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Sample records for activity dna binding

  1. The quinobenzoxazines: relationship between DNA binding and biological activity.

    PubMed

    Kwok, Y; Sun, D; Clement, J J; Hurley, L H

    1999-10-01

    The quinobenzoxazine compounds, derived from antibacterial quinolones, is active in vitro and in vivo against murine and human tumors. In this contribution, we show that the relative DNA binding affinity of the quinobenzoxazine compounds correlates with their cytotoxicity, their ability to inhibit gyrase-DNA complex formation, and the decatenation of kinetoplast DNA by human topoisomerase II. DNA binding studies with the descarboxy-A-62176 analogue indicate that the beta-keto acid moiety of the quinobenzoxazine compounds plays an important role in their interaction with DNA.

  2. The DNA-remodelling activity of DnaD is the sum of oligomerization and DNA-binding activities on separate domains

    PubMed Central

    Carneiro, Maria J. V. M.; Zhang, Wenke; Ioannou, Charikleia; Scott, David J.; Allen, Stephanie; Roberts, Clive J.; Soultanas, Panos

    2011-01-01

    Summary The Bacillus subtilis DnaD protein is an essential protein that has been implicated in the primosomal step of DNA replication, and recently in global DNA remodelling. Here we show that DnaD consists of two domains with distinct activities; an N-terminal domain (Nd) with oligomerization activity, and a C-terminal domain (Cd) with DNA-binding activity and a second DNA-induced oligomerization activity. Although Cd can bind to DNA and form large nucleoprotein complexes, it does not exhibit global DNA-remodelling activity. The presence of separate Nd does not restore this activity. Our data suggest that the global DNA-remodelling activity of DnaD is the sum of three separate oligomerization and DNA-binding activities residing on two distinct but linked domains. PMID:16677303

  3. Photo-activated DNA binding and antimicrobial activities of furoquinoline and pyranoquinolone alkaloids from rutaceae.

    PubMed

    Hanawa, Fujinori; Fokialakis, Nikolas; Skaltsounis, Alexios-Leandros

    2004-06-01

    To find novel photo-active compounds of potential use in photochemotherapy from higher plants, photo-activated antimicrobial and DNA binding activities of the furoquinolines, skimmianine, kokusaginine, and haplopine, and a pyranoquinolone, flindersine, from two species of Rutaceae plants were investigated. TLC overlay assays against a methichillin-resistant strain of Staphylococcus aureus and Candida albicans were employed to test antimicrobial properties. All of the tested compounds showed photo-activated antimicrobial activity against S. aureus in the order of kokusaginine > haplopine, flindersine > skimmianine. Weaker activity was found for C. albicans. Photo-activated DNA binding activity of these compounds was investigated by a method using restriction enzymes and a specially designed 1.5 kb DNA fragment. Kokusaginine showed inhibition against all of the 16 restriction enzymes. Haplopine showed a similar inhibition pattern but the binding activity against Asc I and Sma I with restriction sequences consisting only of G and C was very weak. Skimmianine showed binding activity against Xba I, BciV I, Sal I, Pst I, Sph I and Hind III, but very weak or no activity was found for the other restriction enzymes. A pyranoquinolone, flindersine, showed no activity against any of the restriction enzymes. Photo-activated DNA binding activity of furoquinolines was therefore in the order of kokusaginine > haplopine > skimmianine, which was the same order as their photo-activated antimicrobial activity against S. aureus. Therefore, it was concluded that DNA is one of the cellular targets for the furoquinolines to exert their biological activities, similar to psoralens. However, because flindersine showed photo-activated antimicrobial activity against S. aureus but did not show photo-activated DNA binding activity, it is clear that there are other cellular target components for this compound to exert photo-toxic activity.

  4. Potent inhibition of DNA unwinding and ATPase activities of pea DNA helicase 45 by DNA-binding agents.

    PubMed

    Pham, Xuan Hoi; Tuteja, Narendra

    2002-06-07

    Pea DNA helicase 45 (PDH45) is an ATP-dependent DNA unwinding enzyme, with intrinsic DNA-dependent ATPase activity [Plant J. 24 (2000) 219]. We have determined the effect of various DNA-binding agents, such as daunorubicin, ethidium bromide, ellipticine, cisplatin, nogalamycin, actinomycin C1, and camptothecin on the DNA unwinding and ATPase activities of the plant nuclear DNA helicase PDH45. The results show that all the agents except actinomycin C1, and camptothecin inhibited the helicase (apparent K(i) values ranging from 1.5 to 7.0 microM) and ATPase (apparent K(i) values ranging from 2.5 to 11.9 microM) activities. This is the first study to show the effect of various DNA-binding agents on the plant nuclear helicase and also first to demonstrate inhibition of any helicase by cisplatin. Another striking finding that the actinomycin C1 and ellipticine act differentially on PDH45 as compared to pea chloroplast helicase suggests that the mechanism of DNA unwinding could be different in nucleus and chloroplast. These results suggest that the intercalation of the inhibitors into duplex DNA generates a complex that impedes translocation of PDH45, resulting in both the inhibitions of unwinding activity and ATP hydrolysis. This study would be useful to obtain a better understanding of the mechanism of plant nuclear DNA helicase unwinding and the mechanism by which these agents can disturb genome integrity.

  5. Role of Single-Stranded DNA Binding Activity of T Antigen in Simian Virus 40 DNA Replication

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Chunxiao; Roy, Rupa; Simmons, Daniel T.

    2001-01-01

    We have previously mapped the single-stranded DNA binding domain of large T antigen to amino acid residues 259 to 627. By using internal deletion mutants, we show that this domain most likely begins after residue 301 and that the region between residues 501 and 550 is not required. To study the function of this binding activity, a series of single-point substitutions were introduced in this domain, and the mutants were tested for their ability to support simian virus 40 (SV40) replication and to bind to single-stranded DNA. Two replication-defective mutants (429DA and 460EA) were grossly impaired in single-stranded DNA binding. These two mutants were further tested for other biochemical activities needed for viral DNA replication. They bound to origin DNA and formed double hexamers in the presence of ATP. Their ability to unwind origin DNA and a helicase substrate was severely reduced, although they still had ATPase activity. These results suggest that the single-stranded DNA binding activity is involved in DNA unwinding. The two mutants were also very defective in structural distortion of origin DNA, making it likely that single-stranded DNA binding is also required for this process. These data show that single-stranded DNA binding is needed for at least two steps during SV40 DNA replication. PMID:11222709

  6. Quercetin-Iron Complex: Synthesis, Characterization, Antioxidant, DNA Binding, DNA Cleavage, and Antibacterial Activity Studies.

    PubMed

    Raza, Aun; Xu, Xiuquan; Xia, Li; Xia, Changkun; Tang, Jian; Ouyang, Zhen

    2016-11-01

    Quercetin-iron (II) complex was synthesized and characterized by elemental analysis, ultraviolet-visible spectrophotometry, fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, mass spectrometry, proton nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy, thermogravimetry and differential scanning calorimetry, scanning electron micrography and molar conductivity. The low molar conductivity value investigates the non-electrolyte nature of the complex. The elemental analysis and other physical and spectroscopic methods reveal the 1:2 stoichiometric ratio (metal:ligand) of the complex. Antioxidant study of the quercetin and its metal complex against 2, 2-di-phenyl-1-picryl hydrazyl radical showed that the complex has much more radical scavenging activity than free quercetin. The interaction of quercetin-iron (II) complex with DNA was determined using ultraviolet visible spectra, fluorescence spectra and agarose gel electrophoresis. The results showed that quercetin-iron (II) complex can intercalate moderately with DNA, quench a strong intercalator ethidium bromide and compete for the intercalative binding sites. The complex showed significant cleavage of pBR 322 DNA from supercoiled form to nicked circular form and these cleavage effects were dose-dependent. Moreover, the mechanism of DNA cleavage indicated that it was an oxidative cleavage pathway. These results revealed the potential nuclease activity of complex to cleave DNA. In addition, antibacterial activity of complex on E.coli and S. aureus was also investigated. The results showed that complex has higher antibacterial activity than ligand.

  7. Retinoblastoma-binding protein 1 has an interdigitated double Tudor domain with DNA binding activity.

    PubMed

    Gong, Weibin; Wang, Jinfeng; Perrett, Sarah; Feng, Yingang

    2014-02-21

    Retinoblastoma-binding protein 1 (RBBP1) is a tumor and leukemia suppressor that binds both methylated histone tails and DNA. Our previous studies indicated that RBBP1 possesses a Tudor domain, which cannot bind histone marks. In order to clarify the function of the Tudor domain, the solution structure of the RBBP1 Tudor domain was determined by NMR and is presented here. Although the proteins are unrelated, the RBBP1 Tudor domain forms an interdigitated double Tudor structure similar to the Tudor domain of JMJD2A, which is an epigenetic mark reader. This indicates the functional diversity of Tudor domains. The RBBP1 Tudor domain structure has a significant area of positively charged surface, which reveals a capability of the RBBP1 Tudor domain to bind nucleic acids. NMR titration and isothermal titration calorimetry experiments indicate that the RBBP1 Tudor domain binds both double- and single-stranded DNA with an affinity of 10-100 μM; no apparent DNA sequence specificity was detected. The DNA binding mode and key interaction residues were analyzed in detail based on a model structure of the Tudor domain-dsDNA complex, built by HADDOCK docking using the NMR data. Electrostatic interactions mediate the binding of the Tudor domain with DNA, which is consistent with NMR experiments performed at high salt concentration. The DNA-binding residues are conserved in Tudor domains of the RBBP1 protein family, resulting in conservation of the DNA-binding function in the RBBP1 Tudor domains. Our results provide further insights into the structure and function of RBBP1.

  8. Rutin-Nickel Complex: Synthesis, Characterization, Antioxidant, DNA Binding, and DNA Cleavage Activities.

    PubMed

    Raza, Aun; Bano, Shumaila; Xu, Xiuquan; Zhang, Rong Xian; Khalid, Haider; Iqbal, Furqan Muhammad; Xia, Changkun; Tang, Jian; Ouyang, Zhen

    2016-12-17

    The rutin-nickel (II) complex (RN) was synthesized and characterized by elemental analysis, UV-visible spectroscopy, IR, mass spectrometry, (1)H NMR, TG-DSC, SEM, and molar conductivity. The low molar conductivity value investigates the non-electrolyte nature of the complex. The elemental analysis and other physical and spectroscopic methods reveal the 1:2 stoichiometric ratio (metal/ligand) of the complex. An antioxidant study of rutin and its metal complex against DPPH radical showed that the complex has more radical scavenging activity than free rutin. The interaction of complex RN with DNA was determined using fluorescence spectra and agarose gel electrophoresis. The results showed that RN can intercalate moderately with DNA, quench a strong intercalator ethidium bromide (EB), and compete for the intercalative binding sites. The complex showed significant cleavage of pBR 322 DNA from supercoiled form (SC) to nicked circular form (NC), and these cleavage effects were dose-dependent. Moreover, the mechanism of DNA cleavage indicated that it was a hydrolytic cleavage pathway. These results revealed the potential nuclease activity of the complex to cleave DNA.

  9. N-ethylmaleimide inhibition of the DNA-binding activity of the herpes simplex virus type 1 major DNA-binding protein

    SciTech Connect

    Ruyechan, W.T. )

    1988-03-01

    The major herpes simplex virus DNA-binding protein, designated ICP8, binds tightly to single-stranded DNA and is required for replication of viral DNA. The sensitivity of the DNA-binding activity of ICP8 to the action of the sulfhydryl reagent N-ethylmaleimide has been examined by using nitrocellulose filter-binding and agarose gel electrophoresis assays. Incubation of ICP8 with N-ethylmaleimide results in a rapid loss of DNA-binding activity. Preincubation of ICP8 with single-stranded DNA markedly inhibits this loss of binding activity. These results imply that a free sulfhydryl group is involved in the interaction of ICP8 with single-stranded DNA and that this sulfhydryl group becomes less accessible to the environment upon binding. Agarose gel electrophoretic analysis of the binding interaction in the presence and absence of N-ethylmaleimide indicates that the cooperative binding exhibited by ICP8 is lost upon treatment with this reagent but that some residual noncooperative binding may remain. This last result was confirmed by equilibrium dialysis experiments with the {sup 32}P-labeled oligonucleotide dT{sub 10} and native and N-ethylmaleimide-treated ICP8.

  10. Synthesis, DNA Binding, and Antiproliferative Activity of Novel Acridine-Thiosemicarbazone Derivatives

    PubMed Central

    de Almeida, Sinara Mônica Vitalino; Lafayette, Elizabeth Almeida; Gomes da Silva, Lúcia Patrícia Bezerra; Amorim, Cézar Augusto da Cruz; de Oliveira, Tiago Bento; Gois Ruiz, Ana Lucia Tasca; de Carvalho, João Ernesto; de Moura, Ricardo Olímpio; Beltrão, Eduardo Isidoro Carneiro; de Lima, Maria do Carmo Alves; de Carvalho Júnior, Luiz Bezerra

    2015-01-01

    In this work, the acridine nucleus was used as a lead-compound for structural modification by adding different substituted thiosemicarbazide moieties. Eight new (Z)-2-(acridin-9-ylmethylene)-N-phenylhydrazinecarbothioamide derivatives (3a–h) were synthesized, their antiproliferative activities were evaluated, and DNA binding properties were performed with calf thymus DNA (ctDNA) by electronic absorption and fluorescence spectroscopies. Both hyperchromic and hypochromic effects, as well as red or blue shifts were demonstrated by addition of ctDNA to the derivatives. The calculated binding constants ranged from 1.74 × 104 to 1.0 × 106 M−1 and quenching constants from −0.2 × 104 to 2.18 × 104 M−1 indicating high affinity to ctDNA base pairs. The most efficient compound in binding to ctDNA in vitro was (Z)-2-(acridin-9-ylmethylene)-N-(4-chlorophenyl) hydrazinecarbothioamide (3f), while the most active compound in antiproliferative assay was (Z)-2-(acridin-9-ylmethylene)-N-phenylhydrazinecarbothioamide (3a). There was no correlation between DNA-binding and in vitro antiproliferative activity, but the results suggest that DNA binding can be involved in the biological activity mechanism. This study may guide the choice of the size and shape of the intercalating part of the ligand and the strategic selection of substituents that increase DNA-binding or antiproliferative properties. PMID:26068233

  11. Synthesis, DNA Binding, and Antiproliferative Activity of Novel Acridine-Thiosemicarbazone Derivatives.

    PubMed

    de Almeida, Sinara Mônica Vitalino; Lafayette, Elizabeth Almeida; da Silva, Lúcia Patrícia Bezerra Gomes; Amorim, Cézar Augusto da Cruz; de Oliveira, Tiago Bento; Ruiz, Ana Lucia Tasca Gois; de Carvalho, João Ernesto; de Moura, Ricardo Olímpio; Beltrão, Eduardo Isidoro Carneiro; de Lima, Maria do Carmo Alves; de Carvalho Júnior, Luiz Bezerra

    2015-06-09

    In this work, the acridine nucleus was used as a lead-compound for structural modification by adding different substituted thiosemicarbazide moieties. Eight new (Z)-2-(acridin-9-ylmethylene)-N-phenylhydrazinecarbothioamide derivatives (3a-h) were synthesized, their antiproliferative activities were evaluated, and DNA binding properties were performed with calf thymus DNA (ctDNA) by electronic absorption and fluorescence spectroscopies. Both hyperchromic and hypochromic effects, as well as red or blue shifts were demonstrated by addition of ctDNA to the derivatives. The calculated binding constants ranged from 1.74 × 10(4) to 1.0 × 10(6) M(-1) and quenching constants from -0.2 × 10(4) to 2.18 × 10(4) M(-1) indicating high affinity to ctDNA base pairs. The most efficient compound in binding to ctDNA in vitro was (Z)-2-(acridin-9-ylmethylene)-N- (4-chlorophenyl) hydrazinecarbothioamide (3f), while the most active compound in antiproliferative assay was (Z)-2-(acridin-9-ylmethylene)-N-phenylhydrazinecarbothioamide (3a). There was no correlation between DNA-binding and in vitro antiproliferative activity, but the results suggest that DNA binding can be involved in the biological activity mechanism. This study may guide the choice of the size and shape of the intercalating part of the ligand and the strategic selection of substituents that increase DNA-binding or antiproliferative properties.

  12. Light-activated DNA binding in a designed allosteric protein

    SciTech Connect

    Strickland, Devin; Moffat, Keith; Sosnick, Tobin R.

    2008-09-03

    An understanding of how allostery, the conformational coupling of distant functional sites, arises in highly evolvable systems is of considerable interest in areas ranging from cell biology to protein design and signaling networks. We reasoned that the rigidity and defined geometry of an {alpha}-helical domain linker would make it effective as a conduit for allosteric signals. To test this idea, we rationally designed 12 fusions between the naturally photoactive LOV2 domain from Avena sativa phototropin 1 and the Escherichia coli trp repressor. When illuminated, one of the fusions selectively binds operator DNA and protects it from nuclease digestion. The ready success of our rational design strategy suggests that the helical 'allosteric lever arm' is a general scheme for coupling the function of two proteins.

  13. Binding of disparate transcriptional activators to nucleosomal DNA is inherently cooperative.

    PubMed Central

    Adams, C C; Workman, J L

    1995-01-01

    To investigate mechanisms by which multiple transcription factors access complex promoters and enhancers within cellular chromatin, we have analyzed the binding of disparate factors to nucleosome cores. We used a purified in vitro system to analyze binding of four activator proteins, two GAL4 derivatives, USF, and NF-kappa B (KBF1), to reconstituted nucleosome cores containing different combinations of binding sites. Here we show that binding of any two or all three of these factors to nucleosomal DNA is inherently cooperative. Thus, the binuclear Zn clusters of GAL4, the helix-loop-helix/basic domains of USF, and the rel domain of NF-kappa B all participated in cooperative nucleosome binding, illustrating that this effect is not restricted to a particular DNA-binding domain. Simultaneous binding by two factors increased the affinity of individual factors for nucleosomal DNA by up to 2 orders of magnitude. Importantly, cooperative binding resulted in efficient nucleosome binding by factors (USF and NF-kappa B) which independently possess little nucleosome-binding ability. The participation of GAL4 derivatives in cooperative nucleosome binding required only DNA-binding and dimerization domains, indicating that disruption of histone-DNA contacts by factor binding was responsible for the increased affinity of additional factors. Cooperative nucleosome binding required sequence-specific binding of all transcription factors, appeared to have spatial constraints, and was independent of the orientation of the binding sites on the nucleosome. These results indicate that cooperative nucleosome binding is a general mechanism that may play a significant role in loading complex enhancer and promoter elements with multiple diverse factors in chromatin and contribute to the generation of threshold responses and transcriptional synergy by multiple activator sites in vivo. PMID:7862134

  14. The activation of a specific DNA binding protein by neutron irradiation

    SciTech Connect

    Teale, B.; Singh, S.; Cohen, D.

    1995-08-30

    The purpose of this investigation was to determine whether the quality of ionizing radiation is critical for activation of a radiation-specific DNA binding protein. We have previously shown that after exposing Epstein Barr virus-transformed lymphoblastoid cells to ionizing radiation, a specific DNA binding factor appears in the nucleus apparently as a result of translocation from the cytoplasm. This protein binds to a number of different genomic sequences and a consensus motif has been identified. Because the protein was not activated by UV light, it was of interest whether high linear energy transfer (LET) radiation was capable of activation. We describe here the activation of a specific DNA binding protein by high LET neutron radiation. The protein binds a region adjacent to and overlapping with the distal repeat within a 179 base-pair fragment of the well-characterized Simian Virus (SV40) bidirectional promoter/enhancer element. The appearance of the DNA binding activity was dose dependent and reached a maximum level by 90 min postirradiation. A reduction in DNA binding activity was evident at later times after irradiation. The specific nature of this response and the rapidity of activation may indicate a pivotal role for this protein in repair or in some other aspect of the cellular response to radiation damage. 22 refs., 4 figs.

  15. Novel DNA motif binding activity observed in vivo with an estrogen receptor α mutant mouse.

    PubMed

    Hewitt, Sylvia C; Li, Leping; Grimm, Sara A; Winuthayanon, Wipawee; Hamilton, Katherine J; Pockette, Brianna; Rubel, Cory A; Pedersen, Lars C; Fargo, David; Lanz, Rainer B; DeMayo, Francesco J; Schütz, Günther; Korach, Kenneth S

    2014-06-01

    Estrogen receptor α (ERα) interacts with DNA directly or indirectly via other transcription factors, referred to as "tethering." Evidence for tethering is based on in vitro studies and a widely used "KIKO" mouse model containing mutations that prevent direct estrogen response element DNA- binding. KIKO mice are infertile, due in part to the inability of estradiol (E2) to induce uterine epithelial proliferation. To elucidate the molecular events that prevent KIKO uterine growth, regulation of the pro-proliferative E2 target gene Klf4 and of Klf15, a progesterone (P4) target gene that opposes the pro-proliferative activity of KLF4, was evaluated. Klf4 induction was impaired in KIKO uteri; however, Klf15 was induced by E2 rather than by P4. Whole uterine chromatin immunoprecipitation-sequencing revealed enrichment of KIKO ERα binding to hormone response elements (HREs) motifs. KIKO binding to HRE motifs was verified using reporter gene and DNA-binding assays. Because the KIKO ERα has HRE DNA-binding activity, we evaluated the "EAAE" ERα, which has more severe DNA-binding domain mutations, and demonstrated a lack of estrogen response element or HRE reporter gene induction or DNA-binding. The EAAE mouse has an ERα null-like phenotype, with impaired uterine growth and transcriptional activity. Our findings demonstrate that the KIKO mouse model, which has been used by numerous investigators, cannot be used to establish biological functions for ERα tethering, because KIKO ERα effectively stimulates transcription using HRE motifs. The EAAE-ERα DNA-binding domain mutant mouse demonstrates that ERα DNA-binding is crucial for biological and transcriptional processes in reproductive tissues and that ERα tethering may not contribute to estrogen responsiveness in vivo.

  16. Novel DNA Motif Binding Activity Observed In Vivo With an Estrogen Receptor α Mutant Mouse

    PubMed Central

    Li, Leping; Grimm, Sara A.; Winuthayanon, Wipawee; Hamilton, Katherine J.; Pockette, Brianna; Rubel, Cory A.; Pedersen, Lars C.; Fargo, David; Lanz, Rainer B.; DeMayo, Francesco J.; Schütz, Günther; Korach, Kenneth S.

    2014-01-01

    Estrogen receptor α (ERα) interacts with DNA directly or indirectly via other transcription factors, referred to as “tethering.” Evidence for tethering is based on in vitro studies and a widely used “KIKO” mouse model containing mutations that prevent direct estrogen response element DNA- binding. KIKO mice are infertile, due in part to the inability of estradiol (E2) to induce uterine epithelial proliferation. To elucidate the molecular events that prevent KIKO uterine growth, regulation of the pro-proliferative E2 target gene Klf4 and of Klf15, a progesterone (P4) target gene that opposes the pro-proliferative activity of KLF4, was evaluated. Klf4 induction was impaired in KIKO uteri; however, Klf15 was induced by E2 rather than by P4. Whole uterine chromatin immunoprecipitation-sequencing revealed enrichment of KIKO ERα binding to hormone response elements (HREs) motifs. KIKO binding to HRE motifs was verified using reporter gene and DNA-binding assays. Because the KIKO ERα has HRE DNA-binding activity, we evaluated the “EAAE” ERα, which has more severe DNA-binding domain mutations, and demonstrated a lack of estrogen response element or HRE reporter gene induction or DNA-binding. The EAAE mouse has an ERα null–like phenotype, with impaired uterine growth and transcriptional activity. Our findings demonstrate that the KIKO mouse model, which has been used by numerous investigators, cannot be used to establish biological functions for ERα tethering, because KIKO ERα effectively stimulates transcription using HRE motifs. The EAAE-ERα DNA-binding domain mutant mouse demonstrates that ERα DNA-binding is crucial for biological and transcriptional processes in reproductive tissues and that ERα tethering may not contribute to estrogen responsiveness in vivo. PMID:24713037

  17. Erythroblast transformation by FLI-1 depends upon its specific DNA binding and transcriptional activation properties.

    PubMed

    Ano, Sabine; Pereira, Rui; Pironin, Martine; Lesault, Isabelle; Milley, Caroline; Lebigot, Ingrid; Quang, Christine Tran; Ghysdael, Jacques

    2004-01-23

    FLI-1 is a transcriptional regulator of the ETS family of proteins. Insertional activation at the FLI-1 locus is an early event in F-murine leukemia virus-induced erythroleukemia. Consistent with its essential role in erythroid transformation, enforced expression of FLI-1 in primary erythroblasts strongly impairs the response of these cells to erythropoietin (Epo), a cytokine essential to erythropoiesis. We show here that point mutations in the ETS domain that abolished FLI-1 binding to specific DNA elements (ETS-binding sites) suppressed the ability of FLI-1 to transform erythroblasts. The exchange of the entire ETS domain (DNA binding domain) of FLI-1 for that of PU.1 changed the DNA binding specificity of FLI-1 for that of PU.1 and impaired FLI-1 transforming properties. In contrast, ETS domain swapping mutants that maintained the DNA binding specificity of FLI-1 did not affect the ability of FLI-1 to transform erythroblasts. Deletion and swapping mutants that failed to inhibit the DNA binding activity of FLI-1 but impaired its transcriptional activation properties were also transformation-defective. Taken together, these results show that both the ability of FLI-1 to inhibit Epo-induced differentiation of erythroblasts and to confer enhanced cell survival in the absence of Epo critically depend upon FLI-1 ETS-binding site-dependent transcriptional activation properties.

  18. Overcoming transcription activator-like effector (TALE) DNA binding domain sensitivity to cytosine methylation.

    PubMed

    Valton, Julien; Dupuy, Aurélie; Daboussi, Fayza; Thomas, Séverine; Maréchal, Alan; Macmaster, Rachel; Melliand, Kevin; Juillerat, Alexandre; Duchateau, Philippe

    2012-11-09

    Within the past 2 years, transcription activator-like effector (TALE) DNA binding domains have emerged as the new generation of engineerable platform for production of custom DNA binding domains. However, their recently described sensitivity to cytosine methylation represents a major bottleneck for genome engineering applications. Using a combination of biochemical, structural, and cellular approaches, we were able to identify the molecular basis of such sensitivity and propose a simple, drug-free, and universal method to overcome it.

  19. Characterization of DNA binding and pairing activities associated with the native SFPQ·NONO DNA repair protein complex.

    PubMed

    Udayakumar, Durga; Dynan, William S

    2015-08-07

    Nonhomologous end joining (NHEJ) is a major pathway for repair of DNA double-strand breaks. We have previously shown that a complex of SFPQ (PSF) and NONO (p54(nrb)) cooperates with Ku protein at an early step of NHEJ, forming a committed preligation complex and stimulating end-joining activity by 10-fold or more. SFPQ and NONO show no resemblance to other repair factors, and their mechanism of action is uncertain. Here, we use an optimized microwell-based assay to characterize the in vitro DNA binding behavior of the native SFPQ·NONO complex purified from human (HeLa) cells. SFPQ·NONO and Ku protein bind independently to DNA, with little evidence of cooperativity and only slight mutual interference at high concentration. Whereas Ku protein requires free DNA ends for binding, SFPQ·NONO does not. Both Ku and SFPQ·NONO have pairing activity, as measured by the ability of DNA-bound protein to capture a second DNA fragment in a microwell-based assay. Additionally, SFPQ·NONO stimulates DNA-dependent protein kinase autophosphorylation, consistent with the ability to promote formation of a synaptic complex formation without occluding the DNA termini proper. These findings suggest that SFPQ·NONO promotes end joining by binding to internal DNA sequences and cooperating with other repair proteins to stabilize a synaptic pre-ligation complex.

  20. PARP activation regulates the RNA-binding protein NONO in the DNA damage response to DNA double-strand breaks.

    PubMed

    Krietsch, Jana; Caron, Marie-Christine; Gagné, Jean-Philippe; Ethier, Chantal; Vignard, Julien; Vincent, Michel; Rouleau, Michèle; Hendzel, Michael J; Poirier, Guy G; Masson, Jean-Yves

    2012-11-01

    After the generation of DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs), poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase-1 (PARP-1) is one of the first proteins to be recruited and activated through its binding to the free DNA ends. Upon activation, PARP-1 uses NAD+ to generate large amounts of poly(ADP-ribose) (PAR), which facilitates the recruitment of DNA repair factors. Here, we identify the RNA-binding protein NONO, a partner protein of SFPQ, as a novel PAR-binding protein. The protein motif being primarily responsible for PAR-binding is the RNA recognition motif 1 (RRM1), which is also crucial for RNA-binding, highlighting a competition between RNA and PAR as they share the same binding site. Strikingly, the in vivo recruitment of NONO to DNA damage sites completely depends on PAR, generated by activated PARP-1. Furthermore, we show that upon PAR-dependent recruitment, NONO stimulates nonhomologous end joining (NHEJ) and represses homologous recombination (HR) in vivo. Our results therefore place NONO after PARP activation in the context of DNA DSB repair pathway decision. Understanding the mechanism of action of proteins that act in the same pathway as PARP-1 is crucial to shed more light onto the effect of interference on PAR-mediated pathways with PARP inhibitors, which have already reached phase III clinical trials but are until date poorly understood.

  1. Conserved Cysteine Residue in the DNA-Binding Domain of the Bovine Papillomavirus Type 1 E2 Protein Confers Redox Regulation of the DNA- Binding Activity in Vitro

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McBride, Alison A.; Klausner, Richard D.; Howley, Peter M.

    1992-08-01

    The bovine papillomavirus type 1 E2 open reading frame encodes three proteins involved in viral DNA replication and transcriptional regulation. These polypeptides share a carboxyl-terminal domain with a specific DNA-binding activity; through this domain the E2 polypeptides form dimers. In this study, we demonstrate the inhibition of E2 DNA binding in vitro by reagents that oxidize or otherwise chemically modify the free sulfydryl groups of reactive cysteine residues. However, these reagents had no effect on DNA-binding activity when the E2 polypeptide was first bound to DNA, suggesting that the free sulfydryl group(s) may be protected by DNA binding. Sensitivity to sulfydryl modification was mapped to a cysteine residue at position 340 in the E2 DNA-binding domain, an amino acid that is highly conserved among the E2 proteins of different papillomaviruses. Replacement of this residue with other amino acids abrogated the sensitivity to oxidation-reduction changes but did not affect the DNA-binding property of the E2 protein. These results suggest that papillomavirus DNA replication and transcriptional regulation could be modulated through the E2 proteins by changes in the intracellular redox environment. Furthermore, a motif consisting of a reactive cysteine residue carboxyl-terminal to a lysine residue in a basic region of the DNA-binding domain is a feature common to a number of transcriptional regulatory proteins that, like E2, are subject to redox regulation. Thus, posttranslational regulation of the activity of these proteins by the intracellular redox environment may be a general phenomenon.

  2. Binding Potency of Heparin Immobilized on Activated Charcoal for DNA Antibodies.

    PubMed

    Snezhkova, E A; Tridon, A; Evrard, B; Nikolaev, V G; Uvarov, V Yu; Tsimbalyuk, R S; Ivanuk, A A; Komov, V V; Sakhno, L A

    2016-02-01

    In vitro experiments showed that heparin adsorbed on activated charcoal can bind antibodies raised against native and single-stranded DNA in a diluted sera pool with a high level of these DNA. Thus, heparin used as anticoagulant during hemosorption procedure can demonstrate supplementary therapeutic activity resulting from its interaction with various agents involved in acute and chronic inflammatory reactions such as DNA- and RNA-binding substances, proinflammatory cytokines, complement components, growth factors, etc. Research and development of heparin-containing carbonic adsorbents for the therapy of numerous inflammatory and autoimmune diseases seems to be a promising avenue in hematology.

  3. Investigation of DNA binding, DNA photocleavage, topoisomerase I inhibition and antioxidant activities of water soluble titanium(IV) phthalocyanine compounds.

    PubMed

    Özel, Arzu; Barut, Burak; Demirbaş, Ümit; Biyiklioglu, Zekeriya

    2016-04-01

    The binding mode of water soluble peripherally tetra-substituted titanium(IV) phthalocyanine (Pc) compounds Pc1, Pc2 and Pc3 with calf thymus (CT) DNA was investigated by using UV-Vis spectroscopy and thermal denaturation studies in this work. The results of DNA binding constants (Kb) and the changes in the thermal denaturation profile of DNA with the addition of Pc compounds indicated that Pc1, Pc2 and Pc3 are able to bind to CT-DNA with different binding affinities. DNA photocleavage studies of Pc compounds were performed in the absence and presence of oxidizing agents such as hydrogen peroxide (H2O2), ascorbic acid (AA) and 2-mercaptoethanol (ME) using the agarose gel electrophoresis method at irradiation 650 nm. According to the results of electrophoresis studies, Pc1, Pc2 and Pc3 cleaved of supercoiled pBR322 DNA via photocleavage pathway. The Pc1, Pc2 and Pc3 compounds were examined for topoisomerase I inhibition by measuring the relaxation of supercoiled pBR322 DNA. The all of Pc compounds inhibited topoisomerase I at 20 μM concentration. A series of antioxidant assays, including 2,2-diphenyl-1-picrylhydrazyl (DPPH) assay, superoxide radical scavenging (SOD) assay and metal chelating effect assay were performed for Pc1, Pc2 and Pc3 compounds. The results of antioxidant assays indicated that Pc1, Pc2 and Pc3 compounds have remarkable superoxide radical scavenging activities, moderate 2,2-diphenyl-1-picrylhydrazyl activities and metal chelating effect activities. All the experimental studies showed that Pc1, Pc2 and Pc3 compounds bind to CT-DNA via minor groove binding, cleave of supercoiled pBR322 DNA via photocleavage pathway, inhibit topoisomerase I and have remarkable superoxide radical scavenging activities. Thanks to these properties the Pc1, Pc2 and Pc3 compounds are suitable agents for photo dynamic therapy.

  4. DNA binding residues in the RQC domain of Werner protein are critical for its catalytic activities.

    PubMed

    Tadokoro, Takashi; Kulikowicz, Tomasz; Dawut, Lale; Croteau, Deborah L; Bohr, Vilhelm A

    2012-06-01

    Werner protein (WRN), member of the RecQ helicase family, is a helicase and exonuclease, and participates in multiple DNA metabolic processes including DNA replication, recombination and DNA repair. Mutations in the WRN gene cause Werner syndrome, associated with premature aging, genome instability and cancer predisposition. The RecQ C-terminal (RQC) domain of WRN, containing α2-α3 loop and β-wing motifs, is important for DNA binding and for many protein interactions. To better understand the critical functions of this domain, we generated recombinant WRN proteins (using a novel purification scheme) with mutations in Arg-993 within the α2-α3 loop of the RQC domain and in Phe-1037 of the -wing motif. We then studied the catalytic activities and DNA binding of these mutant proteins as well as some important functional protein interactions. The mutant proteins were defective in DNA binding and helicase activity, and interestingly, they had deficient exonuclease activity and strand annealing function. The RQC domain of WRN has not previously been implicated in exonuclease or annealing activities. The mutant proteins could not stimulate NEIL1 incision activity as did the wild type. Thus, the Arg-993 and Phe-1037 in the RQC domain play essential roles in catalytic activity, and in functional interactions mediated by WRN.

  5. DNA-binding activity of TNF-{alpha} inducing protein from Helicobacter pylori

    SciTech Connect

    Kuzuhara, T. Suganuma, M.; Oka, K.; Fujiki, H.

    2007-11-03

    Tumor necrosis factor-{alpha} (TNF-{alpha}) inducing protein (Tip{alpha}) is a carcinogenic factor secreted from Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori), mediated through both enhanced expression of TNF-{alpha} and chemokine genes and activation of nuclear factor-{kappa}B. Since Tip{alpha} enters gastric cancer cells, the Tip{alpha} binding molecules in the cells should be investigated. The direct DNA-binding activity of Tip{alpha} was observed by pull down assay using single- and double-stranded genomic DNA cellulose. The surface plasmon resonance assay, indicating an association between Tip{alpha} and DNA, revealed that the affinity of Tip{alpha} for (dGdC)10 is 2400 times stronger than that of del-Tip{alpha}, an inactive Tip{alpha}. This suggests a strong correlation between DNA-binding activity and carcinogenic activity of Tip{alpha}. And the DNA-binding activity of Tip{alpha} was first demonstrated with a molecule secreted from H. pylori.

  6. Multispectral studies of DNA binding, antioxidant and cytotoxic activities of a new pyranochromene derivative

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dehkordi, Mahvash Farajzadeh; Dehghan, Gholamreza; Mahdavi, Majid; Hosseinpour Feizi, Mohammad Ali

    2015-06-01

    The binding properties of a new pyranochromene derivative, 2-amino-4-(3-hydroxyphenyl)-5-oxo-4H, 5H-pyrano-[3, 2-c] chromene-3-carbonitrile (3-HC) with calf thymus DNA (ctDNA) have been investigated by UV-vis absorption, circular dichroism, fluorescence spectroscopy and viscosity measurement. These results indicated that 3-HC can interact with DNA through non-intercalative mode and the intrinsic binding constant (Kb) for 3-HC with DNA was estimated to be 3.6 × 103 M-1. The antioxidant activity experiments show that 3-HC also exhibit good antioxidant activity in DPPH free radical scavenging and ferric reducing ability methods. Moreover, 3-HC exhibited cytotoxic activity against K562, human chronic myelogenous leukemia cells, with IC50 value of 146 μM and the cells responded to the treatment with mostly through apoptosis.

  7. An RNA aptamer that interferes with the DNA binding of the HSF transcription activator.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Xiaoching; Shi, Hua; Sevilimedu, Aarti; Liachko, Nicole; Nelson, Hillary C M; Lis, John T

    2006-01-01

    Heat shock factor (HSF) is a conserved and highly potent transcription activator. It is involved in a wide variety of important biological processes including the stress response and specific steps in normal development. Reagents that interfere with HSF function would be useful for both basic studies and practical applications. We selected an RNA aptamer that binds to HSF with high specificity. Deletion analysis defined the minimal binding motif of this aptamer to be two stems and one stem-loop joined by a three-way junction. This RNA aptamer interferes with normal interaction of HSF with its DNA element, which is a key regulatory step for HSF function. The DNA-binding domain plus a flanking linker region on the HSF (DL) is essential for the RNA binding. Additionally, this aptamer inhibits HSF-induced transcription in vitro in the complex milieu of a whole cell extract. In contrast to the previously characterized NF-kappaB aptamer, the HSF aptamer does not simply mimic DNA binding, but rather binds to HSF in a manner distinct from DNA binding to HSF.

  8. New metal based drugs: Spectral, electrochemical, DNA-binding, surface morphology and anticancer activity properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Çeşme, Mustafa; Gölcü, Aysegul; Demirtaş, Ibrahim

    2015-01-01

    The NSAID piroxicam (PRX) drug was used for complex formation reactions with Cu(II), Zn(II) and Pt(II) metal salts have been synthesized. Then, these complexes have been characterized by spectroscopic and analytical techniques. Thermal behavior of the complexes were also investigated. The electrochemical properties of all complexes have been investigated by cyclic voltammetry (CV) using glassy carbon electrode. The biological activity of the complexes has been evaluated by examining their ability to bind to fish sperm double strand DNA (FSFSdsDNA) with UV spectroscopy. UV studies of the interaction of the PRX and its complexes with FSdsDNA have shown that these compounds can bind to FSdsDNA. The binding constants of the compounds with FSdsDNA have also been calculated. The morphology of the FSdsDNA, PRX, metal ions and metal complexes has been investigated by scanning electron microscopy (SEM). To get the SEM images, the interaction of compounds with FSdsDNA has been studied by means of differential pulse voltammetry (DPV) at FSdsDNA modified pencil graphite electrode (PGE). The decrease in intensity of the guanine oxidation signals has been used as an indicator for the interaction mechanism. The effect of proliferation PRX and complexes were examined on the HeLA and C6 cells using real-time cell analyzer with four different concentrations.

  9. Inhibition of Pseudomonas aeruginosa ExsA DNA-Binding Activity by N-Hydroxybenzimidazoles.

    PubMed

    Marsden, Anne E; King, Jessica M; Spies, M Ashley; Kim, Oak K; Yahr, Timothy L

    2016-02-01

    The Pseudomonas aeruginosa type III secretion system (T3SS) is a primary virulence determinant and a potential target for antivirulence drugs. One candidate target is ExsA, a member of the AraC family of DNA-binding proteins required for expression of the T3SS. A previous study identified small molecules based on an N-hydroxybenzimidazole scaffold that inhibit the DNA-binding activity of several AraC proteins, including ExsA. In this study, we further characterized a panel of N-hydroxybenzimidazoles. The half-maximal inhibitory concentrations (IC50s) for the tested N-hydroxybenzimidazoles ranged from 8 to 45 μM in DNA-binding assays. Each of the N-hydroxybenzimidazoles protected mammalian cells from T3SS-dependent cytotoxicity, and protection correlated with reduced T3SS gene expression in a coculture infection model. Binding studies with the purified ExsA DNA-binding domain (i.e., lacking the amino-terminal self-association domain) confirmed that the activity of N-hydroxybenzimidazoles results from interactions with the DNA-binding domain. The interaction is specific, as an unrelated DNA-binding protein (Vfr) was unaffected by N-hydroxybenzimidazoles. ExsA homologs that control T3SS gene expression in Yersinia pestis, Aeromonas hydrophila, and Vibrio parahaemolyticus were also sensitive to N-hydroxybenzimidazoles. Although ExsA and Y. pestis LcrF share 79% sequence identity in the DNA-binding domain, differential sensitivities to several of the N-hydroxybenzimidazoles were observed. Site-directed mutagenesis based on in silico docking of inhibitors to the DNA-binding domain, and on amino acid differences between ExsA and LcrF, resulted in the identification of several substitutions that altered the sensitivity of ExsA to N-hydroxybenzimidazoles. Development of second-generation compounds targeted to the same binding pocket could lead to drugs with improved pharmacological properties.

  10. Pentaprobe: a comprehensive sequence for the one-step detection of DNA-binding activities.

    PubMed

    Kwan, Ann H Y; Czolij, Robert; Mackay, Joel P; Crossley, Merlin

    2003-10-15

    The rapid increase in the number of novel proteins identified in genome projects necessitates simple and rapid methods for assigning function. We describe a strategy for determining whether novel proteins possess typical sequence-specific DNA-binding activity. Many proteins bind recognition sequences of 5 bp or less. Given that there are 4(5) possible 5 bp sites, one might expect the length of sequence required to cover all possibilities would be 4(5) x 5 or 5120 nt. But by allowing overlaps, utilising both strands and using a computer algorithm to generate the minimum sequence, we find the length required is only 516 base pairs. We generated this sequence as six overlapping double-stranded oligonucleotides, termed pentaprobe, and used it in gel retardation experiments to assess DNA binding by both known and putative DNA-binding proteins from several protein families. We have confirmed binding by the zinc finger proteins BKLF, Eos and Pegasus, the Ets domain protein PU.1 and the treble clef N- and C-terminal fingers of GATA-1. We also showed that the N-terminal zinc finger domain of FOG-1 does not behave as a typical DNA-binding domain. Our results suggest that pentaprobe, and related sequences such as hexaprobe, represent useful tools for probing protein function.

  11. Inhibition of DNA helicase, ATPase and DNA-binding activities of E. coli RecQ helicase by chemotherapeutic agents.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Bo; Zhang, Ai-hua; Chen, Lei; Xi, Xu Guang

    2008-06-01

    RecQ helicases play an essential role in maintaining genetic integrity in all organisms from Escherichia coli to humans. Defects to these enzymes are responsible for three distinct human diseases: Werner syndrome, Bloom syndrome and Rothmund-Thomson syndrome. All three diseases are characterized by a predisposition to cancer due to increased genomic instability. Previous studies on the effects of non-covalent DNA modifications on the catalytic activity of purified Werner and Bloom DNA helicases have shown that both enzymes have similar sensitivity profiles to these DNA-binding agents and are most strongly inhibited by the minor groove binder distamycin A. In this study, we show that the sensitivity profiles of E. coli RecQ to a number of DNA-binding ligands are different to those observed for WRN and Bloom helicases. These observations may give insights into the differences in molecular mechanisms underlying efficient motor function of RecQ helicases.

  12. Imidazolium tagged acridines: Synthesis, characterization and applications in DNA binding and anti-microbial activities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Raju, Gembali; Vishwanath, S.; Prasad, Archana; Patel, Basant K.; Prabusankar, Ganesan

    2016-03-01

    New water soluble 4,5-bis imidazolium tagged acridines have been synthesized and structurally characterized by multinuclear NMR and single crystal X-ray diffraction techniques. The DNA binding and anti-microbial activities of these acridine derivatives were investigated by fluorescence and far-UV circular dichroism studies.

  13. Exploring the DNA binding mode of transition metal based biologically active compounds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Raman, N.; Sobha, S.

    2012-01-01

    Few novel 4-aminoantipyrine derived Schiff bases and their metal complexes were synthesized and characterized. Their structural features and other properties were deduced from the elemental analysis, magnetic susceptibility and molar conductivity as well as from mass, IR, UV-vis, 1H NMR and EPR spectral studies. The binding of the complexes with CT-DNA was analyzed by electronic absorption spectroscopy, viscosity measurement, and cyclic voltammetry. The interaction of the metal complexes with DNA was also studied by molecular modeling with special reference to docking. The experimental and docking results revealed that the complexes have the ability of interaction with DNA of minor groove binding mode. The intrinsic binding constants ( Kb) of the complexes with CT-DNA were found out which show that they are minor groove binders. Gel electrophoresis assay demonstrated the ability of the complexes to cleave the pUC19 DNA in the presence of AH 2 (ascorbic acid). Moreover, the oxidative cleavage studies using distamycin revealed the minor groove binding for the newly synthesized 4-aminoantipyrine derived Schiff bases and their metal complexes. Evaluation of antibacterial activity of the complexes against Staphylococcus aureus, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Escherichia coli, Staphylococcus epidermidis, and Klebsiella pneumoniae exhibited that the complexes have potent biocidal activity than the free ligands.

  14. Exploring the DNA binding mode of transition metal based biologically active compounds.

    PubMed

    Raman, N; Sobha, S

    2012-01-01

    Few novel 4-aminoantipyrine derived Schiff bases and their metal complexes were synthesized and characterized. Their structural features and other properties were deduced from the elemental analysis, magnetic susceptibility and molar conductivity as well as from mass, IR, UV-vis, (1)H NMR and EPR spectral studies. The binding of the complexes with CT-DNA was analyzed by electronic absorption spectroscopy, viscosity measurement, and cyclic voltammetry. The interaction of the metal complexes with DNA was also studied by molecular modeling with special reference to docking. The experimental and docking results revealed that the complexes have the ability of interaction with DNA of minor groove binding mode. The intrinsic binding constants (K(b)) of the complexes with CT-DNA were found out which show that they are minor groove binders. Gel electrophoresis assay demonstrated the ability of the complexes to cleave the pUC19 DNA in the presence of AH(2) (ascorbic acid). Moreover, the oxidative cleavage studies using distamycin revealed the minor groove binding for the newly synthesized 4-aminoantipyrine derived Schiff bases and their metal complexes. Evaluation of antibacterial activity of the complexes against Staphylococcus aureus, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Escherichia coli, Staphylococcus epidermidis, and Klebsiella pneumoniae exhibited that the complexes have potent biocidal activity than the free ligands.

  15. Interaction with Single-stranded DNA-binding Protein Stimulates Escherichia coli Ribonuclease HI Enzymatic Activity.

    PubMed

    Petzold, Christine; Marceau, Aimee H; Miller, Katherine H; Marqusee, Susan; Keck, James L

    2015-06-05

    Single-stranded (ss) DNA-binding proteins (SSBs) bind and protect ssDNA intermediates formed during replication, recombination, and repair reactions. SSBs also directly interact with many different genome maintenance proteins to stimulate their enzymatic activities and/or mediate their proper cellular localization. We have identified an interaction formed between Escherichia coli SSB and ribonuclease HI (RNase HI), an enzyme that hydrolyzes RNA in RNA/DNA hybrids. The RNase HI·SSB complex forms by RNase HI binding the intrinsically disordered C terminus of SSB (SSB-Ct), a mode of interaction that is shared among all SSB interaction partners examined to date. Residues that comprise the SSB-Ct binding site are conserved among bacterial RNase HI enzymes, suggesting that RNase HI·SSB complexes are present in many bacterial species and that retaining the interaction is important for its cellular function. A steady-state kinetic analysis shows that interaction with SSB stimulates RNase HI activity by lowering the reaction Km. SSB or RNase HI protein variants that disrupt complex formation nullify this effect. Collectively our findings identify a direct RNase HI/SSB interaction that could play a role in targeting RNase HI activity to RNA/DNA hybrid substrates within the genome.

  16. Tunable regulation of CREB DNA binding activity couples genotoxic stress response and metabolism

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Sang Hwa; Trinh, Anthony T.; Larsen, Michele Campaigne; Mastrocola, Adam S.; Jefcoate, Colin R.; Bushel, Pierre R.; Tibbetts, Randal S.

    2016-01-01

    cAMP response element binding protein (CREB) is a key regulator of glucose metabolism and synaptic plasticity that is canonically regulated through recruitment of transcriptional coactivators. Here we show that phosphorylation of CREB on a conserved cluster of Ser residues (the ATM/CK cluster) by the DNA damage-activated protein kinase ataxia-telangiectasia-mutated (ATM) and casein kinase1 (CK1) and casein kinase2 (CK2) positively and negatively regulates CREB-mediated transcription in a signal dependent manner. In response to genotoxic stress, phosphorylation of the ATM/CK cluster inhibited CREB-mediated gene expression, DNA binding activity and chromatin occupancy proportional to the number of modified Ser residues. Paradoxically, substoichiometric, ATM-independent, phosphorylation of the ATM/CK cluster potentiated bursts in CREB-mediated transcription by promoting recruitment of the CREB coactivator, cAMP-regulated transcriptional coactivators (CRTC2). Livers from mice expressing a non-phosphorylatable CREB allele failed to attenuate gluconeogenic genes in response to DNA damage or fully activate the same genes in response to glucagon. We propose that phosphorylation-dependent regulation of DNA binding activity evolved as a tunable mechanism to control CREB transcriptional output and promote metabolic homeostasis in response to rapidly changing environmental conditions. PMID:27431323

  17. Isohelical DNA-Binding Oligomers: Antiviral Activity and Application for the Design of Nanostructured Devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gursky, Georgy; Nikitin, Alexei; Surovaya, Anna; Grokhovsky, Sergey; Andronova, Valeria; Galegov, Georgy

    We performed a systematic search for new structural motifs isohelical to double-stranded DNA and found five motifs that can be used for the design and synthesis of new DNA-binding oligomers. Some of the DNA-binding oligomers can be equipped with fluorescence chromophores and metal-chelating groups and may serve as conductive wires in nano-scaled electric circuits. A series of new DNA-binding ligands were synthesized by a modular assembly of pyrrole carboxamides and novel pseudopeptides of the form (XY)n. Here, Y is a glycine residue; n is the degree of polymerization. X is an unusual amino acid residue containing a five-membered aromatic ring. Antiviral activity of bis-linked netropsin derivatives is studied. Bis-netropsins containing 15 and 31 lysine residues at the N-termini inhibit most effectively reproduction of the herpes virus type 1 in the Vero cell culture, including virus variants resistant to acyclovir and its analogues. Antiviral activity of bis-linked netropsin derivatives is correlated with their ability to interact with long clusters of AT-base pairs in the origin of replication of the viral DNA.

  18. The single-strand DNA binding activity of human PC4 preventsmutagenesis and killing by oxidative DNA damage

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Jen-Yeu; Sarker, Altaf Hossain; Cooper, Priscilla K.; Volkert, Michael R.

    2004-02-01

    Human positive cofactor 4 (PC4) is a transcriptional coactivator with a highly conserved single-strand DNA (ssDNA) binding domain of unknown function. We identified PC4 as a suppressor of the oxidative mutator phenotype of the Escherichia coli fpg mutY mutant and demonstrate that this suppression requires its ssDNA binding activity. Yeast mutants lacking their PC4 ortholog Sub1 are sensitive to hydrogen peroxide and exhibit spontaneous and peroxide induced hypermutability. PC4 expression suppresses the peroxide sensitivity of the yeast sub l{Delta} mutant, suggesting that the human protein has a similar function. A role for yeast and human proteins in DNA repair is suggested by the demonstration that Sub1 acts in a peroxide-resistance pathway involving Rad2 and by the physical interaction of PC4 with the human Rad2 homolog XPG. We show XPG recruits PC4 to a bubble-containing DNA substrate with resulting displacement of XPG and formation of a PC4-DNA complex. We discuss the possible requirement for PC4 in either global or transcription-coupled repair of oxidative DNA damage to mediate the release of XPG bound to its substrate.

  19. Drosophila Mi-2 negatively regulates dDREF by inhibiting its DNA-binding activity.

    PubMed

    Hirose, Fumiko; Ohshima, Nobuko; Kwon, Eun-Jeong; Yoshida, Hideki; Yamaguchi, Masamitsu

    2002-07-01

    Drosophila melanogaster DNA replication-related element (DRE) factor (dDREF) is a transcriptional regulatory factor required for the expression of genes carrying the 5'-TATCGATA DRE. dDREF has been reported to bind to a sequence in the chromatin boundary element, and thus, dDREF may play a part in regulating insulator activity. To generate further insights into dDREF function, we carried out a Saccharomyces cerevisiae two-hybrid screening with DREF polypeptide as bait and identified Mi-2 as a DREF-interacting protein. Biochemical analyses revealed that the C-terminal region of Drosophila Mi-2 (dMi-2) specifically binds to the DNA-binding domain of dDREF. Electrophoretic mobility shift assays showed that dMi-2 thereby inhibits the DNA-binding activity of dDREF. Ectopic expression of dDREF and dMi-2 in eye imaginal discs resulted in severe and mild rough-eye phenotypes, respectively, whereas flies simultaneously expressing both proteins exhibited almost-normal eye phenotypes. Half-dose reduction of the dMi-2 gene enhanced the DREF-induced rough-eye phenotype. Immunostaining of polytene chromosomes of salivary glands showed that dDREF and dMi-2 bind in mutually exclusive ways. These lines of evidence define a novel function of dMi-2 in the negative regulation of dDREF by its DNA-binding activity. Finally, we postulated that dDREF and dMi-2 may demonstrate reciprocal regulation of their functions.

  20. Phosphorylation of Opaque2 changes diurnally and impacts its DNA binding activity.

    PubMed Central

    Ciceri, P; Gianazza, E; Lazzari, B; Lippoli, G; Genga, A; Hoscheck, G; Schmidt, R J; Viotti, A

    1997-01-01

    In the maize endosperm, the Opaque2 (O2) basic leucine zipper transcriptional activator regulates the expression of a subset of the zein seed storage protein gene family. Immunodetection of wild-type or mutant O2 polypeptides fractionated by SDS-PAGE resolved a closely spaced doublet migrating in the 68- to 72-kD range, whereas by using isoelectric focusing, seven to nine isoforms were detected for each allele. Phosphatase treatment simplified the protein patterns to a single band corresponding to the nonphosphorylated component. In vivo and in vitro labeling confirmed that O2 can be phosphorylated. In protein gel blots probed with DNA, only the nonphosphorylated and hypophosphorylated O2 polypeptides were able to bind an oligonucleotide containing the O2 binding sequence. Upon in situ dephosphorylation of the focused isoforms by phosphatase treatment of the isoelectric focusing filter, the hyperphosphorylated forms acquired DNA binding activity. The ratio among the various isoforms remained constant throughout the developmental stages of endosperm growth but changed from daytime to nighttime, with a significant increase of the hyperphosphorylated forms during the night period. These results indicate that O2 exists in vivo as a pool of differently phosphorylated polypeptides and demonstrate that O2 DNA binding activity is modulated by a phosphorylation/dephosphorylation mechanism that appears to be influenced by environmental conditions. PMID:9014367

  1. Spectroscopic analysis, DNA binding and antimicrobial activities of metal complexes with phendione and its derivative

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abdus Subhan, Md; Saifur Rahman, Md.; Alam, Khyrul; Mahmud Hasan, Md.

    2014-01-01

    A novel ligand (E)-2-styryl-1H-imidazo [4, 5-f] [1, 10] phenanthroline(L) has been synthesized from 1,10-phenanthroline-5,6-dione. Its transition metal complexes, [FeLCl4][L-H] and [CuL2](NO3)2 have also been synthesized. Besides, three mixed ligand lanthanide metal complexes of Phendione and β-diketones have been synthesized, namely [Eu(TFN)3(Phendione)] (TFN = 4,4,4-trifluoro-1(2-napthyl)-1,3-butanedione), [Eu(HFT)3(Phendione)] (HFT = 4,4,5,5,6,6,6-heptafluoro-1-(2-thienyl)-1,3-hexanedione), [Yb(HFA)3(Phendione)] (hfa = hexafluoroacetylacetonate). The synthesized ligands and metal complexes have been characterized by FTIR, UV-Visible spectroscopy and PL spectra. DNA binding activities of the complexes and the ligands have been studied by DNA gel electrophoresis. DNA binding studies showed that Fe complex of the synthesized ligand is more potent DNA binding and damaging agent compare to others under study. The synthesized compounds were also screened for their antimicrobial activities by disc diffusion method against three microbes, namely Escherichia coli, Staphylococcus aureus, Proteus penneri. The lanthanide complexes of phendione showed great antibacterial activities.

  2. Synthesis, DNA binding and topoisomerase I inhibition activity of thiazacridine and imidazacridine derivatives.

    PubMed

    Lafayette, Elizabeth Almeida; Vitalino de Almeida, Sinara Mônica; Pitta, Marina Galdino da Rocha; Carneiro Beltrão, Eduardo Isidoro; da Silva, Teresinha Gonçalves; Olímpio de Moura, Ricardo; Pitta, Ivan da Rocha; de Carvalho, Luiz Bezerra; de Lima, Maria do Carmo Alves

    2013-12-06

    Thiazacridine and imidazacridine derivatives have shown promising results as tumors suppressors in some cancer cell lines. For a better understanding of the mechanism of action of these compounds, binding studies of 5-acridin-9-ylmethylidene-3-amino-2-thioxo-thiazolidin-4-one, 5-acridin-9-ylmethylidene-2-thioxo-thiazolidin-4-one, 5-acridin-9-ylmethylidene-2-thioxo-imidazolidin-4-one and 3-acridin-9-ylmethyl-thiazolidin-2,4-dione with calf thymus DNA (ctDNA) by electronic absorption and fluorescence spectroscopy and circular dichroism spectroscopy were performed. The binding constants ranged from 1.46 × 10(4) to 6.01 × 10(4) M(-1). UV-Vis, fluorescence and circular dichroism measurements indicated that the compounds interact effectively with ctDNA, both by intercalation or external binding. They demonstrated inhibitory activities to human topoisomerase I, except for 5-acridin-9-ylmethylidene-2-thioxo-1,3-thiazolidin-4-one. These results provide insight into the DNA binding mechanism of imidazacridines and thiazacridines.

  3. GT-2: in vivo transcriptional activation activity and definition of novel twin DNA binding domains with reciprocal target sequence selectivity.

    PubMed

    Ni, M; Dehesh, K; Tepperman, J M; Quail, P H

    1996-06-01

    GT-2 is a novel DNA binding protein that interacts with a triplet functionally defined, positively acting GT-box motifs (GT1-bx, GT2-bx, and GT3-bx) in the rice phytochrome A gene (PHYA) promoter. Data from a transient transfection assay used here show that recombinant GT-2 enhanced transcription from both homologous and heterologous GT-box-containing promoters, thereby indicating that this protein can function as a transcriptional activator in vivo. Previously, we have shown that GT-2 contains separate DNA binding determinants in its N- and C-terminal halves, with binding site preferences for the GT3-bx and GT2-bx promoter motifs, respectively. Here, we demonstrate that the minimal DNA binding domains reside within dual 90-amino acid polypeptide segments encompassing duplicated sequences, termed trihelix regions, in each half of the molecule, plus 15 additional immediately adjacent amino acids downstream. These minimal binding domains retained considerable target sequence selectivity for the different GT-box motifs, but this selectivity was enhanced by a separate polypeptide segment farther downstream on the C-terminal side of each trihelix region. Therefore, the data indicate that the twin DNA binding domains of GT-2 each consist of a general GT-box recognition core with intrinsic differential binding activity toward closely related target motifs and a modified sequence conferring higher resolution reciprocal selectivity between these motifs.

  4. The new generation drug candidate molecules: Spectral, electrochemical, DNA-binding and anticancer activity properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gölcü, Ayşegül; Muslu, Harun; Kılıçaslan, Derya; Çeşme, Mustafa; Eren, Özge; Ataş, Fatma; Demirtaş, İbrahim

    2016-09-01

    The new generation drug candidate molecules [Cu(5-Fu)2Cl2H2O] (NGDCM1) and [Zn(5-Fu)2(CH3COO)2] (NGDCM2) were obtained from the reaction of copper(II) and zinc(II) salts with the anticancer drug 5-fluoracil (5-Fu). These compounds have been characterized by spectroscopic and analytical techniques. Thermal behavior of the compounds were also investigated. The electrochemical properties of the compounds have been investigated by cyclic voltammetry (CV) using glassy carbon electrode. The biological activity of the NGDCM1 and NGDCM2 has been evaluated by examining their ability to bind to fish sperm double strand DNA (FSdsDNA) with UV spectroscopy. UV studies of the interaction of the 5-Fu and metal derivatives with FSdsDNA have shown that these compounds can bind to FSdsDNA. The binding constants of the compounds with FSdsDNA have also been calculated. Thermal decomposition of the compounds lead to the formation of CuO and ZnO as final products. The effect of proliferation 5-Fu, NGDCM1 and NGDCM2 were examined on the HeLa cells using real-time cell analyzer with three different concentrations.

  5. FRET-based protein-DNA binding assay for detection of active NF-kappa B

    SciTech Connect

    Giannetti, Ambra; Baldini, Francesco; Wabuyele, Musundi B; Vo Dinh, Tuan

    2006-01-01

    A novel method to detect the active form of NF-{kappa}B, a transcription factor regulating a battery of inflammatory genes and playing a fundamental role in the development of numerous pathological states, has been developed. In the present work, we used fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET) to study DNA-protein binding interaction taking place between double-strand (ds) DNA immobilized in a glass capillary wall and p50 proteins. For this purpose, we developed a regenerable FRET-based system comprising of a single-strand (ss) DNA with auto-complementary sequence that is end-labeled with Cy5 dye and is highly specific for p50 proteins. The proteins were labeled with a Black Hole Quencher (BHQ-3) to be used as FRET pair. The interaction of p50/p50 homodimer active form with its DNA binding site was demonstrated by both electrophoretic mobility shift assays and FRET studies. These preliminary results demonstrated the feasibility of the FRET-based DNA technique to detect the active form of NF-{kappa}B protein with 90% detection efficiency. In addition, we show that the system is stable and highly regenerable.

  6. An intact DNA-binding domain is not required for peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma (PPARgamma) binding and activation on some PPAR response elements.

    PubMed

    Temple, Karla A; Cohen, Ronald N; Wondisford, Sarah R; Yu, Christine; Deplewski, Dianne; Wondisford, Fredric E

    2005-02-04

    Peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma (PPARgamma) interacts with retinoid X receptor (RXR) on PPAR response elements (PPREs) to regulate transcription of PPAR-responsive genes. To investigate the binding of PPARgamma and RXR to PPREs, three mutations were constructed in the DNA-binding domains of PPARgamma; two of the mutants maintained the structure of zinc finger I (PPARgamma-GS and PPARgamma-AA), and a third mutation disrupted the protein structure of zinc finger I (PPARgamma-CS). Results indicated that the mutations of PPARgamma that maintained intact zinc fingers were capable of binding to a variety of PPREs in the presence of RXR and could activate transcription on several PPREs. In parallel, a mutation was created in the DNA-binding domain of RXRalpha that maintained the structure of the zinc fingers (RXR-GS) but did not bind DNA and was transcriptionally inactive. Examination of the 3' half-site of several PPREs revealed that variations from the consensus sequence reduced or abolished transcriptional activity, but conversion to consensus improved transcriptional activity with PPARgamma-GS and PPARgamma-AA. Examination of the 5' half-site indicated that the upstream three nucleotides were more important for transcriptional activity than the downstream three nucleotides. Our data demonstrated that stringent binding of RXR to the 3' half-site of a PPRE is more influential on the binding of the PPARgamma/RXR heterodimer than the ability of PPARgamma to bind DNA. Thus, unlike RXR, PPARgamma exhibits promiscuity in binding on a PPRE, suggesting that the definition of a PPRE for PPARgamma may need to be expanded.

  7. Novel FOXC2 Mutation in Hereditary Distichiasis Impairs DNA-Binding Activity and Transcriptional Activation

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Leilei; He, Jie; Han, Bing; Lu, Linna; Fan, Jiayan; Zhang, He; Ge, Shengfang; Zhou, Yixiong; Jia, Renbing; Fan, Xianqun

    2016-01-01

    Distichiasis presents as double rows of eyelashes arising from aberrant differentiation of the meibomian glands of the eyelids, and it may be sporadic or hereditary. FOXC2 gene mutations in hereditary distichiasis are rarely reported. Here, we examined two generations of a Chinese family with hereditary distichiasis but without lymphedema or other features of LD syndrome. The FOXC2 gene was amplified and sequenced in all family members. Subcellular localization and luciferase assays were performed to assess the activity of the mutant FOXC2 protein. Clinical examinations showed distichiasis, lower eyelid ectropion, congenital ptosis and photophobia in all affected individuals. Sequence analysis revealed a novel frameshift mutation, c.964_965insG, in the coding region of the FOXC2 gene. This mutation caused protein truncation due to the presence of a premature stop codon. A fluorescence assay showed that this mutation did not change the nuclear localization of the protein. However, it impaired DNA-binding activity and decreased transcriptional activation. This is the first report of a FOXC2 mutation in hereditary distichiasis in the Chinese population. The findings of our study expand the FOXC2 mutation spectrum and contribute to the understanding of the genotype-phenotype correlation of this disease. PMID:27570485

  8. The metabolic activator FOXO1 binds hepatitis B virus DNA and activates its transcription

    SciTech Connect

    Shlomai, Amir; Shaul, Yosef

    2009-04-17

    Hepatitis B virus (HBV) is a small DNA virus that targets the liver and infects humans worldwide. Recently we have shown that the metabolic regulator PGC-1{alpha} coactivates HBV transcription thereby rendering the virus susceptible to fluctuations in the nutritional status of the liver. PGC-1{alpha} coactivation of HBV is mediated through the liver-enriched nuclear receptor HNF4{alpha} and through another yet unknown transcription factor(s). Here we show that the forkhead transcription factor FOXO1, a known target for PGC-1{alpha} coactivation and a central mediator of glucose metabolism in the liver, binds HBV core promoter and activates its transcription. This activation is further enhanced in the presence of PGC-1{alpha}, implying that FOXO1 is a target for PGC-1{alpha} coactivation of HBV transcription. Thus, our results identify another key metabolic regulator as an activator of HBV transcription, thereby supporting the principle that HBV gene expression is regulated in a similar way to key hepatic metabolic genes.

  9. A new thio-Schiff base fluorophore with copper ion sensing, DNA binding and nuclease activity.

    PubMed

    Vikneswaran, R; Syafiq, Muhamad Syamir; Eltayeb, Naser Eltaher; Kamaruddin, Mohd Naqiuddin; Ramesh, S; Yahya, R

    2015-01-01

    Copper ion recognition and DNA interaction of a newly synthesized fluorescent Schiff base (HPyETSC) were investigated using UV-vis and fluorescent spectroscopy. Examination using these two techniques revealed that the detection of copper by HPyETSC is highly sensitive and selective, with a detection limit of 0.39 μm and the mode of interaction between HPyETSC and DNA is electrostatic, with a binding constant of 8.97×10(4) M(-1). Furthermore, gel electrophoresis studies showed that HPyETSC exhibited nuclease activity through oxidative pathway.

  10. Repressor activity of the RpoS/σS-dependent RNA polymerase requires DNA binding

    PubMed Central

    Lévi-Meyrueis, Corinne; Monteil, Véronique; Sismeiro, Odile; Dillies, Marie-Agnès; Kolb, Annie; Monot, Marc; Dupuy, Bruno; Duarte, Sara Serradas; Jagla, Bernd; Coppée, Jean-Yves; Beraud, Mélanie; Norel, Françoise

    2015-01-01

    The RpoS/σS sigma subunit of RNA polymerase (RNAP) activates transcription of stationary phase genes in many Gram-negative bacteria and controls adaptive functions, including stress resistance, biofilm formation and virulence. In this study, we address an important but poorly understood aspect of σS-dependent control, that of a repressor. Negative regulation by σS has been proposed to result largely from competition between σS and other σ factors for binding to a limited amount of core RNAP (E). To assess whether σS binding to E alone results in significant downregulation of gene expression by other σ factors, we characterized an rpoS mutant of Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium producing a σS protein proficient for EσS complex formation but deficient in promoter DNA binding. Genome expression profiling and physiological assays revealed that this mutant was defective for negative regulation, indicating that gene repression by σS requires its binding to DNA. Although the mechanisms of repression by σS are likely specific to individual genes and environmental conditions, the study of transcription downregulation of the succinate dehydrogenase operon suggests that σ competition at the promoter DNA level plays an important role in gene repression by EσS. PMID:25578965

  11. Drosophila distal-less negatively regulates dDREF by inhibiting its DNA binding activity.

    PubMed

    Hayashi, Yuko; Kato, Masaki; Seto, Hirokazu; Yamaguchi, Masamitsu

    2006-07-01

    The Drosophila DNA replication-related element binding factor (dDREF) is required for expression of many proliferation-related genes carrying the DRE sequence, 5'-TATCGATA. Over-expression of dDREF in the eye imaginal disc induces ectopic DNA synthesis, apoptosis and inhibition of photoreceptor cell specification, and results in rough eye phenotype in adults. In the present study, half dose reduction of the Distal-less (Dll) gene enhanced the dDREF-induced rough eye phenotype, suggesting that Dll negatively regulates dDREF activity in eye imaginal disc cells. Biochemical analyses revealed the N-terminal (30aa to 124aa) and C-terminal (190aa to 327aa) regions of Dll to interact with the DNA binding domain (16aa to 125aa) of dDREF, although it is not clear yet whether the interaction is direct or indirect. Electrophoretic mobility shift assays showed that Dll thereby inhibits DNA binding. The repression of this dDREF-function by a homeodomain protein like Dll may contribute to the differentiation-coupled repression of cell proliferation during development.

  12. Evaluation of DNA binding, DNA cleavage, protein binding, radical scavenging and in vitro cytotoxic activities of ruthenium(II) complexes containing 2,4-dihydroxy benzylidene ligands.

    PubMed

    Mohanraj, Maruthachalam; Ayyannan, Ganesan; Raja, Gunasekaran; Jayabalakrishnan, Chinnasamy

    2016-12-01

    The new ruthenium(II) complexes with hydrazone ligands, 4-Methyl-benzoic acid (2,4-dihydroxy-benzylidene)-hydrazide (HL(1)), 4-Methoxy-benzoic acid (2,4-dihydroxy-benzylidene)-hydrazide (HL(2)), 4-Bromo-benzoic acid (2,4-dihydroxy-benzylidene)-hydrazide (HL(3)), were synthesized and characterized by various spectro analytical techniques. The molecular structures of the ligands were confirmed by single crystal X-ray diffraction technique. The DNA binding studies of the ligands and complexes were examined by absorption, fluorescence, viscosity and cyclic voltammetry methods. The results indicated that the ligands and complexes could interact with calf thymus DNA (CT-DNA) through intercalation. The DNA cleavage activity of the complexes was evaluated by gel electrophoresis assay, which revealed that the complexes are good DNA cleaving agents. The binding interaction of the ligands and complexes with bovine serum albumin (BSA) was investigated using fluorescence spectroscopic method. Antioxidant studies showed that the complexes have a strong radical scavenging properties. Further, the cytotoxic effect of the complexes examined on cancerous cell lines showed that the complexes exhibit significant anticancer activity.

  13. Human Pif1 helicase is a G-quadruplex DNA-binding protein with G-quadruplex DNA-unwinding activity.

    PubMed

    Sanders, Cyril M

    2010-08-15

    Pif1 proteins are helicases that in yeast are implicated in the maintenance of genome stability. One activity of Saccharomyces cerevisiae Pif1 is to stabilize DNA sequences that could otherwise form deleterious G4 (G-quadruplex) structures by acting as a G4 resolvase. The present study shows that human Pif1 (hPif1, nuclear form) is a G4 DNA-binding and resolvase protein and that these activities are properties of the conserved helicase domain (amino acids 206-620 of 641, hPifHD). hPif1 preferentially bound synthetic G4 DNA relative to ssDNA (single-stranded DNA), dsDNA (double-stranded DNA) and a partially single-stranded duplex DNA helicase substrate. G4 DNA unwinding, but not binding, required an extended (>10 nucleotide) 5' ssDNA tail, and in competition assays, G4 DNA was an ineffective suppressor of helicase activity compared with ssDNA. These results suggest a distinction between the determinants of G4 DNA binding and the ssDNA interactions required for helicase action and that hPif1 may act on G4 substrates by binding alone or as a resolvase. Human Pif1 could therefore have a role in processing G4 structures that arise in the single-stranded nucleic acid intermediates formed during DNA replication and gene expression.

  14. The Sso7d DNA-binding protein from Sulfolobus solfataricus has ribonuclease activity.

    PubMed

    Shehi, E; Serina, S; Fumagalli, G; Vanoni, M; Consonni, R; Zetta, L; Dehò, G; Tortora, P; Fusi, P

    2001-05-25

    Sso7d is a small, basic, abundant protein from the thermoacidophilic archaeon Sulfolobus solfataricus. Previous research has shown that Sso7d can bind double-stranded DNA without sequence specificity by placing its triple-stranded beta-sheet across the minor groove. We previously found RNase activity both in preparations of Sso7d purified from its natural source and in recombinant, purified protein expressed in Escherichia coli. This paper provides conclusive evidence that supports the assignment of RNase activity to Sso7d, shown by the total absence of activity in the single-point mutants E35L and K12L, despite the preservation of their overall structure under the assay conditions. In keeping with our observation that the residues putatively involved in RNase activity and those playing a role in DNA binding are located on different surfaces of the molecule, the activity was not impaired in the presence of DNA. If a small synthetic RNA was used as a substrate, Sso7d attacked both predicted double- and single-stranded RNA stretches, with no evident preference for specific sequences or individual bases. Apparently, the more readily attacked bonds were those intrinsically more unstable.

  15. Drosophila Mad binds to DNA and directly mediates activation of vestigial by Decapentaplegic.

    PubMed

    Kim, J; Johnson, K; Chen, H J; Carroll, S; Laughon, A

    1997-07-17

    The TGF-beta (transforming growth factor-beta)-related signalling proteins, including Decapentaplegic (Dpp) in Drosophila-and bone morphogenic proteins and activin in vertebrates, affect the growth and patterning of a great variety of structures. However, the mechanisms by which these ligands regulate gene expression are not understood. Activation of complexes of type I with type II receptors results in the phosphorylation and nuclear localization of members of the SMAD protein family, which are thought to act as co-activators of transcription, perhaps in conjunction with sequence-specific cofactors. Here we show that the amino-terminal domain of the Drosophila Mothers against dpp protein (Mad), a mediator of Dpp signalling, possesses a sequence-specific DNA-binding activity that becomes apparent when carboxy-terminal residues are removed. Mad binds to and is required for the activation of an enhancer within the vestigial wing-patterning gene in cells across the entire developing wing blade. Mad also binds to Dpp-response elements in other genes. These results suggest that Dpp signalling regulates gene expression by activating Mad binding to target gene enhancers.

  16. DNA Binding and Antitumor Activity of α-Diimineplatinum(II) and Palladium(II) Dithiocarbamate Complexes

    PubMed Central

    Mansouri-Torshizi, Hassan; Saeidifar, Maryam; Khosravi, Fatemeh; Divsalar, Adeleh; Saboury, Ali Akbar; Hassani, Fatemeh

    2011-01-01

    The two water-soluble designed platinum(II) complex, [Pt(Oct-dtc)(bpy)]NO3 (Oct-dtc = Octyldithiocarbamate and bpy = 2,2′ -bipyridine) and palladium(II) complex, [Pd(Oct-dtc)(bpy)]NO3, have been synthesized and characterized by elemental analyses, molar conductivity measurements, IR, 1H NMR, and electronic spectra studies. Studies of antitumor activity of these complexes against human cell tumor lines (K562) have been carried out. They show Ic50 values lower than that of cisplatin. The complexes have been investigated for their interaction with calf thymus DNA (CT-DNA) by utilizing the electronic absorption spectroscopy, fluorescence spectra, and ethidium bromide displacement and gel filtration techniques. Both of these water-soluble complexes bound cooperatively and intercalatively to the CT-DNA at very low concentrations. Several binding and thermodynamic parameters are also described. PMID:22110410

  17. A Colorimetric Microplate Assay for DNA-Binding Activity of His-Tagged MutS Protein.

    PubMed

    Banasik, Michał; Sachadyn, Paweł

    2016-09-01

    A simple microplate method was designed for rapid testing DNA-binding activity of proteins. The principle of the assay involves binding of tested DNA by his-tagged protein immobilized on a nickel-coated ELISA plate, following colorimetric detection of biotinylated DNA with avidin conjugated to horseradish peroxidase. The method was used to compare DNA mismatch binding activities of MutS proteins from three bacterial species. The assay required relatively low amounts of tested protein (approximately 0.5-10 pmol) and DNA (0.1-10 pmol) and a relatively short time of analysis (up to 60 min). The method is very simple to apply and convenient to test different buffer conditions of DNA-protein binding. Sensitive colorimetric detection enables naked eye observations and quantitation with an ELISA reader. The performance of the assay, which we believe is a distinguishing trait of the method, is based on two strong and specific molecular interactions: binding of a his-tagged protein to a nickel-coated microplate and binding of biotinylated DNA to avidin. In the reported experiments, the solution was used to optimize the conditions for DNA mismatch binding by MutS protein; however, the approach could be implemented to test nucleic acids interactions with any protein of interest.

  18. Multiple DNA binding activities of the novel site-specific recombinase, Piv, from Moraxella lacunata.

    PubMed

    Tobiason, D M; Lenich, A G; Glasgow, A C

    1999-04-02

    The recombinase, Piv, is essential for site-specific DNA inversion of the type IV pilin DNA segment in Moraxella lacunata and Moraxella bovis. Piv shows significant homology with the transposases of the IS110/IS492 family of insertion elements, but, surprisingly, Piv contains none of the conserved amino acid motifs of the lambda Int or Hin/Res families of site-specific recombinases. Therefore, Piv may mediate site-specific recombination by a novel mechanism. To begin to determine how Piv may assemble a synaptic nucleoprotein structure for DNA cleavage and strand exchange, we have characterized the interaction of Piv with the DNA inversion region of M. lacunata. Gel shift and nuclease/chemical protection assays, competition and dissociation rate analyses, and cooperativity studies indicate that Piv binds two distinct recognition sequences. One recognition sequence, found at multiple sites within and outside of the invertible segment, is bound by Piv protomers with high affinity. The second recognition sequence is located at the recombination cross-over sites at the ends of the invertible element; Piv interacts with this sequence as an oligomer with apparent low affinity. A model is proposed for the role of the different Piv binding sites of the M. lacunata inversion region in the formation of an active synaptosome.

  19. Macrocyclic nickel(II) complexes: Synthesis, characterization, superoxide scavenging activity and DNA-binding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ramadan, Abd El-Motaleb M.

    2012-05-01

    A new series of nickel(II) complexes with the tetraaza macrocyclic ligand have been synthesized as possible functional models for nickel-superoxide dismutase enzyme. The reaction of 5-amino-3-methyl-1-phenylpyrazole-4-carbaldehyde (AMPC) with itself in the presence of nickel(II) ion yields, the new macrocyclic cationic complex, [NiL(NO3)2], containing a ligand composed of the self-condensed AMPC (4 mol) bound to a single nickel(II) ion. A series of metathetical reactions have led to the isolation of a number of newly complexes of the types [NiL]X2; X = ClO4 and BF4, [NiLX2], X = Cl and Br (Scheme 1). Structures and characterizations of these complexes were achieved by several physicochemical methods namely, elemental analysis, magnetic moment, conductivity, and spectral (IR and UV-Vis) measurements. The electrochemical properties and thermal behaviors of these chelates were investigated by using cyclic voltammetry and thermogravimetric analysis (TGA and DTG) techniques. A distorted octahedral stereochemistry has been proposed for the six-coordinate nitrato, and halogeno complexes. For the four-coordinate, perchlorate and fluoroborate, complex species a square-planar geometry is proposed. The measured superoxide dismutase mimetic activities of the complexes indicated that they are potent NiSOD mimics and their activities are compared with those obtained previously for nickel(II) complexes. The probable mechanistic implications of the catalytic dismutation of O2rad - by the synthesized nickel(II) complexes are discussed. The DNA-binding properties of representative complexes [NiLCl2] and [NiL](PF4)2 have been investigated by the electronic absorption and fluorescence measurements. The results obtained suggest that these complexes bind to DNA via an intercalation binding mode and the binding affinity for DNA follows the order: [NiLCl2] □ [NiL](PF4)2.

  20. Transcriptional activation and repression by cellular DNA-binding protein C/EBP.

    PubMed Central

    Pei, D Q; Shih, C H

    1990-01-01

    A putative transcription factor, C/EBP, isolated from rat liver nuclei, has been shown to bind to at least two different sequence motifs: the CCAAT promoter domain and a core sequence [GTGG(T/A)(T/A)(T/A)G] common to many viral enhancers, including simian virus 40 and human hepatitis B virus. It has been proposed that C/EBP might function as a positive transcription factor by facilitating the communication between promoter and enhancer elements through its dual binding activities to DNA. Surprisingly, results from three different approaches suggest that C/EBP functions as a transcriptional repressor to hepatitis B virus and simian virus 40. Further investigation indicated that C/EBP can function as both a transcriptional activator and a repressor, depending on the reporter gene system. Images PMID:2157040

  1. TATA-box DNA binding activity and subunit composition for RNA polymerase III transcription factor IIIB from Xenopus laevis.

    PubMed Central

    McBryant, S J; Meier, E; Leresche, A; Sharp, S J; Wolf, V J; Gottesfeld, J M

    1996-01-01

    The RNA polymerase III transcription initiation factor TFIIIB contains the TATA-box-binding protein (TBP) and polymerase III-specific TBP-associated factors (TAFs). Previous studies have shown that DNA oligonucleotides containing the consensus TATA-box sequence inhibit polymerase III transcription, implying that the DNA binding domain of TBP is exposed in TFIIIB. We have investigated the TATA-box DNA binding activity of Xenopus TFIIIB, using transcription inhibition assays and a gel mobility shift assay. Gel shift competition assays with mutant and nonspecific DNAs demonstrate the specificity of the TFIIIB-TATA box DNA complex. The apparent dissociation constant for this protein-DNA interaction is approximately 0.4 nM, similar to the affinity of yeast TBP for the same sequence. TFIIIB transcriptional activity and TATA-box binding activity cofractionate during a series of four ion-exchange chromatographic steps, and reconstituted transcription reactions demonstrate that the TATA-box DNA-protein complex contains TFIIIB TAF activity. Polypeptides with apparent molecular masses of 75 and 92 kDa are associated with TBP in this complex. These polypeptides were renatured after elution from sodium dodecyl sulfate-gels and tested individually and in combination for TFIIIB TAF activity. Recombinant TBP along with protein fractions containing the 75- and 92-kDa polypeptides were sufficient to reconstitute TFIIIB transcriptional activity and DNA binding activity, suggesting that Xenopus TFIIIB is composed of TBP along with these polypeptides. PMID:8756620

  2. Thermolabile in vivo DNA-binding activity associated with a protein encoded by mutants of herpes simplex virus type 1.

    PubMed Central

    Lee, C K; Knipe, D M

    1983-01-01

    The major DNA-binding protein encoded by several temperature-sensitive mutants of herpes simplex virus type 1 was thermolabile for binding to intracellular viral DNA. The ability of DNase I to release this protein from isolated nuclei was used as a measure of the amount of protein bound to viral DNA. This assay was based upon our previous observation that the fraction of herpesviral DNA-binding protein which can be eluted from nuclei with DNase I represents proteins associated with progeny viral DNA (D. M. Knipe and A. E. Spang, J. Virol. 43:314-324, 1982). In this study, we found that several temperature-sensitive mutants encoded proteins which rapidly chased from a DNase I-sensitive to a DNase I-resistant nuclear form upon shift to the nonpermissive temperature. We interpret this change in DNase I sensitivity to represent the denaturation of the DNA-binding site at the nonpermissive temperature and the association with the nuclear framework via a second site on the protein. The DNA-binding activity measured by the DNase I sensitivity assay represents an important function of the protein in viral replication because three of five mutants tested were thermolabile for this activity. A fourth mutant encoded a protein which did not associate with the nucleus at the nonpermissive temperature and therefore would not be available for DNA binding in the nucleus. We also present supportive evidence for the binding of the wild-type protein to intracellular viral DNA by showing that a monoclonal antibody coprecipitated virus-specific DNA sequences with the major DNA-binding protein. Images PMID:6304350

  3. Fluorescence studies, DNA binding properties and antimicrobial activity of a dysprosium(III) complex containing 1,10-phenanthroline.

    PubMed

    Khorasani-Motlagh, Mozhgan; Noroozifar, Meissam; Moodi, Asieh; Niroomand, Sona

    2013-10-05

    Luminescence and binding properties of dysprosium(III) complex containing 1,10-phenanthroline (phen), [Dy(phen)2(OH2)3Cl]Cl2⋅H2O with DNA has been studied by electronic absorption, emission spectroscopy and viscosity measurement. The thermodynamic studies suggest that the interaction process to be endothermic and entropically driven, which indicates that the dysprosium(III) complex might interact with DNA by a non intercalation binding mode. Additionally, the competitive fluorescence study with ethidium bromide and also the effect of iodide ion and salt concentration on fluorescence of the complex-DNA system is investigated. Experimental results indicate that the Dy(III) complex strongly binds to DNA, presumably via groove binding mode. Furthermore, the complex shows a potent antibacterial activity and DNA cleavage ability.

  4. Qualitative analysis of sequence specific binding of flavones to DNA using restriction endonuclease activity assays.

    PubMed

    Duran, Elizabeth; Ramsauer, Victoria P; Ballester, Maria; Torrenegra, Ruben D; Rodriguez, Oscar E; Winkle, Stephen A

    2013-08-01

    Flavones, found in nature as secondary plant metabolites, have shown efficacy as anti-cancer agents. We have examined the binding of two flavones, 5,7-dihydroxy-3,6,8-trimethoxy-2-phenyl-4H-chromen-4-one (5,7-dihydroxy-3,6,8-trimethoxy flavone; FlavA) and 3,5-dihydroxy-6,7,8-trimethoxy-2-phenyl-4H-chromen-4-one (3,5-dihydroxy-6,7,8-trimethoxy flavone; FlavB), to phiX174 RF DNA using restriction enzyme activity assays employing the restriction enzymes Alw44, AvaII, BssHII, DraI, MluI, NarI, NciI, NruI, PstI, and XhoI. These enzymes possess differing target and flanking sequences allowing for observation of sequence specificity analysis. Using restriction enzymes that cleave once with a mixture of supercoiled and relaxed DNA substrates provides for observation of topological effects on binding. FlavA and FlavB show differing sequence specificities in their respective binding to phiX. For example, with relaxed DNA, FlavA shows inhibition of cleavage with DraI (reaction site (5') TTTAAA) but not BssHII ((5') GCGCGC) while FlavB shows the opposite results. Evidence for tolological specificity is also observed, Molecular modeling and conformational analysis of the flavones suggests that the phenyl ring of FlavB is coplanar with the flavonoid ring while the phenyl ring of FlavA is at an angle relative to the flavonoid ring. This may account for aspects of the observed sequence and topological specificities in the effects on restriction enzyme activity.

  5. Exploration of DAPI analogues: Synthesis, antitrypanosomal activity, DNA binding and fluorescence properties.

    PubMed

    Farahat, Abdelbasset A; Kumar, Arvind; Say, Martial; Wenzler, Tanja; Brun, Reto; Paul, Ananya; Wilson, W David; Boykin, David W

    2017-03-10

    The DAPI structure has been modified by replacing the phenyl group with substituted phenyl or heteroaryl rings. Twelve amidines were synthesized and their DNA binding, fluorescence properties, in vitro and in vivo activities were evaluated. These compounds are shown to bind in the DNA minor groove with high affinity, and exhibit superior in vitro antitrypanosomal activity to that of DAPI. Six new diamidines (5b, 5c, 5d, 5e, 5f and 5j) exhibit superior in vivo activity to that of DAPI and four of these compounds provide 100% animal cure at a low dose of 4 × 5 mg/kg i.p. in T. b. rhodesiense infected mice. Generally, the fluorescence properties of the new analogues are inferior to that of DAPI with the exception of compound 5i which shows a moderate increase in efficacy while compound 5k is comparable to DAPI.

  6. Synthesis, cytotoxic activities and DNA binding properties of β-carboline derivatives.

    PubMed

    Chen, Zhiyong; Cao, Rihui; Yu, Liang; Shi, Buxi; Sun, Jie; Guo, Liang; Ma, Qin; Yi, Wei; Song, Xiao; Song, Huacan

    2010-11-01

    In a continuing effort to develop novel β-carbolines endowed with better pharmacological profile, a series of water-soluble β-carbolines bearing a flexible amino side chain was designed and synthesized, and the cytotoxic activities in vitro of these compounds were evaluated. The N(9)-arylated alkyl substituted β-carbolines represented the most interesting cytotoxic agents, and compounds 4c and 4d were found to be the most potent compounds with IC(50) values lower than 10 μM against ten human tumor cell lines. The results confirmed that the N(9)-arylated alkyl substituents of β-carboline played a very important role in the modulation of the cytotoxic potencies. In addition, the interaction with DNA of these compounds was also investigated, these compounds were found to exhibit significant DNA binding affinity.

  7. Mutual activation of Ets-1 and AML1 DNA binding by direct interaction of their autoinhibitory domains.

    PubMed Central

    Kim, W Y; Sieweke, M; Ogawa, E; Wee, H J; Englmeier, U; Graf, T; Ito, Y

    1999-01-01

    The transcription factors Ets-1 and AML1 (the alphaBl subunit of PEBP2/CBF) play critical roles in hematopoiesis and leukemogenesis, and cooperate in the transactivation of the T cell receptor (TCR) beta chain enhancer. The DNA binding capacity of both factors is blocked intramolecularly but can be activated by the removal of negative regulatory domains. These include the exon VII domain for Ets-1 and the negative regulatory domain for DNA binding (NRDB) for alphaB1. Here we report that the direct interaction between the two factors leads to a reciprocal stimulation of their DNA binding activity and activation of their transactivation function. Detailed mapping revealed two independent contact points involving the exon VII and NRDB regions as well as the two DNA binding domains. Using deletion variants and dominant interfering mutants, we demonstrate that the interaction between exon VII and NRDB is necessary and sufficient for cooperative DNA binding. The exon VII and NRDB motifs are highly conserved in evolution yet deleted in natural variants, suggesting that the mechanism described is of biological relevance. The mutual activation of DNA binding of Ets and AML1 through the intermolecular interaction of autoinhibitory domains may represent a novel principle for the regulation of transcription factor function. PMID:10075931

  8. Mitochondrial Single-stranded DNA-binding Proteins Stimulate the Activity of DNA Polymerase γ by Organization of the Template DNA*

    PubMed Central

    Ciesielski, Grzegorz L.; Bermek, Oya; Rosado-Ruiz, Fernando A.; Hovde, Stacy L.; Neitzke, Orrin J.; Griffith, Jack D.; Kaguni, Laurie S.

    2015-01-01

    The activity of the mitochondrial replicase, DNA polymerase γ (Pol γ) is stimulated by another key component of the mitochondrial replisome, the mitochondrial single-stranded DNA-binding protein (mtSSB). We have performed a comparative analysis of the human and Drosophila Pols γ with their cognate mtSSBs, evaluating their functional relationships using a combined approach of biochemical assays and electron microscopy. We found that increasing concentrations of both mtSSBs led to the elimination of template secondary structure and gradual opening of the template DNA, through a series of visually similar template species. The stimulatory effect of mtSSB on Pol γ on these ssDNA templates is not species-specific. We observed that human mtSSB can be substituted by its Drosophila homologue, and vice versa, finding that a lower concentration of insect mtSSB promotes efficient stimulation of either Pol. Notably, distinct phases of the stimulation by both mtSSBs are distinguishable, and they are characterized by a similar organization of the template DNA for both Pols γ. We conclude that organization of the template DNA is the major factor contributing to the stimulation of Pol γ activity. Additionally, we observed that human Pol γ preferentially utilizes compacted templates, whereas the insect enzyme achieves its maximal activity on open templates, emphasizing the relative importance of template DNA organization in modulating Pol γ activity and the variation among systems. PMID:26446790

  9. Targeting the DNA-binding activity of the human ERG transcription factor using new heterocyclic dithiophene diamidines

    PubMed Central

    Nhili, Raja; Peixoto, Paul; Depauw, Sabine; Flajollet, Sébastien; Dezitter, Xavier; Munde, Manoj M.; Ismail, Mohamed A.; Kumar, Arvind; Farahat, Abdelbasset A.; Stephens, Chad E.; Duterque-Coquillaud, Martine; David Wilson, W.; Boykin, David W.; David-Cordonnier, Marie-Hélène

    2013-01-01

    Direct modulation of gene expression by targeting oncogenic transcription factors is a new area of research for cancer treatment. ERG, an ETS-family transcription factor, is commonly over-expressed or translocated in leukaemia and prostate carcinoma. In this work, we selected the di-(thiophene-phenyl-amidine) compound DB1255 as an ERG/DNA binding inhibitor using a screening test of synthetic inhibitors of the ERG/DNA interaction followed by electrophoretic mobility shift assays (EMSA) validation. Spectrometry, footprint and biosensor-surface plasmon resonance analyses of the DB1255/DNA interaction evidenced sequence selectivity and groove binding as dimer. Additional EMSA evidenced the precise DNA-binding sequence required for optimal DB1255/DNA binding and thus for an efficient ERG/DNA complex inhibition. We further highlighted the structure activity relationships from comparison with derivatives. In cellulo luciferase assay confirmed this modulation both with the constructed optimal sequences and the Osteopontin promoter known to be regulated by ERG and which ERG-binding site was protected from DNaseI digestion on binding of DB1255. These data showed for the first time the ERG/DNA complex modulation, both in vitro and in cells, by a heterocyclic diamidine that specifically targets a portion of the ERG DNA recognition site. PMID:23093599

  10. DNA-binding-defective mutants of the Epstein-Barr virus lytic switch activator Zta transactivate with altered specificities.

    PubMed Central

    Flemington, E K; Lytle, J P; Cayrol, C; Borras, A M; Speck, S H

    1994-01-01

    The Epstein-Barr virus BRLF1 and BZLF1 genes are the first viral genes transcribed upon induction of the viral lytic cycle. The protein products of both genes (referred to here as Rta and Zta, respectively) activate expression of other viral genes, thereby initiating the lytic cascade. Among the viral antigens expressed upon induction of the lytic cycle, however, Zta is unique in its ability to disrupt viral latency; expression of the BZLF1 gene is both necessary and sufficient for triggering the viral lytic cascade. We have previously shown that Zta can activate its own promoter (Zp), through binding to two Zta recognition sequences (ZIIIA and ZIIIB). Here we describe mutant Zta proteins that do not bind DNA (referred to as Zta DNA-binding mutants [Zdbm]) but retain the ability to transactivate Zp. Consistent with the inability of these mutants to bind DNA, transactivation of Zp by Zdbm is not dependent on the Zta recognition sequences. Instead, transactivation by Zdbm is dependent upon promoter elements that bind cellular factors. An examination of other viral and cellular promoters identified promoters that are weakly responsive or unresponsive to Zdbm. An analysis of a panel of artificial promoters containing one copy of various promoter elements demonstrated a specificity for Zdbm activation that is distinct from that of Zta. These results suggest that non-DNA-binding forms of some transactivators retain the ability to transactivate specific target promoters without direct binding to DNA. Images PMID:8164660

  11. Influence of chirality using Mn(III) salen complexes on DNA binding and antioxidant activity.

    PubMed

    Khan, Noor-Ul H; Pandya, Nirali; Kumar, Manoj; Bera, Prasanta Kumar; Kureshy, Rukhsana I; Abdi, Sayed H R; Bajaj, Hari C

    2010-10-07

    Chiral Mn(iii) salen complexes S-1, R-1, S-2, R-2, S-3 and R-3 derived from the respective chiral salen ligands, viz., (1S,2S)-N,N'-bis-[3-tert-butyl-5-chloromethyl-salicylidine]-1,2-cyclohexanediamine S-1'/(1R,2R)-N,N'-bis-[3-tert-butyl-5-chloromethyl-salicylidine]-1,2-cyclohexanediamine R-1'/(1S,2S)-N,N'-bis-[3-tert-butyl-5-N,N'N'triethylaminomethyl-salicylidine]-1,2-cyclohexanediamine dichloride S-2'/(1R,2R)-N,N'-bis-[3-tert-butyl-5-N,N'N'triethylaminomethyl-salicylidine]-1,2-cyclohexanediamine dichloride R-2'/(1S,2S)-N,N'-bis-[3,5-di-tert-butylsalicylidene]-1,2-cyclohexanediamine S-3' and (1R,2R)-N,N'-bis-[3,5-di-tert-butyl-salicylidene]-1,2-cyclohexanediamine R-3', were synthesized. Characterization of the complexes was done by microanalysis, IR, LC-MS, UV-vis. and circular dichroism (CD) spectroscopy. Binding of these complexes with calf thymus DNA (CT-DNA) was studied by absorption spectroscopy, competitive binding study, viscosity measurements, circular dichroism measurements, thermal denaturation study and observation of their different antioxidant activities. Among all the complexes used, the best result in terms of binding constant (intercalative) (130.4 x 10(4)) was achieved with the complex S-1 by spectroscopic titration. The complex S-1 showed strong antioxidant activity as well.

  12. JAB1 regulates unphosphorylated STAT3 DNA-binding activity through protein–protein interaction in human colon cancer cells

    SciTech Connect

    Nishimoto, Arata; Kugimiya, Naruji; Hosoyama, Toru; Enoki, Tadahiko; Li, Tao-Sheng; Hamano, Kimikazu

    2013-08-30

    Highlights: •JAB1 interacted with unphosphorylated STAT3 in the nucleus. •JAB1 knockdown tended to increase nuclear STAT3 expression. •JAB1 knockdown significantly decreased unphosphorylated STAT3 DNA-binding activity. •JAB1 knockdown significantly decreased MDR1, NANOG, and VEGF expressions. •Nuclear JAB1, but not nuclear STAT3, correlated with STAT3 DNA-binding activity. -- Abstract: Recent studies have revealed that unphosphorylated STAT3 forms a dimer, translocates to the nucleus, binds to the STAT3 binding site, and activates the transcription of STAT3 target genes, thereby playing an important role in oncogenesis in addition to phosphorylated STAT3. Among signaling steps of unphosphorylated STAT3, nuclear translocation and target DNA-binding are the critical steps for its activation. Therefore, elucidating the regulatory mechanism of these signaling steps of unphosphorylated STAT3 is a potential step in the discovery of a novel cancer drug. However, the mechanism of unphosphorylated STAT3 binding to the promoter of target genes remains unclear. In this study, we focused on Jun activation domain-binding protein 1 (JAB1) as a candidate protein that regulates unphosphorylated STAT3 DNA-binding activity. Initially, we observed that both unphosphorylated STAT3 and JAB1 existed in the nucleus of human colon cancer cell line COLO205 at the basal state (no cytokine stimulation). On the other hand, phosphorylated STAT3 did not exist in the nucleus of COLO205 cells at the basal state. Immunoprecipitation using nuclear extract of COLO205 cells revealed that JAB1 interacted with unphosphorylated STAT3. To investigate the effect of JAB1 on unphosphorylated STAT3 activity, RNAi studies were performed. Although JAB1 knockdown tended to increase nuclear STAT3 expression, it significantly decreased unphosphorylated STAT3 DNA-binding activity. Subsequently, JAB1 knockdown significantly decreased the expression levels of MDR1, NANOG, and VEGF, which are STAT3 target

  13. DNA Mutagenic Activity and Capacity for HIV-1 Restriction of the Cytidine Deaminase APOBEC3G Depends on Whether DNA or RNA Binds to Tyrosine 315.

    PubMed

    Polevoda, Bogdan; Joseph, Rebecca; Friedman, Alan E; Bennett, Ryan P; Greiner, Rebecca; De Zoysa, Thareendra; Stewart, Ryan A; Smith, Harold C

    2017-04-05

    APOBEC3G (A3G) belongs to the AID/APOBEC protein family of cytidine deaminases (CDA) that bind to nucleic acids. A3G mutates the HIV genome by deamination of dC to dU, leading to accumulation of virus-inactivating mutations. Binding to cellular RNAs inhibits A3G binding to substrate single-stranded (ss) DNA and CDA activity. RNA and ssDNA bind to the same three A3G tryptic peptides (amino acids 181-194, 314-320, and 345-374) that form parts of a continuously exposed protein surface extending from the catalytic domain in the C-terminus of A3G to its N-terminus. We show here that the A3G tyrosines 181 and 315 directly cross-link ssDNA. Binding experiments showed that a Y315A mutation alone significantly reduced A3G binding to both ssDNA and RNA, whereas Y181A and Y182A mutations only moderately affected A3G nucleic acid binding. Consistent with these findings, the Y315A mutant exhibited little to no deaminase activity in an E. coli DNA mutator reporter, while Y181A and Y182A mutants retained ~50% of wild-type A3G activity. The Y315A mutant also showed a markedly reduced ability to assemble into viral particles and had reduced antiviral activity. In uninfected cells, the impaired RNA-binding capacity of Y315A was evident by a shift of A3G from high-molecular-mass ribonucleoprotein complexes to low-molecular-mass complexes. We conclude that Y315 is essential for coordinating ssDNA interaction with or entry to the deaminase domain and hypothesize that RNA bound to Y315 may be sufficient to competitively inhibit ssDNA deaminase-dependent antiviral activity.

  14. Review on the binding of anticancer drug doxorubicin with DNA and tRNA: Structural models and antitumor activity.

    PubMed

    Agudelo, D; Bourassa, P; Bérubé, G; Tajmir-Riahi, H A

    2016-05-01

    In this review, we have compared the results of multiple spectroscopic studies and molecular modeling of anticancer drug doxorubicin (DOX) bindings to DNA and tRNA. DOX was intercalated into DNA duplex, while tRNA binding is via major and minor grooves. DOX-DNA intercalation is close to A-7, C-5, *C-19 (H-bonding with DOX NH2 group), G-6, T-8 and T-18 with the free binding energy of -4.99kcal/mol. DOX-tRNA groove bindings are near A-29, A-31, A-38, C-25, C-27, C-28, *G-30 (H-bonding) and U-41 with the free binding energy of -4.44kcal/mol. Drug intercalation induced a partial B to A-DNA transition, while tRNA remained in A-family structure. The structural differences observed between DOX bindings to DNA and tRNA can be the main reasons for drug antitumor activity. The results of in vitro MTT assay on SKC01 colon carcinoma are consistent with the observed DNA structural changes. Future research should be focused on finding suitable nanocarriers for delivery of DOX in vivo in order to exploit the full capacity of this very important anticancer drug.

  15. The quorum sensing transcriptional regulator TraR has separate binding sites for DNA and the anti-activator

    SciTech Connect

    Zheng, Zhida; Fuqua, Clay; Chen, Lingling

    2012-02-10

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Quorum sensing transcription factor TraR is inhibited by forming TraR-TraM complex. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer K213 is a key DNA binding residue, but not involved in interaction with TraM. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Mutations of TraM-interacting TraR residues did not affect DNA-binding of TraR. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Mutations of TraR residues reduced the TraR-TraM interaction more than those of TraM. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer TraM inhibition on DNA-binding of TraR is driven by thermodynamics. -- Abstract: Quorum sensing represents a mechanism by which bacteria control their genetic behaviors via diffusible signals that reflect their population density. TraR, a quorum sensing transcriptional activator in the Rhizobiaceae family, is regulated negatively by the anti-activator TraM via formation of a TraR-TraM heterocomplex. Prior structural analysis suggests that TraM and DNA bind to TraR in distinct sites. Here we combined isothermal titration calorimetry (ITC) and electrophoretic mobility shift assays (EMSA) to investigate roles of TraR residues from Rhizobium sp. NGR234 in binding of both TraM and DNA. We found that K213A mutation of TraR{sub NGR} abolished DNA binding, however, did not alter TraM binding. Mutations of TraM-interfacing TraR{sub NGR} residues decreased the TraR-TraM interaction, but did not affect the DNA-binding activity of TraR{sub NGR}. Thus, our biochemical studies support the independent binding sites on TraR for TraM and DNA. We also found that point mutations in TraR{sub NGR} appeared to decrease the TraR-TraM interaction more effectively than those in TraM{sub NGR}, consistent with structural observations that individual TraR{sub NGR} residues contact with more TraM{sub NGR} residues than each TraM{sub NGR} residues with TraR{sub NGR} residues. Finally, we showed that TraM inhibition on DNA-binding of TraR was driven thermodynamically. We discussed subtle mechanistic differences in Tra

  16. Phage Orf Family Recombinases: Conservation of Activities and Involvement of the Central Channel in DNA Binding

    PubMed Central

    Curtis, Fiona A.; Malay, Ali D.; Trotter, Alexander J.; Wilson, Lindsay A.; Barradell-Black, Michael M. H.; Bowers, Laura Y.; Reed, Patricia; Hillyar, Christopher R. T.; Yeo, Robert P.; Sanderson, John M.; Heddle, Jonathan G.; Sharples, Gary J.

    2014-01-01

    Genetic and biochemical evidence suggests that λ Orf is a recombination mediator, promoting nucleation of either bacterial RecA or phage Redβ recombinases onto single-stranded DNA (ssDNA) bound by SSB protein. We have identified a diverse family of Orf proteins that includes representatives implicated in DNA base flipping and those fused to an HNH endonuclease domain. To confirm a functional relationship with the Orf family, a distantly-related homolog, YbcN, from Escherichia coli cryptic prophage DLP12 was purified and characterized. As with its λ relative, YbcN showed a preference for binding ssDNA over duplex. Neither Orf nor YbcN displayed a significant preference for duplex DNA containing mismatches or 1-3 nucleotide bulges. YbcN also bound E. coli SSB, although unlike Orf, it failed to associate with an SSB mutant lacking the flexible C-terminal tail involved in coordinating heterologous protein-protein interactions. Residues conserved in the Orf family that flank the central cavity in the λ Orf crystal structure were targeted for mutagenesis to help determine the mode of DNA binding. Several of these mutant proteins showed significant defects in DNA binding consistent with the central aperture being important for substrate recognition. The widespread conservation of Orf-like proteins highlights the importance of targeting SSB coated ssDNA during lambdoid phage recombination. PMID:25083707

  17. PTEN downregulates p75NTR expression by decreasing DNA-binding activity of Sp1

    SciTech Connect

    Rankin, Sherri L.; Guy, Clifford S.; Mearow, Karen M.

    2009-02-13

    p75NTR is expressed throughout the nervous system and its dysregulation is associated with pathological conditions. We have recently demonstrated a signalling cascade initiated by laminin (LN), which upregulates PTEN and downregulates p75NTR. Here we investigate the mechanism by which PTEN modulates p75NTR. Studies using PTEN mutants show that its protein phosphatase activity directly modulates p75NTR protein expression. Nuclear relocalization of PTEN subsequent to LN stimulation suggests transcriptional control of p75NTR expression, which was confirmed following EMSA and ChIP analysis of Sp1 transcription factor binding activity. LN and PTEN independently decrease the DNA-binding ability of PTEN to the p75NTR promoter. Sp1 regulation of p75NTR occurs via dephosphorylation of Sp1, thus reducing p75NTR transcription and protein expression. This mechanism represents a novel regulatory pathway which controls the expression level of a receptor with broad implications not only for the development of the nervous system but also for progression of pathological conditions.

  18. Functional characterization of a conserved archaeal viral operon revealing single-stranded DNA binding, annealing and nuclease activities.

    PubMed

    Guo, Yang; Kragelund, Birthe B; White, Malcolm F; Peng, Xu

    2015-06-19

    The majority of archaeal viral genes are of unknown function hindering our understanding of the virus life cycle and viral interactions with their host. Here, we first describe functional characterization of ORF131b (gp17) and ORF436 (gp18) of Sulfolobus islandicus rod-shaped virus 2 (SIRV2), both encoding proteins of unknown function and forming an operon with ORF207 (gp19). SIRV2 gp17 was found to be a single-stranded DNA (ssDNA) binding protein different in structure from all previously characterized ssDNA binding proteins. Mutagenesis of a few conserved basic residues suggested a U-shaped binding path for ssDNA. The recombinant gp18 showed an ssDNA annealing activity often associated with helicases and recombinases. To gain insight into the biological role of the entire operon, we characterized SIRV2 gp19 and showed it to possess a 5' → 3' ssDNA exonuclease activity, in addition to the previously demonstrated ssDNA endonuclease activity. Further, in vitro pull-down assay demonstrated interactions between gp17 and gp18 and between gp18 and gp19 with the former being mediated by the intrinsically disordered C-terminus of gp17. The strand-displacement replication mode proposed previously for rudiviruses and the close interaction among the ssDNA binding, annealing and nuclease proteins strongly point to a role of the gene operon in genome maturation and/or DNA recombination that may function in viral DNA replication/repair.

  19. Fluoroquinolones stimulate the DNA cleavage activity of topoisomerase IV by promoting the binding of Mg2+ to the second metal binding site

    PubMed Central

    Oppegard, Lisa M.; Schwanz, Heidi A.; Towle, Tyrell R.; Kerns, Robert J.; Hiasa, Hiroshi

    2016-01-01

    Background Fluoroquinolones target bacterial type IIA topoisomerases, DNA gyrase and topoisomerase IV (Topo IV). Fluoroquinolones trap a topoisomerase-DNA covalent complex as a topoisomerase-fluoroquinolone-DNA ternary complex and ternary complex formation is critical for their cytotoxicity. A divalent metal ion is required for type IIA topoisomerase-catalyzed strand breakage and religation reactions. Recent studies have suggested that type IIA topoisomerases use two metal ions, one structural and one catalytic, to carry out the strand breakage reaction. Methods We conducted a series of DNA cleavage assays to examine the effects of fluoroquinolones and quinazolinediones on Mg2+-, Mn2+-, or Ca2+-supported DNA cleavage activity of Esherichia coli Topo IV. Results In the absence of any drug, 20–30 mM Mg2+ was required for the maximum levels of the DNA cleavage activity of Topo IV, whereas approximately 1 mM of either Mn2+ or Ca2+ was sufficient to support the maximum levels of the DNA cleavage activity of Topo IV. Fluoroquinolones promoted the Topo IV-catalyzed strand breakage reaction at low Mg2+ concentrations where Topo IV alone could not efficiently cleave DNA. Conclusions and General Significance At low Mg2+ concentrations, fluoroquinolones may stimulate the Topo IV-catalyzed strand breakage reaction by promoting Mg2+ binding to metal binding site B through the structural distortion in DNA. As Mg2+ concentration increases, fluoroquinolones may inhibit the religation reaction by either stabilizing Mg2+ at site B or inhibition the binding of Mg2+ to site A. This study provides a molecular basis of how fluoroquinolones stimulate the Topo IV-catalyzed strand breakage reaction by modulating Mg2+ binding. PMID:26723176

  20. Variola virus E3L Zα domain, but not its Z-DNA binding activity, is required for PKR inhibition.

    PubMed

    Thakur, Meghna; Seo, Eun Joo; Dever, Thomas E

    2014-02-01

    Responding to viral infection, the interferon-induced, double-stranded RNA (dsRNA)-activated protein kinase PKR phosphorylates translation initiation factor eIF2α to inhibit cellular and viral protein synthesis. To overcome this host defense mechanism, many poxviruses express the protein E3L, containing an N-terminal Z-DNA binding (Zα) domain and a C-terminal dsRNA-binding domain (dsRBD). While E3L is thought to inhibit PKR activation by sequestering dsRNA activators and by directly binding the kinase, the role of the Zα domain in PKR inhibition remains unclear. Here, we show that the E3L Zα domain is required to suppress the growth-inhibitory properties associated with expression of human PKR in yeast, to inhibit PKR kinase activity in vitro, and to reverse the inhibitory effects of PKR on reporter gene expression in mammalian cells treated with dsRNA. Whereas previous studies revealed that the Z-DNA binding activity of E3L is critical for viral pathogenesis, we identified point mutations in E3L that functionally uncouple Z-DNA binding and PKR inhibition. Thus, our studies reveal a molecular distinction between the nucleic acid binding and PKR inhibitory functions of the E3L Zα domain, and they support the notion that E3L contributes to viral pathogenesis by targeting PKR and other components of the cellular anti-viral defense pathway.

  1. DNA-binding studies and biological activities of new nitrosubstituted acyl thioureas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tahir, Shaista; Badshah, Amin; Hussain, Raja Azadar; Tahir, Muhammad Nawaz; Tabassum, Saira; Patujo, Jahangir Ali; Rauf, Muhammad Khawar

    2015-11-01

    Four new nitrosubstituted acylthioureas i.e. 1-acetyl-3-(4-nitrophenyl)thiourea (TU1), 1-acetyl-3-(2-methyl-4-nitrophenyl)thiourea (TU2), 1-acetyl-3-(2-methoxy-4-nitrophenyl)thiourea (TU3) and 1-acetyl-3-(4-chloro-3-nitrophenyl)thiourea (TU4) have been synthesized and characterized (by C13 and H1 nuclear magnetic resonance, Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy and single crystal X-ray diffraction). As a preliminary investigation of the anti-cancer potencies of the said compounds, DNA interaction studies have been carried out using cyclic voltammetry and UV-vis spectroscopy along with verification from computational studies. The drug-DNA binding constants are found to be in the order, KTU3 9.04 × 106 M-1 > KTU4 8.57 × 106 M-1 > KTU2 6.05 × 106 M-1 > KTU1 1.16 × 106 M-1. Furthermore, the antioxidant, cytotoxic, antibacterial and antifungal activities have been carried out against DPPH (1,1-diphenyl-2-dipicrylhydrazyl), Brine shrimp eggs, gram positive (Micrococcus luteus, Staphylococcus aureus) and gram negative (Bordetella bronchiseptica, Salmonella typhimurium, Enterobacter aerogens) and fungal cultures (Aspergillus fumigatus, Mucor species, Aspergillus niger, Aspergillus flavus) respectively.

  2. Dual regulation of heat-shock transcription factor (HSF) activation and DNA-binding activity by H2O2: role of thioredoxin.

    PubMed Central

    Jacquier-Sarlin, M R; Polla, B S

    1996-01-01

    The heat-shock (HS) response is a ubiquitous cellular response to stress, involving the transcriptional activation of HS genes. Reactive oxygen species (ROS) have been shown to regulate the activity of a number of transcription factors. We investigated the redox regulation of the stress response and report here that in the human pre-monocytic line U937 cells, H2O2 induced a concentration-dependent transactivation and DNA-binding activity of heat-shock factor-1 (HSF-1). DNA-binding activity was, however, lower with H2O2 than with HS. We thus hypothesized a dual regulation of HSF by oxidants. We found that oxidizing agents, such as H2O2 and diamide, as well as alkylating agents, such as iodoacetic acid, abolished, in vitro, the HSF-DNA-binding activity induced by HS in vivo. The effects of H2O2 in vitro were reversed by the sulphydryl reducing agent dithiothreitol and the endogenous reductor thioredoxin (TRX), while the effects of iodoacetic acid were irreversible. In addition, TRX also restored the DNA-binding activity of HSF oxidized in vivo, while it was found to be itself induced in vivo by both HS and H2O2. Thus, H2O2 exerts dual effects on the activation and the DNA-binding activity of HSF: on the one hand, H2O2 favours the nuclear translocation of HSF, while on the other, it alters HSF-DNA-binding activity, most likely by oxidizing critical cysteine residues within the DNA-binding domain. HSF thus belongs to the group of ROS-modulated transcription factors. We propose that the time required for TRX induction, which may restore the DNA-binding activity of oxidized HSF, provides an explanation for the delay in heat-shock protein synthesis upon exposure of cells to ROS. PMID:8761470

  3. Biological Impact of Pd (II) Complexes: Synthesis, Spectral Characterization, In Vitro Anticancer, CT-DNA Binding, and Antioxidant Activities

    PubMed Central

    Sharma, Nitin Kumar; Ameta, Rakesh Kumar; Singh, Man

    2016-01-01

    A new series of Pd (II) complexes of methyl substituted benzylamine ligands (BLs) has been synthesized and characterized via spectroscopic techniques such as UV/Vis. FTIR, LCMS, 1H, and 13C NMR. The UV/Vis study in DMSO, DMSO + water, and DMSO + PBS buffer (pH = 7.2) confirmed their molecular sustainability in liquids. Their in vitro anticancer activity against breast cancer cell lines such as MCF-7 and MDA-MB-231 makes them interesting for in vivo analysis. Their stronger DNA binding activity (DBA) compared with free ligand suggested them as a good DNA binder. DBA was further confirmed by physicochemical studies such as surface tension and viscosity of complex + DNA which inferred the disruption of DNA and intercalation of complexes, respectively. Their % binding activity, % disruption of DNA base pairs (DNABP), and % intercalating strength are reported in this paper for the first time for better understanding of DNA binding mechanism. Along with this, their scavenging activity (SA) determined through DPPH free radical and the results indicate good antioxidant behaviour of complexes. PMID:26989511

  4. Isolation and Characterization of the DNA and Protein Binding Activities of Adenovirus Core Protein V

    PubMed Central

    Pérez-Vargas, Jimena; Vaughan, Robert C.; Houser, Carolyn; Hastie, Kathryn M.; Kao, C. Cheng

    2014-01-01

    ABSTRACT The structure of adenovirus outer capsid was revealed recently at 3- to 4-Å resolution (V. Reddy, S. Natchiar, P. Stewart, and G. Nemerow, Science 329:1071–1075, 2010, http://dx.doi.org/10.1126/science.1187292); however, precise details on the function and biochemical and structural features for the inner core still are lacking. Protein V is one the most important components of the adenovirus core, as it links the outer capsid via association with protein VI with the inner DNA core. Protein V is a highly basic protein that strongly binds to DNA in a nonspecific manner. We report the expression of a soluble protein V that exists in monomer-dimer equilibrium. Using reversible cross-linking affinity purification in combination with mass spectrometry, we found that protein V contains multiple DNA binding sites. The binding sites from protein V mediate heat-stable nucleic acid associations, with some of the binding sites possibly masked in the virus by other core proteins. We also demonstrate direct interaction between soluble proteins V and VI, thereby revealing the bridging of the inner DNA core with the outer capsid proteins. These findings are consistent with a model of nucleosome-like structures proposed for the adenovirus core and encapsidated DNA. They also suggest an additional role for protein V in linking the inner nucleic acid core with protein VI on the inner capsid shell. IMPORTANCE Scant knowledge exists of how the inner core of adenovirus containing its double-stranded DNA (dsDNA) genome and associated proteins is organized. Here, we report a purification scheme for a recombinant form of protein V that allowed analysis of its interactions with the nucleic acid core region. We demonstrate that protein V exhibits stable associations with dsDNA due to the presence of multiple nucleic acid binding sites identified both in the isolated recombinant protein and in virus particles. As protein V also binds to the membrane lytic protein VI molecules

  5. A zinc-dependent DNA-binding activity co-operates with cAMP-responsive-element-binding protein to activate the human thyroglobulin enhancer.

    PubMed Central

    Berg, V; Vassart, G; Christophe, D

    1997-01-01

    Footprinting experiments involving the human thyroglobulin gene enhancer and thyroid nuclear extracts revealed a protected region called X2, containing an incomplete cAMP-responsive element (CRE). Band-shift experiments identified two binding activities recognizing the X2 element: a CRE-binding protein (CREB)/activating transcription factor (ATF) relative that binds the half CRE motif and a second factor that interacts with a G-rich motif located just upstream from the CRE. The first factor appears to be CREB itself, as indicated by the supershifting when using an antibody directed against CREB, and the second DNA-binding activity involved was shown to be zinc-dependent and exhibited an apparent molecular mass of 42-44 kDa in South-Western blotting experiments. This factor may represent a novel entity, which we named CAF, for 'CREB Associated Factor'. Three copies of X2 sequence conferred a strong cAMP-dependent transcriptional activation to a heterologous promoter in transient transfection assay in cAMP-stimulated primary thyrocytes and HeLa cells. Transfection experiments of constructs containing the X2 element mutated in either the CRE or the G-rich site showed that both motifs were required for this transcription activating function. Moreover, the combination of several individual X2 elements mutated in either the CRE or the G-rich motif did not exhibit full transcriptional activity. This suggests that, in the context of the X2 element, CREB requires a close interaction with CAF to achieve both basal and cAMP-dependent transcriptional activation. PMID:9163323

  6. Photochemical and DFT studies on DNA-binding ability and antibacterial activity of lanthanum(III)-phenanthroline complex

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Niroomand, Sona; Khorasani-Motlagh, Mozhgan; Noroozifar, Meissam; Jahani, Shohreh; Moodi, Asieh

    2017-02-01

    The binding of the lanthanum(III) complex containing 1,10-phenanthroline (phen), [La(phen)3Cl3·OH2], to DNA is investigated by absorption and emission methods. This complex shows absorption decreasing in a charge transfer band, and fluorescence decrement when it binds to DNA. Electronic absorption spectroscopy (UV-Vis), fluorescence spectra, iodide quenching experiments, salt effect and viscosity measurements, ethidium bromide (EB) competition test, circular dichroism (CD) spectra as well as variable temperature experiments indicate that the La(III) complex binds to fish salmon (FS) DNA, presumably via groove binding mode. The binding constants (Kb) of the La(III) complex with DNA is (2.55 ± 0.02) × 106 M-1. Furthermore, the binding site size, n, the Stern-Volmer constant KSV and thermodynamic parameters; enthalpy change (ΔH0) and entropy change (ΔS0) and Gibb's free energy (ΔG0), are calculated according to relevant fluorescent data and the Van't Hoff equation. The La(III) complex has been screened for its antibacterial activities by the disc diffusion method. Also, in order to supplement the experimental findings, DFT computation and NBO analysis are carried out.

  7. Copper(I)-Phosphine Polypyridyl Complexes: Synthesis, Characterization, DNA/HSA Binding Study, and Antiproliferative Activity.

    PubMed

    Villarreal, Wilmer; Colina-Vegas, Legna; Visbal, Gonzalo; Corona, Oscar; Corrêa, Rodrigo S; Ellena, Javier; Cominetti, Marcia Regina; Batista, Alzir Azevedo; Navarro, Maribel

    2017-04-03

    A series of copper(I)-phosphine polypyridyl complexes have been investigated as potential antitumor agents. The complexes [Cu(PPh3)2dpq]NO3 (2), [Cu(PPh3)2dppz]NO3 (3), [Cu(PPh3)2dppa]NO3 (4), and [Cu(PPh3)2dppme]NO3 (5) were synthesized by the reaction of [Cu(PPh3)2NO3] with the respective planar ligand under mild conditions. These copper complexes were fully characterized by elemental analysis, molar conductivity, FAB-MS, and NMR, UV-vis, and IR spectroscopies. Interactions between these copper(I)-phosphine polypyridyl complexes and DNA have been investigated using various spectroscopic techniques and analytical methods, such as UV-vis titrations, thermal denaturation, circular dichroism, viscosity measurements, gel electrophoresis, and competitive fluorescent intercalator displacement assays. The results of our studies suggest that these copper(I) complexes interact with DNA in an intercalative way. Furthermore, their high protein binding affinities toward human serum albumin were determined by fluorescence studies. Additionally, cytotoxicity analyses of all complexes against several tumor cell lines (human breast, MCF-7; human lung, A549; and human prostate, DU-145) and non-tumor cell lines (Chinese hamster lung, V79-4; and human lung, MRC-5) were performed. The results revealed that copper(I)-phosphine polypyridyl complexes are more cytotoxic than the corresponding planar ligand and also showed to be more active than cisplatin. A good correlation was observed between the cytostatic activity and lipophilicity of the copper(I) complexes studied here.

  8. Biochemical investigation of yttrium(III) complex containing 1,10-phenanthroline: DNA binding and antibacterial activity.

    PubMed

    Khorasani-Motlagh, Mozhgan; Noroozifar, Meissam; Moodi, Asieh; Niroomand, Sona

    2013-03-05

    Characterization of the interaction between yttrium(III) complex containing 1,10-phenanthroline as ligand, [Y(phen)2Cl(OH2)3]Cl2⋅H2O, and DNA has been carried out by UV absorption, fluorescence spectra and viscosity measurements in order to investigate binding mode. The experimental results indicate that the yttrium(III) complex binds to DNA and absorption is decreasing in charge transfer band with the increase in amount of DNA. The binding constant (Kb) at different temperatures as well as thermodynamic parameters, enthalpy change (ΔH°) and entropy change (ΔS°), were calculated according to relevant fluorescent data and Vant' Hoff equation. The results of interaction mechanism studies, suggested that groove binding plays a major role in the binding of the complex and DNA. The activity of yttrium(III) complex against some bacteria was tested and antimicrobial screening tests shown growth inhibitory activity in the presence of yttrium(III) complex.

  9. Evaluation of DNA, BSA binding, and antimicrobial activity of new synthesized neodymium complex containing 29-dimethyl 110-phenanthroline.

    PubMed

    Moradi, Zohreh; Khorasani-Motlagh, Mozhgan; Rezvani, Ali Reza; Noroozifar, Meissam

    2017-02-21

    In order to evaluate biological potential of a novel synthesized complex [Nd(dmp)2Cl3.OH2] where dmp is 29-dimethyl 110-phenanthroline, the DNA-binding, cleavage, BSA binding, and antimicrobial activity properties of the complex are investigated by multispectroscopic techniques study in physiological buffer (pH 7.2).The intrinsic binding constant (Kb) for interaction of Nd(III) complex and FS-DNA is calculated by UV-Vis (Kb = 2.7 ± 0.07 × 10(5)) and fluorescence spectroscopy (Kb = 1.13 ± 0.03 × 10(5)). The Stern-Volmer constant (KSV), thermodynamic parameters including free energy change (ΔG°), enthalpy change (∆H°), and entropy change (∆S°), are calculated by fluorescent data and Vant' Hoff equation. The experimental results show that the complex can bind to FS-DNA and the major binding mode is groove binding. Meanwhile, the interaction of Nd(III) complex with protein, bovine serum albumin (BSA), has also been studied by using absorption and emission spectroscopic tools. The experimental results show that the complex exhibits good binding propensity to BSA. The positive ΔH° and ∆S° values indicate that the hydrophobic interaction is main force in the binding of the Nd(III) complex to BSA, and the complex can quench the intrinsic fluorescence of BSA remarkably through a static quenching process. Also, DNA cleavage was investigated by agarose gel electrophoresis that according to the results cleavage of DNA increased with increasing of concentration of the complex. Antimicrobial screening test gives good results in the presence of Nd(III) complex system.

  10. Deciphering the Binding between Nupr1 and MSL1 and Their DNA-Repairing Activity

    PubMed Central

    Doménech, Rosa; Pantoja-Uceda, David; Gironella, Meritxell; Santoro, Jorge; Velázquez-Campoy, Adrián; Neira, José L.; Iovanna, Juan L.

    2013-01-01

    The stress protein Nupr1 is a highly basic, multifunctional, intrinsically disordered protein (IDP). MSL1 is a histone acetyl transferase-associated protein, known to intervene in the dosage compensation complex (DCC). In this work, we show that both Nupr1 and MSL1 proteins were recruited and formed a complex into the nucleus in response to DNA-damage, which was essential for cell survival in reply to cisplatin damage. We studied the interaction of Nupr1 and MSL1, and their binding affinities to DNA by spectroscopic and biophysical methods. The MSL1 bound to Nupr1, with a moderate affinity (2.8 µM) in an entropically-driven process. MSL1 did not bind to non-damaged DNA, but it bound to chemically-damaged-DNA with a moderate affinity (1.2 µM) also in an entropically-driven process. The Nupr1 protein bound to chemically-damaged-DNA with a slightly larger affinity (0.4 µM), but in an enthalpically-driven process. Nupr1 showed different interacting regions in the formed complexes with Nupr1 or DNA; however, they were always disordered (“fuzzy”), as shown by NMR. These results underline a stochastic description of the functionality of the Nupr1 and its other interacting partners. PMID:24205110

  11. DNA binding activity studies and computational approach of mutant SRY in patients with 46, XY complete pure gonadal dysgenesis.

    PubMed

    Sánchez-Moreno, Irene; Canto, Patricia; Munguía, Patricia; de León, Mario Bermúdez; Cisneros, Bulmaro; Vilchis, Felipe; Reyes, Edgardo; Méndez, Juan Pablo

    2009-02-27

    Mutations of SRY are the cause of 46,XY complete pure gonadal dysgenesis (PGD) in 10-15% of patients. In this study, DNA was isolated and sequenced from blood leukocytes and from paraffin-embedded gonadal tissue in five patients with 46,XY complete PGD. DNA binding capability was analyzed by three different methods. The structure of the full length SRY and its mutant proteins was carried out using a protein molecular model. DNA analysis revealed two mutations and one synonymous polymorphism: in patient #4 a Y96C mutation, and a E156 polymorphism; in patient #5 a S143G mosaic mutation limited to gonadal tissue. We demonstrated, by all methods used, that both mutant proteins reduced SRY DNA binding activity. The three-dimensional structure of SRY suggested that besides the HMG box, the carboxy-terminal region of SRY interacts with DNA. In conclusion, we identified two SRY mutations and a polymorphism in two patients with 46,XY complete PGD, demonstrating the importance of the carboxy-terminal region of SRY in DNA binding activity.

  12. The cavity in the hydrophobic core of Myb DNA-binding domain is reserved for DNA recognition and trans-activation.

    PubMed

    Ogata, K; Kanei-Ishii, C; Sasaki, M; Hatanaka, H; Nagadoi, A; Enari, M; Nakamura, H; Nishimura, Y; Ishii, S; Sarai, A

    1996-02-01

    The DNA-binding domain of Myb consists of three imperfect repeats, R1, R2 and R3, each containing a helix-turn-helix motif variation. Among these repeats, R2 has distinct characteristics with high thermal instability. The NMR structure analysis found a cavity inside the hydrophobic core of R2 but not in R1 or R3. Here, we show that R2 has slow conformational fluctuations, and that a cavity-filling mutation which stabilizes the R2 structure significantly reduces specific Myb DNA-binding activity and trans-activation. Structural observations of the free and DNA-complexed stages suggest that the implied inherent conformational flexibility of R2, associated with the presence of the cavity, could be important for DNA recognition by Myb.

  13. Binding of Mn-deoxyribonucleoside Triphosphates to the Active Site of the DNA Polymerase of Bacteriophage T7

    SciTech Connect

    B Akabayov; C Richardson

    2011-12-31

    Divalent metal ions are crucial as cofactors for a variety of intracellular enzymatic activities. Mg{sup 2+}, as an example, mediates binding of deoxyribonucleoside 5'-triphosphates followed by their hydrolysis in the active site of DNA polymerase. It is difficult to study the binding of Mg{sup 2+} to an active site because Mg{sup 2+} is spectroscopically silent and Mg{sup 2+} binds with low affinity to the active site of an enzyme. Therefore, we substituted Mg{sup 2+} with Mn{sup 2+}:Mn{sup 2+} that is not only visible spectroscopically but also provides full activity of the DNA polymerase of bacteriophage T7. In order to demonstrate that the majority of Mn{sup 2+} is bound to the enzyme, we have applied site-directed titration analysis of T7 DNA polymerase using X-ray near edge spectroscopy. Here we show how X-ray near edge spectroscopy can be used to distinguish between signal originating from Mn{sup 2+} that is free in solution and Mn{sup 2+} bound to the active site of T7 DNA polymerase. This method can be applied to other enzymes that use divalent metal ions as a cofactor.

  14. Eos and pegasus, two members of the Ikaros family of proteins with distinct DNA binding activities.

    PubMed

    Perdomo, J; Holmes, M; Chong, B; Crossley, M

    2000-12-08

    Members of the Ikaros family of transcription factors, Ikaros, Aiolos, and Helios, are expressed in lymphocytes and have been implicated in controlling lymphoid development. These proteins contain two characteristic clusters of zinc fingers, an N-terminal domain important for DNA recognition, and a C-terminal domain that mediates homo- and heterotypic associations between family members. The conservation of these domains is such that all three proteins recognize related DNA sequences, and all are capable of dimerizing with other family members. Here we describe two additional Ikaros family proteins, Eos and Pegasus. Eos is most highly related to Helios and shares its DNA binding and protein association properties. Pegasus is related to other Ikaros proteins in its C-terminal dimerization domain but contains a divergent N-terminal zinc finger domain. Pegasus self-associates and binds to other family members but recognizes distinct DNA-binding sites. Eos and Pegasus repress the expression of reporter genes containing their recognition elements. Our results suggest that these proteins may associate with previously described Ikaros family proteins in lymphoid cells and play additional roles in other tissues.

  15. S-nitrosylation influences the structure and DNA binding activity of AtMYB30 transcription factor from Arabidopsis thaliana.

    PubMed

    Tavares, Carolina Pereira; Vernal, Javier; Delena, Ricardo Alexandre; Lamattina, Lorenzo; Cassia, Raul; Terenzi, Hernán

    2014-04-01

    MYB proteins are a family of transcription factors that play an important role in plant development and regulatory defense processes. Arabidopsis thaliana MYB30 (AtMYB30), a member of this protein family, is involved in cell death processes during the hypersensitive response (HR) of plants. HR is characterized by a vast production of reactive oxygen species (ROS) and nitric oxide (NO). NO may thus influence the binding of AtMYB30 to DNA. In this work we evaluated the effect of NO on AtMYB30 DNA binding activity, and also in the protein structural properties. A fully active minimal DNA-binding domain (DBD) of AtMYB30 (residues 11-116) containing two cysteine residues (C49 and C53) was overexpressed and purified. Site-directed mutagenesis was used to obtain AtMYB30 DBD mutants C49A and C53A. The DNA binding activity of AtMYB30 DBD, and Cys single mutants is clearly inhibited upon incubation with a NO donor, and S-nitrosylation was confirmed by the biotin switch assay. Finally, in order to understand the mechanism of NO effect on AtMYB30 DNA binding activity we performed circular dichroism analysis, to correlate the observed protein function inhibition and a potential structural impairment on AtMYB30 DBD. Indeed, NO modification of C49 and C53 residues promotes a subtle modification on the secondary structure of this transcription factor. We thus demonstrated, using various techniques, the in vitro effect of NO on AtMYB30 DBD, and thus the potential consequences of NO activity on plant metabolism influenced by this transcription factor.

  16. Interaction with Single-stranded DNA-binding Protein Stimulates Escherichia coli Ribonuclease HI Enzymatic Activity

    SciTech Connect

    Petzold, Christine; Marceau, Aimee H.; Miller, Katherine H.; Marqusee, Susan; Keck, James L.

    2015-04-22

    Single-stranded (ss) DNA-binding proteins (SSBs) bind and protect ssDNA intermediates formed during replication, recombination, and repair reactions. SSBs also directly interact with many different genome maintenance proteins to stimulate their enzymatic activities and/or mediate their proper cellular localization. We have identified an interaction formed between Escherichia coli SSB and ribonuclease HI (RNase HI), an enzyme that hydrolyzes RNA in RNA/DNA hybrids. The RNase HI·SSB complex forms by RNase HI binding the intrinsically disordered C terminus of SSB (SSB-Ct), a mode of interaction that is shared among all SSB interaction partners examined to date. Residues that comprise the SSB-Ct binding site are conserved among bacterial RNase HI enzymes, suggesting that RNase HI·SSB complexes are present in many bacterial species and that retaining the interaction is important for its cellular function. A steady-state kinetic analysis shows that interaction with SSB stimulates RNase HI activity by lowering the reaction Km. SSB or RNase HI protein variants that disrupt complex formation nullify this effect. Collectively our findings identify a direct RNase HI/SSB interaction that could play a role in targeting RNase HI activity to RNA/DNA hybrid substrates within the genome.

  17. Human GATA-3 trans-activation, DNA-binding, and nuclear localization activities are organized into distinct structural domains.

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Z; Gu, L; Romeo, P H; Bories, D; Motohashi, H; Yamamoto, M; Engel, J D

    1994-01-01

    GATA-3 is a zinc finger transcription factor which is expressed in a highly restricted and strongly conserved tissue distribution pattern in vertebrate organisms, specifically, in a subset of hematopoietic cells, in cells within the central and peripheral nervous systems, in the kidney, and in placental trophoblasts. Tissue-specific cellular genes regulated by GATA-3 have been identified in T lymphocytes and the placenta, while GATA-3-regulated genes in the nervous system and kidney have not yet been defined. We prepared monoclonal antibodies with which we could dissect the biochemical and functional properties of human GATA-3. The results of these experiments show some anticipated phenotypes, for example, the definition of discrete domains required for specific DNA-binding site recognition (amino acids 303 to 348) and trans activation (amino acids 30 to 74). The signaling sequence for nuclear localization of human GATA-3 is a property conferred by sequences within and surrounding the amino finger (amino acids 249 to 311) of the protein, thereby assigning a function to this domain and thus explaining the curious observation that this zinc finger is dispensable for DNA binding by the GATA family of transcription factors. Images PMID:8114750

  18. Discovery of membrane active benzimidazole quinolones-based topoisomerase inhibitors as potential DNA-binding antimicrobial agents.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Ling; Addla, Dinesh; Ponmani, Jeyakkumar; Wang, Ao; Xie, Dan; Wang, Ya-Nan; Zhang, Shao-Lin; Geng, Rong-Xia; Cai, Gui-Xin; Li, Shuo; Zhou, Cheng-He

    2016-03-23

    A series of novel benzimidazole quinolones as potential antimicrobial agents were designed and synthesized. Most of the prepared compounds exhibited good or even stronger antimicrobial activities in comparison with reference drugs. The most potent compound 15m was membrane active and did not trigger the development of resistance in bacteria. It not only inhibited the formation of biofilms but also disrupted the established Staphylococcus aureus and Escherichia coli biofilms. It was able to inhibit the relaxation activity of E. coli topoisomerase IV at 10 μM concentration. Moreover, this compound also showed low toxicity against mammalian cells. Molecular modeling and experimental investigation of compound 15m with DNA suggested that this compound could effectively bind with DNA to form a steady 15m-DNA complex which might further block DNA replication to exert the powerful bioactivities.

  19. The Sunscreen Octyl Methoxycinnamate Binds to DNA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Norrell, Johannes; Vohra, Shikhar; Nordlund, T. M.

    2000-03-01

    Sunscreens are designed to prevent skin cancer by absorbing ultraviolet radiation from the sun before it gets to the DNA in skin cells. The purpose of this work is to determine whether or not octyl methoxycinnamate, an active ingredient in many sunscreens, will bind to DNA. If so, the sunscreen could transfer the energy it absorbed from the sun to the DNA and cause damage. To determine this, we prepared samples with varying concentrations of cinnamate added to herring sperm DNA, sonicating the mixture to disperse the hydrophobic sunscreen into solution. Absorption and fluorescence spectra of the mixtures showed (i) much more sunscreen was dispersed into solution when DNA was present, and (ii) the spectra of both DNA and sunscreen differed from those of the separate solutions. We conclude that the octyl methoxycinnamate can indeed bind to DNA in aqueous solution. Energy transfer experiments from DNA to sunscreen and from sunscreen to 2-aminopurine- (a fluorescent DNA base) labeled DNA will be presented.

  20. Induction of the DNA-binding and transcriptional activities of heat shock factor 1 is uncoupled in Xenopus oocytes.

    PubMed

    Bharadwaj, S; Hnatov, A; Ali, A; Ovsenek, N

    1998-03-12

    The DNA-binding and transcriptional activities of the heat shock transcription factor 1 (HSF1) are repressed under normal conditions and rapidly upregulated by heat stress. Here, we tested for the ability of various stress agents to activate HSF1 in the Xenopus oocyte model system. The HSE-binding activity of HSF1 was induced by a number of chemical stresses including cadmium, aluminum, iron, mercury, arsenite, ethanol, methanol, and salicylate. HSE-binding was not induced by several stresses known to induce the synthesis of hsps in other cell types in different organisms including zinc, copper, cobalt, manganese, recovery from anoxia, UV-irradiation, and increased pH. The inability of several known inducers of the stress response to activate the HSE-binding ability of HSF1 suggests that certain stress activation pathways may be absent or inactive in oocytes. The transcriptional activity of oocyte HSF1 was induced by heat, cadmium, and arsenite, but many of the agents that induced HSE-binding failed to stimulate HSF1-mediated transcription. The apparent uncoupling of inducible HSE-binding and transcriptional activities of HSF1 under a variety of stress regimes indicates that these events are regulated by independent mechanisms in the oocyte.

  1. Synthesis, characterization and in vitro activity of thrombin-binding DNA aptamers with triazole internucleotide linkages.

    PubMed

    Varizhuk, Anna M; Tsvetkov, Vladimir B; Tatarinova, Olga N; Kaluzhny, Dmitry N; Florentiev, Vladimir L; Timofeev, Edward N; Shchyolkina, Anna K; Borisova, Olga F; Smirnov, Igor P; Grokhovsky, Sergei L; Aseychev, Anton V; Pozmogova, Galina E

    2013-09-01

    A series of DNA aptamers bearing triazole internucleotide linkages that bind to thrombin was synthesized. The novel aptamers are structurally analogous to the well-known thrombin-inhibiting G-quadruplexes TBA15 and TBA31. The secondary structure stability, binding affinity for thrombin and anticoagulant effects of the triazole-modified aptamers were measured. A modification in the central loop of the aptamer quadruplex resulted in increased nuclease resistance and an inhibition efficiency similar to that of TBA15. The likely aptamer-thrombin binding mode was determined by molecular dynamics simulations. Due to their relatively high activity and the increased resistance to nuclease digestion imparted by the triazole internucleotide linkages, the novel aptamers are a promising alternative to known DNA-based anticoagulant agents.

  2. DNA binding, BSA interaction and SOD activity of two new nickel(II) complexes with glutamine Schiff base ligands.

    PubMed

    Wei, Qiang; Dong, Jianfang; Zhao, Peiran; Li, Manman; Cheng, Fengling; Kong, Jinming; Li, Lianzhi

    2016-08-01

    Two hexacoordinated octahedral nickel(II) complexes, [Ni(o-van-gln)(phen)(H2O)](1) and [Ni(sal-gln)(phen)(H2O)](2) [o-van-gln=a Schiff base derived from o-vanillin and glutamine, sal-gln=a Schiff base derived from salicylaldehyde and glutamine, phen=1,10-phenanthroline], have been synthesized and characterized by elemental analysis, IR spectra and single crystal X-ray diffraction. X-ray studies showed that nickel atoms of both 1 and 2 exhibit distorted NiN3O3 octahedral geometry. In each crystal, intermolecular hydrogen bonds form a two-dimensional network structure. DNA-binding properties of these two nickel(II) complexes were investigated by using UV-Vis absorption, fluorescence, circular dichroism (CD) spectroscopies and viscosity measurements. Results indicated that the two complexes can bind to calf thymus DNA (CT-DNA) via an intercalative mode, and complex 1 exhibits higher interaction with CT-DNA than complex 2. Furthermore, the interactions between the nickel(II) complexes with bovine serum albumin (BSA) have been studied by spectroscopies. The results indicated that both complexes could quench the intrinsic fluorescence of BSA in a static quenching process. The binding constants (Kb) and the numbers of binding sites (n) obtained are 1.10×10(5)M(-1) and 1.05 for complex 1 and 5.05×10(4)M(-1) and 0.997 for complex 2, respectively. Site-selective competitive binding investigation indicated that the binding sites of both the complexes are located in site I of sub-domains IIA of BSA. Assay of superoxide dismutase (SOD) activity of the nickel(II) complexes revealed that they exhibit significant superoxide scavenging activity with IC50=3.4×10(-5)M for complex 1 and 4.3×10(-5)M for complex 2, respectively.

  3. The non-coding B2 RNA binds to the DNA cleft and active site region of RNA polymerase II

    PubMed Central

    Ponicsan, Steven L.; Houel, Stephane; Old, William M.; Ahn, Natalie G.; Goodrich, James A.; Kugel, Jennifer F.

    2013-01-01

    The B2 family of short interspersed elements is transcribed into non-coding RNA by RNA polymerase III. The ~180 nt B2 RNA has been shown to potently repress mRNA transcription by binding tightly to RNA polymerase II (Pol II) and assembling with it into complexes on promoter DNA, where it keeps the polymerase from properly engaging the promoter DNA. Mammalian Pol II is a ~500 kD complex that contains 12 different protein subunits, providing many possible surfaces for interaction with B2 RNA. We found that the carboxy-terminal domain of the largest Pol II subunit was not required for B2 RNA to bind Pol II and repress transcription in vitro. To identify the surface on Pol II to which the minimal functional region of B2 RNA binds, we coupled multi-step affinity purification, reversible formaldehyde crosslinking, peptide sequencing by mass spectrometry, and analysis of peptide enrichment. The Pol II peptides most highly recovered after crosslinking to B2 RNA mapped to the DNA binding cleft and active site region of Pol II. These studies determine the location of a defined nucleic acid binding site on a large, native, multi-subunit complex and provide insight into the mechanism of transcriptional repression by B2 RNA. PMID:23416138

  4. ct-DNA Binding and Antibacterial Activity of Octahedral Titanium (IV) Heteroleptic (Benzoylacetone and Hydroxamic Acids) Complexes

    PubMed Central

    Kaushal, Raj; Thakur, Sheetal; Nehra, Kiran

    2016-01-01

    Five structurally related titanium (IV) heteroleptic complexes, [TiCl2(bzac)(L1–4)] and [TiCl3(bzac)(HL5)]; bzac = benzoylacetonate; L1–5 = benzohydroximate (L1), salicylhydroximate (L2), acetohydroximate (L3), hydroxyurea (L4), and N-benzoyl-N-phenyl hydroxylamine (L5), were used for the assessment of their antibacterial activities against ten pathogenic bacterial strains. The titanium (IV) complexes (1–5) demonstrated significant level of antibacterial properties as measured using agar well diffusion method. UV-Vis absorption spectroscopic technique was applied, to get a better insight into the nature of binding between titanium (IV) complexes with calf thymus DNA (ct-DNA). On the basis of the results of UV-Vis absorption spectroscopy, the interaction between ct-DNA and the titanium (IV) complexes is likely to occur through the same mode. Results indicated that titanium (IV) complex can bind to calf thymus DNA (ct-DNA) via an intercalative mode. The intrinsic binding constant (Kb) was calculated by absorption spectra by using Benesi-Hildebrand equation. Further, Gibbs free energy was also calculated for all the complexes. PMID:27119022

  5. Drosophila Uri, a PP1α binding protein, is essential for viability, maintenance of DNA integrity and normal transcriptional activity

    PubMed Central

    Kirchner, Jasmin; Vissi, Emese; Gross, Sascha; Szoor, Balazs; Rudenko, Andrey; Alphey, Luke; White-Cooper, Helen

    2008-01-01

    Background Protein phosphatase 1 (PP1) is involved in diverse cellular processes, and is targeted to substrates via interaction with many different protein binding partners. PP1 catalytic subunits (PP1c) fall into PP1α and PP1β subfamilies based on sequence analysis, however very few PP1c binding proteins have been demonstrated to discriminate between PP1α and PP1β. Results URI (unconventional prefoldin RPB5 interactor) is a conserved molecular chaperone implicated in a variety of cellular processes, including the transcriptional response to nutrient signalling and maintenance of DNA integrity. We show that Drosophila Uri binds PP1α with much higher affinity than PP1β, and that this ability to discriminate between PP1c forms is conserved to humans. Most Uri is cytoplasmic, however we found some protein associated with active RNAPII on chromatin. We generated a uri loss of function allele, and show that uri is essential for viability in Drosophila. uri mutants have transcriptional defects, reduced cell viability and differentiation in the germline, and accumulate DNA damage in their nuclei. Conclusion Uri is the first PP1α specific binding protein to be described in Drosophila. Uri protein plays a role in transcriptional regulation. Activity of uri is required to maintain DNA integrity and cell survival in normal development. PMID:18412953

  6. Phage P4 origin-binding domain structure reveals a mechanism for regulation of DNA-binding activity by homo- and heterodimerization of winged helix proteins.

    PubMed

    Yeo, Hye-Jeong; Ziegelin, Günter; Korolev, Sergey; Calendar, Richard; Lanka, Erich; Waksman, Gabriel

    2002-02-01

    The origin-binding domain of the gpalpha protein of phage P4 (P4-OBD) mediates origin recognition and regulation of gpalpha activity by the protein Cnr. We have determined the crystal structure of P4-OBD at 2.95 A resolution. The structure of P4-OBD is that of a dimer with pseudo twofold symmetry. Each subunit has a winged helix topology with a unique structure among initiator proteins. The only structural homologue of the P4-OBD subunit is the DNA-binding domain of the eukaryotic transcriptional activator Rfx1. Based on this structural alignment, a model for origin recognition by the P4-OBD dimer is suggested. P4-OBD mutations that interfere with Cnr binding locate to the dimer interface, indicating that Cnr acts by disrupting the gpalpha dimer. P4-OBD dimerization is mediated by helices alpha1 and alpha3 in both subunits, a mode of winged helix protein dimerization that is reminiscent of that of the eukaryotic transcription factors E2F and DP. This, in turn, suggests that Cnr is also a winged helix protein, a possibility that is supported by previously unreported sequence homologies between Cnr and Rfx1 and homology modelling. Hence, in a mechanism that appears to be conserved from phage to man, the DNA-binding activity of winged helix proteins can be regulated by other winged helix proteins via the versatile use of the winged helix motif as a homo- or heterodimerization scaffold.

  7. Label-free monitoring of DNA polymerase activity based on a thrombin-binding aptamer G-quadruplex.

    PubMed

    Wang, Jing; Liu, Haisheng; Ma, Changbei; Wang, Jun; Zhong, Linxiu; Wu, Kefeng

    2017-04-01

    We have developed a label-free assay for the detection of DNA polymerase activity based on a thrombin-binding aptamer (TBA) G-quadruplex. In the presence of DNA polymerase, the 3'-OH termini of the hairpin substrate are immediately elongated to replace the TBA, which can be recognized quickly by the ThT dye and results in an increase of fluorescence. This method is highly sensitive with a detection limit of 0.1 U/mL. It is simple and cost-effective without any requirement of labeling with a fluorophore-quencher pair. Furthermore, the proposed method can also be applied to analyze the inhibition of DNA polymerase, which clearly indicates that the proposed method can be applied for screening of potential DNA polymerase inhibitors.

  8. Recombinant production of Epstein-Barr virus BZLF1 trans-activator and characterization of its DNA-binding specificity.

    PubMed

    Lim, Chun Shen; Goh, Siang Ling; Krishnan, Gopala; Ng, Ching Ching

    2014-03-01

    This paper describes the recombinant production of a biologically active Epstein-Barr virus BZLF1 trans-activator, i.e., Z-encoded broadly reactive activator (ZEBRA), that recognized specific DNA motifs. We used auto-induction for histidine-tagged BZLF1 expression in Escherichia coli and immobilized cobalt affinity membrane chromatography for protein purification under native conditions. We obtained the purified BZLF1 at a yield of 5.4mg per gram of wet weight cells at 75% purity, in which 27% of the recombinant BZLF1 remained biologically active. The recombinant BZLF1 bound to oligonucleotides containing ZEBRA response elements, either AP-1 or ZIIIB, but not a ZIIIB mutant. The recombinant BZLF1 showed a specific DNA-binding activity which could be useful for functional studies.

  9. Free-radical-mediated DNA binding.

    PubMed Central

    O'Brien, P J

    1985-01-01

    Free-radical metabolites can be generated metabolically by a one-electron reductase-catalyzed reaction or a "peroxidase" catalyzed oxidation or by photoactivation of a wide variety of aromatic xenobiotics. Radicals may also be generated during lipid peroxidation. Some radicals can react with DNA or bind covalently or noncovalently as a dismutation product or as a dimer, trimer or polymeric product. Modification to the DNA can result in single-strand breaks, loss of template activity, and crosslinking. The binding can prevent enzymic digestion. In some cases, the radicals react with oxygen, resulting before conversion to DNA reactive oxygen species. Most radicals probably do not interact with DNA. PMID:3007090

  10. γ Sulphate PNA (PNA S): highly selective DNA binding molecule showing promising antigene activity.

    PubMed

    Avitabile, Concetta; Moggio, Loredana; Malgieri, Gaetano; Capasso, Domenica; Di Gaetano, Sonia; Saviano, Michele; Pedone, Carlo; Romanelli, Alessandra

    2012-01-01

    Peptide Nucleic Acids (PNAs), nucleic acid analogues showing high stability to enzyme degradation and strong affinity and specificity of binding toward DNA and RNA are widely investigated as tools to interfere in gene expression. Several studies have been focused on PNA analogues with modifications on the backbone and bases in the attempt to overcome solubility, uptake and aggregation issues. γ PNAs, PNA derivatives having a substituent in the γ position of the backbone show interesting properties in terms of secondary structure and affinity of binding toward complementary nucleic acids. In this paper we illustrate our results obtained on new analogues, bearing a sulphate in the γ position of the backbone, developed to be more DNA-like in terms of polarity and charge. The synthesis of monomers and oligomers is described. NMR studies on the conformational properties of monomers and studies on the secondary structure of single strands and triplexes are reported. Furthermore the hybrid stability and the effect of mismatches on the stability have also been investigated. Finally, the ability of the new analogue to work as antigene, interfering with the transcription of the ErbB2 gene on a human cell line overexpressing ErbB2 (SKBR3), assessed by FACS and qPCR, is described.

  11. Expression of active hormone and DNA-binding domains of the chicken progesterone receptor in E. coli.

    PubMed Central

    Eul, J; Meyer, M E; Tora, L; Bocquel, M T; Quirin-Stricker, C; Chambon, P; Gronemeyer, H

    1989-01-01

    Bacterially-expressed fusion proteins containing the DNA-(region C) or hormone-binding (region E) domains of the chicken progesterone receptor (cPR) fused to the C terminus of Escherichia coli beta-galactosidase were analysed for the specificity of interaction with natural and synthetic hormone-responsive elements (HREs) and progestins, respectively. The purified fusion protein containing the progestin-binding domain bound progesterone with an apparent Kd of 1.0-1.5 nM and was specifically photocross-linked with the synthetic progestin R5020 in crude bacterial lysates. Labelling of intact bacterial cells with [3H]R5020 revealed that the majority, if not all, of the bacterially produced hormone-binding domain was active. No differences in the binding to a synthetic palindromic glucocorticoid/progestin-responsive element (GRE/PRE) were found when the bacterially produced cPR DNA-binding domain was compared in methylation interference assays with the full-length chicken progesterone receptor form A expressed in eukaryotic cells. The study of dissociation kinetics, however, revealed differences in the half-life of the complexes formed between the palindromic GRE/PRE and either the receptor form A or the fusion protein containing the cPR DNA-binding domain. DNase I protection experiments demonstrated that the bacterially produced region C of the cPR generated specific 'footprints' on the mouse mammary tumour virus long terminal repeat (MMTV-LTR) which were nearly identical to those previously reported for the rat glucocorticoid receptor. Images PMID:2540961

  12. Synthesis, characterization, DNA binding, cleavage activity and cytotoxicity of copper(II) complexes.

    PubMed

    Li, Mei-Jin; Lan, Tao-Yu; Cao, Xiu-Hui; Yang, Huang-Hao; Shi, Yupeng; Yi, Changqing; Chen, Guo-Nan

    2014-02-21

    Three new mononuclear copper(II) complexes, [Cu(L2)](2+) (1), [Cu(acac)(L)](+) (2), and [Cu(acac-Cl)(L)](+) (3) (L = 2-(4-pyridine)oxazo[4,5-f]1,10-phenanthroline (4-PDOP); acac = acetylacetone; acac-Cl = 3-chloroacetylacetone), have been synthesized and characterized by elemental analysis, high resolution mass spectrometry (Q-TOF), and IR spectroscopy. Two of the complexes were structurally characterized by single-crystal X-ray diffraction techniques. Their interactions with DNA were studied by UV-vis absorption and emission spectra, viscosity, thermal melting, DNA unwinding assay and CD spectroscopy. The nucleolytic cleavage activity of the compounds was carried out on double stranded pBR322 circular plasmid DNA by using a gel electrophoresis experiment in the presence and absence of an oxidant (H2O2). Active oxygen intermediates such as hydroxyl radicals and hydrogen peroxide generated in the presence of L and complexes 1-3 may act as active species for the DNA scission. The cytotoxicity of the complexes against HepG2 cancer cells was also studied.

  13. Direct DNA binding by Brca1

    PubMed Central

    Paull, Tanya T.; Cortez, David; Bowers, Blair; Elledge, Stephen J.; Gellert, Martin

    2001-01-01

    The tumor suppressor Brca1 plays an important role in protecting mammalian cells against genomic instability, but little is known about its modes of action. In this work we demonstrate that recombinant human Brca1 protein binds strongly to DNA, an activity conferred by a domain in the center of the Brca1 polypeptide. As a result of this binding, Brca1 inhibits the nucleolytic activities of the Mre11/Rad50/Nbs1 complex, an enzyme implicated in numerous aspects of double-strand break repair. Brca1 displays a preference for branched DNA structures and forms protein–DNA complexes cooperatively between multiple DNA strands, but without DNA sequence specificity. This fundamental property of Brca1 may be an important part of its role in DNA repair and transcription. PMID:11353843

  14. Detailed studies of the binding mechanism of the Sinorhizobium meliloti transcriptional activator ExpG to DNA.

    PubMed

    Baumgarth, Birgit; Bartels, Frank Wilco; Anselmetti, Dario; Becker, Anke; Ros, Robert

    2005-01-01

    The exopolysaccharide galactoglucan promotes the establishment of symbiosis between the nitrogen-fixing Gram-negative soil bacterium Sinorhizobium meliloti 2011 and its host plant alfalfa. The transcriptional regulator ExpG activates expression of galactoglucan biosynthesis genes by direct binding to the expA1, expG/expD1 and expE1 promoter regions. ExpG is a member of the MarR family of regulatory proteins. Analysis of target sequences of an ExpG(His)(6) fusion protein in the exp promoter regions resulted in the identification of a binding site composed of a conserved palindromic region and two associated sequence motifs. Association and dissociation kinetics of the specific binding of ExpG(His)(6) to this binding site were characterized by standard biochemical methods and by single-molecule spectroscopy based on the atomic force microscope (AFM). Dynamic force spectroscopy indicated a distinct difference in the kinetics between the wild-type binding sequence and two mutated binding sites, leading to a closer understanding of the ExpG-DNA interaction.

  15. A DNA-binding Molecule Targeting the Adaptive Hypoxic Response in Multiple Myeloma has Potent Anti-tumor Activity

    PubMed Central

    Mysore, Veena S.; Szablowski, Jerzy; Dervan, Peter B.; Frost, Patrick J.

    2016-01-01

    Multiple myeloma (MM) is incurable and invariably becomes resistant to chemotherapy. Although the mechanisms remain unclear, hypoxic conditions in the bone marrow have been implicated in contributing to MM progression, angiogenesis, and resistance to chemotherapy. These effects occur via adaptive cellular responses mediated by hypoxia-inducible transcription factors (HIFs), and targeting HIFs can have anti-cancer effects in both solid and hematological malignancies. Here, it was found that in most myeloma cell lines tested, HIF1α, but not HIF2α expression was oxygen dependent and this could be explained by the differential expression of the regulatory prolyl-hydroxylase isoforms. The anti-MM effects of a sequence-specific DNA-binding pyrrole-imidazole polyamide (HIF-PA), that disrupts the HIF heterodimer from binding to its cognate DNA sequences, were also investigated. HIF-PA is cell permeable, localizes to the nuclei, and binds specific regions of DNA with an affinity comparable to that of HIF transcription factors. Most of the MM cells were resistant to hypoxia-mediated apoptosis, and HIF-PA treatment could overcome this resistance in vitro. Using xenograft models, it was determined that HIF-PA significantly decreased tumor volume and increased hypoxic and apoptotic regions within solid tumor nodules and the growth of myeloma cells engrafted in the bone marrow. This provides a rationale for targeting the adaptive cellular hypoxic response of the O2-dependent activation of HIFα using polyamides. PMID:26801054

  16. Novel function of the poly(c)-binding protein α-CP2 as a transcriptional activator that binds to single-stranded DNA sequences.

    PubMed

    Kang, Duk-Hee; Song, Kyu Young; Wei, Li-Na; Law, Ping-Yee; Loh, Horace H; Choi, Hack Sun

    2013-11-01

    α-complex protein 2 (α-CP2) is known as an RNA-binding protein that interacts in a sequence-specific manner with single-stranded polycytosine [poly(C)]. This protein is involved in various post-transcriptional regulations, such as mRNA stabilization and translational regulation. In this study, the full-length mouse α-CP2 gene was expressed in an insoluble form with an N-terminal histidine tag in Escherichia coli and purified for homogeneity using affinity column chromatography. Its identity was confirmed using matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization time-of-flight (MALDI-TOF) mass spectrometry. Recombinant α-CP2 was expressed and refolded. The protein folding conditions for denatured α-CP2 were optimized. DNA and RNA electrophoretic mobility shift assays demonstrated that the recombinant α-CP2 is capable of binding to both single-stranded DNA and RNA poly(C) sequences. Furthermore, plasmids expressing α-CP2 activated the expression of a luciferase reporter when co-transfected with a single-stranded (pGL-SS) construct containing a poly(C) sequence. To our knowledge, this study demonstrates for the first time that α-CP2 functions as a transcriptional activator by binding to a single-stranded poly(C) sequence.

  17. Definition of the transcriptional activation domains of three human HOX proteins depends on the DNA-binding context.

    PubMed

    Viganò, M A; Di Rocco, G; Zappavigna, V; Mavilio, F

    1998-11-01

    Hox proteins control developmental patterns and cell differentiation in vertebrates by acting as positive or negative regulators of still unidentified downstream target genes. The homeodomain and other small accessory sequences encode the DNA-protein and protein-protein interaction functions which ultimately dictate target recognition and functional specificity in vivo. The effector domains responsible for either positive or negative interactions with the cell transcriptional machinery are unknown for most Hox proteins, largely due to a lack of physiological targets on which to carry out functional analysis. We report the identification of the transcriptional activation domains of three human Hox proteins, HOXB1, HOXB3, and HOXD9, which interact in vivo with the autoregulatory and cross-regulatory enhancers of the murine Hoxb-1 and human HOXD9 genes. Activation domains have been defined both in a homologous context, i.e., within a HOX protein binding as a monomer or as a HOX-PBX heterodimer to the specific target, and in a heterologous context, after translocation to the yeast Gal4 DNA-binding domain. Transfection analysis indicates that activation domains can be identified in different regions of the three HOX proteins depending on the context in which they interact with the DNA target. These results suggest that Hox proteins may be multifunctional transcriptional regulators, interacting with different cofactors and/or components of the transcriptional machinery depending on the structure of their target regulatory elements.

  18. Topoisomerase inhibition, nucleolytic and electrolytic contribution on DNA binding activity exerted by biological active analogue of coordination compounds.

    PubMed

    Patel, Mohan N; Bhatt, Bhupesh S; Dosi, Promise A

    2012-04-01

    The neutral mononuclear copper complexes with the quinolone antibacterial drug ciprofloxacin and bipyridine derivatives have been synthesized and characterized. Complexes were screened for their antibacterial activity against three Gram((-)) and two Gram((+)) bacteria, and study suggests inhibition of gyrase activity by metal complexes as the possible mechanism. The nucleolytic activity of adducts was carried out on double stranded pUC19 DNA using gel electrophoresis in the presence of radical scavenging agents that suggest hydrolytic cleavage mechanism for plasmid DNA.

  19. Molecular cloning of MSSP-2, a c-myc gene single-strand binding protein: characterization of binding specificity and DNA replication activity.

    PubMed Central

    Takai, T; Nishita, Y; Iguchi-Ariga, S M; Ariga, H

    1994-01-01

    We have previously reported the human cDNA encoding MSSP-1, a sequence-specific double- and single-stranded DNA binding protein [Negishi, Nishita, Saëgusa, Kakizaki, Galli, Kihara, Tamai, Miyajima, Iguchi-Ariga and Ariga (1994) Oncogene, 9, 1133-1143]. MSSP-1 binds to a DNA replication origin/transcriptional enhancer of the human c-myc gene and has turned out to be identical with Scr2, a human protein which complements the defect of cdc2 kinase in S.pombe [Kataoka and Nojima (1994) Nucleic Acid Res., 22, 2687-2693]. We have cloned the cDNA for MSSP-2, another member of the MSSP family of proteins. The MSSP-2 cDNA shares highly homologous sequences with MSSP-1 cDNA, except for the insertion of 48 bp coding 16 amino acids near the C-terminus. Like MSSP-1, MSSP-2 has RNP-1 consensus sequences. The results of the experiments using bacterially expressed MSSP-2, and its deletion mutants, as histidine fusion proteins suggested that the binding specificity of MSSP-2 to double- and single-stranded DNA is the same as that of MSSP-1, and that the RNP consensus sequences are required for the DNA binding of the protein. MSSP-2 stimulated the DNA replication of an SV40-derived plasmid containing the binding sequence for MSSP-1 or -2. MSSP-2 is hence suggested to play an important role in regulation of DNA replication. Images PMID:7838710

  20. Rare earth complexes with 3-carbaldehyde chromone-(benzoyl) hydrazone: synthesis, characterization, DNA binding studies and antioxidant activity.

    PubMed

    Li, Yong; Yang, Zheng-Yin

    2010-01-01

    A new ligand, 3-carbaldehyde chromone-(benzoyl) hydrazone (L), was prepared by condensation of 3-carbaldehyde chromone with benzoyl hydrazine. Its four rare earth complexes have been prepared and characterized on the basis of elemental analyses, molar conductivities, mass spectra, (1)H NMR spectra, UV-vis spectra, fluorescence studies and IR spectra. The Sm(III) complex exhibits red fluorescence under UV light and the fluorescent properties of Sm(III) complex in solid state and different solutions were investigated. In addition, the DNA binding properties of the ligand and its complexes have been investigated by electronic absorption spectroscopy, fluorescence spectra, ethidium bromide displacement experiments, iodide quenching experiments, salt effect and viscosity measurements. Experimental results suggest that all the compounds can bind to DNA via an intercalation binding mode. Furthermore, the antioxidant activities of the ligand and its complexes were determined by superoxide and hydroxyl radical scavenging methods in vitro. The rare earth complexes were found to possess potent antioxidant activities that are better than those of the ligand alone.

  1. Synthesis, crystal structure, DNA binding and photo-induced DNA cleavage activity of (S-methyl-L-cysteine)copper(II) complexes of heterocyclic bases.

    PubMed

    Patra, Ashis K; Nethaji, Munirathinam; Chakravarty, Akhil R

    2007-02-01

    Ternary S-methyl-L-cysteine (SMe-l-cys) copper(II) complexes [Cu(SMe-L-cys)(B)(H(2)O)](X) (1-4), where the heterocyclic base B is 2,2'-bipyridine (bpy, 1), 1,10-phenanthroline (phen, 2), dipyridoquinoxaline (dpq, 3) and dipyridophenazine (dppz, 4), and X is ClO(4)(-) (1-3) or NO(3)(-) (4), are prepared and their DNA binding and cleavage properties studied. Complexes 2 and 4 are structurally characterized by X-ray crystallography. Both the crystal structures show distorted square-pyramidal (4+1) CuN(3)O(2) coordination geometry of the complexes in which the N,O-donor S-methyl-L-cysteine and N,N-donor heterocyclic base bind at the basal plane with a water molecule as the axial ligand. In addition, the dppz structure shows the presence of a 1D-chain formed due to covalent linkage of the carboxylate oxygen atom belonging to another molecule at the elongated axial site. The crystal structures show chemically significant non-covalent interactions like hydrogen bonding involving the axial aqua ligand and pi-pi interactions between dppz ligands. The complexes display a d-d band in the range of 605-654 nm in aqueous dimethylformamide (DMF) solution (9:1 v/v). The redox active complexes show quasireversible cyclic voltammetric response near 0.1 V in DMF assignable to the Cu(II)/Cu(I) couple. The complexes show good binding affinity to calf thymus (CT) DNA giving the order: 4 (dppz)>3 (dpq)>2 (phen)>1 (bpy). The intrinsic binding constants, obtained from UV-visible spectroscopic studies, are 1.3x10(4) and 2.15 x 10(4) M(-1) for 3 and 4, respectively. Control DNA cleavage experiments using pUC19 supercoiled (SC) DNA and minor groove binder distamycin suggest major groove binding propensity for the dppz complex, while the phen and dpq complexes bind at the minor groove of DNA. Complexes 2-4 show DNA cleavage activity in dark in the presence of a reducing agent 3-mercaptopropionic acid (MPA) via a mechanistic pathway involving formation of hydroxyl radical as the reactive

  2. Guanylate-binding proteins promote AIM2 inflammasome activation during Francisella novicida infection by inducing cytosolic bacteriolysis and DNA release

    PubMed Central

    Dreier, Roland F.; Costanzo, Stéphanie; Anton, Leonie; Rühl, Sebastian; Dussurgey, Sébastien; Dick, Mathias S.; Kistner, Anne; Rigard, Mélanie; Degrandi, Daniel; Pfeffer, Klaus; Yamamoto, Masahiro; Henry, Thomas; Broz, Petr

    2015-01-01

    The AIM2 inflammasome detects double-stranded DNA in the cytosol and induces caspase-1-dependent pyroptosis as well as release of the inflammatory cytokines IL-1β and IL-18. AIM2 is critical for host defense against DNA viruses and bacteria that replicate in the cytosol, such as Francisella novicida. AIM2 activation by F. novicida requires bacteriolysis, yet whether this process is accidental or a host-driven immune mechanism remained unclear. Using siRNA screening for nearly 500 interferon-stimulated genes, we identified guanylate-binding proteins GBP2 and GBP5 as key AIM2 activators during F. novicida infection. Their prominent role was validated in vitro and in a mouse model of tularemia. Mechanistically, these two GBPs target cytosolic F. novicida and promote bacteriolysis. Thus, besides their role in host defense against vacuolar pathogens, GBPs also facilitate the presentation of ligands by directly attacking cytosolic bacteria. PMID:25774716

  3. Synthesis of Aryl-1,2,4,5-tetrazinane-3-thiones, in vitro DNA binding studies, nuclease activity and its antimicrobial activity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tabassum, Sartaj; Parveen, Mehtab; Ali, Akhtar; Alam, Mahboob; Ahmad, Anis; Khan, Asad U.; Khan, Rais Ahmad

    2012-08-01

    A series of small molecules with a tetrazine scaffold (5-8) was designed and synthesized as metal free DNA cleaving agent. These compounds (5-8) were characterized by using various spectroscopic (via; IR, 1H, 13C NMR and ESI-MS) and analytical methods. The interaction studies of (5-8) with CT DNA were carried out by using various biophysical techniques, which showed high binding affinity of 7 and 8 towards CT DNA. Gel electrophoresis pattern demonstrated that the compounds are efficient artificial nuclease and prefers minor groove binding site. The mechanistic pattern showed that compounds follow hydrolytic pathway for DNA cleavage. In vitro antibacterial screening of these tetrazine-thiones (5-8) gives remarkable results both against gram-positive and gram-negative strains. These compounds also possess moderate antifungal activity when compared with the standard drugs.

  4. Selective disruption of ER{alpha} DNA-binding activity alters uterine responsiveness to estradiol.

    PubMed

    Hewitt, Sylvia C; O'Brien, Jeanne E; Jameson, J Larry; Kissling, Grace E; Korach, Kenneth S

    2009-12-01

    In vitro models have been used to demonstrate that estrogen receptors (ERs) can regulate estrogen-responsive genes either by directly interacting with estrogen-responsive element (ERE) DNA motifs or by interacting with other transcription factors such as AP1. In this study, we evaluated estrogen (E(2))-dependent uterine gene profiles by microarray in the KIKO mouse, an in vivo knock-in mouse model that lacks the DNA-binding function of ERalpha and is consequently restricted to non-ERE-mediated responses. The 2- or 24-h E(2)-mediated uterine gene responses were distinct in wild-type (WT), KIKO, and alphaERKO genotypes, indicating that unique sets of genes are regulated by ERE and non-ERE pathways. After 2 h E(2) treatment, 38% of the WT transcripts were also regulated in the KIKO, demonstrating that the tethered mechanism does operate in this in vivo model. Surprisingly, 1438 E(2)-regulated transcripts were unique in the KIKO mouse and were not seen in either WT or alphaERKO. Pathway analyses revealed that some canonical pathways, such as the Jak/Stat pathway, were affected in a similar manner by E(2) in WT and KIKO. In other cases, however, the WT and KIKO differed. One example is the Wnt/beta-catenin pathway; this pathway was impacted, but different members of the pathway were regulated by E(2) or were regulated in a different manner, consistent with differences in biological responses. In summary, this study provides a comprehensive analysis of uterine genes regulated by E(2) via ERE and non-ERE pathways.

  5. Semi-automatic synthesis, antiproliferative activity and DNA-binding properties of new netropsin and bis-netropsin analogues.

    PubMed

    Szerszenowicz, Jakub; Drozdowska, Danuta

    2014-07-31

    A general route for the semi-automatic synthesis of some new potential minor groove binders was established. Six four-numbered sub-libraries of new netropsin and bis-netropsin analogues have been synthesized using a Syncore Reactor. The structures of the all new substances prepared in this investigation were fully characterized by NMR ((1)H, (13)C), HPLC and LC-MS. The antiproliferative activity of the obtained compounds was tested on MCF-7 breast cancer cells. The ethidium displacement assay using pBR322 confirmed the DNA-binding properties of the new analogues of netropsin and bis-netropsin.

  6. The effects of modulation of microsomal epoxide hydrolase activity on microsome-catalyzed activation of benzo[alpha]pyrene and its covalent binding to DNA.

    PubMed

    Guenthner, T M; Oesch, F

    1981-01-01

    The effects of modulation of microsomal epoxide hydrolase activity on the binding of calf thymus DNA of benzo[alpha]pyrene metabolically activated by rat liver microsomes were investigated. In systems where microsomal epoxide hydrolase levels were not manipulated, 2 major bound species, one derived from 9-hydroxybenzo[alpha]pyrene and the other derived from benzo[alpha]pyrene 7,8-dihydrodiol, were found in approximately equivalent amounts. When epoxide hydrolase levels were increased, either by addition in vitro of purified enzyme or by induction in vivo by trans-stilbene oxide, the binding of the benzo[alpha]pyrene 7,8-dihydrodiol product was increased, while the binding of the 9-hydroxybenzo[alpha]pyrene product was practically eliminated. When microsomal epoxide hydrolase activity was decreased by selective inhibition with low concentrations of 1,1,1-trichloropropene 2,3-oxide, the binding of the species derived from 9-hydroxybenzo[alpha]pyrene was increased several-fold, while that of the species derived from benzo[alpha]pyrene 7,8-dihydrodiol was greatly decreased. The results indicate that the binding species derived from 9-hydroxybenzo[alpha]pyrene is formed through a metabolic pathway leading to an epoxide which is a substrate of microsomal epoxide hydrolase and that microsomal epoxide hydrolase is important in regulating the pattern of binding of individual microsomally-formed benzo[alpha]pyrene metabolites to DNA.

  7. Novel metal-based pharmacologically dynamic agents of transition metal(II) complexes: Designing, synthesis, structural elucidation, DNA binding and photo-induced DNA cleavage activity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Raman, N.; Jeyamurugan, R.; Sakthivel, A.; Mitu, L.

    2010-01-01

    Novel Schiff base Cu(II), Ni(II), Co(II) and Zn(II) complexes have been designed and synthesized using the macrocyclic ligand derived from the condensation of diethylphthalate with Schiff base, obtained from benzene-1,2-diamine and 3-benzylidene-pentane-2,4-dione. The ligand and its complexes have been characterized by analytical and spectral techniques. DNA binding properties of these complexes have been investigated by UV-vis, viscosity measurements, cyclic voltammetric and differential pulse voltammogram studies. The intrinsic binding constants for Co(II), Ni(II), Cu(II) and Zn(II) complexes are 1.6 × 10 6, 1.8 × 10 6, 2.0 × 10 6 and 1.5 × 10 6 M -1 respectively which are obtained from electronic absorption experiment. Control DNA cleavage experiments using pUC19 supercoiled (SC) DNA and minor groove binder (distamycin) suggest the major groove binding tendency for the synthesized complexes. In the presence of a reducing agent like 3-mercaptopropionic acid (MPA), the synthesized complexes show chemical nuclease activity under dark reaction condition. The complexes also show efficient photo-induced DNA cleavage activity on irradiation with a monochromatic UV light of 360 nm in the presence of inhibitors. Control experiments show inhibition of cleavage in the presence of singlet oxygen quencher like sodium azide and enhancement of cleavage in D 2O, suggesting the formation of singlet oxygen as a reactive species in a type-II process.

  8. Structure, antimicrobial activity, DNA- and albumin-binding of manganese(II) complexes with the quinolone antimicrobial agents oxolinic acid and enrofloxacin.

    PubMed

    Zampakou, Marianthi; Akrivou, Melpomeni; Andreadou, Eleni G; Raptopoulou, Catherine P; Psycharis, Vassilis; Pantazaki, Anastasia A; Psomas, George

    2013-04-01

    The reaction of MnCl2 with the quinolone antibacterial drug oxolinic acid (Hoxo) results to the formation of [KMn(oxo)3(MeOH)3]. Interaction of MnCl2 with the quinolone Hoxo or enrofloxacin (Herx) and the N,N'-donor heterocyclic ligand 1,10-phenanthroline (phen) results in the formation of metal complexes with the general formula [Mn(quinolonato)2(phen)]. The crystal structures of [KMn(oxo)3(MeOH)3] and [Mn(erx)2(phen)], exhibiting a 1D polymeric and a mononuclear structure, respectively, have been determined by X-ray crystallography. In these complexes, the deprotonated bidentate quinolonato ligands are coordinated to manganese(II) ion through the pyridone oxygen and a carboxylato oxygen. All complexes can act as potential antibacterial agents with [Mn(erx)2(phen)] exhibiting the most pronounced antimicrobial activity against five different microorganisms. Interaction of the complexes with calf-thymus DNA (CT DNA), studied by UV spectroscopy, has shown that they bind to CT DNA. Competitive study with ethidium bromide (EB) has shown that all complexes can displace the DNA-bound EB indicating their binding to DNA in strong competition with EB. Intercalative binding mode is proposed for the interaction of the complexes with CT DNA and has also been verified by DNA solution viscosity measurements and cyclic voltammetry. DNA electrophoretic mobility experiments suggest that [Mn(erx)2(phen)] binds strongly to supercoiled pDNA and to linearized pDNA possibly by an intercalative manner provoking double-stranded cleavage reflecting in a nuclease-like activity. The complexes exhibit good binding propensity to human or bovine serum albumin protein showing relatively high binding constant values. The binding constants of the complexes towards CT DNA and albumins have been compared to their corresponding zinc(II) and nickel(II) complexes.

  9. Mutation of serum response factor phosphorylation sites and the mechanism by which its DNA-binding activity is increased by casein kinase II.

    PubMed Central

    Manak, J R; Prywes, R

    1991-01-01

    Casein kinase II (CKII) phosphorylates the mammalian transcription factor serum response factor (SRF) on a serine residue(s) located within a region of the protein spanning amino acids 70 to 92, thereby enhancing its DNA-binding activity in vitro. We report here that serine 83 appears to be the residue phosphorylated by CKII but that three other serines in this region can also be involved in phosphorylation and the enhancement of DNA-binding activity. A mutant that contained glutamate residues in place of these serines had only low-level binding activity; however, when the serines were replaced with glutamates and further mutations were made that increased the negative charge of the region, the resulting mutant showed a constitutively high level of binding equal to that achieved by phosphorylation of wild-type SRF. We have investigated the mechanism by which phosphorylation of SRF increases its DNA-binding activity. We have ruled out the possibilities that phosphorylation affects SRF dimerization or relieves inhibition due to masking of the DNA-binding domain by an amino-terminal region of the protein. Rather, using partial proteolysis to probe SRF's structure, we find that the conformation of SRF's DNA-binding domain is altered by phosphorylation. Images PMID:2046671

  10. Evaluation of DNA-binding, DNA cleavage, antioxidant and cytotoxic activity of mononuclear ruthenium(II) carbonyl complexes of benzaldehyde 4-phenyl-3-thiosemicarbazones

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sampath, Krishnan; Sathiyaraj, Subbaiyan; Jayabalakrishnan, Chinnasamy

    2013-11-01

    Two 4-phenyl-3-thiosemicarbazone ligands, (E)-2-(2-chlorobenzylidene)-N-phenylhydrazinecarbothioamide (HL1) and (E)-2-(2-nitrobenzylidene)-N-phenylhydrazinecarbothioamide (HL2), and its ruthenium(II) complexes were synthesized and characterized by physico-chemical and spectroscopic methods. The Schiff bases act as bidentate, monobasic chelating ligands with S and N as the donor sites and are preferably found in the thiol form in all the complexes studied. The molecular structure of HL1 and HL2 were determined by single crystal X-ray diffraction method. DNA binding of the compounds was investigated by absorption spectroscopy which indicated that the compounds bind to DNA via intercalation. The oxidative cleavage of the complexes with CT-DNA inferred that the effects of cleavage are dose dependent. Antioxidant study of the ligands and complexes showed significant antioxidant activity against DPPH radical. In addition, the in vitro cytotoxicity of the ligands and complexes assayed against HeLa and MCF-7 cell lines showed higher cytotoxic activity with the lower IC50 values indicating their efficiency in killing the cancer cells even at low concentrations.

  11. Characterization of the DNA binding properties of polyomavirus capsid protein

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chang, D.; Cai, X.; Consigli, R. A.; Spooner, B. S. (Principal Investigator)

    1993-01-01

    The DNA binding properties of the polyomavirus structural proteins VP1, VP2, and VP3 were studied by Southwestern analysis. The major viral structural protein VP1 and host-contributed histone proteins of polyomavirus virions were shown to exhibit DNA binding activity, but the minor capsid proteins VP2 and VP3 failed to bind DNA. The N-terminal first five amino acids (Ala-1 to Lys-5) were identified as the VP1 DNA binding domain by genetic and biochemical approaches. Wild-type VP1 expressed in Escherichia coli (RK1448) exhibited DNA binding activity, but the N-terminal truncated VP1 mutants (lacking Ala-1 to Lys-5 and Ala-1 to Cys-11) failed to bind DNA. The synthetic peptide (Ala-1 to Cys-11) was also shown to have an affinity for DNA binding. Site-directed mutagenesis of the VP1 gene showed that the point mutations at Pro-2, Lys-3, and Arg-4 on the VP1 molecule did not affect DNA binding properties but that the point mutation at Lys-5 drastically reduced DNA binding affinity. The N-terminal (Ala-1 to Lys-5) region of VP1 was found to be essential and specific for DNA binding, while the DNA appears to be non-sequence specific. The DNA binding domain and the nuclear localization signal are located in the same N-terminal region.

  12. Common and distinct DNA-binding and regulatory activities of the BEN-solo transcription factor family

    PubMed Central

    Dai, Qi; Ren, Aiming; Westholm, Jakub O.; Duan, Hong; Patel, Dinshaw J.

    2015-01-01

    Recently, the BEN (BANP, E5R, and NAC1) domain was recognized as a new class of conserved DNA-binding domain. The fly genome encodes three proteins that bear only a single BEN domain (“BEN-solo” factors); namely, Insensitive (Insv), Bsg25A (Elba1), and CG9883 (Elba2). Insv homodimers preferentially bind CCAATTGG palindromes throughout the genome to mediate transcriptional repression, whereas Bsg25A and Elba2 heterotrimerize with their obligate adaptor, Elba3 (i.e., the ELBA complex), to recognize a CCAATAAG motif in the Fab-7 insulator. While these data suggest distinct DNA-binding properties of BEN-solo proteins, we performed reporter assays that indicate that both Bsg25A and Elba2 can individually recognize Insv consensus sites efficiently. We confirmed this by solving the structure of Bsg25A complexed to the Insv site, which showed that key aspects of the BEN:DNA recognition strategy are similar between these proteins. We next show that both Insv and ELBA proteins are competent to mediate transcriptional repression via Insv consensus sequences but that the ELBA complex appears to be selective for the ELBA site. Reciprocally, genome-wide analysis reveals that Insv exhibits significant cobinding to class I insulator elements, indicating that it may also contribute to insulator function. Indeed, we observed abundant Insv binding within the Hox complexes with substantial overlaps with class I insulators, many of which bear Insv consensus sites. Moreover, Insv coimmunoprecipitates with the class I insulator factor CP190. Finally, we observed that Insv harbors exclusive activity among fly BEN-solo factors with respect to regulation of Notch-mediated cell fate choices in the peripheral nervous system. This in vivo activity is recapitulated by BEND6, a mammalian BEN-solo factor that conserves the Notch corepressor function of Insv but not its capacity to bind Insv consensus sites. Altogether, our data define an array of common and distinct biochemical and functional

  13. A novel, evolutionarily conserved gene family with putative sequence-specific single-stranded DNA-binding activity.

    PubMed

    Castro, Patricia; Liang, Hong; Liang, Jan C; Nagarajan, Lalitha

    2002-07-01

    Complete and partial deletions of chromosome 5q are recurrent cytogenetic anomalies associated with aggressive myeloid malignancies. Earlier, we identified an approximately 1.5-Mb region of loss at 5q13.3 between the loci D5S672 and D5S620 in primary leukemic blasts. A leukemic cell line, ML3, is diploid for all of chromosome 5, except for an inversion-coupled translocation within the D5S672-D5S620 interval. Here, we report the development of a bacterial artificial chromosome (BAC) contig to define the breakpoint and the identification of a novel gene SSBP2, the target of disruption in ML3 cells. A preliminary evaluation of SSBP2 as a tumor suppressor gene in primary leukemic blasts and cell lines suggests that the remaining allele does not undergo intragenic mutations. SSBP2 is one of three members of a closely related, evolutionarily conserved, and ubiquitously expressed gene family. SSBP3 is the human ortholog of a chicken gene, CSDP, that encodes a sequence-specific single-stranded DNA-binding protein. SSBP3 localizes to chromosome 1p31.3, and the third member, SSBP4, maps to chromosome 19p13.1. Chromosomal localization and the putative single-stranded DNA-binding activity suggest that all three members of this family are capable of potential tumor suppressor activity by gene dosage or other epigenetic mechanisms.

  14. Binding analysis of ytterbium(III) complex containing 1,10-phenanthroline with DNA and its antimicrobial activity.

    PubMed

    Moodi, Asieh; Khorasani-Motlagh, Mozhgan; Noroozifar, Meissam; Niroomand, Sona

    2013-01-01

    To evaluate the biological preference of [Yb(phen)₂(OH₂)Cl₃](H₂O)₂ (phen is 1,10-phenanthroline) for DNA, interaction of Yb(III) complex with DNA in Tris-HCl buffer is studied by various biophysical and spectroscopic techniques which reveal that the complex binds to DNA. The results of fluorescence titration reveal that [Yb(phen)₂(OH₂)Cl₃](H₂O)₂ has strongly quenched in the presence of DNA. The binding site number n, apparent binding constant K b, and the Stern-Volmer quenching constant K SV are determined. ΔH⁰, ΔS⁰, and ΔG⁰ are obtained based on the quenching constants and thermodynamic theory (ΔH⁰ > 0, ΔS⁰ > 0, and ΔG⁰ < 0). The experimental results show that the Yb(III) complex binds to DNA by non-intercalative mode. Groove binding is the preferred mode of interaction for [Yb(phen)₂(OH₂)Cl₃](H₂O)₂ to DNA. The DNA cleavage results show that in the absence of any reducing agent, Yb(III) complex can cleave DNA. The antimicrobial screening tests are also recorded and give good results in the presence of Yb(III) complex.

  15. Thapsigargin suppresses phorbol ester-dependent human involucrin promoter activity by suppressing CCAAT-enhancer-binding protein alpha (C/EBPalpha) DNA binding.

    PubMed Central

    Balasubramanian, S; Agarwal, C; Efimova, T; Dubyak, G R; Banks, E; Welter, J; Eckert, R L

    2000-01-01

    Human involucrin (hINV) is a keratinocyte differentiation marker expressed in the suprabasal epidermal layers. In cultured keratinocytes hINV mRNA levels are increased 10-fold by a 24-h treatment with 50 ng/ml PMA, an agent that promotes keratinocyte differentiation. Previous studies show that thapsigargin (TGN), an agent that depletes intracellular calcium stores, inhibits keratinocyte differentiation. In the present study we show that TGN inhibits the PMA-dependent, differentiation-associated, increase in hINV mRNA levels and hINV promoter activity. Inhibition is half-maximal at 10 nM and maximal at 100 nM TGN. Neither basal hINV promoter activity nor glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase mRNA levels are inhibited. Mutation of a functionally important CAATT-enhancer-binding protein (C/EBP) site within the hINV promoter proximal regulatory region eliminates the regulation, suggesting that TGN may effect C/EBP-dependent promoter activation. Consistent with this hypothesis, TGN inhibits C/EBPalpha-dependent promoter activation via a mechanism that involves inhibition of C/EBPalpha binding to DNA without changing C/EBPalpha protein levels. These results suggest that TGN interferes with hINV expression by interfering with C/EBP transcription-factor function. PMID:10970794

  16. Maximal stimulation of meiotic recombination by a yeast transcription factor requires the transcription activation domain and a DNA-binding domain.

    PubMed Central

    Kirkpatrick, D T; Fan, Q; Petes, T D

    1999-01-01

    The DNA sequences located upstream of the yeast HIS4 represent a very strong meiotic recombination hotspot. Although the activity of this hotspot requires the transcription activator Rap1p, the level of HIS4 transcription is not directly related to the level of recombination. We find that the recombination-stimulating activity of Rap1p requires the transcription activation domain of the protein. We show that a hybrid protein with the Gal4p DNA-binding domain and the Rap1p activation domain can stimulate recombination in a strain in which Gal4p-binding sites are inserted upstream of HIS4. In addition, we find recombination hotspot activity associated with the Gal4p DNA-binding sites that is independent of known transcription factors. We suggest that yeast cells have two types of recombination hotspots, alpha (transcription factor dependent) and beta (transcription factor independent). PMID:10224246

  17. The glucosaminidase domain of Atl – the major Staphylococcus aureus autolysin – has DNA-binding activity

    PubMed Central

    Grilo, Inês R; Ludovice, Ana Madalena; Tomasz, Alexander; de Lencastre, Hermínia; Sobral, Rita G

    2014-01-01

    In this communication, we describe evidence demonstrating the capacity of Atl, the major Staphylococcus aureus autolytic enzyme to bind DNA. Electrophoretic mobility shift assays (EMSA) show that both the Atl protein and the endo-β-N-acetylglucosaminidase (GL) domain were able to bind DNA of nonspecific sequence. The implications of this unexpected observation for the physiology of S. aureus remain to be explored. PMID:24585695

  18. Phosphatase-like activity, DNA binding, DNA hydrolysis, anticancer and lactate dehydrogenase inhibition activity promoting by a new bis-phenanthroline dicopper(II) complex.

    PubMed

    Anbu, Sellamuthu; Kandaswamy, Muthusamy; Kamalraj, Subban; Muthumarry, Johnpaul; Varghese, Babu

    2011-07-28

    A new bis-phenanthroline dicopper(II) complex has been synthesized and characterized by elemental analysis and spectroscopic methods. The molecular structure of the dinuclear Cu(II) complex [Cu(2)(μ-CH(3)COO)(μ-H(2)O)(μ-OH)(phen)(2)](2+) (phen = 1,10-phenanthroline) (1) was determined by single crystal X-ray diffraction technique. The coordination environment around each Cu(II) ion in complex 1 can be described as slightly distorted square pyramidal geometry. The distance between the CuCu centers in the complex is found to be 2.987 Å. The electronic, redox, phosphate hydrolysis, DNA binding and DNA cleavage have been studied. The antiproliferative effect of complex 1 was confirmed by the lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) enzyme level in MCF-7 cancer cell lysate and content media. The dicopper(II) complex inhibited the LDH enzyme as well as the growth of the human breast cancer MCF7 cell line at an IC(50) value of 0.011 μg ml(-1). The results strongly suggest that complex 1 is a good cancer therapeutic agent. Electrochemical studies of complex 1 showed an irreversible, followed by a quasi-reversible, one electron reduction processes between -0.20 to -0.8 V. Michaelis-Menten kinetic parameters for the hydrolysis of 4-nitrophenyl phosphate by complex 1 are k(cat) = 3.56 × 10(-2) s(-1) and K(M) = 4.3 × 10(-2) M. Complex 1 shows good binding propensity to calf thymus DNA, with a binding constant value of 1.3 (±0.13) × 10(5) M(-1) (s = 2.1). The size of the binding site and viscosity data suggest a DNA intercalative binding nature of the complex. Complex 1 shows efficient hydrolytic cleavage of supercoiled pBR322-DNA in the dark and in the absence of any external reagents, as demonstrated by the T4 ligase experiment. The pseudo-Michaelis-Menten kinetic parameters for DNA hydrolysis by complex 1 are k(cat) = 1.27 ± 0.4 h(-1) and K(M) = 7.7 × 10(-2) M.

  19. Amino Acids in the Basic Domain of Epstein-Barr Virus ZEBRA Protein Play Distinct Roles in DNA Binding, Activation of Early Lytic Gene Expression, and Promotion of Viral DNA Replication

    PubMed Central

    Heston, Lee; El-Guindy, Ayman; Countryman, Jill; Dela Cruz, Charles; Delecluse, Henri-Jacques; Miller, George

    2006-01-01

    The ZEBRA protein of Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) drives the viral lytic cycle cascade. The capacity of ZEBRA to recognize specific DNA sequences resides in amino acids 178 to 194, a region in which 9 of 17 residues are either lysine or arginine. To define the basic domain residues essential for activity, a series of 46 single-amino-acid-substitution mutants were examined for their ability to bind ZIIIB DNA, a high-affinity ZEBRA binding site, and for their capacity to activate early and late EBV lytic cycle gene expression. DNA binding was obligatory for the protein to activate the lytic cascade. Nineteen mutants that failed to bind DNA were unable to disrupt latency. A single acidic replacement of a basic amino acid destroyed DNA binding and the biologic activity of the protein. Four mutants that bound weakly to DNA were defective at stimulating the expression of Rta, the essential first target of ZEBRA in lytic cycle activation. Four amino acids, R183, A185, C189, and R190, are likely to contact ZIIIB DNA specifically, since alanine or valine substitutions at these positions drastically weakened or eliminated DNA binding. Twenty-three mutants were proficient in binding to ZIIIB DNA. Some DNA binding-proficient mutants were refractory to supershift by BZ-1 monoclonal antibody (epitope amino acids 214 to 230), likely as the result of the increased solubility of the mutants. Mutants competent to bind DNA could be separated into four functional groups: the wild-type group (eight mutants), a group defective at activating Rta (five mutants, all with mutations at the S186 site), a group defective at activating EA-D (three mutants with the R179A, S186T, and K192A mutations), and a group specifically defective at activating late gene expression (seven mutants). Three late mutants, with a Y180A, Y180E, or K188A mutation, were defective at stimulating EBV DNA replication. This catalogue of point mutants reveals that basic domain amino acids play distinct functions in binding

  20. Activity of the tetrapyrrole regulator CrtJ is controlled by oxidation of a redox active cysteine located in the DNA binding domain

    PubMed Central

    Cheng, Zhuo; Wu, Jiang; Setterdahl, Aaron; Reddie, Khalilah; Carroll, Kate; Hammad, Loubna A.; Karty, Jonathan A.; Bauer, Carl E.

    2012-01-01

    CrtJ from Rhodobacter capsulatus is a regulator of genes involved in the biosynthesis of heme, bacteriochlorophyll, carotenoids as well as structural proteins of the light harvesting-II complex. Fluorescence anisotropy based DNA-binding analysis demonstrates that oxidized CrtJ exhibits ~20-fold increase in binding affinity over that of reduced CrtJ. Liquid chromatography electrospray tandem mass spectrometric analysis using DAz-2, a sulfenic acid (-SOH)-specific probe, demonstrates that exposure of CrtJ to oxygen or to hydrogen peroxide leads to significant accumulation of a sulfenic acid derivative of Cys420 which is located in the helix-turn-helix (HTH) motif. In vivo labeling with 4-(3-azidopropyl)cyclohexane-1,3-dione (DAz-2) shows that Cys420 also forms a sulfenic acid modification in vivo when cells are exposed to oxygen. Moreover, a Cys420 to Ala mutation leads to a ~60-fold reduction of DNA binding activity while a Cys to Ser substitution at position 420 that mimics a cysteine sulfenic acid results in a ~4-fold increase in DNA binding activity. These results provide the first example where sulfenic acid oxidation of a cysteine in a HTH motif leads to differential effects on gene expression. PMID:22715852

  1. Structures of the HIN Domain:DNA Complexes Reveal Ligand Binding and Activation Mechanisms of the AIM2 Inflammasome and IFI16 Receptor

    SciTech Connect

    Jin, Tengchuan; Perry, Andrew; Jiang, Jiansheng; Smith, Patrick; Curry, James A.; Unterholzner, Leonie; Jiang, Zhaozhao; Horvath, Gabor; Rathinam, Vijay A.; Johnstone, Ricky W.; Hornung, Veit; Latz, Eicke; Bowie, Andrew G.; Fitzgerald, Katherine A.; Xiao, T. Sam

    2012-05-21

    Recognition of DNA by the innate immune system is central to antiviral and antibacterial defenses, as well as an important contributor to autoimmune diseases involving self DNA. AIM2 (absent in melanoma 2) and IFI16 (interferon-inducible protein 16) have been identified as DNA receptors that induce inflammasome formation and interferon production, respectively. Here we present the crystal structures of their HIN domains in complex with double-stranded (ds) DNA. Non-sequence-specific DNA recognition is accomplished through electrostatic attraction between the positively charged HIN domain residues and the dsDNA sugar-phosphate backbone. An intramolecular complex of the AIM2 Pyrin and HIN domains in an autoinhibited state is liberated by DNA binding, which may facilitate the assembly of inflammasomes along the DNA staircase. These findings provide mechanistic insights into dsDNA as the activation trigger and oligomerization platform for the assembly of large innate signaling complexes such as the inflammasomes.

  2. E1 initiator DNA binding specificity is unmasked by selective inhibition of non-specific DNA binding

    PubMed Central

    Stenlund, Arne

    2003-01-01

    Initiator proteins are critical components of the DNA replication machinery and mark the site of initiation. This activity probably requires highly selective DNA binding; however, many initiators display modest specificity in vitro. We demonstrate that low specificity of the papillomavirus E1 initiator results from the presence of a non-specific DNA-binding activity, involved in melting, which masks the specificity intrinsic to the E1 DNA-binding domain. The viral factor E2 restores specificity through a physical interaction with E1 that suppresses non-specific binding. We propose that this arrangement, where one DNA-binding activity tethers the initiator to ori while another alters DNA structure, is a characteristic of other viral and cellular initiator proteins. This arrangement would provide an explanation for the low selectivity observed for DNA binding by initiator proteins. PMID:12574131

  3. p53 regulates cyclophosphamide teratogenesis by controlling caspases 3, 8, 9 activation and NF-kappaB DNA binding.

    PubMed

    Pekar, Olga; Molotski, Nataly; Savion, Shoshana; Fein, Amos; Toder, Vladimir; Torchinsky, Arkady

    2007-08-01

    The tumor suppressor protein p53 regulates the sensitivity of embryos to such human teratogens as ionizing radiation, diabetes, and cytostatics. Yet, the molecular mechanisms whereby it fulfills this function remain undefined. We used p53 heterozygous (p53(+/-)) female mice mated with p53(+/-) males and then exposed to cyclophosphamide (CP) to test whether caspases 3, 8, and 9 and the transcription factor nuclear factor (NF)-kappaB may serve as p53 targets. Mice were exposed to CP on day 12 of pregnancy and killed on days 15 and 18 of pregnancy to evaluate CP-induced teratogenic effect. The brain and limbs of embryos harvested 24 h after CP treatment were used to evaluate NF-kappaB (p65) DNA-binding activity by an ELISA-based method, the activity of the caspases by appropriate colorimetric kits, apoptosis, and cell proliferation by TUNEL, and 5'-bromo-2'-deoxyuridine incorporation respectively. We observed that the activation of caspases 3, 8, and 9 and the suppression of NF-kappaB DNA binding following CP-induced teratogenic insult took place only in teratologically sensitive organs of p53(+/+) but not p53(-/-) embryos. CP-induced apoptosis and suppression of cell proliferation were also more intensive in the former, and they exhibited a higher incidence of structural anomalies, such as open eyes, digit, limb, and tail anomalies. The analysis of the correlations between the p53 embryonic genotype, the activity of the tested molecules, and the CP-induced dysmorphic events at the cellular and organ level suggests caspases 3, 8, and 9 and NF-kappaB as components of p53-targeting mechanisms in embryos exposed to the teratogen.

  4. New orally active DNA minor groove binding small molecule CT-1 acts against breast cancer by targeting tumor DNA damage leading to p53-dependent apoptosis.

    PubMed

    Saini, Karan Singh; Hamidullah; Ashraf, Raghib; Mandalapu, Dhanaraju; Das, Sharmistha; Siddiqui, Mohd Quadir; Dwivedi, Sonam; Sarkar, Jayanta; Sharma, Vishnu Lal; Konwar, Rituraj

    2017-04-01

    Targeting tumor DNA damage and p53 pathway is a clinically established strategy in the development of cancer chemotherapeutics. Majority of anti-cancer drugs are delivered through parenteral route for reasons like severe toxicity, lack of stability, and poor enteral absorption. Current DNA targeting drugs in clinical like anthracycline suffers from major drawbacks like cardiotoxicity. Here, we report identification of a new orally active small molecule curcumin-triazole conjugate (CT-1) with significant anti-breast cancer activity in vitro and in vivo. CT-1 selectively and significantly inhibits viability of breast cancer cell lines; retards cells cycle progression at S phase and induce mitochondrial-mediated cell apoptosis. CT-1 selectively binds to minor groove of DNA and induces DNA damage leading to increase in p53 along with decrease in its ubiquitination. Inhibition of p53 with pharmacological inhibitor as well as siRNA revealed the necessity of p53 in CT-1-mediated anti-cancer effects in breast cancer cells. Studies using several other intact p53 and deficient p53 cancer cell lines further confirmed necessity of p53 in CT-1-mediated anti-cancer response. Pharmacological inhibition of pan-caspase showed CT-1 induces caspase-dependent cell death in breast cancer cells. Most interestingly, oral administration of CT-1 induces significant inhibition of tumor growth in LA-7 syngeneic orthotropic rat mammary tumor model. CT-1 treated mammary tumor shows enhancement in DNA damage, p53 upregulation, and apoptosis. Collectively, CT-1 exhibits potent anti-cancer effect both in vitro and in vivo and could serve as a safe orally active lead for anti-cancer drug development. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  5. Carcinogenic heavy metals replace Ca{sup 2+} for DNA binding and annealing activities of mono-ubiquitinated annexin A1 homodimer

    SciTech Connect

    Hirata, Aiko; Corcoran, George B.; Hirata, Fusao

    2010-10-01

    Mono-ubiquitinated annexin A1 was purified from rat liver nuclei. The homodimer form of mono-ubiquitinated annexin A1 was able to unwind dsDNA in a Mg{sup 2+}- and ATP-dependent manner, and to anneal ssDNA in a Ca{sup 2+}-dependent manner. Phospholipids decreased the concentration of Ca{sup 2+} required for maximal annealing activity. Heavy metals such as As{sup 3+}, Cr{sup 6+}, Pb{sup 2+} and Cd{sup 2+} substituted for Ca{sup 2+} in the ssDNA binding and annealing activities of annexin A1. While these metals inhibited the unwinding of dsDNA by nuclear annexin A1 in the presence of Mg{sup 2+} and ATP, they enhanced dsDNA-dependent ATPase activity of annexin A1. Heavy metals may have produced dsDNA, a substrate for the DNA unwinding reaction, via the DNA annealing reaction. DNA synthesomes were isolated from L5178Y tk(+/-) mouse lymphoma cells in exponential growth, and were found to contain helicase activities. The As{sup 3+}- or Cr{sup 6+}-induced increases in ssDNA binding activity of DNA synthesomes were reduced by a mono-specific anti-annexin A1 antibody, but not by anti-Ig antibody. Anti-annexin A1 antibody also blocked the inhibitory and stimulatory effects of As{sup 3+} or Cr{sup 6+} towards DNA unwinding and annealing activities of DNA synthesomes. Based on these observations, it can be concluded that the effects of heavy metals on DNA annealing and unwinding activities are mediated, at least in substantial part, through actions of the mono-ubiquitinated annexin A1 homodimer.

  6. Curcumin binding to DNA and RNA.

    PubMed

    Nafisi, Shohreh; Adelzadeh, Maryam; Norouzi, Zeinab; Sarbolouki, Mohammad Nabi

    2009-04-01

    Curcumin, the yellow pigment from the rhizoma of Curcuma longa, is a widely studied phytochemical with a variety of biological activities. The ongoing research and clinical trials have proved that this natural phenolic compound has great and diverse pharmacological potencies. Beside its effective antioxidant, antiinflammatory, and antimicrobial/antiviral properties, curcumin is also considered as a cancer chemopreventive agent. While the antioxidant activity of curcumin is well documented, its interaction with DNA and RNA is not fully investigated. This study was designed to examine the interactions of curcumin with calf thymus DNA and yeast RNA in aqueous solution at physiological conditions, using constant DNA and RNA concentration (6.25 mM) and various curcumin/polynucleotide (phosphate) ratios of 1/120, 1/80, 1/40, 1/20, and 1/10. Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) and UV-visible spectroscopic methods were used to determine the ligand binding modes, the binding constants, and the stability of curcumin-DNA and curcumin-RNA complexes in aqueous solution. Spectroscopic evidence showed that curcumin binds to the major and minor grooves of DNA duplex and to RNA bases as well as to the back bone phosphate group with overall binding constants of K(curcumin-DNA) = 4.255 x 10(4) M(-1) and K(curcumin-RNA) = 1.262 x 10(4) M(-1). Major DNA and RNA aggregation occurred at high pigment concentration. No conformational changes were observed upon curcumin interaction with these biopolymers; that is, DNA remains in the B, and RNA retains its A-family structure.

  7. A novel porphyrin derivative and its metal complexes: Electrochemical, photoluminescence, thermal, DNA-binding and superoxide dismutase activity studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Purtaş, Savaş; Köse, Muhammet; Tümer, Ferhan; Tümer, Mehmet; Gölcü, Ayşegül; Ceyhan, Gökhan

    2016-02-01

    In this study, a new porphyrin-Schiff base ligand (L) and its metal complexes (Cu(II), Fe(III), Mn(III), Pt(II) and Zn(II)) were synthesized. The starting material 4-ethyl-2,6-bis(hydroxymethyl)phenol (A) was synthesized from 4-ethylphenol and formaldehyde in the alkaline media. The compound (A) was then oxidized to the 4-ethyl-2,6-diformylphenol (B). The starting compounds (A) and (B) were obtained as single crystals. Structures of the compounds (A) and (B) were determined by the X-ray crytallography technique. The porphyrin ligand (L) and its metal complexes were characterized by the analytical and spectroscopic methods. Electronic, electrochemical and thermal properties of the synthesised compounds were investigated. Superoxide dismutase activities (SOD) of the porphyrin Schiff base complexes were investigated and results were discussed. Additionally, the DNA (fish sperm FSdsDNA) binding studies of the complexes were performed using UV-vis spectroscopy. Competitive studies with ethidium bromide (EB) show that the compounds interact efficiently with DNA through an intercalating way.

  8. Binding of the transcription activator NRI (NTRC) to a supercoiled DNA segment imitates association with the natural enhancer: an electron microscopic investigation.

    PubMed Central

    Révet, B; Brahms, S; Brahms, G

    1995-01-01

    Electron microscopic visualization indicates that the transcription activator NRI (NTRC) binds with exceptional selectivity and efficiency to a sequence-induced superhelical (spiral) segment inserted upstream of the glnA promoter, accounting for its observed ability to substitute for the natural glnA enhancer. The cooperative binding of NRI to the spiral insert leads to protein oligomerization which, at higher concentration, promotes selective coating of the entire superhelical segment with protein. Localization of NRI at apical loops is observed with negatively supercoiled plasmid DNA. With a linear plasmid, bending of DNA is observed. We confirm that NRI is a DNA-bending protein, consistent with its high affinity for spiral DNA. These results prove that spiral DNA without any homology to the NRI-binding sequence site can substitute for the glnA enhancer by promoting cooperative activator binding to DNA and facilitating protein oligomerization. Similar mechanisms might apply to other prokaryotic and eukaryotic activator proteins that share the ability to bend DNA and act efficiently as multimers. Images Fig. 1 Fig. 2 Fig. 4 Fig. 5 PMID:7638226

  9. The neutrophil-activating Dps protein of Helicobacter pylori, HP-NAP, adopts a mechanism different from Escherichia coli Dps to bind and condense DNA.

    PubMed

    Ceci, Pierpaolo; Mangiarotti, Laura; Rivetti, Claudio; Chiancone, Emilia

    2007-01-01

    The Helicobacter pylori neutrophil-activating protein (HP-NAP), a member of the Dps family, is a fundamental virulence factor involved in H.pylori-associated disease. Dps proteins protect bacterial DNA from oxidizing radicals generated by the Fenton reaction and also from various other damaging agents. DNA protection has a chemical component based on the highly conserved ferroxidase activity of Dps proteins, and a physical one based on the capacity of those Dps proteins that contain a positively charged N-terminus to bind and condense DNA. HP-NAP does not possess a positively charged N-terminus but, unlike the other members of the family, is characterized by a positively charged protein surface. To establish whether this distinctive property could be exploited to bind DNA, gel shift, fluorescence quenching and atomic force microscopy (AFM) experiments were performed over the pH range 6.5-8.5. HP-NAP does not self-aggregate in contrast to Escherichia coli Dps, but is able to bind and even condense DNA at slightly acid pH values. The DNA condensation capacity acts in concert with the ferritin-like activity and could be used to advantage by H.pylori to survive during host-infection and other stress challenges. A model for DNA binding/condensation is proposed that accounts for all the experimental observations.

  10. The neutrophil-activating Dps protein of Helicobacter pylori, HP-NAP, adopts a mechanism different from Escherichia coli Dps to bind and condense DNA

    PubMed Central

    Mangiarotti, Laura; Rivetti, Claudio; Chiancone, Emilia

    2007-01-01

    The Helicobacter pylori neutrophil-activating protein (HP-NAP), a member of the Dps family, is a fundamental virulence factor involved in H.pylori-associated disease. Dps proteins protect bacterial DNA from oxidizing radicals generated by the Fenton reaction and also from various other damaging agents. DNA protection has a chemical component based on the highly conserved ferroxidase activity of Dps proteins, and a physical one based on the capacity of those Dps proteins that contain a positively charged N-terminus to bind and condense DNA. HP-NAP does not possess a positively charged N-terminus but, unlike the other members of the family, is characterized by a positively charged protein surface. To establish whether this distinctive property could be exploited to bind DNA, gel shift, fluorescence quenching and atomic force microscopy (AFM) experiments were performed over the pH range 6.5–8.5. HP-NAP does not self-aggregate in contrast to Escherichia coli Dps, but is able to bind and even condense DNA at slightly acid pH values. The DNA condensation capacity acts in concert with the ferritin-like activity and could be used to advantage by H.pylori to survive during host-infection and other stress challenges. A model for DNA binding/condensation is proposed that accounts for all the experimental observations. PMID:17371778

  11. Synthesis and characterization, antimicrobial activity, DNA binding and DNA cleavage studies of new 5-chloro-2-[4-phenylthiazol-2-yl-iminomethyl]phenol metal complexes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alaghaz, Abdel-Nasser M. A.; Zayed, Mohamed E.; Alharbi, Suliman A.

    2015-02-01

    New Cr(III), Mn(II), Fe(III), Co(II), Ni(II), Cu(II) and Cd(II) complexes derived from bidentate Schiff base ligand, 5-chloro-2-[4-phenylthiazol-2-yl-iminomethyl]phenol (HL) have been synthesized. The molar ratio for all synthesized complexes is M: L = 1:2 which was established from the results of chemical analysis. The complexes have been characterized by elemental analysis, spectral (IR, UV-Vis, (1H and 13C) NMR, mass, ESR, XRD, CV, fluorescence, and magnetic as well as thermal analysis measurements. The IR spectra of the prepared complexes were suggested that the Schiff base ligand behaves as a bi-dentate ligand through the azomethine nitrogen atom and phenolic oxygen atom. The crystal field splitting, Racah repulsion and nepheloauxetic parameters and determined from the electronic spectra of the complexes. The presence of co-ordinated water molecules were confirmed by thermal studies. The spectroscopic studies suggest the octahedral geometry. From the modeling studies, the bond length, bond angle, core-core interaction, heat of formation, electronic energy, binding energy, HOMO, LUMO and dipole moment had been calculated to confirm the geometry of the ligand and their investigated complexes. Also, the thermal behavior and the kinetic parameters of degradation were determined using Coats-Redfern, Horowitz-Metzger and Piloyan-Novikova methods. Moreover, the in vitro antibacterial studies of all compounds screened against pathogenic bacteria (two Gram +ve and three Gram -ve) and three antifungal to assess their inhibiting potential. The assay indicated that the inhibition potential is metal ion dependent. The interaction of the complexes with calf thymus DNA (CT-DNA) has been investigated by UV absorption method, and the mode of CT-DNA binding to the complexes has been explored. Furthermore, the DNA cleavage activity by the complexes was performed.

  12. A Trihelix DNA Binding Protein Counterbalances Hypoxia-Responsive Transcriptional Activation in Arabidopsis

    PubMed Central

    Licausi, Francesco; Kosmacz, Monika; Oosumi, Teruko; van Dongen, Joost T.; Bailey-Serres, Julia; Perata, Pierdomenico

    2014-01-01

    Transcriptional activation in response to hypoxia in plants is orchestrated by ethylene-responsive factor group VII (ERF-VII) transcription factors, which are stable during hypoxia but destabilized during normoxia through their targeting to the N-end rule pathway of selective proteolysis. Whereas the conditionally expressed ERF-VII genes enable effective flooding survival strategies in rice, the constitutive accumulation of N-end-rule–insensitive versions of the Arabidopsis thaliana ERF-VII factor RAP2.12 is maladaptive. This suggests that transcriptional activation under hypoxia that leads to anaerobic metabolism may need to be fine-tuned. However, it is presently unknown whether a counterbalance of RAP2.12 exists. Genome-wide transcriptome analyses identified an uncharacterized trihelix transcription factor gene, which we named HYPOXIA RESPONSE ATTENUATOR1 (HRA1), as highly up-regulated by hypoxia. HRA1 counteracts the induction of core low oxygen-responsive genes and transcriptional activation of hypoxia-responsive promoters by RAP2.12. By yeast-two-hybrid assays and chromatin immunoprecipitation we demonstrated that HRA1 interacts with the RAP2.12 protein but with only a few genomic DNA regions from hypoxia-regulated genes, indicating that HRA1 modulates RAP2.12 through protein–protein interaction. Comparison of the low oxygen response of tissues characterized by different levels of metabolic hypoxia (i.e., the shoot apical zone versus mature rosette leaves) revealed that the antagonistic interplay between RAP2.12 and HRA1 enables a flexible response to fluctuating hypoxia and is of importance to stress survival. In Arabidopsis, an effective low oxygen-sensing response requires RAP2.12 stabilization followed by HRA1 induction to modulate the extent of the anaerobic response by negative feedback regulation of RAP2.12. This mechanism is crucial for plant survival under suboptimal oxygenation conditions. The discovery of the feedback loop regulating the oxygen

  13. Dose dependency of aflatoxin B/sub 1/ binding on human high molecular weight DNA in the activation of proto-oncogene

    SciTech Connect

    Yang, S.S.; Taub, J.V.; Modali, R.; Vieira, W.; Yasei, P.; Yang, G.C.

    1985-10-01

    The binding of aflatoxin B/sub 1/, AFB/sub 1/, a potent hepatocarcinogen, to various high molecular weight (HMW) DNAs from human normal liver and two liver cancer cell lines, Alexander primary liver carcinoma (PLC) and Mahlavu hepatocellular carcinoma (hHC) and from NIH/3T3 cell have been investigated. The kinetics of AFB/sub 1/ binding to these DNAs showed similar initial rates but the extents of binding to the PLC and hHC DNAs seemed to be slightly higher. Preferential AFB/sub 1/ bindings were identified in both PLC and hHC DNAs compared to normal liver DNA. A critical AFB/sub 1/ binding dosage, ranging 100 to 460 fmole/..mu..g DNA, was found to activate the carcinogenic effect of the Mahlavu hHC HMW DNA, but not normal liver HMW DNA, rendering it capable of inducting focal transformation in NIH/3T3 cell. Excessive AFB/sub 1/ binding on the hHC and PLC HMW DNAs resulted in an over-kill of both cell transformation capability and templating activity of the DNA.

  14. Arsenite binding-induced zinc loss from PARP-1 is equivalent to zinc deficiency in reducing PARP-1 activity, leading to inhibition of DNA repair

    SciTech Connect

    Sun, Xi; Zhou, Xixi; Du, Libo; Liu, Wenlan; Liu, Yang; Hudson, Laurie G.; Liu, Ke Jian

    2014-01-15

    Inhibition of DNA repair is a recognized mechanism for arsenic enhancement of ultraviolet radiation-induced DNA damage and carcinogenesis. Poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase-1 (PARP-1), a zinc finger DNA repair protein, has been identified as a sensitive molecular target for arsenic. The zinc finger domains of PARP-1 protein function as a critical structure in DNA recognition and binding. Since cellular poly(ADP-ribosyl)ation capacity has been positively correlated with zinc status in cells, we hypothesize that arsenite binding-induced zinc loss from PARP-1 is equivalent to zinc deficiency in reducing PARP-1 activity, leading to inhibition of DNA repair. To test this hypothesis, we compared the effects of arsenite exposure with zinc deficiency, created by using the membrane-permeable zinc chelator TPEN, on 8-OHdG formation, PARP-1 activity and zinc binding to PARP-1 in HaCat cells. Our results show that arsenite exposure and zinc deficiency had similar effects on PARP-1 protein, whereas supplemental zinc reversed these effects. To investigate the molecular mechanism of zinc loss induced by arsenite, ICP-AES, near UV spectroscopy, fluorescence, and circular dichroism spectroscopy were utilized to examine arsenite binding and occupation of a peptide representing the first zinc finger of PARP-1. We found that arsenite binding as well as zinc loss altered the conformation of zinc finger structure which functionally leads to PARP-1 inhibition. These findings suggest that arsenite binding to PARP-1 protein created similar adverse biological effects as zinc deficiency, which establishes the molecular mechanism for zinc supplementation as a potentially effective treatment to reverse the detrimental outcomes of arsenic exposure. - Highlights: • Arsenite binding is equivalent to zinc deficiency in reducing PARP-1 function. • Zinc reverses arsenic inhibition of PARP-1 activity and enhancement of DNA damage. • Arsenite binding and zinc loss alter the conformation of zinc finger

  15. Examination of microsomal cytochrome P450-catalyzed in vitro activation of o-phenylphenol to DNA binding metabolite(s) by 32P-postlabeling technique.

    PubMed

    Pathak, D N; Roy, D

    1992-09-01

    It has been previously reported that the reactive metabolites phenylsemiquinone and phenylbenzoquinone are generated during microsomal cytochrome P450-catalyzed redox cycling of o-phenylphenol (OPP). However, covalent modification of DNA by OPP-reactive metabolites has yet not been demonstrated. In the present study we have investigated the covalent binding in DNA by OPP-reactive metabolites using 32P-postlabeling. Analysis of adducts by 32P-postlabeling in products of chemical reaction of DNA with phenylbenzoquinone revealed four major and several minor adducts. The chemical reaction of deoxyguanosine 3'-phosphate with phenylbenzoquinone also showed four major adducts. The chromatographic mobility of major adducts of deoxyguanosine 3'-phosphate-phenylbenzoquinone was identical to that of major adducts of DNA-phenylbenzoquinone. The major adducts are demonstrated to be stable. The total covalent binding in deoxyguanosine 3'-phosphate by phenylbenzoquinone (686,000-687,000 amol/nmol nucleotide) was higher than that observed in DNA (26,500-28,000 amol/nmol nucleotides). Reaction of DNA with OPP or a hydroxylated metabolite of OPP, phenylhydroquinone, in the presence of microsomes and NADPH or cumene hydroperoxide showed four major adducts. Adduct formation in DNA by OPP or phenylhydroquinone in the presence of the microsomal activation system was drastically decreased by known inhibitors of cytochrome P450. The chromatographic mobility of major adducts in DNA by OPP or phenylhydroquinone in the presence of microsomal activation system matched with those major adducts observed in deoxyguanosine 3'-phosphate or DNA reacted with pure phenylbenzoquinone. These data demonstrate that OPP or phenylhydroquinone, a hydroxylated metabolite of OPP, is able to bind covalently to DNA in the presence of a microsomal cytochrome P450 activation system. Phenylbenzoquinone is one of the DNA-binding metabolite(s) of OPP. It is concluded that OPP is genotoxic in an in vitro system and

  16. Crystal structure of the DNA cytosine deaminase APOBEC3F: the catalytically active and HIV-1 Vif-binding domain.

    PubMed

    Bohn, Markus-Frederik; Shandilya, Shivender M D; Albin, John S; Kouno, Takahide; Anderson, Brett D; McDougle, Rebecca M; Carpenter, Michael A; Rathore, Anurag; Evans, Leah; Davis, Ahkillah N; Zhang, Jingying; Lu, Yongjian; Somasundaran, Mohan; Matsuo, Hiroshi; Harris, Reuben S; Schiffer, Celia A

    2013-06-04

    Human APOBEC3F is an antiretroviral single-strand DNA cytosine deaminase, susceptible to degradation by the HIV-1 protein Vif. In this study the crystal structure of the HIV Vif binding, catalytically active, C-terminal domain of APOBEC3F (A3F-CTD) was determined. The A3F-CTD shares structural motifs with portions of APOBEC3G-CTD, APOBEC3C, and APOBEC2. Residues identified to be critical for Vif-dependent degradation of APOBEC3F all fit within a predominantly negatively charged contiguous region on the surface of A3F-CTD. Specific sequence motifs, previously shown to play a role in Vif susceptibility and virion encapsidation, are conserved across APOBEC3s and between APOBEC3s and HIV-1 Vif. In this structure these motifs pack against each other at intermolecular interfaces, providing potential insights both into APOBEC3 oligomerization and Vif interactions.

  17. Mutant p53 proteins bind DNA in a DNA structure-selective mode

    PubMed Central

    Göhler, Thomas; Jäger, Stefan; Warnecke, Gabriele; Yasuda, Hideyo; Kim, Ella; Deppert, Wolfgang

    2005-01-01

    Despite the loss of sequence-specific DNA binding, mutant p53 (mutp53) proteins can induce or repress transcription of mutp53-specific target genes. To date, the molecular basis for transcriptional modulation by mutp53 is not understood, but increasing evidence points to the possibility that specific interactions of mutp53 with DNA play an important role. So far, the lack of a common denominator for mutp53 DNA binding, i.e. the existence of common sequence elements, has hampered further characterization of mutp53 DNA binding. Emanating from our previous discovery that DNA structure is an important determinant of wild-type p53 (wtp53) DNA binding, we analyzed the binding of various mutp53 proteins to oligonucleotides mimicking non-B DNA structures. Using various DNA-binding assays we show that mutp53 proteins bind selectively and with high affinity to non-B DNA. In contrast to sequence-specific and DNA structure-dependent binding of wtp53, mutp53 DNA binding to non-B DNA is solely dependent on the stereo-specific configuration of the DNA, and not on DNA sequence. We propose that DNA structure-selective binding of mutp53 proteins is the basis for the well-documented interaction of mutp53 with MAR elements and for transcriptional activities mediates by mutp53. PMID:15722483

  18. Synthesis of new heterometallic macromolecules: Their DNA binding, cleavage activity and in vitro model electrochemotherapy study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tabassum, Sartaj; Bhat, Irshad-ul-Haq; Arjmand, Farukh

    2009-12-01

    The homodinuclear C 16H 30N 8O 5Sn 2Cl 4 ( 1), heterotetranuclear C 16H 38N 8O 9Sn 2Cu 2Cl 8 ( 2) and C 16H 38N 8O 9Sn 2Mn 2Cl 8 ( 3) macrocyclic complexes were synthesized and characterized by elemental analysis, spectroscopic techniques and molar conductance measurements. The interaction studies of 1-3 with calf thymus DNA (CT-DNA) were carried out by UV-vis titration, fluorescence, cyclic voltammetry and viscosity measurements. These results were further authenticated by carrying out interaction studies of 1-3 with plasmid pBR322 DNA employing gel electrophoresis. To overcome the dose resistance, auto toxicity of the drugs, a model study based on electrochemotherapy (ECT) was carried out and the results were compared in the presence and in the absence of the applied electrical potential.

  19. Copper(II) interacting with the non-steroidal antiinflammatory drug flufenamic acid: structure, antioxidant activity and binding to DNA and albumins.

    PubMed

    Tolia, Charikleia; Papadopoulos, Athanassios N; Raptopoulou, Catherine P; Psycharis, Vassilis; Garino, Claudio; Salassa, Luca; Psomas, George

    2013-06-01

    Copper(II) complexes with the non-steroidal antiinflammatory drug flufenamic acid (Hfluf) in the presence of N,N-dimethylformamide (DMF) or nitrogen donor heterocyclic ligands (2,2'-bipyridylamine (bipyam), 1,10-phenanthroline (phen), 2,2'-bipyridine (bipy) or pyridine (py)) have been synthesized and characterized. The crystal structures of [Cu2(fluf)4(DMF)2], 1, and [Cu(fluf)(bipyam)Cl], 2, have been determined by X-ray crystallography. Density functional theory (DFT) (CAM-B3LYP/LANL2DZ/6-31G**) was employed to determine the structure of complex 2 and its analogues (complexes [Cu(fluf)(phen)Cl], 3, [Cu(fluf)(bipy)Cl], 4 and [Cu(fluf)2(py)2], 5). Time-dependent DFT calculations of doublet-doublet transitions show that the lowest-energy band in the absorption spectrum of 2-5 has a mixed d-d/LMCT character. UV study of the interaction of the complexes with calf-thymus DNA (CT DNA) has shown that the complexes can bind to CT DNA with [Cu(fluf)(bipy)Cl] exhibiting the highest binding constant to CT DNA. The complexes can bind to CT DNA via intercalation as concluded by studying the cyclic voltammograms of the complexes in the presence of CT DNA solution and by DNA solution viscosity measurements. Competitive studies with ethidium bromide (EB) have shown that the complexes can displace the DNA-bound EB suggesting strong competition with EB. Flufenamic acid and its Cu(II) complexes exhibit good binding affinity to human or bovine serum albumin protein with high binding constant values. All compounds have been tested for their antioxidant and free radical scavenging activity as well as for their in vitro inhibitory activity against soybean lipoxygenase showing significant activity with [Cu(fluf)(phen)Cl] being the most active.

  20. Identification of base and backbone contacts used for DNA sequence recognition and high-affinity binding by LAC9, a transcription activator containing a C6 zinc finger.

    PubMed Central

    Halvorsen, Y D; Nandabalan, K; Dickson, R C

    1991-01-01

    The LAC9 protein of Kluyveromyces lactis is a transcriptional regulator of genes in the lactose-galactose regulon. To regulate transcription, LAC9 must bind to 17-bp upstream activator sequences (UASs) located in front of each target gene. LAC9 is homologous to the GAL4 protein of Saccharomyces cerevisiae, and the two proteins must bind DNA in a very similar manner. In this paper we show that high-affinity, sequence-specific binding by LAC9 dimers is mediated primarily by 3 bp at each end of the UAS: [Formula: see text]. In addition, at least one half of the UAS must have a GC or CG base pair at position 1 for high-affinity binding; LAC9 binds preferentially to the half containing the GC base pair. Bases at positions 2, 3, and 4 in each half of the UAS make little if any contribution to binding. The center base pair is not essential for high-affinity LAC9 binding when DNA-binding activity measured in vitro. However, the center base pair must play an essential role in vivo, since all natural UASs have 17, not 16, bp. Hydroxyl radical footprinting shows that a LAC9 dimer binds an unusually broad region on one face of the DNA helix. Because of the data, we suggest that LAC9 contacts positions 6, 7, and 8, both plus and minus, of the UAS, which are separated by more than one turn of the DNA helix, and twists part way around the DNA, thus protecting the broad region of the minor groove between the major-groove contacts. Images PMID:2005880

  1. DNA, protein binding, cytotoxicity, cellular uptake and antibacterial activities of new palladium(II) complexes of thiosemicarbazone ligands: effects of substitution on biological activity.

    PubMed

    Kalaivani, P; Prabhakaran, R; Dallemer, F; Poornima, P; Vaishnavi, E; Ramachandran, E; Padma, V Vijaya; Renganathan, R; Natarajan, K

    2012-01-01

    The coordination propensities of 4(N,N')-diethylaminosalicylaldehyde-4(N)-substituted thiosemicarbazones (H(2)L(1-4)) were investigated by reacting with an equimolar amount of [PdCl(2)(PPh(3))(2)]. The new complexes were characterized by various spectroscopic techniques. The structure determination of the complexes [Pd(DeaSal-tsc)(PPh(3))] (1), [Pd(DeaSal-mtsc)(PPh(3))] (2) and [Pd(DeaSal-etsc)(PPh(3))] (3) by X-ray crystallography showed that ligands are coordinated in a dibasic tridentate ONS donor fashion forming stable five and six membered chelate rings. The binding ability of complexes (1-4) to calf-thymus DNA (CT DNA) has been explored by absorption and emission titration methods. Based on the observations, an electrostatic and an intercalative binding mode have been proposed. The protein binding studies have been monitored by quenching of tryptophan and tyrosine residues in the presence of complexes using lysozyme as a model protein. As determined by MTT assays, complex 3 exhibited a higher cytotoxic effect towards human lung cancer cell line (A549) and liver cancer cells (HepG2). LDH, NO assay and cellular uptake of the complexes have been studied. Further, antibacterial activity studies of the complexes have been screened against the pathogenic bacteria such as Enterococcus faecalis, Staphylococcus aureus, Escherichia coli, Klebsiella pneumoniae and Pseudomonas aeruginosa, MIC50 values of the complexes showed that the complexes exhibited significant activity against the pathogens and among the complexes, 3 exhibited higher activity.

  2. DNA binding, antitumor activities, and hydroxyl radical scavenging properties of novel oxovanadium (IV) complexes with substituted isoniazid.

    PubMed

    Liao, Xiangwen; Lu, Jiazheng; Ying, Peng; Zhao, Ping; Bai, Yinliang; Li, Wengjie; Liu, Mingpei

    2013-12-01

    Four novel oxovanadium(IV) complexes—[VO(PAHN)(phen)] (1; PAHN is 4-pyridinecarboxylic acid, 2-[(2-hydroxy)-1-naphthalenylene] hydrazide, phen is 1,10-phenanthroline), [VO(PAHN)(bpy)] (2; bpy is 2,2′-bipyridine), [VO(PAH)(phen)] (3; PAH is 4-pyridinecarboxylic acid, 2-[(2-hydroxy)-1-phenyl]methylene hydrazide), and [VO(PAH)(bpy)] (4)—have been synthesized and characterized by elemental analysis, UV–vis spectroscopy, electrospray ionization mass spectrometry, IR spectroscopy, 1H-NMR spectroscopy, and 13C-NMR spectroscopy. Their interactions with calf thymus DNA were investigated. The results suggest that these complexes bind to DNA in an intercalative mode. All four complexes exhibited highly cytotoxic activity against tumor cells (SH-SY5Y, MCF-7, and SK-N-SH), with 50 % inhibitory concentrations of the same order of magnitude as for cisplatin or of lower order of magnitude. Complex 1 exhibited the highest interaction ability and was found to be the most potent antitumor agent among the four complexes. It can cause G2/M phase arrest of the cell cycle, induces significant apoptosis in SK-N-SH cells, and displays typical morphological apoptotic characteristics. In addition, their hydroxyl radical scavenging properties have been tested, and complex 1 was the best inhibitor.

  3. SOD activity and DNA binding properties of a new symmetric porphyrin Schiff base ligand and its metal complexes.

    PubMed

    Çay, Sevim; Köse, Muhammet; Tümer, Ferhan; Gölcü, Ayşegül; Tümer, Mehmet

    2015-12-05

    4-Methoxy-2,6-bis(hydroxymethyl)phenol (1) was prepared from the reaction of 4-methoxyphenol and formaldehyde. The compound (1) was then oxidized to the 4-methoxy-2,6-diformylphenol (2) compound. Molecular structure of compound (2) was determined by X-ray diffraction method. A new symmetric porphyrin Schiff base ligand 4-methoxy-2,6-bis[5-(4-iminophenyl)-10,15,20-triphenylporphyrin]phenol (L) was prepared from the reaction of the 5-(4-aminophenyl)-10,15,20-triphenylporphyrin (TTP-NH2) and the compound (2) in the toluene solution. The metal complexes (Cu(II), Fe(III), Mn(III), Pt(II) and Zn(II)) of the ligand (L) were synthesized and characterized by the spectroscopic and analytical methods. The DNA (fish sperm FSdsDNA) binding studies of the ligand and its complexes were performed using UV-vis spectroscopy. Additionally, superoxide dismutase activities of the porphyrin Schiff base metal complexes were investigated. Additionally, electrochemical, photoluminescence and thermal properties of the compounds were investigated.

  4. Peroxisome proliferator-activated receptorα agonists differentially regulate inhibitor of DNA binding expression in rodents and human cells.

    PubMed

    González, María Del Carmen; Corton, J Christopher; Acero, Nuria; Muñoz-Mingarro, Dolores; Quirós, Yolanda; Alvarez-Millán, Juan José; Herrera, Emilio; Bocos, Carlos

    2012-01-01

    Inhibitor of DNA binding (Id2) is a helix-loop-helix (HLH) transcription factor that participates in cell differentiation and proliferation. Id2 has been linked to the development of cardiovascular diseases since thiazolidinediones, antidiabetic agents and peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor (PPAR) gamma agonists, have been reported to diminish Id2 expression in human cells. We hypothesized that PPARα activators may also alter Id2 expression. Fenofibrate diminished hepatic Id2 expression in both late pregnant and unmated rats. In 24 hour fasted rats, Id2 expression was decreased under conditions known to activate PPARα. In order to determine whether the fibrate effects were mediated by PPARα, wild-type mice and PPARα-null mice were treated with Wy-14,643 (WY). WY reduced Id2 expression in wild-type mice without an effect in PPARα-null mice. In contrast, fenofibrate induced Id2 expression after 24 hours of treatment in human hepatocarcinoma cells (HepG2). MK-886, a PPARα antagonist, did not block fenofibrate-induced activation of Id2 expression, suggesting a PPARα-independent effect was involved. These findings confirm that Id2 is a gene responsive to PPARα agonists. Like other genes (apolipoprotein A-I, apolipoprotein A-V), the opposite directional transcriptional effect in rodents and a human cell line further emphasizes that PPARα agonists have different effects in rodents and humans.

  5. Peroxisome Proliferator-Activated Receptorα Agonists Differentially Regulate Inhibitor of DNA Binding Expression in Rodents and Human Cells

    PubMed Central

    González, María del Carmen; Corton, J. Christopher; Acero, Nuria; Muñoz-Mingarro, Dolores; Quirós, Yolanda; Álvarez-Millán, Juan José; Herrera, Emilio; Bocos, Carlos

    2012-01-01

    Inhibitor of DNA binding (Id2) is a helix-loop-helix (HLH) transcription factor that participates in cell differentiation and proliferation. Id2 has been linked to the development of cardiovascular diseases since thiazolidinediones, antidiabetic agents and peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor (PPAR) gamma agonists, have been reported to diminish Id2 expression in human cells. We hypothesized that PPARα activators may also alter Id2 expression. Fenofibrate diminished hepatic Id2 expression in both late pregnant and unmated rats. In 24 hour fasted rats, Id2 expression was decreased under conditions known to activate PPARα. In order to determine whether the fibrate effects were mediated by PPARα, wild-type mice and PPARα-null mice were treated with Wy-14,643 (WY). WY reduced Id2 expression in wild-type mice without an effect in PPARα-null mice. In contrast, fenofibrate induced Id2 expression after 24 hours of treatment in human hepatocarcinoma cells (HepG2). MK-886, a PPARα antagonist, did not block fenofibrate-induced activation of Id2 expression, suggesting a PPARα-independent effect was involved. These findings confirm that Id2 is a gene responsive to PPARα agonists. Like other genes (apolipoprotein A-I, apolipoprotein A-V), the opposite directional transcriptional effect in rodents and a human cell line further emphasizes that PPARα agonists have different effects in rodents and humans. PMID:22701468

  6. Scaffold protein enigma homolog 1 overcomes the repression of myogenesis activation by inhibitor of DNA binding 2.

    PubMed

    Nakatani, Miyuki; Ito, Jumpei; Koyama, Riko; Iijima, Masumi; Yoshimoto, Nobuo; Niimi, Tomoaki; Kuroda, Shun'ichi; Maturana, Andrés D

    2016-05-27

    Enigma Homolog 1 (ENH1) is a scaffold protein for signaling proteins and transcription factors. Previously, we reported that ENH1 overexpression promotes the differentiation of C2C12 myoblasts. However, the molecular mechanism underlying the role of ENH1 in the C2C12 cells differentiation remains elusive. ENH1 was shown to inhibit the proliferation of neuroblastoma cells by sequestering Inhibitor of DNA binding protein 2 (Id2) in the cytosol. Id2 is a repressor of basic Helix-Loop-Helix transcription factors activity and prevents myogenesis. Here, we found that ENH1 overcome the Id2 repression of C2C12 cells myogenic differentiation and that ENH1 overexpression promotes mice satellite cells activation, the first step toward myogenic differentiation. In addition, we show that ENH1 interacted with Id2 in C2C12 cells and mice satellite cells. Collectively, our results suggest that ENH1 plays an important role in the activation of myogenesis through the repression of Id2 activity.

  7. Synthesis, structure, DNA/protein binding, and cytotoxic activity of a rhodium(III) complex with 2,6-bis(2-benzimidazolyl)pyridine.

    PubMed

    Esteghamat-Panah, Roya; Hadadzadeh, Hassan; Farrokhpour, Hossein; Simpson, Jim; Abdolmaleki, Amir; Abyar, Fatemeh

    2017-02-15

    A new mononuclear rhodium(III) complex, [Rh(bzimpy)Cl3] (bzimpy = 2,6-bis(2-benzimidazolyl)pyridine), was synthesized and characterized by elemental analysis and spectroscopic methods. The molecular structure of the complex was confirmed by single-crystal X-ray crystallography. The interaction of the complex with fish sperm DNA (FS-DNA) was investigated by UV spectroscopy, emission titration, and viscosity measurement in order to evaluate the possible DNA-binding mode and to calculate the corresponding DNA-binding constant. The results reveal that the Rh(III) complex interacts with DNA through groove binding mode with a binding affinity on the order of 10(4). In addition, the binding of the Rh(III) complex to bovine serum albumin (BSA) was monitored by UV-Vis and fluorescence emission spectroscopy at different temperatures. The mechanism of the complex interaction was found to be static quenching. The thermodynamic parameters (ΔH, ΔS, and ΔG) obtained from the fluorescence spectroscopy data show that van der Waals interactions and hydrogen bonds play a major role in the binding of the Rh(III) complex to BSA. For the comparison of the DNA- and BSA-binding affinities of the free bzimpy ligand with its Rh(III) complex, the absorbance titration and fluorescence quenching experiments of the free bzimpy ligand with DNA and BSA were carried out. Competitive experiments using eosin Y and ibuprofen as site markers indicated that the complex was mainly located in the hydrophobic cavity of site I of the protein. These experimental results were confirmed by the results of molecular docking. Finally, the in vitro cytotoxicity properties of the Rh(III) complex against the MCF-7, K562, and HT-29 cell lines were evaluated and compared with those of the free ligand (bzimpy). It was found that the complexation process improved the anticancer activity significantly.

  8. The N-terminal zinc finger domain of Tgf2 transposase contributes to DNA binding and to transposition activity

    PubMed Central

    Jiang, Xia-Yun; Hou, Fei; Shen, Xiao-Dan; Du, Xue-Di; Xu, Hai-Li; Zou, Shu-Ming

    2016-01-01

    Active Hobo/Activator/Tam3 (hAT) transposable elements are rarely found in vertebrates. Previously, goldfish Tgf2 was found to be an autonomously active vertebrate transposon that is efficient at gene-transfer in teleost fish. However, little is known about Tgf2 functional domains required for transposition. To explore this, we first predicted in silico a zinc finger domain in the N-terminus of full length Tgf2 transposase (L-Tgf2TPase). Two truncated recombinant Tgf2 transposases with deletions in the N-terminal zinc finger domain, S1- and S2-Tgf2TPase, were expressed in bacteria from goldfish cDNAs. Both truncated Tgf2TPases lost their DNA-binding ability in vitro, specifically at the ends of Tgf2 transposon than native L-Tgf2TPase. Consequently, S1- and S2-Tgf2TPases mediated gene transfer in the zebrafish genome in vivo at a significantly (p < 0.01) lower efficiency (21%–25%), in comparison with L-Tgf2TPase (56% efficiency). Compared to L-Tgf2TPase, truncated Tgf2TPases catalyzed imprecise excisions with partial deletion of TE ends and/or plasmid backbone insertion/deletion. The gene integration into the zebrafish genome mediated by truncated Tgf2TPases was imperfect, creating incomplete 8-bp target site duplications at the insertion sites. These results indicate that the zinc finger domain in Tgf2 transposase is involved in binding to Tgf2 terminal sequences, and loss of those domains has effects on TE transposition. PMID:27251101

  9. Bio-sensitive activities of coordination compounds containing 1,10-phenanthroline as co-ligand: Synthesis, structural elucidation and DNA binding properties of metal(II) complexes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Raman, Natarajan; Mahalakshmi, Rajkumar; Mitu, Liviu

    2014-10-01

    Present work reports the DNA binding and cleavage characteristics of a series of mixed-ligand complexes having the composition [M(L)(phen)2]Cl2 (where M = Cu(II), Ni(II), Co(II) and Zn(II) and phen as co-ligand) in detail. Their structural features and other properties have been deduced from their elemental analyses, magnetic susceptibility and molar conductivity as well as from IR, UV-Vis, 1H NMR and EPR spectral studies. The UV-Vis, magnetic susceptibility and EPR spectral data of metal complexes suggest an octahedral geometry. The binding properties of these complexes with calf thymus DNA (CT-DNA) have been explored using electronic absorption spectroscopy, viscosity measurement, cyclic voltammetry and differential pulse voltammetry. The DNA-binding constants for Cu(II), Ni(II), Co(II), and Zn(II) complexes are 6.14 × 105 M-1, 1.8 × 105 M-1, 6.7 × 104 M-1 and 2.5 × 104 M-1 respectively. Detailed analysis reveals that these complexes interact with DNA through intercalation binding. Nuclease activity has also been investigated by gel electrophoresis. Moreover, the synthesized Schiff base and its mixed-ligand complexes have been screened for antibacterial and antifungal activities. The data reveal that the complexes exhibit higher activity than the parent ligand.

  10. Bio-sensitive activities of coordination compounds containing 1,10-phenanthroline as co-ligand: synthesis, structural elucidation and dna binding properties of metal(II) complexes.

    PubMed

    Raman, Natarajan; Mahalakshmi, Rajkumar; Mitu, Liviu

    2014-10-15

    Present work reports the DNA binding and cleavage characteristics of a series of mixed-ligand complexes having the composition [M(L)(phen)2]Cl2 (where M=Cu(II), Ni(II), Co(II) and Zn(II) and phen as co-ligand) in detail. Their structural features and other properties have been deduced from their elemental analyses, magnetic susceptibility and molar conductivity as well as from IR, UV-Vis, (1)H NMR and EPR spectral studies. The UV-Vis, magnetic susceptibility and EPR spectral data of metal complexes suggest an octahedral geometry. The binding properties of these complexes with calf thymus DNA (CT-DNA) have been explored using electronic absorption spectroscopy, viscosity measurement, cyclic voltammetry and differential pulse voltammetry. The DNA-binding constants for Cu(II), Ni(II), Co(II), and Zn(II) complexes are 6.14×10(5)M(-1), 1.8×10(5)M(-1), 6.7×10(4)M(-1) and 2.5×10(4)M(-1) respectively. Detailed analysis reveals that these complexes interact with DNA through intercalation binding. Nuclease activity has also been investigated by gel electrophoresis. Moreover, the synthesized Schiff base and its mixed-ligand complexes have been screened for antibacterial and antifungal activities. The data reveal that the complexes exhibit higher activity than the parent ligand.

  11. Non-DNA-binding cofactors enhance DNA-binding specificity of a transcriptional regulatory complex

    PubMed Central

    Siggers, Trevor; Duyzend, Michael H; Reddy, Jessica; Khan, Sidra; Bulyk, Martha L

    2011-01-01

    Recruitment of cofactors to specific DNA sites is integral for specificity in gene regulation. As a model system, we examined how targeting and transcriptional control of the sulfur metabolism genes in Saccharomyces cerevisiae is governed by recruitment of the transcriptional co-activator Met4. We developed genome-scale approaches to measure transcription factor (TF) DNA-binding affinities and cofactor recruitment to >1300 genomic binding site sequences. We report that genes responding to the TF Cbf1 and cofactor Met28 contain a novel ‘recruitment motif' (RYAAT), adjacent to Cbf1 binding sites, which enhances the binding of a Met4–Met28–Cbf1 regulatory complex, and that abrogation of this motif significantly reduces gene induction under low-sulfur conditions. Furthermore, we show that correct recognition of this composite motif requires both non-DNA-binding cofactors Met4 and Met28. Finally, we demonstrate that the presence of an RYAAT motif next to a Cbf1 site, rather than Cbf1 binding affinity, specifies Cbf1-dependent sulfur metabolism genes. Our results highlight the need to examine TF/cofactor complexes, as novel specificity can result from cofactors that lack intrinsic DNA-binding specificity. PMID:22146299

  12. Analysis of the DNA-Binding Activities of the Arabidopsis R2R3-MYB Transcription Factor Family by One-Hybrid Experiments in Yeast

    PubMed Central

    Kelemen, Zsolt; Sebastian, Alvaro; Xu, Wenjia; Grain, Damaris; Salsac, Fabien; Avon, Alexandra; Berger, Nathalie; Tran, Joseph; Dubreucq, Bertrand; Lurin, Claire; Lepiniec, Loïc; Contreras-Moreira, Bruno; Dubos, Christian

    2015-01-01

    The control of growth and development of all living organisms is a complex and dynamic process that requires the harmonious expression of numerous genes. Gene expression is mainly controlled by the activity of sequence-specific DNA binding proteins called transcription factors (TFs). Amongst the various classes of eukaryotic TFs, the MYB superfamily is one of the largest and most diverse, and it has considerably expanded in the plant kingdom. R2R3-MYBs have been extensively studied over the last 15 years. However, DNA-binding specificity has been characterized for only a small subset of these proteins. Therefore, one of the remaining challenges is the exhaustive characterization of the DNA-binding specificity of all R2R3-MYB proteins. In this study, we have developed a library of Arabidopsis thaliana R2R3-MYB open reading frames, whose DNA-binding activities were assayed in vivo (yeast one-hybrid experiments) with a pool of selected cis-regulatory elements. Altogether 1904 interactions were assayed leading to the discovery of specific patterns of interactions between the various R2R3-MYB subgroups and their DNA target sequences and to the identification of key features that govern these interactions. The present work provides a comprehensive in vivo analysis of R2R3-MYB binding activities that should help in predicting new DNA motifs and identifying new putative target genes for each member of this very large family of TFs. In a broader perspective, the generated data will help to better understand how TF interact with their target DNA sequences. PMID:26484765

  13. The Human SWI-SNF Complex Protein p270 Is an ARID Family Member with Non-Sequence-Specific DNA Binding Activity

    PubMed Central

    Dallas, Peter B.; Pacchione, Stephen; Wilsker, Deborah; Bowrin, Valerie; Kobayashi, Ryuji; Moran, Elizabeth

    2000-01-01

    p270 is an integral member of human SWI-SNF complexes, first identified through its shared antigenic specificity with p300 and CREB binding protein. The deduced amino acid sequence of p270 reported here indicates that it is a member of an evolutionarily conserved family of proteins distinguished by the presence of a DNA binding motif termed ARID (AT-rich interactive domain). The ARID consensus and other structural features are common to both p270 and yeast SWI1, suggesting that p270 is a human counterpart of SWI1. The approximately 100-residue ARID sequence is present in a series of proteins strongly implicated in the regulation of cell growth, development, and tissue-specific gene expression. Although about a dozen ARID proteins can be identified from database searches, to date, only Bright (a regulator of B-cell-specific gene expression), dead ringer (a Drosophila melanogaster gene product required for normal development), and MRF-2 (which represses expression from the cytomegalovirus enhancer) have been analyzed directly in regard to their DNA binding properties. Each binds preferentially to AT-rich sites. In contrast, p270 shows no sequence preference in its DNA binding activity, thereby demonstrating that AT-rich binding is not an intrinsic property of ARID domains and that ARID family proteins may be involved in a wider range of DNA interactions. PMID:10757798

  14. Identification of base and backbone contacts used for DNA sequence recognition and high-affinity binding by LAC9, a transcription activator containing a C6 zinc finger

    SciTech Connect

    Halvorsen, Yuan-Di C.; Nandabalan, K.; Dickson, R.C. )

    1991-04-01

    The LAC9 protein of Kluyveromyces lactis is a transcriptional regulator of genes in the lactose-galactose regulon. To regulate transcription, LAC9 must bind to 17-bp upstream activator sequences (UASs) located in front of each target gene. LAC9 is homologous to the GAL4 protein of Saccharomyces cerevisiae, and the two proteins must bind DNA in a very similar manner. In this paper the authors show that high-affinity, sequence-specific binding by LAC9 dimers is mediated primarily by 3 bp at each end of the UAS. In addition, at least one half of the UAS must have a GC or CG base pair at position 1 for high-affinity binding; LAC9k binds preferentially to the half containing the GC base pair. Hydroxyl radical footprinting shows that a LAC9 dimer binds an unusually broad region on one face of the DNA helix. Because of the data, they suggest that LAC9 contacts positions 6, 7, and 8, both plus and minus, of the UAS, which are separated by more than one turn of the DNA helix, and twists part way around the DNA, thus protecting the broad region of the minor groove between the major-groove contacts.

  15. New DNA-binding radioprotectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martin, Roger

    The normal tissue damage associated with cancer radiotherapy has motivated the development at Peter Mac of a new class of DNA-binding radioprotecting drugs that could be applied top-ically to normal tissues at risk. Methylproamine (MP), the lead compound, reduces radiation induced cell kill at low concentrations. For example, experiments comparing the clonogenic survival of transformed human keratinocytes treated with 30 micromolar MP before and dur-ing various doses of ionising radiation, with the radiation dose response for untreated cells, indicate a dose reduction factor (DRF) of 2. Similar survival curve experiments using various concentrations of MP, with parallel measurements of uptake of MP into cell nuclei, have en-abled the relationship between drug uptake and extent of radioprotection to be established. Radioprotection has also been demonstrated after systemic administration to mice, for three different endpoints, namely lung, jejunum and bone marrow (survival at 30 days post-TBI). The results of pulse radiolysis studies indicated that the drugs act by reduction of transient radiation-induced oxidative species on DNA. This hypothesis was substantiated by the results of experiments in which MP radioprotection of radiation-induced DNA double-strand breaks, assessed as -H2AX foci, in the human keratinocyte cell line. For both endpoints, the extent of radioprotection increased with MP concentration up to a maximal value. These results are consistent with the hypothesis that radioprotection by MP is mediated by attenuation of the extent of initial DNA damage. However, although MP is a potent radioprotector, it becomes cytotoxic at higher concentrations. This limitation has been addressed in an extensive program of lead optimisation and some promising analogues have emerged from which the next lead will be selected. Given the clinical potential of topical radioprotection, the new analogues are being assessed in terms of delivery to mouse oral mucosa. This is

  16. The COUP-TFII variant lacking a DNA-binding domain inhibits the activation of the Cyp7a1 promoter through physical interaction with COUP-TFII.

    PubMed

    Yamazaki, Tomoko; Suehiro, Jun-ichi; Miyazaki, Hideki; Minami, Takashi; Kodama, Tatsuhiki; Miyazono, Kohei; Watabe, Tetsuro

    2013-06-01

    The COUP-TFII (chicken ovalbumin upstream promoter-transcription factor II) nuclear receptor, which is composed of a DNA-binding domain and a ligand-binding domain, exerts pleiotropic effects on development and cell differentiation by regulating the transcription of its target genes, including Cyp7a1 (cytochrome P450, family 7, subfamily a, polypeptide 1), which plays important roles in catabolism of cholesterol in the liver. Although multiple variants of COUP-TFII exist, their roles in the regulation of Cyp7a1 expression have not been elucidated. In the present study, we investigated the roles of COUP-TFII-V2 (variant 2), which lacks a DNA-binding domain, in the regulation of the transcriptional control of the Cyp7a1 gene by COUP-TFII in hepatocellular carcinoma cells. We found that COUP-TFII-V2 was significantly expressed in Huh7 cells, in which Cyp7a1 was not expressed. Furthermore, knockdown of COUP-TFII-V2 enhanced endogenous Cyp7a1 expression in Huh7 cells. Although COUP-TFII activates the Cyp7a1 promoter through direct binding to DNA, this activation was affected by COUP-TFII-V2, which physically interacted with COUP-TFII and inhibited its DNA-binding ability. Chromatin immunoprecipitation assays showed that COUP-TFII-V2 inhibited the binding of endogenous COUP-TFII to the intact Cyp7a1 promoter. The results of the present study suggest that COUP-TFII-V2 negatively regulates the function of COUP-TFII by inhibiting its binding to DNA to decrease Cyp7a1 expression.

  17. The NFAT-1 DNA binding complex in activated T cells contains Fra-1 and JunB.

    PubMed Central

    Boise, L H; Petryniak, B; Mao, X; June, C H; Wang, C Y; Lindsten, T; Bravo, R; Kovary, K; Leiden, J M; Thompson, C B

    1993-01-01

    Activation of T cells induces transcription of the interleukin-2 (IL-2) gene. IL-2 expression is regulated through the binding of transcription factors to multiple sites within the IL-2 enhancer. One such cis-acting element within the IL-2 enhancer is the NFAT-1 (nuclear factor of activated T cells) binding site. NFAT-1 binding activity is absent in resting cells but is induced upon T-cell activation. The induction of NFAT-1 binding activity can be inhibited by cyclosporin A, potentially accounting for the ability of cyclosporin A to inhibit IL-2 production by T cells. We have previously reported that the NFAT-1 binding complex is composed of at least two proteins and that the 5' portion of the NFAT-1 sequence acts as a binding site for one or more proteins from the Ets family of transcription factors. We now report that the 3' portion of the NFAT-1 sequence contains a variant AP-1 binding site. NFAT-1 binding can be specifically inhibited by oligonucleotides containing a consensus AP-1 site. Moreover, mutation of the AP-1 site at the 3' end of the NFAT-1 sequence inhibits both NFAT-1 binding and the ability of the NFAT-1 binding site to activate expression from a reporter plasmid upon T-cell activation. Since AP-1 sites bind dimeric protein complexes composed of individual members of the Fos and Jun families of transcription factors, we used antibodies specific for individual Fos and Jun family members to determine whether they are present in the NFAT-1 binding complex. These experiments demonstrated that the NFAT-1 binding complex contains JunB and Fra-1 proteins. Northern (RNA) blot analyses demonstrate that both fra-1 and junB mRNAs are induced upon T-cell activation, although fra-1 mRNA is present even in quiescent T cells. Of interest, junB is not expressed in quiescent T cells, and it is induced with kinetics that are similar to those for the induction of IL-2 mRNA expression. Taken together, these results suggested that the JunB-Fra-1 heterodimer is the

  18. Yeast transcription co-activator Sub1 and its human homolog PC4 preferentially bind to G-quadruplex DNA

    PubMed Central

    Gao, Jun; Zybailov, Boris L.; Byrd, Alicia K.; Griffin, Wezley C.; Chib, Shubeena; Mackintosh, Samuel G.; Tackett, Alan J.; Raney, Kevin D.

    2015-01-01

    Using a G-quadruplex bait, we identified the transcription co-activator Sub1 as a G-quadruplex binding protein by quantitative LC-MS/MS and demonstrated in vivo G-quadruplex binding by ChIP. In vitro, Sub1, and its human homolog PC4, bind preferentially to G-quadruplexes. This provides a possible mechanism by which G-quadruplexes can influence gene transcription. PMID:25813861

  19. Quantification of Cooperativity in Heterodimer-DNA Binding Improves the Accuracy of Binding Specificity Models.

    PubMed

    Isakova, Alina; Berset, Yves; Hatzimanikatis, Vassily; Deplancke, Bart

    2016-05-06

    Many transcription factors (TFs) have the ability to cooperate on DNA elements as heterodimers. Despite the significance of TF heterodimerization for gene regulation, a quantitative understanding of cooperativity between various TF dimer partners and its impact on heterodimer DNA binding specificity models is still lacking. Here, we used a novel integrative approach, combining microfluidics-steered measurements of dimer-DNA assembly with mechanistic modeling of the implicated protein-protein-DNA interactions to quantitatively interrogate the cooperative DNA binding behavior of the adipogenic peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor γ (PPARγ):retinoid X receptor α (RXRα) heterodimer. Using the high throughput MITOMI (mechanically induced trapping of molecular interactions) platform, we derived equilibrium DNA binding data for PPARγ, RXRα, as well as the PPARγ:RXRα heterodimer to more than 300 target DNA sites and variants thereof. We then quantified cooperativity underlying heterodimer-DNA binding and derived an integrative heterodimer DNA binding constant. Using this cooperativity-inclusive constant, we were able to build a heterodimer-DNA binding specificity model that has superior predictive power than the one based on a regular one-site equilibrium. Our data further revealed that individual nucleotide substitutions within the target site affect the extent of cooperativity in PPARγ:RXRα-DNA binding. Our study therefore emphasizes the importance of assessing cooperativity when generating DNA binding specificity models for heterodimers.

  20. Synthesis, characterization, antioxidant activity and DNA-binding studies of two rare earth(III) complexes with naringenin-2-hydroxy benzoyl hydrazone ligand.

    PubMed

    Li, Tian-Rong; Yang, Zheng-Yin; Wang, Bao-Dui; Qin, Dong-Dong

    2008-08-01

    Two novel rare earth complexes, Y(III) complex (1) and Eu(III) complex (2), with naringenin-2-hydroxy benzoyl hydrazone ligand were synthesized and characterized. The interaction of the two metal complexes and the free ligand with calf thymus DNA (CT DNA) was investigated by electronic absorption spectroscopy, fluorescence spectroscopy and viscosity measurement. All the experimental evidences indicate that these three compounds can strongly bind to CT DNA via an intercalation mechanism. The intrinsic binding constants of the Y(III) complex (1), Eu(III) complex (2) and the free ligand with CT DNA were 2.1 x 10(4), 8.5 x 10(4) and 1.6 x 10(4) M(-1), respectively. Furthermore, the antioxidant activity of the metal complexes was determined by hydroxyl radical scavenging method in vitro.

  1. Genomewide and biochemical analyses of DNA-binding activity of Cdc6/Orc1 and Mcm proteins in Pyrococcus sp.

    PubMed

    Matsunaga, Fujihiko; Glatigny, Annie; Mucchielli-Giorgi, Marie-Hélène; Agier, Nicolas; Delacroix, Hervé; Marisa, Laetitia; Durosay, Patrice; Ishino, Yoshizumi; Aggerbeck, Lawrence; Forterre, Patrick

    2007-01-01

    The origin of DNA replication (oriC) of the hyperthermophilic archaeon Pyrococcus abyssi contains multiple ORB and mini-ORB repeats that show sequence similarities to other archaeal ORB (origin recognition box). We report here that the binding of Cdc6/Orc1 to a 5 kb region containing oriC in vivo was highly specific both in exponential and stationary phases, by means of chromatin immunoprecipitation coupled with hybridization on a whole genome microarray (ChIP-chip). The oriC region is practically the sole binding site for the Cdc6/Orc1, thereby distinguishing oriC in the 1.8 M bp genome. We found that the 5 kb region contains a previously unnoticed cluster of ORB and mini-ORB repeats in the gene encoding the small subunit (dp1) for DNA polymerase II (PolD). ChIP and the gel retardation analyses further revealed that Cdc6/Orc1 specifically binds both of the ORB clusters in oriC and dp1. The organization of the ORB clusters in the dp1 and oriC is conserved during evolution in the order Thermococcales, suggesting a role in the initiation of DNA replication. Our ChIP-chip analysis also revealed that Mcm alters the binding specificity to the oriC region according to the growth phase, consistent with its role as a licensing factor.

  2. Damage-specific DNA-binding proteins from human cells

    SciTech Connect

    Kanjilal, S.

    1992-01-01

    The primary objective of the study was to detect and characterize factors from human cells that bind DNA damaged by ultraviolet radiation. An application of the gel-shift assay was devised in which a DNA probe was UV-irradiated and compared with non-irradiated probe DNA for the ability to bind to such factors in cell extracts. UV-dose dependent binding proteins were identified. Formation of the DNA-protein complexes was independent of the specific sequence, form or source of the DNA. There was a marked preference for lesions on double stranded DNA over those on single stranded DNA. DNA irradiated with gamma rays did not compete with UV-irradiated DNA for the binding activities. Cell lines from patients with genetic diseases associated with disorders of the DNA repair system were screened for the presence of damaged-DNA-binding activities. Simultaneous occurrence of the clinical symptoms of some of these diseases had been previously documented and possible links between the syndromes proposed. However, supporting biochemical or molecular evidence for such associations were lacking. The data from the present investigations indicate that some cases of Xeroderma Pigmentosum group A, Cockayne's Syndrome, Bloom's Syndrome and Ataxia Telangiectasia, all of which exhibit sensitivity to UV or gamma radiation, share an aberrant damaged-DNA-binding factor. These findings support the hypothesis that some of the repair disorder diseases are closely related and may have arisen from a common defect. Partial purification of the binding activities from HeLa cells was achieved. Size-exclusion chromatography resolved the activities into various peaks, one of which was less damage-specific than the others as determined by competition studies using native or UV-irradiated DNA. Some of the activities were further separated by ion-exchange chromatography. On using affinity chromatography methods, the major damage-binding factor could be eluted in the presence of 2 M KCl and 1% NP-40.

  3. Synthesis, DNA binding and antitrypanosomal activity of benzimidazole analogues of DAPI.

    PubMed

    Farahat, Abdelbasset A; Bennett-Vaughn, Cheree; Mineva, Ekaterina M; Kumar, Arvind; Wenzler, Tanja; Brun, Reto; Liu, Yang; Wilson, W David; Boykin, David W

    2016-12-15

    A series of novel benzimidazole diamidines were prepared from the corresponding dicyano analogues either by applying Pinner methodology (5a-c, 10 and 13a) or by making amidoximes intermediates that were reduced to the corresponding amidines (15a-c). The new amidines were evaluated in vitro against the protozoan parasite Trypanosoma brucei rhodesiense (T. b. r.). The thiophene analogue 5b and the N-methyl compound 15a showed superior antitrypanosomal activity compared to that of the parent I.

  4. Synthesis, characterization, antioxidant activity and DNA-binding studies of three rare earth (III) complexes with 1-(4-aminoantipyrine)-3-tosylurea ligand.

    PubMed

    Xi, Pin-xian; Xu, Zhi-hong; Liu, Xiao-hui; Chen, Feng-juan; Zeng, Zheng-zhi; Zhang, Xiao-wen; Liu, Ying

    2009-01-01

    1-(4-aminoantipyrine)-3-tosylurea (H2L) and its three lanthanide (III) complexes, M(H2L)3 3NO3 [where M=Nd(III), Sm(III) and Eu(III)], have been synthesized and characterized. In addition, the DNA-binding properties of the three complexes have been investigated by UV-vis (ultraviolet and visible) absorption spectroscopy, fluorescence spectroscopy, circular dichroism (CD) spectroscopy, cyclic voltammetry, and viscosity measurements. Results suggest that the three complexes bind to DNA via a groove binding mode. Furthermore, the antioxidant activity (superoxide and hydroxyl radical) of the metal complexes was determined by using spectrophotometer methods in vitro. These complexes were found to possess potent antioxidant activity and be better than standard antioxidants like vitamin C and mannitol.

  5. De novo-engineered transcription activator-like effector (TALE) hybrid nuclease with novel DNA binding specificity creates double-strand breaks.

    PubMed

    Mahfouz, Magdy M; Li, Lixin; Shamimuzzaman, Md; Wibowo, Anjar; Fang, Xiaoyun; Zhu, Jian-Kang

    2011-02-08

    Site-specific and rare cutting nucleases are valuable tools for genome engineering. The generation of double-strand DNA breaks (DSBs) promotes homologous recombination in eukaryotes and can facilitate gene targeting, additions, deletions, and inactivation. Zinc finger nucleases have been used to generate DSBs and subsequently, for genome editing but with low efficiency and reproducibility. The transcription activator-like family of type III effectors (TALEs) contains a central domain of tandem repeats that could be engineered to bind specific DNA targets. Here, we report the generation of a Hax3-based hybrid TALE nuclease with a user-selected DNA binding specificity. We show that the engineered TALE nuclease can bind to its target sequence in vitro and that the homodimeric TALE nuclease can cleave double-stranded DNA in vitro if the DNA binding sites have the proper spacing and orientation. Transient expression assays in tobacco leaves suggest that the hybrid nuclease creates DSB in its target sequence, which is subsequently repaired by nonhomologous end-joining repair. Taken together, our data show the feasibility of engineering TALE-based hybrid nucleases capable of generating site-specific DSBs and the great potential for site-specific genome modification in plants and eukaryotes in general.

  6. New bimetallic dicyanidoargentate(I)-based coordination compounds: Synthesis, characterization, biological activities and DNA-BSA binding affinities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Korkmaz, Nesrin; Aydın, Ali; Karadağ, Ahmet; Yanar, Yusuf; Maaşoğlu, Yelis; Şahin, Ertan; Tekin, Şaban

    2017-02-01

    Four compounds -two (2 and 3) completely new- of composition [Ni(edbea)Ag3(CN)5] (1), [Cu(edbea)Ag2(CN)4]·H2O (2), [Cd(edbea)Ag3(CN)5]·H2O (3) and [Cd(edbea)2] [Ag(CN)2]2·H2O (4) {edbea; 2,2‧-(ethylenedioxy)bis (ethylamine)}, were synthesized and characterized using elemental, FT-IR, X-Ray (4), thermal, variable temperature magnetic measurement (1 and 2) and biological techniques. The DNA/BSA binding affinities of 2 and 3 were evaluated by UV-Vis spectrophotometric titrations, ethidium bromide exchange experiments and electrophoretic mobility measurements. Compounds 1 and 4 have previously been characterized and shown to reduce the proliferation and migration of tumor cells. For the sake of clarity, 1 precise mechanism of action on microbial organisms and temperature magnetic measurement were determined. The crystallographic analyses showed that 4 was built up of [Cd(edbea)2]II cations and [Ag2(CN)4]II anions. Complexes demonstrated a remarkable antibacterial (1-4), antifungal (1-4) and antiproliferative activities (2 and 3) to ten human bacterial pathogens, four plant pathogenic fungi or three tumor cells (HeLa, HT29, and C6), respectively. Therefore, our results strongly confirm that cell proliferation, cell morphology, Bcl-2, P53 changes and apoptosis can be related to the pharmacological effects of the complexes as suitable candidate for clinical trials.

  7. Mechanism of Iron-Dependent Repressor (IdeR) Activation and DNA Binding: A Molecular Dynamics and Protein Structure Network Study

    PubMed Central

    Ghosh, Soma; Chandra, Nagasuma; Vishveshwara, Saraswathi

    2015-01-01

    Metalloproteins form a major class of enzymes in the living system that are involved in crucial biological functions such as catalysis, redox reactions and as ‘switches’ in signal transductions. Iron dependent repressor (IdeR) is a metal-sensing transcription factor that regulates free iron concentration in Mycobacterium tuberculosis. IdeR is also known to promote bacterial virulence, making it an important target in the field of therapeutics. Mechanistic details of how iron ions modulate IdeR such that it dimerizes and binds to DNA is not understood clearly. In this study, we have performed molecular dynamic simulations and integrated it with protein structure networks to study the influence of iron on IdeR structure and function. A significant structural variation between the metallated and the non-metallated system is observed. Our simulations clearly indicate the importance of iron in stabilizing its monomeric subunit, which in turn promotes dimerization. However, the most striking results are obtained from the simulations of IdeR-DNA complex in the absence of metals, where at the end of 100ns simulations, the protein subunits are seen to rapidly dissociate away from the DNA, thereby forming an excellent resource to investigate the mechanism of DNA binding. We have also investigated the role of iron as an allosteric regulator of IdeR that positively induces IdeR-DNA complex formation. Based on this study, a mechanistic model of IdeR activation and DNA binding has been proposed. PMID:26699663

  8. Difference in DNA-binding abilities of Fur-homolog DNA binding protein from Neisseria gonorrhoeae.

    PubMed

    Bagchi, Angshuman

    2016-10-01

    Gonorrhea is a severe disease infecting both men and women worldwide. The causative agent of the disease is Neisseria gonorrhoeae. The organism mostly affects human beings in iron restricted environments. In such an environment the organism produces a set of proteins which are mostly absent in iron rich environments. The expressions of the genes for the proteins are regulated by the transcription factor (TF) belonging to the Fur family. Interestingly, the same TF acts as the activator and repressor of genes. In this present work, an attempt has been made to analyze the molecular details of the differential DNA-binding activities of the TF from Neisseria gonorrhoeae to come up with a plausible molecular reason behind the difference DNA binding activities of the same TF. Computational modelling technique was used to build the three dimensional structure of the TF. Molecular docking and molecular dynamics simulations were employed to determine the binding interactions between the TF and the promoter DNA. With the help of the computational techniques, the biochemical reason behind the different modes of DNA binding by the TF was analyzed. Results from this analysis may be useful to future drug development endeavours to curtail the spread of Gonorrhea.

  9. The intracisternal A-particle proximal enhancer-binding protein activates transcription and is identical to the RNA- and DNA-binding protein p54nrb/NonO.

    PubMed

    Basu, A; Dong, B; Krainer, A R; Howe, C C

    1997-02-01

    The long terminal repeats of murine intracisternal A particles (IAPs) contain an IAP proximal enhancer (IPE) element that is inactive in murine F9 embryonal carcinoma cells and active in the parietal endoderm cell line PYS-2. The element binds efficiently to a 60-kDa IPE-binding protein (IPEB) present in PYS-2 cells but poorly to F9 proteins, suggesting a role for IPEB in regulating IAP expression. We have purified calf thymus IPEB, which binds to the IPE and transactivates a reporter gene in HeLa cell extracts. Based on the peptide sequence of the purified calf IPEB, we have cloned a 420-bp cDNA and showed that the encoded protein is the homolog of human p54nrb and mouse NonO, which are characterized by the presence of two RNA recognition motifs. We show that p54nrb is an IPE-binding transcription activator with its DNA-binding and activation domains in the N- and C-terminal halves, respectively. The activation domain of p54nrb is active in HeLa, PYS-2, and F9 cells, whereas p54nrb as a whole molecule is active in HeLa and PYS-2 cells but not in F9 cells. Thus, the lack of activity of p54nrb in F9 cells is due to an ineffective DNA-binding domain. We demonstrate that p54nrb also binds to a pre-mRNA. Based on the close sequence relatedness of this protein to PSF, which is required for pre-mRNA splicing in vitro, we discuss the possibility that p54nrb has dual roles in transcription and splicing.

  10. Exploring DNA binding and nucleolytic activity of few 4-aminoantipyrine based amino acid Schiff base complexes: A comparative approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Raman, N.; Sakthivel, A.; Pravin, N.

    A series of novel Co(II), Cu(II), Ni(II) and Zn(II) complexes were synthesized from Schiff base(s), obtained by the condensation of 4-aminoantipyrine with furfural and amino acid (glycine(L1)/alanine(L2)/valine(L3)) and respective metal(II) chloride. Their structural features and other properties were explored from the analytical and spectral methods. The binding behaviors of the complexes to calf thymus DNA were investigated by absorption spectra, viscosity measurements and cyclic voltammetry. The intrinsic binding constants for the above synthesized complexes are found to be in the order of 102 to 105 indicating that most of the synthesized complexes are good intercalators. The binding constant values (Kb) clearly indicate that valine Schiff-base complexes have more intercalating ability than alanine and glycine Schiff-base complexes. The results indicate that the complexes bind to DNA through intercalation and act as efficient cleaving agents. The in vitro antibacterial and antifungal assay indicates that these complexes are good antimicrobial agents against various pathogens. The IC50 values of [Ni(L1)2] and [Zn(L1)2] complexes imply that these complexes have preferable ability to scavenge hydroxyl radical.

  11. Exploring DNA binding and nucleolytic activity of few 4-aminoantipyrine based amino acid Schiff base complexes: a comparative approach.

    PubMed

    Raman, N; Sakthivel, A; Pravin, N

    2014-05-05

    A series of novel Co(II), Cu(II), Ni(II) and Zn(II) complexes were synthesized from Schiff base(s), obtained by the condensation of 4-aminoantipyrine with furfural and amino acid (glycine(L1)/alanine(L2)/valine(L3)) and respective metal(II) chloride. Their structural features and other properties were explored from the analytical and spectral methods. The binding behaviors of the complexes to calf thymus DNA were investigated by absorption spectra, viscosity measurements and cyclic voltammetry. The intrinsic binding constants for the above synthesized complexes are found to be in the order of 10(2) to 10(5) indicating that most of the synthesized complexes are good intercalators. The binding constant values (Kb) clearly indicate that valine Schiff-base complexes have more intercalating ability than alanine and glycine Schiff-base complexes. The results indicate that the complexes bind to DNA through intercalation and act as efficient cleaving agents. The in vitro antibacterial and antifungal assay indicates that these complexes are good antimicrobial agents against various pathogens. The IC50 values of [Ni(L1)2] and [Zn(L1)2] complexes imply that these complexes have preferable ability to scavenge hydroxyl radical.

  12. Studies on DNA binding behaviour of biologically active transition metal complexes of new tetradentate N2O2 donor Schiff bases: Inhibitory activity against bacteria

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sobha, S.; Mahalakshmi, R.; Raman, N.

    A series of Cu(II), Ni(II) and Zn(II) complexes of the type ML have been synthesized with Schiff bases derived from o-acetoacetotoluidide, 2-hydroxybenzaldehyde and o-phenylenediamine/1,4-diaminobutane. The complexes are insoluble in common organic solvents but soluble in DMF and DMSO. The measured molar conductance values in DMSO indicate that the complexes are non-electrolytic in nature. All the six metal complexes have been fully characterized with the help of elemental analyses, molecular weights, molar conductance values, magnetic moments and spectroscopic data. The analytical data helped to elucidate the structure of the metal complexes. The Schiff bases are found to act as tetradentate ligands using N2O2 donor set of atoms leading to a square-planar geometry for the complexes around all the metal ions. The binding properties of metal complexes with DNA were investigated by absorption spectra, viscosity measurements and cyclic voltammetry. Detailed analysis reveals that the metal complexes intercalate into the DNA base stack as intercalators. All the metal complexes cleave the pUC19 DNA in presence of H2O2. The Schiff bases and their complexes have been screened for their antibacterial activity against five bacterial strains (Staphylococcus aureus, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Escherichia coli, Staphylococcus epidermidis, Klebsiella pneumoniae) by disk diffusion method. All the metal complexes have potent biocidal activity than the free ligands.

  13. Studies on DNA binding behaviour of biologically active transition metal complexes of new tetradentate N2O2 donor Schiff bases: inhibitory activity against bacteria.

    PubMed

    Sobha, S; Mahalakshmi, R; Raman, N

    2012-06-15

    A series of Cu(II), Ni(II) and Zn(II) complexes of the type ML have been synthesized with Schiff bases derived from o-acetoacetotoluidide, 2-hydroxybenzaldehyde and o-phenylenediamine/1,4-diaminobutane. The complexes are insoluble in common organic solvents but soluble in DMF and DMSO. The measured molar conductance values in DMSO indicate that the complexes are non-electrolytic in nature. All the six metal complexes have been fully characterized with the help of elemental analyses, molecular weights, molar conductance values, magnetic moments and spectroscopic data. The analytical data helped to elucidate the structure of the metal complexes. The Schiff bases are found to act as tetradentate ligands using N(2)O(2) donor set of atoms leading to a square-planar geometry for the complexes around all the metal ions. The binding properties of metal complexes with DNA were investigated by absorption spectra, viscosity measurements and cyclic voltammetry. Detailed analysis reveals that the metal complexes intercalate into the DNA base stack as intercalators. All the metal complexes cleave the pUC19 DNA in presence of H(2)O(2.) The Schiff bases and their complexes have been screened for their antibacterial activity against five bacterial strains (Staphylococcus aureus, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Escherichia coli, Staphylococcus epidermidis, Klebsiella pneumoniae) by disk diffusion method. All the metal complexes have potent biocidal activity than the free ligands.

  14. A human centromere protein, CENP-B, has a DNA binding domain containing four potential alpha helices at the NH2 terminus, which is separable from dimerizing activity

    PubMed Central

    1992-01-01

    The alphoid DNA-CENP-B (centromere protein B) complex is the first sequence-specific DNA/protein complex detected in the centromeric region of human chromosomes. In the reaction, CENP-B recognizes a 17-bp sequence (CENP-B box) and assembles two alphoid DNA molecules into a complex, which is designated complex A (Muro, Y., H. Masumoto, K. Yoda, N. Nozaki, M. Ohashi, and T. Okazaki. 1992. J. Cell Biol. 116:585-596). Since CENP-B gene is conserved in mammalian species and CENP-B boxes are found also in mouse centromere satellite DNA (minor satellite), this sequence-specific DNA-protein interaction may be important for some kind of common centromere function. In this study we have characterized the structure of CENP-B and CENP-B-alphoid DNA complex. We have shown by chemical cross-linking that CENP-B formed a dimer, and have estimated by molecular weight determination the composition of complex A to be a CENP-B dimer and two molecules of alphoid DNA. The DNA binding domain has been delimited within the NH2-terminal 125-amino acid region containing four potential alpha-helices using truncated CENP-B made in Escherichia coli cells. We have shown that CENP-B had sites highly sensitive to proteases and that the DNA binding domain was separable from the dimerizing activity by the proteolytic cleavage at 20 kD from the COOH terminus of the molecule. Thus, CENP-B may organize a higher order structure in the centromere by juxtaposing two CENP-B boxes in the alphoid DNA repeat through both the DNA-protein and protein-protein interactions. PMID:1469042

  15. Addition and correction: the NF-kappa B-like DNA binding activity observed in Dictyostelium nuclear extracts is due to the GBF transcription factor.

    PubMed

    Traincard, F; Ponte, E; Pun, J; Coukell, B; Veron, M

    2001-10-01

    We have previously reported that a NF-kappa B transduction pathway was likely to be present in the cellular slime mold Dictyostelium discoideum. This conclusion was based on several observations, including the detection of developmentally regulated DNA binding proteins in Dictyostelium nuclear extracts that bound to bona fide kappa B sequences. We have now performed additional experiments which demonstrate that the protein responsible for this NF-kappa B-like DNA binding activity is the Dictyostelium GBF (G box regulatory element binding factor) transcription factor. This result, along with the fact that no sequence with significant similarity to components of the mammalian NF-kappa B pathway can be found in Dictyostelium genome, now almost entirely sequenced, led us to reconsider our previous conclusion on the occurrence of a NF-kappa B signal transduction pathway in Dictyostelium.

  16. Synthesis, Characterization, and Biological Activities of Pendant Arm-Pyridyltetrazole Copper(II) Complexes: DNA Binding/Cleavage Activity and Cytotoxic Studies.

    PubMed

    Mustafa, Shaik; Rao, Bommuluri Umamaheswara; Surendrababu, Manubolu Surya; Raju, Kalidindi Krishnam; Rao, Gollapalli Nageswara

    2015-10-01

    2-(1H-Tetrazol-5-yl)pyridine (L) has been reacted separately with Me2NCH2CH2Cl⋅HCl and ClCH2CH2OH to yield two regioisomers in each case, N,N-dimethyl-2-[5-(pyridin-2-yl)-1H-tetrazol-1-yl]ethanamine (L1)/N,N-dimethyl-2-[5-(pyridin-2-yl)-2H-tetrazol-2-yl]ethanamine (L2) and 2-[5-(pyridin-2-yl)-1H-tetrazol-1-yl]ethanol (L3)/2-[5-(pyridin-2-yl)-2H-tetrazol-2-yl]ethanol (L4), respectively. These ligands, L1-L4, have been coordinated with CuCl2 ⋅H2O in 1 : 1 composition to furnish the corresponding complexes 1-4. EPR Spectra of Cu complexes 1 and 3 were characteristic of square planar geometry, with nuclear hyperfine spin 3/2. Single X-ray crystallographic studies of 3 revealed that the Cu center has a square planar structure. DNA binding studies were carried out by UV/VIS absorption; viscosity and thermal denaturation studies revealed that each of these complexes are avid binders of calf thymus DNA. Investigation of nucleolytic cleavage activities of the complexes was carried out on double-stranded pBR322 circular plasmid DNA by using a gel electrophoresis experiment under various conditions, where cleavage of DNA takes place by oxidative free-radical mechanism (OH(⋅)). In vitro anticancer activities of the complexes against MCF-7 (human breast adenocarcinoma) cells revealed that the complexes inhibit the growth of cancer cells. The IC50 values of the complexes showed that Cu complexes exhibit comparable cytotoxic activities compared to the standard drug cisplatin.

  17. In vitro DNA binding studies of Aspartame, an artificial sweetener.

    PubMed

    Kashanian, Soheila; Khodaei, Mohammad Mehdi; Kheirdoosh, Fahimeh

    2013-03-05

    A number of small molecules bind directly and selectively to DNA, by inhibiting replication, transcription or topoisomerase activity. In this work the interaction of native calf thymus DNA (CT-DNA) with Aspartame (APM), an artificial sweeteners was studied at physiological pH. DNA binding study of APM is useful to understand APM-DNA interaction mechanism and to provide guidance for the application and design of new and safer artificial sweeteners. The interaction was investigated using spectrophotometric, spectrofluorometric competition experiment and circular dichroism (CD). Hypochromism and red shift are shown in UV absorption band of APM. A strong fluorescence quenching reaction of DNA to APM was observed and the binding constants (Kf) of DNA with APM and corresponding number of binding sites (n) were calculated at different temperatures. Thermodynamic parameters, enthalpy changes (ΔH) and entropy changes (ΔS) were calculated to be +181kJmol(-1) and +681Jmol(-1)K(-1) according to Van't Hoff equation, which indicated that reaction is predominantly entropically driven. Moreover, spectrofluorometric competition experiment and circular dichroism (CD) results are indicative of non-intercalative DNA binding nature of APM. We suggest that APM interacts with calf thymus DNA via groove binding mode with an intrinsic binding constant of 5×10(+4)M(-1).

  18. The N-terminal Region of Chromodomain Helicase DNA-binding Protein 4 (CHD4) Is Essential for Activity and Contains a High Mobility Group (HMG) Box-like-domain That Can Bind Poly(ADP-ribose)*

    PubMed Central

    Silva, Ana P. G.; Ryan, Daniel P.; Galanty, Yaron; Low, Jason K. K.; Vandevenne, Marylene; Jackson, Stephen P.; Mackay, Joel P.

    2016-01-01

    Chromodomain Helicase DNA-binding protein 4 (CHD4) is a chromatin-remodeling enzyme that has been reported to regulate DNA-damage responses through its N-terminal region in a poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase-dependent manner. We have identified and determined the structure of a stable domain (CHD4-N) in this N-terminal region. The-fold consists of a four-α-helix bundle with structural similarity to the high mobility group box, a domain that is well known as a DNA binding module. We show that the CHD4-N domain binds with higher affinity to poly(ADP-ribose) than to DNA. We also show that the N-terminal region of CHD4, although not CHD4-N alone, is essential for full nucleosome remodeling activity and is important for localizing CHD4 to sites of DNA damage. Overall, these data build on our understanding of how CHD4-NuRD acts to regulate gene expression and participates in the DNA-damage response. PMID:26565020

  19. Cooperative binding of estrogen receptor to imperfect estrogen-responsive DNA elements correlates with their synergistic hormone-dependent enhancer activity.

    PubMed

    Martinez, E; Wahli, W

    1989-12-01

    The Xenopus vitellogenin (vit) gene B1 estrogen-inducible enhancer is formed by two closely adjacent 13 bp imperfect palindromic estrogen-responsive elements (EREs), i.e. ERE-2 and ERE-1, having one and two base substitutions respectively, when compared to the perfect palindromic consensus ERE (GGTCANNNTGACC). Gene transfer experiments indicate that these degenerated elements, on their own, have a low or no regulatory capacity at all, but in vivo act together synergistically to confer high receptor- and hormone-dependent transcription activation to the heterologous HSV thymidine kinase promoter. Thus, the DNA region upstream of the vitB1 gene comprising these two imperfect EREs separated by 7 bp, was called the vitB1 estrogen-responsive unit (vitB1 ERU). Using in vitro protein-DNA interaction techniques, we demonstrate that estrogen receptor dimers bind cooperatively to the imperfect EREs of the vitB1 ERU. Binding of a first receptor dimer to the more conserved ERE-2 increases approximately 4- to 8-fold the binding affinity of the receptor to the adjacent less conserved ERE-1. Thus, we suggest that the observed synergistic estrogen-dependent transcription activation conferred by the pair of hormone-responsive DNA elements of the vit B1 ERU is the result of cooperative binding of two estrogen receptor dimers to these two adjacent imperfect EREs.

  20. Propensity for HBZ-SP1 isoform of HTLV-I to inhibit c-Jun activity correlates with sequestration of c-Jun into nuclear bodies rather than inhibition of its DNA-binding activity

    SciTech Connect

    Clerc, Isabelle; Hivin, Patrick; Rubbo, Pierre-Alain; Lemasson, Isabelle; Barbeau, Benoit; Mesnard, Jean-Michel

    2009-09-01

    HTLV-I bZIP factor (HBZ) contains a C-terminal zipper domain involved in its interaction with c-Jun. This interaction leads to a reduction of c-Jun DNA-binding activity and prevents the protein from activating transcription of AP-1-dependent promoters. However, it remained unclear whether the negative effect of HBZ-SP1 was due to its weak DNA-binding activity or to its capacity to target cellular factors to transcriptionally-inactive nuclear bodies. To answer this question, we produced a mutant in which specific residues present in the modulatory and DNA-binding domain of HBZ-SP1 were substituted for the corresponding c-Fos amino acids to improve the DNA-binding activity of the c-Jun/HBZ-SP1 heterodimer. The stability of the mutant, its interaction with c-Jun, DNA-binding activity of the resulting heterodimer, and its effect on the c-Jun activity were tested. In conclusion, we demonstrate that the repression of c-Jun activity in vivo is mainly due to the HBZ-SP1-mediated sequestration of c-Jun to the HBZ-NBs.

  1. Cytotoxic activity of proflavine diureas: synthesis, antitumor, evaluation and DNA binding properties of 1',1''-(acridin-3,6-diyl)-3',3''-dialkyldiureas.

    PubMed

    Kozurková, Mária; Sabolová, Danica; Janovec, Ladislav; Mikes, Jaromír; Koval', Ján; Ungvarský, Ján; Stefanisinová, Miroslava; Fedorocko, Peter; Kristian, Pavol; Imrich, Ján

    2008-04-01

    The synthesis of novel 1',1''-(acridin-3,6-diyl)-3',3''-dialkyldiureas was reported. Their biological activity to inhibit cell proliferation was assessed by a MTT assay on two cell lines, HeLa and HCT-116, at micromolar concentration. 1',1''-(Acridin-3,6-diyl)-3',3''-dihexyldiurea hydrochloride was active on a HCT-116 cell line with an IC(50) value of 3.1 microM. The interaction of these compounds with calf thymus DNA was investigated by a variety of spectroscopic techniques including UV-vis, fluorescence and CD spectroscopy. From spectrofluorimetric titrations, binding constants for the DNA-drug complexes were determined (K=0.9-4.2x10(5) M(-1)). Antiproliferative activity of synthesized derivatives might be related to their intercalation into DNA.

  2. The yeast telomere-binding protein RAP1 binds to and promotes the formation of DNA quadruplexes in telomeric DNA.

    PubMed Central

    Giraldo, R; Rhodes, D

    1994-01-01

    The protein RAP1 is essential for the maintenance of the telomeres of Saccharomyces cerevisiae and binds in vitro to multiple sites found within the TG1-3 telomeric repeats. We show here that, in addition to its known binding activity for double-stranded DNA, RAP1 binds sequence-specifically to the GT-strands. This indicates that RAP1 is the protein that binds to the telomeric terminal GT-tails. Furthermore, we have found that RAP1 binds to and promotes the formation of G-tetrads, i.e. DNA quadruplexes, in GT-strand oligonucleotides at nanomolar concentrations. The formation of DNA quadruplexes appears to involve the intermolecular association of GT-strands. The minimal DNA-binding domain of RAP1 (DBD) binds only to double-stranded DNA, so that the novel DNA-binding activity we have found involves regions of the protein located outside of the DBD. The finding that a telomeric protein promotes the formation of G-tetrads argues for the use of DNA quadruplexes in telomere association. Images PMID:8194531

  3. SCH529074, a small molecule activator of mutant p53, which binds p53 DNA binding domain (DBD), restores growth-suppressive function to mutant p53 and interrupts HDM2-mediated ubiquitination of wild type p53.

    PubMed

    Demma, Mark; Maxwell, Eugene; Ramos, Robert; Liang, Lianzhu; Li, Cheng; Hesk, David; Rossman, Randall; Mallams, Alan; Doll, Ronald; Liu, Ming; Seidel-Dugan, Cynthia; Bishop, W Robert; Dasmahapatra, Bimalendu

    2010-04-02

    Abrogation of p53 function occurs in almost all human cancers, with more than 50% of cancers harboring inactivating mutations in p53 itself. Mutation of p53 is indicative of highly aggressive cancers and poor prognosis. The vast majority of mutations in p53 occur in its core DNA binding domain (DBD) and result in inactivation of p53 by reducing its thermodynamic stability at physiological temperature. Here, we report a small molecule, SCH529074, that binds specifically to the p53 DBD in a saturable manner with an affinity of 1-2 microm. Binding restores wild type function to many oncogenic mutant forms of p53. This small molecule reactivates mutant p53 by acting as a chaperone, in a manner similar to that previously reported for the peptide CDB3. Binding of SCH529074 to the p53 DBD is specifically displaced by an oligonucleotide with a sequence derived from the p53-response element. In addition to reactivating mutant p53, SCH529074 binding inhibits ubiquitination of p53 by HDM2. We have also developed a novel variant of p53 by changing a single amino acid in the core domain of p53 (N268R), which abolishes binding of SCH529074. This amino acid change also inhibits HDM2-mediated ubiquitination of p53. Our novel findings indicate that through its interaction with p53 DBD, SCH529074 restores DNA binding activity to mutant p53 and inhibits HDM2-mediated ubiquitination.

  4. DNA binding studies of tartrazine food additive.

    PubMed

    Kashanian, Soheila; Zeidali, Sahar Heidary

    2011-07-01

    The interaction of native calf thymus DNA with tartrazine in 10 mM Tris-HCl aqueous solution at neutral pH 7.4 was investigated. Tartrazine is a nitrous derivative and may cause allergic reactions, with a potential of toxicological risk. Also, tartrazine induces oxidative stress and DNA damage. Its DNA binding properties were studied by UV-vis and circular dichroism spectra, competitive binding with Hoechst 33258, and viscosity measurements. Tartrazine molecules bind to DNA via groove mode as illustrated by hyperchromism in the UV absorption band of tartrazine, decrease in Hoechst-DNA solution fluorescence, unchanged viscosity of DNA, and conformational changes such as conversion from B-like to C-like in the circular dichroism spectra of DNA. The binding constants (K(b)) of DNA with tartrazine were calculated at different temperatures. Enthalpy and entropy changes were calculated to be +37 and +213 kJ mol(-1), respectively, according to the Van't Hoff equation, which indicated that the reaction is predominantly entropically driven. Also, tartrazine does not cleave plasmid DNA. Tartrazine interacts with calf thymus DNA via a groove interaction mode with an intrinsic binding constant of 3.75 × 10(4) M(-1).

  5. Synthesis of mononuclear copper(II) complexes of acyclic Schiff's base ligands: Spectral, structural, electrochemical, antibacterial, DNA binding and cleavage activity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jayamani, Arumugam; Thamilarasan, Vijayan; Sengottuvelan, Nallathambi; Manisankar, Paramasivam; Kang, Sung Kwon; Kim, Young-Inn; Ganesan, Vengatesan

    2014-03-01

    The mononuclear copper(II) complexes (1&2) of ligands L1 [N,N";-bis(2-hydroxy-5-methylbenzyl)-1,4-bis(3-iminopropyl)piperazine] or L2 [N,N";-bis(2-hydroxy-5-bromobenzyl)-1,4-bis(3-iminopropyl) piperazine] have been synthesized and characterised. The single crystal X-ray study had shown that ligands L1 and L2 crystallize in a monoclinic crystal system with P21/c space group. The mononuclear copper(II) complexes show one quasireversible cyclic voltammetric response near cathodic region (-0.77 to -0.85 V) in DMF assignable to the Cu(II)/Cu(I) couple. Binding interaction of the complexes with calf thymus DNA (CT DNA) investigated by absorption studies and fluorescence spectral studies show good binding affinity to CT DNA, which imply both the copper(II) complexes can strongly interact with DNA efficiently. The copper(II) complexes showed efficient oxidative cleavage of plasmid pBR322 DNA in the presence of 3-mercaptopropionic acid as reducing agent through a mechanistic pathway involving formation of singlet oxygen as the reactive species. The Schiff bases and their Cu(II) complexes have been screened for antibacterial activities which indicates that the complexes exhibited higher antimicrobial activity than the free ligands.

  6. Synthesis of mononuclear copper(II) complexes of acyclic Schiff's base ligands: spectral, structural, electrochemical, antibacterial, DNA binding and cleavage activity.

    PubMed

    Jayamani, Arumugam; Thamilarasan, Vijayan; Sengottuvelan, Nallathambi; Manisankar, Paramasivam; Kang, Sung Kwon; Kim, Young-Inn; Ganesan, Vengatesan

    2014-03-25

    The mononuclear copper(II) complexes (1&2) of ligands L(1) [N,N'-bis(2-hydroxy-5-methylbenzyl)-1,4-bis(3-iminopropyl)piperazine] or L(2) [N,N'-bis(2-hydroxy-5-bromobenzyl)-1,4-bis(3-iminopropyl) piperazine] have been synthesized and characterised. The single crystal X-ray study had shown that ligands L(1) and L(2) crystallize in a monoclinic crystal system with P21/c space group. The mononuclear copper(II) complexes show one quasireversible cyclic voltammetric response near cathodic region (-0.77 to -0.85 V) in DMF assignable to the Cu(II)/Cu(I) couple. Binding interaction of the complexes with calf thymus DNA (CT DNA) investigated by absorption studies and fluorescence spectral studies show good binding affinity to CT DNA, which imply both the copper(II) complexes can strongly interact with DNA efficiently. The copper(II) complexes showed efficient oxidative cleavage of plasmid pBR322 DNA in the presence of 3-mercaptopropionic acid as reducing agent through a mechanistic pathway involving formation of singlet oxygen as the reactive species. The Schiff bases and their Cu(II) complexes have been screened for antibacterial activities which indicates that the complexes exhibited higher antimicrobial activity than the free ligands.

  7. Binding of globular proteins to DNA from surface tension measurement.

    PubMed

    Mitra, A; Chattoraj, D K; Chakraborty, P

    2001-10-01

    Extent of binding (gammap) of globular proteins to calf-thymus DNA have been measured in mole per mole of nucleotide as function of equilibrium protein concentration. We have exploited measurement of the surface tension of the protein solution in the presence and absence of DNA to calculate the binding ration (gammap). Interaction of bovine serum albumin with DNA has been studied at different pH. Interaction of bovine serum albumin with DNA has been studied at different pH, ionic strength and in presence of Ca2+. Interaction of BSA with denatured DNA has also been investigated. Binding isotherms for other globular proteins like beta-lactoglobulin, alpha-lactalbumin and lysozyme have been compared under identical physicochemical condition. It has been noted with considerable interest that globular form of protein is important to some extent in protein-DNA interaction. An attempt has been made to explain the significance of difference in binding ratios of these two biopolymers in aqueous medium for different systems in the light of electrostatic and hydrophobic effects. Values of maximum binding ration (gammap(m)) at saturated level for different systems have been also presented. The Gibb's free energy decrease (-deltaG0) of the binding of proteins to DNA has been compared more precisely for the saturation of binding sites in the DNA with the change of activity of protein in solution from zero to unity in the rational mole fraction scale.

  8. A high mobility group box 1 (HMGB1) gene from Chlamys farreri and the DNA-binding ability and pro-inflammatory activity of its recombinant protein.

    PubMed

    Wang, Mengqiang; Wang, Lingling; Guo, Ying; Zhou, Zhi; Yi, Qilin; Zhang, Daoxiang; Zhang, Huan; Liu, Rui; Song, Linsheng

    2014-02-01

    High-mobility group box 1 (HMGB1) protein, a highly conserved DNA binding protein, plays an important role in maintaining nucleosome structures, transcription, and inflammation. In the present research, a cDNA of 1268 bp for the Zhikong scallop Chlamys farreri HMGB1 (designed as CfHMGB1) was cloned via rapid amplification of cDNA ends (RACE) technique and expression sequence tag (EST) analysis. The complete cDNA sequence of CfHMGB1 contained an open reading frame (ORF) of 648 bp, which encoded a protein of 215 amino acids. The amino acid sequence of CfHMGB1 shared 53-57% similarity with other identified HMGB1s. There were two HMG domains, two low complexity regions and a conserved acidic tail in the amino acid sequence of CfHMGB1. The mRNA transcripts of CfHMGB1 were constitutively expressed in all the tested tissues, including haemocytes, muscle, mantle, gill, hepatopancreas, kidney and gonad, with the highest expression level in hepatopancreas. The mRNA expression profiles of CfHMGB1 in haemocytes after the stimulation with different pathogen-associated molecular patterns (PAMPs), including lipopolysaccharide (LPS), peptidoglycan (PGN) and glucan (Glu), were similar with an up-regulation in the early stage and then recovered to the original level. The recombinant CfHMGB1 protein could bind double-stranded DNA and induce the release of TNF-α activity in mixed primary culture of scallop haemocytes. These results collectively indicated that CfHMGB1, with DNA-binding ability and pro-inflammatory activity, could play an important role in the immune response of scallops.

  9. Mononuclear zinc(II) complexes of 2-((2-(piperazin-1-yl)ethylimino)methyl)-4-substituted phenols: Synthesis, structural characterization, DNA binding and cheminuclease activities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ravichandran, J.; Gurumoorthy, P.; Karthick, C.; Kalilur Rahiman, A.

    2014-03-01

    Four new zinc(II) complexes [Zn(HL1-4)Cl2] (1-4), where HL1-4 = 2-((2-(piperazin-1-yl)ethylimino)methyl)-4-substituted phenols, have been isolated and fully characterized using various spectro-analytical techniques. The X-ray crystal structure of complex 4 shows the distorted trigonal-bipyramidal coordination geometry around zinc(II) ion. The crystal packing is stabilized by intermolecular NH⋯O hydrogen bonding interaction. The complexes display no d-d electronic band in the visible region due to d10 electronic configuration of zinc(II) ion. The electrochemical properties of the synthesized ligands and their complexes exhibit similar voltammogram at reduction potential due to electrochemically innocent Zn(II) ion, which evidenced that the electron transfer is due to the nature of the ligand. Binding interaction of complexes with calf thymus DNA was studied by UV-Vis absorption titration, viscometric titration and cyclic voltammetry. All complexes bind with CT DNA by intercalation, giving the binding affinity in the order of 2 > 1 ≫ 3 > 4. The prominent cheminuclease activity of complexes on plasmid DNA (pBR322 DNA) was observed in the absence and presence of H2O2. Oxidative pathway reveals that the underlying mechanism involves hydroxyl radical.

  10. Hepatitis B virus X protein inhibits p53 sequence-specific DNA binding, transcriptional activity, and association with transcription factor ERCC3.

    PubMed Central

    Wang, X W; Forrester, K; Yeh, H; Feitelson, M A; Gu, J R; Harris, C C

    1994-01-01

    Chronic active hepatitis caused by infection with hepatitis B virus, a DNA virus, is a major risk factor for human hepatocellular carcinoma. Since the oncogenicity of several DNA viruses is dependent on the interaction of their viral oncoproteins with cellular tumor-suppressor gene products, we investigated the interaction between hepatitis B virus X protein (HBX) and human wild-type p53 protein. HBX complexes with the wild-type p53 protein and inhibits its sequence-specific DNA binding in vitro. HBX expression also inhibits p53-mediated transcriptional activation in vivo and the in vitro association of p53 and ERCC3, a general transcription factor involved in nucleotide excision repair. Therefore, HBX may affect a wide range of p53 functions and contribute to the molecular pathogenesis of human hepatocellular carcinoma. Images PMID:8134379

  11. Local conformations and competitive binding affinities of single- and double-stranded primer-template DNA at the polymerization and editing active sites of DNA polymerases.

    PubMed

    Datta, Kausiki; Johnson, Neil P; LiCata, Vince J; von Hippel, Peter H

    2009-06-19

    In addition to their capacity for template-directed 5' --> 3' DNA synthesis at the polymerase (pol) site, DNA polymerases have a separate 3' --> 5' exonuclease (exo) editing activity that is involved in assuring the fidelity of DNA replication. Upon misincorporation of an incorrect nucleotide residue, the 3' terminus of the primer strand at the primer-template (P/T) junction is preferentially transferred to the exo site, where the faulty residue is excised, allowing the shortened primer to rebind to the template strand at the pol site and incorporate the correct dNTP. Here we describe the conformational changes that occur in the primer strand as it shuttles between the pol and exo sites of replication-competent Klenow and Klentaq DNA polymerase complexes in solution and use these conformational changes to measure the equilibrium distribution of the primer between these sites for P/T DNA constructs carrying both matched and mismatched primer termini. To this end, we have measured the fluorescence and circular dichroism spectra at wavelengths of >300 nm for conformational probes comprising pairs of 2-aminopurine bases site-specifically replacing adenine bases at various positions in the primer strand of P/T DNA constructs bound to DNA polymerases. Control experiments that compare primer conformations with available x-ray structures confirm the validity of this approach. These distributions and the conformational changes in the P/T DNA that occur during template-directed DNA synthesis in solution illuminate some of the mechanisms used by DNA polymerases to assure the fidelity of DNA synthesis.

  12. Characterizing Requirements for Small Ubiquitin-like Modifier (SUMO) Modification and Binding on Base Excision Repair Activity of Thymine-DNA Glycosylase in Vivo.

    PubMed

    McLaughlin, Dylan; Coey, Christopher T; Yang, Wei-Chih; Drohat, Alexander C; Matunis, Michael J

    2016-04-22

    Thymine-DNA glycosylase (TDG) plays critical roles in DNA base excision repair and DNA demethylation. It has been proposed, based on structural studies and in vitro biochemistry, that sumoylation is required for efficient TDG enzymatic turnover following base excision. However, whether sumoylation is required for TDG activity in vivo has not previously been tested. We have developed an in vivo assay for TDG activity that takes advantage of its recently discovered role in DNA demethylation and selective recognition and repair of 5-carboxylcytosine. Using this assay, we investigated the role of sumoylation in regulating TDG activity through the use of TDG mutants defective for sumoylation and Small Ubiquitin-like Modifier (SUMO) binding and by altering TDG sumoylation through SUMO and SUMO protease overexpression experiments. Our findings indicate that sumoylation and SUMO binding are not essential for TDG-mediated excision and repair of 5-carboxylcytosine bases. Moreover, in vitro assays revealed that apurinic/apyrimidinic nuclease 1 provides nearly maximum stimulation of TDG processing of G·caC substrates. Thus, under our assay conditions, apurinic/apyrimidinic nuclease 1-mediated stimulation or other mechanisms sufficiently alleviate TDG product inhibition and promote its enzymatic turnover in vivo.

  13. Cdk5 activator-binding protein C53 regulates apoptosis induced by genotoxic stress via modulating the G2/M DNA damage checkpoint.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Hai; Luo, Shouqing; Li, Honglin

    2005-05-27

    In response to DNA damage, the cellular decision of life versus death involves an intricate network of multiple factors that play critical roles in regulation of DNA repair, cell cycle, and cell death. DNA damage checkpoint proteins are crucial for maintaining DNA integrity and normal cellular functions, but they may also reduce the effectiveness of cancer treatment. Here we report the involvement of Cdk5 activator p35-binding protein C53 in regulation of apoptosis induced by genotoxic stress through modulating Cdk1-cyclin B1 function. C53 was originally identified as a Cdk5 activator p35-binding protein and a caspase substrate. Importantly, our results demonstrated that C53 deficiency conferred partial resistance to genotoxic agents such as etoposide and x-ray irradiation, whereas ectopic expression of C53 rendered cells susceptible to multiple genotoxins that usually trigger G(2)/M arrest. Furthermore, we found that Cdk1 activity was required for etoposide-induced apoptosis of HeLa cells. Overexpression of C53 promoted Cdk1 activity and nuclear accumulation of cyclin B1, whereas C53 deficiency led to more cytoplasmic retention of cyclin B1, suggesting that C53 acts as a pivotal player in modulating the G(2)/M DNA damage checkpoint. Finally, C53 and cyclin B1 co-localize and associate in vivo, indicating a direct role of C53 in regulating the Cdk1-cyclin B1 complex. Taken together, our results strongly indicate that in response to genotoxic stress, C53 serves as an important regulatory component of the G(2)/M DNA damage checkpoint. By overriding the G(2)/M checkpoint-mediated inhibition of Cdk1-cyclin B1 function, ectopic expression of C53 may represent a novel approach for chemo- and radio-sensitization of cancer cells.

  14. Effects of DNA-binding drugs on T4 DNA ligase.

    PubMed Central

    Montecucco, A; Pedrali-Noy, G; Spadari, S; Lestingi, M; Ciarrocchi, G

    1990-01-01

    A number of DNA intercalating and externally binding drugs have been found to inhibit nick sealing, cohesive and blunt end ligation, AMP-dependent DNA topoisomerization and EDTA-induced DNA nicking mediated by bacteriophage T4 DNA ligase. The inhibition seems to arise from drug-substrate interaction so that formation of active DNA-Mg2(+)-AMP-enzyme complex is impaired while assembled and active complexes are not disturbed by drug binding to the substrate. Images Fig. 2. Fig. 4. Fig. 5. PMID:2156493

  15. Binding mode and affinity studies of DNA-binding agents using topoisomerase I DNA unwinding assay.

    PubMed

    McKnight, Ruel E; Gleason, Aaron B; Keyes, James A; Sahabi, Sadia

    2007-02-15

    A topoisomerase I DNA unwinding assay has been used to determine the relative DNA-binding affinities of a model pair of homologous naphthalene diimides. Binding affinity data were corroborated using calorimetric (ITC) and spectrophotometric (titration and T(m)) studies, with substituent size playing a significant role in binding. The assay was also used to investigate the mode of binding adopted by several known DNA-binding agents, including SYBR Green and PicoGreen. Some of the compounds exhibited unexpected binding modes.

  16. Genome-wide specificity of DNA binding, gene regulation, and chromatin remodeling by TALE- and CRISPR/Cas9-based transcriptional activators.

    PubMed

    Polstein, Lauren R; Perez-Pinera, Pablo; Kocak, D Dewran; Vockley, Christopher M; Bledsoe, Peggy; Song, Lingyun; Safi, Alexias; Crawford, Gregory E; Reddy, Timothy E; Gersbach, Charles A

    2015-08-01

    Genome engineering technologies based on the CRISPR/Cas9 and TALE systems are enabling new approaches in science and biotechnology. However, the specificity of these tools in complex genomes and the role of chromatin structure in determining DNA binding are not well understood. We analyzed the genome-wide effects of TALE- and CRISPR-based transcriptional activators in human cells using ChIP-seq to assess DNA-binding specificity and RNA-seq to measure the specificity of perturbing the transcriptome. Additionally, DNase-seq was used to assess genome-wide chromatin remodeling that occurs as a result of their action. Our results show that these transcription factors are highly specific in both DNA binding and gene regulation and are able to open targeted regions of closed chromatin independent of gene activation. Collectively, these results underscore the potential for these technologies to make precise changes to gene expression for gene and cell therapies or fundamental studies of gene function.

  17. Crystal structure of the adenovirus DNA binding protein reveals a hook-on model for cooperative DNA binding.

    PubMed Central

    Tucker, P A; Tsernoglou, D; Tucker, A D; Coenjaerts, F E; Leenders, H; van der Vliet, P C

    1994-01-01

    The adenovirus single-stranded DNA binding protein (Ad DBP) is a multifunctional protein required, amongst other things, for DNA replication and transcription control. It binds to single- and double-stranded DNA, as well as to RNA, in a sequence-independent manner. Like other single-stranded DNA binding proteins, it binds ssDNA, cooperatively. We report the crystal structure, at 2.6 A resolution, of the nucleic acid binding domain. This domain is active in DNA replication. The protein contains two zinc atoms in different, novel coordinations. The zinc atoms appear to be required for the stability of the protein fold rather than being involved in direct contacts with the DNA. The crystal structure shows that the protein contains a 17 amino acid C-terminal extension which hooks onto a second molecule, thereby forming a protein chain. Deletion of this C-terminal arm reduces cooperativity in DNA binding, suggesting a hook-on model for cooperativity. Based on this structural work and mutant studies, we propose that DBP forms a protein core around which the single-stranded DNA winds. Images PMID:8039495

  18. Repression of GCN5 Histone Acetyltransferase Activity via Bromodomain-Mediated Binding and Phosphorylation by the Ku–DNA-Dependent Protein Kinase Complex

    PubMed Central

    Barlev, Nickolai A.; Poltoratsky, Vladimir; Owen-Hughes, Tom; Ying, Carol; Liu, Lin; Workman, Jerry L.; Berger, Shelley L.

    1998-01-01

    GCN5, a putative transcriptional adapter in humans and yeast, possesses histone acetyltransferase (HAT) activity which has been linked to GCN5’s role in transcriptional activation in yeast. In this report, we demonstrate a functional interaction between human GCN5 (hGCN5) and the DNA-dependent protein kinase (DNA-PK) holoenzyme. Yeast two-hybrid screening detected an interaction between the bromodomain of hGCN5 and the p70 subunit of the human Ku heterodimer (p70-p80), which is the DNA-binding component of DNA-PK. Interaction between intact hGCN5 and Ku70 was shown biochemically using recombinant proteins and by coimmunoprecipitation of endogenous proteins following chromatography of HeLa nuclear extracts. We demonstrate that the catalytic subunit of DNA-PK phosphorylates hGCN5 both in vivo and in vitro and, moreover, that the phosphorylation inhibits the HAT activity of hGCN5. These findings suggest a possible regulatory mechanism of HAT activity. PMID:9488450

  19. POZ domain transcription factor, FBI-1, represses transcription of ADH5/FDH by interacting with the zinc finger and interfering with DNA binding activity of Sp1.

    PubMed

    Lee, Dong-Kee; Suh, Dongchul; Edenberg, Howard J; Hur, Man-Wook

    2002-07-26

    The POZ domain is a protein-protein interaction motif that is found in many transcription factors, which are important for development, oncogenesis, apoptosis, and transcription repression. We cloned the POZ domain transcription factor, FBI-1, that recognizes the cis-element (bp -38 to -22) located just upstream of the core Sp1 binding sites (bp -22 to +22) of the ADH5/FDH minimal promoter (bp -38 to +61) in vitro and in vivo, as revealed by electrophoretic mobility shift assay and chromatin immunoprecipitation assay. The ADH5/FDH minimal promoter is potently repressed by the FBI-1. Glutathione S-transferase fusion protein pull-down showed that the POZ domains of FBI-1, Plzf, and Bcl-6 directly interact with the zinc finger DNA binding domain of Sp1. DNase I footprinting assays showed that the interaction prevents binding of Sp1 to the GC boxes of the ADH5/FDH promoter. Gal4-POZ domain fusions targeted proximal to the GC boxes repress transcription of the Gal4 upstream activator sequence-Sp1-adenovirus major late promoter. Our data suggest that POZ domain represses transcription by interacting with Sp1 zinc fingers and by interfering with the DNA binding activity of Sp1.

  20. Cyclic AMP-responsive expression of the surfactant protein-A gene is mediated by increased DNA binding and transcriptional activity of thyroid transcription factor-1.

    PubMed

    Li, J; Gao, E; Mendelson, C R

    1998-02-20

    Surfactant protein (SP)-A gene transcription is stimulated by factors that increase cyclic AMP. In the present study, we observed that three thyroid transcription factor-1 (TTF-1) binding elements (TBEs) located within a 255 base pair region flanking the 5'-end of the baboon SP-A2 (bSP-A2) gene are required for maximal cyclic AMP induction of bSP-A2 promoter activity. We found that TTF-1 DNA binding activity was increased in nuclear extracts of pulmonary type II cells cultured in the presence of cyclic AMP. By contrast, the levels of immunoreactive TTF-1 protein were similar in nuclear extracts of control and cyclic AMP-treated type II cells. The incorporation of [32P]orthophosphate into immunoprecipitated TTF-1 protein also was markedly increased by cyclic AMP treatment. Moreover, exposure of nuclear extracts from cyclic AMP-treated type II cells either to potato acid phosphatase or alkaline phosphatase abolished the cyclic AMP-induced increase in TTF-1 DNA-binding activity. Interestingly, the phorbol ester 12-O-tetradecanoylphorbol-13-acetate (TPA), known to activate protein kinase C, also enhanced incorporation of [32P]orthophosphate into TTF-1 protein; however, the DNA binding activity of TTF-1 was decreased in nuclear extracts of TPA-treated type II cells. Expression vectors encoding TTF-1 and the catalytic subunit of protein kinase A (PKA-cat) were cotransfected into A549 lung adenocarcinoma cells together with an SPA:human growth hormone fusion gene (255 base pairs of 5'-flanking DNA from the baboon SP-A2 gene linked to human growth hormone, as reporter) containing TBEs, or with a reporter gene construct containing three tandem TBEs fused upstream of the bSP-A2 gene TATA box and the transcription initiation site. Coexpression of TTF-1 and PKA-cat increased fusion gene expression 3-4-fold as compared with expression of TTF-1 in the absence of PKA-cat. Moreover, the transcriptional activity of TTF-1 was suppressed by cotransfection of a dominant negative form

  1. Pin1-mediated Sp1 phosphorylation by CDK1 increases Sp1 stability and decreases its DNA-binding activity during mitosis.

    PubMed

    Yang, Hang-Che; Chuang, Jian-Ying; Jeng, Wen-Yih; Liu, Chia-I; Wang, Andrew H-J; Lu, Pei-Jung; Chang, Wen-Chang; Hung, Jan-Jong

    2014-12-16

    We have shown that Sp1 phosphorylation at Thr739 decreases its DNA-binding activity. In this study, we found that phosphorylation of Sp1 at Thr739 alone is necessary, but not sufficient for the inhibition of its DNA-binding activity during mitosis. We demonstrated that Pin1 could be recruited to the Thr739(p)-Pro motif of Sp1 to modulate the interaction between phospho-Sp1 and CDK1, thereby facilitating CDK1-mediated phosphorylation of Sp1 at Ser720, Thr723 and Thr737 during mitosis. Loss of the C-terminal end of Sp1 (amino acids 741-785) significantly increased Sp1 phosphorylation, implying that the C-terminus inhibits CDK1-mediated Sp1 phosphorylation. Binding analysis of Sp1 peptides to Pin1 by isothermal titration calorimetry indicated that Pin1 interacts with Thr739(p)-Sp1 peptide but not with Thr739-Sp1 peptide. X-ray crystallography data showed that the Thr739(p)-Sp1 peptide occupies the active site of Pin1. Increased Sp1 phosphorylation by CDK1 during mitosis not only stabilized Sp1 levels by decreasing interaction with ubiquitin E3-ligase RNF4 but also caused Sp1 to move out of the chromosomes completely by decreasing its DNA-binding activity, thereby facilitating cell cycle progression. Thus, Pin1-mediated conformational changes in the C-terminal region of Sp1 are critical for increased CDK1-mediated Sp1 phosphorylation to facilitate cell cycle progression during mitosis.

  2. New modulated design and synthesis of chiral CuII/SnIV bimetallic potential anticancer drug entity: In vitro DNA binding and pBR322 DNA cleavage activity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tabassum, Sartaj; Sharma, Girish Chandra; Arjmand, Farukh

    2012-05-01

    A new chiral ligand scaffold L derived from (R)-2-amino-2-phenyl ethanol and diethyl oxalate was isolated and thoroughly characterized by various spectroscopic methods. The ligand L was allowed to react with CuCl2·2H2O and NiCl2·6H2O to achieve monometallic complexes 1 and 2, respectively. Subsequently modulation of 1 and 2 was carried out in the presence of SnCl4·5H2O to obtain heterobimetallic potential drug candidates 3 and 4 possessing (CuII/SnIV and NiII/SnIV) metallic cores, respectively and characterized by elemental analysis and spectroscopic data including 1H, 13C and 119Sn NMR in case of 3 and 4. In vitro DNA binding studies revealed that complex 3 avidly binds to DNA as quantified by Kb and Ksv values. Complex 3 exhibits a remarkable DNA cleavage activity (concentration dependent) with pBR322 DNA and the cleavage activity of 3 was significantly enhanced in the presence of activators and follows the order H2O2 > Asc > MPA > GSH. Complex 3 cleave pBR322 DNA via hydrolytic pathway and accessible to major groove of DNA.

  3. Isolation and characterization of a new class of DNA aptamers specific binding to Singapore grouper iridovirus (SGIV) with antiviral activities.

    PubMed

    Li, Pengfei; Yan, Yang; Wei, Shina; Wei, Jingguang; Gao, Ren; Huang, Xiaohong; Huang, Youhua; Jiang, Guohua; Qin, Qiwei

    2014-08-08

    The Singapore grouper iridovirus (SGIV), a member of the genus Ranavirus, is a major viral pathogen that has caused heavy economic losses to the grouper aquaculture industry in China and Southeast Asia. No efficient method of controlling SGIV outbreaks is currently available. Systematic evolution of ligands by exponential enrichment (SELEX) is now widely used for the in vitro selection of artificial ssDNA or RNA ligands, known as aptamers, which bind to targets through their stable three-dimensional structures. In our current study, we generated ssDNA aptamers against the SGIV, and evaluated their ability to block SGIV infection in cultured fish cells and cultured fish in vivo. The anti-SGIV DNA aptamers, LMB-761, LMB-764, LMB-748, LMB-439, LMB-755, and LMB-767, were selected from a pool of oligonucleotides randomly generated using a SELEX iterative method. The analysis of the secondary structure of the aptamers revealed that they all formed similar stem-loop structures. Electrophoretic mobility shift assays showed that the aptamers bound SGIV specifically, as evidenced by a lack cross-reactivity with the soft shell turtle iridovirus. The aptamers produced no cytotoxic effects in cultured grouper spleen cells (GS). Assessment of cytopathic effects (CPE) and viral titer assays showed that LMB-761, LMB-764, LMB-748, LMB-755, and LMB-767 significantly inhibited SGIV infection in GS cells. The in vivo experiments showed that LMB-761 and LMB-764 reduced SGIV-related mortality, and no negative effects were observed in orange-spotted grouper, Epinephelus coioides, indicating that these DNA aptamers may be suitable antiviral candidates for controlling SGIV infections in fish reared in marine aquaculture facilities.

  4. Structures of the activator of K. pneumonia biofilm formation, MrkH, indicates PilZ domains involved in c-di-GMP and DNA binding

    PubMed Central

    Schumacher, Maria A.; Zeng, Wenjie

    2016-01-01

    The pathogenesis of Klebsiella pneumonia is linked to the bacteria’s ability to form biofilms. Mannose-resistant Klebsiella-like (Mrk) hemagglutinins are critical for K. pneumonia biofilm development, and the expression of the genes encoding these proteins is activated by a 3′,5′-cyclic diguanylic acid (c-di-GMP)–regulated transcription factor, MrkH. To gain insight into MrkH function, we performed structural and biochemical analyses. Data revealed MrkH to be a monomer with a two-domain architecture consisting of a PilZ C-domain connected to an N domain that unexpectedly also harbors a PilZ-like fold. Comparison of apo- and c-di-GMP–bound MrkH structures reveals a large 138° interdomain rotation that is induced by binding an intercalated c-di-GMP dimer. c-di-GMP interacts with PilZ C-domain motifs 1 and 2 (RxxxR and D/NxSxxG) and a newly described c-di-GMP–binding motif in the MrkH N domain. Strikingly, these c-di-GMP–binding motifs also stabilize an open state conformation in apo MrkH via contacts from the PilZ motif 1 to residues in the C-domain motif 2 and the c-di-GMP–binding N-domain motif. Use of the same regions in apo structure stabilization and c-di-GMP interaction allows distinction between the states. Indeed, domain reorientation by c-di-GMP complexation with MrkH, which leads to a highly compacted structure, suggests a mechanism by which the protein is activated to bind DNA. To our knowledge, MrkH represents the first instance of specific DNA binding mediated by PilZ domains. The MrkH structures also pave the way for the rational design of inhibitors that target K. pneumonia biofilm formation. PMID:27551088

  5. Desulfovibrio vulgaris bacterioferritin uses H(2)O(2) as a co-substrate for iron oxidation and reveals DPS-like DNA protection and binding activities.

    PubMed

    Timóteo, Cristina G; Guilherme, Márcia; Penas, Daniela; Folgosa, Filipe; Tavares, Pedro; Pereira, Alice S

    2012-08-15

    A gene encoding Bfr (bacterioferritin) was identified and isolated from the genome of Desulfovibrio vulgaris cells, and overexpressed in Escherichia coli. In vitro, H(2)O(2) oxidizes Fe(2+) ions at much higher reaction rates than O(2). The H(2)O(2) oxidation of two Fe(2+) ions was proven by Mössbauer spectroscopy of rapid freeze-quenched samples. On the basis of the Mössbauer parameters of the intermediate species we propose that D. vulgaris Bfr follows a mineralization mechanism similar to the one reported for vertebrate H-type ferritins subunits, in which a diferrous centre at the ferroxidase site is oxidized to diferric intermediate species, that are subsequently translocated into the inner nanocavity. D. vulgaris recombinant Bfr oxidizes and stores up to 600 iron atoms per protein. This Bfr is able to bind DNA and protect it against hydroxyl radical and DNase deleterious effects. The use of H(2)O(2) as an oxidant, combined with the DNA binding and protection activities, seems to indicate a DPS (DNA-binding protein from starved cells)-like role for D. vulgaris Bfr.

  6. Characterization of the DNA-binding domain and identification of the active site residue in the 'Gyr A' half of Leishmania donovani topoisomerase II.

    PubMed

    Sengupta, Tanushri; Mukherjee, Mandira; Das, Rakhee; Das, Aditi; Majumder, Hemanta K

    2005-01-01

    DNA topoisomerase II is a multidomain homodimeric enzyme that changes DNA topology by coupling ATP hydrolysis to the transport of one DNA helix through a transient double-stranded break in another. To investigate the biochemical properties of the individual domains of Leishmania donovani topoisomerase II, four truncation mutants were generated. Deletion of 178 aminoacids from the C-terminus (core and LdDeltaC1058) had no apparent effect on the DNA-binding or cleavage activities of the enzymes. However, when 429 aminoacids from the N-terminus and 451 aminoacids from the C-terminus were removed (LdDeltaNDeltaC), the enzyme was no longer active. Moreover, the removal of 429 aminoacids from the N-terminus (LdDeltaNDeltaC, core and LdDeltaN429) render the mutant proteins incapable of performing ATP hydrolysis. The mutant proteins show cleavage activities at wide range of KCl concentrations (25-350 mM). In addition, the mutant proteins, excepting LdDeltaNDeltaC, can also act on kDNA and linearize the minicircles. Surprisingly, the mutant proteins fail to show the formation of the enhanced cleavable complex in the presence of etoposide. Our findings suggest that the conformation required for interaction with the drug is absent in the mutant proteins. Here, we have also identified Tyr(775) through direct sequencing of the DNA linked peptide as the catalytic residue implicated in DNA-breakage and rejoining. Taken together, our results demonstrate that topoisomerase II are functionally and mechanistically conserved enzymes and the variations in activity seem to reflect functional optimization for its physiological role during parasite genome replication.

  7. Characterization of the DNA-binding domain and identification of the active site residue in the ‘Gyr A’ half of Leishmania donovani topoisomerase II

    PubMed Central

    Sengupta, Tanushri; Mukherjee, Mandira; Das, Rakhee; Das, Aditi; Majumder, Hemanta K.

    2005-01-01

    DNA topoisomerase II is a multidomain homodimeric enzyme that changes DNA topology by coupling ATP hydrolysis to the transport of one DNA helix through a transient double-stranded break in another. To investigate the biochemical properties of the individual domains of Leishmania donovani topoisomerase II, four truncation mutants were generated. Deletion of 178 aminoacids from the C-terminus (core and LdΔC1058) had no apparent effect on the DNA-binding or cleavage activities of the enzymes. However, when 429 aminoacids from the N-terminus and 451 aminoacids from the C-terminus were removed (LdΔNΔC), the enzyme was no longer active. Moreover, the removal of 429 aminoacids from the N-terminus (LdΔNΔC, core and LdΔN429) render the mutant proteins incapable of performing ATP hydrolysis. The mutant proteins show cleavage activities at wide range of KCl concentrations (25–350 mM). In addition, the mutant proteins, excepting LdΔNΔC, can also act on kDNA and linearize the minicircles. Surprisingly, the mutant proteins fail to show the formation of the enhanced cleavable complex in the presence of etoposide. Our findings suggest that the conformation required for interaction with the drug is absent in the mutant proteins. Here, we have also identified Tyr775 through direct sequencing of the DNA linked peptide as the catalytic residue implicated in DNA-breakage and rejoining. Taken together, our results demonstrate that topoisomerase II are functionally and mechanistically conserved enzymes and the variations in activity seem to reflect functional optimization for its physiological role during parasite genome replication. PMID:15860773

  8. Distinctive features of Egr transcription factor regulation and DNA binding activity in CA1 of the hippocampus in synaptic plasticity and consolidation and reconsolidation of fear memory.

    PubMed

    Cheval, Hélène; Chagneau, Carine; Levasseur, Grégoire; Veyrac, Alexandra; Faucon-Biguet, Nicole; Laroche, Serge; Davis, Sabrina

    2012-03-01

    Activity-dependent regulation of Egr1/Zif268, a transcription factor (TF) of the Egr family, is essential for stabilization of dentate gyrus synaptic plasticity and consolidation and reconsolidation of several forms of memory. The gene can be rapidly induced in selective brain circuits after certain types of learning or after recall. Here, we focused on area CA1 and examined regulation of Egr1, Egr2, and Egr3 mRNA and protein, and their DNA binding activity to the Egr response element (ERE) at different times after LTP in vivo and after learning and recall of a fear memory. We found LTP in CA1 leads to rapid induction of the three Egrs, however only Egr1 protein was overexpressed without a co-ordinated change in binding activity, indicating a fundamental difference between CA1 and dentate gyrus LTP. Our investigations in fear memory reveal that both learning and retrieval lead to an increase in binding of constitutively expressed Egr1 and Egr3 to the ERE, but not Egr2. Memory recall was also associated with increased Egr1 protein translation. The nature and temporal dynamics of these changes and tests for interactions between TFs suggest that in addition to ERE-mediated transcription, Egr1 in CA1 may interact with the TF c-Fos to regulate genes via other DNA response elements.

  9. Synthesis and Evaluation of In Vitro DNA/Protein Binding Affinity, Antimicrobial, Antioxidant and Antitumor Activity of Mononuclear Ru(II) Mixed Polypyridyl Complexes.

    PubMed

    Putta, Venkat Reddy; Chintakuntla, Nagamani; Mallepally, Rajender Reddy; Avudoddi, Srishailam; K, Nagasuryaprasad; Nancherla, Deepika; V V N, Yaswanth; R S, Prakasham; Surya, Satyanarayana Singh; Sirasani, Satyanarayana

    2016-01-01

    The four novel Ru(II) complexes [Ru(phen)2MAFIP](2+) (1) [MAFIP = 2-(5-(methylacetate)furan-2-yl)-1 H-imidazo[4,5-f] [1, 10]phenanthroline, phen = 1,10-Phenanthroline], [Ru(bpy)2MAFIP](2+) (2) (bpy = 2,2'-bipyridine) and [Ru(dmb)2MAFIP](2+) (3) (dmb = 4,4'-dimethyl-2,2'-bipyridine) and [Ru(hdpa)2MAFIP](2+) (4) (hdpa = 2,2-dipyridylamine) have been synthesized and fully characterized via elemental analysis, NMR spectroscopy, EI-MS and FT-IR spectroscopy. In addition, the DNA-binding behaviors of the complexes 1-4 with calf thymus DNA were investigated by UV-Vis absorption, fluorescence studies and viscosity measurement. The DNA-binding experiments showed that the complexes 1-4 interact with CT-DNA through an intercalative mode. BSA protein binding affinity of synthesized complexes was determined by UV/Vis absorption and fluorescence emission titrations. The binding affinity of ruthenium complexes was supported by molecular docking. The photoactivated cleavage of plasmid pBR322 DNA by ruthenium complexes 1-4 was investigated. All the synthesized compounds were tested for antimicrobial activity by using three Gram-negative (Escherichia coli, Salmonella typhi and Pseudomonas aeruginosa) and three Gram-positive (Micrococcus luteus, Bacillus subtilis and Bacillus megaterium) organisms, these results indicated that complex 3 was more activity compared to other complexes against all tested microbial strains while moderate antimicrobial activity profile was noticed for complex 4. The antioxidant activity experiments show that the complexes exhibit moderate antioxidant activity. The cytotoxicity of synthesized complexes on HeLa cell lines has been examined by MTT assay. The apoptosis assay was carried out with Acridine Orange (AO) staining methods and the results indicate that complexes can induce the apoptosis of HeLa cells. The cell cycle arrest investigated by flow cytometry and these results indicate that complexes 1-4 induce the cell cycle arrest at G0/G1

  10. DNA binding, photoactivated DNA cleavage and cytotoxic activity of Cu(II) and Co(II) based Schiff-base azo photosensitizers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pradeepa, S. M.; Bhojya Naik, H. S.; Vinay Kumar, B.; Indira Priyadarsini, K.; Barik, Atanu; Prabhakara, M. C.

    2015-04-01

    A new class of Cu(II) and Co(II) complexes of azo-containing Schiff base of the type [Cu(L1)2] and [Co(L1)2], where L1 = 4-[(E)-{2-hydroxy-3-[(E)-(4-bromophenyl)diazenyl]benzylidene}amino]benzoic acid have been synthesized and characterized. Extension of conjugation and the presence of free carboxylic acid group of the ligand L1 increased the wavelength of the complexes from visible region to the near IR region (620-850 nm). The Cu(II) and Co(II) complexes interacted with CT-DNA via intercalative mode with the respective Kb value of 3.2 × 104 M-1 and 2.9 × 104 M-1 and acted as proficient photocleavers of SC pUC19 DNA in UV-A light, forming 1O2 as the reactive oxygen species with the quantum yield of 0.38 and 0.36, respectively. Furthermore, the Cu(II) and Co(II) complexes showed photocytotoxicity toward two selected tumor cell lines MCF-7 and A549 by 3-(4,5-Dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2,5-diphenyltetrazoliumbromide (MTT) method, and the Cu(II) complex exhibits higher photocytotoxicity than Co(II) complex against each of the selected cell lines, this result is identical with their DNA binding ability order.

  11. DNA binding, photoactivated DNA cleavage and cytotoxic activity of Cu(II) and Co(II) based Schiff-base azo photosensitizers.

    PubMed

    Pradeepa, S M; Bhojya Naik, H S; Vinay Kumar, B; Indira Priyadarsini, K; Barik, Atanu; Prabhakara, M C

    2015-04-15

    A new class of Cu(II) and Co(II) complexes of azo-containing Schiff base of the type [Cu(L1)2] and [Co(L1)2], where L1=4-[(E)-{2-hydroxy-3-[(E)-(4-bromophenyl)diazenyl]benzylidene}amino]benzoic acid have been synthesized and characterized. Extension of conjugation and the presence of free carboxylic acid group of the ligand L1 increased the wavelength of the complexes from visible region to the near IR region (620-850 nm). The Cu(II) and Co(II) complexes interacted with CT-DNA via intercalative mode with the respective Kb value of 3.2×10(4) M(-1) and 2.9×10(4) M(-1) and acted as proficient photocleavers of SC pUC19 DNA in UV-A light, forming (1)O2 as the reactive oxygen species with the quantum yield of 0.38 and 0.36, respectively. Furthermore, the Cu(II) and Co(II) complexes showed photocytotoxicity toward two selected tumor cell lines MCF-7 and A549 by 3-(4,5-Dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2,5-diphenyltetrazoliumbromide (MTT) method, and the Cu(II) complex exhibits higher photocytotoxicity than Co(II) complex against each of the selected cell lines, this result is identical with their DNA binding ability order.

  12. The T4 phage DNA mimic protein Arn inhibits the DNA binding activity of the bacterial histone-like protein H-NS.

    PubMed

    Ho, Chun-Han; Wang, Hao-Ching; Ko, Tzu-Ping; Chang, Yuan-Chih; Wang, Andrew H-J

    2014-09-26

    The T4 phage protein Arn (Anti restriction nuclease) was identified as an inhibitor of the restriction enzyme McrBC. However, until now its molecular mechanism remained unclear. In the present study we used structural approaches to investigate biological properties of Arn. A structural analysis of Arn revealed that its shape and negative charge distribution are similar to dsDNA, suggesting that this protein could act as a DNA mimic. In a subsequent proteomic analysis, we found that the bacterial histone-like protein H-NS interacts with Arn, implying a new function. An electrophoretic mobility shift assay showed that Arn prevents H-NS from binding to the Escherichia coli hns and T4 p8.1 promoters. In vitro gene expression and electron microscopy analyses also indicated that Arn counteracts the gene-silencing effect of H-NS on a reporter gene. Because McrBC and H-NS both participate in the host defense system, our findings suggest that T4 Arn might knock down these mechanisms using its DNA mimicking properties.

  13. Characterization of the DNA-binding activity of GCR1: in vivo evidence for two GCR1-binding sites in the upstream activating sequence of TPI of Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed Central

    Huie, M A; Scott, E W; Drazinic, C M; Lopez, M C; Hornstra, I K; Yang, T P; Baker, H V

    1992-01-01

    GCR1 gene function is required for high-level glycolytic gene expression in Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Recently, we suggested that the CTTCC sequence motif found in front of many genes encoding glycolytic enzymes lay at the core of the GCR1-binding site. Here we mapped the DNA-binding domain of GCR1 to the carboxy-terminal 154 amino acids of the polypeptide. DNase I protection studies showed that a hybrid MBP-GCR1 fusion protein protected a region of the upstream activating sequence of TPI (UASTPI), which harbored the CTTCC sequence motif, and suggested that the fusion protein might also interact with a region of the UAS that contained the related sequence CATCC. A series of in vivo G methylation protection experiments of the native TPI promoter were carried out with wild-type and gcr1 deletion mutant strains. The G doublets that correspond to the C doublets in each site were protected in the wild-type strain but not in the gcr1 mutant strain. These data demonstrate that the UAS of TPI contains two GCR1-binding sites which are occupied in vivo. Furthermore, adjacent RAP1/GRF1/TUF- and REB1/GRF2/QBP/Y-binding sites in UASTPI were occupied in the backgrounds of both strains. In addition, DNA band-shift assays were used to show that the MBP-GCR1 fusion protein was able to form nucleoprotein complexes with oligonucleotides that contained CTTCC sequence elements found in front of other glycolytic genes, namely, PGK, ENO1, PYK, and ADH1, all of which are dependent on GCR1 gene function for full expression. However, we were unable to detect specific interactions with CTTCC sequence elements found in front of the translational component genes TEF1, TEF2, and CRY1. Taken together, these experiments have allowed us to propose a consensus GCR1-binding site which is 5'-(T/A)N(T/C)N(G/A)NC(T/A)TCC(T/A)N(T/A)(T/A)(T/G)-3'. Images PMID:1588965

  14. The Methanosarcina acetivorans thioredoxin system activates DNA binding of the redox-sensitive transcriptional regulator MsvR

    PubMed Central

    Sheehan, Ryan; McCarver, Addison C.; Isom, Catherine E.; Karr, Elizabeth A.; Lessner, Daniel J.

    2015-01-01

    The production of biogas (methane) by anaerobic digestion is an important facet to renewable energy, but is subject to instability due to the sensitivity of strictly anaerobic methanogenic archaea (methanogens) to environmental perturbations, such as oxygen. An understanding of the oxidant-sensing mechanisms used by methanogens may lead to the development of more oxidant tolerant (i.e. stable) methanogen strains. MsvR is a redox-sensitive transcriptional regulator that is found exclusively in methanogens. We show here that oxidation of MsvR from Methanosarcina acetivorans (MaMsvR) with hydrogen peroxide oxidizes cysteine thiols, which inactivates MaMsvR binding to its own promoter (PmsvR). Incubation of oxidized MaMsvR with the M. acetivorans thioredoxin system (NADPH, MaTrxR, and MaTrx7) results in reduction of the cysteines back to thiols and activation of PmsvR binding. These data confirm that cysteines are critical for the thiol-disulfide regulation of PmsvR binding by MaMsvR and support a role for the M. acetivorans thioredoxin system in the in vivo activation of MaMsvR. The results support the feasibility of using MaMsvR and PmsvR, along with the Methanosarcina genetic system, to design methanogen strains with oxidant-regulated gene expression systems, which may aid in stabilizing anaerobic digestion. PMID:25791378

  15. Importance of DNA stiffness in protein-DNA binding specificity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hogan, M. E.; Austin, R. H.

    1987-09-01

    From the first high-resolution structure of a repressor bound specifically to its DNA recognition sequence1 it has been shown that the phage 434 repressor protein binds as a dimer to the helix. Tight, local interactions are made at the ends of the binding site, causing the central four base pairs (bp) to become bent and overtwisted. The centre of the operator is not in contact with protein but repressor binding affinity can be reduced at least 50-fold in response to a sequence change there2. This observation might be explained should the structure of the intervening DNA segment vary with its sequence, or if DNA at the centre of the operator resists the torsional and bending deformation necessary for complex formation in a sequence dependent fashion. We have considered the second hypothesis by demonstrating that DNA stiffness is sequence dependent. A method is formulated for calculating the stiffness of any particular DNA sequence, and we show that this predicted relationship between sequence and stiffness can explain the repressor binding data in a quantitative manner. We propose that the elastic properties of DNA may be of general importance to an understanding of protein-DNA binding specificity.

  16. OVEREXPRESSION OF ANTIOXIDANT ENZYMES UPREGULATES ARYL HYDROCARBON RECEPTOR EXPRESSION VIA INCREASED SP1 DNA-BINDING ACTIVITY

    PubMed Central

    Tang, Tian; Lin, Xinghua; Yang, Hong; Zhou, LiChun; Wang, Zefen; Shan, Guang; Guo, ZhongMao

    2010-01-01

    We previously reported up-regulation of aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AhR) expression as a mechanism by which overexpression of Cu/Zn-superoxide dismutase (SOD) and/or catalase accelerates benzo(a)pyrene (BaP) detoxification in mouse aorta endothelial cells (MAECs). The objective of this study was to investigate the regulatory role of specificity protein-1 (Sp1) in AhR expression in MAECs that overexpress Cu/Zn-SOD and/or catalase. Our data demonstrated comparable levels of nuclear Sp1 protein in the transgenic and wild-type MAECs; however, binding of Sp1 protein to the AhR promoter region was more than 2-fold higher in MAECs overexpressing Cu/Zn-SOD and/or catalase than in wild-type cells. Inhibition of Sp1 binding to the AhR promoter by mithramycin A reduced AhR expression and eliminated the differences between wild-type MAECs, and three lines of transgenic cells. Functional promoter analysis indicated that AhR promoter activity was significantly higher in MAECs overexpressing catalase than in wild-type cells. Mutation of an AhR promoter Sp1-binding site or addition of hydrogen peroxide to the culture medium reduced AhR promoter activity, and decreased the differences between wild-type MAECs and transgenic cells overexpressing catalase. These results suggest that increased Sp1 binding to the AhR promoter region is an underlying mechanism for up-regulation of AhR expression in MAECs that overexpress Cu/Zn-SOD and/or catalase. PMID:20478378

  17. HTLV-1 Tax Protein Stimulation of DNA Binding of bZIP Proteins by Enhancing Dimerization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wagner, Susanne; Green, Michael R.

    1993-10-01

    The Tax protein of human T cell leukemia virus type-1 (HTLV-I) transcriptionally activates the HTLV-I promoter. This activation requires binding sites for activating transcription factor (ATF) proteins, a family of cellular proteins that contain basic region-leucine zipper (bZIP) DNA binding domains. Data are presented showing that Tax increases the in vitro DNA binding activity of multiple ATF proteins. Tax also stimulated DNA binding by other bZIP proteins, but did not affect DNA binding proteins that lack a bZIP domain. The increase in DNA binding occurred because Tax promotes dimerization of the bZIP domain in the absence of DNA, and the elevated concentration of the bZIP homodimer then facilitates the DNA binding reaction. These results help explain how Tax activates viral transcription and transforms cells.

  18. Structural basis for DNA binding by replication initiator Mcm10

    SciTech Connect

    Warren, Eric M.; Vaithiyalingam, Sivaraja; Haworth, Justin; Greer, Briana; Bielinsky, Anja-Katrin; Chazin, Walter J.; Eichman, Brandt F.

    2009-06-30

    Mcm10 is an essential eukaryotic DNA replication protein required for assembly and progression of the replication fork. The highly conserved internal domain (Mcm10-ID) has been shown to physically interact with single-stranded (ss) DNA, DNA polymerase alpha, and proliferating cell nuclear antigen (PCNA). The crystal structure of Xenopus laevis Mcm10-ID presented here reveals a DNA binding architecture composed of an oligonucleotide/oligosaccharide-fold followed in tandem by a variant and highly basic zinc finger. NMR chemical shift perturbation and mutational studies of DNA binding activity in vitro reveal how Mcm10 uses this unique surface to engage ssDNA. Corresponding mutations in Saccharomyces cerevisiae result in increased sensitivity to replication stress, demonstrating the functional importance of DNA binding by this region of Mcm10 to replication. In addition, mapping Mcm10 mutations known to disrupt PCNA, polymerase alpha, and DNA interactions onto the crystal structure provides insight into how Mcm10 might coordinate protein and DNA binding within the replisome.

  19. Structures of apo IRF-3 and IRF-7 DNA binding domains: effect of loop L1 on DNA binding

    SciTech Connect

    De Ioannes, Pablo; Escalante, Carlos R.; Aggarwal, Aneel K.

    2013-11-20

    Interferon regulatory factors IRF-3 and IRF-7 are transcription factors essential in the activation of interferon-{beta} (IFN-{beta}) gene in response to viral infections. Although, both proteins recognize the same consensus IRF binding site AANNGAAA, they have distinct DNA binding preferences for sites in vivo. The X-ray structures of IRF-3 and IRF-7 DNA binding domains (DBDs) bound to IFN-{beta} promoter elements revealed flexibility in the loops (L1-L3) and the residues that make contacts with the target sequence. To characterize the conformational changes that occur on DNA binding and how they differ between IRF family members, we have solved the X-ray structures of IRF-3 and IRF-7 DBDs in the absence of DNA. We found that loop L1, carrying the conserved histidine that interacts with the DNA minor groove, is disordered in apo IRF-3 but is ordered in apo IRF-7. This is reflected in differences in DNA binding affinities when the conserved histidine in loop L1 is mutated to alanine in the two proteins. The stability of loop L1 in IRF-7 derives from a unique combination of hydrophobic residues that pack against the protein core. Together, our data show that differences in flexibility of loop L1 are an important determinant of differential IRF-DNA binding.

  20. In Vitro DNA-Binding, Anti-Oxidant and Anticancer Activity of Indole-2-Carboxylic Acid Dinuclear Copper(II) Complexes.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xiangcong; Yan, Maocai; Wang, Qibao; Wang, Huannan; Wang, Zhengyang; Zhao, Jiayi; Li, Jing; Zhang, Zhen

    2017-01-20

    Indole-2-carboxylic acid copper complex (ICA-Cu) was successfully prepared and characterized through elemental analysis, IR, UV-Vis, ¹H-NMR, TG analysis, and molar conductance, and its molecular formula was [Cu₂(C₉H₆O₂N)₄(H₂O)₂]·2H₂O. The binding ability of ICA-Cu to calf thymus DNA (CT-DNA) was examined by fluorescence spectrometry and the viscosity method. The results indicated that, upon the addition of increasing amounts of CT-DNA, the excitation and emission intensity of ICA-Cu decreased obviously and the excitation spectra shifted towards a long wavelength. ICA-Cu could displace ethidium bromide (EB) from the EB-DNA system, making the fluorescence intensity of the EB-DNA system decrease sharply; the quenching constant KSV value was 3.99 × 10⁴ M(-1). The emission intensity of the ICA-Cu-DNA system was nearly constant, along with the addition of Na⁺ in a series of concentrations. The fluorescence of the complex could be protected after the complex interacted with DNA. A viscosity measurement further supported the result that the ICA-Cu complex may interact with DNA in an intercalative binding mode. The antioxidant activities of ICA-Cu were evaluated by a 2,2-diphenyl-1-picrylhydrazyl (DPPH) assay, a hydroxyl radical (OH) scavenging assay, and a 2,2'-azino-bis(3-ethylbenzothiazoline-6-sulphonic acid (ABTS) assay. The ICA-Cu exhibited the highest inhibitory effects on the ABTS radical (94% inhibition at 60 µM), followed by OH and DPPH radicals (the degrees of inhibition being 71% and 56%, respectively). The in vitro cytotoxicity activity of ICA-Cu against two human breast cancer cell lines, MDA-MB-231 and MCF-7, was investigated by 3-[4,5-dimethyltiazol2-yl]-2.5-diphenyl-tetrazolium bromide (MTT) assay and cellular morphological analysis. The results showed that, upon increasing the concentration of ICA-Cu, an increase was observed in growth-inhibitory activity and the inhibition percentage were greater than 90% at 20 µM in both cell

  1. Crystal structures, DNA-binding and cytotoxic activities studies of Cu(II) complexes with 2-oxo-quinoline-3-carbaldehyde Schiff-bases.

    PubMed

    Liu, Zeng-Chen; Wang, Bao-Dui; Li, Bo; Wang, Qin; Yang, Zheng-Yin; Li, Tian-Rong; Li, Yong

    2010-11-01

    Three novel 2-oxo-quinoline-3-carbaldehyde Schiff-bases and their Cu(II) complexes were synthesized. The molecular structures of Cu(II) complexes were determined by X-ray crystal diffraction. The DNA-binding modes of the complexes were also investigated by UV-vis absorption spectrum, fluorescence spectrum, viscosity measurement and EB-DNA displacement experiment. The experimental evidences indicated that the ligands and Cu(II) complexes could interact with CT-DNA (calf-thymus DNA) through intercalation, respectively. Comparative cytotoxic activities of ligands and Cu(II) complexes were also determined by MTT [3-(4,5-dimethyl-2-thiazoyl)-2,5-diphenyl-2H-tetrazolium bromide] and SRB (sulforhodamine B) methods. The results showed that the three Cu(II) complexes exhibited more effective cytotoxic activity against HL60 cells and HeLa cells than corresponding ligands. Also, CuL(3) showed higher cytotoxic activity than CuL(1) and CuL(2).

  2. Variola type IB DNA topoisomerase: DNA binding and supercoil unwinding using engineered DNA minicircles.

    PubMed

    Anderson, Breeana G; Stivers, James T

    2014-07-08

    Type IB topoisomerases unwind positive and negative DNA supercoils and play a key role in removing supercoils that would otherwise accumulate at replication and transcription forks. An interesting question is whether topoisomerase activity is regulated by the topological state of the DNA, thereby providing a mechanism for targeting the enzyme to highly supercoiled DNA domains in genomes. The type IB enzyme from variola virus (vTopo) has proven to be useful in addressing mechanistic questions about topoisomerase function because it forms a reversible 3'-phosphotyrosyl adduct with the DNA backbone at a specific target sequence (5'-CCCTT-3') from which DNA unwinding can proceed. We have synthesized supercoiled DNA minicircles (MCs) containing a single vTopo target site that provides highly defined substrates for exploring the effects of supercoil density on DNA binding, strand cleavage and ligation, and unwinding. We observed no topological dependence for binding of vTopo to these supercoiled MC DNAs, indicating that affinity-based targeting to supercoiled DNA regions by vTopo is unlikely. Similarly, the cleavage and religation rates of the MCs were not topologically dependent, but topoisomers with low superhelical densities were found to unwind more slowly than highly supercoiled topoisomers, suggesting that reduced torque at low superhelical densities leads to an increased number of cycles of cleavage and ligation before a successful unwinding event. The K271E charge reversal mutant has an impaired interaction with the rotating DNA segment that leads to an increase in the number of supercoils that were unwound per cleavage event. This result provides evidence that interactions of the enzyme with the rotating DNA segment can restrict the number of supercoils that are unwound. We infer that both superhelical density and transient contacts between vTopo and the rotating DNA determine the efficiency of supercoil unwinding. Such determinants are likely to be important in

  3. DNA-Binding Proteins Essential for Protein-Primed Bacteriophage Φ29 DNA Replication

    PubMed Central

    Salas, Margarita; Holguera, Isabel; Redrejo-Rodríguez, Modesto; de Vega, Miguel

    2016-01-01

    Bacillus subtilis phage Φ29 has a linear, double-stranded DNA 19 kb long with an inverted terminal repeat of 6 nucleotides and a protein covalently linked to the 5′ ends of the DNA. This protein, called terminal protein (TP), is the primer for the initiation of replication, a reaction catalyzed by the viral DNA polymerase at the two DNA ends. The DNA polymerase further elongates the nascent DNA chain in a processive manner, coupling strand displacement with elongation. The viral protein p5 is a single-stranded DNA binding protein (SSB) that binds to the single strands generated by strand displacement during the elongation process. Viral protein p6 is a double-stranded DNA binding protein (DBP) that preferentially binds to the origins of replication at the Φ29 DNA ends and is required for the initiation of replication. Both SSB and DBP are essential for Φ29 DNA amplification. This review focuses on the role of these phage DNA-binding proteins in Φ29 DNA replication both in vitro and in vivo, as well as on the implication of several B. subtilis DNA-binding proteins in different processes of the viral cycle. We will revise the enzymatic activities of the Φ29 DNA polymerase: TP-deoxynucleotidylation, processive DNA polymerization coupled to strand displacement, 3′–5′ exonucleolysis and pyrophosphorolysis. The resolution of the Φ29 DNA polymerase structure has shed light on the translocation mechanism and the determinants responsible for processivity and strand displacement. These two properties have made Φ29 DNA polymerase one of the main enzymes used in the current DNA amplification technologies. The determination of the structure of Φ29 TP revealed the existence of three domains: the priming domain, where the primer residue Ser232, as well as Phe230, involved in the determination of the initiating nucleotide, are located, the intermediate domain, involved in DNA polymerase binding, and the N-terminal domain, responsible for DNA binding and

  4. DNA binding and transcriptional regulatory activity of mammalian achaete-scute homologous (MASH) proteins revealed by interaction with a muscle-specific enhancer.

    PubMed

    Johnson, J E; Birren, S J; Saito, T; Anderson, D J

    1992-04-15

    The MASH genes are vertebrate homologues of achaete-scute, genes required for neuronal determination in Drosophila. The sequence of MASH1 and MASH2 contains a basic helix-loop-helix (bHLH) motif that is present in other transcriptional regulators such as MyoD and E12. In the absence of an authentic target for the MASH proteins, we examined their DNA binding and transcriptional regulatory activity by using a binding site (the E box) from the muscle creatine kinase (MCK) gene, a target of MyoD. Like myogenic bHLH proteins, the MASH proteins form heterooligomers with E12 that bind the MCK E box with high affinity in vitro. Unexpectedly, however, MASH1 and MASH2 also activate transcription of both exogenous and endogenous MCK in transfected C3H/10T1/2 fibroblasts. However, they do not induce myogenesis. Myogenic activity is not exclusively a property of the MyoD basic region, as substitution of this domain fails to confer myogenic activity on MASH1. These data suggest that different bHLH proteins may activate overlapping but distinct sets of target genes in the same cell type.

  5. hsDNA groove binding, photocatalytic activity, and in vitro breast and colon cancer cell reducing function of greener SeNPs.

    PubMed

    Pansare, Amol V; Kulal, Dnyaneshwar K; Shedge, Amol A; Patil, Vishwanath R

    2016-07-26

    Selenium nanoparticles (SeNPs) have attracted great attention because of their superior optical properties and wide utilization in biological and biomedical studies. This paper reports an environmentally benign procedure of greener monodispersible SeNP synthesis using the reducing power of Trigonella foenum-graecum extract, characterization and their protective effect against unfolded (Herring sperm DNA) hsDNA. We investigated the anti-cancer activity of SeNPs against MCF-7, MDA MB 435 and COLO-205 cells. The photocatalytic activity of SeNPs was investigated for the degradation of a Sunset Yellow FCF (SYFCF) dye using ultraviolet-B light. The reduction of the Se ion to SeNPs was monitored by ultraviolet-visible spectroscopy (UV-vis). The size and morphology of the SeNPs were characterized by high resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM), X-ray diffraction (XRD), and Dynamic Light Scattering (DLS). The SeNPs were stable, and the diameter was homogeneous at around 5-12 nm. Interactions of various concentrations of SeNPs with hsDNA were systematically investigated by UV-vis, fluorescence, circular dichroism (CD), polarimetry and FTIR spectroscopy under physiological conditions. The results from fluorescence spectroscopy indicated that SeNPs quenched the fluorescence intensity of hsDNA with increasing concentrations. The modified Stern-Volmer quenching rate constant Ksv, binding constant K and binding sites n at different temperatures and the corresponding thermodynamic parameters ΔH°, ΔG° and ΔS° were calculated. Hoechst 33258 and methyl green (MG) site markers, melting experiment (Tm), viscosity measurements and sequence specificity verification by DNA bases clarified that SeNPs bind to hsDNA via a groove site. The rate of photocatalytic degradation of the SYFCF dye in the presence and absence of photocatalysts (SeNPs) was studied using UV-vis, the results showed appreciable degradation of the SYFCF dye. Our results suggested that nano Se can be used

  6. The effect of 17beta-estradiol on IL-6 secretion and NF-kappaB DNA-binding activity in human retinal pigment epithelial cells.

    PubMed

    Paimela, Tuomas; Ryhänen, Tuomas; Mannermaa, Eliisa; Ojala, Johanna; Kalesnykas, Giedrius; Salminen, Antero; Kaarniranta, Kai

    2007-06-15

    Toll-like receptors (TLRs) and inflammatory cascades participate in the pathology of age-related macular degeneration (AMD). The effect of estrogens on the development of AMD is poorly understood, although many studies indicate that these compounds can modulate inflammatory responses. In this study, we investigated the regulatory role of TLR agonists and 17beta-estradiol (E(2)) on IL-6 expression and NF-kappaB DNA-binding activity in human retinal pigment epithelial cells (ARPE-19). The inflammatory response of ARPE-19 cells to various TLR agonists, e.g. Pam, zymosan, flagellin, SLTA and lipopolysaccharide (LPS) exposures were examined via the secretion of IL-6 cytokine as analyzed by ELISA. In addition, the IL-6 responses to the estrogen-receptor agonist, E(2), and to the estrogen-receptor antagonist ICI 182.780 as well as to the NF-kappaB inhibitor helenalin were compared. The DNA-binding activity of NF-kappaB transcription factor of nuclear cell extracts was analyzed by the gel mobility shift assay (EMSA). TLR4 gene expression was studied by quantitave PCR. The TLR4 agonist, LPS, caused a clear IL-6 response that was attenuated by E(2) in ARPE-19-cells. The anti-inflammatory properties of E(2) were mediated through estrogen receptors and were associated with decreased NF-kappaB DNA-binding activity. The level of TLR4 gene expression was not affected by LPS exposure. Our results indicate that IL-6 expression is regulated through NF-kappaB transcription factor and stereoid-receptor signalling pathways in ARPE-19 cells.

  7. Expression and DNA-binding activity of MYCN/Max and Mnt/Max during induced differentiation of human neuroblastoma cells.

    PubMed

    Smith, Anna Grynfeld; Popov, Nikita; Imreh, Martha; Axelson, Håkan; Henriksson, Marie

    2004-08-15

    Amplification of MYCN is one of the most important prognostic markers for neuroblastoma and is correlated with rapid tumor progression and poor prognosis. MYCN belongs to the Myc/Max/Mad/Mnt network of proteins that regulate proliferation, apoptosis, and differentiation. It is well established that MYCN is downregulated during induced differentiation of neuroblastoma cells carrying an amplified MYCN gene, but very little is known about other components of the network, i.e., the Max, Mad, and Mnt proteins, during this process. In this study we show that Mad and Mnt expression was only modestly regulated in differentiating SK-N-BE(2) neuroblastoma cells, while MYCN was rapidly downregulated. This downregulation was reflected in a decreased MYCN/Max DNA-binding activity while the Mnt/Max binding did not change during differentiation. In parallel experiments we also analyzed the Myc/Max/Mad expression and DNA binding capacity during induced differentiation in the MYCN single copy neuroblastoma cell line SH-SY5Y. In this cell line only modest changes in expression of the components of the MYCN/Max/Mad/Mnt network was detected, but since the cell line expresses relatively low levels of MYCN and c-Myc, these changes might be of functional significance. Cell cycle analyses of SK-N-BE(2) demonstrated an increase in the G1-phase fraction after RA-treatment. These data show that the decreased MYCN expression and MYCN DNA-binding is correlated with retarded cell cycle progression. Furthermore, when Mad1 or Mnt was overexpressed in SK-N-BE(2) cells they retained the capacity to differentiate, underscoring the notion that MYCN downregulation, and not changes in Mad/Mnt expression, is essential for neuroblastoma cell differentiation.

  8. Synergistic activation of transcription is mediated by the N-terminal domain of Drosophila fushi tarazu homeoprotein and can occur without DNA binding by the protein.

    PubMed Central

    Ananthan, J; Baler, R; Morrissey, D; Zuo, J; Lan, Y; Weir, M; Voellmy, R

    1993-01-01

    Synergistic activation of transcription by Drosophila segmentation genes in tissue culture cells provides a model with which to study combinatorial regulation. We examined the synergistic activation of an engrailed-derived promoter by the pair-rule proteins paired (PRD) and fushi tarazu (FTZ). Synergistic activation by PRD requires regions of the homeodomain or adjacent sequences, and that by FTZ requires the first 171 residues. Surprisingly, deletion of the FTZ homeodomain does not reduce the capacity of the protein for synergistic activation, although this mutation abolishes any detectable DNA-binding activity. This finding suggests that FTZ can function through protein-protein interactions with PRD or other components of the homeoprotein transcription complex, adding a new layer of mechanisms that could underlie the functional specificities and combinatorial regulation of homeoproteins. Images PMID:8095092

  9. Restoration of DNA-Binding and Growth-Suppressive Activity of Mutant Forms of p53 Via a PCAF-Mediated Acetylation Pathway

    PubMed Central

    PEREZ, RICARDO E.; KNIGHTS, CHAD D.; SAHU, GEETARAM; CATANIA, JASON; KOLUKULA, VAMSI K.; STOLER, DANIEL; GRAESSMANN, ADOLF; OGRYZKO, VASILY; PISHVAIAN, MICHAEL; ALBANESE, CHRISTOPHER; AVANTAGGIATI, MARIA LAURA

    2013-01-01

    Tumor-derived mutant forms of p53 compromise its DNA binding, transcriptional, and growth regulatory activity in a manner that is dependent upon the cell-type and the type of mutation. Given the high frequency of p53 mutations in human tumors, reactivation of the p53 pathway has been widely proposed as beneficial for cancer therapy. In support of this possibility p53 mutants possess a certain degree of conformational flexibility that allows for re-induction of function by a number of structurally different artificial compounds or by short peptides. This raises the question of whether physiological pathways for p53 mutant reactivation also exist and can be exploited therapeutically. The activity of wild-type p53 is modulated by various acetyl-transferases and deacetylases, but whether acetylation influences signaling by p53 mutant is still unknown. Here, we show that the PCAF acetyl-transferase is down-regulated in tumors harboring p53 mutants, where its re-expression leads to p53 acetylation and to cell death. Furthermore, acetylation restores the DNA-binding ability of p53 mutants in vitro and expression of PCAF, or treatment with deacetylase inhibitors, promotes their binding to p53-regulated promoters and transcriptional activity in vivo. These data suggest that PCAF-mediated acetylation rescues activity of at least a set of p53 mutations. Therefore, we propose that dis-regulation of PCAF activity is a pre-requisite for p53 mutant loss of function and for the oncogenic potential acquired by neoplastic cells expressing these proteins. Our findings offer a new rationale for therapeutic targeting of PCAF activity in tumors harboring oncogenic versions of p53. PMID:20589832

  10. DNA binding, DNA cleavage, and cytotoxicity studies of two new copper (II) complexes.

    PubMed

    Kashanian, Soheila; Khodaei, Mohammad Mehdi; Roshanfekr, Hamideh; Shahabadi, Nahid; Rezvani, Alireza; Mansouri, Ghobad

    2011-05-01

    The DNA binding behavior of [Cu(phen)(phen-dione)Cl]Cl (1) and [Cu(bpy)(phen-dione)Cl]Cl (2) was studied with a series of techniques including UV-vis absorption, circular dichroism spectroscopy, and viscometric methods. Cytotoxicity effect and DNA unwinding properties were also investigated. The results indicate that the Cu(II) complexes interact with calf-thymus DNA by both partially intercalative and hydrogen binding. These findings have been further substantiated by the determination of intrinsic binding constants spectrophotometrically, 12.5 × 10(5) and 5 × 10(5) for 1 and 2, respectively. Our findings suggest that the type of ligands and structure of complexes have marked effect on the binding affinity of complexes involving CT-DNA. Circular dichroism results show that complex 1 causes considerable increase in base stacking of DNA, whereas 2 decreases the base stacking, which is related to more extended aromatic area of 1,10-phenanthroline in 1 rather than bipyridine in 2. Slow decrease in DNA viscosity indicates partially intercalative binding in addition to hydrogen binding on the surface of DNA. The second binding mode was also confirmed by additional tests: interaction in denaturation condition and acidic pH. Also, these new complexes induced cleavage in pUC18 plasmid DNA as indicated in gel electrophoresis and showed excellent antitumor activity against K562 (human chronic myeloid leukemia) cells.

  11. In vitro DNA and BSA-binding, cell imaging and anticancer activity against human carcinoma cell lines of mixed ligand copper(II) complexes.

    PubMed

    Anjomshoa, Marzieh; Torkzadeh-Mahani, Masoud

    2015-01-01

    Binding studies of two water soluble copper(II) complexes of the type [Cu(phen-dion)(diimine)Cl]Cl, where phen-dione is 1,10-phenanthroline-5,6-dione and diimine is 1,10-phenanthroline (1) and 2,2'-bipyridine (2), with fish sperm DNA (FS-DNA) and bovine serum albumin (BSA) have been examined under physiological conditions by a series of experimental methods (UV-Vis absorption, fluorescence, viscosity, cyclic voltammetry (CV) and circular dichroism (CD) spectroscopic techniques). The experimental results indicate that the complexes interact with FS-DNA by electrostatic and partial insertion of pyridyl rings between the base stacks of double-stranded DNA. The complexes could quench the intrinsic fluorescence of BSA with the binding constants (Kbin) of 32×10(5) M(-1) (1) and 1.7×10(5) M(-1) (2) at 290 K. The quenching mechanism, thermodynamic parameters, the number of binding sites and the effect of the Cu(II) complexes on the secondary structure of BSA have been explored. The in vitro anticancer chemotherapeutic potential of two copper(II) complexes against the three human carcinoma cell lines (MCF-7, A-549, and HT-29) and one normal cell line (DPSC) were evaluated by MTT assay. The results of in vitro cytotoxicity indicate that the complex (1) has greater cytotoxicity activity against all of the cell lines, especially HT-29 with IC50 values of 1.8 μM. Based on the IC50 values, these complexes did not display an apparent cyto-selective profile, because it would appear that two complexes are toxic to all four model cell lines. The microscopic analyses of the cancer cells confirm results of cytotoxicity.

  12. The Tomato Nucleotide-binding Leucine-rich Repeat Immune Receptor I-2 Couples DNA-binding to Nucleotide-binding Domain Nucleotide Exchange*

    PubMed Central

    Fenyk, Stepan; Dixon, Christopher H.; Gittens, William H.; Townsend, Philip D.; Sharples, Gary J.; Pålsson, Lars-Olof; Takken, Frank L. W.; Cann, Martin J.

    2016-01-01

    Plant nucleotide-binding leucine-rich repeat (NLR) proteins enable plants to recognize and respond to pathogen attack. Previously, we demonstrated that the Rx1 NLR of potato is able to bind and bend DNA in vitro. DNA binding in situ requires its genuine activation following pathogen perception. However, it is unknown whether other NLR proteins are also able to bind DNA. Nor is it known how DNA binding relates to the ATPase activity intrinsic to NLR switch function required to immune activation. Here we investigate these issues using a recombinant protein corresponding to the N-terminal coiled-coil and nucleotide-binding domain regions of the I-2 NLR of tomato. Wild type I-2 protein bound nucleic acids with a preference of ssDNA ≈ dsDNA > ssRNA, which is distinct from Rx1. I-2 induced bending and melting of DNA. Notably, ATP enhanced DNA binding relative to ADP in the wild type protein, the null P-loop mutant K207R, and the autoactive mutant S233F. DNA binding was found to activate the intrinsic ATPase activity of I-2. Because DNA binding by I-2 was decreased in the presence of ADP when compared with ATP, a cyclic mechanism emerges; activated ATP-associated I-2 binds to DNA, which enhances ATP hydrolysis, releasing ADP-bound I-2 from the DNA. Thus DNA binding is a general property of at least a subset of NLR proteins, and NLR activation is directly linked to its activity at DNA. PMID:26601946

  13. Synthesis of new piperazine derived Cu(II)/Zn(II) metal complexes, their DNA binding studies, electrochemistry and anti-microbial activity: validation for specific recognition of Zn(II) complex to DNA helix by interaction with thymine base.

    PubMed

    Bhat, Irshad-Ul-Haq; Tabassum, Sartaj

    2009-06-01

    New 3,4:9,10-dibenzo-2,11-dihydroxy-1,12-bispiperazine-5,8-dioxododecane complexes [C(24)H(36)N(4)O(6)Cu] (1), [C(24)H(32)N(4)O(4)Zn] (2) have been synthesized and characterized by elemental analysis, IR, NMR, Mass, EPR, UV-vis spectroscopy and molar conductance measurements. The complexes are non-ionic in nature and possess octahedral geometry around Cu(2+), Zn(2+) central metal ions. The binding studies of 1 and 2 with calf thymus DNA (CT-DNA) were investigated by UV-vis, fluorescence, cyclic voltammetery and viscosity measurements. The calculated binding constant K(b) for 1 and 2 obtained from UV-vis absorption studies was 7.6x10(3)M(-1), 80.8x10(4)M(-1), respectively. The intrinsic binding constants were also estimated to be 7.0x10(4)M(-1) and 7.53x10(5)M(-1) for 1 and 2, respectively by using emission titrations. These experimental results suggest that complexes are groove binders and interact to CT-DNA with different affinities. Both the complexes in presence and absence of CT-DNA show quasireversible wave corresponding to Cu(II)/Cu(I) and Zn(II)/Zn(I) redox couple. The changes in E(1/2), DeltaE, I(pa)/I(pc) ascertain the interaction of 1 and 2 with CT-DNA. Further, decrease in viscosity of CT-DNA with increasing concentration of complexes was observed. In vitro, antimicrobial activity against fungi A. brassicicola, A. niger and bacteria E. coli, P. aeruginosa of complexes were carried out, which indicate that complex 2 is more active against both fungal and bacterial strains as shown by % inhibition data.

  14. Synthesis, Spectral Characterization, SEM, Antimicrobial, Antioxidative Activity Evaluation, DNA Binding and DNA Cleavage Investigation of Transition Metal(II) Complexes Derived from a tetradentate Schiff base bearing thiophene moiety.

    PubMed

    Abdel Aziz, Ayman A; Seda, Sabry H

    2017-03-01

    A novel series of Co(II), Ni(II), Cu(II) and Zn(II) mononuclear complexes have been synthesized involving a potentially tetradentate Schiff base ligand, which was obtained by condensation of 2-aminophenol with 2,5-thiophene-dicarboxaldehyde. The complexes were synthesized via reflux reaction of methanolic solution of the appropriate Schiff base ligand with one equivalent of corresponding metal acetate salt. Based on different techniques including micro analysis, FT-IR, NMR, UV-Vis, ESR, ESI-mass and conductivity measurements, four-coordinated geometry was assigned for all complexes. Spectroscopic data have shown that, the reported Schiff base coordinated to metal ions as a dibasic tetradentate ligand through the phenolic oxygen and the azomethine nitrogen. The antimicrobial activities of the parent ligand and its complexes were investigated by using the agar disk diffusion method. Antioxidation properties of the novel complexes were investigated and it was found that all the complexes have good radical scavenging properties. The binding of complexes to calf thymus DNA (CT-DNA) was investigated by absorption, emission and viscosity measurements. Binding studies have shown that all the complexes interacted with CT-DNA via intercalation mode and the binding affinity varies with relative order as Cu(II) complex > Co(II) complex > Zn(II) complex > Ni(II) complex. Furthermore, DNA cleavage properties of the metal complexes were also investigated. The results suggested the possible utilization of novel complexes for pharmaceutical applications.

  15. DNA Origami Seesaws as Comparative Binding Assay

    PubMed Central

    Nickels, Philipp C.; Høiberg, Hans C.; Simmel, Stephanie S.; Holzmeister, Phil; Tinnefeld, Philip

    2016-01-01

    Abstract The application of commonly used force spectroscopy in biological systems is often limited by the need for an invasive tether connecting the molecules of interest to a bead or cantilever tip. Here we present a DNA origami‐based prototype in a comparative binding assay. It has the advantage of in situ readout without any physical connection to the macroscopic world. The seesaw‐like structure has a lever that is able to move freely relative to its base. Binding partners on each side force the structure into discrete and distinguishable conformations. Model experiments with competing DNA hybridisation reactions yielded a drastic shift towards the conformation with the stronger binding interaction. With reference DNA duplexes of tuneable length on one side, this device can be used to measure ligand interactions in comparative assays. PMID:27038073

  16. Kaposi's Sarcoma-associated herpesvirus lytic switch protein stimulates DNA binding of RBP-Jk/CSL to activate the Notch pathway.

    PubMed

    Carroll, Kyla Driscoll; Bu, Wei; Palmeri, Diana; Spadavecchia, Sophia; Lynch, Stephen J; Marras, Salvatore A E; Tyagi, Sanjay; Lukac, David M

    2006-10-01

    Kaposi's sarcoma-associated herpesvirus (KSHV) lytic switch protein, Rta, is a ligand-independent inducer of the Notch signal transduction pathway, and KSHV cannot reactivate from latency in cells null for the Notch target protein RBP-Jk. Here we show that Rta promotes DNA binding of RBP-Jk, a mechanism that is fundamentally different from that established for the RBP-Jk-activating proteins, Notch intracellular domain (NICD) and Epstein-Barr virus EBNA2. Although constitutively active RBP-Jk and NICD do not transactivate KSHV promoters independently, cotransfection of an Rta mutant lacking its transactivation domain robustly restores transcriptional activation. Cooperation requires intact DNA binding sites for Rta and RBP-Jk and trimeric complex formation between the three molecules in vitro. In infected cells, RBP-Jk is virtually undetectable on a series of viral and cellular promoters during KSHV latency but is significantly enriched following Rta expression during viral reactivation. Accordingly, Rta, but not EBNA2 and NICD, reactivates the complete viral lytic cycle.

  17. Copper(I) and nickel(II) complexes with 1:1 vs. 1:2 coordination of ferrocenyl hydrazone ligands: do the geometry and composition of complexes affect DNA binding/cleavage, protein binding, antioxidant and cytotoxic activities?

    PubMed

    Krishnamoorthy, Paramasivam; Sathyadevi, Palanisamy; Butorac, Rachel R; Cowley, Alan H; Bhuvanesh, Nattamai S P; Dharmaraj, Nallasamy

    2012-04-21

    A new series of geometrically different complexes containing ferrocenyl hydrazone ligands were synthesised by reacting suitable precursor complex [MCl(2)(PPh(3))(2)] with the ligands HL(1) or HL(2) (where M = Cu(II) or Ni(II); HL(1) = [Cp(2)Fe(CH=N-NH-CO-C(6)H(5))] (1) and HL(2) = [Cp(2)Fe(CH=N-NH-CO-C(5)H(4)N)]) (2). The new complexes of the composition [Cu(L(1))(PPh(3))(2)], (3) [Cu(L(2))(PPh(3))(2)] (4), [Ni(L(1))(2)] (5) and [Ni(L(2))(2)] (6) were characterised by various spectral studies. Among them, complexes 3 and 5 characterised by single crystal X-ray diffraction showed a distorted tetrahedral structure for the former with 1:1 metal-ligand stoichiometry, but a distorted square planar geometry with 1:2 metal-ligand stoichiometry in the case of the latter. Systematic biological investigations like DNA binding, DNA cleavage, protein binding, free radical scavenging and cytotoxicity activities were carried out using all the synthesised compounds and the results obtained were explained on the basis of structure-activity relationships. The binding constant (K(b)) values of the synthesised compounds are found to be in the order of magnitude 10(3)-10(5) M(-1) and also they exhibit significant cleavage of supercoiled (SC) pUC19 DNA in the presence of H(2)O(2) as co-oxidant. The conformational changes of bovine serum albumin (BSA) upon binding with the above complexes were also studied. In addition, concentration dependent free radical scavenging potential of all the synthesised compounds (1-6) was also carried out under in vitro conditions. Assays on the cytotoxicity of the above complexes against HeLa and A431 tumor cells and NIH 3T3 normal cells were also carried out.

  18. Modulating DNA methylation in activated CD8+ T cells inhibits regulatory T cell-induced binding of Foxp3 to the CD8+ T Cell IL-2 promoter.

    PubMed

    Miller, Michelle M; Akaronu, Nnenna; Thompson, Elizabeth M; Hood, Sylvia F; Fogle, Jonathan E

    2015-02-01

    We have previously demonstrated that CD4(+)CD25(+) regulatory T cells (Tregs) activated during the course of feline immunodeficiency virus (FIV) infection suppress CD8(+) CTL function in a TGF-β-dependent fashion, inhibiting IFN-γ and IL-2 production and inducing G1 cell-cycle arrest. In this article, we describe the molecular events occurring at the IL-2 promoter leading to suppression of IL-2 production. These experiments demonstrate that Foxp3 induced by lentivirus-activated Tregs in the CD8(+) target cells binds to the IL-2 promoter, actively repressing IL-2 transcription. We further demonstrate that the chronic activation of CD8(+) T cells during FIV infection results in chromatin remodeling at the IL-2 promoter, specifically, demethylation of CpG residues. These DNA modifications occur during active transcription and translation of IL-2; however, these changes render the IL-2 promoter permissive to Foxp3-induced transcriptional repression. These data help explain, in part, the seemingly paradoxical observations that CD8(+) T cells displaying an activation phenotype exhibit altered antiviral function. Further, we demonstrate that blocking demethylation of CpG residues at the IL-2 promoter inhibits Foxp3 binding, suggesting a potential mechanism for rescue and/or reactivation of CD8(+) T cells. Using the FIV model for lentiviral persistence, these studies provide a framework for understanding how immune activation combined with Treg-mediated suppression may affect CD8(+) T cell IL-2 transcription, maturation, and antiviral function.

  19. Biophysical characterization of DNA binding from single molecule force measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chaurasiya, Kathy R.; Paramanathan, Thayaparan; McCauley, Micah J.; Williams, Mark C.

    2010-09-01

    Single molecule force spectroscopy is a powerful method that uses the mechanical properties of DNA to explore DNA interactions. Here we describe how DNA stretching experiments quantitatively characterize the DNA binding of small molecules and proteins. Small molecules exhibit diverse DNA binding modes, including binding into the major and minor grooves and intercalation between base pairs of double-stranded DNA (dsDNA). Histones bind and package dsDNA, while other nuclear proteins such as high mobility group proteins bind to the backbone and bend dsDNA. Single-stranded DNA (ssDNA) binding proteins slide along dsDNA to locate and stabilize ssDNA during replication. Other proteins exhibit binding to both dsDNA and ssDNA. Nucleic acid chaperone proteins can switch rapidly between dsDNA and ssDNA binding modes, while DNA polymerases bind both forms of DNA with high affinity at distinct binding sites at the replication fork. Single molecule force measurements quantitatively characterize these DNA binding mechanisms, elucidating small molecule interactions and protein function.

  20. Biophysical characterization of DNA binding from single molecule force measurements

    PubMed Central

    Chaurasiya, Kathy R.; Paramanathan, Thayaparan; McCauley, Micah J.; Williams, Mark C.

    2010-01-01

    Single molecule force spectroscopy is a powerful method that uses the mechanical properties of DNA to explore DNA interactions. Here we describe how DNA stretching experiments quantitatively characterize the DNA binding of small molecules and proteins. Small molecules exhibit diverse DNA binding modes, including binding into the major and minor grooves and intercalation between base pairs of double-stranded DNA (dsDNA). Histones bind and package dsDNA, while other nuclear proteins such as high mobility group proteins bind to the backbone and bend dsDNA. Single-stranded DNA (ssDNA) binding proteins slide along dsDNA to locate and stabilize ssDNA during replication. Other proteins exhibit binding to both dsDNA and ssDNA. Nucleic acid chaperone proteins can switch rapidly between dsDNA and ssDNA binding modes, while DNA polymerases bind both forms of DNA with high affinity at distinct binding sites at the replication fork. Single molecule force measurements quantitatively characterize these DNA binding mechanisms, elucidating small molecule interactions and protein function. PMID:20576476

  1. DNA binding and antigene activity of a daunomycin-conjugated triplex-forming oligonucleotide targeting the P2 promoter of the human c-myc gene

    PubMed Central

    Carbone, Giuseppina M.; McGuffie, Eileen; Napoli, Sara; Flanagan, Courtney E.; Dembech, Chiara; Negri, Umberto; Arcamone, Federico; Capobianco, Massimo L.; Catapano, Carlo V.

    2004-01-01

    Triplex-forming oligonucleotides (TFO) that bind DNA in a sequence-specific manner might be used as selective repressors of gene expression and gene-targeted therapeutics. However, many factors, including instability of triple helical complexes in cells, limit the efficacy of this approach. In the present study, we tested whether covalent linkage of a TFO to daunomycin, which is a potent DNA-intercalating agent and anticancer drug, could increase stability of the triple helix and activity of the oligonucleotide in cells. The 11mer daunomycin-conjugated GT (dauno-GT11) TFO targeted a sequence upstream of the P2 promoter, a site known to be critical for transcription of the c-myc gene. Band-shift assays showed that the dauno-GT11 formed triplex DNA with enhanced stability compared to the unmodified TFO. Band shift and footprinting experiments demonstrated that binding of dauno-GT11 was highly sequence-specific with exclusive binding to the 11 bp target site in the c-myc promoter. The daunomycin-conjugated TFO inhibited transcription in vitro and reduced c-myc promoter activity in prostate and breast cancer cells. The daunomycin-conjugated TFO was taken up by cells with a distinctive intracellular distribution compared to free daunomycin. However, cationic lipid-mediated delivery was required for enhanced cellular uptake, nuclear localization and biological activity of the TFO in cells. Dauno-GT11 reduced transcription of the endogenous c-myc gene in cells, but did not affect expression of non-target genes, such as ets-1 and ets-2, which contained very similar target sequences in their promoters. Daunomycin-conjugated control oligonucleotides unable to form triplex DNA with the target sequence did not have any effect in these assays, indicating that daunomycin was not directly responsible for the activity of daunomycin-conjugated TFO. Thus, attachment of daunomycin resulted in increased triplex stability and biological activity of the 11mer GT-rich TFO without

  2. Influence of terminal substitution on structural, DNA, protein binding, anticancer and antibacterial activities of palladium(II) complexes containing 3-methoxy salicylaldehyde-4(N) substituted thiosemicarbazones.

    PubMed

    Kalaivani, P; Prabhakaran, R; Ramachandran, E; Dallemer, F; Paramaguru, G; Renganathan, R; Poornima, P; Vijaya Padma, V; Natarajan, K

    2012-02-28

    The variable chelating behavior of 3-methoxysalicylaldehyde-4(N)-substituted thiosemicarbazones was observed in equimolar reactions with [PdCl(2)(PPh(3))(2)]. The new complexes were characterized by various analytical, spectroscopic techniques (mass, (1)H-NMR, absorption, IR). All the new complexes were structurally characterized by single crystal X-ray diffraction. Crystallographic results showed that the ligands H(2)L(1) and H(2)L(4) are coordinated as binegative tridentate ONS donor ligands in the complexes 1 and 4 by forming six and five member rings. However, the ligands H(2)L(2) and H(2)L(3) bound to palladium in 2 and 3 as uninegative bidentate NS donors by forming a five member chelate ring. From this study, it was found that the substitution on terminal 4(N)-nitrogen may have an influence on the chelating ability of thiosemicarbazone. The presence of hydrogen bonding in 2 and 3 might be responsible for preventing the coordination of phenolic oxygen to the metal ion. The interaction of the complexes with calf-thymus DNA (CT-DNA) has been explored by absorption and emission titration methods. Based on the observations, an electrostatic binding mode of DNA has been proposed. The protein binding studies were monitored by quenching of tryptophan and tyrosine residues in the presence of complexes using Lysozyme as model protein. Antibacterial activity studies of the complexes have been screened against pathogenic bacteria such as Enterococcus faecalis, Staphylococcus aureus, Escherichia coli, Klebsiella pneumonia and Pseudomonas aeruginosa. MIC50 values of the complexes showed that they exhibited significant activity against the pathogens and among them, 3 exhibited higher activity. Further, anticancer activity of the complexes on the lung cancer cell line A549 has also been studied.

  3. Quinoxaline based bio-active mixed ligand transition metal complexes: Synthesis, characterization, electrochemical, antimicrobial, DNA binding, cleavage, antioxidant and molecular docking studies.

    PubMed

    Dhanaraj, C Justin; Johnson, Jijo

    2015-10-01

    Co(II), Ni(II), Cu(II) and Zn(II) mixed ligand complexes have been synthesized from N(2), N(3)-bis(4-nitrophenyl)quinoxaline-2,3-diamine and 1,10-phenanthroline. The compounds were characterized by elemental analyses, molar conductance, magnetic susceptibility, IR, UV-Vis., (1)H NMR, mass and ESR spectra. Octahedral geometry has been assigned for Co(II), Ni(II) and Zn(II) complexes and distorted octahedral geometry for Cu(II) complex. Electrochemical behavior of the synthesized complexes was studied using cyclic voltammetry. Grain size and surface morphologies of the complexes were determined by powder XRD and SEM analyses. The mixed ligand metal complexes were screened for antimicrobial activity against bacterial species Escherichia coli, Klebsiella pneumoniae, Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Staphylococcus aureus; fungal species Aspergillus niger, and Candida albicans by disc diffusion method. The DNA binding and DNA cleavage activities of the compounds were determined using electronic absorption titration and agarose gel electrophoresis respectively. The superoxide radical scavenging and free radical scavenging activities of the Cu(II) complex was also evaluated. Molecular docking studies of the synthesized mixed ligand metal complexes were carried out against B-DNA dodecamer and the protein Plasmodium falciparum dihydrofolate reductase (pf DHFR).

  4. Chromatin landscape dictates HSF binding to target DNA elements.

    PubMed

    Guertin, Michael J; Lis, John T

    2010-09-09

    Sequence-specific transcription factors (TFs) are critical for specifying patterns and levels of gene expression, but target DNA elements are not sufficient to specify TF binding in vivo. In eukaryotes, the binding of a TF is in competition with a constellation of other proteins, including histones, which package DNA into nucleosomes. We used the ChIP-seq assay to examine the genome-wide distribution of Drosophila Heat Shock Factor (HSF), a TF whose binding activity is mediated by heat shock-induced trimerization. HSF binds to 464 sites after heat shock, the vast majority of which contain HSF Sequence-binding Elements (HSEs). HSF-bound sequence motifs represent only a small fraction of the total HSEs present in the genome. ModENCODE ChIP-chip datasets, generated during non-heat shock conditions, were used to show that inducibly bound HSE motifs are associated with histone acetylation, H3K4 trimethylation, RNA Polymerase II, and coactivators, compared to HSE motifs that remain HSF-free. Furthermore, directly changing the chromatin landscape, from an inactive to an active state, permits inducible HSF binding. There is a strong correlation of bound HSEs to active chromatin marks present prior to induced HSF binding, indicating that an HSE's residence in "active" chromatin is a primary determinant of whether HSF can bind following heat shock.

  5. Synthesis, crystal structures, in vitro DNA binding, antibacterial and cytotoxic activities of new di- and polynuclear silver(I) saccharinate complexes with tertiary monophosphanes.

    PubMed

    Yilmaz, Veysel T; Gocmen, Elif; Icsel, Ceyda; Cengiz, Murat; Susluer, Sunde Y; Buyukgungor, Orhan

    2014-02-05

    Four new silver(I) saccharinate (sac) complexes, [Ag(μ-sac)(PPh3)]2 (1), [Ag(μ-sac)(PPh2Cy)]2 (2), [Ag(μ-sac)(PPhCy2)]2 (3) and [Ag(μ-sac)(PCy3)]n (4), where PPh3=triphenylphosphane, PPh2Cy=cyclohexyldiphenylphosphane, PPhCy2=dicyclohexylphenylphosphane and PCy3=tricyclohexylphosphane, have been synthesized and fully characterized by elemental analysis, IR, NMR, ESI-MS and single crystal X-ray diffraction. Fluorescence ethidium bromide displacement indicate that all complexes bind to fish sperm (FS) DNA by intercalation with binding constants (KA) of 29.1±0.26×10(5)M(-1) for 1, 2.54±0.12×10(5)M(-1) for 2, 2.42±0.08×10(5)M(-1) for 3, 0.19±0.03×10(5)M(-1) for 4. The relative viscosities of the FS-DNA solutions increase with increasing of the complex concentration, providing strong evidence for the intercalation mode. The gel electrophoresis assay further confirms their binding with the pBR322 plasmid DNA. The MIC values of the silver(I) complexes are generally higher than those of AgNO3 and silver sulfadiazine, but 1 presents a promising activity against Salmonellatyphimurium and Staphylococcusaureus. All complexes are highly cytotoxic on human lung carcinoma (A549) and human breast adenocarcinoma (MCF-7) cell lines with IC50 values ranging from 0.82 to 3.13μM.

  6. Novel DNA-binding properties of the RNA-binding protein TIAR.

    PubMed

    Suswam, Esther A; Li, Yan Yan; Mahtani, Harry; King, Peter H

    2005-01-01

    TIA-1 related protein binds avidly to uridine-rich elements in mRNA and pre-mRNAs of a wide range of genes, including interleukin (IL)-8 and vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF). The protein has diverse regulatory roles, which in part depend on the locus of binding within the transcript, including translational control, splicing and apoptosis. Here, we observed selective and potent inhibition of TIAR-RNP complex formation with IL-8 and VEGF 3'-untranslated regions (3'-UTRs) using thymidine-rich deoxyoligonucleotide (ODN) sequences derived from the VEFG 3'-UTR. We show by ultraviolet crosslinking and electrophoretic mobility shift assays that TIAR can bind directly to single-stranded, thymidine-rich ODNs but not to double-stranded ODNs containing the same sequence. TIAR had a nearly 6-fold greater affinity for DNA than RNA (K(d)app = 1.6x10(-9) M versus 9.4 x 10(-9) M). Truncation of TIAR indicated that the high affinity DNA-binding site overlaps with the RNA-binding site involving RNA recognition motif 2 (RRM2). However, RRM1 alone could also bind to DNA. Finally, we show that TIAR can be displaced from single-stranded DNA by active transcription through the binding site. These results provide a potential mechanism by which TIAR can shuttle between RNA and DNA ligands.

  7. p53 inhibits DNA replication in vitro in a DNA-binding-dependent manner

    SciTech Connect

    Miller, S.D.; Farmer, G.; Prives, C.

    1995-12-01

    This report discusses new findings that the tumor supressor gene product p53 may play a role as a DNA-binding-dependent regulator of DNA replication. The results were obtained using polyomavirus in replication assays. Details regarding effects on cell growth arrest and transcriptional activation are discussed. 61 refs., 7 figs.

  8. Esc2 promotes Mus81 complex-activity via its SUMO-like and DNA binding domains

    PubMed Central

    Sebesta, Marek; Urulangodi, Madhusoodanan; Stefanovie, Barbora; Szakal, Barnabas; Pacesa, Martin; Lisby, Michael; Branzei, Dana; Krejci, Lumir

    2017-01-01

    Replication across damaged DNA templates is accompanied by transient formation of sister chromatid junctions (SCJs). Cells lacking Esc2, an adaptor protein containing no known enzymatic domains, are defective in the metabolism of these SCJs. However, how Esc2 is involved in the metabolism of SCJs remains elusive. Here we show interaction between Esc2 and a structure-specific endonuclease Mus81-Mms4 (the Mus81 complex), their involvement in the metabolism of SCJs, and the effects Esc2 has on the enzymatic activity of the Mus81 complex. We found that Esc2 specifically interacts with the Mus81 complex via its SUMO-like domains, stimulates enzymatic activity of the Mus81 complex in vitro, and is involved in the Mus81 complex-dependent resolution of SCJs in vivo. Collectively, our data point to the possibility that the involvement of Esc2 in the metabolism of SCJs is, in part, via modulation of the activity of the Mus81 complex. PMID:27694623

  9. Synthesis, structural characterization, antibacterial activity, DNA binding and computational studies of bis(2-methyl-1H-imidazole κN3)silver(I)dichromate(VI)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beheshti, Azizolla; Hashemi, Faezeh; Monavvar, Mohamad Fattahi; Khorrmdin, Rahman; Abrahams, Carmel T.; Motamedi, Hossein; Shakerzadeh, Ehsan

    2017-04-01

    A new silver complex [Ag(C4H6N2)2]2Cr2O7 (1) derived from Ag2[CrO4] and 2-methylimidazole has been synthesized and fully characterized by Single crystal X-ray diffraction, UV-Vis, FT-IR, elemental analysis, DFT and AIM calculations. The crystal structure of 1 shows that the discrete, ionic compound of [Ag(C4H6N2)2]2Cr2O7 consists of two [Ag(C4H6N2)2]+ cations bridged by a [Cr2O7]2- counter anion. In each of the [Ag(C4H6N2)2]+ complexes, the Ag center is coordinated by two N atoms from two distinct neutral monodentate 2-methylimidazole ligands in an almost linear geometry with Agsbnd N distances between 2.068(4) Å and 2.076(4) Å and Nsbnd Agsbnd N bond angles of 179.4(2)° and 173.8(2)°. The Nsbnd H⋯O and Csbnd H ⋯ O hydrogen bonds, π⋯π stacking, Csbnd H⋯π and Ag⋯O interactions play an important role in the structural stabilization of the complex to generate a three-dimensional framework. The antibacterial activity and molecular docking studies of the free 2-methylimidazole ligand and the title complex show that these compounds have ability to inhibit the growth of the tested bacteria. A scanning probe microscopy (SPM) study of the treated bacteria was carried out to investigate the structural changes caused by the interactions between the complex and target bacteria. The interaction of the complex 1 with the E.coli DNA (E-DNA) has been studied by UV-Vis absorption, competitive DNA-binding studies with ethidium bromide by fluorescence and gel electrophoresis techniques. These experiments indicate that the complex interacts with DNA by intercalative binding.

  10. An N-terminal mutation in the bacteriophage T4 motA gene yields a protein that binds DNA but is defective for activation of transcription.

    PubMed Central

    Gerber, J S; Hinton, D M

    1996-01-01

    The bacteriophage T4 MotA protein is a transcriptional activator of T4-modified host RNA polymerase and is required for activation of the middle class of T4 promoters. MotA alone binds to the -30 region of T4 middle promoters, a region that contains the MotA box consensus sequence [(t/a)(t/a)TGCTT(t/c)A]. We report the isolation and characterization of a protein designated Mot21, in which the first 8 codons of the wild-type motA sequence have been replaced with 11 different codons. In gel retardation assays, Mot21 and MotA bind DNA containing the T4 middle promoter P(uvsX) similarly, and the proteins yield similar footprints on P(uvsX). However, Mot21 is severely defective in the activation of transcription. On native protein gels, a new protein species is seen after incubation of the sigma70 subunit of RNA polymerase and wild-type MotA protein, suggesting a direct protein-protein contact between MotA and sigma70. Mot21 fails to form this complex, suggesting that this interaction is necessary for transcriptional activation and that the Mot21 defect arises because Mot21 cannot form this contact like the wild-type activator. PMID:8892810

  11. Dynamics of nucleosome invasion by DNA binding proteins.

    PubMed

    Tims, Hannah S; Gurunathan, Kaushik; Levitus, Marcia; Widom, Jonathan

    2011-08-12

    Nucleosomes sterically occlude their wrapped DNA from interacting with many large protein complexes. How proteins gain access to nucleosomal DNA target sites in vivo is not known. Outer stretches of nucleosomal DNA spontaneously unwrap and rewrap with high frequency, providing rapid and efficient access to regulatory DNA target sites located there; however, rates for access to the nucleosome interior have not been measured. Here we show that for a selected high-affinity nucleosome positioning sequence, the spontaneous DNA unwrapping rate decreases dramatically with distance inside the nucleosome. The rewrapping rate also decreases, but only slightly. Our results explain the previously known strong position dependence on the equilibrium accessibility of nucleosomal DNA, which is characteristic of both selected and natural sequences. Our results point to slow nucleosome conformational fluctuations as a potential source of cell-cell variability in gene activation dynamics, and they reveal the dominant kinetic path by which multiple DNA binding proteins cooperatively invade a nucleosome.

  12. Characterization of the Novel DNA-Binding Activity of p270, a hSWI/SNF Protein Frequently Downregulated in Breast Cancer

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2005-07-01

    therefore concentrated on the ARID-dependent DNA-binding properties of p270. Through a combination of structural, biochemical and mutational approaches...applied for this fellowship, few biochemical studies had addressed the DNA-binding properties attributed to the ARID region, and no detailed mutational ...of the ARID region of p270 through a combination of structural, biochemical, and mutational approaches. In this final report, I show a summary of the

  13. Azadiradione ameliorates polyglutamine expansion disease in Drosophila by potentiating DNA binding activity of heat shock factor 1

    PubMed Central

    Dutta, Naibedya; Ghosh, Suvranil; Jana, Manas; Ganguli, Arnab; Komarov, Andrei; Paul, Soumyadip; Dwivedi, Vibha; Chatterjee, Subhrangsu; Jana, Nihar R.; Lakhotia, Subhash C.; Chakrabarti, Gopal; Misra, Anup K.; Mandal, Subhash C.; Pal, Mahadeb

    2016-01-01

    Aggregation of proteins with the expansion of polyglutamine tracts in the brain underlies progressive genetic neurodegenerative diseases (NDs) like Huntington's disease and spinocerebellar ataxias (SCA). An insensitive cellular proteotoxic stress response to non-native protein oligomers is common in such conditions. Indeed, upregulation of heat shock factor 1 (HSF1) function and its target protein chaperone expression has shown promising results in animal models of NDs. Using an HSF1 sensitive cell based reporter screening, we have isolated azadiradione (AZD) from the methanolic extract of seeds of Azadirachta indica, a plant known for its multifarious medicinal properties. We show that AZD ameliorates toxicity due to protein aggregation in cell and fly models of polyglutamine expansion diseases to a great extent. All these effects are correlated with activation of HSF1 function and expression of its target protein chaperone genes. Notably, HSF1 activation by AZD is independent of cellular HSP90 or proteasome function. Furthermore, we show that AZD directly interacts with purified human HSF1 with high specificity, and facilitates binding of HSF1 to its recognition sequence with higher affinity. These unique findings qualify AZD as an ideal lead molecule for consideration for drug development against NDs that affect millions worldwide. PMID:27835876

  14. Substitutional impact on biological activity of new water soluble Ni(II) complexes: Preparation, spectral characterization, X-ray crystallography, DNA/protein binding, antibacterial activity and in vitro cytotoxicity.

    PubMed

    Umadevi, C; Kalaivani, P; Puschmann, H; Murugan, S; Mohan, P S; Prabhakaran, R

    2017-02-01

    A series of new water soluble nickel(II) complexes containing triphenylphosphine and 4-methoxysalicylaldehyde-4(N)-substituted thiosemicarbazones were synthesized and characterized. Crystallographic investigations confirmed the structure of the complexes (1-4) having the general structure [Ni(4-Msal-Rtsc)(PPh3)] (Where R=H (1); CH3 (2); C2H5 (3); C6H5 (4)) which showed that thiosemicarbazone ligands coordinated to nickel(II) ion as ONS tridentate bibasic donor. DNA/BSA protein binding ability of the ligands and their new complexes were studied by taking calf-thymus DNA (CT-DNA) and Bovine serum albumin (BSA) through absorption and emission titrations. Ethidium bromide (EB) displacement study showed the intercalative binding trend of the complexes to DNA. From the albumin binding studies, the mechanism of quenching was found as static and the alterations in the secondary structure of BSA by the compounds were confirmed with synchronous spectral studies. The binding affinity of the complexes to CT-DNA and BSA has the order of [Ni(4-Msal-etsc)(PPh3)] (3) >[Ni(4-Msal-mtsc)(PPh3)] (2) >[Ni(4-Msal-tsc)(PPh3)] (1) >[Ni(4-Msal-ptsc)(PPh3)] (4). In vitro cytotoxicity of the complexes was tested on human lung cancer cells (A549), human cervical cancer cells (HeLa), human liver carcinoma cells (Hep G2). All the complexes exhibited significant activity against three cancer cells. Among them, complex 4 exhibited almost 2.5 fold activity than cisplatin in A549 and HepG2 cell lines. In HeLa cell line, the complexes exhibited significant activity which is less than cisplatin. While comparing the activity of the complexes in A549 and HepG2 cell lines it falls in the order 4>1>2>3>cisplatin. The results obtained from DNA, protein binding and cytotoxicity studies, it is concluded that the cytotoxicity of the complexes as determined by MTT assay were not unduly influenced by the complexes having different binding efficiency with DNA and protein. The complexes exhibited good spectrum

  15. Replication protein A binds to regulatory elements in yeast DNA repair and DNA metabolism genes.

    PubMed Central

    Singh, K K; Samson, L

    1995-01-01

    Saccharomyces cerevisiae responds to DNA damage by arresting cell cycle progression (thereby preventing the replication and segregation of damaged chromosomes) and by inducing the expression of numerous genes, some of which are involved in DNA repair, DNA replication, and DNA metabolism. Induction of the S. cerevisiae 3-methyladenine DNA glycosylase repair gene (MAG) by DNA-damaging agents requires one upstream activating sequence (UAS) and two upstream repressing sequences (URS1 and URS2) in the MAG promoter. Sequences similar to the MAG URS elements are present in at least 11 other S. cerevisiae DNA repair and metabolism genes. Replication protein A (Rpa) is known as a single-stranded-DNA-binding protein that is involved in the initiation and elongation steps of DNA replication, nucleotide excision repair, and homologous recombination. We now show that the MAG URS1 and URS2 elements form similar double-stranded, sequence-specific, DNA-protein complexes and that both complexes contain Rpa. Moreover, Rpa appears to bind the MAG URS1-like elements found upstream of 11 other DNA repair and DNA metabolism genes. These results lead us to hypothesize that Rpa may be involved in the regulation of a number of DNA repair and DNA metabolism genes. Images Fig. 1 Fig. 2 Fig. 3 Fig. 4 PMID:7761422

  16. Chromophore-modified antitumor anthracenediones: synthesis, DNA binding, and cytotoxic activity of 1,4-bis[(aminoalkyl)amino]benzo[g]-phthalazine-5,10-diones.

    PubMed

    Gandolfi, C A; Beggiolin, G; Menta, E; Palumbo, M; Sissi, C; Spinelli, S; Johnson, F

    1995-02-03

    As part of a program aimed at exploring the effect of the introduction of heteroatoms into the anthracene-9,10-dione chromophore, we have synthesized novel 1,4-bis[(aminoalkyl)amino]-benzo[g]phthalazine-5,10-diones (BPDs) 1 which are related to the antitumor agents ametantrone and mitoxantrone. Derivatives 1 were prepared by chromic acid oxidation of acylated benzo[g]phthalazines 5 followed by acid hydrolysis or by silylation-amination of 5,10-dihydroxybenzo[g]phthalazine-1,4-dione (8). The 1-[(aminoalkyl)amino]-4-amino congeners 2 were isolated in low yields as byproducts from the oxidation of 5. Against a panel of human tumor cell lines, the benzo[g]phthalazine-5,10-diones 1 and 2 exhibited cytotoxic activity comparable or even superior to that of mitoxantrone. In compounds 1, structure-activity relationships different than those operative in the carbocyclic series appeared to emerge. DNA-binding studies with the ametantrone-like compound 1c and its single-armed congener 2c indicated that the introduction of a 2,3-diaza subunit into the anthracene-9,10-dione chromophore reduces the affinity of the drug for DNA in comparison with ametantrone. On the other hand, the number of side-chain groups does not affect binding to a great extent. These findings seem to suggest mechanisms of cell death other than those induced by simple interaction of the 1,4-BPDs 1 and 2 with DNA.

  17. Intercalative DNA binding of the marine anticancer drug variolin B

    PubMed Central

    Canals, Albert; Arribas-Bosacoma, Raquel; Albericio, Fernando; Álvarez, Mercedes; Aymamí, Joan; Coll, Miquel

    2017-01-01

    Variolin B is a rare marine alkaloid that showed promising anti-cancer activity soon after its isolation. It acts as a cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitor, although the precise mechanism through which it exerts the cytotoxic effects is still unknown. The crystal structure of a variolin B bound to a DNA forming a pseudo-Holliday junction shows that this compound can also contribute, through intercalative binding, to either the formation or stabilization of multi-stranded DNA forms. PMID:28051169

  18. Phosphorylation of Krüppel-like Factor 3 (KLF3/BKLF) and C-terminal Binding Protein 2 (CtBP2) by Homeodomain-interacting Protein Kinase 2 (HIPK2) Modulates KLF3 DNA Binding and Activity*

    PubMed Central

    Dewi, Vitri; Kwok, Alister; Lee, Stella; Lee, Ming Min; Tan, Yee Mun; Nicholas, Hannah R.; Isono, Kyo-ichi; Wienert, Beeke; Mak, Ka Sin; Knights, Alexander J.; Quinlan, Kate G. R.; Cordwell, Stuart J.; Funnell, Alister P. W.; Pearson, Richard C. M; Crossley, Merlin

    2015-01-01

    Krüppel-like factor 3 (KLF3/BKLF), a member of the Krüppel-like factor (KLF) family of transcription factors, is a widely expressed transcriptional repressor with diverse biological roles. Although there is considerable understanding of the molecular mechanisms that allow KLF3 to silence the activity of its target genes, less is known about the signal transduction pathways and post-translational modifications that modulate KLF3 activity in response to physiological stimuli. We observed that KLF3 is modified in a range of different tissues and found that the serine/threonine kinase homeodomain-interacting protein kinase 2 (HIPK2) can both bind and phosphorylate KLF3. Mass spectrometry identified serine 249 as the primary phosphorylation site. Mutation of this site reduces the ability of KLF3 to bind DNA and repress transcription. Furthermore, we also determined that HIPK2 can phosphorylate the KLF3 co-repressor C-terminal binding protein 2 (CtBP2) at serine 428. Finally, we found that phosphorylation of KLF3 and CtBP2 by HIPK2 strengthens the interaction between these two factors and increases transcriptional repression by KLF3. Taken together, our results indicate that HIPK2 potentiates the activity of KLF3. PMID:25659434

  19. Solution structure and binding specificity of the p63 DNA binding domain

    PubMed Central

    Enthart, Andreas; Klein, Christian; Dehner, Alexander; Coles, Murray; Gemmecker, Gerd; Kessler, Horst; Hagn, Franz

    2016-01-01

    p63 is a close homologue of p53 and, together with p73, is grouped into the p53 family of transcription factors. p63 is known to be involved in the induction of controlled apoptosis important for differentiation processes, germ line integrity and development. Despite its high homology to p53, especially within the DNA binding domain (DBD), p63-DBD does not show cooperative DNA binding properties and is significantly more stable against thermal and chemical denaturation. Here, we determined the solution structure of p63-DBD and show that it is markedly less dynamic than p53-DBD. In addition, we also investigate the effect of a double salt bridge present in p53-DBD, but not in p63-DBD on the cooperative binding behavior and specificity to various DNA sites. Restoration of the salt bridges in p63-DBD by mutagenesis leads to enhanced binding affinity to p53-specific, but not p63-specific response elements. Furthermore, we show that p63-DBD is capable of binding to anti-apoptotic BclxL via its DNA binding interface, a feature that has only been shown for p53 so far. These data suggest that all p53 family members - despite alterations in the specificity and binding affinity - are capable of activating pro-apoptotic pathways in a tissue specific manner. PMID:27225672

  20. Solution structure and binding specificity of the p63 DNA binding domain.

    PubMed

    Enthart, Andreas; Klein, Christian; Dehner, Alexander; Coles, Murray; Gemmecker, Gerd; Kessler, Horst; Hagn, Franz

    2016-05-26

    p63 is a close homologue of p53 and, together with p73, is grouped into the p53 family of transcription factors. p63 is known to be involved in the induction of controlled apoptosis important for differentiation processes, germ line integrity and development. Despite its high homology to p53, especially within the DNA binding domain (DBD), p63-DBD does not show cooperative DNA binding properties and is significantly more stable against thermal and chemical denaturation. Here, we determined the solution structure of p63-DBD and show that it is markedly less dynamic than p53-DBD. In addition, we also investigate the effect of a double salt bridge present in p53-DBD, but not in p63-DBD on the cooperative binding behavior and specificity to various DNA sites. Restoration of the salt bridges in p63-DBD by mutagenesis leads to enhanced binding affinity to p53-specific, but not p63-specific response elements. Furthermore, we show that p63-DBD is capable of binding to anti-apoptotic BclxL via its DNA binding interface, a feature that has only been shown for p53 so far. These data suggest that all p53 family members - despite alterations in the specificity and binding affinity - are capable of activating pro-apoptotic pathways in a tissue specific manner.

  1. Novel DNA binding motifs in the DNA repair enzyme endonuclease III crystal structure.

    PubMed Central

    Thayer, M M; Ahern, H; Xing, D; Cunningham, R P; Tainer, J A

    1995-01-01

    The 1.85 A crystal structure of endonuclease III, combined with mutational analysis, suggests the structural basis for the DNA binding and catalytic activity of the enzyme. Helix-hairpin-helix (HhH) and [4Fe-4S] cluster loop (FCL) motifs, which we have named for their secondary structure, bracket the cleft separating the two alpha-helical domains of the enzyme. These two novel DNA binding motifs and the solvent-filled pocket in the cleft between them all lie within a positively charged and sequence-conserved surface region. Lys120 and Asp138, both shown by mutagenesis to be catalytically important, lie at the mouth of this pocket, suggesting that this pocket is part of the active site. The positions of the HhH motif and protruding FCL motif, which contains the DNA binding residue Lys191, can accommodate B-form DNA, with a flipped-out base bound within the active site pocket. The identification of HhH and FCL sequence patterns in other DNA binding proteins suggests that these motifs may be a recurrent structural theme for DNA binding proteins. Images PMID:7664751

  2. Antioxidant, DNA binding and nuclease activities of heteroleptic copper(II) complexes derived from 2-((2-(piperazin-1-yl)ethylimino)methyl)-4-substituted phenols and diimines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ravichandran, J.; Gurumoorthy, P.; Imran Musthafa, M. A.; Kalilur Rahiman, A.

    2014-12-01

    A series of heteroleptic copper(II) complexes of the type [CuL1-4(diimine)](ClO4)2 (1-8) [L1-4 = 2-((2-(piperazin-1-yl)ethylimino)methyl)-4-substituted phenols, and diimine = 2,2‧-bipyridyl (bpy) or 1,10-phenanthroline (phen)], have been synthesized and characterized by spectroscopic methods. The IR spectra of complexes indicate the presence of uncoordinated perchlorate anions and the electronic spectra revealed the square pyramidal geometry with N4O coordination environment around copper(II) nuclei. Electrochemical studies of the mononuclear complexes evidenced one-electron irreversible reduction wave in the cathodic region. The EPR spectra of complexes with g|| (2.206-2.214) and A|| (154-172 × 10-4 cm-1) values support the square-based CuN3O coordination chromophore and the presence of unpaired electron localized in dx-y ground state. Antioxidant studies against DPPH revealed effective radical scavenging properties of the synthesized complexes. Binding studies suggest that the heteroleptic copper(II) complexes interact with calf thymus DNA (CT-DNA) through minor-groove and electrostatic interaction, and all the complexes display pronounced nuclease activity against supercoiled pBR322 DNA.

  3. DNA binding, cytotoxicity and apoptosis induction activity of a mixed-ligand copper(II) complex with taurine Schiff base and imidazole

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Mei; kong, Lin Lin; Gou, Yi; Yang, Feng; Liang, Hong

    2014-07-01

    A novel binuclear copper(II) complex (complex 1) with taurine Schiff base and imidazole has been synthesized and structurally characterized by single crystal X-ray diffraction, elemental analysis, ESI-MS spectrometry, UV-vis and IR spectroscopy. Single-crystal analysis revealed that 1 displays the sulfonate-bridged dinuclear copper(II) centers. Both copper atoms are five-coordinated and exhibit slightly distorted square pyramidal geometries. Each of copper atom is surrounded by three oxygen atoms and one nitrogen atom from different taurine Schiff base ligands, and one nitrogen atom from one imidazole ligand. The interaction between 1 and calf thymus DNA (CT-DNA) was investigated by UV-vis, fluorescence, circular dichroism (CD) spectra and agarose gel electrophoresis. The experimental results indicated that 1 could bind to CT-DNA via an intercalative mode and show efficient cleavage activity. In addition, 1 showed an antitumor effect on cell cycle and apoptosis. Flow cytometric analysis revealed that MGC-803 cells were arrested in the S phase after treatment with 1. Fluorescence microscopic observation indicated that 1 could induce apoptosis of MGC-803 cells.

  4. The mechanism of guanine specific photooxidation in the presence of berberine and palmatine: activation of photosensitized singlet oxygen generation through DNA-binding interaction.

    PubMed

    Hirakawa, Kazutaka; Kawanishi, Shosuke; Hirano, Toru

    2005-10-01

    The mechanism of DNA damage by photoexcited alkaloids, berberine and palmatine, was examined using 32P-labeled DNA fragments obtained from human genes. Berberine and palmatine easily bind to DNA, leading to the formation of strong fluorescent complexes. The binding constants of berberine and palmatine to DNA, estimated from an analysis of their fluorescence enhancements, indicate the formation of stable complexes. Photoexcited berberine and palmatine caused DNA cleavage, specifically at almost all guanine residues, under the aerobic condition after Escherichia coli formamidopyrimidine-DNA glycosylase or piperidine treatment, suggesting the formation of 8-oxo-7,8-dihydro-2'-deoxyguanosine (8-oxodGuo), an oxidized product of 2'-deoxyguanosine, and further oxidized products. The formation of 8-oxodGuo was confirmed by HPLC measurement. The quantum yield of 8-oxodGuo formation by berberine was almost the same as that induced by palmatine. Berberine and palmatine did not cause DNA photodamage under anaerobic conditions. Scavengers of singlet oxygen (1O2), such as sodium azide and methional, inhibited DNA damage. These findings suggest that photoexcited berberine and palmatine give rise to 8-oxodGuo through 1O2 generation. The photosensitized 1O2 generation from these alkaloids was examined using near-infrared luminescence measurements. Emission at ca. 1270 nm was observed during photoexcitation of the DNA-alkaloid complexes. This emission was quenched by sodium azide, a scavenger of 1O2. In the absence of DNA, berberine and palmatine could not show the emission. This spectroscopic study has shown that photoexcited alkaloids can generate 1O2 only when the DNA-alkaloid complexes are formed. In conclusion, berberine and palmatine easily bind to DNA and induce guanine specific photooxidation via 1O2 formation. The present study suggests that berberine and palmatine can act as functional photosensitizers enabling a switch in phototoxicity via 1O2 formation by the interaction

  5. Induction of cell death by ternary copper(II) complexes of L-tyrosine and diimines: role of coligands on DNA binding and cleavage and anticancer activity.

    PubMed

    Ramakrishnan, Sethu; Rajendiran, Venugopal; Palaniandavar, Mallayan; Periasamy, Vaiyapuri Subbarayan; Srinag, Bangalore Suresh; Krishnamurthy, Hanumanthappa; Akbarsha, Mohammad Abdulkader

    2009-02-16

    The mononuclear mixed ligand copper(II) complexes of the type [Cu(L-tyr)(diimine)](ClO(4)), where tyr is L-tyrosine and diimine is 2,2'-bipyridine (bpy) (1), 1,10-phenanthroline (phen) (2), 5,6-dimethyl-1,10-phenanthroline (5,6-dmp) (3), and dipyrido[3,2-d:2',3'-f]quinoxaline (dpq) (4), have been isolated and characterized by analytical and spectral methods. In the X-ray crystal structure 3 Cu(II) possesses a distorted square pyramidal coordination geometry with the two nitrogen atoms of 5,6-dmp ligand and the amine nitrogen and carboxylate oxygen atoms of L-tyrosine located at the equatorial sites and the coordinated water molecule present in the apical position. The electronic absorption and electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) spectral parameters reveal that the complexes retain their square-based geometries even in solution. All of the complexes display a ligand field band in the visible region (600-700 nm) in Tris-HCl/NaCl buffer (5:50 mM) at pH 7.2 and also axial EPR spectra in acetonitrile at 77 K with g(parallel) > g(perpendicular) indicating a d(x(2)-y(2)) ground state. The g(parallel) and A(parallel) values of 2.230 and (170-180) x 10(-4) cm(-1), respectively, conform to a square-based CuN(3)O coordination chromophore, which is consistent with the X-ray crystal structure of 3. The interaction of the complexes with calf thymus DNA (CT DNA) has been explored by using physical methods to propose modes of DNA binding of the complexes. Absorption (K(b)) and emission spectral studies and viscosity measurements indicate that 4 interacts with DNA more strongly than all of the other complexes through partial intercalation of the extended planar ring of dpq with DNA base stack. Interestingly, complex 3 exhibits a DNA binding affinity that is higher than that of 2, which suggests the involvement of 5,6-dimethyl groups on the phen ring in hydrophobic interaction with DNA surface. In contrast with the increase in relative viscosities of DNA bound to 2-4, the

  6. Insight into the cooperative DNA binding of the O⁶-alkylguanine DNA alkyltransferase.

    PubMed

    Tessmer, Ingrid; Fried, Michael G

    2014-08-01

    The O(6)-alkylguanine DNA alkyltransferase (AGT) is a highly conserved protein responsible for direct repair of alkylated guanine and to a lesser degree thymine bases. While specific DNA lesion-bound complexes in crystal structures consist of monomeric AGT, several solution studies have suggested that cooperative DNA binding plays a role in the physiological activities of AGT. Cooperative AGT-DNA complexes have been described by theoretical models, which can be tested by atomic force microscopy (AFM). Direct access to structural features of AGT-DNA complexes at the single molecule level by AFM imaging revealed non-specifically bound, cooperative complexes with limited cluster length. Implications of cooperative binding in AGT-DNA interactions are discussed.

  7. Methylated DNA-binding protein is present in various mammalian cell types

    SciTech Connect

    Supakar, P.C.; Weist, D.; Zhang, D.; Inamdar, N.; Zhang, Xianyang; Khan, R.; Ehrlich, M. ); Ehrlich, K.C. )

    1988-08-25

    A DNA-binding protein from human placenta, methylated DNA-binding protein (MDBP), binds to certain DNA sequences only when they contain 5-methylcytosine (m{sup 5}C) residues at specific positions. The authors found a very similar DNA-binding activity in nuclear extracts of rat tissues, calf thymus, human embryonal carcinoma cells, HeLa cells, and mouse LTK cells. Like human placental MDBP, the analogous DNA-binding proteins from the above mammalian cell lines formed a number of different low-electrophoretic-mobility complexes with a 14-bp MDBP-specific oligonucleotide duplex. All of these complexes exhibited the same DNA methylation specificity and DNA sequence specificity. Although MDBP activity was found in various mammalian cell types, it was not detected in extracts of cultured mosquito cells and so may be associated only with cells with vertebrate-type DNA methylation.

  8. Preparation of (32)P-end-labeled DNA fragments for performing DNA-binding experiments.

    PubMed

    Carey, Michael F; Peterson, Craig L; Smale, Stephen T

    2013-05-01

    The generation of a uniquely (32)P-end-labeled DNA fragment is essential for DNA-binding experiments such as DNase I footprinting and ethylation interference. We describe here a protocol for end-labeling a restriction fragment. For a plasmid DNA bearing a region containing the binding site of interest, cleaving with a single restriction endonuclease generates a 5' overhang containing a phosphate. This is generally necessary for both common forms of fragment end-labeling: phosphorylation with polynucleotide kinase and "filling in the end" with DNA polymerases (e.g., Klenow fragment). For the phosphorylation reaction, as described here, the phosphate is removed with calf intestinal phosphatase or bacterial alkaline phosphatase, and the resulting free 5'-OH is phosphorylated with polynucleotide kinase and [γ-(32)P]ATP. This generates a plasmid labeled at each end with γ-(32)P. The molar amount of plasmid DNA must be below the amount of ATP added to the reaction and the ATP must be of sufficiently high specific activity to generate a fragment labeled to the extent necessary for many DNA-binding experiments. To generate a uniquely end-labeled DNA fragment, the labeled plasmid is heat-treated to inactivate any remaining kinase and recleaved with a second endonuclease, releasing a short DNA fragment and a longer vector fragment. The DNA fragment is purified from the labeled vector on a 5%-8% native polyacrylamide gel. The preparation and labeling of DNA restriction fragments typically takes 1-2 d.

  9. Rhodopsin targeted transcriptional silencing by DNA-binding.

    PubMed

    Botta, Salvatore; Marrocco, Elena; de Prisco, Nicola; Curion, Fabiola; Renda, Mario; Sofia, Martina; Lupo, Mariangela; Carissimo, Annamaria; Bacci, Maria Laura; Gesualdo, Carlo; Rossi, Settimio; Simonelli, Francesca; Surace, Enrico Maria

    2016-03-14

    Transcription factors (TFs) operate by the combined activity of their DNA-binding domains (DBDs) and effector domains (EDs) enabling the coordination of gene expression on a genomic scale. Here we show that in vivo delivery of an engineered DNA-binding protein uncoupled from the repressor domain can produce efficient and gene-specific transcriptional silencing. To interfere with RHODOPSIN (RHO) gain-of-function mutations we engineered the ZF6-DNA-binding protein (ZF6-DB) that targets 20 base pairs (bp) of a RHOcis-regulatory element (CRE) and demonstrate Rho specific transcriptional silencing upon adeno-associated viral (AAV) vector-mediated expression in photoreceptors. The data show that the 20 bp-long genomic DNA sequence is necessary for RHO expression and that photoreceptor delivery of the corresponding cognate synthetic trans-acting factor ZF6-DB without the intrinsic transcriptional repression properties of the canonical ED blocks Rho expression with negligible genome-wide transcript perturbations. The data support DNA-binding-mediated silencing as a novel mode to treat gain-of-function mutations.

  10. Rhodopsin targeted transcriptional silencing by DNA-binding

    PubMed Central

    Botta, Salvatore; Marrocco, Elena; de Prisco, Nicola; Curion, Fabiola; Renda, Mario; Sofia, Martina; Lupo, Mariangela; Carissimo, Annamaria; Bacci, Maria Laura; Gesualdo, Carlo; Rossi, Settimio; Simonelli, Francesca; Surace, Enrico Maria

    2016-01-01

    Transcription factors (TFs) operate by the combined activity of their DNA-binding domains (DBDs) and effector domains (EDs) enabling the coordination of gene expression on a genomic scale. Here we show that in vivo delivery of an engineered DNA-binding protein uncoupled from the repressor domain can produce efficient and gene-specific transcriptional silencing. To interfere with RHODOPSIN (RHO) gain-of-function mutations we engineered the ZF6-DNA-binding protein (ZF6-DB) that targets 20 base pairs (bp) of a RHOcis-regulatory element (CRE) and demonstrate Rho specific transcriptional silencing upon adeno-associated viral (AAV) vector-mediated expression in photoreceptors. The data show that the 20 bp-long genomic DNA sequence is necessary for RHO expression and that photoreceptor delivery of the corresponding cognate synthetic trans-acting factor ZF6-DB without the intrinsic transcriptional repression properties of the canonical ED blocks Rho expression with negligible genome-wide transcript perturbations. The data support DNA-binding-mediated silencing as a novel mode to treat gain-of-function mutations. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.12242.001 PMID:26974343

  11. Survey of variation in human transcription factors reveals prevalent DNA binding changes

    PubMed Central

    Barrera, Luis A.; Rogers, Julia M.; Gisselbrecht, Stephen S.; Rossin, Elizabeth J.; Woodard, Jaie; Mariani, Luca; Kock, Kian Hong; Inukai, Sachi; Siggers, Trevor; Shokri, Leila; Gordân, Raluca; Sahni, Nidhi; Cotsapas, Chris; Hao, Tong; Yi, Song; Kellis, Manolis; Daly, Mark J.; Vidal, Marc; Hill, David E.; Bulyk, Martha L.

    2016-01-01

    Sequencing of exomes and genomes has revealed abundant genetic variation affecting the coding sequences of human transcription factors (TFs), but the consequences of such variation remain largely unexplored. We developed a computational, structure-based approach to evaluate TF variants for their impact on DNA-binding activity and used universal protein binding microarrays to assay sequence-specific DNA-binding activity across 41 reference and 117 variant alleles found in individuals of diverse ancestries and families with Mendelian diseases. We found 77 variants in 28 genes that affect DNA-binding affinity or specificity and identified thousands of rare alleles likely to alter the DNA-binding activity of human sequence-specific TFs. Our results suggest that most individuals have unique repertoires of TF DNA-binding activities, which may contribute to phenotypic variation. PMID:27013732

  12. Cinnamaldehyde and cinnamaldehyde derivatives reduce virulence in Vibrio spp. by decreasing the DNA-binding activity of the quorum sensing response regulator LuxR

    PubMed Central

    Brackman, Gilles; Defoirdt, Tom; Miyamoto, Carol; Bossier, Peter; Van Calenbergh, Serge; Nelis, Hans; Coenye, Tom

    2008-01-01

    Background To date, only few compounds targeting the AI-2 based quorum sensing (QS) system are known. In the present study, we screened cinnamaldehyde and substituted cinnamaldehydes for their ability to interfere with AI-2 based QS. The mechanism of QS inhibition was elucidated by measuring the effect on bioluminescence in several Vibrio harveyi mutants. We also studied in vitro the ability of these compounds to interfere with biofilm formation, stress response and virulence of Vibrio spp. The compounds were also evaluated in an in vivo assay measuring the reduction of Vibrio harveyi virulence towards Artemia shrimp. Results Our results indicate that cinnamaldehyde and several substituted derivatives interfere with AI-2 based QS without inhibiting bacterial growth. The active compounds neither interfered with the bioluminescence system as such, nor with the production of AI-2. Study of the effect in various mutants suggested that the target protein is LuxR. Mobility shift assays revealed a decreased DNA-binding ability of LuxR. The compounds were further shown to (i) inhibit biofilm formation in several Vibrio spp., (ii) result in a reduced ability to survive starvation and antibiotic treatment, (iii) reduce pigment and protease production in Vibrio anguillarum and (iv) protect gnotobiotic Artemia shrimp against virulent Vibrio harveyi BB120. Conclusion Cinnamaldehyde and cinnamaldehyde derivatives interfere with AI-2 based QS in various Vibrio spp. by decreasing the DNA-binding ability of LuxR. The use of these compounds resulted in several marked phenotypic changes, including reduced virulence and increased susceptibility to stress. Since inhibitors of AI-2 based quorum sensing are rare, and considering the role of AI-2 in several processes these compounds may be useful leads towards antipathogenic drugs. PMID:18793453

  13. Effects of glutathione depletion by 2-cyclohexen-1-one on excitatory amino acids-induced enhancement of activator protein-1 DNA binding in murine hippocampus.

    PubMed

    Ogita, K; Kitayama, T; Okuda, H; Yoneda, Y

    2001-03-01

    We have investigated the role of glutathione in mechanisms associated with excitatory amino acid signaling to the nuclear transcription factor activator protein-1 (AP1) in the brain using mice depleted of endogenous glutathione by prior treatment with 2-cyclohexen-1-one (CHX). In the hippocampus of animals treated with CHX 2 h before, a significant increase was seen in enhancement of AP1 DNA binding when determined 2 h after the injection of kainic acid (KA) at low doses. The sensitization to KA was not seen in animals injected with CHX 24 h before, in coincidence with the recovery of glutathione contents to the normal levels. By contrast, CHX did not significantly affect the potentiation by NMDA of AP1 binding under any experimental conditions. Prior treatment with CHX resulted in facilitation of behavioral changes induced by KA without affecting those induced by NMDA. These results suggest that endogenous glutathione may be at least in part involved in molecular mechanisms underlying transcriptional control by KA, but not by NMDA, signals of cellular functions.

  14. B-Ring-Aryl Substituted Luotonin A Analogues with a New Binding Mode to the Topoisomerase 1-DNA Complex Show Enhanced Cytotoxic Activity

    PubMed Central

    González-Ruiz, Víctor; Pascua, Irene; Fernández-Marcelo, Tamara; Ribelles, Pascual; Bianchini, Giulia; Sridharan, Vellaisamy; Iniesta, Pilar; Ramos, M. Teresa; Olives, Ana I.; Martín, M. Antonia; Menéndez, J. Carlos

    2014-01-01

    Topoisomerase 1 inhibition is an important strategy in targeted cancer chemotherapy. The drugs currently in use acting on this enzyme belong to the family of the camptothecins, and suffer severe limitations because of their low stability, which is associated with the hydrolysis of the δ-lactone moiety in their E ring. Luotonin A is a natural camptothecin analogue that lacks this functional group and therefore shows a much-improved stability, but at the cost of a lower activity. Therefore, the development of luotonin A analogues with an increased potency is important for progress in this area. In the present paper, a small library of luotonin A analogues modified at their A and B rings was generated by cerium(IV) ammonium nitrate-catalyzed Friedländer reactions. All analogues showed an activity similar or higher than the natural luotonin A in terms of topoisomerase 1 inhibition and some compounds had an activity comparable to that of camptothecin. Furthermore, most compounds showed a better activity than luotonin A in cell cytotoxicity assays. In order to rationalize these results, the first docking studies of luotonin-topoisomerase 1-DNA ternary complexes were undertaken. Most compounds bound in a manner similar to luotonin A and to standard topoisomerase poisons such as topotecan but, interestingly, the two most promising analogues, bearing a 3,5-dimethylphenyl substituent at ring B, docked in a different orientation. This binding mode allows the hydrophobic moiety to be shielded from the aqueous environment by being buried between the deoxyribose belonging to the G(+1) guanine and Arg364 in the scissile strand and the surface of the protein and a hydrogen bond between the D-ring carbonyl and the basic amino acid. The discovery of this new binding mode and its associated higher inhibitory potency is a significant advance in the design of new topoisomerase 1 inhibitors. PMID:24830682

  15. Metallation of ethylenediamine based Schiff base with biologically active Cu(II), Ni(II) and Zn(II) ions: synthesis, spectroscopic characterization, electrochemical behaviour, DNA binding, photonuclease activity and in vitro antimicrobial efficacy.

    PubMed

    Raman, N; Selvan, A; Sudharsan, S

    2011-09-01

    A new ligand [C28H20N6O8] (L2) has been synthesized by the condensation reaction of 3-hydroxy-4-nitrobenzaldehydenephenylhydrazine (L1) with diethyloxalate. This ligand L2 is allowed to react with bis(ethylenediamine)Cu(II)/Ni(II)/Zn(II) complexes. It affords [(L2)Cu(en)2]Cl2(1)/[(L2)Ni(en)2]Cl2(2)/[(L2)Zn(en)2]Cl2(3) complexes, respectively. These complexes (1-3) have been characterized by the spectral and analytical techniques. The interaction of these complexes with calf thymus (CT) DNA is characterized by the absorption spectra which exhibit a slight red shift with hypochromic effect. Electrochemical analyses and viscosity measurements have also been carried out to determine the mode of binding. The shift in ΔEp, E1/2 and Ipc values explores the interaction of CT DNA with the above metal complexes. The slight increase in the viscosity of CT DNA indicates that these complexes bind to CT DNA through a partial non-classical intercalative mode. Cleavage experiments using pBR322 DNA in presence of H2O2 indicate that these complexes behave as efficient artificial chemical nucleases in the order of 1>2>3. Moreover, the antibacterial and antifungal studies reveal that complex 1 is highly active against the bacterial and fungal growth.

  16. DNA binding and antiproliferative activity toward human carcinoma cells of copper(II) and zinc(II) complexes of a 2,5-diphenyl[1,3,4]oxadiazole derivative.

    PubMed

    Terenzi, Alessio; Fanelli, Mirco; Ambrosi, Gianluca; Amatori, Stefano; Fusi, Vieri; Giorgi, Luca; Turco Liveri, Vincenzo; Barone, Giampaolo

    2012-04-21

    The interaction of calf thymus DNA with [CuL(ClO(4))]ClO(4)·H(2)O (1) and [ZnLBr]Br·H(2)O (2) (L = 9,12,15,18,27,28-hexaaza-29-oxatetracyclo[24.2.1.0(2,7).0(20,25)]enneicosa-2,4,6,20,22,24,26,28(1)-octaene) dicationic complexes in aqueous solution at neutral pH, was investigated by variable-temperature UV-vis absorption, circular dichroism and fluorescence spectroscopy. The values of the DNA-binding constants of these complexes, determined by competitive binding spectrofluorimetric titrations of ethidium bromide (EB)-DNA solutions, are (6.7 ± 0.5) × 10(6) M(-1) for CuL(2+) and (4.7 ± 0.5) × 10(5) M(-1) for ZnL(2+). These data together with a through analysis of the spectroscopic behaviour consistently suggest that both compounds are effective DNA binders. Interestingly, the DNA-binding strength of these complexes has been found to be correlated to their in vitro cytotoxic activity toward human breast carcinoma cells, although the complex with lower DNA-binding affinity is more active. In fact, biological studies showed that when the compounds are delivered through the cell membrane by a lipidic carrier, the cell survival is sensibly reduced, up to 58% with 1 and to 31% with 2.

  17. Mechanisms for Binding between Methylene Blue and DNA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vardevanyan, P. O.; Antonyan, A. P.; Parsadanyan, M. A.; Shahinyan, M. A.; Hambardzumyan, L. A.

    2013-09-01

    We have used absorption and fl uorimetric methods to study the interaction between methylene blue (MB) and calfthymus DNA. Based on Scatchard analysis of the experimental data, we plotted the methylene blue-DNA binding curve. This curve consists of two linear sections, which indicates two types of interaction, for which we determined the constants K and the number of binding sites n for binding of this ligand to DNA. Comparison of the data obtained with analogous values found for interaction between ethidium bromide and DNA allowed us to conclude that there are two modes of interaction between methylene blue and DNA: strong binding (semi-intercalation) and weak binding (electrostatic).

  18. Fluoroquinolone-gyrase-DNA complexes: two modes of drug binding.

    PubMed

    Mustaev, Arkady; Malik, Muhammad; Zhao, Xilin; Kurepina, Natalia; Luan, Gan; Oppegard, Lisa M; Hiasa, Hiroshi; Marks, Kevin R; Kerns, Robert J; Berger, James M; Drlica, Karl

    2014-05-02

    DNA gyrase and topoisomerase IV control bacterial DNA topology by breaking DNA, passing duplex DNA through the break, and then resealing the break. This process is subject to reversible corruption by fluoroquinolones, antibacterials that form drug-enzyme-DNA complexes in which the DNA is broken. The complexes, called cleaved complexes because of the presence of DNA breaks, have been crystallized and found to have the fluoroquinolone C-7 ring system facing the GyrB/ParE subunits. As expected from x-ray crystallography, a thiol-reactive, C-7-modified chloroacetyl derivative of ciprofloxacin (Cip-AcCl) formed cross-linked cleaved complexes with mutant GyrB-Cys(466) gyrase as evidenced by resistance to reversal by both EDTA and thermal treatments. Surprisingly, cross-linking was also readily seen with complexes formed by mutant GyrA-G81C gyrase, thereby revealing a novel drug-gyrase interaction not observed in crystal structures. The cross-link between fluoroquinolone and GyrA-G81C gyrase correlated with exceptional bacteriostatic activity for Cip-AcCl with a quinolone-resistant GyrA-G81C variant of Escherichia coli and its Mycobacterium smegmatis equivalent (GyrA-G89C). Cip-AcCl-mediated, irreversible inhibition of DNA replication provided further evidence for a GyrA-drug cross-link. Collectively these data establish the existence of interactions between the fluoroquinolone C-7 ring and both GyrA and GyrB. Because the GyrA-Gly(81) and GyrB-Glu(466) residues are far apart (17 Å) in the crystal structure of cleaved complexes, two modes of quinolone binding must exist. The presence of two binding modes raises the possibility that multiple quinolone-enzyme-DNA complexes can form, a discovery that opens new avenues for exploring and exploiting relationships between drug structure and activity with type II DNA topoisomerases.

  19. Altering the GTP binding site of the DNA/RNA-binding protein, Translin/TB-RBP, decreases RNA binding and may create a dominant negative phenotype.

    PubMed

    Chennathukuzhi, V M; Kurihara, Y; Bray, J D; Yang, J; Hecht, N B

    2001-11-01

    The DNA/RNA-binding protein, Translin/Testis Brain RNA-binding protein (Translin/TB-RBP), contains a putative GTP binding site in its C-terminus which is highly conserved. To determine if guanine nucleotide binding to this site functionally alters nucleic acid binding, electrophoretic mobility shift assays were performed with RNA and DNA binding probes. GTP, but not GDP, reduces RNA binding by approximately 50% and the poorly hydrolyzed GTP analog, GTPgammaS, reduces binding by >90% in gel shift and immunoprecipitation assays. No similar reduction of DNA binding is seen. When the putative GTP binding site of TB-RBP, amino acid sequence VTAGD, is altered to VTNSD by site directed mutagenesis, GTP will no longer bind to TB-RBP(GTP) and TB-RBP(GTP) no longer binds to RNA, although DNA binding is not affected. Yeast two-hybrid assays reveal that like wild-type TB-RBP, TB-RBP(GTP) will interact with itself, with wild-type TB-RBP and with Translin associated factor X (Trax). Transfection of TB-RBP(GTP) into NIH 3T3 cells leads to a marked increase in cell death suggesting a dominant negative function for TB-RBP(GTP) in cells. These data suggest TB-RBP is an RNA-binding protein whose activity is allosterically controlled by nucleotide binding.

  20. Ehrlichia chaffeensis TRP120 binds a G+C-rich motif in host cell DNA and exhibits eukaryotic transcriptional activator function.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Bing; Kuriakose, Jeeba A; Luo, Tian; Ballesteros, Efren; Gupta, Sharu; Fofanov, Yuriy; McBride, Jere W

    2011-11-01

    Ehrlichia chaffeensis is an obligately intracellular bacterium that modulates host cell gene transcription in the mononuclear phagocyte, but the host gene targets and mechanisms involved in transcriptional modulation are not well-defined. In this study, we identified a novel tandem repeat DNA-binding domain in the E. chaffeensis 120-kDa tandem repeat protein (TRP120) that directly binds host cell DNA. TRP120 was observed by immunofluorescent microscopy in the nucleus of E. chaffeensis-infected host cells and was detected in nuclear extracts by Western immunoblotting with TRP120-specific antibody. The TRP120 binding sites and associated host cell target genes were identified using high-throughput deep sequencing (Illumina) of immunoprecipitated DNA (chromatin immunoprecipitation and high-throughput DNA sequencing). Multiple em motif elicitation (MEME) analysis of the most highly enriched TRP120-bound sequences revealed a G+C-rich DNA motif, and recombinant TRP120 specifically bound synthetic oligonucleotides containing the motif. TRP120 target gene binding sites were mapped most frequently to intersecting regions (intron/exon; 49%) but were also identified in upstream regulatory regions (25%) and downstream locations (26%). Genes targeted by TRP120 were most frequently associated with transcriptional regulation, signal transduction, and apoptosis. TRP120 targeted inflammatory chemokine genes, CCL2, CCL20, and CXCL11, which were strongly upregulated during E. chaffeensis infection and were also upregulated by direct transfection with recombinant TRP120. This study reveals that TRP120 is a novel DNA-binding protein that is involved in a host gene transcriptional regulation strategy.

  1. Z-DNA binding protein from chicken blood nuclei

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Herbert, A. G.; Spitzner, J. R.; Lowenhaupt, K.; Rich, A.

    1993-01-01

    A protein (Z alpha) that appears to be highly specific for the left-handed Z-DNA conformer has been identified in chicken blood nuclear extracts. Z alpha activity is measured in a band-shift assay by using a radioactive probe consisting of a (dC-dG)35 oligomer that has 50% of the deoxycytosines replaced with 5-bromodeoxycytosine. In the presence of 10 mM Mg2+, the probe converts to the Z-DNA conformation and is bound by Z alpha. The binding of Z alpha to the radioactive probe is specifically blocked by competition with linear poly(dC-dG) stabilized in the Z-DNA form by chemical bromination but not by B-form poly(dC-dG) or boiled salmon-sperm DNA. In addition, the binding activity of Z alpha is competitively blocked by supercoiled plasmids containing a Z-DNA insert but not by either the linearized plasmid or by an equivalent amount of the parental supercoiled plasmid without the Z-DNA-forming insert. Z alpha can be crosslinked to the 32P-labeled brominated probe with UV light, allowing us to estimate that the minimal molecular mass of Z alpha is 39 kDa.

  2. DNA binding studies of Vinca alkaloids: experimental and computational evidence.

    PubMed

    Pandya, Prateek; Gupta, Surendra P; Pandav, Kumud; Barthwal, Ritu; Jayaram, B; Kumar, Surat

    2012-03-01

    Fluorescence studies on the indole alkaloids vinblastine sulfate, vincristine sulfate, vincamine and catharanthine have demonstrated the DNA binding ability of these molecules. The binding mode of these molecules in the minor groove of DNA is non-specific. A new parameter of the purine-pyrimidine base sequence specificty was observed in order to define the non-specific DNA binding of ligands. Catharanthine had shown 'same' pattern of 'Pu-Py' specificity while evaluating its DNA binding profile. The proton resonances of a DNA decamer duplex were assigned. The models of the drug:DNA complexes were analyzed for DNA binding features. The effect of temperature on the DNA binding was also evaluated.

  3. Viral interference with DNA repair by targeting of the single-stranded DNA binding protein RPA.

    PubMed

    Banerjee, Pubali; DeJesus, Rowena; Gjoerup, Ole; Schaffhausen, Brian S

    2013-10-01

    Correct repair of damaged DNA is critical for genomic integrity. Deficiencies in DNA repair are linked with human cancer. Here we report a novel mechanism by which a virus manipulates DNA damage responses. Infection with murine polyomavirus sensitizes cells to DNA damage by UV and etoposide. Polyomavirus large T antigen (LT) alone is sufficient to sensitize cells 100 fold to UV and other kinds of DNA damage. This results in activated stress responses and apoptosis. Genetic analysis shows that LT sensitizes via the binding of its origin-binding domain (OBD) to the single-stranded DNA binding protein replication protein A (RPA). Overexpression of RPA protects cells expressing OBD from damage, and knockdown of RPA mimics the LT phenotype. LT prevents recruitment of RPA to nuclear foci after DNA damage. This leads to failure to recruit repair proteins such as Rad51 or Rad9, explaining why LT prevents repair of double strand DNA breaks by homologous recombination. A targeted intervention directed at RPA based on this viral mechanism could be useful in circumventing the resistance of cancer cells to therapy.

  4. NonO enhances the association of many DNA-binding proteins to their targets.

    PubMed

    Yang, Y S; Yang, M C; Tucker, P W; Capra, J D

    1997-06-15

    NonO is an unusual nucleic acid binding protein not only in that it binds both DNA and RNA but that it does so via functionally separable domains. Here we document that NonO enhances the binding of some (E47, OTF-1 and OTF-2) but not all (PEA3) conventional sequence-specific transcription factors to their recognition sites in artificial substrates as well as in an immunoglobulin VHpromoter. We also show that NonO induces the binding of the Ku complex to DNA ends. Ku has no known DNA sequence specificity. These enhancement of binding effects are NonO concentration dependent. Using the E box activity of E47 as a model, kinetic studies demonstrate that the association rate of the protein-DNA complex increases in the presence of NonO while the dissociation rate remains the same, thereby increasing the sum total of the interaction. Oligo competition experiments indicate that NonO does not contact the target DNA in order to enhance the binding activity of DNA binding proteins. Rather, methylation interference analysis reveals that the induced E47 binding-activity has the same DNA-binding sequence specificity as the normal binding. This result suggests that one of the effects of NonO is to induce a true protein-DNA interaction. In this way, it might be possible for NonO to play a crucial role in gene regulation.

  5. Binding characteristics of salbutamol with DNA by spectral methods.

    PubMed

    Bi, Shuyun; Pang, Bo; Zhao, Tingting; Wang, Tianjiao; Wang, Yu; Yan, Lili

    2013-07-01

    Salbutamol interacting with deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) was examined by fluorescence, UV absorption, viscosity measurements, and DNA melting techniques. The binding constants and binding sites were obtained at different temperatures by fluorescence quenching. The Stern-Volmer plots showed that the quenching of fluorescence of salbutamol by DNA was a static quenching. To probe the binding mode, various analytical methods were performed and the results were as follows: hyperchromic effect was shown in the absorption spectra of salbutamol upon addition of DNA; there was no appreciable increase in melting temperature of DNA when salbutamol was presented in DNA solution; the fluorescence intensity of salbutamol-DNA decrease with the increasing ionic strength; the relative viscosity of DNA did not change in the presence of salbutamol; the binding constant of salbutamol with double strand DNA (dsDNA) was much higher than that of it with single strand DNA (ssDNA). All these results indicated that the binding mode of salbutamol to DNA should be groove binding. The thermodynamic parameters suggested that hydrogen bond or van der Waals force might play an important role in salbutamol binding to DNA. According to the Förster energy transference theory, the binding distance between the acceptor and donor was 3.70 nm.

  6. Binding characteristics of salbutamol with DNA by spectral methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bi, Shuyun; Pang, Bo; Zhao, Tingting; Wang, Tianjiao; Wang, Yu; Yan, Lili

    2013-07-01

    Salbutamol interacting with deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) was examined by fluorescence, UV absorption, viscosity measurements, and DNA melting techniques. The binding constants and binding sites were obtained at different temperatures by fluorescence quenching. The Stern-Volmer plots showed that the quenching of fluorescence of salbutamol by DNA was a static quenching. To probe the binding mode, various analytical methods were performed and the results were as follows: hyperchromic effect was shown in the absorption spectra of salbutamol upon addition of DNA; there was no appreciable increase in melting temperature of DNA when salbutamol was presented in DNA solution; the fluorescence intensity of salbutamol-DNA decrease with the increasing ionic strength; the relative viscosity of DNA did not change in the presence of salbutamol; the binding constant of salbutamol with double strand DNA (dsDNA) was much higher than that of it with single strand DNA (ssDNA). All these results indicated that the binding mode of salbutamol to DNA should be groove binding. The thermodynamic parameters suggested that hydrogen bond or van der Waals force might play an important role in salbutamol binding to DNA. According to the Förster energy transference theory, the binding distance between the acceptor and donor was 3.70 nm.

  7. PEROXISOME PROLIFERATOR-ACTIVATED RECEPTORα (PPARα) AGONISTS DIFFERENTIALLY REGULATE INHIBITOR OF DNA BINDING (ID2) EXPRESSION IN RODENTS AND HUMAN CELLS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Abstract Inhibitor of DNA binding (Id2) is a member of the helix-loop-helix (HLH) transcription factor family whose members play important roles in cell differentiation and proliferation. Id2 has been linked to the development of cardiovascular diseases since thiazolidinediones,...

  8. Mechanism of RecO recruitment to DNA by single-stranded DNA binding protein

    SciTech Connect

    Ryzhikov, Mikhail; Koroleva, Olga; Postnov, Dmitri; Tran, Andrew; Korolev, Sergey

    2011-08-25

    RecO is a recombination mediator protein (RMP) important for homologous recombination, replication repair and DNA annealing in bacteria. In all pathways, the single-stranded (ss) DNA binding protein, SSB, plays an inhibitory role by protecting ssDNA from annealing and recombinase binding. Conversely, SSB may stimulate each reaction through direct interaction with RecO. We present a crystal structure of Escherichia coli RecO bound to the conserved SSB C-terminus (SSB-Ct). SSB-Ct binds the hydrophobic pocket of RecO in a conformation similar to that observed in the ExoI/SSB-Ct complex. Hydrophobic interactions facilitate binding of SSB-Ct to RecO and RecO/RecR complex in both low and moderate ionic strength solutions. In contrast, RecO interaction with DNA is inhibited by an elevated salt concentration. The SSB mutant lacking SSB-Ct also inhibits RecO-mediated DNA annealing activity in a salt-dependent manner. Neither RecO nor RecOR dissociates SSB from ssDNA. Therefore, in E. coli, SSB recruits RMPs to ssDNA through SSB-Ct, and RMPs are likely to alter the conformation of SSB-bound ssDNA without SSB dissociation to initiate annealing or recombination. Intriguingly, Deinococcus radiodurans RecO does not bind SSB-Ct and weakly interacts with the peptide in the presence of RecR, suggesting the diverse mechanisms of DNA repair pathways mediated by RecO in different organisms.

  9. Metal based pharmacologically active agents: Synthesis, structural characterization, molecular modeling, CT-DNA binding studies and in vitro antimicrobial screening of iron(II) bromosalicylidene amino acid chelates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abdel-Rahman, Laila H.; El-Khatib, Rafat M.; Nassr, Lobna A. E.; Abu-Dief, Ahmed M.; Ismael, Mohamed; Seleem, Amin Abdou

    2014-01-01

    In recent years, great interest has been focused on Fe(II) Schiff base amino acid complexes as cytotoxic and antitumor drugs. Thus a series of new iron(II) complexes based on Schiff bases amino acids ligands have been designed and synthesized from condensation of 5-bromosalicylaldehyde (bs) and α-amino acids (L-alanine (ala), L-phenylalanine (phala), L-aspartic acid (aspa), L-histidine (his) and L-arginine (arg)). The structure of the investigated iron(II) complexes was elucidated using elemental analyses, infrared, ultraviolet-visible, thermogravimetric analysis, as well as conductivity and magnetic susceptibility measurements. Moreover, the stoichiometry and the stability constants of the prepared complexes have been determined spectrophotometrically. The results suggest that 5-bromosalicylaldehyde amino acid Schiff bases (bs:aa) behave as dibasic tridentate ONO ligands and coordinate to Fe(II) in octahedral geometry according to the general formula [Fe(bs:aa)2]ṡnH2O. The conductivity values between 37 and 64 ohm-1 mol-1 cm2 in ethanol imply the presence of nonelectrolyte species. The structure of the complexes was validated using quantum mechanics calculations based on accurate DFT methods. Geometry optimization of the Fe-Schiff base amino acid complexes showed that all complexes had octahedral coordination. In addition, the interaction of these complexes with (CT-DNA) was investigated at pH = 7.2, by using UV-vis absorption, viscosity and agarose gel electrophoresis measurements. Results indicated that the investigated complexes strongly bind to calf thymus DNA via intercalative mode and showed a different DNA binding according to the sequence: bsari > bshi > bsali > bsasi > bsphali. Moreover, the prepared compounds are screened for their in vitro antibacterial and antifungal activity against three types of bacteria, Escherichia coli, Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Bacillus cereus and three types of anti fungal cultures, Penicillium purpurogenium, Aspergillus

  10. Identification of amino acids essential for DNA binding and dimerization in p67SRF: implications for a novel DNA-binding motif.

    PubMed Central

    Sharrocks, A D; Gille, H; Shaw, P E

    1993-01-01

    The serum response factor (p67SRF) binds to a palindromic sequence in the c-fos serum response element (SRE). A second protein, p62TCF binds in conjunction with p67SRF to form a ternary complex, and it is through this complex that growth factor-induced transcriptional activation of c-fos is thought to take place. A 90-amino-acid peptide, coreSRF, is capable for dimerizing, binding DNA, and recruiting p62TCF. By using extensive site-directed mutagenesis we have investigated the role of individual coreSRF amino acids in DNA binding. Mutant phenotypes were defined by gel retardation and cross-linking analyses. Our results have identified residues essential for either DNA binding or dimerization. Three essential basic amino acids whose conservative mutation severely reduced DNA binding were identified. Evidence which is consistent with these residues being on the face of a DNA binding alpha-helix is presented. A phenylalanine residue and a hexameric hydrophobic box are identified as essential for dimerization. The amino acid phasing is consistent with the dimerization interface being presented as a continuous region on a beta-strand. A putative second alpha-helix acts as a linker between these two regions. This study indicates that p67SRF is a member of a protein family which, in common with many DNA binding proteins, utilize an alpha-helix for DNA binding. However, this alpha-helix is contained within a novel domain structure. Images PMID:8417320

  11. Phenazine virulence factor binding to extracellular DNA is important for Pseudomonas aeruginosa biofilm formation

    PubMed Central

    Das, Theerthankar; Kutty, Samuel K.; Tavallaie, Roya; Ibugo, Amaye I.; Panchompoo, Janjira; Sehar, Shama; Aldous, Leigh; Yeung, Amanda W. S.; Thomas, Shane R.; Kumar, Naresh; Gooding, J. Justin; Manefield, Mike

    2015-01-01

    Bacterial resistance to conventional antibiotics necessitates the identification of novel leads for infection control. Interference with extracellular phenomena, such as quorum sensing, extracellular DNA integrity and redox active metabolite release, represents a new frontier to control human pathogens such as Pseudomonas aeruginosa and hence reduce mortality. Here we reveal that the extracellular redox active virulence factor pyocyanin produced by P. aeruginosa binds directly to the deoxyribose-phosphate backbone of DNA and intercalates with DNA nitrogenous base pair regions. Binding results in local perturbations of the DNA double helix structure and enhanced electron transfer along the nucleic acid polymer. Pyocyanin binding to DNA also increases DNA solution viscosity. In contrast, antioxidants interacting with DNA and pyocyanin decrease DNA solution viscosity. Biofilms deficient in pyocyanin production and biofilms lacking extracellular DNA show similar architecture indicating the interaction is important in P. aeruginosa biofilm formation. PMID:25669133

  12. Melatonin inhibits MMP-9 transactivation and renal cell carcinoma metastasis by suppressing Akt-MAPKs pathway and NF-κB DNA-binding activity.

    PubMed

    Lin, Yung-Wei; Lee, Liang-Ming; Lee, Wei-Jiunn; Chu, Chih-Ying; Tan, Peng; Yang, Yi-Chieh; Chen, Wei-Yu; Yang, Shun-Fa; Hsiao, Michael; Chien, Ming-Hsien

    2016-04-01

    Renal cell carcinoma (RCC) is the most lethal of all urological malignancies because of its potent metastasis potential. Melatonin exerts multiple tumor-suppressing activities through antiproliferative, proapoptotic, and anti-angiogenic actions and has been tested in clinical trials. However, the antimetastastic effect of melatonin and its underlying mechanism in RCC are unclear. In this study, we demonstrated that melatonin at the pharmacologic concentration (0.5-2 mm) considerably reduced the migration and invasion of RCC cells (Caki-1 and Achn). Furthermore, we found that melatonin suppressed metastasis of Caki-1 cells in spontaneous and experimental metastasis animal models. Mechanistic investigations revealed that melatonin transcriptionally inhibited MMP-9 by reducing p65- and p52-DNA-binding activities. Moreover, the Akt-mediated JNK1/2 and ERK1/2 signaling pathways were involved in melatonin-regulated MMP-9 transactivation and cell motility. Clinical samples revealed an inverse correlation between melatonin receptor 1A (MTNR1A) and MMP-9 expression in normal kidney and RCC tissues. In addition, a higher survival rate was found in MTNR1A(high) /MMP-9(low) patients than in MTNR1A(low) /MMP-9(high) patients. Overall, our results provide new insights into the role of melatonin-induced molecular regulation in suppressing RCC metastasis and suggest that melatonin has potential therapeutic applications for metastastic RCC.

  13. Characterization of single stranded telomeric DNA-binding proteins in cultured soybean (Glycine max) cells.

    PubMed

    Kwon, Chian; Kwon, Kisang; Chung, In Kwon; Kim, Soon Young; Cho, Myeon Haeng; Kang, Bin Goo

    2004-06-30

    We have identified and characterized a protein factor in soybean (Glycine max) nuclear extracts that binds to plant single stranded telomeric DNA repeats. A single DNA-protein complex was detected in gel retardation assays using synthetic telomeres and nuclear extracts. The protein forming this complex was designated soy-bean (Glycine max) single stranded telomeric DNA-binding protein (Gm-STBP). Gm-STBP binds to single stranded telomeric DNA containing more than two repeats. It does not bind to Tetrahymena, human or mutated plant telomere sequences, and its binding activity is not affected by RNase treatment. Gm-STBP activity gradually decreased after suspension cultures entered stationary phase. A slower migrating band was formed with extracts of earlier and later phases of soybean suspension cultures. Our findings suggest that binding of Gm-STBP to plant single stranded telomeric DNA may play a role in the proper functioning of telomeres during development.

  14. HTLV-I Tax protein stimulation of DNA binding of bZIP proteins by enhancing dimerization.

    PubMed

    Wagner, S; Green, M R

    1993-10-15

    The Tax protein of human T cell leukemia virus type-1 (HTLV-I) transcriptionally activates the HTLV-I promoter. This activation requires binding sites for activating transcription factor (ATF) proteins, a family of cellular proteins that contain basic region-leucine zipper (bZIP) DNA binding domains. Data are presented showing that Tax increases the in vitro DNA binding activity of multiple ATF proteins. Tax also stimulated DNA binding by other bZIP proteins, but did not affect DNA binding proteins that lack a bZIP domain. The increase in DNA binding occurred because Tax promotes dimerization of the bZIP domain in the absence of DNA, and the elevated concentration of the bZIP homodimer then facilitates the DNA binding reaction. These results help explain how Tax activates viral transcription and transforms cells.

  15. Artificial zinc finger DNA binding domains: versatile tools for genome engineering and modulation of gene expression.

    PubMed

    Hossain, Mir A; Barrow, Joeva J; Shen, Yong; Haq, Md Imdadul; Bungert, Jörg

    2015-11-01

    Genome editing and alteration of gene expression by synthetic DNA binding activities gained a lot of momentum over the last decade. This is due to the development of new DNA binding molecules with enhanced binding specificity. The most commonly used DNA binding modules are zinc fingers (ZFs), TALE-domains, and the RNA component of the CRISPR/Cas9 system. These binding modules are fused or linked to either nucleases that cut the DNA and induce DNA repair processes, or to protein domains that activate or repress transcription of genes close to the targeted site in the genome. This review focuses on the structure, design, and applications of ZF DNA binding domains (ZFDBDs). ZFDBDs are relatively small and have been shown to penetrate the cell membrane without additional tags suggesting that they could be delivered to cells without a DNA or RNA intermediate. Advanced algorithms that are based on extensive knowledge of the mode of ZF/DNA interactions are used to design the amino acid composition of ZFDBDs so that they bind to unique sites in the genome. Off-target binding has been a concern for all synthetic DNA binding molecules. Thus, increasing the specificity and affinity of ZFDBDs will have a significant impact on their use in analytical or therapeutic settings.

  16. Redox regulation of c-Jun DNA binding by reversible S-glutathiolation.

    PubMed

    Klatt, P; Molina, E P; De Lacoba, M G; Padilla, C A; Martinez-Galesteo, E; Barcena, J A; Lamas, S

    1999-09-01

    Redox control of the transcription factor c-Jun maps to a single cysteine in its DNA binding domain. However, the nature of the oxidized state of this cysteine and, thus, the potential molecular mechanisms accounting for the redox regulation of c-Jun DNA binding remain unclear. To address this issue, we have analyzed the purified recombinant c-Jun DNA binding domain for redox-dependent thiol modifications and concomitant changes in DNA binding activity. We show that changes in the ratio of reduced to oxidized glutathione provide the potential to oxidize c-Jun sulfhydryls by mechanisms that include both protein disulfide formation and S-glutathiolation. We provide evidence that S-glutathiolation, which is specifically targeted to the cysteine residue located in the DNA binding site of the protein, may account for the reversible redox regulation of c-Jun DNA binding. Furthermore, based on a molecular model of the S-glutathiolated protein, we discuss the structural elements facilitating S-glutathiolation and how this modification interferes with DNA binding. Given the structural similarities between the positively charged cysteine-containing DNA binding motif of c-Jun and the DNA binding site of related oxidant-sensitive transcriptional activators, the unprecedented phenomenon of redox-triggered S-thiolation of a transcription factor described in this report suggests a novel role for protein thiolation in the redox control of transcription.

  17. Prediction of zinc finger DNA binding protein.

    PubMed

    Nakata, K

    1995-04-01

    Using the neural network algorithm with back-propagation training procedure, we analysed the zinc finger DNA binding protein sequences. We incorporated the characteristic patterns around the zinc finger motifs TFIIIA type (Cys-X2-5-Cys-X12-13-His-X2-5-His) and the steroid hormone receptor type (Cys-X2-5-Cys-X12-15-Cys-X2-5-Cys-X15-16-Cys-X4-5-Cys-X8-10- Cys-X2-3-Cys) in the neural network algorithm. The patterns used in the neural network were the amino acid pattern, the electric charge and polarity pattern, the side-chain chemical property and subproperty patterns, the hydrophobicity and hydrophilicity patterns and the secondary structure propensity pattern. Two consecutive patterns were also considered. Each pattern was incorporated in the single layer perceptron algorithm and the combinations of patterns were considered in the two-layer perceptron algorithm. As for the TFIIIA type zinc finger DNA binding motifs, the prediction results of the two-layer perceptron algorithm reached up to 96.9% discrimination, and the prediction results of the discriminant analysis using the combination of several characters reached up to 97.0%. As for the steroid hormone receptor type zinc finger, the prediction results of neural network algorithm and the discriminant analyses reached up to 96.0%.

  18. Selective binding of single-stranded DNA-binding proteins onto DNA molecules adsorbed on single-walled carbon nanotubes.

    PubMed

    Nii, Daisuke; Hayashida, Takuya; Yamaguchi, Yuuki; Ikawa, Shukuko; Shibata, Takehiko; Umemura, Kazuo

    2014-09-01

    Single-stranded DNA-binding (SSB) proteins were treated with hybrids of DNA and single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs) to examine the biological function of the DNA molecules adsorbed on the SWNT surface. When single-stranded DNA (ssDNA) was used for the hybridization, significant binding of the SSB molecules to the ssDNA-SWNT hybrids was observed by using atomic force microscopy (AFM) and agarose gel electrophoresis. When double-stranded DNA (dsDNA) was used, the SSB molecules did not bind to the dsDNA-SWNT hybrids in most of the conditions that we evaluated. A specifically modified electrophoresis procedure was used to monitor the locations of the DNA, SSB, and SWNT molecules. Our results clearly showed that ssDNA/dsDNA molecules on the SWNT surfaces retained their single-stranded/double-stranded structures.

  19. Molecular spectroscopy evidence of berberine binding to DNA: comparative binding and thermodynamic profile of intercalation.

    PubMed

    Li, Xiao-Ling; Hu, Yan-Jun; Wang, Hong; Yu, Bing-Qiong; Yue, Hua-Li

    2012-03-12

    Berberine (BH) is an important traditional medicinal herb endowed with diverse pharmacological and biological activities. In this work, the binding characteristics and molecular mechanism of the interaction between the BH and herring sperm DNA were explored by UV-vis absorbance and fluorescence spectroscopy. In the mechanism discussion, fluorescence quenching, absorption spectra, competition experiment, and iodide quenching experiment studies hinted at an intercalative mode of binding for BH to DNA. Fluorescence studies revealed the binding constant (K) of BH-DNA was ∼10(4) L·mol(-1). The effects of temperature, chemical denaturants, thermal denaturation, and pH were studied to show the factors of the interaction and provided further support for the intercalative binding mode. The results of thermodynamic parameters ΔG, ΔH, and ΔS at different temperatures indicated that the hydrogen bonds and van der Waals interactions played major roles in the reaction, and the effect of ionic strength indicated that electrostatic attraction between the BH and DNA was also a component of the interaction.

  20. Ubiquitin C-terminal hydrolase37 regulates Tcf7 DNA binding for the activation of Wnt signalling

    PubMed Central

    Han, Wonhee; Lee, Hyeyoon; Han, Jin-Kwan

    2017-01-01

    The Tcf/Lef family of transcription factors mediates the Wnt/β-catenin pathway that is involved in a wide range of biological processes, including vertebrate embryogenesis and diverse pathogenesis. Post-translational modifications, including phosphorylation, sumoylation and acetylation, are known to be important for the regulation of Tcf/Lef proteins. However, the importance of ubiquitination and ubiquitin-mediated regulatory mechanisms for Tcf/Lef activity are still unclear. Here, we newly show that ubiquitin C-terminal hydrolase 37 (Uch37), a deubiquitinase, interacts with Tcf7 (formerly named Tcf1) to activate Wnt signalling. Biochemical analyses demonstrated that deubiquitinating activity of Uch37 is not involved in Tcf7 protein stability but is required for the association of Tcf7 to target gene promoter in both Xenopus embryo and human liver cancer cells. In vivo analyses further revealed that Uch37 functions as a positive regulator of the Wnt/β-catenin pathway downstream of β-catenin stabilization that is required for the expression of ventrolateral mesoderm genes during Xenopus gastrulation. Our study provides a new mechanism for chromatin occupancy of Tcf7 and uncovers the physiological significance of Uch37 during early vertebrate development by regulating the Wnt/β-catenin pathway. PMID:28198400

  1. Ubiquitin C-terminal hydrolase37 regulates Tcf7 DNA binding for the activation of Wnt signalling.

    PubMed

    Han, Wonhee; Lee, Hyeyoon; Han, Jin-Kwan

    2017-02-15

    The Tcf/Lef family of transcription factors mediates the Wnt/β-catenin pathway that is involved in a wide range of biological processes, including vertebrate embryogenesis and diverse pathogenesis. Post-translational modifications, including phosphorylation, sumoylation and acetylation, are known to be important for the regulation of Tcf/Lef proteins. However, the importance of ubiquitination and ubiquitin-mediated regulatory mechanisms for Tcf/Lef activity are still unclear. Here, we newly show that ubiquitin C-terminal hydrolase 37 (Uch37), a deubiquitinase, interacts with Tcf7 (formerly named Tcf1) to activate Wnt signalling. Biochemical analyses demonstrated that deubiquitinating activity of Uch37 is not involved in Tcf7 protein stability but is required for the association of Tcf7 to target gene promoter in both Xenopus embryo and human liver cancer cells. In vivo analyses further revealed that Uch37 functions as a positive regulator of the Wnt/β-catenin pathway downstream of β-catenin stabilization that is required for the expression of ventrolateral mesoderm genes during Xenopus gastrulation. Our study provides a new mechanism for chromatin occupancy of Tcf7 and uncovers the physiological significance of Uch37 during early vertebrate development by regulating the Wnt/β-catenin pathway.

  2. Hypoxia-inducible factor 1 mediates hypoxia-induced cardiomyocyte lipid accumulation by reducing the DNA binding activity of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor {alpha}/retinoid X receptor

    SciTech Connect

    Belanger, Adam J.; Luo Zhengyu; Vincent, Karen A.; Akita, Geoffrey Y.; Cheng, Seng H.; Gregory, Richard J.; Jiang Canwen

    2007-12-21

    In response to cellular hypoxia, cardiomyocytes adapt to consume less oxygen by shifting ATP production from mitochondrial fatty acid {beta}-oxidation to glycolysis. The transcriptional activation of glucose transporters and glycolytic enzymes by hypoxia is mediated by hypoxia-inducible factor 1 (HIF-1). In this study, we examined whether HIF-1 was involved in the suppression of mitochondrial fatty acid {beta}-oxidation in hypoxic cardiomyocytes. We showed that either hypoxia or adenovirus-mediated expression of a constitutively stable hybrid form (HIF-1{alpha}/VP16) suppressed mitochondrial fatty acid metabolism, as indicated by an accumulation of intracellular neutral lipid. Both treatments also reduced the mRNA levels of muscle carnitine palmitoyltransferase I which catalyzes the rate-limiting step in the mitochondrial import of fatty acids for {beta}-oxidation. Furthermore, adenovirus-mediated expression of HIF-1{alpha}/VP16 in cardiomyocytes under normoxic conditions also mimicked the reduction in the DNA binding activity of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor {alpha} (PPAR{alpha})/retinoid X receptor (RXR), in the presence or absence of a PPAR{alpha} ligand. These results suggest that HIF-1 may be involved in hypoxia-induced suppression of fatty acid metabolism in cardiomyocytes by reducing the DNA binding activity of PPAR{alpha}/RXR.

  3. p53 inhibits DNA replication in vitro in a DNA-binding-dependent manner.

    PubMed Central

    Miller, S D; Farmer, G; Prives, C

    1995-01-01

    The p53 tumor suppressor gene product is a sequence-specific DNA-binding protein that is necessary for the G1 arrest of many cell types. Consistent with its role as a cell cycle checkpoint factor, p53 has been shown to be capable of both transcriptional activation and repression. Here we show a new potential role for p53 as a DNA-binding-dependent regulator of DNA replication. Constructs containing multiple copies of the ribosomal gene cluster (RGC) p53 binding site cloned on the late side of the polyomavirus origin were used in in vitro replication assays. In the presence of p53, the replication of these constructs was strongly inhibited, while the replication of constructs containing a mutant version of the RGC site was not affected by p53. Several tumor-derived mutant p53 proteins were unable to inhibit replication of the construct with wild-type RGC sites. Additionally, the transactivator GAL4-VP16 was unable to inhibit replication of a construct containing GAL4 binding sites adjacent to the polyomavirus origin. We also show that the inhibition by p53 can occur from sites cloned as far as 600 bp from the origin. Preincubation experiments suggest that p53 inhibits replication at a step mediated by ATP, possibly by inhibiting the binding of polyomavirus T antigen to the core origin. The presence of an endogenous p53 binding site in the polyomavirus origin suggests potential mechanisms for the observed inhibition. PMID:8524220

  4. Crystal Structure of Clustered Regularly Interspaced Short Palindromic Repeats (CRISPR)-associated Csn2 Protein Revealed Ca[superscript 2+]-dependent Double-stranded DNA Binding Activity

    SciTech Connect

    Nam, Ki Hyun; Kurinov, Igor; Ke, Ailong

    2012-05-22

    Clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeats (CRISPR) and their associated protein genes (cas genes) are widespread in bacteria and archaea. They form a line of RNA-based immunity to eradicate invading bacteriophages and malicious plasmids. A key molecular event during this process is the acquisition of new spacers into the CRISPR loci to guide the selective degradation of the matching foreign genetic elements. Csn2 is a Nmeni subtype-specific cas gene required for new spacer acquisition. Here we characterize the Enterococcus faecalis Csn2 protein as a double-stranded (ds-) DNA-binding protein and report its 2.7 {angstrom} tetrameric ring structure. The inner circle of the Csn2 tetrameric ring is {approx}26 {angstrom} wide and populated with conserved lysine residues poised for nonspecific interactions with ds-DNA. Each Csn2 protomer contains an {alpha}/{beta} domain and an {alpha}-helical domain; significant hinge motion was observed between these two domains. Ca{sup 2+} was located at strategic positions in the oligomerization interface. We further showed that removal of Ca{sup 2+} ions altered the oligomerization state of Csn2, which in turn severely decreased its affinity for ds-DNA. In summary, our results provided the first insight into the function of the Csn2 protein in CRISPR adaptation by revealing that it is a ds-DNA-binding protein functioning at the quaternary structure level and regulated by Ca{sup 2+} ions.

  5. Crystal structure of clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeats (CRISPR)-associated Csn2 protein revealed Ca2+-dependent double-stranded DNA binding activity.

    PubMed

    Nam, Ki Hyun; Kurinov, Igor; Ke, Ailong

    2011-09-02

    Clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeats (CRISPR) and their associated protein genes (cas genes) are widespread in bacteria and archaea. They form a line of RNA-based immunity to eradicate invading bacteriophages and malicious plasmids. A key molecular event during this process is the acquisition of new spacers into the CRISPR loci to guide the selective degradation of the matching foreign genetic elements. Csn2 is a Nmeni subtype-specific cas gene required for new spacer acquisition. Here we characterize the Enterococcus faecalis Csn2 protein as a double-stranded (ds-) DNA-binding protein and report its 2.7 Å tetrameric ring structure. The inner circle of the Csn2 tetrameric ring is ∼26 Å wide and populated with conserved lysine residues poised for nonspecific interactions with ds-DNA. Each Csn2 protomer contains an α/β domain and an α-helical domain; significant hinge motion was observed between these two domains. Ca(2+) was located at strategic positions in the oligomerization interface. We further showed that removal of Ca(2+) ions altered the oligomerization state of Csn2, which in turn severely decreased its affinity for ds-DNA. In summary, our results provided the first insight into the function of the Csn2 protein in CRISPR adaptation by revealing that it is a ds-DNA-binding protein functioning at the quaternary structure level and regulated by Ca(2+) ions.

  6. An aromatic-rich loop couples DNA binding and ATP hydrolysis in the PriA DNA helicase.

    PubMed

    Windgassen, Tricia A; Keck, James L

    2016-11-16

    Helicases couple ATP hydrolysis to nucleic acid binding and unwinding via molecular mechanisms that remain poorly defined for most enzyme subfamilies within the superfamily 2 (SF2) helicase group. A crystal structure of the PriA SF2 DNA helicase, which governs restart of prematurely terminated replication processes in bacteria, revealed the presence of an aromatic-rich loop (ARL) on the presumptive DNA-binding surface of the enzyme. The position and sequence of the ARL was similar to loops known to couple ATP hydrolysis with DNA binding in a subset of other SF2 enzymes, however, the roles of the ARL in PriA had not been investigated. Here, we show that changes within the ARL sequence uncouple PriA ATPase activity from DNA binding. In vitro protein-DNA crosslinking experiments define a residue- and nucleotide-specific interaction map for PriA, showing that the ARL binds replication fork junctions whereas other sites bind the leading or lagging strands. We propose that DNA binding to the ARL allosterically triggers ATP hydrolysis in PriA. Additional SF2 helicases with similarly positioned loops may also couple DNA binding to ATP hydrolysis using related mechanisms.

  7. An aromatic-rich loop couples DNA binding and ATP hydrolysis in the PriA DNA helicase

    PubMed Central

    Windgassen, Tricia A.; Keck, James L.

    2016-01-01

    Helicases couple ATP hydrolysis to nucleic acid binding and unwinding via molecular mechanisms that remain poorly defined for most enzyme subfamilies within the superfamily 2 (SF2) helicase group. A crystal structure of the PriA SF2 DNA helicase, which governs restart of prematurely terminated replication processes in bacteria, revealed the presence of an aromatic-rich loop (ARL) on the presumptive DNA-binding surface of the enzyme. The position and sequence of the ARL was similar to loops known to couple ATP hydrolysis with DNA binding in a subset of other SF2 enzymes, however, the roles of the ARL in PriA had not been investigated. Here, we show that changes within the ARL sequence uncouple PriA ATPase activity from DNA binding. In vitro protein-DNA crosslinking experiments define a residue- and nucleotide-specific interaction map for PriA, showing that the ARL binds replication fork junctions whereas other sites bind the leading or lagging strands. We propose that DNA binding to the ARL allosterically triggers ATP hydrolysis in PriA. Additional SF2 helicases with similarly positioned loops may also couple DNA binding to ATP hydrolysis using related mechanisms. PMID:27484483

  8. Synthesis, DNA-binding, DNA-photonuclease profiling and antimicrobial activity of novel tetra-aza macrocyclic Ni(II), Co(II) and Cu(II) complexes constrained by thiadiazole

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vinay Kumar, B.; Bhojya Naik, H. S.; Girija, D.; Sharath, N.; Pradeepa, S. M.; Joy Hoskeri, H.; Prabhakara, M. C.

    A new tetra-aza macrocyclic ligand, L (C24H16N12O2S4) and its complexes of type, [MLCl2] and [CuL]Cl2 (where M = Ni(II), Co(II); L = N,N'-(benzene-1,3-diyldi-1,3,4-thiadiazole-5,2-diyl)bis{2-[(5-benzene-1,3-diyl-1,3,4-thiadiazol-2-yl)amino]acetamide}) were synthesized and characterized by the spectral and analytical techniques. An octahedral geometry has been proposed for Ni(II) and Co(II) complexes while Cu(II) complex exhibit a square planar geometry. All the synthesized metal complexes were screened for their in vitro antimicrobial activity against selected species of pathogenic bacteria and fungi. The binding property of the complexes with CT-DNA was studied by absorption spectral analysis, followed by viscosity measurement and thermal denaturation studies. The photo induced cleavage studies revealed that the complexes possess photonuclease property against pUC19 DNA under UV-visible irradiation.

  9. Synthesis, DNA-binding, DNA-photonuclease profiling and antimicrobial activity of novel tetra-aza macrocyclic Ni(II), Co(II) and Cu(II) complexes constrained by thiadiazole.

    PubMed

    Vinay Kumar, B; Bhojya Naik, H S; Girija, D; Sharath, N; Pradeepa, S M; Joy Hoskeri, H; Prabhakara, M C

    2012-08-01

    A new tetra-aza macrocyclic ligand, L (C(24)H(16)N(12)O(2)S(4)) and its complexes of type, [MLCl(2)] and [CuL]Cl(2) (where M=Ni(II), Co(II); L=N,N'-(benzene-1,3-diyldi-1,3,4-thiadiazole-5,2-diyl)bis{2-[(5-benzene-1,3-diyl-1,3,4-thiadiazol-2-yl)amino]acetamide}) were synthesized and characterized by the spectral and analytical techniques. An octahedral geometry has been proposed for Ni(II) and Co(II) complexes while Cu(II) complex exhibit a square planar geometry. All the synthesized metal complexes were screened for their in vitro antimicrobial activity against selected species of pathogenic bacteria and fungi. The binding property of the complexes with CT-DNA was studied by absorption spectral analysis, followed by viscosity measurement and thermal denaturation studies. The photo induced cleavage studies revealed that the complexes possess photonuclease property against pUC19 DNA under UV-visible irradiation.

  10. Molecular beacons for DNA binding proteins: an emerging technology for detection of DNA binding proteins and their ligands.

    PubMed

    Dummitt, Benjamin; Chang, Yie-Hwa

    2006-06-01

    Quantitation of the level or activity of specific proteins is one of the most commonly performed experiments in biomedical research. Protein detection has historically been difficult to adapt to high throughput platforms because of heavy reliance upon antibodies for protein detection. Molecular beacons for DNA binding proteins is a recently developed technology that attempts to overcome such limitations. Protein detection is accomplished using inexpensive, easy-to-synthesize oligonucleotides, accompanied by a fluorescence readout. Importantly, detection of the protein and reporting of the signal occur simultaneously, allowing for one-step protocols and increased potential for use in high throughput analysis. While the initial iteration of the technology allowed only for the detection of sequence-specific DNA binding proteins, more recent adaptations allow for the possibility of development of beacons for any protein, independent of native DNA binding activity. Here, we discuss the development of the technology, the mechanism of the reaction, and recent improvements and modifications made to improve the assay in terms of sensitivity, potential for multiplexing, and broad applicability.

  11. Novel binding interactions of the DNA fragment d(pGpG) cross-linked by the antitumor active compound tetrakis(mu-carboxylato)dirhodium(II,II).

    PubMed

    Chifotides, Helen T; Koshlap, Karl M; Pérez, Lisa M; Dunbar, Kim R

    2003-09-03

    Insight into the N7/O6 equatorial binding interactions of the antitumor active complex Rh(2)(OAc)(4)(H(2)O)(2) (OAc(-) = CH(3)CO(2)(-)) with the nucleotide 5'-GMP and the DNA fragment d(pGpG) has been obtained by one- (1D) and two-dimensional (2D) NMR spectroscopy. The lack of N7 protonation at low pH values and the significant increase in the acidity of N1-H (pK(a) approximately 5.6 as compared to 8.5 for N7 only bound platinum adducts), indicated by the pH dependence study of the H8 (1)H NMR resonance for the HT (head-to-tail) isomer of Rh(2)(OAc)(2)(5'-GMP)(2), are consistent with bidentate N7/O6 binding of the guanine. The H8 (1)H NMR resonance of the HH (head-to-head) Rh(2)(OAc)(2)(5'-GMP)(2) isomer, as well as the 5'-G and 3'-G H8 resonances of the Rh(2)(OAc)(2) [d(pGpG)] adduct exhibit pH-independent titration curves, attributable to the added effect of the 5'-phosphate group deprotonation at a pH value similar to that of the N1 site. The enhancement in the acidity of N1-H, with respect to N7 only bound metal adducts, afforded by the O6 binding of the bases to the rhodium centers, has been corroborated by monitoring the pH dependence of the purine C6 and C2 (13)C NMR resonances for Rh(2)(OAc)(2)(5'-GMP)(2) and Rh(2)(OAc)(2) [d(pGpG)]. The latter studies resulted in pK(a) values in good agreement with those derived from the pH-dependent (1)H NMR titrations of the H8 resonances. Comparison of the (13)C NMR resonances of C6 and C2 for the dirhodium adducts Rh(2)(OAc)(2)(5'-GMP)(2) and Rh(2)(OAc)(2) [d(pGpG)] with the corresponding resonances of the unbound ligands at pH 8.0, showed substantial downfield shifts of Deltadelta approximately 11.0 and 6.0 ppm, respectively. The HH arrangement of the bases in the Rh(2)(OAc)(2) [d(pGpG)] adduct is evidenced by intense H8/H8 ROE cross-peaks in the 2D ROESY NMR spectrum. The presence of the terminal 5'-phosphate group in d(pGpG) results in stabilization of one left-handed Rh(2)(OAc)(2) [d(pGpG)] HH1 L conformer, due to

  12. Flavonoid-DNA binding studies and thermodynamic parameters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Janjua, Naveed Kausar; Shaheen, Amber; Yaqub, Azra; Perveen, Fouzia; Sabahat, Sana; Mumtaz, Misbah; Jacob, Claus; Ba, Lalla Aicha; Mohammed, Hamdoon A.

    2011-09-01

    Interactional studies of new flavonoid derivatives (Fl) with chicken blood ds.DNA were investigated spectrophotometrically in DMSO-H 2O (9:1 v/v) at various temperatures. Spectral parameters suggest considerable binding between the flavonoid derivatives studied and ds.DNA. The binding constant values lie in the enhanced-binding range. Thermodynamic parameters obtained from UV studies also point to strong spontaneous binding of Fl with ds.DNA. Viscometric studies complimented the UV results where a small linear increase in relative viscosity of the DNA solution was observed with added optimal flavonoid concentration. An overall mixed mode of interaction (intercalative plus groove binding) is proposed between DNA and flavonoids. Conclusively, investigated flavonoid derivatives are found to be strong DNA binders and seem to be promising drug candidates like their natural analogues.

  13. Rifampicin Inhibits the LPS-induced Expression of Toll-like Receptor 2 via the Suppression of NF-kappaB DNA-binding Activity in RAW 264.7 Cells.

    PubMed

    Kim, Seong Keun; Kim, Young Mi; Yeum, Chung Eun; Jin, Song-Hyo; Chae, Gue Tae; Lee, Seong-Beom

    2009-12-01

    Rifampicin is a macrocyclic antibiotic which is used extensively for treatment against Mycobacterium tuberculosis and other mycobacterial infections. Recently, a number of studies have focused on the immune-regulatory effects of rifampicin. Therefore, we hypothesized that rifampicin may influence the TLR2 expression in LPS-activated RAW 264.7 cells. In this study, we determined that rifampicin suppresses LPS-induced TLR2 mRNA expression. The down-regulation of TLR2 expression coincided with decreased production of TNF-alpha. Since NF-kappaB is a major transcription factor that regulates genes for TLR2 and TNF-alpha, we examined the effect of rifampicin on the LPS-induced NF-kappaB activation. Rifampicin inhibited NF-kappaB DNA-binding activity in LPS-activated RAW 264.7 cells, while it did not affect IKKalpha/beta activity. However, rifampicin slightly inhibited the nuclear translocation of NF-kappaB p65. In addition, rifampicin increased physical interaction between pregnane X receptor, a receptor for rifampicin, and NF-kappaB p65, suggesting pregnane X receptor interferes with NF-kappaB binding to DNA. Taken together, our results demonstrate that rifampicin inhibits LPS-induced TLR2 expression, at least in part, via the suppression of NF-kappaB DNA-binding activity in RAW 264.7 cells. Thus, the present results suggest that the rifampicin-mediated inhibition of TLR2 via the suppression of NF-kappaB DNA-binding activity may be a novel mechanism of the immune-suppressive effects of rifampicin.

  14. The DNA Binding Domain of a Papillomavirus E2 Protein Programs a Chimeric Nuclease To Cleave Integrated Human Papillomavirus DNA in HeLa Cervical Carcinoma Cells▿

    PubMed Central

    Horner, Stacy M.; DiMaio, Daniel

    2007-01-01

    Viral DNA binding proteins that direct nucleases or other protein domains to viral DNA in lytically or latently infected cells may provide a novel approach to modulate viral gene expression or replication. Cervical carcinogenesis is initiated by high-risk human papillomavirus (HPV) infection, and viral DNA persists in the cancer cells. To test whether a DNA binding domain of a papillomavirus protein can direct a nuclease domain to cleave HPV DNA in cervical cancer cells, we fused the DNA binding domain of the bovine papillomavirus type 1 (BPV1) E2 protein to the catalytic domain of the FokI restriction endonuclease, generating a BPV1 E2-FokI chimeric nuclease (BEF). BEF introduced DNA double-strand breaks on both sides of an E2 binding site in vitro, whereas DNA binding or catalytic mutants of BEF did not. After expression of BEF in HeLa cervical carcinoma cells, we detected cleavage at E2 binding sites in the integrated HPV18 DNA in these cells and also at an E2 binding site in cellular DNA. BEF-expressing cells underwent senescence, which required the DNA binding activity of BEF, but not its nuclease activity. These results demonstrate that DNA binding domains of viral proteins can target effector molecules to cognate binding sites in virally infected cells. PMID:17392356

  15. V-shaped ligand 1,3-bis(1-ethylbenzimidazol-2-yl)-2-thiapropane and manganese(II), cobalt(II) and copper(II) complexes: Synthesis, crystal structure, DNA-binding properties and antioxidant activities.

    PubMed

    Wu, Huilu; Yang, Zaihui; Wang, Fei; Peng, Hongping; Zhang, Han; Wang, Cuiping; Wang, Kaitong

    2015-07-01

    A V-shaped ligand 1,3-bis(1-ethylbenzimidazol-2-yl)-2-thiapropane (bebt) and its transition metal complexes, [Mn(bebt)(pic)2]·CH3OH (pic=picrate) 1, [Co(bebt)2](pic)22 and [Cu(bebt)2](pic)2·2DMF 3, have been synthesized and characterized. The coordinate forms of complexes 1 and 2 are basically alike, which can be described as six-coordinated distorted octahedron. The geometric structure around Cu(II) atom can be described as distorted tetrahedral in complex 3. The DNA-binding properties of the ligand bebt and complexes have been investigated by electronic absorption, fluorescence, and viscosity measurements. The results suggest that bebt and complexes bind to DNA via an intercalative binding mode and the order of the binding affinity is 1<2<3DNA-binding properties are also discussed. Moreover, the complex 3 possess significant antioxidant activity against superoxide and hydroxyl radicals, and the scavenging effects of it are stronger than standard mannitol and vitamin C.

  16. A new protein domain for binding to DNA through the minor groove.

    PubMed Central

    Freire, R; Salas, M; Hermoso, J M

    1994-01-01

    Protein p6 of the Bacillus subtilis phage phi 29 binds with low sequence specificity to DNA through the minor groove, forming a multimeric nucleoprotein complex that activates the initiation of phi 29 DNA replication. Deletion analysis suggested that the N-terminal part of protein p6, predicted to form an amphipathic alpha-helix, is involved in DNA binding. We have constructed site-directed mutants at the polar side of the putative alpha-helix. DNA binding and activation of initiation of phi 29 DNA replication were impaired in most of the mutant proteins obtained. A 19 amino acid peptide comprising the N-terminus of protein p6 interacted with a DNA fragment containing high-affinity signals for protein p6 binding with approximately 50-fold higher affinity than the peptide corresponding to an inactive mutant. Both wild-type peptide and protein p6 recognized the same sequences in this DNA fragment. This result, together with distamycin competition experiments, suggested that the wild-type peptide also binds to DNA through the minor groove. In addition, CD spectra of the wild-type peptide showed an increase in the alpha-helical content when bound to DNA. All these results indicate that an alpha-helical structure located in the N-terminal region of protein p6 is involved in DNA binding through the minor groove. Images PMID:7925279

  17. MCM ring hexamerization is a prerequisite for DNA-binding

    DOE PAGES

    Froelich, Clifford A.; Nourse, Amanda; Enemark, Eric J.

    2015-09-13

    The hexameric Minichromosome Maintenance (MCM) protein complex forms a ring that unwinds DNA at the replication fork in eukaryotes and archaea. Our recent crystal structure of an archaeal MCM N-terminal domain bound to single-stranded DNA (ssDNA) revealed ssDNA associating across tight subunit interfaces but not at the loose interfaces, indicating that DNA-binding is governed not only by the DNA-binding residues of the subunits (MCM ssDNA-binding motif, MSSB) but also by the relative orientation of the subunits. We now extend these findings to show that DNA-binding by the MCM N-terminal domain of the archaeal organism Pyrococcus furiosus occurs specifically in themore » hexameric oligomeric form. We show that mutants defective for hexamerization are defective in binding ssDNA despite retaining all the residues observed to interact with ssDNA in the crystal structure. One mutation that exhibits severely defective hexamerization and ssDNA-binding is at a conserved phenylalanine that aligns with the mouse Mcm4(Chaos3) mutation associated with chromosomal instability, cancer, and decreased intersubunit association.« less

  18. MCM ring hexamerization is a prerequisite for DNA-binding

    SciTech Connect

    Froelich, Clifford A.; Nourse, Amanda; Enemark, Eric J.

    2015-09-13

    The hexameric Minichromosome Maintenance (MCM) protein complex forms a ring that unwinds DNA at the replication fork in eukaryotes and archaea. Our recent crystal structure of an archaeal MCM N-terminal domain bound to single-stranded DNA (ssDNA) revealed ssDNA associating across tight subunit interfaces but not at the loose interfaces, indicating that DNA-binding is governed not only by the DNA-binding residues of the subunits (MCM ssDNA-binding motif, MSSB) but also by the relative orientation of the subunits. We now extend these findings to show that DNA-binding by the MCM N-terminal domain of the archaeal organism Pyrococcus furiosus occurs specifically in the hexameric oligomeric form. We show that mutants defective for hexamerization are defective in binding ssDNA despite retaining all the residues observed to interact with ssDNA in the crystal structure. One mutation that exhibits severely defective hexamerization and ssDNA-binding is at a conserved phenylalanine that aligns with the mouse Mcm4(Chaos3) mutation associated with chromosomal instability, cancer, and decreased intersubunit association.

  19. DNA topology, not DNA sequence, is a critical determinant for Drosophila ORC–DNA binding

    PubMed Central

    Remus, Dirk; Beall, Eileen L; Botchan, Michael R

    2004-01-01

    Drosophila origin recognition complex (ORC) localizes to defined positions on chromosomes, and in follicle cells the chorion gene amplification loci are well-studied examples. However, the mechanism of specific localization is not known. We have studied the DNA binding of DmORC to investigate the cis-requirements for DmORC:DNA interaction. DmORC displays at best six-fold differences in the relative affinities to DNA from the third chorion locus and to random fragments in vitro, and chemical probing and DNase1 protection experiments did not identify a discrete binding site for DmORC on any of these fragments. The intrinsic DNA-binding specificity of DmORC is therefore insufficient to target DmORC to origins of replication in vivo. However, the topological state of the DNA significantly influences the affinity of DmORC to DNA. We found that the affinity of DmORC for negatively supercoiled DNA is about 30-fold higher than for either relaxed or linear DNA. These data provide biochemical evidence for the notion that origin specification in metazoa likely involves mechanisms other than simple replicator–initiator interactions and that in vivo other proteins must determine ORC's localization. PMID:14765124

  20. Crystal Structure of the Chromodomain Helicase DNA-binding Protein 1 (Chd1) DNA-binding Domain in Complex with DNA

    SciTech Connect

    Sharma A.; Heroux A.; Jenkins K. R.; Bowman G. D.

    2011-12-09

    Chromatin remodelers are ATP-dependent machines that dynamically alter the chromatin packaging of eukaryotic genomes by assembling, sliding, and displacing nucleosomes. The Chd1 chromatin remodeler possesses a C-terminal DNA-binding domain that is required for efficient nucleosome sliding and believed to be essential for sensing the length of DNA flanking the nucleosome core. The structure of the Chd1 DNA-binding domain was recently shown to consist of a SANT and SLIDE domain, analogous to the DNA-binding domain of the ISWI family, yet the details of how Chd1 recognized DNA were not known. Here we present the crystal structure of the Saccharomyces cerevisiae Chd1 DNA-binding domain in complex with a DNA duplex. The bound DNA duplex is straight, consistent with the preference exhibited by the Chd1 DNA-binding domain for extranucleosomal DNA. Comparison of this structure with the recently solved ISW1a DNA-binding domain bound to DNA reveals that DNA lays across each protein at a distinct angle, yet contacts similar surfaces on the SANT and SLIDE domains. In contrast to the minor groove binding seen for Isw1 and predicted for Chd1, the SLIDE domain of the Chd1 DNA-binding domain contacts the DNA major groove. The majority of direct contacts with the phosphate backbone occur only on one DNA strand, suggesting that Chd1 may not strongly discriminate between major and minor grooves.

  1. Fluorescent mixed ligand copper(II) complexes of anthracene-appended Schiff bases: studies on DNA binding, nuclease activity and cytotoxicity.

    PubMed

    Jaividhya, Paramasivam; Ganeshpandian, Mani; Dhivya, Rajkumar; Akbarsha, Mohammad Abdulkadher; Palaniandavar, Mallayan

    2015-07-14

    A series of mixed ligand copper(ii) complexes of the type [Cu(L)(phen)(ACN)](ClO4)21-5, where L is a bidentate Schiff base ligand (N(1)-(anthracen-10-ylmethylene)-N(2)-methylethane-1,2-diamine (L1), N(1)-(anthracen-10-ylmethylene)-N(2),N(2)-dimethylethane-1,2-diamine (L2), N(1)-(anthracen-10-yl-methylene)-N(2)-ethylethane-1,2-diamine (L3), N(1)-(anthracen-10-ylmethylene)-N(2),N(2)-diethylethane-1,2-diamine (L4) and N(1)-(anthracen-10-ylmethylene)-N(3)-methylpropane-1,3-diamine (L5)) and phen is 1,10-phenanthroline, have been synthesized and characterized by spectral and analytical methods. The X-ray crystal structure of 5 reveals that the coordination geometry around Cu(ii) is square pyramidal distorted trigonal bipyramidal (τ, 0.76). The corners of the trigonal plane of the geometry are occupied by the N2 nitrogen atom of phen, the N4 nitrogen atom of L5 and the N5 nitrogen of acetonitrile while the N1 nitrogen of phen and the N3 nitrogen of L5 occupy the axial positions with an N1-Cu1-N3 bond angle of 176.0(3)°. All the complexes display a ligand field band (600-705 nm) and three less intense anthracene-based bands (345-395 nm) in solution. The Kb values calculated from absorption spectral titration of the complexes (π→π*, 250-265 nm) with Calf Thymus (CT) DNA vary in the order 5 > 4 > 3 > 2 > 1. The fluorescence intensity of the complexes (520-525 nm) decreases upon incremental addition of CT DNA, which reveals the involvement of phen rather than the appended anthracene ring in partial DNA intercalation with the DNA base stack. The extent of quenching is in agreement with the DNA binding affinities and the relative increase in the viscosity of DNA upon binding to the complexes as well. Thus 5 interacts with DNA more strongly than 4 on account of the stronger involvement in hydrophobic DNA interaction of the anthracenyl moiety, which is facilitated by the propylene ligand backbone with chair conformation. The ability of complexes (100 μM) to cleave DNA (p

  2. Equilibrium binding of single-stranded DNA to the secondary DNA binding site of the bacterial recombinase RecA.

    PubMed

    Gourves, A S; Defais, M; Johnson, N P

    2001-03-30

    The bacterial recombinase RecA forms a nucleoprotein filament in vitro with single-stranded DNA (ssDNA) at its primary DNA binding site, site I. This filament has a second site, site II, which binds ssDNA and double-stranded DNA. We have investigated the binding of ssDNA to the RecA protein in the presence of adenosine 5'-O-(thiotriphosphate) cofactor using fluorescence anisotropy. The RecA protein carried out DNA strand exchange with a 5'-fluorescein-labeled 32-mer oligonucleotide. The anisotropy signal was shown to measure oligonucleotide binding to RecA, and the relationship between signal and binding density was determined. Binding of ssDNA to site I of RecA was stable at high NaCl concentrations. Binding to site II could be described by a simple two-state equilibrium, K = 4.5 +/- 1.5 x 10(5) m(-1) (37 degrees C, 150 mm NaCl, pH 7.4). The reaction was enthalpy-driven and entropy-opposed. It depended on salt concentration and was sensitive to the type of monovalent anion, suggesting that anion-dependent protein conformations contribute to ssDNA binding at site II.

  3. Synthesis, structure, and biological activities of a new μ-oxamido-bridged dicopper(II) complex: the influence of hydrophobicity of bridging ligand on DNA binding and cytotoxic activities.

    PubMed

    Wang, Ling-Dong; Tao, Lin; Li, Yan-Tuan; Wu, Zhi-Yong; Yan, Cui-Wei

    2015-02-01

    A new μ-oxamido-bridged dicopper(II) complex, [Cu2 (papo)(H2 O)- (phen)]Cl·CH3 OH·H2 O, where H3 papo and phen represent N-(2-hydroxyphenyl)-N'-(3-aminopropyl)oxamide and 1,10-phenanthroline, respectively, has been synthesized and characterized by elemental analysis, molar conductivity measurement, infrared and electronic spectra studies, and single-crystal X-ray diffraction. The complex crystallizes in the triclinic space group P-1. Each copper(II) ion is located in a slightly distorted square-pyramidal environment. The Cu···Cu distance through the oxamide bridge is 5.1848(7) Å. The three-dimensional supramolecular structure is built-up by hydrogen bonds and π-π stacking interactions. The dicopper(II) complex exhibits cytotoxic activity against the SMMC-7721 and A549 cell lines. The reactivity toward herring sperm DNA and protein bovine serum albumin (BSA) reveals that the dicopper(II) complex can interact with the DNA by the intercalation mode, and effectively quench the intrinsic fluorescence of BSA via a static mechanism. The influence of hydrophobicity of the bridging ligand on DNA-binding properties and in vitro cytotoxic activities of this kind of dicopper(II) complexes was investigated.

  4. Clickable tyrosine binding bifunctional linkers for preparation of DNA-protein conjugates.

    PubMed

    Bauer, Dennis M; Ahmed, Ishtiaq; Vigovskaya, Antonina; Fruk, Ljiljana

    2013-06-19

    We have prepared bifunctional linkers containing clickable functional groups that enable preparation of protein-DNA conjugates through binding onto tyrosine residues. Mild conjugation strategy was demonstrated using two proteins, streptavidin(STV) and myoglobin (Mb) and it resulted in conjugates with preserved functionality of both the proteins and DNA strands. Furthermore, we show that protein-DNA conjugates can be successfully immobilized onto solid surface containing complementary DNA strands and the enzymatic activity of Mb-DNA conjugates is even higher than that of corresponding conjugates prepared through Lys binding.

  5. FOREVER YOUNG FLOWER Negatively Regulates Ethylene Response DNA-Binding Factors by Activating an Ethylene-Responsive Factor to Control Arabidopsis Floral Organ Senescence and Abscission.

    PubMed

    Chen, Wei-Han; Li, Pei-Fang; Chen, Ming-Kun; Lee, Yung-I; Yang, Chang-Hsien

    2015-08-01

    In this study of Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana), we investigated the relationship between FOREVER YOUNG FLOWER (FYF) and Ethylene Response DNA-binding Factors (EDFs) and functionally analyzed a key FYF target, an Ethylene-Responsive Factor (ERF), that controls flower senescence/abscission. Ectopic expression of EDF1/2/3/4 caused promotion of flower senescence/abscission and the activation of the senescence-associated genes. The presence of a repressor domain in EDFs and the enhancement of the promotion of senescence/abscission in EDF1/2/3/4+SRDX (converting EDFs to strong repressors by fusion with the ERF-associated amphiphilic repression motif repression domain SRDX) transgenic plants suggested that EDFs act as repressors. The significant reduction of β-glucuronidase (GUS) expression by 35S:FYF in EDF1/2/3/4:GUS plants indicates that EDF1/2/3/4 functions downstream of FYF in regulating flower senescence/abscission. In this study, we also characterized an ERF gene, FOREVER YOUNG FLOWER UP-REGULATING FACTOR1 (FUF1), which is up-regulated by FYF during flower development. Ectopic expression of FUF1 caused similar delayed flower senescence/abscission as seen in 35S:FYF plants. This phenotype was correlated with deficient abscission zone formation, ethylene insensitivity, and down-regulation of EDF1/2/3/4 and abscission-associated genes in 35S:FUF1 flowers. In contrast, significant promotion of flower senescence/abscission and up-regulation of EDF1/2/3/4 were observed in 35S:FUF1+SRDX transgenic dominant-negative plants, in which FUF1 is converted to a potent repressor by fusion to an SRDX-suppressing motif. Thus, FUF1 acts as an activator in suppressing EDF1/2/3/4 function and senescence/abscission of the flowers. Our results reveal that FYF regulates flower senescence/abscission by negatively regulating EDF1/2/3/4, which is the downstream gene in the ethylene response, by activating FUF1 in Arabidopsis.

  6. A family of Fe(3+) based double-stranded helicates showing a magnetocaloric effect, and Rhodamine B dye and DNA binding activities.

    PubMed

    Adhikary, Amit; Jena, Himanshu Sekhar; Konar, Sanjit

    2015-09-21

    Herein, the synthesis, structural characterization, magnetic properties and guest binding activities of four Fe(3+) based double-stranded helicates namely; [Fe2(L)2](ClO4)(Cl)·4(CH3OH)·2(H2O) (), [Fe2(L)2](BF4)2·2(H2O) (), [Fe2(L)2](NO3)2·3(CH3OH)·2(H2O) (), and [Fe2(L)2](Cl)2·2(CH3OH)·4(H2O) () are reported. Complexes have been synthesized using the hydrazide-based ligand H2L (H2L = N'1,N'4-bis(2-hydroxybenzylidene)succinohydrazide) and the corresponding Fe(2+) salts. Each of the independent cationic complexes [Fe2(L)2](2+) shows double-stranded helicates from the self-assembly of the ligand and metal ions in a 2 : 2 ratio, where the individual Fe(3+) centre is lying on a C2-axis and the ligand strands wrap around it. In , ligand L adopts "pseudo-C" conformations and forms a double-stranded dinuclear helicate with a small cage in between them. Moreover, in , each of the independent cationic complexes [Fe2L2](2+) is inherently chiral and possesses P for right-hand and M for left-hand helicity and as a consequence is a racemic solid. Detailed magnetic studies of all the complexes reveal that the Fe(3+) centres are magnetically isolated and isotropic in nature. Estimation of the Magnetocaloric Effect (MCE) from magnetization data unveils a moderate MCE at a temperature of 3 K with magnetic entropy changes (-ΔSm) of 22.9, 27.7, 24.1, 26.5 J kg(-1) K(-1) at a magnetic field of 7 T for complexes , respectively. Also, the variation of the -ΔSm values was justified by considering the parameter of magnetization per unit mass. Stability of all the complexes in solution phase was confirmed by ESI-mass spectrometric analysis and liquid phase FT-IR spectroscopy. Further, the interaction of the complexes with Rhodamine B dye was examined by UV-vis and fluorescence spectroscopic study. The observed blue-shift in the fluorescence study and hyperchromicity and hypochromicity with the appearance of two isosbestic points in the UV-vis study ascertain the interactions of

  7. Binding, Electrochemical Activation and Cleavage of DNA by Cobalt(II)tetrakis-N-Methylpyridyl Porphyrin and its β-Pyrrole Brominated Derivative

    PubMed Central

    Yellappa, Shivaraj; Seetharamappa, Jaldappagari; Rogers, Lisa M.; Chitta, Raghu; Singhal, Ram P.; D’Souza, Francis

    2008-01-01

    The binding of nucleic acids by water soluble cobalt(II) tetrakis-N-methylpyridyl porphyrin, (TMPyP)Co and its highly electron deficient derivative, cobalt(II) tetrakis-N-methyl pyridyl-β-octabromoporphyrin, (Br8TMPyP)Co was investigated by UV-visible absorption, circular dichroism (CD), electrochemical and gel electrophoresis methods. The changes of the absorption spectra during the titration of these complexes with polynucleotides revealed a shift in the absorption maxima and a hypochromicity of the porphyrin Soret bands. The intrinsic binding constants were found to be in the range of 105 – 106 M−1. These values were higher for more electron deficient (Br8TMPyP)Co. Induced CD bands were noticed in the Soret region of the complexes due to the interaction of these complexes with different polynucleotides and an analysis of the CD spectra supported mainly external mode of binding. Electrochemical studies revealed the cleavage of polynucleotide by (TMPyP)Co and (Br8TMPyP)Co in the presence of oxygen preferentially at the A-T base pair region. Gel electrophoresis experiments further supported the cleavage of nucleic acids. The results indicate that the β-pyrrole brominated porphyrin, (Br8TMPyP)Co binds strongly and cleaves nucleic acids efficiently as compared to (TMPyP)Co. This electrolytic procedure offers a unique tool in biotechnology for cleaving double-stranded DNA with specificity at the A-T regions. PMID:17105219

  8. DNA and Protein Footprinting Analysis of the Modulation of DNA Binding by the N-Terminal Domain of the Saccharomyces cervisiae TATA Binding Protein

    SciTech Connect

    Gupta,S.; Cheng, H.; Mollah, A.; Jamison, E.; Morris, S.; Chance, M.; Khrapunov, S.; Brenowitz, M.

    2007-01-01

    Recombinant full-length Saccharomyces cerevisiae TATA binding protein (TBP) and its isolated C-terminal conserved core domain (TBPc) were prepared with measured high specific DNA-binding activities. Direct, quantitative comparison of TATA box binding by TBP and TBPc reveals greater affinity by TBPc for either of two high-affinity sequences at several different experimental conditions. TBPc associates more rapidly than TBP to TATA box bearing DNA and dissociates more slowly. The structural origins of the thermodynamic and kinetic effects of the N-terminal domain on DNA binding by TBP were explored in comparative studies of TBPc and TBP by 'protein footprinting' with hydroxyl radical ({center_dot}OH) side chain oxidation. Some residues within TBPc and the C-terminal domain of TBP are comparably protected by DNA, consistent with solvent accessibility changes calculated from core domain crystal structures. In contrast, the reactivity of some residues located on the top surface and the DNA-binding saddle of the C-terminal domain differs between TBP and TBPc in both the presence and absence of bound DNA; these results are not predicted from the crystal structures. A strikingly different pattern of side chain oxidation is observed for TBP when a nonionic detergent is present. Taken together, these results are consistent with the N-terminal domain actively modulating TATA box binding by TBP and nonionic detergent modulating the interdomain interaction.

  9. Protection of DNA during oxidative stress by the nonspecific DNA-binding protein Dps.

    PubMed

    Martinez, A; Kolter, R

    1997-08-01

    Reactive oxygen species can damage most cellular components, but DNA appears to be the most sensitive target of these agents. Here we present the first evidence of DNA protection against the toxic and mutagenic effects of oxidative damage in metabolically active cells: direct protection of DNA by Dps, an inducible nonspecific DNA-binding protein from Escherichia coli. We demonstrate that in a recA-deficient strain, expression of Dps from an inducible promoter prior to hydrogen peroxide challenge increases survival and reduces the number of chromosomal single-strand breaks. dps mutants exhibit increased levels of the G x C-->T x A mutations characteristic of oxidative damage after treatment with hydrogen peroxide. In addition, expression of Dps from the inducible plasmid reduces the frequency of spontaneous G x C-->T x A and A x T-->T x A mutations and can partially suppress the mutator phenotype of mutM (fpg) and mutY alleles. In a purified in vitro system, Dps reduces the number of DNA single-strand breaks and Fpg-sensitive sites introduced by hydrogen peroxide treatment, indicating that the protection observed in vivo is a direct effect of DNA binding by Dps. The widespread conservation of Dps homologs among prokaryotes suggests that this may be a general strategy for coping with oxidative stress.

  10. The biotin repressor: thermodynamic coupling of corepressor binding, protein assembly, and sequence-specific DNA binding.

    PubMed

    Streaker, Emily D; Gupta, Aditi; Beckett, Dorothy

    2002-12-03

    The Escherichia coli biotin repressor, an allosteric transcriptional regulator, is activated for binding to the biotin operator by the small molecule biotinyl-5'-AMP. Results of combined thermodynamic, kinetic, and structural studies of the protein have revealed that corepressor binding results in disorder to order transitions in the protein monomer that facilitate tighter dimerization. The enhanced stability of the dimer leads to stabilization of the resulting biotin repressor-biotin operator complex. It is not clear, however, that the allosteric response in the system is transmitted solely through the protein-protein interface. In this work, the allosteric mechanism has been quantitatively probed by measuring the biotin operator binding and dimerization properties of three biotin repressor species: the apo or unliganded form, the biotin-bound form, and the holo or bio-5'-AMP-bound form. Comparisons of the pairwise differences in the bioO binding and dimerization energetics for the apo and holo species reveal that the enhanced DNA binding energetics resulting from adenylate binding track closely with the enhanced assembly energetics. However, when the results for repressor pairs that include the biotin-bound species are compared, no such equivalence is observed.

  11. Adsorption of DNA binding proteins to functionalized carbon nanotube surfaces with and without DNA wrapping.

    PubMed

    Ishibashi, Yu; Oura, Shusuke; Umemura, Kazuo

    2017-02-15

    We examined the adsorption of DNA binding proteins on functionalized, single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs). When SWNTs were functionalized with polyethylene glycol (PEG-SWNT), moderate adsorption of protein molecules was observed. In contrast, nanotubes functionalized with CONH2 groups (CONH2-SWNT) exhibited very strong interactions between the CONH2-SWNT and DNA binding proteins. Instead, when these SWNT surfaces were wrapped with DNA molecules (thymine 30-mers), protein binding was a little decreased. Our results revealed that DNA wrapped PEG-SWNT was one of the most promising candidates to realize DNA nanodevices involving protein reactions on DNA-SWNT surfaces. In addition, the DNA binding protein RecA was more adhesive than single-stranded DNA binding proteins to the functionalized SWNT surfaces.

  12. Probing the binding mode of psoralen to calf thymus DNA.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Xiaoyue; Zhang, Guowen; Wang, Langhong

    2014-06-01

    The binding properties between psoralen (PSO) and calf thymus DNA (ctDNA) were predicted by molecular docking, and then determined with the use of UV-vis absorption, fluorescence, circular dichroism (CD) and Fourier transform infrared (FT-IR) spectroscopy, coupled with DNA melting and viscosity measurements. The data matrix obtained from UV-vis spectra was resolved by multivariate curve resolution-alternating least squares (MCR-ALS) approach. The pure spectra and the equilibrium concentration profiles for PSO, ctDNA and PSO-ctDNA complex extracted from the highly overlapping composite response were obtained simultaneously to evaluate the PSO-ctDNA interaction. The intercalation mode of PSO binding to ctDNA was supported by the results from the melting studies, viscosity measurements, iodide quenching and fluorescence polarization experiments, competitive binding investigations and CD analysis. The molecular docking prediction showed that the specific binding most likely occurred between PSO and adenine bases of ctDNA. FT-IR spectra studies further confirmed that PSO preferentially bound to adenine bases, and this binding decreased right-handed helicity of ctDNA and enhanced the degree of base stacking with the preservation of native B-conformation. The calculated thermodynamic parameters indicated that hydrogen bonds and van der Waals forces played a major role in the binding process.

  13. Diethyl pyrocarbonate reaction with the lactose repressor protein affects both inducer and DNA binding

    SciTech Connect

    Sams, C.F.; Matthews, K.S.

    1988-04-05

    Modification of the lactose repressor protein of Escherichia coli with diethyl pyrocarbonate (DPC) results in decreased inducer binding as well as operator and nonspecific DNA binding. Spectrophotometric measurements indicated a maximum of three histidines per subunit was modified, and quantitation of lysine residues with trinitrobenzenesulfonate revealed the modification of one lysine residue. The loss of DNA binding, both operator and nonspecific, was correlated with histidine modification; removal of the carbethoxy groups from the histidines by hydroxylamine was accompanied by significant recovery of DNA binding function. The presence of inducing sugars during the DPC reaction had no effect on histidine modification or the loss of DNA binding activity. In contrast, inducer binding was not recovered upon reversal of the histidine modification. However, the presence of inducer during reaction protected lysine from reaction and also prevented the decrease in inducer binding; these results indicate that reaction of the lysine residue(s) may correlate to the loss of sugar binding activity. Since no difference in incorporation of radiolabeled carbethoxy was observed following reaction with diethyl pyrocarbonate in the presence or absence of inducer, the reagent appears to function as a catalyst in the modification of the lysine. The formation of an amide bond between the affected lysine and a nearby carboxylic acid moiety provides a possible mechanism for the activity loss. Reaction of the isolated NH2-terminal domain resulted in loss of DNA binding with modification of the single histidine at position 29. Results from the modification of core domain paralleled observations with intact repressor.

  14. Transcriptional Regulation in Mammalian Cells by Sequence-Specific DNA Binding Proteins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mitchell, Pamela J.; Tjian, Robert

    1989-07-01

    The cloning of genes encoding mammalian DNA binding transcription factors for RNA polymerase II has provided the opportunity to analyze the structure and function of these proteins. This review summarizes recent studies that define structural domains for DNA binding and transcriptional activation functions in sequence-specific transcription factors. The mechanisms by which these factors may activate transcriptional initiation and by which they may be regulated to achieve differential gene expression are also discussed.

  15. [Features of binding of proflavine to DNA at different DNA-ligand concentration ratios].

    PubMed

    Berezniak, E G; gladkovskaia, N A; Khrebtova, A S; Dukhopel'nikov, E V; Zinchenko, A V

    2009-01-01

    The binding of proflavine to calf thymus DNA has been studied using the methods of differential scanning calorimetry and spectrophotometry. It was shown that proflavine can interact with DNA by at least 3 binding modes. At high DNA-ligand concentration ratios (P/D), proflavine intercalates into both GC- and AT-sites, with a preference to GC-rich sequences. At low P/D ratios proflavine interacts with DNA by the external binding mode. From spectrophotometric concentration dependences, the parameters of complexing of proflavine with DNA were calculated. Thermodynamic parameters of DNA melting were calculated from differential scanning calorimetry data.

  16. FANCI-FANCD2 stabilizes the RAD51-DNA complex by binding RAD51 and protects the 5'-DNA end.

    PubMed

    Sato, Koichi; Shimomuki, Mayo; Katsuki, Yoko; Takahashi, Daisuke; Kobayashi, Wataru; Ishiai, Masamichi; Miyoshi, Hiroyuki; Takata, Minoru; Kurumizaka, Hitoshi

    2016-12-15

    The FANCI-FANCD2 (I-D) complex is considered to work with RAD51 to protect the damaged DNA in the stalled replication fork. However, the means by which this DNA protection is accomplished have remained elusive. In the present study, we found that the I-D complex directly binds to RAD51, and stabilizes the RAD51-DNA filament. Unexpectedly, the DNA binding activity of FANCI, but not FANCD2, is explicitly required for the I-D complex-mediated RAD51-DNA filament stabilization. The RAD51 filament stabilized by the I-D complex actually protects the DNA end from nucleolytic degradation by an FA-associated nuclease, FAN1. This DNA end protection is not observed with the RAD51 mutant from FANCR patient cells. These results clearly answer the currently enigmatic question of how RAD51 functions with the I-D complex to prevent genomic instability at the stalled replication fork.

  17. Synthesis and structural characterization of ternary Cu (II) complexes of glycine with 2,2'-bipyridine and 2,2'-dipyridylamine. The DNA-binding studies and biological activity.

    PubMed

    Mohamed, Mervat S; Shoukry, Azza A; Ali, Ayat G

    2012-02-01

    In this study two new complexes [Cu(bpy)(Gly)Cl]·2H(2)O (1) and [Cu(dpa)(Gly)Cl]·2H(2)O (2) (bpy=2,2'-bipyridine; dpa=2,2'-dipyridylamine, Gly=glycine) have been synthesized and characterized by elemental analysis, IR, TGA, UV-vis and magnetic susceptibility measurements. The binding properties of the complexes with CT-DNA were investigated by electronic absorption spectra. The intrinsic binding constants (K(b)) calculated from UV-vis absorption studies were 1.84 × 10(3) M(-1) and 3.1 × 10(3) M(-1) for complexes 1 and 2 respectively. Thermal denaturation has been systematically studied by spectrophotometric method and the calculated ΔT(m) was nearly 5 °C for each complex. All the results suggest that the interaction modes between the complexes and CT-DNA were electrostatic and/or groove binding. The redox behavior of the two complexes was investigated by cyclic voltammetry. Both complexes, in presence and absence of CT-DNA show a quasi-reversible wave corresponding to Cu(II)/Cu(I) redox couple. The change in E(1/2), ΔE and I(pc)/I(pa) ascertain the interaction of complexes 1 and 2 with CT-DNA. Further insight into the binding of complexes with CT-DNA has been made by gel electrophoresis, where the binding of complexes is confirmed through decreasing the mobility and intensity of DNA bands. In addition, the antitumor activity of the complexes was tested on two cancer cell lines; the breast cancer (MCF7) and the human hepatocellular carcinoma (HEPG2), as well as one normal cell line; the human normal melanocytes (HFB4). The results showed that complex 1 was more potent antitumor agent than complex 2. The in-vitro antimicrobial activity of the two complexes was carried out using the disc diffusion method against different species of pathogenic bacteria and fungi. The activity data showed that complex 2 was more active in inhibiting the growth of the tested organisms.

  18. Synthesis and structural characterization of ternary Cu (II) complexes of glycine with 2,2'-bipyridine and 2,2'-dipyridylamine. The DNA-binding studies and biological activity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mohamed, Mervat S.; Shoukry, Azza A.; Ali, Ayat G.

    2012-02-01

    In this study two new complexes [Cu(bpy)(Gly)Cl]·2H 2O ( 1) and [Cu(dpa)(Gly)Cl]·2H 2O ( 2) (bpy = 2,2'-bipyridine; dpa = 2,2'-dipyridylamine, Gly = glycine) have been synthesized and characterized by elemental analysis, IR, TGA, UV-vis and magnetic susceptibility measurements. The binding properties of the complexes with CT-DNA were investigated by electronic absorption spectra. The intrinsic binding constants ( Kb) calculated from UV-vis absorption studies were 1.84 × 10 3 M -1 and 3.1 × 10 3 M -1 for complexes 1 and 2 respectively. Thermal denaturation has been systematically studied by spectrophotometric method and the calculated Δ Tm was nearly 5 °C for each complex. All the results suggest that the interaction modes between the complexes and CT-DNA were electrostatic and/or groove binding. The redox behavior of the two complexes was investigated by cyclic voltammetry. Both complexes, in presence and absence of CT-DNA show a quasi-reversible wave corresponding to Cu II/Cu I redox couple. The change in E1/2, Δ E and Ipc/ Ipa ascertain the interaction of complexes 1 and 2 with CT-DNA. Further insight into the binding of complexes with CT-DNA has been made by gel electrophoresis, where the binding of complexes is confirmed through decreasing the mobility and intensity of DNA bands. In addition, the antitumor activity of the complexes was tested on two cancer cell lines; the breast cancer (MCF7) and the human hepatocellular carcinoma (HEPG2), as well as one normal cell line; the human normal melanocytes (HFB4). The results showed that complex 1 was more potent antitumor agent than complex 2. The in-vitro antimicrobial activity of the two complexes was carried out using the disc diffusion method against different species of pathogenic bacteria and fungi. The activity data showed that complex 2 was more active in inhibiting the growth of the tested organisms.

  19. Characterization of a DNA binding protein of bacteriophage PRD1 involved in DNA replication.

    PubMed Central

    Pakula, T M; Caldentey, J; Serrano, M; Gutierrez, C; Hermoso, J M; Salas, M; Bamford, D H

    1990-01-01

    Escherichia coli phage PRD1 protein P12, involved in PRD1 DNA replication in vivo, has been highly purified from E. coli cells harbouring a gene XII-containing plasmid. Protein P12 binds to single-stranded DNA as shown by gel retardation assays and nuclease protection experiments. Binding of protein P12 to single-stranded DNA increases about 14% the contour length of the DNA as revealed by electron microscopy. Binding to single-stranded DNA seems to be cooperative, and it is not sequence specific. Protein P12 also binds to double-stranded DNA although with an affinity 10 times lower than to single-stranded DNA. Using the in vitro phage phi 29 DNA replication system, it is shown that protein P12 stimulates the overall phi 29 DNA replication. Images PMID:2251117

  20. RNA recognition by the DNA end-binding Ku heterodimer.

    PubMed

    Dalby, Andrew B; Goodrich, Karen J; Pfingsten, Jennifer S; Cech, Thomas R

    2013-06-01

    Most nucleic acid-binding proteins selectively bind either DNA or RNA, but not both nucleic acids. The Saccharomyces cerevisiae Ku heterodimer is unusual in that it has two very different biologically relevant binding modes: (1) Ku is a sequence-nonspecific double-stranded DNA end-binding protein with prominent roles in nonhomologous end-joining and telomeric capping, and (2) Ku associates with a specific stem-loop of TLC1, the RNA subunit of budding yeast telomerase, and is necessary for proper nuclear localization of this ribonucleoprotein enzyme. TLC1 RNA-binding and dsDNA-binding are mutually exclusive, so they may be mediated by the same site on Ku. Although dsDNA binding by Ku is well studied, much less is known about what features of an RNA hairpin enable specific recognition by Ku. To address this question, we localized the Ku-binding site of the TLC1 hairpin with single-nucleotide resolution using phosphorothioate footprinting, used chemical modification to identify an unpredicted motif within the hairpin secondary structure, and carried out mutagenesis of the stem-loop to ascertain the critical elements within the RNA that permit Ku binding. Finally, we provide evidence that the Ku-binding site is present in additional budding yeast telomerase RNAs and discuss the possibility that RNA binding is a conserved function of the Ku heterodimer.

  1. RNA recognition by the DNA end-binding Ku heterodimer

    PubMed Central

    Dalby, Andrew B.; Goodrich, Karen J.; Pfingsten, Jennifer S.; Cech, Thomas R.

    2013-01-01

    Most nucleic acid-binding proteins selectively bind either DNA or RNA, but not both nucleic acids. The Saccharomyces cerevisiae Ku heterodimer is unusual in that it has two very different biologically relevant binding modes: (1) Ku is a sequence-nonspecific double-stranded DNA end-binding protein with prominent roles in nonhomologous end-joining and telomeric capping, and (2) Ku associates with a specific stem–loop of TLC1, the RNA subunit of budding yeast telomerase, and is necessary for proper nuclear localization of this ribonucleoprotein enzyme. TLC1 RNA-binding and dsDNA-binding are mutually exclusive, so they may be mediated by the same site on Ku. Although dsDNA binding by Ku is well studied, much less is known about what features of an RNA hairpin enable specific recognition by Ku. To address this question, we localized the Ku-binding site of the TLC1 hairpin with single-nucleotide resolution using phosphorothioate footprinting, used chemical modification to identify an unpredicted motif within the hairpin secondary structure, and carried out mutagenesis of the stem–loop to ascertain the critical elements within the RNA that permit Ku binding. Finally, we provide evidence that the Ku-binding site is present in additional budding yeast telomerase RNAs and discuss the possibility that RNA binding is a conserved function of the Ku heterodimer. PMID:23610127

  2. Binding of undamaged double stranded DNA to vaccinia virus uracil-DNA glycosylase

    SciTech Connect

    Schormann, Norbert; Banerjee, Surajit; Ricciardi, Robert; Chattopadhyay, Debasish

    2015-06-02

    Background: Uracil-DNA glycosylases are evolutionarily conserved DNA repair enzymes. However, vaccinia virus uracil-DNA glycosylase (known as D4), also serves as an intrinsic and essential component of the processive DNA polymerase complex during DNA replication. In this complex D4 binds to a unique poxvirus specific protein A20 which tethers it to the DNA polymerase. At the replication fork the DNA scanning and repair function of D4 is coupled with DNA replication. So far, DNA-binding to D4 has not been structurally characterized. Results: This manuscript describes the first structure of a DNA-complex of a uracil-DNA glycosylase from the poxvirus family. This also represents the first structure of a uracil DNA glycosylase in complex with an undamaged DNA. In the asymmetric unit two D4 subunits bind simultaneously to complementary strands of the DNA double helix. Each D4 subunit interacts mainly with the central region of one strand. DNA binds to the opposite side of the A20-binding surface on D4. In comparison of the present structure with the structure of uracil-containing DNA-bound human uracil-DNA glycosylase suggests that for DNA binding and uracil removal D4 employs a unique set of residues and motifs that are highly conserved within the poxvirus family but different in other organisms. Conclusion: The first structure of D4 bound to a truly non-specific undamaged double-stranded DNA suggests that initial binding of DNA may involve multiple non-specific interactions between the protein and the phosphate backbone.

  3. Binding of undamaged double stranded DNA to vaccinia virus uracil-DNA glycosylase

    DOE PAGES

    Schormann, Norbert; Banerjee, Surajit; Ricciardi, Robert; ...

    2015-06-02

    Background: Uracil-DNA glycosylases are evolutionarily conserved DNA repair enzymes. However, vaccinia virus uracil-DNA glycosylase (known as D4), also serves as an intrinsic and essential component of the processive DNA polymerase complex during DNA replication. In this complex D4 binds to a unique poxvirus specific protein A20 which tethers it to the DNA polymerase. At the replication fork the DNA scanning and repair function of D4 is coupled with DNA replication. So far, DNA-binding to D4 has not been structurally characterized. Results: This manuscript describes the first structure of a DNA-complex of a uracil-DNA glycosylase from the poxvirus family. This alsomore » represents the first structure of a uracil DNA glycosylase in complex with an undamaged DNA. In the asymmetric unit two D4 subunits bind simultaneously to complementary strands of the DNA double helix. Each D4 subunit interacts mainly with the central region of one strand. DNA binds to the opposite side of the A20-binding surface on D4. In comparison of the present structure with the structure of uracil-containing DNA-bound human uracil-DNA glycosylase suggests that for DNA binding and uracil removal D4 employs a unique set of residues and motifs that are highly conserved within the poxvirus family but different in other organisms. Conclusion: The first structure of D4 bound to a truly non-specific undamaged double-stranded DNA suggests that initial binding of DNA may involve multiple non-specific interactions between the protein and the phosphate backbone.« less

  4. DNA binding, photo-induced DNA cleavage and cytotoxicity studies of lomefloxacin and its transition metal complexes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ragheb, Mohamed A.; Eldesouki, Mohamed A.; Mohamed, Mervat S.

    2015-03-01

    This work was focused on a study of the DNA binding and cleavage properties of lomefloxacin (LMF) and its ternary transition metal complexes with glycine. The nature of the binding interactions between compounds and calf thymus DNA (CT-DNA) was studied by electronic absorption spectra, fluorescence spectra and thermal denaturation experiments. The obtained results revealed that LMF and its complexes could interact with CT-DNA via partial/moderate intercalative mode. Furthermore, the DNA cleavage activities of the compounds were investigated by gel electrophoresis. Mechanistic studies of DNA cleavage suggest that singlet oxygen (1O2) is likely to be the cleaving agent via an oxidative pathway, except for Cu(II) complex which proceeds via both oxidative and hydrolytic pathways. Antimicrobial and antitumor activities of the compounds were also studied against some kinds of bacteria, fungi and human cell lines.

  5. Yeast general transcription factor GFI: sequence requirements for binding to DNA and evolutionary conservation.

    PubMed Central

    Dorsman, J C; van Heeswijk, W C; Grivell, L A

    1990-01-01

    GFI is an abundant DNA binding protein in the yeast S. cerevisiae. The protein binds to specific sequences in both ARS elements and the upstream regions of a large number of genes and is likely to play an important role in yeast cell growth. To get insight into the relative strength of the various GFI-DNA binding sites within the yeast genome, we have determined dissociation rates for several GFI-DNA complexes and found them to vary over a 70-fold range. Strong binding sites for GFI are present in the upstream activating sequences of the gene encoding the 40 kDa subunit II of the QH2:cytochrome c reductase, the gene encoding ribosomal protein S33 and in the intron of the actin gene. The binding site in the ARS1-TRP1 region is of intermediate strength. All strong binding sites conform to the sequence 5' RTCRYYYNNNACG-3'. Modification interference experiments and studies with mutant binding sites indicate that critical bases for GFI recognition are within the two elements of the consensus DNA recognition sequence. Proteins with the DNA binding specificities of GFI and GFII can also be detected in the yeast K. lactis, suggesting evolutionary conservation of at least the respective DNA-binding domains in both yeasts. Images PMID:2187179

  6. Differential use of SCL/TAL-1 DNA-binding domain in developmental hematopoiesis.

    PubMed

    Kassouf, Mira T; Chagraoui, Hedia; Vyas, Paresh; Porcher, Catherine

    2008-08-15

    Dissecting the molecular mechanisms used by developmental regulators is essential to understand tissue specification/differentiation. SCL/TAL-1 is a basic helix-loop-helix transcription factor absolutely critical for hematopoietic stem/progenitor cell specification and lineage maturation. Using in vitro and forced expression experimental systems, we previously suggested that SCL might have DNA-binding-independent functions. Here, to assess the requirements for SCL DNA-binding activity in vivo, we examined hematopoietic development in mice carrying a germline DNA-binding mutation. Remarkably, in contrast to complete absence of hematopoiesis and early lethality in scl-null embryos, specification of hematopoietic cells occurred in homozygous mutant embryos, indicating that direct DNA binding is dispensable for this process. Lethality was forestalled to later in development, although some mice survived to adulthood. Anemia was documented throughout development and in adulthood. Cellular and molecular studies showed requirements for SCL direct DNA binding in red cell maturation and indicated that scl expression is positively autoregulated in terminally differentiating erythroid cells. Thus, different mechanisms of SCL's action predominate depending on the developmental/cellular context: indirect DNA binding activities and/or sequestration of other nuclear regulators are sufficient in specification processes, whereas direct DNA binding functions with transcriptional autoregulation are critically required in terminal maturation processes.

  7. Synthesis and antiproliferative activity of 9-benzylamino-6-chloro-2-methoxy-acridine derivatives as potent DNA-binding ligands and topoisomerase II inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Wei; Zhang, Bin; Zhang, Wei; Yang, Ti; Wang, Ning; Gao, Chunmei; Tan, Chunyan; Liu, Hongxia; Jiang, Yuyang

    2016-06-30

    A series of 9-benzylamino acridine derivatives were synthesized as an extension of our discovery of acridine antitumor agents. Most of these acridine compounds displayed good antiproliferative activity with IC50 values in low micromole range and structure-activity relationships were studied. Topo I- and II- mediated relaxation studies suggested that all of our compounds displayed strong Topo II inhibitory activity at 100 μM, while only four exhibited moderate Topo I inhibitory activity. The typical compound 8p could penetrate A549 cancer cells efficiently. Compound 8p could intercalate within the double-stranded DNA structure and induce DNA damage. Moreover, compound 8p could induce A549 cells apoptosis through caspase-dependent intrinsic pathway and arrest A549 cells at the G2/M phase.

  8. Dynamical DNA accessibility induced by chromatin remodeling and protein binding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Montel, F.; Faivre-Moskalenko, C.; Castelnovo, M.

    2014-11-01

    Chromatin remodeling factors are enzymes being able to alter locally chromatin structure at the nucleosomal level and they actively participate in the regulation of gene expression. Using simple rules for individual nucleosome motion induced by a remodeling factor, we designed simulations of the remodeling of oligomeric chromatin, in order to address quantitatively collective effects in DNA accessibility upon nucleosome mobilization. Our results suggest that accessibility profiles are inhomogeneous thanks to borders effects like protein binding. Remarkably, we show that the accessibility lifetime of DNA sequence is roughly doubled in the vicinity of borders as compared to its value in bulk regions far from the borders. These results are quantitatively interpreted as resulting from the confined diffusion of a large nucleosome depleted region.

  9. The Lon protease from the haloalkaliphilic archaeon Natrialba magadii is transcriptionally linked to a cluster of putative membrane proteases and displays DNA-binding activity.

    PubMed

    Sastre, Diego E; Paggi, Roberto A; De Castro, Rosana E

    2011-05-20

    The ATP-dependent Lon protease is universally distributed in bacteria, eukaryotic organelles and archaea. In comparison with bacterial and eukaryal Lon proteases, the biology of the archaeal Lon has been studied to a limited extent. In this study, the gene encoding the Lon protease of the alkaliphilic haloarchaeon Natrialba magadii (Nmlon) was cloned and sequenced, and the genetic organization of Nmlon was examined at the transcriptional level. Nmlon encodes a 84 kDa polypeptide with a pI of 4.42 which contains the ATPase, protease and membrane targeting domains of the archaeal-type LonB proteases. Nmlon is part of an operon that encodes membrane proteases and it is transcribed as a polycistronic mRNA in N. magadii cells at different growth stages. Accordingly, NmLon was detected in cell membranes of N. magadii throughout growth by Western blot analysis using specific anti-NmLon antibodies. Interestingly, in electrophoretic mobility shift assays, purified NmLon bound double stranded as well as single stranded DNA in the presence of elevated salt concentrations. This finding shows that DNA-binding is conserved in the LonA and LonB subfamilies and suggests that Lon-DNA interaction may be relevant for its function in haloarchaea.

  10. A constitutive damage specific DNA-binding protein is synthesized at higher levels in UV-irradiated primate cells

    SciTech Connect

    Hirschfeld, S.; Levine, A.S.; Ozato, K.; Protic, M. )

    1990-05-01

    Using a DNA band shift assay, we have identified a DNA-binding protein complex in primate cells which is present constitutively and has a high affinity for UV-irradiated, double-stranded DNA. Cells pretreated with UV light, mitomycin C, or aphidicolin have higher levels of this damage-specific DNA-binding protein complex, suggesting that the signal for induction can either be damage to the DNA or interference with cellular DNA replication. Physiochemical modifications of the DNA and competition analysis with defined substrates suggest that the most probable target site for the damage-specific DNA-binding protein complex is a 6-4'-(pyrimidine-2'-one)-pyrimidine dimer: specific binding could not be detected with probes which contain -TT- cyclobutane dimers, and damage-specific DNA binding did not decrease after photoreactivation of UV-irradiated DNA. This damage-specific DNA-binding protein complex is the first such inducible protein complex identified in primate cells. Cells from patients with the sun-sensitive cancer-prone disease, xeroderma pigmentosum (group E), are lacking both the constitutive and the induced damage-specific DNA-binding activities. These findings suggest a possible role for this DNA-binding protein complex in lesion recognition and DNA repair of UV-light-induced photoproducts.

  11. DNA-Based Nanostructures: Changes of Mechanical Properties of DNA upon Ligand Binding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nechipurenko, Yury; Grokhovsky, Sergey; Gursky, Georgy; Nechipurenko, Dmitry; Polozov, Robert

    The formation of DNA-based nanostructures involves the binding of different kinds of ligands to DNA as well as the interaction of DNA molecules with each other. Complex formation between ligand and DNA can alter physicochemical properties of the DNA molecule. In the present work, the accessibility of DNA-ligand complexes to cleavage by DNase I are considered, and the exact algorithms for analysis of diagrams of DNase I footprinting for ligand-DNA complexes are obtained. Changes of mechanical properties of the DNA upon ligand binding are also demonstrated by the cleavage patterns generated upon ultrasound irradiation of cis-platin-DNA complexes. Propagation of the mechanical perturbations along DNA in the presence of bound ligands is considered in terms of a string model with a heterogeneity corresponding to the position of a bound ligand on DNA. This model can reproduce qualitatively the cleavage patterns obtained upon ultrasound irradiation of cis-platin-DNA complexes.

  12. Thermodynamics of Damaged DNA Binding and Catalysis by Human AP Endonuclease 1.

    PubMed

    Miroshnikova, A D; Kuznetsova, A A; Kuznetsov, N A; Fedorova, O S

    2016-01-01

    Apurinic/apyrimidinic (AP) endonucleases play an important role in DNA repair and initiation of AP site elimination. One of the most topical problems in the field of DNA repair is to understand the mechanism of the enzymatic process involving the human enzyme APE1 that provides recognition of AP sites and efficient cleavage of the 5'-phosphodiester bond. In this study, a thermodynamic analysis of the interaction between APE1 and a DNA substrate containing a stable AP site analog lacking the C1' hydroxyl group (F site) was performed. Based on stopped-flow kinetic data at different temperatures, the steps of DNA binding, catalysis, and DNA product release were characterized. The changes in the standard Gibbs energy, enthalpy, and entropy of sequential specific steps of the repair process were determined. The thermodynamic analysis of the data suggests that the initial step of the DNA substrate binding includes formation of non-specific contacts between the enzyme binding surface and DNA, as well as insertion of the amino acid residues Arg177 and Met270 into the duplex, which results in the removal of "crystalline" water molecules from DNA grooves. The second binding step involves the F site flipping-out process and formation of specific contacts between the enzyme active site and the everted 5'-phosphate-2'-deoxyribose residue. It was shown that non-specific interactions between the binding surfaces of the enzyme and DNA provide the main contribution into the thermodynamic parameters of the DNA product release step.

  13. Histone-like DNA binding protein of Streptococcus intermedius induces the expression of pro-inflammatory cytokines in human monocytes via activation of ERK1/2 and JNK pathways.

    PubMed

    Liu, Dali; Yumoto, Hiromichi; Hirota, Katsuhiko; Murakami, Keiji; Takahashi, Kanako; Hirao, Kouji; Matsuo, Takashi; Ohkura, Kazuto; Nagamune, Hideaki; Miyake, Yoichiro

    2008-01-01

    Streptococcus intermedius is a commensal associated with serious, deep-seated purulent infections in major organs, such as the brain and liver. Histone-like DNA binding protein (HLP) is an accessory architectural protein in a variety of bacterial cellular processes. In this study, we investigated the mechanisms of pro-inflammatory cytokine inductions in THP-1 cells by stimulation with recombinant HLP of S. intermedius (rSi-HLP). rSi-HLP stimulation-induced production of pro-inflammatory cytokines (IL-8, IL-1 beta and TNF-alpha) occurred in a time- and dose-dependent manner. In contrast with the heat-stable activity of DNA binding, the induction activity of rSi-HLP was heat-unstable. In subsequent studies, rSi-HLP acted cooperatively with lipoteichoic acid, the synthetic Toll-like receptor 2 agonist, Pam3CSK4, and the cytosolic nucleotide binding oligomerization domain 2 receptor agonist, muramyldipeptide. Furthermore, Western blot and blocking assays with specific inhibitors showed that rSi-HLP stimulation induced the activation of cell signal transduction pathways, extracellular signal-regulated kinase 1/2 (ERK1/2) and c-Jun N-terminal kinase (JNK). In addition to its physiological role in bacterial growth through DNA binding, these results indicate that Si-HLP can trigger a cascade of events that induce pro-inflammatory responses via ERK1/2 and JNK signal pathways, and suggest that bacterial HLP may contribute to the activation of host innate immunity during bacterial infection.

  14. CCAAT box binding protein NF-Y facilitates in vivo recruitment of upstream DNA binding transcription factors.

    PubMed Central

    Wright, K L; Vilen, B J; Itoh-Lindstrom, Y; Moore, T L; Li, G; Criscitiello, M; Cogswell, P; Clarke, J B; Ting, J P

    1994-01-01

    NF-Y binds a CCAAT motif found in many eukaryotic polymerase II-dependent promoters. In the HLA-DRA promoter it has been demonstrated that stereo-specific alignment between this motif and the upstream elements X1 and X2 is required for activation. To study the underlying mechanism for this requirement, a panel of transfected cell lines that maintained integrated, wild-type and mutant promoters were analyzed by in vivo genomic footprinting. Cell lines harboring a mutated CCAAT element exhibited a loss of interactions at the CCAAT site, as expected, and no transcriptional activity. Most importantly, mutation of the CCAAT sequence nearly abolished in vivo binding at the X1 and X2 sites, while mutations of X1 and X2 had little effect on CCAAT box binding. However, X1 and X2 binding was interdependent. In vitro, X1 binding activities are known to be stabilized by NF-Y binding. Interaction between NF-Y and X box binding proteins was demonstrated by reciprocal co-immunoprecipitation in the absence of DNA and co-affinity purification in the presence of DNA. Collectively, these studies indicate that occupancy of the CCAAT element represents an early event affecting other protein-DNA interactions and suggest that NF-Y stabilizes and interacts with X box factors to mediate this function. These findings may represent a common theme among promoters containing a CCAAT element. Images PMID:8076600

  15. Synthesis, characterization, DNA binding, cleavage activity, cytotoxicity and molecular docking of new nano water-soluble [M(5-CH₂PPh₃-3,4-salpyr)](ClO₄)₂ (M = Ni, Zn) complexes.

    PubMed

    Mandegani, Zeinab; Asadi, Zahra; Asadi, Mozaffar; Karbalaei-Heidari, Hamid Reza; Rastegari, Banafsheh

    2016-04-21

    Some new water soluble complexes [N,N'-bis{5-[(triphenyl phosphonium chloride)-methyl]salicylidine}-3,4-diaminopyridine] M(ii), which are formulated as nano-[Zn(5-CH2PPh3-3,4-salpyr)](ClO4)2 (), [Zn(5-CH2PPh3-3,4-salpyr)](ClO4)2 (), nano-[Ni(5-CH2PPh3-3,4-salpyr)](ClO4)2 (), [Ni(5-CH2PPh3-3,4-salpyr)](ClO4)2 (), and [N,N'-bis{5-[(triphenyl phosphonium chloride)-methyl]salicylidine}-2,3-diaminopyridine]Ni(ii) [Ni(5-CH2PPh3-2,3-salpyr)](ClO4)2 () have been isolated and characterized by elemental analysis, FT-IR, (1)H NMR, (13)C NMR, (31)P NMR, and UV-vis spectroscopy. The morphology and size of the nano complexes were determined using FE-SEM and TEM. In vitro DNA binding studies were investigated by UV-vis absorption spectroscopy, viscosity measurements, CD spectroscopy, cyclic voltammetry, emission spectra and gel electrophoresis, which suggest that the metal complexes act as efficient DNA binders. The absorption spectroscopy of the compounds with DNA reveals that the DNA binding affinity (Kb) has this order: > > > > > Ligand. The metal complexes show DNA binding stronger than the ligand, which is expected due to the nature of the metal. The nano complexes display DNA binding stronger than the other complexes which is related to the effect of size on binding affinity and the Ni(ii) complexes reveal DNA binding stronger than the corresponding Zn(ii) analogues, which is expected due to their z* effect and geometry. The prominent double strand DNA cleavage abilities of compound are observed in the absence of H2O2 with efficiencies of more than 50% even at 70 μM complex concentration. Surprisingly, Zn(ii) complexes (compounds & ) exhibit a higher cytotoxicity (IC50: 7.3 & 10.9 μM at 24 h; IC50: 4.6 & 8.7 μM at 48 h) against human hepatoma (HepG2) and HeLa cell lines than the Ni(ii) complexes (compounds , & ) and 5-fluorouracil as control in spite of their inability to cleave DNA. Finally, DNA binding interactions were performed by docking studies. Density functional

  16. Measuring Equilibrium Binding Constants for the WT1-DNA Interaction Using a Filter Binding Assay.

    PubMed

    Romaniuk, Paul J

    2016-01-01

    Equilibrium binding of WT1 to specific sites in DNA and potentially RNA molecules is central in mediating the regulatory roles of this protein. In order to understand the functional effects of mutations in the nucleic acid-binding domain of WT1 proteins and/or mutations in the DNA- or RNA-binding sites, it is necessary to measure the equilibrium constant for formation of the protein-nucleic acid complex. This chapter describes the use of a filter binding assay to make accurate measurements of the binding of the WT1 zinc finger domain to the consensus WT1-binding site in DNA. The method described is readily adapted to the measurement of the effects of mutations in either the WT1 zinc finger domain or the putative binding sites within a promoter element or cellular RNA.

  17. A filter microplate assay for quantitative analysis of DNA binding proteins using fluorescent DNA.

    PubMed

    Yang, William C; Swartz, James R

    2011-08-15

    We present a rapid method for quantifying the apparent DNA binding affinity and capacity of recombinant transcription factors (TFs). We capture His6-tagged TFs using nickel-nitrilotriacetic acid (Ni-NTA) agarose and incubate the immobilized TFs with fluorescently labeled cognate DNA probes. After washing, the strength of the fluorescence signal indicates the extent of DNA binding. The assay was validated using two pluripotency-regulating TFs: SOX2 and NANOG. Using competitive binding analysis with nonlabeled competitor DNA, we show that SOX2 and NANOG specifically bind to their consensus sequences. We also determined the apparent affinity of SOX2 and NANOG for their consensus sequences to be 54.2±9 and 44.0±6nM, respectively, in approximate agreement with literature values. Our assay does not require radioactivity, but radioactively labeling the TFs enables the measurement of absolute amounts of immobilized SOX2 and NANOG and, hence, a DNA-to-protein binding ratio. SOX2 possesses a 0.95 DNA-to-protein binding ratio, whereas NANOG possesses a 0.44 ratio, suggesting that most of the SOX2 and approximately half of the NANOG are competent for DNA binding. Alternatively, the NANOG dimer may be capable of binding only one DNA target. This flexible DNA binding assay enables the analysis of crude or purified samples with or without radioactivity.

  18. Aptamer-Binding Directed DNA Origami Pattern for Logic Gates.

    PubMed

    Yang, Jing; Jiang, Shuoxing; Liu, Xiangrong; Pan, Linqiang; Zhang, Cheng

    2016-12-14

    In this study, an aptamer-substrate strategy is introduced to control programmable DNA origami pattern. Combined with DNA aptamer-substrate binding and DNAzyme-cutting, small DNA tiles were specifically controlled to fill into the predesigned DNA origami frame. Here, a set of DNA logic gates (OR, YES, and AND) are performed in response to the stimuli of adenosine triphosphate (ATP) and cocaine. The experimental results are confirmed by AFM imaging and time-dependent fluorescence changes, demonstrating that the geometric patterns are regulated in a controllable and programmable manner. Our approach provides a new platform for engineering programmable origami nanopatterns and constructing complex DNA nanodevices.

  19. Characterization and cDNA cloning of phospholipase C-gamma, a major substrate for heparin-binding growth factor 1 (acidic fibroblast growth factor)-activated tyrosine kinase.

    PubMed Central

    Burgess, W H; Dionne, C A; Kaplow, J; Mudd, R; Friesel, R; Zilberstein, A; Schlessinger, J; Jaye, M

    1990-01-01

    Heparin-binding growth factors (HBGFs) bind to high-affinity cell surface receptors which possess intrinsic tyrosine kinase activity. A Mr 150,000 protein phosphorylated on tyrosine in response to class 1 HBGF (HBGF-1) was purified and partially sequenced. On the basis of this sequence, cDNA clones were isolated from a human endothelial cell library and identified as encoding phospholipase C-gamma. Phosphorylation of phospholipase C-gamma in intact cells treated with HBGF-1 was directly demonstrated by using antiphospholipase C-gamma antibodies. Thus, HBGF-1 joins epidermal growth factor and platelet-derived growth factor, whose receptor activation leads to tyrosine phosphorylation and probable activation of phospholipase C-gamma. Images PMID:2167438

  20. Context influences on TALE-DNA binding revealed by quantitative profiling.

    PubMed

    Rogers, Julia M; Barrera, Luis A; Reyon, Deepak; Sander, Jeffry D; Kellis, Manolis; Joung, J Keith; Bulyk, Martha L

    2015-06-11

    Transcription activator-like effector (TALE) proteins recognize DNA using a seemingly simple DNA-binding code, which makes them attractive for use in genome engineering technologies that require precise targeting. Although this code is used successfully to design TALEs to target specific sequences, off-target binding has been observed and is difficult to predict. Here we explore TALE-DNA interactions comprehensively by quantitatively assaying the DNA-binding specificities of 21 representative TALEs to ∼5,000-20,000 unique DNA sequences per protein using custom-designed protein-binding microarrays (PBMs). We find that protein context features exert significant influences on binding. Thus, the canonical recognition code does not fully capture the complexity of TALE-DNA binding. We used the PBM data to develop a computational model, Specificity Inference For TAL-Effector Design (SIFTED), to predict the DNA-binding specificity of any TALE. We provide SIFTED as a publicly available web tool that predicts potential genomic off-target sites for improved TALE design.

  1. Nucleic acid sensing with enzyme-DNA binding protein conjugates cascade and simple DNA nanostructures.

    PubMed

    Aktas, Gülsen Betül; Skouridou, Vasso; Masip, Lluis

    2017-03-22

    A versatile and universal DNA sensing platform is presented based on enzyme-DNA binding protein tags conjugates and simple DNA nanostructures. Two enzyme conjugates were thus prepared, with horseradish peroxidase linked to the dimeric single-chain bacteriophage Cro repressor protein (HRP-scCro) and glucose oxidase linked to the dimeric headpiece domain of Escherichia coli LacI repressor protein (GOx-dHP), and used in conjunction with a hybrid ssDNA-dsDNA detection probe. This probe served as a simple DNA nanostructure allowing first for target recognition through its target-complementary single-stranded DNA (ssDNA) part and then for signal generation after conjugate binding on the double-stranded DNA (dsDNA) containing the specific binding sites for the dHP and scCro DNA binding proteins. The DNA binding proteins chosen in this work have different sequence specificity, high affinity, and lack of cross-reactivity. The proposed sensing system was validated for the detection of model target ssDNA from high-risk human papillomavirus (HPV16) and the limits of detection of 45, 26, and 21 pM were achieved using the probes with scCro/dHP DNA binding sites ratio of 1:1, 2:1, and 1:2, respectively. The performance of the platform in terms of limit of detection was comparable to direct HRP systems using target-specific oligonucleotide-HRP conjugates. The ratio of the two enzymes can be easily manipulated by changing the number of binding sites on the detection probe, offering further optimization possibilities of the signal generation step. Moreover, since the signal is obtained in the absence of externally added hydrogen peroxide, the described platform is compatible with paper-based assays for molecular diagnostics applications. Finally, just by changing the ssDNA part of the detection probe, this versatile nucleic acid platform can be used for the detection of different ssDNA target sequences or in a multiplex detection configuration without the need to change any of the

  2. A mammary cell-specific enhancer in mouse mammary tumor virus DNA is composed of multiple regulatory elements including binding sites for CTF/NFI and a novel transcription factor, mammary cell-activating factor.

    PubMed Central

    Mink, S; Härtig, E; Jennewein, P; Doppler, W; Cato, A C

    1992-01-01

    Mouse mammary tumor virus (MMTV) is a milk-transmitted retrovirus involved in the neoplastic transformation of mouse mammary gland cells. The expression of this virus is regulated by mammary cell type-specific factors, steroid hormones, and polypeptide growth factors. Sequences for mammary cell-specific expression are located in an enhancer element in the extreme 5' end of the long terminal repeat region of this virus. This enhancer, when cloned in front of the herpes simplex thymidine kinase promoter, endows the promoter with mammary cell-specific response. Using functional and DNA-protein-binding studies with constructs mutated in the MMTV long terminal repeat enhancer, we have identified two main regulatory elements necessary for the mammary cell-specific response. These elements consist of binding sites for a transcription factor in the family of CTF/NFI proteins and the transcription factor mammary cell-activating factor (MAF) that recognizes the sequence G Pu Pu G C/G A A G G/T. Combinations of CTF/NFI- and MAF-binding sites or multiple copies of either one of these binding sites but not solitary binding sites mediate mammary cell-specific expression. The functional activities of these two regulatory elements are enhanced by another factor that binds to the core sequence ACAAAG. Interdigitated binding sites for CTF/NFI, MAF, and/or the ACAAAG factor are also found in the 5' upstream regions of genes encoding whey milk proteins from different species. These findings suggest that mammary cell-specific regulation is achieved by a concerted action of factors binding to multiple regulatory sites. Images PMID:1328867

  3. DNA polymerase having modified nucleotide binding site for DNA sequencing

    DOEpatents

    Tabor, S.; Richardson, C.

    1997-03-25

    A modified gene encoding a modified DNA polymerase is disclosed. The modified polymerase incorporates dideoxynucleotides at least 20-fold better compared to the corresponding deoxynucleotides as compared with the corresponding naturally-occurring DNA polymerase. 6 figs.

  4. DNA polymerase having modified nucleotide binding site for DNA sequencing

    DOEpatents

    Tabor, Stanley; Richardson, Charles

    1997-01-01

    Modified gene encoding a modified DNA polymerase wherein the modified polymerase incorporates dideoxynucleotides at least 20-fold better compared to the corresponding deoxynucleotides as compared with the corresponding naturally-occurring DNA polymerase.

  5. Mechanochemical regulations of RPA's binding to ssDNA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Jin; Le, Shimin; Basu, Anindita; Chazin, Walter J.; Yan, Jie

    2015-03-01

    Replication protein A (RPA) is a ubiquitous eukaryotic single-stranded DNA (ssDNA) binding protein that serves to protect ssDNA from degradation and annealing, and as a template for recruitment of many downstream factors in virtually all DNA transactions in cell. During many of these transactions, DNA is tethered and is likely subject to force. Previous studies of RPA's binding behavior on ssDNA were conducted in the absence of force; therefore the RPA-ssDNA conformations regulated by force remain unclear. Here, using a combination of atomic force microscopy imaging and mechanical manipulation of single ssDNA tethers, we show that force mediates a switch of the RPA bound ssDNA from amorphous aggregation to a much more regular extended conformation. Further, we found an interesting non-monotonic dependence of the binding affinity on monovalent salt concentration in the presence of force. In addition, we discovered that zinc in micromolar concentrations drives ssDNA to a unique, highly stiff and more compact state. These results provide new mechanochemical insights into the influences and the mechanisms of action of RPA on large single ssDNA.

  6. A seven-coordinated manganese(II) complex with V-shaped ligand bis(N-benzylbenzimidazol-2-ylmethyl)benzylamine: synthesis, structure, DNA-binding properties and antioxidant activities.

    PubMed

    Wu, Huilu; Yuan, Jingkun; Bai, Ying; Wang, Hua; Pan, Guolong; Kong, Jin

    2012-11-05

    A manganese(II) complex of the type, [MnL(pic)(2)]·H(2)O, was obtained by the reaction of the V-shaped ligand bis(N-benzylbenzimidazol-2-ylmethyl)benzylamine (L) with Mn(pic)(2) (pic=picrate). The ligand L and Mn(II) complex were confirmed on the basis of elemental analysis, molarconductivities, (1)H NMR, IR, UV-vis spectra and X-ray crystallography. Single-crystal X-ray revealed that central Mn(II) atom is seven-coordinate with a MnN(3)O(4) environment, in which ligand L acts as a tridentate N-donor. The remaining coordination sites were occupied by four O atoms afforded by two picrate anion. Interaction of the free ligand L and Mn(II) complex with DNA were investigated by spectrophotometric methods and viscosity measurements. The results suggested that both ligand L and Mn(II) complex bind to DNA in an intercalative binding mode, and DNA-binding affinity of the Mn(II) complex is stronger than that of ligand L. Moreover, antioxidant assay in vitro shows the Mn(II) complex possesses significant antioxidant activities.

  7. Visually Relating Gene Expression and in vivo DNA Binding Data

    SciTech Connect

    Huang, Min-Yu; Mackey, Lester; Ker?,; nen, Soile V. E.; Weber, Gunther H.; Jordan, Michael I.; Knowles, David W.; Biggin, Mark D.; Hamann, Bernd

    2011-09-20

    Gene expression and in vivo DNA binding data provide important information for understanding gene regulatory networks: in vivo DNA binding data indicate genomic regions where transcription factors are bound, and expression data show the output resulting from this binding. Thus, there must be functional relationships between these two types of data. While visualization and data analysis tools exist for each data type alone, there is a lack of tools that can easily explore the relationship between them. We propose an approach that uses the average expression driven by multiple of ciscontrol regions to visually relate gene expression and in vivo DNA binding data. We demonstrate the utility of this tool with examples from the network controlling early Drosophila development. The results obtained support the idea that the level of occupancy of a transcription factor on DNA strongly determines the degree to which the factor regulates a target gene, and in some cases also controls whether the regulation is positive or negative.

  8. Quantitative Determination of DNA-Ligand Binding Using Fluorescence Spectroscopy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Healy, Eamonn F.

    2007-01-01

    The effective use of fluorescence spectroscopy for determining the binding of the intercalcating agent crhidium bromide to DNA is being described. The analysis used simple measurement techniques and hence can be easily adopted by the students for a better understanding.

  9. FANCI protein binds to DNA and interacts with FANCD2 to recognize branched structures.

    PubMed

    Yuan, Fenghua; El Hokayem, Jimmy; Zhou, Wen; Zhang, Yanbin

    2009-09-04

    In this study, we report that the purified wild-type FANCI (Fanconi anemia complementation group I) protein directly binds to a variety of DNA substrates. The DNA binding domain roughly encompasses residues 200-1000, as suggested by the truncation study. When co-expressed in insect cells, a small fraction of FANCI forms a stable complex with FANCD2 (Fanconi anemia complementation group D2). Intriguingly, the purified FANCI-FANCD2 complex preferentially binds to the branched DNA structures when compared with either FANCI or FANCD2 alone. Co-immunoprecipitation with purified proteins indicates that FANCI interacts with FANCD2 through its C-terminal amino acid 1001-1328 fragment. Although the C terminus of FANCI is dispensable for direct DNA binding, it seems to be involved in the regulation of DNA binding activity. This notion is further enhanced by two C-terminal point mutations, R1285Q and D1301A, which showed differentiated DNA binding activity. We also demonstrate that FANCI forms discrete nuclear foci in HeLa cells in the absence or presence of exogenous DNA damage. The FANCI foci are colocalized perfectly with FANCD2 and partially with proliferating cell nuclear antigen irrespective of mitomycin C treatment. An increased number of FANCI foci form and become resistant to Triton X extraction in response to mitomycin C treatment. Our data suggest that the FANCI-FANCD2 complex may participate in repair of damaged replication forks through its preferential recognition of branched structures.

  10. Nitropyrene: DNA binding and adduct formation in respiratory tissues.

    PubMed Central

    Jackson, M A; King, L C; Ball, L M; Ghayourmanesh, S; Jeffrey, A M; Lewtas, J

    1985-01-01

    Binding of 1-nitro (14C)pyrene (NP) or its metabolites to cellular DNA and protein in cultures of rabbit alveolar macrophages, lung tissue, and tracheal tissue was examined. DNA binding in tracheal tissue (136 +/- 18.3 pmole NP/mg DNA) was four to five times the levels measured in either lung tissue (38 +/- 9.4 pmole NP/mg DNA) or macrophages (26 +/- 7.5 pmole NP/mg DNA). Adduct analysis of DNA isolated from lung tissue incubated with 1-nitro[H3]pyrene in vitro resulted in the identification of 2 to 5% of the NP adducts as C8-deoxyguanosine 1-aminopyrene. NP was also bound to cellular protein in tracheal tissue and lung tissue, and at a lower level in macrophages. Cocultivation of the macrophages with lung and tracheal tissue decreased the DNA binding in tracheal tissue by 45%. Following intratracheal instillation of diesel particles (5 mg) vapor-coated with 14C-NP (380 ppm, 0.085 muCi/mg) particles into rats, 5-8% of the radioactivity remained in the lungs after 20 hr. Most of the diesel particles were also deposited in the lung. Examination of DNA and protein binding in this tissue showed 5 to 12% of the pulmonary 14C bound to protein and no detectable levels of 14C bound to DNA. PMID:3841313

  11. Protein-protein and protein-DNA interaction regions within the DNA end-binding protein Ku70-Ku86.

    PubMed Central

    Wu, X; Lieber, M R

    1996-01-01

    DNA ends are generated during double-strand-break repair and recombination. A p70-p86 heterodimer, Ku, accounts for the DNA end binding activity in eukaryotic cell extracts. When one or both subunits of Ku are missing, mammalian cells are deficient in double-strand-break repair and in specialized recombination, such as V(D)J recombination. Little is known of which regions of Ku70 and Ku86 bind to each other to form the heterodimeric complex or of which regions are important for DNA end binding. We have done genetic and biochemical studies to examine the domains within the two subunits important for protein assembly and for DNA end binding. We found that the C-terminal 20-kDa region of Ku70 and the C-terminal 32-kDa region of Ku86 are important for subunit-subunit interaction. For DNA binding, full-length individual subunits are inactive, indicating that heterodimer assembly precedes DNA binding. DNA end binding activity by the heterodimer requires the C-terminal 40-kDa region of Ku70 and the C-terminal 45-kDa region of Ku86. Leucine zipper-like motifs in both subunits that have been suggested as the Ku70-Ku86 interaction domains do not appear to be the sites of such interaction because these are dispensable for both assembly and DNA end binding. On the basis of these studies, we have organized Ku70 into nine sequence regions conserved between Saccharomyces cerevisiae, Drosophila melanogaster, mice, and humans; only the C-terminal three regions are essential for assembly (amino acids [aa] 439 to 609), and the C-terminal four regions appear to be essential for DNA end binding (aa 254 to 609). Within the minimal active fragment of Ku86 necessary for subunit interaction (aa 449 to 732) and DNA binding (aa 334 to 732), a proline-rich region is the only defined motif. PMID:8756676

  12. miR-155 activates cytokine gene expression in Th17 cells by regulating the DNA-binding protein Jarid2 to relieve polycomb-mediated repression.

    PubMed

    Escobar, Thelma M; Kanellopoulou, Chrysi; Kugler, David G; Kilaru, Gokhul; Nguyen, Cuong K; Nagarajan, Vijayaraj; Bhairavabhotla, Ravikiran K; Northrup, Daniel; Zahr, Rami; Burr, Patrick; Liu, Xiuhuai; Zhao, Keji; Sher, Alan; Jankovic, Dragana; Zhu, Jinfang; Muljo, Stefan A

    2014-06-19

    Specification of the T helper 17 (Th17) cell lineage requires a well-defined set of transcription factors, but how these integrate with posttranscriptional and epigenetic programs to regulate gene expression is poorly understood. Here we found defective Th17 cell cytokine expression in miR-155-deficient CD4+ T cells in vitro and in vivo. Mir155 was bound by Th17 cell transcription factors and was highly expressed during Th17 cell differentiation. miR-155-deficient Th17 and T regulatory (Treg) cells expressed increased amounts of Jarid2, a DNA-binding protein that recruits the Polycomb Repressive Complex 2 (PRC2) to chromatin. PRC2 binding to chromatin and H3K27 histone methylation was increased in miR-155-deficient cells, coinciding with failure to express Il22, Il10, Il9, and Atf3. Defects in Th17 cell cytokine expression and Treg cell homeostasis in the absence of Mir155 could be partially suppressed by Jarid2 deletion. Thus, miR-155 contributes to Th17 cell function by suppressing the inhibitory effects of Jarid2.

  13. miR-155 activates cytokine gene expression in Th17 cells by regulating the DNA-binding protein Jarid2 to relieve Polycomb-mediated repression

    PubMed Central

    Escobar, Thelma M.; Kanellopoulou, Chrysi; Kugler, David G.; Kilaru, Gokhul; Nguyen, Cuong K.; Nagarajan, Vijayaraj; Bhairavabhotla, Ravikiran K.; Northrup, Daniel; Zahr, Rami; Burr, Patrick; Liu, Xiuhuai; Zhao, Keji; Sher, Alan; Jankovic, Dragana; Zhu, Jinfang; Muljo, Stefan A.

    2014-01-01

    Specification of the T helper 17 (Th17) cell lineage requires a well defined set of transcription factors, but how these integrate with post-transcriptional and epigenetic programs to regulate gene expression is poorly understood. Here we found defective Th17 cell cytokine expression in miR-155-deficient CD4+ T cells in vitro and in vivo. Mir155 was bound by Th17 cell transcription factors and was highly expressed during Th17 cell differentiation. miR-155-deficient-Th17 and -T regulatory (Treg) cells expressed increased amounts of Jarid2, a DNA-binding protein that recruits the Polycomb Repressive Complex 2 (PRC2) to chromatin. PRC2 binding to chromatin and H3K27 histone methylation was increased in miR-155-deficient cells, coinciding with failure to express Il22, Il10, Il9 and Atf3. Defects in Th17 cell cytokine expression and Treg cell homeostasis in the absence of Mir155 could be partially suppressed by Jarid2 deletion. Thus, miR-155 contributes to Th17 cell function by suppressing the inhibitory effects of Jarid2. PMID:24856900

  14. A calmodulin binding protein from Arabidopsis is induced by ethylene and contains a DNA-binding motif

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reddy, A. S.; Reddy, V. S.; Golovkin, M.

    2000-01-01

    Calmodulin (CaM), a key calcium sensor in all eukaryotes, regulates diverse cellular processes by interacting with other proteins. To isolate CaM binding proteins involved in ethylene signal transduction, we screened an expression library prepared from ethylene-treated Arabidopsis seedlings with 35S-labeled CaM. A cDNA clone, EICBP (Ethylene-Induced CaM Binding Protein), encoding a protein that interacts with activated CaM was isolated in this screening. The CaM binding domain in EICBP was mapped to the C-terminus of the protein. These results indicate that calcium, through CaM, could regulate the activity of EICBP. The EICBP is expressed in different tissues and its expression in seedlings is induced by ethylene. The EICBP contains, in addition to a CaM binding domain, several features that are typical of transcription factors. These include a DNA-binding domain at the N terminus, an acidic region at the C terminus, and nuclear localization signals. In database searches a partial cDNA (CG-1) encoding a DNA-binding motif from parsley and an ethylene up-regulated partial cDNA from tomato (ER66) showed significant similarity to EICBP. In addition, five hypothetical proteins in the Arabidopsis genome also showed a very high sequence similarity with EICBP, indicating that there are several EICBP-related proteins in Arabidopsis. The structural features of EICBP are conserved in all EICBP-related proteins in Arabidopsis, suggesting that they may constitute a new family of DNA binding proteins and are likely to be involved in modulating gene expression in the presence of ethylene.

  15. Epstein-Barr virus EBNA3A and EBNA3C proteins both repress RBP-J kappa-EBNA2-activated transcription by inhibiting the binding of RBP-J kappa to DNA.

    PubMed Central

    Waltzer, L; Perricaudet, M; Sergeant, A; Manet, E

    1996-01-01

    Following infection by Epstein-Barr virus (EBV), the production of viral nuclear proteins EBNA1, EBNA2, EBNA3A, and EBNA3C and the viral membrane protein LMP1 is essential for the permanent proliferation of primary B lymphocytes to occur. Among these, the transcription factor EBNA2 is central to the immortalizing process, since it activates not only the transcription of all the EBNA proteins and LMP1, TP1, and TP2 but also certain cellular genes. EBNA2 is targeted to its DNA-responsive elements through direct interaction with the DNA-binding cellular repressor RBP-J kappa. In a transient-expression assay, the EBNA2-activated transcription was found to be downregulated by EBNA3A, EBNA3B, and EBNA3C. However, since it has been reported that EBNA3C, but not EBNA3A, directly contacts RBP-J kappa in vitro, these proteins appear to repress through different mechanisms. Here, we report for the first time that EBNA3A and EBNA3C both stably interact with RBP-J kappa and most probably repress EBNA2-activated transcription by destabilizing the binding of RBP-J kappa to DNA. PMID:8709211

  16. Distinct Z-DNA binding mode of a PKR-like protein kinase containing a Z-DNA binding domain (PKZ)

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Doyoun; Hur, Jeonghwan; Park, Kwangsoo; Bae, Sangsu; Shin, Donghyuk; Ha, Sung Chul; Hwang, Hye-Yeon; Hohng, Sungchul; Lee, Joon-Hwa; Lee, Sangho; Kim, Yang-Gyun; Kim, Kyeong Kyu

    2014-01-01

    Double-stranded ribonucleic acid-activated protein kinase (PKR) downregulates translation as a defense mechanism against viral infection. In fish species, PKZ, a PKR-like protein kinase containing left-handed deoxyribonucleic acid (Z-DNA) binding domains, performs a similar role in the antiviral response. To understand the role of PKZ in Z-DNA recognition and innate immune response, we performed structural and functional studies of the Z-DNA binding domain (Zα) of PKZ from Carassius auratus (caZαPKZ). The 1.7-Å resolution crystal structure of caZαPKZ:Z-DNA revealed that caZαPKZ shares the overall fold with other Zα, but has discrete structural features that differentiate its DNA binding mode from others. Functional analyses of caZαPKZ and its mutants revealed that caZαPKZ mediates the fastest B-to-Z transition of DNA among Zα, and the minimal interaction for Z-DNA recognition is mediated by three backbone phosphates and six residues of caZαPKZ. Structure-based mutagenesis and B-to-Z transition assays confirmed that Lys56 located in the β-wing contributes to its fast B-to-Z transition kinetics. Investigation of the DNA binding kinetics of caZαPKZ further revealed that the B-to-Z transition rate is positively correlated with the association rate constant. Taking these results together, we conclude that the positive charge in the β-wing largely affects fast B-to-Z transition activity by enhancing the DNA binding rate. PMID:24682817

  17. Design of Sequence-Specific DNA Binding Molecules for DNA Methyltransferase Inhibition

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    The CpG dyad, an important genomic feature in DNA methylation and transcriptional regulation, is an attractive target for small molecules. To assess the utility of minor groove binding oligomers for CpG recognition, we screened a small library of hairpin pyrrole-imidazole polyamides targeting the sequence 5′-CGCG-3′ and assessed their sequence specificity using an unbiased next-generation sequencing assay. Our findings indicate that hairpin polyamide of sequence PyImβIm-γ-PyImβIm (1), previously identified as a high affinity 5′-CGCG-3′ binder, favors 5′-GCGC-3′ in an unanticipated reverse binding orientation. Replacement of one β alanine with Py to afford PyImPyIm-γ-PyImβIm (3) restores the preference for 5′-CGCG-3′ binding in a forward orientation. The minor groove binding hairpin 3 inhibits DNA methyltransferase activity in the major groove at its target site more effectively than 1, providing a molecular basis for design of sequence-specific antagonists of CpG methylation. PMID:24502234

  18. Spermine Attenuates the Action of the DNA Intercalator, Actinomycin D, on DNA Binding and the Inhibition of Transcription and DNA Replication

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Jeremy J. W.; Wu, Wen-Lin; Yuann, Jeu-Ming P.; Su, Wang-Lin; Chuang, Show-Mei; Hou, Ming-Hon

    2012-01-01

    The anticancer activity of DNA intercalators is related to their ability to intercalate into the DNA duplex with high affinity, thereby interfering with DNA replication and transcription. Polyamines (spermine in particular) are almost exclusively bound to nucleic acids and are involved in many cellular processes that require nucleic acids. Until now, the effects of polyamines on DNA intercalator activities have remained unclear because intercalation is the most important mechanism employed by DNA-binding drugs. Herein, using actinomycin D (ACTD) as a model, we have attempted to elucidate the effects of spermine on the action of ACTD, including its DNA-binding ability, RNA and DNA polymerase interference, and its role in the transcription and replication inhibition of ACTD within cells. We found that spermine interfered with the binding and stabilization of ACTD to DNA. The presence of increasing concentrations of spermine enhanced the transcriptional and replication activities of RNA and DNA polymerases, respectively, in vitro treated with ActD. Moreover, a decrease in intracellular polyamine concentrations stimulated by methylglyoxal-bis(guanylhydrazone) (MGBG) enhanced the ACTD-induced inhibition of c-myc transcription and DNA replication in several cancer cell lines. The results indicated that spermine attenuates ACTD binding to DNA and its inhibition of transcription and DNA replication both in vitro and within cells. Finally, a synergistic antiproliferative effect of MGBG and ACTD was observed in a cell viability assay. Our findings will be of significant relevance to future developments in combination with cancer therapy by enhancing the anticancer activity of DNA interactors through polyamine depletion. PMID:23144800

  19. Molecular modeling and spectroscopic studies of semustine binding with DNA and its comparison with lomustine-DNA adduct formation.

    PubMed

    Agarwal, Shweta; Chadha, Deepti; Mehrotra, Ranjana

    2015-01-01

    Chloroethyl nitrosoureas constitute an important family of cancer chemotherapeutic agents, used in the treatment of various types of cancer. They exert antitumor activity by inducing DNA interstrand cross-links. Semustine, a chloroethyl nitrosourea, is a 4-methyl derivative of lomustine. There exist some interesting reports dealing with DNA-binding properties of chloroethyl nitrosoureas; however, underlying mechanism of cytotoxicity caused by semustine has not been precisely and completely delineated. The present work focuses on understanding semustine-DNA interaction to comprehend its anti-proliferative action at molecular level using various spectroscopic techniques. Attenuated total reflection-Fourier transform infrared (ATR-FTIR) spectroscopy is used to determine the binding site of semustine on DNA. Conformational transition in DNA after semustine complexation is investigated using circular dichroism (CD) spectroscopy. Stability of semustine-DNA complexes is determined using absorption spectroscopy. Results of the present study demonstrate that semustine performs major-groove-directed DNA alkylation at guanine residues in an incubation-time-drug-concentration-dependent manner. CD spectral outcomes suggest partial transition of DNA from native B-conformation to C-form. Calculated binding constants (Ka) for semustine and lomustine interactions with DNA are 1.53 × 10(3) M(-1) and 8.12 × 10(3) M(-1), respectively. Moreover, molecular modeling simulation is performed to predict preferential binding orientation of semustine with DNA that corroborates well with spectral outcomes. Results based on comparative study of DNA-binding properties of semustine and lomustine, presented here, may establish a correlation between molecular structure and cytotoxicity of chloroethyl nitrosoureas that may be instrumental in the designing and synthesis of new nitrosourea therapeutics possessing better efficacy and fewer side effects.

  20. Nuclear translocation and DNA-binding activity of NFKB (NF-kappaB) after exposure of human monocytes to pulsed ultra-wideband electromagnetic fields (1 kV/cm) fails to transactivate kappaB-dependent gene expression.

    PubMed

    Natarajan, M; Nayak, B K; Galindo, C; Mathur, S P; Roldan, F N; Meltz, M L

    2006-06-01

    The objective of this study was to investigate whether exposure of human monocytes to a pulsed ultra-wideband electromagnetic field (EMF) of 1 kV/cm average peak power triggers a signaling pathway responsible for the transcriptional regulation of NFKB (NF-kappaB)-dependent gene expression. Human Mono Mac 6 (MM6) cells were exposed intermittently to EMF pulses for a total of 90 min. The pulse width was 0.79+/-0.01 ns and the pulse repetition rate was 250 pps. The temperature of the medium was maintained at 37 degrees C in both sham- and EMF-exposed flasks. Total NFKB DNA-binding activity was measured in the nuclear extracts by the electrophoretic mobility shift assay. Cells exposed to the EMFs and incubated for 24 h postexposure showed a 3.5+/-0.2-fold increase in the NFKB DNA-binding activity. Since activation of NFKB was observed, the possibility of kappaB-dependent gene expression in response to exposure to the EMFs was investigated using NFKB signal-specific gene arrays. The results revealed no difference in the NFKB-dependent gene expression profiles at 8 or 24 h postexposure, indicating that activated NFKB does not lead to the differential expression of kappaB-dependent target genes. To determine whether the absence of the kappaB-dependent gene expression was due to compromised transcriptional regulation of NFKB, the functional activity of NFKB was examined in cells transiently transfected with Mercury Pathway constructs containing 4x NFKB binding sites associated either with the luciferase reporter system or a control vector. Pulsed EMF exposure did not induce NFKB-driven luciferase activity in these cells, indicating that the activation of NFKB at 24 h after the 1 kV/cm EMF exposure is functionally inactive. From these results, it is clear that the EMF-induced NFKB activation is only a transient response, with minimal or no downstream effect.

  1. Thermodynamics of cationic lipid binding to DNA and DNA condensation: roles of electrostatics and hydrophobicity.

    PubMed

    Matulis, Daumantas; Rouzina, Ioulia; Bloomfield, Victor A

    2002-06-26

    Alkylammonium binding to DNA was studied by isothermal titration calorimetry. Experimental data, obtained as functions of alkyl chain length, salt concentration, DNA concentration, and temperature, provided a detailed thermodynamic description of lipid-DNA binding reactions leading to DNA condensation. Lipid binding, counterion displacement, and DNA condensation were highly cooperative processes, driven by a large increase in entropy and opposed by a relatively small endothermic enthalpy at room temperature. Large negative heat capacity change indicated a contribution from hydrophobic interactions between aliphatic tails. An approximation of lipid-DNA binding as dominated by two factors-ionic and hydrophobic interactions-yielded a model that was consistent with experimental data. Chemical group contributions to the energetics of binding were determined and could be used to predict energetics of other lipid binding to DNA. Electrostatic and hydrophobic contributions to Gibbs free energy, enthalpy, entropy, and heat capacity could be distinguished by applying additivity principles. Binding of lipids with two, three, and four aliphatic tails was investigated and compared to single-tailed lipid binding. Structurally, the model suggests that lipid cationic headgroups and aliphatic tails distribute evenly and lay down on DNA surface without the formation of micelles.

  2. ssDNA binding reveals the atomic structure of graphene.

    PubMed

    Husale, By Sudhir; Sahoo, Sangeeta; Radenovic, Aleksandra; Traversi, Floriano; Annibale, Paolo; Kis, Andras

    2010-12-07

    We used AFM to investigate the interaction of polyelectrolytes such as ssDNA and dsDNA molecules with graphene as a substrate. Graphene is an appropriate substrate due to its planarity, relatively large surfaces that are detectable via an optical microscope, and straightforward identification of the number of layers. We observe that in the absence of the screening ions deposited ssDNA will bind only to the graphene and not to the SiO(2) substrate, confirming that the binding energy is mainly due to the π-π stacking interaction. Furthermore, deposited ssDNA will map the graphene underlying structure. We also quantify the π-π stacking interaction by correlating the amount of deposited DNA with the graphene layer thickness. Our findings agree with reported electrostatic force microscopy (EFM) measurements. Finally, we inspected the suitability of using a graphene as a substrate for DNA origami-based nanostructures.

  3. A Fundamental Relationship Between Hydrophobic Properties and Biological Activity for the Duocarmycin Class of DNA Alkylating Antitumor Drugs: Hydrophobic Binding-Driven-Bonding

    PubMed Central

    Wolfe, Amanda L.; Duncan, Katharine K.; Lajiness, James P.; Zhu, Kaicheng; Duerfeldt, Adam S.; Boger, Dale L.

    2013-01-01

    Two systematic series of increasingly hydrophilic derivatives of duocarmycin SA are described that feature the incorporation of ethylene glycol units (n = 1–5) into the methoxy substituents of the trimethoxyindole subunit. These derivatives exhibit progressively increasing water solubility, along with progressive decreases in cell growth inhibitory activity and DNA alkylation efficiency with the incremental ethylene glycol unit incorporations. A linear relationship between cLogP and –logIC50 for cell growth inhibition and –logAE (AE = cell free DNA alkylation efficiency) is observed where cLogP values span the productive range of 2.5–0.49 and –logIC50 values span the range of 11.2–6.4, representing IC50 values covering a 105 range (0.008 to 370 nM). The results quantify a fundamental role the compound hydrophobic character plays in the expression of the biological activity of members in this class, driving the intrinsically reversible DNA alkylation reaction, and define the stunning magnitude of its effect. PMID:23944748

  4. Structural Basis for Telomerase Catalytic Subunit TERT Binding to RNA Template and Telomeric DNA

    SciTech Connect

    Mitchell, M.; Gillis, A; Futahashi, M; Fujiwara, H; Skordalakes, E

    2010-01-01

    Telomerase is a specialized DNA polymerase that extends the 3{prime} ends of eukaryotic linear chromosomes, a process required for genomic stability and cell viability. Here we present the crystal structure of the active Tribolium castaneum telomerase catalytic subunit, TERT, bound to an RNA-DNA hairpin designed to resemble the putative RNA-templating region and telomeric DNA. The RNA-DNA hybrid adopts a helical structure, docked in the interior cavity of the TERT ring. Contacts between the RNA template and motifs 2 and B{prime} position the solvent-accessible RNA bases close to the enzyme active site for nucleotide binding and selectivity. Nucleic acid binding induces rigid TERT conformational changes to form a tight catalytic complex. Overall, TERT-RNA template and TERT-telomeric DNA associations are remarkably similar to those observed for retroviral reverse transcriptases, suggesting common mechanistic aspects of DNA replication between the two families of enzymes.

  5. SiteOut: An Online Tool to Design Binding Site-Free DNA Sequences.

    PubMed

    Estrada, Javier; Ruiz-Herrero, Teresa; Scholes, Clarissa; Wunderlich, Zeba; DePace, Angela H

    2016-01-01

    DNA-binding proteins control many fundamental biological processes such as transcription, recombination and replication. A major goal is to decipher the role that DNA sequence plays in orchestrating the binding and activity of such regulatory proteins. To address this goal, it is useful to rationally design DNA sequences with desired numbers, affinities and arrangements of protein binding sites. However, removing binding sites from DNA is computationally non-trivial since one risks creating new sites in the process of deleting or moving others. Here we present an online binding site removal tool, SiteOut, that enables users to design arbitrary DNA sequences that entirely lack binding sites for factors of interest. SiteOut can also be used to delete sites from a specific sequence, or to introduce site-free spacers between functional sequences without creating new sites at the junctions. In combination with commercial DNA synthesis services, SiteOut provides a powerful and flexible platform for synthetic projects that interrogate regulatory DNA. Here we describe the algorithm and illustrate the ways in which SiteOut can be used; it is publicly available at https://depace.med.harvard.edu/siteout/.

  6. SiteOut: An Online Tool to Design Binding Site-Free DNA Sequences

    PubMed Central

    Scholes, Clarissa; Wunderlich, Zeba; DePace, Angela H.

    2016-01-01

    DNA-binding proteins control many fundamental biological processes such as transcription, recombination and replication. A major goal is to decipher the role that DNA sequence plays in orchestrating the binding and activity of such regulatory proteins. To address this goal, it is useful to rationally design DNA sequences with desired numbers, affinities and arrangements of protein binding sites. However, removing binding sites from DNA is computationally non-trivial since one risks creating new sites in the process of deleting or moving others. Here we present an online binding site removal tool, SiteOut, that enables users to design arbitrary DNA sequences that entirely lack binding sites for factors of interest. SiteOut can also be used to delete sites from a specific sequence, or to introduce site-free spacers between functional sequences without creating new sites at the junctions. In combination with commercial DNA synthesis services, SiteOut provides a powerful and flexible platform for synthetic projects that interrogate regulatory DNA. Here we describe the algorithm and illustrate the ways in which SiteOut can be used; it is publicly available at https://depace.med.harvard.edu/siteout/. PMID:26987123

  7. Defining a minimal estrogen receptor DNA binding domain.

    PubMed Central

    Mader, S; Chambon, P; White, J H

    1993-01-01

    The estrogen receptor (ER) is a transcriptional regulator which binds to cognate palindromic DNA sequences known as estrogen response elements (EREs). A 66 amino acid core region which contains two zinc fingers and is highly conserved among the nuclear receptors is essential for site specific DNA recognition. However, it remains unclear how many flanking amino acids in addition to the zinc finger core are required for DNA binding. Here, we have characterized the minimal DNA binding region of the human ER by analysing the DNA binding properties of a series of deletion mutants expressed in bacteria. We find that the 66 amino acid zinc finger core of the DBD fails to bind DNA, and that the C-terminal end of the minimal ER DBD required for binding to perfectly palindromic EREs corresponds to the limit of 100% amino acid homology between the chicken and human receptors, which represents the boundary between regions C and D in the ER. Moreover, amino acids of region D up to 30 residues C-terminal to the zinc fingers greatly stabilize DNA binding by the DBD to perfectly palindromic EREs and are absolutely required for formation of gel retardation complexes by the DBD on certain physiological imperfectly palindromic EREs. These results indicate that in addition to the zinc finger core, amino acids C-terminal to the core in regions C and D play a key role in DNA binding by the ER, particularly to imperfectly palindromic response elements. The ER DBD expressed in E. coli binds as a dimer to ERE palindromes in a highly cooperative manner and forms only low levels of monomeric protein-DNA complexes on either palindromic or half-palindromic response elements. Conversion of ER amino acids 222 to 226, which lie within region C, to the corresponding residues of the human RAR alpha abolishes formation of dimeric protein-DNA complexes. Conversely, replacement of the same region of RAR alpha with ER residues 222 to 226 creates a derivative that, unlike the RAR alpha DBD, binds

  8. Nbs1-dependent binding of Mre11 to adenovirus E4 mutant viral DNA is important for inhibiting DNA replication

    SciTech Connect

    Mathew, Shomita S.; Bridge, Eileen

    2008-04-25

    Adenovirus (Ad) infections stimulate the activation of cellular DNA damage response and repair pathways. Ad early regulatory proteins prevent activation of DNA damage responses by targeting the MRN complex, composed of the Mre11, Rad50 and Nbs1 proteins, for relocalization and degradation. In the absence of these viral proteins, Mre11 colocalizes with viral DNA replication foci. Mre11 foci formation at DNA damage induced by ionizing radiation depends on the Nbs1 component of the MRN complex and is stabilized by the mediator of DNA damage checkpoint protein 1 (Mdc1). We find that Nbs1 is required for Mre11 localization at DNA replication foci in Ad E4 mutant infections. Mre11 is important for Mdc1 foci formation in infected cells, consistent with its role as a sensor of DNA damage. Chromatin immunoprecipitation assays indicate that both Mre11 and Mdc1 are physically bound to viral DNA, which could account for their localization in viral DNA containing foci. Efficient binding of Mre11 to E4 mutant DNA depends on the presence of Nbs1, and is correlated with a significant E4 mutant DNA replication defect. Our results are consistent with a model in which physical interaction of Mre11 with viral DNA is mediated by Nbs1, and interferes with viral DNA replication.

  9. DNA Conforming Dynamics and Protein Binding

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2006-12-01

    spectroscopy". We repeat this Introduction here for completeness. The Watson - Crick double- helix is the thermodynamically stable configuration of a DNA ...molecule under physiological conditions (normal salt and room/body temperature). This stability is effected (a) by Watson - Crick H-bonding, that is...contribution to DNA helix stability comes from base-stacking between neighboring base pairs: through hydrophobic interactions between the planar aromatic

  10. Potency of carcinogens derived from covalent DNA binding and stimulation of DNA synthesis in rat liver

    SciTech Connect

    Lutz, W.K.; Buesser, M.T.; Sagelsdorff, P.

    1984-01-01

    In order to investigate the role of the stimulation of cell division for the initiation (and possibly promotion) of liver tumors by chemical carcinogens, the incorporation of radiolabelled thymidine into liver DNA was determined in male rats. Single doses of various levels of aflatoxin B1, benzidine and carbon tetrachloride (all known to be genotoxic via DNA binding) did not affect cell division, whereas several hepatocarcinogens known not to bind to DNA (alpha-HCH, clofibrate, and 2,3,7,8-tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin) gave rise to a dose-dependent stimulation of liver DNA synthesis within 24 h. An equation combining the influences of mitotic stimulation, expressed as dose required to double the control level of DNA synthesis, and DNA binding potency, expressed as the Covalent Binding Index, correlated well with the carcinogenic potency for both classes of hepatocarcinogens.

  11. Zinc-binding Domain of the Bacteriophage T7 DNA Primase Modulates Binding to the DNA Template*

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Seung-Joo; Zhu, Bin; Akabayov, Barak; Richardson, Charles C.

    2012-01-01

    The zinc-binding domain (ZBD) of prokaryotic DNA primases has been postulated to be crucial for recognition of specific sequences in the single-stranded DNA template. To determine the molecular basis for this role in recognition, we carried out homolog-scanning mutagenesis of the zinc-binding domain of DNA primase of bacteriophage T7 using a bacterial homolog from Geobacillus stearothermophilus. The ability of T7 DNA primase to catalyze template-directed oligoribonucleotide synthesis is eliminated by substitution of any five-amino acid residue-long segment within the ZBD. The most significant defect occurs upon substitution of a region (Pro-16 to Cys-20) spanning two cysteines that coordinate the zinc ion. The role of this region in primase function was further investigated by generating a protein library composed of multiple amino acid substitutions for Pro-16, Asp-18, and Asn-19 followed by genetic screening for functional proteins. Examination of proteins selected from the screening reveals no change in sequence-specific recognition. However, the more positively charged residues in the region facilitate DNA binding, leading to more efficient oligoribonucleotide synthesis on short templates. The results suggest that the zinc-binding mode alone is not responsible for sequence recognition, but rather its interaction with the RNA polymerase domain is critical for DNA binding and for sequence recognition. Consequently, any alteration in the ZBD that disturbs its conformation leads to loss of DNA-dependent oligoribonucleotide synthesis. PMID:23024359

  12. DNA-binding properties of ARID family proteins

    PubMed Central

    Patsialou, Antonia; Wilsker, Deborah; Moran, Elizabeth

    2005-01-01

    The ARID (A–T Rich Interaction Domain) is a helix–turn–helix motif-based DNA-binding domain, conserved in all eukaryotes and diagnostic of a family that includes 15 distinct human proteins with important roles in development, tissue-specific gene expression and proliferation control. The 15 human ARID family proteins can be divided into seven subfamilies based on the degree of sequence identity between individual members. Most ARID family members have not been characterized with respect to their DNA-binding behavior, but it is already apparent that not all ARIDs conform to the pattern of binding AT-rich sequences. To understand better the divergent characteristics of the ARID proteins, we undertook a survey of DNA-binding properties across the entire ARID family. The results indicate that the majority of ARID subfamilies (i.e. five out of seven) bind DNA without obvious sequence preference. DNA-binding affinity also varies somewhat between subfamilies. Site-specific mutagenesis does not support suggestions made from structure analysis that specific amino acids in Loop 2 or Helix 5 are the main determinants of sequence specificity. Most probably, this is determined by multiple interacting differences across the entire ARID structure. PMID:15640446

  13. The SV40 large T-antigen origin binding domain directly participates in DNA unwinding.

    PubMed

    Foster, Erin C; Simmons, Daniel T

    2010-03-16

    The origin binding domain (OBD) of SV40 large T-ag serves a critical role during initiation of DNA replication to position T-ag on the origin. After origin recognition, T-ag forms a double hexamer over the origin. Within each hexamer, the OBD adopts a lock washer structure where the origin recognizing A1 and B2 loops face toward the helicase domain and likely become unavailable for binding DNA. In this study, we investigated the role of the central channel of the OBD hexamer in DNA replication by analyzing the effects of mutations of residues lining the channel. All mutants showed binding defects with origin DNA and ssDNA especially at low protein concentrations, but only half were defective at supporting DNA replication in vitro. All mutants were normal in unwinding linear origin DNA fragments. However, replication defective mutants failed to unwind a small origin containing circular DNA whereas replication competent mutants did so normally. The presence of RPA and/or pol/prim restored circular DNA unwinding activity of compromised mutants probably by interacting with the separated DNA strands on the T-ag surface. We interpret these results to indicate a role for the OBD central channel in binding and threading ssDNA during unwinding of circular SV40 DNA. Mixing experiments suggested that only one monomer in an OBD hexamer was necessary for DNA unwinding. We present a model of DNA threading through the T-ag complex illustrating how single-stranded DNA could pass close to a trough generated by key residues in one monomer of the OBD hexamer.

  14. A method to identify and characterize Z-DNA binding proteins using a linear oligodeoxynucleotide

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Herbert, A. G.; Rich, A.

    1993-01-01

    An oligodeoxynucleotide that readily flips to the Z-DNA conformation in 10mM MgCl2 was produced by using Klenow enzyme to incorporate 5-bromodeoxycytosine and deoxyguanosine into a (dC-dG)22 template. During synthesis the oligomer can be labeled with 32P to high specific activity. The labeled oligodeoxynucleotide can be used in bandshift experiment to detect proteins that bind Z-DNA. This allows the binding specificity of such proteins to be determined with high reliability using unlabeled linear and supercoiled DNA competitors. In addition, because the radioactive oligodeoxynucleotide contains bromine atoms, DNA-protein complexes can be readily crosslinked using UV light. This allows an estimate to be made of the molecular weight of the proteins that bind to the radioactive probe. Both techniques are demonstrated using a goat polyclonal anti-Z-DNA antiserum.

  15. Noncanonical DNA-binding mode of repressor and its disassembly by antirepressor

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Minsik; Kim, Hee Jung; Son, Sang Hyeon; Yoon, Hye Jin; Lim, Youngbin; Lee, Jong Woo; Seok, Yeong-Jae; Jin, Kyeong Sik; Yu, Yeon Gyu; Kim, Seong Keun; Ryu, Sangryeol; Lee, Hyung Ho

    2016-01-01

    DNA-binding repressors are involved in transcriptional repression in many organisms. Disabling a repressor is a crucial step in activating expression of desired genes. Thus, several mechanisms have been identified for the removal of a stably bound repressor (Rep) from the operator. Here, we describe an uncharacterized mechanism of noncanonical DNA binding and induction by a Rep from the temperate Salmonella phage SPC32H; this mechanism was revealed using the crystal structures of homotetrameric Rep (92–198) and a hetero-octameric complex between the Rep and its antirepressor (Ant). The canonical method of inactivating a repressor is through the competitive binding of the antirepressor to the operator-binding site of the repressor; however, these studies revealed several noncanonical features. First, Ant does not compete for the DNA-binding region of Rep. Instead, the tetrameric Ant binds to the C-terminal domains of two asymmetric Rep dimers. Simultaneously, Ant facilitates the binding of the Rep N-terminal domains to Ant, resulting in the release of two Rep dimers from the bound DNA. Second, the dimer pairs of the N-terminal DNA-binding domains originate from different dimers of a Rep tetramer (trans model). This situation is different from that of other canonical Reps, in which two N-terminal DNA-binding domains from the same dimeric unit form a dimer upon DNA binding (cis model). On the basis of these observations, we propose a noncanonical model for the reversible inactivation of a Rep by an Ant. PMID:27099293

  16. Ligand-binding pocket bridges DNA-binding and dimerization domains of the urate-responsive MarR homologue MftR from Burkholderia thailandensis.

    PubMed

    Gupta, Ashish; Grove, Anne

    2014-07-15

    Members of the multiple antibiotic resistance regulator (MarR) family often regulate gene activity by responding to a specific ligand. In the absence of ligand, most MarR proteins function as repressors, while ligand binding causes attenuated DNA binding and therefore increased gene expression. Previously, we have shown that urate is a ligand for MftR (major facilitator transport regulator), which is encoded by the soil bacterium Burkholderia thailandensis. We show here that both mftR and the divergently oriented gene mftP encoding a major facilitator transport protein are upregulated in the presence of urate. MftR binds two cognate sites in the mftR-mftP intergenic region with equivalent affinity and sensitivity to urate. Mutagenesis of four conserved residues previously reported to be involved in urate binding to Deinococcus radiodurans HucR and Rhizobium radiobacter PecS significantly reduced protein stability and DNA binding affinity but not ligand binding. These data suggest that residues equivalent to those implicated in ligand binding to HucR and PecS serve structural roles and that MftR relies on distinct residues for ligand binding. MftR exhibits a two-step melting transition suggesting independent unfolding of the dimerization and DNA-binding regions; urate binding or mutations in the predicted ligand-binding sites result in one-step unfolding transitions. We suggest that MftR binds the ligand in a cleft between the DNA-binding lobes and the dimer interface but that the mechanism of ligand-mediated attenuation of DNA binding differs from that proposed for other urate-responsive MarR homologues. Since DNA binding by MftR is attenuated at 37 °C, our data also suggest that MftR responds to both ligand and a thermal upshift by attenuated DNA binding and upregulation of the genes under its control.

  17. CtBP Levels Control Intergenic Transcripts, PHO/YY1 DNA Binding, and PcG Recruitment to DNA

    PubMed Central

    Basu, Arindam; Atchison, Michael L.

    2013-01-01

    Carboxy-terminal binding protein (CtBP) is a well-known corepressor of several DNA binding transcription factors in Drosophila as well as in mammals. CtBP is implicated in Polycomb Group (PcG) complex-mediated transcriptional repression because it can bind to some PcG proteins, and mutation of the ctbp gene in flies results in lost PcG protein recruitment to Polycomb Response Elements (PREs) and lost PcG repression. However, the mechanism of reduced PcG DNA binding in CtBP mutant backgrounds is unknown. We show here that in a Drosophila CtBP mutant background, intergenic transcripts are induced across several PRE sequences and this corresponds to reduced DNA binding by PcG proteins Pleiohomeotic (PHO) and Polycomb (Pc), and reduced trimethylation of histone H3 on lysine 27, a hallmark of PcG repression. Restoration of CtBP levels by expression of a CtBP transgene results in repression of intergenic transcripts, restored PcG binding, and elevated trimethylation of H3 on lysine 27. Our results support a model in which CtBP regulates expression of intergenic transcripts that controls DNA binding by PcG proteins and subsequent histone modifications and transcriptional activity. PMID:20082324

  18. Protein-DNA binding in high-resolution

    PubMed Central

    Mahony, Shaun; Pugh, B. Franklin

    2015-01-01

    Recent advances in experimental and computational methodologies are enabling ultra-high resolution genome-wide profiles of protein-DNA binding events. For example, the ChIP-exo protocol precisely characterizes protein-DNA crosslinking patterns by combining chromatin immunoprecipitation (ChIP) with 5′ → 3′ exonuclease digestion. Similarly, deeply sequenced chromatin accessibility assays (e.g. DNase-seq and ATACseq) enable the detection of protected footprints at protein-DNA binding sites. With these techniques and others, we have the potential to characterize the individual nucleotides that interact with transcription factors, nucleosomes, RNA polymerases, and other regulatory proteins in a particular cellular context. In this review, we explain the experimental assays and computational analysis methods that enable high-resolution profiling of protein-DNA binding events. We discuss the challenges and opportunities associated with such approaches. PMID:26038153

  19. Effect of clustered peptide binding on DNA condensation.

    PubMed

    Haley, Jennifer; Kabiru, Paul; Geng, Yan

    2010-01-01

    DNA condensation in-vitro has been studied as a model system to reveal common principles underlying gene packaging in biology, and as the critical first step towards the development of non-viral gene delivery vectors. In this study, we use a bio-inspired approach, where small DNA-binding peptides are controllably clustered by an amphiphilic block copolymer scaffold, to reveal the effect of clustered peptide binding on the energetics, size, shape and physical properties of DNA condensation in-vitro. This provides insights into the general architectural effect of gene-binding proteins on DNA condensation process. Moreover, the versatility afforded by regulating the clustering density and composition of peptides may provide a novel design platform for gene delivery applications in the future.

  20. A calmodulin-binding/CGCG box DNA-binding protein family involved in multiple signaling pathways in plants

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yang, Tianbao; Poovaiah, B. W.

    2002-01-01

    We reported earlier that the tobacco early ethylene-responsive gene NtER1 encodes a calmodulin-binding protein (Yang, T., and Poovaiah, B. W. (2000) J. Biol. Chem. 275, 38467-38473). Here we demonstrate that there is one NtER1 homolog as well as five related genes in Arabidopsis. These six genes are rapidly and differentially induced by environmental signals such as temperature extremes, UVB, salt, and wounding; hormones such as ethylene and abscisic acid; and signal molecules such as methyl jasmonate, H(2)O(2), and salicylic acid. Hence, they were designated as AtSR1-6 (Arabidopsis thaliana signal-responsive genes). Ca(2+)/calmodulin binds to all AtSRs, and their calmodulin-binding regions are located on a conserved basic amphiphilic alpha-helical motif in the C terminus. AtSR1 targets the nucleus and specifically recognizes a novel 6-bp CGCG box (A/C/G)CGCG(G/T/C). The multiple CGCG cis-elements are found in promoters of genes such as those involved in ethylene signaling, abscisic acid signaling, and light signal perception. The DNA-binding domain in AtSR1 is located on the N-terminal 146 bp where all AtSR1-related proteins share high similarity but have no similarity to other known DNA-binding proteins. The calmodulin-binding nuclear proteins isolated from wounded leaves exhibit specific CGCG box DNA binding activities. These results suggest that the AtSR gene family encodes a family of calmodulin-binding/DNA-binding proteins involved in multiple signal transduction pathways in plants.

  1. Inhibition by an extract of Ocimum sanctum of DNA-binding activity of 7,12-dimethylbenz[a]anthracene in rat hepatocytes in vitro.

    PubMed

    Prashar, R; Kumar, A; Hewer, A; Cole, K J; Davis, W; Phillips, D H

    1998-06-19

    Ocimum sanctum is a traditional medicinal plant. Previous studies have shown that extracts of O. sanctum inhibit the induction of skin papillomas in mice by 7,12-dimethylbenz[a]anthracene (DMBA). In the present study, primary cultures of rat hepatocytes were treated with 0-500 microg of O. sanctum extract for 24 h and then with DMBA (10 or 50 microg) for 18 h. Cells were then harvested and their DNA was isolated and analyzed by 32P-postlabelling. A significant reduction in the levels of DMBA-DNA adducts was observed in all cultures pretreated with O. sanctum extract. This effect was more pronounced at the lower dose of DMBA (10 microg). Hepatocytes which were treated with the highest dose of extract (500 microg) showed a maximum reduction of 93% in the mean values of DMBA-DNA adducts. The viability of the cells was not adversely affected by pretreatment with extract. Our findings suggest that O. sanctum leaf extract blocks or suppresses the events associated with chemical carcinogenesis by inhibiting metabolic activation of the carcinogen.

  2. Structure of the RAG1 Nonamer Binding Domain with DNA Reveals a Dimer that Mediates DNA Synapsis

    SciTech Connect

    Yin, F.; Bailey, S; Innis, C; Ciubotaru, M; Kamtekar, S; Steitz, T; Schatz, D

    2009-01-01

    The products of recombination-activating genes RAG1 and RAG2 mediate the assembly of antigen receptor genes during lymphocyte development in a process known as V(D)J recombination. Lack of structural information for the RAG proteins has hindered mechanistic studies of this reaction. We report here the crystal structure of an essential DNA binding domain of the RAG1 catalytic core bound to its nonamer DNA recognition motif. The RAG1 nonamer binding domain (NBD) forms a tightly interwoven dimer that binds and synapses two nonamer elements, with each NBD making contact with both DNA molecules. Biochemical and biophysical experiments confirm that the two nonamers are in close proximity in the RAG1/2-DNA synaptic complex and demonstrate the functional importance of the protein-DNA contacts revealed in the structure. These findings reveal a previously unsuspected function for the NBD in DNA synapsis and have implications for the regulation of DNA binding and cleavage by RAG1 and RAG2.

  3. Structure of the RAG1 nonamer-binding domain with DNA reveals a dimer that mediates DNA synapsis

    PubMed Central

    Fang Yin, Fang; Bailey, Scott; Innis, C. Axel; Ciubotaru, Mihai; Kamtekar, Satwik; Steitz, Thomas A.; Schatz, David G.

    2009-01-01

    The products of recombination activating genes (RAG) 1 and 2 mediate the assembly of antigen receptor genes during lymphocyte development in a process known as V(D)J recombination. Lack of structural information for the RAG proteins has hindered mechanistic studies of this reaction. We report here the crystal structure of an essential DNA-binding domain of the RAG1 catalytic core bound to its nonamer DNA recognition motif. The RAG1 nonamer-binding domain (NBD) forms a tightly interwoven dimer that binds and synapses two nonamer elements, with each NBD making contact with both DNA molecules. Biochemical and biophysical experiments confirm that the two nonamers are in close proximity in the RAG1/2-DNA synaptic complex and demonstrate the functional importance of the protein-DNA contacts revealed in the structure. These findings reveal a previously unsuspected function for the NBD in DNA synapsis and have implications for the regulation of DNA binding and cleavage by RAG1/2. PMID:19396172

  4. DNA-binding antibodies and hepatitis B markers in acute and chronic liver disease.

    PubMed Central

    Kingham, J G; Rassam, S; Ganguly, N; Mcguire, M J; Nasrat, B; Holgate, S T; Triger, D R; Wright, R

    1978-01-01

    A Farr technique has been used to assay antibodies to double-stranded DNA in the serum of patients with acute and chronic liver disease and carriers of HBsAg from the United Kingdom and Iraq. These antibodies were found in all groups from both countries. The highest levels were found in chronic active hepatitis and cirrhosis. In the Iraqi patients there was a strongly positive correlation between DNA-binding antibody levels and the presence of hepatitis B markers but not with disease activity. In the patients from the United Kingdom there was little correlation with disease activity and none with autoantibodies. Ninety-five per cent of asymptomatic carriers of HBsAG had elevated DNA-binding antibodies. It is suggested that hepatitis B-specific DNA might be one trigger to DNA antibody formation, though in liver disease a variety of factors are clearly operative. PMID:309808

  5. Isolation and characterization of the DNA-binding protein (DBP) of the Autographa californica multiple nucleopolyhedrovirus

    SciTech Connect

    Mikhailov, Victor S. Vanarsdall, Adam L.; Rohrmann, George F.

    2008-01-20

    DNA-binding protein (DBP) of Autographa californica multiple nucleopolyhedrovirus (AcMNPV) was expressed as an N-terminal His{sub 6}-tag fusion using a recombinant baculovirus and purified to near homogeneity. Purified DBP formed oligomers that were crosslinked by redox reagents resulting in predominantly protein dimers and tetramers. In gel retardation assays, DBP showed a high affinity for single-stranded oligonucleotides and was able to compete with another baculovirus SSB protein, LEF-3, for binding sites. DBP binding protected ssDNA against hydrolysis by a baculovirus alkaline nuclease AN/LEF-3 complex. Partial proteolysis by trypsin revealed a domain structure of DBP that is required for interaction with DNA and that can be disrupted by thermal treatment. Binding to ssDNA, but not to dsDNA, changed the pattern of proteolytic fragments of DBP indicating adjustments in protein structure upon interaction with ssDNA. DBP was capable of unwinding short DNA duplexes and also promoted the renaturation of long complementary strands of ssDNA into duplexes. The unwinding and renaturation activities of DBP, as well as the DNA binding activity, were sensitive to sulfhydryl reagents and were inhibited by oxidation of thiol groups with diamide or by alkylation with N-ethylmaleimide. A high affinity of DBP for ssDNA and its unwinding and renaturation activities confirmed identification of DBP as a member of the SSB/recombinase family. These activities and a tight association with subnuclear structures suggests that DBP is a component of the virogenic stroma that is involved in the processing of replicative intermediates.

  6. Synthesis of trimethoprim metal complexes: Spectral, electrochemical, thermal, DNA-binding and surface morphology studies.

    PubMed

    Demirezen, Nihat; Tarınç, Derya; Polat, Duygu; Ceşme, Mustafa; Gölcü, Ayşegül; Tümer, Mehmet

    2012-08-01

    Complexes of trimethoprim (TMP), with Cu(II), Zn(II), Pt(II), Ru(III) and Fe(III) have been synthesized. Then, these complexes have been characterized by spectroscopic techniques involving UV-vis, IR, mass and (1)H NMR. CHN elemental analysis, electrochemical and thermal behavior of complexes have also been investigated. The electrochemical properties of all complexes have been investigated by cyclic voltammetry (CV) using glassy carbon electrode. The biological activity of the complexes has been evaluated by examining their ability to bind to calf-thymus DNA (CT DNA) with UV spectroscopy and cyclic voltammetry. UV studies of the interaction of the complexes with DNA have shown that these compounds can bind to CT DNA. The binding constants of the complexes with CT DNA have also been calculated. The cyclic voltammograms of the complexes in the presence of CT DNA have shown that the complexes can bind to CT DNA by both the intercalative and the electrostatic binding mode. The antimicrobial activity of these complexes has been evaluated against three Gram-positive and four Gram-negative bacteria. Antifungal activity against two different fungi has been evaluated and compared with the reference drug TMP. Almost all types of complexes show excellent activity against all type of bacteria and fungi. The morphology of the CT DNA, TMP, metal ions and metal complexes has been investigated by scanning electron microscopy (SEM). To get the SEM images, the interaction of compounds with CT DNA has been studied by means of differential pulse voltammetry (DPV) at CT DNA modified pencil graphite electrode (PGE). The decrease in intensity of the guanine oxidation signals has been used as an indicator for the interaction mechanism.

  7. Synthesis of trimethoprim metal complexes: Spectral, electrochemical, thermal, DNA-binding and surface morphology studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Demirezen, Nihat; Tarınç, Derya; Polat, Duygu; Çeşme, Mustafa; Gölcü, Ayşegül; Tümer, Mehmet

    Complexes of trimethoprim (TMP), with Cu(II), Zn(II), Pt(II), Ru(III) and Fe(III) have been synthesized. Then, these complexes have been characterized by spectroscopic techniques involving UV-vis, IR, mass and 1H NMR. CHN elemental analysis, electrochemical and thermal behavior of complexes have also been investigated. The electrochemical properties of all complexes have been investigated by cyclic voltammetry (CV) using glassy carbon electrode. The biological activity of the complexes has been evaluated by examining their ability to bind to calf-thymus DNA (CT DNA) with UV spectroscopy and cyclic voltammetry. UV studies of the interaction of the complexes with DNA have shown that these compounds can bind to CT DNA. The binding constants of the complexes with CT DNA have also been calculated. The cyclic voltammograms of the complexes in the presence of CT DNA have shown that the complexes can bind to CT DNA by both the intercalative and the electrostatic binding mode. The antimicrobial activity of these complexes has been evaluated against three Gram-positive and four Gram-negative bacteria. Antifungal activity against two different fungi has been evaluated and compared with the reference drug TMP. Almost all types of complexes show excellent activity against all type of bacteria and fungi. The morphology of the CT DNA, TMP, metal ions and metal complexes has been investigated by scanning electron microscopy (SEM). To get the SEM images, the interaction of compounds with CT DNA has been studied by means of differential pulse voltammetry (DPV) at CT DNA modified pencil graphite electrode (PGE). The decrease in intensity of the guanine oxidation signals has been used as an indicator for the interaction mechanism.

  8. Structure-based Analysis to Hu-DNA Binding

    SciTech Connect

    Swinger,K.; Rice, P.

    2007-01-01

    HU and IHF are prokaryotic proteins that induce very large bends in DNA. They are present in high concentrations in the bacterial nucleoid and aid in chromosomal compaction. They also function as regulatory cofactors in many processes, such as site-specific recombination and the initiation of replication and transcription. HU and IHF have become paradigms for understanding DNA bending and indirect readout of sequence. While IHF shows significant sequence specificity, HU binds preferentially to certain damaged or distorted DNAs. However, none of the structurally diverse HU substrates previously studied in vitro is identical with the distorted substrates in the recently published Anabaena HU(AHU)-DNA cocrystal structures. Here, we report binding affinities for AHU and the DNA in the cocrystal structures. The binding free energies for formation of these AHU-DNA complexes range from 10-14.5 kcal/mol, representing K{sub d} values in the nanomolar to low picomolar range, and a maximum stabilization of at least 6.3 kcal/mol relative to complexes with undistorted, non-specific DNA. We investigated IHF binding and found that appropriate structural distortions can greatly enhance its affinity. On the basis of the coupling of structural and relevant binding data, we estimate the amount of conformational strain in an IHF-mediated DNA kink that is relieved by a nick (at least 0.76 k