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Sample records for activity direction sheet

  1. Electrospinning Directly Synthesized Porous TiO2 Nanofibers Modified by Graphitic Carbon Nitride Sheets for Enhanced Photocatalytic Degradation Activity under Solar Light Irradiation.

    PubMed

    Adhikari, Surya Prasad; Awasthi, Ganesh Prasad; Kim, Han Joo; Park, Chan Hee; Kim, Cheol Sang

    2016-06-21

    We report a direct approach to the fabrication of a composite made of porous TiO2 nanofibers (NFs) and graphitic carbon nitride (g-C3N4) sheets, by means of an angled two-nozzle electrospinning combined with calcination process. Different wt % amounts of g-C3N4 particles in a polymer solution from one nozzle and TiO2 precursors containing the same polymer solution from another nozzle were electrospun and deposited on the collector. Structural characterizations confirm a well-defined morphology of the TiO2/g-C3N4 composite in which the TiO2 NFs are uniformly attached on the g-C3N4 sheet. This proper attachment of TiO2 NFs on the g-C3N4 sheets occurred during calcination. The prepared composites showed the enhanced photocatalytic activity over the photodegradation of rhodamine B and reactive black 5 under natural sunlight. Here, the synergistic effect between the g-C3N4 sheets and the TiO2 NFs having anisotropic properties enhanced the photogenerated electron-hole pair separation and migration, which was confirmed by the measurement of photoluminescence spectra, cyclic voltammograms, and electrochemical impedance spectra. The direct synthesis approach that is established here for such kinds of sheetlike structure and porous NFs composites could provide new insights for the design of high-performance energy conversion catalysts. PMID:27254544

  2. Electrospinning Directly Synthesized Porous TiO2 Nanofibers Modified by Graphitic Carbon Nitride Sheets for Enhanced Photocatalytic Degradation Activity under Solar Light Irradiation.

    PubMed

    Adhikari, Surya Prasad; Awasthi, Ganesh Prasad; Kim, Han Joo; Park, Chan Hee; Kim, Cheol Sang

    2016-06-21

    We report a direct approach to the fabrication of a composite made of porous TiO2 nanofibers (NFs) and graphitic carbon nitride (g-C3N4) sheets, by means of an angled two-nozzle electrospinning combined with calcination process. Different wt % amounts of g-C3N4 particles in a polymer solution from one nozzle and TiO2 precursors containing the same polymer solution from another nozzle were electrospun and deposited on the collector. Structural characterizations confirm a well-defined morphology of the TiO2/g-C3N4 composite in which the TiO2 NFs are uniformly attached on the g-C3N4 sheet. This proper attachment of TiO2 NFs on the g-C3N4 sheets occurred during calcination. The prepared composites showed the enhanced photocatalytic activity over the photodegradation of rhodamine B and reactive black 5 under natural sunlight. Here, the synergistic effect between the g-C3N4 sheets and the TiO2 NFs having anisotropic properties enhanced the photogenerated electron-hole pair separation and migration, which was confirmed by the measurement of photoluminescence spectra, cyclic voltammograms, and electrochemical impedance spectra. The direct synthesis approach that is established here for such kinds of sheetlike structure and porous NFs composites could provide new insights for the design of high-performance energy conversion catalysts.

  3. Activity Sheets. Draft Copy.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Duke Power Company, Educational Services Dept., Charlotte, NC.

    This document consists of energy vocabulary activities, three games, worksheets, laboratory activities/exercises, and an introductory classroom exercise designed to introduce energy concepts to students. Vocabulary activities focus on coal and energy consumption. The three games (with instructions) focus on various aspects of energy and energy…

  4. Ice stream activity scaled to ice sheet volume during Laurentide Ice Sheet deglaciation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stokes, C. R.; Margold, M.; Clark, C. D.; Tarasov, L.

    2016-02-01

    The contribution of the Greenland and West Antarctic ice sheets to sea level has increased in recent decades, largely owing to the thinning and retreat of outlet glaciers and ice streams. This dynamic loss is a serious concern, with some modelling studies suggesting that the collapse of a major ice sheet could be imminent or potentially underway in West Antarctica, but others predicting a more limited response. A major problem is that observations used to initialize and calibrate models typically span only a few decades, and, at the ice-sheet scale, it is unclear how the entire drainage network of ice streams evolves over longer timescales. This represents one of the largest sources of uncertainty when predicting the contributions of ice sheets to sea-level rise. A key question is whether ice streams might increase and sustain rates of mass loss over centuries or millennia, beyond those expected for a given ocean-climate forcing. Here we reconstruct the activity of 117 ice streams that operated at various times during deglaciation of the Laurentide Ice Sheet (from about 22,000 to 7,000 years ago) and show that as they activated and deactivated in different locations, their overall number decreased, they occupied a progressively smaller percentage of the ice sheet perimeter and their total discharge decreased. The underlying geology and topography clearly influenced ice stream activity, but—at the ice-sheet scale—their drainage network adjusted and was linked to changes in ice sheet volume. It is unclear whether these findings can be directly translated to modern ice sheets. However, contrary to the view that sees ice streams as unstable entities that can accelerate ice-sheet deglaciation, we conclude that ice streams exerted progressively less influence on ice sheet mass balance during the retreat of the Laurentide Ice Sheet.

  5. Ice stream activity scaled to ice sheet volume during Laurentide Ice Sheet deglaciation.

    PubMed

    Stokes, C R; Margold, M; Clark, C D; Tarasov, L

    2016-02-18

    The contribution of the Greenland and West Antarctic ice sheets to sea level has increased in recent decades, largely owing to the thinning and retreat of outlet glaciers and ice streams. This dynamic loss is a serious concern, with some modelling studies suggesting that the collapse of a major ice sheet could be imminent or potentially underway in West Antarctica, but others predicting a more limited response. A major problem is that observations used to initialize and calibrate models typically span only a few decades, and, at the ice-sheet scale, it is unclear how the entire drainage network of ice streams evolves over longer timescales. This represents one of the largest sources of uncertainty when predicting the contributions of ice sheets to sea-level rise. A key question is whether ice streams might increase and sustain rates of mass loss over centuries or millennia, beyond those expected for a given ocean-climate forcing. Here we reconstruct the activity of 117 ice streams that operated at various times during deglaciation of the Laurentide Ice Sheet (from about 22,000 to 7,000 years ago) and show that as they activated and deactivated in different locations, their overall number decreased, they occupied a progressively smaller percentage of the ice sheet perimeter and their total discharge decreased. The underlying geology and topography clearly influenced ice stream activity, but--at the ice-sheet scale--their drainage network adjusted and was linked to changes in ice sheet volume. It is unclear whether these findings can be directly translated to modern ice sheets. However, contrary to the view that sees ice streams as unstable entities that can accelerate ice-sheet deglaciation, we conclude that ice streams exerted progressively less influence on ice sheet mass balance during the retreat of the Laurentide Ice Sheet. PMID:26887494

  6. Environmental Education Activity Sheets 1-11.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Halsey, Clifton F.; And Others

    These activity sheets, developed by personnel of the Agricultural Extension Service of the University of Minnesota, were designed for youth group campers but may be used by other populations and individuals. Each activity sheet focuses on a separate topic: (1) Selecting Suitable Uses for Land, (2) Measuring the Steepness of Land, (3) Determining…

  7. Direct observation of warping in the plasma sheet of Saturn

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carbary, J. F.; Mitchell, D. G.; Paranicas, C.; Roelof, E. C.; Krimigis, S. M.

    2008-12-01

    The ENA images from the Ion Neutral CAmera (INCA) on the Cassini spacecraft are projected onto the noon-midnight plane of Sun-Saturn orbital coordinates, and a composite ``image'' of Saturn's plasma sheet is constructed from dawn-side observations of 20-50 keV hydrogens obtained from days 352 to 361 in 2004. The maxima in the intensity contours define the center of the plasma sheet in the noon-midnight plane. This plasma sheet surface displays a distinct bending or ``warping'' above Saturn's equatorial plane at radial distances of beyond ~15 RS on the nightside. On the dayside, the plasma sheet lies close to the equator all the way to the magnetopause. The observed warping agrees with the ``bowl'' model derived from measurements of Saturn's magnetic field, but fits more closely a simple third-order polynomial.

  8. Direct evidence of metallic bands in a monolayer boron sheet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feng, Baojie; Zhang, Jin; Liu, Ro-Ya; Iimori, Takushi; Lian, Chao; Li, Hui; Chen, Lan; Wu, Kehui; Meng, Sheng; Komori, Fumio; Matsuda, Iwao

    2016-07-01

    The search for metallic boron allotropes has attracted great attention in the past decades and recent theoretical works predict the existence of metallicity in monolayer boron. Here, we synthesize the β12-sheet monolayer boron on a Ag(111) surface and confirm the presence of metallic boron-derived bands using angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy. The Fermi surface is composed of one electron pocket at the S ¯ point and a pair of hole pockets near the X ¯ point, which is supported by the first-principles calculations. The metallic boron allotrope in β12 sheet opens the way to novel physics and chemistry in material science.

  9. Active volcanism beneath the West Antarctic ice sheet and implications for ice-sheet stability

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Blankenship, D.D.; Bell, R.E.; Hodge, S.M.; Brozena, J.M.; Behrendt, John C.; Finn, C.A.

    1993-01-01

    IT is widely understood that the collapse of the West Antarctic ice sheet (WAIS) would cause a global sea level rise of 6 m, yet there continues to be considerable debate about the detailed response of this ice sheet to climate change1-3. Because its bed is grounded well below sea level, the stability of the WAIS may depend on geologically controlled conditions at the base which are independent of climate. In particular, heat supplied to the base of the ice sheet could increase basal melting and thereby trigger ice streaming, by providing the water for a lubricating basal layer of till on which ice streams are thought to slide4,5. Ice streams act to protect the reservoir of slowly moving inland ice from exposure to oceanic degradation, thus enhancing ice-sheet stability. Here we present aerogeophysical evidence for active volcanism and associated elevated heat flow beneath the WAIS near the critical region where ice streaming begins. If this heat flow is indeed controlling ice-stream formation, then penetration of ocean waters inland of the thin hot crust of the active portion of the West Antarctic rift system could lead to the disappearance of ice streams, and possibly trigger a collapse of the inland ice reservoir.

  10. Career Orientation 7-8. Student Activity Sheets in Economics.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Flowers, E. L.

    Activity sheets for seventh and eighth grade student use in economics are contained in this document. Activities are developed in the following areas: checking accounts, bank account applications, check writing, keeping a check register, using checks, budgets, insurance, responsibility and planning, consumer shopping, supermarkets, taxes, help…

  11. Features of the Active Evening Plasma Sheet from MMS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moore, T. E.; Chandler, M. O.; Avanov, L. A.; Burch, J. L.; Coffey, V. N.; Ergun, R. E.; Fuselier, S. A.; Gershman, D. J.; Giles, B. L.; Lavraud, B.; MacDonald, E.; Mauk, B.; Mukai, T.; Nakamura, R.; Pollock, C. J.; Russell, C. T.; Saito, Y.; Sauvaud, J. A.; Torbert, R. B.; Yokota, S.

    2015-12-01

    The Magnetospheric Multiscale (MMS) mission, consisting of four identical plasmas and fields observatories, was launched into a 12 RE elliptical equatorial orbit in March 2015 and was in the process of being commissioned through August 2015. During commissioning, the orbit apogee rotated from near midnight through the evening toward the dusk sector and occasionally captured new observations of the plasma sheet, its boundary layers, and the magnetospheric tail lobes. On 22-23 June, an especially active plasma sheet was involved in a major geospace storm that developed a ring current with 200 nT DST. We report on the ion kinetic and flow features of this active plasma sheet, comparing them with familiar observations from earlier missions, as an exercise in validating the MMS observations and assessing their capabilities to provide higher time resolution in multi-point views of thin, fast-moving structures. The observed features include but are not limited to cold lobal wind streams in the lobes, tailward flowing auroral beams and conics, hot earthward field-aligned flows and counter-flows, fast cross-field convection of some flows toward the neutral sheet, and the hot isotropic plasma sheet proper. Relationships between these features, the ionosphere, and the reconnecting magnetotail will be explored and discussed, seeking preliminary conclusions.

  12. Direct imaging charge distribution in reduced graphene oxide sheets induced by isolated charges

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shen, Yue; Wang, Ying; Zhou, Yuan; Shi, Anting; Hu, Jun; Zhang, Yi

    2016-10-01

    In this paper, we directly visualized the charges distributed in one-atom-thick reduced graphene oxide (rGO) sheet induced by adjacent charged rGO using a sample-charged mode scanning polarization force microscopy. We found that electron carriers could be attracted to one side of the rGO sheet and leave holes on the other side. The induced charges were distributed inhomogeneously; that is, contrary to earlier reports, the free carrier concentration was neither distributed on the ends, nor distributed uniformly on the whole rGO sheet. When the surrounding rGO sheets were injected with electrostatic charges, the motion of the charge carriers happened in the target-neutral rGO sheet simultaneously. The charges induced in the rGO sheet by isolated charges on adjacent rGO sheets decayed rapidly with the increasing of their separated distance. In addition, fine control of the distribution of the induced charges in a single rGO sheet could be realized through placing more isolated charges in the surrounding areas. These findings suggest a feasible and precise strategy for the modulation and design of local-charge-sensitive functional graphene-based systems.

  13. Past temperatures directly from the greenland ice sheet

    PubMed

    Dahl-Jensen; Mosegaard; Gundestrup; Clow; Johnsen; Hansen; Balling

    1998-10-01

    A Monte Carlo inverse method has been used on the temperature profiles measured down through the Greenland Ice Core Project (GRIP) borehole, at the summit of the Greenland Ice Sheet, and the Dye 3 borehole 865 kilometers farther south. The result is a 50, 000-year-long temperature history at GRIP and a 7000-year history at Dye 3. The Last Glacial Maximum, the Climatic Optimum, the Medieval Warmth, the Little Ice Age, and a warm period at 1930 A.D. are resolved from the GRIP reconstruction with the amplitudes -23 kelvin, +2.5 kelvin, +1 kelvin, -1 kelvin, and +0.5 kelvin, respectively. The Dye 3 temperature is similar to the GRIP history but has an amplitude 1.5 times larger, indicating higher climatic variability there. The calculated terrestrial heat flow density from the GRIP inversion is 51.3 milliwatts per square meter. PMID:9765146

  14. Kinetic processes in the plasma sheet observed during auroral activity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fillingim, Matthew Owen

    In this dissertation we analyze plasma sheet magnetic field and plasma data observed during varying levels of auroral activity from very small, isolated events known as pseudobreakups to large, global events known as substorms. The plasma and magnetic field data are taken from instruments onboard the WIND spacecraft while it traverses the near-Earth plasma sheet. Simultaneous global auroral images from POLAR/UVI allow us to determine the auroral activity level. The goal of this dissertation is to provide the most complete set of plasma sheet observations during auroral activity currently available. The kinetic aspects of the plasma dynamics which have largely been ingnored in other works are emphasized here. We have the capability to resolve changes in the three dimensional ion distribution functions with a time resolution comparable to or faster than the local ion gyroperiod. In addition, we consider the typically neglected electron dynamics when relating plasma sheet processes to the aurora. We find that the plasma sheet signatures of both pseudobreakups and substorms appear very similar. During both types of events, increases in auroral precipitation into the ionosphere are associated with large amplitude, high frequency magnetic field fluctuations, large Earthward ion < v>, increases in the fluxes of high energy ions and electrons, and hardening of the electron spectrum. Both ion and electron distributions appear to be composed of multiple components. Electromagnetic waves with power at frequencies up to and above the local proton gyrofrequency area also observed. Additionally, the ion distributions can change significantly in one gyroperiod. Together, these results imply that the microphysical processes occurring in the plasma sheet during pseudobreakups and substorms are the same and that kinetic effects are important. Therefore, magnetohydrodynamics (MHD) cannot adequately describe the physics occurring during large ion < v> events.

  15. Experimental Method for Characterizing Electrical Steel Sheets in the Normal Direction

    PubMed Central

    Hihat, Nabil; Lecointe, Jean Philippe; Duchesne, Stephane; Napieralska, Ewa; Belgrand, Thierry

    2010-01-01

    This paper proposes an experimental method to characterise magnetic laminations in the direction normal to the sheet plane. The principle, which is based on a static excitation to avoid planar eddy currents, is explained and specific test benches are proposed. Measurements of the flux density are made with a sensor moving in and out of an air-gap. A simple analytical model is derived in order to determine the permeability in the normal direction. The experimental results for grain oriented steel sheets are presented and a comparison is provided with values obtained from literature. PMID:22163394

  16. EERE-Supported International Activities in Latin America (Fact Sheet)

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    2010-05-01

    The Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) is involved in a variety of international initiatives, partnerships, and events that promote greater understanding and use of renewable energy (RE) and energy efficiency (EE) worldwide. In support of the Energy and Climate Partnership of the Americas (ECPA), EERE is working with several Latin American countries to advance EE and RE deployment for economic growth, energy security, poverty relief, and disaster recovery goals. This fact sheet highlights those activities.

  17. Electric-Field-Assisted Directed Assembly of Transition Metal Dichalcogenide Monolayer Sheets.

    PubMed

    Deng, Donna D; Lin, Zhong; Elías, Ana Laura; Perea-Lopez, Nestor; Li, Jie; Zhou, Chanjing; Zhang, Kehao; Feng, Simin; Terrones, Humberto; Mayer, Jeffrey S; Robinson, Joshua A; Terrones, Mauricio; Mayer, Theresa S

    2016-05-24

    Directed assembly of two-dimensional (2D) layered materials, such as transition metal dichalcogenides, holds great promise for large-scale electronic and optoelectronic applications. Here, we demonstrate controlled placement of solution-suspended monolayer tungsten disulfide (WS2) sheets on a substrate using electric-field-assisted assembly. Micrometer-sized triangular WS2 monolayers are selectively positioned on a lithographically defined interdigitated guiding electrode structure using the dielectrophoretic force induced on the sheets in a nonuniform field. Triangular sheets with sizes comparable to the interelectrode gap assemble with an observed preferential orientation where one side of the triangle spans across the electrode gap. This orientation of the sheets relative to the guiding electrode is confirmed to be the lowest energy configuration using semianalytical calculations. Nearly all sheets assemble without observable physical deformation, and postassembly photoluminescence and Raman spectroscopy characterization of the monolayers reveal that they retain their as-grown crystalline quality. These results show that the field-assisted assembly process may be used for large-area bottom-up integration of 2D monolayer materials for nanodevice applications. PMID:27082162

  18. Direct synthesis of ZnS nanoribbons, micro-sheets and tetrapods.

    PubMed

    Kar, Soumitra; Santra, Swadeshmukul; Chaudhuri, Subhadra

    2008-06-01

    ZnS nano and micro structures such as nanoribbons, large sheets and tetrapod shaped crystals were fabricated by direct thermal evaporation of ZnS powder without using any catalyst. Formation of the one dimensional structures such as nanoribbons and micron order sheets was attributed to the vapor-solid growth mechanism. The formation of octahedron nucleus with cubic crystal structures was proposed as the growth unit of the wurtzite crystal structured tetrapods. Appearance of the periodic stacking faults or twining planes in between alternate cubic and hexagonal crystal structured zones along the growth direction of the ribbons provided secondary growth sites for the octahedron nucleus and subsequent crystal growth resulted in to the formation of the tetrapod arrays. These nano/micro structures of ZnS exhibited a green emission band at room temperature.

  19. A Honeycomb BeN2 Sheet with a Desirable Direct Band Gap and High Carrier Mobility.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Cunzhi; Sun, Qiang

    2016-07-21

    Using global particle-swarm optimization method, we report, for the first time, a BeN2 sheet (h-BeN2) with a graphene-like honeycomb lattice but displaying a direct band gap. Symmetry group analysis indicates that the dipole transition is allowed between the conduction band minimum and the valence band maximum. Although the direct band gap of 2.23 eV is close to that (2.14 eV) of MoS2 sheet, the h-BeN2 sheet has additional advantages: the direct band gap feature of the h-BeN2 sheet is quite insensitive to the layer stacking pattern and layer number, in contrast to the well-known direct-to-indirect band gap transition observed in TMDs and h-BN sheets. When rolled up, all the resulting h-BeN2 nanotubes have direct band gaps independent of chirality and diameter. Furthermore, the intrinsic acoustic-phonon-limited carrier mobility of the h-BeN2 sheet can reach ∼10(5) cm(2) V(-1) s(-1) for electron and ∼10(4) cm(2) V(-1) s(-1) for hole, which are higher than that of MoS2 and black phosphorus. PMID:27338078

  20. Virus activity on the surface of glaciers and ice sheets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bellas, C. M.; Anesio, A. M.; Telling, J.; Stibal, M.; Barker, G.; Tranter, M.; Yallop, M.; Cook, J.

    2012-12-01

    Viruses are found wherever there is life. They are major components of aquatic ecosystems and through interactions with their hosts they significantly alter global biogeochemical cycles and drive evolutionary processes. Here we focus on the interactions between bacteriophages and their hosts inhabiting the microbially dominated supraglacial ecosystems known as cryoconite holes. The diversity of phages present in the sediments of cryoconites was examined for the first time by using a molecular based approach to target the T4-type bacteriophage. Through phylogenetic analysis it was determined that the phage community was diverse, consisting of strains that grouped with those from other global habitats and those that formed several completely new T4-type phage clusters. The activity of the viral community present on glaciers from Svalbard and the Greenland Ice Sheet was also addressed through a series of incubation experiments. Here new virus production was found to be capable of turning over the viral population approximately twice a day, a rate comparable to marine and freshwater sediments around the globe. This large scale viral production was found to be theoretically capable of accounting for all heterotrophic bacterial mortality in cryoconite holes. The mode of infection that viruses employ in cryoconite holes was also addressed to show that a variety of viral life strategies are likely responsible for the continued dominance of viruses in these unique habitats. The implications of viral activity are discussed in terms of carbon cycling in supraglacial ecosystems.

  1. Sequential Folding using Light-activated Polystyrene Sheet

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Yonghee; Lee, Hyeok; Hwang, Taesoon; Lee, Jong-Gu; Cho, Maenghyo

    2015-01-01

    A pre-strained polystyrene (PS) polymer sheet is deformed when it approaches the glass transition state as a result of light absorption. By controlling the light absorption of the polymer sheet, non-contact sequential folding can be accomplished. Line patterns of different transparencies and shapes are used to control the light absorption. The line pattern shape is closely related to the folding angle and folding start time. The relation between the line pattern design and folding performance was evaluated experimentally to develop a technique for folding PS sheets. The results show that sequential folding of PS sheets can be accomplished by changing the degree of transparency of the line pattern. Using the technique developed in this study, self-folding origami structures with complicated shapes can be designed and manufactured. PMID:26559611

  2. Direct observations of evolving subglacial drainage beneath the Greenland Ice Sheet.

    PubMed

    Andrews, Lauren C; Catania, Ginny A; Hoffman, Matthew J; Gulley, Jason D; Lüthi, Martin P; Ryser, Claudia; Hawley, Robert L; Neumann, Thomas A

    2014-10-01

    Seasonal acceleration of the Greenland Ice Sheet is influenced by the dynamic response of the subglacial hydrologic system to variability in meltwater delivery to the bed via crevasses and moulins (vertical conduits connecting supraglacial water to the bed of the ice sheet). As the melt season progresses, the subglacial hydrologic system drains supraglacial meltwater more efficiently, decreasing basal water pressure and moderating the ice velocity response to surface melting. However, limited direct observations of subglacial water pressure mean that the spatiotemporal evolution of the subglacial hydrologic system remains poorly understood. Here we show that ice velocity is well correlated with moulin hydraulic head but is out of phase with that of nearby (0.3-2 kilometres away) boreholes, indicating that moulins connect to an efficient, channelized component of the subglacial hydrologic system, which exerts the primary control on diurnal and multi-day changes in ice velocity. Our simultaneous measurements of moulin and borehole hydraulic head and ice velocity in the Paakitsoq region of western Greenland show that decreasing trends in ice velocity during the latter part of the melt season cannot be explained by changes in the ability of moulin-connected channels to convey supraglacial melt. Instead, these observations suggest that decreasing late-season ice velocity may be caused by changes in connectivity in unchannelized regions of the subglacial hydrologic system. Understanding this spatiotemporal variability in subglacial pressures is increasingly important because melt-season dynamics affect ice velocity beyond the conclusion of the melt season. PMID:25279921

  3. Direct observations of evolving subglacial drainage beneath the Greenland Ice Sheet.

    PubMed

    Andrews, Lauren C; Catania, Ginny A; Hoffman, Matthew J; Gulley, Jason D; Lüthi, Martin P; Ryser, Claudia; Hawley, Robert L; Neumann, Thomas A

    2014-10-01

    Seasonal acceleration of the Greenland Ice Sheet is influenced by the dynamic response of the subglacial hydrologic system to variability in meltwater delivery to the bed via crevasses and moulins (vertical conduits connecting supraglacial water to the bed of the ice sheet). As the melt season progresses, the subglacial hydrologic system drains supraglacial meltwater more efficiently, decreasing basal water pressure and moderating the ice velocity response to surface melting. However, limited direct observations of subglacial water pressure mean that the spatiotemporal evolution of the subglacial hydrologic system remains poorly understood. Here we show that ice velocity is well correlated with moulin hydraulic head but is out of phase with that of nearby (0.3-2 kilometres away) boreholes, indicating that moulins connect to an efficient, channelized component of the subglacial hydrologic system, which exerts the primary control on diurnal and multi-day changes in ice velocity. Our simultaneous measurements of moulin and borehole hydraulic head and ice velocity in the Paakitsoq region of western Greenland show that decreasing trends in ice velocity during the latter part of the melt season cannot be explained by changes in the ability of moulin-connected channels to convey supraglacial melt. Instead, these observations suggest that decreasing late-season ice velocity may be caused by changes in connectivity in unchannelized regions of the subglacial hydrologic system. Understanding this spatiotemporal variability in subglacial pressures is increasingly important because melt-season dynamics affect ice velocity beyond the conclusion of the melt season.

  4. "Direct" measurement of sheet resistance in inter-subcell layers of multi-junction solar cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rumyantsev, Valery D.; Larionov, Valery R.; Pokrovskiy, Pavel V.

    2015-09-01

    The multi-junction cells are sensitive to chromatic aberrations inherent to the lens-type concentrators. At spectrally and spatially inhomogeneous distribution of incident light, considerable lateral currents flow along the inter-subcell layers causing a voltage drop across corresponding sheet resistance and, consequently, a decrease in the cell conversion efficiency. The sheet resistance unit is Ohm-per-square that corresponds to the resistance between two bar-type electrodes on the opposite sides of a thin conductive square. A method of "direct" measurement of this parameter is proposed using lasers for local illumination of the strip-in-shape parts of a rectangular-in-form tested cell. These illuminated parts play a role of electrodes for a lateral current induced by photoexitation. Wavelengths of the lasers have to be chosen to generate photocurrents independently in the neighboring subcells, as well as locally in the upper and lower ones. SPICE model of the method is analyzed and experimental results on the InGaP/InGaAs/Ge triple-junction solar cells are presented.

  5. New ways of studying ice sheet flow directions and glacial erosion by computer modelling—examples from Fennoscandia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Näslund, J. O.; Rodhe, L.; Fastook, J. L.; Holmlund, P.

    2003-02-01

    A computer ice sheet model has been used to study regional ice flow directions and glacial erosion of the Weichselian ice sheet, adopting a new method of presenting modelled ice flow directions. Ice sheet model results from different time periods during the Weichselian were extracted for five regions and presented in rose diagrams. When comparing these computer-generated results with information on flow directions obtained from current conceptual geological models based on field data, large similarities were observed. In comparing the ice flow directions as such, the similarities were strikingly good. In many cases there was also a good agreement in the timing of the events, while in some cases a certain flow direction was assigned to a different time period by the ice sheet model than in the current interpretation of geological information. Nevertheless, the overall agreement between the data sets shows that results from ice sheet models can aid in placing geological information into a coarse timeframe and chronostratigraphic context, and also fill in time gaps in the glacial geological record where chronological control is sparse. Ice sheet model results thus constitute a new data set against which glacial geological information can be compared and tested. A new quantity, basal sliding distance, has also been calculated from the ice sheet model results, describing the over time accumulated length of ice that has passed over the landscape by basal sliding. The results show high basal sliding distance values in SW Sweden/SE Norway, in Skagerrak, and along the Gulf of Bothnia, implying relatively large amounts of glacial erosion in these regions. On elevated parts of the Scandinavian mountain range and on adjacent plains in the east the basal sliding distance values are low, implying weaker glacial erosion. This compares well with different types of geological and morphological data, suggesting that basal sliding distance is a useful entity for studying regional

  6. Performance evaluation of ePTFE and PVDF flat-sheet module direct contact membrane distillation.

    PubMed

    Chuang, Ching-Jung; Tung, Kuo-Lun; Fan, Yang-Hsiang; Ho, Chii-Dong; Huang, James

    2010-01-01

    This paper reports experiments using a flat-sheet module with 0.18 approximately 0.45 microm ePTFE (expanded polytetrafluoroethylene) and PVDF (polyvinylidene fluoride) membranes to show the effects of membrane properties, salt concentration and fluid hydrodynamics on the permeate flux and salt rejection of DCMD (direct contact membrane distillation). A theoretical prediction of the permeate flux was carried out, and was in close agreement with the experimental results. In addition, the energy integration of the process was also analyzed in order to evaluate module design to increase energy efficiency. According to the simulated results of the energy integration design, a combination of simultaneous cooling of the permeate stream and an additional heat exchanger to lower the temperature of the permeate stream not only enhances the MD flux, but also reduces energy consumption.

  7. Simulation and measurement of melting effects on metal sheets caused by direct lightning strikes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kern, Alexander

    1991-01-01

    Direct lightning strikes melt metal parts of various systems, like fuel and propellant tanks of rockets and airplanes, at the point of strike. Responsible for this melting are the impulse current and, if occurring, the long duration current, both carrying a remarkable charge Q. For studying these meltings the simulation in the laboratory has to be based on the parameters of natural lightnings. International standards exist defining certain threat levels of natural lightnings and giving possible generator circuits for the simulation. The melting caused by both types of lightning currents show different appearance. Their characteristics, their differences in melting and heating of metal sheets are investigated. Nevertheless the simulation of lightning in the laboratory is imperfect. While natural lightning is a discharge without a counter electrode, the simulation always demands a close counter electrode. The influence of this counter electrode is studied.

  8. Rubber sheet strewn with TiO2 particles: photocatalytic activity and recyclability.

    PubMed

    Sriwong, Chaval; Wongnawa, Sumpun; Patarapaiboolchai, Orasa

    2012-01-01

    A new method for the preparation of rubber sheet strewn with titanium dioxide particles (TiO2-strewn sheet) is presented. This simple and low cost method is based on the use of TiO2 powder (Degussa P25) being strewn onto the sheet made from rubber latex (60% HA) through a steel sieve. The characteristic of the TiO2-strewn sheet was studied by using scanning electron microscopy/energy dispersive X-ray spectrometer (SEM/EDS) and X-ray diffractometer (XRD) techniques. The photocatalytic activity of TiO2-strewn rubber sheet was evaluated using Indigo Carmine (IC) dye as a model for organic dye pollutant in water. The results showed that the TiO2-strewn sheet could degrade IC dye solution under UV light irradiation. The effects of pH, initial concentration, and the intensity of UV light on the photodegradation were also investigated. Kinetics of the photocatalytic degradation was of the first-order reaction. The used TiO2-strewn sheet can be recovered and reused. The recycling uses did not require any cleaning between successive uses and no decline in the photodegradation efficiency was observed compared with freshly prepared TiO2-strewn sheet. PMID:22655360

  9. Indirect Versus Direct Heating of Sheet Materials: Superplastic Forming and Diffusion Bonding Using Lasers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jocelyn, Alan; Kar, Aravinda; Fanourakis, Alexander; Flower, Terence; Ackerman, Mike; Keevil, Allen; Way, Jerome

    2010-06-01

    Many from within manufacturing industry consider superplastic forming (SPF) to be ‘high tech’, but it is often criticized as too complicated, expensive, slow and, in general, an unstable process when compared to other methods of manipulating sheet materials. Perhaps, the fundamental cause of this negative perception of SPF, and also of diffusion bonding (DB), is the fact that the current process of SPF/DB relies on indirect sources of heating to produce the conditions necessary for the material to be formed. Thus, heat is usually derived from the electrically heated platens of hydraulic presses, to a lesser extent from within furnaces and, sometimes, from heaters imbedded in ceramic moulds. Recent evaluations of these isothermal methods suggest they are slow, thermally inefficient and inappropriate for the process. In contrast, direct heating of only the material to be formed by modern, electrically efficient, lasers could transform SPF/DB into the first choice of designers in aerospace, automotive, marine, medical, architecture and leisure industries. Furthermore, ‘variable temperature’ direct heating which, in theory, is possible with a laser beam(s) may provide a means to control material thickness distribution, a goal of enormous importance as fuel efficient, lightweight structures for transportation systems are universally sought. This paper compares, and contrasts, the two systems and suggests how a change to laser heating might be achieved.

  10. All about Me: Reproducible Activity Sheets To Develop Self-Esteem in Your Students.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Palomares, Susanna

    This document contains a set of reproducible activity sheets for teachers to use in enhancing the self-esteem of their students. Designed to supplement other approaches being used by teachers, the activities in this book can be used to infuse esteem-building activities into the core curriculum. The activities are organized around several…

  11. Electric fields measured by ISEE-1 within and near the neutral sheet during quiet and active times

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cattell, C. A.; Mozer, F. S.

    1982-01-01

    An understanding of the physical processes occurring in the magnetotail and plasmasheet during different interplanetary magnetic field orientations and differing levels of ground magnetic activity is crucial for the development of a theory of energy transfer from the solar wind to the particles which produce auroral arcs. In the present investigation, the first observations of electric fields during neutral sheet crossings are presented, taking into account the statistical correlations of the interplanetary magnetic field direction and ground activity with the character of the electric field. The electric field data used in the study were obtained from a double probe experiment on the ISEE-1 satellite. The observations suggest that turbulent electric and magnetic fields are intimately related to plasma acceleration in the neutral sheet and to the processes which create auroral particles.

  12. Salt-assisted direct exfoliation of graphite into high-quality, large-size, few-layer graphene sheets.

    PubMed

    Niu, Liyong; Li, Mingjian; Tao, Xiaoming; Xie, Zhuang; Zhou, Xuechang; Raju, Arun P A; Young, Robert J; Zheng, Zijian

    2013-08-21

    We report a facile and low-cost method to directly exfoliate graphite powders into large-size, high-quality, and solution-dispersible few-layer graphene sheets. In this method, aqueous mixtures of graphite and inorganic salts such as NaCl and CuCl2 are stirred, and subsequently dried by evaporation. Finally, the mixture powders are dispersed into an orthogonal organic solvent solution of the salt by low-power and short-time ultrasonication, which exfoliates graphite into few-layer graphene sheets. We find that the as-made graphene sheets contain little oxygen, and 86% of them are 1-5 layers with lateral sizes as large as 210 μm(2). Importantly, the as-made graphene can be readily dispersed into aqueous solution in the presence of surfactant and thus is compatible with various solution-processing techniques towards graphene-based thin film devices. PMID:23824229

  13. Salt-assisted direct exfoliation of graphite into high-quality, large-size, few-layer graphene sheets.

    PubMed

    Niu, Liyong; Li, Mingjian; Tao, Xiaoming; Xie, Zhuang; Zhou, Xuechang; Raju, Arun P A; Young, Robert J; Zheng, Zijian

    2013-08-21

    We report a facile and low-cost method to directly exfoliate graphite powders into large-size, high-quality, and solution-dispersible few-layer graphene sheets. In this method, aqueous mixtures of graphite and inorganic salts such as NaCl and CuCl2 are stirred, and subsequently dried by evaporation. Finally, the mixture powders are dispersed into an orthogonal organic solvent solution of the salt by low-power and short-time ultrasonication, which exfoliates graphite into few-layer graphene sheets. We find that the as-made graphene sheets contain little oxygen, and 86% of them are 1-5 layers with lateral sizes as large as 210 μm(2). Importantly, the as-made graphene can be readily dispersed into aqueous solution in the presence of surfactant and thus is compatible with various solution-processing techniques towards graphene-based thin film devices.

  14. FSA future directions: FSA technology activities in FY86

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Leipold, M. H.

    1985-01-01

    The silicon material, advanced silicon sheet, device research, and process research activities are explained. There will be no new initiatives. Many activities are targeted for completion and the emphasis will then be on technology transfer. Industrial development of the fluidized-bed reactor (FBR) deposition technology is proceeding. Technology transfer and industry funding of sheet development are continuing.

  15. Direct Observations of Melt-Water Lake Drainage and the Establishment of an Efficient Surface to Basal Water Connection on the Greenland Ice Sheet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Das, S. B.; Joughin, I.; Behn, M. D.; Howat, I.; King, M. A.; Lizarralde, D.; Bhatia, M. P.

    2007-12-01

    Melt water lakes are recurrent features on the surface of the Greenland Ice Sheet margin that collect a large fraction of the annual surface melt across the ablation region. Many of these lakes fill and drain seasonally and are hypothesized to be a significant source of surface melt water to the ice sheet bed. We present results from field campaigns during the summers of 2006 and 2007 to investigate the filling and draining of two lakes, and the dynamic response of the ice sheet to drainage events. Measurements include air temperature, lake-water level, seismicity and local ice motion. One of the instrumented lakes was observed to be actively discharging water through a meltwater-cut channel in the side of the lake basin, which followed a deeply incised (5-10 m) supraglacial stream for nearly a kilometer before cascading into a moulin. The second instrumented lake drained catastrophically through a series of fractures and moulins that opened beneath the lake and that were subsequently mapped in the field following drainage. At this site, the 2.7-km-diameter lake, holding on the order of 0.03 km3 of water, drained entirely through 1 km of ice thickness in less than 2 hours. The peak rate of water flow during this event exceeds the average flow over Niagara Falls. This drainage event coincided with increased seismicity as well as rapid glacier uplift (1.2 m) and horizontal acceleration to nearly 8 km/yr as measured on the ice surface near the lake shoreline. Subsequent subsidence and deceleration of the ice sheet occurred over the following 24 hours. These observations provide evidence for the injection of surface melt water directly to the ice sheet bed, and also indicate the presence of an efficient basal drainage system that can quickly disperse large inputs of surface melt water.

  16. Paleo-Ice Sheet/Stream Flow Directions of the Northern Antarctic Peninsula Ice Sheet Based Upon New Synthesis of Multibeam Seabed Imagery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Domack, E. W.; Lavoie, C.; Scambos, T. A.; Pettit, E. C.; Schenke, H. W.; Yoo, K. C.; Larter, R. D.; Gutt, J.; Wellner, J.; Canals, M.; Anderson, J. B.; Amblas, D.

    2014-12-01

    We provide a new map of swath bathymetry for the northern Antarctic Peninsula, including data sets from five national programs. Our map allows for the compilation and examination of Late Glacial Maximum (LGM) paleo-ice sheet/stream flow directions developed upon the seafloor from the preservation of: mega-scale glacial lineations, drumlinized features, and selective linear erosion. We combine this with terrestrial observations of flow direction to place constraints on ice divides and accumulation centers (ice domes). The results show a flow divergence in Larsen B embayment, between flow emanating off the Seal Nunataks (including Robertson Island) that directed ice in a southeast direction, then easterly as the flow transits toward the Robertson Trough. A second, stronger "streaming flow" directed ice southeasterly then southward, as ice overflowed the Jason Peninsula to reach the Jason Trough, the southern perimeter of the embayment. This reconstruction is far more detailed than other recent compilations because we followed specific flow indicators and have kept tributary flow paths parallel. Our reconstitution also refines the extent of at least five other distinct paleo-ice stream systems which in turn serve to delineate seven broad regions where ice domes must have been centered across the continental shelf during the LGM.

  17. Associations of geomagnetic activity with plasma sheet thinning and expansion: A statistical study

    SciTech Connect

    Hones,Jr., E.W.; Pytte, T.; West,Jr., H.I.

    1984-07-01

    Associations of geomagnetic activity in the auroral zone with thinnings and expansions of the magnetotail plasma sheet are examined statistically in this paper. We first identified many plasma sheet thinnings and expansions in plasma and particle data from VELA satellites and from OGO 5 without reference to the ground magnetic data. These events were grouped according to the location of the detecting satellite in the magnetotail. For each such group the times of thinning or expansion were then used as fiducial times in a superposed-epoch analysis of the geomagnetic AL index values that were recorded in 8-hour intervals centered on the event times. The results show that many plasma sheet thinnings and expansions are related to discrete negative bay structures that are the classical signature of substorms. Furthermore, they support earlier findings that plasma sheet thinning and expansion at the VELA orbit (rroughly-equal18 R/sub E/) tend to be associated with the onset of the auroral zone negative bay and the beginning of its subsidence, respectively. Earthward of rroughly-equal13-15 R/sub E/, plasma sheet expansion occurs near the time of the onset of the negative bay, again in agreement with earlier findings. A large fraction of plasma sheet expansions to half thicknesses of > or approx. =6 R/sub E/ at the VELA orbit are associated not with a baylike geomagnetic disturbance but with subsidence of a prolonged interval of disturbance. The study also shows that many plasma sheet expansions are related simply to generally enhanced geomagnetic activity showing no baylike or other distinctive features.

  18. Application of heat- and steam-generating sheets to the lumbar or abdominal region affects autonomic nerve activity.

    PubMed

    Nagashima, Yoshinao; Oda, Hideshi; Igaki, Michihito; Suzuki, Megumi; Suzuki, Atsushi; Yada, Yukihiro; Tsuchiya, Shuichi; Suzuki, Toshiyuki; Ohishi, Sachiko

    2006-06-30

    Effects of applying a heat- and steam-generating (HSG) sheet on peripheral hemodynamics and autonomic nerve activity were examined. An HSG sheet was applied to the lumbar or abdominal region. Measurements included skin temperature at the lumbar and abdominal regions and the fingertip, total hemoglobin, tissue oxygen saturation ratio (StO2), pupillary light reflex, changes in ECG R-R interval blood pressure and percutaneous electrogastrography (EGG). A heat-generating sheet without steam was used as the control. Based on the present findings, application of the HSG sheet to the lumbar or abdominal region may improve peripheral hemodynamics and inhibit sympathetic nerve activity, resulting in parasympathetic nerve activity dominance.

  19. New directions in the science and technology of advanced sheet explosive formulations and the key energetic materials used in the processing of sheet explosives: Emerging trends.

    PubMed

    Talawar, M B; Jangid, S K; Nath, T; Sinha, R K; Asthana, S N

    2015-12-30

    This review presents the work carried out by the international community in the area of sheet explosive formulations and its applications in various systems. The sheet explosive is also named as PBXs and is a composite material in which solid explosive particles like RDX, HMX or PETN are dispersed in a polymeric matrix, forms a flexible material that can be rolled/cut into sheet form which can be applied to any complex contour. The designed sheet explosive must possess characteristic properties such as flexible, cuttable, water proof, easily initiable, and safe handling. The sheet explosives are being used for protecting tanks (ERA), light combat vehicle and futuristic infantry carrier vehicle from different attacking war heads etc. Besides, sheet explosives find wide applications in demolition of bridges, ships, cutting and metal cladding. This review also covers the aspects such as risks and hazard analysis during the processing of sheet explosive formulations, effect of ageing on sheet explosives, detection and analysis of sheet explosive ingredients and the R&D efforts of Indian researchers in the development of sheet explosive formulations. To the best of our knowledge, there has been no review article published in the literature in the area of sheet explosives.

  20. Tail reconnection region versus auroral activity inferred from conjugate ARTEMIS plasma sheet flow and auroral observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nishimura, Y.; Lyons, L. R.; Xing, X.; Angelopoulos, V.; Donovan, E. F.; Mende, S. B.; Bonnell, J. W.; Auster, U.

    2013-09-01

    sheet flow bursts have been suggested to correspond to different types of auroral activity, such as poleward boundary intensifications (PBIs), ensuing auroral streamers, and substorms. The flow-aurora association leads to the important question of identifying the magnetotail source region for the flow bursts and how this region depends on magnetic activity. The present study uses the ARTEMIS spacecraft coordinated with conjugate ground-based auroral imager observations to identify flow bursts beyond 45 RE downtail and corresponding auroral forms. We find that quiet-time flows are directed dominantly earthward with a one-to-one correspondence with PBIs. Flow bursts during the substorm recovery phase and during steady magnetospheric convection (SMC) periods are also directed earthward, and these flows are associated with a series of PBIs/streamers lasting for tens of minutes with similar durations to that of the series of earthward flows. Presubstorm onset flows are also earthward and associated with PBIs/streamers. The earthward flows during those magnetic conditions suggest that the flow bursts, which lead to PBIs and streamers, originate from further downtail of ARTEMIS, possibly from the distant-tail neutral line (DNL) or tailward-retreated near-Earth neutral line (NENL) rather than from the nominal NENL location in the midtail. We find that tailward flows are limited primarily to the substorm expansion phase. They continue throughout the period of auroral poleward expansion, indicating that the expansion-phase flows originate from the NENL and that NENL activity is closely related to the auroral expansion of the substorm expansion phase.

  1. Anti-adhesion and antibacterial activity of silver nanoparticles supported on graphene oxide sheets.

    PubMed

    de Faria, Andreia Fonseca; Martinez, Diego Stéfani Teodoro; Meira, Stela Maris Meister; de Moraes, Ana Carolina Mazarin; Brandelli, Adriano; Filho, Antonio Gomes Souza; Alves, Oswaldo Luiz

    2014-01-01

    This work reports on the preparation, characterization and antibacterial activity of a nanocomposite formed from graphene oxide (GO) sheets decorated with silver nanoparticles (GO-Ag). The GO-Ag nanocomposite was prepared in the presence of AgNO3 and sodium citrate. The physicochemical characterization was performed by UV-vis spectroscopy, X-ray diffraction (XRD), thermogravimetric analysis (TGA), Raman spectroscopy and transmission electron microscopy (TEM). The average size of the silver nanoparticles anchored on the GO surface was 7.5 nm. Oxidation debris fragments (a byproduct adsorbed on the GO surface) were found to be crucial for the nucleation and growth of the silver nanoparticles. The antibacterial activity of the GO and GO-Ag nanocomposite against the microorganism Pseudomonas aeruginosa was investigated using the standard counting plate methodology. The GO dispersion showed no antibacterial activity against P. aeruginosa over the concentration range investigated. On the other hand, the GO-Ag nanocomposite displayed high biocidal activity with a minimum inhibitory concentration ranging from 2.5 to 5.0 μg/mL. The anti-biofilm activity toward P. aeruginosa adhered on stainless steel surfaces was also investigated. The results showed a 100% inhibition rate of the adhered cells after exposure to the GO-Ag nanocomposite for one hour. To the best of our knowledge, this work provides the first direct evidence that GO-Ag nanocomposites can inhibit the growth of microbial adhered cells, thus preventing the process of biofilm formation. These promising results support the idea that GO-Ag nanocomposites may be applied as antibacterial coatings material to prevent the development of biofilms in food packaging and medical devices. PMID:24060936

  2. Differences in microstructure and texture of Al-Mg sheets produced by twin-roll continuous casting and by direct-chill casting

    SciTech Connect

    Slamova, M.; Karlik, M.; Robaut, F.; Slama, P.; Veron, M

    2002-10-15

    Over the last two decades, the use of aluminum sheets in automotive applications has increased. Aluminum sheets are currently produced from direct-chill (DC) cast plates. The need for low-cost aluminum sheets is a challenge for the development of new materials produced by twin-roll continuous (TRC) casting and cold rolling. It is expected that the sheets produced from these different casting procedures can differ in their microstructure. Therefore, they can exhibit different formability behavior. The paper presents the results of the microstructural characterization and texture evaluation of aluminum sheets produced by both technologies. Sheets produced from twin-roll cast materials have much finer and more numerous second-phase particles, the grain structures of both types of materials are similar. Electron backscatter diffraction (EBSD) and X-ray diffraction techniques were used for texture evaluation and both confirmed the presence of stronger cube texture in the strips produced from DC-cast plates.

  3. Teen Sexual Activity, Pregnancy and Childbearing among Latinos in the United States. Fact Sheet.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National Campaign To Prevent Teen Pregnancy, Washington, DC.

    The Latino population is the fastest-growing major racial/ethnic group in the United States. By 2020, approximately 16 percent of the population will be Latino. This increase will be even more pronounced among teens. This fact sheet summarizes data from the National Vital Statistics Reports on reported sexual activity, pregnancy rates, and…

  4. Are Adolescents Talking with Their Parents about Sex before Becoming Sexually Active? Fact Sheet

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Leuschner, Kristin

    2010-01-01

    This paper examines parent-child discussions of sexual behavior. It finds consistency in the timing and content of such discussions; however, many parents and children do not discuss key topics, such as birth control, before adolescents become sexually active. [This fact sheet is based on Megan K. Beckett, Marc N. Elliott, Steven Martino, David E.…

  5. NREL Develops Accelerated Sample Activation Process for Hydrogen Storage Materials (Fact Sheet)

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    2010-12-01

    This fact sheet describes NREL's accomplishments in developing a new sample activation process that reduces the time to prepare samples for measurement of hydrogen storage from several days to five minutes and provides more uniform samples. Work was performed by NREL's Chemical and Materials Science Center.

  6. "Working." Student Activity Sheets for Selected Interviews Contained in "Working" by Studs Terkel.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Eakin, David; And Others

    These student activity sheets are intended to accompany a vocational English program based on Studs Terkel's book, "Working," a collection of more than 100 interviews with people about their jobs. The 30 interviews selected for inclusion in the curriculum either illustrate occupations taught in the schools or deal with occupations related to those…

  7. Hierarchical-structured anatase-titania/cellulose composite sheet with high photocatalytic performance and antibacterial activity.

    PubMed

    Luo, Yan; Huang, Jianguo

    2015-02-01

    Bulk hierarchical anatase-titania/cellulose composite sheets were fabricated by subjecting an ultrathin titania gel film pre-deposited filter paper to a solvo-co-hydrothermal treatment by using titanium butoxide as the precursor to grow anatase-titania nanocrystallites on the cellulose nanofiber surfaces. The titanium butoxide specie is firstly absorbed onto the nanofibers of the cellulose substance through a solvothermal process, which was thereafter hydrolyzed and crystallized upon the subsequent hydrothermal treatment, leading to the formation of fine anatase-titania nanoparticles with sizes of 2-5 nm uniformly anchored on the cellulose nanofibers. The resulting anatase-titania/cellulose composite sheet shows a significant photocatalytic performance towards degradation of a methylene blue dye, and introduction of silver nanoparticles into the composite sheet yields an Ag-NP/anatase-titania/cellulose composite material possessing excellent antibacterial activity against both Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacteria.

  8. Fe, O, and C Charge States Associated with Quiescent Versus Active Current Sheets in the Solar Wind

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Suess, S. T.; Ko, Y.-K.; vonSteiger, R.

    2008-01-01

    Ulysses MAG data were used to locate the heliospheric current sheet in data from 1991 through 2006. The purpose was to characterize typical charge states for Fe, O, and C in the vicinity of the current sheet and provide insight into the physical sources for these charge states in the corona. A study of He/H around the current sheets has led to a clear distinction between quiescent current sheets at times of low solar activity and active current sheets associated with magnetic clouds (and, presumably, ICMES). It has been shown that high ionization state Fe is produced in the corona in current sheets associated with CMEs through spectroscopic observations of the corona and through in situ detection at Ulysses. Here we show that the ionization state of Fe is typically only enhanced around active current sheets while the ionization states of O and C are commonly enhanced around both quiescent and active current sheets. This is consistent with UV coronal spectroscopy, which has shown that reconnection in current sheets behind CMEs leads to high temperatures not typically seen above quiet streamers.

  9. World War II Commemoration Committee: Fact Sheet and Suggested Activities.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Department of Defense, Washington, DC.

    This packet suggests activities and events that school districts, schools, classes, and educational organizations can conduct to commemorate World War II. Suggestions are made to include local veterans, including those in veteran's and nursing homes and hospitals, and youth at every possible opportunity. Recognition can take the form of military…

  10. Analysis of methanogenic and methanotrophic activity at the western margin of the Greenland Ice Sheet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Broemsen, E. L.; Webster, K. D.; Dieser, M.; Pratt, L. M.; Christner, B. C.

    2012-12-01

    Anoxic conditions in environments beneath the world's glaciers and ice sheets provide plausible habitats supporting the microbial production of methane. Recent reports of potential methane sources beneath the Greenland Ice Sheet (GrIS) suggest in situ production by an active community of methanogens. Beneath the GrIS, microbially derived methane can be dissolved in subglacial water, and during periods of melting, can exchange with the atmosphere at sites of subglacial discharge. Transfer of methane from subglacial fluids to the atmosphere could be a significant climate factor, but few data are available to make such assessments. The specific aim of this study was to characterize the composition and activity of methanogens and methanotrophs present in samples of subglacial outflow at the ice sheet margin near Kangerlussuaq, Greenland. Subglaical water was collected twice-weekly over a nine week period (mid July to mid September of 2012) and the dissolved methane concentration in the samples was determined via gas chromatography. Extracted RNA and DNA from the subglacial water was analyzed by analysis of 16s rRNA and rRNA genes present in the subglacial assemblages. From the molecular results we infer the presence of active methanogens related to the order Methanosarcinales. Further, locally elevated concentrations of atmospheric methane as high as 1.92 ± 0.03 ppmv, were detected in the ice tunnel of the subglacial outflow using open-path laser spectrometry. From these data we estimate rates of methane release at the ice sheet margin during the summer melt months at this geographical location. The results provide a context for addressing the impact that deglaciation will have on the release of greenhouse gases from ice sheets on a warming Earth.

  11. Water-resources activities in Ohio, 1986 (water fact sheet)

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hindall, S.M.

    1986-01-01

    The Ohio District of the Water Resources Division, U.S. Geological Survey, provides information on Ohio 's water resources for the overall benefit of the State and the Nation. An integral part of the Survey 's mission is to conduct investigations of the Nation 's land, mineral, and water resources, and to publish and disseminate the information needed to understand, to plan the use of, and to manage these resources. The activities fall into eight broad categories: collection of hydrologic data; water resources investigations and assessments; basic and problem-oriented hydrologic and water related research; acquisition of information useful in predicting and delineating water related natural hazards; coordination of the activities of all Federal agencies in the acquisition of water data, and operation of water information centers; dissemination of data and the results of investigations; provision of scientific and technical assistance in hydrologic studies; and the administration of the State Water Resources Research Institute Program and the National Water Resources Research Grant Program. (Lantz-PTT)

  12. Antibacterial activity of two-dimensional MoS2 sheets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Xi; Li, Jie; Liang, Tao; Ma, Chunyan; Zhang, Yingying; Chen, Hongzheng; Hanagata, Nobutaka; Su, Huanxing; Xu, Mingsheng

    2014-08-01

    Graphene-like two-dimensional materials (2DMats) show application potential in optoelectronics and biomedicine due to their unique properties. However, environmental and biological influences of these 2DMats remain to be unveiled. Here we reported the antibacterial activity of two-dimensional (2D) chemically exfoliated MoS2 (ce-MoS2) sheets. We found that the antibacterial activity of ce-MoS2 sheets was much more potent than that of the raw MoS2 powders used for the synthesis of ce-MoS2 sheets possibly due to the 2D planar structure (high specific surface area) and higher conductivity of the ce-MoS2. We investigated the antibacterial mechanisms of the ce-MoS2 sheets and proposed their antibacterial pathways. We found that the ce-MoS2 sheets could produce reactive oxygen species (ROS), different from a previous report on graphene-based materials. Particularly, the oxidation capacity of the ce-MoS2 sheets toward glutathione oxidation showed a time and concentration dependent trend, which is fully consistent with the antibacterial behaviour of the ce-MoS2 sheets. The results suggest that antimicrobial behaviors were attributable to both membrane and oxidation stress. The antibacterial pathways include MoS2-bacteria contact induced membrane stress, superoxide anion (O2&z.rad;-) induced ROS production by the ce-MoS2, and the ensuing superoxide anion-independent oxidation. Our study thus indicates that the tailoring of the dimension of nanomaterials and their electronic properties would manipulate antibacterial activity.Graphene-like two-dimensional materials (2DMats) show application potential in optoelectronics and biomedicine due to their unique properties. However, environmental and biological influences of these 2DMats remain to be unveiled. Here we reported the antibacterial activity of two-dimensional (2D) chemically exfoliated MoS2 (ce-MoS2) sheets. We found that the antibacterial activity of ce-MoS2 sheets was much more potent than that of the raw MoS2 powders

  13. NLR activation takes a direct route.

    PubMed

    Monie, Tom P

    2013-03-01

    For the first time there is now clear biochemical and biophysical evidence indicating that members of the nucleotide-binding domain and leucine-rich repeat containing (NLR) family can be activated as a result of direct interaction between the receptor and ligand. NLRX1 leucine-rich repeats bind to RNA; murine NAIP (NLR family, apoptosis inhibitory protein) 5 binds flagellin directly; and NOD (nucleotide-binding oligomerization domain containing) 1 and NOD2 may interact directly with fragments of peptidoglycan. It remains to be seen if NLRP3 has a specific ligand, but progress has been made in addressing its mechanism of activation, with cellular imbalances and mitochondrial dysfunction being important. This review updates our understanding of NLR activation in light of these recent advances and their impact on the NLR research. PMID:23394939

  14. Paleo-ice flow directions of the Northern Antarctic Peninsula ice sheet based upon a new synthesis of seabed imagery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lavoie, C.; Domack, E. W.; Pettit, E. C.; Scambos, T. A.; Larter, R. D.; Schenke, H.-W.; Yoo, K. C.; Gutt, J.; Wellner, J.; Canals, M.; Anderson, J. B.; Amblas, D.

    2014-10-01

    We present a new seafloor map for the northern Antarctic Peninsula (AP), including swath multibeam data sets from five national programs. Our map allows for the examination and interpretation of Last Glacial Maximum (LGM) paleo-ice sheet/stream flow directions developed upon the seafloor from the preservation of: mega-scale glacial lineations, drumlinized features, and selective linear erosion. We combine this with terrestrial observations of flow direction to place constraints on ice divides and accumulation centers (ice domes) on the AP continental shelf. The results show a flow bifurcation as ice exits the Larsen-B embayment. Flow emanating off the Seal Nunataks (including Robertson Island) is directed toward the southeast, then eastward as the flow transits toward the Robertson Trough. A second, stronger "streaming flow" is directed toward the southeast then southward, as ice overflowed the tip of the Jason Peninsula to reach the southern perimeter of the embayment. Our reconstruction also refines the extent of at least five other distinct paleo-ice stream systems which, in turn, serve to delineate seven broad regions where contemporaneous ice domes must have been centered on the continental shelf during the LGM time interval. Our reconstruction is more detailed than other recent compilations because we followed specific flow indicators and have kept tributary flow paths parallel.

  15. Aerogeophysical evidence for active volcanism beneath the West Antarctic Ice Sheet

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Blankenship, Donald D.; Bell, Robin E.; Hodge, Steven M.; Brozena, John M.; Behrendt, John C.

    1993-01-01

    Although it is widely understood that the collapse of the West Antarctic Ice Sheet (WAIS) would cause a global sea-level rise of 6 m, there continues to be considerable debate about the response of this ice sheet to climate change. The stability of the WAIS, which is characterized by a bed grounded well below sea level, may depend on geologically controlled conditions at the base, which are independent of climate. Ice streams moving up to 750 m/yr disperse material from the interior through to the oceans. As these ice streams tend to buffer the reservoir of slow-moving inland ice from exposure to oceanic degradation, understanding the ice-streaming process is important for evaluating WAIS stability. There is strong evidence that ice streams slide on a lubricating layer of water-saturated till. Development of this basal layer requires both water and easily eroded sediments. Active lithospheric extension may elevate regional heat flux, increase basal melting, and trigger ice streaming. If a geologically defined boundary with a sharp contrast in geothermal flux exists beneath the WAIS, ice streams may only be capable of operating as a buffer over a restricted region. Should ocean waters penetrate beyond this boundary, the ice-stream buffer would disappear, possibly triggering a collapse of the inland ice reservoir. Aerogeophysical evidence for active volcanism and elevated heat flux beneath the WAIS near the critical region where ice streaming begins is presented.

  16. Diverse magma flow directions during construction of sheeted dike complexes at fast- to superfast-spreading centers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Horst, A. J.; Varga, R. J.; Gee, J. S.; Karson, J. A.

    2014-12-01

    Dike intrusion is a fundamental process during upper oceanic crustal accretion at fast- to superfast-spreading ridges. Based on the distribution of magma along fast-spreading centers inferred from marine geophysical data, models predict systematic steep flow at magmatically robust segment centers and shallow magma flow toward distal segment ends. Anisotropy of magnetic susceptibility (AMS) fabrics from 48 fully-oriented block samples of dikes from upper oceanic crust exposed at Hess Deep Rift and Pito Deep Rift reveal a wide range of magma flow directions that are not consistent with such simple magma supply models. The AMS is interpreted to arise from distribution anisotropy of titanomagnetite crystals based on weak shape-preferred orientation of opaque oxide and plagioclase crystals generally parallel to AMS maximum eigenvectors. Most dike samples show normal AMS fabrics with maximum eigenvector directions ranging from subvertical to subhorizontal. The distributions of inferred magma flow lineations from maximum eigenvectors show no preferred flow pattern, even after structural correction. We use a Kolmogorov-Smirnov test (KS-test) to show that the distribution of bootstrapped flow lineation rakes from Pito Deep are not statistically distinct from Hess Deep, and neither are distinguishable from Oman and Troodos Ophiolite AMS data. Magma flow directions in sheeted dikes from these two seafloor escarpments also do not correlate with available geochemistry in any systematic way as previously predicted. These results indicate distinct compositional sources feed melt that is injected into dikes at fast- to superfast-spreading ridges with no preference for subhorizontal or subvertical magma flow. Collectively, results imply ephemeral melt lenses at different along-axis locations within the continuous axial magma chamber and either direct injection or intermingling of melt from other deeper ridge-centered or off-axis sources.

  17. Environmental controls on microbial abundance and activity on the greenland ice sheet: a multivariate analysis approach.

    PubMed

    Stibal, Marek; Telling, Jon; Cook, Joe; Mak, Ka Man; Hodson, Andy; Anesio, Alexandre M

    2012-01-01

    Microbes in supraglacial ecosystems have been proposed to be significant contributors to regional and possibly global carbon cycling, and quantifying the biogeochemical cycling of carbon in glacial ecosystems is of great significance for global carbon flow estimations. Here we present data on microbial abundance and productivity, collected along a transect across the ablation zone of the Greenland ice sheet (GrIS) in summer 2010. We analyse the relationships between the physical, chemical and biological variables using multivariate statistical analysis. Concentrations of debris-bound nutrients increased with distance from the ice sheet margin, as did both cell numbers and activity rates before reaching a peak (photosynthesis) or a plateau (respiration, abundance) between 10 and 20 km from the margin. The results of productivity measurements suggest an overall net autotrophy on the GrIS and support the proposed role of ice sheet ecosystems in carbon cycling as regional sinks of CO(2) and places of production of organic matter that can be a potential source of nutrients for downstream ecosystems. Principal component analysis based on chemical and biological data revealed three clusters of sites, corresponding to three 'glacier ecological zones', confirmed by a redundancy analysis (RDA) using physical data as predictors. RDA using data from the largest 'bare ice zone' showed that glacier surface slope, a proxy for melt water flow, accounted for most of the variation in the data. Variation in the chemical data was fully explainable by the determined physical variables. Abundance of phototrophic microbes and their proportion in the community were identified as significant controls of the carbon cycling-related microbial processes.

  18. Criminal investigations and the Superfund program. Fact sheet (Final)

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1990-09-01

    The fact sheet, directed toward any one who witnesses fraudulent activity in EPA programs, discusses areas in which fraud and abuse can occur and provides an understanding of the criminal investigation process that results from reports of suspicious activity.

  19. Persistent neural activity in head direction cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Taube, Jeffrey S.; Bassett, Joshua P.; Oman, C. M. (Principal Investigator)

    2003-01-01

    Many neurons throughout the rat limbic system discharge in relation to the animal's directional heading with respect to its environment. These so-called head direction (HD) cells exhibit characteristics of persistent neural activity. This article summarizes where HD cells are found, their major properties, and some of the important experiments that have been conducted to elucidate how this signal is generated. The number of HD and angular head velocity cells was estimated for several brain areas involved in the generation of the HD signal, including the postsubiculum, anterior dorsal thalamus, lateral mammillary nuclei and dorsal tegmental nucleus. The HD cell signal has many features in common with what is known about how neural integration is accomplished in the oculomotor system. The nature of the HD cell signal makes it an attractive candidate for using neural network models to elucidate the signal's underlying mechanisms. The conditions that any network model must satisfy in order to accurately represent how the nervous system generates this signal are highlighted and areas where key information is missing are discussed.

  20. A mathematical model of the heat and fluid flows in direct-chill casting of aluminum sheet ingots and billets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mortensen, Dag

    1999-02-01

    A finite-element method model for the time-dependent heat and fluid flows that develop during direct-chill (DC) semicontinuous casting of aluminium ingots is presented. Thermal convection and turbulence are included in the model formulation and, in the mushy zone, the momentum equations are modified with a Darcy-type source term dependent on the liquid fraction. The boundary conditions involve calculations of the air gap along the mold wall as well as the heat transfer to the falling water film with forced convection, nucleate boiling, and film boiling. The mold wall and the starting block are included in the computational domain. In the start-up period of the casting, the ingot domain expands over the starting-block level. The numerical method applies a fractional-step method for the dynamic Navier-Stokes equations and the “streamline upwind Petrov-Galerkin” (SUPG) method for mixed diffusion and convection in the momentum and energy equations. The modeling of the start-up period of the casting is demonstrated and compared to temperature measurements in an AA1050 200×600 mm sheet ingot.

  1. Direct numerical simulation of active fiber composite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Seung J.; Hwang, Joon S.; Paik, Seung H.

    2003-08-01

    Active Fiber Composites (AFC) possess desirable characteristics for smart structure applications. One major advantage of AFC is the ability to create anisotropic laminate layers useful in applications requiring off-axis or twisting motions. AFC is naturally composed of two different constituents: piezoelectric fiber and matrix. Therefore, homogenization method, which is utilized in the analysis of laminated composite material, has been used to characterize the material properties. Using this approach, the global behaviors of the structures are predicted in an averaged sense. However, this approach has intrinsic limitations in describing the local behaviors in the level of the constituents. Actually, the failure analysis of AFC requires the knowledge of the local behaviors. Therefore, microscopic approach is necessary to predict the behaviors of AFC. In this work, a microscopic approach for the analysis of AFC was performed. Piezoelectric fiber and matrix were modeled separately and finite element method using three-dimensional solid elements was utilized. Because fine mesh is essential, high performance computing technology was applied to the solution of the immense degree-of-freedom problem. This approach is called Direct Numerical Simulation (DNS) of structure. Through the DNS of AFC, local stress distribution around the interface of fiber and matrix was analyzed.

  2. A volitional help sheet to increase physical activity in people with low socioeconomic status: A randomised exploratory trial.

    PubMed

    Armitage, Christopher J; Arden, Madelynne A

    2010-12-01

    Volitional help sheets use Gollwitzer's (1993) concept of implementation intentions as a vehicle to change behaviour using Prochaska and DiClemente's (1983) processes of change. The present study designed and tested a volitional help sheet to increase physical activity in a group with low socioeconomic status (low-SES). Sixty-eight people (33 women, 35 men; mean age 27) with low-SES were randomly allocated to either an experimental group or a control group. Both groups received a questionnaire and a volitional help sheet; the only difference between the experimental and control groups was that the former were given explicit instructions to link occasions on which they were tempted not to be physically active with appropriate behavioural responses (processes of change). Physical activity (Metabolic Equivalent minutes per week) was the main outcome measure; behavioural intention and self-efficacy were the secondary outcome measures. The findings revealed significant increase in physical activity in the experimental condition, relative to the control condition, F (1, 66) = 7.28, p < 0.01, η2(10) = 0.10, but no differences for social cognitive variables. Furthermore, the participants who were most responsive to the intervention engaged in more than three times the physical activity at baseline than those who received the intervention but did not subsequently change. The findings provide further support for volitional help sheets to change health behaviour and extend them to a group with low-SES. Further work is required to refine this intervention tool.

  3. ASYMMETRIC SUNSPOT ACTIVITY AND THE SOUTHWARD DISPLACEMENT OF THE HELIOSPHERIC CURRENT SHEET

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Y.-M.; Robbrecht, E. E-mail: eva.robbrecht@oma.be

    2011-08-01

    Observations of the interplanetary magnetic field (IMF) have suggested a statistical tendency for the heliospheric current sheet (HCS) to be shifted a few degrees southward of the heliographic equator during the period 1965-2010, particularly in the years near sunspot minimum. Using potential-field source-surface extrapolations and photospheric flux-transport simulations, we demonstrate that this southward displacement follows from Joy's law and the observed hemispheric asymmetry in the sunspot numbers, with activity being stronger in the southern (northern) hemisphere during the declining (rising) phase of cycles 20-23. The hemispheric asymmetry gives rise to an axisymmetric quadrupole field, whose equatorial zone has the sign of the leading-polarity flux in the dominant hemisphere; during the last four cycles, the polarity of the IMF around the equator thus tended to match that of the north polar field both before and after polar field reversal. However, large fluctuations are introduced by the nonaxisymmetric field components, which depend on the longitudinal distribution of sunspot activity in either hemisphere. Consistent with this model, the HCS showed an average northward displacement during cycle 19, when the 'usual' alternation was reversed and the northern hemisphere became far more active than the southern hemisphere during the declining phase of the cycle. We propose a new method for determining the north-south displacement of the HCS from coronal streamer observations.

  4. Anisotropy of the Taylor scale and the correlation scale in plasma sheet magnetic field fluctuations as a function of auroral electrojet activity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weygand, James M.; Matthaeus, W. H.; El-Alaoui, M.; Dasso, S.; Kivelson, M. G.

    2010-12-01

    Magnetic field data from the Cluster spacecraft in the magnetospheric plasma sheet are employed to determine the correlation scale and the magnetic Taylor microscale from simultaneous multiple-point measurements for multiple intervals over a range of mean magnetic field directions for three different levels of geomagnetic activity. We have determined that in the plasma sheet the correlation scale along the mean magnetic field direction decreases from 19,500 ± 2200 to 13,100 ± 700 km as the auroral electrojet activity increases from quiet (<80 nT) to active conditions (>200 nT). The reverse occurs for the correlation scale perpendicular to the magnetic field, which increases from 8200 ± 600 km to 13,000 ± 2100 km as the auroral electrojet activity increases from quiet to active conditions. This variation of the correlation scale with geomagnetic activity may mean either a change in the scale size of the turbulence driver or may mean a change in the predominance of one over another type of turbulence driving mechanism. Unlike the correlation scale, the Taylor scale does not show any clear variation with geomagnetic activity. We find that the Taylor scale is longer parallel to the magnetic field than perpendicular to it for all levels of geomagnetic activity. The correlation and Taylor scales may be used to estimate the effective magnetic Reynolds numbers separately for each angular channel. Reynolds numbers were found to be approximately independent of the angle relative to the mean magnetic field. These results may be useful in magnetohydrodynamic modeling of the magnetosphere and can contribute to our understanding of energetic particle diffusion in the magnetosphere.

  5. Field-Aligned Current Sheet Motion and Its Correlation with Solar Wind Conditions and Geomagnetic Activities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Y.; Le, G.; Boardsen, S. A.; Slavin, J. A.; Strangeway, R. J.

    2008-05-01

    Field-aligned currents (FACs) are the currents flowing into and out of the ionosphere which connect to the magnetosphere. They provide an essential linkage between the solar wind - magnetosphere system and the ionosphere, and the understanding of these currents is important for global magnetosphere dynamics and space weather prediction. The three spacecraft ST-5 constellation provides an unprecedented opportunity to study in situ FAC dynamics in time scales (10 sec to 10 min) that can not be achieved previously with single spacecraft studies or large-spaced conjugate spacecraft studies. In this study, we use the magnetic field observations during the whole ST-5 mission and their corresponding solar wind conditions to study the dependence of FAC current sheet motion and intensity on solar wind conditions. FAC peak current densities show very good correlations with some solar wind parameters, including IMF Bz, dynamic pressure, Ey, and some IMF angles, but not with other parameters. Instant FAC speeds show generally much weaker dependence on solar wind conditions comparing to FAC peak current densities. This obvious uncorrelation between FAC peak current densities and speeds implies that FAC peak current densities are more consistently controlled by solar wind conditions and geomagnetic activities, while FAC speeds are more oscillatory, sometimes with higher speeds during quieter times and lower speeds during more turbulent times.

  6. Seismicity on the western Greenland Ice Sheet: Surface fracture in the vicinity of active moulins

    SciTech Connect

    Carmichael, Joshua D.; Joughin, Ian; Behn, Mark D.; Das, Sarah; King, Matt A.; Stevens, Laura; Lizarralde, Dan

    2015-06-25

    We analyzed geophone and GPS measurements collected within the ablation zone of the western Greenland Ice Sheet during a ~35 day period of the 2011 melt season to study changes in ice deformation before, during, and after a supraglacial lake drainage event. During rapid lake drainage, ice flow speeds increased to ~400% of winter values, and icequake activity peaked. At times >7 days after drainage, this seismicity developed variability over both diurnal and longer periods (~10 days), while coincident ice speeds fell to ~150% of winter values and showed nightly peaks in spatial variability. Approximately 95% of all detected seismicity in the lake basin and its immediate vicinity was triggered by fracture propagation within near-surface ice (<330 m deep) that generated Rayleigh waves. Icequakes occurring before and during drainage frequently were collocated with the down flow (west) end of the primary hydrofracture through which the lake drained but shifted farther west and outside the lake basin after the drainage. We interpret these results to reveal vertical hydrofracture opening and local uplift during the drainage, followed by enhanced seismicity and ice flow on the downstream side of the lake basin. This region collocates with interferometric synthetic aperture radar-measured speedup in previous years and could reflect the migration path of the meltwater supplied to the bed by the lake. The diurnal seismic signal can be associated with nightly reductions in surface melt input that increase effective basal pressure and traction, thereby promoting elevated strain in the surficial ice.

  7. Direct Monitoring of β-Sheet Formation in the Outer Membrane Protein TtoA Assisted by TtOmp85.

    PubMed

    Henke, Katharina; Welte, Wolfram; Hauser, Karin

    2016-08-01

    Attenuated total reflection Fourier-transform infrared (ATR-FTIR) spectroscopy was applied to investigate the folding of an outer membrane protein, TtoA, assisted by TtOmp85, both from the thermophilic eubacterium Thermus thermophilus. To directly monitor the formation of β-sheet structure in TtoA and to analyze the function of TtOmp85, we immobilized unfolded TtoA on an ATR crystal. Interaction with TtOmp85 initiated TtoA folding as shown by time-dependent spectra recorded during the folding process. Our ATR-FTIR experiments prove that TtOmp85 possesses specific functionality to assist β-sheet formation of TtoA. We demonstrate the potential of this spectroscopic approach to study the interaction of outer membrane proteins in vitro and in a time-resolved manner. PMID:27400268

  8. Seismicity on the western Greenland Ice Sheet: Surface fracture in the vicinity of active moulins

    DOE PAGES

    Carmichael, Joshua D.; Joughin, Ian; Behn, Mark D.; Das, Sarah; King, Matt A.; Stevens, Laura; Lizarralde, Dan

    2015-06-25

    We analyzed geophone and GPS measurements collected within the ablation zone of the western Greenland Ice Sheet during a ~35 day period of the 2011 melt season to study changes in ice deformation before, during, and after a supraglacial lake drainage event. During rapid lake drainage, ice flow speeds increased to ~400% of winter values, and icequake activity peaked. At times >7 days after drainage, this seismicity developed variability over both diurnal and longer periods (~10 days), while coincident ice speeds fell to ~150% of winter values and showed nightly peaks in spatial variability. Approximately 95% of all detected seismicitymore » in the lake basin and its immediate vicinity was triggered by fracture propagation within near-surface ice (<330 m deep) that generated Rayleigh waves. Icequakes occurring before and during drainage frequently were collocated with the down flow (west) end of the primary hydrofracture through which the lake drained but shifted farther west and outside the lake basin after the drainage. We interpret these results to reveal vertical hydrofracture opening and local uplift during the drainage, followed by enhanced seismicity and ice flow on the downstream side of the lake basin. This region collocates with interferometric synthetic aperture radar-measured speedup in previous years and could reflect the migration path of the meltwater supplied to the bed by the lake. The diurnal seismic signal can be associated with nightly reductions in surface melt input that increase effective basal pressure and traction, thereby promoting elevated strain in the surficial ice.« less

  9. Direct charge radioisotope activation and power generation

    DOEpatents

    Lal, Amit; Li, Hui; Blanchard, James P.; Henderson, Douglass L.

    2002-01-01

    An activator has a base on which is mounted an elastically deformable micromechanical element that has a section that is free to be displaced toward the base. An absorber of radioactively emitted particles is formed on the base or the displaceable section of the deformable element and a source is formed on the other of the displaceable section or the base facing the absorber across a small gap. The radioactive source emits charged particles such as electrons, resulting in a buildup of charge on the absorber, drawing the absorber and source together and storing mechanical energy as the deformable element is bent. When the force between the absorber and the source is sufficient to bring the absorber into effective electrical contact with the source, discharge of the charge between the source and absorber allows the deformable element to spring back, releasing the mechanical energy stored in the element. An electrical generator such as a piezoelectric transducer may be secured to the deformable element to convert the released mechanical energy to electrical energy that can be used to provide power to electronic circuits.

  10. A melamine-assisted chemical blowing synthesis of N-doped activated carbon sheets for supercapacitor application

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Yiliang; Xuan, Huaqing; Lin, Gaoxin; Wang, Fan; Chen, Zhi; Dong, Xiaoping

    2016-07-01

    N-doped activated carbon sheets (NACS) have been successfully synthesized using glucose as carbon source via melamine-assisted chemical blowing and sequent KOH-activation method. The obtained carbon material possesses a sheet-like morphology with ultrathin thickness, hierarchical micro/mesoporous structure, high specific surface area (up to 1997.5 m2 g-1) and high pore volume (0.94 cm3 g-1). Besides, NACS material with a nitrogen content of 3.06 wt% presents a maximum specific capacitance of 312 F g-1 at a current density of 0.5 A g-1 in 6 M KOH aqueous electrolyte due to the cocontribution of double layer capacitance and pseudocapacitance. It also displays good rate performance (246 F g-1 at 30 A g-1) and cycle stability (∼91.3% retention after 4000 galvanostatic charge-discharge cycles). The assembled NACS-based symmetric capacitor exhibits a maximum energy density of 20.2 Wh kg-1 at a power density of 448 W kg-1 within a voltage range of 0-1.8 V in 0.5 M Na2SO4 aqueous electrolyte. Thus, the unique porous sheet structure and nitrogen-doping characteristic endue the electrode material a potential application for high-performance supercapacitors.

  11. Sheet Resistance Low Dose Monitoring Using The Double Implant Technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smith, A. K.; Johnson, W. H.; Keenan, W. A.

    1986-06-01

    Sheet resistance has become an industry standard for monitoring high and medium dose ion implants. For low dose there are two sheet resistance techniques available, the direct implant technique and the double implant technique. Careful processing has extended the range of direct sheet resistance measurements down to doses of 2E11 ions/cm2. The double implant technique requires an initial implant to create an easily measured sheet resistance layer that serves as the test vehicle for the second implant. The dose of the second implant is measured by monitoring the change in the sheet resistance due to the implant damage created by the second implant into the first. This double implant technique is not limited to low dose nor to species that are electrically active in the substrate.

  12. Red facts: Ethylene. Fact sheet

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1992-09-01

    EPA is directed by the Federal Insecticide, Fungicide, and Rodenticide Act as amended in 1988 (FIFRA '88) to review all pesticide products containing active ingredients initially registered before November 1, 1984, and to reregister those products that have a substantially complete data base and do not pose unreasonable adverse effects to people or the environment. The pesticide reregistration program is to be completed by the late 1990's. The RED FACTS fact sheet summarizes EPA's conclusion, as set forth in the Reregistration Eligibility Document (or RED), that products containing a pesticide do not pose unreasonable risks when used as directed by Agency-approved labeling, and are eligible for reregistration.

  13. Effect of OSHA's bloodborne pathogens standard on hazardous waste cleanup activities. Fact sheet

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1993-08-01

    Bloodborne pathogens are microorganisms that are present in human blood and can cause disease in humans. These pathogens include, but are not limited to, hepatitis B virus (HBV) and human immunodeficiency virus (HIV). In addition to healthcare workers, the standard also may affect workers who handle waste potentially contaminated with blood or other potentially infectious material during response actions at uncontrolled hazardous waste sites. The purpose of the Fact Sheet is to describe the additional planning, training, and medical surveillance requirements that the new OSHA standard on bloodborne pathogens imposes upon On-Scene Coordinators (OSCs) and Remedial Project Managers (RPMs) during a Superfund response action.

  14. Copper and protons directly activate the zinc-activated channel.

    PubMed

    Trattnig, Sarah M; Gasiorek, Agnes; Deeb, Tarek Z; Ortiz, Eydith J Comenencia; Moss, Stephen J; Jensen, Anders A; Davies, Paul A

    2016-03-01

    The zinc-activated channel (ZAC) is a cationic ion channel belonging to the superfamily of Cys-loop receptors, which consists of pentameric ligand-gated ion channels. ZAC is the least understood member of this family so in the present study we sought to characterize the properties of this channel further. We demonstrate that not only zinc (Zn(2+)) but also copper (Cu(2+)) and protons (H(+)) are agonists of ZAC, displaying potencies and efficacies in the rank orders of H(+)>Cu(2+)>Zn(2+) and H(+)>Zn(2+)>Cu(2+), respectively. The responses elicited by Zn(2+), Cu(2+) and H(+) through ZAC are all characterized by low degrees of desensitization. In contrast, currents evoked by high concentrations of the three agonists comprise distinctly different activation and decay components, with transitions to and from an open state being significantly faster for H(+) than for the two metal ions. The permeabilities of ZAC for Na(+) and K(+) relative to Cs(+) are indistinguishable, whereas replacing all of extracellular Na(+) and K(+) with the divalent cations Ca(2+) or Mg(2+) results in complete elimination of Zn(2+)-activated currents at both negative and positive holding potentials. This indicates that ZAC is non-selectively permeable to monovalent cations, whereas Ca(2+) and Mg(2+) inhibit the channel. In conclusion, this is the first report of a Cys-loop receptor being gated by Zn(2+), Cu(2+) and H(+). ZAC could be an important mediator of some of the wide range of physiological functions regulated by or involving Zn(2+), Cu(2+) and H(+).

  15. Wounding Sheets of Epithelial Cells Activates the Epidermal Growth Factor Receptor through Distinct Short- and Long-Range Mechanisms

    PubMed Central

    Block, Ethan R.

    2008-01-01

    Wounding epithelia induces activation of the epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR), which is absolutely required for induction of motility. ATP is released from cells after wounding; it binds to purinergic receptors on the cell surface, and the EGFR is subsequently activated. Exogenous ATP activates phospholipase D, and we show here that ATP activates the EGFR through the phospholipase D2 isoform. The EGFR is activated in cells far (>0.3 cm) from wounds, which is mediated by diffusion of extracellular ATP because activation at a distance from wounds is abrogated by eliminating ATP in the medium with apyrase. In sharp contrast, activation of the EGFR near wounds is not sensitive to apyrase. Time-lapse microscopy revealed that cells exhibit increased motilities near edges of wounds; this increase in motility is not sensitive to apyrase, and apyrase does not detectably inhibit healing of wounds in epithelial sheets. This novel ATP/PLD2-independent pathway activates the EGFR by a transactivation process through ligand release, and it involves signaling by a member of the Src family of kinases. We conclude that wounding activates two distinct signaling pathways that induce EGFR activation and promote healing of wounds in epithelial cells. One pathway signals at a distance from wounds through release of ATP, and another pathway acts locally and is independent on ATP signaling. PMID:18799627

  16. Direct potentiometric determination of diastase activity in honey.

    PubMed

    Sak-Bosnar, Milan; Sakač, Nikola

    2012-11-15

    A novel method for the determination of diastase activity is reported. The method is based on a direct potentiometric measurement of triiodide ion that is released when a starch-triiodide complex is hydrolysed by honey diastase. The increase of free triiodide ion concentration in a sample is found to be directly proportional to the diastase activity of the sample. A response mechanism of the platinum redox electrode is proposed, allowing a calculation of the diastase activity factor (F). The sensor and analyte parameters, including F, were obtained by least squares fitting of potentiometric data using the optimisation function of the Solver add-in of Microsoft Excel. The values of F obtained by the new direct potentiometric method were compared with those obtained using the standard Phadebas method (DN values), and the two values were found to agree within experimental error. Finally, the diastase activity of nine varieties of honey was determined using the novel method developed here.

  17. Emplacement and inflation of pahoehoe sheet flows: observations and measurements of active lava flows on Kilauea volcano, Hawaii

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hon, K.; Kauahikaua, J.; Denlinger, R.; Mackay, K.

    1994-01-01

    Inflated pahoehoe sheet flows have a distinctive horizontal upper surface, which can be several hundred meters across, and are bounded to steep monoclinal uplifts. The inflated sheet flows studied ranged from 1 to 5 m in thickness, but initially propagated as thin sheets of fluid pahoehoe lava, generally 20-30 cm thick. The morphology of the lava as flow advanced is described. Inflated sheet flows from Kilauea and Mauna Loa are morphologically similar to some thick Icelandic and submarine sheet flows, suggesting a similar mechanism of emplacement. -from Authors

  18. Web-based Tools for Educators: Outreach Activities of the Polar Radar for Ice Sheet Measurements (PRISM) Project

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Braaten, D. A.; Holvoet, J. F.; Gogineni, S.

    2003-12-01

    The Radar Systems and Remote Sensing Laboratory at the University of Kansas (KU) has implemented extensive outreach activities focusing on Polar Regions as part of the Polar Radar for Ice Sheet Measurements (PRISM) project. The PRISM project is developing advanced intelligent remote sensing technology that involves radar systems, an autonomous rover, and communications systems to measure detailed ice sheet characteristics, and to determine bed conditions (frozen or wet) below active ice sheets in both Greenland and Antarctica. These measurements will provide a better understanding of the response of polar ice sheets to global climate change and the resulting impact the ice sheets will have on sea level rise. Many of the research and technological development aspects of the PRISM project, such as robotics, radar systems, climate change and exploration of harsh environments, can kindle an excitement and interest in students about science and technology. These topics form the core of our K-12 education and training outreach initiatives, which are designed to capture the imagination of young students, and prompt them to consider an educational path that will lead them to scientific or engineering careers. The K-12 PRISM outreach initiatives are being developed and implemented in a collaboration with the Advanced Learning Technology Program (ALTec) of the High Plains Regional Technology in Education Consortium (HPR*TEC). ALTec is associated with the KU School of Education, and is a well-established educational research center that develops and hosts web tools to enable teachers nationwide to network, collaborate, and share resources with other teachers. An example of an innovative and successful web interface developed by ALTec is called TrackStar. Teachers can use TrackStar over the Web to develop interactive, resource-based lessons (called tracks) on-line for their students. Once developed, tracks are added to the TrackStar database and can be accessed and modified

  19. Family Therapy: A Phenomenological and Active Directive Approach

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ellis, Albert

    1978-01-01

    A "third force" in family therapy is outlined in this paper, which combines a phenomenological-humanistic approach with a highly active-directive attempt to help family members surrender their misperceptions of themselves and others and to make profound philosophic changes in their intrapersonal and interpersonal attitudes and behaviors. (Author)

  20. Activity plan: Directional drilling and environmental measurements while drilling

    SciTech Connect

    Myers, D.A.

    1998-07-16

    This activity plan describes the testing of directional drilling combined with environmental measurements while drilling at two Hanford Site locations. A cold test is to be conducted at the 105A Mock Tank Leak Facility in the 200 East Area. A hot test is proposed to be run at the 216-B-8 tile field north of the 241-B Tank Farm in 200 East Area. Criteria to judge the success, partial success or failure of various aspects of the test are included. The TWRS program is assessing the potential for use of directional drilling because of an identified need to interrogate the vadose zone beneath the single-shell tanks. Because every precaution must be taken to assure that investigation activities do not violate the integrity of the tanks, control of the drill bit and ability to follow a predetermined drill path are of utmost importance and are being tested.

  1. Direct activation of cardiac pacemaker channels by intracellular cyclic AMP.

    PubMed

    DiFrancesco, D; Tortora, P

    1991-05-01

    Cyclic AMP acts as a second messenger in the modulation of several ion channels that are typically controlled by a phosphorylation process. In cardiac pacemaker cells, adrenaline and acetylcholine regulate the hyperpolarization-activated current (if), but in opposite ways; this current is involved in the generation and modulation of pacemaker activity. These actions are mediated by cAMP and underlie control of spontaneous rate by neurotransmitters. Whether the cAMP modulation of if is mediated by channel phosphorylation is, however, still unknown. Here we investigate the action of cAMP on if in excised patches of cardiac pacemaker cells and find that cAMP activates if by a mechanism independent of phosphorylation, involving a direct interaction with the channels at their cytoplasmic side. Cyclic AMP activates if by shifting its activation curve to more positive voltages, in agreement with whole-cell results. This is the first evidence of an ion channel whose gating is dually regulated by voltage and direct cAMP binding.

  2. The Asymmetric Active Coupler: Stable Nonlinear Supermodes and Directed Transport

    PubMed Central

    Kominis, Yannis; Bountis, Tassos; Flach, Sergej

    2016-01-01

    We consider the asymmetric active coupler (AAC) consisting of two coupled dissimilar waveguides with gain and loss. We show that under generic conditions, not restricted by parity-time symmetry, there exist finite-power, constant-intensity nonlinear supermodes (NS), resulting from the balance between gain, loss, nonlinearity, coupling and dissimilarity. The system is shown to possess non-reciprocal dynamics enabling directed power transport functionality. PMID:27640818

  3. The Asymmetric Active Coupler: Stable Nonlinear Supermodes and Directed Transport.

    PubMed

    Kominis, Yannis; Bountis, Tassos; Flach, Sergej

    2016-01-01

    We consider the asymmetric active coupler (AAC) consisting of two coupled dissimilar waveguides with gain and loss. We show that under generic conditions, not restricted by parity-time symmetry, there exist finite-power, constant-intensity nonlinear supermodes (NS), resulting from the balance between gain, loss, nonlinearity, coupling and dissimilarity. The system is shown to possess non-reciprocal dynamics enabling directed power transport functionality. PMID:27640818

  4. The Asymmetric Active Coupler: Stable Nonlinear Supermodes and Directed Transport

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kominis, Yannis; Bountis, Tassos; Flach, Sergej

    2016-09-01

    We consider the asymmetric active coupler (AAC) consisting of two coupled dissimilar waveguides with gain and loss. We show that under generic conditions, not restricted by parity-time symmetry, there exist finite-power, constant-intensity nonlinear supermodes (NS), resulting from the balance between gain, loss, nonlinearity, coupling and dissimilarity. The system is shown to possess non-reciprocal dynamics enabling directed power transport functionality.

  5. Evidence for Subglacial Volcanic Activity Beneath the area of the Divide of the West Antarctic Ice Sheet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Behrendt, J. C.

    2013-12-01

    There is an increasing body of aeromagnetic, radar ice-sounding, heat flow, subglacial volcanic earthquakes, several exposed active and subglacial volcanoes and other lines of evidence for volcanic activity associated with the West Antarctic Rift System (WR) since the origin (~25 Ma) of the West Antarctic Ice Sheet (WAIS), which flows through it. Exposed late Cenozoic, alkaline volcanic rocks, 34 Ma to present concentrated in Marie Byrd Land (LeMasurier and Thomson, 1990), but also exposed along the rift shoulder on the Transantarctic Mountains flank of the WR, and >1 million cubic kilometers, of mostly subglacially erupted 'volcanic centers' beneath the WAIS inferred from aeromagnetic data, have been interpreted as evidence of a magmatic plume. About 18 high relief, (~600-2000 m) 'volcanic centers' presently beneath the WAIS surface, probably were erupted subaerially when the WAIS was absent, based on the 5-km orthogonally line spaced Central West Antarctica aerogeophysical survey. All would be above sea level after ice removal and isostatic adjustment. Nine of these high relief peaks are in the general area beneath the divide of the WAIS. This high bed relief topography was first interpreted in the 1980s as the volcanic 'Sinuous Ridge ' based on a widely spaced aeromagnetic -radar ice sounding survey (Jankowski et al,. 1983). A 70-km wide, circular ring of interpreted subglacial volcanic rocks was cited as evidence of a volcanic caldera underlying the ice sheet divide based on the CWA survey (Behrendt et al., 1998). A broad magnetic 'low' surrounding the caldera area possibly is evidence of a shallow Curie isotherm. High heat flow reported from temperature logging (Clow et al., 2012) in the WAISCORE and a thick volcanic ash layer in the core (Dunbar et al., 2012) are consistent with this interpretation. A 2 km-high subaerially erupted volcano (subglacial Mt Thiel, ~78.5 degrees S, 111 degrees W) ~ 100 km north from the WAISCORE could be the source of the ash

  6. Different bulk and active bacterial communities in cryoconite from the margin and interior of the Greenland ice sheet.

    PubMed

    Stibal, Marek; Schostag, Morten; Cameron, Karen A; Hansen, Lars H; Chandler, David M; Wadham, Jemma L; Jacobsen, Carsten S

    2015-04-01

    Biological processes in the supraglacial ecosystem, including cryoconite, contribute to nutrient cycling within the cryosphere and may affect surface melting, yet little is known of the diversity of the active microbes in these environments. We examined the bacterial abundance and community composition of cryoconite over a melt season at two contrasting sites at the margin and in the interior of the Greenland ice sheet, using sequence analysis and quantitative polymerase chain reaction of coextracted 16S rDNA and rRNA. Significant differences were found between bulk (rDNA) and potentially active (rRNA) communities, and between communities sampled from the two sites. Higher concentrations of rRNA than rDNA were detected at the interior site, whereas at the margin several orders of magnitude less rRNA was found compared with rDNA, which may be explained by a lower proportion of active bacteria at the margin site. The rRNA communities at both sites were dominated by a few taxa of Cyanobacteria and Alpha- and/or Betaproteobacteria. The bulk alpha diversity was higher in the margin site community, suggesting that local sources may be contributing towards the gene pool in addition to long distance transport.

  7. Hemispherical-directional reflectance factor measurements of snow on the Greenland Ice Sheet during the Radiation, Snow Characteristics and Albedo at Summit (RASCALS) campaign

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hakala, Teemu; Riihelä, Aku; Lahtinen, Panu; Peltoniemi, Jouni I.

    2014-10-01

    During the summer of 2010 a snow measurement campaign was carried out at Greenland Environmental Observatory, on Greenland Ice Sheet. Broadband snow albedo (bihemispherical reflectance), spectral hemispherical conical reflectance factor, temperature, density and other physical parameters were measured. Especially, the Hemispherical Directional Reflectance Factor (HDRF) of 46 snow samples was measured using the Finnish Geodetic Institute Field Goniospectrometer (FIGIFIGO). Additionally, linear polarization (Stokes parameters I, Q, and U), or Muller matrix elements R11, R12, and R13, were measured from some samples. Albedo was also calculated from the HDRF and these values were compared to those from the albedometer. Values were found to be within 3% of each other, which is within the accuracy limits of the instruments. We also compared our results to previous measurements at the Summit (by Bourgeois et al. during 2005 and Carmagnola et al. during 2011) and found our results to be in agreement with their measurements. Compared to previous studies, our measurements have full solar spectrum spectral coverage and linear polarization.

  8. Specific activities and DOE-STD-1027-92 hazard Category 2 thresholds, LANL fact sheet

    SciTech Connect

    Clow, J.; DeVore, R.; Elder, J.; Heindel, G.; Inkret, W.; Miller, G.

    1994-11-01

    Data tables are presented to provide consistency in safety analysis work at the Los Alamos National Laboratory. Included are calculated specific activities and calculated hazard classification Category 2 threshold quantities for radionuclides listed in DOE-STD-1027-92. Some calculated threshold quantities differ from the DOE thresholds. Calculated specific activities are also presented for plutonium material types or mixtures.

  9. 78 FR 52169 - Agency Information Collection Activities; Comment Request; William D. Ford Federal Direct Loan...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-08-22

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION Agency Information Collection Activities; Comment Request; William D. Ford Federal Direct Loan (Direct... of Collection: William D. Ford Federal Direct Loan (Direct Loan) Program Federal Direct PLUS...

  10. Clouds enhance Greenland ice sheet meltwater runoff

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Van Tricht, Kristof; Lhermitte, Stef; Lenaerts, Jan T. M.; Gorodetskaya, Irina V.; L'Ecuyer, Tristan S.; Noël, Brice; van den Broeke, Michiel R.; Turner, David D.; van Lipzig, Nicole P. M.

    2016-04-01

    The Greenland ice sheet has become one of the main contributors to global sea level rise, predominantly through increased meltwater runoff. The main drivers of Greenland ice sheet runoff, however, remain poorly understood. Here we show that clouds enhance meltwater runoff by about one-third relative to clear skies, using a unique combination of active satellite observations, climate model data and snow model simulations. This impact results from a cloud radiative effect of 29.5 (±5.2) W m‑2. Contrary to conventional wisdom, however, the Greenland ice sheet responds to this energy through a new pathway by which clouds reduce meltwater refreezing as opposed to increasing surface melt directly, thereby accelerating bare-ice exposure and enhancing meltwater runoff. The high sensitivity of the Greenland ice sheet to both ice-only and liquid-bearing clouds highlights the need for accurate cloud representations in climate models, to better predict future contributions of the Greenland ice sheet to global sea level rise.

  11. Clouds enhance Greenland ice sheet meltwater runoff.

    PubMed

    Van Tricht, K; Lhermitte, S; Lenaerts, J T M; Gorodetskaya, I V; L'Ecuyer, T S; Noël, B; van den Broeke, M R; Turner, D D; van Lipzig, N P M

    2016-01-12

    The Greenland ice sheet has become one of the main contributors to global sea level rise, predominantly through increased meltwater runoff. The main drivers of Greenland ice sheet runoff, however, remain poorly understood. Here we show that clouds enhance meltwater runoff by about one-third relative to clear skies, using a unique combination of active satellite observations, climate model data and snow model simulations. This impact results from a cloud radiative effect of 29.5 (±5.2) W m(-2). Contrary to conventional wisdom, however, the Greenland ice sheet responds to this energy through a new pathway by which clouds reduce meltwater refreezing as opposed to increasing surface melt directly, thereby accelerating bare-ice exposure and enhancing meltwater runoff. The high sensitivity of the Greenland ice sheet to both ice-only and liquid-bearing clouds highlights the need for accurate cloud representations in climate models, to better predict future contributions of the Greenland ice sheet to global sea level rise.

  12. Clouds enhance Greenland ice sheet meltwater runoff

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Van Tricht, Kristof; Lhermitte, Stef; Lenaerts, Jan T. M.; Gorodetskaya, Irina V.; L'Ecuyer, Tristan S.; Noël, Brice; van den Broeke, Michiel R.; Turner, David D.; van Lipzig, Nicole P. M.

    2016-04-01

    The Greenland ice sheet has become one of the main contributors to global sea level rise, predominantly through increased meltwater runoff. The main drivers of Greenland ice sheet runoff, however, remain poorly understood. Here we show that clouds enhance meltwater runoff by about one-third relative to clear skies, using a unique combination of active satellite observations, climate model data and snow model simulations. This impact results from a cloud radiative effect of 29.5 (±5.2) W m-2. Contrary to conventional wisdom, however, the Greenland ice sheet responds to this energy through a new pathway by which clouds reduce meltwater refreezing as opposed to increasing surface melt directly, thereby accelerating bare-ice exposure and enhancing meltwater runoff. The high sensitivity of the Greenland ice sheet to both ice-only and liquid-bearing clouds highlights the need for accurate cloud representations in climate models, to better predict future contributions of the Greenland ice sheet to global sea level rise.

  13. Clouds enhance Greenland ice sheet meltwater runoff

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van Tricht, K.; Lhermitte, S.; Lenaerts, J. T. M.; Gorodetskaya, I. V.; L'Ecuyer, T. S.; Noël, B.; van den Broeke, M. R.; Turner, D. D.; van Lipzig, N. P. M.

    2016-01-01

    The Greenland ice sheet has become one of the main contributors to global sea level rise, predominantly through increased meltwater runoff. The main drivers of Greenland ice sheet runoff, however, remain poorly understood. Here we show that clouds enhance meltwater runoff by about one-third relative to clear skies, using a unique combination of active satellite observations, climate model data and snow model simulations. This impact results from a cloud radiative effect of 29.5 (+/-5.2) W m-2. Contrary to conventional wisdom, however, the Greenland ice sheet responds to this energy through a new pathway by which clouds reduce meltwater refreezing as opposed to increasing surface melt directly, thereby accelerating bare-ice exposure and enhancing meltwater runoff. The high sensitivity of the Greenland ice sheet to both ice-only and liquid-bearing clouds highlights the need for accurate cloud representations in climate models, to better predict future contributions of the Greenland ice sheet to global sea level rise.

  14. Clouds enhance Greenland ice sheet meltwater runoff

    PubMed Central

    Van Tricht, K.; Lhermitte, S.; Lenaerts, J. T. M.; Gorodetskaya, I. V.; L'Ecuyer, T. S.; Noël, B.; van den Broeke, M. R.; Turner, D. D.; van Lipzig, N. P. M.

    2016-01-01

    The Greenland ice sheet has become one of the main contributors to global sea level rise, predominantly through increased meltwater runoff. The main drivers of Greenland ice sheet runoff, however, remain poorly understood. Here we show that clouds enhance meltwater runoff by about one-third relative to clear skies, using a unique combination of active satellite observations, climate model data and snow model simulations. This impact results from a cloud radiative effect of 29.5 (±5.2) W m−2. Contrary to conventional wisdom, however, the Greenland ice sheet responds to this energy through a new pathway by which clouds reduce meltwater refreezing as opposed to increasing surface melt directly, thereby accelerating bare-ice exposure and enhancing meltwater runoff. The high sensitivity of the Greenland ice sheet to both ice-only and liquid-bearing clouds highlights the need for accurate cloud representations in climate models, to better predict future contributions of the Greenland ice sheet to global sea level rise. PMID:26756470

  15. NREL Team Creates High-Activity, Durable Platinum Extended Surface Catalyst for Fuel Cells (Fact Sheet)

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    2011-02-01

    Researchers with NREL's Fuel Cell team showed that platinum can replace copper nanowires in such a way that high-surface-area and high-specific-activity catalysts are produced, potentially allowing for lower-cost catalysts.

  16. Dengue Virus Directly Stimulates Polyclonal B Cell Activation

    PubMed Central

    Papa, Michelle Premazzi; de Morais, Ana Theresa Silveira; Peçanha, Ligia Maria Torres; de Arruda, Luciana Barros

    2015-01-01

    Dengue infection is associated to vigorous inflammatory response, to a high frequency of activated B cells, and to increased levels of circulating cross-reactive antibodies. We investigated whether direct infection of B cells would promote activation by culturing primary human B lymphocytes from healthy donors with DENV in vitro. B cells were susceptible, but poorly permissive to infection. Even though, primary B cells cultured with DENV induced substantial IgM secretion, which is a hallmark of polyclonal B cell activation. Notably, DENV induced the activation of B cells obtained from either DENV immune or DENV naïve donors, suggesting that it was not dependent on DENV-specific secondary/memory response. B cell stimulation was dependent on activation of MAPK and CD81. B cells cultured with DENV also secreted IL-6 and presented increased expression of CD86 and HLA-DR, which might contribute to B lymphocyte co-stimulatory function. Indeed, PBMCs, but not isolated B cells, secreted high amounts of IgG upon DENV culture, suggesting that interaction with other cell types in vivo might promote Ig isotype switching and IgG secretion from different B cell clones. These findings suggest that activation signaling pathways triggered by DENV interaction with non-specific receptors on B cells might contribute to the exacerbated response observed in dengue patients. PMID:26656738

  17. A direct measurement of strontium-89 activity in bone metastases.

    PubMed

    Ben-Josef, E; Maughan, R L; Vasan, S; Porter, A T

    1995-06-01

    The total absorbed dose after systemic administration of 89Sr has been determined by measuring directly its activity in bone metastases. Autoradiography was performed on sections of bones obtained from patients treated with 89Sr to study the pattern of deposition. Discs of 5 and 8 mm diameter were cut from metastatic sites and normal bone. The beta-ray activity was determined with a scintillation counter, which was calibrated using similar bovine cancellous bone discs, onto which a known activity of 89Sr was transferred by pipette. From the activity measured, the initial activity (at the time of 89Sr administration) was calculated. The absorbed dose was estimated using the methodology described in NCRP Report No. 58. The estimated initial activity of 89Sr in the bone metastases varied from 2.3 to 240 MBq kg-1, with a mean value of 31 +/- 27 MBq kg-1. The total absorbed dose ranged from 1.3 to 64 Gy, with a mean of 18 +/- 16 Gy. The average total dose to normal bone sites was 1.1 +/- 0.4 Gy. The metastases to normal bone dose ratio in individual samples varied from 8 +/- 4 to 40 +/- 25. These estimates are in agreement with those obtained previously by indirect methods. PMID:7675358

  18. Direct determination of phosphatase activity from physiological substrates in cells.

    PubMed

    Ren, Zhongyuan; Do, Le Duy; Bechkoff, Géraldine; Mebarek, Saida; Keloglu, Nermin; Ahamada, Saandia; Meena, Saurabh; Magne, David; Pikula, Slawomir; Wu, Yuqing; Buchet, René

    2015-01-01

    A direct and continuous approach to determine simultaneously protein and phosphate concentrations in cells and kinetics of phosphate release from physiological substrates by cells without any labeling has been developed. Among the enzymes having a phosphatase activity, tissue non-specific alkaline phosphatase (TNAP) performs indispensable, multiple functions in humans. It is expressed in numerous tissues with high levels detected in bones, liver and neurons. It is absolutely required for bone mineralization and also necessary for neurotransmitter synthesis. We provided the proof of concept that infrared spectroscopy is a reliable assay to determine a phosphatase activity in the osteoblasts. For the first time, an overall specific phosphatase activity in cells was determined in a single step by measuring simultaneously protein and substrate concentrations. We found specific activities in osteoblast like cells amounting to 116 ± 13 nmol min(-1) mg(-1) for PPi, to 56 ± 11 nmol min(-1) mg(-1) for AMP, to 79 ± 23 nmol min(-1) mg(-1) for beta-glycerophosphate and to 73 ± 15 nmol min(-1) mg(-1) for 1-alpha-D glucose phosphate. The assay was also effective to monitor phosphatase activity in primary osteoblasts and in matrix vesicles. The use of levamisole--a TNAP inhibitor--served to demonstrate that a part of the phosphatase activity originated from this enzyme. An IC50 value of 1.16 ± 0.03 mM was obtained for the inhibition of phosphatase activity of levamisole in osteoblast like cells. The infrared assay could be extended to determine any type of phosphatase activity in other cells. It may serve as a metabolomic tool to monitor an overall phosphatase activity including acid phosphatases or other related enzymes. PMID:25785438

  19. Direct determination of phosphatase activity from physiological substrates in cells.

    PubMed

    Ren, Zhongyuan; Do, Le Duy; Bechkoff, Géraldine; Mebarek, Saida; Keloglu, Nermin; Ahamada, Saandia; Meena, Saurabh; Magne, David; Pikula, Slawomir; Wu, Yuqing; Buchet, René

    2015-01-01

    A direct and continuous approach to determine simultaneously protein and phosphate concentrations in cells and kinetics of phosphate release from physiological substrates by cells without any labeling has been developed. Among the enzymes having a phosphatase activity, tissue non-specific alkaline phosphatase (TNAP) performs indispensable, multiple functions in humans. It is expressed in numerous tissues with high levels detected in bones, liver and neurons. It is absolutely required for bone mineralization and also necessary for neurotransmitter synthesis. We provided the proof of concept that infrared spectroscopy is a reliable assay to determine a phosphatase activity in the osteoblasts. For the first time, an overall specific phosphatase activity in cells was determined in a single step by measuring simultaneously protein and substrate concentrations. We found specific activities in osteoblast like cells amounting to 116 ± 13 nmol min(-1) mg(-1) for PPi, to 56 ± 11 nmol min(-1) mg(-1) for AMP, to 79 ± 23 nmol min(-1) mg(-1) for beta-glycerophosphate and to 73 ± 15 nmol min(-1) mg(-1) for 1-alpha-D glucose phosphate. The assay was also effective to monitor phosphatase activity in primary osteoblasts and in matrix vesicles. The use of levamisole--a TNAP inhibitor--served to demonstrate that a part of the phosphatase activity originated from this enzyme. An IC50 value of 1.16 ± 0.03 mM was obtained for the inhibition of phosphatase activity of levamisole in osteoblast like cells. The infrared assay could be extended to determine any type of phosphatase activity in other cells. It may serve as a metabolomic tool to monitor an overall phosphatase activity including acid phosphatases or other related enzymes.

  20. Practical experience with full-scale structured sheet media (SSM) integrated fixed-film activated sludge (IFAS) systems for nitrification.

    PubMed

    Li, Hua; Zhu, Jia; Flamming, James J; O'Connell, Jack; Shrader, Michael

    2015-01-01

    Many wastewater treatment plants in the USA, which were originally designed as secondary treatment systems with no or partial nitrification requirements, are facing increased flows, loads, and more stringent ammonia discharge limits. Plant expansion is often not cost-effective due to either high construction costs or lack of land. Under these circumstances, integrated fixed-film activated sludge (IFAS) systems using both suspended growth and biofilms that grow attached to a fixed plastic structured sheet media are found to be a viable solution for solving the challenges. Multiple plants have been retrofitted with such IFAS systems in the past few years. The system has proven to be efficient and reliable in achieving not only consistent nitrification, but also enhanced bio-chemical oxygen demand removal and sludge settling characteristics. This paper presents long-term practical experiences with the IFAS system design, operation and maintenance, and performance for three full-scale plants with distinct processes; that is, a trickling filter/solids contact process, a conventional plug flow activated sludge process and an extended aeration process. PMID:25746646

  1. Practical experience with full-scale structured sheet media (SSM) integrated fixed-film activated sludge (IFAS) systems for nitrification.

    PubMed

    Li, Hua; Zhu, Jia; Flamming, James J; O'Connell, Jack; Shrader, Michael

    2015-01-01

    Many wastewater treatment plants in the USA, which were originally designed as secondary treatment systems with no or partial nitrification requirements, are facing increased flows, loads, and more stringent ammonia discharge limits. Plant expansion is often not cost-effective due to either high construction costs or lack of land. Under these circumstances, integrated fixed-film activated sludge (IFAS) systems using both suspended growth and biofilms that grow attached to a fixed plastic structured sheet media are found to be a viable solution for solving the challenges. Multiple plants have been retrofitted with such IFAS systems in the past few years. The system has proven to be efficient and reliable in achieving not only consistent nitrification, but also enhanced bio-chemical oxygen demand removal and sludge settling characteristics. This paper presents long-term practical experiences with the IFAS system design, operation and maintenance, and performance for three full-scale plants with distinct processes; that is, a trickling filter/solids contact process, a conventional plug flow activated sludge process and an extended aeration process.

  2. Immobilized epidermal growth factor stimulates persistent, directed keratinocyte migration via activation of PLCγ1.

    PubMed

    Kim, Chloe S; Mitchell, Isaiah P; Desotell, Anthony W; Kreeger, Pamela K; Masters, Kristyn S

    2016-07-01

    Epidermal growth factor (EGF) is a critical element in dermal repair, but EGF-containing wound dressings have not been successful clinically. However, these dressings have delivered only soluble EGF, and the native environment provides both soluble and matrix-bound EGF. To address our hypothesis that tethered EGF can stimulate cell behaviors not achievable with soluble EGF, we examined single-cell movement and signaling in human immortalized HaCaT keratinocytes treated with soluble or immobilized EGF. Although both EGF treatments increased collective sheet displacement and individual cell speed, only cells treated with immobilized EGF exhibited directed migration, as well as 2-fold greater persistence compared with soluble EGF. Immunofluorescence showed altered EGF receptor (EGFR) trafficking, where EGFR remained membrane-localized in the immobilized EGF condition. Cells treated with soluble EGF demonstrated higher phosphorylated ERK1/2, and cells on immobilized EGF exhibited higher pPLCγ1, which was localized at the leading edge. Treatment with U0126 inhibited migration in both conditions, demonstrating that ERK1/2 activity was necessary but not responsible for the observed differences. In contrast, PLCγ1 inhibition with U73122 significantly decreased persistence on immobilized EGF. Combined, these results suggest that immobilized EGF increases collective keratinocyte displacement via an increase in single-cell migration persistence resulting from altered EGFR trafficking and PLCγ1 activation.-Kim, C. S., Mitchell, I. P., Desotell, A. W., Kreeger, P. K., Masters, K. S. Immobilized epidermal growth factor stimulates persistent, directed keratinocyte migration via activation of PLCγ1.

  3. Immobilized epidermal growth factor stimulates persistent, directed keratinocyte migration via activation of PLCγ1.

    PubMed

    Kim, Chloe S; Mitchell, Isaiah P; Desotell, Anthony W; Kreeger, Pamela K; Masters, Kristyn S

    2016-07-01

    Epidermal growth factor (EGF) is a critical element in dermal repair, but EGF-containing wound dressings have not been successful clinically. However, these dressings have delivered only soluble EGF, and the native environment provides both soluble and matrix-bound EGF. To address our hypothesis that tethered EGF can stimulate cell behaviors not achievable with soluble EGF, we examined single-cell movement and signaling in human immortalized HaCaT keratinocytes treated with soluble or immobilized EGF. Although both EGF treatments increased collective sheet displacement and individual cell speed, only cells treated with immobilized EGF exhibited directed migration, as well as 2-fold greater persistence compared with soluble EGF. Immunofluorescence showed altered EGF receptor (EGFR) trafficking, where EGFR remained membrane-localized in the immobilized EGF condition. Cells treated with soluble EGF demonstrated higher phosphorylated ERK1/2, and cells on immobilized EGF exhibited higher pPLCγ1, which was localized at the leading edge. Treatment with U0126 inhibited migration in both conditions, demonstrating that ERK1/2 activity was necessary but not responsible for the observed differences. In contrast, PLCγ1 inhibition with U73122 significantly decreased persistence on immobilized EGF. Combined, these results suggest that immobilized EGF increases collective keratinocyte displacement via an increase in single-cell migration persistence resulting from altered EGFR trafficking and PLCγ1 activation.-Kim, C. S., Mitchell, I. P., Desotell, A. W., Kreeger, P. K., Masters, K. S. Immobilized epidermal growth factor stimulates persistent, directed keratinocyte migration via activation of PLCγ1. PMID:27025961

  4. The adaptor protein Cindr regulates JNK activity to maintain epithelial sheet integrity.

    PubMed

    Yasin, Hannah W R; van Rensburg, Samuel H; Feiler, Christina E; Johnson, Ruth I

    2016-02-15

    Epithelia are essential barrier tissues that must be appropriately maintained for their correct function. To achieve this a plethora of protein interactions regulate epithelial cell number, structure and adhesion, and differentiation. Here we show that Cindr (the Drosophila Cin85 and Cd2ap ortholog) is required to maintain epithelial integrity. Reducing Cindr triggered cell delamination and movement. Most delaminating cells died. These behaviors were consistent with JNK activation previously associated with loss of epithelial integrity in response to ectopic oncogene activity. We confirmed a novel interaction between Cindr and Drosophila JNK (dJNK), which when perturbed caused inappropriate JNK signaling. Genetically reducing JNK signaling activity suppressed the effects of reducing Cindr. Furthermore, ectopic JNK signaling phenocopied loss of Cindr and was partially rescued by concomitant cindr over-expression. Thus, correct Cindr-dJNK stoichiometry is essential to maintain epithelial integrity and disturbing this balance may contribute to the pathogenesis of disease states, including cancer. PMID:26772997

  5. Repeated games and direct reciprocity under active linking.

    PubMed

    Pacheco, Jorge M; Traulsen, Arne; Ohtsuki, Hisashi; Nowak, Martin A

    2008-02-21

    Direct reciprocity relies on repeated encounters between the same two individuals. Here we examine the evolution of cooperation under direct reciprocity in dynamically structured populations. Individuals occupy the vertices of a graph, undergoing repeated interactions with their partners via the edges of the graph. Unlike the traditional approach to evolutionary game theory, where individuals meet at random and have no control over the frequency or duration of interactions, we consider a model in which individuals differ in the rate at which they seek new interactions. Moreover, once a link between two individuals has formed, the productivity of this link is evaluated. Links can be broken off at different rates. Whenever the active dynamics of links is sufficiently fast, population structure leads to a simple transformation of the payoff matrix, effectively changing the game under consideration, and hence paving the way for reciprocators to dominate defectors. We derive analytical conditions for evolutionary stability.

  6. Resolving the active versus passive conundrum for head direction cells.

    PubMed

    Shinder, M E; Taube, J S

    2014-06-13

    Head direction (HD) cells have been identified in a number of limbic system structures. These cells encode the animal's perceived directional heading in the horizontal plane and are dependent on an intact vestibular system. Previous studies have reported that the responses of vestibular neurons within the vestibular nuclei are markedly attenuated when an animal makes a volitional head turn compared to passive rotation. This finding presents a conundrum in that if vestibular responses are suppressed during an active head turn how is a vestibular signal propagated forward to drive and update the HD signal? This review identifies and discusses four possible mechanisms that could resolve this problem. These mechanisms are: (1) the ascending vestibular signal is generated by more than just vestibular-only neurons, (2) not all vestibular-only neurons contributing to the HD pathway have firing rates that are attenuated by active head turns, (3) the ascending pathway may be spared from the affects of the attenuation in that the HD system receives information from other vestibular brainstem sites that do not include vestibular-only cells, and (4) the ascending signal is affected by the inhibited vestibular signal during an active head turn, but the HD circuit compensates and uses the altered signal to accurately update the current HD. Future studies will be needed to decipher which of these possibilities is correct.

  7. High-activity barley alpha-amylase by directed evolution.

    PubMed

    Wong, Dominic W S; Batt, Sarah B; Lee, Charles C; Robertson, George H

    2004-10-01

    Barley alpha-amylase isozyme 2 was cloned into and constitutively secreted by Saccharomyces cervisiae. The gene coding for the wild-type enzyme was subjected to directed evolution. Libraries of mutants were screened by halo formation on starch agar plates, followed by high-throughput liquid assay using dye-labeled starch as the substrate. The concentration of recombinant enzyme in the culture supernatant was determined by immunodetection, and used for the calculation of specific activity. After three rounds of directed evolution, one mutant (Mu322) showed 1000 times the total activity and 20 times the specific activity of the wild-type enzyme produced by the same yeast expression system. Comparison of the amino acid sequence of this mutant with the wild type revealed five substitutions: Q44H, R303K and F325Y in domain A, and T94A and R128Q in domain B. Two of these mutations. Q44H and R303K, result in amino acids highly conserved in cereal alpha-amylases. R303K and F325Y are located in the raw starch-binding fragment of the enzyme molecule. PMID:15635937

  8. Design and biological activity of {beta}-sheet breaker peptide conjugates

    SciTech Connect

    Rocha, Sandra Cardoso, Isabel; Boerner, Hans; Pereira, Maria Carmo; Saraiva, Maria Joao; Coelho, Manuel

    2009-03-06

    The sequence LPFFD (iA{beta}{sub 5}) prevents amyloid-{beta} peptide (A{beta}) fibrillogenesis and neurotoxicity, hallmarks of Alzheimer's disease (AD), as previously demonstrated. In this study iA{beta}{sub 5} was covalently linked to poly(ethylene glycol) (PEG) and the activity of conjugates was assessed and compared to the activity of the peptide alone by in vitro studies. The conjugates were characterized by MALDI-TOF. Competition binding assays established that conjugates retained the ability to bind A{beta} with similar strength as iA{beta}{sub 5}. Transmission electron microscopy analysis showed that iA{beta}{sub 5} conjugates inhibited amyloid fibril formation, which is in agreement with binding properties observed for the conjugates towards A{beta}. The conjugates were also able to prevent amyloid-induced cell death, as evaluated by activation of caspase 3. These results demonstrated that the biological activity of iA{beta}{sub 5} is not affected by the pegylation process.

  9. The Marfan Syndrome. Fact Sheet [and] Physical Education and Activity Guidelines.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National Marfan Foundation, Port Washington, NY.

    This document consists of two brochures, the first explaining the Marfan Syndrome and a second providing guidelines for physical education and activity for people who have this syndrome are provided. The brochure on factual information about Marfan syndrome outlines the associated medical problems involving the cardiovascular system, the skeleton,…

  10. Dental Charting. Learning Activities, Unit Tests, Progress Chart, and Work Sheet.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Texas Univ., Austin. Center for Occupational Curriculum Development.

    These materials are part of a series dealing with skills and information needed by students in dental assisting. The individualized student materials are suitable for classroom, laboratory, or cooperative training programs. These student materials, designed to be used with the Dental Charting Student Manual, consist of learning activities, unit…

  11. Bullous pemphigoid autoantibodies directly induce blister formation without complement activation.

    PubMed

    Ujiie, Hideyuki; Sasaoka, Tetsumasa; Izumi, Kentaro; Nishie, Wataru; Shinkuma, Satoru; Natsuga, Ken; Nakamura, Hideki; Shibaki, Akihiko; Shimizu, Hiroshi

    2014-11-01

    Complement activation and subsequent recruitment of inflammatory cells at the dermal/epidermal junction are thought to be essential for blister formation in bullous pemphigoid (BP), an autoimmune blistering disease induced by autoantibodies against type XVII collagen (COL17); however, this theory does not fully explain the pathological features of BP. Recently, the involvement of complement-independent pathways has been proposed. To directly address the question of the necessity of the complement activation in blister formation, we generated C3-deficient COL17-humanized mice. First, we show that passive transfer of autoantibodies from BP patients induced blister formation in neonatal C3-deficient COL17-humanized mice without complement activation. By using newly generated human and murine mAbs against the pathogenic noncollagenous 16A domain of COL17 with high (human IgG1, murine IgG2), low (murine IgG1), or no (human IgG4) complement activation abilities, we demonstrate that the deposition of Abs, and not complements, is relevant to the induction of blister formation in neonatal and adult mice. Notably, passive transfer of BP autoantibodies reduced the amount of COL17 in lesional mice skin, as observed in cultured normal human keratinocytes treated with the same Abs. Moreover, the COL17 depletion was associated with a ubiquitin/proteasome pathway. In conclusion, the COL17 depletion induced by BP autoantibodies, and not complement activation, is essential for the blister formation under our experimental system.

  12. Direct detection of relic active and sterile neutrinos

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Yu-Feng

    2016-05-01

    Both active and sterile sub-eV neutrinos can form the cosmic neutrino background in the early Universe. We consider the beta-decaying (e.g., 3H) and EC-decaying (e.g., 163Ho) nuclei as the promising targets to capture relic neutrinos in the laboratory. We calculate the capture rates of relic electron neutrinos and antineutrinos against the corresponding beta decay or electron capture (EC) decay backgrounds in the (3+Ns) flavor mixing scheme, and discuss the future prospect in terms of the PTOLEMY project. We stress that such direct measurements of hot DM might not be hopeless in the long term.

  13. Quantity, Quality, and Variety of Pupil Responses during an Open-Communication Structured Group Directed Reading-Thinking Activity and a Closed Communication Structured Group Directed Reading Activity.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Petre, Richard M.

    The quality, quantity, and variety of pupil responses while using two different group directed reading activities, the Directed Reading Activity (DRA), and the Directed Reading-Thinking Activity (DRTA) were investigated in this study. The subjects, all fourth graders in two nearby communities, were grouped into above-grade-level, at-grade-level,…

  14. Utilizing Chimeric Antigen Receptors to Direct Natural Killer Cell Activity

    PubMed Central

    Hermanson, David L.; Kaufman, Dan S.

    2015-01-01

    Natural killer (NK) cells represent an attractive lymphocyte population for cancer immunotherapy due to their ability to lyse tumor targets without prior sensitization and without need for human leukocyte antigens-matching. Chimeric antigen receptors (CARs) are able to enhance lymphocyte targeting and activation toward diverse malignancies. CARs consist of an external recognition domain (typically a small chain variable fragment) directed at a specific tumor antigen that is linked with one or more intracellular signaling domains that mediate lymphocyte activation. Most CAR studies have focused on their expression in T cells. However, use of CARs in NK cells is starting to gain traction because they provide a method to redirect these cells more specifically to target refractory cancers. CAR-mediated anti-tumor activity has been demonstrated using NK cell lines, as well as NK cells isolated from peripheral blood, and NK cells produced from human pluripotent stem cells. This review will outline the CAR constructs that have been reported in NK cells with a focus on comparing the use of different signaling domains in combination with other co-activating domains. PMID:25972867

  15. Direct inhibitors of InhA active against Mycobacterium tuberculosis

    PubMed Central

    Manjunatha, Ujjini H.; Rao, Srinivasa P. S.; Kondreddi, Ravinder Reddy; Noble, Christian G.; Camacho, Luis R.; Tan, Bee H.; Ng, Seow H.; Ng, Pearly Shuyi; Ma, N. L.; Lakshminarayana, Suresh B.; Herve, Maxime; Barnes, S. Whitney; Yu, Weixuan; Kuhen, Kelli; Blasco, Francesca; Beer, David; Walker, John R.; Tonge, Peter J.; Glynne, Richard; Smith, Paul W.; Diagana, Thierry T.

    2015-01-01

    New chemotherapeutic agents are urgently required to combat the global spread of multi-drug resistant tuberculosis (MDR-TB). The mycobacterial enoyl reductase, InhA, is one of the few clinically-validated targets in tuberculosis drug discovery. Here, we report the identification of a new class of direct InhA inhibitors, the 4-hydroxy-2-pyridones, using phenotypic high-throughput whole-cell screening. This class of orally-active compounds showed potent bactericidal activity against common isoniazid-resistant TB clinical isolates. Biophysical studies revealed that 4-hydroxy-2-pyridones bound specifically to InhA in an NADH-dependent manner and blocked the enoyl-substrate binding pocket. The lead compound NITD-916 directly blocked InhA in a dose-dependent manner and showed in vivo efficacy in acute and established mouse models of infection by Mycobacterium tuberculosis. Collectively, our structural and biochemical data open up new avenues for rational structure-guided optimization of the 4-hydroxy-2-pyridone class of compounds for the treatment of MDR-TB. PMID:25568071

  16. Ohm's law for a current sheet

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lyons, L. R.; Speiser, T. W.

    1985-01-01

    The paper derives an Ohm's law for single-particle motion in a current sheet, where the magnetic field reverses in direction across the sheet. The result is considerably different from the resistive Ohm's law often used in MHD studies of the geomagnetic tail. Single-particle analysis is extended to obtain a self-consistency relation for a current sheet which agrees with previous results. The results are applicable to the concept of reconnection in that the electric field parallel to the current is obtained for a one-dimensional current sheet with constant normal magnetic field. Dissipated energy goes directly into accelerating particles within the current sheet.

  17. Curcumin directly inhibits the transport activity of GLUT1

    PubMed Central

    Gunnink, Leesha K.; Alabi, Ola D.; Kuiper, Benjamin D.; Gunnink, Stephen M.; Schuiteman, Sam J.; Strohbehn, Lauren E.; Hamilton, Kathryn E.; Wrobel, Kathryn E.; Louters, Larry L.

    2016-01-01

    Curcumin, a major ingredient in turmeric, has a long history of medicinal applications in a wide array of maladies including treatment for diabetes and cancer. Seemingly counterintuitive to the documented hypoglycemic effects of curcumin, however, a recent report indicates that curcumin directly inhibits glucose uptake in adipocytes. The major glucose transporter in adipocytes is GLUT4. Therefore, this study investigates the effects of curcumin in cell lines where the major transporter is GLUT1. We report that curcumin has an immediate inhibitory effect on basal glucose uptake in L929 fibroblast cells with a maximum inhibition of 80% achieved at 75 μM curcumin. Curcumin also blocks activation of glucose uptake by azide, glucose deprivation, hydroxylamine, or phenylarsine oxide. Inhibition does not increase with exposure time and the inhibitory effects reverse within an hour. Inhibition does not appear to involve a reaction between curcumin and the thiol side chain of a cysteine residue since neither prior treatment of cells with iodoacetamide nor curcumin with cysteine alters curcumin’s inhibitory effects. Curcumin is a mixed inhibitor reducing the Vmax of 2DG transport by about half with little effect on the Km. The inhibitory effects of curcumin are not additive to the effects of cytochalasin B and 75 μM curcumin actually reduces specific cytochalasin B binding by 80%. Taken together, the data suggest that curcumin binds directly to GLUT1 at a site that overlaps with the cytochalasin B binding site and thereby inhibits glucose transport. A direct inhibition of GLUT proteins in intestinal epithelial cells would likely reduce absorption of dietary glucose and contribute to a hypoglycemic effect of curcumin. Also, inhibition of GLUT1 activity might compromise cancer cells that overexpress GLUT1 and be another possible mechanism for the documented anticancer effects of curcumin. PMID:27039889

  18. Human filarial Wolbachia lipopeptide directly activates human neutrophils in vitro.

    PubMed

    Tamarozzi, F; Wright, H L; Johnston, K L; Edwards, S W; Turner, J D; Taylor, M J

    2014-10-01

    The host inflammatory response to the Onchocerca volvulus endosymbiont, Wolbachia, is a major contributing factor in the development of chronic pathology in humans (onchocerciasis/river blindness). Recently, the toll-like pattern recognition receptor motif of the major inflammatory ligands of filarial Wolbachia, membrane-associated diacylated lipoproteins, was functionally defined in murine models of pathology, including mediation of neutrophil recruitment to the cornea. However, the extent to which human neutrophils can be activated in response to this Wolbachia pattern recognition motif is not known. Therefore, the responses of purified peripheral blood human neutrophils to a synthetic N-terminal diacylated lipopeptide (WoLP) of filarial Wolbachia peptidoglycan-associated lipoprotein (PAL) were characterized. WoLP exposure led to a dose-dependent activation of healthy, human neutrophils that included gross morphological alterations and modulation of surface expressed integrins involved in tethering, rolling and extravasation. WoLP exposure induced chemotaxis but not chemokinesis of neutrophils, and secretion of the major neutrophil chemokine, interleukin 8. WoLP also induced and primed the respiratory burst, and enhanced neutrophil survival by delay of apoptosis. These results indicate that the major inflammatory motif of filarial Wolbachia lipoproteins directly activates human neutrophils in vitro and promotes a molecular pathway by which human neutrophils are recruited to sites of Onchocerca parasitism. PMID:24909063

  19. Coseismic Faulting and Folding in an Active Thrust Sheet over Multiple Rupture Cycles Resolved by Integrating Surface and Subsurface Records of Earthquake Deformation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stockmeyer, J. M.; Shaw, J. H.; Brown, N.; Rhodes, E. J.; Wang, M.; Lavin, L. C.; Guan, S.

    2015-12-01

    Many recent thrust fault earthquakes have involved coseismic surface faulting and folding, revealing the complex nature of surface deformation in active thrust sheets. In this study, we characterize deformation along the active Southern Junggar Thrust (SJT) in the Junggar basin, NW China - which sourced the 1906 M8 Manas earthquake - to gain insight into how fault slip at depth is partitioned between faulting and folding strains at Earth's surface by integrating deformed terrace records, subsurface geophysical data, and luminescence geochronology. Using a 1-m digital elevation model and field surveys, we have mapped the precise geometries of fluvial terraces across the entire Tugulu anticline, which lies in the hanging wall of the SJT. These profiles reveal progressive uplift of several terraces along prominent fault scarps where the SJT is surface-emergent. Similarly aged terraces are folded in the backlimb of the Tugulu fold, providing a sequential record of surface folding. These folded terraces are progressively rotated such that the oldest terraces are dipping much steeper than younger terraces within the same fold limb. Using 2- and 3-D seismic reflection data, we integrate subsurface deformation constraints with records of surface strain. Structural interpretations of these seismic data define the geometry of the SJT and reveal that folding is localized across synclinal bends along the SJT. We evaluate a range of distinct fault-related fold models (e.g. fault-bend folding, shear fault-bend folding) to assess which structural style best describes the geometries of the subsurface and surface fold patterns. By doing so, we have the opportunity to directly relate surface fault slip measures from terrace folding and uplift to total fault slip at depth. This integration of surface and subsurface deformation - combined with constraints on terrace ages from post-IR IRSL geochronology - allows us to characterize how fault slip and seismic moment are partitioned

  20. Vertically scanned laser sheet microscopy.

    PubMed

    Dong, Di; Arranz, Alicia; Zhu, Shouping; Yang, Yujie; Shi, Liangliang; Wang, Jun; Shen, Chen; Tian, Jie; Ripoll, Jorge

    2014-01-01

    Laser sheet microscopy is a widely used imaging technique for imaging the three-dimensional distribution of a fluorescence signal in fixed tissue or small organisms. In laser sheet microscopy, the stripe artifacts caused by high absorption or high scattering structures are very common, greatly affecting image quality. To solve this problem, we report here a two-step procedure which consists of continuously acquiring laser sheet images while vertically displacing the sample, and then using the variational stationary noise remover (VSNR) method to further reduce the remaining stripes. Images from a cleared murine colon acquired with a vertical scan are compared with common stitching procedures demonstrating that vertically scanned light sheet microscopy greatly improves the performance of current light sheet microscopy approaches without the need for complex changes to the imaging setup and allows imaging of elongated samples, extending the field of view in the vertical direction.

  1. Subsonic longitudinal and lateral-directional static aerodynamic characteristics of a general research fighter configuration employing a jet sheet vortex generator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Huffman, J. K.; Fox, C. H., Jr.; Ziegler, H.

    1978-01-01

    A configuration concept for developing vortex lift, which replaces the physical wing strake with a jet sheet generated fluid strake, was investigated on a general research fighter model. The vertical and horizontal location of the jet sheet with respect to the wing leading edge was studied over a momentum coefficient range from 0 to 0.24 in the Langley 7- by 10-foot high speed tunnel over a Mach number range from 0.3 to 0.8. The angle of attack range studied was from -2 to 30 deg at sideslip angles of 0, -5, and 5 deg. Test data are presented without analysis.

  2. Electromagnetic augmentation for casting of thin metal sheets

    SciTech Connect

    Hull, J.R.

    1989-07-11

    This patent describes an apparatus for the horizontal casting of thin metal sheets. The apparatus consists of: vessel means containing a molten metal and including an aperture for discharging the molten metal in the form of a thin horizontal sheet; mold means for receiving, confining and directing the molten metal sheet and for removing heat from the molten metal sheet in effecting the solidification thereof; electromagnetic conducting means including a DC conductor disposed about the metal sheet for directing a DC magnetic field along the direction of displacement of and about the metal sheet; and a DC voltage source coupled to the metal sheet for establishing a direct current therein, such that the direct current interacts with the DC magnetic field for generating and exerting a constant uniform levitation force on the metal sheet wherein the pressure exerted by the metal sheet upon the mold means is reduced to zero.

  3. Single cell activity reveals direct electron transfer in methanotrophic consortia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McGlynn, Shawn E.; Chadwick, Grayson L.; Kempes, Christopher P.; Orphan, Victoria J.

    2015-10-01

    Multicellular assemblages of microorganisms are ubiquitous in nature, and the proximity afforded by aggregation is thought to permit intercellular metabolic coupling that can accommodate otherwise unfavourable reactions. Consortia of methane-oxidizing archaea and sulphate-reducing bacteria are a well-known environmental example of microbial co-aggregation; however, the coupling mechanisms between these paired organisms is not well understood, despite the attention given them because of the global significance of anaerobic methane oxidation. Here we examined the influence of interspecies spatial positioning as it relates to biosynthetic activity within structurally diverse uncultured methane-oxidizing consortia by measuring stable isotope incorporation for individual archaeal and bacterial cells to constrain their potential metabolic interactions. In contrast to conventional models of syntrophy based on the passage of molecular intermediates, cellular activities were found to be independent of both species intermixing and distance between syntrophic partners within consortia. A generalized model of electric conductivity between co-associated archaea and bacteria best fit the empirical data. Combined with the detection of large multi-haem cytochromes in the genomes of methanotrophic archaea and the demonstration of redox-dependent staining of the matrix between cells in consortia, these results provide evidence for syntrophic coupling through direct electron transfer.

  4. Active Learning for Directed Exploration of Complex Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Burl, Michael C.; Wang, Esther

    2009-01-01

    Physics-based simulation codes are widely used in science and engineering to model complex systems that would be infeasible to study otherwise. Such codes provide the highest-fidelity representation of system behavior, but are often so slow to run that insight into the system is limited. For example, conducting an exhaustive sweep over a d-dimensional input parameter space with k-steps along each dimension requires k(sup d) simulation trials (translating into k(sup d) CPU-days for one of our current simulations). An alternative is directed exploration in which the next simulation trials are cleverly chosen at each step. Given the results of previous trials, supervised learning techniques (SVM, KDE, GP) are applied to build up simplified predictive models of system behavior. These models are then used within an active learning framework to identify the most valuable trials to run next. Several active learning strategies are examined including a recently-proposed information-theoretic approach. Performance is evaluated on a set of thirteen synthetic oracles, which serve as surrogates for the more expensive simulations and enable the experiments to be replicated by other researchers.

  5. Discoveries from Revisiting Apollo Direct Active Measurements of Lunar Dust

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    O'Brien, Brian

    2010-05-01

    New missions to the moon being developed by China, Japan, India, USA, Russia and Europe and possibilities of human missions about 2020 face the reality that 6 Apollo expeditions did not totally manage or mitigate effects of easily-mobilised and very "sticky" lunar dust on humans and hardware. Laboratory and theoretical modelling cannot reliably simulate the complex lunar environments that affect dynamical movements of lunar dust. The only direct active measurements of lunar dust during Apollo were made by matchbox-sized minimalist Dust Detector Experiments (DDEs) deployed to transmit some 30 million digital measurements from Apollo 11, 12, 14 and 15. These were misplaced or relatively ignored until 2009, when a self-funded suite of discoveries (O'Brien Geophys. Research Letters FIX 6 May 2099) revealed unexpected properties of lunar dust, such as the adhesive force being stronger as illumination increased. We give the first reports of contrasting effects, contamination or cleansing, from rocket exhausts of Apollo 11, 12, 14 and 15 Lunar Modules leaving the moon. We further strengthen the importance of collateral dust inadvertently splashed on Apollo hardware by human activities. Dust management designs and mission plans require optimum use of such in situ measurements, extended by laboratory simulations and theoretical modelling.

  6. Single cell activity reveals direct electron transfer in methanotrophic consortia.

    PubMed

    McGlynn, Shawn E; Chadwick, Grayson L; Kempes, Christopher P; Orphan, Victoria J

    2015-10-22

    Multicellular assemblages of microorganisms are ubiquitous in nature, and the proximity afforded by aggregation is thought to permit intercellular metabolic coupling that can accommodate otherwise unfavourable reactions. Consortia of methane-oxidizing archaea and sulphate-reducing bacteria are a well-known environmental example of microbial co-aggregation; however, the coupling mechanisms between these paired organisms is not well understood, despite the attention given them because of the global significance of anaerobic methane oxidation. Here we examined the influence of interspecies spatial positioning as it relates to biosynthetic activity within structurally diverse uncultured methane-oxidizing consortia by measuring stable isotope incorporation for individual archaeal and bacterial cells to constrain their potential metabolic interactions. In contrast to conventional models of syntrophy based on the passage of molecular intermediates, cellular activities were found to be independent of both species intermixing and distance between syntrophic partners within consortia. A generalized model of electric conductivity between co-associated archaea and bacteria best fit the empirical data. Combined with the detection of large multi-haem cytochromes in the genomes of methanotrophic archaea and the demonstration of redox-dependent staining of the matrix between cells in consortia, these results provide evidence for syntrophic coupling through direct electron transfer. PMID:26375009

  7. Bi-Directional SIFT Predicts a Subset of Activating Mutations

    PubMed Central

    Lee, William; Lazarus, Robert A.; Zhang, Zemin

    2009-01-01

    Advancements in sequencing technologies have empowered recent efforts to identify polymorphisms and mutations on a global scale. The large number of variations and mutations found in these projects requires high-throughput tools to identify those that are most likely to have an impact on function. Numerous computational tools exist for predicting which mutations are likely to be functional, but none that specifically attempt to identify mutations that result in hyperactivation or gain-of-function. Here we present a modified version of the SIFT (Sorting Intolerant from Tolerant) algorithm that utilizes protein sequence alignments with homologous sequences to identify functional mutations based on evolutionary fitness. We show that this bi-directional SIFT (B-SIFT) is capable of identifying experimentally verified activating mutants from multiple datasets. B-SIFT analysis of large-scale cancer genotyping data identified potential activating mutations, some of which we have provided detailed structural evidence to support. B-SIFT could prove to be a valuable tool for efforts in protein engineering as well as in identification of functional mutations in cancer. PMID:20011534

  8. Synthesis of TiO2 nanorod-decorated graphene sheets and their highly efficient photocatalytic activities under visible-light irradiation.

    PubMed

    Lee, Eunwoo; Hong, Jin-Yong; Kang, Haeyoung; Jang, Jyongsik

    2012-06-15

    The titanium dioxide (TiO(2)) nanorod-decorated graphene sheets photocatalysts with different TiO(2) nanorods population have been synthesized by a simple non-hydrolytic sol-gel approach. Electron microscopy and X-ray diffraction analysis indicated that the TiO(2) nanorods are well-dispersed and successfully anchored on the graphene sheet surface through the formation of covalent bonds between Ti and C atoms. The photocatalytic activities are evaluated in terms of the efficiencies of photodecomposition and adsorption of methylene blue (MB) in aqueous solution under visible-light irradiation. The as-synthesized TiO(2) nanorod-decorated graphene sheets showed unprecedented photodecomposition efficiency compared to the pristine TiO(2) nanorods and the commercial TiO(2) (P-25, Degussa) under visible-light. It is believed that this predominant photocatalytic activity is due to the synergistic contribution of both a retarded charge recombination rate caused by a high electronic mobility of graphene and an increased surface area originated from nanometer-sized TiO(2) nanorods. Furthermore, photoelectrochemical study is performed to give deep insights into the primary roles of graphene that determines the photocatalytic activity. PMID:22497717

  9. Biomolecular Science (Fact Sheet)

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    2012-04-01

    A brief fact sheet about NREL Photobiology and Biomolecular Science. The research goal of NREL's Biomolecular Science is to enable cost-competitive advanced lignocellulosic biofuels production by understanding the science critical for overcoming biomass recalcitrance and developing new product and product intermediate pathways. NREL's Photobiology focuses on understanding the capture of solar energy in photosynthetic systems and its use in converting carbon dioxide and water directly into hydrogen and advanced biofuels.

  10. Synthesis of N-doped microporous carbon via chemical activation of polyindole-modified graphene oxide sheets for selective carbon dioxide adsorption.

    PubMed

    Saleh, Muhammad; Chandra, Vimlesh; Kemp, K Christian; Kim, Kwang S

    2013-06-28

    A polyindole-reduced graphene oxide (PIG) hybrid was synthesized by reducing graphene oxide sheets in the presence of polyindole. We have shown PIG as a material for capturing carbon dioxide (CO2). The PIG hybrid was chemically activated at temperatures of 400-800 °C, which resulted in nitrogen (N)-doped graphene sheets. The N-doped graphene sheets are microporous with an adsorption pore size of 0.6 nm for CO2 and show a maximum (Brunauer, Emmet and Teller) surface area of 936 m(2) g(-1). The hybrid activated at 600 °C (PIG6) possesses a surface area of 534 m(2) g(-1) and a micropore volume of 0.29 cm(3) g(-1). PIG6 shows a maximum CO2 adsorption capacity of 3.0 mmol g(-1) at 25 °C and 1 atm. This high CO2 uptake is due to the highly microporous character of the material and its N content. The material retains its original adsorption capacity on recycling even after 10 cycles (within experimental error). PIG6 also shows high adsorption selectivity ratios for CO2 over N2, CH4 and H2 of 23, 4 and 85 at 25 °C, respectively.

  11. LABORATORY DIRECTED RESEARCH AND DEVELOPMENT PROGRAM ACTIVITIES FOR FY2002.

    SciTech Connect

    FOX,K.J.

    2002-12-31

    Brookhaven National (BNL) Laboratory is a multidisciplinary laboratory that carries out basic and applied research in the physical, biomedical, and environmental sciences, and in selected energy technologies. It is managed by Brookhaven Science Associates, LLC, under contract with the U. S. Department of Energy. BNL's total annual budget has averaged about $450 million. There are about 3,000 employees, and another 4,500 guest scientists and students who come each year to use the Laboratory's facilities and work with the staff. The BNL Laboratory Directed Research and Development (LDRD) Program reports its status to the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) annually in March, as required by DOE Order 4 1 3.2A, ''Laboratory Directed Research and Development,'' January 8, 2001, and the LDRD Annual Report guidance, updated February 12, 1999. The LDRD Program obtains its funds through the Laboratory overhead pool and operates under the authority of DOE Order 413.2A. The goals and objectives of BNL's LDRD Program can be inferred from the Program's stated purposes. These are to (1) encourage and support the development of new ideas and technology, (2) promote the early exploration and exploitation of creative and innovative concepts, and (3) develop new ''fundable'' R&D projects and programs. The emphasis is clearly articulated by BNL to be on supporting exploratory research ''which could lead to new programs, projects, and directions'' for the Laboratory. As one of the premier scientific laboratories of the DOE, BNL must continuously foster groundbreaking scientific research. At Brookhaven National Laboratory one such method is through its LDRD Program. This discretionary research and development tool is critical in maintaining the scientific excellence and long-term vitality of the Laboratory. Additionally, it is a means to stimulate the scientific community and foster new science and technology ideas, which becomes a major factor in achieving and maintaining staff excellence

  12. A statistical study of the inner edge of the electron plasma sheet and the net convection potential as a function of geomagnetic activity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiang, F.; Kivelson, M. G.; Walker, R. J.; Khurana, K. K.; Angelopoulos, V.; Hsu, T.

    2011-06-01

    A widely accepted explanation of the location of the inner edge of the electron plasma sheet and its dependence on electron energy is based on drift motions of individual particles. The boundary is identified as the separatrix between drift trajectories linking the tail to the dayside magnetopause (open paths) and trajectories closed around the Earth. A statistical study of the inner edge of the electron plasma sheet using THEMIS Electrostatic Analyzer plasma data from November 2007 to April 2009 enabled us to examine this model. Using a dipole magnetic field and a Volland-Stern electric field with shielding, we find that a steady state drift boundary model represents the average location of the electron plasma sheet boundary and reflects its variation with the solar wind electric field in the local time region between 21:00 and 06:00, except at high activity levels. However, the model does not reproduce the observed energy dispersion of the boundaries. We have also used the location of the inner edge of the electron plasma sheet to parameterize the potential drop of the tail convection electric field as a function of solar wind electric field (Esw) and geomagnetic activity. The range of Esw examined is small because the data were acquired near solar minimum. For the range of values tested (meaningful statistics only for Esw < 2 mV/m), reasonably good agreement is found between the potential drop of the tail convection electric field inferred from the location of the inner edge and the polar cap potential drop calculated from the model of Boyle et al. (1997).

  13. Laboratory Directed Research and Development Program Activities for FY 2008.

    SciTech Connect

    Looney,J.P.; Fox, K.

    2009-04-01

    with limited management filtering to encourage the creativity of individual researchers. The competition is open to all BNL staff in programmatic, scientific, engineering, and technical support areas. Researchers submit their project proposals to the Assistant Laboratory Director for Policy and Strategic Planning. A portion of the LDRD budget is held for the Strategic LDRD (S-LDRD) category. Projects in this category focus on innovative R&D activities that support the strategic agenda of the Laboratory. The Laboratory Director entertains requests or articulates the need for S-LDRD funds at any time. Strategic LDRD Proposals also undergo rigorous peer review; the approach to review is tailored to the size and scope of the proposal. These Projects are driven by special opportunities, including: (1) Research project(s) in support of Laboratory strategic initiatives as defined and articulated by the Director; (2) Research project(s) in support of a Laboratory strategic hire; (3) Evolution of Program Development activities into research and development activities; and (4) ALD proposal(s) to the Director to support unique research opportunities. The goals and objectives of BNL's LDRD Program can be inferred fronl the Program's stated purposes. These are to (1) encourage and support the development of new ideas and technology, (2) promote the early exploration and exploitation of creative and innovative concepts, and (3) develop new 'fundable' R&D projects and programs. The emphasis is clearly articulated by BNL to be on supporting exploratory research 'which could lead to new programs, projects, and directions' for the Laboratory. We explicitly indicate that research conducted under the LDRD Program should be highly innovative, and an element of high risk as to success is acceptable. To be one of the premier DOE National Laboratories, BNL must continuously foster groundbreaking scientific research. At Brookhaven National Laboratory one such method is through its LDRD Program

  14. The ligand for osteoprotegerin (OPGL) directly activates mature osteoclasts.

    PubMed

    Burgess, T L; Qian, Y; Kaufman, S; Ring, B D; Van, G; Capparelli, C; Kelley, M; Hsu, H; Boyle, W J; Dunstan, C R; Hu, S; Lacey, D L

    1999-05-01

    Osteoprotegerin (OPG) and OPG-ligand (OPGL) potently inhibit and stimulate, respectively, osteoclast differentiation (Simonet, W.S., D.L. Lacey, C.R. Dunstan, M. Kelley, M.-S. Chang, R. Luethy, H.Q. Nguyen, S. Wooden, L. Bennett, T. Boone, et al. 1997. Cell. 89:309-319; Lacey, D.L., E. Timms, H.-L. Tan, M.J. Kelley, C.R. Dunstan, T. Burgess, R. Elliott, A. Colombero, G. Elliott, S. Scully, et al. 1998. Cell. 93: 165-176), but their effects on mature osteoclasts are not well understood. Using primary cultures of rat osteoclasts on bone slices, we find that OPGL causes approximately sevenfold increase in total bone surface erosion. By scanning electron microscopy, OPGL-treated osteoclasts generate more clusters of lacunae on bone suggesting that multiple, spatially associated cycles of resorption have occurred. However, the size of individual resorption events are unchanged by OPGL treatment. Mechanistically, OPGL binds specifically to mature OCs and rapidly (within 30 min) induces actin ring formation; a marked cytoskeletal rearrangement that necessarily precedes bone resorption. Furthermore, we show that antibodies raised against the OPGL receptor, RANK, also induce actin ring formation. OPGL-treated mice exhibit increases in blood ionized Ca++ within 1 h after injections, consistent with immediate OC activation in vivo. Finally, we find that OPG blocks OPGL's effects on both actin ring formation and bone resorption. Together, these findings indicate that, in addition to their effects on OC precursors, OPGL and OPG have profound and direct effects on mature OCs and indicate that the OC receptor, RANK, mediates OPGL's effects. PMID:10225954

  15. Direct Observations Of Microbial Activity At Extreme Pressures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sharma, A.; Scott, J. H.; Cody, G. D.; Fogel, M.; Hazen, R. M.; Hemley, R. J.; Huntress, W. T.

    2002-12-01

    Microbial communities adapt to a wide range of pressures, temperatures, salinities, pH, and oxidation states. Although, significant attention has been focused on the effects of high and low temperature on physiology, there is some evidence that elevated pressure may also manifest interesting effects on cellular physiology, such as enzyme inactivation, cell-membrane breach, and suppression of protein interactions with various substrates. However, exactly how these factors affect intact cells is not well understood. In this study, we have adapted diamond anvil cells to explore the effects of high pressure on microbial life. We used the rate of microbial formate oxidation as a probe of metabolic viability. The utilization of formate by microorganisms is a fundamental metabolic process in anaerobic environments. We monitored in-situ microbial formate oxidation via molecular spectroscopy for Shewanella oneidensis strain MR1 and Escherichia coli strain MG1655 at high pressures (68 to 1060 MPa). At pressures of 1200 to 1600 MPa, living bacteria resided in fluid inclusions in ice-VI crystals and continued to be viable upon subsequent release to ambient pressures (0.1 MPa). Furthermore, direct microscopic observations indicate that these cells maintain their ability for cellular division upon decompression from such high pressures. Evidence of microbial viability and activity at these extreme pressures expands by an order of magnitude the range of conditions representing the habitable zone in the solar system. These results imply that pressure may not be a significant impediment to life. The maximum pressure explored in this work is equivalent to a depth of ~ 50 km below Earth's crust, or ~ 160 km in a hypothetical ocean. The pressures encountered at the depths of thick ice caps and deep crustal subsurface may not be a limiting factor for the existence of life. This suggests that deep (water/ice) layers of Europa, Callisto, or Ganymede, subduction zones on Earth, and the

  16. Formation of proteasome-PA700 complexes directly correlates with activation of peptidase activity.

    PubMed

    Adams, G M; Crotchett, B; Slaughter, C A; DeMartino, G N; Gogol, E P

    1998-09-15

    The proteolytic activity of the eukaryotic 20S proteasome is stimulated by a multisubunit activator, PA700, which forms both 1:1 and 2:1 complexes with the proteasome. Formation of the complexes is enhanced by an additional protein assembly called modulator, which also stimulates the enzymatic activity of the proteasome only in the presence of PA700. Here we show that the binding of PA700 to the proteasome is cooperative, as is the activation of the proteasome's intrinsic peptidase activity. Modulator increases the extent of complex formation and peptidase activation, while preserving the cooperative kinetics. Furthermore, the increase in activity is not linear with the number of PA700 assemblies bound to the proteasome, but rather with the number of proteasome-PA700 complexes, regardless of the PA700:proteasome stoichiometry. Hence the stimulation of peptidase activity is fully (or almost fully) effected by the binding of a single PA700 to the 20S proteasome. The stimulation of peptidase by modulator is explained entirely by the increased number of proteasome-PA700 complexes formed in its presence, rather than by any substantial direct stimulation of catalysis. These observations are consistent with a model in which PA700, either alone or assisted by modulator, promotes conformational changes in the proteasome that activate the catalytic sites and/or facilitate access of peptide substrates to these sites. PMID:9737872

  17. Large-scale thrusting along the northern margin of the Tibetan Plateau and the southwest Tarim basin: 230 km long active Hotian thrust sheet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suppe, J.; Wang, X.; He, D.; Liang, H.

    2015-12-01

    We present the geometry, kinematics and mechanics of large-scale active thrusting in the western Kunlunshan and southwest Tarim basin, which accounts for ~130-165km total shortening of Tarim crust at the northern margin of Tibet. The great frontal structure is the ~230km long bedding-parallel Hotian thrust sheet, which is perhaps the longest active intact thrust sheet in the world, composed of flat-lying strata of the Tarim basin sliding northward on a regional gypsum detachment at the base of the Cenozoic sequence. The toe of the Hotian thrust ramps to the surface two thirds of the way across the Tarim basin, forming the Selibuya-Mazartag hills in the Taklamakan sand desert. At the southern edge of the Tarim basin in the Kunlunshan foothills, a set of high-amplitude anticlines are growing by complex break-forward ramping and wedging in the Hotian thrust sheet as it steps up to the Cenozoic gypsum detachment from a regional Cambrian evaporate detachment that extends under Tibet. More interior structures such as the Tiklik thrust bring older strata and Proterozoic basement to the surface, together with their Cenozoic Tarim cover in the Buya basin. The Cambrian detachment also extends northward under the Tarim basin with minor hanging-wall deformation that locally warps the overlying Hotian thrust sheet, producing a complete syntectonic record in seismically imaged growth strata of its northward motion over these warps. Seismic profiles in the southwest Tarim foothill belt also reveal widespread growth strata that record much of the structural history beginning in the early Pliocene Atushi Formation. Ages of seismic reflectors are calibrated to a surface magnetostratigraphic sequence (Zheng et al., 2000). The beginning of thrusting and folding in the southwest Tarim basin north of the Tiklik thrust is dated at 3.6Ma with shortening >25km and a progressive northward propagation toward the Selibuya-Mazartag hills. The overall shortening rate is ~10 mm/yr. The gypsum

  18. Bipartite functions of the CREB co-activators selectively direct alternative splicing or transcriptional activation.

    PubMed

    Amelio, Antonio L; Caputi, Massimo; Conkright, Michael D

    2009-09-16

    The CREB regulated transcription co-activators (CRTCs) regulate many biological processes by integrating and converting environmental inputs into transcriptional responses. Although the mechanisms by which CRTCs sense cellular signals are characterized, little is known regarding how CRTCs contribute to the regulation of cAMP inducible genes. Here we show that these dynamic regulators, unlike other co-activators, independently direct either pre-mRNA splice-site selection or transcriptional activation depending on the cell type or promoter context. Moreover, in other scenarios, the CRTC co-activators coordinately regulate transcription and splicing. Mutational analyses showed that CRTCs possess distinct functional domains responsible for regulating either pre-mRNA splicing or transcriptional activation. Interestingly, the CRTC1-MAML2 oncoprotein lacks the splicing domain and is incapable of altering splice-site selection despite robustly activating transcription. The differential usage of these distinct domains allows CRTCs to selectively mediate multiple facets of gene regulation, indicating that co-activators are not solely restricted to coordinating alternative splicing with increase in transcriptional activity.

  19. New method for evaluating antibacterial activity directly on fabric.

    PubMed

    Lashen, E S

    1971-04-01

    Bacteriostasis of treated fabric was evaluated directly by a colony count made on the treated fabric after impregnation with seeded agar containing triphenyltetrazolium chloride and incubation in a horizontal, suspended position in a petri dish.

  20. Future Directions of Inquiry in Adapted Physical Activity.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Reid, Greg

    2000-01-01

    Sketches some future trends of inquiry in adapted physical activity. These include investigation into ethics in adapted physical activity. Empirically based issues of inquiry include physical activity as a dependent measure, diverse and changing populations, theoretical and applied research, nomothetic and idiographic research perspectives,…

  1. Cellular Cholesterol Directly Activates Smoothened in Hedgehog Signaling.

    PubMed

    Huang, Pengxiang; Nedelcu, Daniel; Watanabe, Miyako; Jao, Cindy; Kim, Youngchang; Liu, Jing; Salic, Adrian

    2016-08-25

    In vertebrates, sterols are necessary for Hedgehog signaling, a pathway critical in embryogenesis and cancer. Sterols activate the membrane protein Smoothened by binding its extracellular, cysteine-rich domain (CRD). Major unanswered questions concern the nature of the endogenous, activating sterol and the mechanism by which it regulates Smoothened. We report crystal structures of CRD complexed with sterols and alone, revealing that sterols induce a dramatic conformational change of the binding site, which is sufficient for Smoothened activation and is unique among CRD-containing receptors. We demonstrate that Hedgehog signaling requires sterol binding to Smoothened and define key residues for sterol recognition and activity. We also show that cholesterol itself binds and activates Smoothened. Furthermore, the effect of oxysterols is abolished in Smoothened mutants that retain activation by cholesterol and Hedgehog. We propose that the endogenous Smoothened activator is cholesterol, not oxysterols, and that vertebrate Hedgehog signaling controls Smoothened by regulating its access to cholesterol. PMID:27545348

  2. Silicon sheets by redox assisted chemical exfoliation.

    PubMed

    Tchalala, Mohamed Rachid; Ali, Mustapha Ait; Enriquez, Hanna; Kara, Abdelkader; Lachgar, Abdessadek; Yagoubi, Said; Foy, Eddy; Vega, Enrique; Bendounan, Azzedine; Silly, Mathieu G; Sirotti, Fausto; Nitshe, Serge; Chaudanson, Damien; Jamgotchian, Haik; Aufray, Bernard; Mayne, Andrew J; Dujardin, Gérald; Oughaddou, Hamid

    2013-11-01

    In this paper, we report the direct chemical synthesis of silicon sheets in gram-scale quantities by chemical exfoliation of pre-processed calcium disilicide (CaSi2). We have used a combination of x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, transmission electron microscopy and energy-dispersive x-ray spectroscopy to characterize the obtained silicon sheets. We found that the clean and crystalline silicon sheets show a two-dimensional hexagonal graphitic structure. PMID:24131870

  3. Thrombin-Mediated Direct Activation of Proteinase-Activated Receptor-2: Another Target for Thrombin Signaling.

    PubMed

    Mihara, Koichiro; Ramachandran, Rithwik; Saifeddine, Mahmoud; Hansen, Kristina K; Renaux, Bernard; Polley, Danny; Gibson, Stacy; Vanderboor, Christina; Hollenberg, Morley D

    2016-05-01

    Thrombin is known to signal to cells by cleaving/activating a G-protein-coupled family of proteinase-activated receptors (PARs). The signaling mechanism involves the proteolytic unmasking of an N-terminal receptor sequence that acts as a tethered receptor-activating ligand. To date, the recognized targets of thrombin cleavage and activation for signaling are PAR1 and PAR4, in which thrombin cleaves at a conserved target arginine to reveal a tethered ligand. PAR2, which like PAR1 is also cleaved at an N-terminal arginine to unmask its tethered ligand, is generally regarded as a target for trypsin but not for thrombin signaling. We now show that thrombin, at concentrations that can be achieved at sites of acute injury or in a tumor microenvironment, can directly activate PAR2 vasorelaxation and signaling, stimulating calcium and mitogen-activated protein kinase responses along with triggeringβ-arrestin recruitment. Thus, PAR2 can be added alongside PAR1 and PAR4 to the targets, whereby thrombin can affect tissue function.

  4. Modeling Harris Current Sheets with Themis Observations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kepko, L.; Angelopoulos, V.; McPherron, R. L.; Apatenkov, S.; Glassmeier, K.-H.

    2010-01-01

    Current sheets are ubiquitous in nature. occurring in such varied locations as the solar atmosphere. the heliosphere, and the Earth's magnetosphere. The simplest current sheet is the one-dimensional Harris neutral sheet, with the lobe field strength and scale-height the only free parameters. Despite its simplicity, confirmation of the Harris sheet as a reasonable description of the Earth's current sheet has remained elusive. In early 2009 the orbits of the 5 THEMIS probes fortuitously aligned such that profiles of the Earth's current sheet could be modeled in a time dependent manner. For the few hours of alignment we have calculated the time history of the current sheet parameters (scale height and current) in the near-Earth region. during both quiet and active times. For one particular substorm. we further demonstrate good quantitative agreement with the diversion of cross tail current inferred from the Harris modeling with the ionospheric current inferred from ground magnetometer data.

  5. Novel assay for direct fluorescent imaging of sialidase activity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tomin, A.; Shkandina, T.; Bilyy, R.

    2011-07-01

    Here we describe a novel approach to sialidase activity estimation. Sialidases (EC 3.2.1.18, exo-α-sialidases), also known as neuraminidases, are the group of enzymes, which hydrolyze the glycoside bound between terminal sialic acid and subsequent carbohydrate residue in glycoproteins and glycolipids. Sialic acids are the group of monosaccharides with acidic properties, since they are acetylated or glycolylated derivates of neuraminic acid. Flu and some other viruses use neuraminidase activity to infect host cells. The level of sialylation was shown to be tightly connected with tumor cell invasiveness and metastatic potential, sialylation level also determines the clearance of aged or virus-infected cells. Thus, detection of sialidase activity is of primary importance for clinical diagnostics as well as life science research. The authors developed the assay for both visualization and estimation of sialidase activity in living cells. Previously known methods for sialidase activity detection required destruction of cellular material, or were low-sensitive, or provided no information on the activity localization in certain intracellular compartment. To overcome these problems, a fluorogenic neuraminidase substrate, 4-MUNA was utilized, and the method for detection of neuraminidase activity using fluorescent microscopy was proposed, it provided a high signal level and information on cellular localization of the studied enzyme. By using this approach the increase of sialidase activity on apoptotic cells was demonstrated in comparison to viable and primary necrotic cells.

  6. 78 FR 52169 - Agency Information Collection Activities; Comment Request; Federal Direct Stafford/Ford Loan and...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-08-22

    ... Agency Information Collection Activities; Comment Request; Federal Direct Stafford/Ford Loan and Federal Direct Subsidized/ Unsubsidized Stafford/Ford Loan Master Promissory Note AGENCY: Department of Education... of Collection: Federal Direct Stafford/Ford Loan and Federal Direct Subsidized/Unsubsidized...

  7. Direct imaging of macrophage activation during PDT treatment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Song, Sheng; Zhou, Feifan; Chen, Wei R.; Xing, Da

    2011-11-01

    Mounting evidence describes a more complex progress of macrophage activation during photodynamic therapy (PDT), which performing distinct immunological functions and different physiologies on surrounding cells and tissues. Macrophage-targeted PDT has been applied in the selective killing of cells involved in inflammation and tumor. We have previously shown that PDT-mediated tumor cells apoptosis can induce a higher level immune response than necrosis, and enhance the macrophage activation. However, the molecular mechanism of macrophage activation during PDT-induced apoptotic cells (AC) still unclear. Here, we use confocal microscopy to image the phagocytosis of tumor cells by macrophages. We also observed that PDT-treated AC can activate Toll-like receptors (TLRs) which are present on macrophages surface. Besides, the increase in nitric oxide (NO) formation in macrophages was detected in real time by a laser scanning microscopy. This study provided more details for understanding the molecular mechanism of the immune response induced by PDT-treated AC.

  8. Direct imaging of macrophage activation during PDT treatment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Song, Sheng; Zhou, Feifan; Chen, Wei R.; Xing, Da

    2012-03-01

    Mounting evidence describes a more complex progress of macrophage activation during photodynamic therapy (PDT), which performing distinct immunological functions and different physiologies on surrounding cells and tissues. Macrophage-targeted PDT has been applied in the selective killing of cells involved in inflammation and tumor. We have previously shown that PDT-mediated tumor cells apoptosis can induce a higher level immune response than necrosis, and enhance the macrophage activation. However, the molecular mechanism of macrophage activation during PDT-induced apoptotic cells (AC) still unclear. Here, we use confocal microscopy to image the phagocytosis of tumor cells by macrophages. We also observed that PDT-treated AC can activate Toll-like receptors (TLRs) which are present on macrophages surface. Besides, the increase in nitric oxide (NO) formation in macrophages was detected in real time by a laser scanning microscopy. This study provided more details for understanding the molecular mechanism of the immune response induced by PDT-treated AC.

  9. Piccolo Directs Activity Dependent F-Actin Assembly from Presynaptic Active Zones via Daam1

    PubMed Central

    Wagh, Dhananjay; Terry-Lorenzo, Ryan; Waites, Clarissa L.; Leal-Ortiz, Sergio A.; Maas, Christoph; Reimer, Richard J.; Garner, Craig C.

    2015-01-01

    The dynamic assembly of filamentous (F) actin plays essential roles in the assembly of presynaptic boutons, the fusion, mobilization and recycling of synaptic vesicles (SVs), and presynaptic forms of plasticity. However, the molecular mechanisms that regulate the temporal and spatial assembly of presynaptic F-actin remain largely unknown. Similar to other F-actin rich membrane specializations, presynaptic boutons contain a set of molecules that respond to cellular cues and trans-synaptic signals to facilitate activity-dependent assembly of F-actin. The presynaptic active zone (AZ) protein Piccolo has recently been identified as a key regulator of neurotransmitter release during SV cycling. It does so by coordinating the activity-dependent assembly of F-Actin and the dynamics of key plasticity molecules including Synapsin1, Profilin and CaMKII. The multidomain structure of Piccolo, its exquisite association with the AZ, and its ability to interact with a number of actin-associated proteins suggest that Piccolo may function as a platform to coordinate the spatial assembly of F-actin. Here we have identified Daam1, a Formin that functions with Profilin to drive F-actin assembly, as a novel Piccolo binding partner. We also found that within cells Daam1 activation promotes Piccolo binding, an interaction that can spatially direct the polymerization of F-Actin. Moreover, similar to Piccolo and Profilin, Daam1 loss of function impairs presynaptic-F-actin assembly in neurons. These data suggest a model in which Piccolo directs the assembly of presynaptic F-Actin from the AZ by scaffolding key actin regulatory proteins including Daam1. PMID:25897839

  10. Initiation and Eruption Process of Magnetic Flux Rope from Solar Active Region NOAA 11719 to Earth-directed CME

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vemareddy, P.; Zhang, J.

    2014-12-01

    An eruption event launched from the solar active region (AR) NOAA 11719 is investigated based on coronal EUV observations and photospheric magnetic field measurements obtained from the Solar Dynamic Observatory. The AR consists of a filament channel originating from a major sunspot and its south section is associated with an inverse-S sigmoidal system as observed in Atmospheric Imaging Assembly passbands. We regard the sigmoid as the main body of the flux rope (FR). There also exists a twisted flux bundle crossing over this FR. This overlying flux bundle transforms in shape similar to kink-rise evolution, which corresponds with the rise motion of the FR. The emission measure and temperature along the FR exhibits an increasing trend with its rising motion, indicating reconnection in the thinning current sheet underneath the FR. Net magnetic flux of the AR, evaluated at north and south polarities, showed decreasing behavior whereas the net current in these fluxes exhibits an increasing trend. Because the negative (positive) flux has a dominant positive (negative) current, the chirality of AR flux system is likely negative (left handed) in order to be consistent with the chirality of inverse S-sigmoidal FR. This analysis of magnetic fields of the source AR suggests that the cancelling fluxes are prime factors of the monotonous twisting of the FR system, reaching to a critical state to trigger kink instability and rise motion. This rise motion may have led to the onset of the torus instability, resulting in an Earth-directed coronal mass ejection, and the progressive reconnection in the thinning current sheet beneath the rising FR led to the M6.5 flare.

  11. INITIATION AND ERUPTION PROCESS OF MAGNETIC FLUX ROPE FROM SOLAR ACTIVE REGION NOAA 11719 TO EARTH-DIRECTED CME

    SciTech Connect

    Vemareddy, P.; Zhang, J.

    2014-12-20

    An eruption event launched from the solar active region (AR) NOAA 11719 is investigated based on coronal EUV observations and photospheric magnetic field measurements obtained from the Solar Dynamic Observatory. The AR consists of a filament channel originating from a major sunspot and its south section is associated with an inverse-S sigmoidal system as observed in Atmospheric Imaging Assembly passbands. We regard the sigmoid as the main body of the flux rope (FR). There also exists a twisted flux bundle crossing over this FR. This overlying flux bundle transforms in shape similar to kink-rise evolution, which corresponds with the rise motion of the FR. The emission measure and temperature along the FR exhibits an increasing trend with its rising motion, indicating reconnection in the thinning current sheet underneath the FR. Net magnetic flux of the AR, evaluated at north and south polarities, showed decreasing behavior whereas the net current in these fluxes exhibits an increasing trend. Because the negative (positive) flux has a dominant positive (negative) current, the chirality of AR flux system is likely negative (left handed) in order to be consistent with the chirality of inverse S-sigmoidal FR. This analysis of magnetic fields of the source AR suggests that the cancelling fluxes are prime factors of the monotonous twisting of the FR system, reaching to a critical state to trigger kink instability and rise motion. This rise motion may have led to the onset of the torus instability, resulting in an Earth-directed coronal mass ejection, and the progressive reconnection in the thinning current sheet beneath the rising FR led to the M6.5 flare.

  12. MHD bending waves in a current sheet

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Musielak, Z. E.; Suess, S. T.

    1986-01-01

    Transverse MHD bending waves are considered in an isothermal and compressible two-dimensional current sheet of finite thickness in which the magnetic field changes direction and strength. The general form of the wave equation is obtained. It is shown that rotation of the magnetic field across the current sheet prevents the existence of singular points so that continuous spectrum solutions and the concomitant wave decay disappear. Instead, normal modes exist and closed integral solution for arbitrary current sheet structure are found. The results are discussed in terms of small-scale waves on the heliospheric current sheet.

  13. Mapping whole-brain activity with cellular resolution by light-sheet microscopy and high-throughput image analysis (Conference Presentation)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Silvestri, Ludovico; Rudinskiy, Nikita; Paciscopi, Marco; Müllenbroich, Marie Caroline; Costantini, Irene; Sacconi, Leonardo; Frasconi, Paolo; Hyman, Bradley T.; Pavone, Francesco S.

    2016-03-01

    Mapping neuronal activity patterns across the whole brain with cellular resolution is a challenging task for state-of-the-art imaging methods. Indeed, despite a number of technological efforts, quantitative cellular-resolution activation maps of the whole brain have not yet been obtained. Many techniques are limited by coarse resolution or by a narrow field of view. High-throughput imaging methods, such as light sheet microscopy, can be used to image large specimens with high resolution and in reasonable times. However, the bottleneck is then moved from image acquisition to image analysis, since many TeraBytes of data have to be processed to extract meaningful information. Here, we present a full experimental pipeline to quantify neuronal activity in the entire mouse brain with cellular resolution, based on a combination of genetics, optics and computer science. We used a transgenic mouse strain (Arc-dVenus mouse) in which neurons which have been active in the last hours before brain fixation are fluorescently labelled. Samples were cleared with CLARITY and imaged with a custom-made confocal light sheet microscope. To perform an automatic localization of fluorescent cells on the large images produced, we used a novel computational approach called semantic deconvolution. The combined approach presented here allows quantifying the amount of Arc-expressing neurons throughout the whole mouse brain. When applied to cohorts of mice subject to different stimuli and/or environmental conditions, this method helps finding correlations in activity between different neuronal populations, opening the possibility to infer a sort of brain-wide 'functional connectivity' with cellular resolution.

  14. Laboratory Directed Research and Development Program Activities for FY 2007.

    SciTech Connect

    Newman,L.

    2007-12-31

    Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL) is a multidisciplinary laboratory that carries out basic and applied research in the physical, biomedical, and environmental sciences, and in selected energy technologies. It is managed by Brookhaven Science Associates, LLC, (BSA) under contract with the U. S. Department of Energy (DOE). BNL's Fiscal year 2007 budget was $515 million. There are about 2,600 employees, and another 4,500 guest scientists and students who come each year to use the Laboratory's facilities and work with the staff. The BNL Laboratory Directed Research and Development (LDRD) Program reports its status to the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) annually in March, as required by DOE Order 413.2B, 'Laboratory Directed Research and Development', April 19, 2006, and the Roles, Responsibilities, and Guidelines for Laboratory Directed Research and Development at the Department of Energy/National Nuclear Security Administration Laboratories dated June 13, 2006. In accordance this is our Annual Report in which we describe the Purpose, Approach, Technical Progress and Results, and Specific Accomplishments of all LDRD projects that received funding during Fiscal Year 2007. The goals and objectives of BNL's LDRD Program can be inferred from the Program's stated purposes. These are to (1) encourage and support the development of new ideas and technology, (2) promote the early exploration and exploitation of creative and innovative concepts, and (3) develop new 'fundable' R&D projects and programs. The emphasis is clearly articulated by BNL to be on supporting exploratory research 'which could lead to new programs, projects, and directions' for the Laboratory. We explicitly indicate that research conducted under the LDRD Program should be highly innovative, and an element of high risk as to success is acceptable. In the solicitation for new proposals for Fiscal Year 2007 we especially requested innovative new projects in support of RHIC and the Light Source and any of

  15. Drying apparatus for photographic sheet material

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Epstein, P.; Donovan, G.; Lawhite, E. (Inventor)

    1973-01-01

    An elongated drying chamber is provided with transport means for carrying photographic sheet material edgewise with the sheets in end-to-end relationship past a plurality of tubes that issue drying air streams. The tubes are slotted a distance equal to substantially the full width of the sheet material for complete, gentle drying by sheets of air. A common plenum supplies the tubes with heated air; the air is directed from the tube slots at a pronounced angle to the sheet surface to provide for arraying the tubes close to the surface for maximum drying effect while minimizing the danger of mechanical interference between the edges of the sheets and the slots in the tubes. The driver for the transport is housed in an enclosure between the plenum and the drying chamber; an air return duct is provided along another side to complete insulation of the drying chamber from ambient conditions.

  16. A critical review finds styrene lacks direct endocrine disruptor activity.

    PubMed

    Gelbke, Heinz-Peter; Banton, Marcy; Leibold, Edgar; Pemberton, Mark; Samson, Susan Leanne

    2015-01-01

    The European Commission lists styrene (S) as an endocrine disruptor based primarily on reports of increased prolactin (PRL) levels in S-exposed workers. The US Environmental Protection Agency included S in its list of chemicals to be tested for endocrine activity. Therefore, the database of S for potential endocrine activity is assessed. In vitro and in vivo screening studies, as well as non-guideline and guideline investigations in experimental animals indicate that S is not associated with (anti)estrogenic, (anti)androgenic, or thyroid-modulating activity or with an endocrine activity that may be relevant for the environment. Studies in exposed workers have suggested elevated PRL levels that have been further examined in a series of human and animal investigations. While there is only one definitively known physiological function of PRL, namely stimulation of milk production, many normal stress situations may lead to elevations without any chemical exposure. Animal studies on various aspects of dopamine (DA), the PRL-regulating neurotransmitter, in the central nervous system did not give mechanistic explanations on how S may affect PRL levels. Overall, a neuroendocrine disruption of PRL regulation cannot be deduced from a large experimental database. The effects in workers could not consistently be reproduced in experimental animals and the findings in humans represented acute reversible effects clearly below clinical and pathological levels. Therefore, unspecific acute workplace-related stress is proposed as an alternative mode of action for elevated PRL levels in workers. PMID:26406562

  17. Direct Experimental Assessment of Microbial Activity in North Pond Sediments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ferdelman, T. G.; Picard, A.; Morando, M.; Ziebis, W.

    2009-12-01

    North Pond, an isolated sediment pond located at 22°45’N on the western flank of the Mid-Atlantic Ridge, offered the opportunity to study microbial activities in deeply-buried low-activity sediments. About 8 x 15 km in size with sediment maximum thickness of about 300 m, North Pond is completely surrounded by exposed 7 Ma old basement. North Pond lies above the carbonate compensation depth at a water depth about 4500 m; hydrostatic pressure at the seafloor is about 45 MPa and the temperature is near 2°C. During the a R/V MS Merian cruise (MSM-11/1) in February -March 2009, 14 gravity cores of up to 9 m length were successfully obtained, from which samples were taken with 1-m resolution for experimental activity measurements. The goal of the experimental work was 1) to examine potential metabolic pathways in North Pond sediments and carbon assimilation pathways in this low-energy environment, and 2) explore the effects of pressure on microbial metabolic activities. As dissolved oxygen penetrated through all depths, sediments were aerobically sampled, processed and incubated at 4°C. Selected samples were immediately stored at in situ pressure until further use. The microbial uptake of both organic and inorganic carbon in selected North Pond sediment samples was investigated by following the fate of 14C in radio-labeled organic and organic compounds in North Pond sediment slurry incubations. Shipboard and on-shore experiments using 14C-leucine, 14C-glucose and 14C-bicarbonate were performed on selected cores. Day- to month- incubations were performed at 4°C. Parallel incubations were conducted at atmospheric pressure (0.1 MPa) and in situ pressure (~45 MPa). Either whole cell extraction (Kallmeyer et al., Limnol. Oceanogr.: Methods 6, 2008, 238-245) or protein-DNA extraction was carried on after various incubations to determine the fraction of 14C incorporated into cellular components. Formation of 14C-labeled CO2 was determined on samples incubated with 14C

  18. Lightning as a space-weather hazard: UK thunderstorm activity modulated by the passage of the heliospheric current sheet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Owens, M. J.; Scott, C. J.; Bennett, A. J.; Thomas, S. R.; Lockwood, M.; Harrison, R. G.; Lam, M. M.

    2015-11-01

    Lightning flash rates, RL, are modulated by corotating interaction regions (CIRs) and the polarity of the heliospheric magnetic field (HMF) in near-Earth space. As the HMF polarity reverses at the heliospheric current sheet (HCS), typically within a CIR, these phenomena are likely related. In this study, RL is found to be significantly enhanced at the HCS and at 27 days prior/after. The strength of the enhancement depends on the polarity of the HMF reversal at the HCS. Near-Earth solar and galactic energetic particle fluxes are also ordered by HMF polarity, though the variations qualitatively differ from RL, with the main increase occurring prior to the HCS crossing. Thus, the CIR effect on lightning is either the result of compression/amplification of the HMF (and its subsequent interaction with the terrestrial system) or that energetic particle preconditioning of the Earth system prior to the HMF polarity change is central to solar wind lightning coupling mechanism.

  19. SAMS – Sediment Assessment and Monitoring Sheets, SAMS #1, Collecting and Using Fish Tissue Contaminant Data in Monitoring Sediment Remedy Effectiveness, FINAL; OSWER Directive 9200.1-77D

    EPA Science Inventory

    This fact sheet, a Sediment Assessment and Monitoring Sheet #1, was written to supplement the Contaminated Sediment Remediation Guidance for Hazardous Waste Sites, EPA-540-R-05-012, OSWER 9355.0-85, Dec. 2005.

  20. Heterogeneous Effects of Direct Hypoxia Pathway Activation in Kidney Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Salama, Rafik; Masson, Norma; Simpson, Peter; Sciesielski, Lina Katrin; Sun, Min; Tian, Ya-Min; Ratcliffe, Peter John; Mole, David Robert

    2015-01-01

    General activation of hypoxia-inducible factor (HIF) pathways is classically associated with adverse prognosis in cancer and has been proposed to contribute to oncogenic drive. In clear cell renal carcinoma (CCRC) HIF pathways are upregulated by inactivation of the von-Hippel-Lindau tumor suppressor. However HIF-1α and HIF-2α have contrasting effects on experimental tumor progression. To better understand this paradox we examined pan-genomic patterns of HIF DNA binding and associated gene expression in response to manipulation of HIF-1α and HIF-2α and related the findings to CCRC prognosis. Our findings reveal distinct pan-genomic organization of canonical and non-canonical HIF isoform-specific DNA binding at thousands of sites. Overall associations were observed between HIF-1α-specific binding, and genes associated with favorable prognosis and between HIF-2α-specific binding and adverse prognosis. However within each isoform-specific set, individual gene associations were heterogeneous in sign and magnitude, suggesting that activation of each HIF-α isoform contributes a highly complex mix of pro- and anti-tumorigenic effects. PMID:26262842

  1. Chitinase producing bacteria with direct algicidal activity on marine diatoms.

    PubMed

    Li, Yi; Lei, Xueqian; Zhu, Hong; Zhang, Huajun; Guan, Chengwei; Chen, Zhangran; Zheng, Wei; Fu, Lijun; Zheng, Tianling

    2016-01-01

    Chitinase producing bacteria can involve extensively in nutrient cycling and energy flow in the aquatic environment through degradation and utilization of chitin. It is well known that diatoms cells are encased by box-like frustules composed of chitin. Thus the chitin containing of diatoms shall be a natural target of chitinase producing bacteria, however, the interaction between these two organismic groups has not been studied thus far. Therefore, in this study, the algicidal mechanism of one chitinase producing bacterium (strain LY03) on Thalassiosira pseudonana was investigated. The algicidal range and algicidal mode of strain LY03 were first studied, and then bacterial viability, chemotactic ability and direct interaction characteristic between bacteria and diatom were also confirmed. Finally, the characteristic of the intracellular algicidal substance was identified and the algicidal mechanism was determined whereby algicidal bacterial cells showed chemotaxis to algal cells, fastened themselves on algal cells with their flagella, and then produced chitinase to degrade algal cell walls, and eventually caused algal lysis and death. It is the first time to investigate the interaction between chitinase producing bacteria and diatoms, and this novel special interaction mode was confirmed in this study, which will be helpful in protection and utilization of diatoms resources. PMID:26902175

  2. Chitinase producing bacteria with direct algicidal activity on marine diatoms

    PubMed Central

    Li, Yi; Lei, Xueqian; Zhu, Hong; Zhang, Huajun; Guan, Chengwei; Chen, Zhangran; Zheng, Wei; Fu, Lijun; Zheng, Tianling

    2016-01-01

    Chitinase producing bacteria can involve extensively in nutrient cycling and energy flow in the aquatic environment through degradation and utilization of chitin. It is well known that diatoms cells are encased by box-like frustules composed of chitin. Thus the chitin containing of diatoms shall be a natural target of chitinase producing bacteria, however, the interaction between these two organismic groups has not been studied thus far. Therefore, in this study, the algicidal mechanism of one chitinase producing bacterium (strain LY03) on Thalassiosira pseudonana was investigated. The algicidal range and algicidal mode of strain LY03 were first studied, and then bacterial viability, chemotactic ability and direct interaction characteristic between bacteria and diatom were also confirmed. Finally, the characteristic of the intracellular algicidal substance was identified and the algicidal mechanism was determined whereby algicidal bacterial cells showed chemotaxis to algal cells, fastened themselves on algal cells with their flagella, and then produced chitinase to degrade algal cell walls, and eventually caused algal lysis and death. It is the first time to investigate the interaction between chitinase producing bacteria and diatoms, and this novel special interaction mode was confirmed in this study, which will be helpful in protection and utilization of diatoms resources. PMID:26902175

  3. Sheet resistance monitoring of low dose implants using the double implant technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smith, A. K.; Johnson, W. H.; Keenan, W. A.; Rigik, Michael; Kleppinger, Rob

    Sheet resistance has become an industry standard for monitoring high and medium dose ion implants. For low dose there are two sheet resistance techniques available, the direct implant technique and the double implant technique. Careful processing has extended the range of direct sheet resistance measurements down to doses of 2E11 ions/cm 2. The double implant technique requires an initial implant to create an easily measured sheet resistance layer that serves as the test vehicle for the second implant. The dose of the second implant is measured by monitoring the change in the sheet resistance due to the implant damage created by the second implant into the first. This double implant technique is not limited to low dose nor to species that are electrically active in the substrate. The sensitivity of any measurement is defined as the percent change in the measured value divided by the percent change with monitored value. The direct sheet resistance technique has a sensitivity of about unity in the low dose region. For the double implant technique, however, the sensitivity can be increased up to 1.5 by varying the initial dose. The sensitivity of the double implant technique can thus be tailored to the particular dose to be monitored. Several double implant experiments will be reviewed to demonstrate the range, repeatability, accuracy, resolution and sensitivity of the technique.

  4. Activated metallic gold as an agent for direct methoxycarbonylation.

    PubMed

    Xu, Bingjun; Madix, Robert J; Friend, Cynthia M

    2011-12-21

    We have discovered that metallic gold is a highly effective vehicle for the low-temperature vapor-phase carbonylation of methanol by insertion of CO into the O-H bond to form methoxycarbonyl. This reaction contrasts sharply to the carbonylation pathway well known for homogeneously catalyzed carbonylation reactions, such as the synthesis of acetic acid. The methoxycarbonyl intermediate can be further employed in a variety of methoxycarbonylation reactions, without the use or production of toxic chemicals. More generally we observe facile, selective methoxycarbonylation of alkyl and aryl alcohols and secondary amines on metallic gold well below room temperature. A specific example is the synthesis of dimethyl carbonate, which has extensive use in organic synthesis. This work establishes a unique framework for using oxygen-activated metallic gold as a catalyst for energy-efficient, environmentally benign production of key synthetic chemical agents. PMID:22035206

  5. Mercury's Tail Current Sheet from MESSENGER Magnetic Field Measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Al Asad, M.; Johnson, C. L.; Philpott, L. C.; Anderson, B. J.; Korth, H.; Slavin, J. A.; Solomon, S. C.

    2014-12-01

    We have estimated the spatial variations in the position and average thickness of Mercury's magnetospheric tail current sheet from orbital magnetic field data collected by the MErcury Surface, Space ENvironment, GEochemistry, and Ranging (MESSENGER) spacecraft. We have investigated the changes in these average properties with varying solar wind conditions and magnetospheric activity. The time-averaged thickness of the current sheet was obtained from superposed epoch analysis (SEA) of the 1-s-averaged vector magnetic field data within ± 10 min of the identified magnetic equator position at different down-tail distances. The average thickness was then estimated from a given SEA by identifying the time interval during which the field completed a rotation from the sunward to the anti-sunward direction, or vice versa, accompanied by a depression in the field magnitude. We have found that the current sheet has a thickness of ~0.8 RM (where RM is Mercury's radius, or 2440 km) close to the planet (~ 1.1 RM) and thins to ~0.2 RM in the far tail region (~2.8 RM). We examined individual orbits to catalogue the existence and number of current sheet crossings encountered on each orbit. These data allow us to (1) determine whether the thickness obtained from the SEA is an actual thickness or an apparent thickness controlled by rapid motions of the current sheet, and (2) estimate the statistical likelihood of observing the current sheet as a function of down-tail distance. For example, some magnetically quiet orbits that cross the magnetic equator at down-tail distances greater than 2 RM do not record a current sheet crossing and appear to cross closed field lines in the vicinity of the magnetic equator, even though they lie in a region in which the tail current sheet is usually observed. This result suggests that the inner (near-planet) edge of the current sheet is not stationary but may move anti-sunward (or sunward) under quiet (or active) magnetospheric conditions.

  6. 78 FR 11857 - Agency Information Collection Activities; Comment Request; William D. Ford Federal Direct Loan...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-02-20

    ... Agency Information Collection Activities; Comment Request; William D. Ford Federal Direct Loan Program... of Collection: William D. Ford Federal Direct Loan Program (DL) Regulations. OMB Control Number: 1845... Annual Burden Hours: 535,998. Abstract: The William D. Ford Federal Direct Loan Program regulations...

  7. Structural Biology Fact Sheet

    MedlinePlus

    ... Home > Science Education > Structural Biology Fact Sheet Structural Biology Fact Sheet Tagline (Optional) Middle/Main Content Area What is structural biology? Structural biology is a field of science focused ...

  8. Zika Virus Fact Sheet

    MedlinePlus

    ... 2014 Fact sheets Features Commentaries 2014 Multimedia Contacts Zika virus Fact sheet Updated 6 September 2016 Key facts ... and last for 2-7 days. Complications of Zika virus disease After a comprehensive review of evidence, there ...

  9. Optimal swimming of a sheet.

    PubMed

    Montenegro-Johnson, Thomas D; Lauga, Eric

    2014-06-01

    Propulsion at microscopic scales is often achieved through propagating traveling waves along hairlike organelles called flagella. Taylor's two-dimensional swimming sheet model is frequently used to provide insight into problems of flagellar propulsion. We derive numerically the large-amplitude wave form of the two-dimensional swimming sheet that yields optimum hydrodynamic efficiency: the ratio of the squared swimming speed to the rate-of-working of the sheet against the fluid. Using the boundary element method, we show that the optimal wave form is a front-back symmetric regularized cusp that is 25% more efficient than the optimal sine wave. This optimal two-dimensional shape is smooth, qualitatively different from the kinked form of Lighthill's optimal three-dimensional flagellum, not predicted by small-amplitude theory, and different from the smooth circular-arc-like shape of active elastic filaments. PMID:25019709

  10. Optimal swimming of a sheet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Montenegro-Johnson, Thomas D.; Lauga, Eric

    2014-06-01

    Propulsion at microscopic scales is often achieved through propagating traveling waves along hairlike organelles called flagella. Taylor's two-dimensional swimming sheet model is frequently used to provide insight into problems of flagellar propulsion. We derive numerically the large-amplitude wave form of the two-dimensional swimming sheet that yields optimum hydrodynamic efficiency: the ratio of the squared swimming speed to the rate-of-working of the sheet against the fluid. Using the boundary element method, we show that the optimal wave form is a front-back symmetric regularized cusp that is 25% more efficient than the optimal sine wave. This optimal two-dimensional shape is smooth, qualitatively different from the kinked form of Lighthill's optimal three-dimensional flagellum, not predicted by small-amplitude theory, and different from the smooth circular-arc-like shape of active elastic filaments.

  11. 78 FR 22252 - Agency Information Collection Activities; Comment Request; FFEL/Direct Loan/Perkins Military...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-04-15

    ... service deferment and/or post-active duty student deferment and provides his or her loan holder with the... Agency Information Collection Activities; Comment Request; FFEL/ Direct Loan/Perkins Military Service Deferment/Post-Active Duty Student Deferment Request & SCRA Request AGENCY: Federal Student Aid...

  12. Self-Directed Activity-Based Learning and Achievement in High School Chemistry

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bassett, Meighan M.; Martinez, James; Martin, Ellice P.

    2014-01-01

    The effects of student-directed activity-based learning (SDABL) were examined in two high school chemistry classes. Students in the SDABL class were given pretest results, a list of standards to be mastered, and a chart of learning activities categorized by difficulty level. They selected activities to meet their needs and preferences.…

  13. A study of thin liquid sheet flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chubb, Donald L.; Calfo, Frederick D.; Mcconley, Marc W.; Mcmaster, Matthew S.; Afjeh, Abdollah A.

    1993-01-01

    This study was a theoretical and experimental investigation of thin liquid sheet flows in vacuum. A sheet flow created by a narrow slit of width, W, coalesces to a point at a distance, L, as a result of surface tension forces acting at the sheet edges. As the flow coalesces, the fluid accumulates in the sheet edges. The observed triangular shape of the sheet agrees with the calculated triangular result. Experimental results for L/W as a function of Weber number, We, agree with the calculated result, L/W = the sq. root of 8We. The edge cross sectional shape is found to oscillate from elliptic to 'cigar' like to 'peanut' like and then back to elliptic in the flow direction. A theoretical one-dimensional model was developed that yielded only elliptic solutions for the edge cross section. At the points where the elliptic shapes occur, there is agreement between theory and experiment.

  14. Findings from HFRP's Study of Predictors of Participation in Out-of-School Time Activities: Fact Sheet

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Harvard Family Research Project, 2007

    2007-01-01

    Participation in various structured out-of-school time (OST) activities benefits youth socially, emotionally, and academically and may have the most positive effects for youth who are most at risk. Little research, however, has explored the questions of who participates in OST activities and why. The Harvard Family Research Project examined the…

  15. Anisotropic Properties of Stainless Steel—Clad Aluminum Sheet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Daeyong; Hwang, Bum Kyu; Lee, Young Seon; Kim, Ji Hoon; Kim, Min-Joong

    2010-06-01

    The production of a stainless steel—clad aluminum sheet by the cold rolling process is a more efficient and economical approach compared with the other types of processes utilized for the production of such sheets. Because both the stainless steel and aluminum sheets show the highly anisotropic behavior, it is necessary to investigate anisotropic properties of clad sheets for the design of process. In this paper, to investigate the anisotropic properties of stainless steel—clad aluminum sheet, two kinds of clad sheets were considered: STS439/AA3003 and STS439/AA1050/STS304 clad sheets. The uni-axial tension tests at 0, 45 and 90 degrees for the rolling direction were performed to obtained yield stresses and R values. The strain ratio at balanced biaxial tension state was measured from compression disk test. In order to describe the anisotropic behavior of the clad sheet, nonquadratic anisotropic yield function Yld2000-2d was utilized.

  16. 46 CFR 232.4 - Balance sheet accounts.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... Administration's Dividend Policy for Operators Receiving ODS (46 CFR part 283), accounting information for... 46 Shipping 8 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Balance sheet accounts. 232.4 Section 232.4 Shipping... ACTIVITIES UNIFORM FINANCIAL REPORTING REQUIREMENTS Balance Sheet § 232.4 Balance sheet accounts....

  17. 46 CFR 232.4 - Balance sheet accounts.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... Administration's Dividend Policy for Operators Receiving ODS (46 CFR part 283), accounting information for... 46 Shipping 8 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Balance sheet accounts. 232.4 Section 232.4 Shipping... ACTIVITIES UNIFORM FINANCIAL REPORTING REQUIREMENTS Balance Sheet § 232.4 Balance sheet accounts....

  18. 46 CFR 232.4 - Balance sheet accounts.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... Administration's Dividend Policy for Operators Receiving ODS (46 CFR part 283), accounting information for... 46 Shipping 8 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Balance sheet accounts. 232.4 Section 232.4 Shipping... ACTIVITIES UNIFORM FINANCIAL REPORTING REQUIREMENTS Balance Sheet § 232.4 Balance sheet accounts....

  19. 46 CFR 232.4 - Balance sheet accounts.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... Administration's Dividend Policy for Operators Receiving ODS (46 CFR part 283), accounting information for... 46 Shipping 8 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Balance sheet accounts. 232.4 Section 232.4 Shipping... ACTIVITIES UNIFORM FINANCIAL REPORTING REQUIREMENTS Balance Sheet § 232.4 Balance sheet accounts....

  20. 46 CFR 232.4 - Balance sheet accounts.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... Administration's Dividend Policy for Operators Receiving ODS (46 CFR part 283), accounting information for... 46 Shipping 8 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Balance sheet accounts. 232.4 Section 232.4 Shipping... ACTIVITIES UNIFORM FINANCIAL REPORTING REQUIREMENTS Balance Sheet § 232.4 Balance sheet accounts....

  1. 45 CFR 2520.25 - What direct service activities may AmeriCorps members perform?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... disaster preparedness and response), or other human needs. (c) Direct service activities generally refer to... disaster; and (7) Conducting a neighborhood watch program as part of a public safety effort....

  2. 45 CFR 2520.25 - What direct service activities may AmeriCorps members perform?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... disaster preparedness and response), or other human needs. (c) Direct service activities generally refer to... disaster; and (7) Conducting a neighborhood watch program as part of a public safety effort....

  3. 45 CFR 2520.25 - What direct service activities may AmeriCorps members perform?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... disaster preparedness and response), or other human needs. (c) Direct service activities generally refer to... disaster; and (7) Conducting a neighborhood watch program as part of a public safety effort....

  4. 45 CFR 2520.25 - What direct service activities may AmeriCorps members perform?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... disaster preparedness and response), or other human needs. (c) Direct service activities generally refer to... disaster; and (7) Conducting a neighborhood watch program as part of a public safety effort....

  5. 45 CFR 2520.25 - What direct service activities may AmeriCorps members perform?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... disaster preparedness and response), or other human needs. (c) Direct service activities generally refer to... disaster; and (7) Conducting a neighborhood watch program as part of a public safety effort....

  6. UTILITY OF MECHANISTIC MODELS FOR DIRECTING ADVANCED SEPARATIONS RESEARCH & DEVELOPMENT ACTIVITIES: Electrochemically Modulated Separation Example

    SciTech Connect

    Schwantes, Jon M.

    2009-06-01

    The objective for this work was to demonstrate the utility of mechanistic computer models designed to simulate actinide behavior for use in efficiently and effectively directing advanced laboratory R&D activities associated with developing advanced separations methods.

  7. Increased Brain Activity to Infant-Directed Speech in 6- and 13-Month-Old Infants

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zangl, Renate; Mills, Debra L.

    2007-01-01

    This study explored the impact of infant-directed speech (IDS) versus adult-directed speech (ADS) on neural activity to familiar and unfamiliar words in 6- and 13-month-old infants. Event-related potentials were recorded while infants listened to familiar words in IDS, familiar words in ADS, unfamiliar words in IDS, and unfamiliar words in ADS.…

  8. 29 CFR 780.405 - Exemption is direct and does not mean activities are agriculture.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 3 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Exemption is direct and does not mean activities are agriculture. 780.405 Section 780.405 Labor Regulations Relating to Labor (Continued) WAGE AND HOUR DIVISION, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR STATEMENTS OF GENERAL POLICY OR INTERPRETATION NOT DIRECTLY RELATED TO REGULATIONS EXEMPTIONS APPLICABLE TO...

  9. Superfund fact sheet: Benzene. Fact sheet

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1992-09-01

    The fact sheet describes benzene, a chemical that can be found in a variety of products, including petroleum products (e.g. gasoline), some household cleaners, and some glues and adhesives. Explanations of how people are exposed to benzene and how benzene can enter the body and may affect human health are given. The fact sheet is one in a series providing reference information about Superfund issues and is intended for readers with no formal scientific training.

  10. Anisotropy in rupture lines of paper sheets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Menezes-Sobrinho, I. L.; Couto, M. S.; Ribeiro, I. R. B.

    2005-06-01

    We have experimentally investigated the fracture process in paper samples submitted to a uniaxial force. Five types of paper sheets (newsprint, towel, sulfite, silk, and couche papers) were fractured along two orthogonal orientations. In order to characterize the rupture lines of the paper sheets we utilized the Hurst exponent. Our results indicate a dependence of the Hurst exponent on the orientation of the paper sheets for samples of newsprint and, probably, towel and silk papers. For the other types of paper the Hurst exponent does not depend on the direction of crack propagation.

  11. Anisotropy in rupture lines of paper sheets.

    PubMed

    Menezes-Sobrinho, I L; Couto, M S; Ribeiro, I R B

    2005-06-01

    We have experimentally investigated the fracture process in paper samples submitted to a uniaxial force. Five types of paper sheets (newsprint, towel, sulfite, silk, and couche papers) were fractured along two orthogonal orientations. In order to characterize the rupture lines of the paper sheets we utilized the Hurst exponent. Our results indicate a dependence of the Hurst exponent on the orientation of the paper sheets for samples of newsprint and, probably, towel and silk papers. For the other types of paper the Hurst exponent does not depend on the direction of crack propagation. PMID:16089834

  12. Direct Loan Overview Workshop. Participant's Guide.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Department of Education, Washington, DC.

    This training guide for a one-day workshop provides an introduction to the William D. Ford Federal Direct Loan Program for administrative personnel at higher educations institutions. The seven sections of the guide, each corresponding to a single workshop session, include activity sheets, questions for participants to answer, and space for notes.…

  13. Selective synthesis of pure cobalt disulfide on reduced graphene oxide sheets and its high electrocatalytic activity for hydrogen evolution reaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ahn, Seongjoon; Yang, Jieun; Lim, Hyunseob; Shin, Hyeon Suk

    2016-01-01

    We synthesized single-phase CoS2 on a large scale by adding graphene oxide of sufficient quantity via the hydrothermal method using cobalt acetate and thioacetamide as precursors; this produced the hybrid of CoS2 with reduced graphene oxide which exhibited high electrocatalytic activity in the hydrogen evolution reaction.

  14. Direct growth of flower-like manganese oxide on reduced graphene oxide towards efficient oxygen reduction reaction.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Jintao; Guo, Chunxian; Zhang, Lianying; Li, Chang Ming

    2013-07-18

    Three-dimensional manganese oxide is directly grown on reduced graphene oxide (RGO) sheets, exhibiting comparable catalytic activity, higher selectivity and better stability towards oxygen reduction reaction than those of the commercial Pt/XC-72 catalyst. PMID:23745182

  15. Individualized Instruction in Science, Earth-Space Project, Self-Directed Activities.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kuczma, R. M.

    As a supplement to Learning Activity Packages (LAP) of the earth-space project, this manual presents self-directed activities especially designed for individualized instruction. Besides an introduction to LAP characteristics, sets of instructions are given in connection with the metric system, the earth's dimensions, indirect evidence for atomic…

  16. Individualized Instruction in Science, Time-Space-Matter, Self-Directed Activities.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kuczma, R. M.

    As a supplement to Learning Activity Packages (LAP) on the time-space-matter subject, details are presented for self-directed activities. Major descriptions are given on the background of LAP characteristics, metric system, profile graph construction, spectroscope operation, radiant energy measurement, sunspot effects, density determination,…

  17. Correlation of fingertip shear force direction with somatosensory cortical activity in monkey.

    PubMed

    Fortier-Poisson, Pascal; Langlais, Jean-Sébastien; Smith, Allan M

    2016-01-01

    To examine the activity of somatosensory cortex (S1) neurons to self-generated shear forces on the index and thumb, two monkeys were trained to grasp a stationary metal tab with a key grip and exert forces without the fingers slipping in one of four orthogonal directions for 1 s. A majority (∼85%) of slowly adapting and rapidly adapting (RA) S1 neurons had activity modulated with shear force direction. The cells were recorded mainly in areas 1 and 2 of the S1, although some area 3b neurons also responded to shear direction or magnitude. The preferred shear vectors were distributed in every direction, with tuning arcs varying from 50° to 170°. Some RA neurons sensitive to dynamic shear force direction also responded to static shear force but within a narrower range, suggesting that the direction of the shear force may influence the adaptation rate. Other neurons were modulated with shear forces in diametrically opposite directions. The directional sensitivity of S1 cortical neurons is consistent with recordings from cutaneous afferents showing that shear direction, even without slip, is a powerful stimulus to S1 neurons. PMID:26467520

  18. Construction of Self-Supported Three–Dimensional TiO2 Sheeted Networks with Enhanced Photocatalytic Activity

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Xuan; Hu, Chao; Bai, Hua; Yan, Yan; Li, Junfang; Yang, Haifeng; Lu, Xiaojing; Xi, Guangcheng

    2013-01-01

    The degradation of toxic gases and liquids using a catalyst and solar energy is an ideal method, compared with landfill and combustion methods. The search for active semiconductor photocatalysts that efficiently decompose contaminations under light irradiation remains one of the most challenging tasks for solar-energy utilization. In this work, free–supporting three-dimensional (3D) nanosheeted hierarchical porous tungsten, titanium, and tin oxide networks were obtained by a facile Lewis acid catalytic binary template route. These networks possess large macroscopic scale (millimeter–sized) and hierarchical macro/mesoporous nanostructure with high surface area and large pore volume. Photocatalytic degradation of Azo dyes demonstrated that the nanosheets-constructed hierarchical porous networks have high photocatalytic activity and stability. The present synthetic route can serve as the new design concept for functional 3D layered porous nanostructures. PMID:24356418

  19. Construction of Self-Supported Three-Dimensional TiO2 Sheeted Networks with Enhanced Photocatalytic Activity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Xuan; Hu, Chao; Bai, Hua; Yan, Yan; Li, Junfang; Yang, Haifeng; Lu, Xiaojing; Xi, Guangcheng

    2013-12-01

    The degradation of toxic gases and liquids using a catalyst and solar energy is an ideal method, compared with landfill and combustion methods. The search for active semiconductor photocatalysts that efficiently decompose contaminations under light irradiation remains one of the most challenging tasks for solar-energy utilization. In this work, free-supporting three-dimensional (3D) nanosheeted hierarchical porous tungsten, titanium, and tin oxide networks were obtained by a facile Lewis acid catalytic binary template route. These networks possess large macroscopic scale (millimeter-sized) and hierarchical macro/mesoporous nanostructure with high surface area and large pore volume. Photocatalytic degradation of Azo dyes demonstrated that the nanosheets-constructed hierarchical porous networks have high photocatalytic activity and stability. The present synthetic route can serve as the new design concept for functional 3D layered porous nanostructures.

  20. Construction of self-supported three-dimensional TiO2 sheeted networks with enhanced photocatalytic activity.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Xuan; Hu, Chao; Bai, Hua; Yan, Yan; Li, Junfang; Yang, Haifeng; Lu, Xiaojing; Xi, Guangcheng

    2013-12-20

    The degradation of toxic gases and liquids using a catalyst and solar energy is an ideal method, compared with landfill and combustion methods. The search for active semiconductor photocatalysts that efficiently decompose contaminations under light irradiation remains one of the most challenging tasks for solar-energy utilization. In this work, free-supporting three-dimensional (3D) nanosheeted hierarchical porous tungsten, titanium, and tin oxide networks were obtained by a facile Lewis acid catalytic binary template route. These networks possess large macroscopic scale (millimeter-sized) and hierarchical macro/mesoporous nanostructure with high surface area and large pore volume. Photocatalytic degradation of Azo dyes demonstrated that the nanosheets-constructed hierarchical porous networks have high photocatalytic activity and stability. The present synthetic route can serve as the new design concept for functional 3D layered porous nanostructures.

  1. Characterization of Chitosan Nanofiber Sheets for Antifungal Application

    PubMed Central

    Egusa, Mayumi; Iwamoto, Ryo; Izawa, Hironori; Morimoto, Minoru; Saimoto, Hiroyuki; Kaminaka, Hironori; Ifuku, Shinsuke

    2015-01-01

    Chitosan produced by the deacetylation of chitin is a cationic polymer with antimicrobial properties. In this study, we demonstrate the improvement of chitosan properties by nanofibrillation. Nanofiber sheets were prepared from nanofibrillated chitosan under neutral conditions. The Young’s modulus and tensile strength of the chitosan NF sheets were higher than those of the chitosan sheets prepared from dissolving chitosan in acetic acid. The chitosan NF sheets showed strong mycelial growth inhibition against dermatophytes Microsporum and Trichophyton. Moreover, the chitosan NF sheets exhibited resistance to degradation by the fungi, suggesting potentials long-lasting usage. In addition, surface-deacetylated chitin nanofiber (SDCNF) sheets were prepared. The SDCNF sheet had a high Young’s modulus and tensile strength and showed antifungal activity to dermatophytes. These data indicate that nanofibrillation improved the properties of chitosan. Thus, chitosan NF and SDCNF sheets are useful candidates for antimicrobial materials. PMID:26540046

  2. Characterization of Chitosan Nanofiber Sheets for Antifungal Application.

    PubMed

    Egusa, Mayumi; Iwamoto, Ryo; Izawa, Hironori; Morimoto, Minoru; Saimoto, Hiroyuki; Kaminaka, Hironori; Ifuku, Shinsuke

    2015-11-02

    Chitosan produced by the deacetylation of chitin is a cationic polymer with antimicrobial properties. In this study, we demonstrate the improvement of chitosan properties by nanofibrillation. Nanofiber sheets were prepared from nanofibrillated chitosan under neutral conditions. The Young's modulus and tensile strength of the chitosan NF sheets were higher than those of the chitosan sheets prepared from dissolving chitosan in acetic acid. The chitosan NF sheets showed strong mycelial growth inhibition against dermatophytes Microsporum and Trichophyton. Moreover, the chitosan NF sheets exhibited resistance to degradation by the fungi, suggesting potentials long-lasting usage. In addition, surface-deacetylated chitin nanofiber (SDCNF) sheets were prepared. The SDCNF sheet had a high Young's modulus and tensile strength and showed antifungal activity to dermatophytes. These data indicate that nanofibrillation improved the properties of chitosan. Thus, chitosan NF and SDCNF sheets are useful candidates for antimicrobial materials.

  3. Microwave assisted synthesis of sheet-like Cu/BiVO{sub 4} and its activities of various photocatalytic conditions

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, Xi; Li, Li; Yi, Tingting; Zhang, WenZhi; Zhang, Xiuli; Wang, Lili

    2015-09-15

    The Cu/BiVO{sub 4} photocatalyst with visible-light responsivity was prepared by the microwave-assisted hydrothermal method. The phase structures, chemical composition and surface physicochemical properties were well-characterized via X-ray diffraction (XRD), X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), UV–vis diffuse reflectance absorption (UV–vis/DRS), scanning electron microscopy (SEM), and N{sub 2} adsorption–desorption tests. Results indicate that the crystal structure of synthetic composite materials is mainly monoclinic scheelite BiVO{sub 4}, which is not changed with the increasing doping amount of Cu. In addition, the presence of Cu not only enlarges the range of the composite materials under the visible-light response, but also increases the BET value significantly. Compared to pure BiVO{sub 4}, 1% Cu/BiVO{sub 4}-160 performs the highest photocatalytic activity to degrade methylene blue under the irradiation of ultraviolet, visible and simulated sunlight. In addition, the capture experiments prove that the main active species was superoxide radicals during photocatalytic reaction. Moreover, the 1% Cu/BiVO{sub 4}-160 composite shows good photocatalytic stability after three times of recycling. - Graphical abstract: A series of BiVO{sub 4} with different amounts of Cu doping were prepared by the microwave-assisted method, moreover, which performed the high photocatalytic activities to degrade methylene blue under multi-mode. - Highlights: • A series of Cu/BiVO{sub 4} with different amounts of Cu doping were prepared by microwave-assisted synthesis. • The morphologies of as-samples were different with the amount of Cu doping increased. • Compared with pure BiVO{sub 4}, as-Cu/BiVO{sub 4} showed stronger absorption in the visible light region obviously. • 1% Cu/BiVO{sub 4}-160 performed the high photocatalytic activities to degrade methylene blue under multi-mode. • OH{sup •} and h{sup +} both play important roles in the photocatalytic reaction.

  4. Electromagnetic augmentation for casting of thin metal sheets

    DOEpatents

    Hull, John R.

    1989-01-01

    Thin metal sheets are cast by magnetically levitating molten metal deposited in a mold within a ferromagnetic yoke and between AC conducting coils and linearly displacing the magnetically levitated liquid metal while it is being cooled by the water-cooled walls of the mold to form a solid metal sheet. A conducting shield is electrically coupled to the molten metal sheet to provide a return path for eddy currents induced in the metal sheet by the current in the AC conducting coils. In another embodiment, a DC conducting coil is coupled to the metal sheet for providing a direct current therein which interacts with the magnetic field to levitate the moving metal sheet. Levitation of the metal sheet in both molten and solid forms reduces its contact pressure with the mold walls while maintaining sufficient engagement therebetween to permit efficient conductive cooling by the mold through which a coolant fluid may be circulated. The magnetic fields associated with the currents in the aforementioned coils levitate the molten metal sheet while the mold provides for its lateral and vertical confinement. A leader sheet having electromagnetic characteristics similar to those of the molten metal sheet is used to start the casing process and precedes the molten metal sheet through the yoke/coil arrangement and mold and forms a continuous sheet therewith. The yoke/coil arrangement may be either U-shaped with a single racetrack coil or may be rectangular with a pair of spaced, facing bedstead coils.

  5. Photocatalytic decomposition of selected estrogens and their estrogenic activity by UV-LED irradiated TiO2 immobilized on porous titanium sheets via thermal-chemical oxidation.

    PubMed

    Arlos, Maricor J; Liang, Robert; Hatat-Fraile, Melisa M; Bragg, Leslie M; Zhou, Norman Y; Servos, Mark R; Andrews, Susan A

    2016-11-15

    The removal of endocrine disrupting compounds (EDCs) remains a big challenge in water treatment. Risks associated with these compounds are not clearly defined and it is important that the water industry has additional options to increase the resiliency of water treatment systems. Titanium dioxide (TiO2) has potential applications for the removal of EDCs from water. TiO2 has been immobilized on supports using a variety of synthesis methods to increase its feasibility for water treatment. In this study, we immobilized TiO2 through the thermal-chemical oxidation of porous titania sheets. The efficiency of the material to degrade target EDCs under UV-LED irradiation was examined under a wide range of pH conditions. A yeast-estrogen screen assay was used to complement chemical analysis in assessing removal efficiency. All compounds but 17β-estradiol were degraded and followed a pseudo first-order kinetics at all pH conditions tested, with pH 4 and pH 11 showing the most and the least efficient treatments respectively. In addition, the total estrogenic activity was substantially reduced even with the inefficient degradation of 17β-estradiol. Additional studies will be required to optimize different treatment conditions, UV-LED configurations, and membrane fouling mitigation measures to make this technology a more viable option for water treatment. PMID:27469042

  6. Perforating Thin Metal Sheets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Davidson, M. E.

    1985-01-01

    Sheets only few mils thick bonded together, punched, then debonded. Three-step process yields perforated sheets of metal. (1): Individual sheets bonded together to form laminate. (2): laminate perforated in desired geometric pattern. (3): After baking, laminate separates into individual sheets. Developed for fabricating conductive layer on blankets that collect and remove ions; however, perforated foils have other applications - as conductive surfaces on insulating materials; stiffeners and conductors in plastic laminates; reflectors in antenna dishes; supports for thermal blankets; lightweight grille cover materials; and material for mockup of components.

  7. Microwave assisted synthesis of sheet-like Cu/BiVO4 and its activities of various photocatalytic conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Xi; Li, Li; Yi, Tingting; Zhang, WenZhi; Zhang, Xiuli; Wang, Lili

    2015-09-01

    The Cu/BiVO4 photocatalyst with visible-light responsivity was prepared by the microwave-assisted hydrothermal method. The phase structures, chemical composition and surface physicochemical properties were well-characterized via X-ray diffraction (XRD), X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), UV-vis diffuse reflectance absorption (UV-vis/DRS), scanning electron microscopy (SEM), and N2 adsorption-desorption tests. Results indicate that the crystal structure of synthetic composite materials is mainly monoclinic scheelite BiVO4, which is not changed with the increasing doping amount of Cu. In addition, the presence of Cu not only enlarges the range of the composite materials under the visible-light response, but also increases the BET value significantly. Compared to pure BiVO4, 1% Cu/BiVO4-160 performs the highest photocatalytic activity to degrade methylene blue under the irradiation of ultraviolet, visible and simulated sunlight. In addition, the capture experiments prove that the main active species was superoxide radicals during photocatalytic reaction. Moreover, the 1% Cu/BiVO4-160 composite shows good photocatalytic stability after three times of recycling.

  8. Assessing the sensitivity of diffusion MRI to detect neuronal activity directly.

    PubMed

    Bai, Ruiliang; Stewart, Craig V; Plenz, Dietmar; Basser, Peter J

    2016-03-22

    Functional MRI (fMRI) is widely used to study brain function in the neurosciences. Unfortunately, conventional fMRI only indirectly assesses neuronal activity via hemodynamic coupling. Diffusion fMRI was proposed as a more direct and accurate fMRI method to detect neuronal activity, yet confirmative findings have proven difficult to obtain. Given that the underlying relation between tissue water diffusion changes and neuronal activity remains unclear, the rationale for using diffusion MRI to monitor neuronal activity has yet to be clearly established. Here, we studied the correlation between water diffusion and neuronal activity in vitro by simultaneous calcium fluorescence imaging and diffusion MR acquisition. We used organotypic cortical cultures from rat brains as a biological model system, in which spontaneous neuronal activity robustly emerges free of hemodynamic and other artifacts. Simultaneous fluorescent calcium images of neuronal activity are then directly correlated with diffusion MR signals now free of confounds typically encountered in vivo. Although a simultaneous increase of diffusion-weighted MR signals was observed together with the prolonged depolarization of neurons induced by pharmacological manipulations (in which cell swelling was demonstrated to play an important role), no evidence was found that diffusion MR signals directly correlate with normal spontaneous neuronal activity. These results suggest that, whereas current diffusion MR methods could monitor pathological conditions such as hyperexcitability, e.g., those seen in epilepsy, they do not appear to be sensitive or specific enough to detect or follow normal neuronal activity.

  9. Assessing the sensitivity of diffusion MRI to detect neuronal activity directly

    PubMed Central

    Bai, Ruiliang; Stewart, Craig V.; Plenz, Dietmar; Basser, Peter J.

    2016-01-01

    Functional MRI (fMRI) is widely used to study brain function in the neurosciences. Unfortunately, conventional fMRI only indirectly assesses neuronal activity via hemodynamic coupling. Diffusion fMRI was proposed as a more direct and accurate fMRI method to detect neuronal activity, yet confirmative findings have proven difficult to obtain. Given that the underlying relation between tissue water diffusion changes and neuronal activity remains unclear, the rationale for using diffusion MRI to monitor neuronal activity has yet to be clearly established. Here, we studied the correlation between water diffusion and neuronal activity in vitro by simultaneous calcium fluorescence imaging and diffusion MR acquisition. We used organotypic cortical cultures from rat brains as a biological model system, in which spontaneous neuronal activity robustly emerges free of hemodynamic and other artifacts. Simultaneous fluorescent calcium images of neuronal activity are then directly correlated with diffusion MR signals now free of confounds typically encountered in vivo. Although a simultaneous increase of diffusion-weighted MR signals was observed together with the prolonged depolarization of neurons induced by pharmacological manipulations (in which cell swelling was demonstrated to play an important role), no evidence was found that diffusion MR signals directly correlate with normal spontaneous neuronal activity. These results suggest that, whereas current diffusion MR methods could monitor pathological conditions such as hyperexcitability, e.g., those seen in epilepsy, they do not appear to be sensitive or specific enough to detect or follow normal neuronal activity. PMID:26941239

  10. Default network activity, coupled with the frontoparietal control network, supports goal-directed cognition.

    PubMed

    Spreng, R Nathan; Stevens, W Dale; Chamberlain, Jon P; Gilmore, Adrian W; Schacter, Daniel L

    2010-10-15

    Tasks that demand externalized attention reliably suppress default network activity while activating the dorsal attention network. These networks have an intrinsic competitive relationship; activation of one suppresses activity of the other. Consequently, many assume that default network activity is suppressed during goal-directed cognition. We challenge this assumption in an fMRI study of planning. Recent studies link default network activity with internally focused cognition, such as imagining personal future events, suggesting a role in autobiographical planning. However, it is unclear how goal-directed cognition with an internal focus is mediated by these opposing networks. A third anatomically interposed 'frontoparietal control network' might mediate planning across domains, flexibly coupling with either the default or dorsal attention network in support of internally versus externally focused goal-directed cognition, respectively. We tested this hypothesis by analyzing brain activity during autobiographical versus visuospatial planning. Autobiographical planning engaged the default network, whereas visuospatial planning engaged the dorsal attention network, consistent with the anti-correlated domains of internalized and externalized cognition. Critically, both planning tasks engaged the frontoparietal control network. Task-related activation of these three networks was anatomically consistent with independently defined resting-state functional connectivity MRI maps. Task-related functional connectivity analyses demonstrate that the default network can be involved in goal-directed cognition when its activity is coupled with the frontoparietal control network. Additionally, the frontoparietal control network may flexibly couple with the default and dorsal attention networks according to task domain, serving as a cortical mediator linking the two networks in support of goal-directed cognitive processes.

  11. Design and performance of BNR activated sludge systems with flat sheet membranes for solid-liquid separation.

    PubMed

    du Toit, G J G; Ramphao, M C; Parco, V; Wentzel, M C; Ekama, G A

    2007-01-01

    The use of immersed membranes for solid-liquid separation in biological nutrient removal activated sludge (BNRAS) systems was investigated at lab scale. Two laboratory-scale BNR activated sludge systems were run in parallel, one a MBR system and the other a conventional system with secondary settling tanks. Both systems were in 3 reactor anaerobic, anoxic, aerobic UCT configurations. The systems were set up to have, as far as possible, identical design parameters such as reactor mass fractions, recycles and sludge age. Differences were the influent flow and total reactor volumes, and the higher reactor concentrations in the MBR system. The performances of the two systems were extensively monitored and compared to identify and quantify the influence of the membranes on system response. The MBR UCT system exhibited COD, FSA, TKN, TP and TSS removals that were consistently equivalent or superior to the conventional system. Better P removal in the MBR was attributed to lower observed P uptake in the anoxic zone. High nitrate loads to the anoxic reactor appeared to be the determining factor in stimulating P uptake. The MBR UCT system had a greater sludge production than the conventional system. This was partly attributable to the retention of all solids in the MBR reactor. For steady state design this increase is accommodated by increasing the influent unbiodegradable particulate COD fraction. Additionally an attempt was made to determine the Alpha values in the oxygen transfer rate. This paper briefly summarises and compares the results from both systems, and the conclusions that can be drawn from these results.

  12. Epigallocatechin-3-O-Gallate-Loaded Poly(lactic-co-glycolic acid) Fibrous Sheets as Anti-Adhesion Barriers.

    PubMed

    Lee, Jong Ho; Shin, Yong Cheol; Yang, Won Jun; Park, Jong-chul; Hyon, Suong-hyu; Han, Dong-wook

    2015-08-01

    Epigallocatechin-3-O-gallate (EGCG), the main polyphenolic component of green tea, has a wide range of pharmacological activities, including antioxidant, anti-inflammatory, and anti-fibrotic effects. In this study, EGCG-loaded poly(lactic-co-glycolic acid) (PLGA) sheets were prepared by electrospinning nanofibers and evaluating their potential as tissue-adhesion barriers. EGCG-loaded PLGA (E-PLGA) fibrous sheets were electrospun from a PLGA solution containing 8% (w/v) EGCG. The average diameter of E-PLGA fibers was 397 ± 159 nm, which was comparable to that of pure PLGA fibers (459 ± 154 nm). EGCG was uniformly dispersed in E-PLGA sheets without direct chemical interactions. E-PLGA fibrous sheets showed sustained release of EGCG by controlled diffusion and PLGA degradation. The attachment and proliferation of L-929 fibroblastic cells were significantly (p < 0.05) suppressed in E-PLGA sheets. Furthermore, E-PLGA fibrous sheets did not induce any inflammatory response to J774A.1 macrophages. The anti-adhesion efficacy of E-PLGA fibrous sheets was evaluated in the intraperitoneal adhesion model in rats. Two weeks after surgical treatment, macroscopic adhesion (extent and severity) scores and histopathological tissue responses of E-PLGA fibrous sheets were significantly lower than those of non-treated controls and pure PLGA sheets. The results suggest that the scores are comparable, and in some cases superior, to those of other commercialized tissue-adhesion barriers. In conclusion, our study findings suggest that E-PLGA fibrous sheets may be exploited as potential tissue-adhesion barriers for the prevention of post-surgical adhesion formation. PMID:26295146

  13. Dietary regulation of adiponectin by direct and indirect lipid activators of nuclear hormone receptors.

    PubMed

    Rühl, R; Landrier, J F

    2016-01-01

    Adiponectin is an adipokine mainly secreted by adipocytes that presents antidiabetic, anti-inflammatory, and antiatherogenic functions. Therefore, modulation of adiponectin expression represents a promising target for prevention or treatment of several diseases including insulin resistance and type II diabetes. Pharmacological agents such as the nuclear hormone receptor synthetic agonists like peroxisome proliferator activated receptor γ agonists are of particular interest in therapeutic strategies due to their ability to increase the plasma adiponectin concentration. Nutritional approaches are also of particular interest, especially in primary prevention, since some active compounds of our diet (notably vitamins, carotenoids, or other essential nutrients) are direct or indirect lipid-activators of nuclear hormone receptors and are modifiers of adiponectin expression and secretion. The aim of the present review is to summarize current knowledge about the nutritional regulation of adiponectin by derivatives of active compounds naturally present in the diet acting as indirect or direct activators of nuclear hormone receptors.

  14. Electromagnetic augmentation for casting of thin metal sheets

    DOEpatents

    Hull, J.R.

    1987-10-28

    Thin metal sheets are cast by magnetically levitating molten metal deposited in a model within a ferromagnetic yoke and between AC conducting coils and linearly displacing the magnetically levitated liquid metal while it is being cooled by the water-cooled walls of the mold to form a solid metal sheet. A conducting shield is electrically coupled to the molten metal sheet to provide a return path for eddy currents induced in the metal sheet by the current in the AC conducting coils. In another embodiment, a DC conducting coil is coupled to the metal sheet for providing a direct current therein which interacts with the magnetic field to levitate the moving metal sheet. Levitation of the metal sheet in both molten and solid forms reduces its contact pressure with the mold walls while maintaining sufficient engagement therebetween to permit efficient conductive cooling by the mold through which a coolant fluid may be circulated. 8 figs.

  15. Does the vestibular system contribute to head direction cell activity in the rat?

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brown, J. E.; Yates, B. J.; Taube, J. S.; Oman, C. M. (Principal Investigator)

    2002-01-01

    Head direction cells (HDC) located in several regions of the brain, including the anterior dorsal nucleus of the thalamus (ADN), postsubiculum (PoS), and lateral mammillary nuclei (LMN), provide the neural substrate for the determination of head direction. Although activity of HDC is influenced by various sensory signals and internally generated cues, lesion studies and some anatomical and physiological evidence suggest that vestibular inputs are critical for the maintenance of directional sensitivity of these cells. However, vestibular inputs must be transformed considerably in order to signal head direction, and the neuronal circuitry that accomplishes this signal processing has not been fully established. Furthermore, it is unclear why the removal of vestibular inputs abolishes the directional sensitivity of HDC, as visual and other sensory inputs and motor feedback signals strongly affect the firing of these neurons and would be expected to maintain their directional-related activity. Further physiological studies will be required to establish the role of vestibular system in producing HDC responses, and anatomical studies are needed to determine the neural circuitry that mediates vestibular influences on determination of head direction.

  16. Developing Fact Sheets.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Weiler, Robert M.

    1998-01-01

    Presents an assignment that allows preservice health educators to learn how to develop fact sheets for communicating health information. The process of developing fact sheets involves selecting a topic, selecting a target audience, researching the topic, writing the message, constructing the draft, and pretesting the product. Strategies for…

  17. Head Direction Cell Activity Is Absent in Mice without the Horizontal Semicircular Canals

    PubMed Central

    Valerio, Stephane

    2016-01-01

    Head direction (HD) cells fire when an animal faces a particular direction in its environment, and they are thought to represent the neural correlate of the animal's perceived spatial orientation. Previous studies have shown that vestibular information is critical for generating the HD signal but have not delineated whether information from all three semicircular canals or just the horizontal canals, which are primarily sensitive to angular head rotation in the horizontal (yaw) plane, are critical for the signal. Here, we monitored cell activity in the anterodorsal thalamus (ADN), an area known to contain HD cells, in epstatic circler (Ecl) mice, which have a bilateral malformation of the horizontal (lateral) semicircular canals. Ecl mice and their littermates that did not express the mutation (controls) were implanted with recording electrodes in the ADN. Results confirm the important role the horizontal canals play in forming the HD signal. Although normal HD cell activity (Raleigh's r > 0.4) was recorded in control mice, no such activity was found in Ecl mice, although some cells had activity that was mildly modulated by HD (0.4 > r > 0.2). Importantly, we also observed activity in Ecl mice that was best characterized as bursty—a pattern of activity similar to an HD signal but without any preferred firing direction. These results suggest that the neural structure for the HD network remains intact in Ecl mice, but the absence of normal horizontal canals results in an inability to control the network properly and brings about an unstable HD signal. SIGNIFICANCE STATEMENT Cells in the anterior dorsal thalamic nucleus normally fire in relation to the animal's directional heading with respect to the environment—so-called head direction cells. To understand how these head direction cells generate their activity, we recorded single-unit activity from the anterior dorsal thalamus in transgenic mice that lack functional horizontal semicircular canals. We show that

  18. Highly active copper-network catalyst for the direct aldol reaction.

    PubMed

    Ohta, Hidetoshi; Uozumi, Yasuhiro; Yamada, Yoichi M A

    2011-09-01

    The development of a highly active solid-phase catechol-copper network catalyst for direct aldol reaction is described. The catalyst was prepared from an alkyl-chain-linked bis(catechol) and a copper(II) complex. The direct aldol reaction between carbonyl compounds (aldehydes and ketones) and methyl isocyanoacetate was carried out using 0.1-1 mol% [Cu] catalyst to give the corresponding oxazolines at yields of up to 99% and a trans/cis ratio of >99:1. The catalyst was reused with no loss of catalytic activity. A plausible reaction pathway is also described. PMID:21751405

  19. Highly porous activated carbons prepared from carbon rich Mongolian anthracite by direct NaOH activation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Byamba-Ochir, Narandalai; Shim, Wang Geun; Balathanigaimani, M. S.; Moon, Hee

    2016-08-01

    Highly porous activated carbons (ACs) were prepared from Mongolian raw anthracite (MRA) using sodium hydroxide as an activation agent by varying the mass ratio (powdered MRA/NaOH) as well as the mixing method of chemical agent and powdered MRA. The specific BET surface area and total pore volume of the prepared MRA-based activated carbons (MACs) are in the range of 816-2063 m2/g and of 0.55-1.61 cm3/g, respectively. The pore size distribution of MACs show that most of the pores are in the range from large micropores to small mesopores and their distribution can be controlled by the mass ratio and mixing method of the activating agent. As expected from the intrinsic property of the MRA, the highly graphitic surface morphology of prepared carbons was confirmed from Raman spectra and transmission electron microscopy (TEM) studies. Furthermore the FTIR and XPS results reveal that the preparation of MACs with hydrophobic in nature is highly possible by controlling the mixing conditions of activating agent and powdered MRA. Based on all the results, it is suggested that the prepared MACs could be used for many specific applications, requiring high surface area, optimal pore size distribution, proper surface hydrophobicity as well as strong physical strength.

  20. Mechanics of Sheeting Joints

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martel, S. J.

    2015-12-01

    Physical breakdown of rock across a broad scale spectrum involves fracturing. In many areas large fractures develop near the topographic surface, with sheeting joints being among the most impressive. Sheeting joints share many geometric, textural, and kinematic features with other joints (opening-mode fractures) but differ in that they are (a) discernibly curved, (b) open near the topographic surface, and (c) form subparallel to the topographic surface. Where sheeting joints are geologically young, the surface-parallel compressive stresses are typically several MPa or greater. Sheeting joints are best developed beneath domes, ridges, and saddles; they also are reported, albeit rarely, beneath valleys or bowls. A mechanism that accounts for all these associations has been sought for more than a century: neither erosion of overburden nor high lateral compressive stresses alone suffices. Sheeting joints are not accounted for by Mohr-Coulomb shear failure criteria. Principles of linear elastic fracture mechanics, together with the mechanical effect of a curved topographic surface, do provide a basis for understanding sheeting joint growth and the pattern sheeting joints form. Compressive stresses parallel to a singly or doubly convex topographic surface induce a tensile stress perpendicular to the surface at shallow depths; in some cases this alone could overcome the weight of overburden to open sheeting joints. If regional horizontal compressive stresses, augmented by thermal stresses, are an order of magnitude or so greater than a characteristic vertical stress that scales with topographic amplitude, then topographic stress perturbations can cause sheeting joints to open near the top of a ridge. This topographic effect can be augmented by pressure within sheeting joints arising from water, ice, or salt. Water pressure could be particularly important in helping drive sheeting joints downslope beneath valleys. Once sheeting joints have formed, the rock sheets between

  1. RNase H and RNA-directed DNA polymerase: associated enzymatic activities of murine mammary tumor virus.

    PubMed Central

    Dion, A S; Williams, C J; Moore, D H

    1977-01-01

    The RNA-directed DNA polymerase of murine mammary tumor virus, a type B RNA tumor virus, was purified sequentially through DEAE-cellulose, phosphocellulose (step gradient), and phosphocellulose (linear salt gradient) chromatography followed by glycerol sedimentation centrifugation. During all stages of purification, coincident peaks of RNA-directed DNA polymerase activity, templated by polyribocytidylate-oligodeoxyguanidylate, and RNase H digestion of [3H]polyriboadenylate-polydeoxythymidylate were observed, and both enzymatic activities displayed a cation preference for magnesium. Under conditions that removed adventitiously associated nucleases, RNase H activity was found to co-purify with polymerase. The specificity of this nuclease was assayed with various prepared substrates, which indicated that the polymerase-associated RNase H activity was directed only against the RNA strand of an RNA-DNA hybrid. It is highly probable that RNase H (RNA-DNA hybrid: ribonucleotide-hydrolase, EC 3.1.4..34) and RNA-directed DNA polymerase of type B viruses are associated enzymatic activities analogous to those observed for avian and mammalian type C RNA tumor viruses. Images PMID:67221

  2. Emittance Measurements for a Thin Liquid Sheet Flow

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Englehart, Amy N.; McConley, Marc W.; Chubb, Donald L.

    1996-01-01

    The Liquid Sheet Radiator (LSR) is an external flow radiator that uses a triangular-shaped flowing liquid sheet as the radiating surface. It has potentially much lower mass than solid wall radiators such as pumped loop and heat pipe radiators, along with being nearly immune to micrometeoroid penetration. The LSR has an added advantage of simplicity. Surface tension causes a thin (100-300 microns) liquid sheet to coalesce to a point, causing the sheet flow to have a triangular shape. Such a triangular sheet is desirable since it allows for simple collection of the flow at a single point. A major problem for all external flow radiators is the requirement that the working fluid be of very low (approx. 10(sup -8) torr) vapor pressure to keep evaporative losses low. As a result, working fluids are limited to certain oils (such as used in diffusion pumps) for low temperatures (300-400 K) and liquid metals for higher temperatures. Previous research on the LSR has been directed at understanding the fluid mechanics of thin sheet flows and assessing the stability of such flows, especially with regard to the formation of holes in the sheet. Taylor studied extensively the stability of thin liquid sheets both theoretically and experimentally. He showed that thin sheets in a vacuum are stable. The latest research has been directed at determining the emittance of thin sheet flows. The emittance was calculated from spectral transmittance data for the Dow Corning 705 silicone oil. By experimentally setting up a sheet flow, the emittance was also determined as a function of measurable quantities, most importantly, the temperature drop between the top of the sheet and the temperature at the coalescence point of the sheet. Temperature fluctuations upstream of the liquid sheet were a potential problem in the analysis and were investigated.

  3. Photoredox Activation for the Direct β-Arylation of Ketones and Aldehydes

    PubMed Central

    Pirnot, Michael T.; Rankic, Danica A.; Martin, David B. C.; MacMillan, David W. C.

    2013-01-01

    The direct β-activation of saturated aldehydes and ketones has long been an elusive transformation. We found that photoredox catalysis in combination with organocatalysis can lead to the transient generation of 5π-electron β-enaminyl radicals from ketones and aldehydes that rapidly couple with cyano-substituted aryl rings at the carbonyl β-position. This mode of activation is suitable for a broad range of carbonyl β-functionalization reactions and is amenable to enantioselective catalysis. PMID:23539600

  4. Nonlinear techniques for forecasting solar activity directly from its time series

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ashrafi, S.; Roszman, L.; Cooley, J.

    1993-01-01

    This paper presents numerical techniques for constructing nonlinear predictive models to forecast solar flux directly from its time series. This approach makes it possible to extract dynamical in variants of our system without reference to any underlying solar physics. We consider the dynamical evolution of solar activity in a reconstructed phase space that captures the attractor (strange), give a procedure for constructing a predictor of future solar activity, and discuss extraction of dynamical invariants such as Lyapunov exponents and attractor dimension.

  5. Nonlinear techniques for forecasting solar activity directly from its time series

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ashrafi, S.; Roszman, L.; Cooley, J.

    1992-01-01

    Numerical techniques for constructing nonlinear predictive models to forecast solar flux directly from its time series are presented. This approach makes it possible to extract dynamical invariants of our system without reference to any underlying solar physics. We consider the dynamical evolution of solar activity in a reconstructed phase space that captures the attractor (strange), given a procedure for constructing a predictor of future solar activity, and discuss extraction of dynamical invariants such as Lyapunov exponents and attractor dimension.

  6. Extended Corannulenes: Aromatic Bowl/Sheet Hybridization.

    PubMed

    Dutta, Amit K; Linden, Anthony; Zoppi, Laura; Baldridge, Kim K; Siegel, Jay S

    2015-09-01

    Among sheet/sheet polynuclear aromatic hydrocarbon (PAH) hybrids, a buckybowl-graphene hybrid has been used as a model to explore the effects of physical properties of PAHs with distinct planar and bowl regions. Activation of a C(Ar)-F bond was used to synthesize this corannulene/graphenic hybrid. Photophysical and voltammetric studies together with high-level computations revealed curvature and extended π-effects on the properties of these materials. PMID:26216746

  7. Possible Effects on the Stability of the West Antarctic Ice Sheet (WAIS) and Associated Sea-level Rise From Active-Recent Subglacial Volcanism Interpreted from Aeromagnetic and Radar Ice-sounding Observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Behrendt, J. C.

    2009-12-01

    Aeromagnetic profiles (>10,000 km) acquired in the early 1960s over the West Antarctic Ice Sheet (WAIS) combined with coincident aeromagnetic and radar ice sounding in 1978-79 indicated numerous high-amplitude, shallow-source, magnetic anomalies over a very extensive area of the volcanically active West Antarctic rift system interpreted as caused by subglacial volcanic rocks. These early aerogeophysical surveys defined this area as >500,000 km2. Five-kilometer spaced coincident aeromagnetic and radar ice sounding surveys since 1990 provide three dimensional characterization of the magnetic field and bed topography beneath the ice sheet. These 5-50-km width, semicircular magnetic anomalies range from 100->1000 nT as observed ~1 km over the 2-3 km thick ice. Behrendt et al, (2005, 2008) interpreted these anomalies as indicating >1000 "volcanic centers". requiring high remanent normal (and at least 10% reversed) magnetizations in the present field direction. These data have shown that >80% of the anomaly sources at the bed of the WAIS, have been modified by the moving ice into which they were injected, requiring a younger age than the WAIS (about 25 Ma). Behrendt et al., (1994; 2007) conservatively estimated >1 x 106 km3 volume of volcanic sources to account for the area of the "volcanic center" anomalies. Although exposed volcanoes surrounding the WAIS extend in age to ~34 m.y., Mt Erebus, (<1 Ma) Mt. Melbourne, (<0.26 Ma), and Mt. Takahae (<0.1 Ma) are examples of exposed active volcanoes in the WAIS area. However, the great volume of volcanic centers is buried beneath the WAIS. If only a very small percentage of these >1000 volcanic, magnetic-anomaly sources are active today, or in the recent past, in the drainage area of the WAIS, subglacial volcanism may still have a significant effect on the dynamics of the WAIS. Interpreted active subglacial volcanism is revealed by aerogeophysical data reported by Blankenship et al., (1993, Mt. Casertz), and Corr and Vaughan

  8. Direct activation of the Mauthner cell by electric field pulses drives ultrarapid escape responses

    PubMed Central

    Tabor, Kathryn M.; Bergeron, Sadie A.; Horstick, Eric J.; Jordan, Diana C.; Aho, Vilma; Porkka-Heiskanen, Tarja; Haspel, Gal

    2014-01-01

    Rapid escape swims in fish are initiated by the Mauthner cells, giant reticulospinal neurons with unique specializations for swift responses. The Mauthner cells directly activate motoneurons and facilitate predator detection by integrating acoustic, mechanosensory, and visual stimuli. In addition, larval fish show well-coordinated escape responses when exposed to electric field pulses (EFPs). Sensitization of the Mauthner cell by genetic overexpression of the voltage-gated sodium channel SCN5 increased EFP responsiveness, whereas Mauthner ablation with an engineered variant of nitroreductase with increased activity (epNTR) eliminated the response. The reaction time to EFPs is extremely short, with many responses initiated within 2 ms of the EFP. Large neurons, such as Mauthner cells, show heightened sensitivity to extracellular voltage gradients. We therefore tested whether the rapid response to EFPs was due to direct activation of the Mauthner cells, bypassing delays imposed by stimulus detection and transmission by sensory cells. Consistent with this, calcium imaging indicated that EFPs robustly activated the Mauthner cell but only rarely fired other reticulospinal neurons. Further supporting this idea, pharmacological blockade of synaptic transmission in zebrafish did not affect Mauthner cell activity in response to EFPs. Moreover, Mauthner cells transgenically expressing a tetrodotoxin (TTX)-resistant voltage-gated sodium channel retained responses to EFPs despite TTX suppression of action potentials in the rest of the brain. We propose that EFPs directly activate Mauthner cells because of their large size, thereby driving ultrarapid escape responses in fish. PMID:24848468

  9. The effect of gaze direction on three-dimensional face recognition in infant brain activity.

    PubMed

    Yamashita, Wakayo; Kanazawa, So; Yamaguchi, Masami K; Kakigi, Ryusuke

    2012-09-12

    In three-dimensional face recognition studies, it is well known that viewing rotating faces enhance face recognition. For infants, our previous study indicated that 8-month-old infants showed recognition of three-dimensional rotating faces with a direct gaze, and they did not learn with an averted gaze. This suggests that gaze direction may affect three-dimensional face recognition in infants. In this experiment, we used near-infrared spectroscopy to measure infants' hemodynamic responses to averted gaze and direct gaze. We hypothesized that infants would show different neural activity for averted and direct gazes. The responses were compared with the baseline activation during the presentation of non-face objects. We found that the concentration of oxyhemoglobin increased in the temporal cortex on both sides only during the presentation of averted gaze compared with that of the baseline period. This is the first study to show that infants' brain activity in three-dimensional face processing is different between averted gaze and direct gaze.

  10. [Effects of activator and activator + anterior high-pull headgear on the growth direction of Class 2 cases].

    PubMed

    Uner, O; Akkaya, S; Buyruk, F

    1989-04-01

    In this study which the effects of activator and activator + anterior high-pull headgear on the growth direction of skeletal class 2 cases for a period of approximately 9 months; 33 cases having a mean age of 10.59 years; ANB angles 4.5 degrees and over were studied. Activator treatment has been applied to the 11 of the 22 treatment cases, the others have had the activator + anterior high-pull headgear treatment. The control group, 11 patients, has only been observed in terms of the growth and development without having any treatment. At the end of the study; it was found that the decrease in ANB angle and the increase in SL dimension in the treatment groups; the increase in anterior lower face height in the activator group and the increase in the ratio of posterior to anterior face height were statistically significant.

  11. Direct interaction between AR and PAK6 in androgen-stimulated PAK6 activation.

    PubMed

    Liu, Xia; Busby, Jennifer; John, Ciny; Wei, Jianning; Yuan, Xin; Lu, Michael L

    2013-01-01

    A p21-activated kinase 6 (PAK6) was previously identified to be an androgen receptor (AR) interacting protein through a yeast two-hybrid screening. We used hormone responsive prostate cancer LAPC4 and LNCap cell lines as models to study the signaling events associated with androgen stimulation and PAK6. An androgen-stimulated PAK6 kinase activation was observed in LAPC4 cells expressing endogenous PAK6 and in LNCap cells ectopically expressing a wild type PAK6. This activation was likely mediated through a direct interaction between AR and PAK6 since siRNA knock-down of AR in LAPC4 cells downregulated androgen-stimulated PAK6 activation. In addition, LNCap cells expressing a non-AR-interacting PAK6 mutant exhibited dampened androgen-stimulated kinase activation. As a consequence of androgen-stimulated activation, PAK6 was phosphorylated at multiple serine/threonine residues including the AR-interacting domain of PAK6. Furthermore, androgen-stimulation promoted prostate cancer cell motility and invasion were demonstrated in LNCap cells ectopically expressing PAK6-WT. In contrast, LNCap expressing non-AR-interacting mutant PAK6 did not respond to androgen stimulation with increased cell motility and invasion. Our results demonstrate that androgen-stimulated PAK6 activation is mediated through a direct interaction between AR and PAK6 and PAK6 activation promotes prostate cancer cells motility and invasion.

  12. Studies on the Release of Renin by Direct and Reflex Activation of Renal Sympathetic Nerves.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Donald, David E.

    1979-01-01

    Presents data on release of renin during direct and indirect stimulation of renal nerves. Conclusions show that renin release is influenced by change in activity of carotid and cardiopulmonary baroreceptor systems, and excitation of discrete areas of brain and hypothalamus by changes in renal sympathetic nerve. (Author/SA)

  13. Bidirectional Transcription Directs Both Transcriptional Gene Activation and Suppression in Human Cells

    PubMed Central

    Morris, Kevin V.; Santoso, Sharon; Turner, Anne-Marie; Pastori, Chiara; Hawkins, Peter G.

    2008-01-01

    Small RNAs targeted to gene promoters in human cells have been shown to modulate both transcriptional gene suppression and activation. However, the mechanism involved in transcriptional activation has remained poorly defined, and an endogenous RNA trigger for transcriptional gene silencing has yet to be identified. Described here is an explanation for siRNA-directed transcriptional gene activation, as well as a role for non-coding antisense RNAs as effector molecules driving transcriptional gene silencing. Transcriptional activation of p21 gene expression was determined to be the result of Argonaute 2–dependent, post-transcriptional silencing of a p21-specific antisense transcript, which functions in Argonaute 1–mediated transcriptional control of p21 mRNA expression. The data presented here suggest that in human cells, bidirectional transcription is an endogenous gene regulatory mechanism whereby an antisense RNA directs epigenetic regulatory complexes to a sense promoter, resulting in RNA-directed epigenetic gene regulation. The observations presented here support the notion that epigenetic silencing of tumor suppressor genes, such as p21, may be the result of an imbalance in bidirectional transcription levels. This imbalance allows the unchecked antisense RNA to direct silent state epigenetic marks to the sense promoter, resulting in stable transcriptional gene silencing. PMID:19008947

  14. The Impact of Directed Viewing-Thinking Activity on Students' Critical Thinking: Part II

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ee, Neo Chin; Sum, Cheung Wing

    2005-01-01

    Background: Critical thinking disposition is an area that has been overlooked in various academic fields until recent years. Critical thinking occurs only when individuals possess thinking dispositions. This study explores the possibility of using directed viewing-thinking activity (DVTA) to cultivate the critical thinking dispositions of…

  15. The Effects of the Directed Reading-Thinking Activity on EFL Students' Referential and Inferential Comprehension

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    El-Koumy, Abdel Salam Abdel Khalek

    2006-01-01

    A study investigated the effects of the Directed Reading Thinking Activity on Egyptian first-year secondary stage EFL students' referential and inferential reading comprehension. The study utilized a pretest-posttest control group experimental design. The subjects consisted of 72 first-year secondary students in Menouf Secondary School for Boys at…

  16. A Comparison of Activity-Based Intervention and Embedded Direct Instruction When Teaching Emergent Literacy Skills

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Botts, Dawn C.; Losardo, Angela S.; Tillery, Christina Y.; Werts, Margaret G.

    2014-01-01

    This replication study focused on the effectiveness of two different intervention approaches, activity-based intervention and embedded direct instruction, on the acquisition, generalization, and maintenance of phonological awareness, a key area of emergent literacy, by preschool children with language delays. Five male preschool participants with…

  17. Late-stage diversification of biologically active pyridazinones via a direct C-H functionalization strategy.

    PubMed

    Li, Wei; Fan, Zhoulong; Geng, Kaijun; Xu, Youjun; Zhang, Ao

    2015-01-14

    Divergent C-H functionalization reactions (arylation, carboxylation, olefination, thiolation, acetoxylation, halogenation, naphthylation) using a pyridazinone moiety as an internal directing group were successfully established. This approach offers a late-stage, ortho-selective diversification of a biologically active pyridazinone scaffold. Seven series of novel pyridazinone analogues were synthesized conveniently as the synthetic precursors of potential sortase A (SrtA) inhibitors.

  18. 78 FR 45515 - Agency Information Collection Activities; Comment Request; William D. Ford Federal Direct Loan...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-07-29

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION Agency Information Collection Activities; Comment Request; William D. Ford Federal Direct Loan Program... to this notice will be considered public records. Title of Collection: William D. Ford Federal...

  19. 78 FR 14083 - Agency Information Collection Activities: Direct Loan, FFEL, Perkins and TEACH Grant Total and...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-03-04

    ... Agency Information Collection Activities: Direct Loan, FFEL, Perkins and TEACH Grant Total and Permanent... TEACH Grant Total and Permanent Disability Discharge Forms. OMB Control Number: 1845-0065. Type of... Loan, FFEL, or Perkins loan program loans, or TEACH Grant service obligation. The form collects...

  20. Direct activation and anti-repression functions of GAL4-VP16 use distinct molecular mechanisms.

    PubMed Central

    Lyons, J G; Chambon, P

    1995-01-01

    In order to determine whether the molecular mechanisms used for direct activation by GAL4-VP16 are the same as those used for anti-repression, we have employed monoclonal antibodies specific for the VP16 activation domain. In the absence of added repressors, GAL4-VP16 was able to stimulate transcription from a template containing GAL4-binding sites, and the antibodies raised against the VP16 activation domain failed to inhibit this direct activation. GAL4-VP16 also was able to prevent histone H1-mediated repression by a mechanism that was strongly dependent on the presence of specific GAL4-binding elements in the promoter. However, in contrast to the assays conducted in the absence of repressors, the antibodies were strong inhibitors of GAL4-VP16-activated transcription in the presence of histone H1. Thus the binding of the antibodies distinguished between the direct activation and anti-repression functions of GAL4-VP16, indicating that these functions operate through distinct molecular mechanisms. The anti-repression-specific mechanism that is inhibitable by the antibodies acted at an early stage of preinitiation complex formation. Deletions of individual subdomains of the VP16 activation domain demonstrated that there was not a discrete subdomain responsible for the anti-repression function of GAL4-VP16. Thus, the inhibitory effect of the antibodies appeared to be due to the location of the epitope within the activator protein rather than to some inherent biochemical property of that region of the protein that is required specifically for anti-repression. The inhibitory effect of the antibodies also ruled out the possibility that steric exclusion of repressor proteins from the promoter was the sole means of anti-repression by the transcriptional activator. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 PMID:8554536

  1. Direct measurement of activation time and nucleation rate in capillary-condensed water nanomeniscus

    SciTech Connect

    Sung, Baekman; Kim, Jongwoo; Stambaugh, Corey; Chang, Sung-Jin; Jhe, Wonho

    2013-11-18

    We demonstrate real-time observation of nucleation of the single water nanomeniscus formed via capillary condensation. We directly measure (i) activation time by time-resolved atomic force microscopy and (ii) nucleation rate by statistical analysis of its exponential distribution, which is the experimental evidence that the activation process is stochastic and follows the Poisson statistics. It implies that formation of the water nanomeniscus is triggered by nucleation, which requires activation for producing a nucleus. We also find the dependence of the nucleation rate on the tip-sample distance and temperature.

  2. Azithromycin suppresses CD4+ T-cell activation by direct modulation of mTOR activity

    PubMed Central

    Ratzinger, F.; Haslacher, H.; Poeppl, W.; Hoermann, G.; Kovarik, J. J.; Jutz, S.; Steinberger, P.; Burgmann, H.; Pickl, W. F.; Schmetterer, K. G.

    2014-01-01

    Advanced macrolides, such as azithromycin (AZM) or clarithromycin (CLM), are antibiotics with immunomodulatory properties. Here we have sought to evaluate their in vitro influence on the activation of CD4+ T-cells. Isolated CD4+ T-cells were stimulated with agonistic anti-CD3/anti-CD28 monoclonal antibodies in the presence of 0.6 mg/L, 2.5 mg/L, 10 mg/L or 40 mg/L AZM or CLM. Cell proliferation, cytokine level in supernatants and cell viability was assessed. Intracellular signaling pathways were evaluated using reporter cell lines, FACS analysis, immunoblotting and in vitro kinase assays. AZM inhibited cell proliferation rate and cytokine secretion of CD4+ T-cells in a dose-dependent manner. Similarly, high concentrations of CLM (40 mg/L) also suppressed these T-cell functions. Analysis of molecular signaling pathways revealed that exposure to AZM reduced the phosphorylation of the S6 ribosomal protein, a downstream target of mTOR. This effect was also observed at 40 mg/L CLM. In vitro kinase studies using recombinant mTOR showed that AZM inhibited mTOR activity. In contrast to rapamycin, this inhibition was independent of FKBP12. We show for the first time that AZM and to a lesser extent CLM act as immunosuppressive agents on CD4+ T-cells by inhibiting mTOR activity. Our results might have implications for the clinical use of macrolides. PMID:25500904

  3. Active Flow Control of Lifting Surface With Flap-Current Activities and Future Directions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ahmadi, G.; Marzocca, P.; Jha, R.; Alstorm, B.; Obied, S.; Kabir, P.; Shahrabi, A.

    2010-01-01

    The main objective is to develop effective control strategies for separation control of an airfoil with a single hinge flap. The specific objectives are: Develop an active control architecture for flow control around an airfoil with flap. Design, fabricate, a wind tunnel test of a high lift wing (with flap) with integrated actuators and sensors. Design, development and fabrication of synthetic jet actuators. Develop appropriate control strategy for application to the airfoil. Wind tunnel testing of the high lift wing at various angles of attack and flap positions with closed loop control.

  4. Effect of Direct-Current Electric Field on Enzymatic Activity and the Concentration of Laccase.

    PubMed

    Wang, Chunxing; Zhang, Huiling; Ren, Dajun; Li, Qian; Zhang, Shuqin; Feng, Tao

    2015-09-01

    This work investigates the effect of direct-current electric field on the extracellular enzymatic activity, concentration and other experimental parameters of laccase from Trametes versicolor. The results showed that laccase could significantly contribute to the change of pH at the end of graphite electrode. In addition, it increased the electrical conductivity of the water. In the experiment, the optimum pH and catalytic pH range for laccase activity were 3.0 and pH 2.5-4.0. The application of 6 V direct current showed significant effects on the laccase enzyme activity. The activity of laccase was enhanced in the anodic region, but at the same time was strongly inhibited at the cathode. The electric charge characteristics of laccase were changed when exposed to electric field, and some laccases molecules moved to the anode, which produced a slight migration phenomenon. This study is the basis of combination of laccase and electrical technology, at the same time, providing a new direction of enhancing laccase activity. Compared to immobilization, using electric field is simple, no chemical additives, and great potential.

  5. Modification of purine and pyrimidine nucleosides by direct C-H bond activation.

    PubMed

    Liang, Yong; Wnuk, Stanislaw F

    2015-03-17

    Transition metal-catalyzed modifications of the activated heterocyclic bases of nucleosides as well as DNA or RNA fragments employing traditional cross-coupling methods have been well-established in nucleic acid chemistry. This review covers advances in the area of cross-coupling reactions in which nucleosides are functionalized via direct activation of the C8-H bond in purine and the C5-H or C6-H bond in uracil bases. The review focuses on Pd/Cu-catalyzed couplings between unactivated nucleoside bases with aryl halides. It also discusses cross-dehydrogenative arylations and alkenylations as well as other reactions used for modification of nucleoside bases that avoid the use of organometallic precursors and involve direct C-H bond activation in at least one substrate. The scope and efficiency of these coupling reactions along with some mechanistic considerations are discussed.

  6. Spin Alignment in Analogues of The Local Sheet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Conidis, George J.

    2016-10-01

    Tidal torque theory and simulations of large scale structure predict spin vectors of massive galaxies should be coplanar with sheets in the cosmic web. Recently demonstrated, the giants (K s <= -22.5 mag) in the Local Volume beyond the Local Sheet have spin vectors directed close to the plane of the Local Supercluster, supporting the predictions of Tidal Torque Theory. However, the giants in the Local Sheet encircling the Local Group display a distinctly different arrangement, suggesting that the mass asymmetry of the Local Group or its progenitor torqued them from their primordial spin directions. To investigate the origin of the spin alignment of giants locally, analogues of the Local Sheet were identified in the SDSS DR9. Similar to the Local Sheet, analogues have an interacting pair of disk galaxies isolated from the remaining sheet members. Modified sheets in which there is no interacting pair of disk galaxies were identified as a control sample. Galaxies in face-on control sheets do not display axis ratios predominantly weighted toward low values, contrary to the expectation of tidal torque theory. For face-on and edge-on sheets, the distribution of axis ratios for galaxies in analogues is distinct from that in controls with a confidence of 97.6% & 96.9%, respectively. This corroborates the hypothesis that an interacting pair can affect spin directions of neighbouring galaxies.

  7. Microcomponent sheet architecture

    DOEpatents

    Wegeng, R.S.; Drost, M.K..; McDonald, C.E.

    1997-03-18

    The invention is a microcomponent sheet architecture wherein macroscale unit processes are performed by microscale components. The sheet architecture may be a single laminate with a plurality of separate microcomponent sections or the sheet architecture may be a plurality of laminates with one or more microcomponent sections on each laminate. Each microcomponent or plurality of like microcomponents perform at least one unit operation. A first laminate having a plurality of like first microcomponents is combined with at least a second laminate having a plurality of like second microcomponents thereby combining at least two unit operations to achieve a system operation. 14 figs.

  8. Microcomponent sheet architecture

    DOEpatents

    Wegeng, Robert S.; Drost, M. Kevin; McDonald, Carolyn E.

    1997-01-01

    The invention is a microcomponent sheet architecture wherein macroscale unit processes are performed by microscale components. The sheet architecture may be a single laminate with a plurality of separate microcomponent sections or the sheet architecture may be a plurality of laminates with one or more microcomponent sections on each laminate. Each microcomponent or plurality of like microcomponents perform at least one unit operation. A first laminate having a plurality of like first microcomponents is combined with at least a second laminate having a plurality of like second microcomponents thereby combining at least two unit operations to achieve a system operation.

  9. Head direction cell activity in the anterodorsal thalamus requires intact supragenual nuclei

    PubMed Central

    Clark, Benjamin J.; Brown, Joel E.

    2012-01-01

    Neural activity in several limbic areas varies as a function of the animal's head direction (HD) in the horizontal plane. Lesions of the vestibular periphery abolish this HD cell signal, suggesting an essential role for vestibular afference in HD signal generation. The organization of brain stem pathways conveying vestibular information to the HD circuit is poorly understood; however, recent anatomical work has identified the supragenual nucleus (SGN) as a putative relay. To test this hypothesis, we made lesions of the SGN in rats and screened for HD cells in the anterodorsal thalamus. In animals with complete bilateral lesions, the overall number of HD cells was significantly reduced relative to control animals. In animals with unilateral lesions of the SGN, directional activity was present, but the preferred firing directions of these cells were unstable and less influenced by the rotation of an environmental landmark. In addition, we found that preferred directions displayed large directional shifts when animals foraged for food in a darkened environment and when they were navigating from a familiar environment to a novel one, suggesting that the SGN plays a critical role in projecting essential self-motion (idiothetic) information to the HD cell circuit. PMID:22875899

  10. Memoryless self-reinforcing directionality in endosomal active transport within living cells.

    PubMed

    Chen, Kejia; Wang, Bo; Granick, Steve

    2015-06-01

    In contrast to Brownian transport, the active motility of microbes, cells, animals and even humans often follows another random process known as truncated Lévy walk. These stochastic motions are characterized by clustered small steps and intermittent longer jumps that often extend towards the size of the entire system. As there are repeated suggestions, although disagreement, that Lévy walks have functional advantages over Brownian motion in random searching and transport kinetics, their intentional engineering into active materials could be useful. Here, we show experimentally in the classic active matter system of intracellular trafficking that Brownian-like steps self-organize into truncated Lévy walks through an apparent time-independent positive feedback such that directional persistence increases with the distance travelled persistently. A molecular model that allows the maximum output of the active propelling forces to fluctuate slowly fits the experiments quantitatively. Our findings offer design principles for programming efficient transport in active materials.

  11. Memoryless self-reinforcing directionality in endosomal active transport within living cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Kejia; Wang, Bo; Granick, Steve

    2015-06-01

    In contrast to Brownian transport, the active motility of microbes, cells, animals and even humans often follows another random process known as truncated Lévy walk. These stochastic motions are characterized by clustered small steps and intermittent longer jumps that often extend towards the size of the entire system. As there are repeated suggestions, although disagreement, that Lévy walks have functional advantages over Brownian motion in random searching and transport kinetics, their intentional engineering into active materials could be useful. Here, we show experimentally in the classic active matter system of intracellular trafficking that Brownian-like steps self-organize into truncated Lévy walks through an apparent time-independent positive feedback such that directional persistence increases with the distance travelled persistently. A molecular model that allows the maximum output of the active propelling forces to fluctuate slowly fits the experiments quantitatively. Our findings offer design principles for programming efficient transport in active materials.

  12. The Jovian magnetotail and its current sheet

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Behannon, K. W.; Burlaga, L. F.; Ness, N. F.

    1980-01-01

    Analyses of Voyager magnetic field measurements have extended the understanding of the structural and temporal characteristics of Jupiter's magnetic tail. The magnitude of the magnetic field in the lobes of the tail is found to decrease with Jovicentric distance approximately as r to he-1.4, compared with the power law exponent of -1.7 found for the rate of decrease along the Pioneer 10 outbound trajectory. Voyager observations of magnetic field component variations with Jovicentric distance in the tail do not support the uniform radial plasma outflow model derived from Pioneer data. Voyager 2 has shown that the azimuthal current sheet which surrounds Jupiter in the inner and middle magnetosphere extends tailward (in the anti-Sun direction) to a distance of at least 100 R sub J. In the tail this current sheet consists of a plasma sheet and embedded neutral sheet. In the region of the tail where the sheet is observed, the variation of the magnetic field as a result of the sheet structure and its 10 hr periodic motion is the dominant variation seen.

  13. Annulation of aromatic imines via directed C-H bond activation.

    PubMed

    Thalji, Reema K; Ahrendt, Kateri A; Bergman, Robert G; Ellman, Jonathan A

    2005-08-19

    A directed C-H bond activation approach to the synthesis of indans, tetralins, dihydrofurans, dihydroindoles, and other polycyclic aromatic compounds is presented. Cyclization of aromatic ketimines and aldimines containing alkenyl groups tethered at the meta position relative to the imine directing group has been achieved using (PPh3)3RhCl (Wilkinson's catalyst). The cyclization of a range of aromatic ketimines and aldimines provides bi- and tricyclic ring systems with good regioselectivity. Different ring sizes and substitution patterns can be accessed through the coupling of monosubstituted, 1,1- or 1,2-disubstituted, and trisubstituted alkenes bearing both electron-rich and electron-deficient functionality.

  14. Polarised light sheet tomography.

    PubMed

    Reidt, Sascha L; O'Brien, Daniel J; Wood, Kenneth; MacDonald, Michael P

    2016-05-16

    The various benefits of light sheet microscopy have made it a widely used modality for capturing three-dimensional images. It is mostly used for fluorescence imaging, but recently another technique called light sheet tomography solely relying on scattering was presented. The method was successfully applied to imaging of plant roots in transparent soil, but is limited when it comes to more turbid samples. This study presents a polarised light sheet tomography system and its advantages when imaging in highly scattering turbid media. The experimental configuration is guided by Monte Carlo radiation transfer methods, which model the propagation of a polarised light sheet in the sample. Images of both reflecting and absorbing phantoms in a complex collagenous matrix were acquired, and the results for different polarisation configurations are compared. Focus scanning methods were then used to reduce noise and produce three-dimensional reconstructions of absorbing targets.

  15. Cerebral Aneurysms Fact Sheet

    MedlinePlus

    ... Awards Enhancing Diversity Find People About NINDS Cerebral Aneurysms Fact Sheet See a list of all NINDS ... I get more information? What is a cerebral aneurysm? A cerebral aneurysm (also known as an intracranial ...

  16. Global ice sheet modeling

    SciTech Connect

    Hughes, T.J.; Fastook, J.L.

    1994-05-01

    The University of Maine conducted this study for Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) as part of a global climate modeling task for site characterization of the potential nuclear waste respository site at Yucca Mountain, NV. The purpose of the study was to develop a global ice sheet dynamics model that will forecast the three-dimensional configuration of global ice sheets for specific climate change scenarios. The objective of the third (final) year of the work was to produce ice sheet data for glaciation scenarios covering the next 100,000 years. This was accomplished using both the map-plane and flowband solutions of our time-dependent, finite-element gridpoint model. The theory and equations used to develop the ice sheet models are presented. Three future scenarios were simulated by the model and results are discussed.

  17. Avian Fact Sheet

    SciTech Connect

    NWCC Wildlife Work Group

    2004-12-01

    OAK-B135 After conducting four national research meetings, producing a document guiding research: Metrics and Methods for Determining or Monitoring Potential Impacts on Birds at Existing and Proposed Wind Energy Sites, 1999, and another paper, Avian Collisions with Wind Turbines: A Summary of Existing Studies and Comparisons to Other Sources of Avian Collision Mortality in the United States, 2001, the subcommittee recognized a need to summarize in a short fact sheet what is known about avian-wind interaction and what questions remain. This fact sheet attempts to summarize in lay terms the result of extensive discussion about avian-wind interaction on land. This fact sheet does not address research conducted on offshore development. This fact sheet is not intended as a conclusion on the subject; rather, it is a summary as of Fall/Winter 2002.

  18. Polarised light sheet tomography.

    PubMed

    Reidt, Sascha L; O'Brien, Daniel J; Wood, Kenneth; MacDonald, Michael P

    2016-05-16

    The various benefits of light sheet microscopy have made it a widely used modality for capturing three-dimensional images. It is mostly used for fluorescence imaging, but recently another technique called light sheet tomography solely relying on scattering was presented. The method was successfully applied to imaging of plant roots in transparent soil, but is limited when it comes to more turbid samples. This study presents a polarised light sheet tomography system and its advantages when imaging in highly scattering turbid media. The experimental configuration is guided by Monte Carlo radiation transfer methods, which model the propagation of a polarised light sheet in the sample. Images of both reflecting and absorbing phantoms in a complex collagenous matrix were acquired, and the results for different polarisation configurations are compared. Focus scanning methods were then used to reduce noise and produce three-dimensional reconstructions of absorbing targets. PMID:27409945

  19. Improving the activity of the subtilisin nattokinase by site-directed mutagenesis and molecular dynamics simulation.

    PubMed

    Weng, Meizhi; Deng, Xiongwei; Bao, Wei; Zhu, Li; Wu, Jieyuan; Cai, Yongjun; Jia, Yan; Zheng, Zhongliang; Zou, Guolin

    2015-09-25

    Nattokinase (NK), a bacterial serine protease from Bacillus subtilis var. natto, is a potential cardiovascular drug exhibiting strong fibrinolytic activity. To broaden its commercial and medical applications, we constructed a single-mutant (I31L) and two double-mutants (M222A/I31L and T220S/I31L) by site-directed mutagenesis. Active enzymes were expressed in Escherichia coli with periplasmic secretion and were purified to homogeneity. The kinetic parameters of enzymes were examined by spectroscopy assay and isothermal titration calorimetry (ITC), and their fibrinolytic activities were determined by fibrin plate method. The substitution of Leu(31) for Ile(31) resulted in about 2-fold enhancement of catalytic efficiency (Kcat/KM) compared with wild-type NK. The specific activities of both double-mutants (M222A/I31L and T220S/I31L) were significantly increased when compared with the single-mutants (M222A and T220S) and the oxidative stability of M222A/I31L mutant was enhanced with respect to wild-type NK. This study demonstrates the feasibility of improving activity of NK by site-directed mutagenesis and shows successful protein engineering cases to improve the activity of NK as a potent therapeutic agent.

  20. A novel direct activator of AMPK inhibits prostate cancer growth by blocking lipogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Zadra, Giorgia; Photopoulos, Cornelia; Tyekucheva, Svitlana; Heidari, Pedram; Weng, Qing Ping; Fedele, Giuseppe; Liu, Hong; Scaglia, Natalia; Priolo, Carmen; Sicinska, Ewa; Mahmood, Umar; Signoretti, Sabina; Birnberg, Neal; Loda, Massimo

    2014-01-01

    5′AMP-activated kinase (AMPK) constitutes a hub for cellular metabolic and growth control, thus representing an ideal therapeutic target for prostate cancers (PCas) characterized by increased lipogenesis and activation of mTORC1 pathway. However, whether AMPK activation itself is sufficient to block cancer cell growth remains to be determined. A small molecule screening was performed and identified MT 63–78, a specific and potent direct AMPK activator. Here, we show that direct activation of AMPK inhibits PCa cell growth in androgen sensitive and castration resistant PCa (CRPC) models, induces mitotic arrest, and apoptosis. In vivo, AMPK activation is sufficient to reduce PCa growth, whereas the allelic loss of its catalytic subunits fosters PCa development. Importantly, despite mTORC1 blockade, the suppression of de novo lipogenesis is the underpinning mechanism responsible for AMPK-mediated PCa growth inhibition, suggesting AMPK as a therapeutic target especially for lipogenesis-driven PCas. Finally, we demonstrate that MT 63–78 enhances the growth inhibitory effect of AR signaling inhibitors MDV3100 and abiraterone. This study thus provides a rationale for their combined use in CRPC treatment. PMID:24497570

  1. Abnormal brain activation during directed forgetting of negative memory in depressed patients.

    PubMed

    Yang, Wenjing; Chen, Qunlin; Liu, Peiduo; Cheng, Hongsheng; Cui, Qian; Wei, Dongtao; Zhang, Qinglin; Qiu, Jiang

    2016-01-15

    The frequent occurrence of uncontrollable negative thoughts and memories is a troubling aspect of depression. Thus, knowledge on the mechanism underlying intentional forgetting of these thoughts and memories is crucial to develop an effective emotion regulation strategy for depressed individuals. Behavioral studies have demonstrated that depressed participants cannot intentionally forget negative memories. However, the neural mechanism underlying this process remains unclear. In this study, participants completed the directed forgetting task in which they were instructed to remember or forget neutral or negative words. Standard univariate analysis based on the General Linear Model showed that the depressed participants have higher activation in the inferior frontal gyrus (IFG), superior frontal gyrus (SFG), superior parietal gyrus (SPG), and inferior temporal gyrus (ITG) than the healthy individuals. The results indicated that depressed participants recruited more frontal and parietal inhibitory control resources to inhibit the TBF items, but the attempt still failed because of negative bias. We also used the Support Vector Machine to perform multivariate pattern classification based on the brain activation during directed forgetting. The pattern of brain activity in directed forgetting of negative words allowed correct group classification with an overall accuracy of 75% (P=0.012). The brain regions which are critical for this discrimination showed abnormal activation when depressed participants were attempting to forget negative words. These results indicated that the abnormal neural circuitry when depressed individuals tried to forget the negative words might provide neurobiological markers for depression.

  2. Biodiesel Basics (Fact Sheet)

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    2014-06-01

    This fact sheet provides a brief introduction to biodiesel, including a discussion of biodiesel blends, which blends are best for which vehicles, where to buy biodiesel, how biodiesel compares to diesel fuel in terms of performance, how biodiesel performs in cold weather, whether biodiesel use will plug vehicle filters, how long-term biodiesel use may affect engines, biodiesel fuel standards, and whether biodiesel burns cleaner than diesel fuel. The fact sheet also dismisses the use of vegetable oil as a motor fuel.

  3. Energy information sheets

    SciTech Connect

    1995-07-01

    The National Energy Information Center (NEIC), as part of its mission, provides energy information and referral assistance to Federal, State, and local governments, the academic community, business and industrial organizations, and the public. The Energy Information Sheets was developed to provide general information on various aspects of fuel production, prices, consumption, and capability. Additional information on related subject matter can be found in other Energy Information Administration (EIA) publications as referenced at the end of each sheet.

  4. Transporter for Treated Sheet Materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pollack, M., H.

    1983-01-01

    Plastic spacers keep parts separated during transport or storage. Cart with rods and spacers holds sheets with delicate finishes for storage or transport. Sheets supported vertically by rods, or horizontally. Spacers keep sheets separated. Designed to eliminate time and expense of tapping, wrapping, and sometimes refinishing aluminum sheets with delicate anodized finished.

  5. Observations of double layers in earth's plasma sheet.

    PubMed

    Ergun, R E; Andersson, L; Tao, J; Angelopoulos, V; Bonnell, J; McFadden, J P; Larson, D E; Eriksson, S; Johansson, T; Cully, C M; Newman, D N; Goldman, M V; Roux, A; LeContel, O; Glassmeier, K-H; Baumjohann, W

    2009-04-17

    We report the first direct observations of parallel electric fields (E_{ parallel}) carried by double layers (DLs) in the plasma sheet of Earth's magnetosphere. The DL observations, made by the THEMIS spacecraft, have E_{ parallel} signals that are analogous to those reported in the auroral region. DLs are observed during bursty bulk flow events, in the current sheet, and in plasma sheet boundary layer, all during periods of strong magnetic fluctuations. These observations imply that DLs are a universal process and that strongly nonlinear and kinetic behavior is intrinsic to Earth's plasma sheet. PMID:19518640

  6. Observations of Double Layers in Earth's Plasma Sheet

    SciTech Connect

    Ergun, R. E.; Tao, J.; Andersson, L.; Eriksson, S.; Johansson, T.; Angelopoulos, V.; Bonnell, J.; McFadden, J. P.; Larson, D. E.; Cully, C. M.; Newman, D. N.; Goldman, M. V.; Roux, A.; LeContel, O.; Glassmeier, K.-H.; Baumjohann, W.

    2009-04-17

    We report the first direct observations of parallel electric fields (E{sub parallel}) carried by double layers (DLs) in the plasma sheet of Earth's magnetosphere. The DL observations, made by the THEMIS spacecraft, have E{sub parallel} signals that are analogous to those reported in the auroral region. DLs are observed during bursty bulk flow events, in the current sheet, and in plasma sheet boundary layer, all during periods of strong magnetic fluctuations. These observations imply that DLs are a universal process and that strongly nonlinear and kinetic behavior is intrinsic to Earth's plasma sheet.

  7. Progesterone directly and rapidly inhibits GnRH neuronal activity via progesterone receptor membrane component 1.

    PubMed

    Bashour, Nicholas Michael; Wray, Susan

    2012-09-01

    GnRH neurons are essential for reproduction, being an integral component of the hypothalamic-pituitary-gonadal axis. Progesterone (P4), a steroid hormone, modulates reproductive behavior and is associated with rapid changes in GnRH secretion. However, a direct action of P4 on GnRH neurons has not been previously described. Receptors in the progestin/adipoQ receptor family (PAQR), as well as progesterone receptor membrane component 1 (PgRMC1) and its partner serpin peptidase inhibitor, clade E (nexin, plasminogen activator inhibitor type 1) mRNA binding protein 1 (SERBP1), have been shown to mediate rapid progestin actions in various tissues, including the brain. This study shows that PgRMC1 and SERBP1, but not PAQR, are expressed in prenatal GnRH neurons. Expression of PgRMC1 and SERBP1 was verified in adult mouse GnRH neurons. To investigate the effect of P4 on GnRH neuronal activity, calcium imaging was used on primary GnRH neurons maintained in explants. Application of P4 significantly decreased the activity of GnRH neurons, independent of secretion of gamma-aminobutyric acidergic and glutamatergic input, suggesting a direct action of P4 on GnRH neurons. Inhibition was not blocked by RU486, an antagonist of the classic nuclear P4 receptor. Inhibition was also maintained after uncoupling of the inhibitory regulative G protein (G(i/o)), the signal transduction pathway used by PAQR. However, AG-205, a PgRMC1 ligand and inhibitor, blocked the rapid P4-mediated inhibition, and inhibition of protein kinase G, thought to be activated downstream of PgRMC1, also blocked the inhibitory activity of P4. These data show for the first time that P4 can act directly on GnRH neurons through PgRMC1 to inhibit neuronal activity.

  8. Application of the cell sheet technique in tissue engineering

    PubMed Central

    CHEN, GUANGNAN; QI, YIYING; NIU, LIE; DI, TUOYU; ZHONG, JINWEI; FANG, TINGTING; YAN, WEIQI

    2015-01-01

    The development and application of the tissue engineering technique has shown a significant potential in regenerative medicine. However, the limitations of conventional tissue engineering methods (cell suspensions, scaffolds and/or growth factors) restrict its application in certain fields. The novel cell sheet technique can overcome such disadvantages. Cultured cells can be harvested as intact sheets without the use of proteolytic enzymes, such as trypsin or dispase, which can result in cell damage and loss of differentiated phenotypes. The cell sheet is a complete layer, which contains extracellular matrix, ion channel, growth factor receptors, nexin and other important cell surface proteins. Mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs), which have the potential for multiple differentiation, are promising candidate seed cells for tissue engineering. The MSC sheet technique may have potential in the fields of regenerative medicine and tissue engineering in general. Additionally, induced pluripotent stem cell and embryonic stem cell-derived cell sheets have been proposed for tissue regeneration. Currently, the application of cell sheet for tissue reconstruction includes: Direct recipient sites implantation, superposition of cell sheets to construct three-dimensional structure for implantation, or cell sheet combined with scaffolds. The present review discusses the progress in cell sheet techniques, particularly stem cell sheet techniques, in tissue engineering. PMID:26623011

  9. Active sites and mechanisms for direct oxidation of benzene to phenol over carbon catalysts.

    PubMed

    Wen, Guodong; Wu, Shuchang; Li, Bo; Dai, Chunli; Su, Dang Sheng

    2015-03-23

    The direct oxidation of benzene to phenol with H2 O2 as the oxidizer, which is regarded as an environmentally friendly process, can be efficiently catalyzed by carbon catalysts. However, the detailed roles of carbon catalysts, especially what is the active site, are still a topic of debate controversy. Herein, we present a fundamental consideration of possible mechanisms for this oxidation reaction by using small molecular model catalysts, Raman spectra, static secondary ion mass spectroscopy (SIMS), DFT calculations, quasi in situ ATR-IR and UV spectra. Our study indicates that the defects, being favorable for the formation of active oxygen species, are the active sites for this oxidation reaction. Furthermore, one type of active defect, namely the armchair configuration defect was successfully identified.

  10. Direct activation of the apoptosis machinery as a mechanism to target cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Nguyen, Jack T; Wells, James A

    2003-06-24

    Apoptosis plays a pivotal role in the cytotoxic activity of most chemotherapeutic drugs, and defects in this pathway provide a basis for drug resistance in many cancers. Thus the ability to restore apoptosis by using small molecules could have important therapeutic implications. Using a cell-free assay to simultaneously target multiple components of the apoptosis pathway, we identified a class of compounds that activate caspases in a cytochrome c-dependent manner and induce apoptosis in whole cells. By reconstituting the apoptosis pathway with purified proteins, we determined that these compounds promote the protein-protein association of Apaf-1 into the functional apoptosome. These compounds exert cytostatic and cytotoxic effects on a variety of cancer cell lines while having little or no activity against the normal cell lines tested. These findings suggest that direct activation of the basic apoptosis machinery may be a viable mechanism to selectively target cancer.

  11. Nitric oxide directly activates calcium-dependent potassium channels in vascular smooth muscle.

    PubMed

    Bolotina, V M; Najibi, S; Palacino, J J; Pagano, P J; Cohen, R A

    1994-04-28

    Nitric oxide is the major endothelium-derived relaxing factor (EDRF), and it is thought to relax smooth muscle cells by stimulation of guanylate cyclase, accumulation of its product cyclic GMP, and cGMP-dependent modification of several intracellular processes, including activation of potassium channels through cGMP-dependent protein kinase. Here we present evidence that both exogenous nitric oxide and native EDRF can directly activate single Ca(2+)-dependent K+ channels (K+Ca) in cell-free membrane patches without requiring cGMP. Under conditions when guanylate cyclase was inhibited by methylene blue, considerable relaxation of rabbit aorta to nitric oxide persisted which was blocked by charybdotoxin, a specific inhibitor of K+Ca channels. These studies demonstrate a novel direct action of nitric oxide on K+Ca channels. PMID:7512692

  12. Increasing activity and thermal resistance of Bacillus gibsonii alkaline protease (BgAP) by directed evolution.

    PubMed

    Martinez, Ronny; Jakob, Felix; Tu, Ran; Siegert, Petra; Maurer, Karl-Heinz; Schwaneberg, Ulrich

    2013-03-01

    Bacillus gibsonii Alkaline Protease (BgAP) is a recently reported subtilisin protease exhibiting activity and stability properties suitable for applications in laundry and dish washing detergents. However, BgAP suffers from a significant decrease of activity at low temperatures. In order to increase BgAP activity at 15°C, a directed evolution campaign based on the SeSaM random mutagenesis method was performed. An optimized microtiter plate expression system in B. subtilis was established and classical proteolytic detection methods were adapted for high throughput screening. In parallel, the libraries were screened for increased residual proteolytic activity after incubation at 58°C. Three iterative rounds of directed BgAP evolution yielded a set of BgAP variants with increased specific activity (K(cat)) at 15°C and increased thermal resistance. Recombination of both sets of amino acid substitutions resulted finally in variant MF1 with a 1.5-fold increased specific activity (15°C) and over 100 times prolonged half-life at 60°C (224 min compared to 2 min of the WT BgAP). None of the introduced amino acid substitutions were close to the active site of BgAP. Activity-altering amino acid substitutions were from non-charged to non-charged or from sterically demanding to less demanding. Thermal stability improvements were achieved by substitutions to negatively charged amino acids in loop areas of the BgAP surface which probably fostered ionic and hydrogen bonds interactions.

  13. Evaluation of the BH3-only protein Puma as a direct Bak activator.

    PubMed

    Dai, Haiming; Pang, Yuan-Ping; Ramirez-Alvarado, Marina; Kaufmann, Scott H

    2014-01-01

    Interactions among Bcl-2 family proteins play critical roles in cellular life and death decisions. Previous studies have established the BH3-only proteins Bim, tBid, and Noxa as "direct activators" that are able to directly initiate the oligomerization and activation of Bak and/or Bax. Earlier studies of Puma have yielded equivocal results, with some concluding that it also acts as a direct activator and other studies suggesting that it acts solely as a sensitizer BH3-only protein. In the present study we examined the interaction of Puma BH3 domain or full-length protein with Bak by surface plasmon resonance, assessed Bak oligomerization status by cross-linking followed by immunoblotting, evaluated the ability of the Puma BH3 domain to induce Bak-mediated permeabilization of liposomes and mitochondria, and determined the effect of wild type and mutant Puma on cell viability in a variety of cellular contexts. Results of this analysis demonstrate high affinity (KD = 26 ± 5 nM) binding of the Puma BH3 domain to purified Bak ex vivo, leading to Bak homo-oligomerization and membrane permeabilization. Mutations in Puma that inhibit (L141E/M144E/L148E) or enhance (M144I/A145G) Puma BH3 binding to Bak also produce corresponding alterations in Bak oligomerization, Bak-mediated membrane permeabilization and, in a cellular context, Bak-mediated killing. Collectively, these results provide strong evidence that Puma, like Bim, Noxa, and tBid, is able to act as a direct Bak activator.

  14. Direct tests of micro channel plates as the active element of a new shower maximum detector

    DOE PAGES

    Ronzhin, A.; Los, S.; Ramberg, E.; Apresyan, A.; Xie, S.; Spiropulu, M.; Kim, H.

    2015-05-22

    We continue the study of micro channel plates (MCP) as the active element of a shower maximum (SM) detector. We present below test beam results obtained with MCPs detecting directly secondary particles of an electromagnetic shower. The MCP efficiency to shower particles is close to 100%. Furthermore, the time resolution obtained for this new type of the SM detector is at the level of 40 ps.

  15. A comparison of coronal and interplanetary current sheet inclinations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Behannon, K. W.; Burlaga, L. F.; Hundhausen, A. J.

    1983-01-01

    The HAO white light K-coronameter observations show that the inclination of the heliospheric current sheet at the base of the corona can be both large (nearly vertical with respect to the solar equator) or small during Cararington rotations 1660 - 1666 and even on a single solar rotation. Voyager 1 and 2 magnetic field observations of crossing of the heliospheric current sheet at distances from the Sun of 1.4 and 2.8 AU. Two cases are considered, one in which the corresponding coronameter data indicate a nearly vertical (north-south) current sheet and another in which a nearly horizontal, near equatorial current sheet is indicated. For the crossings of the vertical current sheet, a variance analysis based on hour averages of the magnetic field data gave a minimum variance direction consistent with a steep inclination. The horizontal current sheet was observed by Voyager as a region of mixed polarity and low speeds lasting several days, consistent with multiple crossings of a horizontal but irregular and fluctuating current sheet at 1.4 AU. However, variance analysis of individual current sheet crossings in this interval using 1.92 see averages did not give minimum variance directions consistent with a horizontal current sheet.

  16. Direct Visualization of Catalytically Active Sites at the FeO-Pt(111) Interface.

    PubMed

    Kudernatsch, Wilhelmine; Peng, Guowen; Zeuthen, Helene; Bai, Yunhai; Merte, Lindsay R; Lammich, Lutz; Besenbacher, Flemming; Mavrikakis, Manos; Wendt, Stefan

    2015-08-25

    Within the area of surface science, one of the "holy grails" is to directly visualize a chemical reaction at the atomic scale. Whereas this goal has been reached by high-resolution scanning tunneling microscopy (STM) in a number of cases for reactions occurring at flat surfaces, such a direct view is often inhibited for reaction occurring at steps and interfaces. Here we have studied the CO oxidation reaction at the interface between ultrathin FeO islands and a Pt(111) support by in situ STM and density functional theory (DFT) calculations. Time-lapsed STM imaging on this inverse model catalyst in O2 and CO environments revealed catalytic activity occurring at the FeO-Pt(111) interface and directly showed that the Fe-edges host the catalytically most active sites for the CO oxidation reaction. This is an important result since previous evidence for the catalytic activity of the FeO-Pt(111) interface is essentially based on averaging techniques in conjunction with DFT calculations. The presented STM results are in accord with DFT+U calculations, in which we compare possible CO oxidation pathways on oxidized Fe-edges and O-edges. We found that the CO oxidation reaction is more favorable on the oxidized Fe-edges, both thermodynamically and kinetically.

  17. Direct Visualization of Catalytically Active Sites at the FeO-Pt(111) Interface

    SciTech Connect

    Kudernatsch, Wilhelmine; Peng, Guowen; Zeuthen, Helene; Bai, Yunhai; Merte, L. R.; Lammich, Lutz; Besenbacher, Fleming; Mavrikakis, Manos; Wendt, Stefen

    2015-08-25

    Within the area of surface science, one of the “holy grails” is to directly visualize a chemical reaction at the atomic scale. Whereas this goal has been reached by high-resolution scanning tunneling microscopy (STM) in a number of cases for reactions occurring at flat surfaces, such a direct view is often inhibited for reaction occurring at steps and interfaces. Here we have studied the CO oxidation reaction at the interface between ultrathin FeO islands and a Pt(111) support by in situ STM and density functional theory (DFT) calculations. Time-lapsed STM imaging on this inverse model catalyst in O2 and CO environments revealed catalytic activity occurring at the FeO-Pt(111) interface and directly showed that the Fe-edges host the catalytically most active sites for the CO oxidation reaction. This is an important result since previous evidence for the catalytic activity of the FeO-Pt(111) interface is essentially based on averaging techniques in conjunction with DFT calculations. The presented STM results are in accord with DFTþU calculations, in which we compare possible CO oxidation pathways on oxidized Fe-edges and O-edges. We found that the CO oxidation reaction is more favorable on the oxidized Fe-edges, both thermodynamically and kinetically.

  18. The 4'-hydroxyl group of resveratrol is functionally important for direct activation of PPARα.

    PubMed

    Takizawa, Yoshie; Nakata, Rieko; Fukuhara, Kiyoshi; Yamashita, Hiroshi; Kubodera, Hideo; Inoue, Hiroyasu

    2015-01-01

    Long-term moderate consumption of red wine is associated with a reduced risk of developing lifestyle-related diseases such as cardiovascular disease and cancer. Therefore, resveratrol, a constituent of grapes and various other plants, has attracted substantial interest. This study focused on one molecular target of resveratrol, the peroxisome proliferator activated receptor α (PPARα). Our previous study in mice showed that resveratrol-mediated protection of the brain against stroke requires activation of PPARα; however, the molecular mechanisms involved in this process remain unknown. Here, we evaluated the chemical basis of the resveratrol-mediated activation of PPARα by performing a docking mode simulation and examining the structure-activity relationships of various polyphenols. The results of experiments using the crystal structure of the PPARα ligand-binding domain and an analysis of the activation of PPARα by a resveratrol analog 4-phenylazophenol (4-PAP) in vivo indicate that the 4'-hydroxyl group of resveratrol is critical for the direct activation of PPARα. Activation of PPARα by 5 μM resveratrol was enhanced by rolipram, an inhibitor of phosphodiesterase (PDE) and forskolin, an activator of adenylate cyclase. We also found that resveratrol has a higher PDE inhibitory activity (IC50 = 19 μM) than resveratrol analogs trans-4-hydroxystilbene and 4-PAP (IC50 = 27-28 μM), both of which has only 4'-hydroxyl group, indicating that this 4'-hydroxyl group of resveratrol is not sufficient for the inhibition of PDE. This result is consistent with that 10 μM resveratrol has a higher agonistic activity of PPARα than these analogs, suggesting that there is a feedforward activation loop of PPARα by resveratrol, which may be involved in the long-term effects of resveratrol in vivo. PMID:25798826

  19. Volunteering among High School Students. Fact Sheet

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Marcelo, Karlo Barrios

    2007-01-01

    This fact sheet explores volunteering among high school students, ages 16-18. Overall, volunteering among high school students was down slightly in 2006 as compared to 2005. Additional information includes types of volunteer organizations and activities, and ways that high school students become involved in these activities. Volunteer rate vary by…

  20. State Civic Education Requirements. CIRCLE Fact Sheet

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Godsay, Surbhi; Henderson, Whitney; Levine, Peter; Littenberg-Tobias, Josh

    2012-01-01

    This fact sheet summarizes state requirements related to civic education, which means learning about citizenship, government, law, current events, and related topics. Civic education is most directly addressed in courses labeled "civics," "government," or "U.S. government." Social studies is a broader category that also includes such disciplines…

  1. Peak-valley-peak pattern of histone modifications delineates active regulatory elements and their directionality.

    PubMed

    Pundhir, Sachin; Bagger, Frederik O; Lauridsen, Felicia B; Rapin, Nicolas; Porse, Bo T

    2016-05-19

    Formation of nucleosome free region (NFR) accompanied by specific histone modifications at flanking nucleosomes is an important prerequisite for enhancer and promoter activity. Due to this process, active regulatory elements often exhibit a distinct shape of histone signal in the form of a peak-valley-peak (PVP) pattern. However, different features of PVP patterns and their robustness in predicting active regulatory elements have never been systematically analyzed. Here, we present PARE, a novel computational method that systematically analyzes the H3K4me1 or H3K4me3 PVP patterns to predict NFRs. We show that NFRs predicted by H3K4me1 and me3 patterns are associated with active enhancers and promoters, respectively. Furthermore, asymmetry in the height of peaks flanking the central valley can predict the directionality of stable transcription at promoters. Using PARE on ChIP-seq histone modifications from four ENCODE cell lines and four hematopoietic differentiation stages, we identified several enhancers whose regulatory activity is stage specific and correlates positively with the expression of proximal genes in a particular stage. In conclusion, our results demonstrate that PVP patterns delineate both the histone modification landscape and the transcriptional activities governed by active enhancers and promoters, and therefore can be used for their prediction. PARE is freely available at http://servers.binf.ku.dk/pare. PMID:27095194

  2. The relative merits of therapies being developed to tackle inappropriate ('self'-directed) complement activation.

    PubMed

    Antwi-Baffour, Samuel; Kyeremeh, Ransford; Adjei, Jonathan Kofi; Aryeh, Claudia; Kpentey, George

    2016-12-01

    The complement system is an enzyme cascade that helps defend against infection. Many complement proteins occur in serum as inactive enzyme precursors or reside on cell surfaces. Complement components have many biologic functions and their activation can eventually damage the plasma membranes of cells and some bacteria. Although a direct link between complement activation and autoimmune diseases has not been found, there is increasing evidence that complement activation significantly contributes to the pathogenesis of a large number of inflammatory diseases that may have autoimmune linkage. The inhibition of complement may therefore be very important in a variety of autoimmune diseases since their activation may be detrimental to the individual involved. However, a complete and long-term inhibition of complement may have some contra side effects such as increased susceptibility to infection. The site of complement activation will, however, determine the type of inhibitor to be used, its route of application and dosage level. Compared with conventional drugs, complement inhibitors may be the best option for treatment of autoimmune diseases. The review takes a critical look at the relative merits of therapies being developed to tackle inappropriate complement activation that are likely to result in sporadic autoimmune diseases or worsen already existing one. It covers the complement system, general aspects of complement inhibition therapy, therapeutic strategies and examples of complement inhibitors. It concludes by highlighting on the possibility that a better inhibitor of complement activation when found will help provide a formidable treatment for autoimmune diseases as well as preventing one.

  3. Effects of aging on value-directed modulation of semantic network activity during verbal learning.

    PubMed

    Cohen, Michael S; Rissman, Jesse; Suthana, Nanthia A; Castel, Alan D; Knowlton, Barbara J

    2016-01-15

    While impairments in memory recall are apparent in aging, older adults show a remarkably preserved ability to selectively remember information deemed valuable. Here, we use fMRI to compare brain activation in healthy older and younger adults during encoding of high and low value words to determine whether there are differences in how older adults achieve value-directed memory selectivity. We find that memory selectivity in older adults is associated with value-related changes in activation during word presentation in left hemisphere regions that are involved in semantic processing, similar to young adults. However, highly selective young adults show a relatively greater increase in semantic network activity during encoding of high-value items, whereas highly selective older adults show relatively diminished activity during encoding of low-value items. Additionally, only younger adults showed value-related increases in activity in semantic and reward processing regions during presentation of the value cue preceding each to-be-remembered word. Young adults therefore respond to cue value more proactively than do older adults, yet the magnitude of value-related differences in cue period brain activity did not predict individual differences in memory selectivity. Thus, our data also show that age-related reductions in prestimulus activity do not always lead to inefficient performance. PMID:26244278

  4. Comparison of Plasma Activation of Thin Water Layers by Direct and Remote Plasma Sources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kushner, Mark

    2014-10-01

    Plasma activation of liquids is now being investigated for a variety of biomedical applications. The plasma sources used for this activation can be generally classified as direct (the plasma is in contact with the surface of the liquid) or remote (the plasma does not directly touch the liquid). The direct plasma source may be a dielectric barrier discharge (DBD) where the surface of the liquid is a floating electrode or a plasma jet in which the ionization wave forming the plasma plume reaches the liquid. The remote plasma source may be a DBD with electrodes electrically isolated from the liquid or a plasma jet in which the ionization wave in the plume does not reach the liquid. In this paper, a comparison of activation of thin water layers on top of tissue, as might be encountered in wound healing, will be discussed using results from numerical investigations. We used the modeling platform nonPDPSIM to simulate direct plasma activation of thin water layers using DBDs and remote activation using plasma jets using up to hundreds of pulses. The DBDs are sustained in humid air while the plasma jets consist of He/O2 mixtures flowed into humid air. For similar number of pulses and energy deposition, the direct DBD plasma sources produce more acidification and higher production of nitrates/nitrites in the liquid. This is due to the accumulation of NxOy plasma jets, the convective flow removes many of these species prior to their diffusing into the water or reacting to form higher nitrogen oxides. This latter effect is sensitive to the repetition rate which determines whether reactive species formed during prior pulses overlap with newly produced reactive species. in the gas phase. In the plasma jets, the convective flow removes many of these species prior to their diffusing into the water or reacting to form higher nitrogen oxides. This latter effect is sensitive to the repetition rate which determines whether reactive species formed during prior pulses overlap with

  5. Direct measurement of catalase activity in living cells and tissue biopsies.

    PubMed

    Scaglione, Christine N; Xu, Qijin; Ramanujan, V Krishnan

    2016-01-29

    Spatiotemporal regulation of enzyme-substrate interactions governs the decision-making steps in biological systems. Enzymes, being functional units of every living cell, contribute to the macromolecular stability of cell survival, proliferation and hence are vital windows to unraveling the biological complexity. Experimental measurements capturing this dynamics of enzyme-substrate interactions in real time add value to this understanding. Furthermore these measurements, upon validation in realistic biological specimens such as clinical biopsies - can further improve our capability in disease diagnostics and treatment monitoring. Towards this direction, we describe here a novel, high-sensitive measurement system for measuring diffusion-limited enzyme-substrate kinetics in real time. Using catalase (enzyme) and hydrogen peroxide (substrate) as the example pair, we demonstrate that this system is capable of direct measurement of catalase activity in vitro and the measured kinetics follows the classical Michaelis-Menten reaction kinetics. We further demonstrate the system performance by measuring catalase activity in living cells and in very small amounts of liver biopsies (down to 1 μg total protein). Catalase-specific enzyme activity is demonstrated by genetic and pharmacological tools. Finally we show the clinically-relevant diagnostic capability of our system by comparing the catalase activities in liver biopsies from young and old mouse (liver and serum) samples. We discuss the potential applicability of this system in clinical diagnostics as well as in intraoperative surgical settings.

  6. Activity in V4 reflects the direction, but not the latency, of saccades during visual search.

    PubMed

    Gee, Angela L; Ipata, Anna E; Goldberg, Michael E

    2010-10-01

    We constantly make eye movements to bring objects of interest onto the fovea for more detailed processing. Activity in area V4, a prestriate visual area, is enhanced at the location corresponding to the target of an eye movement. However, the precise role of activity in V4 in relation to these saccades and the modulation of other cortical areas in the oculomotor system remains unknown. V4 could be a source of visual feature information used to select the eye movement, or alternatively, it could reflect the locus of spatial attention. To test these hypotheses, we trained monkeys on a visual search task in which they were free to move their eyes. We found that activity in area V4 reflected the direction of the upcoming saccade but did not predict the latency of the saccade in contrast to activity in the lateral intraparietal area (LIP). We suggest that the signals in V4, unlike those in LIP, are not directly involved in the generation of the saccade itself but rather are more closely linked to visual perception and attention. Although V4 and LIP have different roles in spatial attention and preparing eye movements, they likely perform complimentary processes during visual search. PMID:20610790

  7. A phosphorylation switch controls the spatiotemporal activation of Rho GTPases in directional cell migration

    PubMed Central

    Cao, Xuan; Kaneko, Tomonori; Li, Jenny S.; Liu, An-Dong; Voss, Courtney; Li, Shawn S. C.

    2015-01-01

    Although cell migration plays a central role in development and disease, the underlying molecular mechanism is not fully understood. Here we report that a phosphorylation-mediated molecular switch comprising deleted in liver cancer 1 (DLC1), tensin-3 (TNS3), phosphatase and tensin homologue (PTEN) and phosphoinositide-3-kinase (PI3K) controls the spatiotemporal activation of the small GTPases, Rac1 and RhoA, thereby initiating directional cell migration induced by growth factors. On epidermal growth factor (EGF) or platelet-derived growth factor (PDGF) stimulation, TNS3 and PTEN are phosphorylated at specific Thr residues, which trigger the rearrangement of the TNS3–DLC1 and PTEN–PI3K complexes into the TNS3–PI3K and PTEN–DLC1 complexes. Subsequently, the TNS3–PI3K complex translocates to the leading edge of a migrating cell to promote Rac1 activation, whereas PTEN–DLC1 translocates to the posterior for localized RhoA activation. Our work identifies a core signalling mechanism by which an external motility stimulus is coupled to the spatiotemporal activation of Rac1 and RhoA to drive directional cell migration. PMID:26166433

  8. Influenza A Virus Panhandle Structure Is Directly Involved in RIG-I Activation and Interferon Induction

    PubMed Central

    Liu, GuanQun; Park, Hong-Su; Pyo, Hyun-Mi; Liu, Qiang

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Retinoic acid-inducible gene I (RIG-I) is an important innate immune sensor that recognizes viral RNA in the cytoplasm. Its nonself recognition largely depends on the unique RNA structures imposed by viral RNA. The panhandle structure residing in the influenza A virus (IAV) genome, whose primary function is to serve as the viral promoter for transcription and replication, has been proposed to be a RIG-I agonist. However, this has never been proved experimentally. Here, we employed multiple approaches to determine if the IAV panhandle structure is directly involved in RIG-I activation and type I interferon (IFN) induction. First, in porcine alveolar macrophages, we demonstrated that the viral genomic coding region is dispensable for RIG-I-dependent IFN induction. Second, using in vitro-synthesized hairpin RNA, we showed that the IAV panhandle structure could directly bind to RIG-I and stimulate IFN production. Furthermore, we investigated the contributions of the wobble base pairs, mismatch, and unpaired nucleotides within the wild-type panhandle structure to RIG-I activation. Elimination of these destabilizing elements within the panhandle structure promoted RIG-I activation and IFN induction. Given the function of the panhandle structure as the viral promoter, we further monitored the promoter activity of these panhandle variants and found that viral replication was moderately affected, whereas viral transcription was impaired dramatically. In all, our results indicate that the IAV panhandle promoter region adopts a nucleotide composition that is optimal for balanced viral RNA synthesis and suboptimal for RIG-I activation. IMPORTANCE The IAV genomic panhandle structure has been proposed to be an RIG-I agonist due to its partial complementarity; however, this has not been experimentally confirmed. Here, we provide direct evidence that the IAV panhandle structure is competent in, and sufficient for, RIG-I activation and IFN induction. By constructing

  9. Estimating Am-241 activity in the body: comparison of direct measurements and radiochemical analyses

    SciTech Connect

    Lynch, Timothy P.; Tolmachev, Sergei Y.; James, Anthony C.

    2009-06-01

    The assessment of dose and ultimately the health risk from intakes of radioactive materials begins with estimating the amount actually taken into the body. An accurate estimate provides the basis to best assess the distribution in the body, the resulting dose, and ultimately the health risk. This study continues the time-honored practice of evaluating the accuracy of results obtained using in vivo measurement methods and techniques. Results from the radiochemical analyses of the 241Am activity content of tissues and organs from four donors to the United States Transuranium and Uranium Registries were compared to the results from direct measurements of radioactive material in the body performed in vivo and post mortem. Two were whole body donations and two were partial body donations The skeleton was the organ with the highest deposition of 241Am activity in all four cases. The activities ranged from 30 Bq to 300 Bq. The skeletal estimates obtained from measurements over the forehead were within 20% of the radiochemistry results in three cases and differed by 78% in one case. The 241Am lung activity estimates ranged from 1 Bq to 30 Bq in the four cases. The results from the direct measurements were within 40% of the radiochemistry results in 3 cases and within a factor of 3 for the other case. The direct measurement estimates of liver activity ranged from 2 Bq to 60 Bq and were generally lower than the radiochemistry results. The results from this study suggest that the measurement methods and calibration techniques used at the In Vivo Radiobioassay and Research Facility to quantify the activity in the lungs, skeleton and liver are reasonable under the most challenging conditions where there is 241Am activity in multiple organs. These methods and techniques are comparable to those used at other Department of Energy sites. This suggests that the current in vivo methods and calibration techniques provide reasonable estimates of radioactive material in the body. Not

  10. Fencing direct memory access data transfers in a parallel active messaging interface of a parallel computer

    DOEpatents

    Blocksome, Michael A; Mamidala, Amith R

    2014-02-11

    Fencing direct memory access (`DMA`) data transfers in a parallel active messaging interface (`PAMI`) of a parallel computer, the PAMI including data communications endpoints, each endpoint including specifications of a client, a context, and a task, the endpoints coupled for data communications through the PAMI and through DMA controllers operatively coupled to segments of shared random access memory through which the DMA controllers deliver data communications deterministically, including initiating execution through the PAMI of an ordered sequence of active DMA instructions for DMA data transfers between two endpoints, effecting deterministic DMA data transfers through a DMA controller and a segment of shared memory; and executing through the PAMI, with no FENCE accounting for DMA data transfers, an active FENCE instruction, the FENCE instruction completing execution only after completion of all DMA instructions initiated prior to execution of the FENCE instruction for DMA data transfers between the two endpoints.

  11. Fencing direct memory access data transfers in a parallel active messaging interface of a parallel computer

    DOEpatents

    Blocksome, Michael A.; Mamidala, Amith R.

    2013-09-03

    Fencing direct memory access (`DMA`) data transfers in a parallel active messaging interface (`PAMI`) of a parallel computer, the PAMI including data communications endpoints, each endpoint including specifications of a client, a context, and a task, the endpoints coupled for data communications through the PAMI and through DMA controllers operatively coupled to segments of shared random access memory through which the DMA controllers deliver data communications deterministically, including initiating execution through the PAMI of an ordered sequence of active DMA instructions for DMA data transfers between two endpoints, effecting deterministic DMA data transfers through a DMA controller and a segment of shared memory; and executing through the PAMI, with no FENCE accounting for DMA data transfers, an active FENCE instruction, the FENCE instruction completing execution only after completion of all DMA instructions initiated prior to execution of the FENCE instruction for DMA data transfers between the two endpoints.

  12. Free radicals and SOD activity of jaw cyst. Direct measurement and spin trapping studies by ESR.

    PubMed

    Kimura, H; Simodate, H; Suzuki, M

    1990-01-01

    Free radicals produced in the fluid of jaw cysts were directly measured at room temperature using ESR. With these samples, SOD activity of the cyst fluid was measured by the ESR spin trapping method with DMPO as a trapping agent. Freeze-dried samples of cyst fluid showed a broad ESR signal at g = 2.005. Relative signal intensity of samples from jaw cysts with inflammation was higher than jaw cysts without inflammation. SOD activity of cyst fluid with high viscosity showed higher values than that of cyst fluid with low viscosity. We suggest that free radicals produced in jaw cyst damage tissues while higher SOD activity of cyst fluid play a role in a self-defense mechanism against free radicals.

  13. Endonucleolytic activity directed towards 8-(2-hydroxy-2-propyl) purines in double-stranded DNA.

    PubMed

    Livneh, Z; Elad, D; Sperling, J

    1979-11-01

    Photoalkylation of circular covalently closed DNA from phage PM2 with isopropyl alcohol by using a free radical photoinitiator and UV light of lambda greater than 305 nm led to the specific 8-substitution of purine moieties in the DNA, yielding 8-(2-hydroxy-2-propyl)adenine and 8-(2-hydroxy-2-propyl)guanine as the only detectable damage in the DNA. Using this specifically photoalkylated DNA as a substrate, we discovered in extracts of Micrococcus luteus an endonucleolytic activity that is directed towards 8-(2-hydroxy-2-propyl) purines in DNA. The activity is not a combination of a DNA-glycosylase and an apurinic site endonuclease. It is not inhibited by single-stranded DNA, by UV- or gamma-irradiated single-stranded DNA, or by normal or depurinated double-stranded DNA. however, gamma- or UV-(254 nm) irradiated double-stranded DNAs to inhibit the activity, hinting at the possibility of a common type of lesion in these damaged DNAs. Divalent cations are not required for the incising activity, and it is fully active in 1 mM EDTA, whereas caffeine and ATP cause inhibition. Extracts of mutant M. luteus lacking pyrimidine-dimer-directed endonucleases were found to contain the endonucleolytic activity in levels comparable to those present in the wild type. After the incision, we could demonstrate the specific excision of the 8-alkylated purines from the damaged DNA. The special conformational consequences of the 8-alkylation of purines, at the nucleotide level, namely their nonregular syn conformation, suggest that it is the distortion in the DNA that is recognized by the endonuclease. PMID:293658

  14. BPA Directly Decreases GnRH Neuronal Activity via Noncanonical Pathway.

    PubMed

    Klenke, Ulrike; Constantin, Stephanie; Wray, Susan

    2016-05-01

    Peripheral feedback of gonadal estrogen to the hypothalamus is critical for reproduction. Bisphenol A (BPA), an environmental pollutant with estrogenic actions, can disrupt this feedback and lead to infertility in both humans and animals. GnRH neurons are essential for reproduction, serving as an important link between brain, pituitary, and gonads. Because GnRH neurons express several receptors that bind estrogen, they are potential targets for endocrine disruptors. However, to date, direct effects of BPA on GnRH neurons have not been shown. This study investigated the effects of BPA on GnRH neuronal activity using an explant model in which large numbers of primary GnRH neurons are maintained and express many of the receptors found in vivo. Because oscillations in intracellular calcium have been shown to correlate with electrical activity in GnRH neurons, calcium imaging was used to assay the effects of BPA. Exposure to 50μM BPA significantly decreased GnRH calcium activity. Blockage of γ-aminobutyric acid ergic and glutamatergic input did not abrogate the inhibitory BPA effect, suggesting direct regulation of GnRH neurons by BPA. In addition to estrogen receptor-β, single-cell RT-PCR analysis confirmed that GnRH neurons express G protein-coupled receptor 30 (G protein-coupled estrogen receptor 1) and estrogen-related receptor-γ, all potential targets for BPA. Perturbation studies of the signaling pathway revealed that the BPA-mediated inhibition of GnRH neuronal activity occurred independent of estrogen receptors, GPER, or estrogen-related receptor-γ, via a noncanonical pathway. These results provide the first evidence of a direct effect of BPA on GnRH neurons. PMID:26934298

  15. BPA Directly Decreases GnRH Neuronal Activity via Noncanonical Pathway.

    PubMed

    Klenke, Ulrike; Constantin, Stephanie; Wray, Susan

    2016-05-01

    Peripheral feedback of gonadal estrogen to the hypothalamus is critical for reproduction. Bisphenol A (BPA), an environmental pollutant with estrogenic actions, can disrupt this feedback and lead to infertility in both humans and animals. GnRH neurons are essential for reproduction, serving as an important link between brain, pituitary, and gonads. Because GnRH neurons express several receptors that bind estrogen, they are potential targets for endocrine disruptors. However, to date, direct effects of BPA on GnRH neurons have not been shown. This study investigated the effects of BPA on GnRH neuronal activity using an explant model in which large numbers of primary GnRH neurons are maintained and express many of the receptors found in vivo. Because oscillations in intracellular calcium have been shown to correlate with electrical activity in GnRH neurons, calcium imaging was used to assay the effects of BPA. Exposure to 50μM BPA significantly decreased GnRH calcium activity. Blockage of γ-aminobutyric acid ergic and glutamatergic input did not abrogate the inhibitory BPA effect, suggesting direct regulation of GnRH neurons by BPA. In addition to estrogen receptor-β, single-cell RT-PCR analysis confirmed that GnRH neurons express G protein-coupled receptor 30 (G protein-coupled estrogen receptor 1) and estrogen-related receptor-γ, all potential targets for BPA. Perturbation studies of the signaling pathway revealed that the BPA-mediated inhibition of GnRH neuronal activity occurred independent of estrogen receptors, GPER, or estrogen-related receptor-γ, via a noncanonical pathway. These results provide the first evidence of a direct effect of BPA on GnRH neurons.

  16. Laser-assisted sheet metal working in series production

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brecher, Christian; Emonts, Michael; Eckert, Markus

    2013-02-01

    Based on the demand for a responsible use of natural resources and energy the need for lightweight materials is increasing. The most common materials for lightweight production are high and highest strength steel. These materials are difficult to machine using conventional sheet metal working processes because the high strength leads to a limited formability and high tool wear. The Fraunhofer IPT developed the laser-assisted sheet metal working. Selective laser based heating of the part directly before machining softens the material locally. Thus the quality of the following cut can be increased, for example for shearing 1.4310 the clear cut surface ratio can be increased from 20% up to 100% using a shearing gap of 10% of the sheet thickness. Because of the softening of the material and thus the increased formability, parts with a higher complexity can be produced. For example 1.4310 can be bent laser-assisted with a radius of 0.25 mm instead of 2-3 mm using the conventional process. For the first time spring steel can be embossed with conventional tools up to 50% of the sheet thickness. For the implementation in series production a modular system upgrade "hy-PRESS" has been developed to include laser and scanner technology into existing presses. For decoupling the sensitive optical elements of the machine vibrations an active-passive damping system has been developed. The combination of this new hybrid process and the system technology allows to produce parts of high strength steel with a high complexity and quality.

  17. Exchange factors directly activated by cAMP mediate melanocortin 4 receptor-induced gene expression

    PubMed Central

    Glas, Evi; Mückter, Harald; Gudermann, Thomas; Breit, Andreas

    2016-01-01

    Gs protein-coupled receptors regulate many vital body functions by activation of cAMP response elements (CRE) via cAMP-dependent kinase A (PKA)-mediated phosphorylation of the CRE binding protein (CREB). Melanocortin 4 receptors (MC4R) are prototypical Gs-coupled receptors that orchestrate the hypothalamic control of food-intake and metabolism. Remarkably, the significance of PKA for MC4R-induced CRE-dependent transcription in hypothalamic cells has not been rigorously interrogated yet. In two hypothalamic cell lines, we observed that blocking PKA activity had only weak or no effects on reporter gene expression. In contrast, inhibitors of exchange factors directly activated by cAMP-1/2 (EPAC-1/2) mitigated MC4R-induced CRE reporter activation and mRNA induction of the CREB-dependent genes c-fos and thyrotropin-releasing hormone. Furthermore, we provide first evidence that extracellular-regulated kinases-1/2 (ERK-1/2) activated by EPACs and not PKA are the elusive CREB kinases responsible for MC4R-induced CREB/CRE activation in hypothalamic cells. Overall, these data emphasize the pivotal role of EPACs rather than PKA in hypothalamic gene expression elicited by a prototypical Gs-coupled receptor. PMID:27612207

  18. Exchange factors directly activated by cAMP mediate melanocortin 4 receptor-induced gene expression.

    PubMed

    Glas, Evi; Mückter, Harald; Gudermann, Thomas; Breit, Andreas

    2016-01-01

    Gs protein-coupled receptors regulate many vital body functions by activation of cAMP response elements (CRE) via cAMP-dependent kinase A (PKA)-mediated phosphorylation of the CRE binding protein (CREB). Melanocortin 4 receptors (MC4R) are prototypical Gs-coupled receptors that orchestrate the hypothalamic control of food-intake and metabolism. Remarkably, the significance of PKA for MC4R-induced CRE-dependent transcription in hypothalamic cells has not been rigorously interrogated yet. In two hypothalamic cell lines, we observed that blocking PKA activity had only weak or no effects on reporter gene expression. In contrast, inhibitors of exchange factors directly activated by cAMP-1/2 (EPAC-1/2) mitigated MC4R-induced CRE reporter activation and mRNA induction of the CREB-dependent genes c-fos and thyrotropin-releasing hormone. Furthermore, we provide first evidence that extracellular-regulated kinases-1/2 (ERK-1/2) activated by EPACs and not PKA are the elusive CREB kinases responsible for MC4R-induced CREB/CRE activation in hypothalamic cells. Overall, these data emphasize the pivotal role of EPACs rather than PKA in hypothalamic gene expression elicited by a prototypical Gs-coupled receptor. PMID:27612207

  19. Forced expression of Hnf4a induces hepatic gene activation through directed differentiation.

    PubMed

    Yahoo, Neda; Pournasr, Behshad; Rostamzadeh, Jalal; Fathi, Fardin

    2016-08-01

    Embryonic stem (ES) cells are capable of unlimited self-renewal and have a diverse differentiation potential. These unique features make ES cells as an attractive source for developmental biology studies. Having the mature hepatocyte in the lab with functional activities is valuable in drug discovery studies. Overexpression of hepatocyte lineage-specific transcription factors (TFs) becomes a promising approach in pluripotent cell differentiation toward liver cells. Many studies generate transgenic ES cell lines to examine the effects of specific TFs overexpression in cell differentiation. In the present report, we have addressed whether a suspension or adherent model of differentiation is an appropriate way to study the role of Hnf4a overexpression. We generated ES cells that carried a doxycycline (Dox)-inducible Hnf4a using lentiviral vectors. The transduced cells were subjected to induced Hnf4a overexpression through both spontaneous and directed differentiation methods. Gene expression analysis showed substantially increased expression of hepatic gene markers, particularly Ttr and endogenous Hnf4a, in transduced cells differentiated by the directed approach. These results demonstrated that forced expression of TFs during directed differentiation would be an appropriate way to study relevant gene activation and the effects of overexpression in the context of hepatic differentiation. PMID:27233607

  20. Maternal celiac disease autoantibodies bind directly to syncytiotrophoblast and inhibit placental tissue transglutaminase activity

    PubMed Central

    Anjum, Naheed; Baker, Philip N; Robinson, Nicola J; Aplin, John D

    2009-01-01

    Background Celiac disease (CD) occurs in as many as 1 in 80 pregnant women and is associated with poor pregnancy outcome, but it is not known if this is an effect on maternal nutrient absorption or, alternatively, if the placenta is an autoimmune target. The major autoantigen, tissue transglutaminase (tTG), has previously been shown to be present in the maternal-facing syncytiotrophoblast plasma membrane of the placenta. Methods ELISA was used to demonstrate the presence of antibodies to tissue transglutaminase in a panel of CD sera. Immunohistochemistry was used to evaluate the binding of IgA autoantibodies from CD serum to term placenta. In addition, novel direct binding and activity assays were developed to mimic the in vivo exposure of the villous placenta to maternal autoantibody. Results and Discussion CD IgA autoantibodies located to the syncytial surface of the placenta significantly more than IgA antibodies in control sera (P < 0.0001). The distribution of antigen was similar to that observed using a monoclonal antibody to tissue transglutaminase. Staining was reduced by pre-absorption of CD serum with recombinant human tissue transglutaminase. In direct binding assays, autoimmune immunoglobulin A (IgA) from the maternal compartment became associated with antigen at the syncytial surface of the placenta, as a result of which transglutaminase activity at this site was inhibited. Conclusion These data indicate that direct immune effects in untreated CD women may compromise placental function. PMID:19228395

  1. Cells activated for wound repair have the potential to direct collective invasion of an epithelium

    PubMed Central

    Bleaken, Brigid M.; Menko, A. Sue; Walker, Janice L.

    2016-01-01

    Mechanisms regulating how groups of cells are signaled to move collectively from their original site and invade surrounding matrix are poorly understood. Here we develop a clinically relevant ex vivo injury invasion model to determine whether cells involved in directing wound healing have invasive function and whether they can act as leader cells to direct movement of a wounded epithelium through a three-dimensional (3D) extracellular matrix (ECM) environment. Similar to cancer invasion, we found that the injured cells invade into the ECM as cords, involving heterotypical cell–cell interactions. Mesenchymal cells with properties of activated repair cells that typically locate to a wound edge are present in leader positions at the front of ZO-1–rich invading cords of cells, where they extend vimentin intermediate filament–enriched protrusions into the 3D ECM. Injury-induced invasion depends on both vimentin cytoskeletal function and MMP-2/9 matrix remodeling, because inhibiting either of these suppressed invasion. Potential push and pull forces at the tips of the invading cords were revealed by time-lapse imaging, which showed cells actively extending and retracting protrusions into the ECM. This 3D injury invasion model can be used to investigate mechanisms of leader cell–directed invasion and understand how mechanisms of wound healing are hijacked to cause disease. PMID:26658613

  2. The activation of directional stem cell motility by green light-emitting diode irradiation.

    PubMed

    Ong, Wei-Kee; Chen, How-Foo; Tsai, Cheng-Ting; Fu, Yun-Ju; Wong, Yi-Shan; Yen, Da-Jen; Chang, Tzu-Hao; Huang, Hsien-Da; Lee, Oscar Kuang-Sheng; Chien, Shu; Ho, Jennifer Hui-Chun

    2013-03-01

    Light-emitting diode (LED) irradiation is potentially a photostimulator to manipulate cell behavior by opsin-triggered phototransduction and thermal energy supply in living cells. Directional stem cell motility is critical for the efficiency and specificity of stem cells in tissue repair. We explored that green LED (530 nm) irradiation directed the human orbital fat stem cells (OFSCs) to migrate away from the LED light source through activation of extracellular signal-regulated kinases (ERK)/MAP kinase/p38 signaling pathway. ERK inhibitor selectively abrogated light-driven OFSC migration. Phosphorylation of these kinases as well as green LED irradiation-induced cell migration was facilitated by increasing adenosine triphosphate (ATP) production in OFSCs after green LED exposure, and which was thermal stress-independent mechanism. OFSCs, which are multi-potent mesenchymal stem cells isolated from human orbital fat tissue, constitutionally express three opsins, i.e. retinal pigment epithelium-derived rhodopsin homolog (RRH), encephalopsin (OPN3) and short-wave-sensitive opsin 1 (OPN1SW). However, only two non-visual opsins, i.e. RRH and OPN3, served as photoreceptors response to green LED irradiation-induced OFSC migration. In conclusion, stem cells are sensitive to green LED irradiation-induced directional cell migration through activation of ERK signaling pathway via a wavelength-dependent phototransduction.

  3. A novel method for direct measurement of complement convertases activity in human serum.

    PubMed

    Blom, A M; Volokhina, E B; Fransson, V; Strömberg, P; Berghard, L; Viktorelius, M; Mollnes, T E; López-Trascasa, M; van den Heuvel, L P; Goodship, T H; Marchbank, K J; Okroj, M

    2014-10-01

    Complement convertases are enzymatic complexes that play a central role in sustaining and amplification of the complement cascade. Impairment of complement function leads directly or indirectly to pathological conditions, including higher infection rate, kidney diseases, autoimmune- or neurodegenerative diseases and ischaemia-reperfusion injury. An assay for direct measurement of activity of the convertases in patient sera is not available. Existing assays testing convertase function are based on purified complement components and, thus, convertase formation occurs under non-physiological conditions. We designed a new assay, in which C5 blocking compounds enabled separation of the complement cascade into two phases: the first ending at the stage of C5 convertases and the second ending with membrane attack complex formation. The use of rabbit erythrocytes or antibody-sensitized sheep erythrocytes as the platforms for convertase formation enabled easy readout based on measurement of haemolysis. Thus, properties of patient sera could be studied directly regarding convertase activity and membrane attack complex formation. Another advantage of this assay was the possibility to screen for host factors such as C3 nephritic factor and other anti-complement autoantibodies, or gain-of-function mutations, which prolong the half-life of complement convertases. Herein, we present proof of concept, detailed description and validation of this novel assay.

  4. XSmad2 directly activates the activin-inducible, dorsal mesoderm gene XFKH1 in Xenopus embryos.

    PubMed Central

    Howell, M; Hill, C S

    1997-01-01

    Transforming growth factor (TGF)-beta family members play a central role in mesoderm induction during early embryogenesis in Xenopus. Although a number of target genes induced as an immediate-early response to activin-like members of the family have been described, little is known about the molecular mechanisms involved. Our systematic analysis of the activin induction of the target gene XFKH1 reveals two regions that mediate activin-responsive transcription: one, in the first intron, is targeted directly by the activin-signalling pathway; the other, in the 5' flanking sequences, responds to activin indirectly, possibly being required for maintenance of gene expression. We demonstrate that a 107 bp region of the XFKH1 first intron acts as an enhancer and confers activin inducibility onto a minimal uninducible promoter in the absence of new protein synthesis. It bears little sequence similarity to other activin responsive sequences. We further demonstrate that overexpression of a constitutively active derivative of Xenopus Smad2 (XSmad2), which has been implicated as a component of the activin signalling pathway, is sufficient for direct activation of transcription via this enhancer. Moreover, we show that XSmad2 acts indirectly on the proximal promoter element induced by activin via an indirect mechanism. These results establish the XFKH1 intron enhancer as a direct nuclear target of the activin signalling pathway in Xenopus embryos, and provide strong new evidence that XSmad2 is a transducer of activin signals. PMID:9405370

  5. Zinc Metalloproteinase ProA Directly Activates Legionella pneumophila PlaC Glycerophospholipid:cholesterol Acyltransferase*

    PubMed Central

    Lang, Christina; Rastew, Elena; Hermes, Björn; Siegbrecht, Enrico; Ahrends, Robert; Banerji, Sangeeta; Flieger, Antje

    2012-01-01

    Enzymes secreted by Legionella pneumophila, such as phospholipases A (PLAs) and glycerophospholipid:cholesterol acyltransferases (GCATs), may target host cell lipids and therefore contribute to the establishment of Legionnaires disease. L. pneumophila possesses three proteins, PlaA, PlaC, and PlaD, belonging to the GDSL family of lipases/acyltransferases. We have shown previously that PlaC is the major GCAT secreted by L. pneumophila and that the zinc metalloproteinase ProA is essential for GCAT activity. Here we characterized the mode of PlaC GCAT activation and determined that ProA directly processes PlaC. We further found that not only cholesterol but also ergosterol present in protozoa was palmitoylated by PlaC. Such ester formations were not induced by either PlaA or PlaD. PlaD was shown here to possess lysophospholipase A activity, and interestingly, all three GDSL enzymes transferred short chain fatty acids to sterols. The three single putative catalytic amino acids (Ser-37, Asp-398, and His-401) proved essential for all PlaC-associated PLA, lysophospholipase A, and GCAT activities. A further four cysteine residues are important for the PLA/GCAT activities as well as their oxidized state, and we therefore conclude that PlaC likely forms at least one disulfide loop. Analysis of cleavage site and loop deletion mutants suggested that for GCAT activation deletion of several amino acids within the loop is necessary rather than cleavage at a single site. Our data therefore suggest a novel enzyme inhibition/activation mechanism where a disulfide loop inhibits PlaC GCAT activity until the protein is exported to the external space where it is ProA-activated. PMID:22582391

  6. Loss, adaptation and new directions: The impact of arm morbidity on leisure activities following breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Thomas, Roanne; Hack, Thomas F; Quinlan, Elizabeth; Tatemichi, Sue; Towers, Anna; Kwan, Winkle; Miedema, Baukje; Tilley, Andrea; Hamoline, Rita; Morrison, Tricia

    2015-01-01

    The impact of arm morbidity on leisure and quality of life is an understudied area in cancer survivorship. The purpose of this study was to qualitatively describe the impact of breast cancer-related arm morbidity on leisure participation in Canadian women. A grounded theory approach was used to generate thematic categories and a model. Drawing on participants from a larger cohort study (n = 740), 40 women with arm morbidity symptoms were purposively sampled and interviewed. Three themes emerged: a sense of loss, adapting participation, and new directions. Women with arm morbidity may experience an abrupt loss of previously enjoyed leisure activities and engage in a process of adapting to discover new meanings and directions. Comprehensive, person-centred cancer survivorship programs may assist with adaptation to arm morbidity.

  7. Direct visualization of free-volume-triggered activation of β relaxation in colloidal glass

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, Yunzhuo; Lu, Xing; Qin, Zuoxiang; Shen, Jun

    2016-07-01

    β relaxation, which is predicted by mode coupling theory and involves the localized motions of particles, initiates in a supercooled liquid and continues into glassy state. It correlates essentially with many fundamental properties of amorphous materials. Despite its importance, the underlying mechanisms leading to the β relaxation have remained elusive. As natural heterogeneity, the original distributed free volume has been supposed to be associated with the activation of β relaxation in amorphous solids. However, there has been no direct experimental proof for this hypothesis. Here we used a colloidal glass to directly observe the β relaxation and free-volume distribution. We found a spatial correlation between the β relaxation and free volume. The large free volume regions were observed to possess a low-energy cost of relaxation-induced strain, indicating that the large free volume region presenting a low-energy barrier for structural relaxation benefits the β relaxation.

  8. Loss, adaptation and new directions: The impact of arm morbidity on leisure activities following breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Thomas, Roanne; Hack, Thomas F; Quinlan, Elizabeth; Tatemichi, Sue; Towers, Anna; Kwan, Winkle; Miedema, Baukje; Tilley, Andrea; Hamoline, Rita; Morrison, Tricia

    2015-01-01

    The impact of arm morbidity on leisure and quality of life is an understudied area in cancer survivorship. The purpose of this study was to qualitatively describe the impact of breast cancer-related arm morbidity on leisure participation in Canadian women. A grounded theory approach was used to generate thematic categories and a model. Drawing on participants from a larger cohort study (n = 740), 40 women with arm morbidity symptoms were purposively sampled and interviewed. Three themes emerged: a sense of loss, adapting participation, and new directions. Women with arm morbidity may experience an abrupt loss of previously enjoyed leisure activities and engage in a process of adapting to discover new meanings and directions. Comprehensive, person-centred cancer survivorship programs may assist with adaptation to arm morbidity. PMID:26642494

  9. Direct visualization of free-volume-triggered activation of β relaxation in colloidal glass.

    PubMed

    Lu, Yunzhuo; Lu, Xing; Qin, Zuoxiang; Shen, Jun

    2016-07-01

    β relaxation, which is predicted by mode coupling theory and involves the localized motions of particles, initiates in a supercooled liquid and continues into glassy state. It correlates essentially with many fundamental properties of amorphous materials. Despite its importance, the underlying mechanisms leading to the β relaxation have remained elusive. As natural heterogeneity, the original distributed free volume has been supposed to be associated with the activation of β relaxation in amorphous solids. However, there has been no direct experimental proof for this hypothesis. Here we used a colloidal glass to directly observe the β relaxation and free-volume distribution. We found a spatial correlation between the β relaxation and free volume. The large free volume regions were observed to possess a low-energy cost of relaxation-induced strain, indicating that the large free volume region presenting a low-energy barrier for structural relaxation benefits the β relaxation. PMID:27575178

  10. Direction-dependent activation of the insular cortex during vertical and horizontal hand movements.

    PubMed

    Rousseau, C; Fautrelle, L; Papaxanthis, C; Fadiga, L; Pozzo, T; White, O

    2016-06-14

    The planning of any motor action requires a complex multisensory processing by the brain. Gravity - immutable on Earth - has been shown to be a key input to these mechanisms. Seminal fMRI studies performed during visual perception of falling objects and self-motion demonstrated that humans represent the action of gravity in parts of the cortical vestibular system; in particular, the insular cortex and the cerebellum. However, little is known as to whether a specific neural network is engaged when processing non-visual signals relevant to gravity. We asked participants to perform vertical and horizontal hand movements without visual control, while lying in a 3T-MRI scanner. We highlighted brain regions activated in the processing of vertical movements, for which the effects of gravity changed during execution. Precisely, the left insula was activated in vertical movements and not in horizontal movements. Moreover, the network identified by contrasting vertical and horizontal movements overlapped with neural correlates previously associated to the processing of simulated self-motion and visual perception of the vertical direction. Interestingly, we found that the insular cortex activity is direction-dependent which suggests that this brain region processes the effects of gravity on the moving limbs through non-visual signals. PMID:27001175

  11. Direct action of capsaicin in brown adipogenesis and activation of brown adipocytes.

    PubMed

    Kida, Ryosuke; Yoshida, Hirofumi; Murakami, Masaru; Shirai, Mitsuyuki; Hashimoto, Osamu; Kawada, Teruo; Matsui, Tohru; Funaba, Masayuki

    2016-01-01

    The ingestion of capsaicin, the principle pungent component of red and chili peppers, induces thermogenesis, in part, through the activation of brown adipocytes expressing genes related to mitochondrial biogenesis and uncoupling such as peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor (Ppar) γ coactivator-1α (Pgc-1α) and uncoupling protein 1 (Ucp1). Capsaicin has been suggested to induce the activation of brown adipocytes, which is mediated by the stimulation of sympathetic nerves. However, capsaicin may directly affect the differentiation of brown preadipocytes, brown adipocyte function, or both, through its significant absorption. We herein demonstrated that Trpv1, a capsaicin receptor, is expressed in brown adipose tissue, and that its expression level is increased during the differentiation of HB2 brown preadipocytes. Furthermore, capsaicin induced calcium influx in brown preadipocytes. A treatment with capsaicin in the early stage of brown adipogenesis did not affect lipid accumulation or the expression levels of Fabp4 (a gene expressed in mature adipocytes), Pparγ2 (a master regulator of adipogenesis) or brown adipocyte-selective genes. In contrast, a treatment with capsaicin in the late stage of brown adipogenesis slightly increased the expression levels of Fabp4, Pparγ2 and Pgc-1α. Although capsaicin did not affect the basal expression level of Ucp1, Ucp1 induction by forskolin was partially inhibited by capsaicin, irrespective of the dose of capsaicin. The results of the present study suggest the direct effects of capsaicin on brown adipocytes or in the late stage of brown adipogenesis. PMID:26781688

  12. Highly active oxygen reduction non-platinum group metal electrocatalyst without direct metal-nitrogen coordination

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Strickland, Kara; Miner, Elise; Jia, Qingying; Tylus, Urszula; Ramaswamy, Nagappan; Liang, Wentao; Sougrati, Moulay-Tahar; Jaouen, Frédéric; Mukerjee, Sanjeev

    2015-06-01

    Replacement of noble metals in catalysts for cathodic oxygen reduction reaction with transition metals mostly create active sites based on a composite of nitrogen-coordinated transition metal in close concert with non-nitrogen-coordinated carbon-embedded metal atom clusters. Here we report a non-platinum group metal electrocatalyst with an active site devoid of any direct nitrogen coordination to iron that outperforms the benchmark platinum-based catalyst in alkaline media and is comparable to its best contemporaries in acidic media. In situ X-ray absorption spectroscopy in conjunction with ex situ microscopy clearly shows nitrided carbon fibres with embedded iron particles that are not directly involved in the oxygen reduction pathway. Instead, the reaction occurs primarily on the carbon-nitrogen structure in the outer skin of the nitrided carbon fibres. Implications include the potential of creating greater active site density and the potential elimination of any Fenton-type process involving exposed iron ions culminating in peroxide initiated free-radical formation.

  13. Highly active oxygen reduction non-platinum group metal electrocatalyst without direct metal-nitrogen coordination.

    PubMed

    Strickland, Kara; Miner, Elise; Jia, Qingying; Tylus, Urszula; Ramaswamy, Nagappan; Liang, Wentao; Sougrati, Moulay-Tahar; Jaouen, Frédéric; Mukerjee, Sanjeev

    2015-06-10

    Replacement of noble metals in catalysts for cathodic oxygen reduction reaction with transition metals mostly create active sites based on a composite of nitrogen-coordinated transition metal in close concert with non-nitrogen-coordinated carbon-embedded metal atom clusters. Here we report a non-platinum group metal electrocatalyst with an active site devoid of any direct nitrogen coordination to iron that outperforms the benchmark platinum-based catalyst in alkaline media and is comparable to its best contemporaries in acidic media. In situ X-ray absorption spectroscopy in conjunction with ex situ microscopy clearly shows nitrided carbon fibres with embedded iron particles that are not directly involved in the oxygen reduction pathway. Instead, the reaction occurs primarily on the carbon-nitrogen structure in the outer skin of the nitrided carbon fibres. Implications include the potential of creating greater active site density and the potential elimination of any Fenton-type process involving exposed iron ions culminating in peroxide initiated free-radical formation.

  14. High-activity PtRuPd/C catalyst for direct dimethyl ether fuel cells.

    PubMed

    Li, Qing; Wen, Xiaodong; Wu, Gang; Chung, Hoon T; Gao, Rui; Zelenay, Piotr

    2015-06-22

    Dimethyl ether (DME) has been considered as a promising alternative fuel for direct-feed fuel cells but lack of an efficient DME oxidation electrocatalyst has remained the challenge for the commercialization of the direct DME fuel cell. The commonly studied binary PtRu catalyst shows much lower activity in DME than methanol oxidation. In this work, guided by density functional theory (DFT) calculation, a ternary carbon-supported PtRuPd catalyst was designed and synthesized for DME electrooxidation. DFT calculations indicated that Pd in the ternary PtRuPd catalyst is capable of significantly decreasing the activation energy of the CO and CH bond scission during the oxidation process. As evidenced by both electrochemical measurements in an aqueous electrolyte and polymer-electrolyte fuel cell testing, the ternary catalyst shows much higher activity (two-fold enhancement at 0.5 V in fuel cells) than the state-of-the-art binary Pt50 Ru50 /C catalyst (HiSPEC 12100).

  15. Highly active oxygen reduction non-platinum group metal electrocatalyst without direct metal-nitrogen coordination.

    PubMed

    Strickland, Kara; Miner, Elise; Jia, Qingying; Tylus, Urszula; Ramaswamy, Nagappan; Liang, Wentao; Sougrati, Moulay-Tahar; Jaouen, Frédéric; Mukerjee, Sanjeev

    2015-01-01

    Replacement of noble metals in catalysts for cathodic oxygen reduction reaction with transition metals mostly create active sites based on a composite of nitrogen-coordinated transition metal in close concert with non-nitrogen-coordinated carbon-embedded metal atom clusters. Here we report a non-platinum group metal electrocatalyst with an active site devoid of any direct nitrogen coordination to iron that outperforms the benchmark platinum-based catalyst in alkaline media and is comparable to its best contemporaries in acidic media. In situ X-ray absorption spectroscopy in conjunction with ex situ microscopy clearly shows nitrided carbon fibres with embedded iron particles that are not directly involved in the oxygen reduction pathway. Instead, the reaction occurs primarily on the carbon-nitrogen structure in the outer skin of the nitrided carbon fibres. Implications include the potential of creating greater active site density and the potential elimination of any Fenton-type process involving exposed iron ions culminating in peroxide initiated free-radical formation. PMID:26059552

  16. Highly active oxygen reduction non-platinum group metal electrocatalyst without direct metal–nitrogen coordination

    PubMed Central

    Strickland, Kara; Miner, Elise; Jia, Qingying; Tylus, Urszula; Ramaswamy, Nagappan; Liang, Wentao; Sougrati, Moulay-Tahar; Jaouen, Frédéric; Mukerjee, Sanjeev

    2015-01-01

    Replacement of noble metals in catalysts for cathodic oxygen reduction reaction with transition metals mostly create active sites based on a composite of nitrogen-coordinated transition metal in close concert with non-nitrogen-coordinated carbon-embedded metal atom clusters. Here we report a non-platinum group metal electrocatalyst with an active site devoid of any direct nitrogen coordination to iron that outperforms the benchmark platinum-based catalyst in alkaline media and is comparable to its best contemporaries in acidic media. In situ X-ray absorption spectroscopy in conjunction with ex situ microscopy clearly shows nitrided carbon fibres with embedded iron particles that are not directly involved in the oxygen reduction pathway. Instead, the reaction occurs primarily on the carbon–nitrogen structure in the outer skin of the nitrided carbon fibres. Implications include the potential of creating greater active site density and the potential elimination of any Fenton-type process involving exposed iron ions culminating in peroxide initiated free-radical formation. PMID:26059552

  17. Active vibration control for flexible rotor by optimal direct-output feedback control

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nonami, Kenzou; Dirusso, Eliseo; Fleming, David P.

    1989-01-01

    Experimental research tests were performed to actively control the rotor vibrations of a flexible rotor mounted on flexible bearing supports. The active control method used in the tests is called optimal direct-output feedback control. This method uses four electrodynamic actuators to apply control forces directly to the bearing housings in order to achieve effective vibration control of the rotor. The force actuators are controlled by an analog controller that accepts rotor displacement as input. The controller is programmed with experimentally determined feedback coefficients; the output is a control signal to the force actuators. The tests showed that this active control method reduced the rotor resonance peaks due to unbalance from approximately 250 micrometers down to approximately 25 micrometers (essentially runout level). The tests were conducted over a speed range from 0 to 10,000 rpm; the rotor system had nine critical speeds within this speed range. The method was effective in significantly reducing the rotor vibration for all of the vibration modes and critical speeds.

  18. Active vibration control for flexible rotor by optimal direct-output feedback control

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nonami, K.; Dirusso, E.; Fleming, D. P.

    1989-01-01

    Experimental research tests were performed to actively control the rotor vibrations of a flexible rotor mounted on flexible bearing supports. The active control method used in the tests is called optimal direct-output feedback control. This method uses four electrodynamic actuators to apply control forces directly to the bearing housings in order to achieve effective vibration control of the rotor. The force actuators are controlled by an analog controller that accepts rotor displacement as input. The controller is programmed with experimentally determined feedback coefficients; the output is a control signal to the force actuators. The tests showed that this active control method reduced the rotor resonance peaks due to unbalance from approximately 250 microns down to approximately 25 microns (essentially runout level). The tests were conducted over a speed range from 0 to 10,000 rpm; the rotor system had nine critical speeds within this speed range. The method was effective in significantly reducing the rotor vibration for all of the vibration modes and critical speeds.

  19. Arsenic Directly Binds to and Activates the Yeast AP-1-Like Transcription Factor Yap8

    PubMed Central

    Kumar, Nallani Vijay; Yang, Jianbo; Pillai, Jitesh K.; Rawat, Swati; Solano, Carlos; Kumar, Abhay; Grøtli, Morten; Stemmler, Timothy L.; Rosen, Barry P.

    2015-01-01

    The AP-1-like transcription factor Yap8 is critical for arsenic tolerance in the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae. However, the mechanism by which Yap8 senses the presence of arsenic and activates transcription of detoxification genes is unknown. Here we demonstrate that Yap8 directly binds to trivalent arsenite [As(III)] in vitro and in vivo and that approximately one As(III) molecule is bound per molecule of Yap8. As(III) is coordinated by three sulfur atoms in purified Yap8, and our genetic and biochemical data identify the cysteine residues that form the binding site as Cys132, Cys137, and Cys274. As(III) binding by Yap8 does not require an additional yeast protein, and Yap8 is regulated neither at the level of localization nor at the level of DNA binding. Instead, our data are consistent with a model in which a DNA-bound form of Yap8 acts directly as an As(III) sensor. Binding of As(III) to Yap8 triggers a conformational change that in turn brings about a transcriptional response. Thus, As(III) binding to Yap8 acts as a molecular switch that converts inactive Yap8 into an active transcriptional regulator. This is the first report to demonstrate how a eukaryotic protein couples arsenic sensing to transcriptional activation. PMID:26711267

  20. Direct action of capsaicin in brown adipogenesis and activation of brown adipocytes.

    PubMed

    Kida, Ryosuke; Yoshida, Hirofumi; Murakami, Masaru; Shirai, Mitsuyuki; Hashimoto, Osamu; Kawada, Teruo; Matsui, Tohru; Funaba, Masayuki

    2016-01-01

    The ingestion of capsaicin, the principle pungent component of red and chili peppers, induces thermogenesis, in part, through the activation of brown adipocytes expressing genes related to mitochondrial biogenesis and uncoupling such as peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor (Ppar) γ coactivator-1α (Pgc-1α) and uncoupling protein 1 (Ucp1). Capsaicin has been suggested to induce the activation of brown adipocytes, which is mediated by the stimulation of sympathetic nerves. However, capsaicin may directly affect the differentiation of brown preadipocytes, brown adipocyte function, or both, through its significant absorption. We herein demonstrated that Trpv1, a capsaicin receptor, is expressed in brown adipose tissue, and that its expression level is increased during the differentiation of HB2 brown preadipocytes. Furthermore, capsaicin induced calcium influx in brown preadipocytes. A treatment with capsaicin in the early stage of brown adipogenesis did not affect lipid accumulation or the expression levels of Fabp4 (a gene expressed in mature adipocytes), Pparγ2 (a master regulator of adipogenesis) or brown adipocyte-selective genes. In contrast, a treatment with capsaicin in the late stage of brown adipogenesis slightly increased the expression levels of Fabp4, Pparγ2 and Pgc-1α. Although capsaicin did not affect the basal expression level of Ucp1, Ucp1 induction by forskolin was partially inhibited by capsaicin, irrespective of the dose of capsaicin. The results of the present study suggest the direct effects of capsaicin on brown adipocytes or in the late stage of brown adipogenesis.

  1. Action of methotrexate and tofacitinib on directly stimulated and bystander-activated lymphocytes.

    PubMed

    Piscianz, Elisa; Candilera, Vanessa; Valencic, Erica; Loganes, Claudia; Paron, Greta; De Iudicibus, Sara; Decorti, Giuliana; Tommasini, Alberto

    2016-07-01

    Chronic inflammation associated with autoimmune activation is characteristic of rheumatic diseases from childhood to adulthood. In recent decades, significant improvements in the treatment of these types of disease have been achieved using disease modifying anti-rheumatic drugs (DMARDs), such as methotrexate (MTX) and, more recently, using biologic inhibitors. The recent introduction of kinase inhibitors (for example, tofacitinib; Tofa) further increases the available ARDs. However, there are patients that do not respond to any treatment strategies, for whom combination therapies are proposed. The data regarding the combined action of different drugs is lacking and the knowledge of the mechanisms of ARDs and their actions upon pathogenic lymphocytes, which are hypothesized to sustain disease, is poor. An in vitro model of inflammation was developed in the current study, in which stimulated and unstimulated lymphocytes were cultured together, but tracked separately, to investigate the action of MTX and Tofa on the two populations. By analysing lymphocyte proliferation and activation, and cytokine secretion in the culture supernatants, it was established that, due to the presence of activated cells, unstimulated cells underwent a bystander activation that was modulated by the ARDs. Additionally, varying administration schedules were demonstrated to affect lymphocytes differently in vitro, either directly or via bystander activation. Furthermore, MTX and Tofa exerted different effects; while MTX showed an antiproliferative effect, Tofa marginally effected activation, although only a slight antiproliferative action, which could be potentiated by sequential treatment with MTX. Thus, it was hypothesized that these differences may be exploited in sequential therapeutic strategies, to maximize the anti‑rheumatic effect. These findings are notable and must be accounted for, as bystander‑activated cells in vivo could contribute to the spread of autoimmune activation

  2. Removal of direct blue-86 from aqueous solution by new activated carbon developed from orange peel.

    PubMed

    Nemr, Ahmed El; Abdelwahab, Ola; El-Sikaily, Amany; Khaled, Azza

    2009-01-15

    The use of low-cost, easy obtained, high efficiency and eco-friendly adsorbents has been investigated as an ideal alternative to the current expensive methods of removing dyes from wastewater. This study investigates the potential use of activated carbon prepared from orange peel for the removal of direct blue-86 (DB-86) (Direct Fast Turquoise Blue GL) dye from simulated wastewater. The effects of different system variables, adsorbent dosage, initial dye concentration, pH and contact time were studied. The results showed that as the amount of the adsorbent increased, the percentage of dye removal increased accordingly. Optimum pH value for dye adsorption was determined as approximately 2.0. Maximum dye was sequestered within 30min after the beginning for every experiment. The adsorption of direct blue-86 followed a pseudo-second-order rate equation and fit well Langmuir, Tempkin and Dubinin-Radushkevich (D-R) equations better than Freundlich and Redlich-Peterson equations. The maximum removal of direct blue-86 was obtained at pH 2 as 92% for adsorbent dose of 6gL(-1) and 100mgL(-1) initial dye concentration at room temperature. The maximum adsorption capacity obtained from Langmuir equation was 33.78mgg(-1). Furthermore, adsorption kinetics of DB-86 was studied and the rate of adsorption was found to conform to pseudo-second-order kinetics with a good correlation (R2>0.99) with intraparticle diffusion as one of the rate determining steps. Activated carbon developed from orange peel can be attractive options for dye removal from diluted industrial effluents since test reaction made on simulated dyeing wastewater show better removal percentage of DB-86.

  3. A pincer-shaped plasma sheet at Uranus

    SciTech Connect

    Hammond, C.M.; Walker, R.J.; Kivelson, M.G. )

    1990-09-01

    A model from Voigt et al. (1987) and an MHD simulation from Walker et al. (1989) both show that the curvature of the plasma sheet at Uranus changes as the dipole tilt varies between 38{degree} and 22{degree}. The models suggest that one of the two partial traversals of the uranian plasma sheet made during the outbound trajectory of Voyager 2 can be explained as an entry into the highly curved plasma sheet that develops when Uranus is near the maximum dipole tilt value of 38{degree}; previously both partial traversals have been explained as anomalous. The spacecraft would have reversed its motion relative to the plasma sheet as the continued rotation diminished the dipole tilt and the retreating plasma sheet uncurled. As the dipole tilt approached its minimum value, spacecraft motion towards the neutral sheet resumed and the traversal of the plasma sheet was completed. Evidence from the PWS plasma wave detector suggests that the spacecraft trajectory skimmed the plasma sheet boundary layer for several hours prior to the partial immersion. The plasma sheet of the Voigt et al. model was not located near the spacecraft during this time interval. On the other hand, the MHD simulation reveals a plasma sheet that is more curved than in the Boigt et al. model; near maximum dipole tilt, the plasma sheet is pincer-shaped. The unusual geometry implies that Voyager 2 remained near the plasma sheet boundary layer during the period suggested by the PWS data. Thus the simulation accounts easily for the first of the plasma sheet encounters previously called anomalous. The second partial immersion remains anomalous, having previously been related to substorm activity, and thus is not discussed here. The stagnation distances of the earth and Uranus at the nose of the magnetopause were used to scale the Walker et al. (1989) simulation of the terrestrial magnetosphere to represent the uranian magnetosphere.

  4. Energy information sheets

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1993-12-02

    The National Energy Information Center (NEIC), as part of its mission, provides energy information and referral assistance to Federal, State, and local governments, the academic community, business and industrial organizations, and the general public. Written for the general public, the EIA publication Energy Information Sheets was developed to provide information on various aspects of fuel production, prices, consumption and capability. The information contained herein pertains to energy data as of December 1991. Additional information on related subject matter can be found in other EIA publications as referenced at the end of each sheet.

  5. Light sheet microscopy.

    PubMed

    Weber, Michael; Mickoleit, Michaela; Huisken, Jan

    2014-01-01

    This chapter introduces the concept of light sheet microscopy along with practical advice on how to design and build such an instrument. Selective plane illumination microscopy is presented as an alternative to confocal microscopy due to several superior features such as high-speed full-frame acquisition, minimal phototoxicity, and multiview sample rotation. Based on our experience over the last 10 years, we summarize the key concepts in light sheet microscopy, typical implementations, and successful applications. In particular, sample mounting for long time-lapse imaging and the resulting challenges in data processing are discussed in detail.

  6. 5. Historic American Buildings Survey Taken from drawing sheet, SHEET ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    5. Historic American Buildings Survey Taken from drawing sheet, SHEET #21, Showing the house as restored since Survey. (Dormer windows omitted as not authentic) - Samuel des Marest House, River Road, New Milford, Bergen County, NJ

  7. 71. PALMDALE WATER COMPANY, EASTWOOD MULTIPLEARCHED DAM: STRESS SHEET, SHEET ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    71. PALMDALE WATER COMPANY, EASTWOOD MULTIPLE-ARCHED DAM: STRESS SHEET, SHEET 3; DECEMBER 20, 1918. Littlerock Water District files. - Little Rock Creek Dam, Little Rock Creek, Littlerock, Los Angeles County, CA

  8. Aligned carbon nanotube sheet piezoresistive strain sensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Ang; Bogdanovich, Alexander E.; Bradford, Philip D.

    2015-09-01

    Carbon nanotubes (CNTs) have a unique set of properties that may be useful in the production of next generation structural health monitoring composites. This research introduces a novel CNT based material system for strain and damage sensing applications. An aligned sheet of interconnected CNTs was drawn from a chemical vapor deposition grown CNT array and then bonded to the surface of glass fiber/epoxy composite coupons. Various types of mechanical tests were conducted, accompanied by real-time electrical data acquisition, in order to evaluate the electro-mechanical behavior of the developed sensing material. Specimens were loaded in the longitudinal and transverse CNT sheet orientations to investigate the anisotropy of the piezoresistive effect. The CNT sheets exhibited good sensing stability, linearity, sensitivity and repeatability within a practical strain range; which are crucial sensor features for health monitoring. It was also demonstrated that the CNT orientation in the sheet had a dramatic effect on the sensitivity, thus validating the usefulness of this sensing material for directional strain/damage monitoring. Finally, pre-straining of the CNT sheet sensors was conducted to further enhance the linearity of electro-mechanical response and long-term stability of the sensors during cyclic loading.

  9. Use of a fluorescent redox probe for direct visualization of actively respiring bacteria.

    PubMed

    Rodriguez, G G; Phipps, D; Ishiguro, K; Ridgway, H F

    1992-06-01

    The redox dye 5-cyano-2,3-ditolyl tetrazolium chloride (CTC) was employed for direct epifluorescent microscopic enumeration of respiring bacteria in environmental samples. Oxidized CTC is nearly colorless and is nonfluorescent; however, the compound is readily reduced via electron transport activity to fluorescent, insoluble CTC-formazan, which accumulates intracellularly. Bacteria containing CTC-formazan were visualized by epifluorescence microscopy in wet-mount preparations, on polycarbonate membrane filter surfaces, or in biofilms associated with optically opaque surfaces. Counterstaining of CTC-treated samples with the DNA-specific fluorochrome 4',6-diamidino-2-phenylindole allowed enumeration of active and total bacterial subpopulations within the same preparation. Municipal wastewater, groundwater, and seawater samples supplied with exogenous nutrients yielded CTC counts that were generally lower than total 4',6-diamidino-2-phenylindole counts but typically equal to or greater than standard heterotrophic (aerobic) plate counts. In unsupplemented water samples, CTC counts were typically lower than those obtained with the heterotrophic plate count method. Reduction of CTC by planktonic or biofilm-associated bacteria was suppressed by formaldehyde, presumably because of inhibition of electron transport activity and other metabolic processes. Because of their bright red fluorescence (emission maximum, 602 nm), actively respiring bacteria were readily distinguishable from abiotic particles and other background substances, which typically fluoresced at shorter wavelengths. The use of CTC greatly facilitated microscopic detection and enumeration of metabolically active (i.e., respiring) bacteria in environmental samples.

  10. Alkyl isocyanates as active site-directed inactivators of guinea pig liver transglutaminase.

    PubMed

    Gross, M; Whetzel, N K; Folk, J E

    1975-10-10

    Alkyl isocyanates are effective inactivators of guinea pig liver transglutaminase. Based on the specificity of the reaction the protection against inactivation by glutamine substrate, and the essential nature of calcium for the inactivation reaction, it is concluded that these reagents act as amide substrate analogs and, thus function in an active site-specific manner. Support for the contention that inactivation results from alkyl thiocarbamate ester formation through the single active site sulfhydryl group of the enzyme is (a) the loss of one free--SH group and the incorporation of 1 mol of reagent/mol of enzyme in the reaction, (b) similarity in chemical properties of the inactive enzyme derivative formed to those previously reported for another alkyl thiocarbamoylenzyme and an alkyl thiocarbamoylcysteine derivative, and (c) the finding that labeled peptides from digests of [methyl-14C]thiocarbamoyltransglutaminase and those from digests of iodoacetamide-inactivated enzyme occupy similar positions on peptide maps. Transglutaminase was found to be inactivated neither by urethan anlogs of its active ester substrates nor by urea analogs of its amide substrates. It is concluded on the basis of these findings that inactive carbamoylenzyme derivatives are formed only by direct addition of the transglutaminase active--SH group to the isocyanate C--N double bond, and not, like several serine active site enzymes, by nucleophilic displacement with urethan analogs of substrate, or by nucleophilic displacement with urea analogs of substrate. PMID:240837

  11. Quantification of the activity of biomolecules in microarrays obtained by direct laser transfer.

    PubMed

    Dinca, V; Ranella, A; Farsari, M; Kafetzopoulos, D; Dinescu, M; Popescu, A; Fotakis, C

    2008-10-01

    The direct-writing technique laser-induced forward transfer has been employed for the micro-array printing of liquid solutions of the enzyme horseradish peroxidase and the protein Titin on nitrocellulose solid surfaces. The effect of two UV laser pulse lengths, femtosecond and nanosecond has been studied in relation with maintaining the activity of the transferred biomolecules. The quantification of the active biomolecules after transfer has been carried out using Bradford assay, quantitative colorimetric enzymatic assay and fluorescence techniques. Spectrophotometric measurements of the HRP and the Titin activity as well as chromatogenic and fluorescence assay studies have revealed a connection between the properties of the deposited, biologically active biomolecules, the experimental conditions and the target composition. The bioassays have shown that up to 78% of the biomolecules remained active after femtosecond laser transfer, while this value reduced to 54% after nanosecond laser transfer. The addition of glycerol in a percentage up to 70% in the solution to be transferred has contributed to the stabilization of the micro-array patterns and the increase of their resolution.

  12. A Direct Grain-Boundary-Activity Correlation for CO Electroreduction on Cu Nanoparticles

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Copper catalyzes the electrochemical reduction of CO to valuable C2+ products including ethanol, acetate, propanol, and ethylene. These reactions could be very useful for converting renewable energy into fuels and chemicals, but conventional Cu electrodes are energetically inefficient and have poor selectivity for CO vs H2O reduction. Efforts to design improved catalysts have been impeded by the lack of experimentally validated, quantitative structure–activity relationships. Here we show that CO reduction activity is directly correlated to the density of grain boundaries (GBs) in Cu nanoparticles (NPs). We prepared electrodes of Cu NPs on carbon nanotubes (Cu/CNT) with different average GB densities quantified by transmission electron microscopy. At potentials ranging from −0.3 V to −0.5 V vs the reversible hydrogen electrode, the specific activity for CO reduction to ethanol and acetate was linearly proportional to the fraction of NP surfaces comprised of GB surface terminations. Our results provide a design principle for CO reduction to ethanol and acetate on Cu. GB-rich Cu/CNT electrodes are the first NP catalysts with significant CO reduction activity at moderate overpotential, reaching a mass activity of up to ∼1.5 A per gram of Cu and a Faradaic efficiency >70% at −0.3 V. PMID:27163043

  13. Kindlin-2 cooperates with talin to activate integrins and induces cell spreading by directly binding paxillin

    PubMed Central

    Theodosiou, Marina; Widmaier, Moritz; Böttcher, Ralph T; Rognoni, Emanuel; Veelders, Maik; Bharadwaj, Mitasha; Lambacher, Armin; Austen, Katharina; Müller, Daniel J; Zent, Roy; Fässler, Reinhard

    2016-01-01

    Integrins require an activation step prior to ligand binding and signaling. How talin and kindlin contribute to these events in non-hematopoietic cells is poorly understood. Here we report that fibroblasts lacking either talin or kindlin failed to activate β1 integrins, adhere to fibronectin (FN) or maintain their integrins in a high affinity conformation induced by Mn2+. Despite compromised integrin activation and adhesion, Mn2+ enabled talin- but not kindlin-deficient cells to initiate spreading on FN. This isotropic spreading was induced by the ability of kindlin to directly bind paxillin, which in turn bound focal adhesion kinase (FAK) resulting in FAK activation and the formation of lamellipodia. Our findings show that talin and kindlin cooperatively activate integrins leading to FN binding and adhesion, and that kindlin subsequently assembles an essential signaling node at newly formed adhesion sites in a talin-independent manner. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.10130.001 PMID:26821125

  14. Texture Evolution of Single-Pass Hot-Rolled 5052/AZ31/5052 Clad Sheets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nie, Huihui; Liang, Wei; Yang, Fuqian; Zheng, Liuwei; Li, Xianrong; Fan, Haiwei

    2016-08-01

    Three-layered 5052/AZ31/5052 clad sheets with maximum rolling reductions of 33% and 48% were prepared, using single-pass hot rolling followed by thermal annealing at 200°C for 1 h. The evolutions of microstructures and textures were analyzed. The experimental results show that the AZ31 layer exhibited a typical deformation microstructure with rolling-induced twins. The AZ31 layer with the 33% rolling reduction possessed a texture with the basal pole tilting about 35° away from normal direction to transverse direction and the majority of twins consists of {10 bar{1} 1}-{10 bar{1} 2} double twins and {10 bar{1} 2} tensile twins. The AZ31 layer with the 48% rolling reduction possessed a typical basal texture because {10 bar{1} 1} compression twins were activated by c-axis strain to compete with the tensile twins. No intermetallics were observed after annealing, and recrystallization occurred preferentially at the interface between AZ31 and 5052. The typical rolling texture of the 5052 layer disappeared, and the stable {001} <110> rotation cube component was dominant. The tensile test of the rolled three-layered 5052/AZ31/5052 clad sheets was performed. The tensile experimental results show that the annealed clad sheets with 33% rolling reduction and smaller degree of recrystallization have the largest elongation of 22.5% and larger ultimate tensile strength (UTS) than the annealed clad sheets with 48% rolling reduction.

  15. Direct laser writing for active and passive high-Q polymer microdisks on silicon.

    PubMed

    Grossmann, Tobias; Schleede, Simone; Hauser, Mario; Beck, Torsten; Thiel, Michael; von Freymann, Georg; Mappes, Timo; Kalt, Heinz

    2011-06-01

    We report the fabrication of high-Q polymeric microdisks on silicon via direct laser writing utilizing two-photon absorption induced polymerization. The quality factors of the passive cavities are above 10(6) in the 1300 nm wavelength region. The flexible three-dimensional (3D) lithography method allows for the fabrication of different cavity thicknesses on the same substrate, useful for rapid prototyping of active and passive optical microcavities. Microdisk lasers are realized by doping the resist with dye, resulting in laser emission at visible wavelengths.

  16. Synthesis of fluorescent carbon nanoparticles directly from active carbon via a one-step ultrasonic treatment

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Haitao; He, Xiaodie; Liu, Yang; Yu, Hang; Kang, Zhenhui; Lee, Shuit-Tong

    2011-01-15

    Water-soluble fluorescent carbon nanoparticles were synthesized directly from active carbon by a one-step hydrogen peroxide-assisted ultrasonic treatment. The carbon nanoparticles were characterized by transmission electron microscopy, optical fluorescent microscopy, fluorescent spectroscopy, Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy and ultraviolet-visible spectrophotometer. The results showed that the surface of carbon nanoparticles was rich of hydroxyl groups resulting in high hydrophilicity. The carbon nanoparticles could emit bright and colorful photoluminescence covering the entire visible-to-near infrared spectral range. Furthermore, these carbon nanoparticles also had excellent up-conversion fluorescent properties.

  17. Direct air activation measurements at a 15-MV medical linear accelerator.

    PubMed

    Saeed, M K; Poppe, B; Fischer, H W

    2015-02-01

    Direct radiometric determination of (14)N (γ, n) (13)N air activation was achieved at a 15-MV medical linear accelerator operating in a high-energy photon mode. (13)N was identified by irradiating a gas-tight Marinelli beaker filled with nitrogen gas and later observing the 10-min half-life of the 511-keV positron-electron annihilation line using high-resolution gamma spectroscopy. Quantitative evaluation of the spectral signal yielded a (13)N production rate of 836.8 ± 32 Bq Gy(-1) in air per 40 × 40 cm(2) field cross section at 100 cm source-surface distance.

  18. Structure of the Magnetotail Current Sheet

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Larson, Douglas J.; Kaufmann, Richard L.

    1996-01-01

    An orbit tracing technique was used to generate current sheets for three magnetotail models. Groups of ions were followed to calculate the resulting cross-tail current. Several groups then were combined to produce a current sheet. The goal is a model in which the ions and associated electrons carry the electric current distribution needed to generate the magnetic field B in which ion orbits were traced. The region -20 R(E) less than x less than -14 R(E) in geocentric solar magnetospheric coordinates was studied. Emphasis was placed on identifying the categories of ion orbits which contribute most to the cross-tail current and on gaining physical insight into the manner by which the ions carry the observed current distribution. Ions that were trapped near z = 0, ions that magnetically mirrored throughout the current sheet, and ions that mirrored near the Earth all were needed. The current sheet structure was determined primarily by ion magnetization currents. Electrons of the observed energies carried relatively little cross-tail current in these quiet time current sheets. Distribution functions were generated and integrated to evaluate fluid parameters. An earlier model in which B depended only on z produced a consistent current sheet, but it did not provide a realistic representation of the Earth's middle magnetotail. In the present study, B changed substantially in the x and z directions but only weakly in the y direction within our region of interest. Plasmas with three characteristic particle energies were used with each of the magnetic field models. A plasma was found for each model in which the density, average energy, cross-tail current, and bulk flow velocity agreed well with satellite observations.

  19. Ice Sheet Stratigraphy Can Constrain Basal Slip

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wolovick, M.; Creyts, T. T.; Buck, W. R.; Bell, R. E.

    2014-12-01

    Basal slip is an important component of ice sheet mass flux and dynamics. Basal slip varies over time due to variations in basal temperature, water pressure, and sediment cover. All of these factors can create coherent patterns of basal slip that migrate over time. Our knowledge of the spatial variability in basal slip comes from inversions of driving stress, ice thickness, and surface velocity, but these inversions contain no information about temporal variability. We do not know if the patterns in slip revealed by those inversions move over time. While englacial stratigraphy has classically been used to constrain surface accumulation and geothermal flux, it is also sensitive to horizontal gradients in basal slip. Here we show that englacial stratigraphy can constrain the velocity of basal slip patterns. Englacial stratigraphy responds strongly to patterns of basal slip that move downstream over time close to the ice sheet velocity. In previous work, we used a thermomechanical model to discover that thermally controlled slip patterns migrate downstream and create stratigraphic structures, but we were unable to directly control the pattern velocity, as that arose naturally out of the model physics. Here, we use a kinematic flowline model that allows us to directly control pattern velocity, and thus is applicable to a wide variety of slip mechanisms in addition to basal temperature. We find that the largest and most intricate stratigraphic structures develop when the pattern moves at the column-average ice velocity. Patterns that move slower than the column-average ice velocity produce overturned stratigraphy in the lower part of the ice sheet, while patterns moving at the column-average eventually cause the entire ice sheet to overturn if they persist long enough. Based on these forward models, we develop an interpretive guide for deducing moving patterns in basal slip from ice sheet internal layers. Ice sheet internal stratigraphy represents a potentially vast

  20. Polarized fluorescent emission from aligned electrospun nanofiber sheets containing semiconductor nanorods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hasegawa, Masaki; Hirayama, Yuki; Dertinger, Stephan

    2015-02-01

    We fabricated sheets consisting of aligned electrospun polymer nanofibers embedded with semiconductor nanorods (NRs) and confirmed the production of polarized fluorescence emission. Electrospun nanofibers with embedded semiconductor NRs were rolled around a drum to form a sheet in which each nanofiber was aligned parallel to the rotation direction. The thickness and polarization ratio of the sheet were 1.5 μm and 0.6, respectively. We also examined how electrospinning parameters affected the polarization ratio of the sheet.

  1. Human immunodeficiency virus type 1 Nef binds directly to Lck and mitogen-activated protein kinase, inhibiting kinase activity.

    PubMed Central

    Greenway, A; Azad, A; Mills, J; McPhee, D

    1996-01-01

    It is now well established that human immunodeficiency virus type I (HIV-1) Nef contributes substantially to disease pathogenesis by augmenting virus replication and markedly perturbing T-cell function. The effect of Nef on host cell activation could be explained in part by its interaction with specific cellular proteins involved in signal transduction, including at least a member of the src family kinase, Lck, and the serine/threonine kinase, mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK). Recombinant Nef directly interacted with purified Lck and MAPK in coprecipitation experiments and binding assays. A proline-rich repeat sequence [(Pxx)4] in Nef occurring between amino acid residues 69 to 78 is highly conserved and bears strong resemblance to a defined consensus sequence identified as an SH3 binding domain present in several proteins which can interact with the SH3 domain of various signalling and cytoskeletal proteins. Binding and coprecipitation assays with short synthetic peptides corresponding to the proline-rich repeat sequence [(Pxx)4] of Nef and the SH2, SH3, or SH2 and SH3 domains of Lck revealed that the interaction between these two proteins is at least in part mediated by the proline repeat sequence of Nef and the SH3 domain of Lck. In addition to direct binding to full-length Nef, MAPK was also shown to bind the same proline repeat motif. Nef protein significantly decreased the in vitro kinase activity of Lck and MAPK. Inhibition of key members of signalling cascades, including those emanating from the T-cell receptor, by the HIV-1 Nef protein undoubtedly alters the ability of the infected T cell to respond to antigens or cytokines, facilitating HIV-1 replication and contributing to HIV-1-induced disease pathogenesis. PMID:8794306

  2. Quantitative, directional measurement of electric field heterogeneity in the active site of ketosteroid isomerase.

    PubMed

    Fafarman, Aaron T; Sigala, Paul A; Schwans, Jason P; Fenn, Timothy D; Herschlag, Daniel; Boxer, Steven G

    2012-02-01

    Understanding the electrostatic forces and features within highly heterogeneous, anisotropic, and chemically complex enzyme active sites and their connection to biological catalysis remains a longstanding challenge, in part due to the paucity of incisive experimental probes of electrostatic properties within proteins. To quantitatively assess the landscape of electrostatic fields at discrete locations and orientations within an enzyme active site, we have incorporated site-specific thiocyanate vibrational probes into multiple positions within bacterial ketosteroid isomerase. A battery of X-ray crystallographic, vibrational Stark spectroscopy, and NMR studies revealed electrostatic field heterogeneity of 8 MV/cm between active site probe locations and widely differing sensitivities of discrete probes to common electrostatic perturbations from mutation, ligand binding, and pH changes. Electrostatic calculations based on active site ionization states assigned by literature precedent and computational pK(a) prediction were unable to quantitatively account for the observed vibrational band shifts. However, electrostatic models of the D40N mutant gave qualitative agreement with the observed vibrational effects when an unusual ionization of an active site tyrosine with a pK(a) near 7 was included. UV-absorbance and (13)C NMR experiments confirmed the presence of a tyrosinate in the active site, in agreement with electrostatic models. This work provides the most direct measure of the heterogeneous and anisotropic nature of the electrostatic environment within an enzyme active site, and these measurements provide incisive benchmarks for further developing accurate computational models and a foundation for future tests of electrostatics in enzymatic catalysis.

  3. LE135, a retinoid acid receptor antagonist, produces pain through direct activation of TRP channels

    PubMed Central

    Yin, Shijin; Luo, Jialie; Qian, Aihua; Yu, Weihua; Hu, Hongzhen

    2014-01-01

    Background and PurposeRetinoids, through their activation of retinoic acid receptors (RARs) and retinoid X receptors, regulate diverse cellular processes, and pharmacological intervention in their actions has been successful in the treatment of skin disorders and cancers. Despite the many beneficial effects, administration of retinoids causes irritating side effects with unknown mechanisms. Here, we demonstrate that LE135 [4-(7,8,9,10-tetrahydro-5,7,7,10,10-pentamethyl-5H-benzo[e]naphtho[2,3-b][1,4]diazepin-13-yl)benzoic acid], a selective antagonist of RARβ, is a potent activator of the capsaicin (TRPV1) and wasabi (TRPA1) receptors, two critical pain-initiating cation channels. Experimental ApproachWe performed to investigate the excitatory effects of LE135 on TRPV1 and TRPA1 channels expressed in HEK293T cells and in dorsal root ganglia neurons with calcium imaging and patch-clamp recordings. We also used site-directed mutagenesis of the channels to determine the structural basis of LE135-induced activation of TRPV1 and TRPA1 channels and behavioural testing to examine if pharmacological inhibition and genetic deletion of the channels affected LE135-evoked pain-related behaviours. Key ResultsLE135 activated both the capsaicin receptor (TRPV1) and the allyl isothiocyanate receptor (TRPA1) heterologously expressed in HEK293T cells and endogenously expressed by sensory nociceptors. Mutations disrupting the capsaicin-binding site attenuated LE135 activation of TRPV1 channels and a single mutation (K170R) eliminated TRPA1 activity evoked by LE135. Intraplantar injection of LE135 evoked pain-related behaviours. Both TRPV1 and TRPA1 channels were involved in LE135-elicited pain-related responses, as shown by pharmacological and genetic ablation studies. Conclusions and ImplicationsThis blocker of retinoid acid signalling also exerted non-genomic effects through activating the pain-initiating TRPV1 and TRPA1 channels. PMID:24308840

  4. Activated pathways for the directed insertion of patterned nanoparticles into polymer membranes.

    PubMed

    Ting, Christina L; Frischknecht, Amalie L

    2013-10-28

    We combine the string method with self-consistent field theory to compute the most probable transition pathway, i.e. the minimum free energy path, for the insertion of Janus and protein-like nanoparticles into a polymer membrane bilayer. The method makes no assumptions in the reaction coordinate and overcomes the long timescales challenge associated with simulating rare events. Our study suggests that one approach to building functional polymer–nanoparticle composite membranes with oriented nanoparticles is through electrostatic interactions. In particular, hydrophobic Janus nanoparticles with an asymmetric charge distribution can be made to directionally insert into charged membranes. This process is kinetically driven, and involves overcoming a thermally surmountable activation barrier, which requires favorable interactions between the nanoparticle and the hydrophilic block of the membrane. In contrast, the insertion of protein-like nanoparticles with alternating hydrophilic–hydrophobic–hydrophilic domains into polymer membranes does not occur as a thermally activated event. PMID:26029770

  5. Increased silver activity for direct propylene epoxidation via subnanometer size effects.

    PubMed

    Lei, Y; Mehmood, F; Lee, S; Greeley, J; Lee, B; Seifert, S; Winans, R E; Elam, J W; Meyer, R J; Redfern, P C; Teschner, D; Schlögl, R; Pellin, M J; Curtiss, L A; Vajda, S

    2010-04-01

    Production of the industrial chemical propylene oxide is energy-intensive and environmentally unfriendly. Catalysts based on bulk silver surfaces with direct propylene epoxidation by molecular oxygen have not resolved these problems because of substantial formation of carbon dioxide. We found that unpromoted, size-selected Ag3 clusters and approximately 3.5-nanometer Ag nanoparticles on alumina supports can catalyze this reaction with only a negligible amount of carbon dioxide formation and with high activity at low temperatures. Density functional calculations show that, relative to extended silver surfaces, oxidized silver trimers are more active and selective for epoxidation because of the open-shell nature of their electronic structure. The results suggest that new architectures based on ultrasmall silver particles may provide highly efficient catalysts for propylene epoxidation. PMID:20378815

  6. Increased Silver Activity for Direct Propylene Epoxidation via Subnanometer Size Effects

    SciTech Connect

    Lei, Y.; Mehmood, Faisal; Lee, Sang Soo; Greeley, Jeffrey P.; Lee, Byeongdu; Seifert, Soenke; Winans, R. E.; Elam, J. W.; Meyer, R. J.; Redfern, Paul C.; Teschner, D.; Schlogl, Robert; Pellin, M. J.; Curtiss, Larry A.; Vajda, S.

    2010-04-09

    Production of the industrial chemical propylene oxide is energy-intensive and environmentally unfriendly. Catalysts based on bulk silver surfaces with direct propylene epoxidation by molecular oxygen have not resolved these problems because of substantial formation of carbon dioxide. We found that unpromoted, size-selected Ag3 clusters and ~3.5-nanometer Ag nanoparticles on alumina supports can catalyze this reaction with only a negligible amount of carbon dioxide formation and with high activity at low temperatures. Density functional calculations show that, relative to extended silver surfaces, oxidized silver trimers are more active and selective for epoxidation because of the open-shell nature of their electronic structure. The results suggest that new architectures based on ultrasmall silver particles may provide highly efficient catalysts for propylene epoxidation.

  7. Direct neuronal glucose uptake heralds activity-dependent increases in cerebral metabolism

    PubMed Central

    Lundgaard, Iben; Li, Baoman; Xie, Lulu; Kang, Hongyi; Sanggaard, Simon; Haswell, John Douglas R; Sun, Wei; Goldman, Siri; Blekot, Solomiya; Nielsen, Michael; Takano, Takahiro; Deane, Rashid; Nedergaard, Maiken

    2015-01-01

    Metabolically, the brain is a highly active organ that relies almost exclusively on glucose as its energy source. According to the astrocyte-to-neuron lactate shuttle hypothesis, glucose is taken up by astrocytes and converted to lactate, which is then oxidized by neurons. Here we show, using 2-photon imaging of a near-infrared 2-deoxyglucose analogue (2DG-IR), that glucose is taken up preferentially by neurons in awake behaving mice. Anesthesia suppressed neuronal 2DG-IR uptake and sensory stimulation was associated with a sharp increase in neuronal, but not astrocytic, 2DG-IR uptake. Moreover, hexokinase, which catalyze the first enzymatic steps in glycolysis, was highly enriched in neurons compared with astrocytes, in mouse as well as in human cortex. These observations suggest that brain activity and neuronal glucose metabolism are directly linked, and identifies the neuron as the principal locus of glucose uptake as visualized by functional brain imaging. PMID:25904018

  8. Peroxisome Proliferator-Activated Receptors and the Heart: Lessons from the Past and Future Directions

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Wang-Soo; Kim, Jaetaek

    2015-01-01

    Peroxisome proliferator-activated receptors (PPARs) belong to the nuclear family of ligand activated transcriptional factors and comprise three different isoforms, PPAR-α, PPAR-β/δ, and PPAR-γ. The main role of PPARs is to regulate the expression of genes involved in lipid and glucose metabolism. Several studies have demonstrated that PPAR agonists improve dyslipidemia and glucose control in animals, supporting their potential as a promising therapeutic option to treat diabetes and dyslipidemia. However, substantial differences exist in the therapeutic or adverse effects of specific drug candidates, and clinical studies have yielded inconsistent data on their cardioprotective effects. This review summarizes the current knowledge regarding the molecular function of PPARs and the mechanisms of the PPAR regulation by posttranslational modification in the heart. We also describe the results and lessons learned from important clinical trials on PPAR agonists and discuss the potential future directions for this class of drugs. PMID:26587015

  9. Increased silver activity for direct propylene epoxidation via subnanometer size effects.

    SciTech Connect

    Lei, Y.; Mehmood, F.; Lee, S.; Greeley, J. P.; Lee, B.; Seifert, S.; Winans, R. E.; Elam, J. E.; Meyer, R. J.; Redfern, P. C.; Teschner, D.; Schlogl, R.; Pellin, M. J.; Curtiss, L. A.; Vajda, S.; Univ. of Illinois at Chicago; Fritz-Haber Inst. der Max-Planck-Gesellschaft; Yale Univ.

    2010-04-09

    Production of the industrial chemical propylene oxide is energy-intensive and environmentally unfriendly. Catalysts based on bulk silver surfaces with direct propylene epoxidation by molecular oxygen have not resolved these problems because of substantial formation of carbon dioxide. We found that unpromoted, size-selected Ag{sub 3} clusters and {approx}3.5-nanometer Ag nanoparticles on alumina supports can catalyze this reaction with only a negligible amount of carbon dioxide formation and with high activity at low temperatures. Density functional calculations show that, relative to extended silver surfaces, oxidized silver trimers are more active and selective for epoxidation because of the open-shell nature of their electronic structure. The results suggest that new architectures based on ultrasmall silver particles may provide highly efficient catalysts for propylene epoxidation.

  10. Rapid Detection of Thrombin and Other Protease Activity Directly in Whole Blood

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Johnson Chung Sing

    Thrombin is a serine protease that plays a key role in the clotting cascade to promote hemostasis following injury to the endothelium. From a clinical diagnostic perspective, in-vivo thrombin activity is linked to various blood clotting disorders, as well as cardiovascular disease (DVT, arteriosclerosis, etc). Thus, the ability to rapidly measure protease activity directly in whole blood will provide important new diagnostics, and clinical researchers with a powerful tool to further elucidate the relationship between circulating protease levels and disease. The ultimate goal is to design novel point of care (POC) diagnostic devices that are capable of monitoring protease activities directly in whole blood and biological sample. A charge-changing substrate specific to the thrombin enzyme was engineered and its functionality was confirmed by a series of experiments. This led to the preliminary design, construction, and testing of two device platforms deemed fully functional for the electrophoretic separation and focusing of charged peptide fragments. The concept of using the existing charge-changing substrate platform for bacterial protease detection was also investigated. Certain strains of E coli are associated with severe symptoms such as abdominal cramps, bloody diarrhea, and vomiting. The OmpT protease is expressed on the outer membrane of E coli and plays a role in the cleavage of antimicrobial peptides, the degradation of recombinant heterologous proteins, and the activation of plasminogen in the host. Thus, a synthetic peptide substrate specific to the OmpT protease was designed and modeled for the purpose of detecting E coli in biological sample.

  11. Direct Ionic Regulation of the Activity of Myo-Inositol Biosynthesis Enzymes in Mozambique Tilapia.

    PubMed

    Villarreal, Fernando D; Kültz, Dietmar

    2015-01-01

    Myo-inositol (Ins) is a major compatible osmolyte in many cells, including those of Mozambique tilapia (Oreochromis mossambicus). Ins biosynthesis is highly up-regulated in tilapia and other euryhaline fish exposed to hyperosmotic stress. In this study, enzymatic regulation of two enzymes of Ins biosynthesis, Ins phosphate synthase (MIPS) and inositol monophosphatase (IMPase), by direct ionic effects is analyzed. Specific MIPS and IMPase isoforms from Mozambique tilapia (MIPS-160 and IMPase 1) were selected based on experimental, phylogenetic, and structural evidence supporting their role for Ins biosynthesis during hyperosmotic stress. Recombinant tilapia IMPase 1 and MIPS-160 activity was assayed in vitro at ionic conditions that mimic changes in the intracellular milieu during hyperosmotic stress. The in vitro activities of MIPS-160 and IMPase 1 are highest at alkaline pH of 8.8. IMPase 1 catalytic efficiency is strongly increased during hyperosmolality (particularly for the substrate D-Ins-3-phosphate, Ins-3P), mainly as a result of [Na+] elevation. Furthermore, the substrate-specificity of IMPase 1 towards D-Ins-1-phosphate (Ins-1P) is lower than towards Ins-3P. Because MIPS catalysis results in Ins-3P this results represents additional evidence for IMPase 1 being the isoform that mediates Ins biosynthesis in tilapia. Our data collectively demonstrate that the Ins biosynthesis enzymes are activated under ionic conditions that cells are exposed to during hypertonicity, resulting in Ins accumulation, which, in turn, results in restoration of intracellular ion homeostasis. We propose that the unique and direct ionic regulation of the activities of Ins biosynthesis enzymes represents an efficient biochemical feedback loop for regulation of intracellular physiological ion homeostasis during hyperosmotic stress.

  12. Direct Ionic Regulation of the Activity of Myo-Inositol Biosynthesis Enzymes in Mozambique Tilapia

    PubMed Central

    Villarreal, Fernando D.; Kültz, Dietmar

    2015-01-01

    Myo-inositol (Ins) is a major compatible osmolyte in many cells, including those of Mozambique tilapia (Oreochromis mossambicus). Ins biosynthesis is highly up-regulated in tilapia and other euryhaline fish exposed to hyperosmotic stress. In this study, enzymatic regulation of two enzymes of Ins biosynthesis, Ins phosphate synthase (MIPS) and inositol monophosphatase (IMPase), by direct ionic effects is analyzed. Specific MIPS and IMPase isoforms from Mozambique tilapia (MIPS-160 and IMPase 1) were selected based on experimental, phylogenetic, and structural evidence supporting their role for Ins biosynthesis during hyperosmotic stress. Recombinant tilapia IMPase 1 and MIPS-160 activity was assayed in vitro at ionic conditions that mimic changes in the intracellular milieu during hyperosmotic stress. The in vitro activities of MIPS-160 and IMPase 1 are highest at alkaline pH of 8.8. IMPase 1 catalytic efficiency is strongly increased during hyperosmolality (particularly for the substrate D-Ins-3-phosphate, Ins-3P), mainly as a result of [Na+] elevation. Furthermore, the substrate-specificity of IMPase 1 towards D-Ins-1-phosphate (Ins-1P) is lower than towards Ins-3P. Because MIPS catalysis results in Ins-3P this results represents additional evidence for IMPase 1 being the isoform that mediates Ins biosynthesis in tilapia. Our data collectively demonstrate that the Ins biosynthesis enzymes are activated under ionic conditions that cells are exposed to during hypertonicity, resulting in Ins accumulation, which, in turn, results in restoration of intracellular ion homeostasis. We propose that the unique and direct ionic regulation of the activities of Ins biosynthesis enzymes represents an efficient biochemical feedback loop for regulation of intracellular physiological ion homeostasis during hyperosmotic stress. PMID:26066044

  13. Exposure age and ice-sheet model constraints on Pliocene East Antarctic ice sheet dynamics

    PubMed Central

    Yamane, Masako; Yokoyama, Yusuke; Abe-Ouchi, Ayako; Obrochta, Stephen; Saito, Fuyuki; Moriwaki, Kiichi; Matsuzaki, Hiroyuki

    2015-01-01

    The Late Pliocene epoch is a potential analogue for future climate in a warming world. Here we reconstruct Plio-Pleistocene East Antarctic Ice Sheet (EAIS) variability using cosmogenic nuclide exposure ages and model simulations to better understand ice sheet behaviour under such warm conditions. New and previously published exposure ages indicate interior-thickening during the Pliocene. An ice sheet model with mid-Pliocene boundary conditions also results in interior thickening and suggests that both the Wilkes Subglacial and Aurora Basins largely melted, offsetting increased ice volume. Considering contributions from West Antarctica and Greenland, this is consistent with the most recent IPCC AR5 estimate, which indicates that the Pliocene sea level likely did not exceed +20 m on Milankovitch timescales. The inception of colder climate since ∼3 Myr has increased the sea ice cover and inhibited active moisture transport to Antarctica, resulting in reduced ice sheet thickness, at least in coastal areas. PMID:25908601

  14. Exposure age and ice-sheet model constraints on Pliocene East Antarctic ice sheet dynamics.

    PubMed

    Yamane, Masako; Yokoyama, Yusuke; Abe-Ouchi, Ayako; Obrochta, Stephen; Saito, Fuyuki; Moriwaki, Kiichi; Matsuzaki, Hiroyuki

    2015-04-24

    The Late Pliocene epoch is a potential analogue for future climate in a warming world. Here we reconstruct Plio-Pleistocene East Antarctic Ice Sheet (EAIS) variability using cosmogenic nuclide exposure ages and model simulations to better understand ice sheet behaviour under such warm conditions. New and previously published exposure ages indicate interior-thickening during the Pliocene. An ice sheet model with mid-Pliocene boundary conditions also results in interior thickening and suggests that both the Wilkes Subglacial and Aurora Basins largely melted, offsetting increased ice volume. Considering contributions from West Antarctica and Greenland, this is consistent with the most recent IPCC AR5 estimate, which indicates that the Pliocene sea level likely did not exceed +20 m on Milankovitch timescales. The inception of colder climate since ∼3 Myr has increased the sea ice cover and inhibited active moisture transport to Antarctica, resulting in reduced ice sheet thickness, at least in coastal areas.

  15. Quick Information Sheets. 1988.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wisconsin Univ., Madison. Trace Center.

    The Trace Center gathers and organizes information on communication, control, and computer access for handicapped individuals. The information is disseminated in the form of brief sheets describing print, nonprint, and organizational resources and listing addresses and telephone numbers for ordering or for additional information. This compilation…

  16. Quick Information Sheets.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wisconsin Univ., Madison. Trace Center.

    This compilation of "Trace Quick Sheets" provides descriptions, prices, and ordering information for products and services that assist with communication, control, and computer access for disabled individuals. Product descriptions or product sources are included for: adaptive toys and toy modifications; head pointers, light pointers, and…

  17. Ethanol Myths Fact Sheet

    SciTech Connect

    2009-10-27

    Ethanol is a clean, renewable fuel that is helping to reduce our nation’s dependence on oil and can offer additional economic and environmental benefits in the future. This fact sheet is intended to address some common misconceptions about this important alternative fuel.

  18. Insulation Fact Sheet.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Conservation and Renewable Energy Inquiry and Referral Service (DOE), Silver Spring, MD.

    Heating and cooling account for 50-70% of the energy consumed in the average American home. Heating water accounts for another 20%. A poorly insulated home loses much of this energy, causing drafty rooms and high energy bills. This fact sheet discusses how to determine if your home needs more insulation, the additional thermal resistance (called…

  19. Ethanol Basics (Fact Sheet)

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    2015-01-01

    Ethanol is a widely-used, domestically-produced renewable fuel made from corn and other plant materials. More than 96% of gasoline sold in the United States contains ethanol. Learn more about this alternative fuel in the Ethanol Basics Fact Sheet, produced by the U.S. Department of Energy's Clean Cities program.

  20. Reading Recovery. [Fact Sheets].

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Reading Recovery Council of North America, Columbus, OH.

    This set of 10 fact sheets (each 2 to 4 pages long) addresses aspects of Reading Recovery, a program that helps children to be proficient readers and writers by the end of the first grade. It discusses the basic facts of Reading Recovery; Reading Recovery for Spanish literacy; Reading Recovery lessons; Reading Recovery professional development;…

  1. Algal Biofuels Fact Sheet

    SciTech Connect

    2009-10-27

    This fact sheet provides information on algal biofuels, which are generating considerable interest around the world. They may represent a sustainable pathway for helping to meet the U.S. biofuel production targets set by the Energy Independence and Security Act of 2007.

  2. Rubella - Fact Sheet for Parents

    MedlinePlus

    ... this page: About CDC.gov . Redirect for the Rubella fact sheet page. The current fact sheet can ... http://www.cdc.gov/vaccines/parents/diseases/child/rubella.html Print page Share Compartir File Formats Help: ...

  3. Modulation of cortical activity as a result of voluntary postural sway direction: an EEG study

    PubMed Central

    Slobounov, Semyon; Hallett, Mark; Cao, Cheng; Newell, Karl

    2008-01-01

    There is increasing evidence demonstrating the role of the cerebral cortex in human postural control. Modulation of EEG both in voltage and frequency domains has been observed preceding and following self-paced postural movements and those induced by external perturbations. The current study set out to provide additional evidence regarding the role of cerebral cortex in human postural control by specifically examining modulation of EEG as a function of postural sway direction. Twelve neurologically normal subjects were instructed to produce self-paced voluntary postural sways in the anterior-posterior (AP) and medial-lateral (ML) directions. The center of pressure dynamics and EEG both in voltage and frequency domains were extracted by averaging and Morlet wavelet techniques, respectively. The amplitude of movement-related cortical potentials (MRCP) was significantly higher preceding ML sways. Also, time-frequency wavelet coefficients (TF) indicated differential modulation of EEG within alpha, beta and gamma bands as a function of voluntary postural sway direction. Thus, ML sway appear to be more difficult and energy demanding tasks than the AP sway as reflected in differential modulation of EEG. These results are discussed within the conceptual framework of differential patterns of brain activation as a result of postural task complexity. PMID:18639613

  4. A Self-Sensing Active Magnetic Bearing Based on a Direct Current Measurement Approach

    PubMed Central

    Niemann, Andries C.; van Schoor, George; du Rand, Carel P.

    2013-01-01

    Active magnetic bearings (AMBs) have become a key technology in various industrial applications. Self-sensing AMBs provide an integrated sensorless solution for position estimation, consolidating the sensing and actuating functions into a single electromagnetic transducer. The approach aims to reduce possible hardware failure points, production costs, and system complexity. Despite these advantages, self-sensing methods must address various technical challenges to maximize the performance thereof. This paper presents the direct current measurement (DCM) approach for self-sensing AMBs, denoting the direct measurement of the current ripple component. In AMB systems, switching power amplifiers (PAs) modulate the rotor position information onto the current waveform. Demodulation self-sensing techniques then use bandpass and lowpass filters to estimate the rotor position from the voltage and current signals. However, the additional phase-shift introduced by these filters results in lower stability margins. The DCM approach utilizes a novel PA switching method that directly measures the current ripple to obtain duty-cycle invariant position estimates. Demodulation filters are largely excluded to minimize additional phase-shift in the position estimates. Basic functionality and performance of the proposed self-sensing approach are demonstrated via a transient simulation model as well as a high current (10 A) experimental system. A digital implementation of amplitude modulation self-sensing serves as a comparative estimator. PMID:24030681

  5. Multiple Receptor-Ligand Interactions Direct Tissue-Resident γδ T Cell Activation

    PubMed Central

    Witherden, Deborah. A.; Ramirez, Kevin; Havran, Wendy L.

    2014-01-01

    γδ T cells represent a major T cell population in epithelial tissues, such as skin, intestine, and lung, where they function in maintenance of the epithelium and provide a crucial first line defense against environmental and pathogenic insults. Despite their importance, the molecular mechanisms directing their activation and function have remained elusive. Epithelial-resident γδ T cells function through constant communication with neighboring cells, either via direct cell-to-cell contact or cell-to-matrix interactions. These intimate relationships allow γδ T cells to facilitate the maintenance of epithelial homeostasis, tissue repair following injury, inflammation, and protection from malignancy. Recent studies have identified a number of molecules involved in these complex interactions, under both homeostatic conditions, as well as following perturbation of these barrier tissues. These interactions are crucial to the timely production of cytokines, chemokines, growth factors, and extracellular matrix proteins for restoration of homeostasis. In this review, we discuss recent advances in understanding the mechanisms directing epithelial-T cell crosstalk and the distinct roles played by individual receptor-ligand pairs of cell surface molecules in this process. PMID:25505467

  6. A self-sensing active magnetic bearing based on a direct current measurement approach.

    PubMed

    Niemann, Andries C; van Schoor, George; du Rand, Carel P

    2013-09-11

    Active magnetic bearings (AMBs) have become a key technology in various industrial applications. Self-sensing AMBs provide an integrated sensorless solution for position estimation, consolidating the sensing and actuating functions into a single electromagnetic transducer. The approach aims to reduce possible hardware failure points, production costs, and system complexity. Despite these advantages, self-sensing methods must address various technical challenges to maximize the performance thereof. This paper presents the direct current measurement (DCM) approach for self-sensing AMBs, denoting the direct measurement of the current ripple component. In AMB systems, switching power amplifiers (PAs) modulate the rotor position information onto the current waveform. Demodulation self-sensing techniques then use bandpass and lowpass filters to estimate the rotor position from the voltage and current signals. However, the additional phase-shift introduced by these filters results in lower stability margins. The DCM approach utilizes a novel PA switching method that directly measures the current ripple to obtain duty-cycle invariant position estimates. Demodulation filters are largely excluded to minimize additional phase-shift in the position estimates. Basic functionality and performance of the proposed self-sensing approach are demonstrated via a transient simulation model as well as a high current (10 A) experimental system. A digital implementation of amplitude modulation self-sensing serves as a comparative estimator.

  7. Direct assay of glutathione peroxidase activity using high-performance capillary electrophoresis.

    PubMed

    Pascual, P; Martinez-Lara, E; Bárcena, J A; López-Barea, J; Toribio, F

    1992-10-01

    A fast, sensitive and direct method has been developed for the determination of glutathione peroxidase activity (both selenium- and non-selenium-dependent) in cell-free preparations. The assay is based on the separation and quantitation of reduced and oxidized glutathione by capillary electrophoresis. The electrophoretic separation buffer was 100 mM sodium tetraborate (pH 8.2) containing 100 mM sodium dodecylsulphate. A micellar electrokinetic mechanism took place under these conditions, and a total mass recovery was observed for both peptides. The reproducibility of migration times was excellent (less than 3% variability). A linear detector response range was observed in the range 5-50 U/ml, and both the reproducibility and accuracy were satisfied. Samples out of this linear range could be analysed by either increasing the reaction time or diluting the enzyme preparation. The results obtained with the new direct capillary electrophoresis assay were compared with those derived from a reversed phase high-performance liquid chromatographic and spectrophotometric coupled assay. A very good agreement was found between the two direct assay methods in all samples. Capillary electrophoresis is a versatile technique that allows the automation of the glutathione peroxidase assay in a reproducible manner and within a relatively short time with sufficient accuracy and precision. PMID:1430007

  8. Atmospheric circulation of brown dwarfs and directly imaged extrasolar giant planets with active clouds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tan, Xianyu; Showman, Adam

    2016-10-01

    Observational evidence have suggested active meteorology in the atmospheres of brown dwarfs (BDs) and directly imaged extrasolar giant planets (EGPs). In particular, a number of surveys for brown dwarfs showed that near-IR brightness variability is common for L and T dwarfs. Directly imaged EGPs share similar observations, and can be viewed as low-gravity versions of BDs. Clouds are believed to play the major role in shaping the thermal structure, dynamics and near-IR flux of these atmospheres. So far, only a few studies have been devoted to atmospheric circulation and the implications for observations of BDs and directly EGPs, and yet no global model includes a self-consistent active cloud formation. Here we present preliminary results from the first global circulation model applied to BDs and directly imaged EGPs that can properly treat absorption and scattering of radiation by cloud particles. Our results suggest that horizontal temperature differences on isobars can reach up to a few hundred Kelvins, with typical horizontal length scale of the temperature and cloud patterns much smaller than the radius of the object. The combination of temperature anomaly and cloud pattern can result in moderate disk-integrated near-IR flux variability. Wind speeds can reach several hundred meters per second in cloud forming layers. Unlike Jupiter and Saturn, we do not observe stable zonal jet/banded patterns in our simulations. Instead, our simulated atmospheres are typically turbulent and dominated by transient vortices. The circulation is sensitive to the parameterized cloud microphysics. Under some parameter combinations, global-scale atmospheric waves can be triggered and maintained. These waves induce global-scale temperature anomalies and cloud patterns, causing large (up to several percent) disk-integrated near-IR flux variability. Our results demonstrate that the commonly observed near-IR brightness variability for BDs and directly imaged EGPs can be explained by the

  9. Lasting modulation of in vitro oscillatory activity with weak direct current stimulation

    PubMed Central

    Bikson, Marom; Parra, Lucas C.

    2014-01-01

    Transcranial direct current stimulation (tDCS) is emerging as a versatile tool to affect brain function. While the acute neurophysiological effects of stimulation are well understood, little is know about the long-term effects. One hypothesis is that stimulation modulates ongoing neural activity, which then translates into lasting effects via physiological plasticity. Here we used carbachol-induced gamma oscillations in hippocampal rat slices to establish whether prolonged constant current stimulation has a lasting effect on endogenous neural activity. During 10 min of stimulation, the power and frequency of gamma oscillations, as well as multiunit activity, were modulated in a polarity specific manner. Remarkably, the effects on power and multiunit activity persisted for more than 10 min after stimulation terminated. Using a computational model we propose that altered synaptic efficacy in excitatory and inhibitory pathways could be the source of these lasting effects. Future experimental studies using this novel in vitro preparation may be able to confirm or refute the proposed hypothesis. PMID:25505103

  10. FHL2 mediates p53-induced transcriptional activation through a direct association with HIPK2

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Sang-Wang . E-mail: umsj@sejong.ac.kr

    2006-01-27

    To understand the molecular mechanism underlying HIPK2 regulation of the transcriptional activation by p53, we sought to identify the protein that interacts with HIPK2. From our yeast two-hybrid screen, we found that four and a half LIM domains 2 (FHL2) could bind to the C-terminal half of HIPK2. Further assays in yeast mapped the minimal interaction domain to amino acids 812-907 in HIPK2. The interaction was confirmed using a GST pull-down assay in vitro, and an immunoprecipitation (IP) assay and fluorescence microscopy in vivo. FHL2 alone spread throughout both the cytoplasm and nucleus but was redistributed to dot-like structures in the nucleus when HIPK2 was coexpressed in HEK293 cells. When tethered to the Gal4-responsive promoter through the Gal4 DBD fusion, FHL2 showed autonomous transcriptional activity that was enhanced by wild-type HIPK2, but not by the kinase-defective mutant. In addition, FHL2 increased the p53-dependent transcriptional activation and had an additive effect on the activation when coexpressed with HIPK2, which was again not observed with the kinase-defective mutant of HIPK2. Finally, we found a ternary complex of p53, HIPK2, and FHL2 using IP, and their recruitment to the p53-responsive p21Waf1 promoter in chromatin IP assays. Overall, our findings indicate that FHL2 can also regulate p53 via a direct association with HIPK2.

  11. Distinct fates of monocytes and T cells directly activated by Pseudomonas aeruginosa exoenzyme S.

    PubMed

    Epelman, Slava; Neely, Graham G; Ma, Ling Ling; Gjomarkaj, Mark; Pace, Elisabetta; Melis, Mario; Woods, Donald E; Mody, Christopher H

    2002-03-01

    Gram-negative infections can cause overwhelming inflammatory responses. Although factors other than LPS are clearly involved, these factors and their mechanisms of action have been poorly defined. During studies of LPS-independent inflammatory responses of the gram-negative pathogen Pseudomonas aeruginosa, an important virulence factor (exoenzyme S) was shown to be a potent mitogen for T cells. The current work demonstrates that exoenzyme S selectively induced transcription and secretion of biologically active cytokines and chemokines (chemotactic for neutrophils and T cells) from monocytes. Exoenzyme S stimulated highly purified monocytes independent of T cells. In addition, exoenzyme S stimulated T cells directly; neither T-cell activation (CD69) nor apoptosis (hypodiploidy) required the presence of monocytes. However, T-cell activation was enhanced via a noncontact-dependent mechanism as a result of the secretion of TNF-alpha and IL-6. This study identifies a unique property of a gram-negative-derived microbial product capable of activating multiple cell types and suggests a mechanism by which exoenzyme S contributes to the immunopathogenesis of cystic fibrosis and sepsis in patients infected with P. aeruginosa. PMID:11867683

  12. NRC-interacting factor directs neurite outgrowth in an activity-dependent manner.

    PubMed

    Zhao, X-S; Fu, W-Y; Hung, K-W; Chien, W W Y; Li, Z; Fu, A K; Ip, N Y

    2015-03-19

    Nuclear hormone receptor coregulator-interacting factor 1 (NIF-1) is a zinc finger nuclear protein that was initially identified to enhance nuclear hormone receptor transcription via its interaction with nuclear hormone receptor coregulator (NRC). NIF-1 may regulate gene transcription either by modulating general transcriptional machinery or remodeling chromatin structure through interactions with specific protein partners. We previously reported that the cytoplasmic/nuclear localization of NIF-1 is regulated by the neuronal Cdk5 activator p35, suggesting potential neuronal functions for NIF-1. The present study reveals that NIF-1 plays critical roles in regulating neuronal morphogenesis at early stages. NIF-1 was prominently expressed in the nuclei of developing rat cortical neurons. Knockdown of NIF-1 expression attenuated both neurite outgrowth in cultured cortical neurons and retinoic acid (RA)-treated Neuro-2a neuroblastoma cells. Furthermore, activity-induced Ca(2+) influx, which is critical for neuronal morphogenesis, stimulated the nuclear localization of NIF-1 in cortical neurons. Suppression of NIF-1 expression reduced the up-regulation of neuronal activity-dependent gene transcription. These findings collectively suggest that NIF-1 directs neuronal morphogenesis during early developmental stages through modulating activity-dependent gene transcription.

  13. [Enhancing glutamate decarboxylase activity by site-directed mutagenesis: an insight from Ramachandran plot].

    PubMed

    Ke, Piyu; Huang, Jun; Hu, Sheng; Zhao, Weirui; Lü, Changjiang; Yu, Kai; Lei, Yinlin; Wang, Jinbo; Mei, Lehe

    2016-01-01

    Glutamate decarboxylase (GAD) can catalyze the decarboxylation of glutamate into γ-aminobutyrate (GABA) and is the only enzyme of GABA biosynthesis. Improving GAD activity and thermostability will be helpful for the highly efficient biosynthesis of GABA. According to the Ramachandran plot information of GAD 1407 three-dimensional structure from Lactobacillus brevis CGMCC No. 1306, we identified the unstable site K413 as the mutation target, constructed the mutant GAD by site-directed mutagenesis and measured the thermostability and activity of the wide type and mutant GAD. Mutant K413A led to a remarkably slower inactivation rate, and its half-life at 50 °C reached 105 min which was 2.1-fold higher than the wild type GAD1407. Moreover, mutant K413I exhibited 1.6-fold higher activity in comparison with the wide type GAD1407, although it had little improvement in thermostability of GAD. Ramachandran plot can be considered as a potential approach to increase GAD thermostability and activity. PMID:27443004

  14. [Enhancing glutamate decarboxylase activity by site-directed mutagenesis: an insight from Ramachandran plot].

    PubMed

    Ke, Piyu; Huang, Jun; Hu, Sheng; Zhao, Weirui; Lü, Changjiang; Yu, Kai; Lei, Yinlin; Wang, Jinbo; Mei, Lehe

    2016-01-01

    Glutamate decarboxylase (GAD) can catalyze the decarboxylation of glutamate into γ-aminobutyrate (GABA) and is the only enzyme of GABA biosynthesis. Improving GAD activity and thermostability will be helpful for the highly efficient biosynthesis of GABA. According to the Ramachandran plot information of GAD 1407 three-dimensional structure from Lactobacillus brevis CGMCC No. 1306, we identified the unstable site K413 as the mutation target, constructed the mutant GAD by site-directed mutagenesis and measured the thermostability and activity of the wide type and mutant GAD. Mutant K413A led to a remarkably slower inactivation rate, and its half-life at 50 °C reached 105 min which was 2.1-fold higher than the wild type GAD1407. Moreover, mutant K413I exhibited 1.6-fold higher activity in comparison with the wide type GAD1407, although it had little improvement in thermostability of GAD. Ramachandran plot can be considered as a potential approach to increase GAD thermostability and activity.

  15. TGF-β activates Erk MAP kinase signalling through direct phosphorylation of ShcA

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Matt K; Pardoux, Cécile; Hall, Marie C; Lee, Pierre S; Warburton, David; Qing, Jing; Smith, Susan M; Derynck, Rik

    2007-01-01

    Erk1/Erk2 MAP kinases are key regulators of cell behaviour and their activation is generally associated with tyrosine kinase signalling. However, TGF-β stimulation also activates Erk MAP kinases through an undefined mechanism, albeit to a much lower level than receptor tyrosine kinase stimulation. We report that upon TGF-β stimulation, the activated TGF-β type I receptor (TβRI) recruits and directly phosphorylates ShcA proteins on tyrosine and serine. This dual phosphorylation results from an intrinsic TβRI tyrosine kinase activity that complements its well-defined serine-threonine kinase function. TGF-β-induced ShcA phosphorylation induces ShcA association with Grb2 and Sos, thereby initiating the well-characterised pathway linking receptor tyrosine kinases with Erk MAP kinases. We also found that TβRI is tyrosine phosphorylated in response to TGF-β. Thus, TβRI, like the TGF-β type II receptor, is a dual-specificity kinase. Recruitment of tyrosine kinase signalling pathways may account for aspects of TGF-β biology that are independent of Smad signalling. PMID:17673906

  16. mTORC1 directly phosphorylates and activates ERα upon estrogen stimulation

    PubMed Central

    Alayev, A; Salamon, R S; Berger, S M; Schwartz, N S; Cuesta, R; Snyder, R B; Holz, M K

    2015-01-01

    Breast cancer is the leading cause of cancer-related deaths among women. Approximately 75% of breast cancers are estrogen receptor α (ERα) positive, underscoring the dependence of cancer cells on estrogen for growth and survival. Patients treated with endocrine therapy often develop resistance, either de novo or acquired, which in some cases is caused by aberrations within the growth factor signaling pathways. The mechanistic target of rapamycin complex 1 (mTORC1) has emerged as a critical node in estrogenic signaling. We have previously shown that mTORC1 can phosphorylate and activate ERα on S167 via its effector the 40S ribosomal S6 kinase 1 (S6K1). Presently, we have uncovered a direct link between mTORC1 and ERα. We found that ERα binds to regulatory-associated protein of mTOR (Raptor) and causes it to translocate to the nucleus upon estrogen stimulation. Additionally, we identified mTOR as the kinase that phosphorylates ERα on S104/106 and activates transcription of ER target genes. Our findings show a direct link between mTORC1 and ERα, which further implicates mTORC1 signaling in the pathogenesis of ER-positive breast cancer and provides rationale for FDA-approved use of mTORC1 inhibitors in combination with endocrine agents for treatment of this disease. PMID:26522726

  17. Multifunctional role of osteopontin in directing intrafibrillar mineralization of collagen and activation of osteoclasts

    PubMed Central

    Rodriguez, Douglas E.; Thula-Mata, Taili; Toro, Edgardo J.; Yeh, Ya-Wen; Holt, Carl; Holliday, L. Shannon; Gower, Laurie B.

    2013-01-01

    Mineralized collagen composites are of interest because they have the potential to provide a bone-like scaffold that stimulates the natural processes of resorption and remodeling. Working toward this goal, our group has previously shown that the nanostructure of bone can be reproduced using a polymer-induced liquid-precursor (PILP) process, which enables intrafibrillar mineralization of collagen with hydroxyapatite (HA) to be achieved. This prior work used polyaspartic acid (pASP), a simple mimic for acidic non-collagenous proteins (NCPs), to generate nanodroplets/nanoparticles of an amorphous mineral precursor which can infiltrate the interstices of type-I collagen fibrils. In this study we show that osteopontin (OPN) can similarly serve as a process-directing agent for the intrafibrillar mineralization of collagen, even though OPN is generally considered a mineralization inhibitor. We also found that inclusion of OPN in the mineralization process promotes the interaction of mouse marrow-derived osteoclasts with PILP-remineralized bone that was previously demineralized, as measured by actin ring formation. While osteoclast activation occurred when pASP was used as the process-directing agent, using OPN resulted in a dramatic effect on osteoclast activation, presumably because of the inherent arginine-glycine-aspartate acid (RGD) ligands of OPN. By capitalizing on the multifunctionality of OPN, these studies may lead the way to producing biomimetic bone substitutes with the capability of tailorable bioresorption rates. PMID:24140612

  18. Multifunctional role of osteopontin in directing intrafibrillar mineralization of collagen and activation of osteoclasts.

    PubMed

    Rodriguez, Douglas E; Thula-Mata, Taili; Toro, Edgardo J; Yeh, Ya-Wen; Holt, Carl; Holliday, L Shannon; Gower, Laurie B

    2014-01-01

    Mineralized collagen composites are of interest because they have the potential to provide a bone-like scaffold that stimulates the natural processes of resorption and remodeling. Working towards this goal, our group has previously shown that the nanostructure of bone can be reproduced using a polymer-induced liquid-precursor (PILP) process, which enables intrafibrillar mineralization of collagen with hydroxyapatite to be achieved. This prior work used polyaspartic acid (pASP), a simple mimic for acidic non-collagenous proteins, to generate nanodroplets/nanoparticles of an amorphous mineral precursor which can infiltrate the interstices of type-I collagen fibrils. In this study we show that osteopontin (OPN) can similarly serve as a process-directing agent for the intrafibrillar mineralization of collagen, even though OPN is generally considered a mineralization inhibitor. We also found that inclusion of OPN in the mineralization process promotes the interaction of mouse marrow-derived osteoclasts with PILP-remineralized bone that was previously demineralized, as measured by actin ring formation. While osteoclast activation occurred when pASP was used as the process-directing agent, using OPN resulted in a dramatic effect on osteoclast activation, presumably because of the inherent arginine-glycine-aspartate acid ligands of OPN. By capitalizing on the multifunctionality of OPN, these studies may lead the way to producing biomimetic bone substitutes with the capability of tailorable bioresorption rates.

  19. Inhibition of mammillary body neurons by direct activation of Group II metabotropic glutamate receptors

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Charles C.

    2016-01-01

    The mammillary body is an important neural component of limbic circuitry implicated in learning and memory. Excitatory and inhibitory inputs, primarily mediated by glutamate and gamma-amino butyric acid (GABA), respectively, converge and integrate in this region, before sending information to the thalamus. One potentially overlooked mechanism for inhibition of mammillary body neurons is through direct activation of Group II metabotropic glutamate receptors (mGluRs). Here, whole-cell patch clamp recordings of in vitro slice preparations containing the mammillary body nuclei of the mouse were employed to record responses to bath application of pharmacological agents to isolate the direct effect of activating Group II mGluRs. Application of the Group II mGluR specific agonist, APDC, resulted in a hyperpolarization of the membrane potential in mammillary body neurons, likely resulting from the opening of a potassium conductance. These data suggest that glutamatergic inputs to the mammillary body may be attenuated via Group II mGluRs and implicates a functional role for these receptors in memory-related circuits and broadly throughout the central nervous system. PMID:27390777

  20. Direct and indirect antioxidant activity of polyphenol- and isothiocyanate-enriched fractions from Moringa oleifera.

    PubMed

    Tumer, Tugba Boyunegmez; Rojas-Silva, Patricio; Poulev, Alexander; Raskin, Ilya; Waterman, Carrie

    2015-02-11

    Moringa oleifera Lam. is a fast-growing, tropical tree with various edible parts used as nutritious food and traditional medicine. This study describes an efficient preparatory strategy to extract and fractionate moringa leaves by fast centrifugal partition chromatography (FCPC) to produce polyphenol and isothiocyanate (ITC) rich fractions. Characterization and further purification of these fractions showed that moringa polyphenols were potent direct antioxidants assayed by oxygen radical absorbance capacity (ORAC), whereas moringa ITCs were effective indirect antioxidants assayed by induction of NAD(P)H quinone oxidoreductase 1 (NQO1) activity in Hepa1c1c7 cells. In addition, purified 4-[(α-l-rhamnosyloxy)benzyl]isothiocyanate and 4-[(4'-O-acetyl-α-l-rhamnosyloxy)benzyl]isothiocyanate were further evaluated for their ORAC and NQO1 inducer potency in comparison with sulforaphane (SF). Both ITCs were as potent as SF in inducing NQO1 activity. These findings suggest that moringa leaves contain a potent mixture of direct and indirect antioxidants that can explain its various health-promoting effects. PMID:25605589

  1. Direct and indirect antioxidant activity of polyphenol- and isothiocyanate-enriched fractions from Moringa oleifera.

    PubMed

    Tumer, Tugba Boyunegmez; Rojas-Silva, Patricio; Poulev, Alexander; Raskin, Ilya; Waterman, Carrie

    2015-02-11

    Moringa oleifera Lam. is a fast-growing, tropical tree with various edible parts used as nutritious food and traditional medicine. This study describes an efficient preparatory strategy to extract and fractionate moringa leaves by fast centrifugal partition chromatography (FCPC) to produce polyphenol and isothiocyanate (ITC) rich fractions. Characterization and further purification of these fractions showed that moringa polyphenols were potent direct antioxidants assayed by oxygen radical absorbance capacity (ORAC), whereas moringa ITCs were effective indirect antioxidants assayed by induction of NAD(P)H quinone oxidoreductase 1 (NQO1) activity in Hepa1c1c7 cells. In addition, purified 4-[(α-l-rhamnosyloxy)benzyl]isothiocyanate and 4-[(4'-O-acetyl-α-l-rhamnosyloxy)benzyl]isothiocyanate were further evaluated for their ORAC and NQO1 inducer potency in comparison with sulforaphane (SF). Both ITCs were as potent as SF in inducing NQO1 activity. These findings suggest that moringa leaves contain a potent mixture of direct and indirect antioxidants that can explain its various health-promoting effects.

  2. Direct and Indirect Antioxidant Activity of Polyphenol- and Isothiocyanate-Enriched Fractions from Moringa oleifera

    PubMed Central

    Boyunegmez Tumer, Tugba; Rojas-Silva, Patricio; Poulev, Alexander; Raskin, Ilya; Waterman, Carrie

    2016-01-01

    Moringa oleifera Lam. is a fast-growing, tropical tree with various edible parts used as nutritious food and traditional medicine. This study describes an efficient preparatory strategy to extract and fractionate moringa leaves by fast centrifugal partition chromatography (FCPC) to produce polyphenol and isothiocyanate (ITC) rich fractions. Characterization and further purification of these fractions showed that moringa polyphenols were potent direct antioxidants assayed by oxygen radical absorbance capacity (ORAC), whereas moringa ITCs were effective indirect antioxidants assayed by induction of NAD(P)H quinone oxidoreductase 1 (NQO1) activity in Hepa1c1c7 cells. In addition, purified 4-[(α-l-rhamnosyloxy)benzyl]-isothiocyanate and 4-[(4′-O-acetyl-α-l-rhamnosyloxy)benzyl]isothiocyanate were further evaluated for their ORAC and NQO1 inducer potency in comparison with sulforaphane (SF). Both ITCs were as potent as SF in inducing NQO1 activity. These findings suggest that moringa leaves contain a potent mixture of direct and indirect antioxidants that can explain its various health-promoting effects. PMID:25605589

  3. Directional transport and active retention of Dpp/BMP create wing vein patterns in Drosophila.

    PubMed

    Matsuda, Shinya; Shimmi, Osamu

    2012-06-15

    The bone morphogenetic protein (BMP) family ligand decapentaplegic (Dpp) plays critical roles in wing vein development during pupal stages in Drosophila. However, how the diffusible Dpp specifies elaborate wing vein patterns remains unknown. Here, we visualized Dpp distribution in the pupal wing and found that it tightly reflects the wing vein patterns. We show that Dpp is directionally transported from the longitudinal veins (LVs) into the posterior crossvein (PCV) primordial region by the extracellular BMP-binding proteins, short gastrulation (Sog) and crossveinless (Cv). Another BMP-type ligand, glass bottom boat (Gbb), also moves into the PCV region and is required for Dpp distribution, presumably as a Dpp-Gbb heterodimer. In contrast, we found that most of the Dpp is actively retained in the LVs by the BMP type I receptor thickveins (Tkv) and a positive feedback mechanism. We provide evidence that the directionality of Dpp transport is manifested by sog transcription that prepatterns the PCV position in a Dpp signal-independent manner. Taken together, our data suggest that spatial distribution of Dpp is tightly regulated at the extracellular level by combination of long-range facilitated transport toward the PCV and short-range signaling by active retention in the LVs, thereby allowing diffusible ligands to form elaborate wing vein patterns.

  4. Direct activation of platelets by heat is the possible trigger of the coagulopathy of heat stroke.

    PubMed

    Gader, A M; al-Mashhadani, S A; al-Harthy, S S

    1990-01-01

    The trigger of the coagulopathy that complicates heat stroke is obscure, but direct platelet activation by heat is a possibility we set out to study. Platelet rich plasma (PRP), prepared from blood donors, was incubated at increasing temperatures (38-45 degrees C) and then platelet aggregation was undertaken in response to decreasing low doses of ADP (less than 2.0 mumol/l). Hyperaggregability was manifested when the incubation temperature reached 43 degrees C and was maximum at 44 degrees C before complete inhibition of responses at 45 degrees C. The platelet hyperactivity induced by heating at 44 degrees C persisted after reincubating PRP samples at 37 degrees C. These platelet responses could not be triggered in PRP samples prepared from subjects after the overnight ingestion of aspirin or after the addition of aspirin to PRP before starting the heating procedure. However, aspirin was less effective when added to PRP after the appearance of the heat-induced hyperaggregability. In conclusion, these results indicate that platelets can be activated directly by heat. This mechanism which may be operational in heat stroke, is unaffected by cooling (body cooling being basic in the management of heat stroke) but can be prevented by the early administration of aspirin. PMID:2310701

  5. Correlation of direct viable counts with heterotrophic activity for marine bacteria.

    PubMed

    Kogure, K; Simidu, U; Taga, N; Colwell, R R

    1987-10-01

    Viable-bacteria counts, heterotrophic activity, and substrate responsiveness of viable bacteria have been used to measure microbial activity. However, the relationship between these parameters is not clear. Thus, the direct viable count (DVC) method was used to analyze seawater samples collected from several different geographical locations. Samples collected from offshore waters of the South China Sea and western Pacific Ocean yielded DVC that indicated the presence of surface and subsurface peaks of viable, substrate-responsive bacteria which could be correlated with turnover rates of amino acids obtained by using uniformly C-labeled amino acids. DVC were always less than total viable counts (acridine orange direct counts), and the DVC subsurface peak occurred close to and within the chlorophyll a zone, suggesting algal-bacterial interactions within the layer. For comparison with the open-ocean samples, selected substrates were used to determine the response of viable bacteria present in seawater samples collected near an ocean outfall of the Barceloneta Regional Waste Treatment Plant, Barceloneta, Puerto Rico. The number of specific substrate-responsive bacteria at the outfall stations varied depending on the substrate used and the sampling location. Changes in the population size or physiological condition of the bacteria were detected and found to be associated with the presence of pharmaceutical waste.

  6. Rapid direct methods for enumeration of specific, active bacteria in water and biofilms

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    McFeters, G. A.; Pyle, B. H.; Lisle, J. T.; Broadaway, S. C.

    1999-01-01

    Conventional methods for detecting indicator and pathogenic bacteria in water may underestimate the actual population due to sublethal environmental injury, inability of the target bacteria to take up nutrients and other physiological factors which reduce bacterial culturability. Rapid and direct methods are needed to more accurately detect and enumerate active bacteria. Such a methodological advance would provide greater sensitivity in assessing the microbiological safety of water and food. The principle goal of this presentation is to describe novel approaches we have formulated for the rapid and simultaneous detection of bacteria plus the determination of their physiological activity in water and other environmental samples. The present version of our method involves the concentration of organisms by membrane filtration or immunomagnetic separation and combines an intracellular fluorochrome (CTC) for assessment of respiratory activity plus fluorescent-labelled antibody detection of specific bacteria. This approach has also been successfully used to demonstrate spatial and temporal heterogeneities of physiological activities in biofilms when coupled with cryosectioning. Candidate physiological stains include those capable of determining respiratory activity, membrane potential, membrane integrity, growth rate and cellular enzymatic activities. Results obtained thus far indicate that immunomagnetic separation can provide a high degree of sensitivity in the recovery of seeded target bacteria (Escherichia coli O157:H7) in water and hamburger. The captured and stained target bacteria are then enumerated by either conventional fluorescence microscopy or ChemScan(R), a new instrument that is very sensitive and rapid. The ChemScan(R) laser scanning instrument (Chemunex, Paris, France) provides the detection of individual fluorescently labelled bacterial cells using three emission channels in less than 5 min. A high degree of correlation has been demonstrated between

  7. Bacterial Effector Activates Jasmonate Signaling by Directly Targeting JAZ Transcriptional Repressors

    PubMed Central

    Jiang, Shushu; Yao, Jian; Ma, Ka-Wai; Zhou, Huanbin; Song, Jikui; He, Sheng Yang; Ma, Wenbo

    2013-01-01

    Gram-negative bacterial pathogens deliver a variety of virulence proteins through the type III secretion system (T3SS) directly into the host cytoplasm. These type III secreted effectors (T3SEs) play an essential role in bacterial infection, mainly by targeting host immunity. However, the molecular basis of their functionalities remains largely enigmatic. Here, we show that the Pseudomonas syringae T3SE HopZ1a, a member of the widely distributed YopJ effector family, directly interacts with jasmonate ZIM-domain (JAZ) proteins through the conserved Jas domain in plant hosts. JAZs are transcription repressors of jasmonate (JA)-responsive genes and major components of the jasmonate receptor complex. Upon interaction, JAZs can be acetylated by HopZ1a through a putative acetyltransferase activity. Importantly, P. syringae producing the wild-type, but not a catalytic mutant of HopZ1a, promotes the degradation of HopZ1-interacting JAZs and activates JA signaling during bacterial infection. Furthermore, HopZ1a could partially rescue the virulence defect of a P. syringae mutant that lacks the production of coronatine, a JA-mimicking phytotoxin produced by a few P. syringae strains. These results highlight a novel example by which a bacterial effector directly manipulates the core regulators of phytohormone signaling to facilitate infection. The targeting of JAZ repressors by both coronatine toxin and HopZ1 effector suggests that the JA receptor complex is potentially a major hub of host targets for bacterial pathogens. PMID:24204266

  8. Using a simple apparatus to measure direct and diffuse photosynthetically active radiation at remote locations.

    PubMed

    Cruse, Michael J; Kucharik, Christopher J; Norman, John M

    2015-01-01

    Plant canopy interception of photosynthetically active radiation (PAR) drives carbon dioxide (CO2), water and energy cycling in the soil-plant-atmosphere system. Quantifying intercepted PAR requires accurate measurements of total incident PAR above canopies and direct beam and diffuse PAR components. While some regional data sets include these data, e.g. from Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Program sites, they are not often applicable to local research sites because of the variable nature (spatial and temporal) of environmental variables that influence incoming PAR. Currently available instrumentation that measures diffuse and direct beam radiation separately can be cost prohibitive and require frequent adjustments. Alternatively, generalized empirical relationships that relate atmospheric variables and radiation components can be used but require assumptions that increase the potential for error. Our goal here was to construct and test a cheaper, highly portable instrument alternative that could be used at remote field sites to measure total, diffuse and direct beam PAR for extended time periods without supervision. The apparatus tested here uses a fabricated, solar powered rotating shadowband and other commercially available parts to collect continuous hourly PAR data. Measurements of total incident PAR had nearly a one-to-one relationship with total incident radiation measurements taken at the same research site by an unobstructed point quantum sensor. Additionally, measurements of diffuse PAR compared favorably with modeled estimates from previously published data, but displayed significant differences that were attributed to the important influence of rapidly changing local environmental conditions. The cost of the system is about 50% less than comparable commercially available systems that require periodic, but not continual adjustments. Overall, the data produced using this apparatus indicates that this instrumentation has the potential to support

  9. Using a Simple Apparatus to Measure Direct and Diffuse Photosynthetically Active Radiation at Remote Locations

    PubMed Central

    Cruse, Michael J.; Kucharik, Christopher J.; Norman, John M.

    2015-01-01

    Plant canopy interception of photosynthetically active radiation (PAR) drives carbon dioxide (CO2), water and energy cycling in the soil-plant-atmosphere system. Quantifying intercepted PAR requires accurate measurements of total incident PAR above canopies and direct beam and diffuse PAR components. While some regional data sets include these data, e.g. from Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Program sites, they are not often applicable to local research sites because of the variable nature (spatial and temporal) of environmental variables that influence incoming PAR. Currently available instrumentation that measures diffuse and direct beam radiation separately can be cost prohibitive and require frequent adjustments. Alternatively, generalized empirical relationships that relate atmospheric variables and radiation components can be used but require assumptions that increase the potential for error. Our goal here was to construct and test a cheaper, highly portable instrument alternative that could be used at remote field sites to measure total, diffuse and direct beam PAR for extended time periods without supervision. The apparatus tested here uses a fabricated, solar powered rotating shadowband and other commercially available parts to collect continuous hourly PAR data. Measurements of total incident PAR had nearly a one-to-one relationship with total incident radiation measurements taken at the same research site by an unobstructed point quantum sensor. Additionally, measurements of diffuse PAR compared favorably with modeled estimates from previously published data, but displayed significant differences that were attributed to the important influence of rapidly changing local environmental conditions. The cost of the system is about 50% less than comparable commercially available systems that require periodic, but not continual adjustments. Overall, the data produced using this apparatus indicates that this instrumentation has the potential to support

  10. Skill Sheets for Agricultural Mechanics.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Iowa State Univ. of Science and Technology, Ames. Dept. of Agricultural Education.

    This set of 33 skill sheets for agricultural mechanics was developed for use in high school and vocational school agricultural mechanics programs. Some sheets teach operational procedures while others are for simple projects. Each skill sheet covers a single topic and includes: (1) a diagram, (2) a step-by-step construction or operational…

  11. The Physics of Ice Sheets

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bassis, J. N.

    2008-01-01

    The great ice sheets in Antarctica and Greenland are vast deposits of frozen freshwater that contain enough to raise sea level by approximately 70 m if they were to completely melt. Because of the potentially catastrophic impact that ice sheets can have, it is important that we understand how ice sheets have responded to past climate changes and…

  12. Increased Expression of Cathelicidin by Direct Activation of Protease-Activated Receptor 2: Possible Implications on the Pathogenesis of Rosacea

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Ji Young; Kim, Yoon Jee; Lim, Beom Jin; Sohn, Hyo Jung; Shin, Dongyun

    2014-01-01

    Purpose Recent findings of increased cathelicidin protein and its proteolytic fragments in rosacea suggest a pathogenic role for cathelicidin in this disease. The relationship between cathelicidin and protease-activated receptor 2 (PAR-2) is therefore of interest, as PAR-2, expressed principally in keratinocytes, regulates pro-inflammatory cytokine expression in the skin. The purpose of this study was to determine the relationship between expression of PAR-2 and cathelicidin in rosacea and to test the effect of direct PAR-2 activation on cathelicidin expression in keratinocytes. Materials and Methods Samples from 40 patients with clinicopathologic diagnosis of rosacea and facial skin tissue samples from 20 patients with no specific findings or milium without inflammation were retrieved. Intensities of immunohistochemical staining for PAR-2 and cathelicidin were compared between normal and rosacea-affected skin tissues. Additionally, correlations between PAR-2 and cathelicidin staining intensities within rosacea patients were analyzed. In cultured keratinocytes, changes in PAR-2, cathelicidin, and vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) mRNA and protein were analyzed after treatment with PAR-2 activating peptide (AP). Results Cathelicidin expression was significantly higher in rosacea skin tissues than in normal tissues (p<0.001), while PAR-2 expression was not significantly higher in rosacea tissues than in normal skin tissues. A positive correlation between PAR-2 and cathelicidin within rosacea samples was observed (R=0.330, p=0.037). After treatment of PAR-2 AP, both mRNA and protein levels for PAR-2, cathelicidin, and VEGF significantly increased in cultured keratinocytes, compared with PAR-2 control peptide treatment. Conclusion PAR-2 may participate in the pathogenesis of rosacea through activation of cathelicidin LL-37, a mediator of innate immune responses in the skin. PMID:25323904

  13. Ice-sheet response to oceanic forcing.

    PubMed

    Joughin, Ian; Alley, Richard B; Holland, David M

    2012-11-30

    The ice sheets of Greenland and Antarctica are losing ice at accelerating rates, much of which is a response to oceanic forcing, especially of the floating ice shelves. Recent observations establish a clear correspondence between the increased delivery of oceanic heat to the ice-sheet margin and increased ice loss. In Antarctica, most of these processes are reasonably well understood but have not been rigorously quantified. In Greenland, an understanding of the processes by which warmer ocean temperatures drive the observed retreat remains elusive. Experiments designed to identify the relevant processes are confounded by the logistical difficulties of instrumenting ice-choked fjords with actively calving glaciers. For both ice sheets, multiple challenges remain before the fully coupled ice-ocean-atmosphere models needed for rigorous sea-level projection are available.

  14. Geologic controls on the West Antarctic Ice Sheet

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Anandakrishnan, Sridhar

    1993-01-01

    The stability of the West Antarctic Ice Sheet is intertwined with its geologic history. The sub-ice geology and the possibility of active rifting and associated elevated heat-flux and volcanism might be determining factors in ice-sheet behavior. Seismic monitoring of natural events at the base of Ice Stream C reveals the presence of a young sedimentary basin beneath the ice stream. The sediments are presumed to be of glacio-marine origin, similar to those beneath Ice Stream B and in the Ross Sea. The young sediments are approximately 1/2 km thick at UpC camp, but thin abruptly southward to 100 m or less. We hypothesize the presence of a fault with a throw of 400 m to account for this (though we have not directly detected the fault), rather than invoking unrealistic basement dips. To extend these studies to critical inland regions, we suggest an expanded explosive-source seismic survey of the Byrd Subglacial Basin to determine the extent and character of the hypothesized rift basin. High-resolution seismic monitoring will detect layering in the sedimentary column, as well as possibly imaging faults directly.

  15. The Andes Virus Nucleocapsid Protein Directs Basal Endothelial Cell Permeability by Activating RhoA

    PubMed Central

    Gorbunova, Elena E.; Simons, Matthew J.; Gavrilovskaya, Irina N.

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Andes virus (ANDV) predominantly infects microvascular endothelial cells (MECs) and nonlytically causes an acute pulmonary edema termed hantavirus pulmonary syndrome (HPS). In HPS patients, virtually every pulmonary MEC is infected, MECs are enlarged, and infection results in vascular leakage and highly lethal pulmonary edema. We observed that MECs infected with the ANDV hantavirus or expressing the ANDV nucleocapsid (N) protein showed increased size and permeability by activating the Rheb and RhoA GTPases. Expression of ANDV N in MECs increased cell size by preventing tuberous sclerosis complex (TSC) repression of Rheb-mTOR-pS6K. N selectively bound the TSC2 N terminus (1 to 1403) within a complex containing TSC2/TSC1/TBC1D7, and endogenous TSC2 reciprocally coprecipitated N protein from ANDV-infected MECs. TSCs normally restrict RhoA-induced MEC permeability, and we found that ANDV infection or N protein expression constitutively activated RhoA. This suggests that the ANDV N protein alone is sufficient to activate signaling pathways that control MEC size and permeability. Further, RhoA small interfering RNA, dominant-negative RhoA(N19), and the RhoA/Rho kinase inhibitors fasudil and Y27632 dramatically reduced the permeability of ANDV-infected MECs by 80 to 90%. Fasudil also reduced the bradykinin-directed permeability of ANDV and Hantaan virus-infected MECs to control levels. These findings demonstrate that ANDV activation of RhoA causes MEC permeability and reveal a potential edemagenic mechanism for ANDV to constitutively inhibit the basal barrier integrity of infected MECs. The central importance of RhoA activation in MEC permeability further suggests therapeutically targeting RhoA, TSCs, and Rac1 as potential means of resolving capillary leakage during hantavirus infections. PMID:27795403

  16. Direct Activation of β-Cell KATP Channels with a Novel Xanthine Derivative

    PubMed Central

    Raphemot, Rene; Swale, Daniel R.; Dadi, Prasanna K.; Jacobson, David A.; Cooper, Paige; Wojtovich, Andrew P.; Banerjee, Sreedatta; Nichols, Colin G.

    2014-01-01

    ATP-regulated potassium (KATP) channel complexes of inward rectifier potassium channel (Kir) 6.2 and sulfonylurea receptor (SUR) 1 critically regulate pancreatic islet β-cell membrane potential, calcium influx, and insulin secretion, and consequently, represent important drug targets for metabolic disorders of glucose homeostasis. The KATP channel opener diazoxide is used clinically to treat intractable hypoglycemia caused by excessive insulin secretion, but its use is limited by off-target effects due to lack of potency and selectivity. Some progress has been made in developing improved Kir6.2/SUR1 agonists from existing chemical scaffolds and compound screening, but there are surprisingly few distinct chemotypes that are specific for SUR1-containing KATP channels. Here we report the serendipitous discovery in a high-throughput screen of a novel activator of Kir6.2/SUR1: VU0071063 [7-(4-(tert-butyl)benzyl)-1,3-dimethyl-1H-purine-2,6(3H,7H)-dione]. The xanthine derivative rapidly and dose-dependently activates Kir6.2/SUR1 with a half-effective concentration (EC50) of approximately 7 μM, is more efficacious than diazoxide at low micromolar concentrations, directly activates the channel in excised membrane patches, and is selective for SUR1- over SUR2A-containing Kir6.1 or Kir6.2 channels, as well as Kir2.1, Kir2.2, Kir2.3, Kir3.1/3.2, and voltage-gated potassium channel 2.1. Finally, we show that VU0071063 activates native Kir6.2/SUR1 channels, thereby inhibiting glucose-stimulated calcium entry in isolated mouse pancreatic β cells. VU0071063 represents a novel tool/compound for investigating β-cell physiology, KATP channel gating, and a new chemical scaffold for developing improved activators with medicinal chemistry. PMID:24646456

  17. Direct conscious telemetry recordings demonstrate increased renal sympathetic nerve activity in rats with chronic kidney disease

    PubMed Central

    Salman, Ibrahim M.; Sarma Kandukuri, Divya; Harrison, Joanne L.; Hildreth, Cara M.; Phillips, Jacqueline K.

    2015-01-01

    Chronic kidney disease (CKD) is associated with sympathetic hyperactivity and impaired blood pressure control reflex responses, yet direct evidence demonstrating these features of autonomic dysfunction in conscious animals is still lacking. Here we measured renal sympathetic nerve activity (RSNA) and mean arterial pressure (MAP) using telemetry-based recordings in a rat model of CKD, the Lewis Polycystic Kidney (LPK) rat, and assessed responses to chemoreflex activation and acute stress. Male LPK and Lewis control animals (total n = 16) were instrumented for telemetric recording of RSNA and MAP. At 12–13 weeks-of-age, resting RSNA and MAP, sympathetic and haemodynamic responses to both peripheral (hypoxia: 10% O2) and central chemoreflex (hypercapnia: 7% CO2) activation and acute stress (open-field exposure), were measured. As indicators of renal function, urinary protein (UPro) and creatinine (UCr) levels were assessed. LPK rats had higher resting RSNA (1.2 ± 0.1 vs. 0.6 ± 0.1 μV, p < 0.05) and MAP (151 ± 8 vs. 97 ± 2 mmHg, p < 0.05) compared to Lewis. MAP was negatively correlated with UCr (r = −0.80, p = 0.002) and positively correlated with RSNA (r = 0.66, p = 0.014), with multiple linear regression modeling indicating the strongest correlation was with Ucr. RSNA and MAP responses to activation of the central chemoreflex and open-field stress were reduced in the LPK relative to the Lewis (all p < 0.05). This is the first description of dual conscious telemetry recording of RSNA and MAP in a genetic rodent model of CKD. Elevated RSNA is likely a key contributor to the marked hypertension in this model, while attenuated RSNA and MAP responses to central chemoreflex activation and acute stress in the LPK indicate possible deficits in the neural processing of autonomic outflows evoked by these sympathoexcitatory pathways. PMID:26300784

  18. Directed Evolution of an LBP/CD14 Inhibitory Peptide and Its Anti-Endotoxin Activity

    PubMed Central

    Fang, Li; Xu, Zhi; Wang, Guan-song; Ji, Fu-yun; Mei, Chun-xia; Liu, Juan; Wu, Guo-ming

    2014-01-01

    Background LPS-binding protein (LBP) and its ligand CD14 are located upstream of the signaling pathway for LPS-induced inflammation. Blocking LBP and CD14 binding might prevent LPS-induced inflammation. In previous studies, we obtained a peptide analog (MP12) for the LBP/CD14 binding site and showed that this peptide analog had anti-endotoxin activity. In this study, we used in vitro directed evolution for this peptide analog to improve its in vivo and in vitro anti-endotoxin activity. Methods We used error-prone PCR (ep-PCR) and induced mutations in the C-terminus of LBP and attached the PCR products to T7 phages to establish a mutant phage display library. The positive clones that competed with LBP for CD14 binding was obtained by screening. We used both in vivo and in vitro experiments to compare the anti-endotoxin activities of a polypeptide designated P1 contained in a positive clone and MP12. Results 11 positive clones were obtained from among target phages. Sequencing showed that 9 positive clones had a threonine (T) to methionine (M) mutation in amino acid 287 of LBP. Compared to polypeptide MP12, polypeptide P1 significantly inhibited LPS-induced TNF-α expression and NF-κB activity in U937 cells (P<0.05). Compared to MP12, P1 significantly improved arterial oxygen pressure, an oxygenation index, and lung pathology scores in LPS-induced ARDS rats (P<0.05). Conclusion By in vitro directed evolution of peptide analogs for the LBP/CD14 binding site, we established a new polypeptide (P1) with a threonine (T)-to-methionine (M) mutation in amino acid 287 of LBP. This polypeptide had high anti-endotoxin activity in vitro and in vivo, which suggested that amino acid 287 in the C-terminus of LBP may play an important role in LBP binding with CD14. PMID:25025695

  19. GABA signalling modulates plant growth by directly regulating the activity of plant-specific anion transporters

    PubMed Central

    Ramesh, Sunita A.; Tyerman, Stephen D.; Xu, Bo; Bose, Jayakumar; Kaur, Satwinder; Conn, Vanessa; Domingos, Patricia; Ullah, Sana; Wege, Stefanie; Shabala, Sergey; Feijó, José A.; Ryan, Peter R.; Gillham, Matthew

    2015-01-01

    The non-protein amino acid, gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA) rapidly accumulates in plant tissues in response to biotic and abiotic stress, and regulates plant growth. Until now it was not known whether GABA exerts its effects in plants through the regulation of carbon metabolism or via an unidentified signalling pathway. Here, we demonstrate that anion flux through plant aluminium-activated malate transporter (ALMT) proteins is activated by anions and negatively regulated by GABA. Site-directed mutagenesis of selected amino acids within ALMT proteins abolishes GABA efficacy but does not alter other transport properties. GABA modulation of ALMT activity results in altered root growth and altered root tolerance to alkaline pH, acid pH and aluminium ions. We propose that GABA exerts its multiple physiological effects in plants via ALMT, including the regulation of pollen tube and root growth, and that GABA can finally be considered a legitimate signalling molecule in both the plant and animal kingdoms. PMID:26219411

  20. Direct evidence of active surface reconstruction during oxidative dehydrogenation of propane over VMgO catalyst

    SciTech Connect

    Pantazidis, A.; Mirodatos, C.; Burrows, A.; Kiely, C.J.

    1998-07-25

    This paper presents a thorough investigation of an optimized VMgO catalyst (14 wt% V) for the oxidative dehydrogenation of propane, carried out in order to elucidate the nature and behavior of the active surface. The catalyst morphology and the surface composition are studied by means of HREM, XPS, UV-vis, XRD, and in-situ electrical conductivity techniques, as a function of the gaseous environments of the catalyst. The active surface is shown to be essentially a monolayer of amorphous VO{sub 4}{sup 3{minus}} units scattered over the magnesia as isolated and polymeric species. These surface vanadia units are found to stabilize an unusual polar (111) orientation of MgO up to temperatures of 800 C. A direct and outstanding evidence of a totally reversible phenomenon of order/disorder restructuration of this V overlayer is provided in conjunction with the redox state of the surface depending on the properties of the surrounding atmosphere (reductive or oxidative). These fast surface phenomena are assumed to determine the elementary steps of propane activation within the overall oxidative dehydrogenation of propane (ODHP) process.

  1. Direct regulation of topoisomerase activity by a nucleoid-associated protein

    PubMed Central

    Ghosh, Soumitra; Mallick, Bratati; Nagaraja, Valakunja

    2014-01-01

    The topological homeostasis of bacterial chromosomes is maintained by the balance between compaction and the topological organization of genomes. Two classes of proteins play major roles in chromosome organization: the nucleoid-associated proteins (NAPs) and topoisomerases. The NAPs bind DNA to compact the chromosome, whereas topoisomerases catalytically remove or introduce supercoils into the genome. We demonstrate that HU, a major NAP of Mycobacterium tuberculosis specifically stimulates the DNA relaxation ability of mycobacterial topoisomerase I (TopoI) at lower concentrations but interferes at higher concentrations. A direct physical interaction between M. tuberculosis HU (MtHU) and TopoI is necessary for enhancing enzyme activity both in vitro and in vivo. The interaction is between the amino terminal domain of MtHU and the carboxyl terminal domain of TopoI. Binding of MtHU did not affect the two catalytic trans-esterification steps but enhanced the DNA strand passage, requisite for the completion of DNA relaxation, a new mechanism for the regulation of topoisomerase activity. An interaction-deficient mutant of MtHU was compromised in enhancing the strand passage activity. The species-specific physical and functional cooperation between MtHU and TopoI may be the key to achieve the DNA relaxation levels needed to maintain the optimal superhelical density of mycobacterial genomes. PMID:25200077

  2. A new electrochemically active-inactive switching aptamer molecular beacon to detect thrombin directly in solution.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Guifang; Shen, Bijun; Zhang, Fan; Wu, Jikui; Xu, Ying; He, Pingang; Fang, Yuzhi

    2010-06-15

    A new electrochemical aptamer molecular beacon (MB) was designed by the carminic acid (CA) covalently linking at the each end of a special single-stranded stem-loop shaped oligonucleotide and named as CAs-MB. CA is an electrochemically active molecule and two CA molecules at the ends of molecular beacon stem were closed enough to associate each other to be as CA dimer. The dimer was electrochemically inactive. It separated into two CA monomers and produced the electrochemical signal while CAs-MB combined with target. In this protocol, the detection strategy of CAs-MB for thrombin is based on electrochemical active-inactive switching between monomer and dimer forms of CA. In order to enhance the electrochemical signal, magnetic nanobeads (MNB) was applied by connecting CAs-MB with MNB through a duplex of DNA. With the magnetic enrichment, the detection limit for thrombin reached to 42.4 pM. The experiment results showed that this type of electrochemical active-inactive switching aptamer molecular beacon allowed the direct detection of target proteins in the solution with no requirement of removing uncombined CAs-MB. Besides, CAs-MB/MNB can be easily regenerated by using 2M NaCl solution to cleave the thrombin from the aptasensor. PMID:20378327

  3. Direct electron imaging in electron microscopy with monolithic active pixel sensors.

    PubMed

    Deptuch, G; Besson, A; Rehak, P; Szelezniak, M; Wall, J; Winter, M; Zhu, Y

    2007-08-01

    A new imaging device for dynamic electron microscopy is in great demand. The detector should provide the experimenter with images having sufficient spatial resolution at high speed. Immunity to radiation damage, accumulated during exposures, is critical. Photographic film, a traditional medium, is not adequate for studies that require large volumes of data or rapid recording and charge coupled device (CCD) cameras have limited resolution, due to phosphor screen coupling. CCD chips are not suitable for direct recording due to their extreme sensitivity to radiation damage. This paper discusses characterization of monolithic active pixel sensors (MAPS) in a scanning electron microscope (SEM) as well as in a transmission electron microscope (TEM). The tested devices were two versions of the MIMOSA V (MV) chip. This 1M pixel device features pixel size of 17 x 17 microm(2) and was designed in a 0.6 microm CMOS process. The active layer for detection is a thin (less than 20 microm) epitaxial layer, limiting the broadening of the electron beam. The first version of the detector was a standard imager with electronics, passivation and interconnection layers on top of the active region; the second one was bottom-thinned, reaching the epitaxial layer from the bottom. The electron energies used range from a few keV to 30 keV for SEM and from 40 to 400 keV for TEM. Deterioration of the image resolution due to backscattering was quantified for different energies and both detector versions. PMID:17346890

  4. Transcranial Direct Current Stimulation Modulates Neurogenesis and Microglia Activation in the Mouse Brain

    PubMed Central

    Pikhovych, Anton; Stolberg, Nina Paloma; Jessica Flitsch, Lea; Walter, Helene Luise; Graf, Rudolf; Fink, Gereon Rudolf; Schroeter, Michael

    2016-01-01

    Transcranial direct current stimulation (tDCS) has been suggested as an adjuvant tool to promote recovery of function after stroke, but the mechanisms of its action to date remain poorly understood. Moreover, studies aimed at unraveling those mechanisms have essentially been limited to the rat, where tDCS activates resident microglia as well as endogenous neural stem cells. Here we studied the effects of tDCS on microglia activation and neurogenesis in the mouse brain. Male wild-type mice were subjected to multisession tDCS of either anodal or cathodal polarity; sham-stimulated mice served as control. Activated microglia in the cerebral cortex and neuroblasts generated in the subventricular zone as the major neural stem cell niche were assessed immunohistochemically. Multisession tDCS at a sublesional charge density led to a polarity-dependent downregulation of the constitutive expression of Iba1 by microglia in the mouse cortex. In contrast, both anodal and, to an even greater extent, cathodal tDCS induced neurogenesis from the subventricular zone. Data suggest that tDCS elicits its action through multifacetted mechanisms, including immunomodulation and neurogenesis, and thus support the idea of using tDCS to induce regeneration and to promote recovery of function. Furthermore, data suggest that the effects of tDCS may be animal- and polarity-specific. PMID:27403166

  5. A new electrochemically active-inactive switching aptamer molecular beacon to detect thrombin directly in solution.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Guifang; Shen, Bijun; Zhang, Fan; Wu, Jikui; Xu, Ying; He, Pingang; Fang, Yuzhi

    2010-06-15

    A new electrochemical aptamer molecular beacon (MB) was designed by the carminic acid (CA) covalently linking at the each end of a special single-stranded stem-loop shaped oligonucleotide and named as CAs-MB. CA is an electrochemically active molecule and two CA molecules at the ends of molecular beacon stem were closed enough to associate each other to be as CA dimer. The dimer was electrochemically inactive. It separated into two CA monomers and produced the electrochemical signal while CAs-MB combined with target. In this protocol, the detection strategy of CAs-MB for thrombin is based on electrochemical active-inactive switching between monomer and dimer forms of CA. In order to enhance the electrochemical signal, magnetic nanobeads (MNB) was applied by connecting CAs-MB with MNB through a duplex of DNA. With the magnetic enrichment, the detection limit for thrombin reached to 42.4 pM. The experiment results showed that this type of electrochemical active-inactive switching aptamer molecular beacon allowed the direct detection of target proteins in the solution with no requirement of removing uncombined CAs-MB. Besides, CAs-MB/MNB can be easily regenerated by using 2M NaCl solution to cleave the thrombin from the aptasensor.

  6. Among the twenty classical L-amino acids, only glutamate directly activates metabotropic glutamate receptors.

    PubMed

    Frauli, Mélanie; Neuville, Pascal; Vol, Claire; Pin, Jean-Philippe; Prézeau, Laurent

    2006-02-01

    Under pathophysiological conditions, cellular amino acids can be profusely released from cells into the cerebral interstitial space. Because several class-C G protein coupled receptors (GPCRs) display a broad natural ligand spectrum, being sensitive to more than one endogenous ligand, we wondered whether the related metabotropic glutamate (mGlu) receptors could be modulated by various types of L-amino acids, allowing them to sense large increase in extracellular amino acid concentration. Here, the agonist, antagonist and allosteric effects of the twenty classical L-amino acids were evaluated on the eight mGlu receptor subtypes. We show that, in addition to glutamate (Glu), cysteine, aspartate and asparagine also lead to the activation of mGlu3, 4 and 5. Interestingly, our data demonstrate that the effect of these three amino acids did not result from a direct activation of the receptors, but from an indirect action involving Glu-transporters/exchangers. These data first demonstrate that mGlu receptors, unlike other class-C GPCRs, display an extremely high selectivity towards one ligand. Moreover, our results also show that Glu transport systems allow mGlu receptors to sense large increase in the extracellular concentration of some amino acids. Such a system will certainly lead to a large increase in some mGlu receptor activity under pathological conditions, such as seizure, ischemia or other brain injuries. PMID:16310227

  7. The Influence of Prior Knowledge on the Retrieval-Directed Function of Note Taking in Prior Knowledge Activation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wetzels, Sandra A. J.; Kester, Liesbeth; van Merrienboer, Jeroen J. G.; Broers, Nick J.

    2011-01-01

    Background: Prior knowledge activation facilitates learning. Note taking during prior knowledge activation (i.e., note taking directed at retrieving information from memory) might facilitate the activation process by enabling learners to build an external representation of their prior knowledge. However, taking notes might be less effective in…

  8. Trees actively and directly influence biogeochemical processes in boreal forested watersheds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Högberg, Peter

    2010-05-01

    Trees actively and directly influence biogeochemical processes in boreal forested watersheds Peter Högberg, Dept. of Forest Ecology and Management, SLU, SE-901 83 Umeå, Sweden It is increasingly realized that trees are directly influencing soil processes, and thereby significantly also biogeochemical processes at the scale of watersheds. For example, it is now well established that recent photosynthesis supports on average around 50% of the soil respiratory activity. It takes only a few days from tree canopy photosynthesis to the use of that C by plant roots and soil microbes. Importantly, not only does this represent a significant and rapid return flux of CO2 back to the atmosphere, but it also relates to a range of important biogeochemical processes. These occur not only in the soil, but also in streams and lakes, e.g., in nutrient-poor boreal forests areas labile C compounds produced by tree roots and their associated microorganisms constitute an important C source for lake biota. Furthermore, the tree belowground C allocation is under strong physiological control and responds to the supply of nutrients, especially to the supply of nitrogen. When this is low, as in most boreal forests, the belowground C allocation to roots and mycorrhizal fungi is large. This explains the very large N retention capacity of these forests. However, after large additions of N, this belowground C flux is reduced and consequently also the N retention capacity of mycorrhizal fungi. When this occurs, bacteria, organisms with a much lower C/N ratio, become dominant; but as these are C-limited, their capacity to sequester N is much lower than that of fungi. As a consequence, the N cycle opens up, and N is lost through leaching of nitrate and denitrification. However, if the N-load is removed, the trees start to allocate more C belowground to their mycorrhizal fungi again, and this important N-trap is restored. Thus, there are many examples of how trees actively and directly (with short

  9. Photophysiology and albedo-changing potential of the ice algal community on the surface of the Greenland ice sheet

    PubMed Central

    Yallop, Marian L; Anesio, Alexandre M; Perkins, Rupert G; Cook, Joseph; Telling, Jon; Fagan, Daniel; MacFarlane, James; Stibal, Marek; Barker, Gary; Bellas, Chris; Hodson, Andy; Tranter, Martyn; Wadham, Jemma; Roberts, Nicholas W

    2012-01-01

    Darkening of parts of the Greenland ice sheet surface during the summer months leads to reduced albedo and increased melting. Here we show that heavily pigmented, actively photosynthesising microalgae and cyanobacteria are present on the bare ice. We demonstrate the widespread abundance of green algae in the Zygnematophyceae on the ice sheet surface in Southwest Greenland. Photophysiological measurements (variable chlorophyll fluorescence) indicate that the ice algae likely use screening mechanisms to downregulate photosynthesis when exposed to high intensities of visible and ultraviolet radiation, rather than non-photochemical quenching or cell movement. Using imaging microspectrophotometry, we demonstrate that intact cells and filaments absorb light with characteristic spectral profiles across ultraviolet and visible wavelengths, whereas inorganic dust particles typical for these areas display little absorption. Our results indicate that the phototrophic community growing directly on the bare ice, through their photophysiology, most likely have an important role in changing albedo, and subsequently may impact melt rates on the ice sheet. PMID:23018772

  10. Antibiofilm Activity of Low-Amperage Continuous and Intermittent Direct Electrical Current

    PubMed Central

    Schmidt-Malan, Suzannah M.; Karau, Melissa J.; Cede, Julia; Greenwood-Quaintance, Kerryl E.; Brinkman, Cassandra L.; Mandrekar, Jayawant N.

    2015-01-01

    Bacterial biofilms are difficult to treat using available antimicrobial agents, so new antibiofilm strategies are needed. We previously showed that 20, 200, and 2,000 μA of electrical current reduced bacterial biofilms of Staphylococcus aureus, Staphylococcus epidermidis, and Pseudomonas aeruginosa. Here, we tested continuous direct current at lower amperages, intermittent direct current, and combinations of surface materials (Teflon or titanium) and electrode compositions (stainless steel, graphite, titanium, or platinum) against S. aureus, S. epidermidis, and P. aeruginosa biofilms. In addition, we tested 200 or 2,000 μA for 1 and 4 days against biofilms of 33 strains representing 13 species of microorganisms. The logarithmic reduction factor was used to measure treatment effects. Using continuous current delivery, the lowest active amperage was 2 μA for 1, 4, or 7 days against P. aeruginosa and 5 μA for 7 days against S. epidermidis and S. aureus biofilms. Delivery of 200 μA for 4 h a day over 4 days reduced P. aeruginosa, S. aureus, and S. epidermidis biofilms on Teflon or titanium discs. A reduction of P. aeruginosa, S. aureus, and S. epidermidis biofilms was measured for 23 of 24 combinations of surface materials and electrode compositions tested. Four days of direct current delivery reduced biofilms of 25 of 33 strains studied. In conclusion, low-amperage current or 4 h a day of intermittent current delivered using a variety of electrode compositions reduced P. aeruginosa, S. aureus, and S. epidermidis biofilms on a variety of surface materials. The electricidal effect was observed against a majority of bacterial species studied. PMID:26014944

  11. Antibiofilm Activity of Low-Amperage Continuous and Intermittent Direct Electrical Current.

    PubMed

    Schmidt-Malan, Suzannah M; Karau, Melissa J; Cede, Julia; Greenwood-Quaintance, Kerryl E; Brinkman, Cassandra L; Mandrekar, Jayawant N; Patel, Robin

    2015-08-01

    Bacterial biofilms are difficult to treat using available antimicrobial agents, so new antibiofilm strategies are needed. We previously showed that 20, 200, and 2,000 μA of electrical current reduced bacterial biofilms of Staphylococcus aureus, Staphylococcus epidermidis, and Pseudomonas aeruginosa. Here, we tested continuous direct current at lower amperages, intermittent direct current, and combinations of surface materials (Teflon or titanium) and electrode compositions (stainless steel, graphite, titanium, or platinum) against S. aureus, S. epidermidis, and P. aeruginosa biofilms. In addition, we tested 200 or 2,000 μA for 1 and 4 days against biofilms of 33 strains representing 13 species of microorganisms. The logarithmic reduction factor was used to measure treatment effects. Using continuous current delivery, the lowest active amperage was 2 μA for 1, 4, or 7 days against P. aeruginosa and 5 μA for 7 days against S. epidermidis and S. aureus biofilms. Delivery of 200 μA for 4 h a day over 4 days reduced P. aeruginosa, S. aureus, and S. epidermidis biofilms on Teflon or titanium discs. A reduction of P. aeruginosa, S. aureus, and S. epidermidis biofilms was measured for 23 of 24 combinations of surface materials and electrode compositions tested. Four days of direct current delivery reduced biofilms of 25 of 33 strains studied. In conclusion, low-amperage current or 4 h a day of intermittent current delivered using a variety of electrode compositions reduced P. aeruginosa, S. aureus, and S. epidermidis biofilms on a variety of surface materials. The electricidal effect was observed against a majority of bacterial species studied. PMID:26014944

  12. The concordance of directly and indirectly measured built environment attributes and physical activity adoption

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Physical activity (PA) adoption is essential for obesity prevention and control, yet ethnic minority women report lower levels of PA and are at higher risk for obesity and its comorbidities compared to Caucasians. Epidemiological studies and ecologic models of health behavior suggest that built environmental factors are associated with health behaviors like PA, but few studies have examined the association between built environment attribute concordance and PA, and no known studies have examined attribute concordance and PA adoption. Purpose The purpose of this study was to associate the degree of concordance between directly and indirectly measured built environment attributes with changes in PA over time among African American and Hispanic Latina women participating in a PA intervention. Method Women (N = 410) completed measures of PA at Time 1 (T1) and Time 2 (T2); environmental data collected at T1 were used to compute concordance between directly and indirectly measured built environment attributes. The association between changes in PA and the degree of concordance between each directly and indirectly measured environmental attribute was assessed using repeated measures analyses. Results There were no significant associations between built environment attribute concordance values and change in self-reported or objectively measured PA. Self-reported PA significantly increased over time (F(1,184) = 7.82, p = .006), but this increase did not vary by ethnicity or any built environment attribute concordance variable. Conclusions Built environment attribute concordance may not be associated with PA changes over time among minority women. In an effort to promote PA, investigators should clarify specific built environment attributes that are important for PA adoption and whether accurate perceptions of these attributes are necessary, particularly among the vulnerable population of minority women. PMID:21736740

  13. Extensive site-directed mutagenesis reveals interconnected functional units in the alkaline phosphatase active site.

    PubMed

    Sunden, Fanny; Peck, Ariana; Salzman, Julia; Ressl, Susanne; Herschlag, Daniel

    2015-01-01

    Enzymes enable life by accelerating reaction rates to biological timescales. Conventional studies have focused on identifying the residues that have a direct involvement in an enzymatic reaction, but these so-called 'catalytic residues' are embedded in extensive interaction networks. Although fundamental to our understanding of enzyme function, evolution, and engineering, the properties of these networks have yet to be quantitatively and systematically explored. We dissected an interaction network of five residues in the active site of Escherichia coli alkaline phosphatase. Analysis of the complex catalytic interdependence of specific residues identified three energetically independent but structurally interconnected functional units with distinct modes of cooperativity. From an evolutionary perspective, this network is orders of magnitude more probable to arise than a fully cooperative network. From a functional perspective, new catalytic insights emerge. Further, such comprehensive energetic characterization will be necessary to benchmark the algorithms required to rationally engineer highly efficient enzymes. PMID:25902402

  14. Extensive site-directed mutagenesis reveals interconnected functional units in the alkaline phosphatase active site.

    PubMed

    Sunden, Fanny; Peck, Ariana; Salzman, Julia; Ressl, Susanne; Herschlag, Daniel

    2015-01-01

    Enzymes enable life by accelerating reaction rates to biological timescales. Conventional studies have focused on identifying the residues that have a direct involvement in an enzymatic reaction, but these so-called 'catalytic residues' are embedded in extensive interaction networks. Although fundamental to our understanding of enzyme function, evolution, and engineering, the properties of these networks have yet to be quantitatively and systematically explored. We dissected an interaction network of five residues in the active site of Escherichia coli alkaline phosphatase. Analysis of the complex catalytic interdependence of specific residues identified three energetically independent but structurally interconnected functional units with distinct modes of cooperativity. From an evolutionary perspective, this network is orders of magnitude more probable to arise than a fully cooperative network. From a functional perspective, new catalytic insights emerge. Further, such comprehensive energetic characterization will be necessary to benchmark the algorithms required to rationally engineer highly efficient enzymes.

  15. Annealing effects on recombinative activity of nickel at direct silicon bonded interface

    SciTech Connect

    Kojima, Takuto Ohshita, Yoshio; Yamaguchi, Masafumi

    2015-09-15

    By performing capacitance transient analyses, the recombination activity at a (110)/(100) direct silicon bonded (DSB) interface contaminated with nickel diffused at different temperatures, as a model of grain boundaries in multicrystalline silicon, was studied. The trap level depth from the valence band, trap density of states, and hole capture cross section peaked at an annealing temperature of 300 °C. At temperatures ⩾400 °C, the hole capture cross section increased with temperature, but the density of states remained unchanged. Further, synchrotron-based X-ray analyses, microprobe X-ray fluorescence (μ-XRF), and X-ray absorption near edge structure (XANES) analyses were performed. The analysis results indicated that the chemical phase after the sample was annealed at 200 °C was a mixture of NiO and NiSi{sub 2}.

  16. Electrocatalytic activity of ZnS nanoparticles in direct ethanol fuel cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bredol, Michael; Kaczmarek, Michał; Wiemhöfer, Hans-Dieter

    2014-06-01

    Low temperature fuel cells consuming ethanol without reformation would be a major step toward the use of renewable energy sources from biomass. However, the necessary electrodes and electrocatalysts still are far from being perfect and suffer from various poisoning and deactivation processes. This work describes investigations on systems using carbon/ZnS-based electrocatalysts for ethanol oxidation in complete membrane electrode assemblies (MEAs). MEAs were built on Nafion membranes with active masses prepared from ZnS nanoparticles and Vulcan carbon support. Under operation, acetic acid and acetaldehyde were identified and quantified as soluble oxidation products, whereas the amount of CO2 generated could not be quantified directly. Overall conversion efficiencies of up to 25% were estimated from cells operated over prolonged time. From polarization curves, interrupt experiments and analysis of reaction products, mass transport problems (concentration polarization) and breakthrough losses were found to be the main deficiencies of the ethanol oxidation electrodes fabricated so far.

  17. Calcium pentosan polysulfate directly inhibits enzymatic activity of ADAMTS4 (aggrecanase-1) in osteoarthritic chondrocytes.

    PubMed

    Takizawa, Masayuki; Yatabe, Taku; Okada, Aiko; Chijiiwa, Miyuki; Mochizuki, Satsuki; Ghosh, Peter; Okada, Yasunori

    2008-08-20

    Aggrecanases that include ADAMTS1, 4, 5, 8, 9 and 15 are considered to play key roles in aggrecan degradation in osteoarthritic cartilage. Here we demonstrate that calcium pentosan polysulfate (CaPPS) directly inhibits the aggrecanase activity of ADAMTS4 without affecting the mRNA expression of the ADAMTS species in interleukin-1alpha-stimulated osteoarthritic chondrocytes. Synthetic peptides corresponding to specific regions of the thrombospondin type 1 repeat, cysteine-rich or spacer domain of ADAMTS4 inhibit the binding to immobilized CaPPS. These data suggest that CaPPS could function as chondroprotective agent for the treatment of osteoarthritis by inhibition of ADAMTS4 through interaction with the C-terminal ancillary domain.

  18. Active site-directed plasmin inhibitors: Extension on the P2 residue.

    PubMed

    Hidaka, Koushi; Gohda, Keigo; Teno, Naoki; Wanaka, Keiko; Tsuda, Yuko

    2016-02-15

    Based on the structure of YO-2 [N-(trans-4-aminomethylcyclohexanecarbonyl)-l-Tyr(O-picolyl)-NH-octyl], active site-directed plasmin (Plm) inhibitors were explored. The picolyl moiety in the Tyr(O-picolyl) residue (namely, the P2 residue) was replaced with smaller or larger groups, such as hydrogen, tert-butyl, benzyl, (2-naphthyl)methyl, and (quinolin-2-yl)methyl. Those efforts produced compound 17 {N-(trans-4-aminomethylcyclohexanecarbonyl)-l-Tyr[O-(quinolin-2-yl)methyl]-NH-octyl} [IC50=0.22 and 77μM for Plm and urokinase (UK), respectively], which showed not only 2.4-fold greater Plm inhibition than YO-2, but also an improvement in selectivity (Plm/UK) by 35-fold. The docking experiments of the Plm-17 complexes disclosed that the amino group of the tranexamyl moiety interacted with the side-chain of Asp753 which formed S1 site.

  19. Evaluation of harmonic direction-finding systems for detecting locomotor activity

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Boyarski, V.L.; Rodda, G.H.; Savidge, J.A.

    2007-01-01

    We conducted a physical simulation experiment to test the efficacy of harmonic direction finding for remotely detecting locomotor activity in animals. The ability to remotely detect movement helps to avoid disturbing natural movement behavior. Remote detection implies that the observer can sense only a change in signal bearing. In our simulated movements, small changes in bearing (<5.7??) were routinely undetectable. Detectability improved progressively with the size of the simulated animal movement. The average (??SD) of reflector tag movements correctly detected for 5 observers was 93.9 ?? 12.8% when the tag was moved ???11.5??; most observers correctly detected tag movements ???20.1??. Given our data, one can assess whether the technique will be effective for detecting movements at an observation distance appropriate for the study organism. We recommend that both habitat and behavior of the organism be taken into consideration when contemplating use of this technique for detecting locomotion.

  20. Mediating relationship between body mass index and the direct measures of the Theory of Planned Behaviour on physical activity intention.

    PubMed

    Caperchione, Cristina M; Duncan, Mitch J; Mummery, Kerry; Steele, Rebekah; Schofield, Grant

    2008-03-01

    This research examines (a) the interrelationships between body mass index (BMI), the direct measures of the Theory of Planned Behaviour (TPB) and physical activity intention and (b) the potential mediation effects of the direct measures of the TPB in the relationship between BMI and physical activity intention in a sample of Australian adults. A total sample of 1,062 respondents participated in a computer-assisted telephone-interview (CATI) survey comprised of a standardised introduction; questions regarding TPB and physical activity; and standard demographic questions. BMI for each participant was calculated from self-reported height and weight. Separate regression analyses were performed to examine the mediating effects of each of the direct measures of the TPB on the predictive relationship between the BMI and physical activity intention, as proposed by Baron and Kenny (Journal of Personality and Social Psychology, 51(6), 1173 - 1182, 1986). Findings indicated that the direct measure of attitude and perceived behavioural control mediated the relationship between BMI and physical activity intention. However, the direct measure of subjective norm failed to act as a mediating mechanism. To date there has been no research that has examined the mechanism by which body mass may affect physical activity behaviour. Given the current focus for health promotion specialists on promoting physical activity as a strategy for reducing overweight and obesity, a theoretical understanding of weight-related barriers to physical activity may aid in the development of future interventions and community physical activity programs, particularly those targeting overweight and obese populations.

  1. SHEET PLASMA DEVICE

    DOEpatents

    Henderson, O.A.

    1962-07-17

    An ion-electron plasma heating apparatus of the pinch tube class was developed wherein a plasma is formed by an intense arc discharge through a gas and is radially constricted by the magnetic field of the discharge. To avoid kink and interchange instabilities which can disrupt a conventional arc shortiy after it is formed, the apparatus is a pinch tube with a flat configuration for forming a sheet of plasma between two conductive plates disposed parallel and adjacent to the plasma sheet. Kink instabilities are suppressed by image currents induced in the conductive plates while the interchange instabilities are neutrally stable because of the flat plasma configuration wherein such instabilities may occur but do not dynamically increase in amplitude. (AEC)

  2. Plasma Sheet Energy Distributions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sotirelis, T.; Lee, A. R.; Newell, P. T.

    2009-12-01

    Energy spectra of electrons and ions, as observed by DMSP, are fit to various distributions. The goal is to characterize the inner edge of the plasma sheet, so the focus is on large scale plasma sheet properties. Lower energy electron populations are ignored as they appear to be small-scale transients. Maxwellian, kappa and power-law distributed spectra are considered. Non-thermal ion distributions appear with greater frequency than anticipated. In order to be thermally distributed the differential energy flux must rise with a slope of ~2 toward a peak, after which the flux should fall sharply. The figure shows an apparently non-thermal ion distribution, together with a Maxwellian fit. The results from fits for one full year are presented.

  3. C-H-Activated Direct Arylation of Strong Benzothiadiazole and Quinoxaline-Based Electron Acceptors.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Junxiang; Parker, Timothy C; Chen, Wayne; Williams, LaRita; Khrustalev, Victor N; Jucov, Evgheni V; Barlow, Stephen; Timofeeva, Tatiana V; Marder, Seth R

    2016-01-15

    Electron acceptors are important components of π-conjugated materials, but the strong electron-withdrawing properties of the required synthetic intermediates often make them poor substrates in synthetic schemes designed around conventional organometallic cross-coupling. Here, strong benzodiimine-based acceptors, including 5,6-difluoro[2,1,3]benzothiadiazole, 5,6-dicyano[2,1,3]benzothiadiazole, 5,6-dicyanobenzo[d][1,2,3]triazole, 6,7-dicyanoquinoxaline, and 6,7-dinitroquinoxaline, are shown to undergo facile palladium-catalyzed C-H direct arylation with a variety of bromoarenes in moderate to high yields. The electrochemical characteristics of di-2-thienyl derivatives synthesized using this methodology are compared and suggest that, in an electron-transfer sense, 5,6-dicyano[2,1,3]benzothiadiazole is a comparably strong acceptor to benzo[1,2-c:4,5-c']bis[1,2,5]thiadiazole. The synthetic results suggest that high electron-withdrawing ability, which has traditionally limited reaction yields and structural variety in organic electronic materials, may be advantageous when employing C-H activated direct arylation in certain circumstances.

  4. Direct anticryptococcal activity of lymphocytes from Cryptococcus neoformans-immunized mice.

    PubMed Central

    Muth, S M; Murphy, J W

    1995-01-01

    Assessment of the direct anticryptococcal activity of murine lymphocytes from both Cryptococcus neoformans-immunized and control mice was the focus of this investigation. We demonstrate that at a 2:1 effector cell-to-cryptococcal target cell ratio, effector cell populations comprised of alpha beta T-cell receptor-positive T lymphocytes (98 to 99% CD3+) from C. neoformans-immunized mice inhibited the growth of cryptococcal cells better than similar populations of lymphocytes from nonimmunized control mice. Almost immediately after mixing of cryptococci with the effector cells, C. neoformans-lymphocyte conjugates were observed. The percentage of conjugates increased over the first 30 min of incubation and then remained constant over the next 1.5 h. T-lymphocyte-enriched populations from C. neoformans-immunized mice formed significantly greater percentages of conjugates with cryptococci than control T lymphocytes at each time period that assessment was made. For growth inhibition to occur, direct contact between the effector and target cells was necessary, as evidenced by abrogation of cryptococcal growth inhibition when lymphocyte and cryptococcal cell populations were separated by a porous membrane during the growth inhibition assay. Vital staining of cryptococci after incubation with the T-cell-enriched populations showed that the T lymphocytes killed the cryptococcal cells. PMID:7729867

  5. The State of the Plasma Sheet and Atmosphere at Europa

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shemansky, D. E.; Yung, Y. L.; Liu, X.; Yoshii, J.; Hansen, C. J.; Hendrix, A.; Esposito, L. W.

    2014-12-01

    The Hall et al. (1995) report announcing the discovery of atomic oxygen FUV emission from Europa included a conclusion that the atmosphere was dominated by O2. Over the following 20 years publications referencing the atmosphere accepted this conclusion, and calculations of rates, particularly mass loading of the magnetosphere depended on a composition that was of order 90% O2. Analysis of the Europa emission spectrum in the present work, leads to the conclusion that the O I emission properties were misinterpreted. The interpretation of the source process depends on the ratio of the O I 1356 and 1304 A multiplet emissions (R(4:5) = (I(1356)/I(1304)). The value of R(4:5) never reaches the lower limit for electron impact dissociation of O2 for any of the 7 recorded disk averaged measurements between 1994 and 2013. Analysis of the Cassini UVIS exposures show the 1304 A multiplet to be optically thick, and the emissions are modeled as direct electron and solar photon excitation of O I. The result is a model atmosphere dominated by O I and O II, with neutral density a factor of 100 below the original O2 model. Other considerations show incompatibility with an O2 atmosphere. Deep exposures using the Cassini UVIS EUV spectrograph provide the state of the plasma sheet at Europa. The ion species are identified as mainly outwardly diffused mass from the Io plasma torus with a minor contribution from Europa. Plasma time-constants are of the order of 200 days. Neutral species in the plasma sheet are not measureable. The energy flux in the magnetosphere L-shells are mainly responsible for energy deposition maintaining the plasma sheet. The energy content in the Io and Europa L-shells, as measured, is similar, but the mean radiative cooling rate in the Io plasma torus at the time of the Cassini encounter was 565 femtoergs cm-3 s-1, compared to 7.3 at Europa, reflecting the difference between an active and inactive planetary satellite, particularly considering the fact that most

  6. Magma transport in sheet intrusions of the Alnö carbonatite complex, central Sweden.

    PubMed

    Andersson, Magnus; Almqvist, Bjarne S G; Burchardt, Steffi; Troll, Valentin R; Malehmir, Alireza; Snowball, Ian; Kübler, Lutz

    2016-01-01

    Magma transport through the Earth's crust occurs dominantly via sheet intrusions, such as dykes and cone-sheets, and is fundamental to crustal evolution, volcanic eruptions and geochemical element cycling. However, reliable methods to reconstruct flow direction in solidified sheet intrusions have proved elusive. Anisotropy of magnetic susceptibility (AMS) in magmatic sheets is often interpreted as primary magma flow, but magnetic fabrics can be modified by post-emplacement processes, making interpretation of AMS data ambiguous. Here we present AMS data from cone-sheets in the Alnö carbonatite complex, central Sweden. We discuss six scenarios of syn- and post-emplacement processes that can modify AMS fabrics and offer a conceptual framework for systematic interpretation of magma movements in sheet intrusions. The AMS fabrics in the Alnö cone-sheets are dominantly oblate with magnetic foliations parallel to sheet orientations. These fabrics may result from primary lateral flow or from sheet closure at the terminal stage of magma transport. As the cone-sheets are discontinuous along their strike direction, sheet closure is the most probable process to explain the observed AMS fabrics. We argue that these fabrics may be common to cone-sheets and an integrated geology, petrology and AMS approach can be used to distinguish them from primary flow fabrics. PMID:27282420

  7. Magma transport in sheet intrusions of the Alnö carbonatite complex, central Sweden

    PubMed Central

    Andersson, Magnus; Almqvist, Bjarne S. G.; Burchardt, Steffi; Troll, Valentin R.; Malehmir, Alireza; Snowball, Ian; Kübler, Lutz

    2016-01-01

    Magma transport through the Earth’s crust occurs dominantly via sheet intrusions, such as dykes and cone-sheets, and is fundamental to crustal evolution, volcanic eruptions and geochemical element cycling. However, reliable methods to reconstruct flow direction in solidified sheet intrusions have proved elusive. Anisotropy of magnetic susceptibility (AMS) in magmatic sheets is often interpreted as primary magma flow, but magnetic fabrics can be modified by post-emplacement processes, making interpretation of AMS data ambiguous. Here we present AMS data from cone-sheets in the Alnö carbonatite complex, central Sweden. We discuss six scenarios of syn- and post-emplacement processes that can modify AMS fabrics and offer a conceptual framework for systematic interpretation of magma movements in sheet intrusions. The AMS fabrics in the Alnö cone-sheets are dominantly oblate with magnetic foliations parallel to sheet orientations. These fabrics may result from primary lateral flow or from sheet closure at the terminal stage of magma transport. As the cone-sheets are discontinuous along their strike direction, sheet closure is the most probable process to explain the observed AMS fabrics. We argue that these fabrics may be common to cone-sheets and an integrated geology, petrology and AMS approach can be used to distinguish them from primary flow fabrics. PMID:27282420

  8. Magma transport in sheet intrusions of the Alnö carbonatite complex, central Sweden

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Andersson, Magnus; Almqvist, Bjarne S. G.; Burchardt, Steffi; Troll, Valentin R.; Malehmir, Alireza; Snowball, Ian; Kübler, Lutz

    2016-06-01

    Magma transport through the Earth’s crust occurs dominantly via sheet intrusions, such as dykes and cone-sheets, and is fundamental to crustal evolution, volcanic eruptions and geochemical element cycling. However, reliable methods to reconstruct flow direction in solidified sheet intrusions have proved elusive. Anisotropy of magnetic susceptibility (AMS) in magmatic sheets is often interpreted as primary magma flow, but magnetic fabrics can be modified by post-emplacement processes, making interpretation of AMS data ambiguous. Here we present AMS data from cone-sheets in the Alnö carbonatite complex, central Sweden. We discuss six scenarios of syn- and post-emplacement processes that can modify AMS fabrics and offer a conceptual framework for systematic interpretation of magma movements in sheet intrusions. The AMS fabrics in the Alnö cone-sheets are dominantly oblate with magnetic foliations parallel to sheet orientations. These fabrics may result from primary lateral flow or from sheet closure at the terminal stage of magma transport. As the cone-sheets are discontinuous along their strike direction, sheet closure is the most probable process to explain the observed AMS fabrics. We argue that these fabrics may be common to cone-sheets and an integrated geology, petrology and AMS approach can be used to distinguish them from primary flow fabrics.

  9. Direct activation of the mitochondrial calcium uniporter by natural plant flavonoids

    PubMed Central

    2004-01-01

    During cell activation, mitochondria play an important role in Ca2+ homoeostasis due to the presence of a fast and specific Ca2+ channel in its inner membrane, the mitochondrial Ca2+ uniporter. This channel allows mitochondria to buffer local cytosolic [Ca2+] changes and controls the intramitochondrial Ca2+ levels, thus modulating a variety of phenomena from respiratory rate to apoptosis. We have described recently that SB202190, an inhibitor of p38 MAPK (mitogen-activated protein kinase), strongly activated the uniporter. We show in the present study that a series of natural plant flavonoids, widely distributed in foods, produced also a strong stimulation of the mitochondrial Ca2+ uniporter. This effect was of the same magnitude as that induced by SB202190 (an approx. 20-fold increase in the mitochondrial Ca2+ uptake rate), developed without measurable delay and was rapidly reversible. In intact cells, the mitochondrial Ca2+ peak induced by histamine was also largely increased by the flavonoids. Stimulation of the uniporter by either flavonoids or SB202190 did not require ATP, suggesting a direct effect on the uniporter or an associated protein which is not mediated by protein phosphorylation. The most active compound, kaempferol, increased the rate of mitochondrial Ca2+ uptake by 85±15% (mean±S.E.M., n=4) and the histamine-induced mitochondrial Ca2+ peak by 139±19% (mean±S.E.M., n=5) at a concentration of 1 μM. Given that flavonoids can reach this concentration range in plasma after ingestion of flavonoid-rich food, these compounds could be modulating the uniporter under physiological conditions. PMID:15324303

  10. Critical role of arg433 in rat transketolase activity as probed by site-directed mutagenesis.

    PubMed Central

    Soh, Y; Song, B J; Jeng, J; Kallarakal, A T

    1998-01-01

    It has been shown that one arginine per monomer at an unknown position is essential for enzyme activity of the homodimeric transketolase (TK) [Kremer, Egan and Sable (1980) J. Biol. Chem. 255, 2405-2410]. To identify the critical arginine, four highly conserved arginine residues of rat TK (Arg102, Arg350, Arg433 and Arg506) were replaced with alanine by site-directed mutagenesis. Wild-type and mutant TK proteins were produced in Escherichia coli and characterized. The Arg102-->Ala mutant exhibited similar catalytic activity to the wild-type enzyme, whereas Arg350-->Ala, Arg506-->Ala and Arg433-->Ala mutants exhibited 36.7, 37.0 and 6.1% of the wild-type activity respectively. Three recombinant proteins (wild-type, Arg350-->Ala and Arg433-->Ala) were purified to apparent homogeneity using Ni2+-affinity chromatography and further characterized. All these proteins were able to form homodimers (148 kDa), as shown by immunoblot analysis subsequent to non-denaturing gel electrophoresis. The Arg433-->Ala mutant protein was less stable than the wild-type and Arg350-->Ala proteins at 55 degrees C. Kinetic analyses revealed that both Vmax and Km values were markedly affected in the Arg433-->Ala mutant. The Km values for two substrates xylulose 5-phosphate and ribose 5-phosphate were 11.5- and 24.3-fold higher respectively. The kcat/Km values of the Arg433-->Ala mutant for the two substrates were less than 1% of those of the wild-type protein. Molecular modelling of the rat TK revealed that Arg433 of one monomer has three potential hydrogen-bond interactions with the catalytically important highly conserved loop of the other monomer. Thus, our biochemical analyses and modelling data suggest the critical role of the previously uncharacterized Arg433 in TK activity. PMID:9657977

  11. A new mass spectrometry based bioassay for the direct assessment of hyaluronidase activity and inhibition.

    PubMed

    Britton, Emily R; Ibberson, Carolyn B; Horswill, Alexander R; Cech, Nadja B

    2015-12-01

    The development of drug resistance by bacterial pathogens is a growing threat. Drug resistant infections have high morbidity and mortality rates, and treatment of these infections is a major burden on the health care system. One potential strategy to prevent the development of drug resistance would be the application of therapeutic strategies that target bacterial virulence. Hyaluronidase is virulence factor that plays a role in the ability of Gram-positive bacteria such as Staphyloccus aureus and Streptococcus agalactiae to spread in tissue. As such, this enzyme could be a target for the development of future anti-virulence therapies. To facilitate the identification of hyaluronidase inhibitors, quantitative and reproducible assays of hyaluronidase activity are required. In the present study, we developed a new mass spectrometry based bioassay for this purpose. This assay directly measures the quantity of a degradation product (3-(4-deoxy-β-D-gluc-4-enuronosyl)-N-acetyl-D-glucosamine) produced by the hyaluronidase enzyme. Validation parameters for the new assay are as follows: repeatability, <7%; intermediate precision, <10%; range, 0.78-50 μM; limit of detection, 0.29 μM; and limit of quantification, 0.78 μM. Using the new assay, the IC50 value for a published inhibitor of S. agalactiae hyaluronidase, ascorbic acyl 6-palmitate, was 8.0±1.0 μM. We also identified a new hyaluronidase inhibitor, n-cyclohexanecarbonylpentadecylamine, with an IC50 of 30.4±9.8 μM. In conclusion, we describe a new, direct, and reproducible method for assessing hyaluronidase activity using mass spectrometry that can facilitate the discovery of inhibitors. PMID:26519769

  12. Trichodiene synthase. Identification of active site residues by site-directed mutagenesis.

    PubMed

    Cane, D E; Shim, J H; Xue, Q; Fitzsimons, B C; Hohn, T M

    1995-02-28

    Derivatization of 5,5'-dithiobis(2-nitrobenzoic acid)-treated trichodiene synthase with [methyl-14C]methyl methanethiosulfonate and analysis of the derived tryptic peptides suggested the presence of two cysteine residues at the active site. The corresponding C146A and C190A mutants were constructed by site-directed mutagenesis. The C190A mutant displayed partial but significantly reduced activity, with a reduction in kcat/Km of 3000 compared to the wild-type trichodiene synthase, while the C146A mutant was essentially inactive. A hybrid trichodiene synthase, constructed from amino acids 1-309 of the Fusarium sporotrichioides enzyme and amino acids 310-383 of the Gibberella pulicaris cyclase, had steady state kinetic parameters nearly identical to those of the wild-type F. sporotrichioides enzyme. From this parent hybrid, a series of mutants was constructed by site-directed mutagenesis in which the amino acids in the base-rich region, 302-306 (DRRYR), were systematically modified. Three of these mutants were overexpressed and purified to homogeneity. The importance of Arg304 for catalysis was established by the observation that the R304K mutant showed a more than 25-fold increase in Km, as well as a 200-fold reduction in kcat. In addition, analysis of the incubation products of the R304K mutant by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS) indicated that farnesyl diphosphate was converted not only to trichodiene but to at least two additional C15H24 hydrocarbons, mle 204. Replacement of the Tyr305 residue of trichodiene synthase with Phe had little effect on kcat, while increasing the Km by a factor of ca. 7-8.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:7873527

  13. Left anterior temporal cortex actively engages in speech perception: A direct cortical stimulation study.

    PubMed

    Matsumoto, Riki; Imamura, Hisaji; Inouchi, Morito; Nakagawa, Tomokazu; Yokoyama, Yohei; Matsuhashi, Masao; Mikuni, Nobuhiro; Miyamoto, Susumu; Fukuyama, Hidenao; Takahashi, Ryosuke; Ikeda, Akio

    2011-04-01

    Recent neuroimaging studies proposed the importance of the anterior auditory pathway for speech comprehension. Its clinical significance is implicated by semantic dementia or pure word deafness. Neurodegenerative or cerebrovascular nature, however, precluded precise localization of the cortex responsible for speech perception. Electrical cortical stimulation could delineate such localization by producing transient, functional impairment. We investigated engagement of the left anterior temporal cortex in speech perception by means of direct electrical cortical stimulation. Subjects were two partial epilepsy patients, who underwent direct cortical stimulation as a part of invasive presurgical evaluations. Stimulus sites were coregistered to presurgical 3D-MRI, and then to MNI standard space for anatomical localization. Separate from the posterior temporal language area, electrical cortical stimulation revealed a well-restricted language area in the anterior part of the superior temporal sulcus and gyrus (aSTS/STG) in both patients. Auditory sentence comprehension was impaired upon electrical stimulation of aSTS/STG. In one patient, additional investigation revealed that the functional impairment was restricted to auditory sentence comprehension with preserved visual sentence comprehension and perception of music and environmental sounds. Both patients reported that they could hear the voice but not understand the sentence well (e.g., heard as a series of meaningless utterance). The standard coordinates of this restricted area at left aSTS/STG well corresponded with the coordinates of speech perception reported in neuroimaging activation studies in healthy subjects. The present combined anatomo-functional case study, for the first time, demonstrated that aSTS/STG in the language dominant hemisphere actively engages in speech perception.

  14. Temporal variations of membrane foulants in the process of using flat-sheet membrane for simultaneous thickening and digestion of waste activated sludge.

    PubMed

    Wu, Zhichao; Zhu, Xuefeng; Wang, Zhiwei

    2011-07-01

    Membrane foulants were extracted at different operation time in simultaneous sludge thickening and digestion reactors using flat-sheet membranes. Temporal variations of foulants were analyzed by three-dimensional excitation-emission matrix (EEM) fluorescence spectroscopy, gel filtration chromatography (GFC), particle size distribution (PSD) and attenuated total reflection-Fourier transform infrared (ATR-FTIR) spectroscopy. Results showed that during the first 4days fouling was mainly assigned to internal membrane foulants (IMFs), and afterwards external membrane foulants (EMFs) increased dramatically. EEM analysis showed that both IMFs and EMFs changed during the operation. Cluster analysis demonstrated that the characteristics of IMFs were relatively similar; however, both quantity and properties of EMFs were changed. GFC analysis showed that EMFs contained more molecules with large molecular weight compared to IMFs. PSD analysis illuminated that particle size of EMFs gradually increased and was larger than that of IMFs. ATR-FTIR analysis indicated that the foulants on membranes consisted of polysaccharides and proteins. PMID:21555218

  15. Clean Cities Fact Sheet

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    2004-01-01

    This fact sheet explains the Clean Cities Program and provides contact information for all coalitions and regional offices. It answers key questions such as: What is the Clean Cities Program? What are alternative fuels? How does the Clean Cities Program work? What sort of assistance does Clean Cities offer? What has Clean Cities accomplished? What is Clean Cities International? and Where can I find more information?

  16. Topographical atlas sheets

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Wheeler, George Montague

    1876-01-01

    The following topographical atlas sheets, accompanying Appendix J.J. of the Annual Report of the Chief of Engineers, U.S. Army-being Annual Report upon U. S. Geographical Surveys-have been published during the fiscal year ending June 30, 1876, and are a portion of the series projected to embrace the territory of the United States lying west of the 100th meridian.

  17. Titanium Sheet Fabricated from Powder for Industrial Applications

    SciTech Connect

    Peter, William H; Muth, Thomas R; Chen, Wei; Yamamoto, Yukinori; Jolly, Brian C; Stone, Nigel; Cantin, G.M.D.; Barnes, John; Paliwal, Muktesh; Smith, Ryan; Capone, Joseph; Liby, Alan L; Williams, James C; Blue, Craig A

    2012-01-01

    In collaboration with Ametek and Commonwealth Scientific and Industrial Research Organization (CSIRO), Oak Ridge National Laboratory has evaluated three different methods for converting titanium hydride-dehydride (HDH) powder into thin gauge titanium sheet from a roll compacted preform. Methodologies include sintering, followed by cold rolling and annealing; direct hot rolling of the roll-compacted sheet; and hot rolling of multiple layers of roll compacted sheet that are encapsulated in a steel can. All three methods have demonstrated fully consolidated sheet, and each process route has the ability to produce sheet that meets ASTM B265 specifications. However, not every method currently provides sheet that can be highly formed without tearing. The degree of sintering between powder particles, post processing density, and the particle to particle boundary layer where compositional variations may exist, have a significant effect on the ability to form the sheet into useful components. Uniaxial tensile test results, compositional analysis, bend testing, and biaxial testing of the titanium sheet produced from hydride-dehydride powder will be discussed. Multiple methods of fabrication and the resulting properties can then be assessed to determine the most economical means of making components for industrial applications.

  18. Characteristics of liquid sheets formed by splash plate nozzles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ahmed, M.; Amighi, A.; Ashgriz, N.; Tran, H. N.

    2008-01-01

    An experimental study was conducted to identify the effect of viscosity on the characteristics of liquid sheets formed by a splash plate nozzle. Various mixtures of corn syrup and water are used to obtain viscosities in the range 1-170 mPa.s. Four different splash plates with nozzle diameters of 0.5, 0.75, 1, and 2 mm, with a constant plate angle of 55° were tested. Liquid sheets formed under various operating conditions were directly visualized. The sheet atomization process for the range of parameters studied here is governed by two different mechanisms: Rayleigh-Plateau (R-P) and Rayleigh-Taylor (R-T) instabilities. R-P occurs at the rim and R-T occurs on the thin sheet. The rim instability can be laminar or turbulent, depending on the jet Reynolds number. The R-T instability of the sheet is observed at the outer edges of the radially spreading sheet, where the sheet is the thinnest. It can also occur inside the sheet, due to formation of holes and ruptures.

  19. Calcium ion-induced formation of β-sheet/-turn structure leading to alteration of osteogenic activity of bone morphogenetic protein-2.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Wenjing; He, Hongyan; Tian, Yu; Gan, Qi; Zhang, Jing; Yuan, Yuan; Liu, Changsheng

    2015-07-27

    Preserving bioactivity of bone morphogenetic protein 2 (BMP-2) still remains a challenge in protein-based therapy. It is not known how Ca(2+) released from extracellular matrix or existing in physiological environment influences bioactivity in situ till now. Here, effects of extracellular Ca(2+) on conformation and osteogenic bioactivity of recombinant human BMP-2 (rhBMP-2) were investigated systematically. In vitro results indicated that Ca(2+) could bind rhBMP-2 rapidly and had no obvious effect on cell behaviors. Low concentration of Ca(2+) (0.18 mM) enhanced rhBMP-2-induced osteogenic differentiation, while high Ca(2+) concentration (>1.80 mM) exerted negative effect. In vivo ectopic bone formation exhibited similar trend. Further studies by circular dichroism spectroscopy, fluorescence spectroscopy, together with cell culture experiments revealed at low concentration, weak interaction of Ca(2+) and rhBMP(-)2 slightly increased β-sheet/-turn content and facilitated recognition of BMP-2 and BMPRIA. But, high Ca(2+) concentration (>1.8 mM) induced formation of Ca-rhBMP-2 complex and markedly increased content of β-sheet/-turn, which led to inhibition binding of rhBMP-2 and BMPRIA and thus suppression of downstream Smad1/5/8, ERK1/2 and p38 mitogen-associated protein kinase signaling pathways. Our work suggests osteogenic bioactivity of BMP-2 can be adjusted via extracellular Ca(2+), which should provide guide and assist for development of BMP-2-based materials for bone regeneration.

  20. Direct Functionalization of Nitrogen Heterocycles via Rh-Catalyzed C-H Bond Activation

    SciTech Connect

    Lewis, Jared; Bergman, Robert; Ellman, Jonathan

    2008-02-04

    Nitrogen heterocycles are present in many compounds of enormous practical importance, ranging from pharmaceutical agents and biological probes to electroactive materials. Direct funtionalization of nitrogen heterocycles through C-H bond activation constitutes a powerful means of regioselectively introducing a variety of substituents with diverse functional groups onto the heterocycle scaffold. Working together, our two groups have developed a family of Rh-catalyzed heterocycle alkylation and arylation reactions that are notable for their high level of functional-group compatibility. This Account describes their work in this area, emphasizing the relevant mechanistic insights that enabled synthetic advances and distinguished the resulting transformations from other methods. They initially discovered an intramolecular Rh-catalyzed C-2-alkylation of azoles by alkenyl groups. That reaction provided access to a number of di-, tri-, and tetracyclic azole derivatives. They then developed conditions that exploited microwave heating to expedite these reactions. While investigating the mechanism of this transformation, they discovered that a novel substrate-derived Rh-N-heterocyclic carbene (NHC) complex was involved as an intermediate. They then synthesized analogous Rh-NHC complexes directly by treating precursors to the intermediate [RhCl(PCy{sub 3}){sub 2}] with N-methylbenzimidazole, 3-methyl-3,4-dihydroquinazolein, and 1-methyl-1,4-benzodiazepine-2-one. Extensive kinetic analysis and DFT calculations supported a mechanism for carbene formation in which the catalytically active RhCl(PCy{sub 3}){sub 2} fragment coordinates to the heterocycle before intramolecular activation of the C-H bond occurs. The resulting Rh-H intermediate ultimately tautomerizes to the observed carbene complex. With this mechanistic information and the discovery that acid co-catalysts accelerate the alkylation, they developed conditions that efficiently and intermolecularly alkylate a variety of

  1. Direct functionalization of nitrogen heterocycles via Rh-catalyzed C-H bond activation.

    PubMed

    Lewis, Jared C; Bergman, Robert G; Ellman, Jonathan A

    2008-08-01

    [Reaction: see text]. Nitrogen heterocycles are present in many compounds of enormous practical importance, ranging from pharmaceutical agents and biological probes to electroactive materials. Direct functionalization of nitrogen heterocycles through C-H bond activation constitutes a powerful means of regioselectively introducing a variety of substituents with diverse functional groups onto the heterocycle scaffold. Working together, our two groups have developed a family of Rh-catalyzed heterocycle alkylation and arylation reactions that are notable for their high level of functional-group compatibility. This Account describes our work in this area, emphasizing the relevant mechanistic insights that enabled synthetic advances and distinguished the resulting transformations from other methods. We initially discovered an intramolecular Rh-catalyzed C-2 alkylation of azoles by alkenyl groups. That reaction provided access to a number of di-, tri-, and tetracyclic azole derivatives. We then developed conditions that exploited microwave heating to expedite these reactions. While investigating the mechanism of this transformation, we discovered that a novel substrate-derived Rh- N-heterocyclic carbene (NHC) complex was involved as an intermediate. We then synthesized analogous Rh-NHC complexes directly by treating precursors to the intermediate [RhCl(PCy 3)2] with N-methylbenzimidazole, 3-methyl-3,4-dihydroquinazoline, and 1-methyl-1,4-benzodiazepine-2-one. Extensive kinetic analysis and DFT calculations supported a mechanism for carbene formation in which the catalytically active RhCl(PCy 3) 2 fragment coordinates to the heterocycle before intramolecular activation of the C-H bond occurs. The resulting Rh-H intermediate ultimately tautomerizes to the observed carbene complex. With this mechanistic information and the discovery that acid cocatalysts accelerate the alkylation, we developed conditions that efficiently and intermolecularly alkylate a variety of

  2. Confocal multiview light-sheet microscopy

    PubMed Central

    Medeiros, Gustavo de; Norlin, Nils; Gunther, Stefan; Albert, Marvin; Panavaite, Laura; Fiuza, Ulla-Maj; Peri, Francesca; Hiiragi, Takashi; Krzic, Uros; Hufnagel, Lars

    2015-01-01

    Selective-plane illumination microscopy has proven to be a powerful imaging technique due to its unsurpassed acquisition speed and gentle optical sectioning. However, even in the case of multiview imaging techniques that illuminate and image the sample from multiple directions, light scattering inside tissues often severely impairs image contrast. Here we combine multiview light-sheet imaging with electronic confocal slit detection implemented on modern camera sensors. In addition to improved imaging quality, the electronic confocal slit detection doubles the acquisition speed in multiview setups with two opposing illumination directions allowing simultaneous dual-sided illumination. Confocal multiview light-sheet microscopy eliminates the need for specimen-specific data fusion algorithms, streamlines image post-processing, easing data handling and storage. PMID:26602977

  3. A Preliminary Investigation of Self-Directed Learning Activities in a Non-Formal Blended Learning Environment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schwier, Richard A.; Morrison, Dirk; Daniel, Ben K.

    2009-01-01

    This research considers how professional participants in a non-formal self-directed learning environment (NFSDL) made use of self-directed learning activities in a blended face-to-face and on line learning professional development course. The learning environment for the study was a professional development seminar on teaching in higher education…

  4. Impacts of direct human activity and climate change on north Ethiopian mountain landscapes over 140 Years

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nyssen, Jan; Frankl, Amaury; Haile, Mitiku; Hurni, Hans; Descheemaeker, Katrien; Ritler, Alfons; Crummey, Donald; Nievergelt, Bernhard; Moeyersons, Jan; Munro, Neil

    2010-05-01

    Studies on recent environmental change in tropical areas are generally conducted over limited time scales. This study makes a multi-scale assessment over a time span of 140 years, in one of the world's most degraded areas: the highlands of Northern Ethiopia. 300 landscapes, pictured on historical photographs, starting 1868, were re-photographed and environmental changes apparent on the paired photographs were analysed through expert rating. General tendencies appearing include an improved vegetation cover nowadays as compared to any period of the last 140 years, with a second optimum in the early 20th century. In the uppermost areas (above 3500 m a.s.l.) an upward shift of the upper tree line (Erica arborea) is observed, demonstrating that global warming takes also place in this region. At lower elevations, increased vegetation cover is the result of 25 years of intense rehabilitation activities. Physical soil and water conservation follows the same trend. Regional variations occurring in these trends are observed and discussed. The findings are substantiated by field investigations. The positive changes that result from these conservation activities in the north Ethiopian highlands are an issue of global concern as they show that (1) in our study area direct human impact on the environment is overriding and (2) severe land degradation should not always be irreversible.

  5. Quantifying surface albedo and other direct biogeophysical climate forcings of forestry activities.

    PubMed

    Bright, Ryan M; Zhao, Kaiguang; Jackson, Robert B; Cherubini, Francesco

    2015-09-01

    By altering fluxes of heat, momentum, and moisture exchanges between the land surface and atmosphere, forestry and other land-use activities affect climate. Although long recognized scientifically as being important, these so-called biogeophysical forcings are rarely included in climate policies for forestry and other land management projects due to the many challenges associated with their quantification. Here, we review the scientific literature in the fields of atmospheric science and terrestrial ecology in light of three main objectives: (i) to elucidate the challenges associated with quantifying biogeophysical climate forcings connected to land use and land management, with a focus on the forestry sector; (ii) to identify and describe scientific approaches and/or metrics facilitating the quantification and interpretation of direct biogeophysical climate forcings; and (iii) to identify and recommend research priorities that can help overcome the challenges of their attribution to specific land-use activities, bridging the knowledge gap between the climate modeling, forest ecology, and resource management communities. We find that ignoring surface biogeophysics may mislead climate mitigation policies, yet existing metrics are unlikely to be sufficient. Successful metrics ought to (i) include both radiative and nonradiative climate forcings; (ii) reconcile disparities between biogeophysical and biogeochemical forcings, and (iii) acknowledge trade-offs between global and local climate benefits. We call for more coordinated research among terrestrial ecologists, resource managers, and coupled climate modelers to harmonize datasets, refine analytical techniques, and corroborate and validate metrics that are more amenable to analyses at the scale of an individual site or region.

  6. Directed enzyme evolution guided by multidimensional analysis of substrate-activity space.

    PubMed

    Larsson, Anna-Karin; Emrén, Lars O; Bardsley, William G; Mannervik, Bengt

    2004-01-01

    The directed evolution of protein function frequently involves identification of mutants with improved properties from a population of variants obtained by mutagenesis. The selection of clones to parent the subsequent generation is crucial to the continued creation of superior progeny. In the present study, multivariate analysis guided the evolution of human glutathione transferase (GST) T1-1 to 65-fold enhanced alkyltransferase activity. Six alternative substrates monitored the substrate-activity space that characterized a mutant library of enzymes, obtained by recombination of DNA and heterologous expression in Escherichia coli. A subset of mutants was identified by their proximity in the targeted region of six-dimensional factor space. DNA from these mutants was recombined to create a new generation of GST variants from which an improved enzyme was isolated. The multidimensional cluster analysis is applicable to quantitative properties in any population of molecules undergoing evolution and can guide the tailoring of proteins, nucleic acids and other chemical structures to novel and improved functions.

  7. Calibration of a direct nuclear activation diagnostic which uses boron nitride to measure energetic deuterium ions

    SciTech Connect

    Cooper, G.W.; Chambers, G.D.; Savage, M.E.; Ruiz, C.L.; Schmidlapp, F.A.

    1998-07-01

    A direct nuclear activation diagnostic for the measurement of the kinetic energy of deuterium ions in the energy range of 1 to 3 MeV has been successfully developed. This diagnostic is based on the fact that the ratio of two different thick target yields which are generated by the same incident ion species can be a sensitive function of incident ion energy. Targets for this diagnostic are made of {alpha}-boron nitride (BN) and use the two reactions: {sup 10}B(d,n){sup 11}C({beta}+) and {sup 14}N(d,n){sup 15}O({beta}+). As long as the BN material matrix remains constant, the ratio of thick target yields depends only on the deuterium ion energy and is independent of ion fluence and detector efficiency. Calibration of the diagnostic was accomplished by irradiating BN targets with deuterium beams of known ion kinetic energy and fluence. The calibrated diagnostic was then fielded to measure the voltage in a Plasma Opening Switch (POS). Electrical measurements of the POS voltage and the voltage inferred from the BN nuclear activation diagnostic were in good agreement.

  8. Cysteine Sulfenylation Directs IRE-1 to Activate the SKN-1/Nrf2 Antioxidant Response.

    PubMed

    Hourihan, John M; Moronetti Mazzeo, Lorenza E; Fernández-Cárdenas, L Paulette; Blackwell, T Keith

    2016-08-18

    Emerging evidence suggests that many proteins may be regulated through cysteine modification, but the extent and functions of this signaling remain largely unclear. The endoplasmic reticulum (ER) transmembrane protein IRE-1 maintains ER homeostasis by initiating the unfolded protein response (UPR(ER)). Here we show in C. elegans and human cells that IRE-1 has a distinct redox-regulated function in cytoplasmic homeostasis. Reactive oxygen species (ROS) that are generated at the ER or by mitochondria sulfenylate a cysteine within the IRE-1 kinase activation loop. This inhibits the IRE-1-mediated UPR(ER) and initiates the p38/SKN-1(Nrf2) antioxidant response, thereby increasing stress resistance and lifespan. Many AGC-family kinases (AKT, p70S6K, PKC, ROCK1) seem to be regulated similarly. The data reveal that IRE-1 has an ancient function as a cytoplasmic sentinel that activates p38 and SKN-1(Nrf2) and indicate that cysteine modifications induced by ROS signals can direct proteins to adopt unexpected functions and may coordinate many cellular processes. PMID:27540856

  9. Directed evolution can rapidly improve the activity of chimeric assembly-line enzymes

    PubMed Central

    Fischbach, Michael A.; Lai, Jonathan R.; Roche, Eric D.; Walsh, Christopher T.; Liu, David R.

    2007-01-01

    Nonribosomal peptides (NRPs) are produced by NRP synthetase (NRPS) enzymes that function as molecular assembly lines. The modular architecture of NRPSs suggests that a domain responsible for activating a building block could be replaced with a domain from a foreign NRPS to create a chimeric assembly line that produces a new variant of a natural NRP. However, such chimeric NRPS modules are often heavily impaired, impeding efforts to create novel NRP variants by swapping domains from different modules or organisms. Here we show that impaired chimeric NRPSs can be functionally restored by directed evolution. Using rounds of mutagenesis coupled with in vivo screens for NRP production, we rapidly isolated variants of two different chimeric NRPSs with ≈10-fold improvements in enzyme activity and product yield, including one that produces new derivatives of the potent NRP/polyketide antibiotic andrimid. Because functional restoration in these examples required only modest library sizes (103 to 104 clones) and three or fewer rounds of screening, our approach may be widely applicable even for NRPSs from genetically challenging hosts. PMID:17620609

  10. Quality control of astrocyte-directed Cre transgenic mice: the benefits of a direct link between loss of gene expression and reporter activation.

    PubMed

    Requardt, Robert Pascal; Kaczmarczyk, Lech; Dublin, Pavel; Wallraff-Beck, Anke; Mikeska, Thomas; Degen, Joachim; Waha, Andreas; Steinhäuser, Christian; Willecke, Klaus; Theis, Martin

    2009-04-15

    Cre recombinase activity for cell-type restricted deletion of floxed target genes (i.e., flanked by Cre recognition loxP-sites) is often measured by separate matings with recombination-activated reporter gene mice. Using a floxed Gja1 (Cx43) allele, we demonstrate the benefits of a direct link between reporter gene expression and target gene deletion to overcome critical limitations of the Cre/loxP system. The widely used human glial fibrillary acidic protein (hGFAP)-Cre transgene exhibits variable recombination activity and requires postexperimental validation. Such quality control is essential to correlate the extent of Cre-mediated Gja1 ablation with phenotypical alterations and to maintain the activity status of hGFAP-Cre in transgenic mouse colonies. We present several strategies to control for the fidelity of hGFAP-Cre mediated recombination. (c) 2008 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  11. The mechanical actions of muscles predict the direction of muscle activation during postural perturbations in the cat hindlimb.

    PubMed

    Honeycutt, Claire F; Nichols, T Richard

    2014-03-01

    Humans and cats respond to balance challenges, delivered via horizontal support surface perturbations, with directionally selective muscle recruitment and constrained ground reaction forces. It has been suggested that this postural strategy arises from an interaction of limb biomechanics and proprioceptive networks in the spinal cord. A critical experimental validation of this hypothesis is to test the prediction that the principal directions of muscular activation oppose the directions responding muscles exert their forces on the environment. Therefore, our objective was to quantify the endpoint forces of a diverse set of cat hindlimb muscles and compare them with the directionally sensitive muscle activation patterns generated in the intact and decerebrate cat. We hypothesized that muscles are activated based on their mechanical advantage. Our primary expectation was that the principal direction of muscle activation during postural perturbations will be directed oppositely (180°) from the muscle endpoint ground reaction force. We found that muscle activation during postural perturbations was indeed directed oppositely to the endpoint reaction forces of that muscle. These observations indicate that muscle recruitment during balance challenges is driven, at least in part, by limb architecture. This suggests that sensory sources that provide feedback about the mechanical environment of the limb are likely important to appropriate and effective responses during balance challenges. Finally, we extended the analysis to three dimensions and different stance widths, laying the groundwork for a more comprehensive study of postural regulation than was possible with measurements confined to the horizontal plane and a single stance configuration.

  12. Central and direct regulation of testicular activity by gonadotropin-inhibitory hormone and its receptor.

    PubMed

    Ubuka, Takayoshi; Son, You Lee; Tobari, Yasuko; Narihiro, Misato; Bentley, George E; Kriegsfeld, Lance J; Tsutsui, Kazuyoshi

    2014-01-01

    Gonadotropin-inhibitory hormone (GnIH) was first identified in Japanese quail to be an inhibitor of gonadotropin synthesis and release. GnIH peptides have since been identified in all vertebrates, and all share an LPXRFamide (X = L or Q) motif at their C-termini. The receptor for GnIH is the G protein-coupled receptor 147 (GPR147), which inhibits cAMP signaling. Cell bodies of GnIH neurons are located in the paraventricular nucleus (PVN) in birds and the dorsomedial hypothalamic area (DMH) in most mammals. GnIH neurons in the PVN or DMH project to the median eminence to control anterior pituitary function via GPR147 expressed in gonadotropes. Further, GnIH inhibits gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GnRH)-induced gonadotropin subunit gene transcription by inhibiting the adenylate cyclase/cAMP/PKA-dependent ERK pathway in an immortalized mouse gonadotrope cell line (LβT2 cells). GnIH neurons also project to GnRH neurons that express GPR147 in the preoptic area (POA) in birds and mammals. Accordingly, GnIH can inhibit gonadotropin synthesis and release by decreasing the activity of GnRH neurons as well as by directly inhibiting pituitary gonadotrope activity. GnIH and GPR147 can thus centrally suppress testosterone secretion and spermatogenesis by acting in the hypothalamic-pituitary-gonadal axis. GnIH and GPR147 are also expressed in the testis of birds and mammals, possibly acting in an autocrine/paracrine manner to suppress testosterone secretion and spermatogenesis. GnIH expression is also regulated by melatonin, stress, and social environment in birds and mammals. Accordingly, the GnIH-GPR147 system may play a role in transducing physical and social environmental information to regulate optimal testicular activity in birds and mammals. This review discusses central and direct inhibitory effects of GnIH and GPR147 on testosterone secretion and spermatogenesis in birds and mammals.

  13. Plasma Sheet Dynamics Imposed by Bursty Bulk Flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Panov, E. V.

    2009-04-01

    On 17 March 2008 around 9:12 UT the five Themis spacecraft were located in the plasma sheet no more than 1 hour MLT apart and cover ed radial distances from 15 Re (THB) to about 10 Re (THA). We found that all the spacecraft consecutively observed a bursty bulk flow traveling first earthward, slowing down between THB and THA from 400 km/s to 50 km/s, and then changing toward the opposite direction. We found that the most tailward located spacecraft, THB and THC, detected thinning and then thickening of the plasma sheet around the time of the flow direction change. The plasma sheet thinning propagated from THB to THC at about the Alfvén velocity in the plasma sheet boundary layer. Both spacecraft showed signatures of crossing the reconnection separatrix. On the other hand, we found that the THA, THD and THE spacecraft, which were located in a more dipolar region, indicated first plasma sheet thickening and then thinning. The five spacecraft observations can well be explained as the observation of the reconnected magnetic flux, which first moved toward a more dipolar field region close to the Earth, and then bounced tailward. Finally, we discuss the Pi2 pulsations observed by ground based magnetometers during these space observations, and also the non-adiabatic heating of particles inside the plasma sheet found after the sheet's thinning-thickening motion.

  14. Physical activity and self-esteem: testing direct and indirect relationships associated with psychological and physical mechanisms

    PubMed Central

    Zamani Sani, Seyed Hojjat; Fathirezaie, Zahra; Brand, Serge; Pühse, Uwe; Holsboer-Trachsler, Edith; Gerber, Markus; Talepasand, Siavash

    2016-01-01

    In the present study, we investigated the relationship between physical activity (PA) and self-esteem (SE), while introducing body mass index (BMI), perceived physical fitness (PPF), and body image (BI) in adults (N =264, M =38.10 years). The findings indicated that PA was directly and indirectly associated with SE. BMI predicted SE neither directly nor indirectly, but was directly associated with PPF and both directly and indirectly with BI. Furthermore, PPF was directly related to BI and SE, and a direct association was found between BI and SE. The pattern of results suggests that among a sample of adults, PA is directly and indirectly associated with SE, PPF, and BI, but not with BMI. PA, PPF, and BI appear to play an important role in SE. Accordingly, regular PA should be promoted, in particular, among adults reporting lower SE. PMID:27789950

  15. Direct Measurements of Local Coupling between Myosin Molecules Are Consistent with a Model of Muscle Activation

    PubMed Central

    Walcott, Sam; Kad, Neil M.

    2015-01-01

    Muscle contracts due to ATP-dependent interactions of myosin motors with thin filaments composed of the proteins actin, troponin, and tropomyosin. Contraction is initiated when calcium binds to troponin, which changes conformation and displaces tropomyosin, a filamentous protein that wraps around the actin filament, thereby exposing myosin binding sites on actin. Myosin motors interact with each other indirectly via tropomyosin, since myosin binding to actin locally displaces tropomyosin and thereby facilitates binding of nearby myosin. Defining and modeling this local coupling between myosin motors is an open problem in muscle modeling and, more broadly, a requirement to understanding the connection between muscle contraction at the molecular and macro scale. It is challenging to directly observe this coupling, and such measurements have only recently been made. Analysis of these data suggests that two myosin heads are required to activate the thin filament. This result contrasts with a theoretical model, which reproduces several indirect measurements of coupling between myosin, that assumes a single myosin head can activate the thin filament. To understand this apparent discrepancy, we incorporated the model into stochastic simulations of the experiments, which generated simulated data that were then analyzed identically to the experimental measurements. By varying a single parameter, good agreement between simulation and experiment was established. The conclusion that two myosin molecules are required to activate the thin filament arises from an assumption, made during data analysis, that the intensity of the fluorescent tags attached to myosin varies depending on experimental condition. We provide an alternative explanation that reconciles theory and experiment without assuming that the intensity of the fluorescent tags varies. PMID:26536123

  16. Alignment of Synaptic Vesicle Macromolecules with the Macromolecules in Active Zone Material that Direct Vesicle Docking

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Jing; Jung, Jae Hoon; Marshall, Robert M.; McMahan, Uel J.

    2013-01-01

    Synaptic vesicles dock at active zones on the presynaptic plasma membrane of a neuron’s axon terminals as a precondition for fusing with the membrane and releasing their neurotransmitter to mediate synaptic impulse transmission. Typically, docked vesicles are next to aggregates of plasma membrane-bound macromolecules called active zone material (AZM). Electron tomography on tissue sections from fixed and stained axon terminals of active and resting frog neuromuscular junctions has led to the conclusion that undocked vesicles are directed to and held at the docking sites by the successive formation of stable connections between vesicle membrane proteins and proteins in different classes of AZM macromolecules. Using the same nanometer scale 3D imaging technology on appropriately stained frog neuromuscular junctions, we found that ∼10% of a vesicle’s luminal volume is occupied by a radial assembly of elongate macromolecules attached by narrow projections, nubs, to the vesicle membrane at ∼25 sites. The assembly’s chiral, bilateral shape is nearly the same vesicle to vesicle, and nubs, at their sites of connection to the vesicle membrane, are linked to macromolecules that span the membrane. For docked vesicles, the orientation of the assembly’s shape relative to the AZM and the presynaptic membrane is the same vesicle to vesicle, whereas for undocked vesicles it is not. The connection sites of most nubs on the membrane of docked vesicles are paired with the connection sites of the different classes of AZM macromolecules that regulate docking, and the membrane spanning macromolecules linked to these nubs are also attached to the AZM macromolecules. We conclude that the luminal assembly of macromolecules anchors in a particular arrangement vesicle membrane macromolecules, which contain the proteins that connect the vesicles to AZM macromolecules during docking. Undocked vesicles must move in a way that aligns this arrangement with the AZM macromolecules for

  17. Alignment of synaptic vesicle macromolecules with the macromolecules in active zone material that direct vesicle docking.

    PubMed

    Harlow, Mark L; Szule, Joseph A; Xu, Jing; Jung, Jae Hoon; Marshall, Robert M; McMahan, Uel J

    2013-01-01

    Synaptic vesicles dock at active zones on the presynaptic plasma membrane of a neuron's axon terminals as a precondition for fusing with the membrane and releasing their neurotransmitter to mediate synaptic impulse transmission. Typically, docked vesicles are next to aggregates of plasma membrane-bound macromolecules called active zone material (AZM). Electron tomography on tissue sections from fixed and stained axon terminals of active and resting frog neuromuscular junctions has led to the conclusion that undocked vesicles are directed to and held at the docking sites by the successive formation of stable connections between vesicle membrane proteins and proteins in different classes of AZM macromolecules. Using the same nanometer scale 3D imaging technology on appropriately stained frog neuromuscular junctions, we found that ∼10% of a vesicle's luminal volume is occupied by a radial assembly of elongate macromolecules attached by narrow projections, nubs, to the vesicle membrane at ∼25 sites. The assembly's chiral, bilateral shape is nearly the same vesicle to vesicle, and nubs, at their sites of connection to the vesicle membrane, are linked to macromolecules that span the membrane. For docked vesicles, the orientation of the assembly's shape relative to the AZM and the presynaptic membrane is the same vesicle to vesicle, whereas for undocked vesicles it is not. The connection sites of most nubs on the membrane of docked vesicles are paired with the connection sites of the different classes of AZM macromolecules that regulate docking, and the membrane spanning macromolecules linked to these nubs are also attached to the AZM macromolecules. We conclude that the luminal assembly of macromolecules anchors in a particular arrangement vesicle membrane macromolecules, which contain the proteins that connect the vesicles to AZM macromolecules during docking. Undocked vesicles must move in a way that aligns this arrangement with the AZM macromolecules for docking

  18. A channelopathy mechanism revealed by direct calmodulin activation of TrpV4

    PubMed Central

    Loukin, Stephen H.; Teng, Jinfeng; Kung, Ching

    2015-01-01

    Ca2+-calmodulin (CaM) regulates varieties of ion channels, including Transient Receptor Potential vanilloid subtype 4 (TrpV4). It has previously been proposed that internal Ca2+ increases TrpV4 activity through Ca2+-CaM binding to a C-terminal Ca2+-CaM binding domain (CBD). We confirmed this model by directly presenting Ca2+-CaM protein to membrane patches excised from TrpV4-expressing oocytes. Over 50 TRPV4 mutations are now known to cause heritable skeletal dysplasia (SD) and other diseases in human. We have previously examined 14 SD alleles and found them to all have gain-of-function effects, with the gain of constitutive open probability paralleling disease severity. Among the 14 SD alleles examined, E797K and P799L are located immediate upstream of the CBD. They not only have increase basal activity, but, unlike the wild-type or other SD-mutant channels examined, they were greatly reduced in their response to Ca2+-CaM. Deleting a 10-residue upstream peptide (Δ795–804) that covers the two SD mutant sites resulted in strong constitutive activity and the complete lack of Ca2+-CaM response. We propose that the region immediately upstream of CBD is an autoinhibitory domain that maintains the closed state through electrostatic interactions, and adjacent detachable Ca2+-CaM binding to CBD sterically interferes with this autoinhibition. This work further supports the notion that TrpV4 mutations cause SD by constitutive leakage. However, the closed conformation is likely destabilized by various mutations by different mechanisms, including the permanent removal of an autoinhibition documented here. PMID:26170305

  19. Real-time stream processing for active fire monitoring on Landsat 8 direct reception data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bohme, C.; Bouwer, P.; Prinsloo, M. J.

    2015-04-01

    Some remote sensing applications are relatively time insensitive, for others, near-real-time processing (results 30-180 minutes after data reception) offer a viable solution. There are, however, a few applications, such as active wildfire monitoring or ship and airplane detection, where real-time processing and image interpretation offers a distinct advantage. The objective of real-time processing is to provide notifications before the complete satellite pass has been received. This paper presents an automated system for real-time, stream-based processing of data acquired from direct broadcast push-broom sensors for applications that require a high degree of timeliness. Based on this system, a processing chain for active fire monitoring using Landsat 8 live data streams was implemented and evaluated. The real-time processing system, called the FarEarth Observer, is connected to a ground station's demodulator and uses its live data stream as input. Processing is done on variable size image segments assembled from detector lines of the push broom sensor as they are streamed from the satellite, enabling detection of active fires and sending of notifications within seconds of the satellite passing over the affected area, long before the actual acquisition completes. This approach requires performance optimized techniques for radiometric and geometric correction of the sensor data. Throughput of the processing system is kept well above the 400Mbit/s downlink speed of Landsat 8. A latency of below 10 seconds from sensor line acquisition to anomaly detection and notification is achieved. Analyses of geometric and radiometric accuracy and comparisons in latency to traditional near-real-time systems are also presented.

  20. Modeling Abrupt Change in Global Sea Level Arising from Ocean - Ice-Sheet Interaction

    SciTech Connect

    Holland, David M

    2011-09-24

    It is proposed to develop, validate, and apply a coupled ocean ice-sheet model to simulate possible, abrupt future change in global sea level. This research is to be carried out collaboratively between an academic institute and a Department of Energy Laboratory (DOE), namely, the PI and a graduate student at New York University (NYU) and climate model researchers at the Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL). The NYU contribution is mainly in the area of incorporating new physical processes into the model, while the LANL efforts are focused on improved numerics and overall model development. NYU and LANL will work together on applying the model to a variety of modeling scenarios of recent past and possible near-future abrupt change to the configuration of the periphery of the major ice sheets. The project's ultimate goal is to provide a robust, accurate prediction of future global sea level change, a feat that no fully-coupled climate model is currently capable of producing. This proposal seeks to advance that ultimate goal by developing, validating, and applying a regional model that can simulate the detailed processes involved in sea-level change due to ocean ice-sheet interaction. Directly modeling ocean ice-sheet processes in a fully-coupled global climate model is not a feasible activity at present given the near-complete absence of development of any such causal mechanism in these models to date.

  1. Impediments to enhancement of CPT-11 anticancer activity by E. coli directed beta-glucuronidase therapy.

    PubMed

    Hsieh, Yuan-Ting; Chen, Kai-Chuan; Cheng, Chiu-Min; Cheng, Tian-Lu; Tao, Mi-Hua; Roffler, Steve R

    2015-01-01

    CPT-11 is a camptothecin analog used for the clinical treatment of colorectal adenocarcinoma. CPT-11 is converted into the therapeutic anti-cancer agent SN-38 by liver enzymes and can be further metabolized to a non-toxic glucuronide SN-38G, resulting in low SN-38 but high SN-38G concentrations in the circulation. We previously demonstrated that adenoviral expression of membrane-anchored beta-glucuronidase could promote conversion of SN-38G to SN-38 in tumors and increase the anticancer activity of CPT-11. Here, we identified impediments to effective tumor therapy with E. coli that were engineered to constitutively express highly active E. coli beta-glucuronidase intracellularly to enhance the anticancer activity of CPT-11. The engineered bacteria, E. coli (lux/βG), could hydrolyze SN-38G to SN-38, increased the sensitivity of cultured tumor cells to SN-38G by about 100 fold and selectively accumulated in tumors. However, E. coli (lux/βG) did not more effectively increase CPT-11 anticancer activity in human tumor xenografts as compared to non-engineered E. coli. SN-38G conversion to SN-38 by E. coli (lux/βG) appeared to be limited by slow uptake into bacteria as well as by segregation of E. coli in necrotic regions of tumors that may be relatively inaccessible to systemically-administered drug molecules. Studies using a fluorescent glucuronide probe showed that significantly greater glucuronide hydrolysis could be achieved in mice pretreated with E. coli (lux/βG) by direct intratumoral injection of the glucuronide probe or by intratumoral lysis of bacteria to release intracellular beta-glucuronidase. Our study suggests that the distribution of beta-glucuronidase, and possibly other therapeutic proteins, in the tumor microenvironment might be an important barrier for effective bacterial-based tumor therapy. Expression of secreted therapeutic proteins or induction of therapeutic protein release from bacteria might therefore be a promising strategy to enhance anti

  2. Impediments to Enhancement of CPT-11 Anticancer Activity by E. coli Directed Beta-Glucuronidase Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Hsieh, Yuan-Ting; Chen, Kai-Chuan; Cheng, Chiu-Min; Cheng, Tian-Lu; Tao, Mi-Hua; Roffler, Steve R.

    2015-01-01

    CPT-11 is a camptothecin analog used for the clinical treatment of colorectal adenocarcinoma. CPT-11 is converted into the therapeutic anti-cancer agent SN-38 by liver enzymes and can be further metabolized to a non-toxic glucuronide SN-38G, resulting in low SN-38 but high SN-38G concentrations in the circulation. We previously demonstrated that adenoviral expression of membrane-anchored beta-glucuronidase could promote conversion of SN-38G to SN-38 in tumors and increase the anticancer activity of CPT-11. Here, we identified impediments to effective tumor therapy with E. coli that were engineered to constitutively express highly active E. coli beta-glucuronidase intracellularly to enhance the anticancer activity of CPT-11. The engineered bacteria, E. coli (lux/βG), could hydrolyze SN-38G to SN-38, increased the sensitivity of cultured tumor cells to SN-38G by about 100 fold and selectively accumulated in tumors. However, E. coli (lux/βG) did not more effectively increase CPT-11 anticancer activity in human tumor xenografts as compared to non-engineered E. coli. SN-38G conversion to SN-38 by E. coli (lux/βG) appeared to be limited by slow uptake into bacteria as well as by segregation of E. coli in necrotic regions of tumors that may be relatively inaccessible to systemically-administered drug molecules. Studies using a fluorescent glucuronide probe showed that significantly greater glucuronide hydrolysis could be achieved in mice pretreated with E. coli (lux/βG) by direct intratumoral injection of the glucuronide probe or by intratumoral lysis of bacteria to release intracellular beta-glucuronidase. Our study suggests that the distribution of beta-glucuronidase, and possibly other therapeutic proteins, in the tumor microenvironment might be an important barrier for effective bacterial-based tumor therapy. Expression of secreted therapeutic proteins or induction of therapeutic protein release from bacteria might therefore be a promising strategy to enhance anti

  3. Strengthening America's Energy Security with Offshore Wind (Fact Sheet)

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    2012-02-01

    This fact sheet describes the current state of the offshore wind industry in the United States and the offshore wind research and development activities conducted the U.S. Department of Energy Wind and Water Power Program.

  4. Solar America Cities Awards: Solar America Initiative Fact Sheet

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    2008-03-01

    This fact sheet provides an overview of the Solar America Cities activities within the Solar America Initiative and lists the 25 cities that have received financial awards from the U.S. Department of Energy.

  5. Solar: A Clean Energy Source for Utilities (Fact Sheet)

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    2010-09-01

    The fact sheet summarizes the goals and activities of the DOE Solar Energy Technologies Program efforts with utilities to remove the technical, regulatory, and market challenges they face in deploying solar technologies.

  6. Guided bone regeneration using individualized ceramic sheets.

    PubMed

    Malmström, J; Anderud, J; Abrahamsson, P; Wälivaara, D-Å; Isaksson, S G; Adolfsson, E

    2016-10-01

    Guided bone regeneration (GBR) describes the use of membranes to regenerate bony defects. A membrane for GBR needs to be biocompatible, cell-occlusive, non-toxic, and mouldable, and possess space-maintaining properties including stability. The purpose of this pilot study was to describe a new method of GBR using individualized ceramic sheets to perfect bone regeneration prior to implant placement; bone regeneration was assessed using traditional histology and three-dimensional (3D) volumetric changes in the bone and soft tissue. Three patients were included. After full-thickness flap reflection, the individualized ceramic sheets were fixed. The sites were left to heal for 7 months. All patients were evaluated preoperatively and at 7 months postoperative using cone beam computed tomography and 3D optical equipment. Samples of the regenerated bone and soft tissue were collected and analyzed. The bone regenerated in the entire interior volume of all sheets. Bone biopsies revealed newly formed trabecular bone with a lamellar structure. Soft tissue biopsies showed connective tissue with no signs of an inflammatory response. This was considered to be newly formed periosteum. Thus ceramic individualized sheets can be used to regenerate large volumes of bone in both vertical and horizontal directions independent of the bone defect and with good biological acceptance of the material. PMID:27364369

  7. An integrate-and-fire model of prefrontal cortex neuronal activity during performance of goal-directed decision making.

    PubMed

    Koene, Randal A; Hasselmo, Michael E

    2005-12-01

    The orbital frontal cortex appears to be involved in learning the rules of goal-directed behavior necessary to perform the correct actions based on perception to accomplish different tasks. The activity of orbitofrontal neurons changes dependent upon the specific task or goal involved, but the functional role of this activity in performance of specific tasks has not been fully determined. Here we present a model of prefrontal cortex function using networks of integrate-and-fire neurons arranged in minicolumns. This network model forms associations between representations of sensory input and motor actions, and uses these associations to guide goal-directed behavior. The selection of goal-directed actions involves convergence of the spread of activity from the goal representation with the spread of activity from the current state. This spiking network model provides a biological implementation of the action selection process used in reinforcement learning theory. The spiking activity shows properties similar to recordings of orbitofrontal neurons during task performance.

  8. Ice sheets play important role in climate change

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Clark, Peter U.; MacAyeal, Douglas R.; Andrews, John T.; Bartlein, Patrick J.

    Ice sheets once were viewed as passive elements in the climate system enslaved to orbitally generated variations in solar radiation. Today, modeling results and new geologic records suggest that ice sheets actively participated in late-Pleistocene climate change, amplifying or driving significant variability at millennial as well as orbital timescales. Although large changes in global ice volume were ultimately caused by orbital variations (the Milankovitch hypothesis), once in existence, the former ice sheets behaved dynamically and strongly influenced regional and perhaps even global climate by altering atmospheric and oceanic circulation and temperature.Experiments with General Circulation Models (GCMs) yielded the first inklings of ice sheets' climatic significance. Manabe and Broccoli [1985], for example, found that the topographic and albedo effects of ice sheets alone explain much of the Northern Hemisphere cooling identified in paleoclimatic records of the last glacial maximum (˜21 ka).

  9. Concentrating Solar Power Fact Sheet

    SciTech Connect

    2015-12-01

    This fact sheet is an overview of the Concentrating Solar Power (CSP) subprogram at the U.S. Department of Energy SunShot Initiative. CSP is a dispatchable, renewable energy option that uses mirrors to focus and concentrate sunlight onto a receiver, from which a heat transfer fluid carries the intense thermal energy to a power block to generate electricity. CSP systems can store solar energy to be used when the sun is not shining. It will help meet the nation’s goal of making solar energy fully cost-competitive with other energy sources by the end of the decade. Worldwide, CSP activity is rapidly scaling, with approximately 10 gigawatts (GW) in various stages of operation or development. In the United States alone, nearly 2 GW of CSP are in operation.

  10. Lactic acid does not directly activate hypothalamic-pituitary corticotroph function.

    PubMed

    Petrides, J S; Deuster, P A; Mueller, G P

    1999-02-01

    The role that metabolic products play in regulating the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis during strenuous exercise is speculative. This investigation examined the extent to which lactic acid, a major metabolite of anaerobic exercise, directly affects hypothalamic-pituitary function. Specifically, beta-endorphin secretion was measured from AtT-20 (D-16) mouse corticotroph tumor cells treated either acutely (15 min - 180 min) or chronically (1 day - 3 day) with physiologic levels of lactate (0. 5 x 10-3 M to 5 x 10-2 M) or lactate in combination with the corticotroph releasing factors: corticotroph releasing hormone (CRH), arginine vasopressin (AVP), norepinephrine and/or epinephrine. Findings with AtT-20 cell cultures were shown to be representative of responses in primary cultures of rat anterior pituitary. Lactic acid did not alter the spontaneous release of beta-endorphin by AtT-20 cells under either acute or chronic conditions. While CRH, norepinephrine, and epinephrine evoked significant increases in beta-endorphin release, lactate, in combination with these secretagogues did not alter their effects. Similarly, lactic acid failed to alter basal or stimulated release of beta-endorphin by primary cultures of rat anterior pituitary. The addition of lactate (3 x 103 M) to rat hypothalamic explants did, however, produce a modest but significant reduction in spontaneous CRH release, suggesting that lactate may facilitate the return to basal secretion following exercise. The present findings show that physiologic concentrations of lactate have no effect, either alone or in combination with other pituitary secretagogues, on corticotroph secretion. Whereas a physiologic action for lactate within the hypothalamus is possible, the present findings indicate that lactate is an inhibitor of CRH release. Thus, lactate does not appear to play a direct role in the profound activation of the HPA axis that occurs in response to strenuous exercise.

  11. Direct stroke unit admission of intravenous tissue plasminogen activator: safety, clinical outcome, and hospital cost savings

    PubMed Central

    Alexandrov, Anne W.; Coleman, Kisha C.; Palazzo, Paola; Shahripour, Reza Bavarsad; Alexandrov, Andrei V.

    2016-01-01

    Background: In the USA, stable intravenous tissue plasminogen activator (IV tPA) patients have traditionally been cared for in an intensive care unit (ICU). We examined the safety of using an acuity-adaptable stroke unit (SU) to manage IV tPA patients. Methods: We conducted an observational study of consecutive patients admitted to our acuity-adaptable SU over the first 3 years of operation. Safety was assessed by symptomatic intracerebral hemorrhage (sICH) rates, systemic hemorrhage (SH) rates, tPA-related deaths, and transfers from SU to ICU; cost savings and length of stay (LOS) were determined. Results: We admitted 333 IV tPA patients, of which 302 were admitted directly to the SU. A total of 31 (10%) patients had concurrent systemic hemodynamic or pulmonary compromise warranting direct ICU admission. There were no differences in admission National Institutes of Health Stroke Scale scores between SU and ICU patients (9.0 versus 9.5, respectively). Overall sICH rate was 3.3% (n = 10) and SH rate was 2.9 (n = 9), with no difference between SU and ICU patients. No tPA-related deaths occurred, and no SU patients required transfer to the ICU. Estimated hospital cost savings were US$362,400 for ‘avoided’ ICU days, and hospital LOS decreased significantly (p = 0.001) from 9.8 ± 15.6 days (median 5) in year 1, to 5.2 ± 4.8 days (median 3) by year 3. Conclusions: IV tPA patients may be safely cared for in a SU when nurses undergo extensive education to ensure clinical competence. Use of the ICU solely for monitoring may constitute significant overuse of system resources at an expense that is not associated with additional safety benefit. PMID:27366237

  12. Indirect and direct relations between aerobic fitness, physical activity, and academic achievement in elementary school students

    PubMed Central

    Lambourne, K.; Hansen, D.M.; Szabo, A.N.; Lee, J.; Herrmann, S.D.; Donnelly, J.E.

    2013-01-01

    BACKGROUND There is evidence to suggest that increasing physical activity (PA) improves academic achievement (AA) in children and that aerobic fitness is associated with both cognitive function and AA. However, it is not known how these variables are interrelated and analyses with adequate control for socioeconomic variables are needed. It was hypothesized that PA would not directly affect AA but would have an indirect effect on AA through its effect on aerobic fitness. The purpose of this study was to test this hypothesized mediation using path analysis. METHODS Cross-sectional data including AA, aerobic fitness, and daily PA assessed through accelerometry were collected from a large sample (N = 687) of 2nd and 3rd grade students. Demographic data were assessed via parent self-report. RESULTS A total of 401 students wore the accelerometer for at least 10 hours on 3 days or more and were included in the final path analysis to evaluate potential relations among PA (predictor), aerobic fitness (mediator), and WIAT-III subtest standard scores (outcomes; i.e., reading, spelling, and mathematics). Findings showed a direct effect of PA on aerobic fitness (b = 0.009, p < 0.001) and an indirect effect (mediation) of PA via fitness on math achievement (b = 0.003, p < 0.01) after controlling for student’s grade, gender, body mass index, mother’s education level, and household income, as well as intraclass correlations among classes and schools. Neither PA nor aerobic fitness were correlated with WIAT-III reading or spelling scores. CONCLUSIONS Mediation analysis indicated that PA exerted an influence on math achievement through its effects on aerobic fitness but was not associated with reading or spelling achievement scores. PMID:25984236

  13. Preferences of a Traditional Extension Audience for Self-Directed Delivery Methods.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Caldwell, Allen E.; Richardson, John G.

    1995-01-01

    North Carolina farmers growing barley (n=20) tested 3 self-directed information delivery methods: fact sheets, fact sheets plus audiocassettes, and an extension bulletin/pamphlet. The fact sheet/cassette was preferred by 17 of 20; they achieved significant knowledge gains with self-directed methods. The fact sheet/cassette was considered…

  14. Transcranial Direct Current Stimulation Modulates Cortical Neuronal Activity in Alzheimer's Disease.

    PubMed

    Marceglia, Sara; Mrakic-Sposta, Simona; Rosa, Manuela; Ferrucci, Roberta; Mameli, Francesca; Vergari, Maurizio; Arlotti, Mattia; Ruggiero, Fabiana; Scarpini, Elio; Galimberti, Daniela; Barbieri, Sergio; Priori, Alberto

    2016-01-01

    Quantitative electroencephalography (qEEG) showed that Alzheimer's disease (AD) is characterized by increased theta power, decreased alpha and beta power, and decreased coherence in the alpha and theta band in posterior regions. These abnormalities are thought to be associated with functional disconnections among cortical areas, death of cortical neurons, axonal pathology, and cholinergic deficits. Since transcranial Direct Current Stimulation (tDCS) over the temporo-parietal area is thought to have beneficial effects in patients with AD, in this study we aimed to investigate whether tDCS benefits are related to tDCS-induced changes in cortical activity, as represented by qEEG. A weak anodal current (1.5 mA, 15 min) was delivered bilaterally over the temporal-parietal lobe to seven subjects with probable AD (Mini-Mental State Examination, MMSE score >20). EEG (21 electrodes, 10-20 international system) was recorded for 5 min with eyes closed before (baseline, t0) and 30 min after anodal and cathodal tDCS ended (t1). At the same time points, patients performed a Word Recognition Task (WRT) to assess working memory functions. The spectral power and the inter- and intra-hemispheric EEG coherence in different frequency bands (e.g., low frequencies, including delta and theta; high frequencies, including alpha and beta) were calculated for each subject at t0 and t1. tDCS-induced changes in EEG neurophysiological markers were correlated with the performance of patients at the WRT. At baseline, qEEG features in AD patients confirmed that the decreased high frequency power was correlated with lower MMSE. After anodal tDCS, we observed an increase in the high-frequency power in the temporo-parietal area and an increase in the temporo-parieto-occipital coherence that correlated with the improvement at the WRT. In addition, cathodal tDCS produced a non-specific effect of decreased theta power all over the scalp that was not correlated with the clinical observation at the WRT

  15. Transcranial Direct Current Stimulation Modulates Cortical Neuronal Activity in Alzheimer's Disease

    PubMed Central

    Marceglia, Sara; Mrakic-Sposta, Simona; Rosa, Manuela; Ferrucci, Roberta; Mameli, Francesca; Vergari, Maurizio; Arlotti, Mattia; Ruggiero, Fabiana; Scarpini, Elio; Galimberti, Daniela; Barbieri, Sergio; Priori, Alberto

    2016-01-01

    Quantitative electroencephalography (qEEG) showed that Alzheimer's disease (AD) is characterized by increased theta power, decreased alpha and beta power, and decreased coherence in the alpha and theta band in posterior regions. These abnormalities are thought to be associated with functional disconnections among cortical areas, death of cortical neurons, axonal pathology, and cholinergic deficits. Since transcranial Direct Current Stimulation (tDCS) over the temporo-parietal area is thought to have beneficial effects in patients with AD, in this study we aimed to investigate whether tDCS benefits are related to tDCS-induced changes in cortical activity, as represented by qEEG. A weak anodal current (1.5 mA, 15 min) was delivered bilaterally over the temporal-parietal lobe to seven subjects with probable AD (Mini-Mental State Examination, MMSE score >20). EEG (21 electrodes, 10–20 international system) was recorded for 5 min with eyes closed before (baseline, t0) and 30 min after anodal and cathodal tDCS ended (t1). At the same time points, patients performed a Word Recognition Task (WRT) to assess working memory functions. The spectral power and the inter- and intra-hemispheric EEG coherence in different frequency bands (e.g., low frequencies, including delta and theta; high frequencies, including alpha and beta) were calculated for each subject at t0 and t1. tDCS-induced changes in EEG neurophysiological markers were correlated with the performance of patients at the WRT. At baseline, qEEG features in AD patients confirmed that the decreased high frequency power was correlated with lower MMSE. After anodal tDCS, we observed an increase in the high-frequency power in the temporo-parietal area and an increase in the temporo-parieto-occipital coherence that correlated with the improvement at the WRT. In addition, cathodal tDCS produced a non-specific effect of decreased theta power all over the scalp that was not correlated with the clinical observation at the WRT

  16. Rapid fabrication system for three-dimensional tissues using cell sheet engineering and centrifugation.

    PubMed

    Hasegawa, Akiyuki; Haraguchi, Yuji; Shimizu, Tatsuya; Okano, Teruo

    2015-12-01

    Three-dimensional (3D) tissues can be reconstructed by cell sheet technology, and various clinical researches using these constructed tissues have already been initiated to regenerate damaged tissues. While 3D tissues can be easily fabricated by layering cell sheets, the attachment period for cell adhesion between a cell sheet and a culture dish, or double-layered cell sheets normally takes 20-30 min. This study proposed a more rapid fabrication system for bioengineered tissue using cell sheet technology and centrifugation. A C2C12 mouse myoblast sheet harvested from a temperature-responsive culture dish will attach tightly to a culture dish or another cell sheet at 37°C after a 20 min-incubation. However, the same cell sheet centrifuged (12-34 × g) for 3 min also attached tightly to a dish or another cell sheet at 37°C after only a 3 min-incubation. The manipulation time was reduced by approximately two-thirds by centrifugation. The rapid attachments were also cross-sectionally confirmed by optical coherence tomography. These rapidly constructed cell sheet-tissues using centrifugation showed active cell metabolism, cell viability, and very high production of vascular endothelial growth factor, like those prepared by the conventional method; indicating complete cell sheet-attachment without any cell damage. This new system will be a powerful tool in the fields of cell sheet-based tissue engineering and regenerative medicine, and accelerate the use of cell sheets in clinical applications.

  17. Interfacial Assembly of Graphene Oxide Sheets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cote, Laura J.

    Scientific interest in graphene oxide (GO) sheets, the product of chemical oxidation and exfoliation of graphite powder, has resurged in recent years because GO is considered a promising precursor for the bulk production of graphene-based sheets for a variety of applications. In addition, GO can be viewed as an unconventional type of soft material as it is characterized by two abruptly different length scales. Its thickness is of typical molecular dimensions, measured to be about 1 nm by atomic force microscopy, but its lateral dimensions are that of common colloidal particles, ranging from nanometers to tens of microns. This high anisotropy leads to interesting fundamental colloidal interactions between the soft sheets which have practical implications in the solution processing and assembly of the material. This research therefore aims to use a variety of techniques to control these inter-sheet interactions to gain an understanding of the processing-structure relationships which ultimately determine the overall properties of the bulk GO assembly. GO is identified as a two-dimensional amphiphile with a unique edge-to-center arrangement of hydrophilic and hydrophobic groups, which has led to the demonstration of its pH- and size-dependent surface activity. The water surface is then utilized, as in the Langmuir-Blodgett technique, as an ideal substrate to tile up the GO sheets and study the interactions between them. Sheet-sheet interaction morphologies were successfully altered between wrinkled and overlapped states by pH tuning of sheet charge density, and the resulting structure-property relationships are explored. In addition, a novel flash-reduction and assembly process is described in which a simple photographic camera flash can rapidly and cleanly turn an insulating, well-stacked GO paper to a more open and fluffy conducting film. Lastly, the use of these research results as educational outreach platforms is highlighted. A variety of outlets, such as You

  18. Direct biosensor detection of botulinum neurotoxin endopeptidase activity in sera from patients with type A botulism.

    PubMed

    Lévêque, Christian; Ferracci, Géraldine; Maulet, Yves; Mazuet, Christelle; Popoff, Michel; Seagar, Michael; El Far, Oussama

    2014-07-15

    Botulinum neurotoxin A (BoNT/A) has intrinsic endoprotease activity specific for SNAP-25, a key protein for presynaptic neurotransmitter release. The inactivation of SNAP-25 by BoNT/A underlies botulism, a rare but potentially fatal disease. There is a crucial need for a rapid and sensitive in vitro serological test for BoNT/A to replace the current in vivo mouse bioassay. Cleavage of SNAP-25 by BoNT/A generates neo-epitopes which can be detected by binding of a monoclonal antibody (mAb10F12) and thus measured by surface plasmon resonance (SPR). We have explored two SPR assay formats, with either mAb10F12 or His6-SNAP-25 coupled to the biosensor chip. When BoNT/A was incubated with SNAP-25 in solution and the reaction products were captured on a mAb-coated chip, a sensitivity of 5 fM (0.1LD50/ml serum) was obtained. However, this configuration required prior immunoprecipitation of BoNT/A. A sensitivity of 0.5 fM in 10% serum (0.1 LD50/ml serum) was attained when SNAP-25 was coupled directly to the chip, followed by sequential injection of BoNT/A samples and mAb10F12 into the flow system to achieve on-chip cleavage and detection, respectively. This latter format detected BoNT/A endoprotease activity in 50-100 µl serum samples from all patients (11/11) with type A botulism within 5h. No false positives occurred in sera from healthy subjects or patients with other neurological diseases. The automated chip-based procedure has excellent specificity and sensitivity, with significant advantages over the mouse bioassay in terms of rapidity, required sample volume and animal ethics.

  19. Functional Activity of Antibodies Directed towards Flagellin Proteins of Non-Typhoidal Salmonella.

    PubMed

    Ramachandran, Girish; Tennant, Sharon M; Boyd, Mary A; Wang, Jin Y; Tulapurkar, Mohan E; Pasetti, Marcela F; Levine, Myron M; Simon, Raphael

    2016-01-01

    Non-typhoidal Salmonella (NTS) serovars Typhimurium and Enteritidis are major causes of invasive bacterial infections in children under 5 years old in sub-Saharan Africa, with case fatality rates of ~20%. There are no licensed NTS vaccines for humans. Vaccines that induce antibodies against a Salmonella Typhi surface antigen, Vi polysaccharide, significantly protect humans against typhoid fever, establishing that immune responses to Salmonella surface antigens can be protective. Flagella proteins, abundant surface antigens in Salmonella serovars that cause human disease, are also powerful immunogens, but the functional capacity of elicited anti-flagellar antibodies and their role in facilitating bacterial clearance has been unclear. We examined the ability of anti-flagellar antibodies to mediate microbial killing by immune system components in-vitro and assessed their role in protecting mice against invasive Salmonella infection. Polyclonal (hyperimmune sera) and monoclonal antibodies raised against phase 1 flagellin proteins of S. Enteritidis and S. Typhimurium facilitated bacterial uptake and killing of the homologous serovar pathogen by phagocytes. Polyclonal anti-flagellar antibodies accompanied by complement also achieved direct bacterial killing. Serum bactericidal activity was restricted to Salmonella serovars expressing the same flagellin used as immunogen. Notably, individual anti-flagellin monoclonal antibodies with complement were not bactericidal, but this biological activity was restored when different monoclonal anti-flagellin antibodies were combined. Passive transfer immunization with a monoclonal IgG antibody specific for phase 1 flagellin from S. Typhimurium protected mice against lethal challenge with a representative African invasive S. Typhimurium strain. These findings have relevance for the use of flagellin proteins in NTS vaccines, and confirm the role of anti-flagellin antibodies as mediators of protective immunity. PMID:26998925

  20. Transcranial Direct Current Stimulation Modulates Neuronal Activity and Learning in Pilot Training.

    PubMed

    Choe, Jaehoon; Coffman, Brian A; Bergstedt, Dylan T; Ziegler, Matthias D; Phillips, Matthew E

    2016-01-01

    Skill acquisition requires distributed learning both within (online) and across (offline) days to consolidate experiences into newly learned abilities. In particular, piloting an aircraft requires skills developed from extensive training and practice. Here, we tested the hypothesis that transcranial direct current stimulation (tDCS) can modulate neuronal function to improve skill learning and performance during flight simulator training of aircraft landing procedures. Thirty-two right-handed participants consented to participate in four consecutive daily sessions of flight simulation training and received sham or anodal high-definition-tDCS to the right dorsolateral prefrontal cortex (DLPFC) or left motor cortex (M1) in a randomized, double-blind experiment. Continuous electroencephalography (EEG) and functional near infrared spectroscopy (fNIRS) were collected during flight simulation, n-back working memory, and resting-state assessments. tDCS of the right DLPFC increased midline-frontal theta-band activity in flight and n-back working memory training, confirming tDCS-related modulation of brain processes involved in executive function. This modulation corresponded to a significantly different online and offline learning rates for working memory accuracy and decreased inter-subject behavioral variability in flight and n-back tasks in the DLPFC stimulation group. Additionally, tDCS of left M1 increased parietal alpha power during flight tasks and tDCS to the right DLPFC increased midline frontal theta-band power during n-back and flight tasks. These results demonstrate a modulation of group variance in skill acquisition through an increasing in learned skill consistency in cognitive and real-world tasks with tDCS. Further, tDCS performance improvements corresponded to changes in electrophysiological and blood-oxygenation activity of the DLPFC and motor cortices, providing a stronger link between modulated neuronal function and behavior. PMID:26903841

  1. Validation of a New Counter for Direct Observation of Physical Activity in Parks

    PubMed Central

    Han, Bing; Cohen, Deborah A.; Derose, Kathryn Pitkin; Marsh, Terry; Williamson, Stephanie; Raaen, Laura

    2015-01-01

    Purpose Prior tools to observe large groups of people in parks have not allowed disaggregation of physical activity levels by age group and gender simultaneously, making it impossible to determine which subgroups engaged in moderate to vigorous physical activity (MVPA). This study aims to examine the reliability of a 12-button counter to simultaneously assess MVPA by age and gender subgroups in park settings. Methods A total of 1,160 pairs of observations were conducted in 481 target areas of 19 neighborhood parks in the great Los Angeles area between June 2013 and March 2014. Inter-rater reliability was assessed by Pearson’s correlation, intra-class correlation (ICC), and agreement probability in the total metabolic equivalents (METs) and METs spent in MVPA. Cosine similarity was used to check the resemblance of distributions among age and gender categories. Pictures taken in a total of 112 target areas at the beginning of the observations were used as a second check on the reliability of direct observation. Results Inter-rater reliability was high for the total METs and METs in all age and gender categories (between 0.82 and 0.97), except for male seniors (correlations and ICC between 0.64 and 0.77, agreement probability 0.85 to 0.86). Reliability was higher for total METs than for METs spent in MVPA. Correlation and ICC between observers’ measurement and picture-based counts are also high (between 0.79 and 0.94). Conclusion Trained observers can reliably use the 12-button counter to accurately assess PA distribution and disparities by age and gender. PMID:26103584

  2. Transcranial Direct Current Stimulation Modulates Neuronal Activity and Learning in Pilot Training.

    PubMed

    Choe, Jaehoon; Coffman, Brian A; Bergstedt, Dylan T; Ziegler, Matthias D; Phillips, Matthew E

    2016-01-01

    Skill acquisition requires distributed learning both within (online) and across (offline) days to consolidate experiences into newly learned abilities. In particular, piloting an aircraft requires skills developed from extensive training and practice. Here, we tested the hypothesis that transcranial direct current stimulation (tDCS) can modulate neuronal function to improve skill learning and performance during flight simulator training of aircraft landing procedures. Thirty-two right-handed participants consented to participate in four consecutive daily sessions of flight simulation training and received sham or anodal high-definition-tDCS to the right dorsolateral prefrontal cortex (DLPFC) or left motor cortex (M1) in a randomized, double-blind experiment. Continuous electroencephalography (EEG) and functional near infrared spectroscopy (fNIRS) were collected during flight simulation, n-back working memory, and resting-state assessments. tDCS of the right DLPFC increased midline-frontal theta-band activity in flight and n-back working memory training, confirming tDCS-related modulation of brain processes involved in executive function. This modulation corresponded to a significantly different online and offline learning rates for working memory accuracy and decreased inter-subject behavioral variability in flight and n-back tasks in the DLPFC stimulation group. Additionally, tDCS of left M1 increased parietal alpha power during flight tasks and tDCS to the right DLPFC increased midline frontal theta-band power during n-back and flight tasks. These results demonstrate a modulation of group variance in skill acquisition through an increasing in learned skill consistency in cognitive and real-world tasks with tDCS. Further, tDCS performance improvements corresponded to changes in electrophysiological and blood-oxygenation activity of the DLPFC and motor cortices, providing a stronger link between modulated neuronal function and behavior.

  3. Transcranial Direct Current Stimulation Modulates Neuronal Activity and Learning in Pilot Training

    PubMed Central

    Choe, Jaehoon; Coffman, Brian A.; Bergstedt, Dylan T.; Ziegler, Matthias D.; Phillips, Matthew E.

    2016-01-01

    Skill acquisition requires distributed learning both within (online) and across (offline) days to consolidate experiences into newly learned abilities. In particular, piloting an aircraft requires skills developed from extensive training and practice. Here, we tested the hypothesis that transcranial direct current stimulation (tDCS) can modulate neuronal function to improve skill learning and performance during flight simulator training of aircraft landing procedures. Thirty-two right-handed participants consented to participate in four consecutive daily sessions of flight simulation training and received sham or anodal high-definition-tDCS to the right dorsolateral prefrontal cortex (DLPFC) or left motor cortex (M1) in a randomized, double-blind experiment. Continuous electroencephalography (EEG) and functional near infrared spectroscopy (fNIRS) were collected during flight simulation, n-back working memory, and resting-state assessments. tDCS of the right DLPFC increased midline-frontal theta-band activity in flight and n-back working memory training, confirming tDCS-related modulation of brain processes involved in executive function. This modulation corresponded to a significantly different online and offline learning rates for working memory accuracy and decreased inter-subject behavioral variability in flight and n-back tasks in the DLPFC stimulation group. Additionally, tDCS of left M1 increased parietal alpha power during flight tasks and tDCS to the right DLPFC increased midline frontal theta-band power during n-back and flight tasks. These results demonstrate a modulation of group variance in skill acquisition through an increasing in learned skill consistency in cognitive and real-world tasks with tDCS. Further, tDCS performance improvements corresponded to changes in electrophysiological and blood-oxygenation activity of the DLPFC and motor cortices, providing a stronger link between modulated neuronal function and behavior. PMID:26903841

  4. Limiting concentrations of activated mononucleotides necessary for poly(C)-directed elongation of oligoguanylates

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kanavarioti, A.; Chang, S.; Alberas, D. J.

    1990-01-01

    Selected imidazolide-activated nucleotides have been subjected to hydrolysis under conditions similar to those that favor their template-directed oligomerization. Rate constants of hydrolysis of the P-N bond in guanosine 5'-monophosphate 2-methylimidazolide (2-MeImpG) and in guanosine 5'-monophosphate imidazolide (ImpG), kh, have been determined in the presence/absence of magnesium ion as a function of temperature and polycytidylate [poly(C)] concentration. Using the rate constant of hydrolysis of 2-MeImpG and the rate constant of elongation, i.e., the reaction of an oligoguanylate with 2-MeImpG in the presence of poly(C) acting as template, the limiting concentration of 2-MeImpG necessary for oligonucleotide elongation to compete with hydrolysis can be calculated. The limiting concentration is defined as the initial concentration of monomer that results in its equal consumption by hydrolysis and by elongation. These limiting concentrations of 2-MeImpG are found to be 1.7 mM at 37 degrees C and 0.36 mM at 1 degrees C. Boundary conditions in the form of limiting concentration of activated nucleotide may be used to evaluate a prebiotic model for chemical synthesis of biopolymers. For instance, the limiting concentration of monomer can be used as a basis of comparison among catalytic, but nonenzymatic, RNA-type systems. We also determined the rate constant of dimerization of 2-MeImpG, k2 = 0.45 +/- 0.06 M-1 h-1 in the absence of poly(C), and 0.45 +/- 0.06 less than or equal to k2 less than or equal to 0.97 +/- 0.13 M-1 h-1 in its presence at 37 degrees C and pH 7.95.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS).

  5. Functional Activity of Antibodies Directed towards Flagellin Proteins of Non-Typhoidal Salmonella.

    PubMed

    Ramachandran, Girish; Tennant, Sharon M; Boyd, Mary A; Wang, Jin Y; Tulapurkar, Mohan E; Pasetti, Marcela F; Levine, Myron M; Simon, Raphael

    2016-01-01

    Non-typhoidal Salmonella (NTS) serovars Typhimurium and Enteritidis are major causes of invasive bacterial infections in children under 5 years old in sub-Saharan Africa, with case fatality rates of ~20%. There are no licensed NTS vaccines for humans. Vaccines that induce antibodies against a Salmonella Typhi surface antigen, Vi polysaccharide, significantly protect humans against typhoid fever, establishing that immune responses to Salmonella surface antigens can be protective. Flagella proteins, abundant surface antigens in Salmonella serovars that cause human disease, are also powerful immunogens, but the functional capacity of elicited anti-flagellar antibodies and their role in facilitating bacterial clearance has been unclear. We examined the ability of anti-flagellar antibodies to mediate microbial killing by immune system components in-vitro and assessed their role in protecting mice against invasive Salmonella infection. Polyclonal (hyperimmune sera) and monoclonal antibodies raised against phase 1 flagellin proteins of S. Enteritidis and S. Typhimurium facilitated bacterial uptake and killing of the homologous serovar pathogen by phagocytes. Polyclonal anti-flagellar antibodies accompanied by complement also achieved direct bacterial killing. Serum bactericidal activity was restricted to Salmonella serovars expressing the same flagellin used as immunogen. Notably, individual anti-flagellin monoclonal antibodies with complement were not bactericidal, but this biological activity was restored when different monoclonal anti-flagellin antibodies were combined. Passive transfer immunization with a monoclonal IgG antibody specific for phase 1 flagellin from S. Typhimurium protected mice against lethal challenge with a representative African invasive S. Typhimurium strain. These findings have relevance for the use of flagellin proteins in NTS vaccines, and confirm the role of anti-flagellin antibodies as mediators of protective immunity.

  6. Zinc Oxide-Containing Porous Boron-Carbon-Nitrogen Sheets from Glycine-Nitrate Combustion: Synthesis, Self-Cleaning, and Sunlight-Driven Photocatalytic Activity.

    PubMed

    Bharathidasan, T; Mandalam, Aditya; Balasubramanian, M; Dhandapani, P; Sathiyanarayanan, S; Mayavan, Sundar

    2015-08-26

    We developed a single-step thermal method that enables successful inclusion of ZnO components in the porous boron-carbon-nitrogen (BCN) framework to form a new class of functional hybrid. ZnO-containing BCN hybrids were prepared by treating a mixture of B2O3, glycine, and zinc nitrate at 500 °C. Glycine-nitrate decomposition along with B2O3 acts as a source for ZnO-BCN formation. The incorporation of ZnO onto BCN has extended the photoresponse of ZnO in the visible region, which makes ZnO-BCN a preferable photocatalyst relative to ZnO upon sunlight exposure. It is interesting to note that as-prepared 2D ZnO-BCN sheets dispersed in PDMS form a stable coating over aluminum alloys. The surface exhibited a water contact angle (CA) of 157.6° with 66.6 wt % ZnO-BCN in polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) and a water droplet (7 μL) roll-off angle of <6° and also demonstrates oil fouling resistant superhydrophobicity. In brief, the present study focuses on the gram scale synthesis of a new class of sunlight-driven photocatalyst and also its application toward the development of superhydrophobic and oleophobic coating. PMID:26252873

  7. Zinc Oxide-Containing Porous Boron-Carbon-Nitrogen Sheets from Glycine-Nitrate Combustion: Synthesis, Self-Cleaning, and Sunlight-Driven Photocatalytic Activity.

    PubMed

    Bharathidasan, T; Mandalam, Aditya; Balasubramanian, M; Dhandapani, P; Sathiyanarayanan, S; Mayavan, Sundar

    2015-08-26

    We developed a single-step thermal method that enables successful inclusion of ZnO components in the porous boron-carbon-nitrogen (BCN) framework to form a new class of functional hybrid. ZnO-containing BCN hybrids were prepared by treating a mixture of B2O3, glycine, and zinc nitrate at 500 °C. Glycine-nitrate decomposition along with B2O3 acts as a source for ZnO-BCN formation. The incorporation of ZnO onto BCN has extended the photoresponse of ZnO in the visible region, which makes ZnO-BCN a preferable photocatalyst relative to ZnO upon sunlight exposure. It is interesting to note that as-prepared 2D ZnO-BCN sheets dispersed in PDMS form a stable coating over aluminum alloys. The surface exhibited a water contact angle (CA) of 157.6° with 66.6 wt % ZnO-BCN in polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) and a water droplet (7 μL) roll-off angle of <6° and also demonstrates oil fouling resistant superhydrophobicity. In brief, the present study focuses on the gram scale synthesis of a new class of sunlight-driven photocatalyst and also its application toward the development of superhydrophobic and oleophobic coating.

  8. Highly active nitrogen-doped nanocarbon electrocatalysts for alkaline direct methanol fuel cell

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kruusenberg, Ivar; Ratso, Sander; Vikkisk, Merilin; Kanninen, Petri; Kallio, Tanja; Kannan, Arunachala M.; Tammeveski, Kaido

    2015-05-01

    Direct methanol fuel cells are assembled and evaluated using Fumatech FAA3 alkaline anion exchange membrane. Two novel metal-free cathode catalysts are synthesised, investigated and compared with the commercial Pt-based catalyst. In this work nitrogen-doped few-layer graphene/multi-walled carbon nanotube (N-FLG/MWCNT) composite and nitrogen-doped MWCNT (N-MWCNT) catalyst are prepared by pyrolysing the mixture of dicyandiamide (DCDA) and carbon nanomaterials at 800 °C. The resulting cathode catalyst material shows a remarkable electrocatalytic activity for oxygen reduction reaction (ORR) in 0.1 M KOH solution employing the rotating disk electrode (RDE) method. Fuel cell tests are performed by using 1 M methanol as anode and pure oxygen gas cathode feed. The maximum power density obtained with the N-FLG/MWCNT material (0.72 mW cm-2) is similar to that of the Pt/C catalyst (0.72 mW cm-2), whereas the N-MWCNT material shows higher peak power density (0.92 mW cm-2) than the commercial Pt/C catalyst.

  9. Direct binding of C1q to apoptotic cells and cell blebs induces complement activation.

    PubMed

    Nauta, Alma J; Trouw, Leendert A; Daha, Mohamed R; Tijsma, Odette; Nieuwland, Rienk; Schwaeble, Wilhelm J; Gingras, Alexandre R; Mantovani, Alberto; Hack, Erik C; Roos, Anja

    2002-06-01

    Deficiency of early components of the classical pathway of complement, particularly C1q, predisposes to the development of systemic lupus erythematosus. Several studies have suggested an association between the classical complement pathway and the clearance of apoptotic cells. Mice with a targeted deletion of the C1q gene develop a lupus-like renal disease, which is associated with the presence of multiple apoptotic bodies in the kidney. In the present study we demonstrate that highly purified C1q binds to apoptotic cells and isolated blebs derived from these apoptotic cells. Binding of C1q to apoptotic cells occurs via the globular heads of C1q and induces activation of the classical complement pathway, as shown by the deposition of C4 and C3 on the surface of these cells and on cell-derived blebs. In addition, for the first time, we demonstrate that surface-bound C1q is present on a subpopulation of microparticles isolated from human plasma. Taken together, these observations demonstrate that C1q binds directly to apoptotic cells and blebs derived therefrom and support a role for C1q, possibly in concert with C4 and C3, in the clearance of apoptotic cells and blebs by the phagocytic system.

  10. Modulating activity in the orbitofrontal cortex changes trustees' cooperation: A transcranial direct current stimulation study.

    PubMed

    Wang, Guangrong; Li, Jianbiao; Yin, Xile; Li, Shuaiqi; Wei, Mengxing

    2016-04-15

    Trust is one of the most important factors in human society, as it pervades almost all domains of the society. The trusting behavior of trustors is dependent on the belief about the cooperative (reciprocal) level of trustees. Thence what are the motives underlying the cooperative behavior? An important explanation is that guilt aversion can motivate cooperative behavior. The right orbitofrontal cortex (OFC) is the guilt-specific region, while there is little understanding on the causal effect of this network. We explored the causal effect of the OFC on cooperative behavior using transcranial direct current stimulation (tDCS). Sixty participants played the trust game as trustees, and they received either anodal tDCS over the right OFC and simultaneously cathodal electrode over the right dorsolateral prefrontal cortex (DLPFC), or sham stimulation. Experimental results showed that participants as trustees transferred back more money in the tDCS treatment than sham stimulation. This suggests that the activity of the right OFC has causal effects on cooperative behavior. PMID:26808605

  11. First direct measurements of behavioural responses by Cuvier's beaked whales to mid-frequency active sonar.

    PubMed

    DeRuiter, Stacy L; Southall, Brandon L; Calambokidis, John; Zimmer, Walter M X; Sadykova, Dinara; Falcone, Erin A; Friedlaender, Ari S; Joseph, John E; Moretti, David; Schorr, Gregory S; Thomas, Len; Tyack, Peter L

    2013-08-23

    Most marine mammal- strandings coincident with naval sonar exercises have involved Cuvier's beaked whales (Ziphius cavirostris). We recorded animal movement and acoustic data on two tagged Ziphius and obtained the first direct measurements of behavioural responses of this species to mid-frequency active (MFA) sonar signals. Each recording included a 30-min playback (one 1.6-s simulated MFA sonar signal repeated every 25 s); one whale was also incidentally exposed to MFA sonar from distant naval exercises. Whales responded strongly to playbacks at low received levels (RLs; 89-127 dB re 1 µPa): after ceasing normal fluking and echolocation, they swam rapidly, silently away, extending both dive duration and subsequent non-foraging interval. Distant sonar exercises (78-106 dB re 1 µPa) did not elicit such responses, suggesting that context may moderate reactions. The observed responses to playback occurred at RLs well below current regulatory thresholds; equivalent responses to operational sonars could elevate stranding risk and reduce foraging efficiency.

  12. DNA Double Strand Break Repair Pathway Choice Is Directed by Distinct MRE11 Nuclease Activities

    PubMed Central

    Shibata, Atsushi; Moiani, Davide; Arvai, Andrew S.; Perry, J. Jefferson P.; Harding, Shane M.; Genois, Marie-Michelle; Maity, Ranjan; van Rossum-Fikkert, Sari; Kertokalio, Aryandi; Romoli, Filippo; Ismail, Amani; Ismalaj, Ermal; Petricci, Elena; Matthew, J Neale; Bristow, Robert G; Masson, Jean-Yves; Wyman, Claire; Jeggo, Penny; Tainer, John A.

    2014-01-01

    SUMMARY MRE11 within the MRE11-RAD50-NBS1 (MRN) complex acts in DNA double-strand break repair (DSBR), detection and signaling; yet, how its endo- and exonuclease activities regulate DSB repair by non-homologous end-joining (NHEJ) versus homologous recombination (HR) remains enigmatic. Here we employed structure-based design with a focused chemical library to discover specific MRE11 endo- or exonuclease inhibitors. With these inhibitors we examined repair pathway choice at DSBs generated in G2 following radiation exposure. Whilst endo- or exonuclease inhibition impairs radiation-induced RPA chromatin binding, suggesting diminished resection, the inhibitors surprisingly direct different repair outcomes. Endonuclease inhibition promotes NHEJ in lieu of HR, whilst exonuclease inhibition confers a repair defect. Collectively, the results describe nuclease-specific MRE11 inhibitors, define distinct nuclease roles in DSB repair, and support a mechanism whereby MRE11 endonuclease initiates resection, thereby licensing HR followed by MRE11 exo and EXO1/BLM bidirectional resection towards and away from the DNA end, which commits to HR. PMID:24316220

  13. A Design Methodology for Rapid Implementation of Active Control Systems Across Lean Direct Injection Combustor Platforms

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Baumann, William T.; Saunders, William R.; Vandsburger, Uri; Saus, Joseph (Technical Monitor)

    2003-01-01

    The VACCG team is comprised of engineers at Virginia Tech who specialize in the subject areas of combustion physics, chemical kinetics, dynamics and controls, and signal processing. Currently, the team's work on this NRA research grant is designed to determine key factors that influence combustion control performance through a blend of theoretical and experimental investigations targeting design and demonstration of active control for three different combustors. To validiate the accuracy of conclusions about control effectiveness, a sequence of experimental verifications on increasingly complex lean, direct injection combustors is underway. During the work period January 1, 2002 through October 15, 2002, work has focused on two different laboratory-scale combustors that allow access for a wide variety of measurements. As the grant work proceeds, one key goal will be to obtain certain knowledge about a particular combustor process using a minimum of sophisticated measurements, due to the practical limitations of measurements on full-scale combustors. In the second year, results obtained in the first year will be validated on test combustors to be identified in the first quarter of that year. In the third year, it is proposed to validate the results at more realistic pressure and power levels by utilizing the facilities at the Glenn Research Center.

  14. Polymer-directed Hybrid Nanostructures for Enhanced Electrocatalytic Activity and Solar Fuel Generation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Dong Ha; Jang, Yoon Hee; Lee, Ji-Eun; Quan, Li Na; Jang, Yu Jin; Polymer Nanohybrid Materials Lab Team

    2015-03-01

    In this presentation, we introduce a comprehensive approach to the design and fabrication of hybrid nanostructures directed by functional polymers for photovoltaic, phoelectrochemical and electrocatalytic properties. A unique strategy to generate core-shell nanoparticles based on AuNPs decorated with PANI shell with uniformly distributed alloy metal NPs in the PANI shells was developed. We systematically investigate the structural alteration during the sequential synthetic process and compared the electrocatalytic performance with respect to Pt-decorated AuNP-PANI structures in terms of the oxygen reduction reaction. Aimed for an alternative photoanodes, hierarchical mesoporous carbon-TiO2 inverse opal nanostructures were synthesized by complementary colloid and block copolymer (BCP) self-assembly, where the triblock copolymer P123 acts simultaneously as template and carbon source. Analytical studies show that incorporation of carbon moieties into TiO2 creates a new energy level above the valence band of TiO2, resulting in an effective decrease in the band gap. A significant enhanced visible light photocatalytic activity was demonstrated in terms of the degradation of p-nitrophenol (~ 79 %) and photoelectrochemical water splitting.

  15. p73 promotes glioblastoma cell invasion by directly activating POSTN (periostin) expression

    PubMed Central

    Landré, Vivien; Antonov, Alexey; Knight, Richard; Melino, Gerry

    2016-01-01

    Glioblastoma Multiforme is one of the most highly metastatic cancers and constitutes 70% of all gliomas. Despite aggressive treatments these tumours have an exceptionally bad prognosis, mainly due to therapy resistance and tumour recurrence. Here we show that the transcription factor p73 confers an invasive phenotype by directly activating expression of POSTN (periostin, HGNC:16953) in glioblastoma cells. Knock down of endogenous p73 reduces invasiveness and chemo-resistance, and promotes differentiation in vitro. Using chromatin immunoprecipitation and reporter assays we demonstrate that POSTN, an integrin binding protein that has recently been shown to play a major role in metastasis, is a transcriptional target of TAp73. We further show that POSTN overexpression is sufficient to rescue the invasive phenotype of glioblastoma cells after p73 knock down. Additionally, bioinformatics analysis revealed that an intact p73/POSTN axis, where POSTN and p73 expression is correlated, predicts bad prognosis in several cancer types. Taken together, our results support a novel role of TAp73 in controlling glioblastoma cell invasion by regulating the expression of the matricellular protein POSTN. PMID:26930720

  16. First direct measurements of behavioural responses by Cuvier's beaked whales to mid-frequency active sonar

    PubMed Central

    DeRuiter, Stacy L.; Southall, Brandon L.; Calambokidis, John; Zimmer, Walter M. X.; Sadykova, Dinara; Falcone, Erin A.; Friedlaender, Ari S.; Joseph, John E.; Moretti, David; Schorr, Gregory S.; Thomas, Len; Tyack, Peter L.

    2013-01-01

    Most marine mammal­ strandings coincident with naval sonar exercises have involved Cuvier's beaked whales (Ziphius cavirostris). We recorded animal movement and acoustic data on two tagged Ziphius and obtained the first direct measurements of behavioural responses of this species to mid-frequency active (MFA) sonar signals. Each recording included a 30-min playback (one 1.6-s simulated MFA sonar signal repeated every 25 s); one whale was also incidentally exposed to MFA sonar from distant naval exercises. Whales responded strongly to playbacks at low received levels (RLs; 89–127 dB re 1 µPa): after ceasing normal fluking and echolocation, they swam rapidly, silently away, extending both dive duration and subsequent non-foraging interval. Distant sonar exercises (78–106 dB re 1 µPa) did not elicit such responses, suggesting that context may moderate reactions. The observed responses to playback occurred at RLs well below current regulatory thresholds; equivalent responses to operational sonars could elevate stranding risk and reduce foraging efficiency. PMID:23825085

  17. Method and apparatus for determining weldability of thin sheet metal

    DOEpatents

    Goodwin, Gene M.; Hudson, Joseph D.

    1988-01-01

    A fixture is provided for testing thin sheet metal specimens to evaluate hot-cracking sensitivity for determining metal weldability on a heat-to-heat basis or through varying welding parameters. A test specimen is stressed in a first direction with a load selectively adjustable over a wide range and then a weldment is passed along over the specimen in a direction transverse to the direction of strain to evaluate the hot-cracking characteristics of the sheet metal which are indicative of the weldability of the metal. The fixture provides evaluations of hot-cracking sensitivity for determining metal weldability in a highly reproducible manner with minimum human error.

  18. A microbial ecosystem beneath the West Antarctic ice sheet.

    PubMed

    Christner, Brent C; Priscu, John C; Achberger, Amanda M; Barbante, Carlo; Carter, Sasha P; Christianson, Knut; Michaud, Alexander B; Mikucki, Jill A; Mitchell, Andrew C; Skidmore, Mark L; Vick-Majors, Trista J

    2014-08-21

    Liquid water has been known to occur beneath the Antarctic ice sheet for more than 40 years, but only recently have these subglacial aqueous environments been recognized as microbial ecosystems that may influence biogeochemical transformations on a global scale. Here we present the first geomicrobiological description of water and surficial sediments obtained from direct sampling of a subglacial Antarctic lake. Subglacial Lake Whillans (SLW) lies beneath approximately 800 m of ice on the lower portion of the Whillans Ice Stream (WIS) in West Antarctica and is part of an extensive and evolving subglacial drainage network. The water column of SLW contained metabolically active microorganisms and was derived primarily from glacial ice melt with solute sources from lithogenic weathering and a minor seawater component. Heterotrophic and autotrophic production data together with small subunit ribosomal RNA gene sequencing and biogeochemical data indicate that SLW is a chemosynthetically driven ecosystem inhabited by a diverse assemblage of bacteria and archaea. Our results confirm that aquatic environments beneath the Antarctic ice sheet support viable microbial ecosystems, corroborating previous reports suggesting that they contain globally relevant pools of carbon and microbes that can mobilize elements from the lithosphere and influence Southern Ocean geochemical and biological systems.

  19. Ice sheets and nitrogen.

    PubMed

    Wolff, Eric W

    2013-07-01

    Snow and ice play their most important role in the nitrogen cycle as a barrier to land-atmosphere and ocean-atmosphere exchanges that would otherwise occur. The inventory of nitrogen compounds in the polar ice sheets is approximately 260 Tg N, dominated by nitrate in the much larger Antarctic ice sheet. Ice cores help to inform us about the natural variability of the nitrogen cycle at global and regional scale, and about the extent of disturbance in recent decades. Nitrous oxide concentrations have risen about 20 per cent in the last 200 years and are now almost certainly higher than at any time in the last 800 000 years. Nitrate concentrations recorded in Greenland ice rose by a factor of 2-3, particularly between the 1950s and 1980s, reflecting a major change in NOx emissions reaching the background atmosphere. Increases in ice cores drilled at lower latitudes can be used to validate or constrain regional emission inventories. Background ammonium concentrations in Greenland ice show no significant recent trend, although the record is very noisy, being dominated by spikes of input from biomass burning events. Neither nitrate nor ammonium shows significant recent trends in Antarctica, although their natural variations are of biogeochemical and atmospheric chemical interest. Finally, it has been found that photolysis of nitrate in the snowpack leads to significant re-emissions of NOx that can strongly impact the regional atmosphere in snow-covered areas.

  20. Ice sheets and nitrogen

    PubMed Central

    Wolff, Eric W.

    2013-01-01

    Snow and ice play their most important role in the nitrogen cycle as a barrier to land–atmosphere and ocean–atmosphere exchanges that would otherwise occur. The inventory of nitrogen compounds in the polar ice sheets is approximately 260 Tg N, dominated by nitrate in the much larger Antarctic ice sheet. Ice cores help to inform us about the natural variability of the nitrogen cycle at global and regional scale, and about the extent of disturbance in recent decades. Nitrous oxide concentrations have risen about 20 per cent in the last 200 years and are now almost certainly higher than at any time in the last 800 000 years. Nitrate concentrations recorded in Greenland ice rose by a factor of 2–3, particularly between the 1950s and 1980s, reflecting a major change in NOx emissions reaching the background atmosphere. Increases in ice cores drilled at lower latitudes can be used to validate or constrain regional emission inventories. Background ammonium concentrations in Greenland ice show no significant recent trend, although the record is very noisy, being dominated by spikes of input from biomass burning events. Neither nitrate nor ammonium shows significant recent trends in Antarctica, although their natural variations are of biogeochemical and atmospheric chemical interest. Finally, it has been found that photolysis of nitrate in the snowpack leads to significant re-emissions of NOx that can strongly impact the regional atmosphere in snow-covered areas. PMID:23713125