greater than previously reported bulk single-crystal SnS2. The Seebeck coefficient obtained for our two-dimensional SnS2 nanosheets was 34.7 mV K(-1) for 16-nm-thick samples at 300 K.

  17. Indium phosphide negative electron affinity photocathodes: Surface cleaning and activation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Yun

    InP(100) is a very important semi-conductor for many applications. When activated by Cs and oxygen, the InP surface achieves the state of Negative Electron Affinity (NEA) making the Cs+O/InP system a very efficient electron source. Despite many years of study, the chemical cleaning and activation of InP are still not well understood. In our work, we have established an understanding of the basic physics and chemistry for the chemical cleaning and activation of the InP(100) surface. Synchrotron Radiation Photoelectron Spectroscopy is the main technique used in this study because of its high surface sensitivity and ability to identify chemical species present on the surface at each stage of our process. A clean, stoichiometric InP(100) surface is crucial for obtaining high performance of NEA photocathodes. Therefore, the first part of our study focused on the chemical cleaning of InP(100). We found that hydrogen peroxide based solutions alone, originally developed to clean GaAs(100) surfaces and widely used for InP(100), do not result in clean InP(I00) surfaces because oxide is left on the surface. A second cleaning step, which uses acid solutions like HCl or H2SO4, can remove all the oxide and leave a 0.4 ML protective layer of elemental phosphorous on the surface. The elemental phosphorous can be removed by annealing at 330°C and a clean InP(100) surface can be obtained. Cs deposition on InP(100) surface shows clear charge transfer from the Cs ad-atoms to the substrate. When the Cs/InP(100) surface is dosed with oxygen, the charge transfer from the Cs to substrate is reduced and substrate is oxidized. The activation of InP as a NEA photocathode is carried out by an alternating series of steps consisting of Cs deposition and Cs+O co-deposition. Two types of oxygen are found after activation. The first is dissociated oxygen and the other is a di-oxygen species (peroxide or superoxide). The decay of quantum-yield with time and with annealing is studied and changes in

  18. Negative correlation between mycological surfaces pollution in hospital emergency departments and blood monocytes phagocytosis of healthcare workers.

    PubMed

    Lewicki, Sławomir; Bielawska-Drózd, Agata; Winnicka, Izabela; Leszczyński, Paweł; Cieślik, Piotr; Korniłłowicz-Kowalska, Teresa; Bohacz, Justyna; Jaroszuk-Ściseł, Jolanta; Skopińska-Różewska, Ewa; Kocik, Janusz

    2015-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to find a possible relationship between the presence of yeast and filamentous fungi in hospital emergency departments and the activity levels of blood granulocytes and monocytes in emergency personnel. The study of mycological pollution was conducted in winter; the samples were collected from 10 Warsaw hospitals emergency departments (HE D) and in 10 control locations (office spaces) and included air samples and swabbing of floor and walls. The blood for immunological investigation was taken in spring, from 40 men, 26 to 53 years old, healthcare workers of these departments, who have been working for at least 5 years in their current positions, and from 36 corresponding controls, working in control offices. Evaluation of blood leukocyte subpopulations was done by hematological analyzer and cytometry analysis and monocyte and granulocyte phagocytosis by Phagotest. There were no significant differences in the level of mycological contamination between the test and control places. The qualitative analysis of the surfaces and air samples revealed a prevalence of strains belonging to Aspergillus spp. and Penicillium spp. genus. Statistical analysis revealed the existence of negative correlation between the number of phagocytizing blood monocytes and fungi spores content on floor and wall surfaces in hospital emergency departments (r = -0.3282, p < 0.05 and positive correlation between the number of phagocytizing monocytes in the blood of office workers and fungi pollution of control offices (r = 0.4421, p < 0.01).

  19. Negative correlation between mycological surfaces pollution in hospital emergency departments and blood monocytes phagocytosis of healthcare workers

    PubMed Central

    Lewicki, Sławomir; Bielawska-Drózd, Agata; Winnicka, Izabela; Leszczyński, Paweł; Cieślik, Piotr; Korniłłowicz-Kowalska, Teresa; Bohacz, Justyna; Jaroszuk-Ściseł, Jolanta; Kocik, Janusz

    2015-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to find a possible relationship between the presence of yeast and filamentous fungi in hospital emergency departments and the activity levels of blood granulocytes and monocytes in emergency personnel. The study of mycological pollution was conducted in winter; the samples were collected from 10 Warsaw hospitals emergency departments (HE D) and in 10 control locations (office spaces) and included air samples and swabbing of floor and walls. The blood for immunological investigation was taken in spring, from 40 men, 26 to 53 years old, healthcare workers of these departments, who have been working for at least 5 years in their current positions, and from 36 corresponding controls, working in control offices. Evaluation of blood leukocyte subpopulations was done by hematological analyzer and cytometry analysis and monocyte and granulocyte phagocytosis by Phagotest. There were no significant differences in the level of mycological contamination between the test and control places. The qualitative analysis of the surfaces and air samples revealed a prevalence of strains belonging to Aspergillus spp. and Penicillium spp. genus. Statistical analysis revealed the existence of negative correlation between the number of phagocytizing blood monocytes and fungi spores content on floor and wall surfaces in hospital emergency departments (r = –0.3282, p < 0.05 and positive correlation between the number of phagocytizing monocytes in the blood of office workers and fungi pollution of control offices (r = 0.4421, p < 0.01). PMID:26648782

  20. Inner-shell photodetachment from a Si‑ negative ion: strong effect of many-electron correlations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schrange-Kashenock, G.

    2016-06-01

    The first theoretical investigation of the inner-shell single-photodetachment from the Si‑ (1s22s22p63s23p3 4So) negative ion is presented. The partial and total cross sections, the photoelectron phaseshifts, and the parameters of angular anisotropy are calculated in the framework of the many-body theory for L-shell photodetachment from Si‑ ion in the experimentally accessible range of photon energies (7.5–14 Ry). Comparison is made between the calculations of the response of the ionic many-electron system Si‑ to an electromagnetic field at the different levels of approximation: the ‘frozen-field’ random phase approximation with exchange (RPAE), and the static relaxation approximation. The optimal analysis is made when the dynamic relaxation and polarization are included within the Dyson equation method (DEM) simultaneously with the RPAE corrections (the RPAE&DEM approach). It is predicted that the photoexcitation to a resonance state of complex ‘shape-Feschbach’ nature in the open p-shell reveals itself as a prominent resonance structure in the photodetachment cross sections in the energy range of the 2s and 2p inner shell thresholds similar to that in 1s inner-shell photodetachment from C‑ (2006 J. Phys. B: At. Mol. Opt. Phys. 39 1379). The photodetachment dynamical characteristics clearly demonstrate the significance of all the considered many-electron correlations within the RPAE&DEM approach, however the total photodetachment cross section is dominated by a strong resonance peak just after the 2s threshold. Dynamical relaxation (screening) is identified as a decisive factor in the formation of this resonance.

  1. A comparison of the in vitro activity of metronidazole, tinidazole, and nimorazole against Gram-negative anaerobic bacilli.

    PubMed Central

    Reynolds, A V; Hamilton-Miller, J M; Brumfitt, W

    1975-01-01

    The in vitro activities of metronidazole, nimorazole, and tinidazole were compared against 69 strains of obligately anaerobic Gram-negative bacilli. Geometric mean MICs were 0-34, 1-05, and 0-28 mug/ml respectively. Thirty-six strains were also tested by the disk method. Correlation between MIC and diameter of the zones of inhibition was poor. PMID:1214009

  2. Negative emotion differentiation: its personality and well-being correlates and a comparison of different assessment methods.

    PubMed

    Erbas, Yasemin; Ceulemans, Eva; Lee Pe, Madeline; Koval, Peter; Kuppens, Peter

    2014-01-01

    Previous research has shown that individual differences in negative emotion differentiation may play a prominent role in well-being. Yet, many basic questions about negative emotion differentiation remain unanswered, including how it relates and overlaps with related and known dimensions of individual differences and what its possible underlying processes are. To answer these questions, in the current article we present three correlational studies that chart the nomological network of individual differences in negative emotion differentiation in terms of personality, difficulties in identifying and describing feelings, and several indicators of well-being, propose a novel paradigm to assess it in the lab, and explore relationships with a possible underlying mechanism in terms of the motivation to approach or avoid emotions. The results affirm consistent relations between negative emotion differentiation and indicators of adjustment like negative affect, self-esteem, neuroticism, depression and meta-knowledge about one's emotions, and show how it is related to the motivation to experience affective states.

  3. Cerebrospinal fluid and plasma oxytocin concentrations are positively correlated and negatively predict anxiety in children.

    PubMed

    Carson, D S; Berquist, S W; Trujillo, T H; Garner, J P; Hannah, S L; Hyde, S A; Sumiyoshi, R D; Jackson, L P; Moss, J K; Strehlow, M C; Cheshier, S H; Partap, S; Hardan, A Y; Parker, K J

    2015-09-01

    The neuropeptide oxytocin (OXT) exerts anxiolytic and prosocial effects in the central nervous system of rodents. A number of recent studies have attempted to translate these findings by investigating the relationships between peripheral (e.g., blood, urinary and salivary) OXT concentrations and behavioral functioning in humans. Although peripheral samples are easy to obtain in humans, whether peripheral OXT measures are functionally related to central OXT activity remains unclear. To investigate a possible relationship, we quantified OXT concentrations in concomitantly collected cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) and blood samples from child and adult patients undergoing clinically indicated lumbar punctures or other CSF-related procedures. Anxiety scores were obtained in a subset of child participants whose parents completed psychometric assessments. Findings from this study indicate that plasma OXT concentrations significantly and positively predict CSF OXT concentrations (r=0.56, P=0.0064, N=27). Moreover, both plasma (r=-0.92, P=0.0262, N=10) and CSF (r=-0.91, P=0.0335, N=10) OXT concentrations significantly and negatively predicted trait anxiety scores, consistent with the preclinical literature. Importantly, plasma OXT concentrations significantly and positively (r=0.96, P=0.0115, N=10) predicted CSF OXT concentrations in the subset of child participants who provided behavioral data. This study provides the first empirical support for the use of blood measures of OXT as a surrogate for central OXT activity, validated in the context of behavioral functioning. These preliminary findings also suggest that impaired OXT signaling may be a biomarker of anxiety in humans, and a potential target for therapeutic development in individuals with anxiety disorders.

  4. Correlates of video game screen time among males: body mass, physical activity, and other media use.

    PubMed

    Ballard, Mary; Gray, Melissa; Reilly, Jenny; Noggle, Matthew

    2009-08-01

    This study examined the correlations between media use, body mass variables, and physical activity among 116 male undergraduates (white n=106; African American n=5, Latin American n=1, Asian American n=2, and 2 others). Length of video game play during one sitting was positively related to body mass index (BMI; r=.27, p<.01) and negatively correlated with frequency of exercise (r=-.21, p<.05) and days of walking (r=-.22, p<.05). Frequency of video game play was negatively correlated with length of exercising (r=-.21, p<.05). Years of video game play was negatively correlated with length of exercise (r=-.21, p<.05). These results were stronger among those who play online games. Hierarchical regression analyses indicated that video game use predicted BMI, accounting for 6.9% of the variance. The implications of the results are discussed. PMID:19665099

  5. Mastermind: An Activity for Becoming Aware of Negative Mental Sets.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gershaw, David A.

    Since 1974, the game, Mastermind, has been a partial requirement for an introduction to psychology course at Arizona Western College. The game is designed to help students become aware of negative mental sets and apply critical thinking skills, and requires students to duplicate a code consisting of four different colored pegs arranged in a…

  6. 15 CFR 930.35 - Negative determinations for proposed activities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... effects, Federal agencies shall follow § 930.33(a)(1), including an evaluation of the relevant enforceable policies of a management program and include the evaluation in the negative determination. The level of... COASTAL RESOURCE MANAGEMENT FEDERAL CONSISTENCY WITH APPROVED COASTAL MANAGEMENT PROGRAMS Consistency...

  7. Correlates of Reminiscence Activity among Elderly Individuals.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Quackenbush, Steven W.; Barnett, Mark A.

    1995-01-01

    Examines several psychological characteristics and life experiences that may be related to reminiscence activity among elderly individuals (n=70). Results provide support for the notion that aspects of reminiscence activity are associated with individual differences in specific psychological and situational variables. (JPS)

  8. Gene-Environment Correlation Underlying the Association between Parental Negativity and Adolescent Externalizing Problems

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Marceau, Kristine; Horwitz, Briana N.; Narusyte, Jurgita; Ganiban, Jody M.; Spotts, Erica L.; Reiss, David; Neiderhiser, Jenae M.

    2013-01-01

    Studies of adolescent or parent-based twins suggest that gene-environment correlation (rGE) is an important mechanism underlying parent-adolescent relationships. However, information on how parents' and children's genes and environments influence correlated parent "and" child behaviors is needed to distinguish types of rGE. The…

  9. Impact of Negative Emotion on the Neural Correlates of Long-Term Recognition in Younger and Older Adults

    PubMed Central

    Kalpouzos, Grégoria; Fischer, Håkan; Rieckmann, Anna; MacDonald, Stuart W. S.; Bäckman, Lars

    2012-01-01

    Some studies have suggested that the memory advantage for negative emotional information over neutral information (“negativity effect”) is reduced in aging. Besides the fact that most findings are based on immediate retrieval, the neural underpinnings of long-term emotional memory in aging have so far not been investigated. To address these issues, we assessed recognition of neutral and negative scenes after 1- and 3-week retention intervals in younger and older adults using functional magnetic resonance imaging. We further used an event-related design in order to disentangle successful, false, and true recognition. This study revealed four key findings: (1) increased retention interval induced an increased rate of false recognitions for negative scenes, canceling out the negativity effect (present for hit rates only) on discrimination in both younger and older adults; (2) in younger, but not older, adults, reduced activity of the medial temporal lobe was observed over time for neutral scenes, but not for negative scenes, where stable or increased activity was seen; (3) engagement of amygdala (AMG) was observed in older adults after a 3-week delay during successful recognition of negative scenes (hits vs. misses) in comparison with neutral scenes, which may indicate engagement of automatic processes, but engagement of ventrolateral prefrontal cortex was unrelated to AMG activity and performance; and (4) after 3 weeks, but not after 1 week, true recognition of negative scenes was characterized by more activity in left hippocampus and lateral occipito-temporal regions (hits vs. false alarms). As these regions are known to be related to consolidation mechanisms, the observed pattern may indicate the presence of delayed consolidation of true memories. Nonetheless, older adults’ low performance in discrimination of negative scenes could reflect the fact that overall, after long delays of retention, they rely more on general information rather than on

  10. Social Cognitive Impairments and Negative Symptoms in Schizophrenia: Are There Subtypes With Distinct Functional Correlates?

    PubMed Central

    Bell, Morris D.; Corbera, Silvia; Johannesen, Jason K.; Fiszdon, Joanna M.; Wexler, Bruce E.

    2013-01-01

    Social cognitive impairments and negative symptoms are core features of schizophrenia closely associated with impaired community functioning. However, little is known about whether these are independent dimensions of illness and if so, whether individuals with schizophrenia can be meaningfully classified based on these dimensions (SANS) and potentially differentially treated. Five social cognitive measures plus Scale for the Assessment of Negative Symptoms (SANS) and Positive and Negative Syndrome Scale (PANSS) scores in a sample of 77 outpatients produced 2 distinct factors—a social cognitive factor and a negative symptom factor. Factor scores were used in a cluster analysis, which yielded 3 well-defined groupings—a high negative symptom group (HN) and 2 low negative symptom groups, 1 with higher social cognition (HSC) and 1 with low social cognition (LSC). To make these findings more practicable for research and clinical settings, a rule of thumb for categorizing using only the Mayer–Salovey–Caruso Emotional Intelligence Test and PANSS negative component was created and produced 84.4% agreement with the original cluster groups. An additional 63 subjects were added to cross validate the rule of thumb. When samples were combined (N = 140), the HSC group had significantly better quality of life and Global Assessment of Functioning (GAF) scores, higher rates of marriage and more hospitalizations. The LSC group had worse criminal and substance abuse histories. With 2 common assessment instruments, people with schizophrenia can be classified into 3 subgroups that have different barriers to community integration and could potentially benefit from different treatments. PMID:21976710

  11. Increased anterior cingulate cortex and hippocampus activation in Complex PTSD during encoding of negative words.

    PubMed

    Thomaes, Kathleen; Dorrepaal, Ethy; Draijer, Nel; de Ruiter, Michiel B; Elzinga, Bernet M; Sjoerds, Zsuzsika; van Balkom, Anton J; Smit, Johannes H; Veltman, Dick J

    2013-02-01

    Post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) is associated with impaired memory performance coupled with functional changes in brain areas involved in declarative memory and emotion regulation. It is not yet clear how symptom severity and comorbidity affect neurocognitive functioning in PTSD. We performed a functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) study with an emotional declarative memory task in 28 Complex PTSD patients with comorbid depressive and personality disorders, and 21 healthy non-trauma-exposed controls. In Complex PTSD patients--compared to controls--encoding of later remembered negative words vs baseline was associated with increased blood oxygenation level dependent (BOLD) response in the left ventral anterior cingulate cortex (ACC) and dorsal ACC extending to the dorsomedial prefrontal cortex (dmPFC) together with a trend for increased left hippocampus activation. Patients tended to commit more False Alarms to negative words compared to controls, which was associated with enhanced left ventrolateral prefrontal and orbitofrontal cortex (vlPFC/OFC) responses. Severity of child abuse was positively correlated with left ventral ACC activity and severity of depression with (para) hippocampal and ventral ACC activity. Presented results demonstrate functional abnormalities in Complex PTSD in the frontolimbic brain circuit also implicated in fear conditioning models, but generally in the opposite direction, which may be explained by severity of the trauma and severity of comorbid depression in Complex PTSD.

  12. Claudin 4 expression in triple-negative breast cancer: correlation with androgen receptors and Ki-67 expression.

    PubMed

    Abd-Elazeem, Mona A; Abd-Elazeem, Marwa A

    2015-02-01

    Breast cancer is the most common malignancy in women and the leading cause of cancer mortality worldwide. Triple-negative breast cancer (TNBC) is an important phenotype of breast cancer that accounts for a relatively small number of breast cancer cases but still represent a focus of increasing interest at the clinical, biological, and epidemiological level. Claudins are the major component of the tight junction, and only a few studies have addressed the role of claudins in breast cancer, especially TNBC. Androgen receptors (ARs), as members of the nuclear receptor superfamily, are known to be involved in a complex network of signaling pathways that collectively regulate cell proliferation. However, roles of AR in breast cancer development and progression have not been very clearly understood. The proliferation marker Ki-67 has been confirmed as an independent predictive and prognostic factor in early breast cancer. The aims of this study are to identify the clinicopathologic associations and prognostic value of claudin 4 expression in TNBC and to correlate claudin 4 expression with AR status and Ki-67 expression. Paraffin blocks obtained from 56 female patients with triple-negative primary invasive ductal breast carcinomas were analyzed for claudin 4, AR, and Ki-67 immunohistochemical expression. High levels of claudin 4 expression were detected in 66.1% of TNBC cases. There was a significant positive correlation with age, tumor size, grade, nodal status, metastasis, and Ki-67 expression (all P < .05) and negative correlation with AR status (P < .001). Androgen receptor showed positivity in 29 cases (51.78%). There was a statistical negative correlation with the all the studied clinicopathologic parameters, claudin 4 and Ki-67 expression. High claudin 4 expression, negative AR expression, and high Ki-67 index would provide a strong prognostic power to differentiate the patients with worse outcome among TNBC patients. Moreover, target treatment for TNBC cells

  13. Negative regulation of mTOR activation by diacylglycerol kinases

    PubMed Central

    Gorentla, Balachandra K.; Wan, Chi-Keung

    2011-01-01

    The engagement of TCR induces T-cell activation, which initiates multiple characteristic changes such as increase in cell size, cell division, and the production of cytokines and other effector molecules. The mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) regulates protein synthesis, transcription, cell survival, and autophagy. Critical roles of mTOR in T-cell activation and effector/memory differentiation have been revealed using chemical inhibitors or by genetic ablation of mTOR in T cells. However, the connection between mTOR signaling and other signaling cascades downstream of TCR is unclear. We demonstrate that diacylglycerol (DAG) and TCR engagement activate signaling in both mTOR complexes 1 and 2 through the activation of the Ras–mitogen-activated protein kinase/extracellular signal–regulated kinase 1/2 (Mek1/2)–extracellular signal–regulated kinase 1/2 (Erk1/2)–activator protein 1 (AP-1), known collectively as the Ras-Mek1/2-Erk1/2-AP-1 pathway. Deficiency of RasGRP1 or inhibition of Mek1/2 activity drastically decreases TCR-induced mTOR activation, whereas constitutively active Ras or Mek1 promotes mTOR activation. Although constitutively active Akt promotes TCR-induced mTOR activation, such activation is attenuated by Mek1/2 inhibition. We demonstrated further that DAG kinases (DGKs) α and ζ, which terminate DAG-mediated signaling, synergistically inhibit TCR-induced mTOR activation by inhibiting the Ras-Mek1/2-Erk/12 pathway. These observations provide novel insights into the regulation of mTOR activation. PMID:21310925

  14. Neural correlates of partial lexical activation

    PubMed Central

    Pirog Revill, Kathleen; Aslin, Richard N.; Tanenhaus, Michael K.; Bavelier, Daphne

    2008-01-01

    As a spoken word unfolds over time, it is temporarily consistent with the acoustic forms of multiple words. Previous behavioral research has shown that, in the face of temporary ambiguity about how a word will end, multiple candidate words are briefly activated. Here, we provide neural imaging evidence that lexical candidates only temporarily consistent with the input activate perceptually based semantic representations. An artificial lexicon and novel visual environment were used to target human MT/V5 and an area anterior to it which have been shown to be recruited during the reading of motion words. Participants learned words that referred to novel objects and to motion or color/texture changes that the objects underwent. The lexical items corresponding to the change events were organized into phonologically similar pairs differing only in the final syllable. Upon hearing spoken scene descriptions in a posttraining verification task, participants showed greater activation in the left hemisphere anterior extent of MT/V5 when motion words were heard than when nonmotion words were heard. Importantly, when a nonmotion word was heard, the level of activation in the anterior extent of MT/V5 was modulated by whether there was a phonologically related competitor that was a motion word rather than another nonmotion word. These results provide evidence of activation of a perceptual brain region in response to the semantics of a word while lexical competition is in process and before the word is fully recognized. PMID:18725635

  15. Adolescent age moderates genetic and environmental influences on parent-adolescent positivity and negativity: Implications for genotype-environment correlation.

    PubMed

    Marceau, Kristine; Knopik, Valerie S; Neiderhiser, Jenae M; Lichtenstein, Paul; Spotts, Erica L; Ganiban, Jody M; Reiss, David

    2016-02-01

    We examined how genotype-environment correlation processes differ as a function of adolescent age. We tested whether adolescent age moderates genetic and environmental influences on positivity and negativity in mother-adolescent and father-adolescent relationships using parallel samples of twin parents from the Twin and Offspring Study in Sweden and twin/sibling adolescents from the Nonshared Environment in Adolescent Development Study. We inferred differences in the role of passive and nonpassive genotype-environment correlation based on biometric moderation findings. The findings indicated that nonpassive gene-environment correlation played a stronger role for positivity in mother- and father-adolescent relationships in families with older adolescents than in families with younger adolescents, and that passive gene-environment correlation played a stronger role for positivity in the mother-adolescent relationship in families with younger adolescents than in families with older adolescents. Implications of these findings for the timing and targeting of interventions on family relationships are discussed.

  16. He Did It on Purpose! Family Correlates of Negative Attributions about an Adolescent Sibling

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Matthews, Lisa S.; Conger, Rand D.

    2004-01-01

    Scholars have suggested that family life may influence children's attributions about close relationships. Using a sample of 369 two-parent families with 2 children (a target adolescent in the 8th grade and a sibling aged 10 to 18), we investigated whether the sibling's negative attributions regarding the target adolescent were associated with…

  17. MHC class I expression in HPV positive and negative tonsillar squamous cell carcinoma in correlation to clinical outcome.

    PubMed

    Näsman, Anders; Andersson, Emilia; Nordfors, Cecilia; Grün, Nathalie; Johansson, Hemming; Munck-Wikland, Eva; Massucci, Giuseppe; Dalianis, Tina; Ramqvist, Torbjörn

    2013-01-01

    Human papillomavirus (HPV) is an important factor for the development of tonsillar squamous cell carcinoma (TSCC). In addition, patients with HPV-positive TSCC have a better clinical outcome than patients with HPV-negative TSCC. Although, HPV is an important prognostic marker, additional biomarkers are needed to better predict clinical outcome to individualize treatment. Hence, we examined if classical HLA HLA-A,B,C and nonclassical HLA-E,G could serve as such marker. Formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded TSCC from 150 patients diagnosed 2000-2006, earlier analyzed for HPV DNA and p16(INK4a), and treated with intention to cure were evaluated for the expression of HLA-A,B,C and HLA-E,G by immunohistochemistry. For HPV-positive TSCC a low expression of HLA-A,B,C, whereas for HPV-negative TSCC, a normal expression of HLA-A,B,C was significantly correlated to a favorable clinical outcome. These correlations were more pronounced for membrane staining of HLA-A,B,C when compared with cytoplasmatic staining. No significant correlation was found between HLA-E,G and HPV status or clinical outcome. The unexpected contrasting correlation between HLA-A,B,C expression, and clinical outcome depending on HPV, indicates essential differences between HPV-positive and HPV-negative TSCC. Furthermore, our data demonstrate that for both HPV-positive and HPV-negative TSCC, the expression of HLA-A,B,C together with HPV may serve as a useful biomarker for predicting clinical outcome. PMID:22592660

  18. Multiparticle azimuthal correlations of negative pions in nucleus-nucleus collisions

    SciTech Connect

    Chkhaidze, L. V. Djobava, T. D.; Kharkhelauri, L. L.; Kladnitskaya, E. N.

    2012-07-15

    Multiparticle azimuthal correlations of {pi}{sup -} mesons have been studied in dC, HeC, CC, CNe, MgMg, (d, He)Ta, CCu, CTa, and OPb collisions at momentum of 4.2, 4.5 GeV/c per nucleon within the standard transverse momentum analysis method of P. Danielewicz and G. Odyniec. The data were obtained by SKM-200-GIBS and Propane Bubble Chamber Collaborations of JINR. The axis has been selected in the phase space and with respect to this axis {pi}{sup -} meson correlations were observed. The values of the coefficient of the correlations linearly depend on the mass numbers of projectile (A{sub P}) and target (A{sub T}) nuclei. The Quark-Gluon String Model satisfactorily describes the experimental results.

  19. Self-control, negative affect and neural activity during effortful cognition in deprived smokers.

    PubMed

    Wilson, Stephen J; Sayette, Michael A; Fiez, Julie A

    2014-06-01

    The vast majority of attempts to quit smoking cigarettes are unsuccessful. Negative affect (NA) is one of the primary factors contributing to smoking relapse, in part because it interferes with psychological processes that are essential for self-regulation and coping. Converging evidence suggests that NA may be less of a problem for smokers with high relative to low dispositional self-control, but very little is known about the mechanisms that underlie this effect. We used functional magnetic resonance imaging to address this issue by examining the associations between trait self-control, state levels of NA and patterns of brain activation in nicotine-deprived smokers (n = 117) during the performance of a verbal n-back paradigm (a task requiring cognitive processes that support self-regulation). While the activation of several brain regions linked to executive control correlated positively and negatively with state NA and trait self-control, respectively, an interaction between these factors was identified in only one region: the ventromedial prefrontal cortex (vmPFC). We conclude that the functions supported by the vmPFC are an important source of variability in smokers' self-regulatory functioning and propose that the region may contribute to the use of implicit forms of self-control under demanding circumstances.

  20. Plasticity in maximum stomatal conductance constrained by negative correlation between stomatal size and density: an analysis using Eucalyptus globulus.

    PubMed

    Franks, Peter J; Drake, Paul L; Beerling, David J

    2009-12-01

    Maximum stomatal conductance to water vapour and CO2 (gwmax, gcmax, respectively), which are set at the time of leaf maturity, are determined predominantly by stomatal size (S) and density (D). In theory, many combinations of S and D yield the same gwmax and gcmax, so there is no inherent correlation between S and D, or between S, D and maximum stomatal conductance. However, using basic equations for gas diffusion through stomata of different sizes, we show that a negative correlation between S and D offers several advantages, including plasticity in gwmax and gcmax with minimal change in epidermal area allocation to stomata. Examination of the relationship between S and D in Eucalyptus globulus seedlings and coppice shoots growing in the field under high and low rainfall revealed a strong negative relationship between S and D, whereby S decreased with increasing D according to a negative power function. The results provide evidence that plasticity in maximum stomatal conductance may be constrained by a negative S versus D relationship, with higher maximum stomatal conductance characterized by smaller S and higher D, and a tendency to minimize change in epidermal space allocation to stomata as S and D vary.

  1. Positive and negative reinforcement activate human auditory cortex.

    PubMed

    Weis, Tina; Puschmann, Sebastian; Brechmann, André; Thiel, Christiane M

    2013-01-01

    Prior studies suggest that reward modulates neural activity in sensory cortices, but less is known about punishment. We used functional magnetic resonance imaging and an auditory discrimination task, where participants had to judge the duration of frequency modulated tones. In one session correct performance resulted in financial gains at the end of the trial, in a second session incorrect performance resulted in financial loss. Incorrect performance in the rewarded as well as correct performance in the punishment condition resulted in a neutral outcome. The size of gains and losses was either low or high (10 or 50 Euro cent) depending on the direction of frequency modulation. We analyzed neural activity at the end of the trial, during reinforcement, and found increased neural activity in auditory cortex when gaining a financial reward as compared to gaining no reward and when avoiding financial loss as compared to receiving a financial loss. This was independent on the size of gains and losses. A similar pattern of neural activity for both gaining a reward and avoiding a loss was also seen in right middle temporal gyrus, bilateral insula and pre-supplemental motor area, here however neural activity was lower after correct responses compared to incorrect responses. To summarize, this study shows that the activation of sensory cortices, as previously shown for gaining a reward is also seen during avoiding a loss.

  2. Transient Decline in Hippocampal Theta Activity during the Acquisition Process of the Negative Patterning Task

    PubMed Central

    Sakimoto, Yuya; Okada, Kana; Takeda, Kozue; Sakata, Shogo

    2013-01-01

    Hippocampal function is important in the acquisition of negative patterning but not of simple discrimination. This study examined rat hippocampal theta activity during the acquisition stages (early, middle, and late) of the negative patterning task (A+, B+, AB-). The results showed that hippocampal theta activity began to decline transiently (for 500 ms after non-reinforced stimulus presentation) during the late stage of learning in the negative patterning task. In addition, this transient decline in hippocampal theta activity in the late stage was lower in the negative patterning task than in the simple discrimination task. This transient decline during the late stage of task acquisition may be related to a learning process distinctive of the negative patterning task but not the simple discrimination task. We propose that the transient decline of hippocampal theta activity reflects inhibitory learning and/or response inhibition after the presentation of a compound stimulus specific to the negative patterning task. PMID:23936249

  3. Distinct Neuropsychological Correlates in Positive and Negative Formal Thought Disorder Syndromes: The Thought and Language Disorder Scale in Endogenous Psychoses.

    PubMed

    Nagels, Arne; Fährmann, Paul; Stratmann, Mirjam; Ghazi, Sayed; Schales, Christian; Frauenheim, Michael; Turner, Lena; Hornig, Tobias; Katzev, Michael; Müller-Isberner, Rüdiger; Grosvald, Michael; Krug, Axel; Kircher, Tilo

    2016-01-01

    The correlation of formal thought disorder (FTD) symptoms and subsyndromes with neuropsychological dimensions is as yet unclear. Evidence for a dysexecutive syndrome and semantic access impairments has been discussed in positive FTD, albeit focusing mostly on patients with schizophrenia. We investigated the correlation of the full range of positive and negative as well as subjective and objective FTD with neuropsychological domains in different patient groups. Patients with ICD-10 schizophrenia (n = 51), depression (n = 51), and bipolar mania (n = 18), as well as healthy subjects (n = 60), were interviewed with the Rating Scale for the Assessment of Objective and Subjective Formal Thought and Language Disorder (TALD) and assessed using a multidimensional neuropsychological test battery (executive function, semantic and lexical verbal fluency, attention, working memory, and abstract thinking). Partial correlation analysis, controlling for age and word knowledge, revealed significant results for the objective positive FTD dimension and executive dysfunctions. Objective negative FTD was associated with deficits in lexico-semantic retrieval, as well as attention and working memory dysfunctions. The results suggest that different neuropsychological substrates correlate with the multidimensional and phenomenologically different FTD syndromes. FTD is a complex, multidimensional syndrome with a variety of neuropsychological impairments, which should be accounted for in future studies investigating the pathogenesis of FTD.

  4. Correlation of surface topography of metal-shadowed specimens with their negatively stained reconstructions.

    PubMed

    Buhle, E L; Aebi, U; Smith, P R

    1985-01-01

    We present a comparison of surface reconstructions from three different freeze-dried and unidirectionally metal-shadowed specimens (i.e. bacteriophage T4 polyheads, crystalline actin sheets and nuclear pore complexes) with two- or three-dimensional reconstructions of the same specimens when prepared by negative staining. Based on these and many published results, the following conclusions have been reached: With a "cooperative" specimen (e.g. the polyheads), the surface reconstruction computed from a metal-shadowed replica compares favorably with two- or three-dimensional reconstructions obtained from the same specimen after negative staining at the 3-4 nm resolution level. This relatively "poor" level at which the surface topographies of the two preparations can be compared appears to be set by a "practical" resolution limit (i.e. of distinct and reproducible structural detail) of metal replicas of biological specimens, despite the appearance of weak higher-order diffraction spots (i.e. corresponding to 2-3 nm). While in some cases (e.g. the crystalline actin sheets) the surface reliefs of metal replicas may bear little resemblance to the actual structure under investigation, the replicas may still contain sufficient features to establish the polarity or handedness of the structure (i.e., the "top" and "bottom" surfaces of a crystalline sheet). Information from negatively stained specimens is usually complementary with information from freeze-dried and metal-shadowed specimens. However, there are artifacts in both techniques, and we present an example with the nuclear pore complex, where these techniques yield confusing results. PMID:2413606

  5. Osterix represses adipogenesis by negatively regulating PPARγ transcriptional activity

    PubMed Central

    Han, Younho; Kim, Chae Yul; Cheong, Heesun; Lee, Kwang Youl

    2016-01-01

    Osterix is a novel bone-related transcription factor involved in osteoblast differentiation, and bone maturation. Because a reciprocal relationship exists between adipocyte and osteoblast differentiation of bone marrow derived mesenchymal stem cells, we hypothesized that Osterix might have a role in adipogenesis. Ablation of Osterix enhanced adipogenesis in 3T3-L1 cells, whereas overexpression suppressed this process and inhibited the expression of adipogenic markers including CCAAT/enhancer-binding protein alpha (C/EBPα) and peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma (PPARγ). Further studies indicated that Osterix significantly decreased PPARγ-induced transcriptional activity. Using co-immunoprecipitation and GST-pull down analysis, we found that Osterix directly interacts with PPARγ. The ligand-binding domain (LBD) of PPARγ was responsible for this interaction, which was followed by repression of PPARγ-induced transcriptional activity, even in the presence of rosiglitazone. Taken together, we identified the Osterix has an important regulatory role on PPARγ activity, which contributed to the mechanism of adipogenesis. PMID:27752121

  6. Negative emotions impact lateral prefrontal cortex activation during theory of mind: An fNIRS study.

    PubMed

    Himichi, Toshiyuki; Fujita, Hiroyo; Nomura, Michio

    2015-01-01

    The lateral prefrontal cortex (lPFC) plays a critical role in inhibiting self-perspective information, which is necessary for theory of mind (ToM) processing. Additionally, previous research has indicated that negative emotions interfere with lPFC activation during executive tasks. In this study, we hypothesized that negative emotions would inhibit lPFC activation during a ToM task. While female participants performed the director task following the observation of emotionally laden movies (neutral/negative/positive), their prefrontal hemodynamic activity was measured using near-infrared spectroscopy. After viewing the neutral movie, bilateral lPFC activity was significantly enhanced during ToM process compared to the control condition. In contrast, after viewing the negative movie, left lPFC activity during ToM process was significantly impaired. These results were interpreted to support the idea that negative emotions interfere with inhibition of self-perspective information through inactivation of the lPFC.

  7. Negative Correlation Between miR-326 and Ets-1 in Regulatory T Cells from new-Onset SLE Patients.

    PubMed

    Sun, Xiao-Ge; Tao, Jin-Hui; Xiang, Nan; Li, Xiao-Mei; Wang, Guo-Sheng; Fang, Xuan; Dai, Chao; Zhang, Min; Chen, Zhu; Li, Xiang-Pei

    2016-04-01

    To analyze the relationship between miR-326 and Ets-1 mRNA levels in Treg cells and clinical manifestations in patients with SLE and explore the role of miR-326 and Ets-1 in the pathogenesis and activity of SLE. Twenty-five new-onset SLE patients without treatment, twenty-eight inactive SLE patients (SLEDA ≤ 4) and twenty-two healthy controls were included in the present study. Clinical data of SLE patients were recorded. Treg cells were purified by MACS from 20 ml peripheral blood, in which the quantity of miR-326 and Ets-1 mRNA were assessed by real-time PCR. Data were analyzed using SPSS Version 17.0. The nonparametric Mann-Whitney U test was used to compare the groups, The Spearman test was used for correlation analyses. Two-tailed p values <0.05 were considered statistically significant. 1.The level of miR-326 was significantly higher in Treg cells from SLE patients [1.98(0.592,6.148)] than that in healthy controls [0.921(0.345, 1.879)] (p = 0.032). The difference between new-onset SLE patients [6.192(0.673, 15.298)] and healthy controls was significant (p = 0.019). Significant difference of the miR-326 expression was found between new-onset SLE patients with serous cavity effusion and new-onset SLE patients without it(P<0.05). Significant positive correlation was found between the expression of miR-326 mRNA in Treg cells with CRP and anti-C1q antibody from new-onset SLE patients. 2. The level of Ets-1 mRNA was decreased in SLE patients [0.382(0.232, 0.572)] compared to healthy controls(p = 0.013). The difference was also found in new-onset SLE patients [0.222(0.125, 0.296)] while compared to healthy controls. Also, the level in new-onset SLE patients was lower than that in inactive SLE patients [0.482(0.398, 0.512)] (p = 0.001). 3. Negative correlation was found between miR-326 and Ets-1 mRNA expression in Treg cells from new-onset SLE patients (r = -0.583 p = 0.01). 4. There was no correlation of miR-326 or Ets-1 m

  8. Developmental Associations between Short-Term Variability and Long-Term Changes: Intraindividual Correlation of Positive and Negative Affect in Daily Life and Cognitive Aging

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hülür, Gizem; Hoppmann, Christiane A.; Ram, Nilam; Gerstorf, Denis

    2015-01-01

    Conceptual notions and empirical evidence suggest that the intraindividual correlation (iCorr) of positive affect (PA) and negative affect (NA) is a meaningful characteristic of affective functioning. PA and NA are typically negatively correlated within-person. Previous research has found that the iCorr of PA and NA is relatively stable over time…

  9. Genetic Alterations of Triple Negative Breast Cancer By Targeted Next Generation Sequencing And Correlation With Tumor Morphology

    PubMed Central

    Weisman, Paul S; Ng, Charlotte K.Y.; Brogi, Edi; Eisenberg, Rachel E; Won, Helen H.; Piscuoglio, Salvatore; De Filippo, Maria R.; Ioris, Rafael; Akram, Muzaffar; Norton, Larry; Weigelt, Britta; Berger, Michael F.; Reis-Filho, Jorge S.; Wen, Hannah Y.

    2016-01-01

    Triple negative breast cancer represents a heterogeneous group of breast carcinomas, both at the histologic and genetic level. While recent molecular studies have comprehensively characterized the genetic landscape of these tumors, few have integrated a detailed histologic examination into the analysis. In this study, we defined the genetic alterations in 39 triple negative breast cancers using a high-depth targeted massively parallel sequencing assay and correlated the findings with a detailed morphologic analysis. We obtained representative frozen tissue of primary triple negative breast cancers from patients treated at our institution between 2002 and 2010. We characterized tumors according to their histologic subtype and morphologic features. DNA was extracted from paired frozen primary tumor and normal tissue samples and was subjected to a targeted massively parallel sequencing platform comprising 229 cancer associated genes common across all experiments. The average number of non-synonymous mutations was 3 (range 0–10) per case. The most frequent somatic alterations were mutations in TP53 (74%) and PIK3CA (10%) and MYC amplifications (26%). Triple negative breast cancers with apocrine differentiation less frequently harbored TP53 mutations (25%) and MYC gains (0%), and displayed a high mutation frequency in PIK3CA and other PI3K signaling pathway related genes (75%). Using a targeted massively parallel sequencing platform, we identified the key somatic genetic alterations previously reported in triple negative breast cancers. Furthermore, our findings show that triple negative breast cancers with apocrine differentiation constitute a distinct subset, characterized by a high frequency of PI3K pathway alterations similar to luminal subtypes of breast cancer. PMID:26939876

  10. Overnight emotional adaptation to negative stimuli is altered by REM sleep deprivation and is correlated with intervening dream emotions.

    PubMed

    Lara-Carrasco, Jessica; Nielsen, Tore A; Solomonova, Elizaveta; Levrier, Katia; Popova, Ani

    2009-06-01

    Rapid eye movement (REM) sleep and dreaming may be implicated in cross-night adaptation to emotionally negative events. To evaluate the impact of REM sleep deprivation (REMD) and the presence of dream emotions on a possible emotional adaptation (EA) function, 35 healthy subjects randomly assigned to REMD (n = 17; mean age 26.4 +/- 4.3 years) and control (n = 18; mean age 23.7 +/- 4.4 years) groups underwent a partial REMD and control nights in the laboratory, respectively. In the evening preceding and morning following REMD, subjects rated neutral and negative pictures on scales of valence and arousal and EA scores were calculated. Subjects also rated dream emotions using the same scales and a 10-item emotions list. REMD was relatively successful in decreasing REM% on the experimental night, although a mean split procedure was applied to better differentiate subjects high and low in REM%. High and low groups differed - but in a direction contrary to expectations. Subjects high in REMD% showed greater adaptation to negative pictures on arousal ratings than did those low in REMD% (P < 0.05), even after statistically controlling sleep efficiency and awakening times. Subjects above the median on EA(valence) had less intense overall dream negativity (P < 0.005) and dream sadness (P < 0.004) than subjects below the median. A correlation between the emotional intensities of the morning dream and the morning picture ratings supports a possible emotional carry-over effect. REM sleep may enhance morning reactivity to negative emotional stimuli. Further, REM sleep and dreaming may be implicated in different dimensions of cross-night adaptation to negative emotions.

  11. Correlates of physical activity behavior in rural youth.

    PubMed

    Pate, R R; Trost, S G; Felton, G M; Ward, D S; Dowda, M; Saunders, R

    1997-09-01

    The purpose of this study was to identify correlates of physical activity behavior in a sample of rural, predominantly African American youth. Three hundred sixty-one fifth-grade students from two rural counties in South Carolina (69% African American, median age = 11 years) completed a questionnaire designed to measure beliefs and social influences regarding physical activity, physical activity self-efficacy, perceived physical activity habits of family members and friends, and access to exercise and fitness equipment at home. After school physical activity and television watching were assessed using the Previous Day Physical Activity Recall (PDPAR). Students were classified as physically active according to a moderate physical activity standard: two or more 30-min blocks at an intensity of 3 METs (metabolic equivalents) or greater, and a vigorous physical activity standard: one or more 30-min blocks at an intensity of 6 METs or greater. According to the moderate physical activity standard, 34.9% of students were classified as low-active. Multivariate analysis revealed age, gender, television watching, and exercise equipment at home to be significant correlates of low activity status. According to the vigorous physical activity standard, 32.1% of the students were classified as low-active. Multivariate analysis revealed age, gender, television watching, and self-efficacy with respect to seeking support for physical activity to be significant correlates of low activity status. In summary, gender and the amount of television watching were found to be the most important correlates of physical activity in rural, predominantly African American youth. PMID:9294878

  12. Moessbauer studies of two-electron centers with negative correlation energy in crystalline and amorphous semiconductors

    SciTech Connect

    Bordovsky, G. A.; Nemov, S. A.; Marchenko, A. V.; Seregin, P. P.

    2012-01-15

    The results of the study of donor U{sup -}-centers of tin and germanium in lead chalcogenides by Moessbauer emission spectroscopy are discussed. The published data regarding the identification of amphoteric U{sup -}-centers of tin in glassy binary arsenic and germanium chalcogenides using Moessbauer emission spectroscopy, and in multicomponent chalcogenide glasses using Moessbauer absorption spectroscopy are considered. Published data concerning the identification of two-atom U{sup -}-centers of copper in lattices of semimetal copper oxides by Moessbauer emission spectroscopy are analyzed. The published data on the detection of spatial inhomogeneity of the Bose-Einstein condensate in superconducting semiconductors and semimetal compounds, and on the existence of the correlation between the electron density in lattice sites and the superconducting transition temperature are presented. The principal possibility of using Moessbauer U{sup -}-centers as a tool for studying the Bose-Einstein condensation of electron pairs during the superconducting phase transition in semiconductors and semimetals is considered.

  13. Negative correlation between male allocation and rate of self-fertilization in a hermaphroditic animal

    PubMed Central

    Johnston, Mark O.; Das, Bijon; Hoeh, Walter R.

    1998-01-01

    Sex-allocation theory predicts that the evolution of increased rates of self-fertilization should be accompanied by decreased allocation to male reproduction (sperm production and broadcast). This prediction has found support in plants but has not previously been tested in animals, which, in contrast to biotically pollinated plants, are free of complications associated with incorporating the costs of attractive structures such as petals. Here we report rates of self-fertilization as well as proportional allocation to male reproductive tissues within populations of the simultaneous hermaphrodite Utterbackia imbecillis, a freshwater mussel. Individuals from populations with higher selfing rates devoted a lower proportion of reproductive tissue to sperm production (correlation = −0.99), in support of theory. PMID:9435241

  14. Improving the signal-to-noise ratio of thermal ghost imaging based on positive-negative intensity correlation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Song, Shu-Chun; Sun, Ming-Jie; Wu, Ling-An

    2016-05-01

    Ghost imaging with thermal light is a topic in optical imaging that has aroused great interest in recent years. However, the imaging quality must be greatly improved before the technology can be transferred from the lab to engineering applications. By means of correspondence ghost imaging (CGI) with a pseudo-thermal light source and appropriate sorting of the intensity fluctuations of the signal and reference beams, we obtain the positive and negative Hanbury Brown and Twiss intensity correlation characteristics of the optical field. Then, for ghost imaging of a transmissive binary object, we find that by subtracting the negative from the positive fluctuation frames of the presorted reference detector signals, the signal-to-noise ratio can be effectively increased, with almost all the background noise eliminated. Our results show that, compared with the generic CGI technique, the signal-to-noise ratio can be increased by nearly 60%.

  15. Negative regulation of TLR-signaling pathways by activating transcription factor-3.

    PubMed

    Whitmore, Mark M; Iparraguirre, Amaya; Kubelka, Lindsey; Weninger, Wolfgang; Hai, Tsonwin; Williams, Bryan R G

    2007-09-15

    Activating transcription factor-3 (ATF3) is rapidly induced by LPS in mouse macrophages and regulates TLR4 responses. We show that ATF3 is rapidly induced by various TLRs in mouse macrophages and plasmacytoid dendritic cells (DCs), as well as plasmacytoid and myeloid subsets of human DCs. In primary macrophages from mice with a targeted deletion of the atf3 gene (ATF3-knockout (KO)), TLR-stimulated levels of IL-12 and IL-6 were elevated relative to responses in wild-type macrophages. Similarly, targeted deletion of atf3 correlated with enhanced responsiveness of myeloid DCs to TLR activation as measured by IL-12 secretion. Ectopic expression of ATF3 antagonized TLR-stimulated IL-12p40 activation in a reporter assay. In vivo, CpG-oligodeoxynucleotide, a TLR9 agonist, given i.p. to ATF3-KO mice resulted in enhanced cytokine production from splenocytes. Furthermore, while ATF3-KO mice challenged with a sublethal dose of PR8 influenza virus were delayed in body weight recovery in comparison to wild type, the ATF3-KO mice showed higher titers of serum neutralizing Ab against PR8 5 mo postinfection. Thus, ATF3 behaves as a negative regulatory transcription factor in TLR pathways and, accordingly, deficiency in atf3 alters responses to immunological challenges in vivo. ATF3 dysregulation merits further exploration in diseases such as type I diabetes and cancer, where altered innate immunity has been implicated in their pathogenesis.

  16. Expression of a functional jasmonic acid carboxyl methyltransferase is negatively correlated with strawberry fruit development.

    PubMed

    Preuß, Anja; Augustin, Christiane; Figueroa, Carlos R; Hoffmann, Thomas; Valpuesta, Victoriano; Sevilla, José F; Schwab, Wilfried

    2014-09-15

    The volatile metabolite methyl jasmonate (MeJA) plays an important role in intra- and interplant communication and is involved in diverse biological processes. In this study, we report the cloning and functional characterization of a S-adenosyl-l-methionine:jasmonic acid carboxyl methyltransferase (JMT) from Fragaria vesca and Fragaria×ananassa. Biochemical assays and comprehensive transcript analyses showed that JMT has been erroneously annotated as gene fusion with a carboxyl methyltransferase (CMT) (gene15184) in the first published genome sequence of F. vesca. Recombinant FvJMT catalyzed the formation of MeJA with KM value of 22.3μM while FvCMT and the fusion protein were almost inactive. Activity of JMT with benzoic acid and salicylic acid as substrates was less than 1.5% of that with JA. Leucine at position 245, an amino acid missing in other JMT sequences is essential for activity of FvJMT. In accordance with MeJA levels, JMT transcript levels decreased steadily during strawberry fruit ripening, as did the expression levels of JA biosynthesis and regulatory genes. It appears that CMT has originated by a recent duplication of JMT and lost its enzymatic activity toward JA. In the newest version of the strawberry genome sequence (June 2014) CMT and JMT are annotated as separate genes in accordance with differential temporal and spatial expression patterns of both genes in Fragaria sp. In conclusion, MeJA, the inactive derivative of JA, is probably involved in early steps of fruit development by modulating the levels of the active plant hormone JA.

  17. Expression of a functional jasmonic acid carboxyl methyltransferase is negatively correlated with strawberry fruit development.

    PubMed

    Preuß, Anja; Augustin, Christiane; Figueroa, Carlos R; Hoffmann, Thomas; Valpuesta, Victoriano; Sevilla, José F; Schwab, Wilfried

    2014-09-15

    The volatile metabolite methyl jasmonate (MeJA) plays an important role in intra- and interplant communication and is involved in diverse biological processes. In this study, we report the cloning and functional characterization of a S-adenosyl-l-methionine:jasmonic acid carboxyl methyltransferase (JMT) from Fragaria vesca and Fragaria×ananassa. Biochemical assays and comprehensive transcript analyses showed that JMT has been erroneously annotated as gene fusion with a carboxyl methyltransferase (CMT) (gene15184) in the first published genome sequence of F. vesca. Recombinant FvJMT catalyzed the formation of MeJA with KM value of 22.3μM while FvCMT and the fusion protein were almost inactive. Activity of JMT with benzoic acid and salicylic acid as substrates was less than 1.5% of that with JA. Leucine at position 245, an amino acid missing in other JMT sequences is essential for activity of FvJMT. In accordance with MeJA levels, JMT transcript levels decreased steadily during strawberry fruit ripening, as did the expression levels of JA biosynthesis and regulatory genes. It appears that CMT has originated by a recent duplication of JMT and lost its enzymatic activity toward JA. In the newest version of the strawberry genome sequence (June 2014) CMT and JMT are annotated as separate genes in accordance with differential temporal and spatial expression patterns of both genes in Fragaria sp. In conclusion, MeJA, the inactive derivative of JA, is probably involved in early steps of fruit development by modulating the levels of the active plant hormone JA. PMID:25046752

  18. Skin roughness is negatively correlated to irritation with DMSO, but not with NaOH and SLS.

    PubMed

    Iliev, D; Hinnen, U; Elsner, P

    1997-08-01

    While many endogenous and exogenous factors have been found to influence skin irritant reactivity, the role of skin roughness in irritation has not yet been studied. In this study we measured skin roughness by visiometry and performed irritation tests on the flexural side of the forearm with sodium hydroxide (NaOH), sodium lauryl sulphate (SLS) and dimethyl sulfoxide (DMSO) in two different concentrations in a population of 151 volunteers between 15 and 25 years of age. The results showed a significant negative correlation between most roughness parameters and DMSO irritation. The correlation between roughness parameters and irritation tests with SLS and NaOH was not significant. We conclude that smoother skin is more prone to DMSO irritation than rougher skin and that this may be due to differences in percutaneous penetration of the compound.

  19. Revisiting the correlation between stellar activity and planetary surface gravity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Figueira, P.; Oshagh, M.; Adibekyan, V. Zh.; Santos, N. C.

    2014-12-01

    Aims: We re-evaluate the correlation between planetary surface gravity and stellar host activity as measured by the index log (R'HK). This correlation, previously identified by Hartman (2010, ApJ, 717, L138), is now analyzed in light of an extended measurement dataset, roughly three times larger than the original one. Methods: We calculated the Spearman rank correlation coefficient between the two quantities and its associated p-value. The correlation coefficient was calculated for both the full dataset and the star-planet pairs that follow the conditions proposed by Hartman (2010). To do so, we considered effective temperatures both as collected from the literature and from the SWEET-Cat catalog, which provides a more homogeneous and accurate effective temperature determination. Results: The analysis delivers significant correlation coefficients, but with a lower value than those obtained by Hartman (2010). The two datasets are compatible, and we show that a correlation coefficient as high as previously published can arise naturally from a small-number statistics analysis of the current dataset. The correlation is recovered for star-planet pairs selected using the different conditions proposed by Hartman (2010). Remarkably, the usage of SWEET-Cat temperatures led to higher correlation coefficient values. We highlight and discuss the role of the correlation betwen different parameters such as effective temperature and activity index. Several additional effects on top of those discussed previously were considered, but none fully explains the detected correlation. In light of the complex issue discussed here, we encourage the different follow-up teams to publish their activity index values in the form of a log (R'HK) index so that a comparison across stars and instruments can be pursued. Appendix A is available in electronic form at http://www.aanda.org

  20. Race and Sex Differences in College Student Physical Activity Correlates

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McArthur, Laura H.; Raedeke, Thomas D.

    2009-01-01

    Objectives: To assess sex/race differences on psychosocial correlates of physical activity among college students. Methods: Survey research protocol. Results: Students (n = 636) exercised an average of 3.5 days per week, with black females being the least active. Across subgroups, health/fitness was rated as the most important motive for exercise,…

  1. Brain Activation of Negative Feedback in Rule Acquisition Revealed in a Segmented Wisconsin Card Sorting Test

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Jing; Cao, Bihua; Cai, Xueli; Gao, Heming; Li, Fuhong

    2015-01-01

    The present study is to investigate the brain activation associated with the informative value of negative feedback in rule acquisition. In each trial of a segmented Wisconsin Card Sorting Test, participants were provided with three reference cards and one target card, and were asked to match one of three reference cards to the target card based on a classification rule. Participants received feedback after each match. Participants would acquire the rule after one negative feedback (1-NF condition) or two successive negative feedbacks (2-NF condition). The functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) results indicated that lateral prefrontal-to-parietal cortices were more active in the 2-NF condition than in the 1-NF condition. The activation in the right lateral prefrontal cortex and left posterior parietal cortex increased gradually with the amount of negative feedback. These results demonstrate that the informative value of negative feedback in rule acquisition might be modulated by the lateral prefronto-parietal loop. PMID:26469519

  2. Waist circumference is positively correlated with markers of inflammation and negatively with adiponectin in women with metabolic syndrome.

    PubMed

    Ackermann, Daniela; Jones, Jennifer; Barona, Jacqueline; Calle, Mariana C; Kim, Jung Eun; LaPia, Branden; Volek, Jeff S; McIntosh, Mark; Kalynych, Colleen; Najm, Wadie; Lerman, Robert H; Fernandez, Maria Luz

    2011-03-01

    The purpose of this study was to correlate biomarkers of metabolic syndrome (MetS), with markers of inflammation and macronutrient intake in 89 women (25-72 years) with MetS. We hypothesized that waist circumference (WC) would have the stronger correlations with inflammatory parameters and would correlate with carbohydrate intake. Values for WC (108.7 ± 11.1 cm) and plasma triglycerides (202.7 ± 52.1 mg/dL) were elevated, whereas plasma glucose levels varied from 66 to 179 mg/dL, with 42% of women having insulin resistance. Plasma levels of interleukin 6 (0.2-15.9 mg/L), tumor necrosis factor α (1.47-12.3 mg/L), and high-sensitivity C-reactive protein (0.06-3.08 mg/dL) varied widely, with most women being above values considered normal. Subjects had high intake of total sugar (92.3 ± 56.4 g/d), high glycemic index (59.8 ± 6.5), and glycemic load (127.2 ± 56.1), whereas dietary fiber (17.1 ± 9.1 g/d) was below recommended intake. Waist circumference was positively correlated with insulin (r = 0.275, P < .01) and with the inflammatory markers interleukin 6 (r = 0.307, P < .01) and tumor necrosis factor α (r = 0.228, P < .05) and negatively correlated with plasma adiponectin (r = -0.309, P < .0001). In addition, WC was positively correlated with total carbohydrate, added sugar, and glycemic load (P < .05) but not with fat or protein. These results are consistent with central obesity being a key marker of the inflammatory state, and they also suggest that carbohydrates, particularly those that are digested rapidly, contribute to increased risk of central obesity and development of MetS.

  3. Sorghum flour fractions: correlations among polysaccharides, phenolic compounds, antioxidant activity and glycemic index.

    PubMed

    Moraes, Érica Aguiar; Marineli, Rafaela da Silva; Lenquiste, Sabrina Alves; Steel, Caroline Joy; de Menezes, Cícero Beserra; Queiroz, Valéria Aparecida Vieira; Maróstica Júnior, Mário Roberto

    2015-08-01

    Nutrients composition, phenolic compounds, antioxidant activity and estimated glycemic index (EGI) were evaluated in sorghum bran (SB) and decorticated sorghum flour (DSF), obtained by a rice-polisher, as well as whole sorghum flour (WSF). Correlation between EGI and the studied parameters were determined. SB presented the highest protein, lipid, ash, β-glucan, total and insoluble dietary fiber contents; and the lowest non-resistant and total starch contents. The highest carbohydrate and resistant starch contents were in DSF and WSF, respectively. Phenolic compounds and antioxidant activities were concentrated in SB. The EGI values were: DSF 84.5 ± 0.41; WSF 77.2 ± 0.33; and SB 60.3 ± 0.78. Phenolic compounds, specific flavonoids and antioxidant activities, as well as total, insoluble and soluble dietary fiber and β-glucans of sorghum flour samples were all negatively correlated to EGI. RS content was not correlated to EGI.

  4. Characterization of murine BATF: a negative regulator of activator protein-1 activity in the thymus.

    PubMed

    Williams, K L; Nanda, I; Lyons, G E; Kuo, C T; Schmid, M; Leiden, J M; Kaplan, M H; Taparowsky, E J

    2001-05-01

    BATF belongs to the AP-1/ATF superfamily of transcription factors and forms heterodimers with Jun proteins to bind AP-1 consensus DNA. Unlike Fos/Jun heterodimers which stimulate gene transcription, BATF/Jun heterodimers are transcriptionally inert and inhibit biological processes that are associated with the overstimulation of AP-1 activity. Here, we describe the murine BATF cDNA and genomic clones and map the BATF locus to chromosome 12 D2-3. Using in situ hybridization of BATF mRNA, we show that BATF gene expression is highly restricted, with the most prominent signals detected in the thymus. BATF mRNA levels are regulated differentially during discrete stages of T cell development and are up-regulated following activation of T cells in the periphery. To demonstrate the impact of BATF on AP-1 activity in vivo, AP-1 luciferase reporter mice were crossed to transgenic mice overexpressing BATF exclusively in thymic T cells. Results show that elevated levels of BATF protein correlate with reduced transactivation by AP-1. Since the differential regulation of AP-1 activity is linked to key transitions in the developing immune system, our observations support a critical role for BATF in determining the overall level of AP-1 activity, and thus AP-1 target gene expression, in specific T cell subtypes.

  5. Brain Oscillatory Correlates of Altered Executive Functioning in Positive and Negative Symptomatic Schizophrenia Patients and Healthy Controls

    PubMed Central

    Berger, Barbara; Minarik, Tamas; Griesmayr, Birgit; Stelzig-Schoeler, Renate; Aichhorn, Wolfgang; Sauseng, Paul

    2016-01-01

    Working Memory and executive functioning deficits are core characteristics of patients suffering from schizophrenia. Electrophysiological research indicates that altered patterns of neural oscillatory mechanisms underpinning executive functioning are associated with the psychiatric disorder. Such brain oscillatory changes have been found in local amplitude differences at gamma and theta frequencies in task-specific cortical areas. Moreover, interregional interactions are also disrupted as signified by decreased phase coherence of fronto-posterior theta activity in schizophrenia patients. However, schizophrenia is not a one-dimensional psychiatric disorder but has various forms and expressions. A common distinction is between positive and negative symptomatology but most patients have both negative and positive symptoms to some extent. Here, we examined three groups—healthy controls, predominantly negative, and predominantly positive symptomatic schizophrenia patients—when performing a working memory task with increasing cognitive demand and increasing need for executive control. We analyzed brain oscillatory activity in the three groups separately and investigated how predominant symptomatology might explain differences in brain oscillatory patterns. Our results indicate that differences in task specific fronto-posterior network activity (i.e., executive control network) expressed by interregional phase synchronization are able to account for working memory dysfunctions between groups. Local changes in the theta and gamma frequency range also show differences between patients and healthy controls, and more importantly, between the two patient groups. We conclude that differences in oscillatory brain activation patterns related to executive processing can be an indicator for positive and negative symptomatology in schizophrenia. Furthermore, changes in cognitive and especially executive functioning in patients are expressed by alterations in a task

  6. Soil properties drive a negative correlation between species diversity and genetic diversity in a tropical seasonal rainforest.

    PubMed

    Xu, Wumei; Liu, Lu; He, Tianhua; Cao, Min; Sha, Liqing; Hu, Yuehua; Li, Qiaoming; Li, Jie

    2016-01-01

    A negative species-genetic diversity correlation (SGDC) could be predicted by the niche variation hypothesis, whereby an increase in species diversity within community reduces the genetic diversity of the co-occurring species because of the reduction in average niche breadth; alternatively, competition could reduce effective population size and therefore genetic diversity of the species within community. We tested these predictions within a 20 ha tropical forest dynamics plot (FDP) in the Xishuangbanna tropical seasonal rainforest. We established 15 plots within the FDP and investigated the soil properties, tree diversity, and genetic diversity of a common tree species Beilschmiedia roxburghiana within each plot. We observed a significant negative correlation between tree diversity and the genetic diversity of B. roxburghiana within the communities. Using structural equation modeling, we further determined that the inter-plot environmental characteristics (soil pH and phosphorus availability) directly affected tree diversity and that the tree diversity within the community determined the genetic diversity of B. roxburghiana. Increased soil pH and phosphorus availability might promote the coexistence of more tree species within community and reduce genetic diversity of B. roxburghiana for the reduced average niche breadth; alternatively, competition could reduce effective population size and therefore genetic diversity of B. roxburghiana within community. PMID:26860815

  7. Soil properties drive a negative correlation between species diversity and genetic diversity in a tropical seasonal rainforest.

    PubMed

    Xu, Wumei; Liu, Lu; He, Tianhua; Cao, Min; Sha, Liqing; Hu, Yuehua; Li, Qiaoming; Li, Jie

    2016-02-10

    A negative species-genetic diversity correlation (SGDC) could be predicted by the niche variation hypothesis, whereby an increase in species diversity within community reduces the genetic diversity of the co-occurring species because of the reduction in average niche breadth; alternatively, competition could reduce effective population size and therefore genetic diversity of the species within community. We tested these predictions within a 20 ha tropical forest dynamics plot (FDP) in the Xishuangbanna tropical seasonal rainforest. We established 15 plots within the FDP and investigated the soil properties, tree diversity, and genetic diversity of a common tree species Beilschmiedia roxburghiana within each plot. We observed a significant negative correlation between tree diversity and the genetic diversity of B. roxburghiana within the communities. Using structural equation modeling, we further determined that the inter-plot environmental characteristics (soil pH and phosphorus availability) directly affected tree diversity and that the tree diversity within the community determined the genetic diversity of B. roxburghiana. Increased soil pH and phosphorus availability might promote the coexistence of more tree species within community and reduce genetic diversity of B. roxburghiana for the reduced average niche breadth; alternatively, competition could reduce effective population size and therefore genetic diversity of B. roxburghiana within community.

  8. Soil properties drive a negative correlation between species diversity and genetic diversity in a tropical seasonal rainforest

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Wumei; Liu, Lu; He, Tianhua; Cao, Min; Sha, Liqing; Hu, Yuehua; Li, Qiaoming; Li, Jie

    2016-01-01

    A negative species-genetic diversity correlation (SGDC) could be predicted by the niche variation hypothesis, whereby an increase in species diversity within community reduces the genetic diversity of the co-occurring species because of the reduction in average niche breadth; alternatively, competition could reduce effective population size and therefore genetic diversity of the species within community. We tested these predictions within a 20 ha tropical forest dynamics plot (FDP) in the Xishuangbanna tropical seasonal rainforest. We established 15 plots within the FDP and investigated the soil properties, tree diversity, and genetic diversity of a common tree species Beilschmiedia roxburghiana within each plot. We observed a significant negative correlation between tree diversity and the genetic diversity of B. roxburghiana within the communities. Using structural equation modeling, we further determined that the inter-plot environmental characteristics (soil pH and phosphorus availability) directly affected tree diversity and that the tree diversity within the community determined the genetic diversity of B. roxburghiana. Increased soil pH and phosphorus availability might promote the coexistence of more tree species within community and reduce genetic diversity of B. roxburghiana for the reduced average niche breadth; alternatively, competition could reduce effective population size and therefore genetic diversity of B. roxburghiana within community. PMID:26860815

  9. Physical Activity Measured by Physical Activity Monitoring System Correlates with Glucose Trends Reconstructed from Continuous Glucose Monitoring

    PubMed Central

    Zecchin, Chiara; Facchinetti, Andrea; Sparacino, Giovanni; Dalla Man, Chiara; Manohar, Chinmay; Levine, James A.; Basu, Ananda; Kudva, Yogish C.

    2013-01-01

    Abstract Background In type 1 diabetes mellitus (T1DM), physical activity (PA) lowers the risk of cardiovascular complications but hinders the achievement of optimal glycemic control, transiently boosting insulin action and increasing hypoglycemia risk. Quantitative investigation of relationships between PA-related signals and glucose dynamics, tracked using, for example, continuous glucose monitoring (CGM) sensors, have been barely explored. Subjects and Methods In the clinic, 20 control and 19 T1DM subjects were studied for 4 consecutive days. They underwent low-intensity PA sessions daily. PA was tracked by the PA monitoring system (PAMS), a system comprising accelerometers and inclinometers. Variations on glucose dynamics were tracked estimating first- and second-order time derivatives of glucose concentration from CGM via Bayesian smoothing. Short-time effects of PA on glucose dynamics were quantified through the partial correlation function in the interval (0, 60 min) after starting PA. Results Correlation of PA with glucose time derivatives is evident. In T1DM, the negative correlation with the first-order glucose time derivative is maximal (absolute value) after 15 min of PA, whereas the positive correlation is maximal after 40–45 min. The negative correlation between the second-order time derivative and PA is maximal after 5 min, whereas the positive correlation is maximal after 35–40 min. Control subjects provided similar results but with positive and negative correlation peaks anticipated of 5 min. Conclusions Quantitative information on correlation between mild PA and short-term glucose dynamics was obtained. This represents a preliminary important step toward incorporation of PA information in more realistic physiological models of the glucose–insulin system usable in T1DM simulators, in development of closed-loop artificial pancreas control algorithms, and in CGM-based prediction algorithms for generation of hypoglycemic alerts. PMID

  10. Dissociation between active and observational learning from positive and negative feedback in Parkinsonism.

    PubMed

    Kobza, Stefan; Ferrea, Stefano; Schnitzler, Alfons; Pollok, Bettina; Südmeyer, Martin; Bellebaum, Christian

    2012-01-01

    Feedback to both actively performed and observed behaviour allows adaptation of future actions. Positive feedback leads to increased activity of dopamine neurons in the substantia nigra, whereas dopamine neuron activity is decreased following negative feedback. Dopamine level reduction in unmedicated Parkinson's Disease patients has been shown to lead to a negative learning bias, i.e. enhanced learning from negative feedback. Recent findings suggest that the neural mechanisms of active and observational learning from feedback might differ, with the striatum playing a less prominent role in observational learning. Therefore, it was hypothesized that unmedicated Parkinson's Disease patients would show a negative learning bias only in active but not in observational learning. In a between-group design, 19 Parkinson's Disease patients and 40 healthy controls engaged in either an active or an observational probabilistic feedback-learning task. For both tasks, transfer phases aimed to assess the bias to learn better from positive or negative feedback. As expected, actively learning patients showed a negative learning bias, whereas controls learned better from positive feedback. In contrast, no difference between patients and controls emerged for observational learning, with both groups showing better learning from positive feedback. These findings add to neural models of reinforcement-learning by suggesting that dopamine-modulated input to the striatum plays a minor role in observational learning from feedback. Future research will have to elucidate the specific neural underpinnings of observational learning.

  11. Plasma bile acids show a positive correlation with body mass index and are negatively associated with cognitive restraint of eating in obese patients

    PubMed Central

    Prinz, Philip; Hofmann, Tobias; Ahnis, Anne; Elbelt, Ulf; Goebel-Stengel, Miriam; Klapp, Burghard F.; Rose, Matthias; Stengel, Andreas

    2015-01-01

    Bile acids may be involved in the regulation of food intake and energy metabolism. The aim of the study was to investigate the association of plasma bile acids with body mass index (BMI) and the possible involvement of circulating bile acids in the modulation of physical activity and eating behavior. Blood was obtained in a group of hospitalized patients with normal weight (BMI 18.5–25 kg/m2), underweight (anorexia nervosa, BMI < 17.5 kg/m2) and overweight (obesity with BMI 30–40, 40–50 and >50 kg/m2, n = 14–15/group) and plasma bile acid concentrations assessed. Physical activity and plasma bile acids were measured in a group of patients with anorexia nervosa (BMI 14.6 ± 0.3 kg/m2, n = 43). Lastly, in a population of obese patients (BMI 48.5 ± 0.9 kg/m2, n = 85), psychometric parameters related to disordered eating and plasma bile acids were assessed. Plasma bile acids showed a positive correlation with BMI (r = 0.26, p = 0.03) in the population of patients with broad range of BMI (9–85 kg/m2, n = 74). No associations were observed between plasma bile acids and different parameters of physical activity in anorexic patients (p > 0.05). Plasma bile acids were negatively correlated with cognitive restraint of eating (r = −0.30, p = 0.008), while no associations were observed with other psychometric eating behavior-related parameters (p > 0.05) in obese patients. In conclusion, these data may point toward a role of bile acids in the regulation of body weight. Since plasma bile acids are negatively correlated with the cognitive restraint of eating in obese patients, this may represent a compensatory adaptation to prevent further overeating. PMID:26089773

  12. Psychological Correlates of Self-Reported and Objectively Measured Physical Activity among Chinese Children—Psychological Correlates of PA

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Jing-Jing; Baranowski, Tom; Lau, Patrick W. C.; Chen, Tzu-An; Zhang, Shu-Ge

    2016-01-01

    This study aimed to explore the associations among psychological correlates and physical activity (PA) in Chinese children and to further examine whether these associations varied by different PA measures. PA self-efficacy, motivation, and preference were reported in 449 8–13-year-old Chinese children (252 males). Moderate- to vigorous- intensity PA (MVPA) was measured by the Physical Activity Questionnaire for Older Children (PAQ-C) and with an ActiGraph GT3X accelerometer. Correlations and hierarchical regressions were performed to explore their associations. The study psychological variables were all positively related to PAQ-C and objective MVPA (r: 0.22–0.63). The associations with PAQ-C were all substantially stronger than those with accelerometry. Beyond the explained variance accounted for by demographics and social desirability, the addition of the psychological correlates accounted for 45% of the variance of the PAQ-C score, while only 13% for accelerometry-based MVPA. The associations of specific variables with the PAQ-C score (age, PA self-efficacy, autonomous motivation and preference) were somewhat different from those associated with objective MVPA (PA self-efficacy, autonomous motivation, and negatively associated with female gender). This study demonstrated the importance of self-efficacy and autonomous motivation in association with PA and indicated the difference in level of their associations with different PA measures. PMID:27754396

  13. Clipped viscous damping with negative stiffness for semi-active cable damping

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weber, F.; Boston, C.

    2011-04-01

    This paper investigates numerically and experimentally clipped viscous damping with negative stiffness for semi-active cable damping. From simulations it is concluded that unclipped and clipped viscous damping with negative stiffness is equivalent to unclipped and clipped LQR. It is shown that optimized unclipped viscous damping with negative stiffness generates critical cable damping by an anti-node at the actuator position. The resulting curvature at the actuator position is larger than the curvature close to the anchors due to the disturbance forces which may lead to premature cable fatigue at the actuator position. Optimized clipped viscous damping with negative stiffness does not show this drawback, can be implemented using a semi-active damper and produces twice as much cable damping as optimal viscous damping. Close to the optimal tuning, it leads to approximately the same control force as optimal semi-active friction damping with negative stiffness, which explains the superior cable damping. The superior damping results from the negative stiffness that increases the damper motion. Clipped viscous damping with negative stiffness is validated on a strand cable with a magneto-rheological damper. The measured cable damping is twice that achieved by emulated viscous damping, which confirms the numerical results. A tuning rule for clipped viscous damping with negative stiffness of real cables with flexural rigidity is given.

  14. Antitumor activity of the glutaminase inhibitor CB-839 in triple-negative breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Gross, Matt I; Demo, Susan D; Dennison, Jennifer B; Chen, Lijing; Chernov-Rogan, Tania; Goyal, Bindu; Janes, Julie R; Laidig, Guy J; Lewis, Evan R; Li, Jim; Mackinnon, Andrew L; Parlati, Francesco; Rodriguez, Mirna L M; Shwonek, Peter J; Sjogren, Eric B; Stanton, Timothy F; Wang, Taotao; Yang, Jinfu; Zhao, Frances; Bennett, Mark K

    2014-04-01

    Glutamine serves as an important source of energy and building blocks for many tumor cells. The first step in glutamine utilization is its conversion to glutamate by the mitochondrial enzyme glutaminase. CB-839 is a potent, selective, and orally bioavailable inhibitor of both splice variants of glutaminase (KGA and GAC). CB-839 had antiproliferative activity in a triple-negative breast cancer (TNBC) cell line, HCC-1806, that was associated with a marked decrease in glutamine consumption, glutamate production, oxygen consumption, and the steady-state levels of glutathione and several tricarboxylic acid cycle intermediates. In contrast, no antiproliferative activity was observed in an estrogen receptor-positive cell line, T47D, and only modest effects on glutamine consumption and downstream metabolites were observed. Across a panel of breast cancer cell lines, GAC protein expression and glutaminase activity were elevated in the majority of TNBC cell lines relative to receptor positive cells. Furthermore, the TNBC subtype displayed the greatest sensitivity to CB-839 treatment and this sensitivity was correlated with (i) dependence on extracellular glutamine for growth, (ii) intracellular glutamate and glutamine levels, and (iii) GAC (but not KGA) expression, a potential biomarker for sensitivity. CB-839 displayed significant antitumor activity in two xenograft models: as a single agent in a patient-derived TNBC model and in a basal like HER2(+) cell line model, JIMT-1, both as a single agent and in combination with paclitaxel. Together, these data provide a strong rationale for the clinical investigation of CB-839 as a targeted therapeutic in patients with TNBC and other glutamine-dependent tumors.

  15. Beta-hemolytic activity of Trichomonas vaginalis correlates with virulence.

    PubMed Central

    Krieger, J N; Poisson, M A; Rein, M F

    1983-01-01

    The reasons that some women develop symptomatic trichomonal vaginitis, whereas many other infected women remain asymptomatic, are unclear, but it has been suggested that Trichomonas vaginalis strains vary in their intrinsic virulence. We describe beta-hemolytic activity in T. vaginalis which correlates with virulence in patients as well as in an animal model and in tissue culture. Fresh T. vaginalis isolates from four women with severe, symptomatic trichomoniasis had high-level (86.3 +/- 6.6%) hemolytic activity, whereas isolates from three completely asymptomatic women had low-level (45.3 +/- 8.4%) hemolytic activity (P less than 0.001). Hemolytic activity also correlated with the production of subcutaneous abscesses in mice (r = 0.74) and with destruction of CHO cell monolayers (r = 0.94). All of the 20 clinical isolates of T. vaginalis tested possessed hemolytic activity. The beta-hemolysin may be a virulence factor for T. vaginalis. Images PMID:6604026

  16. Abnormal brain activation during directed forgetting of negative memory in depressed patients.

    PubMed

    Yang, Wenjing; Chen, Qunlin; Liu, Peiduo; Cheng, Hongsheng; Cui, Qian; Wei, Dongtao; Zhang, Qinglin; Qiu, Jiang

    2016-01-15

    The frequent occurrence of uncontrollable negative thoughts and memories is a troubling aspect of depression. Thus, knowledge on the mechanism underlying intentional forgetting of these thoughts and memories is crucial to develop an effective emotion regulation strategy for depressed individuals. Behavioral studies have demonstrated that depressed participants cannot intentionally forget negative memories. However, the neural mechanism underlying this process remains unclear. In this study, participants completed the directed forgetting task in which they were instructed to remember or forget neutral or negative words. Standard univariate analysis based on the General Linear Model showed that the depressed participants have higher activation in the inferior frontal gyrus (IFG), superior frontal gyrus (SFG), superior parietal gyrus (SPG), and inferior temporal gyrus (ITG) than the healthy individuals. The results indicated that depressed participants recruited more frontal and parietal inhibitory control resources to inhibit the TBF items, but the attempt still failed because of negative bias. We also used the Support Vector Machine to perform multivariate pattern classification based on the brain activation during directed forgetting. The pattern of brain activity in directed forgetting of negative words allowed correct group classification with an overall accuracy of 75% (P=0.012). The brain regions which are critical for this discrimination showed abnormal activation when depressed participants were attempting to forget negative words. These results indicated that the abnormal neural circuitry when depressed individuals tried to forget the negative words might provide neurobiological markers for depression.

  17. Bootstrap testing for cross-correlation under low firing activity.

    PubMed

    González-Montoro, Aldana M; Cao, Ricardo; Espinosa, Nelson; Cudeiro, Javier; Mariño, Jorge

    2015-06-01

    A new cross-correlation synchrony index for neural activity is proposed. The index is based on the integration of the kernel estimation of the cross-correlation function. It is used to test for the dynamic synchronization levels of spontaneous neural activity under two induced brain states: sleep-like and awake-like. Two bootstrap resampling plans are proposed to approximate the distribution of the test statistics. The results of the first bootstrap method indicate that it is useful to discern significant differences in the synchronization dynamics of brain states characterized by a neural activity with low firing rate. The second bootstrap method is useful to unveil subtle differences in the synchronization levels of the awake-like state, depending on the activation pathway.

  18. Analysis of PIK3CA Mutations and Activation Pathways in Triple Negative Breast Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Muroni, Maria Rosaria; Sanges, Francesca; Sotgiu, Giovanni; Ena, Sara; Pira, Giovanna; Murgia, Luciano; Manca, Alessandra; Uras, Maria Gabriela; Sarobba, Maria Giuseppina; Urru, Silvana; De Miglio, Maria Rosaria

    2015-01-01

    Background Triple Negative Breast Cancer (TNBC) accounts for 12–24% of all breast carcinomas, and shows worse prognosis compared to other breast cancer subtypes. Molecular studies demonstrated that TNBCs are a heterogeneous group of tumors with different clinical and pathologic features, prognosis, genetic-molecular alterations and treatment responsivity. The PI3K/AKT is a major pathway involved in the regulation of cell survival and proliferation, and is the most frequently altered pathway in breast cancer, apparently with different biologic impact on specific cancer subtypes. The most common genetic abnormality is represented by PIK3CA gene activating mutations, with an overall frequency of 20–40%. The aims of our study were to investigate PIK3CA gene mutations on a large series of TNBC, to perform a wider analysis on genetic alterations involving PI3K/AKT and BRAF/RAS/MAPK pathways and to correlate the results with clinical-pathologic data. Materials and Methods PIK3CA mutation analysis was performed by using cobas® PIK3CA Mutation Test. EGFR, AKT1, BRAF, and KRAS genes were analyzed by sequencing. Immunohistochemistry was carried out to identify PTEN loss and to investigate for PI3K/AKT pathways components. Results PIK3CA mutations were detected in 23.7% of TNBC, whereas no mutations were identified in EGFR, AKT1, BRAF, and KRAS genes. Moreover, we observed PTEN loss in 11.3% of tumors. Deregulation of PI3K/AKT pathways was revealed by consistent activation of pAKT and p-p44/42 MAPK in all PIK3CA mutated TNBC. Conclusions Our data shows that PIK3CA mutations and PI3K/AKT pathway activation are common events in TNBC. A deeper investigation on specific TNBC genomic abnormalities might be helpful in order to select patients who would benefit from current targeted therapy strategies. PMID:26540293

  19. Behavioral activation and inhibition, negative affect, and gambling severity in a sample of young adult college students.

    PubMed

    Atkinson, John; Sharp, Carla; Schmitz, Joy; Yaroslavsky, Ilya

    2012-09-01

    The prevalence of pathological gambling among college students is increasing. Few studies have directly examined the relation between reward processing and gambling severity while concurrently examining the effects of co-occurring negative affect in this at risk population. This study used Structural Equation Modeling (SEM) techniques to analyze results from an online survey of 352 female and 96 male students age 18-25. Participants completed measures of past year gambling behavior and severity of gambling problems using the Canadian Problem Gambling Index and the Problem Gambling Severity Index. Negative affect and reward processing were measured by the 21-item version of the Depression, Anxiety, and Stress Scales and the Behavioral Inhibition System and Behavioral Activation System (BIS/BAS) scales, respectively. Thirty-five percent of participants reported gambling in the previous 12 months, and 11% had gambling severity scores indicative of "moderate-risk" or "problem gambling." Gambling severity was associated with negative affect. Negative affect, in turn, was correlated with the unitary BIS scale and inversely associated with the BAS reward responsiveness scale. Reward responsiveness was also inversely associated with gambling severity. In the SEM models, the association between reward responsiveness and gambling severity was mediated by negative affect among males but not among females. Potential explanations for these findings and their implications for addressing problem gambling are discussed.

  20. Melt mixing causes negative correlation of trace element enrichment and CO2 content prior to an Icelandic eruption

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Neave, David A.; Maclennan, John; Edmonds, Marie; Thordarson, Thorvaldur

    2014-08-01

    Major elements, trace elements and volatiles were measured in 110 olivine-hosted melt inclusions from the subglacial Skuggafjöll eruption in the Eastern Volcanic Zone of Iceland. Variations in melt inclusion trace element concentrations can be accounted for by incomplete mixing of diverse mantle parental melts accompanied by variable extents of fractional crystallisation. Binary mixing between an incompatible trace element-enriched and depleted melts provides a good fit to observed variations in trace element ratios such as Ce/Y. Surprisingly, the CO2 contents of melt inclusions correlate negatively with their degree of trace element enrichment. Depleted, low-Ce/Y inclusions with ∼1200 ppm CO2 have high CO2/Nb contents (∼400), suggesting that melts experienced little or no CO2 exsolution before inclusion entrapment. Enriched, high-Ce/Y inclusions contain ∼300 ppm CO2, have low CO2/Nb (contents 50-100) and melts are likely to have exsolved much of their original CO2 contents prior to inclusion entrapment. The negative correlation between CO2 content and trace element enrichment may arise either from the more efficient exsolution of CO2 from enriched melts, or from the intrusion of CO2-supersaturated depleted melts into enriched melts that had already exsolved much of their original CO2 contents. Some inclusions have lower CO2 contents than predicted from binary mixing models, which suggests that at least some CO2 exsolution occurred concurrently with mixing. Enriched inclusions record entrapment pressures of ∼0.5 kbar. These pressures probably correspond to the depth of mixing. Higher pressures recorded in depleted inclusions may have resulted from the development of CO2 supersaturation during ascent from storage at ≥1.5 kbar. The presence of CO2 supersaturation in melt inclusions has the potential to constrain timescales of melt inclusion entrapment.

  1. Existence of high-order correlations in cortical activity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Benucci, Andrea; Verschure, Paul F.; König, Peter

    2003-10-01

    Neurons collect signals originating from a large number of other cells. The variability of this integrated population activity at the millisecond time scale is a critical constraint on the degree of signal integration and processing performed by single neurons. Optical imaging, EEG, and fMRI studies have indicated that cortical activity shows a high degree of variability at a time scale of hundreds of ms. However, currently no experimental methods are available to directly assess the variability in the activity of populations of neurons at a time scale closer to that of the characteristic time constants of neurons, i.e., around 10 ms. Here we integrate pertinent experimental data in one rigorous mathematical framework to demonstrate that (1) the high temporal variability in the spiking activity of individual neurons, (2) the second-order correlation properties of the spiking activity of cortical neurons, and (3) the correlations of the subthreshold dynamics, all impose high amplitude, fast variability in the population activity of cortical neurons. This implies that higher order correlations, a necessary condition for temporal coding models, must be a central feature of cortical dynamics.

  2. Plastic and evolutionary responses to heat stress in a temperate dung fly: negative correlation between basal and induced heat tolerance?

    PubMed

    Esperk, T; Kjaersgaard, A; Walters, R J; Berger, D; Blanckenhorn, W U

    2016-05-01

    Extreme weather events such as heat waves are becoming more frequent and intense. Populations can cope with elevated heat stress by evolving higher basal heat tolerance (evolutionary response) and/or stronger induced heat tolerance (plastic response). However, there is ongoing debate about whether basal and induced heat tolerance are negatively correlated and whether adaptive potential in heat tolerance is sufficient under ongoing climate warming. To evaluate the evolutionary potential of basal and induced heat tolerance, we performed experimental evolution on a temperate source population of the dung fly Sepsis punctum. Offspring of flies adapted to three thermal selection regimes (Hot, Cold and Reference) were subjected to acute heat stress after having been exposed to either a hot-acclimation or non-acclimation pretreatment. As different traits may respond differently to temperature stress, several physiological and life history traits were assessed. Condition dependence of the response was evaluated by exposing juveniles to different levels of developmental (food restriction/rearing density) stress. Heat knockdown times were highest, whereas acclimation effects were lowest in the Hot selection regime, indicating a negative association between basal and induced heat tolerance. However, survival, adult longevity, fecundity and fertility did not show such a pattern. Acclimation had positive effects in heat-shocked flies, but in the absence of heat stress hot-acclimated flies had reduced life spans relative to non-acclimated ones, thereby revealing a potential cost of acclimation. Moreover, body size positively affected heat tolerance and unstressed individuals were less prone to heat stress than stressed flies, offering support for energetic costs associated with heat tolerance. Overall, our results indicate that heat tolerance of temperate insects can evolve under rising temperatures, but this response could be limited by a negative relationship between basal and

  3. Synchronous vitellogenin expression and sexual maturation during migration are negatively correlated with juvenile hormone levels in Mythimna separata

    PubMed Central

    Xiao, Hai-Jun; Fu, Xiao-Wei; Liu, Yong-Qiang; Wu, Kong-Ming

    2016-01-01

    Annual migration of pests between different seasonal habitats can lead to serious crop damage. Reproductive immaturity is generally associated with the migratory process (oogenesis-flight syndrome), but the mechanism of reproductive development during migration varies unpredictably. Here, the vitellogenin gene (MsVg) and three key regulatory enzyme genes (MsJhamt, MsJheh and MsJhe) related to juvenile hormone (JH) synthesis and degradation were identified and characterized in Mythimna separata. The relative expression of MsVg varied significantly in response to seasonal changes and was significantly correlated with stages of ovarian development. The relatively low levels of JH titer did not differ significantly in male moths but slightly increased in female adults during the migratory season, which was consistent with changes in mRNA levels for MsJhamt, MsJheh and MsJhe. JH titer was negatively associated with relative seasonal levels of vitellogenin mRNA transcripts and with ovarian development in migrating M. separata. The synchrony of MsVg expression with sexual maturation highlighted the potential of MsVg transcript levels to serve as an index to monitor the adult reproductive status. In addition, the level of JH and sexual maturity were correlated with the extent of JH in regulating the MsVg expression and reproduction during seasonal northern and southern migration. PMID:27629246

  4. Invasive Chloroplast Population Genetics of Mikania micrantha in China: No Local Adaptation and Negative Correlation between Diversity and Geographic Distance

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Ting; Wang, Zhen; Chen, Guopei; Wang, Chunbo; Su, Yingjuan

    2016-01-01

    Two fundamental questions on how invasive species are able to rapidly colonize novel habitat have emerged. One asks whether a negative correlation exists between the genetic diversity of invasive populations and their geographic distance from the origin of introduction. The other is whether selection on the chloroplast genome is important driver of adaptation to novel soil environments. Here, we addressed these questions in a study of the noxious invasive weed, Mikania micrantha, which has rapidly expanded in to southern China after being introduced to Hong Kong in 1884. Seven chloroplast simple sequence repeats (cpSSRs) were used to investigate population genetics in 28 populations of M. micrantha, which produced 39 loci. The soil compositions for these populations, including Mg abundance, were measured. The results showed that M. micrantha possessed relatively high cpSSR variation and differentiation among populations. Multiple diversity indices were quantified, and none was significantly correlated with distance from the origin of introduction. No evidence for “isolation by distance,” significant spatial structure, bottlenecks, nor linkage disequilibrium was detected. We also were unable to identify loci on the chloroplast genome that exhibited patterns of differentiation that would suggest adaptive evolution in response to soil attributes. Soil Mg had only a genome-wide effect instead of being a selective factor, which highlighted the association between Mg and the successful invasion. This study characterizes the role of the chloroplast genome of M. micrantha during its recent invasion of southern China. PMID:27708663

  5. Adolescent Age Moderates Genetic and Environmental Influences on Parent-Adolescent Positivity and Negativity: Implications for Genotype-Environment Correlation

    PubMed Central

    Marceau, Kristine; Knopik, Valerie S.; Neiderhiser, Jenae M.; Lichtenstein, Paul; Spotts, Erica L.; Ganiban, Jody M.; Reiss, David

    2015-01-01

    In the present study we examined how genotype-environment correlation processes differ as a function of adolescent age. We tested whether adolescent age moderates genetic and environmental influences on positivity and negativity in mother-adolescent and father-adolescent relationships using parallel samples of twin parents from the Twin and Offspring Study in Sweden and twin/sibling adolescents from the Nonshared Environment in Adolescent Development Study. We inferred differences in the role of passive and non-passive genotype-environment correlation based on biometric moderation findings. Findings indicated that non-passive rGE played a stronger role for positivity in mother- and father- adolescent relationships in families with older adolescents than families with younger adolescents, and that passive rGE played a stronger role for positivity in the mother-adolescent relationship in families with younger adolescents than in families with older adolescents. Implications of these findings for the timing and targeting of interventions on family relationships are discussed. PMID:25924807

  6. Synchronous vitellogenin expression and sexual maturation during migration are negatively correlated with juvenile hormone levels in Mythimna separata.

    PubMed

    Xiao, Hai-Jun; Fu, Xiao-Wei; Liu, Yong-Qiang; Wu, Kong-Ming

    2016-01-01

    Annual migration of pests between different seasonal habitats can lead to serious crop damage. Reproductive immaturity is generally associated with the migratory process (oogenesis-flight syndrome), but the mechanism of reproductive development during migration varies unpredictably. Here, the vitellogenin gene (MsVg) and three key regulatory enzyme genes (MsJhamt, MsJheh and MsJhe) related to juvenile hormone (JH) synthesis and degradation were identified and characterized in Mythimna separata. The relative expression of MsVg varied significantly in response to seasonal changes and was significantly correlated with stages of ovarian development. The relatively low levels of JH titer did not differ significantly in male moths but slightly increased in female adults during the migratory season, which was consistent with changes in mRNA levels for MsJhamt, MsJheh and MsJhe. JH titer was negatively associated with relative seasonal levels of vitellogenin mRNA transcripts and with ovarian development in migrating M. separata. The synchrony of MsVg expression with sexual maturation highlighted the potential of MsVg transcript levels to serve as an index to monitor the adult reproductive status. In addition, the level of JH and sexual maturity were correlated with the extent of JH in regulating the MsVg expression and reproduction during seasonal northern and southern migration. PMID:27629246

  7. Treatment of refractory low-pressure hydrocephalus with an active pumping negative-pressure shunt system.

    PubMed

    Kalani, M Yashar S; Turner, Jay D; Nakaji, Peter

    2013-03-01

    Low-pressure hydrocephalus is a rare type of hydrocephalus characterized by negative intracranial pressure (ICP) and ventriculomegaly. Given the shortcomings of available methods to treat refractory low-pressure hydrocephalus, we set out to develop a new system for evacuation of cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) from the ventricular system where existing shunt systems do not produce the necessary gradient for CSF drainage. We retrospectively reviewed the charts of two patients with the diagnosis of negative-pressure hydrocephalus refractory to traditional treatments. We combined a traditional low-pressure, non-siphoning valve with a pumping chamber placed distal to the valve to create a system that could be actively pumped to remove excess CSF. Treatment of negative-pressure hydrocephalus requires the establishment of a lower ventricular drainage pressure than the drainage pressure in the subarachnoid space. In refractory cases, we propose the use of this active negative-pressure pumping system.

  8. Long -Term Variation In The Correlation Between Solar Activity And Earth Climate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mehravani Behrouz, Masoud; Ajabshirizadeh, Ali

    The spots on surface of the sun are one of important indexes that make the solar activity clear . From 1610, according to the studies that have done about the sun, scientists have found that the number of these sunspots from each maximum to the next one is variable in a cycle of almost eleven years. Most of these scientists have found a positive correlation between different parameters of climatology and solar activity , but some have found negative correlation between them . In this study , according to the existent data about the sunspot number ( Wolf number ) and another parameter that bond with solar activity, apply numerical computation method and adjustment a prediction software with Neural Network method, curve of variation of temperature, rainfall and cloud cover of zone of Iran up to 2010 is predicted. With notice this subject that the variation in temperature is global, these data are useful to advance.

  9. Correlates of lifestyle: physical activity among South Asian Indian immigrants.

    PubMed

    Daniel, Manju; Wilbur, JoEllen; Fogg, Louis F; Miller, Arlene Michaels

    2013-01-01

    South Asian immigrants are at increased risk for cardiovascular disease and diabetes, but little is known about their physical activity patterns. In this cross-sectional study, 110 participants were recruited to describe lifestyle physical activity behavior of this at-risk population. Education (p = .042), global health (p = .045), and self-efficacy (p = .000) had significant positive independent effects on leisure-time physical activity. Depression (p = .035) and waist circumference (p = .012) had significant negative independent effects, and frequency of experiencing discrimination a significant positive independent effect (p = .007) on daily step counts. Culture-sensitive physical activity interventions need to target South Asian Indian immigrants who are less educated, in poor health, concerned about racial discrimination, and have low self-efficacy.

  10. Correlates of lifestyle: physical activity among South Asian Indian immigrants.

    PubMed

    Daniel, Manju; Wilbur, JoEllen; Fogg, Louis F; Miller, Arlene Michaels

    2013-01-01

    South Asian immigrants are at increased risk for cardiovascular disease and diabetes, but little is known about their physical activity patterns. In this cross-sectional study, 110 participants were recruited to describe lifestyle physical activity behavior of this at-risk population. Education (p = .042), global health (p = .045), and self-efficacy (p = .000) had significant positive independent effects on leisure-time physical activity. Depression (p = .035) and waist circumference (p = .012) had significant negative independent effects, and frequency of experiencing discrimination a significant positive independent effect (p = .007) on daily step counts. Culture-sensitive physical activity interventions need to target South Asian Indian immigrants who are less educated, in poor health, concerned about racial discrimination, and have low self-efficacy. PMID:24219639

  11. Negatively charged liposomes show potent adjuvant activity when simply admixed with protein antigens

    PubMed Central

    Yanasarn, Nijaporn; Sloat, Brian R.; Cui, Zhengrong

    2011-01-01

    Liposomes have been investigated extensively as a vaccine delivery system. Herein the adjuvant activities of liposomes with different net surface charges (neutral, positive, or negative) were evaluated when admixed with protein antigens, ovalbumin (OVA, pI = 4.7), Bacillus anthracis protective antigen protein (PA, pI = 5.6), or cationized OVA (cOVA). Mice immunized subcutaneously with OVA admixed with different liposomes generated different antibody responses. Interestingly, OVA admixed with net negatively charged liposomes prepared with DOPA was as immunogenic as OVA admixed with positively charged liposomes prepared with DOTAP. Immunization of mice with the anthrax PA protein admixed with the net negatively charged DOPA liposomes also induced a strong and functional anti-PA antibody response. When the cationized OVA was used as a model antigen, liposomes with net neutral, negative, or positive charges showed comparable adjuvant activities. Immunization of mice with the OVA admixed with DOPA liposomes also induced OVA-specific CD8+ cytotoxic T lymphocyte responses and significantly delayed the growth of OVA-expressing B16-OVA tumors in mice. However, not all net negatively charged liposomes showed a strong adjuvant activity. The adjuvant activity of the negatively charged liposomes may be related to the liposome’s ability (i) to up-regulate the expression of molecules related to the activation and maturation of antigen-presenting cells and (ii) to slightly facilitate the uptake of the antigens by antigen-presenting cells. Simply admixing certain negatively charged liposomes with certain protein antigens of interest may represent a novel platform for vaccine development. PMID:21615153

  12. Prediction of Spatiotemporal Patterns of Neural Activity from Pairwise Correlations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marre, O.; El Boustani, S.; Frégnac, Y.; Destexhe, A.

    2009-04-01

    We designed a model-based analysis to predict the occurrence of population patterns in distributed spiking activity. Using a maximum entropy principle with a Markovian assumption, we obtain a model that accounts for both spatial and temporal pairwise correlations among neurons. This model is tested on data generated with a Glauber spin-glass system and is shown to correctly predict the occurrence probabilities of spatiotemporal patterns significantly better than Ising models only based on spatial correlations. This increase of predictability was also observed on experimental data recorded in parietal cortex during slow-wave sleep. This approach can also be used to generate surrogates that reproduce the spatial and temporal correlations of a given data set.

  13. Prediction of Spatiotemporal Patterns of Neural Activity from Pairwise Correlations

    SciTech Connect

    Marre, O.; El Boustani, S.; Fregnac, Y.; Destexhe, A.

    2009-04-03

    We designed a model-based analysis to predict the occurrence of population patterns in distributed spiking activity. Using a maximum entropy principle with a Markovian assumption, we obtain a model that accounts for both spatial and temporal pairwise correlations among neurons. This model is tested on data generated with a Glauber spin-glass system and is shown to correctly predict the occurrence probabilities of spatiotemporal patterns significantly better than Ising models only based on spatial correlations. This increase of predictability was also observed on experimental data recorded in parietal cortex during slow-wave sleep. This approach can also be used to generate surrogates that reproduce the spatial and temporal correlations of a given data set.

  14. The glutaminase activity of l-asparaginase is not required for anticancer activity against ASNS-negative cells

    PubMed Central

    Chan, Wai Kin; Lorenzi, Philip L.; Anishkin, Andriy; Purwaha, Preeti; Rogers, David M.; Sukharev, Sergei; Rempe, Susan B.; Weinstein, John N.

    2014-01-01

    l-Asparaginase (l-ASP) is a key component of therapy for acute lymphoblastic leukemia. Its mechanism of action, however, is still poorly understood, in part because of its dual asparaginase and glutaminase activities. Here, we show that l-ASP’s glutaminase activity is not always required for the enzyme’s anticancer effect. We first used molecular dynamics simulations of the clinically standard Escherichia coli l-ASP to predict what mutated forms could be engineered to retain activity against asparagine but not glutamine. Dynamic mapping of enzyme substrate contacts identified Q59 as a promising mutagenesis target for that purpose. Saturation mutagenesis followed by enzymatic screening identified Q59L as a variant that retains asparaginase activity but shows undetectable glutaminase activity. Unlike wild-type l-ASP, Q59L is inactive against cancer cells that express measurable asparagine synthetase (ASNS). Q59L is potently active, however, against ASNS-negative cells. Those observations indicate that the glutaminase activity of l-ASP is necessary for anticancer activity against ASNS-positive cell types but not ASNS-negative cell types. Because the clinical toxicity of l-ASP is thought to stem from its glutaminase activity, these findings suggest the hypothesis that glutaminase-negative variants of l-ASP would provide larger therapeutic indices than wild-type l-ASP for ASNS-negative cancers. PMID:24659632

  15. Metabolic activity of sperm cells: correlation with sperm cell concentration, viability and motility in the rabbit.

    PubMed

    Sabés-Alsina, Maria; Planell, Núria; Gil, Sílvia; Tallo-Parra, Oriol; Maya-Soriano, Maria José; Taberner, Ester; Piles, Miriam; Sabés, Manel; Lopez-Bejar, Manel

    2016-10-01

    The resazurin reduction test (RRT) is a useful technique to assess the metabolic rate of sperm cells. RRT depends on the ability of metabolically active cells to reduce the non-fluorescent dye resazurin to the fluorescent resorufin. The aim of this study was to develop a vital fluorometric method to evaluate metabolic activity of rabbit sperm cells. Twenty-five rabbit males were included in the study. Viability and morphology, motility and metabolic activity were evaluated using an eosin-nigrosin staining, a computer-assisted semen analysis (CASA) and the RRT, respectively. Spearman rank correlation analysis was used to determine the correlation between RRT and semen parameters. After evaluation, a concentration of 10 × 106 sperm cells/ml was selected for further experiments with RRT. No significant correlation was found between the RRT results and the motility parameters. However, after RRT a significant positive correlation between relative fluorescence units and the percentage of alive spermatozoa (r = 0.62; P = 0.001) and a negative one with the percentage of sperm cells with acrosomic abnormalities (r = -0.45; P < 0.05) were detected. The vital assessment of metabolic rate of sperm cells by RRT could provide more information about semen quality than other routine semen analysis, correlating with sperm viability and acrosome status information.

  16. Are the correlates of active school transport context-specific?

    PubMed Central

    Larouche, R; Sarmiento, O L; Broyles, S T; Denstel, K D; Church, T S; Barreira, T V; Chaput, J-P; Fogelholm, M; Hu, G; Kuriyan, R; Kurpad, A; Lambert, E V; Maher, C; Maia, J; Matsudo, V; Olds, T; Onywera, V; Standage, M; Tremblay, M S; Tudor-Locke, C; Zhao, P; Katzmarzyk, P T

    2015-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: Previous research consistently indicates that children who engage in active school transport (AST) are more active than their peers who use motorized modes (car or bus). However, studies of the correlates of AST have been conducted predominantly in high-income countries and have yielded mixed findings. Using data from a heterogeneous sample of 12 country sites across the world, we investigated the correlates of AST in 9–11-year olds. METHODS: The analytical sample comprised 6555 children (53.8% girls), who reported their main travel mode to school and the duration of their school trip. Potential individual and neighborhood correlates of AST were assessed with a parent questionnaire adapted from previously validated instruments. Multilevel generalized linear mixed models (GLMM) were used to examine the associations between individual and neighborhood variables and the odds of engaging in AST while controlling for the child's school. Site moderated the relationship of seven of these variables with AST; therefore we present analyses stratified by site. RESULTS: The prevalence of AST varied from 5.2 to 79.4% across sites and the school-level intra-class correlation ranged from 0.00 to 0.56. For each site, the final GLMM included a different set of correlates of AST. Longer trip duration (that is, ⩾16 min versus ⩽15 min) was associated with lower odds of AST in eight sites. Other individual and neighborhood factors were associated with AST in three sites or less. CONCLUSIONS: Our results indicate wide variability in the prevalence and correlates of AST in a large sample of children from twelve geographically, economically and culturally diverse country sites. This suggests that AST interventions should not adopt a ‘one size fits all' approach. Future research should also explore the association between psychosocial factors and AST in different countries. PMID:27152191

  17. Extended amygdala and emotional salience: a PET activation study of positive and negative affect.

    PubMed

    Liberzon, Israel; Phan, K Luan; Decker, Laura R; Taylor, Stephan F

    2003-04-01

    Functional neuroimaging studies have implicated amygdaloid and basal forebrain regions, including sublenticular extended amygdala (SLEA), in the mediation of aversive emotional responses. However, it is not clear whether SLEA responds to 'aversiveness' or to general stimulus salience. We predicted that both pleasant and aversive stimuli would activate this region. Using [(15)O] water PET, we studied 10 healthy subjects while viewing pleasant, aversive, neutral, and blank images. Each subject underwent eight scans, which were processed and averaged with standard statistical methods. Both positive and negative stimuli activated regions in SLEA. Both positive and negative content activated the visual cortex, relative to neutral content. Aversive stimuli deactivated the left frontal pole, relative to positive and neutral stimuli. These findings demonstrate that both positive and negative emotional content evokes processing in the sublenticular/extended amygdala region, suggesting that this region is involved in general emotional processing, such as detection or attribution of salience.

  18. Serum Renalase Levels Correlate with Disease Activity in Lupus Nephritis

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Minfang; Shao, Xinghua; Chang, Xinbei; Fan, Zhuping; Cao, Qin; Mou, Shan; Wang, Qin; Yan, Yucheng; Desir, Gary; Ni, Zhaohui

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Lupus nephritis (LN) is among the most serious complications of systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE), which causes significant morbidity and mortality. Renalase is a novel, kidney-secreted cytokine-like protein that promotes cell survival. Here, we aimed to investigate the relationship of serum renalase levels with LN and its role in the disease progression of LN. Methods For this cross-sectional study, 67 LN patients and 35 healthy controls were enrolled. Seventeen active LN patients who received standard therapies were followed up for six months. Disease activity was determined by the SLE Disease Activity–2000 (SLEDAI-2K) scoring system and serum renalase amounts were determined by ELISA. Predictive value of renalase for disease activity was assessed. Furthermore, the expression of renalase in the kidneys of patients and macrophage infiltration was assessed by immunohistochemistry. Results Serum renalase amounts were significantly higher in LN patients than in healthy controls. Moreover, patients with proliferative LN had more elevated serum renalase levels than Class V LN patients. In proliferative LN patients, serum renalase levels were significantly higher in patients with active LN than those with inactive LN. Serum renalase levels were positively correlated with SLEDAI-2K, 24-h urine protein excretion, ds-DNA and ESR but inversely correlated with serum albumin and C3. Renalase amounts decreased significantly after six-months of standard therapy. The performance of renalase as a marker for diagnosis of active LN was 0.906 with a cutoff value of 66.67 μg/ml. We also observed that the amount of renalase was significantly higher in glomerular of proliferative LN along with the co-expression of macrophages. Conclusion Serum renalase levels were correlated with disease activity in LN. Serum renalase might serve as a potential indicator for disease activity in LN. The marked increase of glomerular renalase and its association with macrophages suggest

  19. Cocaine users with comorbid Cluster B personality disorders show dysfunctional brain activation and connectivity in the emotional regulation networks during negative emotion maintenance and reappraisal.

    PubMed

    Albein-Urios, Natalia; Verdejo-Román, Juan; Soriano-Mas, Carles; Asensio, Samuel; Martínez-González, José Miguel; Verdejo-García, Antonio

    2013-12-01

    Cocaine dependence often co-occurs with Cluster B personality disorders. Since both disorders are characterized by emotion regulation deficits, we predicted that cocaine comorbid patients would exhibit dysfunctional patterns of brain activation and connectivity during reappraisal of negative emotions. We recruited 18 cocaine users with comorbid Cluster B personality disorders, 17 cocaine users without comorbidities and 21 controls to be scanned using functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) during performance on a reappraisal task in which they had to maintain or suppress the emotions induced by negative affective stimuli. We followed region of interest (ROI) and whole-brain approaches to investigate brain activations and connectivity associated with negative emotion experience and reappraisal. Results showed that cocaine users with comorbid personality disorders had reduced activation of the subgenual anterior cingulate cortex during negative emotion maintenance and increased activation of the lateral orbitofrontal cortex and the amygdala during reappraisal. Amygdala activation correlated with impulsivity and antisocial beliefs in the comorbid group. Connectivity analyses showed that in the cocaine comorbid group the subgenual cingulate was less efficiently connected with the amygdala and the fusiform gyri and more efficiently connected with the anterior insula during maintenance, whereas during reappraisal the left orbitofrontal cortex was more efficiently connected with the amygdala and the right orbitofrontal cortex was less efficiently connected with the dorsal striatum. We conclude that cocaine users with comorbid Cluster B personality disorders have distinctive patterns of brain activation and connectivity during maintenance and reappraisal of negative emotions, which correlate with impulsivity and dysfunctional beliefs.

  20. New trends in the development of "active correlations" technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsyganov, Yu. S.

    2016-09-01

    With reaching extremely high intensities of heavy-ion beams, new requirements for the detection system of the Dubna Gas-Filled Recoil Separator (DGFRS) will definitely be set. One of the challenges is how to apply the "active correlations" method [1-6] to suppress beam associated background products without significant losses in the whole long-term experiment efficiency value. Different scenarios and equations for the development of a method according to this requirement are under consideration in the present paper.

  1. Correlations between solar activity and the atmosphere - An unphysical explanation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Salby, Murry L.; Shea, Dennis J.

    1991-12-01

    Attention is given to the behavior of atmospheric properties and to a nonphysical explanation of their relationship to solar activity. The relatively short lengths of atmospheric records limit the ability of cross-covariance properties to discriminate to solar activity and hence to distinguish them from other forms of interanual variability. The discrete nature of the cross spectrum with solar activity admits only a few statistical degrees of freedom, which limits the reliability with which correlations can be determined. Coherence and correlation with sea level pressure both decrease with increasing record length and fall beneath the 90-percent level of statistical significance when records are extended back to the turn of the 20th century. The physical significance of such properties is considered in statistics generated from artificial solar variability, which demonstrate that behavior like that observed is not unique to the solar period. Over a wide range of periods, false solar variability leads to correlations and coherences that are as high as or higher than those produced by actual solar variability.

  2. Spatial correlations of Diceroprocta apache and its host plants: Evidence for a negative impact from Tamarix invasion

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Ellingson, A.R.; Andersen, D.C.

    2002-01-01

    1. The hypothesis that the habitat-scale spatial distribution of the, Apache cicada Diceroprocta apache Davis is unaffected by the presence of the invasive exotic saltcedar Tamarix ramosissima was tested using data from 205 1-m2 quadrats placed within the flood-plain of the Bill Williams River, Arizona, U.S.A. Spatial dependencies within and between cicada density and habitat variables were estimated using Moran's I and its bivariate analogue to discern patterns and associations at spatial scales from 1 to 30 m. 2. Apache cicadas were spatially aggregated in high-density clusters averaging 3m in diameter. A positive association between cicada density, estimated by exuvial density, and the per cent canopy cover of a native tree, Goodding's willow Salix gooddingii, was detected in a non-spatial correlation analysis. No non-spatial association between cicada density and saltcedar canopy cover was detected. 3. Tests for spatial cross-correlation using the bivariate IYZ indicated the presence of a broad-scale negative association between cicada density and saltcedar canopy cover. This result suggests that large continuous stands of saltcedar are associated with reduced cicada density. In contrast, positive associations detected at spatial scales larger than individual quadrats suggested a spill-over of high cicada density from areas featuring Goodding's willow canopy into surrounding saltcedar monoculture. 4. Taken together and considered in light of the Apache cicada's polyphagous habits, the observed spatial patterns suggest that broad-scale factors such as canopy heterogeneity affect cicada habitat use more than host plant selection. This has implications for management of lower Colorado River riparian woodlands to promote cicada presence and density through maintenance or creation of stands of native trees as well as manipulation of the characteristically dense and homogeneous saltcedar canopies.

  3. Brain activation to negative stimuli mediates a relationship between adolescent marijuana use and later emotional functioning.

    PubMed

    Heitzeg, Mary M; Cope, Lora M; Martz, Meghan E; Hardee, Jillian E; Zucker, Robert A

    2015-12-01

    This work investigated the impact of heavy marijuana use during adolescence on emotional functioning, as well as the brain functional mediators of this effect. Participants (n=40) were recruited from the Michigan Longitudinal Study (MLS). Data on marijuana use were collected prospectively beginning in childhood as part of the MLS. Participants were classified as heavy marijuana users (n=20) or controls with minimal marijuana use. Two facets of emotional functioning-negative emotionality and resiliency (a self-regulatory mechanism)-were assessed as part of the MLS at three time points: mean age 13.4, mean age 19.6, and mean age 23.1. Functional neuroimaging data during an emotion-arousal word task were collected at mean age 20.2. Negative emotionality decreased and resiliency increased across the three time points in controls but not heavy marijuana users. Compared with controls, heavy marijuana users had less activation to negative words in temporal, prefrontal, and occipital cortices, insula, and amygdala. Activation of dorsolateral prefrontal cortex to negative words mediated an association between marijuana group and later negative emotionality. Activation of the cuneus/lingual gyrus mediated an association between marijuana group and later resiliency. Results support growing evidence that heavy marijuana use during adolescence affects later emotional outcomes. PMID:26403581

  4. NK cell function triggered by multiple activating receptors is negatively regulated by glycogen synthase kinase-3β.

    PubMed

    Kwon, Hyung-Joon; Kwon, Soon Jae; Lee, Heejae; Park, Hye-Ran; Choi, Go-Eun; Kang, Sang-Wook; Kwon, Seog Woon; Kim, Nacksung; Lee, Soo Young; Ryu, Sangryeol; Kim, Sun Chang; Kim, Hun Sik

    2015-09-01

    Activation of NK cells is triggered by combined signals from multiple activating receptors that belong to different families. Several NK cell activating receptors have been identified, but their role in the regulation of effector functions is primarily understood in the context of their individual engagement. Therefore, little is known about the signaling pathways broadly implicated by the multiple NK cell activation cues. Here we provide evidence pointing to glycogen synthase kinase (GSK)-3β as a negative regulator of multiple NK cell activating signals. Using an activation model that combines NKG2D and 2B4 and tests different signaling molecules, we found that GSK-3 undergoes inhibitory phosphorylation at regulatory serine residues by the engagement of NKG2D and 2B4, either individually or in combination. The extent of such phosphorylation was closely correlated with the degree of NK cell activation. NK cell functions, such as cytokine production and cytotoxicity, were consistently enhanced by the knockdown of GSK-3β or its inhibition with different pharmacological inhibitors, whereas inhibition of the GSK-3α isoform had no effect. In addition, NK cell function was augmented by the overexpression of a catalytically inactive form of GSK-3β. Importantly, the regulation of NK cell function by GSK-3β was common to diverse activating receptors that signal through both ITAM and non-ITAM pathways. Thus, our results suggest that GSK-3β negatively regulates NK cell activation and that modulation of GSK-3β function could be used to enhance NK cell activation.

  5. Correlates of children's time-specific physical activity: a review of the literature.

    PubMed

    Stanley, Rebecca M; Ridley, Kate; Dollman, James

    2012-01-01

    Assessment of correlates of physical activity occurring at different times of the day, locations and contexts, is imperative to understanding children's physical activity behaviour. The purpose of this review was to identify the correlates of children's physical activity (aged 8-14 years) occurring during the school break time and after-school periods. A review was conducted of the peer-reviewed literature, published between 1990 and January 2011. A total of 22 studies (12 school break time studies, 10 after-school studies) were included in the review. Across the 22 studies, 17 studies were cross-sectional and five studies were interventions. In the school break time studies, 39 potential correlates were identified, of which gender and age were consistently associated with school break time physical activity in two or more studies, and family affluence, access to a gym, access to four or more physical activity programs and the condition of a playing field were all associated with school break time physical activity in only one study. Access to loose and fixed equipment, playground markings, size of and access to play space and the length of school break time were all positively associated with changes in school break time physical activity in intervention studies. Thirty-six potential correlates of after-school physical activity were identified. Gender (with boys more active), younger age, lower body mass index (for females), lower TV viewing/playing video games, and greater access to facilities were associated with higher levels of after-school physical activity in two or more studies. Parent supervision was negatively associated with females' after-school physical activity in one study. This review has revealed a relatively small number of studies investigating the school break time and after-school periods in the specified age range and only a few correlates have demonstrated a consistent association with physical activity. This highlights the infancy of this

  6. Amygdala Reactivity and Negative Emotionality: Divergent Correlates of Antisocial Personality and Psychopathy Traits in a Community Sample

    PubMed Central

    Hyde, Luke W.; Byrd, Amy L.; Votruba-Drzal, Elizabeth; Hariri, Ahmad R.; Manuck, Stephen B.

    2014-01-01

    Previous studies have emphasized that antisocial personality disorder (APD) and psychopathy overlap highly but differ critically in several features, notably negative emotionality (NEM) and possibly amygdala reactivity to social signals of threat and distress. Here we examined whether dimensions of psychopathy and APD correlate differentially with NEM and amygdala reactivity to emotional faces. Testing these relationships among healthy individuals, dimensions of psychopathy and APD were generated by the profile matching technique of Lynam and Widiger (2001), using facet scales of the NEO Personality Inventory-Revised, and amygdala reactivity was measured using a well-established emotional faces task, in a community sample of 103 men and women. Higher psychopathy scores were associated with lower NEM and lower amygdala reactivity, whereas higher APD scores were related to greater NEM and greater amygdala reactivity, but only after overlapping variance in APD and psychopathy was adjusted for in the statistical model. Amygdala reactivity did not mediate the relationship of APD and psychopathy scores to NEM. Supplemental analyses also compared other measures of factors within psychopathy in predicting NEM and amygdala reactivity and found that Factor 2 psychopathy was positively related to NEM and amygdala reactivity across measures of psychopathy. The overall findings replicate seminal observations on NEM in psychopathy by Hicks and Patrick (2006) and extend this work to neuroimaging in a normative population. They also suggest that one critical way in which APD and psychopathy dimensions may differ in their etiology is through their opposing levels of NEM and amygdala reactivity to threat. PMID:24661171

  7. Correlation of Positive and Negative Reciprocity Fails to Confer an Evolutionary Advantage: Phase Transitions to Elementary Strategies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Szolnoki, Attila; Perc, Matjaž

    2013-10-01

    Economic experiments reveal that humans value cooperation and fairness. Punishing unfair behavior is therefore common, and according to the theory of strong reciprocity, it is also directly related to rewarding cooperative behavior. However, empirical data fail to confirm that positive and negative reciprocity are correlated. Inspired by this disagreement, we determine whether the combined application of reward and punishment is evolutionarily advantageous. We study a spatial public goods game, where in addition to the three elementary strategies of defection, rewarding, and punishment, a fourth strategy that combines the latter two competes for space. We find rich dynamical behavior that gives rise to intricate phase diagrams where continuous and discontinuous phase transitions occur in succession. Indirect territorial competition, spontaneous emergence of cyclic dominance, as well as divergent fluctuations of oscillations that terminate in an absorbing phase are observed. Yet, despite the high complexity of solutions, the combined strategy can survive only in very narrow and unrealistic parameter regions. Elementary strategies, either in pure or mixed phases, are much more common and likely to prevail. Our results highlight the importance of patterns and structure in human cooperation, which should be considered in future experiments.

  8. Water spray-induced grooming is negatively correlated with depressive behavior in the forced swimming test in rats.

    PubMed

    Shiota, Noboru; Narikiyo, Kimiya; Masuda, Akira; Aou, Shuji

    2016-05-01

    Rodents show grooming, a typical self-care behavior, under stress and non-stress conditions. Previous studies revealed that grooming under stress conditions such as the open-field test (OFT) or the elevated plus-maze test (EPM) is associated with anxiety, but the roles of grooming under non-stress conditions are not well understood. Here, we examined spray-induced grooming as a model of grooming under a non-stress condition to investigate the relationship between this grooming and depression-like behavior in the forced swim test (FST) and tail suspension test, and we compared spray-induced grooming with OFT- and EPM-induced grooming. The main finding was that the duration of spray-induced grooming, but not that of OFT/EPM-induced grooming, was negatively correlated with the duration of immobility in the FST, an index of depression-like behavior. The results suggest that spray-induced grooming is functionally different from the grooming in the OFT and EPM and is related to reduction of depressive behavior.

  9. Amygdala reactivity and negative emotionality: divergent correlates of antisocial personality and psychopathy traits in a community sample.

    PubMed

    Hyde, Luke W; Byrd, Amy L; Votruba-Drzal, Elizabeth; Hariri, Ahmad R; Manuck, Stephen B

    2014-02-01

    Previous studies have emphasized that antisocial personality disorder (APD) and psychopathy overlap highly but differ critically in several features, notably negative emotionality (NEM) and possibly amygdala reactivity to social signals of threat and distress. Here we examined whether dimensions of psychopathy and APD correlate differentially with NEM and amygdala reactivity to emotional faces. Testing these relationships among healthy individuals, dimensions of psychopathy and APD were generated by the profile matching technique of Lynam and Widiger (2001), using facet scales of the NEO Personality Inventory-Revised, and amygdala reactivity was measured using a well-established emotional faces task, in a community sample of 103 men and women. Higher psychopathy scores were associated with lower NEM and lower amygdala reactivity, whereas higher APD scores were related to greater NEM and greater amygdala reactivity, but only after overlapping variance in APD and psychopathy was adjusted for in the statistical model. Amygdala reactivity did not mediate the relationship of APD and psychopathy scores to NEM. Supplemental analyses also compared other measures of factors within psychopathy in predicting NEM and amygdala reactivity and found that Factor 2 psychopathy was positively related to NEM and amygdala reactivity across measures of psychopathy. The overall findings replicate seminal observations on NEM in psychopathy by Hicks and Patrick (2006) and extend this work to neuroimaging in a normative population. They also suggest that one critical way in which APD and psychopathy dimensions may differ in their etiology is through their opposing levels of NEM and amygdala reactivity to threat.

  10. Temperament and peer problems from early to middle childhood: Gene-environment correlations with negative emotionality and sociability.

    PubMed

    Hasenfratz, Liat; Benish-Weisman, Maya; Steinberg, Tami; Knafo-Noam, Ariel

    2015-11-01

    Based in a transactional framework in which children's own characteristics and the social environment influence each other to produce individual differences in social adjustment, we investigated relationships between children's peer problems and their temperamental characteristics, using a longitudinal and genetically informed study of 939 pairs of Israeli twins followed from early to middle childhood (ages 3, 5, and 6.5). Peer problems were moderately stable within children over time, such that children who appeared to have more peer problems at age 3 tended to have also more peer problems at age 6.5. Children's temperament accounted for 10%-22% of the variance in their peer problems measured at the same age and for 2%-7% of the variance longitudinally. It is important that genetic factors accounted for the association between temperament and peer problems and were in line with a gene-environment correlation process, providing support for the proposal that biologically predisposed characteristics, particularly negative emotionality and sociability, have an influence on children's early experiences of peer problems. The results highlight the need for early and continuous interventions that are specifically tailored to address the interpersonal difficulties of children with particular temperamental profiles.

  11. Programmed cell death 4 and BCR-ABL fusion gene expression are negatively correlated in chronic myeloid leukemia

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Xia; Liu, Riming; Huang, Baohua; Zhang, Xiaolu; Yu, Weijuan; Bao, Cuixia; Li, Jie; Sun, Chengming

    2016-01-01

    Programmed cell death 4 (PDCD4) is a tumor suppressor that inhibits carcinogenesis, tumor progression and invasion by preventing gene transcription and translation. Downregulation of PDCD4 expression has been identified in multiple types of human cancer, however, to date, the function of PDCD4 in leukemia has not been investigated. In the present study, PDCD4 mRNA and protein expression was investigated in 50 patients exhibiting various phases of chronic myeloid leukemia (CML) and 20 healthy individuals by reverse transcription-quantitative polymerase chain reaction and western blot analysis. PDCD4 expression and cell proliferation was also investigated following treatment with the tyrosine kinase inhibitor, imatinib, in K562 cells. The results demonstrated that PDCD4 mRNA and protein expression was decreased in all CML samples when compared with healthy controls, who expressed high levels of PDCD4 mRNA and protein. No significant differences in PDCD4 expression were identified between chronic phase, accelerated phase and blast phase CML patients. In addition, PDCD4 expression was negatively correlated with BCR-ABL gene expression (r=−0.6716; P<0.001). Furthermore, K562 cells treated with imatinib exhibited significantly enhanced PDCD4 expression. These results indicate that downregulation of PDCD4 expression may exhibit a critical function in the progression and malignant proliferation of human CML.

  12. Cholinergic activity correlates with reserve proxies in Alzheimer's disease.

    PubMed

    Garibotto, Valentina; Tettamanti, Marco; Marcone, Alessandra; Florea, Ioana; Panzacchi, Andrea; Moresco, Rosamaria; Virta, Jere R; Rinne, Juha; Cappa, Stefano F; Perani, Daniela

    2013-11-01

    The clinical expression of Alzheimer's disease (AD) occurs as neuropathology exceeds the brain "reserve capacity." A possible association between the cholinergic system and reserve is suggested by preclinical observations that the cholinergic system allows cortical plasticity and by clinical observations of variable responses to cholinergic treatments depending on the patient's educational level. The aim of this study was to investigate the association of reserve proxies, that is, education and occupation, with acetylcholinesterase (AChE) activity, measured voxelwise by [(11)C]-MP4A and positron emission tomography (PET), in 9 healthy controls (HC), 7 patients with early probable AD, and 9 subjects with mild cognitive impairment (MCI) at the time of PET imaging, who progressed to AD at follow-up (prodromal AD). The analysis of prodromal and early AD showed positive correlations between education and AChE activity in the hippocampus, bilaterally, and between occupation and AChE activity in the right posterior cingulate gyrus. The significant correlation between AChE activity in structures belonging to the memory network and reserve proxies suggests that the brain reserve in AD is associated with a preserved/stimulated cholinergic neurotransmission.

  13. A CORRELATION BETWEEN STELLAR ACTIVITY AND HOT JUPITER EMISSION SPECTRA

    SciTech Connect

    Knutson, Heather A.; Howard, Andrew W.; Isaacson, Howard

    2010-09-10

    We present evidence for a correlation between the observed properties of hot Jupiter emission spectra and the activity levels of the host stars measured using Ca II H and K emission lines. We find that planets with dayside emission spectra that are well-described by standard one-dimensional atmosphere models with water in absorption (HD 189733, TrES-1, TrES-3, WASP-4) orbit chromospherically active stars, while planets with emission spectra that are consistent with the presence of a strong high-altitude temperature inversion and water in emission orbit quieter stars. We estimate that active G and K stars have Lyman {alpha} fluxes that are typically a factor of 4-7 times higher than quiet stars with analogous spectral types and propose that the increased UV flux received by planets orbiting active stars destroys the compounds responsible for the formation of the observed temperature inversions. In this paper, we also derive a model-independent method for differentiating between these two atmosphere types using the secondary eclipse depths measured in the 3.6 and 4.5 {mu}m bands on the Spitzer Space Telescope and argue that the observed correlation is independent of the inverted/non-inverted paradigm for classifying hot Jupiter atmospheres.

  14. Deviation from the grain protein concentration-grain yield negative relationship is highly correlated to post-anthesis N uptake in winter wheat.

    PubMed

    Bogard, Matthieu; Allard, Vincent; Brancourt-Hulmel, Maryse; Heumez, Emmanuel; Machet, Jean-Marie; Jeuffroy, Marie-Hélène; Gate, Philippe; Martre, Pierre; Le Gouis, Jacques

    2010-10-01

    In plants, carbon and nitrogen (N) economies are intimately linked at the physiological and biochemical level. The strong genetic negative correlation between grain yield and grain protein concentration observed in various cereals is an illustration of this inter-relationship. Studies have shown that deviation from this negative relationship (grain protein deviation or GPD) has a genetic basis, but its physiological basis is still poorly understood. This study analysed data on 27 genotypes grown in multienvironment field trials, representing a wide range of agricultural practices and climatic conditions. The objective was to identify physiological processes related to the genetic variability in GPD. Under most environments, GPD was significantly related to post-anthesis N uptake independently of anthesis date and total N at anthesis. The underlying physiological trait might be related to genotypic differences in either access to soil N, regulation of N uptake by plant N status, or ability to maintain root activity during the grain-filling period. GPD is an interesting potential target in breeding as it appears to be relatively robust across different environments and would be valuable in increasing total N uptake by maturity.

  15. Development of Preparatory Activity Indexed by the Contingent Negative Variation in Children

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Flores, Angelica B.; Digiacomo, Marcia R.; Meneres, Susana; Trigo, Eva; Gomez, Carlos M.

    2009-01-01

    Objectives: The present study investigated the effect of age on task-specific preparatory activation induced by a spatial cue using the central cue Posner's paradigm. The behavioral responses and the contingent negative variation (CNV) generated between S1 (the warning stimulus) and S2 (the imperative stimulus) were compared between 16 healthy…

  16. Effects of informative and confirmatory feedback on brain activation during negative feedback processing

    PubMed Central

    Woo, Yeon-kyoung; Song, Juyeon; Jiang, Yi; Cho, Catherine; Bong, Mimi; Kim, Sung-il

    2015-01-01

    The current study compared the effects of informative and confirmatory feedback on brain activation during negative feedback processing. For confirmatory feedback trials, participants were informed that they had failed the task, whereas informative feedback trials presented task relevant information along with the notification of their failure. Fourteen male undergraduates performed a series of spatial-perceptual tasks and received feedback while their brain activity was recorded. During confirmatory feedback trials, greater activations in the amygdala, dorsal anterior cingulate cortex, and the thalamus (including the habenular) were observed in response to incorrect responses. These results suggest that confirmatory feedback induces negative emotional reactions to failure. In contrast, informative feedback trials elicited greater activity in the dorsolateral prefrontal cortex (DLPFC) when participants experienced failure. Further psychophysiological interaction (PPI) analysis revealed a negative coupling between the DLPFC and the amygdala during informative feedback relative to confirmatory feedback trials. These findings suggest that providing task-relevant information could facilitate implicit down-regulation of negative emotions following failure. PMID:26175679

  17. Distinct brain activity in processing negative pictures of animals and objects - the role of human contexts.

    PubMed

    Cao, Zhijun; Zhao, Yanbing; Tan, Tengteng; Chen, Gang; Ning, Xueling; Zhan, Lexia; Yang, Jiongjiong

    2014-01-01

    Previous studies have shown that the amygdala is important in processing not only animate entities but also social information. It remains to be determined to what extent the factors of category and social context interact to modulate the activities of the amygdala and cortical regions. In this study, pictures depicting animals and inanimate objects in negative and neutral levels were presented. The contexts of the pictures differed in whether they included human/human parts. The factors of valence, arousal, familiarity and complexity of pictures were controlled across categories. The results showed that the amygdala activity was modulated by category and contextual information. Under the nonhuman context condition, the amygdala responded more to animals than objects for both negative and neutral pictures. In contrast, under the human context condition, the amygdala showed stronger activity for negative objects than animals. In addition to cortical regions related to object action, functional and effective connectivity analyses showed that the anterior prefrontal cortex interacted more with the amygdala for negative objects (vs. animals) in the human context condition, by a top-down modulation of the anterior prefrontal cortex to the amygdala. These results highlighted the effects of category and human contexts on modulating brain activity in emotional processing.

  18. Bile acid-activated nuclear receptor FXR suppresses apolipoprotein A-I transcription via a negative FXR response element

    PubMed Central

    Claudel, Thierry; Sturm, Ekkehard; Duez, Hélène; Torra, Inés Pineda; Sirvent, Audrey; Kosykh, Vladimir; Fruchart, Jean-Charles; Dallongeville, Jean; Hum, Dean W.; Kuipers, Folkert; Staels, Bart

    2002-01-01

    Serum levels of HDL are inversely correlated with the risk of coronary heart disease. The anti-atherogenic effect of HDL is partially mediated by its major protein constituent apoA-I. In this study, we identify bile acids that are activators of the nuclear receptor farnesoid X receptor (FXR) as negative regulators of human apoA-I expression. Intrahepatocellular accumulation of bile acids, as seen in patients with progressive familial intrahepatic cholestasis and biliary atresia, was associated with diminished apoA-I serum levels. In human apoA-I transgenic mice, treatment with the FXR agonist taurocholic acid strongly decreased serum concentrations and liver mRNA levels of human apoA-I, which was associated with reduced serum HDL levels. Incubation of human primary hepatocytes and hepatoblastoma HepG2 cells with bile acids resulted in a dose-dependent downregulation of apoA-I expression. Promoter mutation analysis and gel-shift experiments in HepG2 cells demonstrated that bile acid–activated FXR decreases human apoA-I promoter activity by a negative FXR response element mapped to the C site. FXR bound this site and repressed transcription in a manner independent of retinoid X receptor. The nonsteroidal synthetic FXR agonist GW4064 likewise decreased apoA-I mRNA levels and promoter activity in HepG2 cells. PMID:11927623

  19. Neural activations correlated with reading speed during reading novels.

    PubMed

    Fujimaki, Norio; Munetsuna, Shinji; Sasaki, Toyofumi; Hayakawa, Tomoe; Ihara, Aya; Wei, Qiang; Terazono, Yasushi; Murata, Tsutomu

    2009-12-01

    Functional magnetic resonance imaging was used to measure neural activations in subjects instructed to silently read novels at ordinary and rapid speeds. Among the 19 subjects, 8 were experts in a rapid reading technique. Subjects pressed a button to turn pages during reading, and the interval between turning pages was recorded to evaluate the reading speed. For each subject, we evaluated activations in 14 areas and at 2 instructed reading speeds. Neural activations decreased with increasing reading speed in the left middle and posterior superior temporal area, left inferior frontal area, left precentral area, and the anterior temporal areas of both hemispheres, which have been reported to be active for linguistic processes, while neural activation increased with increasing reading speed in the right intraparietal sulcus, which is considered to reflect visuo-spatial processes. Despite the considerable reading speed differences, correlation analysis showed no significant difference in activation dependence on reading speed with respect to the subject groups and instructed reading speeds. The activation reduction with speed increase in language-related areas was opposite to the previous reports for low reading speeds. The present results suggest that subjects reduced linguistic processes with reading speed increase from ordinary to rapid speed.

  20. High frequency activity correlates of robust movement in humans.

    PubMed

    Kerr, Matthew S D; Kahn, Kevin; Hyun-Joo Park; Thompson, Susan; Hao, Stephanie; Bulacio, Juan; Gonzalez-Martinez, Jorge A; Gale, John; Sarma, Sridevi V

    2014-01-01

    The neural circuitry underlying fast robust human motor control is not well understood. In this study we record neural activity from multiple stereotactic encephalograph (SEEG) depth electrodes in a human subject while he/she performs a center-out reaching task holding a robotic manipulandum that occasionally introduces an interfering force field. Collecting neural data from humans during motor tasks is rare, and SEEG provides an unusual opportunity to examine neural correlates of movement at a millisecond time scale in multiple brain regions. Time-frequency analysis shows that high frequency activity (50-150 Hz) increases significantly in the left precuneus and left hippocampus when the subject is compensating for a perturbation to their movement. These increases in activity occur with different durations indicating differing roles in the motor control process.

  1. Are Plasma Oxytocin and Vasopressin Levels Reflective of Amygdala Activation during the Processing of Negative Emotions? A Preliminary Study.

    PubMed

    Motoki, Kosuke; Sugiura, Motoaki; Takeuchi, Hikaru; Kotozaki, Yuka; Nakagawa, Seishu; Yokoyama, Ryoichi; Kawashima, Ryuta

    2016-01-01

    Plasma oxytocin (OT) and arginine vasopressin (AVP) are associated with individual differences in emotional responses and behaviors. The amygdala is considered to be an important brain region for regulating emotion-based behavior, with OT and AVP modulating activity in the amygdala during the processing of negative emotions. In particular, increased OT levels may diminish amygdala activation (anxiolytic effects) and enhanced AVP levels may augment amygdala activation (anxiogenic effects) when negative emotions are processed. A growing body of research has shown that the effects of OT and AVP are modulated by sex: the aforementioned anxiolytic effects of OT and the anxiogenic effects of AVP occur in men, but not in women. However, we have little knowledge regarding the biological mechanisms underlying OT and AVP plasma levels or their respective anxiogenic and anxiolytic effects; similarly, little is known about the causes and nature of sex differences related to these neuropeptides and their effects on emotional processing. In the current study, we focused on the neural functions associated with the biological mechanisms underlying such effects. We hypothesized that amygdala activation would correlate with trait plasma OT (anxiolytic effects) and AVP (anxiogenic effects) levels because the amygdala is thought to affect the coordinated release of these neuropeptides following affective experiences. We further hypothesized that the effects would be modulated by sex. We assessed 51 participants (male and female) using a paradigm involving negative emotion in conjunction with functional magnetic resonance imaging and measurements of plasma OT and AVP levels. We determined that increased plasma AVP levels were positively associated with amygdala activation (anxiogenic effects) in men, but not in women. These findings highlight the potential underlying neural mechanisms of plasma AVP levels in men. PMID:27092094

  2. Are Plasma Oxytocin and Vasopressin Levels Reflective of Amygdala Activation during the Processing of Negative Emotions? A Preliminary Study

    PubMed Central

    Motoki, Kosuke; Sugiura, Motoaki; Takeuchi, Hikaru; Kotozaki, Yuka; Nakagawa, Seishu; Yokoyama, Ryoichi; Kawashima, Ryuta

    2016-01-01

    Plasma oxytocin (OT) and arginine vasopressin (AVP) are associated with individual differences in emotional responses and behaviors. The amygdala is considered to be an important brain region for regulating emotion-based behavior, with OT and AVP modulating activity in the amygdala during the processing of negative emotions. In particular, increased OT levels may diminish amygdala activation (anxiolytic effects) and enhanced AVP levels may augment amygdala activation (anxiogenic effects) when negative emotions are processed. A growing body of research has shown that the effects of OT and AVP are modulated by sex: the aforementioned anxiolytic effects of OT and the anxiogenic effects of AVP occur in men, but not in women. However, we have little knowledge regarding the biological mechanisms underlying OT and AVP plasma levels or their respective anxiogenic and anxiolytic effects; similarly, little is known about the causes and nature of sex differences related to these neuropeptides and their effects on emotional processing. In the current study, we focused on the neural functions associated with the biological mechanisms underlying such effects. We hypothesized that amygdala activation would correlate with trait plasma OT (anxiolytic effects) and AVP (anxiogenic effects) levels because the amygdala is thought to affect the coordinated release of these neuropeptides following affective experiences. We further hypothesized that the effects would be modulated by sex. We assessed 51 participants (male and female) using a paradigm involving negative emotion in conjunction with functional magnetic resonance imaging and measurements of plasma OT and AVP levels. We determined that increased plasma AVP levels were positively associated with amygdala activation (anxiogenic effects) in men, but not in women. These findings highlight the potential underlying neural mechanisms of plasma AVP levels in men. PMID:27092094

  3. On the Need of Objective Vigilance Monitoring: Effects of Sleep Loss on Target Detection and Task-Negative Activity Using Combined EEG/fMRI

    PubMed Central

    Czisch, Michael; Wehrle, Renate; Harsay, Helga A.; Wetter, Thomas C.; Holsboer, Florian; Sämann, Philipp G.; Drummond, Sean P. A.

    2012-01-01

    Sleep loss affects attention by reducing levels of arousal and alertness. The neural mechanisms underlying the compensatory efforts of the brain to maintain attention and performance after sleep deprivation (SD) are not fully understood. Previous neuroimaging studies of SD have not been able to separate the effects of reduced arousal from the effects of SD on cerebral responses to cognitive challenges. Here, we used a simultaneous electroencephalography (EEG) and functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) approach to study the effects of 36 h of total sleep deprivation (TSD). Specifically, we focused on changes in selective attention processes as induced by an active acoustic oddball task, with the ability to isolate runs with objective EEG signs of high (SDalert) or reduced (SDsleepy) vigilance. In the SDalert condition, oddball task-related activity appears to be sustained by compensatory co-activation of insular regions, but task-negative activity in the right posterior node of the default mode network is altered following TSD. In the SDsleepy condition, oddball task-positive activity was massively impaired, but task-negative activation was showing levels comparable with the control condition after a well-rested night. Our results suggest that loss of strict negative correlation between oddball task-positive and task-negative activation reflects the effects of TSD, while the actual state of vigilance during task performance can affects either task-related or task-negative activity, depending on the exact vigilance level. PMID:22557992

  4. Correlations of non-exercise activity thermogenesis to metabolic parameters in Japanese patients with type 2 diabetes

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Non-exercise activity thermogenesis (NEAT) is the energy expenditure due to physical activities besides active sports-like exercise and resistance training in daily life. Methods We studied 45 subjects (22 women and 23 men) with type 2 diabetes who did not take any hypoglycemic, anti-hypertensive, or cholesterol-lowering agents and asked them about physical activity concerned with NEAT using an original questionnaire modified from a compendium of physical activities. We studied the association of the NEAT score to body weight, waist circumference, blood pressure, glucose and lipid metabolism, and arterial stiffness. Results The NEAT score was negatively correlated with serum insulin levels (r = -0.42, P < 0.05) in all subjects. The NEAT score was also negatively correlated with waist circumference (r = -0.509, P < 0.05) and positively correlated with high-density lipoprotein-cholesterol levels (r = 0.494, P < 0.05) in women, and negatively associated with serum insulin levels (r = -0.732, p < 0.005), systolic (r = -0.482, P < 0.05) and diastolic blood pressure (r = -0.538, P < 0.05) in patients with abdominal obesity. Furthermore, the NEAT score was negatively associated with pulse wave velocity (r = -0.719, P < 0.005) in smokers. Conclusion The study demonstrated that NEAT is associated with amelioration in insulin sensitivity, waist circumference, high-density lipoprotein-cholesterol, blood pressure and the marker for atherosclerosis in patients with type 2 diabetes. PMID:23711224

  5. Spontaneous perceptual facial distortions correlate with ventral occipitotemporal activity.

    PubMed

    Dalrymple, Kirsten A; Davies-Thompson, Jodie; Oruc, Ipek; Handy, Todd C; Barton, Jason J S; Duchaine, Brad

    2014-07-01

    Prosopometamorphopsia is a disorder of face perception in which faces appear distorted to the perceiver. The neural basis of prosopometamorphopsia is unclear, but may involve abnormal activity in face-selective areas in the ventral occipito-temporal pathway. Here we present the case of AS, a 44-year-old woman who reports persistent perceptual distortions of faces with no known cause. AS was presented with facial images and rated the magnitude of her distortions while activity in her core face areas and other areas in the ventral visual pathway was measured using functional magnetic resonance imaging. The magnitude of her distortions was positively correlated with signal changes in the right occipital face area (OFA) and right fusiform face area (FFA), as well as right V1-V3, and right lateral occipital cortex (LOC). There was also a trend for a significant correlation with signal in the left OFA and right inferior frontal gyrus (IFG), but not in the right or left superior temporal sulcus (STS). These results suggest that AS' prosopometamorphopsia reflects anomalous activity in face-processing network, particularly in the ventral occipitotemporal cortex.

  6. Brain activation during visual working memory correlates with behavioral mobility performance in older adults.

    PubMed

    Kawagoe, Toshikazu; Suzuki, Maki; Nishiguchi, Shu; Abe, Nobuhito; Otsuka, Yuki; Nakai, Ryusuke; Yamada, Minoru; Yoshikawa, Sakiko; Sekiyama, Kaoru

    2015-01-01

    Functional mobility and cognitive function often decline with age. We previously found that functional mobility as measured by the Timed Up and Go Test (TUG) was associated with cognitive performance for visually-encoded (i.e., for location and face) working memory (WM) in older adults. This suggests a common neural basis between TUG and visual WM. To elucidate this relationship further, the present study aimed to examine the neural basis for the WM-mobility association. In accordance with the well-known neural compensation model in aging, we hypothesized that "attentional" brain activation for easy WM would increase in participants with lower mobility. The data from 32 healthy older adults were analyzed, including brain activation during easy WM tasks via functional Magnetic Resonance Imaging (fMRI) and mobility performance via both TUG and a simple walking test. WM performance was significantly correlated with TUG but not with simple walking. Some prefrontal brain activations during WM were negatively correlated with TUG performance, while positive correlations were found in subcortical structures including the thalamus, putamen and cerebellum. Moreover, activation of the subcortical regions was significantly correlated with WM performance, with less activation for lower WM performers. These results indicate that older adults with lower mobility used more cortical (frontal) and fewer subcortical resources for easy WM tasks. To date, the frontal compensation has been proposed separately in the motor and cognitive domains, which have been assumed to compensate for dysfunction of the other brain areas; however, such dysfunction was less clear in previous studies. The present study observed such dysfunction as degraded activation associated with lower performance, which was found in the subcortical regions. We conclude that a common dysfunction-compensation activation pattern is likely the neural basis for the association between visual WM and functional mobility.

  7. Arginine Patch Predicts the RNA Annealing Activity of Hfq from Gram-Negative and Gram-Positive Bacteria.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Amy; Panja, Subrata; Woodson, Sarah A

    2016-06-01

    The Sm-protein Hfq facilitates interactions between small non-coding RNA (sRNA) and target mRNAs. In enteric Gram-negative bacteria, Hfq is required for sRNA regulation, and hfq deletion results in stress intolerance and reduced virulence. By contrast, the role of Hfq in Gram-positive is less established and varies among species. The RNA binding and RNA annealing activity of Hfq from Escherichia coli, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Listeria monocytogenes, Bacillus subtilis, and Staphylococcus aureus were compared using minimal RNAs and fluorescence spectroscopy. The results show that RNA annealing activity increases with the number of arginines in a semi-conserved patch on the rim of the Hfq hexamer and correlates with the previously reported requirement for Hfq in sRNA regulation. Thus, the amino acid sequence of the arginine patch can predict the chaperone function of Hfq in sRNA regulation in different organisms. PMID:27049793

  8. Arginine Patch Predicts the RNA Annealing Activity of Hfq from Gram-Negative and Gram-Positive Bacteria.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Amy; Panja, Subrata; Woodson, Sarah A

    2016-06-01

    The Sm-protein Hfq facilitates interactions between small non-coding RNA (sRNA) and target mRNAs. In enteric Gram-negative bacteria, Hfq is required for sRNA regulation, and hfq deletion results in stress intolerance and reduced virulence. By contrast, the role of Hfq in Gram-positive is less established and varies among species. The RNA binding and RNA annealing activity of Hfq from Escherichia coli, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Listeria monocytogenes, Bacillus subtilis, and Staphylococcus aureus were compared using minimal RNAs and fluorescence spectroscopy. The results show that RNA annealing activity increases with the number of arginines in a semi-conserved patch on the rim of the Hfq hexamer and correlates with the previously reported requirement for Hfq in sRNA regulation. Thus, the amino acid sequence of the arginine patch can predict the chaperone function of Hfq in sRNA regulation in different organisms.

  9. Positive And Negative Feedback Loops Coupled By Common Transcription Activator And Repressor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sielewiesiuk, Jan; Łopaciuk, Agata

    2015-03-01

    Dynamical systems consisting of two interlocked loops with negative and positive feedback have been studied using the linear analysis of stability and numerical solutions. Conditions for saddle-node bifurcation were formulated in a general form. Conditions for Hopf bifurcations were found in a few symmetrical cases. Auto-oscillations, when they exist, are generated by the negative feedback repressive loop. This loop determines the frequency and amplitude of oscillations. The positive feedback loop of activation slightly modifies the oscillations. Oscillations are possible when the difference between Hilll's coefficients of the repression and activation is sufficiently high. The highly cooperative activation loop with a fast turnover slows down or even makes the oscillations impossible. The system under consideration can constitute a component of epigenetic or enzymatic regulation network.

  10. High expression of UBD correlates with epirubicin resistance and indicates poor prognosis in triple-negative breast cancer

    PubMed Central

    Han, Tao; Liu, Zhaozhe; Li, Hengyu; Xie, Wanqing; Zhang, Ranran; Zhu, Li; Guo, Fang; Han, Yaling; Sheng, Yuan; Xie, Xiaodong

    2015-01-01

    Background Triple-negative breast cancer (TNBC) is a heterogeneous subtype of breast cancer that is prone to recurrence and metastasis with worse prognosis. Epirubicin-based chemotherapy is of great importance for patients with TNBC, but resistance to epirubicin severely limits the application of this drug and this has emerged as a major problem in the treatment of TNBC. The ubiquitin protein D (UBD) molecule has often been considered a tumor oncogene, and has been shown to promote the recurrence and metastasis of malignant tumor cells. Since the role of UBD in epirubicin resistance and its prognostic value in TNBC have not been reported, the study reported here was designed to identify the epirubicin-resistance molecule and clarify the related biomarker for TNBC prognosis. Methods UBD plasmid was transfected into MDA-MB-231 cells, and the cells were exposed to epirubicin to observe the ability of UBD in epirubicin resistance. UBD expression was also detected in 78 breast cancer tissues by immunohistochemistry. Statistical methods were used to study the relationship between UBD expression and epirubicin resistance in TNBC treatment. Kaplan–Meier survival analysis was used to determine the correlation between UBD expression and TNBC patients’ prognostic parameters. Results UBD expression was found increased in breast cancer tissues. Forced UBD expression was found to have a relationship with TNBC epirubicin resistance in vitro. High expression of UBD was found in TNBC, compared with in non-TNBC, and this played a positive role in epirubicin resistance and indicated the poor prognosis of TNBC treatment. Conclusion UBD may play an important role in epirubicin resistance in TNBC. UBD has the potential to be a novel biomarker in TNBC chemoresistance and may be a promising therapeutic target for TNBC patients. PMID:26185453

  11. Photosynthetic capacity is negatively correlated with the concentration of leaf phenolic compounds across a range of different species

    PubMed Central

    Sumbele, Sally; Fotelli, Mariangela N.; Nikolopoulos, Dimosthenis; Tooulakou, Georgia; Liakoura, Vally; Liakopoulos, Georgios; Bresta, Panagiota; Dotsika, Elissavet; Adams, Mark A.; Karabourniotis, George

    2012-01-01

    Background and aims Phenolic compounds are the most commonly studied of all secondary metabolites because of their significant protective–defensive roles and their significant concentration in plant tissues. However, there has been little study on relationships between gas exchange parameters and the concentration of leaf phenolic compounds (total phenolics (TP) and condensed tannins (CT)) across a range of species. Therefore, we addressed the question: is there any correlation between photosynthetic capacity (Amax) and TP and CT across species from different ecosystems in different continents? Methodology A plethora of functional and structural parameters were measured in 49 plant species following different growth strategies from five sampling sites located in Greece and Australia. The relationships between several leaf traits were analysed by means of regression and principal component analysis. Principal results The results revealed a negative relationship between TP and CT and Amax among the different plant species, growth strategies and sampling sites, irrespective of expression (with respect to mass, area or nitrogen content). Principal component analysis showed that high concentrations of TP and CT are associated with thick, dense leaves with low nitrogen. This leaf type is characterized by low growth, Amax and transpiration rates, and is common in environments with low water and nutrient availability, high temperatures and high light intensities. Therefore, the high TP and CT in such leaves are compatible with the protective and defensive functions ascribed to them. Conclusions Our results indicate a functional integration between carbon gain and the concentration of leaf phenolic compounds that reflects the trade-off between growth and defence/protection demands, depending on the growth strategy adopted by each species. PMID:23050073

  12. Urine Toxicology Screen in Multiple Sleep Latency Test: The Correlation of Positive Tetrahydrocannabinol, Drug Negative Patients, and Narcolepsy

    PubMed Central

    Dzodzomenyo, Samuel; Stolfi, Adrienne; Splaingard, Deborah; Earley, Elizabeth; Onadeko, Oluwole; Splaingard, Mark

    2015-01-01

    Objective: Drugs can influence results of multiple sleep latency tests (MSLT). We sought to identify the effect of marijuana on MSLT results in pediatric patients evaluated for excessive daytime sleepiness (EDS). Methods: This is a retrospective study of urine drug screens performed the morning before MSLT in 383 patients < 21 years old referred for EDS. MSLT results were divided into those with (1) (−) urine drug screens, (2) urine drug screens (+) for tetrahydrocannabinol (THC) alone or THC plus other drugs, and (3) urine drug screens (+) for drugs other than THC. Groups were compared with Fisher exact tests or one-way ANOVA. Results: 38 (10%) urine drug tests were (+): 14 for THC and 24 for other drugs. Forty-three percent of patients with drug screen (+) for THC had MSLT findings consistent with narcolepsy, 0% consistent with idiopathic hypersomnia, 29% other, and 29% normal. This was statistically different from those with (−) screens (24% narcolepsy, 20% idiopathic hypersomnia, 6% other, 50% normal), and those (+) for drugs other than THC (17% narcolepsy, 33% idiopathic hypersomnia, 4% other, 46% normal (p = 0.01). Six percent (6/93) of patients with MSLT findings consistent with narcolepsy were drug screen (+) for THC; 71% of patients with drug screen (+) for THC had multiple sleep onset REM periods (SOREMS). There were no (+) urine drug screens in patients < 13 years old. Conclusion: Many pediatric patients with (+) urine drug screens for THC met MSLT criteria for narcolepsy or had multiple SOREMs. Drug screening is important in interpreting MSLT findings for children ≥ 13 years. Citation: Dzodzomenyo S, Stolfi A, Splaingard D, Earley E, Onadeko O, Splaingard M. Urine toxicology screen in multiple sleep latency test: the correlation of positive tetrahydrocannabinol, drug negative patients, and narcolepsy. J Clin Sleep Med 2015;11(2):93–99. PMID:25348245

  13. Neural Correlates of Biased Responses: The Negative Method Effect in the Rosenberg Self-Esteem Scale Is Associated with Right Amygdala Volume.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yinan; Kong, Feng; Huang, Lijie; Liu, Jia

    2016-10-01

    Self-esteem is a widely studied construct in psychology that is typically measured by the Rosenberg Self-Esteem Scale (RSES). However, a series of cross-sectional and longitudinal studies have suggested that a simple and widely used unidimensional factor model does not provide an adequate explanation of RSES responses due to method effects. To identify the neural correlates of the method effect, we sought to determine whether and how method effects were associated with the RSES and investigate the neural basis of these effects. Two hundred and eighty Chinese college students (130 males; mean age = 22.64 years) completed the RSES and underwent magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). Behaviorally, method effects were linked to both positively and negatively worded items in the RSES. Neurally, the right amygdala volume negatively correlated with the negative method factor, while the hippocampal volume positively correlated with the general self-esteem factor in the RSES. The neural dissociation between the general self-esteem factor and negative method factor suggests that there are different neural mechanisms underlying them. The amygdala is involved in modulating negative affectivity; therefore, the current study sheds light on the nature of method effects that are related to self-report with a mix of positively and negatively worded items.

  14. Bactericidal Activity and Mechanism of Photoirradiated Polyphenols against Gram-Positive and -Negative Bacteria.

    PubMed

    Nakamura, Keisuke; Ishiyama, Kirika; Sheng, Hong; Ikai, Hiroyo; Kanno, Taro; Niwano, Yoshimi

    2015-09-01

    The bactericidal effect of various types of photoirradiated polyphenols against Gram-positive and -negative bacteria was evaluated in relation to the mode of action. Gram-positive bacteria (Enterococcus faecalis, Staphylococcus aureus, and Streptococcus mutans) and Gram-negative bacteria (Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans, Escherichia coli, and Pseudomonas aeruginosa) suspended in a 1 mg/mL polyphenol aqueous solution (caffeic acid, gallic acid, chlorogenic acid, epigallocatechin, epigallocatechin gallate, and proanthocyanidin) were exposed to LED light (wavelength, 400 nm; irradiance, 260 mW/cm(2)) for 5 or 10 min. Caffeic acid and chlorogenic acid exerted the highest bactericidal activity followed by gallic acid and proanthocyanidin against both Gram-positive and -negative bacteria. It was also demonstrated that the disinfection treatment induced oxidative damage of bacterial DNA, which suggests that polyphenols are incorporated into bacterial cells. The present study suggests that blue light irradiation of polyphenols could be a novel disinfection treatment.

  15. Nodal infection in Markovian susceptible-infected-susceptible and susceptible-infected-removed epidemics on networks are non-negatively correlated.

    PubMed

    Cator, E; Van Mieghem, P

    2014-05-01

    By invoking the famous Fortuin, Kasteleyn, and Ginibre (FKG) inequality, we prove the conjecture that the correlation of infection at the same time between any pair of nodes in a network cannot be negative for (exact) Markovian susceptible-infected-susceptible (SIS) and susceptible-infected-removed (SIR) epidemics on networks. The truth of the conjecture establishes that the N-intertwined mean-field approximation (NIMFA) upper bounds the infection probability in any graph so that network design based on NIMFA always leads to safe protections against malware spread. However, when the infection or/and curing are not Poisson processes, the infection correlation between two nodes can be negative. PMID:25353839

  16. Nodal infection in Markovian susceptible-infected-susceptible and susceptible-infected-removed epidemics on networks are non-negatively correlated.

    PubMed

    Cator, E; Van Mieghem, P

    2014-05-01

    By invoking the famous Fortuin, Kasteleyn, and Ginibre (FKG) inequality, we prove the conjecture that the correlation of infection at the same time between any pair of nodes in a network cannot be negative for (exact) Markovian susceptible-infected-susceptible (SIS) and susceptible-infected-removed (SIR) epidemics on networks. The truth of the conjecture establishes that the N-intertwined mean-field approximation (NIMFA) upper bounds the infection probability in any graph so that network design based on NIMFA always leads to safe protections against malware spread. However, when the infection or/and curing are not Poisson processes, the infection correlation between two nodes can be negative.

  17. Nodal infection in Markovian susceptible-infected-susceptible and susceptible-infected-removed epidemics on networks are non-negatively correlated

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cator, E.; Van Mieghem, P.

    2014-05-01

    By invoking the famous Fortuin, Kasteleyn, and Ginibre (FKG) inequality, we prove the conjecture that the correlation of infection at the same time between any pair of nodes in a network cannot be negative for (exact) Markovian susceptible-infected-susceptible (SIS) and susceptible-infected-removed (SIR) epidemics on networks. The truth of the conjecture establishes that the N-intertwined mean-field approximation (NIMFA) upper bounds the infection probability in any graph so that network design based on NIMFA always leads to safe protections against malware spread. However, when the infection or/and curing are not Poisson processes, the infection correlation between two nodes can be negative.

  18. Correlation between prefrontal cortex activity during working memory tasks and natural mood independent of personality effects: an optical topography study.

    PubMed

    Aoki, Ryuta; Sato, Hiroki; Katura, Takusige; Matsuda, Ryoichi; Koizumi, Hideaki

    2013-04-30

    Interactions between mood and cognition have drawn much attention in the fields of psychology and neuroscience. Recent neuroimaging studies have examined a neural basis of the mood-cognition interaction that which emphasize the role of the prefrontal cortex (PFC). Although these studies have shown that natural mood variations among participants are correlated with PFC activity during cognitive tasks, they did not control for personality differences. Our aim in this study was to clarify the relationship between natural mood and PFC activity by partialling out the effects of personality. Forty healthy adults completed self-report questionnaires assessing natural mood (the Profile of Mood States) and personality (the NEO Five-Factor Inventory and the Behavioral Inhibition/Activation Systems scales). They performed verbal and spatial working memory (WM) tasks while their PFC activity was measured using optical topography, a non-invasive, low-constraint neuroimaging tool. Correlation analysis showed that the level of negative mood was inversely associated with PFC activity during the verbal WM task, which replicated our previous findings. Furthermore, the negative correlation between negative mood and PFC activity remained significant after controlling for participants' personality traits, suggesting that natural mood is an independent contributing factor of PFC activity during verbal WM tasks.

  19. Genetic study of the loss and restoration of Mutator transposon activity in maize: evidence against dominant-negative regulator associated with loss of activity.

    PubMed

    Brown, J; Sundaresan, V

    1992-04-01

    The Mutator system of transposable elements is characterized by a family of transposons called Mu transposons that share common termini and are actively transposing in Robertson's Mutator (Mu) lines of maize. Mu lines lose transposition activity during propagation by either outcrossing or inbreeding. This loss of transposition activity, which can occur at non-Mendelian frequencies, is in the form of loss of forward transposition activity resulting in a decrease in the generation of new mutations, as well as the loss of mutability of Mu transposon induced mutations, and it has been correlated with hypermethylation of the Mu elements. Previous studies have concluded that restoration of Mutator transposon activity by crossing inactive lines back to active lines is incomplete or transient, and depends upon the sex of the inactive parent. Further, it has been proposed that the inactive system is dominant to the active system, with the dominance possibly mediated through a negative regulatory factor that is preferentially transmitted through the female. In this study, we have examined the frequencies of loss and restoration of Mu transposon activity using a Mu line carrying an insertion in the bronze 1 locus. We find that transmission of Mu transposon activity to non-Mu plants can occur at high rates through males and females, but individual cases of decreased transmission through the male were observed. We also find that in crosses between inactive-Mu and active-Mu plants, reactivation was efficient as well as heritable, regardless of the sex of the inactive parent. Similar results were obtained whether the inactivation occurred in an outcross or a self. In all cases examined, loss of Mu transposon activity was correlated with hypermethylation of Mu elements, and reactivation was correlated with their demethylation. Our results indicate that an inactive Mu system does not exhibit dominance over an active Mu system. We conclude that contrary to current models

  20. Pain relief produces negative reinforcement through activation of mesolimbic reward-valuation circuitry.

    PubMed

    Navratilova, Edita; Xie, Jennifer Y; Okun, Alec; Qu, Chaoling; Eyde, Nathan; Ci, Shuang; Ossipov, Michael H; King, Tamara; Fields, Howard L; Porreca, Frank

    2012-12-11

    Relief of pain is rewarding. Using a model of experimental postsurgical pain we show that blockade of afferent input from the injury with local anesthetic elicits conditioned place preference, activates ventral tegmental dopaminergic cells, and increases dopamine release in the nucleus accumbens. Importantly, place preference is associated with increased activity in midbrain dopaminergic neurons and blocked by dopamine antagonists injected into the nucleus accumbens. The data directly support the hypothesis that relief of pain produces negative reinforcement through activation of the mesolimbic reward-valuation circuitry.

  1. Detecting the community structure and activity patterns of temporal networks: a non-negative tensor factorization approach.

    PubMed

    Gauvin, Laetitia; Panisson, André; Cattuto, Ciro

    2014-01-01

    The increasing availability of temporal network data is calling for more research on extracting and characterizing mesoscopic structures in temporal networks and on relating such structure to specific functions or properties of the system. An outstanding challenge is the extension of the results achieved for static networks to time-varying networks, where the topological structure of the system and the temporal activity patterns of its components are intertwined. Here we investigate the use of a latent factor decomposition technique, non-negative tensor factorization, to extract the community-activity structure of temporal networks. The method is intrinsically temporal and allows to simultaneously identify communities and to track their activity over time. We represent the time-varying adjacency matrix of a temporal network as a three-way tensor and approximate this tensor as a sum of terms that can be interpreted as communities of nodes with an associated activity time series. We summarize known computational techniques for tensor decomposition and discuss some quality metrics that can be used to tune the complexity of the factorized representation. We subsequently apply tensor factorization to a temporal network for which a ground truth is available for both the community structure and the temporal activity patterns. The data we use describe the social interactions of students in a school, the associations between students and school classes, and the spatio-temporal trajectories of students over time. We show that non-negative tensor factorization is capable of recovering the class structure with high accuracy. In particular, the extracted tensor components can be validated either as known school classes, or in terms of correlated activity patterns, i.e., of spatial and temporal coincidences that are determined by the known school activity schedule.

  2. Neural correlates of active avoidance behavior in superior colliculus

    PubMed Central

    Cohen, Jeremy D.; Castro-Alamancos, Manuel A.

    2010-01-01

    Active avoidance of harmful situations seems highly adaptive, but the underlying neural mechanisms are largely unknown. Rats can effectively use the superior colliculus during active avoidance to detect a salient whisker conditioned stimulus (WCS) that signals an aversive event. Here, we recorded unit and field potential activity in the intermediate layers of the superior colliculus of rats during active avoidance behavior. During the period preceding the onset of the WCS, avoids are associated with a higher firing rate than escapes (unsuccessful avoids), indicating that a prepared superior colliculus is more likely to detect the WCS and lead to an avoid. Moreover, during the WCS, a robust ramping up of overall firing rate is observed for trials leading to avoids. The firing rate ramping is not due to shuttling, and may serve to drive downstream circuits to avoid. Therefore, a robust neural correlate of active avoidance behavior is found in the superior colliculus, emphasizing its role in the detection of salient sensory signals that require immediate action. PMID:20573897

  3. 100 s extraction of negative ion beams by using actively temperature-controlled plasma grid

    SciTech Connect

    Kojima, A. Hanada, M.; Yoshida, M.; Tobari, H.; Kashiwagi, M.; Umeda, N.; Watanabe, K.; Grisham, L. R.

    2014-02-15

    Long pulse beam extraction with a current density of 120 A/m{sup 2} for 100 s has been achieved with a newly developed plasma grid (PG) for the JT-60SA negative ion source which is designed to produce high power and long pulse beams with a negative ion current of 130 A/m{sup 2} (22 A) and a pulse length of 100 s. The PG temperature is regulated by fluorinated fluids in order to keep the high PG temperature for the cesium-seeded negative ion production. The time constant for temperature controllability of the PG was measured to be below 10 s, which was mainly determined by the heat transfer coefficient of the fluorinated fluid. The measured decay time of the negative ion current extracted from the actively temperature-controlled PG was 430 s which was sufficient for the JT-60SA requirement, and much longer than that by inertial-cooling PG of 60 s. Obtained results of the long pulse capability are utilized to design the full size PG for the JT-60SA negative ion source.

  4. Exogenous lytic activity of SPN9CC endolysin against gram-negative bacteria.

    PubMed

    Lim, Jeong-A; Shin, Hakdong; Heu, Sunggi; Ryu, Sangryeol

    2014-06-28

    Concerns over drug-resistant bacteria have stimulated interest in developing alternative methods to control bacterial infections. Endolysin, a phage-encoded enzyme that breaks down bacterial peptidoglycan at the terminal stage of the phage reproduction cycle, is reported to be effective for the control of bacterial pathogenic bacteria. Bioinformatic analysis of the SPN9CC bacteriophage genome revealed a gene that encodes an endolysin with a domain structure similar to those of the endolysins produced by the P1 and P22 coliphages. The SPN9CC endolysin was purified with a C-terminal oligo-histidine tag. The endolysin was relatively stable and active over a broad temperature range (from 24°C to 65°C). It showed maximal activity at 50°C, and its optimum pH range was from pH 7.5 to 8.5. The SPN9CC endolysin showed antimicrobial activity against only gram-negative bacteria and functioned by cutting the glycosidic bond of peptidoglycan. Interestingly, the SPN9CC endolysin could lyse intact gram-negative bacteria in the absence of EDTA as an outer membrane permeabilizer. The exogenous lytic activity of the SPN9CC endolysin makes it a potential therapeutic agent against gram-negative bacteria. PMID:24690638

  5. Nanocrosses of lead sulphate as the negative active material of lead acid batteries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Yi; Gao, Pengran; Bu, Xianfu; Kuang, Guizhi; Liu, Wei; Lei, Lixu

    2014-10-01

    Lead sulphate transforms into PbO2 and Pb in the positive and negative electrodes, respectively, when a lead acid battery is charged, thus, it is an active material. It is also generally acknowledged that sulphation results in the failure of lead acid batteries; therefore, it is very interesting to find out how to make lead sulphate more electrochemically active. Here, we demonstrate that nanocrystalline lead sulphate can be used as excellent negative active material in lead acid batteries. The lead sulphate nanocrystals, which are prepared by a facile chemical precipitation of aqueous lead acetate and sodium sulphate in a few minutes, look like crosses with diameter of each arm being 100 nm to 3 μm. The electrode is effectively formed in much shorter time than traditional technique, yet it discharges a capacity of 103 mA h g-1 at the current density of 120 mA g-1, which is 24% higher than that discharged by the electrode made from leady oxide under the same condition. During 100% DOD cycles, more than 80% of that capacity remains in 550 cycles. These results show that lead sulphate can be a nice negative active material in lead acid batteries.

  6. Drosophila protein kinase N (Pkn) is a negative regulator of actin-myosin activity during oogenesis.

    PubMed

    Ferreira, Tânia; Prudêncio, Pedro; Martinho, Rui Gonçalo

    2014-10-15

    Nurse cell dumping is an actin-myosin based process, where 15 nurse cells of a given egg chamber contract and transfer their cytoplasmic content through the ring canals into the growing oocyte. We isolated two mutant alleles of protein kinase N (pkn) and showed that Pkn negatively-regulates activation of the actin-myosin cytoskeleton during the onset of dumping. Using live-cell imaging analysis we observed that nurse cell dumping rates sharply increase during the onset of fast dumping. Such rate increase was severely impaired in pkn mutant nurse cells due to excessive nurse cell actin-myosin activity and/or loss of tissue integrity. Our work demonstrates that the transition between slow and fast dumping is a discrete event, with at least a five to six-fold dumping rate increase. We show that Pkn negatively regulates nurse cell actin-myosin activity. This is likely to be important for directional cytoplasmic flow. We propose Pkn provides a negative feedback loop to help avoid excessive contractility after local activation of Rho GTPase.

  7. Drosophila protein kinase N (Pkn) is a negative regulator of actin-myosin activity during oogenesis.

    PubMed

    Ferreira, Tânia; Prudêncio, Pedro; Martinho, Rui Gonçalo

    2014-10-15

    Nurse cell dumping is an actin-myosin based process, where 15 nurse cells of a given egg chamber contract and transfer their cytoplasmic content through the ring canals into the growing oocyte. We isolated two mutant alleles of protein kinase N (pkn) and showed that Pkn negatively-regulates activation of the actin-myosin cytoskeleton during the onset of dumping. Using live-cell imaging analysis we observed that nurse cell dumping rates sharply increase during the onset of fast dumping. Such rate increase was severely impaired in pkn mutant nurse cells due to excessive nurse cell actin-myosin activity and/or loss of tissue integrity. Our work demonstrates that the transition between slow and fast dumping is a discrete event, with at least a five to six-fold dumping rate increase. We show that Pkn negatively regulates nurse cell actin-myosin activity. This is likely to be important for directional cytoplasmic flow. We propose Pkn provides a negative feedback loop to help avoid excessive contractility after local activation of Rho GTPase. PMID:25131196

  8. Cumulative activation during positive and negative events and state anxiety predicts subsequent inertia of amygdala reactivity.

    PubMed

    Pichon, Swann; Miendlarzewska, Ewa A; Eryilmaz, Hamdi; Vuilleumier, Patrik

    2015-02-01

    Inertia, together with intensity and valence, is an important component of emotion. We tested whether positive and negative events generate lingering changes in subsequent brain responses to unrelated threat stimuli and investigated the impact of individual anxiety. We acquired fMRI data while participants watched positive or negative movie-clips and subsequently performed an unrelated task with fearful and neutral faces. We quantified changes in amygdala reactivity to fearful faces as a function of the valence of preceding movies and cumulative neural activity evoked during them. We demonstrate that amygdala responses to emotional movies spill over to subsequent processing of threat information in a valence-specific manner: negative movies enhance later amygdala activation whereas positive movies attenuate it. Critically, the magnitude of such changes is predicted by a measure of cumulative amygdala responses to the preceding positive or negative movies. These effects appear independent of overt attention, are regionally limited to amygdala, with no changes in functional connectivity. Finally, individuals with higher state anxiety displayed stronger modulation of amygdala reactivity by positive movies. These results suggest that intensity and valence of emotional events as well as anxiety levels promote local changes in amygdala sensitivity to threat, highlighting the importance of past experience in shaping future affective reactivity.

  9. Knowing good from bad: differential activation of human cortical areas by positive and negative outcomes.

    PubMed

    Nieuwenhuis, Sander; Slagter, Heleen A; von Geusau, Niels J Alting; Heslenfeld, Dirk J; Holroyd, Clay B

    2005-06-01

    Previous research has identified a component of the event-related brain potential (ERP), the feedback-related negativity, that is elicited by feedback stimuli associated with unfavourable outcomes. In the present research we used event-related functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) and electroencephalographic (EEG) recordings to test the common hypothesis that this component is generated in the caudal anterior cingulate cortex. The EEG results indicated that our paradigm, a time estimation task with trial-to-trial performance feedback, elicited a large feedback-related negativity (FRN). Nevertheless, the fMRI results did not reveal any area in the caudal anterior cingulate cortex that was differentially activated by positive and negative performance feedback, casting doubt on the notion that the FRN is generated in this brain region. In contrast, we found a number of brain areas outside the posterior medial frontal cortex that were activated more strongly by positive feedback than by negative feedback. These included areas in the rostral anterior cingulate cortex, posterior cingulate cortex, right superior frontal gyrus, and striatum. An anatomically constrained source model assuming equivalent dipole generators in the rostral anterior cingulate, posterior cingulate, and right superior frontal gyrus produced a simulated scalp distribution that corresponded closely to the observed scalp distribution of the FRN. These results support a new hypothesis regarding the neural generators of the FRN, and have important implications for the use of this component as an electrophysiological index of performance monitoring and reward processing. PMID:15978024

  10. Non-Stationary Effects and Cross Correlations in Solar Activity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nefedyev, Yuri; Panischev, Oleg; Demin, Sergey

    2016-07-01

    In this paper within the framework of the Flicker-Noise Spectroscopy (FNS) we consider the dynamic properties of the solar activity by analyzing the Zurich sunspot numbers. As is well-known astrophysics objects are the non-stationary open systems, whose evolution are the quite individual and have the alternation effects. The main difference of FNS compared to other related methods is the separation of the original signal reflecting the dynamics of solar activity into three frequency bands: system-specific "resonances" and their interferential contributions at lower frequencies, chaotic "random walk" ("irregularity-jump") components at larger frequencies, and chaotic "irregularity-spike" (inertial) components in the highest frequency range. Specific parameters corresponding to each of the bands are introduced and calculated. These irregularities as well as specific resonance frequencies are considered as the information carriers on every hierarchical level of the evolution of a complex natural system with intermittent behavior, consecutive alternation of rapid chaotic changes in the values of dynamic variables on small time intervals with small variations of the values on longer time intervals ("laminar" phases). The jump and spike irregularities are described by power spectra and difference moments (transient structural functions) of the second order. FNS allows revealing the most crucial points of the solar activity dynamics by means of "spikiness" factor. It is shown that this variable behaves as the predictor of crucial changes of the sunspot number dynamics, particularly when the number comes up to maximum value. The change of averaging interval allows revealing the non-stationary effects depending by 11-year cycle and by inside processes in a cycle. To consider the cross correlations between the different variables of solar activity we use the Zurich sunspot numbers and the sequence of corona's radiation energy. The FNS-approach allows extracting the

  11. PREX1 Protein Function Is Negatively Regulated Downstream of Receptor Tyrosine Kinase Activation by p21-activated Kinases (PAKs).

    PubMed

    Barrows, Douglas; He, John Z; Parsons, Ramon

    2016-09-16

    Downstream of receptor tyrosine kinase and G protein-coupled receptor (GPCR) stimulation, the phosphatidylinositol 3,4,5-trisphosphate (PIP3)-dependent Rac exchange factor (PREX) family of guanine nucleotide exchange factors (GEFs) activates Rho GTPases, leading to important roles for PREX proteins in numerous cellular processes and diseases, including cancer. PREX1 and PREX2 GEF activity is activated by the second messengers PIP3 and Gβγ, and further regulation of PREX GEF activity occurs by phosphorylation. Stimulation of receptor tyrosine kinases by neuregulin and insulin-like growth factor 1 (IGF1) leads to the phosphorylation of PREX1; however, the kinases that phosphorylate PREX1 downstream of these ligands are not known. We recently reported that the p21-activated kinases (PAKs), which are activated by GTP-bound Ras-related C3 botulinum toxin substrate 1 (Rac1), mediate the phosphorylation of PREX2 after insulin receptor activation. Here we show that certain phosphorylation events on PREX1 after insulin, neuregulin, and IGF1 treatment are PAK-dependent and lead to a reduction in PREX1 binding to PIP3 Like PREX2, PAK-mediated phosphorylation also negatively regulates PREX1 GEF activity. Furthermore, the onset of PREX1 phosphorylation was delayed compared with the phosphorylation of AKT, supporting a model of negative feedback downstream of PREX1 activation. We also found that the phosphorylation of PREX1 after isoproterenol and prostaglandin E2-mediated GPCR activation is partially PAK-dependent and likely also involves protein kinase A, which is known to reduce PREX1 function. Our data point to multiple mechanisms of PREX1 negative regulation by PAKs within receptor tyrosine kinase and GPCR-stimulated signaling pathways that have important roles in diseases such as diabetes and cancer. PMID:27481946

  12. Mitogen-activated protein kinase phosphatase 1 negatively regulates MAPK signaling in mouse hypothalamus.

    PubMed

    Adachi, Koichi; Goto, Motomitsu; Onoue, Takeshi; Tsunekawa, Taku; Shibata, Miyuki; Hagimoto, Shigeru; Ito, Yoshihiro; Banno, Ryoichi; Suga, Hidetaka; Sugimura, Yoshihisa; Oiso, Yutaka; Arima, Hiroshi

    2014-05-21

    Mitogen-activated protein kinase phosphatase 1 (MKP-1) is shown to negatively regulate MAPK signaling in various peripheral tissues as well as the central nervous system such as cortex, striatum and hippocampus. In this study, we examined whether MKP-1 regulates MAPK signaling in the mouse hypothalamus. Intraperitoneal injection of TNFα significantly increased MKP-1 mRNA expression in paraventricular and arcuate nuclei in the hypothalamus. TNFα treatment induced increases in MKP-1 expression at both mRNA and protein levels, accompanied by the inactivation of MAPK signaling in mouse hypothalamic explants. Inhibition of MKP-1 by its inhibitor or siRNA increased MAPK activity in the explants. Our data indicate that MKP-1 negatively regulates MAPK signaling in the mouse hypothalamus.

  13. Correlates of Chilean Adolescents’ Negative Attitudes Toward Cigarettes: The Role of Gender, Peer, Parental, and Environmental Factors

    PubMed Central

    Bares, Cristina; Delva, Jorge

    2012-01-01

    Introduction: We examined the association of peer, parental, and environmental factors with negative attitudes toward cigarettes among youth from Santiago, Chile. Methods: A total of 860 youth from Santiago, Chile, completed questions regarding their lifetime use of cigarettes, intentions to smoke, attitudes toward cigarettes, and questions that assessed peer, parental, and environmental factors. Results: For both boys and girls, peer disapproval of smoking was associated with more negative attitudes toward cigarettes and peer smoking was associated with less negative attitudes toward cigarettes. Peer pressure was significantly associated with more negative attitudes toward cigarettes for girls only. Parental smoking was associated with less negative attitudes and parental control with more negative attitudes, but these associations were significant in the overall sample only. School prevention efforts and exposure to cigarette ads were not associated with cigarette attitudes. Difficulty in accessing cigarettes was positively associated with negative attitudes for boys and girls. Conclusion: Smoking prevention efforts focus on attitude change, but scant information is available about the experiences that influence Chilean youth’s attitudes toward cigarettes. Results from the current study suggest that prevention efforts could benefit from gender-specific strategies. Girls’ but not boys’ attitudes were influenced by peer pressure. Moreover, negative attitudes toward cigarettes were associated with lower current smoking in girls only. Parental smoking was an important influence on youth’s attitudes toward cigarettes. Efforts to reduce smoking among Chilean youth may benefit from concurrently reducing parental smoking. PMID:22157230

  14. Serum melatonin in juvenile rheumatoid arthritis: correlation with disease activity.

    PubMed

    El-Awady, Hanaa Mahmoud; El-Wakkad, Amany Salah El-Dien; Saleh, Maysa Tawheed; Muhammad, Saadia Ibraheem; Ghaniema, Eiman Mahmoud

    2007-05-01

    The study was conducted to investigate the abnormalities in early morning serum melatonin among patients with Juvenile Rheumatoid Arthritis (JRA) and to outline its relation to disease activity and severity. Twenty one patients with JRA and twenty healthy age and sex matched controls were enrolled in the study. Fifteen patients had polyarticular JRA, 3 had oligoarticular and 3 had systemic onset JRA. Evaluation was carried out clinically, functionally and radiologically by using disease activity score, Juvenile Arthritis Functional Assessment Report for Children (JAFAR-C score) and modified Larsen score, respectively. Laboratory investigations included Complete Blood Picture (CBC), The Erythrocyte Sedimentation Rate (ESR), C-Reactive Protein (CRP), classic IgM Rheumatoid Factor (RF), Anti-nuclear Antibodies (ANA) and melatonin estimation in serum. The serum levels of melatonin were significantly increased in JRA patients (mean +/- SD = 13.9 +/- 8 pg mL(-1)) as compared to healthy controls (mean +/- SD = 8.1 +/- 2.7 pg mL(-1), p < 0.01). A significant positive correlation could link serum melatonin levels to disease activity scores and ESR (r = 0.91, p < 0.001 and r = 0.55, p < 0.01, respectively). No significant correlation was found between melatonin and either Larsen or JAFAR scores (r = 0.19, r = 0.15, respectively). According to melatonin levels, there were 2 groups of patients: Group I with elevated melatonin level (more than 11 pg mL(-1)) (n = 15) and group II with normal melatonin level (less than 11 pg mL(-1)) (n = 6). Patients with elevated melatonin levels had higher ESR (p < 0.05), higher disease activity scores (p < 0.01) and Larsen scores (p < 0.05), than the group of patients with normal serum melatonin. The results of GAFAR scores were comparable between the two groups (p > 0.05). Hence the study conclude that the elevated melatonin levels among JRA patients with active synovitis and its close relation to disease activity rather than disease severity

  15. Autoinducer-2 activity of gram-negative foodborne pathogenic bacteria and its influence on biofilm formation.

    PubMed

    Yoon, Y; Sofos, J N

    2008-04-01

    This study evaluated whether autoinducer-2 (AI-2) activity would be associated with biofilm formation by Salmonella and Escherichia coli O157:H7 strains on food contact surfaces. In study I, a Salmonella Typhimurium DT104 strain and an E. coli O157:H7 strain, both AI-2 positive, were individually inoculated into 50 mL of Luria-Bertani (LB) or LB + 0.5% glucose (LBG) broth, without or with stainless steel or polypropylene (Salmonella) coupons. At 0, 14 (Salmonella), 24, 48, and 72 h of storage (25 degrees C), cells in suspension and detached cells from the coupons, obtained by vortexing, were enumerated on tryptic soy agar. In study II, a Salmonella Thompson AI-2-positive strain and an AI-2-negative strain, and an E. coli O157:H7 AI-2-positive strain and an AI-2-negative strain were inoculated into LB broth with stainless steel coupons. Cells were enumerated as in study I. In both studies, AI-2 activity was determined in cell-free supernatants. Cell numbers of S. Typhimurium DT104 on biofilms were higher (P < 0.05) in LB than those in LBG, while the E. coli O157:H7 strain showed no difference (P>or= 0.05) in biofilm cell counts between LB and LBG after storage for 72 h. Both S. Typhimurium DT104 and E. coli O157:H7 strains produced higher (P < 0.05) AI-2 activity in LBG than LB cell suspensions. Cell counts of AI-2-positive and-negative S. Thompson and E. coli O157:H7 strains were not different (P>or= 0.05) within suspensions or coupons (study II). The results indicated that, under the conditions of this study, AI-2 activity of the pathogen strains tested may not have a major influence on biofilm formation on food contact surfaces, which was similar between AI-2-positive and -negative strains.

  16. The facial massage reduced anxiety and negative mood status, and increased sympathetic nervous activity.

    PubMed

    Hatayama, Tomoko; Kitamura, Shingo; Tamura, Chihiro; Nagano, Mayumi; Ohnuki, Koichiro

    2008-12-01

    The aim of this study was to clarify the effects of 45 min of facial massage on the activity of autonomic nervous system, anxiety and mood in 32 healthy women. Autonomic nervous activity was assessed by heart rate variability (HRV) with spectral analysis. In the spectral analysis of HRV, we evaluated the high-frequency components (HF) and the low- to high-frequency ratio (LF/HF ratio), reflecting parasympathetic nervous activity and sympathetic nervous activity, respectively. The State Trait Anxiety Inventory (STAI) and the Profile of Mood Status (POMS) were administered to evaluate psychological status. The score of STAI and negative scale of POMS were significantly reduced following the massage, and only the LF/HF ratio was significantly enhanced after the massage. It was concluded that the facial massage might refresh the subjects by reducing their psychological distress and activating the sympathetic nervous system.

  17. Cerebral activation is correlated to regional atrophy of the spinal cord and functional motor disability in spinal cord injured individuals.

    PubMed

    Lundell, H; Christensen, M S; Barthélemy, D; Willerslev-Olsen, M; Biering-Sørensen, F; Nielsen, J B

    2011-01-15

    Recovery of function following lesions in the nervous system requires adaptive changes in surviving circuitries. Here we investigate whether changes in cerebral activation are correlated to spinal cord atrophy and recovery of functionality in individuals with incomplete spinal cord injury (SCI). 19 chronic SCI individuals and 7 age-comparable controls underwent functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) while performing rhythmic dorsiflexion of the ankle. A significant negative correlation was found between the activation in the ipsilateral motor (M1) and bilateral premotor cortex (PMC) on one hand and the functional ability of the SCI participants measured by the clinical motor score on the other. There was no significant correlation between activation in any other cerebral area and the motor score. Activation in ipsilateral somatosensory cortex (S1), M1 and PMC was negatively correlated to the width of the spinal cord in the left-right direction, where the corticospinal tract is located, but not in the antero-posterior direction. There was a tendency for a negative correlation between cerebral activation in ipsilateral S1, M1 and PMC and the amplitude of motor evoked potentials in the tibialis anterior muscle elicited by transcranial magnetic stimulation, but this did not reach statistical significance. There was no correlation between motor score or spinal cord dimensions and the volume of the cortical motor areas. The observations show that lesion of descending tracts in the lateral part of the spinal cord results in increased activation in ipsilateral motor and sensory areas, which may help to compensate for the functional deficit following SCI. PMID:20851198

  18. Influence of sleep on genioglossus muscle activation by negative pressure in normal men.

    PubMed

    Wheatley, J R; Mezzanotte, W S; Tangel, D J; White, D P

    1993-09-01

    An important mechanism controlling genioglossus (GG) muscle activity is the reflex response to negative airway pressure. We hypothesize that this reflex response may be lost during sleep and believe that this loss may be important in the pathogenesis of airway collapse during sleep. Thus, we determined the effect of non-rapid eye movement (NREM) sleep on the GG electromyogram (EMG) response to brief (0.2 to 0.6 s) episodes of negative pressure generation (NPG) in the upper airway of six normal subjects. Up to 100 NPGs (mean 58 +/- 12) were recorded both awake and during stable NREM sleep. During wakefulness, the change in GG moving time average EMG from basal to peak levels (during NPG) was 17.1 +/- 2.5 au (a 154 +/- 22% increase above basal levels). This response was markedly reduced during NREM sleep (2.7 +/- 1.2 au; p < 0.01). The latency of the GG EMG response was 53.8 +/- 11.5 ms during wakefulness (n = 6), but much longer during sleep (132.7 +/- 24.5 ms; n = 3; p < 0.03). We conclude that in normal subjects (1) the GG muscle responds to negative airway pressure by reflex activation during wakefulness, and (2) this reflex activation is reduced or lost during NREM sleep. We speculate that loss of this mechanism during sleep may contribute to pharyngeal collapse in obstructive apnea patients.

  19. Stereotype validation: the effects of activating negative stereotypes after intellectual performance.

    PubMed

    Clark, Jason K; Thiem, Kelsey C; Barden, Jamie; Stuart, Jillian O'Rourke; Evans, Abigail T

    2015-04-01

    With regard to intellectual performance, a large body of research has shown that stigmatized group members may perform more poorly when negative, self-relevant stereotypes become activated prior to a task. However, no research to date has identified the potential ramifications of stereotype activation that happens after-rather than before-a person has finished performing. Six studies examined how postperformance stereotype salience may increase the certainty individuals have in evaluations of their own performance. In the current research, the accessibility of gender or racial stereotypes was manipulated after participants completed either a difficult math test (Studies 1-5) or a test of child-care knowledge (Study 6). Consistent with predictions, stereotype activation was found to increase the certainty that women (Studies 1, 2, 4, and 5), African Americans (Study 3), and men (Study 6) had toward negative evaluations of their own test performance. These effects emerged when performance-related perceptions were stereotype consistent rather than inconsistent (Studies 1-6) and were found to be most pronounced among those who were highly identified with the stereotyped group (Study 5). Furthermore, greater certainty-triggered by negative stereotypes-predicted lowered domain-relevant beliefs (Studies 1, 2, 3, and 6) and differential exposure to domain-relevant stimuli (Studies 4 and 5).

  20. Stereotype validation: the effects of activating negative stereotypes after intellectual performance.

    PubMed

    Clark, Jason K; Thiem, Kelsey C; Barden, Jamie; Stuart, Jillian O'Rourke; Evans, Abigail T

    2015-04-01

    With regard to intellectual performance, a large body of research has shown that stigmatized group members may perform more poorly when negative, self-relevant stereotypes become activated prior to a task. However, no research to date has identified the potential ramifications of stereotype activation that happens after-rather than before-a person has finished performing. Six studies examined how postperformance stereotype salience may increase the certainty individuals have in evaluations of their own performance. In the current research, the accessibility of gender or racial stereotypes was manipulated after participants completed either a difficult math test (Studies 1-5) or a test of child-care knowledge (Study 6). Consistent with predictions, stereotype activation was found to increase the certainty that women (Studies 1, 2, 4, and 5), African Americans (Study 3), and men (Study 6) had toward negative evaluations of their own test performance. These effects emerged when performance-related perceptions were stereotype consistent rather than inconsistent (Studies 1-6) and were found to be most pronounced among those who were highly identified with the stereotyped group (Study 5). Furthermore, greater certainty-triggered by negative stereotypes-predicted lowered domain-relevant beliefs (Studies 1, 2, 3, and 6) and differential exposure to domain-relevant stimuli (Studies 4 and 5). PMID:25844573

  1. Correlation between Cortical State and Locus Coeruleus Activity: Implications for Sensory Coding in Rat Barrel Cortex

    PubMed Central

    Fazlali, Zeinab; Ranjbar-Slamloo, Yadollah; Adibi, Mehdi; Arabzadeh, Ehsan

    2016-01-01

    Cortical state modulates the background activity of cortical neurons, and their evoked response to sensory stimulation. Multiple mechanisms are involved in switching between cortical states including various neuromodulatory systems. Locus Coeruleus (LC) is one of the major neuromodulatory nuclei in the brainstem with widespread projections throughout the brain and modulates the activity of cells and networks. Here, we quantified the link between the LC spontaneous activity, cortical state and sensory processing in the rat vibrissal somatosensory “barrel” cortex (BC). We simultaneously recorded unit activity from LC and BC along with prefrontal electroencephalogram (EEG) while presenting brief whisker deflections under urethane anesthesia. The ratio of low to high frequency components of EEG (referred to as the L/H ratio) was employed to identify cortical state. We found that the spontaneous activity of LC units exhibited a negative correlation with the L/H ratio. Cross-correlation analysis revealed that changes in LC firing preceded changes in the cortical state: the correlation of the LC firing profile with the L/H ratio was maximal at an average lag of −1.2 s. We further quantified BC neuronal responses to whisker stimulation during the synchronized and desynchronized states. In the desynchronized state, BC neurons showed lower stimulus detection threshold, higher response fidelity, and shorter response latency. The most prominent change was observed in the late phase of BC evoked activity (100–400 ms post stimulus onset): almost every BC unit exhibited a greater late response during the desynchronized state. Categorization of the BC evoked responses based on LC activity (into high and low LC discharge rates) resulted in highly similar response profiles compared to categorization based on the cortical state (low and high L/H ratios). These findings provide evidence for the involvement of the LC neuromodulatory system in desynchronization of cortical state

  2. An Investigation of the Relationship between the Fear of Receiving Negative Criticism and of Taking Academic Risk through Canonical Correlation Analysis

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cetin, Bayram; Ilhan, Mustafa; Yilmaz, Ferat

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this study is to examine the relationship between the fear of receiving negative criticism and taking academic risk through canonical correlation analysis-in which a relational model was used. The participants of the study consisted of 215 university students enrolled in various programs at Dicle University's Ziya Gökalp Faculty of…

  3. Study of the lipidemic profile of diabetic patients. Negative correlation of cholesterol levels of diabetes type I patients with serum amylase concentration.

    PubMed

    Eleftheriou, Phaedra; Tseka, Eros; Varaga, Evagelia; Nasiou, Margarita; Sampanis, Christos; Zografou, Ioanna; Oulorgia, Jensila; Damontsidou, Katerina; Zaimi, Terpsithea; Markou, Helen-Irene; Varsamidis, Kostantinos; Petrou, Christos; Limberaki, Eugenia; Ganou, Christina-Joulia

    2014-01-01

    , triglyceride values were within normal range in both cases (123.7±63.2mg/dL in DM1 and 168.1±76.0mg/dL in DM2 patients). Cortisol levels were elevated in both cases with higher values observed in Diabetes type I (280.5±162.9ng/mL in DM1 and 248.5±100.1ng/mL in DM2), while total antioxidant capacity was significantly reduced compared to healthy individuals, 1.470mM, with lower values observed in Diabetes type I (0.680±0.116mM in DM1 and 0.849±0.126mM in DM2). Amylase determination revealed a mean amylase value, 81.7U/ml, within normal range and a negative correlation between cholesterol levels and amylase (r=-0.770) in DM1 patients. No correlation was observed between the determined values or the presence of autoantibodies and antibodies against Neu5Gc in the samples. In conlusion, the lipidemic profile and overall atherogenic and cardiovascular risk factors were worse in Diabetes I compared to Diabetes II patients. Most interestingly, cholesterol levels exhibited a negative correlation with serum amylase values. Since, amylase is not known to be involved in lipid metabolism, cholesterol levels and serum amylase activity may have a common modulator related to Diabetes development. PMID:24392467

  4. Error-Related Activity and Correlates of Grammatical Plasticity

    PubMed Central

    Davidson, Doug J.; Indefrey, Peter

    2011-01-01

    Cognitive control involves not only the ability to manage competing task demands, but also the ability to adapt task performance during learning. This study investigated how violation-, response-, and feedback-related electrophysiological (EEG) activity changes over time during language learning. Twenty-two Dutch learners of German classified short prepositional phrases presented serially as text. The phrases were initially presented without feedback during a pre-test phase, and then with feedback in a training phase on two separate days spaced 1 week apart. The stimuli included grammatically correct phrases, as well as grammatical violations of gender and declension. Without feedback, participants’ classification was near chance and did not improve over trials. During training with feedback, behavioral classification improved and violation responses appeared to both types of violation in the form of a P600. Feedback-related negative and positive components were also present from the first day of training. The results show changes in the electrophysiological responses in concert with improving behavioral discrimination, suggesting that the activity is related to grammar learning. PMID:21960979

  5. Pre-Activation Negativity (PrAN) in Brain Potentials to Unfolding Words

    PubMed Central

    Söderström, Pelle; Horne, Merle; Frid, Johan; Roll, Mikael

    2016-01-01

    We describe an event-related potential (ERP) effect termed the “pre-activation negativity” (PrAN), which is proposed to index the degree of pre-activation of upcoming word-internal morphemes in speech processing. Using lexical competition measures based on word-initial speech fragments (WIFs), as well as statistical analyses of ERP data from three experiments, it is shown that the PrAN is sensitive to lexical competition and that it reflects the degree of predictive certainty: the negativity is larger when there are fewer upcoming lexical competitors. PMID:27777558

  6. Brain activity associated with illusory correlations in animal phobia.

    PubMed

    Wiemer, Julian; Schulz, Stefan M; Reicherts, Philipp; Glotzbach-Schoon, Evelyn; Andreatta, Marta; Pauli, Paul

    2015-07-01

    Anxiety disorder patients were repeatedly found to overestimate the association between disorder-relevant stimuli and aversive outcomes despite random contingencies. Such an illusory correlation (IC) might play an important role in the return of fear after extinction learning; yet, little is known about how this cognitive bias emerges in the brain. In a functional magnetic resonance imaging study, 18 female patients with spider phobia and 18 healthy controls were exposed to pictures of spiders, mushrooms and puppies followed randomly by either a painful electrical shock or nothing. In advance, both patients and healthy controls expected more shocks after spider pictures. Importantly, only patients with spider phobia continued to overestimate this association after the experiment. The strength of this IC was predicted by increased outcome aversiveness ratings and primary sensory motor cortex activity in response to the shock after spider pictures. Moreover, increased activation of the left dorsolateral prefrontal cortex (dlPFC) to spider pictures predicted the IC. These results support the theory that phobia-relevant stimuli amplify unpleasantness and sensory motor representations of aversive stimuli, which in turn may promote their overestimation. Hyper-activity in dlPFC possibly reflects a pre-occupation of executive resources with phobia-relevant stimuli, thus complicating the accurate monitoring of objective contingencies and the unlearning of fear.

  7. Brain activity associated with illusory correlations in animal phobia.

    PubMed

    Wiemer, Julian; Schulz, Stefan M; Reicherts, Philipp; Glotzbach-Schoon, Evelyn; Andreatta, Marta; Pauli, Paul

    2015-07-01

    Anxiety disorder patients were repeatedly found to overestimate the association between disorder-relevant stimuli and aversive outcomes despite random contingencies. Such an illusory correlation (IC) might play an important role in the return of fear after extinction learning; yet, little is known about how this cognitive bias emerges in the brain. In a functional magnetic resonance imaging study, 18 female patients with spider phobia and 18 healthy controls were exposed to pictures of spiders, mushrooms and puppies followed randomly by either a painful electrical shock or nothing. In advance, both patients and healthy controls expected more shocks after spider pictures. Importantly, only patients with spider phobia continued to overestimate this association after the experiment. The strength of this IC was predicted by increased outcome aversiveness ratings and primary sensory motor cortex activity in response to the shock after spider pictures. Moreover, increased activation of the left dorsolateral prefrontal cortex (dlPFC) to spider pictures predicted the IC. These results support the theory that phobia-relevant stimuli amplify unpleasantness and sensory motor representations of aversive stimuli, which in turn may promote their overestimation. Hyper-activity in dlPFC possibly reflects a pre-occupation of executive resources with phobia-relevant stimuli, thus complicating the accurate monitoring of objective contingencies and the unlearning of fear. PMID:25411452

  8. Brain activity associated with illusory correlations in animal phobia

    PubMed Central

    Wiemer, Julian; Schulz, Stefan M.; Reicherts, Philipp; Glotzbach-Schoon, Evelyn; Andreatta, Marta

    2015-01-01

    Anxiety disorder patients were repeatedly found to overestimate the association between disorder-relevant stimuli and aversive outcomes despite random contingencies. Such an illusory correlation (IC) might play an important role in the return of fear after extinction learning; yet, little is known about how this cognitive bias emerges in the brain. In a functional magnetic resonance imaging study, 18 female patients with spider phobia and 18 healthy controls were exposed to pictures of spiders, mushrooms and puppies followed randomly by either a painful electrical shock or nothing. In advance, both patients and healthy controls expected more shocks after spider pictures. Importantly, only patients with spider phobia continued to overestimate this association after the experiment. The strength of this IC was predicted by increased outcome aversiveness ratings and primary sensory motor cortex activity in response to the shock after spider pictures. Moreover, increased activation of the left dorsolateral prefrontal cortex (dlPFC) to spider pictures predicted the IC. These results support the theory that phobia-relevant stimuli amplify unpleasantness and sensory motor representations of aversive stimuli, which in turn may promote their overestimation. Hyper-activity in dlPFC possibly reflects a pre-occupation of executive resources with phobia-relevant stimuli, thus complicating the accurate monitoring of objective contingencies and the unlearning of fear. PMID:25411452

  9. Autonomic nervous system reactivity to positive and negative mood induction: The role of acute psychological responses and frontal electrocortical activity

    PubMed Central

    Kop, Willem J.; Synowski, Stephen J.; Newell, Miranda E.; Schmidt, Louis A.; Waldstein, Shari R.; Fox, Nathan A.

    2011-01-01

    The differential effects of positive versus negative emotions on autonomic nervous system activity are insufficiently understood. This study examined the role of acute mood responses and central nervous system activity on heart rate variability (HRV) using 5-min event recall tasks (happiness and anger recall) and a 5-min Stroop Color Word Test (SCWT) in 20 healthy individuals (mean age 25±4 years, 55% female). HRV was measured in high frequency (HF) and low frequency (LF) domains, and frontal brain activity using electroencephalography (EEG) in the alpha frequency band in F3 and F4. Happiness Recall resulted in increased LF-HRV (p=0.005) but not HF-HRV (p=0.71). Anger Recall did not change HRV (p-values>0.10). The SCWT produced decreases in HF-HRV (p=0.001) as well as LF-HRV (p=0.001). The magnitude of feeling “happy” during Happiness Recall was positively correlated with ΔHF-HRV (p=0.050), whereas an incongruent mood state (“frustrated”) was associated with smaller ΔHF-HRV (p=0.070). Associations between frontal EEG activation and HRV responses were mostly non-significant, except for increased right frontal activation during Happiness Recall which was associated with a decrease in LF/HF ratio (p = 0.009), It is concluded that positive and negative mood induction result in differential HRV responses, which is related to both task valence and the intensity of task-induced emotions. PMID:21182891

  10. Negative feedback regulation and desensitization of insulin- and epidermal growth factor-stimulated p21ras activation.

    PubMed

    Langlois, W J; Sasaoka, T; Saltiel, A R; Olefsky, J M

    1995-10-27

    Insulin and epidermal growth factor receptors transmit signals for cell proliferation and gene regulation through formation of active GTP-bound p21ras mediated by the guanine nucleotide exchange factor Sos. Sos is constitutively bound to the adaptor protein Grb2 and growth factor stimulation induces association of the Grb2/Sos complex with Shc and movement of Sos to the plasma membrane location of p21ras. Insulin or epidermal growth factor stimulation induces a rapid increase in p21ras levels, but after several minutes levels decline toward basal despite ongoing hormone stimulation. Here we show that deactivation of p21ras correlates closely with phosphorylation of Sos and dissociation of Sos from Grb2, and that inhibition of mitogen-activated protein (MAP) kinase kinase (also known as extracellular signal-related kinase (ERK) kinase, or MEK) blocks both events, resulting in prolonged p21ras activation. These data suggest that a negative feedback loop exists whereby activation of the Raf/MEK/MAP kinase cascade by p21ras causes Sos phosphorylation and, therefore, Sos/Grb2 dissociation, limiting the duration of p21ras activation by growth factors. A serine/threonine kinase downstream of MEK (probably MAP kinase) mediates this desensitization feedback pathway.

  11. Phonetic Measures of Reduced Tongue Movement Correlate with Negative Symptom Severity in Hospitalized Patients with First-Episode Schizophrenia-Spectrum Disorders

    PubMed Central

    Covington, Michael A.; Lunden, S.L. Anya; Cristofaro, Sarah L.; Wan, Claire Ramsay; Bailey, C. Thomas; Broussard, Beth; Fogarty, Robert; Johnson, Stephanie; Zhang, Shayi; Compton, Michael T.

    2012-01-01

    Background Aprosody, or flattened speech intonation, is a recognized negative symptom of schizophrenia, though it has rarely been studied from a linguistic/phonological perspective. To bring the latest advances in computational linguistics to the phenomenology of schizophrenia and related psychotic disorders, a clinical first-episode psychosis research team joined with a phonetics/computational linguistics team to conduct a preliminary, proof-of-concept study. Methods Video recordings from a semi-structured clinical research interview were available from 47 first-episode psychosis patients. Audio tracks of the video recordings were extracted, and after review of quality, 25 recordings were available for phonetic analysis. These files were de-noised and a trained phonologist extracted a 1-minute sample of each patient’s speech. WaveSurfer 1.8.5 was used to create, from each speech sample, a file of formant values (F0, F1, F2, where F0 is the fundamental frequency and F1 and F2 are resonance bands indicating the moment-by-moment shape of the oral cavity). Variability in these phonetic indices was correlated with severity of Positive and Negative Syndrome Scale negative symptom scores using Pearson correlations. Results A measure of variability of tongue front-to-back position—the standard deviation of F2—was statistically significantly correlated with the severity of negative symptoms (r=−0.446, p=0.03). Conclusion This study demonstrates a statistically significant and meaningful correlation between negative symptom severity and phonetically measured reductions in tongue movements during speech in a sample of first-episode patients just initiating treatment. Further studies of negative symptoms, applying computational linguistics methods, are warranted. PMID:23102940

  12. Brain activity correlates with emotional perception induced by dynamic avatars.

    PubMed

    Goldberg, Hagar; Christensen, Andrea; Flash, Tamar; Giese, Martin A; Malach, Rafael

    2015-11-15

    An accurate judgment of the emotional state of others is a prerequisite for successful social interaction and hence survival. Thus, it is not surprising that we are highly skilled at recognizing the emotions of others. Here we aimed to examine the neuronal correlates of emotion recognition from gait. To this end we created highly controlled dynamic body-movement stimuli based on real human motion-capture data (Roether et al., 2009). These animated avatars displayed gait in four emotional (happy, angry, fearful, and sad) and speed-matched neutral styles. For each emotional gait and its equivalent neutral gait, avatars were displayed at five morphing levels between the two. Subjects underwent fMRI scanning while classifying the emotions and the emotional intensity levels expressed by the avatars. Our results revealed robust brain selectivity to emotional compared to neutral gait stimuli in brain regions which are involved in emotion and biological motion processing, such as the extrastriate body area (EBA), fusiform body area (FBA), superior temporal sulcus (STS), and the amygdala (AMG). Brain activity in the amygdala reflected emotional awareness: for visually identical stimuli it showed amplified stronger response when the stimulus was perceived as emotional. Notably, in avatars gradually morphed along an emotional expression axis there was a parametric correlation between amygdala activity and emotional intensity. This study extends the mapping of emotional decoding in the human brain to the domain of highly controlled dynamic biological motion. Our results highlight an extensive level of brain processing of emotional information related to body language, which relies mostly on body kinematics. PMID:26220746

  13. The transcription factor GFI1 negatively regulates NLRP3 inflammasome activation in macrophages.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Liuluan; Meng, Qingcai; Liang, Shuntao; Ma, Yaluan; Li, Rui; Li, Guoli; Zeng, Hui

    2014-11-28

    Interleukin-1β (IL-1β) secretion downstream of Toll-like receptor (TLR) activation is tightly controlled at the transcriptional and post-translational levels. NLRP3 inflammasome is involved in the maturation of pro-IL-1β, with NLRP3 expression identified as the limiting factor for inflammasome activation. Previously, we had demonstrated that the zinc-finger protein GFI1 inhibits pro-IL-1β transcription. Here, we show that GFI1 inhibits NLRP3 inflammasome activation and IL-1β secretion in macrophages. GFI1 suppressed Nlrp3 transcription via two mechanisms: (1) by binding to the Gli-responsive element 1 (GRE1) in the Nlrp3 promoter; and (2) by antagonizing the nuclear factor-κB (NF-κB) transcriptional activity. Thus, GFI1 negatively regulates TLR-mediated IL-1β production at both transcriptional and post-translational levels.

  14. Structural Insights Lead to a Negamycin Analogue with Improved Antimicrobial Activity against Gram-Negative Pathogens

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Negamycin is a natural product with antibacterial activity against a broad range of Gram-negative pathogens. Recent revelation of its ribosomal binding site and mode of inhibition has reinvigorated efforts to identify improved analogues with clinical potential. Translation-inhibitory potency and antimicrobial activity upon modification of different moieties of negamycin were in line with its observed ribosomal binding conformation, reaffirming stringent structural requirements for activity. However, substitutions on the N6 amine were tolerated and led to N6-(3-aminopropyl)-negamycin (31f), an analogue showing 4-fold improvement in antibacterial activity against key bacterial pathogens. This represents the most potent negamycin derivative to date and may be a stepping stone toward clinical development of this novel antibacterial class. PMID:26288696

  15. Bioengineered Nisin A Derivatives with Enhanced Activity against Both Gram Positive and Gram Negative Pathogens

    PubMed Central

    Field, Des; Begley, Maire; O’Connor, Paula M.; Daly, Karen M.; Hugenholtz, Floor; Cotter, Paul D.; Hill, Colin; Ross, R. Paul

    2012-01-01

    Nisin is a bacteriocin widely utilized in more than 50 countries as a safe and natural antibacterial food preservative. It is the most extensively studied bacteriocin, having undergone decades of bioengineering with a view to improving function and physicochemical properties. The discovery of novel nisin variants with enhanced activity against clinical and foodborne pathogens has recently been described. We screened a randomized bank of nisin A producers and identified a variant with a serine to glycine change at position 29 (S29G), with enhanced efficacy against S. aureus SA113. Using a site-saturation mutagenesis approach we generated three more derivatives (S29A, S29D and S29E) with enhanced activity against a range of Gram positive drug resistant clinical, veterinary and food pathogens. In addition, a number of the nisin S29 derivatives displayed superior antimicrobial activity to nisin A when assessed against a range of Gram negative food-associated pathogens, including E. coli, Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium and Cronobacter sakazakii. This is the first report of derivatives of nisin, or indeed any lantibiotic, with enhanced antimicrobial activity against both Gram positive and Gram negative bacteria. PMID:23056510

  16. SPTLC1 binds ABCA1 to negatively regulate trafficking and cholesterol efflux activity of the transporter.

    PubMed

    Tamehiro, Norimasa; Zhou, Suiping; Okuhira, Keiichiro; Benita, Yair; Brown, Cari E; Zhuang, Debbie Z; Latz, Eicke; Hornemann, Thorsten; von Eckardstein, Arnold; Xavier, Ramnik J; Freeman, Mason W; Fitzgerald, Michael L

    2008-06-10

    ABCA1 transport of cholesterol and phospholipids to nascent HDL particles plays a central role in lipoprotein metabolism and macrophage cholesterol homeostasis. ABCA1 activity is regulated both at the transcriptional level and at the post-translational level. To explore mechanisms involved in the post-translational regulation of the transporter, we have used affinity purification and mass spectrometry to identify proteins that bind ABCA1 and influence its activity. Previously, we demonstrated that an interaction between beta1-syntrophin stimulated ABCA1 activity, at least in part, be slowing the degradation of the transporter. This work demonstrates that one subunit of the serine palmitoyltransferase enzyme, SPTLC1, but not subunit 2 (SPTLC2), is copurified with ABCA1 and negatively regulates its function. In human THP-I macrophages and in mouse liver, the ABCA1-SPTLC1 complex was detected by co-immunoprecipitation, demonstrating that the interaction occurs in cellular settings where ABCA1 activity is critical for HDL genesis. Pharmacologic inhibition of SPTLC1 with myriocin, which resulted in the disruption of the SPTLC1-ABCA1 complex, and siRNA knockdown of SPTLC1 expression both stimulated ABCA1 efflux by nearly 60% ( p < 0.05). In contrast, dominant-negative mutants of SPTLC1 inhibited ABCA1 efflux, indicating that a reduced level of sphingomyelin synthesis could not explain the effect of myriocin on ABCA1 activity. In 293 cells, the SPTLC1 inhibition of ABCA1 activity led to the blockade of the exit of ABCA1 from the endoplasmic reticulum. In contrast, myriocin treatment of macrophages increased the level of cell surface ABCA1. In composite, these results indicate that the physical interaction of ABCA1 and SPTLC1 results in reduction of ABCA1 activity and that inhibition of this interaction produces enhanced cholesterol efflux. PMID:18484747

  17. Gremlin-1 Overexpression in Mouse Lung Reduces Silica-Induced Lymphocyte Recruitment – A Link to Idiopathic Pulmonary Fibrosis through Negative Correlation with CXCL10 Chemokine

    PubMed Central

    Koli, Katri; Sutinen, Eva; Rönty, Mikko; Rantakari, Pia; Fortino, Vittorio; Pulkkinen, Ville; Greco, Dario; Sipilä, Petra; Myllärniemi, Marjukka

    2016-01-01

    Idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis (IPF) is characterized by activation and injury of epithelial cells, the accumulation of connective tissue and changes in the inflammatory microenvironment. The bone morphogenetic protein (BMP) inhibitor protein gremlin-1 is associated with the progression of fibrosis both in human and mouse lung. We generated a transgenic mouse model expressing gremlin-1 in type II lung epithelial cells using the surfactant protein C (SPC) promoter and the Cre-LoxP system. Gremlin-1 protein expression was detected specifically in the lung after birth and did not result in any signs of respiratory insufficiency. Exposure to silicon dioxide resulted in reduced amounts of lymphocyte aggregates in transgenic lungs while no alteration in the fibrotic response was observed. Microarray gene expression profiling and analyses of bronchoalveolar lavage fluid cytokines indicated a reduced lymphocytic response and a downregulation of interferon-induced gene program. Consistent with reduced Th1 response, there was a downregulation of the mRNA and protein expression of the anti-fibrotic chemokine CXCL10, which has been linked to IPF. In human IPF patient samples we also established a strong negative correlation in the mRNA expression levels of gremlin-1 and CXCL10. Our results suggest that in addition to regulation of epithelial-mesenchymal crosstalk during tissue injury, gremlin-1 modulates inflammatory cell recruitment and anti-fibrotic chemokine production in the lung. PMID:27428020

  18. Gremlin-1 Overexpression in Mouse Lung Reduces Silica-Induced Lymphocyte Recruitment - A Link to Idiopathic Pulmonary Fibrosis through Negative Correlation with CXCL10 Chemokine.

    PubMed

    Koli, Katri; Sutinen, Eva; Rönty, Mikko; Rantakari, Pia; Fortino, Vittorio; Pulkkinen, Ville; Greco, Dario; Sipilä, Petra; Myllärniemi, Marjukka

    2016-01-01

    Idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis (IPF) is characterized by activation and injury of epithelial cells, the accumulation of connective tissue and changes in the inflammatory microenvironment. The bone morphogenetic protein (BMP) inhibitor protein gremlin-1 is associated with the progression of fibrosis both in human and mouse lung. We generated a transgenic mouse model expressing gremlin-1 in type II lung epithelial cells using the surfactant protein C (SPC) promoter and the Cre-LoxP system. Gremlin-1 protein expression was detected specifically in the lung after birth and did not result in any signs of respiratory insufficiency. Exposure to silicon dioxide resulted in reduced amounts of lymphocyte aggregates in transgenic lungs while no alteration in the fibrotic response was observed. Microarray gene expression profiling and analyses of bronchoalveolar lavage fluid cytokines indicated a reduced lymphocytic response and a downregulation of interferon-induced gene program. Consistent with reduced Th1 response, there was a downregulation of the mRNA and protein expression of the anti-fibrotic chemokine CXCL10, which has been linked to IPF. In human IPF patient samples we also established a strong negative correlation in the mRNA expression levels of gremlin-1 and CXCL10. Our results suggest that in addition to regulation of epithelial-mesenchymal crosstalk during tissue injury, gremlin-1 modulates inflammatory cell recruitment and anti-fibrotic chemokine production in the lung. PMID:27428020

  19. Correlation between pedometer and the Global Physical Activity Questionnaire on physical activity measurement in office workers

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background This study aimed to examine the correlation of physical activity levels assessed by pedometer and those by the Global Physical Activity Questionnaire (GPAQ) in a population of office workers. Methods A cross-sectional study was conducted on 320 office workers. A self-administered questionnaire was distributed to each office worker by hand. Physical activity level was objectively assessed by a pedometer for 7 consecutive days and subjectively assessed by the GPAQ. Based on the pedometer and GPAQ outcomes, participants were classified into 3 groups: inactive, moderately active, and highly active. Results No correlation in the physical activity level assessed by the pedometer and GPAQ was found (rs = .08, P = 0.15). When considering the pedometer as the criterion for comparison, 65.3% of participants had underestimated their physical activity level using the GPAQ, whereas 9.3% of participants overestimated their physical activity level. Conclusions Physical activity level in office workers assessed by a subjective measure was greatly different from assessed by an objective tool. Consequently, research on physical activity level, especially in those with sedentary lifestyle, should consider using an objective measure to ensure that it closely reflects a person’s physical activity level. PMID:24886593

  20. Infants of Depressed and Nondepressed Mothers Exhibit Differences in Frontal Brain Electrical Activity during the Expression of Negative Emotions.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dawson, Geraldine; And Others

    1997-01-01

    Examined electrical brain activity during negative and positive emotion expression in infants of depressed and nondepressed mothers. Found that, compared with infants of nondepressed mothers, infants of depressed mothers exhibited increased EEG activation in the frontal but not parietal region when expressing negative emotions. There were no…

  1. Brazilian Propolis: Correlation Between Chemical Composition and Antimicrobial Activity

    PubMed Central

    Salomão, Kelly; Pereira, Paulo Roberto S.; Campos, Leila C.; Borba, Cintia M.; Cabello, Pedro H.; Marcucci, Maria Cristina

    2008-01-01

    The chemical composition of ethanol extracts from samples of Brazilian propolis (EEPs) determined by HPLC and their activity against Trypanosoma cruzi, Staphylococcus aureus, Streptococcus pneumoniae, Klebisiella pneumoniae, Candida albicans, Sporothrix schenckii and Paracoccidioides brasiliensis were determined. Based on the predominant botanical origin in the region of samples' collection, the 10 extracts were separated into three groups: A (B. dracunculifolia + Auraucaria spp), B (B. dracunculifolia) and C (Araucaria spp). Analysis by the multiple regression of all the extracts together showed a positive correlation, higher concentrations leading to higher biological effect, of S. aureus with p-coumaric acid (PCUM) and 3-(4-hydroxy-3-(oxo-butenyl)-phenylacrylic acid (DHCA1) and of trypomastigotes of T. cruzi with 3,5-diprenyl-4-hydroxycinnamic acid derivative 4 (DHCA4) and 2,2-dimethyl-6-carboxyethenyl-2H-1-benzopyran (DCBEN). When the same approach was employed for each group, due to the small number of observations, the statistical test gave unreliable results. However, an overall analysis revealed for group A an association of S. aureus with caffeic acid (CAF) and dicaffeoylquinic acid 3 (CAFQ3), of S. pneumoniae with CAFQ3 and monocaffeoylquinic acid 2 (CAFQ2) and of T. cruzi also with CAFQ3. For group B, a higher activity against S. pneumoniae was associated DCBEN and for T. cruzi with CAF. For group C no association was observed between the anitmicrobial effect and any component of the extracts. The present study reinforces the relevance of PCUM and derivatives, especially prenylated ones and also of caffeolyquinic acids, on the biological activity of Brazilian propolis. PMID:18830454

  2. Non-Canonical EZH2 Transcriptionally Activates RelB in Triple Negative Breast Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Lawrence, Cortney L.; Baldwin, Albert S.

    2016-01-01

    Enhancer of zeste homology 2 (EZH2) is the methyltransferase component of the polycomb repressive complex (PRC2) which represses gene transcription via histone H3 trimethylation at lysine 23 (H3K27me3). EZH2 activity has been linked with oncogenesis where it is thought to block expression of certain tumor suppressors. Relative to a role in cancer, EZH2 functions to promote self-renewal and has been shown to be important for the tumor-initiating cell (TIC) phenotype in breast cancer. Recently a non-canonical role for EZH2 has been identified where it promotes transcriptional activation of certain genes. Here we show that EZH2, through a methyltransferase-independent mechanism, promotes the transcriptional activation of the non-canonical NF-κB subunit RelB to drive self-renewal and the TIC phenotype of triple-negative breast cancer cells. PMID:27764181

  3. Experimental Comparison of two Active Vibration Control Approaches: Velocity Feedback and Negative Capacitance Shunt Damping

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Beck, Benjamin; Schiller, Noah

    2013-01-01

    This paper outlines a direct, experimental comparison between two established active vibration control techniques. Active vibration control methods, many of which rely upon piezoelectric patches as actuators and/or sensors, have been widely studied, showing many advantages over passive techniques. However, few direct comparisons between different active vibration control methods have been made to determine the performance benefit of one method over another. For the comparison here, the first control method, velocity feedback, is implemented using four accelerometers that act as sensors along with an analog control circuit which drives a piezoelectric actuator. The second method, negative capacitance shunt damping, consists of a basic analog circuit which utilizes a single piezoelectric patch as both a sensor and actuator. Both of these control methods are implemented individually using the same piezoelectric actuator attached to a clamped Plexiglas window. To assess the performance of each control method, the spatially averaged velocity of the window is compared to an uncontrolled response.

  4. Statistical correlation of low-altitude ENA emissions with geomagnetic activity from IMAGE/MENA observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mackler, D. A.; Jahn, J.-M.; Perez, J. D.; Pollock, C. J.; Valek, P. W.

    2016-03-01

    Plasma sheet particles transported Earthward during times of active magnetospheric convection can interact with exospheric/thermospheric neutrals through charge exchange. The resulting Energetic Neutral Atoms (ENAs) are free to leave the influence of the magnetosphere and can be remotely detected. ENAs associated with low-altitude (300-800 km) ion precipitation in the high-latitude atmosphere/ionosphere are termed low-altitude emissions (LAEs). Remotely observed LAEs are highly nonisotropic in velocity space such that the pitch angle distribution at the time of charge exchange is near 90°. The Geomagnetic Emission Cone of LAEs can be mapped spatially, showing where proton energy is deposited during times of varying geomagnetic activity. In this study we present a statistical look at the correlation between LAE flux (intensity and location) and geomagnetic activity. The LAE data are from the MENA imager on the IMAGE satellite over the declining phase of solar cycle 23 (2000-2005). The SYM-H, AE, and Kp indices are used to describe geomagnetic activity. The goal of the study is to evaluate properties of LAEs in ENA images and determine if those images can be used to infer properties of ion precipitation. Results indicate a general positive correlation to LAE flux for all three indices, with the SYM-H showing the greatest sensitivity. The magnetic local time distribution of LAEs is centered about midnight and spreads with increasing activity. The invariant latitude for all indices has a slightly negative correlation. The combined results indicate LAE behavior similar to that of ion precipitation.

  5. Correlation of Paraoxonase Status with Disease Activity Score and Systemic Inflammation in Rheumatoid Arthritic Patients

    PubMed Central

    Bindal, Usha Dudeja; Siddiqui, Merajul Haque; Sharma, Dilutpal

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Despite, various preventive efforts on conventional cardiovascular disease (CVD) risk factors, the incidence of CVD in rheumatoid arthritis (RA) patients increases continuously. To solve this conundrum one needs more investigations. Aim The present study was conducted to evaluate the plasma paraoxonase (PON) activity along with the markers of systemic inflammation, oxidative stress and disease activity score-28 (DAS28) in RA patients and clarify their role in determining the probability of RA patients to develop future CVD risk. Materials and Methods Plasma PON, total antioxidant activity (TAA), C-reactive protein (CRP), synovial interleukin-6 (IL-6) and erythrocyte malondialdehyde (MDA) levels were estimated in 40 RA patients aged 40-55 years aged and 40 age-matched healthy controls. The data obtained were compared statistically by using Student’s t-test and Pearson correlation test. Results Besides dyslipidaemia, marked reduction in plasma PON and TAA (p< 0.05) were observed in RA patients as compared with that of healthy controls. Erythrocyte MDA, plasma CRP and synovial IL-6 levels were increased significantly (p<0.05) in RA patients. PON was negatively correlated with MDA (r = - 0.672; p < 0.001), CRP (r = -0.458; p<0.05), IL-6 (r = -0.426; p<0.05) and DAS28 (r = -0.598; p < 0.001), and positively correlated with HDL cholesterol (r = 0.648; p<0.001) and TAA (r = 0.608; p< 0.001) levels in RA patients. Conclusion Alteration in PON activity might contribute to the progression of future CVD risk in RA patients, which may result from interplay of several confounding factors, such as inflammation, oxidative stress and dyslipidaemia. Furthermore, plasma PON activity, CRP and TAA levels could be considered as non-traditional factors to predict CVD risk. Thus, it is suggested that future drugs could be developed to target the non-traditional risk factors in RA patients. PMID:27134854

  6. Feeling Better About Self After Receiving Negative Feedback: When the Sense That Ability Can Be Improved Is Activated.

    PubMed

    Hu, Xinyi; Chen, Yinghe; Tian, Baowei

    2016-01-01

    Past studies suggest that managers and educators often consider negative feedback as a motivator for individuals to think about their shortcomings and improve their work, but delivering negative feedback does not always achieve desired results. The present study, based on incremental theory, employed an intervention method to activate the belief that a particular ability could be improved after negative feedback. Three experiments tested the intervention effect on negative self-relevant emotion. Study 1 indicated conveying suggestions for improving ability reduced negative self-relevant emotion after negative feedback. Study 2 tested whether activating the sense of possible improvement in the ability could reduce negative self-relevant emotion. Results indicated activating the belief that ability could be improved reduced negative self-relevant emotion after failure, but delivering emotion management information alone did not yield the same effect. Study 3 extended the results by affirming the effort participants made in doing the test, and found the affirmation reduced negative self-relevant emotion. Collectively, the findings indicated focusing on the belief that the ability could be improved in the future can reduce negative self-relevant emotion after negative feedback.

  7. Feeling Better About Self After Receiving Negative Feedback: When the Sense That Ability Can Be Improved Is Activated.

    PubMed

    Hu, Xinyi; Chen, Yinghe; Tian, Baowei

    2016-01-01

    Past studies suggest that managers and educators often consider negative feedback as a motivator for individuals to think about their shortcomings and improve their work, but delivering negative feedback does not always achieve desired results. The present study, based on incremental theory, employed an intervention method to activate the belief that a particular ability could be improved after negative feedback. Three experiments tested the intervention effect on negative self-relevant emotion. Study 1 indicated conveying suggestions for improving ability reduced negative self-relevant emotion after negative feedback. Study 2 tested whether activating the sense of possible improvement in the ability could reduce negative self-relevant emotion. Results indicated activating the belief that ability could be improved reduced negative self-relevant emotion after failure, but delivering emotion management information alone did not yield the same effect. Study 3 extended the results by affirming the effort participants made in doing the test, and found the affirmation reduced negative self-relevant emotion. Collectively, the findings indicated focusing on the belief that the ability could be improved in the future can reduce negative self-relevant emotion after negative feedback. PMID:25699420

  8. Cocaine users with comorbid Cluster B personality disorders show dysfunctional brain activation and connectivity in the emotional regulation networks during negative emotion maintenance and reappraisal.

    PubMed

    Albein-Urios, Natalia; Verdejo-Román, Juan; Soriano-Mas, Carles; Asensio, Samuel; Martínez-González, José Miguel; Verdejo-García, Antonio

    2013-12-01

    Cocaine dependence often co-occurs with Cluster B personality disorders. Since both disorders are characterized by emotion regulation deficits, we predicted that cocaine comorbid patients would exhibit dysfunctional patterns of brain activation and connectivity during reappraisal of negative emotions. We recruited 18 cocaine users with comorbid Cluster B personality disorders, 17 cocaine users without comorbidities and 21 controls to be scanned using functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) during performance on a reappraisal task in which they had to maintain or suppress the emotions induced by negative affective stimuli. We followed region of interest (ROI) and whole-brain approaches to investigate brain activations and connectivity associated with negative emotion experience and reappraisal. Results showed that cocaine users with comorbid personality disorders had reduced activation of the subgenual anterior cingulate cortex during negative emotion maintenance and increased activation of the lateral orbitofrontal cortex and the amygdala during reappraisal. Amygdala activation correlated with impulsivity and antisocial beliefs in the comorbid group. Connectivity analyses showed that in the cocaine comorbid group the subgenual cingulate was less efficiently connected with the amygdala and the fusiform gyri and more efficiently connected with the anterior insula during maintenance, whereas during reappraisal the left orbitofrontal cortex was more efficiently connected with the amygdala and the right orbitofrontal cortex was less efficiently connected with the dorsal striatum. We conclude that cocaine users with comorbid Cluster B personality disorders have distinctive patterns of brain activation and connectivity during maintenance and reappraisal of negative emotions, which correlate with impulsivity and dysfunctional beliefs. PMID:23712090

  9. Combined activity of sulfamethoxazole, trimethoprim, and polymyxin B against gram-negative bacilli.

    PubMed

    Rosenblatt, J E; Stewart, P R

    1974-07-01

    The activity of the three two-drug combinations of sulfamethoxazole (SMX), trimethoprim (TMP), and polymyxin B (PB) against 52 clinical isolates of gram-negative bacilli was studied by a "checkerboard" agar dilution method. The organisms studied included strains of Enterobacter spp., Klebsiella pneumoniae, Serratia marcescens, Providence, Proteus, and Pseudomonas aeruginosa. The majority of these isolates were resistant to at least two of the three agents used in the combined studies and to the most commonly used antimicrobials. The TMP-PB combination demonstrated enhanced activity more frequently than the other two-drug combinations, showing synergism or addition in 85% of the combined studies; indifference or antagonism was also observed least frequently with TMP-PB. The great majority (83%) of Enterobacter-Klebsiella-Serratia isolates were susceptible to enhanced activity of all combinations. Proteus-Providence isolates were frequently susceptible (63%), but combined activity was indifferent or antagonistic against 60% of P. aeruginosa. Twelve isolates were selected for "killing-curve" assays in which an inoculum was incubated with SMX, TMP, and PB individually and in various two- and three-drug combinations. Surviving bacteria were counted at timed intervals over 24 h of incubation. The triple combination (SMX-TMP-PB) was synergistic against 9 of 12 isolates, whereas TMP-PB and SMX-PB showed synergism against 5 and 3 isolates, respectively. These data suggest that, although TMP-PB will often show enhanced activity against the gram-negative bacilli studied here, optimal antibacterial activity will be demonstrated when the three-drug combination is used.

  10. Antioxidant activity via DPPH, gram-positive and gram-negative antimicrobial potential in edible mushrooms.

    PubMed

    Ahmad, Nisar; Mahmood, Fazal; Khalil, Shahid Akbar; Zamir, Roshan; Fazal, Hina; Abbasi, Bilal Haider

    2014-10-01

    Edible mushrooms (EMs) are nutritionally rich source of proteins and essential amino acids. In the present study, the antioxidant activity via 1,1-diphenyl-2-picrylhydrazyl (DPPH) and antimicrobial potential in EMs (Pleurotus ostreatus, Morchella esculenta, P. ostreatus (Black), P. ostreatus (Yellow) and Pleurotus sajor-caju) were investigated. The DPPH radical scavenging activity revealed that the significantly higher activity (66.47%) was observed in Morchella esculenta at a maximum concentration. Similarly, the dose-dependent concentrations (200, 400, 600, 800 and 1000 µg) were also used for other four EMs. Pleurotus ostreatus exhibited 36.13% activity, P. ostreatus (Black (B)) exhibited 30.64%, P. ostreatus (Yellow (Y)) exhibited 40.75% and Pleurotus sajor-caju exhibited 47.39% activity at higher concentrations. Furthermore, the antimicrobial potential were investigated for its toxicity against gram-negative bacterial strains (Escherichia coli, Pseudomonas aeroginosa, Salmonella typhi, Klebsiella pneumonia, Erwinia carotovora and Agrobacterium tumifaciens), gram-positive bacterial strains (Bacillus subtilis, Bacillus atrophaeus and Staphylococcus aureus) and a fungal strain (Candida albicans) in comparison with standard antibiotics. Antimicrobial screening revealed that the ethanol extract of P. ostreatus was active against all microorganism tested except E. coli. Maximum zone of inhibition (13 mm) was observed against fungus and A. tumifaciens. P. sajor-caju showed best activities (12.5 mm) against B. subtilis, B. atrophaeus and K. pneumonia. P. ostreatus (Y) showed best activities against P. aeroginosa (21.83 mm), B. atrophaeus (20 mm) and C. albicans (21 mm). P. ostreatus (B) exhibited best activities against C. albicans (16 mm) and slightly lower activities against all other microbes except S. typhi. M. esculenta possess maximum activities in terms of inhibition zone against all microorganisms tested except S. typhi.

  11. Anxiety is correlated with running in adolescent female mice undergoing activity-based anorexia

    PubMed Central

    Wable, Gauri S.; Min, Jung-Yun; Chen, Yi-Wen; Aoki, Chiye

    2015-01-01

    Activity-based anorexia (ABA) is a widely used animal model for identifying the biological basis of excessive exercise and starvation, two hallmarks of anorexia nervosa (AN). Anxiety is correlated with exercise in AN. Yet the anxiety level of animals in ABA has not been reported. We asked: Does food restriction as part of ABA induction change the anxiety level of animals? If so, is the degree of anxiety correlated with degree of hyperactivity? We used the open field test before food restriction and the elevated plus maze test (EPM) during food restriction to quantify anxiety among singly housed adolescent female mice and determined whether food restriction alone or combined with exercise (i.e., ABA induction) abates or increases anxiety. We show that food restriction, with or without exercise, reduced anxiety significantly, as measured by the proportion of entries into the open arms of EPM (35.73 %, p= .04). Moreover, ABA-induced individuals varied in their open arm time measure of anxiety and this value was highly and negatively correlated to the individual’s food restriction-evoked wheel activity during the 24 hours following the anxiety test (R = − .75, p= .004, N = 12). This correlation was absent among the exercise-only controls. Additionally, mice with higher increase in anxiety ran more following food restriction. Our data suggest that food restriction-evoked wheel running hyperactivity can be used as a reliable and continuous measure of anxiety in ABA. The parallel relationship between anxiety level and activity in AN and ABA-induced female mice strengthens the animal model. PMID:25730124

  12. The effects of negative emotion on encoding-related neural activity predicting item and source recognition.

    PubMed

    Yick, Yee Ying; Buratto, Luciano Grüdtner; Schaefer, Alexandre

    2015-07-01

    We report here a study that obtained reliable effects of emotional modulation of a well-known index of memory encoding--the electrophysiological "Dm" effect--using a recognition memory paradigm followed by a source memory task. In this study, participants performed an old-new recognition test of emotionally negative and neutral pictures encoded 1 day before the test, and a source memory task involving the retrieval of the temporal context in which pictures had been encoded. Our results showed that Dm activity was enhanced for all emotional items on a late positivity starting at ~400 ms post-stimulus onset, although Dm activity for high arousal items was also enhanced at an earlier stage (200-400 ms). Our results also showed that emotion enhanced Dm activity for items that were both recognised with or without correct source information. Further, when only high arousal items were considered, larger Dm amplitudes were observed if source memory was accurate. Three main conclusions are drawn from these findings. First, negative emotion can enhance encoding processes predicting the subsequent recognition of central item information. Second, if emotion reaches high levels of arousal, the encoding of contextual details can also be enhanced over and above the effects of emotion on central item encoding. Third, the morphology of our ERPs is consistent with a hybrid model of the role of attention in emotion-enhanced memory (Pottage and Schaefer, 2012).

  13. Sleep is associated with task-negative brain activity in fibromyalgia participants with comorbid chronic insomnia.

    PubMed

    Vatthauer, Karlyn E; Craggs, Jason G; Robinson, Michael E; Staud, Roland; Berry, Richard B; Perlstein, William M; McCrae, Christina S

    2015-01-01

    Patients with chronic pain exhibit altered default mode network (DMN) activity. This preliminary project questioned whether comorbid disease states are associated with further brain alterations. Thirteen women with fibromyalgia (FM) only and 26 women with fibromyalgia with comorbid chronic insomnia (FMI) underwent a single night of ambulatory polysomnography and completed a sleep diary each morning for 14 days prior to performing a neuroimaging protocol. Novel imaging analyses were utilized to identify regions associated with significantly disordered sleep that were more active in task-negative periods than task-oriented periods in participants with FMI, when compared to participants with FM. It was hypothesized that core DMN areas (ie, cingulate cortex, inferior parietal lobule, medial prefrontal cortex, medial temporal cortex, precuneus) would exhibit increased activity during task-negative periods. Analyses revealed that significantly disordered sleep significantly contributed to group differences in the right cingulate gyrus, left lentiform nucleus, left anterior cingulate, left superior gyrus, medial frontal gyrus, right caudate, and the left inferior parietal lobules. Results suggest that FMI may alter some brain areas of the DMN, above and beyond FM. However, future work will need to investigate these results further by controlling for chronic insomnia only before conclusions can be made regarding the effect of FMI comorbidity on the DMN. PMID:26648751

  14. Membrane-Active Macromolecules Resensitize NDM-1 Gram-Negative Clinical Isolates to Tetracycline Antibiotics

    PubMed Central

    Uppu, Divakara S. S. M.; Manjunath, Goutham B.; Yarlagadda, Venkateswarlu; Kaviyil, Jyothi E.; Ravikumar, Raju; Paramanandham, Krishnamoorthy; Shome, Bibek R.; Haldar, Jayanta

    2015-01-01

    Gram-negative ‘superbugs’ such as New Delhi metallo-beta-lactamase-1 (blaNDM-1) producing pathogens have become world’s major public health threats. Development of molecular strategies that can rehabilitate the ‘old antibiotics’ and halt the antibiotic resistance is a promising approach to target them. We report membrane-active macromolecules (MAMs) that restore the antibacterial efficacy (enhancement by >80-1250 fold) of tetracycline antibiotics towards blaNDM-1 Klebsiella pneumonia and blaNDM-1 Escherichia coli clinical isolates. Organismic studies showed that bacteria had an increased and faster uptake of tetracycline in the presence of MAMs which is attributed to the mechanism of re-sensitization. Moreover, bacteria did not develop resistance to MAMs and MAMs stalled the development of bacterial resistance to tetracycline. MAMs displayed membrane-active properties such as dissipation of membrane potential and membrane-permeabilization that enabled higher uptake of tetracycline in bacteria. In-vivo toxicity studies displayed good safety profiles and preliminary in-vivo antibacterial efficacy studies showed that mice treated with MAMs in combination with antibiotics had significantly decreased bacterial burden compared to the untreated mice. This report of re-instating the efficacy of the antibiotics towards blaNDM-1 pathogens using membrane-active molecules advocates their potential for synergistic co-delivery of antibiotics to combat Gram-negative superbugs. PMID:25789871

  15. Sleep is associated with task-negative brain activity in fibromyalgia participants with comorbid chronic insomnia

    PubMed Central

    Vatthauer, Karlyn E; Craggs, Jason G; Robinson, Michael E; Staud, Roland; Berry, Richard B; Perlstein, William M; McCrae, Christina S

    2015-01-01

    Patients with chronic pain exhibit altered default mode network (DMN) activity. This preliminary project questioned whether comorbid disease states are associated with further brain alterations. Thirteen women with fibromyalgia (FM) only and 26 women with fibromyalgia with comorbid chronic insomnia (FMI) underwent a single night of ambulatory polysomnography and completed a sleep diary each morning for 14 days prior to performing a neuroimaging protocol. Novel imaging analyses were utilized to identify regions associated with significantly disordered sleep that were more active in task-negative periods than task-oriented periods in participants with FMI, when compared to participants with FM. It was hypothesized that core DMN areas (ie, cingulate cortex, inferior parietal lobule, medial prefrontal cortex, medial temporal cortex, precuneus) would exhibit increased activity during task-negative periods. Analyses revealed that significantly disordered sleep significantly contributed to group differences in the right cingulate gyrus, left lentiform nucleus, left anterior cingulate, left superior gyrus, medial frontal gyrus, right caudate, and the left inferior parietal lobules. Results suggest that FMI may alter some brain areas of the DMN, above and beyond FM. However, future work will need to investigate these results further by controlling for chronic insomnia only before conclusions can be made regarding the effect of FMI comorbidity on the DMN. PMID:26648751

  16. Modeling activities on the negative-ion-based Neutral Beam Injectors of the Large Helical Device

    SciTech Connect

    Agostinetti, P.; Antoni, V.; Chitarin, G.; Pilan, N.; Serianni, G.; Veltri, P.; Cavenago, M.; Nakano, H.; Takeiri, Y.; Tsumori, K.

    2011-09-26

    At the National Institute for Fusion Science (NIFS) large-scaled negative ion sources have been widely used for the Neutral Beam Injectors (NBIs) mounted on the Large Helical Device (LHD), which is the world-largest superconducting helical system. These injectors have achieved outstanding performances in terms of beam energy, negative-ion current and optics, and represent a reference for the development of heating and current drive NBIs for ITER.In the framework of the support activities for the ITER NBIs, the PRIMA test facility, which includes a RF-drive ion source with 100 keV accelerator (SPIDER) and a complete 1 MeV Neutral Beam system (MITICA) is under construction at Consorzio RFX in Padova.An experimental validation of the codes has been undertaken in order to prove the accuracy of the simulations and the soundness of the SPIDER and MITICA design. To this purpose, the whole set of codes have been applied to the LHD NBIs in a joint activity between Consorzio RFX and NIFS, with the goal of comparing and benchmarking the codes with the experimental data. A description of these modeling activities and a discussion of the main results obtained are reported in this paper.

  17. Active pneumatic vibration isolation system using negative stiffness structures for a vehicle seat

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Danh, Le Thanh; Ahn, Kyoung Kwan

    2014-02-01

    In this paper, an active pneumatic vibration isolation system using negative stiffness structures (NSS) for a vehicle seat in low excitation frequencies is proposed, which is named as an active system with NSS. Here, the negative stiffness structures (NSS) are used to minimize the vibratory attraction of a vehicle seat. Owing to the time-varying and nonlinear behavior of the proposed system, it is not easy to build an accurate dynamic for model-based controller design. Thus, an adaptive intelligent backstepping controller (AIBC) is designed to manage the system operation for high-isolation effectiveness. In addition, an auxiliary control effort is also introduced to eliminate the effect of the unpredictable perturbations. Moreover, a radial basis function neural network (RBFNN) model is utilized to estimate the optimal gain of the auxiliary control effort. Final control input and the adaptive law for updating coefficients of the approximate series can be obtained step by step using a suitable Lyapunov function. Afterward, the isolation performance of the proposed system is assessed experimentally. In addition, the effectiveness of the designed controller for the proposed system is also compared with that of the traditional backstepping controller (BC). The experimental results show that the isolation effectiveness of the proposed system is better than that of the active system without NSS. Furthermore, the undesirable chattering phenomenon in control effort is quite reduced by the estimation mechanism. Finally, some concluding remarks are given at the end of the paper.

  18. The effects of negative emotion on encoding-related neural activity predicting item and source recognition.

    PubMed

    Yick, Yee Ying; Buratto, Luciano Grüdtner; Schaefer, Alexandre

    2015-07-01

    We report here a study that obtained reliable effects of emotional modulation of a well-known index of memory encoding--the electrophysiological "Dm" effect--using a recognition memory paradigm followed by a source memory task. In this study, participants performed an old-new recognition test of emotionally negative and neutral pictures encoded 1 day before the test, and a source memory task involving the retrieval of the temporal context in which pictures had been encoded. Our results showed that Dm activity was enhanced for all emotional items on a late positivity starting at ~400 ms post-stimulus onset, although Dm activity for high arousal items was also enhanced at an earlier stage (200-400 ms). Our results also showed that emotion enhanced Dm activity for items that were both recognised with or without correct source information. Further, when only high arousal items were considered, larger Dm amplitudes were observed if source memory was accurate. Three main conclusions are drawn from these findings. First, negative emotion can enhance encoding processes predicting the subsequent recognition of central item information. Second, if emotion reaches high levels of arousal, the encoding of contextual details can also be enhanced over and above the effects of emotion on central item encoding. Third, the morphology of our ERPs is consistent with a hybrid model of the role of attention in emotion-enhanced memory (Pottage and Schaefer, 2012). PMID:25936685

  19. Haemolytic and proteolytic activity of coagulase-negative staphylococci isolated from mastitis cows.

    PubMed

    Bochniarz, M; Wawron, W

    2012-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to assess the haemolytic and proteolytic activity of coagulase-negative staphylococci (CNS) isolated from cows with mastitis. The study was conducted on 100 CNS strains: S. xylosus (n=28), S. chromogenes (n=26), S. haemolyticus (n=25), S. sciuri (n=14), S. warneri (n=4), S. hominis (n=2), S. saprophyticus (n=1); 22 CNS were isolated from cows with clinical mastitis and 78 from those with subclinical mastitis. The CNS studied showed the ability to produce only alpha-haemolysin and belonged to one strain - S. haemolyticus (21.0% of isolated CNS strains). Haemolysin-positive CNS were responsible for both clinical and subclinical mastitis (22.7% and 20.5%, respectively). The ability to produce protease was found in 31.0% of CNS belonging to two strains: S. chromogenes and S. sciuri. Protease-positive CNS were the etiological factor of both clinical and subclinical mastitis (31.8% and 30.8%, respectively). All S. xylosus, S. warneri, S. hominis, and S. saprophyticus strains were found protease-negative and haemolysin-negative, irrespective of whether they caused clinical or subclinical mastitis in cows. PMID:22708359

  20. CSF levels of receptor-active endorphins in schizophrenic patients: correlations with symptomatology and monoamine metabolites.

    PubMed

    Lindström, L H; Besev, G; Gunne, L M; Terenius, L

    1986-10-01

    Cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) levels of an opioid receptor-active, chromatographically separated endorphin fraction (Fraction I) were measured in 45 schizophrenic patients and 18 healthy volunteers. Significantly increased levels of Fraction I differentiated the patient group from controls, with no difference being found between newly admitted untreated and chronic previously neuroleptic-treated subjects. Fraction I levels did not correlate with age, weight, height, duration of illness, total time hospitalized, or age when symptoms first appeared. No differences were found between patients with or without a family history of schizophrenia. Fraction I levels were negatively correlated with "hallucinations" and "indecision" on the Comprehensive Psychopathological Rating Scale. Increased levels of Fraction I were associated with low levels of the dopamine metabolite homovanillic acid in drug-free schizophrenics. This relationship was not present after neuroleptic treatment or in healthy controls. No relationship was found between Fraction I and the serotonin metabolite 5-hydroxyindoleacetic acid. Neuroleptic treatment did not significantly change Fraction I levels; when only patients above the control range were considered, however, a significant decrease was observed. The data support our previous hypothesis of an increased opioid activity in schizophrenia and further indicate a concomitant dysfunction of brain endorphin and dopamine activity in schizophrenic patients.

  1. Siblings of Individuals with Smith-Magenis Syndrome: An Investigation of the Correlates of Positive and Negative Behavioural Traits

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Moshier, M. S.; York, T. P.; Silberg, J. L.; Elsea, S. H.

    2012-01-01

    Background: Smith-Magenis syndrome (SMS) is a neurodevelopmental disorder that affects approximately one out of 25 000 births worldwide. To date, no research has been conducted to investigate how having an individual with SMS in a family is a positive or negative influence on siblings. Methods: To investigate this question we conducted a study…

  2. EFA6 controls Arf1 and Arf6 activation through a negative feedback loop.

    PubMed

    Padovani, Dominique; Folly-Klan, Marcia; Labarde, Audrey; Boulakirba, Sonia; Campanacci, Valérie; Franco, Michel; Zeghouf, Mahel; Cherfils, Jacqueline

    2014-08-26

    Guanine nucleotide exchange factors (GEFs) of the exchange factor for Arf6 (EFA6), brefeldin A-resistant Arf guanine nucleotide exchange factor (BRAG), and cytohesin subfamilies activate small GTPases of the Arf family in endocytic events. These ArfGEFs carry a pleckstrin homology (PH) domain in tandem with their catalytic Sec7 domain, which is autoinhibitory and supports a positive feedback loop in cytohesins but not in BRAGs, and has an as-yet unknown role in EFA6 regulation. In this study, we analyzed how EFA6A is regulated by its PH and C terminus (Ct) domains by reconstituting its GDP/GTP exchange activity on membranes. We found that EFA6 has a previously unappreciated high efficiency toward Arf1 on membranes and that, similar to BRAGs, its PH domain is not autoinhibitory and strongly potentiates nucleotide exchange on anionic liposomes. However, in striking contrast to both cytohesins and BRAGs, EFA6 is regulated by a negative feedback loop, which is mediated by an allosteric interaction of Arf6-GTP with the PH-Ct domain of EFA6 and monitors the activation of Arf1 and Arf6 differentially. These observations reveal that EFA6, BRAG, and cytohesins have unanticipated commonalities associated with divergent regulatory regimes. An important implication is that EFA6 and cytohesins may combine in a mixed negative-positive feedback loop. By allowing EFA6 to sustain a pool of dormant Arf6-GTP, such a circuit would fulfill the absolute requirement of cytohesins for activation by Arf-GTP before amplification of their GEF activity by their positive feedback loop.

  3. Slamf8 is a negative regulator of Nox2 activity in macrophages

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Guoxing; Abadía-Molina, Ana C; Berger, Scott B; Romero, Xavier; O'Keeffe, Michael; Rojas-Barros, Domingo I.; Aleman, Marta; Liao, Gongxian; Maganto-García, Elena; Fresno, Manuel; Wang, Ninghai; Detre, Cynthia; Terhorst, Cox

    2012-01-01

    Slamf8 (CD353) is a cell surface receptor that is expressed upon activation of macrophages by interferon-gamma or bacteria. Here we report that a very high Nox2 activity enzyme was found in Slamf8−/− macrophages in response to E.coli or S.aureus, but also to phorbol myristate acetate. The elevated Nox2 activity in Slamf8−/− macrophages was also demonstrated in E.coli or S.aureus phagosomes by using a pH indicator system, and was further confirmed by a reduction of the enzyme activity after transfection of the receptor into Slamf8-deficient primary macrophages or RAW 264.7 cells. Upon exposure to bacteria and/or phorbol myristate acetate, PKC activity in Slamf8−/− macrophages is increased. This results in an enhanced phosphorylation of p40phox, one key component of the Nox2 enzyme complex, which in turn leads to greater Nox2 activity. Taken together, the data show that upon response to inflammation-associated stimuli the inducible receptor Slamf8 negatively regulates inflammatory responses. PMID:22593622

  4. An Arabidopsis SUMO E3 Ligase, SIZ1, Negatively Regulates Photomorphogenesis by Promoting COP1 Activity

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Xiao-Li; Niu, De; Hu, Zi-Liang; Kim, Dae Heon; Jin, Yin Hua; Cai, Bin; Liu, Peng; Miura, Kenji; Yun, Dae-Jin; Kim, Woe-Yeon; Lin, Rongcheng

    2016-01-01

    COP1 (CONSTITUTIVE PHOTOMORPHOGENIC 1), a ubiquitin E3 ligase, is a central negative regulator of photomorphogenesis. However, how COP1 activity is regulated by post-translational modifications remains largely unknown. Here we show that SUMO (small ubiquitin-like modifier) modification enhances COP1 activity. Loss-of-function siz1 mutant seedlings exhibit a weak constitutive photomorphogenic phenotype. SIZ1 physically interacts with COP1 and mediates the sumoylation of COP1. A K193R substitution in COP1 blocks its SUMO modification and reduces COP1 activity in vitro and in planta. Consistently, COP1 activity is reduced in siz1 and the level of HY5, a COP1 target protein, is increased in siz1. Sumoylated COP1 may exhibits higher transubiquitination activity than does non-sumoylated COP1, but SIZ1-mediated SUMO modification does not affect COP1 dimerization, COP1-HY5 interaction, and nuclear accumulation of COP1. Interestingly, prolonged light exposure reduces the sumoylation level of COP1, and COP1 mediates the ubiquitination and degradation of SIZ1. These regulatory mechanisms may maintain the homeostasis of COP1 activity, ensuing proper photomorphogenic development in changing light environment. Our genetic and biochemical studies identify a function for SIZ1 in photomorphogenesis and reveal a novel SUMO-regulated ubiquitin ligase, COP1, in plants. PMID:27128446

  5. Methylation at a transcription factor-binding site on the 5-HT1A receptor gene correlates with negative symptom treatment response in first episode schizophrenia.

    PubMed

    Tang, Hao; Dalton, Caroline F; Srisawat, Umarat; Zhang, Zhi Jun; Reynolds, Gavin P

    2014-04-01

    Individual variability and inadequate response of negative symptoms are major limitations of antipsychotic treatment in schizophrenia. A functional polymorphism, rs6295, in the 5-HT1A-receptor gene (HTR1A) contributes to this variability in negative symptom response. The DNA sequence containing rs6295 is rich in cytosine methylation (CpG) sites; CpG methylation is an epigenetic factor that, like rs6295, can modify transcriptional control. To investigate whether DNA methylation influences response to antipsychotic treatment, we determined methylation at CpG sites close to rs6295 in DNA from 82 Chinese subjects with a first psychotic episode. Methylation of one CpG site within a recognition sequence for HES transcriptional repressors was found to correlate with changes in total PANSS score (p = 0.006) and negative factor sub-score (p < 0.001) following 10 wk initial antipsychotic treatment, as well as with baseline negative factor score (p = 0.019); the effect on symptom change remained after correction for this baseline score. An effect of rs6295 on negative symptom response was not seen in this sample, which may not have provided sufficient power for the pharmacogenetic association. These preliminary results indicate that epigenetic modification of transcriptional regulation by specific cytosine methylation may modulate HTR1A expression, resulting in effects on emotional dysfunction and negative symptom response to antipsychotic treatment. PMID:24331356

  6. Anterior cingulate activity to monetary loss and basal ganglia activity to monetary gain uniquely contribute to the feedback negativity

    PubMed Central

    Foti, Dan; Weinberg, Anna; Bernat, Edward M.; Proudfit, Greg H.

    2014-01-01

    Objective The feedback negativity (FN) is an event-related potential that differentiates unfavorable versus favorable outcomes. Although thought to reflect error-related activity within the anterior cingulate cortex, recent work indicates the FN may also reflect reward-related activity that has been linked to the basal ganglia. To date, it remains unclear how to reconcile these conflicting perspectives. Methods We decomposed the FN by applying time-frequency analysis to isolate activity unique to monetary losses and gains. The FN was recorded from 84 individuals during a laboratory gambling task. Results Two signals contributed to the FN elicited by unpredictable outcomes: theta activity (4-7 Hz) was increased following monetary loss, and delta activity (< 3 Hz) was increased following monetary gain. Predictable outcomes elicited delta but not theta activity. Source analysis revealed distinct generators, with loss-related theta localized to the anterior cingulate cortex and gain-related delta to a possible source in the striatum. Symptoms of depression, anxiety, and stress reactivity were specifically associated with blunted gain-related delta. Conclusions The FN may be a composite of loss- and gain-related neural activity, reflecting distinct facets of reward processing. Significance Gain-related delta activity may provide unique information about reward dysfunction in major depression and other internalizing psychopathology. PMID:25454338

  7. In vitro activities of arylomycin natural-product antibiotics against Staphylococcus epidermidis and other coagulase-negative staphylococci.

    PubMed

    Smith, Peter A; Powers, Michael E; Roberts, Tucker C; Romesberg, Floyd E

    2011-03-01

    The arylomycins are a class of natural-product antibiotics that act via the inhibition of type I signal peptidase (SPase), and we have found in diverse bacteria that their activity is limited by the presence of a resistance-conferring Pro residue in SPase that reduces inhibitor binding. We have also demonstrated that Staphylococcus epidermidis, which lacks this Pro residue, is extremely susceptible to the arylomycins. Here, to further explore the potential utility of the arylomycins, we report an analysis of the activity of a synthetic arylomycin derivative, arylomycin C₁₆, against clinical isolates of S. epidermidis and other coagulase-negative staphylococci (CoNS) from distinct geographical locations. Against many important species of CoNS, including S. epidermidis, S. haemolyticus, S. lugdunensis, and S. hominis, we find that arylomycin C₁₆ exhibits activity equal to or greater than that of vancomycin, the antibiotic most commonly used to treat CoNS infections. While the susceptibility was generally correlated with the absence of the previously identified Pro residue, several cases were identified where additional factors also appear to contribute.

  8. A novel human aquaporin-4 splice variant exhibits a dominant-negative activity: a new mechanism to regulate water permeability

    PubMed Central

    De Bellis, Manuela; Pisani, Francesco; Mola, Maria Grazia; Basco, Davide; Catalano, Francesco; Nicchia, Grazia Paola; Svelto, Maria; Frigeri, Antonio

    2014-01-01

    Two major isoforms of aquaporin-4 (AQP4) have been described in human tissue. Here we report the identification and functional analysis of an alternatively spliced transcript of human AQP4, AQP4-Δ4, that lacks exon 4. In transfected cells AQP4-Δ4 is mainly retained in the endoplasmic reticulum and shows no water transport properties. When AQP4-Δ4 is transfected into cells stably expressing functional AQP4, the surface expression of the full-length protein is reduced. Furthermore, the water transport activity of the cotransfectants is diminished in comparison to transfectants expressing only AQP4. The observed down-regulation of both the expression and water channel activity of AQP4 is likely to originate from a dominant-negative effect caused by heterodimerization between AQP4 and AQP4-Δ4, which was detected in coimmunoprecipitation studies. In skeletal muscles, AQP4-Δ4 mRNA expression inversely correlates with the level of AQP4 protein and is physiologically associated with different types of skeletal muscles. The expression of AQP4-Δ4 may represent a new regulatory mechanism through which the cell-surface expression and therefore the activity of AQP4 can be physiologically modulated. PMID:24356448

  9. Interplay between stochasticity and negative feedback leads to pulsed dynamics and distinct gene activity patterns

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zambrano, Samuel; Bianchi, Marco E.; Agresti, Alessandra; Molina, Nacho

    2015-08-01

    Gene expression is an inherently stochastic process that depends on the structure of the biochemical regulatory network in which the gene is embedded. Here we study the dynamical consequences of the interplay between stochastic gene switching and the widespread negative feedback regulatory loop in a simple model of a biochemical regulatory network. Using a simplified hybrid simulation approach, in which only the gene activation is modeled stochastically, we find that stochasticity in gene switching by itself can induce pulses in the system, providing also analytical insights into their origin. Furthermore, we find that this simple network is able to reproduce both exponential and peaked distributions of gene active and inactive times similar to those that have been observed experimentally. This simplified hybrid simulation approach also allows us to link these patterns to the dynamics of the system for each gene state.

  10. Increased Functional Activation of Limbic Brain Regions during Negative Emotional Processing in Migraine.

    PubMed

    Wilcox, Sophie L; Veggeberg, Rosanna; Lemme, Jordan; Hodkinson, Duncan J; Scrivani, Steven; Burstein, Rami; Becerra, Lino; Borsook, David

    2016-01-01

    Pain is both an unpleasant sensory and emotional experience. This is highly relevant in migraine where cortical hyperexcitability in response to sensory stimuli (including pain, light, and sound) has been extensively reported. However, migraine may feature a more general enhanced response to aversive stimuli rather than being sensory-specific. To this end we used functional magnetic resonance imaging to assess neural activation in migraineurs interictaly in response to emotional visual stimuli from the International Affective Picture System. Migraineurs, compared to healthy controls, demonstrated increased neural activity in response to negative emotional stimuli. Most notably in regions overlapping in their involvement in both nociceptive and emotional processing including the posterior cingulate, caudate, amygdala, and thalamus (cluster corrected, p < 0.01). In contrast, migraineurs and healthy controls displayed no and minimal differences in response to positive and neutral emotional stimuli, respectively. These findings support the notion that migraine may feature more generalized altered cerebral processing of aversive/negative stimuli, rather than exclusively to sensory stimuli. A generalized hypersensitivity to aversive stimuli may be an inherent feature of migraine, or a consequential alteration developed over the duration of the disease. This proposed cortical-limbic hypersensitivity may form an important part of the migraine pathophysiology, including psychological comorbidity, and may represent an innate sensitivity to aversive stimuli that underpins attack triggers, attack persistence and (potentially) gradual headache chronification.

  11. Structural Basis for a Reciprocating Mechanism of Negative Cooperativity in Dimeric Phosphagen Kinase Activity

    SciTech Connect

    Wu, X.; Ye, S; Guo, S; Yan, W; Bartlam, M; Rao, Z

    2010-01-01

    Phosphagen kinase (PK) family members catalyze the reversible phosphoryl transfer between phosphagen and ADP to reserve or release energy in cell energy metabolism. The structures of classic quaternary complexes of dimeric creatine kinase (CK) revealed asymmetric ligand binding states of two protomers, but the significance and mechanism remain unclear. To understand this negative cooperativity further, we determined the first structure of dimeric arginine kinase (dAK), another PK family member, at 1.75 {angstrom}, as well as the structure of its ternary complex with AMPPNP and arginine. Further structural analysis shows that the ligand-free protomer in a ligand-bound dimer opens more widely than the protomers in a ligand-free dimer, which leads to three different states of a dAK protomer. The unexpected allostery of the ligand-free protomer in a ligand-bound dimer should be relayed from the ligand-binding-induced allostery of its adjacent protomer. Mutations that weaken the interprotomer connections dramatically reduced the catalytic activities of dAK, indicating the importance of the allosteric propagation mediated by the homodimer interface. These results suggest a reciprocating mechanism of dimeric PK, which is shared by other ATP related oligomeric enzymes, e.g., ATP synthase. - Wu, X., Ye, S., Guo, S., Yan, W., Bartlam, M., Rao, Z. Structural basis for a reciprocating mechanism of negative cooperativity in dimeric phosphagen kinase activity.

  12. Increased Functional Activation of Limbic Brain Regions during Negative Emotional Processing in Migraine

    PubMed Central

    Wilcox, Sophie L.; Veggeberg, Rosanna; Lemme, Jordan; Hodkinson, Duncan J.; Scrivani, Steven; Burstein, Rami; Becerra, Lino; Borsook, David

    2016-01-01

    Pain is both an unpleasant sensory and emotional experience. This is highly relevant in migraine where cortical hyperexcitability in response to sensory stimuli (including pain, light, and sound) has been extensively reported. However, migraine may feature a more general enhanced response to aversive stimuli rather than being sensory-specific. To this end we used functional magnetic resonance imaging to assess neural activation in migraineurs interictaly in response to emotional visual stimuli from the International Affective Picture System. Migraineurs, compared to healthy controls, demonstrated increased neural activity in response to negative emotional stimuli. Most notably in regions overlapping in their involvement in both nociceptive and emotional processing including the posterior cingulate, caudate, amygdala, and thalamus (cluster corrected, p < 0.01). In contrast, migraineurs and healthy controls displayed no and minimal differences in response to positive and neutral emotional stimuli, respectively. These findings support the notion that migraine may feature more generalized altered cerebral processing of aversive/negative stimuli, rather than exclusively to sensory stimuli. A generalized hypersensitivity to aversive stimuli may be an inherent feature of migraine, or a consequential alteration developed over the duration of the disease. This proposed cortical-limbic hypersensitivity may form an important part of the migraine pathophysiology, including psychological comorbidity, and may represent an innate sensitivity to aversive stimuli that underpins attack triggers, attack persistence and (potentially) gradual headache chronification. PMID:27507939

  13. Increased Functional Activation of Limbic Brain Regions during Negative Emotional Processing in Migraine.

    PubMed

    Wilcox, Sophie L; Veggeberg, Rosanna; Lemme, Jordan; Hodkinson, Duncan J; Scrivani, Steven; Burstein, Rami; Becerra, Lino; Borsook, David

    2016-01-01

    Pain is both an unpleasant sensory and emotional experience. This is highly relevant in migraine where cortical hyperexcitability in response to sensory stimuli (including pain, light, and sound) has been extensively reported. However, migraine may feature a more general enhanced response to aversive stimuli rather than being sensory-specific. To this end we used functional magnetic resonance imaging to assess neural activation in migraineurs interictaly in response to emotional visual stimuli from the International Affective Picture System. Migraineurs, compared to healthy controls, demonstrated increased neural activity in response to negative emotional stimuli. Most notably in regions overlapping in their involvement in both nociceptive and emotional processing including the posterior cingulate, caudate, amygdala, and thalamus (cluster corrected, p < 0.01). In contrast, migraineurs and healthy controls displayed no and minimal differences in response to positive and neutral emotional stimuli, respectively. These findings support the notion that migraine may feature more generalized altered cerebral processing of aversive/negative stimuli, rather than exclusively to sensory stimuli. A generalized hypersensitivity to aversive stimuli may be an inherent feature of migraine, or a consequential alteration developed over the duration of the disease. This proposed cortical-limbic hypersensitivity may form an important part of the migraine pathophysiology, including psychological comorbidity, and may represent an innate sensitivity to aversive stimuli that underpins attack triggers, attack persistence and (potentially) gradual headache chronification. PMID:27507939

  14. The role of multiparticle correlations and Cooper pairing in the formation of molecules in an ultracold gas of Fermi atoms with a negative scattering length

    SciTech Connect

    Babichenko, V. S. Kagan, Yu.

    2012-11-15

    The influence of multiparticle correlation effects and Cooper pairing in an ultracold Fermi gas with a negative scattering length on the formation rate of molecules is investigated. Cooper pairing is shown to cause the formation rate of molecules to increase, as distinct from the influence of Bose-Einstein condensation in a Bose gas on this rate. This trend is retained in the entire range of temperatures below the critical one.

  15. Plexin-B2 negatively regulates macrophage motility, Rac, and Cdc42 activation.

    PubMed

    Roney, Kelly E; O'Connor, Brian P; Wen, Haitao; Holl, Eda K; Guthrie, Elizabeth H; Davis, Beckley K; Jones, Stephen W; Jha, Sushmita; Sharek, Lisa; Garcia-Mata, Rafael; Bear, James E; Ting, Jenny P-Y

    2011-01-01

    Plexins are cell surface receptors widely studied in the nervous system, where they mediate migration and morphogenesis though the Rho family of small GTPases. More recently, plexins have been implicated in immune processes including cell-cell interaction, immune activation, migration, and cytokine production. Plexin-B2 facilitates ligand induced cell guidance and migration in the nervous system, and induces cytoskeletal changes in overexpression assays through RhoGTPase. The function of Plexin-B2 in the immune system is unknown. This report shows that Plexin-B2 is highly expressed on cells of the innate immune system in the mouse, including macrophages, conventional dendritic cells, and plasmacytoid dendritic cells. However, Plexin-B2 does not appear to regulate the production of proinflammatory cytokines, phagocytosis of a variety of targets, or directional migration towards chemoattractants or extracellular matrix in mouse macrophages. Instead, Plxnb2(-/-) macrophages have greater cellular motility than wild type in the unstimulated state that is accompanied by more active, GTP-bound Rac and Cdc42. Additionally, Plxnb2(-/-) macrophages demonstrate faster in vitro wound closure activity. Studies have shown that a closely related family member, Plexin-B1, binds to active Rac and sequesters it from downstream signaling. The interaction of Plexin-B2 with Rac has only been previously confirmed in yeast and bacterial overexpression assays. The data presented here show that Plexin-B2 functions in mouse macrophages as a negative regulator of the GTPases Rac and Cdc42 and as a negative regulator of basal cell motility and wound healing.

  16. Gramicidin A Mutants with Antibiotic Activity against Both Gram-Positive and Gram-Negative Bacteria.

    PubMed

    Zerfas, Breanna L; Joo, Yechaan; Gao, Jianmin

    2016-03-17

    Antimicrobial peptides (AMPs) have shown potential as alternatives to traditional antibiotics for fighting infections caused by antibiotic-resistant bacteria. One promising example of this is gramicidin A (gA). In its wild-type sequence, gA is active by permeating the plasma membrane of Gram-positive bacteria. However, gA is toxic to human red blood cells at similar concentrations to those required for it to exert its antimicrobial effects. Installing cationic side chains into gA has been shown to lower its hemolytic activity while maintaining the antimicrobial potency. In this study, we present the synthesis and the antibiotic activity of a new series of gA mutants that display cationic side chains. Specifically, by synthesizing alkylated lysine derivatives through reductive amination, we were able to create a broad selection of structures with varied activities towards Staphylococcus aureus and methicillin-resistant S. aureus (MRSA). Importantly, some of the new mutants were observed to have an unprecedented activity towards important Gram-negative pathogens, including Escherichia coli, Klebsiella pneumoniae and Psuedomonas aeruginosa. PMID:26918268

  17. GILZ mediates the antiproliferative activity of glucocorticoids by negative regulation of Ras signaling

    PubMed Central

    Ayroldi, Emira; Zollo, Ornella; Bastianelli, Alessandra; Marchetti, Cristina; Agostini, Massimiliano; Di Virgilio, Rosa; Riccardi, Carlo

    2007-01-01

    Tsc22d3 coding for glucocorticoid-induced leucine zipper (GILZ) was initially identified as a dexamethasone-responsive gene involved in the control of T lymphocyte activation and apoptosis. However, the physiological role of this molecule and its function in the biological activity of glucocorticoids (GCs) has not been clarified. Here, we demonstrate that GILZ interacts directly with Ras in vitro and in vivo as shown by GILZ and Ras coimmunoprecipitation and colocalization upon PMA activation in primary mouse spleen T lymphocytes and thymus cells. The analysis of GILZ mutants showed that they bound Ras through the tuberous sclerosis complex box (TSC) and, depending on the Ras activation level, formed a trimeric complex with Ras and Raf, which we previously identified as a GILZ binder. As a consequence of these interactions, GILZ diminished the activation of Ras and Raf downstream targets including ERK1/2, AKT/PKB serine/threonine kinase, and retinoblastoma (Rb) phosphorylation and cyclin D1 expression, leading to inhibition of Ras- and Raf-dependent cell proliferation and Ras-induced NIH-3T3 transformation. GILZ silencing resulted in an increase in concanavalin A–induced T cell proliferation and, most notably, inhibition of dexamethasone antiproliferative effects. Together, these findings indicate that GILZ serves as a negative regulator of Ras- and Raf-induced proliferation and is an important mediator of the antiproliferative effect of GCs. PMID:17492054

  18. All-trans retinoic acid negatively regulates cytotoxic activities of nature killer cell line 92

    SciTech Connect

    Li Ang . E-mail: liang3829@sina.com.cn; He Meilan; Wang Hui; Qiao Bin; Chen Ping; Gu Hua; Zhang Mengjie; He Shengxiang

    2007-01-05

    NK cells are key components of innate immune systems and their activities are regulated by cytokines and hormones. All-trans retinoic acid (ATRA), as a metabolite of vitamin A and an immunomodulatory hormone, plays an important role in regulating immune responses. In the present study, we investigated the effect of ATRA on human NK cell line NK92. We found that ATRA dose-dependently suppressed cytotoxic activities of NK92 cells without affecting their proliferation. To explore the mechanisms underlying the ATRA influence on NK92 cells, we examined the production of cytokines (TNF-{alpha}, IFN-{gamma}), gene expression of cytotoxic-associated molecules (perforin, granzyme B, nature killer receptors (NCRs), and NKG2D), and the activation of NF-{kappa}B pathways related with immune response. Our results demonstrated that ATRA suppressed NF-{kappa}B activity and prevented I{kappa}B{alpha} degradation in a dose-dependent way, inhibited IFN-{gamma} production and gene expression of granzyme B and NKp46. Our findings suggest that ATRA is a negative regulator of NK92 cell activation and may act as a potential regulator of anti-inflammatory functions in vivo.

  19. Gramicidin A Mutants with Antibiotic Activity against Both Gram-Positive and Gram-Negative Bacteria.

    PubMed

    Zerfas, Breanna L; Joo, Yechaan; Gao, Jianmin

    2016-03-17

    Antimicrobial peptides (AMPs) have shown potential as alternatives to traditional antibiotics for fighting infections caused by antibiotic-resistant bacteria. One promising example of this is gramicidin A (gA). In its wild-type sequence, gA is active by permeating the plasma membrane of Gram-positive bacteria. However, gA is toxic to human red blood cells at similar concentrations to those required for it to exert its antimicrobial effects. Installing cationic side chains into gA has been shown to lower its hemolytic activity while maintaining the antimicrobial potency. In this study, we present the synthesis and the antibiotic activity of a new series of gA mutants that display cationic side chains. Specifically, by synthesizing alkylated lysine derivatives through reductive amination, we were able to create a broad selection of structures with varied activities towards Staphylococcus aureus and methicillin-resistant S. aureus (MRSA). Importantly, some of the new mutants were observed to have an unprecedented activity towards important Gram-negative pathogens, including Escherichia coli, Klebsiella pneumoniae and Psuedomonas aeruginosa.

  20. Monoaminergic tone supports conductance correlations and stabilizes activity features in pattern generating neurons of the lobster, Panulirus interruptus.

    PubMed

    Krenz, Wulf-Dieter; Parker, Anna R; Rodgers, Edmund; Baro, Deborah J

    2015-01-01

    Experimental and computational studies demonstrate that different sets of intrinsic and synaptic conductances can give rise to equivalent activity patterns. This is because the balance of conductances, not their absolute values, defines a given activity feature. Activity-dependent feedback mechanisms maintain neuronal conductance correlations and their corresponding activity features. This study demonstrates that tonic nM concentrations of monoamines enable slow, activity-dependent processes that can maintain a correlation between the transient potassium current (I(A) and the hyperpolarization activated current (Ih) over the long-term (i.e., regulatory change persists for hours after removal of modulator). Tonic 5 nM DA acted through an RNA interference silencing complex (RISC)- and RNA polymerase II-dependent mechanism to maintain a long-term positive correlation between I(A) and Ih in the lateral pyloric neuron (LP) but not in the pyloric dilator neuron (PD). In contrast, tonic 5 nM 5HT maintained a RISC-dependent positive correlation between I(A) and Ih in PD but not LP over the long-term. Tonic 5 nM OCT maintained a long-term negative correlation between I(A) and Ih in PD but not LP; however, it was only revealed when RISC was inhibited. This study also demonstrated that monoaminergic tone can also preserve activity features over the long-term: the timing of LP activity, LP duty cycle and LP spike number per burst were maintained by tonic 5 nM DA. The data suggest that low-level monoaminergic tone acts through multiple slow processes to permit cell-specific, activity-dependent regulation of ionic conductances to maintain conductance correlations and their corresponding activity features over the long-term. PMID:26539083

  1. Monoaminergic tone supports conductance correlations and stabilizes activity features in pattern generating neurons of the lobster, Panulirus interruptus

    PubMed Central

    Krenz, Wulf-Dieter; Parker, Anna R.; Rodgers, Edmund; Baro, Deborah J.

    2015-01-01

    Experimental and computational studies demonstrate that different sets of intrinsic and synaptic conductances can give rise to equivalent activity patterns. This is because the balance of conductances, not their absolute values, defines a given activity feature. Activity-dependent feedback mechanisms maintain neuronal conductance correlations and their corresponding activity features. This study demonstrates that tonic nM concentrations of monoamines enable slow, activity-dependent processes that can maintain a correlation between the transient potassium current (IA) and the hyperpolarization activated current (Ih) over the long-term (i.e., regulatory change persists for hours after removal of modulator). Tonic 5 nM DA acted through an RNA interference silencing complex (RISC)- and RNA polymerase II-dependent mechanism to maintain a long-term positive correlation between IA and Ih in the lateral pyloric neuron (LP) but not in the pyloric dilator neuron (PD). In contrast, tonic 5 nM 5HT maintained a RISC-dependent positive correlation between IA and Ih in PD but not LP over the long-term. Tonic 5 nM OCT maintained a long-term negative correlation between IA and Ih in PD but not LP; however, it was only revealed when RISC was inhibited. This study also demonstrated that monoaminergic tone can also preserve activity features over the long-term: the timing of LP activity, LP duty cycle and LP spike number per burst were maintained by tonic 5 nM DA. The data suggest that low-level monoaminergic tone acts through multiple slow processes to permit cell-specific, activity-dependent regulation of ionic conductances to maintain conductance correlations and their corresponding activity features over the long-term. PMID:26539083

  2. Correlation between JAK2 allele burden and pulmonary arterial hypertension and hematological parameters in Philadelphia negative JAK2 positive myeloproliferative neoplasms. An Egyptian experience.

    PubMed

    Mattar, Mervat M; Morad, Mohammed Abdel Kader; El Husseiny, Noha M; Ali, Noha H; El Demerdash, Doaa M

    2016-10-01

    Myeloproliferative neoplasms are characterized by a common stem cell-derived clonal proliferation, but are phenotypically diverse. JAK2 is mutated (V617F) in more than 90 % of patients with polycythemia vera (PV) and approximately 60 % of patients with essential thrombocythemia (ET) or primary myelofibrosis (PMF). Pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH) is a major complication of several hematological disorders. Chronic myeloproliferative disorders associated with PAH have been included in group five for which the etiology is unclear and/or multifactorial. The aim of this study is to screen Egyptian Philadelphia negative JAK2 positive myeloproliferative neoplasm patients for the presence of PAH and its correlation with JAK2 allele burden. We also made a review for correlation of JAK2 allele with hematological parameters comparing our results to others. We enrolled 60 patients with Philadelphia negative myeloproliferative neoplasms. All patients enrolled in the study were subjected to laboratory and imaging workup in the form of CBC, liver, kidney profile, bone marrow examination, abdominal ultrasonography, and transthoracic echocardiography. Our results revealed that 7 patients out of 60 (11.67 %) had pulmonary arterial hypertension, 3 patients with PMF, 2 patients with PRV, and 2 patients with ET, and its correlation with JAK2 allele burden was not statistically significant. Correlation analysis between JAK2 V617F allele burden and other parameters revealed: statistical significant correlation with age, HB, HCT, PLT, UA, LDH, and splenic diameter but insignificant correlation with WBCs and PAH. Pulmonary arterial hypertension prevalence in our study was 11.67 % and no significant correlation with JAK 2 allele burden. Our study is the largest one up to our knowledge that studies the association between its prevalence and JAK2 burden.

  3. Correlation between JAK2 allele burden and pulmonary arterial hypertension and hematological parameters in Philadelphia negative JAK2 positive myeloproliferative neoplasms. An Egyptian experience.

    PubMed

    Mattar, Mervat M; Morad, Mohammed Abdel Kader; El Husseiny, Noha M; Ali, Noha H; El Demerdash, Doaa M

    2016-10-01

    Myeloproliferative neoplasms are characterized by a common stem cell-derived clonal proliferation, but are phenotypically diverse. JAK2 is mutated (V617F) in more than 90 % of patients with polycythemia vera (PV) and approximately 60 % of patients with essential thrombocythemia (ET) or primary myelofibrosis (PMF). Pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH) is a major complication of several hematological disorders. Chronic myeloproliferative disorders associated with PAH have been included in group five for which the etiology is unclear and/or multifactorial. The aim of this study is to screen Egyptian Philadelphia negative JAK2 positive myeloproliferative neoplasm patients for the presence of PAH and its correlation with JAK2 allele burden. We also made a review for correlation of JAK2 allele with hematological parameters comparing our results to others. We enrolled 60 patients with Philadelphia negative myeloproliferative neoplasms. All patients enrolled in the study were subjected to laboratory and imaging workup in the form of CBC, liver, kidney profile, bone marrow examination, abdominal ultrasonography, and transthoracic echocardiography. Our results revealed that 7 patients out of 60 (11.67 %) had pulmonary arterial hypertension, 3 patients with PMF, 2 patients with PRV, and 2 patients with ET, and its correlation with JAK2 allele burden was not statistically significant. Correlation analysis between JAK2 V617F allele burden and other parameters revealed: statistical significant correlation with age, HB, HCT, PLT, UA, LDH, and splenic diameter but insignificant correlation with WBCs and PAH. Pulmonary arterial hypertension prevalence in our study was 11.67 % and no significant correlation with JAK 2 allele burden. Our study is the largest one up to our knowledge that studies the association between its prevalence and JAK2 burden. PMID:27468853

  4. Emotional and cognitive health correlates of leisure activities in older Latino and Caucasian women.

    PubMed

    Herrera, Angelica P; Meeks, Thomas W; Dawes, Sharron E; Hernandez, Dominique M; Thompson, Wesley K; Sommerfeld, David H; Allison, Matthew A; Jeste, Dilip V

    2011-12-01

    This study examined differences in the frequency of leisure activity participation and relationships to depressive symptom burden and cognition in Latino and Caucasian women. Cross-sectional data were obtained from a demographically matched subsample of Latino and Caucasian (n = 113 each) postmenopausal women (age ≥60 years), interviewed in 2004-2006 for a multiethnic cohort study of successful aging in San Diego County. Frequencies of engagement in 16 leisure activities and associations between objective cognitive performance and depressive symptom burden by ethnicity were identified using bivariate and linear regression, adjusted for physical functioning and demographic covariates. Compared to Caucasian women, Latinas were significantly more likely to be caregivers and used computers less often. Engaging in organized social activity was associated with fewer depressive symptoms in both groups. Listening to the radio was positively correlated with lower depressive symptom burden for Latinas and better cognitive functioning in Caucasians. Cognitive functioning was better in Latinas who read and did puzzles. Housework was negatively associated with Latinas' emotional health and Caucasians' cognitive functioning. Latino and Caucasian women participate in different patterns of leisure activities. Additionally, ethnicity significantly affects the relationship between leisure activities and both emotional and cognitive health.

  5. Uniformity and nonuniformity of neural activities correlated to different insight problem solving.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Q; Li, Y; Shang, X; Zhou, Z; Han, L

    2014-06-13

    Previous studies on the neural basis of insight reflected weak consistency except for the anterior cingulate cortex. The present work adopted the semantic and homophonic punny riddle to explore the uniformity and nonuniformity of neural activities correlated to different insight problem solving. Results showed that in the early period of insight solving, the semantic and homophonic punny riddles induced a common N350-500 over the central scalp. However, during -400 to 0 ms before the riddles were solved, the semantic punny riddles induced a positive event-related potential (ERP) deflection over the temporal cortex for retrieving the extensive semantic information, while the homophonic punny riddles induced a positive ERP deflection over the temporal cortex and a negative one in the left frontal cortex which might reflect the semantic and phonological information processing respectively. Our study indicated that different insight problem solving should have the same cognitive process of detecting cognitive conflicts, but have different ways to solve the conflicts.

  6. Insular Activity during Passive Viewing of Aversive Stimuli Reflects Individual Differences in State Negative Affect

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Meriau, Katja; Wartenburger, Isabell; Kazzer, Philipp; Prehn, Kristin; Villringer, Arno; van der Meer, Elke; Heekeren, Hauke R.

    2009-01-01

    People differ with regard to how they perceive, experience, and express negative affect. While trait negative affect reflects a stable, sustained personality trait, state negative affect represents a stimulus limited and temporally acute emotion. So far, little is known about the neural systems mediating the relationship between negative affect…

  7. Biphasic change in correlation between ovarian lipid peroxides and progestational activity during pseudopregnancy induced in immature rats.

    PubMed

    Kurusu, S; Tsukamoto, K; Konishi, H; Tachibana, M; Kawaminami, M; Hashimoto, I

    1999-09-01

    We measured ovarian lipid peroxide (LP) levels and plasma progestins, progesterone (P4) and 20alpha-dihydroprogesterone, throughout pseudopregnancy in gonadotropin-primed immature rats. Plasma P4 fluctuated, with two peaks on days 5 (PSP5) and 8 of pseudopregnancy, and then declined to the basal level by PSP12. Ovarian LP increased from PSP1 to PSP4, decreased temporarily until PSP8, and then rose gradually until PSP14. From PSP1 through PSP7, ovarian LP was positively correlated with total progestins according to the Spearman ranked correlation coefficient (r=+0.829, p<0.05). In contrast, a negative correlation between ovarian LP and plasma P4 was apparent (r=-0.816, p<0.05) from PSP8 to PSP14. These results show the biphasic correlation of LP with luteal progestational activity depending on the luteal stage.

  8. Rapid estrogen signaling negatively regulates PTEN activity through phosphorylation in endometrial cancer cells

    PubMed Central

    Scully, Melanie M.; Palacios-Helgeson, Leslie K.; Wah, Lah S.; Jackson, Twila A.

    2014-01-01

    Hyperestrogenicity is a risk factor for endometrial cancer. 17β-estradiol (E2) is known to stimulate both genomic and nongenomic estrogen receptor-α (ERα) actions in a number of reproductive tissues. However, the contributions of transcription-independent ERα signaling on normal and malignant endometrium are not fully understood. Phosphatase and tensin homolog (PTEN) is a tumor suppressor that decreases cellular mitosis primarily through negative regulation of the phosphoinositide 3-kinase/AKT signaling axis. PTEN levels are elevated during the E2 dominated, mitotically active, proliferative phase of the menstrual cycle, indicating possible hormonal regulation of PTEN in the uterus. In order to determine if rapid E2 signaling regulates PTEN, we used ERα positive, PTEN positive, endometrial cells. We show that cytosolic E2/ERα signaling leads to increased phosphorylation of PTEN at key regulatory residues. Importantly, E2 stimulation decreased PTEN lipid phosphatase activity and caused consequent increases in phospho-AKT. We further demonstrate that cytosolic ERα forms a complex with PTEN in an E2-dependent manner, and that ERα constitutively complexes with protein kinase2-α (CK2α), a kinase previously shown to phosphorylate the C-terminal tail of PTEN. These results provide mechanistic support for an E2-dependent, ERα cytosolic signaling complex that negatively regulates PTEN activity through carboxy terminus phosphorylation. Using an animal model, we show that sustained E2 signaling results in increased phospho-PTEN (S380, T382, T383), total PTEN and phospho-AKT (S473). Taken together, we provide a novel mechanism in which transcription-independent E2/ERα signaling may promote a pro-tumorigenic environment in the endometrium. PMID:24844349

  9. MRF4 negatively regulates adult skeletal muscle growth by repressing MEF2 activity.

    PubMed

    Moretti, Irene; Ciciliot, Stefano; Dyar, Kenneth A; Abraham, Reimar; Murgia, Marta; Agatea, Lisa; Akimoto, Takayuki; Bicciato, Silvio; Forcato, Mattia; Pierre, Philippe; Uhlenhaut, N Henriette; Rigby, Peter W J; Carvajal, Jaime J; Blaauw, Bert; Calabria, Elisa; Schiaffino, Stefano

    2016-01-01

    The myogenic regulatory factor MRF4 is highly expressed in adult skeletal muscle but its function is unknown. Here we show that Mrf4 knockdown in adult muscle induces hypertrophy and prevents denervation-induced atrophy. This effect is accompanied by increased protein synthesis and widespread activation of muscle-specific genes, many of which are targets of MEF2 transcription factors. MEF2-dependent genes represent the top-ranking gene set enriched after Mrf4 RNAi and a MEF2 reporter is inhibited by co-transfected MRF4 and activated by Mrf4 RNAi. The Mrf4 RNAi-dependent increase in fibre size is prevented by dominant negative MEF2, while constitutively active MEF2 is able to induce myofibre hypertrophy. The nuclear localization of the MEF2 corepressor HDAC4 is impaired by Mrf4 knockdown, suggesting that MRF4 acts by stabilizing a repressor complex that controls MEF2 activity. These findings open new perspectives in the search for therapeutic targets to prevent muscle wasting, in particular sarcopenia and cachexia. PMID:27484840

  10. Vitamin D receptor negatively regulates bacterial-stimulated NF-kappaB activity in intestine.

    PubMed

    Wu, Shaoping; Liao, Anne P; Xia, Yinglin; Li, Yan Chun; Li, Jian-Dong; Sartor, R Balfour; Sun, Jun

    2010-08-01

    Vitamin D receptor (VDR) plays an essential role in gastrointestinal inflammation. Most investigations have focused on the immune response; however, how bacteria regulate VDR and how VDR modulates the nuclear factor (NF)-kappaB pathway in intestinal epithelial cells remain unexplored. This study investigated the effects of VDR ablation on NF-kappaB activation in intestinal epithelia and the role of enteric bacteria on VDR expression. We found that VDR(-/-) mice exhibited a pro-inflammatory bias. After Salmonella infection, VDR(-/-) mice had increased bacterial burden and mortality. Serum interleukin-6 in noninfected VDR(+/+) mice was undetectable, but was easily detectable in VDR(-/-) mice. NF-kappaB p65 formed a complex with VDR in noninfected wild-type mouse intestine. In contrast, deletion of VDR abolished VDR/P65 binding. P65 nuclear translocation occurred in colonic epithelial cells of untreated VDR(-/-) mice. VDR deletion also elevated NF-kappaB activity in intestinal epithelia. VDR was localized to the surface epithelia of germ-free mice, but to crypt epithelial cells in conventionalized mice. VDR expression, distribution, transcriptional activity, and target genes were regulated by Salmonella stimulation, independent of 1,25-dihydroxyvitamin D3. Our study demonstrates that commensal and pathogenic bacteria directly regulate colonic epithelial VDR expression and location in vivo. VDR negatively regulates bacterial-induced intestinal NF-kappaB activation and attenuates response to infection. Therefore, VDR is an important contributor to intestinal homeostasis and host protection from bacterial invasion and infection.

  11. In vitro antimicrobial activity of five essential oils on multidrug resistant Gram-negative clinical isolates

    PubMed Central

    Sakkas, Hercules; Gousia, Panagiota; Economou, Vangelis; Sakkas, Vassilios; Petsios, Stefanos; Papadopoulou, Chrissanthy

    2016-01-01

    Aim/Background: The emergence of drug-resistant pathogens has drawn attention on medicinal plants for potential antimicrobial properties. The objective of the present study was the investigation of the antimicrobial activity of five plant essential oils on multidrug resistant Gram-negative bacteria. Materials and Methods: Basil, chamomile blue, origanum, thyme, and tea tree oil were tested against clinical isolates of Acinetobacter baumannii (n = 6), Escherichia coli (n = 4), Klebsiella pneumoniae (n = 7), and Pseudomonas aeruginosa (n = 5) using the broth macrodilution method. Results: The tested essential oils produced variable antibacterial effect, while Chamomile blue oil demonstrated no antibacterial activity. Origanum, Thyme, and Basil oils were ineffective on P. aeruginosa isolates. The minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) and minimum bactericidal concentration values ranged from 0.12% to 1.50% (v/v) for tea tree oil, 0.25-4% (v/v) for origanum and thyme oil, 0.50% to >4% for basil oil and >4% for chamomile blue oil. Compared to literature data on reference strains, the reported MIC values were different by 2SD, denoting less successful antimicrobial activity against multidrug resistant isolates. Conclusions: The antimicrobial activities of the essential oils are influenced by the strain origin (wild, reference, drug sensitive, or resistant) and it should be taken into consideration whenever investigating the plants’ potential for developing new antimicrobials. PMID:27366345

  12. Effects of negative air ions on activity of neural substrates involved in autonomic regulation in rats

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suzuki, Satoko; Yanagita, Shinya; Amemiya, Seiichiro; Kato, Yumi; Kubota, Natsuko; Ryushi, Tomoo; Kita, Ichiro

    2008-07-01

    The neural mechanism by which negative air ions (NAI) mediate the regulation of autonomic nervous system activity is still unknown. We examined the effects of NAI on physiological responses, such as blood pressure (BP), heart rate (HR), and heart rate variability (HRV) as well as neuronal activity, in the paraventricular nucleus of the hypothalamus (PVN), locus coeruleus (LC), nucleus ambiguus (NA), and nucleus of the solitary tract (NTS) with c-Fos immunohistochemistry in anesthetized, spontaneously breathing rats. In addition, we performed cervical vagotomy to reveal the afferent pathway involved in mediating the effects of NAI on autonomic regulation. NAI significantly decreased BP and HR, and increased HF power of the HRV spectrum. Significant decreases in c-Fos positive nuclei in the PVN and LC, and enhancement of c-Fos expression in the NA and NTS were induced by NAI. After vagotomy, these physiological and neuronal responses to NAI were not observed. These findings suggest that NAI can modulate autonomic regulation through inhibition of neuronal activity in PVN and LC as well as activation of NA neurons, and that these effects of NAI might be mediated via the vagus nerves.

  13. Antibacterial activities of selected edible plants extracts against multidrug-resistant Gram-negative bacteria

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background In response to the propagation of bacteria resistant to many antibiotics also called multi-drug resistant (MDR) bacteria, the discovery of new and more efficient antibacterial agents is primordial. The present study was aimed at evaluating the antibacterial activities of seven Cameroonian dietary plants (Adansonia digitata, Aframomum alboviolaceum, Aframomum polyanthum, Anonidium. mannii, Hibiscus sabdarifa, Ocimum gratissimum and Tamarindus indica). Methods The phytochemical screening of the studied extracts was performed using described methods whilst the liquid broth micro dilution was used for all antimicrobial assays against 27 Gram-negative bacteria. Results The results of the phytochemical tests indicate that all tested extracts contained phenols and triterpenes, other classes of chemicals being selectively present. The studied extracts displayed various degrees of antibacterial activities. The extracts of A. digitata, H. sabdarifa, A. polyanthum, A. alboviolaceum and O. gratissimum showed the best spectra of activity, their inhibitory effects being recorded against 81.48%, 66.66%, 62.96%, 55.55%, and 55.55% of the 27 tested bacteria respectively. The extract of A. polyanthum was very active against E. aerogenes EA294 with the lowest recorded minimal inhibitory concentration (MIC) of 32 μg/ml. Conclusion The results of the present work provide useful baseline information for the potential use of the studied edible plants in the fight against both sensitive and MDR phenotypes. PMID:23837916

  14. MRF4 negatively regulates adult skeletal muscle growth by repressing MEF2 activity

    PubMed Central

    Moretti, Irene; Ciciliot, Stefano; Dyar, Kenneth A.; Abraham, Reimar; Murgia, Marta; Agatea, Lisa; Akimoto, Takayuki; Bicciato, Silvio; Forcato, Mattia; Pierre, Philippe; Uhlenhaut, N. Henriette; Rigby, Peter W. J.; Carvajal, Jaime J.; Blaauw, Bert; Calabria, Elisa; Schiaffino, Stefano

    2016-01-01

    The myogenic regulatory factor MRF4 is highly expressed in adult skeletal muscle but its function is unknown. Here we show that Mrf4 knockdown in adult muscle induces hypertrophy and prevents denervation-induced atrophy. This effect is accompanied by increased protein synthesis and widespread activation of muscle-specific genes, many of which are targets of MEF2 transcription factors. MEF2-dependent genes represent the top-ranking gene set enriched after Mrf4 RNAi and a MEF2 reporter is inhibited by co-transfected MRF4 and activated by Mrf4 RNAi. The Mrf4 RNAi-dependent increase in fibre size is prevented by dominant negative MEF2, while constitutively active MEF2 is able to induce myofibre hypertrophy. The nuclear localization of the MEF2 corepressor HDAC4 is impaired by Mrf4 knockdown, suggesting that MRF4 acts by stabilizing a repressor complex that controls MEF2 activity. These findings open new perspectives in the search for therapeutic targets to prevent muscle wasting, in particular sarcopenia and cachexia. PMID:27484840

  15. The lack of long-range negative correlations in glucose dynamics is associated with worse glucose control in patients with diabetes mellitus.

    PubMed

    Ogata, Hitomi; Tokuyama, Kumpei; Nagasaka, Shoichiro; Tsuchita, Takeshi; Kusaka, Ikuyo; Ishibashi, Shun; Suzuki, Hiroaki; Yamada, Nobuhiro; Hamano, Kumiko; Kiyono, Ken; Struzik, Zbigniew R; Yamamoto, Yoshiharu

    2012-07-01

    Glucose dynamics measured in ambulatory settings are fluid in nature and exhibit substantial complexity. We recently showed that a long-range negative correlation of glucose dynamics, which is considered to reflect blood glucose controllability over a substantial period, is absent in patients with diabetes mellitus. This was demonstrated using detrended fluctuation analysis (DFA), a modified random-walk analysis method for the detection of long-range correlations. In the present study, we further assessed the relationships between the established clinical indices of glycemic or insulinogenic control of hemoglobin A(1c) (HbA(1c)), glycated albumin (GA), 1,5-anhydroglucitol, and urine C-peptide immunoreactivity and the recently proposed DFA-based indices obtained from continuous glucose monitoring in 104 Japanese diabetic patients. Significant correlations between the following parameters were observed: (1) HbA(1c) and the long-range scaling exponent α(2) (r = 0.236, P < .05), (2) GA and α(2) (r = 0.254, P < .05), (3) GA and the short-range scaling exponent α(1) (r = 0.233, P < .05), and (4) urine C-peptide immunoreactivity and the mean glucose fluctuations (r = -0.294, P < .01). Therefore, we concluded that increases in the long-range DFA scaling exponent, which are indicative of the lack of a long-range negative correlation in glucose dynamics, reflected abnormalities in average glycemic control as clinically determined using HbA(1c) and GA parameters.

  16. Error-Related Brain Activity in Young Children: Associations with Parental Anxiety and Child Temperamental Negative Emotionality

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Torpey, Dana C.; Hajcak, Greg; Kim, Jiyon; Kujawa, Autumn J.; Dyson, Margaret W.; Olino, Thomas M.; Klein, Daniel N.

    2013-01-01

    Background: There is increasing interest in error-related brain activity in anxiety disorders. The error-related negativity (ERN) is a negative deflection in the event-related potential approximately 50 [milliseconds] after errors compared to correct responses. Recent studies suggest that the ERN may be a biomarker for anxiety, as it is positively…

  17. The Effects of Preferred Activities during Academic Work Breaks on Task Engagement and Negatively Reinforced Destructive Behavior.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McComas, Jennifer J.; Goddard, Carol; Hoch, Hannah

    2002-01-01

    Destructive behavior of 9-year-old with learning disabilities was evaluated in a functional analysis. The effects of extinction, negative reinforcement, and negative reinforcement combined with access to preferred activities were compared on behavior and task engagement. Engagement occurred most and destructive behavior occurred least when…

  18. Negative correlation between Nosema ceranae spore loads and deformed wing virus infection levels in adult honey bee workers.

    PubMed

    Costa, Cecilia; Tanner, Gina; Lodesani, Marco; Maistrello, Lara; Neumann, Peter

    2011-11-01

    Interactions between pathogens might contribute to honey bee colony losses. Here we investigated if there is an association between the microsporidian Nosema ceranae and the deformed wing virus (DWV) in different body sections of individual honey bee workers (Apis mellifera ligustica) under exclusion of the vector Varroa destructor. Our data provide correlational evidence for antagonistic interactions between the two pathogens in the midgut of the bees.

  19. Transcriptional activation by Myc is under negative control by the transcription factor AP-2.

    PubMed Central

    Gaubatz, S; Imhof, A; Dosch, R; Werner, O; Mitchell, P; Buettner, R; Eilers, M

    1995-01-01

    The Myc protein binds to and transactivates the expression of genes via E-box elements containing a central CAC(G/A)TG sequence. The transcriptional activation function of Myc is required for its ability to induce cell cycle progression, cellular transformation and apoptosis. Here we show that transactivation by Myc is under negative control by the transcription factor AP-2. AP-2 inhibits transactivation by Myc via two distinct mechanisms. First, high affinity binding sites for AP-2 overlap Myc-response elements in two bona fide target genes of Myc, prothymosin-alpha and ornithine decarboxylase. On these sites, AP-2 competes for binding of either Myc/Max heterodimers or Max/Max homodimers. The second mechanism involves a specific interaction between C-terminal domains of AP-2 and the BR/HLH/LZ domain of Myc, but not Max or Mad. Binding of AP-2 to Myc does not preclude association of Myc with Max, but impairs DNA binding of the Myc/Max complex and inhibits transactivation by Myc even in the absence of an overlapping AP-2 binding site. Taken together, our data suggest that AP-2 acts as a negative regulator of transactivation by Myc. Images PMID:7729426

  20. Investigation of the electrophysiological correlates of negative BOLD response during intermittent photic stimulation: An EEG-fMRI study.

    PubMed

    Maggioni, Eleonora; Zucca, Claudio; Reni, Gianluigi; Cerutti, Sergio; Triulzi, Fabio M; Bianchi, Anna M; Arrigoni, Filippo

    2016-06-01

    Although the occurrence of concomitant positive BOLD responses (PBRs) and negative BOLD responses (NBRs) to visual stimuli is increasingly investigated in neuroscience, it still lacks a definite explanation. Multimodal imaging represents a powerful tool to study the determinants of negative BOLD responses: the integration of functional Magnetic Resonance Imaging (fMRI) and electroencephalographic (EEG) recordings is especially useful, since it can give information on the neurovascular coupling underlying this complex phenomenon. In the present study, the brain response to intermittent photic stimulation (IPS) was investigated in a group of healthy subjects using simultaneous EEG-fMRI, with the main objective to study the electrophysiological mechanisms associated with the intense NBRs elicited by IPS in extra-striate visual cortex. The EEG analysis showed that IPS induced a desynchronization of the basal rhythm, followed by the instauration of a novel rhythm driven by the visual stimulation. The most interesting results emerged from the EEG-informed fMRI analysis, which suggested a relationship between the neuronal rhythms at 10 and 12 Hz and the BOLD dynamics in extra-striate visual cortex. These findings support the hypothesis that NBRs to visual stimuli may be neuronal in origin rather than reflecting pure vascular phenomena. Hum Brain Mapp 37:2247-2262, 2016. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  1. Negative activation energy and dielectric signatures of excitons and excitonic Mott transitions in quantum confined laser structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bhunia, Amit; Bansal, Kanika; Henini, Mohamed; Alshammari, Marzook S.; Datta, Shouvik

    2016-10-01

    Mostly, optical spectroscopies are used to investigate the physics of excitons, whereas their electrical evidences are hardly explored. Here, we examined a forward bias activated differential capacitance response of GaInP/AlGaInP based multi-quantum well laser diodes to trace the presence of excitons using electrical measurements. Occurrence of "negative activation energy" after light emission is understood as thermodynamical signature of steady state excitonic population under intermediate range of carrier injections. Similar corroborative results are also observed in an InGaAs/GaAs quantum dot laser structure grown by molecular beam epitaxy. With increasing biases, the measured differential capacitance response slowly vanishes. This represents gradual Mott transition of an excitonic phase into an electron-hole plasma in a GaInP/AlGaInP laser diode. This is further substantiated by more and more exponentially looking shapes of high energy tails in electroluminescence spectra with increasing forward bias, which originates from a growing non-degenerate population of free electrons and holes. Such an experimental correlation between electrical and optical properties of excitons can be used to advance the next generation excitonic devices.

  2. Negative Correlation between Serum S100B and Leptin Levels in Schizophrenic Patients During Treatment with Clozapine and Risperidone: Preliminary Evidence

    PubMed Central

    Hendouei, Narjes; Hosseini, Seyed Hamzeh; Panahi, Amin; Khazaeipour, Zahra; Barari, Fatemeh; Sahebnasagh, Adeleh; Ala, Shahram

    2016-01-01

    Recently, extensive efforts have been made to understand the rate of energy expenditure and the weight gain associated with atypical antipsychotic treatment, including identification of markers of obesity risk. In recent years, leptin, an adipocyte hormone, has gained significant interest in psychiatric disorders. S100B has been considered as a surrogate marker for astrocyte-specific damage in neurologic disorders. Also, S100B has been detected in adipose with concentration as high as nervous tissue as a second release source. In this study we evaluated the relationship between S100B and leptin in schizophrenic patients under treatment with clozapine and risperidone.This study included 19 patients meeting the DSM-IV-TR criteria for schizophrenia, having body mass index (BMI) of 16- 25 kg/m2 and suffering schizophrenia for more than 3 years and from this study. Twenty five healthy controls were group matched for age and gender whose BMI was 16-25 kg/m2. Serum S100B and leptin levels and positive and negative symptom scale (PANSS) were assessed at admission and after six weeks. During the study, S100B showed a strong and negative correlation with leptin (r = -0.5, P = 0.01). Also, there were negative correlation between serum S100B level and PANSS negative subscale after 6 weeks of treatment (r = -0.048, P = 0.8). Positive correlation between leptin level and PANSS suggested a potential role for leptin which can mediate the link between antipsychotic induced weight gain and therapeutic response in schizophrenia. PMID:27610173

  3. Negative Correlation between Serum S100B and Leptin Levels in Schizophrenic Patients During Treatment with Clozapine and Risperidone: Preliminary Evidence

    PubMed Central

    Hendouei, Narjes; Hosseini, Seyed Hamzeh; Panahi, Amin; Khazaeipour, Zahra; Barari, Fatemeh; Sahebnasagh, Adeleh; Ala, Shahram

    2016-01-01

    Recently, extensive efforts have been made to understand the rate of energy expenditure and the weight gain associated with atypical antipsychotic treatment, including identification of markers of obesity risk. In recent years, leptin, an adipocyte hormone, has gained significant interest in psychiatric disorders. S100B has been considered as a surrogate marker for astrocyte-specific damage in neurologic disorders. Also, S100B has been detected in adipose with concentration as high as nervous tissue as a second release source. In this study we evaluated the relationship between S100B and leptin in schizophrenic patients under treatment with clozapine and risperidone.This study included 19 patients meeting the DSM-IV-TR criteria for schizophrenia, having body mass index (BMI) of 16- 25 kg/m2 and suffering schizophrenia for more than 3 years and from this study. Twenty five healthy controls were group matched for age and gender whose BMI was 16-25 kg/m2. Serum S100B and leptin levels and positive and negative symptom scale (PANSS) were assessed at admission and after six weeks. During the study, S100B showed a strong and negative correlation with leptin (r = -0.5, P = 0.01). Also, there were negative correlation between serum S100B level and PANSS negative subscale after 6 weeks of treatment (r = -0.048, P = 0.8). Positive correlation between leptin level and PANSS suggested a potential role for leptin which can mediate the link between antipsychotic induced weight gain and therapeutic response in schizophrenia.

  4. Negative Correlation between Serum S100B and Leptin Levels in Schizophrenic Patients During Treatment with Clozapine and Risperidone: Preliminary Evidence.

    PubMed

    Hendouei, Narjes; Hosseini, Seyed Hamzeh; Panahi, Amin; Khazaeipour, Zahra; Barari, Fatemeh; Sahebnasagh, Adeleh; Ala, Shahram

    2016-01-01

    Recently, extensive efforts have been made to understand the rate of energy expenditure and the weight gain associated with atypical antipsychotic treatment, including identification of markers of obesity risk. In recent years, leptin, an adipocyte hormone, has gained significant interest in psychiatric disorders. S100B has been considered as a surrogate marker for astrocyte-specific damage in neurologic disorders. Also, S100B has been detected in adipose with concentration as high as nervous tissue as a second release source. In this study we evaluated the relationship between S100B and leptin in schizophrenic patients under treatment with clozapine and risperidone.This study included 19 patients meeting the DSM-IV-TR criteria for schizophrenia, having body mass index (BMI) of 16- 25 kg/m(2) and suffering schizophrenia for more than 3 years and from this study. Twenty five healthy controls were group matched for age and gender whose BMI was 16-25 kg/m(2). Serum S100B and leptin levels and positive and negative symptom scale (PANSS) were assessed at admission and after six weeks. During the study, S100B showed a strong and negative correlation with leptin (r = -0.5, P = 0.01). Also, there were negative correlation between serum S100B level and PANSS negative subscale after 6 weeks of treatment (r = -0.048, P = 0.8). Positive correlation between leptin level and PANSS suggested a potential role for leptin which can mediate the link between antipsychotic induced weight gain and therapeutic response in schizophrenia.

  5. Negative Correlation between Serum S100B and Leptin Levels in Schizophrenic Patients During Treatment with Clozapine and Risperidone: Preliminary Evidence.

    PubMed

    Hendouei, Narjes; Hosseini, Seyed Hamzeh; Panahi, Amin; Khazaeipour, Zahra; Barari, Fatemeh; Sahebnasagh, Adeleh; Ala, Shahram

    2016-01-01

    Recently, extensive efforts have been made to understand the rate of energy expenditure and the weight gain associated with atypical antipsychotic treatment, including identification of markers of obesity risk. In recent years, leptin, an adipocyte hormone, has gained significant interest in psychiatric disorders. S100B has been considered as a surrogate marker for astrocyte-specific damage in neurologic disorders. Also, S100B has been detected in adipose with concentration as high as nervous tissue as a second release source. In this study we evaluated the relationship between S100B and leptin in schizophrenic patients under treatment with clozapine and risperidone.This study included 19 patients meeting the DSM-IV-TR criteria for schizophrenia, having body mass index (BMI) of 16- 25 kg/m(2) and suffering schizophrenia for more than 3 years and from this study. Twenty five healthy controls were group matched for age and gender whose BMI was 16-25 kg/m(2). Serum S100B and leptin levels and positive and negative symptom scale (PANSS) were assessed at admission and after six weeks. During the study, S100B showed a strong and negative correlation with leptin (r = -0.5, P = 0.01). Also, there were negative correlation between serum S100B level and PANSS negative subscale after 6 weeks of treatment (r = -0.048, P = 0.8). Positive correlation between leptin level and PANSS suggested a potential role for leptin which can mediate the link between antipsychotic induced weight gain and therapeutic response in schizophrenia. PMID:27610173

  6. Developmental associations between short-term variability and long-term changes: Intraindividual correlation of positive and negative affect in daily life and cognitive aging.

    PubMed

    Hülür, Gizem; Hoppmann, Christiane A; Ram, Nilam; Gerstorf, Denis

    2015-07-01

    Conceptual notions and empirical evidence suggest that the intraindividual correlation (iCorr) of positive affect (PA) and negative affect (NA) is a meaningful characteristic of affective functioning. PA and NA are typically negatively correlated within-person. Previous research has found that the iCorr of PA and NA is relatively stable over time within individuals, that it differs across individuals, and that a less negative iCorr is associated with better resilience and less vulnerability. However, little is known about how the iCorr of PA and NA relates to cognitive aging. This project examined how the association between PA and NA in everyday life is associated with long-term cognitive aging trajectories. To do so, we linked microlongitudinal data on PA and NA obtained on up to 33 occasions over 6 consecutive days with macrolongitudinal data on fluid and crystallized cognitive abilities obtained over 15 years from a subsample of Berlin Aging Study participants (N = 81, mean age at the microlongitudinal study = 81 years, range 73-98; 41% women). Over and above age, gender, education, overall levels of PA and NA, and number of health conditions, a less negative iCorr of PA and NA was associated with lower levels of cognitive ability and steeper cognitive declines, particularly for fluency and knowledge abilities. We discuss possible mechanisms for this finding and argue that a less negative iCorr of PA and NA may be indicative of deficits in emotional integration that are tied to changes in crystallized aspects of cognitive abilities.

  7. The destructive negative binomial cure rate model with a latent activation scheme.

    PubMed

    Cancho, Vicente G; Bandyopadhyay, Dipankar; Louzada, Francisco; Yiqi, Bao

    2013-07-01

    A new flexible cure rate survival model is developed where the initial number of competing causes of the event of interest (say lesions or altered cells) follow a compound negative binomial (NB) distribution. This model provides a realistic interpretation of the biological mechanism of the event of interest as it models a destructive process of the initial competing risk factors and records only the damaged portion of the original number of risk factors. Besides, it also accounts for the underlying mechanisms that leads to cure through various latent activation schemes. Our method of estimation exploits maximum likelihood (ML) tools. The methodology is illustrated on a real data set on malignant melanoma, and the finite sample behavior of parameter estimates are explored through simulation studies.

  8. Traumatic Brain Injury among US Active Duty Military Personnel and Negative Drinking-Related Consequences

    PubMed Central

    Adams, Rachel Sayko; Larson, Mary Jo; Corrigan, John D.; Ritter, Grant A.; Williams, Thomas V.

    2013-01-01

    This study used the 2008 Department of Defense Survey of Health Related Behaviors among Active Duty Military Personnel to determine whether traumatic brain injury (TBI) is associated with past year drinking-related consequences. The study sample included currently-drinking personnel who had a combat deployment in the past year and were home for ≥6 months (N = 3,350). Negative binomial regression models were used to assess the incidence rate ratios of consequences, by TBI-level. Experiencing a TBI with a loss of consciousness >20 minutes was significantly associated with consequences independent of demographics, combat exposure, posttraumatic stress disorder, and binge drinking. The study’s limitations are noted. PMID:23869456

  9. Acoustic manipulation of active spherical carriers: Generation of negative radiation force

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rajabi, Majid; Mojahed, Alireza

    2016-09-01

    This paper examines theoretically a novel mechanism of generating negative (pulling) radiation force for acoustic manipulation of spherical carriers equipped with piezoelectric actuators in its inner surface. In this mechanism, the spherical particle is handled by common plane progressive monochromatic acoustic waves instead of zero-/higher- order Bessel beams or standing waves field. The handling strategy is based on applying a spatially uniform harmonic electrical voltage at the piezoelectric actuator with the same frequency of handling acoustic waves, in order to change the radiation force effect from repulsive (away from source) to attractive (toward source). This study may be considered as a start point for development of contact-free precise handling and entrapment technology of active carriers which are essential in many engineering and medicine applications.

  10. Dealing with negative stereotypes in sports: the role of cognitive anxiety when multiple identities are activated in sensorimotor tasks.

    PubMed

    Martiny, Sarah E; Gleibs, Ilka H; Parks-Stamm, Elizabeth J; Martiny-Huenger, Torsten; Froehlich, Laura; Harter, Anna Lena; Roth, Jenny

    2015-08-01

    Based on research on stereotype threat and multiple identities, this work explores the beneficial effects of activating a positive social identity when a negative identity is salient on women's performance in sports. Further, in line with research on the effects of anxiety in sports, we investigate whether the activation of a positive social identity buffers performance from cognitive anxiety associated with a negative stereotype. Two experiments tested these predictions in field settings. Experiment 1 (N = 83) shows that the simultaneous activation of a positive (i.e., member of a soccer team) and a negative social identity (i.e., woman) led to better performance than the activation of only a negative social identity for female soccer players. Experiment 2 (N = 46) demonstrates that identity condition moderated the effect of cognitive anxiety on performance for female basketball players. Results are discussed concerning multiple identities' potential for dealing with stressful situations.

  11. Smart conjugated polymer nanocarrier for healthy weight loss by negative feedback regulation of lipase activity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Yu-Lei; Zhu, Sha; Zhang, Lei; Feng, Pei-Jian; Yao, Xi-Kuang; Qian, Cheng-Gen; Zhang, Can; Jiang, Xi-Qun; Shen, Qun-Dong

    2016-02-01

    Healthy weight loss represents a real challenge when obesity is increasing in prevalence. Herein, we report a conjugated polymer nanocarrier for smart deactivation of lipase and thus balancing calorie intake. After oral administration, the nanocarrier is sensitive to lipase in the digestive tract and releases orlistat, which deactivates the enzyme and inhibits fat digestion. It also creates negative feedback to control the release of itself. The nanocarrier smartly regulates activity of the lipase cyclically varied between high and low levels. In spite of high fat diet intervention, obese mice receiving a single dose of the nanocarrier lose weight over eight days, whereas a control group continues the tendency to gain weight. Daily intragastric administration of the nanocarrier leads to lower weight of livers or fat pads, smaller adipocyte size, and lower total cholesterol level than that of the control group. Near-infrared fluorescence of the nanocarrier reveals its biodistribution.Healthy weight loss represents a real challenge when obesity is increasing in prevalence. Herein, we report a conjugated polymer nanocarrier for smart deactivation of lipase and thus balancing calorie intake. After oral administration, the nanocarrier is sensitive to lipase in the digestive tract and releases orlistat, which deactivates the enzyme and inhibits fat digestion. It also creates negative feedback to control the release of itself. The nanocarrier smartly regulates activity of the lipase cyclically varied between high and low levels. In spite of high fat diet intervention, obese mice receiving a single dose of the nanocarrier lose weight over eight days, whereas a control group continues the tendency to gain weight. Daily intragastric administration of the nanocarrier leads to lower weight of livers or fat pads, smaller adipocyte size, and lower total cholesterol level than that of the control group. Near-infrared fluorescence of the nanocarrier reveals its biodistribution

  12. Tetraspanin CD151 Is a Negative Regulator of FcεRI-Mediated Mast Cell Activation

    PubMed Central

    Abdala-Valencia, Hiam; Bryce, Paul J.; Schleimer, Robert P.; Wechsler, Joshua B.; Loffredo, Lucas F.; Cook-Mills, Joan M.; Hsu, Chia-Lin; Berdnikovs, Sergejs

    2016-01-01

    Mast cells are critical in the pathogenesis of allergic disease due to the release of preformed and newly synthesized mediators, yet the mechanisms controlling mast cell activation are not well understood. Members of the tetraspanin family are recently emerging as modulators of FcεRI-mediated mast cell activation; however, mechanistic understanding of their function is currently lacking. The tetraspanin CD151 is a poorly understood member of this family and is specifically induced on mouse and human mast cells upon FcεRI aggregation but its functional effects are unknown. In this study, we show that CD151 deficiency significantly exacerbates the IgE-mediated late phase inflammation in a murine model of passive cutaneous anaphylaxis. Ex vivo, FcεRI stimulation of bone marrow–derived mast cells from CD151−/− mice resulted in significantly enhanced expression of proinflammatory cytokines IL-4, IL-13, and TNF-α compared with wild-type controls. However, FcεRI -induced mast cell degranulation was unaffected. At the molecular signaling level, CD151 selectively regulated IgE-induced activation of ERK1/2 and PI3K, associated with cytokine production, but had no effect on the phospholipase Cγ1 signaling, associated with degranulation. Collectively, our data indicate that CD151 exerts negative regulation over IgE-induced late phase responses and cytokine production in mast cells. PMID:26136426

  13. Activation energy of negative fixed charges in thermal ALD Al2O3

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kühnhold-Pospischil, S.; Saint-Cast, P.; Richter, A.; Hofmann, M.

    2016-08-01

    A study of the thermally activated negative fixed charges Qtot and the interface trap densities Dit at the interface between Si and thermal atomic-layer-deposited amorphous Al2O3 layers is presented. The thermal activation of Qtot and Dit was conducted at annealing temperatures between 220 °C and 500 °C for durations between 3 s and 38 h. The temperature-induced differences in Qtot and Dit were measured using the characterization method called corona oxide characterization of semiconductors. Their time dependency were fitted using stretched exponential functions, yielding activation energies of EA = (2.2 ± 0.2) eV and EA = (2.3 ± 0.7) eV for Qtot and Dit, respectively. For annealing temperatures from 350 °C to 500 °C, the changes in Qtot and Dit were similar for both p- and n-type doped Si samples. In contrast, at 220 °C the charging process was enhanced for p-type samples. Based on the observations described in this contribution, a charging model leading to Qtot based on an electron hopping process between the silicon and Al2O3 through defects is proposed.

  14. Trait anxiety impact on posterior activation asymmetries at rest and during evoked negative emotions: EEG investigation.

    PubMed

    Aftanas, Ljubomir I; Pavlov, Sergey V

    2005-01-01

    The main objective of the present investigation was to examine how high trait anxiety would influence cortical EEG asymmetries under non-emotional conditions and while experiencing negative emotions. The 62-channel EEG was recorded in control (n=21) and high anxiety (HA, n=18) non-patient individuals. Results showed that in HA subjects, the lowest level of arousal (eyes closed) was associated with stronger right-sided parieto-temporal theta-1 (4-6 Hz) and beta-1 (12-18 Hz) activity, whereas increased non-emotional arousal (eyes open, viewing neutral movie clip) was marked by persisting favored right hemisphere beta-1 activity. In turn, viewing aversive movie clip by the HA group led to significant lateralized decrease of the right parieto-temporal beta-1 power, which was initially higher in the emotionally neutral conditions. The EEG data suggests that asymmetrical parieto-temporal theta-1 and beta-1 EEG activity might be better interpreted in terms of Gray's BAS and BIS theory. PMID:15598519

  15. Positive and negative regulation of T-cell activation through kinases and phosphatases.

    PubMed Central

    Mustelin, Tomas; Taskén, Kjetil

    2003-01-01

    The sequence of events in T-cell antigen receptor (TCR) signalling leading to T-cell activation involves regulation of a number of protein tyrosine kinases (PTKs) and the phosphorylation status of many of their substrates. Proximal signalling pathways involve PTKs of the Src, Syk, Csk and Tec families, adapter proteins and effector enzymes in a highly organized tyrosine-phosphorylation cascade. In intact cells, tyrosine phosphorylation is rapidly reversible and generally of a very low stoichiometry even under induced conditions due to the fact that the enzymes removing phosphate from tyrosine-phosphorylated substrates, the protein tyrosine phosphatases (PTPases), have a capacity that is several orders of magnitude higher than that of the PTKs. It follows that a relatively minor change in the PTK/PTPase balance can have a major impact on net tyrosine phosphorylation and thereby on activation and proliferation of T-cells. This review focuses on the involvement of PTKs and PTPases in positive and negative regulation of T-cell activation, the emerging theme of reciprocal regulation of each type of enzyme by the other, as well as regulation of phosphotyrosine turnover by Ser/Thr phosphorylation and regulation of localization of signal components. PMID:12485116

  16. Nicotine induces negative energy balance through hypothalamic AMP-activated protein kinase.

    PubMed

    Martínez de Morentin, Pablo B; Whittle, Andrew J; Fernø, Johan; Nogueiras, Rubén; Diéguez, Carlos; Vidal-Puig, Antonio; López, Miguel

    2012-04-01

    Smokers around the world commonly report increased body weight after smoking cessation as a major factor that interferes with their attempts to quit. Numerous controlled studies in both humans and rodents have reported that nicotine exerts a marked anorectic action. The effects of nicotine on energy homeostasis have been mostly pinpointed in the central nervous system, but the molecular mechanisms controlling its action are still not fully understood. The aim of this study was to investigate the effect of nicotine on hypothalamic AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) and its effect on energy balance. Here we demonstrate that nicotine-induced weight loss is associated with inactivation of hypothalamic AMPK, decreased orexigenic signaling in the hypothalamus, increased energy expenditure as a result of increased locomotor activity, increased thermogenesis in brown adipose tissue (BAT), and alterations in fuel substrate utilization. Conversely, nicotine withdrawal or genetic activation of hypothalamic AMPK in the ventromedial nucleus of the hypothalamus reversed nicotine-induced negative energy balance. Overall these data demonstrate that the effects of nicotine on energy balance involve specific modulation of the hypothalamic AMPK-BAT axis. These targets may be relevant for the development of new therapies for human obesity. PMID:22315316

  17. Nicotine induces negative energy balance through hypothalamic AMP-activated protein kinase.

    PubMed

    Martínez de Morentin, Pablo B; Whittle, Andrew J; Fernø, Johan; Nogueiras, Rubén; Diéguez, Carlos; Vidal-Puig, Antonio; López, Miguel

    2012-04-01

    Smokers around the world commonly report increased body weight after smoking cessation as a major factor that interferes with their attempts to quit. Numerous controlled studies in both humans and rodents have reported that nicotine exerts a marked anorectic action. The effects of nicotine on energy homeostasis have been mostly pinpointed in the central nervous system, but the molecular mechanisms controlling its action are still not fully understood. The aim of this study was to investigate the effect of nicotine on hypothalamic AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) and its effect on energy balance. Here we demonstrate that nicotine-induced weight loss is associated with inactivation of hypothalamic AMPK, decreased orexigenic signaling in the hypothalamus, increased energy expenditure as a result of increased locomotor activity, increased thermogenesis in brown adipose tissue (BAT), and alterations in fuel substrate utilization. Conversely, nicotine withdrawal or genetic activation of hypothalamic AMPK in the ventromedial nucleus of the hypothalamus reversed nicotine-induced negative energy balance. Overall these data demonstrate that the effects of nicotine on energy balance involve specific modulation of the hypothalamic AMPK-BAT axis. These targets may be relevant for the development of new therapies for human obesity.

  18. Correlates of physical activity: why are some people physically active and others not?

    PubMed

    Bauman, Adrian E; Reis, Rodrigo S; Sallis, James F; Wells, Jonathan C; Loos, Ruth J F; Martin, Brian W

    2012-07-21

    Physical inactivity is an important contributor to non-communicable diseases in countries of high income, and increasingly so in those of low and middle income. Understanding why people are physically active or inactive contributes to evidence-based planning of public health interventions, because effective programmes will target factors known to cause inactivity. Research into correlates (factors associated with activity) or determinants (those with a causal relationship) has burgeoned in the past two decades, but has mostly focused on individual-level factors in high-income countries. It has shown that age, sex, health status, self-efficacy, and motivation are associated with physical activity. Ecological models take a broad view of health behaviour causation, with the social and physical environment included as contributors to physical inactivity, particularly those outside the health sector, such as urban planning, transportation systems, and parks and trails. New areas of determinants research have identified genetic factors contributing to the propensity to be physically active, and evolutionary factors and obesity that might predispose to inactivity, and have explored the longitudinal tracking of physical activity throughout life. An understanding of correlates and determinants, especially in countries of low and middle income, could reduce the eff ect of future epidemics of inactivity and contribute to effective global prevention of non-communicable diseases.

  19. TRIM11 negatively regulates IFNβ production and antiviral activity by targeting TBK1.

    PubMed

    Lee, Younglang; Song, Byeongwoon; Park, Chankyu; Kwon, Ki-Sun

    2013-01-01

    The innate immune response is a host defense mechanism against infection by viruses and bacteria. Type I interferons (IFNα/β) play a crucial role in innate immunity. If not tightly regulated under normal conditions and during immune responses, IFN production can become aberrant, leading to inflammatory and autoimmune diseases. In this study, we identified TRIM11 (tripartite motif containing 11) as a novel negative regulator of IFNβ production. Ectopic expression of TRIM11 decreased IFNβ promoter activity induced by poly (I:C) stimulation or overexpression of RIG-I (retinoic acid-inducible gene-I) signaling cascade components RIG-IN (constitutively active form of RIG-I), MAVS (mitochondrial antiviral signaling protein), or TBK1 (TANK-binding kinase-1). Conversely, TRIM11 knockdown enhanced IFNβ promoter activity induced by these stimuli. Moreover, TRIM11 overexpression inhibited the phosphorylation and dimerization of IRF3 and expression of IFNβ mRNA. By contrast, TRIM11 knockdown increased the IRF3 phosphorylation and IFNβ mRNA expression. We also found that TRIM11 and TBK1, a key kinase that phosphorylates IRF3 in the RIG-I pathway, interacted with each other through CC and CC2 domain, respectively. This interaction was enhanced in the presence of the TBK1 adaptor proteins, NAP1 (NF-κB activating kinase-associated protein-1), SINTBAD (similar to NAP1 TBK1 adaptor) or TANK (TRAF family member-associated NF-κB activator). Consistent with its inhibitory role in RIG-I-mediated IFNβ signaling, TRIM11 overexpression enhanced viral infectivity, whereas TRIM11 knockdown produced the opposite effect. Collectively, our results suggest that TRIM11 inhibits RIG-I-mediated IFNβ production by targeting the TBK1 signaling complex. PMID:23675467

  20. PCDH10 Interacts With hTERT and Negatively Regulates Telomerase Activity

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Li-Na; Hua, Xing; Deng, Wu-Quan; Wu, Qi-Nan; Mei, Hao; Chen, Bing

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Telomerase catalyzes telomeric DNA synthesis, an essential process to maintain the length of telomere for continuous cell proliferation and genomic stability. Telomerase is activated in gametes, stem cells, and most tumor cells, and its activity is tightly controlled by a catalytic human telomerase reverse transcriptase (hTERT) subunit and a collection of associated proteins. In the present work, normal human testis tissue was used for the first time to identify proteins involved in the telomerase regulation under normal physiological conditions. Immunoprecipitation was performed using total protein lysates from the normal testis tissue and the proteins of interest were identified by microfluidic high-performance liquid chromatography and tandem mass spectrometry (HPLC-Chip-MS/MS). The regulatory role of PCDH10 in telomerase activity was confirmed by a telomeric repeat amplification protocol (TRAP) assay, and the biological functions of it were characterized by in vitro proliferation, migration, and invasion assays. A new in vivo hTERT interacting protein, protocadherin 10 (PCDH10), was identified. Overexpression of PCDH10 in pancreatic cancer cells impaired telomere elongation by inhibiting telomerase activity while having no obvious effect on hTERT expression at mRNA and protein levels. As a result of this critical function in telomerase regulation, PCDH10 was found to inhibit cell proliferation, migration, and invasion, suggesting a tumor suppressive role of this protein. Our data suggested that PCDH10 played a critical role in cancer cell growth, by negatively regulating telomerase activity, implicating a potential value in future therapeutic development against cancer. PMID:26683936

  1. Assessment of subclinical atherosclerosis in ankylosing spondylitis: correlations with disease activity indices.

    PubMed

    Perrotta, F M; Scarno, A; Carboni, A; Bernardo, V; Montepaone, M; Lubrano, E; Spadaro, A

    2013-01-01

    The aim of the study was to evaluate atherosclerosis in ankylosing spondylitis (AS) through the assessment of morphological and functional measures of subclinical atherosclerosis. Twenty patients [M/F=12/8, age (median/range) 43.5/28-69 years; disease duration (median/range) 9.7/1-36) years] with AS classified according to modified New York criteria and twenty age and sex related healthy controls with negative past medical history for cardiovascular events were enrolled in the study. In all patients and controls, the intima-media thickness (IMT) of common carotid artery, carotid bulb and internal carotid artery, and the flow-mediated dilatation (FMD) of non-dominant arm brachial artery were determined, using a sonographic probe Esaote GPX (Genoa, Italy). Furthermore, we assess the main disease activity and disability indices [bath ankylosing spondylitis disease activity index, ankylosing spondylitis disease activity score-eritrosedimentation rate (ASDAS-ESR), ASDAS-C-reactive protein (CRP), bath ankylosing spondylitis metrology index, bath ankylosing spondylitis functional index) and acute phase reactants. Plasmatic values of total cholesterol, low-density lipoprotein, high-density lipoprotein, triglyceride and homocysteine were carried out in all twenty patients. IMT at carotid bulb was significant higher in patients than in controls (0.67 mm vs 0.54 mm; P=0.03). FMD did not statistically differ between patients and controls (12.5% vs 15%; P>0.05). We found a correlation between IMT at carotid bulb and ESR (rho 0.43; P=0.04). No correlation was found between FMD and disease activity and disability indices. This study showed that in AS patients, without risk factors for cardiovascular disease, carotid bulb IMT, morphological index of subclinical atherosclerosis, is higher than in controls.

  2. PLZF is a negative regulator of retinoic acid receptor transcriptional activity.

    PubMed

    Martin, Perrine J; Delmotte, Marie-Hélène; Formstecher, Pierre; Lefebvre, Philippe

    2003-09-01

    BACKGROUND: Retinoic acid receptors (RARs) are ligand-regulated transcription factors controlling cellular proliferation and differentiation. Receptor-interacting proteins such as corepressors and coactivators play a crucial role in specifying the overall transcriptional activity of the receptor in response to ligand treatment. Little is known however on how receptor activity is controlled by intermediary factors which interact with RARs in a ligand-independent manner. RESULTS: We have identified the promyelocytic leukemia zinc finger protein (PLZF), a transcriptional corepressor, to be a RAR-interacting protein using the yeast two-hybrid assay. We confirmed this interaction by GST-pull down assays and show that the PLZF N-terminal zinc finger domain is necessary and sufficient for PLZF to bind RAR. The RAR ligand binding domain displayed the highest affinity for PLZF, but corepressor and coactivator binding interfaces did not contribute to PLZF recruitment. The interaction was ligand-independent and correlated to a decreased transcriptional activity of the RXR-RAR heterodimer upon overexpression of PLZF. A similar transcriptional interference could be observed with the estrogen receptor alpha and the glucocorticoid receptor. We further show that PLZF is likely to act by preventing RXR-RAR heterodimerization, both in-vitro and in intact cells. CONCLUSION: Thus RAR and PLZF interact physically and functionally. Intriguingly, these two transcription factors play a determining role in hematopoiesis and regionalization of the hindbrain and may, upon chromosomal translocation, form fusion proteins. Our observations therefore define a novel mechanism by which RARs activity may be controlled.

  3. Enhanced Correlation of SMART Active Flap Rotor Loads

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kottapalli, Sesi

    2011-01-01

    This is a follow-on study to a 2010 correlation effort. Measured data from the SMART rotor test in the NASA Ames 40- by 80- Foot Wind Tunnel are compared with CAMRAD II calculations. As background, during the wind tunnel test, unexpectedly high inboard loads were encountered, and it was hypothesized at that time that due to changes in the flexbeams over the years, the flexbeam properties used in the analysis needed updating. Boeing Mesa, recently updated these properties. This correlation study uses the updated flexbeam properties. Compared to earlier studies, the following two enhancements are implemented: i) the inboard loads (pitchcase and flexbeam loads) correlation is included for the first time (reliable prediction of the inboard loads is a prerequisite for any future anticipated flight-testing); ii) the number of blade modes is increased to better capture the flap dynamics and the pitchcase-flexbeam dynamics. Also, aerodynamically, both the rolled-up wake model and the more complex, multiple trailer wake model are used, with the latter slightly improving the blade chordwise moment correlation. This sensitivity to the wake model indicates that CFD is needed. Three high-speed experimental cases, one uncontrolled free flap case and two commanded flap cases, are considered. The two commanded flap cases include a 2o flap deflection at 5P case and a 0o flap deflection case. For the free flap case, selected modifications to the HH-06 section flap airfoil pitching moment table are implemented. For the commanded 2o flap case, the experimental flap variation is approximately matched by increasing the analytical flap hinge stiffness. This increased flap hinge stiffness is retained for the commanded 0o flap case also, which is treated as a free flap case, but with larger flap hinge stiffness. The change in the mid-span and outboard loads correlation due to the updating of the flexbeam properties is not significant. Increasing the number of blade modes results in an

  4. Child-evoked maternal negativity from 9 to 27 months: Evidence of gene-environment correlation and its moderation by marital distress.

    PubMed

    Fearon, R M Pasco; Reiss, David; Leve, Leslie D; Shaw, Daniel S; Scaramella, Laura V; Ganiban, Jody M; Neiderhiser, Jenae M

    2015-11-01

    Past research has documented pervasive genetic influences on emotional and behavioral disturbance across the life span and on liability to adult psychiatric disorder. Increasingly, interest is turning to mechanisms of gene-environment interplay in attempting to understand the earliest manifestations of genetic risk. We report findings from a prospective adoption study, which aimed to test the role of evocative gene-environment correlation in early development. Included in the study were 561 infants adopted at birth and studied between 9 and 27 months, along with their adoptive parents and birth mothers. Birth mother psychiatric diagnoses and symptoms scales were used as indicators of genetic influence, and multiple self-report measures were used to index adoptive mother parental negativity. We hypothesized that birth mother psychopathology would be associated with greater adoptive parent negativity and that such evocative effects would be amplified under conditions of high adoptive family adversity. The findings suggested that genetic factors associated with birth mother externalizing psychopathology may evoke negative reactions in adoptive mothers in the first year of life, but only when the adoptive family environment is characterized by marital problems. Maternal negativity mediated the effects of genetic risk on child adjustment at 27 months. The results underscore the importance of genetically influenced evocative processes in early development.

  5. Child-evoked maternal negativity from 9 to 27 months: evidence of gene-environment correlation and its moderation by marital distress

    PubMed Central

    Fearon, R.M. Pasco; Reiss, David; Leve, Leslie D.; Shaw, Daniel S.; Scaramella, Laura V.; Ganiban, Jody M.; Neiderhiser, Jenae M.

    2014-01-01

    Past research has documented pervasive genetic influences on emotional and behavioral disturbance across the lifespan and on liability to adult psychiatric disorder. Increasingly, interest is turning to mechanisms of gene-environment interplay in attempting to understand the earliest manifestations of genetic risk. We report findings from a prospective adoption study, which aimed to test the role of evocative gene-environment correlation in early development. 561 infants adopted at birth were studied between 9 and 27 months with their adoptive parents and birth mothers. Birth mother psychiatric diagnoses and symptoms scales were used as indicators of genetic influence, and multiple self-report measures were used to index adoptive mother parental negativity. We hypothesized that birth parent psychopathology would be associated with greater adoptive parent negativity, and that such evocative effects would be amplified under conditions of high family adversity. The findings suggested that genetic factors linked to birth mother externalizing psychopathology may evoke negative reactions in adoptive mothers in the first year of life, but primarily when the adoptive family environment was characterized by marital problems. The observed maternal negativity mediated the effects of genetic risk on child adjustment at 27 months. The results underline the importance of genetically-influenced evocative processes in early development. PMID:25216383

  6. Impact of regular meditation practice on EEG activity at rest and during evoked negative emotions.

    PubMed

    Aftanas, Ljubomir; Golosheykin, Semen

    2005-06-01

    The main objective of the present investigation was to examine how long-term meditation practice is manifested in EEG activity under conditions of non-emotional arousal (eyes-closed and eyes-open periods, viewing emotionally neutral movie clip) and while experiencing experimentally induced negative emotions (viewing aversive movie clip). The 62-channel EEG was recorded in age-matched control individuals (n=25) and Sahaja Yoga meditators (SYM, n=25). Findings from the non-emotional continuum show that at the lowest level of arousal (eyes closed) SYM manifested larger power values in theta-1 (4-6 Hz), theta-2 (6-8 Hz) and alpha-1 (8-10 Hz) frequency bands. Although increasing arousal desynchronized activity in these bands in both groups, the theta-2 and alpha-1 power in the eyes-open period and alpha-1 power while viewing the neutral clip remained still higher in the SYM. During eyes-closed and eyes-open periods the controls were marked by larger right than left hemisphere power, indexing relatively more active left hemisphere parieto-temporal cortex whereas meditators manifested no hemisphere asymmetry. When contrasted with the neutral, the aversive movie clip yielded significant alpha desynchronization in both groups, reflecting arousing nature of emotional induction. In the control group along with alpha desynchronization affective movie clip synchronized gamma power over anterior cortical sites. This was not seen in the SYM. Overall, the presented report emphasizes that the revealed changes in the electrical brain activity associated with regular meditation practice are dynamical by nature and depend on arousal level. The EEG power findings also provide the first empirical proof of a theoretical assumption that meditators have better capabilities to moderate intensity of emotional arousal.

  7. Estradiol levels modulate brain activity and negative responses to psychosocial stress across the menstrual cycle.

    PubMed

    Albert, Kimberly; Pruessner, Jens; Newhouse, Paul

    2015-09-01

    Although ovarian hormones are thought to have a potential role in the well-known sex difference in mood and anxiety disorders, the mechanisms through which ovarian hormone changes contribute to stress regulation are not well understood. One mechanism by which ovarian hormones might impact mood regulation is by mediating the effect of psychosocial stress, which often precedes depressive episodes and may have mood consequences that are particularly relevant in women. In the current study, brain activity and mood response to psychosocial stress was examined in healthy, normally cycling women at either the high or low estradiol phase of the menstrual cycle. Twenty eight women were exposed to the Montreal Imaging Stress Task (MIST), with brain activity determined through functional magnetic resonance imaging, and behavioral response assessed with subjective mood and stress measures. Brain activity responses to psychosocial stress differed between women in the low versus high estrogen phase of the menstrual cycle: women with high estradiol levels showed significantly less deactivation in limbic regions during psychosocial stress compared to women with low estradiol levels. Additionally, women with higher estradiol levels also had less subjective distress in response to the MIST than women with lower estradiol levels. The results of this study suggest that, in normally cycling premenopausal women, high estradiol levels attenuate the brain activation changes and negative mood response to psychosocial stress. Normal ovarian hormone fluctuations may alter the impact of psychosocially stressful events by presenting periods of increased vulnerability to psychosocial stress during low estradiol phases of the menstrual cycle. This menstrual cycle-related fluctuation in stress vulnerability may be relevant to the greater risk for affective disorder or post-traumatic stress disorder in women.

  8. Spatial Correlation Function of the Chandra Selected Active Galactic Nuclei

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yang, Y.; Mushotzky, R. F.; Barger, A. J.; Cowie, L. L.

    2006-01-01

    We present the spatial correlation function analysis of non-stellar X-ray point sources in the Chandra Large Area Synoptic X-ray Survey of Lockman Hole Northwest (CLASXS). Our 9 ACIS-I fields cover a contiguous solid angle of 0.4 deg(exp 2) and reach a depth of 3 x 10(exp -15) erg/square cm/s in the 2-8 keV band. We supplement our analysis with data from the Chandra Deep Field North (CDFN). The addition of this field allows better probe of the correlation function at small scales. A total of 233 and 252 sources with spectroscopic information are used in the study of the CLASXS and CDFN fields respectively. We calculate both redshift-space and projected correlation functions in co-moving coordinates, averaged over the redshift range of 0.1 < z < 3.0, for both CLASXS and CDFN fields for a standard cosmology with Omega(sub Lambda) = 0.73,Omega(sub M) = 0.27, and h = 0.71 (H(sub 0) = 100h km/s Mpc(exp -1). The correlation function for the CLASXS field over scales of 3 Mpc< s < 200 Mpc can be modeled as a power-law of the form xi(s) = (S/SO)(exp - gamma), with gamma = 1.6(sup +0.4 sub -0.3) and S(sub o) = 8.0(sup +.14 sub -1.5) Mpc. The redshift-space correlation function for CDFN on scales of 1 Mpc< s < 100 Mpc is found to have a similar correlation length so = 8.55(sup +0.74 sub -0.74) Mpc, but a shallower slope (gamma = 1.3 +/- 0.1). The real-space correlation functions derived from the projected correlation functions, are found to be tau(sub 0 = 8.1(sup +1.2 sub -2.2) Mpc, and gamma = 2.1 +/- 0.5 for the CLASXS field, and tau(sub 0) = 5.8(sup +.1.0 sub -1.5) Mpc, gamma = 1.38(sup +0.12 sub -0.14 for the CDFN field. By comparing the real- and redshift-space correlation functions in the combined CLASXS and CDFN samples, we are able to estimate the redshift distortion parameter Beta = 0.4 +/- 0.2 at an effective redshift z = 0.94. We compare the correlation functions for hard and soft spectra sources in the CLASXS field and find no significant difference between the

  9. Phosphorylation acts positively and negatively to regulate MRTF-A subcellular localisation and activity

    PubMed Central

    Panayiotou, Richard; Miralles, Francesc; Pawlowski, Rafal; Diring, Jessica; Flynn, Helen R; Skehel, Mark; Treisman, Richard

    2016-01-01

    The myocardin-related transcription factors (MRTF-A and MRTF-B) regulate cytoskeletal genes through their partner transcription factor SRF. The MRTFs bind G-actin, and signal-regulated changes in cellular G-actin concentration control their nuclear accumulation. The MRTFs also undergo Rho- and ERK-dependent phosphorylation, but the function of MRTF phosphorylation, and the elements and signals involved in MRTF-A nuclear export are largely unexplored. We show that Rho-dependent MRTF-A phosphorylation reflects relief from an inhibitory function of nuclear actin. We map multiple sites of serum-induced phosphorylation, most of which are S/T-P motifs and show that S/T-P phosphorylation is required for transcriptional activation. ERK-mediated S98 phosphorylation inhibits assembly of G-actin complexes on the MRTF-A regulatory RPEL domain, promoting nuclear import. In contrast, S33 phosphorylation potentiates the activity of an autonomous Crm1-dependent N-terminal NES, which cooperates with five other NES elements to exclude MRTF-A from the nucleus. Phosphorylation thus plays positive and negative roles in the regulation of MRTF-A. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.15460.001 PMID:27304076

  10. A highly sensitive telomerase activity assay that eliminates false-negative results caused by PCR inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Yaku, Hidenobu; Murashima, Takashi; Miyoshi, Daisuke; Sugimoto, Naoki

    2013-01-01

    An assay for telomerase activity based on asymmetric polymerase chain reaction (A-PCR) on magnetic beads (MBs) and subsequent application of cycling probe technology (CPT) is described. In this assay, the telomerase reaction products are immobilized on MBs, which are then washed to remove PCR inhibitors that are commonly found in clinical samples. The guanine-rich sequences (5'-(TTAGGG)n-3') of the telomerase reaction products are then preferentially amplified by A-PCR, and the amplified products are subsequently detected via CPT, where a probe RNA with a fluorophore at the 5' end and a quencher at the 3' end is hydrolyzed by RNase H in the presence of the target DNA. The catalyst-mediated cleavage of the probe RNA enhances fluorescence from the 5' end of the probe. The assay allowed us to successfully detect HeLa cells selectively over normal human dermal fibroblast (NHDF) cells. Importantly, this selectivity produced identical results with regard to detection of HeLa cells in the absence and presence of excess NHDF cells; therefore, this assay can be used for practical clinical applications. The lower limit of detection for HeLa cells was 50 cells, which is lower than that achieved with a conventional telomeric repeat amplification protocol assay. Our assay also eliminated false-negative results caused by PCR inhibitors. Furthermore, we show that this assay is appropriate for screening among G-quadruplex ligands to find those that inhibit telomerase activity.

  11. A highly sensitive telomerase activity assay that eliminates false-negative results caused by PCR inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Yaku, Hidenobu; Murashima, Takashi; Miyoshi, Daisuke; Sugimoto, Naoki

    2013-01-01

    An assay for telomerase activity based on asymmetric polymerase chain reaction (A-PCR) on magnetic beads (MBs) and subsequent application of cycling probe technology (CPT) is described. In this assay, the telomerase reaction products are immobilized on MBs, which are then washed to remove PCR inhibitors that are commonly found in clinical samples. The guanine-rich sequences (5'-(TTAGGG)n-3') of the telomerase reaction products are then preferentially amplified by A-PCR, and the amplified products are subsequently detected via CPT, where a probe RNA with a fluorophore at the 5' end and a quencher at the 3' end is hydrolyzed by RNase H in the presence of the target DNA. The catalyst-mediated cleavage of the probe RNA enhances fluorescence from the 5' end of the probe. The assay allowed us to successfully detect HeLa cells selectively over normal human dermal fibroblast (NHDF) cells. Importantly, this selectivity produced identical results with regard to detection of HeLa cells in the absence and presence of excess NHDF cells; therefore, this assay can be used for practical clinical applications. The lower limit of detection for HeLa cells was 50 cells, which is lower than that achieved with a conventional telomeric repeat amplification protocol assay. Our assay also eliminated false-negative results caused by PCR inhibitors. Furthermore, we show that this assay is appropriate for screening among G-quadruplex ligands to find those that inhibit telomerase activity. PMID:24071983

  12. BCL6 is a negative prognostic factor and exhibits pro-oncogenic activity in ovarian cancer

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Yi-Qin; Xu, Mi-Die; Weng, Wei-Wei; Wei, Ping; Yang, Yu-Si; Du, Xiang

    2015-01-01

    Background: Dysregulation of BCL6 plays critical oncogenic roles and facilitates tumorigenesis in various malignancies. However, whether the aberrant expression of BCL6 in ovarian carcinoma is associated with malignancy, metastasis or prognosis remains unknown. Our study aimed to investigate the expression of BCL6 in ovarian carcinoma and its possible correlation with clinicopathological features as well as patient survival to reveal its biological effects in ovarian tumor progression. Methods: Immunochemistry analysis was performed in 105 cases of ovarian carcinoma covering the histological types of serous, endometrioid and clear cell. Spearman analysis was used to calculate the correlation between pathological parameters and the expression of BCL6. Kaplan–Meier method and Cox proportional hazards analysis were used to analyze the disease-specific survival (DSS) and disease-free survival (DFS). We also assessed whether overexpression and knockdown of BCL6 influence in vitro cell proliferation, cell cycle progression, as well as tumor cell invasion and migration. Results: The expression of BCL6 was higher in all three major kinds of ovarian cancer in comparison with paratumorous epithelium. BCL6 expression was tightly correlated with FIGO staging, lymph node metastasis and recurrence. Higher expression of BCL6 led to a significantly poorer DSS and DFS and multivariate analysis revealed that BCL6 was an independent risk factor of DSS and DFS. Enforced overexpression of BCL6 in ovarian tumor cells stimulated proliferation by inducing G1–S transition, and promoted tumor cell invasion and migration. Conversely, RNA interference–mediated silencing BCL6 expression inhibited proliferation by altered cell cycle progression and reduced the ability of the cells to migrate, and invade the extracellular matrix in culture. Conclusions: Our study suggests that the inappropriate activation of BCL6 predicts poor prognosis and promotes tumor progression in ovarian carcinoma

  13. Does the prevalence of latent toxoplasmosis and frequency of Rhesus-negative subjects correlate with the nationwide rate of traffic accidents?

    PubMed

    Flegr, Jaroslav; Dama, Madhukar

    2014-12-01

    Latent toxoplasmosis is probably the most common protistan parasitic disease with many indirect negative impacts on human health. One of the important impacts is impaired psychomotor function leading to reduced driving efficiency in Toxoplasma-seropositive subjects. Numerous case-control studies have established a positive relation between the seroprevalence of Toxoplasma gondii (Nicolle et Manceaux, 1908) and probability of traffic accidents in study populations. The prevalence of toxoplasmosis varies between populations according to local geographical conditions, hygienic practices and kitchen habits. Similarly, we see a striking variation in the incidence of traffic accidents across countries. Hence, we compiled the largest ever data set on the seroprevalence of toxoplasmosis and tried to understand its role in traffic accident-related deaths and disabilities across 87 countries. Simple non-parametric analysis showed a positive and strong relation of T. gondii seroprevalence and traffic accident related disabilities. Further, we conducted multivariate analysis to control for confounding factors. After controlling for wealth, geographical latitude, health of population, length of roads and number of vehicles, the correlation disappeared. When the frequency of RhD negativity and its interaction with toxoplasmosis were included into the model, the effects of toxoplasmosis seemingly returned. However, the analysed data suffered from the problem of multicollinearity. When a proper method of analysis, ridge regression, was applied, the effects of toxoplasmosis prevalence and RhD negativity frequency disappeared again. The existence of a strong correlation between the prevalence of toxoplasmosis and health of population in particular countries, which was the probable cause of multicollinearity and possible reason for the negative result of the present study, suggests that 'asymptomatic' latent toxoplasmosis could have a large impact on public health.

  14. Negative Correlation between Individual-Insect-Level Virulence and Colony-Level Virulence of Paenibacillus larvae, the Etiological Agent of American Foulbrood of Honeybees▿

    PubMed Central

    Rauch, Sandra; Ashiralieva, Ainura; Hedtke, Kati; Genersch, Elke

    2009-01-01

    Paenibacillus larvae is the etiological agent of American foulbrood (AFB) in honeybees. Recently, different genotypes of P. larvae (ERIC I to ERIC IV) were defined, and it was shown that these genotypes differ inter alia in their virulence on the larval level. On the colony level, bees mitigate AFB through the hygienic behavior of nurse bees. Therefore, we investigated how the hygienic behavior shapes P. larvae virulence on the colony level. Our results indicate that P. larvae virulence on the larval level and that on the colony level are negatively correlated. PMID:19304833

  15. Geomagnetic activity during the previous day is correlated with increased consumption of sucrose during subsequent days: is increased geomagnetic activity aversive?

    PubMed

    Galic, M A; Persinger, M A

    2004-06-01

    In five separate blocks over a period of several months for 33 female rats the amount of geomagnetic activity during the day before ad libitum access to 10% sucrose or water was positively correlated with the volume of sucrose consumed per 24-hr. period. The strength of the correlation (.62 to .77) declined over the subsequent 10 days from between .12 to -.18 and resembled an extinction curve. In a subsequent experiment four rats exposed to 5 nT to 8 nT, 0.5-Hz magnetic fields that ceased for 30 min. once every 4 hr. for 4 days consumed 11% more sucrose than the four rats exposed to no field. We suggest that the initial consumption of 10% sucrose may have been reinforced because it diminished the aversive physiological effects associated with the increased geomagnetic activity. However, over the subsequent days, as geomagnetic activity decreased or habituation occurred, negative reinforcement did not maintain this behavior.

  16. Recent Activities of Tsukuba Correlator/Analysis Center

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kokado, K.; Kurihara, S.; Kawabata, R.; Nozawa, K.

    2012-12-01

    The Geospatial Information Authority of Japan (GSI) has been a member of IVS and taken charge of a Network Station and an IVS Correlator since 1998. In addition, GSI became an IVS Operational Analysis Center in January 2010.The Tsukuba Correlator takes charge of correlation work for approximately 100 IVS-INT02 (INT2) sessions and 10 Japanese domestic sessions every year. In 2011, the number of INT2 sessions dramatically increased, because INT2 sessions were observed twice a day during the weekend from April 2011 to January 2012 due to the change in position of the Tsukuba 32-m antenna by the 2011 earthquake off the Pacific coast of Tohoku. The role of the Tsukuba VLBI Analysis Center is to produce ultra-rapid dUT1 measurements, sessions with the goal of obtaining a dUT1 solution within 30 minutes after the end of the observation session. The data processing system at the Tsukuba Correlator and Analysis Center was dramatically improved to achieve rapid data processing. It enabled us to shorten the data processing time to one-sixth and to process the IVS VLBI data in near real-time. In 2011, we processed the ultra-rapid dUT1 measurements with the Onsala or Wettzell stations from INT2 sessions or IVS 24-hour sessions, such as R1, RD or T2 sessions. The most successful sessions for ultra-rapid dUT1 measurement was the CONT11 sessions which were a campaign of 15 days of continuous VLBI sessions. During these sessions, we succeeded in estimating continuous dUT1 solutions in near real-time for 15 days.

  17. PLZF is a negative regulator of retinoic acid receptor transcriptional activity

    PubMed Central

    Martin, Perrine J; Delmotte, Marie-Hélène; Formstecher, Pierre; Lefebvre, Philippe

    2003-01-01

    Background Retinoic acid receptors (RARs) are ligand-regulated transcription factors controlling cellular proliferation and differentiation. Receptor-interacting proteins such as corepressors and coactivators play a crucial role in specifying the overall transcriptional activity of the receptor in response to ligand treatment. Little is known however on how receptor activity is controlled by intermediary factors which interact with RARs in a ligand-independent manner. Results We have identified the promyelocytic leukemia zinc finger protein (PLZF), a transcriptional corepressor, to be a RAR-interacting protein using the yeast two-hybrid assay. We confirmed this interaction by GST-pull down assays and show that the PLZF N-terminal zinc finger domain is necessary and sufficient for PLZF to bind RAR. The RAR ligand binding domain displayed the highest affinity for PLZF, but corepressor and coactivator binding interfaces did not contribute to PLZF recruitment. The interaction was ligand-independent and correlated to a decreased transcriptional activity of the RXR-RAR heterodimer upon overexpression of PLZF. A similar transcriptional interference could be observed with the estrogen receptor alpha and the glucocorticoid receptor. We further show that PLZF is likely to act by preventing RXR-RAR heterodimerization, both in-vitro and in intact cells. Conclusion Thus RAR and PLZF interact physically and functionally. Intriguingly, these two transcription factors play a determining role in hematopoiesis and regionalization of the hindbrain and may, upon chromosomal translocation, form fusion proteins. Our observations therefore define a novel mechanism by which RARs activity may be controlled. PMID:14521715

  18. Disease activity in idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis: CT and pathologic correlation.

    PubMed

    Müller, N L; Staples, C A; Miller, R R; Vedal, S; Thurlbeck, W M; Ostrow, D N

    1987-12-01

    Computed tomography (CT) scans were compared with pathologic determinants of disease activity in 12 patients with idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis. The theory was that intraalveolar and interstitial cellularity would result in areas of opacification of air spaces on CT scans. All patients underwent open lung biopsy, and disease activity was assessed with a pathologic grading system. Seven patients had mild disease activity, five had moderate to marked disease activity. Opacification of air spaces was patchy in distribution, predominantly peripheral, and seen better on 1.5-mm rather than 10-mm collimation scans. Disease activity on CT scans was graded independently from 0 to 3 based on the presence and relative density of the areas of air space consolidation compared with the surrounding parenchyma. The pathologic score was significantly greater in the patients with high CT scores than in those with low CT scores (P = .001). Five patients with marked disease activity and five of seven patients with mild disease activity were correctly identified. CT may be useful in the assessment of disease activity in idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis.

  19. Correlates of School-Day Physical Activity in Preschool Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Robinson, Leah E.; Wadsworth, Danielle D.; Peoples, Christina M.

    2012-01-01

    This study examined the relationship among sex, body mass index, motor skill competence (MSC), perceived physical competence (PPC), and school-day physical activity in preschool students (N = 34). Physical activity was assessed by steps accumulated during the school day, while MSC and PPC were assessed with the Test of Gross Motor Development--2nd…

  20. Correlated activity of cortical neurons survives extensive removal of feedforward sensory input

    PubMed Central

    Shapcott, Katharine A.; Schmiedt, Joscha T.; Saunders, Richard C.; Maier, Alexander; Leopold, David A.; Schmid, Michael C.

    2016-01-01

    A fundamental property of brain function is that the spiking activity of cortical neurons is variable and that some of this variability is correlated between neurons. Correlated activity not due to the stimulus arises from shared input but the neuronal circuit mechanisms that result in these noise correlations are not fully understood. Here we tested in the visual system if correlated variability in mid-level area V4 of visual cortex is altered following extensive lesions of primary visual cortex (V1). To this end we recorded longitudinally the neuronal correlations in area V4 of two behaving macaque monkeys before and after a V1 lesion while the monkeys fixated a grey screen. We found that the correlations of neuronal activity survived the lesions in both monkeys. In one monkey, the correlation of multi-unit spiking signals was strongly increased in the first week post-lesion, while in the second monkey, correlated activity was slightly increased, but not greater than some week-by-week fluctuations observed. The typical drop-off of inter-neuronal correlations with cortical distance was preserved after the lesion. Therefore, as V4 noise correlations remain without feedforward input from V1, these results suggest instead that local and/or feedback input seem to be necessary for correlated activity. PMID:27721468

  1. Role of Amphiphilicity in the Design of Synthetic Mimics of Antimicrobial Peptides with Gram-Negative Activity

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Two new series of aryl SMAMPs (synthetic mimics of antimicrobial peptides) with facially amphiphilic (FA) and disrupted amphiphilic (DA) topologies were designed and synthesized to directly assess the role of amphiphilicity on their antimicrobial activity against Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacteria in closely related structures. The FA SMAMPs displayed broad spectrum antimicrobial activity against both Gram-positive S. aureus and Gram-negative E. coli, whereas the DA SMAMPs, which contained a polar amide bond in between the hydrophobic moieties, only exhibited activity toward S. aureus with increasing hydrophobicity. The integy moment (IW) was used to quantify the amphiphilicity of the SMAMPs and confirmed that it is critical for the design of SMAMPs with Gram-negative activity. PMID:23814644

  2. Negative Experiences in Physical Education and Sport: How Much Do They Affect Physical Activity Participation Later in Life?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cardinal, Bradley J.; Yan, Zi; Cardinal, Marita K.

    2013-01-01

    People's feelings toward physical activity are often influenced by memories of their childhood experiences in physical education and sport. Unfortunately, many adults remember negative experiences, which may affect their desire to maintain a physically active lifestyle. A survey that asked 293 students about recollections from their childhood…

  3. Cold-induced precipitation of a monoclonal IgM: a negative activation enthalpy reaction.

    PubMed

    Meliga, Stefano C; Farrugia, William; Ramsland, Paul A; Falconer, Robert J

    2013-01-17

    Cold-induced precipitation of a monoclonal IgM cryoglobulin isolated from a patient with Waldenström's macroglobulinemia was observed to have a negative activation enthalpy. The rate of the reaction increased, as the temperature decreased. Differential scanning calorimetry of the monoclonal IgM showed precipitation as an inverted peak during a downward temperature scan. The transition temperature was between 14 and 15 °C and was possibly concentration dependent. At temperatures below the transition the precipitation was best described by second-order kinetics. The difference in change in enthalpy between precipitation and disassociation suggests that cold-induced precipitation had a fast precipitation stage followed by a slower consolidation reaction. Negligible curvature of the Eyring plot suggested the precipitation reaction was dominated by van der Waal forces and hydrogen bonding. Conversely, during an upward temperature scan, disassociation was observed as a positive enthalpy peak. This reaction had two stages, a reaction undoing consolidation followed by heat-induced disassociation that had first-order kinetics.

  4. Metastable atom-activated dissociation mass spectrometry of phosphorylated and sulfonated peptides in negative ion mode.

    PubMed

    Cook, Shannon L; Jackson, Glen P

    2011-06-01

    The dissociation behavior of phosphorylated and sulfonated peptide anions was explored using metastable atom-activated dissociation mass spectrometry (MAD-MS) and collision-induced dissociation (CID). A beam of high kinetic energy helium (He) metastable atoms was exposed to isolated phosphorylated and sulfonated peptides in the 3- and 2- charge states. Unlike CID, where phosphate losses are dominant, the major dissociation channels observed using MAD were C(α) - C peptide backbone cleavages and neutral losses of CO(2), H(2)O, and [CO(2) + H(2)O] from the charge reduced (oxidized) product ion, consistent with an electron detachment dissociation (EDD) mechanism such as Penning ionization. Regardless of charge state or modification, MAD provides ample backbone cleavages with little modification loss, which allows for unambiguous PTM site determination. The relative abundance of certain fragment ions in MAD is also demonstrated to be somewhat sensitive to the number and location of deprotonation sites, with backbone cleavage somewhat favored adjacent to deprotonated sites like aspartic acid residues. MAD provides a complementary dissociation technique to CID, ECD, ETD, and EDD for peptide sequencing and modification identification. MAD offers the unique ability to analyze highly acidic peptides that contain few to no basic amino acids in either negative or positive ion mode.

  5. Cold-induced precipitation of a monoclonal IgM: a negative activation enthalpy reaction.

    PubMed

    Meliga, Stefano C; Farrugia, William; Ramsland, Paul A; Falconer, Robert J

    2013-01-17

    Cold-induced precipitation of a monoclonal IgM cryoglobulin isolated from a patient with Waldenström's macroglobulinemia was observed to have a negative activation enthalpy. The rate of the reaction increased, as the temperature decreased. Differential scanning calorimetry of the monoclonal IgM showed precipitation as an inverted peak during a downward temperature scan. The transition temperature was between 14 and 15 °C and was possibly concentration dependent. At temperatures below the transition the precipitation was best described by second-order kinetics. The difference in change in enthalpy between precipitation and disassociation suggests that cold-induced precipitation had a fast precipitation stage followed by a slower consolidation reaction. Negligible curvature of the Eyring plot suggested the precipitation reaction was dominated by van der Waal forces and hydrogen bonding. Conversely, during an upward temperature scan, disassociation was observed as a positive enthalpy peak. This reaction had two stages, a reaction undoing consolidation followed by heat-induced disassociation that had first-order kinetics. PMID:23240622

  6. Frequencies of Inaudible High-Frequency Sounds Differentially Affect Brain Activity: Positive and Negative Hypersonic Effects

    PubMed Central

    Fukushima, Ariko; Yagi, Reiko; Kawai, Norie; Honda, Manabu; Nishina, Emi; Oohashi, Tsutomu

    2014-01-01

    The hypersonic effect is a phenomenon in which sounds containing significant quantities of non-stationary high-frequency components (HFCs) above the human audible range (max. 20 kHz) activate the midbrain and diencephalon and evoke various physiological, psychological and behavioral responses. Yet important issues remain unverified, especially the relationship existing between the frequency of HFCs and the emergence of the hypersonic effect. In this study, to investigate the relationship between the hypersonic effect and HFC frequencies, we divided an HFC (above 16 kHz) of recorded gamelan music into 12 band components and applied them to subjects along with an audible component (below 16 kHz) to observe changes in the alpha2 frequency component (10–13 Hz) of spontaneous EEGs measured from centro-parieto-occipital regions (Alpha-2 EEG), which we previously reported as an index of the hypersonic effect. Our results showed reciprocal directional changes in Alpha-2 EEGs depending on the frequency of the HFCs presented with audible low-frequency component (LFC). When an HFC above approximately 32 kHz was applied, Alpha-2 EEG increased significantly compared to when only audible sound was applied (positive hypersonic effect), while, when an HFC below approximately 32 kHz was applied, the Alpha-2 EEG decreased (negative hypersonic effect). These findings suggest that the emergence of the hypersonic effect depends on the frequencies of inaudible HFC. PMID:24788141

  7. Frequencies of inaudible high-frequency sounds differentially affect brain activity: positive and negative hypersonic effects.

    PubMed

    Fukushima, Ariko; Yagi, Reiko; Kawai, Norie; Honda, Manabu; Nishina, Emi; Oohashi, Tsutomu

    2014-01-01

    The hypersonic effect is a phenomenon in which sounds containing significant quantities of non-stationary high-frequency components (HFCs) above the human audible range (max. 20 kHz) activate the midbrain and diencephalon and evoke various physiological, psychological and behavioral responses. Yet important issues remain unverified, especially the relationship existing between the frequency of HFCs and the emergence of the hypersonic effect. In this study, to investigate the relationship between the hypersonic effect and HFC frequencies, we divided an HFC (above 16 kHz) of recorded gamelan music into 12 band components and applied them to subjects along with an audible component (below 16 kHz) to observe changes in the alpha2 frequency component (10-13 Hz) of spontaneous EEGs measured from centro-parieto-occipital regions (Alpha-2 EEG), which we previously reported as an index of the hypersonic effect. Our results showed reciprocal directional changes in Alpha-2 EEGs depending on the frequency of the HFCs presented with audible low-frequency component (LFC). When an HFC above approximately 32 kHz was applied, Alpha-2 EEG increased significantly compared to when only audible sound was applied (positive hypersonic effect), while, when an HFC below approximately 32 kHz was applied, the Alpha-2 EEG decreased (negative hypersonic effect). These findings suggest that the emergence of the hypersonic effect depends on the frequencies of inaudible HFC.

  8. Vicarious motor activation during action perception: beyond correlational evidence

    PubMed Central

    Avenanti, Alessio; Candidi, Matteo; Urgesi, Cosimo

    2013-01-01

    Neurophysiological and imaging studies have shown that seeing the actions of other individuals brings about the vicarious activation of motor regions involved in performing the same actions. While this suggests a simulative mechanism mediating the perception of others' actions, one cannot use such evidence to make inferences about the functional significance of vicarious activations. Indeed, a central aim in social neuroscience is to comprehend how vicarious activations allow the understanding of other people's behavior, and this requires to use stimulation or lesion methods to establish causal links from brain activity to cognitive functions. In the present work, we review studies investigating the effects of transient manipulations of brain activity or stable lesions in the motor system on individuals' ability to perceive and understand the actions of others. We conclude there is now compelling evidence that neural activity in the motor system is critical for such cognitive ability. More research using causal methods, however, is needed in order to disclose the limits and the conditions under which vicarious activations are required to perceive and understand actions of others as well as their emotions and somatic feelings. PMID:23675338

  9. Enhancing effect of serum ultrafiltrate on the activity of cephalosporins against gram-negative bacilli.

    PubMed Central

    Leggett, J E; Craig, W A

    1989-01-01

    A few studies have suggested that the inhibitory effect of serum on activity of broad-spectrum cephalosporins is less than that predicted by the degree of protein binding. Microdilution MICs of ceftriaxone, cefoperazone, moxalactam, and ceftizoxime were therefore determined against ATCC and clinical strains of Escherichia coli, Klebsiella pneumoniae, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, and Staphylococcus aureus in Mueller-Hinton broth containing either human albumin (as 0, 2.5, or 5% solution) or heat-inactivated human serum (as 0, 25, 50, or 95% solution). Arithmetic linear dilutions were used to improve accuracy. For standard bacterial strains, MICs in the presence of 5% albumin were higher than in broth alone by multiples of 10.9 to 21 for ceftriaxone, 5.5 to 16.4 for cefoperazone, 1.9 to 3.7 for moxalactam, and 1.1 to 1.4 for ceftizoxime, as expected by their protein binding. MICs in the presence of 95% serum were similar to those in 5% albumin for all four drugs against S. aureus and P. aeruginosa but were 2.2- to 4.8-fold lower (P less than 0.001) against E. coli and K. pneumoniae. Similar findings were observed at lower protein concentrations and with clinical isolates, except that for some strains of P. aeruginosa MICs were lower in serum than in albumin. Individual sera from five subjects gave comparable results. The addition of serum ultrafiltrate to albumin-containing solutions reduced MICs of ceftriaxone and cefoperazone 1.6- to 7.4-fold against E. coli and K. pneumoniae (P less than 0.01) but did not alter the MICs for S. aureus. Serum may contain an ultrafiltrable component(s) that enhances the activity of third-generation cephalosporins against many gram-negative bacilli. PMID:2496656

  10. Activation of Beta-Catenin Signaling in Androgen Receptor–Negative Prostate Cancer Cells

    PubMed Central

    Wan, Xinhai; Liu, Jie; Lu, Jing-Fang; Tzelepi, Vassiliki; Yang, Jun; Starbuck, Michael W.; Diao, Lixia; Wang, Jing; Efstathiou, Eleni; Vazquez, Elba S.; Troncoso, Patricia; Maity, Sankar N.; Navone, Nora M.

    2012-01-01

    Purpose To study Wnt/beta-catenin in castrate-resistant prostate cancer (CRPC) and understand its function independently of the beta-catenin–androgen receptor (AR) interaction. Experimental Design We performed beta-catenin immunocytochemical analysis, evaluated TOP-flash reporter activity (a reporter of beta-catenin–mediated transcription), and sequenced the beta-catenin gene in MDA PCa 118a, MDA PCa 118b, MDA PCa 2b, and PC-3 prostate cancer (PCa) cells. We knocked down beta-catenin in AR-negative MDA PCa 118b cells and performed comparative gene-array analysis. We also immunohistochemically analyzed beta-catenin and AR in 27 bone metastases of human CRPCs. Results Beta-catenin nuclear accumulation and TOP-flash reporter activity were high in MDA PCa 118b but not in MDA PCa 2b or PC-3 cells. MDA PCa 118a and 118b cells carry a mutated beta-catenin at codon 32 (D32G). Ten genes were expressed differently (false discovery rate, 0.05) in MDA PCa 118b cells with downregulated beta-catenin. One such gene, hyaluronan synthase 2 (HAS2), synthesizes hyaluronan, a core component of the extracellular matrix. We confirmed HAS2 upregulation in PC-3 cells transfected with D32G-mutant beta-catenin. Finally, we found nuclear localization of beta-catenin in 10 of 27 human tissue specimens; this localization was inversely associated with AR expression (P = 0.056, Fisher’s exact test), suggesting that reduced AR expression enables Wnt/beta-catenin signaling. Conclusion We identified a previously unknown downstream target of beta-catenin, HAS2, in PCa, and found that high beta-catenin nuclear localization and low or no AR expression may define a subpopulation of men with bone-metastatic PCa. These findings may guide physicians in managing these patients. PMID:22298898

  11. Correlated transition between two activity states of neurons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Uchida, Go; Fukuda, Mitsuhiro; Tanifuji, Manabu

    2006-03-01

    In order to understand the dynamical properties of a neural network, it is important to characterize the relation between spike trains of two neurons in the network. In this study, we show that in some neuron pairs in inferior temporal cortices of macaque monkeys, spike trains of a pair are described by a two-dimensional Poisson process whose means are modulated by a common two-state Markov process. The common two-state Markov process describes a correlated state transition between firing and nonfiring states of the constituent neurons of the pair.

  12. Effects of Positive and Negative Mood Induction on the Prefrontal Cortex Activity Measured by Near Infrared Spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Compare, A; Brugnera, Agostino; Adorni, R; Sakatani, K

    2016-01-01

    The neurophysiological mechanism of positive versus negative emotions is insufficiently understood. In the present study, we examined the effect of event recall tasks on the prefrontal cortex (PFC) activity using near infrared spectroscopy (NIRS). Nine healthy adults were instructed to recall episodes of their life associated with positive (happiness) and negative (anger) emotion, both silently and verbally. Heart rate (HR) changes were simultaneously measured. NIRS showed an increased oxyhemoglobin (oxy-Hb) in the bilateral PFC during silent and verbal recall of both positive and negative episodes. The changes of oxy-Hb in the bilateral PFC during silent recall of negative episodes were significantly larger than those during silent recall of positive episodes (p < 0.01). There was no difference in average changes of oxy-Hb between silent and verbal recall of negative episodes (p > 0.95), while changes of oxy-Hb during verbal recall of positive episodes were larger than those during silent recall of positive episodes (p < 0.05). Both verbal and silent recall of positive and negative episodes increased HR; however, verbal recall caused larger increases of HR than silent recall (p < 0.01). The present results suggest that recall of negative episodes affect the PFC activity, which plays a key role in cognitive control of emotions, more than positive episodes. PMID:27526137

  13. Influence of the active mass particle suspension in electrolyte upon corrosion of negative electrode of a lead-acid battery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kamenev, Yu.; Shtompel, G.; Ostapenko, E.; Leonov, V.

    2014-07-01

    The influence of the suspension of positive active mass particles in the electrolyte on the performance of the negative electrode in a lead-acid battery is studied. A significant increase in the rate of corrosion of the lead electrode is shown when slime particles get in contact with its surface, which may result in the rise of macro-defects on the lugs of the negative electrodes.

  14. Negative core affect and employee silence: How differences in activation, cognitive rumination, and problem-solving demands matter.

    PubMed

    Madrid, Hector P; Patterson, Malcolm G; Leiva, Pedro I

    2015-11-01

    Employees can help to improve organizational performance by sharing ideas, suggestions, or concerns about practices, but sometimes they keep silent because of the experience of negative affect. Drawing and expanding on this stream of research, this article builds a theoretical rationale based on core affect and cognitive appraisal theories to describe how differences in affect activation and boundary conditions associated with cognitive rumination and cognitive problem-solving demands can explain employee silence. Results of a diary study conducted with professionals from diverse organizations indicated that within-person low-activated negative core affect increased employee silence when, as an invariant factor, cognitive rumination was high. Furthermore, within-person high-activated negative core affect decreased employee silence when, as an invariant factor, cognitive problem-solving demand was high. Thus, organizations should manage conditions to reduce experiences of low-activated negative core affect because these feelings increase silence in individuals high in rumination. In turn, effective management of experiences of high-activated negative core affect can reduce silence for individuals working under high problem-solving demand situations.

  15. Correlations Decrease with Propagation of Spiking Activity in the Mouse Barrel Cortex

    PubMed Central

    Ranganathan, Gayathri Nattar; Koester, Helmut Joachim

    2011-01-01

    Propagation of suprathreshold spiking activity through neuronal populations is important for the function of the central nervous system. Neural correlations have an impact on cortical function particularly on the signaling of information and propagation of spiking activity. Therefore we measured the change in correlations as suprathreshold spiking activity propagated between recurrent neuronal networks of the mammalian cerebral cortex. Using optical methods we recorded spiking activity from large samples of neurons from two neural populations simultaneously. The results indicate that correlations decreased as spiking activity propagated from layer 4 to layer 2/3 in the rodent barrel cortex. PMID:21629764

  16. Correlation of lattice distortion with photocatalytic activity of titanium dioxide

    SciTech Connect

    Wang Xia; Shui Miao Li Rongsheng; Song Yue

    2008-08-04

    The photocatalytic activity of titanium dioxide dispersions on X-3B pigment degradation has been investigated. A variety of factors that would influence the photocatalytic activity such as crystallite size, lattice distortion, and anatase content are discussed in detail. It is found that lattice distortion is the most important one among these factors and is expected to inhibit the hole and electron pair recombination. It determines, to some extent, the photocatalytic efficiency of titanium dioxide dispersions.

  17. Decreased Circulating T Regulatory Cells in Egyptian Patients with Nonsegmental Vitiligo: Correlation with Disease Activity

    PubMed Central

    Hegab, Doaa Salah; Attia, Mohamed Attia Saad

    2015-01-01

    Background. Vitiligo is an acquired depigmentary skin disorder resulting from autoimmune destruction of melanocytes. Regulatory T cells (Tregs), specifically CD4+CD25+ and Forkhead box P3+ (FoxP3+) Tregs, acquired notable attention because of their role in a variety of autoimmune pathologies. Dysregulation of Tregs may be one of the factors that can break tolerance to melanocyte self-antigens and contribute to vitiligo pathogenesis. Methods. In order to sustain the role of Tregs in pathogenesis and disease activity of vitiligo, surface markers for CD4+CD25+ and FoxP3+ peripheral Tregs were evaluated by flow cytometry in 80 Egyptian patients with nonsegmental vitiligo in addition to 60 healthy control subjects and correlated with clinical findings. Results. Vitiligo patients had significantly decreased numbers of both peripheral CD4+CD25+ and FoxP3+ T cells compared to control subjects (11.49%  ± 8.58% of CD4+ T cells versus 21.20%  ± 3.08%, and 1.09%  ± 0.96% versus 1.44%  ± 0.24%, resp., P < 0.05 for both). Peripheral numbers of CD4+CD25+ and FoxP3+ Tregs correlated negatively with VIDA score. Conclusion. Treg depletion with impaired immune downregulatory function might play a key role in the autoimmune conditions beyond nonsegmental vitiligo particularly in active cases. Effective Treg cell-based immunotherapies might be a future hope for patients with progressive vitiligo. PMID:26788051

  18. Decreased Circulating T Regulatory Cells in Egyptian Patients with Nonsegmental Vitiligo: Correlation with Disease Activity.

    PubMed

    Hegab, Doaa Salah; Attia, Mohamed Attia Saad

    2015-01-01

    Background. Vitiligo is an acquired depigmentary skin disorder resulting from autoimmune destruction of melanocytes. Regulatory T cells (Tregs), specifically CD4(+)CD25(+) and Forkhead box P3(+) (FoxP3(+)) Tregs, acquired notable attention because of their role in a variety of autoimmune pathologies. Dysregulation of Tregs may be one of the factors that can break tolerance to melanocyte self-antigens and contribute to vitiligo pathogenesis. Methods. In order to sustain the role of Tregs in pathogenesis and disease activity of vitiligo, surface markers for CD4(+)CD25(+) and FoxP3(+) peripheral Tregs were evaluated by flow cytometry in 80 Egyptian patients with nonsegmental vitiligo in addition to 60 healthy control subjects and correlated with clinical findings. Results. Vitiligo patients had significantly decreased numbers of both peripheral CD4(+)CD25(+) and FoxP3(+) T cells compared to control subjects (11.49%  ± 8.58% of CD4(+) T cells versus 21.20%  ± 3.08%, and 1.09%  ± 0.96% versus 1.44%  ± 0.24%, resp., P < 0.05 for both). Peripheral numbers of CD4(+)CD25(+) and FoxP3(+) Tregs correlated negatively with VIDA score. Conclusion. Treg depletion with impaired immune downregulatory function might play a key role in the autoimmune conditions beyond nonsegmental vitiligo particularly in active cases. Effective Treg cell-based immunotherapies might be a future hope for patients with progressive vitiligo. PMID:26788051

  19. New insights into 3-(aminomethyl)naphthoquinones: Evaluation of cytotoxicity, electrochemical behavior and search for structure-activity correlation.

    PubMed

    da Silva, Gustavo B; Neves, Amanda P; Vargas, Maria D; Marinho-Filho, José D B; Costa-Lotufo, Letícia V

    2016-08-01

    Herein we describe the structure-activity relationship of a large library of Mannich bases (MBs) synthesized from 2-hydroxy-1,4-naphthoquinone. In general, the compounds have shown high to moderate activity against the HL-60 (promyelocytic leukaemia) cell line with IC50=1.1-19.2μM. Our results suggest that the nature of the aryl moiety introduced in the structure of MBs by the aldehyde component is crucial to the cytotoxicity, and although the group originated from the primary amine has a lesser influence, aromatic ones were found to suppress the activity. Thus, MBs derived from salicylaldehydes or 2-pyridinecarboxaldehyde and aliphatic amines are the most active compounds. A satisfactory correlation of the EpIIc versus IC50 (μM) in dimethylsulfoxide was observed. The most cytotoxic MBs (Series a-c, derived from salicylaldehydes) showed the least negative EpIIc values. Noteworthy, however, Series d (derived from 2-pyridinecarboxaldehyde) did not follow this correlation. They exhibited both the lowest IC50 and the most negative EpIIc values, thus suggesting that other factors also influence the cytotoxicity of the MBs, such as lipophilicity, electronic distribution and hydrogen bonding. PMID:27363939

  20. Social Cognitive Correlates of Physical Activity in Inactive Adults with Multiple Sclerosis

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dlugonski, Deirdre; Wojcicki, Thomas R.; McAuley, Edward; Motl, Robert W.

    2011-01-01

    Persons with multiple sclerosis (MS) are often physically inactive. This observation has prompted the search for modifiable constructs derived from established theories that act as correlates of physical activity. This study investigated self efficacy, outcome expectations, impediments, and goal setting as correlates of physical activity in…

  1. Subthalamic, not striatal, activity correlates with basal ganglia downstream activity in normal and parkinsonian monkeys

    PubMed Central

    Deffains, Marc; Iskhakova, Liliya; Katabi, Shiran; Haber, Suzanne N; Israel, Zvi; Bergman, Hagai

    2016-01-01

    The striatum and the subthalamic nucleus (STN) constitute the input stage of the basal ganglia (BG) network and together innervate BG downstream structures using GABA and glutamate, respectively. Comparison of the neuronal activity in BG input and downstream structures reveals that subthalamic, not striatal, activity fluctuations correlate with modulations in the increase/decrease discharge balance of BG downstream neurons during temporal discounting classical condition task. After induction of parkinsonism with 1-methyl-4-phenyl-1,2,3,6-tetrahydropyridine (MPTP), abnormal low beta (8-15 Hz) spiking and local field potential (LFP) oscillations resonate across the BG network. Nevertheless, LFP beta oscillations entrain spiking activity of STN, striatal cholinergic interneurons and BG downstream structures, but do not entrain spiking activity of striatal projection neurons. Our results highlight the pivotal role of STN divergent projections in BG physiology and pathophysiology and may explain why STN is such an effective site for invasive treatment of advanced Parkinson's disease and other BG-related disorders. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.16443.001 PMID:27552049

  2. Entanglement activation and the robustness of quantum correlations

    SciTech Connect

    Brandao, Fernando G. S. L.

    2007-09-15

    We show that the usefulness of a state as an activator in teleportation protocols is equivalent to the robustness of its entanglement to noise. The robustness of entanglement of a bipartite state {sigma} is linked to the maximum increase in the fidelity of teleportation of any other state when {sigma} is used as an extra resource. On the one hand, this connection gives an operational meaning to the robustness of entanglement. On the other hand, it shows that the activation capability--which has a central role as an operational way of quantifying bound entangled states -- can be estimated experimentally by measuring entanglement witnesses.

  3. Decrease in serum cortisol during yoga exercise is correlated with alpha wave activation.

    PubMed

    Kamei, T; Toriumi, Y; Kimura, H; Ohno, S; Kumano, H; Kimura, K

    2000-06-01

    We examined changes in brain waves and blood levels of serum cortisol during yoga exercise in 7 yoga instructors and found that alpha waves increased and serum cortisol decreased. These two measures were negatively correlated (r = -.83). Comparison with a control group of nonpractitioners is desirable.

  4. Inverse correlation between promoter strength and excision activity in class 1 integrons.

    PubMed

    Jové, Thomas; Da Re, Sandra; Denis, François; Mazel, Didier; Ploy, Marie-Cécile

    2010-01-01

    Class 1 integrons are widespread genetic elements that allow bacteria to capture and express gene cassettes that are usually promoterless. These integrons play a major role in the dissemination of antibiotic resistance among Gram-negative bacteria. They typically consist of a gene (intI) encoding an integrase (that catalyzes the gene cassette movement by site-specific recombination), a recombination site (attI1), and a promoter (Pc) responsible for the expression of inserted gene cassettes. The Pc promoter can occasionally be combined with a second promoter designated P2, and several Pc variants with different strengths have been described, although their relative distribution is not known. The Pc promoter in class 1 integrons is located within the intI1 coding sequence. The Pc polymorphism affects the amino acid sequence of IntI1 and the effect of this feature on the integrase recombination activity has not previously been investigated. We therefore conducted an extensive in silico study of class 1 integron sequences in order to assess the distribution of Pc variants. We also measured these promoters' strength by means of transcriptional reporter gene fusion experiments and estimated the excision and integration activities of the different IntI1 variants. We found that there are currently 13 Pc variants, leading to 10 IntI1 variants, that have a highly uneven distribution. There are five main Pc-P2 combinations, corresponding to five promoter strengths, and three main integrases displaying similar integration activity but very different excision efficiency. Promoter strength correlates with integrase excision activity: the weaker the promoter, the stronger the integrase. The tight relationship between the aptitude of class 1 integrons to recombine cassettes and express gene cassettes may be a key to understanding the short-term evolution of integrons. Dissemination of integron-driven drug resistance is therefore more complex than previously thought.

  5. E-ADA activity in erythrocytes of lambs experimentally infected with Haemonchus contortus and its possible functional correlations with anemia.

    PubMed

    Da Silva, Aleksandro S; Schafer, Andressa S; Aires, Adelina R; Tonin, Alexandre A; Pimentel, Victor C; Oliveira, Camila B; Zanini, Daniela; Schetinger, Maria R C; Lopes, Sonia T A; Leal, Marta L R

    2013-12-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the ecto-adenosine deaminase (E-ADA) activity in erythrocytes of lambs experimentally infected with Haemonchus contortus, correlating it with the degrees of anemia of the experimental animals. A total of 14 healthy lambs, with negative fecal exam for parasites, were to carry out the present study. They were divided into two groups, composed by seven animals: Group A represented the healthy animals (uninfected), while in Group B the animals were infected with 15,000 larvae of H. contortus. Blood was drawn on the days 15, 45 and 75 post-infection (PI) in order to perform the hematological analysis, as well as the mensuration of E-ADA activity in erythrocytes. Parasitological stool exam were performed on the same days mentioned above to follow up the evolution of the infection, as well to determine the number of eggs per gram of feces (EPG). On day 15PI, the animals presented negative EPG and there was not significant (P>0.05) difference between groups in relation to E-ADA activity and hematologic parameters. Animals in Group B had positive EPG for helminths on days 45 and 75 PI, accompanied by varying degrees of anemia, when compared to Group A. At the same periods E-ADA activity was significantly (P<0.05) increased in the erythrocytes of animals of Group B when compared with the not-infected ones. Statistically, there was a negative correlation (P<0.01) between activity E-ADA in erythrocytes and hematocrit on days 45 (r = -0.76) and 75 (r = -0.85)PI. Based on these results and in the scientific literature, it is possible to conclude that the E-ADA may participate on mechanisms related with the pathogenesis and host response against anemia caused by H. contortus.

  6. Reverse Transcriptase: Correlation of Zinc Content with Activity

    PubMed Central

    Poiesz, Bernard J.; Seal, Gita; Loeb, Lawrence A.

    1974-01-01

    Evidence is presented that DNA polymerase of avian myeloblastosis virus has an obligatory zinc requirement for activity. Previous studies indicate that the purified polymerase contains zinc in a stoichiometry of about 1 g-atom/mole. We now find that the enzyme-bound zinc is exchangeable with radioactive 65Zn; after isoelectric focusing, the radioactive 65Zn is coincident with polymerase activity. Dialysis of the 65Zn-labeled polymerase against the chelator, 1,10-phenanthroline, results in a progressive loss of radioactive 65Zn and polymerase activity. Thereupon, incubation of the inactivated enzyme with Zn2+ fully restores activity. Thus, the DNA polymerase present in an oncogenic RNA virus, like animal DNA polymerases, can be rigorously classified as a zinc metalloenzyme. DNA polymerase of avian myeloblastosis virus is inactivated by 1,10-phenanthroline at a much faster rate than the bacterial and animal DNA polymerases that have been tested. It may, therefore, be possible to inactivate selectively DNA polymerases from animal tumor viruses by brief exposure to appropriate metal chelators. PMID:4140513

  7. Correlates of Lifetime Physical Activity in Young Women

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wallace, Lorraine Silver

    2003-01-01

    This study retrospectively examined physical activity patterns across three specific age periods (childhood, teenage, and young adulthood) in a cross sectional sample of young Caucasian undergraduate women (N = 44). All women (mean age = 22.27 plus or minus 3.14 years) completed questionnaire packets assessing transtheoretical model of behavior…

  8. CD99 correlates with low cyclin D1, high topoisomerase 2 status and triple negative molecular phenotype but is prognostically irrelevant in breast carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Czapiewski, Piotr; Wełnicka-Jaśkiewicz, Marzena; Seroczyńska, Barbara; Skokowski, Jarosław; Sejda, Aleksandra; Szade, Jolanta; Wiewiora, Claudia; Biernat, Wojciech; Żaczek, Anna

    2015-09-01

    CD99 is a protein initially described in the Ewing sarcoma family of tumors, but growing evidence has shown its expression in other tumors of mesenchymal, hematopoietic and even epithelial origin. Some articles report CD99 in metaplastic carcinoma of the breast, a subtype of breast carcinoma (BC) with pronounced epithelial to mesenchymal (EMT) phenotype. Our aim was to analyse the potential relationship between CD99 and selected EMT (vimentin, E-cadherin, Twist) and proliferation markers (Ki-67, c-myc, cyclin D1, topoisomerase 2), molecular subtypes of BC, as well as overall survival (OS) and progression-free survival (PFS). In a group of 122 cases CD99 membrane expression was seen in 14 (11.5%) cases: strong in 11 (9%) and moderate in 3 (2.5%). Expression of CD99 correlated with low cyclin D1 index, high level of topoisomerase 2 expression and lack of progesterone receptor (PR) but not with EMT characteristics. Additionally, strong expression of CD99 correlated with triple negative molecular BC phenotype. CD99 was prognostically irrelevant for OS and PFS. CD99 correlates with selected proliferative markers and low ER/PR receptor status but not with patients' outcome in BC. Further studies are required to explain precisely its role in molecular pathogenesis of BC. PMID:26619106

  9. Cyclic GMP-dependent protein kinase activation in the absence of negative inotropic effects in the rat ventricle

    PubMed Central

    MacDonell, Karen L; Diamond, Jack

    1997-01-01

    It has been suggested that activation of cyclic GMP-dependent protein kinase (PKG) is a necessary step in the chain of events leading to the production of negative inotropy by muscarinic receptor agonists in mammalian ventricles, and that some cyclic GMP-elevating agents, such as sodium nitroprusside (SNP), fail to exert a negative inotropic effect because they elevate cyclic GMP levels in a pool that does not activate the kinase. This hypothesis was tested in the present study by monitoring the effects of carbachol, SNP and atrial natriuretic peptide (ANP) on contractility, cyclic GMP content and PKG activity in rat intact ventricular preparations and freshly isolated ventricular cardiomyocytes.The presence of PKG in both the intact vehicle and in isolated ventricular cardiomyocytes was confirmed by MonoQ anion exchange chromatography and Western blotting. The elution profile indicated that the conditions of the PKG assay were selective for measuring PKG activity.Carbachol induced a marked negative inotropic effect in intact, perfused hearts and ventricular strips in the presence of isoproterenol. The negative inotropic effect of carbachol was not associated with significant changes in cyclic GMP content or PKG activity in intact ventricular tissue, or in PKG activity in isolated cardiomyocytes.SNP and ANP significantly increased cyclic GMP levels and activated PKG in intact ventricular preparations. Both drugs also activated PKG in isolated cardiomyocytes. However, neither drug had any negative inotropic effect in isoprenaline-stimulated perfused hearts and ANP did not change the contractility of isoprenaline-stimulated isolated cardiomyocytes.The results of this study demonstrate that the negative inotropic effects of muscarinic receptor agonists can occur in the absence of significant activation of PKG. Conversely, marked increases in ventricular cyclic GMP content and PKG activity caused by SNP or ANP were not accompanied by a negative inotropic effect

  10. Sulforaphene inhibits triple negative breast cancer through activating tumor suppressor Egr1.

    PubMed

    Yang, Ming; Teng, Wendi; Qu, Yue; Wang, Haiyong; Yuan, Qipeng

    2016-07-01

    Sulforaphene (SFE, 4-methylsufinyl-3-butenyl isothiocyanate) is a member of isothiocyanates, which is derived from radish seeds. It has shown that multiple isothiocyanates, such as sulforaphane, can effectively inhibit cancer cell proliferation in vitro and in vivo. However, it is still largely unknown if SFE could impact breast cancer. In this study, we investigated the anticancer effects of SFE on triple negative breast cancer (TNBC) via a series of in vitro and in vivo assays. We found that SFE can significantly inhibit cell proliferation in multiple TNBC cell lines through inducing G2/M phase arrest as well as cell apoptosis. Nude mice xenograft assays support the anti-TNBC role of SFE in vivo. Interestingly, SFE can repress expression of cyclinB1, Cdc2, and phosphorylated Cdc2, and, then, induced G2/M phase arrest of TNBC cells. To identify SFE target genes, we detected genome-wide gene expression changes through gene expression profiling and observed 27 upregulated and 18 downregulated genes in MDA-MB-453 cells treated with SFE. Among these genes, Egr1 was successfully validated as a consistently activated gene after SFE treatment in TNBC MDA-MB-453 and MDA-MB-436 cells. Egr1 overexpression inhibited proliferation of TNBC cells. However, Egr1 knockdown using siRNAs significantly promoted TNBC cell growth, indicating the tumor suppressor nature of Egr1. In sum, we for the first time found that SFE might be a potential anti-TNBC natural compound and its antiproliferation effects might be mediated by tumor suppressor Egr1. PMID:27377973

  11. Pharmacological Modulation of NMDA Receptor Activity and the Advent of Negative and Positive Allosteric Modulators

    PubMed Central

    Monaghan, Daniel T.; Irvine, Mark W.; Costa, Blaise Mathias; Fang, Guangyu; Jane, David E.

    2012-01-01

    The NMDA receptor (NMDAR) family of L-glutamate receptors are well known to have diverse roles in CNS function as well as in various neuropathological and psychiatric conditions. Until recently, the types of agents available to pharmacologically regulate NMDAR function have been quite limited in terms of mechanism of action and subtype selectivity. This has changed significantly in the past two years. The purpose of this review is to summarize the many drug classes now available for modulating NMDAR activity. Previously, this included competitive antagonists at the L-glutamate and glycine binding sites, high and low affinity channel blockers, and GluN2B-selective N-terminal domain binding site antagonists. More recently, we and others have identifed new classes of NMDAR agents that are either positive or negative allosteric modulators (PAMs and NAMs, respectively). These compounds include the pan potentiator UBP646, the GluN2A-selective potentiator/GluN2C & GluN2D inhibitor UBP512, the GluN2D-selective potentiator UBP551, the GluN2C/GluN2D-selective potentiator CIQ as well as the new NMDAR-NAMs such as the pan-inhibitor UBP618, the GluN2C/GluN2D-selective inhibitor QZN46 and the GluN2A inhibitors UBP608 and TCN201. These new agents do not bind within the L-glutamate or glycine binding sites, the ion channel pore or the N-terminal regulatory domain. Collectively, these new allosteric modulators appear to be acting at multiple novel sites on the NMDAR complex. Importantly, these agents display improved subtype-selectivity and as NMDAR PAMs and NAMs, they represent a new generation of potential NMDAR therapeutics. PMID:22269804

  12. Featured Article: Teriflunomide, an immunomodulatory drug, exerts anticancer activity in triple negative breast cancer cells

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Ou; Zhang, Weili; Zhi, Qiaoming; Xue, Xiaofeng; Liu, Hongchun; Shen, Daoming; Geng, Meiyu; Xie, Zuoquan

    2015-01-01

    Triple-negative breast cancer (TNBC) is defined as a group of primary breast cancers lacking expression of estrogen, progesterone, and human epidermal growth factor receptor-2 (HER-2) receptors, characterized by higher relapse rate and lower survival compared with other subtypes. Due to lack of identified targets and molecular heterogeneity, conventional chemotherapy is the only available option for treatment of TNBC, but non-discordant positive therapeutic efficacy could not be achieved. Here, we demonstrated that these TNBC cells were sensitive to teriflunomide, which was a well-known immunomodulatory drug for treatment of relapsing multiple sclerosis (MS). Potent anti-cancer effects in TNBC in vitro, including proliferation inhibition, cell cycle delay, cell apoptosis, and suppression of cell motility and invasiveness, could be achieved with this agent. Of note, we showed that multiple signals involved in TNBC proliferation, survival, migratory, and invasive potential were under regulation by teriflunomide. Among them, we identified down-regulation of growth factor receptors to abolish growth maintenance, suppression of c-Myc, and cyclin D1 to contribute to its anti-proliferative effect, modulation of components of cell cycle to induce S-phase arrest, degradation of Bcl-xL, and up-regulation of BAX via activation of MAPK pathway to induce apoptosis, and inhibition of epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT) process, matrix metalloproteinase-9 (MMP9) expression, and inactivation of Src/FAK to reduce TNBC migration and invasion. The results identified teriflunomide may be of therapeutic benefit for the more aggressive and difficult-to-treat breast cancer subtype, indicating the use of teriflunomide for clinical trials for treatment of TNBC patients. PMID:25304315

  13. Teriflunomide, an immunomodulatory drug, exerts anticancer activity in triple negative breast cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Huang, Ou; Zhang, Weili; Zhi, Qiaoming; Xue, Xiaofeng; Liu, Hongchun; Shen, Daoming; Geng, Meiyu; Xie, Zuoquan; Jiang, Min

    2015-04-01

    Triple-negative breast cancer (TNBC) is defined as a group of primary breast cancers lacking expression of estrogen, progesterone, and human epidermal growth factor receptor-2 (HER-2) receptors, characterized by higher relapse rate and lower survival compared with other subtypes. Due to lack of identified targets and molecular heterogeneity, conventional chemotherapy is the only available option for treatment of TNBC, but non-discordant positive therapeutic efficacy could not be achieved. Here, we demonstrated that these TNBC cells were sensitive to teriflunomide, which was a well-known immunomodulatory drug for treatment of relapsing multiple sclerosis (MS). Potent anti-cancer effects in TNBC in vitro, including proliferation inhibition, cell cycle delay, cell apoptosis, and suppression of cell motility and invasiveness, could be achieved with this agent. Of note, we showed that multiple signals involved in TNBC proliferation, survival, migratory, and invasive potential were under regulation by teriflunomide. Among them, we identified down-regulation of growth factor receptors to abolish growth maintenance, suppression of c-Myc, and cyclin D1 to contribute to its anti-proliferative effect, modulation of components of cell cycle to induce S-phase arrest, degradation of Bcl-xL, and up-regulation of BAX via activation of MAPK pathway to induce apoptosis, and inhibition of epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT) process, matrix metalloproteinase-9 (MMP9) expression, and inactivation of Src/FAK to reduce TNBC migration and invasion. The results identified teriflunomide may be of therapeutic benefit for the more aggressive and difficult-to-treat breast cancer subtype, indicating the use of teriflunomide for clinical trials for treatment of TNBC patients. PMID:25304315

  14. Rac1 inhibition negatively regulates transcriptional activity of the amyloid precursor protein gene.

    PubMed

    Wang, Pi-Lin; Niidome, Tetsuhiro; Akaike, Akinori; Kihara, Takeshi; Sugimoto, Hachiro

    2009-07-01

    Rac1, a member of the Rho family GTPases, participates in a variety of cellular functions including lamellipodia formation, actin cytoskeleton organization, cell growth, apoptosis, and neuronal development. Recent studies have implicated Rac1 in cytoskeletal abnormalities, production of reactive oxygen species, and generation of the amyloid beta-peptide (Abeta) observed in Alzheimer's disease. In this study, we examined the relationship between Rac1 and amyloid precursor protein (APP), because the abnormal proteolytic processing of APP is a pathologic feature of Alzheimer's disease. In primary hippocampal neurons, the Rac1-specific inhibitor NSC23766 decreased both Rac1 activity and APP protein levels in a concentration-dependent manner. To elucidate how NSC23766 decreases APP protein levels, we examined the effects of NSC23766 on APP processing, degradation, and biosynthesis. NSC23766 did not increase the levels of the proteolytic products of APP, sAPPalpha, Abeta40, and Abeta42. The proteasome inhibitor lactacystin did not reverse the NSC23766-induced decrease in APP protein levels. NSC23766 did, however, decrease the levels of both APP mRNA and APP protein. Decreased levels of APP mRNA and protein were also observed when HEK293 cells were transfected with an expression vector containing a dominant-negative Rac1 mutant or with siRNA targeting Rac1. By overexpressing progressively deleted fragments of the APP promoter in HEK293 cells, we identified a Rac1 response site at positions -233 to -41 bp in the APP promoter. Taken together, our results suggest that Rac1 regulates transcription of the APP gene in primary hippocampal neurons.

  15. Personal, Social, and Game-Related Correlates of Active and Non-Active Gaming Among Dutch Gaming Adolescents: Survey-Based Multivariable, Multilevel Logistic Regression Analyses

    PubMed Central

    de Vet, Emely; Chinapaw, Mai JM; de Boer, Michiel; Seidell, Jacob C; Brug, Johannes

    2014-01-01

    strongly (negatively) associated with attitude with respect to non-active games, followed by observed active game behavior of brothers and sisters and attitude with respect to active gaming (positive associations). On the other hand, non-active gaming is most strongly associated with observed non-active game behavior of friends, habit strength regarding gaming and attitude toward non-active gaming (positive associations). Habit strength was a correlate of both active and non-active gaming, indicating that both types of gaming are habitual behaviors. Although these results should be interpreted with caution because of the limitations of the study, they do provide preliminary insights into potential correlates of active and non-active gaming that can be used for further research as well as preliminary direction for the development of effective intervention strategies for replacing non-active gaming by active gaming among adolescents. PMID:25654657

  16. [Correlation between the microbiological (S. aureus) and seismic activities with regard to the sun-earth interactions and neutron flux generation].

    PubMed

    Shestopalov, I P; Rogozhin, Iu A

    2005-01-01

    The study searched for interactions between the solar activity, seismic energy of the Earth and microbiological processes in the period from 1969 to 1997. Microbiological processes were found dependent on as the solar, so intraterrestrial (e.g. seismic) activity. The 11-year seismic on biological cycles on Earth display a positive inter-correlation and a negative one with the solar activity (sun-spots cycles). There is also correlation between the Earth's seismic energy and neutron fluxes generated at the times of earthquakes on our planet, and microbiological parameters.

  17. The expressions of NEDD9 and E-cadherin correlate with metastasis and poor prognosis in triple-negative breast cancer patients

    PubMed Central

    Li, Peng; Sun, Tingting; Yuan, Qingzhong; Pan, Guozheng; Zhang, Jian; Sun, Diwen

    2016-01-01

    Background Neural precursor cell expressed, developmentally downregulated 9 (NEDD9), a member of Crk-associated substrate family, is involved in cancer cell adhesion, migration, invasion, and epithelial–mesenchymal transition. E-cadherin is a key event in the cellular invasion during the epithelial–mesenchymal transition mechanism. The aim of this study was to evaluate the association among NEDD9 expression, E-cadherin expression, and survival in triple-negative breast cancer (TNBC) patients. Methods NEDD9 and E-cadherin expressions were analyzed by immunohistochemistry in 106 TNBC patients and 120 non-TNBC patients. And the association of clinicopathological factors with survival was analyzed using Kaplan–Meier analysis and Cox regression in TNBC patients. Results The results revealed that the rate of increased expression of NEDD9 and reduced expression of E-cadherin was significantly higher in TNBC group than that in non-TNBC group (P<0.001, both). Comparison of features between TNBC and non-TNBC groups showed that histological type (P=0.026) and lymph node metastasis (P=0.001) were significantly different. Correlation analysis showed that positive NEDD9 expression and negative E-cadherin expression were significantly correlated with lymph node metastasis and tumor-node-metastasis stage (P<0.05). In addition, the enhanced NEDD9 expression was significantly associated with a reduced 5-year survival for TNBC patients (overall survival [OS]: P=0.013; disease-free survival [DFS]: P=0.021). Negative E-cadherin expression showed a significantly worse 5-year OS and DFS (OS: P=0.011; DFS: P=0.012). Multivariate analysis showed that lymph node metastasis (OS: P=0.006; DFS: P=0.004), tumor-node-metastasis stage (OS: P=0.012; DFS: P=0.001), NEDD9 (OS: P=0.046; DFS: P=0.022), and E-cadherin (OS: P=0.022; DFS: P=0.025) independently predicted a poor prognosis of OS and DFS. Moreover, patients with NEDD9-positive/E-cadherin-negative expression had a significantly worse

  18. Correlation analysis between the rate of respiration in the root and the active components in licorice (Glycyrrhiza uralensis).

    PubMed

    Guo, Peijun; Sun, Zhirong; Liu, Wenlan; Chen, Long; DU, Yuan; Wei, Xinxin

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the correlation between root respiration and the percentage of active components in licorice (Glycyrrhiza uralensis Fisch.), in order to provide a foundation for the regulation and modulation of the quality of G. uralensis. Respiration efflux of annual and biennial G. uralensis was determined using a Li-7000 CO2/H2O analyzer. The root systems were scanned at a resolution of 3,000 dpi using an Epson Expression 10000XL scanner. Root growth was determined by analyzing the scanned images using WinRHIZO version Pro2007d software and the rate of respiration in the root was subsequently calculated. In addition, the percentages of the five major active components in licorice, glycyrrhizic acid, glycyrrhizin, isoliquiritin, liquiritigenin and isoliquiritigenin, were detected using high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC). The correlation between the root respiration and the percentage of the active components was investigated. Significant seasonal changes were observed in the rates of respiration of first and zero-class roots. In annual and biennial G. uralensis, the maximum and minimum values for rate of respiration were present in July (P<0.05) and November (P<0.05), respectively. The correlation coefficients between the five major active components and the rate of respiration were -0.304 (glycyrrhizin), -0.129 (liquiritigenin), -0.441 (glycyrrhizic acid; P<0.05), -0.471 (isoliquiritin; P<0.05) and 0.148 (isoliquiritigenin). The percentages of glycyrrhizic acid and isoliquiritin were significantly negatively correlated with the rate of respiration in annual and biennial G. uralensis. Understanding the correlation between the root rate of respiration and the active components in G. uralensis may be beneficial to ensuring the quality of cultivated G. uralensis.

  19. Increased motor preparation activity during fluent single word production in DS: A correlate for stuttering frequency and severity.

    PubMed

    Vanhoutte, Sarah; Santens, Patrick; Cosyns, Marjan; van Mierlo, Pieter; Batens, Katja; Corthals, Paul; De Letter, Miet; Van Borsel, John

    2015-08-01

    Abnormal speech motor preparation is suggested to be a neural characteristic of stuttering. One of the neurophysiological substrates of motor preparation is the contingent negative variation (CNV). The CNV is an event-related, slow negative potential that occurs between two defined stimuli. Unfortunately, CNV tasks are rarely studied in developmental stuttering (DS). Therefore, the present study aimed to evaluate motor preparation in DS by use of a CNV task. Twenty five adults who stutter (AWS) and 35 fluent speakers (FS) were included. They performed a picture naming task while an electro-encephalogram was recorded. The slope of the CNV was evaluated at frontal, central and parietal electrode sites. In addition, a correlation analysis was performed with stuttering severity and frequency measures. There was a marked increase in CNV slope in AWS as compared to FS. This increase was observed over the entire scalp with respect to stimulus onset, and only over the right hemisphere with respect to lip movement onset. Moreover, strong positive correlations were found between CNV slope and stuttering frequency and severity. As the CNV is known to reflect the activity in the basal ganglia-thalamo-cortical-network, the present findings confirm an increased activation of this loop during speech motor preparation in stuttering. The more a person stutters, the more neurons of this cortical-subcortical network seem to be activated. Because this increased CNV slope was observed during fluent single word production, it is discussed whether or not this observation refers to a successful compensation strategy.

  20. Dynamics of Population Activity in Rat Sensory Cortex: Network Correlations Predict Anatomical Arrangement and Information Content.

    PubMed

    Sabri, Mohammad Mahdi; Adibi, Mehdi; Arabzadeh, Ehsan

    2016-01-01

    To study the spatiotemporal dynamics of neural activity in a cortical population, we implanted a 10 × 10 microelectrode array in the vibrissal cortex of urethane-anesthetized rats. We recorded spontaneous neuronal activity as well as activity evoked in response to sustained and brief sensory stimulation. To quantify the temporal dynamics of activity, we computed the probability distribution function (PDF) of spiking on one electrode given the observation of a spike on another. The spike-triggered PDFs quantified the strength, temporal delay, and temporal precision of correlated activity across electrodes. Nearby cells showed higher levels of correlation at short delays, whereas distant cells showed lower levels of correlation, which tended to occur at longer delays. We found that functional space built based on the strength of pairwise correlations predicted the anatomical arrangement of electrodes. Moreover, the correlation profile of electrode pairs during spontaneous activity predicted the "signal" and "noise" correlations during sensory stimulation. Finally, mutual information analyses revealed that neurons with stronger correlations to the network during spontaneous activity, conveyed higher information about the sensory stimuli in their evoked response. Given the 400-μm-distance between adjacent electrodes, our functional quantifications unravel the spatiotemporal dynamics of activity among nearby and distant cortical columns. PMID:27458347

  1. Dynamics of Population Activity in Rat Sensory Cortex: Network Correlations Predict Anatomical Arrangement and Information Content

    PubMed Central

    Sabri, Mohammad Mahdi; Adibi, Mehdi; Arabzadeh, Ehsan

    2016-01-01

    To study the spatiotemporal dynamics of neural activity in a cortical population, we implanted a 10 × 10 microelectrode array in the vibrissal cortex of urethane-anesthetized rats. We recorded spontaneous neuronal activity as well as activity evoked in response to sustained and brief sensory stimulation. To quantify the temporal dynamics of activity, we computed the probability distribution function (PDF) of spiking on one electrode given the observation of a spike on another. The spike-triggered PDFs quantified the strength, temporal delay, and temporal precision of correlated activity across electrodes. Nearby cells showed higher levels of correlation at short delays, whereas distant cells showed lower levels of correlation, which tended to occur at longer delays. We found that functional space built based on the strength of pairwise correlations predicted the anatomical arrangement of electrodes. Moreover, the correlation profile of electrode pairs during spontaneous activity predicted the “signal” and “noise” correlations during sensory stimulation. Finally, mutual information analyses revealed that neurons with stronger correlations to the network during spontaneous activity, conveyed higher information about the sensory stimuli in their evoked response. Given the 400-μm-distance between adjacent electrodes, our functional quantifications unravel the spatiotemporal dynamics of activity among nearby and distant cortical columns. PMID:27458347

  2. Age-related decline of myelin proteins is highly correlated with activation of astrocytes and microglia in the rat CNS.

    PubMed

    Xie, Fang; Zhang, Jiu-Cong; Fu, Han; Chen, Jun

    2013-11-01

    It has been shown that aging can greatly influence the integrity and ultrastructure of white matter and the myelin sheath; however, studies regarding the effects of aging on the expression of myelin proteins are still limited. In the present study, immunohistochemical mapping was used to investigate the overall expression of myelin basic protein (Mbp) and myelin oligodendrocyte glycoprotein (Mog) in the central nervous system (CNS) of rats in postnatal months 2, 5, 18 and 26. Astrocyte and microglia activation was also detected by glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP) or ionized calcium-binding adaptor molecule 1 (Iba1) staining and western blotting. A significant decline of Mbp and Mog was identified as a universal alteration in the CNS of aged rats. Aging also induced significant astrocyte and microglial activation. Correlation analysis indicated a negative correlation between the reduction of age‑related myelin proteins and glial activation in aging. This correlation of myelin breakdown and glial activation in aging may reveal new evidence in connecting the inflammation and myelin breakdown mechanism of age‑related neurodegenerative diseases.

  3. Kaiso depletion attenuates transforming growth factor-β signaling and metastatic activity of triple-negative breast cancer cells

    PubMed Central

    Bassey-Archibong, B I; Kwiecien, J M; Milosavljevic, S B; Hallett, R M; Rayner, L G A; Erb, M J; Crawford-Brown, C J; Stephenson, K B; Bédard, P-A; Hassell, J A; Daniel, J M

    2016-01-01

    Triple-negative breast cancers (TNBCs) represent a subset of breast tumors that are highly aggressive and metastatic, and are responsible for a disproportionate number of breast cancer-related deaths. Several studies have postulated a role for the epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition (EMT) program in the increased aggressiveness and metastatic propensity of TNBCs. Although EMT is essential for early vertebrate development and wound healing, it is frequently co-opted by cancer cells during tumorigenesis. One prominent signaling pathway involved in EMT is the transforming growth factor-β (TGFβ) pathway. In this study, we report that the novel POZ-ZF transcription factor Kaiso is highly expressed in TNBCs and correlates with a shorter metastasis-free survival. Notably, Kaiso expression is induced by the TGFβ pathway and silencing Kaiso expression in the highly invasive breast cancer cell lines, MDA-MB-231 (hereafter MDA-231) and Hs578T, attenuated the expression of several EMT-associated proteins (Vimentin, Slug and ZEB1), abrogated TGFβ signaling and TGFβ-dependent EMT. Moreover, Kaiso depletion attenuated the metastasis of TNBC cells (MDA-231 and Hs578T) in a mouse model. Although high Kaiso and high TGFβR1 expression is associated with poor overall survival in breast cancer patients, overexpression of a kinase-active TGFβR1 in the Kaiso-depleted cells was insufficient to restore the metastatic potential of these cells, suggesting that Kaiso is a key downstream component of TGFβ-mediated pro-metastatic responses. Collectively, these findings suggest a critical role for Kaiso in TGFβ signaling and the metastasis of TNBCs. PMID:26999717

  4. Kaiso depletion attenuates transforming growth factor-β signaling and metastatic activity of triple-negative breast cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Bassey-Archibong, B I; Kwiecien, J M; Milosavljevic, S B; Hallett, R M; Rayner, L G A; Erb, M J; Crawford-Brown, C J; Stephenson, K B; Bédard, P-A; Hassell, J A; Daniel, J M

    2016-01-01

    Triple-negative breast cancers (TNBCs) represent a subset of breast tumors that are highly aggressive and metastatic, and are responsible for a disproportionate number of breast cancer-related deaths. Several studies have postulated a role for the epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition (EMT) program in the increased aggressiveness and metastatic propensity of TNBCs. Although EMT is essential for early vertebrate development and wound healing, it is frequently co-opted by cancer cells during tumorigenesis. One prominent signaling pathway involved in EMT is the transforming growth factor-β (TGFβ) pathway. In this study, we report that the novel POZ-ZF transcription factor Kaiso is highly expressed in TNBCs and correlates with a shorter metastasis-free survival. Notably, Kaiso expression is induced by the TGFβ pathway and silencing Kaiso expression in the highly invasive breast cancer cell lines, MDA-MB-231 (hereafter MDA-231) and Hs578T, attenuated the expression of several EMT-associated proteins (Vimentin, Slug and ZEB1), abrogated TGFβ signaling and TGFβ-dependent EMT. Moreover, Kaiso depletion attenuated the metastasis of TNBC cells (MDA-231 and Hs578T) in a mouse model. Although high Kaiso and high TGFβR1 expression is associated with poor overall survival in breast cancer patients, overexpression of a kinase-active TGFβR1 in the Kaiso-depleted cells was insufficient to restore the metastatic potential of these cells, suggesting that Kaiso is a key downstream component of TGFβ-mediated pro-metastatic responses. Collectively, these findings suggest a critical role for Kaiso in TGFβ signaling and the metastasis of TNBCs.

  5. Uniformity and nonuniformity of neural activities correlated to different insight problem solving.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Q; Li, Y; Shang, X; Zhou, Z; Han, L

    2014-06-13

    Previous studies on the neural basis of insight reflected weak consistency except for the anterior cingulate cortex. The present work adopted the semantic and homophonic punny riddle to explore the uniformity and nonuniformity of neural activities correlated to different insight problem solving. Results showed that in the early period of insight solving, the semantic and homophonic punny riddles induced a common N350-500 over the central scalp. However, during -400 to 0 ms before the riddles were solved, the semantic punny riddles induced a positive event-related potential (ERP) deflection over the temporal cortex for retrieving the extensive semantic information, while the homophonic punny riddles induced a positive ERP deflection over the temporal cortex and a negative one in the left frontal cortex which might reflect the semantic and phonological information processing respectively. Our study indicated that different insight problem solving should have the same cognitive process of detecting cognitive conflicts, but have different ways to solve the conflicts. PMID:24759773

  6. Amplifiers of Developmental and Negative Experiences in Organized Activities: Dosage, Motivation, Lead Roles, and Adult-Youth Ratios

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hansen, David M.; Larson, Reed W.

    2007-01-01

    This study evaluated four sets of factors hypothesized to amplify adolescents' developmental and negative experience in organized youth activities. A representative sample of 1,822 eleventh grade students from 19 high schools completed the computer-administered Youth Experience Survey. Findings indicated that amount of time, motivation, holding a…

  7. Correlates of college students' physical activity: cross-cultural differences.

    PubMed

    Seo, Dong-Chul; Torabi, Mohammad R; Jiang, Nan; Fernandez-Rojas, Xinia; Park, Bock-Hee

    2009-10-01

    This study examined cross-cultural differences in personal and behavioral determinants of vigorous-intensity and moderate-intensity physical activity (PA) among college students living in distinctly different cultures, that is, the United States, Costa Rica, India, and South Korea. Participants of this study were recruited from randomly chosen public universities in the 4 countries during the 2006-2007 academic year. A total of 4685 students participated in the study (response rate 90%). Vigorous-intensity PA was measured by asking on how many of the past 7 days the participants participated in PA for at least 20 minutes that made them sweat or breathe hard. For moderate-intensity PA, participants were asked on how many of the past 7 days they participated in PA for at least 30 minutes that did not make them sweat or breathe hard. Findings indicate that whereas perceived overweight and fruit and vegetable consumption are relatively culture-free predictors of PA, gender and TV/video watching are culture-specific predictors. Binge drinking was not predictive of meeting the vigorous-intensity and moderate-intensity PA guidelines in any of the 4 countries. PMID:19661101

  8. Negative correlation between nuptial throat colour and blood parasite load in male European green lizards supports the Hamilton-Zuk hypothesis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Molnár, Orsolya; Bajer, Katalin; Mészáros, Boglárka; Török, János; Herczeg, Gábor

    2013-06-01

    During female mate choice, conspicuous male sexual signals are used to infer male quality and choose the best sire for the offspring. The theory of parasite-mediated sexual selection (Hamilton-Zuk hypothesis) presumes that parasite infection can influence the elaboration of sexual signals: resistant individuals can invest more energy into signal expression and thus advertise their individual quality through signal intensity. By preferring these males, females can provide resistance genes for their offspring. Previous research showed that nuptial throat colour of male European green lizard, Lacerta viridis, plays a role in both inter- and intrasexual selections as a condition-dependent multiple signalling system. The aim of this study was to test the predictions of the Hamilton-Zuk hypothesis on male European green lizards. By blood sampling 30 adult males during the reproductive season, we found members of the Haemogregarinidae family in all but one individual (prevalence = 96 %). The infection intensity showed strong negative correlation with the throat and belly colour brightness in line with the predictions of the Hamilton-Zuk hypothesis. In addition, we found other correlations between infection intensity and other fitness-related traits, suggesting that parasite load has a remarkable effect on individual fitness. This study shows that throat patch colour of the European green lizards not only is a multiple signalling system but also possibly acts as an honest sexual signal of health state in accordance with the Hamilton-Zuk hypothesis.

  9. Negative correlation between nuptial throat colour and blood parasite load in male European green lizards supports the Hamilton-Zuk hypothesis.

    PubMed

    Molnár, Orsolya; Bajer, Katalin; Mészáros, Boglárka; Török, János; Herczeg, Gábor

    2013-06-01

    During female mate choice, conspicuous male sexual signals are used to infer male quality and choose the best sire for the offspring. The theory of parasite-mediated sexual selection (Hamilton-Zuk hypothesis) presumes that parasite infection can influence the elaboration of sexual signals: resistant individuals can invest more energy into signal expression and thus advertise their individual quality through signal intensity. By preferring these males, females can provide resistance genes for their offspring. Previous research showed that nuptial throat colour of male European green lizard, Lacerta viridis, plays a role in both inter- and intrasexual selections as a condition-dependent multiple signalling system. The aim of this study was to test the predictions of the Hamilton-Zuk hypothesis on male European green lizards. By blood sampling 30 adult males during the reproductive season, we found members of the Haemogregarinidae family in all but one individual (prevalence = 96%). The infection intensity showed strong negative correlation with the throat and belly colour brightness in line with the predictions of the Hamilton-Zuk hypothesis. In addition, we found other correlations between infection intensity and other fitness-related traits, suggesting that parasite load has a remarkable effect on individual fitness. This study shows that throat patch colour of the European green lizards not only is a multiple signalling system but also possibly acts as an honest sexual signal of health state in accordance with the Hamilton-Zuk hypothesis. PMID:23644520

  10. Enhanced performance of Zn(II)-doped lead-acid batteries with electrochemical active carbon in negative mass

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xiang, Jiayuan; Hu, Chen; Chen, Liying; Zhang, Dong; Ding, Ping; Chen, Dong; Liu, Hao; Chen, Jian; Wu, Xianzhang; Lai, Xiaokang

    2016-10-01

    The effect and mechanism of Zn(II) on improving the performances of lead-acid cell with electrochemical active carbon (EAC) in negative mass is investigated. The hydrogen evolution of the cell is significantly reduced due to the deposition of Zn on carbon surface and the increased porosity of negative mass. Zn(II) additives can also improve the low-temperature and high-rate capacities of the cell with EAC in negative mass, which ascribes to the formation of Zn on lead and carbon surface that constructs a conductive bridge among the active mass. Under the co-contribution of EAC and Zn(II), the partial-state-of-charge cycle life is greatly prolonged. EAC optimizes the NAM structure and porosity to enhance the charge acceptance and retard the lead sulfate accumulation. Zn(II) additive reduces the hydrogen evolution during charge process and improves the electric conductivity of the negative electrode. The cell with 0.6 wt% EAC and 0.006 wt% ZnO in negative mass exhibits 90% reversible capacity of the initial capacity after 2100 cycles. In contrast, the cell with 0.6 wt% EAC exhibits 84% reversible capacity after 2100 cycles and the control cell with no EAC and Zn(II) exhibits less than 80% reversible capacity after 1350 cycles.

  11. The adhesion GPCR BAI1 mediates macrophage ROS production and microbicidal activity against Gram-negative bacteria

    PubMed Central

    Billings, Emily A.; Lee, Chang Sup; Owen, Katherine A.; D’Souza, Ryan S.; Ravichandran, Kodi S.; Casanova, James E.

    2016-01-01

    The detection of microbes and initiation of an innate immune response occur through pattern recognition receptors (PRRs), which are critical for the production of inflammatory cytokines and activation of the cellular microbicidal machinery. In particular, the production of reactive oxygen species (ROS) by the NADPH oxidase complex is a critical component of the macrophage bactericidal machinery. We previously characterized brain-specific angiogenesis inhibitor 1 (BAI1), a member of the adhesion family of G protein (heterotrimeric guanine nucleotide–binding protein)–coupled receptors (GPCRs), as a PRR that mediates the selective phagocytic uptake of Gram-negative bacteria by macrophages. We showed that BAI1 promoted phagosomal ROS production through activation of the Rho family guanosine triphosphatase (GTPase) Rac1, thereby stimulating NADPH oxidase activity. Primary BAI1-deficient macrophages exhibited attenuated Rac GTPase activity and reduced ROS production in response to several Gram-negative bacteria, resulting in impaired microbicidal activity. Furthermore, in a peritoneal infection model, BAI1-deficient mice exhibited increased susceptibility to death by bacterial challenge because of impaired bacterial clearance. Together, these findings suggest that BAI1 mediates the clearance of Gram-negative bacteria by stimulating both phagocytosis and NADPH oxidase activation, thereby coupling bacterial detection to the cellular microbicidal machinery. PMID:26838550

  12. Vitamin D and L-cysteine levels correlate positively with GSH and negatively with insulin resistance levels in the blood of type 2 diabetic patients

    PubMed Central

    Jain, S K; Micinski, D; Huning, L; Kahlon, G; Bass, P F; Levine, S N

    2014-01-01

    Background/Objectives: Vitamin D, L-cysteine (LC) and glutathione (GSH) levels are lower in the blood of diabetic patients. This study examined the hypothesis that the levels of vitamin D and LC correlate with those of GSH in the blood of type 2 diabetic patients (T2D), and that vitamin D and LC upregulate glutamate–cysteine ligase (GCLC), which catalyzes GSH biosynthesis, in cultured monocytes. Subjects/Methods: Fasting blood was obtained after written informed consent from T2D (n=79) and healthy controls (n=22). U937 monocytes were pretreated with 1,25 (OH)2 vitamin D (0–25 nM) or LC (0–500 μM) for 24 h and then exposed to control or high glucose (25 mM) for 4 h. Results: Plasma levels of vitamin D, LC, GSH and GCLC protein were significantly lower in T2D versus those in age-matched healthy controls. Multiple linear regression analyses and adjustment for body weight showed a significant positive correlation between plasma levels of vitamin D (r=0.26, P=0.05) and LC (r=0.81, P=0.001) and that of GSH, and between LC and vitamin D (r=0.27, P=0.045) levels. Plasma levels of GSH (r=−0.34, P=0.01) and LC (r=−0.33, r=0.01) showed a negative correlation with triglyceride levels. Vitamin D correlated inversely with HbA1C (−0.30, P=0.01) and homeostatic model assessment insulin resistance (r=−0.31, P=0.03), which showed a significant positive correlation with triglycerides (r=0.44, P=0.001) in T2D. Cell culture studies demonstrate that supplementation with vitamin D and LC significantly increased GCLC expression and GSH formation in control and high-glucose-treated monocytes. Conclusions: This study suggests a positive relationship between the concentrations of the micronutrients vitamin D and LC and that of GSH. Some of the beneficial effects of vitamin D and LC supplementation may be mediated by an increase in the levels of GSH and a decrease in triglyceride levels in T2D patients. PMID:24961547

  13. Pollution of mycological surfaces in hospital emergency departments correlates positively with blood NKT CD3+ 16+ 56+ and negatively with CD4+ cell levels of their staff

    PubMed Central

    Suska, Milena; Kiepura, Anna; Winnicka, Izabela; Leszczyński, Paweł; Bielawska-Drózd, Agata; Cieślik, Piotr; Kubiak, Leszek; Depczyńska, Daria; Brewczyńska, Aleksandra; Skopińska-Różewska, Ewa; Kocik, Janusz

    2016-01-01

    The aim of the present study was the assessment of the putative influence of yeast and filamentous fungi in healthcare and control (office) workplaces (10 of each kind) on immune system competence measured by NK (natural killer), CD4+, and NKT (natural killer T lymphocyte) cell levels in the blood of the personnel employed at these workplaces. Imprints from floors and walls were collected in winter. The blood was taken in spring the following year, from 40 men, 26 to 53 years old, healthcare workers of hospital emergency departments (HED), who had been working for at least five years in their current positions, and from 36 corresponding controls, working in control offices. Evaluation of blood leukocyte subpopulations was done by flow cytometry. The qualitative analysis of the surface samples revealed a prevalence of strains belonging to Aspergillus spp. and Penicillium spp. genus. There was no statistically significant difference between the level of NKT; however, the percentage of NK cells was lower in the blood of HED workers than in the blood of offices personnel. Spearman analysis revealed the existence of positive correlation (r = 0.4677, p = 0.002) between the total CFU/25 cm2 obtained by imprinting method from walls and floors of HED and the percentage of NKT (CD3+16+56+) lymphocytes collected from the blood of their personnel, and negative correlation (r = –0. 3688, p = 0.019) between this parameter of fungal pollution and the percentage of CD4+ lymphocytes in the blood of HED staff. No other correlations were found. PMID:27095925

  14. Pollution of mycological surfaces in hospital emergency departments correlates positively with blood NKT CD3(+) 16(+) 56(+) and negatively with CD4(+) cell levels of their staff.

    PubMed

    Suska, Milena; Lewicki, Sławomir; Kiepura, Anna; Winnicka, Izabela; Leszczyński, Paweł; Bielawska-Drózd, Agata; Cieślik, Piotr; Kubiak, Leszek; Depczyńska, Daria; Brewczyńska, Aleksandra; Skopińska-Różewska, Ewa; Kocik, Janusz

    2016-01-01

    The aim of the present study was the assessment of the putative influence of yeast and filamentous fungi in healthcare and control (office) workplaces (10 of each kind) on immune system competence measured by NK (natural killer), CD4(+), and NKT (natural killer T lymphocyte) cell levels in the blood of the personnel employed at these workplaces. Imprints from floors and walls were collected in winter. The blood was taken in spring the following year, from 40 men, 26 to 53 years old, healthcare workers of hospital emergency departments (HED), who had been working for at least five years in their current positions, and from 36 corresponding controls, working in control offices. Evaluation of blood leukocyte subpopulations was done by flow cytometry. The qualitative analysis of the surface samples revealed a prevalence of strains belonging to Aspergillus spp. and Penicillium spp. genus. There was no statistically significant difference between the level of NKT; however, the percentage of NK cells was lower in the blood of HED workers than in the blood of offices personnel. Spearman analysis revealed the existence of positive correlation (r = 0.4677, p = 0.002) between the total CFU/25 cm(2) obtained by imprinting method from walls and floors of HED and the percentage of NKT (CD3(+)16(+)56(+)) lymphocytes collected from the blood of their personnel, and negative correlation (r = -0. 3688, p = 0.019) between this parameter of fungal pollution and the percentage of CD4(+) lymphocytes in the blood of HED staff. No other correlations were found.

  15. 77 FR 11484 - Agency Information Collection Activities: Proposed Collection; Comment Request-Negative QC Review...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-02-27

    ...In accordance with the Paperwork Reduction Act of 1995, this notice invites the general public and other public agencies to comment on the proposed information collection for the FNS-245, Negative Case Action Review Schedule and updates the status of the FNS-248, Status of Sample Selection and Completion. The FNS-245 is currently used in the Quality Control process for the Supplemental......

  16. Reduction in delta activity predicted improved negative affect in Major Depressive Disorder.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Philip; Goldschmied, Jennifer; Casement, Melynda; Kim, Hyang Sook; Hoffmann, Robert; Armitage, Roseanne; Deldin, Patricia

    2015-08-30

    While prior research has demonstrated a paradoxical antidepressant effect of slow-wave disruption (SWD), the specific dimensions of depression affected is still unclear. The current study aimed to extend this research by utilizing a dimensional approach in examining the antidepressant effects of SWD. Of particular interest is the affective dimension, as negative affect in depression is arguably the most salient characteristic of depression. This sample included 16 individuals with depression (10 female) recruited from the community. Participants slept in the lab for three nights (adaptation, baseline night, and SWD) with polysomnography, and completed measures of negative affect and depression severity the following morning. Results show that reduction in delta power was linearly associated with improved negative affect. Comparison of individual change scores revealed that half of the individuals showed improved negative affect, which is comparable to the reported 40-60% antidepressant response rate to sleep deprivation. Results suggest that vulnerability in the sleep homeostatic system may be a contributing individual differences factor in response to slow-wave disruption in depression.

  17. Reduction in delta activity predicted improved negative affect in Major Depressive Disorder.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Philip; Goldschmied, Jennifer; Casement, Melynda; Kim, Hyang Sook; Hoffmann, Robert; Armitage, Roseanne; Deldin, Patricia

    2015-08-30

    While prior research has demonstrated a paradoxical antidepressant effect of slow-wave disruption (SWD), the specific dimensions of depression affected is still unclear. The current study aimed to extend this research by utilizing a dimensional approach in examining the antidepressant effects of SWD. Of particular interest is the affective dimension, as negative affect in depression is arguably the most salient characteristic of depression. This sample included 16 individuals with depression (10 female) recruited from the community. Participants slept in the lab for three nights (adaptation, baseline night, and SWD) with polysomnography, and completed measures of negative affect and depression severity the following morning. Results show that reduction in delta power was linearly associated with improved negative affect. Comparison of individual change scores revealed that half of the individuals showed improved negative affect, which is comparable to the reported 40-60% antidepressant response rate to sleep deprivation. Results suggest that vulnerability in the sleep homeostatic system may be a contributing individual differences factor in response to slow-wave disruption in depression. PMID:26123231

  18. Correlates of Physical Activity of Children and Adolescents: A Systematic Review of Reviews

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sterdt, Elena; Liersch, Sebastian; Walter, Ulla

    2014-01-01

    Objective: The aim of this study was to identify promoting and inhibiting correlates associated with the physical activity (PA) of children and adolescents (aged 3-18). The intention was to demonstrate the complexity of correlates of PA and to determine possible influencing factors. Design: A systematic review of reviews. Methods: Systematic…

  19. Personal and social-environmental correlates of objectively measured physical activity in Norwegian pre-adolescent children.

    PubMed

    Bergh, I H; Grydeland, M; Bjelland, M; Lien, N; Andersen, L F; Klepp, K-I; Anderssen, S A; Ommundsen, Y

    2011-12-01

    The aim of this study was to examine modifiable biological, psychological, behavioral and social-environmental correlates of physical activity among 1129 Norwegian 11-year-old children within a cross-sectional sample from the HEalth In Adolescents study. Physical activity was assessed by accelerometer, and weight and height were measured objectively. Age- and gender-specific cut-off points proposed by the International Obesity Task Force were used to define body mass index. Social-environmental variables were self-reported by questionnaire. Hierarchical regression (linear mixed models) revealed that normal weight children scored higher on percentage daily moderate-to-vigorous physical activity [% daily moderate to vigorous physical activity (MVPA)] than overweight/obese children (P<0.001). Self-efficacy (P<0.01) and perceived social support from friends (P<0.01) were positively associated with children's % daily MVPA, and a negative association was found for computer/game-use on weekends (P<0.01). A moderator effect of weight category (normal vs overweight/obese) in the relationship between computer/game-use on weekends and % daily MVPA was detected (P<0.05), reflecting that higher computer/game-use on weekends was associated with lower % MVPA among the overweight/obese, but not among the normal weight. Modifiable correlates from multiple domains accounted for 14% of the variance in % daily MVPA. Prospective and intervention studies are needed to examine whether these factors act as mediators for physical activity change in pre-adolescent children.

  20. The influence of negative ionization of the air on motor activity in Syrian hamsters ( Masocricetus auratus Waterhouse) in light conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lenkiewicz, Zofia; Dabrowska, Barbara; Schiffer, Zofia

    1989-12-01

    The motor activity of Syrian hamsters ( Mesocricetus auratus Waterhouse) under the influence of negative ionization of the atmosphere applied for 10, 20 or 30 min per day was investigated. An ionizer with output of 14000 light negative ions per 1 cm3 of air was used. Studies carried out in the light phase of a 12∶12 h light/dark regime revealed a relation between the reaction of the animal and the time of day at which ionization was applied. Ionization for 20 or 30 min in the light phase decreased motor activity, while 10 min of ionization increased it compared to control animals. Ionization in the dark phase gave a more distinct rise in activity than that applied in the light phase for all three durations of ionization.

  1. Hostility and social support explain physical activity beyond negative affect among young men, but not women, in college.

    PubMed

    Maier, Karl J; James, Ashley E

    2014-01-01

    We examined social support as a moderator of cynical hostility in relation to physical activity and body mass index among college students (n = 859; M = 18.71 years (SD = 1.22); 60% women, 84% White). After controlling for negative affect in hierarchical linear regression models, greater hostility was associated with lesser physical activity among those with low social support, as expected. Greater hostility was also associated with greater physical activity among those high in social support, ps < .05. Effects were observed for men only. Hostility and social support were unrelated to body mass index, ps > .05. Young men with a hostile disposition and low social support may be at risk for a sedentary lifestyle for reasons other than negative affect.

  2. ERBB activation modulates sensitivity to MEK1/2 inhibition in a subset of driver-negative melanoma

    PubMed Central

    Hutchinson, Katherine E.; Johnson, Douglas B.; Johnson, Adam S.; Sanchez, Violeta; Kuba, Maria; Lu, Pengcheng; Chen, Xi; Kelley, Mark C.; Wang, Qingguo; Zhao, Zhongming; Kris, Mark; Berger, Michael F.; Sosman, Jeffrey A.; Pao, William

    2015-01-01

    Melanomas are characterized by activating “driver” mutations in BRAF, NRAS, KIT, GNAQ, and GNA11. Resultant mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) pathway signaling makes some melanomas susceptible to BRAF (BRAF V600 mutations), MEK1/2 (BRAF V600, L597, fusions; NRAS mutations), or other kinase inhibitors (KIT), respectively. Among driver-negative (“pan-negative”) patients, an unexplained heterogeneity of response to MEK1/2 inhibitors has been observed. Analysis of 16 pan-negative melanoma cell lines revealed that 8 (50%; termed Class I) are sensitive to the MEK1/2 inhibitor, trametinib, similar to BRAF V600E melanomas. A second set (termed Class II) display reduced trametinib sensitivity, paradoxical activation of MEK1/2 and basal activation of ERBBs 1, 2, and 3 (4 lines, 25%). In 3 of these lines, PI3K/AKT and MAPK pathway signaling is abrogated using the ERBB inhibitor, afatinib, and proliferation is even further reduced upon the addition of trametinib. A potential mechanism of ERBB activation in Class II melanomas is minimal expression of the ERK1/2 phosphatase, DUSP4, as ectopic restoration of DUSP4 attenuated ERBB signaling through potential modulation of the ERBB ligand, amphiregulin (AREG). Consistent with these data, immunohistochemical analysis of patient melanomas revealed a trend towards lower overall DUSP4 expression in pan-negative versus BRAF- and NRAS-mutant tumors. This study is the first to demonstrate that differential ERBB activity in pan-negative melanoma may modulate sensitivity to clinically-available MEK1/2 inhibitors and provides rationale for the use of ERBB inhibitors, potentially in combination with MEK1/2 inhibitors, in subsets of this disease. PMID:26084293

  3. Matrix metalloproteinase-9 activity is associated with poor prognosis in T3-T4 node-negative colorectal cancer.

    PubMed

    Cho, Yong Beom; Lee, Woo Yong; Song, Sang Yong; Shin, Hee Jung; Yun, Seong Hyeon; Chun, Ho-Kyung

    2007-11-01

    Reversion-inducing cysteine-rich protein with Kazal motifs (RECK) is a novel membrane-anchored matrix metalloproteinase (MMP) inhibitor. RECK, MMP-2, and MMP-9 are believed to play crucial roles in tumor progression. This study was designed to examine the prognostic value of RECK, MMP-2, and MMP-9 in conjunction with other clinicopathologic factors in patients of T3-T4 node-negative colorectal cancer. RECK and MMP expression was observed using immunohistochemical analysis of the primary tumor from 89 patients with curatively resected T3-4 N0 colorectal cancer retrospectively. High RECK expression was observed in 51 cases, whereas expression was low in the other 38 cases. MMP-2 and MMP-9 expression was positive in cancer cells in 24 and 33 cases, respectively. RECK and MMP-2 expression was not significantly associated with any clinicopathologic factors. However, expression of MMP-9 was correlated with tumor location. A statistically significant inverse correlation was found between RECK and MMP-2 expression, and a statistically significant correlation was found between MMP-2 and MMP-9 expression. However, no association between RECK and MMP-9 expression was observed. Univariate analysis demonstrated that rectal tumor location, preoperative carcinoembryonic antigen more than 5 ng/mL, positive lymphatic invasion, less than 12 dissected lymph nodes, and positive MMP-9 expression were poor prognostic factors of disease-free survival. A multivariate analysis confirmed that enhanced MMP-9 expression was an independent and significant factor for prediction of a poor prognosis. In addition, positive lymphatic invasion and less than 12 dissected lymph nodes were significant negative prognostic factors. In conclusion, MMP-9 status represents a novel prognostic factor in evaluation of T3-T4 node-negative colorectal cancer.

  4. A correlation between antioxidant activity and metabolite release during the blanching of Chrysanthemum coronarium L.

    PubMed

    Kim, Jiyoung; Choi, Jung Nam; Ku, Kang Mo; Kang, Daejung; Kim, Jong Sang; Park, Jung Han Yoon; Lee, Choong Hwan

    2011-01-01

    Liquid chromatography tandem mass spectrometry (LCMS/MS)-based metabolite profiling was applied to elucidate the correlation between metabolite release and antioxidant activity during water blanching of Chrysanthemum coronarium L. (CC). Some major metabolites showing differences between fresh CC and blanched CC (BCC) were selected by principal component analysis (PCA) and partial least-square discriminate analysis (PLS-DA) loading plots, and were identified as dicaffeoylquinic acid (DCQA), succinoyl-DCQA, and acetylmycosinol. By PLS regression analysis of the correlation between antioxidant components and effects, candidate antioxidative metabolites were predicted due to strong positive correlations with DCQA and succinoyl-DCQA, and by a relatively weak positive correlation with acetylmycosinol.

  5. Correlations in background activity control persistent state stability and allow execution of working memory tasks

    PubMed Central

    Dipoppa, Mario; Gutkin, Boris S.

    2013-01-01

    Working memory (WM) requires selective information gating, active information maintenance, and rapid active updating. Hence performing a WM task needs rapid and controlled transitions between neural persistent activity and the resting state. We propose that changes in correlations in neural activity provides a mechanism for the required WM operations. As a proof of principle, we implement sustained activity and WM in recurrently coupled spiking networks with neurons receiving excitatory random background activity where background correlations are induced by a common noise source. We first characterize how the level of background correlations controls the stability of the persistent state. With sufficiently high correlations, the sustained state becomes practically unstable, so it cannot be initiated by a transient stimulus. We exploit this in WM models implementing the delay match to sample task by modulating flexibly in time the correlation level at different phases of the task. The modulation sets the network in different working regimes: more prompt to gate in a signal or clear the memory. We examine how the correlations affect the ability of the network to perform the task when distractors are present. We show that in a winner-take-all version of the model, where two populations cross-inhibit, correlations make the distractor blocking robust. In a version of the mode where no cross inhibition is present, we show that appropriate modulation of correlation levels is sufficient to also block the distractor access while leaving the relevant memory trace in tact. The findings presented in this manuscript can form the basis for a new paradigm about how correlations are flexibly controlled by the cortical circuits to execute WM operations. PMID:24155714

  6. Frontal midline theta rhythm is correlated with cardiac autonomic activities during the performance of an attention demanding meditation procedure.

    PubMed

    Kubota, Y; Sato, W; Toichi, M; Murai, T; Okada, T; Hayashi, A; Sengoku, A

    2001-04-01

    Frontal midline theta rhythm (Fm theta), recognized as distinct theta activity on EEG in the frontal midline area, reflects mental concentration as well as meditative state or relief from anxiety. Attentional network in anterior frontal lobes including anterior cingulate cortex is suspected to be the generator of this activity, and the regulative function of the frontal neural network over autonomic nervous system (ANS) during cognitive process is suggested. However no studies have examined peripheral autonomic activities during Fm theta induction, and interaction of central and peripheral mechanism associated with Fm theta remains unclear. In the present study, a standard procedure of Zen meditation requiring sustained attention and breath control was employed as the task to provoke Fm theta, and simultaneous EEG and ECG recordings were performed. For the subjects in which Fm theta activities were provoked (six men, six women, 48% of the total subjects), peripheral autonomic activities were evaluated during the appearance of Fm theta as well as during control periods. Successive inter-beat intervals were measured from the ECG, and a recently developed method of analysis by Toichi et al. (J. Auton. Nerv. Syst. 62 (1997) 79-84) based on heart rate variability was used to assess cardiac sympathetic and parasympathetic functions separately. Both sympathetic and parasympathetic indices were increased during the appearance of Fm theta compared with control periods. Theta band activities in the frontal area were correlated negatively with sympathetic activation. The results suggest a close relationship between cardiac autonomic function and activity of medial frontal neural circuitry.

  7. In vitro activity of ciprofloxacin against aerobic gram-negative bacteria.

    PubMed Central

    Rudin, J E; Norden, C W; Shinners, E M

    1984-01-01

    For 177 gram-negative isolates, the MICs for ciprofloxacin ranged from 0.02 microgram/ml (Escherichia coli) to 0.31 microgram/ml (Pseudomonas aeruginosa). In time-kill curves, ciprofloxacin at 8 X the MIC almost completely killed 10(6) CFU of P. aeruginosa by 24 h. Ciprofloxacin at 4 X the MIC allowed bacterial regrowth by 24 h, with development of partial resistance to ciprofloxacin. PMID:6517550

  8. ERBB2 in Cat Mammary Neoplasias Disclosed a Positive Correlation between RNA and Protein Low Expression Levels: A Model for erbB-2 Negative Human Breast Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Abreu, Rui M. V.; Bastos, Estela; Amorim, Irina; Gut, Ivo G.; Gärtner, Fátima; Chaves, Raquel

    2013-01-01

    Human ERBB2 is a proto-oncogene that codes for the erbB-2 epithelial growth factor receptor. In human breast cancer (HBC), erbB-2 protein overexpression has been repeatedly correlated with poor prognosis. In more recent works, underexpression of this gene has been described in HBC. Moreover, it is also recognised that oncogenes that are commonly amplified or deleted encompass point mutations, and some of these are associated with HBC. In cat mammary lesions (CMLs), the overexpression of ERBB2 (27%–59.6%) has also been described, mostly at the protein level and although cat mammary neoplasias are considered to be a natural model of HBC, molecular information is still scarce. In the present work, a cat ERBB2 fragment, comprising exons 10 to 15 (ERBB2_10–15) was achieved for the first time. Allelic variants and genomic haplotype analyses were also performed, and differences between normal and CML populations were observed. Three amino acid changes, corresponding to 3 non-synonymous genomic sequence variants that were only detected in CMLs, were proposed to damage the 3D structure of the protein. We analysed the cat ERBB2 gene at the DNA (copy number determination), mRNA (expression levels assessment) and protein levels (in extra- and intra protein domains) in CML samples and correlated the last two evaluations with clinicopathological features. We found a positive correlation between the expression levels of the ERBB2 RNA and erbB-2 protein, corresponding to the intracellular region. Additionally, we detected a positive correlation between higher mRNA expression and better clinical outcome. Our results suggest that the ERBB2 gene is post-transcriptionally regulated and that proteins with truncations and single point mutations are present in cat mammary neoplastic lesions. We would like to emphasise that the recurrent occurrence of low erbB-2 expression levels in cat mammary tumours, suggests the cat mammary neoplasias as a valuable model for erbB-2 negative HBC

  9. The Y’s that bind: negative regulators of Src family kinase activity in platelets

    PubMed Central

    NEWMAN, D. K.

    2015-01-01

    Summary Members of the Src family of protein tyrosine kinases play important roles in platelet adhesion, activation, and aggregation. The purpose of this review is to summarize current knowledge regarding how Src family kinase activity is regulated in general, to describe what is known about mechanisms underlying SFK activation in platelets, and to discuss platelet proteins that contribute to SFK inactivation, particularly those that use phosphotyrosine-containing sequences to recruit phosphatases and kinases to sites of SFK activity. PMID:19630799

  10. Phenomenological correlates of metabolic activity in 18 patients with chronic schizophrenia

    SciTech Connect

    Volkow, N.D.; Wolf, A.P.; Van Gelder, P.; Brodie, J.D.; Overall, J.E.; Cancro, R.; Gomez-Mont, F.

    1987-02-01

    Using (11C)-deoxy-D-glucose and positron emission tomography (PET), the authors measured brain metabolism in 18 patients with chronic schizophrenia to assess which of the metabolic measures from two test conditions was more closely related to the patients' differing clinical characteristics. The two conditions were resting and activation, and an eye tracking task was used. Patients with more negative symptoms showed lower global metabolic rates and more severe hypofrontality than did the patients with fewer negative symptoms. Differences among the patients were distinguished by the task: sicker patients failed to show a metabolic activation response. These findings suggest that cerebral metabolic patterns reflect clinical characteristics of schizophrenic patients.

  11. Adaptor protein-2 sigma subunit mutations causing familial hypocalciuric hypercalcaemia type 3 (FHH3) demonstrate genotype-phenotype correlations, codon bias and dominant-negative effects.

    PubMed

    Hannan, Fadil M; Howles, Sarah A; Rogers, Angela; Cranston, Treena; Gorvin, Caroline M; Babinsky, Valerie N; Reed, Anita A; Thakker, Clare E; Bockenhauer, Detlef; Brown, Rosalind S; Connell, John M; Cook, Jacqueline; Darzy, Ken; Ehtisham, Sarah; Graham, Una; Hulse, Tony; Hunter, Steven J; Izatt, Louise; Kumar, Dhavendra; McKenna, Malachi J; McKnight, John A; Morrison, Patrick J; Mughal, M Zulf; O'Halloran, Domhnall; Pearce, Simon H; Porteous, Mary E; Rahman, Mushtaqur; Richardson, Tristan; Robinson, Robert; Scheers, Isabelle; Siddique, Haroon; Van't Hoff, William G; Wang, Timothy; Whyte, Michael P; Nesbit, M Andrew; Thakker, Rajesh V

    2015-09-15

    The adaptor protein-2 sigma subunit (AP2σ2) is pivotal for clathrin-mediated endocytosis of plasma membrane constituents such as the calcium-sensing receptor (CaSR). Mutations of the AP2σ2 Arg15 residue result in familial hypocalciuric hypercalcaemia type 3 (FHH3), a disorder of extracellular calcium (Ca(2+) o) homeostasis. To elucidate the role of AP2σ2 in Ca(2+) o regulation, we investigated 65 FHH probands, without other FHH-associated mutations, for AP2σ2 mutations, characterized their functional consequences and investigated the genetic mechanisms leading to FHH3. AP2σ2 mutations were identified in 17 probands, comprising 5 Arg15Cys, 4 Arg15His and 8 Arg15Leu mutations. A genotype-phenotype correlation was observed with the Arg15Leu mutation leading to marked hypercalcaemia. FHH3 probands harboured additional phenotypes such as cognitive dysfunction. All three FHH3-causing AP2σ2 mutations impaired CaSR signal transduction in a dominant-negative manner. Mutational bias was observed at the AP2σ2 Arg15 residue as other predicted missense substitutions (Arg15Gly, Arg15Pro and Arg15Ser), which also caused CaSR loss-of-function, were not detected in FHH probands, and these mutations were found to reduce the numbers of CaSR-expressing cells. FHH3 probands had significantly greater serum calcium (sCa) and magnesium (sMg) concentrations with reduced urinary calcium to creatinine clearance ratios (CCCR) in comparison with FHH1 probands with CaSR mutations, and a calculated index of sCa × sMg/100 × CCCR, which was ≥ 5.0, had a diagnostic sensitivity and specificity of 83 and 86%, respectively, for FHH3. Thus, our studies demonstrate AP2σ2 mutations to result in a more severe FHH phenotype with genotype-phenotype correlations, and a dominant-negative mechanism of action with mutational bias at the Arg15 residue. PMID:26082470

  12. Adaptor protein-2 sigma subunit mutations causing familial hypocalciuric hypercalcaemia type 3 (FHH3) demonstrate genotype-phenotype correlations, codon bias and dominant-negative effects.

    PubMed

    Hannan, Fadil M; Howles, Sarah A; Rogers, Angela; Cranston, Treena; Gorvin, Caroline M; Babinsky, Valerie N; Reed, Anita A; Thakker, Clare E; Bockenhauer, Detlef; Brown, Rosalind S; Connell, John M; Cook, Jacqueline; Darzy, Ken; Ehtisham, Sarah; Graham, Una; Hulse, Tony; Hunter, Steven J; Izatt, Louise; Kumar, Dhavendra; McKenna, Malachi J; McKnight, John A; Morrison, Patrick J; Mughal, M Zulf; O'Halloran, Domhnall; Pearce, Simon H; Porteous, Mary E; Rahman, Mushtaqur; Richardson, Tristan; Robinson, Robert; Scheers, Isabelle; Siddique, Haroon; Van't Hoff, William G; Wang, Timothy; Whyte, Michael P; Nesbit, M Andrew; Thakker, Rajesh V

    2015-09-15

    The adaptor protein-2 sigma subunit (AP2σ2) is pivotal for clathrin-mediated endocytosis of plasma membrane constituents such as the calcium-sensing receptor (CaSR). Mutations of the AP2σ2 Arg15 residue result in familial hypocalciuric hypercalcaemia type 3 (FHH3), a disorder of extracellular calcium (Ca(2+) o) homeostasis. To elucidate the role of AP2σ2 in Ca(2+) o regulation, we investigated 65 FHH probands, without other FHH-associated mutations, for AP2σ2 mutations, characterized their functional consequences and investigated the genetic mechanisms leading to FHH3. AP2σ2 mutations were identified in 17 probands, comprising 5 Arg15Cys, 4 Arg15His and 8 Arg15Leu mutations. A genotype-phenotype correlation was observed with the Arg15Leu mutation leading to marked hypercalcaemia. FHH3 probands harboured additional phenotypes such as cognitive dysfunction. All three FHH3-causing AP2σ2 mutations impaired CaSR signal transduction in a dominant-negative manner. Mutational bias was observed at the AP2σ2 Arg15 residue as other predicted missense substitutions (Arg15Gly, Arg15Pro and Arg15Ser), which also caused CaSR loss-of-function, were not detected in FHH probands, and these mutations were found to reduce the numbers of CaSR-expressing cells. FHH3 probands had significantly greater serum calcium (sCa) and magnesium (sMg) concentrations with reduced urinary calcium to creatinine clearance ratios (CCCR) in comparison with FHH1 probands with CaSR mutations, and a calculated index of sCa × sMg/100 × CCCR, which was ≥ 5.0, had a diagnostic sensitivity and specificity of 83 and 86%, respectively, for FHH3. Thus, our studies demonstrate AP2σ2 mutations to result in a more severe FHH phenotype with genotype-phenotype correlations, and a dominant-negative mechanism of action with mutational bias at the Arg15 residue.

  13. Correlation of Geomagnetic Activity with Implantable Cardioverter Defibrillator Shocks and Antitachycardia Pacing

    PubMed Central

    Ebrille, Elisa; Konecny, Tomas; Konecny, Dana; Spacek, Radim; Jones, Paul; Ambroz, Pavel; DeSimone, Christopher V; Powell, Brian D; Hayes, David L; Friedman, Paul A; Asirvatham, Samuel J

    2016-01-01

    Objective Small-scale observational studies have suggested that geomagnetic activity (GMA) may negatively correlate with the frequency of life-threatening arrhythmias. We investigated a potential relationship between implantable cardioverter defibrillator (ICD) therapies and daily GMA recorded in a large database. Patients and Methods The ALTITUDE database, derived from the Boston Scientific LATITUDE remote monitoring system, was retrospectively analyzed for the frequency of ICD therapies. Daily GMA was expressed as the planetary K-index and the integrated A-index and graded as Levels I – quiet, II – unsettled, III – active, and IV – storm. Results A daily mean of 59,468 ± 11,397 patients were monitored between 2009 and 2012. The distribution of days according to GMA was: Level I 75%, Level II 18%, Level III 5%, Level IV 2%. The daily number of ICD shocks received per 1000 active patients in the database was 1.29 ± 0.47, 1.17 ± 0.46, 1.03 ± 0.37, and 0.94 ± 0.29 on Level I, Level II, Level III, and Level IV days respectively; the daily sum of shocks and antitachycardia pacing (ATP) therapies was 9.29 ± 2.86, 8.46 ± 2.45, 7.92 ± 1.80, and 7.83 ± 2.28 on quiet, unsettled, active and storm days respectively. A statistically significant inverse relationship between GMA and the frequency of ICD therapies was identified, with the most pronounced difference between Level I and Level IV days (p < .001 for shocks, p = .008 for shocks + ATP). Conclusion In a large scale cohort analysis, ICD therapies were delivered less frequently on days of higher GMA, confirming the previous pilot data and suggesting that higher GMA does not pose an increased risk of arrhythmias using ICD therapies as a surrogate marker. Further studies are needed to gain an in-depth understanding of the underlying mechanisms. PMID:25659238

  14. A new estimator for activity on dynamic speckles based on contrast of sucessive correlations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    da Silva, Emerson Rodrigo; Rabal, Hector Jorge; Júnior, Mauro Favoretto; Muramatsu, Mikiya

    2008-04-01

    In this work, we propose the contrast of sucessive correlations as a valid estimator for activity on dynamic speckles. We call "sucessive correlations" the correlation coeficients between two sucessive instants recorded on a Time History Speckle Pattern (THSP). In following, by dividing the standard deviation of these coeficients by their mean value, we get the corresponding contrast of sucessive correlations. A wide number of THSPs was simulated, using a numerical model previous developed by one of the authors, and the new index was compared with the corresponding inertia moments of cooccurrence matrices. A comparison with real THSPs, obtained during a drying paint process, was done. We found a strong correlation between the contrast of sucessive correlations and the inertia moment, sugesting the validity of this new estimator.

  15. In-vivo imaging of stimulus-evoked intrinsic optical signals correlated with retinal activation in anesthetized frog

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yao, Xin-Cheng; Zhang, Qiu-Xiang; Li, Yang-Guo

    2011-09-01

    Intrinsic optical signal imaging (IOS) promises a noninvasive method for high resolution examination of retinal function. Using freshly isolated animal retinas, we have conducted a series of experiments to test fast IOSs which have time courses comparable to electrophysiological kinetics. In this article, we demonstrate the feasibility of in vivo imaging of fast IOSs correlated with retinal activation in anesthetized frog (Rana Pipiens). A rapid (68,000 lines/s) line-scan confocal ophthalmoscope was constructed to achieve high-speed (200 frames/s) near infared (NIR) recording of fast IOSs. By rejecting out-of-focus background light, the line-scan confocal imager provided enough resolution to differentiate individual photoreceptors in vivo. With visible light stimulation, NIR confocal images disclosed transient IOSs with time courses comparable to retinal ERG kinetics. High-resolution IOS images revealed both positive (increasing) and negative (decreasing) light responses, with sub-cellular complexity, in the activated retina.

  16. Raster image cross-correlation analysis for spatiotemporal visualization of intracellular degradation activities against exogenous DNAs.

    PubMed

    Sasaki, Akira; Yamamoto, Johtaro; Jin, Takashi; Kinjo, Masataka

    2015-09-24

    Reducing intracellular DNA degradation is critical to enhance the efficiency of gene therapy. Exogenous DNA incorporation into cells is strictly blocked by the defense machinery of intracellular nuclease activity. Raster image correlation spectroscopy (RICS) and raster image cross-correlation spectroscopy (cross-correlation RICS; ccRICS) are image-based correlation methods. These powerful tools allow the study of spatiotemporal molecular dynamics. Here we performed spatiotemporal ccRICS analyses of fluorescent DNA and directly monitored the process of exogenous DNA degradation in living cell cytoplasm. Such direct monitors of DNA degradation allow us to determine the fate of the exogenous DNA in living cells. On comparing the process in living cells, our study shows that cytoplasmic nuclease activity differs between cell lines; therefore, we propose that the difference of nuclease activity in cytoplasm dictates a different resistance to exogenous DNA incorporation. New insight on efficient gene delivery can be provided with our study.

  17. Raster image cross-correlation analysis for spatiotemporal visualization of intracellular degradation activities against exogenous DNAs.

    PubMed

    Sasaki, Akira; Yamamoto, Johtaro; Jin, Takashi; Kinjo, Masataka

    2015-01-01

    Reducing intracellular DNA degradation is critical to enhance the efficiency of gene therapy. Exogenous DNA incorporation into cells is strictly blocked by the defense machinery of intracellular nuclease activity. Raster image correlation spectroscopy (RICS) and raster image cross-correlation spectroscopy (cross-correlation RICS; ccRICS) are image-based correlation methods. These powerful tools allow the study of spatiotemporal molecular dynamics. Here we performed spatiotemporal ccRICS analyses of fluorescent DNA and directly monitored the process of exogenous DNA degradation in living cell cytoplasm. Such direct monitors of DNA degradation allow us to determine the fate of the exogenous DNA in living cells. On comparing the process in living cells, our study shows that cytoplasmic nuclease activity differs between cell lines; therefore, we propose that the difference of nuclease activity in cytoplasm dictates a different resistance to exogenous DNA incorporation. New insight on efficient gene delivery can be provided with our study. PMID:26400011

  18. Symptom Screening Among HIV-Infected Pregnant Women Is Acceptable and Has High Negative Predictive Value for Active Tuberculosis

    PubMed Central

    Chandrasekhar, Aditya; Gupte, Nikhil; Patil, Sandesh; Bhosale, Ramesh; Sambarey, Pradeep; Ghorpade, Shivahari; Nayak, Uma; Garda, Laila; Sastry, Jayagowri; Bharadwaj, Renu; Bollinger, Robert C.

    2011-01-01

    We evaluated tuberculosis (TB) screening among 799 human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)–infected pregnant women in India. Eleven (1.4%) had active TB. The negative predictive value of screening using cough, fever, night sweats, or weight loss was 99.3%. Tuberculin skin test and targeted chest radiography provided no substantial benefit. TB symptom screening, as recommended by the World Health Organization, is effective for ruling out TB in HIV-infected pregnant women. PMID:21940417

  19. Biochemical and electron microscopic evidence that cell nucleus negatively controls mitochondrial genomic activity in early sea urchin development.

    PubMed Central

    Rinaldi, A M; De Leo, G; Arzone, A; Salcher, I; Storace, A; Mutolo, V

    1979-01-01

    Enucleated halves of sea urchin eggs obtained by centrifugation contain almost all the mitochondrial population of the egg. Removal of the nucleus followed by parthenogenetic activation stimulates the incorporation of [3H]thymidine into the mitochondrial DNA, whereas no such incorportion is observed in activated whole eggs. The block is not the result of a modification in the permeability of the mitochondrial membrane. Electron microscopic observations demonstrated duplication of mitochondrial DNA molecules in activated enucleated halves. No duplication was found in the mitochondrial DNA from activated whole eggs or from nonactivated enucleated halves. We conclude that the cell nucleus exerts a negative control on the activity of the mitochondrial genome through some short-lived nuclear substance(s). Images PMID:287031

  20. Image patch analysis of sunspots and active regions. I. Intrinsic dimension and correlation analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moon, Kevin R.; Li, Jimmy J.; Delouille, Véronique; De Visscher, Ruben; Watson, Fraser; Hero, Alfred O.

    2016-01-01

    Context. The flare productivity of an active region is observed to be related to its spatial complexity. Mount Wilson or McIntosh sunspot classifications measure such complexity but in a categorical way, and may therefore not use all the information present in the observations. Moreover, such categorical schemes hinder a systematic study of an active region's evolution for example. Aims: We propose fine-scale quantitative descriptors for an active region's complexity and relate them to the Mount Wilson classification. We analyze the local correlation structure within continuum and magnetogram data, as well as the cross-correlation between continuum and magnetogram data. Methods: We compute the intrinsic dimension, partial correlation, and canonical correlation analysis (CCA) of image patches of continuum and magnetogram active region images taken from the SOHO-MDI instrument. We use masks of sunspots derived from continuum as well as larger masks of magnetic active regions derived from magnetogram to analyze separately the core part of an active region from its surrounding part. Results: We find relationships between the complexity of an active region as measured by its Mount Wilson classification and the intrinsic dimension of its image patches. Partial correlation patterns exhibit approximately a third-order Markov structure. CCA reveals different patterns of correlation between continuum and magnetogram within the sunspots and in the region surrounding the sunspots. Conclusions: Intrinsic dimension has the potential to distinguish simple from complex active regions. These results also pave the way for patch-based dictionary learning with a view toward automatic clustering of active regions.

  1. Phagocytosis and transforming activity of crystalline metal sulfide particles are related to their negative surface charge

    SciTech Connect

    Abbracchio, M.P.; Heck, J.D.; Costa, M.

    1982-01-01

    Crystalline nickel sulfide (alpha NiS) and cobalt sulfide (CoS2) particles can cause greater cell transformation and cellular toxicity than the respective amorphous metal sulfide particles. Cultured mammalian cells phagocytose the crystalline metal sulfide particles more readily than the amorphous ones. In the case of the nickel sulfides, the crystalline metal sulfide particles had negatively charged surfaces (Zeta potential: -27.012 mV) in contrast to the amorphous particles, which were positively charge (Zeta potential: +9.174 mV). X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy analysis of amorphous and crystalline NiS particles revealed that the outermost surface (1-4 nm) of the two particles had striking differences in Ni/S ratios and in their sulfur oxidation states. Rendering particles' surfaces more negative by reduction with lithium aluminum hydride enhanced their phagocytosis, and in the case of amorphous NiS chemical reduction resulted in an incidence of morphological transformation of Syrian hamster embryo cells comparable to that observed with untreated crystalline alpha NiS.

  2. Correlation between vitamin D levels and muscle fatigue risk factors based on physical activity in healthy older adults

    PubMed Central

    Al-Eisa, Einas S; Alghadir, Ahmad H; Gabr, Sami A

    2016-01-01

    Purpose The purpose of this study was to investigate the relationship of serum vitamin D levels with physical activity, obesity, muscle fatigue biomarkers, and total antioxidant capacity (TAC) in healthy older adults. Methods A total of 85 healthy older subjects aged 64–96 years were recruited in this study. Based on estimated energy expenditure scores, the participants were classified into three groups: inactive (n=25), moderate (n=20), and physically active (n=35). Serum 25(OH)D (25-hydroxy vitamin D) levels, metabolic syndrome parameters, TAC activity, muscle fatigue biomarkers (Ca, creatine kinase, lactic acid dehydrogenase, troponin I, hydroxyproline), physical activity, body fatness, and fatigue score (visual analog scale) were estimated using immunoassay techniques and prevalidated questionnaires, respectively. Results Physical activity was estimated in 64.6% of the participants. Males showed higher physical activity (42.5%) compared to females (26.25%). Compared to participants with lower activity, significant reduction in body mass index, waist circumference, hips, fasting blood sugar, triglycerides, total cholesterol, HDL-cholesterol, and LDL-cholesterol were observed in moderate and physically active participants. Also, significant increase in the levels of serum 25(OH)D concentrations, calcium, and TAC activity along with reduction in the levels of muscle fatigue biomarkers: creatine kinase, lactic acid dehydrogenase, troponin I, hydroxyproline, and fatigue scores (visual analog scale) were reported in physically active participants compared to those of lower physical activity. In all participants, serum 25(OH)D concentrations correlated positively with Ca, TAC, physical activity scores, and negatively with body mass index, lipid profile, fatigue scores (visual analog scale), and muscle fatigue biomarkers. Stepwise regression analysis showed that serum 25(OH)D concentrations, physical activity, Ca, TAC, and demographic parameters explained

  3. The apoptotic protease-activating factor 1-mediated pathway of apoptosis is dispensable for negative selection of thymocytes.

    PubMed

    Hara, Hiromitsu; Takeda, Atsunobu; Takeuchi, Michiyo; Wakeham, Andrew C; Itié, Annick; Sasaki, Masafumi; Mak, Tak W; Yoshimura, Akihiko; Nomoto, Kikuo; Yoshida, Hiroki

    2002-03-01

    Negative selection is a process to delete potentially autoreactive clones in developing thymocytes. Programmed cell death or apoptosis is thought to play an important role in this selection process. In this study, we investigated the role of apoptotic protease-activating factor 1 (Apaf1), a mammalian homologue of CED-4, in programmed cell death during the negative selection in thymus. There was no developmental abnormality in thymocytes from newborn Apaf1(-/-) mice in terms of CD4 and CD8 expression pattern and thymocyte number. Clonal deletion by endogenous male H-Y Ag of Apaf1-deficient thymocytes with transgenic expression of H-Y Ag-specific TCRs (H-Y Tg/Apaf1(-/-) thymocytes) was normally observed in lethally irradiated wild-type mice reconstituted with fetal liver-derived hemopoietic stem cells. Clonal deletion induced in vitro by a bacterial superantigen was also normal in fetal thymic organ culture. Thus, Apaf1-mediated pathway of apoptosis is dispensable for the negative selection of thymocytes. However, H-Y Tg/Apaf1(-/-) thymocytes showed partial resistance to H-Y peptide-induced deletion in vitro as compared with H-Y Tg/Apaf1(+/-) thymocytes, implicating the Apaf1-mediated apoptotic pathway in the negative selection in a certain situation. In addition, the peptide-induced deletion was still observed in H-Y Tg/Apaf1(-/-) thymocytes in the presence of a broad spectrum caspase inhibitor, z-VAD-fmk, suggesting the presence of caspase-independent cell death pathway playing roles during the negative selection. We assume that mechanisms for the negative selection are composed of several cell death pathways to avoid failure of elimination of autoreactive clones.

  4. A large family of antivirulence regulators modulates the effects of transcriptional activators in Gram-negative pathogenic bacteria.

    PubMed

    Santiago, Araceli E; Ruiz-Perez, Fernando; Jo, Noah Y; Vijayakumar, Vidhya; Gong, Mei Q; Nataro, James P

    2014-05-01

    We have reported that transcription of a hypothetical small open reading frame (orf60) in enteroaggregative E. coli (EAEC) strain 042 is impaired after mutation of aggR, which encodes a global virulence activator. We have also reported that the cryptic orf60 locus was linked to protection against EAEC diarrhea in two epidemiologic studies. Here, we report that the orf60 product acts as a negative regulator of aggR itself. The orf60 protein product lacks homology to known repressors, but displays 44-100% similarity to at least fifty previously undescribed small (<10 kDa) hypothetical proteins found in many gram negative pathogen genomes. Expression of orf60 homologs from enterotoxigenic E. coli (ETEC) repressed the expression of the AraC-transcriptional ETEC regulator CfaD/Rns and its regulon in ETEC strain H10407. Complementation in trans of EAEC 042orf60 by orf60 homologs from ETEC and the mouse pathogen Citrobacter rodentium resulted in dramatic suppression of aggR. A C. rodentium orf60 homolog mutant showed increased levels of activator RegA and increased colonization of the adult mouse. We propose the name Aar (AggR-activated regulator) for the clinically and epidemiologically important orf60 product in EAEC, and postulate the existence of a large family of homologs among pathogenic Enterobacteriaceae and Pasteurellaceae. We propose the name ANR (AraC Negative Regulators) for this family. PMID:24875828

  5. A Large Family of Antivirulence Regulators Modulates the Effects of Transcriptional Activators in Gram-negative Pathogenic Bacteria

    PubMed Central

    Santiago, Araceli E.; Ruiz-Perez, Fernando; Jo, Noah Y.; Vijayakumar, Vidhya; Gong, Mei Q.; Nataro, James P.

    2014-01-01

    We have reported that transcription of a hypothetical small open reading frame (orf60) in enteroaggregative E. coli (EAEC) strain 042 is impaired after mutation of aggR, which encodes a global virulence activator. We have also reported that the cryptic orf60 locus was linked to protection against EAEC diarrhea in two epidemiologic studies. Here, we report that the orf60 product acts as a negative regulator of aggR itself. The orf60 protein product lacks homology to known repressors, but displays 44–100% similarity to at least fifty previously undescribed small (<10 kDa) hypothetical proteins found in many gram negative pathogen genomes. Expression of orf60 homologs from enterotoxigenic E. coli (ETEC) repressed the expression of the AraC-transcriptional ETEC regulator CfaD/Rns and its regulon in ETEC strain H10407. Complementation in trans of EAEC 042orf60 by orf60 homologs from ETEC and the mouse pathogen Citrobacter rodentium resulted in dramatic suppression of aggR. A C. rodentium orf60 homolog mutant showed increased levels of activator RegA and increased colonization of the adult mouse. We propose the name Aar (AggR-activated regulator) for the clinically and epidemiologically important orf60 product in EAEC, and postulate the existence of a large family of homologs among pathogenic Enterobacteriaceae and Pasteurellaceae. We propose the name ANR (AraC Negative Regulators) for this family. PMID:24875828

  6. Correlation between the Physical Activity Level and Grade Point Averages of Faculty of Education Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Imdat, Yarim

    2014-01-01

    The aim of the study is to find the correlation that exists between physical activity level and grade point averages of faculty of education students. The subjects consist of 359 (172 females and 187 males) under graduate students To determine the physical activity levels of the students in this research, International Physical Activity…

  7. PLTP activity inversely correlates with CAAD: effects of PON1 enzyme activity and genetic variants on PLTP activity1[S

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Daniel Seung; Burt, Amber A.; Ranchalis, Jane E.; Vuletic, Simona; Vaisar, Tomas; Li, Wan-Fen; Rosenthal, Elisabeth A.; Dong, Weijiang; Eintracht, Jason F.; Motulsky, Arno G.; Brunzell, John D.; Albers, John J.; Furlong, Clement E.; Jarvik, Gail P.

    2015-01-01

    Recent studies have failed to demonstrate a causal cardioprotective effect of HDL cholesterol levels, shifting focus to the functional aspects of HDL. Phospholipid transfer protein (PLTP) is an HDL-associated protein involved in reverse cholesterol transport. This study sought to determine the genetic and nongenetic predictors of plasma PLTP activity (PLTPa), and separately, to determine whether PLTPa predicted carotid artery disease (CAAD). PLTPa was measured in 1,115 European ancestry participants from a case-control study of CAAD. A multivariate logistic regression model was used to elucidate the relationship between PLTPa and CAAD. Separately, a stepwise linear regression determined the nongenetic clinical and laboratory characteristics that best predicted PLTPa. A final stepwise regression considering both nongenetic and genetic variables identified the combination of covariates that explained maximal PLTPa variance. PLTPa was significantly associated with CAAD (7.90 × 10−9), with a 9% decrease in odds of CAAD per 1 unit increase in PLTPa (odds ratio = 0.91). Triglyceride levels (P = 0.0042), diabetes (P = 7.28 × 10−5), paraoxonase 1 (PON1) activity (P = 0.019), statin use (P = 0.026), PLTP SNP rs4810479 (P = 6.38 × 10−7), and PCIF1 SNP rs181914932 (P = 0.041) were all significantly associated with PLTPa. PLTPa is significantly inversely correlated with CAAD. Furthermore, we report a novel association between PLTPa and PON1 activity, a known predictor of CAAD. PMID:26009633

  8. PLTP activity inversely correlates with CAAD: effects of PON1 enzyme activity and genetic variants on PLTP activity.

    PubMed

    Kim, Daniel Seung; Burt, Amber A; Ranchalis, Jane E; Vuletic, Simona; Vaisar, Tomas; Li, Wan-Fen; Rosenthal, Elisabeth A; Dong, Weijiang; Eintracht, Jason F; Motulsky, Arno G; Brunzell, John D; Albers, John J; Furlong, Clement E; Jarvik, Gail P

    2015-07-01

    Recent studies have failed to demonstrate a causal cardioprotective effect of HDL cholesterol levels, shifting focus to the functional aspects of HDL. Phospholipid transfer protein (PLTP) is an HDL-associated protein involved in reverse cholesterol transport. This study sought to determine the genetic and nongenetic predictors of plasma PLTP activity (PLTPa), and separately, to determine whether PLTPa predicted carotid artery disease (CAAD). PLTPa was measured in 1,115 European ancestry participants from a case-control study of CAAD. A multivariate logistic regression model was used to elucidate the relationship between PLTPa and CAAD. Separately, a stepwise linear regression determined the nongenetic clinical and laboratory characteristics that best predicted PLTPa. A final stepwise regression considering both nongenetic and genetic variables identified the combination of covariates that explained maximal PLTPa variance. PLTPa was significantly associated with CAAD (7.90 × 10(-9)), with a 9% decrease in odds of CAAD per 1 unit increase in PLTPa (odds ratio = 0.91). Triglyceride levels (P = 0.0042), diabetes (P = 7.28 × 10(-5)), paraoxonase 1 (PON1) activity (P = 0.019), statin use (P = 0.026), PLTP SNP rs4810479 (P = 6.38 × 10(-7)), and PCIF1 SNP rs181914932 (P = 0.041) were all significantly associated with PLTPa. PLTPa is significantly inversely correlated with CAAD. Furthermore, we report a novel association between PLTPa and PON1 activity, a known predictor of CAAD.

  9. Geraniol Restores Antibiotic Activities against Multidrug-Resistant Isolates from Gram-Negative Species▿ †

    PubMed Central

    Lorenzi, Vannina; Muselli, Alain; Bernardini, Antoine François; Berti, Liliane; Pagès, Jean-Marie; Amaral, Leonard; Bolla, Jean-Michel

    2009-01-01

    The essential oil of Helichrysum italicum significantly reduces the multidrug resistance of Enterobacter aerogenes, Escherichia coli, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, and Acinetobacter baumannii. Combinations of the two most active fractions of the essential oil with each other or with phenylalanine arginine β-naphthylamide yield synergistic activity. Geraniol, a component of one fraction, significantly increased the efficacy of β-lactams, quinolones, and chloramphenicol. PMID:19258278

  10. CSK negatively regulates nerve growth factor induced neural differentiation and augments AKT kinase activity

    SciTech Connect

    Dey, Nandini . E-mail: Don_Durden@oz.ped.emory.edu

    2005-07-01

    Src family kinases are involved in transducing growth factor signals for cellular differentiation and proliferation in a variety of cell types. The activity of all Src family kinases (SFKs) is controlled by phosphorylation at their C-terminal 527-tyrosine residue by C-terminal SRC kinase, CSK. There is a paucity of information regarding the role of CSK and/or specific Src family kinases in neuronal differentiation. Pretreatment of PC12 cells with the Src family kinase inhibitor, PP1, blocked NGF-induced activation of SFKs and obliterated neurite outgrowth. To confirm a role for CSK and specific isoforms of SFKs in neuronal differentiation, we overexpressed active and catalytically dead CSK in the rat pheochromocytoma cell line, PC12. CSK overexpression caused a profound inhibition of NGF-induced activation of FYN, YES, RAS, and ERK and inhibited neurite outgrowth, NGF-stimulated integrin-directed migration and blocked the NGF-induced conversion of GDP-RAC to its GTP-bound active state. CSK overexpression markedly augmented the activation state of AKT following NGF stimulation. In contrast, kinase-dead CSK augmented the activation of FYN, RAS, and ERK and increased neurite outgrowth. These data suggest a distinct requirement for CSK in the regulation of NGF/TrkA activation of RAS, RAC, ERK, and AKT via the differential control of SFKs in the orchestration of neuronal differentiation.

  11. MSK2 negatively regulates p53 activity in the absence of stress

    PubMed Central

    Llanos, Susana; Cuadrado, Ana; Serrano, Manuel

    2013-01-01

    Mitogen- and stress-activated kinase 2 (MSK2) is an inhibitor of the transcription factor p53; here, we investigate the mechanisms underlying this inhibition. In the absence of stress stimuli, MSK2 selectively suppressed the expression of a subset of p53 target genes. This basal inhibition of p53 by MSK2 occurred independently of its catalytic kinase activity and of upstream mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) signaling to MSK2. Furthermore, MSK2 interacted with and inhibited the p53 coactivator p300, and associated with the Noxa promoter. Apoptotic stimuli promoted the degradation of MSK2, thus relieving its inhibitory activity towards p53 and allowing efficient p53-dependent transactivation of Noxa, which contributed to apoptosis. Together, these findings constitute a new mechanism of p53 activation in response to stress. PMID:19797274

  12. The Effect of Weight on Self-Concept, and Psychosocial Correlates of Physical Activity in Youths

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Welk, Gregory J.; Joens-Matre, Roxane

    2007-01-01

    Much more attention has been given to the health implications of overweight and obesity than to the psychosocial implications. In order to combat obesity effectively, it is important to understand the implications of overweight on self-concept, self-esteem, and physical activity levels. Youth obesity has been associated with negative psychosocial…

  13. Long-pulse production of high current negative ion beam by using actively temperature controlled plasma grid for JT-60SA negative ion source

    SciTech Connect

    Kojima, A.; Hanada, M.; Yoshida, M.; Umeda, N.; Hiratsuka, J.; Kashiwagi, M.; Tobari, H.; Watanabe, K.; Grisham, L. R.

    2015-04-08

    The temperature control system of the large-size plasma grid has been developed to realize the long pulse production of high-current negative ions for JT-60SA. By using this prototype system for the JT-60SA ion source, 15 A negative ions has been sustained for 100 s for the first time, which is three times longer than that obtained in JT-60U. In this system, a high-temperature fluorinated fluid with a high boiling point of 270 degree Celsius is circulated in the cooling channels of the plasma grids (PG) where a cesium (Cs) coverage is formed to enhance the negative ion production. Because the PG temperature control had been applied to only 10% of the extraction area previously, the prototype PG with the full extraction area (110 cm × 45 cm) was developed to increase the negative ion current in this time. In the preliminary results of long pulse productions of high-current negative ions at a Cs conditioning phase, the negative ion production was gradually degraded in the last half of 100 s pulse where the temperature of an arc chamber wall was not saturated. From the spectroscopic measurements, it was found that the Cs flux released from the wall might affect to the negative ion production, which implied the wall temperature should be kept low to control the Cs flux to the PG for the long-pulse high-current production. The obtained results of long-pulse production and the PG temperature control method contributes the design of the ITER ion source.

  14. The Transcriptional Repressor Polycomb Group Factor 6, PCGF6, Negatively Regulates Dendritic Cell Activation and Promotes Quiescence.

    PubMed

    Boukhaled, Giselle M; Cordeiro, Brendan; Deblois, Genevieve; Dimitrov, Vassil; Bailey, Swneke D; Holowka, Thomas; Domi, Anisa; Guak, Hannah; Chiu, Huai-Hsuan Clare; Everts, Bart; Pearce, Edward J; Lupien, Mathieu; White, John H; Krawczyk, Connie M

    2016-08-16

    Pro-inflammatory signals provided by the microenvironment are critical to activate dendritic cells (DCs), components of the innate immune system that shape both innate and adaptive immunity. However, to prevent inappropriate immune activation, mechanisms must be in place to restrain DC activation to ensure DCs are activated only once sufficient stimuli have been received. Here, we report that DC activation and immunogenicity are regulated by the transcriptional repressor Polycomb group factor 6 (PCGF6). Pcgf6 is rapidly downregulated upon stimulation, and this downregulation is necessary to permit full DC activation. Silencing PCGF6 expression enhanced both spontaneous and stimulated DC activation. We show that PCGF6 associates with the H3K4me3 demethylase JARID1c, and together, they negatively regulate H3K4me3 levels in DCs. Our results identify two key regulators, PCGF6 and JARID1c that temper DC activation and implicate active transcriptional silencing via histone demethylation as a previously unappreciated mechanism for regulating DC activation and quiescence.

  15. The Transcriptional Repressor Polycomb Group Factor 6, PCGF6, Negatively Regulates Dendritic Cell Activation and Promotes Quiescence.

    PubMed

    Boukhaled, Giselle M; Cordeiro, Brendan; Deblois, Genevieve; Dimitrov, Vassil; Bailey, Swneke D; Holowka, Thomas; Domi, Anisa; Guak, Hannah; Chiu, Huai-Hsuan Clare; Everts, Bart; Pearce, Edward J; Lupien, Mathieu; White, John H; Krawczyk, Connie M

    2016-08-16

    Pro-inflammatory signals provided by the microenvironment are critical to activate dendritic cells (DCs), components of the innate immune system that shape both innate and adaptive immunity. However, to prevent inappropriate immune activation, mechanisms must be in place to restrain DC activation to ensure DCs are activated only once sufficient stimuli have been received. Here, we report that DC activation and immunogenicity are regulated by the transcriptional repressor Polycomb group factor 6 (PCGF6). Pcgf6 is rapidly downregulated upon stimulation, and this downregulation is necessary to permit full DC activation. Silencing PCGF6 expression enhanced both spontaneous and stimulated DC activation. We show that PCGF6 associates with the H3K4me3 demethylase JARID1c, and together, they negatively regulate H3K4me3 levels in DCs. Our results identify two key regulators, PCGF6 and JARID1c that temper DC activation and implicate active transcriptional silencing via histone demethylation as a previously unappreciated mechanism for regulating DC activation and quiescence. PMID:27498878

  16. Slowing of Hippocampal Activity Correlates with Cognitive Decline in Early Onset Alzheimer's Disease. An MEG Study with Virtual Electrodes.

    PubMed

    Engels, Marjolein M A; Hillebrand, Arjan; van der Flier, Wiesje M; Stam, Cornelis J; Scheltens, Philip; van Straaten, Elisabeth C W

    2016-01-01

    Pathology in Alzheimer's disease (AD) starts in the entorhinal cortex and hippocampus. Because of their deep location, activity from these areas is difficult to record with conventional electro- or magnetoencephalography (EEG/MEG). The purpose of this study was to explore hippocampal activity in AD patients and healthy controls using "virtual MEG electrodes". We used resting-state MEG recordings from 27 early onset AD patients [age 60.6 ± 5.4, 12 females, mini-mental state examination (MMSE) range: 19-28] and 26 cognitively healthy age- and gender-matched controls (age 61.8 ± 5.5, 14 females). Activity was reconstructed using beamformer-based virtual electrodes for 78 cortical regions and 6 hippocampal regions. Group differences in peak frequency and relative power in six frequency bands were identified using permutation testing. For the patients, spearman correlations between the MMSE scores and peak frequency or relative power were calculated. Moreover, receiver operator characteristic curves were plotted to estimate the diagnostic accuracy. We found a lower hippocampal peak frequency in AD compared to controls, which, in the patients, correlated positively with MMSE [r(25) = 0.61; p < 0.01] whereas hippocampal relative theta power correlated negatively with MMSE [r(25) = -0.54; p < 0.01]. Cortical peak frequency was also lower in AD in association areas. Furthermore, cortical peak frequency correlated positively with MMSE [r(25) = 0.43; p < 0.05]. In line with this finding, relative theta power was higher in AD across the cortex, and relative alpha and beta power was lower in more circumscribed areas. The average cortical relative theta power was the best discriminator between AD and controls (sensitivity 82%; specificity 81%). Using beamformer-based virtual electrodes, we were able to detect hippocampal activity in AD. In AD, this hippocampal activity is slowed, and correlates better with cognition than the (slowed) activity in cortical areas. On the other

  17. Slowing of Hippocampal Activity Correlates with Cognitive Decline in Early Onset Alzheimer's Disease. An MEG Study with Virtual Electrodes.

    PubMed

    Engels, Marjolein M A; Hillebrand, Arjan; van der Flier, Wiesje M; Stam, Cornelis J; Scheltens, Philip; van Straaten, Elisabeth C W

    2016-01-01

    Pathology in Alzheimer's disease (AD) starts in the entorhinal cortex and hippocampus. Because of their deep location, activity from these areas is difficult to record with conventional electro- or magnetoencephalography (EEG/MEG). The purpose of this study was to explore hippocampal activity in AD patients and healthy controls using "virtual MEG electrodes". We used resting-state MEG recordings from 27 early onset AD patients [age 60.6 ± 5.4, 12 females, mini-mental state examination (MMSE) range: 19-28] and 26 cognitively healthy age- and gender-matched controls (age 61.8 ± 5.5, 14 females). Activity was reconstructed using beamformer-based virtual electrodes for 78 cortical regions and 6 hippocampal regions. Group differences in peak frequency and relative power in six frequency bands were identified using permutation testing. For the patients, spearman correlations between the MMSE scores and peak frequency or relative power were calculated. Moreover, receiver operator characteristic curves were plotted to estimate the diagnostic accuracy. We found a lower hippocampal peak frequency in AD compared to controls, which, in the patients, correlated positively with MMSE [r(25) = 0.61; p < 0.01] whereas hippocampal relative theta power correlated negatively with MMSE [r(25) = -0.54; p < 0.01]. Cortical peak frequency was also lower in AD in association areas. Furthermore, cortical peak frequency correlated positively with MMSE [r(25) = 0.43; p < 0.05]. In line with this finding, relative theta power was higher in AD across the cortex, and relative alpha and beta power was lower in more circumscribed areas. The average cortical relative theta power was the best discriminator between AD and controls (sensitivity 82%; specificity 81%). Using beamformer-based virtual electrodes, we were able to detect hippocampal activity in AD. In AD, this hippocampal activity is slowed, and correlates better with cognition than the (slowed) activity in cortical areas. On the other

  18. Systemic Activation of TLR3-Dependent TRIF Signaling Confers Host Defense against Gram-Negative Bacteria in the Intestine.

    PubMed

    Ruiz, Jose; Kanagavelu, Saravana; Flores, Claudia; Romero, Laura; Riveron, Reldy; Shih, David Q; Fukata, Masayuki

    2015-01-01

    Recognition of Gram-negative bacteria by toll-like receptor (TLR)4 induces MyD88 and TRIF mediated responses. We have shown that TRIF-dependent responses play an important role in intestinal defense against Gram-negative enteropathogens. In the current study, we examined underlying mechanisms of how systemic TRIF activation enhances intestinal immune defense against Gram-negative bacteria. First we confirmed that the protective effect of poly I:C against enteric infection of mice with Yersinia enterocolitica was dependent on TLR3-mediated TRIF signaling by using TLR3-deficient mice. This protection was unique in TRIF-dependent TLR signaling because systemic stimulation of mice with agonists for TLR2 (Pam3CSK4) or TLR5 (flagellin) did not reduce mortality on Y. enterocolitica infection. Systemic administration of poly I:C mobilized CD11c+, F4/80+, and Gr-1(hi) cells from lamina propria and activated NK cells in the mesenteric lymph nodes (MLN) within 24 h. This innate immune cell rearrangement was type I IFN dependent and mediated through upregulation of TLR4 followed by CCR7 expression in these innate immune cells found in the intestinal mucosa. Poly I:C induced IFN-γ expression by NK cells in the MLN, which was mediated through type I IFNs and IL-12p40 from antigen presenting cells and consequent activation of STAT1 and STAT4 in NK cells. This formation of innate immunity significantly contributed to the elimination of bacteria in the MLN. Our results demonstrated an innate immune network in the intestine that can be established by systemic stimulation of TRIF, which provides a strong host defense against Gram-negative pathogens. The mechanism underlying TRIF-mediated protective immunity may be useful to develop novel therapies for enteric bacterial infection.

  19. A Count Model to Study the Correlates of 60 Min of Daily Physical Activity in Portuguese Children

    PubMed Central

    Borges, Alessandra; Gomes, Thayse Natacha; Santos, Daniel; Pereira, Sara; dos Santos, Fernanda K.; Chaves, Raquel; Katzmarzyk, Peter T.; Maia, José

    2015-01-01

    This study aimed to present data on Portuguese children (aged 9–11 years) complying with moderate-to-vigorous physical activity (MVPA) guidelines, and to identify the importance of correlates from multiple domains associated with meeting the guidelines. Physical activity (PA) was objectively assessed by accelerometry throughout seven days on 777 children. A count model using Poisson regression was used to identify the best set of correlates that predicts the variability in meeting the guidelines. Only 3.1% of children met the recommended daily 60 min of MVPA for all seven days of the week. Further, the Cochrane–Armitage chi-square test indicated a linear and negative trend (p < 0.001) from none to all seven days of children complying with the guidelines. The count model explained 22% of the variance in meeting MVPA guidelines daily. Being a girl, having a higher BMI, belonging to families with higher income, sleeping more and taking greater time walking from home to a sporting venue significantly reduced the probability of meeting daily recommended MVPA across the seven days. Furthermore, compared to girls, increasing sleep time in boys increased their chances of compliance with the MVPA recommendations. These results reinforce the relevance of considering different covariates’ roles on PA compliance when designing efficient intervention strategies to promote healthy and active lifestyles in children. PMID:25730296

  20. A count model to study the correlates of 60 min of daily physical activity in Portuguese children.

    PubMed

    Borges, Alessandra; Gomes, Thayse Natacha; Santos, Daniel; Pereira, Sara; dos Santos, Fernanda K; Chaves, Raquel; Katzmarzyk, Peter T; Maia, José

    2015-03-01

    This study aimed to present data on Portuguese children (aged 9-11 years) complying with moderate-to-vigorous physical activity (MVPA) guidelines, and to identify the importance of correlates from multiple domains associated with meeting the guidelines. Physical activity (PA) was objectively assessed by accelerometry throughout seven days on 777 children. A count model using Poisson regression was used to identify the best set of correlates that predicts the variability in meeting the guidelines. Only 3.1% of children met the recommended daily 60 min of MVPA for all seven days of the week. Further, the Cochrane-Armitage chi-square test indicated a linear and negative trend (p<0.001) from none to all seven days of children complying with the guidelines. The count model explained 22% of the variance in meeting MVPA guidelines daily. Being a girl, having a higher BMI, belonging to families with higher income, sleeping more and taking greater time walking from home to a sporting venue significantly reduced the probability of meeting daily recommended MVPA across the seven days. Furthermore, compared to girls, increasing sleep time in boys increased their chances of compliance with the MVPA recommendations. These results reinforce the relevance of considering different covariates' roles on PA compliance when designing efficient intervention strategies to promote healthy and active lifestyles in children. PMID:25730296

  1. Correlation between Antioxidant Enzyme Activity, Free Iron Content and Lipid Oxidation in Four Lines of Korean Native Chicken Meat.

    PubMed

    Utama, Dicky Tri; Lee, Seung Gyu; Baek, Ki Ho; Kim, Hye-Kyung; Cho, Chang-Yeon; Lee, Cheol-Koo; Lee, Sung Ki

    2016-01-01

    This study was conducted to observe the association between antioxidant enzyme activity, free iron content and lipid oxidation of Korean native chicken (KNC) meat during refrigerated storage. Four lines of KNC (Yeonsan ogye, Hyunin black, Hoengseong yakdak and Hwangbong) were raised under similar conditions. A total of 16 roosters were randomly sampled and slaughtered at the age of 12 mon. The breast and thigh meats were stored aerobically for 10 d at 4℃. Although thigh meat had higher antioxidant enzyme activity, it was more susceptible to lipid oxidation and released more iron during storage than breast meat. Aerobic refrigerated storage for 10 d significantly decreased the activity of antioxidant enzymes and increased the amount of free iron and malondialdehyde. The activities of superoxide dismutase (SOD) and glutathione peroxidase (GSH-Px) were negatively correlated with lipid oxidation, whereas that of catalase was not. The amount of free iron was positively associated with lipid oxidation. We concluded that chicken line did not affect strongly on antioxidant enzyme activity and lipid oxidation in breast meat of KNC. However, the thigh meat of Hwangbong and Hyunin black had higher SOD and GSH-Px activity, respectively, and lower malondialdehyde contents than that of other chickens. SOD, GSH-Px and free iron play significant roles in meat lipid oxidation during refrigerated storage. PMID:27499663

  2. Correlation between Antioxidant Enzyme Activity, Free Iron Content and Lipid Oxidation in Four Lines of Korean Native Chicken Meat

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Hye-Kyung; Cho, Chang-Yeon; Lee, Cheol-Koo

    2016-01-01

    This study was conducted to observe the association between antioxidant enzyme activity, free iron content and lipid oxidation of Korean native chicken (KNC) meat during refrigerated storage. Four lines of KNC (Yeonsan ogye, Hyunin black, Hoengseong yakdak and Hwangbong) were raised under similar conditions. A total of 16 roosters were randomly sampled and slaughtered at the age of 12 mon. The breast and thigh meats were stored aerobically for 10 d at 4℃. Although thigh meat had higher antioxidant enzyme activity, it was more susceptible to lipid oxidation and released more iron during storage than breast meat. Aerobic refrigerated storage for 10 d significantly decreased the activity of antioxidant enzymes and increased the amount of free iron and malondialdehyde. The activities of superoxide dismutase (SOD) and glutathione peroxidase (GSH-Px) were negatively correlated with lipid oxidation, whereas that of catalase was not. The amount of free iron was positively associated with lipid oxidation. We concluded that chicken line did not affect strongly on antioxidant enzyme activity and lipid oxidation in breast meat of KNC. However, the thigh meat of Hwangbong and Hyunin black had higher SOD and GSH-Px activity, respectively, and lower malondialdehyde contents than that of other chickens. SOD, GSH-Px and free iron play significant roles in meat lipid oxidation during refrigerated storage. PMID:27499663

  3. Altered promoter recycling rates contribute to dominant-negative activity of human peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-gamma mutations associated with diabetes.

    PubMed

    Li, Gang; Leff, Todd

    2007-04-01

    The transcription factor peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-gamma (PPARgamma) plays an important role in regulating lipid and glucose metabolism and improves insulin sensitivity in diabetic patients when activated by thiazolidinedione drugs. Several loss-of-function mutations in PPARgamma have been identified that cause lipodystrophy and diabetes in humans. Because affected individuals are heterozygotes and have one normal PPARgamma allele, it is of interest to know whether these mutations act in a dominant-negative fashion to inhibit the activity of the wild-type (WT) receptor. Here we compare the molecular phenotypes of two previously identified PPARgamma mutations: P467L, reported to be dominant negative; and F388L, reported to be devoid of dominant-negative activity. We developed a competitive chromatin immunoprecipitation assay to measure the relative ability of mutant PPARgamma to compete with WT receptor for binding to a PPAR regulatory element (PPRE)-containing promoter. By determining the ratio of mutant and WT receptors bound to a PPRE over time, we estimated the relative promoter turnover rate of each receptor. This assay demonstrated that PPARgamma bearing the P467L had a reduced promoter turnover rate compared with the F388L receptor, and over time out-competed the WT receptor for promoter binding sites. We propose that the P467L receptor is dominant negative because in a cell containing both WT and mutant receptors, the majority of the PPAR-regulated promoters will be occupied by the transcriptionally defective mutant receptor. In contrast, the F388L mutation lacks dominant-negative activity because its more rapid promoter turnover rate prevented it from out-competing the WT receptor for promoter binding sites.

  4. Efflux Pump Blockers in Gram-Negative Bacteria: The New Generation of Hydantoin Based-Modulators to Improve Antibiotic Activity

    PubMed Central

    Otręebska-Machaj, Ewa; Chevalier, Jacqueline; Handzlik, Jadwiga; Szymańska, Ewa; Schabikowski, Jakub; Boyer, Gérard; Bolla, Jean-Michel; Kieć-Kononowicz, Katarzyna; Pagès, Jean-Marie; Alibert, Sandrine

    2016-01-01

    Multidrug resistant (MDR) bacteria are an increasing health problem with the shortage of new active antibiotic agents. Among effective mechanisms that contribute to the spread of MDR Gram-negative bacteria are drug efflux pumps that expel clinically important antibiotic classes out of the cell. Drug pumps are attractive targets to restore the susceptibility toward the expelled antibiotics by impairing their efflux activity. Arylhydantoin derivatives were investigated for their potentiation of activities of selected antibiotics described as efflux substrates in Enterobacter aerogenes expressing or not AcrAB pump. Several compounds increased the bacterial susceptibility toward nalidixic acid, chloramphenicol and sparfloxacin and were further pharmacomodulated to obtain a better activity against the AcrAB producing bacteria. PMID:27199950

  5. Efflux Pump Blockers in Gram-Negative Bacteria: The New Generation of Hydantoin Based-Modulators to Improve Antibiotic Activity.

    PubMed

    Otręebska-Machaj, Ewa; Chevalier, Jacqueline; Handzlik, Jadwiga; Szymańska, Ewa; Schabikowski, Jakub; Boyer, Gérard; Bolla, Jean-Michel; Kieć-Kononowicz, Katarzyna; Pagès, Jean-Marie; Alibert, Sandrine

    2016-01-01

    Multidrug resistant (MDR) bacteria are an increasing health problem with the shortage of new active antibiotic agents. Among effective mechanisms that contribute to the spread of MDR Gram-negative bacteria are drug efflux pumps that expel clinically important antibiotic classes out of the cell. Drug pumps are attractive targets to restore the susceptibility toward the expelled antibiotics by impairing their efflux activity. Arylhydantoin derivatives were investigated for their potentiation of activities of selected antibiotics described as efflux substrates in Enterobacter aerogenes expressing or not AcrAB pump. Several compounds increased the bacterial susceptibility toward nalidixic acid, chloramphenicol and sparfloxacin and were further pharmacomodulated to obtain a better activity against the AcrAB producing bacteria. PMID:27199950

  6. The correlation of active and passive microwave data for the Skylab S-193 sensor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Krishen, Kumar

    1993-01-01

    This paper presents the results of the correlation analysis of the Skylab S-193 13.9 GHz Radiometer/Scatterometer data. Computer analysis of the S-193 data shows more than 50 percent of the radiometer and scatterometer data are uncorrelated. The correlation coefficients computed for the data gathered over various ground scenes indicates the desirability of using both active and passive sensors for the determination of various Earth phenomena.

  7. The Correlation of Active and Passive Microwave Outputs for the Skylab S-193 Sensor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Krishen, K.

    1976-01-01

    This paper presents the results of the correlation analysis of the Skylab S-193 13.9 GHz Radiometer/Scatterometer data. Computer analysis of the S-193 data shows more than 50 percent of the radiometer and scatterometer data are uncorrelated. The correlation coefficients computed for the data gathered over various ground scenes indicates the desirability of using both active and passive sensors for the determination of various Earth phenomena.

  8. Residual plasmatic activity of ADAMTS13 is correlated with phenotype severity in congenital thrombotic thrombocytopenic purpura.

    PubMed

    Lotta, Luca A; Wu, Haifeng M; Mackie, Ian J; Noris, Marina; Veyradier, Agnes; Scully, Marie A; Remuzzi, Giuseppe; Coppo, Paul; Liesner, Ri; Donadelli, Roberta; Loirat, Chantal; Gibbs, Richard A; Horne, April; Yang, Shangbin; Garagiola, Isabella; Musallam, Khaled M; Peyvandi, Flora

    2012-07-12

    The quantification of residual plasmatic ADAMTS13 activity in congenital thrombotic thrombocytopenic purpura (TTP) patients is constrained by limitations in sensitivity and reproducibility of commonly used assays at low levels of ADAMTS13 activity, blunting efforts to establish genotype-phenotype correlations. In the present study, the residual plasmatic activity of ADAMTS13 was measured centrally by surface-enhanced laser desorption/ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometry (limit of detection = 0.5%) in 29 congenital TTP patients. The results were used to study correlations among ADAMTS13 genotype, residual plasmatic activity, and clinical phenotype severity. An ADAMTS13 activity above 0.5% was measured in 26 (90%) patients and lower levels of activity were associated with earlier age at first TTP episode requiring plasma infusion, more frequent recurrences, and prescription of fresh-frozen plasma prophylaxis. Receiver operating characteristic curve analysis showed that activity levels of less than 2.74% and 1.61% were discriminative of age at first TTP episode requiring plasma infusion < 18 years, annual rate of TTP episodes > 1, and use of prophylaxis. Mutations affecting the highly conserved N-terminal domains of the protein were associated with lower residual ADAMTS13 activity and a more severe phenotype in an allelic-dose dependent manner. The results of the present study show that residual ADAMTS13 activity is associated with the severity of clinical phenotype in congenital TTP and provide insights into genotype-phenotype correlations.

  9. Contribution of the GABAergic pathway(s) to the correlated activities of chicken retinal ganglion cells.

    PubMed

    Liu, Xue; Zhou, Yi; Gong, Hai-Qing; Liang, Pei-Ji

    2007-10-26

    In the present study, the spatiotemporal pattern of chicken retinal ganglion cells' firing activity in response to full-field white light stimulation was investigated. Cross-correlation analysis showed that ganglion cells of sustained subtype fired in precise synchrony with their adjacent neurons of the same subtype (delay lag within 2 ms, narrow correlation). On the other hand, the activities of neighboring ganglion cells of transient subtype were correlated with distributed time lags (10-30 ms, medium correlation). Pharmacological studies demonstrated that the intensity of the medium correlations could be strengthened when exogenous GABA was applied and attenuated when GABA receptors were blocked by picrotoxin. Meanwhile, the GABAergic modulation on the narrow correlations was not consistent. These results suggest that, in the chicken retina, GABAergic pathway(s) are likely involved in the formation of medium correlations between ganglion cells. Neurons might fire at a lower rate but with higher level of synchronization to improve the efficiency of information transmission, with the mechanism involving the GABAergic inhibitory input. PMID:17919471

  10. Activated inflammatory T cells correlate with lesion size in human cutaneous leishmaniasis.

    PubMed

    Antonelli, Lis R V; Dutra, Walderez O; Almeida, Roque P; Bacellar, Olivia; Carvalho, Edgar M; Gollob, Kenneth J

    2005-11-15

    Leishmaniasis is an important parasitic disease affecting millions worldwide. In attempts to understand the clinical relevance of immunological measurements as determined using flow cytometry, several immunological phenotypes were determined for a group of well defined human leishmaniasis patients and correlated with clinical measurements of the disease (Montenegro skin test (MST) and lesion area). The analysis demonstrated a positive correlation between the MST size and the frequency of ex vivo recent activated CD4(+) T cells. In contrast, higher frequencies of recent activated CD8(+) T cells were correlated with a smaller MST size. Moreover, a positive correlation was observed between the lesion total area and the frequency of activated CD69(+) (ex vivo) and CD40L(+) (cultured with Leishmania soluble antigen (SLA)) T lymphocytes. Finally, larger lesions were also correlated with a higher frequency of SLA specific inflammatory cytokine (IFN-gamma or TNF-alpha) producing lymphocytes. These studies demonstrate that immunological markers are correlated with clinical indicators of human leishmaniasis and serve to better understand the evolution of this important parasitic disease.

  11. Activation of PPAR{gamma} negatively regulates O-GlcNAcylation of Sp1

    SciTech Connect

    Chung, Sung Soo; Kim, Ji Hyun; Park, Ho Seon; Choi, Hye Hun; Lee, Kyeong Won; Cho, Young Min; Lee, Hong Kyu; Park, Kyong Soo

    2008-08-08

    O-GlcNAcylation is a kind of post-translational modification and many nuclear and cytoplasmic proteins are O-GlcNAcylated. In this study, we demonstrated that thiazolidinediones (TZDs), which are used as insulin sensitizer, specifically inhibited the O-GlcNAcylation of Sp1 but did not affect the O-GlcNAcylation of the total proteins in cell culture systems and mouse models. This effect was mediated by peroxisome proliferator activated receptor {gamma} (PPAR{gamma}) activation and probably by synthesis of a specific protein induced by PPAR{gamma} activation. In addition, we demonstrated that the O-GlcNAcylation sites in the zinc-finger domain were involved in the transcriptional activation of Sp1 and that rosiglitazone, a member of TZDs, affected Sp1 transcriptional activity partially by regulating the O-GlcNAcylation level of these sites. Considering the role of hexosamine biosynthesis pathway in hyperglycemia-induced insulin resistance and Sp1 in the hyperglycemia-induced gene expression, the regulation of Sp1 O-GlcNAcylation by TZDs may help to explain the function of TZDs as a treatment for insulin resistance and diabetes.

  12. Programmed electromyographic activity and negative incremental muscle stiffness in monkeys jumping downward.

    PubMed Central

    Dyhre-Poulsen, P; Laursen, A M

    1984-01-01

    We trained monkeys to jump down from different heights, and recorded electromyograms (e.m.g.s) in arm muscles, and ground reaction forces. The landing movements were also recorded by high-speed cinematography. The e.m.g. of the triceps began about 80 ms before landing. The initial burst lasted until about 20 ms after ground contact and was succeeded by bursts of gradually declining amplitude. These discharges were not of reflex origin, because when the monkey was deceived by a collapsible platform, they were time-locked to the expected, not to the true landing. The amplitude of the e.m.g. in the triceps increased with the height of the jump, indicating adaptive control. The timing of the e.m.g. pattern was assumed to be programmed before take off, because it was unaffected by extinction of the light during the fall. The vertical ground reaction force produced by the arms had an inflexion on its rising phase which arose from the very rapid stretch of the muscles which control the wrist. Then came a sharp peak produced mainly by stretch of the triceps. The inflexion and the sharp peak were probably produced by short-range stiffness of the muscles of the upper arm. The torque acting on the elbow joint, and the elbow joint stiffness were calculated from the ground reaction forces and the movement of the arm. The torque was high at impact and gradually declined during the landing. The force produced by the triceps increased sharply, then decreased while it continued to lengthen. Thus, the elbow joint showed high initial stiffness, which then decreased, and finally became negative. This dynamic relation between length and tension was very different from the static length-tension characteristic of skeletal muscles. The observed behaviour of the muscles presum