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Sample records for activity direction sheet

  1. Activity Sheets. Draft Copy.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Duke Power Company, Educational Services Dept., Charlotte, NC.

    This document consists of energy vocabulary activities, three games, worksheets, laboratory activities/exercises, and an introductory classroom exercise designed to introduce energy concepts to students. Vocabulary activities focus on coal and energy consumption. The three games (with instructions) focus on various aspects of energy and energy…

  2. Ice stream activity scaled to ice sheet volume during Laurentide Ice Sheet deglaciation.

    PubMed

    Stokes, C R; Margold, M; Clark, C D; Tarasov, L

    2016-02-18

    The contribution of the Greenland and West Antarctic ice sheets to sea level has increased in recent decades, largely owing to the thinning and retreat of outlet glaciers and ice streams. This dynamic loss is a serious concern, with some modelling studies suggesting that the collapse of a major ice sheet could be imminent or potentially underway in West Antarctica, but others predicting a more limited response. A major problem is that observations used to initialize and calibrate models typically span only a few decades, and, at the ice-sheet scale, it is unclear how the entire drainage network of ice streams evolves over longer timescales. This represents one of the largest sources of uncertainty when predicting the contributions of ice sheets to sea-level rise. A key question is whether ice streams might increase and sustain rates of mass loss over centuries or millennia, beyond those expected for a given ocean-climate forcing. Here we reconstruct the activity of 117 ice streams that operated at various times during deglaciation of the Laurentide Ice Sheet (from about 22,000 to 7,000 years ago) and show that as they activated and deactivated in different locations, their overall number decreased, they occupied a progressively smaller percentage of the ice sheet perimeter and their total discharge decreased. The underlying geology and topography clearly influenced ice stream activity, but--at the ice-sheet scale--their drainage network adjusted and was linked to changes in ice sheet volume. It is unclear whether these findings can be directly translated to modern ice sheets. However, contrary to the view that sees ice streams as unstable entities that can accelerate ice-sheet deglaciation, we conclude that ice streams exerted progressively less influence on ice sheet mass balance during the retreat of the Laurentide Ice Sheet.

  3. Environmental Education Activity Sheets 1-11.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Halsey, Clifton F.; And Others

    These activity sheets, developed by personnel of the Agricultural Extension Service of the University of Minnesota, were designed for youth group campers but may be used by other populations and individuals. Each activity sheet focuses on a separate topic: (1) Selecting Suitable Uses for Land, (2) Measuring the Steepness of Land, (3) Determining…

  4. Active deformable sheets: prototype implementation, modeling, and control

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lind, Robert J.; Johnson, Norbert; Doumanidis, Charalabos C.

    2000-06-01

    Active deformable sheets are integrated smart planar sheet structures performing off-plane deformations under computer actuation and control, to take up a desired dynamic morphology specified in CAD software or obtained by 3-D scanning of a solid surface. The sheet prototypes are implemented in the laboratory by elastic neoprene foil layers with embedded asymmetric grids of SMA wires (Nitinol), which upon electrical contraction bend the sheet to the necessary local curvature distribution. An analytical model of such prototypes, consisting of an electrical, a thermal, a material and a mechanical module, as well as a more complex finite element thermomechanical simulation of the sheet structure have been developed and validated experimentally. Besides open-loop control of the sheet curvatures by modulation of the SMA wire actuation current, a closed-loop control system has been implemented, using feedback of the wire electrical resistance measurements in real time, correlating to the material transformation state. The active deformable sheets are intended for applications such as reconfigurable airfoils and aerospace structures, variable focal length optics and electromagnetic reflectors, flexible and rapid tooling and microrobotics.

  5. Active volcanism beneath the West Antarctic ice sheet and implications for ice-sheet stability

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Blankenship, D.D.; Bell, R.E.; Hodge, S.M.; Brozena, J.M.; Behrendt, John C.; Finn, C.A.

    1993-01-01

    IT is widely understood that the collapse of the West Antarctic ice sheet (WAIS) would cause a global sea level rise of 6 m, yet there continues to be considerable debate about the detailed response of this ice sheet to climate change1-3. Because its bed is grounded well below sea level, the stability of the WAIS may depend on geologically controlled conditions at the base which are independent of climate. In particular, heat supplied to the base of the ice sheet could increase basal melting and thereby trigger ice streaming, by providing the water for a lubricating basal layer of till on which ice streams are thought to slide4,5. Ice streams act to protect the reservoir of slowly moving inland ice from exposure to oceanic degradation, thus enhancing ice-sheet stability. Here we present aerogeophysical evidence for active volcanism and associated elevated heat flow beneath the WAIS near the critical region where ice streaming begins. If this heat flow is indeed controlling ice-stream formation, then penetration of ocean waters inland of the thin hot crust of the active portion of the West Antarctic rift system could lead to the disappearance of ice streams, and possibly trigger a collapse of the inland ice reservoir.

  6. Petroleum Refineries New Source Performance Standards (NSPS) Direct Final Amendments Fact Sheet

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    This page contains a December 2013 fact sheet with information regarding the direct final rule for the NSPS for Petroleum Refineries. This document provides a summary of the information for this NSPS.

  7. Features of the Active Evening Plasma Sheet from MMS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moore, T. E.; Chandler, M. O.; Avanov, L. A.; Burch, J. L.; Coffey, V. N.; Ergun, R. E.; Fuselier, S. A.; Gershman, D. J.; Giles, B. L.; Lavraud, B.; MacDonald, E.; Mauk, B.; Mukai, T.; Nakamura, R.; Pollock, C. J.; Russell, C. T.; Saito, Y.; Sauvaud, J. A.; Torbert, R. B.; Yokota, S.

    2015-12-01

    The Magnetospheric Multiscale (MMS) mission, consisting of four identical plasmas and fields observatories, was launched into a 12 RE elliptical equatorial orbit in March 2015 and was in the process of being commissioned through August 2015. During commissioning, the orbit apogee rotated from near midnight through the evening toward the dusk sector and occasionally captured new observations of the plasma sheet, its boundary layers, and the magnetospheric tail lobes. On 22-23 June, an especially active plasma sheet was involved in a major geospace storm that developed a ring current with 200 nT DST. We report on the ion kinetic and flow features of this active plasma sheet, comparing them with familiar observations from earlier missions, as an exercise in validating the MMS observations and assessing their capabilities to provide higher time resolution in multi-point views of thin, fast-moving structures. The observed features include but are not limited to cold lobal wind streams in the lobes, tailward flowing auroral beams and conics, hot earthward field-aligned flows and counter-flows, fast cross-field convection of some flows toward the neutral sheet, and the hot isotropic plasma sheet proper. Relationships between these features, the ionosphere, and the reconnecting magnetotail will be explored and discussed, seeking preliminary conclusions.

  8. Direct imaging charge distribution in reduced graphene oxide sheets induced by isolated charges

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shen, Yue; Wang, Ying; Zhou, Yuan; Shi, Anting; Hu, Jun; Zhang, Yi

    2016-10-01

    In this paper, we directly visualized the charges distributed in one-atom-thick reduced graphene oxide (rGO) sheet induced by adjacent charged rGO using a sample-charged mode scanning polarization force microscopy. We found that electron carriers could be attracted to one side of the rGO sheet and leave holes on the other side. The induced charges were distributed inhomogeneously; that is, contrary to earlier reports, the free carrier concentration was neither distributed on the ends, nor distributed uniformly on the whole rGO sheet. When the surrounding rGO sheets were injected with electrostatic charges, the motion of the charge carriers happened in the target-neutral rGO sheet simultaneously. The charges induced in the rGO sheet by isolated charges on adjacent rGO sheets decayed rapidly with the increasing of their separated distance. In addition, fine control of the distribution of the induced charges in a single rGO sheet could be realized through placing more isolated charges in the surrounding areas. These findings suggest a feasible and precise strategy for the modulation and design of local-charge-sensitive functional graphene-based systems.

  9. Effect of skin-pass rolling direction on magnetic properties of semiprocessed nonoriented electrical steel sheets

    SciTech Connect

    Kurosaki, Y.; Shimazu, T.; Shiozaki, M.

    1999-09-01

    Effect of skin-pass rolling direction on magnetic properties and directionality in semiprocessed nonoriented electrical steel sheets produced by skin-pass rolling process was studied. Skin-pass rolling direction greatly affects magnetic properties and directionality. By control of skin-pass rolling direction, the value of B{sub 50} in the required directions such as 0{degree}, 90{degree} and circumferential direction can be adjusted and the value of B{sub 50} is higher than that of the usual skin-pass rolling direction of 0{degree}. The textures of the steel sheets developed after batch annealing varied with the skin-pass rolling directions and this result indicates that the residual strain energy by skin-pass rolling varies with skin-pass rolling directions.

  10. Experimental Method for Characterizing Electrical Steel Sheets in the Normal Direction

    PubMed Central

    Hihat, Nabil; Lecointe, Jean Philippe; Duchesne, Stephane; Napieralska, Ewa; Belgrand, Thierry

    2010-01-01

    This paper proposes an experimental method to characterise magnetic laminations in the direction normal to the sheet plane. The principle, which is based on a static excitation to avoid planar eddy currents, is explained and specific test benches are proposed. Measurements of the flux density are made with a sensor moving in and out of an air-gap. A simple analytical model is derived in order to determine the permeability in the normal direction. The experimental results for grain oriented steel sheets are presented and a comparison is provided with values obtained from literature. PMID:22163394

  11. EERE-Supported International Activities in Latin America (Fact Sheet)

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    2010-05-01

    The Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) is involved in a variety of international initiatives, partnerships, and events that promote greater understanding and use of renewable energy (RE) and energy efficiency (EE) worldwide. In support of the Energy and Climate Partnership of the Americas (ECPA), EERE is working with several Latin American countries to advance EE and RE deployment for economic growth, energy security, poverty relief, and disaster recovery goals. This fact sheet highlights those activities.

  12. Direct exfoliation of natural graphite into micrometer size few layers graphene sheets using ionic liquids

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, X.; Fulvio, P. F.; Baker, G. A.; Veith, G. M.; Unocic, R. R.; Mahurin, S., M.; Chi, M.; Dai, S.

    2010-01-01

    Stable high-concentration suspensions (up to 0.95 mg mL-1) of non-oxidized few layer graphene (FLG), five or less sheets, with micrometre-long edges were obtained via direct exfoliation of natural graphite flakes in ionic liquids, such as 1-butyl-3-methyl-imidazolium bis(trifluoro-methane-sulfonyl)imide ([Bmim]-[Tf2N]), by tip ultrasonication.

  13. Direct exfoliation of natural graphite into micrometer size few layers graphene sheets using ionic liquids

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Xiqing; Fulvio, Pasquale F; Baker, Gary A; Veith, Gabriel M; Unocic, Raymond R; Mahurin, Shannon Mark; Dai, Sheng

    2010-01-01

    Stable high-concentration suspensions (up to 0.95 mg mL{sup -1}) of non-oxidized few layer graphene (FLG), five or less sheets, with micrometre-long edges were obtained via direct exfoliation of natural graphite flakes in ionic liquids, such as 1-butyl-3-methyl-imidazolium bis(trifluoro-methane-sulfonyl)imide ([Bmim]-[Tf{sub 2}N]), by tip ultrasonication.

  14. Sensitivity of the Ice Sheet System Model to direct surface mass balance forcing over the Greenland Ice Sheet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schlegel, N. J.; Seroussi, H. L.; Morlighem, M.; Larour, E. Y.; Box, J. E.

    2011-12-01

    The Greenland Ice Sheet, which extends south of the Arctic Circle, is vulnerable to temperature perturbations in the Northern Hemisphere, and its complete retreat would raise global sea level by about 7 meters. Models of the ice sheet's past behavior suggest that Greenland's severe retreat was largely responsible for sea-level rise during the last interglacial period. A clear understanding of exactly how the ice sheet responded to past climate change requires a high-degree of spatial resolution, especially within the ice sheet's large drainage basins, as they contain outlets capable of high-velocity flow. The newly developed Ice Sheet System Model (ISSM) is a finite-element model capable of simulating transient ice flow on an anisotropic mesh. The adaptable mesh can be refined to higher resolutions in the areas of enhanced ice flow. These features offer a distinct advantage over previous models of the Greenland Ice Sheet, specifically in terms of modeling fast-flowing outlet glaciers. With use of established ISSM capabilities, we examined the sensitivity of Greenland's outlet glaciers to the new Arctic System Reanalysis (ASR) reconstruction of yearly surface mass balance forcing of the last 150 years. This work was performed at the California Institute of Technology's Jet Propulsion Laboratory under a contract with the National Aeronautics and Space Administration's Modeling, Analysis and Prediction (MAP) Program.

  15. Virus activity on the surface of glaciers and ice sheets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bellas, C. M.; Anesio, A. M.; Telling, J.; Stibal, M.; Barker, G.; Tranter, M.; Yallop, M.; Cook, J.

    2012-12-01

    Viruses are found wherever there is life. They are major components of aquatic ecosystems and through interactions with their hosts they significantly alter global biogeochemical cycles and drive evolutionary processes. Here we focus on the interactions between bacteriophages and their hosts inhabiting the microbially dominated supraglacial ecosystems known as cryoconite holes. The diversity of phages present in the sediments of cryoconites was examined for the first time by using a molecular based approach to target the T4-type bacteriophage. Through phylogenetic analysis it was determined that the phage community was diverse, consisting of strains that grouped with those from other global habitats and those that formed several completely new T4-type phage clusters. The activity of the viral community present on glaciers from Svalbard and the Greenland Ice Sheet was also addressed through a series of incubation experiments. Here new virus production was found to be capable of turning over the viral population approximately twice a day, a rate comparable to marine and freshwater sediments around the globe. This large scale viral production was found to be theoretically capable of accounting for all heterotrophic bacterial mortality in cryoconite holes. The mode of infection that viruses employ in cryoconite holes was also addressed to show that a variety of viral life strategies are likely responsible for the continued dominance of viruses in these unique habitats. The implications of viral activity are discussed in terms of carbon cycling in supraglacial ecosystems.

  16. A beta-sheet interaction interface directs the tetramerisation of the Miz-1 POZ domain.

    PubMed

    Stead, Mark A; Trinh, Chi H; Garnett, James A; Carr, Stephen B; Baron, Andrew J; Edwards, Thomas A; Wright, Stephanie C

    2007-11-02

    The POZ/BTB domain is an evolutionarily conserved motif found in approximately 40 zinc-finger transcription factors (POZ-ZF factors). Several POZ-ZF factors are implicated in human cancer, and POZ domain interaction interfaces represent an attractive target for therapeutic intervention. Miz-1 (Myc-interacting zinc-finger protein) is a POZ-ZF factor that regulates DNA-damage-induced cell cycle arrest and plays an important role in human cancer by virtue of its interaction with the c-Myc and BCL6 oncogene products. The Miz-1 POZ domain mediates both self-association and the recruitment of non-POZ partners. POZ-ZF factors generally function as homodimers, although higher-order associations and heteromeric interactions are known to be physiologically important; crucially, the interaction interfaces in such large complexes have not been characterised. We report here the crystal structure of the Miz-1 POZ domain up to 2.1 A resolution. The tetrameric organisation of Miz-1 POZ reveals two types of interaction interface between subunits; an interface of alpha-helices resembles the dimerisation interface of reported POZ domain structures, whereas a novel beta-sheet interface directs the association of two POZ domain dimers. We show that the beta-sheet interface directs the tetramerisation of the Miz-1 POZ domain in solution and therefore represents a newly described candidate interface for the higher-order homo- and hetero-oligomerisation of POZ-ZF proteins in vivo.

  17. The Conductive Silver Nanowires Fabricated by Two-beam Laser Direct Writing on the Flexible Sheet.

    PubMed

    He, Gui-Cang; Zheng, Mei-Ling; Dong, Xian-Zi; Jin, Feng; Liu, Jie; Duan, Xuan-Ming; Zhao, Zhen-Sheng

    2017-02-02

    Flexible electrically conductive nanowires are now a key component in the fields of flexible devices. The achievement of metal nanowire with good flexibility, conductivity, compact and smooth morphology is recognized as one critical milestone for the flexible devices. In this study, a two-beam laser direct writing system is designed to fabricate AgNW on PET sheet. The minimum width of the AgNW fabricated by this method is 187 ± 34 nm with the height of 84 ± 4 nm. We have investigated the electrical resistance under different voltages and the applicable voltage per meter range is determined to be less than 7.5 × 10(3) V/m for the fabricated AgNW. The flexibility of the AgNW is very excellent, since the resistance only increases 6.63% even after the stretched bending of 2000 times at such a small bending radius of 1.0 mm. The proposed two-beam laser direct writing is an efficient method to fabricate AgNW on the flexible sheet, which could be applied in flexible micro/nano devices.

  18. The Conductive Silver Nanowires Fabricated by Two-beam Laser Direct Writing on the Flexible Sheet

    PubMed Central

    He, Gui-Cang; Zheng, Mei-Ling; Dong, Xian-Zi; Jin, Feng; Liu, Jie; Duan, Xuan-Ming; Zhao, Zhen-Sheng

    2017-01-01

    Flexible electrically conductive nanowires are now a key component in the fields of flexible devices. The achievement of metal nanowire with good flexibility, conductivity, compact and smooth morphology is recognized as one critical milestone for the flexible devices. In this study, a two-beam laser direct writing system is designed to fabricate AgNW on PET sheet. The minimum width of the AgNW fabricated by this method is 187 ± 34 nm with the height of 84 ± 4 nm. We have investigated the electrical resistance under different voltages and the applicable voltage per meter range is determined to be less than 7.5 × 103 V/m for the fabricated AgNW. The flexibility of the AgNW is very excellent, since the resistance only increases 6.63% even after the stretched bending of 2000 times at such a small bending radius of 1.0 mm. The proposed two–beam laser direct writing is an efficient method to fabricate AgNW on the flexible sheet, which could be applied in flexible micro/nano devices. PMID:28150712

  19. The Conductive Silver Nanowires Fabricated by Two-beam Laser Direct Writing on the Flexible Sheet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    He, Gui-Cang; Zheng, Mei-Ling; Dong, Xian-Zi; Jin, Feng; Liu, Jie; Duan, Xuan-Ming; Zhao, Zhen-Sheng

    2017-02-01

    Flexible electrically conductive nanowires are now a key component in the fields of flexible devices. The achievement of metal nanowire with good flexibility, conductivity, compact and smooth morphology is recognized as one critical milestone for the flexible devices. In this study, a two-beam laser direct writing system is designed to fabricate AgNW on PET sheet. The minimum width of the AgNW fabricated by this method is 187 ± 34 nm with the height of 84 ± 4 nm. We have investigated the electrical resistance under different voltages and the applicable voltage per meter range is determined to be less than 7.5 × 103 V/m for the fabricated AgNW. The flexibility of the AgNW is very excellent, since the resistance only increases 6.63% even after the stretched bending of 2000 times at such a small bending radius of 1.0 mm. The proposed two–beam laser direct writing is an efficient method to fabricate AgNW on the flexible sheet, which could be applied in flexible micro/nano devices.

  20. Spatial variation in the plasma sheet composition: Dependence on geomagnetic and solar activity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maggiolo, R.; Kistler, L. M.

    2014-04-01

    We study the spatial distribution of plasma sheet O+ and H+ ions using data from the COmposition and DIstribution Function (CODIF) instrument on board the Cluster spacecraft from 2001 to 2005. The densities are mapped along magnetic field lines to produce bidimensional density maps at the magnetospheric equatorial plane for various geomagnetic and solar activity levels (represented by the Kp and F10.7 indexes). We analyze the correlation of the O+ and H+ density with Kp and F10.7 in the midtail region at geocentric distances between 15 and 20 RE and in the near-Earth regions at radial distances between 7 and 8 RE. Near Earth the H+ density slightly increases with Kp and F10.7 while in the midtail region it is not correlated with Kp and F10.7. On the contrary, the amount of O+ ions significantly increases with Kp and F10.7 independently of the region. In the near-Earth region, the effects of solar EUV and geomagnetic activity on the O+ density are comparable. In the midtail region, the O+ density increases at a lower rate with solar EUV flux but strongly increases with geomagnetic activity although the effect is modulated by the solar EUV flux level. We also evidence a strong increase of the proportion of O+ ions with decreasing geocentric distance below ~10 RE. These results confirm the direct entry of O+ ions into the near-Earth plasma sheet and suggest that both energetic outflows from the auroral zone and cold outflow from the high-latitude ionosphere may contribute to feed the near-Earth plasma sheet with ionospheric ions.

  1. Direct observations of evolving subglacial drainage beneath the Greenland Ice Sheet.

    PubMed

    Andrews, Lauren C; Catania, Ginny A; Hoffman, Matthew J; Gulley, Jason D; Lüthi, Martin P; Ryser, Claudia; Hawley, Robert L; Neumann, Thomas A

    2014-10-02

    Seasonal acceleration of the Greenland Ice Sheet is influenced by the dynamic response of the subglacial hydrologic system to variability in meltwater delivery to the bed via crevasses and moulins (vertical conduits connecting supraglacial water to the bed of the ice sheet). As the melt season progresses, the subglacial hydrologic system drains supraglacial meltwater more efficiently, decreasing basal water pressure and moderating the ice velocity response to surface melting. However, limited direct observations of subglacial water pressure mean that the spatiotemporal evolution of the subglacial hydrologic system remains poorly understood. Here we show that ice velocity is well correlated with moulin hydraulic head but is out of phase with that of nearby (0.3-2 kilometres away) boreholes, indicating that moulins connect to an efficient, channelized component of the subglacial hydrologic system, which exerts the primary control on diurnal and multi-day changes in ice velocity. Our simultaneous measurements of moulin and borehole hydraulic head and ice velocity in the Paakitsoq region of western Greenland show that decreasing trends in ice velocity during the latter part of the melt season cannot be explained by changes in the ability of moulin-connected channels to convey supraglacial melt. Instead, these observations suggest that decreasing late-season ice velocity may be caused by changes in connectivity in unchannelized regions of the subglacial hydrologic system. Understanding this spatiotemporal variability in subglacial pressures is increasingly important because melt-season dynamics affect ice velocity beyond the conclusion of the melt season.

  2. "Direct" measurement of sheet resistance in inter-subcell layers of multi-junction solar cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rumyantsev, Valery D.; Larionov, Valery R.; Pokrovskiy, Pavel V.

    2015-09-01

    The multi-junction cells are sensitive to chromatic aberrations inherent to the lens-type concentrators. At spectrally and spatially inhomogeneous distribution of incident light, considerable lateral currents flow along the inter-subcell layers causing a voltage drop across corresponding sheet resistance and, consequently, a decrease in the cell conversion efficiency. The sheet resistance unit is Ohm-per-square that corresponds to the resistance between two bar-type electrodes on the opposite sides of a thin conductive square. A method of "direct" measurement of this parameter is proposed using lasers for local illumination of the strip-in-shape parts of a rectangular-in-form tested cell. These illuminated parts play a role of electrodes for a lateral current induced by photoexitation. Wavelengths of the lasers have to be chosen to generate photocurrents independently in the neighboring subcells, as well as locally in the upper and lower ones. SPICE model of the method is analyzed and experimental results on the InGaP/InGaAs/Ge triple-junction solar cells are presented.

  3. Laser-assisted direct joining of AISI304 stainless steel with polycarbonate sheets: Thermal analysis, mechanical characterization, and bonds morphology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lambiase, F.; Genna, S.

    2017-02-01

    Laser-Assisted Metal and Plastic bonding (LAMP) of AISI304 sheets with polycarbonate sheets is investigated in this work. The process was performed by means of a high power diode laser with a maximum power of 200 W. The study introduces an integrated experimental approach aimed at understanding how the main process conditions (laser power and scanning speed) influence the direct-bonds quality, dimensions and presence of defects. To this end, the bonds dimension, shear strength, formation and dimension of bubbles in the bonded region were related to the temperature measurements and process parameters. According to the achieved results, the processing window that enables a good adhesion of the two materials is relatively small; this is due the activation of the adhesion phenomena that require overcoming an energy threshold. However, excessive energy levels reduce the bonds strength due to the increase in defects (bubbles) dimension that may combine (coalescence) leading to the formation of a central tunnel where the two substrates are completely detached.

  4. Simulation and measurement of melting effects on metal sheets caused by direct lightning strikes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kern, Alexander

    1991-01-01

    Direct lightning strikes melt metal parts of various systems, like fuel and propellant tanks of rockets and airplanes, at the point of strike. Responsible for this melting are the impulse current and, if occurring, the long duration current, both carrying a remarkable charge Q. For studying these meltings the simulation in the laboratory has to be based on the parameters of natural lightnings. International standards exist defining certain threat levels of natural lightnings and giving possible generator circuits for the simulation. The melting caused by both types of lightning currents show different appearance. Their characteristics, their differences in melting and heating of metal sheets are investigated. Nevertheless the simulation of lightning in the laboratory is imperfect. While natural lightning is a discharge without a counter electrode, the simulation always demands a close counter electrode. The influence of this counter electrode is studied.

  5. TSCA Chemical Data Reporting Fact Sheet: Reporting Manufactured Chemical Substances from Metal Mining and Related Activities

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    This fact sheet provides guidance on the Chemical Data Reporting (CDR) rule requirements related to the reporting of mined metals, intermediates, and byproducts manufactured during metal mining and related activities.

  6. Rubber sheet strewn with TiO2 particles: photocatalytic activity and recyclability.

    PubMed

    Sriwong, Chaval; Wongnawa, Sumpun; Patarapaiboolchai, Orasa

    2012-01-01

    A new method for the preparation of rubber sheet strewn with titanium dioxide particles (TiO2-strewn sheet) is presented. This simple and low cost method is based on the use of TiO2 powder (Degussa P25) being strewn onto the sheet made from rubber latex (60% HA) through a steel sieve. The characteristic of the TiO2-strewn sheet was studied by using scanning electron microscopy/energy dispersive X-ray spectrometer (SEM/EDS) and X-ray diffractometer (XRD) techniques. The photocatalytic activity of TiO2-strewn rubber sheet was evaluated using Indigo Carmine (IC) dye as a model for organic dye pollutant in water. The results showed that the TiO2-strewn sheet could degrade IC dye solution under UV light irradiation. The effects of pH, initial concentration, and the intensity of UV light on the photodegradation were also investigated. Kinetics of the photocatalytic degradation was of the first-order reaction. The used TiO2-strewn sheet can be recovered and reused. The recycling uses did not require any cleaning between successive uses and no decline in the photodegradation efficiency was observed compared with freshly prepared TiO2-strewn sheet.

  7. Indirect Versus Direct Heating of Sheet Materials: Superplastic Forming and Diffusion Bonding Using Lasers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jocelyn, Alan; Kar, Aravinda; Fanourakis, Alexander; Flower, Terence; Ackerman, Mike; Keevil, Allen; Way, Jerome

    2010-06-01

    Many from within manufacturing industry consider superplastic forming (SPF) to be ‘high tech’, but it is often criticized as too complicated, expensive, slow and, in general, an unstable process when compared to other methods of manipulating sheet materials. Perhaps, the fundamental cause of this negative perception of SPF, and also of diffusion bonding (DB), is the fact that the current process of SPF/DB relies on indirect sources of heating to produce the conditions necessary for the material to be formed. Thus, heat is usually derived from the electrically heated platens of hydraulic presses, to a lesser extent from within furnaces and, sometimes, from heaters imbedded in ceramic moulds. Recent evaluations of these isothermal methods suggest they are slow, thermally inefficient and inappropriate for the process. In contrast, direct heating of only the material to be formed by modern, electrically efficient, lasers could transform SPF/DB into the first choice of designers in aerospace, automotive, marine, medical, architecture and leisure industries. Furthermore, ‘variable temperature’ direct heating which, in theory, is possible with a laser beam(s) may provide a means to control material thickness distribution, a goal of enormous importance as fuel efficient, lightweight structures for transportation systems are universally sought. This paper compares, and contrasts, the two systems and suggests how a change to laser heating might be achieved.

  8. Electric fields measured by ISEE-1 within and near the neutral sheet during quiet and active times

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cattell, C. A.; Mozer, F. S.

    1982-01-01

    An understanding of the physical processes occurring in the magnetotail and plasmasheet during different interplanetary magnetic field orientations and differing levels of ground magnetic activity is crucial for the development of a theory of energy transfer from the solar wind to the particles which produce auroral arcs. In the present investigation, the first observations of electric fields during neutral sheet crossings are presented, taking into account the statistical correlations of the interplanetary magnetic field direction and ground activity with the character of the electric field. The electric field data used in the study were obtained from a double probe experiment on the ISEE-1 satellite. The observations suggest that turbulent electric and magnetic fields are intimately related to plasma acceleration in the neutral sheet and to the processes which create auroral particles.

  9. Modeling of Directional Hardening Based on Non-Associated Flow for Sheet Forming

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yoon, Jeong Whan; Stoughton, Thomas B.

    2010-06-01

    This work describes a material model for sheet metal forming that takes into account anisotropic hardening under conditions of proportional loading. Conventional isotropic and kinematic hardening models constrain the shape of the yield function to remain fixed throughout plastic deformation, which is not consistent with most test data from aluminum alloys obtained under proportional loading. Conventional hardening models are shown to introduce systemic errors in stresses in different loading conditions at low and high levels of strain that tend to amplify the effect of stress miscalculation on the prediction of springback. A new model is described in which four stress-strain functions are explicitly integrated into the yield criterion in closed form solution. The model is based on non-associated flow so that this integration does not affect the accuracy of the plastic strain components. The model is expected to lead to a significant improvement in stress prediction under conditions dominated by proportional loading, and this is expected to directly improve the accuracy of springback prediction for these processes.

  10. Salt-assisted direct exfoliation of graphite into high-quality, large-size, few-layer graphene sheets.

    PubMed

    Niu, Liyong; Li, Mingjian; Tao, Xiaoming; Xie, Zhuang; Zhou, Xuechang; Raju, Arun P A; Young, Robert J; Zheng, Zijian

    2013-08-21

    We report a facile and low-cost method to directly exfoliate graphite powders into large-size, high-quality, and solution-dispersible few-layer graphene sheets. In this method, aqueous mixtures of graphite and inorganic salts such as NaCl and CuCl2 are stirred, and subsequently dried by evaporation. Finally, the mixture powders are dispersed into an orthogonal organic solvent solution of the salt by low-power and short-time ultrasonication, which exfoliates graphite into few-layer graphene sheets. We find that the as-made graphene sheets contain little oxygen, and 86% of them are 1-5 layers with lateral sizes as large as 210 μm(2). Importantly, the as-made graphene can be readily dispersed into aqueous solution in the presence of surfactant and thus is compatible with various solution-processing techniques towards graphene-based thin film devices.

  11. Direct measurement of sheet resistance Rsquare in cuprate systems: evidence of a fermionic scenario in a metal-insulator transition.

    PubMed

    Orgiani, P; Aruta, C; Balestrino, G; Born, D; Maritato, L; Medaglia, P G; Stornaiuolo, D; Tafuri, F; Tebano, A

    2007-01-19

    The metal-insulator transition (MIT) has been studied in Ba(0.9)Nd(0.1)CuO(2+x)/CaCuO2 ultrathin cuprate structures. Such structures allow for the direct measurement of the 2D sheet resistance R( square), eliminating ambiguity in the definition of the effective thickness of the conducting layer in high temperature superconductors. The MIT occurs at room temperature for experimental values of R(square) close to the 25.8 kOmega universal quantum resistance. All data confirm the assumption that each CaCuO2 layer forms a 2D superconducting sheet within the superconducting block, which can be described as weak-coupled equivalent sheets in parallel.

  12. Paleo-Ice Sheet/Stream Flow Directions of the Northern Antarctic Peninsula Ice Sheet Based Upon New Synthesis of Multibeam Seabed Imagery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Domack, E. W.; Lavoie, C.; Scambos, T. A.; Pettit, E. C.; Schenke, H. W.; Yoo, K. C.; Larter, R. D.; Gutt, J.; Wellner, J.; Canals, M.; Anderson, J. B.; Amblas, D.

    2014-12-01

    We provide a new map of swath bathymetry for the northern Antarctic Peninsula, including data sets from five national programs. Our map allows for the compilation and examination of Late Glacial Maximum (LGM) paleo-ice sheet/stream flow directions developed upon the seafloor from the preservation of: mega-scale glacial lineations, drumlinized features, and selective linear erosion. We combine this with terrestrial observations of flow direction to place constraints on ice divides and accumulation centers (ice domes). The results show a flow divergence in Larsen B embayment, between flow emanating off the Seal Nunataks (including Robertson Island) that directed ice in a southeast direction, then easterly as the flow transits toward the Robertson Trough. A second, stronger "streaming flow" directed ice southeasterly then southward, as ice overflowed the Jason Peninsula to reach the Jason Trough, the southern perimeter of the embayment. This reconstruction is far more detailed than other recent compilations because we followed specific flow indicators and have kept tributary flow paths parallel. Our reconstitution also refines the extent of at least five other distinct paleo-ice stream systems which in turn serve to delineate seven broad regions where ice domes must have been centered across the continental shelf during the LGM.

  13. Direct Observations of Melt-Water Lake Drainage and the Establishment of an Efficient Surface to Basal Water Connection on the Greenland Ice Sheet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Das, S. B.; Joughin, I.; Behn, M. D.; Howat, I.; King, M. A.; Lizarralde, D.; Bhatia, M. P.

    2007-12-01

    Melt water lakes are recurrent features on the surface of the Greenland Ice Sheet margin that collect a large fraction of the annual surface melt across the ablation region. Many of these lakes fill and drain seasonally and are hypothesized to be a significant source of surface melt water to the ice sheet bed. We present results from field campaigns during the summers of 2006 and 2007 to investigate the filling and draining of two lakes, and the dynamic response of the ice sheet to drainage events. Measurements include air temperature, lake-water level, seismicity and local ice motion. One of the instrumented lakes was observed to be actively discharging water through a meltwater-cut channel in the side of the lake basin, which followed a deeply incised (5-10 m) supraglacial stream for nearly a kilometer before cascading into a moulin. The second instrumented lake drained catastrophically through a series of fractures and moulins that opened beneath the lake and that were subsequently mapped in the field following drainage. At this site, the 2.7-km-diameter lake, holding on the order of 0.03 km3 of water, drained entirely through 1 km of ice thickness in less than 2 hours. The peak rate of water flow during this event exceeds the average flow over Niagara Falls. This drainage event coincided with increased seismicity as well as rapid glacier uplift (1.2 m) and horizontal acceleration to nearly 8 km/yr as measured on the ice surface near the lake shoreline. Subsequent subsidence and deceleration of the ice sheet occurred over the following 24 hours. These observations provide evidence for the injection of surface melt water directly to the ice sheet bed, and also indicate the presence of an efficient basal drainage system that can quickly disperse large inputs of surface melt water.

  14. Antibacterial activity of two-dimensional MoS2 sheets.

    PubMed

    Yang, Xi; Li, Jie; Liang, Tao; Ma, Chunyan; Zhang, Yingying; Chen, Hongzheng; Hanagata, Nobutaka; Su, Huanxing; Xu, Mingsheng

    2014-09-07

    Graphene-like two-dimensional materials (2DMats) show application potential in optoelectronics and biomedicine due to their unique properties. However, environmental and biological influences of these 2DMats remain to be unveiled. Here we reported the antibacterial activity of two-dimensional (2D) chemically exfoliated MoS2 (ce-MoS2) sheets. We found that the antibacterial activity of ce-MoS2 sheets was much more potent than that of the raw MoS2 powders used for the synthesis of ce-MoS2 sheets possibly due to the 2D planar structure (high specific surface area) and higher conductivity of the ce-MoS2. We investigated the antibacterial mechanisms of the ce-MoS2 sheets and proposed their antibacterial pathways. We found that the ce-MoS2 sheets could produce reactive oxygen species (ROS), different from a previous report on graphene-based materials. Particularly, the oxidation capacity of the ce-MoS2 sheets toward glutathione oxidation showed a time and concentration dependent trend, which is fully consistent with the antibacterial behaviour of the ce-MoS2 sheets. The results suggest that antimicrobial behaviors were attributable to both membrane and oxidation stress. The antibacterial pathways include MoS2-bacteria contact induced membrane stress, superoxide anion (O2(˙-) induced ROS production by the ce-MoS2, and the ensuing superoxide anion-independent oxidation. Our study thus indicates that the tailoring of the dimension of nanomaterials and their electronic properties would manipulate antibacterial activity.

  15. FSA future directions: FSA technology activities in FY86

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Leipold, M. H.

    1985-01-01

    The silicon material, advanced silicon sheet, device research, and process research activities are explained. There will be no new initiatives. Many activities are targeted for completion and the emphasis will then be on technology transfer. Industrial development of the fluidized-bed reactor (FBR) deposition technology is proceeding. Technology transfer and industry funding of sheet development are continuing.

  16. Litter Control Achievement - Ohio 4-H Club Score Sheet [and] Activity Guides 1 through 7. 4-H Pilot Program 918.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ohio State Univ., Columbus. Cooperative Extension Service.

    Seven activity guides, evaluation sheet, and club scoresheet have been prepared for Ohio 4-H clubs' litter education program. Topics of the seven activity guides include: (1) general guidelines and types of activities; (2) little known facts about waste/litter; (3) guidelines for a walking tour; (4) fact sheet (questionnaire) related to garbage;…

  17. New directions in the science and technology of advanced sheet explosive formulations and the key energetic materials used in the processing of sheet explosives: Emerging trends.

    PubMed

    Talawar, M B; Jangid, S K; Nath, T; Sinha, R K; Asthana, S N

    2015-12-30

    This review presents the work carried out by the international community in the area of sheet explosive formulations and its applications in various systems. The sheet explosive is also named as PBXs and is a composite material in which solid explosive particles like RDX, HMX or PETN are dispersed in a polymeric matrix, forms a flexible material that can be rolled/cut into sheet form which can be applied to any complex contour. The designed sheet explosive must possess characteristic properties such as flexible, cuttable, water proof, easily initiable, and safe handling. The sheet explosives are being used for protecting tanks (ERA), light combat vehicle and futuristic infantry carrier vehicle from different attacking war heads etc. Besides, sheet explosives find wide applications in demolition of bridges, ships, cutting and metal cladding. This review also covers the aspects such as risks and hazard analysis during the processing of sheet explosive formulations, effect of ageing on sheet explosives, detection and analysis of sheet explosive ingredients and the R&D efforts of Indian researchers in the development of sheet explosive formulations. To the best of our knowledge, there has been no review article published in the literature in the area of sheet explosives.

  18. SU-F-BRA-06: Dose Distributions for the CivaSheet Pd-103 Directional Brachytherapy Device

    SciTech Connect

    Rivard, MJ

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: A flexible polymer membrane (CivaSheet) has been developed by CivaTech Oncology, Inc. (Research Triangle Park, NC) for permanent brachytherapy. Distributed throughout the array are small plastic disks containing Pd-103 and gold foil shielding on one side to provide a directional dose distribution and facilitate imaging. This study evaluated dosimetry for the CivaSheet. Methods: Manufacturer-provided dimensional and compositional information for the device were compared to physical samples for validation of design information, then entered into the MCNP6 radiation transport code for dosimetry simulations. Three device sizes (6×6, 6×12, or 6×18 disk-arrays) were simulated as the membrane can be custom-sized preceding surgical placement. Dose to water was estimated with 0.01 cm resolution from the surface to 10 cm on both sides of the device. Because this is a novel device with calibration methods under development, results were normalized using DVHs to provide 90% prescription coverage to a plane positioned 0.5 cm from the front surfaces. This same normalization was used for creating isodose distributions. Results: Planar dose distributions of flat CivaSheets were relatively homogeneous with acceptable dose uniformity variations. Differences in the results between the differently sized CivaSheets were not significant. At 0.5 mm, 87% of the target volume was within the therapeutic dose range. Dose hotspots on the CivaSheet forward surfaces were directly above the disks. However, dose hotspots on the rear-facing surfaces were positioned between the disks. Doses in contact with the front surface were similar to those observed for currently available brachytherapy sources. Maximum doses that occurred on the rear surface were approximately 55 times lower than the dose on the front surface. Conclusion: Monte Carlo calculations validated the directional capabilities and advantageous dosimetry of the new Pd-103 brachytherapy device. It appears feasible to re

  19. Anti-adhesion and antibacterial activity of silver nanoparticles supported on graphene oxide sheets.

    PubMed

    de Faria, Andreia Fonseca; Martinez, Diego Stéfani Teodoro; Meira, Stela Maris Meister; de Moraes, Ana Carolina Mazarin; Brandelli, Adriano; Filho, Antonio Gomes Souza; Alves, Oswaldo Luiz

    2014-01-01

    This work reports on the preparation, characterization and antibacterial activity of a nanocomposite formed from graphene oxide (GO) sheets decorated with silver nanoparticles (GO-Ag). The GO-Ag nanocomposite was prepared in the presence of AgNO3 and sodium citrate. The physicochemical characterization was performed by UV-vis spectroscopy, X-ray diffraction (XRD), thermogravimetric analysis (TGA), Raman spectroscopy and transmission electron microscopy (TEM). The average size of the silver nanoparticles anchored on the GO surface was 7.5 nm. Oxidation debris fragments (a byproduct adsorbed on the GO surface) were found to be crucial for the nucleation and growth of the silver nanoparticles. The antibacterial activity of the GO and GO-Ag nanocomposite against the microorganism Pseudomonas aeruginosa was investigated using the standard counting plate methodology. The GO dispersion showed no antibacterial activity against P. aeruginosa over the concentration range investigated. On the other hand, the GO-Ag nanocomposite displayed high biocidal activity with a minimum inhibitory concentration ranging from 2.5 to 5.0 μg/mL. The anti-biofilm activity toward P. aeruginosa adhered on stainless steel surfaces was also investigated. The results showed a 100% inhibition rate of the adhered cells after exposure to the GO-Ag nanocomposite for one hour. To the best of our knowledge, this work provides the first direct evidence that GO-Ag nanocomposites can inhibit the growth of microbial adhered cells, thus preventing the process of biofilm formation. These promising results support the idea that GO-Ag nanocomposites may be applied as antibacterial coatings material to prevent the development of biofilms in food packaging and medical devices.

  20. Are Adolescents Talking with Their Parents about Sex before Becoming Sexually Active? Fact Sheet

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Leuschner, Kristin

    2010-01-01

    This paper examines parent-child discussions of sexual behavior. It finds consistency in the timing and content of such discussions; however, many parents and children do not discuss key topics, such as birth control, before adolescents become sexually active. [This fact sheet is based on Megan K. Beckett, Marc N. Elliott, Steven Martino, David E.…

  1. Teen Sexual Activity, Pregnancy and Childbearing among Latinos in the United States. Fact Sheet.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National Campaign To Prevent Teen Pregnancy, Washington, DC.

    The Latino population is the fastest-growing major racial/ethnic group in the United States. By 2020, approximately 16 percent of the population will be Latino. This increase will be even more pronounced among teens. This fact sheet summarizes data from the National Vital Statistics Reports on reported sexual activity, pregnancy rates, and…

  2. NREL Develops Accelerated Sample Activation Process for Hydrogen Storage Materials (Fact Sheet)

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    2010-12-01

    This fact sheet describes NREL's accomplishments in developing a new sample activation process that reduces the time to prepare samples for measurement of hydrogen storage from several days to five minutes and provides more uniform samples. Work was performed by NREL's Chemical and Materials Science Center.

  3. Enhanced Activity and Stability of Pt catalysts on Functionalized Graphene Sheets for Electrocatalytic Oxygen Reduction

    SciTech Connect

    Kou, Rong; Shao, Yuyan; Wang, Donghai; Engelhard, Mark H.; Kwak, Ja Hun; Wang, Jun; Viswanathan, Vilayanur V.; Wang, Chong M.; Lin, Yuehe; Wang, Yong; Aksay, Ilhan A.; Liu, Jun

    2009-04-30

    Electrocatalysis of oxygen reduction using Pt nanoparticles supported on functionalized graphene sheets (FGSs) was studied. FGSs were prepared by thermal expansion of graphite oxide. Pt nanoparticles with average diameter of 2 nm were uniformly loaded on FGSs by impregnation methods. Pt-FGS showed a higher electrochemical surface area and oxygen reduction activity with improved stability as compared with commercial catalyst. Transmission electron microscopy, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, and electrochemical characterization suggest that the improved performance of Pt-FGS can be attributed to smaller particle size and less aggregation of Pt nanoparticles on the functionalized graphene sheets.

  4. Hierarchical-structured anatase-titania/cellulose composite sheet with high photocatalytic performance and antibacterial activity.

    PubMed

    Luo, Yan; Huang, Jianguo

    2015-02-02

    Bulk hierarchical anatase-titania/cellulose composite sheets were fabricated by subjecting an ultrathin titania gel film pre-deposited filter paper to a solvo-co-hydrothermal treatment by using titanium butoxide as the precursor to grow anatase-titania nanocrystallites on the cellulose nanofiber surfaces. The titanium butoxide specie is firstly absorbed onto the nanofibers of the cellulose substance through a solvothermal process, which was thereafter hydrolyzed and crystallized upon the subsequent hydrothermal treatment, leading to the formation of fine anatase-titania nanoparticles with sizes of 2-5 nm uniformly anchored on the cellulose nanofibers. The resulting anatase-titania/cellulose composite sheet shows a significant photocatalytic performance towards degradation of a methylene blue dye, and introduction of silver nanoparticles into the composite sheet yields an Ag-NP/anatase-titania/cellulose composite material possessing excellent antibacterial activity against both Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacteria.

  5. Differences in microstructure and texture of Al-Mg sheets produced by twin-roll continuous casting and by direct-chill casting

    SciTech Connect

    Slamova, M.; Karlik, M.; Robaut, F.; Slama, P.; Veron, M

    2002-10-15

    Over the last two decades, the use of aluminum sheets in automotive applications has increased. Aluminum sheets are currently produced from direct-chill (DC) cast plates. The need for low-cost aluminum sheets is a challenge for the development of new materials produced by twin-roll continuous (TRC) casting and cold rolling. It is expected that the sheets produced from these different casting procedures can differ in their microstructure. Therefore, they can exhibit different formability behavior. The paper presents the results of the microstructural characterization and texture evaluation of aluminum sheets produced by both technologies. Sheets produced from twin-roll cast materials have much finer and more numerous second-phase particles, the grain structures of both types of materials are similar. Electron backscatter diffraction (EBSD) and X-ray diffraction techniques were used for texture evaluation and both confirmed the presence of stronger cube texture in the strips produced from DC-cast plates.

  6. Fe, O, and C Charge States Associated with Quiescent Versus Active Current Sheets in the Solar Wind

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Suess, S. T.; Ko, Y.-K.; vonSteiger, R.

    2008-01-01

    Ulysses MAG data were used to locate the heliospheric current sheet in data from 1991 through 2006. The purpose was to characterize typical charge states for Fe, O, and C in the vicinity of the current sheet and provide insight into the physical sources for these charge states in the corona. A study of He/H around the current sheets has led to a clear distinction between quiescent current sheets at times of low solar activity and active current sheets associated with magnetic clouds (and, presumably, ICMES). It has been shown that high ionization state Fe is produced in the corona in current sheets associated with CMEs through spectroscopic observations of the corona and through in situ detection at Ulysses. Here we show that the ionization state of Fe is typically only enhanced around active current sheets while the ionization states of O and C are commonly enhanced around both quiescent and active current sheets. This is consistent with UV coronal spectroscopy, which has shown that reconnection in current sheets behind CMEs leads to high temperatures not typically seen above quiet streamers.

  7. Direct generation of graphene plasmonic polaritons at THz frequencies via four wave mixing in the hybrid graphene sheets waveguides.

    PubMed

    Sun, Yu; Qiao, Guofu; Sun, Guodong

    2014-11-17

    A compact waveguide incorporating a high-index nano-ridge sandwiched between graphene sheets is proposed for the direct generation of graphene plasmonic polaritons (GSPs) via four wave mixing (FWM). The proposed waveguide supports GSP modes at the THz frequencies and photonic modes at the infrared wavelengths. Due to the strong confinement of coupled graphene sheets, the GSP modes concentrate in the high-index nano-ridge far below the diffraction limit, which improves integral overlap with the photonic modes and greatly facilitates the FWM process. To cope with the ultra-high effective refractive of the GSP modes, an alternative energy conservation diagram is selected for the degenerated FWM, which corresponds to one pump photon transfers its energy to two signal photons and one GSP photon. The single mode condition of the generated symmetric GSP modes is analyzed by the effective index method to suppress the undesired conversion. Due to the unique tunability of GSPs, the phase matching condition can be satisfied by tuning the chemical potential of the graphene sheets employing external gates. The FWM pumped at 1,550 nm with a peak power of 1 kW is theoretically investigated by solving the modified coupled mode equations. The generated GSP power reaches its maximum up to 67 W at a propagation distance of only 43.7 μm. The proposed waveguide have a great potential for integrated chip-scale GSP source.

  8. Antibacterial activity of two-dimensional MoS2 sheets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Xi; Li, Jie; Liang, Tao; Ma, Chunyan; Zhang, Yingying; Chen, Hongzheng; Hanagata, Nobutaka; Su, Huanxing; Xu, Mingsheng

    2014-08-01

    Graphene-like two-dimensional materials (2DMats) show application potential in optoelectronics and biomedicine due to their unique properties. However, environmental and biological influences of these 2DMats remain to be unveiled. Here we reported the antibacterial activity of two-dimensional (2D) chemically exfoliated MoS2 (ce-MoS2) sheets. We found that the antibacterial activity of ce-MoS2 sheets was much more potent than that of the raw MoS2 powders used for the synthesis of ce-MoS2 sheets possibly due to the 2D planar structure (high specific surface area) and higher conductivity of the ce-MoS2. We investigated the antibacterial mechanisms of the ce-MoS2 sheets and proposed their antibacterial pathways. We found that the ce-MoS2 sheets could produce reactive oxygen species (ROS), different from a previous report on graphene-based materials. Particularly, the oxidation capacity of the ce-MoS2 sheets toward glutathione oxidation showed a time and concentration dependent trend, which is fully consistent with the antibacterial behaviour of the ce-MoS2 sheets. The results suggest that antimicrobial behaviors were attributable to both membrane and oxidation stress. The antibacterial pathways include MoS2-bacteria contact induced membrane stress, superoxide anion (O2&z.rad;-) induced ROS production by the ce-MoS2, and the ensuing superoxide anion-independent oxidation. Our study thus indicates that the tailoring of the dimension of nanomaterials and their electronic properties would manipulate antibacterial activity.Graphene-like two-dimensional materials (2DMats) show application potential in optoelectronics and biomedicine due to their unique properties. However, environmental and biological influences of these 2DMats remain to be unveiled. Here we reported the antibacterial activity of two-dimensional (2D) chemically exfoliated MoS2 (ce-MoS2) sheets. We found that the antibacterial activity of ce-MoS2 sheets was much more potent than that of the raw MoS2 powders

  9. Direct Imaging of Single Plasmonic Metal Nanoparticles in Capillary with Laser Light-Sheet Scattering Imaging.

    PubMed

    Cao, Xuan; Feng, Jingjing; Pan, Qi; Xiong, Bin; He, Yan; Yeung, Edward S

    2017-03-07

    Understanding the heterogeneous distribution of the physical and chemical properties of plasmonic metal nanoparticles is fundamentally important to their basic and applied research. Traditionally, they are obtained either indirectly via bulk spectroscopic measurements plus electron microscopic characterizations or through single molecule/particle imaging of nanoparticles immobilized on planar substrates. In this study, by using light-sheet scattering microscopy with a supercontinuum white laser, highly sensitive imaging of individual metal nanoparticles (MNPs) flowing inside a capillary, driven by either pressure or electric field, was achieved for the first time. We demonstrate that single plasmonic nanoparticles with different size or chemical modification could be differentiated through their electrophoretic mobility in a few minutes. This technique could potentially be applied to high throughput characterization and evaluation of single metal nanoparticles as well as their dynamic interactions with various local environments.

  10. Paleo-ice flow directions of the Northern Antarctic Peninsula ice sheet based upon a new synthesis of seabed imagery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lavoie, C.; Domack, E. W.; Pettit, E. C.; Scambos, T. A.; Larter, R. D.; Schenke, H.-W.; Yoo, K. C.; Gutt, J.; Wellner, J.; Canals, M.; Anderson, J. B.; Amblas, D.

    2014-10-01

    We present a new seafloor map for the northern Antarctic Peninsula (AP), including swath multibeam data sets from five national programs. Our map allows for the examination and interpretation of Last Glacial Maximum (LGM) paleo-ice sheet/stream flow directions developed upon the seafloor from the preservation of: mega-scale glacial lineations, drumlinized features, and selective linear erosion. We combine this with terrestrial observations of flow direction to place constraints on ice divides and accumulation centers (ice domes) on the AP continental shelf. The results show a flow bifurcation as ice exits the Larsen-B embayment. Flow emanating off the Seal Nunataks (including Robertson Island) is directed toward the southeast, then eastward as the flow transits toward the Robertson Trough. A second, stronger "streaming flow" is directed toward the southeast then southward, as ice overflowed the tip of the Jason Peninsula to reach the southern perimeter of the embayment. Our reconstruction also refines the extent of at least five other distinct paleo-ice stream systems which, in turn, serve to delineate seven broad regions where contemporaneous ice domes must have been centered on the continental shelf during the LGM time interval. Our reconstruction is more detailed than other recent compilations because we followed specific flow indicators and have kept tributary flow paths parallel.

  11. An actuated elastic sheet interacting with passive and active structures in a viscoelastic fluid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chrispell, J. C.; Fauci, L. J.; Shelley, M.

    2013-01-01

    We adapt the classic Taylor swimming sheet set-up to investigate both the transient and long-time dynamics of an actuated elastic sheet immersed in a viscoelastic fluid as it interacts with neighboring structures. While the preferred kinematics of the sheet are specified, the flexible sheet interacts with the surrounding fluid and other structures, and its realized kinematics emerges from this coupling. We use an immersed boundary framework to evolve the Oldroyd-B/Navier-Stokes equations and capture the spatial and temporal development of viscoelastic stresses and sheet shape. We compare the dynamics when the actuated sheet swims next to a free elastic membrane, with and without bending rigidity, and next to a fixed wall. We demonstrate that the sheets can exploit the neighboring structures to enhance their swimming speed and efficiency, and also examine how this depends upon fluid viscoelasticity. When the neighboring structure is likewise an actuated elastic sheet, we investigate the viscoelastic dynamics of phase-locking.

  12. Aerogeophysical evidence for active volcanism beneath the West Antarctic Ice Sheet

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Blankenship, Donald D.; Bell, Robin E.; Hodge, Steven M.; Brozena, John M.; Behrendt, John C.

    1993-01-01

    Although it is widely understood that the collapse of the West Antarctic Ice Sheet (WAIS) would cause a global sea-level rise of 6 m, there continues to be considerable debate about the response of this ice sheet to climate change. The stability of the WAIS, which is characterized by a bed grounded well below sea level, may depend on geologically controlled conditions at the base, which are independent of climate. Ice streams moving up to 750 m/yr disperse material from the interior through to the oceans. As these ice streams tend to buffer the reservoir of slow-moving inland ice from exposure to oceanic degradation, understanding the ice-streaming process is important for evaluating WAIS stability. There is strong evidence that ice streams slide on a lubricating layer of water-saturated till. Development of this basal layer requires both water and easily eroded sediments. Active lithospheric extension may elevate regional heat flux, increase basal melting, and trigger ice streaming. If a geologically defined boundary with a sharp contrast in geothermal flux exists beneath the WAIS, ice streams may only be capable of operating as a buffer over a restricted region. Should ocean waters penetrate beyond this boundary, the ice-stream buffer would disappear, possibly triggering a collapse of the inland ice reservoir. Aerogeophysical evidence for active volcanism and elevated heat flux beneath the WAIS near the critical region where ice streaming begins is presented.

  13. Criminal investigations and the Superfund program. Fact sheet (Final)

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1990-09-01

    The fact sheet, directed toward any one who witnesses fraudulent activity in EPA programs, discusses areas in which fraud and abuse can occur and provides an understanding of the criminal investigation process that results from reports of suspicious activity.

  14. Hypoxic preconditioning of human cardiosphere-derived cell sheets enhances cellular functions via activation of the PI3K/Akt/mTOR/HIF-1α pathway

    PubMed Central

    Tanaka, Yuya; Hosoyama, Tohru; Mikamo, Akihito; Kurazumi, Hiroshi; Nishimoto, Arata; Ueno, Koji; Shirasawa, Bungo; Hamano, Kimikazu

    2017-01-01

    Cell sheet technology is a promising therapeutic strategy for the treatment of ischemic diseases such as myocardial infarction. We recently developed a novel protocol, termed “hypoxic preconditioning,” capable of augmenting the therapeutic efficacy of cell sheets. Following this protocol, the pro-angiogenic and anti-fibrotic activity of cell sheets were enhanced by brief incubation of cell sheets under hypoxic culture conditions. However, the precise molecular mechanism underlying the hypoxic preconditioning of cell sheets is unclear. In the present study, we examined signal transducers in cell sheets to identify those responsive to hypoxic preconditioning, using cardiosphere-derived cell (CDC) sheets. We initially tested whether sheet-like structures were suitable for hypoxic preconditioning by comparing them with individual cells. Hypoxic preconditioning was more effective in sheeted cells than in individual cells. Expression of hypoxia inducible factor-1α (HIF-1α) and mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) were induced upon hypoxic preconditioning of cell sheets, as was the phosphoinositide 3-kinase (PI3K)/Akt pathway. In addition, hypoxic preconditioning increased phosphorylation of epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) and heat shock protein 60 (HSP60) in CDC sheets. Our findings provide novel insights into the utility of hypoxic preconditioning in cell sheet-based technologies for the treatment of ischemic diseases. PMID:28337294

  15. ASYMMETRIC SUNSPOT ACTIVITY AND THE SOUTHWARD DISPLACEMENT OF THE HELIOSPHERIC CURRENT SHEET

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Y.-M.; Robbrecht, E. E-mail: eva.robbrecht@oma.be

    2011-08-01

    Observations of the interplanetary magnetic field (IMF) have suggested a statistical tendency for the heliospheric current sheet (HCS) to be shifted a few degrees southward of the heliographic equator during the period 1965-2010, particularly in the years near sunspot minimum. Using potential-field source-surface extrapolations and photospheric flux-transport simulations, we demonstrate that this southward displacement follows from Joy's law and the observed hemispheric asymmetry in the sunspot numbers, with activity being stronger in the southern (northern) hemisphere during the declining (rising) phase of cycles 20-23. The hemispheric asymmetry gives rise to an axisymmetric quadrupole field, whose equatorial zone has the sign of the leading-polarity flux in the dominant hemisphere; during the last four cycles, the polarity of the IMF around the equator thus tended to match that of the north polar field both before and after polar field reversal. However, large fluctuations are introduced by the nonaxisymmetric field components, which depend on the longitudinal distribution of sunspot activity in either hemisphere. Consistent with this model, the HCS showed an average northward displacement during cycle 19, when the 'usual' alternation was reversed and the northern hemisphere became far more active than the southern hemisphere during the declining phase of the cycle. We propose a new method for determining the north-south displacement of the HCS from coronal streamer observations.

  16. Distributive Education--Product Information Fact Sheet. Kit No. 69. Instructor's Manual [and] Student Learning Activity Guide.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McLean, Robert

    An instructor's manual and student activity guide on the product information fact sheet are provided in this set of prevocational education materials which focuses on the vocational area of distributive education. (This set of materials is one of ninety-two prevocational education sets arranged around a cluster of seven vocational offerings:…

  17. The heliospheric sheet configuration according to the coronal ray synoptic maps in solar activity cycles 23 and 24

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guseva, S. A.; Fat'yanov, M. P.; Shramko, A. D.

    2015-05-01

    Two catalogs of coronal ray synoptic maps for different altitudes (1.5-5 R ⊙) for solar activity cycles 23 and 24 (1996-2013) were compiled based on a proposed technique with the data from the SOHO space observatory LASCO C2 coronograph and the Mauna-Loa observatory Mark-IV K coronometer. The constructed synoptic maps of coronal rays represent an image of three-dimensional spherical sections of the heliospheric neutral sheet expanded along the heliographic longitude. The evolution of different heliospheric sheet spatial parameters during the analyzed period was studied based on the obtained maps.

  18. Persistent neural activity in head direction cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Taube, Jeffrey S.; Bassett, Joshua P.; Oman, C. M. (Principal Investigator)

    2003-01-01

    Many neurons throughout the rat limbic system discharge in relation to the animal's directional heading with respect to its environment. These so-called head direction (HD) cells exhibit characteristics of persistent neural activity. This article summarizes where HD cells are found, their major properties, and some of the important experiments that have been conducted to elucidate how this signal is generated. The number of HD and angular head velocity cells was estimated for several brain areas involved in the generation of the HD signal, including the postsubiculum, anterior dorsal thalamus, lateral mammillary nuclei and dorsal tegmental nucleus. The HD cell signal has many features in common with what is known about how neural integration is accomplished in the oculomotor system. The nature of the HD cell signal makes it an attractive candidate for using neural network models to elucidate the signal's underlying mechanisms. The conditions that any network model must satisfy in order to accurately represent how the nervous system generates this signal are highlighted and areas where key information is missing are discussed.

  19. Seismicity on the western Greenland Ice Sheet: Surface fracture in the vicinity of active moulins

    SciTech Connect

    Carmichael, Joshua D.; Joughin, Ian; Behn, Mark D.; Das, Sarah; King, Matt A.; Stevens, Laura; Lizarralde, Dan

    2015-06-25

    We analyzed geophone and GPS measurements collected within the ablation zone of the western Greenland Ice Sheet during a ~35 day period of the 2011 melt season to study changes in ice deformation before, during, and after a supraglacial lake drainage event. During rapid lake drainage, ice flow speeds increased to ~400% of winter values, and icequake activity peaked. At times >7 days after drainage, this seismicity developed variability over both diurnal and longer periods (~10 days), while coincident ice speeds fell to ~150% of winter values and showed nightly peaks in spatial variability. Approximately 95% of all detected seismicity in the lake basin and its immediate vicinity was triggered by fracture propagation within near-surface ice (<330 m deep) that generated Rayleigh waves. Icequakes occurring before and during drainage frequently were collocated with the down flow (west) end of the primary hydrofracture through which the lake drained but shifted farther west and outside the lake basin after the drainage. We interpret these results to reveal vertical hydrofracture opening and local uplift during the drainage, followed by enhanced seismicity and ice flow on the downstream side of the lake basin. This region collocates with interferometric synthetic aperture radar-measured speedup in previous years and could reflect the migration path of the meltwater supplied to the bed by the lake. The diurnal seismic signal can be associated with nightly reductions in surface melt input that increase effective basal pressure and traction, thereby promoting elevated strain in the surficial ice.

  20. Seismicity on the western Greenland Ice Sheet: Surface fracture in the vicinity of active moulins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carmichael, Joshua D.; Joughin, Ian; Behn, Mark D.; Das, Sarah; King, Matt A.; Stevens, Laura; Lizarralde, Dan

    2015-06-01

    We analyzed geophone and GPS measurements collected within the ablation zone of the western Greenland Ice Sheet during a ~35 day period of the 2011 melt season to study changes in ice deformation before, during, and after a supraglacial lake drainage event. During rapid lake drainage, ice flow speeds increased to ~400% of winter values, and icequake activity peaked. At times >7 days after drainage, this seismicity developed variability over both diurnal and longer periods (~10 days), while coincident ice speeds fell to ~150% of winter values and showed nightly peaks in spatial variability. Approximately 95% of all detected seismicity in the lake basin and its immediate vicinity was triggered by fracture propagation within near-surface ice (<330 m deep) that generated Rayleigh waves. Icequakes occurring before and during drainage frequently were collocated with the down flow (west) end of the primary hydrofracture through which the lake drained but shifted farther west and outside the lake basin after the drainage. We interpret these results to reveal vertical hydrofracture opening and local uplift during the drainage, followed by enhanced seismicity and ice flow on the downstream side of the lake basin. This region collocates with interferometric synthetic aperture radar-measured speedup in previous years and could reflect the migration path of the meltwater supplied to the bed by the lake. The diurnal seismic signal can be associated with nightly reductions in surface melt input that increase effective basal pressure and traction, thereby promoting elevated strain in the surficial ice.

  1. Leaf-like hybrid of bismuth subcarbonate nanotubes/graphene sheet with highly efficient photocatalytic activities.

    PubMed

    Tang, Yanping; Yang, Chongqing; Li, Kan; Jing, Fan; Liu, Ruili; Wu, Dongqing; Jia, Jinping

    2017-04-01

    In this work, leaf-like hybrid with Bi2O2CO3 nanotubes as the "veins" and graphene sheet as the "laminae" is fabricated via a facile one-pot reaction of bismuth nitrate and graphene oxide in alkaline aqueous solution. With the uniform distribution of Bi2O2CO3 nanotubes on the graphene substrate, the obtained Bi2O2CO3-NT/G manifests high specific surface area (90.4m(2)g(-1)) and large pore volume (0.197cm(3)g(-1)), which are favorable for the efficient light capturing together with the rapid transfer of mass and charge carriers. In comparison with the pure Bi2O2CO3 nanotubes and commercial Bi2O2CO3, Bi2O2CO3-NT/G exhibits much enhanced activity and long-term stability towards the photocatalytic degradation of organic dye pollutant, which is owing to its unique leaf-like structural features.

  2. Al2C Monolayer Sheet and Nanoribbons with Unique Direction-Dependent Acoustic-Phonon-Limited Carrier Mobility and Carrier Polarity.

    PubMed

    Xu, Yuehua; Dai, Jun; Zeng, Xiao Cheng

    2016-01-21

    The intrinsic acoustic-phonon-limited carrier mobility (μ) of Al2C monolayer sheet and nanoribbons are investigated using ab initio computation and deformation potential theory. It is found that the polarity of the room-temperature carrier mobility of the Al2C monolayer is direction-dependent, with μ of electron (e) and hole (h) being 2348 and 40.77 cm(2)/V/s, respectively, in the armchair direction and 59.95 (e) and 705.8 (h) in the zigzag direction. More interestingly, one-dimensional Al2C nanoribbons not only can retain the direction-dependent polarity but also may entail even higher mobility, in contrast to either the graphene nanoribbons which tend to exhibit lower μ compared to the two-dimensional graphene or the MoS2 nanoribbons which have reversed polarity compared to the MoS2 sheet. As an example, the Al-terminated zigzag nanoribbon with a width of 4.1 nm exhibits μ of 212.6 (e) and 2087 (h) cm(2)/V/s, while the C-terminated armchair nanoribbon with a width 2.6 nm exhibits μ of 1090 (e) and 673.9 (h) cm(2)/V/s; the C-terminated zigzag nanoribbon with a width 3.7 nm exhibits μ of 177.6 (e) and 1889 (h) cm(2)/V/s, and the Al-terminated armchair nanoribbon with a width 2.4 nm exhibits μ of 6695 (e) and 518.4 (h) cm(2)/V/s. The high carrier mobility, μ, coupled with polarity and direction dependence endows the Al2C sheet and nanoribbons with unique transport properties that can be exploited for special applications in nanoelectronics.

  3. Direct electrochemical determination of Candida albicans activity.

    PubMed

    Hassan, Rabeay Y A; Bilitewski, Ursula

    2013-11-15

    Despite advances made in the field, rapid detection methods for the human pathogen Candida albicans are still missing. In this regard, bio-electrochemical systems including electrochemical sensors and biosensors satisfy the increasing demand for rapid, reliable, and direct microbial analyses. In this study, the bioelectrochemical characteristics of C. albicans were investigated for use in an analytical system that determines the viability of the organisms. The electrochemical responses of viable and non-viable cells of C. albicans and Saccharomyces cerevisiae were monitored. Cyclic voltammograms (CV) showed an irreversible oxidation peak at about 750 mV that accounts for viable cells. The peak current increased at viable cell numbers ranging from 3 × 10(5) to 1.6 × 10(7)cells/ml, indicating that the amount of viable cells can be accurately quantified. To elucidate the underlying electron transfer processes, the influence of electron transfer chain (ETC) - inhibitors on the electrochemical behavior of the two organisms were investigated. Inhibition of the function of classical respiratory chain (CRC) led to a decrease in the electrochemical response, whereas the oxidation current increased when the alternative oxidase (AOX) pathway was blocked by salicylhydroxamic acid (SHA). Blocking the AOX pathway improved the electrochemical performance, suggesting an involvement in the CRC, with cytochrome c oxidase (COX) as a relevant protein complex. Mutants, in which components of COX were deleted, showed a lower electro-activity than the wild-type strain. Particularly, deletion of subunit COX5a almost completely abolished the electrochemical signal. We believe that this work can be utilized for the development of early detection assays and opens the door for new technological developments in the field of C. albicans.

  4. Coronal Hole-Active Region-Current Sheet (CHARCS) Association with Intense Interplanetary and Geomagnetic Activity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gonzalez, W. D.; Tsurutani, B. T.; McIntosh, P. S.; Gonzalez, A. L.

    1996-01-01

    Intense geomagnetic storms (Dstactive regions(flares and/or filament eruptions) ocurring close to the streamer belt and to growing low altitude coronal holes. It is also shown that such type of coronal holes had a dual-peak solar cycle distribution during solar cycle 21, similar to that previously reported for the above mentioned interplanetary and geomagnetic phenomena.

  5. Seismicity on the western Greenland Ice Sheet: Surface fracture in the vicinity of active moulins

    DOE PAGES

    Carmichael, Joshua D.; Joughin, Ian; Behn, Mark D.; ...

    2015-06-25

    We analyzed geophone and GPS measurements collected within the ablation zone of the western Greenland Ice Sheet during a ~35 day period of the 2011 melt season to study changes in ice deformation before, during, and after a supraglacial lake drainage event. During rapid lake drainage, ice flow speeds increased to ~400% of winter values, and icequake activity peaked. At times >7 days after drainage, this seismicity developed variability over both diurnal and longer periods (~10 days), while coincident ice speeds fell to ~150% of winter values and showed nightly peaks in spatial variability. Approximately 95% of all detected seismicitymore » in the lake basin and its immediate vicinity was triggered by fracture propagation within near-surface ice (<330 m deep) that generated Rayleigh waves. Icequakes occurring before and during drainage frequently were collocated with the down flow (west) end of the primary hydrofracture through which the lake drained but shifted farther west and outside the lake basin after the drainage. We interpret these results to reveal vertical hydrofracture opening and local uplift during the drainage, followed by enhanced seismicity and ice flow on the downstream side of the lake basin. This region collocates with interferometric synthetic aperture radar-measured speedup in previous years and could reflect the migration path of the meltwater supplied to the bed by the lake. The diurnal seismic signal can be associated with nightly reductions in surface melt input that increase effective basal pressure and traction, thereby promoting elevated strain in the surficial ice.« less

  6. Modeling the transition between upper plane bed regime and sheet flow without an active layer formulation. Preliminary results.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Viparelli, E.; Hernandez Moreira, R. R.; Blom, A.

    2015-12-01

    A perusal of the literature on bedload transport revealed that, notwithstanding the large number of studies on bedform morphology performed in the past decades, the upper plane bed regime has not been thoroughly investigated and the distinction between the upper plane bed and sheet flow transport regimes is still poorly defined. Previous experimental work demonstrated that the upper plane bed regime is characterized by long wavelength and small amplitude bedforms that migrate downstream. These bedforms, however, were not observed in experiments on sheet flow transport suggesting that the upper plane bed and the sheet flow are two different regimes. We thus designed and performed experiments in a sediment feed flume in the hydraulic laboratory of the Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering at the University of South Carolina at Columbia to study the transition from upper plane bed to sheet flow regime. Periodic measurements of water surface and bed elevation, bedform geometry and thicknesses of the bedload layer were performed by eyes, and with cameras, movies and a system of six ultrasonic probes that record the variations of bed elevation at a point over time. We used the time series of bed elevations to determine the probability functions of bed elevation. These probability functions are implemented in a continuous model of river morphodynamics, i.e. a model that does not use the active layer approximation to describe the sediment fluxes between the bedload and the deposit and that should thus be able to capture the details of the vertical and streamwise variation of the deposit grain size distribution. This model is validated against the experimental results for the case of uniform material. We then use the validated model in the attempt to study if and how the spatial distribution of grain sizes in the deposit changes from upper plane bed regime to sheet flow and if these results are influenced by the imposed rates of base level rise.

  7. Polarization features of solar radio emission and possible existence of current sheets in active regions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gopalswamy, N.; Zheleznyakov, V. V.; White, S. M.; Kundu, M. R.

    1994-01-01

    We show that it is possible to account for the polarization features of solar radio emission provided the linear mode coupling theory is properly applied and the presence of current sheets in the corona is taken into account. We present a schematic model, including a current sheet that can explain the polarization features of both the low frequency slowly varying component and the bipolar noise storm radiation; the two radiations face similar propagation conditions through a current sheet and hence display similar polarization behavior. We discuss the applications of the linear mode coupling theory to the following types of solar emission: the slowly varying component, the microwave radio bursts, metric type U bursts, and bipolar noise storms.

  8. Multiple-satellite studies of magnetospheric substorms: Plasma sheet recovery and the poleward leap of auroral-zone activity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pytte, T.; Mcpherron, R. L.; Kivelson, M. G.; West, H. I., Jr.; Hones, E. W., Jr.

    1977-01-01

    Particle observations from pairs of satellites (Ogo 5, Vela 4A and 5B, Imp 3) during the recovery of plasma sheet thickness late in substorms were examined. Six of the nine events occurred within about 5 min in locations near the estimated position of the neutral sheet, but over wide ranges of east-west and radial separations. The time of occurrence and spatial extent of the recovery were related to the onset (defined by ground Pi 2 pulsations) and approximate location (estimated from ground mid-latitude magnetic signatures) of substorm expansions. It was found that the plasma sheet recovery occurred 10 - 30 min after the last in a series of Pi bursts, which were interpreted to indicate that the recovery was not due directly to a late, high latitude substorm expansion. The recovery was also observed to occur after the substorm current wedge had moved into the evening sector and to extend far to the east of the center of the last preceding substorm expansion.

  9. A melamine-assisted chemical blowing synthesis of N-doped activated carbon sheets for supercapacitor application

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Yiliang; Xuan, Huaqing; Lin, Gaoxin; Wang, Fan; Chen, Zhi; Dong, Xiaoping

    2016-07-01

    N-doped activated carbon sheets (NACS) have been successfully synthesized using glucose as carbon source via melamine-assisted chemical blowing and sequent KOH-activation method. The obtained carbon material possesses a sheet-like morphology with ultrathin thickness, hierarchical micro/mesoporous structure, high specific surface area (up to 1997.5 m2 g-1) and high pore volume (0.94 cm3 g-1). Besides, NACS material with a nitrogen content of 3.06 wt% presents a maximum specific capacitance of 312 F g-1 at a current density of 0.5 A g-1 in 6 M KOH aqueous electrolyte due to the cocontribution of double layer capacitance and pseudocapacitance. It also displays good rate performance (246 F g-1 at 30 A g-1) and cycle stability (∼91.3% retention after 4000 galvanostatic charge-discharge cycles). The assembled NACS-based symmetric capacitor exhibits a maximum energy density of 20.2 Wh kg-1 at a power density of 448 W kg-1 within a voltage range of 0-1.8 V in 0.5 M Na2SO4 aqueous electrolyte. Thus, the unique porous sheet structure and nitrogen-doping characteristic endue the electrode material a potential application for high-performance supercapacitors.

  10. Surface Structure Dependent Electrocatalytic Activity of Co3O4 Anchored on Graphene Sheets toward Oxygen Reduction Reaction

    PubMed Central

    Xiao, Junwu; Kuang, Qin; Yang, Shihe; Xiao, Fei; Wang, Shuai; Guo, Lin

    2013-01-01

    Catalytic activity is primarily a surface phenomenon, however, little is known about Co3O4 nanocrystals in terms of the relationship between the oxygen reduction reaction (ORR) catalytic activity and surface structure, especially when dispersed on a highly conducting support to improve the electrical conductivity and so to enhance the catalytic activity. Herein, we report a controllable synthesis of Co3O4 nanorods (NR), nanocubes (NC) and nano-octahedrons (OC) with the different exposed nanocrystalline surfaces ({110}, {100}, and {111}), uniformly anchored on graphene sheets, which has allowed us to investigate the effects of the surface structure on the ORR activity. Results show that the catalytically active sites for ORR should be the surface Co2+ ions, whereas the surface Co3+ ions catalyze CO oxidation, and the catalytic ability is closely related to the density of the catalytically active sites. These results underscore the importance of morphological control in the design of highly efficient ORR catalysts. PMID:23892418

  11. Red facts: Ethylene. Fact sheet

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1992-09-01

    EPA is directed by the Federal Insecticide, Fungicide, and Rodenticide Act as amended in 1988 (FIFRA '88) to review all pesticide products containing active ingredients initially registered before November 1, 1984, and to reregister those products that have a substantially complete data base and do not pose unreasonable adverse effects to people or the environment. The pesticide reregistration program is to be completed by the late 1990's. The RED FACTS fact sheet summarizes EPA's conclusion, as set forth in the Reregistration Eligibility Document (or RED), that products containing a pesticide do not pose unreasonable risks when used as directed by Agency-approved labeling, and are eligible for reregistration.

  12. Direct observation of single layer graphene oxide reduction through spatially resolved, single sheet absorption/emission microscopy.

    PubMed

    Sokolov, Denis A; Morozov, Yurii V; McDonald, Matthew P; Vietmeyer, Felix; Hodak, Jose H; Kuno, Masaru

    2014-06-11

    Laser reduction of graphene oxide (GO) offers unique opportunities for the rapid, nonchemical production of graphene. By tuning relevant reduction parameters, the band gap and conductivity of reduced GO can be precisely controlled. In situ monitoring of single layer GO reduction is therefore essential. In this report, we show the direct observation of laser-induced, single layer GO reduction through correlated changes to its absorption and emission. Absorption/emission movies illustrate the initial stages of single layer GO reduction, its transition to reduced-GO (rGO) as well as its subsequent decomposition upon prolonged laser illumination. These studies reveal GO's photoreduction life cycle and through it native GO/rGO absorption coefficients, their intrasheet distributions as well as their spatial heterogeneities. Extracted absorption coefficients for unreduced GO are α405 nm ≈ 6.5 ± 1.1 × 10(4) cm(-1), α520 nm ≈ 2.1 ± 0.4 × 10(4) cm(-1), and α640 nm ≈ 1.1 ± 0.3 × 10(4) cm(-1) while corresponding rGO α-values are α405 nm ≈ 21.6 ± 0.6 × 10(4) cm(-1), α520 nm ≈ 16.9 ± 0.4 × 10(4) cm(-1), and α640 nm ≈ 14.5 ± 0.4 × 10(4) cm(-1). More importantly, the correlated absorption/emission imaging provides us with unprecedented insight into GO's underlying photoreduction mechanism, given our ability to spatially resolve its kinetics and to connect local rate constants to activation energies. On a broader level, the developed absorption imaging is general and can be applied toward investigating the optical properties of other two-dimensional materials, especially those that are nonemissive and are invisible to current single molecule optical techniques.

  13. Plasma sheet ion composition at various levels of geomagnetic and solar activity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lennartsson, W.

    1987-01-01

    The data obtained in the earth's plasma sheet by the Plasma Composition Experiment on the ISEE-1 spacecraft are briefly reexamined. The data are shown in the form of statistically averaged bulk parameters for the four major ions H(+), He(2+), He(+), and O(+) to illustrate the apparent mixture of solar and terrestrial ions, a mixture that varies with geomagnetic and other conditions. Some major differences in the statistical properties of different ions, which may have a bearing on the physics of the solar wind-magnetosphere interaction, are highlighted.

  14. Plasma sheet ion composition at various levels of geomagnetic and solar activity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lennartsson, W.

    1987-08-01

    The data obtained in the earth's plasma sheet by the Plasma Composition Experiment on the ISEE-1 spacecraft are briefly reexamined. The data are shown in the form of statistically averaged bulk parameters for the four major ions H(+), He(2+), He(+), and O(+) to illustrate the apparent mixture of solar and terrestrial ions, a mixture that varies with geomagnetic and other conditions. Some major differences in the statistical properties of different ions, which may have a bearing on the physics of the solar wind-magnetosphere interaction, are highlighted.

  15. Preparation of magnetic Co/graphene sheets composites and investigation on its catalytic activity for H2 generation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Dongcui; Nan, Zhaodong

    2016-12-01

    A cobalt (Co)/graphene sheets (GRs) composite was synthesized via a one-pot chemical method. The composite shows high saturation magnetizations (Ms), which leads it to be conveniently separated from aqueous solution by an external magnetic field. Compared to the pure Co and some references, the catalytic activity of the as-obtained composite was significantly enhanced for the generation of H2 gas by hydrolysis of NaBH4 solution. Effects of NaBH4 initial concentration, the composite and reaction temperature on the H2 generation rate were investigated. The H2 generation rate is independent with the initial NaBH4 concentration, increased with the reaction temperature increasing. The composite can be continuously used several times with about the same catalytic activity.

  16. The β-sheet core is the favored candidate of engineering SDR for enhancing thermostability but not for activity.

    PubMed

    Lou, Deshuai; Tan, Jun; Zhu, Liancai; Ji, Shunlin; Wang, Bochu

    2017-01-26

    7α-Hydroxysteroid dehydrogenases (7α-HSDHs) can stereoselectively catalyze steroids, aromatic α-ketoesters, and benzaldehyde analogues playing a critical role in the biotransformation and poor thermostability that hinders their biomedical and industrial applications. Based on the three-dimensional structure of 7α-HSDH from Clostridium absonum (CA 7α-HSDH), recently reported program MAESTRO was used to compute the ΔΔG and predict the single-point mutants that could enhance its thermostability. Four mutants were selected and verified experimentally. The results from the circular dichroism spectrum indicated that three of the mutants, N89L, N184I, and A185I, fitted a three-state model and the values for TmN→I and TmI→D increased with different ranges. In particular, the TmN→I for the N184I mutant increased maximally by 9.93°C. Meanwhile, the denaturation process of the G189I mutant fitted the two-state model and it was more stable than the wild type, judging from the denaturation curves. Nevertheless, the enzyme catalytic activity analysis suggested that only the N89L mutant held a 2.28% catalytic efficiency, compared to the wild type, CA 7α-HSDH, and the activities of the other three mutants could not be detected. Molecular dynamics (MD) simulations were performed to determine the structural changes that occurred in the mutations and the results indicated that β-sheet structures in the mutants without detectable activity had changed significantly. Judging from the locations of the mutated sites, residues in the β-sheet core were considered as the favored candidates for SDR engineering to enhance the thermostability but not for activity holding.

  17. Web-based Tools for Educators: Outreach Activities of the Polar Radar for Ice Sheet Measurements (PRISM) Project

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Braaten, D. A.; Holvoet, J. F.; Gogineni, S.

    2003-12-01

    The Radar Systems and Remote Sensing Laboratory at the University of Kansas (KU) has implemented extensive outreach activities focusing on Polar Regions as part of the Polar Radar for Ice Sheet Measurements (PRISM) project. The PRISM project is developing advanced intelligent remote sensing technology that involves radar systems, an autonomous rover, and communications systems to measure detailed ice sheet characteristics, and to determine bed conditions (frozen or wet) below active ice sheets in both Greenland and Antarctica. These measurements will provide a better understanding of the response of polar ice sheets to global climate change and the resulting impact the ice sheets will have on sea level rise. Many of the research and technological development aspects of the PRISM project, such as robotics, radar systems, climate change and exploration of harsh environments, can kindle an excitement and interest in students about science and technology. These topics form the core of our K-12 education and training outreach initiatives, which are designed to capture the imagination of young students, and prompt them to consider an educational path that will lead them to scientific or engineering careers. The K-12 PRISM outreach initiatives are being developed and implemented in a collaboration with the Advanced Learning Technology Program (ALTec) of the High Plains Regional Technology in Education Consortium (HPR*TEC). ALTec is associated with the KU School of Education, and is a well-established educational research center that develops and hosts web tools to enable teachers nationwide to network, collaborate, and share resources with other teachers. An example of an innovative and successful web interface developed by ALTec is called TrackStar. Teachers can use TrackStar over the Web to develop interactive, resource-based lessons (called tracks) on-line for their students. Once developed, tracks are added to the TrackStar database and can be accessed and modified

  18. Copper and protons directly activate the zinc-activated channel.

    PubMed

    Trattnig, Sarah M; Gasiorek, Agnes; Deeb, Tarek Z; Ortiz, Eydith J Comenencia; Moss, Stephen J; Jensen, Anders A; Davies, Paul A

    2016-03-01

    The zinc-activated channel (ZAC) is a cationic ion channel belonging to the superfamily of Cys-loop receptors, which consists of pentameric ligand-gated ion channels. ZAC is the least understood member of this family so in the present study we sought to characterize the properties of this channel further. We demonstrate that not only zinc (Zn(2+)) but also copper (Cu(2+)) and protons (H(+)) are agonists of ZAC, displaying potencies and efficacies in the rank orders of H(+)>Cu(2+)>Zn(2+) and H(+)>Zn(2+)>Cu(2+), respectively. The responses elicited by Zn(2+), Cu(2+) and H(+) through ZAC are all characterized by low degrees of desensitization. In contrast, currents evoked by high concentrations of the three agonists comprise distinctly different activation and decay components, with transitions to and from an open state being significantly faster for H(+) than for the two metal ions. The permeabilities of ZAC for Na(+) and K(+) relative to Cs(+) are indistinguishable, whereas replacing all of extracellular Na(+) and K(+) with the divalent cations Ca(2+) or Mg(2+) results in complete elimination of Zn(2+)-activated currents at both negative and positive holding potentials. This indicates that ZAC is non-selectively permeable to monovalent cations, whereas Ca(2+) and Mg(2+) inhibit the channel. In conclusion, this is the first report of a Cys-loop receptor being gated by Zn(2+), Cu(2+) and H(+). ZAC could be an important mediator of some of the wide range of physiological functions regulated by or involving Zn(2+), Cu(2+) and H(+).

  19. Effect of material flow on joint strength in activation spot joining of Al alloy and steel sheets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Watanabe, Goro; Yogo, Yasuhiro; Takao, Hisaaki

    2014-08-01

    A new joining method for dissimilar metal sheets was developed where a rotated consumable rod of Al alloy is pressed onto an Al alloy sheet at the part overlapped with a mild steel sheet. The metal flow in the joining region is increased by the through-hole in the Al sheet and consumable Al rod. The rod creates the joint interface and pads out of the thinly joined parts through pressing. This produces a higher joint strength than that of conventional friction stir spot welding. Measurements of the joint interface showed the presence of a 5-10 nm thick amorphous layer consisting of Al and Mg oxides.

  20. Controllable curvature from planar polymer sheets in response to light.

    PubMed

    Hubbard, Amber M; Mailen, Russell W; Zikry, Mohammed A; Dickey, Michael D; Genzer, Jan

    2017-02-24

    The ability to change shape and control curvature in 3D structures starting from planar sheets can aid in assembly and add functionality to an object. Herein, we convert planar sheets of shape memory polymers (SMPs) into 3D objects with controllable curvature by dictating where the sheets shrink. Ink patterned on the surface of the sheet absorbs infrared (IR) light, resulting in localized heating, and the material shrinks locally wherever the temperature exceeds the activation temperature, Ta. We introduce two different mechanisms for controlling curvature within SMP sheets. The 'direct' mechanism uses localized shrinkage to induce curvature only in regions patterned with ink. The 'indirect' mechanism uses localized shrinkage in regions patterned with ink to induce curvature in neighboring regions without ink through a balance of internal stresses. Finite element analysis predicts the final shape of the polymer sheets with excellent qualitative agreement with experimental studies. Results from this study show that curvature can be controlled by the distribution and darkness of the ink pattern on the polymer sheet. Additionally, we utilize the direct and indirect curvature mechanisms to demonstrate the formation and actuation of gripper devices, which represent the potential utility of this approach.

  1. Evidence for Subglacial Volcanic Activity Beneath the area of the Divide of the West Antarctic Ice Sheet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Behrendt, J. C.

    2013-12-01

    There is an increasing body of aeromagnetic, radar ice-sounding, heat flow, subglacial volcanic earthquakes, several exposed active and subglacial volcanoes and other lines of evidence for volcanic activity associated with the West Antarctic Rift System (WR) since the origin (~25 Ma) of the West Antarctic Ice Sheet (WAIS), which flows through it. Exposed late Cenozoic, alkaline volcanic rocks, 34 Ma to present concentrated in Marie Byrd Land (LeMasurier and Thomson, 1990), but also exposed along the rift shoulder on the Transantarctic Mountains flank of the WR, and >1 million cubic kilometers, of mostly subglacially erupted 'volcanic centers' beneath the WAIS inferred from aeromagnetic data, have been interpreted as evidence of a magmatic plume. About 18 high relief, (~600-2000 m) 'volcanic centers' presently beneath the WAIS surface, probably were erupted subaerially when the WAIS was absent, based on the 5-km orthogonally line spaced Central West Antarctica aerogeophysical survey. All would be above sea level after ice removal and isostatic adjustment. Nine of these high relief peaks are in the general area beneath the divide of the WAIS. This high bed relief topography was first interpreted in the 1980s as the volcanic 'Sinuous Ridge ' based on a widely spaced aeromagnetic -radar ice sounding survey (Jankowski et al,. 1983). A 70-km wide, circular ring of interpreted subglacial volcanic rocks was cited as evidence of a volcanic caldera underlying the ice sheet divide based on the CWA survey (Behrendt et al., 1998). A broad magnetic 'low' surrounding the caldera area possibly is evidence of a shallow Curie isotherm. High heat flow reported from temperature logging (Clow et al., 2012) in the WAISCORE and a thick volcanic ash layer in the core (Dunbar et al., 2012) are consistent with this interpretation. A 2 km-high subaerially erupted volcano (subglacial Mt Thiel, ~78.5 degrees S, 111 degrees W) ~ 100 km north from the WAISCORE could be the source of the ash

  2. Activated FcgammaRII and signalling molecules revealed in rafts by ultra-structural observations of plasma-membrane sheets.

    PubMed

    Strzelecka-Kiliszek, Agnieszka; Korzeniowski, Marek; Kwiatkowska, Katarzyna; Mrozińska, Kazimiera; Sobota, Andrzej

    2004-01-01

    To reveal topography of FcgammaRII components of the receptor-signalling complex, large plasma-membrane sheets were obtained by cell cleavage and analysed by immuno-electron microscopy. Non-activated FcgammaRII was dispersed in the plane of the plasma membrane and only rarely was localized in the proximity of Lyn, an Src family tyrosine kinase, and CD55, a glycosylphosphatidylinositol-anchored protein. After FcgammaRII activation by cross-linking with antibodies, clusters of an electron-dense material acquiring about 86% of FcgammaRII and reaching up to 300 nm in diameter were formed within 5 min. These structures also accommodated about 85% of Lyn and 63% of CD55 labels that were located in close vicinity of gold particles attributed to the cross-linked FcgammaRII . The electron-dense structures were also abundant in tyrosine phosphorylated proteins. At their margins PIP2 was preferentially located. Based on a concentration of Lyn, CD55 and activated FcgammaRII , the electron-dense structures seem to reflect coalescent membrane rafts.

  3. Clouds enhance Greenland ice sheet meltwater runoff.

    PubMed

    Van Tricht, K; Lhermitte, S; Lenaerts, J T M; Gorodetskaya, I V; L'Ecuyer, T S; Noël, B; van den Broeke, M R; Turner, D D; van Lipzig, N P M

    2016-01-12

    The Greenland ice sheet has become one of the main contributors to global sea level rise, predominantly through increased meltwater runoff. The main drivers of Greenland ice sheet runoff, however, remain poorly understood. Here we show that clouds enhance meltwater runoff by about one-third relative to clear skies, using a unique combination of active satellite observations, climate model data and snow model simulations. This impact results from a cloud radiative effect of 29.5 (±5.2) W m(-2). Contrary to conventional wisdom, however, the Greenland ice sheet responds to this energy through a new pathway by which clouds reduce meltwater refreezing as opposed to increasing surface melt directly, thereby accelerating bare-ice exposure and enhancing meltwater runoff. The high sensitivity of the Greenland ice sheet to both ice-only and liquid-bearing clouds highlights the need for accurate cloud representations in climate models, to better predict future contributions of the Greenland ice sheet to global sea level rise.

  4. Clouds enhance Greenland ice sheet meltwater runoff

    PubMed Central

    Van Tricht, K.; Lhermitte, S.; Lenaerts, J. T. M.; Gorodetskaya, I. V.; L'Ecuyer, T. S.; Noël, B.; van den Broeke, M. R.; Turner, D. D.; van Lipzig, N. P. M.

    2016-01-01

    The Greenland ice sheet has become one of the main contributors to global sea level rise, predominantly through increased meltwater runoff. The main drivers of Greenland ice sheet runoff, however, remain poorly understood. Here we show that clouds enhance meltwater runoff by about one-third relative to clear skies, using a unique combination of active satellite observations, climate model data and snow model simulations. This impact results from a cloud radiative effect of 29.5 (±5.2) W m−2. Contrary to conventional wisdom, however, the Greenland ice sheet responds to this energy through a new pathway by which clouds reduce meltwater refreezing as opposed to increasing surface melt directly, thereby accelerating bare-ice exposure and enhancing meltwater runoff. The high sensitivity of the Greenland ice sheet to both ice-only and liquid-bearing clouds highlights the need for accurate cloud representations in climate models, to better predict future contributions of the Greenland ice sheet to global sea level rise. PMID:26756470

  5. Clouds enhance Greenland ice sheet meltwater runoff

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Van Tricht, Kristof; Lhermitte, Stef; Lenaerts, Jan T. M.; Gorodetskaya, Irina V.; L'Ecuyer, Tristan S.; Noël, Brice; van den Broeke, Michiel R.; Turner, David D.; van Lipzig, Nicole P. M.

    2016-04-01

    The Greenland ice sheet has become one of the main contributors to global sea level rise, predominantly through increased meltwater runoff. The main drivers of Greenland ice sheet runoff, however, remain poorly understood. Here we show that clouds enhance meltwater runoff by about one-third relative to clear skies, using a unique combination of active satellite observations, climate model data and snow model simulations. This impact results from a cloud radiative effect of 29.5 (±5.2) W m-2. Contrary to conventional wisdom, however, the Greenland ice sheet responds to this energy through a new pathway by which clouds reduce meltwater refreezing as opposed to increasing surface melt directly, thereby accelerating bare-ice exposure and enhancing meltwater runoff. The high sensitivity of the Greenland ice sheet to both ice-only and liquid-bearing clouds highlights the need for accurate cloud representations in climate models, to better predict future contributions of the Greenland ice sheet to global sea level rise.

  6. NREL Team Creates High-Activity, Durable Platinum Extended Surface Catalyst for Fuel Cells (Fact Sheet)

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    2011-02-01

    Researchers with NREL's Fuel Cell team showed that platinum can replace copper nanowires in such a way that high-surface-area and high-specific-activity catalysts are produced, potentially allowing for lower-cost catalysts.

  7. Magma flow directions in the sheeted dike complex at superfast spreading mid-ocean ridges: Insights from IODP Hole 1256D, Eastern Pacific

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Veloso, Eugenio E.; Hayman, Nicholas W.; Anma, Ryo; Tominaga, Masako; González, Rodrigo T.; Yamazaki, Toshitsugu; Astudillo, Natalia

    2014-04-01

    Integrated Ocean Drilling Program (IODP) Hole 1256D successfully sampled a complete section of an intact oceanic crustal sheeted dike complex (SDC) (from 1061 to 1320 meters below seafloor; mbsf) on a 15 Ma old Cocos Plate. A series of rock magnetic measurements were carried out to understand the magmatic processes that accreted this end-member, superfast-spread (200 mm/yr full rate) oceanic crust. Results indicate that main ferromagnetic minerals are predominantly pseudo single-domain (titano)magnetite crystals, responsible for both anisotropy of magnetic susceptibility (AMS) and magnetic remanence signals. AMS fabrics were reoriented into a geographic reference frame using magnetic remanence data, and corrected for a counterclockwise rotation of the Cocos Plate relative to the East Pacific Rise (EPR) ca. 15 Ma. Corrected AMS fabrics were then compared with the orientations of chilled margins previously obtained from Formation MicroScanner (FMS) images of the SDC at Hole 1256D. For some samples taken from close to dike margins, a dike-normal orientation of the minimum AMS axes (Kmin) of prolate AMS ellipsoids mean that the long axis (Kmax) can be used to infer magma flow directions. Subvertical Kmin orientations in the interior of the dikes, however, may have required settling or compaction of the magma shortly after intrusion, thus rearranging the AMS fabric. Despite this orientation of Kmin axes, orientation of Kmax axes indicate a rather constant subhorizontal paleo-flow direction, suggesting that magmas most probably traveled to the surface considerable distances from source regions within the EPR system.

  8. The adaptor protein Cindr regulates JNK activity to maintain epithelial sheet integrity.

    PubMed

    Yasin, Hannah W R; van Rensburg, Samuel H; Feiler, Christina E; Johnson, Ruth I

    2016-02-15

    Epithelia are essential barrier tissues that must be appropriately maintained for their correct function. To achieve this a plethora of protein interactions regulate epithelial cell number, structure and adhesion, and differentiation. Here we show that Cindr (the Drosophila Cin85 and Cd2ap ortholog) is required to maintain epithelial integrity. Reducing Cindr triggered cell delamination and movement. Most delaminating cells died. These behaviors were consistent with JNK activation previously associated with loss of epithelial integrity in response to ectopic oncogene activity. We confirmed a novel interaction between Cindr and Drosophila JNK (dJNK), which when perturbed caused inappropriate JNK signaling. Genetically reducing JNK signaling activity suppressed the effects of reducing Cindr. Furthermore, ectopic JNK signaling phenocopied loss of Cindr and was partially rescued by concomitant cindr over-expression. Thus, correct Cindr-dJNK stoichiometry is essential to maintain epithelial integrity and disturbing this balance may contribute to the pathogenesis of disease states, including cancer.

  9. 46 CFR 232.4 - Balance sheet accounts.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 8 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Balance sheet accounts. 232.4 Section 232.4 Shipping... ACTIVITIES UNIFORM FINANCIAL REPORTING REQUIREMENTS Balance Sheet § 232.4 Balance sheet accounts. (a.... (b) Purpose of balance sheet accounts. The balance sheet accounts are intended to disclose...

  10. 46 CFR 232.4 - Balance sheet accounts.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 8 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Balance sheet accounts. 232.4 Section 232.4 Shipping... ACTIVITIES UNIFORM FINANCIAL REPORTING REQUIREMENTS Balance Sheet § 232.4 Balance sheet accounts. (a.... (b) Purpose of balance sheet accounts. The balance sheet accounts are intended to disclose...

  11. 46 CFR 232.4 - Balance sheet accounts.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 8 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Balance sheet accounts. 232.4 Section 232.4 Shipping... ACTIVITIES UNIFORM FINANCIAL REPORTING REQUIREMENTS Balance Sheet § 232.4 Balance sheet accounts. (a.... (b) Purpose of balance sheet accounts. The balance sheet accounts are intended to disclose...

  12. Air Guide for Sheet-Metal Grinder

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Heermann, T.

    1984-01-01

    Tool attachment reduces heat distortion of sheet. Air-guide attachment directs air from grinder motor to grinding wheel and metal sheet being ground. Cooling air reduces thermal distortion of workpiece due to localized frictional heating. Particularly useful when grinding sheet metal.

  13. Design and biological activity of {beta}-sheet breaker peptide conjugates

    SciTech Connect

    Rocha, Sandra Cardoso, Isabel; Boerner, Hans; Pereira, Maria Carmo; Saraiva, Maria Joao; Coelho, Manuel

    2009-03-06

    The sequence LPFFD (iA{beta}{sub 5}) prevents amyloid-{beta} peptide (A{beta}) fibrillogenesis and neurotoxicity, hallmarks of Alzheimer's disease (AD), as previously demonstrated. In this study iA{beta}{sub 5} was covalently linked to poly(ethylene glycol) (PEG) and the activity of conjugates was assessed and compared to the activity of the peptide alone by in vitro studies. The conjugates were characterized by MALDI-TOF. Competition binding assays established that conjugates retained the ability to bind A{beta} with similar strength as iA{beta}{sub 5}. Transmission electron microscopy analysis showed that iA{beta}{sub 5} conjugates inhibited amyloid fibril formation, which is in agreement with binding properties observed for the conjugates towards A{beta}. The conjugates were also able to prevent amyloid-induced cell death, as evaluated by activation of caspase 3. These results demonstrated that the biological activity of iA{beta}{sub 5} is not affected by the pegylation process.

  14. The Marfan Syndrome. Fact Sheet [and] Physical Education and Activity Guidelines.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National Marfan Foundation, Port Washington, NY.

    This document consists of two brochures, the first explaining the Marfan Syndrome and a second providing guidelines for physical education and activity for people who have this syndrome are provided. The brochure on factual information about Marfan syndrome outlines the associated medical problems involving the cardiovascular system, the skeleton,…

  15. Dental Charting. Learning Activities, Unit Tests, Progress Chart, and Work Sheet.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Texas Univ., Austin. Center for Occupational Curriculum Development.

    These materials are part of a series dealing with skills and information needed by students in dental assisting. The individualized student materials are suitable for classroom, laboratory, or cooperative training programs. These student materials, designed to be used with the Dental Charting Student Manual, consist of learning activities, unit…

  16. Direct Activation of Bax Protein for Cancer Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Zhiqing; Ding, Ye; Ye, Na; Wild, Christopher; Chen, Haiying; Zhou, Jia

    2015-01-01

    Bax, a central cell death regulator, is an indispensable gateway to mitochondrial dysfunction and a major pro-apoptotic member of the Bcl-2 family proteins that control apoptosis in normal and cancer cells. Dysfunction of apoptosis renders the cancer cell resistant to treatment as well as promotes tumorigenesis. Bax activation induces mitochondrial membrane permeabilization, thereby leading to the release of apoptotic factor cytochrome c and consequently cancer cell death. A number of drugs in clinical use are known to indirectly activate Bax. Intriguingly, recent efforts demonstrate that Bax can serve as a promising direct target for small-molecule drug discovery. Several direct Bax activators have been identified to hold promise for cancer therapy with the advantages of specificity and the potential of overcoming chemo- and radioresistance. Further investigation of this new class of drug candidates will be needed to advance them into the clinic as a novel means to treat cancer. PMID:26395559

  17. Ohm's law for a current sheet

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lyons, L. R.; Speiser, T. W.

    1985-01-01

    The paper derives an Ohm's law for single-particle motion in a current sheet, where the magnetic field reverses in direction across the sheet. The result is considerably different from the resistive Ohm's law often used in MHD studies of the geomagnetic tail. Single-particle analysis is extended to obtain a self-consistency relation for a current sheet which agrees with previous results. The results are applicable to the concept of reconnection in that the electric field parallel to the current is obtained for a one-dimensional current sheet with constant normal magnetic field. Dissipated energy goes directly into accelerating particles within the current sheet.

  18. Current status of solar cell performance of unconventional silicon sheets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yoo, H. I.; Liu, J. K.

    1981-01-01

    It is pointed out that activities in recent years directed towards reduction in the cost of silicon solar cells for terrestrial photovoltaic applications have resulted in impressive advancements in the area of silicon sheet formation from melt. The techniques used in the process of sheet formation can be divided into two general categories. All approaches in one category require subsequent ingot wavering. The various procedures of the second category produce silicon in sheet form. The performance of baseline solar cells is discussed. The baseline process included identification marking, slicing to size, and surface treatment (etch-polishing) when needed. Attention is also given to the performance of cells with process variations, and the effects of sheet quality on performance and processing.

  19. Direct activation of cardiac pacemaker channels by intracellular cyclic AMP.

    PubMed

    DiFrancesco, D; Tortora, P

    1991-05-09

    Cyclic AMP acts as a second messenger in the modulation of several ion channels that are typically controlled by a phosphorylation process. In cardiac pacemaker cells, adrenaline and acetylcholine regulate the hyperpolarization-activated current (if), but in opposite ways; this current is involved in the generation and modulation of pacemaker activity. These actions are mediated by cAMP and underlie control of spontaneous rate by neurotransmitters. Whether the cAMP modulation of if is mediated by channel phosphorylation is, however, still unknown. Here we investigate the action of cAMP on if in excised patches of cardiac pacemaker cells and find that cAMP activates if by a mechanism independent of phosphorylation, involving a direct interaction with the channels at their cytoplasmic side. Cyclic AMP activates if by shifting its activation curve to more positive voltages, in agreement with whole-cell results. This is the first evidence of an ion channel whose gating is dually regulated by voltage and direct cAMP binding.

  20. The Asymmetric Active Coupler: Stable Nonlinear Supermodes and Directed Transport

    PubMed Central

    Kominis, Yannis; Bountis, Tassos; Flach, Sergej

    2016-01-01

    We consider the asymmetric active coupler (AAC) consisting of two coupled dissimilar waveguides with gain and loss. We show that under generic conditions, not restricted by parity-time symmetry, there exist finite-power, constant-intensity nonlinear supermodes (NS), resulting from the balance between gain, loss, nonlinearity, coupling and dissimilarity. The system is shown to possess non-reciprocal dynamics enabling directed power transport functionality. PMID:27640818

  1. Allergen extracts directly mobilize and activate human eosinophils.

    PubMed

    Svensson, Lena; Rudin, Anna; Wennerås, Christine

    2004-06-01

    Allergic diseases are characterized by the presence of eosinophils, which are recruited to the affected tissues by chemoattractants produced by T cells, mast cells and epithelium. Our objective was to evaluate if allergens can directly activate human eosinophils. The capacity of purified allergen extracts to elicit eosinophil chemotaxis, respiratory burst, degranulation and up-regulation of the adhesion molecule complement receptor 3 (CR3) was determined in eosinophils isolated from healthy blood donors. Eosinophils stimulated with an extract from house dust mite (HDM) released the granule protein major basic protein (MBP) and up-regulated the surface expression of CR3. Cat allergen extracts also induced the up-regulation of CR3, but not the release of MBP; instead cat, as well as birch and grass allergens, elicited the release of eosinophil peroxidase (EPO). In addition, grass pollen extract caused the secretion of MBP. None of the allergens stimulated eosinophilic cationic protein release, nor production of free oxygen radicals. Both HDM and birch extracts were chemotactic for eosinophils. These findings establish that common aeroallergens can directly activate eosinophils in vitro. We propose that eosinophil activation in vivo is not exclusively mediated by cytokines and chemokines of the allergic inflammatory reaction, but could partly be the result of direct interaction between allergens and eosinophils.

  2. Vertically scanned laser sheet microscopy.

    PubMed

    Dong, Di; Arranz, Alicia; Zhu, Shouping; Yang, Yujie; Shi, Liangliang; Wang, Jun; Shen, Chen; Tian, Jie; Ripoll, Jorge

    2014-01-01

    Laser sheet microscopy is a widely used imaging technique for imaging the three-dimensional distribution of a fluorescence signal in fixed tissue or small organisms. In laser sheet microscopy, the stripe artifacts caused by high absorption or high scattering structures are very common, greatly affecting image quality. To solve this problem, we report here a two-step procedure which consists of continuously acquiring laser sheet images while vertically displacing the sample, and then using the variational stationary noise remover (VSNR) method to further reduce the remaining stripes. Images from a cleared murine colon acquired with a vertical scan are compared with common stitching procedures demonstrating that vertically scanned light sheet microscopy greatly improves the performance of current light sheet microscopy approaches without the need for complex changes to the imaging setup and allows imaging of elongated samples, extending the field of view in the vertical direction.

  3. Self-enhanced catalytic activities of functionalized graphene sheets in the combustion of nitromethane: molecular dynamic simulations by molecular reactive force field.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Chaoyang; Wen, Yushi; Xue, Xianggui

    2014-08-13

    Functionalized graphene sheet (FGS) is a promising additive that enhances fuel/propellant combustion, and the determination of its mechanism has attracted much interest. In the present study, a series of molecular dynamic simulations based on a reactive force field (ReaxFF) are performed to explore the catalytic activity (CA) of FGS in the thermal decay of nitromethane (NM, CH3NO2). FGSs and pristine graphene sheets (GSs) are oxidized in hot NM liquid to increase their functionalities and subsequently show self-enhanced CAs during the decay. The CAs result from the interatomic exchanges between the functional groups on the sheets and the NM liquid, i.e., mainly between H and O atoms. CA is dependent on the density of NM, functionalities of sheets, and temperature. The GSs and FGSs that originally exhibit different functionalities tend to possess similar functionalities and consequently similar CAs as temperature increases. Other carbon materials and their oxides can accelerate combustion of other fuels/propellants similar to NM, provided that they can be dispersed and their key reaction steps in combustion are similar to NM.

  4. Coseismic Faulting and Folding in an Active Thrust Sheet over Multiple Rupture Cycles Resolved by Integrating Surface and Subsurface Records of Earthquake Deformation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stockmeyer, J. M.; Shaw, J. H.; Brown, N.; Rhodes, E. J.; Wang, M.; Lavin, L. C.; Guan, S.

    2015-12-01

    Many recent thrust fault earthquakes have involved coseismic surface faulting and folding, revealing the complex nature of surface deformation in active thrust sheets. In this study, we characterize deformation along the active Southern Junggar Thrust (SJT) in the Junggar basin, NW China - which sourced the 1906 M8 Manas earthquake - to gain insight into how fault slip at depth is partitioned between faulting and folding strains at Earth's surface by integrating deformed terrace records, subsurface geophysical data, and luminescence geochronology. Using a 1-m digital elevation model and field surveys, we have mapped the precise geometries of fluvial terraces across the entire Tugulu anticline, which lies in the hanging wall of the SJT. These profiles reveal progressive uplift of several terraces along prominent fault scarps where the SJT is surface-emergent. Similarly aged terraces are folded in the backlimb of the Tugulu fold, providing a sequential record of surface folding. These folded terraces are progressively rotated such that the oldest terraces are dipping much steeper than younger terraces within the same fold limb. Using 2- and 3-D seismic reflection data, we integrate subsurface deformation constraints with records of surface strain. Structural interpretations of these seismic data define the geometry of the SJT and reveal that folding is localized across synclinal bends along the SJT. We evaluate a range of distinct fault-related fold models (e.g. fault-bend folding, shear fault-bend folding) to assess which structural style best describes the geometries of the subsurface and surface fold patterns. By doing so, we have the opportunity to directly relate surface fault slip measures from terrace folding and uplift to total fault slip at depth. This integration of surface and subsurface deformation - combined with constraints on terrace ages from post-IR IRSL geochronology - allows us to characterize how fault slip and seismic moment are partitioned

  5. A molecular mechanism for direct sirtuin activation by resveratrol.

    PubMed

    Gertz, Melanie; Nguyen, Giang Thi Tuyet; Fischer, Frank; Suenkel, Benjamin; Schlicker, Christine; Fränzel, Benjamin; Tomaschewski, Jana; Aladini, Firouzeh; Becker, Christian; Wolters, Dirk; Steegborn, Clemens

    2012-01-01

    Sirtuins are protein deacetylases regulating metabolism, stress responses, and aging processes, and they were suggested to mediate the lifespan extending effect of a low calorie diet. Sirtuin activation by the polyphenol resveratrol can mimic such lifespan extending effects and alleviate metabolic diseases. The mechanism of Sirtuin stimulation is unknown, hindering the development of improved activators. Here we show that resveratrol inhibits human Sirt3 and stimulates Sirt5, in addition to Sirt1, against fluorophore-labeled peptide substrates but also against peptides and proteins lacking the non-physiological fluorophore modification. We further present crystal structures of Sirt3 and Sirt5 in complex with fluorogenic substrate peptide and modulator. The compound acts as a top cover, closing the Sirtuin's polypeptide binding pocket and influencing details of peptide binding by directly interacting with this substrate. Our results provide a mechanism for the direct activation of Sirtuins by small molecules and suggest that activators have to be tailored to a specific Sirtuin/substrate pair.

  6. Subsonic longitudinal and lateral-directional static aerodynamic characteristics of a general research fighter configuration employing a jet sheet vortex generator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Huffman, J. K.; Fox, C. H., Jr.; Ziegler, H.

    1978-01-01

    A configuration concept for developing vortex lift, which replaces the physical wing strake with a jet sheet generated fluid strake, was investigated on a general research fighter model. The vertical and horizontal location of the jet sheet with respect to the wing leading edge was studied over a momentum coefficient range from 0 to 0.24 in the Langley 7- by 10-foot high speed tunnel over a Mach number range from 0.3 to 0.8. The angle of attack range studied was from -2 to 30 deg at sideslip angles of 0, -5, and 5 deg. Test data are presented without analysis.

  7. Direct determination of phosphatase activity from physiological substrates in cells.

    PubMed

    Ren, Zhongyuan; Do, Le Duy; Bechkoff, Géraldine; Mebarek, Saida; Keloglu, Nermin; Ahamada, Saandia; Meena, Saurabh; Magne, David; Pikula, Slawomir; Wu, Yuqing; Buchet, René

    2015-01-01

    A direct and continuous approach to determine simultaneously protein and phosphate concentrations in cells and kinetics of phosphate release from physiological substrates by cells without any labeling has been developed. Among the enzymes having a phosphatase activity, tissue non-specific alkaline phosphatase (TNAP) performs indispensable, multiple functions in humans. It is expressed in numerous tissues with high levels detected in bones, liver and neurons. It is absolutely required for bone mineralization and also necessary for neurotransmitter synthesis. We provided the proof of concept that infrared spectroscopy is a reliable assay to determine a phosphatase activity in the osteoblasts. For the first time, an overall specific phosphatase activity in cells was determined in a single step by measuring simultaneously protein and substrate concentrations. We found specific activities in osteoblast like cells amounting to 116 ± 13 nmol min(-1) mg(-1) for PPi, to 56 ± 11 nmol min(-1) mg(-1) for AMP, to 79 ± 23 nmol min(-1) mg(-1) for beta-glycerophosphate and to 73 ± 15 nmol min(-1) mg(-1) for 1-alpha-D glucose phosphate. The assay was also effective to monitor phosphatase activity in primary osteoblasts and in matrix vesicles. The use of levamisole--a TNAP inhibitor--served to demonstrate that a part of the phosphatase activity originated from this enzyme. An IC50 value of 1.16 ± 0.03 mM was obtained for the inhibition of phosphatase activity of levamisole in osteoblast like cells. The infrared assay could be extended to determine any type of phosphatase activity in other cells. It may serve as a metabolomic tool to monitor an overall phosphatase activity including acid phosphatases or other related enzymes.

  8. Resolving the active versus passive conundrum for head direction cells.

    PubMed

    Shinder, M E; Taube, J S

    2014-06-13

    Head direction (HD) cells have been identified in a number of limbic system structures. These cells encode the animal's perceived directional heading in the horizontal plane and are dependent on an intact vestibular system. Previous studies have reported that the responses of vestibular neurons within the vestibular nuclei are markedly attenuated when an animal makes a volitional head turn compared to passive rotation. This finding presents a conundrum in that if vestibular responses are suppressed during an active head turn how is a vestibular signal propagated forward to drive and update the HD signal? This review identifies and discusses four possible mechanisms that could resolve this problem. These mechanisms are: (1) the ascending vestibular signal is generated by more than just vestibular-only neurons, (2) not all vestibular-only neurons contributing to the HD pathway have firing rates that are attenuated by active head turns, (3) the ascending pathway may be spared from the affects of the attenuation in that the HD system receives information from other vestibular brainstem sites that do not include vestibular-only cells, and (4) the ascending signal is affected by the inhibited vestibular signal during an active head turn, but the HD circuit compensates and uses the altered signal to accurately update the current HD. Future studies will be needed to decipher which of these possibilities is correct.

  9. [Mechanism of arginine deiminase activity by site-directed mutagenesis].

    PubMed

    Li, Lifeng; Ni, Ye; Sun, Zhihao

    2012-04-01

    Arginine deiminase (ADI) has been studied as a potential anti-cancer agent for inhibiting arginine-auxotrophic tumors (such as melanomas and hepatocellular carcinomas) in phase III clinical trials. In this work, we studied the molecular mechanism of arginine deiminase activity by site-directed mutagenesis. Three mutation sites, A128, H404 and 1410, were introduced into wild-type ADI gene by QuikChange site-directed mutagenesis method, and four ADI mutants M1 (A128T), M2 (H404R), M3 (I410L), and M4 (A128T, H404R) were obtained. The ADI mutants were individually expressed in Escherichia coli BL21 (DE3), and the enzymatic properties of the purified mutant proteins were determined. The results show that both A128T and H404R had enhanced optimum pH, higher activity and stability of ADI under physiological condition (pH 7.4), as well as reduced K(m) value. This study provides an insight into the molecular mechanism of the ADI activity, and also the experimental evidence for the rational protein evolution in the future.

  10. Synthesis of TiO2 nanorod-decorated graphene sheets and their highly efficient photocatalytic activities under visible-light irradiation.

    PubMed

    Lee, Eunwoo; Hong, Jin-Yong; Kang, Haeyoung; Jang, Jyongsik

    2012-06-15

    The titanium dioxide (TiO(2)) nanorod-decorated graphene sheets photocatalysts with different TiO(2) nanorods population have been synthesized by a simple non-hydrolytic sol-gel approach. Electron microscopy and X-ray diffraction analysis indicated that the TiO(2) nanorods are well-dispersed and successfully anchored on the graphene sheet surface through the formation of covalent bonds between Ti and C atoms. The photocatalytic activities are evaluated in terms of the efficiencies of photodecomposition and adsorption of methylene blue (MB) in aqueous solution under visible-light irradiation. The as-synthesized TiO(2) nanorod-decorated graphene sheets showed unprecedented photodecomposition efficiency compared to the pristine TiO(2) nanorods and the commercial TiO(2) (P-25, Degussa) under visible-light. It is believed that this predominant photocatalytic activity is due to the synergistic contribution of both a retarded charge recombination rate caused by a high electronic mobility of graphene and an increased surface area originated from nanometer-sized TiO(2) nanorods. Furthermore, photoelectrochemical study is performed to give deep insights into the primary roles of graphene that determines the photocatalytic activity.

  11. Direct and indirect activation of the hippocampus by tubocurarine

    PubMed Central

    Feldberg, W.; Lotti, V. J.

    1970-01-01

    1. In cats anaesthetized with intravenous chloralose, tubocurarine was either perfused through the inferior horn of a lateral ventricle or applied by micro-injection into the hippocampus, and the electrical activity was recorded from the surfaces of the occipital cortices and from the cannulae used for the perfusion or injection which, insulated except at their tips, served as recording electrodes as well. 2. With both methods, the hippocampus became activated by tubocurarine acting directly on the hippocampus. The activation resulted in an abnormal spike discharge interrupted from time to time by short bursts of fast activity, termed episodes, followed by periods of electrical silence during which no abnormal activity was recorded. This abnormal discharge was recorded in all leads. The spikes were negative when recorded from the surface of the hippocampus, but changed polarity when the electrode was lowered and penetrated the pyramidal cell layer, and on further lowering the electrode the positive spikes increased in voltage up to 15 mV and then decreased. 3. With both methods, signs of indirect activation of the hippocampus were observed when the tubocurarine set up foci of excitation in one of the following three areas of cerebral cortex which lie ventral to the hippocampus, the Area entorhinica, the Area perirhinica and the Area post-splenialis. The foci of excitation resulted in a continuous discharge of negative spikes which were recorded in the leads from these areas only. A characteristic feature of the indirect hippocampal activation arising from the continuous discharge set up in the Area post-splenialis was the periodicity. Activation lasting 20-60 sec occurred every few minutes or at shorter intervals, often leading to an episode. PMID:5499820

  12. Mathematical modeling of the evolution of thermal field during start-up phase of the direct chill casting process for AA5182 sheet ingots

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sengupta, Joydeep

    The control of the thermal cooling conditions at the start-up phase of the Direct Chill (DC) casting process for aluminum sheet ingots is difficult, and is critical from the standpoint of defect formation. Firstly, boiling water heat transfer governs the secondary cooling experienced by the ingot surfaces as they emerge from the mould. This results in varying rates of heat transfer from the ingot faces as the surface temperature of the ingot changes with time during the start-up phase. Moreover, if the ingot surface temperature at locations below the point of water impingement is high enough to promote film boiling, the water is ejected away from the surface. This can result in a sudden decrease in heat transfer and the formation of local hot spots. Also, the chill water may enter into the gap formed between the ingot base and the bottom block with the evolution of the butt curl. This process of water incursion alters the heat transfer from the base of the ingot, and in turn affects the surface temperature of the ingot faces. A comprehensive mathematical model has been developed to describe heat transfer during the start-up phase of the D.C. casting process. The model, based on the commercial finite element package ABAQUS, includes primary cooling to the mould, secondary cooling to water, and ingot base cooling. The algorithm used to account for secondary cooling to the water includes boiling curves that are a function of surface temperature, water flow rate, impingement point temperature, and position relative to the point of water impingement. In addition, the secondary cooling algorithm accounts for water ejection, which can occur at low water flow rates (low heat extraction rates). The algorithm used to describe ingot base cooling includes the drop in contact heat transfer due to base deformation (butt curl), and also the increase in heat transfer due to the process of water incursion between the ingot base and bottom block. The model has been extensively

  13. Bullous pemphigoid autoantibodies directly induce blister formation without complement activation.

    PubMed

    Ujiie, Hideyuki; Sasaoka, Tetsumasa; Izumi, Kentaro; Nishie, Wataru; Shinkuma, Satoru; Natsuga, Ken; Nakamura, Hideki; Shibaki, Akihiko; Shimizu, Hiroshi

    2014-11-01

    Complement activation and subsequent recruitment of inflammatory cells at the dermal/epidermal junction are thought to be essential for blister formation in bullous pemphigoid (BP), an autoimmune blistering disease induced by autoantibodies against type XVII collagen (COL17); however, this theory does not fully explain the pathological features of BP. Recently, the involvement of complement-independent pathways has been proposed. To directly address the question of the necessity of the complement activation in blister formation, we generated C3-deficient COL17-humanized mice. First, we show that passive transfer of autoantibodies from BP patients induced blister formation in neonatal C3-deficient COL17-humanized mice without complement activation. By using newly generated human and murine mAbs against the pathogenic noncollagenous 16A domain of COL17 with high (human IgG1, murine IgG2), low (murine IgG1), or no (human IgG4) complement activation abilities, we demonstrate that the deposition of Abs, and not complements, is relevant to the induction of blister formation in neonatal and adult mice. Notably, passive transfer of BP autoantibodies reduced the amount of COL17 in lesional mice skin, as observed in cultured normal human keratinocytes treated with the same Abs. Moreover, the COL17 depletion was associated with a ubiquitin/proteasome pathway. In conclusion, the COL17 depletion induced by BP autoantibodies, and not complement activation, is essential for the blister formation under our experimental system.

  14. Direct detection of relic active and sterile neutrinos

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Yu-Feng

    2016-05-01

    Both active and sterile sub-eV neutrinos can form the cosmic neutrino background in the early Universe. We consider the beta-decaying (e.g., 3H) and EC-decaying (e.g., 163Ho) nuclei as the promising targets to capture relic neutrinos in the laboratory. We calculate the capture rates of relic electron neutrinos and antineutrinos against the corresponding beta decay or electron capture (EC) decay backgrounds in the (3+Ns) flavor mixing scheme, and discuss the future prospect in terms of the PTOLEMY project. We stress that such direct measurements of hot DM might not be hopeless in the long term.

  15. Quantity, Quality, and Variety of Pupil Responses during an Open-Communication Structured Group Directed Reading-Thinking Activity and a Closed Communication Structured Group Directed Reading Activity.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Petre, Richard M.

    The quality, quantity, and variety of pupil responses while using two different group directed reading activities, the Directed Reading Activity (DRA), and the Directed Reading-Thinking Activity (DRTA) were investigated in this study. The subjects, all fourth graders in two nearby communities, were grouped into above-grade-level, at-grade-level,…

  16. Guide RNA functional modules direct Cas9 activity and orthogonality.

    PubMed

    Briner, Alexandra E; Donohoue, Paul D; Gomaa, Ahmed A; Selle, Kurt; Slorach, Euan M; Nye, Christopher H; Haurwitz, Rachel E; Beisel, Chase L; May, Andrew P; Barrangou, Rodolphe

    2014-10-23

    The RNA-guided Cas9 endonuclease specifically targets and cleaves DNA in a sequence-dependent manner and has been widely used for programmable genome editing. Cas9 activity is dependent on interactions with guide RNAs, and evolutionarily divergent Cas9 nucleases have been shown to work orthogonally. However, the molecular basis of selective Cas9:guide-RNA interactions is poorly understood. Here, we identify and characterize six conserved modules within native crRNA:tracrRNA duplexes and single guide RNAs (sgRNAs) that direct Cas9 endonuclease activity. We show the bulge and nexus are necessary for DNA cleavage and demonstrate that the nexus and hairpins are instrumental in defining orthogonality between systems. In contrast, the crRNA:tracrRNA complementary region can be modified or partially removed. Collectively, our results establish guide RNA features that drive DNA targeting by Cas9 and open new design and engineering avenues for CRISPR technologies.

  17. Directed energy active illumination for near-Earth object detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Riley, Jordan; Lubin, Philip; Hughes, Gary B.; O'Neill, Hugh; Meinhold, Peter; Suen, Jonathan; Bible, Johanna; Johansson, Isabella E.; Griswold, Janelle; Cook, Brianna

    2014-09-01

    On 15 February 2013, a previously unknown ~20 m asteroid struck Earth near Chelyabinsk, Russia, releasing kinetic energy equivalent to ~570 kt TNT. Detecting objects like the Chelyabinsk impactor that are orbiting near Earth is a difficult task, in part because such objects spend much of their own orbits in the direction of the Sun when viewed from Earth. Efforts aimed at protecting Earth from future impacts will rely heavily on continued discovery. Ground-based optical observatory networks and Earth-orbiting spacecraft with infrared sensors have dramatically increased the pace of discovery. Still, less than 5% of near-Earth objects (NEOs) >=100 m/~100 Mt TNT have been identified, and the proportion of known objects decreases rapidly for smaller sizes. Low emissivity of some objects also makes detection by passive sensors difficult. A proposed orbiting laser phased array directed energy system could be used for active illumination of NEOs, enhancing discovery particularly for smaller and lower emissivity objects. Laser fiber amplifiers emit very narrow-band energy, simplifying detection. Results of simulated illumination scenarios are presented based on an orbiting emitter array with specified characteristics. Simulations indicate that return signals from small and low emissivity objects is strong enough to detect. The possibility for both directed and full sky blind surveys is discussed, and the resulting diameter and mass limits for objects in different observational scenarios. The ability to determine both position and speed of detected objects is also discussed.

  18. Synthesis of N-doped microporous carbon via chemical activation of polyindole-modified graphene oxide sheets for selective carbon dioxide adsorption.

    PubMed

    Saleh, Muhammad; Chandra, Vimlesh; Kemp, K Christian; Kim, Kwang S

    2013-06-28

    A polyindole-reduced graphene oxide (PIG) hybrid was synthesized by reducing graphene oxide sheets in the presence of polyindole. We have shown PIG as a material for capturing carbon dioxide (CO2). The PIG hybrid was chemically activated at temperatures of 400-800 °C, which resulted in nitrogen (N)-doped graphene sheets. The N-doped graphene sheets are microporous with an adsorption pore size of 0.6 nm for CO2 and show a maximum (Brunauer, Emmet and Teller) surface area of 936 m(2) g(-1). The hybrid activated at 600 °C (PIG6) possesses a surface area of 534 m(2) g(-1) and a micropore volume of 0.29 cm(3) g(-1). PIG6 shows a maximum CO2 adsorption capacity of 3.0 mmol g(-1) at 25 °C and 1 atm. This high CO2 uptake is due to the highly microporous character of the material and its N content. The material retains its original adsorption capacity on recycling even after 10 cycles (within experimental error). PIG6 also shows high adsorption selectivity ratios for CO2 over N2, CH4 and H2 of 23, 4 and 85 at 25 °C, respectively.

  19. Curcumin directly inhibits the transport activity of GLUT1.

    PubMed

    Gunnink, Leesha K; Alabi, Ola D; Kuiper, Benjamin D; Gunnink, Stephen M; Schuiteman, Sam J; Strohbehn, Lauren E; Hamilton, Kathryn E; Wrobel, Kathryn E; Louters, Larry L

    2016-06-01

    Curcumin, a major ingredient in turmeric, has a long history of medicinal applications in a wide array of maladies including treatment for diabetes and cancer. Seemingly counterintuitive to the documented hypoglycemic effects of curcumin, however, a recent report indicates that curcumin directly inhibits glucose uptake in adipocytes. The major glucose transporter in adipocytes is GLUT4. Therefore, this study investigates the effects of curcumin in cell lines where the major transporter is GLUT1. We report that curcumin has an immediate inhibitory effect on basal glucose uptake in L929 fibroblast cells with a maximum inhibition of 80% achieved at 75 μM curcumin. Curcumin also blocks activation of glucose uptake by azide, glucose deprivation, hydroxylamine, or phenylarsine oxide. Inhibition does not increase with exposure time and the inhibitory effects reverse within an hour. Inhibition does not appear to involve a reaction between curcumin and the thiol side chain of a cysteine residue since neither prior treatment of cells with iodoacetamide nor curcumin with cysteine alters curcumin's inhibitory effects. Curcumin is a mixed inhibitor reducing the Vmax of 2DG transport by about half with little effect on the Km. The inhibitory effects of curcumin are not additive to the effects of cytochalasin B and 75 μM curcumin actually reduces specific cytochalasin B binding by 80%. Taken together, the data suggest that curcumin binds directly to GLUT1 at a site that overlaps with the cytochalasin B binding site and thereby inhibits glucose transport. A direct inhibition of GLUT proteins in intestinal epithelial cells would likely reduce absorption of dietary glucose and contribute to a hypoglycemic effect of curcumin. Also, inhibition of GLUT1 activity might compromise cancer cells that overexpress GLUT1 and be another possible mechanism for the documented anticancer effects of curcumin.

  20. Curcumin directly inhibits the transport activity of GLUT1

    PubMed Central

    Gunnink, Leesha K.; Alabi, Ola D.; Kuiper, Benjamin D.; Gunnink, Stephen M.; Schuiteman, Sam J.; Strohbehn, Lauren E.; Hamilton, Kathryn E.; Wrobel, Kathryn E.; Louters, Larry L.

    2016-01-01

    Curcumin, a major ingredient in turmeric, has a long history of medicinal applications in a wide array of maladies including treatment for diabetes and cancer. Seemingly counterintuitive to the documented hypoglycemic effects of curcumin, however, a recent report indicates that curcumin directly inhibits glucose uptake in adipocytes. The major glucose transporter in adipocytes is GLUT4. Therefore, this study investigates the effects of curcumin in cell lines where the major transporter is GLUT1. We report that curcumin has an immediate inhibitory effect on basal glucose uptake in L929 fibroblast cells with a maximum inhibition of 80% achieved at 75 μM curcumin. Curcumin also blocks activation of glucose uptake by azide, glucose deprivation, hydroxylamine, or phenylarsine oxide. Inhibition does not increase with exposure time and the inhibitory effects reverse within an hour. Inhibition does not appear to involve a reaction between curcumin and the thiol side chain of a cysteine residue since neither prior treatment of cells with iodoacetamide nor curcumin with cysteine alters curcumin’s inhibitory effects. Curcumin is a mixed inhibitor reducing the Vmax of 2DG transport by about half with little effect on the Km. The inhibitory effects of curcumin are not additive to the effects of cytochalasin B and 75 μM curcumin actually reduces specific cytochalasin B binding by 80%. Taken together, the data suggest that curcumin binds directly to GLUT1 at a site that overlaps with the cytochalasin B binding site and thereby inhibits glucose transport. A direct inhibition of GLUT proteins in intestinal epithelial cells would likely reduce absorption of dietary glucose and contribute to a hypoglycemic effect of curcumin. Also, inhibition of GLUT1 activity might compromise cancer cells that overexpress GLUT1 and be another possible mechanism for the documented anticancer effects of curcumin. PMID:27039889

  1. A statistical study of the inner edge of the electron plasma sheet and the net convection potential as a function of geomagnetic activity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiang, F.; Kivelson, M. G.; Walker, R. J.; Khurana, K. K.; Angelopoulos, V.; Hsu, T.

    2011-06-01

    A widely accepted explanation of the location of the inner edge of the electron plasma sheet and its dependence on electron energy is based on drift motions of individual particles. The boundary is identified as the separatrix between drift trajectories linking the tail to the dayside magnetopause (open paths) and trajectories closed around the Earth. A statistical study of the inner edge of the electron plasma sheet using THEMIS Electrostatic Analyzer plasma data from November 2007 to April 2009 enabled us to examine this model. Using a dipole magnetic field and a Volland-Stern electric field with shielding, we find that a steady state drift boundary model represents the average location of the electron plasma sheet boundary and reflects its variation with the solar wind electric field in the local time region between 21:00 and 06:00, except at high activity levels. However, the model does not reproduce the observed energy dispersion of the boundaries. We have also used the location of the inner edge of the electron plasma sheet to parameterize the potential drop of the tail convection electric field as a function of solar wind electric field (Esw) and geomagnetic activity. The range of Esw examined is small because the data were acquired near solar minimum. For the range of values tested (meaningful statistics only for Esw < 2 mV/m), reasonably good agreement is found between the potential drop of the tail convection electric field inferred from the location of the inner edge and the polar cap potential drop calculated from the model of Boyle et al. (1997).

  2. A novel approach to image neural activity directly by MRI

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Singh, Manbir; Sungkarat, Witaya

    2005-04-01

    Though an approach to image the electrical activity of neurons directly by detecting phase shifts in MRI was first reported in 1991, results to-date remain equivocal due to the low signal-to-noise ratio. The objective of this work was to develop a stimulus-presentation and data acquisition strategy specially geared to detect phase-dispersion effects of neuronal currents within 10-100 ms following stimulation. The key feature is to set the repeated MR data acquisition time TR and the stimulus presentation interval (TI) slightly different from each other so that the time at which images are acquired shifts gradually from one acquisition to the next with respect to stimulus onset. For example, at TR=275ms and 4 Hz stimulus presentation (TI=250ms), initial synchronization of the stimulus onset and MR acquisition would result in the first image being acquired at a latency of 0+/- (temporal width of data acquisition window), second image at a latency of 25ms, third image at a latency of 50ms and so on up to a latency of 250ms, at which time the stimulus and data acquisition times would become re-synchronized to once again acquire an image at latency=0. Human data were acquired on a 1.5T GE EXCITE scanner from two 8mm thick contiguous slices bracketing the calcarine fissure during a checkerboard flashing at 4 Hz. Preliminary results show activity in the visual cortex at latencies consistent with EEG studies, suggesting the potential of this methodology to image neural activity directly.

  3. Human filarial Wolbachia lipopeptide directly activates human neutrophils in vitro.

    PubMed

    Tamarozzi, F; Wright, H L; Johnston, K L; Edwards, S W; Turner, J D; Taylor, M J

    2014-10-01

    The host inflammatory response to the Onchocerca volvulus endosymbiont, Wolbachia, is a major contributing factor in the development of chronic pathology in humans (onchocerciasis/river blindness). Recently, the toll-like pattern recognition receptor motif of the major inflammatory ligands of filarial Wolbachia, membrane-associated diacylated lipoproteins, was functionally defined in murine models of pathology, including mediation of neutrophil recruitment to the cornea. However, the extent to which human neutrophils can be activated in response to this Wolbachia pattern recognition motif is not known. Therefore, the responses of purified peripheral blood human neutrophils to a synthetic N-terminal diacylated lipopeptide (WoLP) of filarial Wolbachia peptidoglycan-associated lipoprotein (PAL) were characterized. WoLP exposure led to a dose-dependent activation of healthy, human neutrophils that included gross morphological alterations and modulation of surface expressed integrins involved in tethering, rolling and extravasation. WoLP exposure induced chemotaxis but not chemokinesis of neutrophils, and secretion of the major neutrophil chemokine, interleukin 8. WoLP also induced and primed the respiratory burst, and enhanced neutrophil survival by delay of apoptosis. These results indicate that the major inflammatory motif of filarial Wolbachia lipoproteins directly activates human neutrophils in vitro and promotes a molecular pathway by which human neutrophils are recruited to sites of Onchocerca parasitism.

  4. Buckling and stretching of thin viscous sheets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    O'Kiely, Doireann; Breward, Chris; Griffiths, Ian; Howell, Peter; Lange, Ulrich

    2016-11-01

    Thin glass sheets are used in smartphone, battery and semiconductor technology, and may be manufactured by producing a relatively thick glass slab and subsequently redrawing it to a required thickness. The resulting sheets commonly possess undesired centerline ripples and thick edges. We present a mathematical model in which a viscous sheet undergoes redraw in the direction of gravity, and show that, in a sufficiently strong gravitational field, buckling is driven by compression in a region near the bottom of the sheet, and limited by viscous resistance to stretching of the sheet. We use asymptotic analysis in the thin-sheet, low-Reynolds-number limit to determine the centerline profile and growth rate of such a viscous sheet.

  5. Plasma heating and acceleration in current sheets formed in discharges in argon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kyrie, N. P.

    2016-12-01

    According to present notion, flares on the sun and other stars, substorms in magnetospheres of Earth and other planets, and disruptive instabilities in tokamak plasma are connected to development of current sheets in magnetized plasma. Therefore, current sheet dynamics and magnetic reconnection processes were studied actively during the last several decades. This paper presents the results of experimental studies of plasma heating and acceleration in current sheets formed in discharges in argon. The temperature and energy of directed motion of argon ions of different degrees of ionization were measured by spectroscopic methods. It was found that Ar II, Ar III and Ar IV ions are localized in different regions of the sheet. It was shown that Ampere forces applied to the sheet can accelerate the argon ions to observed energies.

  6. Discoveries from Revisiting Apollo Direct Active Measurements of Lunar Dust

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    O'Brien, Brian

    2010-05-01

    New missions to the moon being developed by China, Japan, India, USA, Russia and Europe and possibilities of human missions about 2020 face the reality that 6 Apollo expeditions did not totally manage or mitigate effects of easily-mobilised and very "sticky" lunar dust on humans and hardware. Laboratory and theoretical modelling cannot reliably simulate the complex lunar environments that affect dynamical movements of lunar dust. The only direct active measurements of lunar dust during Apollo were made by matchbox-sized minimalist Dust Detector Experiments (DDEs) deployed to transmit some 30 million digital measurements from Apollo 11, 12, 14 and 15. These were misplaced or relatively ignored until 2009, when a self-funded suite of discoveries (O'Brien Geophys. Research Letters FIX 6 May 2099) revealed unexpected properties of lunar dust, such as the adhesive force being stronger as illumination increased. We give the first reports of contrasting effects, contamination or cleansing, from rocket exhausts of Apollo 11, 12, 14 and 15 Lunar Modules leaving the moon. We further strengthen the importance of collateral dust inadvertently splashed on Apollo hardware by human activities. Dust management designs and mission plans require optimum use of such in situ measurements, extended by laboratory simulations and theoretical modelling.

  7. RNA-directed DNA methylation induces transcriptional activation in plants

    PubMed Central

    Shibuya, Kenichi; Fukushima, Setsuko; Takatsuji, Hiroshi

    2009-01-01

    A class-C floral homeotic gene of Petunia, pMADS3, is specifically expressed in the stamen and carpels of developing flowers. We had previously reported the ect-pMADS3 phenomenon in which introduction of a part of the pMADS3 genomic sequence, including intron 2, induces ectopic expression of endogenous pMADS3. Unlike transcriptional or posttranscriptional gene silencing triggered by the introduction of homologous sequences, this observation is unique in that the gene expression is up-regulated. In this study, we demonstrated that the ect-pMADS3 phenomenon is due to transcriptional activation based on RNA-directed DNA methylation (RdDM) occurring in a particular CG in a putative cis-element in pMADS3 intron 2. The CG methylation was maintained over generations, along with pMADS3 ectopic expression, even in the absence of RNA triggers. These results demonstrate a previously undescribed transcriptional regulatory mechanism that could lead to the generation of a transcriptionally active epiallele, thereby contributing to plant evolution. Our results also reveal a putative negative cis-element for organ-specific transcriptional regulation of class-C floral homeotic genes, which could be difficult to identify by other approaches. PMID:19164525

  8. Single cell activity reveals direct electron transfer in methanotrophic consortia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McGlynn, Shawn E.; Chadwick, Grayson L.; Kempes, Christopher P.; Orphan, Victoria J.

    2015-10-01

    Multicellular assemblages of microorganisms are ubiquitous in nature, and the proximity afforded by aggregation is thought to permit intercellular metabolic coupling that can accommodate otherwise unfavourable reactions. Consortia of methane-oxidizing archaea and sulphate-reducing bacteria are a well-known environmental example of microbial co-aggregation; however, the coupling mechanisms between these paired organisms is not well understood, despite the attention given them because of the global significance of anaerobic methane oxidation. Here we examined the influence of interspecies spatial positioning as it relates to biosynthetic activity within structurally diverse uncultured methane-oxidizing consortia by measuring stable isotope incorporation for individual archaeal and bacterial cells to constrain their potential metabolic interactions. In contrast to conventional models of syntrophy based on the passage of molecular intermediates, cellular activities were found to be independent of both species intermixing and distance between syntrophic partners within consortia. A generalized model of electric conductivity between co-associated archaea and bacteria best fit the empirical data. Combined with the detection of large multi-haem cytochromes in the genomes of methanotrophic archaea and the demonstration of redox-dependent staining of the matrix between cells in consortia, these results provide evidence for syntrophic coupling through direct electron transfer.

  9. Active Learning for Directed Exploration of Complex Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Burl, Michael C.; Wang, Esther

    2009-01-01

    Physics-based simulation codes are widely used in science and engineering to model complex systems that would be infeasible to study otherwise. Such codes provide the highest-fidelity representation of system behavior, but are often so slow to run that insight into the system is limited. For example, conducting an exhaustive sweep over a d-dimensional input parameter space with k-steps along each dimension requires k(sup d) simulation trials (translating into k(sup d) CPU-days for one of our current simulations). An alternative is directed exploration in which the next simulation trials are cleverly chosen at each step. Given the results of previous trials, supervised learning techniques (SVM, KDE, GP) are applied to build up simplified predictive models of system behavior. These models are then used within an active learning framework to identify the most valuable trials to run next. Several active learning strategies are examined including a recently-proposed information-theoretic approach. Performance is evaluated on a set of thirteen synthetic oracles, which serve as surrogates for the more expensive simulations and enable the experiments to be replicated by other researchers.

  10. Large-scale thrusting along the northern margin of the Tibetan Plateau and the southwest Tarim basin: 230 km long active Hotian thrust sheet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suppe, J.; Wang, X.; He, D.; Liang, H.

    2015-12-01

    We present the geometry, kinematics and mechanics of large-scale active thrusting in the western Kunlunshan and southwest Tarim basin, which accounts for ~130-165km total shortening of Tarim crust at the northern margin of Tibet. The great frontal structure is the ~230km long bedding-parallel Hotian thrust sheet, which is perhaps the longest active intact thrust sheet in the world, composed of flat-lying strata of the Tarim basin sliding northward on a regional gypsum detachment at the base of the Cenozoic sequence. The toe of the Hotian thrust ramps to the surface two thirds of the way across the Tarim basin, forming the Selibuya-Mazartag hills in the Taklamakan sand desert. At the southern edge of the Tarim basin in the Kunlunshan foothills, a set of high-amplitude anticlines are growing by complex break-forward ramping and wedging in the Hotian thrust sheet as it steps up to the Cenozoic gypsum detachment from a regional Cambrian evaporate detachment that extends under Tibet. More interior structures such as the Tiklik thrust bring older strata and Proterozoic basement to the surface, together with their Cenozoic Tarim cover in the Buya basin. The Cambrian detachment also extends northward under the Tarim basin with minor hanging-wall deformation that locally warps the overlying Hotian thrust sheet, producing a complete syntectonic record in seismically imaged growth strata of its northward motion over these warps. Seismic profiles in the southwest Tarim foothill belt also reveal widespread growth strata that record much of the structural history beginning in the early Pliocene Atushi Formation. Ages of seismic reflectors are calibrated to a surface magnetostratigraphic sequence (Zheng et al., 2000). The beginning of thrusting and folding in the southwest Tarim basin north of the Tiklik thrust is dated at 3.6Ma with shortening >25km and a progressive northward propagation toward the Selibuya-Mazartag hills. The overall shortening rate is ~10 mm/yr. The gypsum

  11. Modeling Harris Current Sheets with Themis Observations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kepko, L.; Angelopoulos, V.; McPherron, R. L.; Apatenkov, S.; Glassmeier, K.-H.

    2010-01-01

    Current sheets are ubiquitous in nature. occurring in such varied locations as the solar atmosphere. the heliosphere, and the Earth's magnetosphere. The simplest current sheet is the one-dimensional Harris neutral sheet, with the lobe field strength and scale-height the only free parameters. Despite its simplicity, confirmation of the Harris sheet as a reasonable description of the Earth's current sheet has remained elusive. In early 2009 the orbits of the 5 THEMIS probes fortuitously aligned such that profiles of the Earth's current sheet could be modeled in a time dependent manner. For the few hours of alignment we have calculated the time history of the current sheet parameters (scale height and current) in the near-Earth region. during both quiet and active times. For one particular substorm. we further demonstrate good quantitative agreement with the diversion of cross tail current inferred from the Harris modeling with the ionospheric current inferred from ground magnetometer data.

  12. LABORATORY DIRECTED RESEARCH AND DEVELOPMENT PROGRAM ACTIVITIES FOR FY2002.

    SciTech Connect

    FOX,K.J.

    2002-12-31

    Brookhaven National (BNL) Laboratory is a multidisciplinary laboratory that carries out basic and applied research in the physical, biomedical, and environmental sciences, and in selected energy technologies. It is managed by Brookhaven Science Associates, LLC, under contract with the U. S. Department of Energy. BNL's total annual budget has averaged about $450 million. There are about 3,000 employees, and another 4,500 guest scientists and students who come each year to use the Laboratory's facilities and work with the staff. The BNL Laboratory Directed Research and Development (LDRD) Program reports its status to the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) annually in March, as required by DOE Order 4 1 3.2A, ''Laboratory Directed Research and Development,'' January 8, 2001, and the LDRD Annual Report guidance, updated February 12, 1999. The LDRD Program obtains its funds through the Laboratory overhead pool and operates under the authority of DOE Order 413.2A. The goals and objectives of BNL's LDRD Program can be inferred from the Program's stated purposes. These are to (1) encourage and support the development of new ideas and technology, (2) promote the early exploration and exploitation of creative and innovative concepts, and (3) develop new ''fundable'' R&D projects and programs. The emphasis is clearly articulated by BNL to be on supporting exploratory research ''which could lead to new programs, projects, and directions'' for the Laboratory. As one of the premier scientific laboratories of the DOE, BNL must continuously foster groundbreaking scientific research. At Brookhaven National Laboratory one such method is through its LDRD Program. This discretionary research and development tool is critical in maintaining the scientific excellence and long-term vitality of the Laboratory. Additionally, it is a means to stimulate the scientific community and foster new science and technology ideas, which becomes a major factor in achieving and maintaining staff excellence

  13. Laboratory Directed Research and Development Program Activities for FY 2008.

    SciTech Connect

    Looney,J.P.; Fox, K.

    2009-04-01

    with limited management filtering to encourage the creativity of individual researchers. The competition is open to all BNL staff in programmatic, scientific, engineering, and technical support areas. Researchers submit their project proposals to the Assistant Laboratory Director for Policy and Strategic Planning. A portion of the LDRD budget is held for the Strategic LDRD (S-LDRD) category. Projects in this category focus on innovative R&D activities that support the strategic agenda of the Laboratory. The Laboratory Director entertains requests or articulates the need for S-LDRD funds at any time. Strategic LDRD Proposals also undergo rigorous peer review; the approach to review is tailored to the size and scope of the proposal. These Projects are driven by special opportunities, including: (1) Research project(s) in support of Laboratory strategic initiatives as defined and articulated by the Director; (2) Research project(s) in support of a Laboratory strategic hire; (3) Evolution of Program Development activities into research and development activities; and (4) ALD proposal(s) to the Director to support unique research opportunities. The goals and objectives of BNL's LDRD Program can be inferred fronl the Program's stated purposes. These are to (1) encourage and support the development of new ideas and technology, (2) promote the early exploration and exploitation of creative and innovative concepts, and (3) develop new 'fundable' R&D projects and programs. The emphasis is clearly articulated by BNL to be on supporting exploratory research 'which could lead to new programs, projects, and directions' for the Laboratory. We explicitly indicate that research conducted under the LDRD Program should be highly innovative, and an element of high risk as to success is acceptable. To be one of the premier DOE National Laboratories, BNL must continuously foster groundbreaking scientific research. At Brookhaven National Laboratory one such method is through its LDRD Program

  14. Direct Observations Of Microbial Activity At Extreme Pressures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sharma, A.; Scott, J. H.; Cody, G. D.; Fogel, M.; Hazen, R. M.; Hemley, R. J.; Huntress, W. T.

    2002-12-01

    Microbial communities adapt to a wide range of pressures, temperatures, salinities, pH, and oxidation states. Although, significant attention has been focused on the effects of high and low temperature on physiology, there is some evidence that elevated pressure may also manifest interesting effects on cellular physiology, such as enzyme inactivation, cell-membrane breach, and suppression of protein interactions with various substrates. However, exactly how these factors affect intact cells is not well understood. In this study, we have adapted diamond anvil cells to explore the effects of high pressure on microbial life. We used the rate of microbial formate oxidation as a probe of metabolic viability. The utilization of formate by microorganisms is a fundamental metabolic process in anaerobic environments. We monitored in-situ microbial formate oxidation via molecular spectroscopy for Shewanella oneidensis strain MR1 and Escherichia coli strain MG1655 at high pressures (68 to 1060 MPa). At pressures of 1200 to 1600 MPa, living bacteria resided in fluid inclusions in ice-VI crystals and continued to be viable upon subsequent release to ambient pressures (0.1 MPa). Furthermore, direct microscopic observations indicate that these cells maintain their ability for cellular division upon decompression from such high pressures. Evidence of microbial viability and activity at these extreme pressures expands by an order of magnitude the range of conditions representing the habitable zone in the solar system. These results imply that pressure may not be a significant impediment to life. The maximum pressure explored in this work is equivalent to a depth of ~ 50 km below Earth's crust, or ~ 160 km in a hypothetical ocean. The pressures encountered at the depths of thick ice caps and deep crustal subsurface may not be a limiting factor for the existence of life. This suggests that deep (water/ice) layers of Europa, Callisto, or Ganymede, subduction zones on Earth, and the

  15. Seven-day activity and self-report compared to a direct measure of physical activity.

    PubMed

    Taylor, C B; Coffey, T; Berra, K; Iaffaldano, R; Casey, K; Haskell, W L

    1984-12-01

    To determine how well a seven-day interview-administered activity recall used in a large epidemiologic study at Stanford University reflected seven days of self-reported activity and directly measured physical activity, 30 white males, mean age 52 years, recorded daily physical activity for a week, and half of these wore an ambulatory solid-state minicomputer (Vitalog) which measures continuous heart rate and motion. Total hours of moderate, hard, and hard plus very hard activity were not significantly different for weekdays and weekends for self-report and recall and were significantly correlated. Total energy expenditure for subjects wearing the Vitalog averaged 38.5 +/- 6.7 kcal/kg/day compared to an average of 37.7 +/- 4.5 kcal/kg/day for recall or 39.6 +/- 7.2 kcal/kg/day for self-report. Conditioning activities are best remembered followed by home or leisure and job activities. Mean hours of sleep per week night were significantly greater reported by self-report than reported by recall, but the two were significantly correlated. It is concluded that a seven-day activity recall accurately reflects mean kcal/day expenditure, with conditioning activities being the best recalled. A self-report log used in conjunction with an interview-based seven-day recall might maximize accuracy of recall.

  16. Composition and plasma properties of the plasma sheet in the earth's magnetotail

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Orsini, S.; Altwegg, K.; Balsiger, H.

    1986-10-01

    Using 300 h of plasma sheet observations obtained by the ISEE-1 Ion Composition Experiment in 1978, H(+) and He(2+) densities and temperatures are investigated as functions of magnetospheric substorm activity and geocentric distance. Temperatures of H(+) and He(2+) are well correlated with an average ratio of 2.7 + or - 0.1, though linear regression for high activity periods suggests a nonvanishing T(He2+) in the limit as T(H+) approaches 0. Plasma sheet ion temperatures vary directly with geomagnetic activity and inversely with geocentric distance, while the N(He2+)/N(H+) ratio increases with geocentric distance irrespective of the activity index.

  17. Strong correlation in acene sheets from the active-space variational two-electron reduced density matrix method: effects of symmetry and size.

    PubMed

    Pelzer, Kenley; Greenman, Loren; Gidofalvi, Gergely; Mazziotti, David A

    2011-06-09

    Polyaromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) are a class of organic molecules with importance in several branches of science, including medicine, combustion chemistry, and materials science. The delocalized π-orbital systems in PAHs require highly accurate electronic structure methods to capture strong electron correlation. Treating correlation in PAHs has been challenging because (i) traditional wave function methods for strong correlation have not been applicable since they scale exponentially in the number of strongly correlated orbitals, and (ii) alternative methods such as the density-matrix renormalization group and variational two-electron reduced density matrix (2-RDM) methods have not been applied beyond linear acene chains. In this paper we extend the earlier results from active-space variational 2-RDM theory [Gidofalvi, G.; Mazziotti, D. A. J. Chem. Phys. 2008, 129, 134108] to the more general two-dimensional arrangement of rings--acene sheets--to study the relationship between geometry and electron correlation in PAHs. The acene-sheet calculations, if performed with conventional wave function methods, would require wave function expansions with as many as 1.5 × 10(17) configuration state functions. To measure electron correlation, we employ several RDM-based metrics: (i) natural-orbital occupation numbers, (ii) the 1-RDM von Neumann entropy, (iii) the correlation energy per carbon atom, and (iv) the squared Frobenius norm of the cumulant 2-RDM. The results confirm a trend of increasing polyradical character with increasing molecular size previously observed in linear PAHs and reveal a corresponding trend in two-dimensional (arch-shaped) PAHs. Furthermore, in PAHs of similar size they show significant variations in correlation with geometry. PAHs with the strictly linear geometry (chains) exhibit more electron correlation than PAHs with nonlinear geometries (sheets).

  18. Mapping whole-brain activity with cellular resolution by light-sheet microscopy and high-throughput image analysis (Conference Presentation)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Silvestri, Ludovico; Rudinskiy, Nikita; Paciscopi, Marco; Müllenbroich, Marie Caroline; Costantini, Irene; Sacconi, Leonardo; Frasconi, Paolo; Hyman, Bradley T.; Pavone, Francesco S.

    2016-03-01

    Mapping neuronal activity patterns across the whole brain with cellular resolution is a challenging task for state-of-the-art imaging methods. Indeed, despite a number of technological efforts, quantitative cellular-resolution activation maps of the whole brain have not yet been obtained. Many techniques are limited by coarse resolution or by a narrow field of view. High-throughput imaging methods, such as light sheet microscopy, can be used to image large specimens with high resolution and in reasonable times. However, the bottleneck is then moved from image acquisition to image analysis, since many TeraBytes of data have to be processed to extract meaningful information. Here, we present a full experimental pipeline to quantify neuronal activity in the entire mouse brain with cellular resolution, based on a combination of genetics, optics and computer science. We used a transgenic mouse strain (Arc-dVenus mouse) in which neurons which have been active in the last hours before brain fixation are fluorescently labelled. Samples were cleared with CLARITY and imaged with a custom-made confocal light sheet microscope. To perform an automatic localization of fluorescent cells on the large images produced, we used a novel computational approach called semantic deconvolution. The combined approach presented here allows quantifying the amount of Arc-expressing neurons throughout the whole mouse brain. When applied to cohorts of mice subject to different stimuli and/or environmental conditions, this method helps finding correlations in activity between different neuronal populations, opening the possibility to infer a sort of brain-wide 'functional connectivity' with cellular resolution.

  19. Large-scale thrusting along the northern margin of the Tibetan Plateau and the southwest Tarim basin: 230 km long active Hotian thrust sheet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Xin; Suppe, John; Liang, Hang; He, Dengfa

    2014-05-01

    We present the geometry, kinematics and mechanics of large-scale thrusting in the West Kunlun Shan and the southwest Tarim Basin, which is associated with the northward motion of Tibet. The great frontal structure is the ~230km long intact bedding parallel Hotian thrust sheet composed of strata of the Tarim Basin lying above a regional gypsum horizon at the base of the Cenozoic sequence. The toe of the Hotian thrust sheet steps steeply to the surface two thirds of the way across the basin forming the Selibuya-Mazartag hills in the sand desert. The Hotan thrust constitutes one of the longest active intact thrust sheets in the world, showing little internal deformation, however at its back it steps down to a Cambrian detachment at the base of the Paleozoic below a belt of complex high-amplitude anticlines near the front of the West Kunlun Shan, which display break-forward imbricate and wedge structure. More interior, steep reverse faults such as the Tieklik thrust bring older strata to the surface, including Paleozoic basement. The Cambrian detachment also extends northward under the Tarim basin with minor hanging-wall deformation that warps the Hotian Thrust sheet locally, causing the development of growth strata in the Hotian thrust sheet that providesa quantitative record of its motion over these warps. Seismic profiles in the southwest Tarim basin reveal widespread growth strata that record much of the structural history beginning in the early Pliocene Atushi Formation. Ages of seismic reflectors are calibrated to a surface magnetostratigraphic sequence(from Zheng et al., 2000)and traced throughout the seismic grid. The bottom of the growth strata is dated at 3.6 Ma indicating a Pliocene and younger age of thrusting and folding in the southwest Tarim Basin. Structural restoration suggests minimum shortening greater than 35km. The Tieklik thrust consumed at least 10 km in early Pliocene. The fold-and-thrust belts of the southwest Tarim basin shortened >25km in

  20. The Direct Loan Reconciliation Game.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Department of Education, Washington, DC.

    This training guide for a one-day workshop provides an introduction to the William D. Ford Federal Direct Loan Program for administrative personnel at higher education institutions. The six sections of the guide, each corresponding to a workshop session, include activity sheets, questions for participants to answer, and space for notes. Following…

  1. Cellular Cholesterol Directly Activates Smoothened in Hedgehog Signaling

    SciTech Connect

    Huang, Pengxiang; Nedelcu, Daniel; Watanabe, Miyako; Jao, Cindy; Kim, Youngchang; Liu, Jing; Salic, Adrian

    2016-08-01

    In vertebrates, sterols are necessary for Hedgehog signaling, a pathway critical in embryogenesis and cancer. Sterols activate the membrane protein Smoothened by binding its extracellular, cysteine-rich domain (CRD). Major unanswered questions concern the nature of the endogenous, activating sterol and the mechanism by which it regulates Smoothened. We report crystal structures of CRD complexed with sterols and alone, revealing that sterols induce a dramatic conformational change of the binding site, which is sufficient for Smoothened activation and is unique among CRD-containing receptors. We demonstrate that Hedgehog signaling requires sterol binding to Smoothened and define key residues for sterol recognition and activity. We also show that cholesterol itself binds and activates Smoothened. Furthermore, the effect of oxysterols is abolished in Smoothened mutants that retain activation by cholesterol and Hedgehog. We propose that the endogenous Smoothened activator is cholesterol, not oxysterols, and that vertebrate Hedgehog signaling controls Smoothened by regulating its access to cholesterol.

  2. SAMS – Sediment Assessment and Monitoring Sheets, SAMS #1, Collecting and Using Fish Tissue Contaminant Data in Monitoring Sediment Remedy Effectiveness, FINAL; OSWER Directive 9200.1-77D

    EPA Science Inventory

    This fact sheet, a Sediment Assessment and Monitoring Sheet #1, was written to supplement the Contaminated Sediment Remediation Guidance for Hazardous Waste Sites, EPA-540-R-05-012, OSWER 9355.0-85, Dec. 2005.

  3. Isoproterenol directs hair follicle-associated pluripotent (HAP) stem cells to differentiate in vitro to cardiac muscle cells which can be induced to form beating heart-muscle tissue sheets.

    PubMed

    Yamazaki, Aiko; Yashiro, Masateru; Mii, Sumiyuki; Aki, Ryoichi; Hamada, Yuko; Arakawa, Nobuko; Kawahara, Katsumasa; Hoffman, Robert M; Amoh, Yasuyuki

    2016-01-01

    Nestin-expressing hair-follicle-associated pluripotent (HAP) stem cells are located in the bulge area of the follicle. Previous studies have shown that HAP stem cells can differentiate to neurons, glia, keratinocytes, smooth muscle cells, and melanocytes in vitro. HAP stem cells effected nerve and spinal cord regeneration in mouse models. Recently, we demonstrated that HAP stem cells differentiated to beating cardiac muscle cells. The differentiation potential to cardiac muscle cells was greatest in the upper part of the follicle. The beat rate of the cardiac muscle cells was stimulated by isoproterenol. In the present study, we observed that isoproterenol directs HAP stem cells to differentiate to cardiac muscle cells in large numbers in culture compared to HAP stem cells not supplemented with isoproterenol. The addition of activin A, bone morphogenetic protein 4, and basic fibroblast growth factor, along with isoproternal, induced the cardiac muscle cells to form tissue sheets of beating heart muscle cells. These results demonstrate that HAP stem cells have great potential to form beating cardiac muscle cells in tissue sheets.

  4. Experimental and DFT studies of gold nanoparticles supported on MgO(111) nano-sheets and their catalytic activity.

    PubMed

    Li, Zhi; Ciobanu, Cristian V; Hu, Juncheng; Palomares-Báez, Juan-Pedro; Rodríguez-López, José-Luis; Richards, Ryan

    2011-02-21

    oxygen or magnesium termination. Furthermore, we have found that for the (001) and (110) substrates the charges of the ions in the top surface layer have similar values as in bulk MgO, but that on (111) surfaces these charges are significantly different. This difference in surface charge determines the direction of the electronic transfer upon adsorption of gold, such transfer occurring so as to restore the bulk MgO charge values. Using the results from theoretical calculations, we provide an explanation of our observations of increased catalytic activity in the case of the Au/MgO(111) system.

  5. Structural Biology Fact Sheet

    MedlinePlus

    ... Home > Science Education > Structural Biology Fact Sheet Structural Biology Fact Sheet Tagline (Optional) Middle/Main Content Area What is structural biology? Structural biology is a field of science focused ...

  6. Zika Virus Fact Sheet

    MedlinePlus

    ... sheets Fact files Questions & answers Features Multimedia Contacts Zika virus Fact sheet Updated 6 September 2016 Key ... and last for 2-7 days. Complications of Zika virus disease Based on a systematic review of ...

  7. Uterine Fibroids Fact Sheet

    MedlinePlus

    ... Topics Uterine fibroids fact sheet (PDF, 950 KB) FDA warning on power morcellators in treatment for uterine ... Topics Uterine fibroids fact sheet (PDF, 950 KB) FDA warning on power morcellators in treatment for uterine ...

  8. Novel assay for direct fluorescent imaging of sialidase activity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tomin, A.; Shkandina, T.; Bilyy, R.

    2011-07-01

    Here we describe a novel approach to sialidase activity estimation. Sialidases (EC 3.2.1.18, exo-α-sialidases), also known as neuraminidases, are the group of enzymes, which hydrolyze the glycoside bound between terminal sialic acid and subsequent carbohydrate residue in glycoproteins and glycolipids. Sialic acids are the group of monosaccharides with acidic properties, since they are acetylated or glycolylated derivates of neuraminic acid. Flu and some other viruses use neuraminidase activity to infect host cells. The level of sialylation was shown to be tightly connected with tumor cell invasiveness and metastatic potential, sialylation level also determines the clearance of aged or virus-infected cells. Thus, detection of sialidase activity is of primary importance for clinical diagnostics as well as life science research. The authors developed the assay for both visualization and estimation of sialidase activity in living cells. Previously known methods for sialidase activity detection required destruction of cellular material, or were low-sensitive, or provided no information on the activity localization in certain intracellular compartment. To overcome these problems, a fluorogenic neuraminidase substrate, 4-MUNA was utilized, and the method for detection of neuraminidase activity using fluorescent microscopy was proposed, it provided a high signal level and information on cellular localization of the studied enzyme. By using this approach the increase of sialidase activity on apoptotic cells was demonstrated in comparison to viable and primary necrotic cells.

  9. Dylan Pritchett, Storyteller. Cue Sheet for Students.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Evans, Karen L. B.

    Designed to be used before and after attending a storytelling performance by Dylan Pritchett, this cue sheet presents information about the performance and suggests activities that can be done with classmates, friends, or family members. The cue sheet discusses where and why people tell stories, what makes a story good for telling, what makes a…

  10. INITIATION AND ERUPTION PROCESS OF MAGNETIC FLUX ROPE FROM SOLAR ACTIVE REGION NOAA 11719 TO EARTH-DIRECTED CME

    SciTech Connect

    Vemareddy, P.; Zhang, J.

    2014-12-20

    An eruption event launched from the solar active region (AR) NOAA 11719 is investigated based on coronal EUV observations and photospheric magnetic field measurements obtained from the Solar Dynamic Observatory. The AR consists of a filament channel originating from a major sunspot and its south section is associated with an inverse-S sigmoidal system as observed in Atmospheric Imaging Assembly passbands. We regard the sigmoid as the main body of the flux rope (FR). There also exists a twisted flux bundle crossing over this FR. This overlying flux bundle transforms in shape similar to kink-rise evolution, which corresponds with the rise motion of the FR. The emission measure and temperature along the FR exhibits an increasing trend with its rising motion, indicating reconnection in the thinning current sheet underneath the FR. Net magnetic flux of the AR, evaluated at north and south polarities, showed decreasing behavior whereas the net current in these fluxes exhibits an increasing trend. Because the negative (positive) flux has a dominant positive (negative) current, the chirality of AR flux system is likely negative (left handed) in order to be consistent with the chirality of inverse S-sigmoidal FR. This analysis of magnetic fields of the source AR suggests that the cancelling fluxes are prime factors of the monotonous twisting of the FR system, reaching to a critical state to trigger kink instability and rise motion. This rise motion may have led to the onset of the torus instability, resulting in an Earth-directed coronal mass ejection, and the progressive reconnection in the thinning current sheet beneath the rising FR led to the M6.5 flare.

  11. Direct imaging of macrophage activation during PDT treatment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Song, Sheng; Zhou, Feifan; Chen, Wei R.; Xing, Da

    2012-03-01

    Mounting evidence describes a more complex progress of macrophage activation during photodynamic therapy (PDT), which performing distinct immunological functions and different physiologies on surrounding cells and tissues. Macrophage-targeted PDT has been applied in the selective killing of cells involved in inflammation and tumor. We have previously shown that PDT-mediated tumor cells apoptosis can induce a higher level immune response than necrosis, and enhance the macrophage activation. However, the molecular mechanism of macrophage activation during PDT-induced apoptotic cells (AC) still unclear. Here, we use confocal microscopy to image the phagocytosis of tumor cells by macrophages. We also observed that PDT-treated AC can activate Toll-like receptors (TLRs) which are present on macrophages surface. Besides, the increase in nitric oxide (NO) formation in macrophages was detected in real time by a laser scanning microscopy. This study provided more details for understanding the molecular mechanism of the immune response induced by PDT-treated AC.

  12. Direct imaging of macrophage activation during PDT treatment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Song, Sheng; Zhou, Feifan; Chen, Wei R.; Xing, Da

    2011-11-01

    Mounting evidence describes a more complex progress of macrophage activation during photodynamic therapy (PDT), which performing distinct immunological functions and different physiologies on surrounding cells and tissues. Macrophage-targeted PDT has been applied in the selective killing of cells involved in inflammation and tumor. We have previously shown that PDT-mediated tumor cells apoptosis can induce a higher level immune response than necrosis, and enhance the macrophage activation. However, the molecular mechanism of macrophage activation during PDT-induced apoptotic cells (AC) still unclear. Here, we use confocal microscopy to image the phagocytosis of tumor cells by macrophages. We also observed that PDT-treated AC can activate Toll-like receptors (TLRs) which are present on macrophages surface. Besides, the increase in nitric oxide (NO) formation in macrophages was detected in real time by a laser scanning microscopy. This study provided more details for understanding the molecular mechanism of the immune response induced by PDT-treated AC.

  13. Transnitrosylation directs TRPA1 selectivity in N-nitrosamine activators.

    PubMed

    Kozai, Daisuke; Kabasawa, Yoji; Ebert, Maximilian; Kiyonaka, Shigeki; Otani, Yuko; Numata, Tomohiro; Takahashi, Nobuaki; Mori, Yasuo; Ohwada, Tomohiko

    2014-01-01

    S-Nitrosylation, the addition of a nitrosyl group to cysteine thiols, regulates various protein functions to mediate nitric oxide (NO) bioactivity. Recent studies have demonstrated that selectivity in protein S-nitrosylation signaling pathways is conferred through transnitrosylation, a transfer of the NO group, between proteins via interaction. We previously demonstrated that sensitivity to activation by synthetic NO-releasing agents via S-nitrosylation is a common feature of members of the transient receptor potential (TRP) family of Ca(2+)-permeable cation channels. However, strategies to confer subtype selectivity to nitrosylating agents targeted to TRP channels are yet to be developed. Here, we show selective activation of TRPA1 channels by novel NO donors derived from the ABBH (7-azabenzobicyclo[2.2.1]heptane) N-nitrosamines, which exhibit transnitrosylation reactivity to thiols without releasing NO. The NNO-ABBH1 (N-nitroso-2-exo,3-exo-ditrifluoromethyl-7-azabenzobicyclo[2.2.1]heptane) elicits S-nitrosylation of TRPA1 proteins, and dose-dependently induces robust Ca(2+) influx via both recombinant and native TRPA1 channels, but not via other NO-activated TRP channels. TRPA1 activation by NNO-ABBH1 is suppressed by specific cysteine mutations but not by NO scavenging, suggesting that cysteine transnitrosylation underlies the activation of TRPA1 by NNO-ABBH1. This is supported by the correlation of N-NO bond reactivity and TRPA1-activating potency in a congeneric series of ABBH N-nitrosamines. Interestingly, nonelectrophilic derivatives of ABBH also activate TRPA1 selectively, but less potently, compared with NNO-ABBH1. Thus, ABBH N-nitrosamines confer subtype selectivity on S-nitrosylation in TRP channels through synergetic effects of two chemical processes: cysteine transnitrosylation and molecular recognition of the nonelectrophilic moiety.

  14. Photovoltaics Fact Sheet

    SciTech Connect

    2016-02-01

    This fact sheet is an overview of the Photovoltaics (PV) subprogram at the U.S. Department of Energy SunShot Initiative. The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)’s Solar Energy Technologies Office works with industry, academia, national laboratories, and other government agencies to advance solar PV, which is the direct conversion of sunlight into electricity by a semiconductor, in support of the goals of the SunShot Initiative. SunShot supports research and development to aggressively advance PV technology by improving efficiency and reliability and lowering manufacturing costs. SunShot’s PV portfolio spans work from early-stage solar cell research through technology commercialization, including work on materials, processes, and device structure and characterization techniques.

  15. Bifunctional activation of a direct methanol fuel cell

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kulikovsky, A. A.; Schmitz, H.; Wippermann, K.; Mergel, J.; Fricke, B.; Sanders, T.; Sauer, D. U.

    We report a novel method for performance recovery of direct methanol fuel cells. Lowering of air flow rate below a critical value turns the cell into bifunctional regime, when the oxygen-rich part of the cell generates current while the rest part works in electrolysis mode (electrolytic domain). Upon restoring the normal (super-critical) air flow rate, the galvanic performance of the electrolytic domain increases. This recovery effect is presumably attributed to Pt surface cleaning on the cathode with the simultaneous increase in catalyst utilization on the anode.

  16. Laboratory Directed Research and Development Program Activities for FY 2007.

    SciTech Connect

    Newman,L.

    2007-12-31

    Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL) is a multidisciplinary laboratory that carries out basic and applied research in the physical, biomedical, and environmental sciences, and in selected energy technologies. It is managed by Brookhaven Science Associates, LLC, (BSA) under contract with the U. S. Department of Energy (DOE). BNL's Fiscal year 2007 budget was $515 million. There are about 2,600 employees, and another 4,500 guest scientists and students who come each year to use the Laboratory's facilities and work with the staff. The BNL Laboratory Directed Research and Development (LDRD) Program reports its status to the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) annually in March, as required by DOE Order 413.2B, 'Laboratory Directed Research and Development', April 19, 2006, and the Roles, Responsibilities, and Guidelines for Laboratory Directed Research and Development at the Department of Energy/National Nuclear Security Administration Laboratories dated June 13, 2006. In accordance this is our Annual Report in which we describe the Purpose, Approach, Technical Progress and Results, and Specific Accomplishments of all LDRD projects that received funding during Fiscal Year 2007. The goals and objectives of BNL's LDRD Program can be inferred from the Program's stated purposes. These are to (1) encourage and support the development of new ideas and technology, (2) promote the early exploration and exploitation of creative and innovative concepts, and (3) develop new 'fundable' R&D projects and programs. The emphasis is clearly articulated by BNL to be on supporting exploratory research 'which could lead to new programs, projects, and directions' for the Laboratory. We explicitly indicate that research conducted under the LDRD Program should be highly innovative, and an element of high risk as to success is acceptable. In the solicitation for new proposals for Fiscal Year 2007 we especially requested innovative new projects in support of RHIC and the Light Source and any of

  17. Direct Experimental Assessment of Microbial Activity in North Pond Sediments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ferdelman, T. G.; Picard, A.; Morando, M.; Ziebis, W.

    2009-12-01

    North Pond, an isolated sediment pond located at 22°45’N on the western flank of the Mid-Atlantic Ridge, offered the opportunity to study microbial activities in deeply-buried low-activity sediments. About 8 x 15 km in size with sediment maximum thickness of about 300 m, North Pond is completely surrounded by exposed 7 Ma old basement. North Pond lies above the carbonate compensation depth at a water depth about 4500 m; hydrostatic pressure at the seafloor is about 45 MPa and the temperature is near 2°C. During the a R/V MS Merian cruise (MSM-11/1) in February -March 2009, 14 gravity cores of up to 9 m length were successfully obtained, from which samples were taken with 1-m resolution for experimental activity measurements. The goal of the experimental work was 1) to examine potential metabolic pathways in North Pond sediments and carbon assimilation pathways in this low-energy environment, and 2) explore the effects of pressure on microbial metabolic activities. As dissolved oxygen penetrated through all depths, sediments were aerobically sampled, processed and incubated at 4°C. Selected samples were immediately stored at in situ pressure until further use. The microbial uptake of both organic and inorganic carbon in selected North Pond sediment samples was investigated by following the fate of 14C in radio-labeled organic and organic compounds in North Pond sediment slurry incubations. Shipboard and on-shore experiments using 14C-leucine, 14C-glucose and 14C-bicarbonate were performed on selected cores. Day- to month- incubations were performed at 4°C. Parallel incubations were conducted at atmospheric pressure (0.1 MPa) and in situ pressure (~45 MPa). Either whole cell extraction (Kallmeyer et al., Limnol. Oceanogr.: Methods 6, 2008, 238-245) or protein-DNA extraction was carried on after various incubations to determine the fraction of 14C incorporated into cellular components. Formation of 14C-labeled CO2 was determined on samples incubated with 14C

  18. A study of thin liquid sheet flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chubb, Donald L.; Calfo, Frederick D.; Mcconley, Marc W.; Mcmaster, Matthew S.; Afjeh, Abdollah A.

    1993-01-01

    This study was a theoretical and experimental investigation of thin liquid sheet flows in vacuum. A sheet flow created by a narrow slit of width, W, coalesces to a point at a distance, L, as a result of surface tension forces acting at the sheet edges. As the flow coalesces, the fluid accumulates in the sheet edges. The observed triangular shape of the sheet agrees with the calculated triangular result. Experimental results for L/W as a function of Weber number, We, agree with the calculated result, L/W = the sq. root of 8We. The edge cross sectional shape is found to oscillate from elliptic to 'cigar' like to 'peanut' like and then back to elliptic in the flow direction. A theoretical one-dimensional model was developed that yielded only elliptic solutions for the edge cross section. At the points where the elliptic shapes occur, there is agreement between theory and experiment.

  19. Thinning and expansion of the substorm plasma sheet: Cluster PEACE timing analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dewhurst, J.; Owen, C.; Fazakerley, A.; Balogh, A.

    2004-12-01

    The storage and subsequent removal of magnetic flux in the magnetotail during a geomagnetic substorm has a dramatic effect on the thickness of the cross-tail plasma sheet. The near-Earth plasma sheet is thought to thin during the growth phase and then rapidly expand after onset of the substorm. The direction of propagation, whether earthward or tailward along the GSM-X direction in the near-Earth tail, may suggest the time ordering of current-disruption and near-Earth reconnection, both of which are key to the substorm process. Cluster's Plasma Electron And Current Experiment (PEACE) allows 4-point observations of electrons at the plasma sheet - lobe boundary as this interface passes over the Cluster tetrahedron. The relative timings of the boundary passage at each spacecraft allow a determination of this boundary's speed and direction of motion, assuming this is planar on the scale of the Cluster separation scale. For those boundaries corresponding to the expansion of the plasma sheet, this direction is fundamental to determining the direction of expansion. We present an example of isolated thinning and expansion of the plasma sheet, as well as a multiple thinning-expansion event that occurs during a more active substorm. Data from the 2001 and 2002 tail passes have been analysed and the average plasma sheet - lobe boundary normal vectors and normal component velocities have been calculated. A total of 77 crossings, typically between 10 and 20 RE downtail, correspond to substorm associated expansion of the plasma sheet over the spacecraft. These had normal vectors predominantly in the GSM-YZ plane and provided no clear evidence for the formation of the near-Earth neutral line occurring before current disruption or vice versa. The expansions of the plasma sheet generally exhibit the appropriate GSM-Z direction expected for the given lobe, and tend to have GSM-Y components that support onset occurring near the origin of the GSM-YZ plane. This result is noteworthy in

  20. A Study of the Effects of Self-Directed Activity Upon Quantity, Quality, and Variety of Responses in a Group Directed Reading-Thinking Activity.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Anderson, William Warner

    Many behavioral theorists have suggested that self-directed activity is central to the learning process (e.g., Dewey, Piaget, Wertheimer). Accordingly, it was predicted that such activity bears a significant positive relationship to the quantity, quality, and variety of responses in a reading lesson. Moreover, it was expected that selected…

  1. Directed transport of active particles over asymmetric energy barriers.

    PubMed

    Koumakis, N; Maggi, C; Di Leonardo, R

    2014-08-21

    We theoretically and numerically investigate the transport of active colloids to target regions, delimited by asymmetric energy barriers. We show that it is possible to introduce a generalized effective temperature that is related to the local variance of particle velocities. The stationary probability distributions can be derived from a simple diffusion equation in the presence of an inhomogeneous effective temperature resulting from the action of external force fields. In particular, transition rates over asymmetric energy barriers can be unbalanced by having different effective temperatures over the two slopes of the barrier. By varying the type of active noise, we find that equal values of diffusivity and persistence time may produce strongly varied effective temperatures and thus stationary distributions.

  2. Dynamic Current Sheet Formation and Evolution with Application to Inter-(Super)granular Flow Lanes and Quasi-Homologous Jet Activity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Edmondson, Justin K.; Velli, M.

    2011-05-01

    The coronal magnetic field structure is an immensely complex system constantly driven away from equilibrium by global drivers such as photospheric flow, flux emergence/cancellation at the lower boundary, helicity injection and transport, etc. In low-beta plasma systems, such as solar corona, the Maxwell stresses dominate forces and therefore the system dynamics. General Poynting stress injection (i.e., flux injection, helicity injection, translational motions, or any combination thereof) results in (possibly large) geometric deformations of the magnetic field, such that the Maxwell stresses distribute as uniformly as possible, constrained by the distorted geometry and topology of the bounding separatricies. Since the topological connectivity is discontinuous across these separatrix surfaces, the magnetic stresses will be discontinuous there as well, manifesting as current sheets within the field. The solar magnetic field undergoes major geometric expansion passing from the photosphere, through the chromosphere, into the corona. No matter the specific details, a mixed polarity distribution at the lower boundary and the divergence-free condition require invariant topological features such as an X-line and separatricies to exist between fields emanating from separate regions of the photosphere. We present the results of fully-3D numerical simulations of a simplified low-beta model of this field expansion. A symmetric injection of Maxwell stresses into this geometry inflates strongly line-tied fields, generating a region of large current densities and magnetic energy dissipation. Elsewhere the injected stresses accumulate along the existing separatricies. There is no evidence of reconnection dynamics until after the initial left-right parity is broken. Once the symmetry breaks, the X-line deforms explosively into a Syrovatskii-type current sheet, leading to a succession of quasi-homologous jet dynamics. The bursty-oscillations of these jets occur as the stresses within

  3. Lepidium meyenii (Maca) does not exert direct androgenic activities.

    PubMed

    Bogani, P; Simonini, F; Iriti, M; Rossoni, M; Faoro, F; Poletti, A; Visioli, F

    2006-04-06

    Maca is the edible root of the Peruvian plant Lepidum meyenii, traditionally employed for its purported aphrodisiac and fertility-enhancing properties. This study aimed at testing the hypothesis that Maca contains testosterone-like compounds, able to bind the human androgen receptor and promote transcription pathways regulated by steroid hormone signaling. Maca extracts (obtained with different solvents: methanol, ethanol, hexane and chloroform) are not able to regulate GRE (glucocorticoid response element) activation. Further experiments are needed to assess which compound, of the several Maca's components, is responsible of the observed in vivo effects.

  4. Chitinase producing bacteria with direct algicidal activity on marine diatoms

    PubMed Central

    Li, Yi; Lei, Xueqian; Zhu, Hong; Zhang, Huajun; Guan, Chengwei; Chen, Zhangran; Zheng, Wei; Fu, Lijun; Zheng, Tianling

    2016-01-01

    Chitinase producing bacteria can involve extensively in nutrient cycling and energy flow in the aquatic environment through degradation and utilization of chitin. It is well known that diatoms cells are encased by box-like frustules composed of chitin. Thus the chitin containing of diatoms shall be a natural target of chitinase producing bacteria, however, the interaction between these two organismic groups has not been studied thus far. Therefore, in this study, the algicidal mechanism of one chitinase producing bacterium (strain LY03) on Thalassiosira pseudonana was investigated. The algicidal range and algicidal mode of strain LY03 were first studied, and then bacterial viability, chemotactic ability and direct interaction characteristic between bacteria and diatom were also confirmed. Finally, the characteristic of the intracellular algicidal substance was identified and the algicidal mechanism was determined whereby algicidal bacterial cells showed chemotaxis to algal cells, fastened themselves on algal cells with their flagella, and then produced chitinase to degrade algal cell walls, and eventually caused algal lysis and death. It is the first time to investigate the interaction between chitinase producing bacteria and diatoms, and this novel special interaction mode was confirmed in this study, which will be helpful in protection and utilization of diatoms resources. PMID:26902175

  5. Chitinase producing bacteria with direct algicidal activity on marine diatoms.

    PubMed

    Li, Yi; Lei, Xueqian; Zhu, Hong; Zhang, Huajun; Guan, Chengwei; Chen, Zhangran; Zheng, Wei; Fu, Lijun; Zheng, Tianling

    2016-02-23

    Chitinase producing bacteria can involve extensively in nutrient cycling and energy flow in the aquatic environment through degradation and utilization of chitin. It is well known that diatoms cells are encased by box-like frustules composed of chitin. Thus the chitin containing of diatoms shall be a natural target of chitinase producing bacteria, however, the interaction between these two organismic groups has not been studied thus far. Therefore, in this study, the algicidal mechanism of one chitinase producing bacterium (strain LY03) on Thalassiosira pseudonana was investigated. The algicidal range and algicidal mode of strain LY03 were first studied, and then bacterial viability, chemotactic ability and direct interaction characteristic between bacteria and diatom were also confirmed. Finally, the characteristic of the intracellular algicidal substance was identified and the algicidal mechanism was determined whereby algicidal bacterial cells showed chemotaxis to algal cells, fastened themselves on algal cells with their flagella, and then produced chitinase to degrade algal cell walls, and eventually caused algal lysis and death. It is the first time to investigate the interaction between chitinase producing bacteria and diatoms, and this novel special interaction mode was confirmed in this study, which will be helpful in protection and utilization of diatoms resources.

  6. 78 FR 11857 - Agency Information Collection Activities; Comment Request; William D. Ford Federal Direct Loan...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-02-20

    ... Agency Information Collection Activities; Comment Request; William D. Ford Federal Direct Loan Program... of Collection: William D. Ford Federal Direct Loan Program (DL) Regulations. OMB Control Number: 1845... Annual Burden Hours: 535,998. Abstract: The William D. Ford Federal Direct Loan Program regulations...

  7. 29 CFR 1620.4 - “Closely related” and “directly essential” activities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 4 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false âClosely relatedâ and âdirectly essentialâ activities. 1620.4 Section 1620.4 Labor Regulations Relating to Labor (Continued) EQUAL EMPLOYMENT OPPORTUNITY COMMISSION THE EQUAL PAY ACT § 1620.4 “Closely related” and “directly essential” activities. An employee...

  8. Ganges Chasma Sand Sheet

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2005-01-01

    [figure removed for brevity, see original site]

    Our topic for the weeks of April 4 and April 11 is dunes on Mars. We will look at the north polar sand sea and at isolated dune fields at lower latitudes. Sand seas on Earth are often called 'ergs,' an Arabic name for dune field. A sand sea differs from a dune field in two ways: 1) a sand sea has a large regional extent, and 2) the individual dunes are large in size and complex in form.

    Today's sand sheet is located in the Ganges Chasma portion of Valles Marineris. As with yesterday's image, note that the dune forms are seen only at the margin and that the interior of the sand sheet at this resolution appears to completely lack dune forms.

    Image information: VIS instrument. Latitude -6.4, Longitude 310.7 East (49.3 West). 19 meter/pixel resolution.

    Note: this THEMIS visual image has not been radiometrically nor geometrically calibrated for this preliminary release. An empirical correction has been performed to remove instrumental effects. A linear shift has been applied in the cross-track and down-track direction to approximate spacecraft and planetary motion. Fully calibrated and geometrically projected images will be released through the Planetary Data System in accordance with Project policies at a later time.

    NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory manages the 2001 Mars Odyssey mission for NASA's Office of Space Science, Washington, D.C. The Thermal Emission Imaging System (THEMIS) was developed by Arizona State University, Tempe, in collaboration with Raytheon Santa Barbara Remote Sensing. The THEMIS investigation is led by Dr. Philip Christensen at Arizona State University. Lockheed Martin Astronautics, Denver, is the prime contractor for the Odyssey project, and developed and built the orbiter. Mission operations are conducted jointly from Lockheed Martin and from JPL, a division of the California Institute of Technology in Pasadena.

  9. Biofuels Feedstock Development Program: 1995 activities and future directions

    SciTech Connect

    Ferrell, J.E.; Wright, L.L.; Tuskan, G.A.

    1995-12-31

    The Department of Energy`s (DOE`s) Biofuels Feedstock Development Program (BFDP) has led the nation in developing short-rotation woody crops (SRWC) and herbaceous energy crops (HEC) as feedstocks for renewable energy. Since 1978, approximately $60 million has been invested in research projects involving more than 100 federal, university, and private research institutions. The research has been highly leveraged with cost-sharing from USDA Forest Service, private industry, and state agencies. The performance of 154 woody species and 35 herbaceous species has been examined in field trials across the U.S. Results of this effort include the prescription of silvi-cultural systems for hybrid poplars and hybrid willows and agricultural systems for switchgrass. Selected clones of woody species are producing dry weight yields in research plots on agricultural land that are 3 to 7 times greater than those obtained from mixed species stands on forest land, and at least 2 times the yields of southern plantation pines. Selected switchgrass varieties are producing dry weight yields 2 to 7 times greater than average forage grass yields on pasture and crop land. Crop development research is continuing efforts to translate this potential to commercial enterprises over a more geographically diverse acreage. Environmental research on biomass crops is aimed at developing sustainable systems that will contribute to the biodiversity of agricultural landscapes. Systems integration and analysis aim to understand all factors affecting price and potential supplies of biomass crops at regional and national scales. Scale-up studies, feasibility analysis and demonstrations are establishing actual costs and facilitating the commercialization of integrated biomass systems. Information management and dissemination activities are facilitating the communication of results among a community of researchers, policy-makers, and potential users and producers of energy crops. 15 refs.

  10. Perforating Thin Metal Sheets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Davidson, M. E.

    1985-01-01

    Sheets only few mils thick bonded together, punched, then debonded. Three-step process yields perforated sheets of metal. (1): Individual sheets bonded together to form laminate. (2): laminate perforated in desired geometric pattern. (3): After baking, laminate separates into individual sheets. Developed for fabricating conductive layer on blankets that collect and remove ions; however, perforated foils have other applications - as conductive surfaces on insulating materials; stiffeners and conductors in plastic laminates; reflectors in antenna dishes; supports for thermal blankets; lightweight grille cover materials; and material for mockup of components.

  11. Construction of Self-Supported Three–Dimensional TiO2 Sheeted Networks with Enhanced Photocatalytic Activity

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Xuan; Hu, Chao; Bai, Hua; Yan, Yan; Li, Junfang; Yang, Haifeng; Lu, Xiaojing; Xi, Guangcheng

    2013-01-01

    The degradation of toxic gases and liquids using a catalyst and solar energy is an ideal method, compared with landfill and combustion methods. The search for active semiconductor photocatalysts that efficiently decompose contaminations under light irradiation remains one of the most challenging tasks for solar-energy utilization. In this work, free–supporting three-dimensional (3D) nanosheeted hierarchical porous tungsten, titanium, and tin oxide networks were obtained by a facile Lewis acid catalytic binary template route. These networks possess large macroscopic scale (millimeter–sized) and hierarchical macro/mesoporous nanostructure with high surface area and large pore volume. Photocatalytic degradation of Azo dyes demonstrated that the nanosheets-constructed hierarchical porous networks have high photocatalytic activity and stability. The present synthetic route can serve as the new design concept for functional 3D layered porous nanostructures. PMID:24356418

  12. Construction of Self-Supported Three-Dimensional TiO2 Sheeted Networks with Enhanced Photocatalytic Activity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Xuan; Hu, Chao; Bai, Hua; Yan, Yan; Li, Junfang; Yang, Haifeng; Lu, Xiaojing; Xi, Guangcheng

    2013-12-01

    The degradation of toxic gases and liquids using a catalyst and solar energy is an ideal method, compared with landfill and combustion methods. The search for active semiconductor photocatalysts that efficiently decompose contaminations under light irradiation remains one of the most challenging tasks for solar-energy utilization. In this work, free-supporting three-dimensional (3D) nanosheeted hierarchical porous tungsten, titanium, and tin oxide networks were obtained by a facile Lewis acid catalytic binary template route. These networks possess large macroscopic scale (millimeter-sized) and hierarchical macro/mesoporous nanostructure with high surface area and large pore volume. Photocatalytic degradation of Azo dyes demonstrated that the nanosheets-constructed hierarchical porous networks have high photocatalytic activity and stability. The present synthetic route can serve as the new design concept for functional 3D layered porous nanostructures.

  13. Characterization of Chitosan Nanofiber Sheets for Antifungal Application

    PubMed Central

    Egusa, Mayumi; Iwamoto, Ryo; Izawa, Hironori; Morimoto, Minoru; Saimoto, Hiroyuki; Kaminaka, Hironori; Ifuku, Shinsuke

    2015-01-01

    Chitosan produced by the deacetylation of chitin is a cationic polymer with antimicrobial properties. In this study, we demonstrate the improvement of chitosan properties by nanofibrillation. Nanofiber sheets were prepared from nanofibrillated chitosan under neutral conditions. The Young’s modulus and tensile strength of the chitosan NF sheets were higher than those of the chitosan sheets prepared from dissolving chitosan in acetic acid. The chitosan NF sheets showed strong mycelial growth inhibition against dermatophytes Microsporum and Trichophyton. Moreover, the chitosan NF sheets exhibited resistance to degradation by the fungi, suggesting potentials long-lasting usage. In addition, surface-deacetylated chitin nanofiber (SDCNF) sheets were prepared. The SDCNF sheet had a high Young’s modulus and tensile strength and showed antifungal activity to dermatophytes. These data indicate that nanofibrillation improved the properties of chitosan. Thus, chitosan NF and SDCNF sheets are useful candidates for antimicrobial materials. PMID:26540046

  14. Electromagnetic augmentation for casting of thin metal sheets

    DOEpatents

    Hull, John R.

    1989-01-01

    Thin metal sheets are cast by magnetically levitating molten metal deposited in a mold within a ferromagnetic yoke and between AC conducting coils and linearly displacing the magnetically levitated liquid metal while it is being cooled by the water-cooled walls of the mold to form a solid metal sheet. A conducting shield is electrically coupled to the molten metal sheet to provide a return path for eddy currents induced in the metal sheet by the current in the AC conducting coils. In another embodiment, a DC conducting coil is coupled to the metal sheet for providing a direct current therein which interacts with the magnetic field to levitate the moving metal sheet. Levitation of the metal sheet in both molten and solid forms reduces its contact pressure with the mold walls while maintaining sufficient engagement therebetween to permit efficient conductive cooling by the mold through which a coolant fluid may be circulated. The magnetic fields associated with the currents in the aforementioned coils levitate the molten metal sheet while the mold provides for its lateral and vertical confinement. A leader sheet having electromagnetic characteristics similar to those of the molten metal sheet is used to start the casing process and precedes the molten metal sheet through the yoke/coil arrangement and mold and forms a continuous sheet therewith. The yoke/coil arrangement may be either U-shaped with a single racetrack coil or may be rectangular with a pair of spaced, facing bedstead coils.

  15. Microwave assisted synthesis of sheet-like Cu/BiVO{sub 4} and its activities of various photocatalytic conditions

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, Xi; Li, Li; Yi, Tingting; Zhang, WenZhi; Zhang, Xiuli; Wang, Lili

    2015-09-15

    The Cu/BiVO{sub 4} photocatalyst with visible-light responsivity was prepared by the microwave-assisted hydrothermal method. The phase structures, chemical composition and surface physicochemical properties were well-characterized via X-ray diffraction (XRD), X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), UV–vis diffuse reflectance absorption (UV–vis/DRS), scanning electron microscopy (SEM), and N{sub 2} adsorption–desorption tests. Results indicate that the crystal structure of synthetic composite materials is mainly monoclinic scheelite BiVO{sub 4}, which is not changed with the increasing doping amount of Cu. In addition, the presence of Cu not only enlarges the range of the composite materials under the visible-light response, but also increases the BET value significantly. Compared to pure BiVO{sub 4}, 1% Cu/BiVO{sub 4}-160 performs the highest photocatalytic activity to degrade methylene blue under the irradiation of ultraviolet, visible and simulated sunlight. In addition, the capture experiments prove that the main active species was superoxide radicals during photocatalytic reaction. Moreover, the 1% Cu/BiVO{sub 4}-160 composite shows good photocatalytic stability after three times of recycling. - Graphical abstract: A series of BiVO{sub 4} with different amounts of Cu doping were prepared by the microwave-assisted method, moreover, which performed the high photocatalytic activities to degrade methylene blue under multi-mode. - Highlights: • A series of Cu/BiVO{sub 4} with different amounts of Cu doping were prepared by microwave-assisted synthesis. • The morphologies of as-samples were different with the amount of Cu doping increased. • Compared with pure BiVO{sub 4}, as-Cu/BiVO{sub 4} showed stronger absorption in the visible light region obviously. • 1% Cu/BiVO{sub 4}-160 performed the high photocatalytic activities to degrade methylene blue under multi-mode. • OH{sup •} and h{sup +} both play important roles in the photocatalytic reaction.

  16. Highly efficient heterojunction photocatalyst based on nanoporous g-C3N4 sheets modified by Ag3PO4 nanoparticles: synthesis and enhanced photocatalytic activity.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Deli; Zhu, Jianjun; Chen, Min; Xie, Jimin

    2014-03-01

    Novel visible-light-driven heterojunction photocatalyst composed by Ag3PO4 nanoparticles and nanoporous graphitic carbon nitride sheets (Ag3PO4/p-g-C3N4) was synthesized by a facile and green method. The results showed that photocatalytic activity of Ag3PO4/p-g-C3N4 was much higher than that of pure p-g-C3N4 in the photodegradation of Rhodamine B under visible light irradiation. The kinetic constant of Rhodamine B degradation over Ag3PO4 (33.3 mol%)/p-g-C3N4 was about 5 and 2 times higher than that over pure p-g-C3N4 and Ag3PO4, respectively. The enhanced photocatalytic performance is attributed to the stronger visible light absorption and the heterojunction between Ag3PO4 nanoparticles and p-g-C3N4, which could induce the low recombination rate of photoinduced electron-hole pairs.

  17. Coupling Molecularly Ultrathin Sheets of NiFe-Layered Double Hydroxide on NiCo2O4 Nanowire Arrays for Highly Efficient Overall Water-Splitting Activity.

    PubMed

    Wang, Zhiqiang; Zeng, Sha; Liu, Weihong; Wang, Xingwang; Li, Qingwen; Zhao, Zhigang; Geng, Fengxia

    2017-01-18

    Developing efficient but nonprecious bifunctional electrocatalysts for overall water splitting in basic media has been the subject of intensive research focus with the increasing demand for clean and regenerated energy. Herein, we report on the synthesis of a novel hierarchical hybrid electrode, NiFe-layered double hydroxide molecularly ultrathin sheets grown on NiCo2O4 nanowire arrays assembled from thin platelets with nickel foam as the scaffold support, in which the catalytic metal sites are more accessible and active and most importantly strong chemical coupling exists at the interface, enabling superior catalytic power toward both oxygen evolution reaction (OER) and additionally hydrogen evolution reaction (HER) in the same alkaline KOH electrolyte. The behavior ranks top-class compared with documented non-noble HER and OER electrocatalysts and even comparable to state-of-the-art noble-metal electrocatalysts, Pt and RuO2. When fabricated as an integrated alkaline water electrolyzer, the designed electrode can deliver a current density of 10 mA cm(-2) at a fairly low cell voltage of 1.60 V, promising the material as efficient bifunctional catalysts toward whole cell water splitting.

  18. Photocatalytic decomposition of selected estrogens and their estrogenic activity by UV-LED irradiated TiO2 immobilized on porous titanium sheets via thermal-chemical oxidation.

    PubMed

    Arlos, Maricor J; Liang, Robert; Hatat-Fraile, Melisa M; Bragg, Leslie M; Zhou, Norman Y; Servos, Mark R; Andrews, Susan A

    2016-11-15

    The removal of endocrine disrupting compounds (EDCs) remains a big challenge in water treatment. Risks associated with these compounds are not clearly defined and it is important that the water industry has additional options to increase the resiliency of water treatment systems. Titanium dioxide (TiO2) has potential applications for the removal of EDCs from water. TiO2 has been immobilized on supports using a variety of synthesis methods to increase its feasibility for water treatment. In this study, we immobilized TiO2 through the thermal-chemical oxidation of porous titania sheets. The efficiency of the material to degrade target EDCs under UV-LED irradiation was examined under a wide range of pH conditions. A yeast-estrogen screen assay was used to complement chemical analysis in assessing removal efficiency. All compounds but 17β-estradiol were degraded and followed a pseudo first-order kinetics at all pH conditions tested, with pH 4 and pH 11 showing the most and the least efficient treatments respectively. In addition, the total estrogenic activity was substantially reduced even with the inefficient degradation of 17β-estradiol. Additional studies will be required to optimize different treatment conditions, UV-LED configurations, and membrane fouling mitigation measures to make this technology a more viable option for water treatment.

  19. Self-Directed Activity-Based Learning and Achievement in High School Chemistry

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bassett, Meighan M.; Martinez, James; Martin, Ellice P.

    2014-01-01

    The effects of student-directed activity-based learning (SDABL) were examined in two high school chemistry classes. Students in the SDABL class were given pretest results, a list of standards to be mastered, and a chart of learning activities categorized by difficulty level. They selected activities to meet their needs and preferences.…

  20. 78 FR 22252 - Agency Information Collection Activities; Comment Request; FFEL/Direct Loan/Perkins Military...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-04-15

    ... Agency Information Collection Activities; Comment Request; FFEL/ Direct Loan/Perkins Military Service.../Perkins Military Service Deferment/Post-Active Duty Student Deferment Request & SCRA Request. OMB Control... Number of Annual Burden Hours: 9,177. Abstract: The Military Service/Post-Active Duty Student...

  1. On the thermodynamics of the plasma sheet

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Baumjohann, W.; Goertz, C. K.

    1991-01-01

    The present study reinvestigates the evidence for nonadiabatic transport in the quiet central plasma sheet, using AMPTE IRM data from the plasma sheet boundary layer and active times selected on the basis of large AE values. It is found that as the plasma is transported from the plasma sheet boundary layer into the central plasma sheet, both its temperature and its density (n) increase. The plasma obeys the relation p varies as n exp 4/3 for quiet times (AE is less than 100 nT) and p varies as n exp 5/3 for AE greater than 300 nT. The temperature in the quiet plasma sheet is usually less than 6 keV, and high-temperature values are more likely to be observed in what is defined as the active plasma sheet. It is suggested that the plasma sheet contains a mixture of high-entropy 'bubbles' and low-entropy 'blobs.' It is argued that these either merge or are lost from the tail before they are convected into the near-earth tail.

  2. Mechanics of Sheeting Joints

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martel, S. J.

    2015-12-01

    Physical breakdown of rock across a broad scale spectrum involves fracturing. In many areas large fractures develop near the topographic surface, with sheeting joints being among the most impressive. Sheeting joints share many geometric, textural, and kinematic features with other joints (opening-mode fractures) but differ in that they are (a) discernibly curved, (b) open near the topographic surface, and (c) form subparallel to the topographic surface. Where sheeting joints are geologically young, the surface-parallel compressive stresses are typically several MPa or greater. Sheeting joints are best developed beneath domes, ridges, and saddles; they also are reported, albeit rarely, beneath valleys or bowls. A mechanism that accounts for all these associations has been sought for more than a century: neither erosion of overburden nor high lateral compressive stresses alone suffices. Sheeting joints are not accounted for by Mohr-Coulomb shear failure criteria. Principles of linear elastic fracture mechanics, together with the mechanical effect of a curved topographic surface, do provide a basis for understanding sheeting joint growth and the pattern sheeting joints form. Compressive stresses parallel to a singly or doubly convex topographic surface induce a tensile stress perpendicular to the surface at shallow depths; in some cases this alone could overcome the weight of overburden to open sheeting joints. If regional horizontal compressive stresses, augmented by thermal stresses, are an order of magnitude or so greater than a characteristic vertical stress that scales with topographic amplitude, then topographic stress perturbations can cause sheeting joints to open near the top of a ridge. This topographic effect can be augmented by pressure within sheeting joints arising from water, ice, or salt. Water pressure could be particularly important in helping drive sheeting joints downslope beneath valleys. Once sheeting joints have formed, the rock sheets between

  3. Epigallocatechin-3-O-Gallate-Loaded Poly(lactic-co-glycolic acid) Fibrous Sheets as Anti-Adhesion Barriers.

    PubMed

    Lee, Jong Ho; Shin, Yong Cheol; Yang, Won Jun; Park, Jong-chul; Hyon, Suong-hyu; Han, Dong-wook

    2015-08-01

    Epigallocatechin-3-O-gallate (EGCG), the main polyphenolic component of green tea, has a wide range of pharmacological activities, including antioxidant, anti-inflammatory, and anti-fibrotic effects. In this study, EGCG-loaded poly(lactic-co-glycolic acid) (PLGA) sheets were prepared by electrospinning nanofibers and evaluating their potential as tissue-adhesion barriers. EGCG-loaded PLGA (E-PLGA) fibrous sheets were electrospun from a PLGA solution containing 8% (w/v) EGCG. The average diameter of E-PLGA fibers was 397 ± 159 nm, which was comparable to that of pure PLGA fibers (459 ± 154 nm). EGCG was uniformly dispersed in E-PLGA sheets without direct chemical interactions. E-PLGA fibrous sheets showed sustained release of EGCG by controlled diffusion and PLGA degradation. The attachment and proliferation of L-929 fibroblastic cells were significantly (p < 0.05) suppressed in E-PLGA sheets. Furthermore, E-PLGA fibrous sheets did not induce any inflammatory response to J774A.1 macrophages. The anti-adhesion efficacy of E-PLGA fibrous sheets was evaluated in the intraperitoneal adhesion model in rats. Two weeks after surgical treatment, macroscopic adhesion (extent and severity) scores and histopathological tissue responses of E-PLGA fibrous sheets were significantly lower than those of non-treated controls and pure PLGA sheets. The results suggest that the scores are comparable, and in some cases superior, to those of other commercialized tissue-adhesion barriers. In conclusion, our study findings suggest that E-PLGA fibrous sheets may be exploited as potential tissue-adhesion barriers for the prevention of post-surgical adhesion formation.

  4. Electromagnetic augmentation for casting of thin metal sheets

    DOEpatents

    Hull, J.R.

    1987-10-28

    Thin metal sheets are cast by magnetically levitating molten metal deposited in a model within a ferromagnetic yoke and between AC conducting coils and linearly displacing the magnetically levitated liquid metal while it is being cooled by the water-cooled walls of the mold to form a solid metal sheet. A conducting shield is electrically coupled to the molten metal sheet to provide a return path for eddy currents induced in the metal sheet by the current in the AC conducting coils. In another embodiment, a DC conducting coil is coupled to the metal sheet for providing a direct current therein which interacts with the magnetic field to levitate the moving metal sheet. Levitation of the metal sheet in both molten and solid forms reduces its contact pressure with the mold walls while maintaining sufficient engagement therebetween to permit efficient conductive cooling by the mold through which a coolant fluid may be circulated. 8 figs.

  5. Simultaneous observation of the poleward expansion of substorm electrojet activity and the tailward expansion of current sheet disruption in the near-earth magnetotail

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lopez, R. E.; Koskinen, H. E. J.; Pulkkinen, T. I.; Bosinger, T.; Mcentire, R. W.; Potemra, T. A.

    1993-01-01

    A substorm that occurred on 7 June 1985 at 2209 UT for which simultaneous measurements from ground stations and CCE are available is considered. The event occurred during a close conjunction between CCE, the EISCAT magnetometer cross, and the STARE radar, allowing a detailed comparison of satellite and ground-based data. Two discrete activations took place during the first few minutes of this substorm: the expansion phase onset at 2209 UT and an intensification at 2212 UT, corresponding to a poleward expansion of activity. The energetic particle data indicate that the active region of the magnetotail during the 2212 UT intensification was located tailward of the active region at 2209 UT. This is direct evidence for a correspondence between tailward expansion of localized activity in the near-earth magnetotail (current disruption and particle energization) and poleward expansion of activity (electrojet formation) in the ionosphere.

  6. UTILITY OF MECHANISTIC MODELS FOR DIRECTING ADVANCED SEPARATIONS RESEARCH & DEVELOPMENT ACTIVITIES: Electrochemically Modulated Separation Example

    SciTech Connect

    Schwantes, Jon M.

    2009-06-01

    The objective for this work was to demonstrate the utility of mechanistic computer models designed to simulate actinide behavior for use in efficiently and effectively directing advanced laboratory R&D activities associated with developing advanced separations methods.

  7. 45 CFR 2520.25 - What direct service activities may AmeriCorps members perform?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... activities that provide a direct, measurable benefit to an individual, a group, or a community. (d) Examples... to, the following: (1) Tutoring children in reading; (2) Helping to run an after-school program;...

  8. 45 CFR 2520.25 - What direct service activities may AmeriCorps members perform?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... activities that provide a direct, measurable benefit to an individual, a group, or a community. (d) Examples... to, the following: (1) Tutoring children in reading; (2) Helping to run an after-school program;...

  9. 45 CFR 2520.25 - What direct service activities may AmeriCorps members perform?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... activities that provide a direct, measurable benefit to an individual, a group, or a community. (d) Examples... to, the following: (1) Tutoring children in reading; (2) Helping to run an after-school program;...

  10. 45 CFR 2520.25 - What direct service activities may AmeriCorps members perform?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... activities that provide a direct, measurable benefit to an individual, a group, or a community. (d) Examples... to, the following: (1) Tutoring children in reading; (2) Helping to run an after-school program;...

  11. Effects of gaze direction, head orientation and valence of facial expression on amygdala activity.

    PubMed

    Sauer, Andreas; Mothes-Lasch, Martin; Miltner, Wolfgang H R; Straube, Thomas

    2014-08-01

    There is increasing evidence for a role of the amygdala in processing gaze direction and emotional relevance of faces. In this event-related functional magnetic resonance study we investigated amygdala responses while we orthogonally manipulated head direction, gaze direction and facial expression (angry, happy and neutral). This allowed us to investigate effects of stimulus ambiguity, low-level factors and non-emotional factors on amygdala activation. Averted vs direct gaze induced increased activation in the right dorsal amygdala regardless of facial expression and head orientation. Furthermore, valence effects were found in the ventral amygdala and strongly dependent on head orientation. We observed enhanced activation to angry and neutral vs happy faces for observer-directed faces in the left ventral amygdala while the averted head condition reversed this pattern resulting in increased activation to happy as compared to angry and neutral faces. These results suggest that gaze direction drives specifically dorsal amygdala activation regardless of facial expression, low-level perceptual factors or stimulus ambiguity. The role of the amygdala is thus not restricted to the detection of potential threat, but has a more general role in attention processes. Furthermore, valence effects are associated with activation of the ventral amygdala and strongly influenced by non-emotional factors.

  12. Liquid sheet radiator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chubb, Donald L.; White, K. Alan, III

    1987-01-01

    A new external flow radiator concept, the liquid sheet radiator (LSR), is introduced. The LSR sheet flow is described and an expression for the length/width (l/w), ratio is presented. A linear dependence of l/w on velocity is predicted that agrees with experimental results. Specific power for the LSR is calculated and is found to be nearly the same as the specific power of a liquid droplet radiator, (LDR). Several sheet thicknesses and widths were experimentally investigated. In no case was the flow found to be unstable.

  13. Microcomponent sheet architecture

    DOEpatents

    Wegeng, Robert S.; Drost, M. Kevin; McDonald, Carolyn E.

    1997-01-01

    The invention is a microcomponent sheet architecture wherein macroscale unit processes are performed by microscale components. The sheet architecture may be a single laminate with a plurality of separate microcomponent sections or the sheet architecture may be a plurality of laminates with one or more microcomponent sections on each laminate. Each microcomponent or plurality of like microcomponents perform at least one unit operation. A first laminate having a plurality of like first microcomponents is combined with at least a second laminate having a plurality of like second microcomponents thereby combining at least two unit operations to achieve a system operation.

  14. Microcomponent sheet architecture

    DOEpatents

    Wegeng, R.S.; Drost, M.K..; McDonald, C.E.

    1997-03-18

    The invention is a microcomponent sheet architecture wherein macroscale unit processes are performed by microscale components. The sheet architecture may be a single laminate with a plurality of separate microcomponent sections or the sheet architecture may be a plurality of laminates with one or more microcomponent sections on each laminate. Each microcomponent or plurality of like microcomponents perform at least one unit operation. A first laminate having a plurality of like first microcomponents is combined with at least a second laminate having a plurality of like second microcomponents thereby combining at least two unit operations to achieve a system operation. 14 figs.

  15. Silicon sheet technologies

    SciTech Connect

    Ciszek, T.F.

    1982-09-01

    A classification of silicon sheet growth methods by meniscus geometry permits them to be discussed in three groups: short meniscus techniques, high meniscus techniques, and extended meniscus or large solid/liquid interface area techniques. A second parameter, meniscus shaper interaction with the liquid silicon, is also instrumental in determining the characteristics of the various sheet processes. The current status of each process is discussed in the context of meniscus geometry and shaper/melt interaction. One aspect of sheet growth, surface area generation rate, is quantitatively compared with combined ingot growth and wafering surface area generation rates.

  16. Computer-aided active-site-directed modeling of the Herpes Simplex Virus 1 and human thymidine kinase

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Folkers, Gerd; Trumpp-Kallmeyer, Susanne; Gutbrod, Oliver; Krickl, Sabine; Fetzer, Jürgen; Keil, Günther M.

    1991-10-01

    Thymidine kinase (TK), which is induced by Herpes Simplex Virus 1 (HSV1), plays a key role in the antiviral activity of guanine derivatives such as aciclovir (ACV). In contrast, ACV shows only low affinity to the corresponding host cell enzyme. In order to define the differences in substrate binding of the two enzymes on molecular level, models for the three-dimensional (3-D) structures of the active sites of HSV1-TK and human TK were developed. The reconstruction of the active sites started from primary and secondary structure analysis of various kinases. The results were validated to homologous enzymes with known 3-D structures. The models predict that both enzymes consist of a central core β-sheet structure, connected by loops and α-helices very similar to the overall structure of other nucleotide binding enzymes. The phosphate binding is made up of a highly conserved glycine-rich loop at the N-terminus of the proteins and a conserved region at the C-terminus. The thymidine recognition site was found about 100 amino acids downstream from the phosphate binding loop. The differing substrate specificity of human and HSV1-TK can be explained by amino-acid substitutions in the homologous regions. To achieve a better understanding of the structure of the active site and how the thymidine kinase proteins interact with their substrates, the corresponding complexes of thymidine and dihydroxypropoxyguanine (DHPG) with HSV1 and human TK were built. For the docking of the guanine derivative, the X-ray structure of Elongation Factor Tu (EF-Tu), co-crystallized with guanosine diphosphate, was taken as reference. Fitting of thymidine into the active sites was done with respect to similar interactions found in thymidylate kinase. To complement the analysis of the 3-D structures of the two kinases and the substrate enzyme interactions, site-directed mutagenesis of the thymidine recognition site of HSV1-TK has been undertaken, changing Asp162 in the thymidine recognition site

  17. Correlation of fingertip shear force direction with somatosensory cortical activity in monkey

    PubMed Central

    Fortier-Poisson, Pascal; Langlais, Jean-Sébastien

    2015-01-01

    To examine the activity of somatosensory cortex (S1) neurons to self-generated shear forces on the index and thumb, two monkeys were trained to grasp a stationary metal tab with a key grip and exert forces without the fingers slipping in one of four orthogonal directions for 1 s. A majority (∼85%) of slowly adapting and rapidly adapting (RA) S1 neurons had activity modulated with shear force direction. The cells were recorded mainly in areas 1 and 2 of the S1, although some area 3b neurons also responded to shear direction or magnitude. The preferred shear vectors were distributed in every direction, with tuning arcs varying from 50° to 170°. Some RA neurons sensitive to dynamic shear force direction also responded to static shear force but within a narrower range, suggesting that the direction of the shear force may influence the adaptation rate. Other neurons were modulated with shear forces in diametrically opposite directions. The directional sensitivity of S1 cortical neurons is consistent with recordings from cutaneous afferents showing that shear direction, even without slip, is a powerful stimulus to S1 neurons. PMID:26467520

  18. Individualized Instruction in Science, Earth-Space Project, Self-Directed Activities.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kuczma, R. M.

    As a supplement to Learning Activity Packages (LAP) of the earth-space project, this manual presents self-directed activities especially designed for individualized instruction. Besides an introduction to LAP characteristics, sets of instructions are given in connection with the metric system, the earth's dimensions, indirect evidence for atomic…

  19. Classroom-Directed Home Training Activities. Preschool Program: A Regional Demonstration Program for Preschool Handicapped Children.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jones, Jacquelyn O.

    One of 10 documents developed for preschool programs for handicapped children, the manual presents classroom directed home training activities. The activities are based on such principles as the effectiveness of home instruction by a parent and the need for a parent to feel responsibility for the child's learning. Intended to provide teachers of…

  20. Individualized Instruction in Science, Time-Space-Matter, Self-Directed Activities.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kuczma, R. M.

    As a supplement to Learning Activity Packages (LAP) on the time-space-matter subject, details are presented for self-directed activities. Major descriptions are given on the background of LAP characteristics, metric system, profile graph construction, spectroscope operation, radiant energy measurement, sunspot effects, density determination,…

  1. Possible Effects on the Stability of the West Antarctic Ice Sheet (WAIS) and Associated Sea-level Rise From Active-Recent Subglacial Volcanism Interpreted from Aeromagnetic and Radar Ice-sounding Observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Behrendt, J. C.

    2009-12-01

    Aeromagnetic profiles (>10,000 km) acquired in the early 1960s over the West Antarctic Ice Sheet (WAIS) combined with coincident aeromagnetic and radar ice sounding in 1978-79 indicated numerous high-amplitude, shallow-source, magnetic anomalies over a very extensive area of the volcanically active West Antarctic rift system interpreted as caused by subglacial volcanic rocks. These early aerogeophysical surveys defined this area as >500,000 km2. Five-kilometer spaced coincident aeromagnetic and radar ice sounding surveys since 1990 provide three dimensional characterization of the magnetic field and bed topography beneath the ice sheet. These 5-50-km width, semicircular magnetic anomalies range from 100->1000 nT as observed ~1 km over the 2-3 km thick ice. Behrendt et al, (2005, 2008) interpreted these anomalies as indicating >1000 "volcanic centers". requiring high remanent normal (and at least 10% reversed) magnetizations in the present field direction. These data have shown that >80% of the anomaly sources at the bed of the WAIS, have been modified by the moving ice into which they were injected, requiring a younger age than the WAIS (about 25 Ma). Behrendt et al., (1994; 2007) conservatively estimated >1 x 106 km3 volume of volcanic sources to account for the area of the "volcanic center" anomalies. Although exposed volcanoes surrounding the WAIS extend in age to ~34 m.y., Mt Erebus, (<1 Ma) Mt. Melbourne, (<0.26 Ma), and Mt. Takahae (<0.1 Ma) are examples of exposed active volcanoes in the WAIS area. However, the great volume of volcanic centers is buried beneath the WAIS. If only a very small percentage of these >1000 volcanic, magnetic-anomaly sources are active today, or in the recent past, in the drainage area of the WAIS, subglacial volcanism may still have a significant effect on the dynamics of the WAIS. Interpreted active subglacial volcanism is revealed by aerogeophysical data reported by Blankenship et al., (1993, Mt. Casertz), and Corr and Vaughan

  2. Statistics of Plasma Properties in Different Magnetotail Plasma Sheet Regions and their Dependence on Magnetic Activity and Solar Wind Driving Conditions, using the ECLAT Dataset

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boakes, P. D.; Nakamura, R.; Volwerk, M.; Milan, S. E.

    2013-12-01

    As part of the European Seventh Framework Programme project 'European Cluster Assimilation Technology (ECLAT)', we have developed a comprehensive list of plasma region encountered in the Earth's magnetotail (X<-8 RE, │Y│<15 RE) by each of the four ESA Cluster spacecraft. The regions identified are the inner plasma sheet, outer plasma sheet, boundary layer, magnetospheric lobes, as well as crossings of the neutral sheet. Each plasma region encountered is recorded with an entry and exit time and averaged parameters, such as magnetic field, plasma, and velocity, describing each region. In this presentation, we statistically investigate the spatial characteristics of the magnetotail region parameters and their dependence on the magnetic/solar wind conditions, for each type of plasma region identified in the ECLAT database.

  3. Sepsis Fact Sheet

    MedlinePlus

    ... Remains Mysterious Life After Traumatic Injury: How the Body Responds Other NIGMS Fact Sheets Related Links Up to top This page last reviewed on February 01, 2017 Social Media Links Bookmark & Share Free Subscriptions Twitter Facebook YouTube ...

  4. Chlamydia - CDC Fact Sheet

    MedlinePlus

    Chlamydia – CDC Fact Sheet Chlamydia is a common sexually transmitted disease (STD) that can be easily cured. If left ... DSTDP) Centers for Disease Control and Prevention www. cdc. gov/ std CDC-INFO Contact Center 1-800- ...

  5. CMAQ Fact Sheet

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    For more than a decade, EPA and states have used EPA’s Community Multiscale Air Quality (CMAQ) Modeling System, a powerful computational tool for air quality management. Learn more about CMAQv5.2 by browsing our fact sheet.

  6. Avian Fact Sheet

    SciTech Connect

    NWCC Wildlife Work Group

    2004-12-01

    OAK-B135 After conducting four national research meetings, producing a document guiding research: Metrics and Methods for Determining or Monitoring Potential Impacts on Birds at Existing and Proposed Wind Energy Sites, 1999, and another paper, Avian Collisions with Wind Turbines: A Summary of Existing Studies and Comparisons to Other Sources of Avian Collision Mortality in the United States, 2001, the subcommittee recognized a need to summarize in a short fact sheet what is known about avian-wind interaction and what questions remain. This fact sheet attempts to summarize in lay terms the result of extensive discussion about avian-wind interaction on land. This fact sheet does not address research conducted on offshore development. This fact sheet is not intended as a conclusion on the subject; rather, it is a summary as of Fall/Winter 2002.

  7. Global ice sheet modeling

    SciTech Connect

    Hughes, T.J.; Fastook, J.L.

    1994-05-01

    The University of Maine conducted this study for Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) as part of a global climate modeling task for site characterization of the potential nuclear waste respository site at Yucca Mountain, NV. The purpose of the study was to develop a global ice sheet dynamics model that will forecast the three-dimensional configuration of global ice sheets for specific climate change scenarios. The objective of the third (final) year of the work was to produce ice sheet data for glaciation scenarios covering the next 100,000 years. This was accomplished using both the map-plane and flowband solutions of our time-dependent, finite-element gridpoint model. The theory and equations used to develop the ice sheet models are presented. Three future scenarios were simulated by the model and results are discussed.

  8. Biodiesel Basics (Fact Sheet)

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    2014-06-01

    This fact sheet provides a brief introduction to biodiesel, including a discussion of biodiesel blends, which blends are best for which vehicles, where to buy biodiesel, how biodiesel compares to diesel fuel in terms of performance, how biodiesel performs in cold weather, whether biodiesel use will plug vehicle filters, how long-term biodiesel use may affect engines, biodiesel fuel standards, and whether biodiesel burns cleaner than diesel fuel. The fact sheet also dismisses the use of vegetable oil as a motor fuel.

  9. Energy information sheets

    SciTech Connect

    1995-07-01

    The National Energy Information Center (NEIC), as part of its mission, provides energy information and referral assistance to Federal, State, and local governments, the academic community, business and industrial organizations, and the public. The Energy Information Sheets was developed to provide general information on various aspects of fuel production, prices, consumption, and capability. Additional information on related subject matter can be found in other Energy Information Administration (EIA) publications as referenced at the end of each sheet.

  10. Spin Alignment in Analogues of The Local Sheet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Conidis, George J.

    2016-10-01

    Tidal torque theory and simulations of large scale structure predict spin vectors of massive galaxies should be coplanar with sheets in the cosmic web. Recently demonstrated, the giants (K s <= -22.5 mag) in the Local Volume beyond the Local Sheet have spin vectors directed close to the plane of the Local Supercluster, supporting the predictions of Tidal Torque Theory. However, the giants in the Local Sheet encircling the Local Group display a distinctly different arrangement, suggesting that the mass asymmetry of the Local Group or its progenitor torqued them from their primordial spin directions. To investigate the origin of the spin alignment of giants locally, analogues of the Local Sheet were identified in the SDSS DR9. Similar to the Local Sheet, analogues have an interacting pair of disk galaxies isolated from the remaining sheet members. Modified sheets in which there is no interacting pair of disk galaxies were identified as a control sample. Galaxies in face-on control sheets do not display axis ratios predominantly weighted toward low values, contrary to the expectation of tidal torque theory. For face-on and edge-on sheets, the distribution of axis ratios for galaxies in analogues is distinct from that in controls with a confidence of 97.6% & 96.9%, respectively. This corroborates the hypothesis that an interacting pair can affect spin directions of neighbouring galaxies.

  11. Singular points of protein beta-sheets.

    PubMed Central

    Liu, W. M.; Chou, K. C.

    1998-01-01

    Protein beta-sheets can be regarded as surfaces. Two surfaces can be connected along a common edge to form a larger surface, or two edges of a surface can coalesce to form a closed sheet such as a beta-barrel. Singular points are locations where these connections are not perfect. In protein beta-sheets, a singular point is characterized by a residue separating two beta-ladders. In this paper, we study the singular points of protein beta-sheets from the surface topologic viewpoint, summarize our search results from the protein structural data in the Protein Data Bank, and present examples where singular points are near the active sites and may contribute to forming the proper relative positions of catalytic residues. PMID:9827998

  12. The Jovian magnetotail and its current sheet

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Behannon, K. W.; Burlaga, L. F.; Ness, N. F.

    1980-01-01

    Analyses of Voyager magnetic field measurements have extended the understanding of the structural and temporal characteristics of Jupiter's magnetic tail. The magnitude of the magnetic field in the lobes of the tail is found to decrease with Jovicentric distance approximately as r to he-1.4, compared with the power law exponent of -1.7 found for the rate of decrease along the Pioneer 10 outbound trajectory. Voyager observations of magnetic field component variations with Jovicentric distance in the tail do not support the uniform radial plasma outflow model derived from Pioneer data. Voyager 2 has shown that the azimuthal current sheet which surrounds Jupiter in the inner and middle magnetosphere extends tailward (in the anti-Sun direction) to a distance of at least 100 R sub J. In the tail this current sheet consists of a plasma sheet and embedded neutral sheet. In the region of the tail where the sheet is observed, the variation of the magnetic field as a result of the sheet structure and its 10 hr periodic motion is the dominant variation seen.

  13. Assessing the sensitivity of diffusion MRI to detect neuronal activity directly

    PubMed Central

    Bai, Ruiliang; Stewart, Craig V.; Plenz, Dietmar; Basser, Peter J.

    2016-01-01

    Functional MRI (fMRI) is widely used to study brain function in the neurosciences. Unfortunately, conventional fMRI only indirectly assesses neuronal activity via hemodynamic coupling. Diffusion fMRI was proposed as a more direct and accurate fMRI method to detect neuronal activity, yet confirmative findings have proven difficult to obtain. Given that the underlying relation between tissue water diffusion changes and neuronal activity remains unclear, the rationale for using diffusion MRI to monitor neuronal activity has yet to be clearly established. Here, we studied the correlation between water diffusion and neuronal activity in vitro by simultaneous calcium fluorescence imaging and diffusion MR acquisition. We used organotypic cortical cultures from rat brains as a biological model system, in which spontaneous neuronal activity robustly emerges free of hemodynamic and other artifacts. Simultaneous fluorescent calcium images of neuronal activity are then directly correlated with diffusion MR signals now free of confounds typically encountered in vivo. Although a simultaneous increase of diffusion-weighted MR signals was observed together with the prolonged depolarization of neurons induced by pharmacological manipulations (in which cell swelling was demonstrated to play an important role), no evidence was found that diffusion MR signals directly correlate with normal spontaneous neuronal activity. These results suggest that, whereas current diffusion MR methods could monitor pathological conditions such as hyperexcitability, e.g., those seen in epilepsy, they do not appear to be sensitive or specific enough to detect or follow normal neuronal activity. PMID:26941239

  14. Differences in Neural Activation for Object-Directed Grasping in Chimpanzees and Humans

    PubMed Central

    Murphy, Lauren E.; Gutman, David A.; Votaw, John R.; Schuster, David M.; Preuss, Todd M.; Orban, Guy A.; Stout, Dietrich; Parr, Lisa A.

    2013-01-01

    The human faculty for object-mediated action, including tool use and imitation, exceeds that of even our closest primate relatives and is a key foundation of human cognitive and cultural uniqueness. In humans and macaques, observing object-directed grasping actions activates a network of frontal, parietal, and occipitotemporal brain regions, but differences in human and macaque activation suggest that this system has been a focus of selection in the primate lineage. To study the evolution of this system, we performed functional neuroimaging in humans' closest living relatives, chimpanzees. We compare activations during performance of an object-directed manual grasping action, observation of the same action, and observation of a mimed version of the action that consisted of only movements without results. Performance and observation of the same action activated a distributed frontoparietal network similar to that reported in macaques and humans. Like humans and unlike macaques, these regions were also activated by observing movements without results. However, in a direct chimpanzee/human comparison, we also identified unique aspects of human neural responses to observed grasping. Chimpanzee activation showed a prefrontal bias, including significantly more activity in ventrolateral prefrontal cortex, whereas human activation was more evenly distributed across more posterior regions, including significantly more activation in ventral premotor cortex, inferior parietal cortex, and inferotemporal cortex. This indicates a more “bottom-up” representation of observed action in the human brain and suggests that the evolution of tool use, social learning, and cumulative culture may have involved modifications of frontoparietal interactions. PMID:23986247

  15. Assessing the sensitivity of diffusion MRI to detect neuronal activity directly.

    PubMed

    Bai, Ruiliang; Stewart, Craig V; Plenz, Dietmar; Basser, Peter J

    2016-03-22

    Functional MRI (fMRI) is widely used to study brain function in the neurosciences. Unfortunately, conventional fMRI only indirectly assesses neuronal activity via hemodynamic coupling. Diffusion fMRI was proposed as a more direct and accurate fMRI method to detect neuronal activity, yet confirmative findings have proven difficult to obtain. Given that the underlying relation between tissue water diffusion changes and neuronal activity remains unclear, the rationale for using diffusion MRI to monitor neuronal activity has yet to be clearly established. Here, we studied the correlation between water diffusion and neuronal activity in vitro by simultaneous calcium fluorescence imaging and diffusion MR acquisition. We used organotypic cortical cultures from rat brains as a biological model system, in which spontaneous neuronal activity robustly emerges free of hemodynamic and other artifacts. Simultaneous fluorescent calcium images of neuronal activity are then directly correlated with diffusion MR signals now free of confounds typically encountered in vivo. Although a simultaneous increase of diffusion-weighted MR signals was observed together with the prolonged depolarization of neurons induced by pharmacological manipulations (in which cell swelling was demonstrated to play an important role), no evidence was found that diffusion MR signals directly correlate with normal spontaneous neuronal activity. These results suggest that, whereas current diffusion MR methods could monitor pathological conditions such as hyperexcitability, e.g., those seen in epilepsy, they do not appear to be sensitive or specific enough to detect or follow normal neuronal activity.

  16. Dietary regulation of adiponectin by direct and indirect lipid activators of nuclear hormone receptors.

    PubMed

    Rühl, R; Landrier, J F

    2016-01-01

    Adiponectin is an adipokine mainly secreted by adipocytes that presents antidiabetic, anti-inflammatory, and antiatherogenic functions. Therefore, modulation of adiponectin expression represents a promising target for prevention or treatment of several diseases including insulin resistance and type II diabetes. Pharmacological agents such as the nuclear hormone receptor synthetic agonists like peroxisome proliferator activated receptor γ agonists are of particular interest in therapeutic strategies due to their ability to increase the plasma adiponectin concentration. Nutritional approaches are also of particular interest, especially in primary prevention, since some active compounds of our diet (notably vitamins, carotenoids, or other essential nutrients) are direct or indirect lipid-activators of nuclear hormone receptors and are modifiers of adiponectin expression and secretion. The aim of the present review is to summarize current knowledge about the nutritional regulation of adiponectin by derivatives of active compounds naturally present in the diet acting as indirect or direct activators of nuclear hormone receptors.

  17. Tectonics and ice sheet dynamics of West Antarctic margins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gohl, Karsten

    2010-05-01

    An understanding of the glacial history of the Amundsen Sea Embayment (ASE) and Pine Island Bay (PIB) is essential for proposing models on the future development of the West Antarctic Ice Sheet. This requires an understanding of the tectonic history and knowledge of tectonic features such as lineaments, ridges, sills and basins, because basement morphology and inherited erosional features control the flow direction of ice-sheets and the influx of Circum-Polar Deep Water (CDW). This is an attempt to reconstruct the tectonic history with the aim to search for basement features and crustal boundaries which may be correlated to the flow and dynamics of the ice-sheet. The Amundsen Sea Embayment of West Antarctica is in a prominent location for a series of tectonic and magmatic events from Paleozoic to Cenozoic times. Seismic, magnetic and gravity data from the embayment and PIB reveal the crustal thickness and significant tectonic features. NE-SW trending magnetic and gravity anomalies and the thin crust indicate a former rift zone which was active during or in the run-up to the breakup process between Chatham Rise and West Antarctica before or at 90 Ma. NW-SE trending gravity and magnetic anomalies, following a prolongation of Peacock Sound, indicate the extensional southern boundary to the Bellingshausen Plate which was active between 79 and 61 Ma. It is likely that the prominent Pine Island Trough follows a structural boundary between the crustal blocks of Ellsworth Land and Marie Byrd Land. Data are shown from the ASE and PIB which can be interpreted in context with the reconstruction of the ice advance and retreat history in this area. Differences in the behaviour of the ice-sheet are shown to exist for the western and eastern parts of PIB due to basement structures affecting the inflow of CDW.

  18. Lysophosphatidic acid directly activates TRPV1 through a C-terminal binding site.

    PubMed

    Nieto-Posadas, Andrés; Picazo-Juárez, Giovanni; Llorente, Itzel; Jara-Oseguera, Andrés; Morales-Lázaro, Sara; Escalante-Alcalde, Diana; Islas, León D; Rosenbaum, Tamara

    2011-11-20

    Since 1992, there has been growing evidence that the bioactive phospholipid lysophosphatidic acid (LPA), whose amounts are increased upon tissue injury, activates primary nociceptors resulting in neuropathic pain. The TRPV1 ion channel is expressed in primary afferent nociceptors and is activated by physical and chemical stimuli. Here we show that in control mice LPA produces acute pain-like behaviors, which are substantially reduced in Trpv1-null animals. Our data also demonstrate that LPA activates TRPV1 through a unique mechanism that is independent of G protein-coupled receptors, contrary to what has been widely shown for other ion channels, by directly interacting with the C terminus of the channel. We conclude that TRPV1 is a direct molecular target of the pain-producing molecule LPA and that this constitutes, to our knowledge, the first example of LPA binding directly to an ion channel to acutely regulate its function.

  19. Observations of double layers in earth's plasma sheet.

    PubMed

    Ergun, R E; Andersson, L; Tao, J; Angelopoulos, V; Bonnell, J; McFadden, J P; Larson, D E; Eriksson, S; Johansson, T; Cully, C M; Newman, D N; Goldman, M V; Roux, A; LeContel, O; Glassmeier, K-H; Baumjohann, W

    2009-04-17

    We report the first direct observations of parallel electric fields (E_{ parallel}) carried by double layers (DLs) in the plasma sheet of Earth's magnetosphere. The DL observations, made by the THEMIS spacecraft, have E_{ parallel} signals that are analogous to those reported in the auroral region. DLs are observed during bursty bulk flow events, in the current sheet, and in plasma sheet boundary layer, all during periods of strong magnetic fluctuations. These observations imply that DLs are a universal process and that strongly nonlinear and kinetic behavior is intrinsic to Earth's plasma sheet.

  20. Magma rheology variation in sheet intrusions (Invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Magee, C.; O'Driscoll, B.; Petronis, M. S.; Stevenson, C.

    2013-12-01

    The rheology of magma fundamentally controls igneous intrusion style as well as the explosivity and type of volcanic eruptions. Importantly, the dynamic interplay between the viscosity of magma and other processes active during intrusion (e.g., crystallisation, magma mixing, assimilation of crystal mushes and/or xenolith entrainment) will likely bear an influence on the temporal variation of magma rheology. Constraining the timing of rheological changes during magma transit therefore plays an important role in understanding the nuances of volcanic systems. However, the rheological evolution of actively emplacing igneous intrusions cannot be directly studied. While significant advances have been made via experimental modelling and analysis of lava flows, how these findings relate to intruding magma remains unclear. This has led to an increasing number of studies that analyse various characteristics of fully crystallised intrusions in an attempt to ';back-out' the rheological conditions governing emplacement. For example, it has long been known that crystallinity affects the rheology and, consequently, the velocity of intruding magma. This means that quantitative textural analysis of crystal populations (e.g., crystal size distribution; CSD) used to elucidate crystallinity at different stages of emplacement can provide insights into magma rheology. Similarly, methods that measure flow-related fabrics (e.g., anisotropy of magnetic susceptibility; AMS) can be used to discern velocity profiles, a potential proxy for the magma rheology. To illustrate these ideas, we present an integrated AMS and petrological study of several sheet intrusions located within the Ardnamurchan Central Complex, NW Scotland. We focus on the entrainment and transport dynamics of gabbroic inclusions that were infiltrated by the host magma upon entrainment. Importantly, groundmass magnetic fabrics within and external to these inclusions are coaxial. This implies that a deviatoric stress was

  1. Application of the cell sheet technique in tissue engineering

    PubMed Central

    CHEN, GUANGNAN; QI, YIYING; NIU, LIE; DI, TUOYU; ZHONG, JINWEI; FANG, TINGTING; YAN, WEIQI

    2015-01-01

    The development and application of the tissue engineering technique has shown a significant potential in regenerative medicine. However, the limitations of conventional tissue engineering methods (cell suspensions, scaffolds and/or growth factors) restrict its application in certain fields. The novel cell sheet technique can overcome such disadvantages. Cultured cells can be harvested as intact sheets without the use of proteolytic enzymes, such as trypsin or dispase, which can result in cell damage and loss of differentiated phenotypes. The cell sheet is a complete layer, which contains extracellular matrix, ion channel, growth factor receptors, nexin and other important cell surface proteins. Mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs), which have the potential for multiple differentiation, are promising candidate seed cells for tissue engineering. The MSC sheet technique may have potential in the fields of regenerative medicine and tissue engineering in general. Additionally, induced pluripotent stem cell and embryonic stem cell-derived cell sheets have been proposed for tissue regeneration. Currently, the application of cell sheet for tissue reconstruction includes: Direct recipient sites implantation, superposition of cell sheets to construct three-dimensional structure for implantation, or cell sheet combined with scaffolds. The present review discusses the progress in cell sheet techniques, particularly stem cell sheet techniques, in tissue engineering. PMID:26623011

  2. Does the vestibular system contribute to head direction cell activity in the rat?

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brown, J. E.; Yates, B. J.; Taube, J. S.; Oman, C. M. (Principal Investigator)

    2002-01-01

    Head direction cells (HDC) located in several regions of the brain, including the anterior dorsal nucleus of the thalamus (ADN), postsubiculum (PoS), and lateral mammillary nuclei (LMN), provide the neural substrate for the determination of head direction. Although activity of HDC is influenced by various sensory signals and internally generated cues, lesion studies and some anatomical and physiological evidence suggest that vestibular inputs are critical for the maintenance of directional sensitivity of these cells. However, vestibular inputs must be transformed considerably in order to signal head direction, and the neuronal circuitry that accomplishes this signal processing has not been fully established. Furthermore, it is unclear why the removal of vestibular inputs abolishes the directional sensitivity of HDC, as visual and other sensory inputs and motor feedback signals strongly affect the firing of these neurons and would be expected to maintain their directional-related activity. Further physiological studies will be required to establish the role of vestibular system in producing HDC responses, and anatomical studies are needed to determine the neural circuitry that mediates vestibular influences on determination of head direction.

  3. State Civic Education Requirements. CIRCLE Fact Sheet

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Godsay, Surbhi; Henderson, Whitney; Levine, Peter; Littenberg-Tobias, Josh

    2012-01-01

    This fact sheet summarizes state requirements related to civic education, which means learning about citizenship, government, law, current events, and related topics. Civic education is most directly addressed in courses labeled "civics," "government," or "U.S. government." Social studies is a broader category that…

  4. A stapled BID BH3 helix directly binds and activates BAX.

    PubMed

    Walensky, Loren D; Pitter, Kenneth; Morash, Joel; Oh, Kyoung Joon; Barbuto, Scott; Fisher, Jill; Smith, Eric; Verdine, Gregory L; Korsmeyer, Stanley J

    2006-10-20

    BAX is a multidomain proapoptotic BCL-2 family protein that resides in the cytosol until activated by an incompletely understood trigger mechanism, which facilitates BAX translocation to mitochondria and downstream death events. Whether BAX is activated by direct contact with select BH3-only members of the BCL-2 family is highly debated. Here we detect and quantify a direct binding interaction between BAX and a hydrocarbon-stapled BID BH3 domain, which triggers the functional activation of BAX at nanomolar doses in vitro. Chemical reinforcement of BID BH3 alpha helicity was required to reveal the direct BID BH3-BAX association. We confirm the specificity of this BH3 interaction by characterizing a stapled BAD BH3 peptide that interacts with antiapoptotic BCL-X(L) but does not bind or activate BAX. We further demonstrate that membrane targeting of stapled BID BH3 optimizes its ability to activate BAX, supporting a model in which BID directly engages BAX to trigger mitochondrial apoptosis.

  5. Highly porous activated carbons prepared from carbon rich Mongolian anthracite by direct NaOH activation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Byamba-Ochir, Narandalai; Shim, Wang Geun; Balathanigaimani, M. S.; Moon, Hee

    2016-08-01

    Highly porous activated carbons (ACs) were prepared from Mongolian raw anthracite (MRA) using sodium hydroxide as an activation agent by varying the mass ratio (powdered MRA/NaOH) as well as the mixing method of chemical agent and powdered MRA. The specific BET surface area and total pore volume of the prepared MRA-based activated carbons (MACs) are in the range of 816-2063 m2/g and of 0.55-1.61 cm3/g, respectively. The pore size distribution of MACs show that most of the pores are in the range from large micropores to small mesopores and their distribution can be controlled by the mass ratio and mixing method of the activating agent. As expected from the intrinsic property of the MRA, the highly graphitic surface morphology of prepared carbons was confirmed from Raman spectra and transmission electron microscopy (TEM) studies. Furthermore the FTIR and XPS results reveal that the preparation of MACs with hydrophobic in nature is highly possible by controlling the mixing conditions of activating agent and powdered MRA. Based on all the results, it is suggested that the prepared MACs could be used for many specific applications, requiring high surface area, optimal pore size distribution, proper surface hydrophobicity as well as strong physical strength.

  6. Comparative evaluation of absorbable hemostats: advantages of fibrin-based sheets.

    PubMed

    Krishnan, Lissy K; Mohanty, Mira; Umashankar, P R; Lal, Arthur Vijayan

    2004-11-01

    Bioactive hemostats and wound dressings consist of either inherently active materials or act as delivery vehicles which contain such materials. Fibrin is a natural hemostat and scaffold, guiding the direction of wound contraction and closure. In order to improve the ease of application of liquid fibrin glue, we have made a freeze-dried form of polymerized fibrin that supports hemostasis and wound healing. The bleeding from the middle ear artery of rabbits was found to be arrested instantaneously on application of fibrin sheets, even when the animal was heparinized systemically. As the fibrin sheet was found to be fragile, gelatin was incorporated to the sheet and thus the mechanical stability was improved without compromising the hemostatic effect. The efficacy of the fabricated fibrin and fibrin-gelatin sheets to seal traumatized rat liver was compared with commercially available hemostats, Abgel (cross-linked gelatin) and Surgicel (cross-linked cellulose). Tissue compatibility of all the hemostats was studied by analyzing the liver tissue 15 days after application. While the hemostatic effect was best with fibrin and fibrin-gelatin sheets, both Surgicel and Abgel were not capable of arresting the bleeding quickly. Gross analysis of tissue on the 15th day of application, visibly, Abgel was not only degraded but resulted in severe adhesions of internal organs and histologically capsule formation around the implant was evident. Though Surgicel was also seen as cream soft material on the site of application that joined two pieces of liver, there was no adhesion of other internal organs and histologically, immune reaction and foreign-body-type giant cells were present in large amounts. Fibrin was not found grossly on application site whereas fibrin-gelatin was seen as a small white spot. Granulation tissue formation and cell migration into the fibrin-based sheets were evident, and therefore, fibrin-based sheets are not only efficient hemostats but showed optimum

  7. Nonlinear techniques for forecasting solar activity directly from its time series

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ashrafi, S.; Roszman, L.; Cooley, J.

    1992-01-01

    Numerical techniques for constructing nonlinear predictive models to forecast solar flux directly from its time series are presented. This approach makes it possible to extract dynamical invariants of our system without reference to any underlying solar physics. We consider the dynamical evolution of solar activity in a reconstructed phase space that captures the attractor (strange), given a procedure for constructing a predictor of future solar activity, and discuss extraction of dynamical invariants such as Lyapunov exponents and attractor dimension.

  8. Nonlinear techniques for forecasting solar activity directly from its time series

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ashrafi, S.; Roszman, L.; Cooley, J.

    1993-01-01

    This paper presents numerical techniques for constructing nonlinear predictive models to forecast solar flux directly from its time series. This approach makes it possible to extract dynamical in variants of our system without reference to any underlying solar physics. We consider the dynamical evolution of solar activity in a reconstructed phase space that captures the attractor (strange), give a procedure for constructing a predictor of future solar activity, and discuss extraction of dynamical invariants such as Lyapunov exponents and attractor dimension.

  9. Photoredox Activation for the Direct β-Arylation of Ketones and Aldehydes

    PubMed Central

    Pirnot, Michael T.; Rankic, Danica A.; Martin, David B. C.; MacMillan, David W. C.

    2013-01-01

    The direct β-activation of saturated aldehydes and ketones has long been an elusive transformation. We found that photoredox catalysis in combination with organocatalysis can lead to the transient generation of 5π-electron β-enaminyl radicals from ketones and aldehydes that rapidly couple with cyano-substituted aryl rings at the carbonyl β-position. This mode of activation is suitable for a broad range of carbonyl β-functionalization reactions and is amenable to enantioselective catalysis. PMID:23539600

  10. A Synthesis of the Basal Thermal State of the Greenland Ice Sheet

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Macgregor, J. A.; Fahnestock, M. A.; Catania, G. A.; Aschwanden, A.; Clow, G. D.; Colgan, W. T.; Gogineni, S. P.; Morlighem, M.; Nowicki, S. M. J.; Paden, J. D.; Price, S. F.; Seroussi, H.

    2016-01-01

    Greenland's thick ice sheet insulates the bedrock below from the cold temperatures at the surface, so the bottom of the ice is often tens of degrees warmer than at the top, because the ice bottom is slowly warmed by heat coming from the Earth's depths. Knowing whether Greenland's ice lies on wet, slippery ground or is anchored to dry, frozen bedrock is essential for predicting how this ice will flow in the future. But scientists have very few direct observations of the thermal conditions beneath the ice sheet, obtained through fewer than two dozen boreholes that have reached the bottom. Our study synthesizes several independent methods to infer the Greenland Ice Sheet's basal thermal state -whether the bottom of the ice is melted or not-leading to the first map that identifies frozen and thawed areas across the whole ice sheet. This map will guide targets for future investigations of the Greenland Ice Sheet toward the most vulnerable and poorly understood regions, ultimately improving our understanding of its dynamics and contribution to future sea-level rise. It is of particular relevance to ongoing Operation IceBridge activities and future large-scale airborne missions over Greenland.

  11. Initiation of Apoptosis by Granzyme B Requires Direct Cleavage of Bid, but Not Direct Granzyme B–Mediated Caspase Activation

    PubMed Central

    Sutton, Vivien R.; Davis, Joanne E.; Cancilla, Michael; Johnstone, Ricky W.; Ruefli, Astrid A.; Sedelies, Karin; Browne, Kylie A.; Trapani, Joseph A.

    2000-01-01

    The essential upstream steps in granzyme B–mediated apoptosis remain undefined. Herein, we show that granzyme B triggers the mitochondrial apoptotic pathway through direct cleavage of Bid; however, cleavage of procaspases was stalled when mitochondrial disruption was blocked by Bcl-2. The sensitivity of granzyme B–resistant Bcl-2–overexpressing FDC-P1 cells was restored by coexpression of wild-type Bid, or Bid with a mutation of its caspase-8 cleavage site, and both types of Bid were cleaved. However, Bid with a mutated granzyme B cleavage site remained intact and did not restore apoptosis. Bid with a mutation preventing its interaction with Bcl-2 was cleaved but also failed to restore apoptosis. Rapid Bid cleavage by granzyme B (<2 min) was not delayed by Bcl-2 overexpression. These results clearly placed Bid cleavage upstream of mitochondrial Bcl-2. In granzyme B–treated Jurkat cells, endogenous Bid cleavage and loss of mitochondrial membrane depolarization occurred despite caspase inactivation with z-Val-Ala-Asp-fluoromethylketone or Asp-Glu-Val-Asp-fluoromethylketone. Initial partial processing of procaspase-3 and -8 was observed irrespective of Bcl-2 overexpression; however, later processing was completely abolished by Bcl-2. Overall, our results indicate that mitochondrial perturbation by Bid is necessary to achieve a lethal threshold of caspase activity and cell death due to granzyme B. PMID:11085743

  12. Direct activation of the Mauthner cell by electric field pulses drives ultrarapid escape responses

    PubMed Central

    Tabor, Kathryn M.; Bergeron, Sadie A.; Horstick, Eric J.; Jordan, Diana C.; Aho, Vilma; Porkka-Heiskanen, Tarja; Haspel, Gal

    2014-01-01

    Rapid escape swims in fish are initiated by the Mauthner cells, giant reticulospinal neurons with unique specializations for swift responses. The Mauthner cells directly activate motoneurons and facilitate predator detection by integrating acoustic, mechanosensory, and visual stimuli. In addition, larval fish show well-coordinated escape responses when exposed to electric field pulses (EFPs). Sensitization of the Mauthner cell by genetic overexpression of the voltage-gated sodium channel SCN5 increased EFP responsiveness, whereas Mauthner ablation with an engineered variant of nitroreductase with increased activity (epNTR) eliminated the response. The reaction time to EFPs is extremely short, with many responses initiated within 2 ms of the EFP. Large neurons, such as Mauthner cells, show heightened sensitivity to extracellular voltage gradients. We therefore tested whether the rapid response to EFPs was due to direct activation of the Mauthner cells, bypassing delays imposed by stimulus detection and transmission by sensory cells. Consistent with this, calcium imaging indicated that EFPs robustly activated the Mauthner cell but only rarely fired other reticulospinal neurons. Further supporting this idea, pharmacological blockade of synaptic transmission in zebrafish did not affect Mauthner cell activity in response to EFPs. Moreover, Mauthner cells transgenically expressing a tetrodotoxin (TTX)-resistant voltage-gated sodium channel retained responses to EFPs despite TTX suppression of action potentials in the rest of the brain. We propose that EFPs directly activate Mauthner cells because of their large size, thereby driving ultrarapid escape responses in fish. PMID:24848468

  13. Direct solubilization of enzyme aggregates with enhanced activity in nonaqueous media.

    PubMed

    Akbar, Umar; Aschenbrenner, Carl D; Harper, Michael R; Johnson, Harvey R; Dordick, Jonathan S; Clark, Douglas S

    2007-04-15

    A protein solubilization method has been developed to directly solubilize protein clusters into organic solvents containing small quantities of surfactant and trace amounts of water. Termed "direct solubilization," this technique was shown to solubilize three distinct proteins - subtilisin Carlsberg, lipase B from Candida antarctica, and soybean peroxidase - with much greater efficiencies than extraction of the protein from aqueous solution into surfactant-containing organic solvents (referred to as extraction). More significant, however, was the dramatic increase in directly solubilized enzyme activity relative to extracted enzyme activity, particularly for subtilisin and lipase in polar organic solvents. For example, in THF the initial rate towards bergenin transesterification was ca. 70 times higher for directly solubilized subtilisin than for the extracted enzyme. Furthermore, unlike their extracted counterparts, the directly solubilized enzymes yielded high product conversions across a spectrum of non-polar and polar solvents. Structural characterization of the solubilized enzymes via light scattering and atomic force microscopy revealed soluble proteins consisting of active enzyme aggregates containing approximately 60 and 100 protein molecules, respectively, for subtilisin and lipase. Formation of such clusters appears to provide a microenvironment conducive to catalysis and, in polar organic solvents at least, may protect the enzyme from solvent-induced inactivation.

  14. The effect of gaze direction on three-dimensional face recognition in infant brain activity.

    PubMed

    Yamashita, Wakayo; Kanazawa, So; Yamaguchi, Masami K; Kakigi, Ryusuke

    2012-09-12

    In three-dimensional face recognition studies, it is well known that viewing rotating faces enhance face recognition. For infants, our previous study indicated that 8-month-old infants showed recognition of three-dimensional rotating faces with a direct gaze, and they did not learn with an averted gaze. This suggests that gaze direction may affect three-dimensional face recognition in infants. In this experiment, we used near-infrared spectroscopy to measure infants' hemodynamic responses to averted gaze and direct gaze. We hypothesized that infants would show different neural activity for averted and direct gazes. The responses were compared with the baseline activation during the presentation of non-face objects. We found that the concentration of oxyhemoglobin increased in the temporal cortex on both sides only during the presentation of averted gaze compared with that of the baseline period. This is the first study to show that infants' brain activity in three-dimensional face processing is different between averted gaze and direct gaze.

  15. Energy information sheets

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1993-12-02

    The National Energy Information Center (NEIC), as part of its mission, provides energy information and referral assistance to Federal, State, and local governments, the academic community, business and industrial organizations, and the general public. Written for the general public, the EIA publication Energy Information Sheets was developed to provide information on various aspects of fuel production, prices, consumption and capability. The information contained herein pertains to energy data as of December 1991. Additional information on related subject matter can be found in other EIA publications as referenced at the end of each sheet.

  16. Light sheet microscopy.

    PubMed

    Weber, Michael; Mickoleit, Michaela; Huisken, Jan

    2014-01-01

    This chapter introduces the concept of light sheet microscopy along with practical advice on how to design and build such an instrument. Selective plane illumination microscopy is presented as an alternative to confocal microscopy due to several superior features such as high-speed full-frame acquisition, minimal phototoxicity, and multiview sample rotation. Based on our experience over the last 10 years, we summarize the key concepts in light sheet microscopy, typical implementations, and successful applications. In particular, sample mounting for long time-lapse imaging and the resulting challenges in data processing are discussed in detail.

  17. Curved cap corrugated sheet

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Davis, R. C.; Bales, T. T.; Royster, D. M.; Jackson, L. R. (Inventor)

    1984-01-01

    The report describes a structure for a strong, lightweight corrugated sheet. The sheet is planar or curved and includes a plurality of corrugation segments, each segment being comprised of a generally U-shaped corrugation with a part-cylindrical crown and cap strip, and straight side walls and with secondary corrugations oriented at right angles to said side walls. The cap strip is bonded to the crown and the longitudinal edge of said cap strip extends beyond edge at the intersection between said crown and said side walls. The high strength relative to weight of the structure makes it desirable for use in aircraft or spacecraft.

  18. Late-stage diversification of biologically active pyridazinones via a direct C-H functionalization strategy.

    PubMed

    Li, Wei; Fan, Zhoulong; Geng, Kaijun; Xu, Youjun; Zhang, Ao

    2015-01-14

    Divergent C-H functionalization reactions (arylation, carboxylation, olefination, thiolation, acetoxylation, halogenation, naphthylation) using a pyridazinone moiety as an internal directing group were successfully established. This approach offers a late-stage, ortho-selective diversification of a biologically active pyridazinone scaffold. Seven series of novel pyridazinone analogues were synthesized conveniently as the synthetic precursors of potential sortase A (SrtA) inhibitors.

  19. Studies on the Release of Renin by Direct and Reflex Activation of Renal Sympathetic Nerves.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Donald, David E.

    1979-01-01

    Presents data on release of renin during direct and indirect stimulation of renal nerves. Conclusions show that renin release is influenced by change in activity of carotid and cardiopulmonary baroreceptor systems, and excitation of discrete areas of brain and hypothalamus by changes in renal sympathetic nerve. (Author/SA)

  20. 78 FR 45515 - Agency Information Collection Activities; Comment Request; William D. Ford Federal Direct Loan...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-07-29

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION Agency Information Collection Activities; Comment Request; William D. Ford Federal Direct Loan Program... to this notice will be considered public records. Title of Collection: William D. Ford Federal...

  1. A Comparison of Activity-Based Intervention and Embedded Direct Instruction When Teaching Emergent Literacy Skills

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Botts, Dawn C.; Losardo, Angela S.; Tillery, Christina Y.; Werts, Margaret G.

    2014-01-01

    This replication study focused on the effectiveness of two different intervention approaches, activity-based intervention and embedded direct instruction, on the acquisition, generalization, and maintenance of phonological awareness, a key area of emergent literacy, by preschool children with language delays. Five male preschool participants with…

  2. The Impact of Directed Viewing-Thinking Activity on Students' Critical Thinking: Part II

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ee, Neo Chin; Sum, Cheung Wing

    2005-01-01

    Background: Critical thinking disposition is an area that has been overlooked in various academic fields until recent years. Critical thinking occurs only when individuals possess thinking dispositions. This study explores the possibility of using directed viewing-thinking activity (DVTA) to cultivate the critical thinking dispositions of…

  3. 78 FR 14083 - Agency Information Collection Activities: Direct Loan, FFEL, Perkins and TEACH Grant Total and...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-03-04

    ... Agency Information Collection Activities: Direct Loan, FFEL, Perkins and TEACH Grant Total and Permanent... TEACH Grant Total and Permanent Disability Discharge Forms. OMB Control Number: 1845-0065. Type of... Loan, FFEL, or Perkins loan program loans, or TEACH Grant service obligation. The form collects...

  4. Direct activation and anti-repression functions of GAL4-VP16 use distinct molecular mechanisms.

    PubMed Central

    Lyons, J G; Chambon, P

    1995-01-01

    In order to determine whether the molecular mechanisms used for direct activation by GAL4-VP16 are the same as those used for anti-repression, we have employed monoclonal antibodies specific for the VP16 activation domain. In the absence of added repressors, GAL4-VP16 was able to stimulate transcription from a template containing GAL4-binding sites, and the antibodies raised against the VP16 activation domain failed to inhibit this direct activation. GAL4-VP16 also was able to prevent histone H1-mediated repression by a mechanism that was strongly dependent on the presence of specific GAL4-binding elements in the promoter. However, in contrast to the assays conducted in the absence of repressors, the antibodies were strong inhibitors of GAL4-VP16-activated transcription in the presence of histone H1. Thus the binding of the antibodies distinguished between the direct activation and anti-repression functions of GAL4-VP16, indicating that these functions operate through distinct molecular mechanisms. The anti-repression-specific mechanism that is inhibitable by the antibodies acted at an early stage of preinitiation complex formation. Deletions of individual subdomains of the VP16 activation domain demonstrated that there was not a discrete subdomain responsible for the anti-repression function of GAL4-VP16. Thus, the inhibitory effect of the antibodies appeared to be due to the location of the epitope within the activator protein rather than to some inherent biochemical property of that region of the protein that is required specifically for anti-repression. The inhibitory effect of the antibodies also ruled out the possibility that steric exclusion of repressor proteins from the promoter was the sole means of anti-repression by the transcriptional activator. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 PMID:8554536

  5. Laser-assisted sheet metal working in series production

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brecher, Christian; Emonts, Michael; Eckert, Markus

    2013-02-01

    Based on the demand for a responsible use of natural resources and energy the need for lightweight materials is increasing. The most common materials for lightweight production are high and highest strength steel. These materials are difficult to machine using conventional sheet metal working processes because the high strength leads to a limited formability and high tool wear. The Fraunhofer IPT developed the laser-assisted sheet metal working. Selective laser based heating of the part directly before machining softens the material locally. Thus the quality of the following cut can be increased, for example for shearing 1.4310 the clear cut surface ratio can be increased from 20% up to 100% using a shearing gap of 10% of the sheet thickness. Because of the softening of the material and thus the increased formability, parts with a higher complexity can be produced. For example 1.4310 can be bent laser-assisted with a radius of 0.25 mm instead of 2-3 mm using the conventional process. For the first time spring steel can be embossed with conventional tools up to 50% of the sheet thickness. For the implementation in series production a modular system upgrade "hy-PRESS" has been developed to include laser and scanner technology into existing presses. For decoupling the sensitive optical elements of the machine vibrations an active-passive damping system has been developed. The combination of this new hybrid process and the system technology allows to produce parts of high strength steel with a high complexity and quality.

  6. 46. HANDRAILING, DETAILS TYPE 'B' (Sheet 12 of 14 sheets), ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    46. HANDRAILING, DETAILS TYPE 'B' (Sheet 12 of 14 sheets), April 5, 1932 - West End-North Side Bridge, Spanning Ohio River, approximately 1 mile downstream from confluence of Monongahela & Allegheny rivers, Pittsburgh, Allegheny County, PA

  7. 5. Historic American Buildings Survey Taken from drawing sheet, SHEET ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    5. Historic American Buildings Survey Taken from drawing sheet, SHEET #21, Showing the house as restored since Survey. (Dormer windows omitted as not authentic) - Samuel des Marest House, River Road, New Milford, Bergen County, NJ

  8. 71. PALMDALE WATER COMPANY, EASTWOOD MULTIPLEARCHED DAM: STRESS SHEET, SHEET ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    71. PALMDALE WATER COMPANY, EASTWOOD MULTIPLE-ARCHED DAM: STRESS SHEET, SHEET 3; DECEMBER 20, 1918. Littlerock Water District files. - Little Rock Creek Dam, Little Rock Creek, Littlerock, Los Angeles County, CA

  9. Direct measurement of activation time and nucleation rate in capillary-condensed water nanomeniscus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sung, Baekman; Kim, Jongwoo; Stambaugh, Corey; Chang, Sung-Jin; Jhe, Wonho

    2013-11-01

    We demonstrate real-time observation of nucleation of the single water nanomeniscus formed via capillary condensation. We directly measure (i) activation time by time-resolved atomic force microscopy and (ii) nucleation rate by statistical analysis of its exponential distribution, which is the experimental evidence that the activation process is stochastic and follows the Poisson statistics. It implies that formation of the water nanomeniscus is triggered by nucleation, which requires activation for producing a nucleus. We also find the dependence of the nucleation rate on the tip-sample distance and temperature.

  10. Test of spectral emission and absorption characteristics of active optical fibers by direct side pumping.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Jianzhong; Luo, Yanhua; Sathi, Zinat M; Azadpeyma, Nilram; Peng, Gang-Ding

    2012-08-27

    Emission and absorption are two main properties of active optical fibers that are important for fiber amplifiers and lasers. We propose a direct side pumping scheme for non-deconstructive evaluation of active optical fibers. This scheme enables a simple in situ test of both emission and absorption characteristics without cutting fiber and produces good accuracy with very low pumping background. A commercial Er-doped fiber and a home-made Bi/Er co-doped optical fiber have been tested to demonstrate that the scheme is a useful alternative technique for characterizing active optical fiber or waveguides.

  11. Active directional switching of surface plasmon polaritons using a phase transition material

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Sun-Je; Yun, Hansik; Park, Kyungsoo; Hong, Jongwoo; Yun, Jeong-Geun; Lee, Kyookeun; Kim, Joonsoo; Jeong, Sun Jae; Mun, Sang-Eun; Sung, Jangwoon; Lee, Yong Wook; Lee, Byoungho

    2017-03-01

    Active switching of near-field directivity, which is an essential functionality for compact integrated photonics and small optoelectronic elements, has been challenging due to small modulation depth and complicated fabrication methods for devices including active optical materials. Here, we theoretically and experimentally realize a nanoscale active directional switching of surface plasmon polaritons (SPPs) using a phase transition material for the first time. The SPP switching device with noticeable distinction is demonstrated based on the phase transition of vanadium dioxide (VO2) at the telecom wavelength. As the insulator-to-metal phase transition (IMT) of VO2 induces the large change of VO2 permittivity at telecom wavelengths, the plasmonic response of a nanoantenna made of VO2 can be largely tuned by external thermal stimuli. The VO2-insulator-metal (VIM) nanoantenna and its periodic array, the VIM metagrating, are suggested as optical switches. The directional power distinction ratio is designed to change from 8.13:1 to 1:10.56 by the IMT and it is experimentally verified that the ratio changes from 3.725:1 to 1:3.132 as the VIM metagratings are heated up to 90 °C. With an electro-thermally controllable configuration and an optimized resonant design, we expect potential applications of the active switching mechanism for integrable active plasmonic elements and reconfigurable imaging.

  12. Active directional switching of surface plasmon polaritons using a phase transition material

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Sun-Je; Yun, Hansik; Park, Kyungsoo; Hong, Jongwoo; Yun, Jeong-Geun; Lee, Kyookeun; Kim, Joonsoo; Jeong, Sun Jae; Mun, Sang-Eun; Sung, Jangwoon; Lee, Yong Wook; Lee, Byoungho

    2017-01-01

    Active switching of near-field directivity, which is an essential functionality for compact integrated photonics and small optoelectronic elements, has been challenging due to small modulation depth and complicated fabrication methods for devices including active optical materials. Here, we theoretically and experimentally realize a nanoscale active directional switching of surface plasmon polaritons (SPPs) using a phase transition material for the first time. The SPP switching device with noticeable distinction is demonstrated based on the phase transition of vanadium dioxide (VO2) at the telecom wavelength. As the insulator-to-metal phase transition (IMT) of VO2 induces the large change of VO2 permittivity at telecom wavelengths, the plasmonic response of a nanoantenna made of VO2 can be largely tuned by external thermal stimuli. The VO2-insulator-metal (VIM) nanoantenna and its periodic array, the VIM metagrating, are suggested as optical switches. The directional power distinction ratio is designed to change from 8.13:1 to 1:10.56 by the IMT and it is experimentally verified that the ratio changes from 3.725:1 to 1:3.132 as the VIM metagratings are heated up to 90 °C. With an electro-thermally controllable configuration and an optimized resonant design, we expect potential applications of the active switching mechanism for integrable active plasmonic elements and reconfigurable imaging. PMID:28262702

  13. Active directional switching of surface plasmon polaritons using a phase transition material.

    PubMed

    Kim, Sun-Je; Yun, Hansik; Park, Kyungsoo; Hong, Jongwoo; Yun, Jeong-Geun; Lee, Kyookeun; Kim, Joonsoo; Jeong, Sun Jae; Mun, Sang-Eun; Sung, Jangwoon; Lee, Yong Wook; Lee, Byoungho

    2017-03-06

    Active switching of near-field directivity, which is an essential functionality for compact integrated photonics and small optoelectronic elements, has been challenging due to small modulation depth and complicated fabrication methods for devices including active optical materials. Here, we theoretically and experimentally realize a nanoscale active directional switching of surface plasmon polaritons (SPPs) using a phase transition material for the first time. The SPP switching device with noticeable distinction is demonstrated based on the phase transition of vanadium dioxide (VO2) at the telecom wavelength. As the insulator-to-metal phase transition (IMT) of VO2 induces the large change of VO2 permittivity at telecom wavelengths, the plasmonic response of a nanoantenna made of VO2 can be largely tuned by external thermal stimuli. The VO2-insulator-metal (VIM) nanoantenna and its periodic array, the VIM metagrating, are suggested as optical switches. The directional power distinction ratio is designed to change from 8.13:1 to 1:10.56 by the IMT and it is experimentally verified that the ratio changes from 3.725:1 to 1:3.132 as the VIM metagratings are heated up to 90 °C. With an electro-thermally controllable configuration and an optimized resonant design, we expect potential applications of the active switching mechanism for integrable active plasmonic elements and reconfigurable imaging.

  14. Effect of Direct-Current Electric Field on Enzymatic Activity and the Concentration of Laccase.

    PubMed

    Wang, Chunxing; Zhang, Huiling; Ren, Dajun; Li, Qian; Zhang, Shuqin; Feng, Tao

    2015-09-01

    This work investigates the effect of direct-current electric field on the extracellular enzymatic activity, concentration and other experimental parameters of laccase from Trametes versicolor. The results showed that laccase could significantly contribute to the change of pH at the end of graphite electrode. In addition, it increased the electrical conductivity of the water. In the experiment, the optimum pH and catalytic pH range for laccase activity were 3.0 and pH 2.5-4.0. The application of 6 V direct current showed significant effects on the laccase enzyme activity. The activity of laccase was enhanced in the anodic region, but at the same time was strongly inhibited at the cathode. The electric charge characteristics of laccase were changed when exposed to electric field, and some laccases molecules moved to the anode, which produced a slight migration phenomenon. This study is the basis of combination of laccase and electrical technology, at the same time, providing a new direction of enhancing laccase activity. Compared to immobilization, using electric field is simple, no chemical additives, and great potential.

  15. HOXA10 Controls Osteoblastogenesis by Directly Activating Bone Regulatory and Phenotypic Genes▿

    PubMed Central

    Hassan, Mohammad Q.; Tare, Rahul; Lee, Suk Hee; Mandeville, Matthew; Weiner, Brian; Montecino, Martin; van Wijnen, Andre J.; Stein, Janet L.; Stein, Gary S.; Lian, Jane B.

    2007-01-01

    HOXA10 is necessary for embryonic patterning of skeletal elements, but its function in bone formation beyond this early developmental stage is unknown. Here we show that HOXA10 contributes to osteogenic lineage determination through activation of Runx2 and directly regulates osteoblastic phenotypic genes. In response to bone morphogenic protein BMP2, Hoxa10 is rapidly induced and functions to activate the Runx2 transcription factor essential for bone formation. A functional element with the Hox core motif was characterized for the bone-related Runx2 P1 promoter. HOXA10 also activates other osteogenic genes, including the alkaline phosphatase, osteocalcin, and bone sialoprotein genes, and temporally associates with these target gene promoters during stages of osteoblast differentiation prior to the recruitment of RUNX2. Exogenous expression and small interfering RNA knockdown studies establish that HOXA10 mediates chromatin hyperacetylation and trimethyl histone K4 (H3K4) methylation of these genes, correlating to active transcription. HOXA10 therefore contributes to early expression of osteogenic genes through chromatin remodeling. Importantly, HOXA10 can induce osteoblast genes in Runx2 null cells, providing evidence for a direct role in mediating osteoblast differentiation independent of RUNX2. We propose that HOXA10 activates RUNX2 in mesenchymal cells, contributing to the onset of osteogenesis, and that HOXA10 subsequently supports bone formation by direct regulation of osteoblast phenotypic genes. PMID:17325044

  16. Mild and Efficient Palladium-Catalyzed Direct Trifluoroethylation of Aromatic Systems by C-H Activation.

    PubMed

    Tóth, Balázs L; Kovács, Szabolcs; Sályi, Gergő; Novák, Zoltán

    2016-02-05

    The introduction of trifluoroalkyl groups into aromatic molecules is an important transformation in the field of organic and medicinal chemistry. However, the direct installation of fluoroalkyl groups onto aromatic molecules still represents a challenging and highly demanding synthetic task. Herein, a simple trifluoroethylation process that relies on the palladium-catalyzed C-H activation of aromatic compounds is described. With the utilization of a highly active trifluoroethyl(mesityl)iodonium salt, the developed catalytic method enables the first highly efficient and selective trifluoroethylation of aromatic compounds. The robust catalytic procedure provides the desired products in up to 95 % yield at 25 °C in 1.5 to 3 hours and tolerates a broad range of functional groups. The utilization of hypervalent reagents opens new synthetic possibilities for direct alkylations and fluoroalkylations in the field of transition-metal-catalyzed C-H activation.

  17. Local entrainment of oscillatory activity induced by direct brain stimulation in humans

    PubMed Central

    Amengual, Julià L.; Vernet, Marine; Adam, Claude; Valero-Cabré, Antoni

    2017-01-01

    In a quest for direct evidence of oscillation entrainment, we analyzed intracerebral electroencephalographic recordings obtained during intracranial electrical stimulation in a cohort of three medication-resistant epilepsy patients tested pre-surgically. Spectral analyses of non-epileptogenic cerebral sites stimulated directly with high frequency electrical bursts yielded episodic local enhancements of frequency-specific rhythmic activity, phase-locked to each individual pulse. These outcomes reveal an entrainment of physiological oscillatory activity within a frequency band dictated by the rhythm of the stimulation source. Our results support future uses of rhythmic stimulation to elucidate the causal contributions of synchrony to specific aspects of human cognition and to further develop the therapeutic manipulation of dysfunctional rhythmic activity subtending the symptoms of some neuropsychiatric conditions. PMID:28256510

  18. Adsorption of direct dye onto activated carbon prepared from areca nut pod--an agricultural waste.

    PubMed

    Gopalswami, P; Sivakumar, N; Ponnuswamy, S; Venkateswaren, V; Kavitha, G

    2010-10-01

    Activated carbons are made from various agricultural wastes by physical and chemical activation. The preparation of activated carbon from agricultural waste could increase economic return and also provides an excellent method for the solid waste disposal thereby reduce pollution. Areca nut pod, which is an agricultural waste, has been used as a raw material to produce activated carbon (AAC) by four different methods. The adsorption of Direct blue dye used in textile industry on the porous areca nut pod activated carbon was investigated. The activated carbon AAC has an average surface area of 502 m2/g. CAC, the commercial reference was mainly micro porous with a surface area of 1026 m2/g .The study investigated the removal of direct dye from simulated water. The effects of adsorbent dosage, initial dye concentration, pH and contact time were studied. The results showed that as the amount of the adsorbent was increased, the percentage of dye removal increased accordingly. The results indicate that AAC could be employed as low-cost alternative to commercial activated carbon in wastewater treatment for the removal of acid dyes.

  19. Fluctuation dynamics in reconnecting current sheets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    von Stechow, Adrian; Grulke, Olaf; Ji, Hantao; Yamada, Masaaki; Klinger, Thomas

    2015-11-01

    During magnetic reconnection, a highly localized current sheet forms at the boundary between opposed magnetic fields. Its steep perpendicular gradients and fast parallel drifts can give rise to a range of instabilities which can contribute to the overall reconnection dynamics. In two complementary laboratory reconnection experiments, MRX (PPPL, Princeton) and VINETA.II (IPP, Greifswald, Germany), magnetic fluctuations are observed within the current sheet. Despite the large differences in geometries (toroidal vs. linear), plasma parameters (high vs. low beta) and magnetic configuration (low vs. high magnetic guide field), similar broadband fluctuation characteristics are observed in both experiments. These are identified as Whistler-like fluctuations in the lower hybrid frequency range that propagate along the current sheet in the electron drift direction. They are intrinsic to the localized current sheet and largely independent of the slower reconnection dynamics. This contribution characterizes these magnetic fluctuations within the wide parameter range accessible by both experiments. Specifically, the fluctuation spectra and wave dispersion are characterized with respect to the magnetic topology and plasma parameters of the reconnecting current sheet.

  20. Algal Biofuels Fact Sheet

    SciTech Connect

    2009-10-27

    This fact sheet provides information on algal biofuels, which are generating considerable interest around the world. They may represent a sustainable pathway for helping to meet the U.S. biofuel production targets set by the Energy Independence and Security Act of 2007.

  1. Ethanol Myths Fact Sheet

    SciTech Connect

    2009-10-27

    Ethanol is a clean, renewable fuel that is helping to reduce our nation’s dependence on oil and can offer additional economic and environmental benefits in the future. This fact sheet is intended to address some common misconceptions about this important alternative fuel.

  2. Quick Information Sheets. 1988.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wisconsin Univ., Madison. Trace Center.

    The Trace Center gathers and organizes information on communication, control, and computer access for handicapped individuals. The information is disseminated in the form of brief sheets describing print, nonprint, and organizational resources and listing addresses and telephone numbers for ordering or for additional information. This compilation…

  3. Quick Information Sheets.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wisconsin Univ., Madison. Trace Center.

    This compilation of "Trace Quick Sheets" provides descriptions, prices, and ordering information for products and services that assist with communication, control, and computer access for disabled individuals. Product descriptions or product sources are included for: adaptive toys and toy modifications; head pointers, light pointers, and…

  4. SILICON CARBIDE DATA SHEETS

    DTIC Science & Technology

    These data sheets present a compilation of a wide range of electrical, optical and energy values for alpha and beta- silicon carbide in bulk and film...spectrum. Energy data include energy bands, energy gap and energy levels for variously-doped silicon carbide , as well as effective mass tables, work

  5. Insulation Fact Sheet.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Conservation and Renewable Energy Inquiry and Referral Service (DOE), Silver Spring, MD.

    Heating and cooling account for 50-70% of the energy consumed in the average American home. Heating water accounts for another 20%. A poorly insulated home loses much of this energy, causing drafty rooms and high energy bills. This fact sheet discusses how to determine if your home needs more insulation, the additional thermal resistance (called…

  6. GED Testing Fact Sheet

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    GED Testing Service, 2009

    2009-01-01

    This GED Testing fact sheet provides information on: (1) GED[R] Tests; (2) Versions and Editions of the GED Tests; (3) Earning a Credential; (4) GED Testing Service[R]; (5) History of the GED Tests; (6) Who Accepts the GED Credential; (7) Public/Private Partnership of GEDTS; (8) Renowned GED Credential Recipients; (9) GED Testing Numbers for 2008;…

  7. Youth Demographics. Fact Sheet

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lopez, Mark Hugo; Marcelo, Karlo Barrios

    2006-01-01

    This fact sheet compares the numbers of 18-25 year-old residents and citizens by gender, race, ethnicity, geographic distribution, marital status, military status, unemployment, educational attainment, and assesses population trends from 1968-2006. It explores such demographic characteristics of young people using data from the March Annual…

  8. Ethanol Basics (Fact Sheet)

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    2015-01-01

    Ethanol is a widely-used, domestically-produced renewable fuel made from corn and other plant materials. More than 96% of gasoline sold in the United States contains ethanol. Learn more about this alternative fuel in the Ethanol Basics Fact Sheet, produced by the U.S. Department of Energy's Clean Cities program.

  9. A pincer-shaped plasma sheet at Uranus

    SciTech Connect

    Hammond, C.M.; Walker, R.J.; Kivelson, M.G. )

    1990-09-01

    A model from Voigt et al. (1987) and an MHD simulation from Walker et al. (1989) both show that the curvature of the plasma sheet at Uranus changes as the dipole tilt varies between 38{degree} and 22{degree}. The models suggest that one of the two partial traversals of the uranian plasma sheet made during the outbound trajectory of Voyager 2 can be explained as an entry into the highly curved plasma sheet that develops when Uranus is near the maximum dipole tilt value of 38{degree}; previously both partial traversals have been explained as anomalous. The spacecraft would have reversed its motion relative to the plasma sheet as the continued rotation diminished the dipole tilt and the retreating plasma sheet uncurled. As the dipole tilt approached its minimum value, spacecraft motion towards the neutral sheet resumed and the traversal of the plasma sheet was completed. Evidence from the PWS plasma wave detector suggests that the spacecraft trajectory skimmed the plasma sheet boundary layer for several hours prior to the partial immersion. The plasma sheet of the Voigt et al. model was not located near the spacecraft during this time interval. On the other hand, the MHD simulation reveals a plasma sheet that is more curved than in the Boigt et al. model; near maximum dipole tilt, the plasma sheet is pincer-shaped. The unusual geometry implies that Voyager 2 remained near the plasma sheet boundary layer during the period suggested by the PWS data. Thus the simulation accounts easily for the first of the plasma sheet encounters previously called anomalous. The second partial immersion remains anomalous, having previously been related to substorm activity, and thus is not discussed here. The stagnation distances of the earth and Uranus at the nose of the magnetopause were used to scale the Walker et al. (1989) simulation of the terrestrial magnetosphere to represent the uranian magnetosphere.

  10. Structure of the Magnetotail Current Sheet

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Larson, Douglas J.; Kaufmann, Richard L.

    1996-01-01

    An orbit tracing technique was used to generate current sheets for three magnetotail models. Groups of ions were followed to calculate the resulting cross-tail current. Several groups then were combined to produce a current sheet. The goal is a model in which the ions and associated electrons carry the electric current distribution needed to generate the magnetic field B in which ion orbits were traced. The region -20 R(E) less than x less than -14 R(E) in geocentric solar magnetospheric coordinates was studied. Emphasis was placed on identifying the categories of ion orbits which contribute most to the cross-tail current and on gaining physical insight into the manner by which the ions carry the observed current distribution. Ions that were trapped near z = 0, ions that magnetically mirrored throughout the current sheet, and ions that mirrored near the Earth all were needed. The current sheet structure was determined primarily by ion magnetization currents. Electrons of the observed energies carried relatively little cross-tail current in these quiet time current sheets. Distribution functions were generated and integrated to evaluate fluid parameters. An earlier model in which B depended only on z produced a consistent current sheet, but it did not provide a realistic representation of the Earth's middle magnetotail. In the present study, B changed substantially in the x and z directions but only weakly in the y direction within our region of interest. Plasmas with three characteristic particle energies were used with each of the magnetic field models. A plasma was found for each model in which the density, average energy, cross-tail current, and bulk flow velocity agreed well with satellite observations.

  11. Structure of the Magnetotail Current Sheet

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Larson, Douglas J.; Kaufmann, Richard L.

    1996-01-01

    An orbit tracing technique was used to generate current sheets for three magnetotail models. Groups of ions were followed to calculate the resulting cross-tail current. Several groups then were combined to produce a current sheet. The goal is a model in which the ions and associated electrons carry the electric current distribution needed to generate the magnetic field B in which ion orbits were traced. The region -20 R(sub E) less than x less than - 14 R(sub E) in geocentric solar magnetospheric coordinates was studied. Emphasis was placed on identifying the categories of ion orbits which contribute most to the cross-tail current and on gaining physical insight into the manner by which the ions carry the observed current distribution. Ions that were trapped near z = 0, ions that magnetically mirrored throughout the current sheet, and ions that mirrored near the Earth all were needed. The current sheet structure was determined primarily by ion magnetization currents. Electrons of the observed energies carried relatively little cross-tail current in these quiet time current sheets. Distribution functions were generated and integrated to evaluate fluid parameters. An earlier model in which B depended only on z produced a consistent current sheet, but it did not provide a realistic representation of the Earth's middle magnetotail. In the present study, B changed substantially in the x and z directions but only weakly in the y direction within our region of interest. Plasmas with three characteristic particle energies were used with each of the magnetic field models. A plasma was found for each model in which the density, average energy, cross-tail current, and bulk flow velocity agreed well with satellite observations.

  12. Memoryless self-reinforcing directionality in endosomal active transport within living cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Kejia; Wang, Bo; Granick, Steve

    2015-06-01

    In contrast to Brownian transport, the active motility of microbes, cells, animals and even humans often follows another random process known as truncated Lévy walk. These stochastic motions are characterized by clustered small steps and intermittent longer jumps that often extend towards the size of the entire system. As there are repeated suggestions, although disagreement, that Lévy walks have functional advantages over Brownian motion in random searching and transport kinetics, their intentional engineering into active materials could be useful. Here, we show experimentally in the classic active matter system of intracellular trafficking that Brownian-like steps self-organize into truncated Lévy walks through an apparent time-independent positive feedback such that directional persistence increases with the distance travelled persistently. A molecular model that allows the maximum output of the active propelling forces to fluctuate slowly fits the experiments quantitatively. Our findings offer design principles for programming efficient transport in active materials.

  13. Direct activation of the ventral striatum in anticipation of aversive stimuli.

    PubMed

    Jensen, Jimmy; McIntosh, Anthony R; Crawley, Adrian P; Mikulis, David J; Remington, Gary; Kapur, Shitij

    2003-12-18

    The brain "reward" system, centered on the limbic ventral striatum, plays a critical role in the response to pleasure and pain. The ventral striatum is activated in animal and human studies during anticipation of appetitive/pleasurable events, but its role in aversive/painful events is less clear. Here we present data from three human fMRI studies based on aversive conditioning using unpleasant cutaneous electrical stimulation and show that the ventral striatum is reliably activated. This activation is observed during anticipation and is not a consequence of relief after the aversive event. Further, the ventral striatum is activated in anticipation regardless of whether there is an opportunity to avoid the aversive stimulus or not. Our data suggest that the ventral striatum, a crucial element of the brain "reward" system, is directly activated in anticipation of aversive stimuli.

  14. Active-absorbing-state phase transition beyond directed percolation: a class of exactly solvable models.

    PubMed

    Basu, Urna; Mohanty, P K

    2009-04-01

    We introduce and solve a model of hardcore particles on a one-dimensional periodic lattice which undergoes an active-absorbing-state phase transition at finite density. In this model, an occupied site is defined to be active if its left neighbor is occupied and the right neighbor is vacant. Particles from such active sites hop stochastically to their right. We show that both the density of active sites and the survival probability vanish as the particle density is decreased below half. The critical exponents and spatial correlations of the model are calculated exactly using the matrix product ansatz. Exact analytical study of several variations of the model reveals that these nonequilibrium phase transitions belong to a new universality class different from the generic active-absorbing-state phase transition, namely, directed percolation.

  15. Rubella - Fact Sheet for Parents

    MedlinePlus

    ... this page: About CDC.gov . Redirect for the Rubella fact sheet page. The current fact sheet can ... http://www.cdc.gov/vaccines/parents/diseases/child/rubella.html Print page Share Compartir File Formats Help: ...

  16. MZI optical isolator with Si-wire waveguides by surface-activated direct bonding.

    PubMed

    Shoji, Yuya; Ito, Masatoshi; Shirato, Yuya; Mizumoto, Tetsuya

    2012-07-30

    We fabricate a Mach-Zehnder interferometer-based optical isolator using a silicon-wire waveguide with magneto-optic garnet cladding using direct bonding techniques. Using Si-wire waveguides, the size of the device is greatly reduced from that of our previous device. We investigate surface-activated direct bonding with nitrogen plasma treatment, which shows better bonding results than oxygen plasma treatment. A large magneto-optic phase shift of 0.8π and an optical isolation of 18 dB are obtained at a wavelength of 1322 nm.

  17. Annulation of Aromatic Imines via Directed C-H BondActivation

    SciTech Connect

    Thalji, Reema K.; Ahrendt, Kateri A.; Bergman, Robert G.; Ellman,Jonathan A.

    2005-04-14

    A directed C-H bond activation approach to the synthesis of indans, tetralins, dihydrofurans, dihydroindoles, and other polycyclic aromatic compounds is presented. Cyclization of aromatic ketimines and aldimines containing alkenyl groups tethered at the meta position relative to the imine directing group has been achieved using (PPh{sub 3}){sub 3}RhCl (Wilkinson's catalyst). The cyclization of a range of aromatic ketimines and aldimines provides bi- and tricyclic ring systems with good regioselectivity. Different ring sizes and substitution patterns can be accessed through the coupling of monosubstituted, 1,1- or 1,2-disubstituted, and trisubstituted alkenes bearing both electron-rich and electron-deficient functionality.

  18. Direction of Biological Motion Affects Early Brain Activation: A Link with Social Cognition

    PubMed Central

    Pegna, Alan John; Gehring, Elise; Meyer, Georg; Del Zotto, Marzia

    2015-01-01

    A number of EEG studies have investigated the time course of brain activation for biological movement over this last decade, however the temporal dynamics of processing are still debated. Moreover, the role of direction of movement has not received much attention even though it is an essential component allowing us to determine the intentions of the moving agent, and thus permitting the anticipation of potential social interactions. In this study, we examined event-related responses (ERPs) in 15 healthy human participants to light point walkers and their scrambled counterparts, whose movements occurred either in the radial or in the lateral plane. Compared to scrambled motion (SM), biological motion (BM) showed an enhanced negativity between 210 and 360ms. A source localization algorithm (sLORETA) revealed that this was due to an increase in superior and middle temporal lobe activity. Regarding direction, we found that radial BM produced an enhanced P1 compared to lateral BM, lateral SM and radial SM. This heightened P1 was due to an increase in activity in extrastriate regions, as well as in superior temporal, medial parietal and medial prefrontal areas. This network is known to be involved in decoding the underlying intentionality of the movement and in the attribution of mental states. The social meaning signaled by the direction of biological motion therefore appears to trigger an early response in brain activity. PMID:26121591

  19. Abnormal brain activation during directed forgetting of negative memory in depressed patients.

    PubMed

    Yang, Wenjing; Chen, Qunlin; Liu, Peiduo; Cheng, Hongsheng; Cui, Qian; Wei, Dongtao; Zhang, Qinglin; Qiu, Jiang

    2016-01-15

    The frequent occurrence of uncontrollable negative thoughts and memories is a troubling aspect of depression. Thus, knowledge on the mechanism underlying intentional forgetting of these thoughts and memories is crucial to develop an effective emotion regulation strategy for depressed individuals. Behavioral studies have demonstrated that depressed participants cannot intentionally forget negative memories. However, the neural mechanism underlying this process remains unclear. In this study, participants completed the directed forgetting task in which they were instructed to remember or forget neutral or negative words. Standard univariate analysis based on the General Linear Model showed that the depressed participants have higher activation in the inferior frontal gyrus (IFG), superior frontal gyrus (SFG), superior parietal gyrus (SPG), and inferior temporal gyrus (ITG) than the healthy individuals. The results indicated that depressed participants recruited more frontal and parietal inhibitory control resources to inhibit the TBF items, but the attempt still failed because of negative bias. We also used the Support Vector Machine to perform multivariate pattern classification based on the brain activation during directed forgetting. The pattern of brain activity in directed forgetting of negative words allowed correct group classification with an overall accuracy of 75% (P=0.012). The brain regions which are critical for this discrimination showed abnormal activation when depressed participants were attempting to forget negative words. These results indicated that the abnormal neural circuitry when depressed individuals tried to forget the negative words might provide neurobiological markers for depression.

  20. Direct effects of tillage on the activity density of ground beetle (Coleoptera: Carabidae) weed seed predators.

    PubMed

    Shearin, A F; Reberg-Horton, S C; Gallandt, E R

    2007-10-01

    Ground beetles are well known as beneficial organisms in agroecosystems, contributing to the predation of a wide range of animal pests and weed seeds. Tillage has generally been shown to have a negative effect on ground beetles, but it is not known whether this is because of direct mortality or the result of indirect losses resulting from dispersal caused by habitat deterioration. In 2005, field experiments measured direct, tillage-induced mortality, of four carabid weed seed predators, Harpalus rufipes DeGeer, Agonum muelleri Herbst, Anisodactylus merula Germar, and Amara cupreolata Putzeys, and one arthropod predator, Pterostichus melanarius Illiger, common to agroecosystems in the northeastern United States. Three tillage treatments (moldboard plow, chisel plow, and rotary tillage) were compared with undisturbed controls at two sites (Stillwater and Presque Isle) and at two dates (July and August) in Maine. Carabid activity density after disturbance was measured using fenced pitfall traps installed immediately after tillage to remove any effects of dispersal. Rotary tillage and moldboard plowing reduced weed seed predator activity density 52 and 54%, respectively. Carabid activity density after chisel plowing was similar to the undisturbed control. This trend was true for each of the weed seed predator species studied. However, activity density of the arthropod predator P. melanarius was reduced by all tillage types, indicating a greater sensitivity to tillage than the four weed seed predator species. These results confirm the need to consider both direct and indirect effects of management in studies of invertebrate seed predators.

  1. A novel direct activator of AMPK inhibits prostate cancer growth by blocking lipogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Zadra, Giorgia; Photopoulos, Cornelia; Tyekucheva, Svitlana; Heidari, Pedram; Weng, Qing Ping; Fedele, Giuseppe; Liu, Hong; Scaglia, Natalia; Priolo, Carmen; Sicinska, Ewa; Mahmood, Umar; Signoretti, Sabina; Birnberg, Neal; Loda, Massimo

    2014-01-01

    5′AMP-activated kinase (AMPK) constitutes a hub for cellular metabolic and growth control, thus representing an ideal therapeutic target for prostate cancers (PCas) characterized by increased lipogenesis and activation of mTORC1 pathway. However, whether AMPK activation itself is sufficient to block cancer cell growth remains to be determined. A small molecule screening was performed and identified MT 63–78, a specific and potent direct AMPK activator. Here, we show that direct activation of AMPK inhibits PCa cell growth in androgen sensitive and castration resistant PCa (CRPC) models, induces mitotic arrest, and apoptosis. In vivo, AMPK activation is sufficient to reduce PCa growth, whereas the allelic loss of its catalytic subunits fosters PCa development. Importantly, despite mTORC1 blockade, the suppression of de novo lipogenesis is the underpinning mechanism responsible for AMPK-mediated PCa growth inhibition, suggesting AMPK as a therapeutic target especially for lipogenesis-driven PCas. Finally, we demonstrate that MT 63–78 enhances the growth inhibitory effect of AR signaling inhibitors MDV3100 and abiraterone. This study thus provides a rationale for their combined use in CRPC treatment. PMID:24497570

  2. Improving the activity of the subtilisin nattokinase by site-directed mutagenesis and molecular dynamics simulation.

    PubMed

    Weng, Meizhi; Deng, Xiongwei; Bao, Wei; Zhu, Li; Wu, Jieyuan; Cai, Yongjun; Jia, Yan; Zheng, Zhongliang; Zou, Guolin

    2015-09-25

    Nattokinase (NK), a bacterial serine protease from Bacillus subtilis var. natto, is a potential cardiovascular drug exhibiting strong fibrinolytic activity. To broaden its commercial and medical applications, we constructed a single-mutant (I31L) and two double-mutants (M222A/I31L and T220S/I31L) by site-directed mutagenesis. Active enzymes were expressed in Escherichia coli with periplasmic secretion and were purified to homogeneity. The kinetic parameters of enzymes were examined by spectroscopy assay and isothermal titration calorimetry (ITC), and their fibrinolytic activities were determined by fibrin plate method. The substitution of Leu(31) for Ile(31) resulted in about 2-fold enhancement of catalytic efficiency (Kcat/KM) compared with wild-type NK. The specific activities of both double-mutants (M222A/I31L and T220S/I31L) were significantly increased when compared with the single-mutants (M222A and T220S) and the oxidative stability of M222A/I31L mutant was enhanced with respect to wild-type NK. This study demonstrates the feasibility of improving activity of NK by site-directed mutagenesis and shows successful protein engineering cases to improve the activity of NK as a potent therapeutic agent.

  3. Fast Light-Sheet Scanner

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hunter, William W., Jr.; Humphreys, William M., Jr.; Bartram, Scott M.

    1995-01-01

    Optomechanical apparatus maintains sheet of pulsed laser light perpendicular to reference axis while causing sheet of light to translate in oscillatory fashion along reference axis. Produces illumination for laser velocimeter in which submicrometer particles entrained in flow illuminated and imaged in parallel planes displaced from each other in rapid succession. Selected frequency of oscillation range upward from tens of hertz. Rotating window continuously shifts sheet of light laterally while maintaining sheet parallel to same plane.

  4. Exposure age and ice-sheet model constraints on Pliocene East Antarctic ice sheet dynamics.

    PubMed

    Yamane, Masako; Yokoyama, Yusuke; Abe-Ouchi, Ayako; Obrochta, Stephen; Saito, Fuyuki; Moriwaki, Kiichi; Matsuzaki, Hiroyuki

    2015-04-24

    The Late Pliocene epoch is a potential analogue for future climate in a warming world. Here we reconstruct Plio-Pleistocene East Antarctic Ice Sheet (EAIS) variability using cosmogenic nuclide exposure ages and model simulations to better understand ice sheet behaviour under such warm conditions. New and previously published exposure ages indicate interior-thickening during the Pliocene. An ice sheet model with mid-Pliocene boundary conditions also results in interior thickening and suggests that both the Wilkes Subglacial and Aurora Basins largely melted, offsetting increased ice volume. Considering contributions from West Antarctica and Greenland, this is consistent with the most recent IPCC AR5 estimate, which indicates that the Pliocene sea level likely did not exceed +20 m on Milankovitch timescales. The inception of colder climate since ∼3 Myr has increased the sea ice cover and inhibited active moisture transport to Antarctica, resulting in reduced ice sheet thickness, at least in coastal areas.

  5. Exposure age and ice-sheet model constraints on Pliocene East Antarctic ice sheet dynamics

    PubMed Central

    Yamane, Masako; Yokoyama, Yusuke; Abe-Ouchi, Ayako; Obrochta, Stephen; Saito, Fuyuki; Moriwaki, Kiichi; Matsuzaki, Hiroyuki

    2015-01-01

    The Late Pliocene epoch is a potential analogue for future climate in a warming world. Here we reconstruct Plio-Pleistocene East Antarctic Ice Sheet (EAIS) variability using cosmogenic nuclide exposure ages and model simulations to better understand ice sheet behaviour under such warm conditions. New and previously published exposure ages indicate interior-thickening during the Pliocene. An ice sheet model with mid-Pliocene boundary conditions also results in interior thickening and suggests that both the Wilkes Subglacial and Aurora Basins largely melted, offsetting increased ice volume. Considering contributions from West Antarctica and Greenland, this is consistent with the most recent IPCC AR5 estimate, which indicates that the Pliocene sea level likely did not exceed +20 m on Milankovitch timescales. The inception of colder climate since ∼3 Myr has increased the sea ice cover and inhibited active moisture transport to Antarctica, resulting in reduced ice sheet thickness, at least in coastal areas. PMID:25908601

  6. Easy fabrication of macroporous gold films using graphene sheets as a template.

    PubMed

    Sun, Shengtong; Wu, Peiyi

    2013-04-24

    We demonstrate a facile new and environmentally friendly strategy to fabricate monolithic macroporous gold (MPG) films using graphene sheets as a sacrificial template. Gold nanoparticle (AuNP) decorated graphene sheets were prepared by a one-pot simultaneous reduction of graphene oxide (GO) and gold precursor (HAuCl4) by sodium citrate. Two thermal annealing methods, direct thermal annealing in air and a two-step thermal treatment (in N2 first and subsequently in air), were then employed to remove the template (graphene sheets), which can both produce macroporous structures, but with distinctly different morphologies. We additionally investigated the porosity evolution mechanism as well as the effect of graphene/Au weight ratio and annealing temperature on the nanoarchitecture. The two-step treatment has a more significant templating effect than direct thermal annealing to fabricate MPG films because of the existence of a preaggregation process of AuNPs assisted by graphene sheets in N2. Moreover, the resulting MPG films were found to exhibit excellent surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) activity. Our method can be hopefully extended to the synthesis of other porous materials (such as Ag, Cu, Pt, and ceramic) and much wider applications.

  7. Crystal Plasticity Finite Element Analysis of Loading-Unloading Behaviour in Magnesium Alloy Sheet

    SciTech Connect

    Hama, Takayuki; Fujimoto, Hitoshi; Takuda, Hirohiko

    2010-06-15

    Magnesium alloy sheets exhibit strong inelastic response during unloading. In this study crystal plasticity finite element analysis of loading-unloading behaviour during uniaxial tension in a rolled magnesium alloy sheet was carried out, and the mechanism of this inelastic response was examined in detail in terms of macroscopic and mesoscopic deformations. The unloading behaviour obtained by the simulation was in good agreement with the experiment in terms of variation with stress of instantaneous tangent modulus during unloading. Variations of activities of each family of slip systems during the deformation showed that the activation of basal slip systems is the largest during unloading, and the slip direction during unloading is opposite from during loading. These results indicated that one of the factors of the inelastic behaviour during unloading is the fact that the basal slip systems are easily activated during unloading because of their low strengths.

  8. Skill Sheets for Agricultural Mechanics.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Iowa State Univ. of Science and Technology, Ames. Dept. of Agricultural Education.

    This set of 33 skill sheets for agricultural mechanics was developed for use in high school and vocational school agricultural mechanics programs. Some sheets teach operational procedures while others are for simple projects. Each skill sheet covers a single topic and includes: (1) a diagram, (2) a step-by-step construction or operational…

  9. Fact Sheets on Selected Programs.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Administration for Children and Families (DHHS), Washington, DC.

    This paper provides 1- to 6-page fact sheets on 15 programs administered by the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services' Administration for Children and Families. Each fact sheet provides information on program services and funding. The fact sheets cover the following programs: Youth Gang Drug Prevention, Refugee Assistance, Runaway and…

  10. The Physics of Ice Sheets

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bassis, J. N.

    2008-01-01

    The great ice sheets in Antarctica and Greenland are vast deposits of frozen freshwater that contain enough to raise sea level by approximately 70 m if they were to completely melt. Because of the potentially catastrophic impact that ice sheets can have, it is important that we understand how ice sheets have responded to past climate changes and…

  11. Beginning Child Care Fact Sheets.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tweedie, Pat

    These six fact sheets from Child Care Aware are designed to help parents ease their children's transition to child care. The first fact sheet, "Before Your Child's First Day," discusses tips such as: (1) "prepare your child"; (2) read and look at picture books about child care; and (3) "prepare yourself." The second fact sheet, "First Day Tips,"…

  12. Comparison of arrhythmogenicity and proinflammatory activity induced by intramyocardial or epicardial myoblast sheet delivery in a rat model of ischemic heart failure.

    PubMed

    Pätilä, Tommi; Miyagawa, Shigeru; Imanishi, Yukiko; Fukushima, Satsuki; Siltanen, Antti; Mervaala, Eero; Kankuri, Esko; Harjula, Ari; Sawa, Yoshiki

    2015-01-01

    Although cell therapy of the failing heart by intramyocardial injections of myoblasts to results in regenerative benefit, it has also been associated with undesired and prospectively fatal arrhythmias. We hypothesized that intramyocardial injections of myoblasts could enhance inflammatory reactivity and facilitate electrical cardiac abnormalities that can be reduced by epicardial myoblast sheet delivery. In a rat model of ischemic heart failure, myoblast therapy either by intramyocardial injections or epicardial cell sheets was given 2 weeks after occlusion of the coronary artery. Ventricular premature contractions (VPCs) were assessed, using an implanted three-lead electrocardiograph at 1, 7, and 14 days after therapy, and 16-point epicardial electropotential mapping (EEPM) was used to evaluate ventricular arrhythmogenicity under isoproterenol stress. Cardiac functioning was assessed by echocardiography. Both transplantation groups showed therapeutic benefit over sham therapy. However, VPCs were more frequent in the Injection group on day 1 and day 14 after therapy than in animals receiving epicardial or sham therapy (p < 0.05 and p < 0.01, respectively). EEPM under isoproterenol stress showed macroreentry at the infarct border area, leading to ventricular tachycardias in the Injection group, but not in the myoblast sheet- or sham-treated groups (p = 0.045). Both transplantation types modified the myocardial cytokine expression profile. In animals receiving epicardial myoblast therapy, selective reductions in the expressions of interferon gamma, interleukin (IL)-1β and IL12 were observed, accompanied by reduced infiltration of inflammatory CD11b- and CD68-positive leukocytes, compared with animals receiving myoblasts as intramyocardial injections. Intramyocardial myoblast delivery was associated with enhanced inflammatory and immunomodulatory reactivity and increased frequency of VPCs. In comparison to intramyocardial injection, the epicardial route may serve as

  13. Urokinase has direct catalytic activity against fibrinogen and renders it less clottable by thrombin.

    PubMed Central

    Weitz, J I; Leslie, B

    1990-01-01

    Recently, we demonstrated that tissue plasminogen activator directly releases fibrinopeptides A and B (FPA and FPB) from fibrinogen. The purpose of this study was to determine whether urokinase has similar activity. Incubation of urokinase with fibrinogen or heparinized plasma results in concentration-dependent FPB release unaccompanied by FPA cleavage. For equivalent amidolytic activity, high molecular weight urokinase releases twofold more FPB than the low molecular weight species. In contrast, prourokinase does not release FPB until activated to urokinase. Contaminating thrombin or plasma is not responsible for urokinase-mediated FPB release because this activity is unaccompanied by FPA or B beta 1-42 cleavage, and is unaffected by heparin, hirudin, a monospecific antibody against thrombin, aprotinin, or alpha 2-antiplasmin. FPB release reflects a direct action of urokinase on fibrinogen because release is completely inhibited by a monospecific antibody against the enzyme. Further, urokinase releases FPB from the FPB-containing substrate B beta 1-42, thus confirming its specificity for the B beta 14 (Arg)-B beta 15 (Gly) bond. In addition to FPB release, SDS-PAGE analysis of the time course of urokinase-mediated fibrinogenolysis indicates progressive proteolysis of both the A alpha- and B beta-chains of fibrinogen that occurs after FPB release is completed. As a consequence of urokinase-mediated fibrinogenolysis, there is progressive prolongation of the thrombin clotting time. These studies indicate that urokinase has direct catalytic activity against fibrinogen. By releasing FPB, a potent chemoattractant, and by rendering fibrinogen less clottable by thrombin, urokinase may participate in processes extending beyond fibrinolysis. Images PMID:2365816

  14. Physical Activity (Exercise)

    MedlinePlus

    ... Physical activity (exercise) fact sheet ePublications Physical activity (exercise) fact sheet How can physical activity improve my ... recent hip surgery More information on physical activity (exercise) For more information about physical activity (exercise), call ...

  15. Increased activity in human visual cortex during directed attention in the absence of visual stimulation.

    PubMed

    Kastner, S; Pinsk, M A; De Weerd, P; Desimone, R; Ungerleider, L G

    1999-04-01

    When subjects direct attention to a particular location in a visual scene, responses in the visual cortex to stimuli presented at that location are enhanced, and the suppressive influences of nearby distractors are reduced. What is the top-down signal that modulates the response to an attended versus an unattended stimulus? Here, we demonstrate increased activity related to attention in the absence of visual stimulation in extrastriate cortex when subjects covertly directed attention to a peripheral location expecting the onset of visual stimuli. Frontal and parietal areas showed a stronger signal increase during this expectation than did visual areas. The increased activity in visual cortex in the absence of visual stimulation may reflect a top-down bias of neural signals in favor of the attended location, which derives from a fronto-parietal network.

  16. Concurrent glucocorticoid and noradrenergic activity shifts instrumental behavior from goal-directed to habitual control.

    PubMed

    Schwabe, Lars; Tegenthoff, Martin; Höffken, Oliver; Wolf, Oliver T

    2010-06-16

    Stress modulates instrumental action in favor of habitual stimulus-response processes that are insensitive to changes in outcome value and at the expense of goal-directed action-outcome processes. The neuroendocrine mechanism underlying this phenomenon is unknown. Here, we tested the hypothesis that concurrent glucocorticoid and noradrenergic activity bias instrumental behavior toward habitual performance. To this end, healthy men and women received hydrocortisone, the alpha2-adrenoceptor antagonist yohimbine or both orally before they were trained in two instrumental actions leading to two distinct food outcomes. After training, one of the outcomes was devalued by inviting participants to eat that food to satiety. A subsequent extinction test revealed whether instrumental performance was goal-directed or habitual. Participants that received hydrocortisone or yohimbine alone decreased responding to the devalued action in the extinction test, i.e., they behaved goal-directed. The combined administration of hydrocortisone and yohimbine, however, rendered participants' behavior insensitive to changes in the value of the goal (i.e., habitual). These findings demonstrate that the concerted action of glucocorticoids and noradrenergic activity shifts instrumental behavior from goal-directed to habitual control.

  17. Lozenge directly activates argos and klumpfuss to regulate programmed cell death.

    PubMed

    Wildonger, Jill; Sosinsky, Alona; Honig, Barry; Mann, Richard S

    2005-05-01

    We show that reducing the activity of the Drosophila Runx protein Lozenge (Lz) during pupal development causes a decrease in cell death in the eye. We identified Lz-binding sites in introns of argos (aos) and klumpfuss (klu) and demonstrate that these genes are directly activated targets of Lz. Loss of either aos or klu reduces cell death, suggesting that Lz promotes apoptosis at least in part by regulating aos and klu. These results provide novel insights into the control of programmed cell death (PCD) by Lz during Drosophila eye development.

  18. Sogolon Marionettes. Cue Sheet for Teachers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Flynn, Rosalind M.

    This performance guide is designed to help teachers prepare students to see the Sogolon Marionettes performing one of two stories from the West African country of Mali. The guide, called a "Cuesheet," contains four activity sheets for use in class, addressing: (1) About the Performance (offering a performance overview of the stories, and…

  19. "Turtle Island Tales." Cue Sheet for Students.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Carr, Gail

    This performance guide is designed for teachers to use with students before and after a shadow play performance of "Turtle Island Tales" by Hobey Ford and His Golden Rod Puppets. The guide, called a "Cuesheet," contains seven activity sheets for use in class, addressing: (1) The Tales (offering brief outlines of the three tales…

  20. College Experience and Volunteering. Fact Sheet

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Marcelo, Karlo Barrios

    2007-01-01

    College experience and volunteering are positively correlated. Measurable differences in civic activity exist between young people who attend college and young people who do not. This fact sheet explores volunteering as civic engagement among youth with college experience, ages 19-25, which was down for the second year in a row in 2006. The…

  1. Work group IV: Future directions for measures of the food and physical activity environments.

    PubMed

    Story, Mary; Giles-Corti, Billie; Yaroch, Amy Lazarus; Cummins, Steven; Frank, Lawrence Douglas; Huang, Terry T-K; Lewis, LaVonna Blair

    2009-04-01

    Much progress has been made in the past 5 to 10 years in measuring and understanding the impact of the food and physical activity environments on behavioral outcomes. Nevertheless, this research is in its infancy. A work group was convened to identify current evidence gaps and barriers in food and physical activity environments and policy research measures, and develop recommendations to guide future directions for measurement and methodologic research efforts. A nominal group process was used to determine six priority areas for food and physical activity environments and policy measures to move the field forward by 2015, including: (1) identify relevant factors in the food and physical activity environments to measure, including those most amenable to change; (2) improve understanding of mechanisms for relationships between the environment and physical activity, diet, and obesity; (3) develop simplified measures that are sensitive to change, valid for different population groups and settings, and responsive to changing trends; (4) evaluate natural experiments to improve understanding of food and physical activity environments and their impact on behaviors and weight; (5) establish surveillance systems to predict and track change over time; and (6) develop standards for adopting effective health-promoting changes to the food and physical activity environments. The recommendations emanating from the work group highlight actions required to advance policy-relevant research related to food and physical activity environments.

  2. Directed evolution of subtilisin E in Bacillus subtilis to enhance total activity in aqueous dimethylformamide.

    PubMed

    You, L; Arnold, F H

    1996-01-01

    Sequential rounds of error-prone PCR to introduce random mutations and screening of the resultant mutant libraries have been used to enhance the total catalytic activity of subtilisin E significantly in a non-natural environment, aqueous dimethylformamide (DMF). Seven DNA substitutions coding for three new amino acid substitutions were identified in a mutant isolated after two additional generations of directed evolution carried out on 10M subtilisin E, previously "evolved' to increase its specific activity in DMF. A Bacillus subtilis-Escherichia coli shuttle vector was developed in order to increase the size of the mutant library that could be established in B.subtilis and the stringency of the screening process was increased to reflect total as well as specific activity. This directed evolution approach has been extremely effective for improving enzyme activity in a non-natural environment: the resulting-evolved 13M subtilisin exhibits specific catalytic efficiency towards the hydrolysis of a peptide substrate succinyl-Ala-Ala-Pro-Phe-p-nitroanilide in 60% DMF solution that is three times that of the parent 10M and 471 times that of wild type subtilisin E. The total activity of the 13M culture supernatant is enhanced 16-fold over that of the parent 10M.

  3. 3-Methylcholanthrene and other aryl hydrocarbon receptor agonists directly activate estrogen receptor alpha.

    PubMed

    Abdelrahim, Maen; Ariazi, Eric; Kim, Kyounghyun; Khan, Shaheen; Barhoumi, Rola; Burghardt, Robert; Liu, Shengxi; Hill, Denise; Finnell, Richard; Wlodarczyk, Bogdan; Jordan, V Craig; Safe, Stephen

    2006-02-15

    3-Methylcholanthrene (3MC) is an aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AhR) agonist, and it has been reported that 3MC induces estrogenic activity through AhR-estrogen receptor alpha (ER alpha) interactions. In this study, we used 3MC and 3,3',4,4',5-pentachlorobiphenyl (PCB) as prototypical AhR ligands, and both compounds activated estrogen-responsive reporter genes/gene products (cathepsin D) in MCF-7 breast cancer cells. The estrogenic responses induced by these AhR ligands were inhibited by the antiestrogen ICI 182780 and by the transfection of a small inhibitory RNA for ER alpha but were not affected by the small inhibitory RNA for AhR. These results suggest that 3MC and PCB directly activate ER alpha, and this was confirmed in a competitive ER alpha binding assay and in a fluorescence resonance energy transfer experiment in which PCB and 3MC induced CFP-ER alpha/YFP-ER alpha interactions. In a chromatin immunoprecipitation assay, PCB and 3MC enhanced ER alpha (but not AhR) association with the estrogen-responsive region of the pS2 gene promoter. Moreover, in AhR knockout mice, 3MC increased uterine weights and induced expression of cyclin D1 mRNA levels. These results show that PCB and 3MC directly activate ER alpha-dependent transactivation and extend the number of ligands that activate both AhR and ER alpha.

  4. Neural Detection of Malicious Network Activities Using a New Direct Parsing and Feature Extraction Technique

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-09-01

    NETWORK ACTIVITIES USING A NEW DIRECT PARSING AND FEATURE EXTRACTION TECHNIQUE by Cheng Hong Low September 2015 Thesis Advisor: Phillip Pace Co...FEATURE EXTRACTION TECHNIQUE 5. FUNDING NUMBERS 6. AUTHOR(S) Low, Cheng Hong 7. PERFORMING ORGANIZATION NAME(S) AND ADDRESS(ES) Center for...FEATURE EXTRACTION TECHNIQUE Cheng Hong Low Civlian, ST Aerospace, Singapore M.Sc., National University of Singapore, 2012 Submitted in

  5. Evaluation of the BH3-only protein Puma as a direct Bak activator.

    PubMed

    Dai, Haiming; Pang, Yuan-Ping; Ramirez-Alvarado, Marina; Kaufmann, Scott H

    2014-01-03

    Interactions among Bcl-2 family proteins play critical roles in cellular life and death decisions. Previous studies have established the BH3-only proteins Bim, tBid, and Noxa as "direct activators" that are able to directly initiate the oligomerization and activation of Bak and/or Bax. Earlier studies of Puma have yielded equivocal results, with some concluding that it also acts as a direct activator and other studies suggesting that it acts solely as a sensitizer BH3-only protein. In the present study we examined the interaction of Puma BH3 domain or full-length protein with Bak by surface plasmon resonance, assessed Bak oligomerization status by cross-linking followed by immunoblotting, evaluated the ability of the Puma BH3 domain to induce Bak-mediated permeabilization of liposomes and mitochondria, and determined the effect of wild type and mutant Puma on cell viability in a variety of cellular contexts. Results of this analysis demonstrate high affinity (KD = 26 ± 5 nM) binding of the Puma BH3 domain to purified Bak ex vivo, leading to Bak homo-oligomerization and membrane permeabilization. Mutations in Puma that inhibit (L141E/M144E/L148E) or enhance (M144I/A145G) Puma BH3 binding to Bak also produce corresponding alterations in Bak oligomerization, Bak-mediated membrane permeabilization and, in a cellular context, Bak-mediated killing. Collectively, these results provide strong evidence that Puma, like Bim, Noxa, and tBid, is able to act as a direct Bak activator.

  6. Direct tests of micro channel plates as the active element of a new shower maximum detector

    DOE PAGES

    Ronzhin, A.; Los, S.; Ramberg, E.; ...

    2015-05-22

    We continue the study of micro channel plates (MCP) as the active element of a shower maximum (SM) detector. We present below test beam results obtained with MCPs detecting directly secondary particles of an electromagnetic shower. The MCP efficiency to shower particles is close to 100%. Furthermore, the time resolution obtained for this new type of the SM detector is at the level of 40 ps.

  7. Increasing activity and thermal resistance of Bacillus gibsonii alkaline protease (BgAP) by directed evolution.

    PubMed

    Martinez, Ronny; Jakob, Felix; Tu, Ran; Siegert, Petra; Maurer, Karl-Heinz; Schwaneberg, Ulrich

    2013-03-01

    Bacillus gibsonii Alkaline Protease (BgAP) is a recently reported subtilisin protease exhibiting activity and stability properties suitable for applications in laundry and dish washing detergents. However, BgAP suffers from a significant decrease of activity at low temperatures. In order to increase BgAP activity at 15°C, a directed evolution campaign based on the SeSaM random mutagenesis method was performed. An optimized microtiter plate expression system in B. subtilis was established and classical proteolytic detection methods were adapted for high throughput screening. In parallel, the libraries were screened for increased residual proteolytic activity after incubation at 58°C. Three iterative rounds of directed BgAP evolution yielded a set of BgAP variants with increased specific activity (K(cat)) at 15°C and increased thermal resistance. Recombination of both sets of amino acid substitutions resulted finally in variant MF1 with a 1.5-fold increased specific activity (15°C) and over 100 times prolonged half-life at 60°C (224 min compared to 2 min of the WT BgAP). None of the introduced amino acid substitutions were close to the active site of BgAP. Activity-altering amino acid substitutions were from non-charged to non-charged or from sterically demanding to less demanding. Thermal stability improvements were achieved by substitutions to negatively charged amino acids in loop areas of the BgAP surface which probably fostered ionic and hydrogen bonds interactions.

  8. Evaluation of Physical Activity Counseling in Primary Care Using Direct Observation of the 5As

    PubMed Central

    Carroll, Jennifer K.; Antognoli, Elizabeth; Flocke, Susan A.

    2011-01-01

    BACKGROUND The 5As (ask, advise, assess, assist, arrange) are recommended as a strategy for brief physical activity counseling in primary care. There is no reference standard for measurement, however, and patient participation is not well understood. This study’s objectives were to (1) develop a coding scheme to measure the 5As using audio-recordings of primary care visits and (2) describe the degree to which patients and physicians accomplish the 5As. METHODS We developed a coding scheme using previously published definitions of the 5As, direct-observation measures, and evaluation of audio-recorded discussions of physical activity. We applied the coding scheme to 361 audio-recorded visits by patients reporting low levels of physical activity and 28 physicians in northeast Ohio. RESULTS The coding scheme achieved good inter-rater agreement for each of the 5As (κ = 0.62–1.0). A total of 135 visits included discussion of physical activity. Although ask tasks occurred in 91% of visits, it infrequently elicited sufficient detail about current activity. Patient readiness to change physical activity (assess) was infrequently directly elicited by the physician (24%), but readiness was commonly expressed by the patient in response to an assessment of current level of physical activity (53%). Ambivalence was infrequently followed by physician assistance (49%). CONCLUSIONS Our newly developed measure showed that (1) physicians infrequently assess patient readiness to change, (2) patient expressions of ambivalence are common, and (3) specific mention of recommended guidelines for exercise is nearly absent. Future work should increase clinician skills in exploring ambivalence and readiness to change, as well as improve explicit mention of recommended guidelines for physical activity. PMID:21911760

  9. Direct Visualization of Catalytically Active Sites at the FeO-Pt(111) Interface

    SciTech Connect

    Kudernatsch, Wilhelmine; Peng, Guowen; Zeuthen, Helene; Bai, Yunhai; Merte, L. R.; Lammich, Lutz; Besenbacher, Fleming; Mavrikakis, Manos; Wendt, Stefen

    2015-08-25

    Within the area of surface science, one of the “holy grails” is to directly visualize a chemical reaction at the atomic scale. Whereas this goal has been reached by high-resolution scanning tunneling microscopy (STM) in a number of cases for reactions occurring at flat surfaces, such a direct view is often inhibited for reaction occurring at steps and interfaces. Here we have studied the CO oxidation reaction at the interface between ultrathin FeO islands and a Pt(111) support by in situ STM and density functional theory (DFT) calculations. Time-lapsed STM imaging on this inverse model catalyst in O2 and CO environments revealed catalytic activity occurring at the FeO-Pt(111) interface and directly showed that the Fe-edges host the catalytically most active sites for the CO oxidation reaction. This is an important result since previous evidence for the catalytic activity of the FeO-Pt(111) interface is essentially based on averaging techniques in conjunction with DFT calculations. The presented STM results are in accord with DFTþU calculations, in which we compare possible CO oxidation pathways on oxidized Fe-edges and O-edges. We found that the CO oxidation reaction is more favorable on the oxidized Fe-edges, both thermodynamically and kinetically.

  10. Ice-sheet response to oceanic forcing.

    PubMed

    Joughin, Ian; Alley, Richard B; Holland, David M

    2012-11-30

    The ice sheets of Greenland and Antarctica are losing ice at accelerating rates, much of which is a response to oceanic forcing, especially of the floating ice shelves. Recent observations establish a clear correspondence between the increased delivery of oceanic heat to the ice-sheet margin and increased ice loss. In Antarctica, most of these processes are reasonably well understood but have not been rigorously quantified. In Greenland, an understanding of the processes by which warmer ocean temperatures drive the observed retreat remains elusive. Experiments designed to identify the relevant processes are confounded by the logistical difficulties of instrumenting ice-choked fjords with actively calving glaciers. For both ice sheets, multiple challenges remain before the fully coupled ice-ocean-atmosphere models needed for rigorous sea-level projection are available.

  11. SHEET PLASMA DEVICE

    DOEpatents

    Henderson, O.A.

    1962-07-17

    An ion-electron plasma heating apparatus of the pinch tube class was developed wherein a plasma is formed by an intense arc discharge through a gas and is radially constricted by the magnetic field of the discharge. To avoid kink and interchange instabilities which can disrupt a conventional arc shortiy after it is formed, the apparatus is a pinch tube with a flat configuration for forming a sheet of plasma between two conductive plates disposed parallel and adjacent to the plasma sheet. Kink instabilities are suppressed by image currents induced in the conductive plates while the interchange instabilities are neutrally stable because of the flat plasma configuration wherein such instabilities may occur but do not dynamically increase in amplitude. (AEC)

  12. Reducing slide sheet injury.

    PubMed

    Varcin-Coad, Lynn

    2008-12-01

    Slide sheets are often stated to be the cause of hand and forearm injuries. While there are many other possible reasons injuries to nursing staff, carer and client occur, the most important linking factors relating to musculoskeletal disorders and manual handling of people is the ongoing inappropriateness or lack of suitably designed and equipped work areas. As physiotherapist Lynn Varcin-Coad writes, staff are bearing the brunt of inefficiencies of design and lack of high order risk control.

  13. Clean Cities Fact Sheet

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    2004-01-01

    This fact sheet explains the Clean Cities Program and provides contact information for all coalitions and regional offices. It answers key questions such as: What is the Clean Cities Program? What are alternative fuels? How does the Clean Cities Program work? What sort of assistance does Clean Cities offer? What has Clean Cities accomplished? What is Clean Cities International? and Where can I find more information?

  14. Cluster multi-point observations of the magnetotail plasma sheet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Henderson, Paul David

    This thesis presents observations of the terrestrial magnetotail plasma sheet made by the European Space Agency Cluster mission. The Cluster mission is composed of four identical spacecraft, the first such multi-spacecraft mission, and enables, for the first time, the disambiguation of time versus space phenomena. Using the data from 2003, when the spacecraft were at their smallest average separation to date, many small-scale processes, both microphysical and macrophysical, are investigated. In the first study presented, two small flux ropes, a possible signature of multiple X-line reconnection, are investigated. By the development and utilisation of various multi-spacecraft methods, the currents and magnetic forces internal and external to the flux ropes, as well as the internal structure of the flux ropes, are investigated. In addition, a theory of their early evolution is suggested. In the second study presented, various terms of the generalised Ohm's law for a plasma are determined, including, for the first time, the divergence of the full electron pressure tensor, during the passage past the spacecraft of an active reconnection X-line. It is found that the electric field contribution from the divergence of the electron pressure tensor is anti-correlated with the contribution from the Hall term in the direction normal to the neutral sheet. In addition, further signatures of reconnection are quantified, such as parallel electric field generation and Hall quadrupolar magnetic field and current systems. In the final study presented, the anti-correlation between the divergence of the electron pressure tensor and Hall terms is investigated further. It is found that the anti-correlation is general, appearing in the direction normal to the neutral sheet because of a cross tail current. In a simple magnetohydrostatic treatment, a force balance argument leads to the conclusion that the gradient of the anti-correlation is a function of the ratio of the electron to ion

  15. Direct molecular interactions between Beclin 1 and the canonical NFκB activation pathway.

    PubMed

    Niso-Santano, Mireia; Criollo, Alfredo; Malik, Shoaib Ahmad; Michaud, Michael; Morselli, Eugenia; Mariño, Guillermo; Lachkar, Sylvie; Galluzzi, Lorenzo; Maiuri, Maria Chaira; Kroemer, Guido

    2012-02-01

    General (macro)autophagy and the activation of NFκB constitute prominent responses to a large array of intracellular and extracellular stress conditions. The depletion of any of the three subunits of the inhibitor of NFκB (IκB) kinase (IKKα, IKKβ, IKKγ/NEMO), each of which is essential for the canonical NFκB activation pathway, limits autophagy induction by physiological or pharmacological triggers, while constitutive active IKK subunits suffice to stimulate autophagy. The activation of IKK usually relies on TGFβ-activated kinase 1 (TAK1), which is also necessary for the optimal induction of autophagy in multiple settings. TAK1 interacts with two structurally similar co-activators, TAK1-binding proteins 2 and 3 (TAB2 and TAB3). Importantly, in resting conditions both TAB2 and TAB3 bind the essential autophagic factor Beclin 1, but not TAK1. In response to pro-autophagic stimuli, TAB2 and TAB3 dissociate from Beclin 1 and engage in stimulatory interactions with TAK1. The inhibitory interaction between TABs and Beclin 1 is mediated by their coiled-coil domains (CCDs). Accordingly, the overexpression of either TAB2 or TAB3 CCD stimulates Beclin 1- and TAK1-dependent autophagy. These results point to the existence of a direct molecular crosstalk between the canonical NFκB activation pathway and the autophagic core machinery that guarantees the coordinated induction of these processes in response to stress.

  16. Effects of aging on value-directed modulation of semantic network activity during verbal learning

    PubMed Central

    Cohen, Michael S.; Rissman, Jesse; Suthana, Nanthia A.; Castel, Alan D.; Knowlton, Barbara J.

    2015-01-01

    While impairments in memory recall are apparent in aging, older adults show a remarkably preserved ability to selectively remember information deemed valuable. Here, we use fMRI to compare brain activation in healthy older and younger adults during encoding of high and low value words to determine whether there are differences in how older adults achieve value-directed memory selectivity. We find that memory selectivity in older adults is associated with value-related changes in activation during word presentation in left hemisphere regions that are involved in semantic processing, similar to young adults. However, highly selective young adults show a relatively greater increase in semantic network activity during encoding of high-value items, whereas highly selective older adults show relatively diminished activity during encoding of low-value items. Additionally, only younger adults showed value-related increases in activity in semantic and reward processing regions during presentation of the value cue preceding each to-be-remembered word. Young adults therefore respond to cue value more proactively than do older adults, yet the magnitude of value-related differences in cue period brain activity did not predict individual differences in memory selectivity. Thus, our data also show that age-related reductions in prestimulus activity do not always lead to inefficient performance. PMID:26244278

  17. Comparison of Plasma Activation of Thin Water Layers by Direct and Remote Plasma Sources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kushner, Mark

    2014-10-01

    Plasma activation of liquids is now being investigated for a variety of biomedical applications. The plasma sources used for this activation can be generally classified as direct (the plasma is in contact with the surface of the liquid) or remote (the plasma does not directly touch the liquid). The direct plasma source may be a dielectric barrier discharge (DBD) where the surface of the liquid is a floating electrode or a plasma jet in which the ionization wave forming the plasma plume reaches the liquid. The remote plasma source may be a DBD with electrodes electrically isolated from the liquid or a plasma jet in which the ionization wave in the plume does not reach the liquid. In this paper, a comparison of activation of thin water layers on top of tissue, as might be encountered in wound healing, will be discussed using results from numerical investigations. We used the modeling platform nonPDPSIM to simulate direct plasma activation of thin water layers using DBDs and remote activation using plasma jets using up to hundreds of pulses. The DBDs are sustained in humid air while the plasma jets consist of He/O2 mixtures flowed into humid air. For similar number of pulses and energy deposition, the direct DBD plasma sources produce more acidification and higher production of nitrates/nitrites in the liquid. This is due to the accumulation of NxOy plasma jets, the convective flow removes many of these species prior to their diffusing into the water or reacting to form higher nitrogen oxides. This latter effect is sensitive to the repetition rate which determines whether reactive species formed during prior pulses overlap with newly produced reactive species. in the gas phase. In the plasma jets, the convective flow removes many of these species prior to their diffusing into the water or reacting to form higher nitrogen oxides. This latter effect is sensitive to the repetition rate which determines whether reactive species formed during prior pulses overlap with

  18. Geologic controls on the West Antarctic Ice Sheet

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Anandakrishnan, Sridhar

    1993-01-01

    The stability of the West Antarctic Ice Sheet is intertwined with its geologic history. The sub-ice geology and the possibility of active rifting and associated elevated heat-flux and volcanism might be determining factors in ice-sheet behavior. Seismic monitoring of natural events at the base of Ice Stream C reveals the presence of a young sedimentary basin beneath the ice stream. The sediments are presumed to be of glacio-marine origin, similar to those beneath Ice Stream B and in the Ross Sea. The young sediments are approximately 1/2 km thick at UpC camp, but thin abruptly southward to 100 m or less. We hypothesize the presence of a fault with a throw of 400 m to account for this (though we have not directly detected the fault), rather than invoking unrealistic basement dips. To extend these studies to critical inland regions, we suggest an expanded explosive-source seismic survey of the Byrd Subglacial Basin to determine the extent and character of the hypothesized rift basin. High-resolution seismic monitoring will detect layering in the sedimentary column, as well as possibly imaging faults directly.

  19. Cluster as current sheet surveyor in the magnetotail

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Narita, Y.; Nakamura, R.; Baumjohann, W.

    2013-09-01

    A novel analysis technique is presented to estimate the current sheet thickness unambiguously and directly, without associating time series data with spatial structure. The technique is a combination of eigenvalue analysis and minimum variance estimator adapted to Harris current sheet geometry, and needs one-time, four-point magnetic field data as provided by the Cluster spacecraft. Two current sheet parameters, thickness and distance to the spacecraft, can be determined at each time step of the magnetic field measurements. An example is shown from a Cluster magnetotail crossing under quiet magnetospheric conditions, yielding the result that the current sheet thickness is on the scale of the proton gyroradius. The analysis technique can also be used to track the dynamical evolution of the current sheet structure in three dimensions.

  20. Nitrooleic acid, an endogenous product of nitrative stress, activates nociceptive sensory nerves via the direct activation of TRPA1.

    PubMed

    Taylor-Clark, Thomas E; Ghatta, Srinivas; Bettner, Weston; Undem, Bradley J

    2009-04-01

    Transient Receptor Potential A1 (TRPA1) is a nonselective cation channel, preferentially expressed on a subset of nociceptive sensory neurons, that is activated by a variety of reactive irritants via the covalent modification of cysteine residues. Excessive nitric oxide during inflammation (nitrative stress), leads to the nitration of phospholipids, resulting in the formation of highly reactive cysteine modifying agents, such as nitrooleic acid (9-OA-NO(2)). Using calcium imaging and electrophysiology, we have shown that 9-OA-NO(2) activates human TRPA1 channels (EC(50), 1 microM), whereas oleic acid had no effect on TRPA1. 9-OA-NO(2) failed to activate TRPA1 in which the cysteines at positions 619, 639, and 663 and the lysine at 708 had been mutated. TRPA1 activation by 9-OA-NO(2) was not inhibited by the NO scavenger carboxy-PTIO. 9-OA-NO(2) had no effect on another nociceptive-specific ion channel, TRPV1. 9-OA-NO(2) activated a subset of mouse vagal and trigeminal sensory neurons, which also responded to the TRPA1 agonist allyl isothiocyanate and the TRPV1 agonist capsaicin. 9-OA-NO(2) failed to activate neurons derived from TRPA1(-/-) mice. The action of 9-OA-NO(2) at nociceptive nerve terminals was investigated using an ex vivo extracellular recording preparation of individual bronchopulmonary C fibers in the mouse. 9-OA-NO(2) evoked robust action potential discharge from capsaicin-sensitive fibers with slow conduction velocities (0.4-0.7 m/s), which was inhibited by the TRPA1 antagonist AP-18. These data demonstrate that nitrooleic acid, a product of nitrative stress, can induce substantial nociceptive nerve activation through the selective and direct activation of TRPA1 channels.

  1. Direct measurement of catalase activity in living cells and tissue biopsies.

    PubMed

    Scaglione, Christine N; Xu, Qijin; Ramanujan, V Krishnan

    2016-01-29

    Spatiotemporal regulation of enzyme-substrate interactions governs the decision-making steps in biological systems. Enzymes, being functional units of every living cell, contribute to the macromolecular stability of cell survival, proliferation and hence are vital windows to unraveling the biological complexity. Experimental measurements capturing this dynamics of enzyme-substrate interactions in real time add value to this understanding. Furthermore these measurements, upon validation in realistic biological specimens such as clinical biopsies - can further improve our capability in disease diagnostics and treatment monitoring. Towards this direction, we describe here a novel, high-sensitive measurement system for measuring diffusion-limited enzyme-substrate kinetics in real time. Using catalase (enzyme) and hydrogen peroxide (substrate) as the example pair, we demonstrate that this system is capable of direct measurement of catalase activity in vitro and the measured kinetics follows the classical Michaelis-Menten reaction kinetics. We further demonstrate the system performance by measuring catalase activity in living cells and in very small amounts of liver biopsies (down to 1 μg total protein). Catalase-specific enzyme activity is demonstrated by genetic and pharmacological tools. Finally we show the clinically-relevant diagnostic capability of our system by comparing the catalase activities in liver biopsies from young and old mouse (liver and serum) samples. We discuss the potential applicability of this system in clinical diagnostics as well as in intraoperative surgical settings.

  2. Direct interactions with the integrin β1 cytoplasmic tail activate the Abl2/Arg kinase.

    PubMed

    Simpson, Mark A; Bradley, William D; Harburger, David; Parsons, Maddy; Calderwood, David A; Koleske, Anthony J

    2015-03-27

    Integrins are heterodimeric α/β extracellular matrix adhesion receptors that couple physically to the actin cytoskeleton and regulate kinase signaling pathways to control cytoskeletal remodeling and adhesion complex formation and disassembly. β1 integrins signal through the Abl2/Arg (Abl-related gene) nonreceptor tyrosine kinase to control fibroblast cell motility, neuronal dendrite morphogenesis and stability, and cancer cell invasiveness, but the molecular mechanisms by which integrin β1 activates Arg are unknown. We report here that the Arg kinase domain interacts directly with a lysine-rich membrane-proximal segment in the integrin β1 cytoplasmic tail, that Arg phosphorylates the membrane-proximal Tyr-783 in the β1 tail, and that the Arg Src homology domain then engages this phosphorylated region in the tail. We show that these interactions mediate direct binding between integrin β1 and Arg in vitro and in cells and activate Arg kinase activity. These findings provide a model for understanding how β1-containing integrins interact with and activate Abl family kinases.

  3. Direct Measurement of Catalase Activity in Living Cells and Tissue Biopsies

    PubMed Central

    Scaglione, Christine N; Xu, Qijin; Ramanujan, V. Krishnan

    2016-01-01

    Spatiotemporal regulation of enzyme-substrate interactions governs the decision-making steps in biological systems. Enzymes, being functional units of every living cell, contribute to the macromolecular stability of cell survival, proliferation and hence are vital windows to unraveling the biological complexity. Experimental measurements capturing this dynamics of enzyme-substrate interactions in real time add value to this understanding. Furthermore these measurements, upon validation in realistic biological specimens such as clinical biopsies – can further improve our capability in disease diagnostics and treatment monitoring. Towards this direction, we describe here a novel, high-sensitive measurement system for measuring diffusion-limited enzyme-substrate kinetics in real time. Using catalase (enzyme) and hydrogen peroxide (substrate) as the example pair, we demonstrate that this system is capable of direct measurement of catalase activity in vitro and the measured kinetics follows the classical Michaelis-Menten reaction kinetics. We further demonstrate the system performance by measuring catalase activity in living cells and in very small amounts of liver biopsies (down to 1μg total protein). Catalase-specific enzyme activity is demonstrated by genetic and pharamacological tools. Finally we show the clinically-relevant diagnostic capability of our system by comparing the catalase activities in liver biopsies from young and old mouse (liver and serum) samples. We discuss the potential applicability of this system in clinical diagnostics as well as in intraoperative surgical settings. PMID:26772884

  4. IL-33 activates eosinophils of visceral adipose tissue both directly and via innate lymphoid cells.

    PubMed

    Hashiguchi, Masaaki; Kashiwakura, Yuji; Kojima, Hidefumi; Kobayashi, Ayano; Kanno, Yumiko; Kobata, Tetsuji

    2015-03-01

    Eosinophils are multifunctional leukocytes involved in allergic reactions as well as adipose tissue regulation. IL-5 is required for eosinophil survival; however, the in vivo mechanisms of eosinophil regulation are not fully understood. A tg mouse model with il5 promoter-driven EGFP expression was established for detecting the IL-5-producing cells in vivo. Il5-egfp tg mice expressed high levels of EGFP in gonadal adipose tissue (GAT) cells. EGFP(+) cells in GAT were mainly group 2 innate lymphoid cells (ILCs). IL-33 preferentially expanded EGFP(+) cells and eosinophils in GAT in vivo. EGFP(+) ILCs were found to upregulate prg2 mRNA expression in GAT eosinophils. These results demonstrate that ILCs activate eosinophils in GAT. The blockage of IL-33Rα, on the other hand, did not impair EGFP(+) ILC numbers but did impair eosinophil numbers in vivo. GAT eosinophils expressed IL-33Rα and IL-33 expanded eosinophil numbers in CD90(+) cell-depleted mice. IL-33 was further observed to induce the expression of retnla and epx mRNA in eosinophils. These findings demonstrate that IL-33 directly activates eosinophils in GAT, and together with our other findings described above, our findings show that IL-33 has dual pathways via which it activates eosinophils in vivo: a direct activation pathway and a group 2 ILC-mediated pathway.

  5. Brain activation related to combinations of gaze position, visual input, and goal-directed hand movements.

    PubMed

    Bédard, Patrick; Wu, Min; Sanes, Jerome N

    2011-06-01

    Humans reach to and acquire objects by transforming visual targets into action commands. How the brain integrates goals specified in a visual framework to signals into a suitable framework for an action plan requires clarification whether visual input, per se, interacts with gaze position to formulate action plans. To further evaluate brain control of visual-motor integration, we assessed brain activation, using functional magnetic resonance imaging. Humans performed goal-directed movements toward visible or remembered targets while fixating gaze left or right from center. We dissociated movement planning from performance using a delayed-response task and manipulated target visibility by its availability throughout the delay or blanking it 500 ms after onset. We found strong effects of gaze orientation on brain activation during planning and interactive effects of target visibility and gaze orientation on movement-related activation during performance in parietal and premotor cortices (PM), cerebellum, and basal ganglia, with more activation for rightward gaze at a visible target and no gaze modulation for movements directed toward remembered targets. These results demonstrate effects of gaze position on PM and movement-related processes and provide new information how visual signals interact with gaze position in transforming visual inputs into motor goals.

  6. Fencing direct memory access data transfers in a parallel active messaging interface of a parallel computer

    DOEpatents

    Blocksome, Michael A.; Mamidala, Amith R.

    2013-09-03

    Fencing direct memory access (`DMA`) data transfers in a parallel active messaging interface (`PAMI`) of a parallel computer, the PAMI including data communications endpoints, each endpoint including specifications of a client, a context, and a task, the endpoints coupled for data communications through the PAMI and through DMA controllers operatively coupled to segments of shared random access memory through which the DMA controllers deliver data communications deterministically, including initiating execution through the PAMI of an ordered sequence of active DMA instructions for DMA data transfers between two endpoints, effecting deterministic DMA data transfers through a DMA controller and a segment of shared memory; and executing through the PAMI, with no FENCE accounting for DMA data transfers, an active FENCE instruction, the FENCE instruction completing execution only after completion of all DMA instructions initiated prior to execution of the FENCE instruction for DMA data transfers between the two endpoints.

  7. Fencing direct memory access data transfers in a parallel active messaging interface of a parallel computer

    DOEpatents

    Blocksome, Michael A; Mamidala, Amith R

    2014-02-11

    Fencing direct memory access (`DMA`) data transfers in a parallel active messaging interface (`PAMI`) of a parallel computer, the PAMI including data communications endpoints, each endpoint including specifications of a client, a context, and a task, the endpoints coupled for data communications through the PAMI and through DMA controllers operatively coupled to segments of shared random access memory through which the DMA controllers deliver data communications deterministically, including initiating execution through the PAMI of an ordered sequence of active DMA instructions for DMA data transfers between two endpoints, effecting deterministic DMA data transfers through a DMA controller and a segment of shared memory; and executing through the PAMI, with no FENCE accounting for DMA data transfers, an active FENCE instruction, the FENCE instruction completing execution only after completion of all DMA instructions initiated prior to execution of the FENCE instruction for DMA data transfers between the two endpoints.

  8. Direct measurement of TRPV4 and PIEZO1 activity reveals multiple mechanotransduction pathways in chondrocytes

    PubMed Central

    Rocio Servin-Vences, M; Moroni, Mirko; Lewin, Gary R; Poole, Kate

    2017-01-01

    The joints of mammals are lined with cartilage, comprised of individual chondrocytes embedded in a specialized extracellular matrix. Chondrocytes experience a complex mechanical environment and respond to changing mechanical loads in order to maintain cartilage homeostasis. It has been proposed that mechanically gated ion channels are of functional importance in chondrocyte mechanotransduction; however, direct evidence of mechanical current activation in these cells has been lacking. We have used high-speed pressure clamp and elastomeric pillar arrays to apply distinct mechanical stimuli to primary murine chondrocytes, stretch of the membrane and deflection of cell-substrate contacts points, respectively. Both TRPV4 and PIEZO1 channels contribute to currents activated by stimuli applied at cell-substrate contacts but only PIEZO1 mediates stretch-activated currents. These data demonstrate that there are separate, but overlapping, mechanoelectrical transduction pathways in chondrocytes. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.21074.001 PMID:28135189

  9. GABA signalling modulates plant growth by directly regulating the activity of plant-specific anion transporters.

    PubMed

    Ramesh, Sunita A; Tyerman, Stephen D; Xu, Bo; Bose, Jayakumar; Kaur, Satwinder; Conn, Vanessa; Domingos, Patricia; Ullah, Sana; Wege, Stefanie; Shabala, Sergey; Feijó, José A; Ryan, Peter R; Gilliham, Matthew; Gillham, Matthew

    2015-07-29

    The non-protein amino acid, gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA) rapidly accumulates in plant tissues in response to biotic and abiotic stress, and regulates plant growth. Until now it was not known whether GABA exerts its effects in plants through the regulation of carbon metabolism or via an unidentified signalling pathway. Here, we demonstrate that anion flux through plant aluminium-activated malate transporter (ALMT) proteins is activated by anions and negatively regulated by GABA. Site-directed mutagenesis of selected amino acids within ALMT proteins abolishes GABA efficacy but does not alter other transport properties. GABA modulation of ALMT activity results in altered root growth and altered root tolerance to alkaline pH, acid pH and aluminium ions. We propose that GABA exerts its multiple physiological effects in plants via ALMT, including the regulation of pollen tube and root growth, and that GABA can finally be considered a legitimate signalling molecule in both the plant and animal kingdoms.

  10. Direct Activation of ENaC by Angiotensin II: Recent Advances and New Insights

    PubMed Central

    Zaika, Oleg; Mamenko, Mykola; Staruschenko, Alexander

    2012-01-01

    Angiotensin II (Ang II) is the principal effector of the renin-angiotensin-aldosterone system (RAAS). It initiates myriad processes in multiple organs integrated to increase circulating volume and elevate systemic blood pressure. In the kidney, Ang II stimulates renal tubular water and salt reabsorption causing antinatriuresis and antidiuresis. Activation of RAAS is known to enhance activity of the epithelial Na+ channel (ENaC) in the aldosterone-sensitive distal nephron. In addition to its well described stimulatory actions on aldosterone secretion, Ang II is also capable to directly increase ENaC activity. In this brief review, we discuss recent findings about non-classical Ang II actions on ENaC and speculate about its relevance for renal sodium handling. PMID:23180052

  11. Simultaneous optimization of enzyme activity and quaternary structure by directed evolution

    PubMed Central

    Vamvaca, Katherina; Butz, Maren; Walter, Kai U.; Taylor, Sean V.; Hilvert, Donald

    2005-01-01

    Natural evolution has produced efficient enzymes of enormous structural diversity. We imitated this natural process in the laboratory to augment the efficiency of an engineered chorismate mutase with low activity and an unusual hexameric topology. By applying two rounds of DNA shuffling and genetic selection, we obtained a 400-fold more efficient enzyme, containing three non-active-site mutations. Detailed biophysical characterization of the evolved variant suggests that it exists predominantly as a trimer in solution, but is otherwise similarly stable as the parent hexamer. The dramatic structural and functional effects achieved by a small number of seemingly innocuous substitutions highlights the utility of directed evolution for modifying protein–protein interactions to produce novel quaternary states with optimized activities. PMID:15987889

  12. BPA Directly Decreases GnRH Neuronal Activity via Noncanonical Pathway.

    PubMed

    Klenke, Ulrike; Constantin, Stephanie; Wray, Susan

    2016-05-01

    Peripheral feedback of gonadal estrogen to the hypothalamus is critical for reproduction. Bisphenol A (BPA), an environmental pollutant with estrogenic actions, can disrupt this feedback and lead to infertility in both humans and animals. GnRH neurons are essential for reproduction, serving as an important link between brain, pituitary, and gonads. Because GnRH neurons express several receptors that bind estrogen, they are potential targets for endocrine disruptors. However, to date, direct effects of BPA on GnRH neurons have not been shown. This study investigated the effects of BPA on GnRH neuronal activity using an explant model in which large numbers of primary GnRH neurons are maintained and express many of the receptors found in vivo. Because oscillations in intracellular calcium have been shown to correlate with electrical activity in GnRH neurons, calcium imaging was used to assay the effects of BPA. Exposure to 50μM BPA significantly decreased GnRH calcium activity. Blockage of γ-aminobutyric acid ergic and glutamatergic input did not abrogate the inhibitory BPA effect, suggesting direct regulation of GnRH neurons by BPA. In addition to estrogen receptor-β, single-cell RT-PCR analysis confirmed that GnRH neurons express G protein-coupled receptor 30 (G protein-coupled estrogen receptor 1) and estrogen-related receptor-γ, all potential targets for BPA. Perturbation studies of the signaling pathway revealed that the BPA-mediated inhibition of GnRH neuronal activity occurred independent of estrogen receptors, GPER, or estrogen-related receptor-γ, via a noncanonical pathway. These results provide the first evidence of a direct effect of BPA on GnRH neurons.

  13. Enhanced activity of Rhizomucor miehei lipase by directed evolution with simultaneous evolution of the propeptide.

    PubMed

    Wang, Jue; Wang, Dan; Wang, Bo; Mei, Zhuo-Hang; Liu, Ji; Yu, Hong-Wei

    2012-10-01

    Propeptides are short sequences that facilitate the folding of their associated proteins. The present study found that the propeptide of Rhizomucor miehei lipase (RML) was not proteolytically removed in Escherichia coli. Moreover, RML was not expressed if the propeptide was removed artificially during the cloning process in E. coli. This behavior in E. coli permitted the application of directed evolution to full-length RML, which included both propeptide and catalytic domain, to explore the role played by the propeptide in governing enzyme activity. The catalytic rate constant, k (cat), of the most active mutant RML protein (Q5) was increased from 10.63 ± 0.80 to 71.44 ± 3.20 min(-1) after four rounds of screening. Sequence analysis of the mutant displayed three mutations in the propeptide (L57V, S65A, and V67A) and two mutations in the functional region (I111T and S168P). This result showed that improved activity was obtained with essential involvement by mutations in the propeptide, meaning that the majority of mutants with enhanced activity had simultaneous mutations in propeptide and catalytic domains. This observation leads to the hypothesis that directed evolution has simultaneous and synergistic effects on both functional and propeptide domains that arise from the role played by the propeptide in the folding and maturation of the enzyme. We suggest that directed evolution of full-length proteins including their propeptides is a strategy with general validity for extending the range of conformations available to proteins, leading to the enhancement of the catalytic rates of the enzymes.

  14. Direct Regulation of Osteocytic Connexin 43 Hemichannels through AKT Kinase Activated by Mechanical Stimulation*

    PubMed Central

    Batra, Nidhi; Riquelme, Manuel A.; Burra, Sirisha; Kar, Rekha; Gu, Sumin; Jiang, Jean X.

    2014-01-01

    Connexin (Cx) 43 hemichannels in osteocytes are thought to play a critical role in releasing bone modulators in response to mechanical loading, a process important for bone formation and remodeling. However, the underlying mechanism that regulates the opening of mechanosensitive hemichannels is largely unknown. We have recently shown that Cx43 and integrin α5 interact directly with each other, and activation of PI3K appears to be required for Cx43 hemichannel opening by mechanical stimulation. Here, we show that mechanical loading through fluid flow shear stress (FFSS) increased the level of active AKT, a downstream effector of PI3K, which is correlated with the opening of hemichannels. Both Cx43 and integrin α5 are directly phosphorylated by AKT. Inhibition of AKT activation significantly reduced FFSS-induced opening of hemichannels and disrupted the interaction between Cx43 and integrin α5. Moreover, AKT phosphorylation on Cx43 and integrin α5 enhanced their interaction. In contrast to the C terminus of wild-type Cx43, overexpression of the C-terminal mutant containing S373A, a consensus site previously shown to be phosphorylated by AKT, failed to bind with α5 and hence could not inhibit hemichannel opening. Together, our results suggest that AKT activated by FFSS directly phosphorylates Cx43 and integrin α5, and Ser-373 of Cx43 plays a predominant role in mediating the interaction between these two proteins and Cx43 hemichannel opening, a crucial step to mediate the anabolic function of mechanical loading in the bone. PMID:24563481

  15. Metabolically inert perfluorinated fatty acids directly activate uncoupling protein 1 in brown-fat mitochondria.

    PubMed

    Shabalina, Irina G; Kalinovich, Anastasia V; Cannon, Barbara; Nedergaard, Jan

    2016-05-01

    The metabolically inert perfluorinated fatty acids perfluorooctane sulfonate (PFOS) and perfluorooctanoate (PFOA) can display fatty acid-like activity in biological systems. The uncoupling protein 1 (UCP1) in brown adipose tissue is physiologically (re)activated by fatty acids, including octanoate. This leads to bioenergetically uncoupled energy dissipation (heat production, thermogenesis). We have examined here the possibility that PFOA/PFOS can directly (re)activate UCP1 in isolated mouse brown-fat mitochondria. In wild-type brown-fat mitochondria, PFOS and PFOA overcame GDP-inhibited thermogenesis, leading to increased oxygen consumption and dissipated membrane potential. The absence of this effect in brown-fat mitochondria from UCP1-ablated mice indicated that it occurred through activation of UCP1. A competitive type of inhibition by increased GDP concentrations indicated interaction with the same mechanistic site as that utilized by fatty acids. No effect was observed in heart mitochondria, i.e., in mitochondria without UCP1. The stimulatory effect of PFOA/PFOS was not secondary to non-specific mitochondrial membrane permeabilization or to ROS production. Thus, metabolic effects of perfluorinated fatty acids could include direct brown adipose tissue (UCP1) activation. The possibility that this may lead to unwarranted extra heat production and thus extra utilization of food resources, leading to decreased fitness in mammalian wildlife, is discussed, as well as possible negative effects in humans. However, a possibility to utilize PFOA-/PFOS-like substances for activating UCP1 therapeutically in obesity-prone humans may also be envisaged.

  16. The activation of directional stem cell motility by green light-emitting diode irradiation.

    PubMed

    Ong, Wei-Kee; Chen, How-Foo; Tsai, Cheng-Ting; Fu, Yun-Ju; Wong, Yi-Shan; Yen, Da-Jen; Chang, Tzu-Hao; Huang, Hsien-Da; Lee, Oscar Kuang-Sheng; Chien, Shu; Ho, Jennifer Hui-Chun

    2013-03-01

    Light-emitting diode (LED) irradiation is potentially a photostimulator to manipulate cell behavior by opsin-triggered phototransduction and thermal energy supply in living cells. Directional stem cell motility is critical for the efficiency and specificity of stem cells in tissue repair. We explored that green LED (530 nm) irradiation directed the human orbital fat stem cells (OFSCs) to migrate away from the LED light source through activation of extracellular signal-regulated kinases (ERK)/MAP kinase/p38 signaling pathway. ERK inhibitor selectively abrogated light-driven OFSC migration. Phosphorylation of these kinases as well as green LED irradiation-induced cell migration was facilitated by increasing adenosine triphosphate (ATP) production in OFSCs after green LED exposure, and which was thermal stress-independent mechanism. OFSCs, which are multi-potent mesenchymal stem cells isolated from human orbital fat tissue, constitutionally express three opsins, i.e. retinal pigment epithelium-derived rhodopsin homolog (RRH), encephalopsin (OPN3) and short-wave-sensitive opsin 1 (OPN1SW). However, only two non-visual opsins, i.e. RRH and OPN3, served as photoreceptors response to green LED irradiation-induced OFSC migration. In conclusion, stem cells are sensitive to green LED irradiation-induced directional cell migration through activation of ERK signaling pathway via a wavelength-dependent phototransduction.

  17. Cells activated for wound repair have the potential to direct collective invasion of an epithelium

    PubMed Central

    Bleaken, Brigid M.; Menko, A. Sue; Walker, Janice L.

    2016-01-01

    Mechanisms regulating how groups of cells are signaled to move collectively from their original site and invade surrounding matrix are poorly understood. Here we develop a clinically relevant ex vivo injury invasion model to determine whether cells involved in directing wound healing have invasive function and whether they can act as leader cells to direct movement of a wounded epithelium through a three-dimensional (3D) extracellular matrix (ECM) environment. Similar to cancer invasion, we found that the injured cells invade into the ECM as cords, involving heterotypical cell–cell interactions. Mesenchymal cells with properties of activated repair cells that typically locate to a wound edge are present in leader positions at the front of ZO-1–rich invading cords of cells, where they extend vimentin intermediate filament–enriched protrusions into the 3D ECM. Injury-induced invasion depends on both vimentin cytoskeletal function and MMP-2/9 matrix remodeling, because inhibiting either of these suppressed invasion. Potential push and pull forces at the tips of the invading cords were revealed by time-lapse imaging, which showed cells actively extending and retracting protrusions into the ECM. This 3D injury invasion model can be used to investigate mechanisms of leader cell–directed invasion and understand how mechanisms of wound healing are hijacked to cause disease. PMID:26658613

  18. Antibacterial efficacy and cytotoxicity of low intensity direct current activated silver-titanium implant system prototype.

    PubMed

    Tan, Zhuo; Havell, Edward A; Orndorff, Paul E; Shirwaiker, Rohan A

    2017-02-01

    Silver-based devices activated by electric current are of interest in biomedicine because of their broad-spectrum antimicrobial activity. This study investigates the in vitro antibacterial efficacy and cytotoxicity of a low intensity direct current (LIDC)-activated silver-titanium implant system prototype designed for localized generation and delivery of silver ions at the implantation site. First, the antibacterial efficacy of the system was assessed against methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) over 48 h at current levels of 3 and 6 µA in Mueller-Hinton broth. The cytotoxicity of the system was then evaluated over 48 h in two phases using an in vitro model with in which the activated electrodes were suspended in growth medium in a cell-seeded tissue culture plate. In phase-1, the system was tested on human osteosarcoma (MG-63) cell line and compared to titanium controls. In phase-2, the cytotoxicity characteristics were validated with normal human diploid osteoblast cells. The LIDC-activated system demonstrated high antimicrobial efficacy against MRSA, but was also toxic to human cells immediately surrounding the electrodes. The statistical analysis showed that the cytotoxicity was a result of the presence of silver, and the electric activation did not make it worse.

  19. Improving the neutral phytase activity from Bacillus amyloliquefaciens DSM 1061 by site-directed mutagenesis.

    PubMed

    Xu, Wei; Shao, Rong; Wang, Zupeng; Yan, Xiuhua

    2015-03-01

    Neutral phytase is used as a feed additive for degradation of anti-nutritional phytate in aquatic feed industry. Site-directed mutagenesis of Bacillus amyloliquefaciens DSM 1061 phytase was performed with an aim to increase its activity. Mutation residues were chosen based on multiple sequence alignments and structure analysis of neutral phytsaes from different microorganisms. The mutation sites on surface (D148E, S197E and N156E) and around the active site (D52E) of phytase were selected. Analysis of the phytase variants showed that the specific activities of mutants D148E and S197E remarkably increased by about 35 and 13% over a temperature range of 40-75 °C at pH 7.0, respectively. The k cat of mutants D148E and S197E were 1.50 and 1.25 times than that of the wild-type phytase, respectively. Both D148E and S197E showed much higher thermostability than that of the wild-type phytase. However, mutants N156E and D52E led to significant loss of specific activity of the enzyme. Structural analysis revealed that these mutations may affect conformation of the active site of phytase. The present mutant phytases D148E and S197E with increased activities and thermostabilities have application potential as additives in aquaculture feed.

  20. Exchange factors directly activated by cAMP mediate melanocortin 4 receptor-induced gene expression

    PubMed Central

    Glas, Evi; Mückter, Harald; Gudermann, Thomas; Breit, Andreas

    2016-01-01

    Gs protein-coupled receptors regulate many vital body functions by activation of cAMP response elements (CRE) via cAMP-dependent kinase A (PKA)-mediated phosphorylation of the CRE binding protein (CREB). Melanocortin 4 receptors (MC4R) are prototypical Gs-coupled receptors that orchestrate the hypothalamic control of food-intake and metabolism. Remarkably, the significance of PKA for MC4R-induced CRE-dependent transcription in hypothalamic cells has not been rigorously interrogated yet. In two hypothalamic cell lines, we observed that blocking PKA activity had only weak or no effects on reporter gene expression. In contrast, inhibitors of exchange factors directly activated by cAMP-1/2 (EPAC-1/2) mitigated MC4R-induced CRE reporter activation and mRNA induction of the CREB-dependent genes c-fos and thyrotropin-releasing hormone. Furthermore, we provide first evidence that extracellular-regulated kinases-1/2 (ERK-1/2) activated by EPACs and not PKA are the elusive CREB kinases responsible for MC4R-induced CREB/CRE activation in hypothalamic cells. Overall, these data emphasize the pivotal role of EPACs rather than PKA in hypothalamic gene expression elicited by a prototypical Gs-coupled receptor. PMID:27612207

  1. Novel APC-like properties of human NK cells directly regulate T cell activation

    PubMed Central

    Hanna, Jacob; Gonen-Gross, Tsufit; Fitchett, Jonathan; Rowe, Tony; Daniels, Mark; Arnon, Tal I.; Gazit, Roi; Joseph, Aviva; Schjetne, Karoline W.; Steinle, Alexander; Porgador, Angel; Mevorach, Dror; Goldman-Wohl, Debra; Yagel, Simcha; LaBarre, Michael J.; Buckner, Jane H.; Mandelboim, Ofer

    2004-01-01

    Initiation of the adaptive immune response is dependent on the priming of naive T cells by APCs. Proteomic analysis of unactivated and activated human NK cell membrane–enriched fractions demonstrated that activated NK cells can efficiently stimulate T cells, since they upregulate MHC class II molecules and multiple ligands for TCR costimulatory molecules. Furthermore, by manipulating antigen administration, we show that NK cells possess multiple independent unique pathways for antigen uptake. These results highlight NK cell–mediated cytotoxicity and specific ligand recognition by cell surface–activating receptors on NK cells as unique mechanisms for antigen capturing and presentation. In addition, we analyzed the T cell–activating potential of human NK cells derived from different clinical conditions, such as inflamed tonsils and noninfected and CMV-infected uterine decidual samples, and from transporter-associated processing antigen 2–deficient patients. This in vivo analysis revealed that proinflammatory, but not immune-suppressive, microenvironmental requirements can selectively dictate upregulation of T cell–activating molecules on NK cells. Taken together, these observations offer new and unexpected insights into the direct interactions between NK and T cells and suggest novel APC-like activating functions for human NK cells. PMID:15578093

  2. Zinc Metalloproteinase ProA Directly Activates Legionella pneumophila PlaC Glycerophospholipid:cholesterol Acyltransferase*

    PubMed Central

    Lang, Christina; Rastew, Elena; Hermes, Björn; Siegbrecht, Enrico; Ahrends, Robert; Banerji, Sangeeta; Flieger, Antje

    2012-01-01

    Enzymes secreted by Legionella pneumophila, such as phospholipases A (PLAs) and glycerophospholipid:cholesterol acyltransferases (GCATs), may target host cell lipids and therefore contribute to the establishment of Legionnaires disease. L. pneumophila possesses three proteins, PlaA, PlaC, and PlaD, belonging to the GDSL family of lipases/acyltransferases. We have shown previously that PlaC is the major GCAT secreted by L. pneumophila and that the zinc metalloproteinase ProA is essential for GCAT activity. Here we characterized the mode of PlaC GCAT activation and determined that ProA directly processes PlaC. We further found that not only cholesterol but also ergosterol present in protozoa was palmitoylated by PlaC. Such ester formations were not induced by either PlaA or PlaD. PlaD was shown here to possess lysophospholipase A activity, and interestingly, all three GDSL enzymes transferred short chain fatty acids to sterols. The three single putative catalytic amino acids (Ser-37, Asp-398, and His-401) proved essential for all PlaC-associated PLA, lysophospholipase A, and GCAT activities. A further four cysteine residues are important for the PLA/GCAT activities as well as their oxidized state, and we therefore conclude that PlaC likely forms at least one disulfide loop. Analysis of cleavage site and loop deletion mutants suggested that for GCAT activation deletion of several amino acids within the loop is necessary rather than cleavage at a single site. Our data therefore suggest a novel enzyme inhibition/activation mechanism where a disulfide loop inhibits PlaC GCAT activity until the protein is exported to the external space where it is ProA-activated. PMID:22582391

  3. The State of the Plasma Sheet and Atmosphere at Europa

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shemansky, D. E.; Yung, Y. L.; Liu, X.; Yoshii, J.; Hansen, C. J.; Hendrix, A.; Esposito, L. W.

    2014-12-01

    The Hall et al. (1995) report announcing the discovery of atomic oxygen FUV emission from Europa included a conclusion that the atmosphere was dominated by O2. Over the following 20 years publications referencing the atmosphere accepted this conclusion, and calculations of rates, particularly mass loading of the magnetosphere depended on a composition that was of order 90% O2. Analysis of the Europa emission spectrum in the present work, leads to the conclusion that the O I emission properties were misinterpreted. The interpretation of the source process depends on the ratio of the O I 1356 and 1304 A multiplet emissions (R(4:5) = (I(1356)/I(1304)). The value of R(4:5) never reaches the lower limit for electron impact dissociation of O2 for any of the 7 recorded disk averaged measurements between 1994 and 2013. Analysis of the Cassini UVIS exposures show the 1304 A multiplet to be optically thick, and the emissions are modeled as direct electron and solar photon excitation of O I. The result is a model atmosphere dominated by O I and O II, with neutral density a factor of 100 below the original O2 model. Other considerations show incompatibility with an O2 atmosphere. Deep exposures using the Cassini UVIS EUV spectrograph provide the state of the plasma sheet at Europa. The ion species are identified as mainly outwardly diffused mass from the Io plasma torus with a minor contribution from Europa. Plasma time-constants are of the order of 200 days. Neutral species in the plasma sheet are not measureable. The energy flux in the magnetosphere L-shells are mainly responsible for energy deposition maintaining the plasma sheet. The energy content in the Io and Europa L-shells, as measured, is similar, but the mean radiative cooling rate in the Io plasma torus at the time of the Cassini encounter was 565 femtoergs cm-3 s-1, compared to 7.3 at Europa, reflecting the difference between an active and inactive planetary satellite, particularly considering the fact that most

  4. Direction-Selective Circuitry in Rat Retina Develops Independently of GABAergic, Cholinergic and Action Potential Activity

    PubMed Central

    He, Shigang

    2011-01-01

    The ON-OFF direction selective ganglion cells (DSGCs) in the mammalian retina code image motion by responding much more strongly to movement in one direction. They do so by receiving inhibitory inputs selectively from a particular sector of processes of the overlapping starburst amacrine cells, a type of retinal interneuron. The mechanisms of establishment and regulation of this selective connection are unknown. Here, we report that in the rat retina, the morphology, physiology of the ON-OFF DSGCs and the circuitry for coding motion directions develop normally with pharmacological blockade of GABAergic, cholinergic activity and/or action potentials for over two weeks from birth. With recent results demonstrating light independent formation of the retinal DS circuitry, our results strongly suggest the formation of the circuitry, i.e., the connections between the second and third order neurons in the visual system, can be genetically programmed, although emergence of direction selectivity in the visual cortex appears to require visual experience. PMID:21573161

  5. The ratios of aldosterone / plasma renin activity (ARR) versus aldosterone / direct renin concentration (ADRR).

    PubMed

    Glinicki, Piotr; Jeske, Wojciech; Bednarek-Papierska, Lucyna; Kruszyńska, Aleksandra; Gietka-Czernel, Małgorzata; Rosłonowska, Elżbieta; Słowińska-Srzednicka, Jadwiga; Kasperlik-Załuska, Anna; Zgliczyński, Wojciech

    2015-12-01

    Primary aldosteronism (PA) is estimated to occur in 5-12% of patients with hypertension. Assessment of aldosterone / plasma renin activity (PRA) ratio (ARR) has been used as a screening test in patients suspected of PA. Direct determination of renin (DRC) and calculation of aldosterone / direct renin concentration ratio (ADRR) could be similarly useful for screening patients suspected of PA. The study included 62 patients with indication for evaluation of the renin-angiotensin-aldosterone system and 35 healthy volunteers. In all participants we measured concentrations of serum aldosterone, plasma direct renin, and PRA after a night's rest and again after walking for two hours. The concentrations of aldosterone, direct renin, and PRA were measured by isotopic methods (radioimmunoassay (RIA) / immunoradiometric assay (IRMA)). Correlations of ARR with ADRR in the supine position were r = 0.9162, r(2) = 0.8165 (p < 0.01); and in the up-right position were r = 0.7765, r(2) = 0.9153 (p < 0.01). The cut-off values of ARR and ADRR ≥ 100 presented highest specificity (99%) for the diagnosis of PA; however, quite acceptable specificity and sensitivity (> 80% and 100%, respectively) appeared for the ratios ≥ 30. We suggest that for practical and economic reasons ARR can be replaced by ADRR.

  6. The IL-1 receptor and Rho directly associate to drive cell activation in inflammation

    PubMed Central

    Singh, R.; Wang, B.; Shirvaikar, A.; Khan, S.; Kamat, S.; Schelling, J.R.; Konieczkowski, M.; Sedor, J.R.

    1999-01-01

    IL-1–stimulated mesenchymal cells model molecular mechanisms of inflammation. Binding of IL-1 to the type I IL-1 receptor (IL-1R) clusters a multi-subunit signaling complex at focal adhesion complexes. Since Rho family GTPases coordinately organize actin cytoskeleton and signaling to regulate cell phenotype, we hypothesized that the IL-1R signaling complex contained these G proteins. IL-1 stimulated actin stress fiber formation in serum-starved HeLa cells in a Rho-dependent manner and rapidly activated nucleotide exchange on RhoA. Glutathione S-transferase (GST) fusion proteins, containing either the full-length IL-1R cytosolic domain (GST-IL-1Rcd) or the terminal 68 amino acids of IL-1R required for IL-1–dependent signal transduction, specifically coprecipitated both RhoA and Rac-1, but not p21ras, from Triton-soluble HeLa cell extracts. In whole cells, a small-molecular-weight G protein coimmunoprecipitated by anti–IL-1R antibody was a substrate for C3 transferase, which specifically ADP-ribosylates Rho GTPases. Constitutively activated RhoA, loaded with [γ-32P]GTP, directly interacted with GST-IL-1Rcd in a filter-binding assay. The IL-1Rcd-RhoA interaction was functionally important, since a dominant inhibitory mutant of RhoA prevented IL-1Rcd–directed transcriptional activation of the IL-6 gene. Consistent with our previous data demonstrating that IL-1R–associated myelin basic protein (MBP) kinases are necessary for IL-1–directed gene expression, cellular incorporation of C3 transferase inhibited IL-1R–associated MBP kinase activity both in solution and in gel kinase assays. In summary, IL-1 activated RhoA, which was physically associated with IL-1Rcd and necessary for activation of cytosolic nuclear signaling pathways. These findings suggest that IL-1–stimulated, Rho-dependent cytoskeletal reorganization may cluster signaling molecules in specific architectures that are necessary for persistent cell activation in chronic inflammatory disease

  7. Photophysiology and albedo-changing potential of the ice algal community on the surface of the Greenland ice sheet

    PubMed Central

    Yallop, Marian L; Anesio, Alexandre M; Perkins, Rupert G; Cook, Joseph; Telling, Jon; Fagan, Daniel; MacFarlane, James; Stibal, Marek; Barker, Gary; Bellas, Chris; Hodson, Andy; Tranter, Martyn; Wadham, Jemma; Roberts, Nicholas W

    2012-01-01

    Darkening of parts of the Greenland ice sheet surface during the summer months leads to reduced albedo and increased melting. Here we show that heavily pigmented, actively photosynthesising microalgae and cyanobacteria are present on the bare ice. We demonstrate the widespread abundance of green algae in the Zygnematophyceae on the ice sheet surface in Southwest Greenland. Photophysiological measurements (variable chlorophyll fluorescence) indicate that the ice algae likely use screening mechanisms to downregulate photosynthesis when exposed to high intensities of visible and ultraviolet radiation, rather than non-photochemical quenching or cell movement. Using imaging microspectrophotometry, we demonstrate that intact cells and filaments absorb light with characteristic spectral profiles across ultraviolet and visible wavelengths, whereas inorganic dust particles typical for these areas display little absorption. Our results indicate that the phototrophic community growing directly on the bare ice, through their photophysiology, most likely have an important role in changing albedo, and subsequently may impact melt rates on the ice sheet. PMID:23018772

  8. Photophysiology and albedo-changing potential of the ice algal community on the surface of the Greenland ice sheet.

    PubMed

    Yallop, Marian L; Anesio, Alexandre M; Perkins, Rupert G; Cook, Joseph; Telling, Jon; Fagan, Daniel; MacFarlane, James; Stibal, Marek; Barker, Gary; Bellas, Chris; Hodson, Andy; Tranter, Martyn; Wadham, Jemma; Roberts, Nicholas W

    2012-12-01

    Darkening of parts of the Greenland ice sheet surface during the summer months leads to reduced albedo and increased melting. Here we show that heavily pigmented, actively photosynthesising microalgae and cyanobacteria are present on the bare ice. We demonstrate the widespread abundance of green algae in the Zygnematophyceae on the ice sheet surface in Southwest Greenland. Photophysiological measurements (variable chlorophyll fluorescence) indicate that the ice algae likely use screening mechanisms to downregulate photosynthesis when exposed to high intensities of visible and ultraviolet radiation, rather than non-photochemical quenching or cell movement. Using imaging microspectrophotometry, we demonstrate that intact cells and filaments absorb light with characteristic spectral profiles across ultraviolet and visible wavelengths, whereas inorganic dust particles typical for these areas display little absorption. Our results indicate that the phototrophic community growing directly on the bare ice, through their photophysiology, most likely have an important role in changing albedo, and subsequently may impact melt rates on the ice sheet.

  9. Characteristics of liquid sheets formed by splash plate nozzles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ahmed, M.; Amighi, A.; Ashgriz, N.; Tran, H. N.

    2008-01-01

    An experimental study was conducted to identify the effect of viscosity on the characteristics of liquid sheets formed by a splash plate nozzle. Various mixtures of corn syrup and water are used to obtain viscosities in the range 1-170 mPa.s. Four different splash plates with nozzle diameters of 0.5, 0.75, 1, and 2 mm, with a constant plate angle of 55° were tested. Liquid sheets formed under various operating conditions were directly visualized. The sheet atomization process for the range of parameters studied here is governed by two different mechanisms: Rayleigh-Plateau (R-P) and Rayleigh-Taylor (R-T) instabilities. R-P occurs at the rim and R-T occurs on the thin sheet. The rim instability can be laminar or turbulent, depending on the jet Reynolds number. The R-T instability of the sheet is observed at the outer edges of the radially spreading sheet, where the sheet is the thinnest. It can also occur inside the sheet, due to formation of holes and ruptures.

  10. Kinetic ballooning/interchange instability in a bent plasma sheet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Panov, E. V.; Nakamura, R.; Baumjohann, W.; Kubyshkina, M. G.; Artemyev, A. V.; Sergeev, V. A.; Petrukovich, A. A.; Angelopoulos, V.; Glassmeier, K.-H.; McFadden, J. P.; Larson, D.

    2012-06-01

    We use Time History of Events and Macroscale Interactions during Substorms (THEMIS) and GOES observations to investigate the plasma sheet evolution on 28 February 2008 between 6:50 and 7:50 UT, when there developed strong magnetic field oscillations with periods of 100 s. Using multispacecraft analysis of the plasma sheet observations and an empirical plasma sheet model, we determine both the large-scale evolution of the plasma sheet and the properties of the oscillations. We found that the oscillations exhibited signatures of kinetic ballooning/interchange instability fingers that developed in a bent current sheet. The interchange oscillations had a sausage structure, propagated duskward at a velocity of about 100 km/s, and were associated with fast radial electron flows. We suggest that the observed negative gradient of the ZGSM magnetic field component (∂BZ/∂X) was a free energy source for the kinetic ballooning/interchange instability. Tens of minutes later a fast elongation of ballooning/interchange fingers was detected between 6 and 16 RE downtail with the length-to-width ratio exceeding 20. The finger elongation ended with signatures of reconnection in an embedded current sheet near the bending point. These observations suggest a complex interplay between the midtail and near-Earth plasma sheet dynamics, involving localized fluctuations in both cross-tail and radial directions before current sheet reconnection.

  11. The Optimal Configuration of Gel Sheet Governed by its Concentration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhai, Xiaobo; Zhang, Shengli; Zhang, Lei; Zhao, Shumin

    2012-07-01

    We investigate the configuration of gel sheets with centrosymmetric distribution of monomer concentration in this paper. The configuration energy of these gel sheets consists of the in-plane stretching energy and bending energy. The equilibrium shape equations are derived by variation principle. This provides a way to control the shape of gel sheets by the initial concentration and thickness. From the equilibrium shape equations, we know that the Gaussian curvature on boundary (K|C) of equilibrium shape is determined by the Poisson ratio hat {ν }. K|C is negative when hat {ν }>0 but positive when hat {ν }<0. Specially, we derive two dome-like solutions from the equilibrium shape equations to compare with the experimental data. In these dome-like sheets, on the boundary part the Gaussian curvature is K < 0, which is different from the center part (K > 0). Furthermore, we deduce that the initial gel distribution of cylinder sheets is proportional to 1/r and find that N-isopropylacrylamide cylinder sheets cannot be formed without additional edges. Our theoretical results agree well with the experimental data [Klein et al., Science 315, 1116 (2007)]. On the other hand, we predict a special type of gel sheets as minimal surface. Their residual stresses are constant and same along radial and circumference directions. For axisymmetric sheets, we give a criterion about the sign of Gaussian curvature K when thickness h is infinite small.

  12. On the balance of stresses in the plasma sheet.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rich, F. J.; Wolf, R. A.; Vasyliunas, V. M.

    1972-01-01

    The stress resulting from magnetic tension on the neutral sheet must, in a steady state, be balanced by any one or a combination of (1) a pressure gradient in the direction along the axis of the tail, (2) a similar gradient of plasma flow kinetic energy, and (3) the tension resulting from a pressure anisotropy within the plasma sheet. Stress balance in the first two cases requires that the ratios h/LX and BZ/BX be of the same order of magnitude, where h is the half-thickness of the neutral sheet, LX is the length scale for variations along the axis of the tail, and BZ and BX are the magnetic field components in the plasma sheet just outside the neutral sheet. The second case requires, in addition, that the plasma flow speed within the neutral sheet be of the order of or larger than the Alfven speed outside the neutral sheet. Stress balance in the third case requires that just outside the neutral sheet the plasma pressure obey the marginal firehose stability condition.

  13. Confocal multiview light-sheet microscopy

    PubMed Central

    Medeiros, Gustavo de; Norlin, Nils; Gunther, Stefan; Albert, Marvin; Panavaite, Laura; Fiuza, Ulla-Maj; Peri, Francesca; Hiiragi, Takashi; Krzic, Uros; Hufnagel, Lars

    2015-01-01

    Selective-plane illumination microscopy has proven to be a powerful imaging technique due to its unsurpassed acquisition speed and gentle optical sectioning. However, even in the case of multiview imaging techniques that illuminate and image the sample from multiple directions, light scattering inside tissues often severely impairs image contrast. Here we combine multiview light-sheet imaging with electronic confocal slit detection implemented on modern camera sensors. In addition to improved imaging quality, the electronic confocal slit detection doubles the acquisition speed in multiview setups with two opposing illumination directions allowing simultaneous dual-sided illumination. Confocal multiview light-sheet microscopy eliminates the need for specimen-specific data fusion algorithms, streamlines image post-processing, easing data handling and storage. PMID:26602977

  14. Magma transport in sheet intrusions of the Alnö carbonatite complex, central Sweden

    PubMed Central

    Andersson, Magnus; Almqvist, Bjarne S. G.; Burchardt, Steffi; Troll, Valentin R.; Malehmir, Alireza; Snowball, Ian; Kübler, Lutz

    2016-01-01

    Magma transport through the Earth’s crust occurs dominantly via sheet intrusions, such as dykes and cone-sheets, and is fundamental to crustal evolution, volcanic eruptions and geochemical element cycling. However, reliable methods to reconstruct flow direction in solidified sheet intrusions have proved elusive. Anisotropy of magnetic susceptibility (AMS) in magmatic sheets is often interpreted as primary magma flow, but magnetic fabrics can be modified by post-emplacement processes, making interpretation of AMS data ambiguous. Here we present AMS data from cone-sheets in the Alnö carbonatite complex, central Sweden. We discuss six scenarios of syn- and post-emplacement processes that can modify AMS fabrics and offer a conceptual framework for systematic interpretation of magma movements in sheet intrusions. The AMS fabrics in the Alnö cone-sheets are dominantly oblate with magnetic foliations parallel to sheet orientations. These fabrics may result from primary lateral flow or from sheet closure at the terminal stage of magma transport. As the cone-sheets are discontinuous along their strike direction, sheet closure is the most probable process to explain the observed AMS fabrics. We argue that these fabrics may be common to cone-sheets and an integrated geology, petrology and AMS approach can be used to distinguish them from primary flow fabrics. PMID:27282420

  15. Magma transport in sheet intrusions of the Alnö carbonatite complex, central Sweden.

    PubMed

    Andersson, Magnus; Almqvist, Bjarne S G; Burchardt, Steffi; Troll, Valentin R; Malehmir, Alireza; Snowball, Ian; Kübler, Lutz

    2016-06-10

    Magma transport through the Earth's crust occurs dominantly via sheet intrusions, such as dykes and cone-sheets, and is fundamental to crustal evolution, volcanic eruptions and geochemical element cycling. However, reliable methods to reconstruct flow direction in solidified sheet intrusions have proved elusive. Anisotropy of magnetic susceptibility (AMS) in magmatic sheets is often interpreted as primary magma flow, but magnetic fabrics can be modified by post-emplacement processes, making interpretation of AMS data ambiguous. Here we present AMS data from cone-sheets in the Alnö carbonatite complex, central Sweden. We discuss six scenarios of syn- and post-emplacement processes that can modify AMS fabrics and offer a conceptual framework for systematic interpretation of magma movements in sheet intrusions. The AMS fabrics in the Alnö cone-sheets are dominantly oblate with magnetic foliations parallel to sheet orientations. These fabrics may result from primary lateral flow or from sheet closure at the terminal stage of magma transport. As the cone-sheets are discontinuous along their strike direction, sheet closure is the most probable process to explain the observed AMS fabrics. We argue that these fabrics may be common to cone-sheets and an integrated geology, petrology and AMS approach can be used to distinguish them from primary flow fabrics.

  16. Site-directed mutagenesis of an alkaline phytase: influencing specificity, activity and stability in acidic milieu.

    PubMed

    Tran, Thuy T; Mamo, Gashaw; Búxo, Laura; Le, Nhi N; Gaber, Yasser; Mattiasson, Bo; Hatti-Kaul, Rajni

    2011-07-10

    Site-directed mutagenesis of a thermostable alkaline phytase from Bacillus sp. MD2 was performed with an aim to increase its specific activity and activity and stability in an acidic environment. The mutation sites are distributed on the catalytic surface of the enzyme (P257R, E180N, E229V and S283R) and in the active site (K77R, K179R and E227S). Selection of the residues was based on the idea that acid active phytases are more positively charged around their catalytic surfaces. Thus, a decrease in the content of negatively charged residues or an increase in the positive charges in the catalytic region of an alkaline phytase was assumed to influence the enzyme activity and stability at low pH. Moreover, widening of the substrate-binding pocket is expected to improve the hydrolysis of substrates that are not efficiently hydrolysed by wild type alkaline phytase. Analysis of the phytase variants revealed that E229V and S283R mutants increased the specific activity by about 19% and 13%, respectively. Mutation of the active site residues K77R and K179R led to severe reduction in the specific activity of the enzyme. Analysis of the phytase mutant-phytate complexes revealed increase in hydrogen bonding between the enzyme and the substrate, which might retard the release of the product, resulting in decreased activity. On the other hand, the double mutant (K77R-K179R) phytase showed higher stability at low pH (pH 2.6-3.0). The E227S variant was optimally active at pH 5.5 (in contrast to the wild type enzyme that had an optimum pH of 6) and it exhibited higher stability in acidic condition. This mutant phytase, displayed over 80% of its initial activity after 3h incubation at pH 2.6 while the wild type phytase retained only about 40% of its original activity. Moreover, the relative activity of this mutant phytase on calcium phytate, sodium pyrophosphate and p-nitro phenyl phosphate was higher than that of the wild type phytase.

  17. Direct visualization of free-volume-triggered activation of β relaxation in colloidal glass.

    PubMed

    Lu, Yunzhuo; Lu, Xing; Qin, Zuoxiang; Shen, Jun

    2016-07-01

    β relaxation, which is predicted by mode coupling theory and involves the localized motions of particles, initiates in a supercooled liquid and continues into glassy state. It correlates essentially with many fundamental properties of amorphous materials. Despite its importance, the underlying mechanisms leading to the β relaxation have remained elusive. As natural heterogeneity, the original distributed free volume has been supposed to be associated with the activation of β relaxation in amorphous solids. However, there has been no direct experimental proof for this hypothesis. Here we used a colloidal glass to directly observe the β relaxation and free-volume distribution. We found a spatial correlation between the β relaxation and free volume. The large free volume regions were observed to possess a low-energy cost of relaxation-induced strain, indicating that the large free volume region presenting a low-energy barrier for structural relaxation benefits the β relaxation.

  18. Active vibration control for flexible rotor by optimal direct-output feedback control

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nonami, Kenzou; Dirusso, Eliseo; Fleming, David P.

    1989-01-01

    Experimental research tests were performed to actively control the rotor vibrations of a flexible rotor mounted on flexible bearing supports. The active control method used in the tests is called optimal direct-output feedback control. This method uses four electrodynamic actuators to apply control forces directly to the bearing housings in order to achieve effective vibration control of the rotor. The force actuators are controlled by an analog controller that accepts rotor displacement as input. The controller is programmed with experimentally determined feedback coefficients; the output is a control signal to the force actuators. The tests showed that this active control method reduced the rotor resonance peaks due to unbalance from approximately 250 micrometers down to approximately 25 micrometers (essentially runout level). The tests were conducted over a speed range from 0 to 10,000 rpm; the rotor system had nine critical speeds within this speed range. The method was effective in significantly reducing the rotor vibration for all of the vibration modes and critical speeds.

  19. Arsenic Directly Binds to and Activates the Yeast AP-1-Like Transcription Factor Yap8.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Nallani Vijay; Yang, Jianbo; Pillai, Jitesh K; Rawat, Swati; Solano, Carlos; Kumar, Abhay; Grøtli, Morten; Stemmler, Timothy L; Rosen, Barry P; Tamás, Markus J

    2015-12-28

    The AP-1-like transcription factor Yap8 is critical for arsenic tolerance in the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae. However, the mechanism by which Yap8 senses the presence of arsenic and activates transcription of detoxification genes is unknown. Here we demonstrate that Yap8 directly binds to trivalent arsenite [As(III)] in vitro and in vivo and that approximately one As(III) molecule is bound per molecule of Yap8. As(III) is coordinated by three sulfur atoms in purified Yap8, and our genetic and biochemical data identify the cysteine residues that form the binding site as Cys132, Cys137, and Cys274. As(III) binding by Yap8 does not require an additional yeast protein, and Yap8 is regulated neither at the level of localization nor at the level of DNA binding. Instead, our data are consistent with a model in which a DNA-bound form of Yap8 acts directly as an As(III) sensor. Binding of As(III) to Yap8 triggers a conformational change that in turn brings about a transcriptional response. Thus, As(III) binding to Yap8 acts as a molecular switch that converts inactive Yap8 into an active transcriptional regulator. This is the first report to demonstrate how a eukaryotic protein couples arsenic sensing to transcriptional activation.

  20. Electric-Field-Directed Self-Assembly of Active Enzyme-Nanoparticle Structures

    PubMed Central

    Hsiao, Alexander P.; Heller, Michael J.

    2012-01-01

    A method is presented for the electric-field-directed self-assembly of higher-order structures composed of alternating layers of biotin nanoparticles and streptavidin-/avidin-conjugated enzymes carried out on a microelectrode array device. Enzymes included in the study were glucose oxidase (GOx), horseradish peroxidase (HRP), and alkaline phosphatase (AP); all of which could be used to form a light-emitting microscale glucose sensor. Directed assembly included fabricating multilayer structures with 200 nm or 40 nm GOx-avidin-biotin nanoparticles, with AP-streptavidin-biotin nanoparticles, and with HRP-streptavidin-biotin nanoparticles. Multilayered structures were also fabricated with alternate layering of HRP-streptavidin-biotin nanoparticles and GOx-avidin-biotin nanoparticles. Results showed that enzymatic activity was retained after the assembly process, indicating that substrates could still diffuse into the structures and that the electric-field-based fabrication process itself did not cause any significant loss of enzyme activity. These methods provide a solution to overcome the cumbersome passive layer-by-layer assembly methods to efficiently fabricate higher-order active biological and chemical hybrid structures that can be useful for creating novel biosensors and drug delivery nanostructures, as well as for diagnostic applications. PMID:22500078

  1. High-activity PtRuPd/C catalyst for direct dimethyl ether fuel cells.

    PubMed

    Li, Qing; Wen, Xiaodong; Wu, Gang; Chung, Hoon T; Gao, Rui; Zelenay, Piotr

    2015-06-22

    Dimethyl ether (DME) has been considered as a promising alternative fuel for direct-feed fuel cells but lack of an efficient DME oxidation electrocatalyst has remained the challenge for the commercialization of the direct DME fuel cell. The commonly studied binary PtRu catalyst shows much lower activity in DME than methanol oxidation. In this work, guided by density functional theory (DFT) calculation, a ternary carbon-supported PtRuPd catalyst was designed and synthesized for DME electrooxidation. DFT calculations indicated that Pd in the ternary PtRuPd catalyst is capable of significantly decreasing the activation energy of the CO and CH bond scission during the oxidation process. As evidenced by both electrochemical measurements in an aqueous electrolyte and polymer-electrolyte fuel cell testing, the ternary catalyst shows much higher activity (two-fold enhancement at 0.5 V in fuel cells) than the state-of-the-art binary Pt50 Ru50 /C catalyst (HiSPEC 12100).

  2. Antifungal and antitumor activities of a monoclonal antibody directed against a stress mannoprotein of Candida albicans.

    PubMed

    Omaetxebarría, M J; Moragues, M D; Elguezabal, N; Rodríguez-Alejandre, A; Brena, S; Schneider, J; Polonelli, L; Pontón, J

    2005-06-01

    Immunization of mice with a stress mannoprotein of >200 kDa from the cell wall of Candida albicans led to the production of monoclonal antibody (Mab) C7. The immunogen is a major target of secretory IgA and its expression is regulated by different environmental conditions including temperature, pH, glucose concentration and ammonium sulphate in the culture medium. Mab C7 reacted with a peptide epitope present in the >200 kDa antigen as well as in a number of antigens from the blastoconidium and germ tube cell wall, including enolase. In addition to its reactivity with C. albicans, Mab C7 also reacted with antigens present in C. krusei, C, tropicalis, C. glabrata, C. dubliniensis and C. lusitaniae, as well as in Cryptococcus neoformans, Scedosporium prolificans and Aspergillus fumigatus. Mab C7 exhibited four important biological activities, namely inhibition of adhesion of C. albicans to a variety of surfaces, inhibition of germination of C. albicans, direct candidacidal activity and direct tumoricidal activity. In tumor cells, Mab C7 reacted with nucleoporin Nup88, a reactivity that can be utilized for diagnostic and prognostic purposes.

  3. Highly active oxygen reduction non-platinum group metal electrocatalyst without direct metal-nitrogen coordination.

    PubMed

    Strickland, Kara; Miner, Elise; Jia, Qingying; Tylus, Urszula; Ramaswamy, Nagappan; Liang, Wentao; Sougrati, Moulay-Tahar; Jaouen, Frédéric; Mukerjee, Sanjeev

    2015-06-10

    Replacement of noble metals in catalysts for cathodic oxygen reduction reaction with transition metals mostly create active sites based on a composite of nitrogen-coordinated transition metal in close concert with non-nitrogen-coordinated carbon-embedded metal atom clusters. Here we report a non-platinum group metal electrocatalyst with an active site devoid of any direct nitrogen coordination to iron that outperforms the benchmark platinum-based catalyst in alkaline media and is comparable to its best contemporaries in acidic media. In situ X-ray absorption spectroscopy in conjunction with ex situ microscopy clearly shows nitrided carbon fibres with embedded iron particles that are not directly involved in the oxygen reduction pathway. Instead, the reaction occurs primarily on the carbon-nitrogen structure in the outer skin of the nitrided carbon fibres. Implications include the potential of creating greater active site density and the potential elimination of any Fenton-type process involving exposed iron ions culminating in peroxide initiated free-radical formation.

  4. Direct action of capsaicin in brown adipogenesis and activation of brown adipocytes.

    PubMed

    Kida, Ryosuke; Yoshida, Hirofumi; Murakami, Masaru; Shirai, Mitsuyuki; Hashimoto, Osamu; Kawada, Teruo; Matsui, Tohru; Funaba, Masayuki

    2016-01-01

    The ingestion of capsaicin, the principle pungent component of red and chili peppers, induces thermogenesis, in part, through the activation of brown adipocytes expressing genes related to mitochondrial biogenesis and uncoupling such as peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor (Ppar) γ coactivator-1α (Pgc-1α) and uncoupling protein 1 (Ucp1). Capsaicin has been suggested to induce the activation of brown adipocytes, which is mediated by the stimulation of sympathetic nerves. However, capsaicin may directly affect the differentiation of brown preadipocytes, brown adipocyte function, or both, through its significant absorption. We herein demonstrated that Trpv1, a capsaicin receptor, is expressed in brown adipose tissue, and that its expression level is increased during the differentiation of HB2 brown preadipocytes. Furthermore, capsaicin induced calcium influx in brown preadipocytes. A treatment with capsaicin in the early stage of brown adipogenesis did not affect lipid accumulation or the expression levels of Fabp4 (a gene expressed in mature adipocytes), Pparγ2 (a master regulator of adipogenesis) or brown adipocyte-selective genes. In contrast, a treatment with capsaicin in the late stage of brown adipogenesis slightly increased the expression levels of Fabp4, Pparγ2 and Pgc-1α. Although capsaicin did not affect the basal expression level of Ucp1, Ucp1 induction by forskolin was partially inhibited by capsaicin, irrespective of the dose of capsaicin. The results of the present study suggest the direct effects of capsaicin on brown adipocytes or in the late stage of brown adipogenesis.

  5. Highly active oxygen reduction non-platinum group metal electrocatalyst without direct metal–nitrogen coordination

    PubMed Central

    Strickland, Kara; Miner, Elise; Jia, Qingying; Tylus, Urszula; Ramaswamy, Nagappan; Liang, Wentao; Sougrati, Moulay-Tahar; Jaouen, Frédéric; Mukerjee, Sanjeev

    2015-01-01

    Replacement of noble metals in catalysts for cathodic oxygen reduction reaction with transition metals mostly create active sites based on a composite of nitrogen-coordinated transition metal in close concert with non-nitrogen-coordinated carbon-embedded metal atom clusters. Here we report a non-platinum group metal electrocatalyst with an active site devoid of any direct nitrogen coordination to iron that outperforms the benchmark platinum-based catalyst in alkaline media and is comparable to its best contemporaries in acidic media. In situ X-ray absorption spectroscopy in conjunction with ex situ microscopy clearly shows nitrided carbon fibres with embedded iron particles that are not directly involved in the oxygen reduction pathway. Instead, the reaction occurs primarily on the carbon–nitrogen structure in the outer skin of the nitrided carbon fibres. Implications include the potential of creating greater active site density and the potential elimination of any Fenton-type process involving exposed iron ions culminating in peroxide initiated free-radical formation. PMID:26059552

  6. Arsenic Directly Binds to and Activates the Yeast AP-1-Like Transcription Factor Yap8

    PubMed Central

    Kumar, Nallani Vijay; Yang, Jianbo; Pillai, Jitesh K.; Rawat, Swati; Solano, Carlos; Kumar, Abhay; Grøtli, Morten; Stemmler, Timothy L.; Rosen, Barry P.

    2015-01-01

    The AP-1-like transcription factor Yap8 is critical for arsenic tolerance in the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae. However, the mechanism by which Yap8 senses the presence of arsenic and activates transcription of detoxification genes is unknown. Here we demonstrate that Yap8 directly binds to trivalent arsenite [As(III)] in vitro and in vivo and that approximately one As(III) molecule is bound per molecule of Yap8. As(III) is coordinated by three sulfur atoms in purified Yap8, and our genetic and biochemical data identify the cysteine residues that form the binding site as Cys132, Cys137, and Cys274. As(III) binding by Yap8 does not require an additional yeast protein, and Yap8 is regulated neither at the level of localization nor at the level of DNA binding. Instead, our data are consistent with a model in which a DNA-bound form of Yap8 acts directly as an As(III) sensor. Binding of As(III) to Yap8 triggers a conformational change that in turn brings about a transcriptional response. Thus, As(III) binding to Yap8 acts as a molecular switch that converts inactive Yap8 into an active transcriptional regulator. This is the first report to demonstrate how a eukaryotic protein couples arsenic sensing to transcriptional activation. PMID:26711267

  7. Electric-field-directed self-assembly of active enzyme-nanoparticle structures.

    PubMed

    Hsiao, Alexander P; Heller, Michael J

    2012-01-01

    A method is presented for the electric-field-directed self-assembly of higher-order structures composed of alternating layers of biotin nanoparticles and streptavidin-/avidin-conjugated enzymes carried out on a microelectrode array device. Enzymes included in the study were glucose oxidase (GOx), horseradish peroxidase (HRP), and alkaline phosphatase (AP); all of which could be used to form a light-emitting microscale glucose sensor. Directed assembly included fabricating multilayer structures with 200 nm or 40 nm GOx-avidin-biotin nanoparticles, with AP-streptavidin-biotin nanoparticles, and with HRP-streptavidin-biotin nanoparticles. Multilayered structures were also fabricated with alternate layering of HRP-streptavidin-biotin nanoparticles and GOx-avidin-biotin nanoparticles. Results showed that enzymatic activity was retained after the assembly process, indicating that substrates could still diffuse into the structures and that the electric-field-based fabrication process itself did not cause any significant loss of enzyme activity. These methods provide a solution to overcome the cumbersome passive layer-by-layer assembly methods to efficiently fabricate higher-order active biological and chemical hybrid structures that can be useful for creating novel biosensors and drug delivery nanostructures, as well as for diagnostic applications.

  8. Activation of peroxynitrite by inducible nitric-oxide synthase: a direct source of nitrative stress.

    PubMed

    Maréchal, Amandine; Mattioli, Tony A; Stuehr, Dennis J; Santolini, Jérôme

    2007-05-11

    In mammals, nitric oxide (NO) is an essential biological mediator that is exclusively synthesized by nitric-oxide synthases (NOSs). However, NOSs are also directly or indirectly responsible for the production of peroxynitrite, a well known cytotoxic agent involved in numerous pathophysiological processes. Peroxynitrite reactivity is extremely intricate and highly depends on activators such as hemoproteins. NOSs present, therefore, the unique ability to both produce and activate peroxynitrite, which confers upon them a major role in the control of peroxynitrite bioactivity. We report here the first kinetic analysis of the interaction between peroxynitrite and the oxygenase domain of inducible NOS (iNOSoxy). iNOSoxy binds peroxynitrite and accelerates its decomposition with a second order rate constant of 22 x 10(4) m(-1)s(-1) at pH 7.4. This reaction is pH-dependent and is abolished by the binding of substrate or product. Peroxynitrite activation is correlated with the observation of a new iNOS heme intermediate with specific absorption at 445 nm. iNOSoxy modifies peroxynitrite reactivity and directs it toward one-electron processes such as nitration or one-electron oxidation. Taken together our results suggest that, upon binding to iNOSoxy, peroxynitrite undergoes homolytic cleavage with build-up of an oxo-ferryl intermediate and concomitant release of a NO(2)(.) radical. Successive cycles of peroxynitrite activation were shown to lead to iNOSoxy autocatalytic nitration and inhibition. The balance between peroxynitrite activation and self-inhibition of iNOSoxy may determine the contribution of NOSs to cellular oxidative stress.

  9. Remote site-selective C–H activation directed by a catalytic bifunctional template

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Zhipeng; Tanaka, Keita; Yu, Jin-Quan

    2017-03-01

    In chemical syntheses, the activation of carbon–hydrogen (C–H) bonds converts them directly into carbon–carbon or carbon–heteroatom bonds without requiring any prior functionalization. C–H activation can thus substantially reduce the number of steps involved in a synthesis. A single specific C–H bond in a substrate can be activated by using a ‘directing’ (usually a functional) group to obtain the desired product selectively. The applicability of such a C–H activation reaction can be severely curtailed by the distance of the C–H bond in question from the directing group, and by the shape of the substrate, but several approaches have been developed to overcome these limitations. In one such approach, an understanding of the distal and geometric relationships between the functional groups and C–H bonds of a substrate has been exploited to achieve meta-selective C–H activation by using a covalently attached, U-shaped template. However, stoichiometric installation of this template has not been feasible in the absence of an appropriate functional group on which to attach it. Here we report the design of a catalytic, bifunctional nitrile template that binds a heterocyclic substrate via a reversible coordination instead of a covalent linkage. The two metal centres coordinated to this template have different roles: one reversibly anchors substrates near the catalyst, and the other cleaves remote C–H bonds. Using this strategy, we demonstrate remote, site-selective C–H olefination of heterocyclic substrates that do not have the necessary functional groups for covalently attaching templates.

  10. Guided bone regeneration using individualized ceramic sheets.

    PubMed

    Malmström, J; Anderud, J; Abrahamsson, P; Wälivaara, D-Å; Isaksson, S G; Adolfsson, E

    2016-10-01

    Guided bone regeneration (GBR) describes the use of membranes to regenerate bony defects. A membrane for GBR needs to be biocompatible, cell-occlusive, non-toxic, and mouldable, and possess space-maintaining properties including stability. The purpose of this pilot study was to describe a new method of GBR using individualized ceramic sheets to perfect bone regeneration prior to implant placement; bone regeneration was assessed using traditional histology and three-dimensional (3D) volumetric changes in the bone and soft tissue. Three patients were included. After full-thickness flap reflection, the individualized ceramic sheets were fixed. The sites were left to heal for 7 months. All patients were evaluated preoperatively and at 7 months postoperative using cone beam computed tomography and 3D optical equipment. Samples of the regenerated bone and soft tissue were collected and analyzed. The bone regenerated in the entire interior volume of all sheets. Bone biopsies revealed newly formed trabecular bone with a lamellar structure. Soft tissue biopsies showed connective tissue with no signs of an inflammatory response. This was considered to be newly formed periosteum. Thus ceramic individualized sheets can be used to regenerate large volumes of bone in both vertical and horizontal directions independent of the bone defect and with good biological acceptance of the material.

  11. Concentrating Solar Power Fact Sheet

    SciTech Connect

    2015-12-01

    This fact sheet is an overview of the Concentrating Solar Power (CSP) subprogram at the U.S. Department of Energy SunShot Initiative. CSP is a dispatchable, renewable energy option that uses mirrors to focus and concentrate sunlight onto a receiver, from which a heat transfer fluid carries the intense thermal energy to a power block to generate electricity. CSP systems can store solar energy to be used when the sun is not shining. It will help meet the nation’s goal of making solar energy fully cost-competitive with other energy sources by the end of the decade. Worldwide, CSP activity is rapidly scaling, with approximately 10 gigawatts (GW) in various stages of operation or development. In the United States alone, nearly 2 GW of CSP are in operation.

  12. Direct evidence for catalase and peroxidase activities of ferritin-platinum nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Fan, Jia; Yin, Jun-Jie; Ning, Bo; Wu, Xiaochun; Hu, Ye; Ferrari, Mauro; Anderson, Gregory J; Wei, Jingyan; Zhao, Yuliang; Nie, Guangjun

    2011-02-01

    Using apoferritin (apoFt) as a nucleation substrate, we have successfully synthesized 1-2 nm platinum nanoparticles (Pt-Ft) which are highly stable. By directly measuring the products of Pt-Ft-catalyzed reactions, we showed, with no doubt, Pt-Ft possesses both catalase and peroxidase activities. With hydrogen peroxide as substrate, we observed oxygen gas bubbles were generated from hydrogen peroxide decomposed by Pt-Ft; the generation of oxygen gas strongly supports Pt-Ft reacts as catalase, other than peroxidase. While with organic dyes and hydrogen peroxide as substrates, distinctive color products were formed catalyzed by Pt-Ft, which indicates a peroxidase-like activity. Interestingly, these biomimetic properties showed differential response to pH and temperature for different reaction substrates. Pt-Ft showed a significant increase in catalase activity with increasing pH and temperature. The HRP-like activity of Pt-Ft was optimal at physiological temperature and slightly acidic conditions. Our current study demonstrates that Pt-Ft possesses both catalase and peroxidase activities for different substrates under different conditions.

  13. DJ-1 activates SIRT1 through its direct binding to SIRT1.

    PubMed

    Takahashi-Niki, Kazuko; Ganaha, Yoko; Niki, Takeshi; Nakagawa, Shota; Kato-Ose, Izumi; Iguchi-Ariga, Sanae M M; Ariga, Hiroyoshi

    2016-05-20

    The DJ-1 gene is a ras-dependent oncogene and also a causative gene for a familial form of Parkinson's disease park7. DJ-1 is a multi-functional protein and plays roles in regulation of cell growth, cells death, metabolism and mitochondrial homeostasis against oxidative stress. To explore various functions, DJ-1 associates with a number of proteins localized in the nucleus, cytoplasm and mitochondria. The oxidative status of a cysteine residue at an amino acid number 106 (C106) of DJ-1 determines the active level of DJ-1. Precise molecular mechanism of exploration of DJ-1 function is, however, not resolved. In this study, we identified Sirtuin family proteins (SIRT1, 2, and 4-6) as DJ-1-binding proteins, and DJ-1 associated with SIRT1 in cells. Sirtuins like DJ-1 also regulates growth, death and metabolism of cells and mitochondrial homeostasis. We found that DJ-1 stimulated deacetylase activity of SIRT1 and that SIRT1-suppressed transcriptional activity of SIRT1-target p53 was further decreased by DJ-1. Furthermore, SIRT1 activity was reduced in DJ-1-knockout cells, and this reduced activity was restored by re-introduction of wild-type DJ-1 but not of C106-mutant DJ-1 into DJ-1-knockout cells. It is first report showing direct connection of DJ-1 with SIRT1.

  14. Quantification of the activity of biomolecules in microarrays obtained by direct laser transfer.

    PubMed

    Dinca, V; Ranella, A; Farsari, M; Kafetzopoulos, D; Dinescu, M; Popescu, A; Fotakis, C

    2008-10-01

    The direct-writing technique laser-induced forward transfer has been employed for the micro-array printing of liquid solutions of the enzyme horseradish peroxidase and the protein Titin on nitrocellulose solid surfaces. The effect of two UV laser pulse lengths, femtosecond and nanosecond has been studied in relation with maintaining the activity of the transferred biomolecules. The quantification of the active biomolecules after transfer has been carried out using Bradford assay, quantitative colorimetric enzymatic assay and fluorescence techniques. Spectrophotometric measurements of the HRP and the Titin activity as well as chromatogenic and fluorescence assay studies have revealed a connection between the properties of the deposited, biologically active biomolecules, the experimental conditions and the target composition. The bioassays have shown that up to 78% of the biomolecules remained active after femtosecond laser transfer, while this value reduced to 54% after nanosecond laser transfer. The addition of glycerol in a percentage up to 70% in the solution to be transferred has contributed to the stabilization of the micro-array patterns and the increase of their resolution.

  15. Kindlin-2 cooperates with talin to activate integrins and induces cell spreading by directly binding paxillin

    PubMed Central

    Theodosiou, Marina; Widmaier, Moritz; Böttcher, Ralph T; Rognoni, Emanuel; Veelders, Maik; Bharadwaj, Mitasha; Lambacher, Armin; Austen, Katharina; Müller, Daniel J; Zent, Roy; Fässler, Reinhard

    2016-01-01

    Integrins require an activation step prior to ligand binding and signaling. How talin and kindlin contribute to these events in non-hematopoietic cells is poorly understood. Here we report that fibroblasts lacking either talin or kindlin failed to activate β1 integrins, adhere to fibronectin (FN) or maintain their integrins in a high affinity conformation induced by Mn2+. Despite compromised integrin activation and adhesion, Mn2+ enabled talin- but not kindlin-deficient cells to initiate spreading on FN. This isotropic spreading was induced by the ability of kindlin to directly bind paxillin, which in turn bound focal adhesion kinase (FAK) resulting in FAK activation and the formation of lamellipodia. Our findings show that talin and kindlin cooperatively activate integrins leading to FN binding and adhesion, and that kindlin subsequently assembles an essential signaling node at newly formed adhesion sites in a talin-independent manner. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.10130.001 PMID:26821125

  16. A Direct Grain-Boundary-Activity Correlation for CO Electroreduction on Cu Nanoparticles

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Copper catalyzes the electrochemical reduction of CO to valuable C2+ products including ethanol, acetate, propanol, and ethylene. These reactions could be very useful for converting renewable energy into fuels and chemicals, but conventional Cu electrodes are energetically inefficient and have poor selectivity for CO vs H2O reduction. Efforts to design improved catalysts have been impeded by the lack of experimentally validated, quantitative structure–activity relationships. Here we show that CO reduction activity is directly correlated to the density of grain boundaries (GBs) in Cu nanoparticles (NPs). We prepared electrodes of Cu NPs on carbon nanotubes (Cu/CNT) with different average GB densities quantified by transmission electron microscopy. At potentials ranging from −0.3 V to −0.5 V vs the reversible hydrogen electrode, the specific activity for CO reduction to ethanol and acetate was linearly proportional to the fraction of NP surfaces comprised of GB surface terminations. Our results provide a design principle for CO reduction to ethanol and acetate on Cu. GB-rich Cu/CNT electrodes are the first NP catalysts with significant CO reduction activity at moderate overpotential, reaching a mass activity of up to ∼1.5 A per gram of Cu and a Faradaic efficiency >70% at −0.3 V. PMID:27163043

  17. Direct activation of Transient Receptor Potential Vanilloid 1(TRPV1) by Diacylglycerol (DAG)

    PubMed Central

    Woo, Dong Ho; Jung, Sung Jun; Zhu, Mei Hong; Park, Chul-Kyu; Kim, Yong Ho; Oh, Seog Bae; Lee, C Justin

    2008-01-01

    The capsaicin receptor, known as transient receptor potential channel vanilloid subtype 1 (TRPV1), is activated by a wide range of noxious stimulants and putative ligands such as capsaicin, heat, pH, anandamide, and phosphorylation by protein kinase C (PKC). However, the identity of endogenous activators for TRPV1 under physiological condition is still debated. Here, we report that diacylglycerol (DAG) directly activates TRPV1 channel in a membrane-delimited manner in rat dorsal root ganglion (DRG) neurons. 1-oleoyl-2-acetyl-sn-glycerol (OAG), a membrane-permeable DAG analog, elicited intracellular Ca2+ transients, cationic currents and cobalt uptake that were blocked by TRPV1-selective antagonists, but not by inhibitors of PKC and DAG lipase in rat DRG neurons or HEK 293 cells heterologously expressing TRPV1. OAG induced responses were about one fifth of capsaicin induced signals, suggesting that OAG displays partial agonism. We also found that endogenously produced DAG can activate rat TRPV1 channels. Mutagenesis of rat TRPV1 revealed that DAG-binding site is at Y511, the same site for capsaicin binding, and PtdIns(4,5)P2binding site may not be critical for the activation of rat TRPV1 by DAG in heterologous system. We propose that DAG serves as an endogenous ligand for rat TRPV1, acting as an integrator of Gq/11-coupled receptors and receptor tyrosine kinases that are linked to phospholipase C. PMID:18826653

  18. LDRD 2014 Annual Report: Laboratory Directed Research and Development Program Activities

    SciTech Connect

    Hatton, Diane

    2015-03-01

    Each year, Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL) is required to provide a program description and overview of its Laboratory Directed Research and Development Program (LDRD) to the Department of Energy (DOE) in accordance with DOE Order 413.2B dated April 19, 2006. This report provides a detailed look at the scientific and technical activities for each of the LDRD projects funded by BNL in FY 2014, as required. In FY 2014, the BNL LDRD Program funded 40 projects, 8 of which were new starts, at a total cost of $9.6M.

  19. Ice sheets promote speciation in boreal birds.

    PubMed

    Weir, Jason T; Schluter, Dolph

    2004-09-22

    The premise that Pleistocene ice ages played an important role in generating present-day species diversity has been challenged by genetic data indicating that most of the youngest terrestrial species on Earth coalesced long before major glacial advances. However, study has been biased towards faunas distributed at low latitudes that were not directly fragmented by advancing ice sheets. Using mitochondrial sequence divergence and a molecular clock, we compared the coalescence times of pairs of avian species belonging to superspecies complexes from the high-latitude boreal forest with those of sub-boreal and tropical avifaunas of the New World. Remarkably, all coalescence events in boreal superspecies date to the Pleistocene, providing direct evidence that speciation was commonly initiated during recent glacial periods. A pattern of endemism in boreal superspecies plausibly links the timing of divergence to the fragmentation of the boreal forest by ice sheets during the Mid- and Late Pleistocene. In contrast to the boreal superspecies, only 56% of sub-boreal and 46% of tropical superspecies members coalesced during the Pleistocene, suggesting that avifaunas directly fragmented by ice sheets experienced rapid rates of diversification, whereas those distributed farther south were affected to a lesser extent. One explanation for the absence of pre-Pleistocene superspecies in boreal avifaunas is that strong selection pressures operated in boreal refugia, causing superspecies members to achieve ecological differentiation at an accelerated rate.

  20. Ice sheets promote speciation in boreal birds.

    PubMed Central

    Weir, Jason T.; Schluter, Dolph

    2004-01-01

    The premise that Pleistocene ice ages played an important role in generating present-day species diversity has been challenged by genetic data indicating that most of the youngest terrestrial species on Earth coalesced long before major glacial advances. However, study has been biased towards faunas distributed at low latitudes that were not directly fragmented by advancing ice sheets. Using mitochondrial sequence divergence and a molecular clock, we compared the coalescence times of pairs of avian species belonging to superspecies complexes from the high-latitude boreal forest with those of sub-boreal and tropical avifaunas of the New World. Remarkably, all coalescence events in boreal superspecies date to the Pleistocene, providing direct evidence that speciation was commonly initiated during recent glacial periods. A pattern of endemism in boreal superspecies plausibly links the timing of divergence to the fragmentation of the boreal forest by ice sheets during the Mid- and Late Pleistocene. In contrast to the boreal superspecies, only 56% of sub-boreal and 46% of tropical superspecies members coalesced during the Pleistocene, suggesting that avifaunas directly fragmented by ice sheets experienced rapid rates of diversification, whereas those distributed farther south were affected to a lesser extent. One explanation for the absence of pre-Pleistocene superspecies in boreal avifaunas is that strong selection pressures operated in boreal refugia, causing superspecies members to achieve ecological differentiation at an accelerated rate. PMID:15347509

  1. Oscillations of spherical fullerenes interacting with graphene sheet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghavanloo, Esmaeal; Fazelzadeh, S. Ahmad

    2017-01-01

    In the present study, the oscillations of spherical fullerenes in the vicinity of a fully constrained graphene sheet are investigated. Using the continuous approximation and Lennard-Jones potential, the van der Waals (vdW) potential energy and interaction forces are obtained. The equation of motion is derived and directly solved based on the actual force distribution between the fullerene molecules and the graphene sheet. Numerical results are obtained and shown that the oscillation is sensitive to the size of the fullerene as well as the distance between the center of the fullerene and the graphene sheet.

  2. Strengthening America's Energy Security with Offshore Wind (Fact Sheet)

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    2012-02-01

    This fact sheet describes the current state of the offshore wind industry in the United States and the offshore wind research and development activities conducted the U.S. Department of Energy Wind and Water Power Program.

  3. Solar America Cities Awards: Solar America Initiative Fact Sheet

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    2008-03-01

    This fact sheet provides an overview of the Solar America Cities activities within the Solar America Initiative and lists the 25 cities that have received financial awards from the U.S. Department of Energy.

  4. National Greenhouse Gas Inventory Fact Sheet and Brochure

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    View a program fact sheet that highlights EPA's capacity-building activities to help developing countries create a national GHG inventory. Also view a brochure that highlights the benefits of developing GHG inventories.

  5. Solar: A Clean Energy Source for Utilities (Fact Sheet)

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    2010-09-01

    The fact sheet summarizes the goals and activities of the DOE Solar Energy Technologies Program efforts with utilities to remove the technical, regulatory, and market challenges they face in deploying solar technologies.

  6. The plasma sheet boundary layer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Eastman, T. E.; Frank, L. A.; Peterson, W. K.; Lennartsson, W.

    1984-01-01

    A spatially distinct, temporally variable, transition region between the magnetotail lobes and the central plasma sheet designated the plasma sheet boundary layer has been identified from a survey of particle spectra and three-dimensional distributions as sampled by the ISEE 1 LEPEDEA. The instrumentation and data presentation are described, and the signatures of the magnetotail plasma regimes are presented and discussed for the central plasma sheet and lobe and the plasma sheet boundary layer. Comparisons of plasma parameters and distribution fucntions are made and the evolution of ion velocity distributions within the plasma sheet boundary layer is discussed. The spatial distribution of the plasma sheet boundary layer is considered and ion composition measurements are presented.

  7. Increased silver activity for direct propylene epoxidation via subnanometer size effects.

    SciTech Connect

    Lei, Y.; Mehmood, F.; Lee, S.; Greeley, J. P.; Lee, B.; Seifert, S.; Winans, R. E.; Elam, J. E.; Meyer, R. J.; Redfern, P. C.; Teschner, D.; Schlogl, R.; Pellin, M. J.; Curtiss, L. A.; Vajda, S.; Univ. of Illinois at Chicago; Fritz-Haber Inst. der Max-Planck-Gesellschaft; Yale Univ.

    2010-04-09

    Production of the industrial chemical propylene oxide is energy-intensive and environmentally unfriendly. Catalysts based on bulk silver surfaces with direct propylene epoxidation by molecular oxygen have not resolved these problems because of substantial formation of carbon dioxide. We found that unpromoted, size-selected Ag{sub 3} clusters and {approx}3.5-nanometer Ag nanoparticles on alumina supports can catalyze this reaction with only a negligible amount of carbon dioxide formation and with high activity at low temperatures. Density functional calculations show that, relative to extended silver surfaces, oxidized silver trimers are more active and selective for epoxidation because of the open-shell nature of their electronic structure. The results suggest that new architectures based on ultrasmall silver particles may provide highly efficient catalysts for propylene epoxidation.

  8. Increased Silver Activity for Direct Propylene Epoxidation via Subnanometer Size Effects

    SciTech Connect

    Lei, Y.; Mehmood, Faisal; Lee, Sang Soo; Greeley, Jeffrey P.; Lee, Byeongdu; Seifert, Soenke; Winans, R. E.; Elam, J. W.; Meyer, R. J.; Redfern, Paul C.; Teschner, D.; Schlogl, Robert; Pellin, M. J.; Curtiss, Larry A.; Vajda, S.

    2010-04-09

    Production of the industrial chemical propylene oxide is energy-intensive and environmentally unfriendly. Catalysts based on bulk silver surfaces with direct propylene epoxidation by molecular oxygen have not resolved these problems because of substantial formation of carbon dioxide. We found that unpromoted, size-selected Ag3 clusters and ~3.5-nanometer Ag nanoparticles on alumina supports can catalyze this reaction with only a negligible amount of carbon dioxide formation and with high activity at low temperatures. Density functional calculations show that, relative to extended silver surfaces, oxidized silver trimers are more active and selective for epoxidation because of the open-shell nature of their electronic structure. The results suggest that new architectures based on ultrasmall silver particles may provide highly efficient catalysts for propylene epoxidation.

  9. Peroxisome Proliferator-Activated Receptors and the Heart: Lessons from the Past and Future Directions

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Wang-Soo; Kim, Jaetaek

    2015-01-01

    Peroxisome proliferator-activated receptors (PPARs) belong to the nuclear family of ligand activated transcriptional factors and comprise three different isoforms, PPAR-α, PPAR-β/δ, and PPAR-γ. The main role of PPARs is to regulate the expression of genes involved in lipid and glucose metabolism. Several studies have demonstrated that PPAR agonists improve dyslipidemia and glucose control in animals, supporting their potential as a promising therapeutic option to treat diabetes and dyslipidemia. However, substantial differences exist in the therapeutic or adverse effects of specific drug candidates, and clinical studies have yielded inconsistent data on their cardioprotective effects. This review summarizes the current knowledge regarding the molecular function of PPARs and the mechanisms of the PPAR regulation by posttranslational modification in the heart. We also describe the results and lessons learned from important clinical trials on PPAR agonists and discuss the potential future directions for this class of drugs. PMID:26587015

  10. Developing technology-enhanced active learning for medical education: challenges, solutions, and future directions.

    PubMed

    McCoy, Lise; Pettit, Robin K; Lewis, Joy H; Bennett, Thomas; Carrasco, Noel; Brysacz, Stanley; Makin, Inder Raj S; Hutman, Ryan; Schwartz, Frederic N

    2015-04-01

    Growing up in an era of video games and Web-based applications has primed current medical students to expect rapid, interactive feedback. To address this need, the A.T. Still University-School of Osteopathic Medicine in Arizona (Mesa) has developed and integrated a variety of approaches using technology-enhanced active learning for medical education (TEAL-MEd) into its curriculum. Over the course of 3 years (2010-2013), the authors facilitated more than 80 implementations of games and virtual patient simulations into the education of 550 osteopathic medical students. The authors report on 4 key aspects of the TEAL-MEd initiative, including purpose, portfolio of tools, progress to date regarding challenges and solutions, and future directions. Lessons learned may be of benefit to medical educators at academic and clinical training sites who wish to implement TEAL-MEd activities.

  11. Energetic particles in the vicinity of a possible neutral line in the plasma sheet

    SciTech Connect

    Moebius, E.; Scholer, M.; Hovestadt, D.; Paschmann, G.; Gloeckler, G.

    1983-10-01

    We have analyzed energetic protons in the energy range 30 to 500 keV and energetic electrons > or =75 keV obtained with the Max-Planck-Institut/University of Maryland sensor system on ISEE-1 during a plasma sheet crossing on March 26, 1978. The behavior of protons with energies of more than approx.100 keV is very different from that of the approx.30 to approx.100 keV protons which represent the suprathermal tail of the plasma sheet distribution. The more energetic ions appear on a time scale of serveral minutes following a northward turning of the tail magnetic field. At about the same time the plassma measurements show a velocity of approx.200 km/s in the tailward direction. This velocity enhancement is first seen at ISEE-1 and later on at ISEE-2, which is earthward of ISEE-1. The temporal sequence of the energetic particle, magnetic field, and plasma observations and the proton and electron anisotropies are discussed in terms of acceleration near a magnetic neutral line which occurs well within the plasma sheet. In this framework the magnetic neutral line would move earthward, followed by a magnetic island. The extent of the neutral line would be limited to the dusk side of the tail. No disruption of the plasma sheet is observed as compared to large-scale substorm activity.

  12. Modeling Abrupt Change in Global Sea Level Arising from Ocean - Ice-Sheet Interaction

    SciTech Connect

    Holland, David M

    2011-09-24

    It is proposed to develop, validate, and apply a coupled ocean ice-sheet model to simulate possible, abrupt future change in global sea level. This research is to be carried out collaboratively between an academic institute and a Department of Energy Laboratory (DOE), namely, the PI and a graduate student at New York University (NYU) and climate model researchers at the Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL). The NYU contribution is mainly in the area of incorporating new physical processes into the model, while the LANL efforts are focused on improved numerics and overall model development. NYU and LANL will work together on applying the model to a variety of modeling scenarios of recent past and possible near-future abrupt change to the configuration of the periphery of the major ice sheets. The project's ultimate goal is to provide a robust, accurate prediction of future global sea level change, a feat that no fully-coupled climate model is currently capable of producing. This proposal seeks to advance that ultimate goal by developing, validating, and applying a regional model that can simulate the detailed processes involved in sea-level change due to ocean ice-sheet interaction. Directly modeling ocean ice-sheet processes in a fully-coupled global climate model is not a feasible activity at present given the near-complete absence of development of any such causal mechanism in these models to date.

  13. A continuum mixture model of ice stream thermomechanics in the Laurentide Ice Sheet 1. Theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marshall, Shawn J.; Clarke, Garry K. C.

    1997-01-01

    We employ a continuum mixture framework to incorporate ice streams in a three-dimensional thermomechanical model of the Laurentide Ice Sheet. The ice mass is composed of a binary mixture of sheet ice, which deforms by viscous creep, and stream ice, which flows by sliding and/or sediment deformation at the bed. Dynamic and thermal evolutions are solved for each component in the mixture, with coupling rules to govern transfer between flow regimes. We describe two different transfer mechanisms: (1) creep exchange, the nourishment of ice streams by viscous creep inflow from the surrounding ice sheet, and (2) bed exchange, the activation, growth, and deactivation of ice streams, perpetrated by transfers of bed area between flow constituents. This paper develops the underlying mixture theory. We express the governing equations for mass, momentum, and energy balance in a form suitable for direct incorporation in existing numerical models of ice thermomechanics. A companion paper in this issue explores mixture and ice stream behavior in applications with the Laurentide Ice Sheet.

  14. Ice sheets play important role in climate change

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Clark, Peter U.; MacAyeal, Douglas R.; Andrews, John T.; Bartlein, Patrick J.

    Ice sheets once were viewed as passive elements in the climate system enslaved to orbitally generated variations in solar radiation. Today, modeling results and new geologic records suggest that ice sheets actively participated in late-Pleistocene climate change, amplifying or driving significant variability at millennial as well as orbital timescales. Although large changes in global ice volume were ultimately caused by orbital variations (the Milankovitch hypothesis), once in existence, the former ice sheets behaved dynamically and strongly influenced regional and perhaps even global climate by altering atmospheric and oceanic circulation and temperature.Experiments with General Circulation Models (GCMs) yielded the first inklings of ice sheets' climatic significance. Manabe and Broccoli [1985], for example, found that the topographic and albedo effects of ice sheets alone explain much of the Northern Hemisphere cooling identified in paleoclimatic records of the last glacial maximum (˜21 ka).

  15. Rapid Detection of Thrombin and Other Protease Activity Directly in Whole Blood

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Johnson Chung Sing

    Thrombin is a serine protease that plays a key role in the clotting cascade to promote hemostasis following injury to the endothelium. From a clinical diagnostic perspective, in-vivo thrombin activity is linked to various blood clotting disorders, as well as cardiovascular disease (DVT, arteriosclerosis, etc). Thus, the ability to rapidly measure protease activity directly in whole blood will provide important new diagnostics, and clinical researchers with a powerful tool to further elucidate the relationship between circulating protease levels and disease. The ultimate goal is to design novel point of care (POC) diagnostic devices that are capable of monitoring protease activities directly in whole blood and biological sample. A charge-changing substrate specific to the thrombin enzyme was engineered and its functionality was confirmed by a series of experiments. This led to the preliminary design, construction, and testing of two device platforms deemed fully functional for the electrophoretic separation and focusing of charged peptide fragments. The concept of using the existing charge-changing substrate platform for bacterial protease detection was also investigated. Certain strains of E coli are associated with severe symptoms such as abdominal cramps, bloody diarrhea, and vomiting. The OmpT protease is expressed on the outer membrane of E coli and plays a role in the cleavage of antimicrobial peptides, the degradation of recombinant heterologous proteins, and the activation of plasminogen in the host. Thus, a synthetic peptide substrate specific to the OmpT protease was designed and modeled for the purpose of detecting E coli in biological sample.

  16. Direct Ionic Regulation of the Activity of Myo-Inositol Biosynthesis Enzymes in Mozambique Tilapia.

    PubMed

    Villarreal, Fernando D; Kültz, Dietmar

    2015-01-01

    Myo-inositol (Ins) is a major compatible osmolyte in many cells, including those of Mozambique tilapia (Oreochromis mossambicus). Ins biosynthesis is highly up-regulated in tilapia and other euryhaline fish exposed to hyperosmotic stress. In this study, enzymatic regulation of two enzymes of Ins biosynthesis, Ins phosphate synthase (MIPS) and inositol monophosphatase (IMPase), by direct ionic effects is analyzed. Specific MIPS and IMPase isoforms from Mozambique tilapia (MIPS-160 and IMPase 1) were selected based on experimental, phylogenetic, and structural evidence supporting their role for Ins biosynthesis during hyperosmotic stress. Recombinant tilapia IMPase 1 and MIPS-160 activity was assayed in vitro at ionic conditions that mimic changes in the intracellular milieu during hyperosmotic stress. The in vitro activities of MIPS-160 and IMPase 1 are highest at alkaline pH of 8.8. IMPase 1 catalytic efficiency is strongly increased during hyperosmolality (particularly for the substrate D-Ins-3-phosphate, Ins-3P), mainly as a result of [Na+] elevation. Furthermore, the substrate-specificity of IMPase 1 towards D-Ins-1-phosphate (Ins-1P) is lower than towards Ins-3P. Because MIPS catalysis results in Ins-3P this results represents additional evidence for IMPase 1 being the isoform that mediates Ins biosynthesis in tilapia. Our data collectively demonstrate that the Ins biosynthesis enzymes are activated under ionic conditions that cells are exposed to during hypertonicity, resulting in Ins accumulation, which, in turn, results in restoration of intracellular ion homeostasis. We propose that the unique and direct ionic regulation of the activities of Ins biosynthesis enzymes represents an efficient biochemical feedback loop for regulation of intracellular physiological ion homeostasis during hyperosmotic stress.

  17. Pungency of TRPV1 agonists is directly correlated with kinetics of receptor activation and lipophilicity.

    PubMed

    Ursu, Daniel; Knopp, Kelly; Beattie, Ruth E; Liu, Bin; Sher, Emanuele

    2010-09-01

    TRPV1 (transient receptor potential vanilloid 1) is a ligand-gated ion channel expressed predominantly in nociceptive primary afferents that plays a key role in pain processing. In vivo activation of TRPV1 receptors by natural agonists like capsaicin is associated with a sharp and burning pain, frequently described as pungency. To elucidate the mechanisms underlying pungency we investigated a series of TRPV1 agonists that included both pungent and non-pungent compounds covering a large range of potencies. Pungency of capsaicin, piperine, arvanil, olvanil, RTX (resiniferatoxin) and SDZ-249665 was evaluated in vivo, by determining the increase in the number of eye wipes caused by direct instillation of agonist solutions into the eye. Agonist-induced calcium fluxes were recorded using the FLIPR technique in a recombinant, TRPV1-expressing cell line. Current-clamp recordings were performed in rat DRG (dorsal root ganglia) neurons in order to assess the consequences of TRPV1 activation on neuronal excitability. Using the eye wipe assay the following rank of pungency was obtained: capsaicin>piperine>RTX>arvanil>olvanil>SDZ-249665. We found a strong correlation between kinetics of calcium flux, pungency and lipophilicity of TRPV1 agonists. Current-clamp recordings confirmed that the rate of receptor activation translates in the ability of agonists to generate action potentials in sensory neurons. We have demonstrated that the lipophilicity of the compounds is directly related to the kinetics of TRPV1 activation and that the latter influences their ability to trigger action potentials in sensory neurons and, ultimately, pungency.

  18. Interfacial Assembly of Graphene Oxide Sheets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cote, Laura J.

    Scientific interest in graphene oxide (GO) sheets, the product of chemical oxidation and exfoliation of graphite powder, has resurged in recent years because GO is considered a promising precursor for the bulk production of graphene-based sheets for a variety of applications. In addition, GO can be viewed as an unconventional type of soft material as it is characterized by two abruptly different length scales. Its thickness is of typical molecular dimensions, measured to be about 1 nm by atomic force microscopy, but its lateral dimensions are that of common colloidal particles, ranging from nanometers to tens of microns. This high anisotropy leads to interesting fundamental colloidal interactions between the soft sheets which have practical implications in the solution processing and assembly of the material. This research therefore aims to use a variety of techniques to control these inter-sheet interactions to gain an understanding of the processing-structure relationships which ultimately determine the overall properties of the bulk GO assembly. GO is identified as a two-dimensional amphiphile with a unique edge-to-center arrangement of hydrophilic and hydrophobic groups, which has led to the demonstration of its pH- and size-dependent surface activity. The water surface is then utilized, as in the Langmuir-Blodgett technique, as an ideal substrate to tile up the GO sheets and study the interactions between them. Sheet-sheet interaction morphologies were successfully altered between wrinkled and overlapped states by pH tuning of sheet charge density, and the resulting structure-property relationships are explored. In addition, a novel flash-reduction and assembly process is described in which a simple photographic camera flash can rapidly and cleanly turn an insulating, well-stacked GO paper to a more open and fluffy conducting film. Lastly, the use of these research results as educational outreach platforms is highlighted. A variety of outlets, such as You

  19. A self-sensing active magnetic bearing based on a direct current measurement approach.

    PubMed

    Niemann, Andries C; van Schoor, George; du Rand, Carel P

    2013-09-11

    Active magnetic bearings (AMBs) have become a key technology in various industrial applications. Self-sensing AMBs provide an integrated sensorless solution for position estimation, consolidating the sensing and actuating functions into a single electromagnetic transducer. The approach aims to reduce possible hardware failure points, production costs, and system complexity. Despite these advantages, self-sensing methods must address various technical challenges to maximize the performance thereof. This paper presents the direct current measurement (DCM) approach for self-sensing AMBs, denoting the direct measurement of the current ripple component. In AMB systems, switching power amplifiers (PAs) modulate the rotor position information onto the current waveform. Demodulation self-sensing techniques then use bandpass and lowpass filters to estimate the rotor position from the voltage and current signals. However, the additional phase-shift introduced by these filters results in lower stability margins. The DCM approach utilizes a novel PA switching method that directly measures the current ripple to obtain duty-cycle invariant position estimates. Demodulation filters are largely excluded to minimize additional phase-shift in the position estimates. Basic functionality and performance of the proposed self-sensing approach are demonstrated via a transient simulation model as well as a high current (10 A) experimental system. A digital implementation of amplitude modulation self-sensing serves as a comparative estimator.

  20. Multiple heliospheric current sheets and coronal streamer belt dynamics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Crooker, N. U.; Siscoe, G. L.; Shodhan, S.; Webb, D. F.; Gosling, J. T.; Smith, E. J.

    1993-01-01

    The occurrence of multiple directional discontinuities in the coronal streamer belt at sector boundary crossings in the heliosphere, often ascribed to waves or kinks in the heliospheric current sheet, may alternatively be attributed to a network of extended current sheets from multiple helmet streamers with a hierarchy of sizes at the base of the corona. Frequent transient outflows from these helmets can account for a variety of signatures observed at sector boundaries, including ordered field rotations, planar magnetic structures and sandwichlike plasma structure.

  1. Atmospheric circulation of brown dwarfs and directly imaged extrasolar giant planets with active clouds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tan, Xianyu; Showman, Adam

    2016-10-01

    Observational evidence have suggested active meteorology in the atmospheres of brown dwarfs (BDs) and directly imaged extrasolar giant planets (EGPs). In particular, a number of surveys for brown dwarfs showed that near-IR brightness variability is common for L and T dwarfs. Directly imaged EGPs share similar observations, and can be viewed as low-gravity versions of BDs. Clouds are believed to play the major role in shaping the thermal structure, dynamics and near-IR flux of these atmospheres. So far, only a few studies have been devoted to atmospheric circulation and the implications for observations of BDs and directly EGPs, and yet no global model includes a self-consistent active cloud formation. Here we present preliminary results from the first global circulation model applied to BDs and directly imaged EGPs that can properly treat absorption and scattering of radiation by cloud particles. Our results suggest that horizontal temperature differences on isobars can reach up to a few hundred Kelvins, with typical horizontal length scale of the temperature and cloud patterns much smaller than the radius of the object. The combination of temperature anomaly and cloud pattern can result in moderate disk-integrated near-IR flux variability. Wind speeds can reach several hundred meters per second in cloud forming layers. Unlike Jupiter and Saturn, we do not observe stable zonal jet/banded patterns in our simulations. Instead, our simulated atmospheres are typically turbulent and dominated by transient vortices. The circulation is sensitive to the parameterized cloud microphysics. Under some parameter combinations, global-scale atmospheric waves can be triggered and maintained. These waves induce global-scale temperature anomalies and cloud patterns, causing large (up to several percent) disk-integrated near-IR flux variability. Our results demonstrate that the commonly observed near-IR brightness variability for BDs and directly imaged EGPs can be explained by the

  2. Perchlorate Regulatory Determination Fact Sheets

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    Fact sheets have been developed for the perchlorate regulatory determination corresponding to the following stages published in the Federal Register: Final, Supplemental request for comments, and Preliminary.

  3. Ice sheets and nitrogen

    PubMed Central

    Wolff, Eric W.

    2013-01-01

    Snow and ice play their most important role in the nitrogen cycle as a barrier to land–atmosphere and ocean–atmosphere exchanges that would otherwise occur. The inventory of nitrogen compounds in the polar ice sheets is approximately 260 Tg N, dominated by nitrate in the much larger Antarctic ice sheet. Ice cores help to inform us about the natural variability of the nitrogen cycle at global and regional scale, and about the extent of disturbance in recent decades. Nitrous oxide concentrations have risen about 20 per cent in the last 200 years and are now almost certainly higher than at any time in the last 800 000 years. Nitrate concentrations recorded in Greenland ice rose by a factor of 2–3, particularly between the 1950s and 1980s, reflecting a major change in NOx emissions reaching the background atmosphere. Increases in ice cores drilled at lower latitudes can be used to validate or constrain regional emission inventories. Background ammonium concentrations in Greenland ice show no significant recent trend, although the record is very noisy, being dominated by spikes of input from biomass burning events. Neither nitrate nor ammonium shows significant recent trends in Antarctica, although their natural variations are of biogeochemical and atmospheric chemical interest. Finally, it has been found that photolysis of nitrate in the snowpack leads to significant re-emissions of NOx that can strongly impact the regional atmosphere in snow-covered areas. PMID:23713125

  4. Ice sheets and nitrogen.

    PubMed

    Wolff, Eric W

    2013-07-05

    Snow and ice play their most important role in the nitrogen cycle as a barrier to land-atmosphere and ocean-atmosphere exchanges that would otherwise occur. The inventory of nitrogen compounds in the polar ice sheets is approximately 260 Tg N, dominated by nitrate in the much larger Antarctic ice sheet. Ice cores help to inform us about the natural variability of the nitrogen cycle at global and regional scale, and about the extent of disturbance in recent decades. Nitrous oxide concentrations have risen about 20 per cent in the last 200 years and are now almost certainly higher than at any time in the last 800 000 years. Nitrate concentrations recorded in Greenland ice rose by a factor of 2-3, particularly between the 1950s and 1980s, reflecting a major change in NOx emissions reaching the background atmosphere. Increases in ice cores drilled at lower latitudes can be used to validate or constrain regional emission inventories. Background ammonium concentrations in Greenland ice show no significant recent trend, although the record is very noisy, being dominated by spikes of input from biomass burning events. Neither nitrate nor ammonium shows significant recent trends in Antarctica, although their natural variations are of biogeochemical and atmospheric chemical interest. Finally, it has been found that photolysis of nitrate in the snowpack leads to significant re-emissions of NOx that can strongly impact the regional atmosphere in snow-covered areas.

  5. Carbamazepine directly inhibits adipocyte differentiation through activation of the ERK 1/2 pathway

    PubMed Central

    Turpin, E; Muscat, A; Vatier, C; Chetrite, G; Corruble, E; Moldes, M; Fève, B

    2013-01-01

    Background and Purpose Carbamazepine (CBZ), known for its anti-epileptic, analgesic and mood-stabilizing properties, is also known to induce weight gain but the pathophysiology of this adverse effect is still largely unknown. We tested the hypothesis that CBZ could have a direct effect on adipocyte development and metabolism. Experimental Research We studied the effects of CBZ on morphological biochemical and molecular markers of adipogenesis, using several pre-adipocyte murine cell lines (3T3-L1, 3T3-F442A and T37i cells) and primary cultures of human pre-adipocytes. To delineate the mechanisms underlying the effect of CBZ, clonal expansion of pre-adipocytes, pro-adipogenic transcription factors, glucose uptake and lipolysis were also examined. Key Results CBZ strongly inhibited pre-adipocyte differentiation and triglyceride accumulation in a time- and dose-dependent manner in all models. Pleiotropic mechanisms were at the basis of the inhibitory effects of CBZ on adipogenesis and cell lipid accumulation. They included suppression of both clonal expansion and major adipogenic transcription factors such as PPAR-γ and CCAAT/enhancer binding protein-α, activation of basal lipolysis and decrease in insulin-stimulated glucose transport. Conclusions and Implications The effect of CBZ on adipogenesis involves activation of the ERK1/2 pathway. Our results show that CBZ acts directly on pre-adipocytes and adipocytes to alter adipose tissue development and metabolism. PMID:22889231

  6. Metabolic activity of bacterial cell enumerated by direct viable count. [Escherichia coli; Salmonella enteritidis

    SciTech Connect

    Roszak, D.B.; Colwell, R.R.

    1987-12-01

    The direct viable count (DVC) method was modified by incorporation radiolabeled substrates in microautoradiographic analyses to assess bacterial survival in controlled laboratory microcosms. The DVC method, which permits enumeration of culturable and nonculturable cells, discriminates those cells that are responsive to added nutrients but in which division is inhibited by the addition of nalidixic acid. The resulting elongated cells represent all viable cells; this includes those that are culturable on routine media and those that are not. Escherichia coli and Salmonella enteritidis were employed in the microcosm studies, and radiolabeled substrates included (methyl-/sup 3/H) thymidine or (U-/sup 14/C) glutamic acid. Samples taken at selected intervals during the survival experiments were examined by epifluorescence microscopy to enumerate cells by the DVC and acridine orange direct count methods, as well as by culture methods. Good correlation was obtained for cell-associated metabolic activity, measured by microautoradiography and substrate responsiveness (by the DVC method) at various stages of survival. Of the cells responsive to nutrients by the DVC method, ca. 90% were metabolically active by the microautoradiographic method. No significant difference was observed between DVC enumerations with or without added radiolabeled substrate.

  7. Direct and indirect antioxidant activity of polyphenol- and isothiocyanate-enriched fractions from Moringa oleifera.

    PubMed

    Tumer, Tugba Boyunegmez; Rojas-Silva, Patricio; Poulev, Alexander; Raskin, Ilya; Waterman, Carrie

    2015-02-11

    Moringa oleifera Lam. is a fast-growing, tropical tree with various edible parts used as nutritious food and traditional medicine. This study describes an efficient preparatory strategy to extract and fractionate moringa leaves by fast centrifugal partition chromatography (FCPC) to produce polyphenol and isothiocyanate (ITC) rich fractions. Characterization and further purification of these fractions showed that moringa polyphenols were potent direct antioxidants assayed by oxygen radical absorbance capacity (ORAC), whereas moringa ITCs were effective indirect antioxidants assayed by induction of NAD(P)H quinone oxidoreductase 1 (NQO1) activity in Hepa1c1c7 cells. In addition, purified 4-[(α-l-rhamnosyloxy)benzyl]isothiocyanate and 4-[(4'-O-acetyl-α-l-rhamnosyloxy)benzyl]isothiocyanate were further evaluated for their ORAC and NQO1 inducer potency in comparison with sulforaphane (SF). Both ITCs were as potent as SF in inducing NQO1 activity. These findings suggest that moringa leaves contain a potent mixture of direct and indirect antioxidants that can explain its various health-promoting effects.

  8. Direct and Indirect Antioxidant Activity of Polyphenol- and Isothiocyanate-Enriched Fractions from Moringa oleifera

    PubMed Central

    Boyunegmez Tumer, Tugba; Rojas-Silva, Patricio; Poulev, Alexander; Raskin, Ilya; Waterman, Carrie

    2016-01-01

    Moringa oleifera Lam. is a fast-growing, tropical tree with various edible parts used as nutritious food and traditional medicine. This study describes an efficient preparatory strategy to extract and fractionate moringa leaves by fast centrifugal partition chromatography (FCPC) to produce polyphenol and isothiocyanate (ITC) rich fractions. Characterization and further purification of these fractions showed that moringa polyphenols were potent direct antioxidants assayed by oxygen radical absorbance capacity (ORAC), whereas moringa ITCs were effective indirect antioxidants assayed by induction of NAD(P)H quinone oxidoreductase 1 (NQO1) activity in Hepa1c1c7 cells. In addition, purified 4-[(α-l-rhamnosyloxy)benzyl]-isothiocyanate and 4-[(4′-O-acetyl-α-l-rhamnosyloxy)benzyl]isothiocyanate were further evaluated for their ORAC and NQO1 inducer potency in comparison with sulforaphane (SF). Both ITCs were as potent as SF in inducing NQO1 activity. These findings suggest that moringa leaves contain a potent mixture of direct and indirect antioxidants that can explain its various health-promoting effects. PMID:25605589

  9. NRC-interacting factor directs neurite outgrowth in an activity-dependent manner.

    PubMed

    Zhao, X-S; Fu, W-Y; Hung, K-W; Chien, W W Y; Li, Z; Fu, A K; Ip, N Y

    2015-03-19

    Nuclear hormone receptor coregulator-interacting factor 1 (NIF-1) is a zinc finger nuclear protein that was initially identified to enhance nuclear hormone receptor transcription via its interaction with nuclear hormone receptor coregulator (NRC). NIF-1 may regulate gene transcription either by modulating general transcriptional machinery or remodeling chromatin structure through interactions with specific protein partners. We previously reported that the cytoplasmic/nuclear localization of NIF-1 is regulated by the neuronal Cdk5 activator p35, suggesting potential neuronal functions for NIF-1. The present study reveals that NIF-1 plays critical roles in regulating neuronal morphogenesis at early stages. NIF-1 was prominently expressed in the nuclei of developing rat cortical neurons. Knockdown of NIF-1 expression attenuated both neurite outgrowth in cultured cortical neurons and retinoic acid (RA)-treated Neuro-2a neuroblastoma cells. Furthermore, activity-induced Ca(2+) influx, which is critical for neuronal morphogenesis, stimulated the nuclear localization of NIF-1 in cortical neurons. Suppression of NIF-1 expression reduced the up-regulation of neuronal activity-dependent gene transcription. These findings collectively suggest that NIF-1 directs neuronal morphogenesis during early developmental stages through modulating activity-dependent gene transcription.

  10. [Enhancing glutamate decarboxylase activity by site-directed mutagenesis: an insight from Ramachandran plot].

    PubMed

    Ke, Piyu; Huang, Jun; Hu, Sheng; Zhao, Weirui; Lü, Changjiang; Yu, Kai; Lei, Yinlin; Wang, Jinbo; Mei, Lehe

    2016-01-01

    Glutamate decarboxylase (GAD) can catalyze the decarboxylation of glutamate into γ-aminobutyrate (GABA) and is the only enzyme of GABA biosynthesis. Improving GAD activity and thermostability will be helpful for the highly efficient biosynthesis of GABA. According to the Ramachandran plot information of GAD 1407 three-dimensional structure from Lactobacillus brevis CGMCC No. 1306, we identified the unstable site K413 as the mutation target, constructed the mutant GAD by site-directed mutagenesis and measured the thermostability and activity of the wide type and mutant GAD. Mutant K413A led to a remarkably slower inactivation rate, and its half-life at 50 °C reached 105 min which was 2.1-fold higher than the wild type GAD1407. Moreover, mutant K413I exhibited 1.6-fold higher activity in comparison with the wide type GAD1407, although it had little improvement in thermostability of GAD. Ramachandran plot can be considered as a potential approach to increase GAD thermostability and activity.

  11. Lasting modulation of in vitro oscillatory activity with weak direct current stimulation

    PubMed Central

    Bikson, Marom; Parra, Lucas C.

    2014-01-01

    Transcranial direct current stimulation (tDCS) is emerging as a versatile tool to affect brain function. While the acute neurophysiological effects of stimulation are well understood, little is know about the long-term effects. One hypothesis is that stimulation modulates ongoing neural activity, which then translates into lasting effects via physiological plasticity. Here we used carbachol-induced gamma oscillations in hippocampal rat slices to establish whether prolonged constant current stimulation has a lasting effect on endogenous neural activity. During 10 min of stimulation, the power and frequency of gamma oscillations, as well as multiunit activity, were modulated in a polarity specific manner. Remarkably, the effects on power and multiunit activity persisted for more than 10 min after stimulation terminated. Using a computational model we propose that altered synaptic efficacy in excitatory and inhibitory pathways could be the source of these lasting effects. Future experimental studies using this novel in vitro preparation may be able to confirm or refute the proposed hypothesis. PMID:25505103

  12. FHL2 mediates p53-induced transcriptional activation through a direct association with HIPK2

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Sang-Wang . E-mail: umsj@sejong.ac.kr

    2006-01-27

    To understand the molecular mechanism underlying HIPK2 regulation of the transcriptional activation by p53, we sought to identify the protein that interacts with HIPK2. From our yeast two-hybrid screen, we found that four and a half LIM domains 2 (FHL2) could bind to the C-terminal half of HIPK2. Further assays in yeast mapped the minimal interaction domain to amino acids 812-907 in HIPK2. The interaction was confirmed using a GST pull-down assay in vitro, and an immunoprecipitation (IP) assay and fluorescence microscopy in vivo. FHL2 alone spread throughout both the cytoplasm and nucleus but was redistributed to dot-like structures in the nucleus when HIPK2 was coexpressed in HEK293 cells. When tethered to the Gal4-responsive promoter through the Gal4 DBD fusion, FHL2 showed autonomous transcriptional activity that was enhanced by wild-type HIPK2, but not by the kinase-defective mutant. In addition, FHL2 increased the p53-dependent transcriptional activation and had an additive effect on the activation when coexpressed with HIPK2, which was again not observed with the kinase-defective mutant of HIPK2. Finally, we found a ternary complex of p53, HIPK2, and FHL2 using IP, and their recruitment to the p53-responsive p21Waf1 promoter in chromatin IP assays. Overall, our findings indicate that FHL2 can also regulate p53 via a direct association with HIPK2.

  13. Rapid direct methods for enumeration of specific, active bacteria in water and biofilms

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    McFeters, G. A.; Pyle, B. H.; Lisle, J. T.; Broadaway, S. C.

    1999-01-01

    Conventional methods for detecting indicator and pathogenic bacteria in water may underestimate the actual population due to sublethal environmental injury, inability of the target bacteria to take up nutrients and other physiological factors which reduce bacterial culturability. Rapid and direct methods are needed to more accurately detect and enumerate active bacteria. Such a methodological advance would provide greater sensitivity in assessing the microbiological safety of water and food. The principle goal of this presentation is to describe novel approaches we have formulated for the rapid and simultaneous detection of bacteria plus the determination of their physiological activity in water and other environmental samples. The present version of our method involves the concentration of organisms by membrane filtration or immunomagnetic separation and combines an intracellular fluorochrome (CTC) for assessment of respiratory activity plus fluorescent-labelled antibody detection of specific bacteria. This approach has also been successfully used to demonstrate spatial and temporal heterogeneities of physiological activities in biofilms when coupled with cryosectioning. Candidate physiological stains include those capable of determining respiratory activity, membrane potential, membrane integrity, growth rate and cellular enzymatic activities. Results obtained thus far indicate that immunomagnetic separation can provide a high degree of sensitivity in the recovery of seeded target bacteria (Escherichia coli O157:H7) in water and hamburger. The captured and stained target bacteria are then enumerated by either conventional fluorescence microscopy or ChemScan(R), a new instrument that is very sensitive and rapid. The ChemScan(R) laser scanning instrument (Chemunex, Paris, France) provides the detection of individual fluorescently labelled bacterial cells using three emission channels in less than 5 min. A high degree of correlation has been demonstrated between

  14. Using a simple apparatus to measure direct and diffuse photosynthetically active radiation at remote locations.

    PubMed

    Cruse, Michael J; Kucharik, Christopher J; Norman, John M

    2015-01-01

    Plant canopy interception of photosynthetically active radiation (PAR) drives carbon dioxide (CO2), water and energy cycling in the soil-plant-atmosphere system. Quantifying intercepted PAR requires accurate measurements of total incident PAR above canopies and direct beam and diffuse PAR components. While some regional data sets include these data, e.g. from Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Program sites, they are not often applicable to local research sites because of the variable nature (spatial and temporal) of environmental variables that influence incoming PAR. Currently available instrumentation that measures diffuse and direct beam radiation separately can be cost prohibitive and require frequent adjustments. Alternatively, generalized empirical relationships that relate atmospheric variables and radiation components can be used but require assumptions that increase the potential for error. Our goal here was to construct and test a cheaper, highly portable instrument alternative that could be used at remote field sites to measure total, diffuse and direct beam PAR for extended time periods without supervision. The apparatus tested here uses a fabricated, solar powered rotating shadowband and other commercially available parts to collect continuous hourly PAR data. Measurements of total incident PAR had nearly a one-to-one relationship with total incident radiation measurements taken at the same research site by an unobstructed point quantum sensor. Additionally, measurements of diffuse PAR compared favorably with modeled estimates from previously published data, but displayed significant differences that were attributed to the important influence of rapidly changing local environmental conditions. The cost of the system is about 50% less than comparable commercially available systems that require periodic, but not continual adjustments. Overall, the data produced using this apparatus indicates that this instrumentation has the potential to support

  15. Rapid fabrication system for three-dimensional tissues using cell sheet engineering and centrifugation.

    PubMed

    Hasegawa, Akiyuki; Haraguchi, Yuji; Shimizu, Tatsuya; Okano, Teruo

    2015-12-01

    Three-dimensional (3D) tissues can be reconstructed by cell sheet technology, and various clinical researches using these constructed tissues have already been initiated to regenerate damaged tissues. While 3D tissues can be easily fabricated by layering cell sheets, the attachment period for cell adhesion between a cell sheet and a culture dish, or double-layered cell sheets normally takes 20-30 min. This study proposed a more rapid fabrication system for bioengineered tissue using cell sheet technology and centrifugation. A C2C12 mouse myoblast sheet harvested from a temperature-responsive culture dish will attach tightly to a culture dish or another cell sheet at 37°C after a 20 min-incubation. However, the same cell sheet centrifuged (12-34 × g) for 3 min also attached tightly to a dish or another cell sheet at 37°C after only a 3 min-incubation. The manipulation time was reduced by approximately two-thirds by centrifugation. The rapid attachments were also cross-sectionally confirmed by optical coherence tomography. These rapidly constructed cell sheet-tissues using centrifugation showed active cell metabolism, cell viability, and very high production of vascular endothelial growth factor, like those prepared by the conventional method; indicating complete cell sheet-attachment without any cell damage. This new system will be a powerful tool in the fields of cell sheet-based tissue engineering and regenerative medicine, and accelerate the use of cell sheets in clinical applications.

  16. DUX4 promotes transcription of FRG2 by directly activating its promoter in facioscapulohumeral muscular dystrophy

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background The most common form of facioscapulohumeral muscular dystrophy (FSHD) is caused by a genetic contraction of the polymorphic D4Z4 macrosatellite repeat array in the subtelomeric region of chromosome 4q. In some studies, genes centromeric to the D4Z4 repeat array have been reported to be over-expressed in FSHD, including FRG1 and FRG2, presumably due to decreased long-distance repression by the shorter array through a mechanism similar to position-effect variegation. Differential regulation of FRG1 in FSHD has never been unequivocally proven, however, FRG2 has been reproducibly shown to be induced in primary FSHD-derived muscle cells when differentiated in vitro. The molecular function of FRG2 and a possible contribution to FSHD pathology remain unclear. Recent evidence has identified the mis-expression of DUX4, located within the D4Z4 repeat unit, in skeletal muscle as the cause of FSHD. DUX4 is a double homeobox transcription factor that has been shown to be toxic when expressed in muscle cells. Methods We used a combination of expression analysis by qRT/PCR and RNA sequencing to determine the transcriptional activation of FRG2 and DUX4. We examined this in both differentiating control and FSHD derived muscle cell cultures or DUX4 transduced control cell lines. Next, we used ChIP-seq analysis and luciferase reporter assays to determine the potential DUX4 transactivation effect on the FRG2 promoter. Results We show that DUX4 directly activates the expression of FRG2. Increased expression of FRG2 was observed following expression of DUX4 in myoblasts and fibroblasts derived from control individuals. Moreover, we identified DUX4 binding sites at the FRG2 promoter by chromatin immunoprecipitation followed by deep sequencing and confirmed the direct regulation of DUX4 on the FRG2 promoter by luciferase reporter assays. Activation of luciferase was dependent on both DUX4 expression and the presence of the DUX4 DNA binding motifs in the FRG2 promoter

  17. Laminated sheet composites reinforced with modular filament sheet

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reece, O. Y.

    1968-01-01

    Aluminum and magnesium composite sheet laminates reinforced with low density, high strength modular filament sheets are produced by diffusion bonding and explosive bonding. Both processes are accomplished in normal atmosphere and require no special tooling or cleaning other than wire brushing the metal surfaces just prior to laminating.

  18. 17. INTAKE PIER, BRIDGE STRESS SHEET, SHEET 8 OF 117, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    17. INTAKE PIER, BRIDGE STRESS SHEET, SHEET 8 OF 117, 1920. - Sacramento River Water Treatment Plant Intake Pier & Access Bridge, Spanning Sacramento River approximately 175 feet west of eastern levee on river; roughly .5 mile downstream from confluence of Sacramento & American Rivers, Sacramento, Sacramento County, CA

  19. Transcranial direct-current stimulation modulates offline visual oscillatory activity: A magnetoencephalography study.

    PubMed

    Heinrichs-Graham, Elizabeth; McDermott, Timothy J; Mills, Mackenzie S; Coolidge, Nathan M; Wilson, Tony W

    2017-03-01

    Transcranial direct-current stimulation (tDCS) is a noninvasive neuromodulatory method that involves delivering low amplitude, direct current to specific regions of the brain. While a wealth of literature shows changes in behavior and cognition following tDCS administration, the underlying neuronal mechanisms remain largely unknown. Neuroimaging studies have generally used fMRI and shown only limited consensus to date, while the few electrophysiological studies have reported mostly null or counterintuitive findings. The goal of the current investigation was to quantify tDCS-induced alterations in the oscillatory dynamics of visual processing. To this end, we performed either active or sham tDCS using an occipital-frontal electrode configuration, and then recorded magnetoencephalography (MEG) offline during a visual entrainment task. Significant oscillatory responses were imaged in the time-frequency domain using beamforming, and the effects of tDCS on absolute and relative power were assessed. The results indicated significantly increased basal alpha levels in the occipital cortex following anodal tDCS, as well as reduced occipital synchronization at the second harmonic of the stimulus-flicker frequency relative to sham stimulation. In addition, we found reduced power in brain regions near the cathode (e.g., right inferior frontal gyrus [IFG]) following active tDCS, which was absent in the sham group. Taken together, these results suggest that anodal tDCS of the occipital cortices differentially modulates spontaneous and induced activity, and may interfere with the entrainment of neuronal populations by a visual-flicker stimulus. These findings also demonstrate the importance of electrode configuration on whole-brain dynamics, and highlight the deceptively complicated nature of tDCS in the context of neurophysiology.

  20. Laterally tapered undercut active waveguide fabricated by simple wet etching method for vertical waveguide directional coupler.

    PubMed

    Lin, Fang-Zheng; Chiu, Yi-Jen; Tsai, Shun-An; Wu, Tsu-Hsiu

    2008-05-26

    A novel structure, namely a laterally tapered undercut active-waveguide (LTUAWG) for an optical spot-size converter (SSC) is proposed and demonstrated in this paper. Using a selectively undercut-etching-active-region (UEAR) on a laterally tapered ridge to define a LTUAWG, a vertical waveguide directional coupler (VWGDC) can be fabricated simply by a wet etching-based technique. The VWGDC comprises a top LTUAWG and a bottom passive waveguide (PWG). An electroabsorption modulator (EAM) is monolithically integrated with a LTUAWG-VWGDC serving as the connecting active waveguide (AWG) and the optical transmission testing device. Through a loss budget analysis on an EAM-integrated VWGDC, an optical mode transfer loss of -1.6 dB is observed between the PWG and the AWG. By comparing the reverse directions of optical excitation, the identical optical transmission relations with bias are observed, further verifying the high efficiency properties in a SSC. Optical misalignment tolerance is employed to test the two transferred optical modes. 1dB misalignment tolerance of +/-2.9 microm (horizontal) and +/-2.2 microm (vertical) is obtained from the PWG, which is better than the value of +/-1.9 microm (horizontal) and +/-1.6 microm (vertical) from the AWG. Far-field angle measurement shows 6.0 degrees (horizontal) 9.3 degrees (vertical) and 11 degrees (horizontal) x 20 degrees (vertical) for the PWG and the AWG, respectively, exhibiting the capability of a mode transformer. All of these measurements are also examined by a 3D beam propagation method (BPM) showing quite consistent results. In this wet etching technique, no regrowth is needed during processing. Furthermore, UEAR processing controlled by in situ monitoring can lead to a simple way for submicron-size processing, showing that a highly reliable processing technique can thus be expected. A low cost of fabrication can also be realized, indicating that this method can be potentially used in optoelectronic integration.

  1. Method and apparatus for determining weldability of thin sheet metal

    DOEpatents

    Goodwin, Gene M.; Hudson, Joseph D.

    1988-01-01

    A fixture is provided for testing thin sheet metal specimens to evaluate hot-cracking sensitivity for determining metal weldability on a heat-to-heat basis or through varying welding parameters. A test specimen is stressed in a first direction with a load selectively adjustable over a wide range and then a weldment is passed along over the specimen in a direction transverse to the direction of strain to evaluate the hot-cracking characteristics of the sheet metal which are indicative of the weldability of the metal. The fixture provides evaluations of hot-cracking sensitivity for determining metal weldability in a highly reproducible manner with minimum human error.

  2. Method for heating a glass sheet

    DOEpatents

    Boaz, P.T.

    1998-07-21

    A method for heating a glass sheet includes the steps of heating a glass sheet to a first predetermined temperature and applying microwave energy to the glass sheet to heat the glass sheet to at least a second predetermined temperature to allow the glass sheet to be formed. 5 figs.

  3. Method for heating a glass sheet

    DOEpatents

    Boaz, Premakaran Tucker

    1998-01-01

    A method for heating a glass sheet includes the steps of heating a glass sheet to a first predetermined temperature and applying microwave energy to the glass sheet to heat the glass sheet to at least a second predetermined temperature to allow the glass sheet to be formed.

  4. How to Target Activated Ras Proteins: Direct Inhibition vs. Induced Mislocalization

    PubMed Central

    Brock, Ethan J.; Ji, Kyungmin; Reiners, John J.; Mattingly, Raymond R.

    2016-01-01

    Oncogenic Ras proteins are a driving force in a significant set of human cancers and wild-type, unmutated Ras proteins likely contribute to the malignant phenotype of many more. The overall challenge of targeting activated Ras proteins has great promise to treat cancer, but this goal has yet to be achieved. Significant efforts and resources have been committed to inhibiting Ras, but these energies have so far made little impact in the clinic. Direct attempts to target activated Ras proteins have faced many obstacles, including the fundamental nature of the gain-of-function oncogenic activity being produced by a loss-of-function at the biochemical level. Nevertheless, there has been very promising recent pre-clinical progress. The major strategy that has so far reached the clinic aimed to inhibit activated Ras indirectly through blocking its post-translational modification and inducing its mislocalization. While these efforts to indirectly target Ras through inhibition of farnesyl transferase (FTase) were rationally designed, this strategy suffered from insufficient attention to the distinctions between the isoforms of Ras. This led to subsequent failures in large-scale clinical trials targeting K-Ras driven lung, colon, and pancreatic cancers. Despite these setbacks, efforts to indirectly target activated Ras through inducing its mislocalization have persisted. It is plausible that FTase inhibitors may still have some utility in the clinic, perhaps in combination with statins or other agents. Alternative approaches for inducing mislocalization of Ras through disruption of its palmitoylation cycle or interaction with chaperone proteins are in early stages of development. PMID:26423696

  5. Direct Activation of β-Cell KATP Channels with a Novel Xanthine Derivative

    PubMed Central

    Raphemot, Rene; Swale, Daniel R.; Dadi, Prasanna K.; Jacobson, David A.; Cooper, Paige; Wojtovich, Andrew P.; Banerjee, Sreedatta; Nichols, Colin G.

    2014-01-01

    ATP-regulated potassium (KATP) channel complexes of inward rectifier potassium channel (Kir) 6.2 and sulfonylurea receptor (SUR) 1 critically regulate pancreatic islet β-cell membrane potential, calcium influx, and insulin secretion, and consequently, represent important drug targets for metabolic disorders of glucose homeostasis. The KATP channel opener diazoxide is used clinically to treat intractable hypoglycemia caused by excessive insulin secretion, but its use is limited by off-target effects due to lack of potency and selectivity. Some progress has been made in developing improved Kir6.2/SUR1 agonists from existing chemical scaffolds and compound screening, but there are surprisingly few distinct chemotypes that are specific for SUR1-containing KATP channels. Here we report the serendipitous discovery in a high-throughput screen of a novel activator of Kir6.2/SUR1: VU0071063 [7-(4-(tert-butyl)benzyl)-1,3-dimethyl-1H-purine-2,6(3H,7H)-dione]. The xanthine derivative rapidly and dose-dependently activates Kir6.2/SUR1 with a half-effective concentration (EC50) of approximately 7 μM, is more efficacious than diazoxide at low micromolar concentrations, directly activates the channel in excised membrane patches, and is selective for SUR1- over SUR2A-containing Kir6.1 or Kir6.2 channels, as well as Kir2.1, Kir2.2, Kir2.3, Kir3.1/3.2, and voltage-gated potassium channel 2.1. Finally, we show that VU0071063 activates native Kir6.2/SUR1 channels, thereby inhibiting glucose-stimulated calcium entry in isolated mouse pancreatic β cells. VU0071063 represents a novel tool/compound for investigating β-cell physiology, KATP channel gating, and a new chemical scaffold for developing improved activators with medicinal chemistry. PMID:24646456

  6. Direct regulation of androgen receptor activity by potent CYP17 inhibitors in prostate cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Soifer, Harris S; Souleimanian, Naira; Wu, Sijian; Voskresenskiy, Anatoliy M; Collak, Filiz Kisaayak; Cinar, Bekir; Stein, Cy A

    2012-02-03

    TOK-001 and abiraterone are potent 17-heteroarylsteroid (17-HAS) inhibitors of Cyp17, one of the rate-limiting enzymes in the biosynthesis of testosterone from cholesterol in prostate cancer cells. Nevertheless, the molecular mechanism underlying the prevention of prostate cell growth by 17-HASs still remains elusive. Here, we assess the effects of 17-HASs on androgen receptor (AR) activity in LNCaP and LAPC-4 cells. We demonstrate that both TOK-001 and abiraterone reduced AR protein and mRNA expression, and antagonized AR-dependent promoter activation induced by androgen. TOK-001, but not abiraterone, is an effective apparent competitor of the radioligand [(3)H]R1881 for binding to the wild type and various mutant AR (W741C, W741L) proteins. In agreement with these data, TOK-001 is a consistently superior inhibitor than abiraterone of R1881-induced transcriptional activity of both wild type and mutant AR. However, neither agent was able to trans-activate the AR in the absence of R1881. Our data demonstrate that phospho-4EBP1 levels are significantly reduced by TOK-001 and to a lesser extent by abiraterone alcohol, and suggest a mechanism by which cap-dependent translation is suppressed by blocking assembly of the eIF4F and eIF4G complex to the mRNA 5' cap. Thus, the effects of these 17-HASs on AR signaling are complex, ranging from a decrease in testosterone production through the inhibition of Cyp17 as previously described, to directly reducing both AR protein expression and R1881-induced AR trans-activation.

  7. The Andes Virus Nucleocapsid Protein Directs Basal Endothelial Cell Permeability by Activating RhoA

    PubMed Central

    Gorbunova, Elena E.; Simons, Matthew J.; Gavrilovskaya, Irina N.

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Andes virus (ANDV) predominantly infects microvascular endothelial cells (MECs) and nonlytically causes an acute pulmonary edema termed hantavirus pulmonary syndrome (HPS). In HPS patients, virtually every pulmonary MEC is infected, MECs are enlarged, and infection results in vascular leakage and highly lethal pulmonary edema. We observed that MECs infected with the ANDV hantavirus or expressing the ANDV nucleocapsid (N) protein showed increased size and permeability by activating the Rheb and RhoA GTPases. Expression of ANDV N in MECs increased cell size by preventing tuberous sclerosis complex (TSC) repression of Rheb-mTOR-pS6K. N selectively bound the TSC2 N terminus (1 to 1403) within a complex containing TSC2/TSC1/TBC1D7, and endogenous TSC2 reciprocally coprecipitated N protein from ANDV-infected MECs. TSCs normally restrict RhoA-induced MEC permeability, and we found that ANDV infection or N protein expression constitutively activated RhoA. This suggests that the ANDV N protein alone is sufficient to activate signaling pathways that control MEC size and permeability. Further, RhoA small interfering RNA, dominant-negative RhoA(N19), and the RhoA/Rho kinase inhibitors fasudil and Y27632 dramatically reduced the permeability of ANDV-infected MECs by 80 to 90%. Fasudil also reduced the bradykinin-directed permeability of ANDV and Hantaan virus-infected MECs to control levels. These findings demonstrate that ANDV activation of RhoA causes MEC permeability and reveal a potential edemagenic mechanism for ANDV to constitutively inhibit the basal barrier integrity of infected MECs. The central importance of RhoA activation in MEC permeability further suggests therapeutically targeting RhoA, TSCs, and Rac1 as potential means of resolving capillary leakage during hantavirus infections. PMID:27795403

  8. Directed Evolution of an LBP/CD14 Inhibitory Peptide and Its Anti-Endotoxin Activity

    PubMed Central

    Fang, Li; Xu, Zhi; Wang, Guan-song; Ji, Fu-yun; Mei, Chun-xia; Liu, Juan; Wu, Guo-ming

    2014-01-01

    Background LPS-binding protein (LBP) and its ligand CD14 are located upstream of the signaling pathway for LPS-induced inflammation. Blocking LBP and CD14 binding might prevent LPS-induced inflammation. In previous studies, we obtained a peptide analog (MP12) for the LBP/CD14 binding site and showed that this peptide analog had anti-endotoxin activity. In this study, we used in vitro directed evolution for this peptide analog to improve its in vivo and in vitro anti-endotoxin activity. Methods We used error-prone PCR (ep-PCR) and induced mutations in the C-terminus of LBP and attached the PCR products to T7 phages to establish a mutant phage display library. The positive clones that competed with LBP for CD14 binding was obtained by screening. We used both in vivo and in vitro experiments to compare the anti-endotoxin activities of a polypeptide designated P1 contained in a positive clone and MP12. Results 11 positive clones were obtained from among target phages. Sequencing showed that 9 positive clones had a threonine (T) to methionine (M) mutation in amino acid 287 of LBP. Compared to polypeptide MP12, polypeptide P1 significantly inhibited LPS-induced TNF-α expression and NF-κB activity in U937 cells (P<0.05). Compared to MP12, P1 significantly improved arterial oxygen pressure, an oxygenation index, and lung pathology scores in LPS-induced ARDS rats (P<0.05). Conclusion By in vitro directed evolution of peptide analogs for the LBP/CD14 binding site, we established a new polypeptide (P1) with a threonine (T)-to-methionine (M) mutation in amino acid 287 of LBP. This polypeptide had high anti-endotoxin activity in vitro and in vivo, which suggested that amino acid 287 in the C-terminus of LBP may play an important role in LBP binding with CD14. PMID:25025695

  9. 3-D Electromagnetic Instabilities in Current Sheet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Zhenyu; Lin, Yu; Wang, Xueyi; Chen, Liu; Tummel, Kurt

    2016-10-01

    3-D electromagnetic instabilities in a Harris current sheet with a finite guide magnetic field BG are systematically studied by employing the gyrokinetic electron and fully kinetic ion (GeFi) particle model with a realistic mass ratio mi /me . Our studies show that lower-hybrid drift instability (LHDI) with k√{ρiρe } 1 and drift kink instability (DKI) and drift sausage instability (DSI) with kρi 1 are excited in the current sheet. The most unstable DKI is away from k . B = 0 , and the most unstable DSI is at k . B = 0 , where k ≡ (kx ,ky) , with kx being along the anti-parallel field direction and ky is along the current direction. On the other hand, an instability with a compressional magnetic field perturbation located at the center of current sheet is also excited under a relatively large BG, and its maximum growth rate is at k × B = 0 . The presence and structure of these instabilities as a function of BG is presented. The GeFi simulation results are compared with those from the fully kinetic particle simulation.

  10. A comparison of direct versus self-report measures for assessing physical activity in adults: a systematic review

    PubMed Central

    Prince, Stéphanie A; Adamo, Kristi B; Hamel, Meghan E; Hardt, Jill; Gorber, Sarah Connor; Tremblay, Mark

    2008-01-01

    Background Accurate assessment is required to assess current and changing physical activity levels, and to evaluate the effectiveness of interventions designed to increase activity levels. This study systematically reviewed the literature to determine the extent of agreement between subjectively (self-report e.g. questionnaire, diary) and objectively (directly measured; e.g. accelerometry, doubly labeled water) assessed physical activity in adults. Methods Eight electronic databases were searched to identify observational and experimental studies of adult populations. Searching identified 4,463 potential articles. Initial screening found that 293 examined the relationship between self-reported and directly measured physical activity and met the eligibility criteria. Data abstraction was completed for 187 articles, which described comparable data and/or comparisons, while 76 articles lacked comparable data or comparisons, and a further 30 did not meet the review's eligibility requirements. A risk of bias assessment was conducted for all articles from which data was abstracted. Results Correlations between self-report and direct measures were generally low-to-moderate and ranged from -0.71 to 0.96. No clear pattern emerged for the mean differences between self-report and direct measures of physical activity. Trends differed by measure of physical activity employed, level of physical activity measured, and the gender of participants. Results of the risk of bias assessment indicated that 38% of the studies had lower quality scores. Conclusion The findings suggest that the measurement method may have a significant impact on the observed levels of physical activity. Self-report measures of physical activity were both higher and lower than directly measured levels of physical activity, which poses a problem for both reliance on self-report measures and for attempts to correct for self-report – direct measure differences. This review reveals the need for valid, accurate

  11. A microbial ecosystem beneath the West Antarctic ice sheet.

    PubMed

    Christner, Brent C; Priscu, John C; Achberger, Amanda M; Barbante, Carlo; Carter, Sasha P; Christianson, Knut; Michaud, Alexander B; Mikucki, Jill A; Mitchell, Andrew C; Skidmore, Mark L; Vick-Majors, Trista J

    2014-08-21

    Liquid water has been known to occur beneath the Antarctic ice sheet for more than 40 years, but only recently have these subglacial aqueous environments been recognized as microbial ecosystems that may influence biogeochemical transformations on a global scale. Here we present the first geomicrobiological description of water and surficial sediments obtained from direct sampling of a subglacial Antarctic lake. Subglacial Lake Whillans (SLW) lies beneath approximately 800 m of ice on the lower portion of the Whillans Ice Stream (WIS) in West Antarctica and is part of an extensive and evolving subglacial drainage network. The water column of SLW contained metabolically active microorganisms and was derived primarily from glacial ice melt with solute sources from lithogenic weathering and a minor seawater component. Heterotrophic and autotrophic production data together with small subunit ribosomal RNA gene sequencing and biogeochemical data indicate that SLW is a chemosynthetically driven ecosystem inhabited by a diverse assemblage of bacteria and archaea. Our results confirm that aquatic environments beneath the Antarctic ice sheet support viable microbial ecosystems, corroborating previous reports suggesting that they contain globally relevant pools of carbon and microbes that can mobilize elements from the lithosphere and influence Southern Ocean geochemical and biological systems.

  12. Role of direct bioautographic method for detection of antistaphylococcal activity of essential oils.

    PubMed

    Horváth, Györgyi; Jámbor, Noémi; Kocsis, Erika; Böszörményi, Andrea; Lemberkovics, Eva; Héthelyi, Eva; Kovács, Krisztina; Kocsis, Béla

    2011-09-01

    The aim of the present study was the chemical characterization of some traditionally used and therapeutically relevant essential oils (thyme, eucalyptus, cinnamon bark, clove, and tea tree) and the optimized microbiological investigation of the effect of these oils on clinical isolates of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) and methicillin-susceptible S. aureus (MSSA). The chemical composition of the oils was analyzed by TLC, and controlled by gas chromatography (GC) and gas chromatography/mass spectrometry (GC/MS). The antibacterial effect was investigated using a TLC-bioautographic method. Antibacterial activity of thyme, clove and cinnamon oils, as well as their main components (thymol, carvacrol, eugenol, and cinnamic aldehyde) was observed against all the bacterial strains used in this study. The essential oils of eucalyptus and tea tree showed weak activity in the bioautographic system. On the whole, the antibacterial activity of the essential oils could be related to their most abundant components, but the effect of the minor components should also be taken into consideration. Direct bioautography is more cost-effective and better in comparison with traditional microbiological laboratory methods (e.g. disc-diffusion, agar-plate technique).

  13. Stat3 Activation in Urothelial Stem Cells Leads to Direct Progression to Invasive Bladder Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Ho, Philip Levy; Lay, Erica Julianne; Jian, Weiguo; Parra, Diana; Chan, Keith Syson

    2012-01-01

    Two subtypes of human bladder cancer, noninvasive papillary and muscle-invasive cancer, develop through independent pathologic and molecular pathways. Human invasive bladder cancer frequently develops without prior clinical evidence of a noninvasive tumor stage. However, an animal model that recapitulates this unique clinical progression of invasive bladder cancer has not yet been developed. In this study, we created a novel transgenic mouse model of invasive bladder cancer by targeting an active dimerized form of Stat3 to the basal cells of bladder epithelium. When exposed to the carcinogen nitrosamine, Stat3-transgenic mice developed invasive cancer directly from carcinoma in situ (CIS), bypassing the noninvasive papillary tumor stage. Remarkably, invasive bladder cancer driven by active Stat3 was predominantly composed of stem cells, which were characterized by cytokeratin 14 (CK14) staining and enhanced tumor sphere-forming ability. Active Stat3 was also shown to localize to the nucleus of human invasive bladder cancers that were primarily composed of CK14+ stem cells. Together, our findings show that Stat3-induced stem cell expansion plays a critical role in the unique clinical progression of invasive bladder cancer through the CIS pathway. PMID:22532166

  14. Direct Single-Enzyme Biomineralization of Catalytically Active Ceria and Ceria-Zirconia Nanocrystals.

    PubMed

    Curran, Christopher D; Lu, Li; Jia, Yue; Kiely, Christopher J; Berger, Bryan W; McIntosh, Steven

    2017-02-21

    Biomineralization is an intriguing approach to the synthesis of functional inorganic materials for energy applications whereby biological systems are engineered to mineralize inorganic materials and control their structure over multiple length scales under mild reaction conditions. Herein we demonstrate a single-enzyme-mediated biomineralization route to synthesize crystalline, catalytically active, quantum-confined ceria (CeO2-x) and ceria-zirconia (Ce1-yZryO2-x) nanocrystals for application as environmental catalysts. In contrast to typical anthropogenic synthesis routes, the crystalline oxide nanoparticles are formed at room temperature from an otherwise inert aqueous solution without the addition of a precipitant or additional reactant. An engineered form of silicatein, rCeSi, as a single enzyme not only catalyzes the direct biomineralization of the nanocrystalline oxides but also serves as a templating agent to control their morphological structure. The biomineralized nanocrystals of less than 3 nm in diameter are catalytically active toward carbon monoxide oxidation following an oxidative annealing step to remove carbonaceous residue. The introduction of zirconia into the nanocrystals leads to an increase in Ce(III) concentration, associated catalytic activity, and the thermal stability of the nanocrystals.

  15. Systems Integration Fact Sheet

    SciTech Connect

    2016-06-01

    This fact sheet is an overview of the Systems Integration subprogram at the U.S. Department of Energy SunShot Initiative. The Systems Integration subprogram enables the widespread deployment of safe, reliable, and cost-effective solar energy technologies by addressing the associated technical and non-technical challenges. These include timely and cost-effective interconnection procedures, optimal system planning, accurate prediction of solar resources, monitoring and control of solar power, maintaining grid reliability and stability, and many more. To address the challenges associated with interconnecting and integrating hundreds of gigawatts of solar power onto the electricity grid, the Systems Integration program funds research, development, and demonstration projects in four broad, interrelated focus areas: grid performance and reliability, dispatchability, power electronics, and communications.

  16. Hyperspectral light sheet microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jahr, Wiebke; Schmid, Benjamin; Schmied, Christopher; Fahrbach, Florian O.; Huisken, Jan

    2015-09-01

    To study the development and interactions of cells and tissues, multiple fluorescent markers need to be imaged efficiently in a single living organism. Instead of acquiring individual colours sequentially with filters, we created a platform based on line-scanning light sheet microscopy to record the entire spectrum for each pixel in a three-dimensional volume. We evaluated data sets with varying spectral sampling and determined the optimal channel width to be around 5 nm. With the help of these data sets, we show that our setup outperforms filter-based approaches with regard to image quality and discrimination of fluorophores. By spectral unmixing we resolved overlapping fluorophores with up to nanometre resolution and removed autofluorescence in zebrafish and fruit fly embryos.

  17. Soft Costs Fact Sheet

    SciTech Connect

    2016-05-01

    This fact sheet is an overview of the systems integration subprogram at the U.S. Department of Energy SunShot Initiative. Soft costs can vary significantly as a result of a fragmented energy marketplace. In the U.S., there are 18,000 jurisdictions and 3,000 utilities with different rules and regulations for how to go solar. The same solar equipment may vary widely in its final installation price due to process and market variations across jurisdictions, creating barriers to rapid industry growth. SunShot supports the development of innovative solutions that enable communities to build their local economies and establish clean energy initiatives that meet their needs, while at the same time creating sustainable solar market conditions.

  18. PRODUCTION OF SHEET FROM PARTICULATE MATERIAL

    DOEpatents

    Blainey, A.

    1959-05-12

    A process is presented for forming coherent sheet material from particulate material such as granular or powdered metal, granular or powdered oxide, slurries, pastes, and plastic mixes which cohere under pressure. The primary object is to avoid the use of expensive and/ or short lived pressing tools, that is, dies and specially profiled rolls, and so to reduce the cost of the product and to prcvide in a simple manner for the making of the product in a variety of shapes or sizes. The sheet material is formed when the particulate material is laterally confined in a boundary material deformable in all lateral directions under axial pressure and then axially compressing the layer of particulate material together with the boundary material.

  19. Cutting Guide for Fibrous Sheets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Warren, A., D.

    1985-01-01

    Tool facilitates repetitive cutting of fibrous sheets. Flexible aluminum tape allows metal strips folded back on themselves, exposing fresh material for cutting. More than one strip folded back, and cutting width therefore increased in multiples of strip width. Developed for cutting strips of alumina-fiber matting, tool also used on such materials as felts, textiles, and sheet metals.

  20. Silicone Coating on Polyimide Sheet

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Park, J. J.

    1985-01-01

    Silicone coatings applied to polyimide sheeting for variety of space-related applications. Coatings intended to protect flexible substrates of solar-cell blankets from degradation by oxygen atoms, electrons, plasmas, and ultraviolet light in low Earth orbit and outer space. Since coatings are flexible, generally useful in forming flexible laminates or protective layers on polyimide-sheet products.

  1. Communication Fact Sheets for Parents.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stremel, Kathleen; Bixler, Betsy; Morgan, Susanne; Layton, Kristen

    This booklet contains 28 fact sheets on communication written primarily for parents and families with a child who is deaf-blind. They attempt to address fundamental but complex issues related to the communication needs of children with vision and hearing impairments. Each fact sheet targets a specific area, including: (1) communication; (2)…

  2. Decellularized Periodontal Ligament Cell Sheets with Recellularization Potential

    PubMed Central

    Farag, A.; Vaquette, C.; Theodoropoulos, C.; Hamlet, S.M.; Hutmacher, D.W.; Ivanovski, S.

    2014-01-01

    The periodontal ligament is the key tissue facilitating periodontal regeneration. This study aimed to fabricate decellularized human periodontal ligament cell sheets for subsequent periodontal tissue engineering applications. The decellularization protocol involved the transfer of intact human periodontal ligament cell sheets onto melt electrospun polycaprolactone membranes and subsequent bi-directional perfusion with NH4OH/Triton X-100 and DNase solutions. The protocol was shown to remove 92% of DNA content. The structural integrity of the decellularized cell sheets was confirmed by a collagen quantification assay, immunostaining of human collagen type I and fibronectin, and scanning electron microscopy. ELISA was used to demonstrate the presence of residual basic fibroblast growth factor (bFGF), vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF), and hepatocyte growth factor (HGF) in the decellularized cell sheet constructs. The decellularized cell sheets were shown to have the ability to support recellularization by allogenic human periodontal ligament cells. This study describes the fabrication of decellularized periodontal ligament cell sheets that retain an intact extracellular matrix and resident growth factors and can support repopulation by allogenic cells. The decellularized hPDL cell sheet concept has the potential to be utilized in future “off-the-shelf” periodontal tissue engineering strategies. PMID:25270757

  3. A thrust-sheet propulsion concept using fissionable elements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moeckel, W. E.

    1976-01-01

    A space propulsion concept is proposed and analyzed which consists of a thin sheet coated on one side with fissionable material, so that nuclear power is converted directly into propulsive power. Thrust is available both from ejected fission fragments and from thermal radiation. Optimum thicknesses are determined for the active and substrate layers. This concept is shown to have potential mission capability (in terms of velocity increments) superior to that of all other advanced propulsion concepts for which performance estimates are available. A suitable spontaneously fissioning material such as Cf254 could provide an extremely high-performance first stage beyond earth orbit. In contrast with some other advanced nuclear propulsion concepts, there is no minimum size below which this concept is infeasible.

  4. A thrust-sheet propulsion concept using fissionable elements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moeckel, W. E.

    1976-01-01

    A space propulsion concept is proposed and analyzed which consists of a thin sheet coated on one side with fissionable material, so that nuclear power is converted directly into propulsive power. Thrust is available both from ejected fission fragments and from thermal radiation. Optimum thicknesses are determined for the active and substrate layers. This concept is shown to have potential mission capability (in terms of velocity increments) superior to that of all other advanced propulsion concepts for which performance estimates are available. A suitable spontaneously fissioning material such as Cf-254 could provide an extremely high-performance first stage beyond earth orbit. In contrast with some other advanced nuclear propulsion concepts, there is no minimum size below which this concept is infeasible.

  5. Rapid and direct estimation of active biomass on granular activated carbon through adenosine tri-phosphate (ATP) determination.

    PubMed

    Velten, Silvana; Hammes, Frederik; Boller, Markus; Egli, Thomas

    2007-05-01

    Granular activated carbon (GAC) filtration is used during drinking water treatment for the removal of micropollutants such as taste and odour compounds, halogenated hydrocarbons, pesticides and pharmaceuticals. In addition, the active microbial biomass established on GAC is responsible for the removal of biodegradable dissolved organic carbon compounds present in water or formed during oxidation (e.g., ozonation and chlorination) processes. In order to conduct correct kinetic evaluations of DOC removal during drinking water treatment, and to assess the state and performance of full-scale GAC filter installations, an accurate and sensitive method for active biomass determination on GAC is required. We have developed a straight-forward method based on direct measurement of the total adenosine tri-phosphate (ATP) content of a GAC sample and other support media. In this method, we have combined flow-cytometric absolute cell counting and ATP analysis to derive case-specific ATP/cell conversion values. In this study, we present the detailed standardisation of the ATP method. An uncertainty assessment has shown that heterogeneous colonisation of the GAC particles makes the largest contribution to the combined standard uncertainty of the method. The method was applied for the investigation of biofilm formation during the start-up period of a GAC pilot-scale plant treating Lake Zurich water. A rapid increase in the biomass of up to 1.1 x 10(10)cells/g GAC dry weight (DW) within the first 33 days was observed, followed by a slight decrease to an average steady-state concentration of 7.9 x 10(9)cells/g GAC DW. It was shown that the method can be used to determine the biomass attached to the GAC for both stable and developing biofilms.

  6. Evidence for in-situ metabolic activity in ice sheets based on anomalous trace gas records from the Vostok and other ice cores

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sowers, T.

    2003-04-01

    Measurements of trace gas species in ice cores are the primary means for reconstructing the composition of the atmosphere. The longest such record comes from the Vostok core taken from the central portion of the East Antarctic ice sheet [Petit et al., 1999]. In general, the trace gas records from Vostok are utilized as the reference signal when correlating trace gas measurements from other ice cores. The underlying assumption implicit in such endeavors is that the bubbles recovered from the ice cores record the composition of the atmosphere at the time the bubbles were formed. Another implicit assumption is that the composition of the bubbles has not been compromised by the extremely long storage periods within the ice sheet. While there is ample evidence that certain trace gas records (e.g. CO2 and CH4) have probably not been compromised, anomalous nitrous oxide (N2O) measurements from the penultimate glacial termination at Vostok are consistent with in-situ (N2O) production [Sowers, 2001]. In general, trace gas measurements from high altitude tropical/temperate glaciers are higher than expected based on contemporaneous measurements from polar cores. Measurements spanning the last 25kyr from the Sajama ice core from central Bolivia (18oS, 69oW, 6542masl), for example, were 1X-5X higher than contemporaneous values recorded in polar ice cores [Campen et al., 2003]. While other physical factors (like temperature/melting) may contribute to the elevated trace gas levels at these sites, the most likely explanation involves the accumulation of in-situ metabolic trace gas byproducts. Stable isotope measurements provide independent information for assessing the origin of the elevated trace gas levels in select samples. For the penultimate glacial termination at Vostok, the anomalous (N2O) values carry high δ15Nbulk and low δ18Obulk values that would be predicted if the added (N2O) was associated with in-situ nitrification. At Sajama, low δ13CH4 values observed during

  7. Germ-line activation of the luteinizing hormone receptor directly drives spermiogenesis in a nonmammalian vertebrate

    PubMed Central

    Chauvigné, François; Zapater, Cinta; Gasol, Josep M.; Cerdà, Joan

    2014-01-01

    In both mammals and teleosts, the differentiation of postmeiotic spermatids to spermatozoa (spermiogenesis) is thought to be indirectly controlled by the luteinizing hormone (LH) acting through the LH/choriogonadotropin receptor (LHCGR) to stimulate androgen secretion in the interstitial Leydig cells. However, a more direct, nonsteroidal role of LH mediating the spermiogenic pathway remains unclear. Using a flatfish with semicystic spermatogenesis, in which spermatids are released into the seminiferous lobule lumen (SLL), where they develop into spermatozoa without direct contact with the supporting Sertoli cells, we show that haploid spermatids express the homolog of the tetrapod LHCGR (Lhcgrba). Both native Lh and intramuscularly injected His-tagged recombinant Lh (rLh) are immunodetected bound to the Lhcgrba of free spermatids in the SLL, showing that circulating gonadotropin can reach the intratubular compartment. In vitro incubation of flatfish spermatids isolated from the SLL with rLh specifically promotes their differentiation into spermatozoa, whereas recombinant follicle-stimulating hormone and steroid hormones are ineffective. Using a repertoire of molecular markers and inhibitors, we find that the Lh-Lhcgrba induction of spermiogenesis is mediated through a cAMP/PKA signaling pathway that initiates the transcription of genes potentially involved in the function of spermatozoa. We further show that Lhcgrba expression in germ cells also occurs in distantly related fishes, suggesting this feature is likely conserved in teleosts regardless of the type of germ cell development. These data reveal a role of LH in vertebrate germ cells, whereby a Lhcgrba-activated signaling cascade in haploid spermatids directs gene expression and the progression of spermiogenesis. PMID:24474769

  8. Germ-line activation of the luteinizing hormone receptor directly drives spermiogenesis in a nonmammalian vertebrate.

    PubMed

    Chauvigné, François; Zapater, Cinta; Gasol, Josep M; Cerdà, Joan

    2014-01-28

    In both mammals and teleosts, the differentiation of postmeiotic spermatids to spermatozoa (spermiogenesis) is thought to be indirectly controlled by the luteinizing hormone (LH) acting through the LH/choriogonadotropin receptor (LHCGR) to stimulate androgen secretion in the interstitial Leydig cells. However, a more direct, nonsteroidal role of LH mediating the spermiogenic pathway remains unclear. Using a flatfish with semicystic spermatogenesis, in which spermatids are released into the seminiferous lobule lumen (SLL), where they develop into spermatozoa without direct contact with the supporting Sertoli cells, we show that haploid spermatids express the homolog of the tetrapod LHCGR (Lhcgrba). Both native Lh and intramuscularly injected His-tagged recombinant Lh (rLh) are immunodetected bound to the Lhcgrba of free spermatids in the SLL, showing that circulating gonadotropin can reach the intratubular compartment. In vitro incubation of flatfish spermatids isolated from the SLL with rLh specifically promotes their differentiation into spermatozoa, whereas recombinant follicle-stimulating hormone and steroid hormones are ineffective. Using a repertoire of molecular markers and inhibitors, we find that the Lh-Lhcgrba induction of spermiogenesis is mediated through a cAMP/PKA signaling pathway that initiates the transcription of genes potentially involved in the function of spermatozoa. We further show that Lhcgrba expression in germ cells also occurs in distantly related fishes, suggesting this feature is likely conserved in teleosts regardless of the type of germ cell development. These data reveal a role of LH in vertebrate germ cells, whereby a Lhcgrba-activated signaling cascade in haploid spermatids directs gene expression and the progression of spermiogenesis.

  9. Directed Evolution of RebH for Site Selective Halogenation of Large, Biologically Active Molecules**

    PubMed Central

    Payne, James T.; Poor, Catherine B.

    2015-01-01

    We recently characterized the substrate scope of wild-type RebH and evolved variants of this enzyme with improved stability for biocatalysis. The substrate scopes of both RebH and the stabilized variants, however, are limited primarily to compounds similar in size to tryptophan. We have now used a substrate walking approach to further evolve RebH variants with expanded substrate scope. Two particularly notable variants were identified: 3-SS, which provides high conversion of tricyclic tryptoline derivatives; and 4-V, which accepts a broad range of large indoles and carbazoles. This constitutes the first reported use of directed evolution to enable functionalization of substrates not accepted by wild-type RebH and demonstrates the utility of RebH variants for site-selective halogenation of biologically active compounds. PMID:25678465

  10. Annealing effects on recombinative activity of nickel at direct silicon bonded interface

    SciTech Connect

    Kojima, Takuto Ohshita, Yoshio; Yamaguchi, Masafumi

    2015-09-15

    By performing capacitance transient analyses, the recombination activity at a (110)/(100) direct silicon bonded (DSB) interface contaminated with nickel diffused at different temperatures, as a model of grain boundaries in multicrystalline silicon, was studied. The trap level depth from the valence band, trap density of states, and hole capture cross section peaked at an annealing temperature of 300 °C. At temperatures ⩾400 °C, the hole capture cross section increased with temperature, but the density of states remained unchanged. Further, synchrotron-based X-ray analyses, microprobe X-ray fluorescence (μ-XRF), and X-ray absorption near edge structure (XANES) analyses were performed. The analysis results indicated that the chemical phase after the sample was annealed at 200 °C was a mixture of NiO and NiSi{sub 2}.

  11. Evaluation of harmonic direction-finding systems for detecting locomotor activity

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Boyarski, V.L.; Rodda, G.H.; Savidge, J.A.

    2007-01-01

    We conducted a physical simulation experiment to test the efficacy of harmonic direction finding for remotely detecting locomotor activity in animals. The ability to remotely detect movement helps to avoid disturbing natural movement behavior. Remote detection implies that the observer can sense only a change in signal bearing. In our simulated movements, small changes in bearing (<5.7??) were routinely undetectable. Detectability improved progressively with the size of the simulated animal movement. The average (??SD) of reflector tag movements correctly detected for 5 observers was 93.9 ?? 12.8% when the tag was moved ???11.5??; most observers correctly detected tag movements ???20.1??. Given our data, one can assess whether the technique will be effective for detecting movements at an observation distance appropriate for the study organism. We recommend that both habitat and behavior of the organism be taken into consideration when contemplating use of this technique for detecting locomotion.

  12. Annealing effects on recombinative activity of nickel at direct silicon bonded interface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kojima, Takuto; Ohshita, Yoshio; Yamaguchi, Masafumi

    2015-09-01

    By performing capacitance transient analyses, the recombination activity at a (110)/(100) direct silicon bonded (DSB) interface contaminated with nickel diffused at different temperatures, as a model of grain boundaries in multicrystalline silicon, was studied. The trap level depth from the valence band, trap density of states, and hole capture cross section peaked at an annealing temperature of 300 °C. At temperatures ⩾400 °C, the hole capture cross section increased with temperature, but the density of states remained unchanged. Further, synchrotron-based X-ray analyses, microprobe X-ray fluorescence (μ-XRF), and X-ray absorption near edge structure (XANES) analyses were performed. The analysis results indicated that the chemical phase after the sample was annealed at 200 °C was a mixture of NiO and NiSi2.

  13. Electrocatalytic activity of ZnS nanoparticles in direct ethanol fuel cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bredol, Michael; Kaczmarek, Michał; Wiemhöfer, Hans-Dieter

    2014-06-01

    Low temperature fuel cells consuming ethanol without reformation would be a major step toward the use of renewable energy sources from biomass. However, the necessary electrodes and electrocatalysts still are far from being perfect and suffer from various poisoning and deactivation processes. This work describes investigations on systems using carbon/ZnS-based electrocatalysts for ethanol oxidation in complete membrane electrode assemblies (MEAs). MEAs were built on Nafion membranes with active masses prepared from ZnS nanoparticles and Vulcan carbon support. Under operation, acetic acid and acetaldehyde were identified and quantified as soluble oxidation products, whereas the amount of CO2 generated could not be quantified directly. Overall conversion efficiencies of up to 25% were estimated from cells operated over prolonged time. From polarization curves, interrupt experiments and analysis of reaction products, mass transport problems (concentration polarization) and breakthrough losses were found to be the main deficiencies of the ethanol oxidation electrodes fabricated so far.

  14. Lectin-directed enzyme activated prodrug therapy (LEAPT): Synthesis and evaluation of rhamnose-capped prodrugs.

    PubMed

    Garnier, Philippe; Wang, Xiang-Tao; Robinson, Mark A; van Kasteren, Sander; Perkins, Alan C; Frier, Malcolm; Fairbanks, Antony J; Davis, Benjamin G

    2010-12-01

    The lectin-directed enzyme activated prodrug therapy (LEAPT) bipartite drug delivery system utilizes glycosylated enzyme, localized according to its sugar pattern, and capped prodrugs released by that enzyme. In this way, the sugar coat of a synthetic enzyme determines the site of release of a given drug. Here, prodrugs of doxorubicin and 5-fluorouracil capped by the nonmammalian l-rhamnosyl sugar unit have been efficiently synthesized and evaluated for use in the LEAPT system. Both are stable in blood, released by synthetically d-galactosylated rhamnosidase enzyme, and do not inhibit the uptake of the synthetic enzyme to its liver target. These results are consistent with their proposed mode of action and efficacy in models of liver cancer, and confirm modular flexibility in the drugs that may be used in LEAPT.

  15. IL-27 Directly Enhances Germinal Center B Cell Activity and Potentiates Lupus in Sanroque Mice.

    PubMed

    Vijayan, Dipti; Mohd Redzwan, Norhanani; Avery, Danielle T; Wirasinha, Rushika C; Brink, Robert; Walters, Giles; Adelstein, Stephen; Kobayashi, Masao; Gray, Paul; Elliott, Michael; Wong, Melanie; King, Cecile; Vinuesa, Carola G; Ghilardi, Nico; Ma, Cindy S; Tangye, Stuart G; Batten, Marcel

    2016-10-15

    Germinal centers (GC) give rise to high-affinity and long-lived Abs and are critical in immunity and autoimmunity. IL-27 supports GCs by promoting survival and function of T follicular helper cells. We demonstrate that IL-27 also directly enhances GC B cell function. Exposure of naive human B cells to rIL-27 during in vitro activation enhanced their differentiation into CD20(+)CD38(+)CD27(low)CD95(+)CD10(+) cells, consistent with the surface marker phenotype of GC B cells. This effect was inhibited by loss-of-function mutations in STAT1 but not STAT3 To extend these findings, we studied the in vivo effects of IL-27 signals to B cells in the GC-driven Roquin(san/san) lupus mouse model. Il27ra(-/-)Roquin(san/san) mice exhibited significantly reduced GCs, IgG2a(c)(+) autoantibodies, and nephritis. Mixed bone marrow chimeras confirmed that IL-27 acts through B cell- and CD4(+) T cell-intrinsic mechanisms to support GCs and alter the production of pathogenic Ig isotypes. To our knowledge, our data provide the first evidence that IL-27 signals directly to B cells promote GCs and support the role of IL-27 in lupus.

  16. A new mass spectrometry based bioassay for the direct assessment of hyaluronidase activity and inhibition

    PubMed Central

    Britton, Emily R.; Ibberson, Carolyn B.; Horswill, Alexander R.; Cech., Nadja B.

    2015-01-01

    The development of drug resistance by bacterial pathogens is a growing threat. Drug resistant infections have high morbidity and mortality rates, and treatment of these infections is a major burden on the health care system. One potential strategy to prevent the development of drug resistance would be the application of therapeutic strategies that target bacterial virulence. Hyaluronidase is virulence factor that plays a role in the ability of Gram-positive bacteria such as Staphyloccus aureus and Streptococcus agalactiae to spread in tissue. As such, this enzyme could be a target for the development of future anti-virulence therapies. To facilitate the identification of hyaluronidase inhibitors, quantitative and reproducible assays of hyaluronidase activity are required. In the present study, we developed a new mass spectrometry based bioassay for this purpose. This assay directly measures the quantity of a degradation product (3-(4-deoxy-β-D-gluc-4-enuronosyl)-N-acetyl-D-glucosamine) produced by the hyaluronidase enzyme. Validation parameters for the new assay are as follows: repeatability, <7%; intermediate precision, <10%; range, 0.78-50 μM; limit of detection, 0.29 μM ; and limit of quantification, 0.78 μM. Using the new assay, the IC50 value for a published inhibitor of S. agalactiae hyaluronidase, ascorbic acyl 6-palmitate, was 8.0 ± 1.0 μM. We also identified a new hyaluronidase inhibitor, n-cyclohexanecarbonylpentadecylamine, with an IC50 of 30.4 ± 9.8 μM. In conclusion, we describe a new, direct, and reproducible method for assessing hyaluronidase activity using mass spectrometry that can facilitate the discovery of inhibitors. PMID:26519769

  17. Electronic bypass of spinal lesions: activation of lower motor neurons directly driven by cortical neural signals

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Lower motor neurons in the spinal cord lose supraspinal inputs after complete spinal cord injury, leading to a loss of volitional control below the injury site. Extensive locomotor training with spinal cord stimulation can restore locomotion function after spinal cord injury in humans and animals. However, this locomotion is non-voluntary, meaning that subjects cannot control stimulation via their natural “intent”. A recent study demonstrated an advanced system that triggers a stimulator using forelimb stepping electromyographic patterns to restore quadrupedal walking in rats with spinal cord transection. However, this indirect source of “intent” may mean that other non-stepping forelimb activities may false-trigger the spinal stimulator and thus produce unwanted hindlimb movements. Methods We hypothesized that there are distinguishable neural activities in the primary motor cortex during treadmill walking, even after low-thoracic spinal transection in adult guinea pigs. We developed an electronic spinal bridge, called “Motolink”, which detects these neural patterns and triggers a “spinal” stimulator for hindlimb movement. This hardware can be head-mounted or carried in a backpack. Neural data were processed in real-time and transmitted to a computer for analysis by an embedded processor. Off-line neural spike analysis was conducted to calculate and preset the spike threshold for “Motolink” hardware. Results We identified correlated activities of primary motor cortex neurons during treadmill walking of guinea pigs with spinal cord transection. These neural activities were used to predict the kinematic states of the animals. The appropriate selection of spike threshold value enabled the “Motolink” system to detect the neural “intent” of walking, which triggered electrical stimulation of the spinal cord and induced stepping-like hindlimb movements. Conclusion We present a direct cortical “intent”-driven electronic spinal

  18. The enhanced cortical activation induced by transcranial direct current stimulation during hand movements.

    PubMed

    Kwon, Yong Hyun; Jang, Sung Ho

    2011-04-01

    The aim of this study is to evaluate whether tDCS applied on the primary motor cortex (M1) in company with hand movements could enhance cortical activation, using functional MRI (fMRI). Twelve right-handed normal subjects were recruited. Real tDCS and sham tDCS with hand movements were applied during fMRI scanning. Subjects performed grasp-release hand movements at a metronome-guided frequency of 1Hz, while direct current with 1.0mA was delivered to the primary motor cortex. The averaged cortical map and the intensity index were compared between real tDCS with hand movements and sham tDCS with hand movements. Our result showed that cortical activation on the primary sensorimotor cortex was observed under both of two conditions; real tDCS with hand movements and sham tDCS with hand movements. Voxel count and peak intensity were 365.10±227.23 and 5.66±1.97, respectively, in the left primary sensorimotor cortex during real tDCS with right hand movements; in contrast, those were 182.20±117.88 and 4.12±0.88, respectively, during sham tDCS with right hand movements. Significant differences in voxel count and peak intensity were observed between real tDCS and sham tDCS (p<0.05). We found that anodal tDCS application during motor task enhanced cortical activation on the underlying targeted motor cortex, compared with the same motor task without tDCS. Therefore, it seemed that tDCS induced more cortical activity and modulated brain function when concurrently applied with motor task.

  19. Plasma Membrane Calcium ATPase Activity Is Regulated by Actin Oligomers through Direct Interaction*

    PubMed Central

    Dalghi, Marianela G.; Fernández, Marisa M.; Ferreira-Gomes, Mariela; Mangialavori, Irene C.; Malchiodi, Emilio L.; Strehler, Emanuel E.; Rossi, Juan Pablo F. C.

    2013-01-01

    As recently described by our group, plasma membrane calcium ATPase (PMCA) activity can be regulated by the actin cytoskeleton. In this study, we characterize the interaction of purified G-actin with isolated PMCA and examine the effect of G-actin during the first polymerization steps. As measured by surface plasmon resonance, G-actin directly interacts with PMCA with an apparent 1:1 stoichiometry in the presence of Ca2+ with an apparent affinity in the micromolar range. As assessed by the photoactivatable probe 1-O-hexadecanoyl-2-O-[9-[[[2-[125I]iodo-4-(trifluoromethyl-3H-diazirin-3-yl)benzyl]oxy]carbonyl]nonanoyl]-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine, the association of PMCA to actin produced a shift in the distribution of the conformers of the pump toward a calmodulin-activated conformation. G-actin stimulates Ca2+-ATPase activity of the enzyme when incubated under polymerizing conditions, displaying a cooperative behavior. The increase in the Ca2+-ATPase activity was related to an increase in the apparent affinity for Ca2+ and an increase in the phosphoenzyme levels at steady state. Although surface plasmon resonance experiments revealed only one binding site for G-actin, results clearly indicate that more than one molecule of G-actin was needed for a regulatory effect on the pump. Polymerization studies showed that the experimental conditions are compatible with the presence of actin in the first stages of assembly. Altogether, these observations suggest that the stimulatory effect is exerted by short oligomers of actin. The functional interaction between actin oligomers and PMCA represents a novel regulatory pathway by which the cortical actin cytoskeleton participates in the regulation of cytosolic Ca2+ homeostasis. PMID:23803603

  20. Direct activation of the mitochondrial calcium uniporter by natural plant flavonoids.

    PubMed

    Montero, Mayte; Lobatón, Carmen D; Hernández-Sanmiguel, Esther; Santodomingo, Jaime; Vay, Laura; Moreno, Alfredo; Alvarez, Javier

    2004-11-15

    During cell activation, mitochondria play an important role in Ca2+ homoeostasis due to the presence of a fast and specific Ca2+ channel in its inner membrane, the mitochondrial Ca2+ uniporter. This channel allows mitochondria to buffer local cytosolic [Ca2+] changes and controls the intramitochondrial Ca2+ levels, thus modulating a variety of phenomena from respiratory rate to apoptosis. We have described recently that SB202190, an inhibitor of p38 MAPK (mitogen-activated protein kinase), strongly activated the uniporter. We show in the present study that a series of natural plant flavonoids, widely distributed in foods, produced also a strong stimulation of the mitochondrial Ca2+ uniporter. This effect was of the same magnitude as that induced by SB202190 (an approx. 20-fold increase in the mitochondrial Ca2+ uptake rate), developed without measurable delay and was rapidly reversible. In intact cells, the mitochondrial Ca2+ peak induced by histamine was also largely increased by the flavonoids. Stimulation of the uniporter by either flavonoids or SB202190 did not require ATP, suggesting a direct effect on the uniporter or an associated protein which is not mediated by protein phosphorylation. The most active compound, kaempferol, increased the rate of mitochondrial Ca2+ uptake by 85+/-15% (mean+/-S.E.M., n=4) and the histamine-induced mitochondrial Ca2+ peak by 139+/-19% (mean+/-S.E.M., n=5) at a concentration of 1 microM. Given that flavonoids can reach this concentration range in plasma after ingestion of flavonoid-rich food, these compounds could be modulating the uniporter under physiological conditions.

  1. Direct activation of the mitochondrial calcium uniporter by natural plant flavonoids

    PubMed Central

    2004-01-01

    During cell activation, mitochondria play an important role in Ca2+ homoeostasis due to the presence of a fast and specific Ca2+ channel in its inner membrane, the mitochondrial Ca2+ uniporter. This channel allows mitochondria to buffer local cytosolic [Ca2+] changes and controls the intramitochondrial Ca2+ levels, thus modulating a variety of phenomena from respiratory rate to apoptosis. We have described recently that SB202190, an inhibitor of p38 MAPK (mitogen-activated protein kinase), strongly activated the uniporter. We show in the present study that a series of natural plant flavonoids, widely distributed in foods, produced also a strong stimulation of the mitochondrial Ca2+ uniporter. This effect was of the same magnitude as that induced by SB202190 (an approx. 20-fold increase in the mitochondrial Ca2+ uptake rate), developed without measurable delay and was rapidly reversible. In intact cells, the mitochondrial Ca2+ peak induced by histamine was also largely increased by the flavonoids. Stimulation of the uniporter by either flavonoids or SB202190 did not require ATP, suggesting a direct effect on the uniporter or an associated protein which is not mediated by protein phosphorylation. The most active compound, kaempferol, increased the rate of mitochondrial Ca2+ uptake by 85±15% (mean±S.E.M., n=4) and the histamine-induced mitochondrial Ca2+ peak by 139±19% (mean±S.E.M., n=5) at a concentration of 1 μM. Given that flavonoids can reach this concentration range in plasma after ingestion of flavonoid-rich food, these compounds could be modulating the uniporter under physiological conditions. PMID:15324303

  2. Plasma membrane calcium ATPase activity is regulated by actin oligomers through direct interaction.

    PubMed

    Dalghi, Marianela G; Fernández, Marisa M; Ferreira-Gomes, Mariela; Mangialavori, Irene C; Malchiodi, Emilio L; Strehler, Emanuel E; Rossi, Juan Pablo F C

    2013-08-09

    As recently described by our group, plasma membrane calcium ATPase (PMCA) activity can be regulated by the actin cytoskeleton. In this study, we characterize the interaction of purified G-actin with isolated PMCA and examine the effect of G-actin during the first polymerization steps. As measured by surface plasmon resonance, G-actin directly interacts with PMCA with an apparent 1:1 stoichiometry in the presence of Ca(2+) with an apparent affinity in the micromolar range. As assessed by the photoactivatable probe 1-O-hexadecanoyl-2-O-[9-[[[2-[(125)I]iodo-4-(trifluoromethyl-3H-diazirin-3-yl)benzyl]oxy]carbonyl]nonanoyl]-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine, the association of PMCA to actin produced a shift in the distribution of the conformers of the pump toward a calmodulin-activated conformation. G-actin stimulates Ca(2+)-ATPase activity of the enzyme when incubated under polymerizing conditions, displaying a cooperative behavior. The increase in the Ca(2+)-ATPase activity was related to an increase in the apparent affinity for Ca(2+) and an increase in the phosphoenzyme levels at steady state. Although surface plasmon resonance experiments revealed only one binding site for G-actin, results clearly indicate that more than one molecule of G-actin was needed for a regulatory effect on the pump. Polymerization studies showed that the experimental conditions are compatible with the presence of actin in the first stages of assembly. Altogether, these observations suggest that the stimulatory effect is exerted by short oligomers of actin. The functional interaction between actin oligomers and PMCA represents a novel regulatory pathway by which the cortical actin cytoskeleton participates in the regulation of cytosolic Ca(2+) homeostasis.

  3. Ultrasonic Cold Forming of Aircraft Sheet Materials

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1981-01-01

    sheet materials, including titanium 6A1-4V alloy, nickel, and stainless steel AM355 -CRT, into a helicopter rotor blade nose cap contour. Equipment for...were nickel 200, 6A1-4V titanium alloy, and AM355 -CRT stainlesb steel. Ultrasonic activation has been demonstrated to produce significant benefits In...titanium alloy, and AM355 -CRT stainless steel. Modifications in the equipment and procedures were made as the work pro- gressed. Samples of the formed

  4. Wind Powering America Initiative (Fact Sheet)

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    2011-01-01

    The U.S. Department of Energy's Wind Powering America initiative engages in technology market acceptance, barrier reduction, and technology deployment support activities. This fact sheet outlines ways in which the Wind Powering America team works to reduce barriers to appropriate wind energy deployment, primarily by focusing on six program areas: workforce development, communications and outreach, stakeholder analysis and resource assessment, wind technology technical support, wind power for Native Americans, and federal sector support and collaboration.

  5. Preferences of a Traditional Extension Audience for Self-Directed Delivery Methods.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Caldwell, Allen E.; Richardson, John G.

    1995-01-01

    North Carolina farmers growing barley (n=20) tested 3 self-directed information delivery methods: fact sheets, fact sheets plus audiocassettes, and an extension bulletin/pamphlet. The fact sheet/cassette was preferred by 17 of 20; they achieved significant knowledge gains with self-directed methods. The fact sheet/cassette was considered…

  6. Direct Functionalization of Nitrogen Heterocycles via Rh-Catalyzed C-H Bond Activation

    SciTech Connect

    Lewis, Jared; Bergman, Robert; Ellman, Jonathan

    2008-02-04

    Nitrogen heterocycles are present in many compounds of enormous practical importance, ranging from pharmaceutical agents and biological probes to electroactive materials. Direct funtionalization of nitrogen heterocycles through C-H bond activation constitutes a powerful means of regioselectively introducing a variety of substituents with diverse functional groups onto the heterocycle scaffold. Working together, our two groups have developed a family of Rh-catalyzed heterocycle alkylation and arylation reactions that are notable for their high level of functional-group compatibility. This Account describes their work in this area, emphasizing the relevant mechanistic insights that enabled synthetic advances and distinguished the resulting transformations from other methods. They initially discovered an intramolecular Rh-catalyzed C-2-alkylation of azoles by alkenyl groups. That reaction provided access to a number of di-, tri-, and tetracyclic azole derivatives. They then developed conditions that exploited microwave heating to expedite these reactions. While investigating the mechanism of this transformation, they discovered that a novel substrate-derived Rh-N-heterocyclic carbene (NHC) complex was involved as an intermediate. They then synthesized analogous Rh-NHC complexes directly by treating precursors to the intermediate [RhCl(PCy{sub 3}){sub 2}] with N-methylbenzimidazole, 3-methyl-3,4-dihydroquinazolein, and 1-methyl-1,4-benzodiazepine-2-one. Extensive kinetic analysis and DFT calculations supported a mechanism for carbene formation in which the catalytically active RhCl(PCy{sub 3}){sub 2} fragment coordinates to the heterocycle before intramolecular activation of the C-H bond occurs. The resulting Rh-H intermediate ultimately tautomerizes to the observed carbene complex. With this mechanistic information and the discovery that acid co-catalysts accelerate the alkylation, they developed conditions that efficiently and intermolecularly alkylate a variety of

  7. THIN CURRENT SHEETS AND ASSOCIATED ELECTRON HEATING IN TURBULENT SPACE PLASMA

    SciTech Connect

    Chasapis, A.; Retinò, A.; Sahraoui, F.; Canu, P.; Vaivads, A.; Khotyaintsev, Yu. V.; Sundkvist, D.; Greco, A.; Sorriso-Valvo, L.

    2015-05-01

    Intermittent structures, such as thin current sheets, are abundant in turbulent plasmas. Numerical simulations indicate that such current sheets are important sites of energy dissipation and particle heating occurring at kinetic scales. However, direct evidence of dissipation and associated heating within current sheets is scarce. Here, we show a new statistical study of local electron heating within proton-scale current sheets by using high-resolution spacecraft data. Current sheets are detected using the Partial Variance of Increments (PVI) method which identifies regions of strong intermittency. We find that strong electron heating occurs in high PVI (>3) current sheets while no significant heating occurs in low PVI cases (<3), indicating that the former are dominant for energy dissipation. Current sheets corresponding to very high PVI (>5) show the strongest heating and most of the time are consistent with ongoing magnetic reconnection. This suggests that reconnection is important for electron heating and dissipation at kinetic scales in turbulent plasmas.

  8. Magnetic double-gradient instability and flapping waves in a current sheet.

    PubMed

    Erkaev, N V; Semenov, V S; Biernat, H K

    2007-12-07

    A new kind of magnetohydrodynamic instability and waves are analyzed for a current sheet in the presence of a small normal magnetic field component varying along the sheet. These waves and instability are related to the existence of two gradients of the tangential (B_{tau}) and normal (B_{n}) magnetic field components along the normal (nabla_{n}B_{tau}) and tangential (nabla_{tau}B_{n}) directions with respect to the current sheet. The current sheet can be stable or unstable if the multiplication of two magnetic gradients is positive or negative. In the stable region, the kinklike wave mode is interpreted as so-called flapping waves observed in Earth's magnetotail current sheet. The kink wave group velocity estimated for the Earth's current sheet is of the order of a few tens of kilometers per second. This is in good agreement with the observations of the flapping motions of the magnetotail current sheet.

  9. Removing a sheet from the surface of a melt using gas jets

    DOEpatents

    Kellerman, Peter L; Thronson, Gregory D; Sun, Dawei

    2014-04-01

    In one embodiment, a sheet production apparatus comprises a vessel configured to hold a melt of a material. A cooling plate is disposed proximate the melt and is configured to form a sheet of the material on the melt. A first gas jet is configured to direct a gas toward an edge of the vessel. A sheet of a material is translated horizontally on a surface of the melt and the sheet is removed from the melt. The first gas jet may be directed at the meniscus and may stabilize this meniscus or increase local pressure within the meniscus.

  10. Structure of the Jovian Magnetodisk Current Sheet: Initial Galileo Observations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Russell, C. T.; Huddleston, D. E.; Khurana, K. K.; Kivelson, M. G.

    2001-01-01

    The ten-degree tilt of the Jovian magnetic dipole causes the magnetic equator to move back and forth across Jupiter's rotational equator and tile Galileo orbit that lies therein. Beyond about 24 Jovian radii, the equatorial current sheet thins and tile magnetic structure changes from quasi-dipolar into magnetodisk-like with two regions of nearly radial but antiparallel magnetic field separated by a strong current layer. The magnetic field at the center of the current sheet is very weak in this region. Herein we examine tile current sheet at radial distances from 24 55 Jovian radii. We find that the magnetic structure very much resembles tile structure seen at planetary magnetopause and tail current sheet crossings. Tile magnetic field variation is mainly linear with little rotation of the field direction, At times there is almost no small-scale structure present and the normal component of the magnetic field is almost constant through the current sheet. At other times there are strong small-scale structures present in both the southward and northward directions. This small-scale structure appears to grow with radial distance and may provide the seeds for tile explosive reconnection observed at even greater radial distances oil tile nightside. Beyond about 40 Jovian radii, the thin current sheet also appears to be almost constantly in oscillatory motion with periods of about 10 min. The amplitude of these oscillations also appears to grow with radial distance. The source of these fluctuations may be dynamical events in tile more distant magnetodisk.

  11. A Preliminary Investigation of Self-Directed Learning Activities in a Non-Formal Blended Learning Environment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schwier, Richard A.; Morrison, Dirk; Daniel, Ben K.

    2009-01-01

    This research considers how professional participants in a non-formal self-directed learning environment (NFSDL) made use of self-directed learning activities in a blended face-to-face and on line learning professional development course. The learning environment for the study was a professional development seminar on teaching in higher education…

  12. Chronologic evidence for multiple periods of loess deposition during the Late Pleistocene in the Missouri and Mississippi River Valley, United States: Implications for the activity of the Laurentide ice sheet

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Forman, S.L.; Bettis, E. Arthur; Kemmis, T.J.; Miller, B.B.

    1992-01-01

    The loess stratigraphy of the mid-continental U.S. is an important proxy record for the activity of the Laurentide Ice Sheet in North America. One of the most outstanding problems is deciphering the age of loess deposits in this area during the late Pleistocene. Radiocarbon dating of snails and thermoluminescence dating of the fine-silt fraction (4-11 ??m) from loess at the Loveland Loess type section, Loveland, Iowa and a recent excavation at the Pleasant Grove School section. Madison County, Illinois provide new chronologic control on loess deposition in the Mississippi/Missouri River Valley chronology indicates that the Loveland Loess is Illinoian in age (135??20 ka) but is not correlative with the Teneriffe Silt which is dated to 77 ?? 8 ka. Concordant radiocarbon and thermoluminescence age estimates demonstrate that the Roxana Silt and a correlative loess in Iowa, the Pisgah Formation, is probably 40-30 ka old. These age estimates in conjunction with previous results indicate that there were four periods of loess deposition during the last 150 ka at 25-12 ka, 45-30 ka, 85-70 ka and at ca. 135 ?? 20 ka. This chronology of loess deposition supports the presence of both a late Illinoian and early Wisconsinan loess and associated soils. Thus, there may be more than one soil in the loess stratigraphy of the mid-continental U.S. with morphologies similar to the Sangamon Soil. The last three periods of loess deposition may be correlative with periods of elevated dust concentrations recorded in the Dye 3 ice core from southern Greenland. This is particularly significant because both areas possibly had the same source for eolian particles. Reconstructions of atmospheric circulation for glacial periods show a southerly deflected jet stream that could have transported dust from the mid-continental USA to southern Greenland. Lastly, the inferred record of loess deposition is parallel to a chronology for deglaciation of the Laurentide Ice Sheet deciphered from chronologic

  13. Selective killing of cancer cells by β-lapachone: Direct checkpoint activation as a strategy against cancer

    PubMed Central

    Li, Youzhi; Sun, Xiangao; LaMont, J. Thomas; Pardee, Arthur B.; Li, Chiang J.

    2003-01-01

    Most chemotherapeutic drugs kill cancer cells by indirectly activating checkpoint-mediated apoptosis after creating nonselective damage to DNA or microtubules, which accounts for their toxicity toward normal cells. We seek to target cancer cells by directly activating checkpoint regulators without creating such damage. Here, we show that β-lapachone selectively induces apoptosis in cancer cells without causing the death of nontransformed cells in culture. This unusual selectivity against cancer cells is preceded by activation of S-phase checkpoint and selective induction of E2F1, a regulator of checkpoint-mediated apoptosis. This study suggests direct checkpoint activation as a strategy against cancer. PMID:12598645

  14. The mechanical actions of muscles predict the direction of muscle activation during postural perturbations in the cat hindlimb

    PubMed Central

    Nichols, T. Richard

    2013-01-01

    Humans and cats respond to balance challenges, delivered via horizontal support surface perturbations, with directionally selective muscle recruitment and constrained ground reaction forces. It has been suggested that this postural strategy arises from an interaction of limb biomechanics and proprioceptive networks in the spinal cord. A critical experimental validation of this hypothesis is to test the prediction that the principal directions of muscular activation oppose the directions responding muscles exert their forces on the environment. Therefore, our objective was to quantify the endpoint forces of a diverse set of cat hindlimb muscles and compare them with the directionally sensitive muscle activation patterns generated in the intact and decerebrate cat. We hypothesized that muscles are activated based on their mechanical advantage. Our primary expectation was that the principal direction of muscle activation during postural perturbations will be directed oppositely (180°) from the muscle endpoint ground reaction force. We found that muscle activation during postural perturbations was indeed directed oppositely to the endpoint reaction forces of that muscle. These observations indicate that muscle recruitment during balance challenges is driven, at least in part, by limb architecture. This suggests that sensory sources that provide feedback about the mechanical environment of the limb are likely important to appropriate and effective responses during balance challenges. Finally, we extended the analysis to three dimensions and different stance widths, laying the groundwork for a more comprehensive study of postural regulation than was possible with measurements confined to the horizontal plane and a single stance configuration. PMID:24304861

  15. The mechanical actions of muscles predict the direction of muscle activation during postural perturbations in the cat hindlimb.

    PubMed

    Honeycutt, Claire F; Nichols, T Richard

    2014-03-01

    Humans and cats respond to balance challenges, delivered via horizontal support surface perturbations, with directionally selective muscle recruitment and constrained ground reaction forces. It has been suggested that this postural strategy arises from an interaction of limb biomechanics and proprioceptive networks in the spinal cord. A critical experimental validation of this hypothesis is to test the prediction that the principal directions of muscular activation oppose the directions responding muscles exert their forces on the environment. Therefore, our objective was to quantify the endpoint forces of a diverse set of cat hindlimb muscles and compare them with the directionally sensitive muscle activation patterns generated in the intact and decerebrate cat. We hypothesized that muscles are activated based on their mechanical advantage. Our primary expectation was that the principal direction of muscle activation during postural perturbations will be directed oppositely (180°) from the muscle endpoint ground reaction force. We found that muscle activation during postural perturbations was indeed directed oppositely to the endpoint reaction forces of that muscle. These observations indicate that muscle recruitment during balance challenges is driven, at least in part, by limb architecture. This suggests that sensory sources that provide feedback about the mechanical environment of the limb are likely important to appropriate and effective responses during balance challenges. Finally, we extended the analysis to three dimensions and different stance widths, laying the groundwork for a more comprehensive study of postural regulation than was possible with measurements confined to the horizontal plane and a single stance configuration.

  16. Ohmic heated sheet for the Ca ion beam production

    SciTech Connect

    Efremov, A.; Bogomolov, S.; Kazarinov, N.; Kochagov, O.; Loginov, V.

    2008-02-15

    The production of intense accelerated {sup 48}Ca ion beams is the key problem in the experiments on the synthesis of new superheavy nuclei. For this purpose in the FLNR (JINR), an electron cyclotron resonance ion source is used at the U-400 cyclotron. The combination of a micro oven with a hot tantalum sheet inside the discharge chamber allowed the production of the intense {sup 48}Ca{sup 5+} ion beam at the {sup 48}Ca consumption of about 0.5 mg/h. In this case, the tantalum sheet is heated by microwaves and plasma electrons. The microwave power of up to 500 W is required to heat the sheet to the temperature of about 500 deg. C. To decrease the required microwave power, a new sheet with a direct Ohmic heating was designed. The present paper describes the method, technique, and preliminary experimental results on the production of the Ca ion beam.

  17. Development of bifurcated current sheets in solar wind reconnection exhausts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mistry, R.; Eastwood, J. P.; Phan, T. D.; Hietala, H.

    2015-12-01

    Petschek-type reconnection is expected to result in bifurcations of reconnection current sheets. In contrast, Hall reconnection simulations show smooth changes in the reconnecting magnetic field. Here we study three solar wind reconnection events where different spacecraft sample oppositely directed reconnection exhausts from a common reconnection site. The spacecraft's relative separations and measurements of the exhaust width are used to geometrically calculate each spacecraft's distance from the X line. We find that in all cases spacecraft farthest from the X line observe clearly bifurcated reconnection current sheets, while spacecraft nearer to the X line do not. These observations suggest that clear bifurcations of reconnection current sheets occur at large distances from the X line (~1000 ion skin depths) and that Petschek-type signatures are less developed close to the reconnection site. This may imply that fully developed bifurcations of reconnection current sheets are unlikely to be observed in the near-Earth magnetotail.

  18. Directed evolution can rapidly improve the activity of chimeric assembly-line enzymes

    PubMed Central

    Fischbach, Michael A.; Lai, Jonathan R.; Roche, Eric D.; Walsh, Christopher T.; Liu, David R.

    2007-01-01

    Nonribosomal peptides (NRPs) are produced by NRP synthetase (NRPS) enzymes that function as molecular assembly lines. The modular architecture of NRPSs suggests that a domain responsible for activating a building block could be replaced with a domain from a foreign NRPS to create a chimeric assembly line that produces a new variant of a natural NRP. However, such chimeric NRPS modules are often heavily impaired, impeding efforts to create novel NRP variants by swapping domains from different modules or organisms. Here we show that impaired chimeric NRPSs can be functionally restored by directed evolution. Using rounds of mutagenesis coupled with in vivo screens for NRP production, we rapidly isolated variants of two different chimeric NRPSs with ≈10-fold improvements in enzyme activity and product yield, including one that produces new derivatives of the potent NRP/polyketide antibiotic andrimid. Because functional restoration in these examples required only modest library sizes (103 to 104 clones) and three or fewer rounds of screening, our approach may be widely applicable even for NRPSs from genetically challenging hosts. PMID:17620609

  19. Directed evolution of an orthogonal nucleoside analog kinase via fluorescence-activated cell sorting.

    PubMed

    Liu, Lingfeng; Li, Yongfeng; Liotta, Dennis; Lutz, Stefan

    2009-07-01

    Nucleoside analogs (NAs) represent an important category of prodrugs for the treatment of viral infections and cancer, yet the biological potency of many analogs is compromised by their inefficient activation through cellular 2'-deoxyribonucleoside kinases (dNKs). We herein report the directed evolution and characterization of an orthogonal NA kinase for 3'-deoxythymidine (ddT), using a new FACS-based screening protocol in combination with a fluorescent analog of ddT. Four rounds of random mutagenesis and DNA shuffling of Drosophila melanogaster 2'-deoxynucleoside kinase, followed by FACS analysis, yielded an orthogonal ddT kinase with a 6-fold higher activity for the NA and a 20-fold k(cat)/K(M) preference for ddT over thymidine, an overall 10,000-fold change in substrate specificity. The contributions of individual amino acid substitutions in the ddT kinase were evaluated by reverse engineering, enabling a detailed structure-function analysis to rationalize the observed changes in performance. Based on our results, kinase engineering with fluorescent NAs and FACS should prove a highly versatile method for evolving selective kinase:NA pairs and for studying fundamental aspects of the structure-function relationship in dNKs.

  20. Pyrethroid Insecticides Directly Activate Microglia Through Interaction With Voltage-Gated Sodium Channels.

    PubMed

    Hossain, Muhammad M; Liu, Jason; Richardson, Jason R

    2017-01-01

    Microglia are considered to be the resident immune cells of the central nervous system and contribute significantly to ongoing neuroinflammation in a variety of neurodegenerative diseases. Recently, we and others identified that voltage-gated sodium channels (VGSC) are present on microglia cells and contribute to excessive accumulation of intracellular Na(+ )and release of major pro-inflammatory cytokine tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-α). Based on this finding and the fact that pyrethroid pesticides act on VGSC, we hypothesized that exposure of microglia to the pyrethroid pesticides, permethrin and deltamethrin, would activate microglia and increase the release of TNF-α. BV2 cells or primary microglia were treated with 0-5 µM deltamethrin or permethrin in the presence or absence of tetrodotoxin (TTX), a VGSC blocker for 24-48 h. Both pyrethroids caused a rapid Na(+ )influx and increased accumulation of intracellular sodium [(Na(+))i] in the microglia in a dose- and time-dependent manner, which was significantly reduced by TTX. Furthermore, deltamethrin and permethrin increased the release of TNF-α in a dose- and time-dependent manner, which was significantly reduced by pre-treatment of cells with TTX. These results demonstrate that pyrethroid pesticides may directly activate microglial cells through their interaction with microglial VGSC. Because neuroinflammation plays a key role in many neurodegenerative diseases, these data provide an additional mechanism by which exposure to pyrethroid insecticides may contribute to neurodegeneration.

  1. Quantifying surface albedo and other direct biogeophysical climate forcings of forestry activities.

    PubMed

    Bright, Ryan M; Zhao, Kaiguang; Jackson, Robert B; Cherubini, Francesco

    2015-09-01

    By altering fluxes of heat, momentum, and moisture exchanges between the land surface and atmosphere, forestry and other land-use activities affect climate. Although long recognized scientifically as being important, these so-called biogeophysical forcings are rarely included in climate policies for forestry and other land management projects due to the many challenges associated with their quantification. Here, we review the scientific literature in the fields of atmospheric science and terrestrial ecology in light of three main objectives: (i) to elucidate the challenges associated with quantifying biogeophysical climate forcings connected to land use and land management, with a focus on the forestry sector; (ii) to identify and describe scientific approaches and/or metrics facilitating the quantification and interpretation of direct biogeophysical climate forcings; and (iii) to identify and recommend research priorities that can help overcome the challenges of their attribution to specific land-use activities, bridging the knowledge gap between the climate modeling, forest ecology, and resource management communities. We find that ignoring surface biogeophysics may mislead climate mitigation policies, yet existing metrics are unlikely to be sufficient. Successful metrics ought to (i) include both radiative and nonradiative climate forcings; (ii) reconcile disparities between biogeophysical and biogeochemical forcings, and (iii) acknowledge trade-offs between global and local climate benefits. We call for more coordinated research among terrestrial ecologists, resource managers, and coupled climate modelers to harmonize datasets, refine analytical techniques, and corroborate and validate metrics that are more amenable to analyses at the scale of an individual site or region.

  2. Site Directed Mutagenesis of Schizosaccharomyces pombe Glutathione Synthetase Produces an Enzyme with Homoglutathione Synthetase Activity

    PubMed Central

    Dworeck, Tamara; Zimmermann, Martin

    2012-01-01

    Three different His-tagged, mutant forms of the fission yeast glutathione synthetase (GSH2) were derived by site-directed mutagenesis. The mutant and wild-type enzymes were expressed in E. coli DH5α and affinity purified in a two-step procedure. Analysis of enzyme activity showed that it was possible to shift the substrate specificity of GSH2 from Gly (km 0,19; wild-type) to β-Ala or Ser. One mutation (substitution of Ile471, Cy472 to Met and Val and Ala 485 and Thr486 to Leu and Pro) increased the affinity of GSH2 for β-Ala (km 0,07) and lowered the affinity for Gly (km 0,83), which is a characteristic of the enzyme homoglutathione synthetase found in plants. Substitution of Ala485 and Thr486 to Leu and Pro only, increased instead the affinity of GSH2 for Ser (km 0,23) as a substrate, while affinity to Gly was preserved (km 0,12). This provides a new biosynthetic pathway for hydroxymethyl glutathione, which is known to be synthesized from glutathione and Ser in a reaction catalysed by carboxypeptidase Y. The reported findings provide further insight into how specific amino acids positioned in the GSH2 active site facilitate the recognition of different amino acid substrates, furthermore they support the evolutionary theory that homoglutathione synthetase evolved from glutathione synthetase by a single gene duplication event. PMID:23091597

  3. The effect of transcranial Direct Current Stimulation on gamma activity and working memory in schizophrenia.

    PubMed

    Hoy, Kate E; Bailey, Neil W; Arnold, Sara L; Fitzgerald, Paul B

    2015-08-15

    Working memory impairments in schizophrenia have been strongly associated with abnormalities in gamma oscillations within the dorsolateral prefrontal cortex (DLFPC). We recently published the first ever study showing that anodal transcranial Direct Current Stimulation (tDCS) to the left DLPFC was able to significantly improve working memory performance in schizophrenia. In the current paper we present a secondary analysis from this study, specifically looking at the effect of tDCS on gamma activity and its relationship to working memory. In a repeated measures design we assessed the impact of anodal tDCS (1mA, 2mA, sham) on gamma activity in the left DLPFC at three time-points post-stimulation (0min, 20min, 40min). EEG data was available for 16 participants in the 2mA condition, 13 in the 1mA condition and 12 in the sham condition. Following 2mA stimulation we found a significant increase in gamma event-related synchronisation in the left DLPFC, this was in the context of a significantly improved working memory performance. There was also a significant decrease in gamma event-related synchronisation, with no changes in working memory, following sham stimulation. The current study provides preliminary evidence that tDCS may enhance working memory in schizophrenia by restoring normal gamma oscillatory function.

  4. Dynamic Response of Magnetic Reconnection Due to Current Sheet Variability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    George, D. E.; Jahn, J. M.; Burch, J. L.; Hesse, M.; Pollock, C. J.

    2014-12-01

    Magnetic reconnection is a process which regulates the interaction between regions of magnetized plasma. While many factors have an impact on the evolution of this process, there still remains a lack of understanding of the key behaviors involved in the triggering of fast reconnection. Despite an abundance of in-situ measurements, indicating the high degree of variability in the thickness, density and composition along the current sheet, no simulation studies exist which account for such current sheet variations. 2D and 3D simulations have a periodic boundary in the dimension along the current sheet and so tend to neglect these variations in the current sheet originating external to the modeled reconnection region. Here we focus on the effects on reconnection due to the variability in the thickness and density of the current sheet. Using 2.5D kinetic simulations of 2-species plasma, we isolate and explore the dynamic effects on reconnection associated with variations in the current sheet originating externally to the reconnection region. While periodic boundary conditions are still used, in the direction along the current sheet, a step-change perturbation in thickness or density of the current sheet is introduced once a stable reconnection rate is reached. The dynamic response of the overall system, after introducing the perturbation, is then evaluated, with a focus on the reconnection rate. When the reconnection rate is slowed significantly over time, loading of the inflow region occurs (a build-up of plasma and magnetic energy/pressure. This state is indicated by an asymptotic behavior in the reconnection rate over time. If a sudden variation in the current sheet is introduced under these conditions, a resultant triggering of fast reconnection may occur, which could lead to an episode of fast reconnection, saw-tooth-crash condition or even act as a trigger for sub-storms.

  5. Physical activity and self-esteem: testing direct and indirect relationships associated with psychological and physical mechanisms

    PubMed Central

    Zamani Sani, Seyed Hojjat; Fathirezaie, Zahra; Brand, Serge; Pühse, Uwe; Holsboer-Trachsler, Edith; Gerber, Markus; Talepasand, Siavash

    2016-01-01

    In the present study, we investigated the relationship between physical activity (PA) and self-esteem (SE), while introducing body mass index (BMI), perceived physical fitness (PPF), and body image (BI) in adults (N =264, M =38.10 years). The findings indicated that PA was directly and indirectly associated with SE. BMI predicted SE neither directly nor indirectly, but was directly associated with PPF and both directly and indirectly with BI. Furthermore, PPF was directly related to BI and SE, and a direct association was found between BI and SE. The pattern of results suggests that among a sample of adults, PA is directly and indirectly associated with SE, PPF, and BI, but not with BMI. PA, PPF, and BI appear to play an important role in SE. Accordingly, regular PA should be promoted, in particular, among adults reporting lower SE. PMID:27789950

  6. Physical activity and self-esteem: testing direct and indirect relationships associated with psychological and physical mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Zamani Sani, Seyed Hojjat; Fathirezaie, Zahra; Brand, Serge; Pühse, Uwe; Holsboer-Trachsler, Edith; Gerber, Markus; Talepasand, Siavash

    2016-01-01

    In the present study, we investigated the relationship between physical activity (PA) and self-esteem (SE), while introducing body mass index (BMI), perceived physical fitness (PPF), and body image (BI) in adults (N =264, M =38.10 years). The findings indicated that PA was directly and indirectly associated with SE. BMI predicted SE neither directly nor indirectly, but was directly associated with PPF and both directly and indirectly with BI. Furthermore, PPF was directly related to BI and SE, and a direct association was found between BI and SE. The pattern of results suggests that among a sample of adults, PA is directly and indirectly associated with SE, PPF, and BI, but not with BMI. PA, PPF, and BI appear to play an important role in SE. Accordingly, regular PA should be promoted, in particular, among adults reporting lower SE.

  7. The cancer gene WWOX behaves as an inhibitor of SMAD3 transcriptional activity via direct binding

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background The WW domain containing protein WWOX has been postulated to behave as a tumor suppressor in breast and other cancers. Expression of this protein is lost in over 70% of ER negative tumors. This prompted us to investigate the phenotypic and gene expression effects of loss of WWOX expression in breast cells. Methods Gene expression microarrays and standard in vitro assays were performed on stably silenced WWOX (shRNA) normal breast cells. Bioinformatic analyses were used to identify gene networks and transcriptional regulators affected by WWOX silencing. Co-immunoprecipitations and GST-pulldowns were used to demonstrate a direct interaction between WWOX and SMAD3. Reporter assays, ChIP, confocal microscopy and in silico analyses were employed to determine the effect of WWOX silencing on TGFβ-signaling. Results WWOX silencing affected cell proliferation, motility, attachment and deregulated expression of genes involved in cell cycle, motility and DNA damage. Interestingly, we detected an enrichment of targets activated by the SMAD3 transcription factor, including significant upregulation of ANGPTL4, FST, PTHLH and SERPINE1 transcripts. Importantly, we demonstrate that the WWOX protein physically interacts with SMAD3 via WW domain 1. Furthermore, WWOX expression dramatically decreases SMAD3 occupancy at the ANGPTL4 and SERPINE1 promoters and significantly quenches activation of a TGFβ responsive reporter. Additionally, WWOX expression leads to redistribution of SMAD3 from the nuclear to the cytoplasmic compartment. Since the TGFβ target ANGPTL4 plays a key role in lung metastasis development, we performed a meta-analysis of ANGPTL4 expression relative to WWOX in microarray datasets from breast carcinomas. We observed a significant inverse correlation between WWOX and ANGPTL4. Furthermore, the WWOX lo /ANGPTL4 hi cluster of breast tumors is enriched in triple-negative and basal-like sub-types. Tumors with this gene expression signature could represent

  8. A minimalist approach toward protein recognition by epitope transfer from functionally evolved beta-sheet surfaces.

    PubMed

    Rajagopal, Srivats; Meyer, Scott C; Goldman, Aaron; Zhou, Min; Ghosh, Indraneel

    2006-11-08

    New approaches for identifying small molecules that specifically target protein surfaces as opposed to active site clefts are of much current interest. Toward this goal, we describe a three-step methodology: in step one, we target a protein of interest by directed evolution of a small beta-sheet scaffold; in step two, we identify residues on the scaffold that are implicated in binding; and in step three, we transfer the chemical information from the beta-sheet to a small molecule mimic. As a case study, we targeted the proteolytic enzyme thrombin, involved in blood coagulation, utilizing a library of beta-sheet epitopes displayed on phage that were previously selected for conservation of structure. We found that the thrombin-binding, beta-sheet displaying mini-proteins retained their structure and stability while inhibiting thrombin at low micromolar inhibition constants. A conserved dityrosine recognition motif separated by 9.2 A was found to be common among the mini-protein inhibitors and was further verified by alanine scanning. A molecule containing two tyrosine residues separated by a linker that matched the spacing on the beta-sheet scaffold inhibited thrombin, whereas a similar dityrosine molecule separated by a shorter 6 A linker could not. Moreover, kinetic analysis revealed that both the mini-protein as well as its minimalist mimic with only two functional residues exhibited noncompetitive inhibition of thrombin. Thus, this reductionist approach affords a simple methodology for transferring information from structured protein scaffolds to yield small molecule leads for targeting protein surfaces with novel mechanisms of action.

  9. Formation and Reconnection of Three-Dimensional Current Sheets in the Solar Corona

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Edmondson, J. K.; Antiochos, S. K.; DeVore, C. R.; Zurbuchen, T. H.

    2010-01-01

    Current-sheet formation and magnetic reconnection are believed to be the basic physical processes responsible for much of the activity observed in astrophysical plasmas, such as the Sun s corona. We investigate these processes for a magnetic configuration consisting of a uniform background field and an embedded line dipole, a topology that is expected to be ubiquitous in the corona. This magnetic system is driven by a uniform horizontal flow applied at the line-tied photosphere. Although both the initial field and the driver are translationally symmetric, the resulting evolution is calculated using a fully three-dimensional magnetohydrodynamic (3D MHD) simulation with adaptive mesh refinement that resolves the current sheet and reconnection dynamics in detail. The advantage of our approach is that it allows us to apply directly the vast body of knowledge gained from the many studies of 2D reconnection to the fully 3D case. We find that a current sheet forms in close analogy to the classic Syrovatskii 2D mechanism, but the resulting evolution is different than expected. The current sheet is globally stable, showing no evidence for a disruption or a secondary instability even for aspect ratios as high as 80:1. The global evolution generally follows the standard Sweet- Parker 2D reconnection model except for an accelerated reconnection rate at a very thin current sheet, due to the tearing instability and the formation of magnetic islands. An interesting conclusion is that despite the formation of fully 3D structures at small scales, the system remains close to 2D at global scales. We discuss the implications of our results for observations of the solar corona. Subject Headings: Sun: corona Sun: magnetic fields Sun: reconnection

  10. Regional geothermal effects on subglacial water routes beneath the last Cordilleran ice sheet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seguinot, Julien; Rogozhina, Irina

    2016-04-01

    The Cordilleran ice sheet, which covered the mountain ranges of north-western America during the last glacial cycle, provides an ideal setting to study the effect of geothermal anomalies on subglacial water routing beneath large-scale ice masses. First, the Cordilleran ice sheet rested directly on a geologically old yet still active subduction zone, which is responsible for significant geothermal variability in the region. Second, the deep valleys and intramontane basins that characterize the Cordilleran topography tend to act as flux wells to further enhance the heterogeneity of this geothermal distribution. Third, compared to the currently ice covered areas such as Greenland and Antarctica where direct observations of the geothermal distribution are exceedingly rare, the region of the North American Cordillera offers insights into geothermal variability from numerous borehole measurements taken across western territories of the US and Canada. Fourth and last, the subglacial water system left ample evidence on the landscape, including vast esker systems, deep canyons and subglacial lake sediments, allowing for an interpretation of the modeled hydrological networks and their comparison with geological data. Here we use the Parallel Ice Sheet Model (PISM) to simulate ice dynamics and simplified subglacial hydrology of the Cordilleran ice sheet through the last 120 000 years. We test several existing reconstructions of the geothermal flux from direct and indirect observations versus a uniform distribution of heat flux to isolate the effects of regional geothermal variability on thermo-hydrological conditions at the base of the last Cordilleran ice sheet. We find that the uncertainties in the geothermal flux distribution as well as regional geothermal anomalies present in the reconstructions have little effect on the modelled ice extent and thickness, but they affect the distribution of melt rate and water routes beneath the ice sheet. All but one of the

  11. Sickle cell disease: current activities, public health implications, and future directions.

    PubMed

    Creary, Melissa; Williamson, Dhelia; Kulkarni, Roshni

    2007-06-01

    Sickle cell disease (SCD) is a genetic blood disorder caused by abnormal hemoglobin that damages and deforms red blood cells (RBCs). The abnormal red cells break down, causing anemia, and obstruct blood vessels, leading to recurrent episodes of severe pain and multiorgan ischemic damage. SCD affects millions of people throughout the world and is particularly common among people whose ancestors come from sub-Saharan Africa. Sickle cell trait (SCT) is an inherited condition in which both normal hemoglobin and sickle hemoglobin are produced in the RBCs. SCT is not a type of sickle cell disease. People with SCT are generally healthy. In SCD, clinical severity varies, ranging from mild and sometimes asymptomatic states to severe symptoms requiring hospitalization. Symptomatic treatments exist, but there is no cure for SCD. Although there has been extensive clinical and basic science research in SCD, many public health issues, such as blood safety surveillance, compliance with immunizations, follow-up of newborns with positive screening tests, stroke prevention, pregnancy complications, pain prevention, quality of life, and thrombosis, in people with SCT remain unaddressed. Currently, efforts are under way to strengthen SCD-related activities within the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC). To date, several activities are being or have been conducted by centers within CDC, including quality assurance of newborn screening tests for SCD, morbidity and mortality studies, genetic studies, and studies focusing on the protective effects of SCT for malaria. This paper discusses the public health implications of SCD, summarizes SCD-related activities within CDC, and points to future directions that the agency can take to begin to address some of these issues.

  12. Alignment of Synaptic Vesicle Macromolecules with the Macromolecules in Active Zone Material that Direct Vesicle Docking

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Jing; Jung, Jae Hoon; Marshall, Robert M.; McMahan, Uel J.

    2013-01-01

    Synaptic vesicles dock at active zones on the presynaptic plasma membrane of a neuron’s axon terminals as a precondition for fusing with the membrane and releasing their neurotransmitter to mediate synaptic impulse transmission. Typically, docked vesicles are next to aggregates of plasma membrane-bound macromolecules called active zone material (AZM). Electron tomography on tissue sections from fixed and stained axon terminals of active and resting frog neuromuscular junctions has led to the conclusion that undocked vesicles are directed to and held at the docking sites by the successive formation of stable connections between vesicle membrane proteins and proteins in different classes of AZM macromolecules. Using the same nanometer scale 3D imaging technology on appropriately stained frog neuromuscular junctions, we found that ∼10% of a vesicle’s luminal volume is occupied by a radial assembly of elongate macromolecules attached by narrow projections, nubs, to the vesicle membrane at ∼25 sites. The assembly’s chiral, bilateral shape is nearly the same vesicle to vesicle, and nubs, at their sites of connection to the vesicle membrane, are linked to macromolecules that span the membrane. For docked vesicles, the orientation of the assembly’s shape relative to the AZM and the presynaptic membrane is the same vesicle to vesicle, whereas for undocked vesicles it is not. The connection sites of most nubs on the membrane of docked vesicles are paired with the connection sites of the different classes of AZM macromolecules that regulate docking, and the membrane spanning macromolecules linked to these nubs are also attached to the AZM macromolecules. We conclude that the luminal assembly of macromolecules anchors in a particular arrangement vesicle membrane macromolecules, which contain the proteins that connect the vesicles to AZM macromolecules during docking. Undocked vesicles must move in a way that aligns this arrangement with the AZM macromolecules for

  13. Direct Measurements of Local Coupling between Myosin Molecules Are Consistent with a Model of Muscle Activation.

    PubMed

    Walcott, Sam; Kad, Neil M

    2015-11-01

    Muscle contracts due to ATP-dependent interactions of myosin motors with thin filaments composed of the proteins actin, troponin, and tropomyosin. Contraction is initiated when calcium binds to troponin, which changes conformation and displaces tropomyosin, a filamentous protein that wraps around the actin filament, thereby exposing myosin binding sites on actin. Myosin motors interact with each other indirectly via tropomyosin, since myosin binding to actin locally displaces tropomyosin and thereby facilitates binding of nearby myosin. Defining and modeling this local coupling between myosin motors is an open problem in muscle modeling and, more broadly, a requirement to understanding the connection between muscle contraction at the molecular and macro scale. It is challenging to directly observe this coupling, and such measurements have only recently been made. Analysis of these data suggests that two myosin heads are required to activate the thin filament. This result contrasts with a theoretical model, which reproduces several indirect measurements of coupling between myosin, that assumes a single myosin head can activate the thin filament. To understand this apparent discrepancy, we incorporated the model into stochastic simulations of the experiments, which generated simulated data that were then analyzed identically to the experimental measurements. By varying a single parameter, good agreement between simulation and experiment was established. The conclusion that two myosin molecules are required to activate the thin filament arises from an assumption, made during data analysis, that the intensity of the fluorescent tags attached to myosin varies depending on experimental condition. We provide an alternative explanation that reconciles theory and experiment without assuming that the intensity of the fluorescent tags varies.

  14. Movement-related activity during goal-directed hand actions in the monkey ventrolateral prefrontal cortex.

    PubMed

    Simone, Luciano; Rozzi, Stefano; Bimbi, Marco; Fogassi, Leonardo

    2015-12-01

    Grasping actions require the integration of two neural processes, one enabling the transformation of object properties into corresponding motor acts, and the other involved in planning and controlling action execution on the basis of contextual information. The first process relies on parieto-premotor circuits, whereas the second is considered to be a prefrontal function. Up to now, the prefrontal cortex has been mainly investigated with conditional visuomotor tasks requiring a learned association between cues and behavioural output. To clarify the functional role of the prefrontal cortex in grasping actions, we recorded the activity of ventrolateral prefrontal (VLPF) neurons while monkeys (Macaca mulatta) performed tasks requiring reaching-grasping actions in different contextual conditions (in light and darkness, memory-guided, and in the absence of abstract learned rules). The results showed that the VLPF cortex contains neurons that are active during action execution (movement-related neurons). Some of them showed grip selectivity, and some also responded to object presentation. Most movement-related neurons discharged during action execution both with and without visual feedback, and this discharge typically did not change when the action was performed with object mnemonic information and in the absence of abstract rules. The findings of this study indicate that a population of VLPF neurons play a role in controlling goal-directed grasping actions in several contexts. This control is probably exerted within a wider network, involving parietal and premotor regions, where the role of VLPF movement-related neurons would be that of activating, on the basis of contextual information, the representation of the motor goal of the intended action (taking possession of an object) during action planning and execution.

  15. Direct observations of active school transportation and stroller use in kindergarten children.

    PubMed

    Rothman, Linda; Macpherson, Alison K; Howard, Andrew; Parkin, Patricia C; Richmond, Sarah A; Birken, Catherine S

    2016-12-01

    Little is known about kindergarten students' active school transportation (AST) and stroller/wagon use as sedentary travel devices. The primary objective of this cross-sectional study was to determine the prevalence of kindergarten children arriving to school by active and sedentary modes, including strollers, in Toronto elementary schools and compare to students in kindergarten to grade 6 (K-6). The secondary objective was to examine factors associated with AST in kindergarten and K-6 students. School travel mode was counted using direct observations at elementary schools in the City of Toronto in 2015. Two samples were observed: 1) Kindergarten sample: a random sample of schools with separate kindergarten entrances (n = 26 schools, 1069 children); 2) Kindergarten to grade 6 sample: observations were conducted at arrival locations at 50% of eligible elementary schools for students of all ages (n = 88 schools, 17,224 children). Proportions arriving by different travel modes were compared using Chi-square analysis. Negative binomial regression was conducted to examine the association between school characteristics and AST. AST was lower in the kindergarten compared to the K-6 sample (60% versus 74%, χ(2) = 91.37, p < 0.001). The predominant sedentary mode for kindergarten students was by vehicle (38%), with < 2% using strollers/wagons. Recent immigrant status was related to higher AST in kindergarten students; higher social disadvantage, crossing guards, school population and collision rates were related to higher AST in the K-6 sample. Factors influencing AST in young students require further investigation to influence the development of healthy active lifestyles at an early age.

  16. Direct Measurements of Local Coupling between Myosin Molecules Are Consistent with a Model of Muscle Activation

    PubMed Central

    Walcott, Sam; Kad, Neil M.

    2015-01-01

    Muscle contracts due to ATP-dependent interactions of myosin motors with thin filaments composed of the proteins actin, troponin, and tropomyosin. Contraction is initiated when calcium binds to troponin, which changes conformation and displaces tropomyosin, a filamentous protein that wraps around the actin filament, thereby exposing myosin binding sites on actin. Myosin motors interact with each other indirectly via tropomyosin, since myosin binding to actin locally displaces tropomyosin and thereby facilitates binding of nearby myosin. Defining and modeling this local coupling between myosin motors is an open problem in muscle modeling and, more broadly, a requirement to understanding the connection between muscle contraction at the molecular and macro scale. It is challenging to directly observe this coupling, and such measurements have only recently been made. Analysis of these data suggests that two myosin heads are required to activate the thin filament. This result contrasts with a theoretical model, which reproduces several indirect measurements of coupling between myosin, that assumes a single myosin head can activate the thin filament. To understand this apparent discrepancy, we incorporated the model into stochastic simulations of the experiments, which generated simulated data that were then analyzed identically to the experimental measurements. By varying a single parameter, good agreement between simulation and experiment was established. The conclusion that two myosin molecules are required to activate the thin filament arises from an assumption, made during data analysis, that the intensity of the fluorescent tags attached to myosin varies depending on experimental condition. We provide an alternative explanation that reconciles theory and experiment without assuming that the intensity of the fluorescent tags varies. PMID:26536123

  17. A comparison of gas geochemistry of fumaroles in the 1912 ash-flow sheet and on active stratovolcanoes, Katmai National Park, Alaska

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Sheppard, D.S.; Janik, C.J.; Keith, T.E.C.

    1992-01-01

    Fumarolic gas samples collected in 1978 and 1979 from the stratovolcanoes Mount Griggs, Mount Mageik, and the 1953-68 SW Trident cone in Katmai National Park, Alaska, have been analysed and the results presented here. Comparison with recalculated analyses of samples collected from the Valley of Ten Thousand Smokes (VTTS) in 1917 and 1919 demonstrates differences between gases from the short-lived VTTS fumaroles, which were not directly magma related, and the fumaroles on the volcanic peaks. Fumarolic gases of Mount Griggs have an elevated total He content, suggesting a more direct deep crustal or mantle source for these gases than those from the other volcanoes. ?? 1992.

  18. Thermoelectric properties of single-layered SnSe sheet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Fancy Qian; Zhang, Shunhong; Yu, Jiabing; Wang, Qian

    2015-09-01

    Motivated by the recent study of inspiring thermoelectric properties in bulk SnSe [Zhao et al., Nature, 2014, 508, 373] and the experimental synthesis of SnSe sheets [Chen et al., J. Am. Chem. Soc., 2013, 135, 1213], we have carried out systematic calculations for a single-layered SnSe sheet focusing on its stability, electronic structure and thermoelectric properties by using density functional theory combined with Boltzmann transport theory. We have found that the sheet is dynamically and thermally stable with a band gap of 1.28 eV, and the figure of merit (ZT) reaches 3.27 (2.76) along the armchair (zigzag) direction with optimal n-type carrier concentration, which is enhanced nearly 7 times compared to its bulk counterpart at 700 K due to quantum confinement effect. Furthermore, we designed four types of thermoelectric couples by assembling single-layered SnSe sheets with different transport directions and doping types, and found that their efficiencies are all above 13%, which are higher than those of thermoelectric couples made of commercial bulk Bi2Te3 (7%-8%), suggesting the great potential of single-layered SnSe sheets for heat-electricity conversion.Motivated by the recent study of inspiring thermoelectric properties in bulk SnSe [Zhao et al., Nature, 2014, 508, 373] and the experimental synthesis of SnSe sheets [Chen et al., J. Am. Chem. Soc., 2013, 135, 1213], we have carried out systematic calculations for a single-layered SnSe sheet focusing on its stability, electronic structure and thermoelectric properties by using density functional theory combined with Boltzmann transport theory. We have found that the sheet is dynamically and thermally stable with a band gap of 1.28 eV, and the figure of merit (ZT) reaches 3.27 (2.76) along the armchair (zigzag) direction with optimal n-type carrier concentration, which is enhanced nearly 7 times compared to its bulk counterpart at 700 K due to quantum confinement effect. Furthermore, we designed four types of

  19. Eruptive Current Sheets Trailing SOHO/LASCO CMEs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Webb, David F.

    2015-04-01

    Current sheets are important signatures of magnetic reconnection during the eruption of solar magnetic structures. Many models of eruptive flare/Coronal Mass Ejections (CMEs) involve formation of a current sheet connecting the ejecting CME flux rope with the post-eruption magnetic loop arcade. Current sheets have been interpreted in white light images as narrow rays trailing the outward-moving CME, in ultraviolet spectra as narrow, bright hot features, and with different manifestations in other wavebands. This study continues that of Webb et al. (2003), who analyzed SMM white light CMEs having candidate magnetic disconnection features at the base of the CME. About half of those were followed by coaxial, bright rays suggestive of newly formed current sheets, and Webb et al. (2003) presented detailed results of analysis of those structures. In this work we extend the study of white light eruptive current sheets to the more sensitive and extensive SOHO/LASCO coronagraph data on CMEs. We comprehensively examined all LASCO CMEs during two periods that we identify with the minimum and maximum activity of solar cycle 23. We identified ~130 ray/current sheets during these periods, nearly all of which trailed CMEs with concave-outward backs. The occurrence rate of the ray/current sheets is 6-7% of all CMEs, irrespective of the solar cycle. We analyze the rays for durations, speeds, alignments, and motions and compare the observational results with some model predictions.

  20. Reconstructing the last Newfoundland Ice Sheet,Canada.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McHenry, Maureen; Dunlop, Paul

    2015-04-01

    attempt at unravelling this new record using flowset analysis which separates discrete ice flow patterns into snapshots of ice sheet behaviour through time. Our initial flowset analysis shows the NIS was a dynamic ice sheet which was susceptible to configuration changes throughout the last glacial cycle including ice divide migration, regional configuration changes, ice stream activity and enhanced ice flow caused by marine drawdown.