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Sample records for activity cry consolability

  1. Efficacy of using Zaontz urethral stent in hypospadias repair by the Face, Legs, Activity, Cry, Consolability (FLACC) scale: A prospective study

    PubMed Central

    Ozcan, Serkan; Bagcioglu, Murat; Karakan, Tolga; Diri, Mehmet Akif; Demirbas, Arif

    2017-01-01

    Introduction: The developments in hypospadias surgical techniques and materials are intended to improve surgery outcomes and patient comfort. The aim of this study is to determine the effect of the Zaontz urethral stent (ZUS) (Cook Medical) on patient comfort and surgical success rates in children undergoing hypospadias surgery. Methods: A feeding tube was used to repair 46 cases of primary distal hypospadias, and ZUS (6F, 8F, and 10F in diameter) was used to repair to 31 cases of primary distal hypospadias between December 2009 and June 2011 in our clinic. ZUS was compared with the feeding tube in terms of surgical success rates and patient comfort in assessments made during postoperative periods. Results: The patients with ZUS were followed with a stent for seven days postoperatively, as were the patients with the feeding tube. There was no statistical difference between the two groups in terms of fistula formation (p>0.05). Patient comfort was evaluated by the Face, Legs, Activity, Cry, Consolability (FLACC) scale on the first and third postoperative days, and a statistically significant difference was observed in favour of ZUS on the third postoperative day (p<0.05). Conclusions: Compared with a feeding tube in hypospadias repair, ZUS does not make any contribution to the urinary fistula rates. However, ZUS may have an advantage in terms of patient comfort in the postoperative followup. On the other hand, the small number of patients and the high price of the ZUS were the most important limitations. Prospective, randomized trials are needed to assess efficacy and cost. PMID:28163807

  2. Systematic review of the Face, Legs, Activity, Cry and Consolability scale for assessing pain in infants and children: is it reliable, valid, and feasible for use?

    PubMed

    Crellin, Dianne J; Harrison, Denise; Santamaria, Nick; Babl, Franz E

    2015-11-01

    The Face, Legs, Activity, Cry and Consolability (FLACC) scale is one of the most widely used behavioural observation pain scales. However, the psychometrics of the scale have not been adequately summarised and evaluated to provide clear recommendations regarding its use. The aim of this study was to rigorously evaluate the reliability, validity, feasibility, and utility of the scale for clinical and research purposes and provide recommendations regarding appropriate use of the scale. Databases searched were MEDLINE, CINAHL, Embase, PsycINFO (using the Ovid, PubMed, and Ebscohost platforms), The Cochrane Database of Systematic reviews and Cochrane Controlled Trials, and Google Scholar. Psychometric evaluation studies reporting feasibility, reliability, validity, or utility data for the FLACC scale applied to children (birth to 18 years) and randomised controlled trials (RCT) using the FLACC scale to measure a study outcome in infants and children. Data extraction included study design, population demographics, and psychometric data. Analysis involved in this study are quality assessment of the psychometric evaluation studies and the RCTs using the COSMIN checklist and the Jadad scale, respectively, and narrative synthesis of all results. Twenty-five psychometric evaluations studies and 52 RCTs were included. The study population, circumstances, and quality of the studies varied greatly. Sufficient data addressing postoperative pain assessment in infants and children exist. Some positive data support the psychometrics of the scale used to assess postoperative pain in children with cognitive impairment. Limited and conflicting data addressing procedural pain assessment exist. Content validity and scale feasibility have had limited psychometric evaluation. There are insufficient data to support the FLACC scale for use in all circumstances and populations to which is currently applied.

  3. Establishing intra- and inter-rater agreement of the Face, Legs, Activity, Cry, Consolability scale for evaluating pain in toddlers during immunization

    PubMed Central

    Gomez, Rebecca J; Barrowman, Nick; Elia, Sonja; Manias, Elizabeth; Royle, Jenny; Harrison, Denise

    2013-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The Face, Legs, Activity, Cry, Consolability (FLACC) scale is a five-item tool that was developed to assess postoperative pain in young children. The tool is frequently used as an outcome measure in studies investigating acute procedural pain in young children; however, there are limited published psychometric data in this context. OBJECTIVE: To establish inter-rater and intrarater agreement of the FLACC scale in toddlers during immunization. METHODS: Participants comprised a convenience sample of toddlers recruited from an immunization drop-in service, who were part of a larger pilot randomized controlled trial. Toddlers were video- and audiotaped during immunization procedures. The first rater scored each video twice in random order over a period of three weeks (intrarater agreement), while the second rater scored each video once and was blinded to the first rater’s scores (inter-rater agreement). The FLACC scale was scored at four time-points throughout the procedure. Intraclass correlation coefficients were used to assess agreement of the FLACC scale. RESULTS: Thirty toddlers between 12 and 18 months of age were recruited, and video data were available for 29. Intrarater agreement coefficients were 0.88 at baseline, 0.97 at insertion of first needle, and 0.80 and 0.81 at 15 s and 30 s following the final injection, respectively. Inter-rater coefficients were 0.40 at baseline, 0.95 at insertion of first needle, and 0.81 and 0.78 at 15 s and 30 s following the final injection, respectively. CONCLUSIONS: The FLACC scale has sufficient agreement in assessing pain in toddlers during immunizations, especially during the most painful periods of the procedure. PMID:24308028

  4. Evolution of Bacillus thuringiensis Cry toxins insecticidal activity.

    PubMed

    Bravo, Alejandra; Gómez, Isabel; Porta, Helena; García-Gómez, Blanca Ines; Rodriguez-Almazan, Claudia; Pardo, Liliana; Soberón, Mario

    2013-01-01

    Insecticidal Cry proteins produced by Bacillus thuringiensis are use worldwide in transgenic crops for efficient pest control. Among the family of Cry toxins, the three domain Cry family is the better characterized regarding their natural evolution leading to a large number of Cry proteins with similar structure, mode of action but different insect specificity. Also, this group is the better characterized regarding the study of their mode of action and the molecular basis of insect specificity. In this review we discuss how Cry toxins have evolved insect specificity in nature and analyse several cases of improvement of Cry toxin action by genetic engineering, some of these examples are currently used in transgenic crops. We believe that the success in the improvement of insecticidal activity by genetic evolution of Cry toxins will depend on the knowledge of the rate-limiting steps of Cry toxicity in different insect pests, the mapping of the specificity binding regions in the Cry toxins, as well as the improvement of mutagenesis strategies and selection procedures.

  5. Evolution of Bacillus thuringiensis Cry toxins insecticidal activity

    PubMed Central

    Bravo, Alejandra; Gómez, Isabel; Porta, Helena; García-Gómez, Blanca Ines; Rodriguez-Almazan, Claudia; Pardo, Liliana; Soberón, Mario

    2013-01-01

    Insecticidal Cry proteins produced by Bacillus thuringiensis are use worldwide in transgenic crops for efficient pest control. Among the family of Cry toxins, the three domain Cry family is the better characterized regarding their natural evolution leading to a large number of Cry proteins with similar structure, mode of action but different insect specificity. Also, this group is the better characterized regarding the study of their mode of action and the molecular basis of insect specificity. In this review we discuss how Cry toxins have evolved insect specificity in nature and analyse several cases of improvement of Cry toxin action by genetic engineering, some of these examples are currently used in transgenic crops. We believe that the success in the improvement of insecticidal activity by genetic evolution of Cry toxins will depend on the knowledge of the rate-limiting steps of Cry toxicity in different insect pests, the mapping of the specificity binding regions in the Cry toxins, as well as the improvement of mutagenesis strategies and selection procedures. PMID:22463726

  6. Console Log Keeping Made Easier - Tools and Techniques for Improving Quality of Flight Controller Activity Logs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Scott, David W.; Underwood, Debrah (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    At the Marshall Space Flight Center's (MSFC) Payload Operations Integration Center (POIC) for International Space Station (ISS), each flight controller maintains detailed logs of activities and communications at their console position. These logs are critical for accurately controlling flight in real-time as well as providing a historical record and troubleshooting tool. This paper describes logging methods and electronic formats used at the POIC and provides food for thought on their strengths and limitations, plus proposes some innovative extensions. It also describes an inexpensive PC-based scheme for capturing and/or transcribing audio clips from communications consoles. Flight control activity (e.g. interpreting computer displays, entering data/issuing electronic commands, and communicating with others) can become extremely intense. It's essential to document it well, but the effort to do so may conflict with actual activity. This can be more than just annoying, as what's in the logs (or just as importantly not in them) often feeds back directly into the quality of future operations, whether short-term or long-term. In earlier programs, such as Spacelab, log keeping was done on paper, often using position-specific shorthand, and the other reader was at the mercy of the writer's penmanship. Today, user-friendly software solves the legibility problem and can automate date/time entry, but some content may take longer to finish due to individual typing speed and less use of symbols. File layout can be used to great advantage in making types of information easy to find, and creating searchable master logs for a given position is very easy and a real lifesaver in reconstructing events or researching a given topic. We'll examine log formats from several console position, and the types of information that are included and (just as importantly) excluded. We'll also look at when a summary or synopsis is effective, and when extensive detail is needed.

  7. Mtx toxins from Lysinibacillus sphaericus enhance mosquitocidal cry-toxin activity and suppress cry-resistance in Culex quinquefasciatus.

    PubMed

    Wirth, Margaret C; Berry, Colin; Walton, William E; Federici, Brian A

    2014-01-01

    The interaction of Mtx toxins from Lysinibacillus sphaericus (formerly Bacillus sphaericus) with Bacillus thuringiensis subsp. israelensis Cry toxins and the influence of such interactions on Cry-resistance were evaluated in susceptible and Cry-resistant Culex quinquefasciatus larvae. Mtx-1 and Mtx-2 were observed to be active against both susceptible and resistant mosquitoes; however varying levels of cross-resistance toward Mtx toxins were observed in the resistant mosquitoes. A 1:1 mixture of either Mtx-1 or Mtx-2 with different Cry toxins generally showed moderate synergism, but some combinations were highly toxic to resistant larvae and suppressed resistance. Toxin synergy has been demonstrated to be a powerful tool for enhancing activity and managing Cry-resistance in mosquitoes, thus Mtx toxins may be useful as components of engineered bacterial larvicides.

  8. Cry1B and Cry3A are active against Hypothenemus hampei Ferrari (Coleoptera: Scolytidae).

    PubMed

    López-Pazos, Silvio Alejandro; Cortázar Gómez, Jorge Eduardo; Cerón Salamanca, Jairo Alonso

    2009-07-01

    Cry1B and Cry3 proteins from Bacillus thuringiensis are toxic to beetles such as the colorado potato beetle and the cottonwood leaf beetle. We report the development of a suitable rearing, bioassay method and the toxicity of these Cry proteins to coffee berry borer first instar larvae.

  9. Cry9Ca1 Toxin, a Bacillus thuringiensis Insecticidal Crystal Protein with High Activity against the Spruce Budworm (Choristoneura fumiferana).

    PubMed

    Van Frankenhuyzen, K; Gringorten, L; Gauthier, D

    1997-10-01

    The Cry9Ca1 toxin from Bacillus thuringiensis was significantly more toxic to spruce budworm (Choristoneura fumiferana) than the Cry1Ab6, Cry1Ba1, Cry1Ca2, Cry1Da1, Cry1Ea1, and Cry1Fa2 toxins. It displayed high activity against silkworm (Bombyx mori) but was not toxic to black army cutworm (Actebia fennica) or gypsy moth (Lymantria dispar). The Cry9Ca1 is the most effective spruce budworm toxin known to date and may offer promise for control and resistance management of that species.

  10. Breastfeeding, Brain Activation to Own Infant Cry, and Maternal Sensitivity

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Pilyoung; Feldman, Ruth; Mayes, Linda C.; Eicher, Virginia; Thompson, Nancy; Leckman, James F.; Swain, James E.

    2011-01-01

    Background Research points to the importance of breastfeeding for promoting close mother-infant contact and social-emotional development. Recent functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) studies have identified brain regions related to maternal behaviors. However, little research has addressed the neurobiological mechanisms underlying the relationship between breastfeeding and maternal behavior in human mothers. We investigated the associations between breastfeeding, maternal brain response to own infant stimuli, and maternal sensitivity in the early postpartum. Methods Seventeen biological mothers of healthy infants participated in two matched groups according to feeding method – exclusive breastfeeding and exclusive formula-feeding at 2-4 weeks postpartum. fMRI scanning was conducted in the first postpartum month to examine maternal brain activation in response to her own baby's cry versus control baby-cry. Dyadic interactions between mothers and infants at 3-4 months postpartum were videotaped in the home and blindly coded for maternal sensitivity. Results In the first postpartum month, breastfeeding mothers showed greater activations in the superior frontal gyrus, insula, precuneus, striatum, and amygdala while listening to their own baby-cry as compared to formula-feeding mothers. For both breastfeeding and formula-feeding mothers, greater activations in the right superior frontal gyrus and amygdala were associated with higher maternal sensitivity at 3-4 months postpartum. Conclusions Results suggest links between breastfeeding and greater response to infant cues in brain regions implicated in maternal-infant bonding and empathy during the early postpartum. Such brain activations may facilitate greater maternal sensitivity as infants enter their social world. PMID:21501165

  11. Cytotoxic activity of Bacillus thuringiensis Cry proteins on mammalian cells transfected with cadherin-like Cry receptor gene of Bombyx mori (silkworm).

    PubMed Central

    Tsuda, Yoko; Nakatani, Fumiki; Hashimoto, Keiko; Ikawa, Satoshi; Matsuura, Chikako; Fukada, Takashi; Sugimoto, Kenji; Himeno, Michio

    2003-01-01

    Cry1Aa, an insecticidal protein produced by Bacillus thuringiensis, has been shown to bind to cadherin-like protein, BtR175, in Bombyx mori (silkworm) midgut. We previously reported three variant alleles of BtR175 (BtR175a, b and c). When transiently expressed in COS7 cells, all the three BtR175 variants bound to Cry1Aa. We stably expressed BtR175b in HEK293 cells. These BtR175b-expressing cells swelled and died in the presence of activated Cry1Aa in a dose- and time-dependent manner, showing that BtR175b itself can impart Cry1Aa-susceptibility to mammalian cells. These cells were more susceptible to Cry1Aa than to Cry1Ab and Cry1Ac. Since dispersed B. mori midgut cells were reported to be highly susceptible to Cry1Ac, this result suggested that other Cry1Ac-specific receptor(s) were simultaneously working with BtR175 in the midgut cells. Advantages are also discussed of applying these transfected mammalian cells to toxicity assays of mutant Cry proteins. PMID:12403648

  12. Cytotoxicity and binding profiles of activated Cry1Ac and Cry2Ab to three insect cell lines

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    While Cry1Ac has been known to bind with larval midgut proteins cadherin, APN (amino peptidase N), ALP (alkaline phosphatase) and ABCC2 (ATP-binding cassette transporter subfamily C2), little is known about the receptors of Cry2Ab. To provide a clue to the receptors of Cry2Ab, we tested the baselin...

  13. Improving Cry8Ka toxin activity towards the cotton boll weevil (Anthonomus grandis)

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background The cotton boll weevil (Anthonomus grandis) is a serious insect-pest in the Americas, particularly in Brazil. The use of chemical or biological insect control is not effective against the cotton boll weevil because of its endophytic life style. Therefore, the use of biotechnological tools to produce insect-resistant transgenic plants represents an important strategy to reduce the damage to cotton plants caused by the boll weevil. The present study focuses on the identification of novel molecules that show improved toxicity against the cotton boll weevil. In vitro directed molecular evolution through DNA shuffling and phage display screening was applied to enhance the insecticidal activity of variants of the Cry8Ka1 protein of Bacillus thuringiensis. Results Bioassays carried out with A. grandis larvae revealed that the LC50 of the screened mutant Cry8Ka5 toxin was 3.15-fold higher than the wild-type Cry8Ka1 toxin. Homology modelling of Cry8Ka1 and the Cry8Ka5 mutant suggested that both proteins retained the typical three-domain Cry family structure. The mutated residues were located mostly in loops and appeared unlikely to interfere with molecular stability. Conclusions The improved toxicity of the Cry8Ka5 mutant obtained in this study will allow the generation of a transgenic cotton event with improved potential to control A. grandis. PMID:21906288

  14. Master Console, SMC

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Paga Marrero, Hector Jose

    2013-01-01

    The Master Console oversees the function of Computer Systems in Firing room 1 (FR1). Master Console Operators, MCOs' for short, are our customer. I was integrated into the System Monitoring and Control (SMC) software team that is under the guidance of David Slaiman, who is the product group lead. I have been brought up to speed with System Monitoring and Control. The initial time spent reading SMC software design description and understanding how it works. The current Firing Room 1 Console Display is a floor layout giving the MCO two essential pieces of information which are Health and Status. When an issue arises, the MCO has to look on the display to find which console is affected and then the MCO must use the Reference designator from the display to manually search for the Portal Workstation (PWS) installed in the console using the hardware map; which is a long process to lookup a PWS if an issue is present. My project is to make the FR1 Console Display easier for the MCO's to pinpoint PWS's without having to lookup additional resources in the process. My project also includes updating Firing Room 1 Console Display to include the F1R Non-Redundant Set. The display does not have good use of space and functionality. PWS numbers were not present in the previous design and are the critical component in efficient understanding and administration of the consoles. Part of the process includes getting feedback from the customer, instead of just emailing them with a question, we made a proposal with changes so they could respond and give us their input; which proved to be an effective method for engaging them. In order to do this I had to use the Display Editor (DE) tool developed by NASA, Paint.Net and Visio. The process I have been using has been Visio to alter the floor layout of Firing Room and take advantage of the white areas, and then I take the altered floor plan into Paint.Net. Once in Paint.Net I put the new floor plan as a background to the standard console

  15. The mitogen-activated protein kinase p38 is involved in insect defense against Cry toxins from Bacillus thuringiensis

    PubMed Central

    Cancino-Rodezno, Angeles; Alexander, Cynthia; Villaseñor, Roberto; Pacheco, Sabino; Porta, Helena; Pauchet, Yannick; Soberón, Mario; Gill, Sarjeet S.; Bravo, Alejandra

    2010-01-01

    The insecticidal Cry toxins are pore-forming toxins produced by the bacteria Bacillus thuringiensis that disrupt insect-midgut cells. In this work we analyzed the response of two different insect orders, the Lepidopteran Manduca sexta and Dipteran Aedes aegypti to highly specific Cry toxins, Cry1Ab and Cry11Aa, respectively. One pathway activated in different organisms in response to a variety of pore forming toxins is the mitogen activated protein kinase p38 pathway (MAPK p38) that activates a complex defense response. We analyzed the MAPK p38 activation by immunodetection of its phosphorylated isoform, and the induction of p38 by RT-PCR, real time-PCR quantitative assays and immunodection. We show that MAPK p38 is activated at postraductional level after Cry toxin intoxication in both insect orders. We detected the p38 induction at the transcriptional and traductional level, and observed a different response. In these three levels, we found that both insects respond to Cry toxin action but M sexta responses more strongly than A. aegypti. Gene silencing of MAPK p38 in vivo, resulted in both insect species becoming hypersensitive to Cry toxin action, suggesting that the MAPK p38 pathway is involved in insect defense against Bt Cry toxins. This finding may have biotechnological applications for enhancing the activity of some Bt Cry toxins against specific insect pests. PMID:20040372

  16. Characterization of the mechanism of action of the genetically modified Cry1AbMod toxin that is active against Cry1Ab-resistant insects.

    PubMed

    Muñóz-Garay, Carlos; Portugal, Leivi; Pardo-López, Liliana; Jiménez-Juárez, Nuria; Arenas, Ivan; Gómez, Isabel; Sánchez-López, Rosana; Arroyo, Raquel; Holzenburg, Andreas; Savva, Christos G; Soberón, Mario; Bravo, Alejandra

    2009-10-01

    Bacillus thuringiensis Cry toxins are used in the control of insect pests. They are pore-forming toxins with a complex mechanism that involves the sequential interaction with receptors. They are produced as protoxins, which are activated by midgut proteases. Activated toxin binds to cadherin receptor, inducing an extra cleavage including helix alpha-1, facilitating the formation of a pre-pore oligomer. The toxin oligomer binds to secondary receptors such as aminopeptidase and inserts into lipid rafts forming pores and causing larval death. The primary threat to efficacy of Bt-toxins is the evolution of insect resistance. Engineered Cry1AMod toxins, devoid of helix alpha-1, could be used for the control of resistance in lepidopterans by bypassing the altered cadherin receptor, killing resistant insects affected in this receptor. Here we analyzed the mechanism of action of Cry1AbMod. We found that alkaline pH and the presence of membrane lipids facilitates the oligomerization of Cry1AbMod. In addition, tryptophan fluorescence emission spectra, ELISA binding to pure aminopeptidase receptor, calcein release assay and analysis of ionic-conductance in planar lipid bilayers, indicated that the secondary steps in mode of action that take place after interaction with cadherin receptor such as oligomerization, receptor binding and pore formation are similar in the Cry1AbMod and in the wild type Cry1Ab. Finally, the membrane-associated structure of Cry1AbMod oligomer was analyzed by electron crystallography showing that it forms a complex with a trimeric organization.

  17. Emergency Communications Console

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1978-01-01

    NASA has applied its communications equipment expertise to development of a communications console that provides, in a compact package only slightly larger than an electric typewriter, all the emergency medical services communications functions needed for a regional hospital. A prototype unit, built by Johnson Space Center, has been installed in the Odessa (Texas) Medical Center Hospital. The hospital is the medical control center for the 17-county Permian Basin Emergency Medical System in west Texas. The console project originated in response to a request to NASA from the Texas governor's office, which sought a better way of providing emergency medical care in rural areas. Because ambulance travel time is frequently long in remote areas of west Texas, it is important that treatment begin at the scene of the emergency rather than at the hospital emergency room. A radio and telephone system linking ambulance emergency technicians and hospital staff makes this possible. But earlier equipment was complex, requiring specialized operators. A highly reliable system was needed to minimize breakdowns and provide controls of utmost simplicity, so that the system could be operated by physicians and nurses rather than by communications specialists. The resulting console has both radio and telephone sections. With the radio equipment, hospital personnel can communicate with ambulance drivers and paramedics, receive incoming electrocardiagrams, consult with other hospitals, page hospital staff and set up a radio-to-telephone "patch." The telephone portion of the system includes a hotline from the Permian Basin Emergency Medical Service's resource control center, an automatic dialer for contacting special care facilities in the Permian Basin network, a hospital intercom terminal and a means of relaying cardioscope displays and other data between hospitals. The integrated system also provides links with local disaster and civil defense organizations and with emergency "Dial 911

  18. Strategies to improve the insecticidal activity of Cry toxins from Bacillus thuringiensis.

    PubMed

    Pardo-López, L; Muñoz-Garay, C; Porta, H; Rodríguez-Almazán, C; Soberón, M; Bravo, A

    2009-03-01

    Bacillus thuringiensis Cry toxins have been widely used in the control of insect pests either as spray products or expressed in transgenic crops. These proteins are pore-forming toxins with a complex mechanism of action that involves the sequential interaction with several toxin-receptors. Cry toxins are specific against susceptible larvae and although they are often highly effective, some insect pests are not affected by them or show low susceptibility. In addition, the development of resistance threatens their effectiveness, so strategies to cope with all these problems are necessary. In this review we will discuss and compare the different strategies that have been used to improve insecticidal activity of Cry toxins. The activity of Cry toxins can be enhanced by using additional proteins in the bioassay like serine protease inhibitors, chitinases, Cyt toxins, or a fragment of cadherin receptor containing a toxin-binding site. On the other hand, different modifications performed in the toxin gene such as site-directed mutagenesis, introduction of cleavage sites in specific regions of the protein, and deletion of small fragments from the amino-terminal region lead to improved toxicity or overcome resistance, representing interesting alternatives for insect pest control.

  19. 36. View of preset counter (PC) console and tracking console ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    36. View of preset counter (PC) console and tracking console on right, located in MWOC facility in transmitter building no. 102. - Clear Air Force Station, Ballistic Missile Early Warning System Site II, One mile west of mile marker 293.5 on Parks Highway, 5 miles southwest of Anderson, Anderson, Denali Borough, AK

  20. Bacillus thuringiensis-derived Cry5B has potent anthelmintic activity against Ascaris suum.

    PubMed

    Urban, Joseph F; Hu, Yan; Miller, Melanie M; Scheib, Ulrike; Yiu, Ying Y; Aroian, Raffi V

    2013-01-01

    Ascaris suum and Ascaris lumbricoides are two closely related geo-helminth parasites that ubiquitously infect pigs and humans, respectively. Ascaris suum infection in pigs is considered a good model for A. lumbricoides infection in humans because of a similar biology and tissue migration to the intestines. Ascaris lumbricoides infections in children are associated with malnutrition, growth and cognitive stunting, immune defects, and, in extreme cases, life-threatening blockage of the digestive tract and aberrant migration into the bile duct and peritoneum. Similar effects can be seen with A. suum infections in pigs related to poor feed efficiency and performance. New strategies to control Ascaris infections are needed largely due to reduced treatment efficacies of current anthelmintics in the field, the threat of resistance development, and the general lack of new drug development for intestinal soil-transmitted helminths for humans and animals. Here we demonstrate for the first time that A. suum expresses the receptors for Bacillus thuringiensis crystal protein and novel anthelmintic Cry5B, which has been previously shown to intoxicate hookworms and which belongs to a class of proteins considered non-toxic to vertebrates. Cry5B is able to intoxicate A. suum larvae and adults and triggers the activation of the p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase pathway similar to that observed with other nematodes. Most importantly, two moderate doses of 20 mg/kg body weight (143 nM/kg) of Cry5B resulted in a near complete cure of intestinal A. suum infections in pigs. Taken together, these results demonstrate the excellent potential of Cry5B to treat Ascaris infections in pigs and in humans and for Cry5B to work effectively in the human gastrointestinal tract.

  1. Bacillus thuringiensis-derived Cry5B Has Potent Anthelmintic Activity against Ascaris suum

    PubMed Central

    Miller, Melanie M.; Scheib, Ulrike; Yiu, Ying Y.; Aroian, Raffi V.

    2013-01-01

    Ascaris suum and Ascaris lumbricoides are two closely related geo-helminth parasites that ubiquitously infect pigs and humans, respectively. Ascaris suum infection in pigs is considered a good model for A. lumbricoides infection in humans because of a similar biology and tissue migration to the intestines. Ascaris lumbricoides infections in children are associated with malnutrition, growth and cognitive stunting, immune defects, and, in extreme cases, life-threatening blockage of the digestive tract and aberrant migration into the bile duct and peritoneum. Similar effects can be seen with A. suum infections in pigs related to poor feed efficiency and performance. New strategies to control Ascaris infections are needed largely due to reduced treatment efficacies of current anthelmintics in the field, the threat of resistance development, and the general lack of new drug development for intestinal soil-transmitted helminths for humans and animals. Here we demonstrate for the first time that A. suum expresses the receptors for Bacillus thuringiensis crystal protein and novel anthelmintic Cry5B, which has been previously shown to intoxicate hookworms and which belongs to a class of proteins considered non-toxic to vertebrates. Cry5B is able to intoxicate A. suum larvae and adults and triggers the activation of the p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase pathway similar to that observed with other nematodes. Most importantly, two moderate doses of 20 mg/kg body weight (143 nM/kg) of Cry5B resulted in a near complete cure of intestinal A. suum infections in pigs. Taken together, these results demonstrate the excellent potential of Cry5B to treat Ascaris infections in pigs and in humans and for Cry5B to work effectively in the human gastrointestinal tract. PMID:23818995

  2. Crying Baby: What to Do When Your Newborn Cries

    MedlinePlus

    Healthy Lifestyle Infant and toddler health Newborn crying jags are inevitable. Here's help soothing a crying baby — and ... own can help renew your coping strength. Make healthy lifestyle choices. Eat a healthy diet. Include physical activity ...

  3. Cortisol administration increases hippocampal activation to infant crying in males depending on childhood neglect.

    PubMed

    Bos, Peter A; Montoya, Estrella R; Terburg, David; van Honk, Jack

    2014-10-01

    Animal studies show that exposure to parental neglect alters stress regulation and can lead to neural hyposensitivity or hypersensitivity in response to cortisol, most pronounced in the hippocampus. Cortisol, the end product of the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis, has also been related to parenting more directly, for example, in both sexes, cortisol levels increase when listening to infants crying, possibly to activate and facilitate effective care behavior. Severe trauma is known to negatively affect the HPA-axis in humans; however, it is unknown whether normal variation in parental care in the healthy population can alter sensitivity of the hippocampus to cortisol. Here, we investigate whether variation in experienced neglect changes neural sensitivity to cortisol when humans listen to infant crying, which is an unequivocal signal relevant for care behavior. In a placebo-controlled, within-subject neuroimaging study, we administered 40 mg cortisol to 21 healthy young males without children and used a validated task for measuring neural responses to infant crying. The Dutch version of the Childhood Trauma Questionnaire was used to index participants' early exposure to abuse and neglect. The data show that cortisol markedly increased hippocampal activation toward crying infants, and this effect varied significantly with parental neglect, even in our nonclinical subject sample. Without exposure to severe trauma or neglect, reduced self-experienced quality of parental care in the normal range already substantially increased hippocampal responsivity to cortisol. Altered hippocampal sensitivity to cortisol might be a cross-species marker for the risk of developing later life psychopathology.

  4. Toxicity of Cry1A toxins from Bacillus thuringiensis to CF1 cells does not involve activation of adenylate cyclase/PKA signaling pathway.

    PubMed

    Portugal, Leivi; Muñóz-Garay, Carlos; Martínez de Castro, Diana L; Soberón, Mario; Bravo, Alejandra

    2017-01-01

    Bacillus thuringiensis (Bt) bacteria produce Cry toxins that are able to kill insect pests. Different models explaining the mode of action of these toxins have been proposed. The pore formation model proposes that the toxin creates pores in the membrane of the larval midgut cells after interaction with different receptors such as cadherin, aminopeptidase N and alkaline phosphatase and that this pore formation activity is responsible for the toxicity of these proteins. The alternative model proposes that interaction with cadherin receptor triggers an intracellular cascade response involving protein G, adenylate cyclase (AC) and protein kinase A (PKA). In addition, it was shown that Cry toxins induce a defense response in the larvae involving the activation of mitogen-activated kinases such as MAPK p38 in different insect orders. Here we analyzed the mechanism of action of Cry1Ab and Cry1Ac toxins and a collection of mutants from these toxins in the insect cell line CF1 from Choristoneura fumiferana, that is naturally sensitive to these toxins. Our results show that both toxins induced permeability of K(+) ions into the cells. The initial response after intoxication with Cry1Ab and Cry1Ac toxins involves the activation of a defense response that involves the phosphorylation of MAPK p38. Analysis of activation of PKA and AC activities indicated that the signal transduction involving PKA, AC and cAMP was not activated during Cry1Ab or Cry1Ac intoxication. In contrast we show that Cry1Ab and Cry1Ac activate apoptosis. These data indicate that Cry toxins can induce an apoptotic death response not related with AC/PKA activation. Since Cry1Ab and Cry1Ac toxins affected K(+) ion permeability into the cells, and that mutant toxins affected in pore formation are not toxic to CF1, we propose that pore formation activity of the toxins is responsible of triggering cell death response in CF1cells.

  5. Right Frontoinsular Cortex and Subcortical Activity to Infant Cry Is Associated with Maternal Mental State Talk

    PubMed Central

    Phillips, Mary L.; Swain, James E.; Moses-Kolko, Eydie L.

    2015-01-01

    The study objective was to examine neural correlates of a specific component of human caregiving: maternal mental state talk, reflecting a mother's proclivity to attribute mental states and intentionality to her infant. Using a potent, ecologically relevant stimulus of infant cry during fMRI, we tested hypotheses that postpartum neural response to the cry of “own” versus a standard “other” infant in the right frontoinsular cortex (RFIC) and subcortical limbic network would be associated with independent observations of maternal mental state talk. The sample comprised 76 urban-living, low socioeconomic mothers (82% African American) and their 4-month-old infants. Before the fMRI scan, mothers were filmed in face-to-face interaction with their infant, and maternal behaviors were coded by trained researchers unaware of all other information about the participants. The results showed higher functional activity in the RFIC to own versus other infant cry at the group level. In addition, RFIC and bilateral subcortical neural activity (e.g., thalamus, amygdala, hippocampus, putamen) was associated positively with maternal mental state talk but not with more global aspects of observed caregiving. These findings held when accounting for perceptual and contextual covariates, such as maternal felt distress, urge to help, depression severity, and recognition of own infant cry. Our results highlight the need to focus on specific components of caregiving to advance understanding of the maternal brain. Future work will examine the predictive utility of this neural marker for mother–child function. SIGNIFICANCE STATEMENT The current study advances extant literature examining the neural underpinning of early parenting behavior. The findings highlight the special functional importance of the right frontoinsular cortex–thalamic–limbic network in a mother's proclivity to engage in mental state talk with her preverbal infant, a circumscribed aspect of maternal caregiving

  6. Stress reduction through consolation in chimpanzees.

    PubMed

    Fraser, Orlaith N; Stahl, Daniel; Aureli, Filippo

    2008-06-24

    Consolation, i.e., postconflict affiliative interaction directed from a third party to the recipient of aggression, is assumed to have a stress-alleviating function. This function, however, has never been demonstrated. This study shows that consolation in chimpanzees reduces behavioral measures of stress in recipients of aggression. Furthermore, consolation was more likely to occur in the absence of reconciliation, i.e., postconflict affiliative interaction between former opponents. Consolation therefore may act as an alternative to reconciliation when the latter does not occur. In the debate about empathy in great apes, evidence for the stress-alleviating function of consolation in chimpanzees provides support for the argument that consolation could be critical behavior. Consistent with the argument that relationship quality affects their empathic responses, we found that consolation was more likely between individuals with more valuable relationships. Chimpanzees may thus respond to distressed valuable partners by consoling them, thereby reducing their stress levels, especially in the absence of reconciliation.

  7. Cry1Ac Transgenic Sugarcane Does Not Affect the Diversity of Microbial Communities and Has No Significant Effect on Enzyme Activities in Rhizosphere Soil within One Crop Season.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Dinggang; Xu, Liping; Gao, Shiwu; Guo, Jinlong; Luo, Jun; You, Qian; Que, Youxiong

    2016-01-01

    Cry1Ac transgenic sugarcane provides a promising way to control stem-borer pests. Biosafety assessment of soil ecosystem for cry1Ac transgenic sugarcane is urgently needed because of the important role of soil microorganisms in nutrient transformations and element cycling, however little is known. This study aimed to explore the potential impact of cry1Ac transgenic sugarcane on rhizosphere soil enzyme activities and microbial community diversity, and also to investigate whether the gene flow occurs through horizontal gene transfer. We found no horizontal gene flow from cry1Ac sugarcane to soil. No significant difference in the population of culturable microorganisms between the non-GM and cry1Ac transgenic sugarcane was observed, and there were no significant interactions between the sugarcane lines and the growth stages. A relatively consistent trend at community-level, represented by the functional diversity index, was found between the cry1Ac sugarcane and the non-transgenic lines. Most soil samples showed no significant difference in the activities of four soil enzymes: urease, protease, sucrose, and acid phosphate monoester between the non-transgenic and cry1Ac sugarcane lines. We conclude, based on one crop season, that the cry1Ac sugarcane lines may not affect the microbial community structure and functional diversity of the rhizosphere soil and have few negative effects on soil enzymes.

  8. Cry1Ac Transgenic Sugarcane Does Not Affect the Diversity of Microbial Communities and Has No Significant Effect on Enzyme Activities in Rhizosphere Soil within One Crop Season

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Dinggang; Xu, Liping; Gao, Shiwu; Guo, Jinlong; Luo, Jun; You, Qian; Que, Youxiong

    2016-01-01

    Cry1Ac transgenic sugarcane provides a promising way to control stem-borer pests. Biosafety assessment of soil ecosystem for cry1Ac transgenic sugarcane is urgently needed because of the important role of soil microorganisms in nutrient transformations and element cycling, however little is known. This study aimed to explore the potential impact of cry1Ac transgenic sugarcane on rhizosphere soil enzyme activities and microbial community diversity, and also to investigate whether the gene flow occurs through horizontal gene transfer. We found no horizontal gene flow from cry1Ac sugarcane to soil. No significant difference in the population of culturable microorganisms between the non-GM and cry1Ac transgenic sugarcane was observed, and there were no significant interactions between the sugarcane lines and the growth stages. A relatively consistent trend at community-level, represented by the functional diversity index, was found between the cry1Ac sugarcane and the non-transgenic lines. Most soil samples showed no significant difference in the activities of four soil enzymes: urease, protease, sucrose, and acid phosphate monoester between the non-transgenic and cry1Ac sugarcane lines. We conclude, based on one crop season, that the cry1Ac sugarcane lines may not affect the microbial community structure and functional diversity of the rhizosphere soil and have few negative effects on soil enzymes. PMID:27014291

  9. The Correlation of the Presence and Expression Levels of cry Genes with the Insecticidal Activities against Plutella xylostella for Bacillus thuringiensis Strains

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Ming-Lun; Chen, Pin-Hsin; Pang, Jen-Chieh; Lin, Chia-Wei; Hwang, Chin-Fa; Tsen, Hau-Yang

    2014-01-01

    The use of Bacillus thuringiensis (Bt) strains with high insecticidal activity is essential for the preparation of bioinsecticide. In this study, for 60 Bt strains isolated in Taiwan, their genotypes and the correlation of some cry genes as well as the expression levels of cry1 genes, with their insecticidal activities against Plutella xylostella, were investigated. Pulsed field gel electrophoresis (PFGE) and random amplified polymorphic DNA (RAPD) results revealed that the genotypes of these Bt strains are highly diversified. Also, a considerable number of the Bt strains isolated in Taiwan were found to have high insecticidal activities. Since strains that showed individual combined patterns of PFGE and RAPD exhibited distinct insecticidal activities against P. xylostella, thus, these genotypes may be useful for the identification of the new Bt strains and those which have been used in bioinsecticides. In addition, although the presence of cry2Aa1 may have a greater effect on the insecticidal activity of Bt strains in bioassay than other cry genes, only high expression level of cry1 genes plays a key role to determine the insecticidal activity of Bt strains. In conclusion, both RAPD and PFGE are effective in the differentiation of Bt strains. The presence of cry2Aa1 and, especially, the expression level of cry1 genes are useful for the prediction of the insecticidal activities of Bt strains against P. xylostella. PMID:25153253

  10. The correlation of the presence and expression levels of cry genes with the insecticidal activities against Plutella xylostella for Bacillus thuringiensis strains.

    PubMed

    Chen, Ming-Lun; Chen, Pin-Hsin; Pang, Jen-Chieh; Lin, Chia-Wei; Hwang, Chin-Fa; Tsen, Hau-Yang

    2014-08-19

    The use of Bacillus thuringiensis (Bt) strains with high insecticidal activity is essential for the preparation of bioinsecticide. In this study, for 60 Bt strains isolated in Taiwan, their genotypes and the correlation of some cry genes as well as the expression levels of cry1 genes, with their insecticidal activities against Plutella xylostella, were investigated. Pulsed field gel electrophoresis (PFGE) and random amplified polymorphic DNA (RAPD) results revealed that the genotypes of these Bt strains are highly diversified. Also, a considerable number of the Bt strains isolated in Taiwan were found to have high insecticidal activities. Since strains that showed individual combined patterns of PFGE and RAPD exhibited distinct insecticidal activities against P. xylostella, thus, these genotypes may be useful for the identification of the new Bt strains and those which have been used in bioinsecticides. In addition, although the presence of cry2Aa1 may have a greater effect on the insecticidal activity of Bt strains in bioassay than other cry genes, only high expression level of cry1 genes plays a key role to determine the insecticidal activity of Bt strains. In conclusion, both RAPD and PFGE are effective in the differentiation of Bt strains. The presence of cry2Aa1 and, especially, the expression level of cry1 genes are useful for the prediction of the insecticidal activities of Bt strains against P. xylostella.

  11. Enhancement of Bacillus thuringiensis insecticidal activity by combining Cry1Ac and bi-functional toxin HWTX-XI from spider.

    PubMed

    Sun, Yunjun; Fu, Zujiao; He, Xiaohong; Yuan, Chunhua; Ding, Xuezhi; Xia, Liqiu

    2016-03-01

    In order to assess the potency of bi-functional HWTX-XI toxin from spider Ornithoctonus huwena in improving the insecticidal activity of Bacillus thuringiensis, a fusion gene of cry1Ac and hwtx-XI was constructed and expressed in an acrystalliferous B. thuringiensis strain Cry(-)B. Western blot analysis and microscopic observation revealed that the recombinant strain could express 140-kDa Cry1Ac-HWTX-XI fusion protein and produce parasporal inclusions during sporulation. Bioassay using the larvae of Helicoverpa armigera and Spodoptera exigua showed that the Cry1Ac-HWTX-XI fusion was more toxic than the control Cry1Ac protoxin, as revealed by 95% lethal concentration. Our study indicated that the HWTX-XI from spider might be a candidate for enhancing the toxicity of B. thuringiensis products.

  12. vVICTORIA Console Development: Design and Fabrication of VICTORIA Console Emulations

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-07-01

    Canada vVICTORIA Console Development Design and Fabrication of VICTORIA Console Emulations Contract Project Manager: Keith Bowden, 902 832 7862...intentionally left blank. vVICTORIA Console Development Design and Fabrication of VICTORIA Console Emulations Keith Bowden Earl Gosse Prepared...integration, optimum equipment configurations and human factors. Résumé …..... Le présent rapport porte sur le développement et la fabrication de

  13. Resistance to Bt maize in Mythimna unipuncta (Lepidoptera: Noctuidae) is mediated by alteration in Cry1Ab protein activation.

    PubMed

    González-Cabrera, Joel; García, Matías; Hernández-Crespo, Pedro; Farinós, Gema P; Ortego, Félix; Castañera, Pedro

    2013-08-01

    Bt maize cultivars based on the event MON810 (expressing Cry1Ab) have shown high efficacy for controlling corn borers. However, their efficiency for controlling some secondary lepidopteran pests such as Mythimna unipuncta has been questioned, raising concerns about potential outbreaks and its economic consequences. We have selected a resistant strain (MR) of M. unipuncta, which is capable of completing its life cycle on Bt maize and displays a similar performance when feeding on both Bt and non-Bt maize. The proteolytic activation of the protoxin and the binding of active toxin to brush border membrane vesicles were investigated in the resistant and a control strain. A reduction in the activity of proteolytic enzymes, which correlates with impaired capacity of midgut extracts to activate the Cry1Ab protoxin has been observed in the resistant strain. Moreover, resistance in larvae of the MR strain was reverted when treated with Cry1Ab toxin activated with midgut juice from the control strain. All these data indicate that resistance in the MR strain is mediated by alteration of toxin activation rather than to an increase in the proteolytic degradation of the protein. By contrast, binding assays performed with biotin labelled Cry1Ab suggest that binding to midgut receptors does not play a major role in the resistance to Bt maize. Our results emphasize the risk of development of resistance in field populations of M. unipuncta and the need to consider this secondary pest in ongoing resistance management programs to avoid the likely negative agronomic and environmental consequences.

  14. CUL4-DDB1-CDT2 E3 Ligase Regulates the Molecular Clock Activity by Promoting Ubiquitination-Dependent Degradation of the Mammalian CRY1

    PubMed Central

    Tong, Xin; Zhang, Deqiang; Guha, Anirvan; Arthurs, Blake; Cazares, Victor; Gupta, Neil; Yin, Lei

    2015-01-01

    The CUL4-DDB1 E3 ligase complex serves as a critical regulator in various cellular processes, including cell proliferation, DNA damage repair, and cell cycle progression. However, whether this E3 ligase complex regulates clock protein turnover and the molecular clock activity in mammalian cells is unknown. Here we show that CUL4-DDB1-CDT2 E3 ligase ubiquitinates CRY1 and promotes its degradation both in vitro and in vivo. Depletion of the major components of this E3 ligase complex, including Ddb1, Cdt2, and Cdt2-cofactor Pcna, leads to CRY1 stabilization in cultured cells or in the mouse liver. CUL4A-DDB1-CDT2 E3 ligase targets lysine 585 within the C-terminal region of CRY1 protein, shown by the CRY1 585KA mutant’s resistance to ubiquitination and degradation mediated by the CUL4A-DDB1 complex. Surprisingly, both depletion of Ddb1 and over-expression of Cry1-585KA mutant enhance the oscillatory amplitude of the Bmal1 promoter activity without altering its period length, suggesting that CUL4A-DDB1-CDT2 E3 targets CRY1 for degradation and reduces the circadian amplitude. All together, we uncovered a novel biological role for CUL4A-DDB1-CDT2 E3 ligase that regulates molecular circadian behaviors via promoting ubiquitination-dependent degradation of CRY1. PMID:26431207

  15. 13. VIEW OF CONTROL CONSOLE CURRENTLY USED ON OCCASION FOR ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    13. VIEW OF CONTROL CONSOLE CURRENTLY USED ON OCCASION FOR AMATUER RADIO AND TO PERIODICALLY ACTIVE STATION KPS. NOTE CLOCK ON WALL. SHADED PORTIONS ON 24HR CLOCK (15-18 AND 45-48 MINUTES) INDICATED MINUTES EACH HOUR WHEN STATIONS WOULD NOT TRANSMIT AND LISTEN FOR WEAK DISTRESS SIGNALS. - Marconi Radio Sites, Receiving, Point Reyes Station, Marin County, CA

  16. Activity of spores and extracellular proteins from six Cry+ strains and a Cry- strain of Bacillus thuringiensis subsp. kurstaki against the western spruce budworm, Choristoneura occidentalis (Lepidoptera: Tortricidae).

    PubMed

    Kalmykova, Galina; Burtseva, Ljudmila; Milne, Ross; van Frankenhuyzen, Kees

    2009-05-01

    We characterized insecticidal activity of previously untested strains of Bacillus thuringiensis kurstaki belonging to two crystal serovars (K-1 and K-73) against the western spruce budworm (Choristoneura occidentalis Freeman 1967). By testing various components, we demonstrated that spores play a critical role in the pathogenesis of each strain. Spore-free crystals caused low mortality and purified spores were generally not toxic. The addition of spores to purified protoxin increased toxicity several hundred-fold, regardless of the parental strain from which the spores or protoxins were derived. The crystal and spore components did not account for full insecticidal activity of whole sporulated cultures owing to the toxicity of soluble proteins that are secreted during cell growth. We observed a marked difference in toxicity of secreted proteins between the K-1 and K-73 type strains, with the K-1 preparations causing much higher mortality, mass reduction, and inhibition of pupation. There was a consistent correlation between relative toxicity of secreted protein preparations and the presence and quantity of the Vip3A protein, suggesting that this protein contributes to the virulence of B. thuringiensis subsp. kurstaki in western spruce budworm larvae. However, other virulence factors have to be invoked to explain the synergizing effect of spores from both K-1 and K-73 strains on Cry protein toxicity.

  17. Molecular approaches to improve the insecticidal activity of Bacillus thuringiensis Cry toxins.

    PubMed

    Lucena, Wagner A; Pelegrini, Patrícia B; Martins-de-Sa, Diogo; Fonseca, Fernando C A; Gomes, Jose E; de Macedo, Leonardo L P; da Silva, Maria Cristina M; Oliveira, Raquel S; Grossi-de-Sa, Maria F

    2014-08-13

    Bacillus thuringiensis (Bt) is a gram-positive spore-forming soil bacterium that is distributed worldwide. Originally recognized as a pathogen of the silkworm, several strains were found on epizootic events in insect pests. In the 1960s, Bt began to be successfully used to control insect pests in agriculture, particularly because of its specificity, which reflects directly on their lack of cytotoxicity to human health, non-target organisms and the environment. Since the introduction of transgenic plants expressing Bt genes in the mid-1980s, numerous methodologies have been used to search for and improve toxins derived from native Bt strains. These improvements directly influence the increase in productivity and the decreased use of chemical insecticides on Bt-crops. Recently, DNA shuffling and in silico evaluations are emerging as promising tools for the development and exploration of mutant Bt toxins with enhanced activity against target insect pests. In this report, we describe natural and in vitro evolution of Cry toxins, as well as their relevance in the mechanism of action for insect control. Moreover, the use of DNA shuffling to improve two Bt toxins will be discussed together with in silico analyses of the generated mutations to evaluate their potential effect on protein structure and cytotoxicity.

  18. Molecular Approaches to Improve the Insecticidal Activity of Bacillus thuringiensis Cry Toxins

    PubMed Central

    Lucena, Wagner A.; Pelegrini, Patrícia B.; Martins-de-Sa, Diogo; Fonseca, Fernando C. A.; Gomes, Jose E.; de Macedo, Leonardo L. P.; da Silva, Maria Cristina M.; Oliveira, Raquel S.; Grossi-de-Sa, Maria F.

    2014-01-01

    Bacillus thuringiensis (Bt) is a gram-positive spore-forming soil bacterium that is distributed worldwide. Originally recognized as a pathogen of the silkworm, several strains were found on epizootic events in insect pests. In the 1960s, Bt began to be successfully used to control insect pests in agriculture, particularly because of its specificity, which reflects directly on their lack of cytotoxicity to human health, non-target organisms and the environment. Since the introduction of transgenic plants expressing Bt genes in the mid-1980s, numerous methodologies have been used to search for and improve toxins derived from native Bt strains. These improvements directly influence the increase in productivity and the decreased use of chemical insecticides on Bt-crops. Recently, DNA shuffling and in silico evaluations are emerging as promising tools for the development and exploration of mutant Bt toxins with enhanced activity against target insect pests. In this report, we describe natural and in vitro evolution of Cry toxins, as well as their relevance in the mechanism of action for insect control. Moreover, the use of DNA shuffling to improve two Bt toxins will be discussed together with in silico analyses of the generated mutations to evaluate their potential effect on protein structure and cytotoxicity. PMID:25123558

  19. Master Console System Monitoring and Control Development

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brooks, Russell A.

    2013-01-01

    The Master Console internship during the spring of 2013 involved the development of firing room displays at the John F. Kennedy Space Center (KSC). This position was with the Master Console Product Group (MCPG) on the Launch Control System (LCS) project. This project is responsible for the System Monitoring and Control (SMC) and Record and Retrieval (R&R) of launch operations data. The Master Console is responsible for: loading the correct software into each of the remaining consoles in the firing room, connecting the proper data paths to and from the launch vehicle and all ground support equipment, and initializing the entire firing room system to begin processing. During my internship, I developed a system health and status display for use by Master Console Operators (MCO) to monitor and verify the integrity of the servers, gateways, network switches, and firewalls used in the firing room.

  20. Oxytocin-dependent consolation behavior in rodents

    PubMed Central

    Burkett, J. P.; Andari, E.; Johnson, Z. V.; Curry, D. C.; de Waal, F. B. M.; Young, L. J.

    2016-01-01

    Consolation behavior toward distressed others is common in humans and great apes, yet our ability to explore the biological mechanisms underlying this behavior is limited by its apparent absence in laboratory animals. Here, we provide empirical evidence that a rodent species, the highly social and monogamous prairie vole (Microtus ochrogaster), greatly increases partner-directed grooming toward familiar conspecifics (but not strangers) that have experienced an unobserved stressor, providing social buffering. Prairie voles also match the fear response, anxiety-related behaviors, and corticosterone increase of the stressed cagemate, suggesting an empathy mechanism. Exposure to the stressed cagemate increases activity in the anterior cingulate cortex, and oxytocin receptor antagonist infused into this region abolishes the partner-directed response, showing conserved neural mechanisms between prairie vole and human. PMID:26798013

  1. Influence of oxalic and malic acids in chickpea leaf exudates on the biological activity of CryIAc towards Helicoverpa armigera.

    PubMed

    Devi, V Surekha; Sharma, Hari C; Rao, P Arjuna

    2013-04-01

    Efforts are being made to express toxin genes from the bacterium, Bacillus thuringiensis (Bt) in chickpea for minimizing the losses due to the pod borer, Helicoverpa armigera. However, there is an apprehension that acidic exudates in chickpea leaves may influence the protoxin-toxin conversion in the insect midgut, and thus, reduce the efficacy of Bt toxins. Therefore, we studied the influence of organic acids (oxalic acid and malic acid) present in the trichome exudates of chickpea on the biological activity and binding of Bt δ-endotoxin Cry1Ac to brush border membrane vesicles (BBMV) of the pod borer, H. armigera. Oxalic and malic acids in combination at concentrations present in chickpea leaves did not influence the biological activity of Bt toxin Cry1Ac towards H. armigera larvae. Amounts of Cry1Ac protein in the midgut of insects reared on diets with organic acids were similar to those reared on artificial diet without the organic acids. However, very high concentrations of the organic acids reduced the amounts of Cry1Ac in the midgut of H. armigera larvae. Organic acids in the artificial diet also increased the excretion of Cry1Ac in the fecal matter. Organic acids reduced the amount of protein in the BBMV of insects reared on diets with Cry1Ac, possibly because of reduced size of the larvae. Oxalic and malic acids at concentrations present in chickpea leaves did not affect the biological activity of Cry1Ac, but it will be desirable to have high levels of expression of Cry1Ac toxin proteins in chickpea for effective control of the pod borer, H. armigera.

  2. Common, but complex, mode of resistance of Plutella xylostella to Bacillus thuringiensis toxins Cry1Ab and Cry1Ac.

    PubMed

    Sayyed, Ali H; Gatsi, Roxani; Ibiza-Palacios, M Sales; Escriche, Baltasar; Wright, Denis J; Crickmore, Neil

    2005-11-01

    A field collected population of Plutella xylostella (SERD4) was selected in the laboratory with Bacillus thuringiensis endotoxins Cry1Ac (Cry1Ac-SEL) and Cry1Ab (Cry1Ab-SEL). Both subpopulations showed similar phenotypes: high resistance to the Cry1A toxins and little cross-resistance to Cry1Ca or Cry1D. A previous analysis of the Cry1Ac-SEL showed incompletely dominant resistance to Cry1Ac with more than one factor, at least one of which was sex influenced. In the present study reciprocal mass crosses between Cry1Ab-SEL and a laboratory susceptible population (ROTH) provided evidence that Cry1Ab resistance was also inherited as incompletely dominant trait with more than one factor, and at least one of the factors was sex influenced. Analysis of single pair mating indicated that Cry1Ab-SEL was still heterogeneous for Cry1Ab resistance genes, showing genes with different degrees of dominance. Binding studies showed a large reduction of specific binding of Cry1Ab and Cry1Ac to midgut membrane vesicles of the Cry1Ab-SEL subpopulation. Cry1Ab-SEL was found to be more susceptible to trypsin-activated Cry1Ab toxin than protoxin, although no defect in toxin activation was found. Present and previous results indicate a common basis of resistance to both Cry1Ab and Cry1Ac in selected subpopulations and suggest that a similar set of resistance genes are responsible for resistance to Cry1Ab and Cry1Ac and are selected whichever toxin was used. The possibility of an incompletely dominant trait of resistant to these toxins should be taken into account when considering refuge resistance management strategies.

  3. Larvicidal activity of Bacillus thuringiensis var. israelensis Cry11Aa toxin against Haemonchus contortus.

    PubMed

    DE Lara, Ana Paula DE Souza Stori; Lorenzon, Lucas Bigolin; Vianna, Ana Muñoz; Santos, Francisco Denis Souza; Pinto, Luciano Silva; Aires Berne, Maria Elisabeth; Leite, Fábio Pereira Leivas

    2016-10-01

    Effective control of gastrointestinal parasites is necessary in sheep production. The development of anthelmintics resistance is causing the available chemically based anthelmintics to become less effective. Biological control strategies present an alternative to this problem. In the current study, we tested the larvicidal effects of Bacillus thuringiensis var. israelensis Cry11Aa toxin against Haemonchus contortus larvae. Bacterial suspensions [2 × 108 colony-forming units (CFU) g-1 of the feces] of B. thuringiensis var. israelensis and recombinant Escherichia coli expressing Cry11Aa toxin were added to naturally H. contortus egg-contaminated feces. The larvae were quantified, and significant reductions of 62 and 81% (P < 0·001) were, respectively observed, compared with the control group. A 30 mL bacterial suspension (1 × 108 CFU mL-1) of B. thuringiensis var. israelensis and recombinant E. coli expressing Cry11Aa toxin were then orally administered to lambs naturally infected with H. contortus. Twelve hours after administration, feces were collected and submitted to coprocultures. Significant larvae reductions (P < 0·001) of 79 and 90% were observed respectively compared with the control group. The results suggest that the Cry11Aa toxin of B. thuringiensis var. israelensis is a promising new class of biological anthelmintics for treating sheep against H. contortus.

  4. Bacillus thuringiensis Cry34Ab1/Cry35Ab1 Interactions with Western Corn Rootworm Midgut Membrane Binding Sites

    PubMed Central

    Li, Huarong; Olson, Monica; Lin, Gaofeng; Hey, Timothy; Tan, Sek Yee; Narva, Kenneth E.

    2013-01-01

    Background Bacillus thuringiensis (Bt) Cry34Ab1/Cry35Ab1 are binary insecticidal proteins that are co-expressed in transgenic corn hybrids for control of western corn rootworm, Diabrotica virgifera virgifera LeConte. Bt crystal (Cry) proteins with limited potential for field-relevant cross-resistance are used in combination, along with non-transgenic corn refuges, as a strategy to delay development of resistant rootworm populations. Differences in insect midgut membrane binding site interactions are one line of evidence that Bt protein mechanisms of action differ and that the probability of receptor-mediated cross-resistance is low. Methodology/Principal Findings Binding site interactions were investigated between Cry34Ab1/Cry35Ab1 and coleopteran active insecticidal proteins Cry3Aa, Cry6Aa, and Cry8Ba on western corn rootworm midgut brush border membrane vesicles (BBMV). Competitive binding of radio-labeled proteins to western corn rootworm BBMV was used as a measure of shared binding sites. Our work shows that 125I-Cry35Ab1 binds to rootworm BBMV, Cry34Ab1 enhances 125I-Cry35Ab1 specific binding, and that 125I-Cry35Ab1 with or without unlabeled Cry34Ab1 does not share binding sites with Cry3Aa, Cry6Aa, or Cry8Ba. Two primary lines of evidence presented here support the lack of shared binding sites between Cry34Ab1/Cry35Ab1 and the aforementioned proteins: 1) No competitive binding to rootworm BBMV was observed for competitor proteins when used in excess with 125I-Cry35Ab1 alone or combined with unlabeled Cry34Ab1, and 2) No competitive binding to rootworm BBMV was observed for unlabeled Cry34Ab1 and Cry35Ab1, or a combination of the two, when used in excess with 125I-Cry3Aa, or 125I-Cry8Ba. Conclusions/Significance Combining two or more insecticidal proteins active against the same target pest is one tactic to delay the onset of resistance to either protein. We conclude that Cry34Ab1/Cry35Ab1 are compatible with Cry3Aa, Cry6Aa, or Cry8Ba for deployment as insect

  5. Pore formation by Cry toxins.

    PubMed

    Soberón, Mario; Pardo, Liliana; Muñóz-Garay, Carlos; Sánchez, Jorge; Gómez, Isabel; Porta, Helena; Bravo, Alejandra

    2010-01-01

    Bacillus thuringiensis (Bt) bacteria produce insecticidal Cry and Cyt proteins used in the biological control of different insect pests. In this review, we will focus on the 3d-Cry toxins that represent the biggest group of Cry proteins and also on Cyt toxins. The 3d-Cry toxins are pore-forming toxins that induce cell death by forming ionic pores into the membrane of the midgut epithelial cells in their target insect. The initial steps in the mode of action include ingestion of the protoxin, activation by midgut proteases to produce the toxin fragment and the interaction with the primary cadherin receptor. The interaction of the monomeric CrylA toxin with the cadherin receptor promotes an extra proteolytic cleavage, where helix alpha-1 of domain I is eliminated and the toxin oligomerization is induced, forming a structure of 250 kDa. The oligomeric structure binds to a secondary receptor, aminopeptidase N or alkaline phosphatase. The secondary receptor drives the toxin into detergent resistant membrane microdomains formingpores that cause osmotic shock, burst of the midgut cells and insect death. Regarding to Cyt toxins, these proteins have a synergistic effect on the toxicity of some Cry toxins. Cyt proteins are also proteolytic activated in the midgut lumen of their target, they bind to some phospholipids present in the mosquito midgut cells. The proposed mechanism of synergism between Cry and Cyt toxins is that Cyt1Aa function as a receptor for Cry toxins. The Cyt1A inserts into midgut epithelium membrane and exposes protein regions that are recognized by Cry11Aa. It was demonstrated that this interaction facilitates the oligomerization of Cry11Aa and also its pore formation activity.

  6. A novel recombinant baculovirus overexpressing a Bacillus thuringiensis Cry1Ab toxin enhances insecticidal activity

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Baculoviruses have been genetically modified to express foreign genes under powerful promoters in order to accelerate their speed of killing. In this study a truncated form of cry1Ab gene derived from Bacillus thuringinsis (Bt) subsp. aegypti isolate Bt7 was engineered into the genome of the baculovirus Autographa californica multiple nuclearpolyhedrosis wild type virus, in place of the polyhedrin gene by using homologous recombination in Spodoptera frugiperda (Sf) cells between a transfer vector carrying the Bt gene and the wild type virus linearized DNA. Recombinant wild type virus containing the cry1Ab gene was detected as blue occlusion-negative plaques in monolayers of Sf cells grown in the presence of X-Gal. In Sf cells infected with plaque-purified recombinant virus, the cry1Ab gene was expressed to yield a protein of approximately 82-kDa, as determined by immunoblot analysis. The toxicity of the recombinant virus expressing the insecticidal crystal protein (ICP) was compared to that of the wild-type virus. Infected-cell extract was toxic to cotton leaf worm Spodoptera littoralis second instar larvae and the estimated LC50 was 1.7 μg/ml for the recombinant virus compared with that of wild-type virus which was 10 μg/ml. PMID:24735532

  7. Expression of the p20 Gene from Bacillus thuringiensis H-14 Increases Cry11A Toxin Production and Enhances Mosquito-Larvicidal Activity in Recombinant Gram-Negative Bacteria

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Y.; Nagai, M.; Bagdasarian, M.; Smith, T. W.; Walker, E. D.

    2001-01-01

    Experimental analyses with recombinant Escherichia coli and Pseudomonas putida transformed with plasmids bearing genes coding for the Cry11A toxin and P20 protein from Bacillus thuringiensis H-14 showed that cells producing both proteins were more toxic when fed to third-instar Aedes aegypti larvae than were cells expressing cry11A alone; the 50% lethal concentrations were in the range of 104 to 105 cells/ml. Western blots revealed a higher production of Cry11A when the p20 gene was coexpressed. Cry11A was detected primarily in insoluble form in recombinant cells. Cry11A was not detected in P. putida when P20 was not coproduced, and these recombinants were not toxic to larvae, whereas P. putida recombinants producing both proteins were toxic at concentrations similar to those for E. coli. A coelution experiment was conducted, in which a p20 gene construct producing the P20 protein with an extension of six histidines on the C terminus was mixed with the Cry11A protein. The results showed that Cry11A bound to the P20(His6) on a nickel chelating column, whereas Cry11A produced without the P20(His6) protein was washed through the column, thus indicating that Cry11A and P20 physically interact. Thus, P20 protein either stabilizes Cry11A or helps it attain the folding important for its toxic activity. PMID:11425714

  8. Infant Cries Rattle Adult Cognition.

    PubMed

    Dudek, Joanna; Faress, Ahmed; Bornstein, Marc H; Haley, David W

    2016-01-01

    The attention-grabbing quality of the infant cry is well recognized, but how the emotional valence of infant vocal signals affects adult cognition and cortical activity has heretofore been unknown. We examined the effects of two contrasting infant vocalizations (cries vs. laughs) on adult performance on a Stroop task using a cross-modal distraction paradigm in which infant distractors were vocal and targets were visual. Infant vocalizations were presented before (Experiment 1) or during each Stroop trial (Experiment 2). To evaluate the influence of infant vocalizations on cognitive control, neural responses to the Stroop task were obtained by measuring electroencephalography (EEG) and event-related potentials (ERPs) in Experiment 1. Based on the previously demonstrated existence of negative arousal bias, we hypothesized that cry vocalizations would be more distracting and invoke greater conflict processing than laugh vocalizations. Similarly, we expected participants to have greater difficulty shifting attention from the vocal distractors to the target task after hearing cries vs. after hearing laughs. Behavioral results from both experiments showed a cry interference effect, in which task performance was slower with cry than with laugh distractors. Electrophysiology data further revealed that cries more than laughs reduced attention to the task (smaller P200) and increased conflict processing (larger N450), albeit differently for incongruent and congruent trials. Results from a correlation analysis showed that the amplitudes of P200 and N450 were inversely related, suggesting a reciprocal relationship between attention and conflict processing. The findings suggest that cognitive control processes contribute to an attention bias to infant signals, which is modulated in part by the valence of the infant vocalization and the demands of the cognitive task. The findings thus support the notion that infant cries elicit a negative arousal bias that is distracting; they

  9. Infant Cries Rattle Adult Cognition

    PubMed Central

    Dudek, Joanna; Faress, Ahmed; Bornstein, Marc H.; Haley, David W.

    2016-01-01

    The attention-grabbing quality of the infant cry is well recognized, but how the emotional valence of infant vocal signals affects adult cognition and cortical activity has heretofore been unknown. We examined the effects of two contrasting infant vocalizations (cries vs. laughs) on adult performance on a Stroop task using a cross-modal distraction paradigm in which infant distractors were vocal and targets were visual. Infant vocalizations were presented before (Experiment 1) or during each Stroop trial (Experiment 2). To evaluate the influence of infant vocalizations on cognitive control, neural responses to the Stroop task were obtained by measuring electroencephalography (EEG) and event-related potentials (ERPs) in Experiment 1. Based on the previously demonstrated existence of negative arousal bias, we hypothesized that cry vocalizations would be more distracting and invoke greater conflict processing than laugh vocalizations. Similarly, we expected participants to have greater difficulty shifting attention from the vocal distractors to the target task after hearing cries vs. after hearing laughs. Behavioral results from both experiments showed a cry interference effect, in which task performance was slower with cry than with laugh distractors. Electrophysiology data further revealed that cries more than laughs reduced attention to the task (smaller P200) and increased conflict processing (larger N450), albeit differently for incongruent and congruent trials. Results from a correlation analysis showed that the amplitudes of P200 and N450 were inversely related, suggesting a reciprocal relationship between attention and conflict processing. The findings suggest that cognitive control processes contribute to an attention bias to infant signals, which is modulated in part by the valence of the infant vocalization and the demands of the cognitive task. The findings thus support the notion that infant cries elicit a negative arousal bias that is distracting; they

  10. The Trichoderma reesei Cry1 Protein Is a Member of the Cryptochrome/Photolyase Family with 6–4 Photoproduct Repair Activity

    PubMed Central

    Guzmán-Moreno, Jesús; Flores-Martínez, Alberto; Brieba, Luis G.; Herrera-Estrella, Alfredo

    2014-01-01

    DNA-photolyases use UV-visible light to repair DNA damage caused by UV radiation. The two major types of DNA damage are cyclobutane pyrimidine dimers (CPD) and 6–4 photoproducts (6-4PP), which are repaired under illumination by CPD and 6–4 photolyases, respectively. Cryptochromes are proteins related to DNA photolyases with strongly reduced or lost DNA repair activity, and have been shown to function as blue-light photoreceptors and to play important roles in circadian rhythms in plants and animals. Both photolyases and cryptochromes belong to the cryptochrome/photolyase family, and are widely distributed in all organisms. Here we describe the characterization of cry1, a member of the cryptochrome/photolyase protein family of the filamentous fungus Trichoderma reesei. We determined that cry1 transcript accumulates when the fungus is exposed to light, and that such accumulation depends on the photoreceptor Blr1 and is modulated by Envoy. Conidia of cry1 mutants show decreased photorepair capacity of DNA damage caused by UV light. In contrast, strains over-expressing Cry1 show increased repair, as compared to the parental strain even in the dark. These observations suggest that Cry1 may be stimulating other systems involved in DNA repair, such as the nucleotide excision repair system. We show that Cry1, heterologously expressed and purified from E. coli, is capable of binding to undamaged and 6-4PP damaged DNA. Photorepair assays in vitro clearly show that Cry1 repairs 6-4PP, but not CPD and Dewar DNA lesions. PMID:24964051

  11. Master Console System Monitoring and Control Development

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brooks, Russell A.

    2013-01-01

    The Master Console internship during the summer of 2013 involved the development of firing room displays and support applications at the John F. Kennedy Space Center (KSC). This position was with the Master Console Product Group (MCPG) on the Launch Control System (LCS) project. This project is responsible for the System Monitoring and Control (SMC) and Record and Retrieval (R&R) of launch operations data. The Master Console is responsible for: loading the correct software into each of the remaining consoles in the firing room, connecting the proper data paths to and from the launch vehicle and all ground support equipment, and initializing the entire firing room system to begin processing. During my internship, I created control scripts using the Application Control Language (ACL) to analyze the health and status of Kennedy Ground Control System (KGCS) programmable logic controllers (PLCs). This application provides a system health and status display I created with summarized data for use by Master Console Operators (MCO) to monitor and verify the integrity of KGCS subsystems.

  12. A coleopteran cadherin fragment synergizes toxicity of Bacillus thuringiensis toxins Cry3Aa, Cry3Bb, and Cry8Ca against lesser mealworm, Alphitobius diaperinus (Coleoptera: Tenebrionidae).

    PubMed

    Park, Youngjin; Hua, Gang; Taylor, Milton D; Adang, Michael J

    2014-11-01

    The lesser mealworm, Alphitobius diaperinus, is a serious cosmopolitan pest of commercial poultry facilities because of its involvement in structural damage to poultry houses, reduction in feed conversion efficiency, and transfer of avian and human pathogens. Cry3Aa, Cry3Bb, and Cry8Ca insecticidal proteins of Bacillus thuringiensis are used to control coleopteran larvae. Cadherins localized in the midgut epithelium function as receptors for Cry toxins in lepidopteran, coleopteran, and dipteran insects. Previously, we demonstrated that the truncated cadherin (DvCad1) from Diabrotica virgifera virgifera, which consists of the C-terminal cadherin repeats (CR) 8-10 and expressed in Escherichia coli, enhanced Cry3Aa and Cry3Bb toxicity against several coleopteran species. Here we report that the DvCad1-CR8-10 enhances Cry3Aa, Cry3Bb, and Cry8Ca toxicity to lesser mealworm. Previously, by an enzyme linked immunosorbent microplate assay, we demonstrated that the DvCad1-CR8-10 binds activated-Cry3Aa (11.8 nM), -Cry3Bb (1.4nM), and now report that CR8-10 binds activated-Cry8Ca (5.7 nM) toxin. The extent of Cry toxins enhancement by DvCad1-CR8-10, which ranged from 3.30- to 5.93-fold, may have practical application for lesser mealworm control in preventing avian and human pathogen transfer in poultry facilities.

  13. Evaluation of corn hybrids expressing Cry1F, cry1A.105, Cry2Ab2, Cry34Ab1/Cry35Ab1, and Cry3Bb1 against southern United States insect pests.

    PubMed

    Siebert, M W; Nolting, S P; Hendrix, W; Dhavala, S; Craig, C; Leonard, B R; Stewart, S D; All, J; Musser, F R; Buntin, G D; Samuel, L

    2012-10-01

    Studies were conducted across the southern United States to characterize the efficacy of multiple Bacillus thuringiensis (Bt) events in a field corn, Zea mays L., hybrid for control of common lepidopteran and coleopteran pests. Cry1F protein in event TC1507 and Cry1A.105 + Cry2Ab2 proteins in event MON 89034 were evaluated against pests infesting corn on above-ground plant tissue including foliage, stalks, and ears. Cry34Ab1/Cry35Ab1 proteins in event DAS-59122-7 and Cry3Bb1 in event MON 88017 were evaluated against the larvae of Mexican corn rootworm, Diabrotica virgifera zeae Krysan and Smith, which occur below-ground. Field corn hybrids containing Cry1F, Cry1A.105 + Cry2Ab2, Cry34Ab1/Cry35Ab1, and Cry3Bb1 insecticidal proteins (SmartStax) consistently demonstrated reductions in plant injury and/or reduced larval survivorship as compared with a non-Bt field corn hybrid. Efficacy provided by a field corn hybrid with multiple Bt proteins was statistically equal to or significantly better than corn hybrids containing a single event active against target pests. Single event field corn hybrids provided very high levels of control of southwestern corn borer, Diatraea grandiosella (Dyar), lesser cornstalk borer, Elasmopalpus lignosellus (Zeller), and fall armyworm, Spodoptera frugiperda (J.E. Smith), and were not significantly different than field corn hybrids with multiple events. Significant increases in efficacy were observed for a field corn hybrid with multiple Bt events for sugarcane borer, Diatraea saccharalis (F.), beet armyworm, Spodoptera exigua (Hübner), corn earworm, Helicoverpa zea (Boddie), and Mexican corn rootworm. Utilization of field corn hybrids containing multiple Bt events provides a means for managing insect resistance to Bt proteins and reduces non-Bt corn refuge requirements.

  14. Characterization of the Activity Spectrum of MON 88702 and the Plant-Incorporated Protectant Cry51Aa2.834_16

    PubMed Central

    Ahmad, Aqeel; Ahrens, Jeffrey E.; Akbar, Waseem; Baum, James A.; Brown, Scott; Clark, Thomas L.; Fridley, Jennifer M.; Gowda, Anilkumar; Greenplate, John T.; Jensen, Peter D.; Mueller, Geoffrey M.; Odegaard, Matthew L.; Tan, Jianguo; Uffman, Joshua P.; Levine, Steven L.

    2017-01-01

    The spectrum of insecticidal activity of Cry51Aa2.834_16 protein targeting hemipteran and thysanopteran insect pests in cotton was characterized by selecting and screening multiple pest and non-pest species, based on representation of ecological functional groups, taxonomic relatedness (e.g. relationship to species where activity was observed), and availability for effective testing. Seven invertebrate orders, comprising 12 families and 17 representative species were screened for susceptibility to Cry51Aa2.834_16 protein and/or the ability of the protein to protect against feeding damage in laboratory, controlled environments (e.g. greenhouse/growth chamber), and/or field studies when present in cotton plants. The screening results presented for Cry51Aa2.834_16 demonstrate selective and limited activity within three insect orders. Other than Orius insidiosus, no activity was observed for Cry51Aa2.834_16 against several groups of arthropods that perform key ecological roles in some agricultural ecosystems (e.g. pollinators, decomposers, and natural enemies). PMID:28072875

  15. Characterization of the Activity Spectrum of MON 88702 and the Plant-Incorporated Protectant Cry51Aa2.834_16.

    PubMed

    Bachman, Pamela M; Ahmad, Aqeel; Ahrens, Jeffrey E; Akbar, Waseem; Baum, James A; Brown, Scott; Clark, Thomas L; Fridley, Jennifer M; Gowda, Anilkumar; Greenplate, John T; Jensen, Peter D; Mueller, Geoffrey M; Odegaard, Matthew L; Tan, Jianguo; Uffman, Joshua P; Levine, Steven L

    2017-01-01

    The spectrum of insecticidal activity of Cry51Aa2.834_16 protein targeting hemipteran and thysanopteran insect pests in cotton was characterized by selecting and screening multiple pest and non-pest species, based on representation of ecological functional groups, taxonomic relatedness (e.g. relationship to species where activity was observed), and availability for effective testing. Seven invertebrate orders, comprising 12 families and 17 representative species were screened for susceptibility to Cry51Aa2.834_16 protein and/or the ability of the protein to protect against feeding damage in laboratory, controlled environments (e.g. greenhouse/growth chamber), and/or field studies when present in cotton plants. The screening results presented for Cry51Aa2.834_16 demonstrate selective and limited activity within three insect orders. Other than Orius insidiosus, no activity was observed for Cry51Aa2.834_16 against several groups of arthropods that perform key ecological roles in some agricultural ecosystems (e.g. pollinators, decomposers, and natural enemies).

  16. Increased Long-Flight Activity Triggered in Beet Armyworm by Larval Feeding on Diet Containing Cry1Ac Protoxin

    PubMed Central

    Jiang, Xing Fu; Chen, Jian; Zhang, Lei; Sappington, Thomas W.; Luo, Li Zhi

    2013-01-01

    Evaluating ecological safety and conducting pest risk analysis for transgenic crops are vitally important before their commercial planting. The beet armyworm, Spodoptera exigua, a long-distance migratory insect pest, is not a direct target of transgenic Cry1Ac-expressing cotton in China, but nevertheless it has recently become an important pest. Migrants leaving their natal field arrive in other appropriate habitat far away in a short time, often followed by larval outbreaks. S. exigua has low susceptibility to Cry1Ac. However, our results from laboratory experiments identified (i) sublethal effects of Cry1Ac protoxin on larval development rate, larval and pupal weight, and adult lifetime fecundity, and (ii) increased long-flight behavior triggered by Cry1Ac which may contribute to larval outbreaks elsewhere. No significant differences in larval mortality, pupation rate, adult emergence rate, longevity, pre-oviposition period, or oviposition period were observed between controls and larvae fed on artificial diet incorporating a low concentration of Cry1Ac protoxin. The negative sublethal effects on some developmental and reproductive traits and lack of effect on others suggest they do not contribute to the observed severity of S. exigua outbreaks after feeding on Cry1Ac cotton. Interestingly, the percentage of long fliers increased significantly when larvae were reared on diet containing either of two low-dose treatments of Cry1Ac, suggesting a possible increased propensity to disperse long distances triggered by Cry1Ac. We hypothesize that negative effects on development and reproduction caused by Cry1Ac in the diet are offset by increased flight propensity triggered by the poor food conditions, thereby improving the chances of escaping adverse local conditions before oviposition. Increased long-flight propensity in turn may amplify the area damaged by outbreak populations. This phenomenon might be common in other migratory insect pests receiving sublethal doses

  17. Crying in infancy

    MedlinePlus

    ... medlineplus.gov/ency/article/002397.htm Crying in infancy To use the sharing features on this page, ... a baby by holding him or her during infancy. If the crying continues for longer than usual ...

  18. Cri du chat syndrome

    MedlinePlus

    ... the infant's cry, which is high-pitched and sounds like a cat. Causes Cri du chat syndrome is rare. It is caused by a missing piece of chromosome 5. Most cases are believed to occur during the development of ... Cry that is high-pitched and may sound like a cat Downward slant to the eyes ...

  19. Loop residues of the receptor binding domain of Bacillus thuringiensis Cry11Ba toxin are important for mosquitocidal activity

    PubMed Central

    Likitvivatanavong, Supaporn; Aimanova, Karlygash; Gill, Sarjeet S.

    2009-01-01

    Using a Cry11Ba toxin model, predicted loops in domain II were analyzed for their role in receptor binding and toxicity. Peptides corresponding to loops α8, 1 and 3, but not loop 2, competed with toxin binding to Aedes midgut membranes. Mutagenesis data reveal loops α8, 1 and 3 are involved in toxicity. Loop 1 and 3 are of greater significance in toxicity to Aedes and Culex larvae than to Anopheles. Cry11Ba binds the apical membrane of larval caecae and posterior midgut, and binding can be competed by loop 1 but not by loop 2 peptides. Cry11Ba binds the same regions to which anti-cadherin antibody binds, and this antibody competes with Cry11Ba binding suggesting a possible role of cadherin in toxication. PMID:19450583

  20. An Improved PCR-Restriction Fragment Length Polymorphism (RFLP) Method for the Identification of cry1-Type Genes

    PubMed Central

    Shu, Changlong; Liu, Dongming; Zhou, Zishan; Cai, Jilin; Peng, Qi; Gao, Jiguo; Song, Fuping

    2013-01-01

    The cry1-type genes of Bacillus thuringiensis represent the largest cry gene family, which contains 50 distinct holotypes. It is becoming more and more difficult to identify cry1-type genes using current methods because of the increasing number of cry1-type genes. In the present study, an improved PCR-restriction fragment length polymorphism (PCR-RFLP) method which can distinguish 41 holotypes of cry1-type genes was developed. This improved method was used to identify cry1-type genes in 20 B. thuringiensis strains that are toxic to lepidoptera. The results showed that the improved method can efficiently identify single and clustered cry1-type genes and can be used to evaluate cry1-type genes in novel strain collections of B. thuringiensis. Among the detected cry1-type genes, we identified four novel genes, cry1Ai, cry1Bb, cry1Ja, and cry1La. The bioassay results from the expressed products of the four novel cry genes showed that Cry1Ai2, Cry1Bb2, and Cry1Ja2 were highly toxic against Plutella xylostella, whereas Cry1La2 exhibited no activity. Moreover, Cry1Ai2 had good lethal activity against Ostrinia furnacalis, Hyphantria cunea, Chilo suppressalis, and Bombyx mori larvae and considerable weight loss activity against Helicoverpa armigera. PMID:23995930

  1. Food safety assessment of Cry8Ka5 mutant protein using Cry1Ac as a control Bt protein.

    PubMed

    Farias, Davi Felipe; Viana, Martônio Ponte; Oliveira, Gustavo Ramos; Santos, Vanessa Olinto; Pinto, Clidia Eduarda Moreira; Viana, Daniel Araújo; Vasconcelos, Ilka Maria; Grossi-de-Sa, Maria Fátima; Carvalho, Ana Fontenele Urano

    2015-07-01

    Cry8Ka5 is a mutant protein from Bacillus thuringiensis (Bt) that has been proposed for developing transgenic plants due to promising activity against coleopterans, like Anthonomus grandis (the major pest of Brazilian cotton culture). Thus, an early food safety assessment of Cry8Ka5 protein could provide valuable information to support its use as a harmless biotechnological tool. This study aimed to evaluate the food safety of Cry8Ka5 protein following the two-tiered approach, based on weights of evidence, proposed by ILSI. Cry1Ac protein was used as a control Bt protein. The history of safe use revealed no convincing hazard reports for Bt pesticides and three-domain Cry proteins. The bioinformatics analysis with the primary amino acids sequence of Cry8Ka5 showed no similarity to any known toxic, antinutritional or allergenic proteins. The mode of action of Cry proteins is well understood and their fine specificity is restricted to insects. Cry8Ka5 and Cry1Ac proteins were rapidly degraded in simulated gastric fluid, but were resistant to simulated intestinal fluid and heat treatment. The LD50 for Cry8Ka5 and Cry1Ac was >5000 mg/kg body weight when administered by gavage in mice. Thus, no expected relevant risks are associated with the consumption of Cry8Ka5 protein.

  2. DNA damage shifts circadian clock time via Hausp-dependent Cry1 stabilization

    PubMed Central

    Papp, Stephanie J; Huber, Anne-Laure; Jordan, Sabine D; Kriebs, Anna; Nguyen, Madelena; Moresco, James J; Yates, John R; Lamia, Katja A

    2015-01-01

    The circadian transcriptional repressors cryptochrome 1 (Cry1) and 2 (Cry2) evolved from photolyases, bacterial light-activated DNA repair enzymes. In this study, we report that while they have lost DNA repair activity, Cry1/2 adapted to protect genomic integrity by responding to DNA damage through posttranslational modification and coordinating the downstream transcriptional response. We demonstrate that genotoxic stress stimulates Cry1 phosphorylation and its deubiquitination by Herpes virus associated ubiquitin-specific protease (Hausp, a.k.a Usp7), stabilizing Cry1 and shifting circadian clock time. DNA damage also increases Cry2 interaction with Fbxl3, destabilizing Cry2. Thus, genotoxic stress increases the Cry1/Cry2 ratio, suggesting distinct functions for Cry1 and Cry2 following DNA damage. Indeed, the transcriptional response to genotoxic stress is enhanced in Cry1−/− and blunted in Cry2−/− cells. Furthermore, Cry2−/− cells accumulate damaged DNA. These results suggest that Cry1 and Cry2, which evolved from DNA repair enzymes, protect genomic integrity via coordinated transcriptional regulation. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.04883.001 PMID:25756610

  3. [Consolation as medical intervention and its history of ideas].

    PubMed

    Weidmann, Werner; Bühler, Karl-Ernst

    2006-01-01

    A review of interpretations of "suffering" was presented after an etymological clarification of the term "consolation". The review begins with an examination of concepts of consolation in the early Greek and Roman antiquity continues with late Greek and Roman antiquity, the early and late Middle Ages, the epochs of Humanism and Reformation and the time after Reformation until to the present. Concerning concepts of consolation in the present the conception of the movement "Biblical Therapeutic Pastoral Care", Viktor Frankl's "Logotherapy" and Viktor Emil von Gebsattel's "Anthropologic Psychotherapy" are discussed. Finally, some essential features of general conceptions of consolation are presented.

  4. Dye fading test for mission control operator console displays

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lockwood, H. E.

    1975-01-01

    A dye fading test of 40 days duration was conducted to determine the effect of mission control operator console and ambient lighting effects on a series of photographic products under consideration for use in mission console operator consoles. Six different display samples, each containing 36 windows of several different colors, were prepared and placed in the mission control consoles for testing. No significant changes were recorded during the testing period. All changes were attributed to a mechanical problem with the densitometer. Detailed results are given in graphs.

  5. The console password feature for DEC workstations

    SciTech Connect

    Van Lehn, A.L.

    1993-10-01

    New VAXstations and all DECstations offer a ``hardware`` password feature that, when enabled, restricts unauthorized access to your system console terminal when turned on or restarted. VAXstation 3100s shipped after July, 1989 offer this feature. A description of this feature should be part of the Hardware User Guide for your workstation; however, some of the early systems did not document this security enhancement. This document is based on the author`s investigation as well as information provided by the Digital Equipment Corporation.

  6. Synthetic fusion-protein containing domains of Bt Cry1Ac and Allium sativum lectin (ASAL) conferred enhanced insecticidal activity against major lepidopteran pests.

    PubMed

    Tajne, Sunita; Boddupally, Dayakar; Sadumpati, Vijayakumar; Vudem, Dashavantha Reddy; Khareedu, Venkateswara Rao

    2014-02-10

    Different transgenic crop plants, developed with δ-endotoxins of Bacillus thuringiensis (Bt) and mannose-specific plant lectins, exhibited significant protection against chewing and sucking insects. In the present study, a synthetic gene (cry-asal) encoding the fusion-protein having 488 amino acids, comprising DI and DII domains from Bt Cry1Ac and Allium sativum agglutinin (ASAL), was cloned and expressed in Escherichia coli. Ligand blot analysis disclosed that the fusion-protein could bind to more number of receptors of brush border membrane vesicle (BBMV) proteins of Helicoverpa armigera. Artificial diet bioassays revealed that 0.025 μg/g and 0.50 μg/g of fusion-protein were sufficient to cause 100% mortality in Pectinophora gossypiella and H. armigera insects, respectively. As compared to Cry1Ac, the fusion-protein showed enhanced (8-fold and 30-fold) insecticidal activity against two major lepidopteran pests. Binding of fusion-protein to the additional receptors in the midgut cells of insects is attributable to its enhanced entomotoxic effect. The synthetic gene, first of its kind, appears promising and might serve as a potential candidate for engineering crop plants against major insect pests.

  7. Medusa: A Scalable MR Console Using USB

    PubMed Central

    Stang, Pascal P.; Conolly, Steven M.; Santos, Juan M.; Pauly, John M.; Scott, Greig C.

    2012-01-01

    MRI pulse sequence consoles typically employ closed proprietary hardware, software, and interfaces, making difficult any adaptation for innovative experimental technology. Yet MRI systems research is trending to higher channel count receivers, transmitters, gradient/shims, and unique interfaces for interventional applications. Customized console designs are now feasible for researchers with modern electronic components, but high data rates, synchronization, scalability, and cost present important challenges. Implementing large multi-channel MR systems with efficiency and flexibility requires a scalable modular architecture. With Medusa, we propose an open system architecture using the Universal Serial Bus (USB) for scalability, combined with distributed processing and buffering to address the high data rates and strict synchronization required by multi-channel MRI. Medusa uses a modular design concept based on digital synthesizer, receiver, and gradient blocks, in conjunction with fast programmable logic for sampling and synchronization. Medusa is a form of synthetic instrument, being reconfigurable for a variety of medical/scientific instrumentation needs. The Medusa distributed architecture, scalability, and data bandwidth limits are presented, and its flexibility is demonstrated in a variety of novel MRI applications. PMID:21954200

  8. Medusa: a scalable MR console using USB.

    PubMed

    Stang, Pascal P; Conolly, Steven M; Santos, Juan M; Pauly, John M; Scott, Greig C

    2012-02-01

    Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) pulse sequence consoles typically employ closed proprietary hardware, software, and interfaces, making difficult any adaptation for innovative experimental technology. Yet MRI systems research is trending to higher channel count receivers, transmitters, gradient/shims, and unique interfaces for interventional applications. Customized console designs are now feasible for researchers with modern electronic components, but high data rates, synchronization, scalability, and cost present important challenges. Implementing large multichannel MR systems with efficiency and flexibility requires a scalable modular architecture. With Medusa, we propose an open system architecture using the universal serial bus (USB) for scalability, combined with distributed processing and buffering to address the high data rates and strict synchronization required by multichannel MRI. Medusa uses a modular design concept based on digital synthesizer, receiver, and gradient blocks, in conjunction with fast programmable logic for sampling and synchronization. Medusa is a form of synthetic instrument, being reconfigurable for a variety of medical/scientific instrumentation needs. The Medusa distributed architecture, scalability, and data bandwidth limits are presented, and its flexibility is demonstrated in a variety of novel MRI applications.

  9. Leveraging Game Consoles for the Delivery of TBI Rehabilitation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Super, Taryn; Mastaglio, Thomas; Shen, Yuzhong; Walker, Robert

    2011-01-01

    Military personnel are at a greater risk for traumatic brain injury (TBI) than the civilian population. In addition, the increase in exposure to explosives, i.e. , improvised explosive devices, in the Afghanistan and Iraq wars, along with more effective body armor, has resulted in far more surviving casualties suffering from TBI than in previous wars. This effort presents the results of a feasibility study and early prototype of a brain injury rehabilitation delivery system (BIRDS). BIRDS is designed to provide medical personnel treating TBI with a capability to prescribe game activities for patients to execute using a commercially available game console, either in a clinical setting or in their homes. These therapeutic activities will contribute to recovery or remediation of the patients' cognitive dysfunctions. Solutions such as this that provide new applications for existing platforms have significant potential to address the growing incidence of TBI today.

  10. Assessment of potential adjuvanticity of Cry proteins.

    PubMed

    Joshi, Saurabh S; Barnett, Brian; Doerrer, Nancy G; Glenn, Kevin; Herman, Rod A; Herouet-Guicheney, Corinne; Hunst, Penny; Kough, John; Ladics, Gregory S; McClain, Scott; Papineni, Sabitha; Poulsen, Lars K; Rascle, Jean-Baptiste; Tao, Ai-Lin; van Ree, Ronald; Ward, Jason; Bowman, Christal C

    2016-08-01

    Genetically modified (GM) crops have achieved success in the marketplace and their benefits extend beyond the overall increase in harvest yields to include lowered use of insecticides and decreased carbon dioxide emissions. The most widely grown GM crops contain gene/s for targeted insect protection, herbicide tolerance, or both. Plant expression of Bacillus thuringiensis (Bt) crystal (Cry) insecticidal proteins have been the primary way to impart insect resistance in GM crops. Although deemed safe by regulatory agencies globally, previous studies have been the basis for discussions around the potential immuno-adjuvant effects of Cry proteins. These studies had limitations in study design. The studies used animal models with extremely high doses of Cry proteins, which when given using the ig route were co-administered with an adjuvant. Although the presumption exists that Cry proteins may have immunostimulatory activity and therefore an adjuvanticity risk, the evidence shows that Cry proteins are expressed at very low levels in GM crops and are unlikely to function as adjuvants. This conclusion is based on critical review of the published literature on the effects of immunomodulation by Cry proteins, the history of safe use of Cry proteins in foods, safety of the Bt donor organisms, and pre-market weight-of-evidence-based safety assessments for GM crops.

  11. 75 FR 80843 - In the Matter of Certain Gaming and Entertainment Consoles, Related Software, and Components...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-12-23

    ... COMMISSION In the Matter of Certain Gaming and Entertainment Consoles, Related Software, and Components... certain gaming and entertainment consoles, related software, and components thereof by reason of... certain gaming and entertainment consoles, related software, and components thereof that infringe one...

  12. 14. DETAIL OF EAST END OF CENTRAL CONTROL CONSOLE IN ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    14. DETAIL OF EAST END OF CENTRAL CONTROL CONSOLE IN SLC-3W CONTROL ROOM SHOWING BLANK PANEL AND COMPLEX SAFETY OFFICER PANEL. CONSOLES AND CHAIRS NEAR NORTH WALL IN BACKGROUND. - Vandenberg Air Force Base, Space Launch Complex 3, Launch Operations Building, Napa & Alden Roads, Lompoc, Santa Barbara County, CA

  13. 25. VIEW OF ATLAS CONTROL CONSOLE NEAR NORTHEAST CORNER OF ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    25. VIEW OF ATLAS CONTROL CONSOLE NEAR NORTHEAST CORNER OF SLC-3W CONTROL ROOM. CONSOLE INCLUDES TELEVISION CONTROL, FACILITIES, AND VEHICLE (MISSILE) POWER PANELS. FROM LEFT TO RIGHT IN BACKGROUND: MILITARY-TIME CLOCK, BASE OF BUNKER PERISCOPE, AND STAIRS TO ESCAPE TUNNEL. - Vandenberg Air Force Base, Space Launch Complex 3, Launch Operations Building, Napa & Alden Roads, Lompoc, Santa Barbara County, CA

  14. 27. LAUNCH CONTROL CAPSULE. ACOUSTICAL ENCLOSURE. COMMUNICATIONS CONSOLE AT LEFT; ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    27. LAUNCH CONTROL CAPSULE. ACOUSTICAL ENCLOSURE. COMMUNICATIONS CONSOLE AT LEFT; LAUNCH CONTROL CONSOLE AT RIGHT. PADLOCKED PANEL AT TOP CENTER CONTAINS MISSILE LAUNCH KEYS. SHOCK ISOLATOR AT FAR LEFT. VIEW TO EAST. - Minuteman III ICBM Launch Control Facility November-1, 1.5 miles North of New Raymer & State Highway 14, New Raymer, Weld County, CO

  15. Assessment of Infant Cry: Acoustic Cry Analysis and Parental Perception

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    LaGasse, Linda L.; Neal, A. Rebecca; Lester, Barry M.

    2005-01-01

    Infant crying signals distress to potential caretakers who can alleviate the aversive conditions that gave rise to the cry. The cry signal results from coordination among several brain regions that control respiration and vocal cord vibration from which the cry sounds are produced. Previous work has shown a relationship between acoustic…

  16. Toxicity and mode of action of Bacillus thuringiensis Cry proteins in the Mediterranean corn borer, Sesamia nonagrioides (Lefebvre).

    PubMed

    González-Cabrera, Joel; Farinós, Gema P; Caccia, Silvia; Díaz-Mendoza, Mercedes; Castañera, Pedro; Leonardi, Maria Giovanna; Giordana, Barbara; Ferré, Juan

    2006-04-01

    Sesamia nonagrioides is one of the most damaging pests of corn in Spain and other Mediterranean countries. Bt corn expressing the Bacillus thuringiensis Cry1Ab toxin is being grown on about 58,000 ha in Spain. Here we studied the mode of action of this Cry protein on S. nonagrioides (binding to specific receptors, stability of binding, and pore formation) and the modes of action of other Cry proteins that were found to be active in this work (Cry1Ac, Cry1Ca, and Cry1Fa). Binding assays were performed with (125)I- or biotin-labeled toxins and larval brush border membrane vesicles (BBMV). Competition experiments indicated that these toxins bind specifically and that Cry1Aa, Cry1Ab, and Cry1Ac share a binding site. Cry1Ca and Cry1Fa bind to different sites. In addition, Cry1Fa binds to Cry1A's binding site with very low affinity and vice versa. Binding of Cry1Ab and Cry1Ac was found to be stable over time, which indicates that the observed binding is irreversible. The pore-forming activity of Cry proteins on BBMV was determined using the voltage-sensitive fluorescent dye DiSC(3)(5). Membrane permeability increased in the presence of the active toxins Cry1Ab and Cry1Fa but not in the presence of the nonactive toxin Cry1Da. In terms of resistance management, based on our results and the fact that Cry1Ca is not toxic to Ostrinia nubilalis, we recommend pyramiding of Cry1Ab with Cry1Fa in the same Bt corn plant for better long-term control of corn borers.

  17. Toxicity and Mode of Action of Bacillus thuringiensis Cry Proteins in the Mediterranean Corn Borer, Sesamia nonagrioides (Lefebvre)

    PubMed Central

    González-Cabrera, Joel; Farinós, Gema P.; Caccia, Silvia; Díaz-Mendoza, Mercedes; Castañera, Pedro; Leonardi, Maria Giovanna; Giordana, Barbara; Ferré, Juan

    2006-01-01

    Sesamia nonagrioides is one of the most damaging pests of corn in Spain and other Mediterranean countries. Bt corn expressing the Bacillus thuringiensis Cry1Ab toxin is being grown on about 58,000 ha in Spain. Here we studied the mode of action of this Cry protein on S. nonagrioides (binding to specific receptors, stability of binding, and pore formation) and the modes of action of other Cry proteins that were found to be active in this work (Cry1Ac, Cry1Ca, and Cry1Fa). Binding assays were performed with 125I- or biotin-labeled toxins and larval brush border membrane vesicles (BBMV). Competition experiments indicated that these toxins bind specifically and that Cry1Aa, Cry1Ab, and Cry1Ac share a binding site. Cry1Ca and Cry1Fa bind to different sites. In addition, Cry1Fa binds to Cry1A's binding site with very low affinity and vice versa. Binding of Cry1Ab and Cry1Ac was found to be stable over time, which indicates that the observed binding is irreversible. The pore-forming activity of Cry proteins on BBMV was determined using the voltage-sensitive fluorescent dye DiSC3(5). Membrane permeability increased in the presence of the active toxins Cry1Ab and Cry1Fa but not in the presence of the nonactive toxin Cry1Da. In terms of resistance management, based on our results and the fact that Cry1Ca is not toxic to Ostrinia nubilalis, we recommend pyramiding of Cry1Ab with Cry1Fa in the same Bt corn plant for better long-term control of corn borers. PMID:16597962

  18. Baby-Crying Acceptance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martins, Tiago; de Magalhães, Sérgio Tenreiro

    The baby's crying is his most important mean of communication. The crying monitoring performed by devices that have been developed doesn't ensure the complete safety of the child. It is necessary to join, to these technological resources, means of communicating the results to the responsible, which would involve the digital processing of information available from crying. The survey carried out, enabled to understand the level of adoption, in the continental territory of Portugal, of a technology that will be able to do such a digital processing. It was used the TAM as the theoretical referential. The statistical analysis showed that there is a good probability of acceptance of such a system.

  19. Circadian clock gene CRY2 degradation is involved in chemoresistance of colorectal cancer

    PubMed Central

    Fang, Lekun; Yang, Zihuan; Zhou, Junyi; Tung, Jung-Yu; Hsiao, Chwan-Deng; Wang, Lei; Deng, Yanhong; Wang, Puning; Wang, Jianping; Lee, Mong-Hong

    2015-01-01

    Biomarkers for predicting chemotherapy response are important to treatment of colorectal cancer (CRC) patients. Cryptochrome 2 (CRY2) is a circadian clock protein involved in cell cycle, but the biological consequences of this activity in cancer are poorly understood. We set up biochemical and cell biology analyses to analyze CRY2 expression and chemoresistance. Here we report that CRY2 is overexpressed in chemoresistant CRC samples, and CRY2 overexpression is correlated with poor patient survival. Knockdown CRY2 increased colorectal cancer sensitivity to oxaliplatin in colorectal cancer cell. We also identify FBXW7 as a novel E3 ubiquitin ligase for targeting CRY2 through proteasomal degradation. Mechanistic studies show that CRY2 is regulated by FBXW7, in which FBXW7 binds directly to phosphorylated Thr300 of CRY2. Furthermore, FBXW7 expression leads to degradation of CRY2 through enhancing CRY2 ubiquitination and accelerating CRY2’s turnover rate. High expressed FBXW7 downregulates CRY2 and increases colorectal cancer cells sensitivity to chemotherapy. Low FBXW7 expression is correlated with high CRY2 expression in CRC patient samples. Also, low FBXW7 expression is correlated with poor patient survival. Taken together, our findings indicate that the upregulation of CRY2 caused by downregulation of FBXW7 may be a novel prognostic biomarker and may represent a new therapeutic target in colorectal cancer. PMID:25855785

  20. Circadian Clock Gene CRY2 Degradation Is Involved in Chemoresistance of Colorectal Cancer.

    PubMed

    Fang, Lekun; Yang, Zihuan; Zhou, Junyi; Tung, Jung-Yu; Hsiao, Chwan-Deng; Wang, Lei; Deng, Yanhong; Wang, Puning; Wang, Jianping; Lee, Mong-Hong

    2015-06-01

    Biomarkers for predicting chemotherapy response are important to the treatment of colorectal cancer patients. Cryptochrome 2 (CRY2) is a circadian clock protein involved in cell cycle, but the biologic consequences of this activity in cancer are poorly understood. We set up biochemical and cell biology analyses to analyze CRY2 expression and chemoresistance. Here, we report that CRY2 is overexpressed in chemoresistant colorectal cancer samples, and CRY2 overexpression is correlated with poor patient survival. Knockdown of CRY2 increased colorectal cancer sensitivity to oxaliplatin in colorectal cancer cells. We also identify FBXW7 as a novel E3 ubiquitin ligase for targeting CRY2 through proteasomal degradation. Mechanistic studies show that CRY2 is regulated by FBXW7, in which FBXW7 binds directly to phosphorylated Thr300 of CRY2. Furthermore, FBXW7 expression leads to degradation of CRY2 through enhancing CRY2 ubiquitination and accelerating the CRY2's turnover rate. High FBXW7 expression downregulates CRY2 and increases colorectal cancer cells' sensitivity to chemotherapy. Low FBXW7 expression is correlated with high CRY2 expression in colorectal cancer patient samples. Also, low FBXW7 expression is correlated with poor patient survival. Taken together, our findings indicate that the upregulation of CRY2 caused by downregulation of FBXW7 may be a novel prognostic biomarker and may represent a new therapeutic target in colorectal cancer.

  1. 32. Launch Control Center, commander's console. Note launch key at ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    32. Launch Control Center, commander's console. Note launch key at right. Lyon - Whiteman Air Force Base, Oscar O-1 Minuteman Missile Alert Facility, Southeast corner of Twelfth & Vendenberg Avenues, Knob Noster, Johnson County, MO

  2. 31. Launch Control Center, deputy commander's console. Lyon Whiteman ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    31. Launch Control Center, deputy commander's console. Lyon - Whiteman Air Force Base, Oscar O-1 Minuteman Missile Alert Facility, Southeast corner of Twelfth & Vendenberg Avenues, Knob Noster, Johnson County, MO

  3. 12. ENGINE TEST CELL BUILDING INTERIOR. DETAIL OF CONTROL CONSOLE ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    12. ENGINE TEST CELL BUILDING INTERIOR. DETAIL OF CONTROL CONSOLE FOR ENGINE TEST CELL 4. LOOKING NORTH. - Fairchild Air Force Base, Engine Test Cell Building, Near intersection of Arnold Street & George Avenue, Spokane, Spokane County, WA

  4. The amount of consolation compensation in road traffic accidents.

    PubMed

    Jou, Rong-Chang

    2014-06-01

    This study aimed to investigate the amount of consolation compensation that road accident perpetrators were willing to pay victims. It used 2010 statistics for general road accidents from Taiwan's National Police Agency (NPA) for further sampling and to mail questionnaires. In investigating consolation compensation, the framework of the contingent valuation method was used, and the data were collected through the design of different scenarios. In this study, five injury levels were designed to further analyse the consolation compensation price the perpetrators were willing to pay: minor injury, moderate injury, serious injury, disability, and death. The results revealed the price that many perpetrators were willing to pay was zero; however, we overcame this issue by using the Spike model. The estimated results showed that road accident perpetrators were willing to pay more consolation compensation with increased injury severity.

  5. Detail, north end of console and pneumatic tube message port, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Detail, north end of console and pneumatic tube message port, also showing mirror to reflect view of communications switchboard - March Air Force Base, Strategic Air Command, Combat Operations Center, 5220 Riverside Drive, Moreno Valley, Riverside County, CA

  6. View looking northeast of console table and mirror flanked by ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    View looking northeast of console table and mirror flanked by 18th century French chairs in the first floor Reception Hall - Perry Belmont House, 1618 New Hampshire Avenue, NW, Washington, District of Columbia, DC

  7. 11. DETAIL OF TERRACOTTA DECORATION, SHOWING SCROLL CONSOLE, WAVE ORNAMENT, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    11. DETAIL OF TERRACOTTA DECORATION, SHOWING SCROLL CONSOLE, WAVE ORNAMENT, EGG-AND-DART, NYMPH HEADS AND FOLIATE PATTERN AROUND WINDOWS - City Hall, Atlantic & Tennessee Avenues, Atlantic City, Atlantic County, NJ

  8. MTR BASEMENT. GENERAL ELECTRIC CONTROL CONSOLE FOR AIRCRAFT NUCLEAR PROPULSION ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    MTR BASEMENT. GENERAL ELECTRIC CONTROL CONSOLE FOR AIRCRAFT NUCLEAR PROPULSION EXPERIMENT NO. 1. INL NEGATIVE NO. 6510. Unknown Photographer, 9/29/1959 - Idaho National Engineering Laboratory, Test Reactor Area, Materials & Engineering Test Reactors, Scoville, Butte County, ID

  9. 2. CONTROL ROOM INTERIOR, CONSOLE AND MONITORS. Looking west. ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    2. CONTROL ROOM INTERIOR, CONSOLE AND MONITORS. Looking west. - Edwards Air Force Base, Air Force Rocket Propulsion Laboratory, Control Center, Test Area 1-115, near Altair & Saturn Boulevards, Boron, Kern County, CA

  10. View southwest operator's console and button boards within the periphery ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    View southwest operator's console and button boards within the periphery of the load dispatch model board. - Thirtieth Street Station, Load Dispatch Center, Thirtieth & Market Streets, Railroad Station, Amtrak (formerly Pennsylvania Railroad Station), Philadelphia, Philadelphia County, PA

  11. Console Room, looking southwesterly into Highbay Generator Room Beale ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Console Room, looking southwesterly into Highbay Generator Room - Beale Air Force Base, Perimeter Acquisition Vehicle Entry Phased-Array Warning System, Power Plant, End of Spencer Paul Road, north of Warren Shingle Road (14th Street), Marysville, Yuba County, CA

  12. 68. VIEW OF CONSOLE CONTAINING OPERATIONS AND CHECKOUT, RANGE SAFETY, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    68. VIEW OF CONSOLE CONTAINING OPERATIONS AND CHECKOUT, RANGE SAFETY, AND BATTERY CLOCK PANELS SHOWING INDEPENDENT POWER SUPPLY IN CABINETS BENEATH PANELS. FOOT PEDAL FOR CONTROLLING COMMUNICATIONS HEADSET VISIBLE IN FRONT OF LEFT CABINET. THIS CONSOLE LOCATED NEAR THE MIDDLE OF THE WEST WALL OF SLC-3E CONTROL ROOM. - Vandenberg Air Force Base, Space Launch Complex 3, Launch Operations Building, Napa & Alden Roads, Lompoc, Santa Barbara County, CA

  13. Npas4 Is Activated by Melatonin, and Drives the Clock Gene Cry1 in the Ovine Pars Tuberalis

    PubMed Central

    West, A.; Dupré, S.M.; Yu, L.; Paton, I.R.; Miedzinska, K.; McNeilly, A.S.; Davis, J.R.E.

    2013-01-01

    Seasonal mammals integrate changes in the duration of nocturnal melatonin secretion to drive annual physiologic cycles. Melatonin receptors within the proximal pituitary region, the pars tuberalis (PT), are essential in regulating seasonal neuroendocrine responses. In the ovine PT, melatonin is known to influence acute changes in transcriptional dynamics coupled to the onset (dusk) and offset (dawn) of melatonin secretion, leading to a potential interval-timing mechanism capable of decoding changes in day length (photoperiod). Melatonin offset at dawn is linked to cAMP accumulation, which directly induces transcription of the clock gene Per1. The rise of melatonin at dusk induces a separate and distinct cohort, including the clock-regulated genes Cry1 and Nampt, but little is known of the up-stream mechanisms involved. Here, we used next-generation sequencing of the ovine PT transcriptome at melatonin onset and identified Npas4 as a rapidly induced basic helix-loop-helix Per-Arnt-Sim domain transcription factor. In vivo we show nuclear localization of NPAS4 protein in presumptive melatonin target cells of the PT (α-glycoprotein hormone-expressing cells), whereas in situ hybridization studies identified acute and transient expression in the PT of Npas4 in response to melatonin. In vitro, NPAS4 forms functional dimers with basic helix loop helix-PAS domain cofactors aryl hydrocarbon receptor nuclear translocator (ARNT), ARNT2, and ARNTL, transactivating both Cry1 and Nampt ovine promoter reporters. Using a combination of 5′-deletions and site-directed mutagenesis, we show NPAS4-ARNT transactivation to be codependent upon two conserved central midline elements within the Cry1 promoter. Our data thus reveal NPAS4 as a candidate immediate early-response gene in the ovine PT, driving molecular responses to melatonin. PMID:23598442

  14. Reconciliation, consolation and postconflict behavioral specificity in chimpanzees.

    PubMed

    Fraser, Orlaith N; Aureli, Filippo

    2008-12-01

    Conflicts of interest arise regularly in the lives of all group-living animals and may escalate into aggressive conflicts. The costs of aggressive escalation can be reduced through peaceful postconflict interactions. This study investigated the postconflict behavior of 22 adult chimpanzees at Chester Zoo. The occurrence of reconciliation, i.e. the postconflict affiliative reunion between conflict opponents, and consolation, i.e. a postconflict affiliative interaction directed from a third party to the recipient of aggression, were demonstrated. Consolation was more likely to occur in the absence of reconciliation than after reconciliation, and reconciliation was more likely to occur in the absence of consolation than after consolation, supporting the hypothesis that consolation acts as a substitute for reconciliation when the latter fails to occur. Evidence for behavioral specificity, i.e. context-specific use of certain behaviors, was found for both reconciliation and consolation, which, along with high conciliatory tendencies, suggests an explicit style of postconflict behavior in the study subjects.

  15. Toxicological, Biochemical, and Histopathological Analyses Demonstrating That Cry1C and Cry2A Are Not Toxic to Larvae of the Honeybee, Apis mellifera.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yuan-Yuan; Li, Yun-He; Huang, Zachary Y; Chen, Xiu-Ping; Romeis, Jörg; Dai, Ping-Li; Peng, Yu-Fa

    2015-07-15

    The honey bee, Apis mellifera, is commonly used as a test species for the regulatory risk assessment of insect-resistant genetically engineered (IRGE) plants. In the current study, a dietary exposure assay was developed, validated, and used to assess the potential toxicity of Cry1C and Cry2A proteins from Bacillus thuringiensis (Bt) to A. mellifera larvae; Cry1C and Cry2A are produced by different IRGE crops. The assay, which uses the soybean trypsin inhibitor (SBTI) as a positive control and bovine serum albumin (BSA) as a negative control, was used to measure the responses of A. mellifera larvae to high concentrations of Cry1C and Cry2A. Survival was reduced and development was delayed when larvae were fed SBTI (1 mg/g diet) but were unaffected when larvae were fed BSA (400 μg/g), Cry1C (50 μg/g), or Cry2A (400 μg/g). The enzymatic activities of A. mellifera larvae were not altered and their midgut brush border membranes (BBMs) were not damaged after being fed with diets containing BSA, Cry1C, or Cry2A; however, enzymatic activities were increased and BBMs were damaged when diets contained SBTI. The study confirms that Cry1C and Cry2A have no acute toxicity to A. mellifera larvae at concentrations >10 times higher than those detected in pollen from Bt plants.

  16. Diversity in gut microflora of Helicoverpa armigera populations from different regions in relation to biological activity of Bacillus thuringiensis δ-endotoxin Cry1Ac.

    PubMed

    Paramasiva, Inakarla; Shouche, Yogesh; Kulkarni, Girish Jayant; Krishnayya, Pulipaka Venkata; Akbar, Shaik Mohammed; Sharma, Hari Chand

    2014-12-01

    Transgenic crops expressing toxin proteins from Bacillus thuringiensis (Bt) have been deployed on a large scale for management of Helicoverpa armigera. Resistance to Bt toxins has been documented in several papers, and therefore, we examined the role of midgut microflora of H. armigera in its susceptibility to Bt toxins. The susceptibility of H. armigera to Bt toxin Cry1Ac was assessed using Log-dose-Probit analysis, and the microbial communities were identified by 16S rRNA sequencing. The H. armigera populations from nine locations harbored diverse microbial communities, and had some unique bacteria, suggesting a wide geographical variation in microbial community in the midgut of the pod borer larvae. Phylotypes belonging to 32 genera were identified in the H. armigera midgut in field populations from nine locations. Bacteria belonging to Enterobacteriaceae (Order Bacillales) were present in all the populations, and these may be the common members of the H. armigera larval midgut microflora. Presence and/or absence of certain species were linked to H. armigera susceptibility to Bt toxins, but there were no clear trends across locations. Variation in susceptibility of F1 neonates of H. armigera from different locations to the Bt toxin Cry1Ac was found to be 3.4-fold. These findings support the idea that insect migut microflora may influence the biological activity of Bt toxins.

  17. Crying in Newborn and Young Infants.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Michelsson, Katarina

    1988-01-01

    Discusses the reasons that newborns and young infants cry, the communicative effect and perception of crying, crying in sick and healthy infants, the sound spectograph, and crying for the use of clinical diagnostics. (RJC)

  18. The interaction of two-spotted spider mites, Tetranychus urticae Koch, with Cry protein production and predation by Amblyseius andersoni (Chant) in Cry1Ac/Cry2Ab cotton and Cry1F maize.

    PubMed

    Guo, Yan-Yan; Tian, Jun-Ce; Shi, Wang-Peng; Dong, Xue-Hui; Romeis, Jörg; Naranjo, Steven E; Hellmich, Richard L; Shelton, Anthony M

    2016-02-01

    Crops producing insecticidal crystal (Cry) proteins from the bacterium, Bacillus thuringiensis (Bt), are an important tool for managing lepidopteran pests on cotton and maize. However, the effects of these Bt crops on non-target organisms, especially natural enemies that provide biological control services, are required to be addressed in an environmental risk assessment. Amblyseius andersoni (Acari: Phytoseiidae) is a cosmopolitan predator of the two-spotted spider mite, Tetranychus urticae (Acari: Tetranychidae), a significant pest of cotton and maize. Tri-trophic studies were conducted to assess the potential effects of Cry1Ac/Cry2Ab cotton and Cry1F maize on life history parameters (survival rate, development time, fecundity and egg hatching rate) of A. andersoni. We confirmed that these Bt crops have no effects on the biology of T. urticae and, in turn, that there were no differences in any of the life history parameters of A. andersoni when it fed on T. urticae feeding on Cry1Ac/Cry2Ab or non-Bt cotton and Cry1F or non-Bt maize. Use of a susceptible insect assay demonstrated that T. urticae contained biologically active Cry proteins. Cry proteins concentrations declined greatly as they moved from plants to herbivores to predators and protein concentration did not appear to be related to mite density. Free-choice experiments revealed that A. andersoni had no preference for Cry1Ac/Cry2Ab cotton or Cry1F maize-reared T. urticae compared with those reared on non-Bt cotton or maize. Collectively these results provide strong evidence that these crops can complement other integrated pest management tactics including biological control.

  19. Neural Circuits Underlying Crying and Cry Responding in Mammals

    PubMed Central

    Newman, John D.

    2007-01-01

    Crying is a universal vocalization in human infants, as well as in the infants of other mammals. Little is known about the neural structures underlying cry production, or the circuitry that mediates a caregiver’s response to cry sounds. In this review, the specific structures known or suspected to be involved in this circuit are identified, along with neurochemical systems and hormones for which evidence suggests a role in responding to infants and infant cries. In addition, evidence that crying elicits parental responses in different mammals is presented. An argument is made for including ‘crying’ as a functional category in the vocal repertoire of all mammalian infants (and the adults of some species). The prevailing neural model for crying production considers forebrain structures to be dispensable. However, evidence for the anterior cingulate gyrus in cry production, and this structure along with the amygdala and some other forebrain areas in responding to cries is presented. PMID:17363076

  20. Structural and Biophysical Characterization of Bacillus thuringiensis Insecticidal Proteins Cry34Ab1 and Cry35Ab1

    PubMed Central

    Kelker, Matthew S.; Berry, Colin; Evans, Steven L.; Pai, Reetal; McCaskill, David G.; Wang, Nick X.; Russell, Joshua C.; Baker, Matthew D.; Yang, Cheng; Pflugrath, J. W.; Wade, Matthew; Wess, Tim J.; Narva, Kenneth E.

    2014-01-01

    Bacillus thuringiensis strains are well known for the production of insecticidal proteins upon sporulation and these proteins are deposited in parasporal crystalline inclusions. The majority of these insect-specific toxins exhibit three domains in the mature toxin sequence. However, other Cry toxins are structurally and evolutionarily unrelated to this three-domain family and little is known of their three dimensional structures, limiting our understanding of their mechanisms of action and our ability to engineer the proteins to enhance their function. Among the non-three domain Cry toxins, the Cry34Ab1 and Cry35Ab1 proteins from B. thuringiensis strain PS149B1 are required to act together to produce toxicity to the western corn rootworm (WCR) Diabrotica virgifera virgifera Le Conte via a pore forming mechanism of action. Cry34Ab1 is a protein of ∼14 kDa with features of the aegerolysin family (Pfam06355) of proteins that have known membrane disrupting activity, while Cry35Ab1 is a ∼44 kDa member of the toxin_10 family (Pfam05431) that includes other insecticidal proteins such as the binary toxin BinA/BinB. The Cry34Ab1/Cry35Ab1 proteins represent an important seed trait technology having been developed as insect resistance traits in commercialized corn hybrids for control of WCR. The structures of Cry34Ab1 and Cry35Ab1 have been elucidated to 2.15 Å and 1.80 Å resolution, respectively. The solution structures of the toxins were further studied by small angle X-ray scattering and native electrospray ion mobility mass spectrometry. We present here the first published structure from the aegerolysin protein domain family and the structural comparisons of Cry34Ab1 and Cry35Ab1 with other pore forming toxins. PMID:25390338

  1. A Binding Site for Bacillus thuringiensis Cry1Ab Toxin Is Lost during Larval Development in Two Forest Pests

    PubMed Central

    Rausell, Carolina; Martínez-Ramírez, Amparo Consuelo; García-Robles, Inmaculada; Real, María Dolores

    2000-01-01

    The insecticidal activity and receptor binding properties of Bacillus thuringiensis Cry1A toxins towards the forest pests Thaumetopoea pityocampa (processionary moth) and Lymantria monacha (nun moth) were investigated. Cry1Aa, Cry1Ab, and Cry1Ac were highly toxic (corresponding 50% lethal concentration values: 956, 895, and 379 pg/μl, respectively) to first-instar T. pityocampa larvae. During larval development, Cry1Ab and Cry1Ac toxicity decreased with increasing age, although the loss of activity was more pronounced for Cry1Ab. Binding assays with 125I-labelled Cry1Ab and brush border membrane vesicles from T. pityocampa first- and last-instar larvae detected a remarkable decrease in the overall Cry1Ab binding affinity in last-instar larvae, although saturable Cry1Ab binding to both instars was observed. Homologous competition experiments demonstrated the loss of one of the two Cry1Ab high-affinity binding sites detected in first-instar larvae. Growth inhibition assays with sublethal doses of Cry1Aa, Cry1Ab, and Cry1Ac in L. monacha showed that all three toxins were able to delay molting from second instar to third instar. Specific saturable binding of Cry1Ab was detected only in first- and second-instar larvae. Cry1Ab binding was not detected in last-instar larvae, although specific binding of Cry1Aa and Cry1Ac was observed. These results demonstrate a loss of Cry1Ab binding sites during development on the midgut epithelium of T. pityocampa and L. monacha, correlating in T. pityocampa with a decrease in Cry1Ab toxicity with increasing age. PMID:10742241

  2. Design and construction of a synthetic Bacillus thuringiensis Cry4Aa gene: hyperexpression in Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Hayakawa, Tohru; Howlader, Mohammad Tofazzal Hossain; Yamagiwa, Masashi; Sakai, Hiroshi

    2008-10-01

    Cry4Aa produced by Bacillus thuringiensis is a dipteran-specific toxin and is, therefore, of great interest for developing a bioinsecticide to control mosquitoes. However, the expression of Cry4Aa in Escherichia coli is relatively low, which is a major disadvantage in its development as a bioinsecticide. In this study, to establish an effective production system, a 1,914-bp modified gene (cry4Aa-S1) encoding Cry4Aa was designed and synthesized in accordance with the G + C content and codon preference of E. coli genes without altering the encoded amino acid sequence. The cry4Aa-S1 gene allowed a significant improvement in expression level, over five-fold, compared to that of the original cry4Aa gene. The product of the cry4Aa-S1 gene showed the same level of insecticidal activity against Culex pipiens larvae as that from cry4Aa. This suggested that unfavorable codon usage was one of the reasons for poor expression of cry4Aa in E. coli, and, therefore, changing the cry4Aa codons to accord with the codon usage in E. coli led to efficient production of Cry4Aa. Efficient production of Cry4Aa in E. coli can be a powerful measure to prepare a sufficient amount of Cry4Aa protein for both basic analytical and applied researches.

  3. Where can I find consolation? A theoretical analysis of the meaning of consolation as experienced by job in the Book of Job in the Hebrew Bible.

    PubMed

    Roxberg, Åsa; Brunt, David; Rask, Mikael; da Silva, António Barbosa

    2013-03-01

    The aim of the study was to explore the meaning of consolation as experienced by Job in the Book of Job and as presented in literature and how consolation relates to suffering and care. The study's theoretical design applied Ricoeur's view on phenomenology and hermeneutics. The resulting themes were as follows: consolation that is present, that originates in confrontation, that keeps suffering at a distance, that does not alleviate suffering, that originates in experience from giving comfort, and that facilitates a change of perspective. The authentic and caring consolation accepts the sufferer's incomprehensible "otherness" but however provides no answers about how to console.

  4. Power console development for NASA's electric propulsion outreach program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pinero, Luis R.; Patterson, Michael J.; Satterwhite, Vincent E.

    1993-01-01

    NASA LeRC is developing a 30 cm diameter xenon ion thruster for auxiliary and primary propulsion applications. To maximize expectations for user-acceptance of ion propulsion technology, NASA LeRC, through their Electric Propulsion Outreach Program, is providing sectors of industry with portable power consoles for operation of 5 KW-class xenon ion thrusters. This power console provides all necessary functions to permit thruster operations over a 0.5-5 KW envelope under both manual and automated control. These functions include the following: discharge, cathode heater, neutralizer keeper, and neutralizer heater currents, screen and accelerator voltages, and a gas feed system to regulate and control propellant flow to the thruster. An electronic circuit monitors screen and accelerator currents and controls arcing events. The power console was successfully integrated with the NASA 30 cm thruster.

  5. Close up view of the center console on the flight ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Close up view of the center console on the flight deck of the Orbiter Discovery showing the console's instrumentation and controls. The commanders station is located to the left in this view and the pilot's station is to the right in the view. The handle and lever located on the right side of the center console and towards its front is one of a pair, the commander has one on the left of his seat in his station, of Speed Brake/Thrust Controllers. These are dual purpose controllers. During ascent the controller can be use to throttle the main engines and during entry the controllers can be used to control aerodynamic drag by opening or closing the orbiter's speed brake. - Space Transportation System, Orbiter Discovery (OV-103), Lyndon B. Johnson Space Center, 2101 NASA Parkway, Houston, Harris County, TX

  6. Evaluation of cytotoxic and antimicrobial effects of two Bt Cry proteins on a GMO safety perspective.

    PubMed

    Farias, Davi Felipe; Viana, Martônio Ponte; de Oliveira, Gustavo Ramos; Beneventi, Magda Aparecida; Soares, Bruno Marques; Pessoa, Claudia; Pessoa, Igor Parra; Silva, Luciano Paulino; Vasconcelos, Ilka Maria; de Sá, Maria Fátima Grossi; Carvalho, Ana Fontenele Urano

    2014-01-01

    Studies have contested the innocuousness of Bacillus thuringiensis (Bt) Cry proteins to mammalian cells as well as to mammals microbiota. Thus, this study aimed to evaluate the cytotoxic and antimicrobial effects of two Cry proteins, Cry8Ka5 (a novel mutant protein) and Cry1Ac (a widely distributed protein in GM crops). Evaluation of cyto- and genotoxicity in human lymphocytes was performed as well as hemolytic activity coupled with cellular membrane topography analysis in mammal erythrocytes. Effects of Cry8Ka5 and Cry1Ac upon Artemia sp. nauplii and upon bacteria and yeast growth were assessed. The toxins caused no significant effects on the viability (IC50 > 1,000 µg/mL) or to the cellular DNA integrity of lymphocytes (no effects at 1,000 µg/mL). The Cry8Ka5 and Cry1Ac proteins did not cause severe damage to erythrocytes, neither with hemolysis (IC50 > 1,000 µg/mL) nor with alterations in the membrane. Likewise, the Cry8Ka5 and Cry1Ac proteins presented high LC50 (755.11 and >1,000 µg/mL, resp.) on the brine shrimp lethality assay and showed no growth inhibition of the microorganisms tested (MIC > 1,000 µg/mL). This study contributed with valuable information on the effects of Cry8Ka5 and Cry1Ac proteins on nontarget organisms, which reinforce their potential for safe biotechnological applications.

  7. Proteomic analysis of Cry2Aa-binding proteins and their receptor function in Spodoptera exigua

    PubMed Central

    Qiu, Lin; Zhang, Boyao; Liu, Lang; Ma, Weihua; Wang, Xiaoping; Lei, Chaoliang; Chen, Lizhen

    2017-01-01

    The bacterium Bacillus thuringiensis produces Crystal (Cry) proteins that are toxic to a diverse range of insects. Transgenic crops that produce Bt Cry proteins are grown worldwide because of their improved resistance to insect pests. Although Bt “pyramid” cotton that produces both Cry1A and Cry2A is predicted to be more resistant to several lepidopteran pests, including Spodoptera exigua, than plants that produce Cry1Ac alone, the mechanisms responsible for the toxicity of Cry2Aa in S. exigua are not well understood. We identified several proteins that bind Cry2Aa (polycalin, V-ATPase subunits A and B, actin, 4-hydroxybutyrate CoA-transferase [4-HB-CoAT]), and a receptor for activated protein kinase C (Rack), in S. exigua. Recombinant, expressed versions of these proteins were able to bind the Cry2Aa toxin in vitro assays. RNA interference gene knockdown of the Se-V-ATPase subunit B significantly decreased the susceptibility of S. exigua larvae to Cry2Aa, whereas knockdown of the other putative binding proteins did not. Moreover, an in vitro homologous competition assay demonstrated that the Se-V-ATPase subunit B binds specifically to the Cry2Aa toxin, suggesting that this protein acts as a functional receptor of Cry2Aa in S. exigua. This the first Cry2Aa toxin receptor identified in S. exigua brush-border membrane vesicles. PMID:28067269

  8. Toxicological and biochemical analyses demonstrate no toxic effect of Cry1C and Cry2A to Folsomia candida

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Yan; Chen, Xiuping; Cheng, Lisheng; Cao, Fengqin; Romeis, Jörg; Li, Yunhe; Peng, Yufa

    2015-01-01

    Collembolans are common soil arthropods that may be exposed to insecticidal proteins produced in genetically engineered (GE) plants by ingestion of crop residues or root exudates. In the present study, a dietary exposure assay was validated and used to assess the lethal and sublethal effects of two Bacillus thuringiensis (Bt) insecticidal proteins, Cry1C and Cry2A, on Folsomia candida. Using the insecticidal compounds potassium arsenate (PA), protease inhibitor (E-64), and Galanthus nivalis agglutinin (GNA) mixed into Baker’s yeast, we show that the assay used can detect adverse effects on F. candida. Survival and development were significantly reduced when F. candida was fed a diet containing PA, E-64, and GNA at 9, 75, and 100 μg/g diet, respectively, but not when fed a diet containing 300 μg/g Cry1C or 600 μg/g Cry2A. The activities of test antioxidant-, detoxification-, and digestion-related enzymes in F. candida were unaltered by a diet containing 300 μg/g Cry1C or 600 μg/g Cry2A, but were significantly increased by a diet containing 75 μg/g E-64. The results confirm that Cry1C and Cry2A are not toxic to F. candida at concentrations that are much higher than those encountered under field conditions. PMID:26494315

  9. ATV Engineering Support Team Safety Console Preparation for the Johannes Kepler Mission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chase, R.; Oliefka, L.

    2010-09-01

    This paper describes the improvements to be implemented in the Safety console position of the Engineering Support Team(EST) at the Automated Transfer Vehicle(ATV) Control Centre(ATV-CC) for the upcoming ATV Johannes Kepler mission. The ATV missions to the International Space Station are monitored and controlled from the ATV-CC in Toulouse, France. The commanding of ATV is performed by the Vehicle Engineering Team(VET) in the main control room under authority of the Flight Director. The EST performs a monitoring function in a room beside the main control room. One of the EST positions is the Safety console, which is staffed by safety engineers from ESA and the industrial prime contractor, Astrium. The function of the Safety console is to check whether the hazard controls are available throughout the mission as required by the Hazard Reports approved by the ISS Safety Review Panel. Safety console preparation activities were limited prior to the first ATV mission due to schedule constraints, and the safety engineers involved have been working to improve the readiness for ATV 2. The following steps have been taken or are in process, and will be described in this paper: • review of the implementation of Operations Control Agreement Documents(OCADs) that record the way operational hazard controls are performed to meet the needs of the Hazard Reports(typically in Flight Rules and Crew Procedures), • crosscheck of operational control needs and implementations with respect to ATV's first flight observations and post flight evaluations, with a view to identifying additional, obsolete or revised operational hazard controls, • participation in the Flight Rule review and update process carried out between missions, • participation in the assessment of anomalies observed during the first ATV mission, to ensure that any impacts are addressed in the ATV 2 safety documentation, • preparation of a Safety console handbook to provide lists of important safety aspects to be

  10. [Psychological effects of emotional crying in adults: events that elicit crying and social reactions to crying].

    PubMed

    Sawada, Tadayuki; Matsuo, Koichiro; Hashimoto, Iwao

    2012-02-01

    This research focused on both the psychological benefits and costs of crying. We investigated the relationships of intrapersonal and interpersonal consequences of crying. Female nurses (N = 300) were requested to describe one of the most impressive negative episodes where they had cried. Then, they were asked to complete a questionnaire including a scale of their psychological changes after the crying episode and the social reactions when they cried. Factor analysis revealed five components of the psychological changes scale. Solitary crying had greater effects for both psychological benefits and costs after crying than crying in front of others. Factor analysis revealed three components of the scale of social reactions. When they cried in front of others, "catharsis", "positive attitude", and "recognition of the relationship with others" after crying were associated with "empathy and social support" from others. The factors of "recognition of negative reality" and "negative attitude" were associated with "criticism and slander" from others. These results were discussed in terms of the communicative functions and the reflective functions of adult crying.

  11. Effect of englitazone on KATP and calcium-activated non-selective cation channels in CRI-G1 insulin-secreting cells.

    PubMed

    Rowe, I C; Lee, K; Khan, R N; Ashford, M L

    1997-06-01

    1. The effects of englitazone sodium, an antidiabetic agent, on ion channel activity in the CRI-G1 insulin secreting cell line was examined by use of the patch clamp technique. 2. Application of englitazone to the outside of CRI-G1 cells in the whole-cell recording configuration produced concentration-dependent inhibition of KATP currents with an IC50 value of 8 microM. The inhibition of the K+ current was not affected by the removal of Mg2+ ions from or the addition of trypsin to the solution bathing the intracellular surface of the cell membrane. 3. Englitazone also inhibited KATP channel activity in recordings from inside out excise membrane patches. The concentration-dependence of inhibition was identical to that observed in whole-cell recordings and was voltage-independent. Single channel recordings confirmed that neither the absence or presence of Mg2+ ions nor the addition of trypsin at the intracellular surface of the membrane influenced the inhibition of KATP channels by englitazone. 4. Englitazone also inhibited Ca(2+)-activated non-selective cation (NSCa) channels in inside-out patches in a concentration-dependent and voltage-independent manner with an IC50 value of 10 microM. In comparison, the non-sulphonylurea KATP channel blocker ciclazindol produced a slight voltage-dependent inhibition of the NSCa channel at a concentration of 20 microM. 5. In whole-cell recordings englitazone, at a relatively high concentration (50 microM) in comparison with that required to block KATP and NSCa channels, inhibited voltage-activated Ca2+ currents by 33% but did not inhibit voltage-activated K+ and Na+ currents. 6. It is concluded that englitazone is a novel blocker of NSCa and KATP channels. The inhibition of KATP channels occurs following procedures that dissociate sulphonylurea receptor coupling to the channel. The equipotent and voltage-independent inhibition of NSCa and KATP channels by englitazone may indicate a common mechanism of block.

  12. 34. Launch Control Center, bottom of drawer of commander's console, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    34. Launch Control Center, bottom of drawer of commander's console, signed by alert crew members on their last alerts. Lyon - Whiteman Air Force Base, Oscar O-1 Minuteman Missile Alert Facility, Southeast corner of Twelfth & Vendenberg Avenues, Knob Noster, Johnson County, MO

  13. 8. Interior of cockpit showing pilot consoles and flight engineer ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    8. Interior of cockpit showing pilot consoles and flight engineer seat with instrument panel. View to east. - Offutt Air Force Base, Looking Glass Airborne Command Post, Looking Glass Aircraft, On Operational Apron covering northeast half of Project Looking Glass Historic District, Bellevue, Sarpy County, NE

  14. 39. View of checkout indicator computer console for DR beams, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    39. View of checkout indicator computer console for DR beams, TR chains, and special checkout target control located in CSMR in transmitter building no. 102. - Clear Air Force Station, Ballistic Missile Early Warning System Site II, One mile west of mile marker 293.5 on Parks Highway, 5 miles southwest of Anderson, Anderson, Denali Borough, AK

  15. Remarks on forensically interesting Microsoft XBox 360 console features

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luttenberger, Silas; Kröger, Knut; Creutzburg, Reiner

    2012-02-01

    This paper deals with forensically interesting features of the Microsoft Xbox 360 game console. The construction and the internal structure are analysed more precisely. One of the main aspects of the study is to analyse the used file system which was examined for forensic features. Possible difficulties that might be of importance to the forensic investigator are discussed.

  16. Remarks on forensically interesting Sony Playstation 3 console features

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Daugs, Gunnar; Kröger, Knut; Creutzburg, Reiner

    2012-02-01

    This paper deals with forensically interesting features of the Sony Playstation 3 game console. The construction and the internal structure are analyzed more precisely. Interesting forensic features of the operating system and the file system are presented. Differences between a PS3 with and without jailbreak are introduced and possible forensic attempts when using an installed Linux are discussed.

  17. 18. DETAIL OF NORTH END OF ATLAS CONTROL CONSOLE NEAR ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    18. DETAIL OF NORTH END OF ATLAS CONTROL CONSOLE NEAR WEST WALL OF SLC-3W CONTROL ROOM SHOWING PAYLOAD ENVIRONMENT CONTROL AND MONITORING PANELS (LABELED 'PECMP') - Vandenberg Air Force Base, Space Launch Complex 3, Launch Operations Building, Napa & Alden Roads, Lompoc, Santa Barbara County, CA

  18. 16. DETAIL OF SOUTH END OF ATLAS CONTROL CONSOLE NEAR ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    16. DETAIL OF SOUTH END OF ATLAS CONTROL CONSOLE NEAR WEST WALL OF SLC-3W CONTROL ROOM SHOWING CONTROLS FOR STILL CAMERAS POSITIONED AROUND THE LAUNCH PAD - Vandenberg Air Force Base, Space Launch Complex 3, Launch Operations Building, Napa & Alden Roads, Lompoc, Santa Barbara County, CA

  19. 36. ENGINE ROOM FROM STARBOARD SIDE OF CONTROL CONSOLE, LOOKING ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    36. ENGINE ROOM FROM STARBOARD SIDE OF CONTROL CONSOLE, LOOKING AT TWO DIESEL ENGINES, STAIRS LEAD UP TO CREW'S BERTHING. THIS IMAGE IS CLOSER TO THE STERN AND MORE ANGLED TOWARDS THE PORT THAN IMAGE 34. - U.S. Coast Guard Cutter WHITE LUPINE, U.S. Coast Guard Station Rockland, east end of Tillson Avenue, Rockland, Knox County, ME

  20. 37. ENGINE ROOM, FROM PORT SIDE OF CONTROL CONSOLE, LOOKING ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    37. ENGINE ROOM, FROM PORT SIDE OF CONTROL CONSOLE, LOOKING TOWARDS STERN, PORT ENGINE AT RIGHT, STARBOARD ENGINE AT LEFT, BOTH ARE DIESEL ENGINES, IN BACKGROUND IS STAIRS UP TO CREWS' BERTHING, BEYONE THE STAIRS IS THE DOOR TO AFT ENGINE ROOM & MACHINE SHOP. - U.S. Coast Guard Cutter WHITE HEATH, USGS Integrated Support Command Boston, 427 Commercial Street, Boston, Suffolk County, MA

  1. 37. View of detection radar environmental display (DRED) console for ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    37. View of detection radar environmental display (DRED) console for middle DR 2 (structure no. 736) antenna, located in MWOC facility. - Clear Air Force Station, Ballistic Missile Early Warning System Site II, One mile west of mile marker 293.5 on Parks Highway, 5 miles southwest of Anderson, Anderson, Denali Borough, AK

  2. 35. View of data and analysis console (DAC), located in ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    35. View of data and analysis console (DAC), located in MWOC facility in transmitter building no. 102, showing clock and missile impact predictor time. - Clear Air Force Station, Ballistic Missile Early Warning System Site II, One mile west of mile marker 293.5 on Parks Highway, 5 miles southwest of Anderson, Anderson, Denali Borough, AK

  3. 5. INSTRUMENT ROOM INTERIOR, SHOWING BACKS OF CONSOLE LOCKERS. Looking ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    5. INSTRUMENT ROOM INTERIOR, SHOWING BACKS OF CONSOLE LOCKERS. Looking northeast to firing control room passageway. - Edwards Air Force Base, Air Force Rocket Propulsion Laboratory, Firing Control Building, Test Area 1-100, northeast end of Test Area 1-100 Road, Boron, Kern County, CA

  4. Differential Brain Responses to Cries of Infants with Autistic Disorder and Typical Development: An fMRI Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Venuti, Paola; Caria, Andrea; Esposito, Gianluca; De Pisapia, Nicola; Bornstein, Marc H.; de Falco, Simona

    2012-01-01

    This study used fMRI to measure brain activity during adult processing of cries of infants with autistic disorder (AD) compared to cries of typically developing (TD) infants. Using whole brain analysis, we found that cries of infants with AD compared to those of TD infants elicited enhanced activity in brain regions associated with verbal and…

  5. Shared midgut binding sites for Cry1A.105, Cry1Aa, Cry1Ab, Cry1Ac and Cry1Fa proteins from Bacillus thuringiensis in two important corn pests, Ostrinia nubilalis and Spodoptera frugiperda.

    PubMed

    Hernández-Rodríguez, Carmen Sara; Hernández-Martínez, Patricia; Van Rie, Jeroen; Escriche, Baltasar; Ferré, Juan

    2013-01-01

    First generation of insect-protected transgenic corn (Bt-corn) was based on the expression of Cry1Ab or Cry1Fa proteins. Currently, the trend is the combination of two or more genes expressing proteins that bind to different targets. In addition to broadening the spectrum of action, this strategy helps to delay the evolution of resistance in exposed insect populations. One of such examples is the combination of Cry1A.105 with Cry1Fa and Cry2Ab to control O. nubilalis and S. frugiperda. Cry1A.105 is a chimeric protein with domains I and II and the C-terminal half of the protein from Cry1Ac, and domain III almost identical to Cry1Fa. The aim of the present study was to determine whether the chimeric Cry1A.105 has shared binding sites either with Cry1A proteins, with Cry1Fa, or with both, in O. nubilalis and in S. frugiperda. Brush-border membrane vesicles (BBMV) from last instar larval midguts were used in competition binding assays with (125)I-labeled Cry1A.105, Cry1Ab, and Cry1Fa, and unlabeled Cry1A.105, Cry1Aa, Cry1Ab, Cry1Ac, Cry1Fa, Cry2Ab and Cry2Ae. The results showed that Cry1A.105, Cry1Ab, Cry1Ac and Cry1Fa competed with high affinity for the same binding sites in both insect species. However, Cry2Ab and Cry2Ae did not compete for the binding sites of Cry1 proteins. Therefore, according to our results, the development of cross-resistance among Cry1Ab/Ac, Cry1A.105, and Cry1Fa proteins is possible in these two insect species if the alteration of shared binding sites occurs. Conversely, cross-resistance between these proteins and Cry2A proteins is very unlikely in such case.

  6. 21 CFR 870.4220 - Cardiopulmonary bypass heart-lung machine console.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Cardiopulmonary bypass heart-lung machine console... Cardiopulmonary bypass heart-lung machine console. (a) Identification. A cardiopulmonary bypass heart-lung machine... heart-lung machine. The console is designed to interface with the basic units used in a gas...

  7. 21 CFR 870.4220 - Cardiopulmonary bypass heart-lung machine console.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Cardiopulmonary bypass heart-lung machine console... Cardiopulmonary bypass heart-lung machine console. (a) Identification. A cardiopulmonary bypass heart-lung machine... heart-lung machine. The console is designed to interface with the basic units used in a gas...

  8. 21 CFR 870.4220 - Cardiopulmonary bypass heart-lung machine console.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Cardiopulmonary bypass heart-lung machine console... Cardiopulmonary bypass heart-lung machine console. (a) Identification. A cardiopulmonary bypass heart-lung machine... heart-lung machine. The console is designed to interface with the basic units used in a gas...

  9. 21 CFR 870.4220 - Cardiopulmonary bypass heart-lung machine console.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Cardiopulmonary bypass heart-lung machine console... Cardiopulmonary bypass heart-lung machine console. (a) Identification. A cardiopulmonary bypass heart-lung machine... heart-lung machine. The console is designed to interface with the basic units used in a gas...

  10. 21 CFR 870.4220 - Cardiopulmonary bypass heart-lung machine console.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Cardiopulmonary bypass heart-lung machine console... Cardiopulmonary bypass heart-lung machine console. (a) Identification. A cardiopulmonary bypass heart-lung machine... heart-lung machine. The console is designed to interface with the basic units used in a gas...

  11. Crying in infants

    PubMed Central

    de Weerth, Carolina; Fuentes, Susana; de Vos, Willem M

    2013-01-01

    Up to around a quarter of all infants cry excessively and unsoothably during their first months of life. This phenomenon has been termed “infant colic.” In most cases, physicians are unable to determine the cause of the colicky behavior. In a recent study, and by means of comprehensive and deep analyses of more than 1000 intestinal phylotypes, we found that infants with colic showed lower microbiota diversity and stability than control infants in the first weeks of life. Colic-control differences in the abundance of certain bacteria were also found at 2 weeks. These microbial signatures possibly explain the colic phenotype. In this addendum we discuss other recent publications on the subject and present previously unpublished analyses of our own. We address possible mechanisms behind the links between microbiota and crying, and present future directions that could further help elucidate the hypothesized relations between intestinal microbiota and infant colic. PMID:23941920

  12. A functional analysis of crying.

    PubMed

    Bowman, Lynn G; Hardesty, Samantha L; Mendres-Smith, Amber E

    2013-01-01

    Crying has yet to be examined systematically in isolation from other problem behavior, such as aggression or tantrums, during functional analyses (Hanley, Iwata, & McCord, 2003). Identification of variables that may maintain crying is especially important for populations who are susceptible to psychiatric interventions (e.g., individuals who have intellectual disabilities and communication deficits). The current study extended functional analysis methodology to crying with an adolescent boy who had been diagnosed with intellectual disabilities. Results suggested that crying was maintained by caregiver attention delivered in a sympathetic manner.

  13. Efficient Production of Bacillus thuringiensis Cry1AMod Toxins under Regulation of cry3Aa Promoter and Single Cysteine Mutations in the Protoxin Region

    PubMed Central

    García-Gómez, Blanca I.; Sánchez, Jorge; Martínez de Castro, Diana L.; Ibarra, Jorge E.; Bravo, Alejandra

    2013-01-01

    Bacillus thuringiensis Cry1AbMod toxins are engineered versions of Cry1Ab that lack the amino-terminal end, including domain I helix α-1 and part of helix α-2. This deletion improves oligomerization of these toxins in solution in the absence of cadherin receptor and counters resistance to Cry1A toxins in different lepidopteran insects, suggesting that oligomerization plays a major role in their toxicity. However, Cry1AbMod toxins are toxic to Escherichia coli cells, since the cry1A promoter that drives its expression in B. thuringiensis has readthrough expression activity in E. coli, making difficult the construction of these CryMod toxins. In this work, we show that Cry1AbMod and Cry1AcMod toxins can be cloned efficiently under regulation of the cry3A promoter region to drive its expression in B. thuringiensis without expression in E. coli cells. However, p3A-Cry1Ab(c)Mod construction promotes the formation of Cry1AMod crystals in B. thuringiensis cells that were not soluble at pH 10.5 and showed no toxicity to Plutella xylostella larvae. Cysteine residues in the protoxin carboxyl-terminal end of Cry1A toxins have been shown to be involved in disulfide bond formation, which is important for crystallization. Six individual cysteine substitutions for serine residues were constructed in the carboxyl-terminal protoxin end of the p3A-Cry1AbMod construct and one in the carboxyl-terminal protoxin end of p3A-Cry1AcMod. Interestingly, p3A-Cry1AbMod C654S and C729S and p3A-Cry1AcMod C730S recover crystal solubility at pH 10.5 and toxicity to P. xylostella. These results show that combining the cry3A promoter expression system with single cysteine mutations is a useful system for efficient expression of Cry1AMod toxins in B. thuringiensis. PMID:24014526

  14. Efficient production of Bacillus thuringiensis Cry1AMod toxins under regulation of cry3Aa promoter and single cysteine mutations in the protoxin region.

    PubMed

    García-Gómez, Blanca I; Sánchez, Jorge; Martínez de Castro, Diana L; Ibarra, Jorge E; Bravo, Alejandra; Soberón, Mario

    2013-11-01

    Bacillus thuringiensis Cry1AbMod toxins are engineered versions of Cry1Ab that lack the amino-terminal end, including domain I helix α-1 and part of helix α-2. This deletion improves oligomerization of these toxins in solution in the absence of cadherin receptor and counters resistance to Cry1A toxins in different lepidopteran insects, suggesting that oligomerization plays a major role in their toxicity. However, Cry1AbMod toxins are toxic to Escherichia coli cells, since the cry1A promoter that drives its expression in B. thuringiensis has readthrough expression activity in E. coli, making difficult the construction of these CryMod toxins. In this work, we show that Cry1AbMod and Cry1AcMod toxins can be cloned efficiently under regulation of the cry3A promoter region to drive its expression in B. thuringiensis without expression in E. coli cells. However, p3A-Cry1Ab(c)Mod construction promotes the formation of Cry1AMod crystals in B. thuringiensis cells that were not soluble at pH 10.5 and showed no toxicity to Plutella xylostella larvae. Cysteine residues in the protoxin carboxyl-terminal end of Cry1A toxins have been shown to be involved in disulfide bond formation, which is important for crystallization. Six individual cysteine substitutions for serine residues were constructed in the carboxyl-terminal protoxin end of the p3A-Cry1AbMod construct and one in the carboxyl-terminal protoxin end of p3A-Cry1AcMod. Interestingly, p3A-Cry1AbMod C654S and C729S and p3A-Cry1AcMod C730S recover crystal solubility at pH 10.5 and toxicity to P. xylostella. These results show that combining the cry3A promoter expression system with single cysteine mutations is a useful system for efficient expression of Cry1AMod toxins in B. thuringiensis.

  15. Single amino acid insertions in extracellular loop 2 of Bombyx mori ABCC2 disrupt its receptor function for Bacillus thuringiensis Cry1Ab and Cry1Ac but not Cry1Aa toxins.

    PubMed

    Tanaka, Shiho; Miyamoto, Kazuhisa; Noda, Hiroaki; Endo, Haruka; Kikuta, Shingo; Sato, Ryoichi

    2016-04-01

    In a previous report, seven Cry1Ab-resistant strains were identified in the silkworm, Bombyx mori; these strains were shown to have a tyrosine insertion at position 234 in extracellular loop 2 of the ABC transporter C2 (BmABCC2). This insertion was confirmed to destroy the receptor function of BmABCC2 and confer the strains resistance against Cry1Ab and Cry1Ac. However, these strains were susceptible to Cry1Aa. In this report, we examined the mechanisms of the loss of receptor function of the transporter by expressing mutations in Sf9 cells. After replacement of one or two of the five amino acid residues in loop 2 of the susceptible BmABCC2 gene [BmABCC2_S] with alanine, cells still showed susceptibility, retaining the receptor function. Five mutants with single amino acid insertions at position 234 in BmABCC2 were also generated, resulting in loop 2 having six amino acids, which corresponds to replacing the tyrosine insertion in the resistant BmABCC2 gene [BmABCC2_R(+(234)Y)] with another amino acid. All five mutants exhibited loss of function against Cry1Ab and Cry1Ac. These results suggest that the amino acid sequence in loop 2 is less important than the loop size (five vs. six amino acids) or loop structure for Cry1Ab and Cry1Ac activity. Several domain-swapped mutant toxins were then generated among Cry1Aa, Cry1Ab, and Cry1Ac, which are composed of three domains. Swapped mutants containing domain II of Cry1Ab or Cry1Ac did not kill Sf9 cells expressing BmABCC2_R(+(234)Y), suggesting that domain II of the Cry toxin is related to the interaction with the receptor function of BmABCC2. This also suggests that different reactions against Bt-toxins in some B. mori strains, that is, Cry1Ab resistance or Cry1Aa susceptibility, are attributable to structural differences in domain II of Cry1A toxins.

  16. Asynchrony of mother-infant hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis activity following extinction of infant crying responses induced during the transition to sleep.

    PubMed

    Middlemiss, Wendy; Granger, Douglas A; Goldberg, Wendy A; Nathans, Laura

    2012-04-01

    This study examines change in the synchrony between mothers' and infants' physiology as 25 infants (11 males; 4 to 10 months of age) participate in a 5-day inpatient sleep training program in which they learn to self-settle through extinction of crying responses during the transition to sleep. The mothers' and infants' experience during the extinction protocol was "yoked" by the infants' behavioral signaling during the sleep transition period. Saliva was sampled for mothers and infants at initiation of infants' nighttime sleep and following infants' falling to sleep on two program days and later assayed for cortisol. As expected on the first day of the program, mothers' and infants' cortisol levels were positively associated at initiation of nighttime sleep following a day of shared activities. Also, when infants expressed distress in response to the sleep transition, mother and infant cortisol responses were again positively associated. On the third day of the program, however, results showed that infants' physiological and behavioral responses were dissociated. They no longer expressed behavioral distress during the sleep transition but their cortisol levels were elevated. Without the infants' distress cue, mothers' cortisol levels decreased. The dissociation between infants' behavioral and physiological responses resulted in asynchrony in mothers' and infants' cortisol levels. The findings are discussed in relation to understanding the determinants and implications of maternal-infant physiological synchrony in early childhood.

  17. Polydispersity of Bacillus thuringiensis Cry1 toxins in solution and its effect on receptor binding kinetics.

    PubMed

    Masson, Luke; Mazza, Alberto; Sangadala, Sreedhara; Adang, Michael J; Brousseau, Roland

    2002-02-11

    Dynamic light scattering and surface plasmon resonance techniques were used to investigate the influence of ionic strength, buffer composition and pH on the multimerization of trypsin-activated Cry1Ac and Cry1C toxins over time and the subsequent effects of the different multimers on receptor binding models. In carbonate buffer at pH 10.5, Cry1Ac and Cry1C assumed a monomeric state. After 24 h, a complete conversion of monomeric toxin to a dimeric or trimeric form was observed only for Cry1Ac under low ionic strength condition. Cry1C and Cry1Ac in high ionic strength buffer remained monomeric. Substitution of CAPS pH 11 for carbonate buffer suppressed this Cry1Ac oligomerization effect. Once Cry1Ac toxin was in an aggregated form, increases in ionic strength failed to revert the aggregated toxin back to a monomeric form. Monomeric Cry1Ac bound to a purified 115 kDa aminopeptidase N receptor from Manduca sexta in a 2:1 molar ratio thus confirming the existence of two binding sites on this receptor. Binding rates of dimeric or higher aggregated Cry1Ac toxin forms were different from those generated using the monomeric form and could not be fitted to existing binding models. In summary, our results confirm that the M. sexta 115 kDa aminopeptidase N receptor possesses two Cry1Ac binding sites. They further suggest that although high pH and low salt conditions promote Cry1Ac aggregation, this observation cannot be applied universally to other members of the Cry family.

  18. CONTROL CONSOLE FOR MTR FISSION PRODUCT MONITOR, USED TO DETECT ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    CONTROL CONSOLE FOR MTR FISSION PRODUCT MONITOR, USED TO DETECT BREAKS IN CLADDING OF FUEL ELEMENTS. COUNT-RATE METER IN TOP PANEL INDICATES AMOUNT OF RADIOACTIVITY. LOWER PANELS SUPPLY POWER AND AMPLIFICATION OF SIGNALS GENERATED BY SCINTILLATION COUNTER/PHOTOMULTIPLIER TUBE COMBINATION IN RESPONSE TO RADIOACTIVITY IN A SAMPLE OF THE COOLING WATER. INL NEGATIVE NO. 56-771. Jack L. Anderson, Photographer, 3/15/1956. - Idaho National Engineering Laboratory, Test Reactor Area, Materials & Engineering Test Reactors, Scoville, Butte County, ID

  19. Cri du Chat syndrome.

    PubMed

    Cerruti Mainardi, Paola

    2006-09-05

    The Cri du Chat syndrome (CdCS) is a genetic disease resulting from a deletion of variable size occurring on the short arm of chromosome 5 (5p-). The incidence ranges from 1:15,000 to 1:50,000 live-born infants. The main clinical features are a high-pitched monochromatic cry, microcephaly, broad nasal bridge, epicanthal folds, micrognathia, abnormal dermatoglyphics, and severe psychomotor and mental retardation. Malformations, although not very frequent, may be present: cardiac, neurological and renal abnormalities, preauricular tags, syndactyly, hypospadias, and cryptorchidism. Molecular cytogenetic analysis has allowed a cytogenetic and phenotypic map of 5p to be defined, even if results from the studies reported up to now are not completely in agreement. Genotype-phenotype correlation studies showed a clinical and cytogenetic variability. The identification of phenotypic subsets associated with a specific size and type of deletion is of diagnostic and prognostic relevance. Specific growth and psychomotor development charts have been established. Two genes, Semaphorin F (SEMAF) and delta-catenin (CTNND2), which have been mapped to the "critical regions", are potentially involved in cerebral development and their deletion may be associated with mental retardation in CdCS patients. Deletion of the telomerase reverse transcriptase (hTERT) gene, localised to 5p15.33, could contribute to the phenotypic changes in CdCS. The critical regions were recently refined by using array comparative genomic hybridisation. The cat-like cry critical region was further narrowed using quantitative polymerase chain reaction (PCR) and three candidate genes were characterised in this region. The diagnosis is based on typical clinical manifestations. Karyotype analysis and, in doubtful cases, FISH analysis will confirm the diagnosis. There is no specific therapy for CdCS but early rehabilitative and educational interventions improve the prognosis and considerable progress has been made

  20. Cri du Chat syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Cerruti Mainardi, Paola

    2006-01-01

    The Cri du Chat syndrome (CdCS) is a genetic disease resulting from a deletion of variable size occurring on the short arm of chromosome 5 (5p-). The incidence ranges from 1:15,000 to 1:50,000 live-born infants. The main clinical features are a high-pitched monochromatic cry, microcephaly, broad nasal bridge, epicanthal folds, micrognathia, abnormal dermatoglyphics, and severe psychomotor and mental retardation. Malformations, although not very frequent, may be present: cardiac, neurological and renal abnormalities, preauricular tags, syndactyly, hypospadias, and cryptorchidism. Molecular cytogenetic analysis has allowed a cytogenetic and phenotypic map of 5p to be defined, even if results from the studies reported up to now are not completely in agreement. Genotype-phenotype correlation studies showed a clinical and cytogenetic variability. The identification of phenotypic subsets associated with a specific size and type of deletion is of diagnostic and prognostic relevance. Specific growth and psychomotor development charts have been established. Two genes, Semaphorin F (SEMAF) and δ-catenin (CTNND2), which have been mapped to the "critical regions", are potentially involved in cerebral development and their deletion may be associated with mental retardation in CdCS patients. Deletion of the telomerase reverse transcriptase (hTERT) gene, localised to 5p15.33, could contribute to the phenotypic changes in CdCS. The critical regions were recently refined by using array comparative genomic hybridisation. The cat-like cry critical region was further narrowed using quantitative polymerase chain reaction (PCR) and three candidate genes were characterised in this region. The diagnosis is based on typical clinical manifestations. Karyotype analysis and, in doubtful cases, FISH analysis will confirm the diagnosis. There is no specific therapy for CdCS but early rehabilitative and educational interventions improve the prognosis and considerable progress has been made in

  1. cry1 and GPA1 signaling genetically interact in hook opening and anthocyanin synthesis in Arabidopsis

    PubMed Central

    Fox, Ana R.; Soto, Gabriela C.; Jones, Alan M.; Casal, Jorge J.; Muschietti, Jorge P.

    2016-01-01

    While studying blue light-independent effects of cryptochrome 1 (cry1) photoreceptor, we observed premature opening of the hook in cry1 mutants grown in complete darkness, a phenotype that resembles the one described for the heterotrimeric G-protein α subunit (GPA1) null mutant gpa1. Both cry1 and gpa1 also showed reduced accumulation of anthocyanin under blue light. These convergent gpa1 and cry1 phenotypes required the presence of sucrose in the growth media and were not additive in the cry1 gpa1 double mutant, suggesting context-dependent signaling convergence between cry1 and GPA1 signaling pathways. Both, gpa1 and cry1 mutants showed reduced GTP-binding activity. The cry1 mutant showed wild-type levels of GPA1 mRNA or GPA1 protein. However, an anti-transducin antibody (AS/7) typically used for plant Gα proteins, recognized a 54 kDa band in the wild type but not in gpa1 and cry1 mutants. We propose a model where cry1-mediated post-translational modification of GPA1 alters its GTP-binding activity. PMID:22855128

  2. Evaluation of Cytotoxicity, Genotoxicity and Hematotoxicity of the Recombinant Spore-Crystal Complexes Cry1Ia, Cry10Aa and Cry1Ba6 from Bacillus thuringiensis in Swiss Mice

    PubMed Central

    de Souza Freire, Ingrid; Miranda-Vilela, Ana Luisa; Barbosa, Lilian Carla Pereira; Martins, Erica Soares; Monnerat, Rose Gomes; Grisolia, Cesar Koppe

    2014-01-01

    The insecticidal properties of Cry-endotoxins from Bacillus thuringiensis (Bt) have long been used as spore-crystals in commercial spray formulations for insect control. Recently, some Bt-endotoxin genes have been cloned in many different plants. Toxicological evaluations of three spore-crystal endotoxins, BtCry1Ia, BtCry10Aa and BtCry1Ba6 from B. thuringiensis, were carried out on mice to understand their adverse effects on hematological systems and on genetic material. These three spore-crystals have shown toxic activity to the boll weevil, which is one of the most aggressive pests of the cotton crop. Cry1Ia, Cry10Aa and Cry1Ba6 did not increase the micronucleus frequency in the peripheral erythrocytes of mice and did not cause changes in the frequency of polychromatic erythrocytes. However, some hematologic disburbances were observed, specifically related to Cry1Ia and Cry1Ba6, respectively, for the erythroid and lymphoid lineage. Thus, although the profile of such adverse side effects can be related to their high level of exposure, which is not commonly found in the environment, results showed that these Bt spore-crystals were not harmless to mice, indicating that each spore-crystal endotoxin presents a characteristic profile of toxicity and might be investigated individually. PMID:25268978

  3. Evaluation of cytotoxicity, genotoxicity and hematotoxicity of the recombinant spore-crystal complexes Cry1Ia, Cry10Aa and Cry1Ba6 from Bacillus thuringiensis in Swiss mice.

    PubMed

    de Souza Freire, Ingrid; Miranda-Vilela, Ana Luisa; Barbosa, Lilian Carla Pereira; Martins, Erica Soares; Monnerat, Rose Gomes; Grisolia, Cesar Koppe

    2014-09-29

    The insecticidal properties of Cry-endotoxins from Bacillus thuringiensis (Bt) have long been used as spore-crystals in commercial spray formulations for insect control. Recently, some Bt-endotoxin genes have been cloned in many different plants. Toxicological evaluations of three spore-crystal endotoxins, BtCry1Ia, BtCry10Aa and BtCry1Ba6 from B. thuringiensis, were carried out on mice to understand their adverse effects on hematological systems and on genetic material. These three spore-crystals have shown toxic activity to the boll weevil, which is one of the most aggressive pests of the cotton crop. Cry1Ia, Cry10Aa and Cry1Ba6 did not increase the micronucleus frequency in the peripheral erythrocytes of mice and did not cause changes in the frequency of polychromatic erythrocytes. However, some hematologic disburbances were observed, specifically related to Cry1Ia and Cry1Ba6, respectively, for the erythroid and lymphoid lineage. Thus, although the profile of such adverse side effects can be related to their high level of exposure, which is not commonly found in the environment, results showed that these Bt spore-crystals were not harmless to mice, indicating that each spore-crystal endotoxin presents a characteristic profile of toxicity and might be investigated individually.

  4. Simulation Training Versus Real Time Console Training for New Flight Controllers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Heaton, Amanda

    2010-01-01

    For new flight controllers, the two main learning tools are simulations and real time console performance training. These benefit the new flight controllers in different ways and could possibly be improved. Simulations: a) Allow for mistakes without serious consequences. b) Lets new flight controllers learn the working style of other new flight controllers. c) Lets new flight controllers eventually begin to feel like they have mastered the sim world, so therefore they must be competent in the real time world too. Real time: a) Shows new flight controllers some of the unique problems that develop and have to be accounted for when dealing with certain payloads or systems. b) Lets new flight controllers experience handovers - gathering information from the previous shift on what the room needs to be aware of and what still needs to be done. c) Gives new flight controllers confidence that they can succeed in the position they are training for when they can solve real anomalies. How Sims could be improved and more like real-time ops for the ISS Operations Controller position: a) Operations Change Requests to review. b) Fewer anomalies (but still more than real time for practice). c) Payload Planning Manager Handover sheet for the E-1 and E-3 reviews. d) Flight note in system with at least one comment to verify for the E-1 and E-3 reviews How the real time console performance training could be improved for the ISS Operations Controller position: a) Schedule the new flight controller to be on console for four days but with a different certified person each day. This will force them to be the source of knowledge about every OCR in progress, everything that has happened in those few days, and every activity on the timeline. Constellation program flight controllers will have to learn entirely from simulations, thereby losing some of the elements that they will need to have experience with for real time ops. It may help them to practice real time console performance training

  5. Resistance to Bacillus thuringiensis Toxin Cry2Ab in Trichoplusia ni Is Conferred by a Novel Genetic Mechanism.

    PubMed

    Song, Xiaozhao; Kain, Wendy; Cassidy, Douglas; Wang, Ping

    2015-08-01

    The resistance to the Bacillus thuringiensis (Bt) toxin Cry2Ab in a greenhouse-originated Trichoplusia ni strain resistant to both Bt toxins Cry1Ac and Cry2Ab was characterized. Biological assays determined that the Cry2Ab resistance in the T. ni strain was a monogenic recessive trait independent of Cry1Ac resistance, and there existed no significant cross-resistance between Cry1Ac and Cry2Ab in T. ni. From the dual-toxin-resistant T. ni strain, a strain resistant to Cry2Ab only was isolated, and the Cry2Ab resistance trait was introgressed into a susceptible laboratory strain to facilitate comparative analysis of the Cry2Ab resistance with the susceptible T. ni strain. Results from biochemical analysis showed no significant difference between the Cry2Ab-resistant and -susceptible T. ni larvae in midgut proteases, including caseinolytic proteolytic activity and zymogram profile and serine protease activities, in midgut aminopeptidase and alkaline phosphatase activity, and in midgut esterases and hemolymph plasma melanization activity. For analysis of genetic linkage of Cry2Ab resistance with potential Cry toxin receptor genes, molecular markers for the midgut cadherin, alkaline phosphatase (ALP), and aminopeptidase N (APN) genes were identified between the original greenhouse-derived dual-toxin-resistant and the susceptible laboratory T. ni strains. Genetic linkage analysis showed that the Cry2Ab resistance in T. ni was not genetically associated with the midgut genes coding for the cadherin, ALP, and 6 APNs (APN1 to APN6) nor associated with the ABC transporter gene ABCC2. Therefore, the Cry2Ab resistance in T. ni is conferred by a novel but unknown genetic mechanism.

  6. Resistance to Bacillus thuringiensis Toxin Cry2Ab in Trichoplusia ni Is Conferred by a Novel Genetic Mechanism

    PubMed Central

    Song, Xiaozhao; Kain, Wendy; Cassidy, Douglas

    2015-01-01

    The resistance to the Bacillus thuringiensis (Bt) toxin Cry2Ab in a greenhouse-originated Trichoplusia ni strain resistant to both Bt toxins Cry1Ac and Cry2Ab was characterized. Biological assays determined that the Cry2Ab resistance in the T. ni strain was a monogenic recessive trait independent of Cry1Ac resistance, and there existed no significant cross-resistance between Cry1Ac and Cry2Ab in T. ni. From the dual-toxin-resistant T. ni strain, a strain resistant to Cry2Ab only was isolated, and the Cry2Ab resistance trait was introgressed into a susceptible laboratory strain to facilitate comparative analysis of the Cry2Ab resistance with the susceptible T. ni strain. Results from biochemical analysis showed no significant difference between the Cry2Ab-resistant and -susceptible T. ni larvae in midgut proteases, including caseinolytic proteolytic activity and zymogram profile and serine protease activities, in midgut aminopeptidase and alkaline phosphatase activity, and in midgut esterases and hemolymph plasma melanization activity. For analysis of genetic linkage of Cry2Ab resistance with potential Cry toxin receptor genes, molecular markers for the midgut cadherin, alkaline phosphatase (ALP), and aminopeptidase N (APN) genes were identified between the original greenhouse-derived dual-toxin-resistant and the susceptible laboratory T. ni strains. Genetic linkage analysis showed that the Cry2Ab resistance in T. ni was not genetically associated with the midgut genes coding for the cadherin, ALP, and 6 APNs (APN1 to APN6) nor associated with the ABC transporter gene ABCC2. Therefore, the Cry2Ab resistance in T. ni is conferred by a novel but unknown genetic mechanism. PMID:26025894

  7. The effects of music listening on inconsolable crying in premature infants.

    PubMed

    Keith, Douglas R; Russell, Kendra; Weaver, Barbara S

    2009-01-01

    Over the decades, medical staff have developed strategies to manage crying episodes of the critically ill and convalescing premature infant. These episodes of crying occur frequently after infants are removed from ventilation, but before they are able to receive nutrition orally. Not only are these episodes stressful to infants and upsetting to parents, but they are also stressful and time consuming for the staff that take care of these patients. Although the literature supports the benefits of music therapy in regard to physiological and certain behavioral measures with premature infants, no research exists that explores the use of music therapy with inconsolability related to the "nothing by mouth" status. This study explored the effects of music therapy on the crying behaviors of critically ill infants classified as inconsolable. Twenty-four premature infants with gestational age 32-40 weeks received a developmentally appropriate music listening intervention, alternating with days on which no intervention was provided. The results revealed a significant reduction in the frequency and duration of episodes of inconsolable crying as a result of the music intervention, as well as improved physiological measures including heart rate, respiration rate, oxygen saturation, and mean arterial pressure. Findings suggest the viability of using recorded music in the absence of a music therapist or the maternal voice to console infants when standard nursing interventions are not effective.

  8. Evidence of field-evolved resistance of Spodoptera frugiperda to Bt corn expressing Cry1F in Brazil that is still sensitive to modified Bt toxins.

    PubMed

    Monnerat, Rose; Martins, Erica; Macedo, Cristina; Queiroz, Paulo; Praça, Lilian; Soares, Carlos Marcelo; Moreira, Helio; Grisi, Isabella; Silva, Joseane; Soberon, Mario; Bravo, Alejandra

    2015-01-01

    Brazil ranked second only to the United States in hectares planted to genetically modified crops in 2013. Recently corn producers in the Cerrado region reported that the control of Spodoptera frugiperda with Bt corn expressing Cry1Fa has decreased, forcing them to use chemicals to reduce the damage caused by this insect pest. A colony of S. frugiperda was established from individuals collected in 2013 from Cry1Fa corn plants (SfBt) in Brazil and shown to have at least more than ten-fold higher resistance levels compared with a susceptible colony (Sflab). Laboratory assays on corn leaves showed that in contrast to SfLab population, the SfBt larvae were able to survive by feeding on Cry1Fa corn leaves. The SfBt population was maintained without selection for eight generations and shown to maintain high levels of resistance to Cry1Fa toxin. SfBt showed higher cross-resistance to Cry1Aa than to Cry1Ab or Cry1Ac toxins. As previously reported, Cry1A toxins competed the binding of Cry1Fa to brush border membrane vesicles (BBMV) from SfLab insects, explaining cross-resistance to Cry1A toxins. In contrast Cry2A toxins did not compete Cry1Fa binding to SfLab-BBMV and no cross-resistance to Cry2A was observed, although Cry2A toxins show low toxicity to S. frugiperda. Bioassays with Cry1AbMod and Cry1AcMod show that they are highly active against both the SfLab and the SfBt populations. The bioassay data reported here show that insects collected from Cry1Fa corn in the Cerrado region were resistant to Cry1Fa suggesting that resistance contributed to field failures of Cry1Fa corn to control S. frugiperda.

  9. Binding of Bacillus thuringiensis Cry1 Toxins to the Midgut Brush Border Membrane Vesicles of Chilo suppressalis (Lepidoptera: Pyralidae): Evidence of Shared Binding Sites

    PubMed Central

    Fiuza, L.; Nielsen-Leroux, C.; Goze, E.; Frutos, R.; Charles, J.

    1996-01-01

    Binding and competition among Cry1Aa, Cry1Ac, and Cry1Ba toxins were analyzed quantitatively in vitro by using (sup125)I-labeled activated toxins and brush border membrane vesicles isolated from Chilo suppressalis larval midguts. The three toxins bound specifically to the midgut brush border membrane vesicles. Direct binding experiments showed that Cry1Aa and Cry1Ba recognized a single class of binding sites with different affinities, whereas Cry1Aa recognized two classes of binding sites, one with a high affinity and a low concentration and the other with a lower affinity but higher concentration. Competition experiments showed that toxins Cry1Ac and Cry1Ba shared a binding site in the C. suppressalis midgut membranes and that this site was also the low-affinity binding site for Cry1Aa. PMID:16535306

  10. Identification of a Bacillus thuringiensis Cry11Ba toxin-binding aminopeptidase from the mosquito, Anopheles quadrimaculatus

    PubMed Central

    Abdullah, Mohd Amir F; Valaitis, Algimantas P; Dean, Donald H

    2006-01-01

    Background Aminopeptidase N (APN) type proteins isolated from several species of lepidopteran insects have been implicated as Bacillus thuringiensis (Bt) toxin-binding proteins (receptors) for Cry toxins. We examined brush border membrane vesicle (BBMV) proteins from the mosquito Anopheles quadrimaculatus to determine if APNs from this organism would bind mosquitocidal Cry toxins that are active to it. Results A 100-kDa protein with APN activity (APNAnq 100) was isolated from the brush border membrane of Anopheles quadrimaculatus. Native state binding analysis by surface plasmon resonance shows that APNAnq 100 forms tight binding to a mosquitocidal Bt toxin, Cry11Ba, but not to Cry2Aa, Cry4Ba or Cry11Aa. Conclusion An aminopeptidase from Anopheles quadrimaculatus mosquitoes is a specific binding protein for Bacillus thuringiensis Cry11Ba. PMID:16716213

  11. Interaction between Cry9Ca and two Cry1A delta-endotoxins from Bacillus thuringiensis in larval toxicity and binding to brush border membrane vesicles of the spruce budworm, Choristoneura fumiferana Clemens.

    PubMed

    Pang, Anthony S D; Gringorten, J Lawrence; van Frankenhuyzen, Kees

    2002-09-24

    A genetically altered variant of Cry9Ca from Bacillus thuringiensis shows high potency against the spruce budworm, Choristoneura fumiferana Clemens. Its activity, as measured by feeding inhibition in frass-failure assays, is estimated to be four to seven times greater than B. thuringiensis subsp. kurstaki HD-1, the strain currently used in commercial products to control this insect. Bioassays against budworm of mixtures of the modified Cry9Ca and two of the Cry1A endotoxin proteins produced by HD-1 show neither synergism nor antagonism. Experiments with brush border membrane vesicles from budworm midgut revealed that Cry9Ca and the Cry1A toxins share a common binding site and that bound Cry9Ca can be displaced from the membrane to some extent by the Cry1A toxins. However, it is uncertain whether the binding site is actually the receptor molecule or a membrane protein associated with pore formation.

  12. Shared Midgut Binding Sites for Cry1A.105, Cry1Aa, Cry1Ab, Cry1Ac and Cry1Fa Proteins from Bacillus thuringiensis in Two Important Corn Pests, Ostrinia nubilalis and Spodoptera frugiperda

    PubMed Central

    Hernández-Rodríguez, Carmen Sara; Hernández-Martínez, Patricia; Van Rie, Jeroen; Escriche, Baltasar; Ferré, Juan

    2013-01-01

    First generation of insect-protected transgenic corn (Bt-corn) was based on the expression of Cry1Ab or Cry1Fa proteins. Currently, the trend is the combination of two or more genes expressing proteins that bind to different targets. In addition to broadening the spectrum of action, this strategy helps to delay the evolution of resistance in exposed insect populations. One of such examples is the combination of Cry1A.105 with Cry1Fa and Cry2Ab to control O. nubilalis and S. frugiperda. Cry1A.105 is a chimeric protein with domains I and II and the C-terminal half of the protein from Cry1Ac, and domain III almost identical to Cry1Fa. The aim of the present study was to determine whether the chimeric Cry1A.105 has shared binding sites either with Cry1A proteins, with Cry1Fa, or with both, in O. nubilalis and in S. frugiperda. Brush-border membrane vesicles (BBMV) from last instar larval midguts were used in competition binding assays with 125I-labeled Cry1A.105, Cry1Ab, and Cry1Fa, and unlabeled Cry1A.105, Cry1Aa, Cry1Ab, Cry1Ac, Cry1Fa, Cry2Ab and Cry2Ae. The results showed that Cry1A.105, Cry1Ab, Cry1Ac and Cry1Fa competed with high affinity for the same binding sites in both insect species. However, Cry2Ab and Cry2Ae did not compete for the binding sites of Cry1 proteins. Therefore, according to our results, the development of cross-resistance among Cry1Ab/Ac, Cry1A.105, and Cry1Fa proteins is possible in these two insect species if the alteration of shared binding sites occurs. Conversely, cross-resistance between these proteins and Cry2A proteins is very unlikely in such case. PMID:23861865

  13. Evaluation of Cytotoxic and Antimicrobial Effects of Two Bt Cry Proteins on a GMO Safety Perspective

    PubMed Central

    Farias, Davi Felipe; Viana, Martônio Ponte; de Oliveira, Gustavo Ramos; Beneventi, Magda Aparecida; Soares, Bruno Marques; Pessoa, Claudia; Pessoa, Igor Parra; Silva, Luciano Paulino; Vasconcelos, Ilka Maria; Grossi de Sá, Maria Fátima; Carvalho, Ana Fontenele Urano

    2014-01-01

    Studies have contested the innocuousness of Bacillus thuringiensis (Bt) Cry proteins to mammalian cells as well as to mammals microbiota. Thus, this study aimed to evaluate the cytotoxic and antimicrobial effects of two Cry proteins, Cry8Ka5 (a novel mutant protein) and Cry1Ac (a widely distributed protein in GM crops). Evaluation of cyto- and genotoxicity in human lymphocytes was performed as well as hemolytic activity coupled with cellular membrane topography analysis in mammal erythrocytes. Effects of Cry8Ka5 and Cry1Ac upon Artemia sp. nauplii and upon bacteria and yeast growth were assessed. The toxins caused no significant effects on the viability (IC50 > 1,000 µg/mL) or to the cellular DNA integrity of lymphocytes (no effects at 1,000 µg/mL). The Cry8Ka5 and Cry1Ac proteins did not cause severe damage to erythrocytes, neither with hemolysis (IC50 > 1,000 µg/mL) nor with alterations in the membrane. Likewise, the Cry8Ka5 and Cry1Ac proteins presented high LC50 (755.11 and >1,000 µg/mL, resp.) on the brine shrimp lethality assay and showed no growth inhibition of the microorganisms tested (MIC > 1,000 µg/mL). This study contributed with valuable information on the effects of Cry8Ka5 and Cry1Ac proteins on nontarget organisms, which reinforce their potential for safe biotechnological applications. PMID:25165717

  14. Production and characterization of Bacillus thuringiensis Cry1Ac-resistant cotton bollworm Helicoverpa zea (Boddie).

    PubMed

    Anilkumar, Konasale J; Rodrigo-Simón, Ana; Ferré, Juan; Pusztai-Carey, Marianne; Sivasupramaniam, Sakuntala; Moar, William J

    2008-01-01

    Laboratory-selected Bacillus thuringiensis-resistant colonies are important tools for elucidating B. thuringiensis resistance mechanisms. However, cotton bollworm, Helicoverpa zea, a target pest of transgenic corn and cotton expressing B. thuringiensis Cry1Ac (Bt corn and cotton), has proven difficult to select for stable resistance. Two populations of H. zea (AR and MR), resistant to the B. thuringiensis protein found in all commercial Bt cotton varieties (Cry1Ac), were established by selection with Cry1Ac activated toxin (AR) or MVP II (MR). Cry1Ac toxin reflects the form ingested by H. zea when feeding on Bt cotton, whereas MVP II is a Cry1Ac formulation used for resistance selection and monitoring. The resistance ratio (RR) for AR exceeded 100-fold after 11 generations and has been maintained at this level for nine generations. This is the first report of stable Cry1Ac resistance in H. zea. MR crashed after 11 generations, reaching only an RR of 12. AR was only partially cross-resistant to MVP II, suggesting that MVP II does not have the same Cry1Ac selection pressure as Cry1Ac toxin against H. zea and that proteases may be involved with resistance. AR was highly cross-resistant to Cry1Ab toxin but only slightly cross-resistant to Cry1Ab expressing corn leaf powder. AR was not cross-resistant to Cry2Aa2, Cry2Ab2-expressing corn leaf powder, Vip3A, and cypermethrin. Toxin-binding assays showed no significant differences, indicating that resistance was not linked to a reduction in binding. These results aid in understanding why this pest has not evolved B. thuringiensis resistance, and highlight the need to choose carefully the form of B. thuringiensis protein used in experiments.

  15. Gender Differences in Physiological Reactivity to Infant Cries and Smiles in Military Families.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brewster, Albert L.; Nelson, John P.; McCanne, Thomas R.; Lucas, D. R.; Milner, Joel S.

    1998-01-01

    Twenty male and 29 female active-duty Air Force personnel viewed and listened to videotapes of a crying infant and a smiling infant while heart rate, skin resistance, and respiration rate were monitored. Males showed a larger increase in skin conductance and heart rate than females during the crying infant stimulus. (Author/CR)

  16. ETR BUILDING, TRA642, INTERIOR. CONSOLE FLOOR, NORTH HALF. CONTEXTUAL VIEW ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    ETR BUILDING, TRA-642, INTERIOR. CONSOLE FLOOR, NORTH HALF. CONTEXTUAL VIEW OF INSTRUMENT PANELS, DATA CONSOLES, AND OTHER INDICATOR DISPLAYS. CAMERA FACES EAST. INL NEGATIVE NO. HD46-17-2. Mike Crane, Photographer, 2/2005 - Idaho National Engineering Laboratory, Test Reactor Area, Materials & Engineering Test Reactors, Scoville, Butte County, ID

  17. 9. PAYLOAD CONTROL CONSOLE NEAR EAST WALL OF SLC3W CONTROL ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    9. PAYLOAD CONTROL CONSOLE NEAR EAST WALL OF SLC-3W CONTROL ROOM. PAYLOAD CONTROLS INSTALLED IN CONSOLE BY THE PAYLOAD SPONSOR PRIOR TO EACH LAUNCH. - Vandenberg Air Force Base, Space Launch Complex 3, Launch Operations Building, Napa & Alden Roads, Lompoc, Santa Barbara County, CA

  18. Co-Evolution of Mobile Language Learning: Going Global with Games Consoles in Higher Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hemmi, Akiko; Narumi-Munro, Fumiko; Alexander, Wilma; Parker, Helen; Yamauchi, Yoko

    2014-01-01

    Game consoles have been adopted as a learning platform in school education. However, there is a scarcity of studies examining the utility of games consoles with built-in WiFi as affordable learning platforms in universities. This paper contributes to knowledge about the capacity of the Nintendo DSi to create new learning spaces mediated and…

  19. 10. PAYLOAD CONTROL CONSOLE NEAR SOUTH WALL OF SLC3W CONTROL ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    10. PAYLOAD CONTROL CONSOLE NEAR SOUTH WALL OF SLC-3W CONTROL ROOM. DECALS ON CONSOLE IN FOREGROUND INDICATE PAYLOAD PROGRAMS LAUNCHED FROM SLC-3W. - Vandenberg Air Force Base, Space Launch Complex 3, Launch Operations Building, Napa & Alden Roads, Lompoc, Santa Barbara County, CA

  20. Video game console usage and US national energy consumption: Results from a field-metering study

    SciTech Connect

    Desroches, Louis-Benoit; Greenblatt, Jeffery B.; Pratt, Stacy; Willem, Henry; Claybaugh, Erin; Beraki, Bereket; Nagaraju, Mythri; Price, Sarah K.; Young, Scott J.; Donovan, Sally M.; Ganeshalingam, Mohan

    2014-10-23

    There has been an increased in attention placed on the energy consumption of miscellaneous electronic loads in buildings by energy analysts and policymakers in recent years. The share of electricity consumed by consumer electronics in US households has increased in the last decade. Many devices, however, lack robust energy use data, making energy consumption estimates difficult and uncertain. Video game consoles are high-performance machines present in approximately half of all households and can consume a considerable amount of power. The precise usage of game consoles has significant uncertainty, however, leading to a wide range of recent national energy consumption estimates. We present here an analysis based on field-metered usage data, collected as part of a larger field metering study in the USA. This larger study collected data from 880 households in 2012 on a variety of devices, including 113 game consoles (the majority of which are Generation 7 consoles). From our metering, we find that although some consoles are left on nearly 24 h/day, the overall average usage is lower than many other studies have assumed, leading to a US national energy consumption estimate of 7.1 TWh in 2012. Nevertheless, there is an opportunity to reduce energy use with proper game console power management, as a substantial amount of game console usage occurs with the television turned off. The emergence of Generation 8 consoles may increase national energy consumption.

  1. Video game console usage and US national energy consumption: Results from a field-metering study

    DOE PAGES

    Desroches, Louis-Benoit; Greenblatt, Jeffery B.; Pratt, Stacy; ...

    2014-10-23

    There has been an increased in attention placed on the energy consumption of miscellaneous electronic loads in buildings by energy analysts and policymakers in recent years. The share of electricity consumed by consumer electronics in US households has increased in the last decade. Many devices, however, lack robust energy use data, making energy consumption estimates difficult and uncertain. Video game consoles are high-performance machines present in approximately half of all households and can consume a considerable amount of power. The precise usage of game consoles has significant uncertainty, however, leading to a wide range of recent national energy consumption estimates.more » We present here an analysis based on field-metered usage data, collected as part of a larger field metering study in the USA. This larger study collected data from 880 households in 2012 on a variety of devices, including 113 game consoles (the majority of which are Generation 7 consoles). From our metering, we find that although some consoles are left on nearly 24 h/day, the overall average usage is lower than many other studies have assumed, leading to a US national energy consumption estimate of 7.1 TWh in 2012. Nevertheless, there is an opportunity to reduce energy use with proper game console power management, as a substantial amount of game console usage occurs with the television turned off. The emergence of Generation 8 consoles may increase national energy consumption.« less

  2. Learning about Cri du Chat Syndrome

    MedlinePlus

    ... chat syndrome - also known as 5p- syndrome and cat cry syndrome - is a rare genetic condition that ... du chat syndrome usually include a high-pitched cat-like cry, mental retardation, delayed development, distinctive facial ...

  3. Binding Site Concentration Explains the Differential Susceptibility of Chilo suppressalis and Sesamia inferens to Cry1A-Producing Rice

    PubMed Central

    Han, Chao; Liu, Zewen; Chen, Fajun; Hou, Maolin; Peng, Yufa

    2014-01-01

    Chilo suppressalis and Sesamia inferens are two important lepidopteran rice pests that occur concurrently during outbreaks in paddy fields in the main rice-growing areas of China. Previous and current field tests demonstrate that the transgenic rice line Huahui 1 (HH1) producing a Cry1Ab-Cry1Ac hybrid toxin from the bacterium Bacillus thuringiensis reduces egg and larval densities of C. suppressalis but not of S. inferens. This differential susceptibility to HH1 rice correlates with the reduced susceptibility to Cry1Ab and Cry1Ac toxins in S. inferens larvae compared to C. suppressalis larvae. The goal of this study was to identify the mechanism responsible for this differential susceptibility. In saturation binding assays, both Cry1Ab and Cry1Ac toxins bound with high affinity and in a saturable manner to midgut brush border membrane vesicles (BBMV) from C. suppressalis and S. inferens larvae. While binding affinities were similar, a dramatically lower concentration of Cry1A toxin binding sites was detected for S. inferens BBMV than for C. suppressalis BBMV. In contrast, no significant differences between species were detected for Cry1Ca toxin binding to BBMV. Ligand blotting detected BBMV proteins binding Cry1Ac or Cry1Ca toxins, some of them unique to C. suppressalis or S. inferens. These data support that reduced Cry1A binding site concentration is associated with a lower susceptibility to Cry1A toxins and HH1 rice in S. inferens larvae than in C. suppressalis larvae. Moreover, our data support Cry1Ca as a candidate for pyramiding efforts with Cry1A-producing rice to extend the activity range and durability of this technology against rice stem borers. PMID:24928872

  4. A Data-Based Console Logger for Mission Operations Team Coordination

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thronesbery, Carroll; Malin, Jane T.; Jenks, Kenneth; Overland, David; Oliver, Patrick; Zhang, Jiajie; Gong, Yang; Zhang, Tao

    2005-01-01

    Concepts and prototypes1,2 are discussed for a data-based console logger (D-Logger) to meet new challenges for coordination among flight controllers arising from new exploration mission concepts. The challenges include communication delays, increased crew autonomy, multiple concurrent missions, reduced-size flight support teams that include multidisciplinary flight controllers during quiescent periods, and migrating some flight support activities to flight controller offices. A spiral development approach has been adopted, making simple, but useful functions available early and adding more extensive support later. Evaluations have guided the development of the D-Logger from the beginning and continue to provide valuable user influence about upcoming requirements. D-Logger is part of a suite of tools designed to support future operations personnel and crew. While these tools can be used independently, when used together, they provide yet another level of support by interacting with one another. Recommendations are offered for the development of similar projects.

  5. Laboratory toxicity studies demonstrate no adverse effects of Cry1Ab and Cry3Bb1 to larvae of Adalia bipunctata (Coleoptera: Coccinellidae): the importance of study design.

    PubMed

    Alvarez-Alfageme, Fernando; Bigler, Franz; Romeis, Jörg

    2011-06-01

    Scientific studies are frequently used to support policy decisions related to transgenic crops. Schmidt et al., Arch Environ Contam Toxicol 56:221-228 (2009) recently reported that Cry1Ab and Cry3Bb were toxic to larvae of Adalia bipunctata in direct feeding studies. This study was quoted, among others, to justify the ban of Bt maize (MON 810) in Germany. The study has subsequently been criticized because of methodological shortcomings that make it questionable whether the observed effects were due to direct toxicity of the two Cry proteins. We therefore conducted tritrophic studies assessing whether an effect of the two proteins on A. bipunctata could be detected under more realistic routes of exposure. Spider mites that had fed on Bt maize (events MON810 and MON88017) were used as carriers to expose young A. bipunctata larvae to high doses of biologically active Cry1Ab and Cry3Bb1. Ingestion of the two Cry proteins by A. bipunctata did not affect larval mortality, weight, or development time. These results were confirmed in a subsequent experiment in which A. bipunctata were directly fed with a sucrose solution containing dissolved purified proteins at concentrations approximately 10 times higher than measured in Bt maize-fed spider mites. Hence, our study does not provide any evidence that larvae of A. bipunctata are sensitive to Cry1Ab and Cry3Bb1 or that Bt maize expressing these proteins would adversely affect this predator. The results suggest that the apparent harmful effects of Cry1Ab and Cry3Bb1 reported by Schmidt et al., Arch Environ Contam Toxicol 56:221-228 (2009) were artifacts of poor study design and procedures. It is thus important that decision-makers evaluate the quality of individual scientific studies and do not view all as equally rigorous and relevant.

  6. Grief consolation in eulogy rhetoric: an integrative framework.

    PubMed

    Kunkel, Adrianne Dennis; Dennis, Michael Robert

    2003-01-01

    In an ever more deadly and uncertain world, rhetoric honoring the deceased is still examined as though that was its primary, if not only, function. Some critics of eulogia also identify the consolation of survivors but rarely define it precisely or analyze its rhetorical execution. This article introduces a framework for the critical analysis and production of eulogia that draws from comforting mechanisms recognized in the interpersonal communication, social psychology, and grief therapy literatures. Self-disclosure, problem-focused coping, positive reappraisal, and the affirmation and continuation of relationships with the deceased are shown to inform criticism of five contemporary eulogies. Challenges inherent in the invention and appreciation of eulogy rhetoric are thus illuminated and addressed.

  7. 15. NBS TOP SIDE CONTROL ROOM. THE SUIT SYSTEMS CONSOLE ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    15. NBS TOP SIDE CONTROL ROOM. THE SUIT SYSTEMS CONSOLE IS USED TO CONTROL AIR FLOW AND WATER FLOW TO THE UNDERWATER SPACE SUIT DURING THE TEST. THE SUIT SYSTEMS ENGINEER MONITORS AIR FLOW ON THE PANEL TO THE LEFT, AND SUIT DATA ON THE COMPUTER MONITOR JUST SLIGHTLY TO HIS LEFT. WATER FLOW IS MONITORED ON THE PANEL JUST SLIGHTLY TO HIS RIGHT AND TEST VIDEO TO HIS FAR RIGHT. THE DECK CHIEF MONITORS THE DIVER'S DIVE TIMES ON THE COMPUTER IN THE UPPER RIGHT. THE DECK CHIEF LOGS THEM IN AS THEY ENTER THE WATER, AND LOGS THEM OUT AS THEY EXIT THE WATER. THE COMPUTER CALCULATES TOTAL DIVE TIME. - Marshall Space Flight Center, Neutral Buoyancy Simulator Facility, Rideout Road, Huntsville, Madison County, AL

  8. Coping with Crying in Babies and Toddlers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    High, Pamela

    2012-01-01

    Pamela High, MS, MD, co-director of the Infant Behavior, Cry and Sleep Clinic at the Brown Center for the Study of Children at Risk, discusses the phenomena of infant crying and the impact it has on families. In most cases, infant crying will peak and resolve in the early months, but infant irritability can increase the risk of maternal…

  9. Bacillus thuringiensis insecticidal three-domain Cry toxins: mode of action, insect resistance and consequences for crop protection.

    PubMed

    Pardo-López, Liliana; Soberón, Mario; Bravo, Alejandra

    2013-01-01

    Bacillus thuringiensis bacteria are insect pathogens that produce different Cry and Cyt toxins to kill their hosts. Here we review the group of three-domain Cry (3d-Cry) toxins. Expression of these 3d-Cry toxins in transgenic crops has contributed to efficient control of insect pests and a reduction in the use of chemical insecticides. The mode of action of 3d-Cry toxins involves sequential interactions with several insect midgut proteins that facilitate the formation of an oligomeric structure and induce its insertion into the membrane, forming a pore that kills midgut cells. We review recent progress in our understanding of the mechanism of action of these Cry toxins and focus our attention on the different mechanisms of resistance that insects have evolved to counter their action, such as mutations in cadherin, APN and ABC transporter genes. Activity of Cry1AMod toxins, which are able to form toxin oligomers in the absence of receptors, against different resistant populations, including those affected in the ABC transporter and the role of dominant negative mutants as antitoxins, supports the hypothesis that toxin oligomerization is a limiting step in the Cry insecticidal activity. Knowledge of the action of 3d-Cry toxin and the resistance mechanisms to these toxins will set the basis for a rational design of novel toxins to overcome insect resistance, extending the useful lifespan of Cry toxins in insect control programs.

  10. New Resistance Mechanism in Helicoverpa armigera Threatens Transgenic Crops Expressing Bacillus thuringiensis Cry1Ac Toxin

    PubMed Central

    Gunning, Robin V.; Dang, Ho T.; Kemp, Fred C.; Nicholson, Ian C.; Moores, Graham D.

    2005-01-01

    In Australia, the cotton bollworm, Helicoverpa armigera, has a long history of resistance to conventional insecticides. Transgenic cotton (expressing the Bacillus thuringiensis toxin Cry1Ac) has been grown for H. armigera control since 1996. It is demonstrated here that a population of Australian H. armigera has developed resistance to Cry1Ac toxin (275-fold). Some 70% of resistant H. armigera larvae were able to survive on Cry1Ac transgenic cotton (Ingard) The resistance phenotype is inherited as an autosomal semidominant trait. Resistance was associated with elevated esterase levels, which cosegregated with resistance. In vitro studies employing surface plasmon resonance technology and other biochemical techniques demonstrated that resistant strain esterase could bind to Cry1Ac protoxin and activated toxin. In vivo studies showed that Cry1Ac-resistant larvae fed Cy1Ac transgenic cotton or Cry1Ac-treated artificial diet had lower esterase activity than non-Cry1Ac-fed larvae. A resistance mechanism in which esterase sequesters Cry1Ac is proposed. PMID:15870346

  11. New resistance mechanism in Helicoverpa armigera threatens transgenic crops expressing Bacillus thuringiensis Cry1Ac toxin.

    PubMed

    Gunning, Robin V; Dang, Ho T; Kemp, Fred C; Nicholson, Ian C; Moores, Graham D

    2005-05-01

    In Australia, the cotton bollworm, Helicoverpa armigera, has a long history of resistance to conventional insecticides. Transgenic cotton (expressing the Bacillus thuringiensis toxin Cry1Ac) has been grown for H. armigera control since 1996. It is demonstrated here that a population of Australian H. armigera has developed resistance to Cry1Ac toxin (275-fold). Some 70% of resistant H. armigera larvae were able to survive on Cry1Ac transgenic cotton (Ingard) The resistance phenotype is inherited as an autosomal semidominant trait. Resistance was associated with elevated esterase levels, which cosegregated with resistance. In vitro studies employing surface plasmon resonance technology and other biochemical techniques demonstrated that resistant strain esterase could bind to Cry1Ac protoxin and activated toxin. In vivo studies showed that Cry1Ac-resistant larvae fed Cy1Ac transgenic cotton or Cry1Ac-treated artificial diet had lower esterase activity than non-Cry1Ac-fed larvae. A resistance mechanism in which esterase sequesters Cry1Ac is proposed.

  12. In Vivo Crystallization of Three-Domain Cry Toxins

    PubMed Central

    Adalat, Rooma; Saleem, Faiza; Crickmore, Neil; Naz, Shagufta; Shakoori, Abdul Rauf

    2017-01-01

    Bacillus thuringiensis (Bt) is the most successful, environmentally-friendly, and intensively studied microbial insecticide. The major characteristic of Bt is the production of proteinaceous crystals containing toxins with specific activity against many pests including dipteran, lepidopteran, and coleopteran insects, as well as nematodes, protozoa, flukes, and mites. These crystals allow large quantities of the protein toxins to remain stable in the environment until ingested by a susceptible host. It has been previously established that 135 kDa Cry proteins have a crystallization domain at their C-terminal end. In the absence of this domain, Cry proteins often need helper proteins or other factors for crystallization. In this review, we classify the Cry proteins based on their requirements for crystallization. PMID:28282927

  13. In Vivo Crystallization of Three-Domain Cry Toxins.

    PubMed

    Adalat, Rooma; Saleem, Faiza; Crickmore, Neil; Naz, Shagufta; Shakoori, Abdul Rauf

    2017-03-09

    Bacillus thuringiensis (Bt) is the most successful, environmentally-friendly, and intensively studied microbial insecticide. The major characteristic of Bt is the production of proteinaceous crystals containing toxins with specific activity against many pests including dipteran, lepidopteran, and coleopteran insects, as well as nematodes, protozoa, flukes, and mites. These crystals allow large quantities of the protein toxins to remain stable in the environment until ingested by a susceptible host. It has been previously established that 135 kDa Cry proteins have a crystallization domain at their C-terminal end. In the absence of this domain, Cry proteins often need helper proteins or other factors for crystallization. In this review, we classify the Cry proteins based on their requirements for crystallization.

  14. Sympathy Crying: Insights from Infrared Thermal Imaging on a Female Sample

    PubMed Central

    Morris, Paul; Terry, Samantha; Baker, Marc; Gallese, Vittorio; Reddy, Vasudevi

    2016-01-01

    Sympathy crying is an odd and complex mixture of physiological and emotional phenomena. Standard psychophysiological theories of emotion cannot attribute crying to a single subdivision of the autonomic nervous system (ANS) and disagreement exists regarding the emotional origin of sympathy crying. The current experiment examines sympathy crying using functional thermal infrared imaging (FTII), a novel contactless measure of ANS activity. To induce crying female participants were given the choice to decide which film they wanted to cry to. Compared to baseline, temperature started increasing on the forehead, the peri-orbital region, the cheeks and the chin before crying and reached even higher temperatures during crying. The maxillary area showed the opposite pattern and a gradual temperature decrease was observed compared to baseline as a result of emotional sweating. The results suggest that tears of sympathy are part of a complex autonomic interaction between the sympathetic and the parasympathetic nervous systems, with the latter preceding the former. The emotional origin of the phenomenon seems to derive from subjective internal factors that relate to one’s personal experiences and attributes with tears arising in the form of catharses or as part of shared sadness. PMID:27716801

  15. Ligand specificity and affinity of BT-R1, the Bacillus thuringiensis Cry1A toxin receptor from Manduca sexta, expressed in mammalian and insect cell cultures.

    PubMed Central

    Keeton, T P; Bulla, L A

    1997-01-01

    The Manduca sexta receptor for the Bacillus thuringiensis Cry1Aa, Cry1Ab, and Cry1Ac toxins, BT-R1, has been expressed in heterologous cell culture, and its ligand binding characteristics have been determined. When transfected with the BT-R1 cDNA, insect and mammalian cell cultures produce a binding protein of approximately 195 kDa, in contrast to natural BT-R1 from M. sexia, which has an apparent molecular weight of 210 kDa. Transfection of cultured Spodoptera frugiperda cells with the BT-R1 cDNA imparts Cry1A-specific high-affinity binding activity typical of membranes prepared from larval M. sexta midguts. Competition assays with BT-R1 prepared from larval M. sexta midguts and transiently expressed in cell culture reveal virtually identical affinities for the Cry1Aa, Cry1Ab, and Cry1Ac toxins, clearly demonstrating the absolute specificity of the receptor for toxins of the lepidopteran-specific Cry1A family. BT-R1 therefore remains the only M. sexta Cry1A binding protein to be purified, cloned, and functionally expressed in heterologous cell culture, and for the first time, we are able to correlate the Cry1Aa, Cry1Ab, and Cry1Ac toxin sensitivities of M. sexta to the identity and ligand binding characteristics of a single midgut receptor molecule. PMID:9292994

  16. Cry1Ac and Vip3Aa proteins from Bacillus thuringiensis targeting Cry toxin resistance in Diatraea flavipennella and Elasmopalpus lignosellus from sugarcane

    PubMed Central

    2017-01-01

    The biological potential of Vip and Cry proteins from Bacillus is well known and widely established. Thus, it is important to look for new genes showing different modes of action, selecting those with differentiated entomotoxic activity against Diatraea flavipennella and Elasmopalpus lignosellus, which are secondary pests of sugarcane. Therefore, Cry1 and Vip3 proteins were expressed in Escherichia coli, and their toxicities were evaluated based on bioassays using neonate larvae. Of those, the most toxic were Cry1Ac and Vip3Aa considering the LC50 values. Toxins from E. coli were purified, solubilized, trypsinized, and biotinylated. Brush Border Membrane Vesicles (BBMVs) were prepared from intestines of the two species to perform homologous and heterologous competition assays. The binding assays demonstrated interactions between Cry1Aa, Cry1Ac, and Vip3Aa toxins and proteins from the BBMV of D. flavipennella and E. lignosellus. Homologous competition assays demonstrated that binding to one of the BBMV proteins was specific for each toxin. Heterologous competition assays indicated that Vip3Aa was unable to compete for Cry1Ac toxin binding. Our results suggest that Cry1Ac and Vip3Aa may have potential in future production of transgenic sugarcane for control of D. flavipennella and E. lignosellus, but more research is needed on the potential antagonism or synergism of the toxins in these pests. PMID:28123906

  17. Cry1Ac and Vip3Aa proteins from Bacillus thuringiensis targeting Cry toxin resistance in Diatraea flavipennella and Elasmopalpus lignosellus from sugarcane.

    PubMed

    Lemes, Ana Rita Nunes; Figueiredo, Camila Soares; Sebastião, Isis; Marques da Silva, Liliane; da Costa Alves, Rebeka; de Siqueira, Herbert Álvaro Abreu; Lemos, Manoel Victor Franco; Fernandes, Odair Aparecido; Desidério, Janete Apparecida

    2017-01-01

    The biological potential of Vip and Cry proteins from Bacillus is well known and widely established. Thus, it is important to look for new genes showing different modes of action, selecting those with differentiated entomotoxic activity against Diatraea flavipennella and Elasmopalpus lignosellus, which are secondary pests of sugarcane. Therefore, Cry1 and Vip3 proteins were expressed in Escherichia coli, and their toxicities were evaluated based on bioassays using neonate larvae. Of those, the most toxic were Cry1Ac and Vip3Aa considering the LC50 values. Toxins from E. coli were purified, solubilized, trypsinized, and biotinylated. Brush Border Membrane Vesicles (BBMVs) were prepared from intestines of the two species to perform homologous and heterologous competition assays. The binding assays demonstrated interactions between Cry1Aa, Cry1Ac, and Vip3Aa toxins and proteins from the BBMV of D. flavipennella and E. lignosellus. Homologous competition assays demonstrated that binding to one of the BBMV proteins was specific for each toxin. Heterologous competition assays indicated that Vip3Aa was unable to compete for Cry1Ac toxin binding. Our results suggest that Cry1Ac and Vip3Aa may have potential in future production of transgenic sugarcane for control of D. flavipennella and E. lignosellus, but more research is needed on the potential antagonism or synergism of the toxins in these pests.

  18. Bacillus thuringiensis HD-73 Spores Have Surface-Localized Cry1Ac Toxin: Physiological and Pathogenic Consequences

    PubMed Central

    Du, C.; Nickerson, K. W.

    1996-01-01

    Spores from Cry(sup+) strains of Bacillus thuringiensis bound fluorescein isothiocyanate-labeled antibodies specific for the 65-kDa activated Cry 1Ac toxin, whereas spores from Bacillus cereus and Cry(sup-) strains of B. thuringiensis did not. The Cry(sup+) spores could be activated for germination by alkaline conditions (pH 10.3), whereas Cry(sup-) spores could not. Once the surrounding exosporia had been removed or permeabilized, Cry(sup+) spores were able to bind the toxin receptor(s) from insect gut brush border membrane vesicle preparations, and their germination rates were increased ca. threefold in the presence of brush border membrane vesicles. A model is presented whereby in the soil the Cry toxins on the spore surface are protected by the exosporium while in the gut they are exposed and available for binding to the insect receptors. This model explains why the disulfide-rich C terminus of the cry genes is so highly conserved even though it is removed during the processing of the protoxin to the activated toxin. It also highlights the trade-off resulting from having Cry toxins located on the spore surface, i.e., decreased spore resistance versus enhanced insect pathogenesis. PMID:16535421

  19. Histopathological effects and determination of the putative receptor of Bacillus thuringiensis Cry1Da toxin in Spodoptera littoralis midgut.

    PubMed

    BenFarhat-Touzri, Dalel; Saadaoui, Marwa; Abdelkefi-Mesrati, Lobna; Saadaoui, Imen; Azzouz, Hichem; Tounsi, Slim

    2013-02-01

    Bacillus thuringiensis subsp. aizawai strain HD133, known by its effectiveness against Spodoptera species, produces many insecticidal proteins including Cry1Ab, Cry1Ca and Cry1Da. In the present study, the insecticidal activity of Cry1Da against Spodoptera littoralis was investigated. It showed toxicity with an LC(50) of 224.4 ng/cm(2) with 95% confidence limits of (178.61-270.19) and an LC(90) of 467.77 ng/cm(2) with 95% confidence limits of (392.89-542.65). The midgut histopathology of Cry1Da fed larvae showed vesicle formation in the apical region, vacuolization and destruction of epithelial cells. Biotinylated-activated Cry1Da toxin bound protein of about 65 kDa on blots of S. littoralis brush border membrane preparations. This putative receptor differs in molecular size from those recognized by Cry1C and Vip3A which are active against this polyphagous insect. This difference in midgut receptors strongly supports the use of Cry1Da as insecticidal agent, particularly in case of Cry and/or Vip-resistance management.

  20. Overview and forensic investigation approaches of the gaming console Sony PlayStation Portable

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schön, Stephan; Schön, Ralph; Kröger, Knut; Creutzburg, Reiner

    2013-03-01

    This paper addresses the forensically interesting features of the Sony PlayStation Portable game console. The construction and the internal structure are analyzed precisely and interesting forensic features of the operating system and the file system are presented.

  1. Astronauts Sally Ride and James Buchli at the CapCom console

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1981-01-01

    Astronauts Sally Ride and James Buchli at the CapCom console during the STS-2 simulation (33962); Dele Moore, remote manipulator system (RMS) specialist, stands beside Ride as they go over procedures (33963).

  2. 77 FR 28622 - Certain Gaming and Entertainment Consoles, Related Software, and Components Thereof; Notice of...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-05-15

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office INTERNATIONAL TRADE COMMISSION Certain Gaming and Entertainment Consoles, Related Software, and Components Thereof; Notice of Request for Statements on the Public Interest AGENCY: U.S. International Trade Commission. ACTION:...

  3. 77 FR 43118 - Certain Gaming and Entertainment Consoles, Related Software, and Components Thereof; Notice of...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-07-23

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office INTERNATIONAL TRADE COMMISSION Certain Gaming and Entertainment Consoles, Related Software, and Components Thereof; Notice of Commission Determination To Review a Final Initial Determination Finding a Violation of Section 337;...

  4. Shared binding sites in Lepidoptera for Bacillus thuringiensis Cry1Ja and Cry1A toxins.

    PubMed

    Herrero, S; González-Cabrera, J; Tabashnik, B E; Ferré, J

    2001-12-01

    Bacillus thuringiensis toxins act by binding to specific target sites in the insect midgut epithelial membrane. The best-known mechanism of resistance to B. thuringiensis toxins is reduced binding to target sites. Because alteration of a binding site shared by several toxins may cause resistance to all of them, knowledge of which toxins share binding sites is useful for predicting cross-resistance. Conversely, cross-resistance among toxins suggests that the toxins share a binding site. At least two strains of diamondback moth (Plutella xylostella) with resistance to Cry1A toxins and reduced binding of Cry1A toxins have strong cross-resistance to Cry1Ja. Thus, we hypothesized that Cry1Ja shares binding sites with Cry1A toxins. We tested this hypothesis in six moth and butterfly species, each from a different family: Cacyreus marshalli (Lycaenidae), Lobesia botrana (Tortricidae), Manduca sexta (Sphingidae), Pectinophora gossypiella (Gelechiidae), P. xylostella (Plutellidae), and Spodoptera exigua (Noctuidae). Although the extent of competition varied among species, experiments with biotinylated Cry1Ja and radiolabeled Cry1Ac showed that Cry1Ja and Cry1Ac competed for binding sites in all six species. A recent report also indicates shared binding sites for Cry1Ja and Cry1A toxins in Heliothis virescens (Noctuidae). Thus, shared binding sites for Cry1Ja and Cry1A occur in all lepidopteran species tested so far.

  5. Some philosophies can console: an old but forgotten message.

    PubMed

    Melley, C

    1998-01-01

    Thesis: Since Socrates, western philosophy has been concerned with the study of humankind, with a strong emphasis on how we ought to live and why. Philosophy, in its multiple forms and expressions, has enabled many to pursue their lives with greater depth, richness, and variety; yet it can also act as a therapeutic method for the achievement of a healthier life. Asking and answering philosophical questions such as 'How best ought I live?', 'What is the meaning of my life in relation to the whole?', 'Why should I live?', 'What constitutes a healthy life?' can act as therapeutic entryways, not only within the parameters of one's own mind or in a university classroom, but also within a health care/therapy context. Philosophy, both as subject and method, is a powerful, largely unrecognized, therapeutic instrument for social medicine, an instrument whose application in various health care settings could benefit those--patient and staff--in need of consolation and support when they need it most.

  6. ETR BUILDING, TRA642, INTERIOR. CONSOLE FLOOR, NORTH HALF. CAMERA IS ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    ETR BUILDING, TRA-642, INTERIOR. CONSOLE FLOOR, NORTH HALF. CAMERA IS NEAR NORTHWEST CORNER AND FACING SOUTH ALONG WEST CORRIDOR. STORAGE CANAL IS ALONG LEFT OF VIEW; PERIMETER WALL, ALONG RIGHT. CORRIDOR WAS ONE MEANS OF WALKING FROM NORTH TO SOUTH SIDE OF CONSOLE FLOOR. INL NEGATIVE NO. HD46-18-1. Mike Crane, Photographer, 2/2005 - Idaho National Engineering Laboratory, Test Reactor Area, Materials & Engineering Test Reactors, Scoville, Butte County, ID

  7. Genetic analysis of cryIIIA gene expression in Bacillus thuringiensis.

    PubMed

    Salamitou, S; Agaisse, H; Bravo, A; Lereclus, D

    1996-08-01

    The Bacillus thuringiensis (Bt) cryIIIA gene is regulated by a different mechanism from that of most of the other cry genes. Its expression begins during late-exponential growth and not during sporulation as for the other classes of cry genes. Moreover, in Bacillus subtilis, cryIIIA expression is independent of the major sporulation-specific sigma factors and is increased in a spoOA genetic background. We used lacZ fusions and primer-extension analysis to follow the time-course of cryIIIA transcription in Bt wild-type and in various Spo- genetic backgrounds (spoOA, sigE and sigK). cryIIIA was activated from the end of vegetative growth to stage II of sporulation (t3) in the wild-type strain. Thereafter, transcription from the same promoter continued, at a decreasing rate, until the end of stage III. In the spoOA mutant strain, the same promoter was activated for at least 15 h during the stationary phase. cryIIIA activation in the sigK genetic background was similar to that in the wild-type but was extended in a sigma E mutant strain. Thus cryIIIA expression in Bt is not directly dependent on the major sporulation-specific sigma factors. Furthermore, an event linked with the thE-dependent period of sporulation ends cryIIIA activation, although transcription of this gene does not switch off before the end of stage III.

  8. Molecular and insecticidal characterization of a Cry1I protein toxic to insects of the families Noctuidae, Tortricidae, Plutellidae, and Chrysomelidae.

    PubMed

    Ruiz de Escudero, Iñigo; Estela, Anna; Porcar, Manuel; Martínez, Clara; Oguiza, José A; Escriche, Baltasar; Ferré, Juan; Caballero, Primitivo

    2006-07-01

    The most notable characteristic of Bacillus thuringiensis is its ability to produce insecticidal proteins. More than 300 different proteins have been described with specific activity against insect species. We report the molecular and insecticidal characterization of a novel cry gene encoding a protein of the Cry1I group with toxic activity towards insects of the families Noctuidae, Tortricidae, Plutellidae, and Chrysomelidae. PCR analysis detected a DNA sequence with an open reading frame of 2.2 kb which encodes a protein with a molecular mass of 80.9 kDa. Trypsin digestion of this protein resulted in a fragment of ca. 60 kDa, typical of activated Cry1 proteins. The deduced sequence of the protein has homologies of 96.1% with Cry1Ia1, 92.8% with Cry1Ib1, and 89.6% with Cry1Ic1. According to the Cry protein classification criteria, this protein was named Cry1Ia7. The expression of the gene in Escherichia coli resulted in a protein that was water soluble and toxic to several insect species. The 50% lethal concentrations for larvae of Earias insulana, Lobesia botrana, Plutella xylostella, and Leptinotarsa decemlineata were 21.1, 8.6, 12.3, and 10.0 microg/ml, respectively. Binding assays with biotinylated toxins to E. insulana and L. botrana midgut membrane vesicles revealed that Cry1Ia7 does not share binding sites with Cry1Ab or Cry1Ac proteins, which are commonly present in B. thuringiensis-treated crops and commercial B. thuringiensis-based bioinsecticides. We discuss the potential of Cry1Ia7 as an active ingredient which can be used in combination with Cry1Ab or Cry1Ac in pest control and the management of resistance to B. thuringiensis toxins.

  9. Identification of a New cry1I-Type Gene as a Candidate for Gene Pyramiding in Corn To Control Ostrinia Species Larvae

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Can; Abdelgaffar, Heba M.; Pan, Hongyu; Song, Fuping

    2015-01-01

    Pyramiding of diverse cry toxin genes from Bacillus thuringiensis with different modes of action is a desirable strategy to delay the evolution of resistance in the European corn borer (Ostrinia nubilalis). Considering the dependency of susceptibility to Cry toxins on toxin binding to receptors in the midgut of target pests, a diverse mode of action is commonly defined as recognition of unique binding sites in the target insect. In this study, we present a novel cry1Ie toxin gene (cry1Ie2) as a candidate for pyramiding with Cry1Ab or Cry1Fa in corn to control Ostrinia species larvae. The new toxin gene encodes an 81-kDa protein that is processed to a protease-resistant core form of approximately 55 kDa by trypsin digestion. The purified protoxin displayed high toxicity to Ostrinia furnacalis and O. nubilalis larvae but low to no activity against Spodoptera or heliothine species or the coleopteran Tenebrio molitor. Results of binding assays with 125I-labeled Cry1Ab toxin and brush border membrane vesicles from O. nubilalis larvae demonstrated that Cry1Ie2 does not recognize the Cry1Ab binding sites in that insect. Reciprocal competition binding assays with biotin-labeled Cry1Ie2 confirmed the lack of shared sites with Cry1Ab or Cry1Fa in O. nubilalis brush border membrane vesicles. These data support Cry1Ie2 as a good candidate for pyramiding with Cry1Ab or Cry1Fa in corn to increase the control of O. nubilalis and reduce the risk of resistance evolution. PMID:25795679

  10. Study on the Relationship between Usability and Number of Buttons of an Interface Console

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miyakawa, Michio; Koyama, Nozomu; Maeda, Yoshinobu

    Usability, or easiness of operation of a console such as a universal remote console (URC), has been investigated in terms of the optimum number of buttons of the console which minimizes the operation time. The console operation is consisted of two major processes, that is, cognition of the button and motion of hand to press it. Cognitive workload would increase in accordance with the increase in number of buttons because difficulty in finding a correct button is increased. Conversely, physical workload would increase when number of buttons is decreased, because one has to press many times the same buttons in different meanings. Thus the optimum number of buttons which minimizes the total operation time of a console appears. To verify this hypothesis, several virtual consoles equipped with different number of buttons were developed on a PC. Subjects were asked to input designated family names in Roman alphabets. Easiness of operation, i.e. usability was evaluated by the operation time among 49 subjects. The operation time showed the minimum value when the number of buttons was approximately 18.

  11. RNAi induced knockdown of a cadherin-like protein (EF531715) does not affect toxicity of Cry34/35Ab1 or Cry3Aa to Diabrotica virgifera virgifera larvae (Coleoptera: Chrysomelidae).

    PubMed

    Tan, Sek Yee; Rangasamy, Murugesan; Wang, Haichuan; Vélez, Ana María; Hasler, James; McCaskill, David; Xu, Tao; Chen, Hong; Jurzenski, Jessica; Kelker, Matthew; Xu, Xiaoping; Narva, Kenneth; Siegfried, Blair D

    2016-08-01

    The western corn rootworm (WCR), Diabrotica virgifera virgifera LeConte, is an important maize pest throughout most of the U.S. Corn Belt. Bacillus thuringiensis (Bt) insecticidal proteins including modified Cry3Aa and Cry34/35Ab1 have been expressed in transgenic maize to protect against WCR feeding damage. To date, there is limited information regarding the WCR midgut target sites for these proteins. In this study, we examined whether a cadherin-like gene from Diabrotica virgifera virgifera (DvvCad; GenBank accession # EF531715) associated with WCR larval midgut tissue is necessary for Cry3Aa or Cry34/35Ab1 toxicity. Experiments were designed to examine the sensitivity of WCR to trypsin activated Cry3Aa and Cry34/35Ab1 after oral feeding of the DvvCad dsRNA to knockdown gene expression. Quantitative real-time PCR confirmed that DvvCad mRNA transcript levels were reduced in larvae treated with cadherin dsRNA. Relative cadherin expression by immunoblot analysis and nano-liquid chromatography - mass spectrometry (nanoLC-MS) of WCR neonate brush border membrane vesicle (BBMV) preparations exposed to DvvCad dsRNA confirmed reduced cadherin expression when compared to BBMV from untreated larvae. However, the larval mortality and growth inhibition of WCR neonates exposed to cadherin dsRNA for two days followed by feeding exposure to either Cry3Aa or Cry34/35Ab1 for four days was not significantly different to that observed in insects exposed to either Cry3Aa or Cry34/35Ab1 alone. In combination, these results suggest that cadherin is unlikely to be involved in the toxicity of Cry3Aa or Cry34/35Ab1 to WCR.

  12. Identification of Holotrichia oblita midgut proteins that bind to Cry8-like toxin from Bacillus thuringiensis and assembling of H. oblita midgut tissue transcriptome.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Jian; Huang, Ying; Shu, Changlong; Soberón, Mario; Bravo, Alejandra; Liu, Chunqing; Song, Fuping; Lai, Jinsheng; Zhang, Jie

    2017-04-07

    The Bacillus thuringiensis strain HBF-18 (CGMCC2070), containing two cry genes (cry8-like and cry8Ga), is toxic to Holotrichia oblita larvae. Both Cry8-like and Cry8Ga proteins are active against this insect pest, while Cry8-like is the more toxic protein. To analyze the binding characteristics of Cry8-like and Cry8Ga proteins to brush border membrane vesicles (BBMV) in H. oblita larvae, binding assays were conducted with a fluorescent DyLight488-labeled Cry8-like toxin. Results of binding saturation assays demonstrated that Cry8-like binds specifically to binding sites on BBMV from H. oblita and heterologous competition assays revealed that Cry8Ga shared binding sites with Cry8-like. Furthermore, Cry8-like-binding proteins in midgut from H. oblita larvae were identified by pull-down assays, and by liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS). In addition, the H. oblita midgut transcriptome was assembled by high-throughput RNA sequencing and used for identification of Cry8-like binding proteins. Eight Cry8-like-binding proteins were obtained from pull-down assays conducted with BBMV. The LC-MS/MS data of these proteins successfully matched with the H. oblita transcriptome, and the BLASTX results identified five proteins as serine protease, transferrin-like, ATPase catalytic subunit, and actin. These identified Cry8-like-binding proteins were different with those previously confirmed as receptors for Cry1A proteins in lepidopteran insect species such as aminopeptidase, alkaline phosphatase and cadherin.Importance:Holotrichia oblita is one of main soil-dwelling pests in China. The larvae damage the roots of crops, and resulted in significant yield reduction and economic losses. It is difficult to control principally due to its soil living habits. In recent years, some Cry8 toxins from Bacillus thuringiensis were shown to be active against this pest. The study of the mechanism of action of these Cry8 toxins is needed for their effective use in the control

  13. Cloning and analysis of the first cry gene from Bacillus popilliae.

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, J; Hodgman, T C; Krieger, L; Schnetter, W; Schairer, H U

    1997-01-01

    An 80-kDa parasporal crystal protein was detected in protein extracts of sporangia of Bacillus popilliae isolated from a diseased larva of the common cockchafer (Melolontha melolontha L.). Amino acid analysis of tryptic peptides revealed significant homology to the Cry2Aa endotoxins of Bacillus thuringiensis. The gene cryBP1 (cry18Aa1), which codes for the parasporal crystal protein, was found in a putative cry operon on the bacterial chromosome, which contains at least one further (smaller) open reading frame, orf1. The 706-amino-acid-long CryBP1 (Cry18Aa1) protein has a predicted molecular mass of 79 kDa and shows about 40% sequence identity to the Cry2 polypeptides of B. thuringiensis. In the light of published observations which suggest that the parasporal crystal proteins of B. popilliae are slightly toxic to their grub hosts, we propose the following survival strategy of B. popilliae. As an obligate pathogen of grubs, B. popilliae germinates in the gut of a grub and the parasporal crystal proteins are released and activated. The activated protein does not cause colloid osmotic lysis but instead damages the gut wall somehow to allow the vegetative cells to enter the hemolymph more easily. By becoming a parasite, B. popilliae can continue to proliferate efficiently while the living grub provides a food supply. This process is in contrast to that of B. thuringiensis, which rapidly kills the insect and is then limited to growth on the larval carcass. PMID:9209052

  14. Mode of action of Bacillus thuringiensis Cry and Cyt toxins and their potential for insect control.

    PubMed

    Bravo, Alejandra; Gill, Sarjeet S; Soberón, Mario

    2007-03-15

    Bacillus thuringiensis Crystal (Cry) and Cytolitic (Cyt) protein families are a diverse group of proteins with activity against insects of different orders--Lepidoptera, Coleoptera, Diptera and also against other invertebrates such as nematodes. Their primary action is to lyse midgut epithelial cells by inserting into the target membrane and forming pores. Among this group of proteins, members of the 3-Domain Cry family are used worldwide for insect control, and their mode of action has been characterized in some detail. Phylogenetic analyses established that the diversity of the 3-Domain Cry family evolved by the independent evolution of the three domains and by swapping of domain III among toxins. Like other pore-forming toxins (PFT) that affect mammals, Cry toxins interact with specific receptors located on the host cell surface and are activated by host proteases following receptor binding resulting in the formation of a pre-pore oligomeric structure that is insertion competent. In contrast, Cyt toxins directly interact with membrane lipids and insert into the membrane. Recent evidence suggests that Cyt synergize or overcome resistance to mosquitocidal-Cry proteins by functioning as a Cry-membrane bound receptor. In this review we summarize recent findings on the mode of action of Cry and Cyt toxins, and compare them to the mode of action of other bacterial PFT. Also, we discuss their use in the control of agricultural insect pests and insect vectors of human diseases.

  15. Single-reversal charge in the β10-β11 receptor-binding loop of Bacillus thuringiensis Cry4Aa and Cry4Ba toxins reflects their different toxicity against Culex spp. larvae.

    PubMed

    Visitsattapongse, Sarinporn; Sakdee, Somsri; Leetacheewa, Somphob; Angsuthanasombat, Chanan

    2014-07-25

    Bacillus thuringiensis Cry4Aa toxin was previously shown to be much more toxic to Culex mosquito-larvae than its closely related toxin - Cry4Ba, conceivably due to their sequence differences within the β10-β11 receptor-binding loop. Here, single-Ala substitutions of five residues (Pro(510), Thr(512), Tyr(513), Lys(514) and Thr(515)) within the Cry4Aa β10-β11 loop revealed that only Lys(514) corresponding to the relative position of Cry4Ba-Asp(454) is crucial for toxicity against Culex quinquefasciatus larvae. Interestingly, charge-reversal mutations at Cry4Ba-Asp(454) (D454R and D454K) revealed a marked increase in toxicity against such less-susceptible larvae. In situ binding analyses revealed that both Cry4Ba-D454R and D454K mutants exhibited a significant increase in binding to apical microvilli of Culex larval midguts, albeit at lower-binding activity when compared with Cry4Aa. Altogether, our present data suggest that a positively charged side-chain near the tip of the β10-β11 loop plays a critical role in determining target specificity of Cry4Aa against Culex spp., and hence a great increase in the Culex larval toxicity of Cry4Ba was obtained toward an opposite-charge conversion of the corresponding Asp(454).

  16. Blepharochalasis: something to cry about.

    PubMed

    Browning, Richard J; Sanchez, April T; Mullins, Stephen; Sheehan, Daniel J; Davis, Loretta S

    2017-03-01

    Blepharochalasis is a rare disorder of unknown etiology defined by loose, atrophic periorbital skin following recurrent episodes of eyelid edema. Characteristic histopathology shows complete absence of elastic fibers. The current case progressed after multiple episodes of crying, which may be related to matrix metalloproteinase dysregulation. This case offers further insights into the possible pathogenesis of blepharochalasis, paving the way for more targeted, disease-modifying therapies.

  17. Can Newborns Discriminate between Their Own Cry and the Cry of Another Newborn Infant?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dondi, Marco; Simion, Francesca; Caltran, Giovanna

    1999-01-01

    Two experiments tested whether newborns could discriminate their own and another newborn's cry. Results indicated that awake newborns expressed facial distress more frequently and longer to another newborn's cry than to their own. Sucking decreased significantly between pretest phase and first minute of another infant's cry. Asleep infants'…

  18. Domain III substitution in Bacillus thuringiensis delta-endotoxin CryIA(b) results in superior toxicity for Spodoptera exigua and altered membrane protein recognition.

    PubMed Central

    de Maagd, R A; Kwa, M S; van der Klei, H; Yamamoto, T; Schipper, B; Vlak, J M; Stiekema, W J; Bosch, D

    1996-01-01

    To test our hypothesis that substitution of domain III of Bacillus thuringiensis delta-endotoxin (Cry) proteins might improve toxicity to pest insects, e.g., Spodoptera exigua, in vivo recombination was used to produce a number of cryIA(b)-cryIC hybrid genes. A rapid screening assay was subsequently exploited to select hybrid genes encoding soluble protoxins. Screening of 120 recombinants yielded two different hybrid genes encoding soluble proteins with domains I and II of CryIA(b) and domain III of CryIC. These proteins differed by only one amino acid residue. Both hybrid protoxins gave a protease-resistant toxin upon in vitro activation by trypsin. Bioassays showed that one of these CryIA(b)-CryIC hybrid proteins (H04) was highly toxic to S. exigua compared with the parental CryIA(b) protein and significantly more toxic than CryIC. In semiquantitative binding studies with biotin-labelled toxins and intact brush border membrane vesicles of S. exigua, this domain III substitution appeared not to affect binding-site specificity. However, binding to a 200-kDa protein by CryIA(b) in preparations of solubilized and blotted brush border membrane vesicle proteins was completely abolished by the domain III substitution. A reciprocal hybrid containing domains I and II of CryIC and domain III of CryIA(b) did bind to the 200-kDa protein, confirming that domain III of CryIA(b) was essential for this reaction. These results show that domain III of CryIC protein plays an important role in the level of toxicity to S. exigua, that substitution of domain III may be a powerful tool to increase the repertoire of available active toxins for pest insects, and that domain III is involved in binding to gut epithelium membrane proteins of S. exigua. PMID:8633853

  19. Bactrian camel nanobody-based immunoassay for specific and sensitive detection of Cry1Fa toxin.

    PubMed

    Wang, Pingyan; Li, Guanghui; Yan, Junrong; Hu, Yonghong; Zhang, Cunzheng; Liu, Xianjin; Wan, Yakun

    2014-12-15

    The variable domain of the heavy-chain-only antibody (VHH) or nanobody (Nb), derived from camelids, begins to play an important role on the detection of protein markers. In this study, we constructed a phage-displayed library of VHHs against Cry1Fa by immunizing a healthy Bactrian camel with Cry1Fa toxin. After a series of bio-panning and screening by phage display technology, three anti-Cry1Fa nanobodies (Nbs) with great difference in complementarity determining region 3 (CDR3) were obtained and they were highly specific to Cry1Fa as well as showed full of activity when exposed to 70 °C for 3 h. Through modifying Nbs with Horseradish Peroxidase (HRP) and biotin, two Nbs which can recognize the different epitopes of Cry1Fa were determined and they were used to establish a novel sandwich immune ELISA based on biotin-SA interaction for Cry1Fa detection. The immunoassay exhibited a linear range from 1 to 100 ng/mL with a detection limit of 0.88 ng/mL. The recoveries from spiked corn and soybean samples were ranged from 83.33 to 117.17%, with a coefficient of variation (C.V) less than 6.0%. All together, the proposed immunoassay will be a promising way for sensitive and accurate determination of Cry1Fa toxin.

  20. Isolation and characterization of a new Bacillus thuringiensis strain Lip harboring a new cry1Aa gene highly toxic to Ephestia kuehniella (Lepidoptera: Pyralidae) larvae.

    PubMed

    El Khoury, Micheline; Azzouz, Hichem; Chavanieu, Alain; Abdelmalak, Nouha; Chopineau, Joël; Awad, Mireille Kallassy

    2014-06-01

    The aim of this study was to characterize new Bacillus thuringiensis strains that have a potent insecticidal activity against Ephestia kuehniella larvae. Strains harboring cry1A genes were tested for their toxicity, and the Lip strain showed a higher insecticidal activity compared to that of the reference strain HD1 (LC50 of Lip and HD1 were 33.27 and 128.61 μg toxin/g semolina, respectively). B. thuringiensis Lip harbors and expresses cry1Aa, cry1Ab, cry1Ac, cry1Ad and cry2A. DNA sequencing revealed several polymorphisms in Lip Cry1Aa and Cry1Ac compared to the corresponding proteins of HD1. The activation process using Ephestia kuehniella midgut juice showed that Lip Cry1A proteins were more stable in the presence of larval proteases. Moreover, LipCry1A proteins exhibited higher insecticidal activity against these larvae. These results indicate that Lip is an interesting strain that could be used as an alternative to the worldwide used strain HD1.

  1. Psychophysiological Responses to an Infant Cry: Comparison of Groups of Women in Different Phases of the Maternal Cycle.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bleichfeld, Bruce; Moely, Barbara E.

    1984-01-01

    Investigates psychophysiological reactions of 60 women to an infant's cry and to a control sound. The 30-second pain cry evoked greater cardiac and electrodermal activity than did the control stimulus, although selected groups varied in the nature and extent of their reactions. Both maternal state and experience with infants affected reactions.…

  2. Joystick-controlled video console game practice for developing power wheelchairs users' indoor driving skills.

    PubMed

    Huang, Wei Pin; Wang, Chia Cheng; Hung, Jo Hua; Chien, Kai Chun; Liu, Wen-Yu; Cheng, Chih-Hsiu; Ng, How-Hing; Lin, Yang-Hua

    2015-02-01

    [Purpose] This study aimed to determine the effectiveness of joystick-controlled video console games in enhancing subjects' ability to control power wheelchairs. [Subjects and Methods] Twenty healthy young adults without prior experience of driving power wheelchairs were recruited. Four commercially available video games were used as training programs to practice joystick control in catching falling objects, crossing a river, tracing the route while floating on a river, and navigating through a garden maze. An indoor power wheelchair driving test, including straight lines, and right and left turns, was completed before and after the video game practice, during which electromyographic signals of the upper limbs were recorded. The paired t-test was used to compare the differences in driving performance and muscle activities before and after the intervention. [Results] Following the video game intervention, participants took significantly less time to complete the course, with less lateral deviation when turning the indoor power wheelchair. However, muscle activation in the upper limbs was not significantly affected. [Conclusion] This study demonstrates the feasibility of using joystick-controlled commercial video games to train individuals in the control of indoor power wheelchairs.

  3. "Built-In" Action/Issues Tracking and Post-Ops Analysis Tool for Realtime Console Operations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Scott, David W.

    2008-01-01

    Marshall Space Flight Center's (MSFC) Payload Operations Integration Center (POIC) for the International Space Station (ISS) uses a number of formal databases to manage and track flight plan changes, onboard and ground equipment anomalies, and other events. However, individual console positions encounter many action items and/or occurrences that don't fit neatly into the databases, and while console logs are comprehensive, manual or automated searches do not always yield consistent results. The Payload Communications Manager (PAYCOM) team, whose members speak directly with the ISS onboard crew with respect to NASA payload operations, has found a creative way to reformat a mandatory Daily Report to organize action items, standing reminders, significant events, and other comments. While the report keeps others appraised of PAYCOMs activities and issues of the moment, the format makes it easy to capture very brief summaries of the items in a "Roll Off Matrix", including start and stop dates, resolution, and possible applicability to future ops. The matrix provides accountability for all action items, gives direct insight into the issues surrounding various payloads and methods of dealing with them, yields indirect information on PAYCOM priorities and processes, and provides a roadmap that makes it easier to get back to extensive details if needed. This paper describes how the ISS PAYCOM Daily Report and Roll Off Matrix are organized, used, and inter-related to each other and the PAYCOM operations log. While the application is for a manned vehicle, the concepts could apply in a wide spectrum of operational settings.

  4. Colic and crying - self-care

    MedlinePlus

    ... your body to hold your baby close. Gently rock your baby. Rocking calms your baby and can help your baby pass gas. When babies cry, they swallow air. They get more gas and more stomach pain, which causes them to cry more. So babies get in a cycle that is hard to break. Try an infant ...

  5. Women's Responses to Young Infants' Cries.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gustafson, Gwen E.; Harris, Karen L.

    1990-01-01

    Assessed 40 women's responses to young infants' cries. Mothers and nonmothers were similar in basic features of caregiving behaviors. Although the sound of infant cries may inform caregivers about distress level, caregiving behaviors appear to be determined by additional factors. (RH)

  6. Effects of Posture on Newborn Crying

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lin, Hung-Chu; Green, James A.

    2007-01-01

    Acoustic properties of the cries of 14 infants were evaluated at both 2 and 4 weeks of age when the infants were lying in a supine position and when they were sitting upright in a car seat. In the upright position, infants' breathing was more rapid and showed less individual variability. The fundamental frequency of their cries increased in the…

  7. A pair of adjacent genes, cry5Ad and orf2-5Ad, encode the typical N- and C-terminal regions of a Cry5Adelta-endotoxin as two separate proteins in Bacillus thuringiensis strain L366.

    PubMed

    Lenane, Ian J; Bagnall, Neil H; Josh, Peter F; Pearson, Roger D; Akhurst, Ray J; Kotze, Andrew C

    2008-01-01

    A new DNA sequence cry5Ad/orf2-5Ad (GenBank accession number EF219060) was isolated from Bacillus thuringiensis strain L366. This DNA sequence contains two ORFs: cry5Ad (a previously unreported member of the cry5A gene family) and orf2-5Ad. cry5Ad is unique among cry5A genes in that it encodes only the N-terminal region of a typical Cry5Adelta-endotoxin. The cry5Ad sequence includes homology blocks 1-5, which are present in most B. thuringiensisdelta-endotoxins. The usual C-terminal region of a Cry5Adelta-endotoxin (including homology blocks 6-8) is encoded by orf2-5Ad. Both proteins encoded by cry5Ad and orf2-5Ad were found in IPTG-induced Escherichia coli, after a copy of cry5Ad/orf2-5Ad was cloned into the pQE32 expression vector and transformed into pREP4 E. coli cells. Both proteins were also found in parasporal crystal inclusions of B. thuringiensis L366. Sequencing of cDNA derived from transformed E. coli cells showed that the two ORFs are transcribed as a single mRNA. Extracts prepared from the recombinant E. coli expressing Cry5Ad and Orf2-5Ad were not toxic to nematode larvae (Haemonchus contortus), indicating that these two proteins are most likely not responsible for the nematocidal activity seen previously in the B. thuringiensis strain L366.

  8. Molecular and Insecticidal Characterization of a Novel Cry-Related Protein from Bacillus Thuringiensis Toxic against Myzus persicae

    PubMed Central

    Palma, Leopoldo; Muñoz, Delia; Berry, Colin; Murillo, Jesús; Ruiz de Escudero, Iñigo; Caballero, Primitivo

    2014-01-01

    This study describes the insecticidal activity of a novel Bacillus thuringiensis Cry-related protein with a deduced 799 amino acid sequence (~89 kDa) and ~19% pairwise identity to the 95-kDa-aphidicidal protein (sequence number 204) from patent US 8318900 and ~40% pairwise identity to the cancer cell killing Cry proteins (parasporins Cry41Ab1 and Cry41Aa1), respectively. This novel Cry-related protein contained the five conserved amino acid blocks and the three conserved domains commonly found in 3-domain Cry proteins. The protein exhibited toxic activity against the green peach aphid, Myzus persicae (Sulzer) (Homoptera: Aphididae) with the lowest mean lethal concentration (LC50 = 32.7 μg/mL) reported to date for a given Cry protein and this insect species, whereas it had no lethal toxicity against the Lepidoptera of the family Noctuidae Helicoverpa armigera (Hübner), Mamestra brassicae (L.), Spodoptera exigua (Hübner), S. frugiperda (J.E. Smith) and S. littoralis (Boisduval), at concentrations as high as ~3.5 μg/cm2. This novel Cry-related protein may become a promising environmentally friendly tool for the biological control of M. persicae and possibly also for other sap sucking insect pests. PMID:25384108

  9. ETRA, TRA642. ON BASEMENT FLOOR. IBEAM COLUMNS SUPPORTING CONSOLE FLOOR ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    ETRA, TRA-642. ON BASEMENT FLOOR. I-BEAM COLUMNS SUPPORTING CONSOLE FLOOR HAVE BEEN SURROUNDED BY CONCRETE IN RECTANGULAR PILLARS. BASEMENT FLOOR IS BEING PREPARED FOR PLACEMENT OF CONCRETE. ABOVE CEILING IS CONSOLE FLOOR, IN WHICH CUT-OUT HAS PRESERVED SPACE FOR REACTOR AND ITS SHIELDING. CIRCULAR FORM IN REACTOR AREA IS CONCRETE FORMING. NOTE VERTICAL CONDUIT AT INTERVALS AROUND REACTOR PITS. INL NEGATIVE NO. 56-1237. Jack L. Anderson, Photographer, 4/17/1956 - Idaho National Engineering Laboratory, Test Reactor Area, Materials & Engineering Test Reactors, Scoville, Butte County, ID

  10. Curve Generation for the RF Systems of the Antiproton Source Console Program Specification and Implementation

    SciTech Connect

    MacLachlan, J.A.

    1984-11-01

    The RF curves program is a PDP-11 console application to calculate the time dependence of amplitude, frequency, and phase for the RF systems of the Antiproton Source. The results of the calculation are formatted and scaled for the curve generator hardware. The user interface of the program is highly flexible with respect to the choice of parameters used to specify the desired curve. It consists of file management, plotting, editing, and hardware loading phases which are implemented as separate pages on the console display. This document provides the functional specification of the program and a discussion of the status of its implementation.

  11. Sex-Specific Automatic Responses to Infant Cries: TMS Reveals Greater Excitability in Females than Males in Motor Evoked Potentials

    PubMed Central

    Messina, Irene; Cattaneo, Luigi; Venuti, Paola; de Pisapia, Nicola; Serra, Mauro; Esposito, Gianluca; Rigo, Paola; Farneti, Alessandra; Bornstein, Marc H.

    2016-01-01

    Neuroimaging reveals that infant cries activate parts of the premotor cortical system. To validate this effect in a more direct way, we used event-related transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS). Here, we investigated the presence and the time course of modulation of motor cortex excitability in young adults who listened to infant cries. Specifically, we recorded motor evoked potentials (MEPs) from the biceps brachii (BB) and interosseus dorsalis primus (ID1) muscles as produced by TMS delivered from 0 to 250 ms after sound onset in six steps of 50 ms in 10 females and 10 males. We observed an excitatory modulation of MEPs at 100 ms from the onset of infant cry specific to females and to the ID1 muscle. We regard this modulation as a response to natural cry sounds because it was attenuated to stimuli increasingly different from natural cry and absent in a separate group of females who listened to non-cry stimuli physically matched to natural infant cries. Furthermore, the 100-ms latency of this response is not compatible with a voluntary reaction to the stimulus but suggests an automatic, bottom-up audiomotor association. The brains of adult females appear to be tuned to respond to infant cries with automatic motor excitation. PMID:26779061

  12. Binding of Bacillus thuringiensis Cry1Ac Toxin to Aminopeptidase in Susceptible and Resistant Diamondback Moths (Plutella xylostella)

    PubMed Central

    Luo, K.; Tabashnik, B. E.; Adang, M. J.

    1997-01-01

    Bacillus thuringiensis Cry1Ac toxin bound to a 120-kDa protein isolated from the brush border membranes of both susceptible and resistant larvae of Plutella xylostella, the diamondback moth. The 120-kDa protein was purified by Cry1Ac toxin affinity chromatography. Like Cry1Ac-binding aminopeptidase N (EC 3.4.11.2) from other insects, this protein was eluted from the affinity column with 200 mM N-acetylgalactosamine. The purified protein had aminopeptidase activity and bound Cry1Ac toxin on ligand blots. Purified aminopeptidase was recognized by antibodies to the cross-reacting determinant found on phosphatidylinositol-specific phospholipase C-solubilized proteins. The results show that the presence of Cry1Ac-binding aminopeptidase in the brush border membrane is not sufficient to confer susceptibility to Cry1Ac. Furthermore, the results do not support the hypothesis that resistance to Cry1Ac was caused by lack of a Cry1Ac-binding aminopeptidase. PMID:16535536

  13. Holding Back the Tears: Individual Differences in Adult Crying Proneness Reflect Attachment Orientation and Attitudes to Crying.

    PubMed

    Millings, Abigail; Hepper, Erica G; Hart, Claire M; Swift, Louise; Rowe, Angela C

    2016-01-01

    Despite being a universal human attachment behavior, little is known about individual differences in crying. To facilitate such examination we first recommend shortened versions of the attitudes and proneness sections of the Adult Crying Inventory using two independent samples. Importantly, we examine attachment orientation differences in crying proneness and test the mediating role of attitudes toward crying in this relationship. Participants (Sample 1 N = 623, Sample 2 N = 781), completed online measures of adult attachment dimensions (avoidance and anxiety), attitudes toward crying, and crying proneness. Exploratory factor analyses in Sample 1 revealed four factors for crying attitudes: crying helps one feel better; crying is healthy; hatred of crying; and crying is controllable; and three factors for crying proneness: threat to self; sadness; and joy. Confirmatory factor analyses in Sample 2 replicated these structures. Theoretically and statistically justified short forms of each scale were created. Multiple mediation analyses revealed similar patterns of results across the two samples, with the attitudes "crying is healthy" and "crying is controllable" consistently mediating the positive links between attachment anxiety and crying proneness, and the negative links between attachment avoidance and crying proneness. Results are discussed in relation to attachment and emotion regulation literature.

  14. Holding Back the Tears: Individual Differences in Adult Crying Proneness Reflect Attachment Orientation and Attitudes to Crying

    PubMed Central

    Millings, Abigail; Hepper, Erica G.; Hart, Claire M.; Swift, Louise; Rowe, Angela C.

    2016-01-01

    Despite being a universal human attachment behavior, little is known about individual differences in crying. To facilitate such examination we first recommend shortened versions of the attitudes and proneness sections of the Adult Crying Inventory using two independent samples. Importantly, we examine attachment orientation differences in crying proneness and test the mediating role of attitudes toward crying in this relationship. Participants (Sample 1 N = 623, Sample 2 N = 781), completed online measures of adult attachment dimensions (avoidance and anxiety), attitudes toward crying, and crying proneness. Exploratory factor analyses in Sample 1 revealed four factors for crying attitudes: crying helps one feel better; crying is healthy; hatred of crying; and crying is controllable; and three factors for crying proneness: threat to self; sadness; and joy. Confirmatory factor analyses in Sample 2 replicated these structures. Theoretically and statistically justified short forms of each scale were created. Multiple mediation analyses revealed similar patterns of results across the two samples, with the attitudes “crying is healthy” and “crying is controllable” consistently mediating the positive links between attachment anxiety and crying proneness, and the negative links between attachment avoidance and crying proneness. Results are discussed in relation to attachment and emotion regulation literature. PMID:27458402

  15. Leucine transport is affected by Bacillus thuringiensis Cry1 toxins in brush border membrane vesicles from Ostrinia nubilalis Hb (Lepidoptera: Pyralidae) and Sesamia nonagrioides Lefebvre (Lepidoptera: Noctuidae) midgut.

    PubMed

    Leonardi, M Giovanna; Caccia, Silvia; González-Cabrera, Joel; Ferré, Juan; Giordana, Barbara

    2006-01-01

    The pore-forming activity of Cry1Ab, Cry1Fa and Cry1Ca toxins and their interaction with leucine transport mediated by the K(+)/leucine cotransporter were studied in brush border membrane vesicles (BBMVs) isolated from the midgut of Ostrinia nubilalis and Sesamia nonagrioides. In both species, as in other Lepidoptera, leucine uptake by BBMVs can take place in the absence of cations, but it can also be driven by a K(+) gradient. Experiments with the voltage-sensitive fluorescent dye 3,3'-diethylthiacarbocyanine iodide proved that Cry1Ab, a Bacillus thuringiensis toxin active in vivo, enhanced the membrane permeability to potassium in O. nubilalis BBMVs. This result is in agreement with similar effects observed in S. nonagrioides BBMV incubated with various Cry1 toxins active in vivo. The effect of the above toxins was tested on the initial rate of 0.1 mM: leucine influx. Instead of an increase in leucine influx, a reduction was observed with the Cry1 toxins active in vivo. Cry1Ab and Cry1Fa, but not the inactive toxin Cry1Da, inhibited in a dose-dependent manner leucine uptake both in the absence and in the presence of a K(+) gradient, a clear indication that their effect is independent of the channel formed by the toxins and that this effect is exerted directly on the amino acid transport system.

  16. Cri du Chat: report of a case.

    PubMed

    Sparks, S; Hutchinson, B

    1980-01-01

    Since Lejeune et al. (1963) first described the syndrome of Cri du Chat (Cry of the Cat), cases have been described in the literature in terms of genetic abnormalities. All cases were severely retarded and the mental impairment has been believed to be progressive, although no longitudinal studies have been reported. Descriptions of speech and language behavior have been scarce. This paper presents a case of a 7-yr, 6 mo-old girl with Cri du Chat who has received speech and language therapy for five years. Her speech, language, and mental development are noted and are not consistent with cases reported previously.

  17. Alkaline phosphatases and aminopeptidases are altered in a Cry11Aa resistant strain of Aedes aegypti

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Su-Bum; Aimanova, Karlygash G.; Gill, Sarjeet S.

    2014-01-01

    Bacillus thuringiensis subsp. israelensis (Bti) has been widely for the biological control of mosquito populations. However, the mechanism of Bti toxins is still not fully understood. To further elucidate the mechanism of Bti toxins, we developed an Aedes aegypti resistant strain that shows high-level resistance to Cry11Aa toxin. After 27 selections with Cry11Aa toxin, the larvae showed a 124-fold resistance ratio for Cry11Aa (strain G30). G30 larvae showed cross-resistance to Cry4Aa (66-fold resistance), less to Cry4Ba (13-fold), but not to Cry11Ba (2-fold). Midguts from these resistant larvae did not show detectable difference in the processing of the Cry11Aa toxin compared to that in susceptible larvae (WT). Brush border membrane vesicles (BBMV) from resistant larvae bound slightly less Cry11Aa compared to WT BBMV. To identify potential proteins associated with Cry11A resistance, not only transcript changes in the larval midgut were analyzed using Illumina sequencing and qPCR, but alterations of previously identified receptor proteins were investigated using immunoblots. The transcripts of 375 genes were significantly increased and those of 208 genes were down regulated in the resistant larvae midgut compared to the WT. None of the transcripts for previously identified receptors of Cry11Aa (Aedes cadherin, ALP1, APN1, and APN2) were altered in these analyses. The genes for the identified functional receptors in resistant larvae midgut did not contain any mutation in their sequences nor was there any change in their transcript expression levels compared to WT. However, ALP proteins were expressed at reduced levels (~40%) in the resistant strain BBMV. APN proteins and their activity were also slightly reduced in resistance strain. The transcript levels of ALPs (AAEL013330 and AAEL015070) and APNs (AAEL008158, AAEL008162) were significantly reduced. These results strongly suggest that ALPs and APNs could be associated with Cry11Aa resistance in Ae. aegypti. PMID

  18. Alanine scanning analyses of the three major loops in domain II of Bacillus thuringiensis mosquitocidal toxin Cry4Aa.

    PubMed

    Howlader, Mohammad Tofazzal Hossain; Kagawa, Yasuhiro; Miyakawa, Ai; Yamamoto, Ayaka; Taniguchi, Tetsuya; Hayakawa, Tohru; Sakai, Hiroshi

    2010-02-01

    Cry4Aa produced by Bacillus thuringiensis is a dipteran-specific toxin and is of great interest for developing a bioinsecticide to control mosquitoes. Therefore, it is very important to characterize the functional motif of Cry4Aa that is responsible for its mosquitocidal activity. In this study, to characterize a potential receptor binding site, namely, loops 1, 2, and 3 in domain II, we constructed a series of Cry4Aa mutants in which a residue in these three loops was replaced with alanine. A bioassay using Culex pipiens larvae revealed that replacement of some residues affected the mosquitocidal activity of Cry4Aa, but the effect was limited. This finding was partially inconsistent with previous results which suggested that replacement of the Cry4Aa loop 2 results in a significant loss of mosquitocidal activity. Therefore, we constructed additional mutants in which multiple (five or six) residues in loop 2 were replaced with alanine. Although the replacement of multiple residues also resulted in some decrease in mosquitocidal activity, the mutants still showed relatively high activity. Since the insecticidal spectrum of Cry4Aa is specific, Cry4Aa must have a specific receptor on the surface of the target tissue, and loss of binding to the receptor should result in a complete loss of mosquitocidal activity. Our results suggested that, unlike the receptor binding site of the well-characterized molecule Cry1, the receptor binding site of Cry4Aa is different from loops 1, 2, and 3 or that there are multiple binding sites that work cooperatively for receptor binding.

  19. Field-Evolved Mode 1 Resistance of the Fall Armyworm to Transgenic Cry1Fa-Expressing Corn Associated with Reduced Cry1Fa Toxin Binding and Midgut Alkaline Phosphatase Expression

    PubMed Central

    Jakka, Siva R. K.; Gong, Liang; Hasler, James; Banerjee, Rahul; Sheets, Joel J.; Narva, Kenneth; Blanco, Carlos A.

    2015-01-01

    Insecticidal protein genes from the bacterium Bacillus thuringiensis (Bt) are expressed by transgenic Bt crops (Bt crops) for effective and environmentally safe pest control. The development of resistance to these insecticidal proteins is considered the most serious threat to the sustainability of Bt crops. Resistance in fall armyworm (Spodoptera frugiperda) populations from Puerto Rico to transgenic corn producing the Cry1Fa insecticidal protein resulted, for the first time in the United States, in practical resistance, and Bt corn was withdrawn from the local market. In this study, we used a field-collected Cry1Fa corn-resistant strain (456) of S. frugiperda to identify the mechanism responsible for field-evolved resistance. Binding assays detected reduced Cry1Fa, Cry1Ab, and Cry1Ac but not Cry1Ca toxin binding to midgut brush border membrane vesicles (BBMV) from the larvae of strain 456 compared to that from the larvae of a susceptible (Ben) strain. This binding phenotype is descriptive of the mode 1 type of resistance to Bt toxins. A comparison of the transcript levels for putative Cry1 toxin receptor genes identified a significant downregulation (>90%) of a membrane-bound alkaline phosphatase (ALP), which translated to reduced ALP protein levels and a 75% reduction in ALP activity in BBMV from 456 compared to that of Ben larvae. We cloned and heterologously expressed this ALP from susceptible S. frugiperda larvae and demonstrated that it specifically binds with Cry1Fa toxin. This study provides a thorough mechanistic description of field-evolved resistance to a transgenic Bt crop and supports an association between resistance and reduced Cry1Fa toxin binding and levels of a putative Cry1Fa toxin receptor, ALP, in the midguts of S. frugiperda larvae. PMID:26637593

  20. ETR BUILDING, TRA642, INTERIOR. CONSOLE FLOOR, SOUTH HALF. CAMERA FACES ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    ETR BUILDING, TRA-642, INTERIOR. CONSOLE FLOOR, SOUTH HALF. CAMERA FACES EAST ALONG CORRIDOR. DATA CABINETS ON LEFT. INL NEGATIVE NO. HD46-18-3. Mike Crane, Photographer, 2/2005 - Idaho National Engineering Laboratory, Test Reactor Area, Materials & Engineering Test Reactors, Scoville, Butte County, ID

  1. PBF Control Building (PER619). Interior of control room. Control console ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    PBF Control Building (PER-619). Interior of control room. Control console in center of room. Indicator panels along walls. Window shown in ID-33-F-120 is between control panels at left. Camera facing northwest. Date: May 2004. INEEL negative no. HD-41-7-3 - Idaho National Engineering Laboratory, SPERT-I & Power Burst Facility Area, Scoville, Butte County, ID

  2. IET control building (TAN620). control room. facing north. control consoles ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    IET control building (TAN-620). control room. facing north. control consoles have been removed. Openings in floor were communication and control conduits. Periscope controls at center left (see also HAER No. ID-33-E-20). INEEL negative no. HD-21-3-1 - Idaho National Engineering Laboratory, Test Area North, Scoville, Butte County, ID

  3. ETR BUILDING, TRA642, INTERIOR. CONSOLE FLOOR, SOUTH HALF. CAMERA IS ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    ETR BUILDING, TRA-642, INTERIOR. CONSOLE FLOOR, SOUTH HALF. CAMERA IS NEAR SOUTHWEST CORNER AND FACING EAST. SOUTH WALL OF BASEMENT IS ALONG RIGHT EDGE OF VIEW. METAL STAIRWAY LEADS TO MEZZANINE. INL NEGATIVE NO. HD46-18-2. Mike Crane, Photographer, 2/2005 - Idaho National Engineering Laboratory, Test Reactor Area, Materials & Engineering Test Reactors, Scoville, Butte County, ID

  4. ETR BUILDING, TRA642, INTERIOR. CONSOLE FLOOR, SOUTH HALF. SOUTH SIDE ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    ETR BUILDING, TRA-642, INTERIOR. CONSOLE FLOOR, SOUTH HALF. SOUTH SIDE OF ETR REACTOR, CAMERA FACING NORTH. CABINET CONTAINING "NUCLEAR INSTRUMENT SYSTEMS" IS RESTRICTED. INL NEGATIVE NO. HD46-18-4. Mike Crane, Photographer, 2/2005 - Idaho National Engineering Laboratory, Test Reactor Area, Materials & Engineering Test Reactors, Scoville, Butte County, ID

  5. CONSOLE: A CAD tandem for optimization-based design interacting with user-supplied simulators

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fan, Michael K. H.; Wang, Li-Sheng; Koninckx, Jan; Tits, Andre L.

    1989-01-01

    CONSOLE employs a recently developed design methodology (International Journal of Control 43:1693-1721) which provides the designer with a congenial environment to express his problem as a multiple ojective constrained optimization problem and allows him to refine his characterization of optimality when a suboptimal design is approached. To this end, in CONSOLE, the designed formulates the design problem using a high-level language and performs design task and explores tradeoff through a few short and clearly defined commands. The range of problems that can be solved efficiently using a CAD tools depends very much on the ability of this tool to be interfaced with user-supplied simulators. For instance, when designing a control system one makes use of the characteristics of the plant, and therefore, a model of the plant under study has to be made available to the CAD tool. CONSOLE allows for an easy interfacing of almost any simulator the user has available. To date CONSOLE has already been used successfully in many applications, including the design of controllers for a flexible arm and for a robotic manipulator and the solution of a parameter selection problem for a neural network.

  6. A remote control console for the HHIRF 25-MV Tandem Accelerator

    SciTech Connect

    Hasanul Basher, A.M.

    1993-09-01

    The CAMAC-based control system for the 25-MV Tandem Accelerator at HHIRF uses two Perkin-Elmer, 32-bit minicomputers: a message-switching computer and a supervisory computer. Two operator consoles are located on one of the six serial highways. Operator control is provided by means of a console CRT, trackball, assignable shaft encoders, and meters. The message-switching computer transmits and receives control information on the serial highways. At present, the CRT pages with updated parameters can be displayed and parameters can be controlled only from the two existing consoles, one in the Tandem control room and the other in the ORIC control room. It has become necessary to expand the control capability to several other locations in the building. With the expansion of control and monitoring capability of accelerator parameters to other locations, the operators will be able to control and observe the result of the control action at the same time. This capability will be useful in the new Radioactive Ion Beam project of the division. Since the new control console will be PC-based, the existing page format will be changed. The PC will be communicating with the Perkin-Elmer through RS-232 with the aid of a communication protocol. Hardware configuration has been established, a software program that reads the pages from the shared memory, and a communication protocol have been developed. The following sections present the implementation strategy, work completed, future action plans, and the functional details of the communication protocol.

  7. "New Directions for Traditional Lessons": Can Handheld Game Consoles Enhance Mental Mathematics Skills?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Main, Susan; O'Rourke, John

    2011-01-01

    This paper reports on a pilot study that compared the use of commercial off-the-shelf (COTS) handheld game consoles (HGCs) with traditional teaching methods to develop the automaticity of mathematical calculations and self-concept towards mathematics for year 4 students in two metropolitan schools. One class conducted daily sessions using the HGCs…

  8. MTR, TRA603. CONTROL ROOM DETAILS. ACOUSTIC PLASTER CEILING, USHAPED CONSOLE, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    MTR, TRA-603. CONTROL ROOM DETAILS. ACOUSTIC PLASTER CEILING, U-SHAPED CONSOLE, INSTRUMENT PANELS, GLASS DOOR, ASPHALT TILE FLOOR AND COLORS. BLAW-KNOX 3150-803-11, 10/1950. INL INDEX NO. 531-0603-00-098-100570, REV. 3. - Idaho National Engineering Laboratory, Test Reactor Area, Materials & Engineering Test Reactors, Scoville, Butte County, ID

  9. ETR CONTROL BUILDING, TRA647, INTERIOR. DETAIL OF CONTROL CONSOLE. OPERATOR ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    ETR CONTROL BUILDING, TRA-647, INTERIOR. DETAIL OF CONTROL CONSOLE. OPERATOR COULD SEE OVER TOP TO INSTRUMENT PANELS BEYOND. CAMERA FACING NORTHEAST. INL NEGATIVE NO. HD42-6. Mike Crane, Photographer, 3/2004 - Idaho National Engineering Laboratory, Test Reactor Area, Materials & Engineering Test Reactors, Scoville, Butte County, ID

  10. Processing the CONSOL Energy, Inc. Mine Maps and Records Collection at the University of Pittsburgh

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rougeux, Debora A.

    2011-01-01

    This article describes the efforts of archivists and student assistants at the University of Pittsburgh's Archives Service Center to organize, describe, store, and provide timely and efficient access to over 8,000 maps of underground coal mines in southwestern Pennsylvania, as well the records that accompanied them, donated by CONSOL Energy, Inc.…

  11. ETR, TRA642. CONSOLE FLOOR ALLOCATION PLAN CA. 1958. GENERAL ELECTRIC ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    ETR, TRA-642. CONSOLE FLOOR ALLOCATION PLAN CA. 1958. GENERAL ELECTRIC (GEFP) AND KNOLLS ATOMIC POWER LABORATORY (KAPL) CONSUME MOST OF THE SPACE. PHILLIPS PETROLEUM COMPANY ETR-D-1293, 1958. INL INDEX NO. 532-0642-00-706-020209, REV. K. - Idaho National Engineering Laboratory, Test Reactor Area, Materials & Engineering Test Reactors, Scoville, Butte County, ID

  12. ETR, TRA642. FLOOR PLAN UNDER BALCONY ON CONSOLE FLOOR. MOTORGENERATOR ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    ETR, TRA-642. FLOOR PLAN UNDER BALCONY ON CONSOLE FLOOR. MOTOR-GENERATOR SETS AND OTHER ELECTRICAL EQUIPMENT. PHILLIPS PETROLEUM COMPANY ETR-D-1781, 7/1960. INL INDEX NO. 532-0642-00-706-020384, REV. 1. - Idaho National Engineering Laboratory, Test Reactor Area, Materials & Engineering Test Reactors, Scoville, Butte County, ID

  13. Why lions roar like babies cry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Titze, Ingo

    2012-11-01

    When an angry lion roars, the sounds it emits can terrify anyone within earshot. But, as Ingo Titze explains, the properties of a lion's roar have some surprising similarities with those of a crying baby.

  14. SREBP1c-CRY1 signalling represses hepatic glucose production by promoting FOXO1 degradation during refeeding

    PubMed Central

    Jang, Hagoon; Lee, Gha Young; Selby, Christopher P.; Lee, Gung; Jeon, Yong Geun; Lee, Jae Ho; Cheng, Kenneth King Yip; Titchenell, Paul; Birnbaum, Morris J.; Xu, Aimin; Sancar, Aziz; Kim, Jae Bum

    2016-01-01

    SREBP1c is a key lipogenic transcription factor activated by insulin in the postprandial state. Although SREBP1c appears to be involved in suppression of hepatic gluconeogenesis, the molecular mechanism is not thoroughly understood. Here we show that CRY1 is activated by insulin-induced SREBP1c and decreases hepatic gluconeogenesis through FOXO1 degradation, at least, at specific circadian time points. SREBP1c−/− and CRY1−/− mice show higher blood glucose than wild-type (WT) mice in pyruvate tolerance tests, accompanied with enhanced expression of PEPCK and G6Pase genes. CRY1 promotes degradation of nuclear FOXO1 by promoting its binding to the ubiquitin E3 ligase MDM2. Although SREBP1c fails to upregulate CRY1 expression in db/db mice, overexpression of CRY1 attenuates hyperglycaemia through reduction of hepatic FOXO1 protein and gluconeogenic gene expression. These data suggest that insulin-activated SREBP1c downregulates gluconeogenesis through CRY1-mediated FOXO1 degradation and that dysregulation of hepatic SREBP1c-CRY1 signalling may contribute to hyperglycaemia in diabetic animals. PMID:27412556

  15. The 60-kilodalton protein encoded by orf2 in the cry19A operon of Bacillus thuringiensis subsp. jegathesan functions like a C-terminal crystallization domain.

    PubMed

    Barboza-Corona, J Eleazar; Park, Hyun-Woo; Bideshi, Dennis K; Federici, Brian A

    2012-03-01

    The cry19A operon of Bacillus thuringiensis subsp. jegathesan encodes two proteins, mosquitocidal Cry19A (ORF1; 75 kDa) and an ORF2 (60 kDa) of unknown function. Expression of the cry19A operon in an acrystalliferous strain of B. thuringiensis (4Q7) yielded one small crystal per cell, whereas no crystals were produced when cry19A or orf2 was expressed alone. To determine the function of the ORF2 protein, different combinations of Cry19A, ORF2, and the N- or C-terminal half of Cry1C were synthesized in strain 4Q7. Stable crystalline inclusions of these fusion proteins similar in shape to those in the strain harboring the wild-type operon were observed in sporulating cells. Comparative analysis showed that ORF2 shares considerable amino acid sequence identity with the C-terminal region of large Cry proteins. Together, these results suggest that ORF2 assists in synthesis and crystallization of Cry19A by functioning like the C-terminal domain characteristic of Cry protein in the 130-kDa mass range. In addition, to determine whether overexpression of the cry19A operon stabilized its shape and increased Cry19A yield, it was expressed under the control of the strong chimeric cyt1A-p/STAB-SD promoter. Interestingly, in contrast to the expression seen with the native promoter, overexpression of the operon yielded uniform bipyramidal crystals that were 4-fold larger on average than the wild-type crystal. In bioassays using the 4th instar larvae of Culex quinquefasciatus, the strain producing the larger Cry19A crystal showed moderate larvicidal activity that was 4-fold (95% lethal concentration [LC(95)] = 1.9 μg/ml) more toxic than the activity produced in the strain harboring the wild-type operon (LC(95) = 8.2 μg/ml).

  16. The 60-Kilodalton Protein Encoded by orf2 in the cry19A Operon of Bacillus thuringiensis subsp. jegathesan Functions Like a C-Terminal Crystallization Domain

    PubMed Central

    Barboza-Corona, J. Eleazar; Park, Hyun-Woo; Bideshi, Dennis K.

    2012-01-01

    The cry19A operon of Bacillus thuringiensis subsp. jegathesan encodes two proteins, mosquitocidal Cry19A (ORF1; 75 kDa) and an ORF2 (60 kDa) of unknown function. Expression of the cry19A operon in an acrystalliferous strain of B. thuringiensis (4Q7) yielded one small crystal per cell, whereas no crystals were produced when cry19A or orf2 was expressed alone. To determine the function of the ORF2 protein, different combinations of Cry19A, ORF2, and the N- or C-terminal half of Cry1C were synthesized in strain 4Q7. Stable crystalline inclusions of these fusion proteins similar in shape to those in the strain harboring the wild-type operon were observed in sporulating cells. Comparative analysis showed that ORF2 shares considerable amino acid sequence identity with the C-terminal region of large Cry proteins. Together, these results suggest that ORF2 assists in synthesis and crystallization of Cry19A by functioning like the C-terminal domain characteristic of Cry protein in the 130-kDa mass range. In addition, to determine whether overexpression of the cry19A operon stabilized its shape and increased Cry19A yield, it was expressed under the control of the strong chimeric cyt1A-p/STAB-SD promoter. Interestingly, in contrast to the expression seen with the native promoter, overexpression of the operon yielded uniform bipyramidal crystals that were 4-fold larger on average than the wild-type crystal. In bioassays using the 4th instar larvae of Culex quinquefasciatus, the strain producing the larger Cry19A crystal showed moderate larvicidal activity that was 4-fold (95% lethal concentration [LC95] = 1.9 μg/ml) more toxic than the activity produced in the strain harboring the wild-type operon (LC95 = 8.2 μg/ml). PMID:22247140

  17. Cri du Chat syndrome: a case report.

    PubMed

    Torres, Carolina Paes; Borsatto, Maria Cristina; de Queiroz, Alexandra Mussolino; Lessa, Fernanda Campos Rosetti; Orsi, Iara Agusta

    2005-01-01

    Cri du Chat Syndrome occurs as a result of a partial deletion in the short arm of chromosome 5. Among the consequent abnormalities are low birth weight, a striking catlike cry in infancy, mental retardation, epicanthal folds, hypertelorism and dental malocclusions. This paper presents a case report on the dental treatment of a 23-year-old patient who received multidisciplinary treatment, including special education and precocious stimulation for carriers of this syndrome.

  18. Non Target Effect of Cry1 Ab and Cry Ab x Cry3 Bb1 Bt Transgenic Maize on Orius Insidiosus (Hemiptera: Anthocoridae) Abundance

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Non-target effects of Cry1Ab x CP4 EPSPS and Cry1Ab + Cry3Bb1 x CP4 EPSPS Bt transgenic new maize hybrids on insidious flower bugs [Orius insidiosus (Say)] was studied in Nebraska (Mead, C lay Center, and Concord) during 2007 and 2008. The Bt effect was compared to CP4 EPSPS maize (isoline), convent...

  19. Why Try (Not) to Cry: Intra- and Inter-Personal Motives for Crying Regulation

    PubMed Central

    Simons, Gwenda; Bruder, Martin; van der Löwe, Ilmo; Parkinson, Brian

    2013-01-01

    This article discusses inter- and intra-personal motives for the regulation of crying, and presents illustrative findings from an online survey (N = 110) exploring why and how people regulate crying in their everyday lives. In line with current theorizing on emotion regulation and crying (e.g., Vingerhoets et al., 2000), we propose that emotional crying is regulated using both antecedent-focused techniques targeting the underlying emotion and response-focused techniques targeting the act of crying itself. Indeed, our survey respondents reported having used both antecedent- and response-focused strategies to either up-regulate or down-regulate their crying. Motives for crying regulation may be both inter- and intra-personal and may serve both immediate, pleasure motives, and future, utility motives (Tamir, 2009). Our findings suggest that down-regulation attempts are often driven by inter-personal motives (e.g., protecting the well-being of others; impression management) in addition to intra-personal motives such as maintaining subjective well-being, whereas up-regulation attempts are mostly driven by intra-personal motives. Further progress requires methodologies for manipulating or tracking regulation motives and strategies in real-time crying episodes. PMID:23335904

  20. Cytotoxicity on human cells of Cry1Ab and Cry1Ac Bt insecticidal toxins alone or with a glyphosate-based herbicide.

    PubMed

    Mesnage, R; Clair, E; Gress, S; Then, C; Székács, A; Séralini, G-E

    2013-07-01

    The study of combined effects of pesticides represents a challenge for toxicology. In the case of the new growing generation of genetically modified (GM) plants with stacked traits, glyphosate-based herbicides (like Roundup) residues are present in the Roundup-tolerant edible plants (especially corns) and mixed with modified Bt insecticidal toxins that are produced by the GM plants themselves. The potential side effects of these combined pesticides on human cells are investigated in this work. Here we have tested for the very first time Cry1Ab and Cry1Ac Bt toxins (10 ppb to 100 ppm) on the human embryonic kidney cell line 293, as well as their combined actions with Roundup, within 24 h, on three biomarkers of cell death: measurements of mitochondrial succinate dehydrogenase, adenylate kinase release by membrane alterations and caspase 3/7 inductions. Cry1Ab caused cell death from 100 ppm. For Cry1Ac, under such conditions, no effects were detected. The Roundup tested alone from 1 to 20 000 ppm is necrotic and apoptotic from 50 ppm, far below agricultural dilutions (50% lethal concentration 57.5 ppm). The only measured significant combined effect was that Cry1Ab and Cry1Ac reduced caspases 3/7 activations induced by Roundup; this could delay the activation of apoptosis. There was the same tendency for the other markers. In these results, we argue that modified Bt toxins are not inert on nontarget human cells, and that they can present combined side-effects with other residues of pesticides specific to GM plants.

  1. RNAi in the striped stem borer, Chilo suppressalis, establishes a functional role for aminopeptidase N in Cry1Ab intoxication.

    PubMed

    Wang, X Y; Du, L X; Liu, C X; Gong, L; Han, L Z; Peng, Y F

    2017-02-01

    The striped stem borer, Chilo suppressalis, is a major target pest of transgenic rice expressing the Cry1Ab protein from the bacterium Bacillus thuringiensis (Bt) in China. Evolution of resistance in this pest is a major threat to the durability of Bt rice. Since Bt exerts its activity through binding to specific receptors in the midgut of target insects, identification of functional Cry1Ab receptors in the midgut of C. suppressalis larvae is crucial to evaluate potential resistance mechanisms and develop effective strategies for delaying insect resistance. In this work, we identified the putative Cry1Ab toxin-binding protein, aminopeptidase-N (APN), in the midgut of C. suppressalis by ligand blot and mass spectrometry. After cloning the full-length cDNAs encoding APN isoforms from the C. suppressalis larval midgut, we studied their spatiotemporal expression in different gut tissues and developmental stages. Furthermore, RNA interference (RNAi) against C. suppressalis aminopeptidases (CsAPNs) was employed to illustrate a functional role for CsAPNs in Cry1Ab toxicity to C. suppressalis larvae using injection and oral delivery of Stealth™ siRNA. Down-regulating the expression of CsAPNs by RNAi was closely associated with reduced susceptibility of C. suppressalis to Cry1Ab. These data provide the first direct evidence that CsAPNs participate in the mode of Cry1Ab action and may act as the functional receptor of Cry1A in C. suppressalis larvae.

  2. Medical Operations Console Procedure Evaluation: BME Response to Crew Call Down for an Emergency

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnson-Troop; Pettys, Marianne; Hurst, Victor, IV; Smaka, Todd; Paul, Bonnie; Rosenquist, Kevin; Gast, Karin; Gillis, David; McCulley, Phyllis

    2006-01-01

    International Space Station (ISS) Mission Operations are managed by multiple flight control disciplines located at the lead Mission Control Center (MCC) at NASA-Johnson Space Center (JSC). ISS Medical Operations are supported by the complementary roles of Flight Surgeons (Surgeon) and Biomedical Engineer (BME) flight controllers. The Surgeon, a board certified physician, oversees all medical concerns of the crew and the BME provides operational and engineering support for Medical Operations Crew Health Care System. ISS Medical Operations is currently addressing the coordinated response to a crew call down for an emergent medical event, in particular when the BME is the only Medical Operations representative in MCC. In this case, the console procedure BME Response to Crew Call Down for an Emergency will be used. The procedure instructs the BME to contact a Surgeon as soon as possible, coordinate with other flight disciplines to establish a Private Medical Conference (PMC) for the crew and Surgeon, gather information from the crew if time permits, and provide Surgeon with pertinent console resources. It is paramount that this procedure is clearly written and easily navigated to assist the BME to respond consistently and efficiently. A total of five BME flight controllers participated in the study. Each BME participant sat in a simulated MCC environment at a console configured with resources specific to the BME MCC console and was presented with two scripted emergency call downs from an ISS crew member. Each participant used the procedure while interacting with analog MCC disciplines to respond to the crew call down. Audio and video recordings of the simulations were analyzed and each BME participant's actions were compared to the procedure. Structured debriefs were conducted at the conclusion of both simulations. The procedure was evaluated for its ability to elicit consistent responses from each BME participant. Trials were examined for deviations in procedure task

  3. You can't take it with you? Effects of handheld portable media consoles on physiological and psychological responses to video game and movie content.

    PubMed

    Ivory, James D; Magee, Robert G

    2009-06-01

    Portable media consoles are becoming extremely popular devices for viewing a number of different types of media content, both for entertainment and for educational purposes. Given the increasingly heavy use of portable consoles as an alternative to traditional television-style monitors, it is important to investigate how physiological and psychological effects of portable consoles may differ from those of television-based consoles, because such differences in physiological and psychological responses may precipitate differences in the delivered content's effectiveness. Because portable consoles are popular as a delivery system for multiple types of media content, such as movies and video games, it is also important to investigate whether differences between the effects of portable and television-based consoles are consistent across multiple types of media. This article reports a 2 x 2 (console: portable or television-based x medium: video game or movie) mixed factorial design experiment with physiological arousal and self-reported flow experience as dependent variables, designed to explore whether console type affects media experiences and whether these effects are consistent across different media. Results indicate that portable media consoles evoke lower levels of physiological arousal and flow experience and that this effect is consistent for both video games and movies. These findings suggest that even though portable media consoles are often convenient compared to television-based consoles, the convenience may come at a cost in terms of the user experience.

  4. The Role of the Subgenual Anterior Cingulate Cortex and Amygdala in Environmental Sensitivity to Infant Crying

    PubMed Central

    Mutschler, Isabella; Ball, Tonio; Kirmse, Ursula; Wieckhorst, Birgit; Pluess, Michael; Klarhöfer, Markus; Meyer, Andrea H.; Wilhelm, Frank H.; Seifritz, Erich

    2016-01-01

    Newborns and infants communicate their needs and physiological states through crying and emotional facial expressions. Little is known about individual differences in responding to infant crying. Several theories suggest that people vary in their environmental sensitivity with some responding generally more and some generally less to environmental stimuli. Such differences in environmental sensitivity have been associated with personality traits, including neuroticism. This study investigated whether neuroticism impacts neuronal, physiological, and emotional responses to infant crying by investigating blood-oxygenation-level dependent (BOLD) responses using functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) in a large sample of healthy women (N = 102) with simultaneous skin conductance recordings. Participants were repeatedly exposed to a video clip that showed crying infants and emotional responses (valence, arousal, and irritation) were assessed after every video clip presentation. Increased BOLD signal during the perception of crying infants was found in brain regions that are associated with emotional responding, the amygdala and anterior insula. Significant BOLD signal decrements (i.e., habituation) were found in the fusiform gyrus, middle temporal gyrus, superior temporal gyrus, Broca’s homologue on the right hemisphere, (laterobasal) amygdala, and hippocampus. Individuals with high neuroticism showed stronger activation in the amygdala and subgenual anterior cingulate cortex (sgACC) when exposed to infant crying compared to individuals with low neuroticism. In contrast to our prediction we found no evidence that neuroticism impacts fMRI-based measures of habituation. Individuals with high neuroticism showed elevated skin conductance responses, experienced more irritation, and perceived infant crying as more unpleasant. The results support the hypothesis that individuals high in neuroticism are more emotionally responsive, experience more negative emotions, and

  5. The Cri-Du-Chat Syndrome: A Case Study.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sykes, Stewart C.; Christie, Margarette A.

    1987-01-01

    The developmental history of a 14-year-old girl with Cri-Du-Chat Syndrome (a genetic disorder characterized by a distinctive cry and severe physical and intellectual disabilities) is reported. (Author/DB)

  6. The Cat Cry Syndrome (5p-) in Adolescents and Adults

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Niebuhr, E.

    1971-01-01

    Summarized are clinical findings (including chromosome analysis and dermatoglyphics, as well as cytogenic findings in relatives) on five female and three male patients (age 15 years or older) with the cat cry or cri du chat syndrome. (KW)

  7. Altered Phase-Relationship between Peripheral Oscillators and Environmental Time in Cry1 or Cry2 Deficient Mouse Models for Early and Late Chronotypes

    PubMed Central

    Destici, Eugin; Jacobs, Edwin H.; Tamanini, Filippo; Loos, Maarten; van der Horst, Gijsbertus T. J.; Oklejewicz, Małgorzata

    2013-01-01

    The mammalian circadian system is composed of a light-entrainable central clock in the suprachiasmatic nuclei (SCN) of the brain and peripheral clocks in virtually any other tissue. It allows the organism to optimally adjust metabolic, physiological and behavioral functions to the physiological needs it will have at specific time of the day. According to the resonance theory, such rhythms are only advantageous to an organism when in tune with the environment, which is illustrated by the adverse health effects originating from chronic circadian disruption by jetlag and shift work. Using short-period Cry1 and long-period Cry2 deficient mice as models for morningness and eveningness, respectively, we explored the effect of chronotype on the phase relationship between the central SCN clock and peripheral clocks in other organs. Whereas the behavioral activity patterns and circadian gene expression in the SCN of light-entrained Cry1-/- and Cry2-/- mice largely overlapped with that of wild type mice, expression of clock and clock controlled genes in liver, kidney, small intestine, and skin was shown to be markedly phase-advanced or phase-delayed, respectively. Likewise, circadian rhythms in urinary corticosterone were shown to display a significantly altered phase relationship similar to that of gene expression in peripheral tissues. We show that the daily dissonance between peripheral clocks and the environment did not affect the lifespan of Cry1-/- or Cry2-/- mice. Nonetheless, the phase-shifted peripheral clocks in light-entrained mice with morningness and eveningness-like phenotypes may have implications for personalized preventive and therapeutic (i.e. chronomodulation-based) health care for people with early and late chronotypes. PMID:24386234

  8. Drosophila small heat shock protein CryAB ensures structural integrity of developing muscles, and proper muscle and heart performance.

    PubMed

    Wójtowicz, Inga; Jabłońska, Jadwiga; Zmojdzian, Monika; Taghli-Lamallem, Ouarda; Renaud, Yoan; Junion, Guillaume; Daczewska, Malgorzata; Huelsmann, Sven; Jagla, Krzysztof; Jagla, Teresa

    2015-03-01

    Molecular chaperones, such as the small heat shock proteins (sHsps), maintain normal cellular function by controlling protein homeostasis in stress conditions. However, sHsps are not only activated in response to environmental insults, but also exert developmental and tissue-specific functions that are much less known. Here, we show that during normal development the Drosophila sHsp CryAB [L(2)efl] is specifically expressed in larval body wall muscles and accumulates at the level of Z-bands and around myonuclei. CryAB features a conserved actin-binding domain and, when attenuated, leads to clustering of myonuclei and an altered pattern of sarcomeric actin and the Z-band-associated actin crosslinker Cheerio (filamin). Our data suggest that CryAB and Cheerio form a complex essential for muscle integrity: CryAB colocalizes with Cheerio and, as revealed by mass spectrometry and co-immunoprecipitation experiments, binds to Cheerio, and the muscle-specific attenuation of cheerio leads to CryAB-like sarcomeric phenotypes. Furthermore, muscle-targeted expression of CryAB(R120G), which carries a mutation associated with desmin-related myopathy (DRM), results in an altered sarcomeric actin pattern, in affected myofibrillar integrity and in Z-band breaks, leading to reduced muscle performance and to marked cardiac arrhythmia. Taken together, we demonstrate that CryAB ensures myofibrillar integrity in Drosophila muscles during development and propose that it does so by interacting with the actin crosslinker Cheerio. The evidence that a DRM-causing mutation affects CryAB muscle function and leads to DRM-like phenotypes in the fly reveals a conserved stress-independent role of CryAB in maintaining muscle cell cytoarchitecture.

  9. A study of global atmospheric budget and distribution of acetone using global atmospheric model STOCHEM-CRI

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khan, M. A. H.; Cooke, M. C.; Utembe, S. R.; Archibald, A. T.; Maxwell, P.; Morris, W. C.; Xiao, P.; Derwent, R. G.; Jenkin, M. E.; Percival, C. J.; Walsh, R. C.; Young, T. D. S.; Simmonds, P. G.; Nickless, G.; O'Doherty, S.; Shallcross, D. E.

    2015-07-01

    The impact of including a more detailed VOC oxidation scheme (CRI v2-R5) with a multi-generational approach for simulating tropospheric acetone is investigated using a 3-D global model, STOCHEM-CRI. The CRI v2-R5 mechanism contains photochemical production of acetone from monoterpenes which account for 64% (46.8 Tg/yr) of the global acetone sources in STOCHEM-CRI. Both photolysis and oxidation by OH in the troposphere contributes equally (42%, each) and dry deposition contributes 16% of the atmospheric sinks of acetone. The tropospheric life-time and the global burden of acetone are found to be 18 days and 3.5 Tg, respectively, these values being close to those reported in the study of Jacob et al. (2002). A dataset of aircraft campaign measurements are used to evaluate the inclusion of acetone formation from monoterpenes in the CRI v2-R5 mechanism used in STOCHEM-CRI. The overall comparison between measurements and models show that the parameterised approach in STOCHEM-NAM (no acetone formation from monoterpenes) underpredicts the mixing ratios of acetone in the atmosphere. However, using a detailed monoterpene oxidation mechanism forming acetone has brought the STOCHEM-CRI into closer agreement with measurements with an improvement in the vertical simulation of acetone. The annual mean surface distribution of acetone simulated by the STOCHEM-CRI shows a peak over forested regions where there are large biogenic emissions and high levels of photochemical activity. Year-long observations of acetone and methanol at the Mace Head research station in Ireland are compared with the simulated acetone and methanol produced by the STOCHEM-CRI and found to produce good overall agreement between model and measurements. The seasonal variation of model and measured acetone levels at Mace Head, California, New Hampshire and Minnesota show peaks in summer and dips in winter, suggesting that photochemical production may have the strongest effect on its seasonal trend.

  10. Training effectiveness of an intelligent tutoring system for a propulsion console trainer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnson, Debra Steele

    1990-01-01

    A formative evaluation was conducted on an Intelligent Tutoring System (ITS) developed for tasks performed on the Propulsion Console. The ITS, which was developed primarily as a research tool, provides training on use of the Manual Select Keyboard (MSK). Three subjects completed three phases of training using the ITS: declarative, speed, and automaticity training. Data were collected on several performance dimensions, including training time, number of trials performed in each training phase, and number of errors. Information was also collected regarding the user interface and content of training. Suggestions for refining the ITS are discussed. Further, future potential uses and limitations of the ITS are discussed. The results provide an initial demonstration of the effectiveness of the Propulsion Console ITS and indicate the potential benefits of this form of training tool for related tasks.

  11. New tool for spreading proteins to the environment: Cry1Ab toxin immobilized to bioplastics.

    PubMed

    Moldes, Cristina; Farinós, Gema P; de Eugenio, Laura I; García, Pedro; García, José L; Ortego, Félix; Hernández-Crespo, Pedro; Castañera, Pedro; Prieto, María A

    2006-08-01

    A new tool to provide an environmentally friendly way to deliver active proteins to the environment has been developed, based on the use of polyhydroxyalkanoate (PHA, bioplastic) granules. To illustrate this novel approach, a derived Cry1Ab insect-specific toxin protein was in vivo immobilized into PHA granules through the polypeptide tag BioF. The new toxin, named Fk-Bt1, was shown to be active against Sesamia nonagrioides (Lepidoptera: Noctuidae). The dose-mortality responses of the new toxin granule formulation (PFk-Bt1) and purified Cry1Ab have been compared, demonstrating the effectiveness of PFk-Bt1 and suggesting a common mode of action.

  12. Mortality impact of transgenic maize roots expressing eCry3.1Ab, mCry3A, and eCry3.1Ab + mCry3A on western corn rootworm larvae in the field

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Mortality of the western corn rootworm (Diabrotica virgifera virgifera LeConte) larvae due to feeding on maize (Zea mays L.) expressing the eCry3.1Ab (5307), mCry3A (MIR604), and eCry3.1Ab + mCry3A proteins relative to survivorship on maize with the same genetic background without these genes (isoli...

  13. M.P. Frank is seated at console in Mission Control during ASTP mission

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1975-01-01

    M.P. Frank (foreground), the American senior ASTP flight director, is seated at his console in the Mission Operations Control Room in the Mission Control Center during the joint U.S.-USSR Apollo-Soyuz Test Project (ASTP) docking in Earth orbit mission. The other two men are Alan C. Glines (in center), operations and procedures officer; and Donald R. Puddy, flight director.

  14. 20. VIEW OF CONSOLE IN NORTHWEST CORNER OF SLC3W CONTROL ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    20. VIEW OF CONSOLE IN NORTHWEST CORNER OF SLC-3W CONTROL ROOM. PANELS FROM LEFT TO RIGHT: OPERATIONS AND CHECKOUT (LABELED POWER CONTROL AND MONITOR PANEL); RANGE SAFETY (LABELED DESTRUCT SYSTEM CONTROL AND MONITOR PANEL); BATTERY CLOCK PANELS. PEDAL FOR FOOT CONTROL OF COMMUNICATIONS HEADSET AND HEADSET IN FOREGROUND. - Vandenberg Air Force Base, Space Launch Complex 3, Launch Operations Building, Napa & Alden Roads, Lompoc, Santa Barbara County, CA

  15. HoloHands: games console interface for controlling holographic optical manipulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McDonald, C.; McPherson, M.; McDougall, C.; McGloin, D.

    2012-10-01

    The increased application of holographic optical manipulation techniques within the life sciences has sparked the development of accessible interfaces for control of holographic optical tweezers. Of particular interest are those that employ familiar, commercially available technologies. Here we present the use of a low cost games console interface, the Microsoft Kinect for the control of holographic optical tweezers and a study into the effect of using such a system upon the quality of trap generated.

  16. ETR, TRA642. CONSOLE FLOOR. CAMERA IS ON WEST SIDE OF ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    ETR, TRA-642. CONSOLE FLOOR. CAMERA IS ON WEST SIDE OF FLOOR AND FACES NORTH. OUTER WALL OF STORAGE CANAL IS AT RIGHT. SHIELDING IS THICKER AT LOWER LEVEL, WHERE SPENT FUEL ELEMENTS WILL COOL AFTER REMOVAL FROM REACTOR. INL NEGATIVE NO. 56-1401. Jack L. Anderson, Photographer, 5/1/1956 - Idaho National Engineering Laboratory, Test Reactor Area, Materials & Engineering Test Reactors, Scoville, Butte County, ID

  17. Use of Game Console for Rehabilitation of Parkinson’s Disease

    PubMed Central

    Özgönenel, Levent; Çağırıcı, Sultan; Çabalar, Murat; Durmuşoğlu, Gülis

    2016-01-01

    Background: Parkinson’s disease (PD) predisposes to falls due to postural instability and decreased coordination. Postural and coordination exercises could ameliorate the incoordination and decrease falls. Aims: In this study, we explored the efficiency of a game console as an adjunct to an exercise program in treating incoordination in patients with PD. Study Design: Case-control study. Methods: In this single-blind, prospective clinical trial, rehabilitation with the Xbox (Microsoft; Washington, USA) game console was used as an adjunct to a standard rehabilitation program. Thirty-three patients with PD at stages 1-3 were enrolled in the study. All patients received the three-times weekly exercise program and electrotherapy to back and hip extensors for 5 weeks. Study patients played catch the ball and obstacle games on the Xbox in addition to the standard exercise program. Patients were evaluated based on the scores from the Timed Up-and-Go Test, the Berg Balance Scale (BBS), and the Unified Parkinson’s Disease Rating Scale-II (UPDRS-II). Post-treatment scores were compared between groups. Results: Thirty-three patients were enrolled in the study (15 in the game-console group, and 18 controls). Patients in both groups had improvements in all scores. The end-of-treatment scores were significantly better in the study group compared to the control group in all parameters: UPDRS (10±5 versus 16±6, p=0.002), BBS (53±4 versus 47±8, p=0.004), and TUG (11±4 seconds versus 20±8 seconds, p<0.001). Conclusion: Game-exercise with a game-console was noted to be a significant adjunct to the rehabilitation program in patients with PD in this study. PMID:27606134

  18. Replicas of Snoopy and Charlie Brown decorate top of console in MCC

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1969-01-01

    Replicas of Snoopy and Charlie Brown, the two characters from Charles Schulz's syndicated comic strip 'Peanuts', decorate the top of a console in the Mission Operations Control Room in the Mission Control Center, bldg 30, on the first day of the Apollo 10 lunar orbit mission. During the Apollo 10 lunar orbit operations the Lunar Module will be called Snoopy when it is separated from the Command/Service Modules. The code words for the Command Module will be Charlie Brown.

  19. Complete genome sequence of Bacillus thuringiensis YC-10, a novel active strain against plant-parasitic nematodes.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Feixue; Wang, Jian; Song, Zhiqiang; Cheng, Ju'e; Zhang, Deyong; Liu, Yong

    2015-09-20

    Bacillus thuringiensis is an important microbial biopesticide for controlling agricultural pests by the production of toxic parasporal crystals proteins.Here,we report the finished annotated genome sequence of B. thuringiensis YC-10,which is highly toxic to nematodes.The complete genome sequence consists of a circular chromosome and nine circular plasmids,which the biggest plasmid harbors six parasporal crystals proteins genes consisting of cry1Aa, cry1Ac, cry1Ia, cry2Aa, cry2Ab and cryB1. The crystals proteins of Cry1Ia and Cry1Aa have high nematicidal activity against Meloidogyne incognita.

  20. 40 CFR 174.505 - Bacillus thuringiensis modified Cry3A protein (mCry3A) in corn; exemption from the requirement of...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... protein (mCry3A) in corn; exemption from the requirement of a tolerance. 174.505 Section 174.505... thuringiensis modified Cry3A protein (mCry3A) in corn; exemption from the requirement of a tolerance. Residues of Bacillus thuringiensis modified Cry3A protein (mCry3A) in corn are exempt from the requirement...

  1. 40 CFR 174.506 - Bacillus thuringiensis Cry34Ab1 and Cry35Ab1 proteins in corn; exemption from the requirement of...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... Cry35Ab1 proteins in corn; exemption from the requirement of a tolerance. 174.506 Section 174.506... thuringiensis Cry34Ab1 and Cry35Ab1 proteins in corn; exemption from the requirement of a tolerance. Residues of Bacillus thuringiensis Cry34Ab1 and Cry35Ab1 proteins in corn are exempted from the requirement of...

  2. 40 CFR 174.505 - Bacillus thuringiensis modified Cry3A protein (mCry3A) in corn; exemption from the requirement of...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... protein (mCry3A) in corn; exemption from the requirement of a tolerance. 174.505 Section 174.505... thuringiensis modified Cry3A protein (mCry3A) in corn; exemption from the requirement of a tolerance. Residues of Bacillus thuringiensis modified Cry3A protein (mCry3A) in corn are exempt from the requirement...

  3. 40 CFR 174.506 - Bacillus thuringiensis Cry34Ab1 and Cry35Ab1 proteins in corn; exemption from the requirement of...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... Cry35Ab1 proteins in corn; exemption from the requirement of a tolerance. 174.506 Section 174.506... thuringiensis Cry34Ab1 and Cry35Ab1 proteins in corn; exemption from the requirement of a tolerance. Residues of Bacillus thuringiensis Cry34Ab1 and Cry35Ab1 proteins in corn are exempted from the requirement of...

  4. 40 CFR 174.506 - Bacillus thuringiensis Cry34Ab1 and Cry35Ab1 proteins in corn; exemption from the requirement of...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... Cry35Ab1 proteins in corn; exemption from the requirement of a tolerance. 174.506 Section 174.506... thuringiensis Cry34Ab1 and Cry35Ab1 proteins in corn; exemption from the requirement of a tolerance. Residues of Bacillus thuringiensis Cry34Ab1 and Cry35Ab1 proteins in corn are exempted from the requirement of...

  5. 40 CFR 174.505 - Bacillus thuringiensis modified Cry3A protein (mCry3A) in corn; exemption from the requirement of...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... protein (mCry3A) in corn; exemption from the requirement of a tolerance. 174.505 Section 174.505... thuringiensis modified Cry3A protein (mCry3A) in corn; exemption from the requirement of a tolerance. Residues of Bacillus thuringiensis modified Cry3A protein (mCry3A) in corn are exempt from the requirement...

  6. 40 CFR 174.506 - Bacillus thuringiensis Cry34Ab1 and Cry35Ab1 proteins in corn; exemption from the requirement of...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... Cry35Ab1 proteins in corn; exemption from the requirement of a tolerance. 174.506 Section 174.506... thuringiensis Cry34Ab1 and Cry35Ab1 proteins in corn; exemption from the requirement of a tolerance. Residues of Bacillus thuringiensis Cry34Ab1 and Cry35Ab1 proteins in corn are exempted from the requirement of...

  7. 40 CFR 174.505 - Bacillus thuringiensis modified Cry3A protein (mCry3A) in corn; exemption from the requirement of...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... protein (mCry3A) in corn; exemption from the requirement of a tolerance. 174.505 Section 174.505... thuringiensis modified Cry3A protein (mCry3A) in corn; exemption from the requirement of a tolerance. Residues of Bacillus thuringiensis modified Cry3A protein (mCry3A) in corn are exempt from the requirement...

  8. Chimpanzee (Pan troglodytes) consolation: third-party identity as a window on possible function.

    PubMed

    Romero, Teresa; de Waal, Frans B M

    2010-08-01

    Consolation, that is, postconflict affiliative contact by a bystander toward a recipient of aggression, has acquired an important role in the debate about empathy in great apes because it has been proposed that the reassuring behavior aimed at distressed parties reflects empathetic arousal. However, the function of this behavior is not fully understood. The present study tests specific predictions about the identity of bystanders on the basis of a database of 1102 agonistic interactions and their corresponding postconflict periods in two outdoor-housed groups of captive chimpanzees (Pan troglodytes). We found that recipients of aggression were more likely to be contacted by their own "friends" than by "friends" of the aggressor and that frequent targets of aggression were not more likely to offer consolation than were nontargets of aggression. These findings support the stress reduction hypothesis rather than two proposed alternatives, that is, the opponent relationship repair hypothesis and the self-protection hypothesis. Our results provide further support for relationship quality as a fundamental underlying factor explaining variation in the occurrence of consolation.

  9. The effects of a dynamic graphical model during simulation-based training of console operation skill

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Farquhar, John D.; Regian, J. Wesley

    1993-01-01

    LOADER is a Windows-based simulation of a complex procedural task. The task requires subjects to execute long sequences of console-operation actions (e.g., button presses, switch actuations, dial rotations) to accomplish specific goals. The LOADER interface is a graphical computer-simulated console which controls railroad cars, tracks, and cranes in a fictitious railroad yard. We hypothesized that acquisition of LOADER performance skill would be supported by the representation of a dynamic graphical model linking console actions to goal and goal states in the 'railroad yard'. Twenty-nine subjects were randomly assigned to one of two treatments (i.e., dynamic model or no model). During training, both groups received identical text-based instruction in an instructional-window above the LOADER interface. One group, however, additionally saw a dynamic version of the bird's-eye view of the railroad yard. After training, both groups were tested under identical conditions. They were asked to perform the complete procedure without guidance and without access to either type of railroad yard representation. Results indicate that rather than becoming dependent on the animated rail yard model, subjects in the dynamic model condition apparently internalized the model, as evidenced by their performance after the model was removed.

  10. Effects of Marijuana Use during Pregnancy on Newborn Cry.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lester, Barry M.; Dreher, Melanie

    1989-01-01

    Investigated acoustic characteristics of the cries of 20 infants whose mothers used marijuana during pregnancy. Cries of infants of marijuana users were shorter, had a higher percentage of dysphonation, a higher amd more variable fundamental frequency, and a lower first format than cries of 20 infants in a control group. (RJC)

  11. Investigation of radiation detection properties of CRY-018 and CRY-019 scintillators for medical imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pani, R.; Colarieti-Tosti, M.; Cinti, M. N.; Polito, C.; Trigila, C.; Ridolfi, S.

    2016-09-01

    During the last years the research for new scintillation crystals has been crucial for the improvement of imaging performance in nuclear medicine applications. Crytur company has recently released two new scintillators named CRY-018 and CRY-019 which are non hygroscopic, have short decay time and low refraction index. They represent the ideal candidates to substitute NaI:Tl and BGO crystals in future PET ad SPECT applications. The purpose of this work is to characterize this unknown crystals, look for possible applications in imaging for nuclear medicine. The results of this work were compared with the results obtained with a LaBr3:ce scintillation crystal. This particular crystal is used as a comparison benchmark because of its strong linear pulse height uniformity response and high energy resolution. Measurements have been performed with a high count rate which is typical for medical applications. Irradiation of the crystals have been performed in three different geometries and in a photon energy range suitable with SPECT and PET applications. The experimental results identify the CRY-018 as an Yttrium and Silicon mixture and the CRY-019 with as Lutetium and Silicon one. Moreover a light yield of about 45% of LaBr3 one, was obtained for both the CRY-018 and CRY-019. This is one of the higher light yield between most of the scintillation crystals usually used in nuclear medicine. Both crystals are characterized by a non-proportionality in the pulse height linearity response. Energy resolutions of 7.4% for CRY-018 and 8.4% for CRY-019 at 661 keV, have been measured. The intrinsic component of the energy resolution has been esteemed for all three scintillators. An intrinsic detection efficiency of about 45% at 122 keV for CRY-018 and 14% at 661 keV for CRY-019 has been measured. Compared with LaBr3:Ce efficiency, which is highly deteriorated by the coating required by the hygroscopicity, CRY-018 and CRY-019 are really interesting considering that these two samples

  12. Cross-resistance and interactions between Bt toxins Cry1Ac and Cry2Ab against the cotton bollworm.

    PubMed

    Wei, Jizhen; Guo, Yuyuan; Liang, Gemei; Wu, Kongming; Zhang, Jie; Tabashnik, Bruce E; Li, Xianchun

    2015-01-14

    To delay evolution of pest resistance to transgenic crops producing insecticidal proteins from Bacillus thuringiensis (Bt), the "pyramid" strategy uses plants that produce two or more toxins that kill the same pest. We conducted laboratory diet experiments with the cotton bollworm, Helicoverpa armigera, to evaluate cross-resistance and interactions between two toxins in pyramided Bt cotton (Cry1Ac and Cry2Ab). Selection with Cry1Ac for 125 generations produced 1000-fold resistance to Cry1Ac and 6.8-fold cross-resistance to Cry2Ab. Selection with Cry2Ab for 29 generations caused 5.6-fold resistance to Cry2Ab and 61-fold cross-resistance to Cry1Ac. Without exposure to Bt toxins, resistance to both toxins decreased. For each of the four resistant strains examined, 67 to 100% of the combinations of Cry1Ac and Cry2Ab tested yielded higher than expected mortality, reflecting synergism between these two toxins. Results showing minor cross-resistance to Cry2Ab caused by selection with Cry1Ac and synergism between these two toxins against resistant insects suggest that plants producing both toxins could prolong the efficacy of Bt cotton against this pest in China. Including toxins against which no cross-resistance occurs and integrating Bt cotton with other control tactics could also increase the sustainability of management strategies.

  13. Cross-resistance and interactions between Bt toxins Cry1Ac and Cry2Ab against the cotton bollworm

    PubMed Central

    Wei, Jizhen; Guo, Yuyuan; Liang, Gemei; Wu, Kongming; Zhang, Jie; Tabashnik, Bruce E.; Li, Xianchun

    2015-01-01

    To delay evolution of pest resistance to transgenic crops producing insecticidal proteins from Bacillus thuringiensis (Bt), the "pyramid" strategy uses plants that produce two or more toxins that kill the same pest. We conducted laboratory diet experiments with the cotton bollworm, Helicoverpa armigera, to evaluate cross-resistance and interactions between two toxins in pyramided Bt cotton (Cry1Ac and Cry2Ab). Selection with Cry1Ac for 125 generations produced 1000-fold resistance to Cry1Ac and 6.8-fold cross-resistance to Cry2Ab. Selection with Cry2Ab for 29 generations caused 5.6-fold resistance to Cry2Ab and 61-fold cross-resistance to Cry1Ac. Without exposure to Bt toxins, resistance to both toxins decreased. For each of the four resistant strains examined, 67 to 100% of the combinations of Cry1Ac and Cry2Ab tested yielded higher than expected mortality, reflecting synergism between these two toxins. Results showing minor cross-resistance to Cry2Ab caused by selection with Cry1Ac and synergism between these two toxins against resistant insects suggest that plants producing both toxins could prolong the efficacy of Bt cotton against this pest in China. Including toxins against which no cross-resistance occurs and integrating Bt cotton with other control tactics could also increase the sustainability of management strategies. PMID:25586723

  14. Synergism and Antagonism between Bacillus thuringiensis Vip3A and Cry1 Proteins in Heliothis virescens, Diatraea saccharalis and Spodoptera frugiperda

    PubMed Central

    Lemes, Ana Rita Nunes; Davolos, Camila Chiaradia; Legori, Paula Cristina Brunini Crialesi; Fernandes, Odair Aparecido; Ferré, Juan; Lemos, Manoel Victor Franco; Desiderio, Janete Apparecida

    2014-01-01

    Second generation Bt crops (insect resistant crops carrying Bacillus thuringiensis genes) combine more than one gene that codes for insecticidal proteins in the same plant to provide better control of agricultural pests. Some of the new combinations involve co-expression of cry and vip genes. Because Cry and Vip proteins have different midgut targets and possibly different mechanisms of toxicity, it is important to evaluate possible synergistic or antagonistic interactions between these two classes of toxins. Three members of the Cry1 class of proteins and three from the Vip3A class were tested against Heliothis virescens for possible interactions. At the level of LC50, Cry1Ac was the most active protein, whereas the rest of proteins tested were similarly active. However, at the level of LC90, Cry1Aa and Cry1Ca were the least active proteins, and Cry1Ac and Vip3A proteins were not significantly different. Under the experimental conditions used in this study, we found an antagonistic effect of Cry1Ca with the three Vip3A proteins. The interaction between Cry1Ca and Vip3Aa was also tested on two other species of Lepidoptera. Whereas antagonism was observed in Spodoptera frugiperda, synergism was found in Diatraea saccharalis. In all cases, the interaction between Vip3A and Cry1 proteins was more evident at the LC90 level than at the LC50 level. The fact that the same combination of proteins may result in a synergistic or an antagonistic interaction may be an indication that there are different types of interactions within the host, depending on the insect species tested. PMID:25275646

  15. Synergism and antagonism between Bacillus thuringiensis Vip3A and Cry1 proteins in Heliothis virescens, Diatraea saccharalis and Spodoptera frugiperda.

    PubMed

    Lemes, Ana Rita Nunes; Davolos, Camila Chiaradia; Legori, Paula Cristina Brunini Crialesi; Fernandes, Odair Aparecido; Ferré, Juan; Lemos, Manoel Victor Franco; Desiderio, Janete Apparecida

    2014-01-01

    Second generation Bt crops (insect resistant crops carrying Bacillus thuringiensis genes) combine more than one gene that codes for insecticidal proteins in the same plant to provide better control of agricultural pests. Some of the new combinations involve co-expression of cry and vip genes. Because Cry and Vip proteins have different midgut targets and possibly different mechanisms of toxicity, it is important to evaluate possible synergistic or antagonistic interactions between these two classes of toxins. Three members of the Cry1 class of proteins and three from the Vip3A class were tested against Heliothis virescens for possible interactions. At the level of LC50, Cry1Ac was the most active protein, whereas the rest of proteins tested were similarly active. However, at the level of LC90, Cry1Aa and Cry1Ca were the least active proteins, and Cry1Ac and Vip3A proteins were not significantly different. Under the experimental conditions used in this study, we found an antagonistic effect of Cry1Ca with the three Vip3A proteins. The interaction between Cry1Ca and Vip3Aa was also tested on two other species of Lepidoptera. Whereas antagonism was observed in Spodoptera frugiperda, synergism was found in Diatraea saccharalis. In all cases, the interaction between Vip3A and Cry1 proteins was more evident at the LC90 level than at the LC50 level. The fact that the same combination of proteins may result in a synergistic or an antagonistic interaction may be an indication that there are different types of interactions within the host, depending on the insect species tested.

  16. Uptake and bioaccumulation of Cry toxins by an aphidophagous predator.

    PubMed

    Paula, Débora P; Andow, David A

    2016-02-01

    Uptake of Cry toxins by insect natural enemies has rarely been considered and bioaccumulation has not yet been demonstrated. Uptake can be demonstrated by the continued presence of Cry toxin after exposure has stopped and gut contents eliminated. Bioaccumulation can be demonstrated by showing uptake and that the concentration of Cry toxin in the natural enemy exceeds that in its food. We exposed larvae of the aphidophagous predator, Harmonia axyridis, to Cry1Ac and Cry1F through uniform and constant tritrophic exposure via an aphid, Myzus persicae, and looked for toxin presence in the pupae. We repeated the experiment using only Cry1F and tested newly emerged adults. Both Cry toxins were detected in pupae, and Cry1F was detected in recently emerged, unfed adults. Cry1Ac was present 2.05 times and Cry1F 3.09 times higher in predator pupae than in the aphid prey. Uptake and bioaccumulation in the third trophic level might increase the persistence of Cry toxins in the food web and mediate new exposure routes to natural enemies.

  17. Sign Communication in Cri du Chat Syndrome

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Erlenkamp, Sonja; Kristoffersen, Kristian Emil

    2010-01-01

    This paper presents findings from a study on the use of sign supported Norwegian (SSN) in two individuals with Cri du chat syndrome (CCS). The study gives a first account of some selected aspects of production and intelligibility of SSN in CCS. Possible deviance in manual parameters, in particular inter- and/or intra-subject variation in the use…

  18. Growth study of cri du chat syndrome.

    PubMed

    Collins, M S; Eaton-Evans, J

    2001-10-01

    We compared the growth of children with cri du chat (5p-) syndrome with the 1990 UK growth curves. Most subjects had impaired growth, particularly of head circumference. The more emaciated the child the more pronounced the microcephaly, showing the need for growth and nutrition monitoring.

  19. Crying Baby? How to Keep Your Cool

    MedlinePlus

    ... or friend, your health care provider, a local crisis intervention service or a mental health help line for support. When your crying baby can't be calmed, you might be tempted to try just about anything to get the tears to stop. It's OK to be creative — but never shake your baby. Babies have weak ...

  20. 40 CFR 180.1154 - CryIA(c) and CryIC derived delta-endotoxins of Bacillus thuringiensis var. kurstaki encapsulated...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 24 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false CryIA(c) and CryIC derived delta... RESIDUES IN FOOD Exemptions From Tolerances § 180.1154 CryIA(c) and CryIC derived delta-endotoxins of... plasmid and cloning vector genetic constructs. CryIA(c) and CryIC derived delta-endotoxins of...

  1. 40 CFR 180.1154 - CryIA(c) and CryIC derived delta-endotoxins of Bacillus thuringiensis var. kurstaki encapsulated...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 25 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false CryIA(c) and CryIC derived delta... RESIDUES IN FOOD Exemptions From Tolerances § 180.1154 CryIA(c) and CryIC derived delta-endotoxins of... plasmid and cloning vector genetic constructs. CryIA(c) and CryIC derived delta-endotoxins of...

  2. 40 CFR 180.1154 - CryIA(c) and CryIC derived delta-endotoxins of Bacillus thuringiensis var. kurstaki encapsulated...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 25 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false CryIA(c) and CryIC derived delta... RESIDUES IN FOOD Exemptions From Tolerances § 180.1154 CryIA(c) and CryIC derived delta-endotoxins of... plasmid and cloning vector genetic constructs. CryIA(c) and CryIC derived delta-endotoxins of...

  3. 40 CFR 180.1154 - CryIA(c) and CryIC derived delta-endotoxins of Bacillus thuringiensis var. kurstaki encapsulated...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 24 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false CryIA(c) and CryIC derived delta... RESIDUES IN FOOD Exemptions From Tolerances § 180.1154 CryIA(c) and CryIC derived delta-endotoxins of... plasmid and cloning vector genetic constructs. CryIA(c) and CryIC derived delta-endotoxins of...

  4. XPVM: A graphical console and monitor for PVM

    SciTech Connect

    Kohl, J.A.

    1994-09-01

    As technology continues to spawn new supercomputing platforms and more powerful workstation environments, it becomes increasingly important to integrate and apply these diverse collections of computers together to extract. the best performance possible. PVM (Parallel Virtual Machine) is gaining wide popularity as a means for realizing the computing power of these heterogeneous systems. PVM is a software package that permits a heterogeneous collection of serial, parallel and vector computers, hooked together by a network, to appear as one large distributed memory computer. One of the primary difficulties in designing applications for distributed computer systems is identifying precisely what is happening inside a program, as multiple threads of control interact to solve a problem. Often it is useful to provide the user with feedback as to the state of the system, including the individual tasks executing on it. XPVM is a graphical interface to PVM that provides such information, to monitor executions and assist in debugging and tuning the performance of PVM programs. XPVM can be used in real time, to observe program activity as it happens, or it can play back saved traces of PVM program executions, for detailed post-mortem analysis.

  5. Food safety knowledge on the Bt mutant protein Cry8Ka5 employed in the development of coleopteran-resistant transgenic cotton plants

    PubMed Central

    Farias, Davi F; Peijnenburg, Ad A C M; Grossi-de-Sá, Maria F; Carvalho, Ana F U

    2015-01-01

    Insecticidal Cry proteins from Bacillus thuringiensis (Bt) have been exploited in the development of genetically modified (GM) crops for pest control. However, several pests are still difficult to control such as the coleopteran boll weevil Anthonomus grandis. By applying in vitro molecular evolution to the cry8Ka1 gene sequence, variants were generated with improved activity against A. grandis. Among them, Cry8Ka5 mutant protein showed coleoptericidal activity 3-fold higher (LC50 2.83 μg/mL) than that of the original protein (Cry8Ka1). Cry8Ka5 has been used in breeding programs in order to obtain coleopteran-resistant cotton plants. Nevertheless, there is some concern in relation to the food safety of transgenic crops, especially to the heterologously expressed proteins. In this context, our research group has performed risk assessment studies on Cry8Ka5, using the tests recommended by Codex as well as tests that we proposed as alternative and/or complementary approaches. Our results on the risk analysis of Cry8Ka5 taken together with those of other Cry proteins, point out that there is a high degree of certainty on their food safety. It is reasonable to emphasize that most safety studies on Cry proteins have essentially used the Codex approach. However, other methodologies would potentially provide additional information such as studies on the effects of Cry proteins and derived peptides on the indigenous gastrointestinal microbiota and on intestinal epithelial cells of humans. Additionally, emerging technologies such as toxicogenomics potentially will offer sensitive alternatives for some current approaches or methods. PMID:26513483

  6. Food safety knowledge on the Bt mutant protein Cry8Ka5 employed in the development of coleopteran-resistant transgenic cotton plants.

    PubMed

    Farias, Davi F; Peijnenburg, Ad A C M; Grossi-de-Sá, Maria F; Carvalho, Ana F U

    2015-01-01

    Insecticidal Cry proteins from Bacillus thuringiensis (Bt) have been exploited in the development of genetically modified (GM) crops for pest control. However, several pests are still difficult to control such as the coleopteran boll weevil Anthonomus grandis. By applying in vitro molecular evolution to the cry8Ka1 gene sequence, variants were generated with improved activity against A. grandis. Among them, Cry8Ka5 mutant protein showed coleoptericidal activity 3-fold higher (LC50 2.83 μg/mL) than that of the original protein (Cry8Ka1). Cry8Ka5 has been used in breeding programs in order to obtain coleopteran-resistant cotton plants. Nevertheless, there is some concern in relation to the food safety of transgenic crops, especially to the heterologously expressed proteins. In this context, our research group has performed risk assessment studies on Cry8Ka5, using the tests recommended by Codex as well as tests that we proposed as alternative and/or complementary approaches. Our results on the risk analysis of Cry8Ka5 taken together with those of other Cry proteins, point out that there is a high degree of certainty on their food safety. It is reasonable to emphasize that most safety studies on Cry proteins have essentially used the Codex approach. However, other methodologies would potentially provide additional information such as studies on the effects of Cry proteins and derived peptides on the indigenous gastrointestinal microbiota and on intestinal epithelial cells of humans. Additionally, emerging technologies such as toxicogenomics potentially will offer sensitive alternatives for some current approaches or methods.

  7. [Creation of transgenic sugar beet lines expressing insect pest resistance genes cry1C and cry2A].

    PubMed

    Litvin, D I; Sivura, V V; Kurilo, V V; Oleneva, V D; Emets, A I; Blium, Ia B

    2014-01-01

    Impact of insect pests makes a significant limitation of the sugar beet crop yield. Integration of cry-genes of Bacillus thuringiensis into plant genome is one of the promising strategies to ensure plant resistance. The aim of this work was to obtain sugar beet lines (based on the MM 1/2 line) transformed with cry2A and cry1Cgenes. We have optimized transformation protocol and direct plant let regeneration protocol from leaf explants using 1 mg/l benzylaminopurine as well as 0,25 mg/l benzylaminopurine and 0,1 mg/l indole-butyric acid. Consequently, transgenic sugar beet lines transformed with vector constructs pRD400-cry1C and pRD400-cry2A have been obtained. PCR analysis revealed integration of cry2A and cry1C into genome of transgenic lines and expression of these genes in leaf tissues was shown by reverse transcription PCR.

  8. Auschwitz: If You Cried, You Died. Teacher's Guide to the Video Program.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Moore Foundation, Indianapolis, IN.

    Designed to accompany a videotape chronicling the journey of two Holocaust survivors as they revisit the site of the concentration camp at Auschwitz (Poland), the guide provides questions, exercises, and suggestions for further activities. The guide begins with a description of how to present the 28-minute videotape "Auschwitz: If You Cried,…

  9. Quantitative genetic analysis of Cry1Ab tolerance in Ostrinia nubilalis Spanish populations.

    PubMed

    Crava, Cristina M; Farinós, Gema P; Bel, Yolanda; Castañera, Pedro; Escriche, Baltasar

    2013-07-01

    Tolerance to Bacillus thuringiensis Cry1Ab toxin in Spanish Ostrinia nubilalis populations was analyzed by quantitative genetic techniques, using isolines established from field-derived insects. F1 offspring was tested for susceptibility to trypsin activated Cry1Ab using a concentration that caused a mean larval mortality of 87% (±17% SD). The progeny of the most tolerant isolines (that had shown mortalities lower than 60%) was crossed to obtain the F2 generation that was exposed to the same Cry1Ab concentration. A clear reduction in mortality (62±17% SD) was observed. The upper limit for heritability was estimated to range between 0.82 and 0.90, suggesting that a high part of phenotypic variation in tolerance to Cry1Ab was attributable to genetic differences. An estimate of the minimum number of segregating factors indicated that the loci involved in tolerance to Cry1Ab were at least two. The role of the cadherin gene, which is a B. thuringiensis resistance gene in Lepidoptera, was assessed in the most tolerant isolines by using an EPIC-PCR marker specifically developed for this study. Association between cadherin and tolerance was obtained in one tolerant isoline; however it could be not confirmed by segregation analysis in the F2 progeny because F2 offspring was not viable. Our results indicate that the tolerance trait is common in Spanish field populations. Quantitative genetic techniques may be helpful for estimating the influence of genetic factors to Cry1Ab tolerance in O. nubilalis.

  10. Effects of Transgenic cry1Ca Rice on the Development of Xenopus laevis.

    PubMed

    Chen, Xiuping; Wang, Jiamei; Zhu, Haojun; Li, Yunhe; Ding, Jiatong; Peng, Yufa

    2015-01-01

    In fields of genetically modified, insect-resistant rice expressing Bacillus thuringiensis (Bt) proteins, frogs are exposed to Bt Cry proteins by consuming both target and non-target insects, and through their highly permeable skin. In the present study, we assessed the potential risk posed by transgenic cry1Ca rice (T1C-19) on the development of a frog species by adding purified Cry1Ca protein or T1C-19 rice straw into the rearing water of Xenopus laevis tadpoles, and by feeding X. laevis froglets diets containing rice grains of T1C-19 or its non-transformed counterpart MH63. Our results showed that there were no significant differences among groups receiving 100 μg L-1 or 10 μg L-1 Cry1Ca and the blank control in terms of time to completed metamorphosis, survival rate, body weight, body length, organ weight and liver enzyme activity after being exposed to the Cry1Ca (P > 0.05). Although some detection indices in the rice straw groups were significantly different from those of the blank control group (P < 0.05), there was no significant difference between the T1C-19 and MH63 rice straw groups. Moreover, there were no significant differences in the mortality rate, body weight, daily weight gain, liver and fat body weight of the froglets between the T1C-19 and MH63 dietary groups after 90 days, and there were no abnormal pathological changes in the stomach, intestines, livers, spleens and gonads. Thus, we conclude that the planting of transgenic cry1Ca rice will not adversely affect frog development.

  11. Effects of Transgenic cry1Ca Rice on the Development of Xenopus laevis

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Haojun; Li, Yunhe; Ding, Jiatong; Peng, Yufa

    2015-01-01

    In fields of genetically modified, insect-resistant rice expressing Bacillus thuringiensis (Bt) proteins, frogs are exposed to Bt Cry proteins by consuming both target and non-target insects, and through their highly permeable skin. In the present study, we assessed the potential risk posed by transgenic cry1Ca rice (T1C-19) on the development of a frog species by adding purified Cry1Ca protein or T1C-19 rice straw into the rearing water of Xenopus laevis tadpoles, and by feeding X. laevis froglets diets containing rice grains of T1C-19 or its non-transformed counterpart MH63. Our results showed that there were no significant differences among groups receiving 100 μg L–1 or 10 μg L–1 Cry1Ca and the blank control in terms of time to completed metamorphosis, survival rate, body weight, body length, organ weight and liver enzyme activity after being exposed to the Cry1Ca (P > 0.05). Although some detection indices in the rice straw groups were significantly different from those of the blank control group (P < 0.05), there was no significant difference between the T1C-19 and MH63 rice straw groups. Moreover, there were no significant differences in the mortality rate, body weight, daily weight gain, liver and fat body weight of the froglets between the T1C-19 and MH63 dietary groups after 90 days, and there were no abnormal pathological changes in the stomach, intestines, livers, spleens and gonads. Thus, we conclude that the planting of transgenic cry1Ca rice will not adversely affect frog development. PMID:26695426

  12. Operation and Maintenance Manual for Draw-Off Holdback (DOHB) Control Console.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1982-12-01

    Control Console M 12. PERSONAL AUTHOR(S) 1z 13a. TYPE OF REPORT 13b. TIME COVERED 14. DATE OF REP. (YYMMDD) 15. PAG FROM TO 82-12 18 x 16 . SUPPLEMENTARY...Select Switch .................. 4-2 4-13 DOHB Constant Tension Control Circuit .......... 4-3 4-15 Bidirectional Circuit ....................... 4-3 4- 16 ...be related to any spe - cific procedures and therefore may not appear elsewhere in this manual. These are recommended precautions that personnel must

  13. Circuit for connecting the Videoton-340 with the ES-1030 as an operator console

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Uskov, V. A.; PRYADIN

    1979-01-01

    A system of connection of the Videoton-340 text display to the standard ES-7070 unit, for use as an operator console, partially replacing and supplementing the ES-7070 electric typewriter, is described. The interactions, including the specific instructions, among the Videoton-340, the Consul-260.1 electric typewriter and the ES-7070, which is the means of user access to the unified system of computers, are presented. Users at the Institute of Space Research note the reliability, high information output rate, noiselessness and convenience of the keyboard of the system.

  14. Driver/passenger discrimination for the interaction with the dual-view touch screen integrated to the automobile centre console

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Herrmann, Enrico; Makrushin, Andrey; Dittmann, Jana; Vielhauer, Claus

    2012-03-01

    In an attempt to further develop and evaluate the optical recognition systems for distinguishing between driver and frontseat passenger during their interactions with dual-view touch screen integrated to the automobile centre console, this work focuses on the enhancement of both image processing algorithms and experimental environment. In addition to the motion based forearm and hand segmentation and the texture based arm direction analysis, the adaptive boosting classifiers with Haar-like features have been engaged for the learning of driver's and passenger's hand patterns. The user discrimination system was completely reproduced in a laboratory, including passenger compartment with genuine dashboard, touch screen, camera and near-infrared lamps, so that different illumination conditions could be modeled. The new acquisition system allows automatic and unambiguous registration of all touch screen interactions and their synchronization with the video stream. This results in credible evaluation of the image processing routines. The adjustment of the camera position and the active infrared illumination made it possible to reduce the recognition error rates and to achieve superior discrimination performance compared to previous works.

  15. APN1 is a functional receptor of Cry1Ac but not Cry2Ab in Helicoverpa zea

    PubMed Central

    Wei, Jizhen; Zhang, Min; Liang, Gemei; Wu, Kongming; Guo, Yuyuan; Ni, Xinzhi; Li, Xianchun

    2016-01-01

    Lepidopteran midgut aminopeptidases N (APNs) are phylogenetically divided into eight clusters, designated as APN1–8. Although APN1 has been implicated as one of the receptors for Cry1Ac in several species, its potential role in the mode of action of Cry2Ab has not been functionally determined so far. To test whether APN1 also acts as one of the receptors for Cry1Ac in Helicoverpa zea and even for Cry2Ab in this species, we conducted a gain of function analysis by heterologously expressing H. zea APN1 (HzAPN1) in the midgut and fat body cell lines of H. zea and the ovarian cell line of Spodoptera frugiperda (Sf9) and a loss of function analysis by RNAi (RNA interference) silencing of the endogenous APN1 in the three cell lines using the HzAPN1 double strand RNA (dsRNA). Heterologous expression of HzAPN1 significantly increased the susceptibility of the three cell lines to Cry1Ac, but had no effects on their susceptibility to Cry2Ab. Knocking down of the endogenous APN1 made the three cell lines resistant to Cry1Ac, but didn’t change cell lines susceptibility to Cry2Ab. The findings from this study demonstrate that HzAPN1 is a functional receptor of Cry1Ac, but not Cry2Ab. PMID:26755166

  16. Asymmetrical cross-resistance between Bacillus thuringiensis toxins Cry1Ac and Cry2Ab in pink bollworm.

    PubMed

    Tabashnik, Bruce E; Unnithan, Gopalan C; Masson, Luke; Crowder, David W; Li, Xianchun; Carrière, Yves

    2009-07-21

    Transgenic crops producing Bacillus thuringiensis (Bt) toxins kill some key insect pests and can reduce reliance on insecticide sprays. Sustainable use of such crops requires methods for delaying evolution of resistance by pests. To thwart pest resistance, some transgenic crops produce 2 different Bt toxins targeting the same pest. This "pyramid" strategy is expected to work best when selection for resistance to 1 toxin does not cause cross-resistance to the other toxin. The most widely used pyramid is transgenic cotton producing Bt toxins Cry1Ac and Cry2Ab. Cross-resistance between these toxins was presumed unlikely because they bind to different larval midgut target sites. Previous results showed that laboratory selection with Cry1Ac caused little or no cross-resistance to Cry2A toxins in pink bollworm (Pectinophora gossypiella), a major cotton pest. We show here, however, that laboratory selection of pink bollworm with Cry2Ab caused up to 420-fold cross-resistance to Cry1Ac as well as 240-fold resistance to Cry2Ab. Inheritance of resistance to high concentrations of Cry2Ab was recessive. Larvae from a laboratory strain resistant to Cry1Ac and Cry2Ab in diet bioassays survived on cotton bolls producing only Cry1Ac, but not on cotton bolls producing both toxins. Thus, the asymmetrical cross-resistance seen here does not threaten the efficacy of pyramided Bt cotton against pink bollworm. Nonetheless, the results here and previous evidence indicate that cross-resistance occurs between Cry1Ac and Cry2Ab in some key cotton pests. Incorporating the potential effects of such cross-resistance in resistance management plans may help to sustain the efficacy of pyramided Bt crops.

  17. Cyt1Aa Protein of Bacillus thuringiensis Is Toxic to the Cottonwood Leaf Beetle, Chrysomela scripta, and Suppresses High Levels of Resistance to Cry3Aa

    PubMed Central

    Federici, Brian A.; Bauer, Leah S.

    1998-01-01

    The insecticidal activity of Bacillus thuringiensis is due primarily to Cry and Cyt proteins. Cry proteins are typically toxic to lepidopterous, coleopterous, or dipterous insects, whereas the known toxicity of Cyt proteins is limited to dipterans. We report here that a Cyt protein, Cyt1Aa, is also highly toxic to the cottonwood leaf beetle, Chrysomela scripta, with a median lethal concentration of 2.5 ng/mm2 of leaf surface for second-instar larvae. Additionally, we show that Cyt1Aa suppresses resistance to Cry3Aa greater than 5,000-fold in C. scripta, a level only partially overcome by Cry1Ba due to cross-resistance. Studies of the histopathology of C. scripta larvae treated with Cyt1Aa revealed disruption and sloughing of midgut epithelial cells, indicating that its mechanism of action against C. scripta is similar to that observed in mosquito and blackfly larvae. These novel properties suggest that Cyt proteins may have an even broader spectrum of activity against insects and, owing to their different mechanism of action in comparison to Cry proteins, might be useful in managing resistance to Cry3 and possibly other Cry toxins used in microbial insecticides and transgenic plants. PMID:9797292

  18. The Console in A Briefcase: An Approach to Remote Space Operations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Heaton, Andy F.; Hagopian, Jeff; Wooten, Lewis (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    The CIAB (Console in a Briefcase) is conceived as an ISS (International Space Station) Payload Operations remote console that would run via an Internet connection, consisting of components (primarily a laptop PC) that fit into a briefcase, and intended for use from home in an 'on call' scenario. The primary purpose of the CIAB project is to verify that the technology and tools exist to support remote-access payload operations for the International Space Station (ISS) and to build, test, and demonstrate a prototype system. The project can potentially provide cost savings and increased morale to the space operations community by reducing demands on staff. Also, the CIAB project provides a vehicle for examining innovative concepts pertaining to Mission Planning software tools that have potential benefits beyond just the immediate needs of remote access. To date we have implemented and tested the basic capability. Current research is focused on reducing bandwidth demands via the adoption of innovative software solutions. Research into current Internet connectivity and bandwidth is also being pursued.

  19. The willingness to pay of parties to traffic accidents for loss of productivity and consolation compensation.

    PubMed

    Jou, Rong-Chang; Chen, Tzu-Ying

    2015-12-01

    In this study, willingness to pay (WTP) for loss of productivity and consolation compensation by parties to traffic accidents is investigated using the Tobit model. In addition, WTP is compared to compensation determined by Taiwanese courts. The modelling results showed that variables such as education, average individual monthly income, traffic accident history, past experience of severe traffic accident injuries, the number of working days lost due to a traffic accident, past experience of accepting compensation for traffic accident-caused productivity loss and past experience of accepting consolation compensation caused by traffic accidents have a positive impact on WTP. In addition, average WTP for these two accident costs were obtained. We found that parties to traffic accidents were willing to pay more than 90% of the compensation determined by the court in the scenario of minor and moderate injuries. Parties were willing to pay approximately 80% of the compensation determined by the court for severe injuries, disability and fatality. Therefore, related agencies can use our study findings as the basis for determining the compensation that parties should pay for productivity losses caused by traffic accidents of different types.

  20. Modification of Cry4Aa toward Improved Toxin Processing in the Gut of the Pea Aphid, Acyrthosiphon pisum

    PubMed Central

    Rausch, Michael A.; Chougule, Nanasaheb P.; Deist, Benjamin R.; Bonning, Bryony C.

    2016-01-01

    Aphids are sap-sucking insects (order: Hemiptera) that cause extensive damage to a wide range of agricultural crops. Our goal was to optimize a naturally occurring insecticidal crystalline (Cry) toxins produced by the soil-dwelling bacterium Bacillus thuringiensis for use against the pea aphid, Acyrthosiphon pisum. On the basis that activation of the Cry4Aa toxin is a rate-limiting factor contributing to the relatively low aphicidal activity of this toxin, we introduced cathepsin L and cathepsin B cleavage sites into Cry4Aa for rapid activation in the aphid gut environment. Incubation of modified Cry4Aa and aphid proteases in vitro demonstrated enhanced processing of the toxin into the active form for some of the modified constructs relative to non-modified Cry4Aa. Aphids fed artificial diet with toxin at a final concentration of 125 μg/ml showed enhanced mortality after two days for one of the four modified constructs. Although only modest toxin improvement was achieved by use of this strategy, such specific toxin modifications designed to overcome factors that limit aphid toxicity could be applied toward managing aphid populations via transgenic plant resistance. PMID:27171411

  1. Peters anomaly in cri-du-chat syndrome.

    PubMed

    Hope, William C; Cordovez, Jose A; Capasso, Jenina E; Hammersmith, Kristin M; Eagle, Ralph C; Lall-Trail, Joel; Levin, Alex V

    2015-06-01

    The cri-du-chat syndrome is a rare genetic disorder caused by deletions in the short arm of chromosome 5. It presents with a distinctive catlike high-pitched cry, psychomotor delays, microcephaly, craniofacial abnormalities, and, in many cases, ocular findings. We report the first child with cri-du-chat and the findings of unilateral corneal staphyloma due to Peters anomaly and retinal dysplasia.

  2. Anaesthetic considerations for the patient with cri du chat syndrome.

    PubMed

    Brislin, R P; Stayer, S A; Schwartz, R E

    1995-01-01

    Cri du chat syndrome is an inherited disease affecting multiple organ systems. Most characteristic is the anatomical abnormality of the larynx resulting in a cat-like cry. Issues important in developing an anaesthetic plan include: anatomical abnormalities of the airway, congenital heart disease, hypotonia, mental retardation, and temperature maintenance. We report the case of a 33-month-old patient with cri du chat syndrome undergoing patent ductus arteriosus (PDA) ligation and discuss the anaesthetic issues.

  3. [A sheet for deciphering the cries of hospitalized elderly patients].

    PubMed

    Gomas, Jean-Marie; Tribout, Didier; Knorreck, Fanny; Denis, Michel; Petrognani, Annie; Sales, Elodie

    2014-01-01

    Crying out is not an insignificant act and it is important to fight against this misconception. Any caregiver can be confronted with this phenomenon with elderly hospitalised patients. Their cries must be understood, analysed and taken into account as they correspond to a particular situation experienced by the elderly patient. There are tools to help caregivers diagnose and reflect on this clinical context. This article presents the example of an interpretation sheet which can help caregivers decipher patients' cries.

  4. Efficacy of Genetically Modified Bt Toxins Alone and in Combinations Against Pink Bollworm Resistant to Cry1Ac and Cry2Ab

    PubMed Central

    Tabashnik, Bruce E.; Fabrick, Jeffrey A.; Unnithan, Gopalan C.; Yelich, Alex J.; Masson, Luke; Zhang, Jie; Bravo, Alejandra; Soberón, Mario

    2013-01-01

    Evolution of resistance in pests threatens the long-term efficacy of insecticidal proteins from Bacillus thuringiensis (Bt) used in sprays and transgenic crops. Previous work showed that genetically modified Bt toxins Cry1AbMod and Cry1AcMod effectively countered resistance to native Bt toxins Cry1Ab and Cry1Ac in some pests, including pink bollworm (Pectinophora gossypiella). Here we report that Cry1AbMod and Cry1AcMod were also effective against a laboratory-selected strain of pink bollworm resistant to Cry2Ab as well as to Cry1Ab and Cry1Ac. Resistance ratios based on the concentration of toxin killing 50% of larvae for the resistant strain relative to a susceptible strain were 210 for Cry2Ab, 270 for Cry1Ab, and 310 for Cry1Ac, but only 1.6 for Cry1AbMod and 2.1 for Cry1AcMod. To evaluate the interactions among toxins, we tested combinations of Cry1AbMod, Cry1Ac, and Cry2Ab. For both the resistant and susceptible strains, the net results across all concentrations tested showed slight but significant synergism between Cry1AbMod and Cry2Ab, whereas the other combinations of toxins did not show consistent synergism or antagonism. The results suggest that the modified toxins might be useful for controlling populations of pink bollworm resistant to Cry1Ac, Cry2Ab, or both. PMID:24244692

  5. Bt crops producing Cry1Ac, Cry2Ab and Cry1F do not harm the green lacewing, Chrysoperla rufilabris.

    PubMed

    Tian, Jun-Ce; Wang, Xiang-Ping; Long, Li-Ping; Romeis, Jörg; Naranjo, Steven E; Hellmich, Richard L; Wang, Ping; Earle, Elizabeth D; Shelton, Anthony M

    2013-01-01

    The biological control function provided by natural enemies is regarded as a protection goal that should not be harmed by the application of any new pest management tool. Plants producing Cry proteins from the bacterium, Bacillus thuringiensis (Bt), have become a major tactic for controlling pest Lepidoptera on cotton and maize and risk assessment studies are needed to ensure they do not harm important natural enemies. However, using Cry protein susceptible hosts as prey often compromises such studies. To avoid this problem we utilized pest Lepidoptera, cabbage looper (Trichoplusia ni) and fall armyworm (Spodoptera frugiperda), that were resistant to Cry1Ac produced in Bt broccoli (T. ni), Cry1Ac/Cry2Ab produced in Bt cotton (T. ni), and Cry1F produced in Bt maize (S. frugiperda). Larvae of these species were fed Bt plants or non-Bt plants and then exposed to predaceous larvae of the green lacewing Chrysoperla rufilabris. Fitness parameters (larval survival, development time, fecundity and egg hatch) of C. rufilabris were assessed over two generations. There were no differences in any of the fitness parameters regardless if C. rufilabris consumed prey (T. ni or S. frugiperda) that had consumed Bt or non-Bt plants. Additional studies confirmed that the prey contained bioactive Cry proteins when they were consumed by the predator. These studies confirm that Cry1Ac, Cry2Ab and Cry1F do not pose a hazard to the important predator C. rufilabris. This study also demonstrates the power of using resistant hosts when assessing the risk of genetically modified plants on non-target organisms.

  6. Susceptibility of northern corn rootworm Diabrotica barberi Smith & Lawrence (Coleoptera: Chrysomelidae) to mCry3A and eCry3.1Ab Bacillus thuringiensis proteins

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Susceptibility of the northern corn rootworm (NCR), to mCry3A and eCry3.1Ab proteins derived from Bacillus thuringiensis (Bt) was determined using a diet bioassay. Northern corn rootworm neonates were exposed to different concentrations of mCry3A and eCry3.1Ab, incorporated into artificial diet. Lar...

  7. Brain stem hypoplasia associated with Cri-du-Chat syndrome.

    PubMed

    Hong, Jin Ho; Lee, Ha Young; Lim, Myung Kwan; Kim, Mi Young; Kang, Young Hye; Lee, Kyung Hee; Cho, Soon Gu

    2013-01-01

    Cri-du-Chat syndrome, also called the 5p-syndrome, is a rare genetic abnormality, and only few cases have been reported on its brain MRI findings. We describe the magnetic resonance imaging findings of a 1-year-old girl with Cri-du-Chat syndrome who showed brain stem hypoplasia, particularly in the pons, with normal cerebellum and diffuse hypoplasia of the cerebral hemispheres. We suggest that Cri-du-Chat syndrome chould be suspected in children with brain stem hypoplasia, particularly for those with high-pitched cries.

  8. Brain Stem Hypoplasia Associated with Cri-du-Chat Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Hong, Jin Ho; Lim, Myung Kwan; Kim, Mi Young; Kang, Young Hye; Lee, Kyung Hee; Cho, Soon Gu

    2013-01-01

    Cri-du-Chat syndrome, also called the 5p-syndrome, is a rare genetic abnormality, and only few cases have been reported on its brain MRI findings. We describe the magnetic resonance imaging findings of a 1-year-old girl with Cri-du-Chat syndrome who showed brain stem hypoplasia, particularly in the pons, with normal cerebellum and diffuse hypoplasia of the cerebral hemispheres. We suggest that Cri-du-Chat syndrome chould be suspected in children with brain stem hypoplasia, particularly for those with high-pitched cries. PMID:24265573

  9. Overexpression of circadian clock protein cryptochrome (CRY) 1 alleviates sleep deprivation-induced vascular inflammation in a mouse model.

    PubMed

    Qin, Bing; Deng, Yunlong

    2015-01-01

    Disturbance of the circadian clock by sleep deprivation has been proposed to be involved in the regulation of inflammation. However, the underlying mechanism of circadian oscillator components in regulating the pro-inflammatory process during sleep deprivation remains poorly understood. Using a sleep deprivation mouse model, we showed here that sleep deprivation increased the expression of pro-inflammatory cytokines expression and decreased the expression of cryptochrome 1 (CRY1) in vascular endothelial cells. Furthermore, the adhesion molecules including intercellular adhesion molecule-1, vascular cell adhesion molecule-1 and E-selectin were elevated in vascular endothelial cells and the monocytes binding to vascular endothelial cells were also increased by sleep deprivation. Interestingly, overexpression of CRY1 in a mouse model by adenovirus vector significantly inhibited the expression of inflammatory cytokines and adhesion molecules, and NF-κB signal pathway activation, as well as the binding of monocytes to vascular endothelial cells. Using a luciferase reporter assay, we found that CRY1 could repress the transcriptional activity of nuclear factor (NF)-κB in vitro. Subsequently, we demonstrated that overexpression of CRY1 inhibited the basal concentration of cyclic adenosine monophosphate (cAMP), leading to decreased protein kinase A activity, which resulted in decreased phosphorylation of p65. Taken together, these results suggested that the overexpression of CRY1 inhibited sleep deprivation-induced vascular inflammation that might be associated with NF-κB and cAMP/PKA pathways.

  10. An overview of the safety and biological effects of Bacillus thuringiensis Cry toxins in mammals.

    PubMed

    Rubio-Infante, Néstor; Moreno-Fierros, Leticia

    2016-05-01

    Crystal proteins (Cry) produced during the growth and sporulation phases of Bacillus thuringiensis (Bt) bacterium are known as delta endotoxins. These toxins are being used worldwide as bioinsecticides to control pests in agriculture, and some Cry toxins are used against mosquitoes to control vector transmission. This review summarizes the relevant information currently available regarding the biosafety and biological effects that Bt and its insecticidal Cry proteins elicit in mammals. This work was performed because of concerns regarding the possible health impact of Cry toxins on vertebrates, particularly because Bt toxins might be associated with immune-activating or allergic responses. The controversial data published to date are discussed in this review considering earlier toxicological studies of B. thuringiensis, spores, toxins and Bt crops. We discussed the experimental studies performed in humans, mice, rats and sheep as well as in diverse mammalian cell lines. Although the term 'toxic' is not appropriate for defining the effects these toxins have on mammals, they cannot be considered innocuous, as they have some physiological effects that may become pathological; thus, trials that are more comprehensive are necessary to determine their effects on mammals because knowledge in this field remains limited.

  11. No impact of transgenic cry1C rice on the rove beetle Paederus fuscipes, a generalist predator of brown planthopper Nilaparvata lugens

    PubMed Central

    Meng, Jiarong; Mabubu, Juma Ibrahim; Han, Yu; He, Yueping; Zhao, Jing; Hua, Hongxia; Feng, Yanni; Wu, Gang

    2016-01-01

    T1C-19 is newly developed transgenic rice active against lepidopteran pests, and expresses a synthesized cry1C gene driven by the maize ubiquitin promoter. The brown planthopper, Nilaparvata lugens, is a major non-target pest of rice, and the rove beetle (Paederus fuscipes) is a generalist predator of N. lugens nymphs. As P. fuscipes may be exposed to the Cry1C protein through preying on N. lugens, it is essential to assess the potential effects of transgenic cry1C rice on this predator. In this study, two experiments (a direct feeding experiment and a tritrophic experiment) were conducted to evaluate the ecological risk of cry1C rice to P. fuscipes. No significant negative effects were observed in the development, survival, female ratio and body weight of P. fuscipes in both treatments of direct exposure to elevated doses of Cry1C protein and prey-mediated exposure to realistic doses of the protein. This indicated that cry1C rice had no detrimental effects on P. fuscipes. This work represents the first study of an assessment continuum for the effects of transgenic cry1C rice on P. fuscipes. Use of the rove beetle as an indicator species to assess potential effects of genetically modified crops on non-target arthropods is feasible. PMID:27444416

  12. No impact of transgenic cry1C rice on the rove beetle Paederus fuscipes, a generalist predator of brown planthopper Nilaparvata lugens

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meng, Jiarong; Mabubu, Juma Ibrahim; Han, Yu; He, Yueping; Zhao, Jing; Hua, Hongxia; Feng, Yanni; Wu, Gang

    2016-07-01

    T1C-19 is newly developed transgenic rice active against lepidopteran pests, and expresses a synthesized cry1C gene driven by the maize ubiquitin promoter. The brown planthopper, Nilaparvata lugens, is a major non-target pest of rice, and the rove beetle (Paederus fuscipes) is a generalist predator of N. lugens nymphs. As P. fuscipes may be exposed to the Cry1C protein through preying on N. lugens, it is essential to assess the potential effects of transgenic cry1C rice on this predator. In this study, two experiments (a direct feeding experiment and a tritrophic experiment) were conducted to evaluate the ecological risk of cry1C rice to P. fuscipes. No significant negative effects were observed in the development, survival, female ratio and body weight of P. fuscipes in both treatments of direct exposure to elevated doses of Cry1C protein and prey-mediated exposure to realistic doses of the protein. This indicated that cry1C rice had no detrimental effects on P. fuscipes. This work represents the first study of an assessment continuum for the effects of transgenic cry1C rice on P. fuscipes. Use of the rove beetle as an indicator species to assess potential effects of genetically modified crops on non-target arthropods is feasible.

  13. The expression of a recombinant cry1Ac gene with subtilisin-like protease CDEP2 gene in acrystalliferous Bacillus thuringiensis by Red/ET homologous recombination.

    PubMed

    Xia, Liqiu; Zeng, Zhi; Ding, Xuezhi; Huang, Fan

    2009-10-01

    A novel cDNA encoding the subtilisin-like serine protease gene CDEP2 was isolated from Beauveria bassiana by reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR). It contained an 1137 bp ORF that predicted a protein of 379 amino acids with M = 38863 Da and pI = 8.21. In an attempt to improve insecticidal activity, the CDEP2 gene and the cry1Ac gene from Bacillus thuringiensis were co-fused into the vector pHT315 as pHAc-CDEP2 plasmid by Red/ET homologous recombination. The co-fusion gene was attempted under the control of the native cry1Ac promoter. Plasmid pHAc-CDEP2 was electro-transformed into the B. thuringiensis subsp. kurstaki Cry(-)B. Analyzed by SDS-PAGE and Western blotting, the transformant Cry(-)B-pHAc-CDEP2 strain produced a 130 kDa Cry1Ac protein and 39 kDa CDEP2 protein. The 50% lethal concentration values (LC(50)) of Cry(-)B-pHAc-CDEP2 strain (8.5 microl/ml) to Helicoverpa armigera third instars larvae was clearly higher than the Cry(-)B-pHAc strain (16.7 microl/ml) at 72 h.

  14. Cry1Ab-expressing rice did not influence expression of fecundity-related genes in the wolf spider Pardosa pseudoannulata.

    PubMed

    Wang, Juan; Peng, Yuan-De; He, Chao; Wei, Bao-Yang; Liang, Yun-Shan; Yang, Hui-Lin; Wang, Zhi; Stanley, David; Song, Qi-Sheng

    2016-10-30

    The impact of Bacillus thuringiensis (Bt) toxin proteins on non-target predatory arthropods is not well understood at the cellular and molecular levels. Here, we investigated the potential effects of Cry1Ab expressing rice on fecundity of the wolf spider, Pardosa pseudoannulata, and some of the underlying molecular mechanisms. The results indicated that brown planthoppers (BPHs) reared on Cry1Ab-expressing rice accumulated the Cry toxin and that reproductive parameters (pre-oviposition period, post-oviposition stage, number of eggs, and egg hatching rate) of the spiders that consumed BPHs reared on Bt rice were not different from those that consumed BPHs reared on the non-Bt control rice. The accumulated Cry1Ab did not influence several vitellin (Vt) parameters, including stored energy and amino acid composition, during one generation. We considered the possibility that the Cry toxins exert their influence on beneficial predators via more subtle effects detectable at the molecular level in terms of gene expression. This led us to transcriptome analysis to detect differentially expressed genes in the ovaries of spiders exposed to dietary Cry1Ab and their counterpart control spiders. Eight genes, associated with vitellogenesis, vitellogenin receptor activity, and vitellin membrane formation were not differentially expressed between ovaries from the treated and control spiders, confirmed by qPCR analysis. We infer that dietary Cry1Ab expressing rice does not influence fecundity, nor expression levels of Vt-associated genes in P. pseudoannulata.

  15. Aggregation of Bacillus thuringiensis Cry1A Toxins upon Binding to Target Insect Larval Midgut Vesicles

    PubMed Central

    Aronson, Arthur I.; Geng, Chaoxian; Wu, Lan

    1999-01-01

    During sporulation, Bacillus thuringiensis produces crystalline inclusions comprised of a mixture of δ-endotoxins. Following ingestion by insect larvae, these inclusion proteins are solubilized, and the protoxins are converted to toxins. These bind specifically to receptors on the surfaces of midgut apical cells and are then incorporated into the membrane to form ion channels. The steps required for toxin insertion into the membrane and possible oligomerization to form a channel have been examined. When bound to vesicles from the midguts of Manduca sexta larvae, the Cry1Ac toxin was largely resistant to digestion with protease K. Only about 60 amino acids were removed from the Cry1Ac amino terminus, which included primarily helix α1. Following incubation of the Cry1Ab or Cry1Ac toxins with vesicles, the preparations were solubilized by relatively mild conditions, and the toxin antigens were analyzed by immunoblotting. In both cases, most of the toxin formed a large, antigenic aggregate of ca. 200 kDa. These toxin aggregates did not include the toxin receptor aminopeptidase N, but interactions with other vesicle components were not excluded. No oligomerization occurred when inactive toxins with mutations in amphipathic helices (α5) and known to insert into the membrane were tested. Active toxins with other mutations in this helix did form oligomers. There was one exception; a very active helix α5 mutant toxin bound very well to membranes, but no oligomers were detected. Toxins with mutations in the loop connecting helices α2 and α3, which affected the irreversible binding to vesicles, also did not oligomerize. There was a greater extent of oligomerization of the Cry1Ac toxin with vesicles from the Heliothis virescens midgut than with those from the M. sexta midgut, which correlated with observed differences in toxicity. Tight binding of virtually the entire toxin molecule to the membrane and the subsequent oligomerization are both important steps in toxicity

  16. pH-Controlled Bacillus thuringiensis Cry1Ac Protoxin Loading and Release from Polyelectrolyte Microcapsules

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Wenhui; He, Kanglai; Zhang, Jie; Guo, Shuyuan

    2012-01-01

    Crystal proteins synthesized by Bacillus thuringiensis (Bt) have been used as biopesticides because of their toxicity to the insect larval hosts. To protect the proteins from environmental stress to extend their activity, we have developed a new microcapsule formulation. Poly (acrylic acid) (PAH) and poly (styrene sulfonate) (PSS) were fabricated through layer-by-layer self-assembly based on a CaCO3 core. Cry1Ac protoxins were loaded into microcapsules through layer-by-layer self-assembly at low pH, and the encapsulated product was stored in water at 4°C. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) was used to observe the morphology of the capsules. To confirm the successful encapsulation, the loading results were observed with a confocal laser scattering microscope (CLSM), using fluorescein-labeled Cry1Ac protoxin (FITC-Cry1Ac). The protoxins were released from the capsule under the alkaline condition corresponding to the midgut of certain insects, a condition which seldom exists elsewhere in the environment. The following bioassay experiment demonstrated that the microcapsules with Cry1Ac protoxins displayed approximately equivalent insecticidal activity to the Asian corn borer compared with free Cry1Ac protoxins, and empty capsules proved to have no effect on insects. Further result also indicated that the formulation could keep stable under the condition of heat and desiccation. These results suggest that this formulation provides a promising methodology that protects protoxins from the environment and releases them specifically in the target insects’ midgut, which has shown potential as biopesticide in the field. PMID:23024810

  17. Bt proteins Cry1Ah and Cry2Ab do not affect cotton aphid Aphis gossypii and ladybeetle Propylea japonica.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Yao; Zhang, Shuai; Luo, Jun-Yu; Wang, Chun-Yi; Lv, Li-Min; Wang, Xiao-Ping; Cui, Jin-Jie; Lei, Chao-Liang

    2016-02-01

    Plant varieties expressing the Bt (Bacillus thuringiensis) insecticidal proteins Cry1Ah and Cry2Ab have potential commercialization prospects in China. However, their potential effects on non-target arthropods (NTAs) remain uncharacterized. The cotton aphid Aphis gossypii is a worldwide pest that damages various important crops. The ladybeetle Propylea japonica is a common and abundant natural enemy in many cropping systems in East Asia. In the present study, the effects of Cry1Ah and Cry2Ab proteins on A. gossypii and P. japonica were assessed from three aspects. First, neither of the Cry proteins affected the growth or developmental characteristics of the two test insects. Second, the expression levels of the detoxification-related genes of the two test insects did not change significantly in either Cry protein treatment. Third, neither of the Cry proteins had a favourable effect on the expression of genes associated with the amino acid metabolism of A. gossypii and the nutrition utilization of P. japonica. In conclusion, the Cry1Ah and Cry2Ab proteins do not appear to affect the cotton aphid A. gossypii or the ladybeetle P. japonica.

  18. Bt proteins Cry1Ah and Cry2Ab do not affect cotton aphid Aphis gossypii and ladybeetle Propylea japonica

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Yao; Zhang, Shuai; Luo, Jun-Yu; Wang, Chun-Yi; Lv, Li-Min; Wang, Xiao-Ping; Cui, Jin-Jie; Lei, Chao-Liang

    2016-01-01

    Plant varieties expressing the Bt (Bacillus thuringiensis) insecticidal proteins Cry1Ah and Cry2Ab have potential commercialization prospects in China. However, their potential effects on non-target arthropods (NTAs) remain uncharacterized. The cotton aphid Aphis gossypii is a worldwide pest that damages various important crops. The ladybeetle Propylea japonica is a common and abundant natural enemy in many cropping systems in East Asia. In the present study, the effects of Cry1Ah and Cry2Ab proteins on A. gossypii and P. japonica were assessed from three aspects. First, neither of the Cry proteins affected the growth or developmental characteristics of the two test insects. Second, the expression levels of the detoxification-related genes of the two test insects did not change significantly in either Cry protein treatment. Third, neither of the Cry proteins had a favourable effect on the expression of genes associated with the amino acid metabolism of A. gossypii and the nutrition utilization of P. japonica. In conclusion, the Cry1Ah and Cry2Ab proteins do not appear to affect the cotton aphid A. gossypii or the ladybeetle P. japonica. PMID:26829252

  19. Inheritance patterns, dominance and cross-resistance of Cry1Ab- and Cry1Ac-selected Ostrinia furnacalis (Guenée).

    PubMed

    Zhang, Tiantao; He, Mingxia; Gatehouse, Angharad M R; Wang, Zhenying; Edwards, Martin G; Li, Qing; He, Kanglai

    2014-09-11

    Two colonies of Asian corn borer, Ostrinia furnacalis (Guenée), artificially selected from a Bt-susceptible colony (ACB-BtS) for resistance to Cry1Ab (ACB-AbR) and Cry1Ac (ACB-AcR) toxins, were used to analyze inheritance patterns of resistance to Cry1 toxins. ACB-AbR and ACB-AcR evolved significant levels of resistance, with resistance ratios (RR) of 39-fold and 78.8-fold to Cry1Ab and Cry1Ac, respectively. The susceptibility of ACB-AbR larvae to Cry1Ac and Cry1F toxins, which had not previously been exposed, were significantly reduced, being >113-fold and 48-fold, respectively. Similarly, susceptibility of ACB-AcR larvae to Cry1Ab and Cry1F were also significantly reduced (RR > nine-fold, RR > 18-fold, respectively), indicating cross-resistance among Cry1Ab, Cry1Ac, and Cry1F toxins. However, ACB-AbR and ACB-AcR larvae were equally susceptible to Cry1Ie as were ACB-BtS larvae, indicating no cross-resistance between Cry1Ie and Cry1Ab or Cry1Ac toxins; this may provide considerable benefits in preventing or delaying the evolution of resistance in ACB to Cry1Ab and Cry1Ac toxins. Backcrossing studies indicated that resistance to Cry1Ab toxin was polygenic in ACB-AbR, but monogenic in ACB-AcR, whilst resistance to Cry1Ac toxin was primarily monogenic in both ACB-AbR and ACB-AcR, but polygenic as resistance increased.

  20. Isolation and distribution of mosquito-larvicidal cry genes in Bacillus thuringiensis strains native to Saudi Arabia.

    PubMed

    El-kersh, T A; Al-akeel, R A; Al-sheikh, Y A; Alharbi, S A

    2014-12-01

    A total of 157 environmental samples were collected from 11 ecological regions across Saudi Arabia to isolate native Bacillus thuringiensis (Bt) strains. Bt isolates (n=103) were recovered by the 50% (v/v) ethanol treatment method with Bt index range of 0.01 to 0.4. Most of Bt isolates showed spherical crystals (54%), while, irregular, bi-pyramidal, and spore-attached crystal constituted 27, 16 and 3% respectively. PCR analysis with eight general and specific dipteran primers of Cry and Cyt genes, revealed positive amplification for cry4 & cyt1, and cry4A, cry4B and cyt2, and cry 10 and cry 11 genes in 28%, 26%, 22%, and 25% of tested strains respectively; whereas cry2 gene was not detected except with the reference Bt kurstaki HD-1 strain. Bioassays against Aedes caspuis and Culex pipiens larvae indicated that 11 strains displayed better larvicidal activity compared with Bacillus thuringiensis H14 (Bti) reference (LC50 0.6 μg/ml) strain against Ae. caspuis, but only two strains (620A & 633R1, LC50 of 0.09 μg/ml & 0.064 μg/ml) that gave significant enhancement. Additionally, one strain (633R1) showed LC50 similar to that of Bti H14 (LC50 0.064 μg/ml) against Cx. pipiens. With the exception of cyt primers, sequenced DNA of all positive primers amplicons revealed 95 to 99% identity in GenBank with Bacillus thuringiensis subsp. israelensis plasmid pBtoxis and also correlated with its SDS-PAGE expressed protein profiles analysis. It is hoped that our wild bio-insecticide Bt strains can be explored in future in the control of mosquito-vector borne diseases in Saudi Arabia.

  1. Binding of Cyt1Aa and Cry11Aa toxins of Bacillus thuringiensis serovar israelensis to brush border membrane vesicles of Tipula paludosa (Diptera: Nematocera) and subsequent pore formation.

    PubMed

    Oestergaard, Jesko; Ehlers, Ralf-Udo; Martínez-Ramírez, Amparo C; Real, Maria Dolores

    2007-06-01

    Bacillus thuringiensis serovar israelensis (B. thuringiensis subsp. israelensis) produces four insecticidal crystal proteins (ICPs) (Cry4A, Cry4B, Cry11A, and Cyt1A). Toxicity of recombinant B. thuringiensis subsp. israelensis strains expressing only one of the toxins was determined with first instars of Tipula paludosa (Diptera: Nematocera). Cyt1A was the most toxic protein, whereas Cry4A, Cry4B, and Cry11A were virtually nontoxic. Synergistic effects were recorded when Cry4A and/or Cry4B was combined with Cyt1A but not with Cry11A. The binding and pore formation are key steps in the mode of action of B. thuringiensis subsp. israelensis ICPs. Binding and pore-forming activity of Cry11Aa, which is the most toxic protein against mosquitoes, and Cyt1Aa to brush border membrane vesicles (BBMVs) of T. paludosa were analyzed. Solubilization of Cry11Aa resulted in two fragments, with apparent molecular masses of 32 and 36 kDa. No binding of the 36-kDa fragment to T. paludosa BBMVs was detected, whereas the 32-kDa fragment bound to T. paludosa BBMVs. Only a partial reduction of binding of this fragment was observed in competition experiments, indicating a low specificity of the binding. In contrast to results for mosquitoes, the Cyt1Aa protein bound specifically to the BBMVs of T. paludosa, suggesting an insecticidal mechanism based on a receptor-mediated action, as described for Cry proteins. Cry11Aa and Cyt1Aa toxins were both able to produce pores in T. paludosa BBMVs. Protease treatment with trypsin and proteinase K, previously reported to activate Cry11Aa and Cyt1Aa toxins, respectively, had the opposite effect. A higher efficiency in pore formation was observed when Cyt1A was proteinase K treated, while the activity of trypsin-treated Cry11Aa was reduced. Results on binding and pore formation are consistent with results on ICP toxicity and synergistic effect with Cyt1Aa in T. paludosa.

  2. The expression and crystallization of Cry65Aa require two C-termini, revealing a novel evolutionary strategy of Bacillus thuringiensis Cry proteins

    PubMed Central

    Peng, Dong-hai; Pang, Cui-yun; Wu, Han; Huang, Qiong; Zheng, Jin-shui; Sun, Ming

    2015-01-01

    The insecticidal crystal protein (Cry) genes of Bacillus thuringiensis are a key gene resource for generating transgenic crops with pest resistance. However, many cry genes cannot be expressed or form crystals in mother cells. Here, we report a novel Cry protein gene, cry65Aa1, which exists in an operon that contains a downstream gene encoding a hypothetical protein ORF2. We demonstrated that ORF2 is required for Cry65Aa1 expression and crystallization by function as a C-terminal crystallization domain. The orf2 sequence is also required for Cry65Aa expression, because orf2 transcripts have a stabilizing effect on cry65Aa1 transcripts. Furthermore, we found that the crystallization of Cry65Aa1 required the Cry65Aa1 C-terminus in addition to ORF2 or a typical Cry protein C-terminal region. Finally, we showed that Cry65Aa1 has a selective cytotoxic effect on MDA-MB231 cancer cells. This report is the first description of a 130-kDa mass range Cry protein requiring two C-termini for crystallization. Our findings reveal a novel evolutionary strategy of Cry proteins and provide an explanation for the existence of Cry protein genes that cannot form crystals in B. thuringiensis. This study also provides a potential framework for isolating novel cry genes from “no crystal” B. thuringiensis strains. PMID:25656389

  3. The power of consoling presence - hospice nurses’ lived experience with spiritual and existential care for the dying

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Being with dying people is an integral part of nursing, yet many nurses feel unprepared to accompany people through the process of dying, reporting a lack of skills in psychosocial and spiritual care, resulting in high levels of moral distress, grief and burnout. The aim of this study is to describe the meaning of hospice nurses’ lived experience with alleviating dying patients’ spiritual and existential suffering. Methods This is a qualitative study. Hospice nurses were interviewed individually and asked to narrate about their experiences with giving spiritual and existential care to terminally ill hospice patients. Data analysis was conducted using phenomenological hermeneutical method. Results The key spiritual and existential care themes identified, were sensing existential and spiritual distress, tuning inn and opening up, sensing the atmosphere in the room, being moved and touched, and consoling through silence, conversation and religious consolation. Conclusions Consoling existential and spiritual distress is a deeply personal and relational practice. Nurses have a potential to alleviate existential and spiritual suffering through consoling presence. By connecting deeply with patients and their families, nurses have the possibility to affirm the patients’ strength and facilitate their courage to live a meaningful life and die a dignified death. PMID:25214816

  4. Sensor-Operated Headset Selection for Virginia Class Submarine Consoles (3CI)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Russotti, Joseph S.; Schwaller, Derek W.

    2001-10-01

    The current research evaluated various headsets for use on C3I (Command, Control, Communication and Intelligence workstation) consoles installed in Virginia Class submarine. Of particular importance is their intended application in accurately presenting not only communications but also passive acoustic sonar data and other future advanced auditory displays that may use spatial coding. Of these applications accurate representation of broadband sonar data becomes the most challenging immediate task. Headset evaluation of commercial off-the-shelf products confirmed our decision to press for development of high fidelity ANC sensor operator headsets. This study reports evaluation of a prototype ANC high fidelity headset developed to our specification for use in critical listening in a moderately noisy environment.

  5. Computation of leading edge film cooling from a CONSOLE geometry (CONverging Slot hOLE)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guelailia, A.; Khorsi, A.; Hamidou, M. K.

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this study is to investigate the effect of mass flow rate on film cooling effectiveness and heat transfer over a gas turbine rotor blade with three staggered rows of shower-head holes which are inclined at 30° to the spanwise direction, and are normal to the streamwise direction on the blade. To improve film cooling effectiveness, the standard cylindrical holes, located on the leading edge region, are replaced with the converging slot holes (console). The ANSYS CFX has been used for this computational simulation. The turbulence is approximated by a k-ɛ model. Detailed film effectiveness distributions are presented for different mass flow rate. The numerical results are compared with experimental data.

  6. Metamorphoses of ONAV console operations: From prototype to real time application

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Millis, Malise; Wang, Lui

    1991-01-01

    The ONAV (Onboard Navigation) Expert System is being developed as a real time console assistant to the ONAV flight controller for use in the Mission Control Center at the Johnson Space Center. Currently the entry and rendezvous systems are in verification, and the ascent is being prototyped. To arrive at this stage, from a prototype to real world application, the ONAV project has had to deal with not only AI issues but operating environment issues. The AI issues included the maturity of AI languages and the debugging tools, what is verification, and availability, stability, and the size of the expert pool. The environmental issues included real time data acquisition, hardware stability, and how to achieve acceptance by users and management.

  7. Development of a Software Tool to Automate ADCO Flight Controller Console Planning Tasks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Anderson, Mark G.

    2011-01-01

    This independent study project covers the development of the International Space Station (ISS) Attitude Determination and Control Officer (ADCO) Planning Exchange APEX Tool. The primary goal of the tool is to streamline existing manual and time-intensive planning tools into a more automated, user-friendly application that interfaces with existing products and allows the ADCO to produce accurate products and timelines more effectively. This paper will survey the current ISS attitude planning process and its associated requirements, goals, documentation and software tools and how a software tool could simplify and automate many of the planning actions which occur at the ADCO console. The project will be covered from inception through the initial prototype delivery in November 2011 and will include development of design requirements and software as well as design verification and testing.

  8. Genomic sequencing identifies novel Bacillus thuringiensis Vip1/Vip2 binary and Cry8 toxins that have high toxicity to Scarabaeoidea larvae.

    PubMed

    Bi, Yang; Zhang, Yanrui; Shu, Changlong; Crickmore, Neil; Wang, Qinglei; Du, Lixin; Song, Fuping; Zhang, Jie

    2015-01-01

    The Bacillus thuringiensis strain HBF-18 (CGMCC 2070), which has previously been shown to encode the cry8Ga toxin gene, is active against both Holotrichia oblita and Holotrichia parallela. Recombinant Cry8Ga however is only weakly toxic to these insect pests suggesting the involvement of additional toxins in the native strain. We report that through the use of Illumina sequencing three additional, and novel, genes, namely vip1Ad1, vip2Ag1, and cry8-like, were identified in this strain. Although no protein corresponding to these genes could be identified by sodium dodecyl sulfate polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (SDS-PAGE) analysis of the HBF-18 proteome, reverse transcription (RT)-PCR indicated that all three genes were transcribed in the native strain. The two vip genes were cloned and expressed and, as with other Vip1/2 toxins, appeared to function as a binary toxin and showed strong activity against H. oblita, H. parallela and Anomala corpulenta. This is the first report to demonstrate that the Vip1/Vip2 binary toxin is active against these Scarabaeoidea larvae. The cry8-like gene appeared to be a C-terminally truncated form of a typical cry8 gene and was not expressed in our usual recombinant Bt expression system. When however the missing C-terminal region was replaced with the corresponding sequence from cry8Ea, the resulting hybrid expressed well and the toxin was active against the three test insects.

  9. Prenatal diagnosis of cri du chat syndrome with encephalocele.

    PubMed

    Bakkum, Jamie N; Watson, William J; Johansen, Keith L; Brost, Brian C

    2005-10-01

    A 19-year-old primigravida was found to have an encephalocele on screening ultrasound study. Amniocentesis indicated cri du chat syndrome, 5p-. Although cri du chat syndrome has been noted in association with central nervous system malformations, encephalocele is a rare finding in this syndrome.

  10. The larynx in the cri du chat syndrome.

    PubMed

    Manning, K P

    1977-10-01

    The Cri du Chat Syndrome which is caused by a chromosome abnormality is described. A summary of the laryngeal features found by various authors has been made. The characteristic cat-like cry is probably central in origin. The larynx in this condition may be normal or abnormal. If abnormal it is just another clinical manifestation of the syndrome.

  11. Spectrum Analysis of Low and Full Birthweight Newborn Cries.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lester, Barry M.; And Others

    Based on findings that report differences between cries of normal and clinically abnormal infants, this study examined the relationship between birthweight and behavioral and acoustic features of neonatal cry because of the long-standing association between birthweight, perinatal trauma, and subsequent development. Subjects were 88 neonates…

  12. Origins of Mothers' and Fathers' Beliefs about Infant Crying

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Leerkes, Esther M.; Parade, Stephanie H.; Burney, Regan V.

    2010-01-01

    Origins of mothers' and fathers' beliefs about infant crying were examined in 87 couples. Parents completed measures of emotion minimization in the family of origin, depressive symptoms, empathy, trait anger, and coping styles prenatally. At 6 months postpartum, parents completed a self-report measure of their beliefs about infant crying. Mothers…

  13. Asymmetric crying face in a newborn with isotretinoin embryopathy.

    PubMed

    Sarici, Dilek; Akin, Mustafa Ali; Kurtoglu, Selim; Uzum, Kazim; Kiraz, Aslihan

    2013-01-01

    We report a newborn with asymmetric crying face and other anomalies whose mother had taken isotretinoin during the first month of pregnancy. We hypothesize that asymmetric crying face is a finding of retinoic acid embryopathy and results from the intrauterine effects of retinoic acid on the development of the depressor anguli oris muscle or the mandibular branch of the facial nerve.

  14. Origins of Mothers’ and Fathers’ Beliefs about Infant Crying

    PubMed Central

    Leerkes, Esther M.; Parade, Stephanie H.; Burney, Regan V.

    2010-01-01

    Origins of mothers’ and fathers’ beliefs about infant crying were examined in 87 couples. Parents completed measures of emotion minimization in the family of origin, depressive symptoms, empathy, trait anger, and coping styles prenatally. At 6 months postpartum, parents completed a self-report measure of their beliefs about infant crying. Mothers endorsed more infant-oriented and less parent-oriented beliefs about crying than did fathers. Consistent with prediction, a history of emotion minimization was linked with more parent-oriented and fewer infant-oriented beliefs about infant crying for both mothers and fathers either as a main effect or in conjunction with the partners’ infant-oriented beliefs. Contrary to expectation, parents’ own emotional dispositions had little effect on parents’ beliefs about crying. The pattern of associations varied for mothers and fathers in a number of ways. Implications for future research and programs promoting sensitive parenting are discussed. PMID:21152107

  15. Identification and characterization of Aedes aegypti aminopeptidase N as a putative receptor of Bacillus thuringiensis Cry11A toxin

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Jianwu; Aimanova, Karlygash G.; Pan, Songqin; Gill, Sarjeet S.

    2009-01-01

    Bacillus thuringiensis subsp. israelensis, which is used worldwide to control Aedes aegypti larvae, produces Cry11Aa and other toxins during sporulation. In this study, pull-down assays were performed using biotinylated Cry11Aa toxin and solubilized brush border membrane vesicles prepared from midguts of Aedes larvae. Three of the eluted proteins were identified as aminopeptidease N (APN), one of which was a 140 kDa protein, named AaeAPN1 (AAEL 012778 in VectorBase). This protein localizes to the apical side of posterior midgut epithelial cells of larva. The full-length AaeAPN1 was cloned and expressed in E. coli and in Sf21 cells. AaeAPN1 protein expressed in Sf21 cells was enzymatically active, had a GPI-anchor but did not bind Cry11Aa. A truncated AaeAPN1, however, binds Cry11Aa with high affinity, and also Cry11Ba but with lower affinity. BBMV but not Sf21 expressed AaeAPN1 can be detected by wheat germ agglutinin suggesting the native but Sf21 cell expressed APN1 contains N-acetylglucosamine moieties. PMID:19698787

  16. APN1 is a functional receptor of Cry1Ac but not Cry2Ab in Helicoverpa zea

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Lepidopteran midgut aminopeptidases N (APNs) are phylogenetically divided into eight clusters, designated as APN1-8. Although APN1 has been implicated as one of the receptors for Cry1Ac in several species, its potential role in the mode of action of Cry2Ab has not been functionally determined so fa...

  17. Behavioral and genetic correlates of the neural response to infant crying among human fathers

    PubMed Central

    Mascaro, Jennifer S.; Hackett, Patrick D.; Gouzoules, Harold; Lori, Adriana

    2014-01-01

    Although evolution has shaped human infant crying and the corresponding response from caregivers, there is marked variation in paternal involvement and caretaking behavior, highlighting the importance of understanding the neurobiology supporting optimal paternal responses to cries. We explored the neural response to infant cries in fathers of children aged 1–2, and its relationship with hormone levels, variation in the androgen receptor (AR) gene, parental attitudes and parental behavior. Although number of AR CAG trinucleotide repeats was positively correlated with neural activity in brain regions important for empathy (anterior insula and inferior frontal gyrus), restrictive attitudes were inversely correlated with neural activity in these regions and with regions involved with emotion regulation (orbitofrontal cortex). Anterior insula activity had a non-linear relationship with paternal caregiving, such that fathers with intermediate activation were most involved. These results suggest that restrictive attitudes may be associated with decreased empathy and emotion regulation in response to a child in distress, and that moderate anterior insula activity reflects an optimal level of arousal that supports engaged fathering. PMID:24336349

  18. Bacillus thuringiensis insecticidal Cry1Aa toxin binds to a highly conserved region of aminopeptidase N in the host insect leading to its evolutionary success.

    PubMed

    Nakanishi, K; Yaoi, K; Shimada, N; Kadotani, T; Sato, R

    1999-06-15

    Bacillus thuringiensis insecticidal protein, Cry1Aa toxin, binds to a specific receptor in insect midguts and has insecticidal activity. Therefore, the structure of the receptor molecule is probably a key factor in determining the binding affinity of the toxin and insect susceptibility. The cDNA fragment (PX frg1) encoding the Cry1Aa toxin-binding region of an aminopeptidase N (APN) or an APN family protein from diamondback moth, Plutella xylostella midgut was cloned and sequenced. A comparison between the deduced amino acid sequence of PX frg1 and other insect APN sequences shows that Cry1Aa toxin binds to a highly conserved region of APN family protein. In this paper, we propose a model to explain the mechanism that causes B. thuringiensis evolutionary success and differing insect susceptibility to Cry1Aa toxin.

  19. Cri du chat syndrome: a critical review.

    PubMed

    Rodríguez-Caballero, Angela; Torres-Lagares, Daniel; Rodríguez-Pérez, Antonio; Serrera-Figallo, María-Angeles; Hernández-Guisado, José-María; Machuca-Portillo, Guillermo

    2010-05-01

    A new syndrome was identified in 1963, when Lejeune et al. reported a genetic disease resulting from a partial or total deletion on the short arm of chromosome 5 (5p-) and named it the cri du chat syndrome (CdCS). This term makes reference to the main clinical feature of the syndrome, a high-pitched monochromatic cat-like crying, that usually disappears in the first years of life. CdCS is one of the most common chromosomal deletion syndromes in humans, with an incidence of 1:15.000-1:50.000 live-births. Our purpose was to review different aspects of this syndrome (concept, epidemiology, aetiology, clinical features, diagnostic methods and prognosis) emphasizing both: the breakthrough in this field introduced by new cytogenetic and molecular techniques, and the orofacial manifestations most frequently reported. The main orofacial anomalies registered were mandibular microretrognathia, high palate but rarely cleft, variable malocclusion (frequently anterior open-bite), enamel hypoplasia, poor oral hygiene, generalized chronic periodontitis, and retardation of tooth eruption, although there is not enough evidence to support any clear association between these pathologies and the CdCS.

  20. A 45,XX,-5,-14,+t(5q;14q)mat cri du chat child.

    PubMed

    Bass, H N; Sparkes, R S; Crandall, B F; Galos, K J; Howard, J

    1978-03-01

    A two-year-old girl has the following features of the cri du chat syndrome: microcephaly, hypertelorism, downward slanting of the palpebral fissures, psychomotor retardation and a cat-like cry. She is only of five patients having the cat cry syndrome with 45 chromosomes. Her karyotype is 45,XX, -5, -14, +t(5; 14)(5qter leads to 5p11: : 14q11 leads to 14qter) with the translocation inherited from her mother and maternal grandmother, each of whom is the carrier of a balanced translocation 46,XX,t(5;14)(p11q11). Normal plasma activity for hexosaminidase B suggests the locus for this enzyme is not located in the delected segment of 5 p.

  1. Occurrence of maize detritus and a transgenic insecticidal protein (Cry1Ab) within the stream network of an agricultural landscape

    PubMed Central

    Tank, Jennifer L.; Rosi-Marshall, Emma J.; Royer, Todd V.; Whiles, Matt R.; Griffiths, Natalie A.; Frauendorf, Therese C.; Treering, David J.

    2010-01-01

    Widespread planting of maize throughout the agricultural Midwest may result in detritus entering adjacent stream ecosystems, and 63% of the 2009 US maize crop was genetically modified to express insecticidal Cry proteins derived from Bacillus thuringiensis. Six months after harvest, we conducted a synoptic survey of 217 stream sites in Indiana to determine the extent of maize detritus and presence of Cry1Ab protein in the stream network. We found that 86% of stream sites contained maize leaves, cobs, husks, and/or stalks in the active stream channel. We also detected Cry1Ab protein in stream-channel maize at 13% of sites and in the water column at 23% of sites. We found that 82% of stream sites were adjacent to maize fields, and Geographical Information Systems analyses indicated that 100% of sites containing Cry1Ab-positive detritus in the active stream channel had maize planted within 500 m during the previous crop year. Maize detritus likely enters streams throughout the Corn Belt; using US Department of Agriculture land cover data, we estimate that 91% of the 256,446 km of streams/rivers in Iowa, Illinois, and Indiana are located within 500 m of a maize field. Maize detritus is common in low-gradient stream channels in northwestern Indiana, and Cry1Ab proteins persist in maize leaves and can be measured in the water column even 6 mo after harvest. Hence, maize detritus, and associated Cry1Ab proteins, are widely distributed and persistent in the headwater streams of a Corn Belt landscape. PMID:20876106

  2. Occurrence of maize detritus and a transgenic insecticidal protein (Cry1Ab) within the stream network of an agricultural landscape.

    PubMed

    Tank, Jennifer L; Rosi-Marshall, Emma J; Royer, Todd V; Whiles, Matt R; Griffiths, Natalie A; Frauendorf, Therese C; Treering, David J

    2010-10-12

    Widespread planting of maize throughout the agricultural Midwest may result in detritus entering adjacent stream ecosystems, and 63% of the 2009 US maize crop was genetically modified to express insecticidal Cry proteins derived from Bacillus thuringiensis. Six months after harvest, we conducted a synoptic survey of 217 stream sites in Indiana to determine the extent of maize detritus and presence of Cry1Ab protein in the stream network. We found that 86% of stream sites contained maize leaves, cobs, husks, and/or stalks in the active stream channel. We also detected Cry1Ab protein in stream-channel maize at 13% of sites and in the water column at 23% of sites. We found that 82% of stream sites were adjacent to maize fields, and Geographical Information Systems analyses indicated that 100% of sites containing Cry1Ab-positive detritus in the active stream channel had maize planted within 500 m during the previous crop year. Maize detritus likely enters streams throughout the Corn Belt; using US Department of Agriculture land cover data, we estimate that 91% of the 256,446 km of streams/rivers in Iowa, Illinois, and Indiana are located within 500 m of a maize field. Maize detritus is common in low-gradient stream channels in northwestern Indiana, and Cry1Ab proteins persist in maize leaves and can be measured in the water column even 6 mo after harvest. Hence, maize detritus, and associated Cry1Ab proteins, are widely distributed and persistent in the headwater streams of a Corn Belt landscape.

  3. Fundamental Bulk/Surface Structure Photoactivity Relationships of Supported (Rh2-yCryO3)/GaN Photocatalysts

    SciTech Connect

    Phivilay, Somphonh; Roberts, Charles; Puretzky, Alexander A; Domen, Kazunari Domen; Wachs, Israel

    2013-01-01

    ABSTRACT. The supported (Rh2-yCryO3)/GaN photocatalyst was examined as a model nitride photocatalyst system to assist in the development of fundamental structure photoactivity relationships for UV activated water splitting. Surface characterization of the outermost surface layers by High Sensitivity-LEIS and High Resolution-XPS revealed for the first time that the GaN support consists of a GaOx outermost surface layer and a thin film of GaOxNy in the surface region. HR-XPS also demonstrates that the supported (Rh2-yCryO3) mixed oxide nanoparticles (NPs) exclusively consist of Cr+3 and Rh+3 cations and are surface enriched for the supported (Rh2-yCryO3)/GaN photocatalyst. Bulk analysis by Raman and UV-vis spectroscopy show that the bulk molecular and electronic structures, respectively, of the GaN support are not perturbed by the deposition of the (Rh2-yCryO3) mixed oxide NPs. The function of the GaN bulk lattice is to generate photoexcited electrons/holes, with the electrons harnessed by the surface Rh+3 sites for evolution of H2 and the holes trapped at the Ga oxide/oxynitride surface sites for splitting of water and evolving O2. These new structure-photoactivity relationships for supported (Rh2-yCryO3)/GaN also extend to the best performing visible light activated supported (Rh2-yCryO3)/(Ga1-xZnx)(N1-xOx) photocatalyst.

  4. Different Effects of Bacillus thuringiensis Toxin Cry1Ab on Midgut Cell Transmembrane Potential of Mythimna separata and Agrotis ipsilon Larvae

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Yingying; Hu, Zhaonong; Wu, Wenjun

    2015-01-01

    Bacillus thuringiensis (Bt) Cry toxins from the Cry1A family demonstrate significantly different toxicities against members of the family Noctuidae for unknown reasons. In this study, membrane potential was measured and analyzed in freshly isolated midgut samples from Mythimna separata and Agrotis ipsilon larvae under oral administration and in vitro incubation with Bt toxin Cry1Ab to elucidate the mechanism of action for further control of these pests. Bioassay results showed that the larvae of M. separata achieved a LD50 of 258.84 ng/larva at 24 h after ingestion; M. separata larvae were at least eightfold more sensitive than A. ipsilon larvae to Cry1Ab. Force-feeding showed that the observed midgut apical-membrane potential (Vam) of M. separata larvae was significantly depolarized from −82.9 ± 6.6 mV to −19.9 ± 7.2 mV at 8 h after ingestion of 1 μg activated Cry1Ab, whereas no obvious changes were detected in A. ipsilon larvae with dosage of 5 μg Cry1Ab. The activated Cry1Ab caused a distinct concentration-dependent depolarization of the apical membrane; Vam was reduced by 50% after 14.7 ± 0.2, 9.8 ± 0.4, and 7.6 ± 0.6 min of treatment with 1, 5, and 10 μg/mL Cry1Ab, respectively. Cry1Ab showed a minimal effect on A. ipsilon larvae even at 20 μg/mL, and Vam decreased by 26.3% ± 2.3% after 15 min. The concentrations of Cry1Ab displayed no significant effect on the basolateral side of the epithelium. The Vam of A. ipsilon (−33.19 ± 6.29 mV, n = 51) was only half that of M. separata (−80.94 ± 6.95 mV, n = 75). The different degrees of sensitivity to Cry1Ab were speculatively associated with various habits, as well as the diverse physiological or biochemical characteristics of the midgut cell membranes. PMID:26694463

  5. Long term cognitive development in children with prolonged crying

    PubMed Central

    Rao, M; Brenner, R; Schisterman, E; Vik, T; Mills, J

    2004-01-01

    Background: Long term studies of cognitive development and colic have not differentiated between typical colic and prolonged crying. Objective: To evaluate whether colic and excessive crying that persists beyond 3 months is associated with adverse cognitive development. Design: Prospective cohort study. A sample of 561 women was enrolled in the second trimester of pregnancy. Colic and prolonged crying were based on crying behaviour assessed at 6 and 13 weeks. Children's intelligence, motor abilities, and behaviour were measured at 5 years (n = 327). Known risk factors for cognitive impairment were ascertained prenatally, after birth, at 6 and 13 weeks, at 6, 9, and 13 months, and at 5 years of age. Results: Children with prolonged crying (but not those with colic only) had an adjusted mean IQ that was 9 points lower than the control group. Their performance and verbal IQ scores were 9.2 and 6.7 points lower than the control group, respectively. The prolonged crying group also had significantly poorer fine motor abilities compared with the control group. Colic had no effect on cognitive development. Conclusions: Excessive, uncontrolled crying that persists beyond 3 months of age in infants without other signs of neurological damage may be a marker for cognitive deficits during childhood. Such infants need to be examined and followed up more intensively. PMID:15499048

  6. The Spodoptera exigua (Lepidoptera: Noctuidae) ABCC2 Mediates Cry1Ac Cytotoxicity and, in Conjunction with Cadherin, Contributes to Enhance Cry1Ca Toxicity in Sf9 Cells.

    PubMed

    Ren, Xiang-Liang; Jiang, Wei-Li; Ma, Ya-Jie; Hu, Hong-Yan; Ma, Xiao-Yan; Ma, Yan; Li, Guo-Qing

    2016-12-01

    In insects, the mode of Cry1A toxins action has been studied in detail and many receptors that participate in the process are known. Recent evidence has revealed that an ABC transporter (ABCC2) is involved in conferring resistance to Cry1A toxins and that ABCC2 could be a receptor of Cry1A. However, it is not known whether Cry1Ca interacts with the same receptor proteins as Cry1A. In this study, we report the cloning of an ABC transporter gene, SeABCC2b, from the midgut of Spodoptera exigua (Hübner) larvae, and its expression in Sf9 cells for a functional analysis. The addition of Cry1Ca and Cry1Ac to Sf9 cell culture caused swelling in 28.5% and 93.9% of the SeABCC2-expressing cells, respectively. In contrast, only 7.4% and 1.3% of the controls cells swelled in the presence of Cry1Ca and Cry1Ac. Thus, SeABCC2b-expressing Sf9 cells had increased susceptibility to Cry1Ca and Cry1Ac. Similarly, S. exigua cadherin (SeCad1b) expressed in Sf9 cells caused 47.1% and 1.8% of the SeCad1b-expressing cells to swell to Cry1Ca and Cry1Ac exposure. Therefore, Sf9 cells expressing SeCad1b were more sensitive to Cry1Ca than Cry1Ac. Together, our data suggest that SeABCC2b from S. exigua mediates Cry1Ac cytotoxicity and, in conjunction with SeCad1b, contributes to enhance Cry1Ca toxicity in Sf9 cells.

  7. Aedes cadherin mediates the in vivo toxicity of the Cry11Aa toxin to Aedes aegypti

    PubMed Central

    Aimanova, Karlygash G.; Gill, Sarjeet S.

    2014-01-01

    Cadherin plays an important role in the toxicity of Bacillus thuringiensis Cry proteins. We previously cloned a full-length cadherin from Aedes aegypti larvae and reported this protein binds Cry11Aa toxin from B. thuringiensis subsp. israelensis with high affinity, ≈ 16.7 nM. Based on these results, we investigated if Aedes cadherin is involved in the in vivo toxicity of Cry11Aa toxin to Ae. aegypti. We established a mosquito cell line stably expressing the full-length Aedes cadherin and transgenic mosquitoes with silenced Aedes cadherin expression. Cells expressing the Aedes cadherin showed increased sensitivity to Cry11Aa toxin. Cry11Aa toxin at 400 nM killed approximately 37% of the cells in 3 h. Otherwise, transgenic mosquitoes with silenced Aedes cadherin expression showed increased tolerance to Cry11Aa toxin. Furthermore, cells expressing Aedes cadherin triggered Cry11Aa oligomerization. These results show the Aedes cadherin plays a pivotal role in Cry11Aa toxicity to Ae. aegypti larvae by mediating Cry11Aa oligomerization. However, since high toxicity was not obtained in cadherin-expressing cells, an additional receptor may be needed for manifestation of full toxicity. Moreover, cells expressing Aedes cadherin were sensitive to Cry4Aa and Cry11Ba but not Cry4Ba. However transgenic mosquitoes with silenced Aedes cadherin expression showed no tolerance to Cry4Aa, Cry4Ba, and Cry11Ba toxins. These results suggest that while Aedes cadherin may mediate Cry4Aa and Cry11Ba toxicity, this cadherin but is not the main receptor of Cry4Aa, Cry4Ba and Cry11Ba toxin in Ae. aegypti. PMID:25064814

  8. Multiple assays indicate varying levels of cross resistance of Cry3Bb1-selected field populations of the western corn rootworm to mCry3A, eCry3.1Ab, and Cry34/35Ab1

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Minnesota populations of the western corn rootworm (WCR) surviving Cry3Bb1-expressing corn in the field and WCR populations assumed to be susceptible to all Bt proteins were evaluated for susceptibility to Cry3Bb1, mCry3A, eCry3.1Ab, and Cry34/35Ab1 in diet assays and three different plant-based ass...

  9. Aedes cadherin mediates the in vivo toxicity of the Cry11Aa toxin to Aedes aegypti.

    PubMed

    Lee, Su-Bum; Chen, Jianwu; Aimanova, Karlygash G; Gill, Sarjeet S

    2015-06-01

    Cadherin plays an important role in the toxicity of Bacillus thuringiensis Cry proteins. We previously cloned a full-length cadherin from Aedes aegypti larvae and reported this protein binds Cry11Aa toxin from B. thuringiensis subsp. israelensis with high affinity, ≈16.7nM. Based on these results, we investigated if Aedes cadherin is involved in the in vivo toxicity of Cry11Aa toxin to Ae. aegypti. We established a mosquito cell line stably expressing the full-length Aedes cadherin and transgenic mosquitoes with silenced Aedes cadherin expression. Cells expressing the Aedes cadherin showed increased sensitivity to Cry11Aa toxin. Cry11Aa toxin at 400nM killed approximately 37% of the cells in 3h. Otherwise, transgenic mosquitoes with silenced Aedes cadherin expression showed increased tolerance to Cry11Aa toxin. Furthermore, cells expressing Aedes cadherin triggered Cry11Aa oligomerization. These results show the Aedes cadherin plays a pivotal role in Cry11Aa toxicity to Ae. aegypti larvae by mediating Cry11Aa oligomerization. However, since high toxicity was not obtained in cadherin-expressing cells, an additional receptor may be needed for manifestation of full toxicity. Moreover, cells expressing Aedes cadherin were sensitive to Cry4Aa and Cry11Ba, but not Cry4Ba. However transgenic mosquitoes with silenced Aedes cadherin expression showed no tolerance to Cry4Aa, Cry4Ba, and Cry11Ba toxins. These results suggest that while Aedes cadherin may mediate Cry4Aa and Cry11Ba toxicity, this cadherin but is not the main receptor of Cry4Aa, Cry4Ba and Cry11Ba toxin in Ae. aegypti.

  10. Developmental and behavioural characteristics of cri du chat syndrome.

    PubMed Central

    Cornish, K M; Pigram, J

    1996-01-01

    Developmental and behavioural characteristics were assessed in 27 children with cri du chat syndrome using the Society for the Study of Behavioural Phenotypes questionnaire, which gave information on prenatal and perinatal conditions, neurological problems, and developmental and behavioural difficulties. The findings suggest that the behavioural profile of children with cri du chat syndrome incorporates self injurious behaviour, repetitive movements, hypersensitivity to sound, clumsiness, and obsessive attachments to objects. In terms of a developmental profile, children with cri du chat syndrome were able to communicate their needs, socially interact with others, and have some degree of mobility. PMID:8957962

  11. Binding sites for Bacillus thuringiensis Cry2Ae toxin on heliothine brush border membrane vesicles are not shared with Cry1A, Cry1F, or Vip3A toxin.

    PubMed

    Gouffon, C; Van Vliet, A; Van Rie, J; Jansens, S; Jurat-Fuentes, J L

    2011-05-01

    The use of combinations of Bacillus thuringiensis (Bt) toxins with diverse modes of action for insect pest control has been proposed as the most efficient strategy to increase target range and delay the onset of insect resistance. Considering that most cases of cross-resistance to Bt toxins in laboratory-selected insect colonies are due to alteration of common toxin binding sites, independent modes of action can be defined as toxins sharing limited or no binding sites in brush border membrane vesicles (BBMV) prepared from the target insect larvae. In this paper, we report on the specific binding of Cry2Ae toxin to binding sites on BBMV from larvae of the three most commercially relevant heliothine species, Heliothis virescens, Helicoverpa zea, and Helicoverpa armigera. Using chromatographic purification under reducing conditions before labeling, we detected specific binding of radiolabeled Cry2Ae, which allowed us to perform competition assays using Cry1Ab, Cry1Ac, Cry1Fa, Vip3A, Cry2Ae, and Cry2Ab toxins as competitors. In these assays, Cry2Ae binding sites were shared with Cry2Ab but not with the tested Cry1 or Vip3A toxins. Our data support the use of Cry2Ae toxin in combination with Cry1 or Vip3A toxins in strategies to increase target range and delay the onset of heliothine resistance.

  12. Binding Sites for Bacillus thuringiensis Cry2Ae Toxin on Heliothine Brush Border Membrane Vesicles Are Not Shared with Cry1A, Cry1F, or Vip3A Toxin ▿

    PubMed Central

    Gouffon, C.; Van Vliet, A.; Van Rie, J.; Jansens, S.; Jurat-Fuentes, J. L.

    2011-01-01

    The use of combinations of Bacillus thuringiensis (Bt) toxins with diverse modes of action for insect pest control has been proposed as the most efficient strategy to increase target range and delay the onset of insect resistance. Considering that most cases of cross-resistance to Bt toxins in laboratory-selected insect colonies are due to alteration of common toxin binding sites, independent modes of action can be defined as toxins sharing limited or no binding sites in brush border membrane vesicles (BBMV) prepared from the target insect larvae. In this paper, we report on the specific binding of Cry2Ae toxin to binding sites on BBMV from larvae of the three most commercially relevant heliothine species, Heliothis virescens, Helicoverpa zea, and Helicoverpa armigera. Using chromatographic purification under reducing conditions before labeling, we detected specific binding of radiolabeled Cry2Ae, which allowed us to perform competition assays using Cry1Ab, Cry1Ac, Cry1Fa, Vip3A, Cry2Ae, and Cry2Ab toxins as competitors. In these assays, Cry2Ae binding sites were shared with Cry2Ab but not with the tested Cry1 or Vip3A toxins. Our data support the use of Cry2Ae toxin in combination with Cry1 or Vip3A toxins in strategies to increase target range and delay the onset of heliothine resistance. PMID:21441333

  13. A GPI-anchored alkaline phosphatase is a functional midgut receptor of Cry11Aa toxin in Aedes aegypti larvae

    PubMed Central

    Fernandez, Luisa E.; Aimanova, Karlygash G.; Gill, Sarjeet S.; Bravo, Alejandra; Soberón, Mario

    2005-01-01

    A 65 kDa GPI (glycosylphosphatidyl-inositol)-anchored ALP (alkaline phosphatase) was characterized as a functional receptor of the Bacillus thuringiensis subsp. israelensis Cry11Aa toxin in Aedes aegypti midgut cells. Two (a 100 kDa and a 65 kDa) GPI-anchored proteins that bound Cry11Aa toxin were preferentially extracted after treatment of BBMV (brush boder membrane vesicles) from Ae. aegypti midgut epithelia with phospholipase C. The 65 kDa protein was further purified by toxin affinity chromatography. The 65 kDa protein showed ALP activity. The peptide-displaying phages (P1.BBMV and P8.BBMV) that bound to the 65 kDa GPI–ALP (GPI-anchored ALP) and competed with the Cry11Aa toxin to bind to BBMV were isolated by selecting BBMV-binding peptide-phages by biopanning. GPI–ALP was shown to be preferentially distributed in Ae. aegypti in the posterior part of the midgut and in the caeca, by using P1.BBMV binding to fixed midgut tissue sections to determine the location of GPI–ALP. Cry11Aa binds to the same regions of the midgut and competed with P1.BBMV and P8.BBMV to bind to BBMV. The importance of this interaction was demonstrated by the in vivo attenuation of Cry11Aa toxicity in the presence of these phages. Our results shows that GPI–ALP is an important receptor molecule involved in Cry11Aa interaction with midgut cells and toxicity to Ae. aegypti larvae. PMID:16255715

  14. Nontarget organism effects tests on eCry3.1Ab and their application to the ecological risk assessment for cultivation of Event 5307 maize.

    PubMed

    Burns, Andrea; Raybould, Alan

    2014-12-01

    Event 5307 transgenic maize produces the novel insecticidal protein eCry3.1Ab, which is active against certain coleopteran pests such as Western corn rootworm (Diabrotica virgifera virgifera). Laboratory tests with representative nontarget organisms (NTOs) were conducted to test the hypothesis of no adverse ecological effects of cultivating Event 5307 maize. Estimates of environmental eCry3.1Ab concentrations for each NTO were calculated from the concentrations of eCry3.1Ab produced by 5307 maize in relevant plant tissues. Nontarget organisms were exposed to diets containing eCry3.1Ab or diets comprising Event 5307 maize tissue and evaluated for effects compared to control groups. No statistically significant differences in survival were observed between the control group and the group exposed to eCry3.1Ab in any organism tested. Measured eCry3.1Ab concentrations in the laboratory studies were equal to or greater than the most conservative estimates of environmental exposure. The laboratory studies corroborate the hypothesis of negligible ecological risk from the cultivation of 5307 maize.

  15. The crying sign: the winking umbilical cord

    PubMed Central

    Smith, Aisling M; Healy, David B; Ryan, C Anthony; Dempsey, Eugene M

    2015-01-01

    A preterm baby girl, born at 34 weeks gestation, with features of Beckwith-Wiedemann syndrome was noted to have a relatively large umbilical stump. No fetal abnormalities had been detected on anatomy scan at 28 weeks and only mild polyhydramnios and macrosomia were noted on a 32-week ultrasound scan. Although there was no obvious omphalocoele, clinical assessment of the umbilical cord revealed an abdominal wall defect through which bowel would protrude into the umbilicus when the infant was crying. In keeping with an abdominal wall defect α-fetoprotein was found to be elevated. Surgical consultation advised conservative management. Subsequently, detachment of the umbilical cord occurred 1 week postdischarge and a large umbilical hernia persists. Genetic analysis confirmed a diagnosis of Beckwith-Wiedemann syndrome. PMID:25820111

  16. Mutations in the Bacillus thuringiensis Cry1Ca toxin demonstrate the role of domains II and III in specificity towards Spodoptera exigua larvae

    PubMed Central

    2004-01-01

    Several mutants of the Bacillus thuringiensis Cry1Ca toxin affected with regard to specific activity towards Spodoptera exigua were studied. Alanine was used to replace single residues in loops 2 and 3 of domain II (mutant pPB19) and to replace residues 541–544 in domain III (mutant pPB20). Additionally, a Cry1Ca mutant combining all mutations was constructed (mutant pPB21). Toxicity assays showed a marked decrease in toxicity against S. exigua for all mutants, while they retained their activity against Manduca sexta, confirming the importance of these residues in determining insect specificity. Parameters for binding to the specific receptors in BBMV (brush border membrane vesicles) of S. exigua were determined for all toxins. Compared with Cry1Ca, the affinity of mutant pPB19 was slightly affected (2-fold lower), whereas the affinity of the mutants with an altered domain III (pPB20 and pPB21) was approx. 8-fold lower. Activation of Cry1Ca protoxin by incubation with S. exigua or M. sexta BBMV revealed the transient formation of an oligomeric form of Cry1Ca. The presence of this oligomeric form was tested in the activation of the different Cry1Ca mutants, and we found that those mutated in domain II (pPB19 and pPB21) could not generate the oligomeric form when activated by S. exigua BBMV. In contrast, when oligomerization was tested using BBMV prepared from M. sexta, all of the Cry1Ca mutants showed the formation of a similar oligomeric form as did the wild-type toxin. Our results show how modification of insect specificity can be achieved by manipulation of different parts of the toxin structure involved in different steps of the mode of action of B. thuringiensis toxins. PMID:15320864

  17. Independent Action between DvSnf7 RNA and Cry3Bb1 Protein in Southern Corn Rootworm, Diabrotica undecimpunctata howardi and Colorado Potato Beetle, Leptinotarsa decemlineata

    PubMed Central

    Levine, Steven L.; Tan, Jianguo; Mueller, Geoffrey M.; Bachman, Pamela M.; Jensen, Peter D.; Uffman, Joshua P.

    2015-01-01

    In recent years, corn rootworm (CRW)-resistant maize events producing two or more CRW-active Bt proteins have been commercialized to enhance efficacy against the target pest(s) by providing multiple modes of action (MoA). The maize hybrid MON 87411 has been developed that produces the CRW-active Cry3Bb1 Bt protein (hereafter Cry3Bb1) and expresses a RNAi-mediated MoA that also targets CRW. As part of an environmental risk assessment for MON 87411, the potential for an interaction between the CRW-active DvSnf7 RNA (hereafter DvSnf7) and Cry3Bb1 was assessed in 12-day diet incorporation bioassays with the southern corn rootworm (SCR, Diabrotica undecimpunctata howardi). The potential for an interaction between DvSnf7 and Cry3Bb1 was evaluated with two established experimental approaches. The first approach evaluated each substance alone and in combination over three different response levels. For all three response levels, observed responses were shown to be additive and not significantly different from predicted responses under the assumption of independent action. The second approach evaluated the potential for a fixed sub-lethal concentration of Cry3Bb1 to decrease the median lethal concentration (LC50) of DvSnf7 and vice-versa. With this approach, the LC50 value of DvSnf7 was not altered by a sub-lethal concentration of Cry3Bb1 and vice-versa. In addition, the potential for an interaction between the Cry3Bb1 and DvSnf7 was tested with Colorado potato beetle (CPB, Leptinotarsa decemlineata), which is sensitive to Cry3Bb1 but not DvSnf7. CPB assays also demonstrated that DvSnf7 does not alter the activity of Cry3Bb1. The results from this study provide multiple lines of evidence that DvSnf7 and Cry3Bb1 produced in MON 87411 have independent action. PMID:25734482

  18. Independent action between DvSnf7 RNA and Cry3Bb1 protein in southern corn rootworm, Diabrotica undecimpunctata howardi and Colorado potato beetle, Leptinotarsa decemlineata.

    PubMed

    Levine, Steven L; Tan, Jianguo; Mueller, Geoffrey M; Bachman, Pamela M; Jensen, Peter D; Uffman, Joshua P

    2015-01-01

    In recent years, corn rootworm (CRW)-resistant maize events producing two or more CRW-active Bt proteins have been commercialized to enhance efficacy against the target pest(s) by providing multiple modes of action (MoA). The maize hybrid MON 87411 has been developed that produces the CRW-active Cry3Bb1 Bt protein (hereafter Cry3Bb1) and expresses a RNAi-mediated MoA that also targets CRW. As part of an environmental risk assessment for MON 87411, the potential for an interaction between the CRW-active DvSnf7 RNA (hereafter DvSnf7) and Cry3Bb1 was assessed in 12-day diet incorporation bioassays with the southern corn rootworm (SCR, Diabrotica undecimpunctata howardi). The potential for an interaction between DvSnf7 and Cry3Bb1 was evaluated with two established experimental approaches. The first approach evaluated each substance alone and in combination over three different response levels. For all three response levels, observed responses were shown to be additive and not significantly different from predicted responses under the assumption of independent action. The second approach evaluated the potential for a fixed sub-lethal concentration of Cry3Bb1 to decrease the median lethal concentration (LC50) of DvSnf7 and vice-versa. With this approach, the LC50 value of DvSnf7 was not altered by a sub-lethal concentration of Cry3Bb1 and vice-versa. In addition, the potential for an interaction between the Cry3Bb1 and DvSnf7 was tested with Colorado potato beetle (CPB, Leptinotarsa decemlineata), which is sensitive to Cry3Bb1 but not DvSnf7. CPB assays also demonstrated that DvSnf7 does not alter the activity of Cry3Bb1. The results from this study provide multiple lines of evidence that DvSnf7 and Cry3Bb1 produced in MON 87411 have independent action.

  19. Testing the feasibility and safety of the Nintendo Wii gaming console in orthopedic rehabilitation: a pilot randomized controlled study

    PubMed Central

    Stapf, Jonas; Meissner, Kay Michael; Niethammer, Thomas; Lahner, Matthias; Wagenhäuser, Markus; Müller, Peter E.; Pietschmann, Matthias F.

    2016-01-01

    Introduction The Nintendo Wii game console is already used as an additional training device for e.g. neurological wards. Still there are limited data available regarding orthopedic rehabilitation. The authors’ objective was to examine whether the Nintendo Wii is an appropriate and safe tool in rehabilitation after orthopedic knee surgery. Material and methods A prospective, randomized, controlled study comparing standard physiotherapy vs. standard physiotherapy plus game console training (Wii group) in patients having anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) repair or knee arthroplasty was conducted. The subjects of the Wii group (n = 17; mean age: 54 ±19 years) performed simple knee exercises daily under the supervision of a physiotherapist in addition to the normal rehabilitation program. The patients of the control group (n = 13; 52 ±18 years) were treated with physiotherapy only. The participants of both groups completed a questionnaire including the International Knee Documentation Committee (IKDC) score, the Modified Cincinnati Rating System and the Tegner Lysholm Knee Score prior to the operation, before discharge from hospital and four weeks after treatment. Results There was no significant difference in the score results between the Wii and the control group (p > 0.05). Conclusions We demonstrated that physiotherapy using the Nintendo Wii gaming console after ACL reconstruction and knee arthroplasty does not negatively influence outcome. Because training with the Wii device was highly accepted by patients, we see an opportunity whereby additional training with a gaming console for a longer period of time could lead to even better results, regarding the training motivation and the outcome after orthopedic surgery. PMID:27904518

  20. Possibilities for retracing of copyright violations on current video game consoles by optical disk analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Irmler, Frank; Creutzburg, Reiner

    2014-02-01

    This paper deals with the possibilities of retracing copyright violations on current video game consoles (e.g. Microsoft Xbox, Sony PlayStation, ...) by studying the corresponding optical storage media DVD and Blu-ray. The possibilities of forensic investigation of DVD and Blu-ray Discs are presented. It is shown which information can be read by using freeware and commercial software for forensic examination. A detailed analysis is given on the visualization of hidden content and the possibility to find out information about the burning hardware used for writing on the optical discs. In connection with a forensic analysis of the Windows registry of a suspects PC a detailed overview of the crime scene for forged DVD and Blu-ray Discs can be obtained. Optical discs are examined under forensic aspects and the obtained results are implemented into automatic analysis scripts for the commercial forensics program EnCase Forensic. It is shown that for the optical storage media a possibility of identification of the drive used for writing can be obtained. In particular Blu-ray Discs contain the serial number of the burner. These and other findings were incorporated into the creation of various EnCase scripts for the professional forensic investigation with EnCase Forensic. Furthermore, a detailed flowchart for a forensic investigation of copyright infringement was developed.

  1. Mixing console design for telematic applications in live performance and remote recording

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Samson, David J.

    The development of a telematic mixing console addresses audio engineers' need for a fully integrated system architecture that improves efficiency and control for applications such as distributed performance and remote recording. Current systems used in state of the art telematic performance rely on software-based interconnections with complex routing schemes that offer minimal flexibility or control over key parameters needed to achieve a professional workflow. The lack of hardware-based control in the current model limits the full potential of both the engineer and the system. The new architecture provides a full-featured platform that, alongside customary features, integrates (1) surround panning capability for motorized, binaural manikin heads, as well as all sources in the included auralization module, (2) self-labelling channel strips, responsive to change at all remote sites, (3) onboard roundtrip latency monitoring, (4) synchronized remote audio recording and monitoring, and (5) flexible routing. These features combined with robust parameter automation and precise analog control will raise the standard for telematic systems as well as advance the development of networked audio systems for both research and professional audio markets.

  2. Evaluation of a generalizable approach to clinical information retrieval using the automated retrieval console (ARC)

    PubMed Central

    Nguyen, Thien M; Farwell, Wildon R; Chen, Yongming; Fitzmeyer, Felicia; Harris, Owen M; Fiore, Louis D

    2010-01-01

    Reducing custom software development effort is an important goal in information retrieval (IR). This study evaluated a generalizable approach involving with no custom software or rules development. The study used documents “consistent with cancer” to evaluate system performance in the domains of colorectal (CRC), prostate (PC), and lung (LC) cancer. Using an end-user-supplied reference set, the automated retrieval console (ARC) iteratively calculated performance of combinations of natural language processing-derived features and supervised classification algorithms. Training and testing involved 10-fold cross-validation for three sets of 500 documents each. Performance metrics included recall, precision, and F-measure. Annotation time for five physicians was also measured. Top performing algorithms had recall, precision, and F-measure values as follows: for CRC, 0.90, 0.92, and 0.89, respectively; for PC, 0.97, 0.95, and 0.94; and for LC, 0.76, 0.80, and 0.75. In all but one case, conditional random fields outperformed maximum entropy-based classifiers. Algorithms had good performance without custom code or rules development, but performance varied by specific application. PMID:20595303

  3. Design and implementation of a ground control console prototype for OMV

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Walcott, Bruce L.

    1990-01-01

    One of the primary uses of the Flat Floor facility of The Marshall Flight Center is to perform autonomous and teleoperated docking of vehicles similar to NASA's Orbital Maneuvering Vehicle (OMV). Using both the air-bearing vehicle and the 8 DOF Dynamic Overhead Target Simulator (DOTS) in tandem, even the most difficult OMV docking problems can be simulated. The OMV was planned to be flown from the ground by a pilot via teleoperation. Specifications were developed for a prototype Ground Control Console (GCC) from where the vehicle will be flown. In order for testing of the OMV to occur at Flat Floor facility, this GCC must be replicated. The project was divided into three primary tasks: (1) the design and development of the video display; (2) the design and development of the switch panel using the micro switch programmable display pushbutton switches; and (3) the design and development of the hand controllers. A final task is to perform system integration on the results of these three primary tasks.

  4. A novel Bacillus thuringiensis Cry-like protein from a rare filamentous strain promotes crystal localization within the exosporium.

    PubMed

    Ammons, David R; Reyna, Antonio; Granados, Jose C; Ventura-Suárez, Antonio; Rojas-Avelizapa, Luz I; Short, John D; Rampersad, Joanne N

    2013-09-01

    Mutation of a novel cry-like gene (cry256) from Bacillus thuringiensis resulted in a protein crystal, normally located within the spore's exosporium, being found predominately outside the exosporium. The cry256 gene codes for a 3-domain Cry-like protein that does not correspond to any of the known Cry protein holotypes.

  5. 78 FR 70043 - Pesticide Product Registration; Receipt of an Application for a New Active Ingredient

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-11-22

    ... name: DAS-81419-2 Soybean. Active ingredients: Bacillus thuringiensis Cry1Ac protein expressed in soybean and Bacillus thuringiensis Cry1F protein expressed in soybean. Proposed classification/Use:...

  6. Genetics Home Reference: cri-du-chat syndrome

    MedlinePlus

    ... syndrome March of Dimes: Chromosomal Conditions Merck Manual Consumer Version: Overview of Chromosomal Abnormalities Orphanet: Monosomy 5p ... Pinkel D. High-resolution mapping of genotype-phenotype relationships in cri du chat syndrome using array comparative ...

  7. 40 CFR 174.506 - Bacillus thuringiensis Cry34Ab1 and Cry35Ab1 proteins in corn; exemption from the requirement of...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 23 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Bacillus thuringiensis Cry34Ab1 and... REQUIREMENTS FOR PLANT-INCORPORATED PROTECTANTS Tolerances and Tolerance Exemptions § 174.506 Bacillus... Bacillus thuringiensis Cry34Ab1 and Cry35Ab1 proteins in corn are exempted from the requirement of...

  8. 40 CFR 174.505 - Bacillus thuringiensis modified Cry3A protein (mCry3A) in corn; exemption from the requirement of...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 23 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Bacillus thuringiensis modified Cry3A... REQUIREMENTS FOR PLANT-INCORPORATED PROTECTANTS Tolerances and Tolerance Exemptions § 174.505 Bacillus... of Bacillus thuringiensis modified Cry3A protein (mCry3A) in corn are exempt from the requirement...

  9. Efficacy of genetically modified Bt toxins alone and in combinations against pink bollworm resistant to Cry1Ac and Cry2Ab

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Evolution of resistance in pests threatens the long-term success of transgenic crops that produce insecticidal proteins from Bacillus thuringiensis (Bt). Previous work showed that genetically modified Bt toxins Cry1AbMod and Cry1AcMod effectively countered resistance to native Bt toxins Cry1Ab and ...

  10. Regulation of cry Gene Expression in Bacillus thuringiensis

    PubMed Central

    Deng, Chao; Peng, Qi; Song, Fuping; Lereclus, Didier

    2014-01-01

    Bacillus thuringiensis differs from the closely related Bacillus cereus group species by its ability to produce crystalline inclusions. The production of these crystals mainly results from the expression of the cry genes, from the stability of their transcripts and from the synthesis, accumulation and crystallization of large amounts of insecticidal Cry proteins. This process normally coincides with sporulation and is regulated by various factors operating at the transcriptional, post-transcriptional, metabolic and post-translational levels. PMID:25055802

  11. Cry protein crystals: a novel platform for protein delivery.

    PubMed

    Nair, Manoj S; Lee, Marianne M; Bonnegarde-Bernard, Astrid; Wallace, Julie A; Dean, Donald H; Ostrowski, Michael C; Burry, Richard W; Boyaka, Prosper N; Chan, Michael K

    2015-01-01

    Protein delivery platforms are important tools in the development of novel protein therapeutics and biotechnologies. We have developed a new class of protein delivery agent based on sub-micrometer-sized Cry3Aa protein crystals that naturally form within the bacterium Bacillus thuringiensis. We demonstrate that fusion of the cry3Aa gene to that of various reporter proteins allows for the facile production of Cry3Aa fusion protein crystals for use in subsequent applications. These Cry3Aa fusion protein crystals are efficiently taken up and retained by macrophages and other cell lines in vitro, and can be delivered to mice in vivo via multiple modes of administration. Oral delivery of Cry3Aa fusion protein crystals to C57BL/6 mice leads to their uptake by MHC class II cells, including macrophages in the Peyer's patches, supporting the notion that the Cry3Aa framework can be used to stabilize cargo protein against degradation for delivery to gastrointestinal lymphoid tissues.

  12. Determination of periodontopathogens in patients with Cri du chat syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Ballesta-Mudarra, Sofía; Torres-Lagares, Daniel; Rodríguez-Caballero, Ángela; Yáñez-Vico, Rosa M.; Solano-Reina, Enrique; Perea-Pérez, Evelio

    2013-01-01

    Objectives: Cri du chat syndrome is a genetic alteration associated with some oral pathologies. However, it has not been described previously any clinical relationship between the periodontal disease and the syndrome. The purpose of this comparative study was to compare periodontopathogenic flora in a group with Cri du chat syndrome and another without the síndrome, to assess a potential microbiological predisposition to suffer a periodontitis. Study Design: The study compared nineteen subjects with Cri du chat Syndrome with a control group of nineteen patients without it. All patients were clinically evaluated by periodontal probing, valuing the pocket depth, the clinical attachmente level and bleeding on probing. There were no significant differences between both groups. Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans, Porphyromonas gingivalis, Prevotella intermedia, Tannerella forsythia and Treponema denticola were detected by multiplex-PCR using 16S rDNA (microIDENT). Results: When A. actinomycetemcomitans, P. gingivalis, P. intermedia and T. denticola were compared, no statistically significant differences were found between the two groups (p>0.05). The value of T. forsythia was significantly higher for Cri du chat syndrome (31.6%) than for the control group (5.3%). The odds ratio for T. forsythia was 8.3. Conclusions: In the present study T. forsythia is associated with Cri du chat syndrome subjects and not with healthy subjects. Key words:Cri du Chat syndrome, periodontal health, microbiology, special care dentistry. PMID:24121919

  13. RNA interference knockdown of aminopeptidase N genes decrease the susceptibility of Chilo suppressalis larvae to Cry1Ab/Cry1Ac and Cry1Ca-expressing transgenic rice.

    PubMed

    Qiu, Lin; Fan, Jinxing; Zhang, Boyao; Liu, Lang; Wang, Xiaoping; Lei, Chaoliang; Lin, Yongjun; Ma, Weihua

    2017-03-06

    Transgenic rice expressing Bacillus thuringiensis (Bt) Cry toxins are resistant to lepidopteran pests, such as Chilo suppressalis, a major insect pest of rice in Asia. Understanding how these toxins interact with their hosts is crucial to understanding their insecticidal action. In this study, knockdown of two aminopeptidase N genes (APN1 and APN2) by RNA interference resulted in decreased susceptibility of C. suppressalis larvae to the Bt rice varieties TT51 (Cry1Ab and Cry1Ac fusion genes) and T1C-19 (Cry1Ca), but not T2A-1 (Cry2Aa). This suggests that APN1 and APN2 are receptors for Cry1A and Cry1C toxins in C. suppressalis.

  14. Transgenic rice plants expressing cry1Ia5 gene are resistant to stem borer (Chilo agamemnon).

    PubMed

    Moghaieb, Reda E A

    2010-01-01

    The stem borer, Chilo agamemnon Bles., is the most serious insect pest in rice fields of the Egyptian Nile Delta. To induce rice plant resistance to Chilo agamemnon, the cry1Ia5 gene was introduced to rice plants (Oryza sativa L.). The integration of the cry1Ia5 gene into the plant genome was confirmed using PCR and Southern blot analyses. The obtained plantlets were transferred to the greenhouse until seeds were collected. Northern blot analysis of the T1 plants confirmed the expression of the cry1Ia5 gene. The insecticidal activity of the transgenic plants against the rice stem borer Chilo agamemnon were tested. The third larval instars were fed on stem cuts from three transgenic lines (L1, L2 and L3) as well as cuts from the control (gfp-transgenic) plants for one week and the mortality percentage was daily recorded. Transgenic line-3 showed the highest mortality percentage after one day (50%) followed by L2 (25%) then L1 (0%). Two days post treatment the mortality percentage increased to 70, 45 and 25% for transgenic lines 1, 2 and 3 respectively. Mortality of 100% was recorded four days post treatment, while those fed on the gfp-transgenic rice (control) showed 0% mortality. Thus, transgenic plants showed high resistance to stem borers and can serve as a novel genetic resource in breeding programs. Transgenic plants expressing BT protein were normal in phenotype with as good seed setting as the nontransgenic control plants.

  15. A Spodoptera exigua cadherin serves as a putative receptor for Bacillus thuringiensis Cry1Ca toxin and shows differential enhancement of Cry1Ca and Cry1Ac toxicity.

    PubMed

    Ren, Xiang-Liang; Chen, Rui-Rui; Zhang, Ying; Ma, Yan; Cui, Jin-Jie; Han, Zhao-Jun; Mu, Li-Li; Li, Guo-Qing

    2013-09-01

    Crystal toxin Cry1Ca from Bacillus thuringiensis has an insecticidal spectrum encompassing lepidopteran insects that are tolerant to current commercially used B. thuringiensis crops (Bt crops) expressing Cry1A toxins and may be useful as a potential bioinsecticide. The mode of action of Cry1A is fairly well understood. However, whether Cry1Ca interacts with the same receptor proteins as Cry1A remains unproven. In the present paper, we first cloned a cadherin-like gene, SeCad1b, from Spodoptera exigua (relatively susceptible to Cry1Ca). SeCad1b was highly expressed in the larval gut but scarcely detected in fat body, Malpighian tubules, and remaining carcass. Second, we bacterially expressed truncated cadherin rSeCad1bp and its interspecific homologue rHaBtRp from Helicoverpa armigera (more sensitive to Cry1Ac) containing the putative toxin-binding regions. Competitive binding assays showed that both Cry1Ca and Cry1Ac could bind to rSeCad1bp and rHaBtRp, and they did not compete with each other. Third, Cry1Ca ingestion killed larvae and decreased the weight of surviving larvae. Dietary introduction of SeCad1b double-stranded RNA (dsRNA) reduced approximately 80% of the target mRNA and partially alleviated the negative effect of Cry1Ca on larval survival and growth. Lastly, rSeCad1bp and rHaBtRp differentially enhanced the negative effects of Cry1Ca and Cry1Ac on the larval mortalities and growth of S. exigua and H. armigera. Thus, we provide the first lines of evidence to suggest that SeCad1b from S. exigua is a functional receptor of Cry1Ca.

  16. Interaction of Bacillus thuringiensis Cry1 and Vip3A proteins with Spodoptera frugiperda midgut binding sites.

    PubMed

    Sena, Janete A D; Hernández-Rodríguez, Carmen Sara; Ferré, Juan

    2009-04-01

    Vip3Aa, Vip3Af, Cry1Ab, and Cry1Fa were tested for their toxicities and binding interactions. Vip3A proteins were more toxic than Cry1 proteins. Binding assays showed independent specific binding sites for Cry1 and Vip3A proteins. Cry1Ab and Cry1Fa competed for the same binding sites, whereas Vip3Aa competed for those of Vip3Af.

  17. Interaction of Bacillus thuringiensis Cry1 and Vip3A Proteins with Spodoptera frugiperda Midgut Binding Sites▿

    PubMed Central

    Sena, Janete A. D.; Hernández-Rodríguez, Carmen Sara; Ferré, Juan

    2009-01-01

    Vip3Aa, Vip3Af, Cry1Ab, and Cry1Fa were tested for their toxicities and binding interactions. Vip3A proteins were more toxic than Cry1 proteins. Binding assays showed independent specific binding sites for Cry1 and Vip3A proteins. Cry1Ab and Cry1Fa competed for the same binding sites, whereas Vip3Aa competed for those of Vip3Af. PMID:19181834

  18. Cadherin is involved in the action of Bacillus thuringiensis toxins Cry1Ac and Cry2Aa in the beet armyworm, Spodoptera exigua.

    PubMed

    Qiu, Lin; Hou, Leilei; Zhang, Boyao; Liu, Lang; Li, Bo; Deng, Pan; Ma, Weihua; Wang, Xiaoping; Fabrick, Jeffrey A; Chen, Lizhen; Lei, Chaoliang

    2015-05-01

    Bacillus thuringiensis (Bt) insecticidal crystal (Cry) proteins are effective against some insect pests in sprays and transgenic crops, although the evolution of resistance could threaten the long-term efficacy of such Bt use. One strategy to delay resistance to Bt crops is to "pyramid" two or more Bt proteins that bind to distinct receptor proteins within the insect midgut. The most common Bt pyramid in cotton (Gossypium hirsutum L.) employs Cry1Ac with Cry2Ab to target several key lepidopteran pests, including the beet armyworm, Spodoptera exigua (Hübner), which is a serious migratory pest of many vegetable crops and is increasingly important in cotton in China. While cadherin and aminopeptidase-N are key receptors of Cry1 toxins in many lepidopterans including S. exigua, the receptor for Cry2A toxins remains poorly characterized. Here, we show that a heterologous expressed peptide corresponding to cadherin repeat 7 to the membrane proximal extracellular domain (CR7-MPED) in the S. exigua cadherin 1b (SeCad1b) binds Cry1Ac and Cry2Aa. Moreover, SeCad1b transcription was suppressed in S. exigua larvae by oral RNA interference and susceptibility to Cry1Ac and Cry2Aa was significantly reduced. These results indicate that SeCad1b plays important functional roles of both Cry1Ac and Cry2Aa, having major implications for resistance management for S. exigua in Bt crops.

  19. Responses of the cutworm Spodoptera litura (Lepidoptera: Noctuidae) to two Bt corn hybrids expressing Cry1Ab.

    PubMed

    Yinghua, Shu; Yan, Du; Jin, Chen; Jiaxi, Wei; Jianwu, Wang

    2017-02-10

    To examine the responses of the secondary lepidopteran pest Spodoptera litura to two Bacillus thuringiensis (Bt) corn hybrids [5422Bt1 (Event Bt11), 5422CBCL (MON810)] expressing Cry1Ab, larval bioassays with Cry1Ab toxin, corn leaves or kernels and bagging on corn plants were conducted. The results showed that larvae displayed a similar performance when fed kernels, but not leaves of 5422Bt1, 5422CBCL and their near-isogenic non-Bt corn (5422). Significantly higher Cry1Ab amounts were detected in larvae fed leaves than kernels of both Bt hybrids, with different molecular weights of protein band in plants (72 and 90 kDa for 5422Bt1 and 5422CBCL, respectively), gut contents (65 kDa), feces (50 kDa), which indicated that larvae had lower ingestion, higher degradation and excretion of Cry1Ab when fed kernels not leaves of both Bt hybrids. Significantly higher levels of cadherin-like receptors and alkaline phosphatase transcripts were detected in larvae fed leaves than kernels of two Bt hybrids. Catalase, superoxide dismutase and glutathione-S-transferase activities in larvae fed 5422Bt1 leaves were significantly higher than that of 5422 treatments. Therefore, S. litura had low susceptibility to 5422Bt1 and 5422CBCL when larvae fed kernels not leaves of Bt corn. Additionally, S. litura presented a much stronger tolerance to 5422CBCL than 5422Bt1.

  20. Aminopeptidase N1 is involved in Bacillus thuringiensis Cry1Ac toxicity in the beet armyworm, Spodoptera exigua

    PubMed Central

    Qiu, Lin; Cui, Songhe; Liu, Lang; Zhang, Boyao; Ma, Weihua; Wang, Xiaoping; Lei, Chaoliang; Chen, Lizhen

    2017-01-01

    Understanding how insecticidal proteins from the bacterium Bacillus thuringiensis (Bt) interact with their hosts is crucial to fully explain the molecular bases of Bt specificity and insecticidal activity. Previous studies support ATP binding cassette transporters (ABCC2/3) and one cadherin-like protein are Cry1Ac functional receptors in the beet armyworm (Spodoptera exigua). In this study, a combined one-dimensional gel electrophoresis and immunoblotting approach identified aminopeptidase N (APNs) as putative Cry1Ac binding proteins in the midgut brush border membrane of S. exigua larvae. Functional analyses by gene silencing of six different S. exigua APN genes (SeAPN1, SeAPN2, SeAPN3, SeAPN4, SeAPN5 and SeAPN6) showed that only suppression of SeAPN1 resulted in decreased larval susceptibility to Cry1Ac toxin. These results support that SeAPN1 plays important functional role in Cry1Ac toxicity in S. exigua. PMID:28327568

  1. Bacillus thuringiensis Cry1Ac toxin interaction with Manduca sexta aminopeptidase N in a model membrane environment.

    PubMed Central

    Cooper, M A; Carroll, J; Travis, E R; Williams, D H; Ellar, D J

    1998-01-01

    The Bacillus thuringiensis Cry1Ac delta-endotoxin was shown to bind in a biphasic manner to Manduca sexta aminopeptidase N (APN) present in a novel model membrane. Surface plasmon resonance analysis allowed the quantification of toxin binding to M. sexta APN in a supported lipid monolayer. The initial binding was rapid and reversible, with an affinity constant of 110 nM. The second phase was slower and resulted in an overall affinity constant of 3.0 nM. Reagents used to disrupt protein-protein interactions did not dissociate the toxin after high-affinity binding was attained. The initial association between Cry1Ac and APN was inhibited by the sugar GalNAc, but the higher-affinity state was resistant to GalNAc-induced dissociation. The results suggest that after binding to M. sexta APN, the Cry1Ac toxin undergoes a rate-limiting step leading to a high-affinity state. A site-directed Cry1Ac mutant, N135Q, exhibited a similar initial binding affinity for APN but did not show the second slower phase. This inability to form an irreversible association with the APN-lipid monolayer helps explain the lack of toxicity of this protein towards M. sexta larvae and its deficient membrane-permeabilizing activity on M. sexta midgut brush border membrane vesicles. PMID:9677328

  2. Responses of the cutworm Spodoptera litura (Lepidoptera: Noctuidae) to two Bt corn hybrids expressing Cry1Ab

    PubMed Central

    Yinghua, Shu; Yan, Du; Jin, Chen; Jiaxi, Wei; Jianwu, Wang

    2017-01-01

    To examine the responses of the secondary lepidopteran pest Spodoptera litura to two Bacillus thuringiensis (Bt) corn hybrids [5422Bt1 (Event Bt11), 5422CBCL (MON810)] expressing Cry1Ab, larval bioassays with Cry1Ab toxin, corn leaves or kernels and bagging on corn plants were conducted. The results showed that larvae displayed a similar performance when fed kernels, but not leaves of 5422Bt1, 5422CBCL and their near-isogenic non-Bt corn (5422). Significantly higher Cry1Ab amounts were detected in larvae fed leaves than kernels of both Bt hybrids, with different molecular weights of protein band in plants (72 and 90 kDa for 5422Bt1 and 5422CBCL, respectively), gut contents (65 kDa), feces (50 kDa), which indicated that larvae had lower ingestion, higher degradation and excretion of Cry1Ab when fed kernels not leaves of both Bt hybrids. Significantly higher levels of cadherin-like receptors and alkaline phosphatase transcripts were detected in larvae fed leaves than kernels of two Bt hybrids. Catalase, superoxide dismutase and glutathione-S-transferase activities in larvae fed 5422Bt1 leaves were significantly higher than that of 5422 treatments. Therefore, S. litura had low susceptibility to 5422Bt1 and 5422CBCL when larvae fed kernels not leaves of Bt corn. Additionally, S. litura presented a much stronger tolerance to 5422CBCL than 5422Bt1. PMID:28186125

  3. Improvement of crystal solubility and increasing toxicity against Caenorhabditis elegans by asparagine substitution in block 3 of Bacillus thuringiensis crystal protein Cry5Ba.

    PubMed

    Wang, Fenshan; Liu, Yingying; Zhang, Fengjuan; Chai, Lujun; Ruan, Lifang; Peng, Donghai; Sun, Ming

    2012-10-01

    The crystal proteins from Bacillus thuringiensis are widely used for their specific toxicity against insects and nematodes. The highly conserved sequence blocks play an important role in Cry protein stability and flexibility, the basis of toxicity. The block 3 in Cry5Ba subfamily has a shorter sequence (only 12 residues) and more asparagine residues than that of others which harbor about 48 residues but only one asparagine. Based on the theoretical structure model of Cry5Ba, all three asparagines in block 3 are closely located in the interface of putative three domains, implying their probable importance in structure and function. In this study, all three asparagines in Cry5Ba2 block 3 were individually substituted with alanine by site-directed mutagenesis. The wild-type and mutant proteins were overexpressed and crystallized in acrystalliferous B. thuringiensis strain BMB171. However, the crystals formed in one of the mutants, designated N586A, abnormally disappeared and dissolved into the culture supernatant once the sporulation cells lysed, whereas the Cry5Ba crystal and the other mutant crystals were stable. The mutant N586A crystal, isolated from sporulation cells by the ultrasonic process, was found to be easily dissolved at wide range of pH value (5.0 to 10.0). Moreover, the toxicity assays showed that the mutant N586A exhibited nearly 9-fold-higher activity against nematodes and damaged the host's intestine more efficiently than the native Cry5Ba2. These data support the presumption that the amide residue Asn586 at the interface of domains might adversely affect the protein flexibility, solubility and resultant toxicity of Cry5Ba.

  4. Structural basis for the specific recognition of the major antigenic peptide from the Japanese cedar pollen allergen Cry j 1 by HLA-DP5.

    PubMed

    Kusano, Seisuke; Kukimoto-Niino, Mutsuko; Satta, Yoko; Ohsawa, Noboru; Uchikubo-Kamo, Tomomi; Wakiyama, Motoaki; Ikeda, Mariko; Terada, Takaho; Yamamoto, Ken; Nishimura, Yasuharu; Shirouzu, Mikako; Sasazuki, Takehiko; Yokoyama, Shigeyuki

    2014-08-26

    The major allergen, Cry j 1, was isolated from Japanese cedar Cryptomeria japonica (Cry j) pollen and was shown to react with immunoglobulin E antibodies in the sera from pollinosis patients. We previously reported that the frequency of HLA-DP5 was significantly higher in pollinosis patients and the immunodominant peptides from Cry j 1 bound to HLA-DP5 to activate Th2 cells. In the present study, we determined the crystal structure of the HLA-DP5 heterodimer in complex with a Cry j 1-derived nine-residue peptide, at 2.4Å resolution. The peptide-binding groove recognizes the minimal peptide with 10 hydrogen bonds, including those between the negatively charged P1 pocket and the Lys side chain at the first position in the peptide sequence. We confirmed that HLA-DP5 exhibits the same Cry j 1-binding mode in solution, through pull-down experiments using structure-based mutations of Cry j 1. We also identified the characteristic residues of HLA-DP5 that are responsible for the distinct properties of the groove, by comparing the structure of HLA-DP5 and the previously reported structures of HLA-DP2 in complexes with pDRA of the self-antigen. The comparison revealed that the HLA-DP5·pCry j 1 complex forms several hydrogen bond/salt bridge networks between the receptor and the antigen that were not observed in the HLA-DP2·pDRA complex. Evolutionary considerations have led us to conclude that HLA-DP5 and HLA-DP2 represent two major groups of the HLA-DP family, in which the properties of the P1 and P4 pockets have evolved and acquired the present ranges of epitope peptide-binding specificities.

  5. Bt crops producing Cry1Ac, Cry2Ab and Cry1F do not harm the green lacewing, chrysoperla rufilabris

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The biological control function provided by natural enemies is regarded as a protection goal that should not be harmed by the application of any new pest management tool. Plants producing Cry proteins from the bacterium, Bacillus thuringiensis (Bt), have become a major tactic for controlling pest Le...

  6. Bacillus thuringiensis plants expressing Cry1Ac, Cry2Ab and Cry1F are not toxic to the assassin bug, Zelus renardii

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Cotton and maize delivering insecticidal crystal (Cry) proteins from the bacterium, Bacillus thuringiensis (Bt), have been commercialized since 1996. Bt plants are subjected to environmental risk assessments for non-target organisms, especially natural enemies that suppress pest populations. In th...

  7. Alkaline phosphatases are involved in the response of Aedes aegypti larvae to intoxication with Bacillus thuringiensis subsp. israelensis Cry toxins.

    PubMed

    Stalinski, Renaud; Laporte, Frédéric; Després, Laurence; Tetreau, Guillaume

    2016-03-01

    Bacillus thuringiensis subsp. israelensis (Bti) is a natural pathogen of dipterans widely used as a biological insecticide for mosquito control. To characterize the response of mosquitoes to intoxication with Bti, the transcriptome profile of Bti-exposed susceptible Aedes aegypti larvae was analysed using Illumina RNA-seq. Gene expression of 11 alkaline phosphatases (ALPs) was further investigated by real time quantitative polymerase chain reaction and ALP activity was measured in the susceptible strain and in four strains resistant to a single Bti Cry toxin or to Bti. These strains were unexposed or exposed to their toxin of selection. Although all resistant strains constitutively exhibited a higher level of transcription of ALP genes than the susceptible strain, they showed a lower total ALP activity. The intoxication with different individual Cry toxins triggered a global pattern of ALP gene under-transcription in all the one-toxin-resistant strains but involving different specific sets of ALPs in each resistant phenotype. Most of the ALPs involved are not known Cry-binding proteins. RNA interference experiment demonstrated that reducing ALP expression conferred increased the survival of larvae exposed to Cry4Aa, confirming the involvement of ALP in Cry4Aa toxicity.

  8. Purification of the insecticidal Cry2Ad protein from a Bt-isolated BRC-HZP10 strain and toxin assay to the diamondback moth, Plutella xylostella (L.).

    PubMed

    Liao, J Y; Gao, Y Q; Wu, Q Y; Zhu, Y C; You, M S

    2015-07-13

    The present study aims to characterize the Cry2Ad toxin protein isolated from a Bacillus thuringiensis strain, BRC-HZP10, which have a potential insecticidal activity against larvae of the diamondback moth, Plutella xylostella (L.). The crude Bt toxin proteins were isolated and purified by cation exchange chromatography, then equilibrated with 0.2 M NaOH buffer, pH 4.0, followed by ultraviolet detection at 280 nm and sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis. A refined Cry2Ad toxin protein with 88.34% purity was eventually obtained and used for a bioassay by feeding it to P. xylostella. The results showed conspicuous insecticidal activity towards P. xylostella with 50% lethal concentration of 6.84 μg/mL and 95% confidence interval of 5.77-7.91 mg/mL. At a concentration of 16.38 μg/mL, the intake of Cry2Ad protein significantly shortened the oviposition period and larval developmental duration, but significantly reduced the fecundity and egg hatchability of the population compared to those of control (without treatment with Cry2Ad protein) (P < 0.05). These results indicate that the Cry2Ad protein plays an effective role in controlling the population of P. xylostella.

  9. Linkage disequilibrium mapping of Arabidopsis CRY2 flowering time alleles.

    PubMed Central

    Olsen, Kenneth M; Halldorsdottir, Solveig S; Stinchcombe, John R; Weinig, Cynthia; Schmitt, Johanna; Purugganan, Michael D

    2004-01-01

    The selfing plant Arabidopsis thaliana has been proposed to be well suited for linkage disequilibrium (LD) mapping as a means of identifying genes underlying natural trait variation. Here we apply LD mapping to examine haplotype variation in the genomic region of the photoperiod receptor CRYPTOCHROME2 and associated flowering time variation. CRY2 DNA sequences reveal strong LD and the existence of two highly differentiated haplogroups (A and B) across the gene; in addition, a haplotype possessing a radical glutamine-to-serine replacement (AS) occurs within the more common haplogroup. Growth chamber and field experiments using an unstratified population of 95 ecotypes indicate that under short-day photoperiod, the AS and B haplogroups are both highly significantly associated with early flowering. Data from six genes flanking CRY2 indicate that these haplogroups are limited to an approximately 65-kb genomic region around CRY2. Whereas the B haplogroup cannot be delimited to <16 kb around CRY2, the AS haplogroup is characterized almost exclusively by the nucleotide polymorphisms directly associated with the serine replacement in CRY2; this finding strongly suggests that the serine substitution is directly responsible for the AS early flowering phenotype. This study demonstrates the utility of LD mapping for elucidating the genetic basis of natural, ecologically relevant variation in Arabidopsis. PMID:15280248

  10. Linkage disequilibrium mapping of Arabidopsis CRY2 flowering time alleles.

    PubMed

    Olsen, Kenneth M; Halldorsdottir, Solveig S; Stinchcombe, John R; Weinig, Cynthia; Schmitt, Johanna; Purugganan, Michael D

    2004-07-01

    The selfing plant Arabidopsis thaliana has been proposed to be well suited for linkage disequilibrium (LD) mapping as a means of identifying genes underlying natural trait variation. Here we apply LD mapping to examine haplotype variation in the genomic region of the photoperiod receptor CRYPTOCHROME2 and associated flowering time variation. CRY2 DNA sequences reveal strong LD and the existence of two highly differentiated haplogroups (A and B) across the gene; in addition, a haplotype possessing a radical glutamine-to-serine replacement (AS) occurs within the more common haplogroup. Growth chamber and field experiments using an unstratified population of 95 ecotypes indicate that under short-day photoperiod, the AS and B haplogroups are both highly significantly associated with early flowering. Data from six genes flanking CRY2 indicate that these haplogroups are limited to an approximately 65-kb genomic region around CRY2. Whereas the B haplogroup cannot be delimited to <16 kb around CRY2, the AS haplogroup is characterized almost exclusively by the nucleotide polymorphisms directly associated with the serine replacement in CRY2; this finding strongly suggests that the serine substitution is directly responsible for the AS early flowering phenotype. This study demonstrates the utility of LD mapping for elucidating the genetic basis of natural, ecologically relevant variation in Arabidopsis.

  11. [Cri-du-chat syndrome. A case report].

    PubMed

    Diop, I B; Sy Signate, H; Ba, S A; Sarr, M; Hane, L; Diame, H; Kane, A; Dieye, O; Sow, D; Diouf, S M; Fall, M

    2000-01-01

    We report a documented case in Senegal with cri-du-chat syndrome diagnosed in a 3 months old girl. Our patient benefited from clinical examination, ECG (15 derivations), chest X ray and standard laboratory tests. The cry has been recorded on a magnetic band. We performed also a pulsed-Doppler, two dimensional and TM echocardiography. Chromosomal analysis has been realized. These data are discussed and compared to the literature. At admission this patient presents characteristic cat like cry. At examination, there is a facial dysmorphy, important growth retardation and feeding dyspnea. Auscultation shows a 3/6 left sub-clavicular systolic murmur. Laboratory tests show anemia (hemoglobin = 7.8 g/dl). Chest x-ray showed a cardio-thoracic ratio at 0.61 with increased pulmonary vascular markings. ECG showed right ventricular hypertrophy. Echocardiography-Doppler revealed persistent ductus arteriosus (PDA). Chromosomal analysis shows deletion of the short arm of chromosome 5. After treatment with digitalis and diuretics there was an improvement of cardiac failure. Diagnosis of cri-du-chat syndrome is easy when characteristic cat-like-cry is present. Cardiovascular abnormalities are unfrequent in this syndrome (20% of the cases). They are dominated by ventricular septal defect and PDA. Hemodynamic failure and related growth retardation can lead to cardiac surgery.

  12. User and Task Analysis of the Flight Surgeon Console at the Mission Control Center of the NASA Johnson Space Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnson, Kathy A.; Shek, Molly

    2003-01-01

    Astronauts in a space station are to some extent like patients in an intensive care unit (ICU). Medical support of a mission crew will require acquisition, transmission, distribution, integration, and archiving of significant amounts of data. These data are acquired by disparate systems and will require timely, reliable, and secure distribution to different communities for the execution of various tasks of space missions. The goal of the Comprehensive Medical Information System (CMIS) Project at Johnson Space Center Flight Medical Clinic is to integrate data from all Medical Operations sources, including the reference information sources and the electronic medical records of astronauts. A first step toward the full CMIS implementation is to integrate and organize the reference information sources and the electronic medical record with the Flight Surgeons console. In order to investigate this integration, we need to understand the usability problems of the Flight Surgeon's console in particular and medical information systems in general. One way to achieve this understanding is through the use of user and task analyses whose general purpose is to ensure that only the necessary and sufficient task features that match users capacities will be included in system implementations. The goal of this summer project was to conduct user and task analyses employing cognitive engineering techniques to analyze the task of the Flight Surgeons and Biomedical Engineers (BMEs) while they worked on Console. The techniques employed were user interviews, observations and a questionnaire to collect data for which a hierarchical task analysis and an information resource assessment were performed. They are described in more detail below. Finally, based on our analyses, we make recommendations for improvements to the support structure.

  13. Consumption of Bt rice pollen containing Cry1C or Cry2A does not pose a risk to Propylea japonica (Thunberg) (Coleoptera: Coccinellidae)

    PubMed Central

    Li, Yunhe; Zhang, Xiaojie; Chen, Xiuping; Romeis, Jörg; Yin, Xinming; Peng, Yufa

    2015-01-01

    As a pollen feeder, Propylea japonica would be directly exposed to Cry proteins in Bacillus thuringiensis (Bt)-transgenic rice fields. The effect of Cry1C- or Cry2A-containing transgenic rice pollen on the fitness of P. japonica was assessed using two dietary-exposure experiments in the laboratory. In the first experiment, larval developmental time of P. japonica was significantly longer when fed pollen from Bt rice lines rather than control pollen but other life table parameters were not significantly affected. In the second experiment, P. japonica was not affected when fed a rapeseed pollen-based diet containing purified Cry1C or Cry2A at concentrations that were >10-times higher than in pollen, but P. japonica was affected when the diet contained E-64 as a positive control. In both experiments, the stability and bioactivity of the Cry proteins in the food sources and the uptake of the proteins by P. japonica were confirmed. The results show that P. japonica is not sensitive to Cry1C or Cry2A proteins; the effect observed in the first experiment was likely attributable to unknown differences in the nutritional composition of Bt rice pollen. Overall, the data indicate that the growing of Cry1C- or Cry2A-transgenic rice should pose a negligible risk to P. japonica. PMID:25567127

  14. Bacillus thuringiensis DB27 produces two novel protoxins, Cry21Fa1 and Cry21Ha1, which act synergistically against nematodes.

    PubMed

    Iatsenko, Igor; Boichenko, Iuliia; Sommer, Ralf J

    2014-05-01

    Bacillus thuringiensis has been widely used as a biopesticide, primarily for the control of insect pests, but some B. thuringiensis strains specifically target nematodes. However, nematicidal virulence factors of B. thuringiensis are poorly investigated. Here, we describe virulence factors of nematicidal B. thuringiensis DB27 using Caenorhabditis elegans as a model. We show that B. thuringiensis DB27 kills a number of free-living and animal-parasitic nematodes via intestinal damage. Its virulence factors are plasmid-encoded Cry protoxins, since plasmid-cured derivatives do not produce Cry proteins and are not toxic to nematodes. Whole-genome sequencing of B. thuringiensis DB27 revealed multiple potential nematicidal factors, including several Cry-like proteins encoded by different plasmids. Two of these proteins appear to be novel and show high similarity to Cry21Ba1. Named Cry21Fa1 and Cry21Ha1, they were expressed in Escherichia coli and fed to C. elegans, resulting in intoxication, intestinal damage, and death of nematodes. Interestingly, the effects of the two protoxins on C. elegans are synergistic (synergism factor, 1.8 to 2.5). Using purified proteins, we determined the 50% lethal concentrations (LC50s) for Cry21Fa1 and Cry21Ha1 to be 13.6 μg/ml and 23.9 μg/ml, respectively, which are comparable to the LC50 of nematicidal Cry5B. Finally, we found that signaling pathways which protect C. elegans against Cry5B toxin are also required for protection against Cry21Fa1. Thus, B. thuringiensis DB27 produces novel nematicidal protoxins Cry21Fa1 and Cry21Ha1 with synergistic action, which highlights the importance of naturally isolated strains as a source of novel toxins.

  15. Bacillus thuringiensis DB27 Produces Two Novel Protoxins, Cry21Fa1 and Cry21Ha1, Which Act Synergistically against Nematodes

    PubMed Central

    Iatsenko, Igor; Boichenko, Iuliia

    2014-01-01

    Bacillus thuringiensis has been widely used as a biopesticide, primarily for the control of insect pests, but some B. thuringiensis strains specifically target nematodes. However, nematicidal virulence factors of B. thuringiensis are poorly investigated. Here, we describe virulence factors of nematicidal B. thuringiensis DB27 using Caenorhabditis elegans as a model. We show that B. thuringiensis DB27 kills a number of free-living and animal-parasitic nematodes via intestinal damage. Its virulence factors are plasmid-encoded Cry protoxins, since plasmid-cured derivatives do not produce Cry proteins and are not toxic to nematodes. Whole-genome sequencing of B. thuringiensis DB27 revealed multiple potential nematicidal factors, including several Cry-like proteins encoded by different plasmids. Two of these proteins appear to be novel and show high similarity to Cry21Ba1. Named Cry21Fa1 and Cry21Ha1, they were expressed in Escherichia coli and fed to C. elegans, resulting in intoxication, intestinal damage, and death of nematodes. Interestingly, the effects of the two protoxins on C. elegans are synergistic (synergism factor, 1.8 to 2.5). Using purified proteins, we determined the 50% lethal concentrations (LC50s) for Cry21Fa1 and Cry21Ha1 to be 13.6 μg/ml and 23.9 μg/ml, respectively, which are comparable to the LC50 of nematicidal Cry5B. Finally, we found that signaling pathways which protect C. elegans against Cry5B toxin are also required for protection against Cry21Fa1. Thus, B. thuringiensis DB27 produces novel nematicidal protoxins Cry21Fa1 and Cry21Ha1 with synergistic action, which highlights the importance of naturally isolated strains as a source of novel toxins. PMID:24632254

  16. Comparative Analysis of Crying in Children with Autism, Developmental Delays, and Typical Development

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Esposito, Gianluca; Venuti, Paola

    2009-01-01

    Crying behavior and mother-infant interactions during episodes of crying were coded using the Cry Observation Codes and then compared for 48 mother-infant dyads of children with autism, children with developmental delays, and typically developing children. At 1 year of age, children who would later be diagnosed with autism showed a different…

  17. The Cry in the Holy Quran and the Effect on the Human Behavior

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    al-Domi, Mohammad Mahmoud

    2015-01-01

    This study aims that cry is the ideal way to release the negative emotions distress, sorrow, and sadness. Which sometimes is also a way to express situations of joy and pleasure of humans. The Almighty Allah also said about cry in The Holy Quran. The prophet pbuh also cry for the expressions of reverence and fear of Allah in perhaps the sort of…

  18. Kinetic Modeling of the Arabidopsis Cryptochrome Photocycle: FADHo Accumulation Correlates with Biological Activity

    PubMed Central

    Procopio, Maria; Link, Justin; Engle, Dorothy; Witczak, Jacques; Ritz, Thorsten; Ahmad, Margaret

    2016-01-01

    Cryptochromes are flavoprotein photoreceptors with multiple signaling roles during plant de-etiolation and development. Arabidopsis cryptochromes (cry1 and cry2) absorb light through an oxidized flavin (FADox) cofactor which undergoes reduction to both FADH° and FADH− redox states. Since the FADH° redox state has been linked to biological activity, it is important to estimate its concentration formed upon illumination in vivo. Here we model the photocycle of isolated cry1 and cry2 proteins with a three-state kinetic model. Our model fits the experimental data for flavin photoconversion in vitro for both cry1 and cry2, providing calculated quantum yields which are significantly lower in cry1 than for cry2. The model was applied to the cryptochrome photocycle in vivo using biological activity in plants as a readout for FADH° concentration. The fit to the in vivo data provided quantum yields for cry1 and cry2 flavin reduction similar to those obtained in vitro, with decreased cry1 quantum yield as compared to cry2. These results validate our assumption that FADH° concentration correlates with biological activity. This is the first reported attempt at kinetic modeling of the cryptochrome photocycle in relation to macroscopic signaling events in vivo, and thereby provides a theoretical framework to the components of the photocycle that are necessary for cryptochrome response to environmental signals. PMID:27446119

  19. Knockdown of the MAPK p38 pathway increases the susceptibility of Chilo suppressalis larvae to Bacillus thuringiensis Cry1Ca toxin

    PubMed Central

    Qiu, Lin; Fan, Jinxing; Liu, Lang; Zhang, Boyao; Wang, Xiaoping; Lei, Chaoliang; Lin, Yongjun; Ma, Weihua

    2017-01-01

    The bacterium Bacillus thuringiensis (Bt) produces a wide range of toxins that are effective against a number of insect pests. Identifying the mechanisms responsible for resistance to Bt toxin will improve both our ability to control important insect pests and our understanding of bacterial toxicology. In this study, we investigated the role of MAPK pathways in resistance against Cry1Ca toxin in Chilo suppressalis, an important lepidopteran pest of rice crops. We first cloned the full-length of C. suppressalis mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) p38, ERK1, and ERK2, and a partial sequence of JNK (hereafter Csp38, CsERK1, CsERK2 and CsJNK). We could then measure the up-regulation of these MAPK genes in larvae at different times after ingestion of Cry1Ca toxin. Using RNA interference to knockdown Csp38, CsJNK, CsERK1 and CsERK2 showed that only knockdown of Csp38 significantly increased the mortality of larvae to Cry1Ca toxin ingested in either an artificial diet, or after feeding on transgenic rice expressed Cry1Ca. These results suggest that MAPK p38 is responsible for the resistance of C. suppressalis larvae to Bt Cry1Ca toxin. PMID:28262736

  20. Genetic variability of Spodoptera frugiperda Smith (Lepidoptera: Noctuidae) populations from Latin America is associated with variations in susceptibility to Bacillus thuringiensis cry toxins.

    PubMed

    Monnerat, Rose; Martins, Erica; Queiroz, Paulo; Ordúz, Sergio; Jaramillo, Gabriela; Benintende, Graciela; Cozzi, Jorge; Real, M Dolores; Martinez-Ramirez, Amparo; Rausell, Carolina; Cerón, Jairo; Ibarra, Jorge E; Del Rincon-Castro, M Cristina; Espinoza, Ana M; Meza-Basso, Luis; Cabrera, Lizbeth; Sánchez, Jorge; Soberon, Mario; Bravo, Alejandra

    2006-11-01

    Bacillus thuringiensis strains isolated from Latin American soil samples that showed toxicity against three Spodoptera frugiperda populations from different geographical areas (Mexico, Colombia, and Brazil) were characterized on the basis of their insecticidal activity, crystal morphology, sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis of parasporal crystals, plasmid profiles, and cry gene content. We found that the different S. frugiperda populations display different susceptibilities to the selected B. thuringiensis strains and also to pure preparations of Cry1B, Cry1C, and Cry1D toxins. Binding assays performed with pure toxin demonstrated that the differences in the toxin binding capacities of these insect populations correlated with the observed differences in susceptibility to the three Cry toxins analyzed. Finally, the genetic variability of the three insect populations was analyzed by random amplification of polymorphic DNA-PCR, which showed significant genetic diversity among the three S. frugiperda populations analyzed. The data presented here show that the genetic variability of S. frugiperda populations should be carefully considered in the development of insect pest control strategies, including the deployment of genetically modified maize in different geographical regions.

  1. Loop replacements with gut-binding peptides in Cry1Ab domain II enhanced toxicity against the brown planthopper, Nilaparvata lugens (Stål)

    PubMed Central

    Shao, Ensi; Lin, Li; Chen, Chen; Chen, Hanze; Zhuang, Haohan; Wu, Songqing; Sha, Li; Guan, Xiong; Huang, Zhipeng

    2016-01-01

    Bacillus thuringiensis (Bt) Cry toxins have been used widely in pest managements. However, Cry toxins are not effective against sap-sucking insects (Hemiptera), which limits the application of Bt for pest management. In order to extend the insecticidal spectrum of Bt toxins to the rice brown planthopper (BPH), Nilaparvata lugens, we modified Cry1Ab putative receptor binding domains with selected BPH gut-binding peptides (GBPs). Three surface exposed loops in the domain II of Cry1Ab were replaced with two GBPs (P2S and P1Z) respectively. Bioassay results showed that toxicity of modified toxin L2-P2S increased significantly (~9 folds) against BPH nymphs. In addition, damage of midgut cells was observed from the nymphs fed with L2-P2S. Our results indicate that modifying Cry toxins based on the toxin-gut interactions can broaden the insecticidal spectrum of Bt toxin. This method provides another approach for the development of transgenic crops with novel insecticidal activity against hemipteran insects and insect populations resistant to current Bt transgenic crops. PMID:26830331

  2. Cry Havoc and Let Slip the Dogs of War

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2001-01-01

    service at the outbreak of the war. Furthermore, the Brits killed over 400,000 dogs and cats in London for fear of the expected German bombing. Sadly...CRY HAVOC AND LET SLIP THE DOGS OF WAR” SPECIAL OPERATIONS FORCES AND THE MILITARY WORKING DOG BY Major Joseph F. Whelan U.S. Army Special Forces...TO) xx-xx-2000 to xx-xx-2001 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER 5b. GRANT NUMBER 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE ?CRY HAVOC AND LET SLIP THE DOGS OF WAR? Unclassified 5c

  3. Creation of Bt rice expressing a fusion protein of Cry1Ac and Cry1I-like using a green tissue-specific promoter.

    PubMed

    Yang, Yong-Yi; Mei, Feng; Zhang, Wei; Shen, Zhicheng; Fang, Jun

    2014-08-01

    The insecticidal genes from Bacillus thuringiensis Berliner (Bt) have long been successfully used for development of insect-resistant rice. However, commercial planting of Bt rice has been delayed by the concern over food safety, although no scientific evidence is ever found to justify the concern. To address this safety concern, we developed a transgenic insect-resistant rice line using a green tissue promoter to minimize the Bt protein expression in the rice seeds. The Bt protein expressed in the rice was a fusion protein of two different Bt toxins, Cry1Ac and Cry1I-like protein. The fusion of the two toxins may be helpful to delay the development of insect resistance to Bt rice. Laboratory and field bioassays demonstrated that the transgenic rice plants created by this study were highly active against the rice leaf folder Cnaphalocrocis medinalis (Guenée) and the striped stem borer Chilo suppressalis (Walker). Western analysis indicated that the fusion protein was specifically expressed in green tissues but not in seeds. Therefore, the transgenic rice created in this study should be useful to mitigate the food safety concern and to delay the development of insect resistance.

  4. Bt rice harbouring cry genes controlled by a constitutive or wound-inducible promoter: protection and transgene expression under Mediterranean field conditions.

    PubMed

    Breitler, Jean Christophe; Vassal, Jean Michel; del Mar Catala, Maria; Meynard, Donaldo; Marfà, Victoria; Melé, Enric; Royer, Monique; Murillo, Isabel; San Segundo, Blanca; Guiderdoni, Emmanuel; Messeguer, Joaquima

    2004-09-01

    Seven homozygous transgenic lines of two European commercial cultivars of rice (Ariete (A) and Senia (S)), harbouring the cry1B or cry1Aa Bacillus thuringiensis (Bt) delta-endotoxin genes, were field evaluated for protection from striped stem borer (SSB) (Chilo suppressalis) damage during the 2001 and 2002 summer crop seasons in the Delta de l'Ebre region, Spain. The plant codon-optimized toxin gene was placed under the control of the promoter of either the constitutive ubi1 gene or the wound-inducible mpi gene from maize. Stable, high-level, insecticidal protein accumulation was observed throughout root, leaf and seed tissues of field-grown plants harbouring the cry1B (lines A64.1, A33.1, A3.4 and S98.9) or cry1Aa (lines S05.1 and A19.14) genes under the control of the ubi1 promoter. Conversely, no toxin was detected in unwounded vegetative tissues of the A9.1 line harbouring the cry1B gene controlled by the mpi promoter, indicating that natural environmental stresses did not trigger the activity of the wound-inducible promoter. However, the toxin accumulated at 0.2% total soluble proteins in A9.1 sheath tissue exhibiting brown lesions resulting from SSB damage. The agronomical traits and performance of the transgenic lines were generally comparable with parental controls, except in the two lines accumulating Cry1Aa, which exhibited a high frequency of plants non-true to type. Natural infestation was assisted with manual infestations of L2/L3 SSB larvae in border control plants surrounding the experimental plots, which served as a reservoir for the second-cycle SSB population. The observation of damage (brown lesions and dead hearts) during the crop season and dissection of plants at harvest stage revealed a range of protection amongst the transgenic lines, which was highly consistent with the level of toxin accumulation and with previous experience in greenhouse assays. Lines A3.4 and S05.1 were found to exhibit stable and full protection against SSB attacks

  5. A Western Corn Rootworm Cadherin-like Protein is not Involved in the Binding and Toxicity of Cry34/35Ab1 and Cry3Aa Bacillus Thuringiensis Proteins

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The western corn rootworm (WCR) Diabrotica virgifera virgifera LeConte is an important insect pest of corn. Bacillus thuringiensis (Bt) insecticidal proteins Cry3Aa (as mCry3A) and Cry34Ab1/Cry35Ab1 have been expressed in transgenic corn and are used to control the insect in the U.S. To date, there ...

  6. Fusing the vegetative insecticidal protein Vip3Aa7 and the N terminus of Cry9Ca improves toxicity against Plutella xylostella larvae.

    PubMed

    Dong, Fang; Shi, Ruiping; Zhang, Shanshan; Zhan, Tao; Wu, Gaobing; Shen, Jie; Liu, Ziduo

    2012-11-01

    Bacillus thuringiensis insecticidal crystal proteins (ICPs) and vegetative insecticidal proteins (VIPs) have been widely used as a kind of safe bio-insecticides. A problem that has been of concern worldwide is how to improve their insecticidal activities. In this study, to determine the synergism between VIPs and ICPs effect on insecticidal activity, a construct that produces a chimeric protein of the Vip3Aa7 and the N terminus ofCry9Ca, named V3AC9C, was expressed in Escherichia coli BL21 cells. In additional experiments, the V3AC9C chimeric protein, the single Vip3Aa7, and the single N terminus of Cry9Ca were treated with trypsin. SDS-PAGE showed that the V3AC9C could be processed into two single toxins. Bioassays tested on third instar larvae of Plutella xylostella showed that the toxicity of the chimeric protein was markedly better than either of the single toxins. Interestingly, the toxicity of the chimeric protein was 3.2-fold higher than a mixture of the Vip3Aa7 and Cry9Ca toxins (mass ratio of 1:1). The synergism factor (SF) of chimeric protein containing Vip3Aa7 and Cry9Ca was calculated to be 4.79. The SF in mixture of toxins is only 1.46. Hence, the effect was more than the sum of the Vip3Aa7 and Cry9C activities. Analysis of the protein's solubility showed that the Vip3Aa7 helped the N terminus of Cry9Ca to dissolve in an alkaline buffer. It was concluded that the increase in the toxicity of the V3AC9C chimeric protein over the constituent proteins mainly resulted from this increase in solubility. These results lay a foundation for the development of a new generation of bio-insecticides and multi-gene transgenic plants.

  7. Inhibition of an Allergen–Antibody Reaction Related to Japanese Cedar Pollinosis Using DNA Aptamers Against the Cry j 2 Allergen

    PubMed Central

    Ogihara, Kazumasa; Savory, Nasa; Abe, Koichi; Yoshida, Wataru; Arakawa, Mitsuru; Asahi, Masahiko; Kamohara, Seika

    2015-01-01

    Japanese cedar pollinosis is one of the most prevalent allergies in Japan. Reducing the allergen content of pollen plays a major role in the alleviation of allergy symptoms. Aptamers, oligonucleotides with an affinity for specific molecules, have great potential for reducing allergic activity. In this study, we report that the anti-Cry j 2 aptamers, CJ2-04 and CJ2-08, inhibited allergen–antibody reactions between Cry j 2, one of the major allergens in Japanese cedar pollen, and immunoglobulin E in serum collected from a patient with Japanese cedar pollinosis. In addition, the suppression of Ca2+ mobilization in basophils, which is related to degranulation, was observed in samples preincubated with either of these DNA aptamers. This study indicates that anti-Cry j 2 aptamers may inhibit allergen–antibody reactions and suppress the induction of Japanese cedar pollinosis, possibly leading to a novel external defense against this and other types of allergens. PMID:26484654

  8. Synergistic interactions between Cry1Ac and natural cotton defenses limit survival of Cry1Ac-resistant Helicoverpa zea (Lepidoptera: Noctuidae) on Bt cotton.

    PubMed

    Anilkumar, Konasale J; Sivasupramaniam, Sakuntala; Head, Graham; Orth, Robert; Van Santen, Edzard; Moar, William J

    2009-07-01

    Larvae of the bollworm Helicoverpa zea (Boddie) show some tolerance to Bacillus thuringiensis (Bt) Cry1Ac, and can survive on Cry1Ac-expressing Bt cotton, which should increase resistance development concerns. However, field-evolved resistance has not yet been observed. In a previous study, a population of H. zea was selected for stable resistance to Cry1Ac toxin. In the present study, we determined in laboratory bioassays if larvae of the Cry1Ac toxin-resistant H. zea population show higher survival rates on field-cultivated Bt cotton squares (= flower buds) collected prebloom-bloom than susceptible H. zea. Our results show that Cry1Ac toxin-resistant H. zea cannot complete larval development on Cry1Ac-expressing Bt cotton, despite being more than 150-fold resistant to Cry1Ac toxin and able to survive until pupation on Cry1Ac toxin concentrations greater than present in Bt cotton squares. Since mortality observed for Cry1Ac-resistant H. zea on Bt cotton was higher than expected, we investigated whether Cry1Ac interacts with gossypol and or other compounds offered with cotton powder in artificial diet. Diet incorporation bioassays were conducted with Cry1Ac toxin alone, and with gossypol and 4% cotton powder in the presence and absence of Cry1Ac. Cry1Ac toxin was significantly more lethal to susceptible H. zea than to resistant H. zea, but no difference in susceptibility to gossypol was observed between strains. However, combinations of Cry1Ac with gossypol or cotton powder were synergistic against resistant, but not against susceptible H. zea. Gossypol concentrations in individual larvae showed no significant differences between insect strains, or between larvae fed gossypol alone vs. those fed gossypol plus Cry1Ac. These results may help explain the inability of Cry1Ac-resistant H. zea to complete development on Bt cotton, and the absence of field-evolved resistance to Bt cotton by this pest.

  9. Fate of the insecticidal Cry1Ab protein of GM crops in two agricultural soils as revealed by ¹⁴C-tracer studies.

    PubMed

    Valldor, Petra; Miethling-Graff, Rona; Martens, Rainer; Tebbe, Christoph C

    2015-09-01

    Insecticidal delta-endotoxins of Bacillus thuringiensis are among the most abundant recombinant proteins released by genetically modified (GM) crops into agricultural soils worldwide. However, there is still controversy about their degradation and accumulation in soils. In this study, (14)C-labelled Cry1Ab protein was applied to soil microcosms at two concentrations (14 and 50 μg g(-1) soil) to quantify the mineralization of Cry1Ab, its incorporation into the soil microbial biomass, and its persistence in two soils which strongly differed in their texture but not in silt or pH. Furthermore, ELISA was used to quantify Cry1Ab and its potential immunoreactive breakdown products in aqueous soil extracts. In both soils, (14)CO2-production was initially very high and then declined during a total monitoring period of up to 135 days. A total of 16 to 23 % of the (14)C activity was incorporated after 29 to 37 days into the soil microbial biomass, indicating that Cry1Ab protein was utilized by microorganisms as a growth substrate. Adsorption in the clay-rich soil was the most important factor limiting microbial degradation; as indicated by higher degradation rates in the more sandy soil, extremely low concentrations of immunoreactive Cry1Ab molecules in the soils' aqueous extracts and a higher amount of (14)C activity bound to the soil with more clay. Ecological risk assessments of Bt-crops should therefore consider that the very low concentrations of extractable Cry1Ab do not reflect the actual elimination of the protein from soils but that, on the other hand, desorbed proteins mineralize quickly due to efficient microbial degradation.

  10. MAPK signaling pathway alters expression of midgut ALP and ABCC genes and causes resistance to Bacillus thuringiensis Cry1Ac toxin in diamondback moth.

    PubMed

    Guo, Zhaojiang; Kang, Shi; Chen, Defeng; Wu, Qingjun; Wang, Shaoli; Xie, Wen; Zhu, Xun; Baxter, Simon W; Zhou, Xuguo; Jurat-Fuentes, Juan Luis; Zhang, Youjun

    2015-04-01

    Insecticidal crystal toxins derived from the soil bacterium Bacillus thuringiensis (Bt) are widely used as biopesticide sprays or expressed in transgenic crops to control insect pests. However, large-scale use of Bt has led to field-evolved resistance in several lepidopteran pests. Resistance to Bt Cry1Ac toxin in the diamondback moth, Plutella xylostella (L.), was previously mapped to a multigenic resistance locus (BtR-1). Here, we assembled the 3.15 Mb BtR-1 locus and found high-level resistance to Cry1Ac and Bt biopesticide in four independent P. xylostella strains were all associated with differential expression of a midgut membrane-bound alkaline phosphatase (ALP) outside this locus and a suite of ATP-binding cassette transporter subfamily C (ABCC) genes inside this locus. The interplay between these resistance genes is controlled by a previously uncharacterized trans-regulatory mechanism via the mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) signaling pathway. Molecular, biochemical, and functional analyses have established ALP as a functional Cry1Ac receptor. Phenotypic association experiments revealed that the recessive Cry1Ac resistance was tightly linked to down-regulation of ALP, ABCC2 and ABCC3, whereas it was not linked to up-regulation of ABCC1. Silencing of ABCC2 and ABCC3 in susceptible larvae reduced their susceptibility to Cry1Ac but did not affect the expression of ALP, whereas suppression of MAP4K4, a constitutively transcriptionally-activated MAPK upstream gene within the BtR-1 locus, led to a transient recovery of gene expression thereby restoring the susceptibility in resistant larvae. These results highlight a crucial role for ALP and ABCC genes in field-evolved resistance to Cry1Ac and reveal a novel trans-regulatory signaling mechanism responsible for modulating the expression of these pivotal genes in P. xylostella.

  11. Crying Behavior and the "Nonviolent" Leboyer Method of Delivery.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hamilton, Joan Safran

    This paper reports on a 3-month longitudinal study comparing the crying behavior of a group of babies delivered by the "nonviolent" Leboyer method with a control group delivered by traditional methods. Subjects were 24 white, middle class infants delivered by minimally medicated, multiparous and primiparous mothers. Fourteen newborns…

  12. The Teacher-Teacher Reliability of the CRI and ERI.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Christine, Charles T.; And Others

    Thirty-two children aged 7 to 12 participated in a study to determine the reliability of the Ekwall Reading Inventory (ERI) and the Classroom Reading Inventory (CRI). The children were randomly assigned to take one of the two inventories, which were administered by four different specially trained teachers. The study used a test-retest design, in…

  13. Consonants in Cri du Chat Syndrome: A Case Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kristoffersen, Kristian Emil

    2008-01-01

    This article reports on a longitudinal case study of consonant productions in one Norwegian girl with Cri du chat syndrome from age 4;6 to age 9;4. It was shown that she had many articulation errors throughout the period of observation. Furthermore, these errors were shown to fall into three main categories: (1) errors of differentiation and…

  14. Past Tense Morphology in Cri Du Chat Syndrome: Experimental Evidence

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wium, Kristin; Kristoffersen, Kristian Emil

    2008-01-01

    It has been observed that persons with Cri du chat syndrome (CDCS) have poor language production. However, very few studies have addressed the question whether all aspects of language production are equally afflicted, or whether there are differences between for instance phonological and morphological abilities. The present study was aimed at…

  15. Physiological Reactivity to Infant Crying and Observed Maternal Sensitivity

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Joosen, Katharina J.; Mesman, Judi; Bakermans-Kranenburg, Marian J.; Pieper, Suzanne; Zeskind, Philip S.; van IJzendoorn, Marinus H.

    2013-01-01

    Relations between maternal sensitivity and physiological reactivity to infant crying were examined using measures of heart rate (HR) and respiratory sinus arrhythmia (RSA) in 49 mothers of second-born infants. Using the Ainsworth Sensitivity Scale, an independent assessment of maternal sensitivity was made during maternal free play and bathing of…

  16. Expiratory and Inspiratory Cries Detection Using Different Signals' Decomposition Techniques.

    PubMed

    Abou-Abbas, Lina; Tadj, Chakib; Gargour, Christian; Montazeri, Leila

    2017-03-01

    This paper addresses the problem of automatic cry signal segmentation for the purposes of infant cry analysis. The main goal is to automatically detect expiratory and inspiratory phases from recorded cry signals. The approach used in this paper is made up of three stages: signal decomposition, features extraction, and classification. In the first stage, short-time Fourier transform, empirical mode decomposition (EMD), and wavelet packet transform have been considered. In the second stage, various set of features have been extracted, and in the third stage, two supervised learning methods, Gaussian mixture models and hidden Markov models, with four and five states, have been discussed as well. The main goal of this work is to investigate the EMD performance and to compare it with the other standard decomposition techniques. A combination of two and three intrinsic mode functions (IMFs) that resulted from EMD has been used to represent cry signal. The performance of nine different segmentation systems has been evaluated. The experiments for each system have been repeated several times with different training and testing datasets, randomly chosen using a 10-fold cross-validation procedure. The lowest global classification error rates of around 8.9% and 11.06% have been achieved using a Gaussian mixture models classifier and a hidden Markov models classifier, respectively. Among all IMF combinations, the winner combination is IMF3+IMF4+IMF5.

  17. Infant Crying, Feeding and Sleeping: Development, Problems and Treatments.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    St. James-Roberts, Ian, Ed.; And Others

    This book is the result of efforts by an expert study group, set up by the Association for Child Psychology and Psychiatry, to examine the relationships between infant crying, sleeping, and feeding problems, and to shed light on the developmental and regulatory mechanisms involved. It brings together research from a variety of professional…

  18. Cry the Beloved Country. A Sound Filmstrip Program. Study Guide.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Peters, John; Peters, Frances

    Based on the novel and motion picture "Cry, the Beloved Country," this filmstrip program is a re-creation of the story of a black minister and a white farmer in South Africa whose lives are bound together in mutual tragedy. The three filmstrips examine the people, problems, laws, and institutions of South Africa and expose the evils of…

  19. Is Enhanced Physical Activity Possible Using Active Videogames?

    PubMed

    Baranowski, Tom; Baranowski, Janice; O'Connor, Teresia; Lu, Amy Shirong; Thompson, Debbe

    2012-06-01

    Our research indicated that 10-12-year-old children receiving two active Wii(™) (Nintendo(®); Nintendo of America, Inc., Redmond, WA) console videogames were no more physically active than children receiving two inactive videogames. Research is needed on how active videogames may increase physical activity.

  20. Specific binding of Bacillus thuringiensis Cry2A insecticidal proteins to a common site in the midgut of Helicoverpa species.

    PubMed

    Hernández-Rodríguez, Carmen Sara; Van Vliet, Adri; Bautsoens, Nadine; Van Rie, Jeroen; Ferré, Juan

    2008-12-01

    For a long time, it has been assumed that the mode of action of Cry2A toxins was unique and different from that of other three-domain Cry toxins due to their apparent nonspecific and unsaturable binding to an unlimited number of receptors. However, based on the homology of the tertiary structure among three-domain Cry toxins, similar modes of action for all of them are expected. To confirm this hypothesis, binding assays were carried out with (125)I-labeled Cry2Ab. Saturation assays showed that Cry2Ab binds in a specific and saturable manner to brush border membrane vesicles (BBMVs) of Helicoverpa armigera. Homologous-competition assays with (125)I-Cry2Ab demonstrated that this toxin binds with high affinity to binding sites in H. armigera and Helicoverpa zea midgut. Heterologous-competition assays showed a common binding site for three toxins belonging to the Cry2A family (Cry2Aa, Cry2Ab, and Cry2Ae), which is not shared by Cry1Ac. Estimation of K(d) (dissociation constant) values revealed that Cry2Ab had around 35-fold less affinity than Cry1Ac for BBMV binding sites in both insect species. Only minor differences were found regarding R(t) (concentration of binding sites) values. This study questions previous interpretations from other authors performing binding assays with Cry2A toxins and establishes the basis for the mode of action of Cry2A toxins.

  1. Specific Binding of Bacillus thuringiensis Cry2A Insecticidal Proteins to a Common Site in the Midgut of Helicoverpa Species▿

    PubMed Central

    Hernández-Rodríguez, Carmen Sara; Van Vliet, Adri; Bautsoens, Nadine; Van Rie, Jeroen; Ferré, Juan

    2008-01-01

    For a long time, it has been assumed that the mode of action of Cry2A toxins was unique and different from that of other three-domain Cry toxins due to their apparent nonspecific and unsaturable binding to an unlimited number of receptors. However, based on the homology of the tertiary structure among three-domain Cry toxins, similar modes of action for all of them are expected. To confirm this hypothesis, binding assays were carried out with 125I-labeled Cry2Ab. Saturation assays showed that Cry2Ab binds in a specific and saturable manner to brush border membrane vesicles (BBMVs) of Helicoverpa armigera. Homologous-competition assays with 125I-Cry2Ab demonstrated that this toxin binds with high affinity to binding sites in H. armigera and Helicoverpa zea midgut. Heterologous-competition assays showed a common binding site for three toxins belonging to the Cry2A family (Cry2Aa, Cry2Ab, and Cry2Ae), which is not shared by Cry1Ac. Estimation of Kd (dissociation constant) values revealed that Cry2Ab had around 35-fold less affinity than Cry1Ac for BBMV binding sites in both insect species. Only minor differences were found regarding Rt (concentration of binding sites) values. This study questions previous interpretations from other authors performing binding assays with Cry2A toxins and establishes the basis for the mode of action of Cry2A toxins. PMID:18931285

  2. Essential Role of an Unusually Long-lived Tyrosyl Radical in the Response to Red Light of the Animal-like Cryptochrome aCRY.

    PubMed

    Oldemeyer, Sabine; Franz, Sophie; Wenzel, Sandra; Essen, Lars-Oliver; Mittag, Maria; Kottke, Tilman

    2016-07-01

    Cryptochromes constitute a group of flavin-binding blue light receptors in bacteria, fungi, plants, and insects. Recently, the response of cryptochromes to light was extended to nearly the entire visible spectral region on the basis of the activity of the animal-like cryptochrome aCRY in the green alga Chlamydomonas reinhardtii This finding was explained by the absorption of red light by the flavin neutral radical as the dark state of the receptor, which then forms the anionic fully reduced state. In this study, time-resolved UV-visible spectroscopy on the full-length aCRY revealed an unusually long-lived tyrosyl radical with a lifetime of 2.6 s, which is present already 1 μs after red light illumination of the flavin radical. Mutational studies disclosed the tyrosine 373 close to the surface to form the long-lived radical and to be essential for photoreduction. This residue is conserved exclusively in the sequences of other putative aCRY proteins distinguishing them from conventional (6-4) photolyases. Size exclusion chromatography showed the full-length aCRY to be a dimer in the dark at 0.5 mm injected concentration with the C-terminal extension as the dimerization site. Upon illumination, partial oligomerization was observed via disulfide bridge formation at cysteine 482 in close proximity to tyrosine 373. The lack of any light response in the C-terminal extension as evidenced by FTIR spectroscopy differentiates aCRY from plant and Drosophila cryptochromes. These findings imply that aCRY might have evolved a different signaling mechanism via a light-triggered redox cascade culminating in photooxidation of a yet unknown substrate or binding partner.

  3. Cry1A toxins of Bacillus thuringiensis bind specifically to a region adjacent to the membrane-proximal extracellular domain of BT-R(1) in Manduca sexta: involvement of a cadherin in the entomopathogenicity of Bacillus thuringiensis.

    PubMed

    Dorsch, J A; Candas, M; Griko, N B; Maaty, W S A; Midboe, E G; Vadlamudi, R K; Bulla, L A

    2002-09-01

    Many subspecies of the soil bacterium Bacillus thuringiensis produce various parasporal crystal proteins, also known as Cry toxins, that exhibit insecticidal activity upon binding to specific receptors in the midgut of susceptible insects. One such receptor, BT-R(1) (210 kDa), is a cadherin located in the midgut epithelium of the tobacco hornworm, Manduca sexta. It has a high binding affinity (K(d) approximately 1nM) for the Cry1A toxins of B. thuringiensis. Truncation analysis of BT-R(1) revealed that the only fragment capable of binding the Cry1A toxins of B. thuringiensis was a contiguous 169-amino acid sequence adjacent to the membrane-proximal extracellular domain. The purified toxin-binding fragment acted as an antagonist to Cry1Ab toxin by blocking the binding of toxin to the tobacco hornworm midgut and inhibiting insecticidal action. Exogenous Cry1Ab toxin bound to intact COS-7 cells expressing BT-R(1) cDNA, subsequently killing the cells. Recruitment of BT-R(1) by B. thuringiensis indicates that the bacterium interacts with a specific cell adhesion molecule during its pathogenesis. Apparently, Cry toxins, like other bacterial toxins, attack epithelial barriers by targeting cell adhesion molecules within susceptible insect hosts.

  4. Production of marker-free transgenic Jatropha curcas expressing hybrid Bacillus thuringiensis δ-endotoxin Cry1Ab/1Ac for resistance to larvae of tortrix moth (Archips micaceanus)

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background The potential biofuel plant Jatropha curcas L. is affected by larvae of Archips micaceanus (Walker), a moth of the family Tortricidae. The hybrid Bacillus thuringiensis (Bt) δ-endotoxin protein Cry1Ab/1Ac confers resistance to lepidopteran insects in transgenic rice. Results Here, we report the production of a marker-free transgenic line of J. curcas (L10) expressing Cry1Ab/1Ac using Agrobacterium-mediated transformation and a chemically regulated, Cre/loxP-mediated DNA recombination system. L10 carries a single copy of marker-free T-DNA that contains the Cry1Ab/1Ac gene under the control of a maize phosphoenolpyruvate carboxylase gene promoter (P Pepc :Cry1Ab/1Ac:T Nos ). The P Pepc :Cry1Ab/1Ac:T Nos gene was highly expressed in leaves of L10 plants. Insecticidal bioassays using leaf explants of L10 resulted in 80-100% mortality of larvae of A. micaceanus at 4 days after infestation. Conclusion The results demonstrate that the hybrid Bt δ-endotoxin protein Cry1Ab/1Ac expressed in Jatropha curcas displays strong insecticidal activity to A. micaceanus. The marker-free transgenic J. curcas line L10 can be used for breeding of insect resistance to A. micaceanus. PMID:24808924

  5. A preliminary user-friendly, digital console for the control room parameters supervision in old-generation Nuclear Plants

    SciTech Connect

    Memmi, F.; Falconi, L.; Cappelli, M.; Palomba, M.; Santoro, E.; Bove, R.; Sepielli, M.

    2012-07-01

    Improvements in the awareness of a system status is an essential requirement to achieve safety in every kind of plant. In particular, in the case of Nuclear Power Plants (NPPs), a progress is crucial to enhance the Human Machine Interface (HMI) in order to optimize monitoring and analyzing processes of NPP operational states. Firstly, as old-fashioned plants are concerned, an upgrading of the whole console instrumentation is desirable in order to replace an analog visualization with a full-digital system. In this work, we present a novel instrument able to interface the control console of a nuclear reactor, developed by using CompactRio, a National Instruments embedded architecture and its dedicated programming language. This real-time industrial controller composed by a real-time processor and FPGA modules has been programmed to visualize the parameters coming from the reactor, and to storage and reproduce significant conditions anytime. This choice has been made on the basis of the FPGA properties: high reliability, determinism, true parallelism and re-configurability, achieved by a simple programming method, based on LabVIEW real-time environment. The system architecture exploits the FPGA capabilities of implementing custom timing and triggering, hardware-based analysis and co-processing, and highest performance control algorithms. Data stored during the supervisory phase can be reproduced by loading data from a measurement file, re-enacting worthwhile operations or conditions. The system has been thought to be used in three different modes, namely Log File Mode, Supervisory Mode and Simulation Mode. The proposed system can be considered as a first step to develop a more complete Decision Support System (DSS): indeed this work is part of a wider project that includes the elaboration of intelligent agents and meta-theory approaches. A synoptic has been created to monitor every kind of action on the plant through an intuitive sight. Furthermore, another important

  6. Persistence of Bt Bacillus thuringiensis Cry1Aa toxin in various soils determined by physicochemical reactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Helassa, N.; Noinville, S.; Déjardin, P.; Janot, J. M.; Quiquampoix, H.; Staunton, S.

    2009-04-01

    Insecticidal Cry proteins from the soil bacterium, Bacillus thuringiensis (Bt) are produced by a class of genetically modified (GM) crops, and released into soils through root exudates and upon decomposition of residues. In contrast to the protoxin produced by the Bacillus, the protein produced in GM crops does not require activation in insect midguts and thereby potentially looses some of its species specificity. Although gene transfer and resistance emergence phenomena are well documented, the fate of these toxins in soil has not yet been clearly elucidated. Cry proteins, in common with other proteins, are adsorbed on soils and soil components. Adsorption on soil, and the reversibility of this adsorption is an important aspect of the environmental behaviour of these toxins. The orientation of the molecule and conformational changes on surfaces may modify the toxicity and confer some protection against microbial degradation. Adsorption will have important consequences for both the risk of exposition of non target species and the acquisition of resistance by target species. We have adopted different approaches to investigate the fate of Cry1Aa in soils and model minerals. In each series of experiments we endeavoured to maintain the protein in a monomeric form (pH above 6.5 and a high ionic strength imposed with 150 mM NaCl). The adsorption and the desorbability of the Cry1Aa Bt insecticidal protein were measured on two different homoionic clays: montmorillonite and kaolinite. Adsorption isotherms obtained followed a low affinity interaction for both clays and could be fitted using the Langmuir equation. Binding of the toxin decreased as the pH increased from 6.5 (close to the isoelectric point) to 9. Maximum adsorption was about 40 times greater on montmorillonite (1.71 g g-1) than on kaolinite (0.04 g g-1) in line with the contrasting respective specific surface areas of the minerals. Finally, some of the adsorbed toxin was desorbed by water and more, about 36

  7. Inheritance of Cry1F resistance, cross-resistance and frequency of resistant alleles in Spodoptera frugiperda (Lepidoptera: Noctuidae).

    PubMed

    Vélez, A M; Spencer, T A; Alves, A P; Moellenbeck, D; Meagher, R L; Chirakkal, H; Siegfried, B D

    2013-12-01

    Transgenic maize, Zea maize L., expressing the Cry1F protein from Bacillus thuringiensis has been registered for Spodoptera frugiperda (J. E. Smith) control since 2003. Unexpected damage to Cry1F maize was reported in 2006 in Puerto Rico and Cry1F resistance in S. frugiperda was documented. The inheritance of Cry1F resistance was characterized in a S. frugiperda resistant strain originating from Puerto Rico, which displayed >289-fold resistance to purified Cry1F. Concentration-response bioassays of reciprocal crosses of resistant and susceptible parental populations indicated that resistance is recessive and autosomal. Bioassays of the backcross of the F1 generation crossed with the resistant parental strain suggest that a single locus is responsible for resistance. In addition, cross-resistance to Cry1Aa, Cry1Ab, Cry1Ac, Cry1Ba, Cry2Aa and Vip3Aa was assessed in the Cry1F-resistant strain. There was no significant cross-resistance to Cry1Aa, Cry1Ba and Cry2Aa, although only limited effects were observed in the susceptible strain. Vip3Aa was highly effective against susceptible and resistant insects indicating no cross-resistance with Cry1F. In contrast, low levels of cross-resistance were observed for both Cry1Ab and Cry1Ac. Because the resistance is recessive and conferred by a single locus, an F1 screening assay was used to measure the frequency of Cry1F-resistant alleles from populations of Florida and Texas in 2010 and 2011. A total frequency of resistant alleles of 0.13 and 0.02 was found for Florida and Texas populations, respectively, indicating resistant alleles could be found in US populations, although there have been no reports of reduced efficacy of Cry1F-expressing plants.

  8. Daphnia magna negatively affected by chronic exposure to purified Cry-toxins.

    PubMed

    Bøhn, Thomas; Rover, Carina Macagnan; Semenchuk, Philipp Robert

    2016-05-01

    Cry-toxin genes originating from Bacillus thuringiensis are inserted into genetically modified (GM) plants, often called Bt-plants, to provide insect resistance to pests. Significant amounts of Bt-plant residues, and thus Cry-toxins, will be shed to soil and aquatic environments. We exposed Daphnia magna to purified Cry1Ab and Cry2Aa toxins for the full life-span of the animals. We used single toxins in different doses and combinations of toxins and Roundup(®), another potential stressor on the rise in agricultural ecosystems. Animals exposed to 4.5 mg/L (ppm) of Cry1Ab, Cry2Aa and the combination of both showed markedly higher mortality, smaller body size and very low juvenile production compared to controls. Animals exposed to 0.75 mg/L also showed a tendency towards increased mortality but with increased early fecundity compared to the controls. Roundup(®) stimulated animals to strong early reproductive output at the cost of later rapid mortality. We conclude that i) purified Cry-toxins in high concentrations are toxic to D. magna, indicating alternative modes-of-action for these Cry-toxins; ii) Cry-toxins act in combination, indicating that 'stacked events' may have stronger effects on non-target organisms; iii) further studies need to be done on combinatorial effects of multiple Cry-toxins and herbicides that co-occur in the environment.

  9. Is enhanced physical activity possible using active videogames?

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Our research indicated that 10– to 12-year-old children receiving two active Wii (TM)(Nintendo (R); Nintendo of America, Inc., Redmond, WA) console videogames were no more physically active than children receiving two inactive videogames. Research is needed on how active videogames may increase phys...

  10. 40 CFR 180.1154 - CryIA(c) and CryIC derived delta-endotoxins of Bacillus thuringiensis var. kurstaki encapsulated...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ...-endotoxins of Bacillus thuringiensis var. kurstaki encapsulated in killed Pseudomonas fluorescens, and the... Bacillus thuringiensis var. kurstaki encapsulated in killed Pseudomonas fluorescens, and the expression plasmid and cloning vector genetic constructs. CryIA(c) and CryIC derived delta-endotoxins of...

  11. Intended Sensitive and Harsh Caregiving Responses to Infant Crying: The Role of Cry Pitch and Perceived Urgency in an Adult Twin Sample

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Out, Dorothee; Pieper, Suzanne; Bakermans-Kranenburg, Marian J.; Zeskind, Philip Sanford; van IJzendoorn, Marinus H.

    2010-01-01

    Objective: To examine the underlying mechanisms of adults' intended caregiving responses to cry sounds in a behavioral genetic design and to investigate the role of cry pitch and perceived urgency in sensitive and harsh caregiving responses. Methods: The sample consisted of 184 adult twin pairs (18-69 years), including males and females, parents…

  12. Frequency of alleles conferring resistance to the Bt toxins Cry1Ac and Cry2Ab in Australian populations of Helicoverpa armigera (Lepidoptera: Noctuidae).

    PubMed

    Mahon, R J; Olsen, K M; Downes, S; Addison, S

    2007-12-01

    Helicoverpa armigera (Hübner) (Lepidoptera: Noctuidae) is an important lepidopteran pest of cotton (Gossypium spp.) in Australia and the Old World. From 2002, F2 screens were used to examine the frequency of resistance alleles in Australian populations of H. armigera to Bacillus thuringiensis (Bt) CrylAc and Cry2Ab, the two insecticidal proteins present in the transgenic cotton Bollgard II. At that time, Ingard (expressing Cry1Ac) cotton had been grown in Australia for seven seasons, and Bollgard II was about to be commercially released. The principal objective of our study was to determine whether sustained exposure caused an elevated frequency of alleles conferring resistance to Cry1Ac in a species with a track record of evolving resistance to conventional insecticides. No major alleles conferring resistance to Cry1Ac were found. The frequency of resistance alleles for Cry1Ac was <0.0003, with a 95% credibility interval between 0 and 0.0009. In contrast, alleles conferring resistance to Cry2Ab were found at a frequency of 0.0033 (0.0017, 0.0055). The first isolation of this allele was found before the widespread deployment of Bollgard II. For both toxins the experiment-wise detection probability was 94.4%. Our results suggest that alleles conferring resistance to Cry1Ac are rare and that a relatively high baseline frequency of alleles conferring resistance to Cry2Ab existed before the introduction of Bt cotton containing this toxin.

  13. Agrotis segetum midgut putative receptor of Bacillus thuringiensis vegetative insecticidal protein Vip3Aa16 differs from that of Cry1Ac toxin.

    PubMed

    Ben Hamadou-Charfi, Dorra; Boukedi, Hanen; Abdelkefi-Mesrati, Lobna; Tounsi, Slim; Jaoua, Samir

    2013-10-01

    Considering the fact that Agrotis segetum is one of the most pathogenic insects to vegetables and cereals in the world, particularly in Africa, the mode of action of Vip3Aa16 of Bacillus thuringiensis BUPM95 and Cry1Ac of the recombinant strain BNS3Cry-(pHTcry1Ac) has been examined in this crop pest. A. segetum proteases activated the Vip3Aa16 protoxin (90kDa) yielding three bands of about 62, 45, 22kDa and the activated form of the toxin was active against this pest with an LC50 of about 86ng/cm(2). To be active against A. segetum, Cry1Ac protoxin was activated to three close bands of about 60-65kDa. Homologous and heterologous competition binding experiments demonstrated that Vip3Aa16 bound specifically to brush border membrane vesicles (BBMV) prepared from A. segetum midgut and that it does not inhibit the binding of Cry1Ac. Moreover, BBMV protein blotting experiments showed that the receptor of Vip3Aa16 toxin in A. segetum midgut differs from that of Cry1Ac. In fact, the latter binds to a 120kDa protein whereas the Vip3Aa16 binds to a 65kDa putative receptor. The midgut histopathology of Vip3Aa16 fed larvae showed vacuolization of the cytoplasm, brush border membrane lysis, vesicle formation in the goblet cells and disintegration of the apical membrane. The distinct binding properties and the unique protein sequence of Vip3Aa16 support its use as a novel insecticidal agent to control the crop pest A. segetum.

  14. Pre-selecting resistance against individual Bti Cry toxins facilitates the development of resistance to the Bti toxins cocktail.

    PubMed

    Stalinski, Renaud; Tetreau, Guillaume; Gaude, Thierry; Després, Laurence

    2014-06-01

    The bioinsecticide Bacillus thuringiensis subsp. israelensis is a larvicide used worldwide for mosquito control, which contains three Cry toxins and one Cyt toxin. We investigated for the first time in Aedes aegypti (1) the evolution of resistance and cross-resistance of strains selected with each Cry toxin, and (2) the effect of pre-selection with Cry toxin on the evolution of resistance to a mix of Bti toxins. Cross resistance was higher between Cry4Ba and Cry11Aa than between Cry4Aa and either Cry4Ba or Cry11Aa, suggesting both common and specific mechanisms of resistance. Pre-selecting resistance to each Cry toxins facilitated the development of resistance to the full Bti toxins cocktail.

  15. Electroclinical and cytogenetic features of epilepsy in cri-du-chat syndrome.

    PubMed

    Nakagami, Yukako; Terada, Kiyohito; Ikeda, Hitoshi; Hiyoshi, Toshio; Inoue, Yushi

    2015-12-01

    Cri-du-chat syndrome (CdCs) is caused by deletion in the short arm of chromosome 5, occurring in 1:15,000 to 1:50,000 live births. Recent genotype-phenotype correlation studies show the importance of 5p15.2 for facial dysmorphism and intellectual disability, and 5p15.3 for cat-like cry. Numerous reports have shown the relative rarity of epilepsy in this syndrome. We identified two cases with epilepsy in CdCs, and described their electroclinical and cytogenetic features. The first case was a 25-year-old female who had axial tonic seizures with flexion of the neck and shoulders. Interictal EEG was characterized by generalized spike-and-slow-wave complexes. Her ictal EEG started with diffuse electrodecremental pattern, followed by alpha-range activities. High-resolution banding analysis of chromosomes revealed a terminal deletion of 5p14.1. The second case was a 30-year-old female who had startle epilepsy with falling. Interictal EEG demonstrated generalized spike and slow waves. High-resolution banding analysis revealed a terminal deletion of 5p13.3 with additional chromosomal material of unknown origin. Based on the cases presented here, as well as those previously reported, the relationship between epilepsy and CdCs is discussed. The data suggests that although CdCs patients rarely suffer from epileptic seizures, the seizures may vary in type.

  16. Differential Protection of Cry1Fa Toxin against Spodoptera frugiperda Larval Gut Proteases by Cadherin Orthologs Correlates with Increased Synergism

    PubMed Central

    Rahman, Khalidur; Abdullah, Mohd Amir F.; Ambati, Suresh; Taylor, Milton D.

    2012-01-01

    The Cry proteins produced by Bacillus thuringiensis (Bt) are the most widely used biopesticides effective against a range of crop pests and disease vectors. Like chemical pesticides, development of resistance is the primary threat to the long-term efficacy of Bt toxins. Recently discovered cadherin-based Bt Cry synergists showed the potential to augment resistance management by improving efficacy of Cry toxins. However, the mode of action of Bt Cry synergists is thus far unclear. Here we elucidate the mechanism of cadherin-based Cry toxin synergism utilizing two cadherin peptides, Spodoptera frugiperda Cad (SfCad) and Manduca sexta Cad (MsCad), which differentially enhance Cry1Fa toxicity to Spodoptera frugiperda neonates. We show that differential SfCad- and MsCad-mediated protection of Cry1Fa toxin in the Spodoptera frugiperda midgut correlates with differential Cry1Fa toxicity enhancement. Both peptides exhibited high affinity for Cry1Fa toxin and an increased rate of Cry1Fa-induced pore formation in S. frugiperda. However, only SfCad bound the S. frugiperda brush border membrane vesicle and more effectively prolonged the stability of Cry1Fa toxin in the gut, explaining higher Cry1Fa enhancement by this peptide. This study shows that cadherin fragments may enhance B. thuringiensis toxicity by at least two different mechanisms or a combination thereof: (i) protection of Cry toxin from protease degradation in the insect midgut and (ii) enhancement of pore-forming ability of Cry toxin. PMID:22081566

  17. Coexpression of chitinase and the cry11Aa1 toxin genes in Bacillus thuringiensis serovar israelensis.

    PubMed

    Sirichotpakorn, N; Rongnoparut, P; Choosang, K; Panbangred, W

    2001-10-01

    At the spore stage, a cloned chitinase gene was coexpressed with the regulatory gene p19 and the toxin gene cry11Aa1 in the hosts Bacillus thuringiensis serovar israelensis strains 4Q2-72 and c4Q2-72. The chitinase gene was derived from a high-chitinase producer, Bacillus licheniformis TP-1. Two transcriptional fusion plasmids between the p19 or p19-cry11Aa1 genes and the promoterless chitinase gene were constructed. In transcription order, the p16-19CHI construct contained the p19 gene together with the chitinase gene only while the p16-1968CHI construct contained p19 together with the toxin gene cry11Aa1 and the chitinase gene. The inserted sequences were regulated by a spore-specific promoter located upstream of p19. The recombinant chitinase of all transformed B. thuringiensis serovar israelensis strains was initially synthesized at low level at about 9 h of growth when a portion of the cells started to sporulate. It increased thereafter and reached maximum levels of 5.5, 4.9, and 4.7 mU/ml at 48 h, for strain 4Q2-72 transformed with p16-19CHI and p16-1968CHI and strain c4Q2-72 transformed with p16-19CHI, respectively. This activity was approximately 2 times higher than the maximum activity (2.7 mU/ml) of the parental strain, B. licheniformis TP-1. Although crude chitinase alone from B. thuringiensis serovar israelensis c4Q2-72 (p16-19CHI) at 4.5 mU/ml caused 40% mortality in second instar Aedes aegypti larvae, transformants containing the chitinase alone or in combination with cry11Aa1 resulted in lower toxicity to A. aegypti larvae than the untransformed 4Q2-72 host. For example the LC(50) for the transformed 4Q2-72 harboring the chitinase gene only (p16-19CHI) was 5.6 x 10(4) +/- 0.7 x 10(4) cells, 40 times higher than that of the untransformed host at 1.4 x 10(3) +/- 0.19 x 10(3). The lower toxicity correlated with poor sporulation in the transformants (i.e., 35 times lower than that in the untransformed host). However, the transformed 4Q2-72 strain

  18. A comprehensive assessment of the effects of Bt cotton on Coleomegilla maculata demonstrates no detrimental effects by Cry1Ac and Cry2Ab.

    PubMed

    Li, Yunhe; Romeis, Jörg; Wang, Ping; Peng, Yufa; Shelton, Anthony M

    2011-01-01

    The ladybird beetle, Coleomegilla maculata (DeGeer), is a common and abundant predator in many cropping systems. Its larvae and adults are predaceous, feeding on aphids, thrips, lepidopteran larvae and plant tissues, such as pollen. Therefore, this species is exposed to insecticidal proteins expressed in insect-resistant, genetically engineered cotton expressing Cry proteins derived from Bacillus thuringiensis (Bt). A tritrophic bioassay was conduced to evaluate the potential impact of Cry2Ab- and Cry1Ac-expressing cotton on fitness parameters of C. maculata using Bt-susceptible and -resistant larvae of Trichoplusia ni as prey. Coleomegilla maculata survival, development time, adult weight and fecundity were not different when they were fed with resistant T. ni larvae reared on either Bt or control cotton. To ensure that C. maculata were not sensitive to the tested Cry toxins independent from the plant background and to add certainty to the hazard assessment, C. maculata larvae were fed artificial diet incorporated with Cry2Ab, Cry1Ac or both at >10 times higher concentrations than in cotton tissue. Artificial diet containing E-64 was included as a positive control. No differences were detected in any life-table parameters between Cry protein-containing diet treatments and the control diet. In contrast, larvae of C. maculata fed the E-64 could not develop to the pupal stage and the 7-d larval weight was significantly negatively affected. In both feeding assays, the stability and bioactivity of Cry proteins in the food sources were confirmed by ELISA and sensitive-insect bioassays. Our results show that C. maculata is not affected by Bt cotton and is not sensitive to Cry2Ab and Cry1Ac at concentrations exceeding the levels in Bt cotton, thus demonstrating that Bt cotton will pose a negligible risk to C. maculata. More importantly, this study demonstrates a comprehensive system for assessing the risk of genetically modified plants on non-target organisms.

  19. A Comprehensive Assessment of the Effects of Bt Cotton on Coleomegilla maculata Demonstrates No Detrimental Effects by Cry1Ac and Cry2Ab

    PubMed Central

    Li, Yunhe; Romeis, Jörg; Wang, Ping; Peng, Yufa; Shelton, Anthony M.

    2011-01-01

    The ladybird beetle, Coleomegilla maculata (DeGeer), is a common and abundant predator in many cropping systems. Its larvae and adults are predaceous, feeding on aphids, thrips, lepidopteran larvae and plant tissues, such as pollen. Therefore, this species is exposed to insecticidal proteins expressed in insect-resistant, genetically engineered cotton expressing Cry proteins derived from Bacillus thuringiensis (Bt). A tritrophic bioassay was conduced to evaluate the potential impact of Cry2Ab- and Cry1Ac-expressing cotton on fitness parameters of C. maculata using Bt-susceptible and -resistant larvae of Trichoplusia ni as prey. Coleomegilla maculata survival, development time, adult weight and fecundity were not different when they were fed with resistant T. ni larvae reared on either Bt or control cotton. To ensure that C. maculata were not sensitive to the tested Cry toxins independent from the plant background and to add certainty to the hazard assessment, C. maculata larvae were fed artificial diet incorporated with Cry2Ab, Cry1Ac or both at >10 times higher concentrations than in cotton tissue. Artificial diet containing E-64 was included as a positive control. No differences were detected in any life-table parameters between Cry protein-containing diet treatments and the control diet. In contrast, larvae of C. maculata fed the E-64 could not develop to the pupal stage and the 7-d larval weight was significantly negatively affected. In both feeding assays, the stability and bioactivity of Cry proteins in the food sources were confirmed by ELISA and sensitive-insect bioassays. Our results show that C. maculata is not affected by Bt cotton and is not sensitive to Cry2Ab and Cry1Ac at concentrations exceeding the levels in Bt cotton, thus demonstrating that Bt cotton will pose a negligible risk to C. maculata. More importantly, this study demonstrates a comprehensive system for assessing the risk of genetically modified plants on non-target organisms. PMID

  20. Ocular findings in a newborn with cri du chat syndrome.

    PubMed

    Schechter, R J

    1978-03-01

    A deletion of the short arm of chromosome No. 5 has been termed the cri du chat (cat cry) syndrome. We report the first ophthalmologic examination of a newborn infant with this syndrome. Multiple ophthalmic abnormalities were found, including hypertelorism, telecanthus, epicanthal folds, antimongoloid palpebral fissures, exotropia, optic atrophy, and tortuosity of the retinal vasculature. It is of interest that these changes are congenital and present at birth, rather than developmental. Although such individuals are usually so severely mentally retarded that no ophthalmologic intervention is indicated, there are rare exceptions, and each case must be judged individually. Ten percent to 15% of these children inherit the chromosomal abnormality from phenotypically normal parents. Chromosomes from each parent should therefore be evaluated for the purposes of genetic counseling.

  1. Neurological abnormalities in the `cri-du-chat' syndrome 1

    PubMed Central

    Colover, Jack; Lucas, Mary; Comley, J. A.; Roe, A. M.

    1972-01-01

    An unusual case of the cri-du-chat syndrome is described in a 6½ year old boy, who, as well as attacks of stridor and choking, showed disorders of spatial perception and cerebellar signs in the form of nystagmus, clumsiness of the hands, and ataxia. Pyramidal signs were also present. He was only mildly retarded mentally. Psychological testing showed that he had a severe deficit for number processing, and also constructional apraxia. Surprisingly, his vocabulary was quite good, as was his reading capacity. Chromosome analysis showed a very small deletion of the short arm of the group B chromosome. In infancy this diagnosis may be suspected because of the high-pitched cry and attacks of stridor and choking. In late childhood, when the signs may be only of a neurological disorder, its recognition may be difficult without confirmation from chromosome studies. The neurological features of this disease are reviewed. Images PMID:5084140

  2. Do cry features reflect pain intensity in preterm neonates? A preliminary study.

    PubMed

    Johnston, C C; Sherrard, A; Stevens, B; Franck, L; Stremler, R; Jack, A

    1999-08-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate if cries from preterm neonates would reflect changes in pain intensity following interventions. The cries from 25 preterm neonates from an original sample of 122 were audiorecorded while the infant was undergoing heelstick during a randomized crossover design testing the efficacy of: pacifier with sucrose or water, or prone position as compared to standard care. Both pacifier conditions reduced procedural pain according to a validated composite pain measure (the Premature Infant Pain Profile). There were proportionately fewer cries in the two pacifier groups compared to the prone positioning and standard care groups, and cry duration was positively correlated with PIPP scores. However, neither cry duration nor fundamental frequency reflected group differences. Further research is needed to determine if cry is a sensitive and valid indicator of pain in preterm infants.

  3. The association between Cri du chat syndrome and dental anomalies.

    PubMed

    Hall, Charmaine; Hallett, Kerrod; Manton, David

    2014-01-01

    Cri du chat syndrome (CdcS), also known as 5p deletion syndrome is a genetic disorder caused by the partial deletion of chromatin from the short arm of chromosome 5. There is a paucity of literature on the dental manifestations in CdcS. The purposes of this report are to present the case of a nine-year-old girl with the syndrome, CdcS and to review its dental and clinical manifestations and their management in children.

  4. Hematotoxicity and genotoxicity evaluations in Swiss mice intraperitoneally exposed to Bacillus thuringiensis (var kurstaki) spore crystals genetically modified to express individually Cry1Aa, Cry1Ab, Cry1Ac, or Cry2Aa.

    PubMed

    Mezzomo, Bélin Poletto; Miranda-Vilela, Ana Luisa; Barbosa, Lilian Carla Pereira; Albernaz, Vanessa Lima; Grisolia, Cesar Koppe

    2016-08-01

    Bacillus thuringiensis (Bt) has been widely used in foliar sprays as part of integrated pest management strategies against insect pests of agricultural crops. Since the advent of genetically modified plants expressing Bt δ-endotoxins, the bioavailability of Cry proteins has increased, and therefore for biosafety reasons their adverse effects should be studied, mainly for nontarget organisms. We evaluated, in Swiss mice, the hematotoxicity and genotoxicity of the genetically modified strains of Bt spore crystals Cry1Aa, 1Ab, 1Ac, or 2Aa at 27 mg/kg, and Cry1Aa, 1Ab and 2Aa also at 136 and 270 mg/kg, administered with a single intraperitoneal injection 24 h before euthanasia. Controls received filtered water or cyclophosphamide. Blood samples collected by cardiac puncture were used to perform hemogram, and bone marrow was extracted for the micronucleus test. Bt spore crystals presented toxicity for lymphocytes when in higher doses, which varied according to the type of spore crystal studied, besides promoting cytotoxic and genotoxic effects for the erythroid lineage of bone marrow, mainly at highest doses. Although the profile of such adverse side effects can be related to their high level of exposure, which is not commonly found in the environment, results indicated that these Bt spore crystals were not harmless to mice. This suggests that a more specific approach should be taken to increase knowledge about their toxicological properties and to establish the toxicological risks to nontarget organisms. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. Environ Toxicol 31: 970-978, 2016.

  5. Prenatal diagnosis of cri du chat (5p-) syndrome in association with isolated moderate bilateral ventriculomegaly.

    PubMed

    Stefanou, E-G G; Hanna, G; Foakes, A; Crocker, M; Fitchett, M

    2002-01-01

    A case of prenatally detected cri du chat syndrome (5p-) is reported. Amniocentesis was performed following an abnormal ultrasound finding of isolated moderate bilateral ventriculomegaly. The karyotype showed a terminal deletion of the short arm of chromosome 5 including the critical region 5p15 for cri du chat syndrome. This was confirmed by fluorescence in situ hybridisation (FISH). Isolated mild ventriculomegaly may be a non-specific marker for cri du chat syndrome.

  6. Self-reported inability to cry as a symptom of anhedonic depression in outpatients with a major depressive disorder.

    PubMed

    Steer, Robert A

    2011-06-01

    To ascertain whether self-reported inability to cry would be associated with symptoms of anhedonic depression, the 21-item Beck Depression Inventory-II was administered to 1,050 outpatients diagnosed with a DSM-IV-TR major depressive disorder. 219 (21%) patients reported on the BDI-II Crying item that they were unable to cry, and 831 (79%) patients reported they were able to cry. Only BDI-II Loss of Interest was significantly associated with the inability to cry after the other BDI-II symptoms were controlled for using a multiple logistic-regression analysis. The inability to cry was discussed as an indicator of anhedonic depression.

  7. Sequestration and Transfer of Cry Entomotoxin to the Eggs of a Predaceous Ladybird Beetle

    PubMed Central

    Paula, Débora P.; Souza, Lucas M.; Andow, David A.

    2015-01-01

    In the past 10 years, sequestration of Cry toxins and transfer to offspring has been indicated in three insect species in laboratory studies. This work directly demonstrates the sequestration and intergenerational transfer of Cry1F by the parents of the aphidophagous coccinellid predator, Harmonia axyridis, to its offspring. Recently emerged adults (10 individual couples/cage/treatment) were exposed during 20 days to aphids (100 Myzus persicae each day) that fed on a holidic diet containing 20 μg/mL Cry1F (and a control-group). Egg batches and neonate larvae were monitored daily, and counted and weighed for immunodetection of Cry1F by ELISA. At the end of the bioassay, the parents were weighed and analyzed by ELISA. Cry1F was detected in the offspring, both eggs and neonate larvae, of exposed H. axyridis adults. On average the neonate larvae had 60% of the Cry1F concentration of the eggs from the same egg batch. The Cry1F concentration in the adults was positively correlated with the concentration in their eggs. These three results provided independent evidence of transfer to offspring. No detrimental effects of Cry1F were observed on the age of first reproduction, total number of eggs laid per female, age-specific fecundity, egg development time, hatching rate, or fertility rate. The occurrence and generality of intergenerational transfer of Cry toxins should be investigated in the field to determine its potential ecological implications. PMID:26661738

  8. CONSOL`s perspective on CCT deployment

    SciTech Connect

    Burke, F.P.; Statnick, R.M.

    1997-12-31

    The principal focus of government investment in Clean Coal Technology must be to serve the interests of the US energy consumer. Because of its security of supply and low cost, coal will continue to be the fuel of choice in the existing domestic electricity generating market. The ability of coal to compete for new generating capacity will depend largely on natural gas prices and the efficiency of coal and gas-fired generating options. Furthermore, potential environmental regulations, coupled with utility deregulation, create a climate of economic uncertainty that may limit future investment decisions favorable to coal. Therefore, the federal government, through programs such as CCT, should promote the development of greenfield and retrofit coal use technology that improves generating efficiency and meets environmental requirements for the domestic electric market.

  9. Transformation and Evaluation of Cry1Ac+Cry2A and GTGene in Gossypium hirsutum L.

    PubMed Central

    Puspito, Agung N.; Rao, Abdul Q.; Hafeez, Muhammad N.; Iqbal, Muhammad S.; Bajwa, Kamran S.; Ali, Qurban; Rashid, Bushra; Abbas, Muhammad A.; Latif, Ayesha; Shahid, Ahmad A.; Nasir, Idrees A.; Husnain, Tayyab

    2015-01-01

    More than 50 countries around the globe cultivate cotton on a large scale. It is a major cash crop of Pakistan and is considered “white gold” because it is highly important to the economy of Pakistan. In addition to its importance, cotton cultivation faces several problems, such as insect pests, weeds, and viruses. In the past, insects have been controlled by insecticides, but this method caused a severe loss to the economy. However, conventional breeding methods have provided considerable breakthroughs in the improvement of cotton, but it also has several limitations. In comparison with conventional methods, biotechnology has the potential to create genetically modified plants that are environmentally safe and economically viable. In this study, a local cotton variety VH 289 was transformed with two Bt genes (Cry1Ac and Cry2A) and a herbicide resistant gene (cp4 EPSPS) using the Agrobacterium mediated transformation method. The constitutive CaMV 35S promoter was attached to the genes taken from Bacillus thuringiensis (Bt) and to an herbicide resistant gene during cloning, and this promoter was used for the expression of the genes in cotton plants. This construct was used to develop the Glyphosate Tolerance Gene (GTGene) for herbicide tolerance and insecticidal gene (Cry1Ac and Cry2A) for insect tolerance in the cotton variety VH 289. The transgenic cotton variety performed 85% better compared with the non-transgenic variety. The study results suggest that farmers should use the transgenic cotton variety for general cultivation to improve the production of cotton. PMID:26617613

  10. Development of dipsticks for simultaneous detection of vip3A and cry1Ab/cry1Ac transgenic proteins.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Rajesh

    2012-01-01

    The number of genetically modified (GM) crops being cultivated and its produce reaching market is increasing every year. The transgenes (vip3A, cry1Ab, and cry1Ac) from Bacillus thuringiensis are being used by plant breeders, apart from other transgenes for developing insect pest-resistant GM crops. It is therefore necessary to develop an easy, rapid, and reliable detection assay to discriminate GM crops and non-GM crops. Dipstick strips using colloidal gold-labeled polyclonal antibodies were developed for simultaneous detection of Vip3A and Cry1Ab/CrylAc proteins. The assay was essentially based on the sandwich format of immunoassay, which was completed within 10 min, and the results were evaluated visually. The detection limits were 50 ng/mL (50 ppb) for both CrylAc and CrylAb proteins, and 100 ng/mL (100 ppb) for Vip3A protein. The developed dipsticks are suitable for on-site simultaneous screening of GM crops bearing two proteins, which, in turn, reduce cost and time of the assay.

  11. In-Silico Determination of Insecticidal Potential of Vip3Aa-Cry1Ac Fusion Protein Against Lepidopteran Targets Using Molecular Docking.

    PubMed

    Ahmad, Aftab; Javed, Muhammad R; Rao, Abdul Q; Khan, Muhammad A U; Ahad, Ammara; Din, Salah Ud; Shahid, Ahmad A; Husnain, Tayyab

    2015-01-01

    Study and research of Bt (Bacillus thuringiensis) transgenic plants have opened new ways to combat insect pests. Over the decades, however, insect pests, especially the Lepidopteran, have developed tolerance against Bt delta-endotoxins. Such issues can be addressed through the development of novel toxins with greater toxicity and affinity against a broad range of insect receptors. In this computational study, functional domains of Bacillus thuringiensis crystal delta-endotoxin (Cry1Ac) insecticidal protein and vegetative insecticidal protein (Vip3Aa) have been fused to develop a broad-range Vip3Aa-Cry1Ac fusion protein. Cry1Ac and Vip3Aa are non-homologous insecticidal proteins possessing receptors against different targets within the midgut of insects. The insecticidal proteins were fused to broaden the insecticidal activity. Molecular docking analysis of the fusion protein against aminopeptidase-N (APN) and cadherin receptors of five Lepidopteran insects (Agrotis ipsilon, Helicoverpa armigera, Pectinophora gossypiella, Spodoptera exigua, and Spodoptera litura) revealed that the Ser290, Ser293, Leu337, Thr340, and Arg437 residues of the fusion protein are involved in the interaction with insect receptors. The Helicoverpa armigera cadherin receptor, however, showed no interaction, which might be due to either loss or burial of interactive residues inside the fusion protein. These findings revealed that the Vip3Aa-Cry1Ac fusion protein has a strong affinity against Lepidopteran insect receptors and hence has a potential to be an efficient broad-range insecticidal protein.

  12. In-Silico Determination of Insecticidal Potential of Vip3Aa-Cry1Ac Fusion Protein Against Lepidopteran Targets Using Molecular Docking

    PubMed Central

    Ahmad, Aftab; Javed, Muhammad R.; Rao, Abdul Q.; Khan, Muhammad A. U.; Ahad, Ammara; Din, Salah ud; Shahid, Ahmad A.; Husnain, Tayyab

    2015-01-01

    Study and research of Bt (Bacillus thuringiensis) transgenic plants have opened new ways to combat insect pests. Over the decades, however, insect pests, especially the Lepidopteran, have developed tolerance against Bt delta-endotoxins. Such issues can be addressed through the development of novel toxins with greater toxicity and affinity against a broad range of insect receptors. In this computational study, functional domains of Bacillus thuringiensis crystal delta-endotoxin (Cry1Ac) insecticidal protein and vegetative insecticidal protein (Vip3Aa) have been fused to develop a broad-range Vip3Aa-Cry1Ac fusion protein. Cry1Ac and Vip3Aa are non-homologous insecticidal proteins possessing receptors against different targets within the midgut of insects. The insecticidal proteins were fused to broaden the insecticidal activity. Molecular docking analysis of the fusion protein against aminopeptidase-N (APN) and cadherin receptors of five Lepidopteran insects (Agrotis ipsilon, Helicoverpa armigera, Pectinophora gossypiella, Spodoptera exigua, and Spodoptera litura) revealed that the Ser290, Ser293, Leu337, Thr340, and Arg437 residues of the fusion protein are involved in the interaction with insect receptors. The Helicoverpa armigera cadherin receptor, however, showed no interaction, which might be due to either loss or burial of interactive residues inside the fusion protein. These findings revealed that the Vip3Aa-Cry1Ac fusion protein has a strong affinity against Lepidopteran insect receptors and hence has a potential to be an efficient broad-range insecticidal protein. PMID:26697037

  13. The protoxin Cry1Ac of Bacillus thuringiensis improves the protection conferred by intranasal immunization with Brucella abortus RB51 in a mouse model.

    PubMed

    González-González, Edith; García-Hernández, Ana Lilia; Flores-Mejía, Raúl; López-Santiago, Rubén; Moreno-Fierros, Leticia

    2015-02-25

    Brucellosis is a zoonotic disease affecting many people and animals worldwide. Preventing this infection requires improving vaccination strategies. The protoxin Cry1Ac of Bacillus thuringiensis is an adjuvant that, in addition to increasing the immunogenicity of different antigens, has shown to be protective in different models of parasitic infections. The objective of the present study was to test whether the intranasal co-administration of pCry1Ac with the RB51 vaccine strain of Brucella abortus confers protection against an intranasal challenge with the virulent strain B. abortus 2308 in BALB/c mice. The results showed that co-administration of pCry1Ac and RB51, increased the immunoprotection conferred by the vaccine as evidenced by the following: (1) decrease of the splenic bacterial load when challenged intranasally with the virulent strain; (2) greater in vivo cytotoxic activity in response to the transference of previously infected cells; (3) further proliferation of cytotoxic TCD8+ cells in response to stimulation with heat-inactivated bacteria; (4) increased production of TNF-α and IFN-γ; and (5) significant IgG2a response. These results indicate that the use of the Cry1Ac protein as a mucosal adjuvant via the intranasal route can be a promising alternative for improving current RB51 vaccine against brucellosis.

  14. Ingestion of Bt corn pollen containing Cry1Ab/2Aj or Cry1Ac does not harm Propylea japonica larvae

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Yanmin; Liu, Qingsong; Wang, Yanan; Chen, Xiuping; Song, Xinyuan; Romeis, Jörg; Li, Yunhe; Peng, Yufa

    2016-01-01

    Propylea japonica (Thunberg) (Coleoptera: Coccinellidae) is a prevalent pollen consumer in corn fields and is therefore exposed to insecticidal proteins contained in the pollen of insect-resistant transgenic corn cultivars expressing Cry proteins derived from Bacillus thuringiensis (Bt). In the present study, the potential effect of Cry1Ab/2Aj- or Cry1Ac-containing transgenic Bt corn pollen on the fitness of P. japonica larvae was evaluated. The results show that the larval developmental time was significantly shorter when P. japonica larvae were fed pollen from Bt corn cultivars rather than control pollen but that pupation rate, eclosion rate, and adult fresh weight were not significantly affected. In the feeding experiments, the stability of the Cry proteins in the food sources was confirmed. When Bt corn pollen passed through the gut of P. japonica, 23% of Cry1Ab/2Aj was digested. The results demonstrate that consumption of Bt corn pollen containing Cry1Ab/2Aj or Cry1Ac has no detrimental effect on P. japonica larvae; the shortened developmental time of larvae that consumed these proteins was likely attributable to unknown differences in the nutritional composition between the Bt-transgenic and control corn pollen. PMID:27005950

  15. Ingestion of Bt corn pollen containing Cry1Ab/2Aj or Cry1Ac does not harm Propylea japonica larvae.

    PubMed

    Liu, Yanmin; Liu, Qingsong; Wang, Yanan; Chen, Xiuping; Song, Xinyuan; Romeis, Jörg; Li, Yunhe; Peng, Yufa

    2016-03-23

    Propylea japonica (Thunberg) (Coleoptera: Coccinellidae) is a prevalent pollen consumer in corn fields and is therefore exposed to insecticidal proteins contained in the pollen of insect-resistant transgenic corn cultivars expressing Cry proteins derived from Bacillus thuringiensis (Bt). In the present study, the potential effect of Cry1Ab/2Aj- or Cry1Ac-containing transgenic Bt corn pollen on the fitness of P. japonica larvae was evaluated. The results show that the larval developmental time was significantly shorter when P. japonica larvae were fed pollen from Bt corn cultivars rather than control pollen but that pupation rate, eclosion rate, and adult fresh weight were not significantly affected. In the feeding experiments, the stability of the Cry proteins in the food sources was confirmed. When Bt corn pollen passed through the gut of P. japonica, 23% of Cry1Ab/2Aj was digested. The results demonstrate that consumption of Bt corn pollen containing Cry1Ab/2Aj or Cry1Ac has no detrimental effect on P. japonica larvae; the shortened developmental time of larvae that consumed these proteins was likely attributable to unknown differences in the nutritional composition between the Bt-transgenic and control corn pollen.

  16. Resistance of Trichoplusia ni Populations Selected by Bacillus thuringiensis Sprays to Cotton Plants Expressing Pyramided Bacillus thuringiensis Toxins Cry1Ac and Cry2Ab

    PubMed Central

    Kain, Wendy; Song, Xiaozhao; Janmaat, Alida F.; Zhao, Jian-Zhou; Myers, Judith; Shelton, Anthony M.

    2014-01-01

    Two populations of Trichoplusia ni that had developed resistance to Bacillus thuringiensis sprays (Bt sprays) in commercial greenhouse vegetable production were tested for resistance to Bt cotton (BollGard II) plants expressing pyramided Cry1Ac and Cry2Ab. The T. ni colonies resistant to Bacillus thuringiensis serovar kurstaki formulations were not only resistant to the Bt toxin Cry1Ac, as previously reported, but also had a high frequency of Cry2Ab-resistant alleles, exhibiting ca. 20% survival on BollGard II foliage. BollGard II-resistant T. ni strains were established by selection with BollGard II foliage to further remove Cry2Ab-sensitive alleles in the T. ni populations. The BollGard II-resistant strains showed incomplete resistance to BollGard II, with adjusted survival values of 0.50 to 0.78 after 7 days. The resistance to the dual-toxin cotton plants was conferred by two genetically independent resistance mechanisms: one to Cry1Ac and one to Cry2Ab. The 50% lethal concentration of Cry2Ab for the resistant strain was at least 1,467-fold that for the susceptible T. ni strain. The resistance to Cry2Ab in resistant T. ni was an autosomally inherited, incompletely recessive monogenic trait. Results from this study indicate that insect populations under selection by Bt sprays in agriculture can be resistant to multiple Bt toxins and may potentially confer resistance to multitoxin Bt crops. PMID:25480752

  17. Response to Infant Cry in Clinically Depressed and Non-Depressed Mothers

    PubMed Central

    Manian, Nanmathi; Truzzi, Anna; Bornstein, Marc H.

    2017-01-01

    Background Bowlby and Ainsworth hypothesized that maternal responsiveness is displayed in the context of infant distress. Depressed mothers are less responsive to infant distress vocalizations (cry) than non-depressed mothers. The present study focuses on acoustical components of infant cry that give rise to responsive caregiving in clinically depressed (n = 30) compared with non-depressed mothers (n = 30) in the natural setting of the home. Methods Analyses of infant and mother behaviors followed three paths: (1) tests of group differences in acoustic characteristics of infant cry, (2) tests of group differences of mothers’ behaviors during their infant’s crying, and (3) tree-based modeling to ascertain which variable(s) best predict maternal behaviors during infant cry. Results (1) Infants of depressed mothers cried as frequently and for equal durations as infants of non-depressed mothers; however, infants of depressed mothers cried with a higher fundamental frequency (f0) and in a more restricted range of f0. (2) Depressed mothers fed, rocked, and touched their crying infants less than non-depressed mothers, and depressed mothers were less responsive to their infants overall. (3) Novel tree-based analyses confirmed that depressed mothers engaged in less caregiving during their infants’ cry and indicated that depressed mothers responded only to cries at higher f0s and shorter durations. Older non-depressed mothers were the most interactive with infants. Conclusions Clinical depression affects maternal responsiveness during infant cry, leading to patterns of action that appear poorly attuned to infant needs. PMID:28046020

  18. Breastfeeding, Brain Activation to Own Infant Cry, and Maternal Sensitivity

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kim, Pilyoung; Feldman, Ruth; Mayes, Linda C.; Eicher, Virginia; Thompson, Nancy; Leckman, James F.; Swain, James E.

    2011-01-01

    Background: Research points to the importance of breastfeeding for promoting close mother-infant contact and social-emotional development. Recent functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) studies have identified brain regions related to maternal behaviors. However, little research has addressed the neurobiological mechanisms underlying the…

  19. Impact of the Bt corn proteins Cry34/35Ab1 and Cry3Bb1, alone or pyramided, on western corn rootworm (Coleoptera: Chrysomelidae) beetle emergence in the field

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Western corn rootworm, Diabrotica virgifera virgifera LeConte, is a major pest of corn, Zea mays L. This study compared the effect of the Bt proteins Cry34/35Ab1, Cry3Bb1, singly expressed, and Cry3Bb1 plus Cry34/35Ab1 in a pyramid, with a near-isoline control, on D. virgifera adult emergence in fie...

  20. Prevalence of cry2-type genes in Bacillus thuringiensis isolates recovered from diverse habitats in India and isolation of a novel cry2Af2 gene toxic to Helicoverpa armigera (cotton boll worm).

    PubMed

    Katara, Jawahar Lal; Kaur, Sarvjeet; Kumari, Gouthami Krishna; Singh, Nagendra Kumar

    2016-12-01

    Insecticidal cry and vip genes from Bacillus thuringiensis (Bt) have been used for control of lepidopteran insects in transgenic crops. However, novel genes are required for gene pyramiding to delay evolution of resistance to the currently deployed genes. Two PCR-based techniques were employed for screening of cry2-type genes in 129 Bt isolates from diverse habitats in India and 27 known Bt strains. cry2Ab-type genes were more prevalent than cry2Aa- and cry2Ac-type genes. Correlation between source of isolates and abundance of cry2-type genes was not observed. Full-length cry2A-type genes were amplified by PCR from 9 Bt isolates and 4 Bt strains. The genes from Bt isolates SK-758 from Sorghum grain dust and SK-793 from Chilli seeds warehouse, Andhra Pradesh, were cloned and sequenced. The gene from SK-758 (NCBI GenBank accession No. GQ866915) was novel, while that from SK-793 (NCBI GenBank accession No. GQ866914) was identical to the cry2Ab1 gene. The Bacillus thuringiensis Nomenclature Committee ( http://www.lifesci.sussex.ac.uk/home/Neil_Crickmore/Bt/toxins2.html ) named these genes cry2Af2 and cry2Ab16, respectively. The cry2Af2 gene was expressed in Escherichia coli and found to be toxic towards Helicoverpa armigera. The cry2Af2 gene will be useful for pyramiding in transgenic crops.

  1. Synergistic activity of Bacillus thuringiensis toxins against Simulium spp. larvae.

    PubMed

    Monnerat, Rose; Pereira, Eleny; Teles, Beatriz; Martins, Erica; Praça, Lilian; Queiroz, Paulo; Soberon, Mario; Bravo, Alejandra; Ramos, Felipe; Soares, Carlos Marcelo

    2014-09-01

    Species of Simulium spread diseases in humans and animals such as onchocerciasis and mansonelosis, causing health problems and economic loses. One alternative for controlling these insects is the use of Bacillus thuringiensis serovar israelensis (Bti). This bacterium produces different dipteran-active Cry and Cyt toxins and has been widely used in blackfly biological control programs worldwide. Studies on other insect targets have revealed the role of individual Cry and Cyt proteins in toxicity and demonstrated a synergistic effect among them. However, the insecticidal activity and interactions of these proteins against Simulium larvae have not been reported. In this study we demonstrate that Cry4Ba is the most effective toxin followed by Cry4Aa and Cry11Aa. Cry10Aa and Cyt1Aa were not toxic when administered alone but both were able to synergise the activity of Cry4B and Cry11Aa toxins. Cyt1Aa is also able to synergise with Cry4Aa. The mixture of all toxin-producing strains showed the greatest level of synergism, but still lower than the Bti parental strain.

  2. Topical ocular treatment with monoclonal antibody Fab fragments targeting Japanese cedar pollen Cry j 1 inhibits Japanese cedar pollen-induced allergic conjunctivitis in mice.

    PubMed

    Mizutani, Nobuaki; Nabe, Takeshi; Yoshino, Shin

    2017-03-05

    Fab fragments (Fabs) of antibodies having the ability only to bind to specific allergens lack effector functions due to the absence of the Fc portion. In the present study, we examined whether IgG1 monoclonal antibody (mAb) Fabs targeting Japanese cedar pollen (JCP) Cry j 1 were able to regulate JCP-induced allergic conjunctivitis in mice. BALB/c mice actively sensitized with JCP were repeatedly challenged by topical administration of JCP eye drops. Fabs prepared by the digestion of anti-JCP IgG1 mAbs (P1-3 and P1-8) with papain were applied to the eye 15min before the JCP challenges followed by measurement of the clinical conjunctivitis score. In the in vitro experiments, P1-3 and P1-8 showed specific binding to JCP Cry j 1. Furthermore, intact P1-3 binding to Cry j 1 was inhibited by P1-3 Fabs, but not P1-8 Fabs; additionally, P1-8 Fabs, but not P1-3 Fabs, suppressed the intact P1-8 binding, suggesting that the epitopes of Cry j 1 recognized by P1-3 and P1-8 were different. Topical ocular treatment with P1-3 Fabs or P1-8 Fabs was followed by marked suppression of JCP-induced conjunctivitis (P<0.01). In histological evaluation, P1-8 Fabs showed a reduction in eosinophil infiltration in the conjunctiva (P<0.01). These results demonstrated that topical ocular treatment with IgG1 mAb Fabs to Cry j 1 was effective in suppressing JCP-induced allergic conjunctivitis in mice. Furthermore, it suggests the possibility that some epitopes recognized by Fabs could be used as a tool to regulate allergic conjunctivitis.

  3. Parental selection of vocal behavior : Crying, cooing, babbling, and the evolution of language.

    PubMed

    Locke, John L

    2006-06-01

    Although all natural languages are spoken, there is no accepted account of the evolution of a skill prerequisite to language-control of the movements of speech. If selection applied at sexual maturity, individuals achieving some command of articulate vocal behavior in previous stages would have enjoyed unusual advantages in adulthood. I offer a parental selection hypothesis, according to which hominin parents apportioned care, in part, on the basis of their infants' vocal behavior. Specifically, it is suggested that persistent or noxious crying reduced care to individuals who would have had difficulty learning complex behaviors, and that cooing and babbling increased social interaction and care as well as control over complex oralmotor activity of the sort required by spoken language. Several different tests of the hypothesis are suggested.

  4. Novel strategy for protein production using a peptide tag derived from Bacillus thuringiensis Cry4Aa.

    PubMed

    Hayakawa, Tohru; Sato, Shinya; Iwamoto, Shigehisa; Sudo, Shigeo; Sakamoto, Yoshiki; Yamashita, Takaaki; Uchida, Motoaki; Matsushima, Kenji; Kashino, Yohko; Sakai, Hiroshi

    2010-07-01

    Numerous proteins cannot be sufficiently prepared by ordinary recombinant DNA techniques because they are unstable or have deleterious effects on the host cell. One idea to prepare such proteins is to produce them as protein inclusions. Here we developed a novel system to effectively prepare proteins by using peptide tags derived from the insecticidal Cry toxin of a soil bacterium, Bacillus thuringiensis. Fusion with this peptide tag, designated 4AaCter, facilitates the formation of protein inclusions of glutathione S-transferase in Escherichia coli without losing the enzyme activity. Application of 4AaCter to the production of syphilis antigens TpN15, TpN17 and TpN47 from Treponema pallidum yielded excellent results, including a dramatic increase in the production level, simplification of the product purification and high reactivity with syphilis antibody. The use of 4AaCter may provide an innovational strategy for the efficient production of proteins.

  5. Prevalence of Autism Spectrum Phenomenology in Cornelia de Lange and Cri du Chat Syndromes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Moss, Joanna F.; Oliver, Chris; Berg, Katy; Kaur, Gurmeash; Jephcott, Lesley; Cornish, Kim

    2008-01-01

    Autism spectrum disorder characteristics have not been evaluated in Cornelia de Lange and Cri du Chat syndromes using robust assessments. The Autism Diagnostic Observation Schedule and Social Communication Questionnaire were administered to 34 participants with Cornelia de Lange syndrome and a comparison group of 23 participants with Cri du Chat…

  6. A yeast artificial chromosome contig of the critical region for cri-du-chat syndrome.

    PubMed

    Goodart, S A; Simmons, A D; Grady, D; Rojas, K; Moyzis, R K; Lovett, M; Overhauser, J

    1994-11-01

    Cri-du-chat is a chromosomal deletion syndrome characterized by partial deletion of the short arm of chromosome 5. The clinical symptoms include growth and mental retardation, microcephaly, hypertelorism, epicanthal folds, hypotonia, and a high-pitched monochromatic cry that is usually considered diagnostic for the syndrome. Recently, a correlation between clinical features and the extent of the chromosome 5 deletions has identified two regions of the short arm that appear to be critical for the abnormal development manifested in this syndrome. Loss of a small region in 5p15.2 correlates with all of the clinical features of cri-du-chat with the exception of the cat-like cry, which maps to 5p15.3. Here we report the construction of a YAC contig that spans the chromosomal region in 5p15.2 that plays a major role in the etiology of the cri-du-chat syndrome. YACs that span the 2-Mb cri-du-chat critical region have been identified and characterized. This YAC contig lays the groundwork for the construction of a transcriptional map of this region and the eventual identification of genes involved in the clinical features associated with the cri-du-chat syndrome. It also provides a new diagnostic tool for cri-du-chat in the shape of a YAC clone that may span the entire critical region.

  7. Prenatal Maternal Reactivity to Infant Cries Predicts Postnatal Perceptions of Infant Temperament and Marriage Appraisal.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pedersen, Frank A.; And Others

    1996-01-01

    Examined cardiac response and ratings of subjective aversiveness to recordings of unfamiliar infant cries in 60 primiparous women at 32 weeks' gestation. Mothers who prenatally rated the crying recordings as more aversive postnatally described their infants as more fussy and unpredictable. Women who showed greater cardiac acceleration to the cries…

  8. A yeast artificial chromosome contig of the critical region for cri-du-chat syndrome

    SciTech Connect

    Goodart, S.A.; Rojas, K.; Overhauser, J.

    1994-11-01

    Cri-du-chat is a chromosomal deletion syndrome characterized by partial deletion of the short arm of chromosome 5. The clinical symptoms include growth and mental retardation, microcephaly, hypertelorism, epicanthal folds, hyptonia, and a high-pitched monochromatic cry that is usually considered diagnostic for the syndrome. Recently, a correlation between clinical features and the extent of the chromosome 5 deletions has identified two regions of the short arm that appear to be critical for the abnormal development manifested in this syndrome. Loss of a small region in 5p15.2 correlates with all of the clinical features of cri-du-chat with the exception of the cat-like cry, which maps to 5p15.3. Here the authors report the construction of a YAC contig that spans the chromosomal region in 5p15.2 that plays a major role in the etiology of the cri-du-chat syndrome. YACs that span the 2-Mb cri-du-chat critical region have been identified and characterized. This YAC contig lays the groundwork for the construction of a transcriptional map of this region and the eventual identification of genes involved in the clinical features associated with the cri-du-chat syndrome. It also provides a new diagnostic tool for cri-du-chat in the shape of a YAC clone that may span the entire critical region. 24 refs., 4 figs., 2 tabs.

  9. A Preliminary Report: An Analysis of Some Types of a Baby's Cries

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rosenhouse, Judith

    1977-01-01

    A classification and description of cry types stimulated by different internal sources--hunger, pain, illness and alarm. Various features of each type were distinguished by spectrographic analysis. Pain cries seemed to be the basic type from which other types evolve. Comparisons with other studies were made. (AMH)

  10. Parental Responses to Infant Crying: The Influence of Child Physical Abuse Risk and Hostile Priming

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Crouch, Julie L.; Skowronski, John J.; Milner, Joel S.; Harris, Benjamin

    2008-01-01

    Objective: Managing a crying infant is a challenge universally faced by new parents. This study examined whether parental interpretations, feelings, and behaviors following exposure to a 2-minute videotaped segment of a crying infant varied as a function of child physical abuse (CPA) risk and exposure to cues of hostility (i.e., hostile priming).…

  11. Energy distribution in the spectrograms of the cries of normal and birth asphyxiated infants.

    PubMed

    Pearce, S; Taylor, B

    1993-08-01

    This paper describes the distribution of energy and energy variance with frequency in the cries of normal and birth asphyxiated infants recorded within eight days of delivery. Single-variable statistical analysis suggested that asphyxiated infants have their cries shifted up in frequency compared to control infants, up to a frequency of 10 kHz.

  12. [Exposure degree of important non-target arthropods to Cry2Aa in Bt rice fields].

    PubMed

    Zhang, Qing-Ling; Li, Yun-He; Hua, Hong-Xia; Yang, Chang-Ju; Wu, Hong-Jin; Peng, Yu-Fa

    2013-06-01

    Based on the principle of "risk = hazard x exposure", the selected representative nontarget organisms in the assessment of the potential effects of insect-resistant genetically modified (GM) crops on non-target arthropods in laboratory are generally the arthropod species highly exposed to the insecticidal proteins expressed by the GM crops in farmland ecosystem. In order to understand the exposure degree of the important arthropod species to Cry proteins in Bt rice fields, and to select the appropriate non-target arthropods in the risk assessment of insect-resistant GM crops, the enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) was conducted to measure the Cry2Aa protein concentration in the arthropods collected from the cry2Aa rice fields at different rice growth stages. The results showed that there was a significant difference in the Cry2Aa content protein concentration in different arthropod species. Some species did not contain Cry2Aa protein, while some species contained larger amounts of Cry2Aa protein. Relative to the arthropods colleted after rice anthesis, the arthropods colleted in rice anthesis contained relative higher concentrations of Cry2Aa protein, especially for the predacious arthropods. No Cry proteins were detected in parasitic arthropods. This study provided references for the laboratory assessment of the effects of GM rice on nontarget arthropods.

  13. Newborn Pain Cries and Vagal Tone: Parallel Changes in Response to Circumcision.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Porter, Fran Lang; And Others

    1988-01-01

    The relation between cry acoustics and vagal tone in normal, healthy newborns undergoing an acutely stressful event was examined. Vagal tone was significantly reduced during the stressful event and was paralleled by significant increases in the pitch of the infants' cries. (PCB)

  14. Atypical cry acoustics in 6-month-old infants at risk for autism spectrum disorder.

    PubMed

    Sheinkopf, Stephen J; Iverson, Jana M; Rinaldi, Melissa L; Lester, Barry M

    2012-10-01

    This study examined differences in acoustic characteristics of infant cries in a sample of babies at risk for autism and a low-risk comparison group. Cry samples derived from vocal recordings of 6-month-old infants at risk for autism spectrum disorder (ASD; n = 21) and low-risk infants (n = 18) were subjected to acoustic analyses using analysis software designed for this purpose. Cries were categorized as either pain-related or non-pain-related based on videotape coding. At-risk infants produced pain-related cries with higher and more variable fundamental frequency (F (0) ) than low-risk infants. At-risk infants later classified with ASD at 36 months had among the highest F (0) values for both types of cries and produced cries that were more poorly phonated than those of nonautistic infants, reflecting cries that were less likely to be produced in a voiced mode. These results provide preliminary evidence that disruptions in cry acoustics may be part of an atypical vocal signature of autism in early life.

  15. Diagnosing Why a Baby Is Crying: The Effect of Caregiving Experience.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Holden, George W.

    Parent ability to diagnose the cause of non-contingent crying in an infant was investigated through use of a new methodological instrument. Problems programmed on a microcomputer presented 25 information units leading to only one correct causal hypothesis about infant crying and 25 information units similarly structured about an adult woman's…

  16. Enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay detection and bioactivity of Cry1Ab protein fragments

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) has emerged as the preferred detection method for Cry proteins in environmental matrices. Concerns exist that ELISAs are capable of detecting fragments of Cry proteins, which may lead to an over-estimation of the concentration of these proteins in the enviro...

  17. Study of Acoustic Features of Newborn Cries that Correlate with the Context

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-11-02

    contexts, are also shown. TABLE III MEAN AND STANDART DESVIATION FROM THE PARAMETERS EXTRACTED FROM CRY OF PAIN CONTEXT Sig F0 F1 F2 F3 Cry 21 486.58 1854...461.64 F0: fundamental frequency (Hz); F1: first formant (Hz); F2: second formant (Hz); F3: third formant (Hz). TABLE IV MEAN AND STANDART DESVIATION

  18. Association between Fatigue and Autistic Symptoms in Children with Cri du Chat Syndrome

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Claro, Anthony; Cornish, Kim; Gruber, Reut

    2011-01-01

    In the current study, the authors examined whether the fatigue level of children diagnosed with cri du chat syndrome was associated with the expression of autistic symptoms. Sixty-nine children with cri du chat syndrome were compared with 47 children with moderate to severe intellectual disabilities who did not differ on intellectual severity.…

  19. Competition of Bacillus thuringiensis Cry1 toxins for midgut binding sites: a basis for the development and management of transgenic tropical maize resistant to several stemborers.

    PubMed

    Rang, Cécile; Bergvingson, David; Bohorova, Natasha; Hoisington, David; Frutos, Roger

    2004-07-01

    Binding and competition of five Bacillus thuringiensis toxins--Cry1Ab, Cry1Ac, Cry1Ba, Cry1Ca, and Cry1Ea--for midgut binding sites from three pests, Spodoptera frugiperda, Diatraea saccharalis, and Diatraea grandiosella, were investigated as part of a strategy to develop tropical transgenic maize resistant to several stemborers. On S. frugiperda, Cry1Ab and Cry1Ac compete for the same binding site; Cry1Ba and Cry1Ca compete for a second binding site. Cry1Ea recognizes a third specific binding site in S. frugiperda and does not compete with any of the other toxins. On D. grandiosella and D. saccharalis, Cry1Ac competes with Cry1Ab and not with Cry1Ba and Cry1Ca. Cry1Ba and Cry1Ca recognize each a specific binding site and do not compete with any of the other four toxins. Cry1Ea does not recognize any binding site on Diatraea species. Combinations of toxins are proposed to develop transgenic maize resistant to the three stemborers while allowing resistance management.

  20. Effect of gamma irradiation on nutritional components and Cry1Ab protein in the transgenic rice with a synthetic cry1Ab gene from Bacillus thuringiensis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Dianxing; Ye, Qingfu; Wang, Zhonghua; Xia, Yingwu

    2004-01-01

    The effects of gamma irradiation on the transgenic rice containing a synthetic cry1Ab gene from Bacillus thuringiensis were investigated. There was almost no difference in the content of the major nutritional components, i.e. crude protein, crude lipid, eight essential amino acids and total ash between the irradiated grains and the non-irradiated transgenic rice. However, the amounts of Cry1Ab protein and apparent amylose in the irradiated transgenic rice were reduced significantly by the doses higher than 200 Gy. In vivo observation showed that Cry1Ab protein contents also decreased in the fresh leaf tissues of survival seedlings after irradiation with 200 Gy or higher doses and showed inhibition of seedling growth. The results indicate that gamma irradiation might improve the quality of transgenic rice due to removal of the toxic Cry1Ab protein.

  1. 40 CFR 174.529 - Bacillus thuringiensis modified Cry1Ab protein as identified under OECD Unique Identifier SYN...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 23 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Bacillus thuringiensis modified Cry1Ab... Tolerance Exemptions § 174.529 Bacillus thuringiensis modified Cry1Ab protein as identified under OECD... Bacillus thuringiensis modified Cry1Ab protein as identified under OECD Unique Identifier SYN-IR67B-1...

  2. 40 CFR 174.502 - Bacillus thuringiensis Cry1A.105 protein; exemption from the requirement of a tolerance.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 23 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Bacillus thuringiensis Cry1A.105...-INCORPORATED PROTECTANTS Tolerances and Tolerance Exemptions § 174.502 Bacillus thuringiensis Cry1A.105 protein; exemption from the requirement of a tolerance. (a) Residues of Bacillus thuringiensis Cry1A.105 protein...

  3. 40 CFR 174.509 - Bacillus thuringiensis Cry3A protein; exemption from the requirement of a tolerance.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 23 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Bacillus thuringiensis Cry3A protein...-INCORPORATED PROTECTANTS Tolerances and Tolerance Exemptions § 174.509 Bacillus thuringiensis Cry3A protein; exemption from the requirement of a tolerance. Residues of Bacillus thuringiensis Cry3A protein are...

  4. 40 CFR 174.509 - Bacillus thuringiensis Cry3A protein; exemption from the requirement of a tolerance.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 24 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Bacillus thuringiensis Cry3A protein...-INCORPORATED PROTECTANTS Tolerances and Tolerance Exemptions § 174.509 Bacillus thuringiensis Cry3A protein; exemption from the requirement of a tolerance. Residues of Bacillus thuringiensis Cry3A protein are...

  5. 40 CFR 174.509 - Bacillus thuringiensis Cry3A protein; exemption from the requirement of a tolerance.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 25 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Bacillus thuringiensis Cry3A protein...-INCORPORATED PROTECTANTS Tolerances and Tolerance Exemptions § 174.509 Bacillus thuringiensis Cry3A protein; exemption from the requirement of a tolerance. Residues of Bacillus thuringiensis Cry3A protein are...

  6. 40 CFR 174.509 - Bacillus thuringiensis Cry3A protein; exemption from the requirement of a tolerance.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 25 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Bacillus thuringiensis Cry3A protein...-INCORPORATED PROTECTANTS Tolerances and Tolerance Exemptions § 174.509 Bacillus thuringiensis Cry3A protein; exemption from the requirement of a tolerance. Residues of Bacillus thuringiensis Cry3A protein are...

  7. 40 CFR 174.509 - Bacillus thuringiensis Cry3A protein; exemption from the requirement of a tolerance.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 24 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Bacillus thuringiensis Cry3A protein...-INCORPORATED PROTECTANTS Tolerances and Tolerance Exemptions § 174.509 Bacillus thuringiensis Cry3A protein; exemption from the requirement of a tolerance. Residues of Bacillus thuringiensis Cry3A protein are...

  8. Frequency of Cry1F Non-Recessive Resistance Alleles in North Carolina Field Populations of Spodoptera frugiperda (Lepidoptera: Noctuidae)

    PubMed Central

    Li, Guoping; Reisig, Dominic; Miao, Jin; Gould, Fred; Huang, Fangneng; Feng, Hongqiang

    2016-01-01

    Fall armyworm, Spodoptera frugiperda (J.E. Smith) (Lepidoptera: Noctuidae), is a target species of transgenic corn (Zea mays L.) that expresses single and pyramided Bacillus thuringiensis (Bt) toxin. In 2014, S. frugiperda were collected from a light trap in North Carolina, and a total of 212 F1/F2 isofemale lines of S. frugiperda were screened for resistance to Bt and non-Bt corn. All of the 212 isolines were susceptible to corn tissue expressing Cry1A.105 + Cry2Ab, Cry1F + Cry1A.105 + Cry2Ab, and Cry1F + Cry1Ab + Vip3Aa20. Growth rate bioassays were performed to isolate non-recessive Bt resistance alleles. Seven individuals out of the 212 isofemale lines carried major non-recessive alleles conferring resistance to Cry1F. A pooled colony was created from the seven individuals. This colony was 151.21 times more resistant to Cry1F than a known-susceptible population and was also resistant to Cry1A.105, but was not resistant to Cry2Ab and Vip3Aa20. The results demonstrate that field populations of S. frugiperda collected from North Carolina are generally susceptible to Cry1F, but that some individuals carry resistant alleles. The data generated in this study can be used as baseline data for resistance monitoring. PMID:27119741

  9. Multilevel assessment of Cry1Ab Bt-maize straw return affecting the earthworm Eisenia fetida.

    PubMed

    Shu, Yinghua; Zhang, Yanyan; Cheng, Miaomiao; Zeng, Huilan; Wang, Jianwu

    2015-10-01

    Non-target effects of two varieties of Bacillus thuringiensis (Bt)-maize straw (5422Bt1 [event Bt11] and 5422CBCL [MON810]) return on the Eisenia fetida were investigated by using multilevel assessments, compared to near-isogenic non-Bt-maize (5422). 5422Bt1 straw return had no deleterious effects on adult earthworms and had significantly positive effects on juveniles over three generations. Negative, no, and positive effects on adults treated with 5422CBCL straw were observed in the 1st, 2nd and 3rd generation, respectively. Negative and positive effects were observed on juveniles produced from the 1st- and 2nd-generation adults treated with 5422CBCL straw, respectively. Glutathione peroxidase activity of earthworms from Bt-maize treatments was significantly higher than that of control on the 90th d. Translationally controlled tumour protein (TCTP) and superoxide dismutase (SOD) genes were down-regulated, while annetocin (ANN) expression was up-regulated in 5422Bt1 treatments. TCTP and SOD genes were up-regulated, while ANN and heat shock protein 70 were down-regulated in E. fetida from 5422CBCL treatments. Enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay revealed that Cry1Ab released from 5422Bt1 and 5422CBCL straw degraded rapidly on the 15th and 30th d and had a slow decline in the rest testing time. Cry1Ab concentrations in the soil, casts and guts of earthworm significantly decreased over the course of the experiment. This study was the first to evaluate generational effects of Bt-maize straw return on earthworms under laboratory conditions. The responses of enzymes activity and genes expression may contribute to better understand above different effects of Bt-maize straw return on earthworms from the 1st generation.

  10. The identification of five novel genes in the cri-du-chat critical region

    SciTech Connect

    Simmons, A.D.; Gallardo, T.D.; Lovett, M.

    1994-09-01

    Cri-du-chat is a contiguous gene syndrome associated with deletions in the short arm of chromosome 5 (chr 5). Chr 5p-specific markers have been used to define two critical regions: a larynx malformation region, located at 5p15.3, and a region responsible for the remaining clinical features of the syndrome, which maps to 5p15.2. Thirty cosmids that map to this latter region have been isolated from the LANL chr 5-specific library using 5 STSs. More recently, we have constructed a YAC contig of the region which encompasses 2-3 Mb. The 30 framework cosmids were used in a direct selection with cDNAs from placenta, activated T-cells and cerebellum to isolate an initial set of expressed sequences from this region. Since no genes, to date, have been isolated or localized within the cri-du-chat deletion, a cosmid containing a control reporter gene (ANX6) was used to monitor enrichment. ANX6 cDNAs were enriched by several thousand-fold in the selected cDNAs. A total of nine non overlapping cDNA fragments were obtained from the cDNA pools. These have been ordered within the YAC contig, map to 5 discrete cosmid sets in the critical region and thus conservatively represent five discrete transcription units. The DNA sequences of these fragments are novel by sequence database comparisons. PCR primers were constructed and were used to confirm gene placements in the YAC contig, as well as to investigate the expression profile of these genes in several different tissues and cell types. In one case, these primer sets enabled two of the nine fragments to be linked into a larger cDNA. The nine cDNAs showed various patterns of differential expression in a panel of tissues. These expressed sequences represent the first genes isolated within the cri-du-chat critical region and represent the initial steps in the derivation of a comprehensive inventory and expression profile of the estimated 100 genes that may reside in this region.

  11. Emotional contagion: dogs and humans show a similar physiological response to human infant crying.

    PubMed

    Yong, Min Hooi; Ruffman, Ted

    2014-10-01

    Humans respond to an infant crying with an increase in cortisol level and heightened alertness, a response interpreted as emotional contagion, a primitive form of empathy. Previous results are mixed when examining whether dogs might respond similarly to human distress. We examined whether domestic dogs, which have a long history of affiliation with humans, show signs of emotional contagion, testing canine (n=75) and human (n=74) responses to one of three auditory stimuli: a human infant crying, a human infant babbling, and computer-generated "white noise", with the latter two stimuli acting as controls. Cortisol levels in both humans and dogs increased significantly from baseline only after listening to crying. In addition, dogs showed a unique behavioral response to crying, combining submissiveness with alertness. These findings suggest that dogs experience emotional contagion in response to human infant crying and provide the first clear evidence of a primitive form of cross-species empathy.

  12. Mtx toxins synergize Bacillus sphaericus and Cry11Aa against susceptible and insecticide-resistant Culex quinquefasciatus larvae.

    PubMed

    Wirth, Margaret C; Yang, Yangkun; Walton, William E; Federici, Brian A; Berry, Colin

    2007-10-01

    Two mosquitocidal toxins (Mtx) of Bacillus sphaericus, which are produced during vegetative growth, were investigated for their potential to increase toxicity and reduce the expression of insecticide resistance through their interactions with other mosquitocidal proteins. Mtx-1 and Mtx-2 were fused with glutathione S-transferase and produced in Escherichia coli, after which lyophilized powders of these fusions were assayed against Culex quinquefasciatus larvae. Both Mtx proteins showed a high level of activity against susceptible C. quinquefasciatus mosquitoes, with 50% lethal concentrations (LC(50)) of Mtx-1 and Mtx-2 of 0.246 and 4.13 microg/ml, respectively. The LC(50)s were 0.406 to 0.430 microg/ml when Mtx-1 or Mtx-2 was mixed with B. sphaericus, and synergy improved activity and reduced resistance levels. When the proteins were combined with a recombinant Bacillus thuringiensis strain that produces Cry11Aa, the mixtures were highly active against Cry11A-resistant larvae and resistance was also reduced. The mixture of two Mtx toxins and B. sphaericus was 10 times more active against susceptible mosquitoes than B. sphaericus alone, demonstrating the influence of relatively low concentrations of these toxins. These results show that, similar to Cyt toxins from B. thuringiensis subsp. israelensis, Mtx toxins can increase the toxicity of other mosquitocidal proteins and may be useful for both increasing the activity of commercial bacterial larvicides and managing potential resistance to these substances among mosquito populations.

  13. Characterization of newborn's cries for the early diagnosis of various diseases

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kheddache, Yasmina

    The use of newborn cry signals in diagnosis is based on many theories proposed lately. The main objective in these researches is the cry signals modeling and spectrographic analysis. It has been shown that the newborn cry acoustics are linked to particular medical conditions. This thesis is motivated by improvement of the accuracy of pathological cries recognition. This can be performed by the combination of several acoustic parameters from spectrographic analysis and parameters that describe the configuration of vocal tract and vocal folds. Acoustic characteristics representing the vocal tract were widely applied to the classification of the cries. However the usefulness of vocal folds characteristics in the automatic recognition, as well as their effective techniques extraction have not been exploited deeply. In this context, we have performed a qualitative characterization of healthy and pathologic newborns cries using characteristics that have been defined in the literature and which describe vocal tract and vocal folds behavior during the cry. This step allowed us to identify the most relevant features in the differentiation of the studied pathological cries. For the extraction of selected characteristics, we have implemented effective measure methods that avoid the overestimation and underestimation of characteristics. The proposed and used approach for characteristics quantification facilitates the automatic analysis of cries and allows efficient use of these features in the diagnostic system. We also conducted experimental tests for the validation of all proposed approaches in this thesis. The results are suitable and show an improvement of the cry-based pathology recognition. The work presented in this thesis is a collection of three articles published/submitted in various journals. Two other papers published in conferences are presented in the annexes.

  14. Lithium effects on circadian rhythms in fibroblasts and suprachiasmatic nucleus slices from Cry knockout mice.

    PubMed

    Noguchi, Takako; Lo, Kevin; Diemer, Tanja; Welsh, David K

    2016-04-21

    Lithium is widely used as a treatment of bipolar disorder, a neuropsychiatric disorder associated with disrupted circadian rhythms. Lithium is known to lengthen period and increase amplitude of circadian rhythms. One possible pathway for these effects involves inhibition of glycogen synthase kinase-3β (GSK-3β), which regulates degradation of CRY2, a canonical clock protein determining circadian period. CRY1 is also known to play important roles in regulating circadian period and phase, although there is no evidence that it is similarly phosphorylated by GSK-3β. In this paper, we tested the hypothesis that lithium affects circadian rhythms through CRYs. We cultured fibroblasts and slices of the suprachiasmatic nucleus (SCN), the master circadian pacemaker of the brain, from Cry1-/-, Cry2-/-, or wild-type (WT) mice bearing the PER2:LUC circadian reporter. Lithium was applied in the culture medium, and circadian rhythms of PER2 expression were measured. In WT and Cry2-/- fibroblasts, 10mM lithium increased PER2 expression and rhythm amplitude but not period, and 1mM lithium did not affect either period or amplitude. In non-rhythmic Cry1-/- fibroblasts, 10mM lithium increased PER2 expression. In SCN slices, 1mM lithium lengthened period ∼1h in all genotypes, but did not affect amplitude except in Cry2-/- SCN. Thus, the amplitude-enhancing effect of lithium in WT fibroblasts was unaffected by Cry2 knockout and occurred in the absence of period-lengthening, whereas the period-lengthening effect of lithium in WT SCN was unaffected by Cry1 or Cry2 knockout and occurred in the absence of rhythm amplification, suggesting that these two effects of lithium on circadian rhythms are independent of CRYs and of each other.

  15. Resistance to Cry Intensive Sleep Intervention in Young Children: Are We Ignoring Children’s Cries or Parental Concerns?

    PubMed Central

    Blunden, Sarah; Etherton, Hayley; Hauck, Yvonne

    2016-01-01

    The majority of behavioural sleep interventions for young children (defined as 5 years of age or less) involve extinction procedures where parents must ignore their child’s cries for a period. Many parents have difficulties implementing and maintaining these procedures, leading to attrition, non-compliance and treatment avoidance. Yet the reasons for these methods being difficult to implement for parents have not been well understood or addressed in the literature. In fact, they are being ignored. We discuss that understanding and addressing parental concerns may enable better targeted sleep interventions. PMID:27417246

  16. This Experiment Cried Out for a Different Interpretation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McSaveney, M. J.; Wang, G.

    2011-12-01

    The results of Niemeijer et al. (2010) are said to highlight the importance of hydrothermal processes in tectonic faulting. Without replicating any experimental condition, and without any hydrothermal process, we obtained identical results in an experiment shearing granulated rock salt in Kyoto University's Ring-Shear Apparatus DPRI-6 (Sassa et al. 2004). We consolidated a 7-kg sample of room-dry granulated rock salt (3.7 mm nominal grain size) at a normal load of 400 kPa for 10 minutes, before shearing it dry at 0.05 m/s for a total distance of 10 m in three about-equal increments (all at 400 kPa). The nominal frictional contact area was 0.188 m2. With onset of shearing, the sample consolidated rapidly, indicating cataclasis. Consolidation slowed exponentially with distance of shear, but never ceased. As the sample sheared for almost 4 m, the apparent friction coefficient dropped from 0.88 to 0.50 and DPRI-6 began to emit a shrill squeal. Shear was stopped, then restarted at the same normal load and shear rate; briefly there was further consolidation (cataclasis) before the same shrill squeal emerged. The apparent friction coefficient dropped to a near-constant but slightly lower value (0.415) than before. At 6.5 m total shear, the apparatus was again stopped. On restarting, there was a briefer period of consolidation and a lower peak strength, before the high-pitched squeal emerged, and a near-constant, but slightly lower friction coefficient (0.387) was obtained. The apparatus was stopped and opened at 10 m displacement. A cataclasite about 15 mm thick was consolidated enough to examine gently in hand specimen. Shear had localised on a small number of smooth, grooved shear surfaces (Y shears), but the sample parted only on what was surmised to be the last active one. There were more Y-shear surfaces than there had been shear episodes. Under SEM magnification, the last Y-shear surface was a layer of tightly packed, uniform-sized (~ 2.4 micron) crystal fragments

  17. A review of 35 cases of asymmetric crying facies.

    PubMed

    Caksen, H; Odabaş, D; Tuncer, O; Kirimi, E; Tombul, T; Ikbal, M; Ataş, B; Ari Yuca, S

    2004-01-01

    A review of 35 cases of asymmetric crying facies: Congenital asymmetric crying facies (ACF) is caused by congenital hypoplasia or agenesis of the depressor anguli oris muscle (DAOM) on one side of the mouth. It is well known that this anomaly is frequently associated with cardiovascular, head and neck, musculoskeletal, respiratory, gastrointestinal, central nervous system, and genitourinary anomalies. In this article we report 35 ACF patients (28 children and 7 adults) and found additional abnormalities in 16 of them (i.e. 45%). The abnormalities were cerebral and cerebellar atrophy, mega-cisterna magna, mental motor retardation, convulsions, corpus callosum dysgenesis, cranial bone defect, dermoid cyst, spina bifida occulta, hypertelorism, micrognatia, retrognatia, hemangioma on the lower lip, short frenulum, cleft palate, low-set ears, preauricular tag, mild facial hypoplasia, sternal cleft, congenital heart defect, renal hypoplasia, vesicoureteral reflux, hypertrophic osteoarthropathy, congenital joint contractures, congenital hip dislocation, polydactyly, and umbilical and inguinal hernia. Besides these, one infant was born to a diabetic mother, and had atrial septal defect and the four other children had 4p deletion, Klinefelter syndrome, isolated CD4 deficiency and Treacher-Collins like facial appearance, respectively Although many of these abnormalities were reported in association with ACF, cerebellar atrophy, sternal cleft, cranial bone defect, infant of diabetic mother, 4p deletion, Klinefelter syndrome, isolated CD4 deficiency and Treacher-Collins like facial appearance were not previously published.

  18. Structural insights into Bacillus thuringiensis Cry, Cyt and parasporin toxins.

    PubMed

    Xu, Chengchen; Wang, Bi-Cheng; Yu, Ziniu; Sun, Ming

    2014-09-16

    Since the first X-ray structure of Cry3Aa was revealed in 1991, numerous structures of B. thuringiensis toxins have been determined and published. In recent years, functional studies on the mode of action and resistance mechanism have been proposed, which notably promoted the developments of biological insecticides and insect-resistant transgenic crops. With the exploration of known pore-forming toxins (PFTs) structures, similarities between PFTs and B. thuringiensis toxins have provided great insights into receptor binding interactions and conformational changes from water-soluble to membrane pore-forming state of B. thuringiensis toxins. This review mainly focuses on the latest discoveries of the toxin working mechanism, with the emphasis on structural related progress. Based on the structural features, B. thuringiensis Cry, Cyt and parasporin toxins could be divided into three categories: three-domain type α-PFTs, Cyt toxin type β-PFTs and aerolysin type β-PFTs. Structures from each group are elucidated and discussed in relation to the latest data, respectively.

  19. Structural Insights into Bacillus thuringiensis Cry, Cyt and Parasporin Toxins

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Chengchen; Wang, Bi-Cheng; Yu, Ziniu; Sun, Ming

    2014-01-01

    Since the first X-ray structure of Cry3Aa was revealed in 1991, numerous structures of B. thuringiensis toxins have been determined and published. In recent years, functional studies on the mode of action and resistance mechanism have been proposed, which notably promoted the developments of biological insecticides and insect-resistant transgenic crops. With the exploration of known pore-forming toxins (PFTs) structures, similarities between PFTs and B. thuringiensis toxins have provided great insights into receptor binding interactions and conformational changes from water-soluble to membrane pore-forming state of B. thuringiensis toxins. This review mainly focuses on the latest discoveries of the toxin working mechanism, with the emphasis on structural related progress. Based on the structural features, B. thuringiensis Cry, Cyt and parasporin toxins could be divided into three categories: three-domain type α-PFTs, Cyt toxin type β-PFTs and aerolysin type β-PFTs. Structures from each group are elucidated and discussed in relation to the latest data, respectively. PMID:25229189

  20. When Cri du chat syndrome meets Edwards syndrome.

    PubMed

    Xie, Yingjun; Zhou, Yi; Wu, Jianzhu; Sun, Yunxia; Chen, Yongzhen; Chen, Baojiang

    2015-03-01

    It has been well established that the 5p deletion causes Cri du chat syndrome, typically characterized by a cat‑like cry, and that duplication of 18q causes Edwards syndrome; the two are rare genetic abnormalities that separately lead to physical and mental impairments. However, the severity of the clinicopathological characteristics that arise when these two aberrations occur in one patient is unknown. Here, the first case in our knowledge of a single patient (a two‑year‑old female) with 5p partial monosomy and 18q partial trisomy is described. In the present study, chromosome microarray analysis was performed, which identified the imbalance of chromosomes 5 and 18 in the patient. The chromosome aberrations were further confirmed by fluorescence in situ hybridization. By comparing the phenotypes of combined case with those of the individual syndromes, severe clinical phenotypes of the 5p (5p15.33‑p13.3) deletion were confirmed, however, the net effect of the duplication of 18q22.3‑q23 was not determined, as this duplication only appeared to have a weak effect on the patient's phenotypes. The correlation between these chromosomal aberrations and their clinical features has implications for the identification of critical regions of 5p and 18q, particularly for the functional mapping of chromosome 18.