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Sample records for activity enables students

  1. How Does Technology-Enabled Active Learning Affect Undergraduate Students' Understanding of Electromagnetism Concepts?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dori, Yehudit Judy; Belcher, John

    2005-01-01

    Educational technology supports meaningful learning and enables the presentation of spatial and dynamic images, which portray relationships among complex concepts. The Technology-Enabled Active Learning (TEAL) Project at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT) involves media-rich software for simulation and visualization in freshman…

  2. The Impact of Technology-Enabled Active Learning (TEAL) Implementation on Student Learning and Teachers' Teaching in a High School Context

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shieh, Ruey S.

    2012-01-01

    Technology-Enabled Active Learning (TEAL) is a pedagogical innovation established in a technology-enhanced multimedia studio, emphasizing constructivist-oriented teaching and learning. In Taiwan, an increasing number of schools are adopting the TEAL notion to deliver courses. This study examines the impact of TEAL on both student performance and…

  3. ICT-Enabled Learning: The Student Perspective

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Scott, Geoff; Grebennikov, Leonid; Gozzard, Terry

    2009-01-01

    This research seeks to contribute to current discussions in Australian higher education on how best to deploy ICT-enabled learning. Its particular focus is on examining the qualitative data from students on their experience of using Information and Communication Technologies (ICT) at one college in an Australian university. In total, about 71,240…

  4. Enabling Students to Develop a Scientific Mindset

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kalman, Calvin

    2010-01-01

    This paper is centered on getting students to understand the nature of science (NOS) by considering historical material in relation to modern philosophers of science. This paper incorporates the methodology of contrasting cases in the calculus-based introductory physics course on optics and modern physics. Students study one philosopher all…

  5. Anatomy Drawing Screencasts: Enabling Flexible Learning for Medical Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pickering, James D.

    2015-01-01

    The traditional lecture remains an essential method of disseminating information to medical students. However, due to the constant development of the modern medical curriculum many institutions are embracing novel means for delivering the core anatomy syllabus. Using mobile media devices is one such way, enabling students to access core material…

  6. Anatomy drawing screencasts: enabling flexible learning for medical students.

    PubMed

    Pickering, James D

    2015-01-01

    The traditional lecture remains an essential method of disseminating information to medical students. However, due to the constant development of the modern medical curriculum many institutions are embracing novel means for delivering the core anatomy syllabus. Using mobile media devices is one such way, enabling students to access core material at a time and place that suits their specific learning style. This study has examined the effect of five anatomy drawing screencasts that replicate the popular anatomy drawing element of a lecture. These resources were uploaded to the University's Virtual Learning Environment for student access. Usage data and an end of module questionnaire were used to assess the impact of the screencasts on student education. The data revealed a high level of usage that varied in both the time of day and day of the week, with the number of downloads dramatically increasing towards the end of the module when the assessment was approaching. The student group found the additional resources extremely useful in consolidating information and revision, with many commenting on their preference to the screencasts compared to the more traditional approaches to learning. Scrutinizing the screencasts in relation to cognitive load theory and the cognitive theory of multimedia learning indicates a high correlation with an evidence-based approach to designing learning resources. Overall the screencasts have been a well-received enhancement that supports the student learning and has been shown to promote flexible learning.

  7. Glycosylation enables aesculin to activate Nrf2.

    PubMed

    Kim, Kyun Ha; Park, Hyunsu; Park, Hee Jin; Choi, Kyoung-Hwa; Sadikot, Ruxana T; Cha, Jaeho; Joo, Myungsoo

    2016-01-01

    Since aesculin, 6,7-dihydroxycoumarin-6-O-β-glucopyranoside, suppresses inflammation, we asked whether its anti-inflammatory activity is associated with the activation of nuclear factor-E2-related factor 2 (Nrf2), a key anti-inflammatory factor. Our results, however, show that aesculin marginally activated Nrf2. Since glycosylation can enhance the function of a compound, we then asked whether adding a glucose makes aesculin activate Nrf2. Our results show that the glycosylated aesculin, 3-O-β-d-glycosyl aesculin, robustly activated Nrf2, inducing the expression of Nrf2-dependent genes, such as heme oxygenase-1, glutamate-cysteine ligase catalytic subunit, and NAD(P)H quinone oxidoreductase 1 in macrophages. Mechanistically, 3-O-β-d-glycosyl aesculin suppressed ubiquitination of Nrf2, retarding degradation of Nrf2. Unlike aesculin, 3-O-β-d-glycosyl aesculin significantly suppressed neutrophilic lung inflammation, a hallmark of acute lung injury (ALI), in mice, which was not recapitulated in Nrf2 knockout mice, suggesting that the anti-inflammatory function of the compound largely acts through Nrf2. In a mouse model of sepsis, a major cause of ALI, 3-O-β-d-glycosyl aesculin significantly enhanced the survival of mice, compared with aesculin. Together, these results show that glycosylation could confer the ability to activate Nrf2 on aesculin, enhancing the anti-inflammatory function of aesculin. These results suggest that glycosylation can be a way to improve or alter the function of aesculin. PMID:27417293

  8. Glycosylation enables aesculin to activate Nrf2

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Kyun Ha; Park, Hyunsu; Park, Hee Jin; Choi, Kyoung-Hwa; Sadikot, Ruxana T.; Cha, Jaeho; Joo, Myungsoo

    2016-01-01

    Since aesculin, 6,7-dihydroxycoumarin-6-O-β-glucopyranoside, suppresses inflammation, we asked whether its anti-inflammatory activity is associated with the activation of nuclear factor-E2-related factor 2 (Nrf2), a key anti-inflammatory factor. Our results, however, show that aesculin marginally activated Nrf2. Since glycosylation can enhance the function of a compound, we then asked whether adding a glucose makes aesculin activate Nrf2. Our results show that the glycosylated aesculin, 3-O-β-d-glycosyl aesculin, robustly activated Nrf2, inducing the expression of Nrf2-dependent genes, such as heme oxygenase-1, glutamate-cysteine ligase catalytic subunit, and NAD(P)H quinone oxidoreductase 1 in macrophages. Mechanistically, 3-O-β-d-glycosyl aesculin suppressed ubiquitination of Nrf2, retarding degradation of Nrf2. Unlike aesculin, 3-O-β-d-glycosyl aesculin significantly suppressed neutrophilic lung inflammation, a hallmark of acute lung injury (ALI), in mice, which was not recapitulated in Nrf2 knockout mice, suggesting that the anti-inflammatory function of the compound largely acts through Nrf2. In a mouse model of sepsis, a major cause of ALI, 3-O-β-d-glycosyl aesculin significantly enhanced the survival of mice, compared with aesculin. Together, these results show that glycosylation could confer the ability to activate Nrf2 on aesculin, enhancing the anti-inflammatory function of aesculin. These results suggest that glycosylation can be a way to improve or alter the function of aesculin. PMID:27417293

  9. Modular System to Enable Extravehicular Activity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sargusingh, Miriam J.

    2012-01-01

    The ability to perform extravehicular activity (EVA), both human and robotic, has been identified as a key component to space missions to support such operations as assembly and maintenance of space systems (e.g. construction and maintenance of the International Space Station), and unscheduled activities to repair an element of the transportation and habitation systems that can only be accessed externally and via unpressurized areas. In order to make human transportation beyond lower Earth orbit (LEO) practical, efficiencies must be incorporated into the integrated transportation systems to reduce system mass and operational complexity. Affordability is also a key aspect to be considered in space system development; this could be achieved through commonality, modularity and component reuse. Another key aspect identified for the EVA system was the ability to produce flight worthy hardware quickly to support early missions and near Earth technology demonstrations. This paper details a conceptual architecture for a modular EVA system that would meet these stated needs for EVA capability that is affordable, and that could be produced relatively quickly. Operational concepts were developed to elaborate on the defined needs, and to define the key capabilities, operational and design constraints, and general timelines. The operational concept lead to a high level design concept for a module that interfaces with various space transportation elements and contains the hardware and systems required to support human and telerobotic EVA; the module would not be self-propelled and would rely on an interfacing element for consumable resources. The conceptual architecture was then compared to EVA Systems used in the Space Shuttle Orbiter, on the International Space Station to develop high level design concepts that incorporate opportunities for cost savings through hardware reuse, and quick production through the use of existing technologies and hardware designs. An upgrade option

  10. Translational Activities to Enable NTD Vaccines.

    PubMed

    Gray, S A; Coler, R N; Carter, D; Siddiqui, A A

    2016-01-01

    There is an urgent need to develop new vaccines for tuberculosis, HIV/AIDS, and malaria, as well as for chronic and debilitating infections known as neglected tropical diseases (NTDs). The term "NTD" emerged at the beginning of the new millennium to describe a set of diseases that are characterized as (1) poverty related, (2) endemic to the tropics and subtropics, (3) lacking public health attention and inadequate industrial investment, (4) having poor research funding and a weak research and development (R&D) pipeline, (5) usually associated with high morbidity but low mortality, and (6) often having no safe and long-lasting treatment available. Many additional challenges to the current control and elimination programs for NTDs exist. These include inconsistent performance of diagnostic tests, regional differences in access to treatment and in treatment outcome, lack of integrated surveillance and vector/intermediate host control, and impact of ecological climatic changes particularly in regions where new cases are increasing in previously nonendemic areas. Moreover, the development of NTD vaccines, including those for schistosomiasis, leishmaniasis, leprosy, hookworm, and Chagas disease are being led by nonprofit product development partnerships (PDPs) working in partnership with academic and industrial partners, contract research organizations, and in some instances vaccine manufacturers in developing countries. In this review, we emphasize global efforts to fuel the development of NTD vaccines, the translational activities needed to effectively move promising vaccine candidates to Phase-I clinical trials and some of the hurdles to ensuring their availability to people in the poorest countries of Africa, Asia, Latin America, and the Caribbean. PMID:27571699

  11. Recruiting Diverse Students and Enabling Them to Succeed in STEM

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tremmel, Michael J.; Pre-Major in Astronomy Program

    2015-01-01

    Improving the diversity within the rapidly growing fields of science, technology, engineering, and mathematics (STEM) has become a forefront issue facing collegiate departments today. It is well known that there are large gaps in the participation and performance of minorities, women, and low-income students within these fields and that special attention must be paid in order to close this gap. Since 2005, the Pre-Major in Astronomy Program (Pre-MAP) at the University of Washington (UW) Department of Astronomy has made a concentrated effort to recruit and retain underrepresented undergraduates in STEM, at which it has been very successful. Of course, recruiting these students can be a challenge, as is creating a curriculum and atmosphere that enables undergraduates to successfully participate in real astronomy research during their first or second year at a four-year college. Pre-MAP recruits a significant population of minorities and women into the program. The structure of the seminar is intended to not only provide necessary skills and experience, but also create a collaborative and supportive atmosphere among each cohort. I will discuss the recruitment practices of Pre-MAP as well as the structure of the seminar and how it addresses the goal of early participation and success in STEM research and course work.The intent of this talk is to share our methods so that more programs like Pre-MAP can be adopted successfully in other institutions.

  12. Enabling Students with Multiple Disabilities to Request and Choose among Environmental Stimuli through Microswitch and Computer Technology

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lancioni, Giulio E.; Singh, Nirbhay N.; O'Reilly, Mark F.; Sigafoos, Jeff; Oliva, Doretta; Baccani, Simona

    2007-01-01

    This study assessed the possibility of enabling two students with multiple disabilities to request and choose among environmental stimuli through microswitch and computer technology. Each student was provided with two basic microswitches the activation of which made a computer system present a sample of a preferred or non-preferred stimulus. The…

  13. Student Activities. Managing Liability.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bennett, Barbara; And Others

    This monograph suggests ways that college or university administrations can undertake a systematic and careful review of the risks posed by students' activities. Its purpose is to provide guidance in integrating the risk management process into a school's existing approaches to managing student organizations and activities. It is noted that no…

  14. Creating Masterpieces: How Course Structures and Routines Enable Student Performance

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dean, Kathy Lund; Fornaciari, Charles J.

    2014-01-01

    Over a five-year period, we made a persistent observation: Course structures and routines, such as assignment parameters, student group process rules, and grading schemes were being consistently ignored. As a result, we got distracted by correcting these structural issues and were spending less time on student assignment performance. In this…

  15. Enabling Students to Understand Measures of Central Tendency and Variation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Suco, Erika; Samere, Marie; Hong, Siu Lun

    2012-01-01

    Somewhere in a programme of study for mathematics in Key Stages 3 and 4 you would expect to find the terms mean, mode, median, and range. You might even find the terms central tendency, and variation. Many students following such a programme will be able to calculate the mean, most will be able to quote the mode, and some students will be able to…

  16. Enabling Remote Activity: Using mobile technology for remote participation in geoscience fieldwork

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Davies, Sarah; Collins, Trevor; Gaved, Mark; Bartlett, Jessica; Valentine, Chris; McCann, Lewis

    2010-05-01

    Field-based activities are regarded as essential to the development of a range of professional and personal skills within the geosciences. Students enjoy field activities, preferring these to learning with simulations (Spicer and Stratford 2001), and these improve deeper learning and understanding (Kern and Carpenter, 1984; Elkins and Elkins, 2007). However, some students find it difficult to access these field-based learning opportunities. Field sites may be remote and often require travel across uneven, challenging or potentially dangerous terrain. Mobility-impaired students are particularly limited in their opportunities to participate in field-based learning activities and, as higher education institutions have a responsibility to provide inclusive opportunities for students (UK Disability Discrimination Act 1995, UK Special Education Needs and Disability Rights Act 2001), the need for inclusive fieldwork learning is being increasingly recognised. The Enabling Remote Activity (ERA) project has been investigating how mobile communications technologies might allow field learning experiences to be brought to students who would otherwise find it difficult to participate, and also to enhance activities for all participants. It uses a rapidly deployable, battery-powered wireless network to transmit video, audio, and high resolution still images to connect participants at an accessible location with participants in the field. Crucially, the system uses a transient wireless network, allowing multiple locations to be explored during a field visit, and for plans to be changed dynamically if required. Central to the concept is the requirement for independent investigative learning: students are enabled to participate actively in the learning experience and to direct the investigations, as opposed to being simply remote viewers of the experience. Two ways of using the ERA system have been investigated: remote access and collaborative groupwork. In 2006 and 2008 remote

  17. Enabling Student Nurses to Use the Information Superhighway.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bachman, Jean A.; Panzarine, Susan

    1998-01-01

    Twenty nursing graduate students in an Internet-based course were compared with 23 who did not take the course. The former were more likely to be connected to nursing networks, used Internet-based health information in practice, used computer skills for other classes, and understood the relevance of telemedicine. (SK)

  18. Enabling Outcomes for Students with Developmental Disabilities through Collaborative Consultation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Villeneuve, Michelle; Hutchinson, Nancy L.

    2012-01-01

    Collaborative consultation has been widely adopted in school-based occupational therapy practice; however, limited research has examined how collaboration between educators and occupational therapists contributes to students' outcomes. The purpose of this study was to describe the nature of collaborative working in two cases of school-based…

  19. Staying the Distance: Students' Perceptions of Enablers of Transition to Higher Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bowles, Angela; Fisher, Ron; McPhail, Ruth; Rosenstreich, Daniela; Dobson, Alexandra

    2014-01-01

    Students' perceptions during their first semester at university may be critical in the decision to continue or discontinue studies. In this study we consider students' perceptions of what factors enable successful transition to university. Using qualitative research, students' perceptions are obtained by in-depth interviews and…

  20. Active Students in Webinars

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kolås, Line; Nordseth, Hugo; Yri, Jørgen Sørlie

    2015-01-01

    To ensure student activity in webinars we have defined 10 learning tasks focusing on production and communication e.g. collaborative writing, discussion and polling, and investigated how the technology supports the learning activities. The three project partners in the VisPed-project use different video-conferencing systems, and we analyzed how it…

  1. SENSE IT: Student Enabled Network of Sensors for the Environment using Innovative Technology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hotaling, L. A.; Stolkin, R.; Kirkey, W.; Bonner, J. S.; Lowes, S.; Lin, P.; Ojo, T.

    2010-12-01

    presentation will provide an overview of the educational modules. A variety of sensors will be described, which are suitably simple for design and construction from first principles by high school students while being accurate enough for students to make meaningful environmental measurements. The presentation will also describe how the sensor building activities can be tied to core curricula classroom theory, enabling the modules to be utilized in regular classes by mathematics, science and computing teachers without disrupting their semester’s teaching goals. Furthermore, the presentation will address of the first two years of the SENSE IT project, during which 39 teachers have been equipped, trained on these materials, and have implemented the modules with around approximately 2,000 high school students.

  2. GeoMapApp Learning Activities: Enabling the democratisation of geoscience learning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goodwillie, A. M.; Kluge, S.

    2011-12-01

    GeoMapApp Learning Activities (http://serc.carleton.edu/geomapapp) are step-by-step guided inquiry geoscience education activities that enable students to dictate the pace of learning. They can be used in the classroom or out of class, and their guided nature means that the requirement for teacher intervention is minimised which allows students to spend increased time analysing and understanding a broad range of geoscience data, content and concepts. Based upon GeoMapApp (http://www.geomapapp.org), a free, easy-to-use map-based data exploration and visualisation tool, each activity furnishes the educator with an efficient package of downloadable documents. This includes step-by-step student instructions and answer sheet; a teacher's edition annotated worksheet containing teaching tips, additional content and suggestions for further work; quizzes for use before and after the activity to assess learning; and a multimedia tutorial. The activities can be used by anyone at any time in any place with an internet connection. In essence, GeoMapApp Learning Activities provide students with cutting-edge technology, research-quality geoscience data sets, and inquiry-based learning in a virtual lab-like environment. Examples of activities so far created are student calculation and analysis of the rate of seafloor spreading, and present-day evidence on the seafloor for huge ancient landslides around the Hawaiian islands. The activities are designed primarily for students at the community college, high school and introductory undergraduate levels, exposing students to content and concepts typically found in those settings.

  3. Teacher Social Capital and Student Achievement: Impact of a Cyber-Enabled Teacher Professional Development Program

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Liu, Wei

    2012-01-01

    This is an evaluative research study of a NSF-funded, DRK-12 cyber-enabled teacher professional development program in elementary engineering education. The finding shows the significant impact of the program on students' science and engineering knowledge in the second year of the program's implementation. However, student learning gain…

  4. Facility Focus: Student Activity Areas.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    College Planning & Management, 2001

    2001-01-01

    Discusses the design of student activity facilities that are showpieces containing both business and entertainment elements. Four examples are highlighted including a performing arts center, a college gym, a student services facility, and a student union. (GR)

  5. Closing the feedback loop: engaging students in large first-year mathematics test revision sessions using pen-enabled screens

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Donovan, Diane; Loch, Birgit

    2013-01-01

    How can active learning, peer learning and prompt feedback be achieved in large first-year mathematics classes? Further, what technologies may support these aims? In this article, we assert that test revision sessions in first-year mathematics held in a technology-enhanced lecture theatre can be highly interactive with students solving problems, learning from each other and receiving immediate feedback. This is facilitated by pen-enabled screens and synchronization software. We argue that the educational benefits achievable through the technology do outweigh the technological distractions, and that these benefits can be achieved by focused, targeted one-off sessions and not only by a semester-long, regular approach. Repeat mid-semester test revision sessions were offered on a non-compulsory basis using pen-enabled screens for all students. Students worked practice test questions and marked solutions to mathematical problems on the screens. Students' work was then displayed anonymously for their peers to see. Answers were discussed with the whole class. We discuss outcomes from two offerings of these sessions using student feedback and lecturer reflections and show the impact of participation on self-reported student confidence. Pedagogical approaches that the technology allowed for the first time in a large class are highlighted. Students responded uniformly positively.

  6. Enabling Remote Activity: Using mobile technology for remote participation in geoscience fieldwork

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Davies, Sarah; Collins, Trevor; Gaved, Mark; Bartlett, Jessica; Valentine, Chris; McCann, Lewis

    2010-05-01

    Field-based activities are regarded as essential to the development of a range of professional and personal skills within the geosciences. Students enjoy field activities, preferring these to learning with simulations (Spicer and Stratford 2001), and these improve deeper learning and understanding (Kern and Carpenter, 1984; Elkins and Elkins, 2007). However, some students find it difficult to access these field-based learning opportunities. Field sites may be remote and often require travel across uneven, challenging or potentially dangerous terrain. Mobility-impaired students are particularly limited in their opportunities to participate in field-based learning activities and, as higher education institutions have a responsibility to provide inclusive opportunities for students (UK Disability Discrimination Act 1995, UK Special Education Needs and Disability Rights Act 2001), the need for inclusive fieldwork learning is being increasingly recognised. The Enabling Remote Activity (ERA) project has been investigating how mobile communications technologies might allow field learning experiences to be brought to students who would otherwise find it difficult to participate, and also to enhance activities for all participants. It uses a rapidly deployable, battery-powered wireless network to transmit video, audio, and high resolution still images to connect participants at an accessible location with participants in the field. Crucially, the system uses a transient wireless network, allowing multiple locations to be explored during a field visit, and for plans to be changed dynamically if required. Central to the concept is the requirement for independent investigative learning: students are enabled to participate actively in the learning experience and to direct the investigations, as opposed to being simply remote viewers of the experience. Two ways of using the ERA system have been investigated: remote access and collaborative groupwork. In 2006 and 2008 remote

  7. Student Activities Survey.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Grider, Clint

    This interest inventory was created to help student affairs professionals increase and enhance student involvement at Baylor University (Texas). Administrators, wishing to improve student programming and development, should find the questionnaire useful. Surveyors followed five steps to develop the instrument: (1) review of similar instruments…

  8. A virtual tornadic thunderstorm enabling students to construct knowledge about storm dynamics through data collection and analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gallus, W. A., Jr.; Cervato, C.; Cruz-Neira, C.; Faidley, G.

    2006-06-01

    A visually realistic tornadic supercell thunderstorm has been constructed in a fully immersive virtual reality environment to allow students to better understand the complex small-scale dynamics present in such a storm through data probing. Less-immersive versions have been created that run on PCs, facilitating broader dissemination. The activity has been tested in introductory meteorology classes over the last four years. An exercise involving the virtual storm was first used by a subset of students from a large introductory meteorology course in spring 2002. Surveys were used at that time to evaluate the impact of this activity as a constructivist learning tool. More recently, data probe capabilities were added to the virtual storm activity enabling students to take measurements of temperature, wind, pressure, relative humidity, and vertical velocity at any point within the 3-D volume of the virtual world, and see the data plotted via a graphical user interface. Similar surveys applied to groups of students in 2003 and 2004 suggest that the addition of data probing improved the understanding of storm-scale features, but the improved understanding may not be statistically significant when evaluated using quizzes reflecting short-term retention. The use of the activity was revised in 2005 to first have students pose scientific questions about these storms and think about a scientific strategy to answer their questions before exploring the storm. Once again, scores on quizzes for students who used the virtual storm activity were slightly better than those of students who were exposed to only a typical lecture, but differences were not statistically significant.

  9. Students' Educational Activities During Clerkship.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    O'Sullivan, Patricia S.; And Others

    1997-01-01

    Logs completed by 201 medical students in third-year clerkships at nine community-based hospitals indicated students received 6.5 hours of teaching with an instructor daily, spending 4.9 more hours in clerkship-related learning. Most teaching was by full-time faculty and residents. In half their educational activities, students participated with…

  10. Getting Students To Read Actively.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kitao, Kenji

    1994-01-01

    This article discusses Japanese students' difficulties in reading English, overviews some of the problems of college English textbooks, presents the results of research on the subject, and discusses characteristics of measures of readability. Teaching methods that have proven effective with Japanese students and activities for engaging students in…

  11. Motivating Students in Fitness Activities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wilkinson, Carol; Hunter, Mike

    2008-01-01

    Physical educators have a responsibility to motivate students to develop personal fitness. This is a critical concept as physical education is the only part of the curriculum capable of meeting the health needs of students regarding physical activity. Current physical educators must promote fitness in ways that motivate students to engage in…

  12. Student Activity Funds: Procedures & Controls.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cuzzetto, Charles E.

    Student activity funds may create educational opportunities for students, but they frequently create problems for business administrators. The first part of this work reviews the types of organizational issues and transactions an organized student group is likely to encounter, including establishing a constitution, participant roles,…

  13. Getting Students to Work Actively

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jones, Stan; Harrell, J. W.; Horton, C. E.

    2007-05-01

    As researchers learn better ways to promote student learning in introductory physics, students learn better ways of circumventing these strategies. Many students remain motivated primarily to find the lowest energy output required to pass a course rather than to actually work at learning physics. We are redesigning our introductory courses, which are taught in a studio format, under the assumption that most students will do only the things they get credit for. By offering incentives for students to participate actively in the learning process, we expect to see an improvement in student performance. This poster describes both the studio format and the teaching strategies being implemented.

  14. Enabling Meaningful Learning through Web-Based Instruction with Occupational Therapy Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Perlman, Cynthia; Weston, Cynthia; Gisel, Erika

    2010-01-01

    This paper explores the design of a Web-based tutorial for Activity Analysis offered within an undergraduate course of occupational therapy and how its design features influenced meaningful learning from the students' perspective. This tutorial, using a case-based format, offers a learner-directed approach to students and the application of…

  15. Mitochondrial Nitroreductase Activity Enables Selective Imaging and Therapeutic Targeting.

    PubMed

    Chevalier, Arnaud; Zhang, Yanmin; Khdour, Omar M; Kaye, Justin B; Hecht, Sidney M

    2016-09-21

    Nitroreductase (NTR) activities have been known for decades, studied extensively in bacteria and also in systems as diverse as yeast, trypanosomes, and hypoxic tumors. The putative bacterial origin of mitochondria prompted us to explore the possible existence of NTR activity within this organelle and to probe its behavior in a cellular context. Presently, by using a profluorescent near-infrared (NIR) dye, we characterize the nature of NTR activity localized in mammalian cell mitochondria. Further, we demonstrate that this mitochondrially localized enzymatic activity can be exploited both for selective NIR imaging of mitochondria and for mitochondrial targeting by activating a mitochondrial poison specifically within that organelle. This constitutes a new mechanism for mitochondrial imaging and targeting. These findings represent the first use of mitochondrial enzyme activity to unmask agents for mitochondrial fluorescent imaging and therapy, which may prove to be more broadly applicable.

  16. International mobility placements enable students and staff in Higher Education to enhance transversal and employability-related skills.

    PubMed

    Standley, Henrietta J

    2015-10-01

    Internationalization has commanded an ever-more prominent position in higher education over recent years, and is now firmly entrenched. While academia has long been outward looking-international research collaborations, conferences and student exchanges are well-established practices-it is relatively recently that internationalization has become a goal in its own right, rather than a consequence of normal academic activity. There are multiple interdependent drivers behind this: a focus on graduate employability and development of broad competencies and transferable skills in addition to subject-specific training, 'international awareness' being confirmed as a graduate attribute that is highly valued by employers, the availability of detailed information enabling prospective students to choose between Higher Education Institutions on the basis of their international opportunities and graduate employment rates, increasing competition between Institutions to attract the best students and to ascend national and international league tables, and (both driving and reflecting these trends) national policy frameworks. This minireview focuses on two aspects of internationalization of direct relevance to microbiology students and academic staff in a typical Higher Education Institution: student research placements overseas, and the impact of international mobility on teaching practice and the student experience. Practical strategies for developing intercultural awareness and enhancing employability are highlighted.

  17. International mobility placements enable students and staff in Higher Education to enhance transversal and employability-related skills.

    PubMed

    Standley, Henrietta J

    2015-10-01

    Internationalization has commanded an ever-more prominent position in higher education over recent years, and is now firmly entrenched. While academia has long been outward looking-international research collaborations, conferences and student exchanges are well-established practices-it is relatively recently that internationalization has become a goal in its own right, rather than a consequence of normal academic activity. There are multiple interdependent drivers behind this: a focus on graduate employability and development of broad competencies and transferable skills in addition to subject-specific training, 'international awareness' being confirmed as a graduate attribute that is highly valued by employers, the availability of detailed information enabling prospective students to choose between Higher Education Institutions on the basis of their international opportunities and graduate employment rates, increasing competition between Institutions to attract the best students and to ascend national and international league tables, and (both driving and reflecting these trends) national policy frameworks. This minireview focuses on two aspects of internationalization of direct relevance to microbiology students and academic staff in a typical Higher Education Institution: student research placements overseas, and the impact of international mobility on teaching practice and the student experience. Practical strategies for developing intercultural awareness and enhancing employability are highlighted. PMID:26347299

  18. "OnTrack" to University: Understanding Mechanisms of Student Retention in an Australian Pre-University Enabling Program

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lisciandro, Joanne G.; Gibbs, Gael

    2016-01-01

    University-based enabling programs have become an important pathway to university for non-traditional students. There is increasing interest in understanding the mechanisms that facilitate retention and success of enabling pathway students, with the aim of developing effective strategies for maximising opportunities for university access and…

  19. Sensor web enables rapid response to volcanic activity

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Davies, Ashley G.; Chien, Steve; Wright, Robert; Miklius, Asta; Kyle, Philip R.; Welsh, Matt; Johnson, Jeffrey B.; Tran, Daniel; Schaffer, Steven R.; Sherwood, Robert

    2006-01-01

    Rapid response to the onset of volcanic activity allows for the early assessment of hazard and risk [Tilling, 1989]. Data from remote volcanoes and volcanoes in countries with poor communication infrastructure can only be obtained via remote sensing [Harris et al., 2000]. By linking notifications of activity from ground-based and spacebased systems, these volcanoes can be monitored when they erupt.Over the last 18 months, NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL) has implemented a Volcano Sensor Web (VSW) in which data from ground-based and space-based sensors that detect current volcanic activity are used to automatically trigger the NASA Earth Observing 1 (EO-1) spacecraft to make highspatial-resolution observations of these volcanoes.

  20. Milk glucosidase activity enables suckled pup starch digestion

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Starch requires six enzymes for digestion to free glucose: two amylases (salivary and pancreatic) and four mucosal maltase activities; sucrase-isomaltase and maltase-glucoamylase. All are deficient in suckling rodents. The objective of this study is to test (13)C-starch digestion before weaning by m...

  1. The development of enabling technologies for producing active interrogation beams

    SciTech Connect

    Kwan, Thomas J. T.; Morgado, Richard E.; Wang, Tai-Sen F.; Vodolaga, B.; Terekhin, V.; Onischenko, L. M.; Vorozhtsov, S. B.; Samsonov, E. V.; Vorozhtsov, A. S.; Alenitsky, Yu. G.; Perpelkin, E. E.; Glazov, A. A.; Novikov, D. L.; Parkhomchuk, V.; Reva, V.; Vostrikov, V.; Mashinin, V. A.; Fedotov, S. N.; Minayev, S. A.

    2010-10-15

    A U.S./Russian collaboration of accelerator scientists was directed to the development of high averaged-current ({approx}1 mA) and high-quality (emittance {approx}15 {pi}mm mrad; energy spread {approx}0.1%) 1.75 MeV proton beams to produce active interrogation beams that could be applied to counterterrorism. Several accelerator technologies were investigated. These included an electrostatic tandem accelerator of novel design, a compact cyclotron, and a storage ring with energy compensation and electron cooling. Production targets capable of withstanding the beam power levels were designed, fabricated, and tested. The cyclotron/storage-ring system was theoretically studied and computationally designed, and the electrostatic vacuum tandem accelerator at BINP was demonstrated for its potential in active interrogation of explosives and special nuclear materials.

  2. The development of enabling technologies for producing active interrogation beams.

    PubMed

    Kwan, Thomas J T; Morgado, Richard E; Wang, Tai-Sen F; Vodolaga, B; Terekhin, V; Onischenko, L M; Vorozhtsov, S B; Samsonov, E V; Vorozhtsov, A S; Alenitsky, Yu G; Perpelkin, E E; Glazov, A A; Novikov, D L; Parkhomchuk, V; Reva, V; Vostrikov, V; Mashinin, V A; Fedotov, S N; Minayev, S A

    2010-10-01

    A U.S./Russian collaboration of accelerator scientists was directed to the development of high averaged-current (∼1 mA) and high-quality (emittance ∼15 πmm mrad; energy spread ∼0.1%) 1.75 MeV proton beams to produce active interrogation beams that could be applied to counterterrorism. Several accelerator technologies were investigated. These included an electrostatic tandem accelerator of novel design, a compact cyclotron, and a storage ring with energy compensation and electron cooling. Production targets capable of withstanding the beam power levels were designed, fabricated, and tested. The cyclotron/storage-ring system was theoretically studied and computationally designed, and the electrostatic vacuum tandem accelerator at BINP was demonstrated for its potential in active interrogation of explosives and special nuclear materials.

  3. Fast ventral stream neural activity enables rapid visual categorization.

    PubMed

    Cauchoix, Maxime; Crouzet, Sébastien M; Fize, Denis; Serre, Thomas

    2016-01-15

    Primates can recognize objects embedded in complex natural scenes in a glimpse. Rapid categorization paradigms have been extensively used to study our core perceptual abilities when the visual system is forced to operate under strong time constraints. However, the neural underpinning of rapid categorization remains to be understood, and the incredible speed of sight has yet to be reconciled with modern ventral stream cortical theories of object recognition. Here we recorded multichannel subdural electrocorticogram (ECoG) signals from intermediate areas (V4/PIT) of the ventral stream of the visual cortex while monkeys were actively engaged in a rapid animal/non-animal categorization task. A traditional event-related potential (ERP) analysis revealed short visual latencies (<50-70ms) followed by a rapidly developing visual selectivity (within ~20-30ms) for most electrodes. A multi-variate pattern analysis (MVPA) technique further confirmed that reliable animal/non-animal category information was possible from this initial ventral stream neural activity (within ~90-100ms). Furthermore, this early category-selective neural activity was (a) unaffected by the presentation of a backward (pattern) mask, (b) generalized to novel (unfamiliar) stimuli and (c) co-varied with behavioral responses (both accuracy and reaction times). Despite the strong prevalence of task-related information on the neural signal, task-irrelevant visual information could still be decoded independently of monkey behavior. Monkey behavioral responses were also found to correlate significantly with human behavioral responses for the same set of stimuli. Together, the present study establishes that rapid ventral stream neural activity induces a visually selective signal subsequently used to drive rapid visual categorization and that this visual strategy may be shared between human and non-human primates. PMID:26477655

  4. Activation-Enabled Syntheses of Functionalized Pillar[5]arene Derivatives.

    PubMed

    Han, Jie; Hou, Xisen; Ke, Chenfeng; Zhang, Huacheng; Strutt, Nathan L; Stern, Charlotte L; Stoddart, J Fraser

    2015-07-01

    A series of regioselective di- and trifunctionalized pillar[5]arene derivatives have been synthesized by a deprotection-followed-by-activation strategy, and their constitutions have been established as a result of having access to their solid-state structures. De-O-methylation occurs in a stepwise manner at lower temperatures under kinetic control, affording the desired oligo-substituted pillar[5]arene derivatives. In addition, the regioisomers of these derivatives can be isolated by installing triflate groups on the free hydroxyl groups. PMID:26083303

  5. Hospitality Services. Student Activity Book.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Texas Tech Univ., Lubbock. Home Economics Curriculum Center.

    This student activity book contains pencil-and-paper activities for use in a hospitality services course focusing on the food and lodging segments of the hospitality and tourism industry. The activities are organized into 29 chapters on the following topics: hospitality services industry; professional ethics; organization/management structures in…

  6. Part II. Empowering grassroots evidence-based practice: a curricular model to foster undergraduate student-enabled practice change.

    PubMed

    Moch, Susan D; Cronje, Ruth J

    2010-01-01

    This article presents evidence collected over the past 15 years that attests to the success of curricular innovations conducted to foster socially meaningful contact between nursing students and practicing nurses as a means to promote evidence-based practice (EBP). Action research data collected as these pedagogical strategies have evolved suggest that such student-staff partnerships offer promise not only to encourage commitment to EBP among nursing students but also to surmount most of the barriers that prevent the widespread diffusion of EBP among practicing nurses in clinical settings. Based upon our successful experiences with student-staff interactions, we propose a curricular model-the Student-Enabled Practice Change model-that suffuses the undergraduate nursing school curriculum with opportunities for nursing students to form meaningful partnerships with practicing nurses. The Student-Enabled Practice Change Curricular Model relocates the power to drive practice change to the grassroots level of students and practicing nurses. PMID:20129588

  7. Part II. Empowering grassroots evidence-based practice: a curricular model to foster undergraduate student-enabled practice change.

    PubMed

    Moch, Susan D; Cronje, Ruth J

    2010-01-01

    This article presents evidence collected over the past 15 years that attests to the success of curricular innovations conducted to foster socially meaningful contact between nursing students and practicing nurses as a means to promote evidence-based practice (EBP). Action research data collected as these pedagogical strategies have evolved suggest that such student-staff partnerships offer promise not only to encourage commitment to EBP among nursing students but also to surmount most of the barriers that prevent the widespread diffusion of EBP among practicing nurses in clinical settings. Based upon our successful experiences with student-staff interactions, we propose a curricular model-the Student-Enabled Practice Change model-that suffuses the undergraduate nursing school curriculum with opportunities for nursing students to form meaningful partnerships with practicing nurses. The Student-Enabled Practice Change Curricular Model relocates the power to drive practice change to the grassroots level of students and practicing nurses.

  8. Coal Activities for Secondary Students.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    American Coal Foundation, Washington, DC.

    This collection of lesson plans designed for teachers of 4th- through 12th-grade students utilizes an assortment of teaching strategies for topics related to coal and the coal industry. Activities cover the following topics: coal formation; coal identification; "the geologist's dilemma" (a supply and demand activity); geologic time and the…

  9. Student Perceptions of Active Learning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lumpkin, Angela; Achen, Rebecca M.; Dodd, Regan K.

    2015-01-01

    A paradigm shift from lecture-based courses to interactive classes punctuated with engaging, student-centered learning activities has begun to characterize the work of some teachers in higher education. Convinced through the literature of the values of using active learning strategies, we assessed through an action research project in five college…

  10. Measuring Cognition of Students with Disabilities Using Technology-Enabled Assessments: Recommendations for a National Research Agenda

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bechard, Sue; Sheinker, Jan; Abell, Rosemary; Barton, Karen; Burling, Kelly; Camacho, Christopher; Cameto, Renee; Haertel, Geneva; Hansen, Eric; Johnstone, Chris; Kingston, Neal; Murray, Elizabeth; Parker, Caroline E.; Redfield, Doris; Tucker, Bill

    2010-01-01

    This article represents one outcome from the "Invitational Research Symposium on Technology-Enabled and Universally Designed Assessments," which examined technology-enabled assessments (TEA) and universal design (UD) as they relate to students with disabilities (SWD). It was developed to stimulate research into TEAs designed to better understand…

  11. Landsat: Space Activities for Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Marks, Steven K.

    1979-01-01

    An aerospace education activity is described which is suitable for grades 3-12. Students piece together several images from the Landsat satellite to make a mosaic of their state. From the mosaic clear acetate overlay maps can be made relating to such subjects as agriculture, geology, hydrology, or urban planning. (BB)

  12. Spitzer - Hot & Colorful Student Activities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McDonald, D.; Rebull, L. M.; DeWolf, C.; Guastella, P.; Johnson, C. H.; Schaefers, J.; Spuck, T.; McDonald, J. G., III; DeWolf, T.; Brock, S.; Boerma, J.; Bemis, G.; Paulsen, K.; Yueh, N.; Peter, A.; Wassmer, W.; Haber, R.; Scaramucci, A.; Butchart, J.; Holcomb, A.; Karns, B.; Kennedy, S.; Siegel, R.; Weiser, S.

    2009-01-01

    In this poster, we present the results of several activities developed for the general science student to explore infrared light. The first activity involved measuring infrared radiation using an updated version of Newton's experiment of splitting white light and finding IR radiation. The second used Leslie's cube to allow students to observe different radiators, while the third used a modern infrared thermometer to measure and identify IR sources in an enclosed box. The last activity involved students making false-color images from narrow-band filter images from data sets from Spitzer Space Telescope, STScI Digitized Sky Survey and other sources. Using computer programs like Adobe Photoshop and free software such as ds9, Spot and Leopard, poster-like images were created by the students. This research is funded by the Spitzer Science Center (SSC) and the National Optical Astronomy Observatory (NOAO). Please see our companion poster, Johnson et al., on the science aspect of this program, and another poster on the educational aspects, Guastella et al.

  13. Testing the Youth Physical Activity Promotion Model: Fatness and Fitness as Enabling Factors

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chen, Senlin; Welk, Gregory J.; Joens-Matre, Roxane R.

    2014-01-01

    As the prevalence of childhood obesity increases, it is important to examine possible differences in psychosocial correlates of physical activity between normal weight and overweight children. The study examined fatness (weight status) and (aerobic) fitness as Enabling factors related to youth physical activity within the Youth Physical Activity…

  14. Student Activities . . . an Extension of the Curriculum.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Grady, Joan B.

    1981-01-01

    Extracurricular activities in secondary schools are an important part of student preparation for adult life. This document presents guidelines on the components, administration, and evaluation of student activities. It suggests that a comprehensive activity program should include student government, publications, cultural activities, service…

  15. Dense small molecule labeling enables activator-dependent STORM by proximity mapping.

    PubMed

    Chen, Ye; Gu, Min; Gunning, Peter W; Russell, Sarah M

    2016-09-01

    Stochastic optical reconstruction microscopy (STORM) enables high-resolution imaging, but multi-channel 3D imaging is problematic because of chromatic aberrations and alignment errors. The use of activator-dependent STORM in which spectrally distinct activators can be coupled with a single reporter can circumvent such issues. However, the standard approach of linking activators and reporters to a single antibody molecule is hampered by low labeling density and the large size of the antibody. We proposed that small molecule labels might enable activator-dependent STORM if the reporter or activator were linked to separate small molecules that bound within 3.5 nm of each other. This would greatly increase the labeling density and therefore improve resolution. We tested various mixtures of phalloidin- or mCling-conjugated fluorophore to demonstrate this feasibility. The specific activation was dependent on the choice of activator, its density, a matching activating laser and its power. In addition to providing an effective means of multi-channel 3D STORM imaging, this method also provides information about the local proximity between labels, potentially enabling super-resolved mapping of the conformation of the labeled structures. PMID:27246003

  16. Dense small molecule labeling enables activator-dependent STORM by proximity mapping.

    PubMed

    Chen, Ye; Gu, Min; Gunning, Peter W; Russell, Sarah M

    2016-09-01

    Stochastic optical reconstruction microscopy (STORM) enables high-resolution imaging, but multi-channel 3D imaging is problematic because of chromatic aberrations and alignment errors. The use of activator-dependent STORM in which spectrally distinct activators can be coupled with a single reporter can circumvent such issues. However, the standard approach of linking activators and reporters to a single antibody molecule is hampered by low labeling density and the large size of the antibody. We proposed that small molecule labels might enable activator-dependent STORM if the reporter or activator were linked to separate small molecules that bound within 3.5 nm of each other. This would greatly increase the labeling density and therefore improve resolution. We tested various mixtures of phalloidin- or mCling-conjugated fluorophore to demonstrate this feasibility. The specific activation was dependent on the choice of activator, its density, a matching activating laser and its power. In addition to providing an effective means of multi-channel 3D STORM imaging, this method also provides information about the local proximity between labels, potentially enabling super-resolved mapping of the conformation of the labeled structures.

  17. Enabling the Full Participation of University Students with Disabilities: Seeking Best Practices for a Barrier-Free Language Centre

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tuomi, Margaret Trotta; Jauhojärvi-Koskelo, Camilla

    2015-01-01

    Recent research has shown that 3.4% of university students in Finland have a diagnosed or observed illness or disability that affects their learning at the university level. The University of Jyväskylä Language Centre embarked on an organised, ongoing research and intervention project to enable appropriate teaching practices to suit the needs of…

  18. Seeking the Passionate Career: First-in-Family Enabling Students and the Idea of the Australian University

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    May, Josephine; Delahunty, Janine; O'Shea, Sarah; Stone, Cathy

    2016-01-01

    This paper examines the idea of the university from the first-in-family enabling students' perspective. It provides an overview of the current crisis of meaning in scholarly commentary that points to a spectrum of meanings about the university. This spectrum ranges from the ancient imaginary of the monastic university as "ivory tower" to…

  19. Horticulture Therapy Activities for Exceptional Students.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Airhart, Douglas L.; And Others

    1988-01-01

    The Tennessee Technological University's Program of Special Education sponsors a "Super Saturday" of enrichment activities for gifted and talented students as well as students with learning disabilities. A session on horticulture was planned and arranged by students in a class on horticultural therapy who designed learning activities of two types:…

  20. Twenty Activities to Expand Your Students' Knowledge of the World While Studying Your State. A Global Perspectives Experimental Unit.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cleveland, Alice Ann; Lewis, Nancy G.

    This unit contains 20 classroom activities which have a global approach and will enable junior or high school students to learn about their state and the world. Student materials and teaching procedures are provided for each activity. Some examples of the activities follow. In one activity students compare the size of New Mexico with another area…

  1. A Student Activity That Simulates Evolution

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Johnson, Nichole L.; Lang-Walker, Rosalyn; Fail, Joseph L., Jr.; Champion, Timothy D.

    2012-01-01

    We describe an activity that uses cards to simulate evolution. The mechanism of the evolutionary pressure in the simulation is clearly indicated for the students. This simulation is useful for allowing student experimentation by varying conditions.

  2. Promoting retention, enabling success: Discovering the potential of student support circles.

    PubMed

    Bass, Janice; Walters, Caroline; Toohill, Jocelyn; Sidebotham, Mary

    2016-09-01

    Retention of students is critical to education programs and future workforce. A mixed methods study evaluated student engagement within a Bachelor of Midwifery program and connection with career choice through participation in student support circles. Centred on the Five Senses of Success Framework (sense of capability, purpose, identity, resourcefulness and connectedness) and including four stages of engagement (creating space, preparing self, sharing stories, focused conversations), the circles support and develop student and professional identity. Of 80 students 43 (54%) provided responses to a two item survey assessed against a five point Likert scale to determine utility. Using a nominal group technique, student's voices gave rich insight into the personal and professional growth that participation in the student support circles provided. Evaluated as helpful to first year students in orientating to university study and early socialisation into the profession, the circles appear to influence the development of a strong sense of professional identity and personal midwifery philosophy based on the relational nature of the midwife being with woman rather than doing midwifery. This suggests that student support circles positively influence perceptions and expectations, contributing to a shared sense of purpose and discipline connection, for enhancing student retention and future workforce participation. PMID:27552548

  3. Promoting retention, enabling success: Discovering the potential of student support circles.

    PubMed

    Bass, Janice; Walters, Caroline; Toohill, Jocelyn; Sidebotham, Mary

    2016-09-01

    Retention of students is critical to education programs and future workforce. A mixed methods study evaluated student engagement within a Bachelor of Midwifery program and connection with career choice through participation in student support circles. Centred on the Five Senses of Success Framework (sense of capability, purpose, identity, resourcefulness and connectedness) and including four stages of engagement (creating space, preparing self, sharing stories, focused conversations), the circles support and develop student and professional identity. Of 80 students 43 (54%) provided responses to a two item survey assessed against a five point Likert scale to determine utility. Using a nominal group technique, student's voices gave rich insight into the personal and professional growth that participation in the student support circles provided. Evaluated as helpful to first year students in orientating to university study and early socialisation into the profession, the circles appear to influence the development of a strong sense of professional identity and personal midwifery philosophy based on the relational nature of the midwife being with woman rather than doing midwifery. This suggests that student support circles positively influence perceptions and expectations, contributing to a shared sense of purpose and discipline connection, for enhancing student retention and future workforce participation.

  4. An Examination of Faculty and Student Online Activity: Predictive Relationships of Student Academic Success in a Learning Management System (LMS)

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stamm, Randy Lee

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this mixed method research study was to examine relationships in student and instructor activity logs and student performance benchmarks specific to enabling early intervention by the instructor in a Learning Management System (LMS). Instructor feedback was collected through a survey instrument to demonstrate perceived importance of…

  5. Collaborative Activities Enabled by GroupScribbles (GS): An Exploratory Study of Learning Effectiveness

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Looi, Chee-Kit; Chen, Wenli; Ng, Foo-Keong

    2010-01-01

    This paper describes the findings of an exploratory cycle of a design-based research project and examines the learning effectiveness of collaborative activities that are supported by the GroupScribbles (GS) software technology in two Singapore primary science classrooms. The students had ten weeks of GS-based lessons in science, which were…

  6. Computer Technology Enables Georgetown U. Medical Students to Simulate Dialogue with Patients.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wilson, David L.

    1991-01-01

    A combination of computer, videodisk, and voice-recognition technology lets Georgetown University medical students ask questions of an electronic "patient" who appears on a television monitor and appears to respond. Students can order laboratory tests and study patient behavior inside and outside the hospital. Simulations use actors or actual…

  7. Software Enabling School Improvement through Analysis of Student Data. Report Number 67

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wayman, Jeffrey C.; Stringfield, Sam; Yakimowski, Mary

    2004-01-01

    The No Child Left Behind legislation has drawn increased attention to student data. Data are most useful in educational decision-making when the purpose extends beyond vertical accountability and toward school- and classroom-level decision-making that enhances the experience and achievement of students. This necessarily involves getting practical…

  8. A Web Enabled Video System for Self Reflection by Student Teachers Using a Guiding Framework

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kong, Siu Cheung; Shroff, Ronnie H.; Hung, Hing Keung

    2009-01-01

    To ensure their teaching quality, it is important for student teachers to undertake self reflection on their teaching performance after supervised teaching sessions. With the goal of sharpening the teaching competence of student teachers, a dual function system that uses web based and video based technologies is being developed to facilitate self…

  9. Enabling Student Learning. Systems and Strategies. Staff and Educational Development Series.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wisker, Gina, Ed.; Brown, Sally, Ed.

    The 16 chapters of this book explore, from a British perspective, a range of strategies, both institutional and individual, developed to foster an environment conducive to learning for university students. Section 1 concentrates on systems and structures to assist student learning while Section 2 offers applications at both the undergraduate and…

  10. "The Place Is Suffering": Enabling Dialogue between Students' Discourses and Academic Literacy Conventions in Engineering

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Archer, Arlene

    2008-01-01

    Students need access to the disciplinary practices of engineering, but at the same time, these practices need to transform to the realities of the changing global environment and the profession. The site of this research is an engineering foundation programme for less advantaged students in South Africa and is thus perhaps well-positioned to look…

  11. Measuring Confidence Levels of Male and Female Students in Open Access Enabling Courses

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Atherton, Mirella

    2015-01-01

    The study of confidence was undertaken at the University of Newcastle with students selecting science courses at two campuses. The students were enrolled in open access programs and aimed to gain access to undergraduate studies in various disciplines at University. The "third person effect" was used to measure the confidence levels of…

  12. Guidelines to Student Activity Fund Accounting. Revised.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Association of School Business Officials International, Reston, VA.

    This booklet provides guidelines to help school business officials develop sound procedures for keeping proper accounts of and managing the money raised and spent in the course of conducting student activity programs. The booklet notes the roles of the administrators and activity advisers related to management of the student activity fund, then…

  13. The Usage and Impact of Internet Enabled Phones on Academic Concentration among Students of Tertiary Institutions: A Study at the University of Ibadan, Nigeria

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ezemenaka, Emeka

    2013-01-01

    The usage of Internet enabled phones has been a 21st century phenomenon that spreads for different purposes and functions. This study looks into the usage and perceived effect implications internet enabled phones have on the academic performance of the tertiary students using University of Ibadan students in Nigeria as a case study. The study was…

  14. A Student Activity on Visual Resolving Power

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Warren, T. H.; Henriksen, P. N.; Ramsier, R. D.

    2003-01-01

    We present a simple activity in which students measure the resolving power of their eyes. The approach can be used at various levels of sophistication with students having a wide variety of skills and scientific training. We discuss our experiences using this activity with a class of non-science majors as well as with a group of pre-engineering…

  15. Design and Data in Balance: Using Design-Driven Decision Making to Enable Student Success

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fairchild, Susan; Farrell, Timothy; Gunton, Brad; Mackinnon, Anne; McNamara, Christina; Trachtman, Roberta

    2014-01-01

    Data-driven approaches to school decision making have come into widespread use in the past decade, nationally and in New York City. New Visions has been at the forefront of those developments: in New Visions schools, teacher teams and school teams regularly examine student performance data to understand patterns and drive classroom- and…

  16. GIS Enabled PBl Pedagogy: The Effects on Students' Learning in the Classroom

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Liu, Yan; Laxman, Kumar

    2009-01-01

    In efforts aimed at acquainting learners with "how to learn" skills rather than static content knowledge, more student centric instructional approaches are being increasingly adopted in informing curriculum design and delivery. Technology-rich problem solving environments offer great promise in scaffolding and facilitating…

  17. Enabling Access and Enhancing Comprehension of Video Content for Postsecondary Students with Intellectual Disability

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Evmenova, Anya S.; Behrmann, Michael M.

    2014-01-01

    There is a great need for new innovative tools to integrate individuals with intellectual disability into educational experiences. This multiple baseline study examined the effects of various adaptations for improving factual and inferential comprehension of non-fiction videos by six postsecondary students with intellectual disability. Video…

  18. Sweden's International Training Programme in Education for Sustainable Development Enables Students to Change Institutions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Taylor, Jim; Neeser, Marie

    2012-01-01

    The Swedish International Training Programme in Education for Sustainable Development, which has been run annually for the past 10 years, is a five-phase program that supports participants to develop and implement a change project in their work places. It requires a team of students from an institution and provides extensive follow up. The course…

  19. The Quality of Reflection in Student Journals: A Review of Limiting and Enabling Factors

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dyment, Janet E.; O'Connell, Timothy S.

    2010-01-01

    Although reflective journals are widely used across many disciplines in higher education, the research that examines their use presents an unclear picture of the quality of reflection found in them. Some research reveals that student journals contain primarily deeply reflective entries. Yet other research presents a less optimistic perspective,…

  20. Supporting Student Research Group Activities.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lopatin, Dennis E.

    1993-01-01

    This discussion describes methods that foster a healthy Student Research Group (SRG) and permits it to fulfill its responsibility in the development of the student researcher. The model used in the discussion is that of the University of Michigan School of Dentistry SRG. (GLR)

  1. 'Dopamine-first' mechanism enables the rational engineering of the norcoclaurine synthase aldehyde activity profile.

    PubMed

    Lichman, Benjamin R; Gershater, Markus C; Lamming, Eleanor D; Pesnot, Thomas; Sula, Altin; Keep, Nicholas H; Hailes, Helen C; Ward, John M

    2015-03-01

    Norcoclaurine synthase (NCS) (EC 4.2.1.78) catalyzes the Pictet-Spengler condensation of dopamine and an aldehyde, forming a substituted (S)-tetrahydroisoquinoline, a pharmaceutically important moiety. This unique activity has led to NCS being used for both in vitro biocatalysis and in vivo recombinant metabolism. Future engineering of NCS activity to enable the synthesis of diverse tetrahydroisoquinolines is dependent on an understanding of the NCS mechanism and kinetics. We assess two proposed mechanisms for NCS activity: (a) one based on the holo X-ray crystal structure and (b) the 'dopamine-first' mechanism based on computational docking. Thalictrum flavum NCS variant activities support the dopamine-first mechanism. Suppression of the non-enzymatic background reaction reveals novel kinetic parameters for NCS, showing it to act with low catalytic efficiency. This kinetic behaviour can account for the ineffectiveness of recombinant NCS in in vivo systems, and also suggests NCS may have an in planta role as a metabolic gatekeeper. The amino acid substitution L76A, situated in the proposed aldehyde binding site, results in the alteration of the enzyme's aldehyde activity profile. This both verifies the dopamine-first mechanism and demonstrates the potential for the rational engineering of NCS activity. PMID:25620686

  2. ‘Dopamine-first’ mechanism enables the rational engineering of the norcoclaurine synthase aldehyde activity profile

    PubMed Central

    Lichman, Benjamin R; Gershater, Markus C; Lamming, Eleanor D; Pesnot, Thomas; Sula, Altin; Keep, Nicholas H; Hailes, Helen C; Ward, John M

    2015-01-01

    Norcoclaurine synthase (NCS) (EC 4.2.1.78) catalyzes the Pictet–Spengler condensation of dopamine and an aldehyde, forming a substituted (S)-tetrahydroisoquinoline, a pharmaceutically important moiety. This unique activity has led to NCS being used for both in vitro biocatalysis and in vivo recombinant metabolism. Future engineering of NCS activity to enable the synthesis of diverse tetrahydroisoquinolines is dependent on an understanding of the NCS mechanism and kinetics. We assess two proposed mechanisms for NCS activity: (a) one based on the holo X-ray crystal structure and (b) the ‘dopamine-first’ mechanism based on computational docking. Thalictrum flavum NCS variant activities support the dopamine-first mechanism. Suppression of the non-enzymatic background reaction reveals novel kinetic parameters for NCS, showing it to act with low catalytic efficiency. This kinetic behaviour can account for the ineffectiveness of recombinant NCS in in vivo systems, and also suggests NCS may have an in planta role as a metabolic gatekeeper. The amino acid substitution L76A, situated in the proposed aldehyde binding site, results in the alteration of the enzyme's aldehyde activity profile. This both verifies the dopamine-first mechanism and demonstrates the potential for the rational engineering of NCS activity. PMID:25620686

  3. Internet-Enabled Audio Communication: A Richer Medium For Students Feedback?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Johnson, Roy D.; Keil, Mark

    This study compared the effects of using voice mail (v-mail) to electronic mail (e-mail) over the Internet to provide student feedback using Media Richness Theory (MRT) and Social Presence Theory (SPT) as the theoretical framework. MRT and SPT would predict that v-mail would be perceived as higher than e-mail in media richness and social presence.…

  4. Oxide Defect Engineering Enables to Couple Solar Energy into Oxygen Activation.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Ning; Li, Xiyu; Ye, Huacheng; Chen, Shuangming; Ju, Huanxin; Liu, Daobin; Lin, Yue; Ye, Wei; Wang, Chengming; Xu, Qian; Zhu, Junfa; Song, Li; Jiang, Jun; Xiong, Yujie

    2016-07-20

    Modern development of chemical manufacturing requires a substantial reduction in energy consumption and catalyst cost. Sunlight-driven chemical transformation by metal oxides holds great promise for this goal; however, it remains a grand challenge to efficiently couple solar energy into many catalytic reactions. Here we report that defect engineering on oxide catalyst can serve as a versatile approach to bridge light harvesting with surface reactions by ensuring species chemisorption. The chemisorption not only spatially enables the transfer of photoexcited electrons to reaction species, but also alters the form of active species to lower the photon energy requirement for reactions. In a proof of concept, oxygen molecules are activated into superoxide radicals on defect-rich tungsten oxide through visible-near-infrared illumination to trigger organic aerobic couplings of amines to corresponding imines. The excellent efficiency and durability for such a highly important process in chemical transformation can otherwise be virtually impossible to attain by counterpart materials.

  5. Oxide Defect Engineering Enables to Couple Solar Energy into Oxygen Activation.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Ning; Li, Xiyu; Ye, Huacheng; Chen, Shuangming; Ju, Huanxin; Liu, Daobin; Lin, Yue; Ye, Wei; Wang, Chengming; Xu, Qian; Zhu, Junfa; Song, Li; Jiang, Jun; Xiong, Yujie

    2016-07-20

    Modern development of chemical manufacturing requires a substantial reduction in energy consumption and catalyst cost. Sunlight-driven chemical transformation by metal oxides holds great promise for this goal; however, it remains a grand challenge to efficiently couple solar energy into many catalytic reactions. Here we report that defect engineering on oxide catalyst can serve as a versatile approach to bridge light harvesting with surface reactions by ensuring species chemisorption. The chemisorption not only spatially enables the transfer of photoexcited electrons to reaction species, but also alters the form of active species to lower the photon energy requirement for reactions. In a proof of concept, oxygen molecules are activated into superoxide radicals on defect-rich tungsten oxide through visible-near-infrared illumination to trigger organic aerobic couplings of amines to corresponding imines. The excellent efficiency and durability for such a highly important process in chemical transformation can otherwise be virtually impossible to attain by counterpart materials. PMID:27351805

  6. Independent Activities for Accelerated Students: Individualized Reading Instruction for Students.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rapides Parish School Board, Alexandria, LAa.

    The teaching guide for use with accelerated elementary school students contains suggestions for independent reading activities, a list of independent reading books for beginning readers, and suggestions for creative activities. Stressed is the value of sharing enthusiasm about books to spur independent reading. Suggestions are given for talking…

  7. Small Spacecraft Active Thermal Control: Micro-Vascular Composites Enable Small Satellite Cooling

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ghosh, Alexander

    2016-01-01

    The Small Spacecraft Integrated Power System with Active Thermal Control project endeavors to achieve active thermal control for small spacecraft in a practical and lightweight structure by circulating a coolant through embedded micro-vascular channels in deployable composite panels. Typically, small spacecraft rely on small body mounted passive radiators to discard heat. This limits cooling capacity and leads to the necessity to design for limited mission operations. These restrictions severely limit the ability of the system to dissipate large amounts of heat from radios, propulsion systems, etc. An actively pumped cooling system combined with a large deployable radiator brings two key advantages over the state of the art for small spacecraft: capacity and flexibility. The use of a large deployable radiator increases the surface area of the spacecraft and allows the radiation surface to be pointed in a direction allowing the most cooling, drastically increasing cooling capacity. With active coolant circulation, throttling of the coolant flow can enable high heat transfer rates during periods of increased heat load, or isolate the radiator during periods of low heat dissipation.

  8. Team Building Activities for Young Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rogers, Kelly

    2004-01-01

    Team building activities are an excellent way to challenge students and teach them the critical communication and problem solving skills that encourage trust, empathy, and ability to work together. They create an atmosphere that enhances the ability to meet fitness and skill goals because students, regardless of skill level, will possess increased…

  9. Student Activities in Meteorology: SAM. Version 2.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Meier, Beverly L.; Passarelli, Elisa

    The task of providing hands-on as well as minds-on activities for students in science is one of concern to many scientists and educators. In an effort to inspire student interest in science and technology, scientists from the Forecast Systems Laboratory, a laboratory within the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration's (NOAA) Environmental…

  10. Development and Progress in Enabling the Photocatalyst Ti02 Visible-Light-Active

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Levine, Lanfang H.; Coutts, Janelle L.; Clausen, Christian A.

    2011-01-01

    Photocatalytic oxidation (PCO) of organic contaminants is a promising air and water quality management approach which offers energy and cost savings compared to thermal catalytic oxidation (TCO). The most widely used photocatalyst, anatase TiO2, has a wide band gap (3.2 eV) and is activated by UV photons. Since solar radiation consists of less than 4% UV, but contains 45% visible light, catalysts capable of utilizing these visible photons need to be developed to make peo approaches more efficient, economical, and safe. Researchers have attempted various approaches to enable TiO2 to be visible-light-active with varied degrees of success'. Strategies attempted thus far fall into three categories based on their electrochemical' mechanisms: 1) narrowing the band gap of TiO2 by implantation of transition metal elements or nonmetal elements such as N, S, and C, 2) modifying electron-transfer processes during PCO by adsorbing sensitizing dyes, and 3) employing light-induced interfacial electron transfer in the heteronanojunction systems consisting of narrow band gap semiconductors represented by metal sulfides and TiO2. There are diverse technical approaches to implement each of these strategies. This paper presents a review of these approaches and results of the photocatalytic activity and photonic efficiency of the end .products under visible light. Although resulting visible-light-active (VLA) photocatalysts show promise, there is often no comparison with unmodified TiO2 under UV. In a limited number of studies where such comparison was provided, the UV-induced catalytic activity of bare TiO2 is much greater than the visible-light-induced catalytic activity of the VLA catalyst. Furthermore, VLA-catalysts have much lower quantum efficiency compared to the approx.50% quantum efficiency of UV-catalysts. This stresses the need for continuing research in this area.

  11. Physical Activity among Ethnically Diverse College Students.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Suminski, Richard R.; Petosa, Rick; Utter, Alan C.; Zhang, James J.

    2002-01-01

    Compared physical activity patterns among Asian, African, white, and Hispanic, American college students. Self-report data indicated that nearly half of the sample did not engage in vigorous physical activity, and 16.7 percent were inactive. Weight-training, youthful physical activity, and television viewing accounted for a significant portion of…

  12. Student Activities in Meteorology (SAM), June 1994

    SciTech Connect

    Meier, B.L.; Passarelli, E.

    1994-06-01

    In an effort to inspire student interest in science and technology, scientists from the Forecast Systems Laboratory, a laboratory within the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration's (NOAA) Environmental Research Laboratories, and classroom teachers from the Boulder Valley School District collaborated to produce a series of classroom science activities on meteorology and atmospheric science. We call this series 'Student Activities in Meteorology,' or SAM. The goal is to provide activities that are interesting to students, and at the same time convenient and easy to use for teachers. The activity topics chosen are to incorporate trend setting scientific research and cutting edge technology. Several of the activities focus on the meteorological concerns of the Denver metropolitan area because many of NOAA's research labs are located in Boulder, where much of the research and testing for the region is performed. We believe that these activities are versatile and can be easily integrated into current science, environmental studies, health, social studies, and math curricula.

  13. Stat5 activation enables erythropoiesis in the absence of EpoR and Jak2.

    PubMed

    Grebien, Florian; Kerenyi, Marc A; Kovacic, Boris; Kolbe, Thomas; Becker, Verena; Dolznig, Helmut; Pfeffer, Klaus; Klingmüller, Ursula; Müller, Mathias; Beug, Hartmut; Müllner, Ernst W; Moriggl, Richard

    2008-05-01

    Erythropoiesis requires erythropoietin (Epo) and stem cell factor (SCF) signaling via their receptors EpoR and c-Kit. EpoR, like many other receptors involved in hematopoiesis, acts via the kinase Jak2. Deletion of EpoR or Janus kinase 2 (Jak2) causes embryonic lethality as a result of defective erythropoiesis. The contribution of distinct EpoR/Jak2-induced signaling pathways (mitogen-activated protein kinase, phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase, signal transducer and activator of transcription 5 [Stat5]) to functional erythropoiesis is incompletely understood. Here we demonstrate that expression of a constitutively activated Stat5a mutant (cS5) was sufficient to relieve the proliferation defect of Jak2(-/-) and EpoR(-/-) cells in an Epo-independent manner. In addition, tamoxifen-induced DNA binding of a Stat5a-estrogen receptor (ER)* fusion construct enabled erythropoiesis in the absence of Epo. Furthermore, c-Kit was able to enhance signaling through the Jak2-Stat5 axis, particularly in lymphoid and myeloid progenitors. Although abundance of hematopoietic stem cells was 2.5-fold reduced in Jak2(-/-) fetal livers, transplantation of Jak2(-/-)-cS5 fetal liver cells into irradiated mice gave rise to mature erythroid and myeloid cells of donor origin up to 6 months after transplantation. Cytokine- and c-Kit pathways do not function independently of each other in hematopoiesis but cooperate to attain full Jak2/Stat5 activation. In conclusion, activated Stat5 is a critical downstream effector of Jak2 in erythropoiesis/myelopoiesis, and Jak2 functionally links cytokine- with c-Kit-receptor tyrosine kinase signaling.

  14. Traditionally taught students learn; actively engaged students remember

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Franklin, Scott V.; Sayre, Eleanor C.; Clark, Jessica W.

    2014-08-01

    A common narrative in physics education research is that students taught in lecture-based classes learn less than those taught with activity-based reformed methods. We show this narrative is simplistic and misses important dynamics of student learning. In particular, we find students of both methods show equal short-term learning gains on a conceptual question dealing with electric potential. For traditionally taught students, this learning rapidly decays on a time scale of weeks, vanishing by the time of the typical end-of-term post-test. For students in reform-based classes, however, the knowledge is retained and may even be enhanced by subsequent instruction. This difference explains the many previous pre- and post-test studies that have found minimal learning gains in lecture-based courses. Our findings suggest a more nuanced model of student learning, one that is sensitive to time-dependent effects such as forgetting and interference. In addition, the findings suggest that lecture-based courses, by incorporating aspects designed to reinforce student understanding of previously covered topics, might approach the long-term learning found in research-based pedagogies.

  15. Technology-Enabled and Universally Designed Assessment: Considering Access in Measuring the Achievement of Students with Disabilities--A Foundation for Research

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Almond, Patricia; Winter, Phoebe; Cameto, Renee; Russell, Michael; Sato, Edynn; Clarke-Midura, Jody; Torres, Chloe; Haertel, Geneva; Dolan, Robert; Beddow, Peter; Lazarus, Sheryl

    2010-01-01

    This paper represents one outcome from the "Invitational Research Symposium on Technology-Enabled and Universally Designed Assessments," which examined technology-enabled assessments (TEA) and universal design (UD) as they relate to students with disabilities (SWD). It was developed to stimulate research into TEAs designed to make tests…

  16. Hermetic diamond capsules for biomedical implants enabled by gold active braze alloys.

    PubMed

    Lichter, Samantha G; Escudié, Mathilde C; Stacey, Alastair D; Ganesan, Kumaravelu; Fox, Kate; Ahnood, Arman; Apollo, Nicholas V; Kua, Dunstan C; Lee, Aaron Z; McGowan, Ceara; Saunders, Alexia L; Burns, Owen; Nayagam, David A X; Williams, Richard A; Garrett, David J; Meffin, Hamish; Prawer, Steven

    2015-01-01

    As the field of biomedical implants matures the functionality of implants is rapidly increasing. In the field of neural prostheses this is particularly apparent as researchers strive to build devices that interact with highly complex neural systems such as vision, hearing, touch and movement. A retinal implant, for example, is a highly complex device and the surgery, training and rehabilitation requirements involved in deploying such devices are extensive. Ideally, such devices will be implanted only once and will continue to function effectively for the lifetime of the patient. The first and most pivotal factor that determines device longevity is the encapsulation that separates the sensitive electronics of the device from the biological environment. This paper describes the realisation of a free standing device encapsulation made from diamond, the most impervious, long lasting and biochemically inert material known. A process of laser micro-machining and brazing is described detailing the fabrication of hermetic electrical feedthroughs and laser weldable seams using a 96.4% gold active braze alloy, another material renowned for biochemical longevity. Accelerated ageing of the braze alloy, feedthroughs and hermetic capsules yielded no evidence of corrosion and no loss of hermeticity. Samples of the gold braze implanted for 15 weeks, in vivo, caused minimal histopathological reaction and results were comparable to those obtained from medical grade silicone controls. The work described represents a first account of a free standing, fully functional hermetic diamond encapsulation for biomedical implants, enabled by gold active alloy brazing and laser micro-machining.

  17. Optimization of recombinant expression enables discovery of novel cytochrome P450 activity in rice diterpenoid biosynthesis

    PubMed Central

    Kitaoka, Naoki; Wu, Yisheng; Xu, Meimei; Peters, Reuben J.

    2015-01-01

    The oxygenation reactions catalyzed by cytochromes P450 (CYPs) play critical roles in plant natural products biosynthesis. At the same time, CYPs are one of most challenging enzymes to functionally characterize due to the difficulty of recombinantly expressing these membrane-associated monooxygenases. In the course of investigating rice diterpenoid biosynthesis we have developed a synthetic biology approach for functional expression of relevant CYPs in Escherichia coli. In certain cases activity was observed for only one of two closely related paralogs although it seems clear that related reactions are required for production of the known diterpenoids. Here we report that optimization of the recombinant expression system enabled characterization of not only these previously recalcitrant CYPs, but also discovery of additional activity relevant to rice diterpenoid biosynthesis. Of particular interest, CYP701A8 was found to catalyze 3β-hydroxylation of syn-pimaradiene, which is presumably relevant to momilactone biosynthesis, while CYP71Z6 & 7 were found to catalyze multiple reactions, with CYP71Z6 catalyzing the production of 2α,3α-dihydroxy-ent-isokaurene via 2α-hydroxy- ent-isokaurene, and CYP71Z7 catalyzing the production of 3α-hydroxy-ent-cassadien-2- one via 2α-hydroxy-ent-cassadiene and ent-cassadien-2-one, which may be relevant to oryzadione and phytocassane biosynthesis, respectively. PMID:25758958

  18. Reliability and validity of a GPS-enabled iPhone "app" to measure physical activity.

    PubMed

    Benson, Amanda Clare; Bruce, Lyndell; Gordon, Brett Ashley

    2015-01-01

    This study assessed the validity and reliability of an iPhone "app" and two sport-specific global positioning system (GPS) units to monitor distance, intensity and contextual physical activity. Forty (23 female, 17 male) 18-55-year-olds completed two trials of six laps around a 400-m athletics track wearing GPSports Pro and WiSpi units (5 and 1 Hz) and an iPhone(TM) with a Motion X GPS(TM) "app" that used the inbuilt iPhone location services application programming interface to obtain its sampling rate (which is likely to be ≤1 Hz). Overall, the statistical agreement, assessed using t-tests and Bland-Altman plots, indicated an underestimation of the known track distance (2.400 km) and average speed by the Motion X GPS "app" and GPSports Pro while the GPSports WiSpi(TM) device overestimated these outcomes. There was a ≤3% variation between trials for distance and average speed when measured by any of the GPS devices. Thus, the smartphone "app" trialled could be considered as an accessible alternative to provide high-quality contextualised data to enable ubiquitous monitoring and modification of programmes to ensure appropriate intensity and type of physical activity is prescribed and more importantly adhered to.

  19. Hermetic diamond capsules for biomedical implants enabled by gold active braze alloys.

    PubMed

    Lichter, Samantha G; Escudié, Mathilde C; Stacey, Alastair D; Ganesan, Kumaravelu; Fox, Kate; Ahnood, Arman; Apollo, Nicholas V; Kua, Dunstan C; Lee, Aaron Z; McGowan, Ceara; Saunders, Alexia L; Burns, Owen; Nayagam, David A X; Williams, Richard A; Garrett, David J; Meffin, Hamish; Prawer, Steven

    2015-01-01

    As the field of biomedical implants matures the functionality of implants is rapidly increasing. In the field of neural prostheses this is particularly apparent as researchers strive to build devices that interact with highly complex neural systems such as vision, hearing, touch and movement. A retinal implant, for example, is a highly complex device and the surgery, training and rehabilitation requirements involved in deploying such devices are extensive. Ideally, such devices will be implanted only once and will continue to function effectively for the lifetime of the patient. The first and most pivotal factor that determines device longevity is the encapsulation that separates the sensitive electronics of the device from the biological environment. This paper describes the realisation of a free standing device encapsulation made from diamond, the most impervious, long lasting and biochemically inert material known. A process of laser micro-machining and brazing is described detailing the fabrication of hermetic electrical feedthroughs and laser weldable seams using a 96.4% gold active braze alloy, another material renowned for biochemical longevity. Accelerated ageing of the braze alloy, feedthroughs and hermetic capsules yielded no evidence of corrosion and no loss of hermeticity. Samples of the gold braze implanted for 15 weeks, in vivo, caused minimal histopathological reaction and results were comparable to those obtained from medical grade silicone controls. The work described represents a first account of a free standing, fully functional hermetic diamond encapsulation for biomedical implants, enabled by gold active alloy brazing and laser micro-machining. PMID:25890743

  20. A Wearable Patch to Enable Long-Term Monitoring of Environmental, Activity and Hemodynamics Variables.

    PubMed

    Etemadi, Mozziyar; Inan, Omer T; Heller, J Alex; Hersek, Sinan; Klein, Liviu; Roy, Shuvo

    2016-04-01

    We present a low power multi-modal patch designed for measuring activity, altitude (based on high-resolution barometric pressure), a single-lead electrocardiogram, and a tri-axial seismocardiogram (SCG). Enabled by a novel embedded systems design methodology, this patch offers a powerful means of monitoring the physiology for both patients with chronic cardiovascular diseases, and the general population interested in personal health and fitness measures. Specifically, to the best of our knowledge, this patch represents the first demonstration of combined activity, environmental context, and hemodynamics monitoring, all on the same hardware, capable of operating for longer than 48 hours at a time with continuous recording. The three-channels of SCG and one-lead ECG are all sampled at 500 Hz with high signal-to-noise ratio, the pressure sensor is sampled at 10 Hz, and all signals are stored to a microSD card with an average current consumption of less than 2 mA from a 3.7 V coin cell (LIR2450) battery. In addition to electronic characterization, proof-of-concept exercise recovery studies were performed with this patch, suggesting the ability to discriminate between hemodynamic and electrophysiology response to light, moderate, and heavy exercise. PMID:25974943

  1. Cross-Couplings Using Aryl Ethers via C-O Bond Activation Enabled by Nickel Catalysts.

    PubMed

    Tobisu, Mamoru; Chatani, Naoto

    2015-06-16

    Arene synthesis has been revolutionized by the invention of catalytic cross-coupling reactions, wherein aryl halides can be coupled with organometallic and organic nucleophiles. Although the replacement of aryl halides with phenol derivatives would lead to more economical and ecological methods, success has been primarily limited to activated phenol derivatives such as triflates. Aryl ethers arguably represent one of the most ideal substrates in terms of availability, cost, safety, and atom efficiency. However, the robust nature of the C(aryl)-O bonds of aryl ethers renders it extremely difficult to use them in catalytic reactions among the phenol derivatives. In 1979, Wenkert reported a seminal work on the nickel-catalyzed cross-coupling of aryl ethers with Grignard reagents. However, it was not until 2004 that the unique ability of a low-valent nickel species to activate otherwise unreactive C(aryl)-O bonds was appreciated with Dankwardt's identification of the Ni(0)/PCy3 system, which significantly expanded the efficiency of the Wenkert reaction. Application of the nickel catalyst to cross-couplings with other nucleophiles was first accomplished in 2008 by our group using organoboron reagents. Later on, several other nucleophiles, including organozinc reagents, amines, hydrosilane, and hydrogen were shown to be coupled with aryl ethers under nickel catalysis. Despite these advances, progress in this field is relatively slow because of the low reactivity of benzene derivatives (e.g., anisole) compared with polyaromatic substrates (e.g., methoxynaphthalene), particularly when less reactive and synthetically useful nucleophiles are used. The "naphthalene problem" has been overcome by the use of N-heterocyclic carbene (NHC) ligands bearing bulky N-alkyl substituents, which enables a wide range of aryl ethers to be coupled with organoboron nucleophiles. Moreover, the use of N-alkyl-substituted NHC ligands allows the use of alkynylmagnesium reagents, thereby realizing

  2. Sports Medicine. Instructor's Guide, Student's Manual, Student Learning Activities.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fair, Helena J.

    The instructor's guide, the first of three documents in this package, is for a course designed for students investigating the activities within the sports medicine department or considering any of the areas of kinesiology as a career. The material is designed for individualized study and is competency based with educational outcomes stated for…

  3. Developing Long-Term Computing Skills among Low-Achieving Students via Web-Enabled Problem-Based Learning and Self-Regulated Learning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tsai, Chia-Wen; Lee, Tsang-Hsiung; Shen, Pei-Di

    2013-01-01

    Many private vocational schools in Taiwan have taken to enrolling students with lower levels of academic achievement. The authors re-designed a course and conducted a series of quasi-experiments to develop students' long-term computing skills, and examined the longitudinal effects of web-enabled, problem-based learning (PBL) and…

  4. Physical Activity among Community College Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Young, Sarah J.; Sturts, Jill R.; Ross, Craig M.

    2015-01-01

    This exploratory study provides insight into the perceived physical activity levels of students attending a Midwestern 2-year community college. Over 60% of respondents were classified as overweight or obese based on a BMI measurement. The majority of respondents were not participating regularly in physical activity to gain any health benefits,…

  5. Advanced Placement Economics. Microeconomics: Student Activities.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Morton, John S.

    This book is designed to help advanced placement students better understand microeconomic concepts through various activities. The book contains 5 units with 73 activities, sample multiple-choice questions, sample short essay questions, and sample long essay questions. The units are entitled: (1) "The Basic Economic Problem"; (2) "The Nature and…

  6. Advanced Placement Economics. Macroeconomics: Student Activities.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Morton, John S.

    This book is designed to help advanced placement students better understand macroeconomic concepts through various activities. The book contains 6 units with 64 activities, sample multiple-choice questions, sample short essay questions, and sample long essay questions. The units are entitled: (1) "Basic Economic Concepts"; (2) "Measuring Economic…

  7. Helping Students Become Active and Smart!

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Holt, Rhonda

    2005-01-01

    With the recently released Position Statement, "Physical Activity for Children Guidelines" (NASPE, 2004), the time is ideal for physical educators to look for ways to encourage students to be active outside the classroom. The first guideline recommends "children accumulate at least 60 minutes, and up to several hours of age-appropriate physical…

  8. Health Activities for Primary School Students.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Peace Corps, Washington, DC. Information Collection and Exchange Div.

    This manual targets new and second-year Peace Corps volunteers, presenting health lessons and activities for primary school students in Thailand. Each section of the manual outlines basic technical information about the topic, contains several detailed lesson plans, and lists quick activities that can be carried out at schools. Songs and recipes…

  9. Practical Activities in Astronomy for Nonscience Students.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bisard, Walter J.

    1985-01-01

    Describes science activities which have been successful with nonscience majors. Each activity requires students to make observations, record the data gathered, interpret data, and prepare a written report. Subject areas include motion of stars, sunspots, lunar orbits, sunset points, meteor showers, and sun shadows. (JN)

  10. Perspectives of Constraining and Enabling Factors for Health-Promoting Physical Activity by Adults with Intellectual Disability

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Temple, Viviene A.; Walkley, Jeff W.

    2007-01-01

    Background: Physical activity influences health in individuals and within populations. This study explored factors perceived as enabling or inhibiting participation in physical activity by adults with intellectual disability from a health promotion perspective. Method: Six focus group interviews were conducted: adults with intellectual disability…

  11. Factors that Limit and Enable Preschool-Aged Children's Physical Activity on Child Care Centre Playgrounds

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Coleman, Bianca; Dyment, Janet E.

    2013-01-01

    The incidence of childhood obesity amongst preschool-aged children has increased dramatically in recent years and can be attributed, in part, to a lack of physical activity amongst children in this age group. This study explores the social factors that stand to limit and/or enable children's physical activity opportunities in outdoor settings…

  12. Barriers to and enablers of physical activity in patients with COPD following a hospital admission: a qualitative study

    PubMed Central

    Thorpe, Olivia; Kumar, Saravana; Johnston, Kylie

    2014-01-01

    Background Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) is characterized by a persistent blockage of airflow, prompting episodes of shortness of breath, commonly leading to hospitalization. Hospitalization may lead to a decline in physical activity following discharge. Physical activity has been shown to improve symptoms of COPD and reduce readmissions, and to decrease morbidity and mortality. This study aims to explore, from the perspectives of people with COPD, the barriers to and enablers of participation in physical activity following hospitalization for COPD. Methods This study had a qualitative descriptive design and included semistructured interviews with 28 adult COPD patients who had been admitted to hospital with a primary diagnosis of exacerbation of COPD. Results A plethora of barriers to but fewer enablers of participation in physical activity and pulmonary rehabilitation were identified for this cohort of people. The main barriers identified were health-related (comorbidities, COPD symptoms, and physical injury or illness) environment-related (weather, transport, and finance), and self-related. The main enabling factors reported were access to health professionals and equipment, social support, routine and extracurricular activities, personal goals and motivation, and the effect of physical activity and “feeling better”. Conclusion This research provides a snapshot of the barriers to and enablers of physical activity and pulmonary rehabilitation in people with COPD. It is evident that there are significant barriers which hinder the ability of people with COPD to undertake and continue participation in physical activity and pulmonary rehabilitation. While there are some enablers that may counter these barriers, it is clear that health professionals dealing with people suffering from COPD need to actively recognize and address barriers to physical activity and pulmonary rehabilitation. Hospital admission may create an opportunity for implementation

  13. Student-Student Online Coaching: Conceptualizing an Emerging Learning Activity

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hrastinski, Stefan; Stenbom, Stefan

    2013-01-01

    The aim of this paper is to describe student-student online coaching, defined as "an online service where a student gets support on a specific subject matter from a more experienced student". Student-student online coaching emphasizes learning a subject matter by giving a student the opportunity to get coached by a coach, i.e. a more experienced…

  14. Spinal neuronal activation during locomotor-like activity enabled by epidural stimulation and 5-HT agonists in spinal rats

    PubMed Central

    Duru, Paul O.; Tillakaratne, Niranjala J.K.; Kim, Jung A.; Zhong, Hui; Stauber, Stacey M.; Pham, Trinh T.; Xiao, Mei S.; Edgerton, V. Reggie; Roy, Roland R.

    2015-01-01

    The neural networks that generate stepping in complete spinal adult rats remain poorly defined. To address this problem we used c-fos (an activity-dependent marker) to identify active interneurons and motoneurons in the lumbar spinal cord of adult spinal rats during a 30-minute bout of bipedal stepping. Spinal rats were either step trained (30 min/day, 3 days/week for 7.5 weeks) or not step-trained. Stepping was enabled by epidural stimulation and the administration of the serotonergic agonists quipazine and 8-OHDPAT. A third group of spinal rats served as untreated (no stimulation, drugs, or stepping) controls. The number of activated cholinergic central canal cluster cells and partition neurons was higher in both step-trained and non-trained than untreated rats, and higher in non-trained than step-trained rats. The latter finding suggests that daily treatment with epidural stimulation plus serotonergic agonist treatment without step training enhanced the excitability of a broader cholinergic interneuronal population than step training. The number of activated interneurons in laminae II-VI of lumbar cross sections was higher in both step-trained and non-trained than untreated rats, and highest in step-trained rats. This finding suggests that this population of interneurons was responsive to epidural stimulation plus serotonergic treatment and that load-bearing induced when stepping had an additive effect. The number of activated motoneurons of all size categories was higher in the step-trained than the other two groups, reflecting a strong effect of loading on motoneuron recruitment. In general, these results indicate that the spinal networks for locomotion are similar with and without brain input. PMID:25789848

  15. Astronomy Student Activities Using Stellarium Software

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Benge, Raymond D.; Tuttle, S. R.

    2012-01-01

    Planetarium programs can be used to provide a valuable learning experience for introductory astronomy students. Educational activities can be designed to utilize the capabilities of the software to display the sky, coordinates, motions in the sky, etc., in order to learn basic astronomical concepts. Most of the major textbook publishers have an option of bundling planetarium software and even laboratory activities using such software with textbooks. However, commercial planetarium software often is updated on a different schedule from the textbook revision and new edition schedule. The software updates also sometimes occur out of sync with college textbook adoption deadlines. Changes in software and activity curriculum often translate into increases costs for students and the college. To provide stability to the process, faculty at Tarrant County College have developed a set of laboratory exercises, entitled Distant Nature, using free open source Stellarium software. Stellarium is a simple, yet powerful, program that is available in formats that run on a variety of operating systems (Windows, Apple, linux). A web site was developed for the Distant Nature activities having a set version of Stellarium that students can download and install on their own computers. Also on the web site, students can access the instructions and worksheets associated with the various Stellarium based activities. A variety of activities are available to support two semesters of introductory astronomy. The Distant Nature web site has been used for one year with Tarrant County College astronomy students and is now available for use by other institutions. The Distant Nature web site is http://www.stuttle1.com/DN_Astro/index.html .

  16. Student Activity Funds: Procedures and Controls.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cuzzetto, Charles E.

    2000-01-01

    An effective internal-control system can help school business administrators meet the challenges of accounting for student activity funds. Such a system should include appropriate policies and procedures, identification of key control points, self-assessments, audit trails, and internal and external audits. (MLH)

  17. Journey to China: Activities for Elementary Students.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stanford Univ., CA. Stanford Program on International and Cross Cultural Education.

    Ten lessons designed to introduce elementary students to China are featured in this document. The lessons are aimed at second through fourth grade, but they also include follow-up activities for kindergarten through sixth grade and are easily adapted to a given grade level. The lessons also are designed to incorporate elements and skills…

  18. Quilts of Alaska--Student Activities.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Alaska State Museum, Juneau.

    This student activities booklet, "Quilts of Alaska," contains historical and educational information on quilts. It is colorfully illustrated with examples of different types of quilts. The booklet describes album or signature quilts, which from 1840 to the 1890s, were a U.S. fad, such as were autograph albums. As the name suggests, these quilts…

  19. Farkle Fundamentals and Fun. Activities for Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hooley, Donald E.

    2014-01-01

    The dice game Farkle provides an excellent basis for four activities that reinforce probability and expected value concepts for students in an introductory statistics class. These concepts appear in the increasingly popular AP statistics course (Peck 2011) and are used in analyzing ethical issues from insurance and gambling (COMAP 2009; Woodward…

  20. Embedding Research Activities to Enhance Student Learning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Webster, Cynthia M.; Kenney, Jacqueline

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this paper's novel, research-oriented approach is to embed research-based activities in a core second-year course of a university business degree program to support and develop student research capabilities. Design/methodology/approach: The design draws on Boud and Prosser's work to foster participation in a…

  1. Student Active Learning Methods in Physical Chemistry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hinde, Robert J.; Kovac, Jeffrey

    2001-01-01

    We describe two strategies for implementing active learning in physical chemistry. One involves supplementing a traditional lecture course with heavily computer-based active-learning exercises carried out by cooperative groups in a department computer lab. The other uses cooperative learning almost exclusively, supplemented by occasional mini-lectures. Both approaches seemed to result in better student learning and a more positive attitude toward the subject. On the basis of our respective experiences using active learning techniques, we discuss some of the strengths of these techniques and some of the challenges we encountered using the active-learning approach in teaching physical chemistry.

  2. Incorporating Student Activities into Climate Change Education

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Steele, H.; Kelly, K.; Klein, D.; Cadavid, A. C.

    2013-12-01

    atmospheric circulation with applications of the Lorenz model, explored the land-sea breeze problem with the Dynamics and Thermodynamics Circulation Model (DTDM), and developed simple radiative transfer models. Class projects explored the effects of varying the content of CO2 and CH4 in the atmosphere, as well as the properties of paleoclimates in atmospheric simulations using EdGCM. Initial assessment of student knowledge, attitudes, and behaviors associated with these activities, particularly about climate change, was measured. Pre- and post-course surveys provided student perspectives about the courses and their learning about remote sensing and climate change concepts. Student performance on the tutorials and course projects evaluated students' ability to learn and apply their knowledge about climate change and skills with remote sensing to assigned problems or proposed projects of their choice. Survey and performance data illustrated that the exercises were successful in meeting their intended learning objectives as well as opportunities for further refinement and expansion.

  3. 2 CFR 200.469 - Student activity costs.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 2 Grants and Agreements 1 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Student activity costs. 200.469 Section 200... REQUIREMENTS FOR FEDERAL AWARDS Cost Principles General Provisions for Selected Items of Cost § 200.469 Student activity costs. Costs incurred for intramural activities, student publications, student clubs, and...

  4. Student Attitudes and Recommendations on Active Learning: A Student-Led Survey Gauging Course Effectiveness.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Marbach-Ad, Gili; Seal, October; Sokolove, Phillip

    2001-01-01

    Describes an active learning approach used in an introductory biology class and evaluates the project with student surveys. Presents students' answers to survey questions. (Contains 16 references.) (YDS)

  5. Student Perceptions of Selected Technology Student Association Activities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Taylor, Jerianne S.

    2006-01-01

    The Technology Student Association (TSA) is the only student organization dedicated exclusively to students enrolled in technology education classes in grades K-12. The effect that TSA has on a student member is often difficult to document. It is only through direct interaction with the student that these effects can be recorded; this in turn…

  6. Number Wonders: 171 Activities to Meet Math Standards & Inspire Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kuhns, Catherine Jones

    2006-01-01

    In this book, author Catherine Jones Kuhns introduces student- and teacher-friendly math activities designed to get students thinking like mathematicians and loving mathematics, while addressing content standards through grade 2. She also shows how to make math fun for students, get children actively engaged in learning, create a student-centered…

  7. Assessing High School Student Learning on Science Outreach Lab Activities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Thomas, Courtney L.

    2012-01-01

    The effect of hands-on laboratory activities on secondary student learning was examined. Assessment was conducted over a two-year period, with 262 students participating the first year and 264 students the second year. Students took a prequiz, performed a laboratory activity (gas chromatography of alcohols, or photosynthesis and respiration), and…

  8. Tanoshii Gakushu--Learning with Enjoyment: Activities about Japan for Elementary Students. Second Edition.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shoresman, Michele; Kinoshita, Waunita

    A variety of experiences are provided to encourage active learning and involvement on the part of U.S. students studying Japanese culture. The aim is to enable the mathematics, English, art, physical education, and science teacher as well as the social studies instructor to incorporate the study of Japan into their curricula. In each of these…

  9. Adapting Creative and Relaxation Activities to Students with Cancer

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jenko, Nika; Stopar, Mojca Lipec

    2015-01-01

    The team which forms a comprehensive treatment plan for students with cancer includes, among other experts, special educators. In cooperation with other team members, their role is to enable students to integrate in the educational process, having regard to their individual needs. In the present paper we introduce the study of specific methodical…

  10. Student Perceptions of Social Justice and Social Justice Activities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Torres-Harding, Susan R.; Steele, Cheronda; Schulz, Erica; Taha, Farah; Pico, Chantal

    2014-01-01

    Encouraging students to engage in activities that actively seek to promote social justice is a goal of many educators. This study analyzed college student perceptions around social justice and related activities in a medium-sized, urban university in the United States. Students' open-ended responses to questions assessing their perceptions of…

  11. Hands-On Activities and Their Influence on Students' Interest

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Holstermann, Nina; Grube, Dietmar; Bogeholz, Susanne

    2010-01-01

    This study investigates the influence of hands-on activities on students' interest. We researched whether students with experience in specific hands-on activities show higher interest in these activities than students without experience. Furthermore, the relationship between the quality of the hands-on experience and interest in the respective…

  12. Confined Activation and Subdiffractive Localization Enables Whole-Cell PALM with Genetically Expressed Probes

    PubMed Central

    York, Andrew G.; Ghitani, Alireza; Vaziri, Alipasha; Davidson, Michael W.; Shroff, Hari

    2011-01-01

    We demonstrate 3D superresolution microscopy in whole fixed cells using photoactivated localization microscopy (PALM). The use of the bright, genetically expressed fluorescent marker photoactivatable mCherry (PA-mCherry1) in combination with near diffraction-limited confinement of photoactivation using two-photon illumination and 3D localization methods allowed us to investigate a variety of cellular structures at <50 nm lateral and <100 nm axial resolution. Compared to existing methods, we substantially reduce excitation and bleaching of unlocalized markers, enabling 3D PALM imaging with high localization density in thick structures. Our 3D localization algorithms based on cross-correlation do not rely on idealized noise models or specific optical configurations, allowing flexible instrument design. Generation of appropriate fusion constructs and expression in Cos7 cells allowed us to image invaginations of the nuclear membrane, vimentin fibrils, the mitochondrial network, and the endoplasmic reticulum at depths greater than 8 μm. PMID:21317909

  13. Personalized Multilayer Daily Life Profiling Through Context Enabled Activity Classification and Motion Reconstruction: An Integrated System Approach.

    PubMed

    Xu, James Y; Wang, Yan; Barrett, Mick; Dobkin, Bruce; Pottie, Greg J; Kaiser, William J

    2016-01-01

    Profiling the daily activity of a physically disabled person in the community would enable healthcare professionals to monitor the type, quantity, and quality of their patients' compliance with recommendations for exercise, fitness, and practice of skilled movements, as well as enable feedback about performance in real-world situations. Based on our early research in in-community activity profiling, we present in this paper an end-to-end system capable of reporting a patient's daily activity at multiple levels of granularity: 1) at the highest level, information on the location categories a patient is able to visit; 2) within each location category, information on the activities a patient is able to perform; and 3) at the lowest level, motion trajectory, visualization, and metrics computation of each activity. Our methodology is built upon a physical activity prescription model coupled with MEMS inertial sensors and mobile device kits that can be sent to a patient at home. A novel context-guided activity-monitoring concept with categorical location context is used to achieve enhanced classification accuracy and throughput. The methodology is then seamlessly integrated with motion reconstruction and metrics computation to provide comprehensive layered reporting of a patient's daily life. We also present an implementation of the methodology featuring a novel location context detection algorithm using WiFi augmented GPS and overlays, with motion reconstruction and visualization algorithms for practical in-community deployment. Finally, we use a series of experimental field evaluations to confirm the accuracy of the system. PMID:25546868

  14. Personalized Multilayer Daily Life Profiling Through Context Enabled Activity Classification and Motion Reconstruction: An Integrated System Approach.

    PubMed

    Xu, James Y; Wang, Yan; Barrett, Mick; Dobkin, Bruce; Pottie, Greg J; Kaiser, William J

    2016-01-01

    Profiling the daily activity of a physically disabled person in the community would enable healthcare professionals to monitor the type, quantity, and quality of their patients' compliance with recommendations for exercise, fitness, and practice of skilled movements, as well as enable feedback about performance in real-world situations. Based on our early research in in-community activity profiling, we present in this paper an end-to-end system capable of reporting a patient's daily activity at multiple levels of granularity: 1) at the highest level, information on the location categories a patient is able to visit; 2) within each location category, information on the activities a patient is able to perform; and 3) at the lowest level, motion trajectory, visualization, and metrics computation of each activity. Our methodology is built upon a physical activity prescription model coupled with MEMS inertial sensors and mobile device kits that can be sent to a patient at home. A novel context-guided activity-monitoring concept with categorical location context is used to achieve enhanced classification accuracy and throughput. The methodology is then seamlessly integrated with motion reconstruction and metrics computation to provide comprehensive layered reporting of a patient's daily life. We also present an implementation of the methodology featuring a novel location context detection algorithm using WiFi augmented GPS and overlays, with motion reconstruction and visualization algorithms for practical in-community deployment. Finally, we use a series of experimental field evaluations to confirm the accuracy of the system.

  15. Carbon–carbon bond activation of cyclobutenones enabled by the addition of chiral organocatalyst to ketone

    PubMed Central

    Li, Bao-Sheng; Wang, Yuhuang; Jin, Zhichao; Zheng, Pengcheng; Ganguly, Rakesh; Chi, Yonggui Robin

    2015-01-01

    The activation of carbon–carbon (C–C) bonds is an effective strategy in building functional molecules. The C–C bond activation is typically accomplished via metal catalysis, with which high levels of enantioselectivity are difficult to achieve due to high reactivity of metal catalysts and the metal-bound intermediates. It remains largely unexplored to use organocatalysis for C–C bond activation. Here we describe an organocatalytic activation of C–C bonds through the addition of an NHC to a ketone moiety that initiates a C–C single bond cleavage as a key step to generate an NHC-bound intermediate for chemo- and stereo-selective reactions. This reaction constitutes an asymmetric functionalization of cyclobutenones using organocatalysts via a C–C bond activation process. Structurally diverse and multicyclic compounds could be obtained with high optical purities via an atom and redox economic process. PMID:25652912

  16. Dynamic assembly of a membrane signaling complex enables selective activation of NFAT by Orai1.

    PubMed

    Kar, Pulak; Samanta, Krishna; Kramer, Holger; Morris, Otto; Bakowski, Daniel; Parekh, Anant B

    2014-06-16

    NFAT-dependent gene expression is essential for the development and function of the nervous, immune, and cardiovascular systems and kidney, bone, and skeletal muscle. Most NFAT protein resides in the cytoplasm because of extensive phosphorylation, which masks a nuclear localization sequence. Dephosphorylation by the Ca(2+)-calmodulin-activated protein phosphatase calcineurin triggers NFAT migration into the nucleus. In some cell types, NFAT can be activated by Ca(2+) nanodomains near open store-operated Orai1 and voltage-gated Ca(2+) channels in the plasma membrane. How local Ca(2+) near Orai1 is detected and whether other Orai channels utilize a similar mechanism remain unclear. Here, we report that the paralog Orai3 fails to activate NFAT. Orai1 is effective in activating gene expression via Ca(2+) nanodomains because it participates in a membrane-delimited signaling complex that forms after store depletion and brings calcineurin, via the scaffolding protein AKAP79, to calmodulin tethered to Orai1. By contrast, Orai3 interacts less well with AKAP79 after store depletion, rendering it ineffective in activating NFAT. A channel chimera of Orai3 with the N terminus of Orai1 was able to couple local Ca(2+) entry to NFAT activation, identifying the N-terminal domain of Orai1 as central to Ca(2+) nanodomain-transcription coupling. The formation of a store-dependent signaling complex at the plasma membrane provides for selective activation of a fundamental downstream response by Orai1.

  17. 25 CFR 36.43 - Standard XVI-Student activities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... activities program based on assessment of both student and program needs. Each activity program shall help... activities that include special interest clubs, physical activities, student government, and cultural affairs. The activity program shall be an integral part of the overall educational program. (a) All...

  18. Physical activity barriers and enablers in older Veterans with lower-limb amputation.

    PubMed

    Littman, Alyson J; Boyko, Edward J; Thompson, Mary Lou; Haselkorn, Jodie K; Sangeorzan, Bruce J; Arterburn, David E

    2014-01-01

    Little is known about the types of physical activities that older individuals with lower-limb loss perform, correlates of regular physical activity (PA), and barriers and facilitators to PA. We conducted an exploratory study in 158 older Veterans from the Pacific Northwest with a partial foot (35%), below-knee (39%) and above-knee (26%) amputation. Ninety-eight percent of survey respondents were male, on average 65 yr of age and 15 yr postamputation; 36% of amputations were trauma-related. The most commonly reported physical activities were muscle strengthening (42%), yard work and/or gardening (30%), and bicycling (11%). Forty-three percent were classified as physically active based on weekly moderate- and vigorous-intensity PA. History of vigorous preamputation PA was positively associated with being active, while low wealth and watching ≥5 h/d of television/videos were inversely associated. While pain- and resource-related barriers to PA were most frequently reported, only knowledge-related and interest/motivation-related barriers were inversely associated with being active. Family support and financial assistance to join a gym were the most commonly reported factors that would facilitate PA. To increase PA in the older amputee population, interventions should address motivational issues, knowledge gaps, and television watching; reduce financial barriers to exercising; and consider involving family members.

  19. Guanylate binding proteins enable rapid activation of canonical and noncanonical inflammasomes in Chlamydia-infected macrophages.

    PubMed

    Finethy, Ryan; Jorgensen, Ine; Haldar, Arun K; de Zoete, Marcel R; Strowig, Till; Flavell, Richard A; Yamamoto, Masahiro; Nagarajan, Uma M; Miao, Edward A; Coers, Jörn

    2015-12-01

    Interferon (IFN)-inducible guanylate binding proteins (GBPs) mediate cell-autonomous host resistance to bacterial pathogens and promote inflammasome activation. The prevailing model postulates that these two GBP-controlled activities are directly linked through GBP-dependent vacuolar lysis. It was proposed that the rupture of pathogen-containing vacuoles (PVs) by GBPs destroyed the microbial refuge and simultaneously contaminated the host cell cytosol with microbial activators of inflammasomes. Here, we demonstrate that GBP-mediated host resistance and GBP-mediated inflammatory responses can be uncoupled. We show that PVs formed by the rodent pathogen Chlamydia muridarum, so-called inclusions, remain free of GBPs and that C. muridarum is impervious to GBP-mediated restrictions on bacterial growth. Although GBPs neither bind to C. muridarum inclusions nor restrict C. muridarum growth, we find that GBPs promote inflammasome activation in C. muridarum-infected macrophages. We demonstrate that C. muridarum infections induce GBP-dependent pyroptosis through both caspase-11-dependent noncanonical and caspase-1-dependent canonical inflammasomes. Among canonical inflammasomes, we find that C. muridarum and the human pathogen Chlamydia trachomatis activate not only NLRP3 but also AIM2. Our data show that GBPs support fast-kinetics processing and secretion of interleukin-1β (IL-1β) and IL-18 by the NLRP3 inflammasome but are dispensable for the secretion of the same cytokines at later times postinfection. Because IFN-γ fails to induce IL-1β transcription, GBP-dependent fast-kinetics inflammasome activation can drive the preferential processing of constitutively expressed IL-18 in IFN-γ-primed macrophages in the absence of prior Toll-like receptor stimulation. Together, our results reveal that GBPs control the kinetics of inflammasome activation and thereby shape macrophage responses to Chlamydia infections.

  20. Guanylate Binding Proteins Enable Rapid Activation of Canonical and Noncanonical Inflammasomes in Chlamydia-Infected Macrophages

    PubMed Central

    Finethy, Ryan; Jorgensen, Ine; Haldar, Arun K.; de Zoete, Marcel R.; Strowig, Till; Flavell, Richard A.; Yamamoto, Masahiro; Nagarajan, Uma M.; Miao, Edward A.

    2015-01-01

    Interferon (IFN)-inducible guanylate binding proteins (GBPs) mediate cell-autonomous host resistance to bacterial pathogens and promote inflammasome activation. The prevailing model postulates that these two GBP-controlled activities are directly linked through GBP-dependent vacuolar lysis. It was proposed that the rupture of pathogen-containing vacuoles (PVs) by GBPs destroyed the microbial refuge and simultaneously contaminated the host cell cytosol with microbial activators of inflammasomes. Here, we demonstrate that GBP-mediated host resistance and GBP-mediated inflammatory responses can be uncoupled. We show that PVs formed by the rodent pathogen Chlamydia muridarum, so-called inclusions, remain free of GBPs and that C. muridarum is impervious to GBP-mediated restrictions on bacterial growth. Although GBPs neither bind to C. muridarum inclusions nor restrict C. muridarum growth, we find that GBPs promote inflammasome activation in C. muridarum-infected macrophages. We demonstrate that C. muridarum infections induce GBP-dependent pyroptosis through both caspase-11-dependent noncanonical and caspase-1-dependent canonical inflammasomes. Among canonical inflammasomes, we find that C. muridarum and the human pathogen Chlamydia trachomatis activate not only NLRP3 but also AIM2. Our data show that GBPs support fast-kinetics processing and secretion of interleukin-1β (IL-1β) and IL-18 by the NLRP3 inflammasome but are dispensable for the secretion of the same cytokines at later times postinfection. Because IFN-γ fails to induce IL-1β transcription, GBP-dependent fast-kinetics inflammasome activation can drive the preferential processing of constitutively expressed IL-18 in IFN-γ-primed macrophages in the absence of prior Toll-like receptor stimulation. Together, our results reveal that GBPs control the kinetics of inflammasome activation and thereby shape macrophage responses to Chlamydia infections. PMID:26416908

  1. Student Activism and Student Exclusions in South Africa

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Koen, Charlton; Cele, Mlungisi; Libhaber, Arial

    2006-01-01

    On average, about 25 percent of students leave higher education (HE) institutions annually in South Africa because they are excluded on academic and financial grounds. To resist such putouts, student boycotts and protests are common despite the fact that student organizations were incorporated into decision-making processes at HE institutions…

  2. A steric tethering approach enables palladium-catalysed C-H activation of primary amino alcohols.

    PubMed

    Calleja, Jonas; Pla, Daniel; Gorman, Timothy W; Domingo, Victoriano; Haffemayer, Benjamin; Gaunt, Matthew J

    2015-12-01

    Aliphatic primary amines are a class of chemical feedstock essential to the synthesis of higher-order nitrogen-containing molecules, commonly found in biologically active compounds and pharmaceutical agents. New methods for the construction of complex amines remain a continuous challenge to synthetic chemists. Here, we outline a general palladium-catalysed strategy for the functionalization of aliphatic C-H bonds within amino alcohols, an important class of small molecule. Central to this strategy is the temporary conversion of catalytically incompatible primary amino alcohols into hindered secondary amines that are capable of undergoing a sterically promoted palladium-catalysed C-H activation. Furthermore, a hydrogen bond between amine and catalyst intensifies interactions around the palladium and orients the aliphatic amine substituents in an ideal geometry for C-H activation. This catalytic method directly transforms simple, easily accessible amines into highly substituted, functionally concentrated and structurally diverse products, and can streamline the synthesis of biologically important amine-containing molecules.

  3. A steric tethering approach enables palladium-catalysed C-H activation of primary amino alcohols

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Calleja, Jonas; Pla, Daniel; Gorman, Timothy W.; Domingo, Victoriano; Haffemayer, Benjamin; Gaunt, Matthew J.

    2015-12-01

    Aliphatic primary amines are a class of chemical feedstock essential to the synthesis of higher-order nitrogen-containing molecules, commonly found in biologically active compounds and pharmaceutical agents. New methods for the construction of complex amines remain a continuous challenge to synthetic chemists. Here, we outline a general palladium-catalysed strategy for the functionalization of aliphatic C-H bonds within amino alcohols, an important class of small molecule. Central to this strategy is the temporary conversion of catalytically incompatible primary amino alcohols into hindered secondary amines that are capable of undergoing a sterically promoted palladium-catalysed C-H activation. Furthermore, a hydrogen bond between amine and catalyst intensifies interactions around the palladium and orients the aliphatic amine substituents in an ideal geometry for C-H activation. This catalytic method directly transforms simple, easily accessible amines into highly substituted, functionally concentrated and structurally diverse products, and can streamline the synthesis of biologically important amine-containing molecules.

  4. Enzyme activity assays within microstructured optical fibers enabled by automated alignment

    PubMed Central

    Warren-Smith, Stephen C.; Nie, Guiying; Schartner, Erik P.; Salamonsen, Lois A.; Monro, Tanya M.

    2012-01-01

    A fluorescence-based enzyme activity assay has been demonstrated within a small-core microstructured optical fiber (MOF) for the first time. To achieve this, a reflection-based automated alignment system has been developed, which uses feedback and piezoelectric actuators to maintain optical alignment. The auto-alignment system provides optical stability for the time required to perform an activity assay. The chosen assay is based on the enzyme proprotein convertase 5/6 (PC6) and has important applications in women’s health. PMID:23243579

  5. Nanoparticle-based probes to enable noninvasive imaging of proteolytic activity for cancer diagnosis.

    PubMed

    Anani, Tareq; Panizzi, Peter; David, Allan E

    2016-08-01

    Proteases play a key role in tumor biology, with high expression levels often correlating with poor prognosis for cancer patients - making them excellent disease markers for tumor diagnosis. Despite their significance, quantifying proteolytic activity in vivo remains a challenge. Nanoparticles, with their ability to serve as scaffolds having unique chemical, optical and magnetic properties, offer the promise of merging diagnostic medicine with material engineering. Such nanoparticles can interact preferentially with proteases enriched in tumors, providing the ability to assess disease state in a noninvasive and spatiotemporal manner. We review recent advances in the development of nanoparticles for imaging and quantification of proteolytic activity in tumor models, and prognosticate future advancements. PMID:27465386

  6. Identifying the rules of engagement enabling leukocyte rolling, activation, and adhesion.

    PubMed

    Tang, Jonathan; Hunt, C Anthony

    2010-02-19

    densities were above a critical level. Importantly, at low densities LFA1 clustering enabled improved efficiency: adhesion exhibited measurable, cell level positive cooperativity.

  7. Testing of SMA-enabled Active Chevron Prototypes under Representative Flow Conditions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Turner, Travis L.; Cabell,Randolph H.; Cano, Roberto J.; Silcox, Richard J.

    2008-01-01

    Control of jet noise continues to be an important research topic. Exhaust-nozzle chevrons have been shown to reduce jet noise, but parametric effects are not well understood. Additionally, thrust loss due to chevrons at cruise suggests significant benefit from active chevrons. The focus of this study is development of an active chevron concept for the primary purpose of parametric studies for jet noise reduction in the laboratory and secondarily for technology development to leverage for full scale systems. The active chevron concept employed in this work consists of a laminated composite structure with embedded shape memory alloy (SMA) actuators, termed a SMA hybrid composite (SMAHC). SMA actuators are embedded on one side of the neutral axis of the structure such that thermal excitation, via joule heating, generates a moment and deflects the structure. The performance of two active chevron concepts is demonstrated in the presence of representative flow conditions. One of the concepts is shown to possess significant advantages for the proposed application and is selected for further development. Fabrication and design changes are described and shown to produce a chevron prototype that meets the performance objectives.

  8. Predisposing, Reinforcing and Enabling Predictors of Middle School Children's After-School Physical Activity Participation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    King, Kristi M.; Ogletree, Roberta J.; Fetro, Joyce V.; Brown, Stephen L.; Partridge, Julie A.

    2011-01-01

    Children's participation in after-school physical activity can attenuate the overweight and obesity rates among rural, low socioeconomic status (SES) children. Children's individual determination, as well as social and environmental factors, can influence their behaviors. Purpose: The purposes of this study were to determine if a difference…

  9. Fulfilled Emotional Outcome Expectancies Enable Successful Adoption and Maintenance of Physical Activity

    PubMed Central

    Klusmann, Verena; Musculus, Lisa; Sproesser, Gudrun; Renner, Britta

    2016-01-01

    Although outcome expectancies are regarded as key determinants of health behavior change, studies on the role of their degree of fulfillment in long-term activity changes are lacking. This study investigated the impact of (un-)fulfilled outcome expectancies (OE) on (un-)successful attempts to increase physical activity, assuming that disengagement is the logical consequence of perceived futility. Participants (n = 138) of a longitudinal cohort study with three measurement waves were assigned to eight different groups according to a staging algorithm of their self-reported, 1-year-long physical activity behavior track. Stages were validated by objective changes in objective fitness, e.g., Physical Working Capacity (PWC). Social cognitive variables, self-efficacy, proximal and distal OE, and fulfillment of OE, were assessed via self-report. Discriminant analyses revealed that OE fulfillment was the predominant predictor for differentiating between successful and unsuccessful behavior change. Amongst OE, proximal OE concerning emotional rewards, in conjunction with action self-efficacy, further improved discriminatory power. OE adjustment warranting hedonic rewards appears to be a crucial mechanism as it facilitates long-term changes through interventions aimed at increasing physical activity rates. Theoretical models might benefit by including the concept of fulfilled expectations acting in terms of feedback loops between volitional and motivational processes. PMID:26779095

  10. Ready, Steady, Action: What Enables Young People to Perceive Themselves as Active Agents in Their Lives?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sharp, Russell

    2014-01-01

    Government and educational priorities place importance on young people of secondary school age being active, having their voices heard, and participating in their community. This paper explores an understanding of the role of agency in young people's lives and how the concept is developing. Young people who perceive themselves as having…

  11. Estrous sheep serum enables in vitro capacitation of ram spermatozoa while preventing caspase activation.

    PubMed

    Del Olmo, E; García-Álvarez, O; Maroto-Morales, A; Ramón, M; Jiménez-Rabadán, P; Iniesta-Cuerda, M; Anel-Lopez, L; Martinez-Pastor, F; Soler, A J; Garde, J J; Fernández-Santos, M R

    2016-01-15

    Estrous sheep serum (ESS) is considered the most efficient agent for in vitro capacitation of ram spermatozoa. We have explored the relationship between caspase activation and capacitation in ram. Semen samples from 17 rams were cryopreserved. In vivo fertility was evaluated after intrauterine artificial insemination. Samples were submitted to four treatments: control, ESS (10%), caspase inhibitor (Z-VAD-FMK), and estrous ewe serum plus caspase inhibitor (I + E). Sperm samples were incubated for 30 minutes at 38.5 °C and 5% CO2 and analyzed with flow cytometry for mitochondrial membrane potential (MitoTracker deep red), sperm viability and apoptosis-like changes (YO-PRO-1/propidium iodide), acrosomal status (peanut agglutinin-fluorescein isothiocyanate), membrane fluidity (merocyanine 540), and caspase activity (Vybrant FAM kits for polycaspases, caspase-8, and caspases 3-7). Estrous sheep serum induced changes compatible with capacitation, doubling the proportion of viable spermatozoa with increased merocyanine 540 and increasing YO-PRO-1(+) and acrosome-reacted spermatozoa (P < 0.05). Incubation increased the proportion of spermatozoa with activated caspases (P < 0.05), which was abolished by the treatments. We detected a simultaneous decrease in the proportion of the viable and caspase(-) spermatozoa after the incubation, which was prevented by the presence of estrous ewe serum (P < 0.05). The analysis of caspases 3/7 and 8 resulted in less marked differences. Fertility was positively related to viability and inactivated caspases and negatively to viable-capacitated spermatozoa and active caspases. In vitro induction of capacitation in thawed ram spermatozoa by using ESS suggests a downregulation in apoptotic pathways. However, males with the lowest fertility showed parameters similar to high-fertility males, suggesting that other factors were involved apart from capacitation and/or caspase activation. PMID:26474680

  12. Estrous sheep serum enables in vitro capacitation of ram spermatozoa while preventing caspase activation.

    PubMed

    Del Olmo, E; García-Álvarez, O; Maroto-Morales, A; Ramón, M; Jiménez-Rabadán, P; Iniesta-Cuerda, M; Anel-Lopez, L; Martinez-Pastor, F; Soler, A J; Garde, J J; Fernández-Santos, M R

    2016-01-15

    Estrous sheep serum (ESS) is considered the most efficient agent for in vitro capacitation of ram spermatozoa. We have explored the relationship between caspase activation and capacitation in ram. Semen samples from 17 rams were cryopreserved. In vivo fertility was evaluated after intrauterine artificial insemination. Samples were submitted to four treatments: control, ESS (10%), caspase inhibitor (Z-VAD-FMK), and estrous ewe serum plus caspase inhibitor (I + E). Sperm samples were incubated for 30 minutes at 38.5 °C and 5% CO2 and analyzed with flow cytometry for mitochondrial membrane potential (MitoTracker deep red), sperm viability and apoptosis-like changes (YO-PRO-1/propidium iodide), acrosomal status (peanut agglutinin-fluorescein isothiocyanate), membrane fluidity (merocyanine 540), and caspase activity (Vybrant FAM kits for polycaspases, caspase-8, and caspases 3-7). Estrous sheep serum induced changes compatible with capacitation, doubling the proportion of viable spermatozoa with increased merocyanine 540 and increasing YO-PRO-1(+) and acrosome-reacted spermatozoa (P < 0.05). Incubation increased the proportion of spermatozoa with activated caspases (P < 0.05), which was abolished by the treatments. We detected a simultaneous decrease in the proportion of the viable and caspase(-) spermatozoa after the incubation, which was prevented by the presence of estrous ewe serum (P < 0.05). The analysis of caspases 3/7 and 8 resulted in less marked differences. Fertility was positively related to viability and inactivated caspases and negatively to viable-capacitated spermatozoa and active caspases. In vitro induction of capacitation in thawed ram spermatozoa by using ESS suggests a downregulation in apoptotic pathways. However, males with the lowest fertility showed parameters similar to high-fertility males, suggesting that other factors were involved apart from capacitation and/or caspase activation.

  13. Urban School Reform Enabled by Transformative Professional Development: Impact on Teacher Change and Student Learning of Science

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Johnson, Carla C.; Fargo, Jamison D.

    2010-01-01

    This longitudinal study of middle school science teachers explored if a teacher participation in the TPD program resulted in change in instructional practice as well as a significant increase in student learning. Four participating schools were matched and randomly assigned to intervention and control groups. Teacher and student outcomes were…

  14. Six Forms of Variety in Students' Moral Reasoning: An Age-Old Distinction Enabling New Methods and Findings

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Backman, Ylva; Gardelli, Viktor

    2015-01-01

    In this study, the age-old distinction between decision method and criterion of rightness, commonly employed in normative ethics, was used to attain a detailed understanding of inter- and intrapersonal variety in students' moral reasoning. A total of 24 Swedish students, 12-15 years of age, were interviewed. Inter- and intrapersonal varieties in…

  15. The Problem of Time: Enabling Student To Make Long-Term Commitments to Community-based Learning.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wallace, John

    2000-01-01

    Describes a partnership between the Jane Addams School for Democracy in Minnesota and two institutions of higher education to address the problems of rapid student turnover in service learning. Promising strategies have two dimensions: to the extent possible lower academic and financial barriers to students' participation, and foster a community…

  16. Applying Mass Customization Concepts to Core Courses: Increasing Student-Centered Customization and Enabling Cross-Functional Integration

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wilson, Darryl D.

    2011-01-01

    This conceptual paper suggests a methodology for increasing student satisfaction in core courses by applying the principle of mass customization to increase student satisfaction. It proposes that customization can be increased by increasing course flexibility along three dimensions: content flexibility, schedule flexibility, and course length…

  17. Instructional Support and Guidance Enable More Students to Prepare for the Next Step. High Schools That Work

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Southern Regional Education Board (SREB), 2011

    2011-01-01

    High schools and middle grades schools are making special efforts to keep students in school and to help them look forward with confidence to the next stage of life. They are connecting students to adult mentors or counselors who assist them in setting goals and completing a program of study for college and career readiness. They are assisting…

  18. Students' Attitudes toward an After-School Physical Activity Programme

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Agbuga, Bulent; Xiang, Ping; McBride, Ron

    2013-01-01

    Though considerable research on student attitudes has been conducted in physical education, little information exists concerning student attitudes toward after-school physical activity programmes. This study assessed students' attitudes toward their after-school physical activity programme located in southwest Texas, USA. Participants included 158…

  19. Silent Students' Participation in a Large Active Learning Science Classroom

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Obenland, Carrie A.; Munson, Ashlyn H.; Hutchinson, John S.

    2012-01-01

    Active learning in large science classrooms furthers opportunities for students to engage in the content and in meaningful learning, yet students can still remain anonymously silent. This study aims to understand the impact of active learning on these silent students in a large General Chemistry course taught via Socratic questioning and…

  20. Student Activism, Diversity, and the Struggle for a Just Society

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rhoads, Robert A.

    2016-01-01

    This introductory article provides a historical overview of various student movements and forms of student activism from the beginning of the Civil Rights Movement to the present. Accordingly, the historical trajectory of student activism is framed in terms of 3 broad periods: the sixties, the postsixties, and the contemporary context. The author…

  1. Video Demo of UMBC's "Check My Activity" Tool for Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fritz, John

    2010-01-01

    The University of Maryland, Baltimore County (UMBC) uses a Blackboard course management system (CMS) to support faculty and students. To supplement the CMS, the university created a custom "Check My Activity" (CMA) self-service feedback tool for students. In addition to comparing their online course activity against a class average, students can…

  2. Students as Doers: Examples of Successful E-Learning Activities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tammelin, Maija; Peltonen, Berit; Puranen, Pasi; Auvinen, Lis

    2012-01-01

    This paper discusses learning language and communication activities that focus on students' concrete involvement in their learning process. The activities first deal with student-produced blogs and digital videos in business Spanish. They then present student-produced podcasts for Swedish business communication learners that are meant for…

  3. Older women's fears of violence: the need for interventions that enable active ageing.

    PubMed

    Barnett, Karen; Buys, Laurie; Lovie-Kitchin, Jan; Boulton-Lewis, Gillian; Smith, Dianne; Heffernan, Maree

    2007-01-01

    Women's fear of violence can impact negatively on their active participation in life. An ageing survey conducted with 2,620 Australian respondents aged 50 to 90 years examined aspects of work, learning, social, spiritual and emotional status, health, vision, home, life events, demographics, and asked an open-ended question about what being actively engaged in life meant. Ordinal regression was carried out on two dependent variables: wanting and needing to learn to discourage violence. Analyses found that as women's age increased, those on lower incomes were more likely than others to say they needed to learn how to discourage violence against them. This paper investigates the variables associated with the findings-transport, finances, news media, home safety, and reduced social interactions. Results highlight the importance of understanding women's fear in the context of personal and social issues, and the need to provide learning opportunities to improve safety and social engagement.

  4. Active and emotional student engagement: a nationwide, prospective, longitudinal study of Swedish nursing students.

    PubMed

    Bruce, Malin; Omne-Pontã N, Marianne; Gustavsson, Petter J

    2010-01-01

    The researchers surveyed nursing students yearly during their three-year education, and examined active and emotional engagement. We examined the association of these properties with seven independent variables: higher educational institution, class size, age, gender, prior assistant nurse education, study experience and self-rated health. This longitudinal study included 1,334 students from 24 universities and university colleges in Sweden. Active engagement increased and emotional engagement decreased during the study years. Male students, older students and those with prior assistant nurse education had higher active engagement than other students. Older students, females, students with good self-rated health and those attending universities had higher emotional engagement. Study results suggest that higher educational institutions should pay more attention to students' active and emotional engagement in learning situations, since this may increase the ability of the students to cope with stressful events during their education, giving them an extra resource on which they can draw.

  5. Design and Evaluation of a Self-Care Educational Activity as a Student Learning Experience

    PubMed Central

    Skoy, Elizabeth T.; Eukel, Heidi N.

    2014-01-01

    Objective. To design an educational activity and evaluate its effectiveness on increasing third-year pharmacy students’ knowledge and confidence to recommend self-care products to patients. Design. Faculty members created a self-care activity, the Amazing Self-Care Race, for educational use in a pharmaceutical care laboratory course. Student teams worked competitively to complete 15 stations focused on self-care. A complex, real-world case was presented at each station. Student recommendations were presented to a facilitator. Prior to and following the activity, students were invited to complete an online anonymous survey instrument. Assessment. Eighty-six students completed presurvey and postsurvey instruments to assess their knowledge and perceived confidence to recommend a self-care product to a patient prior to and following participation in the Amazing Self-Care Race. Students demonstrated a significant increase in their ability and confidence to recommend self-care products following the activity (p<0.001). Conclusion. The Amazing Self-Care Race is an effective educational activity that increases student knowledge and confidence in self-care therapeutics. The activity helped students to develop self-care skills, enabled them to learn through doing, encouraged them to synthesize information while making self-care recommendations, and helped them to develop confidence by thinking on their feet. PMID:24558280

  6. Purification of Active Respiratory Supercomplex from Bovine Heart Mitochondria Enables Functional Studies.

    PubMed

    Shinzawa-Itoh, Kyoko; Shimomura, Harunobu; Yanagisawa, Sachiko; Shimada, Satoru; Takahashi, Ryoko; Oosaki, Marika; Ogura, Takashi; Tsukihara, Tomitake

    2016-02-19

    To understand the roles of mitochondrial respiratory chain supercomplexes, methods for consistently separating and preparing supercomplexes must be established. To this end, we solubilized supercomplexes from bovine heart mitochondria with digitonin and then replaced digitonin with amphipol (A8-35), an amphiphilic polymer. Afterward, supercomplexes were separated from other complexes by sucrose density gradient centrifugation. Twenty-six grams of bovine myocardium yielded 3.2 mg of amphipol-stabilized supercomplex. The purified supercomplexes were analyzed based on their absorption spectra as well as Q10 (ubiquinone with ten isoprene units) and lipid assays. The supercomplex sample did not contain cytochrome c but did contain complexes I, III, and IV at a ratio of 1:2:1, 6 molecules of Q10, and 623 atoms of phosphorus. When cytochrome c was added, the supercomplex exhibited KCN-sensitive NADH oxidation; thus, the purified supercomplex was active. Reduced complex IV absorbs at 444 nm, so we measured the resonance Raman spectrum of the reduced amphipol-solubilized supercomplex and the mixture of amphipol-solubilized complexes I1, III2, and IV1 using an excitation wavelength of 441.6 nm, allowing measurement precision comparable with that obtained for complex IV alone. Use of the purified active sample provides insights into the effects of supercomplex formation. PMID:26698328

  7. Functional diversity of carbohydrate-active enzymes enabling a bacterium to ferment plant biomass.

    PubMed

    Boutard, Magali; Cerisy, Tristan; Nogue, Pierre-Yves; Alberti, Adriana; Weissenbach, Jean; Salanoubat, Marcel; Tolonen, Andrew C

    2014-11-01

    Microbial metabolism of plant polysaccharides is an important part of environmental carbon cycling, human nutrition, and industrial processes based on cellulosic bioconversion. Here we demonstrate a broadly applicable method to analyze how microbes catabolize plant polysaccharides that integrates carbohydrate-active enzyme (CAZyme) assays, RNA sequencing (RNA-seq), and anaerobic growth screening. We apply this method to study how the bacterium Clostridium phytofermentans ferments plant biomass components including glucans, mannans, xylans, galactans, pectins, and arabinans. These polysaccharides are fermented with variable efficiencies, and diauxies prioritize metabolism of preferred substrates. Strand-specific RNA-seq reveals how this bacterium responds to polysaccharides by up-regulating specific groups of CAZymes, transporters, and enzymes to metabolize the constituent sugars. Fifty-six up-regulated CAZymes were purified, and their activities show most polysaccharides are degraded by multiple enzymes, often from the same family, but with divergent rates, specificities, and cellular localizations. CAZymes were then tested in combination to identify synergies between enzymes acting on the same substrate with different catalytic mechanisms. We discuss how these results advance our understanding of how microbes degrade and metabolize plant biomass.

  8. Purification of Active Respiratory Supercomplex from Bovine Heart Mitochondria Enables Functional Studies*

    PubMed Central

    Shinzawa-Itoh, Kyoko; Shimomura, Harunobu; Yanagisawa, Sachiko; Shimada, Satoru; Takahashi, Ryoko; Oosaki, Marika; Ogura, Takashi; Tsukihara, Tomitake

    2016-01-01

    To understand the roles of mitochondrial respiratory chain supercomplexes, methods for consistently separating and preparing supercomplexes must be established. To this end, we solubilized supercomplexes from bovine heart mitochondria with digitonin and then replaced digitonin with amphipol (A8–35), an amphiphilic polymer. Afterward, supercomplexes were separated from other complexes by sucrose density gradient centrifugation. Twenty-six grams of bovine myocardium yielded 3.2 mg of amphipol-stabilized supercomplex. The purified supercomplexes were analyzed based on their absorption spectra as well as Q10 (ubiquinone with ten isoprene units) and lipid assays. The supercomplex sample did not contain cytochrome c but did contain complexes I, III, and IV at a ratio of 1:2:1, 6 molecules of Q10, and 623 atoms of phosphorus. When cytochrome c was added, the supercomplex exhibited KCN-sensitive NADH oxidation; thus, the purified supercomplex was active. Reduced complex IV absorbs at 444 nm, so we measured the resonance Raman spectrum of the reduced amphipol-solubilized supercomplex and the mixture of amphipol-solubilized complexes I1, III2, and IV1 using an excitation wavelength of 441.6 nm, allowing measurement precision comparable with that obtained for complex IV alone. Use of the purified active sample provides insights into the effects of supercomplex formation. PMID:26698328

  9. Transfer Student Success: Educationally Purposeful Activities Predictive of Undergraduate GPA

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fauria, Renee M.; Fuller, Matthew B.

    2015-01-01

    Researchers evaluated the effects of Educationally Purposeful Activities (EPAs) on transfer and nontransfer students' cumulative GPAs. Hierarchical, linear, and multiple regression models yielded seven statistically significant educationally purposeful items that influenced undergraduate student GPAs. Statistically significant positive EPAs for…

  10. Enabling active and healthy ageing decision support systems with the smart collection of TV usage patterns.

    PubMed

    Billis, Antonis S; Batziakas, Asterios; Bratsas, Charalampos; Tsatali, Marianna S; Karagianni, Maria; Bamidis, Panagiotis D

    2016-03-01

    Smart monitoring of seniors behavioural patterns and more specifically activities of daily living have attracted immense research interest in recent years. Development of smart decision support systems to support the promotion of health smart homes has also emerged taking advantage of the plethora of smart, inexpensive and unobtrusive monitoring sensors, devices and software tools. To this end, a smart monitoring system has been used in order to extract meaningful information about television (TV) usage patterns and subsequently associate them with clinical findings of experts. The smart TV operating state remote monitoring system was installed in four elderly women homes and gathered data for more than 11 months. Results suggest that TV daily usage (time the TV is turned on) can predict mental health change. Conclusively, the authors suggest that collection of smart device usage patterns could strengthen the inference capabilities of existing health DSSs applied in uncontrolled settings such as real senior homes.

  11. Enabling active and healthy ageing decision support systems with the smart collection of TV usage patterns

    PubMed Central

    Billis, Antonis S.; Batziakas, Asterios; Bratsas, Charalampos; Tsatali, Marianna S.; Karagianni, Maria

    2016-01-01

    Smart monitoring of seniors behavioural patterns and more specifically activities of daily living have attracted immense research interest in recent years. Development of smart decision support systems to support the promotion of health smart homes has also emerged taking advantage of the plethora of smart, inexpensive and unobtrusive monitoring sensors, devices and software tools. To this end, a smart monitoring system has been used in order to extract meaningful information about television (TV) usage patterns and subsequently associate them with clinical findings of experts. The smart TV operating state remote monitoring system was installed in four elderly women homes and gathered data for more than 11 months. Results suggest that TV daily usage (time the TV is turned on) can predict mental health change. Conclusively, the authors suggest that collection of smart device usage patterns could strengthen the inference capabilities of existing health DSSs applied in uncontrolled settings such as real senior homes. PMID:27284457

  12. Noradrenergic blockade stabilizes prefrontal activity and enables fear extinction under stress.

    PubMed

    Fitzgerald, Paul J; Giustino, Thomas F; Seemann, Jocelyn R; Maren, Stephen

    2015-07-14

    Stress-induced impairments in extinction learning are believed to sustain posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD). Noradrenergic signaling may contribute to extinction impairments by modulating medial prefrontal cortex (mPFC) circuits involved in fear regulation. Here we demonstrate that aversive fear conditioning rapidly and persistently alters spontaneous single-unit activity in the prelimbic and infralimbic subdivisions of the mPFC in behaving rats. These conditioning-induced changes in mPFC firing were mitigated by systemic administration of propranolol (10 mg/kg, i.p.), a β-noradrenergic receptor antagonist. Moreover, propranolol administration dampened the stress-induced impairment in extinction observed when extinction training is delivered shortly after fear conditioning. These findings suggest that β-adrenoceptors mediate stress-induced changes in mPFC spike firing that contribute to extinction impairments. Propranolol may be a helpful adjunct to behavioral therapy for PTSD, particularly in patients who have recently experienced trauma.

  13. A Study of Student Engagement Activities, Discipline Referrals, and Student Achievement in Reading First Schools

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fransen, Shelly Lynette

    2013-01-01

    High quality student engagement activities are essential if students are to be successful learners. Over the years, many instructional strategies and models have been devised to encourage teachers to develop student engagement activities that result in high achievement. The Reading First Model initiative was introduced as a part of the No Child…

  14. Perspectives on the Role and Synergies of Architecture and Social and Built Environment in Enabling Active Healthy Aging

    PubMed Central

    Rabnett, Richard; Tziraki, Chariklia

    2016-01-01

    Research has demonstrated that enabling societal and physical infrastructure and personal accommodations enhance healthy and active aging throughout the lifespan. Yet, there is a paucity of research on how to bring together the various disciplines involved in a multidomain synergistic collaboration to create new living environments for aging. This paper aims to explore the key domains of skills and knowledge that need to be considered for a conceptual prototype of an enabling educational process and environments where healthcare professionals, architects, planners, and entrepreneurs may establish a shared theoretical and experiential knowledge base, vocabulary, and implementation strategies, for the creation of the next generation of living communities of active healthy adults, for persons with disabilities and chronic disease conditions. We focus on synergistic, paradigmatic, simple, and practical issues that can be easily upscaled through market mechanisms. This practical and physically concrete approach may also become linked with more elaborate neuroscientific and technologically sophisticated interventions. We examine the domains of knowledge to be included in establishing a learning model that focuses on the still-understudied impact of the benefits toward active and healthy aging, where architects, urban planners, clinicians, and healthcare facility managers are educated toward a synergistic approach at the operational level.

  15. Perspectives on the Role and Synergies of Architecture and Social and Built Environment in Enabling Active Healthy Aging

    PubMed Central

    Rabnett, Richard; Tziraki, Chariklia

    2016-01-01

    Research has demonstrated that enabling societal and physical infrastructure and personal accommodations enhance healthy and active aging throughout the lifespan. Yet, there is a paucity of research on how to bring together the various disciplines involved in a multidomain synergistic collaboration to create new living environments for aging. This paper aims to explore the key domains of skills and knowledge that need to be considered for a conceptual prototype of an enabling educational process and environments where healthcare professionals, architects, planners, and entrepreneurs may establish a shared theoretical and experiential knowledge base, vocabulary, and implementation strategies, for the creation of the next generation of living communities of active healthy adults, for persons with disabilities and chronic disease conditions. We focus on synergistic, paradigmatic, simple, and practical issues that can be easily upscaled through market mechanisms. This practical and physically concrete approach may also become linked with more elaborate neuroscientific and technologically sophisticated interventions. We examine the domains of knowledge to be included in establishing a learning model that focuses on the still-understudied impact of the benefits toward active and healthy aging, where architects, urban planners, clinicians, and healthcare facility managers are educated toward a synergistic approach at the operational level. PMID:27656295

  16. Perspectives on the Role and Synergies of Architecture and Social and Built Environment in Enabling Active Healthy Aging.

    PubMed

    Chrysikou, Evangelia; Rabnett, Richard; Tziraki, Chariklia

    2016-01-01

    Research has demonstrated that enabling societal and physical infrastructure and personal accommodations enhance healthy and active aging throughout the lifespan. Yet, there is a paucity of research on how to bring together the various disciplines involved in a multidomain synergistic collaboration to create new living environments for aging. This paper aims to explore the key domains of skills and knowledge that need to be considered for a conceptual prototype of an enabling educational process and environments where healthcare professionals, architects, planners, and entrepreneurs may establish a shared theoretical and experiential knowledge base, vocabulary, and implementation strategies, for the creation of the next generation of living communities of active healthy adults, for persons with disabilities and chronic disease conditions. We focus on synergistic, paradigmatic, simple, and practical issues that can be easily upscaled through market mechanisms. This practical and physically concrete approach may also become linked with more elaborate neuroscientific and technologically sophisticated interventions. We examine the domains of knowledge to be included in establishing a learning model that focuses on the still-understudied impact of the benefits toward active and healthy aging, where architects, urban planners, clinicians, and healthcare facility managers are educated toward a synergistic approach at the operational level. PMID:27656295

  17. Low Power, Red, Green and Blue Carbon Nanotube Enabled Vertical Organic Light Emitting Transistors for Active Matrix OLED Displays

    SciTech Connect

    McCarthy, M. A.; Liu, B.; Donoghue, E. P.; Kravchenko, Ivan I; Kim, D. Y.; So, Franky; Rinzler, A. G.

    2011-01-01

    Organic semiconductors are potential alternatives to polycrystalline silicon as the semiconductor used in the backplane of active matrix organic light emitting diode displays. Demonstrated here is a light-emitting transistor with an organic channel, operating with low power dissipation at low voltage, and high aperture ratio, in three colors: red, green and blue. The single-wall carbon nanotube network source electrode is responsible for the high level of performance demonstrated. A major benefit enabled by this architecture is the integration of the drive transistor, storage capacitor and light emitter into a single device. Performance comparable to commercialized polycrystalline-silicon TFT driven OLEDs is demonstrated.

  18. Sensor-enabled RFID system for monitoring arm activity: reliability and validity.

    PubMed

    Barman, Joydip; Uswatte, Gitendra; Ghaffari, Touraj; Sokal, Brad; Byrom, Ezekiel; Trinh, Eva; Brewer, Michael; Varghese, Christopher; Sarkar, Nilanjan

    2012-11-01

    After stroke, capacity to complete tasks in the treatment setting with the more-affected arm is an unreliable index of actual use of that extremity in daily life. Available objective methods for monitoring real-world arm use rely on placing movement sensors on patients. These methods provide information on amount but not type of arm activity, e.g., functional versus nonfunctional movement. This paper presents an approach that places sensors on patients and household objects, overcoming this limitation. An accelerometer and the transmitter component of a radio-frequency proximity sensor are attached to objects; the receiver component is attached to the arm of interest. The receiver triggers an on-board radio-frequency identification tag to signal proximity when that arm is within 23 cm of an instrumented object. In benchmark testing, this system detected perfectly which arm was used to move the target object on 200 trials. In a laboratory study with 35 undergraduates, increasing the amount of time target objects were moved with the arm of interest resulted in a corresponding increase in system output . Moreover, measurement error was low ( ≤ 2.5%). The results support this system's reliability and validity in individuals with unimpaired movement; testing is now warranted in stroke patients. PMID:22875260

  19. An Active Substrate Driver for Enabling Mixed-Voltage SOI Systems-On-A-Chip

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jackson, S. A.; Blalock, B. J.; Mojarradi, M. M.; Li, H. W.

    2001-01-01

    The current trend for space application systems is towards fully integrated systems-on-a-chip. To facilitate this drive, high-voltage transistors must reside on the same substrate as low-voltage transistors. These systems must also be radiation tolerant, particularly for space missions such as the Europa Lander and Titan Explorer. SOI CMOS technology offers high levels of radiation hardness. As a result, a high-voltage lateral MOSFET has been developed in a partially-depleted (PD) SOI technology. Utilizing high voltages causes a parasitic transistor to have non-negligible effects on a circuit. Several circuit architectures have been used to compensate for the radiation induced threshold voltage shift of the parasitic back-channel transistor. However, a new architecture for high-voltage systems must be employed to bias the substrate to voltage levels insuring all parasitic transistors remain off. An active substrate driver has been developed to accomplish task. Additional information is contained in the original extended abstract.

  20. Thalamocortical network activity enables chronic tic detection in humans with Tourette syndrome.

    PubMed

    Shute, Jonathan B; Okun, Michael S; Opri, Enrico; Molina, Rene; Rossi, P Justin; Martinez-Ramirez, Daniel; Foote, Kelly D; Gunduz, Aysegul

    2016-01-01

    Tourette syndrome (TS) is a neuropsychiatric disorder characterized by multiple motor and vocal tics. Deep brain stimulation (DBS) is an emerging therapy for severe cases of TS. We studied two patients with TS implanted with bilateral Medtronic Activa PC + S DBS devices, capable of chronic recordings, with depth leads in the thalamic centromedian-parafascicular complex (CM-PF) and subdural strips over the precentral gyrus. Low-frequency (1-10 Hz) CM-PF activity was observed during tics, as well as modulations in beta rhythms over the motor cortex. Tics were divided into three categories: long complex, complex, and simple. Long complex tics, tics involving multiple body regions and lasting longer than 5 s, were concurrent with a highly detectable thalamocortical signature (average recall [sensitivity] 88.6%, average precision 96.3%). Complex tics were detected with an average recall of 63.9% and precision of 36.6% and simple tics an average recall of 39.3% and precision of 37.9%. The detections were determined using data from both patients. PMID:27419067

  1. Method of Separating Oxygen From Spacecraft Cabin Air to Enable Extravehicular Activities

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Graf, John C.

    2013-01-01

    Extravehicular activities (EVAs) require high-pressure, high-purity oxygen. Shuttle EVAs use oxygen that is stored and transported as a cryogenic fluid. EVAs on the International Space Station (ISS) presently use the Shuttle cryo O2, which is transported to the ISS using a transfer hose. The fluid is compressed to elevated pressures and stored as a high-pressure gas. With the retirement of the shuttle, NASA has been searching for ways to deliver oxygen to fill the highpressure oxygen tanks on the ISS. A method was developed using low-pressure oxygen generated onboard the ISS and released into ISS cabin air, filtering the oxygen from ISS cabin air using a pressure swing absorber to generate a low-pressure (high-purity) oxygen stream, compressing the oxygen with a mechanical compressor, and transferring the high-pressure, high-purity oxygen to ISS storage tanks. The pressure swing absorber (PSA) can be either a two-stage device, or a single-stage device, depending on the type of sorbent used. The key is to produce a stream with oxygen purity greater than 99.5 percent. The separator can be a PSA device, or a VPSA device (that uses both vacuum and pressure for the gas separation). The compressor is a multi-stage mechanical compressor. If the gas flow rates are on the order of 5 to 10 lb (.2.3 to 4.6 kg) per day, the compressor can be relatively small [3 16 16 in. (.8 41 41 cm)]. Any spacecraft system, or other remote location that has a supply of lowpressure oxygen, a method of separating oxygen from cabin air, and a method of compressing the enriched oxygen stream, has the possibility of having a regenerable supply of highpressure, high-purity oxygen that is compact, simple, and safe. If cabin air is modified so there is very little argon, the separator can be smaller, simpler, and use less power.

  2. Engineered heart tissue enables study of residual undifferentiated embryonic stem cell activity in a cardiac environment.

    PubMed

    Dengler, Jana; Song, Hannah; Thavandiran, Nimalan; Massé, Stéphane; Wood, Geoffrey A; Nanthakumar, Kumaraswamy; Zandstra, Peter W; Radisic, Milica

    2011-03-01

    resulted in a more robust cardiac differentiation than injection of ESC. Our data demonstrate that the model-system developed herein can be used to study the functional effects of candidate stem cells on the host myocardium, as well as to measure the residual activity of undifferentiated cells present in the mixture.

  3. Characterization of Instructor and Student Use of Ubiquitous Presenter, a Presentation System Enabling Spontaneity and Digital Archiving

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Price, Edward; Malani, Roshni; Simon, Beth

    2007-01-01

    Ubiquitous Presenter (UP) is a digital presentation system that allows an instructor with a Tablet PC to spontaneously modify prepared slides, while automatically archiving the inked slides on the web. For two introductory physics classes, we examine the types of slides instructors prepare and the ways in which they add ink to the slides. Modes of usage include: using ink to explicitly link multiple representations; making prepared figures dynamic by animating them with ink; and preparing slides with sparse text or figures, then adding extensive annotations during class. In addition, through an analysis of surveys and of web server logs, we examine student reaction to the system, as well as how often and in what ways students' utilize archived material. In general, students find the system valuable and frequently review the presentations online.

  4. Activity Preferences of Middle School Physical Education Students.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Greenwood, Michael; Stillwell, Jim; Byars, Allyn

    2001-01-01

    Investigated the physical education activity preferences of middle school students who completed a checklist featuring a variety of activities. Overall, middle school boys and girls both differed and agreed on their interests for specific activities. Most students liked basketball, bicycling, roller skating, soccer, swimming, and volleyball but…

  5. Learning by Doing: Engaging Students through Learner-Centered Activities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Smart, Karl L.; Csapo, Nancy

    2007-01-01

    With a shift of focus from teaching to learning in higher education, teachers often look for strategies to involve students actively in the learning process, especially since numerous studies have demonstrated that a student's active involvement in the learning process enhances learning. Active learning has resulted in positive learning outcomes.…

  6. Active Learning with "Jeopardy": Students Ask the Questions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Benek-Rivera, Joan; Mathews, Vinitia E.

    2004-01-01

    Nontraditional instructional methods facilitate active learning by students. The "Jeopardy" exercise outlined in this article is based on the popular television game show and is presented as an active learning technique designed to (a) motivate students to actively participate in class and assume more responsibility for learning, (b) provide an…

  7. Enabling students to learn: Design, implementation and assessment of a supplemental study strategies course for an introductory undergraduate biology course

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sriram, Jayanthi Sanjeevi

    Attrition in the STEM disciplines is a national problem and one of the important reasons for this is student experiences in introductory courses. A myriad of factors influence students' experiences in those courses; inadequate student preparation is one of the most cited reasons. Incoming freshmen often lack the learning strategies required to meaningfully learn and succeed in college courses. Unfortunately, the instructors have limited time and/or have little experience in teaching learning strategies. In this paper, the design, implementation, and evaluation of a Supplemental Course (SC) model that emphasizes learning strategies is presented. SC was offered concurrently with the introductory biology courses for four consecutive semesters (fall 2011 to spring 2013); for 10 weeks in fall 2012 and 7 weeks in the other semesters at Miami University. 10 weeks SC began earlier in the semester than the shorter SC. This study evaluated the effects of the SC on students' (1) performance in the introductory biology course, (2) perceived changes in self-regulation and social support, and (3) experiences in the introductory biology course before, during, and after participation in the SC. A mixed methods approach was used to address these goals. A pre-post survey was administered to obtain students' use of self-regulation strategies and social-support data. Quantitative methods were utilized to analyze content exam grades and changes in self-regulation strategies and social-support. To explore the experiences of the students, semi-structured interviews were conducted, followed by analysis using grounded theory. The findings reveal that participants of the longer duration SC (with an earlier start date) significantly improved in content exam performance, perceived use of self-regulation strategies, and social support compared to the non-participants. Participants of the shorter duration SC (with a later start date) did not significantly improve in content exam performance

  8. Glove-Enabled Computer Operations (GECO): Design and Testing of an Extravehicular Activity Glove Adapted for Human-Computer Interface

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Adams, Richard J.; Olowin, Aaron; Krepkovich, Eileen; Hannaford, Blake; Lindsay, Jack I. C.; Homer, Peter; Patrie, James T.; Sands, O. Scott

    2013-01-01

    The Glove-Enabled Computer Operations (GECO) system enables an extravehicular activity (EVA) glove to be dual-purposed as a human-computer interface device. This paper describes the design and human participant testing of a right-handed GECO glove in a pressurized glove box. As part of an investigation into the usability of the GECO system for EVA data entry, twenty participants were asked to complete activities including (1) a Simon Says Games in which they attempted to duplicate random sequences of targeted finger strikes and (2) a Text Entry activity in which they used the GECO glove to enter target phrases in two different virtual keyboard modes. In a within-subjects design, both activities were performed both with and without vibrotactile feedback. Participants' mean accuracies in correctly generating finger strikes with the pressurized glove were surprisingly high, both with and without the benefit of tactile feedback. Five of the subjects achieved mean accuracies exceeding 99% in both conditions. In Text Entry, tactile feedback provided a statistically significant performance benefit, quantified by characters entered per minute, as well as reduction in error rate. Secondary analyses of responses to a NASA Task Loader Index (TLX) subjective workload assessments reveal a benefit for tactile feedback in GECO glove use for data entry. This first-ever investigation of employment of a pressurized EVA glove for human-computer interface opens up a wide range of future applications, including text "chat" communications, manipulation of procedures/checklists, cataloguing/annotating images, scientific note taking, human-robot interaction, and control of suit and/or other EVA systems.

  9. Glove-Enabled Computer Operations (GECO): Design and Testing of an Extravehicular Activity Glove Adapted for Human-Computer Interface

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Adams, Richard J.; Olowin, Aaron; Krepkovich, Eileen; Hannaford, Blake; Lindsay, Jack I. C.; Homer, Peter; Patrie, James T.; Sands, O. Scott

    2013-01-01

    The Glove-Enabled Computer Operations (GECO) system enables an extravehicular activity (EVA) glove to be dual-purposed as a human-computer interface device. This paper describes the design and human participant testing of a right-handed GECO glove in a pressurized glove box. As part of an investigation into the usability of the GECO system for EVA data entry, twenty participants were asked to complete activities including (1) a Simon Says Games in which they attempted to duplicate random sequences of targeted finger strikes and (2) a Text Entry activity in which they used the GECO glove to enter target phrases in two different virtual keyboard modes. In a within-subjects design, both activities were performed both with and without vibrotactile feedback. Participants mean accuracies in correctly generating finger strikes with the pressurized glove were surprisingly high, both with and without the benefit of tactile feedback. Five of the subjects achieved mean accuracies exceeding 99 in both conditions. In Text Entry, tactile feedback provided a statistically significant performance benefit, quantified by characters entered per minute, as well as reduction in error rate. Secondary analyses of responses to a NASA Task Loader Index (TLX) subjective workload assessments reveal a benefit for tactile feedback in GECO glove use for data entry. This first-ever investigation of employment of a pressurized EVA glove for human-computer interface opens up a wide range of future applications, including text chat communications, manipulation of procedureschecklists, cataloguingannotating images, scientific note taking, human-robot interaction, and control of suit andor other EVA systems.

  10. Oxalate Blockage of Calcium and Iron: A Student Learning Activity.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Walker, Noojin

    1988-01-01

    Describes a student learning activity used to teach the meaning of percentage composition, mole concept, selective precipitation, and limiting factors. Presents two word problems and their solutions. (CW)

  11. Rural School Students' Active Labor Position.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zhelbanova, R. I.

    1990-01-01

    Recommends developing programs that involve rural secondary students in the organizational planning and work of collective farms in the USSR. Argues this helps students apply knowledge, develop skills, and sharpen their social focus. Advocates including environmental education to develop students' ecological awareness. Notes experimental schools…

  12. The Combination Design of Enabling Technologies in Group Learning: New Study Support Service for Visually Impaired University Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tangsri, Chatcai; Na-Takuatoong, Onjaree; Sophatsathit, Peraphon

    2013-01-01

    This article aims to show how the process of new service technology-based development improves the current study support service for visually impaired university students. Numerous studies have contributed to improving assisted aid technology such as screen readers, the development and the use of audiobooks, and technology that supports individual…

  13. Academic Self-Concept and Academic Self-Efficacy: Self-Beliefs Enable Academic Achievement of Twice-Exceptional Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wang, Clare Wen; Neihart, Maureen

    2015-01-01

    Many studies have reported that twice-exceptional (2e) students were vulnerable in psychological traits and exhibited low-academic self-concept and academic self-efficacy. Such vulnerability may cause their academic failures. This study applied interpretative phenomenological analysis (IPA), a qualitative approach to investigate the perceptions of…

  14. PECS and VOCAs to Enable Students with Developmental Disabilities to Make Requests: An Overview of the Literature

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lancioni, Giulio E.; O'Reilly, Mark F.; Cuvo, Anthony J.; Singh, Nirbhay N.; Sigafoos, Jeff; Didden, Robert

    2007-01-01

    This paper provides an overview of the literature dealing with the use of the Picture Exchange Communication System (PECS) and voice output communication aids (VOCAs) for promoting the performance of requests by students with developmental disabilities. Computerized and manual searches were carried out to identify the studies published during the…

  15. Enabling Students to Read Historical Images: The Value of the Three-Level Guide for Historical Inquiry

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ormond, Barbara

    2011-01-01

    Students of history are expected to be able to interpret visual images as a source of primary evidence for historical inquiry, yet history teachers may not always place sufficient emphasis on pedagogies that consistently and specifically target the skills of visual interpretation. Developing understanding of visual evidence is sometimes left to…

  16. Implementation of Protocols to Enable Doctoral Training in Physical and Computational Chemistry of a Blind Graduate Student

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Minkara, Mona S.; Weaver, Michael N.; Gorske, Jim; Bowers, Clifford R.; Merz, Kenneth M., Jr.

    2015-01-01

    There exists a sparse representation of blind and low-vision students in science, technology, engineering and mathematics (STEM) fields. This is due in part to these individuals being discouraged from pursuing STEM degrees as well as a lack of appropriate adaptive resources in upper level STEM courses and research. Mona Minkara is a rising fifth…

  17. Enabling Curricula: The Development of a Teaching Observation Protocol to Address Students' Diverse Learning Needs

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hayden, Sharon

    2011-01-01

    Diverse learning needs are students' learning needs in areas such as language, learning styles, background, disabilities, technology skills, motivation, engagement, and access. Teacher candidates must be aware of and plan to meet these needs. The Universal Design for Learning (UDL) provides guidelines that can increase the level of student…

  18. An Activity to Teach Students about Schematic Processing

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Isbell, Linda M.; Tyler, James M.; Burns, Kathleen C.

    2007-01-01

    We designed a classroom activity to foster students' understanding of what schemas are and how they function. We used a video of the instructor as an infant to illustrate how schemas influence gender stereotyping. Before the video, we told students that the baby was either a boy or a girl. After the video, students rated whether the baby would…

  19. MiSIS (Michigan Student Information System) Activities Manual.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    1979

    The Michigan Student Information System (MiSIS) is the student flow component of the Michigan Community College Occupational Education Evaluation System (MCCOEES), a comprehensive state-wide system for evaluating occupational education. The Michigan Student Information System (MiSIS) Activities Manual was designed to help college-level personnel…

  20. Examining Participation of University Students in Recreational Entertainment Marketing Activities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pala, Adem

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this study was to examine participation of university students in recreational entertainment marketing activities. The survey population consisted of university student in Marmara University Province of Istanbul. The sample constituted a total of 272 students (150 male and 122 female), determined by circumstantial method. The survey…

  1. Students' Activity Focus in Online Asynchronous Peer Learning Forums

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gaspar, Alessio; Langevin, Sarah; Boyer, Naomi; Armitage, William

    2010-01-01

    This qualitative study explores how using Peer Learning Forums (PLF) in an online asynchronous computer programming course can be analyzed to derive information about Student Activity Focus (SAF) for adult Information Technology students. Three instruments are proposed to assist instructors classify questions posted by students on these forums,…

  2. Healthy Activity for Secondary Students. A Collaborative Project.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McMillen, Brooks A.; Turman, Jo

    1996-01-01

    Describes a collaborative project designed to help high school students understand healthy exercise. The project involved preservice physical education majors who acted as fitness facilitators and motivators to the high school students who selected on and off campus, moderate intensity activities. Both groups of students tracked progress and…

  3. Student Technological Creativity Using Online Problem-Solving Activities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chang, Yu-Shan

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the effects of online (web-based) creative problem-solving (CPS) activities on student technological creativity and to examine the characteristics of student creativity in the context of online CPS. A pretest-posttest quasi-experiment was conducted with 107 fourth-grade students in Taiwan. The…

  4. Science Teaching and Learning Activities and Students' Engagement in Science

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hampden-Thompson, Gillian; Bennett, Judith

    2013-06-01

    The purpose of this analysis is to describe the variation in students' reports of engagement in science across science teaching and learning activities. In addition, this study examines student and school characteristics that may be associated with students' levels of engagement in science. Data are drawn from the Programme for International Student Assessment 2006 study. The analysis employs a quantitative approach that includes descriptive and inferential statistics to examine three measures of student engagement for a nationally representative sample of approximately 12,000 15-year-old students in the UK. The main results indicate that there is an association between students' motivation towards science, enjoyment of science and future orientation towards science, and the frequency in which various teaching and learning activities take place in the classroom. Understanding student engagement in science and the factors that influence it is essential in addressing the issue of uptake of science after compulsory schooling.

  5. Enabling Exemplary Teaching: A Framework of Student Engagement for Students from Low Socio-Economic Backgrounds with Implications for Technology and Literacy Practices

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Callow, Jon; Orlando, Joanne

    2015-01-01

    Engaging students in effective technology use and literacy learning is an ongoing challenge, particularly for students who are impacted by poverty. Exemplary teaching and teachers' pedagogical choices play a critical role in addressing this challenge. This paper illustrates the practices of teachers, identified to be exemplary in engaging students…

  6. Students' Learning Activities While Studying Biological Process Diagrams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kragten, Marco; Admiraal, Wilfried; Rijlaarsdam, Gert

    2015-08-01

    Process diagrams describe how a system functions (e.g. photosynthesis) and are an important type of representation in Biology education. In the present study, we examined students' learning activities while studying process diagrams, related to their resulting comprehension of these diagrams. Each student completed three learning tasks. Verbal data and eye-tracking data were collected as indications of students' learning activities. For the verbal data, we applied a fine-grained coding scheme to optimally describe students' learning activities. For the eye-tracking data, we used fixation time and transitions between areas of interest in the process diagrams as indices of learning activities. Various learning activities while studying process diagrams were found that distinguished between more and less successful students. Results showed that between-student variance in comprehension score was highly predicted by meaning making of the process arrows (80%) and fixation time in the main area (65%). Students employed successful learning activities consistently across learning tasks. Furthermore, compared to unsuccessful students, successful students used a more coherent approach of interrelated learning activities for comprehending process diagrams.

  7. Instructor Language and Student Active Engagement in Elementary Students with Autism Spectrum Disorder

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sparapani, Nicole J.

    2013-01-01

    Few studies have examined how instructor variables relate to student performance measures for individuals with autism spectrum disorder (ASD). The purpose of this study was to examine instructor language and student active engagement in general and special education classrooms for students with ASD. This study included participants (n = 196…

  8. Working in Pharmacies. Instructor's Guide. Student's Manual. Student Learning Activities. Second Revised Edition.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Driever, Carl W.; And Others

    This document combines three separately bound volumes, a student manual, an instructor's guide, and student learning activities designed for students who are either in beginning-level pharmacy technician courses or considering careers in pharmacy. The material is intended to relate training experience to information studied in the classroom. The…

  9. Staff and Student Experiences of Dialogue Days, a Student Engagement Activity

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Asghar, Mandy

    2016-01-01

    This paper reports the findings from a descriptive phenomenological exploration of the lived experience of dialogue days, a student engagement activity, from the perspectives of staff and students. I suggest that dialogue days enhance the relational and emotional aspects of learning with the potential to impact on future student engagement and…

  10. Students as Researchers: An Inclined-Plane Activity.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Edwards, Thomas G.

    1995-01-01

    Describes an inquiry activity in which students explore the variables that influence the amount of time it takes a ball to roll down an inclined plane. Relates features of the activity to recommendations in the NCTM Standards. (MKR)

  11. Contact activation of C3 enables tethering between activated platelets and polymorphonuclear leukocytes via CD11b/CD18

    PubMed Central

    Hamad, Osama A.; Mitroulis, Ioannis; Fromell, Karin; Kozarcanin, Huda; Chavakis, Triantafyllos; Ricklin, Daniel; Lambris, John D.; Ekdahl, Kristina N.; Nilsson, Bo

    2016-01-01

    Summary Complement component C3 has a potential role in thrombotic pathologies. It is transformed, without proteolytic cleavage, into C3(H2O) upon binding to the surface of activated platelets. We hypothesise that C3(H2O) bound to activated platelets and to platelet-derived microparticles (PMPs) contributes to platelet-PMN complex (PPC) formation and to the binding of PMPs to PMNs. PAR-1 activation of platelets in human whole blood from normal individuals induced the formation of CD16+/CD42a+ PPC. The complement inhibitor compstatin and a C5a receptor antagonist inhibited PPC formation by 50 %, while monoclonal antibodies to C3(H2O) or anti-CD11b inhibited PPC formation by 75–100 %. Using plasma protein-depleted blood and blood from a C3-deficient patient, we corroborated the dependence on C3, obtaining similar results after reconstitution with purified C3. By analogy with platelets, PMPs isolated from human serum were found to expose C3(H2O) and bind to PMNs. This interaction was also blocked by the anti-C3(H2O) and anti-CD11b monoclonal antibodies, indicating that C3(H2O) and CD11b are involved in tethering PMPs to PMNs. We confirmed the direct interaction between C3(H2O) and CD11b by quartz crystal microbalance analysis using purified native C3 and recombinant CD11b/CD18 and by flow cytometry using PMP and recombinant CD11b. Transfectants expressing CD11b/CD18 were also shown to specifically adhere to surface-bound C3(H2O). We have identified contact-activated C3(H2O) as a novel ligand for CD11b/CD18 that mediates PPC formation and the binding of PMPs to PMNs. Given the various roles of C3 in thrombotic reactions, this finding is likely to have important pathophysiological implications. PMID:26293614

  12. Contact activation of C3 enables tethering between activated platelets and polymorphonuclear leukocytes via CD11b/CD18.

    PubMed

    Hamad, Osama A; Mitroulis, Ioannis; Fromell, Karin; Kozarcanin, Huda; Chavakis, Triantafyllos; Ricklin, Daniel; Lambris, John D; Ekdahl, Kristina N; Nilsson, Bo

    2015-11-25

    Complement component C3 has a potential role in thrombotic pathologies. It is transformed, without proteolytic cleavage, into C3(H2O) upon binding to the surface of activated platelets. We hypothesise that C3(H2O) bound to activated platelets and to platelet-derived microparticles (PMPs) contributes to platelet-PMN complex (PPC) formation and to the binding of PMPs to PMNs. PAR-1 activation of platelets in human whole blood from normal individuals induced the formation of CD16+/CD42a+ PPC. The complement inhibitor compstatin and a C5a receptor antagonist inhibited PPC formation by 50 %, while monoclonal antibodies to C3(H2O) or anti-CD11b inhibited PPC formation by 75-100 %. Using plasma protein-depleted blood and blood from a C3-deficient patient, we corroborated the dependence on C3, obtaining similar results after reconstitution with purified C3. By analogy with platelets, PMPs isolated from human serum were found to expose C3(H2O) and bind to PMNs. This interaction was also blocked by the anti-C3(H2O) and anti-CD11b monoclonal antibodies, indicating that C3(H2O) and CD11b are involved in tethering PMPs to PMNs. We confirmed the direct interaction between C3(H2O) and CD11b by quartz crystal microbalance analysis using purified native C3 and recombinant CD11b/CD18 and by flow cytometry using PMP and recombinant CD11b. Transfectants expressing CD11b/CD18 were also shown to specifically adhere to surface-bound C3(H2O). We have identified contact-activated C3(H2O) as a novel ligand for CD11b/CD18 that mediates PPC formation and the binding of PMPs to PMNs. Given the various roles of C3 in thrombotic reactions, this finding is likely to have important pathophysiological implications. PMID:26293614

  13. 25 CFR 36.43 - Standard XVI-Student activities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 25 Indians 1 2012-04-01 2011-04-01 true Standard XVI-Student activities. 36.43 Section 36.43 Indians BUREAU OF INDIAN AFFAIRS, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR EDUCATION MINIMUM ACADEMIC STANDARDS FOR THE BASIC EDUCATION OF INDIAN CHILDREN AND NATIONAL CRITERIA FOR DORMITORY SITUATIONS Instructional Support § 36.43 Standard XVI—Student activities....

  14. Race and Sex Differences in College Student Physical Activity Correlates

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McArthur, Laura H.; Raedeke, Thomas D.

    2009-01-01

    Objectives: To assess sex/race differences on psychosocial correlates of physical activity among college students. Methods: Survey research protocol. Results: Students (n = 636) exercised an average of 3.5 days per week, with black females being the least active. Across subgroups, health/fitness was rated as the most important motive for exercise,…

  15. Bias in Student Survey Findings from Active Parental Consent Procedures

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shaw, Thérèse; Cross, Donna; Thomas, Laura T.; Zubrick, Stephen R.

    2015-01-01

    Increasingly, researchers are required to obtain active (explicit) parental consent prior to surveying children and adolescents in schools. This study assessed the potential bias present in a sample of actively consented students, and in the estimates of associations between variables obtained from this sample. Students (n = 3496) from 36…

  16. Promoting Physical Activity through Student Life and Academics

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McDaniel, Tyler; Melton, Bridget F.; Langdon, Jody

    2014-01-01

    Objective: A physical activity passport (PAP) was developed to increase student's physical activity through the collaboration of student life and academics. The purpose was to measure the effectiveness of the PAP. Design: The research design used was a quantitative, descriptive, quasi-experimental design with experimental and control groups.…

  17. Active and Reflective Learning to Engage All Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McCoy, Bryan

    2013-01-01

    This article describes how teachers effectively manage learning through active engagement of all students throughout each class period. A case study is presented which demonstrates how students learn through active and reflective engagement with ideas, the environment, and other learners (National Middle School Association, 2010). The case study…

  18. Developing Science and Math Integrated Activities for Middle School Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sherrod, Sonya Ellouise; Dwyer, Jerry; Narayan, Ratna

    2009-01-01

    This article reports the development and refinement of science and mathematics integrated activities for middle school students. The expectations of the National Council of Teachers of Mathematics that students develop an understanding of mathematics and an ability to apply it gave birth to these activities. The expectations of the National…

  19. PETE Students' Perceptions of a Healthy and Active Lifestyle

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wilkinson, Carol; Pennington, Todd; Barney, David; Lockhart, Barbara; Hager, Ron; Prusak, Keven

    2014-01-01

    Participants were male and female students (n = 12) in a physical education teacher education (PETE) program with a healthy and active lifestyle management (HALM) focus, at a university in the Intermountain West. The purpose of the study was to examine PETE students' perceptions of a healthy and active lifestyle (HAL). Following inductive content…

  20. Human Spaceflight: Activities for the Intermediate and Junior High Student.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hartsfield, John W.; Hartsfield, Kendra J.

    Since its beginning, space science has created high interest and continues to prod the imagination of students. This activity packet, which has been designed to enhance the curriculum and challenge gifted students, contains background information on spaceflight as well as 24 interdisciplinary classroom activities, 3 crossword puzzles, and 3 word…

  1. Student Activism within Christian College Cultures: A Symbolic Interactionist Perspective

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cole, Brian E.

    2014-01-01

    This study contributes to the understanding of the structural and cultural influences of Christian college environments on student activism through the framework of symbolic interactionism (Blumer, 1969; Mead, 1934). The goal of this research was to examine how the students at Christian institutions understand and engage in activism within their…

  2. Dodecyl Maltopyranoside Enabled Purification of Active Human GABA Type A Receptors for Deep and Direct Proteomic Sequencing*

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Xi; Miller, Keith W.

    2015-01-01

    The challenge in high-quality membrane proteomics is all about sample preparation prior to HPLC, and the cell-to-protein step poses a long-standing bottleneck. Traditional protein extraction methods apply ionic or poly-disperse detergents, harsh denaturation, and repeated protein/peptide precipitation/resolubilization afterward, but suffer low yield, low reproducibility, and low sequence coverage. Contrary to attempts to subdue, we resolved this challenge by providing proteins nature-and-activity-promoting conditions throughout preparation. Using 285-kDa hetero-pentameric human GABA type A receptor overexpressed in HEK293 as a model, we describe a n-dodecyl-β-d-maltopyranoside/cholesteryl hemisuccinate (DDM/CHS)-based affinity purification method, that produced active receptors, supported protease activity, and allowed high performance with both in-gel and direct gel-free proteomic analyses—without detergent removal. Unlike conventional belief that detergents must be removed before HPLC MS, the high-purity low-dose nonionic detergent DDM did not interfere with peptides, and obviated removal or desalting. Sonication or dropwise addition of detergent robustly solubilized over 90% of membrane pellets. The purification conditions were comparable to those applied in successful crystallizations of most membrane proteins. These results enabled streamlined proteomics of human synaptic membrane proteins, and more importantly, allowed directly coupling proteomics with crystallography to characterize both static and dynamic structures of membrane proteins in crystallization pipelines. PMID:25473089

  3. Students' Research-Informed Socio-scientific Activism: Re/Visions for a Sustainable Future

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bencze, Larry; Sperling, Erin; Carter, Lyn

    2012-01-01

    In many educational contexts throughout the world, increasing focus has been placed on socio-scientific issues; that is, disagreements about potential personal, social and/or environmental problems associated with fields of science and technology. Some suggest (as do we) that many of these potential problems, such as those associated with climate change, are so serious that education needs to be oriented towards encouraging and enabling students to become citizen activists, ready and willing to take personal and social actions to reduce risks associated with the issues. Towards this outcome, teachers we studied encouraged and enabled students to direct open-ended primary (e.g., correlational studies), as well as secondary (e.g., internet searches), research as sources of motivation and direction for their activist projects. In this paper, we concluded, based on constant comparative analyses of qualitative data, that school students' tendencies towards socio-political activism appeared to depend on myriad, possibly interacting, factors. We focused, though, on curriculum policy statements, school culture, teacher characteristics and student-generated research findings. Our conclusions may be useful to those promoting education for sustainability, generally, and, more specifically, to those encouraging activism on such issues informed by student-led research.

  4. Supporting Students' Knowledge Transfer in Modeling Activities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Piksööt, Jaanika; Sarapuu, Tago

    2014-01-01

    This study investigates ways to enhance secondary school students' knowledge transfer in complex science domains by implementing question prompts. Two samples of students applied two web-based models to study molecular genetics--the model of genetic code (n = 258) and translation (n = 245). For each model, the samples were randomly divided into…

  5. Transition Strategies to Ensure Active Student Engagement

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Korbel, Donna M.; McGuire, Joan M.; Banerjee, Manju; Saunders, Sue A.

    2011-01-01

    Transition into college for students with disabilities has been written about extensively over the past decade, due in part to legislative mandates implemented at the secondary level. With significant increases in the number of these students in the college population, a focus on their transition through college is imperative to improve retention…

  6. Worming Students into Science.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hanif, Muhammad; Harrod, Tammy

    1997-01-01

    Describes the construction of a sturdy earthworm box that can provide students with firsthand experience with earthworms. Presents activities that enable students to observe earthworms and discover how they enrich the soil. (JRH)

  7. Students' Experiences of Active Engagement through Cooperative Learning Activities in Lectures

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cavanagh, Michael

    2011-01-01

    This article reports on students' experiences of lectures which included many opportunities for active engagement through cooperative learning activities. At the end of a 13-week semester-long unit, 113 students completed a questionnaire which contained five open-ended questions focusing on the extent to which the students thought that the lecture…

  8. A minimal nitrogen fixation gene cluster from Paenibacillus sp. WLY78 enables expression of active nitrogenase in Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Wang, Liying; Zhang, Lihong; Liu, Zhanzhi; Liu, Zhangzhi; Zhao, Dehua; Liu, Xiaomeng; Zhang, Bo; Xie, Jianbo; Hong, Yuanyuan; Li, Pengfei; Chen, Sanfeng; Dixon, Ray; Li, Jilun

    2013-01-01

    Most biological nitrogen fixation is catalyzed by molybdenum-dependent nitrogenase, an enzyme complex comprising two component proteins that contains three different metalloclusters. Diazotrophs contain a common core of nitrogen fixation nif genes that encode the structural subunits of the enzyme and components required to synthesize the metalloclusters. However, the complement of nif genes required to enable diazotrophic growth varies significantly amongst nitrogen fixing bacteria and archaea. In this study, we identified a minimal nif gene cluster consisting of nine nif genes in the genome of Paenibacillus sp. WLY78, a gram-positive, facultative anaerobe isolated from the rhizosphere of bamboo. We demonstrate that the nif genes in this organism are organized as an operon comprising nifB, nifH, nifD, nifK, nifE, nifN, nifX, hesA and nifV and that the nif cluster is under the control of a σ(70) (σ(A))-dependent promoter located upstream of nifB. To investigate genetic requirements for diazotrophy, we transferred the Paenibacillus nif cluster to Escherichia coli. The minimal nif gene cluster enables synthesis of catalytically active nitrogenase in this host, when expressed either from the native nifB promoter or from the T7 promoter. Deletion analysis indicates that in addition to the core nif genes, hesA plays an important role in nitrogen fixation and is responsive to the availability of molybdenum. Whereas nif transcription in Paenibacillus is regulated in response to nitrogen availability and by the external oxygen concentration, transcription from the nifB promoter is constitutive in E. coli, indicating that negative regulation of nif transcription is bypassed in the heterologous host. This study demonstrates the potential for engineering nitrogen fixation in a non-nitrogen fixing organism with a minimum set of nine nif genes.

  9. A Minimal Nitrogen Fixation Gene Cluster from Paenibacillus sp. WLY78 Enables Expression of Active Nitrogenase in Escherichia coli

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Dehua; Liu, Xiaomeng; Zhang, Bo; Xie, Jianbo; Hong, Yuanyuan; Li, Pengfei; Chen, Sanfeng; Dixon, Ray; Li, Jilun

    2013-01-01

    Most biological nitrogen fixation is catalyzed by molybdenum-dependent nitrogenase, an enzyme complex comprising two component proteins that contains three different metalloclusters. Diazotrophs contain a common core of nitrogen fixation nif genes that encode the structural subunits of the enzyme and components required to synthesize the metalloclusters. However, the complement of nif genes required to enable diazotrophic growth varies significantly amongst nitrogen fixing bacteria and archaea. In this study, we identified a minimal nif gene cluster consisting of nine nif genes in the genome of Paenibacillus sp. WLY78, a gram-positive, facultative anaerobe isolated from the rhizosphere of bamboo. We demonstrate that the nif genes in this organism are organized as an operon comprising nifB, nifH, nifD, nifK, nifE, nifN, nifX, hesA and nifV and that the nif cluster is under the control of a σ70 (σA)-dependent promoter located upstream of nifB. To investigate genetic requirements for diazotrophy, we transferred the Paenibacillus nif cluster to Escherichia coli. The minimal nif gene cluster enables synthesis of catalytically active nitrogenase in this host, when expressed either from the native nifB promoter or from the T7 promoter. Deletion analysis indicates that in addition to the core nif genes, hesA plays an important role in nitrogen fixation and is responsive to the availability of molybdenum. Whereas nif transcription in Paenibacillus is regulated in response to nitrogen availability and by the external oxygen concentration, transcription from the nifB promoter is constitutive in E. coli, indicating that negative regulation of nif transcription is bypassed in the heterologous host. This study demonstrates the potential for engineering nitrogen fixation in a non-nitrogen fixing organism with a minimum set of nine nif genes. PMID:24146630

  10. Directed evolution of protease beacons that enable sensitive detection of endogenous MT1-MMP activity in tumor cell lines.

    PubMed

    Jabaiah, Abeer; Daugherty, Patrick S

    2011-03-25

    Directed evolution was applied to identify peptide substrates with enhanced hydrolysis rates by MT1-MMP suitable for protease beacon development. Screening of a random pentapeptide library, using two-color CLiPS, yielded several substrates identical to motifs in distinct collagens that shared the consensus sequence P-x-G↓L. To identify substrates with enhanced cleavage rates, a second-generation decapeptide library incorporating the consensus was screened under stringent conditions, which resulted in a MxPLG↓(M)/(L)M(G)/(A)R consensus motif. These substrates are hydrolyzed by human-MT1-MMP up to six times faster than reported peptide substrates and are stable in plasma. Finally, incubation of soluble protease beacons incorporating the optimized substrates, but not previous substrates, enabled direct detection of endogenous MT1-MMP activity of human-fibrosarcoma (HT-1080) cells. Extended substrate libraries coupled with CLiPS should be useful to generate more effective activity probes for a variety of proteolytic enzymes.

  11. Enabling Music and Journalism Students to Respond Positively to Adversity in Work after Graduation: A Reconsideration of Conventional Pedagogies

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Latukefu, Lotte; Burns, Shawn; O'Donnell, Marcus; Whelan, Andrew

    2014-01-01

    Elite classical music programs continue to focus teaching in Western Classical traditions where the emphasis is on technical virtuosity in instrumental or vocal performance. In this paper we discuss group activities and assessments used in two Creative Arts disciplines (Performance and Journalism), at an Australian regional university, as examples…

  12. Signal-amplifying genetic circuit enables in vivo observation of weak promoter activation in the Rhl quorum sensing system.

    PubMed

    Karig, David; Weiss, Ron

    2005-03-20

    Small changes in transcriptional activity often significantly affect phenotype but are not detectable in vivo by conventional means. To address this problem, we present a technique for detecting weak transcriptional responses using signal-amplifying genetic circuits. We apply this technique to reveal previously undetectable log phase responses of several Rhl quorum sensing controlled (qsc) promoters from Pseudomonas aeruginosa. Genetic circuits with Rhl promoters and transcriptional amplification components were built and tested in Escherichia coli. This enabled us to isolate the behavior of the promoters under study from Las and quinolone interactions. To amplify qsc promoter responses to acyl-homoserine lactones (AHL), the highly efficient lambda repressor gene was placed downstream of several Rhl promoters and coupled to a fluorescent reporter under the control of the lambda P(R) promoter. With amplification, up to approximately 100-fold differences in fluorescence levels between AHL induced and noninduced cultures were observed for promoters whose responses were otherwise not detectable. In addition, the combination of using signal amplification and performing experiments in E. coli simplified the analysis of AHL signal crosstalk. For example, we discovered that while a C4HSL/RhlR complex activates both qscrhlA and qscphzA1, a 3OC12HSL/RhlR complex activates qscphzA1 but not qscrhlA in our system. This crosstalk information is particularly important since one of the potential uses of amplification constructs is for the detection of specific quorum sensing signals in environmental and clinical isolates. Furthermore, the process of decomposing networks into basic parts, isolating these components in a well-defined background, and using amplification to characterize both crosstalk and cognate signal responses embodies an important approach to understanding complex genetic networks.

  13. Preparing students to participate in an active learning environment.

    PubMed

    Modell, H I

    1996-06-01

    Most students have spent the majority of their school career in passive learning environments in which faculty were disseminators of information, and students were required to memorize information or use specified algorithms to "solve problems." In an active learning environment, students are encouraged to engage in the process of building and testing their own mental models from information that they are acquiring. In such a learner-centered environment, faculty become facilitators of learning, and students become active participants, engaging in a dialogue with their colleagues and with the instructor. To create a successful active learning environment, both faculty and students must make adjustments to what has been their respective "traditional" roles in the classroom. For the instructor who is committed to promoting active learning, the challenge lies in helping students understand the necessity of becoming active colleagues in learning. This process can be facilitated if the curriculum includes exercises to direct students' attention to a number of issues that impact their learning. This paper describes four such exercises designed to help students form appropriate course expectations, recognize the need for seeking clarification when communicating, recognize the role of personal experience in building mental models, and become familiar with study aids for building formal models.

  14. Teaching students to read the primary literature using POGIL activities.

    PubMed

    Murray, Tracey Arnold

    2014-01-01

    The ability to read, interpret, and evaluate articles in the primary literature are important skills that science majors will use in graduate school and professional life. Because of this, it is important that students are not only exposed to the primary literature in undergraduate education, but also taught how to read and interpret these articles. To achieve this objective, POGIL activities were designed to use the primary literature in a majors biochemistry sequence. Data show that students were able to learn content from the literature without separate activities or lecture. Students also reported an increase in comfort and confidence in approaching the literature as a result of the activities.

  15. Independent Learning Activities in Science for Students At-Risk.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Geiger, Emily

    The purpose of this project was to determine whether third grade students, given written directions and necessary materials, could work without teacher direction for 30 minutes. Students (N=25) were to gain skill and confidence in carrying out the processes required for completing an independent learning activity by completing science learning…

  16. Total Participation Techniques: Making Every Student an Active Learner

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Himmele, Persida; Himmele, William

    2011-01-01

    Yes, there are easy-to-use and incredibly effective alternatives to the "stand and deliver" approach to teaching that causes so many students to tune out--or even drop out. Here's your opportunity to explore dozens of ways to engage K-12 students in active learning and allow them to demonstrate the depth of their knowledge and understanding. The…

  17. Predictors of Political Activism among Social Work Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Swank, Eric W.

    2012-01-01

    This article identifies factors inspiring greater political participation among undergraduate social work students (N=125). When separating students into self-identified liberals and conservatives, the study uses resource, mobilizing, and framing variables to explain greater levels of activism. After several multivariate regressions, this article…

  18. Effects of Teacher Professional Learning Activities on Student Achievement Growth

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Akiba, Motoko; Liang, Guodong

    2016-01-01

    The authors examined the effects of six types of teacher professional learning activities on student achievement growth over 4 years using statewide longitudinal survey data collected from 467 middle school mathematics teachers in 91 schools merged with 11,192 middle school students' mathematics scores in a standardized assessment in Missouri. The…

  19. Student Perceptions of a Conceptual Physical Education Activity Course

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jenkins, Jayne M.; Jenkins, Patience; Collums, Ashley; Werhonig, Gary

    2006-01-01

    Conceptual physical education (CPE) courses are typically included in university course work to provide students knowledge and skills to engage in physical activity for life. The purpose of this study was to identify CPE course characteristics that contributed to positive and negative student perceptions. Participants included 157 undergraduates…

  20. An Aging Game Simulation Activity for Allied Health Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Douglass, Carolinda; Henry, Beverly W.; Kostiwa, Irene M.

    2008-01-01

    The Aging Game, a simulation activity, has been used successfully with medical students in the development of empathetic attitudes toward older adults. To date, the Aging Game has not been used extensively with allied health students. It has been viewed as too costly, time-consuming and labor-intensive. The purpose of this study was to examine the…

  1. Student Use of Facebook for Organizing Collaborative Classroom Activities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lampe, Cliff; Wohn, Donghee Yvette; Vitak, Jessica; Ellison, Nicole B.; Wash, Rick

    2011-01-01

    Social network sites such as Facebook are often conceived of as purely social spaces; however, as these sites have evolved, so have the ways in which students are using them. In this study, we examine how undergraduate students use the social network site Facebook to engage in classroom-related collaborative activities (e.g., arranging study…

  2. Do Active-Learning Strategies Improve Students' Critical Thinking?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nelson, Larry P.; Crow, Mary L.

    2014-01-01

    Improving students' ability to recognize work-related problems and apply effective strategies and solutions to fundamental challenges in the field is at the crux of a good college preparation. This paper attempts to investigate if active-learning strategies improve students' critical thinking ability in this regard. Participants were pre-service…

  3. Design for Diversity: A Program Planning Grid for Student Activities.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kubik, Jan B.

    This guide provides a program planning grid for college student personnel workers involved in the area of student activities. A program planning and evaluative system is proposed to address campus needs and allow greater control in planning an educationally balanced program. This system is based on an outline of topical areas to be addressed…

  4. It Takes a Virtual Community: Promoting Collaboration through Student Activities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Battista, Ludmila; Forrey, Carol; Stevenson, Carolyn

    2008-01-01

    Distance education provides many nontraditional students with the opportunity to pursue a college education not possible through traditional brick and mortar education. Although not meeting face-to-face, student activities help promote a stronger connection between the classroom and university community. This paper will discuss strategies for…

  5. Sport and Other Motor Activities of Warsaw Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Biernat, Elzbieta

    2011-01-01

    Study aim: To assess the engagement of students of Warsaw university schools in sports and in recreational motor activities. Material and methods: A cohort (n = 1100) of students attending B.S. or M.S. courses at 6 university schools in Warsaw were studied by applying questionnaire techniques. The questions pertained to participation in…

  6. Services for Older Adults. Reference Book [and] Student Activity Book.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Texas Tech Univ., Lubbock. Curriculum Center for Family and Consumer Sciences.

    This student activity book and reference book, which are part of a family and consumer sciences education series focusing on a broad range of employment opportunities, are intended for use in 1- and 2- programs preparing Texas high school students for employment in occupations related to providing services for older adults. The reference book…

  7. Student Activity and Learning Outcomes in a Virtual Learning Environment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Romanov, Kalle; Nevgi, Anne

    2008-01-01

    The aim of the study was to explore the relationship between degree of participation and learning outcomes in an e-learning course on medical informatics. Overall activity in using course materials and degree of participation in the discussion forums of an online course were studied among 39 medical students. Students were able to utilise the…

  8. Economics and Entrepreneurship: Student Activities. Master Curriculum Guide.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National Council on Economic Education, New York, NY.

    Correlated to the Economics and Entrepreneurship Teaching Strategies Master Curriculum Guide, this book features 66 student activities, case studies, comprehension quizzes, and lessons related to economic concepts. Designed for high school students of economics, social studies, and business education, this curriculum guide combines study of basic…

  9. Using the Web to Increase Physical Activity in College Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Magoc, Dejan; Tomaka, Joe; Bridges-Arzaga, Amber

    2011-01-01

    Objectives: To evaluate the effectiveness of a theoretically based and Web-delivered intervention using common course technology for increasing physical activity in a college student sample. Methods: One hundred four students randomly participated in either a Web-based intervention involving 7 theory-based learning lessons or a control group that…

  10. Perceiving the General: The Multisemiotic Dimension of Students' Algebraic Activity

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Radford, Luis; Bardino, Caroline; Sabena, Cristina

    2007-01-01

    In this article, we deal with students' algebraic generalizations set in the context of elementary geometric-numeric patterns. Drawing from Vygotsky's psychology, Leont'ev's Activity Theory, and Husserl's phenomenology, we focus on the various semiotic resources mobilized by students in their passage from the particular to the general. Two small…

  11. An Evolving Framework for Describing Student Engagement in Classroom Activities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Azevedo, Flavio S.; diSessa, Andrea A.; Sherin, Bruce L.

    2012-01-01

    Student engagement in classroom activities is usually described as a function of factors such as human needs, affect, intention, motivation, interests, identity, and others. We take a different approach and develop a framework that models classroom engagement as a function of students' "conceptual competence" in the "specific content" (e.g., the…

  12. Students' Learning Activities While Studying Biological Process Diagrams

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kragten, Marco; Admiraal, Wilfried; Rijlaarsdam, Gert

    2015-01-01

    Process diagrams describe how a system functions (e.g. photosynthesis) and are an important type of representation in Biology education. In the present study, we examined students' learning activities while studying process diagrams, related to their resulting comprehension of these diagrams. Each student completed three learning tasks. Verbal…

  13. Attachment relationships and physical activity motivation of college students.

    PubMed

    Ullrich-French, Sarah; Smith, Alan L; Cox, Anne E

    2011-08-01

    This study was designed to assess the link of attachment relationships with physical activity motivation. Potential mediators of this link were examined in a cross-sectional study targeting college student physical activity motivation and behaviour. Participants completed self-reports of attachment relationships (with mother, father and best friend), self-determined motivation for physical activity, physical activity behaviour and the hypothesised mediator variables of perceived competence, autonomy and relatedness. The results provide support for the mediating role of these variables in the association of father attachment with self-determined motivation. Meaningful variance in self-determined motivation for physical activity and physical activity behaviour was explained. Overall, attachment relationships appear to be relevant, albeit modestly, to physical activity motivation of college students. The findings support continued efforts to integrate attachment and motivational perspectives in the study of college student health behaviour.

  14. Enhancing Active Learning in the Student Laboratory

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Modell, Harold I.; Michael, Joel A.; Adamson, Tom; Horwitz, Barbara

    2004-01-01

    We previously examined how three approaches to directing students in a laboratory setting impacted their ability to repair a faulty mental model in respiratory physiology (Modell, HI, Michael JA, Adamson T, Goldberg J, Horwitz BA, Bruce DS, Hudson ML, Whitescarver SA, and Williams S. Adv Physiol Educ 23: 82?90, 2000). This study addresses issues…

  15. Magnetism and Electricity Activity "Attracts" Student Interest

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Roman, Harry T.

    2010-01-01

    Electricity and magnetism are intimately linked, this relationship forming the basis of the modern electric utility system and the generation of bulk electrical energy. There is rich literature from which to teach students the basics, but nothing drives the point home like having them learn from firsthand experience--and that is what this…

  16. Outdoor Education Activities for Elementary School Students.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lee, Connie L.

    Outdoor education is an informal method of teaching and learning which offers opportunities for elementary school students, regardless of intellectual abilities, to learn about and appreciate their environment and acquire skills with which to enjoy a lifetime of creative, productive, and healthful living. Outdoor education can enrich, vitalize,…

  17. Saving Tropical Rain Forests through Teacher-Student Activism.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Calhoun, Bruce

    1990-01-01

    Described are the formation, goals, and activities of a network of teachers and students designed to help raise consciousness about conservation topics. A two-week minicourse on tropical diversity, ecology, and society is outlined. (CW)

  18. Learning Activities: Students and Recycling. [and] Automobile Aerodynamics.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McLaughlin, Charles H., Jr.; Schieber, Rich

    1994-01-01

    The first learning activity is intended to heighten students' awareness of the need for recycling, reuse, and reduction of materials; the second explores the aerodynamics of automobiles. Both include context, concept, objectives, procedure, and materials needed. (SK)

  19. Nordic Walking: A Simple Lifetime Physical Activity for Every Student

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Santos, Luis; Fernandez-Rio, Javier

    2013-01-01

    Children who become competent in a wide variety of motor skills and movement patterns are more likely to remain physically active for life. Physical education can achieve this goal by providing an extensive selection of activities and by including learning units that encourage students to increase their skill level and stay active year-round.…

  20. Activated Sludge. Student Manual. Biological Treatment Process Control.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Boe, Owen K.; Klopping, Paul H.

    This student manual contains the textual material for a seven-lesson unit on activated sludge. Topic areas addressed in the lessons include: (1) activated sludge concepts and components (including aeration tanks, aeration systems, clarifiers, and sludge pumping systems); (2) activated sludge variations and modes; (3) biological nature of activated…

  1. Active learning and leadership in an undergraduate curriculum: How effective is it for student learning and transition to practice?

    PubMed

    Middleton, Rebekkah

    2013-03-01

    Nurses are being increasingly asked to develop leadership skills in their practice and to be actively involved in continuous change processes in the workplace. Nursing students need to be developing leadership skills prior to entering the workplace to ensure they are able to meet the challenges associated with organisations and the cultures present in nursing, along with having highly tuned communication skills and leadership attributes that contribute to best patient care and outcomes. This paper looks at how the use of Active Learning in an undergraduate setting enabled the development and implementation of a leadership subject for nursing students preparing for professional practice. Through the use of a specific model of Active Learning, incorporating multiple intelligences into education allows students to bring deeper learning to their conscience so that whole person learning is an engaged experience. It seems apparent that Active Learning is an effective means of learning about leadership in undergraduate students who are developing towards a career as a health professional.

  2. Mastery inspired activities to help at risk students

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stelzer, Tim; Gladding, Gary; Gutmann, Brianne; Lundsgaard, Morten; Schroeder, Noah

    2016-03-01

    Introductory physics is a roadblock for many aspiring engineers at the University of Illinois. The overall attrition rate in our introductory mechanics and E&M courses is approximately 15%, however that rate doubles for some under-represented populations. We introduced a set of online activities designed to provide students both an accurate assessment of their current understanding, and the resources to improve their performance. This talk will describe the design of these activities, and their impact on student attitude and understanding.

  3. Developing and evaluating effective bioscience learning activities for nursing students.

    PubMed

    Salvage-Jones, Judith; Hamill, Jessie; Todorovic, Michael; Barton, Matthew J; Johnston, Amy N B

    2016-07-01

    Effective engagement of nursing students in the study of biosciences remains a challenge for many tertiary institutes. In this study we attempted to implement and then evaluate a simple hands-on intervention, consisting of a series of hands-on games and puzzles, to increase nursing student engagement with core concepts and anatomical learning involved in clinical anatomy and physiology. The study used a quazi-experimental longitudinal before and after design, to explore the effect of a learning intervention on student performance. Set across three different campuses of the same University, it included 1320 first year undergraduate nursing students from 2013 to 2014 who were studying Anatomy and Physiology. Students were exposed to the interventions or not, and concomitant academic performance, weekly quiz scores, performance in fortnightly worksheets and, across the semester, exam performance were compared. The results show that while the intervention appeared to increase academic performance in students on one campus (2013) compared to the other two, this difference was not sustained into 2014 when a bigger cohort was examined. Despite significant subjective student satisfaction and enthusiasm about these learning and teaching interventions, the data does not support the capacity of these activities to enhance student academic performance. Tertiary entrance scores, being a non-native English speakers and socio-economic status all had a bigger impact on student performance than engagement with fun anatomy and physiology activities. PMID:27428695

  4. Students' Performance in Investigative Activity and Their Understanding of Activity Aims

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gomes, Alessandro Damasio Trani; Borges, A. Tarciso; Justi, Rosaria

    2008-01-01

    This study investigates the relationship between the students' understanding of the aims of an investigative activity and their performance when conducting it. One hundred and eighty-one year nine students from a public middle school in Brazil took part in the study. Students working in pairs were asked to investigate two problems using a…

  5. Student Behavior and Epistemological Framing: Examples from Collaborative Active-Learning Activities in Physics

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Scherr, Rachel E.; Hammer, David

    2009-01-01

    The concept of framing from anthropology and sociolinguistics is useful for understanding student reasoning. For example, a student may frame a learning activity as an opportunity for sensemaking or as an assignment to fill out a worksheet. The student's framing affects what she notices, what knowledge she accesses, and how she thinks to act. We…

  6. Using Sales Management Students to Manage Professional Selling Students in an Innovative Active Learning Project

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Young, Joyce A.; Hawes, Jon M.

    2013-01-01

    This paper describes an application of active learning within two different courses: professional selling and sales management. Students assumed the roles of sales representatives and sales managers for an actual fund-raiser--a golf outing--sponsored by a student chapter of the American Marketing Association. The sales project encompassed an…

  7. Measuring Students' Physical Activity Levels: Validating SOFIT for Use with High-School Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    van der Mars, Hans; Rowe, Paul J.; Schuldheisz, Joel M.; Fox, Susan

    2004-01-01

    This study was conducted to validate the System for Observing Fitness Instruction Time (SOFIT) for measuring physical activity levels of high-school students. Thirty-five students (21 girls and 14 boys from grades 9-12) completed a standardized protocol including lying, sitting, standing, walking, running, curl-ups, and push-ups. Heart rates and…

  8. Classroom Environment and Student Outcomes among Students Using Anthropometry Activities in High-School Science

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lightburn, Millard E.; Fraser, Barry J.

    2007-01-01

    The main purpose of this research was to evaluate the use of anthropometric activities among a sample of 761 high-school biology students in terms of student outcomes (achievement and attitudes) and classroom environment (assessed with the Science Laboratory Environment Inventory, SLEI). Data analyses supported the SLEI's factorial validity,…

  9. Motivational activities based on previous knowledge of students

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    García, J. A.; Gómez-Robledo, L.; Huertas, R.; Perales, F. J.

    2014-07-01

    Academic results depend strongly on the individual circumstances of students: background, motivation and aptitude. We think that academic activities conducted to increase motivation must be tuned to the special situation of the students. Main goal of this work is analyze the students in the first year of the Degree in Optics and Optometry in the University of Granada and the suitability of an activity designed for those students. Initial data were obtained from a survey inquiring about the reasons to choose this degree, their knowledge of it, and previous academic backgrounds. Results show that: 1) the group is quite heterogeneous, since students have very different background. 2) Reasons to choose the Degree in Optics and Optometry are also very different, and in many cases were selected as a second option. 3) Knowledge and motivations about the Degree are in general quite low. Trying to increase the motivation of the students we designed an academic activity in which we show different topics studied in the Degree. Results show that students that have been involved in this activity are the most motivated and most satisfied with their election of the degree.

  10. The Relationship of Participation in Extracurricular Activities to Student Achievement, Student Attendance, and Student Behavior in a Nebraska School District

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dick, Andrew D.

    2010-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine possible relationships between participation in extracurricular activities and student achievement, participation in extracurricular activities and attendance, and participation in extracurricular activities and behavior. The setting for this study was a high school in western Nebraska. Data for 275 of the…

  11. Tonic 5nM DA stabilizes neuronal output by enabling bidirectional activity-dependent regulation of the hyperpolarization activated current via PKA and calcineurin.

    PubMed

    Krenz, Wulf-Dieter C; Rodgers, Edmund W; Baro, Deborah J

    2015-01-01

    Volume transmission results in phasic and tonic modulatory signals. The actions of tonic dopamine (DA) at type 1 DA receptors (D1Rs) are largely undefined. Here we show that tonic 5nM DA acts at D1Rs to stabilize neuronal output over minutes by enabling activity-dependent regulation of the hyperpolarization activated current (I h). In the presence but not absence of 5nM DA, I h maximal conductance (G max) was adjusted according to changes in slow wave activity in order to maintain spike timing. Our study on the lateral pyloric neuron (LP), which undergoes rhythmic oscillations in membrane potential with depolarized plateaus, demonstrated that incremental, bi-directional changes in plateau duration produced corresponding alterations in LP I hG max when preparations were superfused with saline containing 5nM DA. However, when preparations were superfused with saline alone there was no linear correlation between LP I hGmax and duty cycle. Thus, tonic nM DA modulated the capacity for activity to modulate LP I h G max; this exemplifies metamodulation (modulation of modulation). Pretreatment with the Ca2+-chelator, BAPTA, or the specific PKA inhibitor, PKI, prevented all changes in LP I h in 5nM DA. Calcineurin inhibitors blocked activity-dependent changes enabled by DA and revealed a PKA-mediated, activity-independent enhancement of LP I hG max. These data suggested that tonic 5nM DA produced two simultaneous, PKA-dependent effects: a direct increase in LP I h G max and a priming event that permitted calcineurin regulation of LP I h. The latter produced graded reductions in LP I hG max with increasing duty cycles. We also demonstrated that this metamodulation preserved the timing of LP's first spike when network output was perturbed with bath-applied 4AP. In sum, 5nM DA permits slow wave activity to provide feedback that maintains spike timing, suggesting that one function of low-level, tonic modulation is to stabilize specific features of a dynamic output.

  12. Tonic 5nM DA Stabilizes Neuronal Output by Enabling Bidirectional Activity-Dependent Regulation of the Hyperpolarization Activated Current via PKA and Calcineurin

    PubMed Central

    Krenz, Wulf-Dieter C.; Rodgers, Edmund W.; Baro, Deborah J.

    2015-01-01

    Volume transmission results in phasic and tonic modulatory signals. The actions of tonic dopamine (DA) at type 1 DA receptors (D1Rs) are largely undefined. Here we show that tonic 5nM DA acts at D1Rs to stabilize neuronal output over minutes by enabling activity-dependent regulation of the hyperpolarization activated current (I h). In the presence but not absence of 5nM DA, I h maximal conductance (G max) was adjusted according to changes in slow wave activity in order to maintain spike timing. Our study on the lateral pyloric neuron (LP), which undergoes rhythmic oscillations in membrane potential with depolarized plateaus, demonstrated that incremental, bi-directional changes in plateau duration produced corresponding alterations in LP I hG max when preparations were superfused with saline containing 5nM DA. However, when preparations were superfused with saline alone there was no linear correlation between LP I hGmax and duty cycle. Thus, tonic nM DA modulated the capacity for activity to modulate LP I h G max; this exemplifies metamodulation (modulation of modulation). Pretreatment with the Ca2+-chelator, BAPTA, or the specific PKA inhibitor, PKI, prevented all changes in LP I h in 5nM DA. Calcineurin inhibitors blocked activity-dependent changes enabled by DA and revealed a PKA-mediated, activity-independent enhancement of LP I hG max. These data suggested that tonic 5nM DA produced two simultaneous, PKA-dependent effects: a direct increase in LP I h G max and a priming event that permitted calcineurin regulation of LP I h. The latter produced graded reductions in LP I hG max with increasing duty cycles. We also demonstrated that this metamodulation preserved the timing of LP’s first spike when network output was perturbed with bath-applied 4AP. In sum, 5nM DA permits slow wave activity to provide feedback that maintains spike timing, suggesting that one function of low-level, tonic modulation is to stabilize specific features of a dynamic output. PMID

  13. Can nursing students' confidence levels increase with repeated simulation activities?

    PubMed

    Cummings, Cynthia L; Connelly, Linda K

    2016-01-01

    In 2014, nursing faculty conducted a study with undergraduate nursing students on their satisfaction, confidence, and educational practice levels, as it related to simulation activities throughout the curriculum. The study was a voluntary survey conducted on junior and senior year nursing students. It consisted of 30 items based on the Student Satisfaction and Self-Confidence in Learning and the Educational Practices Questionnaire (Jeffries, 2012). Mean averages were obtained for each of the 30 items from both groups and were compared using T scores for unpaired means. The results showed that 8 of the items had a 95% confidence level and when combined the items were significant for p <.001. The items identified were those related to self-confidence and active learning. Based on these findings, it can be assumed that repeated simulation experiences can lead to an increase in student confidence and active learning. PMID:26599594

  14. Can nursing students' confidence levels increase with repeated simulation activities?

    PubMed

    Cummings, Cynthia L; Connelly, Linda K

    2016-01-01

    In 2014, nursing faculty conducted a study with undergraduate nursing students on their satisfaction, confidence, and educational practice levels, as it related to simulation activities throughout the curriculum. The study was a voluntary survey conducted on junior and senior year nursing students. It consisted of 30 items based on the Student Satisfaction and Self-Confidence in Learning and the Educational Practices Questionnaire (Jeffries, 2012). Mean averages were obtained for each of the 30 items from both groups and were compared using T scores for unpaired means. The results showed that 8 of the items had a 95% confidence level and when combined the items were significant for p <.001. The items identified were those related to self-confidence and active learning. Based on these findings, it can be assumed that repeated simulation experiences can lead to an increase in student confidence and active learning.

  15. Enabling Remote Access to Fieldwork: Gaining Insight into the Pedagogic Effectiveness of "Direct" and "Remote" Field Activities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stokes, Alison; Collins, Trevor; Maskall, John; Lea, John; Lunt, Paul; Davies, Sarah

    2012-01-01

    This study considers the pedagogical effectiveness of remote access to fieldwork locations. Forty-one students from across the GEES disciplines (geography, earth and environmental sciences) undertook a fieldwork exercise, supported by two lecturers. Twenty students accessed the field site directly and the remainder accessed the site remotely using…

  16. Student Constructions of "Active Citizenship": What Does Participation Mean to Students?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kennedy, Kerry J.

    2007-01-01

    "Active citizenship" is currently a popular term in citizenship education policy discourse. Despite this policy interest, there is no agreement about the meaning of "active citizenship". This article draws on data from the IEA Civic Education Study to explore how students themselves construct "active citizenship". The results show that students…

  17. Activities of the Student Forum of the Geoinformation Forum Japan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oba, A.; Miyazaki, H.

    2012-07-01

    This reports a history and future prospects of the activities by the Student Forum of the Geoinformation Forum Japan. For growths of academic fields, active communications among students and young scientists are indispensable. Several academic communities in geoinformation fields are established by youths and play important roles of building networks over schools and institutes. The networks are expected to be innovative cooperation after the youths achieve their professions. Although academic communities are getting fixed growth particularly in Japan, youths had gotten little opportunities to make contacts with youths themselves. To promote gotten youth activities among geoinformation fields, in 1998, we started a series of programs that named the Student Forum of the Geoinformation Forum Japan involving students and young scientists within the annual conferences, Geoinformation Forum Japan. The programs have provided opportunities to do presentation their studies by posters, some events, and motivations to create networks among students and young scientists. From 2009, some members of our activities set additional conference in west area of Japan. Thus our activities are spread within Japan. As a result of these achievements, the number of youth dedicating to the programs keeps growing. From 2009, it's getting international gradually, however, almost all the participants are still Japanese. To keep and expand the network, we are planning to make some nodes with some Asian youth organizations in the field of geoinformation. This paper is concluded with proposals and future prospects on the Student Forum of the Geoinformation Forum Japan.

  18. Student Activities Can Generate Positive PR.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Armistead, Lew

    1985-01-01

    To counter negative news about education it is important to make sure that positive school activities receive their fair share of exposure in the news media. Presents tips on how to generate positive public relations. Includes a list of newsworthy activities ideas. (MD)

  19. Groundwater: A Vital Resource. Student Activities.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Taylor, Carla, Ed.

    Twenty-three activities dealing with various aspects of groundwater are provided in this manual. The activities are arranged under four headings: (1) the water cycle; (2) water distribution in soils (considering such topics as calculating water table depth and purifying water by filtering); (3) water quality (considering such topics as acid rain,…

  20. Cardiovascular Disease and Cancer: Student Awareness Activities.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Meyer, James H., Comp.

    Awareness activities pertaining to cancer and cardiovascular disease are presented as a supplement for high school science classes. The exercises can be used to enrich units of study dealing with the circulatory system, the cell, or human diseases. Eight activities deal with the following topics: (1) cardiovascular disease risk factors; (2)…

  1. The analysis and reconciliation of students' rebuttals in argumentation activities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Yu-Ren; Hung, Jeng-Fung

    2016-01-01

    The present study investigated the guidance provided by science teachers to resolve conflicts during socioscientific issue-based argumentation activities. A graphical representation (GR) was developed as a tool to code and analyze the dialogue interaction process. Through the GR and qualitative analysis, we identified three types of dialogue reconciling strategies. The first one consists of teacher management, in which the teacher temporarily maintains the right to speak when students get mired in an emotional rebuttal situation. The second strategy involves the use of qualifiers to identify the strengths and weaknesses of an opposing argument. The third strategy consists of providing students with guidance to keep both parties (i.e. the students taking, respectively, the affirmative and negative positions) on the same discussion topic and can be used to assist teachers with forming broad questions that prompt students to conduct deeper discussions. These reconciling strategies were beneficial in that they helped students to argue in a more reflective way.

  2. How Active Learning Affects Student Understanding of Concepts in Electromagnetism

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Belcher, John; Dori, Judy; Breslow, Lori

    2009-05-01

    We discuss the effects of the learning environment of the MIT TEAL project on student cognitive and affective outcomes in introductory electromagnetism. Our assessment included examining student conceptual understanding before and after studying electromagnetism in a media-rich environment. We developed pre-and posttests consisting of conceptual questions from standardized tests, as well as questions designed to assess the effect of visualizations and experiments. The research population consisted of 811 undergraduate students, consisting of small-and a large-scale experimental group and control group. The active learning students improved their conceptual understanding of the subject matter to a significantly higher extent than their control group peers. A subsequent longitudinal study indicates that the long-term effect of the TEAL course on student retention of concepts was significantly stronger than that of the traditional course.

  3. Physical Activity & Sport for the Secondary School Student. Fifth Edition.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dougherty, Neil J., Ed.

    This collection of papers offers a comprehensive text about contemporary physical activities and sports forms. It provides students with an overview of the various physical activities, skill technique required, safety, scoring, rules and etiquette, strategies, equipment, and related terminology. The 26 papers are: (1) "Physical Fitness" (Carolyn…

  4. Multimedia Activities for Students: A Teachers' and Librarians' Handbook.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sorrow, Barbara Head

    This book is a collection of multimedia ideas and activities for use in classrooms and libraries. Each activity is intended to be adaptable and for use in many subject areas and for a wide range of age groups. The book emphasizes the creative learning of the student, programs, and available resources. Six chapters are as follows: (1)…

  5. Factors Shaping Students' Opportunities to Engage in Argumentative Activity

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ayalon, Michal; Even, Ruhama

    2016-01-01

    This study examines how students' opportunities to engage in argumentative activity are shaped by the teacher, the class, and the mathematical topic. It compares the argumentative activity between two classes taught by the same teacher using the same textbook and across two beginning algebra topics--investigating algebraic expressions and…

  6. Breaking the Ice: Career Development Activities for Accounting Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kilpatrick, Bob G.; Wilburn, Nancy L.

    2010-01-01

    This paper describes two co-curricular career development activities, mock interviews and speed networking that we provide for accounting majors at our university. The driving force behind both activities was to increase comfort levels for students when interacting with professionals and to enhance their job interview and networking skills.…

  7. 25 CFR 36.43 - Standard XVI-Student activities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... school board shall approve the overall activity plan. A qualified sponsor is a professional staff member... with other schools in setting up a schedule of sports and games. Schools that participate in state... CFR 31.7. All student activity accounts shall be audited annually. (h) The school shall provide...

  8. 25 CFR 36.43 - Standard XVI-Student activities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... school board shall approve the overall activity plan. A qualified sponsor is a professional staff member... with other schools in setting up a schedule of sports and games. Schools that participate in state... CFR 31.7. All student activity accounts shall be audited annually. (h) The school shall provide...

  9. Improving Students' Attitudes to Chance with Games and Activities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nisbet, Steven; Williams, Anne

    2009-01-01

    A study was undertaken to implement a series of chance games and activities in a Year 7 classroom, and investigate the students' knowledge about probability concepts, as well as their attitudes to chance. Initially, the project involved selecting a set of appropriate learning activities to develop key probability concepts which are integral to the…

  10. Career Orientation 7-8. Student Activity Sheets in Economics.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Flowers, E. L.

    Activity sheets for seventh and eighth grade student use in economics are contained in this document. Activities are developed in the following areas: checking accounts, bank account applications, check writing, keeping a check register, using checks, budgets, insurance, responsibility and planning, consumer shopping, supermarkets, taxes, help…

  11. Drinking Water Activities for Students, Teachers, and Parents.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Environmental Protection Agency, Washington, DC.

    This guide provides teachers with materials, information, and classroom activities to enhance any drinking water curriculum. Students can use the activity sheets to further lessons and stimulate thought. Parents can use the guide to develop science projects that will provoke thought, encourage research, and provide a scientific approach to…

  12. Correlates of School-Day Physical Activity in Preschool Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Robinson, Leah E.; Wadsworth, Danielle D.; Peoples, Christina M.

    2012-01-01

    This study examined the relationship among sex, body mass index, motor skill competence (MSC), perceived physical competence (PPC), and school-day physical activity in preschool students (N = 34). Physical activity was assessed by steps accumulated during the school day, while MSC and PPC were assessed with the Test of Gross Motor Development--2nd…

  13. Peer Listening in the Middle School: Training Activities for Students.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hazouri, Sandra Peyser; Smith, Miriam Frey

    This workbook presents activities for training middle school student peer listeners. The first of the workbook's 10 chapters contains an introduction to peer listening. Activities include a pretest on a series of true-false statements called the "Peer Listening Inventory," defining the meaning of the words that describe the qualities of a peer…

  14. The Draws and Drawbacks of College Students' Active Procrastination

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hensley, Lauren C.

    2016-01-01

    When students procrastinate, they divert time from academics toward other activities, returning to academics at a later time. Active procrastination is a departure from the form of procrastination defined by scholars as passive (i.e., avoidant, maladaptive) in nature. Hensley selected the methodology (phenomenology) in order to undertake an…

  15. Expansion of student activities in Africa: from south to north

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cherif, Rim; Ben Salem, Amine; Gueddana, Amor; Zghal, Mourad; Naidoo, Darryl; Forbes, Andrew; Heidt, Alexander M.; Rohwer, Erich G.

    2014-07-01

    Optics and photonics research in Africa has gradually grown in the past ten years with a very active optical community involved in state-of-the-art research. Despite relatively low resources, optics research in the continent is competitive with many international benchmarks and has had a significant impact within the African continent. In the past five years, a group of dynamic students have developed the student chapter network from Tunisia to South Africa. The first student chapters of the optical society of America (OSA) and the international society for optics and photonics (SPIE) were established in South Africa (in the Council for Scientific and Industrial Research (CSIR) and in the University of Stellenbosch), followed by a chapter in Tunisia (Engineering school of communications of Tunis, Sup'Com). In this paper, we will present the major activities of the student chapters of Tunisia and South Africa, and how they are promoting optics and photonics in Africa.

  16. Office-Based Physical Activity and Nutrition Intervention: Barriers, Enablers, and Preferred Strategies for Workplace Obesity Prevention, Perth, Western Australia, 2012

    PubMed Central

    Jancey, Jonine; Howat, Peter; Ledger, Melissa; Lee, Andy H.

    2013-01-01

    Introduction Workplace health promotion programs to prevent overweight and obesity in office-based employees should be evidence-based and comprehensive and should consider behavioral, social, organizational, and environmental factors. The objective of this study was to identify barriers to and enablers of physical activity and nutrition as well as intervention strategies for health promotion in office-based workplaces in the Perth, Western Australia, metropolitan area in 2012. Methods We conducted an online survey of 111 employees from 55 organizations. The online survey investigated demographics, individual and workplace characteristics, barriers and enablers, intervention-strategy preferences, and physical activity and nutrition behaviors. We used χ2 and Mann–Whitney U statistics to test for differences between age and sex groups for barriers and enablers, intervention-strategy preferences, and physical activity and nutrition behaviors. Stepwise multiple regression analysis determined factors that affect physical activity and nutrition behaviors. Results We identified several factors that affected physical activity and nutrition behaviors, including the most common barriers (“too tired” and “access to unhealthy food”) and enablers (“enjoy physical activity” and “nutrition knowledge”). Intervention-strategy preferences demonstrated employee support for health promotion in the workplace. Conclusion The findings provide useful insights into employees’ preferences for interventions; they can be used to develop comprehensive programs for evidence-based workplace health promotion that consider environmental and policy influences as well as the individual. PMID:24028834

  17. Giving the Teacher a Voice: Perceptions Regarding the Barriers and Enablers Associated with the Implementation of Smart Moves (Compulsory Physical Activity) within Primary State Schools

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Usher, Wayne; Anderton, Amy

    2014-01-01

    The specific focus of this study is to explore Queensland (Australia) state school generalist teachers' perceptions regarding the barriers and enablers associated with the implementation of the Smart Moves (compulsory physical activity) policy in the primary classroom setting. This study sought to primarily add to the literature on, and…

  18. Understanding and Facilitating Student Bloggers: Towards a Blogging Activity Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Derntl, Michael

    Since instructors have started recognizing the potential of Web 2.0 integration in web-based courses, blogs have been used to provide students with means of virtual communication, contribution, collaboration and community building. In this paper we aim to take another step forward by presenting and analyzing the integration of student blogs in an undergraduate computer science course on software architecture and web technologies: we implemented an LMS extension that acted as a course blog portal by collecting and displaying feeds of externally hosted blogs and logging usage data. Data analysis reveals that students who perform better academically also tend to participate more actively in the course blogosphere. Subsequently, we propose a blogging activity model, which aims to reveal and explain relationships between blogging activity variables—including peer visits, commenting and posting—to achieve a better understanding of lively blog communities in courses.

  19. Describing Changes in Undergraduate Students' Preconceptions of Research Activities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cartrette, David P.; Melroe-Lehrman, Bethany M.

    2012-12-01

    Research has shown that students bring naïve scientific conceptions to learning situations which are often incongruous with accepted scientific explanations. These preconceptions are frequently determined to be misconceptions; consequentially instructors spend time to remedy these beliefs and bring students' understanding of scientific concepts to acceptable levels. It is reasonable to assume that students also maintain preconceptions about the processes of authentic scientific research and its associated activities. This study describes the most commonly held preconceptions of authentic research activities among students with little or no previous research experience. Seventeen undergraduate science majors who participated in a ten week research program discussed, at various times during the program, their preconceptions of research and how these ideas changed as a result of direct participation in authentic research activities. The preconceptions included the belief that authentic research is a solitary activity which most closely resembles the type of activity associated with laboratory courses in the undergraduate curriculum. Participants' views showed slight maturation over the research program; they came to understand that authentic research is a detail-oriented activity which is rarely successfully completed alone. These findings and their implications for the teaching and research communities are discussed in the article.

  20. Enabling the powerful? Participatory action research with local policymakers and professionals for physical activity promotion with women in difficult life situations.

    PubMed

    Frahsa, Annika; Rütten, Alfred; Roeger, Ulrike; Abu-Omar, Karim; Schow, Diana

    2014-03-01

    Enabling is a concept central to health promotion. It is perceived as a mechanism that can help people gain control over determinants of health. Little is known, however, about enabling among policy-makers and professionals. This case study investigates enabling among policy-makers and professionals who engaged in a specific participatory approach, cooperative planning. We define 'enabling' as creating action situations that allow policy-makers and professionals to (i) build individual capacities for health promotion and to (ii) apply these capacities to concrete organizational and political action at the institutional level. This case study followed policy-makers and professionals as they participated in a local physical activity promotion action research project in Germany. We conducted a secondary analysis of qualitative data gathered in that project (2005-2011). Methods included participant observation, document analysis, focus groups and qualitative interviews. All data were revisited for the case study and analyzed using qualitative content analysis. Findings include examples of enabling among policy-makers and professionals related to the cooperative planning process. Individual capacities were developed in perceived project roles, interactions with target groups and decision-making procedures. Findings also demonstrated municipal policy changes. Access to physical activity infrastructures improved, and an intersectoral job position was funded to support physical activity promotion among target group participants. Findings were analyzed using a model that links cooperative planning with a framework on policy change from a political science perspective. We conclude that cooperative planning might be a pathway to negotiated agreements that foster systematic enabling and health-promoting policy change. PMID:22987843

  1. How Active Are Your Students? Increasing Physical Activity in Schools

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Avery, Marybell; Brandt, Janet

    2010-01-01

    The U. S. Department of Health and Human Services recommends that youth engage in at least 60 minutes of physical activity each day, most of which should be either moderate- or vigorous-intensity aerobic physical activity. Half of this amount (30 minutes) should be achieved during the school day. NASPE provides guidance in the form of a…

  2. Using Technology-Enabled Active Learning Tools to Introduce Business Ethics Topics in Business Law Courses: A Few Practical Examples

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Reid, Linda A.; Weber, Curt M.

    2008-01-01

    In this article, the authors echo the assertion of the Association to Advance Collegiate Schools of Business (AACSB) Ethics Education Task Force that business schools must encourage students to develop a deep understanding of the myriad challenges surrounding corporate responsibility and corporate governance; provide them with tools for…

  3. Active learning increases student performance in science, engineering, and mathematics.

    PubMed

    Freeman, Scott; Eddy, Sarah L; McDonough, Miles; Smith, Michelle K; Okoroafor, Nnadozie; Jordt, Hannah; Wenderoth, Mary Pat

    2014-06-10

    To test the hypothesis that lecturing maximizes learning and course performance, we metaanalyzed 225 studies that reported data on examination scores or failure rates when comparing student performance in undergraduate science, technology, engineering, and mathematics (STEM) courses under traditional lecturing versus active learning. The effect sizes indicate that on average, student performance on examinations and concept inventories increased by 0.47 SDs under active learning (n = 158 studies), and that the odds ratio for failing was 1.95 under traditional lecturing (n = 67 studies). These results indicate that average examination scores improved by about 6% in active learning sections, and that students in classes with traditional lecturing were 1.5 times more likely to fail than were students in classes with active learning. Heterogeneity analyses indicated that both results hold across the STEM disciplines, that active learning increases scores on concept inventories more than on course examinations, and that active learning appears effective across all class sizes--although the greatest effects are in small (n ≤ 50) classes. Trim and fill analyses and fail-safe n calculations suggest that the results are not due to publication bias. The results also appear robust to variation in the methodological rigor of the included studies, based on the quality of controls over student quality and instructor identity. This is the largest and most comprehensive metaanalysis of undergraduate STEM education published to date. The results raise questions about the continued use of traditional lecturing as a control in research studies, and support active learning as the preferred, empirically validated teaching practice in regular classrooms.

  4. Active learning increases student performance in science, engineering, and mathematics.

    PubMed

    Freeman, Scott; Eddy, Sarah L; McDonough, Miles; Smith, Michelle K; Okoroafor, Nnadozie; Jordt, Hannah; Wenderoth, Mary Pat

    2014-06-10

    To test the hypothesis that lecturing maximizes learning and course performance, we metaanalyzed 225 studies that reported data on examination scores or failure rates when comparing student performance in undergraduate science, technology, engineering, and mathematics (STEM) courses under traditional lecturing versus active learning. The effect sizes indicate that on average, student performance on examinations and concept inventories increased by 0.47 SDs under active learning (n = 158 studies), and that the odds ratio for failing was 1.95 under traditional lecturing (n = 67 studies). These results indicate that average examination scores improved by about 6% in active learning sections, and that students in classes with traditional lecturing were 1.5 times more likely to fail than were students in classes with active learning. Heterogeneity analyses indicated that both results hold across the STEM disciplines, that active learning increases scores on concept inventories more than on course examinations, and that active learning appears effective across all class sizes--although the greatest effects are in small (n ≤ 50) classes. Trim and fill analyses and fail-safe n calculations suggest that the results are not due to publication bias. The results also appear robust to variation in the methodological rigor of the included studies, based on the quality of controls over student quality and instructor identity. This is the largest and most comprehensive metaanalysis of undergraduate STEM education published to date. The results raise questions about the continued use of traditional lecturing as a control in research studies, and support active learning as the preferred, empirically validated teaching practice in regular classrooms. PMID:24821756

  5. Active learning increases student performance in science, engineering, and mathematics

    PubMed Central

    Freeman, Scott; Eddy, Sarah L.; McDonough, Miles; Smith, Michelle K.; Okoroafor, Nnadozie; Jordt, Hannah; Wenderoth, Mary Pat

    2014-01-01

    To test the hypothesis that lecturing maximizes learning and course performance, we metaanalyzed 225 studies that reported data on examination scores or failure rates when comparing student performance in undergraduate science, technology, engineering, and mathematics (STEM) courses under traditional lecturing versus active learning. The effect sizes indicate that on average, student performance on examinations and concept inventories increased by 0.47 SDs under active learning (n = 158 studies), and that the odds ratio for failing was 1.95 under traditional lecturing (n = 67 studies). These results indicate that average examination scores improved by about 6% in active learning sections, and that students in classes with traditional lecturing were 1.5 times more likely to fail than were students in classes with active learning. Heterogeneity analyses indicated that both results hold across the STEM disciplines, that active learning increases scores on concept inventories more than on course examinations, and that active learning appears effective across all class sizes—although the greatest effects are in small (n ≤ 50) classes. Trim and fill analyses and fail-safe n calculations suggest that the results are not due to publication bias. The results also appear robust to variation in the methodological rigor of the included studies, based on the quality of controls over student quality and instructor identity. This is the largest and most comprehensive metaanalysis of undergraduate STEM education published to date. The results raise questions about the continued use of traditional lecturing as a control in research studies, and support active learning as the preferred, empirically validated teaching practice in regular classrooms. PMID:24821756

  6. Physician Enabling Skills Questionnaire

    PubMed Central

    Hudon, Catherine; Lambert, Mireille; Almirall, José

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Objective To evaluate the reliability and validity of the newly developed Physician Enabling Skills Questionnaire (PESQ) by assessing its internal consistency, test-retest reliability, concurrent validity with patient-centred care, and predictive validity with patient activation and patient enablement. Design Validation study. Setting Saguenay, Que. Participants One hundred patients with at least 1 chronic disease who presented in a waiting room of a regional health centre family medicine unit. Main outcome measures Family physicians’ enabling skills, measured with the PESQ at 2 points in time (ie, while in the waiting room at the family medicine unit and 2 weeks later through a mail survey); patient-centred care, assessed with the Patient Perception of Patient-Centredness instrument; patient activation, assessed with the Patient Activation Measure; and patient enablement, assessed with the Patient Enablement Instrument. Results The internal consistency of the 6 subscales of the PESQ was adequate (Cronbach α = .69 to .92). The test-retest reliability was very good (r = 0.90; 95% CI 0.84 to 0.93). Concurrent validity with the Patient Perception of Patient-Centredness instrument was good (r = −0.67; 95% CI −0.78 to −0.53; P < .001). The PESQ accounts for 11% of the total variance with the Patient Activation Measure (r2 = 0.11; P = .002) and 19% of the variance with the Patient Enablement Instrument (r2 = 0.19; P < .001). Conclusion The newly developed PESQ presents good psychometric properties, allowing for its use in practice and research. PMID:26889507

  7. Perceived barriers to physical activity in university students.

    PubMed

    Arzu, Daskapan; Tuzun, Emine Handan; Eker, Levent

    2006-01-01

    Many studies which were published in other countries identified certain benefits and barriers to physical activity among young people. But there is no data about the subject pertaining to Turkish adolescents. This study tries to rectify this with a study of Turkish university students. Undergraduate university students (n = 303) were recruited to the study. Current exercise habits and perceived barriers to physical activity were assessed in the sample. Using a Likert Type scale, participants responded an instrument with 12 items representing barriers to physical activity. Mean scores were computed. External barriers were more important than internal barriers. "Lack of time due to busy lesson schedule", "My parents give academic success priority over exercise. "and "lack of time due to responsibilities related to the family and social environment "were most cited items for physical activity barriers. There is a need for future research, which will be carried out with larger sample groups to develop national standardized instrument. It will be helpful for accurately identify perceived barriers and then recommend changes to enhance physical activity among young people. Key PointsThe purpose of this study was to analyze perceived barriers to physical activity in the university students.The results showed that not having enough time was the most important barrier for not participating in physical activity among our samples.This study with relatively small sample must be considered as pilot study for related studies in the future.

  8. Moving (Literally) to Engage Students: Putting the (Physically) Active in Active Learning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Strean, William B.

    2010-01-01

    This paper explores a variety of practices and classroom activities that engage the whole student. Grounded in a somatic perspective (from "soma" meaning the body in its wholeness--the integration of thinking, feeling, and acting), the discussion shows how students can be brought fully into learning through movement, music, and…

  9. MLS student active learning within a "cloud" technology program.

    PubMed

    Tille, Patricia M; Hall, Heather

    2011-01-01

    In November 2009, the MLS program in a large public university serving a geographically large, sparsely populated state instituted an initiative for the integration of technology enhanced teaching and learning within the curriculum. This paper is intended to provide an introduction to the system requirements and sample instructional exercises used to create an active learning technology-based classroom. Discussion includes the following: 1.) define active learning and the essential components, 2.) summarize teaching methods, technology and exercises utilized within a "cloud" technology program, 3.) describe a "cloud" enhanced classroom and programming 4.) identify active learning tools and exercises that can be implemented into laboratory science programs, and 5.) describe the evaluation and assessment of curriculum changes and student outcomes. The integration of technology in the MLS program is a continual process and is intended to provide student-driven active learning experiences.

  10. STUDENT ACTIVITIES STAFF FUNCTIONS--SUM AND SUBSTANCE.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    MARINE, JAMES

    THIS STUDY WAS DESIGNED TO ASSESS (1) THE CURRENT STATUS OF STUDENT ACTIVITIES (S.A.) WORK, (2) THE PERSONS ASSUMING MAJOR RESPONSIBILITY FOR THE S.A. FUNCTION AND THEIR CHARACTERISTICS, BACKGROUND, AND GOALS, (3) THE FUNCTIONS OF PERSONS WHO TAKE LEADERSHIP FOR S.A. PROGRAMS, AND (4) THE TRENDS AND DEVELOPMENTS IN S.A. COPIES OF A FIVE-PAGE…

  11. Another Way to Develop Chinese Students' Creativity: Extracurricular Innovation Activities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Xiao-jiang, Zhao; Xue-ting, Zhao

    2012-01-01

    In China, improving students' creativity is becoming an important goal of modern colleges and universities, especially in the domain of science and technology. The efforts made for this goal can be observed not only in classroom, but also in activities and competitions which were held out-of-school. This paper will firstly give a brief description…

  12. Nutrition Activities Guide for Students in Special Education: Citywide Programs.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    New York City Board of Education, Brooklyn, NY. Div. of Special Education.

    The guide is designed to provide special education students with nutrition education in terms of daily living skills. Activities are organized according to five themes: what we eat (awareness of the physical and sensory characteristics of food, identification of food eaten at various meals); how we eat (identification of cutlery, manners, use of…

  13. California DREAMers: Activism, Identity, and Empowerment among Undocumented College Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    DeAngelo, Linda; Schuster, Maximilian T.; Stebleton, Michael J.

    2016-01-01

    There is a large gap in college access and success for undocumented students. This emergent population remains uniquely and precariously situated within campus environments, despite the passage of Development, Relief, and Education for Alien Minors (DREAM) Acts in some states. These inequities have sparked activism for DREAMers associated with the…

  14. College Student Activism: An Exploration of Learning Outcomes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rosas, Marisela

    2010-01-01

    Researchers, politicians, and the public have criticized colleges and universities for not effectively preparing college students to be active participants in their communities and within a democratic society. Institutional initiatives on civic engagement have focused on community service and service-learning initiatives to meet this demand. The…

  15. Office Reprographics. Instructor's Guide. Student Activity Packet. Office Occupations.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Johnson, Diane E.

    This training package, one in a series of instructional modules consisting of an instructor's guide and a student activity packet, deals with office reprographics. Included in the instructor's guide are general directions for implementing the presentation; a detailed guide for teaching the lesson that includes performance objectives, suggestions…

  16. Boundary Breakers: A Team Building Guide for Student Activity Advisers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schrader, John

    Boundary breakers, the modern term for "icebreakers," tear down barriers that sometimes form within student groups and organizations, and offer a low-risk way for group members to become better acquainted. This document is a "hands on" booklet that covers such boundary-breaking activities as "Send a Letter,""The Lap Game,""One-Minute Interview,"…

  17. Getting Students Involved: Classroom Activities Which Promote Communication.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Freeman, G. Ronald; And Others

    Three essays concerning second language classroom activities that promote learning of communication skills are presented. In "From Manipulation to Communication" (Renate A. Schulz), the importance of establishing minimal communicative objectives for classroom instruction skills is discussed, specifying situations in which students have to…

  18. Coitally Active University Students: Sexual Behaviors, Concerns, and Challenges.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Darling, Carol A.; Davidson, J. Kenneth., Sr.

    1986-01-01

    Examined behaviors, attitudes, and concerns of students coitally active. Differences between genders included male dissatisfaction with infrequent opportunities for sexual intercourse, lack of variety of sex partners, and insufficient oral-genital stimulation. Female concerns were lack of stimulation to their breasts, painful sexual intercourse,…

  19. Setting the Stage for Physical Activity for Secondary Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ciccomascolo, Lori; Riebe, Deborah

    2006-01-01

    Despite the positive long-term physiological and psychological effects of exercise, many young adults between the ages of 12 and 21 years do not participate in regular physical activity. With the time constraints and other challenges in teaching and assessing students, physical educators need realistic strategies that will help in their efforts to…

  20. Freedom's Web: Student Activism in an Age of Cultural Diversity.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rhoads, Robert A.

    This book examines student activism in the 1990s and finds its sources in the struggle over multiculturalism and issues of social justice and equality. It is argued that identity politics is a reaction to the cultural hegemony reinforced through longstanding monocultural norms of the academy. A case study methodology used such data as formal and…

  1. Satisfaction from Academic Activities among Medical Students in Malaysia

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Al-Naggar, Redhwan A.; Bobryshev, Yuri V.

    2013-01-01

    There is a lack of data about the levels of satisfaction among medical students in regards to their academic activities in Malaysia. Therefore, the objective of this study was to fill the gap in the existing knowledge. A cross sectional study was carried out at the International medical school, the Management and Science University of Malaysia,…

  2. Fitness Profiles and Activity Patterns of Entering College Students.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pierce, Edgar F.; And Others

    1992-01-01

    Entering college students were evaluated for performance on maximal oxygen consumption, body composition, muscle endurance, muscle strength, and joint flexibility tests to determine the relationship of physical activity patterns to fitness levels. Results supported previous research indicating reduced fitness levels in young adults. (SM)

  3. Moodog: Tracking Student Activity in Online Course Management Systems

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zhang, Hangjin; Almeroth, Kevin

    2010-01-01

    Many universities are currently using Course Management Systems (CMSes) to conduct online learning, for example, by distributing course materials or submitting homework assignments. However, most CMSes do not include comprehensive activity tracking and analysis capabilities. This paper describes a method to track students' online learning…

  4. Student Activity Guide for "Business in an Information Economy."

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Graf, David; And Others

    The 20 chapters of this student activity guide provide study guides (key terms and concepts reviews), projects, cases for analyses, and self-assessment exercises for business and career education classes. Topics covered include the following: business winners (entrepreneurship); growth of the U.S. economy, the basics of economics, comparing…

  5. Solar Energy Education. Industrial arts: student activities. Field test edition

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1981-02-01

    In this teaching manual several activities are presented to introduce students to information on solar energy through classroom instruction. Wind power is also included. Instructions for constructing demonstration models for passive solar systems, photovoltaic cells, solar collectors and water heaters, and a bicycle wheel wind turbine are provided. (BCS)

  6. Shaping Student Activists: Discursive Sensemaking of Activism and Participation Research

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Taha, Diane E.; Hastings, Sally O.; Minei, Elizabeth M.

    2015-01-01

    As social media becomes a more potent force in society, particularly for younger generations, the role in activism has been contested. This qualitative study examines 35 interviews with students regarding their perceptions of the use of social media in social change, their perceptions of activists, and their level of self-identification as an…

  7. Are Mandatory Student Activity Fees Really Mementos of the Past?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gibbs, Annette

    1999-01-01

    In the fall 1996 issue of this journal, Maxine Schmitz argued against the California Supreme Court's ruling in "Smith" that the University must provide a partial refund to students objecting to fees used for activities supporting a single political or ideological viewpoint. Annette Gibbs defends the "Smith" majority opinion. Perry Zirkel's…

  8. Revealing Student Blogging Activities Using RSS Feeds and LMS Logs

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Derntl, Michael

    2010-01-01

    Blogs are an easy-to-use, free alternative to classic means of computer-mediated communication. Moreover, they are authentically aligned with web activity patterns of today's students. The body of studies on integrating and implementing blogs in various educational settings has grown rapidly recently; however, it is often difficult to distill…

  9. Environmental Pollution, Student's Book (Experiences/Experiments/Activities).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Weaver, Elbert C.

    Described in this student's manual are numerous experiments to acquaint the learner with community environmental problems. Experiments are relatively simple and useful in the junior high school grades. Activities are provided which emphasize some of the materials involved in pollution problems, such as carbon dioxide, sulfur compounds, and others,…

  10. Solar Energy Education. Home economics: student activities. Field test edition

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1981-03-01

    A view of solar energy from the standpoint of home economics is taken in this book of activities. Students are provided information on solar energy resources while performing these classroom activities. Instructions for the construction of a solar food dryer and a solar cooker are provided. Topics for study include window treatments, clothing, the history of solar energy, vitamins from the sun, and how to choose the correct solar home. (BCS)

  11. Contemporary Student Activism Context as a Vehicle for Leader Identity Development

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ivester, Stephen B.

    2013-01-01

    Contemporary college student activism efforts are growing. Little research has been conducted on student activism and leadership development. As student affairs educators consider leadership an important part of an undergraduate education it is important to consider how the context of activism actually influences student leader identity…

  12. Attitudinal Effects of a Student-Centered Active Learning Environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oliver-Hoyo, Maria T.; Allen, Deedee

    2005-06-01

    The importance of attitudes toward science has risen from widely accepted assumptions that achievement and attitude are positively interdependent and that affective variables are as important as cognitive variables in molding student learning. This report examines the effect on student attitudes toward learning chemistry in an active learning environment that has incorporated elements believed to positively influence student attitudes toward science including cooperative learning, hands-on activities, real-world applications, and engaging technology. These elements were considered for synergetic effects and not as individual contributors to the overall results. Two different sections of the same general chemistry course participated. The lecture setting was used as the control. Residualized gain scores were used to compare net changes in student attitudes. Data were analyzed for possible differences in gain for different academic majors. Anxiety in chemistry was monitored for the two class settings in three areas, learning in chemistry, chemistry evaluation, and chemical handling. Qualitative student feedback was also collected and is summarized in this report on the attitudinal aspects of instruction.

  13. Effect of Learning Activity on Students' Motivation, Physical Activity Levels and Effort/Persistence

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gao, Zan; Lee, Amelia M.; Xiang, Ping; Kosma, Maria

    2011-01-01

    The type of learning activity offered in physical education may influence students' motivational beliefs, physical activity participation and effort/persistence in class. However, most empirical studies have focused on the individual level rather than on the learner-content interactions. Accordingly, the potential effects of learning activities on…

  14. Pedagogical Distance: Explaining Misalignment in Student-Driven Online Learning Activities Using Activity Theory

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Westberry, Nicola; Franken, Margaret

    2015-01-01

    This paper provides an Activity Theory analysis of two online student-driven interactive learning activities to interrogate assumptions that such groups can effectively learn in the absence of the teacher. Such an analysis conceptualises learning tasks as constructed objects that drive pedagogical activity. The analysis shows a disconnect between…

  15. Motivating Students to Be Active outside of Class: A Hierarchy for Independent Physical Activity

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hill, Grant

    2009-01-01

    Despite the fact that children have an extraordinary amount of leisure time, students of all ages engage in too little physical activity. Opportunities for physical activity should be provided through recesses, lunch periods, organized fitness breaks, before- and after-school activity programs, and structured physical education classes. However,…

  16. Using the Pharmacist Interaction Tracking Tool for Capturing Student-Patient Interactions in Direct and Simulated Patient Care Activities

    PubMed Central

    Schonder, Kristine S.; Pater, Karen S.; McGivney, Melissa S.; Meyer, Susan M.

    2016-01-01

    Objective. To create and implement a standardized data collection tool for capturing student-patient interactions in direct and simulated patient care activities. Design. Faculty members and students determined key elements, design, and an implementation plan for the tool, which was to be used by students across professional years to quantify numbers and types of interactions with patients for tracking student progression toward achievement of curricular outcomes. Assessment. During the 2013-2014 academic year, 27 778 entries were completed, with 17 767 (64%) advanced pharmacy practice experiences, 7272 (26%) introductory pharmacy practice experiences, and 2739 (10%) simulation. Direct patient care interactions occurred with 11 090 patients and 10 983 providers, with 14 252 drug-related problems identified. Data was used by students for their professional portfolios, by administrators for curricular assessment, and to student impact on patient care. Conclusion. The PITT Form enabled the collection of data from actual and simulated patient care activities, allowed for curricular assessment of activities across years, and was used by individual students. PMID:27667842

  17. Using the Pharmacist Interaction Tracking Tool for Capturing Student-Patient Interactions in Direct and Simulated Patient Care Activities.

    PubMed

    Hall, Deanne L; Schonder, Kristine S; Pater, Karen S; McGivney, Melissa S; Meyer, Susan M

    2016-08-25

    Objective. To create and implement a standardized data collection tool for capturing student-patient interactions in direct and simulated patient care activities. Design. Faculty members and students determined key elements, design, and an implementation plan for the tool, which was to be used by students across professional years to quantify numbers and types of interactions with patients for tracking student progression toward achievement of curricular outcomes. Assessment. During the 2013-2014 academic year, 27 778 entries were completed, with 17 767 (64%) advanced pharmacy practice experiences, 7272 (26%) introductory pharmacy practice experiences, and 2739 (10%) simulation. Direct patient care interactions occurred with 11 090 patients and 10 983 providers, with 14 252 drug-related problems identified. Data was used by students for their professional portfolios, by administrators for curricular assessment, and to student impact on patient care. Conclusion. The PITT Form enabled the collection of data from actual and simulated patient care activities, allowed for curricular assessment of activities across years, and was used by individual students. PMID:27667842

  18. Assisting in Radiology/Imaging. Instructor's Guide, Student's Manual, and Student Learning Activities.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fair, Helena J.

    The instructor's guide, the first of three documents in this package, is designed for a course to help students who are investigating the activities within a radiology department or considering any of the imaging technologies as a career. The material is designed to relate training experience to information studied in the classroom. This…

  19. Assisting in the Medical Laboratory. Instructor's Guide, Students' Manual, and Student Learning Activities.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fair, Helena J.

    The instructor's guide, the first of three documents in this package, is for a course to help students who are investigating the activities within a hospital, clinic, or physician's office. The material is designed to relate training experience to information studied in the classroom. The course is intended for individualized study and is…

  20. Challenging Science and Literacy Activities for K-9 Students - The Cricket Chronicles: Student Edition

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Matthews, Catherine E.

    2006-01-01

    This is an extensive integrated unit of study focused on that common and familiar insect-the cricket. In this edition, students are provided with more than 30 activities on crickets, which will help them learn science content and skills including: (1) Taxonomy; (2) Anatomy; (3) Ecology; (4) Mark and recapture techniques for estimating population…

  1. Astronomical Activities for students-Motivating students interest in Physical Science through Astronomy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matthaiou, Alexis

    2010-05-01

    Astronomical Activities for students Motivating students interest in Physical Science through Astronomy Alexis Matthaiou Philekpaideftiki Etaireia, Arsakeio Lyceum Patron, Patras, Greece,(alexiosmat@yahoo.gr) School education aims not only to providing the necessary knowledge to the students but also to inspire and motivate them to realize their special abilities and inclinations and use their potential for making a joyful future for their lives. In this direction we present some activities held in the Arsakeio School of Patras during the years 2005-2008 in the field of Astronomy and Astrophysics, in order to share our experience with the teachers' community. Students from all grades of primary and secondary education participated with enthusiasm. In particular, they observed the Partial Solar Eclipse of October 3rd, 2005,and the Total Solar Eclipse of March 29th, 2006. They took part in observing and registering Solar Spots, using Astronomical equipments like different types of telescopes with filters and solar scopes. Students studied further the nature of Solar Phenomena and their effects on life, participating in the Environmental Program "Sun and Life"(2006-2007). Moreover, students took part in the International Program for measuring the Light Pollution "Globe at Night" (2006-2007) with observing and registering the luminosity of the Orion constellation in the night sky above their residence. Finally, the students participated in the European program "Hands on Universe" (HOU) (2005-2008) working on a project, which was the Greek contribution to HOU, developed from "Philekpaideftiki Etaireia". In particular, they studied the stars' spectrum and acquired information about the stars' life and age of stellar systems, using interactive multimedia technology.

  2. Improved cyclopropanation activity of histidine-ligated cytochrome P450 enables the enantioselective formal synthesis of levomilnacipran.

    PubMed

    Wang, Z Jane; Renata, Hans; Peck, Nicole E; Farwell, Christopher C; Coelho, Pedro S; Arnold, Frances H

    2014-06-23

    Engineering enzymes capable of modes of activation unprecedented in nature will increase the range of industrially important molecules that can be synthesized through biocatalysis. However, low activity for a new function is often a limitation in adopting enzymes for preparative-scale synthesis, reaction with demanding substrates, or when a natural substrate is also present. By mutating the proximal ligand and other key active-site residues of the cytochrome P450 enzyme from Bacillus megaterium (P450-BM3), a highly active His-ligated variant of P450-BM3 that can be employed for the enantioselective synthesis of the levomilnacipran core was engineered. This enzyme, BM3-Hstar, catalyzes the cyclopropanation of N,N-diethyl-2-phenylacrylamide with an estimated initial rate of over 1000 turnovers per minute and can be used under aerobic conditions. Cyclopropanation activity is highly dependent on the electronic properties of the P450 proximal ligand, which can be used to tune this non-natural enzyme activity. PMID:24802161

  3. An investigation of the impact of selected prereading activities on student content learning through laboratory activities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kass, Jesse (Shaya)

    This study investigated whether two prereading activities impacted student learning from hands-on science activities. The study was based on constructivist learning theory. Based on the work of Piaget, it was hypothesized that students who activated prior knowledge would learn more from the activities. Based on the work of Vygotsky it was hypothesized that students who talk more and write more would learn more from the activity. The K-W-L chart and anticipation guide strategies were used with eighth grade students at Graves Middle School in Whittier, California before learning about levers and convection currents. D. M. Ogle (1986) created the three-column K-W-L chart to have students activate prior knowledge. In the first column, the students write what they already know about a subject, in the second column, the students write what they want to know about the subject, and the students complete the third column after learning about a subject by writing answers to the questions that they asked in the second column. Duffelmeyer (1994) created the anticipation guide based on Herber's (1978) reasoning guide. In the anticipation guide, the teacher creates three or four sentences that convey the major ideas of the topic and the students either agree or disagree with the statements. After learning about the topic, students revisit their answers and decide if they were correct or incorrect and they must defend their choices. This research used the Solomon (1947) four-square design and compared both the experimental groups to a control group that simply discussed the concepts before completing the activity. The research showed no significant difference between the control group and either of the treatment groups. The reasons for the lack of significant differences are considered. It was hypothesized that since the students were unfamiliar with the prereading activities and did not have much experience with using either writing-to-learn or talking-to-learn strategies, the

  4. Activities and interactions of baccalaureate nursing students in clinical practica.

    PubMed

    Polifroni, E C; Packard, S A; Shah, H S; MacAvoy, S

    1995-01-01

    Basic nursing education is governed by individual state rules and regulations lacking in uniformity across the United States and based on unstated and perhaps mistaken assumptions. At the same time, there is increasing evidence of problems and difficulties with the current traditional model of nursing education. Before proposing changes in said model, the authors chose to examine what it is that a nursing student does in a clinical area. The perspective of activities and interactions was chosen to illustrate, through a nonparticipant observation study, the patterns and utilization of time during a scheduled clinical experience for baccalaureate nursing students. The goal of the study was to determine who, other than the client/patient, influences the student learning at the clinical site and how learning time is spent. Two schools (one private and one public) and nine clinical sites with 37 observations were used to collect the data for this study. Findings are best summarized in four (overlapping) categories of school time, registered nurse (RN) staff time, hospital staff time, and supervised time. School time, or time spent interacting with the instructor, another student, and/or the student on his/her own in the practice setting (time exclusive of staff input) constituted 84 per cent of all time. RN staff time that was time spent with either the primary nurse or other RNs on the unit used 10 per cent of the student time, Fourteen per cent of student time was spent in hospital staff time, which includes interactions with any nursing staff or other hospital personnel.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  5. Supporting Online, Non-Traditional Students through the Introduction of Effective E-Learning Tools in a Pre-University Tertiary Enabling Programme

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lambrinidis, George

    2014-01-01

    The increasing number of external students enrolling at Charles Darwin University has led to the university investing in new technologies to provide better support for students studying online. Many students, however, come from non-traditional backgrounds and lack some of the skills and confidence to participate successfully in an e-learning…

  6. A Standards-Based Meteorological Activities for All Students

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fried, Barry; Harding, Ian

    2000-11-01

    Canarsie High School is a typical urban high school in Brooklyn, New York. We have been involved in a District Initiative in collaboration with the City College of New York (CCNY) to initiate and incorporate relevant technologies into the science content areas and classrooms. Through changes in teaching strategies consistent with science education reform movements for mainstream, gifted and special education students; we have been able to effectively motivate student interest and to enhance and enrich the learning potential of all students. Our lessons involve extensive computer and Internet applications, concentrating our efforts in developing high-ordered reasoning skills to address the required concepts covered in Earth Science and Environmental Science curricula. This is a crucial aspect of applied learning approaches as related science concepts are integrated and clearly demonstrated in our daily lives. Our task was to infuse 'live' weather data into Earth Science and Environmental Science classrooms. Student-centered learning activities, laboratory experiences and long-term investigations were designed, written and included into classroom lessons and laboratory sections. This component is aligned with the New Learning and Performance Standards, and makes use of investigative and inquiry-based studies through technological resources. These were accomplished through data readings taken from our school weather station and various World Wide Web sites. Weather data from area "cluster" schools were also used to compare micro-climates within our local region. This fostered peer communication skills among students and staff throughout the Brooklyn High School District.

  7. Extracurricular Activities and Their Effect on the Student's Grade Point Average: Statistical Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bakoban, R. A.; Aljarallah, S. A.

    2015-01-01

    Extracurricular activities (ECA) are part of students' everyday life; they play important roles in students' lives. Few studies have addressed the question of how student engagements to ECA affect student's grade point average (GPA). This research was conducted to know whether the students' grade point average in King Abdulaziz University,…

  8. Synchrony of corticostriatal-midbrain activation enables normal inhibitory control and conflict processing in recovering alcoholic men

    PubMed Central

    Schulte, T.; Müller-Oehring, E.M.; Sullivan, E.V.; Pfefferbaum, A.

    2011-01-01

    Background Alcohol dependence is associated with inhibitory control deficits, possibly related to abnormalities in frontoparietal cortical and midbrain function and connectivity. Methods We examined functional connectivity and microstructural fiber integrity between frontoparietal and midbrain structures using a Stroop Match-to-Sample task with functional MRI and diffusion tensor imaging in 18 alcoholics and 17 controls. Manipulation of color cues and response repetition sequences modulated cognitive demands during Stroop conflict. Results Despite similar lateral frontoparietal activity and functional connectivity in alcoholics and controls when processing conflict, controls deactivated the posterior cingulate cortex (PCC), whereas alcoholics did not. Posterior cingulum fiber integrity predicted the degree of PCC deactivation in controls but not alcoholics. Also, PCC activity was modulated by executive control demands: activated during response switching and deactivated during response repetition. Alcoholics showed the opposite pattern: activation during repetition and deactivation during switching. Here, in alcoholics, greater deviations from the normal PCC activity correlated with higher amounts of lifetime alcohol consumption. A functional dissociation of brain network connectivity between the groups further showed that controls exhibited greater corticocortical connectivity between middle cingulate, posterior cingulate, and medial prefrontal cortices than alcoholics. By contrast, alcoholics exhibited greater midbrain-orbitofrontal cortical network connectivity than controls. Degree of microstructural fiber integrity predicted robustness of functional connectivity. Conclusion Thus, even subtle compromise of microstructural connectivity in alcoholism can influence modulation of functional connectivity and underlie alcohol-related cognitive impairment. PMID:22137506

  9. What Are the Key Ingredients for an Effective and Successful Tertiary Enabling Program for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Students? An Evaluation of the Evolution of One Program

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hall, Lisa

    2015-01-01

    Tertiary enabling programs have become an increasingly important part of the post-secondary schooling landscape. In recognition of the need for increased access for certain under-represented groups within the university population, enabling, bridging or foundational programs are offered by a large number of universities in Australia as alternative…

  10. Post-Web 2.0 Pedagogy: From Student-Generated Content to International Co-Production Enabled by Mobile Social Media

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cochrane, Thomas; Antonczak, Laurent; Wagner, Daniel

    2013-01-01

    The advent of web 2.0 has enabled new forms of collaboration centred upon user-generated content, however, mobile social media is enabling a new wave of social collaboration. Mobile devices have disrupted and reinvented traditional media markets and distribution: iTunes, Google Play and Amazon now dominate music industry distribution channels,…

  11. Periodic Properties and Inquiry: Student Mental Models Observed during a Periodic Table Puzzle Activity

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Larson, Kathleen G.; Long, George R.; Briggs, Michael W.

    2012-01-01

    The mental models of both novice and advanced chemistry students were observed while the students performed a periodic table activity. The mental model framework seems to be an effective way of analyzing student behavior during learning activities. The analysis suggests that students do not recognize periodic trends through the examination of…

  12. Incorporating Active Learning and Student Inquiry into an Introductory Merchandising Class

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lee, Hyun-Hwa; Hines, Jean D.

    2012-01-01

    Many educators believe that student learning is enhanced when they are actively involved in classroom activities that require student inquiry. The purpose of this paper is to report on three student inquiry projects that were incorporated into a merchandising class with the focus on making students responsible for their learning, rather than the…

  13. Development of an activity-directed selection system enabled significant improvement of the carboxylation efficiency of Rubisco.

    PubMed

    Cai, Zhen; Liu, Guoxia; Zhang, Junli; Li, Yin

    2014-07-01

    Photosynthetic CO(2) fixation is the ultimate source of organic carbon on earth and thus is essential for crop production and carbon sequestration. Ribulose-1,5-bisphosphate carboxylase/oxygenase (Rubisco) catalyzes the first step of photosynthetic CO(2) fixation. However, the extreme low carboxylation efficiency of Rubisco makes it the most attractive target for improving photosynthetic efficiency. Extensive studies have focused on re-engineering a more efficient enzyme, but the effort has been impeded by the limited understanding of its structure-function relationships and the lack of an efficient selection system towards its activity. To address the unsuccessful molecular engineering of Rubisco, we developed an Escherichia coli-based activity-directed selection system which links the growth of host cell solely to the Rubisco activity therein. A Synechococcus sp. PCC7002 Rubisco mutant with E49V and D82G substitutions in the small subunit was selected from a total of 15,000 mutants by one round of evolution. This mutant showed an 85% increase in specific carboxylation activity and a 45% improvement in catalytic efficiency towards CO(2). The small-subunit E49V mutation was speculated to influence holoenzyme catalysis through interaction with the large-subunit Q225. This interaction is conserved among various Rubisco from higher plants and Chlamydomonas reinhardtii. Knowledge of these might provide clues for engineering Rubisco from higher plants, with the potential of increasing the crop yield.

  14. Understanding Impediments and Enablers to Physical Activity among African American Adults: A Systematic Review of Qualitative Studies

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Siddiqi, Zoveen; Tiro, Jasmin A.; Shuval, Kerem

    2011-01-01

    Physical inactivity is a leading cause of premature death, disability and numerous chronic diseases. Minority and underserved populations in the United States and worldwide have a higher prevalence of physical inactivity affecting their morbidity and mortality rates. In the United States, African Americans are less physically active and have a…

  15. Connecting with Teachers and Students through K-12 Outreach Activities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chapman, Susan; Lindbo, David; Robinson, Clay

    2014-05-01

    The Soil Science Society of America has invested heavily in a significant outreach effort to reach teachers and students in the primary/secondary grades (K-12 grades in US/Canada) to raise awareness of soil as a critical resource. The SSSA K-12 committee has been charged with increasing interest and awareness of soil science as a scientific pursuit and career choice, and providing resources that integrate more information on soil science into biology, chemistry, physics, and earth science areas taught at multiple grade levels. Activities center around five main areas: assessment and standards, learning modules/lesson plans, website development, and books and materials, and partnership activities. Members (professionals and students) of SSSA are involved through committee participation, local events, materials review, and project development.

  16. Targeted Mutagenesis and Combinatorial Library Screening Enables Control of Protein Orientation on Surfaces and Increased Activity of Adsorbed Proteins.

    PubMed

    Cruz-Teran, Carlos A; Carlin, Kevin B; Efimenko, Kirill; Genzer, Jan; Rao, Balaji M

    2016-08-30

    While nonspecific adsorption is widely used for immobilizing proteins on solid surfaces, the random nature of protein adsorption may reduce the activity of immobilized proteins due to occlusion of the active site. We hypothesized that the orientation a protein assumes on a given surface can be controlled by systematically introducing mutations into a region distant from its active site, thereby retaining activity of the immobilized protein. To test this hypothesis, we generated a combinatorial protein library by randomizing six targeted residues in a binding protein derived from highly stable, nonimmunoglobulin Sso7d scaffold; mutations were targeted in a region that is distant from the binding site. This library was screened to isolate binders that retain binding to its cognate target (chicken immunoglobulin Y, cIgY) as well as exhibit adsorption on unmodified silica at pH 7.4 and high ionic strength conditions. A single mutant, Sso7d-2B5, was selected for further characterization. Sso7d-2B5 retained binding to cIgY with an apparent dissociation constant similar to that of the parent protein; both mutant and parent proteins saturated the surface of silica with similar densities. Strikingly, however, silica beads coated with Sso7d-2B5 could achieve up to 7-fold higher capture of cIgY than beads coated with the parent protein. These results strongly suggest that mutations introduced in Sso7d-2B5 alter its orientation relative to the parent protein, when adsorbed on silica surfaces. Our approach also provides a generalizable strategy for introducing mutations in proteins so as to improve their activity upon immobilization, and has direct relevance to development of protein-based biosensors and biocatalysts. PMID:27490089

  17. Assessing Overweight, Obesity, Diet, and Physical Activity in College Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Huang, Terry T.-K.; Harris, Kari Jo; Lee, Rebecca E.; Nazir, Niaman; Born, Wendi; Kaur, Harsohena

    2003-01-01

    The authors surveyed 738 college students aged 18 to 27 years to assess over weight, obesity, dietary habits, and physical activity. They used BMI (body mass index) [greater than or equal to] 25 kg/m[squared] or BMI [greater than or equal to] 85th percentile and BMI [greater than or equal to] 30 kg/m[squared] or BMI [greater than or equal to] 95th…

  18. Effects of Curricular Activity on Students' Situational Motivation and Physical Activity Levels

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gao, Zan; Hannon, James C.; Newton, Maria; Huang, Chaoqun

    2011-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine (a) the effects of three curricular activities on students' situational motivation (intrinsic motivation [IM], identified regulation [IR], external regulation, and amotivation [AM]) and physical activity (PA) levels, and (b) the predictive strength of situational motivation to PA levels. Four hundred twelve…

  19. A Big Gulp Activity.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kelly, Bruce

    1997-01-01

    Explains how to implement an activity in which students measure the volume of their oral cavities. Enables students to develop skills in estimation, measurement, connections, statistics, applying concepts and procedures, and communication. (DDR)

  20. The Effectiveness of Student Extracurricular Activities in Evaluating Violent Behavior among Students in the Preparatory Year at Hail University

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Aleid, Alkhamsah Saleh

    2016-01-01

    This study aimed to examine the effectiveness of student extracurricular activities in evaluating violent behavior among students in the preparatory year at Hail University. The researcher used the descriptive analytical method, and used two tools for the purpose of the study, the study sample consisted of 104 (violent) female students from the…

  1. U.S. College Student Activism during an Era of Neoliberalism: A Qualitative Study of Students Against Sweatshops

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dominguez, Rachel Fix

    2009-01-01

    This article sets out to examine the experiences of college student activists involved in Students Against Sweatshops on the Beautiful River University campus. Based on observation and interview fieldwork, the paper explores how students negotiate and understand their activism against the backdrop of neoliberalism. The paper concludes that being a…

  2. The Ideal Science Student: Exploring the Relationship of Students' Perceptions to Their Problem Solving Activity in a Robotics Context

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sullivan, Florence; Lin, Xiadong

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to examine the relationship of middle school students' perceptions of the ideal science student to their problem solving activity and conceptual understanding in the applied science area of robotics. Twenty-six 11 and 12 year-olds (22 boys) attending a summer camp for academically advanced students participated in the…

  3. University Student Agency, Representation, and Activism: A Case Study of Students Studying English at Universite Cheikh Anta Diop (Dakar, Senegal)

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stafford, Casey

    2012-01-01

    This study explores and interrogates dominant representations of African university students by examining how students conceptualize and act upon their own agency. Using a qualitative case-study approach, the author examines how students actively confront the ideological and material conditions presented by schooling. [The dissertation citations…

  4. Rational Design of a Dephosphorylation-Resistant Reporter Enables Single-Cell Measurement of Tyrosine Kinase Activity.

    PubMed

    Turner, Abigail H; Lebhar, Michael S; Proctor, Angela; Wang, Qunzhao; Lawrence, David S; Allbritton, Nancy L

    2016-02-19

    Although peptide-based reporters of protein tyrosine kinase (PTK) activity have been used to study PTK enzymology in vitro, the application of these reporters to intracellular conditions is compromised by their dephosphorylation, preventing PTK activity measurements. Nonproteinogenic amino acids may be utilized to rationally design selective peptidic ligands by accessing greater chemical and structural diversity than is available using the native amino acids. We describe a peptidic reporter that, upon phosphorylation by the epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR), is resistant to dephosphorylation both in vitro and in cellulo. The reporter contains a conformationally constrained phosphorylatable moiety (7-(S)-hydroxy-1,2,3,4-tetrahydroisoquinoline-3-carboxylic acid) in the place of L-tyrosine and is efficiently phosphorylated in A431 epidermoid carcinoma cells. Dephosphorylation of the reporter occurs 3 orders of magnitude more slowly compared with that of the conventional tyrosine-containing reporter.

  5. Dendritic Slow Dynamics Enables Localized Cortical Activity to Switch between Mobile and Immobile Modes with Noisy Background Input

    PubMed Central

    Kurashige, Hiroki; Câteau, Hideyuki

    2011-01-01

    Mounting lines of evidence suggest the significant computational ability of a single neuron empowered by active dendritic dynamics. This motivates us to study what functionality can be acquired by a network of such neurons. The present paper studies how such rich single-neuron dendritic dynamics affects the network dynamics, a question which has scarcely been specifically studied to date. We simulate neurons with active dendrites networked locally like cortical pyramidal neurons, and find that naturally arising localized activity – called a bump – can be in two distinct modes, mobile or immobile. The mode can be switched back and forth by transient input to the cortical network. Interestingly, this functionality arises only if each neuron is equipped with the observed slow dendritic dynamics and with in vivo-like noisy background input. If the bump activity is considered to indicate a point of attention in the sensory areas or to indicate a representation of memory in the storage areas of the cortex, this would imply that the flexible mode switching would be of great potential use for the brain as an information processing device. We derive these conclusions using a natural extension of the conventional field model, which is defined by combining two distinct fields, one representing the somatic population and the other representing the dendritic population. With this tool, we analyze the spatial distribution of the degree of after-spike adaptation and explain how we can understand the presence of the two distinct modes and switching between the modes. We also discuss the possible functional impact of this mode-switching ability. PMID:21931635

  6. High activity enables life on a high-sugar diet: blood glucose regulation in nectar-feeding bats.

    PubMed

    Kelm, Detlev H; Simon, Ralph; Kuhlow, Doreen; Voigt, Christian C; Ristow, Michael

    2011-12-01

    High blood glucose levels caused by excessive sugar consumption are detrimental to mammalian health and life expectancy. Despite consuming vast quantities of sugar-rich floral nectar, nectar-feeding bats are long-lived, provoking the question of how they regulate blood glucose. We investigated blood glucose levels in nectar-feeding bats (Glossophaga soricina) in experiments in which we varied the amount of dietary sugar or flight time. Blood glucose levels increased with the quantity of glucose ingested and exceeded 25 mmol l(-1) blood in resting bats, which is among the highest values ever recorded in mammals fed sugar quantities similar to their natural diet. During normal feeding, blood glucose values decreased with increasing flight time, but only fell to expected values when bats spent 75 per cent of their time airborne. Either nectar-feeding bats have evolved mechanisms to avoid negative health effects of hyperglycaemia, or high activity is key to balancing blood glucose levels during foraging. We suggest that the coevolutionary specialization of bats towards a nectar diet was supported by the high activity and elevated metabolic rates of these bats. High activity may have conferred benefits to the bats in terms of behavioural interactions and foraging success, and is simultaneously likely to have increased their efficiency as plant pollinators.

  7. High activity enables life on a high-sugar diet: blood glucose regulation in nectar-feeding bats

    PubMed Central

    Kelm, Detlev H.; Simon, Ralph; Kuhlow, Doreen; Voigt, Christian C.; Ristow, Michael

    2011-01-01

    High blood glucose levels caused by excessive sugar consumption are detrimental to mammalian health and life expectancy. Despite consuming vast quantities of sugar-rich floral nectar, nectar-feeding bats are long-lived, provoking the question of how they regulate blood glucose. We investigated blood glucose levels in nectar-feeding bats (Glossophaga soricina) in experiments in which we varied the amount of dietary sugar or flight time. Blood glucose levels increased with the quantity of glucose ingested and exceeded 25 mmol l−1 blood in resting bats, which is among the highest values ever recorded in mammals fed sugar quantities similar to their natural diet. During normal feeding, blood glucose values decreased with increasing flight time, but only fell to expected values when bats spent 75 per cent of their time airborne. Either nectar-feeding bats have evolved mechanisms to avoid negative health effects of hyperglycaemia, or high activity is key to balancing blood glucose levels during foraging. We suggest that the coevolutionary specialization of bats towards a nectar diet was supported by the high activity and elevated metabolic rates of these bats. High activity may have conferred benefits to the bats in terms of behavioural interactions and foraging success, and is simultaneously likely to have increased their efficiency as plant pollinators. PMID:21490011

  8. Adjacent positioning of cellular structures enabled by a Cdc42 GTPase-activating protein-mediated zone of inhibition.

    PubMed

    Tong, Zongtian; Gao, Xiang-Dong; Howell, Audrey S; Bose, Indrani; Lew, Daniel J; Bi, Erfei

    2007-12-31

    Cells of the budding yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae are born carrying localized transmembrane landmark proteins that guide the subsequent establishment of a polarity axis and hence polarized growth to form a bud in the next cell cycle. In haploid cells, the relevant landmark proteins are concentrated at the site of the preceding cell division, to which they recruit Cdc24, the guanine nucleotide exchange factor for the conserved polarity regulator Cdc42. However, instead of polarizing at the division site, the new polarity axis is directed next to but not overlapping that site. Here, we show that the Cdc42 guanosine triphosphatase-activating protein (GAP) Rga1 establishes an exclusion zone at the division site that blocks subsequent polarization within that site. In the absence of localized Rga1 GAP activity, new buds do in fact form within the old division site. Thus, Cdc42 activators and GAPs establish concentric zones of action such that polarization is directed to occur adjacent to but not within the previous cell division site.

  9. Hypothetical biotechnology companies: A role-playing student centered activity for undergraduate science students.

    PubMed

    Chuck, Jo-Anne

    2011-01-01

    Science students leaving undergraduate programs are entering the biotechnology industry where they are presented with issues which require integration of science content. Students find this difficult as through-out their studies, most content is limited to a single subdiscipline (e.g., biochemistry, immunology). In addition, students need knowledge of the ethical, economic, and legal frame work in which the industry operates. This article presents an approach to deliver these outcomes in a collaborative and active learning modality which promotes deep learning. In the model, groups of final year undergraduate students form hypothetical biotechnology companies and identify real issues of interest to industry, make integrative team decisions, use professional level technology, and develop appropriate communication skills. The final successful teaching paradigm was based on self reflection, observation, and student feedback to ensure appropriate attainment of content, group work skills and increased confidence in professional decision-making. It is these outcomes which will facilitate life long learning skills, a major outcome applicable for all tertiary education.

  10. Gender Difference in Academic Planning Activity among Medical Students

    PubMed Central

    Nguyen, Huy Van; Giang, Thao Thach

    2013-01-01

    Background In Vietnam, as doctor of medicine is socially considered a special career, both men and women who are enrolled in medical universities often study topics of medicine seriously. However, as culturally expected, women often perform better than men. Because of this, teaching leadership and management skill (LMS) to develop academic planning activity (APA) for female medical students would also be expected to be more effective than male counterparts. This research aimed to compare by gender the effect of teaching LMS on increasing APA, using propensity score matching (PSM). Methods In a cross-sectional survey utilizing a self-reported structured questionnaire on a systematic random sample of 421 male and female medical students in Hanoi Medical University, this study adopted first regression techniques to construct a fit model, then PSM to create a matched control group in order to allow for evaluating the effect of LMS education. Results There were several interesting gender differences. First, while for females LMS education had both direct and indirect effects on APA, it had only direct effect on males’ APA. Second, after PSM to adjust for the possible confounders to balance statistically two groups – with and without LMS education, there is statistically a significant difference in APA between male and female students, making a net difference of 11% (p<.01), equivalent to 173 students. The difference in APA between exposed and matched control group in males and females was 9% and 20%, respectively. These estimates of 9.0 and 20.0 percentage point increase can be translated into the practice of APA by 142 males and 315 females, respectively, in the population. These numbers of APA among male and female students can be explained by LMS education. Conclusions Gender appears to be a factor explaining in part academic planning activity. PMID:23418467

  11. Active learning and student-centered pedagogy improve student attitudes and performance in introductory biology.

    PubMed

    Armbruster, Peter; Patel, Maya; Johnson, Erika; Weiss, Martha

    2009-01-01

    We describe the development and implementation of an instructional design that focused on bringing multiple forms of active learning and student-centered pedagogies to a one-semester, undergraduate introductory biology course for both majors and nonmajors. Our course redesign consisted of three major elements: 1) reordering the presentation of the course content in an attempt to teach specific content within the context of broad conceptual themes, 2) incorporating active and problem-based learning into every lecture, and 3) adopting strategies to create a more student-centered learning environment. Assessment of our instructional design consisted of a student survey and comparison of final exam performance across 3 years-1 year before our course redesign was implemented (2006) and during two successive years of implementation (2007 and 2008). The course restructuring led to significant improvement of self-reported student engagement and satisfaction and increased academic performance. We discuss the successes and ongoing challenges of our course restructuring and consider issues relevant to institutional change.

  12. Active Learning and Student-centered Pedagogy Improve Student Attitudes and Performance in Introductory Biology

    PubMed Central

    Patel, Maya; Johnson, Erika; Weiss, Martha

    2009-01-01

    We describe the development and implementation of an instructional design that focused on bringing multiple forms of active learning and student-centered pedagogies to a one-semester, undergraduate introductory biology course for both majors and nonmajors. Our course redesign consisted of three major elements: 1) reordering the presentation of the course content in an attempt to teach specific content within the context of broad conceptual themes, 2) incorporating active and problem-based learning into every lecture, and 3) adopting strategies to create a more student-centered learning environment. Assessment of our instructional design consisted of a student survey and comparison of final exam performance across 3 years—1 year before our course redesign was implemented (2006) and during two successive years of implementation (2007 and 2008). The course restructuring led to significant improvement of self-reported student engagement and satisfaction and increased academic performance. We discuss the successes and ongoing challenges of our course restructuring and consider issues relevant to institutional change. PMID:19723815

  13. SIRRACT: An international randomized clinical trial of activity feedback during inpatient stroke rehabilitation enabled by wireless sensing

    PubMed Central

    Dorsch, Andrew K.; Thomas, Seth; Xu, Xiaoyu; Kaiser, William; Dobkin, Bruce H.

    2014-01-01

    Background Walking-related disability is the most frequent reason for inpatient stroke rehabilitation. Task-related practice is a critical component for improving patient outcomes. Objective To test the feasibility of providing quantitative feedback about daily walking performance and motivating greater skills practice via remote sensing. Methods In this phase III randomized, single blind clinical trial, patients participated in conventional therapies while wearing wireless sensors (tri-axial accelerometers) at both ankles. Activity-recognition algorithms calculated the speed, distance, and duration of walking bouts. Three times a week, therapists provided either feedback about performance on a 10-meter walk (speed-only) or walking speed feedback plus a review of walking activity recorded by the sensors (augmented). Primary outcomes at discharge included total daily walking time, derived from the sensors, and a timed 15-meter walk. Results Sixteen rehabilitation centers in 11 countries enrolled 135 participants over 15 months. Sensors recorded more than 1800 days of therapy, 37,000 individual walking bouts, and 2.5 million steps. No significant differences were found between the two feedback groups in daily walking time (15.1±13.1min vs. 16.6±14.3min, p=0.54) or 15-meter walking speed (0.93±0.47m/s vs. 0.91±0.53m/s, p=0.96). Remarkably, 30% of participants decreased their total daily walking time over their rehabilitation stay. Conclusions In this first trial of remote monitoring of inpatient stroke rehabilitation, augmented feedback beyond speed alone did not increase the time spent practicing or improve walking outcomes. Remarkably modest time was spent walking. Wireless sensing, however, allowed clinicians to audit skills practice and provided ground truth regarding changes in clinically important, mobility-related activities. PMID:25261154

  14. A general alkyl-alkyl cross-coupling enabled by redox-active esters and alkylzinc reagents.

    PubMed

    Qin, Tian; Cornella, Josep; Li, Chao; Malins, Lara R; Edwards, Jacob T; Kawamura, Shuhei; Maxwell, Brad D; Eastgate, Martin D; Baran, Phil S

    2016-05-13

    Alkyl carboxylic acids are ubiquitous in all facets of chemical science, from natural products to polymers, and represent an ideal starting material with which to forge new connections. This study demonstrates how the same activating principles used for decades to make simple C-N (amide) bonds from carboxylic acids with loss of water can be used to make C-C bonds through coupling with dialkylzinc reagents and loss of carbon dioxide. This disconnection strategy benefits from the use of a simple, inexpensive nickel catalyst and exhibits a remarkably broad scope across a range of substrates (>70 examples). PMID:27103669

  15. Catalytic Ring-Opening of Cyclic Alcohols Enabled by PCET Activation of Strong O-H Bonds.

    PubMed

    Yayla, Hatice G; Wang, Huaiju; Tarantino, Kyle T; Orbe, Hudson S; Knowles, Robert R

    2016-08-31

    We report a new photocatalytic protocol for the redox-neutral isomerization of cyclic alcohols to linear ketones via C-C bond scission. Mechanistic studies demonstrate that key alkoxy radical intermediates in this reaction are generated via the direct homolytic activation of alcohol O-H bonds in an unusual intramolecular PCET process, wherein the electron travels to a proximal radical cation in concert with proton transfer to a weak Brønsted base. Effective bond strength considerations are shown to accurately forecast the feasibility of alkoxy radical generation with a given oxidant/base pair. PMID:27515494

  16. Enabling the Discovery and Virtual Screening of Potent and Safe Antimicrobial Peptides. Simultaneous Prediction of Antibacterial Activity and Cytotoxicity.

    PubMed

    Kleandrova, Valeria V; Ruso, Juan M; Speck-Planche, Alejandro; Dias Soeiro Cordeiro, M Natália

    2016-08-01

    Antimicrobial peptides (AMPs) represent promising alternatives to fight against bacterial pathogens. However, cellular toxicity remains one of the main concerns in the early development of peptide-based drugs. This work introduces the first multitasking (mtk) computational model focused on performing simultaneous predictions of antibacterial activities, and cytotoxicities of peptides. The model was created from a data set containing 3592 cases, and it displayed accuracy higher than 96% for classifying/predicting peptides in both training and prediction (test) sets. The technique known as alanine scanning was computationally applied to illustrate the calculation of the quantitative contributions of the amino acids (in their respective positions of the sequence) to the biological effects of a defined peptide. A small library formed by 10 peptides was generated, where peptides were designed by considering the interpretations of the different descriptors in the mtk-computational model. All the peptides were predicted to exhibit high antibacterial activities against multiple bacterial strains, and low cytotoxicity against various cell types. The present mtk-computational model can be considered a very useful tool to support high throughput research for the discovery of potent and safe AMPs.

  17. Enabling the Discovery and Virtual Screening of Potent and Safe Antimicrobial Peptides. Simultaneous Prediction of Antibacterial Activity and Cytotoxicity.

    PubMed

    Kleandrova, Valeria V; Ruso, Juan M; Speck-Planche, Alejandro; Dias Soeiro Cordeiro, M Natália

    2016-08-01

    Antimicrobial peptides (AMPs) represent promising alternatives to fight against bacterial pathogens. However, cellular toxicity remains one of the main concerns in the early development of peptide-based drugs. This work introduces the first multitasking (mtk) computational model focused on performing simultaneous predictions of antibacterial activities, and cytotoxicities of peptides. The model was created from a data set containing 3592 cases, and it displayed accuracy higher than 96% for classifying/predicting peptides in both training and prediction (test) sets. The technique known as alanine scanning was computationally applied to illustrate the calculation of the quantitative contributions of the amino acids (in their respective positions of the sequence) to the biological effects of a defined peptide. A small library formed by 10 peptides was generated, where peptides were designed by considering the interpretations of the different descriptors in the mtk-computational model. All the peptides were predicted to exhibit high antibacterial activities against multiple bacterial strains, and low cytotoxicity against various cell types. The present mtk-computational model can be considered a very useful tool to support high throughput research for the discovery of potent and safe AMPs. PMID:27280735

  18. Optimization of active distribution networks: Design and analysis of significative case studies for enabling control actions of real infrastructure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moneta, Diana; Mora, Paolo; Viganò, Giacomo; Alimonti, Gianluca

    2014-12-01

    The diffusion of Distributed Generation (DG) based on Renewable Energy Sources (RES) requires new strategies to ensure reliable and economic operation of the distribution networks and to support the diffusion of DG itself. An advanced algorithm (DISCoVER - DIStribution Company VoltagE Regulator) is being developed to optimize the operation of active network by means of an advanced voltage control based on several regulations. Starting from forecasted load and generation, real on-field measurements, technical constraints and costs for each resource, the algorithm generates for each time period a set of commands for controllable resources that guarantees achievement of technical goals minimizing the overall cost. Before integrating the controller into the telecontrol system of the real networks, and in order to validate the proper behaviour of the algorithm and to identify possible critical conditions, a complete simulation phase has started. The first step is concerning the definition of a wide range of "case studies", that are the combination of network topology, technical constraints and targets, load and generation profiles and "costs" of resources that define a valid context to test the algorithm, with particular focus on battery and RES management. First results achieved from simulation activity on test networks (based on real MV grids) and actual battery characteristics are given, together with prospective performance on real case applications.

  19. An activated triple bond linker enables ‘click’ attachment of peptides to oligonucleotides on solid support

    PubMed Central

    Wenska, Malgorzata; Alvira, Margarita; Steunenberg, Peter; Stenberg, Åsa; Murtola, Merita; Strömberg, Roger

    2011-01-01

    A general procedure, based on a new activated alkyne linker, for the preparation of peptide–oligonucleotide conjugates (POCs) on solid support has been developed. With this linker, conjugation is effective at room temperature (RT) in millimolar concentration and submicromolar amounts. This is made possible since the use of a readily attachable activated triple bond linker enhances the Cu(I) catalyzed 1,3-dipolar cycloaddition (‘click’ reaction). The preferred scheme for conjugate preparation involves sequential conjugation to oligonucleotides on solid support of (i) an H-phosphonate-based aminolinker; (ii) the triple bond donor p-(N-propynoylamino)toluic acid (PATA); and (iii) azido-functionalized peptides. The method gives conversion of oligonucleotide to the POC on solid support, and only involves a single purification step after complete assembly. The synthesis is flexible and can be carried out without the need for specific automated synthesizers since it has been designed to utilize commercially available oligonucleotide and peptide derivatives on solid support or in solution. Methodology for the ready conversion of peptides into ‘clickable’ azidopeptides with the possibility of selecting either N-terminus or C-terminus connection also adds to the flexibility and usability of the method. Examples of synthesis of POCs include conjugates of oligonucleotides with peptides known to be membrane penetrating and nuclear localization signals. PMID:21795380

  20. GeoMapApp Learning Activities: A Virtual Lab Environment for Student-Centred Engagement with Geoscience Data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kluge, S.; Goodwillie, A. M.

    2012-12-01

    As STEM learning requirements enter the mainstream, there is benefit to providing the tools necessary for students to engage with research-quality geoscience data in a cutting-edge, easy-to-use map-based interface. Funded with an NSF GeoEd award, GeoMapApp Learning Activities ( http://serc.carleton.edu/geomapapp/collection.html ) are being created to help in that endeavour. GeoMapApp Learning Activities offer step-by-step instructions within a guided inquiry approach that enables students to dictate the pace of learning. Based upon GeoMapApp (http://www.geomapapp.org), a free, easy-to-use map-based data exploration and visualisation tool, each activity furnishes the educator with an efficient package of downloadable documents. This includes step-by-step student instructions and answer sheet; an educator's annotated worksheet containing teaching tips, additional content and suggestions for further work; and, quizzes for use before and after the activity to assess learning. Examples of activities so far created involve calculation and analysis of the rate of seafloor spreading; compilation of present-day evidence for huge ancient landslides on the seafloor around the Hawaiian islands; a study of radiometrically-dated volcanic rocks to help understand the concept of hotspots; and, the optimisation of contours as a means to aid visualisation of 3-D data sets on a computer screen. The activities are designed for students at the introductory undergraduate, community college and high school levels, and present a virtual lab-like environment to expose students to content and concepts typically found in those educational settings. The activities can be used in the classroom or out of class, and their guided nature means that the requirement for teacher intervention is reduced thus allowing students to spend more time analysing and understanding geoscience data, content and concepts. Each activity is freely available through the SERC-Carleton web site.

  1. Proteome-Based Analysis of Colloidal Instability Enables the Detection of Haze-Active Proteins in Beer.

    PubMed

    Schulte, Fabian; Flaschel, Erwin; Niehaus, Karsten

    2016-09-01

    Colloidal haze is a serious quality defect of bright beers that considerably reduces their shelf life and is thought to be triggered by hordeins, a class of proline-rich barley proteins. In this work, the proteomes of fresh and old beers were investigated in bottled pilsners and compared to the protein inventory of haze to identify specific haze-active proteins. Haze isolates dissolved in rehydration buffer contained high concentrations of proteins and sugars but provided protein gels with weak spot signals. Consequently, a treatment for the chemical deglycation with trifluoromethanesulfonic acid was applied, which resulted in the identification of protein Z4, LTP1, CMb, CMe, pUP13, 3a, and Bwiph as constituents of the haze proteome. Because only one hordein was detectable and the proline content in haze hydrolysates was lower than those of barley prolamins, our results suggest that this class of proteins is of minor importance for haze development.

  2. Proteome-Based Analysis of Colloidal Instability Enables the Detection of Haze-Active Proteins in Beer.

    PubMed

    Schulte, Fabian; Flaschel, Erwin; Niehaus, Karsten

    2016-09-01

    Colloidal haze is a serious quality defect of bright beers that considerably reduces their shelf life and is thought to be triggered by hordeins, a class of proline-rich barley proteins. In this work, the proteomes of fresh and old beers were investigated in bottled pilsners and compared to the protein inventory of haze to identify specific haze-active proteins. Haze isolates dissolved in rehydration buffer contained high concentrations of proteins and sugars but provided protein gels with weak spot signals. Consequently, a treatment for the chemical deglycation with trifluoromethanesulfonic acid was applied, which resulted in the identification of protein Z4, LTP1, CMb, CMe, pUP13, 3a, and Bwiph as constituents of the haze proteome. Because only one hordein was detectable and the proline content in haze hydrolysates was lower than those of barley prolamins, our results suggest that this class of proteins is of minor importance for haze development. PMID:27515584

  3. Distinct effector-binding sites enable synergistic transcriptional activation by BenM, a LysR-type regulator.

    PubMed

    Ezezika, Obidimma C; Haddad, Sandra; Clark, Todd J; Neidle, Ellen L; Momany, Cory

    2007-03-30

    BenM, a bacterial transcriptional regulator, responds synergistically to two effectors, benzoate and cis,cis-muconate. CatM, a paralog with overlapping function, responds only to muconate. Structures of their effector-binding domains revealed two effector-binding sites in BenM. BenM and CatM are the first LysR-type regulators to be structurally characterized while bound with physiologically relevant exogenous inducers. The effector complexes were obtained by soaking crystals with stabilizing solutions containing high effector concentrations and minimal amounts of competing ions. This strategy, including data collection with fragments of fractured crystals, may be generally applicable to related proteins. In BenM and CatM, the binding of muconate to an interdomain pocket was facilitated by helix dipoles that provide charge stabilization. In BenM, benzoate also bound in an adjacent hydrophobic region where it alters the effect of muconate bound in the primary site. A charge relay system within the BenM protein appears to underlie synergistic transcriptional activation. According to this model, Glu162 is a pivotal residue that forms salt-bridges with different arginine residues depending on the occupancy of the secondary effector-binding site. Glu162 interacts with Arg160 in the absence of benzoate and with Arg146 when benzoate is bound. This latter interaction enhances the negative charge of muconate bound to the adjacent primary effector-binding site. The redistribution of the electrostatic potential draws two domains of the protein more closely towards muconate, with the movement mediated by the dipole moments of four alpha helices. Therefore, with both effectors, BenM achieves a unique conformation capable of high level transcriptional activation.

  4. Electures-Wiki--Toward Engaging Students to Actively Work with Lecture Recordings

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hermann, Christoph; Ottmann, Thomas

    2011-01-01

    In this paper, we present the integration of a Wiki with lecture recordings using a tool called "aofconvert", enabling the students to visually reference lecture recordings in the Wiki at a precise moment in time of the lecture. This tight integration between a Wiki and lecture materials allows the students to elaborate on the topics they learned…

  5. Students' Attitudes towards Technology-Enabled Learning: A Change in Learning Patterns? The Case of a Master's Course in Political Science

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Paunescu, Mihai

    2013-01-01

    This article sets to explore the attitudes of higher education students enrolled in a political science programme at Master level towards e-learning facilitated by the introduction of a Moodle platform. The students have been surveyed at the end of public management course in the first semester of the programme asking them to evaluate both the…

  6. Still Bringing the Vietnam War Home: Sources of Contemporary Student Activism.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Duncan, Lauren E.; Stewart, Abigail J.

    1995-01-01

    Examined student activism concerning the Persian Gulf War. Results showed that students' reports of their parents' activities during the Vietnam War were strongly associated with students' activism. Other correlates included attitudes toward war, political consciousness, authoritarianism, and gender-role ideology. Parents' prowar attitudes had no…

  7. Active Learning Promoting Student Teachers' Professional Competences in Finland and Turkey

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Niemi, Hannele; Nevgi, Anne; Aksit, Fisun

    2016-01-01

    This study investigates student teachers' active learning experiences in teacher education (TE) in Finnish and Turkish contexts and attempts to determine how active learning methods' impact student teachers' professional competences. Student teachers (N = 728) assessed their active learning experiences and the professional competences they…

  8. Imaging of enzyme activity using bio-LSI system enables simultaneous immunosensing of different analytes in multiple specimens.

    PubMed

    Hokuto, Toshiki; Yasukawa, Tomoyuki; Kunikata, Ryota; Suda, Atsushi; Inoue, Kumi Y; Ino, Kosuke; Matsue, Tomokazu; Mizutani, Fumio

    2016-06-01

    Electrochemical imaging is an excellent technique to characterize an activity of biomaterials, such as enzymes and cells. Large scale integration-based amperometric sensor (Bio-LSI) has been developed for the simultaneous and continuous detection of the concentration distribution of redox species generated by reactions of biomolecules. In this study, the Bio-LSI system was demonstrated to be applicable for simultaneous detection of different anaytes in multiple specimens. The multiple specimens containing human immunoglobulin G (hIgG) and mouse IgG (mIgG) were introduced into each channel of the upper substrate across the antibody lines for hIgG and mIgG on the lower substrate. Hydrogen peroxide generated by the enzyme reaction of glucose oxidase captured at intersections was simultaneously detected by 400 microelectrodes of Bio-LSI chip. The oxidation current increased with increasing the concentrations of hIgG, which can be detected in the range of 0.01-1.0 µg mL(-1) . Simultaneous detection of hIgG and mIgG in multiple specimens was achieved by using line pattern of both antibodies. Therefore, the presence of different target molecules in the multiple samples would be quantitatively and simultaneously visualized as a current image by the Bio-LSI system. PMID:27150897

  9. Chaotic....!! Active and Engaged. Effects of an active learning classroom on student retention and engagement.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Palsole, S.; Serpa, L. F.

    2014-12-01

    Scientific literacy has been defined as the foremost challenge of this decade (AAAS, 2012). The Geological Society of American in its position statement postis that due to the systemic nature of the discipline of earth science, it is the most effective way to engage students in STEM disciplines. Given that the most common place for exposure to earth sciences is at the freshman level for non majors, we decided to transform a freshman introductory geology course to an active, student centered course, using an inquiry based approach. Our focus was to ensure the students saw the earth sciences as broadly applicative field, and not an esoteric science. To achieve this goal, we developed a series of problems that required the students to apply the concepts acquired through their self guided learning into the different topics of the course. This self guided learning took the form of didactic content uploaded into the learning management system (the various elements used to deliver the content were designed video clips, short text based lectures, short formative assessments, discussion boards and other web based discovery exercises) with the class time devoted to problem solving. A comparison of student performance in the active learning classroom vs. a traditional classroom as measured on a geoscience concept inventory (the questions were chosen by a third party who was not teaching either courses) showed that the the students in the active learning classroom scored 10% higher on the average in comparison to the traditional class. In addition to this heightened performance, the students in the active classroom also showed a higher degree of content retention 8 weeks after the semester had ended. This session will share the design process, some exercises and efficacy data collected.

  10. Who is Engaged More--Teacher or Students? An Analysis of How Activity Structures Affect Student Learning Engagement.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Edenhart-Pepe, Michael; And Others

    Structural characteristics of classroom activities and student and teacher engagement behaviors were investigated. Observer teams collected data on the structure of activities, student engagement behaviors, and teacher behaviors in arithmetic and reading lessons in six elementary classrooms in a middle class, suburban school district. The…

  11. The Understanding and Interpretation of Innovative Technology-Enabled Multidimensional Physical Activity Feedback in Patients at Risk of Future Chronic Disease

    PubMed Central

    Western, Max J.; Peacock, Oliver J.; Stathi, Afroditi; Thompson, Dylan

    2015-01-01

    Background Innovative physical activity monitoring technology can be used to depict rich visual feedback that encompasses the various aspects of physical activity known to be important for health. However, it is unknown whether patients who are at risk of chronic disease would understand such sophisticated personalised feedback or whether they would find it useful and motivating. The purpose of the present study was to determine whether technology-enabled multidimensional physical activity graphics and visualisations are comprehensible and usable for patients at risk of chronic disease. Method We developed several iterations of graphics depicting minute-by-minute activity patterns and integrated physical activity health targets. Subsequently, patients at moderate/high risk of chronic disease (n=29) and healthcare practitioners (n=15) from South West England underwent full 7-days activity monitoring followed by individual semi-structured interviews in which they were asked to comment on their own personalised visual feedback Framework analysis was used to gauge their interpretation and of personalised feedback, graphics and visualisations. Results We identified two main components focussing on (a) the interpretation of feedback designs and data and (b) the impact of personalised visual physical activity feedback on facilitation of health behaviour change. Participants demonstrated a clear ability to understand the sophisticated personal information plus an enhanced physical activity knowledge. They reported that receiving multidimensional feedback was motivating and could be usefully applied to facilitate their efforts in becoming more physically active. Conclusion Multidimensional physical activity feedback can be made comprehensible, informative and motivational by using appropriate graphics and visualisations. There is an opportunity to exploit the full potential created by technological innovation and provide sophisticated personalised physical activity feedback

  12. What Is a Good Activity for Teaching World Literature to High School Students?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Razzano, Elaine; Baldwin, Anna E.; Cobbs, Lewis; Whitaker, Sandra; Parker, Jessica; Krajcovic, Frank J.

    2002-01-01

    Presents six educators' ideas for good activities for teaching world literature to high school students. Describes ideas, activities, and experiences with innovative ways to teach World Literature. (SG)

  13. 78 FR 57371 - Agency Information Collection Activities; Comment Request; Student Aid Internet Gateway (SAIG...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-09-18

    ... Agency Information Collection Activities; Comment Request; Student Aid Internet Gateway (SAIG) Enrollment... notice will be considered public records. Title of Collection: Student Aid Internet Gateway (SAIG...: Enrollment in the Federal Student Aid (FSA) Student Aid Internet Gateway (SAIG) allows eligible entities...

  14. Daily activities and sleep quality in college students.

    PubMed

    Carney, Colleen E; Edinger, Jack D; Meyer, Björn; Lindman, Linda; Istre, Tai

    2006-01-01

    There is growing evidence that social rhythms (e.g., daily activities such as getting into or out of bed, eating, and adhering to a work schedule) have important implications for sleep. The present study used a prospective measure of daily activities to assess the relation between sleep and social rhythms. College students (n=243) 18 to 39 yrs of age, completed the Social Rhythm Metric (SRM) each day for 14 d and then completed the Pittsburgh Sleep Quality Index (PSQI). The sample was divided into groups of good or poor sleepers, according to a PSQI cut-off score of 5 points and was compared on the regularity, frequency, timing, and extent of social engagement during activities. There was a lower frequency and less regularity of social rhythms in poor sleepers relative to good sleepers. Good sleepers engaged more regularly in activities with active social engagement. Earlier rise time, first consumption of a beverage, going outdoors for the first time, and bedtime were associated with better sleep. Greater variability in rise time, consuming a morning beverage, returning home for the last time, and bedtime were associated with more disturbed sleep. The results are consistent with previous findings of reduced regularity in bedtime and rise time schedules in undergraduates, other age groups, and in clinical populations. Results augment the current thought that regulating behavioral zeitgebers may be important in influencing bed and rise times, and suggest that engaging in activities with other people may increase regularity.

  15. Using Activity Theory to Model the Taiwan Atayal Students' Classroom Mathematical Activity

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Huang, Chih-Hsien; Lin, Fou-Lai

    2013-01-01

    From the sociocultural perspective, this research utilized activity theory as the theoretical framework to analyze the influences of cultural factors for Taiwanese Atayal junior high school students' study in mathematics. The research methodology adopted grounded theory, theoretical and methodological approaches which are illustrated through…

  16. Is Active Learning Like Broccoli? Student Perceptions of Active Learning in Large Lecture Classes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Smith, C. Veronica; Cardaciotto, LeeAnn

    2011-01-01

    Although research suggests that active learning is associated with positive outcomes (e.g., memory, test performance), use of such techniques can be difficult to implement in large lecture-based classes. In the current study, 1,091 students completed out-of-class group exercises to complement course material in an Introductory Psychology class.…

  17. A Survey of Factors and Attitudes of Students at a Rural Two-Year College Which Promote Low Participation in Student Activities Programs: An Institutional Study.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stolar, Steven M.

    In spring 1988, a survey was conducted of the student body at Cumberland County College (CCC) to obtain insight into students' perceptions of student activities programs at the college, the characteristics of participants in these activities, the activities students would like to see offered, and the most convenient times. A random sample of 202…

  18. Active learning and leadership in an undergraduate curriculum: How effective is it for student learning and transition to practice?

    PubMed

    Middleton, Rebekkah

    2013-03-01

    Nurses are being increasingly asked to develop leadership skills in their practice and to be actively involved in continuous change processes in the workplace. Nursing students need to be developing leadership skills prior to entering the workplace to ensure they are able to meet the challenges associated with organisations and the cultures present in nursing, along with having highly tuned communication skills and leadership attributes that contribute to best patient care and outcomes. This paper looks at how the use of Active Learning in an undergraduate setting enabled the development and implementation of a leadership subject for nursing students preparing for professional practice. Through the use of a specific model of Active Learning, incorporating multiple intelligences into education allows students to bring deeper learning to their conscience so that whole person learning is an engaged experience. It seems apparent that Active Learning is an effective means of learning about leadership in undergraduate students who are developing towards a career as a health professional. PMID:22906535

  19. Relation between Academic Performance and Students' Engagement in Digital Learning Activities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bertheussen, Bernt Arne; Myrland, Øystein

    2016-01-01

    This study reports on the effect of student engagement in digital learning activities on academic performance for 120 students enrolled in an undergraduate finance course. Interactive practice and exam problem files were available to each student, and individual download activity was automatically recorded during the first 50 days of the course.…

  20. Summer Activities of Students Enrolled in Grades 1-12. Indicator of the Month.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National Center for Education Statistics (ED), Washington, DC.

    Students engage in a variety of activities during their summer vacations that provide them with educational opportunities. In the summer of 1996, 9% of students in grades 1 through 12 attended summer school, and 38% participated in other organized summer activities. Among the students who were enrolled in grades 8 through 12, 26% worked for pay…

  1. Correlation between the Physical Activity Level and Grade Point Averages of Faculty of Education Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Imdat, Yarim

    2014-01-01

    The aim of the study is to find the correlation that exists between physical activity level and grade point averages of faculty of education students. The subjects consist of 359 (172 females and 187 males) under graduate students To determine the physical activity levels of the students in this research, International Physical Activity…

  2. Does Alcohol Use among Sexually Active College Students Moderate HIV Risk Behavior?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lewis, John E.; Malow, Robert M.; Norman, Lisa

    2008-01-01

    College students frequently use alcohol and are very sexually active, but do the two behaviors result in greater HIV risk? We employed the AIDS Risk Reduction Model to assess condom use during vaginal intercourse for sexually active college students using and not using alcohol proximal to sex. Students reported multiple lifetime sex partners and…

  3. Enhancing Student Motivation in College and University Physical Activity Courses Using Instructional Alignment Practices

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kim, MooSong; Cardinal, Bradley J.; Yun, Joonkoo

    2015-01-01

    Motivation is a key factor in promoting students' active engagement in regular physical activity. According to self-determination theory -- one of the prominent motivational theories -- for this to occur, students' basic psychological needs must be met (i.e., their need for autonomy, competence and relatedness). Students' self-determined…

  4. University Students Meeting the Recommended Standards of Physical Activity and Body Mass Index

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Deng, Xiaofen; Castelli, Darla; Castro-Pinero, Jose; Guan, Hongwei

    2011-01-01

    This study investigated student physical activity (PA) and body mass index (BMI) in relation to the "Healthy Campus 2010" objectives set by the American College Health Association in 2002. Students (N = 1125) at a U.S. southern state university participated in the study. The percentages of students who were physically active and whose BMI were…

  5. Alignment of Hands-On STEM Engagement Activities with Positive STEM Dispositions in Secondary School Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Christensen, Rhonda; Knezek, Gerald; Tyler-Wood, Tandra

    2015-01-01

    This study examines positive dispositions reported by middle school and high school students participating in programs that feature STEM-related activities. Middle school students participating in school-to-home hands-on energy monitoring activities are compared to middle school and high school students in a different project taking part in…

  6. Technology and Engineering Education Students' Perceptions of Hands-On and Hands-Off Activities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sianez, David M.; Fugere, Madeleine A.; Lennon, Carter A.

    2010-01-01

    Technology and engineering education students responded to a survey regarding hands-on and hands-off activities. First, the students listed hands-on and hands-off activities and what characterized the two types of activities. Activities such as building or assembling something as well as working manually with tools were viewed as hands-on. Passive…

  7. Promoting Physical Activity for Students with Autism Spectrum Disorder: Barriers, Benefits, and Strategies for Success

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Menear, Kristi S.; Neumeier, William H.

    2015-01-01

    Many students with autism spectrum disorder (ASD) fall short of the recommended physical activity levels and experience challenges in physical activity and physical education settings. This article reviews factors that can improve the physical activity statistics of students with ASD, outlines the researched benefits of physical activity for…

  8. Enabling People with Developmental Disabilities to Actively Follow Simple Instructions and Perform Designated Physical Activities According to Simple Instructions with Nintendo Wii Balance Boards by Controlling Environmental Stimulation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shih, Ching-Hsiang; Chung, Chiao-Chen; Shih, Ching-Tien; Chen, Ling-Che

    2011-01-01

    The latest researches have adopted software technology turning the Nintendo Wii Balance Board into a high performance standing location detector. This study extended Wii Balance Board functionality to assess whether two people with developmental disabilities would be able to actively perform designated physical activities according to simple…

  9. 78 FR 54457 - Agency Information Collection Activities; Comment Request; Student Assistance General Provisions...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-09-04

    ... Agency Information Collection Activities; Comment Request; Student Assistance General Provisions--Satisfactory Academic Progress Policy AGENCY: Federal Student Aid (FSA), Department of Education (ED). ACTION....), ED is proposing an extension of an existing information collection. DATES: Interested persons...

  10. Genomics Analogy Model for Educators (GAME): Fuzzy DNA Model to Enable the Learning of Gene Sequencing by Visually-Impaired and Blind Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Butler, Charles; Bello, Julia; York, Alan; Orvis, Kathryn; Pittendrigh, Barry R.

    2008-01-01

    Much of the general population is aware of terms such as biotechnology, genetic engineering, and genomics. However, there is a lack of understanding concerning these fields among many secondary school students. Few teaching models exist to explain concepts behind genomics and even less are available for teaching the visually impaired and blind.…

  11. Developing an Appropriate Design of Blended Learning with Web-Enabled Self-Regulated Learning to Enhance Students' Learning and Thoughts regarding Online Learning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tsai, Chia-Wen; Shen, Pei-Di; Tsai, Meng-Chuan

    2011-01-01

    The vocational schools in Taiwan regard professional certifications as a badge of skills achievement. The teaching in this context usually focuses on how to help students enhance their professional skills and pass the certificate examinations, particularly for computing courses. However, due to national education policy, pure online courses are…

  12. Student activity levels, lesson context, and teacher behavior during middle school physical education.

    PubMed

    McKenzie, T L; Marshall, S J; Sallis, J F; Conway, T L

    2000-09-01

    There is little research on students' engagement in physical activity in middle school physical education (PE). We observed student activity, lesson context, and teacher behavior in 430 PE lessons taught by 126 teachers in 24 schools. Variables were analyzed by mixed-model nested analyses of covariance. Boys were more active than girls overall and during skill drills, game play, and free play. Student activity varied by lesson context, with fitness activities producing the most activity. Class size was negatively associated with student activity. Daily PE contributed a weekly total of 25 min of vigorous activity and 83 min of moderate-to-vigorous activity--much less than national objectives. Results suggest that numerous opportunities exist for increasing student physical activity during middle school PE.

  13. Tertiary Students and Social Development: An Area for Direct Action--Student Rural Service Activities in Malaysia.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kong, Kee Poo

    The study is a survey of the different kinds of voluntary rural service (service-learning) corps of students from the institutions of higher education in Malaysia. The history, organization, and activities of the service corps are examined, and this type of student social action is viewed with reference to the role of higher education in the…

  14. The Effect of Active Student Responding during Computer-Assisted Instruction on Social Studies Learning by Students with Learning Disabilities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jerome, Annamaria; Barbetta, Patricia M.

    2005-01-01

    An alternating treatments design with a best treatments phase was used to compare two active student response (ASR) conditions and one on-task (OT) condition on the acquisition and maintenance of social studies facts during computer-assisted instruction. Each week for six weeks, five students were provided daily computer-assisted instruction on 21…

  15. Effective Teachers for Students with Emotional/Behavioral Disorders: Active Ingredients Leading to Positive Teacher and Student Outcomes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Conroy, Maureen A.; Sutherland, Kevin S.

    2012-01-01

    Teachers of students with emotional/behavioral disorders (E/BD) have varied skills and abilities. Within the field there are some teachers, who teach students with E/BD by actively engaging them in learning tasks and who have few behavior problems in comparison to other teachers, who struggle with classroom management. Many researchers have found…

  16. Correlates of college students' physical activity: cross-cultural differences.

    PubMed

    Seo, Dong-Chul; Torabi, Mohammad R; Jiang, Nan; Fernandez-Rojas, Xinia; Park, Bock-Hee

    2009-10-01

    This study examined cross-cultural differences in personal and behavioral determinants of vigorous-intensity and moderate-intensity physical activity (PA) among college students living in distinctly different cultures, that is, the United States, Costa Rica, India, and South Korea. Participants of this study were recruited from randomly chosen public universities in the 4 countries during the 2006-2007 academic year. A total of 4685 students participated in the study (response rate 90%). Vigorous-intensity PA was measured by asking on how many of the past 7 days the participants participated in PA for at least 20 minutes that made them sweat or breathe hard. For moderate-intensity PA, participants were asked on how many of the past 7 days they participated in PA for at least 30 minutes that did not make them sweat or breathe hard. Findings indicate that whereas perceived overweight and fruit and vegetable consumption are relatively culture-free predictors of PA, gender and TV/video watching are culture-specific predictors. Binge drinking was not predictive of meeting the vigorous-intensity and moderate-intensity PA guidelines in any of the 4 countries. PMID:19661101

  17. Evaluation of Active Transition, a Website-Delivered Physical Activity Intervention for University Students: Pilot Study

    PubMed Central

    Faulkner, Guy; Bray, Steven

    2013-01-01

    Background While physical activity in individuals tends to decline steadily with age, there are certain periods where this decline occurs more rapidly, such as during early adulthood. Interventions aimed at attenuating the declines in physical activity during this transition period appear warranted. Objective The purpose of the study was to test the feasibility and efficacy of a theoretically informed, website-delivered physical activity intervention aimed at students entering university. Methods Using a quasi-experimental design, 65 participants (44 females; mean age 18.51, SD 0.91) were assigned to either an intervention (receiving website access plus weekly prompts) or comparison condition (receiving unprompted website access only), completing questionnaires at baseline and follow-up 8 weeks later. The intervention website, “Active Transition”, was specifically designed to target students’ physical activity cognitions and self-regulatory skills. Results Intervention usage was low, with only 47% (18/38) of participants assigned to the intervention condition logging into the website 2 or more times. Among the broader student sample, there were significant declines in students’ physical activity behaviors (F 1,63=18.10, P<.001), attitudes (F 1,62=55.19, P<.001), and perceived behavioral control (F 1,62 =17.56, P<.001). In comparisons between intervention users (29/65, individuals logging in 2 or more times) and non-users (36/65, individuals logging in once or not at all), there was a significant interaction effect for intervention usage and time on perceived behavioral control (F 1,62=5.13, P=.03). Conclusions Poor intervention usage suggests that future efforts need to incorporate innovative strategies to increase intervention uptake and better engage the student population. The findings, however, suggest that a website-delivered intervention aimed at this critical life stage may have positive impact on students’ physical activity cognitions. Future

  18. Enabling People with Developmental Disabilities to Actively Perform Designated Occupational Activities according to Simple Instructions with a Nintendo Wii Remote Controller by Controlling Environmental Stimulation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shih, Ching-Hsiang; Wang, Shu-Hui; Chang, Man-Ling; Shih, Ching-Hsiang

    2012-01-01

    The latest researches have adopted software technology, turning the Nintendo Wii Remote Controller into a high performance three-dimensional object orientation detector. This study extended Wii Remote Controller functionality to assess whether two people with developmental disabilities would be able to actively perform designated simple…

  19. Enhancing Student-Student Online Interaction: Exploring the Study Buddy Peer Review Activity

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Madland, Colin; Richards, Griff

    2016-01-01

    The study buddy is a learning strategy employed in a graduate distance course to promote informal peer reviewing of assignments before submission. This strategy promotes student-student interaction and helps break the social isolation of distance learning. Given the concern by Arum and Roksa (2011) that student-student interaction may be…

  20. Professional Student Organizations and Experiential Learning Activities: What Drives Student Intentions to Participate?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Munoz, Laura; Miller, Richard; Poole, Sonja Martin

    2016-01-01

    Experiential learning theory has been referenced as a possible method for attracting and retaining members in student organizations. In a survey, undergraduate students evaluated a variety of organizational features pertaining to their intention to participate in professional student organizations. The study found that students value activities…

  1. Welding. Student Learning Guide.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Palm Beach County Board of Public Instruction, West Palm Beach, FL.

    This student learning guide contains 30 modules for completing a course in welding. It is designed especially for use in secondary schools in Palm Beach County, Florida. Each module covers one task, and consists of a purpose, performance objective, enabling objectives, learning activities keyed to resources, information sheets, student self-check…

  2. Sex differences in social cognitive factors and physical activity in Korean college students

    PubMed Central

    Choi, Jin Yi; Chang, Ae Kyung; Choi, Eun-Ju

    2015-01-01

    [Purpose] This study examined sex differences in physical activity and social cognitive theory factors in Korean college students. [Subjects and Methods] A cross-sectional survey of 688 college students (285 men and 403 women) in Korea was conducted using a self-reported questionnaire. [Results] There was a significant difference in the level of physical activity between male and female students. The significant predictors of physical activity for male students were physical activity goals, physical activity self-efficacy, and sitting time. Meanwhile, those for female students were perceived weight, physical activity goal, physical activity outcome expectations, and sitting time. [Conclusion] Sex differences should be considered when developing interventions to increase physical activity. PMID:26180293

  3. Accelerometry-Determined Adherence to the "2008 Physical Activity Guidelines for Americans" among College Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Raynor, Douglas A.; Jankowiak, Noelle M.

    2010-01-01

    Background: A need exists to determine whether college students engage in sufficient physical activity (PA) using objective methodology. Purpose: Accelerometry-based activity monitors were used to evaluate adherence to the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services' 2008 Physical Activity Guidelines for Americans. Methods: College students (N =…

  4. Influence of High School Physical Education on University Student's Physical Activity

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kimball, Jessica; Jenkins, Jayne; Wallhead, Tristan

    2009-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to use the Lifelong Physical Activity (LLPA) framework to examine the influence of high school physical education (PE) on university students' level of physical activity (PA). Participants included 365 undergraduate students from the Rocky Mountain West of the USA enrolled in a university physical activity course.…

  5. STEM Related After-School Program Activities and Associated Outcomes on Student Learning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sahin, Alpaslan; Ayar, Mehmet C.; Adiguzel, Tufan

    2014-01-01

    This study explores the characteristics of after-school program activities at a charter school in the Southeast US highlighting students' experiences with and gains from these after-school program activities. A qualitative case study design was employed to understand students' views and opinions regarding the activities and their…

  6. Activities Contributing a Great Deal to the Students' Interactive Skills in Foreign Language Classes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Asatryan, Susanna

    2016-01-01

    While teaching speaking it is desired to provide a rich environment in class for meaningful communication to take place. With this aim, various speaking activities can contribute a great deal to students in developing their interactive skills necessary for life. These activities make students active in the learning process and at the same time…

  7. Lessons in Higher Education: Five Pedagogical Practices that Promote Active Learning for Faculty and Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cook-Sather, Alison

    2011-01-01

    Active learning by faculty members complements and promotes active learning for students. Through The Andrew W. Mellon Teaching and Learning Institute at Bryn Mawr College, faculty members actively engage with one another and with undergraduate students positioned as pedagogical consultants to explore and to practice a wide range of pedagogies. In…

  8. Time Out for Reading: "A Potpourri of Creative Response Activities for Middle and Secondary Students".

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Darwin, Marlene J.

    Most of the activities presented in this packet are appropriate for students in grade 4 through high school. To make the activity more challenging and to meet the needs of older students, the teacher may wish to add detail and written work to complement the assignment's creative aspects. These activities are adapted easily to content areas, and in…

  9. High School Students' Participation in Music Activities beyond the School Day

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kuntz, Tammy L.

    2011-01-01

    The purpose of this qualitative study was to investigate the music activities that high school band students are involved in and how these activities might lead to lifelong music participation. Specific research questions were the following: (a) In what activities are high school band students involved? (b) What are high school band directors…

  10. Traceless splicing enabled by substrate-induced activation of the Nostoc punctiforme Npu DnaE intein after mutation of a catalytic cysteine to serine.

    PubMed

    Cheriyan, Manoj; Chan, Siu-Hong; Perler, Francine

    2014-12-12

    Inteins self-catalytically cleave out of precursor proteins while ligating the surrounding extein fragments with a native peptide bond. Much attention has been lavished on these molecular marvels with the hope of understanding and harnessing their chemistry for novel biochemical transformations including coupling peptides from synthetic or biological origins and controlling protein function. Despite an abundance of powerful applications, the use of inteins is still hampered by limitations in our understanding of their specificity (defined as flanking sequences that permit splicing) and the challenge of inserting inteins into target proteins. We examined the frequently used Nostoc punctiforme Npu DnaE intein after the C-extein cysteine nucleophile (Cys+1) was mutated to serine or threonine. Previous studies demonstrated reduced rates and/or splicing yields with the Npu DnaE intein after mutation of Cys+1 to Ser+1. In this study, genetic selection identified extein sequences with Ser+1 that enabled the Npu DnaE intein to splice with only a 5-fold reduction in rate compared to the wild-type Cys+1 intein and without mutation of the intein itself to activate Ser+1 as a nucleophile. Three different proteins spliced efficiently after insertion of the intein flanked by the selected sequences. We then used this selected specificity to achieve traceless splicing in a targeted enzyme at a location predicted by primary sequence similarity to only the selected C-extein sequence. This study highlights the latent catalytic potential of the Npu DnaE intein to splice with an alternative nucleophile and enables broader intein utility by increasing insertion site choices.

  11. Enable: Developing Instructional Language Skills.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Witt, Beth

    The program presented in this manual provides a structure and activities for systematic development of effective listening comprehension in typical and atypical children. The complete ENABLE kit comes with pictures, cut-outs, and puppets to illustrate the directives, questions, and narrative activities. The manual includes an organizational and…

  12. Unprecedently Large-Scale Kinase Inhibitor Set Enabling the Accurate Prediction of Compound-Kinase Activities: A Way toward Selective Promiscuity by Design?

    PubMed

    Christmann-Franck, Serge; van Westen, Gerard J P; Papadatos, George; Beltran Escudie, Fanny; Roberts, Alexander; Overington, John P; Domine, Daniel

    2016-09-26

    Drug discovery programs frequently target members of the human kinome and try to identify small molecule protein kinase inhibitors, primarily for cancer treatment, additional indications being increasingly investigated. One of the challenges is controlling the inhibitors degree of selectivity, assessed by in vitro profiling against panels of protein kinases. We manually extracted, compiled, and standardized such profiles published in the literature: we collected 356 908 data points corresponding to 482 protein kinases, 2106 inhibitors, and 661 patents. We then analyzed this data set in terms of kinome coverage, results reproducibility, popularity, and degree of selectivity of both kinases and inhibitors. We used the data set to create robust proteochemometric models capable of predicting kinase activity (the ligand-target space was modeled with an externally validated RMSE of 0.41 ± 0.02 log units and R02 0.74 ± 0.03), in order to account for missing or unreliable measurements. The influence on the prediction quality of parameters such as number of measurements, Murcko scaffold frequency or inhibitor type was assessed. Interpretation of the models enabled to highlight inhibitors and kinases properties correlated with higher affinities, and an analysis in the context of kinases crystal structures was performed. Overall, the models quality allows the accurate prediction of kinase-inhibitor activities and their structural interpretation, thus paving the way for the rational design of compounds with a targeted selectivity profile.

  13. Unprecedently Large-Scale Kinase Inhibitor Set Enabling the Accurate Prediction of Compound–Kinase Activities: A Way toward Selective Promiscuity by Design?

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Drug discovery programs frequently target members of the human kinome and try to identify small molecule protein kinase inhibitors, primarily for cancer treatment, additional indications being increasingly investigated. One of the challenges is controlling the inhibitors degree of selectivity, assessed by in vitro profiling against panels of protein kinases. We manually extracted, compiled, and standardized such profiles published in the literature: we collected 356 908 data points corresponding to 482 protein kinases, 2106 inhibitors, and 661 patents. We then analyzed this data set in terms of kinome coverage, results reproducibility, popularity, and degree of selectivity of both kinases and inhibitors. We used the data set to create robust proteochemometric models capable of predicting kinase activity (the ligand–target space was modeled with an externally validated RMSE of 0.41 ± 0.02 log units and R02 0.74 ± 0.03), in order to account for missing or unreliable measurements. The influence on the prediction quality of parameters such as number of measurements, Murcko scaffold frequency or inhibitor type was assessed. Interpretation of the models enabled to highlight inhibitors and kinases properties correlated with higher affinities, and an analysis in the context of kinases crystal structures was performed. Overall, the models quality allows the accurate prediction of kinase-inhibitor activities and their structural interpretation, thus paving the way for the rational design of compounds with a targeted selectivity profile. PMID:27482722

  14. Unprecedently Large-Scale Kinase Inhibitor Set Enabling the Accurate Prediction of Compound-Kinase Activities: A Way toward Selective Promiscuity by Design?

    PubMed

    Christmann-Franck, Serge; van Westen, Gerard J P; Papadatos, George; Beltran Escudie, Fanny; Roberts, Alexander; Overington, John P; Domine, Daniel

    2016-09-26

    Drug discovery programs frequently target members of the human kinome and try to identify small molecule protein kinase inhibitors, primarily for cancer treatment, additional indications being increasingly investigated. One of the challenges is controlling the inhibitors degree of selectivity, assessed by in vitro profiling against panels of protein kinases. We manually extracted, compiled, and standardized such profiles published in the literature: we collected 356 908 data points corresponding to 482 protein kinases, 2106 inhibitors, and 661 patents. We then analyzed this data set in terms of kinome coverage, results reproducibility, popularity, and degree of selectivity of both kinases and inhibitors. We used the data set to create robust proteochemometric models capable of predicting kinase activity (the ligand-target space was modeled with an externally validated RMSE of 0.41 ± 0.02 log units and R02 0.74 ± 0.03), in order to account for missing or unreliable measurements. The influence on the prediction quality of parameters such as number of measurements, Murcko scaffold frequency or inhibitor type was assessed. Interpretation of the models enabled to highlight inhibitors and kinases properties correlated with higher affinities, and an analysis in the context of kinases crystal structures was performed. Overall, the models quality allows the accurate prediction of kinase-inhibitor activities and their structural interpretation, thus paving the way for the rational design of compounds with a targeted selectivity profile. PMID:27482722

  15. Phoenix Student Interns Program: Active Research on Mars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bowman, C. D. D.; Camacho, J.; Dorsch, W.; Hurd, D.; Meyer, J.; Overton, J.; Stocco, K.; Young, N.

    2008-03-01

    In the Phoenix Student Interns Program, high school students and teachers from around the U.S. work with Phoenix Mars Mission scientists and engineers to do the work associated with exploration and discovery on Mars in summer 2008.

  16. Star Schools for All Our Students. Examining the Status of the Star Schools Program, a Federal Program That Enables Students To Be Linked Together via Satellite or Cable TV Hookup with Teachers in Different Parts of the Country. Hearing before the Committee on Labor and Human Resources, United States Senate, One Hundred Second Congress, First Session.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Congress of the U.S., Washington, DC. Senate Committee on Labor and Human Resources.

    The purpose of this hearing was to examine the status of the Star Schools program, a federal program enacted by Congress in 1987 that enables students to be linked together via satellite or cable TV hookup with teachers in different parts of the country. Star Schools are a network of distance education programs that link remote classes of students…

  17. Active Listening Strategies of Academically Successful University Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Canpolat, Murat; Kuzu, Sekvan; Yildirim, Bilal; Canpolat, Sevilay

    2015-01-01

    Problem Statement: In formal educational environments, the quality of student listening affects learning considerably. Students who are uninterested in a lesson listen reluctantly, wanting time to pass quickly and the class to end as soon as possible. In such situations, students become passive and, though appearing to be listening, will not use…

  18. [2010-2011 Federal Student Aid Handbook with Active Index

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Federal Student Aid, US Department of Education, 2011

    2011-01-01

    This publication is intended for financial aid administrators and counselors who help students begin the aid process--filing the Free Application for Federal Student Aid (FAFSA), verifying information, and making corrections and other changes to the information reported on the FAFSA. The Federal Student Aid Handbook consists of the Application and…

  19. Science Teaching and Learning Activities and Students' Engagement in Science

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hampden-Thompson, Gillian; Bennett, Judith

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this analysis is to describe the variation in students' reports of engagement in science across science teaching and learning activities. In addition, this study examines student and school characteristics that may be associated with students' levels of engagement in science. Data are drawn from the Programme for…

  20. Scholarly Networking among Business Students: Structured Discussion Board Activity and Academic Outcomes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Walker, Kristen; Curren, Mary T.; Kiesler, Tina; Lammers, H. Bruce; Goldenson, Jamie

    2013-01-01

    The authors' intent was to show the effect of student discussion board activity on academic outcomes, after accounting for past academic performance. Data were collected from 516 students enrolled in a junior-level required business course. Controlling for students' grade point average, stepwise regression showed a significant…

  1. Look Around You. A Primary Student Activity Book Introducing Basic Environmental Concepts.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Starkey, Sharon

    This activity book, designed for student use, introduces environmental concepts to the primary student. The basic concept around which the guide is developed is the idea that the environment contains many interdependent things. Water, wind, clouds, non-living objects, plants, animals, and pollution are dealt with as part of the primary student's…

  2. A Review of Research on Small-School Student Participation in Extracurricular Activities.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stevens, Neil G.; Peltier, Gary L.

    1994-01-01

    Research reveals that high school students in small schools participate more in extracurricular activities than their peers in large schools; that a high degree of student participation provides opportunities for enhancing leadership, responsibility, and motivation; that students in small schools feel needed; and that the benefits of…

  3. An Action Research Study on the Effect of Interactive Technology and Active Learning on Student Performance

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bear, Teresa J.

    2013-01-01

    This quantitative action science research study utilized a causal-comparative experimental research design in order to determine if the use of student response systems (clickers), as an active learning strategy in a community college course, improved student performance in the course. Students in the experimental group (n = 26) used clickers to…

  4. The Reasons for the Reluctance of Princess Alia University College Students' from Practicing Sports Activities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Odat, Jebril

    2015-01-01

    This study aimed at investigating the reasons lying behind the reluctance of participation in sport activities among Alia Princess College female students, using descriptive approach. The population of the study consisted of (2000) female students, whereas the sample was of (200) students. They were randomly selected and a questionnaire of 31…

  5. An Analysis of Teacher Discourse that Introduces Real Science Activities to High School Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hsu, Pei-Ling; Roth, Wolff-Michael

    2009-01-01

    Most academic science educators encourage teachers to provide their students with access to more authentic science activities. What can and do teachers say to increase students' interests in participating in opportunities to do real science? What are the discursive "resources" they draw on to introduce authentic science to students? The purpose of…

  6. Teacher Feedback and Interactions in Physical Education: Effects of Student Gender and Physical Activities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nicaise, Virginie; Cogerino, Genevieve; Fairclough, Stuart; Bois, Julien; Davis, Kathryn

    2007-01-01

    Previous research conducted in both classroom and physical education (PE) settings has examined the impact of student gender on teacher-student interactions. The purpose of this study was to extend this line of research by analysing the influence of student gender and different types of physical activity on the frequency and nature of teacher…

  7. School Time Physical Activity of Students with and without Autism Spectrum Disorders during PE and Recess

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pan, Chien-Yu

    2008-01-01

    This study compared moderate-to-vigorous physical activity (MVPA) of students with autism spectrum disorders (ASD) and students without disabilities during inclusive physical education and recess. Students (7-12 years) wore a uniaxial accelerometer in school for 5 consecutive school days. Results indicated a significant difference between…

  8. Physical Activity Breaks and Student Learning: A Teacher-Research Project

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Camahalan, Faye Marsha G.; Ipock, Amanda R.

    2015-01-01

    This study is a teacher initiated action research. The purpose is to improve student learning in math using physical activity breaks during classroom lessons. The study was conducted by tracking the results of ten 5th grade students for a period of one week. Using anecdotal notes, students showed improvement on attentiveness during class…

  9. 78 FR 6081 - Agency Information Collection Activities; Comment Request; National Student Loan Data System (NSLDS)

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-01-29

    ... Agency Information Collection Activities; Comment Request; National Student Loan Data System (NSLDS... notice will be considered public records. Title of Collection: National Student Loan Data System (NSLDS... U.S. Department of Education will collect data through the National Student Loan Data System...

  10. Inquiry-Based Laboratory Activities in Electrochemistry: High School Students' Achievements and Attitudes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sesen, Burcin Acar; Tarhan, Leman

    2013-01-01

    This study aimed to investigate the effects of inquiry-based laboratory activities on high school students' understanding of electrochemistry and attitudes towards chemistry and laboratory work. The participants were 62 high school students (average age 17 years) in an urban public high school in Turkey. Students were assigned to experimental (N =…

  11. A Comparison of Motivational Factors and Barriers to Physical Activity among Traditional versus Nontraditional College Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kulavic, Kimberly; Hultquist, Cherilyn N.; McLester, John R.

    2013-01-01

    Objective: To investigate the motivational factors and the barriers to physical activity (PA) in traditional college students (TS) and nontraditional college students (NTS) and determine if differences exist between these 2 groups. Participants: A total of 746 college students; 628 were TS (19.1 [plus-minus] 1.2 years), and 118 were NTS (31.2…

  12. Nobody Says No: Student Self-Censorship in a Collaborative Knowledge Building Activity

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Roberts, Alan; Nason, Rod

    2011-01-01

    This paper explores student self-censorship within an online learning environment. Self-censorship in group activity can be seen as a two-edged sword. While it can be advantageous that a student censor personal frustration and angst when working with others, if the self-censorship impacts on the cognitive contribution a student makes then this may…

  13. 76 FR 67556 - Proposed Information Collection (Notice of Change in Student Status) Activity: Comment Request

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-11-01

    ... comments for information needed to report changes in students' enrollment status. DATES: Written comments... collection. Abstract: Educational institutions use VA Form 22-1999b to report a student's enrollment status... AFFAIRS Proposed Information Collection (Notice of Change in Student Status) Activity: Comment...

  14. 77 FR 67737 - Proposed Information Collection (Student Verification of Enrollment) Activity: Comment Request

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-11-13

    ... AFFAIRS Proposed Information Collection (Student Verification of Enrollment) Activity: Comment Request...: Student Verification of Enrollment, VA Form 22-8979. OMB Control Number: 2900-0465. Type of Review... of actual attendance and verification of the student's continued enrollment in courses leading to...

  15. Self-Regulated Learning and Perceived Health among Students Participating in University Physical Activity Classes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McBride, Ron E.; Xiang, Ping

    2013-01-01

    Three hundred and sixty-one students participating in university physical activity classes completed questionnaires assessing perceived health and self-regulated learning. In addition, 20 students (11 men; 9 women) were interviewed about their reasons for enrolling, participation and goals in the class. Results indicated the students endorsed…

  16. Promoting Health-Related Fitness during Warm-Up Activities for Secondary Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Johnson, Ingrid

    2008-01-01

    It is common to begin a physical education class by having students run laps. Many teachers find that doing the same running warm-up day after day leads to boredom and a lack of interest in their students. This article provides teachers with developmentally appropriate warm-up activities that will not only motivate students, but also keep them…

  17. Beyond the Classroom: Involving Students with Disabilities in Extracurricular Activities at Levy Middle School.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Walker, Pam; And Others

    Six students in a special education classroom at Levy Middle School (Syracuse, New York) became involved in a variety of after-school activities with nondisabled students. The students participated in the school computer club, cross-country skiing, volleyball, stage crew, intramural basketball, the Spanish Club, and after-school programs at two…

  18. Effects of Active Learning on Enhancing Student Critical Thinking in an Undergraduate General Science Course

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kim, Kyoungna; Sharma, Priya; Land, Susan M.; Furlong, Kevin P.

    2013-01-01

    To enhance students' critical thinking in an undergraduate general science course, we designed and implemented active learning modules by incorporating group-based learning with authentic tasks, scaffolding, and individual reports. This study examined the levels of critical thinking students exhibited in individual reports and the students'…

  19. Crossing Boundaries in Facebook: Students' Framing of Language Learning Activities as Extended Spaces

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lantz-Andersson, Annika; Vigmo, Sylvi; Bowen, Rhonwen

    2013-01-01

    Young people's interaction online is rapidly increasing, which enables new spaces for communication; the impact on learning, however, is not yet acknowledged in education. The aim of this exploratory case study is to scrutinize how students frame their interaction in social networking sites (SNS) in school practices and what that implies for…

  20. What Are Students Doing during Lecture? Evidence from New Technologies to Capture Student Activity

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Maltese, Adam V.; Danish, Joshua A.; Bouldin, Ryan M.; Harsh, Joseph A.; Bryan, Branden

    2016-01-01

    Engaging students in class is paramount if they are to gain a deep understanding of class content. Student engagement is manifested by attention to the various components of instruction. However, there is little research at the tertiary level focusing on what aspects of instruction are related to changes in student attention during class. To…

  1. Hypothetical Biotechnology Companies: A Role-Playing Student Centered Activity for Undergraduate Science Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chuck, Jo-Anne

    2011-01-01

    Science students leaving undergraduate programs are entering the biotechnology industry where they are presented with issues which require integration of science content. Students find this difficult as through-out their studies, most content is limited to a single subdiscipline (e.g., biochemistry, immunology). In addition, students need…

  2. Participation in School Food and Nutrition Activities among Grade 6-8 Students in Vancouver.

    PubMed

    Stephens, Teya A; Black, Jennifer L; Chapman, Gwen E; Velazquez, Cayley E; Rojas, Alejandro

    2016-07-01

    This study examined student-reported participation in school food and nutrition activities in Vancouver, British Columbia (BC), and whether engagement differed by gender and between elementary and secondary school students. A cross-sectional survey of grade 6-8 public school students (n = 937) from 20 elementary and 6 secondary schools assessed student-reported participation in a range of food and nutrition activities. Statistical analyses included descriptive statistics and multilevel logistic regression to examine associations between participation with gender and school type. Overall, <50% of students reported engaging in most of the food and nutrition activities examined in the 2011-2012 school year, including: food preparation (36%), choosing/tasting healthy foods (27%), learning about Canada's Food Guide (CFG) (45%), learning about foods grown in BC (35%), gardening (21%), composting (32%), and recycling (51%). Females were more likely to report recycling and learning about CFG and BC-grown foods (P < 0.05). Secondary students were more likely to report activities focused on working with or learning about food/nutrition (P < 0.05). Despite local and provincial efforts to engage students in food and nutrition experiences, participation in most activities remains relatively low, with few students exposed to multiple activities. Continued advocacy is needed from the dietetics community to improve student engagement in food and nutrition activities. PMID:27182726

  3. Candies to Dye for: Cooperative, Open-Ended Student Activities to Promote Understanding of Electrophoretic Fractionation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Emry, Randall; Curtright, Robert D.; Wright, Jonathan; Markwell, John

    2000-10-01

    A three-part series of laboratory activities is presented that allows students to learn why electrophoretic separations work and to manipulate the factors that influence the separation process. In the first two exercises, students perform cooperative separations of FD&C dyes from candies utilizing electrophoresis in two buffers of different pH. Students must use package information from one brand of candy and critical thinking to determine the identities of these dyes. Using structural formulas for the dyes the students draw conclusions regarding the effect of charge and molecular mass on separation. The final activity is an open-ended investigation into a student-formulated question. These activities integrate topics in biology and chemistry into activities that interest students and foster a real understanding of the tool of electrophoresis.

  4. Professional development using student-led, community-based activities.

    PubMed

    Martin, Ashley E; Cunningham, Stacey C; Magnus, Jeanette H

    2011-01-01

    As a community health education center affiliated with an academic institution, we recognize that by investing in the professional development of our students, we not only maximize our own outcomes but those of our students as well. Our project, Creating Community Connections, was developed to aid the work of our Center in characterizing the evolving community landscape following Hurricane Katrina while providing opportunities for students to engage in experiential learning. Students in the project could gain skills in program planning and community assessment, as well as leadership and communications. Twenty-three students worked on the project during its 2 years, developing data collection tools, organizing and conducting key informant interviews, facilitating focus groups and community forums, managing data, and summarizing project findings for community presentations. Participation in this project allowed our students to grow as public health leaders and researchers while gaining a greater appreciation for community collaboration. PMID:21617412

  5. Professional development using student-led, community-based activities.

    PubMed

    Martin, Ashley E; Cunningham, Stacey C; Magnus, Jeanette H

    2011-01-01

    As a community health education center affiliated with an academic institution, we recognize that by investing in the professional development of our students, we not only maximize our own outcomes but those of our students as well. Our project, Creating Community Connections, was developed to aid the work of our Center in characterizing the evolving community landscape following Hurricane Katrina while providing opportunities for students to engage in experiential learning. Students in the project could gain skills in program planning and community assessment, as well as leadership and communications. Twenty-three students worked on the project during its 2 years, developing data collection tools, organizing and conducting key informant interviews, facilitating focus groups and community forums, managing data, and summarizing project findings for community presentations. Participation in this project allowed our students to grow as public health leaders and researchers while gaining a greater appreciation for community collaboration.

  6. Evaluation of Classroom Active Engagement in Elementary Students with Autism Spectrum Disorder

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sparapani, Nicole; Morgan, Lindee; Reinhardt, Vanessa P.; Schatschneider, Christopher; Wetherby, Amy M.

    2016-01-01

    This study evaluated the classroom measure of active engagement (CMAE), an observational tool designed to measure active engagement in students with autism spectrum disorder (ASD). Participants included 196 students with ASD and their educators (n = 126) who were video-recorded at the beginning of the school year. Findings documented limited…

  7. The Effect of Project-Based Activities on Intermediate EFL Students' Reading Comprehension Ability

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shiraz, Mona Poorverdi; Larsari, Ebrahim Ezati

    2014-01-01

    The present study investigates the relationship between the use of Project-based activities and intermediate EFL students' reading comprehension. The study addresses the questions of whether students' reading comprehension differs after implementing Project-based activities, and whether different projects lead to different degrees of reading…

  8. Teaching Graduate Students about Social Class: Using a Classifying Activity with an Inductive Approach

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chennault, Ronald E.

    2010-01-01

    Teaching about social class holds special significance for students who will work in the fields of education and human services. In this article, the author describes how he teaches graduate students about social class using a classifying activity with an inductive approach. He follows this activity with a discussion of course readings that take a…

  9. Selected Bibliography on Student Activism in the Public Schools. Bibliography Series, Number Twelve.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hall, John S., Comp.

    This bibliography on student activism in the public schools lists of 86 books, pamphlets, and articles, most of which were published since 1967. It is designed to help school administrators, teachers, and citizens understand the extent, causes, and effects of student activism at the secondary level. Several items suggest ways in which school…

  10. Self-Regulated Learning and Perceived Health among University Students Participating in Physical Activity Classes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McBride, Ron E.; Altunsöz, Irmak Hürmeriç; Su, Xiaoxia; Xiang, Ping; Demirhan, Giyasettin

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to explore motivational indicators of self-regulated learning (SRL) and the relationship between self-regulation (SR) and perceived health among university students enrolled in physical activity (PA) classes. One hundred thirty-one Turkish students participating in physical education activity classes at two…

  11. Comparing Pictorial and Video Modeling Activity Schedules during Transitions for Students with Autism Spectrum Disorders

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cihak, David F.

    2011-01-01

    This study evaluated the differential effects of two different visual schedule strategies. In the context of an alternating treatments design, static-picture schedules were compared to video based activity schedules as supports for three middle school aged students with autism. Students used the visual schedules to transition between activities in…

  12. Comparing Pictorial and Video-Modeling Activity Schedules during Transitions for Students with Autism Spectrum Disorders

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cihak, David F.; Ayres, Kevin M.

    2010-01-01

    This study evaluated the differential effects of two different visual schedule strategies. In the context of an alternating treatments design, static-picture schedules were compared to video based activity schedules as supports for three middle school aged students with autism. Students used the visual schedules to transition between activities in…

  13. New Voices: Student Political Activism in the '80s and '90s.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vellela, Tony

    An examination of the state of student activism in American higher education is based on a study of the focus and direction of campus activism and on interviews and surveys of undergraduate and graduate students who consider themselves activists. The first two chapters are devoted to an assessment of the overall situation and of the strategies…

  14. Work-Based, Community Service-Learning Activities for Students in Rural America.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Harmon, Hobart L.

    This resource guide provides information on community service-learning activities for rural students. The guide is based on focus-group sessions in which participants from five rural Appalachian counties identified community service activities that would enhance students' academic success, improve their transition from school to work, and address…

  15. "Activities of Older Adults" Survey: Tapping into Student Views of the Elderly

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wurtele, Sandy K.

    2009-01-01

    This article describes an exercise used in a life span developmental psychology course to tap into undergraduates' perceptions of activities of the elderly. Students were asked to generate items to be included in a hypothetical Activities of Older Adults survey (to be administered to people 65 years and older). Responses from 1,340 students over a…

  16. Classroom Environment and Student Outcomes Associated with Using Anthropometry Activities in High School Science.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lightburn, Millard E.; Fraser, Barry J.

    The study involved implementing and evaluating activities that actively engage students in the process of gathering, processing and analyzing data derived from human body measurements, with students using their prior knowledge acquired in science, mathematics, and computer classes to interpret this information. In the classroom activities…

  17. Improving the Laboratory Experience for Introductory Geology Students Using Active Learning and Evidence-Based Reform

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oien, R. P.; Anders, A. M.; Long, A.

    2014-12-01

    We present the initial results of transitioning laboratory activities in an introductory physical geology course from passive to active learning. Educational research demonstrates that student-driven investigations promote increased engagement and better retention of material. Surveys of students in introductory physical geology helped us identify lab activities which do not engage students. We designed new lab activities to be more collaborative, open-ended and "hands-on". Student feedback was most negative for lab activities which are computer-based. In response, we have removed computers from the lab space and increased the length and number of activities involving physical manipulation of samples and models. These changes required investment in lab equipment and supplies. New lab activities also include student-driven exploration of data with open-ended responses. Student-evaluations of the new lab activities will be compiled during Fall 2014 and Spring 2015 to allow us to measure the impact of the changes on student satisfaction and we will report on our findings to date. Modification of this course has been sponsored by NSF's Widening Implementation & Demonstration of Evidence Based Reforms (WIDER) program through grant #1347722 to the University of Illinois. The overall goal of the grant is to increase retention and satisfaction of STEM students in introductory courses.

  18. Undergraduate Student Construction and Interpretation of Graphs in Physics Lab Activities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nixon, Ryan S.; Godfrey, T. J.; Mayhew, Nicholas T.; Wiegert, Craig C.

    2016-01-01

    Lab activities are an important element of an undergraduate physics course. In these lab activities, students construct and interpret graphs in order to connect the procedures of the lab with an understanding of the related physics concepts. This study investigated undergraduate students' construction and interpretation of graphs with best-fit…

  19. Interscholastic Sports, Extracurricular Activities, and the Law: Accommodating Students with Disabilities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Osborne, Allan G., Jr.; Russo, Charles J.

    2011-01-01

    In most school systems in the United States, interscholastic sporting events and other extracurricular activities help bring people together while enhancing opportunities for students to become integral parts of their communities. Because of the important role that extracurricular activities, especially sports, play in the lives of students,…

  20. Student Attitudes in the Transition to an Active-Learning Technology

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Koretsky, Milo D.; Brooks, Bill J.

    2012-01-01

    Changes in student perceptions to a novel technology-based, active-learning pedagogy using a custom, sophisticated, personal response system called WISE were studied over the first five years it was used. Students tended to view active learning more favorably over time, particularly in regards to statements that required them to be interpretive of…

  1. Arranging Instruction to Ensure the Active Participation of Severely Multihandicapped Students.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ford, Alison; And Others

    This task force report considers strategies designed to elicit active participation on the part of severely multihandicapped students. The first section considers ways to gather information on environments and daily activities of severely multihandicapped students. Hypothetical daily home and vocational routines were composed and estimates made of…

  2. Sailing toward Understanding Surface Currents: A Science and Geography Integration Activity for Upper-Elementary Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Eidietis, Laura; Rutherford, Sandra

    2009-01-01

    In the activities presented in this article, students mimic real scientists while constructing predictions and scientific explanations about surface currents. The activities are inspired by and couched within true scientific inquiries regarding the ocean and the North American Great Lakes. Students engage in a classroom inquiry and use map-reading…

  3. Comparing Computer-Supported Dynamic Modeling and "Paper & Pencil" Concept Mapping Technique in Students' Collaborative Activity

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Komis, Vassilis; Ergazaki, Marida; Zogza, Vassiliki

    2007-01-01

    This study aims at highlighting the collaborative activity of two high school students (age 14) in the cases of modeling the complex biological process of plant growth with two different tools: the "paper & pencil" concept mapping technique and the computer-supported educational environment "ModelsCreator". Students' shared activity in both cases…

  4. Student Perception of Metacognitive Activities in Entry-Level Science Courses

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sandall, Leah; Mamo, Martha; Speth, Carol; Lee, Don; Kettler, Timothy

    2014-01-01

    A research study investigated student perception of the use of metacognitive activities in the classroom. The courses were large enrollment (n greater than 100) introductory Plant and Soil Sciences courses taught in the fall semester. The courses implemented activities such as concept sketches or conceptual modeling to help students develop their…

  5. Your Students Can Be Rocket Scientists! A Galaxy of Great Activities about Astronauts, Gravity, and Motion.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kepler, Lynne

    1994-01-01

    Presents activities for a springtime Space Day that can teach students about astronauts, gravity, and motion. Activities include creating a paper bag spacecraft to study liftoff and having students simulate gravity's effects by walking in various manners and recording pulse rates. A list of resources is included. (SM)

  6. Using an Exploratory Internet Activity & Trivia Game to Teach Students about Biomes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Richardson, Matthew L.

    2009-01-01

    Students in life science classes need an introduction to biomes, including an introduction to the concept, key biotic and abiotic features of biomes, and geographic locations of biomes. In this activity, students in seventh- and eighth-grade science classes used a directed exploratory Internet activity to learn about biomes. The author tested…

  7. Exploring Time Allocation for Academic Activities by University Students in France

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fernex, Alain; Lima, Laurent; de Vries, Erica

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this article is to study how students allocate time to different university and extra-university activities and to identify factors that might explain variability both between and within fields of study. At the heart of this exercise is the question of the time students dedicate to academic activities in competition with a whole…

  8. Analyses of Activity Design in Geometry in the Light of Student Actions.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hadas, Nurit; Hershkowitz, Rina; Schwarz, Baruch B.

    2002-01-01

    Investigates the effects of inquiry activities on a dynamic geometry environment designed to confront students with contradictions and uncertainties. Characterizes epistemological, didactic, and cognitive aspects of the activities. Analyzes the interplay among these three aspects, students' investigations, and their explanations. (Author/KHR)

  9. A Literature Review of the Impact of Extracurricular Activities Participation on Students' Academic Performance

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Seow, Poh-Sun; Pan, Gary

    2014-01-01

    Extracurricular activities (ECA) have become an important component of students' school life and many schools have invested significant resources on extracurricular activities. The authors suggest three major theoretical frameworks (zero-sum, developmental, and threshold) to explain the impact of ECA participation on students' academic…

  10. Student Activity Ideas for the Technology Sequence Systems and Foundation Courses.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    New York State Education Dept., Albany.

    This publication provides single-page outlines of brief ideas for high school student activities in each of the System and Foundation Courses of the New York State technology sequence. The idea outlines are provided as a resource to assist teachers in the development of student learning activities. The six courses for which ideas are presented are…

  11. Secondary School Students' Physical Activity Participation across Physical Education Classes: The Expectancy-Value Theory Approach

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gråstén, Arto; Watt, Anthony; Hagger, Martin; Jaakkola, Timo; Liukkonen, Jarmo

    2015-01-01

    The primary purpose of this study was to analyze the link between students' expectancy beliefs, subjective task values, out-of-school activity, and moderate to vigorous physical activity (MVPA) participation across secondary school physical education (PE) classes. The sample comprised 96 students (58 girls, 38 boys; Mage = 15.03, SD = 0.94) from…

  12. Physical Activity Patterns and Self-Efficacy of Selected College Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hutchins, Matt; Drolet, Judy C.; Ogletree, Roberta J.

    2010-01-01

    Much attention has been given to the fact that Americans are becoming less active. This study was designed to examine the levels of exercise-specific self-efficacy and physical activity rates in a selected group of college students. Students were recruited as they entered a fitness facility. Participation consisted of completing a survey that…

  13. Promoting Active-Student Learning Using the World Wide Web in Economics Courses.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Simkins, Scott P.

    1999-01-01

    Illustrates how Web-based technologies can be used to encourage and motivate students to become active participants in the introductory economics classroom and describes two Web-based active learning exercises that place students in the center of the learning process. Includes reactions by Kim Sosin and Linda M. Manning. (CMK)

  14. Changes in Short-Term Attitudes Toward Physical Activity and Exercise of University Personal Wellness Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mack, Mick G.; Shaddox, Lea Ann

    2004-01-01

    This study examined the attitudes toward physical activity and exercise of university students enrolled in Personal Wellness classes. 1,625 undergraduate students completed the Attitudes Toward Exercise and Physical Activity (ATEPA) inventory on the first and last day of the class. Paired-samples t test results comparing the mean pretest ATEPA…

  15. Student Engagement with Artefacts and Scientific Ideas in a Laboratory and a Concept-Mapping Activity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mikael Hamza, Karim; Wickman, Per-Olof

    2013-09-01

    The purpose of this study is to use a comparative approach to scrutinize the common assumption that certain school science activities are theoretical and therefore particularly suited for engaging students with scientific ideas, whereas others are practical and, thus, not equally conducive to engagement with scientific ideas. We compared two school science activities, one (laboratory work) that is commonly regarded as focusing attention on artefacts that may distract students from central science concepts and the other (concept mapping) that is thought to make students focus directly on these concepts. We observed students in either a laboratory activity about real galvanic cells or a concept-mapping activity about idealized galvanic cells. We used a practical epistemology analysis to compare the two activities regarding students' actions towards scientific ideas and artefacts. The comparison revealed that the two activities, despite their alleged differences along the theory-practice scale, primarily resulted in similar student actions. For instance, in both activities, students interacted extensively with artefacts and, to a lesser extent, with scientific ideas. However, only occasionally did students establish any explicit continuity between artefacts and scientific ideas. The findings indicate that some of the problems commonly considered to be unique for school science practical work may indeed be a feature of school science activities more generally.

  16. A Student Activity Fee Primer: Current Research on Collection, Control and Allocation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Meabon, David; And Others

    The past and current status of the student activity fee is reviewed from the perspectives of the legislature, state agency or state board of control, case law, and institutional trends. The analysis is based upon four national studies, a review of case law, and a campus model for the administration of student activity fees. Various states have…

  17. A Curriculum Activities Guide to Environment Studies with Students with Special Education Needs.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tully, Randolph R., Jr., Ed.

    Developed by teachers, the curriculum guide provides information on environmental studies activities for use with handicapped students. Activities are divided into three areas: awareness level activities (aesthetics, cemeteries, water, soil, air, noise, and miscellaneous activities); transition level activities (playgrounds, cemeteries, wildlife,…

  18. The Bringing up of Eco-Mind of Students by Activation of Environment Protection in the Community

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sakaki, Kazuhiko; Kitazawa, Kimiyoshi; Fujii, Tsuneo

    Faculty of engineering, Shinshu University brought up eco-mind of students by cooperation activity to help activation of environment protection of Saku branch of Nagano Association for Conserving Environment. Result of being active of the cooperation activity is following three points; growth of eco-mind of students, promotion of environmental management activity of an area company, construction of cooperation between companies by activity of students. The student learned most about environmental activity, business, society, region through this activity. The field of vision and the skill of students improved remarkably in this activity front and back.

  19. Validation of psychosocial scales for physical activity in university students

    PubMed Central

    Tassitano, Rafael Miranda; de Farias, José Cazuza; Rech, Cassiano Ricardo; Tenório, Maria Cecília Marinho; Cabral, Poliana Coelho; da Silva, Giselia Alves Pontes

    2015-01-01

    OBJECTIVE Translate the Patient-centered Assessment and Counseling for Exercise questionnaire, adapt it cross-culturally and identify the psychometric properties of the psychosocial scales for physical activity in young university students. METHODS The Patient-centered Assessment and Counseling for Exercise questionnaire is made up of 39 items divided into constructs based on the social cognitive theory and the transtheoretical model. The analyzed constructs were, as follows: behavior change strategy (15 items), decision-making process (10), self-efficacy (6), support from family (4), and support from friends (4). The validation procedures were conceptual, semantic, operational, and functional equivalences, in addition to the equivalence of the items and of measurements. The conceptual, of items and semantic equivalences were performed by a specialized committee. During measurement equivalence, the instrument was applied to 717 university students. Exploratory factor analysis was used to verify the loading of each item, explained variance and internal consistency of the constructs. Reproducibility was measured by means of intraclass correlation coefficient. RESULTS The two translations were equivalent and back-translation was similar to the original version, with few adaptations. The layout, presentation order of the constructs and items from the original version were kept in the same form as the original instrument. The sample size was adequate and was evaluated by the Kaiser-Meyer-Olkin test, with values between 0.72 and 0.91. The correlation matrix of the items presented r < 0.8 (p < 0.05). The factor loadings of the items from all the constructs were satisfactory (> 0.40), varying between 0.43 and 0.80, which explained between 45.4% and 59.0% of the variance. Internal consistency was satisfactory (α ≥ 0.70), with support from friends being 0.70 and 0.92 for self-efficacy. Most items (74.3%) presented values above 0.70 for the reproducibility test

  20. Communicating Wave Energy: An Active Learning Experience for Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Huynh, Trongnghia; Hou, Gene; Wang, Jin

    2016-01-01

    We have conducted an education project to communicate the wave energy concept to high school students. A virtual reality system that combines both hardware and software is developed in this project to simulate the buoy-wave interaction. This first-of-its-kind wave energy unit is portable and physics-based, allowing students to conduct a number of…