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Sample records for activity electrophoretic mobility

  1. Electrophoretic mobilities of erythrocytes in various buffers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Plank, L. D.; Kunze, M. E.; Todd, P. W.

    1985-01-01

    The calibration of space flight equipment depends on a source of standard test particles, this test particle of choice is the fixed erythrocyte. Erythrocytes from different species have different electrophoretic mobilities. Electrophoretic mobility depends upon zeta potential, which, in turn depends upon ionic strength. Zeta potential decreases with increasing ionic strength, so cells have high electrophoretic mobility in space electrophoresis buffers than in typical physiological buffers. The electrophoretic mobilities of fixed human, rat, and rabbit erythrocytes in 0.145 M salt and buffers of varying ionic strength, temperature, and composition, to assess the effects of some of the unique combinations used in space buffers were characterized. Several effects were assessed: glycerol or DMSO (dimethylsulfoxide) were considered for use as cryoprotectants. The effect of these substances on erythrocyte electrophoretic mobility was examined. The choice of buffer depended upon cell mobility. Primary experiments with kidney cells established the choice of buffer and cryoprotectant. A nonstandard temperature of EPM in the suitable buffer was determined. A loss of ionic strength control occurs in the course of preparing columns for flight, the effects of small increases in ionic strength over the expected low values need to be evaluated.

  2. ELECTROPHORETIC MOBILITY OF MYCOBACTERIUM AVIUM COMPLEX ORGANISMS

    EPA Science Inventory

    The electrophoretic mobilities (EPMs) of thirty Mycobacterium avium Complex (MAC) organisms were measured. The EPMs of fifteen clinical isolates ranged from -1.9 to -5.0 µm cm V-1s-1, and the EPMs of fifteen environmental isolates ranged from -1...

  3. ELECTROPHORETIC MOBILITY OF MYCOBACTERIUM AVIUM COMPLEX ORGANISMS

    EPA Science Inventory

    The electrophoretic mobilities (EPMs) of thirty Mycobacterium avium Complex (MAC) organisms isolated from clinical and environmental sources were measured in 9.15 mM KH2PO4 buffered water. The EPMs of fifteen clinical isolates ranged from -1.9 to -5.0 µm cm V-1 ...

  4. Controlled method of reducing electrophoretic mobility of various substances

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vanalstine, James M. (Inventor)

    1989-01-01

    A method of reducing electrophoretic mobility of macromolecules, particles, cells, and the like is provided. The method comprises interacting the particles or cells with a polymer-linked affinity compound composed of: a hydrophilic neutral polymer such as polyethylene glycol, and an affinity component consisting of a hydrophobic compound such as a fatty acid ester, an immunocompound such as an antibody or active fragment thereof or simular macromolecule, or other ligands. The reduction of electrophoretic mobility achieved is directly proportional to the concentration of the polymer-linked affinity compound employed, and the mobility reduction obtainable is up to 100 percent for particular particles and cells. The present invention is advantageous in that analytical electrophoretic separation can not be achieved for macromolecules, particles, and cells whose native surface charge structure had prevented them from being separated by normal electrophoretic means. Depending on the affinity component utilized, separation can be achieved on the basis of specific/irreversible, specific/reversible, semi-specific/reversible, relatively nonspecific/reversible, or relatively nonspecific/irreversible ligand-substance interactions. The present method is also advantageous in that it can be used in a variety of standard laboratory electrophoresis equipment.

  5. Electrophoretic mobility, catalytic rate, and activation energy of catalysis of single molecules of the enzyme β-glucuronidase from Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Craig, Douglas B; King, Steffany D; Reinfelds, Gundars; Henderson, Anna R P; Wood, Tabitha E H

    2017-03-01

    Single molecule assays were performed on the enzyme E. coli β-glucuronidase using a capillary electrophoresis-based protocol. Electrophoretic mobility, catalytic rate and activation energy of catalysis were all found to be heterogeneous. The average mobility at 22°C was -1.1×10(-8)±0.1m(2)V(-1)s(-1) (N=49) with a total range of -0.6 to -1.3×10(-8)m(2)V(-1)s(-1). The range in electrophoretic mobility suggests that the differences in shape or charge of the individual molecules underlying the heterogeneity are likely minimal. The average catalytic rate at 22°C was 37,000±19,000min(-1) (N=49) with a total range of 14,000 to 130,000min(-1). Both of these properties were measured simultaneously for each of the molecules. There was a weak correlation (r(2)=0.43) between mobility and rate with the molecules with a less negative mobility having a tendency to have a higher rate. The average activation energy of catalysis, as determined by comparing rates at 22 and 35°C, was found to be 48±18kJmol(-1) (N=7) with a total range of 18-66kJmol(-1).

  6. Electrophoretic mobility of spherical nanoparticles confined in nanochannels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Yu-Wei; Wynne, Tom; Pennathur, Sumita; Meinhart, Carl

    2013-11-01

    We investigate the mobility of a charged spherical nanoparticle driven by weak electric fields that are confined in nanochannels. Factors affecting mobility include particle zeta potential, electrolyte concentration, and channel size. Classic models for electrophoretic mobility (e.g. Smoluchowski and Huckel) are valid only in the linear regime of small particle zeta potential, and for an unbounded fluid domain. The classical models fail to predict electrophoretic mobility estimated from experiments using ~ 42 nm diameter particles confined in a ~ 100 nm nanochannel. We adopt the asymptotically-expanded formulations of Khair and Squires (Phys. Fluids, 2009), and solve the fully-coupled equations on a well-resolved 3D finite element domain. For a charged 42 nm diameter nanoparticle, confined in a 100 nm high nanochannel, the electrophoretic mobility increases nonlinearly when particle zeta potential is greater than thermal potential kB T / e . When the channel size is decreased from 2.5 um to 100 nm, the mobility is reduced by up to 20%. The result suggests that particle/wall interactions, including overlapping double layers may affect electrophoretic mobility in a non-linear manner.

  7. Reliable electrophoretic mobilities free from Joule heating effects using CE.

    PubMed

    Evenhuis, Christopher J; Hruska, Vlastimil; Guijt, Rosanne M; Macka, Miroslav; Gas, Bohuslav; Marriott, Philip J; Haddad, Paul R

    2007-10-01

    Ionic electrophoretic mobilities determined by means of CE experiments are sometimes different when compared to generally accepted values based on limiting ionic conductance measurements. While the effect of ionic strength on electrophoretic mobility has been long understood, the increase in the mobility that results from Joule heating (the resistive heating that occurs when a current passes through an electrolyte) has been largely overlooked. In this work, a simple method for obtaining reliable and reproducible values of electrophoretic mobility is described. The electrophoretic mobility is measured over a range of driving powers and the extrapolation to zero power dissipation is employed to eliminate the effect of Joule heating. These extrapolated values of electrophoretic mobility can then be used to calculate limiting ionic mobilities by making a correction for ionic strength; this somewhat complicated calculation is conveniently performed by using the freeware program PeakMaster 5. These straightforward procedures improve the agreement between experimentally determined and literature values of limiting ionic mobility by at least one order of magnitude. Using Tris-chromate BGE with a value of conductivity 0.34 S/m and ionic strength 59 mM at a modest dissipated power per unit length of 2.0 W/m, values of mobility for inorganic anions were increased by an average of 12.6% relative to their values free from the effects of Joule heating. These increases were accompanied by a reduction in mobilities due to the ionic strength effect, which was 11% for univalent and 28% for divalent inorganic ions compared to their limiting ionic mobilities. Additionally, it was possible to determine the limiting ionic mobility for a number of aromatic anions by using PeakMaster 5 to perform an ionic strength correction. A major significance of this work is in being able to use CE to obtain reliable and accurate values of electrophoretic mobilities with all its benefits, including

  8. A novel method of measuring electrophoretic mobility of gas bubbles.

    PubMed

    Najafi, Aref Seyyed; Drelich, Jaroslaw; Yeung, Anthony; Xu, Zhenghe; Masliyah, Jacob

    2007-04-15

    Accurate measurement of electrophoretic mobility for gas bubbles is a challenging task as it requires the creation of a desired number of very small air bubbles to ensure negligible rise velocities during the course of the measurement. Here, we report a simple and reliable method for generating stable dispersions of "nano-bubbles." Preparation of such dispersions relies on the nucleation of nano-bubbles in solutions supersaturated with gas. Electrophoretic mobility of these nano-bubbles is determined by the ZetaPALS technique (Brookhaven Instruments) using Uzgiris electrodes coated with palladium. The Smoluchowski limit is assumed in the calculation of zeta potentials. In regard to reproducibility and reliability, this novel method shows a clear advantage over other existing techniques of zeta potential measurement for bubbles.

  9. Method for Single-Cell Mass and Electrophoretic Mobility Measurement

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2010-02-01

    machining of the many custom components that were needed to conduct the research described in this thesis. This work has been funded by the National Cancer ...Characterization of Bacteria by Buoyant Mass and Electrophoretic Mobility 5.1 Introduction Bacterial biofilms , layers of bacterial cells attached to solid...descriptions of the initial adhesion kinetics of biofilm formation. [19, 20] One approach to this problem is to model the dependence of cellular EPM

  10. Controlled method of reducing electrophoretic mobility of macromolecules, particles, or cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vanalstine, James M. (Inventor)

    1992-01-01

    A method of reducing electrophoretic mobility of macromolecules, particles, cells, and other substances is provided which comprises interacting in a conventional electrophoretic separating procedure, the substances with a polymer-linked affinity compound comprised of a hydrophilic neutral polymer such as polyethylene glycol bound to a second component such as a hydrophobic compound, an immunocompound such as an antibody or antibody active fragment, or a ligand such as a hormone, drug, antigen, or a hapten. The reduction of electrophoretic mobility achieved is directly proportional to the concentration of the polymer-linked affinity compound employed, and such reduction can comprise up to 100 percent for particular particles and cells. The present invention is advantageous in that electrophoretic separation can now be achieved for substances whose native surface charge structure had prevented them from being separated by normal electrophoretic means. Depending on the affinity component utilized, separation can be achieved on the basis of the specific/irreversible, specific/reversible, semi-specific/reversible, relatively nonspecific/reversible, or relatively nonspecific/irreversible ligand-substance interactions.

  11. Electrophoretic mobility of spherical particles in bounded domain.

    PubMed

    Liu, Yu-Wei; Pennathur, Sumita; Meinhart, Carl D

    2016-01-01

    In this study, we improve on our 3D steady-state model of electrophoretic motion of spherical particles in bounded fluidic channels (Liu et al., 2014) to include the effect of nonsymmetric electrolytes, and further validate this improved model with detailed comparisons to experimental data. Specifically, we use the experimentally-measured particle mobilities from the work of Semenov et al. (2013), Napoli et al. (2011), and Wynne et al. (2012) to determine the corresponding particle zeta potentials using our model, and compare these results with classical theory. Incorporating the effects of nonsymmetric electrolytes, EDL polarization, and confinement, we show that our improved model is applicable to a wide range of practical experimental conditions, for example, particles that have high zeta potentials in a bounded channel filled with nonsymmetric electrolyte solutions, where classical theory is not applicable. In addition, we find that when electrolyte concentration is comparable to the concentration of hydronium or hydroxide ions, the complicated composition of ions increases the particle mobility. Finally, increased electrophoretic mobility can be observed when buffer solutions (phosphate or borate) were used as electrolyte solutions in experiments as opposed to simple symmetric electrolytes.

  12. Electrophoretic mobility of cells in a vertical Ficoll gradiant

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Plank, L. D.; Todd, P. W.; Kunze, M. E.; Gaines, R. A.

    1985-01-01

    The upward migration of living cells and test particles under the influence of a constant electric field in a low conductivity Ficoll gradient occurs at nearly constant velocity. Viscosity and neutral polymer concentration affect migration rate. Decreasing viscosity speeds up the particle migration, decreasing neutral polymer (Ficoll) concentration, slows particle migration, since electrophoretic mobility increases approximately linearly with neutral polymer concentration. Neutral polymers interact with the cell surface to effectively raise its zeta potential. An analytic function was developed from the known dependence of these physical variables on migration distance; the analysis expresses migration velocity as an explicit function of position in the density gradient. It predicts an almost linear increase in velocity of about 12 to 16% over the working region of the gradient. It was numerically integrated and correctly predicts cell migration distance vs time curves without the use of any fitted parameters. The resulting migration curves follow the expected slowly varying exponential form that closely resembles a straight line. The ability to determine standard electrophoretic mobilities from such curves depends on knowledge of the effect of Ficoll on the zeta potential of the cell type that is separated.

  13. Interplay between electrophoretic mobility and intrinsic viscosity of polypeptide chains.

    PubMed

    Deiber, Julio A; Peirotti, Marta B; Piaggio, María V

    2012-03-01

    The present work is motivated specifically by the need to find a simple interplay between experimental values of electrophoretic mobility and intrinsic viscosity (IV) of polypeptides. The connection between these two properties, as they are evaluated experimentally in a formulated dilute solution, may provide relevant information concerning the physicochemical characterization and separation of electrically charged chains such as polypeptides. Based on this aspect, a study on the relation between the effective electrophoretic mobility and the IV of the following globular proteins is carried out: bovine carbonic anhydrase, staphylococcal nuclease, human carbonic anhydrase, lysozyme, human serum albumin. The basic interpretation of the IV through polypeptide chain conformations involves two unknowns: one is the Flory characteristic ratio involving short-range intramolecular interactions and the other is the Mark-Houwink exponent associated with large-range intramolecular interactions. Here, it will be shown via basic and well-established electrokinetic theories and scaling concepts that the IV and global chain flexibility of polypeptides in dilute solutions may be estimated from capillary zone electrophoresis, in addition to classical transport properties. The polypeptide local chain flexibility may change due to electrostatic interactions among closer chain ionizing groups and the hindrance effect of their associated structural water.

  14. Relationship between electrophoretic mobility of erythrocytes and blood erythrocyte count in rats.

    PubMed

    Matyushichev, V B; Shamratova, V G

    2005-03-01

    A significant curvilinear relationship was found between erythrocyte count in rat blood and electrokinetic characteristics of these cells. Electrophoretic mobility of erythrocytes remained unchanged, slightly increased, or decreased with increasing cell count in the vascular bed depending on animal state. Excessive increase in the number of erythrocytes was accompanied by accumulation of cells with low electrophoretic mobility in the electric field.

  15. Electrophoretic Mobility Study of the Adsorption of Alkyl Xanthate Ions on Galena and Sphalerite.

    PubMed

    Song, S.; Lopez-Valdivieso, A.; Ojeda-Escamilla, M. C.

    2001-05-01

    The adsorption of ethyl and amyl xanthate ions on galena and sphalerite fines has been studied using electrophoretic light-scattering (ELS) measurements. It was performed on galena and sphalerite (<2&mgr;m) in aqueous solution at different potassium ethyl xanthate (PEX) and potassium amyl xanthate (PAX) concentrations. It has been observed that the presence of PEX or PAX caused the isoelectric points (IEP) of galena and sphalerite fines to shift and the electrophoretic mobility to reverse in sign, indicating that the xanthate ions chemisorbed on galena and sphalerite surfaces. This adsorption markedly broadened the electrophoretic mobility distribution of the mineral fines, suggesting that the populations of the particles have quite different adsorption densities of xanthate ions, and therefore the particle hydrophobicity was different. This phenomenon might be attributable to the effect of the hemimicelle adsorption of the xanthate ions on the minerals, the nonuniform distribution of active sites and their degree of activity, the effect of particle size and shape, etc. The nonuniform adsorption has been found to increase with increasing PEX or PAX concentration, reaching a maximum at a medium concentration followed by a decline. Also, experimental results have demonstrated that the nonuniform adsorption of the xanthate ions is much stronger on sphalerite than on galena, which may explain why sphalerite has a worse flotation response than galena when alkyl xanthates are used as collectors in flotation systems. Copyright 2001 Academic Press.

  16. Electrophoretic mobility patterns of collagen following laser welding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bass, Lawrence S.; Moazami, Nader; Pocsidio, Joanne O.; Oz, Mehmet C.; LoGerfo, Paul; Treat, Michael R.

    1991-06-01

    Clinical application of laser vascular anastomosis in inhibited by a lack of understanding of its mechanism. Whether tissue fusion results from covalent or non-covalent bonding of collagen and other structural proteins is unknown. We compared electrophoretic mobility of collagen in laser treated and untreated specimens of rat tail tendon (>90% type I collagen) and rabbit aorta. Welding was performed, using tissue shrinkage as the clinical endpoint, using the 808 nm diode laser (power density 14 watts/cm2) and topical indocyanine green dye (max absorption 805 nm). Collagen was extracted with 8 M urea (denaturing), 0.5 M acetic acid (non-denaturing) and acetic acid/pepsin (cleaves non- helical protein). Mobility patterns on gel electrophoresis (SDS-PAGE) after urea or acetic acid extraction were identical in the lasered and control tendon and vessel (confirmed by optical densitometry), revealing no evidence of formation of novel covalent bonds. Alpha and beta band intensity was diminished in pepsin incubated lasered specimens compared with controls (optical density ratio 0.00 +/- 9 tendon, 0.65 +/- 0.12 aorta), indicating the presence of denatured collagen. With the laser parameters used, collagen is denatured without formation of covalent bonds, suggesting that non-covalent interaction between denatured collagen molecules may be responsible for the weld. Based on this mechanism, welding parameters can be chosen which produce collagen denaturation without cell death.

  17. Effect of passage number on electrophoretic mobility distributions of cultured human embryonic kidney cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kunze, M. E.

    1985-01-01

    A systematic investigation was undertaken to characterize population shifts that occur in cultured human embryonic kidney cells as a function of passage number in vitro after original explantation. This approach to cell population shift analysis follows the suggestion of Mehreshi, Klein and Revesz that perturbed cell populations can be characterized by electrophoretic mobility distributions if they contain subpopulations with different electrophoretic mobilities. It was shown that this is the case with early passage cultured human embryo cells.

  18. Electrophoretic mobilities of cultured human embryonic kidney cells in various buffers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1985-01-01

    Data on the electrophoretic mobility distributions of cells in the new D-1 buffer and the interlaboratory standardization of urokinase assay methods are presented. A table of cell strains and recent data on cell dispersal methods are also included. It was decided that glycerol in A-1 electrophoretic mobility data on cultured human embryonic kidney cells subjected to electrophoresis in this buffer. The buffer composition is presented.

  19. Effective electrophoretic mobilities and charges of anti-VEGF proteins determined by capillary zone electrophoresis.

    PubMed

    Li, S Kevin; Liddell, Mark R; Wen, He

    2011-06-01

    Macromolecules such as therapeutic proteins currently serve an important role in the treatment of eye diseases such as wet age-related macular degeneration and diabetic retinopathy. Particularly, bevacizumab and ranibizumab have been shown to be effective in the treatment of these diseases. Iontophoresis can be employed to enhance ocular delivery of these macromolecules, but the lack of information on the properties of these macromolecules has hindered its development. The objectives of the present study were to determine the effective electrophoretic mobilities and charges of bevacizumab, ranibizumab, and model compound polystyrene sulfonate (PSS) using capillary zone electrophoresis. Salicylate, lidocaine, and bovine serum albumin (BSA), which have known electrophoretic mobilities in the literature, were also studied to validate the present technique. The hydrodynamic radii and diffusion coefficients of BSA, bevacizumab, ranibizumab, and PSS were measured by dynamic light scattering. The effective charges were calculated using the Einstein relation between diffusion coefficient and electrophoretic mobility and the Henry equation. The results show that bevacizumab and ranibizumab have low electrophoretic mobilities and are net negatively charged in phosphate buffered saline (PBS) of pH 7.4 and 0.16M ionic strength. PSS has high negative charge but the electrophoretic mobility in PBS is lower than that expected from the polymer structure. The present study demonstrated that capillary electrophoresis could be used to characterize the mobility and charge properties of drug candidates in the development of iontophoretic drug delivery.

  20. Effective Electrophoretic Mobilities and Charges of Anti-VEGF Proteins Determined by Capillary Zone Electrophoresis

    PubMed Central

    Li, S. Kevin; Liddell, Mark R.; Wen, He

    2011-01-01

    Macromolecules such as therapeutic proteins currently serve an important role in the treatment of eye diseases such as wet age-related macular degeneration and diabetic retinopathy. Particularly, bevacizumab and ranibizumab have been shown to be effective in the treatment of these diseases. Iontophoresis can be employed to enhance ocular delivery of these macromolecules, but the lack of information on the properties of these macromolecules has hindered its development. The objectives of the present study were to determine the effective electrophoretic mobilities and charges of bevacizumab, ranibizumab, and model compound polystyrene sulfonate (PSS) using capillary zone electrophoresis. Salicylate, lidocaine, and bovine serum albumin (BSA), which have known electrophoretic mobilities in the literature, were also studied to validate the present technique. The hydrodynamic radii and diffusion coefficients of BSA, bevacizumab, ranibizumab, and PSS were measured by dynamic light scattering. The effective charges were calculated using the Einstein relation between diffusion coefficient and electrophoretic mobility and the Henry equation. The results show that bevacizumab and ranibizumab have low electrophoretic mobilities and are net negatively charged in phosphate buffered saline (PBS) of pH 7.4 and 0.16 M ionic strength. PSS has high negative charge but the electrophoretic mobility in PBS is lower than that expected from the polymer structure. The present study demonstrated that capillary electrophoresis could be used to characterize the mobility and charge properties of drug candidates in the development of iontophoretic drug delivery. PMID:21269789

  1. Gel electrophoretic mobility of charged particles in a medium with curved channels.

    PubMed

    Fridrikh, S; Gotlib, Y; Belenkij, B

    1997-01-01

    A model of electrophoretic mobility of small charged particles (for example short DNA fragments) in media with curved channels is proposed. The medium is represented by a dense material embedding the curved channels accessible to the charged particles. The steady flow method is used to obtain an analytical expression of the particles' electrophoretic mobility as a function of the channel's shape. The analogy between the statistical properties of the channels and polymer chains (free-jointed and with the persistent mobility mechanism) is used.

  2. A DC electrophoresis method for determining electrophoretic mobility through the pressure driven negation of electro osmosis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karam, Pascal; Pennathur, Sumita

    2016-11-01

    Characterization of the electrophoretic mobility and zeta potential of micro and nanoparticles is important for assessing properties such as stability, charge and size. In electrophoretic techniques for such characterization, the bulk fluid motion due to the interaction between the fluid and the charged surface must be accounted for. Unlike current industrial systems which rely on DLS and oscillating potentials to mitigate electroosmotic flow (EOF), we propose a simple alternative electrophoretic method for optically determining electrophoretic mobility using a DC electric fields. Specifically, we create a system where an adverse pressure gradient counters EOF, and design the geometry of the channel so that the flow profile of the pressure driven flow matches that of the EOF in large regions of the channel (ie. where we observe particle flow). Our specific COMSOL-optimized geometry is two large cross sectional areas adjacent to a central, high aspect ratio channel. We show that this effectively removes EOF from a large region of the channel and allows for the accurate optical characterization of electrophoretic particle mobility, no matter the wall charge or particle size.

  3. Analysis of In Vitro DNA Interactions of Brassinosteroid-Controlled Transcription Factors Using Electrophoretic Mobility Shift Assay.

    PubMed

    Unterholzner, Simon J; Rozhon, Wilfried; Poppenberger, Brigitte

    2017-01-01

    Most signaling cascades ultimately lead to changes in gene expression by modulating the activity of transcription factors (TFs). The electrophoretic mobility shift assay (EMSA) is a simple but powerful in vitro method for investigation of specific protein-DNA interactions. It makes use of the fact that protein-DNA complexes have a lower electrophoretic mobility in gels than free DNA has. The application of labeled probes in combination with unlabeled competitors allows investigation of DNA-binding specificity and identification of binding motifs with single base-pair resolution. Here we describe the application of EMSAs for the study of interactions of the brassinosteroid-regulated TFs, BRASSINAZOLE-RESISTANT1, (BZR1), BRI1-ETHYL METHANESULFONATE-SUPPRESSOR1 (BES1)/BZR2, and CESTA with putative binding sites. The classical approach using radiolabeled probes, as well as the more recent application of fluorescent probes, is described and the advantages and disadvantages of both methods are discussed.

  4. A substrate-optimized electrophoretic mobility shift assay for ADAM12.

    PubMed

    Kotzsch, Alexander; Skovgaard, Tine; Buus, Uwe; Andersen, Simon; Devkota, Kanchan; Berthelsen, Jens

    2014-05-01

    ADAM12 belongs to the A disintegrin and metalloprotease (ADAM) family of secreted sheddases activating extracellular growth factors such as epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) ligands and tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-α). ADAM proteases, most notably ADAM17 (TNF-α-converting enzyme), have long been investigated as pharmaceutical drug targets; however, due to lack of potency and in vivo side effects, none of the small-molecule inhibitors discovered so far has made it beyond clinical testing. Ongoing research on novel selective inhibitors of ADAMs requires reliable biochemical assays to validate molecular probes from large-scale screening efforts. Here we describe an electrophoretic mobility shift assay for ADAM12 based on the identification of an optimized peptide substrate that is characterized by excellent performance and reproducibility.

  5. Characterization of the Cell Surface Properties of Drinking Water Pathogens by Microbial Adhesion to Hydrocarbon and Electrophoretic Mobility Measurements

    EPA Science Inventory

    The surface characteristics of microbial cells directly influence their mobility and behavior within aqueous environments. The cell surface hydrophobicity (CSH) and electrophoretic mobility (EPM) of microbial cells impact a number of interactions and processes including aggregati...

  6. ELECTROPHORETIC MOBILITIES OF ESCHERICHIA COLI 0157:H7 AND WILD-TYPE ESCHERICHIA COLI STRAINS

    EPA Science Inventory

    The electrophoretic mobility (EPM) of a number of human-virulent and "wild-type" Escherichia coli strains in phosphate buffered water was measured. The impact of pH, ionic strength, cation type (valence) and concentration, and bacterial strain on the EPM was investigated. Resul...

  7. Electrophoretic mobility shift assays for the analysis of DNA-protein interactions.

    PubMed

    Gaudreault, Manon; Gingras, Marie-Eve; Lessard, Maryse; Leclerc, Steeve; Guérin, Sylvain L

    2009-01-01

    Electromobility shift assay is a simple, efficient, and rapid method for the study of specific DNA-protein interactions. It relies on the reduction in the electrophoretic mobility conferred to a DNA fragment by an interacting protein. The technique is suitable to qualitative, quantitative, and kinetic analyses. It can also be used to analyze conformational changes.

  8. Autophosphorylation, electrophoretic mobility and immunoreaction of oat phototropin 1 under UV and blue Light.

    PubMed

    Knieb, Elke; Salomon, Michael; Rüdiger, Wolfhart

    2005-01-01

    Phototropins are UV-A/blue light photoreceptors containing two flavin mononucleotide (FMN)-binding domains, light, oxygen and voltage (LOV)1 and LOV2, of which LOV2 is more sensitive toward light and more important for the physiological response compared with LOV1. Some physiological responses are plant phototropism, chloroplast migration and stomatal opening. Oat phototropin 1 together with light-dependent autophosphorylation shows a reduced electrophoretic mobility and reduced immunoreaction against a heterologous antiserum; both effects were suggested to be caused by phosphorylation at the same sites (M. Salomon, E. Knieb, T. von Zeppelin and W. Rudiger [2003] Biochemistry 42, 4217-4225). In this study, we show that both effects can be separated from each other: at low temperature, reduced immunoreaction preceded the mobility shift, and irradiation with UV-C light led to the mobility shift without the loss of immunoreactivity. We demonstrated that UV-C light at 280 nm, which does not match any absorption maximum of FMN, leads to autophosphorylation of phototropin. It is hypothesized that UV-C light causes differential activation of the LOV domains via energy transfer from aromatic amino acids.

  9. Computer-controlled pulsed magnetic field gradient NMR system for electrophoretic mobility measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saarinen, Timothy R.; Woodward, W. Stephen

    1988-05-01

    A computer-controlled pulsed magnetic field gradient NMR (PFGNMR) system for making electrophoretic mobility and diffusion measurements is described. Emphasis is placed on the design and capabilities of the gradient and electrophoretic pulse generators. Various pulse sequences can be applied by the programmable gradient generator that can produce 0- to 10-A current pulses for 0 to 13 ms and continuous currents from 0 to 50 mA. The pulse areas are reproducible to within approximately 1 ppm. A pair of opposed Helmholtz coils in the probe create linear magnetic field gradients during the current pulses. Electric fields are applied across a U-tube electrophoretic cell by a 550-V constant current generator.

  10. Coarse-grained model of conformation-dependent electrophoretic mobility and its influence on DNA dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pandey, Harsh; Underhill, Patrick T.

    2015-11-01

    The electrophoretic mobility of molecules such as λ -DNA depends on the conformation of the molecule. It has been shown that electrohydrodynamic interactions between parts of the molecule lead to a mobility that depends on conformation and can explain some experimental observations. We have developed a new coarse-grained model that incorporates these changes of mobility into a bead-spring chain model. Brownian dynamics simulations have been performed using this model. The model reproduces the cross-stream migration that occurs in capillary electrophoresis when pressure-driven flow is applied parallel or antiparallel to the electric field. The model also reproduces the change of mobility when the molecule is stretched significantly in an extensional field. We find that the conformation-dependent mobility can lead to a new type of unraveling of the molecule in strong fields. This occurs when different parts of the molecule have different mobilities and the electric field is large.

  11. Jet-Printed Active-Matrix Backplanes and Electrophoretic Displays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Daniel, Jurgen; Arias, Ana Claudia; Wong, William; Lujan, Rene; Ready, Steve; Krusor, Brent; Street, Robert

    2007-03-01

    The fabrication of large-area electronics, such as active-matrix pixel circuits in flat-panel displays, is becoming increasingly challenging. Particularly for applications such as electronic paper, flexibility of the display and fabrication at extremely low cost is important. Therefore, novel fabrication methods have to be explored. We have developed jet-printing technology to fabricate active-matrix backplanes for paper-like electrophoretic displays. In three approaches we implement several stages of evolution of the printing technology. First, the photolithographic patterning of photoresist used in conventional fabrication is replaced by digital printing of a wax etch mask. Second, the amorphous silicon semiconductor for the thin-film-transistors is replaced with a printed organic semiconductor. Third, the active-matrix pixel circuit is fabricated in an all-additive printing process. In order to test our backplanes we are developing electrophoretic display media. The media is based on microfabricated cell-structures which contain the electrophoretic ink. Particularly for flexible displays, the cells have to be individually sealed and several methods are being explored.

  12. Electrophoretic mobility of silica particles in a mixture of toluene and ethanol at different particle concentrations.

    PubMed

    Medrano, M; Pérez, A T; Lobry, L; Peters, F

    2009-10-20

    In this paper we present measurements of the electrophoretic mobility of colloidal particles by using heterodyne detection of light scattering. The measurements have been made up to concentrations of 5.4% silica nanoparticles, with a diameter on the order of 80 nm, in a mixture of 70% toluene and 30% ethanol. To make possible the measurements at these concentrations, the liquid mixture is chosen so as to match the index of refraction of the particles, thus resulting in a transparent suspension.

  13. Electrophoretic Mobilities of Escherichia coli O157:H7 and Wild-Type Escherichia coli Strains

    PubMed Central

    Lytle, Darren A.; Rice, Eugene W.; Johnson, Clifford H.; Fox, Kim R.

    1999-01-01

    The electrophoretic mobilities (EPMs) of a number of Escherichia coli O157:H7 and wild-type E. coli strains were measured. The effects of pH and ionic strength on the EPMs were investigated. The EPMs of E. coli O157:H7 strains differed from those of wild-type strains. As the suspension pH decreased, the EPMs of both types of strains increased. PMID:10388724

  14. Antisera against electrophoretically purified tubulin stimulate colchicine-binding activity.

    PubMed Central

    Aubin, J E; Subrahmanyan, L; Kalnins, V I; Ling, V

    1976-01-01

    Several rabbit antisera have been prepared against reduced and alkylated, electrophoretically purified tubulin isolated from chick brain. These antisera give a single precipitin line in Ouchterlony double diffusion plates when tested against partially purified tubulin, and label specifically microtubule- and tubulin-containing structures, such as mitotic spindles, cilia, and vinblastine-induced crystals, in a variety of cells. The same antisera also display the unique ability to stimulate the colchicine-binding activity of tubulin preparations from chick brain and Chinese hamster ovary tissue culture cells. This specific stimulation of colchicine binding activity is also obtained with the gamma globulin fractions purified by ammonium sulfate precipitation of these antisera. Images PMID:57619

  15. An Optimized Protocol for Electrophoretic Mobility Shift Assay Using Infrared Fluorescent Dye-labeled Oligonucleotides.

    PubMed

    Hsieh, Yi-Wen; Alqadah, Amel; Chuang, Chiou-Fen

    2016-11-29

    Electrophoretic Mobility Shift Assays (EMSA) are an instrumental tool to characterize the interactions between proteins and their target DNA sequences. Radioactivity has been the predominant method of DNA labeling in EMSAs. However, recent advances in fluorescent dyes and scanning methods have prompted the use of fluorescent tagging of DNA as an alternative to radioactivity for the advantages of easy handling, saving time, reducing cost, and improving safety. We have recently used fluorescent EMSA (fEMSA) to successfully address an important biological question. Our fEMSA analysis provides mechanistic insight into the effect of a missense mutation, G73E, in the highly conserved HMG transcription factor SOX-2 on olfactory neuron type diversification. We found that mutant SOX-2(G73E) protein alters specific DNA binding activity, thereby causing olfactory neuron identity transformation. Here, we present an optimized and cost-effective step-by-step protocol for fEMSA using infrared fluorescent dye-labeled oligonucleotides containing the LIM-4/SOX-2 adjacent target sites and purified SOX-2 proteins (WT and mutant SOX-2(G73E) proteins) as a biological example.

  16. Assessing 2D electrophoretic mobility spectroscopy (2D MOSY) for analytical applications.

    PubMed

    Fang, Yuan; Yushmanov, Pavel V; Furó, István

    2016-12-08

    Electrophoretic displacement of charged entity phase modulates the spectrum acquired in electrophoretic NMR experiments, and this modulation can be presented via 2D FT as 2D mobility spectroscopy (MOSY) spectra. We compare in various mixed solutions the chemical selectivity provided by 2D MOSY spectra with that provided by 2D diffusion-ordered spectroscopy (DOSY) spectra and demonstrate, under the conditions explored, a superior performance of the former method. 2D MOSY compares also favourably with closely related LC-NMR methods. The shape of 2D MOSY spectra in complex mixtures is strongly modulated by the pH of the sample, a feature that has potential for areas such as in drug discovery and metabolomics. Copyright © 2016 The Authors. Magnetic Resonance in Chemistry published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd. StartCopTextCopyright © 2016 The Authors. Magnetic Resonance in Chemistry published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  17. High-Throughput Electrophoretic Mobility Shift Assays for Quantitative Analysis of Molecular Binding Reactions

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    We describe a platform for high-throughput electrophoretic mobility shift assays (EMSAs) for identification and characterization of molecular binding reactions. A photopatterned free-standing polyacrylamide gel array comprised of 8 mm-scale polyacrylamide gel strips acts as a chassis for 96 concurrent EMSAs. The high-throughput EMSAs was employed to assess binding of the Vc2 cyclic-di-GMP riboswitch to its ligand. In optimizing the riboswitch EMSAs on the free-standing polyacrylamide gel array, three design considerations were made: minimizing sample injection dispersion, mitigating evaporation from the open free-standing polyacrylamide gel structures during electrophoresis, and controlling unit-to-unit variation across the large-format free-standing polyacrylamide gel array. Optimized electrophoretic mobility shift conditions allowed for 10% difference in mobility shift baseline resolution within 3 min. The powerful 96-plex EMSAs increased the throughput to ∼10 data/min, notably more efficient than either conventional slab EMSAs (∼0.01 data/min) or even microchannel based microfluidic EMSAs (∼0.3 data/min). The free-standing polyacrylamide gel EMSAs yielded reliable quantification of molecular binding and associated mobility shifts for a riboswitch–ligand interaction, thus demonstrating a screening assay platform suitable for riboswitches and potentially a wide range of RNA and other macromolecular targets. PMID:25233437

  18. Passive trapping of rigid rods due to conformation-dependent electrophoretic mobility.

    PubMed

    Pandey, Harsh; Szafran, Sylvia A; Underhill, Patrick T

    2016-03-28

    We present computer simulations of a rigid rod in a combination of an extensional fluid flow and extensional electric field. The electrophoretic mobility of the rod is different parallel or perpendicular to the rod. The dependence of the mobility on the conformation (orientation) leads to a new phenomenon where the rods can be passively trapped in all directions at the stagnation point. This contrasts with the behavior in either fluid flow or electric field alone, in which an object can be pushed towards the stagnation point along some directions but is pushed away in others. We have determined the state space where trapping occurs and have developed a model that describes the strength of trapping when it does occur. This new phenomenon could be used in the future to separate objects based on a coupling between their mobility and ability to be oriented.

  19. Electrophoretic mobility of a growing cell studied by photonic force microscope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tonin, Mario; Bálint, Stefan; Mestres, Pau; Martınez, Ignacio A.; Petrov, Dmitri

    2010-11-01

    Living cells have spatially localized charged groups such as nucleus, cell walls, and others that can move in an external electric field providing the cell electrophoretic mobility (EPM). We suggest to monitor the EPM of a single living cell during its growth using optical tweezers combined with a position detector. As an example, we studied the EPM during the yeast growth, and we observed a nonmonotonic behavior of the EPM during the cell cycle, such as that the maximal EPM was observed at the initial stage of the growth, strongly reducing when the cell cycle is near its final stage.

  20. The Electrophoretic Mobility of a Polyelectrolyte within a Radially Confining Potential Well

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shendruk, Tyler; Bertrand, Martin; Slater, Gary W.

    2013-03-01

    We demonstrate that a polyelectrolyte electrophoresing while radially confined by a mechanical force has a conformationally dependent electrophoretic mobility that differs from its free-draining value. The mobility increases as a function of the confining harmonic potential and in the absence of solid walls. Mesoscale MPCD-MD hybrid simulations that include electro-hydrodynamics through a mean-field Debye Hückel approximation will be presented for a variety of well widths and contour lengths, demonstrating that mobility increases with confinement after a critical point but remains independent of polymerization. For this reason, models based on a change of monomer friction coefficient at the confinement boundary (such as those recently put forward to explain experimentally measured mobility polyelectrolytes confined within nano- and microfluidic channels) are not sufficient to explain our observations. Since the potential acts perpendicular to the electric field and only on the monomers, the Electro-Hydrodynamic Equivalence Principle does not predict the mobility to differ. We present a course-grained theory explaining these findings in terms of hydrodynamic coupling within overlapping diffuse layers.

  1. Direct visualization of electrophoretic mobility shift assays using nanoparticle-aptamer conjugates.

    PubMed

    Wang, Min S; Reed, Scott M

    2012-01-01

    Here, we demonstrate that aptamers tethered to gold nanoparticles enable direct visualization of protein-oligonucleotide interactions during gel electrophoresis. This technique is used to confirm that an aptamer previously identified as binding to C-reactive protein (CRP) only binds to the monomeric form of CRP. While native, pentameric CRP (pCRP) is used in clinical assays to predict cardiovascular disease (CVD) risk, it is the monomeric isoform that is more strongly associated with pro-inflammatory and pro-atherogenic effects. To visualize this selectivity, the CRP-aptamer was conjugated to streptavidin-coated gold nanoparticles and the mobility of the free oligonucleotide-nanoparticle conjugate (ON-NP) and the protein/ON-NP complex bands were visualized and recorded during electrophoresis using a simple digital camera. At a concentration of 6 μg/mL, monomeric CRP showed a significant decrease in the observed ON-NP mobility, whereas no change in mobility was observed with pCRP up to 18 μg/mL. Advantages of this nanoparticle-based electrophoretic mobility shift assay (NP-EMSA) over the traditional EMSA include real-time detection of protein-oligonucleotide interactions, the avoidance of harmful radioisotopes, and elimination of the need for expensive gel imagers. The availability of both the NP-EMSA technique and an mCRP-specific probe will allow for improved clinical diagnostic to more accurately predict future CVD risk.

  2. Effect of pH on the Electrophoretic Mobility of Spores of Bacillus anthracis and Its Surrogates in Aqueous Solutions

    EPA Science Inventory

    Electrophoretic mobility (EPM) of endospores of Bacillus anthracis and surrogates were measured in aqueous solution across a broad pH range and several ionic strengths. EPM values trended around phylogenetic clustering based on the 16S rRNA gene. Measurements reported here prov...

  3. Using Electrophoretic Mobility Shift Assays to Measure Equilibrium Dissociation Constants: GAL4-p53 Binding DNA as a Model System

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Heffler, Michael A.; Walters, Ryan D.; Kugel, Jennifer F.

    2012-01-01

    An undergraduate biochemistry laboratory experiment is described that will teach students the practical and theoretical considerations for measuring the equilibrium dissociation constant (K[subscript D]) for a protein/DNA interaction using electrophoretic mobility shift assays (EMSAs). An EMSA monitors the migration of DNA through a native gel;…

  4. Poly(styrene/alpha-tert-butoxy-omega-vinylbenzylpolyglycidol) microspheres for immunodiagnostics. Principle of a novel latex test based on combined electrophoretic mobility and particle aggregation measurements.

    PubMed

    Radomska-Galant, Izabela; Basinska, Teresa

    2003-01-01

    The principle of a novel latex agglutination test based on combined results of electrophoretic mobility and particle aggregation measurements is described. Poly(styrene/alpha-tert-butoxy-omega-vinylbenzylpolyglycidol) (P(S/PGL)) microspheres were synthesized by a one step soap-free emulsion copolymerization of styrene and alpha-tert-butoxy-omega-vinylbenzylpolyglycidol macromonomer with number average molecular weight Mn = 2700 (polydispersity [Mw]/[Mn] = 1.10). Particles with monomodal size distribution (number average diameter Dn = 220 nm) and surface fraction of polyglycidol equal to f = 0.42 mol % were obtained. Human serum albumin (HSA) was covalently bound onto the surface of P(S/PGL) microspheres activated with 1,3,5-trichlorotriazine. In a model immunodiagnostic assay for anti-HSA, in which P(S/PGL) particles with covalently bound HSA have been used, the electrophoretic mobility and aggregation of microspheres were measured simultaneously. This approach allowed detection of anti-HSA in the serum in the range of anti-HSA concentrations from 0.1 to 150 microg/mL. The highest changes in electrophoretic mobility were registered for microspheres with surface concentration of immobilized HSA equal to Gamma = 9.2 x 10(-4) g/m2.

  5. Measurements of the electrophoretic mobility with a new laser Doppler cytopherometer (Lazypher) and critical evaluation of the Electrophorese Mobility Test (EMT)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hoffmann, W.

    1982-01-01

    The new developed Laser Doppler Cytopherometer (Lazypher) allows the exact and objective measurement of the electrophoretic mobility of particles. Comparative experiments with the Free Flow Cell Electrophoresis instrument of Hannig showed identical results. The impression that the electrophoretic Mobility Test is not valid for cancer diagnosis has been substantiated. But in its present form with the new instrument (Lazypher) possible improvements, e.g. isolation of lymphocytes, purification of ""antigens'' or indicator particles, can be estimated objectively for their value for the test system.

  6. Rapid agarose gel electrophoretic mobility shift assay for quantitating protein: RNA interactions.

    PubMed

    Ream, Jennifer A; Lewis, L Kevin; Lewis, Karen A

    2016-10-15

    Interactions between proteins and nucleic acids are frequently analyzed using electrophoretic mobility shift assays (EMSAs). This technique separates bound protein:nucleic acid complexes from free nucleic acids by electrophoresis, most commonly using polyacrylamide gels. The current study utilizes recent advances in agarose gel electrophoresis technology to develop a new EMSA protocol that is simpler and faster than traditional polyacrylamide methods. Agarose gels are normally run at low voltages (∼10 V/cm) to minimize heating and gel artifacts. In this study we demonstrate that EMSAs performed using agarose gels can be run at high voltages (≥20 V/cm) with 0.5 × TB (Tris-borate) buffer, allowing for short run times while simultaneously yielding high band resolution. Several parameters affecting band and image quality were optimized for the procedure, including gel thickness, agarose percentage, and applied voltage. Association of the siRNA-binding protein p19 with its target RNA was investigated using the new system. The agarose gel and conventional polyacrylamide gel methods generated similar apparent binding constants in side-by-side experiments. A particular advantage of the new approach described here is that the short run times (5-10 min) reduce opportunities for dissociation of bound complexes, an important concern in non-equilibrium nucleic acid binding experiments.

  7. Determination of electrokinetic and hydrodynamic parameters of proteins by modeling their electrophoretic mobilities through the electrically charged spherical soft particle.

    PubMed

    Deiber, Julio A; Piaggio, María V; Peirotti, Marta B

    2013-03-01

    This work explores the possibility of using the electrically charged "spherical soft particle" (SSP) to model the electrophoretic mobility of proteins in the low charge regime. The general framework concerning the electrophoretic mobility of the SSP already presented in the literature is analyzed and discussed here in particular for polyampholyte-polypeptide chains. In this regard, this theory is applied to BSA for different protocol pH values. The physicochemical conditions required to model proteins as SSP from their experimentally determined electrophoretic mobilities are established. In particular, the protein charge regulation phenomenon and the SSP particle core are included to study BSA having isoelectric point pI ≈ 5.71, within a wide range of bulk pH values. The results of this case study are compared with previous ones concerning the spherical porous particle and the spherical hard particle with occluded water. A discussion of chain conformations in the SSP polyampholyte layer is presented through estimations of the packing and friction fractal dimensions.

  8. Determination of electrokinetic and hydrodynamic parameters of proteins by modeling their electrophoretic mobilities through the electrically charged spherical porous particle.

    PubMed

    Deiber, Julio A; Piaggio, Maria V; Peirotti, Marta B

    2013-03-01

    This work explores the possibility of using the electrically charged "spherical porous particle" (SPP) to model the electrophoretic mobility of proteins in the low charge regime. In this regard, the electrophoretic mobility expression of the charged SPP (Hermans-Fujita model) is used and applied here to BSA and staphylococcal nuclease for different protocol pH values. The SPP is presented within the general framework of the "spherical soft particle" as described in the literature. The physicochemical conditions required to model proteins as SPP from their experimentally determined electrophoretic mobilities are established. It is shown that particle permeability and porosity and chain packing and friction fractal dimensions are relevant structural properties of proteins when hydrodynamic interaction between amino acid residues is present. The charge regulation phenomenon of BSA and staphylococcal nuclease with pIs ≈ 5.71 and 9.63, respectively, is described through the SPP within a wide range of bulk pH values. These case studies illustrate when the average regulating {pH} of the protein domain is lower and higher than the protocol pH. Further research for using the general spherical soft particle is also proposed on the basis of results and main conclusions.

  9. Easy measurement and analysis method of zeta potential and electrophoretic mobility of water-dispersed colloidal particles by using a self-mixing solid-state laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sudo, S.; Ohtomo, T.; Otsuka, K.

    2013-08-01

    We describe a highly sensitive method of measuring electrophoretic mobility and zeta potential of water-dispersed colloidal particles by using a self-mixing laser Doppler velocimeter with a laser-diode-pumped, thin-slice solid-state laser with extremely high optical sensitivity. The power spectra of laser output modulated by reinjected laser light scattered by the electrophoretic particles were observed. The power spectrum cannot be described by the well-known formula for translational motion or flowing Brownian motion, i.e., a combination of Doppler shift, diffusion, and translation. The power spectra shape is found to reflect the velocity distribution of electrophoretic particles in a capillary tube due to the electro-osmotic flow contribution. Not only evaluation of the electrophoretic mobility and zeta potential but also the particle diameter undergoing electrophoretic motion can be performed from the shape of the power spectrum.

  10. Predicting Electrophoretic Mobility of Protein-Ligand Complexes for Ligands from DNA-Encoded Libraries of Small Molecules.

    PubMed

    Bao, Jiayin; Krylova, Svetlana M; Cherney, Leonid T; Hale, Robert L; Belyanskaya, Svetlana L; Chiu, Cynthia H; Shaginian, Alex; Arico-Muendel, Christopher C; Krylov, Sergey N

    2016-05-17

    Selection of target-binding ligands from DNA-encoded libraries of small molecules (DELSMs) is a rapidly developing approach in drug-lead discovery. Methods of kinetic capillary electrophoresis (KCE) may facilitate highly efficient homogeneous selection of ligands from DELSMs. However, KCE methods require accurate prediction of electrophoretic mobilities of protein-ligand complexes. Such prediction, in turn, requires a theory that would be applicable to DNA tags of different structures used in different DELSMs. Here we present such a theory. It utilizes a model of a globular protein connected, through a single point (small molecule), to a linear DNA tag containing a combination of alternating double-stranded and single-stranded DNA (dsDNA and ssDNA) regions of varying lengths. The theory links the unknown electrophoretic mobility of protein-DNA complex with experimentally determined electrophoretic mobilities of the protein and DNA. Mobility prediction was initially tested by using a protein interacting with 18 ligands of various combinations of dsDNA and ssDNA regions, which mimicked different DELSMs. For all studied ligands, deviation of the predicted mobility from the experimentally determined value was within 11%. Finally, the prediction was tested for two proteins and two ligands with a DNA tag identical to those of DELSM manufactured by GlaxoSmithKline. Deviation between the predicted and experimentally determined mobilities did not exceed 5%. These results confirm the accuracy and robustness of our model, which makes KCE methods one step closer to their practical use in selection of drug leads, and diagnostic probes from DELSMs.

  11. Electrophoretic Mobilities of the Charge Variants of DNA and Other Polyelectrolytes: Similarities, Differences, and Comparison with Theory.

    PubMed

    Stellwagen, Nancy C

    2017-03-09

    Free solution electrophoretic mobilities of polyelectrolytes with different charge densities have been analyzed using data taken from the literature. The polyions include single- and double-stranded DNA oligomers, small aromatic molecules, peptides, proteins, and synthetic copolymers. Mobility variations due to differences in the background electrolytes were minimized by calculating mobility ratios, dividing the mobility of each charge variant in each data set by the mobility of the most highly charged polyion in that data set. In all cases, the mobility ratios increase linearly with the logarithm of the fractional charge, not the first power of the charge as usually assumed. In addition, the mobility ratios observed for all polyelectrolytes, except for the synthetic copolymers, exhibit a common dependence on the logarithm of fractional charge. The unique results observed for the synthetic copolymers may be due to the flexibility of their hydrocarbon backbones, in contrast to the relatively rigid hydrophilic backbones of the other polyelectrolytes. The mobilities observed for the DNA charge variants are well predicted by the Manning electrophoresis equation, whereas the mobilities predicted by zeta potential theories are higher. However, mobility ratios calculated from both theories agree with the observed results.

  12. Field and pore size dependence of the electrophoretic mobility of DNA: a combination of fluorescence recovery after photobleaching and electric birefringence measurements.

    PubMed

    Tinland, B; Pernodet, N; Weill, G

    1996-06-01

    By combining an electrophoretic cell with a setup of fluorescence recovery after photobleaching (FRAP) we can measure the electrophoretic mobility mu of double-stranded lambda DNA in agarose gel as a function of electric field E and gel concentration C. Mobility varies linearly with the field in agreement with the biased reptation model with fluctuations. The slopes are analyzed in term of orientation and compared with birefringence results. The mobility extrapolated at zero field follows the prediction of the reptation theory; we deduced the variation of the pore size with the agarose concentration. With a special use of our setup, we measure directly the free-mobility mu 0 of the DNA.

  13. Electrophoretic separation of a class of nucleosomes enriched in HMG 14 and 17 and actively transcribed globin genes.

    PubMed Central

    Albanese, I; Weintraub, H

    1980-01-01

    Monomer nucleosomes from chick erythrocytes can be fractionated according to their electrophoretic mobility in (comparatively) high salt acrylamide gels. We show that the fractionation is based predominantly on differences in charge. The monomer heterogeneity persists even when the nucleosomes are trimmed down to 145 bp with Exo III or when H1 and H5 are removed. The slowest migrating monomers are associated with HMG 14 and 17; however, we do not believe that these proteins are entirely responsible for the altered mobility since the nucleosome heterogeneity persists even after removal of HMG 14 and 17. The DNA associated with the HMG 14 and 17 containing nucleosomes is shown to be enriched in actively transcribed globin sequences. Images PMID:6448987

  14. Liquid phase separation of proteins based on electrophoretic effects in an electrospray setup during sample introduction into a gas-phase electrophoretic mobility molecular analyzer (CE-GEMMA/CE-ES-DMA).

    PubMed

    Weiss, Victor U; Kerul, Lukas; Kallinger, Peter; Szymanski, Wladyslaw W; Marchetti-Deschmann, Martina; Allmaier, Günter

    2014-09-02

    Nanoparticle characterization is gaining importance in food technology, biotechnology, medicine, and pharmaceutical industry. An instrument to determine particle electrophoretic mobility (EM) diameters in the single-digit to double-digit nanometer range receiving increased attention is the gas-phase electrophoretic mobility molecular analyzer (GEMMA) separating electrophoretically single charged analytes in the gas-phase at ambient pressure. A fused-silica capillary is used for analyte transfer to the gas-phase by means of a nano electrospray (ES) unit. The potential of this capillary to separate analytes electrophoretically in the liquid phase due to different mobilities is, at measurement conditions recommended by the manufacturer, eliminated due to elevated pressure applied for sample introduction. Measurements are carried out upon constant feeding of analytes to the system. Under these conditions, aggregate formation is observed for samples including high amounts of non-volatile components or complex samples. This makes the EM determination of individual species sometimes difficult, if not impossible. With the current study we demonstrate that liquid phase electrophoretic separation of proteins (as exemplary analytes) occurs in the capillary (capillary zone electrophoresis, CE) of the nano ES unit of the GEMMA. This finding was consecutively applied for on-line desalting allowing EM diameter determination of analytes despite a high salt concentration within samples. The present study is to our knowledge the first report on the use of the GEMMA to determine EM diameters of analytes solubilized in the ES incompatible electrolyte solutions by the intended use of electrophoresis (in the liquid phase) during sample delivery. Results demonstrate the proof of concept of such an approach and additionally illustrate the high potential of a future on-line coupling of a capillary electrophoresis to a GEMMA instrument.

  15. Separation of very hydrophobic analytes by micellar electrokinetic chromatography IV. Modeling of the effective electrophoretic mobility from carbon number equivalents and octanol-water partition coefficients.

    PubMed

    Huhn, Carolin; Pyell, Ute

    2008-07-11

    It is investigated whether those relationships derived within an optimization scheme developed previously to optimize separations in micellar electrokinetic chromatography can be used to model effective electrophoretic mobilities of analytes strongly differing in their properties (polarity and type of interaction with the pseudostationary phase). The modeling is based on two parameter sets: (i) carbon number equivalents or octanol-water partition coefficients as analyte descriptors and (ii) four coefficients describing properties of the separation electrolyte (based on retention data for a homologous series of alkyl phenyl ketones used as reference analytes). The applicability of the proposed model is validated comparing experimental and calculated effective electrophoretic mobilities. The results demonstrate that the model can effectively be used to predict effective electrophoretic mobilities of neutral analytes from the determined carbon number equivalents or from octanol-water partition coefficients provided that the solvation parameters of the analytes of interest are similar to those of the reference analytes.

  16. Determination of electrolyte friction from measurements of the tracer diffusion coefficients, mutual diffusion coefficients, and electrophoretic mobilities of charged spheres

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gorti, Sridhar; Plank, Lindsay; Ware, B. R.

    1984-07-01

    The technique of fluorescence recovery after photobleaching has been used to measure the tracer diffusion coefficient of fluorescein-labeled charged polystyrene spheres in dilute solutions as a function of solution ionic strength. As the ratio of the particle radius (a) to the Debye-Hückel screening length (κ-1) was varied from 13 to 0.6, a 20% reduction in tracer diffusion coefficient was observed. The mutual diffusion coefficient, measured by quasielastic light scattering, increased as κa was reduced, demonstrating the dominant effect of thermodynamic factors on this parameter. The tracer data have been compared with theoretical predictions of other workers describing the influence of small-ion interactions with a charge sphere on its translational friction. The theoretical results of Schurr, and Booth, involve an explicit dependence on the electrokinetic charge of the sphere and yield estimates of this parameter (by least squares) which are significantly smaller than those obtained from laser Doppler electrophoretic light scattering results for the electrophoretic mobility of the labeled spheres. Approximations in the theoretical analyses are expected to account for these discrepancies.

  17. The 'Densitometric Image Analysis Software' and its application to determine stepwise equilibrium constants from electrophoretic mobility shift assays.

    PubMed

    van Oeffelen, Liesbeth; Peeters, Eveline; Nguyen Le Minh, Phu; Charlier, Daniël

    2014-01-01

    Current software applications for densitometric analysis, such as ImageJ, QuantityOne (BioRad) and the Intelligent or Advanced Quantifier (Bio Image) do not allow to take the non-linearity of autoradiographic films into account during calibration. As a consequence, quantification of autoradiographs is often regarded as problematic, and phosphorimaging is the preferred alternative. However, the non-linear behaviour of autoradiographs can be described mathematically, so it can be accounted for. Therefore, the 'Densitometric Image Analysis Software' has been developed, which allows to quantify electrophoretic bands in autoradiographs, as well as in gels and phosphorimages, while providing optimized band selection support to the user. Moreover, the program can determine protein-DNA binding constants from Electrophoretic Mobility Shift Assays (EMSAs). For this purpose, the software calculates a chosen stepwise equilibrium constant for each migration lane within the EMSA, and estimates the errors due to non-uniformity of the background noise, smear caused by complex dissociation or denaturation of double-stranded DNA, and technical errors such as pipetting inaccuracies. Thereby, the program helps the user to optimize experimental parameters and to choose the best lanes for estimating an average equilibrium constant. This process can reduce the inaccuracy of equilibrium constants from the usual factor of 2 to about 20%, which is particularly useful when determining position weight matrices and cooperative binding constants to predict genomic binding sites. The MATLAB source code, platform-dependent software and installation instructions are available via the website http://micr.vub.ac.be.

  18. Affinity Capillary Electrophoresis for Selective Control of Electrophoretic Mobility of Sialic Acid Using Lanthanide-Hexadentate Macrocyclic Polyazacarboxylate Complexes.

    PubMed

    Goto, Daiki; Ouchi, Kazuki; Shibukawa, Masami; Saito, Shingo

    2015-01-01

    It is difficult to control the electrophoretic mobility in order to obtain high resolution among saccharides in complex samples. We report herein on a new affinity capillary electrophoresis (ACE) method for an anionic monosaccharide, N-acetylneuraminic acid (Neu5Ac), which is important in terms of pathological diagnosis, using lanthanide-hexadentate macrocyclic polyazacarboxylate complexes (Ln-NOTA) as affinity reagents. It was shown that Ln-NOTA complexes increased the anionic mobility of Neu5Ac by approximately 40% through selective complexation with Neu5Ac. The extent of change in the mobility strongly depended on the type of central metal ion of Ln-NOTA. The stability constant (K) of Lu-NOTA with Neu5Ac was determined by ACE to be log Kb = 3.62 ± 0.04, which is the highest value among artificial receptors for Neu5Ac reported so far. Using this ACE, the Neu5Ac content in a glycoprotein sample, α1-acid glycoprotein (AGP), was determined after acid hydrolysis. Complete separation between Neu5Ac and hydrolysis products was successful by controlling the mobility to determine the concentration of Neu5Ac.

  19. Comprehensive Size-Determination of Whole Virus Vaccine Particles Using Gas-Phase Electrophoretic Mobility Macromolecular Analyzer, Atomic Force Microscopy, and Transmission Electron Microscopy

    PubMed Central

    Havlik, Marlene; Marchetti-Deschmann, Martina; Friedbacher, Gernot; Winkler, Wolfgang; Messner, Paul; Perez-Burgos, Laura; Tauer, Christa; Allmaier, Günter

    2015-01-01

    Biophysical properties including particle size distribution, integrity, and shape of whole virus vaccine particles at different stages in tick-borne encephalitis (TBE) vaccines formulation were analyzed by a new set of methods. Size-exclusion chromatography (SEC) was used as a conservative sample preparation for vaccine particle fractionation and gas-phase electrophoretic mobility macromolecular analyzer (GEMMA) for analyzing electrophoretic mobility diameters of isolated TBE virions. The derived particle diameter was then correlated with molecular weight. The diameter of the TBE virions determined after SEC by GEMMA instrumentation was 46.8 ± 1.1 nm. Atomic force microscopy (AFM) and transmission electron microscopy (TEM) were implemented for comparison purposes and to gain morphological information on the virion particle. Western blotting (Dot Blot) as an immunological method confirmed biological activity of the particles at various stages of the developed analytical strategy. AFM and TEM measurements revealed higher diameters with much higher SD for a limited number of virions, 60.4 ± 8.5 and 53.5 ± 5.3 nm, respectively. GEMMA instrumentation was also used for fractionation of virions with specifically selected diameters in the gas-phase, which were finally collected by means of an electrostatic sampler. At that point (i.e., after particle collection), AFM and TEM showed that the sampled virions were still intact, exhibiting a narrow size distribution (i.e., 59.8 ± 7.8 nm for AFM and 47.5 ± 5.2 nm for TEM images), and most importantly, dot blotting confirmed immunological activity of the collected samples. Furthermore dimers and virion artifacts were detected, too. PMID:26266988

  20. Patterns of Molecular Variation. II. Associations of Electrophoretic Mobility and Larval Substrate within Species of the DROSOPHILA MULLERI Complex

    PubMed Central

    Richardson, R. H.; Smouse, Peter E.; Richardson, Martha E.

    1977-01-01

    Electromorphic variation among populations of Drosophila mojavensis, D. arizonensis and D. longicornis was examined for seven genetic loci. The average electrophoretic mobility for a population was used as the metric. D. mojavensis and D. arizonensis use larval substrates in different parts of their geographic ranges, while D. longicornis is more narrowly restricted to different species of the cactus Opuntia in different localities. There is marked electromorphic variation among populations of either D. mojavensis or D. arizonensis, and the bulk of this variation is accounted for by differences in laval substrate. There is somewhat less variation among populations of D. longicornis, and only a moderate portion of this is accounted for by larval substrate differences. There appears to be an association between the taxonomic diversity of the larval substrates and the electromorphic diversity of the Drosophila populations utilizing those substrates. Evidence is reviewed that suggests physiological mechanisms for these possibly adaptive associations. PMID:838268

  1. [Erythrocyte sedimentation rate in diluted suspensions and their electrophoretic mobility in a vertical electrical field].

    PubMed

    Balmukhanov, B S; Basenova, A T; Bulegenov, K E

    1989-01-01

    The sedimentation rates (SR) of human red blood cells (RBC) were measured in diluted suspensions using the thin plate chamber. If the suspension medium was phosphate buffer saline or 0,18 M NaCl the SR-dependence on the distance to the chambers wall corresponded to SR distribution of small particles without interaction. The more NaCl content was decreased down to 0.145 M, the more temperature-dependent variations of SR were noted, while SR distribution became distinct with the predicted one for the non-interacting particles. The use of SR distribution is discussed for testing the RBC interaction in diluted suspensions caused by sedimentation. The electrophoretic measurements carried out under vertical oriented electrical field showed the rate of RBC movement to be the linear function of the field gradient and to be not influenced under the SR modifying conditions.

  2. Principle of a new immunoassay based on electrophoretic mobility of poly(styrene/alpha-tert-butoxy-omega-vinylbenzyl-polyglycidol) microspheres: application for the determination of helicobacter pylori IgG in blood serum.

    PubMed

    Basinska, Teresa; Wisniewska, Monika; Chmiela, Magdalena

    2005-01-14

    The principle of a novel latex diagnostic test for the determination of antibodies against Helicobacter pylori in blood sera is described. The test is based on the measurement of the electrophoretic mobility of the microspheres with immobilized H. pylori antigens. The electrophoretic mobility of these microspheres depends on the concentration of the antibodies against H. pylori in suspending medium. Particles with hydrophilic polyglycidol in the surface layer were used for the test. The microspheres were obtained by an emulsifier-free emulsion copolymerization of styrene and alpha-tert-butoxy-omega-vinylbenzyl-polyglycidol macromonomer (D(n) = 220 nm, diameter polydispersity factor D(w)//D(n) = 1.02). Activation of polyglycidol hydroxyl groups with cyanuric chloride allowed for covalent immobilization of H. pylori antigens. The fraction of H. pylori not specifically adsorbed onto the microspheres was negligible. Changes of the electrophoretic mobility of the microspheres with the surface concentration of the covalently immobilized H. pylori antigens Gamma = (1.6 +/- 0.3) . 10(-3) g m(-2) were suitable for the detection of the antibodies in the sera of patients with titer in the range (determined by the indirect ELISA test) from 1:500 to 1:32 000.

  3. Characterization of the cell surface properties of drinking water pathogens by microbial adhesion to hydrocarbon and electrophoretic mobility measurements.

    PubMed

    Popovici, Jonathan; White, Colin P; Hoelle, Jill; Kinkle, Brian K; Lytle, Darren A

    2014-06-01

    The surface characteristics of microbial cells directly influence their mobility and behavior within aqueous environments. The cell surface hydrophobicity (CSH) and electrophoretic mobility (EPM) of microbial cells impact a number of interactions and processes including aggregation, adhesion to surfaces, and stability of the cells within the aqueous environments. These cell characteristics are unique to the bacterial species and are a reflection of the large diversity of surface structures, proteins, and appendages of microorganisms. CSH and EPM of bacterial cells contribute substantially to the effectiveness of drinking water treatment to remove them, and therefore an investigation of these properties will be useful in predicting their removal through drinking water treatment processes and transport through drinking water distribution systems. EPM and CSH measurements of six microbiological pathogen or surrogate species suspended in phosphate-buffered water are reported in this work. Two strains of Vibrio cholerae were hydrophobic, while three strains of Escherichia coli were hydrophilic. Bacillus cereus was categorized as moderately hydrophobic. The strains of E. coli had the highest (most negative) EPM. Based on the measurements, E. coli species is predicted to be most difficult to remove from water while V. cholerae will be the easiest to remove.

  4. Using electrophoretic mobility shift assays to measure equilibrium dissociation constants: GAL4-p53 binding DNA as a model system.

    PubMed

    Heffler, Michael A; Walters, Ryan D; Kugel, Jennifer F

    2012-01-01

    An undergraduate biochemistry laboratory experiment is described that will teach students the practical and theoretical considerations for measuring the equilibrium dissociation constant (K(D) ) for a protein/DNA interaction using electrophoretic mobility shift assays (EMSAs). An EMSA monitors the migration of DNA through a native gel; the DNA migrates more slowly when bound to a protein. To determine a K(D) the amount of unbound and protein-bound DNA in the gel is measured as the protein concentration increases. By performing this experiment, students will be introduced to making affinity measurements and gain experience in performing quantitative EMSAs. The experiment describes measuring the K(D) for the interaction between the chimeric protein GAL4-p53 and its DNA recognition site; however, the techniques are adaptable to other DNA binding proteins. In addition, the basic experiment described can be easily expanded to include additional inquiry-driven experimentation. © 2012 by The International Union of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology.

  5. Surface charge of trypanosoma cruzi. Binding of cationized ferritin and measurement of cellular electrophoretic mobility.

    PubMed

    De Souza, W; Arguello, C; Martinez-Paloma, A; Trissl, D; Gonzáles-Robles, A; Chiari, E

    1977-08-01

    The surface charge of epimastigote and trypomastigote forms of Trypanosoma cruzi was evaluated by means of binding of cationized ferritin to the cell surface as visualized by electron microscopy, and by direct measurements of the cellular microelectrophoretic mobility (EPM). Epimastigote forms had a mean EPM of -0.52 micrometer-s-1-V-1-cm and were lightly labeled with cationized ferritin. In contrast, bloodstream trypomastigotes had a much higher EPM (-1.14), and the surface was heavily labeled with cationized ferritin. When trypomastigotes from staionary phase cultures were isolated on DEAE cellulose columns, the mean EPM was found to be significantly lower (-0.63), and labeling with cationized ferritin decreased. With a mixed population containing epimastigote, trypomastigote, and intermediate forms, EPM values ranging between -0.70 to -1.14 were found. From these observations we conclude that there is a definite increase in negative surface charge during development from epi- to trypomastigote forms of T. cruzi.

  6. Electrophoretic mobility of linear and star-branched DNA in semidilute polymer solutions.

    PubMed

    Saha, Sourav; Heuer, Daniel M; Archer, Lynden A

    2006-08-01

    Electrophoresis of large linear T2 (162 kbp) and 3-arm star-branched (N(Arm) = 48.5 kbp) DNA in linear polyacrylamide (LPA) solutions above the overlap concentration c* has been investigated using a fluorescence visualization technique that allows both the conformation and mobility mu of the DNA to be determined. LPA solutions of moderate polydispersity index (PI approximately 1.7-2.1) and variable polymer molecular weight Mw (0.59-2.05 MDa) are used as the sieving media. In unentangled semidilute solutions (c* < c < c(e)), we find that the conformational dynamics of linear and star-branched DNA in electric fields are strikingly different; the former migrating in predominantly U- or I-shaped conformations, depending on electric field strength E, and the latter migrating in a squid-like profile with the star-arms outstretched in the direction opposite to E and dragging the branch point through the sieving medium. Despite these visual differences, mu for linear and star-branched DNA of comparable size are found to be nearly identical in semidilute, unentangled LPA solutions. For LPA concentrations above the entanglement threshold (c > c(e)), the conformation of migrating linear and star-shaped DNA manifest only subtle changes from their unentangled solution features, but mu for the stars decreases strongly with increasing LPA concentration and molecular weight, while mu for linear DNA becomes nearly independent of c and Mw. These findings are discussed in the context of current theories for electrophoresis of large polyelectrolytes.

  7. Estimation of electrokinetic and hydrodynamic global properties of relevant amyloid-beta peptides through the modeling of their effective electrophoretic mobilities and analysis of their propensities to aggregation.

    PubMed

    Deiber, Julio A; Piaggio, Maria V; Peirotti, Marta B

    2014-09-01

    Neuronal activity loss may be due to toxicity caused by amyloid-beta peptides forming soluble oligomers. Here amyloid-beta peptides (1-42, 1-40, 1-39, 1-38, and 1-37) are characterized through the modeling of their experimental effective electrophoretic mobilities determined by a capillary zone electrophoresis method as reported in the literature. The resulting electrokinetic and hydrodynamic global properties are used to evaluate amyloid-beta peptide propensities to aggregation through pair particles interaction potentials and Brownian aggregation kinetic theories. Two background electrolytes are considered at 25°C, one for pH 9 and ionic strength I = 40 mM (aggregation is inhibited through NH4OH) the other for pH 10 and I = 100 mM (without NH4OH). Physical explanations of peptide oligomerization mechanisms are provided. The effect of hydration, electrostatic, and dispersion forces in the amyloidogenic process of amyloid-beta peptides (1-40 and 1-42) are quantitatively presented. The interplay among effective charge number, hydration, and conformation of chains is described. It is shown that amyloid-beta peptides (1-40 and 1-42) at pH 10, I = 100 mM and 25°C, may form soluble oligomers, mainly of order 2 and 4, after an incubation of 48 h, which at higher times evolve and end up in complex structures (protofibrils and fibrils) found in plaques associated with Alzheimer's disease.

  8. Development of digestive enzyme activity in larvae of spotted sand bass Paralabrax maculatofasciatus II: Electrophoretic analysis.

    PubMed

    Alvarez-González, C A; Moyano-López, F J; Civera-Cerecedo, R; Carrasco-Chávez, V; Ortíz-Galindo, J L; Nolasco-Soria, H; Tovar-Ramírez, D; Dumas, S

    2010-03-01

    The activities of several digestive enzymes during larval development of the spotted sand bass (Paralabrax maculatofasciatus) were evaluated using electrophoretic techniques. The results show the presence of three isoforms of alkaline protease from day 2 after hatching (ah) and the early appearance of one pepsin-like band from day 12 ah onwards. In addition, two lipase bands first appeared on day 2 ah, and there was a change in the molecular weight of one band from day 15 ah onwards. Several alpha-amylase isoforms were observed from hatching up to day 5 ah. These results indicate that the important digestive enzymes develop rapidly in these larvae, supporting the possibility of early weaning at day 12 ah using artificial diets.

  9. Effects of method of detachment on electrophoretic mobility of mammalian cells grown in monolayer culture

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Plank, L. D.; Kunze, M. E.; Todd, P. W.

    1985-01-01

    A variety of proteolytic and micolytic enzumes, mechanical procedures, and changes in the ionic environment, especially Ca chelation, are used for dispersal of monolayer grown cells. If either chelating agents or mechanical dispersion are used alone, the cell yield is often low and suspensions of single cells are difficult to obtain. Confluent monolayers treated with EDTA tend to be released from their surfaces in sheets, and clumps of cells remain even after further incubation in EDTA. Crude trypsin is the most popular dispersal agent and is known to contain a variety of contaminating enzymes which contribute to the dispersal of cells. A variety of cell injuries resulting from the activity of proteolytic enzymes are reported. It is shown that crystalline trypsin is least harmful to cell integrity as judged by trypan blue uptake.

  10. Global properties and propensity to dimerization of the amyloid-beta (12-28) peptide fragment through the modeling of its monomer and dimer diffusion coefficients and electrophoretic mobilities.

    PubMed

    Deiber, Julio A; Peirotti, Marta B; Piaggio, Maria V

    2015-03-01

    Neuronal activity loss may be due to toxicity caused mainly by amyloid-beta (1-40) and (1-42) peptides forming soluble oligomers. Here the amyloid-beta (12-28) peptide fragment (monomer) and its dimer are characterized at low pH through the modeling of their diffusion coefficients and effective electrophoretic mobilities. Translational diffusion coefficient experimental values of monomer and dimer analogs of this peptide fragment and monomer and dimer mixtures at thermodynamic equilibrium are used as reported in the literature for different monomer initial concentrations. The resulting electrokinetic and hydrodynamic global properties are employed to evaluate the amyloid-beta (12-28) peptide fragment propensity to dimerization through a thermodynamic theoretical framework. Therefore equilibrium constants are considered at pH 2.9 to elucidate one of the amyloidogenic mechanisms involving the central hydrophobic region LVFFA of the peptide spanning residues 17-21 associated with phenylalanine at positions 19 and 20 in the amino acid sequence of amyloid-beta peptides. An analysis demonstrating that peptide aggregation is a concentration-dependent process is provided, where both pair and intraparticle charge regulation phenomena become relevant. It is shown that the modeling of the effective electrophoretic mobility of the amyloid-beta (12-28) peptide fragment is crucial to understand the effect of hydrophobic region LVFFA in the amyloidogenic process.

  11. [Determination of the electrophoretic mobility of peripheral red blood cells from healthy individuals, by using ethylene-2-amine-4-chloroacetic acid as a preservative].

    PubMed

    Iastrubinetskaia, O I; Popova, O V; Sarycheva, T G; Tentsova, I A; Kozinets, G I

    2009-01-01

    It is now known that the electric charge of a surface cellular membrane is a rather characteristic value for each type of a cell. Cellular electrophoresis may be used to study the electrokinetic properties of red blood cells in each specific case, thereby obtaining indirect information on the state of a surface membrane as the electrophoretic mobility (EPM) rate is directly proportional to the value of a cellular electric charge. The study was undertaken to compare the EPM rates of peripheral red blood cells from donors, by employing two different preservatives: EDTCHA and sodium citrate. No statistically significant differences were found in the groups under study and these parameters were comparable.

  12. On the electrophoretic mobility of succinoglycan modelled as a spherical polyelectrolyte: From Hermans-Fujita theory to charge regulation in multi-component electrolytes.

    PubMed

    Hill, Reghan J

    2016-11-15

    Literature interpretations of the electrophoretic mobility of spherical polyelectrolytes are revisited using the capillary-electrophoresis data of Duval et al. (2006) for the extracellular polysaccharide succinoglycan as an example. Subtle changes in the polyelectrolyte mobility have recently been attributed to new electrokinetic theories that feature multi-component electrolytes, charge regulation, and the so-called polarization and relaxation phenomena. However, these calculations exhibit several unusual trends that have yet to be explained, and so the conclusions drawn from them are controversial. Here, independent computations strengthen conclusions drawn from the original model of Duval et al., i.e., the discrepancies between experiments and all the presently available electrokinetic theories reflect changes in the conformation of succinoglycan arising from changes in the electrolyte pH and ionic strength.

  13. Determination of pKa values of tenoxicam from 1H NMR chemical shifts and of oxicams from electrophoretic mobilities (CZE) with the aid of programs SQUAD and HYPNMR.

    PubMed

    Rodríguez-Barrientos, Damaris; Rojas-Hernández, Alberto; Gutiérrez, Atilano; Moya-Hernández, Rosario; Gómez-Balderas, Rodolfo; Ramírez-Silva, María Teresa

    2009-12-15

    In this work it is explained, by the first time, the application of programs SQUAD and HYPNMR to refine equilibrium constant values through the fit of electrophoretic mobilities determined by capillary zone electrophoresis experiments, due to the mathematical isomorphism of UV-vis absorptivity coefficients, NMR chemical shifts and electrophoretic mobilities as a function of pH. Then, the pK(a) values of tenoxicam in H(2)O/DMSO 1:4 (v/v) have been obtained from (1)H NMR chemical shifts, as well as of oxicams in aqueous solution from electrophoretic mobilities determined by CZE, at 25 degrees C. These values are in very good agreement with those reported by spectrophotometric and potentiometric measurements.

  14. An Investigation of Methods of Isolation of β2M1 Globulin (Syn.: Iota Protein, 19S γ Globulin, γ1 Macroglobulin, β2M Globulin) and its Association with Isoagglutinin Activity, together with Preliminary Observations on Other Macroglobulins of Slow Electrophoretic Mobility in Normal Human Serum

    PubMed Central

    Walton, K. W.; Rowe, D. S.; Soothill, J. F.; Stanworth, D. R.

    1963-01-01

    An investigation is described of methods of isolation and purification of the high molecular weight protein (here called β2M1 globulin) which is often associated with the isoagglutinin activity of normal human serum. In the course of these experiments it was observed that ultracentrifugal concentration of this protein from serum fractions gives rise to the simultaneous concentration of two other macroglobulins (here called β2M2 and β2M3 globulins). It was found that the concentration of β2M1 globulin in normal serum is about 25–50 mg. per 100 ml. In serum from the blood of normal donors of groups A, B and O, isohaemagglutinin activity is associated with the β2M1 globulin but probably accounts for 1 per cent or less of the total β2M1-globulin concentration in serum. This activity may represent the so-called `natural' isohaemagglutinin. The immunological relation is discussed of the normal β2M1 globulin to certain other members of the `family' of immune globulins (γ globulin and β2A globulin) and to the pathological macroglobulins occurring in Waldenström's syndrome. Although rabbit antibody to β2M1 globulin cross-reacts with γ globulin, suggesting that a portion of each molecule bears antigenic groupings in common, it was found that a considerable degree of β2M1-globulin specificity could be demonstrated after absorbing antisera with purified γ globulin. Attention is also drawn to the evidence that deficiency of either β2M1 globulin or γ globulin can occur independently, suggesting different cellular sources of origin. The pathological macroglobulin demonstrable in Waldenström's syndrome is closely related immunologically to normal β2M1 globulin but is often deficient in isoagglutinin activity. This immunological relation suggests the use of specific anti-β2M1-globulin antiserum as a simple means of distinguishing macroglobulinaemia from myelomatosis or other conditions with raised levels of γ globulin. The β2M2 and β2M3 globulins are only

  15. Electrophoretic cell separation by means of microspheres

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smolka, A. J. K.; Nerren, B. H.; Margel, S.; Rembaum, A.

    1979-01-01

    The electrophoretic mobility of fixed human erythrocytes immunologically labeled with poly(vinylpyridine) or poly(glutaraldehyde) microspheres was reduced by approximately 40%. This observation was utilized in preparative scale electrophoretic separations of fixed human and turkey erythrocytes, the mobilities of which under normal physiological conditions do not differ sufficiently to allow their separation by continuous flow electrophoresis. We suggest that resolution in the electrophoretic separation of cell subpopulations, currently limited by finite and often overlapping mobility distributions, may be significantly enhanced by immunospecific labeling of target populations using microspheres.

  16. Electrophoretic cell separation by means of immunomicrospheres

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rembaum, A.; Smolka, A. J. K.

    1980-01-01

    The electrophoretic mobility of fixed human red blood cells immunologically labeled with polymeric (4-vinyl)pyridine or polyglutaraldehyde microspheres was altered to a considerable extent. This observation was utilized in the preparative scale electrophoretic separation of human and turkey fixed red blood cells, whose mobilities under normal physiological conditions do not differ sufficiently to allow their separation by continuous flow electrophoresis. It is suggested that resolution in the electrophoretic separation of cell subpopulations, currently limited by finite and often overlapping mobility distributions, may be significantly enhanced by immuno-specific labeling of target populations using microspheres.

  17. Electrophoretic separation of kidney and pituitary cells on STS-8

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morrison, D. R.; Nachtwey, D. S.; Barlow, G. H.; Cleveland, C.; Lanham, J. W.; Farrington, M. A.; Hatfield, J. M.; Hymer, W. C.; Todd, P.; Wilfinger, W.; Grindeland, R.; Lewis, M. L.

    A Continuous Flow Electrophoresis System (CFES) was used on Space Shuttle flight STS-8 to separate specific secretory cells from suspensions of cultured primary human embryonic kidney cells and rat pituitary cells. The objectives were to isolate the subfractions of kidney cells that produce the largest amounts of urokinase (plasminogen activator), and to isolate the subfractions of rat pituitary cells that secrete growth hormone, prolactin, and other hormones. Kidney cells were separated into more than 32 fractions in each of two electrophoretic runs. Electrophoretic mobility distributions in flight experiments were spread more than the ground controls. Multiple assay methods confirmed that all cultured kidney cell fractions produced some urokinase, and five to six fractions produced significantly more urokinase than the other fractions. Several fractions also produced tissue plasminogen activator. The pituitary cells were separated into 48 fractions in each of the two electrophoretic runs, and the amounts of growth hormone (GH) and prolactin (PRL) released into the medium for each cell fraction were determined. Cell fractions were grouped into eight mobility classes and immunocytochemically assayed for the presence of GH, PRL, ACTH, LH, TSH, and FSH. The patterns of hormone distribution indicate that the specialized cells producing GH and PRL are isolatable due to the differences in electrophoretic mobilities.

  18. Electrophoretic deposition of CdS coatings and their photocatalytic activities in the degradation of tetracycline antibiotic

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vázquez, A.; Hernández-Uresti, D. B.; Obregón, S.

    2016-11-01

    The photocatalytic activities of CdS coatings formed by electrophoretic deposition (EPD) were evaluated through the photodegradation of an antibiotic, tetracycline. First, CdS nanoparticles were synthesized under microwave irradiation of aqueous solutions containing the cadmium and sulfur precursors at stoichiometric amounts and by using trisodium citrate as stabilizer. Microwave irradiation was carried out in a conventional microwave oven at 2.45 GHz and 1650 W of nominal power, for 60 s. The CdS nanoparticles were characterized by UV-vis spectrophotometry, photoluminescence and X-ray diffraction. Electrophoretic deposition parameters were 300 mV, 600 mV and 900 mV of applied voltage between aluminum plates separated by 1 cm. The fractal dimensions of the surfaces were evaluated by atomic force microscopy and correlated to the morphological and topographic characteristics of the coatings. The photocatalytic activity of the CdS coatings was investigated by means the photodegradation of the tetracycline antibiotic under simulated sunlight irradiation. According to the results, the photoactivity of the coatings directly depends on the concentration of the precursors and the applied voltage during the deposition. The material obtained at 600 mV showed the best photocatalytic behavior, probably due to its physical properties, such as optimum load and suitable aggregate size.

  19. Electrophoretic Focusing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Snyder, Robert S.

    2001-01-01

    Electrophoretic focusing is a new method of continuous flow electrophoresis that introduces precision flow control to achieve high resolution separations. The electric field is applied perpendicular to an incoming sample lamina and buffer but also perpendicular to the broad faces of the thin rectangular chamber. A uniform fluid cross-flow then enters and exits the separation chamber through the same broad faces which are porous. A balance is achieved by adjusting either the electric field or the cross-flow so the desired sample fraction with its specific migration velocity encounters an opposing flow of the same velocity. Applying an electric field transverse to the incoming sample lamina and opposing this field with a carefully configured buffer flow, a sample constituent can be selected and focused into a narrow stream for subsequent analysis. Monotonically changing either electric field or buffer cross-flow will yield a scan of all constituents of the sample. Stopping the scan increases the collection time for minor constituents to improve their analysis. Using the high voltage gradients and/or cross-flow to rapidly deflect extraneous sample through the porous screens and into either of the side (purge) chambers, the selected sample is focused in the center plane of the separation chamber and collected without contact or interaction with the separation chamber walls. Results will be presented on the separation of a range of materials including dyes, proteins, and monodisperse polystyrene latexes. Sources of sample dispersion inherent in other electrokinetic techniques will be shown to be negligible for a variety of sample concentrations, buffer properties and operating conditions.

  20. Nano electrospray gas-phase electrophoretic mobility molecular analysis (nES GEMMA) of liposomes: applicability of the technique for nano vesicle batch control

    PubMed Central

    Weiss, Victor U.; Urey, Carlos; Gondikas, Andreas; Golesne, Monika; Friedbacher, Gernot; von der Kammer, Frank; Hofmann, Thilo; Andersson, Roland; Marko-Varga, György; Marchetti-Deschmann, Martina

    2016-01-01

    Liposomes are biodegradable nanoparticle vesicles consisting of a lipid bilayer encapsulating an aqueous core. Entrapped cargo material is shielded from the extra-vesicular medium and sustained release of encapsulated material can be achieved. However, application of liposomes as nano-carriers demands their characterization concerning size and size distribution, particle-number concentration, occurrence of vesicle building blocks in solution and determination of the resulting vesicle encapsulation capacity. These questions can be targeted via gas-phase electrophoretic mobility molecular analysis (GEMMA) based on a nano electrospray (nES) charge-reduction source. This instrument separates single-charged nanoparticles in the gas-phase according to size in a high-laminar sheath-flow by means of an orthogonal, tunable electric field. nES GEMMA analysis enables to confirm liposome integrity after passage through the instrument (in combination with atomic force microscopy) as well as to exclude vesicle aggregation. Additionally, nanoparticle diameters at peak apexes and size distribution data are obtained. Differences of hydrodynamic and dry particle diameter values, as well as the effect of number- and mass-based concentration data analysis on obtained liposome diameters are shown. Furthermore, the repeatability of liposome preparation is studied, especially upon incorporation of PEGylated lipids in the bilayer. Finally, the instruments applicability to monitor mechanical stress applied to vesicles is demonstrated. PMID:27549027

  1. Combining gas-phase electrophoretic mobility molecular analysis (GEMMA), light scattering, field flow fractionation and cryo electron microscopy in a multidimensional approach to characterize liposomal carrier vesicles.

    PubMed

    Urey, Carlos; Weiss, Victor U; Gondikas, Andreas; von der Kammer, Frank; Hofmann, Thilo; Marchetti-Deschmann, Martina; Allmaier, Günter; Marko-Varga, György; Andersson, Roland

    2016-11-20

    For drug delivery, characterization of liposomes regarding size, particle number concentrations, occurrence of low-sized liposome artefacts and drug encapsulation are of importance to understand their pharmacodynamic properties. In our study, we aimed to demonstrate the applicability of nano Electrospray Gas-Phase Electrophoretic Mobility Molecular Analyser (nES GEMMA) as a suitable technique for analyzing these parameters. We measured number-based particle concentrations, identified differences in size between nominally identical liposomal samples, and detected the presence of low-diameter material which yielded bimodal particle size distributions. Subsequently, we compared these findings to dynamic light scattering (DLS) data and results from light scattering experiments coupled to Asymmetric Flow-Field Flow Fractionation (AF4), the latter improving the detectability of smaller particles in polydisperse samples due to a size separation step prior detection. However, the bimodal size distribution could not be detected due to method inherent limitations. In contrast, cryo transmission electron microscopy corroborated nES GEMMA results. Hence, gas-phase electrophoresis proved to be a versatile tool for liposome characterization as it could analyze both vesicle size and size distribution. Finally, a correlation of nES GEMMA results with cell viability experiments was carried out to demonstrate the importance of liposome batch-to-batch control as low-sized sample components possibly impact cell viability.

  2. Nano electrospray gas-phase electrophoretic mobility molecular analysis (nES GEMMA) of liposomes: applicability of the technique for nano vesicle batch control.

    PubMed

    Weiss, Victor U; Urey, Carlos; Gondikas, Andreas; Golesne, Monika; Friedbacher, Gernot; von der Kammer, Frank; Hofmann, Thilo; Andersson, Roland; Marko-Varga, György; Marchetti-Deschmann, Martina; Allmaier, Günter

    2016-10-17

    Liposomes are biodegradable nanoparticle vesicles consisting of a lipid bilayer encapsulating an aqueous core. Entrapped cargo material is shielded from the extra-vesicular medium and sustained release of encapsulated material can be achieved. However, application of liposomes as nano-carriers demands their characterization concerning size and size distribution, particle-number concentration, occurrence of vesicle building blocks in solution and determination of the resulting vesicle encapsulation capacity. These questions can be targeted via gas-phase electrophoretic mobility molecular analysis (GEMMA) based on a nano electrospray (nES) charge-reduction source. This instrument separates single-charged nanoparticles in the gas-phase according to size in a high-laminar sheath-flow by means of an orthogonal, tunable electric field. nES GEMMA analysis enables to confirm liposome integrity after passage through the instrument (in combination with atomic force microscopy) as well as to exclude vesicle aggregation. Additionally, nanoparticle diameters at peak apexes and size distribution data are obtained. Differences of hydrodynamic and dry particle diameter values, as well as the effect of number- and mass-based concentration data analysis on obtained liposome diameters are shown. Furthermore, the repeatability of liposome preparation is studied, especially upon incorporation of PEGylated lipids in the bilayer. Finally, the instruments applicability to monitor mechanical stress applied to vesicles is demonstrated.

  3. Charge regulation phenomenon predicted from the modeling of polypeptide electrophoretic mobilities as a relevant mechanism of amyloid-beta peptide oligomerization.

    PubMed

    Deiber, Julio A; Peirotti, Marta B; Piaggio, Maria V

    2016-03-01

    Electrophoretic mobilities of amyloid-beta (1-40) and (1-42) peptides and their aggregates are modeled to study the amyloidogenic pathway associated with Alzheimer´s Disease. The near molecule pH generated by the intraparticle charge regulation phenomenon during the oligomerization of amyloid-beta (1-40) and (1-42) peptides is evaluated and discussed as a relevant mechanism supporting the "amyloid cascade hypothesis" proposed in the literature. A theoretical framework associated with the oligomerization of amyloid-beta peptides including simple scaling laws and the consideration of electrokinetic and hydrodynamic global properties of oligomers is presented. The central finding is the explanation of the near molecule pH change toward the pI when the oligomerization number increases. These results allow one to rationalize consecutive physical stages that validate the amyloid cascade hypothesis. Concluding remarks involving mainly the effects of pair and intraparticle charge regulation phenomena on the amyloidogenic pathway with some suggestions for future research are provided.

  4. Electrophoretic mobility of semi-flexible double-stranded DNA in defect-controlled polymer networks: Mechanism investigation and role of structural parameters.

    PubMed

    Khairulina, Kateryna; Li, Xiang; Nishi, Kengo; Shibayama, Mitsuhiro; Chung, Ung-il; Sakai, Takamasa

    2015-06-21

    Our previous studies have reported an empirical model, which explains the electrophoretic mobility (μ) of double-stranded DNA (dsDNA) as a combination of a basic migration term (Rouse-like or reptation) and entropy loss term in polymer gels with ideal network structure. However, this case is of exception, considering a large amount of heterogeneity in the conventional polymer gels. In this study, we systematically tune the heterogeneity in the polymer gels and study the migration of dsDNA in these gels. Our experimental data well agree with the model found for ideal networks. The basic migration mechanism (Rouse-like or reptation) persists perfectly in the conventional heterogeneous polymer gel system, while the entropy loss term continuously changes with increase in the heterogeneity. Furthermore, we found that in the limit where dsDNA is shorter than dsDNA persistence length, the entropy loss term may be related to the collisional motions between DNA fragments and the cross-links.

  5. Electrophoretic mobility of cell nuclei (EMN index) as a biomarker of the biological aging process: Considering the association between EMN index and age.

    PubMed

    Czapla, Z; McPhail, S M

    2015-12-01

    The present study examined whether a specific property of cell microstructures may be useful as a biomarker of aging. Specifically, the association between age and changes of cellular structures reflected in electrophoretic mobility of cell nuclei index (EMN index) values across the adult lifespan was examined. This report considers findings from cross sections of females (n=1273) aged 18-98 years, and males (n=506) aged 19-93 years. A Biotest apparatus was used to perform intracellular microelectrophoresis on buccal epithelial cells collected from each individual. EMN index was calculated on the basis of the number of epithelial cells with mobile nuclei in reference to the cells with immobile nuclei per 100cells. Regression analyses indicated a significant negative association between EMN index value and age for men (r=-0.71, p<0.001) and women (r=-0.60, p<0.001); demonstrating a key requirement that must be met by a biomarker of aging. The strength of association observed between EMN index and age for both men and women was encouraging and supports the potential use of EMN index for determining a biological age of an individual (or a group). In this study, a new attempt of complex explanation of cellular mechanisms contributing to age related changes of the EMN index was made. In this study, a new attempt of complex explanation of cellular mechanisms contributing to age related changes of the EMN index was made. EMN index has demonstrated potential to meet criteria proposed for biomarkers of aging and further investigations are necessary.

  6. Properties of poly(styrene/alpha-tert-butoxy-omega-vinylbenzyl-polyglycidol) microspheres suspended in water. Effect of sodium chloride and temperature on particle diameters and electrophoretic mobility.

    PubMed

    Basinska, Teresa; Slomkowski, Stanislaw; Kazmierski, Slawomir; Chehimi, Mohamed M

    2008-08-19

    Hydrodynamic and electrophoretic properties of core-shell poly(styrene/alpha- tert-butoxy-omega-vinylbenzyl-polyglycidol) (P(S/PGL)) microspheres suspended in water are described. The microspheres were obtained by surfactant-free emulsion copolymerization of styrene and alpha- tert-butoxy-omega-vinylbenzyl-polyglycidol macromonomer ( M n = 2800, M w/ M n = 1.05). The process yielded microspheres with number average diameter D n = 270 nm and with low diameter dispersity index D w/ D n = 1.01. Shells of P(S/PGL) microspheres were enriched in polyglycidol. Molar fraction of polyglycidol monomeric units in the shells (determined by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy) was equal to 0.34, which is much higher than the average molar fraction of polyglycidol monomeric units in whole particles of 0.048. Influences of NaCl concentration and temperature on P(S/PGL) microsphere diameters and on their electrophoretic mobility were investigated. It was found that hydrodynamic diameter of P(S/PGL) microspheres, determined by photon correlation spectroscopy, decreased significantly when temperature did exceed a certain value (transition temperature, T t). It has been found that the decrease is more pronounced for higher concentrations of NaCl in the medium. For microspheres suspended in 10 (-1) M NaCl, the hydrodynamic diameter decreased by 8% whereas for the same particles in pure water the diameter decreased by 5.2%. The process of shrinkage was fully reversible. Values of T t for P(S/PGL) microspheres were lower for higher concentrations of NaCl. Adjustment of salt concentration allowed controlling T t in a range from 44.4 to 49.9 degrees C. 13C NMR relaxation time measurements (T 1) for carbon atoms in polyglycidol macromonomer revealed that T 1 did increase with increasing temperature (in temperature range from 25 to 75 degrees C) indicating higher motion of chains at higher temperature. Addition of NaCl did not induce a substantial change of T 1 in the mentioned temperature

  7. Effects of non-equilibrium association-dissociation processes in the dynamic electrophoretic mobility and dielectric response of realistic salt-free concentrated suspensions.

    PubMed

    Carrique, Félix; Ruiz-Reina, Emilio; Lechuga, Luis; Arroyo, Francisco J; Delgado, Ángel V

    2013-12-01

    Electrokinetic investigations in nanoparticle suspensions in aqueous media are most often performed assuming that the liquid medium is a strong electrolyte solution with specified concentration. The role of the ions produced by the process of charging the surfaces of the particles is often neglected or, at most, the concentrations of such ions are estimated in some way and added to the concentrations of the ions in the externally prepared solution. The situation here considered is quite different: no electrolyte is dissolved in the medium, and ideally only the counterions stemming from the particle charging are assumed to be in solution. This is the case of so-called salt-free systems. With the aim of making a model for such kind of dispersions as close to real situations as possible, it was previously found to consider the unavoidable presence of H(+) and OH(-) coming from water dissociation, as well as the (almost unavoidable) ions stemming from the dissolution of atmospheric CO2. In this work, we extend such approach by considering that the chemical reactions involved in dissociation and recombination of the (weak) electrolytes in solution must not necessarily be in equilibrium conditions (equal rates of forward and backward reactions). To that aim, we calculate the frequency spectra of the electric permittivity and dynamic electrophoretic mobility of salt-free suspensions considering realistic non-equilibrium conditions, using literature values for the rate constants of the reactions. Four species are linked by such reactions, namely H(+) (from water, from the--assumed acidic--groups on the particle surfaces, and from CO2 dissolution), OH(-) (from water), HCO3(-) and H2CO3 (again from CO2). A cell model is used for the calculations, which are extended to arbitrary values of the surface charge, the particle size, and particle volume fraction, in a wide range of the field frequency ω. Both approaches predict a high frequency relaxation of the counterion

  8. Experimental test of new theoretical models for the electrokinetic properties of biological membranes. The effect of UO/sup 2 + +/ and tetracaine on the electrophoretic mobility of bilayer membranes and human erythrocytes

    SciTech Connect

    Pasquale, L.; Winiski, A.; Oliva, C.; Vaio, G.; McLaughlin, S.

    1986-12-01

    For a large smooth particle with charges at the surface, the electrophoretic mobility is proportional to the zeta potential, which is related to the charge density by the Gouy-Chapman theory of the diffuse double layer. This classical model adequately describes the dependence of the electrophoretic mobility of phospholipid vesicles on charge density and salt concentration, but it is not applicable to most biological cells, for which new theoretical models have been developed. We tested these new models experimentally by measuring the effect of UO/sup 2 + +/ on the electrophoretic mobility of model membranes and human erythrocytes in 0.15 M NaCl at pH 5. We used UO/sup 2 + +/ for these studies because it should adsorb specifically to the bilayer surface of the erythrocyte and should not change the density of fixed charges in the glycocalyx. Our experiments demonstrate that it forms high-affinity complexes with the phosphate groups of several phospholipids in a bilayer but does not bind significantly to sialic acid residues. As observed previously, UO/sup 2 + +/ adsorbs strongly to egg phosphatidylcholine (PC) vesicles: 0.1 mM UO/sup 2 + +/ changes the zeta potential of PC vesicles from 0 to +40 mV. It also has a large effect on the electrophoretic mobility of vesicles formed from mixtures of PC and the negative phospholipid phosphatidylserine (PS): 0.1 mM UO/sup 2 + +/ changes the zeta potential of PC/PS vesicles (10 mol % PS) from -13 to +37 mV. In contrast, UO/sup 2 + +/ has only a small effect on the electrophoretic mobility of either vesicles formed from mixtures of PC and the negative ganglioside GM1 or erythrocytes: 0.1 mM UO/sup 2 + +/ changes the apparent zeta potential of PC/GM1 vesicles (17 mol % GM1) from -11 to +5 mV and the apparent zeta potential of erythrocytes from -12 to -4 mV.

  9. Electrophoretic Deposition for Fabricating Microbatteries

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    West, William; Whitacre, Jay; Bugga, Ratnakumar

    2003-01-01

    An improved method of fabrication of cathodes of microbatteries is based on electrophoretic deposition. Heretofore, sputtering (for deposition) and the use of photoresist and liftoff (for patterning) have been the primary methods of fabricating components of microbatteries. The volume of active electrode material that can be deposited by sputtering is limited, and the discharge capacities of prior microbatteries have been limited accordingly. In addition, sputter deposition is slow. In contrast, electrophoretic deposition is much faster and has shown promise for increasing discharge capacities by a factor of 10, relative to those of microbatteries fabricated by prior methods.

  10. Candies to Dye For: Cooperative, Open-Ended Student Activities To Promote Understanding of Electrophoretic Fractionation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Emry, Randall; Curtright, Robert D.; Wright, Jonathan; Markwell, John

    2000-01-01

    Introduces electrophoresis activities developed for chemistry and biology courses in which students identify the food, drug, and cosmetic identity of the food dyes used in the coating of candies. (YDS)

  11. Electrophoretic analysis of liver glycogen phosphorylase activation in the freeze-tolerant wood frog.

    PubMed

    Crerar, M M; David, E S; Storey, K B

    1988-08-19

    As an adaptation for overwinter survival, the wood frog, Rana sylvatica is able to tolerate the freezing of extracellular body fluids. Tolerance is made possible by the production of very high amounts of glucose in liver which is then sent to other organs where it acts as a cryoprotectant. Cryoprotectant synthesis is under the control of glycogen phosphorylase which in turn is activated in response to ice formation. To determine the mechanism of phosphorylase activation, a quantitative analysis of phosphorylase protein concentration and enzymatic activity in liver was carried out following separation of the phosphorylated a and nonphosphorylated b forms of the enzyme on native polyacrylamide gels. The results suggest that in gels, the b form is completely inactive, even in the presence of AMP and sodium sulfate, whereas the a form is active and stimulated 3-fold by these substances. Further, phosphorylase activation appears to arise solely from conversion of the b to a form of the enzyme without an increase in phosphorylase concentration or activation of a second isozyme. The quantitative analysis presented here should prove generally useful as a simple and rapid method for examining the physiological and genetic regulation of phosphorylase in animal cells.

  12. Electrophoretically active sol-gel processes to backfill, seal, and/or densify porous, flawed, and/or cracked coatings on electrically conductive material

    DOEpatents

    Panitz, Janda K.; Reed, Scott T.; Ashley, Carol S.; Neiser, Richard A.; Moffatt, William C.

    1999-01-01

    Electrophoretically active sol-gel processes to fill, seal, and/or density porous, flawed, and/or cracked coatings on electrically conductive substrates. Such coatings may be dielectrics, ceramics, or semiconductors and, by the present invention, may have deposited onto and into them sol-gel ceramic precursor compounds which are subsequently converted to sol-gel ceramics to yield composite materials with various tailored properties.

  13. Electrophoretically active sol-gel processes to backfill, seal, and/or densify porous, flawed, and/or cracked coatings on electrically conductive material

    DOEpatents

    Panitz, J.K.; Reed, S.T.; Ashley, C.S.; Neiser, R.A.; Moffatt, W.C.

    1999-07-20

    Electrophoretically active sol-gel processes to fill, seal, and/or density porous, flawed, and/or cracked coatings on electrically conductive substrates. Such coatings may be dielectrics, ceramics, or semiconductors and, by the present invention, may have deposited onto and into them sol-gel ceramic precursor compounds which are subsequently converted to sol-gel ceramics to yield composite materials with various tailored properties. 6 figs.

  14. Research on Mobile Learning Activities Applying Tablets

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kurilovas, Eugenijus; Juskeviciene, Anita; Bireniene, Virginija

    2015-01-01

    The paper aims to present current research on mobile learning activities in Lithuania while implementing flagship EU-funded CCL project on application of tablet computers in education. In the paper, the quality of modern mobile learning activities based on learning personalisation, problem solving, collaboration, and flipped class methods is…

  15. Properties of electrophoretic fractions of human embryonic kidney cells separated on space shuttle flight STS-8

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Morrison, D. R.; Lewis, M. L.; Barlow, G. H.; Todd, P. W.; Kunze, M. E.; Sarnoff, B. E.; Li, Z. K.

    1985-01-01

    Suspensions of cultured primary human embryonic kidney cells were subjected to continuous flow electrophoresis on Space Shuttle flight STS-8. The objectives of the experiments were to obtain electrophoretically separated fractions of the original cell populations and to test these fractions for the amount and kind of urokinase (a kidney plasminogen activator that is used medically for digesting blood clots), the morphologies of cells in the individual fractions, and their cellular electrophoretic mobilities after separation and subsequent proliferation. Individual fractions were successfully cultured after return from orbit, and they were found to differ substantially from one another and from the starting sample with respect to all of these properties.

  16. Global chain properties of an all l-α-eicosapeptide with a secondary α-helix and its all retro d-inverso-α-eicosapeptide estimated through the modeling of their CZE-determined electrophoretic mobilities.

    PubMed

    Deiber, Julio A; Piaggio, Maria V; Peirotti, Marta B

    2014-03-01

    Several global chain properties of relatively long peptides composed of 20 amino acid residues are estimated through the modeling of their experimental effective electrophoretic mobilities determined by CZE for 2 < pH < 6. In this regard, an all l-α-eicosapeptide, including a secondary α-helix (Peptide 1) and its all retro d-inverso-α-eicosapeptide (Peptide 2), are considered. Despite Peptides 1 and 2 are isomeric chains, they do not present similar global conformations in the whole range of pH studied. These peptides may also differ in the quality of BGE components chain interactions depending on the pH value. Three Peptide 1 fragments (Peptides 3, 4, and 5) are also analyzed in this framework with the following purposes: (i) visualization of the effects of initial and final strands at each side of the α-helix on the global chain conformations of Peptide 1 at different pHs and (ii) analysis of global chain conformations of Peptides 1 and 2, and Peptide 1 fragments in relation to their pI values. Also, the peptide maximum and minimum hydrations predicted by the model, compatible with experimental effective electrophoretic mobilities at different pHs, are quantified and discussed, and needs for further research concerning chain hydration are proposed. It is shown that CZE is a useful analytical tool for peptidomimetic designs and purposes.

  17. Urokinase production by electrophoretically separated cultured human embryonic kidney cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kunze, M. E.; Plank, L. D.; Giranda, V.; Sedor, K.; Todd, P. W.

    1985-01-01

    Urokinase is a plasminogen activator found in urine. Relatively pure preparations have been tested in Europe, Japan and the United States for the treatment of deep vein thrombosis and other dangerous blood clots. Human embryonic kidney cell cultures have been found to produce urokinase at much higher concentrations, but less than 5% of the cells in typical cultures are producers. Since human diploid cells become senescent in culture the selection of clones derived from single cells will not provide enough material to be useful, so a bulk purification method is needed for the isolation of urokinase producing cell populations. Preparative cell electrophoresis was chosen as the method, since evidence exists that human embryonic cell cultures are richly heterogeneous with respect to electrophoretic mobility, and preliminary electrophoretic separations on the Apollo-Soyuz space flight produced cell populations that were rich in urokinase production. Similarly, erythropoietin is useful in the treatment of certain anemias and is a kidney cell duct, and electrophoretically enriched cell populations producing this product have been reported. Thus, there is a clear need for diploid human cells that produce these products, and there is evidence that such cells should be separable by free-flow cell electrophoresis.

  18. An evaluation of the SPIFE 3000 semi-automated gel electrophoresis system for the identification of hemoglobin variants and comparison of relative electrophoretic mobilities with manual gel electrophoresis methods.

    PubMed

    Hoyer, J D; Markley, K M; Savedra, M E; Kubik, K S; Scheidt, R M

    2010-06-01

    Laboratory identification of hemoglobin (Hb) variants can involve multiple techniques. The use of semi-automated instruments that perform gel electrophoresis and staining, such as the SPIFE 3000 electrophoresis system, can greatly reduce the labor required for these commonly used techniques. We performed a comparison of the method involved in SPIFE 3000 system with those of manual gel electrophoresis. A total of 22 540 samples were analyzed using the SPIFE 3000, and compared with mobilities on cellulose acetate and citrate agar gels using standard manual methods. The results were compared using relative electrophoretic mobilities (REM). Of the 191 Hb variants identified, only 13 had REM that differed from manual electrophoresis when analyzed using the SPIFE 3000 system. One variant (Hb O-Indonesia) showed different mobility on both acid and alkaline gels, two (Hb E, Hb Sunshine Seth) on alkaline gel only, and 10 (Hbs N-Baltimore, N-Seattle, O-Arab, Shelby, Summer Hill, Tak, Hasharon, M-Iwate, Q-Iran, and Setif) on acid gels only. The SPIFE 3000 semi-automated electrophoresis system produces similar results when compared with those of standard manual electrophoresis methods.

  19. Arylsulfatase A: Relationship of genotype to variant electrophoretic properties

    SciTech Connect

    Park, D.S.; Poretz, R.D.; Ricketts, M.H.; Manowitz, P.

    1996-04-01

    Previous work has shown that specific electrophoretic variants of arylsulfatase A occur more frequently among alcoholic patients than among psychiatric and normal controls. The present study sequenced the gene for two of these electrophoretic variants, IIIa and IIIb. Both contain an A-to-G transition corresponding to substitution of Asn{sub 350} by Ser, with the resulting loss of an N -glycosylation site. The difference in electrophoretic mobility of their gene products is due to a mutation in the IIIb gene resulting in the replacement of Arg{sub 496} by His. Evidence is presented that individuals posessing either of two other electrophoretic variants, Va and Vb, are heterozygous for a normal ASA allele and either a IIIa or IIIb allele, respectively. Thus, the relationship between the phenotype of the electrophoretic banding patterns, IIIa, IIIb, Va, and Vb, and their corresponding genotypes has been elucidated. 18 refs., 5 figs., 1 tab.

  20. GalileoMobile: Astronomical activities in schools

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dasi Espuig, Maria; Vasquez, Mayte; Kobel, Philippe

    GalileoMobile is an itinerant science education initiative run on a voluntary basis by an international team of astronomers, educators, and science communicators. Our team's main goal is to make astronomy accessible to schools and communities around the globe that have little or no access to outreach actions. We do this by performing teacher workshops, activities with students, and donating educational material. Since the creation of GalileoMobile in 2008, we have travelled to Chile, Bolivia, Peru, India, and Uganda, and worked with 56 schools in total. Our activities are centred on the GalileoMobile Handbook of Activities that comprises around 20 astronomical activities which we adapted from many different sources, and translated into 4 languages. The experience we gained in Chile, Bolivia, Peru, India, and Uganda taught us that (1) bringing experts from other countries was very stimulating for children as they are naturally curious about other cultures and encourages a collaboration beyond borders; (2) high-school students who were already interested in science were always very eager to interact with real astronomers doing research to ask for career advice; (3) inquiry-based methods are important to make the learning process more effective and we have therefore, re-adapted the activities in our Handbook according to these; (4) local teachers and university students involved in our activities have the potential to carry out follow-up activities, and examples are those from Uganda and India.

  1. Mobile Robotics Activities in DOE Laboratories

    SciTech Connect

    Ron Lujan; Jerry Harbour; John T. Feddema; Sharon Bailey; Jacob Barhen; David Reister

    2005-03-01

    This paper will briefly outline major activities in Department of Energy (DOE) Laboratories focused on mobile platforms, both Unmanned Ground Vehicles (UGV’s) as well as Unmanned Air Vehicles (UAV’s). The activities will be discussed in the context of the science and technology construct used by the DOE Technology Roadmap for Robotics and Intelligent Machines (RIM)1 published in 1998; namely, Perception, Reasoning, Action, and Integration. The activities to be discussed span from research and development to deployment in field operations. The activities support customers in other agencies. The discussion of "perception" will include hyperspectral sensors, complex patterns discrimination, multisensor fusion and advances in LADAR technologies, including real-world perception. "Reasoning" activities to be covered include cooperative controls, distributed systems, ad-hoc networks, platform-centric intelligence, and adaptable communications. The paper will discuss "action" activities such as advanced mobility and various air and ground platforms. In the RIM construct, "integration" includes the Human-Machine Integration. Accordingly the paper will discuss adjustable autonomy and the collaboration of operator(s) with distributed UGV’s and UAV’s. Integration also refers to the applications of these technologies into systems to perform operations such as perimeter surveillance, large-area monitoring and reconnaissance. Unique facilities and test beds for advanced mobile systems will be described. Given that this paper is an overview, rather than delve into specific detail in these activities, other more exhaustive references and sources will be cited extensively.

  2. Prediction limits of mobile phone activity modelling

    PubMed Central

    Grauwin, Sebastian; Kallus, Zsófia; Gódor, István; Sobolevsky, Stanislav; Ratti, Carlo

    2017-01-01

    Thanks to their widespread usage, mobile devices have become one of the main sensors of human behaviour and digital traces left behind can be used as a proxy to study urban environments. Exploring the nature of the spatio-temporal patterns of mobile phone activity could thus be a crucial step towards understanding the full spectrum of human activities. Using 10 months of mobile phone records from Greater London resolved in both space and time, we investigate the regularity of human telecommunication activity on urban scales. We evaluate several options for decomposing activity timelines into typical and residual patterns, accounting for the strong periodic and seasonal components. We carry out our analysis on various spatial scales, showing that regularity increases as we look at aggregated activity in larger spatial units with more activity in them. We examine the statistical properties of the residuals and show that it can be explained by noise and specific outliers. Also, we look at sources of deviations from the general trends, which we find to be explainable based on knowledge of the city structure and places of attractions. We show examples how some of the outliers can be related to external factors such as specific social events. PMID:28386443

  3. Multistage Electrophoretic Separators

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thomas, Nathan; Doyle, John F.; Kurk, Andy; Vellinger, John C.; Todd, Paul

    2006-01-01

    A multistage electrophoresis apparatus has been invented for use in the separation of cells, protein molecules, and other particles and solutes in concentrated aqueous solutions and suspensions. The design exploits free electrophoresis but overcomes the deficiencies of prior free-electrophoretic separators by incorporating a combination of published advances in mathematical modeling of convection, sedimentation, electro-osmotic flow, and the sedimentation and aggregation of droplets. In comparison with other electrophoretic separators, these apparatuses are easier to use and are better suited to separation in relatively large quantities characterized in the art as preparative (in contradistinction to smaller quantities characterized in the art as analytical). In a multistage electrophoretic separator according to the invention, an applied vertical steady electric field draws the electrically charged particles of interest from within a cuvette to within a collection cavity that has been moved into position of the cuvette. There are multiple collection cavities arranged in a circle; each is aligned with the cuvette for a prescribed short time. The multistage, short-migration-path character of the invention solves, possibly for the first time, the fluid-instability problems associated with free electrophoresis. The figure shows a prototype multistage electrophoretic separator that includes four sample stations and five collection stages per sample. At each sample station, an aqueous solution or suspension containing charged species to be separated is loaded into a cuvette, which is machined into a top plate. The apparatus includes a lower plate, into which 20 collection cavities have been milled. Each cavity is filled with an electrophoresis buffer solution. For the collection of an electrophoretic fraction, the lower plate is rotated to move a designated collection cavity into alignment with the opening of the cuvette. An electric field is then applied between a non

  4. Mobile Computer Application for Promoting Physical Activity

    PubMed Central

    McMahon, Siobhan; Vankipuram, Mithra; Fleury, Julie

    2016-01-01

    Despite evidence that physical activity reduces the risk of falls and other causes of disability and death, the majority of older adults do not engage in physical activity on a regular basis. Mobile technology applications have emerged as potential resources for promoting physical activity behavior. This article describes features of a new application, Ready~Steady, highlighting approaches used in its design and development, and implications for clinical practice. Iterative processes enabled the design, development, implementation, and evaluation of the application consistent with the wellness motivation theory, as well as established user-specific strategies and theoretical design principles. Implications in terms of potential benefits and constraints are discussed. Integrating technology that promotes health and wellness in the form of mobile computer applications is a promising adjunct to nursing practice. PMID:23463915

  5. Mobile computer application for promoting physical activity.

    PubMed

    McMahon, Siobhan; Vankipuram, Mithra; Fleury, Julie

    2013-04-01

    Despite evidence that physical activity reduces the risk of falls and other causes of disability and death, the majority of older adults do not engage in physical activity on a regular basis. Mobile technology applications have emerged as potential resources for promoting physical activity behavior. This article describes features of a new application, Ready∼Steady, highlighting approaches used in its design and development, and implications for clinical practice. Iterative processes enabled the design, development, implementation, and evaluation of the application consistent with the wellness motivation theory, as well as established user-specific strategies and theoretical design principles. Implications in terms of potential benefits and constraints are discussed. Integrating technology that promotes health and wellness in the form of mobile computer applications is a promising adjunct to nursing practice.

  6. Active microrheology in active matter systems: Mobility, intermittency, and avalanches.

    PubMed

    Reichhardt, C; Reichhardt, C J Olson

    2015-03-01

    We examine the mobility and velocity fluctuations of a driven particle moving through an active matter bath of self-mobile disks for varied density or area coverage and varied activity. We show that the driven particle mobility can exhibit nonmonotonic behavior that is correlated with distinct changes in the spatiotemporal structures that arise in the active media. We demonstrate that the probe particle velocity distributions exhibit specific features in the different dynamic regimes and identify an activity-induced uniform crystallization that occurs for moderate activity levels and is distinct from the previously observed higher activity cluster phase. The velocity distribution in the cluster phase has telegraph noise characteristics produced when the probe particle moves alternately through high-mobility areas that are in the gas state and low-mobility areas that are in the dense phase. For higher densities and large activities, the system enters what we characterize as an active jamming regime. Here the probe particle moves in intermittent jumps or avalanches that have power-law-distributed sizes that are similar to the avalanche distributions observed for nonactive disk systems near the jamming transition.

  7. Sequence-specific nucleic acid mobility using a reversible block copolymer gel matrix and DNA amphiphiles (lipid-DNA) in capillary and microfluidic electrophoretic separations.

    PubMed

    Wagler, Patrick; Minero, Gabriel Antonio S; Tangen, Uwe; de Vries, Jan Willem; Prusty, Deepak; Kwak, Minseok; Herrmann, Andreas; McCaskill, John S

    2015-10-01

    Reversible noncovalent but sequence-dependent attachment of DNA to gels is shown to allow programmable mobility processing of DNA populations. The covalent attachment of DNA oligomers to polyacrylamide gels using acrydite-modified oligonucleotides has enabled sequence-specific mobility assays for DNA in gel electrophoresis: sequences binding to the immobilized DNA are delayed in their migration. Such a system has been used for example to construct complex DNA filters facilitating DNA computations. However, these gels are formed irreversibly and the choice of immobilized sequences is made once off during fabrication. In this work, we demonstrate the reversible self-assembly of gels combined with amphiphilic DNA molecules, which exhibit hydrophobic hydrocarbon chains attached to the nucleobase. This amphiphilic DNA, which we term lipid-DNA, is synthesized in advance and is blended into a block copolymer gel to induce sequence-dependent DNA retention during electrophoresis. Furthermore, we demonstrate and characterize the programmable mobility shift of matching DNA in such reversible gels both in thin films and microchannels using microelectrode arrays. Such sequence selective separation may be employed to select nucleic acid sequences of similar length from a mixture via local electronics, a basic functionality that can be employed in novel electronic chemical cell designs and other DNA information-processing systems.

  8. On-line and Mobil Learning Activities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ackerman, S. A.; Whittaker, T. M.; Jasmin, T.; Mooney, M. E.

    2012-12-01

    Introductory college-level science courses for non-majors are critical gateways to imparting not only discipline-specific information, but also the basics of the scientific method and how science influences society. They are also indispensable for student success to degree. On-line, web-based homework (whether on computers or mobile devices) is a rapidly growing use of the Internet and is becoming a major component of instruction in science, replacing delayed feedback from a few major exams. Web delivery and grading of traditional textbook-type questions is equally effective as having students write them out for hand grading, as measured by student performance on conceptual and problem solving exams. During this presentation we will demonstrate some of the interactive on-line activities used to teach concepts and how scientists approach problem solving, and how these activities have impacted student learning. Evaluation of the activities, including formative and summative, will be discussed and provide evidence that these interactive activities significantly enhance understanding of introductory meteorological concepts in a college-level science course. More advanced interactive activities are also used in our courses for department majors, some of these will be discussed and demonstrated. Bring your mobile devices to play along! Here is an example on teaching contouring: http://profhorn.aos.wisc.edu/wxwise/contour/index.html

  9. Electrophoretic Transport of Biomolecules through Carbon Nanotube Membranes

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Xinghua; Su, Xin; Wu, Ji; Hinds, Bruce J.

    2013-01-01

    Electrophoretic transport of proteins across electrochemically oxidized multi-walled carbon nanotube (MWCNT) membranes has been investigated. Small charged protein, lysozyme, was successfully pumped across MWCNT membranes by electric field while rejecting larger bovine serum albumin (BSA). Transport of the lysozome was reduced by a factor of about 30 in comparison to bulk mobility and consistent with prediction for hindered transport. Mobilities between 0.33-1.4×10-9 m2/V-s were observed and are approximately 10 fold faster than comparable ordered nanoporous membranes and are consistent with continuum models. For mixtures of BSA and lysozyme, complete rejection of BSA is seen with electrophoretic separations PMID:21338104

  10. Determination of the dissociation constants (pKa) of secondary and tertiary amines in organic media by capillary electrophoresis and their role in the electrophoretic mobility order inversion.

    PubMed

    Cantu, Marcelo Delmar; Hillebranda, Sandro; Carrilho, Emanuel

    2005-03-11

    Non-aqueous capillary electrophoresis (NACE) may provide a selectivity enhancement in separations since the analyte dissociation constants (pKa) in organic media are different from those in aqueous solutions. In this work, we have studied the inversion in mobility order observed in the separation of tertiary (imipramine (IMI) and amitryptiline (AMI)) and secondary amines (desipramine (DES) and nortryptiline (NOR)) in water, methanol, and acetonitrile. We have determined the pKa values in those solvents and the variation of dissociation constants with the temperature. From these data, and applying the Van't Hoff equation, we have calculated the thermodynamic parameters deltaH and deltaS. The pKa values found in methanol for DES, NOR, IMI, and AMI were 10.80, 10.79, 10.38, and 10.33, respectively. On the other hand, in acetonitrile an opposite relation was found since the values were 20.60, 20.67, 20.74, and 20.81 for DES, NOR, IMI, and AMI. This is the reason why a migration order inversion is observed in NACE for these solvents. The thermodynamic parameters were evaluated and presented a tendency that can be correlated with that observed for pKa values.

  11. Electrophoretic Light Scattering: Instrumentation and Application to the Measurement of the Electric Charge of Human Blood Cells.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1982-03-15

    blood cells Human Blood cells- . . .. . Platelets Electric charge Electrophoretic mobility 20. ABSTRACT (Continue on reverse side If necessary and...the electrophoretic mobility of human blood cells and platelets . The technique is called Electrophoretic Light Scattering (ELS), and the measurement...predictive value in ascertaining the quality of preserved red blood cells and platelets . It was found that neither liquid storage (up to 30 days) nor

  12. Preparation of guinea pig macrophage for electrophoretic experiments in space

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1979-01-01

    Methods of storage and cultivation of macrophage cells in preparation for space experiments were investigated. Results show that freezing and thawing immediately after extraction did not cause any change in viability or electrophoretic mobility of the cells. A prolonged storage at -80 C did cause cell damage as indicated by a 95% reduction in variable cells. Cell damage was decreased when Glycerol or Dimethyl Sulfoxide (DMSO) was added as a cryogenic protective agent. A 100% viability was observed in cultivation experiments after two weeks due to the additional serum. Results from gamma-glutamyl transpeptidase study showed a zero activity rate. It is suggested that a flat stationary field be used for the collection and use of macrophage. It was found that a 24-hour delay in obtaining macrophage cells helps to maintain a pure culture.

  13. Perception towards Mobile Learning Activities among Post Graduate Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Thiyagu, K.

    2012-01-01

    M-learning is learning supported by mobile devices and intelligent user interfaces. Compared to the prior generation a few years ago, storage capacity and screen size of mobile devices as well as transfer speed of wireless connections have significantly increased. Equipped with mobile devices, learners can conduct learning activities at anytime…

  14. Mobilization of evaporites in tectonically active terrains

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stiros, Stathis C.

    2015-04-01

    The role of evaporites, mostly halite, during seismic sequences is investigated using evidence from certain earthquakes with magnitude between approximately 6.0 and 7.2 which occurred in the last 60 years in the Zagros Mts. (Iran) and the Ionian Sea (Greece); i.e. two seismically active areas, characterized by evaporite-associated decollements and more shallow decollements combined with mature, along-thrusts intrusions. Studied earthquakes produced either large scale surface deformation, or were covered by high-resolution and accuracy GPS and INSAR data, permitting to fully recognize the deformation pattern. In all cases an "atypical", tectonic deformation pattern was observed, ranging from apparently "impossible" patterns (thrust and normal faults, sub-parallel and homothetic; 1953 Cephalonia earthquake, Greece) to rather diffuse tectonic patterns, even to "phantom" earthquakes (Zagros). Careful analysis and modeling of the surface deformation data, in combination with the available geological, geophysical and seismological data permits to recognize, and even to quantify differences between deformation observed, and that expected in ordinary environments. In particular, it was found that during earthquakes evaporites were mobilized, and this led either to a secondary deformation of the overburden, fully detached from the basement, or to significant aseismic (post-seismic) deformation. Anomalies in the distribution of seismic intensities due to evaporitic intrusions along faults were also observed. Apart from seismological implications (unpredictable post-seismic deformation, possibly also in the far-field), these results deriving from regions at different levels of evaporitic evolution, may prove useful to understand patterns of mobilization of evaporites during periods of tectonic activity.

  15. INFLUENCE OF BORATE BUFFERS ON THE ELECTROPHORETIC BEHAVIOR OF HUMIC SUBSTANCES IN CAPILLARY ZONE ELECTROPHORESIS

    EPA Science Inventory

    The influence of tetrahydroxyborate ions on the electrophoretic mobility of humic acids was evaluated by capillary electrophoresis (CE). Depending on the molarity of borate ions in the separation buffer, the humic acids exhibit electropherograms with sharp peaks consistently exte...

  16. Draft Genome Sequences of Eight Nontypeable Haemophilus influenzae Strains Previously Characterized Using an Electrophoretic Typing Scheme.

    PubMed

    Mussa, Huda J; VanWagoner, Timothy M; Morton, Daniel J; Seale, Thomas W; Whitby, Paul W; Stull, Terrence L

    2015-11-25

    Nontypeable Haemophilus influenzae is an important cause of human disease. Strains were selected for genome sequencing to represent the breadth of nontypeable strains within the species, as previously defined by the electrophoretic mobility of 16 metabolic enzymes.

  17. Draft Genome Sequences of Eight Nontypeable Haemophilus influenzae Strains Previously Characterized Using an Electrophoretic Typing Scheme

    PubMed Central

    Mussa, Huda J.; VanWagoner, Timothy M.; Seale, Thomas W.; Whitby, Paul W.; Stull, Terrence L.

    2015-01-01

    Nontypeable Haemophilus influenzae is an important cause of human disease. Strains were selected for genome sequencing to represent the breadth of nontypeable strains within the species, as previously defined by the electrophoretic mobility of 16 metabolic enzymes. PMID:26607889

  18. Electrophoretic deposition of biomaterials

    PubMed Central

    Boccaccini, A. R.; Keim, S.; Ma, R.; Li, Y.; Zhitomirsky, I.

    2010-01-01

    Electrophoretic deposition (EPD) is attracting increasing attention as an effective technique for the processing of biomaterials, specifically bioactive coatings and biomedical nanostructures. The well-known advantages of EPD for the production of a wide range of microstructures and nanostructures as well as unique and complex material combinations are being exploited, starting from well-dispersed suspensions of biomaterials in particulate form (microsized and nanoscale particles, nanotubes, nanoplatelets). EPD of biological entities such as enzymes, bacteria and cells is also being investigated. The review presents a comprehensive summary and discussion of relevant recent work on EPD describing the specific application of the technique in the processing of several biomaterials, focusing on (i) conventional bioactive (inorganic) coatings, e.g. hydroxyapatite or bioactive glass coatings on orthopaedic implants, and (ii) biomedical nanostructures, including biopolymer–ceramic nanocomposites, carbon nanotube coatings, tissue engineering scaffolds, deposition of proteins and other biological entities for sensors and advanced functional coatings. It is the intention to inform the reader on how EPD has become an important tool in advanced biomaterials processing, as a convenient alternative to conventional methods, and to present the potential of the technique to manipulate and control the deposition of a range of nanomaterials of interest in the biomedical and biotechnology fields. PMID:20504802

  19. Theory for the capillary electrophoretic separation of DNA in polymer solutions.

    PubMed

    Jung, Ho Jin; Bae, Young Chan

    2002-08-23

    We present a mathematical model based on the models of Hubert et al. [Macromolecules 29 (1996) 1006] and Sunada and Blanch [Electrophoresis, 19 (1998) 3128] to describe the electrophoretic mobility of DNA by a transient entanglement coupling mechanism. The proposed model takes into account the interactions between molecules in the capillary and the cross-section of collision between DNA and polymer molecules. The results show that the calculated values agree remarkably well with our electrophoretic mobility data.

  20. Electrophoretic approach to the biochemical systematics of gammarids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bulnheim, H.-P.; Scholl, A.

    1981-12-01

    By utilizing the techniques for electrophoretic separation of proteins by vertical starch gels, the biochemical systematics of 10 Gammaridae species obtained from marine, brackish and freshwater habitats was studied. They included Chaetogammarus marinus, Gammarus zaddachi, G. salinus, G. oceanicus, G. tigrinus, G. chevreuxi, G. locusta, G. duebeni duebeni, G. d. celticus, G. pulex pulex, and G. fossarum. For comparison of electrophoretic mobilities selected enzymes (phosphoglucose isomerase, glutamate oxalacetate transaminase, arginine phosphokinase, hexokinase, leucine amino peptidase, mannose 6-phosphate isomerase) were assayed. They were used as diagnostic characters in terms of electrophoretic identities or diversities of most frequent alleles at polymorphic gene loci. These criteria could be applied to estimate intrageneric enzymic variation and degrees of genetic relatedness between the crustacean amphipod species under consideration, thereby complementing traditional morphological classification.

  1. a Multidisciplinary Analytical Framework for Studying Active Mobility Patterns

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Orellana, D.; Hermida, C.; Osorio, P.

    2016-06-01

    Intermediate cities are urged to change and adapt their mobility systems from a high energy-demanding motorized model to a sustainable low-motorized model. In order to accomplish such a model, city administrations need to better understand active mobility patterns and their links to socio-demographic and cultural aspects of the population. During the last decade, researchers have demonstrated the potential of geo-location technologies and mobile devices to gather massive amounts of data for mobility studies. However, the analysis and interpretation of this data has been carried out by specialized research groups with relatively narrow approaches from different disciplines. Consequently, broader questions remain less explored, mainly those relating to spatial behaviour of individuals and populations with their geographic environment and the motivations and perceptions shaping such behaviour. Understanding sustainable mobility and exploring new research paths require an interdisciplinary approach given the complex nature of mobility systems and their social, economic and environmental impacts. Here, we introduce the elements for a multidisciplinary analytical framework for studying active mobility patterns comprised of three components: a) Methodological, b) Behavioural, and c) Perceptual. We demonstrate the applicability of the framework by analysing mobility patterns of cyclists and pedestrians in an intermediate city integrating a range of techniques, including: GPS tracking, spatial analysis, auto-ethnography, and perceptual mapping. The results demonstrated the existence of non-evident spatial behaviours and how perceptual features affect mobility. This knowledge is useful for developing policies and practices for sustainable mobility planning.

  2. Mobile Health Applications to Promote Active and Healthy Ageing

    PubMed Central

    Helbostad, Jorunn L.; Vereijken, Beatrix; Becker, Clemens; Todd, Chris; Taraldsen, Kristin; Pijnappels, Mirjam; Aminian, Kamiar; Mellone, Sabato

    2017-01-01

    The European population is ageing, and there is a need for health solutions that keep older adults independent longer. With increasing access to mobile technology, such as smartphones and smartwatches, the development and use of mobile health applications is rapidly growing. To meet the societal challenge of changing demography, mobile health solutions are warranted that support older adults to stay healthy and active and that can prevent or delay functional decline. This paper reviews the literature on mobile technology, in particular wearable technology, such as smartphones, smartwatches, and wristbands, presenting new ideas on how this technology can be used to encourage an active lifestyle, and discusses the way forward in order further to advance development and practice in the field of mobile technology for active, healthy ageing. PMID:28335475

  3. Mobile Health Applications to Promote Active and Healthy Ageing.

    PubMed

    Helbostad, Jorunn L; Vereijken, Beatrix; Becker, Clemens; Todd, Chris; Taraldsen, Kristin; Pijnappels, Mirjam; Aminian, Kamiar; Mellone, Sabato

    2017-03-18

    The European population is ageing, and there is a need for health solutions that keep older adults independent longer. With increasing access to mobile technology, such as smartphones and smartwatches, the development and use of mobile health applications is rapidly growing. To meet the societal challenge of changing demography, mobile health solutions are warranted that support older adults to stay healthy and active and that can prevent or delay functional decline. This paper reviews the literature on mobile technology, in particular wearable technology, such as smartphones, smartwatches, and wristbands, presenting new ideas on how this technology can be used to encourage an active lifestyle, and discusses the way forward in order further to advance development and practice in the field of mobile technology for active, healthy ageing.

  4. Electrophoretic Retardation of Colloidal Particles in Nonpolar Liquids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Strubbe, Filip; Beunis, Filip; Brans, Toon; Karvar, Masoumeh; Woestenborghs, Wouter; Neyts, Kristiaan

    2013-04-01

    We have measured the electrophoretic mobility of single, optically trapped colloidal particles, while gradually depleting the co-ions and counterions in the liquid around the particle by applying a dc voltage. This is achieved in a nonpolar liquid, where charged reverse micelles act as co-ions and counterions. By increasing the dc voltage, the mobility first increases when the concentrations of co-ions and counterions near the particle start to decrease. At sufficiently high dc voltage (around 2 V), the mobility reaches a saturation value when the co-ions and counterions are fully separated. The increase in mobility is larger when the equilibrium ionic strength is higher. The dependence of the experimental data on the equilibrium ionic strength and on the applied voltage is in good agreement with the standard theory of electrophoretic retardation, assuming that the bare particle charge remains constant. This method is useful for studying the electrophoretic retardation effect and charging mechanisms for nonpolar colloids, and it sheds light on previously unexplained particle acceleration in electronic ink devices.

  5. Electrophoretic Process For Purifying Wastewater

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sammons, David W.; Twitty, Garland E.; Sharnez, Rizwan; Egen, Ned B.

    1992-01-01

    Microbes, poisonous substances, and colloidal particles removed by combination of electric fields. Electrophoretic process removes pathogenicorganisms, toxins, toxic metals, and cooloidal soil particles from wastewater. Used to render domestic, industrial, and agricultural wastewater streams potable. Process also useful in bioregenerative and other closed systems like in space stations and submarines, where water must be recycled.

  6. Electrophoretically unique amylases in rat livers: phylogenic and ontogenic study on the mammalian liver.

    PubMed

    Koyama, Iwao; Komine, Shin-Ichi; Hokari, Shigeru; Matsunaga, Toshiyuki; Nakamura, Koh-Ich; Komoda, Tsugikazu

    2002-09-01

    Liver amylase activity in rodents was assayed with Blue Starch as substrate, and found to be higher than in humans or pigs. Based on the result of concanavalin A affinity chromatography, we found that the sugar moieties of amylase molecules increased in parallel with amylase activity in the tested mammals. However, the amounts of amylase proteins determined by Western bloting with anti-human salivary-type antibody as the probe, were similar to the levels in mammalian livers. Moreover, a similar expression of amylase mRNA was also detected in the mammalian livers by a reverse transcriptional-polymerase chain reaction using primers specific for the human salivary and/or pancreatic amylase complementary DNA (cDNA) sequences. The amylase was detected at the catalytic activity, protein molecule and mRNA levels in rat liver at all ages from fetus to adult. Salivary-type liver amylase activity increased up to one week after birth, and was maintained at the adult level thereafter. However, based on the results of the electrophoretic mobility test, livers with accelerated amylase activity, e.g., at 2-4 weeks after birth or during liver regeneration after partial hepatectomy, were also found to express an amylase electrophoretical identical to pancreatic-type amylase in addition to salivary-type activity. These results suggest that the liver may express an etopic amylase in a certain condition.

  7. Identification and quantitation of morphological cell types in electrophoretically separated human embryonic kidney cell cultures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Williams, K. B.; Kunze, M. E.; Todd, P. W.

    1985-01-01

    Four major cell types were identified by phase microscopy in early passage human embryonic kidney cell cultures. They are small and large epithelioid, domed, and fenestrated cells. Fibroblasts are also present in some explants. The percent of each cell type changes with passage number as any given culture grows. As a general rule, the fraction of small epithelioid cells increases, while the fraction of fenestrated cells, always small, decreases further. When fibroblasts are present, they always increase in percentage of the total cell population. Electrophoretic separation of early passage cells showed that the domed cells have the highest electrophoretic mobility, fibroblasts have an intermediate high mobility, small epithelioid cells have a low mobility, broadly distributed, and fenestrated cells have the lowest mobility. All cell types were broadly distributed among electrophoretic subfractions, which were never pure but only enriched with respect to a given cell type.

  8. On the flow field about an electrophoretic particle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Orsini, Gabriele; Tricoli, Vincenzo

    2012-10-01

    The flow field about an electrophoretic body is theoretically investigated by analytical methods. An effective boundary condition for the electric potential at particle surface is derived. This condition, which generalizes the one obtained by Levich [Physicochemical Hydrodynamics (Prentice-Hall, Englewood Cliffs, 1962), Chap. 9, p. 475], captures the effect of (convective and electromigratory) surface current in the Debye layer and is valid as far as it is legitimate to neglect ion-concentration gradient in the bulk liquid. Conditions for negligible concentration gradients are also presented and discussed. The effect of surface current determines a deviation from Morrison's "classical" theory, which predicts irrotational flow-field for any particle shape with electrophoretic velocity given by the well-known Smoluchowski formula and always directed along the applied electric field. It is shown here that in the presence of the above effect the irrotationality of the flow field is not preserved if the particle surface has non-uniform curvature. However, irrotational flow-field still subsists for a sphere and a cylinder and is analytically determined in terms of a new non-dimensional parameter, referred to as the electrophoretic number. The case of spheroidal objects is also examined in detail. In this case the flow field, though not strictly irrotational, is shown to be nearly approximated by an irrotational flow-field, which is also determined over wide ranges of electrophoretic number and spheroid aspect ratio. The quality of this approximation is expressed as a relative error on the Helmholtz-Smoluchowski condition and numerically evaluated both in longitudinal and transverse configuration. The limiting cases of spheroid degenerating into a needle and a disk are also addressed. In all above cases the respective mobilities deviate from Smoluchowski's formula and depend on the electrophoretic number. An important effect of surface ion-transport in the double layer is

  9. ODV mobility enhancement using active height control

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rich, Shayne C.; Wood, Carl G.; Keller, Jared

    2000-07-01

    To enhance the mobility of the USU T-class of vehicles, the T3 vehicle has been developed that incorporates Z-axis motion of the drive wheel modules. Moving the wheels up and down provides the ability to pitch and roll the vehicle chassis and move the vehicle center of gravity to change the force distribution on the individual drive wheels. The omni- directional capability of the vehicle provides the capability to align the vehicle with the slope gradient that maximizes the vehicle stability. This paper shows that by pitching the vehicle into the slope, that the uphill traction limit of the vehicle can be increased by about 10 degree(s). Future research efforts concerning stair climbing, step negotiation, and obstacle field navigation are also discussed.

  10. Sensitive and robust electrophoretic NMR: Instrumentation and experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hallberg, Fredrik; Furó, István; Yushmanov, Pavel V.; Stilbs, Peter

    2008-05-01

    Although simple as a concept, electrophoretic NMR (eNMR) has so far failed to find wider application. Problems encountered are mainly due to disturbing and partly irreproducible convection-like bulk flow effects from both electro-osmosis and thermal convection. Additionally, bubble formation at the electrodes and rf noise pickup has constrained the typical sample geometry to U-tube-like arrangements with a small filling factor and a low resulting NMR sensitivity. Furthermore, the sign of the electrophoretic mobility cancels out in U-tube geometries. We present here a new electrophoretic sample cell based on a vertically placed conventional NMR sample tube with bubble-suppressing palladium metal as electrode material. A suitable radiofrequency filter design prevents noise pickup by the NMR sample coil from the high-voltage leads which extend into the sensitive sample volume. Hence, the obtained signal-to-noise ratio of this cell is one order of magnitude higher than that of our previous U-tube cells. Permitted by the retention of the sign of the displacement-related signal phase in the new cell design, an experimental approach is described where bulk flow effects by electro-osmosis and/or thermal convection are compensated through parallel monitoring of a reference signal from a non-charged species in the sample. This approach, together with a CPMG-like pulse train scheme provides a superior first-order cancellation of non-electrophoretic bulk flow effects.

  11. Physical Activity Recognition with Mobile Phones: Challenges, Methods, and Applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Jun; Lu, Hong; Liu, Zhigang; Boda, Péter Pál

    In this book chapter, we present a novel system that recognizes and records the physical activity of a person using a mobile phone. The sensor data is collected by built-in accelerometer sensor that measures the motion intensity of the device. The system recognizes five everyday activities in real-time, i.e., stationary, walking, running, bicycling, and in vehicle. We first introduce the sensor's data format, sensor calibration, signal projection, feature extraction, and selection methods. Then we have a detailed discussion and comparison of different choices of feature sets and classifiers. The design and implementation of one prototype system is presented along with resource and performance benchmark on Nokia N95 platform. Results show high recognition accuracies for distinguishing the five activities. The last part of the chapter introduces one demo application built on top of our system, physical activity diary, and a selection of potential applications in mobile wellness, mobile social sharing and contextual user interface domains.

  12. Electrophoretic study of Clostridium species.

    PubMed Central

    Cato, E P; Hash, D E; Holdeman, L V; Moore, W E

    1982-01-01

    Polyacrylamide gel electrophoretic analysis of soluble cellular proteins (without sodium dodecyl sulfate) of 70 Clostridium species indicated that the procedure was readily applicable to the differentiation of species in the genus. The protein patterns correlated well with the available DNA homology data and with most accepted differential tests. Results indicated that several earlier names for species were synonyms of those of accepted species and that two accepted species may be synonymous. Images PMID:6175658

  13. Design Modification of Electrophoretic Equipment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reddick, J. M.; Hirsch, I.

    1973-01-01

    The improved design of a zone electrophoretic sampler is reported that can be used in mass screening for hemoglobin S, the cause of sickle cell anemia. Considered is a high voltage multicell cellulose acetate device that requires 5 to 6 minutes electrophoresis periods; cells may be activitated individually or simultaneously. A multisample hemoglobin applicator standardizes the amount of sample applied and transfers the homolysate to the electrical wires.

  14. New directions in electrophoretic methods

    SciTech Connect

    Forgensen, J.W.; Phillips, M.

    1987-01-01

    This text presents the state of art of electrophoretic technology and applications. Included are electrophoresis in polyacrylamide gels; immobilized pH gradients; rehydratable polyacrylamide gels; silver-stain detection of proteins; color silver staining of polypeptides; electrophoresis and electrofocusing standards; standardization in isoelectric focusing, high-resolution, two-dimensional electrophoresis; applications of isoelectric focusing; agarose gel electrophoresis; pulsed electrophoresis; capillary zone electrophoresis; capillary isotachophoresis; isotachophoresis of synthetic ion-containing polymers; and preparative electrophoresis.

  15. Mobilizing and Activating Group Demands: The American Agriculture Movement.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Browne, William P.

    1983-01-01

    An analysis of the American agriculture movement begun in 1977 provides insight into group behavior, mobilization, and activation. Leaders who had recruited participants and organized local and state activities were interviewed. Problems of organizing, specifically when protest is involved, are also discussed. (KC)

  16. Recent patents on electrophoretic displays and materials.

    PubMed

    Christophersen, Marc; Phlips, Bernard F

    2010-11-01

    Electrophoretic displays (EPDs) have made their way into consumer products. EPDs enable displays that offer the look and form of a printed page, often called "electronic paper". We will review recent apparatus and method patents for EPD devices and their fabrication. A brief introduction into the basic display operation and history of EPDs is given, while pointing out the technological challenges and difficulties for inventors. Recently, the majority of scientific publications and patenting activity has been directed to micro-segmented EPDs. These devices exhibit high optical reflectance and contrast, wide viewing angle, and high image resolution. Micro-segmented EPDs can also be integrated with flexible transistors technologies into flexible displays. Typical particles size ranges from 200 nm to 2 micrometer. Currently one very active area of patenting is the development of full-color EPDs. We summarize the recent patenting activity for EPDs and provide comments on perceiving factors driving intellectual property protection for EPD technologies.

  17. Preparation of Panel and Charged Particles for Electrophoretic Display

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Choi, Hyung Suk; Park, Jin Woo; Park, Lee Soon; Lee, Jung Kyung; Han, Yoon Soo; Kwon, Younghwan

    Studies on the formulation of photosensitive paste for transparent soft mold press (TSMP) method have been performed. With the optimum formulation of the photosensitive paste the box-type barrier rib with good flexibility and high solvent resistance was fabricated, suitable for the panel material of the electrophoretic display. Cationically-charged white particles were prepared by using TiO2 nanoparticles, silane coupling agent with amino groups, dispersant and acetic acid. The cationically charged TiO2 particles exhibited 74.09 mV of zeta potential and 3.11 × 10-5 cm2/Vs of mobility. Electrophoretic display fabricated with the charged TiO2 particles exhibited 10 V of low driving voltage and maximum contrast ratio (5.3/1) at 30 V.

  18. Electrophoretic separator for purifying biologicals

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1975-01-01

    Mathematical expressions were developed to describe the interrelationships between operating requirements (capabilities), cell parameters, and system constraints in terms of design criteria definition. The mathematical model was programmed for computer solution. The model was exercised to identify performance-limiting characteristics, and analyses were conducted to predict operation in space of an experiment involving separation of four components. An engineering model of a flowing electrophoretic separator was constructed. The design is directed toward verifying improvements in resolution and throughput of a thicker cell than can be used on earth.

  19. [The NAS system: Nursing Activities Score in mobile technology].

    PubMed

    Catalan, Vanessa Menezes; Silveira, Denise Tolfo; Neutzling, Agnes Ludwig; Martinato, Luísa Helena Machado; Borges, Gilberto Cabral de Mello

    2011-12-01

    The objective of this study was to present the computerized structure that enables the use of the Nursing Activities Score (NAS) in mobile technology. It is a project for the development of technology production based on software engineering, founded on the theory of systems development life cycle. The NAS system was built in two modules: the search module, which is accessed using a personal computer (PC), and Data Collection module, which is accessed through a mobile device (Smartphone). The NAS system was constructed to allow other forms, in addition to the NAS tool, to be included in the future. Thus, it is understood that the development of the NAS will bring nurses closer to mobile technology and facilitate their accessibility to the data of the instrument relating to patients, thus assisting in decision-making and in staffing to provide nursing care.

  20. A survey of online activity recognition using mobile phones.

    PubMed

    Shoaib, Muhammad; Bosch, Stephan; Incel, Ozlem Durmaz; Scholten, Hans; Havinga, Paul J M

    2015-01-19

    Physical activity recognition using embedded sensors has enabled many context-aware applications in different areas, such as healthcare. Initially, one or more dedicated wearable sensors were used for such applications. However, recently, many researchers started using mobile phones for this purpose, since these ubiquitous devices are equipped with various sensors, ranging from accelerometers to magnetic field sensors. In most of the current studies, sensor data collected for activity recognition are analyzed offline using machine learning tools. However, there is now a trend towards implementing activity recognition systems on these devices in an online manner, since modern mobile phones have become more powerful in terms of available resources, such as CPU, memory and battery. The research on offline activity recognition has been reviewed in several earlier studies in detail. However, work done on online activity recognition is still in its infancy and is yet to be reviewed. In this paper, we review the studies done so far that implement activity recognition systems on mobile phones and use only their on-board sensors. We discuss various aspects of these studies. Moreover, we discuss their limitations and present various recommendations for future research.

  1. Electrophoretic separator for purifying biologicals, part 1

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mccreight, L. R.

    1978-01-01

    A program to develop an engineering model of an electrophoretic separator for purifying biologicals is summarized. An extensive mathematical modeling study and numerous ground based tests were included. Focus was placed on developing an actual electrophoretic separator of the continuous flow type, configured and suitable for flight testing as a space processing applications rocket payload.

  2. Electrophoretic separation of kidney and pituitary cells on STS-8

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Morrison, D. R.; Nachtwey, D. S.; Barlow, G. H.; Cleveland, C.; Lanham, J. W.; Farrington, M. A.; Hatfield, J. M.; Hymer, W. C.; Grindeland, R.; Lewis, M. L.

    1984-01-01

    Specific secretory cells were separated from suspensions of cultured primary human embryonic cells and rat pituitary cells in microgravity conditions, with an objective of isolating the subfractions of kidney cells that produce the largest amount of urakinase, and the subfractions of rat pituitary cells that secrete growth hormones (GH), prolactin (PRL), and other hormones. It is inferred from the experimental observations that the surface charge distributions of the GH-containing cells differ from those of the PRL-containing cells, which is explained by the presence of secretory products on the surface of pituitary cells. For kidney cells, the electrophoretic mobility distributions in flight experiments were spread more than the ground controls.

  3. Inferring Human Activity in Mobile Devices by Computing Multiple Contexts.

    PubMed

    Chen, Ruizhi; Chu, Tianxing; Liu, Keqiang; Liu, Jingbin; Chen, Yuwei

    2015-08-28

    This paper introduces a framework for inferring human activities in mobile devices by computing spatial contexts, temporal contexts, spatiotemporal contexts, and user contexts. A spatial context is a significant location that is defined as a geofence, which can be a node associated with a circle, or a polygon; a temporal context contains time-related information that can be e.g., a local time tag, a time difference between geographical locations, or a timespan; a spatiotemporal context is defined as a dwelling length at a particular spatial context; and a user context includes user-related information that can be the user's mobility contexts, environmental contexts, psychological contexts or social contexts. Using the measurements of the built-in sensors and radio signals in mobile devices, we can snapshot a contextual tuple for every second including aforementioned contexts. Giving a contextual tuple, the framework evaluates the posteriori probability of each candidate activity in real-time using a Naïve Bayes classifier. A large dataset containing 710,436 contextual tuples has been recorded for one week from an experiment carried out at Texas A&M University Corpus Christi with three participants. The test results demonstrate that the multi-context solution significantly outperforms the spatial-context-only solution. A classification accuracy of 61.7% is achieved for the spatial-context-only solution, while 88.8% is achieved for the multi-context solution.

  4. Inferring Human Activity in Mobile Devices by Computing Multiple Contexts

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Ruizhi; Chu, Tianxing; Liu, Keqiang; Liu, Jingbin; Chen, Yuwei

    2015-01-01

    This paper introduces a framework for inferring human activities in mobile devices by computing spatial contexts, temporal contexts, spatiotemporal contexts, and user contexts. A spatial context is a significant location that is defined as a geofence, which can be a node associated with a circle, or a polygon; a temporal context contains time-related information that can be e.g., a local time tag, a time difference between geographical locations, or a timespan; a spatiotemporal context is defined as a dwelling length at a particular spatial context; and a user context includes user-related information that can be the user’s mobility contexts, environmental contexts, psychological contexts or social contexts. Using the measurements of the built-in sensors and radio signals in mobile devices, we can snapshot a contextual tuple for every second including aforementioned contexts. Giving a contextual tuple, the framework evaluates the posteriori probability of each candidate activity in real-time using a Naïve Bayes classifier. A large dataset containing 710,436 contextual tuples has been recorded for one week from an experiment carried out at Texas A&M University Corpus Christi with three participants. The test results demonstrate that the multi-context solution significantly outperforms the spatial-context-only solution. A classification accuracy of 61.7% is achieved for the spatial-context-only solution, while 88.8% is achieved for the multi-context solution. PMID:26343665

  5. Automated Parallel Capillary Electrophoretic System

    DOEpatents

    Li, Qingbo; Kane, Thomas E.; Liu, Changsheng; Sonnenschein, Bernard; Sharer, Michael V.; Kernan, John R.

    2000-02-22

    An automated electrophoretic system is disclosed. The system employs a capillary cartridge having a plurality of capillary tubes. The cartridge has a first array of capillary ends projecting from one side of a plate. The first array of capillary ends are spaced apart in substantially the same manner as the wells of a microtitre tray of standard size. This allows one to simultaneously perform capillary electrophoresis on samples present in each of the wells of the tray. The system includes a stacked, dual carousel arrangement to eliminate cross-contamination resulting from reuse of the same buffer tray on consecutive executions from electrophoresis. The system also has a gel delivery module containing a gel syringe/a stepper motor or a high pressure chamber with a pump to quickly and uniformly deliver gel through the capillary tubes. The system further includes a multi-wavelength beam generator to generate a laser beam which produces a beam with a wide range of wavelengths. An off-line capillary reconditioner thoroughly cleans a capillary cartridge to enable simultaneous execution of electrophoresis with another capillary cartridge. The streamlined nature of the off-line capillary reconditioner offers the advantage of increased system throughput with a minimal increase in system cost.

  6. Particle separations by electrophoretic techniques

    SciTech Connect

    Ballou, N.E.; Petersen, S.L.; Ducatte, G.R.; Remcho, V.T.

    1996-03-01

    A new method for particle separations based on capillary electrophoresis has been developed and characterized. It uniquely separates particles according to their chemical nature. Separations have been demonstrated with chemically modified latex particles and with inorganic oxide and silicate particles. Separations have been shown both experimentally and theoretically to be essentially independent of particle size in the range of about 0.2 {mu}m to 10 {mu}m. The method has been applied to separations of U0{sub 2} particles from environmental particulate material. For this, an integrated method was developed for capillary electrophoretic separation, collection of separated fractions, and determinations of U0{sub 2} and environmental particles in each fraction. Experimental runs with the integrated method on mixtures of UO{sub 2} particles and environmental particulate material demonstrated enrichment factors of 20 for UO{sub 2} particles in respect to environmental particles in the U0{sub 2}containing fractions. This enrichment factor reduces the costs and time for processing particulate samples by the lexan process by a factor of about 20.

  7. CAPILLARY ELECTROPHORETIC BEHAVIOR OF SEVEN SULFONYLUREAS

    EPA Science Inventory

    The electrophoretic behavior of bensulfuron Me, sulfometuron Me, nicosulfuron (Accent), chlorimuron Et, thifensulfuron Me (Harmony), metsulfuron Me, and chlorsulfuron was studied under capillary zone electrophoresis (CZE) and micellar electrokinetic chromatography (MEKC) conditio...

  8. Active control of excessive sound emission on a mobile device.

    PubMed

    Jeon, Se-Woon; Youn, Dae Hee; Park, Young-cheol; Lee, Gun-Woo

    2015-04-01

    During a phone conversation, loud vocal emission from the far-end to the near-end space can disturb nearby people. In this paper, the possibility of actively controlling such unwanted sound emission using a control source placed on the mobile device is investigated. Two different approaches are tested: Global control, minimizing the potential energy measured along a volumetric space surface, and local control, minimizing the squared sound pressure at a discrete point on the phone. From the test results, both approaches can reduce the unwanted sound emission by more than 6 dB in the frequency range up to 2 kHz.

  9. Multi-carrier mobile TDMA system with active array antenna

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Suzuki, Ryutaro; Matsumoto, Yasushi; Hamamoto, Naokazu

    1990-01-01

    A multi-carrier time division multiple access (TDMA) is proposed for the future mobile satellite communications systems that include a multi-satellite system. This TDMA system employs the active array antenna in which the digital beam forming technique is adopted to control the antenna beam direction. The antenna beam forming is carried out at the base band frequency by using the digital signal processing technique. The time division duplex technique is applied for the TDM/TDMA burst format, in order not to overlap transmit and receive timing.

  10. Mobile health: a synopsis and comment on "Increasing physical activity with mobile devices: a meta-analysis".

    PubMed

    Johnston, Winter; Hoffman, Sara; Thornton, Louise

    2014-03-01

    We offer a synopsis and commentary on J. Fanning and colleagues' article "Increasing Physical Activity with Mobile Devices: A Meta-Analysis" published in the Journal of Medical Internet Research. Although regular physical activity has a range of benefits, very few adults in the USA meet recommended guidelines for daily physical activity. The meta-analysis of Fanning et al. (2012) aimed to synthesize the results of research using mobile devices to increase physical activity. Their review identified 11 studies that used mobile technologies, including short message service (SMS), apps, or personal digital assistant (PDA) to improve physical activity behaviors among participants. Fanning et al. conclude that while literature in this area is limited to date, there is initial support for the efficacy of mobile-based interventions for improving physical activity. Included studies varied greatly, and the majority used only SMS to influence physical behaviors, meaning generalization of results to other forms of mobile technologies may be premature. This review does, however, provide a foundation for understanding how mobile-based interventions may be used efficaciously for the development of future interventions to improve health behaviors.

  11. Energy-efficiency testing activities of the Mobile Energy Laboratory

    SciTech Connect

    Parker, G.B.

    1991-01-01

    This report summarizes energy-efficiency testing activities during the first and second quarters of fiscal year 1990 applying the Mobile Energy Laboratory (MEL) testing capabilities. Four MELs, developed by the US Department of Energy (DOE) Federal Energy Management Program (FEMP), are administered by Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) for energy testing and program support functions at federal facilities. The using agencies principally fund MEL applications, while DOE/FEMP funds program administration and capability enhancement activities. This report fulfills the requirements established in the MEL Use Plan (PNL-6861) for semiannual reporting on energy-efficiency testing activities using the MEL capabilities. The MEL Use Committee, formally established in 1989, developed the MEL Use Plan and meets semiannually to establish priorities for energy-efficient testing applications using the MEL capabilities.

  12. [Activity, physical and psychological mobility in old age].

    PubMed

    Voelcker-Rehage, C; Godde, B; Staudinger, U M

    2006-06-01

    Old age and aging are accompanied by a number of physical and mental changes. However, these so-called age-dependent processes are not exclusively genetically determined or irreversible but can be partially delayed, prevented, or compensated and some can even be reversed. The goal of this article is to highlight the plasticity, or the "mobility", of physical and mental aging. We will point out in what respects an appropriate lifestyle or purposeful interventions can positively influence the reserve capacity of aging human beings and the aging process. Using the example of physical activity, we will illustrate how we can influence physiological development, cognitive performance, longevity, as well as the development and the occurrence of chronic diseases. Additionally, it is shown that cognitive development is malleable as well. It is facilitated or debilitated by behavior and activity-this covers not only cognitive but also physical activity. It is our particular concern to demonstrate the close interconnectedness of body and mind.

  13. Does small-bodied salmon spawning activity enhance streambed mobility?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hassan, Marwan A.; Tonina, Daniele; Buxton, Todd H.

    2015-09-01

    Female salmonids bury and lay their eggs in streambeds by digging a pit, which is then covered with sediment from a second pit that is dug immediately upstream. The spawning process alters streambed topography, winnows fine sediment, and mixes sediment in the active layer. The resulting egg nests (redds) contain coarser and looser sediments than those of unspawned streambed areas, and display a dune-like shape with an amplitude and length that vary with fish size, substrate conditions, and flow conditions. Redds increase local bed surface roughness (<10-1 channel width, W), but may reduce the size of macro bedforms by eroding reach-scale topography (100-101W). Research has suggested that spawning may increase flow resistance due to redd form drag, resulting in lower grain shear stress and less particle mobility. Spawning, also prevents streambed armoring by mixing surface and subsurface material, potentially increasing particle mobility. Here we use two-dimensional hydraulic modeling with detailed prespawning and postspawning bathymetries and field observations to test the effect of spawning by small-bodied salmonids on sediment transport. Our results show that topographical roughness from small salmon redds has negligible effects on shear stress at the reach-unit scale, and limited effects at the local scale. Conversely, results indicate sediment mixing reduces armoring and enhances sediment mobility, which increases potential bed load transport by subsequent floods. River restoration in fish-bearing streams should take into consideration the effects of redd excavation on channel stability. This is particularly important for streams that historically supported salmonids and are the focus of habitat restoration actions.

  14. Emerging Vocabulary Learning: From a Perspective of Activities Facilitated by Mobile Devices

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hu, Zengning

    2013-01-01

    This paper examines the current mobile vocabulary learning practice to discover how far mobile devices are being used to support vocabulary learning. An activity-centered perspective is undertaken, with the consideration of new practice against existing theories of learning activities including behaviorist activities, constructivist activities,…

  15. Mobilization

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1987-01-01

    istic and romantic emotionalism that typifies this genre. Longino, James C., et al. “A Study of World War Procurement and Industrial Mobilization...States. Harrisburg, PA: Military Service Publishing Co., 1941. CARL 355.22 J72b. Written in rough prose , this World War II era document explains the

  16. Study of the Electrophoretic Behavior of Cephalosporins by Capillary Zone Electrophoresis

    PubMed Central

    Hancu, Gabriel; Sasebeşi, Adina; Rusu, Aura; Kelemen, Hajnal; Ciurba, Adriana

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: The aim of the study was the characterization of the electrophoretic behavior of cephalosporins from different generation having different structural characteristics in order to develop a rapid, simple and efficient capillary electrophoretic method for their identification and simultaneous separation from complex mixtures. Methods: Ten cephalosporin derivatives (cefaclor, cefadroxil, cefalexin, cefazolin, cefoxitin, cefuroxime, cefoperazone, cefotaxime, ceftazidime, ceftriaxone) were analyzed by capillary zone electrophoresis using different background electrolyte solutions at different pH values. Electrophoretic mobilities of the analytes were calculated, the influence of the electrophoretic parameteres on the separation was established and the analytical conditions were optimized. Results: Taking into consideration their structural and chemical properties cephalosporins can be detected over a pH range between 6 and 10. The best results were obtained using a buffer solution containing 25 mM disodium hydrogenophosphate - 25 mM sodium dihydrogenophosphate, at a pH – 7.00, + 25 kV voltage at a temperature of 25 °C, UV detection at 210 nm. Using the optimized analytical conditions we achieved the simultaneous baseline separation for seven cephalosporins in less then 10 minutes. Conclusion: Using the described optimized electrophoretic procedures, capillary electrophoresis can be used for the identification and determination of cephalosporins in formulated pharmaceutical products and for their separation from complex mixtures. PMID:26236661

  17. Photon Correlation Spectroscopy and Electrophoretic Light Scattering Using Optical Fibres.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    MacFadyen, Allan John

    Available from UMI in association with The British Library. In photon correlation spectroscopy, the fast local fluctuations in the intensity of the light scattered by submicron particles in suspension are recorded and analysed in terms of the particle motion. These may then be related to the particle size, or, when the particles are subjected to an electric field, the electrophoretic mobility. Light scattering apparatus traditionally incorporates a fixed goniometer arrangement. Recently, however, systems have been reported which incorporate optical fibres for use in remote or on-line situations. In this thesis, recent advances in the development of fibre-based photon correlation systems are reviewed and the design and construction of two novel optical fibre apparatus prototypes, incorporating "SELFOC" lenses, miniature prisms and single mode detection fibre, is discussed. The final outcome, an optical fibre sensor, which combines both photon correlation and electrophoretic light scattering measurements in a single, compact dip -in probe for the first time, is described. Results are presented for a variety of colloidal particles in suspension including polystyrene and "Microsilica" spheres, PTFE ellipsoids and kaolinite platelets, all of which demonstrate the viability of the apparatus.

  18. Activity Recognition and Semantic Description for Indoor Mobile Localization

    PubMed Central

    Guo, Sheng; Xiong, Hanjiang; Zheng, Xianwei; Zhou, Yan

    2017-01-01

    As a result of the rapid development of smartphone-based indoor localization technology, location-based services in indoor spaces have become a topic of interest. However, to date, the rich data resulting from indoor localization and navigation applications have not been fully exploited, which is significant for trajectory correction and advanced indoor map information extraction. In this paper, an integrated location acquisition method utilizing activity recognition and semantic information extraction is proposed for indoor mobile localization. The location acquisition method combines pedestrian dead reckoning (PDR), human activity recognition (HAR) and landmarks to acquire accurate indoor localization information. Considering the problem of initial position determination, a hidden Markov model (HMM) is utilized to infer the user’s initial position. To provide an improved service for further applications, the landmarks are further assigned semantic descriptions by detecting the user’s activities. The experiments conducted in this study confirm that a high degree of accuracy for a user’s indoor location can be obtained. Furthermore, the semantic information of a user’s trajectories can be extracted, which is extremely useful for further research into indoor location applications. PMID:28335555

  19. Evidence for segmental mobility in the active site of pepsin

    SciTech Connect

    Pohl, J.; Strop, P.; Senn, H.; Foundling, S.; Kostka, V.

    1986-05-01

    The low hydrolytic activity (k/sub cat/ < 0.001 s/sup -1/) of chicken pepsin (CP) towards tri- and tetrapeptides is enhanced at least 100 times by modification of its single sulfhydryl group of Cys-115, with little effect on K/sub m/-values. Modification thus simulates the effect of secondary substrate binding on pepsin catalysis. The rate of Cys-115 modification is substantially decreased in the presence of some competitive inhibitors, suggesting its active site location. Experiments with CP alkylated at Cys-115 with Acrylodan as a fluorescent probe or with N-iodoacetyl-(4-fluoro)-aniline as a /sup 19/F-nmr probe suggest conformation change around Cys-115 to occur on substrate or substrate analog binding. The difference /sup 1/H-nmr spectra (500 MHz) of unmodified free and inhibitor-complexed CP reveal chemical shifts almost exclusively in the aromatic region. The effects of Cu/sup + +/ on /sup 19/F- and /sup 1/H-nmr spectra have been studied. Examination of a computer graphics model of CP based on E. parasitica pepsin-inhibitor complex X-ray coordinates suggests that Cys-115 is located near the S/sub 3//S/sub 5/ binding site. The results are interpreted in favor of segmental mobility of this region important for pepsin substrate binding and catalysis.

  20. Combined electrophoretic-separation and electrospray method and system

    DOEpatents

    Smith, R.D.; Olivares, J.A.

    1989-06-27

    A system and method for analyzing molecular constituents of a composition sample includes: forming a solution of the sample, separating the solution by capillary zone electrophoresis into an eluent of constituents longitudinally separated according to their relative electrophoretic mobilities, electrospraying the eluent to form a charged spray in which the molecular constituents have a temporal distribution; and detecting or collecting the separated constituents in accordance with the temporal distribution in the spray. A first high-voltage (e.g., 5--100 kVDC) is applied to the solution. The spray is charged by applying a second high voltage (e.g., [+-]2--8 kVDC) between the eluent at the capillary exit and a cathode spaced in front of the exit. A complete electrical circuit is formed by a conductor which directly contacts the eluent at the capillary exit. 10 figs.

  1. A simplified electrophoretic system for determining molecular weights of proteins.

    PubMed

    Manwell, C

    1977-09-01

    Electrophoresis of 31 different proteins in commercially prepared polyacrylamide gradient gels, Gradipore, yields a linear relationship between a hypothetical limiting pore size (the reciprocal of a limiting gel concentration, GL) and the cube root of the mol.wt., over the range 13 500-9000 000. A regression analysis of these data reveals that 98.6% of all variability in 1/GL is explained by the molecular weight, and this degree of accuracy compares favourably with existing methods for the determination of molecular weight by retardation of mobility in polyacrylamide. This new procedure has the additional advantages that molecular-weight standards can be obtained from readily available body fluids or tissue extracts by localizing enzymes and other proteins by standard histochemical methods, and that the same electrophoretic system can be used in determining molecular weights as is used in routine surveys of populations for individual and species variation in protein heterogeneity.

  2. Combined electrophoretic-separation and electrospray method and system

    DOEpatents

    Smith, Richard D.; Olivares, Jose A.

    1989-01-01

    A system and method for analyzing molecular constituents of a composition sample includes: forming a solution of the sample, separating the solution by capillary zone electrophoresis into an eluent of constituents longitudinally separated according to their relative electrophoretic mobilities, electrospraying the eluent to form a charged spray in which the molecular constituents have a temporal distribution; and detecting or collecting the separated constituents in accordance with the temporal distribution in the spray. A first high-voltage (e.g., 5-100 KVDC) is applied to the solution. The spray is charged by applying a second high voltage (e.g., .+-.2-8 KVDC) between the eluent at the capillary exit and a cathode spaced in front of the exit. A complete electrical circuit is formed by a conductor which directly contacts the eluent at the capillary exit.

  3. Molecular Dynamics Simulations Illuminate the Role of Counterion Condensation in the Electrophoretic Transport of Homogalacturonans.

    PubMed

    Irani, Amir H; Owen, Jessie L; Mercadante, Davide; Williams, Martin A K

    2017-02-13

    Homogalacturonans (HGs) are polysaccharide copolymers of galacturonic acid and its methylesterified counterpart. The inter- and intramolecular distributions of the methylesterifed residues are vital behavior-determining characteristics of a sample's structure, and much experimental effort has been directed to their measurement. While many techniques are able to measure the sample-averaged degree of methylesterification (DM), the measurement of inter- and intramolecular charge distributions are challenging. Here, molecular dynamics (MD) simulations are used to calculate the electrophoretic mobilities of HGs that have different amounts and distributions of charges placed along the backbone. The simulations are shown to capture experimental results well, even for low-DM samples that possess high charge densities. In addition, they illuminate the role that local counterion condensation can play in the determination of the electrophoretic mobility of heterogeneous blocky polyelectrolytes that cannot be adequately described by a single chain-averaged charge spacing.

  4. Electrophoretic purification of cells in space - Evaluation of results from STS-3

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sarnoff, B. E.; Kunze, M. E.; Todd, P.

    1983-01-01

    The procedure and results of Electrophoresis Equipment Verification Test, designed to examine electrophoretic behavior of animal cells is suspension more concentrated than possible on earth and flown on the Shuttle flight STS-3, were discussed. Ground-based laboratory values of electrophoretic mobilities of a mixture of human and rabbit aldehyde-fixed red blood cells (RBC) were compared with those recorded at 11 minute intervals on the Shuttle STS-3. RBC migration and separation observed through photographic records were not as expected. However, cell mobilities and migrating band profiles were consistent with the results of laboratory simulation experiments. It was concluded that zero G electrophoresis of very high concentrations (1 x 10 to the 9th) is possible and similar to electrophoresis of normal cell concentrations on earth.

  5. Eccentric electrophoretic motion of a rectangular particle in a rectangular microchannel.

    PubMed

    Li, Dongquing; Daghighi, Yasaman

    2010-02-15

    Understanding of the effects of the boundary - the channel walls - on the electrophoretic motion of particles in microchannels is very important. This paper developed an analytical solution of the electrophoretic mobility for eccentric motion of a rectangular particle in a rectangular microchannel. The simple geometry of the system does not limit the generality of the qualitative prediction of the model and the analytical solution. Several special cases are studied, and the effects of the degree of the eccentricity, the particle's size relative to the channel's size, and the relative zeta potentials on the particle's mobility are discussed. For the case where the particle's cross-section area is close to the cross-section area of the microchannel, the model's predictions are compared with the published experimental results and good agreement was found.

  6. 21 CFR 864.7440 - Electrophoretic hemoglobin analysis system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Electrophoretic hemoglobin analysis system. 864....7440 Electrophoretic hemoglobin analysis system. (a) Identification. An electrophoretic hemoglobin... hemoglobin types as an aid in the diagnosis of anemia or erythrocytosis (increased total red cell mass)...

  7. 21 CFR 864.7440 - Electrophoretic hemoglobin analysis system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Electrophoretic hemoglobin analysis system. 864....7440 Electrophoretic hemoglobin analysis system. (a) Identification. An electrophoretic hemoglobin... hemoglobin types as an aid in the diagnosis of anemia or erythrocytosis (increased total red cell mass)...

  8. 21 CFR 864.7440 - Electrophoretic hemoglobin analysis system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Electrophoretic hemoglobin analysis system. 864....7440 Electrophoretic hemoglobin analysis system. (a) Identification. An electrophoretic hemoglobin... hemoglobin types as an aid in the diagnosis of anemia or erythrocytosis (increased total red cell mass)...

  9. 21 CFR 864.7440 - Electrophoretic hemoglobin analysis system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Electrophoretic hemoglobin analysis system. 864....7440 Electrophoretic hemoglobin analysis system. (a) Identification. An electrophoretic hemoglobin... hemoglobin types as an aid in the diagnosis of anemia or erythrocytosis (increased total red cell mass)...

  10. 21 CFR 864.7440 - Electrophoretic hemoglobin analysis system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Electrophoretic hemoglobin analysis system. 864....7440 Electrophoretic hemoglobin analysis system. (a) Identification. An electrophoretic hemoglobin... hemoglobin types as an aid in the diagnosis of anemia or erythrocytosis (increased total red cell mass)...

  11. The Effectiveness of WhatsApp Mobile Learning Activities Guided by Activity Theory on Students' Knowledge Management

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Barhoumi, Chokri

    2015-01-01

    This research paper explores the effectiveness of using mobile technologies to support a blended learning course titled Scientific Research Methods in Information Science. Specifically, it discusses the effects of WhatsApp mobile learning activities guided by activity theory on students' knowledge Management (KM). During the 2014 academic year,…

  12. A poly(dA-dT) upstream activating sequence binds high-mobility group I protein and contributes to lymphotoxin (tumor necrosis factor-beta) gene regulation.

    PubMed Central

    Fashena, S J; Reeves, R; Ruddle, N H

    1992-01-01

    Lymphotoxin (LT; also known as tumor necrosis factor-beta) is a pleiotropic cytokine whose expression is tightly regulated in most cells and is repressed prior to activation signals. In some early B cells and Abelson murine leukemia virus-transformed pre-B-cell lines, LT mRNA is constitutively expressed. To examine the molecular regulation of the LT gene in a constitutively expressing cell line, we studied the Abelson murine leukemia virus-transformed lines PD and PD31. As demonstrated by primer extension analysis, constitutively expressed pre-B-cell-derived and inducibly expressed T-cell-derived LT mRNA were initiated at the same cap sites and predominant cap site utilization was conserved. Furthermore, we delineated an upstream activating sequence that was an important functional component of lymphotoxin transcriptional activation in PD and PD31 cells. The upstream activating sequence was localized to an essentially homopolymeric A + T-rich region (LT-612/-580), which was bound specifically by recombinant human high-mobility group I protein (HMG-I) and a PD/PD31 nuclear extract HMG-I (HMG-I-like) protein. The nuclear extract-derived HMG-I-like protein was recognized by anti-HMG-I antibody and bound to LT DNA to effect an electrophoretic mobility shift identical to that of bound recombinant human HMG-I. These findings implicate HMG-I in the regulation of constitutive lymphotoxin gene expression in PD and PD31 cells. HMG-I and HMG-I-like proteins could facilitate the formation of active initiation complexes by altering chromatin structure and/or by creating recognition sites for other activator DNA-binding proteins, some of which may be unique to or uniquely modified in these constitutive LT mRNA producers. Images PMID:1732752

  13. Active objects programming for military autonomous mobile robots software prototyping

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cozien, Roger F.

    2001-09-01

    While designing mobile robots, we do think that the prototyping phase is really critical. Good and clever choices have to be made. Indeed, we may not easily upgrade such robots, and most of all, when the robot is on its own, any change in both the software and the physical body is going to be very difficult, if not impossible. Thus, a great effort has to be made when prototyping the robot. Furthermore, I think that the kind of programming is very important. If your programming model is not expressive enough, you may experience a great deal of difficulties to add all the features you want, in order to give your robot reactiveness and decision making autonomy. Moreover, designing, and prototyping the on-board software of a reactive robot brings other difficulties. A reactive robot does not include any matter of rapidity. A reactive system is a system able to respond to a huge pannel of situations of which it does not have the schedule. In other words, for instance, the robot does not know when a particular situation may occur, and overall, what it would be doing at this time, and what would be its internal state. This kind of robot must be able to take a decision and to act even if they do not have all the contextual information. To do so, we use a computer language named oRis featuring object and active object oriented programming, but also parallel and dynamic code, (the code can be changed during its own execution). This last point has been made possible because oRis is fully interpreted. However oRis may call fully compiled code, but also Prolog and Java code. An oRis program may be distributed on several computers using TCP/IP network connections. The main issue in this paper is to show how active objet oriented programming, as a modern extension of object oriented programming, may help us in designing autonomous mobile robots. Based on a fully parallel software programming, an active object code allows us to give many features to a robot, and to easily solve

  14. Active object programming for military autonomous mobile robot software prototyping

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cozien, Roger F.

    2001-10-01

    While designing mobile robots, we do think that the prototyping phase is really critical. Good and clever choices have to be made. Indeed, we may not easily upgrade such robots, and most of all, when the robot is on its own, any change in both the software and the physical body is going to be very difficult, if not impossible. Thus, a great effort has to be made when prototyping the robot. Furthermore, I think that the kind of programming is very important. If your programming model is not expressive enough, you may experience a great deal of difficulties to add all the features you want, in order to give your robot reactiveness and decision making autonomy. Moreover, designing, and prototyping the on-board software of a reactive robot brings other difficulties. A reactive robot does not include any matter of rapidity. A reactive system is a system able to respond to a huge panel of situations of which it does not have the schedule. In other words, for instance, the robot does not know when a particular situation may occur, and overall, what it would be doing at this time, and what would be its internal state. This kind of robot must be able to take a decision and to act even if they do not have all the contextual information. To do so, we use a computer language named oRis featuring object and active object oriented programming, but also parallel and dynamic code, (the code can be changed during its own execution). This last point has been made possible because oRis is fully interpreted. However oRis may call fully compiled code, but also Prolog and Java code. An oRis program may be distributed on several computers using TCP/IP network connections. The main issue in this paper is to show how active objet oriented programming, as a modern extension of object oriented programming, may help us in designing autonomous mobile robots. Based on a fully parallel software programming, an active object code allows us to give many features to a robot, and to easily solve

  15. Impaired voluntary neuromuscular activation limits muscle power in mobility-limited older adults

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Background. Age-related alterations of neuromuscular activation may contribute to deficits in muscle power and mobility function. This study assesses whether impaired activation of the agonist quadriceps and antagonist hamstrings, including amplitude- and velocity-dependent characteristics of activa...

  16. Effect of structured physical activity on respiratory outcomes in sedentary elderly adults with mobility limitations

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    OBJECTIVES: To evaluate the effect of structured physical activity on respiratory outcomes in community dwelling elderly adults with mobility limitations. DESIGN: Multicenter, randomized trial of physical activity vs health education, with respiratory variables prespecified as tertiary outcomes over...

  17. Brownian dynamics simulations of electrophoretic DNA separations in a sparse ordered post array.

    PubMed

    Cho, Jaeseol; Dorfman, Kevin D

    2010-08-20

    We use Brownian dynamics simulations to analyze the electrophoretic separation of lambda-DNA (48.5kbp) and T4-DNA (169kbp) in a hexagonal array of 1microm diameter posts with a 3microm center-to-center distance. The simulation method takes advantage of an efficient interpolation algorithm for the non-uniform electric field to reach an ensemble size (100 molecules) and simulation length scale (1mm) that produces meaningful results for the average electrophoretic mobility and effective diffusion (dispersion) coefficient of these macromolecules as they move through the array. While the simulated electrophoretic mobility for lambda-DNA is close to the experimental data, the simulation underestimates the magnitude of the corresponding dispersion coefficient. The simulations predict baseline resolution in a 15mm device after 7min using an electric field around 30V/cm, with the resolution increasing exponentially as the electric field further decreases. The mobility and dispersivity data point out two essential phenomena that have been overlooked in previous models of DNA electrophoresis in post arrays: the relaxation time between collisions and simultaneous collisions with multiple posts.

  18. Activation energy associated with the electromigration of oligosaccharides through viscosity modifier and polymeric additive containing background electrolytes.

    PubMed

    Kerékgyártó, Márta; Járvás, Gábor; Novák, Levente; Guttman, András

    2016-02-01

    The activation energy related to the electromigration of oligosaccharides can be determined from their measured electrophoretic mobilities at different temperatures. The effects of a viscosity modifier (ethylene glycol) and a polymeric additive (linear polyacrylamide) on the electrophoretic mobility of linear sugar oligomers with α1-4 linked glucose units (maltooligosaccharides) were studied in CE using the activation energy concept. The electrophoretic separations of 8-aminopyrene-1,3,6-trisulfonate-labeled maltooligosaccharides were monitored by LIF detection in the temperature range of 20-50°C, using either 0-60% ethylene glycol (viscosity modifier) or 0-3% linear polyacrylamide (polymeric additive) containing BGEs. Activation energy curves were constructed based on the slopes of the Arrhenius plots. With the use of linear polyacrylamide additive, solute size-dependent activation energy variations were found for the maltooligosaccharides with polymerization degrees below and above maltoheptaose (DP 7), probably due to molecular conformation changes and possible matrix interaction effects.

  19. SEM Analysis of Electrophoretically-Deposited Nanoparticle Films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Verma, Neil

    Cobalt ferrite nanoparticles (20 nm) were synthesized and electrophoretically deposited onto aluminum foil, graphite paper, and carbon felt in order to study its potential as a cost-effective electrocatalyst for the oxidation of ammonium sulfite to ammonium sulfate in a proposed sulfur ammonia thermochemical cycle. Scanning electron microscopy and linear sweep voltammetry were used to characterize the deposited films and investigate their electrochemical activity. Furthermore, the effects of electrophoretic deposition conditions on deposit morphology and subsequently the effects of deposit morphology on electrochemical activity in 2 M ammonium sulfite were studied to better understand how to improve electrocatalysts. It was found that there is a critical deposit thickness for each substrate, where additional deposited particles reduce overall electrocatalytic activity of the deposits. For graphite paper, this thickness was estimated to be 3 particle layers for the EPD conditions studied. The 3 particle layer film on graphite paper resulted in a 5.5 fold increase in current density from a blank graphite paper substrate. For carbon felt, the deposit thickness threshold was calculated to be 0.13 of a particle layer for the EPD conditions studied. Moreover, this film was found to have a 4.3 fold increase in current density from a blank carbon felt substrate.

  20. Mobilization of hepatic calcium pools by platelet activating factor

    SciTech Connect

    Lapointe, D.S.; Hanahan, D.J.; Olson, M.S.

    1987-03-24

    In the perfused rat liver, platelet activating factor, 1-O-hexadecyl-2-acetyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine (AGEPC), infusion produces an extensive but transient glycogenolytic response which at low AGEPC concentrations is markedly dependent upon the perfusate calcium levels. The role of calcium in the glycogenolytic response of the liver to AGEPC was investigated by assessing the effect of AGEPC on various calcium pools in the intact liver. Livers from fed rats were equilibrated with /sup 45/Ca/sup 2 +/, and the kinetics of /sup 45/Ca/sup 2 +/ efflux were determined in control, AGEPC-stimulated, and phenylephrine-stimulated livers during steady-state washout of /sup 45/Ca/sup 2 +/. AGEPC treatment had only a slight if any effect on the pattern of steady-state calcium efflux from the liver, as opposed to major perturbations in the pattern of calcium efflux effected by the ..cap alpha..-adrenergic agonist phenylephrine. Infusion of short pulses of AGEPC during the washout of /sup 45/Ca/sup 2 +/ from labeled livers caused a transient release of /sup 45/Ca/sup 2 +/ which was not abolished at low calcium concentrations in the perfusate. Infusion of latex beads, which are removed by the reticuloendothelial cells, caused the release of hepatic /sup 45/Ca/sup 2 +/ in a fashion similar to the case with AGEPC. The findings indicate that AGEPC does not perturb a major pool of calcium within the liver as occurs upon ..cap alpha..-adrenergic stimulation; it is likely that AGEPC mobilizes calcium from a smaller yet very important pool, very possibly from nonparenchymal cells in the liver.

  1. Conductivity and electrophoretic mobility of dilute ionic solutions.

    PubMed

    Allison, Stuart; Wu, Hengfu; Twahir, Umar; Pei, Hongxia

    2010-12-01

    Two complementary continuum theories of electrokinetic transport are examined with particular emphasis on the equivalent conductance of binary electrolytes. The "small ion" model [R.M. Fuoss, L. Onsager, J. Phys. Chem. 61 (1957) 668] and "large ion" model [R.W. O'Brien, L.R. White, J. Chem. Soc. Faraday Trans. 2 (74) (1978) 1607] are both discussed and the "large ion" model is generalized to include an ion exclusion distance and to account in a simple but approximate way for the Brownian motion of all ions present. In addition, the "large ion" model is modified to treat "slip" hydrodynamic boundary conditions in addition to the standard "stick" boundary condition. Both models are applied to the equivalent conductance of dilute KCl, MgCl(2), and LaCl(3) solutions and both are able to reproduce experimental conductances to within an accuracy of several tenths of a percent. Despite fundamental differences in the "small ion" and "large ion" theories, they both work equally well in this application. In addition, both "stick-large ion" and "slip-large ion" models are equally capable of accounting for the equivalent conductances of the three electrolyte solutions.

  2. Electrophoretic mobility of magnetite particles in high temperature water

    SciTech Connect

    Vidojkovic, Sonja; Rodriguez-Santiago, V; Fedkin, Mark V.; Wesolowski, David J; Lvov, Serguei N.

    2011-01-01

    Magnetite(Fe3O4) isoneofthemostcommonoxidesformingdepositsandparticulatephasesin industrialhightemperaturewatercircuits.Itscolloidalcharacteristicsplayaprincipalroleinthe mechanismofdepositformationandcanbeusedascontrollingfactorstopreventorminimizedeposit formationanddamageofindustrialpipelinesduetounder-depositcorrosion.Inthisstudy,ahigh temperatureparticleelectrophoresistechniquewasemployedtomeasurethezetapotentialatthe magnetite/waterinterface the parameterthatcontrolscolloidalstabilityofparticles,theiraggrega- tion, anddeposition.Themeasurementsweremadeattemperaturesupto200 1C overawiderangeofpH. The isoelectricpointsofmagnetite,atwhichthedepositionofparticlesisincreased,weredeterminedatpH 6.35, 6.00,5.25,and5.05fortemperatures25,100,150,and200 1C, respectively.Theobserved temperaturedependenceofzetapotentialandtheisoelectricpHpointofmagnetitecanhelptoexplain the extentofinteractionsbetweenthecolloidalparticlesandthesteelwallsurfacesunderhydro- thermalconditions,andindicatemethodsforcontrollingandmitigatingoxidedepositioninhigh temperaturewatercycles.

  3. A unified mathematical theory of electrophoretic processes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bier, M.; Palusinski, O. A.; Mosher, R. A.; Graham, A.; Saville, D. A.

    1983-01-01

    A mathematical theory is presented which shows that each of the four classical electrophoretic modes (zone electrophoresis, moving boundary electrophoresis, isotachophoresis, and isoelectric focusing) is based on the same general principles and can collectively be described in terms of a single set of equations. This model can predict the evolution of the four electrophoretic modes as a function of time. The model system is one-dimensional, neglecting the effects of electroosmosis, temperature gradients, and any bulk flows of liquid. The model is based on equations which express the components' dissociation equilibria, the mass transport due to electromigration and diffusion, electroneutrality, and the conservation of mass and charge. The model consists of a system of coupled partial differential and nonlinear algebraic equations which can be solved numerically by use of a computer. The versatility of this model was verified using an example of a three-component system containing cacodylate, tris hydroxylmethylaminomethane, and histidine. Results show that this model not only correctly predicts the characteristic features of each electrophoretic mode, but also gives details of the concentration, pH, and conductivity profiles not easily amenable to direct experimental measurement.

  4. Embodied Computation: An Active-Learning Approach to Mobile Robotics Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Riek, L. D.

    2013-01-01

    This paper describes a newly designed upper-level undergraduate and graduate course, Autonomous Mobile Robots. The course employs active, cooperative, problem-based learning and is grounded in the fundamental computational problems in mobile robotics defined by Dudek and Jenkin. Students receive a broad survey of robotics through lectures, weekly…

  5. Usability of Mobile Phones in Physical Activity-Rrelated Research: A Systematic Review

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Monroe, Courtney M.; Thompson, Dixie L.; Bassett, David R., Jr.; Fitzhugh, Eugene C.; Raynor, Hollie A.

    2015-01-01

    Background: The use of mobile phones for physical activity (PA) promotion and assessment represents an attractive research area because this technology is characterized by a widespread reach and dynamic features. Purpose: The purpose of this study was to conduct a systematic review of mobile phone-based approaches for encouraging and assessing PA.…

  6. Investigating Acceptance toward Mobile Learning to Assist Individual Knowledge Management: Based on Activity Theory Approach

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Liaw, Shu-Sheng; Hatala, Marek; Huang, Hsiu-Mei

    2010-01-01

    Mobile devices could facilitate human interaction and access to knowledge resources anytime and anywhere. With respect to wide application possibilities of mobile learning, investigating learners' acceptance towards it is an essential issue. Based on activity theory approach, this research explores positive factors for the acceptance of m-learning…

  7. Using Mobile Phones for Vocabulary Activities: Examining the Effect of the Platform

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stockwell, Glenn

    2010-01-01

    While problems such as small screens and inconvenient keypads have been pointed out by researchers (e.g., Thornton & Houser, 2002), we still have little knowledge of how the mobile platform affects the way in which activities are completed and how learners make decisions about using mobile phones. Stockwell (2007b) provided preliminary…

  8. Mobile phone usage in complex urban systems: a space-time, aggregated human activity study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tranos, Emmanouil; Nijkamp, Peter

    2015-04-01

    The present study aims to demonstrate the importance of digital data for investigating space-time dynamics of aggregated human activity in urban systems. Such dynamics can be monitored and modelled using data from mobile phone operators regarding mobile telephone usage. Using such an extensive dataset from the city of Amsterdam, this paper introduces space-time explanatory models of aggregated human activity patterns. Various modelling experiments and results are presented, which demonstrate that mobile telephone data are a good proxy of the space-time dynamics of aggregated human activity in the city.

  9. Developing a Mobile Learning Management System for Outdoors Nature Science Activities Based on 5E Learning Cycle

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lai, Ah-Fur; Lai, Horng-Yih; Chuang, Wei-Hsiang; Wu, Zih-Heng

    2015-01-01

    Traditional outdoor learning activities such as inquiry-based learning in nature science encounter many dilemmas. Due to prompt development of mobile computing and widespread of mobile devices, mobile learning becomes a big trend on education. The main purpose of this study is to develop a mobile-learning management system for overcoming the…

  10. Mobile satellite communications technology - A summary of NASA activities

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dutzi, E. J.; Knouse, G. H.

    1986-01-01

    Studies in recent years indicate that future high-capacity mobile satellite systems are viable only if certain high-risk enabling technologies are developed. Accordingly, NASA has structured an advanced technology development program aimed at efficient utilization of orbit, spectrum, and power. Over the last two years, studies have concentrated on developing concepts and identifying cost drivers and other issues associated with the major technical areas of emphasis: vehicle antennas, speech compression, bandwidth-efficient digital modems, network architecture, mobile satellite channel characterization, and selected space segment technology. The program is now entering the next phase - breadboarding, development, and field experimentation.

  11. An Immuno-Electrophoretic Apparatus

    PubMed Central

    Horner, George; Elliott, G. B.

    1965-01-01

    Serum applied as a streak to a strip of filter-paper can be separated into six main bands, depending upon respective molecular weights (electrophoresis). When such bands of protein are exposed to a polyvalent anti-human serum diffusing in at right angles, at least 18 protein components can be identified as precipitation arcs (immunoelectrophoresis). Using immunoelectrophoresis, 202 sera taken at intervals from 86 patients with tuberculosis were compared with 160 sera from healthy persons and patients with non-tuberculous disease. With clinical recovery from tuberculosis, shrinkage of the beta-2 macroglobulin band was observed, and a gamma-1 globulin arc appeared or was accentuated. This finding suggests an early antibody response of large molecules, and a later defence by slowly developing small molecules, as seen in many common infections. The macroglobulins involved were found to be selectively adsorbed on attapulgite clay particles. This technique should be useful in developing serological tests for active tuberculosis. The apparatus used was designed and built by the authors at trivial cost. Its construction and operation are described. ImagesFig. 2Fig. 3aFig. 3bFig. 4 PMID:14259337

  12. An Active K-Band Receive Slot Array for Mobile Satellite Communications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tulintseff, A. N.; Lee, K. A.; Sukamto, L. M.; Chew, W.

    1994-01-01

    An active receive slot array has been developed for operation in the downlink frequency band, 19.914-20.064 GHz, of NASA's Advanced Communication Technology Satellite (ACTS) for the ACTS Mobile Terminal (AMT) project.

  13. The association between objectively measured physical activity and life-space mobility among older people.

    PubMed

    Tsai, L-T; Portegijs, E; Rantakokko, M; Viljanen, A; Saajanaho, M; Eronen, J; Rantanen, T

    2015-08-01

    The purpose of this cross-sectional study was to investigate the association between objectively measured physical activity and life-space mobility in community-dwelling older people. Life-space refers to the spatial area a person purposefully moves through in daily life (bedroom, home, yard, neighborhood, town, and beyond) and life-space mobility to the frequency of travel and the help needed when moving through different life-space areas. The study population comprised community-living 75- to 90-year-old people {n = 174; median age 79.7 [interquartile range (IQR) 7.1]}, participating in the accelerometer substudy of Life-Space Mobility in Old Age (LISPE) project. Step counts and activity time were measured by an accelerometer (Hookie "AM20 Activity Meter") for 7 days. Life-space mobility was assessed with Life-Space Assessment (LSA) questionnaire. Altogether, 16% had a life-space area restricted to the neighborhood when moving independently. Participants with a restricted life space were less physically active and about 70% of them had exceptionally low values in daily step counts (≤ 615 steps) and moderate activity time (≤ 6.8 min). Higher step counts and activity time correlated positively with life-space mobility. Prospective studies are needed to clarify the temporal order of low physical activity level and restriction in life-space mobility.

  14. Electrophoretic analysis of coniferyl alcohol oxidase and related laccases.

    PubMed

    Udagama-Randeniya, P; Savidge, R

    1994-01-01

    Gradient gel electrophoretic methods enabled a distinction to be made between coniferyl alcohol oxidase (CAO) of lignifying cell walls and a pI approximately 9 pine "laccase" recently implicated in lignification (Science 1993 260, 672). Following treatment of a partially purified protein mixture from developing xylem of Pinus strobus with 2-[N-morpholine]ethanesulfonic acid (MES) buffer, isoelectric focusing and sodium dodecyl sulphate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis indicated that CAO had been selectively precipitated by MES and thereby purified to electrophoretic homogeneity. Purified CAO was determined to be a cell-wall-bound glycoprotein (38% glycan), M(r) 107,500, pI 7.6, pH and temperature optima 6.3 and 30 degrees C, respectively. By graphite-furnace atomic-absorption analysis, CAO contained one copper atom per protein molecule. Proteins obtained from lignifying cambial derivatives of conifers (family Pinaceae) and from Rhus typhina bark were compared with CAO and the pI approximately 9 pine "laccase" following electrophoresis and Western blotting. For Abies balsamea, Larix laricina, Picea rubens, Pinus banksiana, Pinus taeda, and R. typhina, the isoelectric points of oxidatively active bands were identical to those of purified CAO. In addition, for all species only the pI 7.6 band was immunoreactive with antibodies against periodate-deglycosylated CAO.

  15. Isolation and characterization of an utero-active compound from Agave americana.

    PubMed

    Basilio, C M; Seyler, L; Bernstein, J; Castro de la Mata, R

    1989-12-01

    Crude extracts of Agave americana contain two utero-active compounds. One of these, tentatively named "Fraction B", has been purified to chromatographic homogeneity. Its pharmacological actions are similar to those of acetylcholine. However its chromatographic and electrophoretic mobilities are different. Some chemical properties of fraction B are compatible with the structure of an acyl derivative of choline different from acetylcholine.

  16. A mobile system for active otpical pollution monitoring

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sunesson, A.; Edner, H.; Svanberg, S.; Uneus, L.; Wendt, W.; Fredriksson, K.

    1986-01-01

    The remote monitoring of atmospheric pollutants can now be performed in several ways. Laser radar techniques have proven their ability to reveal the spatial distribution of different species or particles. Classical optical techniques can also be used, but yield the average concentration over a given path and hence no range resolution. One such technique is Differential Optical Absorption Spectroscopy, DOAS. Such schemes can be used to monitor paths that a preliminary lidar investigation has shown to be of interest. Having previously had access to a mobile lidar system, a new system has been completed. The construction builds on experience from using the other system and it is meant to be more of a mobile optical laboratory than just a lidar system. A complete system description is given along with some preliminary usage. Future uses are contemplated.

  17. Hybrid activism: social movement mobilization in a multimovement environment.

    PubMed

    Heaney, Michael T; Rojas, Fabio

    2014-01-01

    Social movement organizations often struggle to mobilize supporters from allied movements in their efforts to achieve critical mass. The authors argue that organizations with hybrid identities--those whose organizational identities span the boundaries of two or more social movements, issues, or identities--are vital to mobilizing these constituencies. They use original data from their study of the post-9/11 U.S. antiwar movement to show that individuals with past involvement in nonantiwar movements are more likely to join hybrid organizations than are individuals without involvement in nonantiwar movements. In addition, they show that organizations with hybrid identities occupy relatively more central positions in interorganizational cocontact networks within the antiwar movement and thus recruit significantly more participants in demonstrations than do nonhybrid organizations. Contrary to earlier research, they do not find that hybrid organizations are subject to an illegitimacy discount; instead, they find that hybridization can augment the ability of social movement organizations to mobilize their supporters in multimovement environments.

  18. Modified Advanced Crew Escape Suit Intravehicular Activity Suit for Extravehicular Activity Mobility Evaluations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Watson, Richard D.

    2014-01-01

    The use of an intravehicular activity (IVA) suit for a spacewalk or extravehicular activity (EVA) was evaluated for mobility and usability in the Neutral Buoyancy Laboratory (NBL) environment at the Sonny Carter Training Facility near NASA Johnson Space Center in Houston, Texas. The Space Shuttle Advanced Crew Escape Suit was modified to integrate with the Orion spacecraft. The first several missions of the Orion Multi-Purpose Crew Vehicle will not have mass available to carry an EVA-specific suit; therefore, any EVA required will have to be performed by the Modified Advanced Crew Escape Suit (MACES). Since the MACES was not designed with EVA in mind, it was unknown what mobility the suit would be able to provide for an EVA or whether a person could perform useful tasks for an extended time inside the pressurized suit. The suit was evaluated in multiple NBL runs by a variety of subjects, including crewmembers with significant EVA experience. Various functional mobility tasks performed included: translation, body positioning, tool carrying, body stabilization, equipment handling, and tool usage. Hardware configurations included with and without Thermal Micrometeoroid Garment, suit with IVA gloves and suit with EVA gloves. Most tasks were completed on International Space Station mock-ups with existing EVA tools. Some limited tasks were completed with prototype tools on a simulated rocky surface. Major findings include: demonstrating the ability to weigh-out the suit, understanding the need to have subjects perform multiple runs prior to getting feedback, determining critical sizing factors, and need for adjusting suit work envelope. Early testing demonstrated the feasibility of EVA's limited duration and limited scope. Further testing is required with more flight-like tasking and constraints to validate these early results. If the suit is used for EVA, it will require mission-specific modifications for umbilical management or Primary Life Support System integration

  19. Scanning and storage of electrophoretic records

    DOEpatents

    McKean, Ronald A.; Stiegman, Jeff

    1990-01-01

    An electrophoretic record that includes at least one gel separation is mounted for motion laterally of the separation record. A light source is positioned to illuminate at least a portion of the record, and a linear array camera is positioned to have a field of view of the illuminated portion of the record and orthogonal to the direction of record motion. The elements of the linear array are scanned at increments of motion of the record across the field of view to develop a series of signals corresponding to intensity of light at each element at each scan increment.

  20. Physical Activity Among Persons Aging with Mobility Disabilities: Shaping a Research Agenda

    PubMed Central

    Rosenberg, Dori E.; Bombardier, Charles H.; Hoffman, Jeanne M.; Belza, Basia

    2011-01-01

    With the aging of the baby boomer population and their accompanying burden of disease, future disability rates are expected to increase. This paper summarizes the state of the evidence regarding physical activity and aging for individuals with mobility disability and proposes a healthy aging research agenda for this population. Using a previously published framework, we present evidence in order to compile research recommendations in four areas focusing on older adults with mobility disability: (1) prevalence of physical activity, (2) health benefits of physical activity, (3) correlates of physical activity participation, and, (4) promising physical activity intervention strategies. Overall, findings show a dearth of research examining physical activity health benefits, correlates (demographic, psychological, social, and built environment), and interventions among persons aging with mobility disability. Further research is warranted. PMID:21748010

  1. Effect of affordable technology on physical activity levels and mobility outcomes in rehabilitation: a protocol for the Activity and MObility UsiNg Technology (AMOUNT) rehabilitation trial

    PubMed Central

    Hassett, Leanne; van den Berg, Maayken; Lindley, Richard I; Crotty, Maria; McCluskey, Annie; van der Ploeg, Hidde P; Smith, Stuart T; Schurr, Karl; Killington, Maggie; Bongers, Bert; Howard, Kirsten; Heritier, Stephane; Togher, Leanne; Hackett, Maree; Treacy, Daniel; Dorsch, Simone; Wong, Siobhan; Scrivener, Katharine; Chagpar, Sakina; Weber, Heather; Pearson, Ross; Sherrington, Catherine

    2016-01-01

    Introduction People with mobility limitations can benefit from rehabilitation programmes that provide a high dose of exercise. However, since providing a high dose of exercise is logistically challenging and resource-intensive, people in rehabilitation spend most of the day inactive. This trial aims to evaluate the effect of the addition of affordable technology to usual care on physical activity and mobility in people with mobility limitations admitted to inpatient aged and neurological rehabilitation units compared to usual care alone. Methods and analysis A pragmatic, assessor blinded, parallel-group randomised trial recruiting 300 consenting rehabilitation patients with reduced mobility will be conducted. Participants will be individually randomised to intervention or control groups. The intervention group will receive technology-based exercise to target mobility and physical activity problems for 6 months. The technology will include the use of video and computer games/exercises and tablet applications as well as activity monitors. The control group will not receive any additional intervention and both groups will receive usual inpatient and outpatient rehabilitation care over the 6-month study period. The coprimary outcomes will be objectively assessed physical activity (proportion of the day spent upright) and mobility (Short Physical Performance Battery) at 6 months after randomisation. Secondary outcomes will include: self-reported and objectively assessed physical activity, mobility, cognition, activity performance and participation, utility-based quality of life, balance confidence, technology self-efficacy, falls and service utilisation. Linear models will assess the effect of group allocation for each continuously scored outcome measure with baseline scores entered as a covariate. Fall rates between groups will be compared using negative binomial regression. Primary analyses will be preplanned, conducted while masked to group allocation and use an

  2. Accelerometry is associated with walking mobility, not physical activity, in persons with multiple sclerosis.

    PubMed

    Weikert, Madeline; Suh, Yoojin; Lane, Abbi; Sandroff, Brian; Dlugonski, Deirdre; Fernhall, Bo; Motl, Robert W

    2012-06-01

    Accelerometers are seemingly a criterion standard of real-life walking mobility and this is supported by assumptions and empirical data. This application would be strengthened by including objective measures of walking mobility along with a matched control sample for verifying specificity versus generality in accelerometer output. We compared associations among accelerometer output, walking mobility, and physical activity between persons with multiple sclerosis (MS) and controls without a neurological disorder. Sixty-six persons (33 MS, 33 matched controls) completed a battery of questionnaires, performed the six-minute walk (6MW) and timed-up-and-go (TUG), and wore an accelerometer for a 7-day period. After this period, participants completed the Godin Leisure-Time Exercise Questionnaire (GLTEQ) and International Physical Activity Questionnaire (IPAQ). Accelerometer output was significantly correlated with only mobility measures (6MW, ρ=.78; TUG, ρ=-.68) in MS, whereas it correlated with both mobility (6MW, ρ=.58; TUG, ρ=-.49) and physical activity (GLTEQ, ρ=.56; IPAQ, ρ=.53) measures in controls. Regression analysis indicated that only 6MW explained variance in accelerometer output in MS (β=.65, R(2)=.43). These findings support the possibility that accelerometers primarily and specifically measure real-life walking mobility, not physical activity, in persons with MS.

  3. Applications of graphene electrophoretic deposition. A review.

    PubMed

    Chavez-Valdez, A; Shaffer, M S P; Boccaccini, A R

    2013-02-14

    This Review summarizes research progress employing electrophoretic deposition (EPD) to fabricate graphene and graphene-based nanostructures for a wide range of applications, including energy storage materials, field emission devices, supports for fuel cells, dye-sensitized solar cells, supercapacitors and sensors, among others. These carbonaceous nanomaterials can be dispersed in organic solvents, or more commonly in water, using a variety of techniques compatible with EPD. Most deposits are produced under constant voltage conditions with deposition time also playing an important role in determining the morphology of the resulting graphene structures. In addition to simple planar substrates, it has been shown that uniform graphene-based layers can be deposited on three-dimensional, porous, and even flexible substrates. In general, electrophoretically deposited graphene layers show excellent properties, e.g., high electrical conductivity, large surface area, good thermal stability, high optical transparency, and robust mechanical strength. EPD also enables the fabrication of functional composite materials, e.g., graphene combined with metallic nanoparticles, with other carbonaceous materials (e.g., carbon nanotubes) or polymers, leading to novel nanomaterials with enhanced optical and electrical properties. In summary, the analysis of the available literature reveals that EPD is a simple and convenient processing method for graphene and graphene-based materials, which is easy to apply and versatile. EPD has, therefore, a promising future for applications in the field of advanced nanomaterials, which depend on the reliable manipulation of graphene and graphene-containing systems.

  4. Continuous-flow electrophoretic separator for biologicals

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mccreight, L. R.; Griffin, R. N.; Locker, R. J.

    1976-01-01

    In the near absence of gravity, a continuous-flow type of electrophoretic separator can be operated with a much thicker separation chamber than is possible under 1 g conditions. This should permit either better resolution or shorter separation time per unit of sample. An apparatus to perform experiments on sounding rockets is under development and will be described. The electrophoresis cell is 5 mm thick by 5 cm wide with 10 cm long electrodes. It is supplied with buffer, sample, and coolant at about 4 C through the use of a passive refrigerant system. UV sample detection and provision for recovery and cold storage of up to 50 sample fractions are now being added to the basic unit. A wide range of operating conditions are electronically programmable into the unit, even up to a short time before flight, and a further range of some parameters can be achieved by exchanging power supplies and by changing gears in the motor drive units of the pump. The preliminary results of some separation studies on various biological products using a commercially available electrophoretic separator are also presented.

  5. Electrophoretic Porosimetry of Sol-Gels

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Snow, L. A.; Smith, D. D.; Sibille, L.; Hunt, A. J.; Ng, J.; Rose, M. Franklin (Technical Monitor)

    2000-01-01

    It has been hypothesized that gravity has an effect on the formation and resulting microstructure of sol-gels. In order to more clearly resolve the effect of gravity, pores may be non-destructively analyzed in the wet gel, circumventing the shrinkage and coarsening associated with the drying procedure. We discuss the development of an electrophoretic technique, analogous to affinity chromatography, for the determination of pore size distribution and its application to silica gels. Specifically a monodisperse charged dye is monitored by an optical densitometer as it moves through the wet gel under the influence of an electric field. The transmittance data (output) represents the convolution of the dye concentration profile at the beginning of the run (input) with the pore size distribution (transfer function), i.e. linear systems theory applies. Because of the practical difficulty in producing a delta function input dye profile we prefer instead to use a step function. Average pore size is then related to the velocity of this dye front, while the pore size distribution is related to the spreading of the front. Preliminary results of this electrophoretic porosimetry and its application to ground and space-grown samples will be discussed.

  6. Brain activation during visual working memory correlates with behavioral mobility performance in older adults.

    PubMed

    Kawagoe, Toshikazu; Suzuki, Maki; Nishiguchi, Shu; Abe, Nobuhito; Otsuka, Yuki; Nakai, Ryusuke; Yamada, Minoru; Yoshikawa, Sakiko; Sekiyama, Kaoru

    2015-01-01

    Functional mobility and cognitive function often decline with age. We previously found that functional mobility as measured by the Timed Up and Go Test (TUG) was associated with cognitive performance for visually-encoded (i.e., for location and face) working memory (WM) in older adults. This suggests a common neural basis between TUG and visual WM. To elucidate this relationship further, the present study aimed to examine the neural basis for the WM-mobility association. In accordance with the well-known neural compensation model in aging, we hypothesized that "attentional" brain activation for easy WM would increase in participants with lower mobility. The data from 32 healthy older adults were analyzed, including brain activation during easy WM tasks via functional Magnetic Resonance Imaging (fMRI) and mobility performance via both TUG and a simple walking test. WM performance was significantly correlated with TUG but not with simple walking. Some prefrontal brain activations during WM were negatively correlated with TUG performance, while positive correlations were found in subcortical structures including the thalamus, putamen and cerebellum. Moreover, activation of the subcortical regions was significantly correlated with WM performance, with less activation for lower WM performers. These results indicate that older adults with lower mobility used more cortical (frontal) and fewer subcortical resources for easy WM tasks. To date, the frontal compensation has been proposed separately in the motor and cognitive domains, which have been assumed to compensate for dysfunction of the other brain areas; however, such dysfunction was less clear in previous studies. The present study observed such dysfunction as degraded activation associated with lower performance, which was found in the subcortical regions. We conclude that a common dysfunction-compensation activation pattern is likely the neural basis for the association between visual WM and functional mobility.

  7. Brain activation during visual working memory correlates with behavioral mobility performance in older adults

    PubMed Central

    Kawagoe, Toshikazu; Suzuki, Maki; Nishiguchi, Shu; Abe, Nobuhito; Otsuka, Yuki; Nakai, Ryusuke; Yamada, Minoru; Yoshikawa, Sakiko; Sekiyama, Kaoru

    2015-01-01

    Functional mobility and cognitive function often decline with age. We previously found that functional mobility as measured by the Timed Up and Go Test (TUG) was associated with cognitive performance for visually-encoded (i.e., for location and face) working memory (WM) in older adults. This suggests a common neural basis between TUG and visual WM. To elucidate this relationship further, the present study aimed to examine the neural basis for the WM-mobility association. In accordance with the well-known neural compensation model in aging, we hypothesized that “attentional” brain activation for easy WM would increase in participants with lower mobility. The data from 32 healthy older adults were analyzed, including brain activation during easy WM tasks via functional Magnetic Resonance Imaging (fMRI) and mobility performance via both TUG and a simple walking test. WM performance was significantly correlated with TUG but not with simple walking. Some prefrontal brain activations during WM were negatively correlated with TUG performance, while positive correlations were found in subcortical structures including the thalamus, putamen and cerebellum. Moreover, activation of the subcortical regions was significantly correlated with WM performance, with less activation for lower WM performers. These results indicate that older adults with lower mobility used more cortical (frontal) and fewer subcortical resources for easy WM tasks. To date, the frontal compensation has been proposed separately in the motor and cognitive domains, which have been assumed to compensate for dysfunction of the other brain areas; however, such dysfunction was less clear in previous studies. The present study observed such dysfunction as degraded activation associated with lower performance, which was found in the subcortical regions. We conclude that a common dysfunction—compensation activation pattern is likely the neural basis for the association between visual WM and functional

  8. Flexible Coordination of Stationary and Mobile Conversations with Gaze: Resource Allocation among Multiple Joint Activities

    PubMed Central

    Mayor, Eric; Bangerter, Adrian

    2016-01-01

    Gaze is instrumental in coordinating face-to-face social interactions. But little is known about gaze use when social interactions co-occur with other joint activities. We investigated the case of walking while talking. We assessed how gaze gets allocated among various targets in mobile conversations, whether allocation of gaze to other targets affects conversational coordination, and whether reduced availability of gaze for conversational coordination affects conversational performance and content. In an experimental study, pairs were videotaped in four conditions of mobility (standing still, talking while walking along a straight-line itinerary, talking while walking along a complex itinerary, or walking along a complex itinerary with no conversational task). Gaze to partners was substantially reduced in mobile conversations, but gaze was still used to coordinate conversation via displays of mutual orientation, and conversational performance and content was not different between stationary and mobile conditions. Results expand the phenomena of multitasking to joint activities. PMID:27822189

  9. Electrophoretically pure mouse interferon exerts multiple biologic effects.

    PubMed Central

    Gresser, I; De Maeyer-Guignard, J; Tovey, M G; De Maeyer, E

    1979-01-01

    Electrophoretically pure mouse interferon was examined for a number of biologic effects previously ascribed to crude or partially purified interferon preparations. These effects include: inhibition of the growth of a transplantable tumor in mice; inhibition of cell multiplication of mouse tumor cells in vitro; enhancement of the expression of histocompatibility antigens on mouse tumor cells in vitro; inhibition of antibody formation in vitro; inhibition of sensitization to sheep erythrocytes and the expression of delayed type hypersensitivity in mice; enhancement of natural killer cell activity in vivo and in vitro; enhancement of cell sensitivity to the toxicity of poly(I)-poly(C); and enhanced production ("priming") of interferon production in vitro. Our results establish that the molecules responsible for the antiviral action of interferon are also responsible for these varied biologic effects. PMID:291948

  10. The electrophoretically 'slow' and 'fast' forms of the alpha 2-macroglobulin molecule.

    PubMed Central

    Barrett, A J; Brown, M A; Sayers, C A

    1979-01-01

    alpha 2-Macroglobulin (alpha 2M) was isolated from human plasma by a four-step procedure: poly(ethylene glyco) fractionation, gel chromatography, euglobulin precipitation and immunoadsorption. No contaminants were detected in the final preparations by electrophoresis or immunoprecipitation. The protein ran as a single slow band in gel electrophoresis, and was designated 'S-alpha 2M'. S-alpha 2M bound about 2 mol of trypsin/mol. Treatment of S-alpha 2M with a proteinase or ammonium salts produced a form of the molecule more mobile in electrophoresis, and lacking proteinase-binding activity (F-alpha 2M). The electrophoretic mobility of the F-alpha 2M resulting from reaction with NH4+ salts was identical with that of proteinase complexes. We attribute the change in electrophoretic mobility of the alpha 2M to a conformation change, but there was no evidence of a change in pI or Strokes radius. Electrophoresis of S-alpha 2M in the presence of sodium dodecylsulphate gave results consistent with the view that the alpha 2M molecule is a tetramer of identical subunits, assembled as a non-covalent pair of disulphide-linked dimers. Some of the subunits seemed to be 'nicked' into two-thires-length and one-third-length chains, however. This was not apparent with F-alpha 2M produced by ammonium salts. F-alpha 2M produced by trypsin showed two new bands attributable to cleavage of the subunit polypeptide chain near the middle. Immunoassays of F-alpha 2M gave 'rockets' 12-29% lower than those with S-alpha 2M. The nature of the interactions between subunits in S-alpha 2M and F-alpha 2M was investigated by treating each form with glutaraldehyde before electrophoresis in the presence of sodium dodecyl sulphate. A much greater degree of cross-linking was observed with the F-alpha 2M, indicating that the subunits interact most closely in this form of the molecule. Exposure of S-alpha 2M to 3 M-urea or pH3 resulted in dissociation to the disulphide-bonded half-molecules; these did not

  11. Electrophoretic separation of lunar soils in a space manufacturing facility

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dunning, J. D.; Snyder, R. S.

    1981-01-01

    The feasibility of electrophoretic separation of lunar soil into its mineral constituents is discussed in this paper. The process and its applicability to lunar soil separation are considered in light of the special requirements of a space manufacturing effort. Data generated in studies at NASA-Marshall Space Flight Center, which assess the efficiency of electrophoretic separation of lunar soil, are discussed and evaluated.

  12. Capillary electrophoretic study of green fluorescent hollow carbon nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Liu, Lizhen; Feng, Feng; Hu, Qin; Paau, Man Chin; Liu, Yang; Chen, Zezhong; Bai, Yunfeng; Guo, Fangfang; Choi, Martin M F

    2015-09-01

    CE coupled with laser-induced fluorescence and UV absorption detections has been applied to study the complexity of as-synthesized green fluorescent hollow carbon nanoparticles (HC-NP) samples. The effects of pH, type, and concentration of the run buffer and SDS on the separation of HC-NP are studied in detail. It is observed that phosphate run buffer is more effective in separating the HC-NP and the optimal run buffer is found to be 30 mM phosphate and 10 mM SDS at pH 9.0. The CE separation of this HC-NP is based on the difference in size and electrophoretic mobility of HC-NP. Some selected HC-NP fractions are collected and further characterized by UV-visible absorption and photoluminescence (PL) spectroscopy, MS, and transmission electron microscopy. The fractionated HC-NP show profound differences in absorption, emission characteristics, and PL quantum yield that would have been otherwise misled by studying the complex mixture alone. It is anticipated that our CE methodology will open a new initiative on extensive studies of individual HC-NP species in the biomedical, catalysis, electronic, and optical device, energy storage, material, and sensing field.

  13. Does quadriceps neuromuscular activation capability explain mobility function among older men and women?

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Age-related impairment of neuromuscular activation has been shown to contribute to weakness in older adults. However, it is unclear to what extent impaired neuromuscular activation independently accounts for decline of mobility function. The hypothesis of this study is that capability to produce rap...

  14. Does neuromuscular activation capability explain mobility function among older men and women?

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Age-related impairment of neuromuscular activation has been shown to contribute to weakness in older adults. However, it is unclear to what extent impaired neuromuscular activation independently accounts for decline of mobility function. The hypothesis of this study is that capability to produce rap...

  15. A Physical Activity Program to Mobilize Older People: A Practical and Sustainable Approach

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jancey, Jonine M.; Clarke, Ann; Howat, Peter A.; Lee, Andy H.; Shilton, Trevor; Fisher, John

    2008-01-01

    Purpose: Despite the documented benefits of physical activity, it remains difficult to motivate older adults to start and maintain regular physical activity. This study tested an innovative intervention for mobilizing older adults into a neighborhood-based walking program. Design and Methods: Researchers recruited a total of 260 healthy but…

  16. Exploration of Tensions in a Mobile-Technology Supported Fieldtrip: An Activity Theory Perspective

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lai, Chih-Hung; Chen, Fei-Ching; Yang, Jie-Chi

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to analyze how mobile technologies were incorporated and implemented in an outdoor learning activity. Two classes of primary school students participated in the experiment. Using activity theory as an analytical framework, it is found that underlying tensions provided rich insights into system dynamics and that…

  17. Iterative development of MobileMums: a physical activity intervention for women with young children

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background To describe the iterative development process and final version of ‘MobileMums’: a physical activity intervention for women with young children (<5 years) delivered primarily via mobile telephone (mHealth) short messaging service (SMS). Methods MobileMums development followed the five steps outlined in the mHealth development and evaluation framework: 1) conceptualization (critique of literature and theory); 2) formative research (focus groups, n= 48); 3) pre-testing (qualitative pilot of intervention components, n= 12); 4) pilot testing (pilot RCT, n= 88); and, 5) qualitative evaluation of the refined intervention (n= 6). Results Key findings identified throughout the development process that shaped the MobileMums program were the need for: behaviour change techniques to be grounded in Social Cognitive Theory; tailored SMS content; two-way SMS interaction; rapport between SMS sender and recipient; an automated software platform to generate and send SMS; and, flexibility in location of a face-to-face delivered component. Conclusions The final version of MobileMums is flexible and adaptive to individual participant’s physical activity goals, expectations and environment. MobileMums is being evaluated in a community-based randomised controlled efficacy trial (ACTRN12611000481976). PMID:23256730

  18. Electrophoretic deposition of chiral polymers and composites.

    PubMed

    Wang, Y; Pang, X; Zhitomirsky, I

    2011-10-15

    Electrophoretic deposition (EPD) method has been developed for the deposition of thin films of chiral polymers. EPD of poly-L-lysine (PLL) and poly-L-ornithine (PLO) films was performed for the first time on conductive substrates from aqueous and ethanol-water solutions. The deposition yield was monitored using a quartz crystal microbalance. The results demonstrated that the deposition yield can be varied by variation of the deposition time, voltage and polymer concentration in the solutions. It was shown that PLL and PLO provided stabilization and charging of hydroxyapatite (HA) nanoparticles in suspensions. Composite PLL-HA and PLO-HA films of controlled thickness were prepared by EPD. Electron microscopy investigations showed that the thickness of the PLL, PLO and composite films was varied in the range of 0-3 μm. The polymer and composite films can be used for biomedical applications.

  19. Electrophoretic Deposition on Porous Non-Conductors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Compson, Charles; Besra, Laxmidhar; Liu, Meilin

    2007-01-01

    A method of electrophoretic deposition (EPD) on substrates that are porous and electrically non-conductive has been invented. Heretofore, in order to perform an EPD, it has been necessary to either (1) use a substrate material that is inherently electrically conductive or (2) subject a non-conductive substrate to a thermal and/or chemical treatment to render it conductive. In the present method, instead of relying on the electrical conductivity of the substrate, one ensures that the substrate is porous enough that when it is immersed in an EPD bath, the solvent penetrates throughout the thickness, thereby forming quasi-conductive paths through the substrate. By making it unnecessary to use a conductive substrate, this method simplifies the overall EPD process and makes new applications possible. The method is expected to be especially beneficial in enabling deposition of layers of ceramic and/or metal for chemical and electrochemical devices, notably including solid oxide fuel cells.

  20. SPAR electrophoretic separation experiments, part 2

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cosmi, F. M.

    1978-01-01

    The opportunity to use a sounding rocket for separation experiments is a logical continuation of earlier electrophoresis demonstrations and experiments. A free-flow electrophoresis system, developed under the Advanced Applications Flight Experiment (AAFE) Program, was designed so that it would fit into a rocket payload. The SPAR program provides a unique opportunity to complete the intial stages of microgravity testing prior to any Shuttle applications. The objective of the work described in this report was to ensure proper operating parameters for the defined experimental samples to be used in the SPAR Electrophoretic Separation Experiment. Ground based experiments were undertaken not only to define flight parameters but also to serve as a point of comparison for flight results. Possible flight experiment problem areas were also studied such as sample interaction due to sedimentation, concentration effects and storage effects. Late in the program anomalies of field strengths and buffer conductivities were also investigated.

  1. Investigation of the free flow electrophoretic process

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Weiss, R. A.; Lanham, J. W.; Richman, D. W.; Walker, C. D.

    1980-01-01

    The effects of gravity on the free flow electrophoretic process was demonstrated. The free flow electrophoresis chamber used to demonstrate the effects of gravity on the process was of a proprietary design. This chamber was 120 cm long, 16 cm wide, and 0.15 cm thick. Flow in this chamber was in the upward direction and exited through 197 outlets at the top of the chamber. During electrophoresis a stream of sample was injected into the flow near the bottom of the chamber and an electrical field was applied across the width of the chamber. The field caused a lateral force on particles in the sample proportional to the inherent change of the particle and the electric field strength. Particle lateral velocity was then dependent on the force due to viscous drag which was proportional to particle size and particle shape dependent.

  2. Optimization of the southern electrophoretic transfer method

    SciTech Connect

    Allison, M.A.; Fujimura, R.K.

    1987-01-01

    The technique of separating DNA fragments using agarose gel electrophoresis is essential in the analysis of nucleic acids. Further, after the method of transferring specific DNA fragments from those agarose gels to cellulose nitrate membranes was developed in 1975, a method was developed to transfer DNA, RNA, protein and ribonucleoprotein particles from various gels onto diazobenzyloxymethyl (DBM) paper using electrophoresis as well. This paper describes the optimum conditions for quantitative electrophoretic transfer of DNA onto nylon membranes. This method exemplifies the ability to hybridize the membrane more than once with specific RNA probes by providing sufficient retention of the DNA. Furthermore, the intrinsic properties of the nylon membrane allow for an increase in the efficiency and resolution of transfer while using somewhat harsh alkaline conditions. The use of alkaline conditions is of critical importance since we can now denature the DNA during transfer and thus only a short pre-treatment in acid is required for depurination. 9 refs., 7 figs.

  3. An upward compatible spectrum sharing architecture for existing, actively planned and emerging mobile satellite systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Azarbar, Bahman

    1990-01-01

    Existing and actively planned mobile satellite systems are competing for a viable share of the spectrum allocated by the International Telecommunications Union (ITU) to the satellite based mobile services in the 1.5/1.6 GHz range. The limited amount of spectrum available worldwide and the sheer number of existing and planned mobile satellite systems dictate the adoption of an architecture which will maximize sharing possibilities. A viable sharing architecture must recognize the operational needs and limitations of the existing systems. Furthermore, recognizing the right of access of the future systems as they will emerge in time, the adopted architecture must allow for additional growth and be amenable to orderly introduction of future systems. An attempt to devise such a sharing architecture is described. A specific example of the application of the basic concept to the existing and planned mobile satellite systems is also discussed.

  4. An upward compatible spectrum sharing architecture for existing, actively planned and emerging mobile satellite systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Azarbar, Bahman

    Existing and actively planned mobile satellite systems are competing for a viable share of the spectrum allocated by the International Telecommunications Union (ITU) to the satellite based mobile services in the 1.5/1.6 GHz range. The limited amount of spectrum available worldwide and the sheer number of existing and planned mobile satellite systems dictate the adoption of an architecture which will maximize sharing possibilities. A viable sharing architecture must recognize the operational needs and limitations of the existing systems. Furthermore, recognizing the right of access of the future systems as they will emerge in time, the adopted architecture must allow for additional growth and be amenable to orderly introduction of future systems. An attempt to devise such a sharing architecture is described. A specific example of the application of the basic concept to the existing and planned mobile satellite systems is also discussed.

  5. Electrophoretic dynamics of self-assembling branched DNA structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heuer, Daniel Milton

    This study advances our understanding of the electrophoretic dynamics of branched biopolymers and explores technologies designed to exploit their unique properties. New self-assembly techniques were developed to create branched DNA for visualization via fluorescence microscopy. Experiments in fixed gel networks reveal a distinct trapping behavior, in contrast with linear topologies. The finding that detection can be achieved by introducing a branch point contributes significantly to the field of separation science and can be exploited to develop new applications. Results obtained in polymer solutions point to identical mobilities for branched and linear topologies, despite large differences in their dynamics. This finding led to a new description of electrophoresis based on non-Newtonian viscoelastic effects in the electric double layer surrounding a charged object. This new theoretical framework presents a new outlook important not only to the electrophoretic physics of nucleic acids, but all charged objects including proteins, colloids, and nanoparticles. To study the behavior of smaller biopolymers, such as restriction fragments and recombination intermediates, a library of symmetrically branched DNA was synthesized followed by characterization in gels. The experimental results contribute a large body of information relating molecular architecture and the dynamics of rigid structures in an electric field. The findings allow us to create new separation technologies based on topology. These contributions can also be utilized in a number of different applications including the study of recombination intermediates and the separation of proteins according to structure. To demonstrate the importance of these findings, a sequence and mutation detection technique was envisioned and applied for genetic analysis. Restriction fragments from mutation "hotspots" in the p53 tumor suppressor gene, known to play a role in cancer development, were analyzed with this technique

  6. All solution processed organic thin film transistor-backplane with printing technology for electrophoretic display

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Lee, Myung W.; Song, C.K.

    2012-01-01

    In this study, solution processes were developed for backplane using an organic thin film transistor (OTFT) as a driving device for an electrophoretic display (EPD) panel. The processes covered not only the key device of OTFTs but also interlayer and pixel electrodes. The various materials and printing processes were adopted to achieve the requirements of devices and functioning layers. The performance of OTFT of the backplane was sufficient to drive EPD sheet by producing a mobility of 0.12 cm2/v x sec and on/off current ratio of 10(5).

  7. Human movement activity classification approaches that use wearable sensors and mobile devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaghyan, Sahak; Sarukhanyan, Hakob; Akopian, David

    2013-03-01

    Cell phones and other mobile devices become part of human culture and change activity and lifestyle patterns. Mobile phone technology continuously evolves and incorporates more and more sensors for enabling advanced applications. Latest generations of smart phones incorporate GPS and WLAN location finding modules, vision cameras, microphones, accelerometers, temperature sensors etc. The availability of these sensors in mass-market communication devices creates exciting new opportunities for data mining applications. Particularly healthcare applications exploiting build-in sensors are very promising. This paper reviews different approaches of human activity recognition.

  8. Extracellular adenosine triphosphate activates calcium mobilization in human phagocytic leukocytes and neutrophil/monocyte progenitor cells.

    PubMed Central

    Cowen, D S; Lazarus, H M; Shurin, S B; Stoll, S E; Dubyak, G R

    1989-01-01

    We have examined the ability of extracellular ATP to elicit intracellular Ca2+ mobilization in a broad range of human leukocytes at particular stages of hematopoietic differentiation. The average cytosolic [Ca2+] in various leukocyte populations was measured in Fura 2-loaded cell suspensions while the cytosolic [Ca2+] in individual, Indo 1-loaded leukocytes was assayed by flow cytometric methods. Utilizing normal blood- and marrow-derived cells, human leukemic cell lines, and mononuclear cell fractions derived from the blood of patients with various leukemias, we have found that ATP-induced Ca2+ mobilization appears restricted to leukocytes of neutrophil/monocyte ontogeny. Significant ATP-induced increases in cytosolic [Ca2+] were observed in neutrophils, monocytes, and myeloid progenitor cells as immature as myeloblasts, but not in lymphocytes. Extensive characterization of the ATP-induced changes in [Ca2+] observed in the HL-60 promyelocytic cell line have indicated these Ca2+-mobilizing effects of ATP can be correlated with an activation of inositol phospholipid breakdown via the occupation of P2-purinergic receptors Significantly, of the various agonists (FMLP, platelet-activating factor, LTB4, and ATP) which elicit equivalent and maximal Ca2+ mobilization in mature neutrophils and monocytes, ATP was the most efficacious stimulant of Ca2+ mobilization in immature neutrophil/monocyte precursors. Thus, expression of putative P2-purinergic receptors for ATP appears to precede expression of other receptor types known to activate the inositol phospholipid signaling cascades in terminally differentiated phagocytes. PMID:2708526

  9. A Conceptual Framework Based on Activity Theory for Mobile CSCL

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zurita, Gustavo; Nussbaum, Miguel

    2007-01-01

    There is a need for collaborative group activities that promote student social interaction in the classroom. Handheld computers interconnected by a wireless network allow people who work on a common task to interact face to face while maintaining the mediation afforded by a technology-based system. Wirelessly interconnected handhelds open up new…

  10. Persuasive Technology in Mobile Applications Promoting Physical Activity: a Systematic Review.

    PubMed

    Matthews, John; Win, Khin Than; Oinas-Kukkonen, Harri; Freeman, Mark

    2016-03-01

    Persuasive technology in mobile applications can be used to influence the behaviour of users. A framework known as the Persuasive Systems Design model has been developed for designing and evaluating systems that influence the attitudes or behaviours of users. This paper reviews the current state of mobile applications for health behavioural change with an emphasis on applications that promote physical activity. The inbuilt persuasive features of mobile applications were evaluated using the Persuasive Systems Design model. A database search was conducted to identify relevant articles. Articles were then reviewed using the Persuasive Systems Design model as a framework for analysis. Primary task support, dialogue support, and social support were found to be moderately represented in the selected articles. However, system credibility support was found to have only low levels of representation as a persuasive systems design feature in mobile applications for supporting physical activity. To ensure that available mobile technology resources are best used to improve the wellbeing of people, it is important that the design principles that influence the effectiveness of persuasive technology be understood.

  11. Allergen extracts directly mobilize and activate human eosinophils.

    PubMed

    Svensson, Lena; Rudin, Anna; Wennerås, Christine

    2004-06-01

    Allergic diseases are characterized by the presence of eosinophils, which are recruited to the affected tissues by chemoattractants produced by T cells, mast cells and epithelium. Our objective was to evaluate if allergens can directly activate human eosinophils. The capacity of purified allergen extracts to elicit eosinophil chemotaxis, respiratory burst, degranulation and up-regulation of the adhesion molecule complement receptor 3 (CR3) was determined in eosinophils isolated from healthy blood donors. Eosinophils stimulated with an extract from house dust mite (HDM) released the granule protein major basic protein (MBP) and up-regulated the surface expression of CR3. Cat allergen extracts also induced the up-regulation of CR3, but not the release of MBP; instead cat, as well as birch and grass allergens, elicited the release of eosinophil peroxidase (EPO). In addition, grass pollen extract caused the secretion of MBP. None of the allergens stimulated eosinophilic cationic protein release, nor production of free oxygen radicals. Both HDM and birch extracts were chemotactic for eosinophils. These findings establish that common aeroallergens can directly activate eosinophils in vitro. We propose that eosinophil activation in vivo is not exclusively mediated by cytokines and chemokines of the allergic inflammatory reaction, but could partly be the result of direct interaction between allergens and eosinophils.

  12. Active Mobility and Environment: A Pilot Qualitative Study for the Design of a New Questionnaire.

    PubMed

    Hess, Franck; Salze, Paul; Weber, Christiane; Feuillet, Thierry; Charreire, Hélène; Menai, Mehdi; Perchoux, Camille; Nazare, Julie-Anne; Simon, Chantal; Oppert, Jean-Michel; Enaux, Christophe

    2017-01-01

    It is generally accepted that active mobility, mainly walking and cycling, contributes to people's physical and mental health. One of the current challenges is to improve our understanding of this type of behaviour. This study aims to identify factors from the daily-life environment that may be related to active mobility behaviours, in order to design a new questionnaire for a quantitative study of a large adult population. The new questionnaire obtained through this pilot study combines information from interviews with existing questionnaires materials in order to introduce new factors while retaining the factors already assessed. This approach comprises three stages. The first was a content analysis (Reinert method) of interviews with a sample of participants about daily living activities as well as mobility. This stage led to a typology of factors suggested by interviews. The second was a scoping review of the literature in order to identify the active mobility questionnaires currently used in international literature. The last stage was a cross-tabulation of the factors resulting from the written interviews and the questionnaires. A table of the inter-relationships between the interview-based typology and the questionnaires shows discrepancies between factors considered by the existing questionnaires, and factors coming from individual interviews. Independent factors which were ignored in or absent from the questionnaires are the housing situation within the urban structure, overall consideration of the activity space beyond the limits of the residential neighbourhood, the perception of all the transportation modes, and the time scheduling impacting the modes actually used. Our new questionnaire integrates both the usual factors and the new factors that may be related to active mobility behaviours.

  13. Active Mobility and Environment: A Pilot Qualitative Study for the Design of a New Questionnaire

    PubMed Central

    Salze, Paul; Weber, Christiane; Feuillet, Thierry; Charreire, Hélène; Menai, Mehdi; Perchoux, Camille; Nazare, Julie-Anne; Simon, Chantal; Oppert, Jean-Michel

    2017-01-01

    It is generally accepted that active mobility, mainly walking and cycling, contributes to people’s physical and mental health. One of the current challenges is to improve our understanding of this type of behaviour. This study aims to identify factors from the daily-life environment that may be related to active mobility behaviours, in order to design a new questionnaire for a quantitative study of a large adult population. The new questionnaire obtained through this pilot study combines information from interviews with existing questionnaires materials in order to introduce new factors while retaining the factors already assessed. This approach comprises three stages. The first was a content analysis (Reinert method) of interviews with a sample of participants about daily living activities as well as mobility. This stage led to a typology of factors suggested by interviews. The second was a scoping review of the literature in order to identify the active mobility questionnaires currently used in international literature. The last stage was a cross-tabulation of the factors resulting from the written interviews and the questionnaires. A table of the inter-relationships between the interview-based typology and the questionnaires shows discrepancies between factors considered by the existing questionnaires, and factors coming from individual interviews. Independent factors which were ignored in or absent from the questionnaires are the housing situation within the urban structure, overall consideration of the activity space beyond the limits of the residential neighbourhood, the perception of all the transportation modes, and the time scheduling impacting the modes actually used. Our new questionnaire integrates both the usual factors and the new factors that may be related to active mobility behaviours. PMID:28052086

  14. Training Learners to Use Quizlet Vocabulary Activities on Mobile Phones in Vietnam with Facebook

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tran, Phuong

    2016-01-01

    Mobile phone ownership among university students in Vietnam has reached almost 100%, exceeding that of Internet-capable desktop computers. This has made them increasingly popular to allow learners to carry out learning activities outside of the classroom, but some studies have suggested that learners are not always willing to engage in activities…

  15. Outdoor Built Environment Barriers and Facilitators to Activity among Midlife and Older Adults with Mobility Disabilities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rosenberg, Dori E.; Huang, Deborah L.; Simonovich, Shannon D.; Belza, Basia

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: To gain better understanding of how the built environment impacts neighborhood-based physical activity among midlife and older adults with mobility disabilities. Design and methods: We conducted in-depth interviews with 35 adults over age 50, which used an assistive device and lived in King County, Washington, U.S. In addition,…

  16. Pedagogical Values of Mobile-Assisted Task-Based Activities to Enhance Speaking Skill

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mohammadi, Mojtaba; Safdari, Nastaran

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of the present study was to examine the impact of online mobile-assisted task-based activities on improving Iranian intermediate English as a Foreign Language (EFL) learners' speaking skills. To achieve the purpose of the study, 90 intermediate language learners were selected ranging between 13 to 16 years old and divided into three…

  17. Preparation and application of microcapsule-encapsulated color electrophortic fluid in Isopar M system for electrophoretic display

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Cui; Feng, Ya-Qing; Zhang, Bao; Li, Xiang-Gao; Shao, Ji-Zhou; Han, Jing-Jing; Chen, Xu

    2013-05-01

    The use of Isopar M as a liquid suspending fluid for electrophoretic display was studied. The dispersion stability and chargeability of pigments suspended in Isopar M were investigated. Polyisobutylene monosuccinimide (T-151) as the charge control additive in Isopar M electrophoretic fluid can provide a good electrophoretic mobility to the particles. The wall materials of a series of blue-white, red-white and yellow-white dual-particle microcapsules were prepared by in situ polymerization of urea and formaldehyde. The mass ratio of wall/core material was a key factor in influencing the yield of microcapsules. The concentration of resorcinol has an impact on the surface morphology and mechanical strength of microcapsule wall. Microcapsules' surface morphologies were characterized by optical microscopy and scanning electron microscopy. The performance of the microcapsules with different binder materials and adhesive layers were investigated. Contrast ratio of microcapsules display device were tested every 10 days for a period of 90 days. The compatibility of Isopar M with both the electrophoretic particles and bounding capsule was studied.

  18. Molecular analysis and physicochemical properties of electrophoretic variants of wild soybean Glycine soja storage proteins.

    PubMed

    Fukuda, Takako; Maruyama, Nobuyuki; Kanazawa, Akira; Abe, Jun; Shimamoto, Yoshiya; Hiemori, Miki; Tsuji, Hideaki; Tanisaka, Takatoshi; Utsumi, Shigeru

    2005-05-04

    Cultivated soybeans (Glycine max) are derived from wild soybeans (Glycine soja) and can be crossed with them to produce fertile offspring. The latter exhibit greater genetic variation than the former, suggesting a possibility that wild soybeans contain storage proteins with properties different from and better than those of cultivated soybeans. To identify a wild soybean suitable for breeding a new soybean cultivar, we analyzed seed proteins from 390 lines of wild soybeans by electrophoresis. We found some lines containing electrophoretic variants of glycinin and beta-conglycinin subunits: one line containing a small alpha' subunit of beta-conglycinin and two and five lines containing small A3 and large A4 polypeptides of glycinin, respectively. Beta-Conglycinin and glycinin containing such variant subunits exhibited solubility and emulsifying ability similar to those of the predominant types of wild and cultivated soybeans. Glycinins containing small A3 and large A4 gave a shoulder derived from the start of denaturation at a temperature 4 degrees C lower than that of glycinin from the predominant types of wild and cultivated soybeans, although their thermal denaturation midpoint temperatures were very similar to each other. Cloning and sequencing of the predominant and variant subunit cDNAs revealed that the small alpha' and the small A3 lacked 24 amino acid residues in the extension region and four amino acid residues in the hypervariable region, respectively, and that the large A4 did not have an insert corresponding to the difference in the electrophoretic mobility but Arg279 and Gln305 were replaced by glutamine and histidine, respectively, in the hypervariable region. These suggest that small differences even in the hypervariable region can affect the thermal stability, as well as the electrophoretic mobilities, of the proteins.

  19. A Microfluidic Platform for Interfacial Electrophoretic Deposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Joung, Young Soo; Moran, Jeffrey; Jones, Andrew; Bailey, Eric; Buie, Cullen

    2014-11-01

    Composite membranes of hydrogel and carbon nanotubes (CNTs) are fabricated using electrophoretic deposition (EPD) at the interface of two immiscible liquids in microfluidic channels. Microfluidic channels, which have two parallel electrodes at the walls, are used to create electric fields across the interface of oil and water continuously supplied into the channels. Depending on the Reynolds (Re) and Weber (We) numbers of oil and water, we observe different formations of the interface. Once we find the optimal Re and We to create a planar interface in the channel, we apply an electric field across the interface for EPD of CNTs and/or silver (Ag) nanorods dispersed in water. During EPD, particles migrate to the oil/water interface, where cross-linking of polymers is induced to form composite hydrogel membranes. Properties of the composite hydrogel films are controlled by electric fields, CNT concentrations, and both Re and We numbers, allowing for continuous production. This fabrication method is effective to create composite polymer membranes placed in microfluidic devices with tunable electrical, mechanical, and biological properties. Potential applications include fabrication of doped hydrogels for drug delivery, conductive hydrogels for biological sensing, and electron permeable membranes for water splitting and osmotic power generation.

  20. A lateral electrophoretic flow diagnostic assay.

    PubMed

    Lin, Robert; Skandarajah, Arunan; Gerver, Rachel E; Neira, Hector D; Fletcher, Daniel A; Herr, Amy E

    2015-03-21

    Immunochromatographic assays are a cornerstone tool in disease screening. To complement existing lateral flow assays (based on wicking flow) we introduce a lateral flow format that employs directed electrophoretic transport. The format is termed a "lateral e-flow assay" and is designed to support multiplexed detection using immobilized reaction volumes of capture antigen. To fabricate the lateral e-flow device, we employ mask-based UV photopatterning to selectively immobilize unmodified capture antigen along the microchannel in a barcode-like pattern. The channel-filling polyacrylamide hydrogel incorporates a photoactive moiety (benzophenone) to immobilize capture antigen to the hydrogel without a priori antigen modification. We report a heterogeneous sandwich assay using low-power electrophoresis to drive biospecimen through the capture antigen barcode. Fluorescence barcode readout is collected via a low-resource appropriate imaging system (CellScope). We characterize lateral e-flow assay performance and demonstrate a serum assay for antibodies to the hepatitis C virus (HCV). In a pilot study, the lateral e-flow assay positively identifies HCV+ human sera in 60 min. The lateral e-flow assay provides a flexible format for conducting multiplexed immunoassays relevant to confirmatory diagnosis in near-patient settings.

  1. Microencapsulated Electrophoretic Films for Electronic Paper Displays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Amundson, Karl

    2003-03-01

    Despite the dominance of liquid crystal displays, they do not perform some functions very well. While backlit liquid crystal displays can offer excellent color performance, they wash out in bright lighting and suffer from high power consumption. Reflective liquid crystal displays have limited brightness, making these devices challenging to read for long periods of time. Flexible liquid crystal displays are difficult to manufacture and keep stable. All of these attributes (long battery lifetime, bright reflective appearance, compatibility with flexible substrates) are traits that would be found in an ideal electronic paper display - an updateable substitute for paper that could be employed in electronic books, newspapers, and other applications. I will discuss technologies that are being developed for electronic-paper-like displays, and especially on particle-based technologies. A microencapsulated electrophoretic display technology is being developed at the E Ink corporation. This display film offers offer high brightness and an ink-on-paper appearance, compatibility with flexible substrates, and image stability that can lead to very low power consumption. I will present some of the physical and chemical challenges associated with making display films with high performance.

  2. Development of an electrophoretic image display

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liebert, R.; Lalak, J.

    1981-02-01

    The purpose of this work is to develop an X-Y addressed electrophoretic image display (DPID). At a recent DARPA/PL/ISI meeting it was agreed to increase the size of the display from 350 x 600 to 360 x 640 elements. Glass substrates with the required In2O3 thickness have been obtained commercially; it is now no longer necessary to deposit additional material. Better difinition of the row electrodes has been obtained by using this glass and using ion-beam milling rather than liquid etching. Techniques to identify and repair shorts in the row electrodes have been developed. The number of defects has been reduced by better filtration and proper outgassing of the photoresist. Aluminum spits were eliminated by using electron-beam evaporation rather than evaporation from a tungsten coil. Sputter deposition of ITO has been replaced by the more reproducible evaporation technique. To obtain better electrical contact between the display and the fan-out board, the homogeneous conductive elastomer was replaced with a laminated one. A device free of shorts or opens in the row electrodes and free of shorts between the column electrodes is now being tested.

  3. Barium hexaferrite suspensions for electrophoretic deposition.

    PubMed

    Ovtar, Simona; Lisjak, Darja; Drofenik, Miha

    2009-09-15

    In this investigation we have looked at the preparation of barium hexaferrite suspensions, with the stability of the magnetic barium hexaferrite particles being increased by the addition of a surfactant, dodecylbenzylsulfonic acid (DBSA). The influence of the solubility DBSA in different solvents and its adsorption onto the surfaces of particles with different sizes were determined from zeta-potential measurements. The most suitable and stable suspensions of barium hexaferrite particles, regardless of their sizes, were obtained in 1-butanol, and these were then used for a subsequent electrophoretic deposition. The microstructures of the deposits were examined with electron microscopy. The thickness and density of the deposits as a function of the electric field, the zeta-potential, the particle size, and the separation distance between the electrodes were investigated. The thickness of the deposits was found to increase with the increasing zeta-potential of the suspension and with the increasing separation distance between the electrodes. Denser deposits were obtained from the suspensions of smaller particles that had narrower particle size distributions.

  4. Fluid Delivery System For Capillary Electrophoretic Applications.

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Qingbo; Liu, Changsheng; Kane, Thomas E.; Kernan, John R.; Sonnenschein, Bernard; Sharer, Michael V.

    2002-04-23

    An automated electrophoretic system is disclosed. The system employs a capillary cartridge having a plurality of capillary tubes. The cartridge has a first array of capillary ends projecting from one side of a plate. The first array of capillary ends are spaced apart in substantially the same manner as the wells of a microtitre tray of standard size. This allows one to simultaneously perform capillary electrophoresis on samples present in each of the wells of the tray. The system includes a stacked, dual carrousel arrangement to eliminate cross-contamination resulting from reuse of the same buffer tray on consecutive executions from electrophoresis. The system also has a gel delivery module containing a gel syringe/a stepper motor or a high pressure chamber with a pump to quickly and uniformly deliver gel through the capillary tubes. The system further includes a multi-wavelength beam generator to generate a laser beam which produces a beam with a wide range of wavelengths. An off-line capillary reconditioner thoroughly cleans a capillary cartridge to enable simultaneous execution of electrophoresis with another capillary cartridge. The streamlined nature of the off-line capillary reconditioner offers the advantage of increased system throughput with a minimal increase in system cost.

  5. Cell and Particle Interactions and Aggregation During Electrophoretic Motion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Davis, Robert H.

    2000-01-01

    The objectives of this research were (i) to perform experiments for observing and quantifying electrophoretic aggregation, (ii) to develop a theoretical description to appropriately analyze and compare with the experimental results, (iii) to study the combined effects of electrophoretic and gravitational aggregation of large particles, and the combined effects of electrophoretic and Brownian aggregation of small particles, and (iv) to perform a preliminary design of a potential future flight experiment involving electrophoretic aggregation. Electrophoresis refers to the motion of charged particles, droplets or molecules in response to an applied electric field. Electrophoresis is commonly used for analysis and separation of biological particles or molecules. When particles have different surface charge densities or potentials, they will migrate at different velocities in an electric field. This differential migration leads to the possibility that they will collide and aggregate, thereby preventing separation.

  6. Origin of the effective mobility in non-linear active micro-rheology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Santamaría-Holek, I.; Pérez-Madrid, A.

    2016-10-01

    The distinction between the damping coefficient and the effective non-linear mobility of driven particles in active micro-rheology of supercooled liquids is explained in terms of individual and collective dynamics. The effective mobility arises as a collective effect which gives insight into the energy landscape of the system. On the other hand, the damping coefficient is a constant that modulates the effect of external forces over the thermal energy which particles have at their disposition to perform Brownian motion. For long times, these thermal fluctuations become characterized in terms of an effective temperature that is a consequence of the dynamic coupling between kinetic and configurational degrees of freedom induced by the presence of the strong external force. The interplay between collective mobility and effective temperature allows to formulate a generalized Stokes-Einstein relation that may be used to determine the collective diffusion coefficient. The explicit relations we deduce reproduce simulation data remarkably well.

  7. Capillary electrophoretic and computational study of the complexation of valinomycin with rubidium cation.

    PubMed

    Ehala, Sille; Dybal, Jirí; Makrlík, Emanuel; Kasicka, Václav

    2009-03-01

    This study is focused on the characterization of interactions of valinomycin (Val), a macrocyclic dodecadepsipeptide antibiotic ionophore, with rubidium cation, Rb(+). Capillary affinity electrophoresis was employed for the experimental evaluation of the strength of the Val-Rb(+) complex. The study involved the measurement of the change of effective electrophoretic mobility of Val at increasing concentration of Rb(+) cation in the BGE. From the dependence of Val effective electrophoretic mobility on the Rb(+) cation concentration in the BGE (methanolic solution of 100 mM Tris, 50 mM acetic acid, 0-1 mM RbCl), the apparent binding (stability) constant (K(b)) of the Val-Rb(+) complex in methanol was evaluated as log K(b)=4.63+/-0.27. According to the quantum mechanical density functional theory calculations employed to predict the most probable structure of Val-Rb(+) complex, Val is stabilized by strong non-covalent bond interactions of Rb(+) with six ester carbonyl oxygen atoms so that the position of the "central" Rb(+) cation in the Val cage is symmetric.

  8. Thermal tracking in mobile robots for leak inspection activities.

    PubMed

    Ibarguren, Aitor; Molina, Jorge; Susperregi, Loreto; Maurtua, Iñaki

    2013-10-09

    Maintenance tasks are crucial for all kind of industries, especially in extensive industrial plants, like solar thermal power plants. The incorporation of robots is a key issue for automating inspection activities, as it will allow a constant and regular control over the whole plant. This paper presents an autonomous robotic system to perform pipeline inspection for early detection and prevention of leakages in thermal power plants, based on the work developed within the MAINBOT (http://www.mainbot.eu) European project. Based on the information provided by a thermographic camera, the system is able to detect leakages in the collectors and pipelines. Beside the leakage detection algorithms, the system includes a particle filter-based tracking algorithm to keep the target in the field of view of the camera and to avoid the irregularities of the terrain while the robot patrols the plant. The information provided by the particle filter is further used to command a robot arm, which handles the camera and ensures that the target is always within the image. The obtained results show the suitability of the proposed approach, adding a tracking algorithm to improve the performance of the leakage detection system.

  9. Thermal Tracking in Mobile Robots for Leak Inspection Activities

    PubMed Central

    Ibarguren, Aitor; Molina, Jorge; Susperregi, Loreto; Maurtua, Iñaki

    2013-01-01

    Maintenance tasks are crucial for all kind of industries, especially in extensive industrial plants, like solar thermal power plants. The incorporation of robots is a key issue for automating inspection activities, as it will allow a constant and regular control over the whole plant. This paper presents an autonomous robotic system to perform pipeline inspection for early detection and prevention of leakages in thermal power plants, based on the work developed within the MAINBOT (http://www.mainbot.eu) European project. Based on the information provided by a thermographic camera, the system is able to detect leakages in the collectors and pipelines. Beside the leakage detection algorithms, the system includes a particle filter-based tracking algorithm to keep the target in the field of view of the camera and to avoid the irregularities of the terrain while the robot patrols the plant. The information provided by the particle filter is further used to command a robot arm, which handles the camera and ensures that the target is always within the image. The obtained results show the suitability of the proposed approach, adding a tracking algorithm to improve the performance of the leakage detection system. PMID:24113684

  10. Electrophoretically deposited reduced graphene oxide platform for food toxin detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Srivastava, Saurabh; Kumar, Vinod; Ali, Md Azahar; Solanki, Pratima R.; Srivastava, Anchal; Sumana, Gajjala; Saxena, Preeti Suman; Joshi, Amish G.; Malhotra, B. D.

    2013-03-01

    Reduced graphene oxide (RGO) due to its excellent electrochemical properties and large surface area, has recently aroused much interest for electrochemical biosensing application. Here, the chemically active RGO has been synthesized and deposited onto an indium tin oxide (ITO) coated glass substrate by the electrophoretic deposition technique. This novel platform has been utilized for covalent attachment of the monoclonal antibodies of aflatoxin B1 (anti-AFB1) for food toxin (AFB1) detection. The electron microscopy, X-ray diffraction, and UV-visible studies reveal successful synthesis of reduced graphene oxide while the XPS and FTIR studies suggest its carboxylic functionalized nature. The electrochemical sensing results of the anti-AFB1/RGO/ITO based immunoelectrode obtained as a function of aflatoxin concentration show high sensitivity (68 μA ng-1 mL cm-2) and improved detection limit (0.12 ng mL-1). The association constant (ka) for antigen-antibody interaction obtained as 5 × 10-4 ng mL-1 indicates high affinity of antibodies toward the antigen (AFB1).Reduced graphene oxide (RGO) due to its excellent electrochemical properties and large surface area, has recently aroused much interest for electrochemical biosensing application. Here, the chemically active RGO has been synthesized and deposited onto an indium tin oxide (ITO) coated glass substrate by the electrophoretic deposition technique. This novel platform has been utilized for covalent attachment of the monoclonal antibodies of aflatoxin B1 (anti-AFB1) for food toxin (AFB1) detection. The electron microscopy, X-ray diffraction, and UV-visible studies reveal successful synthesis of reduced graphene oxide while the XPS and FTIR studies suggest its carboxylic functionalized nature. The electrochemical sensing results of the anti-AFB1/RGO/ITO based immunoelectrode obtained as a function of aflatoxin concentration show high sensitivity (68 μA ng-1 mL cm-2) and improved detection limit (0.12 ng mL-1). The

  11. The experience of choice in physical activity contexts for adults with mobility impairments.

    PubMed

    Morphy, Lorraine Y; Goodwin, Donna

    2012-04-01

    This exploratory study described the experiences of choice in physical activity contexts for adults with mobility impairments. The experiences of 3 female and 2 males with mobility impairments between 18 and 23 years of age were described using the interpretive phenomenological methods of individual interviews, written stories, and field notes. Thematic analysis revealed three themes: (a) interpreting the setting described participants' interpretation of the environment, person, and task when making movement choices; (b) alternative selection described how participants actively engaged in analyzing alternatives and choosing among them; and (c) implications of choices made described participants' evaluations of good and bad choices and what was learned. Evidence of effective choice making among adults with physical impairments suggests the potential efficacy of ecological task analysis as a pedagogical tool in physical activity contexts.

  12. Association of electrophoretic karyotype of Candida stellatoidea with virulence for mice

    SciTech Connect

    Kwon-Chung, K.J.; Wickes, B.L.; Merz, W.G.

    1988-07-01

    Seven isolates of Candida stellatoidea were studied for their electrophoretic karyotype, virulence for mice, sensitivity to UV radiation, growth rate in vitro, reaction on cycloheximide-indicator medium, and proteinase activity. The isolates exhibited one of two distinct electrophoretic karyotypes as determined by orthogonal field alternating gel electrophoresis (OFAGE). Four isolates, including the type culture of C. stellatoidea, belonged to electrophoretic karyotype type I by OFAGE, showing eight to nine bands of which at least two bands were less than 1,000 kilobases in size as estimated by comparison with the DNA bands of Saccharomyces cerevisiae. These isolates failed to produce fatal infection in mice within 20 days when 5 X 10(5) cells were injected intravenously. The yeasts were cleared from the kidneys of two of three mice tested by day 30. Type I showed proteinase activity on bovine serum albumin agar at pH 3.8 and produced a negative reaction on cycloheximide-bromcresol green medium within 48 h. The three grouped in type II by OFAGE showed banding patterns similar to those of a well-characterized isolate of Candida albicans. The isolates of type II had an electrophoretic karyotype of six to seven bands approximately 1,200 kilobases or greater in size. All three type II isolates were highly virulent for mice, producing fatality curves similar to those of a previously studied C. albicans isolate. From 80 to 90% of the mice injected with 5 X 10(5) cells intravenously died within 20 days. The type II isolates produced a positive reaction on cycloheximide-bromcresol green agar and showed no proteinase activity on bovine serum albumin agar at the low pH. In addition, the type II isolates grew faster and were significantly more resistant to UV irradiation than the type I isolates.

  13. Understanding local forces in electrophoretic ink systems: utilizing optical tweezers to explore electrophoretic display devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wei, David L.; Dickinson, Mark R.; Smith, N.; Gleeson, Helen F.

    2016-09-01

    Optical tweezers can be used as a valuable tool to characterize electrophoretic display (EPD) systems. EPDs are ubiquitous with e-readers and are becoming a commonplace technology where reflective, low-power displays are required; yet the physics of some features crucial to their operation remains poorly defined. We utilize optical tweezers as a tool to understand the motion of charged ink particles within the devices and show that the response of optically trapped electrophoretic particles can be used to characterize electric fields within these devices. This technique for mapping the force can be compared to simulations of the electric field in our devices, thus demonstrating that the electric field itself is the sole governor of the particle motion in an individual-particle regime. By studying the individual-particle response to the electric field, we can then begin to characterize particle motion in `real' systems with many particles. Combining optical tweezing with particle tracking techniques, we can investigate deviations in many particle systems from the single-particle case.

  14. Mobility disability and the pattern of accelerometer-derived sedentary and physical activity behaviors in people with multiple sclerosis

    PubMed Central

    Ezeugwu, Victor; Klaren, Rachel E.; A. Hubbard, Elizabeth; Manns, Patricia (Trish); Motl, Robert W.

    2015-01-01

    Objective Low physical activity and high sedentary behavior levels are major concerns in persons with multiple sclerosis (MS) and these differ depending on the level of mobility disability. However, the manner in which daily activity is accumulated is currently unknown in this population. Methods A secondary analysis was performed on a combined data set of persons with MS from two previous investigations of physical activity and symptomatic or quality of life outcomes in the United States over a two year period (2007–2009). Mobility disability status was determined using the Patient Determined Disease Steps (PDDS) while activity behavior was objectively monitored using an ActiGraph accelerometer for 7 days. Results Persons with MS who have mobility disability were involved in sedentary behavior, light and moderate intensity activity for 65%, 34% and 1% of the day, respectively compared to 60%, 37%, and 3%, respectively in those without mobility disability (p < 0.05). Breaks in sedentary time did not differ by mobility disability status. Compared to those without mobility disability, the average number of sedentary bouts longer than 30 min was greater in those with mobility disability (p = 0.016). Conclusion Persons with MS with mobility disability are less active, engage in more sedentary behavior and accumulate prolonged sedentary bouts. PMID:26844077

  15. Mobile phone electromagnetic radiation activates MAPK signaling and regulates viability in Drosophila.

    PubMed

    Lee, Kyu-Sun; Choi, Jong-Soon; Hong, Sae-Yong; Son, Tae-Ho; Yu, Kweon

    2008-07-01

    Mobile phones are widely used in the modern world. However, biological effects of electromagnetic radiation produced by mobile phones are largely unknown. In this report, we show biological effects of the mobile phone 835 MHz electromagnetic field (EMF) in the Drosophila model system. When flies were exposed to the specific absorption rate (SAR) 1.6 W/kg, which is the proposed exposure limit by the American National Standards Institute (ANSI), more than 90% of the flies were viable even after the 30 h exposure. However, in the SAR 4.0 W/kg strong EMF exposure, viability dropped from the 12 h exposure. These EMF exposures triggered stress response and increased the production of reactive oxygen species. The EMF exposures also activated extracellular signal regulated kinase (ERK) and c-Jun N-terminal kinase (JNK) signaling, but not p38 kinase signaling. Interestingly, SAR 1.6 W/kg activated mainly ERK signaling and expression of an anti-apoptotic gene, whereas SAR 4.0 W/kg strongly activated JNK signaling and expression of apoptotic genes. In addition, SAR 4.0 W/kg amplified the number of apoptotic cells in the fly brain. These findings demonstrate that the exposure limit on electromagnetic radiation proposed by ANSI triggered ERK-survival signaling but the strong electromagnetic radiation activated JNK-apoptotic signaling in Drosophila.

  16. Activity Classification Using Mobile Phone based Motion Sensing and Distributed Computing.

    PubMed

    Artetxe, Arkaitz; Beristain, Andoni; Kabongo, Luis

    2014-01-01

    In this work we present a system that uses the accelerometer embedded in a mobile phone to perform activity recognition, with the purpose of continuously and pervasively monitoring the users' level of physical activity in their everyday life. Several classification algorithms are analysed and their performance measured, based for 6 different activities, namely walking, running, climbing stairs, descending stairs, sitting and standing. Feature selection has also been explored in order to minimize computational load, which is one of the main concerns given the restrictions of smartphones in terms of processor capabilities and specially battery life.

  17. Column-coupling strategies for multidimensional electrophoretic separation techniques.

    PubMed

    Kler, Pablo A; Sydes, Daniel; Huhn, Carolin

    2015-01-01

    Multidimensional electrophoretic separations represent one of the most common strategies for dealing with the analysis of complex samples. In recent years we have been witnessing the explosive growth of separation techniques for the analysis of complex samples in applications ranging from life sciences to industry. In this sense, electrophoretic separations offer several strategic advantages such as excellent separation efficiency, different methods with a broad range of separation mechanisms, and low liquid consumption generating less waste effluents and lower costs per analysis, among others. Despite their impressive separation efficiency, multidimensional electrophoretic separations present some drawbacks that have delayed their extensive use: the volumes of the columns, and consequently of the injected sample, are significantly smaller compared to other analytical techniques, thus the coupling interfaces between two separations components must be very efficient in terms of providing geometrical precision with low dead volume. Likewise, very sensitive detection systems are required. Additionally, in electrophoretic separation techniques, the surface properties of the columns play a fundamental role for electroosmosis as well as the unwanted adsorption of proteins or other complex biomolecules. In this sense the requirements for an efficient coupling for electrophoretic separation techniques involve several aspects related to microfluidics and physicochemical interactions of the electrolyte solutions and the solid capillary walls. It is interesting to see how these multidimensional electrophoretic separation techniques have been used jointly with different detection techniques, for intermediate detection as well as for final identification and quantification, particularly important in the case of mass spectrometry. In this work we present a critical review about the different strategies for coupling two or more electrophoretic separation techniques and the

  18. An active K/Ka-band antenna array for the NASA ACTS mobile terminal

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tulintseff, A.; Crist, R.; Densmore, Art; Sukamto, L.

    1993-01-01

    An active K/Ka-band antenna array is currently under development for NASA's ACTS Mobile Terminal (AMT). The AMT task will demonstrate voice, data, and video communications to and from the AMT vehicle in Los Angeles, California, and a base station in Cleveland, Ohio, via the ACTS satellite at 30 and 20 GHz. Satellite tracking for the land-mobile vehicular antenna system involves 'mechanical dithering' of the antenna, where the antenna radiates a fixed beam 46 deg. above the horizon. The antenna is to transmit horizontal polarization and receive vertical polarization at 29.634 plus or minus 0.15 GHz and 19.914 plus or minus 0.15 GHz, respectively. The active array will provide a minimum of 22 dBW EIRP transmit power density and a -8 dB/K deg. receive sensitivity.

  19. Metabolic and cytoskeletal modulation of transferrin receptor mobility in mitogen-activated human lymphocytes.

    PubMed Central

    Galbraith, G M; Galbraith, R M

    1980-01-01

    The transferrin receptors which appear on mitogen-activated human peripheral blood lymphocytes were found by the use of immunofluorescence techniques to display temperature-dependent patching and capping reactions upon binding of transferrin. Lateral mobility of ligand-occupied membrane sites was accompanied by both shedding and endocytosis of receptor-transferrin complexes. In the presence of sodium azide or the microfilament inhibitor cytochalasin B, cap formation and shedding were markedly inhibited. In contrast, endocytosis of patched receptor-ligand complexes was inhibited by azide and microtubule inhibitors, including colchicine, vinblastine and vincristine. Co-capping experiments performed to elucidate further the alterations in membrane configuration involved in these reactions failed to reveal any topographical relationship between transferrin receptors and lectin-binding sites in these cells. These studied indicate that temperature-dependent mobility of transferrin receptors upon mitogen-activated peripheral blood lymphocytes is dependent upon the integrity of the cytoskeletal system and metabolic function of the cell. PMID:6258830

  20. An active K/Ka-band antenna array for the NASA ACTS mobile terminal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tulintseff, A.; Crist, R.; Densmore, Art; Sukamto, L.

    An active K/Ka-band antenna array is currently under development for NASA's ACTS Mobile Terminal (AMT). The AMT task will demonstrate voice, data, and video communications to and from the AMT vehicle in Los Angeles, California, and a base station in Cleveland, Ohio, via the ACTS satellite at 30 and 20 GHz. Satellite tracking for the land-mobile vehicular antenna system involves 'mechanical dithering' of the antenna, where the antenna radiates a fixed beam 46 deg. above the horizon. The antenna is to transmit horizontal polarization and receive vertical polarization at 29.634 plus or minus 0.15 GHz and 19.914 plus or minus 0.15 GHz, respectively. The active array will provide a minimum of 22 dBW EIRP transmit power density and a -8 dB/K deg. receive sensitivity.

  1. Investigating children's physical activity and sedentary behavior using ecological momentary assessment with mobile phones.

    PubMed

    Dunton, Genevieve F; Liao, Yue; Intille, Stephen S; Spruijt-Metz, Donna; Pentz, Maryann

    2011-06-01

    The risk of obesity during childhood can be significantly reduced through increased physical activity and decreased sedentary behavior. Recent technological advances have created opportunities for the real-time measurement of these behaviors. Mobile phones are ubiquitous and easy to use, and thus have the capacity to collect data from large numbers of people. The present study tested the feasibility, acceptability, and validity of an electronic ecological momentary assessment (EMA) protocol using electronic surveys administered on the display screen of mobile phones to assess children's physical activity and sedentary behaviors. A total of 121 children (ages 9-13, 51% male, 38% at risk for overweight/overweight) participated in EMA monitoring from Friday afternoon to Monday evening during children's nonschool time, with 3-7 surveys/day. Items assessed current activity (e.g., watching TV/movies, playing video games, active play/sports/exercising). Children simultaneously wore an Actigraph GT2M accelerometer. EMA survey responses were time-matched to total step counts and minutes of moderate-to-vigorous physical activity (MVPA) occurring in the 30 min before each EMA survey prompt. No significant differences between answered and unanswered EMA surveys were found for total steps or MVPA. Step counts and the likelihood of 5+ min of MVPA were significantly higher during EMA-reported physical activity (active play/sports/exercising) vs. sedentary behaviors (reading/computer/homework, watching TV/movies, playing video games, riding in a car) (P < 0.001). Findings generally support the acceptability and validity of a 4-day EMA protocol using mobile phones to measure physical activity and sedentary behavior in children during leisure time.

  2. A mobile system for the multifrequency Doppler sounding of the modified ionosphere in active experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bagno, Iu. D.; Kim, V. Iu.; Namazov, S. A.; Panchenko, V. N.; Khar'kov, I. P.

    1993-01-01

    The paper presents a description of a mobile multichannel Doppler system designed for shipboard studies of the modified ionosphere. The system was used for the diagnostics of the modified ionosphere in active experiments carried out in equatorial and low-latitude regions using the MR-20 geophysical rockets as well as in satellite experiments in the framework of the CRRES project. The data processing method is discussed, and experimental data are presented.

  3. Multiple Behavior Change in Diet and Activity: A Randomized Controlled Trial Using Mobile Technology

    PubMed Central

    Spring, Bonnie; Schneider, Kristin; McFadden, H.G.; Vaughn, Jocelyn; Kozak, Andrea T.; Smith, Malaina; Moller, Arlen C.; Epstein, Leonard H.; DeMott, Andrew; Hedeker, Donald; Siddique, Juned; Lloyd-Jones, Donald M.

    2012-01-01

    Background Many patients exhibit multiple chronic disease risk behaviors. Research provides little information about advice that can maximize simultaneous health behavior changes. Methods To test which combination of diet and activity advice maximizes healthy change, we randomized 204 adults with elevated saturated fat and low fruit/vegetable intakes, high sedentary leisure time and low physical activity to one of four treatments: increase fruit/vegetable and physical activity; decrease fat and sedentary leisure; decrease fat and increase physical activity; increase fruit/vegetable and decrease sedentary leisure. Treatments provided three weeks of remote coaching supported by mobile decision support technology and financial incentives. During treatment, incentives were contingent on using the mobile device to self-monitor and attain behavioral targets; during follow-up they were contingent only on recording. The outcome was standardized, composite improvement on the four diet and activity behaviors at end of treatment and five month follow-up. Results Of those randomized, 200 (98%) completed follow-up. The increase fruit/vegetable and decrease sedentary leisure treatment improved more than the other 3 treatments (p<.001). Specifically, fruit/vegetables increased from 1.2 servings/day to 5.5; sedentary leisure decreased from 219.2 minutes/day to 89.3; saturated fat decreased from 12.0% of calories consumed to 9.5%. Differences between treatment groups were maintained through follow-up. Traditional dieting (decrease fat and increase physical activity) improved less than the other 3 treatments (p<.001). Conclusions Remote coaching supported by mobile technology and financial incentives holds promise to improve diet and activity. Targeting fruits/vegetables and sedentary leisure together maximizes overall adoption and maintenance of multiple healthy behavior changes. PMID:22636824

  4. Analysis of electrophoretic patterns of arbitrarily primed PCR profiling.

    PubMed

    Trifunović, Dragana; Radović, Milan; Ristić, Zoran; Guzvić, Miodrag; Dimitrijević, Bogomir

    2005-11-01

    We present a mathematical algorithm for the analysis of electrophoretic patterns resulting from arbitrarily primed PCR profiling. The algorithm is based on the established mathematical procedures applied to the analysis of digital images of gel patterns. The algorithm includes (a) transformation of the image into a matrix form, (b) identification of every electrophoretic lane as a set of matrix columns that are further mathematically processed, (c) averaging of matrix columns corresponding to electrophoretic lanes that define lane representatives, (d) elimination of "smiling" bands, (e) solving the problem of a lane offset, and (f) removal of the background. Representation of individual electrophoretic lanes in the form of functions allows interlane comparisons and further mathematical analysis. Direct comparison of selected lanes was obtained by employing correlation analysis. Gel images were those obtained after arbitrarily primed PCR analysis of DNA that underwent damage induced by gamma radiation from a (60)Co source. The applied method proved to be useful for elimination of subjectivity of visual inspection. It offers the possibility to avoid overlooking important differences in case of suboptimal electrophoretic resolution. In addition, higher precision is achieved in the assessment of quantitative differences due to better insight into experimental artifacts. These simple mathematical methods offer an open-type algorithm, i.e., this algorithm enables easy implementation of different parameters that may be useful for other analytical needs.

  5. Anaerobic microbial mobilization and biotransformation of arsenate adsorbed onto activated alumina.

    PubMed

    Sierra-Alvarez, Reyes; Field, Jim A; Cortinas, Irail; Feijoo, Gumersindo; Teresa Moreira, Maria; Kopplin, Mike; Jay Gandolfi, A

    2005-01-01

    Due to the enactment of a stricter drinking water standard for arsenic in the United States, larger quantities of arsenic will be treated resulting in larger volumes of treatment residuals. The current United States Environmental Protection Agency recommendation is to dispose spent adsorbent residuals from arsenic treatment into non-hazardous municipal solid waste (MSW) landfills. The potential of microorganisms to alter the speciation affecting the mobility of arsenic in the disposal environment is therefore a concern. The purpose of this paper was to evaluate the potential of an anaerobic microbial consortium to biologically mobilize arsenate (As(V)) adsorbed onto activated alumina (AA), a common adsorbent used for treating arsenic in drinking water. Three anaerobic columns (0.27 l) packed with 100 g dry weight of AA containing 0.657 mg adsorbed As(V) (expressed as arsenic) per gram dry weight were continuously flushed with synthetic landfill leachate for 257 days. The fully biologically active column was inoculated with methanogenic anaerobic sludge (10 g volatile suspended solids l(-1) column) and was operated with a mixture of volatile fatty acids (VFA) in the feed (2.5 g chemical oxygen demand l(-1) feed). At the end of the experiment, 37% of the arsenic was removed from the column, of which 48% was accounted for by arsenical species identified in the column effluent. The most important form of arsenic eluted was arsenite (As(III)), accounting for nearly all of the identified arsenic in periods of high mobilization. Additionally, two methylated metabolites, methylarsonic acid and dimethylarsinic acid were observed. Mobilization of arsenic is attributed to the biological reduction of As(V) to As(III) since literature data indicates that As(III) is more weakly adsorbed to AA compared to As(V). Batch and continuous assays confirmed that VFA, present in landfill leachates, served as an electron donating substrate supporting enhanced rates of As(V) reduction to As

  6. Electrophoretic deposition of iron catalyst on C-fiber textiles for the growth of carbon nanofibers.

    PubMed

    Lee, Sang-Won; Lee, Chang-Seop

    2014-11-01

    In this study, carbon nanofibers synthesis has been conducted by chemical vapor deposition on C-fiber textiles coated with an iron catalyst via electrophoretic deposition. C-fiber textiles were oxidized with nitric acid before the iron catalyst was plated by electrophoretic deposition. Due to oxidation, the hydroxyl group was created on the C-fiber textiles and was used as an active site for iron catalyst deposition. It was verified that the iron catalyst was deposited on the C-fiber textiles, while current, voltage, and deposition time varied and the concentration of electrolyte was kept constant in electrophoretic deposition. After being deposited, the iron particles were dried in oven for 24 hours and reduced by hydrogen gas in a furnace. Ethylene gas was introduced for the growth of carbon nanofibers and the growth temperature was then varied to find the optimal growth temperature of the carbon nanofibers. Thus, the characteristics of carbon nanofibers were analyzed by Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM), Energy Dispersive Spectroscopy (EDS), N2-sorption (BET), X-Ray Diffraction (XRD), and X-ray Photoelectron Spectroscopy (XPS). It is verified that the iron particles were most evenly deposited at 0.1 A for 3 minutes. Carbon nanofibers grew to 150-200 nm most evenly at 600 degrees C via temperature variations in CVD.

  7. Critical role for calcium mobilization in activation of the NLRP3 inflammasome

    PubMed Central

    Murakami, Tomohiko; Ockinger, Johan; Yu, Jiujiu; Byles, Vanessa; McColl, Aisleen; Hofer, Aldebaran M.; Horng, Tiffany

    2012-01-01

    The NLRP3 (nucleotide-binding domain, leucine-rich-repeat-containing family, pyrin domain-containing 3) inflammasome mediates production of inflammatory mediators, such as IL-1β and IL-18, and as such is implicated in a variety of inflammatory processes, including infection, sepsis, autoinflammatory diseases, and metabolic diseases. The proximal steps in NLRP3 inflammasome activation are not well understood. Here we elucidate a critical role for Ca2+ mobilization in activation of the NLRP3 inflammasome by multiple stimuli. We demonstrate that blocking Ca2+ mobilization inhibits assembly and activation of the NLRP3 inflammasome complex, and that during ATP stimulation Ca2+ signaling is pivotal in promoting mitochondrial damage. C/EPB homologous protein, a transcription factor that can modulate Ca2+ release from the endoplasmic reticulum, amplifies NLRP3 inflammasome activation, thus linking endoplasmic reticulum stress to activation of the NLRP3 inflammasome. Our findings support a model for NLRP3 inflammasome activation by Ca2+-mediated mitochondrial damage. PMID:22733741

  8. A plasmid containing the human metallothionein II gene can function as an antibody-assisted electrophoretic biosensor for heavy metals.

    PubMed

    Wooten, Dennis C; Starr, Clarise R; Lyon, Wanda J

    2016-01-01

    Different forms of heavy metals affect biochemical systems in characteristic ways that cannot be detected with typical metal analysis methods like atomic absorption spectrometry. Further, using living systems to analyze interaction of heavy metals with biochemical systems can be laborious and unreliable. To generate a reliable easy-to-use biologically-based biosensor system, the entire human metallothionein-II (MT-II) gene was incorporated into a plasmid (pUC57-MT) easily replicated in Escherichia coli. In this system, a commercial polyclonal antibody raised against human metal-responsive transcription factor-1 protein (MTF-1 protein) could modify the electrophoretic migration patterns (i.e. cause specific decreases in agarose gel electrophoretic mobility) of the plasmid in the presence or absence of heavy metals other than zinc (Zn). In the study here, heavy metals, MTF-1 protein, and polyclonal anti-MTF-1 antibody were used to assess pUC57-MT plasmid antibody-assisted electrophoretic mobility. Anti-MTF-1 antibody bound both MTF-1 protein and pUC57-MT plasmid in a non-competitive fashion such that it could be used to differentiate specific heavy metal binding. The results showed that antibody-inhibited plasmid migration was heavy metal level-dependent. Zinc caused a unique mobility shift pattern opposite to that of other metals tested, i.e. Zn blocked the antibody ability to inhibit plasmid migration, despite a greatly increased affinity for DNA by the antibody when Zn was present. The Zn effect was reversed/modified by adding MTF-1 protein. Additionally, antibody inhibition of plasmid mobility was resistant to heat pre-treatment and trypsinization, indicating absence of residual DNA extraction-resistant bacterial DNA binding proteins. DNA binding by anti-DNA antibodies may be commonly enhanced by xenobiotic heavy metals and elevated levels of Zn, thus making them potentially effective tools for assessment of heavy metal bioavailability in aqueous solutions and

  9. [Leukocyte mobility in modulation of activity of the cell signalling system].

    PubMed

    Luĭk, A I; Mogilevich, S E; Radchenko, I V; Kondrashova, L N

    1993-01-01

    The mobility of the rat polymorphonuclear leukocytes (PMNL) has been studied. It was shown, that it is greatly determined by the balance of adenylate cyclase (AdC) and Ca-polyphosphoinositide (Ca-PPI) cell signalling systems. Various compounds whose action on the activity of the signalling systems was previously connected with the membrane receptors, proved to be capable to affect the activity of submembrane elements of these systems. It is concluded that multiple areas of bioregulators fixation within the limits of the signal cascades are available.

  10. Adsorption of valuable metals from leachates of mobile phone wastes using biopolymers and activated carbon.

    PubMed

    Zazycki, Maria A; Tanabe, Eduardo H; Bertuol, Daniel A; Dotto, Guilherme L

    2017-03-01

    In this work, chitin (CTN), chitosan (CTS) and activated carbon (AC) were used as adsorbents to recover valuable metals from leachates of mobile phone wastes. The mobile phone wastes (contactors) were collected and characterized. The valuable metals were extracted by thiourea leaching. The adsorption of valuable metals from leachates was studied according to the kinetic and equilibrium viewpoints. It was found that the contactors were composed by Au, Ni, Cu and Sn. The thiourea leaching provided extraction percentages of 68.6% for Au, 22.1% for Ni and 2.8% for Cu. Sn was not extracted. The leachate presented 17.5 mg L(-1) of Au, 324.9 mg L(-1) of Ni and 573.1 mg L(-1) of Cu. The adsorption was fast, being the equilibrium attained within 120 min. The adsorption of Au, Ni and Cu onto CTN and AC followed the Langmuir model, while, the adsorption of these metals onto CTS, followed the Freundlich model. Removal percentages higher than 95% were obtained for all metals, depending of the type and amount of adsorbent. It was demonstrated that the adsorption onto chitin, chitosan and activated carbon can be an alternative to recover valuable metals from leachates of mobile phone wastes.

  11. Electrophoretic gel image analysis software for the molecular biology laboratory.

    PubMed

    Redman, T; Jacobs, T

    1991-06-01

    We present GelReader 1.0, a microcomputer program designed to make precision, digital analysis of one-dimensional electrophoretic gels accessible to the molecular biology laboratory of modest means. Images of electrophoretic gels are digitized via a desktop flatbed scanner from instant photographs, autoradiograms or chromogenically stained blotting media. GelReader is then invoked to locate lanes and bands and generate a report of molecular weights of unknowns, based on specified sets of standards. Frequently used standards can be stored in the program. Lanes and bands can be added or removed, based upon users' subjective preferences. A unique lane histogram feature facilitates precise manual addition of bands missed by the software. Image enhancement features include palette manipulation, histogram equalization, shadowing and magnification. The user interface strikes a balance between program autonomy and user intervention, in recognition of the variability in electrophoretic gel quality and users' analytical needs.

  12. Electrophoretic interactions and aggregation of colloidal biological particles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Davis, Robert H.; Nichols, Scott C.; Loewenberg, Michael; Todd, Paul

    1994-01-01

    The separation of cells or particles from solution has traditionally been accomplished with centrifuges or by sedimentation; however, many particles have specific densities close to unity, making buoyancy-driven motion slow or negligible, but most cells and particles carry surface charges, making them ideal for electrophoretic separation. Both buoyancy-driven and electrophoretic separation may be influenced by hydrodynamic interactions and aggregation of neighboring particles. Aggregation by electrophoresis was analyzed for two non-Brownian particles with different zeta potentials and thin double layers migrating through a viscous fluid. The results indicate that the initial rate of electrophoretically-driven aggregation may exceed that of buoyancy-driven aggregation, even under conditions in which buoyancy-driven relative motion of noninteracting particles is dominant.

  13. Physical Activity and Falls in Older Men: The Critical Role of Mobility Limitations

    PubMed Central

    JEFFERIS, BARBARA J.; MEROM, DAFNA; SARTINI, CLAUDIO; WANNAMETHEE, S. GOYA; ASH, SARAH; LENNON, LUCY T.; ILIFFE, STEVE; KENDRICK, DENISE; WHINCUP, PETER H.

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Background Physical activity (PA) has many health benefits but may increase falls risk among older adults. We study how objectively measured habitual daily PA is related to falls by exploring the modifying effect of mobility limitations and the mediating roles of fitness and lower-limb strength. Methods One thousand six hundred fifty-five (53%) of 3137 surviving participants (men age 71–91 yr) in an ongoing UK-population-based cohort study wore an ActiGraph GT3x accelerometer over the hip for 1 wk in 2010–2012 to measure PA (exposure) and reported demographic and health status, including mobility limitations. One year later, 825 men reported falls history (outcome). Results Seven hundred of 825 men had ≥600 min·d−1 of accelerometer wear for ≥3 d. Nineteen percent (n = 128) reported falls 1 yr later. Associations between PA and falls differed by presence of mobility limitations. Among 66% (n = 471) of men without mobility limitations, number of falls increased incrementally (for every 30 min of moderate to vigorous PA [MVPA]: incidence rate ratio [IRR], 1.50; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.10–2.03, adjusted for falls risk factors). Step count was not related to number of falls below 9000 steps per day but was related to number of falls ≥9000 steps per day (for every additional 1000 steps per day: IRR, 1.59; 95% CI, 1.16–2.18). Among 33% (n = 229) of men with mobility limitations, falls risk declined with increasing activity (for every 1000 steps per day: IRR, 0.80; 95% CI, 0.70–0.91; for every 30 min of MVPA: IRR, 0.61; 95% CI, 0.42–0.89; for every additional 30 min of sedentary behavior ≥600 min·d−1: IRR, 1.22; 95% CI, 1.07–1.40). Conclusions Interventions to promote MVPA in older men should incorporate falls prevention strategies. Among adults with mobility limitations, trials should investigate whether increasing MVPA levels can reduce falls risk. PMID:25668406

  14. Restricted mobility of specific functional groups reduces anti-cancer drug activity in healthy cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martins, Murillo L.; Ignazzi, Rosanna; Eckert, Juergen; Watts, Benjamin; Kaneno, Ramon; Zambuzzi, Willian F.; Daemen, Luke; Saeki, Margarida J.; Bordallo, Heloisa N.

    2016-03-01

    The most common cancer treatments currently available are radio- and chemo-therapy. These therapies have, however, drawbacks, such as, the reduction in quality of life and the low efficiency of radiotherapy in cases of multiple metastases. To lessen these effects, we have encapsulated an anti-cancer drug into a biocompatible matrix. In-vitro assays indicate that this bio-nanocomposite is able to interact and cause morphological changes in cancer cells. Meanwhile, no alterations were observed in monocytes and fibroblasts, indicating that this system might carry the drug in living organisms with reduced clearance rate and toxicity. X-rays and neutrons were used to investigate the carrier structure, as well as to assess the drug mobility within the bio-nanocomposite. From these unique data we show that partial mobility restriction of active groups of the drug molecule suggests why this carrier design is potentially safer to healthy cells.

  15. Restricted mobility of specific functional groups reduces anti-cancer drug activity in healthy cells

    SciTech Connect

    Martins, Murillo L.; Ignazzi, Rosanna; Eckert, Juergen; Watts, Benjamin; Kaneno, Ramon; Zambuzzi, Willian F.; Daemen, Luke; Saeki, Margarida J.; Bordallo, Heloisa N.

    2016-03-02

    Here, the most common cancer treatments currently available are radio- and chemo-therapy. These therapies have, however, drawbacks, such as, the reduction in quality of life and the low efficiency of radiotherapy in cases of multiple metastases. To lessen these effects, we have encapsulated an anti-cancer drug into a biocompatible matrix. In-vitro assays indicate that this bio-nanocomposite is able to interact and cause morphological changes in cancer cells. Meanwhile, no alterations were observed in monocytes and fibroblasts, indicating that this system might carry the drug in living organisms with reduced clearance rate and toxicity. X-rays and neutrons were used to investigate the carrier structure, as well as to assess the drug mobility within the bio-nanocomposite. In conclusion, from these unique data we show that partial mobility restriction of active groups of the drug molecule suggests why this carrier design is potentially safer to healthy cells.

  16. Restricted mobility of specific functional groups reduces anti-cancer drug activity in healthy cells

    DOE PAGES

    Martins, Murillo L.; Ignazzi, Rosanna; Eckert, Juergen; ...

    2016-03-02

    Here, the most common cancer treatments currently available are radio- and chemo-therapy. These therapies have, however, drawbacks, such as, the reduction in quality of life and the low efficiency of radiotherapy in cases of multiple metastases. To lessen these effects, we have encapsulated an anti-cancer drug into a biocompatible matrix. In-vitro assays indicate that this bio-nanocomposite is able to interact and cause morphological changes in cancer cells. Meanwhile, no alterations were observed in monocytes and fibroblasts, indicating that this system might carry the drug in living organisms with reduced clearance rate and toxicity. X-rays and neutrons were used to investigatemore » the carrier structure, as well as to assess the drug mobility within the bio-nanocomposite. In conclusion, from these unique data we show that partial mobility restriction of active groups of the drug molecule suggests why this carrier design is potentially safer to healthy cells.« less

  17. Restricted mobility of specific functional groups reduces anti-cancer drug activity in healthy cells

    PubMed Central

    Martins, Murillo L.; Ignazzi, Rosanna; Eckert, Juergen; Watts, Benjamin; Kaneno, Ramon; Zambuzzi, Willian F.; Daemen, Luke; Saeki, Margarida J.; Bordallo, Heloisa N.

    2016-01-01

    The most common cancer treatments currently available are radio- and chemo-therapy. These therapies have, however, drawbacks, such as, the reduction in quality of life and the low efficiency of radiotherapy in cases of multiple metastases. To lessen these effects, we have encapsulated an anti-cancer drug into a biocompatible matrix. In-vitro assays indicate that this bio-nanocomposite is able to interact and cause morphological changes in cancer cells. Meanwhile, no alterations were observed in monocytes and fibroblasts, indicating that this system might carry the drug in living organisms with reduced clearance rate and toxicity. X-rays and neutrons were used to investigate the carrier structure, as well as to assess the drug mobility within the bio-nanocomposite. From these unique data we show that partial mobility restriction of active groups of the drug molecule suggests why this carrier design is potentially safer to healthy cells. PMID:26932808

  18. Somatic Activation of rasK Gene in a Human Ovarian Carcinoma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feig, L. A.; Bast, R. C.; Knapp, R. C.; Cooper, G. M.

    1984-02-01

    A tumor isolate from a patient with serous cystadenocarcinoma of the ovary contained an activated rasK gene detected by transfection of NIH/3T3 cells. In contrast, DNA from normal cells of the same patient lacked transforming activity, indicating that activation of this transforming gene was the consequence of somatic mutation in the neoplastic cells. The transforming gene product displayed an electrophoretic mobility in sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gels that differed from the mobilities of rasK transforming proteins in other tumors, indicating that a previously undescribed mutation was responsible for activation of rasK in this ovarian carcinoma.

  19. Importance of temperature effect on the electrophoretic behavior of charge-regulated particles.

    PubMed

    Hsu, Jyh-Ping; Tai, Yi-Hsuan; Yeh, Li-Hsien; Tseng, Shiojenn

    2012-01-10

    The Joule heating effect is inevitable in electrophoresis operations. To assess its influence on the performance of electrophoresis, we consider the case of a charge-regulated particle in a solution containing multiple ionic species at temperatures ranging from 298 to 308 K. Using an aqueous SiO(2) dispersion as an example, we show that an increase in the temperature leads to a decrease in both the dielectric constant and the viscosity of the liquid phase, and an increase in both the diffusivity of ions and the particle surface potential. For a particle having a constant surface potential, its electrophoretic mobility is most influenced by the variation in the liquid viscosity as the temperature varies, but for a charged-regulated particle both the liquid viscosity and the surface potential can play an important role. Depending upon the level of pH, the degree of increase in the mobility can be on the order of 40% for a 5 K increase in the temperature. The presence of double-layer polarization, which is significant when the surface potential is sufficiently high, has the effect of inhibiting that increase in the mobility. This implies that the influence of the temperature on the mobility of the particle is most significant when the pH is close to the point of zero charge.

  20. Rat serum alkaline phosphatase electrophoretic fractions: variations with feeding, starvation and cellulose fibre ingestion.

    PubMed

    Martins, M J; Dias, P O; Hipólito-Reis, C

    1998-12-01

    The effect of feeding, starvation and fibre ingestion on alkaline phosphatase (ALP) activity (E.C. 3.1.3.1) was studied in Wistar rat serum. Using identical assay conditions for total ALP activity determination and for electrophoretic ALP isoenzymes/fractions activity calculation, alpha- and beta-naphthyl phosphates and p-nitrophenyl phosphate were used as substrates and 2-amino-2-methyl-1-propanol/HCI was used as buffer, respectively. Total activity with beta-naphthyl phosphate was significantly higher than with alpha-naphthyl phosphate and p-nitrophenyl phosphate; with alpha-naphthyl phosphate it was significantly higher than with p-nitrophenyl phosphate. With all substrates, fed animals had significantly higher total activity than starving ones. Electrophoresis allowed the separation of two fractions. The second fraction activity was significantly higher in the fed group than in the starving ones, irrespective of the substrate used. Starving animals with fibre showed higher values of this fraction than starving animals without fibre, the difference reaching statistical significance with alpha-naphthyl phosphate. The first fraction predominated in both starved groups and the second in the fed group. The second fraction was identified as intestinal ALP. We conclude that the mechanical stimulation of the digestive tract appears to influence the passage of intestinal ALP to serum. The experimental conditions used enable quantification of electrophoretic fractions based on total activity. Activity depends on the substrate used.

  1. User experiences of mobile controlled games for activation, rehabilitation and recreation of elderly and physically impaired.

    PubMed

    Sirkka, Andrew; Merilampi, Sari; Koivisto, Antti; Leinonen, Markus; Leino, Mirka

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this paper was to study how aged people experience mobile controlled game as a method of rehabilitation and recreation. The target group contained persons 70+ years of age living in assisted living conditions (N=34). The average age of the participants was 85.9 years. Women (n=17) and men (n=17) were equally presented in the sample group. Only 12 % (n=4) of participants were involved in an active weekly-based rehabilitation, light physical sitting exercises 38% (n=13). Three (n=3) of the participants (9%) used computers (net banking), and 20 (59%) used mobile phones on daily basis. Social activities and physical activation seem to be rather inadequate and traditional in assisted living organizations. The overall experiences of mobile controlled game described in this paper appeared to be a successful experiment also proving that the elderly are not as reluctant to use technical devices or playing virtual games as often thought. The game was reckoned very motivating, interesting, and entertaining both by the aged and the staff. Activation, rehabilitation and recreation in the elderly homes or assisted living organizations could benefit from utilization of new technology providing new ways and solutions that motivate the users and offer also possibilities for measuring and follow-up of the physical impacts. The future goals to improve the game were set according to the feedback given in this survey: a) wider variety of controlling modes for the game, b) developing various difficulty levels, c) developing the game to support different kinds of body movements, d) easily modified according to the individual user's exercising or rehabilitation needs as well as e) emphasizing the social aspects of the game by producing multiplayer versions.

  2. Effects of Carbon in Flooded Paddy Soils: Implications for Microbial Activity and Arsenic Mobilization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Avancha, S.; Boye, K.

    2014-12-01

    In the Mekong delta in Cambodia, naturally occurring arsenic (originating from erosion in the Himalaya Mountains) in paddy soils is mobilized during the seasonal flooding. As a consequence, rice grown on the flooded soils may take up arsenic and expose people eating the rice to this carcinogenic substance. Microbial activity will enhance or decrease the mobilization of arsenic depending on their metabolic pathways. Among the microbes naturally residing in the soil are denitrifying bacteria, sulfate reducers, metal reducers (Fe, Mn), arsenic reducers, methanogens, and fermenters, whose activity varies based on the presence of oxygen. The purpose of the experiment was to assess how different amendments affect the microbial activity and the arsenic mobilization during the transition from aerobic to anaerobic metabolism after flooding of naturally contaminated Cambodian soil. In a batch experiment, we investigated how the relative metabolic rate of naturally occurring microbes could vary with different types of organic carbon. The experiment was designed to measure the effects of various sources of carbon (dried rice straw, charred rice straw, manure, and glucose) on the microbial activity and arsenic release in an arsenic-contaminated paddy soil from Cambodia under flooded conditions. All amendments were added based on the carbon content in order to add 0.036 g of carbon per vial. The soil was flooded with a 10mM TRIS buffer solution at pH 7.04 in airtight 25mL serum vials and kept at 25 °C. We prepared 14 replicates per treatment to sample both gas and solution. On each sampling point, the solution replicates were sampled destructively. The gas replicates continued on and were sampled for both gas and solution on the final day of the experiment. We measured pH, total arsenic, methane, carbon dioxide, and nitrous oxide at 8 hours, 1.5 days, 3.33 days, and 6.33 days from the start of the experiment.

  3. Effects of motor patterns on water-soluble and membrane proteins and cholinesterase activity in subcellular fractions of rat brain tissue

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pevzner, L. Z.; Venkov, L.; Cheresharov, L.

    1980-01-01

    Albino rats were kept for a year under conditions of daily motor load or constant hypokinesia. An increase in motor activity results in a rise in the acetylcholinesterase activity determined in the synaptosomal and purified mitochondrial fractions while hypokinesia induces a pronounced decrease in this enzyme activity. The butyrylcholinesterase activity somewhat decreases in the synaptosomal fraction after hypokinesia but does not change under the motor load pattern. Motor load causes an increase in the amount of synaptosomal water-soluble proteins possessing an intermediate electrophoretic mobility and seem to correspond to the brain-specific protein 14-3-2. In the synaptosomal fraction the amount of membrane proteins with a low electrophoretic mobility and with the cholinesterase activity rises. Hypokinesia, on the contrary, decreases the amount of these membrane proteins.

  4. Damping Control of Liquid Container by Swing-type Active Vibration Reducer on Mobile Robot

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hamaguchi, Masafumi; Taniguchi, Takao

    This paper proposes a damping control of sloshing in a cylindrical container with a swing-type active vibration reducer on a wheeled mobile robot (WMR). The WMR runs along a straight path on a horizontal plane. The container is mounted on the active vibration reducer. A laser displacement sensor is used to observe the liquid level in the container. The container can be tilted in the running direction by the active vibration reducer. A sloshing model is obtained from a spherical pendulum-type sloshing model, which approximately expresses (1, 1)-mode sloshing. The sloshing model is used to design a damping control system. The control system of the active vibration reducer is designed with an inverse model of sloshing and an optimal regulator with a Kalman filter. The WMR is driven by an acceleration pattern designed with an input shaping method. The usefulness of the proposed method is demonstrated through simulation and experimental results.

  5. The relationship of arrhythmias to walking activity during mobilization after myocardial infarction.

    PubMed Central

    Roland, J. M.; Banks, D. C.; Edwards, B.; Fentem, P. H.

    1986-01-01

    The extent to which everyday walking activity is responsible for ventricular arrhythmias in the first 6 weeks after suspected myocardial infarction has been studied by simultaneous 24-hour recordings of electrocardiogram and walking activity. Forty-eight recordings from 46 patients were identified which contained couplets, ventricular tachycardia or R-on-T extrasystoles. In 24 recordings (50%) all the arrhythmias occurred whilst the patient was at rest and in a further four recordings there were fewer arrhythmias during activity than would have been expected by chance. Nineteen recordings (40%) contained arrhythmias which may have been induced by activity but in only three of these was the relationship definite. Clear evidence of arrhythmias precipitated by walking was found in only a minority of patients mobilizing after suspected myocardial infarction. PMID:3714618

  6. Detecting kinase activities from single cell lysate using concentration-enhanced mobility shift assay.

    PubMed

    Cheow, Lih Feng; Sarkar, Aniruddh; Kolitz, Sarah; Lauffenburger, Douglas; Han, Jongyoon

    2014-08-05

    Electrokinetic preconcentration coupled with mobility shift assays can give rise to very high detection sensitivities. We describe a microfluidic device that utilizes this principle to detect cellular kinase activities by simultaneously concentrating and separating substrate peptides with different phosphorylation states. This platform is capable of reliably measuring kinase activities of single adherent cells cultured in nanoliter volume microwells. We also describe a novel method utilizing spacer peptides that significantly increase separation resolution while maintaining high concentration factors in this device. Thus, multiplexed kinase measurements can be implemented with single cell sensitivity. Multiple kinase activity profiling from single cell lysate could potentially allow us to study heterogeneous activation of signaling pathways that can lead to multiple cell fates.

  7. Differential mitotic activation of endogenous c-Src, c-Yes, and Lyn in HeLa cells.

    PubMed

    Kuga, Takahisa; Nakayama, Yuji; Hoshino, Masaki; Higashiyama, Yukihiro; Obata, Yuuki; Matsuda, Daisuke; Kasahara, Kousuke; Fukumoto, Yasunori; Yamaguchi, Naoto

    2007-10-01

    Src-family tyrosine kinases (SFKs) play an important role in mitosis. Despite overlapping expression of multiple SFK members, little is known about how individual SFK members are activated in M phase. Here, we examined mitotic activation of endogenous c-Src, c-Yes, and Lyn, which are co-expressed in HeLa cells. c-Src, c-Yes, and Lyn were activated at different levels in M phase, and the activation was inhibited by Cdc2 inactivation. Mitotic c-Src and c-Yes exhibited normal- and retarded-electrophoretic-mobility forms on SDS-polyacrylamide gels, whereas Lyn did not show mobility retardation. Like c-Src, the retardation of electrophoretic mobility of c-Yes was caused by Cdc2-mediated phosphorylation. The normal- and retarded-mobility forms of c-Src were comparably activated, but activation of the retarded-mobility form of c-Yes was higher than that of the normal-mobility form of c-Yes. Thus, these results suggest that endogenous c-Src, c-Yes, and Lyn are differentially activated through Cdc2 activation during M phase.

  8. Neighbourhoods for Active Kids: study protocol for a cross-sectional examination of neighbourhood features and children's physical activity, active travel, independent mobility and body size

    PubMed Central

    Oliver, Melody; McPhee, Julia; Carroll, Penelope; Ikeda, Erika; Mavoa, Suzanne; Mackay, Lisa; Kearns, Robin A; Kyttä, Marketta; Asiasiga, Lanuola; Garrett, Nicholas; Lin, Judy; Mackett, Roger; Zinn, Caryn; Moewaka Barnes, Helen; Egli, Victoria; Prendergast, Kate; Witten, Karen

    2016-01-01

    Introduction New Zealand children's physical activity, including independent mobility and active travel, has declined markedly over recent decades. The Neighbourhoods for Active Kids (NfAK) study examines how neighbourhood built environments are associated with the independent mobility, active travel, physical activity and neighbourhood experiences of children aged 9–12 years in primary and intermediate schools across Auckland, New Zealand's largest city. Methods and analysis Child-specific indices of walkability, destination accessibility and traffic exposure will be constructed to measure the built environment in 8 neighbourhoods in Auckland. Interactive online-mapping software will be used to measure children's independent mobility and transport mode to destinations and to derive measures of neighbourhood use and perceptions. Physical activity will be measured using 7-day accelerometry. Height, weight and waist circumference will be objectively measured. Parent telephone interviews will collect sociodemographic information and parent neighbourhood perceptions. Interviews with school representative will capture supports and barriers for healthy activity and nutrition behaviours at the school level. Multilevel modelling approaches will be used to understand how differing built environment variables are associated with activity, neighbourhood experiences and health outcomes. Discussion We anticipate that children who reside in neighbourhoods considered highly walkable will be more physically active, accumulate more independent mobility and active travel, and be more likely to have a healthy body size. This research is timely as cities throughout New Zealand develop and implement plans to improve the liveability of intensifying urban neighbourhoods. Results will be disseminated to participants, local government agencies and through conventional academic avenues. PMID:27531740

  9. The impact of utilizing mobile phones to promote physical activity among post-secondary students: a scoping review.

    PubMed

    Ly, Hieu

    2016-01-01

    A commitment to regular physical activity may reduce the risks of chronic diseases for young adults. Internationally, the majority of post-secondary students are insufficiently active for health benefits. Novel health strategies and interventions utilizing mobiles phones could increase post-secondary students' physical activity levels. However, there is contradictory evidence to support the use of mobile phones to promote physical activity, and a scoping review could provide further insights into this topic. The purpose of this study was to conduct a scoping review to explore the existing literature and investigate what is currently known about the use of mobile phones to enhance physical activity levels among post-secondary students. A total of 84 articles were identified from the literature search, and six studies were selected for data analysis. Two major themes were supported by the evidence, which included: (I) the relationship between mobile phones and physical activity levels; and (II) students' perceptions of mobile phones. Goal setting principles combined with text message interventions were reported to have significant influences on students' physical activity levels. Students expressed mixed feelings about coaching elements of apps and posting personal results on social networking websites. No studies reported the use of objective physical activity measurements. In conclusion, mobile phone technologies such as text message reminders could be included in health interventions to enhance post-secondary students' physical activity levels. There is limited evidence available on this topic and additional research is warranted to establish a clearer understanding of the relationship between mobile phones and post-secondary students' physical activity.

  10. The impact of utilizing mobile phones to promote physical activity among post-secondary students: a scoping review

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    A commitment to regular physical activity may reduce the risks of chronic diseases for young adults. Internationally, the majority of post-secondary students are insufficiently active for health benefits. Novel health strategies and interventions utilizing mobiles phones could increase post-secondary students’ physical activity levels. However, there is contradictory evidence to support the use of mobile phones to promote physical activity, and a scoping review could provide further insights into this topic. The purpose of this study was to conduct a scoping review to explore the existing literature and investigate what is currently known about the use of mobile phones to enhance physical activity levels among post-secondary students. A total of 84 articles were identified from the literature search, and six studies were selected for data analysis. Two major themes were supported by the evidence, which included: (I) the relationship between mobile phones and physical activity levels; and (II) students’ perceptions of mobile phones. Goal setting principles combined with text message interventions were reported to have significant influences on students’ physical activity levels. Students expressed mixed feelings about coaching elements of apps and posting personal results on social networking websites. No studies reported the use of objective physical activity measurements. In conclusion, mobile phone technologies such as text message reminders could be included in health interventions to enhance post-secondary students’ physical activity levels. There is limited evidence available on this topic and additional research is warranted to establish a clearer understanding of the relationship between mobile phones and post-secondary students’ physical activity. PMID:28293617

  11. Activation of vegetated parabolic dunes into mobile barchans under potential environmental change scenarios

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yan, Na; Baas, Andreas C. W.

    2016-04-01

    Parabolic dunes are a quintessential example of the co-evolution of soil, landform, and vegetation, and they are found around the world, on coasts, river valleys, lake shores, and margins of deserts and steppes. These areas are often sensitive to changes in natural and anthropogenic forcings and socio-economic activities. Some studies have indicated parabolic dunes can lose vegetation and transform into barchan and transverse dunes by environmental change such as decreased precipitation or lowered water table, as well as anthropogenic stress such as increased burning and grazing. These transformations and shifts between states of eco-geomorphic systems may have significant implications on land management and social-economic development. This study utilises the Extended-DECAL - parameterised by field measurements of dune topography and vegetation characteristics combined with remote sensing - to explore how increases in drought stress, wind strength, and grazing stress may lead to the activation of stabilised parabolic dunes into highly mobile barchans. The modelling results show that the mobility of an initial parabolic dune at the outset of perturbations determines to a large extent the capacity of a system to absorb the environmental change, and a slight increase in vegetation cover of an initial parabolic dune can increase the activation threshold significantly. Plants with a higher deposition tolerance increase the activation threshold for the climatic impact and sand transport rate, whereas the erosion tolerance of plants influences the patterns of resulting barchans. The change in the characteristics of eco-geomorphic interaction zones may indirectly reflect the dune stability and predict an ongoing transformation, whilst the activation angle may be potentially used as a proxy of environmental stresses. In contrast to the natural environmental changes which tend to affect relatively weak and young plants, grazing stress can exert a broader impact on all

  12. Electrophoretic and aggregation behavior of bovine, horse and human red blood cells in plasma and in polymer solutions.

    PubMed

    Bäumler, H; Neu, B; Mitlöhner, R; Georgieva, R; Meiselman, H J; Kiesewetter, H

    2001-01-01

    The electrophoretic mobility of native and glutaraldehyde-fixed bovine, human, and horse red blood cells (RBC) was investigated as a function of ionic strength (5-150 mM) and concentration of 464 kDa dextran (2 and 3 g/dl); RBC aggregation in autologous plasma and in dextran solutions was also measured. In agreement with previous observations, human and horse RBC form stable rouleaux whereas bovine RBC do not aggregate in either plasma or in dextran 464 kDa solutions. Electrophoretic measurements showed a species-dependent adsorption and depletion of dextran that can be theoretically evaluated. Adsorption of polymer is not a prerequisite for RBC aggregation (bovine RBC show the highest amount of adsorbed dextran yet do not aggregate). Aggregate formation thus occurs as long as the Gibbs free energy difference, given by the osmotic pressure difference between the bulk phase and the polymer-depleted region between two RBC, is larger than the steric and electrostatic repulsive energy contributed by the macromolecules present on the RBC surface. With increasing bulk-phase polymer concentration the depletion layer thickness decreases and the amount of adsorbed macromolecules increases, thereby resulting in an increase of the repulsive component of the interaction energy and decreased aggregation. We thus view electrophoretic measurements of RBC in various media as an important tool for understanding polymer behavior near the red cell surface and hence the mechanisms involved in RBC aggregation.

  13. Correlation between esterase electrophoretic polymorphism and virulence-associated traits in extra-intestinal invasive strains of Escherichia coli.

    PubMed Central

    Goullet, P.; Picard, B.; Contrepois, M.; De Rycke, J.; Barnouin, J.

    1994-01-01

    The electrophoretic variations of carboxylesterase B and of esterases A, C and I, the presence of mannose resistant haemagglutinin, alpha-haemolysin, cytotoxic necrotizing factor type 1 (CNF1) and certain O antigens were compared in 150 strains of Escherichia coli responsible for extra-intestinal infections. Electrophoretic mobilities of outer membrane proteins (OMP) were also studied for strains belonging to O4, O6, O7, O8 and O75 serogroups. Fast migrating allozymes of carboxylesterase B (pattern B1) were correlated with slow migrating allozymes of esterase C, serogroups O7 and O8, lack of virulence factor, and particular OMP patterns, whereas slow migrating allozymes of carboxylesterase B (pattern B2) were correlated with fast migrating allozymes of esterase C, serogroups O2, O4, O6, O18 and O75, virulence factor production, and distinct OMP patterns. Allozymes of esterases A and I were not clearly correlated with the distribution of virulence factors. The pattern B2 was more strongly associated with CNF1 than with alpha-haemolysin and mannose resistant haemagglutinin. These results substantiate the view that the electrophoretic pattern B2 of carboxylesterase B identified most of the highly pathogenic strains implicated in extra-intestinal infection of humans. Images Fig. 2 PMID:7509755

  14. Computer simulation of two electrophoretic columns coupled for isoelectric focusing in simple buffers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tsai, Amos; Mosher, Richard A.; Bier, Milan

    1986-01-01

    Computer simulation is used to analyze a system of two electrophoretic columns coupled by mixing the anolyte of one with the catholyte of the other. A mathematical model is presented which is used to predict the pH gradients formed by monovalent buffers in this system, when the currents in the columns are unequal. In the column with the higher current a pH gradient is created which increases from anode to cathode and is potentially useful for isoelectric focusing. The breadth of this gradient is dependent upon the ratio of the currents. The function of the second column is the compensation of buffer migration which occurs in the first column, thereby maintaining constant electrolyte composition. The effects of buffer pKs and mobilities are evaluated.

  15. Electrophoretic Analysis of Histones from Gibberellic Acid-treated Dwarf Peas

    PubMed Central

    Spiker, Steven; Chalkley, Roger

    1971-01-01

    Histones from the epicotyls of light-grown dwarf peas (Pisum sativum L. cv. Little Marvel) which had been treated with gibberellic acid were compared to histones from control dwarf peas by the method of polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis. The histone complements were found to be unaltered in the electrophoretic mobility and relative quantity of the individual fractions. The ratio of histone to DNA was also unaffected by treatment with gibberellic acid. The investigation confirmed earlier reports that over 95% of the histone of peas is contained in seven molecular species and that one of these can exist both as an oxidized disulfide dimer and as a reduced monomer. Evidence is presented which indicates that only the monomer form exists in vivo in the pea epicotyl tissue and that the oxidized dimer is an artifact of extraction. The implications of the data concerning the mechanism of action of gibberellic acid are discussed. Images PMID:16657619

  16. Investigation of the free flow electrophoretic process. Volume 2: Technical analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Weiss, R. A.; Lanham, J. W.; Richman, D. W.; Walker, C. D.

    1979-01-01

    The effect of gravity on the free flow electrophoretic process was investigated. The demonstrated effects were then compared with predictions made by mathematical models. Results show that the carrier buffer flow was affected by gravity induced thermal convection and that the movement of the separating particle streams was affected by gravity induced buoyant forces. It was determined that if gravity induced buoyant forces were included in the mathematical models, then effective predictions of electrophoresis chamber separation performance were possible. The results of tests performed using various methods of electrophoresis using supportive media show that the mobility and the ability to separate were essentially independent of concentration, providing promise of being able to perform electrophoresis with higher inlet concentrations in space.

  17. Active and reactive behaviour in human mobility: the influence of attraction points on pedestrians

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gutiérrez-Roig, M.; Sagarra, O.; Oltra, A.; Palmer, J. R. B.; Bartumeus, F.; Díaz-Guilera, A.; Perelló, J.

    2016-07-01

    Human mobility is becoming an accessible field of study, thanks to the progress and availability of tracking technologies as a common feature of smart phones. We describe an example of a scalable experiment exploiting these circumstances at a public, outdoor fair in Barcelona (Spain). Participants were tracked while wandering through an open space with activity stands attracting their attention. We develop a general modelling framework based on Langevin dynamics, which allows us to test the influence of two distinct types of ingredients on mobility: reactive or context-dependent factors, modelled by means of a force field generated by attraction points in a given spatial configuration and active or inherent factors, modelled from intrinsic movement patterns of the subjects. The additive and constructive framework model accounts for some observed features. Starting with the simplest model (purely random walkers) as a reference, we progressively introduce different ingredients such as persistence, memory and perceptual landscape, aiming to untangle active and reactive contributions and quantify their respective relevance. The proposed approach may help in anticipating the spatial distribution of citizens in alternative scenarios and in improving the design of public events based on a facts-based approach.

  18. Active and reactive behaviour in human mobility: the influence of attraction points on pedestrians

    PubMed Central

    Sagarra, O.; Oltra, A.; Palmer, J. R. B.; Bartumeus, F.; Díaz-Guilera, A.; Perelló, J.

    2016-01-01

    Human mobility is becoming an accessible field of study, thanks to the progress and availability of tracking technologies as a common feature of smart phones. We describe an example of a scalable experiment exploiting these circumstances at a public, outdoor fair in Barcelona (Spain). Participants were tracked while wandering through an open space with activity stands attracting their attention. We develop a general modelling framework based on Langevin dynamics, which allows us to test the influence of two distinct types of ingredients on mobility: reactive or context-dependent factors, modelled by means of a force field generated by attraction points in a given spatial configuration and active or inherent factors, modelled from intrinsic movement patterns of the subjects. The additive and constructive framework model accounts for some observed features. Starting with the simplest model (purely random walkers) as a reference, we progressively introduce different ingredients such as persistence, memory and perceptual landscape, aiming to untangle active and reactive contributions and quantify their respective relevance. The proposed approach may help in anticipating the spatial distribution of citizens in alternative scenarios and in improving the design of public events based on a facts-based approach. PMID:27493774

  19. Active and reactive behaviour in human mobility: the influence of attraction points on pedestrians.

    PubMed

    Gutiérrez-Roig, M; Sagarra, O; Oltra, A; Palmer, J R B; Bartumeus, F; Díaz-Guilera, A; Perelló, J

    2016-07-01

    Human mobility is becoming an accessible field of study, thanks to the progress and availability of tracking technologies as a common feature of smart phones. We describe an example of a scalable experiment exploiting these circumstances at a public, outdoor fair in Barcelona (Spain). Participants were tracked while wandering through an open space with activity stands attracting their attention. We develop a general modelling framework based on Langevin dynamics, which allows us to test the influence of two distinct types of ingredients on mobility: reactive or context-dependent factors, modelled by means of a force field generated by attraction points in a given spatial configuration and active or inherent factors, modelled from intrinsic movement patterns of the subjects. The additive and constructive framework model accounts for some observed features. Starting with the simplest model (purely random walkers) as a reference, we progressively introduce different ingredients such as persistence, memory and perceptual landscape, aiming to untangle active and reactive contributions and quantify their respective relevance. The proposed approach may help in anticipating the spatial distribution of citizens in alternative scenarios and in improving the design of public events based on a facts-based approach.

  20. Electrophoretic separation of human kidney cells at zero gravity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barlow, G. H.; Lazer, S. L.; Rueter, A.; Allen, R. E.

    1977-01-01

    Electrophoretic isolation of cells results in a loss of resolution power caused by the sedimentation of the cells in the media. The results of an experiment to extract urokinase from human embryos during the Apollo Soyuz mission are presented and discussed.

  1. Monodisperse light color nanoparticle ink toward chromatic electrophoretic displays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peng, Bo; Li, Yue; Li, Jian; Bi, Lei; Lu, Haipeng; Xie, Jianliang; Ren, Xiangling; Cao, Yonghai; Wang, Ning; Meng, Xianwei; Deng, Longjiang; Guo, Zhanhu

    2016-05-01

    The facile synthesis of nanoparticles for precise image control and fast response of chromatic electrophoretic displays (EPDs) is a challenge. Herein, we report a general method to prepare pink, blue, and yellow nanoparticles with low density and a tunable size of 230-310 nm. The monodispersity is down to 0.02 and surface charges are up to 666e. Importantly, our work highlights the feasibility of chromatic nanoparticles as cost-effective candidates for electrophoretic displays.The facile synthesis of nanoparticles for precise image control and fast response of chromatic electrophoretic displays (EPDs) is a challenge. Herein, we report a general method to prepare pink, blue, and yellow nanoparticles with low density and a tunable size of 230-310 nm. The monodispersity is down to 0.02 and surface charges are up to 666e. Importantly, our work highlights the feasibility of chromatic nanoparticles as cost-effective candidates for electrophoretic displays. Electronic supplementary information (ESI) available. See DOI: 10.1039/c6nr02524b

  2. Mobile Phone Use and its Association With Sitting Time and Meeting Physical Activity Recommendations in a Mexican American Cohort

    PubMed Central

    Chow, Wong-Ho; Daniel, Carrie R; Wu, Xifeng; Zhao, Hua

    2016-01-01

    Background The benefits of physical activity (PA) are well-documented. Mobile phones influence PA by promoting screen-based sedentary time, providing prompts or reminders to be active, aiding in tracking and monitoring PA, or providing entertainment during PA. It is not known how mobile phone use is associated with PA and sitting time in Mexican Americans, and how mobile phone users may differ from nonusers. Objective To determine the associations between mobile phone use, PA, and sitting time and how these behaviors differ from mobile phone nonusers in a sample of 2982 Mexican-American adults from the Mano a Mano cohort. Methods Differences in meeting PA recommendations and sitting time between mobile phone users and nonusers were examined using chi-square and analysis of variance tests. Logistic regression was used to examine associations between mobile phone use, PA, and sitting. Results Mobile phone users were more likely to be obese by body mass index criteria (≥30 kg/m2), younger, born in the United States and lived there longer, more educated, and sit more hours per day but more likely to meet PA recommendations than nonusers. Males (odds ratio [OR] 1.42, 95% CI 1.16-1.74), use of text messaging (OR 1.26, 95% CI 1.03-1.56), and having a higher acculturation score (OR 1.27, 95% CI 1.07-1.52) were associated with higher odds of meeting PA recommendations. Sitting more hours per day was associated with being male, obese, born in the United States, a former alcohol drinker, and having at least a high school education. Among nonusers, being born in the United States was associated with higher odds of more sitting time, and being married was associated with higher odds of meeting PA recommendations. Conclusions Mobile phone interventions using text messages could be tailored to promote PA in less acculturated and female Mexican American mobile phone users. PMID:27311831

  3. Hand-cycling: an active form of wheeled mobility, recreation, and sports.

    PubMed

    Hettinga, F J; Valent, L; Groen, W; van Drongelen, S; de Groot, S; van der Woude, L H V

    2010-02-01

    By studying exercise and performance in hand-cycling in both activities of daily living and in Paralympic sport settings, new insights can be gained for rehabilitation practice, adapted physical activity, and sports. This review looks into the pros and cons of hand-cycling in both rehabilitation and optimal sports performance settings as suggested from the current-but still limited-scientific literature and experimentation. Despite the limited evidence-base and the diversity of study approaches and methodologies, this study suggests an important role for hand-cycling during and after rehabilitation, and in wheeled mobility recreation and sports. An approach that combines biomechanical, physiological, and psychosocial elements may lead to a better understanding of the benefits of hand-cycling and of the fundamentals of exercise in rehabilitation, activities of daily living, and sports.

  4. Transposable elements become active and mobile in the genomes of aging mammalian somatic tissues.

    PubMed

    De Cecco, Marco; Criscione, Steven W; Peterson, Abigail L; Neretti, Nicola; Sedivy, John M; Kreiling, Jill A

    2013-12-01

    Transposable elements (TEs) were discovered by Barbara McClintock in maize and have since been found to be ubiquitous in all living organisms. Transposition is mutagenic and organisms have evolved mechanisms to repress the activity of their endogenous TEs. Transposition in somatic cells is very low, but recent evidence suggests that it may be derepressed in some cases, such as cancer development. We have found that during normal aging several families of retrotransposable elements (RTEs) start being transcribed in mouse tissues. In advanced age the expression culminates in active transposition. These processes are counteracted by calorie restriction (CR), an intervention that slows down aging. Retrotransposition is also activated in age-associated, naturally occurring cancers in the mouse. We suggest that somatic retrotransposition is a hitherto unappreciated aging process. Mobilization of RTEs is likely to be an important contributor to the progressive dysfunction of aging cells.

  5. Transposable elements become active and mobile in the genomes of aging mammalian somatic tissues

    PubMed Central

    De Cecco, Marco; Criscione, Steven W.; Peterson, Abigail L.; Neretti, Nicola; Sedivy, John M.; Kreiling, Jill A.

    2013-01-01

    Transposable elements (TEs) were discovered by Barbara McClintock in maize and have since been found to be ubiquitous in all living organisms. Transposition is mutagenic and organisms have evolved mechanisms to repress the activity of their endogenous TEs. Transposition in somatic cells is very low, but recent evidence suggests that it may be derepressed in some cases, such as cancer development. We have found that during normal aging several families of retrotransposable elements (RTEs) start being transcribed in mouse tissues. In advanced age the expression culminates in active transposition. These processes are counteracted by calorie restriction (CR), an intervention that slows down aging. Retrotransposition is also activated in age-associated, naturally occurring cancers in the mouse. We suggest that somatic retrotransposition is a hitherto unappreciated aging process. Mobilization of RTEs is likely to be an important contributor to the progressive dysfunction of aging cells. PMID:24323947

  6. Electrophoretic heterogeneity limits the utility of streptavidin-β-galactosidase as a probe in free zone capillary electrophoresis separations.

    PubMed

    Craig, Douglas B; Henderson, Anna

    2013-02-01

    Single molecule assays were performed on streptavidin-β-galactosidase using a capillary electrophoresis-based protocol in order to assess the suitability of single molecule β-galactosidase assays for adaptation to the detection of single copies of target DNA. The conjugate was found to have a heterogeneous catalytic rate, showing an average rate of 44,000 ± 24,000 min(-1), which is similar to that of the unmodified enzyme. Electrophoretic mobility was also measured on individual molecules and determined to be -1.32 × 10(-4) ± 0.19 × 10(-4) cm(2)V(-1)s(-1). The variance in mobility was several times that reported for the unmodified enzyme. The electrophoretic heterogeneity was found to result in the formation of a broad window of peaks in the resultant electropherograms of free zone separations of small plugs of streptavidin-β-galactosidase. This range of mobilities largely overlapped with that of the conjugate bound to primer and plasmid containing a target DNA sequence. This overlap suggests that the separation of free conjugate from that bound to target DNA, which is a requirement for application of the single enzyme molecule assay to the detection of target DNA sequences, is not plausible using free zone capillary electrophoresis.

  7. Volume 4 - Mobile Sources

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    Mobile source reference material for activity data collection from the Emissions Inventory Improvement Program (EIIP). Provides complete methods for collecting key inputs to onroad mobile and nonroad mobile emissions models.

  8. Comparison of Ca2+ mobilizing activities of cyclic ADP-ribose and inositol trisphosphate.

    PubMed Central

    Dargie, P J; Agre, M C; Lee, H C

    1990-01-01

    We have previously shown that a metabolite of NAD+ generated by an enzyme present in sea urchin eggs and mammalian tissues can mobilize intracellular Ca2+ in the eggs. Structural determination established it to be a cyclized ADP-ribose, and the name cyclic ADP-ribose (cADPR) has been proposed. In this study, Ca2+ mobilizations induced by cADPR and inositol trisphosphate (IP3) in sea urchin egg homogenates were monitored with Ca2+ indicators and Ca2(+)-specific electrodes. Both methods showed that cADPR can release Ca2+ from egg homogenates. Evidence indicated that it did not act as a nonspecific Ca2(+)-ionophore or as a blocker of the microsomal Ca2(+)-transport; instead, it was likely to be operating through a specific receptor system. This was supported by its half-maximal effective concentration of 18 nM, which was 7 times lower than that of IP3. The receptor for cADPR appeared to be different from that of IP3 because heparin, an inhibitor of IP3 binding, had no effect on the cADPR action. The Ca2+ releases induced by cADPR and IP3 were not additive and had an inverse relationship, indicating overlapping stores were mobilized. Microinjection of cADPR into intact eggs induced transient intracellular Ca2+ changes and activated the cortical reaction. The in vivo effectiveness of cADPR was directly comparable with IP3 and neither required external Ca2+. In addition, both were effective in activating the eggs to undergo multiple nuclear cycles and DNA synthesis. These results suggest that cADPR could function as a second messenger in sea urchin eggs. Images PMID:2100201

  9. Atrial natriuretic peptide regulates lipid mobilization and oxygen consumption in human adipocytes by activating AMPK

    SciTech Connect

    Souza, Sandra C.; Chau, Mary D.L.; Yang, Qing; Gauthier, Marie-Soleil; Clairmont, Kevin B.; Wu, Zhidan; Gromada, Jesper; Dole, William P.

    2011-07-08

    Highlights: {yields} Treatment of differentiated human adipocytes with atrial natriuretic peptide (ANP) increased lipolysis and oxygen consumption by activating AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK). {yields} ANP stimulated lipid mobilization by selective activation of the alpha2 subunit of AMPK and increased energy utilization through activation of both the alpha1 and alpha2 subunits of AMPK. {yields} ANP enhanced adipocyte mitochondrial oxidative capacity as evidenced by induction of oxidative mitochondrial genes and increase in oxygen consumption. {yields} Exposure of human adipocytes to fatty acids and (TNF{alpha}) induced insulin resistance and decreased expression of mitochondrial genes which was restored to normal by ANP. -- Abstract: Atrial natriuretic peptide (ANP) has been shown to regulate lipid and carbohydrate metabolism providing a possible link between cardiovascular function and metabolism by mediating the switch from carbohydrate to lipid mobilization and oxidation. ANP exerts a potent lipolytic effect via cGMP-dependent protein kinase (cGK)-I mediated-stimulation of AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK). Activation of the ANP/cGK signaling cascade also promotes muscle mitochondrial biogenesis and fat oxidation. Here we demonstrate that ANP regulates lipid metabolism and oxygen utilization in differentiated human adipocytes by activating the alpha2 subunit of AMPK. ANP treatment increased lipolysis by seven fold and oxygen consumption by two fold, both of which were attenuated by inhibition of AMPK activity. ANP-induced lipolysis was shown to be mediated by the alpha2 subunit of AMPK as introduction of dominant-negative alpha2 subunit of AMPK attenuated ANP effects on lipolysis. ANP-induced activation of AMPK enhanced mitochondrial oxidative capacity as evidenced by a two fold increase in oxygen consumption and induction of mitochondrial genes, including carnitine palmitoyltransferase 1A (CPT1a) by 1.4-fold, cytochrome C (CytC) by 1.3-fold, and

  10. Outdoor Built Environment Barriers and Facilitators to Activity among Midlife and Older Adults with Mobility Disabilities

    PubMed Central

    Rosenberg, Dori E.

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: To gain better understanding of how the built environment impacts neighborhood-based physical activity among midlife and older adults with mobility disabilities. Design and methods: We conducted in-depth interviews with 35 adults over age 50, which used an assistive device and lived in King County, Washington, U.S. In addition, participants wore Global Positioning Systems (GPS) devices for 3 days prior to the interview. The GPS maps were used as prompts during the interviews. Open coding of the 35 interviews using latent content analysis resulted in key themes and subthemes that achieved consensus between coders. Two investigators independently coded the text of each interview. Results: Participants were on average of 67 years of age (range: 50–86) and predominantly used canes (57%), walkers (57%), or wheelchairs (46%). Key themes pertained to curb ramp availability and condition, sidewalk availability and condition, hills, aesthetics, lighting, ramp availability, weather, presence and features of crosswalks, availability of resting places and shelter on streets, paved or smooth walking paths, safety, and traffic on roads. Implications: A variety of built environment barriers and facilitators to neighborhood-based activity exist for midlife and older adults with mobility disabilities. Preparing our neighborhood environments for an aging population that uses assistive devices will be important to foster independence and health. PMID:23010096

  11. Evidence of the activity of dissimilatory sulfate-reducing prokaryotes in nonsulfidogenic tropical mobile muds.

    PubMed

    Madrid, Vanessa M; Aller, Robert C; Aller, Josephine Y; Chistoserdov, Andrei Y

    2006-08-01

    In spite of the nonsulfidic conditions and abundant reactive iron(III) commonly found in mobile tropical deltaic muds, genes encoding dissimilatory sulfite reductase (dsr) were successfully amplified from the upper approximately 1 m of coastal deposits sampled along French Guiana and in the Gulf of Papua. The dsr sequences retrieved were highly diverse, were generally represented in both study regions and fell into six large phylogenetic groupings: Deltaproteobacteria, Thermodesulfovibrio groups, Firmicutes and three groups without known cultured representatives. The spatial and temporal distribution of dsr sequences strongly supports the contention that the sulfate-reducing prokaryote communities in mobile mud environments are cosmopolitan and stable over a period of years. The decrease in the (35)SO(4) (2-) tracer demonstrates that, despite abundant reactive sedimentary iron(III) ( approximately 350-400 mumol g(-1)), the sulfate-reducing prokaryotes present are active, with the highest levels of sulfide being generated in the upper zones of the cores (0-30 cm). Both the time course of the (35)S-sulfide tracer activity and the lack of reduced sulfur in sediments demonstrate virtually complete anaerobic loss of solid phase sulfides. We propose a pathway of organic matter oxidation involving at least 5-25% of the remineralized carbon, wherein sulfide produced by sulfate-reducing prokaryotes is cyclically oxidized biotically or abiotically by metal oxides.

  12. Increasing the Lifetime of Mobile WSNs via Dynamic Optimization of Sensor Node Communication Activity

    PubMed Central

    Guimarães, Dayan Adionel; Sakai, Lucas Jun; Alberti, Antonio Marcos; de Souza, Rausley Adriano Amaral

    2016-01-01

    In this paper, a simple and flexible method for increasing the lifetime of fixed or mobile wireless sensor networks is proposed. Based on past residual energy information reported by the sensor nodes, the sink node or another central node dynamically optimizes the communication activity levels of the sensor nodes to save energy without sacrificing the data throughput. The activity levels are defined to represent portions of time or time-frequency slots in a frame, during which the sensor nodes are scheduled to communicate with the sink node to report sensory measurements. Besides node mobility, it is considered that sensors’ batteries may be recharged via a wireless power transmission or equivalent energy harvesting scheme, bringing to the optimization problem an even more dynamic character. We report large increased lifetimes over the non-optimized network and comparable or even larger lifetime improvements with respect to an idealized greedy algorithm that uses both the real-time channel state and the residual energy information. PMID:27657075

  13. Changes in Mice Brain Spontaneous Electrical Activity during Cortical Spreading Depression due to Mobile Phone Radiation

    PubMed Central

    Sallam, Samera M.; Mohamed, Ehab I.; Dawood, Abdel-Fattah B.

    2008-01-01

    The objective of the present study was to investigate changes in spontaneous EEG activity during cortical spreading depression (CSD) in mice brain. The cortical region of anaesthetized mice were exposed to the electromagnetic fields (EMFs) emitted from a mobile phone (MP, 935.2-960.2 MHz, 41.8 mW/cm2). The effect of EMFs on EEG was investigated before and after exposure to different stimuli (MP, 2% KCl, and MP & 2% KCl). The records of brain spontaneous EEG activity, slow potential changes (SPC), and spindle shaped firings were obtained through an interfaced computer. The results showed increases in the amplitude of evoked spindles by about 87%, 17%, and 226% for MP, 2% KCl, and MP & 2% KCl; respectively, as compared to values for the control group. These results showed that the evoked spindle is a more sensitive indicator of the effect of exposure to EMFs from MP. PMID:23675079

  14. Incorporating mobile nanospheres in the lumen of hybrid microcapsules for enhanced enzymatic activity.

    PubMed

    Shi, Jiafu; Zhang, Xiaoman; Zhang, Shaohua; Wang, Xiaoli; Jiang, Zhongyi

    2013-11-13

    Physical encapsulation of enzymes in microcapsules, as a mild, controllable method, has been widely utilized for enzyme immobilization. However, this method often suffers from the big mass transfer resistance from the capsule lumen. In this study, a novel biocatalysis system with enhanced catalytic activity is constructed through coencapsulating enzymes and nanospheres in the lumen of protamine/silica hybrid microcapsules, which are synthesized through the synergy of biomimetic silicification and layer-by-layer (LbL) assembly. When utilized as the host for catalase (CAT) encapsulation, the hybrid microcapsules maintain high mechanical stability, high enzyme loading, and low enzyme leaching. Particularly, because of the existence of mobile nanospheres, the mass transfer resistance in the microcapsules is significantly reduced because of the vigorous agitation, thus acquiring an enhanced catalytic activity. Our strategy may also find applications in drug delivery and biosensor fields.

  15. Electrospray ionization mass spectrometry and ion mobility analysis of the 20S proteasome complex.

    PubMed

    Loo, Joseph A; Berhane, Beniam; Kaddis, Catherine S; Wooding, Kerry M; Xie, Yongming; Kaufman, Stanley L; Chernushevich, Igor V

    2005-07-01

    Mass spectrometry and gas phase ion mobility [gas phase electrophoretic macromolecule analyzer (GEMMA)] with electrospray ionization were used to characterize the structure of the noncovalent 28-subunit 20S proteasome from Methanosarcina thermophila and rabbit. ESI-MS measurements with a quadrupole time-of-flight analyzer of the 192 kDa alpha7-ring and the intact 690 kDa alpha7beta7beta7alpha7 are consistent with their expected stoichiometries. Collisionally activated dissociation of the 20S gas phase complex yields loss of individual alpha-subunits only, and it is generally consistent with the known alpha7beta7beta7alpha7 architecture. The analysis of the binding of a reversible inhibitor to the 20S proteasome shows the expected stoichiometry of one inhibitor for each beta-subunit. Ion mobility measurements of the alpha7-ring and the alpha7beta7beta7alpha7 complex yield electrophoretic diameters of 10.9 and 15.1 nm, respectively; these dimensions are similar to those measured by crystallographic methods. Sequestration of multiple apo-myoglobin substrates by a lactacystin-inhibited 20S proteasome is demonstrated by GEMMA experiments. This study suggests that many elements of the gas phase structure of large protein complexes are preserved upon desolvation, and that methods such as mass spectrometry and ion mobility analysis can reveal structural details of the solution protein complex.

  16. Peripheral and spinal activation of cannabinoid receptors by joint mobilization alleviates postoperative pain in mice.

    PubMed

    Martins, D F; Mazzardo-Martins, L; Cidral-Filho, F J; Gadotti, V M; Santos, A R S

    2013-01-01

    The present study was undertaken to investigate the relative contribution of cannabinoid receptors (CBRs) subtypes and to analyze cannabimimetic mechanisms involved in the inhibition of anandamide (AEA) and 2-arachidonoyl glycerol degradation on the antihyperalgesic effect of ankle joint mobilization (AJM). Mice (25-35g) were subjected to plantar incision (PI) and 24h after surgery animals received the following treatments, AJM for 9min, AEA (10mg/kg, intraperitoneal [i.p.]), WIN 55,212-2 (1.5mg/kg, i.p.), URB937 (0.01-1mg/kg, i.p.; a fatty acid amide hydrolase [FAAH] inhibitor) or JZL184 (0.016-16mg/kg, i.p.; a monoacylglycerol lipase [MAGL] inhibitor). Withdrawal frequency to mechanical stimuli was assessed 24h after PI and at different time intervals after treatments. Receptor specificity was investigated using selective CB1R (AM281) and CB2R (AM630) antagonists. In addition, the effect of the FAAH and MAGL inhibitors on the antihyperalgesic action of AJM was investigated. AJM, AEA, WIN 55,212-2, URB937 and JZL184 decreased mechanical hyperalgesia induced by PI. The antihyperalgesic effect of AJM was reversed by pretreatment with AM281 given by intraperitoneal and intrathecal routes, but not intraplantarly. Additionally, intraperitoneal and intraplantar, but not intrathecal administration of AM630 blocked AJM-induced antihyperalgesia. Interestingly, in mice pretreated with FAAH or the MAGL inhibitor the antihyperalgesic effect of AJM was significantly longer. This article presents data addressing the CBR mechanisms underlying the antihyperalgesic activity of joint mobilization as well as of the endocannabinoid catabolic enzyme inhibitors in the mouse postoperative pain model. Joint mobilization and these enzymes offer potential targets to treat postoperative pain.

  17. Goal striving strategies and effort mobilization: When implementation intentions reduce effort-related cardiac activity during task performance.

    PubMed

    Freydefont, Laure; Gollwitzer, Peter M; Oettingen, Gabriele

    2016-09-01

    Two experiments investigate the influence of goal and implementation intentions on effort mobilization during task performance. Although numerous studies have demonstrated the beneficial effects of setting goals and making plans on performance, the effects of goals and plans on effort-related cardiac activity and especially the cardiac preejection period (PEP) during goal striving have not yet been addressed. According to the Motivational Intensity Theory, participants should increase effort mobilization proportionally to task difficulty as long as success is possible and justified. Forming goals and making plans should allow for reduced effort mobilization when participants perform an easy task. However, when the task is difficult, goals and plans should differ in their effect on effort mobilization. Participants who set goals should disengage, whereas participants who made if-then plans should stay in the field showing high effort mobilization during task performance. As expected, using an easy task in Experiment 1, we observed a lower cardiac PEP in both the implementation intention and the goal intention condition than in the control condition. In Experiment 2, we varied task difficulty and demonstrated that while participants with a mere goal intention disengaged from difficult tasks, participants with an implementation intention increased effort mobilization proportionally with task difficulty. These findings demonstrate the influence of goal striving strategies (i.e., mere goals vs. if-then plans) on effort mobilization during task performance.

  18. Molluscan mobile elements similar to the vertebrate recombination-activating genes

    PubMed Central

    Panchin, Yuri; Moroz, Leonid L.

    2009-01-01

    Animal genomes contain ~20,000 genes. Additionally millions of genes for antigen receptors are generated in cells of the immune system from the sets of separate gene segments by a mechanism known as the V(D)J somatic recombination. The components of the V(D)J recombination system, Recombination-Activating Gene proteins (RAG1 and RAG2) and recombination signal sequence (RSS), are thought to have “entered” the vertebrate genome as a hypothetical “RAG transposon”. Recently discovered mobile elements have terminal inverted repeats (TIRs) similar to RSS and may encode proteins with a different degree of similarity to RAG1. We describe a novel N-RAG-TP transposon identified from the sea slug Aplysia californica that encodes a protein similar to the N-terminal part of RAG1 in vertebrates. This refines the “RAG transposon” hypothesis and allows us to propose a scenario for V(D)J recombination machinery evolution from a relic transposon related to the existing mobile elements N-RAG-TP, Chapaev and Transib. PMID:18313399

  19. Submaximal oxygen uptake kinetics, functional mobility, and physical activity in older adults with heart failure and reduced ejection fraction

    PubMed Central

    Hummel, Scott L; Herald, John; Alpert, Craig; Gretebeck, Kimberlee A; Champoux, Wendy S; Dengel, Donald R; Vaitkevicius, Peter V; Alexander, Neil B

    2016-01-01

    Background Submaximal oxygen uptake measures are more feasible and may better predict clinical cardiac outcomes than maximal tests in older adults with heart failure (HF). We examined relationships between maximal oxygen uptake, submaximal oxygen kinetics, functional mobility, and physical activity in older adults with HF and reduced ejection fraction. Methods Older adults with HF and reduced ejection fraction (n = 25, age 75 ± 7 years) were compared to 25 healthy age- and gender-matched controls. Assessments included a maximal treadmill test for peak oxygen uptake (VO2peak), oxygen uptake kinetics at onset of and on recovery from a submaximal treadmill test, functional mobility testing [Get Up and Go (GUG), Comfortable Gait Speed (CGS), Unipedal Stance (US)], and self-reported physical activity (PA). Results Compared to controls, HF had worse performance on GUG, CGS, and US, greater delays in submaximal oxygen uptake kinetics, and lower PA. In controls, VO2peak was more strongly associated with functional mobility and PA than submaximal oxygen uptake kinetics. In HF patients, submaximal oxygen uptake kinetics were similarly associated with GUG and CGS as VO2peak, but weakly associated with PA. Conclusions Based on their mobility performance, older HF patients with reduced ejection fraction are at risk for adverse functional outcomes. In this population, submaximal oxygen uptake measures may be equivalent to VO2 peak in predicting functional mobility, and in addition to being more feasible, may provide better insight into how aerobic function relates to mobility in older adults with HF. PMID:27594875

  20. Nanomaterials for sample pretreatment prior to capillary electrophoretic analysis.

    PubMed

    Adam, Vojtech; Vaculovicova, Marketa

    2017-02-16

    Nanomaterials are, in analytical science, used for a broad range of purposes, covering the area of sample pretreatment as well as separation, detection and identification of target molecules. This review covers the application of nanomaterials for sample pretreatment in capillary electrophoresis. It targets the utilization of nanomaterials for sample purification, preconcentration and/or extraction coupled both off-line and on-line with capillary electrophoretic analysis. Especially due to their large surface area, nanoparticles and nanomaterials are exceptionally helpful in making up for the limited concentration detection limits provided by capillary electrophoresis. This method possesses excellent separation power; however, its sensitivity may be problematic in some cases. Therefore, this review is focused on utilization of nanomaterials as a powerful tool for sample preconcentration, which is so often required prior to capillary electrophoretic analysis.

  1. Parent-Targeted Mobile Phone Intervention to Increase Physical Activity in Sedentary Children: Randomized Pilot Trial

    PubMed Central

    Marker, Arwen M; Allen, H Raymond; Machtmes, Ryan; Han, Hongmei; Johnson, William D; Schuna Jr, John M; Broyles, Stephanie T; Tudor-Locke, Catrine; Church, Timothy S

    2014-01-01

    Background Low levels of moderate-to-vigorous physical activity are associated with adverse health consequences. Objective The intent of the study was to determine the feasibility and efficacy of a 12-week physical activity promotion program targeting children, which was delivered to parents through mobile phones. Methods Potential participants were recruited through advertisements placed in the newspaper, local hospitals and schools, and an email listserv. Sedentary children aged 6-10 years were randomly assigned to a minimal (MIG) or intensive (IIG) intervention group. Parents in the MIG were given a goal to increase (within 1 month) and maintain their child’s activity at 6000 pedometer steps/day above their baseline levels and to monitor their child’s steps daily. Parents in the IIG were given the same steps/day and monitoring goals, in addition to text messages and articles containing additional behavioral strategies (based on the Social Cognitive Theory) designed to promote their child’s physical activity. The intervention components were delivered via mobile phone. Anthropometrics, body composition, and questionnaires were administered in a clinic. Children wore a New Lifestyles pedometer (NL-1000) each day throughout the intervention and parents were to monitor their child’s step counts daily. Results Out of 59 children who screened for the study, a total of 27 children (mean age 8.7, SD 1.4 years; 56%, 15/27 female; 59%, 16/27 African American) were enrolled and completed the study. Overall, 97.90% (2220/2268; 98.20%, 1072/1092 for MIG; 97.60%, 1148/1176 for IIG) of expected step data were successfully entered by the parent or study coordinator. Parents in the MIG and IIG were sent approximately 7 and 13 text messages per week, respectively, averaged over the course of the study. IIG parents accessed an average of 6.1 (SD 4.4) articles over the course of the intervention and accessed a fewer number of articles in the last month compared to the first

  2. Atomic-force-controlled capillary electrophoretic nanoprinting of proteins.

    PubMed

    Lovsky, Yulia; Lewis, Aaron; Sukenik, Chaim; Grushka, Eli

    2010-01-01

    The general nanoprinting and nanoinjection of proteins on non-conducting or conducting substrates with a high degree of control both in terms of positional and timing accuracy is an important goal that could impact diverse fields from biotechnology (protein chips) to molecular electronics and from fundamental studies in cell biology to nanophotonics. In this paper, we combine capillary electrophoresis (CE), a separation method with considerable control of protein movement, with the unparalleled positional accuracy of an atomic force microscope (AFM). This combination provides the ability to electrophoretically or electroosmotically correlate the timing of protein migration with AFM control of the protein deposition at a high concentration in defined locations and highly confined volumes estimated to be 2 al. Electrical control of bovine serum albumin printing on standard protein-spotting glass substrates is demonstrated. For this advance, fountain pen nanolithography (FPN) that uses cantilevered glass-tapered capillaries is amended with the placement of electrodes on the nanopipette itself. This results in imposed voltages that are three orders of magnitude less than what is normally used in capillary electrophoresis. The development of atomic-force-controlled capillary electrophoretic printing (ACCEP) has the potential for electrophoretic separation, with high resolution, both in time and in space. The large voltage drop at the tip of the tapered nanopipettes allows for significant increases in concentration of protein in the small printed volumes. All of these attributes combine to suggest that this methodology should have a significant impact in science and technology.

  3. Study of enzyme kinetics of phenol sulfotransferase by electrophoretically mediated microanalysis.

    PubMed

    Nováková, Sona; Van Dyck, Sigrid; Glatz, Zdenek; Van Schepdael, Ann; Hoogmartens, Jos

    2004-04-02

    Electrophoretically mediated microanalysis (EMMA) was applied for the study of the kinetic parameters of the enzymatic reaction of phenol sulfotransferase SULT1A1 isoenzyme with 4-nitrophenol as a substrate. The SULT1A1 activity was determined by the quantitation of the product, 4-nitrophenyl sulfate, at 274 nm by using different injection and separation steps. This new approach solved the problem of the presence of the very strong inhibitor, adenosine 3',5'-bisphosphate (PAP), in the co-substrate solution (adenosine 3'-phosphate 5'-phosphosulfate, PAPS) which is unstable at room temperature. The inhibitor PAP was electrophoretically separated from the co-substrate PAPS before the injection of enzyme and substrate inside the capillary (and thus before their in-capillary encountering). With the developed in-capillary SULT1A1 activity assay an average Michaelis constant (Km) for 4-nitrophenol was calculated to be 0.84 microM, a value which is consistent with a previously reported value. Strong substrate inhibition (above a 4-nitrophenol concentration of 2.5 microM) was observed, and this is also in accordance with literature values.

  4. Study on the interaction of catechins with human serum albumin using spectroscopic and electrophoretic techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Trnková, Lucie; Boušová, Iva; Staňková, Veronika; Dršata, Jaroslav

    2011-01-01

    The interaction between eight naturally occurring flavanols (catechin, epicatechin, gallocatechin, epigallocatechin, catechin gallate, epicatechin gallate, gallocatechin gallate, and epigallocatechin gallate) and human serum albumin (HSA) has been investigated by spectroscopic (fluorescence quenching and UV-Vis absorption) and electrophoretic (native and SDS PAGE) techniques under simulated physiological conditions (pH 7.40, 37 °C). The spectroscopic results confirmed the complex formation for the tested systems. The binding constants and the number of binding sites were obtained by analysis of fluorescence data. The strongest binding affinity to HSA was found for epicatechin gallate and decreased in the order epicatechin gallate ⩾ catechin gallate > epigallocatechin gallate > gallocatechin gallate ≫ epicatechin ⩾ catechin > gallocatechin ⩾ epigallocatechin. All free energy changes possessed negative sign indicating the spontaneity of catechin-HSA systems formation. The binding distances between the donor (HSA) and the acceptors (catechins) estimated by the Förster theory revealed that non-radiation energy transfer from HSA to catechins occurred with high possibility. According to results obtained by native PAGE, the galloylated catechins increased the electrophoretic mobility of HSA, which indicated the change in the molecular charge of HSA, whilst the non-galloylated catechins caused no changes. The ability of aggregation and cross-linking of tested catechins with HSA was not proved by SDS-PAGE. The relationship between the structure characteristics of all tested catechins (e.g. presence of the galloyl moiety on the C-ring, the number of hydroxyl groups on the B-ring, and the spatial arrangement of the substituents on the C-ring) and their binding properties to HSA is discussed. The presented study contributes to the current knowledge in the area of protein-ligand binding, particularly catechin-HSA interactions.

  5. Calcium mobilization and phosphoinositide turnover in fluoride-activated human neutrophils

    SciTech Connect

    Strnad, C.F.; Wong, K.

    1986-05-01

    Fluoride ion, at concentrations above 10 mM, has been found to activate a superoxide production response in human neutrophils which is strongly dependent on the presence of extracellular calcium. In an attempt to further explore the calcium requirement of fluoride-induced neutrophil activation, intracellular calcium concentrations were monitored through use of the fluorescent calcium probe, Quin 2. Fluoride ion, at concentrations between 10 and 20 mM, was found to elicit a rise in intracellular calcium levels which was characterized by a lag period of 4 to 10 min and a prolonged duration of action (greater than 20 min). In contrast, the chemotactic peptide, formylmethionyl-leucyl-phenylalanine (FMLP), induced a rise in intracellular calcium concentration which peaked within 1 min. Preincubation of cells with 1 ..mu..g/ml pertussis toxin resulted in inhibition of the FMLP-induced response, but not that elicited by fluoride. Furthermore, anion exchange chromatography indicated that inositol phosphate accumulation occurred in fluoride-treated cells in association with calcium mobilization. Recent evidence suggests that the FMLP receptor is coupled to phospholipase C and phosphoinositide turnover through a guanine nucleotide binding protein susceptible to inhibition by pertussis toxin. Present results suggest that fluoride ion may serve to activate this protein in a manner resistant to inhibition by pertussis toxin.

  6. Effect of microbial activity on the mobility of chromium in soils.

    PubMed

    Desjardin, V; Bayard, R; Huck, N; Manceau, A; Gourdon, R

    2002-01-01

    The effect of microbial activity on the chemical state of chromium, in a contaminated soil located in the Rhĵne-Alpes region (France), has been investigated. This soil contained 4,700 mg kg(-1) Cr, with about 40% present in the soluble hexavalent form. Indigenous microbial activity was found to significantly reduce Cr(VI) to the less mobile form (III) when the soil was incubated at 30 degrees C in an aqueous medium containing glucose and nutrients. A Cr(VI)-reducing strain of Streptomyces thermocarboxydus was isolated from the contaminated soil. The strain was found to metabolize Cr(VI) in a similar manner as an exogenous inoculum of Pseudomonas fluorescens LB300, and to precipitate chromium as a Cr oxyhydroxide with a gammaCrOOH-like local structure. The Cr(VI)-reducing activity of S. thermocarboxydus was induced, or significantly accelerated, by the aggregation of bacterial cells or their adhesion to suspended solid particles, and was stimulated in pure culture by glycerol and chromate.

  7. The application of machine learning in multi sensor data fusion for activity recognition in mobile device space

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marhoubi, Asmaa H.; Saravi, Sara; Edirisinghe, Eran A.

    2015-05-01

    The present generation of mobile handheld devices comes equipped with a large number of sensors. The key sensors include the Ambient Light Sensor, Proximity Sensor, Gyroscope, Compass and the Accelerometer. Many mobile applications are driven based on the readings obtained from either one or two of these sensors. However the presence of multiple-sensors will enable the determination of more detailed activities that are carried out by the user of a mobile device, thus enabling smarter mobile applications to be developed that responds more appropriately to user behavior and device usage. In the proposed research we use recent advances in machine learning to fuse together the data obtained from all key sensors of a mobile device. We investigate the possible use of single and ensemble classifier based approaches to identify a mobile device's behavior in the space it is present. Feature selection algorithms are used to remove non-discriminant features that often lead to poor classifier performance. As the sensor readings are noisy and include a significant proportion of missing values and outliers, we use machine learning based approaches to clean the raw data obtained from the sensors, before use. Based on selected practical case studies, we demonstrate the ability to accurately recognize device behavior based on multi-sensor data fusion.

  8. High flow-resolution for mobility estimation in 2D-ENMR of proteins using maximum entropy method (MEM-ENMR).

    PubMed

    Thakur, Sunitha B; He, Qiuhong

    2006-11-01

    Multidimensional electrophoretic NMR (nD-ENMR) is a potentially powerful tool for structural characterization of co-existing proteins and protein conformations. By applying a DC electric field pulse, the electrophoretic migration rates of different proteins were detected experimentally in a new dimension of electrophoretic flow. The electrophoretic mobilities were employed to differentiate protein signals. In U-shaped ENMR sample chambers, individual protein components in a solution mixture followed a cosinusoidal electrophoretic interferogram as a function of its unique electrophoretic migration rate. After Fourier transformation in the electrophoretic flow dimension, the protein signals were resolved at different resonant frequencies proportional to their electrophoretic mobilities. Currently, the mobility resolution of the proteins in the electrophoretic flow dimension is limited by severe truncations of the electrophoretic interferograms due to the finite electric field strength available before the onset of heat-induced convection. In this article, we present a successful signal processing method, the Burg's maximum entropy method (MEM), to analyze the truncated ENMR signals (MEM-ENMR). Significant enhancement in flow resolution was demonstrated using two-dimensional ENMR of two protein samples: a lysozyme solution and a solution mixture of bovine serum albumin (BSA) and ubiquitin. The electrophoretic mobilities of lysozyme, BSA and ubiquitin were measured from the MEM analysis as 7.5x10(-5), 1.9x10(-4) and 8.7x10(-5) cm2 V-1 s-1, respectively. Results from computer simulations confirmed a complete removal of truncation artifacts in the MEM-ENMR spectra with 3- to 6-fold resolution enhancement.

  9. No evidence for cell activation or brain vaso-occlusion with plerixafor mobilization in sickle cell mice.

    PubMed

    Choi, Erika; Branch, Craig; Cui, Min-Hui; Yazdanbakhsh, Karina; Mohandas, Narla; Billett, Henny H; Shi, Patricia A

    2016-03-01

    Gene therapy for sickle cell disease is currently in active trials. Collecting hematopoietic progenitor cells safely and effectively is challenging, however, because granulocyte colony stimulating factor, the drug used most commonly for mobilization, can cause life-threatening vaso-occlusion in patients with sickle cell disease, and bone marrow harvest requires general anesthesia and multiple hip bone punctures. Plerixafor is an inhibitor of the CXCR4 chemokine receptor on hematopoietic progenitor cells, blocking its binding to SDF-1 (CXCL12) on bone marrow stroma. In support of a clinical trial in patients with sickle cell disease of plerixafor mobilization (NCT02193191), we administered plerixafor to sickle cell mice and found that it mobilizes hematopoietic progenitor cells without evidence of concomitant cell activation or brain vaso-occlusion.

  10. Electrophoretic separation and analysis of living cells from solid tissues by several methods - Human embryonic kidney cell cultures as a model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Todd, Paul; Plank, Lindsay D.; Kunze, M. Elaine; Lewis, Marian L.; Morrison, Dennis R.

    1986-01-01

    The use of free-fluid electrophoresis methods to separate tissue cells having a specific function is discussed. It is shown that cells suspended by trypsinization from cultures of human embryonic kidney are electrophoretically heterogeneous and tolerate a wide range of electrophoresis buffers and conditions without significant attenuation of function. Moreover, these cells do not separate electrophoretically on the basis of size or cell position alone and can be separated according to their ability to give rise to progeny that produce specific plasminogen activators.

  11. In vivo kinematic comparison between mobile-bearing and fixed-bearing total knee arthroplasty during step-up activity.

    PubMed

    Okamoto, Nobukazu; Nakamura, Eiichi; Nishioka, Hiroaki; Karasugi, Tatsuki; Okada, Tatsuya; Mizuta, Hiroshi

    2014-12-01

    Mobile-bearing total knee arthroplasty (TKA) expects high conformity and low contact stress. It is designed to correct the rotational mismatch between femoral and tibial components. We examined the difference in weight-bearing knee kinematics in patients with mobile-bearing and fixed-bearing TKA performing step-up activities. We randomly assigned 40 knees (37 patients) to mobile-bearing TKA (n=20) or fixed-bearing TKA (n=20). Using fluoroscopic imaging we evaluated knee kinematics during step-up activity one year after surgery. The total extent of rotation was not different for the two TKAs. Due to the axial rotation of the polyethylene insert, patients with mobile-bearing TKA had a wider range of absolute axial rotation. The position of the medial and the lateral condyles was significantly more posterior in the fixed-bearing TKA. There were only minor kinematic differences between the two TKAs. The polyethylene insert in the mobile-bearing TKA moved as designed especially with respect to the self-alignment feature.

  12. Electrophoretic Deposition of Chitosan Coatings Modified with Gelatin Nanospheres To Tune the Release of Antibiotics.

    PubMed

    Song, Jiankang; Chen, Qiang; Zhang, Yang; Diba, Mani; Kolwijck, Eva; Shao, Jinlong; Jansen, John A; Yang, Fang; Boccaccini, Aldo R; Leeuwenburgh, Sander C G

    2016-06-08

    Orthopedic and dental implants are increasingly used in the medical field in view of their high success rates. Implant-associated infections, however, still occur and are difficult to treat. To combat these infections, the application of an active coating to the implant surface is advocated as an effective strategy to facilitate sustained release of antibacterial drugs from implant surfaces. Control over this release is, however, still a major challenge. To overcome this problem, we deposited composite coatings composed of a chitosan matrix containing gelatin nanospheres loaded with antibiotics onto stainless steel plates by means of the electrophoretic deposition technique. The gelatin nanospheres were distributed homogeneously throughout the coatings. The surface roughness and wettability of the coatings could be tuned by a simple adjustment of the weight ratio between the gelatin nanospheres and chitosan. Vancomycin and moxifloxacin were released in sustained and burst-type manners, respectively, while the coatings were highly cytocompatible. The antibacterial efficacy of the coatings containing different amounts of antibiotics was tested using a zone of inhibition test against Staphylococcus aureus, which showed that the coatings containing moxifloxacin exhibited an obvious inhibition zone. The coatings containing a high amount of vancomycin were able to kill bacteria in direct contact with the implant surface. These results suggest that the antibacterial capacity of metallic implants can be tuned by orthogonal control over the release of (multiple) antibiotics from electrophoretically deposited composite coatings, which offers a new strategy to prevent orthopedic implant-associated infections.

  13. Electrophoretic deposition of tetracycline modified silk fibroin coatings for functionalization of titanium surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Zhen; Qu, Yinying; Li, Xiaoshuang; Zhang, Sheng; Wei, Qingsong; Shi, Yusheng; Chen, Lili

    2014-06-01

    Electrophoretic deposition has been widely used for the fabrication of functional coatings onto metal implant. A characteristic feature of this process is that positively charged materials migrate toward the cathode and can deposit on it. In this study, silk fibroin was decorated with tetracycline in aqueous solution to impart positive charge, and then deposited on negatively titanium cathode under certain electric field. The characterization of the obtained coatings indicated that the intermolecular hydrogen bonds formed between the backbone of silk fibroin and tetracycline molecular. In vitro biological tests demonstrated that osteoblast-like cells achieved acceptable cell affinity on the tetracycline cross-linked silk fibroin coatings, although greater cell viability was seen on pure silk fibroin coatings. The cationic silk fibroin coatings showed remarkable antibacterial activity against gram-positive (Staphylococcus aureus) and gram-negative (Escherichia coli) bacteria. Therefore, we concluded that electrophoretic deposition was an effective and efficient technique to prepare cationic silk fibroin coatings on the titanium surface and that cationic silk fibroin coatings with acceptable biocompatibility and antibacterial property were promising candidates for further loading of functional agents.

  14. p21-activated kinase regulates mast cell degranulation via effects on calcium mobilization and cytoskeletal dynamics

    PubMed Central

    Allen, Jayme D.; Jaffer, Zahara M.; Park, Su-Jung; Burgin, Sarah; Hofmann, Clemens; Sells, Mary Ann; Chen, Shi; Derr-Yellin, Ethel; Michels, Elizabeth G.; McDaniel, Andrew; Bessler, Waylan K.; Ingram, David A.; Atkinson, Simon J.; Travers, Jeffrey B.

    2009-01-01

    Mast cells are key participants in allergic diseases via activation of high-affinity IgE receptors (FcϵRI) resulting in release of proinflammatory mediators. The biochemical pathways linking IgE activation to calcium influx and cytoskeletal changes required for intracellular granule release are incompletely understood. We demonstrate, genetically, that Pak1 is required for this process. In a passive cutaneous anaphylaxis experiment, Wsh/Wsh mast cell–deficient mice locally reconstituted with Pak1−/− bone marrow–derived mast cells (BMMCs) experienced strikingly decreased allergen-induced vascular permeability compared with controls. Consistent with the in vivo phenotype, Pak1−/− BMMCs exhibited a reduction in FcϵRI-induced degranulation. Further, Pak1−/− BMMCs demonstrated diminished calcium mobilization and altered depolymerization of cortical filamentous actin (F-actin) in response to FcϵRI stimulation. These data implicate Pak1 as an essential molecular target for modulating acute mast cell responses that contribute to allergic diseases. PMID:19124833

  15. Results of the survey activities and mobile gamma scanning in Monticello, Utah

    SciTech Connect

    Little, C.A.; Berven, B.A.

    1985-11-01

    The town of Monticello, Utah, was once the site of an active mill which processed vanadium ore (1942 to 1948), and uranium ore (1948 to 1960). Properties in the vicinity of that mill have become contaminated with radioactive material from ore processing. The Radiological Survey Activities (RASA) group at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) was requested by the Division of Remedial Action Projects (DRAP) in the Department of Energy (DOE) to: (1) identify potentially contaminated properties; (2) assess natural background radiation levels; and (3) rapidly assess the magnitude, extent, and type (i.e. ore, tailings, etc.) of contamination present on these properties (if any). This survey was conducted by RASA during April 1983. In addition to the 114 properties previously identified from historical information, the ORNL mobile gamma scanning van located 36 new properties exhibiting anomalous gamma radiation levels. Onsite surveys were conducted on 145 of the 150 total properties identified either historically or with the gamma scanning van. Of these 145 properties, 122 of them appeared to have some type of contaminated material present on them; however, only 48 appeared to be contaminated to the extent where they were in excess of Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) criteria (40 CFR 192). Twenty-one other properties were recommended for additional investigation (indoor gamma scanning and radon daughter measurements); of these, only ten required further analysis. This report provides the detailed data and analyses related to the radiological survey efforts performed by ORNL in Monticello, Utah.

  16. Venus Mobile Explorer with RPS for Active Cooling: A Feasibility Study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Leifer, Stephanie D.; Green, Jacklyn R.; Balint, Tibor S.; Manvi, Ram

    2009-01-01

    We present our findings from a study to evaluate the feasibility of a radioisotope power system (RPS) combined with active cooling to enable a long-duration Venus surface mission. On-board power with active cooling technology featured prominently in both the National Research Council's Decadal Survey and in the 2006 NASA Solar System Exploration Roadmap as mission-enabling for the exploration of Venus. Power and cooling system options were reviewed and the most promising concepts modeled to develop an assessment tool for Venus mission planners considering a variety of future potential missions to Venus, including a Venus Mobile Explorer (either a balloon or rover concept), a long-lived Venus static lander, or a Venus Geophysical Network. The concepts modeled were based on the integration of General Purpose Heat Source (GPHS) modules with different types of Stirling cycle heat engines for power and cooling. Unlike prior investigations which reported on single point design concepts, this assessment tool allows the user to generate either a point design or parametric curves of approximate power and cooling system mass, power level, and number of GPHS modules needed for a "black box" payload housed in a spherical pressure vessel.

  17. Cost effectiveness of the LIFE physical activity intervention for older adults at increased risk for mobility disability

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    BACKGROUND: Losing the ability to walk safely and independently is a major concern for many older adults. The Lifestyle Interventions and Independence for Elders study recently demonstrated that a physical activity (PA) intervention can delay the onset of major mobility disability. Our objective is ...

  18. Mobility and Active Ageing in Suburban Environments: Findings from In-Depth Interviews and Person-Based GPS Tracking.

    PubMed

    Zeitler, Elisabeth; Buys, Laurie; Aird, Rosemary; Miller, Evonne

    2012-01-01

    Background. Governments face a significant challenge to ensure that community environments meet the mobility needs of an ageing population. Therefore, it is critical to investigate the effect of suburban environments on the choice of transportation and its relation to participation and active ageing. Objective. This research explores if and how suburban environments impact older people's mobility and their use of different modes of transport. Methods. Data derived from GPS tracking, travel diaries, brief questionnaires, and semistructured interviews were gathered from thirteen people aged from 56 to 87 years, living in low-density suburban environments in Brisbane, Australia. Results. The suburban environment influenced the choice of transportation and out-of-home mobility. Both walkability and public transportation (access and usability) impact older people's transportation choices. Impracticality of active and public transportation within suburban environments creates car dependency in older age. Conclusion. Suburban environments often create barriers to mobility, which impedes older people's engagement in their wider community and ability to actively age in place. Further research is needed to develop approaches towards age-friendly suburban environments which will encourage older people to remain active and engaged in older age.

  19. An Augmented Reality-Based Mobile Learning System to Improve Students' Learning Achievements and Motivations in Natural Science Inquiry Activities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chiang, Tosti H. C.; Yang, Stephen J. H.; Hwang, Gwo-Jen

    2014-01-01

    In this study, an augmented reality-based mobile learning system is proposed for conducting inquiry-based learning activities. An experiment has been conducted to examine the effectiveness of the proposed approach in terms of learning achievements and motivations. The subjects were 57 fourth graders from two classes taught by the same teacher in…

  20. Habitual physical activity levels are associated with performance in measures of physical function and mobility in older men

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Physical activity according to triaxial accelerometers; physical function and mobility according to the Short Physical Performance Battery (SPPB), gait speed, stair climb time, and a lift-and-lower task; aerobic capacity according to maximum oxygen consumption (VO(2) max); and leg press and chest pr...

  1. Habitual physical activity levels are associated with performance in measures of physical function and mobility in older men

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Objectives: To determine whether objectively measured physical activity levels are associated with measures of physical function and mobility in older men. Design: Cross-sectional. Setting: Academic research center. Participants: Eighty-two community-dwelling men >/= 65 years of age with self-report...

  2. Enabling Remote Activity: Using mobile technology for remote participation in geoscience fieldwork

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Davies, Sarah; Collins, Trevor; Gaved, Mark; Bartlett, Jessica; Valentine, Chris; McCann, Lewis

    2010-05-01

    Field-based activities are regarded as essential to the development of a range of professional and personal skills within the geosciences. Students enjoy field activities, preferring these to learning with simulations (Spicer and Stratford 2001), and these improve deeper learning and understanding (Kern and Carpenter, 1984; Elkins and Elkins, 2007). However, some students find it difficult to access these field-based learning opportunities. Field sites may be remote and often require travel across uneven, challenging or potentially dangerous terrain. Mobility-impaired students are particularly limited in their opportunities to participate in field-based learning activities and, as higher education institutions have a responsibility to provide inclusive opportunities for students (UK Disability Discrimination Act 1995, UK Special Education Needs and Disability Rights Act 2001), the need for inclusive fieldwork learning is being increasingly recognised. The Enabling Remote Activity (ERA) project has been investigating how mobile communications technologies might allow field learning experiences to be brought to students who would otherwise find it difficult to participate, and also to enhance activities for all participants. It uses a rapidly deployable, battery-powered wireless network to transmit video, audio, and high resolution still images to connect participants at an accessible location with participants in the field. Crucially, the system uses a transient wireless network, allowing multiple locations to be explored during a field visit, and for plans to be changed dynamically if required. Central to the concept is the requirement for independent investigative learning: students are enabled to participate actively in the learning experience and to direct the investigations, as opposed to being simply remote viewers of the experience. Two ways of using the ERA system have been investigated: remote access and collaborative groupwork. In 2006 and 2008 remote

  3. Built environment attributes related to GPS measured active trips in mid-life and older adults with mobility disabilities

    PubMed Central

    Gell, Nancy M.; Rosenberg, Dori E.; Carlson, Jordan; Kerr, Jacqueline; Belza, Basia

    2015-01-01

    Background Understanding factors which may promote walking in mid-life and older adults with mobility impairments is key given the association between physical activity and positive health outcomes. Objective To examine the relationship between active trips and objective measures of the home neighborhood built environment. Methods Global positioning systems (GPS) data collected on 28 adults age 50+ with mobility disabilities were analyzed for active trips from home. Objective and geographic information systems (GIS) derived measures included Walk Score, population density, street connectivity, crime rates, and slope within the home neighborhood. For this cross-sectional observational study, we conducted mean comparisons between participants who took active trips from home and those who did not for the objective measures. Effect sizes were calculated to assess the magnitude of group differences. Results Nine participants (32%) took active trips from home. Walking in the home neighborhood was significantly associated with GIS derived measures (Walk Score, population density, and street density; effect sizes .9-1.2). Participants who used the home neighborhood for active trips had less slope within 1 km of home but the difference was not significant (73.5 meters±22 vs. 100.8 meters ±38.1, p=.06, d=0.8). There were no statistically significant differences in mean scores for crime rates between those with active trips from home and those without. Conclusions The findings provide preliminary evidence that more walkable environments promote active mobility among mid-life and older adults with mobility disabilities. The data suggest that this population can and does use active transportation modes when the built environment is supportive. PMID:25637503

  4. Active ambulatory care management supported by short message services and mobile phone technology in patients with arterial hypertension.

    PubMed

    Kiselev, Anton R; Gridnev, Vladimir I; Shvartz, Vladimir A; Posnenkova, Olga M; Dovgalevsky, Pavel Ya

    2012-01-01

    The use of short message services and mobile phone technology for ambulatory care management is the most accessible and most inexpensive way to transition from traditional ambulatory care management to active ambulatory care management in patients with arterial hypertension (AH). The aim of this study was to compare the clinical efficacy of active ambulatory care management supported by short message services and mobile phone technology with traditional ambulatory care management in AH patients. The study included 97 hypertensive patients under active ambulatory care management and 102 patients under traditional ambulatory care management. Blood pressure levels, body mass, and smoking history of patients were analyzed in the study. The duration of study was 1 year. In the active ambulatory care management group, 36% of patients were withdrawn from the study within a year. At the end of the year, 77% of patients from the active care management group had achieved the goal blood pressure level. That was more than 5 times higher than that in the traditional ambulatory care management group (P < .001). The risk ratio of achieving and maintaining the goal blood pressure in patients of active care management group was 5.44, CI (3.2-9.9; P = .005). Implementation of active ambulatory care management supported by short message services and mobile phone improves the quality of ambulatory care of hypertensive patients.

  5. Impaired neural activation limits muscle power in mobility-limited older adults

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Declines in functional mobility are common with advancing age, though the physiological determinants underlying this problem are not fully understood. Accumulating evidence indicates that muscle power, the product of force and velocity, is an independent predictor of mobility function in older adul...

  6. Trans-synaptic zinc mobilization improves social interaction in two mouse models of autism through NMDAR activation

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Eun-Jae; Lee, Hyejin; Huang, Tzyy-Nan; Chung, Changuk; Shin, Wangyong; Kim, Kyungdeok; Koh, Jae-Young; Hsueh, Yi-Ping; Kim, Eunjoon

    2015-01-01

    Genetic aspects of autism spectrum disorders (ASDs) have recently been extensively explored, but environmental influences that affect ASDs have received considerably less attention. Zinc (Zn) is a nutritional factor implicated in ASDs, but evidence for a strong association and linking mechanism is largely lacking. Here we report that trans-synaptic Zn mobilization rapidly rescues social interaction in two independent mouse models of ASD. In mice lacking Shank2, an excitatory postsynaptic scaffolding protein, postsynaptic Zn elevation induced by clioquinol (a Zn chelator and ionophore) improves social interaction. Postsynaptic Zn is mainly derived from presynaptic pools and activates NMDA receptors (NMDARs) through postsynaptic activation of the tyrosine kinase Src. Clioquinol also improves social interaction in mice haploinsufficient for the transcription factor Tbr1, which accompanies NMDAR activation in the amygdala. These results suggest that trans-synaptic Zn mobilization induced by clioquinol rescues social deficits in mouse models of ASD through postsynaptic Src and NMDAR activation. PMID:25981743

  7. Brain activation and defensive response mobilization during sustained exposure to phobia-related and other affective pictures in spider phobia.

    PubMed

    Wendt, Julia; Lotze, Martin; Weike, Almut I; Hosten, Norbert; Hamm, Alfons O

    2008-03-01

    This study explored defensive response mobilization as well as fMRI responses during sustained exposure to phobia-relevant stimuli. To test the specificity of affective physiology and brain activation, neutral and other affective stimuli were included. Phobia-specific startle potentiation was maintained and autonomic responses even increased during sustained phobic stimulation. Viewing of spider pictures also resulted in increased activation of the amygdala in spider-phobic participants. This effect, however, was not fear specific because other affective materials evoked comparable signal strength in the amygdala. In contrast, insula activation was specifically increased during sustained phobic exposure in phobic volunteers. These data suggest that the activation of the amygdala in fMRI studies primarily indexes the detection of motivationally relevant stimuli whereas the insula might be more specifically linked to defensive response mobilization.

  8. Trans-synaptic zinc mobilization improves social interaction in two mouse models of autism through NMDAR activation.

    PubMed

    Lee, Eun-Jae; Lee, Hyejin; Huang, Tzyy-Nan; Chung, Changuk; Shin, Wangyong; Kim, Kyungdeok; Koh, Jae-Young; Hsueh, Yi-Ping; Kim, Eunjoon

    2015-05-18

    Genetic aspects of autism spectrum disorders (ASDs) have recently been extensively explored, but environmental influences that affect ASDs have received considerably less attention. Zinc (Zn) is a nutritional factor implicated in ASDs, but evidence for a strong association and linking mechanism is largely lacking. Here we report that trans-synaptic Zn mobilization rapidly rescues social interaction in two independent mouse models of ASD. In mice lacking Shank2, an excitatory postsynaptic scaffolding protein, postsynaptic Zn elevation induced by clioquinol (a Zn chelator and ionophore) improves social interaction. Postsynaptic Zn is mainly derived from presynaptic pools and activates NMDA receptors (NMDARs) through postsynaptic activation of the tyrosine kinase Src. Clioquinol also improves social interaction in mice haploinsufficient for the transcription factor Tbr1, which accompanies NMDAR activation in the amygdala. These results suggest that trans-synaptic Zn mobilization induced by clioquinol rescues social deficits in mouse models of ASD through postsynaptic Src and NMDAR activation.

  9. Power and limitations of electrophoretic separations in proteomics strategies.

    PubMed

    Rabilloud, Thierry; Vaezzadeh, Ali R; Potier, Noelle; Lelong, Cécile; Leize-Wagner, Emmanuelle; Chevallet, Mireille

    2009-01-01

    Proteomics can be defined as the large-scale analysis of proteins. Due to the complexity of biological systems, it is required to concatenate various separation techniques prior to mass spectrometry. These techniques, dealing with proteins or peptides, can rely on chromatography or electrophoresis. In this review, the electrophoretic techniques are under scrutiny. Their principles are recalled, and their applications for peptide and protein separations are presented and critically discussed. In addition, the features that are specific to gel electrophoresis and that interplay with mass spectrometry (i.e., protein detection after electrophoresis, and the process leading from a gel piece to a solution of peptides) are also discussed.

  10. AN ELECTROPHORETIC STUDY OF NEPHROTIC SERA AND URINE

    PubMed Central

    Longsworth, L. G.; MacInnes, D. A.

    1940-01-01

    The electrophoretic patterns of the sera and urine of two cases of lipoid nephrosis have been obtained and have been compared with a typical pattern of normal serum. The patterns of the pathological sera deviated widely from the normal, indicating relatively low albumin and high globulin content. The comparison of the patterns of nephrotic sera cleared by centrifugation and by ether extraction shows that a large portion of the β globulin consisted of a labile lipo-protein. The pattern of the nephrotic urine proteins resembled that of normal serum, with, however, significant differences. PMID:19870946

  11. Selectively-etched nanochannel electrophoretic and electrochemical devices

    DOEpatents

    Surh, Michael P.; Wilson, William D.; Barbee, Jr., Troy W.; Lane, Stephen M.

    2004-11-16

    Nanochannel electrophoretic and electrochemical devices having selectively-etched nanolaminates located in the fluid transport channel. The normally flat surfaces of the nanolaminate having exposed conductive (metal) stripes are selectively-etched to form trenches and baffles. The modifications of the prior utilized flat exposed surfaces increase the amount of exposed metal to facilitate electrochemical redox reaction or control the exposure of the metal surfaces to analytes of large size. These etched areas variously increase the sensitivity of electrochemical detection devices to low concentrations of analyte, improve the plug flow characteristic of the channel, and allow additional discrimination of the colloidal particles during cyclic voltammetry.

  12. Selectively-etched nanochannel electrophoretic and electrochemical devices

    DOEpatents

    Surh, Michael P.; Wilson, William D.; Barbee, Jr., Troy W.; Lane, Stephen M.

    2006-06-27

    Nanochannel electrophoretic and electrochemical devices having selectively-etched nanolaminates located in the fluid transport channel. The normally flat surfaces of the nanolaminate having exposed conductive (metal) stripes are selectively-etched to form trenches and baffles. The modifications of the prior utilized flat exposed surfaces increase the amount of exposed metal to facilitate electrochemical redox reaction or control the exposure of the metal surfaces to analytes of large size. These etched areas variously increase the sensitivity of electrochemical detection devices to low concentrations of analyte, improve the plug flow characteristic of the channel, and allow additional discrimination of the colloidal particles during cyclic voltammetry.

  13. Microfluidic devices for DNA sequencing: sample preparation and electrophoretic analysis.

    PubMed

    Paegel, Brian M; Blazej, Robert G; Mathies, Richard A

    2003-02-01

    Modern DNA sequencing 'factories' have revolutionized biology by completing the human genome sequence, but in the race to completion we are left with inefficient, cumbersome, and costly macroscale processes and supporting facilities. During the same period, microfabricated DNA sequencing, sample processing and analysis devices have advanced rapidly toward the goal of a 'sequencing lab-on-a-chip'. Integrated microfluidic processing dramatically reduces analysis time and reagent consumption, and eliminates costly and unreliable macroscale robotics and laboratory apparatus. A microfabricated device for high-throughput DNA sequencing that couples clone isolation, template amplification, Sanger extension, purification, and electrophoretic analysis in a single microfluidic circuit is now attainable.

  14. Development of the Self-Powered Extravehicular Mobility Unit Extravehicular Activity Data Recorder

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bernard, Craig; Hill, Terry R.; Murray, Sean; Wichowski, Robert; Rosenbush, David

    2012-01-01

    The Self-Powered Extravehicular Mobility Unit (EMU) Extravehicular Activity (EVA) Data Recorder (SPEEDR) is a field-programmable gate array (FPGA)-based device designed to collect high-rate EMU Primary Life Support Subsystem (PLSS) data for download at a later time. During EVA, the existing EMU PLSS data downlink capability is one data packet every 2 minutes and is subject to bad packets or loss of signal. Higher-rate PLSS data is generated by the Enhanced Caution and Warning System but is not normally captured or distributed. Access to higher-rate data will increase the capability of EMU anomaly resolution team to pinpoint issues remotely, saving crew time by reducing required call-down Q&A and on-orbit diagnostic activities. With no Space Shuttle flights post Fiscal Year 2011 (FY11), and potentially limited down-mass capability, the ISS crew and ground support personnel will have to be capable of on-orbit operations to maintain, diagnose, repair, and return to service EMU hardware, possibly through 2028. Collecting high-rate EMU PLSS data during both intravehicular activity (IVA) and EVA operations will provide trending analysis for life extension and/or predictive performance. The SPEEDR concept has generated interest as a tool/technology that could be used for other International Space Station subsystems or future exploration-class space suits where hardware reliability/availability is critical and low/variable bandwidth may require store then forward methodology. Preliminary work in FY11 produced a functional prototype consisting of an FPGA evaluation board, custom memory/interface circuit board, and custom software. The SPEEDR concept includes a stand-alone battery that is recharged by a computer Universal Serial Bus (USB) port while data are being downloaded.

  15. How can the curation of hands-on STEM activities power successful mobile apps and websites?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Porcello, D.; Peticolas, L. M.; Schwerin, T. G.

    2015-12-01

    The Lawrence Hall of Science (LHS) is University of California, Berkeley's public science center. Over the last decade, the Center for Technology Innovation at LHS has partnered with many institutions to establish a strong track record of developing successful technology solutions to support STEM teaching and learning within informal environments. Curation by subject-matter experts has been at the heart of many educational technology products from LHS and its partners that are directed at educators and families. This work includes: (1) popular digital libraries for inquiry-based activities at Howtosmile.org (NSF DRL #0735007) and NASA Earth and Space science education resources at NASAwavelength.org; and novel mobile apps like DIY Sun Science (NASA NNX10AE05G) and DIY Human Body (NIH 5R25OD010543) designed to scaffold exploration of STEM phenomena at home. Both NASA Wavelength and DIY Sun Science arose out of long-term collaborations with the Space Sciences Laboratory at UC Berkeley, Institute for Global Environmental Strategies (IGES), and other NASA-funded organizations, in partnership with NASA through cooperative agreements. This session will review the development, formative evaluation, and usage metrics for these two Earth and Space science-themed educational technology products directly relevant to the AGU community. Questions reviewed by presenters will include: What makes a good hands-on activity, and what essential information do educators depend on when searching for programming additions? What content and connections do families need to explore hands-on activities? How can technology help incorporate educational standards into the discovery process for learning experiences online? How do all these components drive the design and user experience of websites and apps that showcase STEM content?

  16. The effects of mobile-phone electromagnetic fields on brain electrical activity: a critical analysis of the literature.

    PubMed

    Marino, Andrew A; Carrubba, Simona

    2009-01-01

    We analyzed the reports in which human brain electrical activity was compared between the presence and absence of radio-frequency and low-frequency electromagnetic fields (EMFs) from mobile phones, or between pre- and post-exposure to the EMFs. Of 55 reports, 37 claimed and 18 denied an EMF-induced effect on either the baseline electro encephalogram (EEG), or on cognitive processing of visual or auditory stimuli as reflected in changes in event-related potentials. The positive reports did not adequately consider the family-wise error rate, the presence of spike artifacts in the EEG, or the confounding role of the two different EMFs. The negative reports contained neither positive controls nor power analyses. Almost all reports were based on the incorrect assumption that the brain was in equilibrium with its surroundings. Overall, the doubt regarding the existence of reproducible mobile-phone EMFs on brain activity created by the reports appeared to legitimate the knowledge claims of the mobile-phone industry. However, it funded, partly or wholly, at least 87% of the reports. From an analysis of their cognitive framework, the common use of disclaimers, the absence of information concerning conflicts of interest, and the industry's donations to the principal EMF journal, we inferred that the doubt was manufactured by the industry. The crucial scientific question of the pathophysiology of mobile-phone EMFs as reflected in measurements of brain electrical activity remains unanswered, and essentially unaddressed.

  17. Simulated null-gravity environments as applied to electrophoretic separations of biological species

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Giannovario, J. A.; Griffin, R. N.

    1978-01-01

    The scale-up of electrophoretic separations to provide preparative quantities of materials has been hampered by gravity induced convection and sedimentation. The separation of biologically important species may be significantly enhanced by electrophoretic space processing. Simple demonstrations on past space flights have proven some principles. Several techniques have been evolved to study electrophoretic separations where the effects of gravity have been nullified or significantly reduced. These techniques employ mechanical design, density gradients and computer modeling. Utilization of these techniques for ground based studies will yield clues as to which biological species can be considered prime candidates for electrophoretic processing in zero-G.

  18. Mobile Phone Apps to Promote Weight Loss and Increase Physical Activity: A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Ferré-Grau, Carme; Montaña-Carreras, Xavier

    2015-01-01

    Background To our knowledge, no meta-analysis to date has assessed the efficacy of mobile phone apps to promote weight loss and increase physical activity. Objective To perform a systematic review and meta-analysis of studies to compare the efficacy of mobile phone apps compared with other approaches to promote weight loss and increase physical activity. Methods We conducted a systematic review and meta-analysis of relevant studies identified by a search of PubMed, the Cumulative Index to Nursing and Allied Health Literature (CINAHL), and Scopus from their inception through to August 2015. Two members of the study team (EG-F, GF-M) independently screened studies for inclusion criteria and extracted data. We included all controlled studies that assessed a mobile phone app intervention with weight-related health measures (ie, body weight, body mass index, or waist circumference) or physical activity outcomes. Net change estimates comparing the intervention group with the control group were pooled across studies using random-effects models. Results We included 12 articles in this systematic review and meta-analysis. Compared with the control group, use of a mobile phone app was associated with significant changes in body weight (kg) and body mass index (kg/m2) of -1.04 kg (95% CI -1.75 to -0.34; I2 = 41%) and -0.43 kg/m2 (95% CI -0.74 to -0.13; I2 = 50%), respectively. Moreover, a nonsignificant difference in physical activity was observed between the two groups (standardized mean difference 0.40, 95% CI -0.07 to 0.87; I2 = 93%). These findings were remarkably robust in the sensitivity analysis. No publication bias was shown. Conclusions Evidence from this study shows that mobile phone app-based interventions may be useful tools for weight loss. PMID:26554314

  19. Design and Certification of the Extravehicular Activity Mobility Unit (EMU) Water Processing Jumper

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Peterson, Laurie J.; Neumeyer, Derek J.; Lewis, John F.

    2006-01-01

    The Extravehicular Mobility Units (EMUs) onboard the International Space Station (ISS) experienced a failure due to cooling water contamination from biomass and corrosion byproducts forming solids around the EMU pump rotor. The coolant had no biocide and a low pH which induced biofilm growth and corrosion precipitates, respectively. NASA JSC was tasked with building hardware to clean the ionic, organic, and particulate load from the EMU coolant loop before and after Extravehicular Activity (EVAs). Based on a return sample of the EMU coolant loop, the chemical load was well understood, but there was not sufficient volume of the returned sample to analyze particulates. Through work with EMU specialists, chemists, (EVA) Mission Operations Directorate (MOD) representation, safety and mission assurance, astronaut crew, and team engineers, requirements were developed for the EMU Water Processing hardware (sometimes referred to as the Airlock Coolant Loop Recovery [A/L CLR] system). Those requirements ranged from the operable level of ionic, organic, and particulate load, interfaces to the EMU, maximum cycle time, operating pressure drop, flow rate, and temperature, leakage rates, and biocide levels for storage. Design work began in February 2005 and certification was completed in April 2005 to support a return to flight launch date of May 12, 2005. This paper will discuss the details of the design and certification of the EMU Water Processing hardware and its components

  20. Successful treatment of mobile right atrial thrombus and acute pulmonary embolism with intravenous tissue plasminogen activator

    PubMed Central

    Bajaj, R; Ramanakumar, Ajay; Mamidala, Suresh; Kumar, Deepti

    2013-01-01

    An 89-year-old woman came with symptoms of progressively worsening dyspnoea at rest over the preceding week. She was normotensive, had elevated jugular venous pressure and clear lungs. ECG revealed atrial fibrillation with the rapid ventricular rate. Labs were significant for markedly elevated pro-brain natriuretic peptide of 43 000 pg/mL and troponin-T of 1 ng/mL. An urgent 2D echocardiogram was obtained, which revealed the severely dilated right atrium and a large linear mobile mass in the right atrium consistent with a thrombus. An emergent CT scan revealed multiple bilateral pulmonary emboli. She received intravenous tissue plasminogen activator. Repeat echocardiogram performed 6 h later showed no evidence of the right atrial thrombus. She was subsequently maintained on intravenous heparin and transitioned to Coumadin. Early recognition of this rare but potentially fatal complication is important as prompt treatment measures can help in preventing life-threatening complications of the right atrial thrombus. PMID:23892824

  1. Piloting a mobile health intervention to increase physical activity for adolescents with ADHD.

    PubMed

    Schoenfelder, Erin; Moreno, Megan; Wilner, Molly; Whitlock, Kathryn B; Mendoza, Jason A

    2017-06-01

    Physical activity (PA) reduces symptoms of Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder (ADHD); interventions to increase PA may improve functioning and health for adolescents with ADHD. Mobile health (mHealth) technology and social media constitute promising interactive modalities for engaging adolescents-who are at highest risk for ADHD treatment drop-out-in interventions to increase PA. The current pilot study evaluated feasibility and acceptability of an innovative intervention incorporating an mHealth-linked wearable activity tracker (Fitbit Flex) and a Facebook group to increase PA among adolescents with ADHD. 11 adolescents diagnosed with ADHD (age 14-18, m = 15.5; 54% female) participated in a 4-week trial utilizing the Fitbit Flex in conjunction with (1) weekly personalized step count goals (2) social support through a Facebook group and (3) daily text messages about PA. The study took place in the greater Seattle, Washington area in the fall of 2015. Adolescents completed online surveys twice per week to rate their ADHD symptoms and positive and negative mood states, and parents rated adolescent ADHD symptoms weekly. Participants were adherent to the study protocol and acceptability of the intervention was high. Linear mixed models indicated that participants significantly increased their average weekly steps over the course of the study and demonstrated improvements in both adolescent and parent-reported ADHD Inattentive symptoms. Results indicate that this mHealth intervention is engaging and promising for increasing PA among adolescents with ADHD, and warrant further study. Implications for improving ADHD symptoms and overall functioning for this undertreated population are discussed.

  2. Electrophoretic deposition of composite hydroxyapatite-chitosan coatings

    SciTech Connect

    Pang Xin; Zhitomirsky, Igor . E-mail: zhitom@mcmaster.ca

    2007-04-15

    Cathodic electrophoretic deposition has been utilized for the fabrication of composite hydroxyapatite-chitosan coatings on 316L stainless steel substrates. The addition of chitosan to the hydroxyapatite suspensions promoted the electrophoretic deposition of the hydroxyapatite nanoparticles and resulted in the formation of composite coatings. The obtained coatings were investigated by X-ray diffraction, thermogravimetric and differential thermal analysis, scanning and transmission electron microscopy, potentiodynamic polarization measurements, and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy. It was shown that the deposit composition can be changed by a variation of the chitosan or hydroxyapatite concentration in the solutions. Experimental conditions were developed for the fabrication of hydroxyapatite-chitosan nanocomposites containing 40.9-89.8 wt.% hydroxyapatite. The method enabled the formation of adherent and uniform coatings of thicknesses up to 60 {mu}m. X-ray studies revealed that the preferred orientation of the hydroxyapatite nanoparticles in the chitosan matrix increases with decreasing hydroxyapatite content in the composite coatings. The obtained coatings provided the corrosion protection for the 316L stainless steel substrates00.

  3. Survival rate of eukaryotic cells following electrophoretic nanoinjection

    PubMed Central

    Simonis, Matthias; Hübner, Wolfgang; Wilking, Alice; Huser, Thomas; Hennig, Simon

    2017-01-01

    Insertion of foreign molecules such as functionalized fluorescent probes, antibodies, or plasmid DNA to living cells requires overcoming the plasma membrane barrier without harming the cell during the staining process. Many techniques such as electroporation, lipofection or microinjection have been developed to overcome the cellular plasma membrane, but they all result in reduced cell viability. A novel approach is the injection of cells with a nanopipette and using electrophoretic forces for the delivery of molecules. The tip size of these pipettes is approximately ten times smaller than typical microinjection pipettes and rather than pressure pulses as delivery method, moderate DC electric fields are used to drive charged molecules out of the tip. Here, we show that this approach leads to a significantly higher survival rate of nanoinjected cells and that injection with nanopipettes has a significantly lower impact on the proliferation behavior of injected cells. Thus, we propose that injection with nanopipettes using electrophoretic delivery is an excellent alternative when working with valuable and rare living cells, such as primary cells or stem cells. PMID:28120926

  4. Recent innovations in protein separation on microchips by electrophoretic methods.

    PubMed

    Peng, Youyuan; Pallandre, Antoine; Tran, N Thuy; Taverna, Myriam

    2008-01-01

    Microchips for analytical purposes have attracted great attention over the last 20 years. In the present review, we focus on the most recent development of microchips for electrophoretic separation of proteins. This review starts with a short recalling about the microchips covering the basic microchip layout for CE and the commercial chips and microchip platforms. A short paragraph is dedicated to the surface treatment of microchips, which is of paramount importance in protein analysis. One section is dedicated to on-line sample pretreatment in microchips and summarizes different strategies to pre-concentrate or to purify proteins from complex matrixes. Most of the common modes used for CE of proteins have already been adapted to the chip format, while multidimensional approaches are still in progress. The different routes to achieve detection in microchip are also presented with a special attention to derivatization or labeling of proteins. Finally, several recent applications are mentioned. They highlight the great potential of electrophoretic separations of proteins in numerous fields such as biological, pharmaceutical or agricultural and food analysis. A bibliography with 151 references is provided covering papers published from 2000 to the early 2007.

  5. Electrophoretic motion of ideally polarizable particles in a microchannel.

    PubMed

    Wu, Zhemin; Gao, Yandong; Li, Dongqing

    2009-03-01

    The induced-charge electrophoretic (ICEP) motion of ideally polarizable particles in a microchannel is numerically studied in this paper. A complete 3-D multi-physics model is set up to simulate the transient ICEP motion of spherical ideally polarizable particles in a microchannel. The study shows that a non-uniform distribution of induced surface charge occurs when an ideally polarizable particle is immersed in an externally applied electric field, resulting in a varying slipping (EOF) velocity along the particle's surface and hence producing micro vortexes in the liquid. The numerical results verify that the steady-state ICEP velocity of an ideally polarizable particle does not differ from the electrophoretic velocity of a non-conducting particle, although the flow field near the particle does. A strong wall-repelling effect of ICEP is found when the polarizable particle is placed close to the channel wall. This is due to the lifting effect generated from the interaction between the induced micro vortexes and the channel wall and depends on the electric field and the particle size. The wall effects on ICEP motion can be used for focusing particles and for separation of particle by density.

  6. Automated band mapping in electrophoretic gel images using background information

    PubMed Central

    Zerr, Troy; Henikoff, Steven

    2005-01-01

    Some popular methods for polymorphism and mutation discovery involve ascertainment of novel bands by the examination of electrophoretic gel images. Although existing strategies for mapping bands work well for specific applications, such as DNA sequencing, these strategies are not well suited for novel band detection. Here, we describe a general strategy for band mapping that uses background banding patterns to facilitate lane calling and size calibration. We have implemented this strategy in GelBuddy, a user-friendly Java-based program for PC and Macintosh computers, which includes several utilities to assist discovery of mutations and polymorphisms. We demonstrate the use of GelBuddy in applications based on single-base mismatch cleavage of heteroduplexed PCR products. Use of software designed to facilitate novel band detection can significantly shorten the time needed for image analysis and data entry in a high-throughput setting. Furthermore, the interactive strategy implemented in GelBuddy has been successfully applied to DNA fingerprinting applications, such as AFLP. GelBuddy promises to make electrophoretic gel analysis a viable alternative to DNA resequencing for discovery of mutations and polymorphisms. PMID:15894797

  7. Electrophoretic deposition of zinc-substituted hydroxyapatite coatings.

    PubMed

    Sun, Guangfei; Ma, Jun; Zhang, Shengmin

    2014-06-01

    Zinc-substituted hydroxyapatite nanoparticles synthesized by the co-precipitation method were used to coat stainless steel plates by electrophoretic deposition in n-butanol with triethanolamine as a dispersant. The effect of zinc concentration in the synthesis on the morphology and microstructure of coatings was investigated. It is found that the deposition current densities significantly increase with the increasing zinc concentration. The zinc-substituted hydroxyapatite coatings were analyzed by X-ray diffraction, scanning electron microscopy and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy. It is inferred that hydroxyapatite and triethanolamine predominate in the chemical composition of coatings. With the increasing Zn/Ca ratios, the contents of triethanolamine decrease in the final products. The triethanolamine can be burnt out by heat treatment. The tests of adhesive strength have confirmed good adhesion between the coatings and substrates. The formation of new apatite layer on the coatings has been observed after 7days of immersion in a simulated body fluid. In summary, the results show that dense, uniform zinc-substituted hydroxyapatite coatings are obtained by electrophoretic deposition when the Zn/Ca ratio reaches 5%.

  8. Electrophoretic fingerprinting of benzodiazepine tablets in spike drinks.

    PubMed

    Sáiz, Jorge; Ortega-Ojeda, Fernando; López-Melero, Lucía; Montalvo, Gema; García-Ruiz, Carmen

    2014-11-01

    Over the last few years, there has been an increase in the reports of drug-facilitated crimes. The list of drugs associated with these crimes is extensive and benzodiazepines constitute one of the groups of substances more commonly used. The sedative properties, which characterize benzodiazepines, are enhanced when such drugs are combined with alcohol, being more attractive for committing these types of crimes. In this work, a capillary electrophoresis method was applied to the analysis of 63 different samples of club drinks spiked with benzodiazepine tablets. The resulting electropherograms were processed and analyzed with the chemometric multivariate techniques: principal component analysis (PCA) and soft independent modeling of class analogies (SIMCA) classification. The PCA results allowed a clear differentiation of each drug class in a 3D plot. In addition, the SIMCA classification model (5% significance level) showed that eight out of nine test samples were automatically assigned by software to their proper sample class. The conflicting sample was correctly classified in the Coomans' plot (95% confidence). This novel approach based on the comparison of electrophoretic profiles of spiked drinks by chemometric tools allows determining the benzodiazepine used for drink spiking without the use of drug standards. Moreover, it provides an opportunity for the forensic laboratories to incorporate the identification capability provided by the electrophoretic fingerprinting of benzodiazepine solutions in existing or new databases.

  9. Relationship of stride activity and participation in mobility-based life habits among children with cerebral palsy

    PubMed Central

    Bjornson, Kristie F.; Zhou, Chuan; Stevenson, Richard D.; Christakis, Dimitri

    2014-01-01

    Objective To date walking outcomes in cerebral palsy (CP) have been capacity-based (what a child does in structured setting). Physical activity performance (what a child really does in daily life) has been documented to influence the relationship of capacity-based gross motor measures to participation.(1) This study examines the relationship between walking performance and participation in mobility-related habits of daily life in children with CP. Design Cross-sectional prospective cohort study. Setting Regional pediatric specialty care centers Participants A cohort of 128 ambulatory children with CP ages 2–9 yrs, 41% female, and 49% having hemiplegia participated. Interventions Not Applicable. Main Outcome Measures Walking performance was quantified from a 5-day sample of StepWatch accelerometry data. Stride activity was summarized through the outcomes of average total strides/day (independent of intensity) and average number of strides/day at > 30 strides/minute (marker of intensity). Mobility-based participation was assessed by the Life Habits (Life-H) categories of Personal Care, Housing, Mobility, and Recreation. Regression models were developed controlling for gender, age, cognition, communication, pain, and body composition. Results Average total strides/day was positively associated with the Personal Care, Housing, Mobility, and Recreation Life-H categories (β = .34 to.41, p <.001). Average number of strides > 30 stride/min/day was associated with all categories (β = .54 to.60, p < .001). Conclusions Accelerometry-based walking activity performance is significantly associated with levels of participation in mobility-based life habits for ambulatory children with CP. Evaluation of other factors and the direction of relationships within the ICF is warranted to inform rehabilitation strategies. PMID:24231402

  10. Electrophoretically deposited multiwalled carbon nanotube based amperometric genosensor for E.coli detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bhardwaj, Hema; Solanki, Shipra; Sumana, Gajjala

    2016-04-01

    This work reports on a sensitive and selective genosensor fabrication method for Escherichia coli (E.coli) detection. The functionalized multiwalled carbon nanotubes (MWCNT) synthesized via chemical vapour deposition have been deposited electrophoretically onto indium tin oxide coated glass surface and have been utilized as matrices for the covalent immobilization of E.coli specific probe oligonucleotide that was identified from the 16s rRNA coding region of the E.coli genome. This fabricated functionalized MWCNT based platform sought to provide improved fundamental characteristics to electrode interface in terms of electro-active surface area and diffusion coefficient. Electrochemical cyclic voltammetry revealed that this genosensor exhibits a linear response to complementary DNA in the concentration range of 10-7 to 10-12 M with a detection limit of 1×10-12 M.

  11. Microchannel gel electrophoretic separation systems and methods for preparing and using

    SciTech Connect

    Herr, Amy; Singh, Anup K; Throckmorton, Daniel J

    2013-09-03

    A micro-analytical platform for performing electrophoresis-based immunoassays was developed by integrating photopolymerized cross-linked polyacrylamide gels within a microfluidic device. The microfluidic immunoassays are performed by gel electrophoretic separation and quantifying analyte concentration based upon conventional polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (PAGE). To retain biological activity of proteins and maintain intact immune complexes, native PAGE conditions were employed. Both direct (non-competitive) and competitive immunoassay formats are demonstrated in microchips for detecting toxins and biomarkers (cytokines, c-reactive protein) in bodily fluids (serum, saliva, oral fluids). Further, a description of gradient gels fabrication is included, in an effort to describe methods we have developed for further optimization of on-chip PAGE immunoassays. The described chip-based PAGE immunoassay method enables immunoassays that are fast (minutes) and require very small amounts of sample (less than a few microliters). Use of microfabricated chips as a platform enables integration, parallel assays, automation and development of portable devices.

  12. Microchannel gel electrophoretic separation systems and methods for preparing and using

    SciTech Connect

    Herr, Amy E; Singh, Anup K; Throckmorton, Daniel J

    2015-02-24

    A micro-analytical platform for performing electrophoresis-based immunoassays was developed by integrating photopolymerized cross-linked polyacrylamide gels within a microfluidic device. The microfluidic immunoassays are performed by gel electrophoretic separation and quantifying analyte concentration based upon conventional polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (PAGE). To retain biological activity of proteins and maintain intact immune complexes, native PAGE conditions were employed. Both direct (non-competitive) and competitive immunoassay formats are demonstrated in microchips for detecting toxins and biomarkers (cytokines, c-reactive protein) in bodily fluids (serum, saliva, oral fluids). Further, a description of gradient gels fabrication is included, in an effort to describe methods we have developed for further optimization of on-chip PAGE immunoassays. The described chip-based PAGE immunoassay method enables immunoassays that are fast (minutes) and require very small amounts of sample (less than a few microliters). Use of microfabricated chips as a platform enables integration, parallel assays, automation and development of portable devices.

  13. Kinesthetic and vestibular information modulate alpha activity during spatial navigation: a mobile EEG study

    PubMed Central

    Ehinger, Benedikt V.; Fischer, Petra; Gert, Anna L.; Kaufhold, Lilli; Weber, Felix; Pipa, Gordon; König, Peter

    2014-01-01

    In everyday life, spatial navigation involving locomotion provides congruent visual, vestibular, and kinesthetic information that need to be integrated. Yet, previous studies on human brain activity during navigation focus on stationary setups, neglecting vestibular and kinesthetic feedback. The aim of our work is to uncover the influence of those sensory modalities on cortical processing. We developed a fully immersive virtual reality setup combined with high-density mobile electroencephalography (EEG). Participants traversed one leg of a triangle, turned on the spot, continued along the second leg, and finally indicated the location of their starting position. Vestibular and kinesthetic information was provided either in combination, as isolated sources of information, or not at all within a 2 × 2 full factorial intra-subjects design. EEG data were processed by clustering independent components, and time-frequency spectrograms were calculated. In parietal, occipital, and temporal clusters, we detected alpha suppression during the turning movement, which is associated with a heightened demand of visuo-attentional processing and closely resembles results reported in previous stationary studies. This decrease is present in all conditions and therefore seems to generalize to more natural settings. Yet, in incongruent conditions, when different sensory modalities did not match, the decrease is significantly stronger. Additionally, in more anterior areas we found that providing only vestibular but no kinesthetic information results in alpha increase. These observations demonstrate that stationary experiments omit important aspects of sensory feedback. Therefore, it is important to develop more natural experimental settings in order to capture a more complete picture of neural correlates of spatial navigation. PMID:24616681

  14. Enhanced activation of B cells in a granulocyte colony-stimulating factor-mobilized peripheral blood stem cell graft.

    PubMed

    Tayebi, H; Lapierre, V; Saas, P; Lienard, A; Sutton, L; Milpied, N; Attal, M; Cahn, J Y; Kuentz, M; Blaise, D; Hervé, P; Tiberghien, P; Robinet, E

    2001-09-01

    In a randomized study that compared human leucocyte antigen-identical allogeneic granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (G-CSF)-mobilized peripheral blood stem cell (PBSC) versus bone marrow (BM) transplantation, the expression of activation markers, CD23, CD25 and CD45RO by B cells, was compared in blood before and after G-CSF mobilization and in PBSC versus BM grafts. The fractions of CD23+ and CD25+ B cells were higher in PBSC than in BM grafts. Moreover, we observed a G-CSF-induced increase in B-cell fractions in blood as well as in PBSC grafts when compared with BM grafts. Such an enhanced B-cell activation could contribute to the accelerated kinetics of immuno-haematological reconstitution, the occurrence of acute haemolysis in the ABO minor incompatibility setting, as well as the increased incidence of chronic graft-versus-host disease observed after PBSC transplantation.

  15. Demonstrating Electrophoretic Separation in a Straight Paper Channel Delimited by a Hydrophobic Wax Barrier

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Xu, Chunxiu; Lin, Wanqi; Cai, Longfei

    2016-01-01

    A demonstration is described of electrophoretic separation of carmine and sunset yellow with a paper-based device. The channel in the paper device was fabricated by hand with a wax pen. Electrophoretic separation of carmine and sunset yellow was achieved within a few minutes by applying potential on the channel using a simple and inexpensive power…

  16. Electrophoretically detectable protein variation in natural populations of the lone star tick, Amblyomma americanum (Acari: Ixodidae).

    PubMed

    Hilburn, L R; Sattler, P W

    1986-08-01

    Nine populations of Amblyomma americanum (L.) were examined electrophoretically for variation of 21 enzymes. Only three enzymes were not polymorphic and the average heterozygosity per individual (h) for the species was 0.085 with a range of 0.077 to 0.110, comparing well with values in other arthropods. The average Nei identity value for pairwise comparisons among the nine populations was high, 0.994 +/- 0.004 (I +/- SD). These high identity values and the absence of geographic structuring of the protein variation suggest that this species is genetically homogeneous. Normal levels of genic variability within and a lack of divergence between populations were not predicted by models developed to describe these genetic characteristics on the basis of the heterogeneities encountered by parasites in their environment. An analysis of data from several different species of ticks suggests host mobility and abundance, as well as tick abundance and selectivity in choosing a host, are important parameters in determining genetic variation in these ectoparasites.

  17. Ionic liquids in chromatographic and electrophoretic techniques: toward additional improvements in the separation of natural compounds

    PubMed Central

    Freire, Carmen S. R.; Coutinho, João A. P.; Silvestre, Armando J. D.; Freire, Mara G.

    2016-01-01

    Due to their unique properties, in recent years, ionic liquids (ILs) have been largely investigated in the field of analytical chemistry. Particularly during the last sixteen years, they have been successfully applied in the chromatographic and electrophoretic analysis of value-added compounds extracted from biomass. Considering the growing interest in the use of ILs in this field, this critical review provides a comprehensive overview on the improvements achieved using ILs as constituents of mobile or stationary phases in analytical techniques, namely in capillary electrophoresis and its different modes, in high performance liquid chromatography, and in gas chromatography, for the separation and analysis of natural compounds. The impact of the IL chemical structure and the influence of secondary parameters, such as the IL concentration, temperature, pH, voltage and analysis time (when applied), are also critically addressed regarding the achieved separation improvements. Major conclusions on the role of ILs in the separation mechanisms and the performance of these techniques in terms of efficiency, resolution and selectivity are provided. Based on a critical analysis of all published results, some target-oriented ILs are suggested. Finally, current drawbacks and future challenges in the field are highlighted. In particular, the design and use of more benign and effective ILs as well as the development of integrated (and thus more sustainable) extraction–separation processes using IL aqueous solutions are suggested within a green chemistry perspective. PMID:27667965

  18. Ionic liquids in chromatographic and electrophoretic techniques: toward additional improvements in the separation of natural compounds.

    PubMed

    Soares, Belinda; Passos, Helena; Freire, Carmen S R; Coutinho, João A P; Silvestre, Armando J D; Freire, Mara G

    2016-09-07

    Due to their unique properties, in recent years, ionic liquids (ILs) have been largely investigated in the field of analytical chemistry. Particularly during the last sixteen years, they have been successfully applied in the chromatographic and electrophoretic analysis of value-added compounds extracted from biomass. Considering the growing interest in the use of ILs in this field, this critical review provides a comprehensive overview on the improvements achieved using ILs as constituents of mobile or stationary phases in analytical techniques, namely in capillary electrophoresis and its different modes, in high performance liquid chromatography, and in gas chromatography, for the separation and analysis of natural compounds. The impact of the IL chemical structure and the influence of secondary parameters, such as the IL concentration, temperature, pH, voltage and analysis time (when applied), are also critically addressed regarding the achieved separation improvements. Major conclusions on the role of ILs in the separation mechanisms and the performance of these techniques in terms of efficiency, resolution and selectivity are provided. Based on a critical analysis of all published results, some target-oriented ILs are suggested. Finally, current drawbacks and future challenges in the field are highlighted. In particular, the design and use of more benign and effective ILs as well as the development of integrated (and thus more sustainable) extraction-separation processes using IL aqueous solutions are suggested within a green chemistry perspective.

  19. Detection of Macromolecular Fractions in HCN Polymers Using Electrophoretic and Ultrafiltration Techniques.

    PubMed

    Marín-Yaseli, Margarita R; Cid, Cristina; Yagüe, Ana I; Ruiz-Bermejo, Marta

    2017-02-01

    Elucidating the origin of life involves synthetic as well as analytical challenges. Herein, for the first time, we describe the use of gel electrophoresis and ultrafiltration to fractionate HCN polymers. Since the first prebiotic synthesis of adenine by Oró, HCN polymers have gained much interest in studies on the origins of life due to the identification of biomonomers and related compounds within them. Here, we demonstrate that macromolecular fractions with electrophoretic mobility can also be detected within HCN polymers. The migration of polymers under the influence of an electric field depends not only on their sizes (one-dimensional electrophoresis) but also their different isoelectric points (two-dimensional electrophoresis, 2-DE). The same behaviour was observed for several macromolecular fractions detected in HCN polymers. Macromolecular fractions with apparent molecular weights as high as 250 kDa were detected by tricine-SDS gel electrophoresis. Cationic macromolecular fractions with apparent molecular weights as high as 140 kDa were also detected by 2-DE. The HCN polymers synthesized were fractionated by ultrafiltration. As a result, the molecular weight distributions of the macromolecular fractions detected in the HCN polymers directly depended on the synthetic conditions used to produce these polymers. The implications of these results for prebiotic chemistry will be discussed.

  20. Electrophoretic transfer of DNA, RNA and protein onto diazobenzyloxymethyl (DBM) - paper.

    PubMed Central

    Stellwag, E J; Dahlberg, A E

    1980-01-01

    A method has been developed for the electrophoretic transfer of DNA, RNA, protein and ribonucleoprotein particles from a variety of gels onto diazobenzyloxymethyl (DBM) - paper. Conditions for the electrophoretic transfer of these macromolecules have been optimized to allow for nearly quantitative transfer and covalent coupling. DNA and RNA electrophoretically transferred to DBM-paper retain their ability to hybridize with specific probes. The high efficiency of transfer and the high capacity of DBM-paper for nucleic acids makes possible the sensitive detection of specific nucleotide sequences. Similar efficiency is achieved in electrophoretic transfer and covalent coupling of proteins to DBM-paper. Macromolecules can also be electrophoretically transferred and bound to DBM-paper incapable of covalent bond formation. Their elution from the paper in high salt provides a new and useful preparative method for isolation of DNA, RNA and protein. Images PMID:6158735

  1. Calcium mobilization is both required and sufficient for initiating chromatin decondensation during activation of peripheral T-cells

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Megan D.; Bingham, Kellie N.; Mitchell, Taylor Y.; Meredith, Jenna L.; Rawlings, Jason S.

    2014-01-01

    Antigen engagement of the T-cell receptor (TCR) induces a rapid and dramatic decondensation of chromatin that is necessary for T-cell activation. This decondensation makes T-cells competent to respond to Interleukin-2 providing a mechanism to ensure clonotypic proliferation during an immune response. Using murine T-cells, we investigated the mechanism by which TCR signaling can initiate chromatin decondensation, focusing on the role of calcium mobilization. During T-cell activation, calcium is first released from intracellular stores, followed by influx of extracellular calcium via store operated calcium entry. We show that mobilization of intracellular calcium is required for TCR-induced chromatin decondensation. However, the decondensation is not dependent on the activity of the downstream transcription factor NFAT. Furthermore, we show that the influx of extracellular calcium is dispensable for initiating chromatin decondensation. Finally, we show that mobilization of calcium from intracellular stores is sufficient to induce decondensation, independent of TCR engagement. Collectively, our data suggest that chromatin decondensation in peripheral T-cells is controlled by modulating intracellular calcium levels. PMID:25453467

  2. The Lifestyle Interventions and Independence for Elders (LIFE) study, randomized trial of physical activity: Effect on the prevention of major mobility disability

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    In older adults reduced mobility is common and is an independent risk factor for morbidity, hospitalization, disability, and mortality. Limited evidence suggests that physical activity may help prevent mobility disability; however, there are no definitive clinical trials examining if physical activi...

  3. Weather effects on the patterns of people's everyday activities: a study using GPS traces of mobile phone users.

    PubMed

    Horanont, Teerayut; Phithakkitnukoon, Santi; Leong, Tuck W; Sekimoto, Yoshihide; Shibasaki, Ryosuke

    2013-01-01

    This study explores the effects that the weather has on people's everyday activity patterns. Temperature, rainfall, and wind speed were used as weather parameters. People's daily activity patterns were inferred, such as place visited, the time this took place, the duration of the visit, based on the GPS location traces of their mobile phones overlaid upon Yellow Pages information. Our analysis of 31,855 mobile phone users allowed us to infer that people were more likely to stay longer at eateries or food outlets, and (to a lesser degree) at retail or shopping areas when the weather is very cold or when conditions are calm (non-windy). When compared to people's regular activity patterns, certain weather conditions affected people's movements and activities noticeably at different times of the day. On cold days, people's activities were found to be more diverse especially after 10AM, showing greatest variations between 2PM and 6PM. A similar trend is observed between 10AM and midnight on rainy days, with people's activities found to be most diverse on days with heaviest rainfalls or on days when the wind speed was stronger than 4 km/h, especially between 10AM-1AM. Finally, we observed that different geographical areas of a large metropolis were impacted differently by the weather. Using data of urban infrastructure to characterize areas, we found strong correlations between weather conditions upon people's accessibility to trains. This study sheds new light on the influence of weather conditions on human behavior, in particular the choice of daily activities and how mobile phone data can be used to investigate the influence of environmental factors on urban dynamics.

  4. Mobile Health Physical Activity Intervention Preferences in Cancer Survivors: A Qualitative Study

    PubMed Central

    Robertson, Michael C; Tsai, Edward; Lyons, Elizabeth J; Srinivasan, Sanjana; Swartz, Maria C; Baum, Miranda L

    2017-01-01

    Background Cancer survivors are at an elevated risk for several negative health outcomes, but physical activity (PA) can decrease those risks. Unfortunately, adherence to PA recommendations among survivors is low. Fitness mobile apps have been shown to facilitate the adoption of PA in the general population, but there are limited apps specifically designed for cancer survivors. This population has unique needs and barriers to PA, and most existing PA apps do not address these issues. Moreover, incorporating user preferences has been identified as an important priority for technology-based PA interventions, but at present there is limited literature that serves to establish these preferences in cancer survivors. This is especially problematic given the high cost of app development and because the majority of downloaded apps fail to engage users over the long term. Objective The aim of this study was to take a qualitative approach to provide practical insight regarding this population’s preferences for the features and messages of an app to increase PA. Methods A total of 35 cancer survivors each attended 2 focus groups; a moderator presented slide shows on potential app features and messages and asked open-ended questions to elicit participant preferences. All sessions were audio recorded and transcribed verbatim. Three reviewers independently conducted thematic content analysis on all transcripts, then organized and consolidated findings to identify salient themes. Results Participants (mean age 63.7, SD 10.8, years) were mostly female (24/35, 69%) and mostly white (25/35, 71%). Participants generally had access to technology and were receptive to engaging with an app to increase PA. Themes identified included preferences for (1) a casual, concise, and positive tone, (2) tools for personal goal attainment, (3) a prescription for PA, and (4) an experience that is tailored to the user. Participants reported wanting extensive background data collection with low data

  5. Method for in-situ calibration of electrophoretic analysis systems

    DOEpatents

    Liu, Changsheng; Zhao, Hequan

    2005-05-08

    An electrophoretic system having a plurality of separation lanes is provided with an automatic calibration feature in which each lane is separately calibrated. For each lane, the calibration coefficients map a spectrum of received channel intensities onto values reflective of the relative likelihood of each of a plurality of dyes being present. Individual peaks, reflective of the influence of a single dye, are isolated from among the various sets of detected light intensity spectra, and these can be used to both detect the number of dye components present, and also to establish exemplary vectors for the calibration coefficients which may then be clustered and further processed to arrive at a calibration matrix for the system. The system of the present invention thus permits one to use different dye sets to tag DNA nucleotides in samples which migrate in separate lanes, and also allows for in-situ calibration with new, previously unused dye sets.

  6. Characterization of electrophoretic suspension for thin polymer film deposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mladenova, D.; Weiter, M.; Stepanek, P.; Ouzzane, I.; Vala, M.; Sinigersky, V.; Zhivkov, I.

    2012-03-01

    The optical absorption and fluorescence spectra of poly [2-methoxy-5-(3',7'-dimethyloctyloxy)-1,4-phenylenevinylene] toluene solutions and 50:50% toluene/acetonitrile suspensions show clearly distinguishable differences (e.g., peak broadening and shifting), which could be used for characterization of suspensions with different acetonitrile content. The dynamic light scattering (DLS) measurement of the suspensions prepared showed a particle size of 90 nm. Thin films with thicknesses of about 400 nm were prepared by electrophoretic deposition (EPD) and spin coating. As the films are very soft, a contactless optical profilometry techique based on chromatic aberration was used to measure their thickness. AFM imaging of spin coated and EPD films revealed film roughness of 20÷40 nm and 40÷80 nm, respectively. The EPD film roughness seems to be less than the suspension particle size obtained by DLS, probably due to the partial film dissolving by the toluene present in the suspension.

  7. Enhanced electrophoretic DNA separation in photonic crystal fiber.

    PubMed

    Sun, Yi; Nguyen, Nam-Trung; Kwok, Yien Chian

    2009-07-01

    Joule heating generated by the electrical current in capillary electrophoresis leads to a temperature gradient along the separation channel and consequently affects the separation quality. We describe a method of reducing the Joule heating effect by incorporating photonic crystal fiber into a micro capillary electrophoresis chip. The photonic crystal fiber consists of a bundle of extremely narrow hollow channels, which ideally work as separation columns. Electrophoretic separation of DNA fragments was simultaneously but independently carried out in 54 narrow capillaries with a diameter of 3.7 microm each. The capillary bundle offers more efficient heat dissipation owing to the high surface-to-volume ratio. Under the same electrical field strength, notable improvement in resolution was obtained in the capillary bundle chip.

  8. Preparation of sol-gel coatings by electrophoretic deposition

    SciTech Connect

    Hirashima, Hiroshi; Obu, Yusuke; Nagai, Takayuki; Imai, Hiroaki

    1994-12-31

    Thin films of ZrO{sub 2} and lead zirconate-titanate, PZT, about 100 to 1,000 nm in thickness, were prepared by electrophoretic deposition from transparent sols obtained by hydrolysis of metal alkoxides. Stainless steel plates and Pt-coated glass plates were used as substrates/electrodes. The applied field was up to 20 V/cm. The refractive indices of as dried films were higher than those of dip-coated films. High temperature oxidation of stainless steel plates was suppressed by the ZrO{sub 2} coatings. Uniformity of the chemical composition of the as-dried PZT films, determined by Auger electron spectroscopy, was better than the dip-coated PZT films.

  9. Formation of diamond nanoparticle thin films by electrophoretic deposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goto, Yosuke; Ohishi, Fujio; Tanaka, Kuniaki; Usui, Hiroaki

    2016-03-01

    Thin films of diamond nanoparticles were prepared by electrophoretic deposition (EPD) using 0.5 wt % dispersions in water, ethanol, and 2-propanol. The film growth rate increased with increasing voltage applied to the electrodes. However, an excessive increase in voltage caused the degradation of film morphology. The optimum voltage was 4 V with an electrode separation of 5 mm. The film growth rate was higher in organic solvents than in water. The deposited film had a smooth surface with an average surface roughness comparable to the size of primary particles of the source material. It is notable that the EPD films had a considerably higher physical stability than spin-coated and cast films. The stability was further improved by thermally annealing the films. IR analysis revealed that the diamond nanoparticles have carboxy and amino groups on their surfaces. It is considered that the stability of the EPD films originate from a chemical reaction between these functional groups.

  10. New capabilities and applications for electrophoretically deposited coatings

    SciTech Connect

    Sharp, D.J.

    1991-01-01

    Our primary purpose in this test is to provide a brief general description of a few applications of various electrophoretic systems which have been investigated and have found use in various coating applications at Sandia National Laboratories. Both organic and inorganic suspensions in aqueous and non-aqueous media have been considered in these studies. Applications include high voltage insulating dielectrics, thermally conductive/electrically insulating films, adherent lubricating films, uniform photoresist films, glass coatings, and fissile uranium oxide/carbon composite films for studies of nuclear powered lasers. More recently, we have become interested in the beneficial environmental aspects of being able to provide protective polymer coatings which reduce or minimize the use of organic solvents required by traditional spray coat processes. Important practical factors which relate to film uniformity, adhesion, and composition are related to unique coating or plating capabilities and applications. 6 refs., 2 figs., 1 tab.

  11. Capillary electrophoretic and mass spectrometric analysis of a polydisperse fluorosurfactant.

    PubMed

    Al-Jarah, Suhair Yousif; Sjödahl, Johan; Woldegiorgis, Andreas; Emmer, Asa

    2005-02-01

    A fluorosurfactant has been studied using capillary electrophoresis and mass spectrometry. The fluorosurfactant, FC134, can be used as a buffer additive in capillary electrophoresis in order to decrease wall adsorption of proteins and in micellar electrokinetic chromatography. However, it has been discovered that this fluorosurfactant is polydisperse, thus containing substances with different lengths and structures. In this work, the fluorosurfactant sample components were separated by capillary electrophoresis. An uncoated as well as a poly(vinyl alcohol)-coated capillary were used with running electrolytes containing methanol and acetic acid. Following the capillary electrophoretic separation, fractions were collected for further analysis by MALDI-MS. Non-fractionated samples were also analyzed both by MALDI-MS and by ESI-MS.

  12. Simulations of Electrophoretic RNA Transport Through Transmembrane Carbon Nanotubes

    PubMed Central

    Zimmerli, Urs; Koumoutsakos, Petros

    2008-01-01

    The study of interactions between carbon nanotubes and cellular components, such as membranes and biomolecules, is fundamental for the rational design of nanodevices interfacing with biological systems. In this work, we use molecular dynamics simulations to study the electrophoretic transport of RNA through carbon nanotubes embedded in membranes. Decorated and naked carbon nanotubes are inserted into a dodecane membrane and a dimyristoylphosphatidylcholine lipid bilayer, and the system is subjected to electrostatic potential differences. The transport properties of this artificial pore are determined by the structural modifications of the membrane in the vicinity of the nanotube openings and they are quantified by the nonuniform electrostatic potential maps at the entrance and inside the nanotube. The pore is used to transport electrophoretically a short RNA segment and we find that the speed of translocation exhibits an exponential dependence on the applied potential differences. The RNA is transported while undergoing a repeated stacking and unstacking process, affected by steric interactions with the membrane headgroups and by hydrophobic interaction with the walls of the nanotube. The RNA is structurally reorganized inside the nanotube, with its backbone solvated by water molecules near the axis of the tube and its bases aligned with the nanotube walls. Upon exiting the pore, the RNA interacts with the membrane headgroups and remains attached to the dodecane membrane while it is expelled into the solvent in the case of the lipid bilayer. The results of the simulations detail processes of molecular transport into cellular compartments through manufactured nanopores and they are discussed in the context of applications in biotechnology and nanomedicine. PMID:18178663

  13. Simulations of electrophoretic RNA transport through transmembrane carbon nanotubes.

    PubMed

    Zimmerli, Urs; Koumoutsakos, Petros

    2008-04-01

    The study of interactions between carbon nanotubes and cellular components, such as membranes and biomolecules, is fundamental for the rational design of nanodevices interfacing with biological systems. In this work, we use molecular dynamics simulations to study the electrophoretic transport of RNA through carbon nanotubes embedded in membranes. Decorated and naked carbon nanotubes are inserted into a dodecane membrane and a dimyristoylphosphatidylcholine lipid bilayer, and the system is subjected to electrostatic potential differences. The transport properties of this artificial pore are determined by the structural modifications of the membrane in the vicinity of the nanotube openings and they are quantified by the nonuniform electrostatic potential maps at the entrance and inside the nanotube. The pore is used to transport electrophoretically a short RNA segment and we find that the speed of translocation exhibits an exponential dependence on the applied potential differences. The RNA is transported while undergoing a repeated stacking and unstacking process, affected by steric interactions with the membrane headgroups and by hydrophobic interaction with the walls of the nanotube. The RNA is structurally reorganized inside the nanotube, with its backbone solvated by water molecules near the axis of the tube and its bases aligned with the nanotube walls. Upon exiting the pore, the RNA interacts with the membrane headgroups and remains attached to the dodecane membrane while it is expelled into the solvent in the case of the lipid bilayer. The results of the simulations detail processes of molecular transport into cellular compartments through manufactured nanopores and they are discussed in the context of applications in biotechnology and nanomedicine.

  14. Electrophoretic deposition of ultrasonicated and functionalized nanomaterials for multifunctional composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    An, Qi

    Recent advances in the synthesis and characterization of nanostructured composite materials have enabled a broad range of opportunities for engineering the properties of polymer-matrix materials. Carbon nanotubes (CNTs) are known to have exceptional mechanical, electrical and thermal properties. Because of their small size, CNTs can occupy regions between traditional micro-scale reinforcements and create a hierarchical micro/nano structure spanning several orders of magnitude. Since CNTs possess critical reinforcement dimensions below 100 nm, new opportunities exist for tailoring the fiber/matrix interphase regions and ultimately the mechanical and electrical performance of advanced fiber-composites with minimal impact on the fiber-dominated properties. This growing interest in nanoscale hybridization with conventional fiber reinforcement has highlighted the need to develop new processing techniques for successful CNT integration. In this work, a novel and industrially scalable approach for producing multi-scale hybrid carbon nanotube/fiber composites using an electrophoretic deposition (EPD) technique has been studied as an alternative to in situ chemical vapor deposition growth (CVD). EPD is a widely used industrial coating process employed in areas ranging from automotive to electronics production. The method has a number of benefits which include low energy use and the ability to homogenously coat complex shapes with well adhered films of controlled thickness and density. A stable aqueous dispersion of multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) was produced using a novel ozonolysis and ultrasonication (USO) technique that results in dispersion and functionalization in a single step. Networks of CNTs span between adjacent fibers and the resulting composites exhibit significant increases in electrical conductivity and considerable improvements in the interlaminar shear strength and fracture toughness. In order to better understand the underlying mechanisms behind the

  15. Synthesis, characterization and catalytic activity of indium substituted nanocrystalline Mobil Five (MFI) zeolite

    SciTech Connect

    Shah, Kishor Kr.; Nandi, Mithun; Talukdar, Anup K.

    2015-06-15

    Highlights: • In situ modification of the MFI zeolite by incorporation of indium. • The samples were characterized by XRD, FTIR, TGA, UV–vis (DRS), SAA, EDX and SEM. • The incorporation of indium was confirmed by XRD, FT-IR, UV–vis (DRS), EDX and TGA. • Hydroxylation of phenol reaction was studied on the synthesized catalysts. - Abstract: A series of indium doped Mobil Five (MFI) zeolite were synthesized hydrothermally with silicon to aluminium and indium molar ratio of 100 and with aluminium to indium molar ratios of 1:1, 2:1 and 3:1. The MFI zeolite phase was identified by XRD and FT-IR analysis. In XRD analysis the prominent peaks were observed at 2θ values of around 6.5° and 23° with a few additional shoulder peaks in case of all the indium incorporated samples suggesting formation of pure phase of the MFI zeolite. All the samples under the present investigation were found to exhibit high crystallinity (∼92%). The crystallite sizes of the samples were found to vary from about 49 to 55 nm. IR results confirmed the formation of MFI zeolite in all cases showing distinct absorbance bands near 1080, 790, 540, 450 and 990 cm{sup −1}. TG analysis of In-MFI zeolites showed mass losses in three different steps which are attributed to the loss due to adsorbed water molecules and the two types TPA{sup +} cations. Further, the UV–vis (DRS) studies reflected the position of the indium metal in the zeolite framework. Surface area analysis of the synthesized samples was carried out to characterize the synthesized samples The analysis showed that the specific surface area ranged from ∼357 to ∼361 m{sup 2} g{sup −1} and the pore volume of the synthesized samples ranged from 0.177 to 0.182 cm{sup 3} g{sup −1}. The scanning electron microscopy studies showed the structure of the samples to be rectangular and twinned rectangular shaped. The EDX analysis was carried out for confirmation of Si, Al and In in zeolite frame work. The catalytic activities of

  16. An Interactive Concept Map Approach to Supporting Mobile Learning Activities for Natural Science Courses

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hwang, Gwo-Jen; Wu, Po-Han; Ke, Hui-Ru

    2011-01-01

    Mobile and wireless communication technologies not only enable anytime and anywhere learning, but also provide the opportunity to develop learning environments that combine real-world and digital-world resources. Nevertheless, researchers have indicated that, without effective tools for helping students organize their observations in the field,…

  17. A Framework for Gamified Activities Based on Mobile Games Played by Portuguese University Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Carvalho, Ana Amélia; Araújo, Inês; Zagalo, Nelson

    2014-01-01

    This paper starts by reporting the findings of a survey of Portuguese university students concerning their game habits and preferences. An online questionnaire was developed and 1101 answers were collected, 626 were mobile game players. The results from the survey indicate that the games most played by university students are essentially casual…

  18. Pollution in the urban soils of Lianyungang, China, evaluated using a pollution index, mobility of heavy metals, and enzymatic activities.

    PubMed

    Li, Yu; Li, Hong-Guan; Liu, Fu-Cheng

    2017-01-01

    Soil samples from 16 urban sites in Lianyungang, China were collected and analyzed. A pollution index was used to assess the potential ecological risk of heavy metals and a sequential extraction procedure was used to evaluate the relative distribution of Cu, Zn, Pb, Cd, Cr, and As in exchangeable, carbonate, Fe/Mn oxide, organic/sulfide, and residual fractions. The mobility of heavy metals and urease (URE) activity, alkaline phosphatase (ALP) activity, and invertase (INV) activity of soils was determined. The results showed that the average concentrations of Cu, Zn, Pb, Cd, Cr, and As in Lianyungang soils were much higher than those in the coastal city soil background values of Jiangsu and China. Among the five studied regions (utilities, commercial, industrial, tourism, and roadside), the industrial region had the highest metal concentrations demonstrating that land use had a significant impact on the accumulation of heavy metals in Lianyungang soils. Compared to the other metals, Cd showed the highest ecological risk. According to chemical partitioning, Cu was associated with the organic/sulfides and Pb and Zn were mainly in the carbonate and the Fe/Mn oxide phase. The greatest amounts of Cd were found in exchangeable and carbonate fractions, while Cr and As were mainly in the residual fraction. Cd had the highest mobility of all metals, and the order of mobility (highest to lowest) of heavy metals in Lianyungang soils was Cd > Zn > Pb > Cu > As > Cr. Soil urease activity, alkaline phosphatase activity, and invertase activity varied considerably in different pollution degree sites. Soil enzyme activities had the lowest levels in roadside and industrial regions. Across all the soil data in the five regions, the total Cu, Zn, Pb, Cd, Cr, and As level was negatively correlated with urease activity, alkaline phosphatase activity, and invertase activity, but the relationship was not significant. In the industrial region, alkaline phosphatase activity had

  19. Water activity and mobility in solutions of glycerol and small molecular weight sugars: Implication for cryo- and lyopreservation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    He, Xiaoming; Fowler, Alex; Toner, Mehmet

    2006-10-01

    In this study, the free volume models, originally developed for large molecular weight polymer-solvent systems, were used to study the water activity and mobility in solutions of four small molecular weight cryo-/lyoprotectants, viz., glycerol, a monosaccharide (fructose), and two disaccharides (sucrose and trehalose). The free volume model parameters were determined by fitting the models to available experimental data using a nonlinear optimization procedure. It was found that free volume models could accurately predict the available experimental data, which suggests that the free volume models might be generally applicable to aqueous solutions of small molecular weight cryo-/lyoprotectants. Furthermore, several models for estimating the mutual diffusion coefficient were tested using available experimental data for aqueous solutions of glycerol and a better method to estimate the mutual diffusion coefficient was proposed. Free volume models were used to predict and analyze the water activity and mobility in solutions of four cryo-/lyoprotectants under conditions frequently encountered in cryo-/lyopreservation applications. It was found that the water mobility in the glassy state of the above four solutions is essentially negligible in the case of cryopreservation with storage temperature lower than -110°C. However, the water mobility in a glass at higher temperature (>-80°C) may be significant. As a result, a subcooling of up to 50°C may be necessary for the long-term cryo-/lyopreservation of biomaterials depending on the water content and the type of cryo-/lyoprotectants. It was further shown that trehalose might be the best of the four protectants studied for lyopreservation (water mass fraction ⩽0.1) when the storage temperature is above the room temperature. The results from this study might be useful for the development of more effective protocols for both cryopreservation and lyopreservation of living cells and other biomaterials.

  20. Fabrication and characterization of carbon-based counter electrodes prepared by electrophoretic deposition for dye-sensitized solar cells

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Three different carbon-based counter electrodes are investigated in light of catalytic activities such as electrochemical frequencies and interface impedances. We fabricated carbon-based counter electrodes of dye-sensitized solar cells [DSSCs] using graphene, single-walled carbon nanotubes [SWNTs], and graphene-SWNT composites by electrophoretic deposition method. We observed the optical and electrochemical properties of the carbon-based counter electrodes. The DSSC with the graphene-deposited counter electrode demonstrated the best conversion efficiency of 5.87% under AM 1.5 and 1 sun condition. It could be utilized for a low-cost and high-throughput process for DSSCs. PMID:22221501

  1. Electrophoretic method for assessment of substrate promiscuity of a heterogeneous biocatalyst using an area imaging ultraviolet detector.

    PubMed

    Urban, Pawel L; Bergström, Edmund T; Goodall, David M; Narayanaswamy, Sreedevi; Bruce, Neil C

    2007-10-01

    We report a new electrophoretic set-up and method for rapid specificity screening of an immobilised enzyme against a range of substrates present in a mixture. The penicillinase-catalysed reaction is carried out on-the-fly, following separation of putative substrates and preceding separation of the reaction products. The new active pixel sensor detector gives an option of using multiple detection windows on a single flow line and enables efficient on-line monitoring of this heterogeneous biocatalytic process with multiple putative substrates injected simultaneously.

  2. Biochemical Analysis of Autophagy in Algae and Plants by Monitoring the Electrophoretic Mobility of ATG8.

    PubMed

    Pérez-Pérez, María Esther; Andrés-Garrido, Ascensión; Crespo, José L

    2016-01-01

    Identification of specific autophagy markers has been fundamental to investigate autophagy as catabolic process. Among them, the ATG8 protein turned out to be one of the most widely used and specific molecular markers of autophagy both in higher and lower eukaryotes. Here, we describe how ATG8 can be used to monitor autophagy in Chlamydomonas and Arabidopsis by western blot analysis.

  3. Sedimentation of macroscopic rigid knots and its relation to gel electrophoretic mobility of DNA knots.

    PubMed

    Weber, Cédric; Carlen, Mathias; Dietler, Giovanni; Rawdon, Eric J; Stasiak, Andrzej

    2013-01-01

    We address the general question of the extent to which the hydrodynamic behaviour of microscopic freely fluctuating objects can be reproduced by macrosopic rigid objects. In particular, we compare the sedimentation speeds of knotted DNA molecules undergoing gel electrophoresis to the sedimentation speeds of rigid stereolithographic models of ideal knots in both water and silicon oil. We find that the sedimentation speeds grow roughly linearly with the average crossing number of the ideal knot configurations, and that the correlation is stronger within classes of knots. This is consistent with previous observations with DNA knots in gel electrophoresis.

  4. Characterization of U(VI)-carbonato ternary complexes on hematite: EXAFS and electrophoretic mobility measurements

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Bargar, John R.; Reitmeyer, Rebecca; Lenhart, John J.; Davis, James A.

    2000-01-01

    We have measured U(VI) adsorption on hematite using EXAFS spectroscopy and electrophoresis under conditions relevant to surface waters and aquifers (0.01 to 10 μM dissolved uranium concentrations, in equilibrium with air, pH 4.5 to 8.5). Both techniques suggest the existence of anionic U(VI)-carbonato ternary complexes. Fits to EXAFS spectra indicate that U(VI) is simultaneously coordinated to surface FeO6 octahedra and carbonate (or bicarbonate) ligands in bidentate fashions, leading to the conclusion that the ternary complexes have an inner-sphere metal bridging (hematite-U(VI)-carbonato) structure. Greater than or equal to 50% of adsorbed U(VI) was comprised of monomeric hematite-U(VI)-carbonato ternary complexes, even at pH 4.5. Multimeric U(VI) species were observed at pH ≥ 6.5 and aqueous U(VI) concentrations approximately an order of magnitude more dilute than the solubility of crystalline β-UO2(OH)2. Based on structural constraints, these complexes were interpreted as dimeric hematite-U(VI)-carbonato ternary complexes. These results suggest that Fe-oxide-U(VI)-carbonato complexes are likely to be important transport-limiting species in oxic aquifers throughout a wide range of pH values.

  5. Sizing Large Proteins and Protein Complexes by Electrospray Ionization Mass Spectrometry and Ion Mobility

    PubMed Central

    Kaddis, Catherine S.; Lomeli, Shirley H.; Yin, Sheng; Berhane, Beniam; Apostol, Marcin I.; Kickhoefer, Valerie A.; Rome, Leonard H.; Loo, Joseph A.

    2009-01-01

    Mass spectrometry (MS) and ion mobility with electrospray ionization (ESI) have the capability to measure and detect large noncovalent protein-ligand and protein-protein complexes. Using an ion mobility method termed GEMMA (Gas-Phase Electrophoretic Mobility Molecular Analysis), protein particles representing a range of sizes can be separated by their electrophoretic mobility in air. Highly charged particles produced from a protein complex solution using electrospray can be manipulated to produce singly charged ions which can be separated and quantified by their electrophoretic mobility. Results from ESI-GEMMA analysis from our laboratory and others were compared to other experimental and theoretically determined parameters, such as molecular mass and cryoelectron microscopy and x-ray crystal structure dimensions. There is a strong correlation between the electrophoretic mobility diameter determined from GEMMA analysis and the molecular mass for protein complexes up to 12 MDa, including the 93 kDa enolase dimer, the 480 kDa ferritin 24-mer complex, the 4.6 MDa cowpea chlorotic mottle virus (CCMV), and the 9 MDa MVP-vault assembly. ESI-GEMMA is used to differentiate a number of similarly sized vault complexes that are composed of different N-terminal protein tags on the MVP subunit. The average effective density of the proteins and protein complexes studied was 0.6 g/cm3. Moreover, there is evidence that proteins and protein complexes collapse or become more compact in the gas phase in the absence of water. PMID:17434746

  6. Harnessing different motivational frames via mobile phones to promote daily physical activity and reduce sedentary behavior in aging adults.

    PubMed

    King, Abby C; Hekler, Eric B; Grieco, Lauren A; Winter, Sandra J; Sheats, Jylana L; Buman, Matthew P; Banerjee, Banny; Robinson, Thomas N; Cirimele, Jesse

    2013-01-01

    Mobile devices are a promising channel for delivering just-in-time guidance and support for improving key daily health behaviors. Despite an explosion of mobile phone applications aimed at physical activity and other health behaviors, few have been based on theoretically derived constructs and empirical evidence. Eighty adults ages 45 years and older who were insufficiently physically active, engaged in prolonged daily sitting, and were new to smartphone technology, participated in iterative design development and feasibility testing of three daily activity smartphone applications based on motivational frames drawn from behavioral science theory and evidence. An "analytically" framed custom application focused on personalized goal setting, self-monitoring, and active problem solving around barriers to behavior change. A "socially" framed custom application focused on social comparisons, norms, and support. An "affectively" framed custom application focused on operant conditioning principles of reinforcement scheduling and emotional transference to an avatar, whose movements and behaviors reflected the physical activity and sedentary levels of the user. To explore the applications' initial efficacy in changing regular physical activity and leisure-time sitting, behavioral changes were assessed across eight weeks in 68 participants using the CHAMPS physical activity questionnaire and the Australian sedentary behavior questionnaire. User acceptability of and satisfaction with the applications was explored via a post-intervention user survey. The results indicated that the three applications were sufficiently robust to significantly improve regular moderate-to-vigorous intensity physical activity and decrease leisure-time sitting during the 8-week behavioral adoption period. Acceptability of the applications was confirmed in the post-intervention surveys for this sample of midlife and older adults new to smartphone technology. Preliminary data exploring sustained use

  7. Self-rated health, activities of daily living, and mobility limitations among black and white stroke survivors.

    PubMed

    Boyington, Josephine E A; Howard, Daniel L; Holmes, DaJuanicia N

    2008-01-01

    Objective. To explore racial differences in self-rated health (SRH) and its relationship to activities of daily living (ADLs) and mobility limitations among stroke survivors. Method. Data from 580 Black and White participants of the North Carolina Established Populations for Epidemiologic Studies of the Elderly (EPESE) were used to assess relationships between SRH, ADLs, and mobility variables. Fisher's exact tests, t tests, and logistic regression with backward selection (p < .20) were used. Results. No racial difference in SRH was found. SRH was significant in predicting ADL status among Whites only (OR = 0.23; CI = 0.08-0.69; p < .01). Participants older than 75 years had a greater likelihood of being in the lowest functioning ADL categories (OR = 2.31; CI = 1.48-3.60; p < .01). Discussion. Though no racial differences in SRH were found, the relationship between SRH, ADLs, and mobility status was moderated by race. SRH was predictive of limitations in Whites only. Observed differences suggest SRH construct may differ by race.

  8. Electrophoretic and antigenic characterisation of Dermatophilus congolensis extracellular products.

    PubMed

    Ambrose, N C; el Jack, M A; McOrist, S; Boid, R

    1997-12-01

    Dermatophilus congolensis is the causative agent of bovine dermatophilosis and lumpy wool in sheep. Two field isolates of D. congolensis, one each from a cow in Ghana and a sheep in Scotland, were cultured for 24-72 h in a synthetic medium based on RPMI-1640. Culture filtrates were examined by SDS-PAGE and considered to contain extracellular products released by growing hyphae and filaments. Electrophoretic profiles of culture filtrates of the two isolates contained common bands and bands that were unique to each isolate. The composition of extracellular products altered with increasing culture periods indicating that specific products were released at different stages of growth. Culture filtrate prepared in the presence of serine protease and metalloprotease inhibitors contained more and better defined bands than that prepared without protease inhibitors indicating the presence of proteases in culture filtrates. Western blot analysis of extracellular products using a panel of sera showed that the two isolates from different host species and distant geographical locations contained cross-reactive antigens. Natural and experimental infections stimulated antibody responses to antigens in culture filtrates, sera from animals that were disease free but in-contact with dermatophilosis-infected animals also contained antibodies to extracellular antigens. The antigens recognised by most sera had molecular weights of 200 kDa in the bovine isolate, 170 kDa in the ovine isolate and 67, 27 and 52-55 kDa in both isolates. The number of antigenic bands of both isolates was positively correlated with the intensity of challenge and the severity of infection: antibodies in sera from disease-free cattle in Ghana recognised more antigens than sera from disease-free sheep in Scotland and more antigens were recognised by sera from chronically-infected Ghanaian cattle than by sera from experimentally-infected calves and sheep. The latter developed antibodies to antigens of 27 and 24 k

  9. A mobile laboratory for surface and subsurface imaging in geo-hazard monitoring activity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cornacchia, Carmela; Bavusi, Massimo; Loperte, Antonio; Pergola, Nicola; Pignatti, Stefano; Ponzo, Felice; Lapenna, Vincenzo

    2010-05-01

    high data acquisition repetition rate up to 500.000 pxl/sec with a range resolution of 0.1 mm, vertical and horizontal FoV of 310° and 360° respectively with a resolution of 0.0018°. The system is also equipped with a metric camera allows to georeference the high resolution images acquired. The electromagnetic sensors allow to obtain in near real time high-resolution 2D and 3D subsurface tomographic images. The main components are a fully automatic resistivity meter for DC electrical surveys (resistivity) and Induced Polarization, a Ground Penetrating Radar with antennas covering range for 400 MHz to 1.5 GHz and a gradiometric magnetometric system. All the sensors can be installed on a mobile van and remotely controlled using wi-fi technologies. An all-time network connection capability is guaranteed by a self-configurable satellite link for data communication, which allows to transmit in near-real time experimental data coming from the field surveys and to share other geospatial information. This ICT facility is well suited for emergency response activities during and after catastrophic events. Sensor synergy, multi-temporal and multi-scale resolutions of surface and sub-surface imaging are the key technical features of this instrumental facility. Finally, in this work we shortly present some first preliminary results obtained during the emergence phase of Abruzzo earthquake (Central Italy).

  10. From Data Acquisition to Data Fusion: A Comprehensive Review and a Roadmap for the Identification of Activities of Daily Living Using Mobile Devices.

    PubMed

    Pires, Ivan Miguel; Garcia, Nuno M; Pombo, Nuno; Flórez-Revuelta, Francisco

    2016-02-02

    This paper focuses on the research on the state of the art for sensor fusion techniques, applied to the sensors embedded in mobile devices, as a means to help identify the mobile device user's daily activities. Sensor data fusion techniques are used to consolidate the data collected from several sensors, increasing the reliability of the algorithms for the identification of the different activities. However, mobile devices have several constraints, e.g., low memory, low battery life and low processing power, and some data fusion techniques are not suited to this scenario. The main purpose of this paper is to present an overview of the state of the art to identify examples of sensor data fusion techniques that can be applied to the sensors available in mobile devices aiming to identify activities of daily living (ADLs).

  11. From Data Acquisition to Data Fusion: A Comprehensive Review and a Roadmap for the Identification of Activities of Daily Living Using Mobile Devices

    PubMed Central

    Pires, Ivan Miguel; Garcia, Nuno M.; Pombo, Nuno; Flórez-Revuelta, Francisco

    2016-01-01

    This paper focuses on the research on the state of the art for sensor fusion techniques, applied to the sensors embedded in mobile devices, as a means to help identify the mobile device user’s daily activities. Sensor data fusion techniques are used to consolidate the data collected from several sensors, increasing the reliability of the algorithms for the identification of the different activities. However, mobile devices have several constraints, e.g., low memory, low battery life and low processing power, and some data fusion techniques are not suited to this scenario. The main purpose of this paper is to present an overview of the state of the art to identify examples of sensor data fusion techniques that can be applied to the sensors available in mobile devices aiming to identify activities of daily living (ADLs). PMID:26848664

  12. Survival, mobility, and membrane-bound enzyme activities of freshwater planarian, Dugesia japonica, exposed to synthetic and natural surfactants.

    PubMed

    Li, Mei-Hui

    2012-04-01

    Surfactants are a major class of emerging pollutants widely used in large quantities in everyday life and commonly found in surface waters worldwide. Freshwater planarian was selected to examine the effects of different surfactants by measuring mortality, mobility, and membrane-bound enzyme activities. Among the 10 surfactants tested, the acute toxicities of betaine and polyethylene glycol (PEG-200) to planarians were relatively low, with a median lethal concentration (LC50) greater than 10,000 mg/L. The toxicity to planarians of the other eight surfactants based on 48-h LC50 could be arranged in the descending order of cetylpyridinum chloride (CPC) > 4-tert-octylphenol (4-tert-OP) > ammonium lauryl sulfate > benzalkonium chloride > saponin > sodium lauroylsarcosinate > dioctyl sulfosuccinate > dodecyl trimethyl ammonium bromide (DTAB). Both CPC and 4-tert-OP were very toxic to planarians, with 48-h LC50 values <1 mg/L. The median effective concentrations (EC50s) of planarian mobility were in the 0.1 to 50 mg/L range and were in the same range as the 24-h LC50 of planarians exposed to different surfactants, except for DTAB. In addition, significant inhibition of cholinesterase activity activities was found in planarians exposed to 4-tert-OP at 2.5 and 5 mg/L and to saponin at 10 mg/L after 2-h treatments. This result suggests that planarian mobility responses can be used as an alternative indicator for acute toxicity of surfactants after a very short exposure period.

  13. Lateral Mobility and Nanoscale Spatial Arrangement of Chemokine-activated α4β1 Integrins on T Cells*

    PubMed Central

    Sosa-Costa, Alberto; Isern de Val, Sol; Sevilla-Movilla, Silvia; Teixidó, Joaquin

    2016-01-01

    Chemokine stimulation of integrin α4β1-dependent T lymphocyte adhesion is a key step during lymphocyte trafficking. A central question regarding α4β1 function is how its lateral mobility and organization influence its affinity and avidity following cell stimulation with chemokines and/or ligands. Using single particle tracking and superresolution imaging approaches, we explored the lateral mobility and spatial arrangement of individual α4β1integrins on T cells exposed to different activating stimuli. We show that CXCL12 stimulation leads to rapid and transient α4β1activation, measured by induction of the activation epitope recognized by the HUTS-21 anti-β1antibody and by increased talin-β1 association. CXCL12-dependent α4β1 activation directly correlated with restricted lateral diffusion and integrin immobilization. Moreover, co-stimulation by CXCL12 together with soluble VCAM-1 potentiated integrin immobilization with a 5-fold increase in immobile integrins compared with unstimulated conditions. Our data indicate that docking by talin of the chemokine-activated α4β1 to the actin cytoskeleton favors integrin immobilization, which likely facilitates ligand interaction and increased adhesiveness. Superresolution imaging showed that the nanoscale organization of high-affinity α4β1 remains unaffected following chemokine and/or ligand addition. Instead, newly activated α4β1 integrins organize on the cell membrane as independent units without joining pre-established integrin sites to contribute to cluster formation. Altogether, our results provide a rationale to understand how the spatiotemporal organization of activated α4β1 integrins regulates T lymphocyte adhesion. PMID:27481944

  14. Phospholipase C-η1 is activated by intracellular Ca(2+) mobilization and enhances GPCRs/PLC/Ca(2+) signaling.

    PubMed

    Kim, Jung Kuk; Choi, Jung Woong; Lim, Seyoung; Kwon, Ohman; Seo, Jeong Kon; Ryu, Sung Ho; Suh, Pann-Ghill

    2011-06-01

    Phospholipase C-η1 (PLC-η1) is the most recently identified PLC isotype and is primarily expressed in nerve tissue. However, its functional role is unclear. In the present study, we report for the first time that PLC-η1 acts as a signal amplifier in G protein-coupled receptor (GPCR)-mediated PLC and Ca(2+) signaling. Short-hairpin RNA (shRNA)-mediated knockdown of endogenous PLC-η1 reduced lysophosphatidic acid (LPA)-, bradykinin (BK)-, and PACAP-induced PLC activity in mouse neuroblastoma Neuro2A (N2A) cells, indicating that PLC-η1 participates in GPCR-mediated PLC activation. Interestingly, ionomycin-induced PLC activity was significantly decreased by PLC-η1, but not PLC-η2, knockdown. In addition, we found that intracellular Ca(2+) source is enough for PLC-η1 activation. Furthermore, the IP(3) receptor inhibitor, 2-APB, inhibited LPA-induced PLC activity in control N2A cells, whereas this effect was not observed in PLC-η1 knockdown N2A cells, suggesting a pivotal role of intracellular Ca(2+) mobilization in PLC-η1 activation. Finally, we found that LPA-induced ERK1/2 phosphorylation and expression of the downstream target gene, krox-24, were significantly decreased by PLC-η1 knockdown, and these knockdown effects were abolished by 2-APB. Taken together, our results strongly suggest that PLC-η1 is activated via intracellular Ca(2+) mobilization from the ER, and therefore amplifies GPCR-mediated signaling.

  15. Solubilization and electrophoretic characterization of select edible nut seed proteins.

    PubMed

    Sathe, Shridhar K; Venkatachalam, Mahesh; Sharma, Girdhari M; Kshirsagar, Harshal H; Teuber, Suzanne S; Roux, Kenneth H

    2009-09-09

    The solubility of almond, Brazil nut, cashew nut, hazelnut, macadamia, pecan, pine nut, pistachio, walnut, and peanut proteins in several aqueous solvents was qualitatively and quantitatively assessed. In addition, the effects of extraction time and ionic strength on protein solubility were also investigated. Electrophoresis and protein determination (Lowry, Bradford, and micro-Kjeldahl) methods were used for qualitative and quantitative assessment of proteins, respectively. Depending on the seed, buffer type and ionic strength significantly affected protein solubility. The results suggest that buffered sodium borate (BSB; 0.1 M H(3)BO(3), 0.025 M Na(2)B(4)O(7), 0.075 M NaCl, pH 8.45) optimally solubilizes nut seed proteins. Qualitative differences in seed protein electrophoretic profiles were revealed. For a specific seed type, these differences were dependent on the solvent(s) used to solubilize the seed proteins. SDS-PAGE results suggest the polypeptide molecular mass range for the tree nut seed proteins to be 3-100 kDa. The results of native IEF suggested that the proteins were mainly acidic, with a pI range from >4.5 to <7.0. Western immunoblotting experiments indicated that rabbit polyclonal antibodies recognized substantially the same polypeptides as those recognized by the corresponding pooled patient sera IgE.

  16. Study of polymer particles suspensions for electrophoretic deposition.

    PubMed

    De Riccardis, M Federica; Martina, Virginia; Carbone, Daniela

    2013-02-14

    Recently a great interest has been expressed in electrophoretic deposition (EPD) of polymers, both as particles and as chains. It is generally accepted that also for polymer particles, the Derjaguin-Landau-Verwey-Overbeek (DLVO) theory is valid, therefore, in principle, polymer suspensions suitable for EPD could be easily obtained by dispersing polymer particles in an aqueous or nonaqueous medium. Nevertheless, this work demonstrated that in order to obtain good quality deposits based on poly(ether ether ketone) (PEEK) and poly(tetrafluoroethylene) (PTFE), some additives have to be used. In the case of PEEK, a dispersant providing citrate anions was successfully used, whereas for PTFE a steric suspension stabilization was reached by adding polyvinylpyrrolidone (PVP). In such a way, codeposition of PEEK and PTFE was achieved. The efficiency of the EPD process was demonstrated by means of differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) measurements. A thermal program consisting of heat/cool/heat cycles at a low rate was used in order to evaluate the crystalline amount of each polymer in the deposits. In order to explain the obtained results, it needed to also consider the dimension and structural characteristic of the polymer particles.

  17. AC electrophoretic deposition of organic-inorganic composite coatings.

    PubMed

    Yoshioka, T; Chávez-Valdez, A; Roether, J A; Schubert, D W; Boccaccini, A R

    2013-02-15

    Alternating current electrophoretic deposition (AC-EPD) of polyacrylic acid (PAA)-titanium oxide (TiO(2)) nanoparticle composites on stainless steel electrodes was investigated in basic aqueous solution. AC square wave with duty cycle of 80% was applied at a frequency of 1 kHz. FTIR-ATR spectra showed that both AC and direct current (DC) EPD successfully deposited PAA-TiO(2) composites. The deposition rate using AC-EPD was lower than that obtained in direct current DC-EPD. However, the microstructure and surface morphology of the deposited composite coatings were different depending on the type of electric field applied. AC-EPD applied for not more than 5 min led to smooth films without bubble formation, while DC-EPD for 1 min or more showed deposits with microstructural defects possibly as result of water electrolysis. AC-EPD was thus for the first time demonstrated to be a suitable technique to deposit organic-inorganic composite coatings from aqueous suspensions, showing that applying a square wave and frequency of 1 kHz leads to uniform PAA-TiO(2) composite coatings on conductive materials.

  18. Electrophoretic deposition of biological macromolecules, drugs, and cells.

    PubMed

    Seuss, Sigrid; Boccaccini, Aldo R

    2013-10-14

    The use of biological entities in biotechnology and the biomedical field is of great interest as the biocompatibility and the functionality of naturally occurring is usually higher compared to other biomaterials, for example, synthetic polymers. Processing of natural biomolecules, including proteins like collagen and also living cells and bacteria, to develop medical devices, bioactive coatings, functionalized implants, tissue scaffolds, or biosensors, is however challenging. Electrophoretic deposition, a technique that takes advantage of the presence of charged particles or molecules in suitable solvents, is a low-temperature process suitable for manipulating a wide range of biomolecules and biological entities preserving their bioactivity, which could be otherwise lost by processing at high temperatures. Another advantage of EPD is the possibility to use aqueous suspensions to process biological entities given that organic solvents also could lead to degradation of biomolecules. This paper gives an overview of the available literature on the application of EPD to process different biomolecules and biological entities, like proteins, bacteria cells, hyaluronic acid, and therapeutic drugs, aiming at using such biomaterials in numerous applications ranging from biosensors to orthopedic implants, tissue scaffolds, and drug delivery devices.

  19. Electrophoretic coating of amphiphilic chitosan colloids on regulating cellular behaviour

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Yen-Jen; Lo, Teng-Yuan; Wu, Chieh-Hsi; Liu, Dean-Mo

    2013-01-01

    In this communication, we report a facile nanotopographical control over a stainless steel surface via an electrophoretic deposition of colloidal amphiphilic chitosan for preferential growth, proliferation or migration of vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMCs) and human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs). Atomic force microscopy revealed that the colloidal surface exhibited a deposition time-dependent nanotopographical evolution, wherein two different nanotopographic textures indexed by ‘kurtosis’ (Rkur) value were easily designed, which were termed as ‘sharp’ (i.e. high peak-to-valley texture) surface and ‘flat’ (i.e. low peak-to-valley texture) surface. Cellular behaviour of VSMCs and HUVECs on both surfaces demonstrated topographically dependent morphogenesis, adherent responses and biochemical properties in comparison with bare stainless steel. The formation of a biofunctionalized surface upon a facile colloidal chitosan deposition envisions the potential application towards numerous biomedical devices, and this is especially promising for cardiovascular stents wherein a new surface with optimized texture can be designed and is expected to create an advantageous environment to stimulate HUVEC growth for improved healing performance. PMID:23804439

  20. Electrophoretic deposition of tannic acid-polypyrrolidone films and composites.

    PubMed

    Luo, Dan; Zhang, Tianshi; Zhitomirsky, Igor

    2016-05-01

    Thin films of polyvinylpyrrolidone (PVP)-tannic acid (TA) complexes were prepared by a conceptually new strategy, based on electrophoretic deposition (EPD). Proof of concept investigations involved the analysis of the deposition yield, FTIR and UV-vis spectroscopy of the deposited material, and electron microscopy studies. The analysis of the deposition mechanism indicated that the limitations of the EPD in the deposition of small phenolic molecules, such as TA, and electrically neutral polymers, similar to PVP, containing hydrogen-accepting carbonyl groups, can be avoided. The remarkable adsorption properties of TA and film forming properties of the PVP-TA complexes allowed for the EPD of materials of different types, such as huntite mineral platelets and hydrotalcite clay particles, TiO2 and MnO2 oxide nanoparticles, multiwalled carbon nanotubes, TiN and Pd nanoparticles. Moreover, PVP-TA complexes were used for the co-deposition of different materials and formation of composite films. In another approach, TA was used as a capping agent for the hydrothermal synthesis of ZnO nanorods, which were then deposited by EPD using PVP-TA complexes. The fundamental adsorption and interaction mechanisms of TA involved chelation of metal atoms on particle surfaces with galloyl groups, π-π interactions and hydrogen bonding. The films prepared by EPD can be used for various applications, utilizing functional properties of TA, PVP, inorganic and organic materials of different types and their composites.

  1. Integrated Microfluidic Isolation of Aptamers Using Electrophoretic Oligonucleotide Manipulation

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Jinho; Olsen, Timothy R.; Zhu, Jing; Hilton, John P.; Yang, Kyung-Ae; Pei, Renjun; Stojanovic, Milan N.; Lin, Qiao

    2016-01-01

    We present a microfluidic approach to integrated isolation of DNA aptamers via systematic evolution of ligands by exponential enrichment (SELEX). The approach employs a microbead-based protocol for the processes of affinity selection and amplification of target-binding oligonucleotides, and an electrophoretic DNA manipulation scheme for the coupling of these processes, which are required to occur in different buffers. This achieves the full microfluidic integration of SELEX, thereby enabling highly efficient isolation of aptamers in drastically reduced times and with minimized consumption of biological material. The approach as such also offers broad target applicability by allowing selection of aptamers with respect to targets that are either surface-immobilized or solution-borne, potentially allowing aptamers to be developed as readily available affinity reagents for a wide range of targets. We demonstrate the utility of this approach on two different procedures, respectively for isolating aptamers against a surface-immobilized protein (immunoglobulin E) and a solution-phase small molecule (bisboronic acid in the presence of glucose). In both cases aptamer candidates were isolated in three rounds of SELEX within a total process time of approximately 10 hours. PMID:27217242

  2. Nanotube-grafted polyacrylamide hydrogels for electrophoretic protein separation.

    PubMed

    Gunavadhi, Murugappan; Maria, Lourdusamy Arul Antony; Chamundeswari, Vidya N; Parthasarathy, Meera

    2012-04-01

    Multiwalled carbon nanotube-modified polyacrylamide gels have been employed for the electrophoretic separation of proteins. Two approaches are compared in this investigation, one using nanotubes only as fillers inside the gel matrix and the other using nanotubes as catalyst for polymerization of acrylamide. In both the cases, polymerization of acryl-amide/bisacrylamide has been carried out in situ in the presence of nanotubes dispersed in the gel buffer containing monomer and cross-linker. In the former case, initiator and catalyst have been added after ultrasonication of nanotubes in the gel buffer mixture where the nanotubes play the role of filler. On the other hand, the second approach precludes use of catalyst and involves addition of initiator alone during ultrasonication of nanotubes in the gel buffer containing monomer and cross-linker, which leads to the formation of nanotube-grafted gel after 25 min. When nanotubes are used as a catalyst instead of N,N,N',N'-tetramethylethylenediamine, pore size distribution of the gel matrix and linearity of molecular weight calibration plots are found to be improved. In addition, other issues associated with the use of an external catalyst like handling the moisture-sensitive and corrosive reagent and associated irreproducibility are addressed in this approach.

  3. Origami paper-based fluidic batteries for portable electrophoretic devices.

    PubMed

    Chen, Sung-Sheng; Hu, Chih-Wei; Yu, I-Fan; Liao, Ying-Chih; Yang, Jing-Tang

    2014-06-21

    A manufacturing approach for paper-based fluidic batteries was developed based on the origami principle (three-dimension paper folding). Microfluidic channels were first created on a filter paper by a wax-printing method. Copper and aluminium sheets were then glued onto the paper as electrodes for the redox reaction. After the addition of copper sulphate and aluminium chloride, commonly available cellophane paper was attached as a membrane to separate the two electrodes. The resulting planar paper sheets were then folded into three-dimensional structures and compiled as a single battery with glue. The two half reactions (Al/Al(3+) and Cu/Cu(2+)) in the folded batteries provided an open-circuit potential from 0.82 V (one cell) to 5.0 V (eight cells in series) depending on the origami design. The prepared battery can provide a stable current of 500 μA and can light a regular LED for more than 65 min. These paper-based fluidic batteries in a set can also be compiled into a portable power bank to provide electric power for many electric or biomedical applications, such as LED lights and electrophoretic devices, as we report here.

  4. Polyacrylamide medium for the electrophoretic separation of biomolecules

    DOEpatents

    Madabhushi, Ramakrishna S.; Gammon, Stuart A.

    2003-11-11

    A polyacryalmide medium for the electrophoretic separation of biomolecules. The polyacryalmide medium comprises high molecular weight polyacrylamides (PAAm) having a viscosity average molecular weight (M.sub.v) of about 675-725 kDa were synthesized by conventional red-ox polymerization technique. Using this separation medium, capillary electrophoresis of BigDye DNA sequencing standard was performed. A single base resolution of .about.725 bases was achieved in .about.60 minute in a non-covalently coated capillary of 50 .mu.m i.d., 40 cm effective length, and a filed of 160 V/cm at 40.degree. C. The resolution achieved with this formulation to separate DNA under identical conditions is much superior (725 bases vs. 625 bases) and faster (60 min. vs. 75 min.) to the commercially available PAAm, such as supplied by Amersham. The formulation method employed here to synthesize PAAm is straight-forward, simple and does not require cumbersome methods such as emulsion polymerizaiton in order to achieve very high molecular weights. Also, the formulation here does not require separation of PAAm from the reaction mixture prior to reconstituting the polymer to a final concentration. Furthermore, the formulation here is prepared from a single average mol. wt. PAAm as opposed to the mixture of two different average mo. wt. PAAm previously required to achieve high resolution.

  5. Interfacial bond strength of electrophoretically deposited hydroxyapatite coatings on metals.

    PubMed

    Wei, M; Ruys, A J; Swain, M V; Kim, S H; Milthorpe, B K; Sorrell, C C

    1999-07-01

    Hydroxyapatite (HAp) coatings were deposited onto substrates of metal biomaterials (Ti, Ti6Al4V, and 316L stainless steel) by electrophoretic deposition (EPD). Only ultra-high surface area HAp powder, prepared by the metathesis method 10Ca(NO3)2 + 6(NH4)2HPO4 + 8NH4OH), could produce dense coatings when sintered at 875-1000degreesC. Single EPD coatings cracked during sintering owing to the 15-18% sintering shrinkage, but the HAp did not decompose. The use of dual coatings (coat, sinter, coat, sinter) resolved the cracking problem. Scanning electron microscopy/energy dispersive spectroscopy (SEM/EDS) inspection revealed that the second coating filled in the "valleys" in the cracks of the first coating. The interfacial shear strength of the dual coatings was found, by ASTM F1044-87, to be approximately 12 MPa on a titanium substrate and approximately 22 MPa on 316L stainless steel, comparing quite favorably with the 34 MPa benchmark (the shear strength of bovine cortical bone was found to be 34 MPa). Stainless steel gave the better result since -316L (20.5 microm mK(-1)) > alpha-HAp (approximately 14 microm mK(-1)), resulting in residual compressive stresses in the coating, whereas alpha-titanium (approximately 10.3 microm mK(-1)) < alpha-HAp, resulting in residual tensile stresses in the coating.

  6. Integrated Microfluidic Isolation of Aptamers Using Electrophoretic Oligonucleotide Manipulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Jinho; Olsen, Timothy R.; Zhu, Jing; Hilton, John P.; Yang, Kyung-Ae; Pei, Renjun; Stojanovic, Milan N.; Lin, Qiao

    2016-05-01

    We present a microfluidic approach to integrated isolation of DNA aptamers via systematic evolution of ligands by exponential enrichment (SELEX). The approach employs a microbead-based protocol for the processes of affinity selection and amplification of target-binding oligonucleotides, and an electrophoretic DNA manipulation scheme for the coupling of these processes, which are required to occur in different buffers. This achieves the full microfluidic integration of SELEX, thereby enabling highly efficient isolation of aptamers in drastically reduced times and with minimized consumption of biological material. The approach as such also offers broad target applicability by allowing selection of aptamers with respect to targets that are either surface-immobilized or solution-borne, potentially allowing aptamers to be developed as readily available affinity reagents for a wide range of targets. We demonstrate the utility of this approach on two different procedures, respectively for isolating aptamers against a surface-immobilized protein (immunoglobulin E) and a solution-phase small molecule (bisboronic acid in the presence of glucose). In both cases aptamer candidates were isolated in three rounds of SELEX within a total process time of approximately 10 hours.

  7. Electrophoretic field gradient focusing: an investigation of the experimental parameters.

    PubMed

    Tuñón, Pilar González; Wang, Yating; Myers, Peter; Bartle, Keith D; Bowhill, Larry; Ivory, Cornelius F; Ansell, Richard J

    2008-01-01

    Electrophoretic field gradient focusing has been used to separate the two oxidation states of myoglobin (Mb), and to separate Mb from bromophenol blue (BPB). Polyacrylamide and Sephadex were shown to be suitable packing materials whilst silica led to band broadening with Mb. BPB and Mb could be simultaneously focused apart using either a fixed 21-electrode setup or a dynamic 6-electrode setup. Using a dynamic three-electrode setup either analyte could be focused but not both simultaneously. It was shown that a higher ionic strength buffer in the separation channel compared to the coolant channel enhanced focusing between electrodes due to a conductivity gradient. Different running buffers were investigated and it was found that using a pH 8.6 buffer containing N,N,N-tris(hydroxymethyl)aminomethane (Tris) and phosphate ions the oxidation states of Mb could be separated but the separation of Mb from BPB was not as good as would be hoped for. Using a pH 8.6 buffer containing Tris, N-2-hydroxyethylpiperazine-N'-3-propanesulphonate and chloride ions as running buffer, BPB and Mb could be well separated but the two oxidation states of Mb merged.

  8. Electrophoretic deposition of composite hydroxyapatite-silica-chitosan coatings

    SciTech Connect

    Grandfield, K.; Zhitomirsky, I.

    2008-01-15

    Electrophoretic deposition (EPD) method has been developed for the fabrication of nanocomposite silica-chitosan coatings. Cathodic deposits were obtained on various conductive substrates using suspensions of silica nanoparticles in a mixed ethanol-water solvent, containing dissolved chitosan. Co-deposition of silica and hydroxyapatite (HA) nanoparticles resulted in the fabrication of HA-silica-chitosan coatings. The deposition yield has been studied at a constant voltage mode at various deposition durations. The method enabled the formation of coatings of different thickness in the range of up to 100 {mu}m. Deposit composition, microstructure and porosity can be varied by variation of HA and silica concentration in the suspensions. It was demonstrated that EPD can be used for the fabrication of HA-silica-chitosan coatings of graded composition and laminates. The method enabled the deposition of coatings containing layers of silica-chitosan and HA-chitosan nanocomposites using suspensions with different HA and silica content. Obtained coatings were studied by X-ray diffraction, thermogravimetric and differential thermal analysis, scanning electron microscopy and energy dispersive spectroscopy. The mechanism of deposition is discussed.

  9. [Electrophoretic studies of serum protein fractions in horses with laminitis].

    PubMed

    Edinger, H; Miller, I; Stanek, C; Gemeiner, M

    1992-10-01

    The spectrum of serum proteins was evaluated in 46 horses affected with spontaneous laminitis and correlations between the severity of the disease and changes of the protein pattern were analyzed. The investigation was made in two groups; group A consisted of 21 horses of various breeds (warmblood, thoroughbred, standardbred) and group B of 25 ponys. Each group was subdivided according to the severity of the disease, using the OBEL-grade (OG) classification system. Serum proteins were separated by different one- and two-dimensional electrophoretic methods. Sera analysed by cellulose acetate electrophoresis showed a significant difference in the alpha 1-globulin fraction between OG II and OG IV affected horses. An increasing severity of the disease was correlated with a decrease of the alpha 1-globulins. The other protein fractions didn't show a uniform tendency. In group B there was a significant difference in the alpha 1-globulin fractions of OG II and OG III and in the beta 2-globulin fractions of OG I and OG II affected ponys. The acute phase proteins C3c, C4, Hp and fibronectin could be determined in a preliminary study in horse serum using the cross-reactivity of antibodies against the homologous human proteins.

  10. Fabrication of Electrophoretic Display Driven by Membrane Switch Array

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Senda, Kazuo; Usui, Hiroaki

    2010-04-01

    Electrophoretic devices (EPDs) and organic light-emitting diodes (OLEDs) have potential application in a large-area flexible displays, such as digital signage. For this purpose, a new backplane is capable of driving a large unit is required instead of thin-film transistors. In this paper we describe the fabrication of a membrane switch array suitable for driving large-scale flat-panel displays. An array of membrane switches was prepared using flexible printed circuit (FPC) technology of polyimide films, by combining low-temperature processes of lamination and copper electroplating methods. An array of 256 matrix switches with a pixel size of 7 mm2 was prepared to drive the EPD front panel. The switches were driven at a voltage of about 40 V and a frequency of 10 Hz. The operation characteristics agreed well with the result of the theoretical calculation. The calculation also suggested that driving voltage can be lowered by increasing pixel size. The contact resistance of the membrane switch was as low as 0.2 Ω, which implies the wide applicability of this device for driving a variety of elements.

  11. Size and DNA distributions of electrophoretically separated cultured human kidney cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kunze, M. E.; Plank, L. D.; Todd, P. W.

    1985-01-01

    Electrophoretic purification of purifying cultured cells according to function presumes that the size of cycle phase of a cell is not an overriding determinant of its electrophoretic velocity in an electrophoretic separator. The size distributions and DNA distributions of fractions of cells purified by density gradient electrophoresis were determined. No systematic dependence of electrophoretic migration upward in a density gradient column upon either size or DNA content were found. It was found that human leukemia cell populations, which are more uniform function and found in all phases of the cell cycle during exponential growth, separated on a vertical sensity gradient electrophoresis column according to their size, which is shown to be strictly cell cycle dependent.

  12. Improved design of electrophoretic equipment for rapid sickle-cell-anemia screening

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reddick, J. M.; Hirsch, I.

    1974-01-01

    Effective mass screening may be accomplished by modifying existing electrophoretic equipment in conjunction with multisample applicator used with cellulose-acetate-matrix test paper. Using this method, approximately 20 to 25 samples can undergo electrophoresis in 5 to 6 minutes.

  13. Assessment of heart rate variability based on mobile device for planning physical activity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Svirin, I. S.; Epishina, E. V.; Voronin, V. V.; Semenishchev, E. A.; Solodova, E. N.; Nabilskaya, N. V.

    2015-05-01

    In this paper we present a method for the functional analysis of human heart based on electrocardiography (ECG) signals. The approach using the apparatus of analytical and differential geometry and correlation and regression analysis. ECG contains information on the current condition of the cardiovascular system as well as on the pathological changes in the heart. Mathematical processing of the heart rate variability allows to obtain a great set of mathematical and statistical characteristics. These characteristics of the heart rate are used when solving research problems to study physiological changes that determine functional changes of an individual. The proposed method implemented for up-to-date mobile Android and iOS based devices.

  14. The role of cell size in density gradient electrophoretic separation of mouse leukemia cells according to position in the cell cycle

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Plank, L. D.; Kunze, M. E.; Todd, P. W.

    1985-01-01

    Cultured mouse leukemia cells line L5178Y were subjected to upward electrophoresis in a density gradient and the slower migrating cell populations were enriched in G2 cells. It is indicated that this cell line does not change electrophoretic mobility through the cell cycle. The possibility that increased sedimentation downward on the part of the larger G2 cells caused this separation was explored. Two different cell populations were investigated. The log phase population was found to migrate upward faster than the G2 population, and a similar difference between their velocities and calculated on the basis of a 1 um diameter difference between the two cell populations. The G2 and G1 enriched populations were isolated by Ficoll density gradient sedimentation. The bottom fraction was enriched in G2 cells and the top fraction was enriched with G1 cells, especially when compared with starting materials. The electrophoretic mobilities of these two cell populations did not differ significantly from one another. Cell diameter dependent migration curves were calculated and were found to be different. Families of migration curves that differ when cell size is considered as a parameter are predicted.

  15. ECG by mobile technologies.

    PubMed

    Guzik, Przemyslaw; Malik, Marek

    Mobile electrocardiographs consist of three components: a mobile device (e.g. a smartphone), an electrocardiographic device or accessory, and a mobile application. Mobile platforms are small computers with sufficient computational power, good quality display, suitable data storage, and several possibilities of data transmission. Electrocardiographic electrodes and sensors for mobile use utilize unconventional materials, e.g. rubber, e-textile, and inkjet-printed nanoparticle electrodes. Mobile devices can be handheld, worn as vests or T-shirts, or attached to patient's skin as biopatches. Mobile electrocardiographic devices and accessories may additionally record other signals including respiratory rate, activity level, and geolocation. Large-scale clinical studies that utilize electrocardiography are easier to conduct using mobile technologies and the collected data are suitable for "big data" processing. This is expected to reveal phenomena so far inaccessible by standard electrocardiographic techniques.

  16. Theory of activated glassy relaxation, mobility gradients, surface diffusion, and vitrification in free standing thin films.

    PubMed

    Mirigian, Stephen; Schweizer, Kenneth S

    2015-12-28

    We have constructed a quantitative, force level, statistical mechanical theory for how confinement in free standing thin films introduces a spatial mobility gradient of the alpha relaxation time as a function of temperature, film thickness, and location in the film. The crucial idea is that relaxation speeds up due to the reduction of both near-surface barriers associated with the loss of neighbors in the local cage and the spatial cutoff and dynamical softening near the vapor interface of the spatially longer range collective elasticity cost for large amplitude hopping. These two effects are fundamentally coupled. Quantitative predictions are made for how an apparent glass temperature depends on the film thickness and experimental probe technique, the emergence of a two-step decay and mobile layers in time domain measurements, signatures of confinement in frequency-domain dielectric loss experiments, the dependence of film-averaged relaxation times and dynamic fragility on temperature and film thickness, surface diffusion, and the relationship between kinetic experiments and pseudo-thermodynamic measurements such as ellipsometry.

  17. Intrinsic restriction activity by AID/APOBEC family of enzymes against the mobility of retroelements

    PubMed Central

    Ikeda, Terumasa

    2011-01-01

    A large portion of the mammalian genome is derived from ancient transposable elements. Retroelements, transported by an intracellular copy-and-paste process involving an RNA intermediate (retrotransposition), constitute a majority of these mobile genetic elements. Endogenous retroviruses are LTR-type retroelements accounting for around 8% of human or murine genomic DNA. Non-LTR members are present in extremely high copy numbers; with LINE-1 contributing to nearly 40% of human and murine genomes. These LINE-1 elements modify mammalian genomes not only through insertions, but also by indirect replication of nonautonomous retrotransposons such as SINEs. As expected, cellular machineries of vertebrate's innate immunity have evolved to support a balance between retroelement insertions that cause deleterious gene disruptions and those that confer beneficial genetic diversity. The ability of APOBEC3 cytidine deaminases targeting DNA to restrict a broad number of retroviruses and retro-elements is now well established. More recently, the RNA editing family member APOBEC1, a protein involved in lipid transport, has also been shown to be involved in keeping mobile elements under control. This review discusses current understanding of the mechanism of action of the AID/APOBEC family, and their role in controlling the retrotransposition of endogenous retroelements. PMID:22479686

  18. Theory of activated glassy relaxation, mobility gradients, surface diffusion, and vitrification in free standing thin films

    SciTech Connect

    Mirigian, Stephen E-mail: smirigian@gmail.com; Schweizer, Kenneth S. E-mail: smirigian@gmail.com

    2015-12-28

    We have constructed a quantitative, force level, statistical mechanical theory for how confinement in free standing thin films introduces a spatial mobility gradient of the alpha relaxation time as a function of temperature, film thickness, and location in the film. The crucial idea is that relaxation speeds up due to the reduction of both near-surface barriers associated with the loss of neighbors in the local cage and the spatial cutoff and dynamical softening near the vapor interface of the spatially longer range collective elasticity cost for large amplitude hopping. These two effects are fundamentally coupled. Quantitative predictions are made for how an apparent glass temperature depends on the film thickness and experimental probe technique, the emergence of a two-step decay and mobile layers in time domain measurements, signatures of confinement in frequency-domain dielectric loss experiments, the dependence of film-averaged relaxation times and dynamic fragility on temperature and film thickness, surface diffusion, and the relationship between kinetic experiments and pseudo-thermodynamic measurements such as ellipsometry.

  19. Design and Test of a Hybrid Foot Force Sensing and GPS System for Richer User Mobility Activity Recognition

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Zelun; Poslad, Stefan

    2013-01-01

    Wearable and accompanied sensors and devices are increasingly being used for user activity recognition. However, typical GPS-based and accelerometer-based (ACC) methods face three main challenges: a low recognition accuracy; a coarse recognition capability, i.e., they cannot recognise both human posture (during travelling) and transportation mode simultaneously, and a relatively high computational complexity. Here, a new GPS and Foot-Force (GPS + FF) sensor method is proposed to overcome these challenges that leverages a set of wearable FF sensors in combination with GPS, e.g., in a mobile phone. User mobility activities that can be recognised include both daily user postures and common transportation modes: sitting, standing, walking, cycling, bus passenger, car passenger (including private cars and taxis) and car driver. The novelty of this work is that our approach provides a more comprehensive recognition capability in terms of reliably recognising both human posture and transportation mode simultaneously during travel. In addition, by comparing the new GPS + FF method with both an ACC method (62% accuracy) and a GPS + ACC based method (70% accuracy) as baseline methods, it obtains a higher accuracy (95%) with less computational complexity, when tested on a dataset obtained from ten individuals. PMID:24189333

  20. Design and test of a hybrid foot force sensing and GPS system for richer user mobility activity recognition.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Zelun; Poslad, Stefan

    2013-11-01

    Wearable and accompanied sensors and devices are increasingly being used for user activity recognition. However, typical GPS-based and accelerometer-based (ACC) methods face three main challenges: a low recognition accuracy; a coarse recognition capability, i.e., they cannot recognise both human posture (during travelling) and transportation mode simultaneously, and a relatively high computational complexity. Here, a new GPS and Foot-Force (GPS + FF) sensor method is proposed to overcome these challenges that leverages a set of wearable FF sensors in combination with GPS, e.g., in a mobile phone. User mobility activities that can be recognised include both daily user postures and common transportation modes: sitting, standing, walking, cycling, bus passenger, car passenger (including private cars and taxis) and car driver. The novelty of this work is that our approach provides a more comprehensive recognition capability in terms of reliably recognising both human posture and transportation mode simultaneously during travel. In addition, by comparing the new GPS + FF method with both an ACC method (62% accuracy) and a GPS + ACC based method (70% accuracy) as baseline methods, it obtains a higher accuracy (95%) with less computational complexity, when tested on a dataset obtained from ten individuals.

  1. Effect of micelles and mixed micelles on efficiency and selectivity of antibiotic-based capillary electrophoretic enantioseparations

    SciTech Connect

    Rundlett, K.L.; Armstrong, D.W.

    1995-07-01

    Vancomycin (an oligophenolic, glycopeptide, macrocyclic antibiotic) has been shown to be a superb chiral selector for anionic and neutral compounds. It was found that adding sodium dodecyl sulfate to the run buffer increased efficiency by over 1 order of magnitude, decreased analysis times, and reversed the elution order of the enantiomers. This allows for control of the retention order as well as the resolution of enantiomers in complex mixtures in a single run. A mechanism is proposed which explains all of the observed effects and is verified experimentally. Since vancomycin is present in both the micelle and in free solution, previously proposed micelle-selector models are, at best, limiting cases. A general equation is derived which can be used to describe all possible interactions, including those with the capillary wall, if needed. Also, it is shown that electrophoretic mobilities and not migration times must be used to calculate binding constants of a solute to the micelle, the chiral selector, or both. Furthermore, it is shown that a neutral marker molecule cannot be used to accurately correct mobilities that have been altered due to changes in solution viscosity. While this work utilizes the practical vancomycin-micelle system, the general conclusions and theory apply to most other analogous CE systems as well. 48 refs., 4 figs., 5 tabs.

  2. Capillary electrophoretic enantioselective determination of zopiclone and its impurities.

    PubMed

    Tonon, Milena Araújo; Bonato, Pierina Sueli

    2012-06-01

    A capillary electrophoretic enantioselective method with UV detection was developed and validated for the simultaneous quantification of zopiclone enantiomers and its impurities, zopiclone-N-oxide enantiomers, and 2-amino-5-chloropyridine, in tablets. The analytes were extracted from the tablets using ACN and were separated in an uncoated fused-silica capillary (50 μm, 42 cm effective length, 50 cm total length) using 80 mM sodium phosphate buffer pH 2.5 and 5 mM carboxymethyl-β-cyclodextrin as running buffer. The analytes and the internal standard (trimethoprim) were detected at 305 and 200 nm, respectively. A voltage of 27 kV was applied and the capillary temperature was maintained at 25°C. All enantiomers were analyzed within 8 min and linear calibration curves over the concentration range of 0.4-0.8 mg mL⁻¹ for each zopiclone enantiomer, 0.8-1.6 μg mL⁻¹ for 2-amino-5-chloropyridine and 0.4-0.8 μg mL⁻¹ for each zopiclone-N-oxide enantiomer were obtained. The coefficients of correlation obtained for the linear curves were greater than 0.99. The intra-day and inter-day accuracy and precision were lower than 2% for all analytes. This validated method was employed to study the degradation and racemization of zopiclone under stress conditions. This application demonstrated the importance of a stability-indicating assay method for this drug.

  3. Optimization of a microfluidic electrophoretic immunoassay using a Peltier cooler.

    PubMed

    Mukhitov, Nikita; Yi, Lian; Schrell, Adrian M; Roper, Michael G

    2014-11-07

    Successful analysis of electrophoretic affinity assays depends strongly on the preservation of the affinity complex during separations. Elevated separation temperatures due to Joule heating promotes complex dissociation leading to a reduction in sensitivity. Affinity assays performed in glass microfluidic devices may be especially prone to this problem due to poor heat dissipation due to the low thermal conductivity of glass and the large amount of bulk material surrounding separation channels. To address this limitation, a method to cool a glass microfluidic chip for performing an affinity assay for insulin was achieved by a Peltier cooler localized over the separation channel. The Peltier cooler allowed for rapid stabilization of temperatures, with 21°C the lowest temperature that was possible to use without producing detrimental thermal gradients throughout the device. The introduction of cooling improved the preservation of the affinity complex, with even passive cooling of the separation channel improving the amount of complex observed by 2-fold. Additionally, the capability to thermostabilize the separation channel allowed for utilization of higher separation voltages than what was possible without temperature control. Kinetic CE analysis was utilized as a diagnostic of the affinity assay and indicated that optimal conditions were at the highest separation voltage, 6 kV, and the lowest separation temperature, 21°C, leading to 3.4% dissociation of the complex peak during the separation. These optimum conditions were used to generate a calibration curve and produced 1 nM limits of detection, representing a 10-fold improvement over non-thermostated conditions. This methodology of cooling glass microfluidic devices for performing robust and high sensitivity affinity assays on microfluidic systems should be amenable in a number of applications.

  4. Optimization of A Microfluidic Electrophoretic Immunoassay Using a Peltier Cooler

    PubMed Central

    Mukhitov, Nikita; Yi, Lian; Schrell, Adrian M.; Roper, Michael G.

    2014-01-01

    Successful analysis of electrophoretic affinity assays depends strongly on the preservation of the affinity complex during separations. Elevated separation temperatures due to Joule heating promotes complex dissociation leading to a reduction in sensitivity. Affinity assays performed in glass microfluidic devices may be especially prone to this problem due to poor heat dissipation due to the low thermal conductivity of glass and the large amount of bulk material surrounding separation channels. To address this limitation, a method to cool a glass microfluidic chip for performing an affinity assay for insulin was achieved by a Peltier cooler localized over the separation channel. The Peltier cooler allowed for rapid stabilization of temperatures, with 21 °C the lowest temperature that was possible to use without producing detrimental thermal gradients throughout the device. The introduction of cooling improved the preservation of the affinity complex, with even passive cooling of the separation channel improving the amount of complex observed by 2-fold. Additionally, the capability to thermostabilize the separation channel allowed for utilization of higher separation voltages than what was possible without temperature control. Kinetic CE analysis was utilized as a diagnostic of the affinity assay and indicated that optimal conditions were at the highest separation voltage, 6 kV, and the lowest separation temperature, 21 °C, leading to 3.4% dissociation of the complex peak during the separation. These optimum conditions were used to generate a calibration curve and produced 1 nM limits of detection, representing a 10-fold improvement over non-thermostated conditions. This methodology of cooling glass microfluidic devices for performing robust and high sensitivity affinity assays on microfluidic systems should be amenable in a number of applications. PMID:25263064

  5. Alpha-mannosidase activity in stallion epididymal fluid and spermatozoa.

    PubMed

    Retamal, C A; Dias, A J B; Brasil, F C; Lanzana, F R; López, M L

    2012-07-15

    The expression of α-D-mannosidase activity was fluorometrically and electrophoretically assessed in spermatozoa, epididymal fluid and homogenates of stallion epididymal tissue. Enzyme activity had regional differences; it was higher (P<0.05) in samples from the cauda epididymal region than in samples from the proximal caput region (largely composed of efferent ducts). Based on enzyme activity, as a function of pH of the assay substrate, electrophoretic analysis in native and native/SDS-PAGE conditions, and the effect of inhibitors or activators, we inferred the presence of at least two catalytically active forms of α-D-mannosidase. The neutral form of the enzyme (α-mannosidase II) was activated by Co2+, whereas the acid form (optimum pH 3.5 to 4.0) was sensitive to swainsonine (an inhibitor of α-mannosidase I), stabilized or stimulated by Zn2+, and not activated by Co2+ (activator of the neutral form). The activity of the acid form of the enzyme was highest in the epididymal fluid, where it seemed to be mainly in a secretory form. This form of the enzyme may have a role in plasma membrane remodeling associated with sperm maturation. In contrast, the activity of α-mannosidase II was higher in mature spermatozoa. It has been postulated that α-mannosidase II may act as a receptor in the recognition and binding of the complementary carbohydrate moieties present on the zona pellucida. With non-denaturing electrophoresis, α-D-mannosidase had an electrophoretic mobility of 0.35 and 0.24. When resolved by 1D and 2D SDS-PAGE (under denaturing conditions) the enzyme had a major protein band of molecular weight 154 kDa in spermatozoa and epididymal samples. Based on its properties under native conditions, we inferred that this enzyme might interact with other proteins and form transitory aggregates.

  6. School Travel Planning: Mobilizing School and Community Resources to Encourage Active School Transportation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Buliung, Ron; Faulkner, Guy; Beesley, Theresa; Kennedy, Jacky

    2011-01-01

    Background: Active school transport (AST), school travel using an active mode like walking, may be important to children's overall physical activity. A "school travel plan" (STP) documents a school's transport characteristics and provides an action plan to address school and neighborhood barriers to AST. Methods: We conducted a pilot STP…

  7. Attitudes and perceptions of patients on the kidney transplant waiting list toward mobile health–delivered physical activity programs

    PubMed Central

    Sieverdes, John C.; Raynor, Phyllis A.; Armstrong, Tracy; Jenkins, Carolyn H.; Sox, Luke R.; Treiber, Frank A.

    2016-01-01

    Context Dialysis patients’ lifestyles are associated with low levels of physical activity, increasing the chances of being removed from kidney waiting lists or dying while awaiting transplant because of increased cardiovascular risk factors and deteriorating health conditions. Personalized mobile health (mHealth) delivered programs may support their engagement in healthier lifestyles, maintain transplant eligibility, and reduce premature mortality. Objective To explore barriers and perceptions of physical activity behaviors and gauge interest in using mHealth in a physical activity wellness program for dialysis patients on the kidney transplant waiting list. Participants and Design In-depth key informant interviews were conducted with 22 randomly selected dialysis patients during dialysis treatment in an urban Southeastern coastal city. A theory-guided community-based participatory research approach was used to develop the interview content. Constructivist grounded theory guided the data analysis using NVIVO 10 (QSR Int). The 32-item checklist from the Consolidated Criteria for Reporting Qualitative Studies was used in the qualitative reporting. Results Dialysis patients had a mean age of 46 (SD, 10.7) years, 45% were female, and 82% were African American. Their mean duration on transplant waiting lists was 6.7 (SD 4.3) years, and 73% owned smartphones. After saturation was reached, predominant themes included (1) physical activity was perceived as optional, (2) social support both encouraged and limited physical activity, (3) chronic stress and coping influenced physical activity, (4) spirituality provided strength to engage in physical activity, (5) self-care management practices varied considerably, and (6) high interest (95%) for using mHealth to promote physical activity was found. Patients preferred their home and neighborhood environments to intradialytic settings for engaging in physical activity. PMID:25758797

  8. Mobilization of endocrine-disrupting chemicals and estrogenic activity in simulated rainfall runoff from land-applied biosolids.

    PubMed

    Giudice, Ben D; Young, Thomas M

    2011-10-01

    Municipal biosolids are commonly applied to land as soil amendment or fertilizer as a form of beneficial reuse of what could otherwise be viewed as waste. Balanced against this benefit are potential risks to groundwater and surface water quality from constituents that may be mobilized during storm events. The objective of the present study was to characterize the mobilization of selected endocrine-disrupting compounds, heavy metals, and total estrogenic activity in rainfall runoff from land-applied biosolids. Rainfall simulations were conducted on soil plots amended with biosolids. Surface runoff and leachate was collected and analyzed for the endocrine-disrupting compounds bisphenol A, 17α-ethynylestradiol, triclocarban, triclosan, octylphenol, and nonylphenol; a suite of 16 metals; and estrogenic activity via the estrogen receptor-mediated chemical activated luciferase gene expression (ER-CALUX) bioassay. Triclocarban (2.3-17.3 ng/L), triclosan (<51-309 ng/L), and octylphenol (<4.9-203 ng/L) were commonly detected. Chromium (2.0-22 µg/L), Co (2.5-10 µg/L), Ni (28-235 µg/L), Cu (14-110 µg/L), As (1.2-2.7 µg/L), and Se (0.29-12 µg/L) were quantifiable over background levels. Triclosan, Ni, and Cu were detected at levels that might pose some risk to aquatic life, though levels of metals in the biosolids were well below the maximum allowable regulatory limits. The ER-CALUX results were mostly explained by background bisphenol A contamination and octylphenol in runoff, although unknown contributors or matrix effects were also found.

  9. A positive role for nucleosome mobility in the transcriptional activity of chromatin templates: restriction by linker histones.

    PubMed Central

    Ura, K; Hayes, J J; Wolffe, A P

    1995-01-01

    Nucleosome mobility facilitates the transcription of chromatin templates containing only histone octamers. Inclusion of linker histones in chromatin inhibits nucleosome mobility, directs nucleosome positioning and represses transcription. Transcriptional repression by linker histone occurs preferentially on templates associated with histone octamers relative to naked DNA. Mobile nucleosomes and the restriction of mobility by linker histones might be expected to exert a major influence on the accessibility of chromatin to regulatory molecules. Images PMID:7641694

  10. Mechanism of the electrophoretic assembly of cadmium selenide nanocrystal films and their mechanical properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jia, Shengguo

    This thesis consists of two closely related experimental studies of electrophoretically deposited CdSe nanocrystal films. In the first part of this thesis, the charging of CdSe nanocrystal in non-aqueous solvent and the mechanism of electrophoretic deposition (EPD) are discussed from the point of view of the influence of the nanocrystal surface. Our experiments show that the charge of these nanocrystals originates from the surface defects of the nanocrystal. EPD leads to equally thick films of CdSe nanocrystals on both positive and negative electrodes due to the deposition of equal numbers of negatively and positively charged nanocrystals, even though their concentrations are not equal in solution. The deposition stops when the charged nanocrystals with lower concentration are depleted. The second part of this thesis focuses on the mechanical and optical properties of these electrophoretically deposited CdSe nanocrystal films. Approaches to measure and analyze the mechanical parameters and fracture properties of electrophoretically deposited CdSe nanocrystal films are described in this part. The values of the elastic modulus of electrophoretically deposited CdSe nanocrystal films composed of 3.2 nm diameter nanocrystals measured by Raman microprobe scattering (˜9.7 GPa) and nanoindentation (˜10 GPa) match each other. The mechanical response of nanocrystal films suggests polymeric features that are attributable to the organic ligand on the nanocrystal cores. After nanocrystal cross-linking and partial ligand removal, the nanocrystal films exhibit more features of granularity. The fracture, strain, and stress of electrophoretically deposited CdSe nanocrystal films are studied as a function of the film thickness, nanocrystal size, and drying method. In addition to Raman microprobe scattering, optical methods such as photoluminescence, high-spatial resolution infrared spectroscopy, and ellipsometry are used to investigate the properties of these electrophoretically

  11. The Presence of a Stable Block bounded by Active Zones (Mobile Belts) in the southwestern North American Proterozoic craton

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goodell, P.; Martinez P, C.; Mahar, M. A.

    2014-12-01

    Bouguer gravity data, initial Sr isotope values, zircon U-Pb, and multiple occurrences of felsic Proterozoic rocks, have revealed an elevated, less deformed, felsic cratonic block in the northern Mexico. The block is situated in western Chihuahua and is bounded by active zones or mobile belts on three sides, and is here referred to as the Western Chihuahua Cratonic Block (WCCB). Bouguer gravity data clearly indicate a region of a highly negative anomaly (< -200 mgal) in contrast to adjoining areas. The region is large and the anomaly is relatively smooth over broad areas; the WCCB appears as a smaller version of the Colorado Plateau. The block is characterized by high initial Sr isotope ratios (<0.706). Several occurrences of Proterozoic rocks are located within or next to the WCCB, and they reveal the character of the Bouguer anomaly. On the east, at Los Filtros, Proterozoic rocks crop out in a basement cored uplift interpreted to having been derived from the WCCB during the Ouachita orogeny. At Sierra La Mojina boulders of 1.1 Ga granites are found in Permian conglomerates. And at Basasiachic, xenoliths of 1.1 Ga granites are present in ash flow tuffs. Establishment of the Precambrian character of the WCCB is of importance, and these multiple occurrences are evidence. Prior studies of the Sierra Madre Occidental suggest that the region was uplifted because of a vast Cenozoic batholith presumed to lie under the SLIP (Silicic Large Igneous Province), the Upper Volcanic Series. The present study challenges that conclusion and maintains the SMO is underlain by Proterozoic silicic crust. The geology of age dated samples supports this. The WCCB is surrounded on three sides by Active Zones or Mobile Belts, which have been active extensional and translational zones periodically over a long period of time. On the east are the Paleozoic Pedrogosa Basin, Mesozoic Chihuahua Trough and Cenozoic Rio Grande Rift, the first two of which also continue around the northern border

  12. Mobile Learning Using Mobile Phones

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vicente, Paula

    2013-01-01

    The participation in mobile learning programs is conditioned by having/using mobile communication technology. Those who do not have or use such technology cannot participate in mobile learning programs. This study evaluates who are the most likely participants of mobile learning programs by examining the demographic profile and mobile phone usage…

  13. The effects of ankle mobilization and active stretching on the difference of weight-bearing distribution, low back pain and flexibility in pronated-foots subjects

    PubMed Central

    Yoon, Ki-Seok; Park, Seong-Doo

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this study was designed to analyze the effects mobilization and active stretching on the difference of weight-bearing distribution, low back pain, and flexibility in pronated-foot subjects. The subjects of this study were 16 chronic low back pain patients. They were randomly divided into the control and experimental group. The experimental group had used the model of ankle mobilization and calf muscle active stretching three times per week, for 4 weeks. The control group did same method without an ankle mobilization. The range of flexion and extension motion of the lumbar vertebrae and low back pain degree and difference of weight-bearing were measured before and after the experiment. The model of ankle mobilization and calf muscle stretching of pronated-foot significantly improved the range of flexion and extension motion of the vertebrae. And the visual analogue scale and distribution of weight-bearing were decreased in both of two groups. In other word, the exercise of this study showed that the model of ankle mobilization and calf muscle stretching of pronated-foot had positive effects on improving the range of flexion and extension motion of the vertebrae. The calf muscle stretching was easy and it is effective in therapy that patients by themselves and helped to recover the balance of the vertebrae to combine ankle mobilization and muscle stretching. PMID:24278874

  14. Granulocyte Colony-Stimulating Factor Induces Osteoblast Inhibition by B Lymphocytes and Osteoclast Activation by T Lymphocytes during Hematopoietic Stem/Progenitor Cell Mobilization.

    PubMed

    Li, Sidan; Li, Tianshou; Chen, Yongbing; Nie, Yinchao; Li, Changhong; Liu, Lanting; Li, Qiaochuan; Qiu, Lugui

    2015-08-01

    In the bone marrow (BM), hematopoietic stem and progenitor cells (HSPCs) reside in specialized niches near osteoblast cells at the endosteum. HSPCs that egress to peripheral blood are widely used for transplant, and mobilization is most commonly performed with recombinant human granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (G-CSF). However, the cellular targets of G-CSF that initiate the mobilization cascade and bone remodeling are not completely understood. Here, we examined whether T and B lymphocytes modulate the bone niche and influence HSPC mobilization. We used T and B defective mice to show that G-CSF-induced mobilization of HSPCs correlated with B lymphocytes but poorly with T lymphocytes. In addition, we found that defective B lymphocytes prevent G-CSF-mediated osteoblast disruption, and further study showed BM osteoblasts were reduced coincident with mobilization, induced by elevated expression of dickkopf1 of BM B lymphocytes. BM T cells were also involved in G-CSF-induced osteoclast activation by regulating the Receptor Activator of Nuclear Factor-κ B Ligand/Osteoprotegerin (RANKL/OPG) axis. These data provide evidence that BM B and T lymphocytes play a role in G-CSF-induced HSPC mobilization by regulating bone remodeling.

  15. Neuropeptide Y Induces Hematopoietic Stem/Progenitor Cell Mobilization by Regulating Matrix Metalloproteinase-9 Activity Through Y1 Receptor in Osteoblasts.

    PubMed

    Park, Min Hee; Lee, Jong Kil; Kim, Namoh; Min, Woo-Kie; Lee, Jeong Eun; Kim, Kyoung-Tae; Akiyama, Haruhiko; Herzog, Herbert; Schuchman, Edward H; Jin, Hee Kyung; Bae, Jae-Sung

    2016-08-01

    Hematopoietic stem/progenitor cell (HSPC) mobilization is an essential homeostatic process regulated by the interaction of cellular and molecular components in bone marrow niches. It has been shown by others that neurotransmitters released from the sympathetic nervous system regulate HSPC egress from bone marrow to peripheral blood. In this study, we investigate the functional role of neuropeptide Y (NPY) on this process. NPY deficient mice had significantly impaired HSPC mobilization due to increased expression of HSPC maintenance factors by reduction of matrix metalloproteinase-9 (MMP-9) activity in bone marrow. Pharmacological or endogenous elevation of NPY led to decrease of HSPC maintenance factors expression by activating MMP-9 in osteoblasts, resulting in HSPC mobilization. Mice in which the Y1 receptor was deleted in osteoblasts did not exhibit HSPC mobilization by NPY. Furthermore, NPY treatment in ovariectomized mice caused reduction of bone loss due to HSPC mobilization. These results suggest a new role of NPY on HSPC mobilization, as well as the potential therapeutic application of this neuropeptide for stem cell-based therapy. Stem Cells 2016;34:2145-2156.

  16. The effects of ankle mobilization and active stretching on the difference of weight-bearing distribution, low back pain and flexibility in pronated-foots subjects.

    PubMed

    Yoon, Ki-Seok; Park, Seong-Doo

    2013-04-01

    The purpose of this study was designed to analyze the effects mobilization and active stretching on the difference of weight-bearing distribution, low back pain, and flexibility in pronated-foot subjects. The subjects of this study were 16 chronic low back pain patients. They were randomly divided into the control and experimental group. The experimental group had used the model of ankle mobilization and calf muscle active stretching three times per week, for 4 weeks. The control group did same method without an ankle mobilization. The range of flexion and extension motion of the lumbar vertebrae and low back pain degree and difference of weight-bearing were measured before and after the experiment. The model of ankle mobilization and calf muscle stretching of pronated-foot significantly improved the range of flexion and extension motion of the vertebrae. And the visual analogue scale and distribution of weight-bearing were decreased in both of two groups. In other word, the exercise of this study showed that the model of ankle mobilization and calf muscle stretching of pronated-foot had positive effects on improving the range of flexion and extension motion of the vertebrae. The calf muscle stretching was easy and it is effective in therapy that patients by themselves and helped to recover the balance of the vertebrae to combine ankle mobilization and muscle stretching.

  17. Ribosomal frameshifting and dual-target antiactivation restrict quorum-sensing-activated transfer of a mobile genetic element.

    PubMed

    Ramsay, Joshua P; Tester, Laura G L; Major, Anthony S; Sullivan, John T; Edgar, Christina D; Kleffmann, Torsten; Patterson-House, Jackson R; Hall, Drew A; Tate, Warren P; Hynes, Michael F; Ronson, Clive W

    2015-03-31

    Symbiosis islands are integrative and conjugative mobile genetic elements that convert nonsymbiotic rhizobia into nitrogen-fixing symbionts of leguminous plants. Excision of the Mesorhizobium loti symbiosis island ICEMlSym(R7A) is indirectly activated by quorum sensing through TraR-dependent activation of the excisionase gene rdfS. Here we show that a +1 programmed ribosomal frameshift (PRF) fuses the coding sequences of two TraR-activated genes, msi172 and msi171, producing an activator of rdfS expression named Frameshifted excision activator (FseA). Mass-spectrometry and mutational analyses indicated that the PRF occurred through +1 slippage of the tRNA(phe) from UUU to UUC within a conserved msi172-encoded motif. FseA activated rdfS expression in the absence of ICEMlSym(R7A), suggesting that it directly activated rdfS transcription, despite being unrelated to any characterized DNA-binding proteins. Bacterial two-hybrid and gene-reporter assays demonstrated that FseA was also bound and inhibited by the ICEMlSym(R7A)-encoded quorum-sensing antiactivator QseM. Thus, activation of ICEMlSym(R7A) excision is counteracted by TraR antiactivation, ribosomal frameshifting, and FseA antiactivation. This robust suppression likely dampens the inherent biological noise present in the quorum-sensing autoinduction circuit and ensures that ICEMlSym(R7A) transfer only occurs in a subpopulation of cells in which both qseM expression is repressed and FseA is translated. The architecture of the ICEMlSym(R7A) transfer regulatory system provides an example of how a set of modular components have assembled through evolution to form a robust genetic toggle that regulates gene transcription and translation at both single-cell and cell-population levels.

  18. High-mobility thin film transistors with neodymium-substituted indium oxide active layer

    SciTech Connect

    Lin, Zhenguo; Lan, Linfeng Xiao, Peng; Sun, Sheng; Li, Yuzhi; Song, Wei; Gao, Peixiong; Wang, Lei; Ning, Honglong; Peng, Junbiao

    2015-09-14

    Thin-film transistors (TFTs) with neodymium-substituted indium oxide (InNdO) channel layer were demonstrated. The structural properties of the InNdO films as a function of annealing temperature have been analyzed using X-ray diffraction and transmission electron microscopy. The InNdO thin films showed polycrystalline nature when annealed at 450 °C with a lattice parameter (cubic cell) of 10.255 Å, which is larger than the cubic In{sub 2}O{sub 3} film (10.117 Å). The high-resolution transmission electron microscopy and energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy showed that no Nd{sub 2}O{sub 3} clusters were found in the InNdO film, implying that Nd was incorporated into the In{sub 2}O{sub 3} lattice. The InNdO TFTs annealed at 450 °C exhibited more excellent electrical properties with a high mobility of 20.4 cm{sup 2} V{sup −1} s{sup −1} and better electric bias stability compared to those annealed at 300 °C, which was attributed to the reduction of the scattering centers and/or charge traps due to the decrease of the |Nd3d{sub 5/2}{sup 5}4f{sup 4}O2p{sup −1}〉 electron configuration.

  19. LYAR promotes colorectal cancer cell mobility by activating galectin-1 expression.

    PubMed

    Wu, Yupeng; Liu, Ming; Li, Zhuchen; Wu, Xiao-Bin; Wang, Ying; Wang, Yadong; Nie, Min; Huang, Feifei; Ju, Junyi; Ma, Chi; Tan, Renxiang; Zen, Ke; Zhang, Chen-Yu; Fu, Keqin; Chen, Yu-Gen; Wang, Ming-Rong; Zhao, Quan

    2015-10-20

    Colorectal cancer (CRC) is one of the leading causes of cancer-related death worldwide. However, the molecular mechanisms of CRC pathogenesis are not fully understood. In this study, we report the characterization of LYAR (Ly-1 antibody reactive clone) as a key regulator of the migration and invasion of human CRC cells. Immunohistochemistry analysis demonstrated that LYAR is expressed at a higher level in metastatic CRC tissues. We found that LYAR promoted the migratory and invasive capabilities of CRC cells. Gene expression profile analysis of CRC cells showed that LGALS1, which encodes the galectin-1 protein, was a potential target of LYAR. The ChIP assay and gene reporter assays indicated that LYAR directly bound to the LGALS1 promoter. The ectopic expression of galectin-1 partially restored the mobile potential of LYAR knocked-down cells, which suggests that galectin-1 contributed to the LYAR-promoted cell migration and invasion of CRC cells. Thus, this study revealed a novel mechanism by which the transcription factor LYAR may promote tumor cell migration and invasion by upregulating galectin-1 gene expression in CRC.

  20. Toward Dynamic Control over Ordered Nanoparticle Monolayer Fabrication by Electrophoretic Deposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dickerson, James; Gonzalo-Juan, Isabel; Krejci, Alex

    2013-03-01

    A primary challenges to the implementation of nanoparticles into device applications is the rapid production of densely packed, ordered films of these materials. The ordered arrangement of the nanomaterials is required for applications that rely on the collective interactions of the constituents or on the high density of the materials for information storage or surface protection. Rapid fabrication is a manufacturing demand to reduce operation costs and to streamline production. We have achieved a substantial milestone toward the mass production of macroscopic monolayers and thin films of colloidal nanocrystals on various substrates, including conducting metals and doped-semiconducting substrates. Our approach combines the advantages of liquid-phase, colloidal suspension approaches with the superior deposition rate, size scalability, and cost effective features of electrophoretic deposition (EPD) to achieve monolayer-by-monolayer deposition control over nanocrystal films with various degrees of internal order. Such work has the potential for the fabrication of industrial scale quantities and surface areas of these colloidal solids. Our recent research activities have demonstrated film formation with titanium dioxide nanoparticles and core/shell iron oxide nanoparticles. This research was partially supported by the United States Office of Naval Research, Award N000140910523, and the National Science Foundation (NSF), Awards DMR- 0757380 and CAREER DMR-1054161.

  1. Electrophoretic amylase fractionation as an aid in diagnosis of pancreatic disease.

    PubMed

    Legaz, M E; Kenny, M A

    1976-01-01

    Six alpha-amylase (EC 3.2.1.1) isoenzymes have been resolved electrophoretically on cellulose acetate membranes in a discontinuous buffer system. The fastest migrating isoenzymes are of salivary origin (S1, S2, S3), the slower ones of pancreatic origin (P1, P2, P3). We determined the amylase isoenzyme distribution in the sera of 240 subjects. A specific pancreatic isoenzyme (P3) was observed in all clinically diagnosed cases of acute or chronic pancreatitis as well as in 15 of 40 renal-transplant patients. Moreover, P3 isoenzyme activity declined during apparent recovery from pancreatitis. The P2 isoenzyme appeared in 95% of all specimens, P1 in only 2%. The pancreatic isoenzymes were preferentially excreted in the urine of both renal-transplant patients and normal individuals. The major salivary isoenzyme, S1, was observed in 95% of all serum and urine samples; however, the S2 and S3 appeared less consistently. Our method is simple and rapid, and quite applicable for use in clinical evaluation of patients with pancreatitis or with certain nonpancreatic dysfunctions.

  2. Energy-efficiency testing activities of the Mobile Energy Laboratory - Semiannual Report: April 1, 1990, Through September 30, 1990

    SciTech Connect

    Parker, G.B.; Currie, J.W.

    1991-03-01

    This report summarizes energy-efficiency testing activities applying the Mobile Energy Laboratory (MEL) testing capabilities during the third and fourth quarters of fiscal year (FY) 1990. The MELs, developed by the US Department of Energy (DOE) Federal Energy Management Program (FEMP), are administered by Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) and the Naval Energy and Environmental Support Activity (NEESA) for energy testing and energy conservation program support functions at federal facilities. MELs are equipped for the on-site evaluation of energy use efficiency. The using agencies principally fund MEL applications, while DOE/FEMP funds program administration and capability enhancement activities. This report fulfills the requirements established in Section 8 of the MEL Use Plan (PNL-6861) for semiannual reporting on energy-efficiency testing activities using the MEL capabilities. The MEL Use Committee, formally established in 1989, developed the MEL Use Plan and meets semiannually to establish priorities for energy-efficient testing applications using the MEL capabilities. This report describes the testing, test results, and suggested courses of action.

  3. Structure of the active N-terminal domain of Ezrin. Conformational and mobility changes identify keystone interactions.

    PubMed

    Smith, William James; Nassar, Nicolas; Bretscher, Anthony; Cerione, Richard A; Karplus, P Andrew

    2003-02-14

    Ezrin is a member of the ERM (ezrin, radixin, moesin) family of proteins that cross-link the actin cytoskeleton to the plasma membrane and also may function in signaling cascades that regulate the assembly of actin stress fibers. Here, we report a crystal structure for the free (activated) FERM domain (residues 2-297) of recombinant human ezrin at 2.3 A resolution. Structural comparison among the dormant moesin FERM domain structure and the three known active FERM domain structures (radixin, moesin, and now ezrin) allows the clear definition of regions that undergo structural changes during activation. The key regions affected are residues 135-150 and 155-180 in lobe F2 and residues 210-214 and 235-267 in lobe F3. Furthermore, we show that a large increase in the mobilities of lobes F2 and F3 accompanies activation, suggesting that their integrity is compromised. This leads us to propose a new concept that we refer to as keystone interactions. Keystone interactions occur when one protein (or protein part) contributes residues that allow another protein to complete folding, meaning that it becomes an integral part of the structure and would rarely dissociate. Such interactions are well suited for long-lived cytoskeletal protein interactions. The keystone interactions concept leads us to predict two specific docking sites within lobes F2 and F3 that are likely to bind target proteins.

  4. The role of chemokine activation of Rac GTPases in hematopoietic stem cell marrow homing, retention, and peripheral mobilization.

    PubMed

    Cancelas, Jose A; Jansen, Michael; Williams, David A

    2006-08-01

    Signaling downstream from the chemokine receptor CXCR4, the tyrosine kinase receptor c-kit and beta1-integrins has been shown to be crucial in the regulation of migration, homing, and engraftment of hematopoietic stem cells and progenitors. Each of these receptors signal through Rac-type Rho guanosine triphosphatases (GTPases). Rac GTPases play a major role in the organization of the actin cytoskeleton and also in the control of gene expression and the activation of proliferation and survival pathways. Here we review the specific roles of the members of the Rac subfamily of the Rho GTPase family in regulating the intracellular signaling of hematopoietic cells responsible for regulation of homing, marrow retention, and peripheral mobilization.

  5. The active gene that encodes human High Mobility Group 1 protein (HMG1) contains introns and maps to chromosome 13

    SciTech Connect

    Ferrari, S.; Finelli, P.; Rocchi, M.

    1996-07-15

    The human genome contains a large number of sequences related to the cDNA for High Mobility Group 1 protein (HMG1), which so far has hampered the cloning and mapping of the active HMG1 gene. We show that the human HMG1 gene contains introns, while the HMG1-related sequences do not and most likely are retrotransposed pseudogenes. We identified eight YACs from the ICI and CEPH libraries that contain the human HMG1 gene. The HMG1 gene is similar in structure to the previously characterized murine homologue and maps to human chromosome 13 and q12, as determined by in situ hybridization. The mouse Hmg1 gene maps to the telomeric region of murine Chromosome 5, which is syntenic to the human 13q12 band. 18 refs., 3 figs.

  6. Mobile internet service for self-management of physical activity in people with rheumatoid arthritis: evaluation of a test version

    PubMed Central

    Opava, Christina H; Ahlén, Henrik; Pettersson, Susanne; Åsenlöf, Pernilla

    2016-01-01

    Objectives Life-long adherence to health-enhancing physical activity (PA) is a major challenge for people with rheumatoid arthritis (RA). Our aim was to evaluate the utilisation of and experiences with a RA-specific, mobile internet PA support service, ‘tRAppen’, developed through a co-design process. Methods 28 participants with RA formed 3 web communities and tested tRAppen for 6 weeks. A mixed-method design was used to combine different types of data. Log data and questionnaire data were analysed quantitatively, while data from telephone interviews were analysed with a directed content analysis. Results 25 of the 28 participants used tRAppen. Log data indicated that a majority of them registered their PA, sent likes and posted comments to peers, set personal goals and made exercise plans. tRAppen was rated as easy and fun to use, and fairly informative and supportive for PA, and was highly recommended for people with RA. The interview analysis resulted in the following 6 categories describing the utilisation of and experiences with tRAppen: (1) experiences in general, (2) feasibility of features, (3) value as support for PA, (4) enjoyment, (5) ideas for improvements and (6) additional factors. Conclusions tRAppen is the first co-designed mobile internet service developed specifically for the self-management of PA in people with RA. The results are promising and indicate that tRAppen may be useful for supporting a physically active lifestyle in a subpopulation at certain risk of poor health. It will now be revised, launched and continuously updated in an iterative process involving its future users. PMID:27099777

  7. MOBILIZATION OF ENDOCRINE DISRUPTING CHEMICALS AND ESTROGENIC ACTIVITY IN SIMULATED RAINFALL RUNOFF FROM LAND-APPLIED BIOSOLIDS

    PubMed Central

    Giudice, Ben D.; Young, Thomas M.

    2012-01-01

    Municipal biosolids are commonly applied to land as soil amendment or fertilizer as a form of beneficial reuse of what could otherwise be viewed as waste. Balanced against this benefit are potential risks to groundwater and surface water quality from constituents that may be mobilized during storm events. The objective of the present study was to characterize the mobilization of selected endocrine disrupting compounds (EDCs), heavy metals, and total estrogenic activity in rainfall runoff from land-applied biosolids. Rainfall simulations were conducted on soil plots amended with biosolids. Surface runoff and leachate was collected and analyzed for the EDCs bisphenol A, 17α-ethynylestradiol, triclocarban, triclosan, octylphenol, and nonylphenol; a suite of sixteen metals; and estrogenic activity via the ER-CALUX bioassay. Triclocarban (2.3–17.3 ng/L), triclosan (<51–309 ng/L), and octylphenol (<4.9–203 ng/L) were commonly detected. Chromium (2.0–22 µg/L), cobalt (2.5–10 µg/L), nickel (28–235 µg/L), copper (14–110 µg/L), arsenic (1.2–2.7 µg/L), and selenium (0.29–12 µg/L) were quantifiable over background levels. Triclosan, nickel, and copper were detected at levels that might pose some risk to aquatic life, though levels of metals in the biosolids were well below maximum allowable regulatory limits. ER-CALUX results were mostly explained by background bisphenol A contamination and octylphenol in runoff, though unknown contributors and/or matrix effects were also found. PMID:21786314

  8. Hand, belt, pocket or bag: Practical activity tracking with mobile phones

    PubMed Central

    Antos, Stephen A.; Albert, Mark V.; Kording, Konrad P.

    2013-01-01

    For rehabilitation and diagnoses, an understanding of patient activities and movements is important. Modern smartphones have built in accelerometers which promise to enable quantifying minute-by-minute what patients do (e.g. walk or sit). Such a capability could inform recommendations of physical activities and improve medical diagnostics. However, a major problem is that during everyday life, we carry our phone in different ways, e.g. on our belt, in our pocket, in our hand, or in a bag. The recorded accelerations are not only affected by our activities but also by the phone’s location. Here we develop a method to solve this kind of problem, based on the intuition that activities change rarely, and phone locations change even less often. A Hidden Markov Model (HMM) tracks changes across both activities and locations, enabled by a static Support Vector Machine (SVM) classifier that probabilistically identifies activity-location pairs. We find that this approach improves tracking accuracy on healthy subjects as compared to a static classifier alone. The obtained method can be readily applied to patient populations. Our research enables the use of phones as activity tracking devices, without the need of previous approaches to instruct subjects to always carry the phone in the same location. PMID:24091138

  9. Microbiological Analysis of an Active Pilot-Scale Mobile Bioreactor Treating Organic Contaminants

    SciTech Connect

    Brigmon, R.L.

    1997-11-26

    Samples were obtained for microbiological analysis from a granular activated carbon fluidized bed bioreactor (GAC-FBR). This GAC-FBR was in operation at a former manufactured gas plant (MGP) Site in Augusta Georgia for in situ groundwater bioremediation of organics. The samples included contaminated site groundwater, GAC-FBR effluent, and biofilm coated granular activated carbon at 5, 9, and 13 feet within the GAC-FBR column. The objective of this analysis was to correlate contaminant removal with microbiological activity within the GAC-FBR.

  10. Assessment of habitual physical activity and paretic arm mobility among stroke survivors by accelerometry.

    PubMed

    Green, Liza B

    2007-01-01

    A major goal for many stroke survivors is a return to ambulatory activities, but there is not much known about the physical activity profiles of stroke survivors. Improved function in the paretic arm is also a major goal of rehabilitation, but there are few good measures of daily arm use. Accelerometers are devices that measure body movements in terms of acceleration. Accelerometers have been found to be useful indicators of movement in a number of studies involving different patient populations. They are able to detect habitual physical activity levels in subjects with low levels or activity and altered gait patterns. Different systems of multiple accelerometers have been used successfully to detect arm usage in individuals with hemiparesis from stroke, as well as with other disabilities that affect the upper extremities.

  11. Increasing Physical Activity Efficiently: An Experimental Pilot Study of a Website and Mobile Phone Intervention

    PubMed Central

    Vittersø, Joar; Svendsen, Gunnvald Bendix

    2014-01-01

    The main objective of this pilot study was to test the effectiveness of an online, interactive physical activity intervention that also incorporated gaming components. The intervention design included an activity planner, progress monitoring, and gamification components and used SMS text as a secondary delivery channel and feedback to improve engagement in the intervention content. Healthy adults (n = 21) recruited through ads in local newspapers (age 35–73) were randomized to the intervention or the control condition. Both groups reported physical activity using daily report forms in four registration weeks during the three-month study: only the experiment condition received access to the intervention. Analyses showed that the intervention group had significantly more minutes of physical activity in weeks five and nine. We also found a difference in the intensity of exercise in week five. Although the intervention group reported more minutes of physical activity at higher intensity levels, we were not able to find a significant effect at the end of the study period. In conclusion, this study adds to the research on the effectiveness of using the Internet and SMS text messages for delivering physical activity interventions and supports gamification as a viable intervention tool. PMID:24963290

  12. Increasing physical activity efficiently: an experimental pilot study of a website and mobile phone intervention.

    PubMed

    Thorsteinsen, Kjærsti; Vittersø, Joar; Svendsen, Gunnvald Bendix

    2014-01-01

    The main objective of this pilot study was to test the effectiveness of an online, interactive physical activity intervention that also incorporated gaming components. The intervention design included an activity planner, progress monitoring, and gamification components and used SMS text as a secondary delivery channel and feedback to improve engagement in the intervention content. Healthy adults (n = 21) recruited through ads in local newspapers (age 35-73) were randomized to the intervention or the control condition. Both groups reported physical activity using daily report forms in four registration weeks during the three-month study: only the experiment condition received access to the intervention. Analyses showed that the intervention group had significantly more minutes of physical activity in weeks five and nine. We also found a difference in the intensity of exercise in week five. Although the intervention group reported more minutes of physical activity at higher intensity levels, we were not able to find a significant effect at the end of the study period. In conclusion, this study adds to the research on the effectiveness of using the Internet and SMS text messages for delivering physical activity interventions and supports gamification as a viable intervention tool.

  13. Alternating Current Electrophoretic Deposition for the Immobilization of Antimicrobial Agents on Titanium Implant Surfaces.

    PubMed

    Braem, Annabel; De Brucker, Katrijn; Delattin, Nicolas; Killian, Manuela S; Roeffaers, Maarten B J; Yoshioka, Tomohiko; Hayakawa, Satoshi; Schmuki, Patrik; Cammue, Bruno P A; Virtanen, Sannakaisa; Thevissen, Karin; Neirinck, Bram

    2017-03-15

    One prominent cause of implant failure is infection; therefore, research is focusing on developing surface coatings that render the surface resistant to colonization by micro-organisms. Permanently attached coatings of antimicrobial molecules are of particular interest because of the reduced cytoxicity and lower risk of developing resistance compared to controlled release coatings. In this study, we focus on the chemical grafting of bioactive molecules on titanium. To concentrate the molecules at the metallic implant surface, we propose electrophoretic deposition (EPD) applying alternating current (AC) signals with an asymmetrical wave shape. We show that for the model molecule bovine serum albumin (BSA), as well as for the clinically relevant antifungal lipopeptide caspofungin (CASP), the deposition yield is drastically improved by superimposing a DC offset in the direction of the high-amplitude peak of the AC signal. Additionally, in order to produce immobilized CASP coatings, this experimental AC/DC-EPD method is combined with an established surface activation protocol. Principle component analysis (PCA) of time-of-flight secondary ion mass spectrometry (ToF-SIMS) data confirm the immobilization of CASP with higher yield as compared to a diffusion-controlled process, and higher purity than the clinical CASP starting suspensions. Scratch testing data indicate good coating adhesion. Importantly, the coatings remain active against the fungal pathogen C. albicans as shown by in vitro biofilm experiments. In summary, this paper delivers a proof-of-concept for the application of AC-EPD as a fast grafting tool for antimicrobial molecules without compromising their activities.

  14. Electrical characterization of electrophoretically coated aluminum samples for photovoltaic concentrator application

    SciTech Connect

    Sugimura, R.S.; Mon, G.R.; Ross, R.G. Jr.

    1992-10-01

    The practicality of using a thin-film styrene/acrylate copolymer electrophoretic coating to isolate concentrator cells electrically from their surroundings in a photovoltaic concentrator module is assessed. Only the electrical isolation problem was investigated. The approach was to subject various types of EP-coated aluminum specimens to electrical stress testing and to aging tests while monitoring coating electrical resistivity properties. It was determined that, in general, longer processing times--i.e., thicker electrophoretic layers--resulted in better voltage-withstand properties. In particular, a two-minute processing time seemed sufficient to provide the electrical isolation required in photovoltaic concentrator application applications. Even though electrophoretic coatings did not seem to fill voids in porous-anodized aluminum substrates, breakdown voltages generally exceeded hi-pot pass-fail voltage levels with a comfortable margin. 6 refs, 11 figs, 5 tabs.

  15. Nonlinear electrophoretic response yields a unique parameter for separation of biomolecules

    PubMed Central

    Pel, Joel; Broemeling, David; Mai, Laura; Poon, Hau-Ling; Tropini, Giorgia; Warren, René L.; Holt, Robert A.; Marziali, Andre

    2009-01-01

    We demonstrate a unique parameter for biomolecule separation that results from the nonlinear response of long, charged polymers to electrophoretic fields and apply it to extraction and concentration of nucleic acids from samples that perform poorly under conventional methods. Our method is based on superposition of synchronous, time-varying electrophoretic fields, which can generate net drift of charged molecules even when the time-averaged molecule displacement generated by each field individually is zero. Such drift can only occur for molecules, such as DNA, whose motive response to electrophoretic fields is nonlinear. Consequently, we are able to concentrate DNA while rejecting high concentrations of contaminants. We demonstrate one application of this method by extracting DNA from challenging samples originating in the Athabasca oil sands. PMID:19706437

  16. Electrophoretic separation techniques and their hyphenation to mass spectrometry in biological inorganic chemistry.

    PubMed

    Holtkamp, Hannah; Grabmann, Gerlinde; Hartinger, Christian G

    2016-04-01

    Electrophoretic methods have been widely applied in research on the roles of metal complexes in biological systems. In particular, CE, often hyphenated to a sensitive MS detector, has provided valuable information on the modes of action of metal-based pharmaceuticals, and more recently new methods have been added to the electrophoretic toolbox. The range of applications continues to expand as a result of enhanced CE-to-MS interfacing, with sensitivity often at picomolar level, and evolved separation modes allowing for innovative sample analysis. This article is a followup to previous reviews about CE methods in metallodrug research (Electrophoresis, 2003, 24, 2023-2037; Electrophoresis, 2007, 28, 3436-3446; Electrophoresis, 2012, 33, 622-634), also providing a comprehensive overview of metal species studied by electrophoretic methods hyphenated to MS. It highlights the latest CE developments, takes a sneak peek into gel electrophoresis, traces biomolecule labeling, and focuses on the importance of early-stage drug development.

  17. Limitation of activities of daily living accompanying reduced neck mobility after laminoplasty preserving or reattaching the semispinalis cervicis into axis.

    PubMed

    Takeuchi, Kazunari; Yokoyama, Toru; Ono, Atsushi; Numasawa, Takuya; Wada, Kanichiro; Itabashi, Taito; Toh, Satoshi

    2008-03-01

    Although difficulties with neck mobility often interfere with patients' activities of daily living (ADL) after cervical laminoplasty, there was no detailed study on the relation between the limitations of ADL accompanying postoperative reduced neck mobility and the cervical posterior approach. The aim of this study was to compare retrospectively the frequency of limitations of ADL accompanying neck mobility after laminoplasty preserving the semispinalis cervicis inserted into the C2 spinous process with that after laminoplasty reattaching the muscle to C2. Forty-nine patients after C4-C7 laminoplasty with C3 laminectomy preserving the semispinalis cervicis inserted into C2 (Group A) and 24 patients after C3-C7 laminoplasty reattaching the muscle (Group B) were evaluated. The frequency of postoperative limitations of ADL accompanying each of three neck movements of extension, flexion and rotation were investigated. The postoperative O-C7 angles at extension and flexion was measured on lateral extension and flexion radiographs of the cervical spine, respectively. The postoperative cervical range of motion in rotation was measured in the cranial view using a digital camera. Frequency of limitations of ADL accompanying extension was lower (P = 0.037) in Group A (2%) than in Group B (17%). Frequency of limitations of ADL accompanying flexion was similar in Group A (8%) and Group B (4%). Frequency of limitations of ADL accompanying rotation was lower (P = 0.031) in Group A (12%) than in Group B (33%). Average O-C7 angle at extension was significantly larger (P = 0.002) in Group A (147 degrees ) than in Group B (136 degrees ). Average O-C7 angle at flexion was similar in Group A (93 degrees ) and Group B (91 degrees ). Average range of motion in rotation was significantly larger (P = 0.004) in Group A (110 degrees ) than in Group B (91 degrees ). This retrospective study suggested that the frequency of limitations of ADL accompanying neck extension or rotation was lower

  18. Involvement of a high-mobility-group protein in the transcriptional activity of herpes simplex virus latency-active promoter 2.

    PubMed Central

    French, S W; Schmidt, M C; Glorioso, J C

    1996-01-01

    Latency-active promoter 2 (LAP 2) is a TATA-less promoter in herpes simplex virus type 1 (HSV-1) that can express genes during viral latency. Four regions of LAP2 are protected from DNase I digestion in vitro by either HeLa cell nuclear extracts or purified Sp1. Transient gene expression assays of LAP2 substitution mutants demonstrate that two of the regions protected by Sp1 and three other regions protected by nuclear extract are important for promoter function. The mutation causing the most significant reduction in expression alters a stretch of 23 thymidine residues (T23) that binds a protein with several properties common to high-mobility-group (HMG) proteins. The T23 binding activity is heat stable, can be inhibited by poly(dA-dT).poly(dA-dT), and is inhibited by minor-groove-binding drugs. Antiserum directed against HMG I(Y) blocked the formation of one of the DNA-protein complexes on the T23 oligonucleotide, suggesting that a protein antigenically related to HMG I(Y) binds to LAP2 in vitro. Direct evidence of HMG I(Y) involvement in LAP2 function is provided by the findings that recombinant HMG I(Y) protein facilitates Sp1 binding to LAP2 in mobility shift assays and that antisense HMG I(Y) RNA specifically inhibits LAP2 function in vivo. These results suggest that DNA structure may be an important determinant of the activity of a promoter that is capable of escaping the global shutoff of transcription that occurs during viral latency. PMID:8816451

  19. Active Social Policy Meets the Discipline of the Australian Marketplace: The Outcomes of Mobile Policies

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zoellner, Don

    2016-01-01

    Many advanced market democracies pursue social justice by bundling together a range of programmes represented as active social policy. Northern European exemplars sanction employment as an economic and social citizen's civic obligation, promote lifelong learning and place welfare payments as a last resort. In the United States, market-based…

  20. [Development of a semi-autonomous mobile robot for reactor containments]. 1992 annual summary of activity

    SciTech Connect

    Wehe, D.K.

    1993-02-10

    The University of Michigan reports its progress on this project on a bimonthly or quarterly reporting frequency. As a result, the detailed annual summary of activity is derived from the integration of these progress reports. They are attached here to form a permanent record of the University`s contribution to this program.

  1. Electrophoretic deposition onto an insulator for thin film preparation toward electronic device fabrication

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miyajima, Shougo; Nagamatsu, Shuichi; Pandey, Shyam S.; Hayase, Shuzi; Kaneto, Keiichi; Takashima, Wataru

    2012-11-01

    An electrostatic film fabrication method utilizing the dielectric layer, entitled dielectric barrier electrophoretic deposition (DBEPD) has been proposed. We demonstrated the fabrication of uniform organic semiconductor thin film onto any kind of substrate by DBEPD. Optical absorption spectra of colloidal poly(3-hexylthiophene) (P3HT) film prepared by DBEPD exhibited the clear vibrational structure attributed to highly ordered domains. It was in contrast to the relatively disordered structure as shown in the case of P3HT film prepared by conventional electrophoretic deposition (EPD). Organic field effect transistors fabricated by each method showed similar organic field effect transistor characteristics, however, the uniformity of DBEPD film was superior to EPD film.

  2. Electrophoretic deposition of hyaluronic acid and composite films for biomedical applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ma, R.; Li, Y.; Zhitomirsky, I.

    2010-06-01

    Hyaluronic acid (HYH) is a natural biopolymer, which has tremendous potential for various biomedical applications. Electrophoretic deposition (EPD) methods have been developed for the fabrication of HYH films and composites. New methods for the immobilization of drugs and proteins have been utilized for the fabrication of organic composites. Electrophoretic deposition enabled the fabrication of organic-inorganic composites containing bioceramics and bioglass in the HYH matrix. It was shown that the deposition yield, microstructure, and composition of the films can be controlled. Potential applications of EPD for the surface modification of biomedical implants and fabrication of biosensors are highlighted.

  3. Polyacrylamide gel electrophoretic methods in the separation of structural muscle proteins.

    SciTech Connect

    Barany, K.; Barany, M.; Giometti, C. S.; Center for Mechanistic Biology and Biotechnology; Univ. of Illinois at Chicago

    1995-04-28

    Polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis plays a major role in analyzing the function of muscle structural proteins. This review describes one- and two-dimensional gel electrophoretic methods for qualitative and quantitative investigation of the muscle proteins, with special emphasis on determination of protein phosphorylation. The electrophoretic studies established the subunit structures of the muscle proteins, characterized their multiple forms, revealed changes in subunit composition or shifts in isoform distribution of specific proteins during development, upon stimulation or denervation of the muscle. Protein phosphorylation during muscle contraction is preferentially studied by two-dimensional gel electrophoresis. The same method demonstrated protein alterations in human neuromuscular diseases.

  4. Alternating-current electrophoretic adhesion of biodegradable hydrogel utilizing intermediate polymers.

    PubMed

    Asoh, Taka-Aki; Kawai, Wataru; Kikuchi, Akihiko

    2014-11-01

    The adhesion of anionic charged biodegradable hydrogels each other utilizing oppositely charged water-soluble polymers as a binder has been achieved by applying alternating-current (AC) electric fields. The two gelatin based dextran sulfate gels (DS gels) were molecularly sutured together by AC electrophoretic adhesion when cationic charged quaternary ammonium chitosan (TMC) was applied between and held in contact with the two DS gels. The adhesive strength of the gels increased with increasing periodicity when a square wave was applied. Hydrogel constructs composed of DS microgels were prepared simply by AC electrophoretic adhesion utilizing intermediate TMC.

  5. Advancement in Preparation of Hydroxyapatite/bioglass Graded Coatings by Electrophoretic Deposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yao, Liang; Chen, Chuanzhong; Wang, Diangang; Bao, Quanhe; Ma, Jie

    Electrophoretic deposition is a good method in the preparation of hydroxyapatite/bioglass graded coatings. Its processing parameters are easy to be operated. As it is nonbeeline process, it can be used in the deposition of complex shape and porous surface. This paper reviewed the advancement of the graded coatings in recent years, concluded the principles, characters, steps of electrophoretic deposition of bioceramic coatings and analyzed influencing factors in detail, such as granularity of suspension, aging of suspension, dispersion media, PH of suspension, electricity, voltage, deposition time, pretreatment of substrate and sintering. The foreground of hydroxyapatite/bioglass graded coatings is expected.

  6. Electrophoretic deposition of graphene oxide as a corrosion inhibitor for sintered NdFeB

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    He, Wenting; Zhu, Liqun; Chen, Haining; Nan, Haiyang; Li, Weiping; Liu, Huicong; Wang, Yan

    2013-08-01

    Graphene oxide (GO) was deposited uniformly on the surface of permanent magnet material NdFeB by electrophoretic deposition (EPD). Electrophoretic deposited graphene oxide (EPD-GO) coating was reduced partially after EPD process, owing to the removal of oxygen functional groups. And EPD-GO coating showed excellent adhesion to the NdFeB matrix. According to the results of electrochemical tests, the decrease in corrosion current density and the positive shift in corrosion potential have both demonstrated that EPD-GO coating served as a corrosion inhibitor, protecting NdFeB from NaCl aqueous solution.

  7. Conceptualization and measurement of environmental exposure in epidemiology: accounting for activity space related to daily mobility.

    PubMed

    Perchoux, Camille; Chaix, Basile; Cummins, Steven; Kestens, Yan

    2013-05-01

    A considerable body of literature has investigated how environmental exposures affect health through various pathways. These studies have generally adopted a common approach to define environmental exposures, focusing on the local residential environment, using census tracts or postcodes to delimit exposures. However, use of such administrative units may not be appropriate to evaluate contextual effets on health because they are generally not a 'true' representation of the environments to which individuals are exposed. Recent work has suggested that advances may be made if an activity-space approach is adopted. The present paper investigates how various disciplines may contribute to the refinement of the concept of activity space for use in health research. In particular we draw on seminal work in time geography, which provides a framework to describe individual behavior in space and time, and can help the conceptualization of activity space. In addition we review work in environmental psychology and social networks research, which provides insights on how people and places interact and offers new theories for improving the spatial definition of contextual exposures.

  8. Relationship of phosphatidylinositol bisphosphate hydrolysis to calcium mobilization and functional activation in fluoride-treated neutrophils.

    PubMed Central

    English, D; Debono, D J; Gabig, T G

    1987-01-01

    Sodium fluoride (20 mM) effected rapid hydrolysis of phosphatidylinositol bisphosphate (PIP2) in human neutrophils. Intracellular free Ca2+ levels increased after PIP2 hydrolysis but before respiratory burst activation. Both the increase in intracellular free Ca2+ levels and the extent of functional activation were dependent on the availability of extracellular Ca2+. The rate of F(-)-stimulated PIP2 hydrolysis, however, was not affected when the rise in cytosolic Ca2+ was severely limited by depletion of extracellular Ca2+. Fluoride caused the specific hydrolysis of PIP2 in isolated neutrophil plasma membranes. This effect occurred in the presence of low levels of available Ca2+ and was accompanied by the release of inositol phosphates. We conclude that PIP2 hydrolysis is an early event in the response of neutrophils to F-. This response is not Ca2+-regulated but may lead to an influx of Ca2+ from the extracellular medium. Activation of a PIP2-specific phospholipase independent of a change in cytosolic free Ca2+ levels may be the initial event in the stimulus-response pathway triggered by fluoride. PMID:3036911

  9. Relationship of phosphatidylinositol bisphosphate hydrolysis to calcium mobilization and functional activation in fluoride-treated neutrophils.

    PubMed

    English, D; Debono, D J; Gabig, T G

    1987-07-01

    Sodium fluoride (20 mM) effected rapid hydrolysis of phosphatidylinositol bisphosphate (PIP2) in human neutrophils. Intracellular free Ca2+ levels increased after PIP2 hydrolysis but before respiratory burst activation. Both the increase in intracellular free Ca2+ levels and the extent of functional activation were dependent on the availability of extracellular Ca2+. The rate of F(-)-stimulated PIP2 hydrolysis, however, was not affected when the rise in cytosolic Ca2+ was severely limited by depletion of extracellular Ca2+. Fluoride caused the specific hydrolysis of PIP2 in isolated neutrophil plasma membranes. This effect occurred in the presence of low levels of available Ca2+ and was accompanied by the release of inositol phosphates. We conclude that PIP2 hydrolysis is an early event in the response of neutrophils to F-. This response is not Ca2+-regulated but may lead to an influx of Ca2+ from the extracellular medium. Activation of a PIP2-specific phospholipase independent of a change in cytosolic free Ca2+ levels may be the initial event in the stimulus-response pathway triggered by fluoride.

  10. Retinal ligand mobility explains internal hydration and reconciles active rhodopsin structures.

    PubMed

    Leioatts, Nicholas; Mertz, Blake; Martínez-Mayorga, Karina; Romo, Tod D; Pitman, Michael C; Feller, Scott E; Grossfield, Alan; Brown, Michael F

    2014-01-21

    Rhodopsin, the mammalian dim-light receptor, is one of the best-characterized G-protein-coupled receptors, a pharmaceutically important class of membrane proteins that has garnered a great deal of attention because of the recent availability of structural information. Yet the mechanism of rhodopsin activation is not fully understood. Here, we use microsecond-scale all-atom molecular dynamics simulations, validated by solid-state (2)H nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy, to understand the transition between the dark and metarhodopsin I (Meta I) states. Our analysis of these simulations reveals striking differences in ligand flexibility between the two states. Retinal is much more dynamic in Meta I, adopting an elongated conformation similar to that seen in the recent activelike crystal structures. Surprisingly, this elongation corresponds to both a dramatic influx of bulk water into the hydrophobic core of the protein and a concerted transition in the highly conserved Trp265(6.48) residue. In addition, enhanced ligand flexibility upon light activation provides an explanation for the different retinal orientations observed in X-ray crystal structures of active rhodopsin.

  11. Mobile Apps for Librarians

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Power, June L.

    2013-01-01

    In an increasing mobile environment, library and reading-related activities often take place on a phone or tablet device. Not only does this mean that library Web sites must keep mobile navigability in mind, but also develop and utilize apps that allow patrons to interact with information and with libraries. While apps do not serve every purpose,…

  12. Measurement and Intervention on Physical Activity and Sedentary Behaviors in Bariatric Surgery Patients: Emphasis on Mobile Technology

    PubMed Central

    Bond, Dale S.; Thomas, J. Graham

    2015-01-01

    Physical activity (PA) and sedentary behaviors (SB—i.e. activities involving low energy expenditure and a sitting/reclining posture) may each have significant implications for weight loss and other bariatric surgery outcomes. While early studies suggested that patients typically comply with clinical recommendations to adopt habitual PA, these data were based on retrospective questionnaires. Conversely, recent studies incorporating mobile health (mHealth) technologies (e.g., objective monitors), which assess PA and SB in real-time and in the natural environment, show that most patients are inactive and highly sedentary preoperatively, and only make modest changes in these behaviors postoperatively. In addition to using mHealth technologies for obtaining accurate and detailed information on PA and SB, they are increasingly being employed to intervene on patients’ PA and SB and/or evaluate intervention outcomes. Researchers and clinicians are encouraged to consider the benefits of using mHealth technology when studying and treating PA and SB in bariatric surgery patients. PMID:26331982

  13. Measurement and Intervention on Physical Activity and Sedentary Behaviours in Bariatric Surgery Patients: Emphasis on Mobile Technology.

    PubMed

    Bond, Dale S; Thomas, J Graham

    2015-11-01

    Physical activity (PA) and sedentary behaviours (SB-i.e. activities involving low-energy expenditure and a sitting/reclining posture) may each have significant implications for weight loss and other bariatric surgery outcomes. While early studies suggested that patients typically comply with clinical recommendations to adopt habitual PA, these data were based on retrospective questionnaires. Conversely, recent studies incorporating mobile health (mHealth) technologies (e.g. objective monitors), which assess PA and SB in real time and in the natural environment, show that most patients are inactive and highly sedentary pre-operatively and only make modest changes in these behaviours postoperatively. In addition to using mHealth technologies for obtaining accurate and detailed information on PA and SB, they are increasingly being employed to intervene on patients' PA and SB and/or evaluate intervention outcomes. Researchers and clinicians are encouraged to consider the benefits of using mHealth technology when studying and treating PA and SB in bariatric surgery patients.

  14. Antihypertensive use and the effect of a physical activity intervention in the prevention of major mobility disability among older adults: The LIFE study

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    BACKGROUND: This subgroup analysis of the Lifestyle Intervention and Independence for Elders trial evaluates the impact of a long-term physical activity (PA) intervention on rates of major mobility disability (MMD) among older adults according to their antihypertensive medication use. METHODS: Lifes...

  15. Electrophoretic Deposition of Carbon Nanotubes over TiO2 Nanotubes: Evaluation of Surface Properties and Biocompatibility

    PubMed Central

    Park, Jung Eun; Park, Il Song; Bae, Tae Sung; Lee, Min Ho

    2014-01-01

    Titanium (Ti) is often used as an orthopedic and dental implant material due to its better mechanical properties, corrosion resistance, and excellent biocompatibility. Formation of TiO2 nanotubes (TiO2 NTs) on titanium is an interesting surface modification to achieve controlled drug delivery and to promote cell growth. Carbon nanotubes (CNTs) possess excellent chemical durability and mechanical strength. The use of CNTs in biomedical applications such as scaffolds has received considerable attention in recent years. The present study aims to modify the surface of titanium by anodizing to form TiO2 NTs and subsequently deposit CNTs over it by electrophoretic deposition (EPD). Characteristic, biocompatibility, and apatite forming ability of the surface modified samples were evaluated. The results of the study reveal that CNTs coating on TiO2 nanotubes help improve the biological activity and this type of surface modification is highly suitable for biomedical applications. PMID:25093017

  16. The high mobility group box 1 protein of Sciaenops ocellatus is a secreted cytokine that stimulates macrophage activation.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Lu; Hu, Yong-Hua; Sun, Jin-Sheng; Sun, Li

    2011-10-01

    High mobility group box 1 protein (HMGB1) is a chromatin-associated nonhistone protein that is involved in nucleosome formation and transcriptional regulation. In addition, HMGB1 is also known as an extracellular cytokine that triggers inflammation and immune responses. HMGB1-like sequences have been identified in a number of fish species, however, the function of piscine HMGB1 remains uninvestigated. In this study, we reported the identification and analysis of SoHMGB1, an HMGB1 homologue from red drum (Sciaenops ocellatus). SoHMGB1 is 206 residues in length and contains two basic HMG boxes and a highly acidic C-terminal domain. SoHMGB1 shares 71-87% overall sequence identities with the HMGB1 counterparts from human, rat, and several fish species. Quantitative real time RT-PCR analysis showed that constitutive SoHMGB1 expression was detected in various tissues, with the lowest and highest levels found in kidney and muscle respectively. Bacterial challenge upregulated SoHMGB1 expression in head kidney (HK) and HK macrophages and induced extracellular secretion of SoHMGB1 by the activated macrophages. Recombinant SoHMGB1 (rSoHMGB1) purified from yeast exhibited no direct antimicrobial effect but was significantly stimulatory on the proliferation, activation, and bactericidal activity of HK macrophages. Taken together, these results indicate for the first time that a fish HMGB1, SoHMGB1, can function as a secreted cytokine in the event of bacterial infection and promote innate defense through the activation of macrophages.

  17. Subjective evaluation of an active crosstalk reduction system for mobile autostereoscopic displays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chappuis, Alexandre; Rerabek, Martin; Hanhart, Philippe; Ebrahimi, Touradj

    2014-03-01

    The Quality of Experience (QoE) provided by autostereoscopic 3D displays strongly depends on the user position. For an optimal image quality, the observer should be located at one of the relevant positions, called sweet spots, where artifacts reducing the QoE, such as crosstalk, are minimum. In this paper, we propose and evaluate a complete active crosstalk reduction system running on an HTC EVO 3D smartphone. To determine the crosstalk level at each position, a full display characterization was performed. Based on the user position and crosstalk profile, the system first helps the user to find the sweet spot using visual feedback. If the user moves away from the sweet spot, then the active crosstalk compensation is performed and reverse stereo phenomenon is corrected. The user preference between standard 2D and 3D modes, and the proposed system was evaluated through a subjective quality assessment. Results show that in terms of depth perception, the proposed system clearly outperforms the 3D and 2D modes. In terms of image quality, 2D mode was found to be best, but the proposed system outperforms 3D mode.

  18. Reusable electrical activity of the heart monitoring patch for mobile/ubiquitous healthcare.

    PubMed

    Lee, Jeong-Whan; Lee, Kang-Hwi; Lee, Young-Jae; Hong, Lee-Yon; Kim, Dong-Jun; Kim, Kyeong-Seop; Lee, Bongsoo; Lee, Myoungho

    2009-02-01

    In order to monitor electrical activity of the heart during daily life, we present an electrode of a medical instrument system which is able to measure the body surface potential difference by minimizing the electrode distance. The designed electrode is composed of concentric circles. It was made from the basis of the Laplacian equation, and implemented on PCB coated with gold. So that it does not cause the uncomfortable feeling of contact and possible skin troubles which are typical shortcoming of the conventional ECG measurement. The suggested method utilized three concentric circles on FR-4 substrate, so new amplifier design regarding measuring of small biological signal, is considered which has the characteristics of asymmetric input impedance since the area of concentric circular ring electrodes is not identical. Thereby, electrical activity of the heart was obtained successfully. However, its signal quality is a little bit degraded and the motion artifact still remains as a major problem as is in conventional electrocardiography measurement. Certainly stable measurement setup was needed to reduce the motion artifact originated from variation in static electricity between skin and electrode interfaces.

  19. Association between physical activity levels and physiological factors underlying mobility in young, middle-aged and older individuals living in a city district.

    PubMed

    Laudani, Luca; Vannozzi, Giuseppe; Sawacha, Zimi; della Croce, Ugo; Cereatti, Andrea; Macaluso, Andrea

    2013-01-01

    Maintaining adequate levels of physical activity is known to preserve health status and functional independence as individuals grow older. However, the relationship between determinants of physical activity (volume and intensity) and physiological factors underlying mobility (cardio-respiratory fitness, neuromuscular function and functional abilities) is still unclear. The aim of this study was to investigate the association between objectively quantified physical activity and a spectrum of physiological factors underlying mobility in young, middle-aged and older individuals living in a city district. Experiments were carried out on 24 young (28 ± 2 years), 24 middle-aged (48 ± 2 years) and 24 older (70 ± 3 years) gender-matched volunteers. Physical activity was monitored by a wearable activity monitor to quantify volume and intensity of overall physical activity and selected habitual activities over 24 hours. Ventilatory threshold was assessed during an incremental cycling test. Torque, muscle fiber conduction velocity and agonist-antagonist coactivation were measured during maximal voluntary contraction of knee extensors and flexors. Ground reaction forces were measured during sit-to-stand and counter-movement jump. K-means cluster analysis was used to classify the participants' physical activity levels based on parameters of volume and intensity. Two clusters of physical activity volume (i.e., high and low volume) and three clusters of physical activity intensity (i.e. high, medium and low intensity) were identified in all participants. Cardio-respiratory fitness was associated with volume of overall physical activity as well as lying, sitting, standing, walking and stair climbing. On the other hand, neuromuscular function and functional abilities showed a significant association with intensity of overall physical activity as well as postural transition, walking and stair climbing. As a practical application, the relative role played by volume and intensity

  20. Using Mobile Devices in Physical Education to Enhance Learning and Physical Activity for At-Risk Girls

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gibbone, Anne; Perez, Samantha L.; Virgilio, Stephen J.

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of the article is to illustrate how a physical education program uses mobile devices to motivate at-risk girls attending an urban charter school. Permitting students to use mobile devices in physical education gives students a "technological freedom" that has been removed in other contexts. The apps described in this article…