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Sample records for activity ferric reducing

  1. Rapid assay for microbially reducible ferric iron in aquatic sediments.

    PubMed

    Lovley, D R; Phillips, E J

    1987-07-01

    The availability of ferric iron for microbial reduction as directly determined by the activity of iron-reducing organisms was compared with its availability as determined by a newly developed chemical assay for microbially reducible iron. The chemical assay was based on the reduction of poorly crystalline ferric iron by hydroxylamine under acidic conditions. There was a strong correlation between the extent to which hydroxylamine could reduce various synthetic ferric iron forms and the susceptibility of the iron to microbial reduction in an enrichment culture of iron-reducing organisms. When sediments that contained hydroxylamine-reducible ferric iron were incubated under anaerobic conditions, ferrous iron accumulated as the concentration of hydroxylamine-reducible ferric iron declined over time. Ferrous iron production stopped as soon as the hydroxylamine-reducible ferric iron was depleted. In anaerobic incubations of reduced sediments that did not contain hydroxylamine-reducible ferric iron, there was no microbial iron reduction, even though the sediments contained high concentrations of oxalate-extractable ferric iron. A correspondence between the presence of hydroxylamine-reducible ferric iron and the extent of ferric iron reduction in anaerobic incubations was observed in sediments from an aquifer and in fresh- and brackish-water sediments from the Potomac River estuary. The assay is a significant improvement over previously described procedures for the determination of hydroxylamine-reducible ferric iron because it provides a correction for the high concentrations of solid ferrous iron which may also be extracted from sediments with acid. This is a rapid, simple technique to determine whether ferric iron is available for microbial reduction. PMID:16347384

  2. Radical-Scavenging Activity and Ferric Reducing Ability of Juniperus thurifera (L.), J. oxycedrus (L.), J. phoenicea (L.) and Tetraclinis articulata (L.).

    PubMed

    El Jemli, Meryem; Kamal, Rabie; Marmouzi, Ilias; Zerrouki, Asmae; Cherrah, Yahia; Alaoui, Katim

    2016-01-01

    Objective. The aim of this work is to study and compare the antioxidant properties and phenolic contents of aqueous leaf extracts of Juniperus thurifera, Juniperus oxycedrus, Juniperus Phoenicea, and Tetraclinis articulata from Morocco. Methods. Antioxidant activities of the extracts were evaluated by 2,2-diphenyl-1-picrylhydrazyl (DPPH) free radical-scavenging ability, Trolox equivalent antioxidant capacity (TEAC), and ferric reducing antioxidant power (FRAP) assays. Also the total phenolic and flavonoids contents of the extracts were determined spectrophotometrically. Results. All the extracts showed interesting antioxidant activities compared to the standard antioxidants (butylated hydroxytoluene (BHT), quercetin, and Trolox). The aqueous extract of Juniperus oxycedrus showed the highest antioxidant activity as measured by DPPH, TEAC, and FRAP assays with IC50 values of 17.91 ± 0.37 μg/mL, 19.80 ± 0.55 μg/mL, and 24.23 ± 0.07 μg/mL, respectively. The strong correlation observed between antioxidant capacities and their total phenolic contents indicated that phenolic compounds were a major contributor to antioxidant properties of these plants extracts. Conclusion. These results suggest that the aqueous extracts of Juniperus thurifera, Juniperus oxycedrus, Juniperus phoenicea, and Tetraclinis articulata can constitute a promising new source of natural compounds with antioxidants ability. PMID:27293428

  3. Radical-Scavenging Activity and Ferric Reducing Ability of Juniperus thurifera (L.), J. oxycedrus (L.), J. phoenicea (L.) and Tetraclinis articulata (L.)

    PubMed Central

    Kamal, Rabie; Marmouzi, Ilias; Zerrouki, Asmae; Cherrah, Yahia; Alaoui, Katim

    2016-01-01

    Objective. The aim of this work is to study and compare the antioxidant properties and phenolic contents of aqueous leaf extracts of Juniperus thurifera, Juniperus oxycedrus, Juniperus Phoenicea, and Tetraclinis articulata from Morocco. Methods. Antioxidant activities of the extracts were evaluated by 2,2-diphenyl-1-picrylhydrazyl (DPPH) free radical-scavenging ability, Trolox equivalent antioxidant capacity (TEAC), and ferric reducing antioxidant power (FRAP) assays. Also the total phenolic and flavonoids contents of the extracts were determined spectrophotometrically. Results. All the extracts showed interesting antioxidant activities compared to the standard antioxidants (butylated hydroxytoluene (BHT), quercetin, and Trolox). The aqueous extract of Juniperus oxycedrus showed the highest antioxidant activity as measured by DPPH, TEAC, and FRAP assays with IC50 values of 17.91 ± 0.37 μg/mL, 19.80 ± 0.55 μg/mL, and 24.23 ± 0.07 μg/mL, respectively. The strong correlation observed between antioxidant capacities and their total phenolic contents indicated that phenolic compounds were a major contributor to antioxidant properties of these plants extracts. Conclusion. These results suggest that the aqueous extracts of Juniperus thurifera, Juniperus oxycedrus, Juniperus phoenicea, and Tetraclinis articulata can constitute a promising new source of natural compounds with antioxidants ability. PMID:27293428

  4. An investigation of carbonaceous materials reducing ferric ions in aqueous solution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cooke, A. V.; Chilton, J. P.; Fray, D. J.

    1988-10-01

    By substituting the ferrous to ferric oxidation for anodic oxygen evolution in an electrowinning cell, it is possible to reduce the cell voltage by about 1 V. However, it is then necessary to reduce the ferric back to ferrous and, depending on the circumstances, acid needs to be cogenerated. Various possible reductants are discussed, and experiments are described on the use of lignite and other carbonaceous materials to reduce the ferric ion. It was found that lignite was able to reduce the ferric ion, in situ in the electrowinning cell, but that the rate of reduction was compatible only with a maximum current density of about 40 Am-2. The efficiency was increased by periodically interrupting the current flow.

  5. Ferric reductase activity in Azotobacter vinelandii and its inhibition by Zn2+.

    PubMed

    Huyer, M; Page, W J

    1989-07-01

    Ferric reductase activity was examined in Azotobacter vinelandii and was found to be located in the cytoplasm. The specific activities of soluble cell extracts were not affected by the iron concentration of the growth medium; however, activity was inhibited by the presence of Zn2+ during cell growth and also by the addition of Zn2+ to the enzyme assays. Intracellular Fe2+ levels were lower and siderophore production was increased in Zn2+-grown cells. The ferric reductase was active under aerobic conditions, had an optimal pH of approximately 7.5, and required flavin mononucleotide and Mg2+ for maximum activity. The enzyme utilized NADH to reduce iron supplied as a variety of iron chelates, including the ferrisiderophores of A. vinelandii. The enzyme was purified by conventional protein purification techniques, and the final preparation consisted of two major proteins with molecular weights of 44,600 and 69,000. The apparent Km values of the ferric reductase for Fe3+ (supplied as ferric citrate) and NADH were 10 and 15.8 microM, respectively, and the data for the enzyme reaction were consistent with Ping Pong Bi Bi kinetics. The approximate Ki values resulting from inhibition of the enzyme by Zn2+, which was a hyperbolic (partial) mixed-type inhibitor, were 25 microM with respect to iron and 1.7 microM with respect to NADH. These results suggested that ferric reductase activity may have a regulatory role in the processes of iron assimilation in A. vinelandii. PMID:2525550

  6. Preparation of ferric-activated sludge-based adsorbent from biological sludge for tetracycline removal.

    PubMed

    Yang, Xin; Xu, Guoren; Yu, Huarong; Zhang, Zhao

    2016-07-01

    Ferric activation was novelly used to produce sludge-based adsorbent (SBA) from biological sludge through pyrolysis, and the adsorbents were applied to remove tetracycline from aqueous solution. The pyrolysis temperature and mass ratio (activator/dried sludge) greatly influenced the surface area and pore characteristics of SBA. Ferric activation could promote the porous structure development of adsorbents, and the optimum preparation conditions were pyrolysis temperature 750°C and mass ratio (activator/dried sludge) 0.5. In batch experiments, ferric-activated SBA showed a higher adsorption capacity for tetracycline than non-activated SBA, because the enhanced mesoporous structure favored the diffusion of tetracycline into the pores, the iron oxides and oxygen-containing functional groups in the adsorbents captured tetracycline by surface complexation. The results indicate that ferric activation is an effective approach for preparing adsorbents from biological sludge to remove tetracycline, providing a potential option for waste resource recovery. PMID:27038265

  7. Impaired myelination and reduced brain ferric iron in the mouse model of mucolipidosis IV

    PubMed Central

    Grishchuk, Yulia; Peña, Karina A.; Coblentz, Jessica; King, Victoria E.; Humphrey, Daniel M.; Wang, Shirley L.; Kiselyov, Kirill I.; Slaugenhaupt, Susan A.

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Mucolipidosis type IV (MLIV) is a lysosomal storage disease caused by mutations in the MCOLN1 gene, which encodes the lysosomal transient receptor potential ion channel mucolipin-1 (TRPML1). MLIV causes impaired motor and cognitive development, progressive loss of vision and gastric achlorhydria. How loss of TRPML1 leads to severe psychomotor retardation is currently unknown, and there is no therapy for MLIV. White matter abnormalities and a hypoplastic corpus callosum are the major hallmarks of MLIV brain pathology. Here, we report that loss of TRPML1 in mice results in developmental aberrations of brain myelination as a result of deficient maturation and loss of oligodendrocytes. Defective myelination is evident in Mcoln1−/− mice at postnatal day 10, an active stage of postnatal myelination in the mouse brain. Expression of mature oligodendrocyte markers is reduced in Mcoln1−/− mice at postnatal day 10 and remains lower throughout the course of the disease. We observed reduced Perls' staining in Mcoln1−/− brain, indicating lower levels of ferric iron. Total iron content in unperfused brain is not significantly different between Mcoln1−/− and wild-type littermate mice, suggesting that the observed maturation delay or loss of oligodendrocytes might be caused by impaired iron handling, rather than by global iron deficiency. Overall, these data emphasize a developmental rather than a degenerative disease course in MLIV, and suggest that there should be a stronger focus on oligodendrocyte maturation and survival to better understand MLIV pathogenesis and aid treatment development. PMID:26398942

  8. Ferric Citrate Reduces Intravenous Iron and Erythropoiesis-Stimulating Agent Use in ESRD.

    PubMed

    Umanath, Kausik; Jalal, Diana I; Greco, Barbara A; Umeukeje, Ebele M; Reisin, Efrain; Manley, John; Zeig, Steven; Negoi, Dana G; Hiremath, Anand N; Blumenthal, Samuel S; Sika, Mohammed; Niecestro, Robert; Koury, Mark J; Ma, Khe-Ni; Greene, Tom; Lewis, Julia B; Dwyer, Jamie P

    2015-10-01

    Ferric citrate (FC) is a phosphate binder with shown efficacy and additional effects on iron stores and use of intravenous (iv) iron and erythropoiesis-stimulating agents (ESAs). We provide detailed analyses of changes in iron/hematologic parameters and iv iron/ESA use at time points throughout the active control period of a phase 3 international randomized clinical trial. In all, 441 subjects were randomized (292 to FC and 149 to sevelamer carbonate and/or calcium acetate [active control (AC)]) and followed for 52 weeks. Subjects on FC had increased ferritin and transferrin saturation (TSAT) levels compared with subjects on AC by week 12 (change in ferritin, 114.1±29.35 ng/ml; P<0.001; change in TSAT, 8.62%±1.57%; P<0.001). Change in TSAT plateaued at this point, whereas change in ferritin increased through week 24, remaining relatively stable thereafter. Subjects on FC needed less iv iron compared with subjects on AC over 52 weeks (median [interquartile range] dose=12.9 [1.0-28.9] versus 26.8 [13.4-47.6] mg/wk; P<0.001), and the percentage of subjects not requiring iv iron was higher with FC (P<0.001). Cumulative ESA over 52 weeks was lower with FC than AC (median [interquartile range] dose=5303 [2023-9695] versus 6954 [2664-12,375] units/wk; P=0.04). Overall, 90.3% of subjects on FC and 89.3% of subjects on AC experienced adverse events. In conclusion, treatment with FC as a phosphate binder results in increased iron parameters apparent after 12 weeks and reduces iv iron and ESA use while maintaining hemoglobin over 52 weeks, with a safety profile similar to that of available binders. PMID:25736045

  9. Geobacter bremensis sp. nov. and Geobacter pelophilus sp. nov., two dissimilatory ferric-iron-reducing bacteria.

    PubMed

    Straub, K L; Buchholz-Cleven, B E

    2001-09-01

    Two strictly anaerobic, dissimilatory ferric-iron-reducing bacteria, strains Dfr1T and Dfr2T, were isolated from freshwater mud samples with ferrihydrite as electron acceptor. Both strains also grew by reducing Mn(IV), S0 and fumarate. Electron donors used by strains Dfr1T and Dfr2T for growth with ferric iron as electron acceptor included hydrogen, formate, acetate, pyruvate, succinate, fumarate and ethanol. An affiliation with the family Geobacteraceae was revealed by comparative analysis of 165 rRNA gene sequences. Strains Dfr1T and Dfr2T shared 92.5% sequence identity and their closest known relative was Geobacter sulfurreducens, with approximately 93% sequence identity. Cultures and colonies of strains Dfr1T and Dfr2T were intensely red in colour, due to the presence of c-type cytochromes. On the basis of physiological and phylogenetic data, strain Dfr1T (= DSM 12179T = OCM 796T) is described as Geobacter bremensis sp. nov. and strain Dfr2T (= DSM 12255T = OCM 797T) as Geobacter pelophilus sp. nov. PMID:11594612

  10. Exposure characteristics of ferric oxide nanoparticles released during activities for manufacturing ferric oxide nanomaterials.

    PubMed

    Xing, Mingluan; Zhang, Yuanbao; Zou, Hua; Quan, Changjian; Chang, Bing; Tang, Shichuan; Zhang, Meibian

    2015-02-01

    The exposure characteristics of Fe2O3 nanoparticles (NPs) released in a factory were investigated, as exposure data on this type of NP is absent. The nature of the particles was identified in terms of their concentrations [i.e. number concentration (NC(20-1000 nm)), mass concentration (MC(100-1000 nm)), surface area concentration (SAC(10-1000 nm))], size distribution, morphology and elemental composition. The relationships between different exposure metrics were determined through analyses of exposure ranking (ER), concentration ratios (CR), correlation coefficients and shapes of the particle concentration curves. Work activities such as powder screening, material feeding and packaging generated higher levels of NPs as compared to those of background particles (p < 0.01). The airborne Fe2O3 NPs exhibited a unimodal size distribution and a spindle-like morphology and consisted predominantly of the elements O and Fe. Periodic and activity-related characteristics were noticed in the temporal variations in NC(20-1000 nm) and SAC(10-1000 nm). The modal size of the Fe2O3 NPs remained relatively constant (ranging from 10 to 15 nm) during the working periods. The ER, CR values and the shapes of NC(20-1000 nm) and SAC(10-1000 nm) curves were similar; however, these were significantly different from those for MC(100-1000 nm). There was a high correlation between NC(20-1000 nm) and SAC(10-1000 nm), and relatively lower correlations between the two and MC(100-1000 nm). These findings suggest that the work activities during the manufacturing processes generated high levels of primary Fe2O3 NPs. The particle concentrations exhibited periodicity and were activity dependent. The number and SACs were found to be much more relevant metrics for characterizing NPs than was the mass concentration. PMID:25703513

  11. Iron sucrose and ferric carboxymaltose: no correlation between physicochemical stability and biological activity.

    PubMed

    Praschberger, Monika; Haider, Kathrin; Cornelius, Carolin; Schitegg, Markus; Sturm, Brigitte; Goldenberg, Hans; Scheiber-Mojdehkar, Barbara

    2015-02-01

    Intravenous iron preparations, like iron sucrose (IS) and ferric carboxymaltose (FCM) differ in their physicochemical stability. Thus differences in storage and utilization can be expected and were investigated in a non-clinical study in liver parenchyma HepG2-cells and THP-1 macrophages as models for toxicological and pharmacological target cells. HepG2-cells incorporated significant amounts of IS, elevated the labile iron pool (LIP) and ferritin and stimulated iron release. HepG2-cells had lower basal cellular iron and ferritin content than THP-1 macrophages, which showed only marginal accumulation of IS and FCM. However, FCM increased the LIP up to twofold and significantly elevated ferritin within 24 h in HepG2-cells. IS and FCM were non-toxic for HepG2-cells and THP-1 macrophages were more sensitive to FCM compared to IS at all concentrations tested. In a cell-free environment redox-active iron was higher with IS than FCM. Biostability testing via assessment of direct transfer to serum transferrin did not reflect the chemical stability of the complexes (i.e., FCM > IS). Effect of vitamin C on mobilisation to transferrin was an increase with IS and interestingly a decrease with FCM. In conclusion, FCM has low bioavailability for liver parenchyma cells, therefore liver iron deposition is unlikely. Ascorbic acid reduces transferrin-chelatable iron from ferric carboxymaltose, thus effects on hepcidin expression should be investigated in clinical studies. PMID:25326244

  12. Antioxidant property of volatile oils determined by the ferric reducing ability.

    PubMed

    Lado, Cristina; Then, Mária; Varga, Ilona; Szoke, Eva; Szentmihályi, Klára

    2004-01-01

    Some current oils and their main components were studied to determine their antioxidant values. This was done by using the modified method of ferric reducing ability of plasma. It has been established that volatile oils of medicinal plants have on average a reducing capacity of 3.5-220 mmol/kg oil. The reducing capacities of the main constituents of volatile oils are 0.165-65.5 mmol/kg in concentrated oils. The highest reducing capacity was showd for phellandrene (65.438 +/- 0.166 mmol/kg) and anethole (50.087 +/- 0.160 mmol/kg) while the lowest values were obtained for menthol (0.165 +/- 0.023 mmol/kg) and menthone (0.168 +/- 0.010 mmol/kg). It has been stated that the antioxidant values of the main constituents are lower than those of volatile oils. The reducing capacity of the main constituents of medicinal plant drugs at different concentrations was also determined. PMID:18998400

  13. Ferric reductase activity and PsFRO1 sequence variation in pisum sps

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Physiological studies in pea (Pisum sativum) suggest that the reduction of iron (Fe) is the rate-limiting physiological process in Fe acquisition by dicotyledonous plants. Previous molecular work suggests that ferric reductase activity is regulated at both the transcriptional and post-translational ...

  14. Syzyguim guineense Extracts Show Antioxidant Activities and Beneficial Activities on Oxidative Stress Induced by Ferric Chloride in the Liver Homogenate.

    PubMed

    Pieme, Constant Anatole; Ngoupayo, Joseph; Nkoulou, Claude Herve Khou-Kouz; Moukette, Bruno Moukette; Nono, Borgia Legrand Njinkio; Moor, Vicky Jocelyne Ama; Minkande, Jacqueline Ze; Ngogang, Jeanne Yonkeu

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this study was to determine the in vitro antioxidant activity, free radical scavenging property and the beneficial effects of extracts of various parts of Syzygium guineense in reducing oxidative stress damage in the liver. The effects of extracts on free radicals were determined on radicals DPPH, ABTS, NO and OH followed by the antioxidant properties using Ferric Reducing Antioxidant Power assay (FRAP) and hosphomolybdenum (PPMB). The phytochemical screening of these extracts was performed by determination of the phenolic content. The oxidative damage inhibition in the liver was determined by measuring malondialdehyde (MDA) as well as the activity of the antioxidant enzymes superoxide dismutase (SOD), catalase (CAT) and peroxidase. Overall, the bark extract of the ethanol/water or methanol showed the highest radical scavenging activities against DPPH, ABTS and OH radicals compared to the other extracts. This extract also contained the highest phenolic content implying the potential contribution of phenolic compounds towards the antioxidant activities. However, the methanol extract of the root demonstrated the highest protective effects of SOD and CAT against ferric chloride while the hydro-ethanol extract of the leaves exhibited the highest inhibitory effects on lipid peroxidation. These findings suggest that antioxidant properties of S. guineense extracts could be attributed to phenolic compounds revealed by phytochemical studies. Thus, the present results indicate clearly that the extracts of S. guineense possess antioxidant properties and could serve as free radical inhibitors or scavengers, acting possibly as primary antioxidants. The antioxidant properties of the bark extract may thus sustain its various biological activities. PMID:26785075

  15. Syzyguim guineense Extracts Show Antioxidant Activities and Beneficial Activities on Oxidative Stress Induced by Ferric Chloride in the Liver Homogenate

    PubMed Central

    Pieme, Constant Anatole; Ngoupayo, Joseph; Khou-Kouz Nkoulou, Claude Herve; Moukette Moukette, Bruno; Njinkio Nono, Borgia Legrand; Ama Moor, Vicky Jocelyne; Ze Minkande, Jacqueline; Yonkeu Ngogang, Jeanne

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this study was to determine the in vitro antioxidant activity, free radical scavenging property and the beneficial effects of extracts of various parts of Syzygium guineense in reducing oxidative stress damage in the liver. The effects of extracts on free radicals were determined on radicals DPPH, ABTS, NO and OH followed by the antioxidant properties using Ferric Reducing Antioxidant Power assay (FRAP) and hosphomolybdenum (PPMB). The phytochemical screening of these extracts was performed by determination of the phenolic content. The oxidative damage inhibition in the liver was determined by measuring malondialdehyde (MDA) as well as the activity of the antioxidant enzymes superoxide dismutase (SOD), catalase (CAT) and peroxidase. Overall, the bark extract of the ethanol/water or methanol showed the highest radical scavenging activities against DPPH, ABTS and OH radicals compared to the other extracts. This extract also contained the highest phenolic content implying the potential contribution of phenolic compounds towards the antioxidant activities. However, the methanol extract of the root demonstrated the highest protective effects of SOD and CAT against ferric chloride while the hydro-ethanol extract of the leaves exhibited the highest inhibitory effects on lipid peroxidation. These findings suggest that antioxidant properties of S. guineense extracts could be attributed to phenolic compounds revealed by phytochemical studies. Thus, the present results indicate clearly that the extracts of S. guineense possess antioxidant properties and could serve as free radical inhibitors or scavengers, acting possibly as primary antioxidants. The antioxidant properties of the bark extract may thus sustain its various biological activities. PMID:26785075

  16. Iron-reducing bacteria accumulate ferric oxyhydroxide nanoparticle aggregates that may support planktonic growth

    SciTech Connect

    Luef, Birgit; Fakra, Sirine C.; Csencsits, Roseann; Wrighton, Kelly C.; Williams, Kenneth H.; Wilkins, Michael J.; Downing, Kenneth H.; Long, Philip E.; Comolli, Luis R.; Banfield, Jillian F.

    2013-02-04

    Iron-reducing bacteria (FeRB) play key roles in anaerobic metal and carbon cycling and carry out biogeochemical transformations that can be harnessed for environmental bioremediation. A subset of FeRB require direct contact with Fe(III) bearing minerals for dissimilatory growth, yet these bacteria must move between mineral particles. Further, they proliferate in planktonic consortia during biostimulation experiments. Thus, a key question is how such organisms can sustain growth under these conditions. Here we characterized planktonic microbial communities sampled from an aquifer in Rifle, Colorado, USA close to the peak of iron reduction following in situ acetate amendment. Samples were cryo-plunged on site and subsequently examined using correlated 2- and 3- dimensional cryogenic transmission electron microscopy (cryo-TEM) and scanning transmission X-ray microscopy (STXM). Most cells had their outer membranes decorated with up to 150 nm diameter aggregates composed of a few nm wide amorphous, Fe-rich nanoparticles. Fluorescent in situ hybridization of lineage-specific probes applied to rRNA of cells subsequently imaged via cryo-TEM identified Geobacter spp., a well studied group of FeRB. STXM results at the Fe L2,3 absorption edges indicate that nanoparticle aggregates contain a variable mixture of Fe(II)-Fe(III), and are generally enriched in Fe(III). Geobacter bemidjiensis cultivated anaerobically in the laboratory on acetate and hydrous ferric oxyhydroxides also accumulated mixed valence nanoparticle aggregates. In field-collected samples, FeRB with a wide variety of morphologies were associated with nano-aggregates, indicating that cell-surface Fe(III) accumulation may be a general mechanism by which FeRB can grow while in planktonic suspension.

  17. Iron-reducing bacteria accumulate ferric oxyhydroxide nanoparticle aggregates that may support planktonic growth

    PubMed Central

    Luef, Birgit; Fakra, Sirine C; Csencsits, Roseann; Wrighton, Kelly C; Williams, Kenneth H; Wilkins, Michael J; Downing, Kenneth H; Long, Philip E; Comolli, Luis R; Banfield, Jillian F

    2013-01-01

    Iron-reducing bacteria (FeRB) play key roles in anaerobic metal and carbon cycling and carry out biogeochemical transformations that can be harnessed for environmental bioremediation. A subset of FeRB require direct contact with Fe(III)-bearing minerals for dissimilatory growth, yet these bacteria must move between mineral particles. Furthermore, they proliferate in planktonic consortia during biostimulation experiments. Thus, a key question is how such organisms can sustain growth under these conditions. Here we characterized planktonic microbial communities sampled from an aquifer in Rifle, Colorado, USA, close to the peak of iron reduction following in situ acetate amendment. Samples were cryo-plunged on site and subsequently examined using correlated two- and three-dimensional cryogenic transmission electron microscopy (cryo-TEM) and scanning transmission X-ray microscopy (STXM). The outer membranes of most cells were decorated with aggregates up to 150 nm in diameter composed of ∼3 nm wide amorphous, Fe-rich nanoparticles. Fluorescent in situ hybridization of lineage-specific probes applied to rRNA of cells subsequently imaged via cryo-TEM identified Geobacter spp., a well-studied group of FeRB. STXM results at the Fe L2,3 absorption edges indicate that nanoparticle aggregates contain a variable mixture of Fe(II)–Fe(III), and are generally enriched in Fe(III). Geobacter bemidjiensis cultivated anaerobically in the laboratory on acetate and hydrous ferric oxyhydroxides also accumulated mixed-valence nanoparticle aggregates. In field-collected samples, FeRB with a wide variety of morphologies were associated with nano-aggregates, indicating that cell surface Fe(III) accumulation may be a general mechanism by which FeRB can grow while in planktonic suspension. PMID:23038172

  18. Glutathione-dependent extracellular ferric reductase activities in dimorphic zoopathogenic fungi

    PubMed Central

    Zarnowski, Robert; Woods, Jon P.

    2009-01-01

    In this study, extracellular glutathione-dependent ferric reductase (GSH-FeR) activities in different dimorphic zoopathogenic fungal species were characterized. Supernatants from Blastomyces dermatitidis, Histoplasma capsulatum, Paracoccidioides brasiliensis and Sporothrix schenckii strains grown in their yeast form were able to reduce iron enzymically with glutathione as a cofactor. Some variations in the level of reduction were noted amongst the strains. This activity was stable in acidic, neutral and slightly alkaline environments and was inhibited when trivalent aluminium and gallium ions were present. Using zymography, single bands of GSH-FeRs with apparent molecular masses varying from 430 to 460 kDa were identified in all strains. The same molecular mass range was determined by size exclusion chromatography. These data demonstrate that dimorphic zoopathogenic fungi produce and secrete a family of similar GSH-FeRs that may be involved in the acquisition and utilization of iron. Siderophore production by these and other fungi has sometimes been considered to provide a full explanation of iron acquisition in these organisms. Our work reveals an additional common mechanism that may be biologically and pathogenically important. Furthermore, while some characteristics of these enzymes such as extracellular location, cofactor utilization and large size are not individually unique, when considered together and shared across a range of fungi, they represent an important novel physiological feature. PMID:16000713

  19. Antioxidant potential of green and black tea determined using the ferric reducing power (FRAP) assay.

    PubMed

    Langley-Evans, S C

    2000-05-01

    Tea is one of the most commonly consumed beverages in the world and is rich in polyphenolic compounds collectively known as the tea flavonoids. Tea flavonoids possess antioxidant properties in vitro and have been proposed as key protective dietary components, reducing risk of coronary heart disease and some cancers. The present study aimed to evaluate the possible effects of different preparation methods on the antioxidant properties of green and black tea. Antioxidant potentials of tea infusates were assessed using an assay based upon the reduction of ferric chloride linked to a chromophore. Green tea, black leaf tea and black tea in tea bags were infused with water at 90 degrees C for time periods ranging from 0.25 to 15 min. Green tea infusates possessed approximately 2.5-fold greater antioxidant capacity than both types of black tea infusates. Both green and black teas released significant levels of antioxidants into the hot water within 2 min of infusion. Preparation of teas across a range of temperatures between 20 and 90 degrees C revealed that although antioxidants were liberated from the leaves into the water in cooler infusions, increasing the temperature could increase antioxidant potential by 4 to 9.5-fold. Black tea prepared using tea bags had significantly lower antioxidant capacity than black leaf tea at temperatures between 20 and 70 degrees C, suggesting that tea bag materials may prevent some extraction of flavonoids into the tea solution. The addition of milk appeared to diminish the antioxidant potential of black tea preparations. This effect was greatest where whole cow's milk was used and appeared to be primarily related to the fat content of the added milk. These experiments have considered the effects of commonly used domestic methods of preparation on the in vitro antioxidant potential of tea. It is concluded that maximum antioxidant capacity and hence maximal health benefit may be derived from green tea or from black leaf tea prepared by

  20. Arsenic Adsorption Equilibrium Concentration and Adsorption Rate of Activated Carbon Coated with Ferric-Aluminum Hydroxides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, M.; Sugita, H.; Oguma, T.; Hara, J.; Takahashi, S.

    2015-12-01

    In some areas of developing countries, ground or well water contaminated with arsenic has been reluctantly used as drinking water. It is highly desirable that effective and inexpensive arsenic removal agents should be developed and provided to reduce the potential health risk. Previous studies demonstrated that activated carbon coated with ferric-aluminum hydroxides (Fe-Al-C) has high adsorptive potential for removal of arsenic. In this study, a series of experiments using Fe-Al-C were carried to discuss adsorption equilibrium time, adsorption equilibrium concentration and adsorption rate of arsenic for Fe-Al-C. Fe-Al-C used in this study was provided by Astec Co., Ltd. Powder reagent of disodium hydrogen arsenate heptahydrate was dissolved into ion-exchanged water. The solution was then further diluted with ion-exchanged water to be 1 and 10 mg/L as arsenic concentration. The pH of the solution was adjusted to be around 7 by adding HCl and/or NaOH. The solution was used as artificial arsenic contaminated water in two types of experiments (arsenic adsorption equilibrium and arsenic adsorption rate tests). The results of the arsenic equilibrium tests were showed that a time period of about 3 days to reach apparent adsorption equilibrium for arsenic. The apparent adsorption equilibrium concentration and adsorbed amount of arsenic on Fe-Al-C adsorbent could be estimated by application of various adsorption isotherms, but the distribution coefficient of arsenic between solid and liquid varies with experimental conditions such as initial concentration of arsenic and addition concentration of adsorbent. An adsorption rate equation that takes into account the reduction in the number of effective adsorption sites on the adsorbent caused by the arsenic adsorption reaction was derived based on the data obtained from the arsenic adsorption rate tests.

  1. High Correlation of 2,2-diphenyl-1-picrylhydrazyl (DPPH) Radical Scavenging, Ferric Reducing Activity Potential and Total Phenolics Content Indicates Redundancy in Use of All Three Assays to Screen for Antioxidant Activity of Extracts of Plants from the Malaysian Rainforest

    PubMed Central

    Clarke, Garry; Ting, Kang Nee; Wiart, Christophe; Fry, Jeffrey

    2013-01-01

    Extracts of plants from the Malaysian rainforest and other fragile habitats are being researched intensively for identification of beneficial biological actions, with assessment of antioxidant behavior being a common component of such assessments. A number of tests for antioxidant behavior are used, with the 2,2-diphenyl-1-picrylhydrazyl (DPPH) and ferric reduction activity potential (FRAP) assays often being used in parallel, and also with measurement of total phenolics content (TPC) as a surrogate marker for antioxidant capacity. The present study investigated the possible redundancy in using all three assays to determine antioxidant capacity in 92 extracts obtained from 27 plants from the Malaysian rainforest. The results demonstrated that the assays displayed a high (R ≥ 0.82) and significant (P < 0.0001) correlation with one another, indicating a high level of redundancy if all three assays are used in parallel. This appears to be a waste of potentially valuable plant extracts. Because of problems with the FRAP assay relating to color interference and variable rates of reaction point, the DPPH assay is the preferred assay in preliminary screening of extracts of plants from the Malaysian rainforest. PMID:26787618

  2. The stability of oxyamphiboles: Existence of Ferric-bearing minerals under the reducing conditions on the surface of Venus

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Straub, Darcy W.; Burns, Roger G.

    1993-01-01

    An enigma of Venusian mineralogy is the suggestion that Fe(3+)-bearing minerals exist under the reducing conditions of the Venusian atmosphere. Analysis of the spectrophotometric data from the Venera 13 and 14 missions, combined with the laboratory reflectance spectral measurements of oxidized basalts at elevated temperatures, led to the suggestion that metastable hematite might exist on Venus. Heating experiments at 475 C when f(sub O2) approximately 10(exp -24) demonstrated that the hematite to magnetite conversion is rapid indicating metastable hematite is not present on Venus. In addition to hematite, several other ferric oxide and silicate minerals have been proposed to occur on Venus, including laihunite or ferrifayalite, Fe(3+)-bearing tephroite, oxyamphiboles, and oxybiotites. Heating experiments performed on these Fe(3+)-bearing minerals under temperature-f(sub O2) conditions existing on Venus suggest that only oxyamphiboles and oxybiotites may be stable on the surface of Venus.

  3. Arsenic sorption onto titanium dioxide, granular ferric hydroxide and activated alumina: batch and dynamic studies.

    PubMed

    Lescano, Maia R; Passalía, Claudio; Zalazar, Cristina S; Brandi, Rodolfo J

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this work was to evaluate and compare the efficiencies of three different adsorbents for arsenic (As) removal from water: titanium dioxide (TiO2), granular ferric hydroxide (GFH) and activated alumina (AA). Equilibrium experiments for dissolved arsenite and arsenate were carried out through batch tests. Freundlich and Langmuir isotherm models were adopted and their parameters were estimated by non-linear regressions. In addition, dynamic experiments were performed in mini fixed bed columns and breakthrough curves were obtained for each combination of sorbate/adsorbent. Experimental results obtained by column assays were compared with predictions of well-known breakthrough models (Bohart-Adams and Clark). Results indicate that As(V) is more easily adsorbed than As(III) for AA and GFH, while TiO2 has a similar behavior for both species. The titanium-based material is the most efficient adsorbent to carry out the process, followed by the GFH. PMID:25723069

  4. The secondary coordination sphere controlled reactivity of a ferric-superoxo heme: unexpected conversion to a ferric hydroperoxo intermediate by reaction with a high-spin ferrous heme.

    PubMed

    Nagaraju, Perumandla; Ohta, Takehiro; Liu, Jin-Gang; Ogura, Takashi; Naruta, Yoshinori

    2016-06-01

    A bio-inspired heme complex involving both a proton donor and an axial imidazole ligand reduces the activation energy for the formation of a ferric hydroperoxo intermediate. A high-spin ferrous heme is shown to be capable of reducing its superoxy species to generate a ferric hydroperoxo intermediate for the first time. PMID:27105471

  5. CIPK23 is involved in iron acquisition of Arabidopsis by affecting ferric chelate reductase activity.

    PubMed

    Tian, Qiuying; Zhang, Xinxin; Yang, An; Wang, Tianzuo; Zhang, Wen-Hao

    2016-05-01

    Iron deficiency is one of the major limiting factors affecting quality and production of crops in calcareous soils. Numerous signaling molecules and transcription factors have been demonstrated to play a regulatory role in adaptation of plants to iron deficiency. However, the mechanisms underlying the iron deficiency-induced physiological processes remain to be fully dissected. Here, we demonstrated that the protein kinase CIPK23 was involved in iron acquisition. Lesion of CIPK23 rendered Arabidopsis mutants hypersensitive to iron deficiency, as evidenced by stronger chlorosis in young leaves and lower iron concentration than wild-type plants under iron-deficient conditions by down-regulating ferric chelate reductase activity. We found that iron deficiency evoked an increase in cytosolic Ca(2+) concentration and the elevated Ca(2+) would bind to CBL1/CBL9, leading to activation of CIPK23. These novel findings highlight the involvement of calcium-dependent CBL-CIPK23 complexes in the regulation of iron acquisition. Moreover, mutation of CIPK23 led to changes in contents of mineral elements, suggesting that CBL-CIPK23 complexes could be as "nutritional sensors" to sense and regulate the mineral homeostasis in Arabisopsis. PMID:26993237

  6. A method for preparing ferric activated carbon composites adsorbents to remove arsenic from drinking water.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Qiao Li; Lin, Y C; Chen, X; Gao, Nai Yun

    2007-09-30

    Iron oxide/activated carbon (FeO/AC) composite adsorbent material, which was used to modify the coal-based activated carbon (AC) 12 x 40, was prepared by the special ferric oxide microcrystal in this study. This composite can be used as the adsorbent to remove arsenic from drinking water, and Langmuir isotherm adsorption equation well describes the experimental adsorption isotherms. Then, the arsenic desorption can subsequently be separated from the medium by using a 1% aqueous NaOH solution. The apparent characters and physical chemistry performances of FeO/AC composite were investigated by X-ray diffraction (XRD), nitrogen adsorption, scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). Batch and column adsorption experiments were carried out to investigate and compare the arsenic removal capability of the prepared FeO/AC composite material and virgin activated carbon. It can be concluded that: (1) the main phase present in this composite are magnetite (Fe(3)O(4)), maghemite (gamma-Fe(2)O(3)), hematite (alpha-Fe(2)O(3)) and goethite (alpha-FeO(OH)); (2) the presence of iron oxides did not significantly affect the surface area or the pore structure of the activated carbon; (3) the comparisons between the adsorption isotherms of arsenic from aqueous solution onto the composite and virgin activated carbon showed that the FeO/AC composite behave an excellent capacity of adsorption arsenic than the virgin activated carbon; (4) column adsorption experiments with FeO/AC composite adsorbent showed that the arsenic could be removed to below 0.01 mg/L within 1250 mL empty bed volume when influent concentration was 0.5mg/L. PMID:17434260

  7. Mechanistic insights into metal ion activation and operator recognition by the ferric uptake regulator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deng, Zengqin; Wang, Qing; Liu, Zhao; Zhang, Manfeng; Machado, Ana Carolina Dantas; Chiu, Tsu-Pei; Feng, Chong; Zhang, Qi; Yu, Lin; Qi, Lei; Zheng, Jiangge; Wang, Xu; Huo, Xinmei; Qi, Xiaoxuan; Li, Xiaorong; Wu, Wei; Rohs, Remo; Li, Ying; Chen, Zhongzhou

    2015-07-01

    Ferric uptake regulator (Fur) plays a key role in the iron homeostasis of prokaryotes, such as bacterial pathogens, but the molecular mechanisms and structural basis of Fur-DNA binding remain incompletely understood. Here, we report high-resolution structures of Magnetospirillum gryphiswaldense MSR-1 Fur in four different states: apo-Fur, holo-Fur, the Fur-feoAB1 operator complex and the Fur-Pseudomonas aeruginosa Fur box complex. Apo-Fur is a transition metal ion-independent dimer whose binding induces profound conformational changes and confers DNA-binding ability. Structural characterization, mutagenesis, biochemistry and in vivo data reveal that Fur recognizes DNA by using a combination of base readout through direct contacts in the major groove and shape readout through recognition of the minor-groove electrostatic potential by lysine. The resulting conformational plasticity enables Fur binding to diverse substrates. Our results provide insights into metal ion activation and substrate recognition by Fur that suggest pathways to engineer magnetotactic bacteria and antipathogenic drugs.

  8. Mechanistic insights into metal ion activation and operator recognition by the ferric uptake regulator

    PubMed Central

    Deng, Zengqin; Wang, Qing; Liu, Zhao; Zhang, Manfeng; Machado, Ana Carolina Dantas; Chiu, Tsu-Pei; Feng, Chong; Zhang, Qi; Yu, Lin; Qi, Lei; Zheng, Jiangge; Wang, Xu; Huo, XinMei; Qi, Xiaoxuan; Li, Xiaorong; Wu, Wei; Rohs, Remo; Li, Ying; Chen, Zhongzhou

    2015-01-01

    Ferric uptake regulator (Fur) plays a key role in the iron homeostasis of prokaryotes, such as bacterial pathogens, but the molecular mechanisms and structural basis of Fur–DNA binding remain incompletely understood. Here, we report high-resolution structures of Magnetospirillum gryphiswaldense MSR-1 Fur in four different states: apo-Fur, holo-Fur, the Fur–feoAB1 operator complex and the Fur–Pseudomonas aeruginosa Fur box complex. Apo-Fur is a transition metal ion-independent dimer whose binding induces profound conformational changes and confers DNA-binding ability. Structural characterization, mutagenesis, biochemistry and in vivo data reveal that Fur recognizes DNA by using a combination of base readout through direct contacts in the major groove and shape readout through recognition of the minor-groove electrostatic potential by lysine. The resulting conformational plasticity enables Fur binding to diverse substrates. Our results provide insights into metal ion activation and substrate recognition by Fur that suggest pathways to engineer magnetotactic bacteria and antipathogenic drugs. PMID:26134419

  9. The Enzyme-mimic Activity of Ferric Nano-Core Residing in Ferritin and Its Biosensing Applications

    SciTech Connect

    Tang, Zhiwen; Wu, Hong J.; Zhang, Youyu; Li, Zhaohui; Lin, Yuehe

    2011-11-15

    Ferritins are nano-scale globular protein cages encapsulating a ferric core. They widely exist in animals, plants, and microbes, playing indispensable roles in iron homeostasis. Interestingly, our study clearly demonstrates that ferritin has an enzyme-mimic activity derived from its ferric nano-core, but not the protein cage. Further study revealed that the mimic-enzyme activity of ferritin is more thermally stable and pH-tolerant compared with horseradish peroxidase. Considering the abundance of ferritin in numerous organisms, this finding may indicate a new role of ferritin in antioxidant and detoxification metabolisms. In addition, as a natural protein-caged nanoparticle with an enzyme-mimic activity, ferritin is readily conjugated with biomolecules to construct nano-biosensors, thus holds promising potential for facile and biocompatible labeling for sensitive and robust bioassays in biomedical applications.

  10. Ferric citrate controls phosphorus and delivers iron in patients on dialysis.

    PubMed

    Lewis, Julia B; Sika, Mohammed; Koury, Mark J; Chuang, Peale; Schulman, Gerald; Smith, Mark T; Whittier, Frederick C; Linfert, Douglas R; Galphin, Claude M; Athreya, Balaji P; Nossuli, A Kaldun Kaldun; Chang, Ingrid J; Blumenthal, Samuel S; Manley, John; Zeig, Steven; Kant, Kotagal S; Olivero, Juan Jose; Greene, Tom; Dwyer, Jamie P

    2015-02-01

    Patients on dialysis require phosphorus binders to prevent hyperphosphatemia and are iron deficient. We studied ferric citrate as a phosphorus binder and iron source. In this sequential, randomized trial, 441 subjects on dialysis were randomized to ferric citrate or active control in a 52-week active control period followed by a 4-week placebo control period, in which subjects on ferric citrate who completed the active control period were rerandomized to ferric citrate or placebo. The primary analysis compared the mean change in phosphorus between ferric citrate and placebo during the placebo control period. A sequential gatekeeping strategy controlled study-wise type 1 error for serum ferritin, transferrin saturation, and intravenous iron and erythropoietin-stimulating agent usage as prespecified secondary outcomes in the active control period. Ferric citrate controlled phosphorus compared with placebo, with a mean treatment difference of -2.2±0.2 mg/dl (mean±SEM) (P<0.001). Active control period phosphorus was similar between ferric citrate and active control, with comparable safety profiles. Subjects on ferric citrate achieved higher mean iron parameters (ferritin=899±488 ng/ml [mean±SD]; transferrin saturation=39%±17%) versus subjects on active control (ferritin=628±367 ng/ml [mean±SD]; transferrin saturation=30%±12%; P<0.001 for both). Subjects on ferric citrate received less intravenous elemental iron (median=12.95 mg/wk ferric citrate; 26.88 mg/wk active control; P<0.001) and less erythropoietin-stimulating agent (median epoetin-equivalent units per week: 5306 units/wk ferric citrate; 6951 units/wk active control; P=0.04). Hemoglobin levels were statistically higher on ferric citrate. Thus, ferric citrate is an efficacious and safe phosphate binder that increases iron stores and reduces intravenous iron and erythropoietin-stimulating agent use while maintaining hemoglobin. PMID:25060056

  11. Ferric Citrate Controls Phosphorus and Delivers Iron in Patients on Dialysis

    PubMed Central

    Sika, Mohammed; Koury, Mark J.; Chuang, Peale; Schulman, Gerald; Smith, Mark T.; Whittier, Frederick C.; Linfert, Douglas R.; Galphin, Claude M.; Athreya, Balaji P.; Nossuli, A. Kaldun Kaldun; Chang, Ingrid J.; Blumenthal, Samuel S.; Manley, John; Zeig, Steven; Kant, Kotagal S.; Olivero, Juan Jose; Greene, Tom; Dwyer, Jamie P.

    2015-01-01

    Patients on dialysis require phosphorus binders to prevent hyperphosphatemia and are iron deficient. We studied ferric citrate as a phosphorus binder and iron source. In this sequential, randomized trial, 441 subjects on dialysis were randomized to ferric citrate or active control in a 52-week active control period followed by a 4-week placebo control period, in which subjects on ferric citrate who completed the active control period were rerandomized to ferric citrate or placebo. The primary analysis compared the mean change in phosphorus between ferric citrate and placebo during the placebo control period. A sequential gatekeeping strategy controlled study-wise type 1 error for serum ferritin, transferrin saturation, and intravenous iron and erythropoietin-stimulating agent usage as prespecified secondary outcomes in the active control period. Ferric citrate controlled phosphorus compared with placebo, with a mean treatment difference of −2.2±0.2 mg/dl (mean±SEM) (P<0.001). Active control period phosphorus was similar between ferric citrate and active control, with comparable safety profiles. Subjects on ferric citrate achieved higher mean iron parameters (ferritin=899±488 ng/ml [mean±SD]; transferrin saturation=39%±17%) versus subjects on active control (ferritin=628±367 ng/ml [mean±SD]; transferrin saturation=30%±12%; P<0.001 for both). Subjects on ferric citrate received less intravenous elemental iron (median=12.95 mg/wk ferric citrate; 26.88 mg/wk active control; P<0.001) and less erythropoietin-stimulating agent (median epoetin-equivalent units per week: 5306 units/wk ferric citrate; 6951 units/wk active control; P=0.04). Hemoglobin levels were statistically higher on ferric citrate. Thus, ferric citrate is an efficacious and safe phosphate binder that increases iron stores and reduces intravenous iron and erythropoietin-stimulating agent use while maintaining hemoglobin. PMID:25060056

  12. Utilization of iron-catecholamine complexes involving ferric reductase activity in Listeria monocytogenes.

    PubMed Central

    Coulanges, V; Andre, P; Ziegler, O; Buchheit, L; Vidon, D J

    1997-01-01

    Listeria monocytogenes is a ubiquitous potentially pathogenic organism requiring iron for growth and virulence. Although it does not produce siderophores, L. monocytogenes is able to obtain iron by using either exogenous siderophores produced by various microorganisms or natural catechol compounds widespread in the environment. In the presence of tropolone, an iron-chelating agent, growth of L. monocytogenes is completely inhibited. However, the growth inhibition can be relieved by the addition of dopamine or norepinephrine under their different isomeric forms, while the catecholamine derivatives 4-hydroxy-3-methoxyphenylglycol and normetanephrine did not relieve the inhibitory effect of tropolone. Preincubation of L. monocytogenes with chlorpromazine and yohimbine did not antagonize the growth-promoting effect of catecholamines in iron-complexed medium. In addition, norepinephrine stimulated the growth-promoting effect induced by human transferrin in iron-limited medium. Furthermore, dopamine and norepinephrine allowed 55Fe uptake by iron-deprived bacterial cells. The uptake of iron was energy dependent, as indicated by inhibition of 55Fe uptake at 0 degrees C as well as by preincubating the bacteria with KCN. Inhibition of 55Fe uptake by L. monocytogenes was also observed in the presence of Pt(II). Moreover, when assessed by a whole-cell ferric reductase assay, reductase activity of L. monocytogenes was inhibited by Pt(II). These data demonstrate that dopamine and norepinephrine can function as siderophore-like compounds in L. monocytogenes owing to their ortho-diphenol function and that catecholamine-mediated iron acquisition does not involve specific catecholamine receptors but acts through a cell-bound ferrireductase activity. PMID:9199450

  13. A universally calibrated microplate ferric reducing antioxidant power (FRAP) assay for foods and applications to Manuka honey.

    PubMed

    Bolanos de la Torre, Amparo Angelica S; Henderson, Terence; Nigam, Poonam Singh; Owusu-Apenten, Richard K

    2015-05-01

    The ferric reducing antioxidant power (FRAP) assay was recently adapted to a microplate format. However, microplate-based FRAP (mFRAP) assays are affected by sample volume and composition. This work describes a calibration process for mFRAP assays which yields data free of volume effects. From the results, the molar absorptivity (ε) for the mFRAP assay was 141,698 M(-1) cm(-1) for gallic acid, 49,328 M(-1) cm(-1) for ascorbic acid, and 21,606 M(-1) cm(-1) for ammonium ferrous sulphate. The significance of ε (M(-1) cm(-1)) is discussed in relation to mFRAP assay sensitivity, minimum detectable concentration, and the dimensionless FRAP-value. Gallic acid showed 6.6 mol of Fe(2+) equivalents compared to 2.3 mol of Fe(+2) equivalents for ascorbic acid. Application of the mFRAP assay to Manuka honey samples (rated 5+, 10+, 15+, and 18+ Unique Manuka Factor; UMF) showed that FRAP values (0.54-0.76 mmol Fe(2+) per 100g honey) were strongly correlated with UMF ratings (R(2)=0.977) and total phenols content (R(2) = 0.982)whilst the UMF rating was correlated with the total phenols (R(2) = 0.999). In conclusion, mFRAP assay results were successfully standardised to yield data corresponding to 1-cm spectrophotometer which is useful for quality assurance purposes. The antioxidant capacity of Manuka honey was found to be directly related to the UMF rating. PMID:25529660

  14. Inhibition of bactericidal and bacteriolytic activities of poly-D-lysine and lysozyme by chitotriose and ferric iron.

    PubMed Central

    Tompkins, G R; O'Neill, M M; Cafarella, T G; Germaine, G R

    1991-01-01

    In a previous report from this laboratory (N. J. Laible and G. R. Germaine, Infect. Immun. 48:720-728, 1985), evidence was presented to suggest that the bactericidal actions of both reduced (i.e., muramidase-inactive) human placental lysozyme and the synthetic cationic homopolymer poly-D-lysine involved the activation of a bacterial endogenous activity that was inhibitable by N,N',N"-triacetylchitotriose (chitotriose). In the present investigation however, we found that the bactericidal and bacteriolytic action of poly-D-lysine could be prevented only by some commercially available chitotriose preparations and not by others. Analysis by physical and chemical methods failed to distinguish protective chitotriose (CTa) and nonprotective chitotriose (CTi) preparations. CTi and CTa preparations displayed equal capacities to competitively inhibit binding of [3H]chitotriose by immobilized lysozyme and were indistinguishable in their abilities to block the lytic activity of lysozyme against Micrococcus lysodeikticus cells. Elemental analysis revealed significantly higher levels of phosphorus, calcium, iron, sodium, manganese, and copper in CTa. Removal of metals from CTa by chelate chromatography completely abolished the poly-D-lysine-protective capacity. Of the metals detected, only ferric iron (5 to 10 microM) mimicked the protective action of CTa. A Fe(III) concentration of 50 microM was required to inhibit lysozyme (5 micrograms/ml). Both Fe(III) and CTa (but not CTi) quantitatively blocked the labeling of poly-D-lysine by fluorescamine, suggesting that the primary amino groups of the lysine residues participate in iron binding. Thus, it appears that the poly-D-lysine-protective capacity of certain chitotriose preparations was due not to the chitotriose itself but to contaminating metal ions which interact directly with the polycationic agent. In contrast, Fe(III) cannot account for inhibition of either the bactericidal or bacteriolytic activity of lysozyme by

  15. Inhibition of bactericidal and bacteriolytic activities of poly-D-lysine and lysozyme by chitotriose and ferric iron.

    PubMed

    Tompkins, G R; O'Neill, M M; Cafarella, T G; Germaine, G R

    1991-02-01

    In a previous report from this laboratory (N. J. Laible and G. R. Germaine, Infect. Immun. 48:720-728, 1985), evidence was presented to suggest that the bactericidal actions of both reduced (i.e., muramidase-inactive) human placental lysozyme and the synthetic cationic homopolymer poly-D-lysine involved the activation of a bacterial endogenous activity that was inhibitable by N,N',N"-triacetylchitotriose (chitotriose). In the present investigation however, we found that the bactericidal and bacteriolytic action of poly-D-lysine could be prevented only by some commercially available chitotriose preparations and not by others. Analysis by physical and chemical methods failed to distinguish protective chitotriose (CTa) and nonprotective chitotriose (CTi) preparations. CTi and CTa preparations displayed equal capacities to competitively inhibit binding of [3H]chitotriose by immobilized lysozyme and were indistinguishable in their abilities to block the lytic activity of lysozyme against Micrococcus lysodeikticus cells. Elemental analysis revealed significantly higher levels of phosphorus, calcium, iron, sodium, manganese, and copper in CTa. Removal of metals from CTa by chelate chromatography completely abolished the poly-D-lysine-protective capacity. Of the metals detected, only ferric iron (5 to 10 microM) mimicked the protective action of CTa. A Fe(III) concentration of 50 microM was required to inhibit lysozyme (5 micrograms/ml). Both Fe(III) and CTa (but not CTi) quantitatively blocked the labeling of poly-D-lysine by fluorescamine, suggesting that the primary amino groups of the lysine residues participate in iron binding. Thus, it appears that the poly-D-lysine-protective capacity of certain chitotriose preparations was due not to the chitotriose itself but to contaminating metal ions which interact directly with the polycationic agent. In contrast, Fe(III) cannot account for inhibition of either the bactericidal or bacteriolytic activity of lysozyme by

  16. Performance evaluation of ALCAN-AASF50-ferric coated activated alumina and granular ferric hydroxide (GFH) for arsenic removal in the presence of competitive ions in an active well :Kirtland field trial - initial studies.

    SciTech Connect

    Neidel, Linnah L.; Krumhansl, James Lee; Siegel, Malcolm Dean; Khandaker, Nadim Reza

    2006-01-01

    This report documents a field trial program carried out at Well No.15 located at Kirtland Air Force Base, Albuquerque, New Mexico, to evaluate the performance of two relatively new arsenic removal media, ALCAN-AASF50 (ferric coated activated alumina) and granular ferric hydroxide (US Filter-GFH). The field trial program showed that both media were able to remove arsenate and meet the new total arsenic maximum contaminant level (MCL) in drinking water of 10 {micro}g/L. The arsenate removal capacity was defined at a breakthrough effluent concentration of 5 {micro}g/L arsenic (50% of the arsenic MCL of 10 {micro}g/L). At an influent pH of 8.1 {+-} 0.4, the arsenate removal capacity of AASF50 was 33.5 mg As(V)/L of dry media (29.9 {micro}g As(V)/g of media on a dry basis). At an influent pH of 7.2 {+-} 0.3, the arsenate removal capacity of GFH was 155 mg As(V)/L of wet media (286 {micro}g As(V)/g of media on a dry basis). Silicate, fluoride, and bicarbonate ions are removed by ALCAN AASF50. Chloride, nitrate, and sulfate ions were not removed by AASF50. The GFH media also removed silicate and bicarbonate ions; however, it did not remove fluoride, chloride, nitrate, and sulfate ions. Differences in the media performance partly reflect the variations in the feed-water pH between the 2 tests. Both the exhausted AASF50 and GFH media passed the Toxicity Characteristic Leaching Procedure (TCLP) test with respect to arsenic and therefore could be disposed as nonhazardous waste.

  17. Sodium Ferric Gluconate Injection

    MedlinePlus

    Sodium ferric gluconate injection is used to treat iron-deficiency anemia (a lower than normal number of ... are also receiving the medication epoetin (Epogen, Procrit). Sodium ferric gluconate injection is in a class of ...

  18. Iron (FeII) Chelation, Ferric Reducing Antioxidant Power, and Immune Modulating Potential of Arisaema jacquemontii (Himalayan Cobra Lily)

    PubMed Central

    Sudan, Rasleen; Bhagat, Madhulika; Singh, Jasvinder; Koul, Anupurna

    2014-01-01

    This study explored the antioxidant and immunomodulatory potential of ethnomedicinally valuable species, namely, Arisaema jacquemontii of north-western Himalayan region. The tubers, leaves, and fruits of this plant were subjected to extraction using different solvents. In vitro antioxidant studies were performed in terms of chelation power on ferrous ions and FRAP assay. The crude methanol extract of leaves was found to harbour better chelating capacity (58% at 100 μg/mL) and reducing power (FRAP value 1085.4 ± 0.11 μMFe3+/g dry wt.) than all the other extracts. The crude methanol extract was thus further partitioned with solvents to yield five fractions. Antioxidant study of fractions suggested that the methanol fraction possessed significant chelation capacity (49.7% at 100 μg/mL) and reducing power with FRAP value of 1435.4 μM/g dry wt. The fractions were also studied for immune modulating potential where it was observed that hexane fraction had significant suppressive effect on mitogen induced T-cell and B-cell proliferation and remarkable stimulating effect on humoral response by 141% and on DTH response by 168% in immune suppressed mice as compared to the controls. Therefore, it can be concluded that A. jacquemontii leaves hold considerable antioxidant and immunomodulating potential and they can be explored further for the identification of their chemical composition for a better understanding of their biological activities. PMID:24895548

  19. Efficacy of a low-dose ferric-EDTA in reducing iron deficiency anaemia among underfive children living in malaria-holoendemic district of Mvomero, Tanzania.

    PubMed

    Mosha, Theobald C E; Laswai, Henry H; Assey, John; Bennink, Maurice R

    2014-04-01

    Iron deficiency anaemia is a public health problem in Tanzania especially among children under the age of five years. In malaria holoendemic areas, control of anaemia by supplementation with iron has been reported to increase serious adverse events. The World Health Organization recommends that, programs to control anaemia in such areas should go concurrently with malaria control programmes. The objectives of the study were to: (i) to determine if a supplement providing 2.5 mg of iron as ferric EDTA and 2.5 mg of iron as ferrous lactate (low dose) is as effective in correcting anaemia as a supplement providing the standard 10 mg of iron as ferrous lactate (high dose); and ii) determine if iron supplementation increased the risk of malaria. This study was carried out in Mvomero District of east-central Tanzania. Two groups (69 and 70 subjects per treatment) of moderately anaemic children (7.0-9.1 g of Hb/dl), received one of the two micronutrient supplements differing only in iron content for a period of 60 days. Results showed that, the average haemoglobin (Hb) concentration improved from 8.30 ± 0.60 g/dl to 11.08 ± 1.25 g/dl. The average weight-for-age for all children increased from 16.0 to 20.6% while their weight-for-height increased from 4.0 to 13.3%. The incidence of asymptomatic and symptomatic malaria ranged from 10.0 to 10.4% at all time points with no apparent increase in malaria severity due to iron supplementation. Overall, there was a significant reduction in anaemia during the 60 day supplementation period. This study demonstrated that, micronutrient supplements containing low-dose ferric-EDTA is just as effective as the high dose iron in reducing anaemia and can be safely utilized in malaria holoendemic areas to control iron deficiency anaemia. It is recommended that, a large study should be conducted to affirm the effectiveness of the low-dose ferric-EDTA in controlling iron deficiency anaemia among underfive children. PMID:26875300

  20. Activation energy for a model ferrous-ferric half reaction from transition path sampling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Drechsel-Grau, Christof; Sprik, Michiel

    2012-01-01

    Activation parameters for the model oxidation half reaction of the classical aqueous ferrous ion are compared for different molecular simulation techniques. In particular, activation free energies are obtained from umbrella integration and Marcus theory based thermodynamic integration, which rely on the diabatic gap as the reaction coordinate. The latter method also assumes linear response, and both methods obtain the activation entropy and the activation energy from the temperature dependence of the activation free energy. In contrast, transition path sampling does not require knowledge of the reaction coordinate and directly yields the activation energy [C. Dellago and P. G. Bolhuis, Mol. Simul. 30, 795 (2004), 10.1080/08927020412331294869]. Benchmark activation energies from transition path sampling agree within statistical uncertainty with activation energies obtained from standard techniques requiring knowledge of the reaction coordinate. In addition, it is found that the activation energy for this model system is significantly smaller than the activation free energy for the Marcus model, approximately half the value, implying an equally large entropy contribution.

  1. Isolation and identification of ferric reducing bacteria and evaluation of their roles in iron availability in two calcareous soils

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghorbanzadeh, N.; Lakzian, A.; Haghnia, G. H.; Karimi, A. R.

    2014-12-01

    Iron is an essential element for all organisms which plays a crucial role in important biochemical processes such as respiration and photosynthesis. Iron deficiency seems to be an important problem in many calcareous soils. Biological dissimilatory Fe(III) reduction increases iron availability through reduction of Fe(III) to Fe(II). The aim of this study was to isolate, identify and evaluate some bacterial isolates for their abilities to reduce Fe(III) in two calcareous soils. Three bacterial isolates were selected and identified from paddy soils by using 16S rRNA amplification and then inoculated to sterilized and non-sterilized calcareous soils in the presence and absence of glucose. The results showed that all isolates belonged to Bacillus genus and were capable of reducing Fe(III) to Fe(II) in vitro condition. The amount of Fe(III) reduction in sterilized calcareous soils was significantly higher when inoculated with PS23 isolate and Shewanella putrefaciens ( S. putrefaciens) (as positive control) compared to PS16 and PS11 isolates. No significant difference was observed between PS11 and PS16 isolates in the presence of indigenous microbial community. The results also revealed that glucose had a significant effect on Fe(III) reduction in the examined calcareous soil samples. The amount of Fe(III) reduction increased two-fold when soil samples were treated with glucose and inoculated by S. putrefaciens and PS23 in non-sterilized soils.

  2. Methane-induced Activation Mechanism of Fused Ferric Oxide-Alumina Catalysts during Methane Decomposition.

    PubMed

    Reddy Enakonda, Linga; Zhou, Lu; Saih, Youssef; Ould-Chikh, Samy; Lopatin, Sergei; Gary, Daniel; Del-Gallo, Pascal; Basset, Jean-Marie

    2016-08-01

    Activation of Fe2 O3 -Al2 O3 with CH4 (instead of H2 ) is a meaningful method to achieve catalytic methane decomposition (CMD). This reaction of CMD is more economic and simple against commercial methane steam reforming (MSR) as it produces COx -free H2 . In this study, for the first time, structure changes of the catalyst were screened during CH4 reduction with time on stream. The aim was to optimize the pretreatment conditions through understanding the activation mechanism. Based on results from various characterization techniques, reduction of Fe2 O3 by CH4 proceeds in three steps: Fe2 O3 →Fe3 O4 →FeO→Fe0. Once Fe0 is formed, it decomposes CH4 with formation of Fe3 C, which is the crucial initiation step in the CMD process to initiate formation of multiwall carbon nanotubes. PMID:27345621

  3. Microglial activation, recruitment and phagocytosis as linked phenomena in ferric oxide nanoparticle exposure.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yun; Wang, Bing; Zhu, Mo-Tao; Li, Ming; Wang, Hua-Jian; Wang, Meng; Ouyang, Hong; Chai, Zhi-Fang; Feng, Wei-Yue; Zhao, Yu-Liang

    2011-08-10

    Microglia as the resident macrophage-like cells in the central nervous system (CNS) play a pivotal role in the innate immune responses of CNS. Understanding the reactions of microglia cells to nanoparticle exposure is important in the exploration of neurobiology of nanoparticles. Here we provide a systemic mapping of microglia and the corresponding pathological changes in olfactory-transport related brain areas of mice with Fe(2)O(3)-nanoparticle intranasal treatment. We showed that intranasal exposure of Fe(2)O(3) nanoparticle could lead to pathological alteration in olfactory bulb, hippocampus and striatum, and caused microglial proliferation, activation and recruitment in these areas, especially in olfactory bulb. Further experiments with BV2 microglial cells showed the exposure to Fe(2)O(3) nanoparticles could induce cells proliferation, phagocytosis and generation of ROS and NO, but did not cause significant release of inflammatory factors, including IL-1β, IL-6 and TNF-α. Our results indicate that microglial activation may act as an alarm and defense system in the processes of the exogenous nanoparticles invading and storage in brain. PMID:21596115

  4. High-spin ferric ions in Saccharomyces cerevisiae vacuoles are reduced to the ferrous state during adenine-precursor detoxification.

    PubMed

    Park, Jinkyu; McCormick, Sean P; Cockrell, Allison L; Chakrabarti, Mrinmoy; Lindahl, Paul A

    2014-06-24

    The majority of Fe in Fe-replete yeast cells is located in vacuoles. These acidic organelles store Fe for use under Fe-deficient conditions and they sequester it from other parts of the cell to avoid Fe-associated toxicity. Vacuolar Fe is predominantly in the form of one or more magnetically isolated nonheme high-spin (NHHS) Fe(III) complexes with polyphosphate-related ligands. Some Fe(III) oxyhydroxide nanoparticles may also be present in these organelles, perhaps in equilibrium with the NHHS Fe(III). Little is known regarding the chemical properties of vacuolar Fe. When grown on adenine-deficient medium (A↓), ADE2Δ strains of yeast such as W303 produce a toxic intermediate in the adenine biosynthetic pathway. This intermediate is conjugated with glutathione and shuttled into the vacuole for detoxification. The iron content of A↓ W303 cells was determined by Mössbauer and EPR spectroscopies. As they transitioned from exponential growth to stationary state, A↓ cells (supplemented with 40 μM Fe(III) citrate) accumulated two major NHHS Fe(II) species as the vacuolar NHHS Fe(III) species declined. This is evidence that vacuoles in A↓ cells are more reducing than those in adenine-sufficient cells. A↓ cells suffered less oxidative stress despite the abundance of NHHS Fe(II) complexes; such species typically promote Fenton chemistry. Most Fe in cells grown for 5 days with extra yeast-nitrogen-base, amino acids and bases in minimal medium was HS Fe(III) with insignificant amounts of nanoparticles. The vacuoles of these cells might be more acidic than normal and can accommodate high concentrations of HS Fe(III) species. Glucose levels and rapamycin (affecting the TOR system) affected cellular Fe content. This study illustrates the sensitivity of cellular Fe to changes in metabolism, redox state and pH. Such effects broaden our understanding of how Fe and overall cellular metabolism are integrated. PMID:24919141

  5. Ferric Reducing Antioxidant Power and Square Wave Voltammetry for Assay of Low Molecular Weight Antioxidants in Blood Plasma: Performance and Comparison of Methods

    PubMed Central

    Pohanka, Miroslav; Bandouchova, Hana; Sobotka, Jakub; Sedlackova, Jana; Soukupova, Ivana; Pikula, Jiri

    2009-01-01

    The purpose of the present study was to employ two methods—square wave voltammetry (SWV) performed on screen printed sensors and ferric reducing antioxidant power (FRAP)—as suitable tools for the assay of low-molecular-weight antioxidants (LMWAs). LMWAs were assayed by both methods and the resulting data were statistically compared. Plasma samples from five Cinereous vultures accidentally intoxicated with lead were used to represent real biological matrices with different levels of LMWAs. Blood was collected from the birds prior to and one month after treatment with Ca-EDTA. SWV resulted in two peaks. The first peak, with the potential value of 466 ± 15 mV, was recognized as ascorbic and uric acids, while the second one (743 ± 30 mV) represented glutathione, tocopherol, ascorbic acid and in a minor effect by uric acid, too. Contribution of individual antioxidants was recognized by separate assays of LMWA standards. Correlation between peaks 1 and 2 as well as the sum of the two peaks and FRAP was analysed. While peak 1 and the sum of peaks were in close correlation to FRAP results (correlation coefficient of 0.97), the relation between peak 2 and FRAP may be expressed using a correlation coefficient of 0.64. The determination of thiols by the Ellman assay confirmed the accuracy of SWV. Levels of glutathione and other similar structures were stable in the chosen model and it may be concluded that SWV is appropriate for assay of LMWAs in plasma samples. The methods employed in the study were advantageous in minimal sample volume consumption and fast acquisition of results. PMID:22291555

  6. Ferric sulfates on Mars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Burns, Roger G.

    1987-01-01

    Evidence is presented for the possible existence of ferric sulfato complexes and hydroxo ferric sulfate minerals in the permafrost of Mars. A sequential combination of ten unique conditions during the cooling history of Mars is suggested which is believed to have generated an environment within Martian permafrost that has stabilized Fe(3+)-SO4(2-)-bearing species. It is argued that minerals belonging to the jarosite and copiapite groups could be present in Martian regolith analyzed in the Viking XRF measurements at Chryse and Utopia, and that maghemite suspected to be coating the Viking magnet arrays is a hydrolysate of dissolved ferric sulfato complexes from exposed Martian permafrost.

  7. Ferric Carboxymaltose Injection

    MedlinePlus

    ... on dialysis. Ferric carboxymaltose injection is in a class of medications called iron replacement products. It works ... rapid, weak pulse; chest pain; or loss of consciousness. If you experience a severe reaction, your doctor ...

  8. Ferric Iron Reduction by Acidophilic Heterotrophic Bacteria

    PubMed Central

    Johnson, D. Barrie; McGinness, Stephen

    1991-01-01

    Fifty mesophilic and five moderately thermophilic strains of acidophilic heterotrophic bacteria were tested for the ability to reduce ferric iron in liquid and solid media under aerobic conditions; about 40% of the mesophiles (but none of the moderate thermophiles) displayed at least some capacity to reduce iron. Both rates and extents of ferric iron reduction were highly strain dependent. No acidophilic heterotroph reduced nitrate or sulfate, and (limited) reduction of manganese(IV) was noted in only one strain (Acidiphilium facilis), an acidophile which did not reduce iron. Insoluble forms of ferric iron, both amorphous and crystalline, were reduced, as well as soluble iron. There was evidence that, in at least some acidophilic heterotrophs, iron reduction was enzymically mediated and that ferric iron could act as a terminal electron acceptor. In anaerobically incubated cultures, bacterial biomass increased with increasing concentrations of ferric but not ferrous iron. Mixed cultures of Thiobacillus ferrooxidans or Leptospirillum ferrooxidans and an acidophilic heterotroph (SJH) produced sequences of iron cycling in ferrous iron-glucose media. PMID:16348395

  9. Ferric iron reduction by sulfur- and iron-oxidizing bacteria.

    PubMed Central

    Brock, T D; Gustafson, J

    1976-01-01

    Acidophilic bacteria of the genera Thiobacillus and Sulfolobus are able to reduce ferric iron when growing on elemental sulfur as an energy source. It has been previously thought that ferric iron serves as a nonbiological oxidant in the formation of acid mine drainage and in the leaching of ores, but these results suggest that bacterial catalysis may play a significant role in the reactivity of ferric iron. PMID:825043

  10. Ferric Tourmaline from Mexico.

    PubMed

    Mason, B; Donnay, G; Hardie, L A

    1964-04-01

    Dark brown crystals, up to 10 mm long, occur in rhyolite at Mexquitic, San Luis Potosi, Mexico. They are short prismatic, showing {1120}, {3030}, {1011}, {0221}, with c/a 0.4521, measured with a goniometer, and distinct {1120} cleavage. With an unusual combination of cell dimensions, high density, high refractive indices, and extreme birefringence, this tourmaline falls outside the known elbaite-schorl and schorl-dravite series. A chemical analysis, recalculated on the basis of cell volume and density, gives close to the theoretical 150 atoms per cell, whether the iron is ferrous or ferric, but the physical properties indicate a ferric tourmaline. PMID:17729799

  11. Heterogeneous catalytic ozonation of biologically pretreated Lurgi coal gasification wastewater using sewage sludge based activated carbon supported manganese and ferric oxides as catalysts.

    PubMed

    Zhuang, Haifeng; Han, Hongjun; Hou, Baolin; Jia, Shengyong; Zhao, Qian

    2014-08-01

    Sewage sludge of biological wastewater treatment plant was converted into sewage sludge based activated carbon (SBAC) with ZnCl₂ as activation agent, which supported manganese and ferric oxides as catalysts (including SBAC) to improve the performance of ozonation of real biologically pretreated Lurgi coal gasification wastewater. The results indicated catalytic ozonation with the prepared catalysts significantly enhanced performance of pollutants removal and the treated wastewater was more biodegradable and less toxic than that in ozonation alone. On the basis of positive effect of higher pH and significant inhibition of radical scavengers in catalytic ozonation, it was deduced that the enhancement of catalytic activity was responsible for generating hydroxyl radicals and the possible reaction pathway was proposed. Moreover, the prepared catalysts showed superior stability and most of toxic and refractory compounds were eliminated at successive catalytic ozonation runs. Thus, the process with economical, efficient and sustainable advantages was beneficial to engineering application. PMID:24907577

  12. 21 CFR 184.1301 - Ferric phosphate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... ferric chloride or ferric citrate. (b) The ingredient meets the specifications of the Food Chemicals... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Ferric phosphate. 184.1301 Section 184.1301 Food... GRAS § 184.1301 Ferric phosphate. (a) Ferric phosphate (ferric orthophosphate, iron (III) phosphate,...

  13. 21 CFR 73.1025 - Ferric ammonium citrate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... COLOR ADDITIVES EXEMPT FROM CERTIFICATION Drugs § 73.1025 Ferric ammonium citrate. (a) Identity. The... green forms, are deliquescent in air, and are reducible by light. (b) Specifications. Ferric ammonium... from certification. Certification of this color additive is not necessary for the protection of...

  14. 21 CFR 73.1025 - Ferric ammonium citrate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... COLOR ADDITIVES EXEMPT FROM CERTIFICATION Drugs § 73.1025 Ferric ammonium citrate. (a) Identity. The... green forms, are deliquescent in air, and are reducible by light. (b) Specifications. Ferric ammonium... from certification. Certification of this color additive is not necessary for the protection of...

  15. 21 CFR 73.1025 - Ferric ammonium citrate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... COLOR ADDITIVES EXEMPT FROM CERTIFICATION Drugs § 73.1025 Ferric ammonium citrate. (a) Identity. The... green forms, are deliquescent in air, and are reducible by light. (b) Specifications. Ferric ammonium... from certification. Certification of this color additive is not necessary for the protection of...

  16. Addition of citrate to Acidithiobacillus ferrooxidans cultures enables precipitate-free growth at elevated pH and reduces ferric inhibition.

    PubMed

    Li, Xiaozheng; Mercado, Roel; Kernan, Timothy; West, Alan C; Banta, Scott

    2014-10-01

    Acidithiobacillus ferrooxidans is an acidophilic chemolithoautotroph that is important in biomining and other biotechnological operations. The cells are able to oxidize inorganic iron, but the insolubility and product inhibition by Fe(3+) complicates characterization of these cultures. Here we explore the growth kinetics of A. ferrooxidans in iron-based medium in a pH range from 1.6 to 2.2. It was found that as the pH was increased from 1.6 to 2.0, the maintenance coefficient decreased while both the growth kinetics and maximum cell yield increased in the precipitate-free, low Fe(2+) concentration medium. In higher iron media a similar trend was observed at low pH, but the formation of precipitates at higher pH (2.0) hampered cell growth and lowered the specific growth rate and maximum cell yield. In order to eliminate ferric precipitates, chelating agents were introduced into the medium. Citric acid was found to be relatively non-toxic and did not appear to interfere with iron oxidation at a maximum concentration of 70 mM. Inclusion of citric acid prevented precipitation and A. ferrooxidans growth parameters resumed their trends as a function of pH. The addition of citrate also decreased the apparent substrate saturation constant (KS ) indicating a reduction in the competitive inhibition of growth by ferric ions. These results indicate that continuous cultures of A. ferrooxidans in the presence of citrate at elevated pH will enable enhanced cell yields and productivities. This will be critical as these cells are used in the development of new biotechnological applications such as electrofuel production. PMID:24771134

  17. Enhanced photocatalytic activity of sprayed Au doped ferric oxide thin films for salicylic acid degradation in aqueous medium.

    PubMed

    Mahadik, M A; Shinde, S S; Kumbhar, S S; Pathan, H M; Rajpure, K Y; Bhosale, C H

    2015-01-01

    Various doping percentage of Au were successfully introduced into the Fe2O3 photocatalysts via a spray pyrolysis method different. The effect of Au doping on photoelectrochemical, structural, optical and morphological properties of these deposited thin films is studied. The PEC characterization shows that, the photocurrent increases gradually with increasing Au content initially up to 2at.% indicating the maximum values of short circuit current (Isc) and open circuit voltage (Voc) are (Isc=90μA and Voc=220.5mV) and then decreases after exceeding the optimal Au doping content. Therefore, the photocurrent of Au doped Fe2O3 photocatalysts can be adjusted by the Au content. Deposited films are polycrystalline with a rhombohedral crystal structure having (104) preferred orientation. SEM and AFM images show deposited thin films are compact and uniform. The photocatalytic activities of the Fe2O3 and Au:Fe2O3 photocatalyst were evaluated by photoelectrocatalytic degradation of salicylic acid under sunlight irradiation. The results show that the Au:Fe2O3 thin film photocatalyst exhibited about 45% more degradation of pollutants than the pure Fe2O3. Thus, in Au doped Fe2O3 photocatalysts, the interaction between Au and Fe2O3 reduces the recombination of photogenerated charge carriers and improve the photocatalytic activity. PMID:25496876

  18. Protein-mediated adhesion of the dissimilatory Fe(III)-reducing bacterium Shewanella alga BrY to hydrous ferric oxide

    SciTech Connect

    Caccavo, F. Jr.

    1999-11-01

    The rate and extent of bacterial Fe(III) mineral reduction are governed by molecular-scale interactions between the bacterial cell surface and the mineral surface. These interactions are poorly understood. This study examined the role of surface proteins in the adhesion of Shewanella alga BrY to hydrous ferric oxide (HFO). Enzymatic degradation of cell surface polysaccharides had no effect on cell adhesion to HFO. The proteolytic enzymes Streptomyces griseus protease and chymotrypsin inhibited the adhesion of S. alga BrY cells to HFO through catalytic degradation of surface proteins. Trypsin inhibited S. alga BrY adhesion solely through surface-coating effects. Protease and chymotrypsin also mediated desorption of adhered S. alga BrY cells from HFO while trypsin did not mediate cell desorption. Protease removed a single peptide band that represented a protein with an apparent molecular mass of 50 kDa. Chymotrypsin removed two peptide bands that represented proteins with apparent molecular masses of 60 and 31 kDa. These proteins represent putative HGO adhesion molecules. A. alga BrY adhesion was inhibited by up to 46% when cells were cultured at sub-MICs of chloramphenicol, suggesting that protein synthesis is necessary for adhesion. Proteins extracted from the surface of S. alga BrY cells inhibited adhesion to HFO by up to 41%. A number of these proteins bound specifically to HFO, suggesting that a complex system of surface proteins mediates S. alga BrY adhesion to HFO.

  19. 21 CFR 184.1301 - Ferric phosphate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... reaction of sodium phosphate with ferric chloride or ferric citrate. (b) The ingredient meets the... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Ferric phosphate. 184.1301 Section 184.1301 Food... Specific Substances Affirmed as GRAS § 184.1301 Ferric phosphate. (a) Ferric phosphate...

  20. 21 CFR 184.1301 - Ferric phosphate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... reaction of sodium phosphate with ferric chloride or ferric citrate. (b) The ingredient meets the... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Ferric phosphate. 184.1301 Section 184.1301 Food... Specific Substances Affirmed as GRAS § 184.1301 Ferric phosphate. (a) Ferric phosphate...

  1. Variations of organic matters and microbial community in thermophilic anaerobic digestion of waste activated sludge with the addition of ferric salts.

    PubMed

    Yu, Bao; Lou, Ziyang; Zhang, Dongling; Shan, Aidang; Yuan, Haiping; Zhu, Nanwen; Zhang, Kanghan

    2015-03-01

    Ferric salts will influence the thermophilic anaerobic digestion of waste activated sludge (WAS). FeCl3 was found to contribute to the anaerobic digestion process with a cumulative biogas production of 357 mL/gVS, 79.6% higher than that in the control group, and Fe2(SO4)3 had no distinct impact, while Fe(NO3)3 inhibited the methanogenesis process. A favorable balance between the release of organic matters from WAS and consumption rate was established after dosing FeCl3 from the perspective of variations of soluble COD, volatile fatty acids (VFAs) and the dissolved organic matters (DOM) assessed by EEM fluorescence spectroscopy and fluorescence regional integration (FRI) technique. Conversely, the system with Fe(NO3)3 achieved an unsuitable substrates environment. Pyrosequencing revealed that the anaerobic digestion system with FeCl3 enriched Coprothermobacter for proteins fermentation and Methanosarcina for methanogenesis with the values of 18.7% and 63.2%, respectively, while that with the supplementation of Fe(NO3)3 obtained the lowest relative abundance. PMID:25545098

  2. Understanding Arsenate Reaction Kinetics with Ferric Hydroxides

    PubMed Central

    Farrell, James; Chaudhary, Binod K.

    2015-01-01

    Understanding arsenic reactions with ferric hydroxides is important in understanding arsenic transport in the environment and in designing systems for removing arsenic from potable water. Many experimental studies have shown that the kinetics of arsenic adsorption on ferric hydroxides is biphasic, where a fraction of the arsenic adsorption occurs on a time scale of seconds while full equilibrium may require weeks to attain. This research employed density functional theory modeling in order to understand the mechanisms contributing to biphasic arsenic adsorption kinetics. The reaction energies and activation barriers for three modes of arsenate adsorption to ferric hydroxides were calculated. Gibbs free energies of reaction depended on the net charge of the complexes, which is a function of the system pH value. Physical adsorption of arsenate to ferric hydroxide proceeded with no activation barrier, with Gibbs free energies of reaction ranging from −21 to −58 kJ/mol. The highest Gibbs free energies of reaction for physical adsorption resulted from negative charge assisted hydrogen bonding between H atoms on the ferric hydroxide and O atoms in arsenate. The conversion of physically adsorbed arsenate into monodentate surface complexes had Gibbs free energies of activation ranging from 62 to 73 kJ/mol, and Gibbs free energies of reaction ranging from −23 to −38 kJ/mol. The conversion of monodentate surface complexes to bidentate, binuclear complexes had Gibbs free energies of activation ranging from 79 to 112 kJ/mol, and Gibbs free energies of reaction ranging from −11 to −55 kJ/mol. For release of arsenate from uncharged bidentate complexes, energies of activation as high as 167 kJ/mol were encountered. Increasingly negative charges on the complexes lowered the activation barriers for desorption of arsenate, and in complexes with −2 charges, the highest activation barrier was 65 kJ/mol. This study shows that the slow kinetics associated with arsenic

  3. INFLUENCE OF RHIZOSPHERE PH ON WHOLE-ROOT FERRIC REDUCTASE ACTIVITY IN DIVERSE ACCESSIONS OF PHASEOLUS VULGARIS

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    In alkaline and calcareous soils, iron (Fe) availability to plants is greatly reduced. Under these conditions, plants frequently exhibit Fe-deficiency induced chlorosis, which inhibits plant productivity and ultimately seed Fe concentration. To address the question of how diverse accessions would ...

  4. Two distinctly regulated genes are required for ferric reduction, the first step of iron uptake in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed Central

    Georgatsou, E; Alexandraki, D

    1994-01-01

    Iron uptake in Saccharomyces cerevisiae involves at least two steps: reduction of ferric to ferrous ions extracellularly and transport of the reduced ions through the plasma membrane. We have cloned and molecularly characterized FRE2, a gene which is shown to account, together with FRE1, for the total membrane-associated ferric reductase activity of the cell. Although not similar at the nucleotide level, the two genes encode proteins with significantly similar primary structures and very similar hydrophobicity profiles. The FRE1 and FRE2 proteins are functionally related, having comparable properties as ferric reductases. FRE2 expression, like FRE1 expression, is induced by iron deprivation, and at least part of this control takes place at the transcriptional level, since 156 nucleotides upstream of the initiator AUG conferred iron-dependent regulation when fused to a heterologous gene. However, the two gene products have distinct temporal regulation of their activities during cell growth. Images PMID:8164662

  5. Combined Hydrous Ferric Oxide and Quaternary Ammonium Surfactant Tailoring of Granular Activated Carbon for Concurrent Arsenate and Perchlorate Removal

    SciTech Connect

    Jang, M.; Cannon, F; Parette, R; Yoon, S; Chen, W

    2009-01-01

    Activated carbon was tailored with both iron and quaternary ammonium surfactants so as to concurrently remove both arsenate and perchlorate from groundwater. The iron (hydr)oxide preferentially removed the arsenate oxyanion but not perchlorate; while the quaternary ammonium preferentially removed the perchlorate oxyanion, but not the arsenate. The co-sorption of two anionic oxyanions via distinct mechanisms has yielded intriguing phenomena. Rapid small-scale column tests (RSSCTs) with these dually prepared media employed synthetic waters that were concurrently spiked with arsenate and perchlorate; and these trial results showed that the quaternary ammonium surfactants enhanced arsenate removal bed life by 25-50% when compared to activated carbon media that had been preloaded merely with iron (hydr)oxide; and the surfactant also enhanced the diffusion rate of arsenate per the Donnan effect. The authors also employed natural groundwater from Rutland, MA which contained 60 microg/L As and traces of silica, and sulfate; and the authors spiked this with 40 microg/L perchlorate. When processing this water, activated carbon that had been tailored with iron and cationic surfactant could treat 12,500 bed volumes before 10 microg/L arsenic breakthrough, and 4500 bed volumes before 6 microg/L perchlorate breakthrough. Although the quaternary ammonium surfactants exhibited only a slight capacity for removing arsenate, these surfactants did facilitate a more favorably positively charged avenue for the arsenate to diffuse through the media to the iron sorption site (i.e. via the Donnan effect).

  6. Potential Role for Extracellular Glutathione-Dependent Ferric Reductase in Utilization of Environmental and Host Ferric Compounds by Histoplasma capsulatum

    PubMed Central

    Timmerman, Michelle M.; Woods, Jon P.

    2001-01-01

    The mammalian host specifically limits iron during Histoplasma capsulatum infection, and fungal acquisition of iron is essential for productive infection. H. capsulatum expresses several iron acquisition mechanisms under iron-limited conditions in vitro. These components include hydroxamate siderophores, extracellular glutathione-dependent ferric reductase enzyme, extracellular nonproteinaceous ferric reductant(s), and cell surface ferric reducing agent(s). We examined the relationship between these mechanisms and a potential role for the extracellular ferric reductase in utilization of environmental and host ferric compounds through the production of free, soluble Fe(II). Siderophores and ferric reducing agents were coproduced under conditions of iron limitation. The H. capsulatum siderophore dimerum acid and the structurally similar basidiomycete siderophore rhodotorulic acid acted as substrates for the ferric reductase, and rhodotorulic acid removed Fe(III) bound by transferrin. The mammalian Fe(III)-binding compounds hemin and transferrin served both as substrates for the ferric reductase and as iron sources for yeast-phase growth at neutral pH. In the case of transferrin, there was a correlation between the level of iron saturation and efficacy for both of these functions. Our data are not consistent with an entirely pH-dependent mechanism of iron acquisition from transferrin, as has been suggested to occur in the macrophage phagolysosome. The foreign siderophore ferrioxamine B also acted as a substrate for the ferric reductase, while the foreign siderophore ferrichrome did not. Both ferrioxamine and ferrichrome served as iron sources for yeast- and mold-phase growth, the latter presumably by some other acquisition mechanism(s). PMID:11705947

  7. Photocatalytic activity of ferric oxide/titanium dioxide nanocomposite films on stainless steel fabricated by anodization and ion implantation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhan, Wei-ting; Ni, Hong-wei; Chen, Rong-sheng; Yue, Gao; Tai, Jun-kai; Wang, Zi-yang

    2013-08-01

    A simple surface treatment was used to develop photocatalytic activity for stainless steel. AISI 304 stainless steel specimens after anodization were implanted by Ti ions at an extracting voltage of 50 kV with an implantation dose of 3 × 1015 atoms·cm-2 and then annealed in air at 450°C for 2 h. The morphology was observed by scanning electron microscopy. The microstructure was characterized by X-ray diffraction and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. The photocatalytic degradation of methylene blue solution was carried out under ultraviolet light. The corrosion resistance of the stainless steel was evaluated in NaCl solution (3.5 wt%) by electrochemical polarization curves. It is found that the Ti ions depth profile resembles a Gaussian distribution in the implanted layer. The nanostructured Fe2O3/TiO2 composite film exhibits a remarkable enhancement in photocatalytic activity referenced to the mechanically polished specimen and anodized specimen. Meanwhile, the annealed Ti-implanted specimen remains good corrosion resistance.

  8. 21 CFR 184.1297 - Ferric chloride.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Ferric chloride. 184.1297 Section 184.1297 Food... GRAS § 184.1297 Ferric chloride. (a) Ferric chloride (iron (III) chloride, FeC13, CAS Reg. No. 7705-08-0) may be prepared from iron and chlorine or from ferric oxide and hydrogen chloride. The...

  9. 21 CFR 184.1297 - Ferric chloride.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Ferric chloride. 184.1297 Section 184.1297 Food... Specific Substances Affirmed as GRAS § 184.1297 Ferric chloride. (a) Ferric chloride (iron (III) chloride... hydrogen chloride. The pure material occurs as hydroscopic, hexagonal, dark crystals. Ferric...

  10. 21 CFR 184.1297 - Ferric chloride.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Ferric chloride. 184.1297 Section 184.1297 Food... Specific Substances Affirmed as GRAS § 184.1297 Ferric chloride. (a) Ferric chloride (iron (III) chloride... hydrogen chloride. The pure material occurs as hydroscopic, hexagonal, dark crystals. Ferric...

  11. The dissolution of galena in ferric chloride media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dutrizac, J. E.

    1986-01-01

    The dissolution of galena (PbS) in ferric chloride-hydrochloric acid media has been investigated over the temperature range 28 to 95 °C and for alkali chloride concentrations from 0 to 4.0 M. Rapid parabolic kinetics were observed under all conditions, together with predominantly (>95 pet) elemental sulfur formation. The leaching rate decreased slightly with increasing FeCl3 concentrations in the range 0.1 to 2.0 M, and was essentially independent of the concentration of the FeCl2 reaction product. The rate was relatively insensitive to HCl concentrations <3.0 M, but increased systematically with increasing concentrations of alkali or alkaline earth chlorides. Most significantly, the leaching rate decreased sharply and linearly with increasing initial concentrations of PbCl2 in the ferric chloride leaching media containing either 0.0 or 3.0 M NaCl. Although the apparent activation energy was in the range 40 to 45 kJ/mol (˜10 kcal/mol), this value was reduced to 16 kJ/mol (3.5 kcal/mol) when the influence of the solubility of lead chloride on the reaction rate was taken into consideration. The experimental results are consistent with rate control by the outward diffusion of the PbCl2 reaction product through the solution trapped in pores in the constantly thickening elemental sulfur layer formed on the surface of the galena.

  12. Evaluation of ferric oxide and ferric citrate for their effects on fermentation, production of sulfide and methane, and abundance of select microbial populations using in vitro rumen cultures.

    PubMed

    Wu, Hao; Meng, Qingxiang; Yu, Zhongtang

    2016-07-01

    This study systematically evaluated the effect of ferric iron on sulfate reduction to sulfide, feed digestion and fermentation, methane production, and populations of select ruminal microbes using in vitro rumen cultures. Ferric oxide (Fe2O3) and ferric citrate (C6H5FeO7) at six concentrations (0, 25, 50, 100, 150, and 200mg/L as Fe(3+)) were tested. Ferric iron decreased production of both H2S gas in culture headspace (up to 71.9%) and aqueous sulfide (up to 80.8%), without adversely affecting other fermentation parameters, with ferric citrate being more effective than ferric oxide. Total archaeal population was increased by ferric citrate, but methane production was not affected significantly. The population of sulfate reducing bacteria was affected differently by ferric oxide than by ferric citrate. The results of this study could guide future in vivo studies to develop effective solutions to abate sulfur-associated polioencephalomalacia in cattle fed high-sulfur diet such as dried distiller's grains with solubles. PMID:27043055

  13. Active structures to reduce torsional vibrations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matthias, M.; Schlote, D.; Atzrodt, H.

    2013-03-01

    This paper describes the development of different active measures to reduce torsional vibrations in power trains. The measures are based on concepts developed for active mounts to reduce the transmission of structure-borne sound. To show the potential of these active measures and investigate their mode of operation to influence torsional vibrations, numerical simulations of powertrains with different active measures were done. First experimental results from tests on an experimental (reduced size) power train were used to align the numerical models. The work was done within the project 'LOEWE-Zentrum AdRIA: Adaptronik - Research, Innovation, Application' funded by the German federal state of Hessen, and the Project AKTos: 'Active control of torsional vibrations by coupling elements' placed in the research Framework program 'Navigation and Maritime Technology for the 21st Century' funded by the German Federal Ministry of Economics and Technology.

  14. 21 CFR 184.1301 - Ferric phosphate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2010-04-01 2009-04-01 true Ferric phosphate. 184.1301 Section 184.1301 Food... Specific Substances Affirmed as GRAS § 184.1301 Ferric phosphate. (a) Ferric phosphate (ferric orthophosphate, iron (III) phosphate, FePO4·xH2O, CAS Reg. No. 10045-86-0) is an odorless, yellowish-white...

  15. 21 CFR 184.1301 - Ferric phosphate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Ferric phosphate. 184.1301 Section 184.1301 Food... Specific Substances Affirmed as GRAS § 184.1301 Ferric phosphate. (a) Ferric phosphate (ferric orthophosphate, iron (III) phosphate, FePO4·xH2O, CAS Reg. No. 10045-86-0) is an odorless, yellowish-white...

  16. Arsenate precipitation using ferric iron in acidic conditions

    SciTech Connect

    Cadena, F.; Kirk, T.L.

    1995-12-31

    Arsenates (i.e., As(V)) can be removed from aqueous solution by precipitation with ferric iron (i.e., Fe(III)). The chemistry of arsenic acid describes the main properties of arsenates. This triprotic acid resembles the phosphoric acid system. For example, free arsenate ions (i.e., AsO{sub 4}{sup 3-}), like free phosphates, are present in significant concentration at pH values above pK{sub a,3}. On the other hand, the concentration of free ferric iron in solution, Fe{sup 3+}, is limited by ferric hydroxide precipitation and hydroxy complexation under neutral or basic conditions. Fe{sup 3+} is the predominant iron form only under very acidic conditions. Therefore, the absence of either ferric ions or arsenate ligands prevents ferric arsenate (FeAsO{sub 4}) precipitation in extreme pH conditions. Precipitation studies using ferric chloride show that the formation of ferric arsenate in water containing 0.667 mM/L (50 mg/L as As) is favored in the pH range between 3 and 4. Ferric iron dose required to remove arsenic from solution increases with pH in the range of 3 to 10. Sludge production also increases with increasing pH conditions. Optimum ferric iron doses at pH 3 and 4 are 4.8 and 10.0 mM/L, respectively, where the arsenate is removed from solution by 98.72 and 99.68 percent. Corresponding iron requirement to arsenate ratios at these two pH conditions are 7.2 and 15.0. Adverse effects on arsenic removal are observed at pH = 3, where the concentration of applied ferric iron exceeds the optimal dose. This effect is probably due to charge reversal on the surface of the precipitates. Overdosing above the optimal iron concentration at pH = 4 does not reduce treatment efficiency significantly. Presence of sodium chloride in solution at a concentration of 171 mM/L (10,000 mg/L as NaCl) does not impair system performance. However, sodium sulfate at a concentration of 104 mM/L (10,000 mg/L) affects adversely treatment performance.

  17. 21 CFR 73.1299 - Ferric ferrocyanide.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... color additive ferric ferrocyanide is a ferric hexacyanoferrate pigment characterized by the structual... ferrocyanide. (2) Color additive mixtures for drug use made with ferric ferrocyanide may contain only those diluents listed in this subpart as safe and suitable for use in color additive mixtures for coloring...

  18. Microscale speciation of arsenic and iron in ferric-based sorbents subjected to simulated landfill conditions.

    PubMed

    Root, Robert A; Fathordoobadi, Sahar; Alday, Fernando; Ela, Wendell; Chorover, Jon

    2013-11-19

    During treatment for potable use, water utilities generate arsenic-bearing ferric wastes that are subsequently dispatched to landfills. The biogeochemical weathering of these residuals in mature landfills affects the potential mobilization of sorbed arsenic species via desorption from solids subjected to phase transformations driven by abundant organic matter and bacterial activity. Such processes are not simulated with the toxicity characteristic leaching procedure (TCLP) currently used to characterize hazard. To examine the effect of sulfate on As retention in landfill leachate, columns of As(V) loaded amorphous ferric hydroxide were reacted biotically at two leachate sulfate concentrations (0.064 mM and 2.1 mM). After 300 days, ferric sorbents were reductively dissolved. Arsenic released to porewaters was partially coprecipitated in mixed-valent secondary iron phases whose speciation was dependent on sulfate concentration. As and Fe XAS showed that, in the low sulfate column, 75-81% of As(V) was reduced to As(III), and 53-68% of the Fe(III) sorbent was transformed, dominantly to siderite and green rust. In the high sulfate column, Fe(III) solids were reduced principally to FeS(am), whereas As(V) was reduced to a polymeric sulfide with local atomic structure of realgar. Multienergy micro-X-ray fluorescence (ME-μXRF) imaging at Fe and As K-edges showed that As formed surface complexes with ferrihydrite > siderite > green rust in the low sulfate column; while discrete realgar-like phases formed in the high sulfate systems. Results indicate that landfill sulfur chemistry exerts strong control over the potential mobilization of As from ferric sorbent residuals by controlling secondary As and Fe sulfide coprecipitate formation. PMID:24102155

  19. Microscale speciation of arsenic and iron in ferric-based sorbents subjected to simulated landfill conditions

    PubMed Central

    Root, Robert A.; Fathordoobadi, Sahar; Alday, Fernando; Ela, Wendell; Chorover, Jon

    2013-01-01

    During treatment for potable use, water utilities generate arsenic-bearing ferric wastes that are subsequently dispatched to landfills. The biogeochemical weathering of these residuals in mature landfills affects the potential mobilization of sorbed arsenic species via desorption from solids subjected to phase transformations driven by abundant organic matter and bacterial activity. Such processes are not simulated with the Toxicity Characteristic Leaching Procedure (TCLP) currently used to characterize hazard. To examine the effect of sulfate on As retention in landfill leachate, columns of As(V) loaded amorphous ferric hydroxide were reacted biotically at two leachate sulfate concentrations (0.064 mM and 2.1 mM). After 300 d, ferric sorbents were reductively dissolved. Arsenic released to porewaters was partially co-precipitated in mixed-valent secondary iron phases whose speciation was dependent on sulfate concentration. As and Fe XAS showed that, in the low sulfate column, 75–81% of As(V) was reduced to As(III), and 53–68% of the Fe(III) sorbent was transformed, dominantly to siderite and green rust. In the high sulfate column, Fe(III) solids were reduced principally to FeS(am), whereas As(V) was reduced to a polymeric sulfide with local atomic structure of realgar. Multi-energy micro-X-ray fluorescence (ME-μXRF) imaging at Fe and As K-edges showed that As formed surface complexes with ferrihydrite > siderite > green rust in the low sulfate column; while discrete realgar-like phases formed in the high sulfate systems. Results indicate that landfill sulfur chemistry exerts strong control over the potential mobilization of As from ferric sorbent residuals by controlling secondary As and Fe sulfide co-precipitate formation. PMID:24102155

  20. Reducing Skin Picking via Competing Activities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lane, Kathleen Lynne; Thompson, Ada; Reske, Cara L.; Gable, Lauren M.; Barton-Arwood, Sally

    2006-01-01

    This study examined the outcomes of a competing activities intervention to decrease skin picking exhibited by a 9-year-old student with comorbid diagnoses. Results of an ABCBAB design revealed that the use of student-selected manipulatives resulted in reduced skin picking. (Contains 1 figure.)

  1. Adverse Reactions of Ferric Carboxymaltose

    PubMed Central

    Patil, Navin; Shenoy, Smita; Bairy, K L; Sarma, Yashdeep

    2014-01-01

    The author reports a 55-year-old female diagnosed of chronic kidney disease grade-5 with associated co-morbidities like type 2 diabetes mellitus, diabetic retinopathy and hypothyroidism was admitted for arteriovenous fistula construction. She was started on ferric carboxymaltose for the treatment of anaemia. She was given a test dose before administering the drug intravenously and she did not develop any reaction. The drug ferric carboxymaltose was then administered over a period of one hour. About half an hour after drug administration, the patient developed breathlessness and myalgia. After half hour of the above episode of breathlessness and myalgia she also developed vomiting (one episode). Patient was managed with oxygen therapy, IV fluids and other drugs like corticosteroids, phenaramine maleate and nalbuphine which controlled the above symptoms. PMID:25478369

  2. Adverse reactions of ferric carboxymaltose.

    PubMed

    Thanusubramanian, Harish; Patil, Navin; Shenoy, Smita; Bairy, K L; Sarma, Yashdeep

    2014-10-01

    The author reports a 55-year-old female diagnosed of chronic kidney disease grade-5 with associated co-morbidities like type 2 diabetes mellitus, diabetic retinopathy and hypothyroidism was admitted for arteriovenous fistula construction. She was started on ferric carboxymaltose for the treatment of anaemia. She was given a test dose before administering the drug intravenously and she did not develop any reaction. The drug ferric carboxymaltose was then administered over a period of one hour. About half an hour after drug administration, the patient developed breathlessness and myalgia. After half hour of the above episode of breathlessness and myalgia she also developed vomiting (one episode). Patient was managed with oxygen therapy, IV fluids and other drugs like corticosteroids, phenaramine maleate and nalbuphine which controlled the above symptoms. PMID:25478369

  3. Ferric sulfates on Mars: Surface Explorations and Laboratory Experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, A.; Ling, Z.; Freeman, J. J.

    2008-12-01

    Recent results from missions to Mars have reinforced the importance of sulfates for Mars science. They are the hosts of water, the sinks of acidity, and maybe the most active species in the past and current surface/near-surface processes on Mars. Fe-sulfate was found frequently by Spirit and Opportunity rovers: jarosite in Meridiani Planum outcrops and a less specific "ferric sulfate" in the salty soils excavated by Spirit at Gusev Crater. Pancam spectral analysis suggests a variety of ferric sulfates in these soils, i.e. ferricopiapite, jarosite, fibroferrite, and rhomboclase. A change in the Pancam spectral features occurred in Tyrone soils after ~ 190 sols of exposure to surface conditions. Dehydration of ferric sulfate is a possible cause. We synthesized eight ferric sulfates and conducted a series of hydration/dehydration experiments. Our goal was to establish the stability fields and phase transition pathways of these ferric sulfates. In our experiments, water activity, temperature, and starting structure are the variables. No redox state change was observed. Acidic, neutral, and basic salts were used. Ferric sulfate sample containers were placed into relative humidity buffer solutions that maintain static relative humidity levels at three temperatures. The five starting phases were ferricopiapite (Fe4.67(SO4)6(OH)2.20H2O), kornelite (Fe2(SO4)3.7H2O), rhomboclase (FeH(SO4)2.4H2O), pentahydrite (Fe2(SO4)3.5H2O), and an amorphous phase (Fe2(SO4)3.5H2O). A total of one hundred fifty experiments have been running for nearly ten months. Thousands of coupled Raman and gravimetric measurements were made at intermediate steps to monitor the phase transitions. The first order discovery from these experiments is the extremely large stability field of ferricopiapite. Ferricopiapite is the major ferric sulfate to precipitate from a Fe3+-S-rich aqueous solution at mid-low temperature, and it has the highest H2O/Fe ratio (~ 4.3). However, unlike the Mg-sulfate with highest

  4. Arsenic removal by ferric chloride

    SciTech Connect

    Hering, J.G.; Chen, P.Y.; Wilkie, J.A.; Elimelech, M.; Liang, S.

    1996-04-01

    Bench-scale studies were conducted in model freshwater systems to investigate how various parameters affected arsenic removal during coagulation with ferric chloride and arsenic adsorption onto preformed hydrous ferric oxide. Parameters included arsenic oxidation state and initial concentration, coagulant dosage or adsorbent concentration, pH, and the presence of co-occurring inorganic solutes. Comparison of coagulation and adsorption experiments and of experimental results with predictions based on surface complexation modeling demonstrated that adsorption is an important (though not the sole) mechanism governing arsenic removal during coagulation. Under comparable conditions, better removal was observed with arsenic(V) [As(V)] than with arsenic(III) [As(III)] in both coagulation and adsorption experiments. Below neutral pH values, As(III) removal-adsorption was significantly decreased in the presence of sulfate, whereas only a slight decrease in As(V) removal-adsorption was observed. At high pH, removal-adsorption of As(V) was increased in the presence of calcium. Removal of As(V) during coagulation with ferric chloride is both more efficient and less sensitive than that of As(III) to variations in source water composition.

  5. Study examines sulfate-reducing bacteria activity

    SciTech Connect

    McElhiney, J.E.; Hardy, J.A.; Rizk, T.Y.; Stott, J.F.D.; Eden, R.D.

    1996-12-09

    Low-sulfate seawater injection can reduce the potential of an oil reservoir turning sour because of sulfate-reducing bacteria. Sulfate-reducing bacteria (SRB) convert sulfate ions in seawater used in waterflooding into sulfide with the concomitant oxidation of a carbon source. A recent study at Capcis investigated the efficiency of SRB under various conditions of sulfate limitation. This study was conducted in a flowing bioreactor at 2,000 psia with different temperature zones (mesophilic 35 C and thermophilic 60--80 C). The study mixed microfloral populations derived from real North Sea-produced fluids, and included an active population of marine methanogenic bacteria present to provide competition for the available carbon sources. In general, results showed that SRB continue to convert sulfate to sulfide in stoichiometric quantities without regard to absolute concentrations. The paper discusses the results and recommends nanofiltration of seawater for ``sweet`` reservoirs.

  6. DEMONSTRATION OF A BIOAVAILABLE FERRIC IRON TEST KIT

    EPA Science Inventory

    Bioavailable ferric iron (BAFeIII) is used by iron-reducing bacteria as an electron acceptor during the oxidation of various organic contaminants such as vinyl chloride and benzene. Quantification of BAFeIII is important with respect to characterizing candidate natural attenuati...

  7. ESTCP DEMONSTRATION OF A BIOAVAILABLE FERRIC IRON TEST KIT

    EPA Science Inventory

    Bioavailable ferric iron (BAFeIII) is used by iron-reducing bacteria as an electron acceptor during the oxidation of various organic contaminants such as vinyl chloride and benzene. Quantification of BAFeIII is important with respect to characterizing candidate natural attenuati...

  8. Soluble microbial products decrease pyrite oxidation by ferric iron at pH < 2.

    PubMed

    Yacob, Tesfayohanes; Pandey, Sachin; Silverstein, Joann; Rajaram, Harihar

    2013-08-01

    Research on microbial activity in acid mine drainage (AMD) has focused on transformations of iron and sulfur. However, carbon cycling, including formation of soluble microbial products (SMP) from cell growth and decay, is an important biogeochemical component of the AMD environment. Experiments were conducted to study the interaction of SMP with soluble ferric iron in acidic conditions, particularly the formation of complexes that inhibit its effectiveness as the primary oxidant of pyrite during AMD generation. The rate of pyrite oxidation by ferric iron in sterile suspensions at pH 1.8 was reduced by 87% in the presence of SMP produced from autoclaved cells at a ratio of 0.3 mg DOC per mg total soluble ferric iron. Inhibition of pyrite oxidation by SMP was shown to be comparable to, but weaker than, the effect of a chelating synthetic siderophore, DFAM. Two computational models incorporating SMP complexation were fitted to experimental results. Results suggest that bacterially produced organic matter can play a role in slowing pyrite oxidation. PMID:23777272

  9. Hydrogen Reduction of Ferric Ions for Use in Copper Electrowinning

    SciTech Connect

    Karl S. Noah; Debby F. Bruhn; John E. Wey; Robert S. Cherry

    2005-01-01

    iron reduction increased with both the flow rate of gas as well as the liquid flow rate (up to ~0.1 g/L/min). Pure carbon monoxide also reduced the ferric ion, but at a rate about one tenth that of pure hydrogen at similar conditions. The syngas mixture of equimolar hydrogen and carbon monoxide reacted at a rate intermediate between each gas as a pure stream (up to ~ 0.06 g/L/min). This gas mixture shows that some form of unpurified reformer gas could be used to reduce the ferric ion in the electrolyte solution. Nitrogen was inert causing very little to no reduction of ferric ion.

  10. Kinetics and mechanism of exogenous anion exchange in FeFbpA-NTA: significance of periplasmic anion lability and anion binding activity of ferric binding protein A.

    PubMed

    Heymann, Jared J; Gabricević, Mario; Mietzner, Timothy A; Crumbliss, Alvin L

    2010-02-01

    The bacterial transferrin ferric binding protein A (FbpA) requires an exogenous anion to facilitate iron sequestration, and subsequently to shuttle the metal across the periplasm to the cytoplasmic membrane. In the diverse conditions of the periplasm, numerous anions are known to be present. Prior in vitro experiments have demonstrated the ability of multiple anions to fulfill the synergistic iron-binding requirement, and the identity of the bound anion has been shown to modulate important physicochemical properties of iron-bound FbpA (FeFbpA). Here we address the kinetics and mechanism of anion exchange for the FeFbpA-nitrilotriacetate (NTA) assembly with several biologically relevant anions (citrate, oxalate, phosphate, and pyrophosphate), with nonphysiologic NTA serving as a representative synergistic anion/chelator. The kinetic data are consistent with an anion-exchange process that occurs in multiple steps, dependent on the identity of both the entering anion and the leaving anion. The exchange mechanism may proceed either as a direct substitution or through an intermediate FeFbpA-X* assembly based on anion (X) identity. Our kinetic results further develop an understanding of exogenous anion lability in the periplasm, as well as address the final step of the iron-free FbpA (apo-FbpA)/Fe(3+) sequestration mechanism. Our results highlight the kinetic significance of the FbpA anion binding site, demonstrating a correlation between apo-FbpA/anion affinity and the FeFbpA rate of anion exchange, further supporting the requirement of an exogenous anion to complete tight sequestration of iron by FbpA, and developing a mechanism for anion exchange within FeFbpA that is dependent on the identity of both the entering anion and the leaving anion. PMID:19813031

  11. 21 CFR 582.5301 - Ferric phosphate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Ferric phosphate. 582.5301 Section 582.5301 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) ANIMAL DRUGS, FEEDS, AND RELATED PRODUCTS SUBSTANCES GENERALLY RECOGNIZED AS SAFE Nutrients and/or Dietary Supplements 1 § 582.5301 Ferric phosphate....

  12. 21 CFR 582.5304 - Ferric pyrophosphate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Ferric pyrophosphate. 582.5304 Section 582.5304 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) ANIMAL DRUGS, FEEDS, AND RELATED PRODUCTS SUBSTANCES GENERALLY RECOGNIZED AS SAFE Nutrients and/or Dietary Supplements 1 § 582.5304 Ferric pyrophosphate....

  13. Ferric sulfate montmorillonites as Mars soil analogs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bishop, J. L.; Pieters, C. M.; Burns, R. G.

    1993-01-01

    Spectroscopic analyses have shown that Fe(3+)-doped smectites prepared in the laboratory exhibit important similarities to the soils on Mars. Ferrihydrite in these smectites has features in the visible to near-infrared region that resemble the energies and band-strengths of features in reflectance spectra observed for several bright regions on Mars. Ferric - sulfate - montmorillonite samples have been prepared more recently because they are a good compositional match with the surface material on Mars as measured by Viking. Reflectance spectra of montmorillonite doped with ferric sulfate in the interlayer regions include a strong 3 micron band that persists under dry conditions. This is in contrast to spectra of similarly prepared ferric-doped montmorillonites, which exhibit a relatively weaker 3 micron band under comparable dry environmental conditions. Presented here are reflectance spectra of a suite of ferric-sulfate exchanged montmorillonites prepared with variable ferric sulfate concentrations and variable pH conditions.

  14. 21 CFR 73.1298 - Ferric ammonium ferrocyanide.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ...) Identity. (1) The color additive ferric ammonium ferrocyanide is the blue pigment obtained by oxidizing... product is filtered, washed, and dried. The pigment consists principally of ferric ammonium...

  15. 21 CFR 73.1298 - Ferric ammonium ferrocyanide.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ...) Identity. (1) The color additive ferric ammonium ferrocyanide is the blue pigment obtained by oxidizing... product is filtered, washed, and dried. The pigment consists principally of ferric ammonium...

  16. 21 CFR 73.1298 - Ferric ammonium ferrocyanide.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ...) Identity. (1) The color additive ferric ammonium ferrocyanide is the blue pigment obtained by oxidizing... product is filtered, washed, and dried. The pigment consists principally of ferric ammonium...

  17. 21 CFR 73.1298 - Ferric ammonium ferrocyanide.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ...) Identity. (1) The color additive ferric ammonium ferrocyanide is the blue pigment obtained by oxidizing... product is filtered, washed, and dried. The pigment consists principally of ferric ammonium...

  18. 21 CFR 73.1298 - Ferric ammonium ferrocyanide.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ...) Identity. (1) The color additive ferric ammonium ferrocyanide is the blue pigment obtained by oxidizing... product is filtered, washed, and dried. The pigment consists principally of ferric ammonium...

  19. Cardiovascular function following reduced aerobic activity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Raven, P. B.; Welch-O'Connor, R. M.; Shi, X.; Blomqvist, C. G. (Principal Investigator)

    1998-01-01

    PURPOSE: The aim of this study was to test the hypothesis that a sustained reduction of physical activity (deconditioning) would alter the cardiovascular regulatory function. METHODS: Nineteen young, healthy volunteers participated in physical deconditioning for a period of 8 wk. Before (pre) and following (post) physical deconditioning, the responses of heart rate (HR), mean arterial pressure (MAP, measured by Finapres), central venous pressure (CVP), stroke volume (SV, Doppler), and forearm blood flow (FBF, plethysmography) were determined during lower body negative pressure (LBNP). The carotid baroreflex (CBR) function was assessed using a train of pulsatile neck pressure (NP) and suction, and the aortic baroreflex control of HR was assessed during steady-state phenylephrine (PE) infusion superimposed by LBNP and NP to counteract the PE increased CVP and carotid sinus pressure, respectively. RESULTS: Active physical deconditioning significantly decreased maximal oxygen uptake (-7%) and LBNP tolerance (-13%) without a change in baseline hemodynamics. Plasma volume (-3% at P = 0.135), determined by Evans Blue dilution, and blood volume (-4% at P = 0.107) were not significantly altered. During LBNP -20 to -50 torr, there was a significantly greater drop of SV per unit decrease in CVP in the post- (14.7 +/- 1.6%/mm Hg) than predeconditioning (11.2 +/- 0.7%/mm Hg) test accompanied by a greater tachycardia. Deconditioning increased the aortic baroreflex sensitivity (pre vs post: -0.61 +/- 0.12 vs -0.84 +/- 0.14 bpm.mm-1 Hg, P = 0.009) and the slope of forearm vascular resistance (calculated from [MAP-CVP]/FBF) to CVP (-2.75 +/- 0.26 vs -4.94 +/- 0.97 PRU/mm Hg, P = 0.086). However, neither the CBR-HR (-0.28 +/- 0.03 VS -0.39 +/- 0.10 bpm.mm-1 Hg) nor the CBR-MAP (-0.37 +/- 0.16 vs -0.25 +/- 0.07 mm Hg/mm Hg) gains were statistically different between pre- and postdeconditioning. CONCLUSIONS: We concluded that the functional modification of the cardiac pressure

  20. 21 CFR 184.1298 - Ferric citrate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... Reg. No. 2338-05-8) is prepared from reaction of citric acid with ferric hydroxide. It is a compound of indefinite ratio of citric acid and iron. (b) The ingredient must be of a purity suitable for...

  1. 21 CFR 184.1298 - Ferric citrate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... prepared from reaction of citric acid with ferric hydroxide. It is a compound of indefinite ratio of citric acid and iron. (b) The ingredient must be of a purity suitable for its intended use. (c) In...

  2. 21 CFR 184.1298 - Ferric citrate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... Reg. No. 2338-05-8) is prepared from reaction of citric acid with ferric hydroxide. It is a compound of indefinite ratio of citric acid and iron. (b) The ingredient must be of a purity suitable for...

  3. 21 CFR 184.1298 - Ferric citrate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... Reg. No. 2338-05-8) is prepared from reaction of citric acid with ferric hydroxide. It is a compound of indefinite ratio of citric acid and iron. (b) The ingredient must be of a purity suitable for...

  4. 21 CFR 73.2299 - Ferric ferrocyanide.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... COLOR ADDITIVES EXEMPT FROM CERTIFICATION Cosmetics § 73.2299 Ferric ferrocyanide. (a) Identity and... coloring externally applied cosmetics, including cosmetics applied to the area of the eye, in...

  5. 21 CFR 73.2299 - Ferric ferrocyanide.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... COLOR ADDITIVES EXEMPT FROM CERTIFICATION Cosmetics § 73.2299 Ferric ferrocyanide. (a) Identity and... coloring externally applied cosmetics, including cosmetics applied to the area of the eye, in...

  6. 21 CFR 73.2299 - Ferric ferrocyanide.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... COLOR ADDITIVES EXEMPT FROM CERTIFICATION Cosmetics § 73.2299 Ferric ferrocyanide. (a) Identity and... coloring externally applied cosmetics, including cosmetics applied to the area of the eye, in...

  7. 21 CFR 73.2299 - Ferric ferrocyanide.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... COLOR ADDITIVES EXEMPT FROM CERTIFICATION Cosmetics § 73.2299 Ferric ferrocyanide. (a) Identity and... coloring externally applied cosmetics, including cosmetics applied to the area of the eye, in...

  8. 21 CFR 73.2299 - Ferric ferrocyanide.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... COLOR ADDITIVES EXEMPT FROM CERTIFICATION Cosmetics § 73.2299 Ferric ferrocyanide. (a) Identity and... coloring externally applied cosmetics, including cosmetics applied to the area of the eye, in...

  9. Process for reducing beta activity in uranium

    DOEpatents

    Briggs, Gifford G.; Kato, Takeo R.; Schonegg, Edward

    1986-10-07

    This invention is a method for lowering the beta radiation hazards associated with the casting of uranium. The method reduces the beta radiation emitted from the as-cast surfaces of uranium ingots. The method also reduces the amount of beta radiation emitters retained on the interiors of the crucibles that have been used to melt the uranium charges and which have undergone cleaning in a remote handling facility. The lowering of the radioactivity is done by scavenging the beta emitters from the molten uranium with a molten mixture containing the fluorides of magnesium and calcium. The method provides a means of collection and disposal of the beta emitters in a manner that reduces radiation exposure to operating personnel in the work area where the ingots are cast and processed.

  10. Process for reducing beta activity in uranium

    DOEpatents

    Briggs, G.G.; Kato, T.R.; Schonegg, E.

    1985-04-11

    This invention is a method for lowering the beta radiation hazards associated with the casting of uranium. The method reduces the beta radiation emitted from the as-cast surfaces of uranium ingots. The method also reduces the amount of beta radiation emitters retained on the interiors of the crucibles that have been used to melt the uranium charges and which undergone cleaning in a remote handling facility. The lowering of the radioactivity is done by scavenging the beta emitters from the molten uranium with a molten mixture containing the fluorides of magnesium and calcium. The method provides a means of collection and disposal of the beta emitters in a manner that reduces radiation exposure to operating personnel in the work area where the ingots are cast and processed. 5 tabs.

  11. Process for reducing beta activity in uranium

    DOEpatents

    Briggs, Gifford G.; Kato, Takeo R.; Schonegg, Edward

    1986-01-01

    This invention is a method for lowering the beta radiation hazards associated with the casting of uranium. The method reduces the beta radiation emitted from the as-cast surfaces of uranium ingots. The method also reduces the amount of beta radiation emitters retained on the interiors of the crucibles that have been used to melt the uranium charges and which have undergone cleaning in a remote handling facility. The lowering of the radioactivity is done by scavenging the beta emitters from the molten uranium with a molten mixture containing the fluorides of magnesium and calcium. The method provides a means of collection and disposal of the beta emitters in a manner that reduces radiation exposure to operating personnel in the work area where the ingots are cast and processed.

  12. Postischemic hyperoxia reduces hippocampal pyruvate dehydrogenase activity

    PubMed Central

    Richards, Erica M.; Rosenthal, Robert E.; Kristian, Tibor; Fiskum, Gary

    2008-01-01

    The pyruvate dehydrogenase complex (PDHC) is a mitochondrial matrix enzyme that catalyzes the oxidative decarboxylation of pyruvate and represents the sole bridge between anaerobic and aerobic cerebral energy metabolism. Previous studies demonstrating loss of PDHC enzyme activity and immunoreactivity during reperfusion after cerebral ischemia suggest that oxidative modifications are involved. This study tested the hypothesis that hyperoxic reperfusion exacerbates loss of PDHC enzyme activity, possibly due to tyrosine nitration or S-nitrosation. We used a clinically relevant canine ventricular fibrillation cardiac arrest model in which, after resuscitation and ventilation on either 100% O2 (hyperoxic) or 21–30% O2 (normoxic), animals were sacrificed at 2 h reperfusion and the brains removed for enzyme activity and immunoreactivity measurements. Animals resuscitated under hyperoxic conditions exhibited decreased PDHC activity and elevated 3-nitrotyrosine immunoreactivity in the hippocampus but not the cortex, compared to nonischemic controls. These measures were unchanged in normoxic animals. In vitro exposure of purified PDHC to peroxynitrite resulted in a dose-dependent loss of activity and increased nitrotyrosine immunoreactivity. These results support the hypothesis that oxidative stress contributes to loss of hippocampal PDHC activity during cerebral ischemia and reperfusion and suggest that PDHC is a target of peroxynitrite. PMID:16716897

  13. Stimuli Reduce the Dimensionality of Cortical Activity.

    PubMed

    Mazzucato, Luca; Fontanini, Alfredo; La Camera, Giancarlo

    2016-01-01

    The activity of ensembles of simultaneously recorded neurons can be represented as a set of points in the space of firing rates. Even though the dimension of this space is equal to the ensemble size, neural activity can be effectively localized on smaller subspaces. The dimensionality of the neural space is an important determinant of the computational tasks supported by the neural activity. Here, we investigate the dimensionality of neural ensembles from the sensory cortex of alert rats during periods of ongoing (inter-trial) and stimulus-evoked activity. We find that dimensionality grows linearly with ensemble size, and grows significantly faster during ongoing activity compared to evoked activity. We explain these results using a spiking network model based on a clustered architecture. The model captures the difference in growth rate between ongoing and evoked activity and predicts a characteristic scaling with ensemble size that could be tested in high-density multi-electrode recordings. Moreover, we present a simple theory that predicts the existence of an upper bound on dimensionality. This upper bound is inversely proportional to the amount of pair-wise correlations and, compared to a homogeneous network without clusters, it is larger by a factor equal to the number of clusters. The empirical estimation of such bounds depends on the number and duration of trials and is well predicted by the theory. Together, these results provide a framework to analyze neural dimensionality in alert animals, its behavior under stimulus presentation, and its theoretical dependence on ensemble size, number of clusters, and correlations in spiking network models. PMID:26924968

  14. Stimuli Reduce the Dimensionality of Cortical Activity

    PubMed Central

    Mazzucato, Luca; Fontanini, Alfredo; La Camera, Giancarlo

    2016-01-01

    The activity of ensembles of simultaneously recorded neurons can be represented as a set of points in the space of firing rates. Even though the dimension of this space is equal to the ensemble size, neural activity can be effectively localized on smaller subspaces. The dimensionality of the neural space is an important determinant of the computational tasks supported by the neural activity. Here, we investigate the dimensionality of neural ensembles from the sensory cortex of alert rats during periods of ongoing (inter-trial) and stimulus-evoked activity. We find that dimensionality grows linearly with ensemble size, and grows significantly faster during ongoing activity compared to evoked activity. We explain these results using a spiking network model based on a clustered architecture. The model captures the difference in growth rate between ongoing and evoked activity and predicts a characteristic scaling with ensemble size that could be tested in high-density multi-electrode recordings. Moreover, we present a simple theory that predicts the existence of an upper bound on dimensionality. This upper bound is inversely proportional to the amount of pair-wise correlations and, compared to a homogeneous network without clusters, it is larger by a factor equal to the number of clusters. The empirical estimation of such bounds depends on the number and duration of trials and is well predicted by the theory. Together, these results provide a framework to analyze neural dimensionality in alert animals, its behavior under stimulus presentation, and its theoretical dependence on ensemble size, number of clusters, and correlations in spiking network models. PMID:26924968

  15. Reducing the endotoxic activity of pertussis vaccine.

    PubMed Central

    Bannatyne, R. M.; Cheung, R.

    1981-01-01

    Unadsorbed, regular production pertussis vaccine was treated with polymyxin B sulphate at concentrations of 25, 50 and 100 microgram/ml. The toxic activity of treated and untreated vaccines was compared using both the limulus amoebocyte lysate test and the mouse-weight-gain test. Protective efficacy was also assessed by the mouse protection test. No discernible effect on either toxicity or efficacy of the pertussis vaccine was observed. When the vaccine was treated with 5000 microgram/ml of polymyxin, endotoxic activity assessed by the limulus lysate test appeared to be abolished. PMID:7310121

  16. Paracoccidioides spp. ferrous and ferric iron assimilation pathways

    PubMed Central

    Bailão, Elisa Flávia L. C.; Lima, Patrícia de Sousa; Silva-Bailão, Mirelle G.; Bailão, Alexandre M.; Fernandes, Gabriel da Rocha; Kosman, Daniel J.; Soares, Célia Maria de Almeida

    2015-01-01

    Iron is an essential micronutrient for almost all organisms, including fungi. Usually, fungi can uptake iron through receptor-mediated internalization of a siderophore or heme, and/or reductive iron assimilation (RIA). Traditionally, the RIA pathway consists of ferric reductases (Fres), ferroxidase (Fet3) and a high-affinity iron permease (Ftr1). Paracoccidioides spp. genomes do not present an Ftr1 homolog. However, this fungus expresses zinc regulated transporter homologs (Zrts), members of the ZIP family of membrane transporters that are able in some organisms to transport zinc and iron. A 2,3,5-triphenyltetrazolium chloride (TTC)-overlay assay indicates that both Pb01 and Pb18 express a ferric reductase activity; however, 59Fe uptake assays indicate that only in Pb18 is this activity coupled to a reductase-dependent iron uptake pathway. In addition, Zrts are up-regulated in iron deprivation, as indicated by RNAseq and qRT-PCR using Pb01 transcripts. RNAseq strategy also demonstrated that transcripts related to siderophore uptake and biosynthesis are up-regulated in iron-deprived condition. The data suggest that the fungus could use both a non-classical RIA, comprising ferric reductases and Fe/Zn permeases (Zrts), and siderophore uptake pathways under iron-limited conditions. The study of iron metabolism reveals novel surface molecules that could function as accessible targets for drugs to block iron uptake and, consequently, inhibit pathogen's proliferation. PMID:26441843

  17. Behavioral intervention to reduce AIDS risk activities.

    PubMed

    Kelly, J A; St Lawrence, J S; Hood, H V; Brasfield, T L

    1989-02-01

    Behavior change can curtail the spread of acquired immune deficiency syndrome (AIDS). In this study, 104 gay men with a history of frequent AIDS high-risk behavior completed self-report, self-monitoring, and behavioral measures related to AIDS risk. The sample was randomly divided into experimental and waiting-list control groups. The experimental intervention provided AIDS risk education, cognitive-behavioral self-management training, sexual assertion training, and attention to the development of steady and self-affirming social supports. Experimental group participants greatly reduced their frequency of high-risk sexual practices and increased behavioral skills for refusing sexual coercions, AIDS risk knowledge, and adoption of "safer sex" practices. Change was maintained at the 8-month follow-up. PMID:2925974

  18. Mucin Binding Reduces Colistin Antimicrobial Activity

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Johnny X.; Blaskovich, Mark A. T.; Pelingon, Ruby; Ramu, Soumya; Kavanagh, Angela; Elliott, Alysha G.; Butler, Mark S.

    2015-01-01

    Colistin has found increasing use in treating drug-resistant bacterial lung infections, but potential interactions with pulmonary biomolecules have not been investigated. We postulated that colistin, like aminoglycoside antibiotics, may bind to secretory mucin in sputum or epithelial mucin that lines airways, reducing free drug levels. To test this hypothesis, we measured binding of colistin and other antibiotics to porcine mucin, a family of densely glycosylated proteins used as a surrogate for human sputum and airway mucin. Antibiotics were incubated in dialysis tubing with or without mucin, and concentrations of unbound antibiotics able to penetrate the dialysis tubing were measured over time using liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS). The percentage of antibiotic measured in the dialysate after 4 h in the presence of mucin, relative to the amount without mucin, was 15% for colistin, 16% for polymyxin B, 19% for tobramycin, 52% for ciprofloxacin, and 78% for daptomycin. Antibiotics with the strongest mucin binding had an overall polybasic positive charge, whereas those with comparatively little binding were less basic. When comparing MICs measured with or without added mucin, colistin and polymyxin B showed >100-fold increases in MICs for multiple Gram-negative bacteria. Preclinical evaluation of mucin binding should become a standard procedure when considering the potential pulmonary use of new or existing antibiotics, particularly those with a polybasic overall charge. In the airways, mucin binding may reduce the antibacterial efficacy of inhaled or intravenously administered colistin, and the presence of sub-MIC effective antibiotic concentrations could result in the development of antibiotic resistance. PMID:26169405

  19. Granulation and ferric oxides loading enable biochar derived from cotton stalk to remove phosphate from water.

    PubMed

    Ren, Jing; Li, Nan; Li, Lei; An, Jing-Kun; Zhao, Lin; Ren, Nan-Qi

    2015-02-01

    Granulation of biochar powder followed by immobilization of ferric oxides on the macroporous granular biochar (Bg-FO-1) substantially enhanced phosphate removal from water. BET analysis confirmed that both granulation and ferric oxides loading can increase the surface areas and pore volumes effectively. Bg-FO-1 was proven to be a favorable adsorbent for phosphate. The phosphate adsorption capacity was substantially increased from 0 mg/g of raw biochar powder to 0.963 mg/g (Bg-FO-1). When the ferric oxides loading was prior to granulation, the adsorption capacity was decreased by 59-0.399 mg/g, possibly due to the decrease of micropore and mesopore area as well as the overlaying of binders to the activated sites produced by ferric oxides. PMID:25446788

  20. Reduction of Soluble Iron and Reductive Dissolution of Ferric Iron-Containing Minerals by Moderately Thermophilic Iron-Oxidizing Bacteria

    PubMed Central

    Bridge, Toni A. M.; Johnson, D. Barrie

    1998-01-01

    Five moderately thermophilic iron-oxidizing bacteria, including representative strains of the three classified species (Sulfobacillus thermosulfidooxidans, Sulfobacillus acidophilus, and Acidimicrobium ferrooxidans), were shown to be capable of reducing ferric iron to ferrous iron when they were grown under oxygen limitation conditions. Iron reduction was most readily observed when the isolates were grown as mixotrophs or heterotrophs with glycerol as an electron donor; in addition, some strains were able to couple the oxidation of tetrathionate to the reduction of ferric iron. Cycling of iron between the ferrous and ferric states was observed during batch culture growth in unshaken flasks incubated under aerobic conditions, although the patterns of oxidoreduction of iron varied in different species of iron-oxidizing moderate thermophiles and in strains of a single species (S. acidophilus). All three bacterial species were able to grow anaerobically with ferric iron as a sole electron acceptor; the growth yields correlated with the amount of ferric iron reduced when the isolates were grown in the absence of oxygen. One of the moderate thermophiles (identified as a strain of S. acidophilus) was able to bring about the reductive dissolution of three ferric iron-containing minerals (ferric hydroxide, jarosite, and goethite) when it was grown under restricted aeration conditions with glycerol as a carbon and energy source. The significance of iron reduction by moderately thermophilic iron oxidizers in both environmental and applied contexts is discussed. PMID:9603832

  1. 21 CFR 184.1297 - Ferric chloride.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Ferric chloride. 184.1297 Section 184.1297 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) FOOD FOR HUMAN CONSUMPTION (CONTINUED) DIRECT FOOD SUBSTANCES AFFIRMED AS GENERALLY RECOGNIZED AS SAFE Listing of Specific Substances Affirmed as GRAS...

  2. 21 CFR 184.1297 - Ferric chloride.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2010-04-01 2009-04-01 true Ferric chloride. 184.1297 Section 184.1297 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) FOOD FOR HUMAN CONSUMPTION (CONTINUED) DIRECT FOOD SUBSTANCES AFFIRMED AS GENERALLY RECOGNIZED AS SAFE Listing of Specific Substances Affirmed as GRAS §...

  3. 21 CFR 582.5304 - Ferric pyrophosphate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Ferric pyrophosphate. 582.5304 Section 582.5304 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) ANIMAL DRUGS, FEEDS, AND RELATED PRODUCTS SUBSTANCES GENERALLY RECOGNIZED AS SAFE Nutrients and/or...

  4. 21 CFR 582.5304 - Ferric pyrophosphate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Ferric pyrophosphate. 582.5304 Section 582.5304 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) ANIMAL DRUGS, FEEDS, AND RELATED PRODUCTS SUBSTANCES GENERALLY RECOGNIZED AS SAFE Nutrients and/or...

  5. 21 CFR 582.5304 - Ferric pyrophosphate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Ferric pyrophosphate. 582.5304 Section 582.5304 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) ANIMAL DRUGS, FEEDS, AND RELATED PRODUCTS SUBSTANCES GENERALLY RECOGNIZED AS SAFE Nutrients and/or...

  6. 21 CFR 582.5301 - Ferric phosphate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Ferric phosphate. 582.5301 Section 582.5301 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) ANIMAL DRUGS, FEEDS, AND RELATED PRODUCTS SUBSTANCES GENERALLY RECOGNIZED AS SAFE Nutrients and/or...

  7. 21 CFR 582.5301 - Ferric phosphate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Ferric phosphate. 582.5301 Section 582.5301 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) ANIMAL DRUGS, FEEDS, AND RELATED PRODUCTS SUBSTANCES GENERALLY RECOGNIZED AS SAFE Nutrients and/or...

  8. 21 CFR 582.5304 - Ferric pyrophosphate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Ferric pyrophosphate. 582.5304 Section 582.5304 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) ANIMAL DRUGS, FEEDS, AND RELATED PRODUCTS SUBSTANCES GENERALLY RECOGNIZED AS SAFE Nutrients and/or...

  9. 21 CFR 582.5301 - Ferric phosphate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Ferric phosphate. 582.5301 Section 582.5301 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) ANIMAL DRUGS, FEEDS, AND RELATED PRODUCTS SUBSTANCES GENERALLY RECOGNIZED AS SAFE Nutrients and/or...

  10. 21 CFR 582.5301 - Ferric phosphate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Ferric phosphate. 582.5301 Section 582.5301 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) ANIMAL DRUGS, FEEDS, AND RELATED PRODUCTS SUBSTANCES GENERALLY RECOGNIZED AS SAFE Nutrients and/or...

  11. 21 CFR 184.1304 - Ferric pyrophosphate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... meets the specifications of the Food Chemicals Codex, 3d Ed. (1981), p. 120, which is incorporated by... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2010-04-01 2009-04-01 true Ferric pyrophosphate. 184.1304 Section 184.1304 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED)...

  12. 40 CFR 415.380 - Applicability; description of the ferric chloride production subcategory.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... ferric chloride production subcategory. 415.380 Section 415.380 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL... SOURCE CATEGORY Ferric Chloride Production Subcategory § 415.380 Applicability; description of the ferric... ferric chloride from pickle liquor....

  13. 40 CFR 415.380 - Applicability; description of the ferric chloride production subcategory.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... ferric chloride production subcategory. 415.380 Section 415.380 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL... SOURCE CATEGORY Ferric Chloride Production Subcategory § 415.380 Applicability; description of the ferric... ferric chloride from pickle liquor....

  14. 40 CFR 415.380 - Applicability; description of the ferric chloride production subcategory.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... ferric chloride production subcategory. 415.380 Section 415.380 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL... SOURCE CATEGORY Ferric Chloride Production Subcategory § 415.380 Applicability; description of the ferric... ferric chloride from pickle liquor....

  15. 40 CFR 415.380 - Applicability; description of the ferric chloride production subcategory.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... ferric chloride production subcategory. 415.380 Section 415.380 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL... SOURCE CATEGORY Ferric Chloride Production Subcategory § 415.380 Applicability; description of the ferric... ferric chloride from pickle liquor....

  16. 40 CFR 415.380 - Applicability; description of the ferric chloride production subcategory.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... ferric chloride production subcategory. 415.380 Section 415.380 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL... SOURCE CATEGORY Ferric Chloride Production Subcategory § 415.380 Applicability; description of the ferric... ferric chloride from pickle liquor....

  17. 21 CFR 73.1025 - Ferric ammonium citrate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 1 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Ferric ammonium citrate. 73.1025 Section 73.1025 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES GENERAL LISTING OF COLOR ADDITIVES EXEMPT FROM CERTIFICATION Drugs § 73.1025 Ferric ammonium citrate. (a) Identity. The color additive ferric ammonium...

  18. 21 CFR 582.5306 - Ferric sodium pyrophosphate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Ferric sodium pyrophosphate. 582.5306 Section 582.5306 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED... Dietary Supplements 1 § 582.5306 Ferric sodium pyrophosphate. (a) Product. Ferric sodium pyrophosphate....

  19. Enhanced dark hydrogen fermentation by addition of ferric oxide nanoparticles using Enterobacter aerogenes.

    PubMed

    Lin, Richen; Cheng, Jun; Ding, Lingkan; Song, Wenlu; Liu, Min; Zhou, Junhu; Cen, Kefa

    2016-05-01

    Ferric oxide nanoparticles (FONPs) were used to facilitate dark hydrogen fermentation using Enterobacter aerogenes. The hydrogen yield of glucose increased from 164.5±2.29 to 192.4±1.14mL/g when FONPs concentration increased from 0 to 200mg/L. SEM images of E. aerogenes demonstrated the existence of bacterial nanowire among cells, suggesting FONPs served as electron conduits to enhance electron transfer. TEM showed cellular internalization of FONPs, indicating hydrogenase synthesis and activity was potentially promoted due to the released iron element. When further increasing FONPs concentration to 400mg/L, the hydrogen yield of glucose decreased to 147.2±2.54mL/g. Soluble metabolic products revealed FONPs enhanced acetate pathway of hydrogen production, but weakened ethanol pathway. This shift of metabolic pathways allowed more nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide for reducing proton to hydrogen. PMID:26890796

  20. Recreational Activities to Reduce Behavioural Symptoms in Dementia

    PubMed Central

    Kolanowski, Ann; Fick, Donna M.; Buettner, Linda

    2009-01-01

    Few clinicians have an educational grounding in the use of nonpharmacological therapies for people with dementia. In this article, we explore the utility of recreational activities as one nonpharmacological intervention that has demonstrated effectiveness for reducing the behavioural symptoms of dementia. The implementation of effective recreational activities involves three components: understanding the evidence for this approach; acknowledging the need to reduce medications that have the potential to interfere with activity effectiveness; and individualizing activities so that the maximum benefit from the intervention is obtained. PMID:20046903

  1. Systematic review of active workplace interventions to reduce sickness absence

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background The workplace is used as a setting for interventions to prevent and reduce sickness absence, regardless of the specific medical conditions and diagnoses. Aims To give an overview of the general effectiveness of active workplace interventions aimed at preventing and reducing sickness absence. Methods We systematically searched PubMed, Embase, Psych-info, and ISI web of knowledge on 27 December 2011. Inclusion criteria were (i) participants over 18 years old with an active role in the intervention, (ii) intervention done partly or fully at the workplace or at the initiative of the workplace and (iii) sickness absence reported. Two reviewers independently screened articles, extracted data and assessed risk of bias. A narrative synthesis was used. Results We identified 2036 articles of which, 93 were assessed in full text. Seventeen articles were included (2 with low and 15 with medium risk of bias), with a total of 24 comparisons. Five interventions from four articles significantly reduced sickness absence. We found moderate evidence that graded activity reduced sickness absence and limited evidence that the Sheerbrooke model (a comprehensive multidisciplinary intervention) and cognitive behavioural therapy (CBT) reduced sickness absence. There was moderate evidence that workplace education and physical exercise did not reduce sickness absence. For other interventions, the evidence was insufficient to draw conclusions. Conclusions The review found limited evidence that active workplace interventions were not generally effective in reducing sickness absence, but there was moderate evidence of effect for graded activity and limited evidence for the effectiveness of the Sheerbrooke model and CBT. PMID:23223750

  2. Application of electrical methods to measure microbial activity in soils: Preliminary microcosm results

    SciTech Connect

    Cox, B.L. Sweet, A.; Majer, E.

    1997-12-01

    The application of the geophysical technique known as self-potential to the measurement of microbial activity was tested on laboratory microcosms containing ferric iron and iron-reducing bacteria Shewanella alga BrY. Measurements of the electrical response of silver-coated copper electrodes distributed along a Teflon probe inserted into sterile and inoculated layers containing either ferric chloride, ferric citrate, or ferric oxide rich soil were recorded over hours or days. Strong electrical signals reached values more negative than {minus}400 mV for all types of inoculated ferric iron layers. Electric signals in sterile control layers, by contrast, rarely reached values more negative than {minus}150 mV. These preliminary experiments indicate that it may be possible to apply the self-potential geophysical method to monitor bioremediation in the field.

  3. Infliximab treatment reduces complement activation in patients with rheumatoid arthritis

    PubMed Central

    Familian, A; Voskuyl, A; van Mierlo, G J; Heijst, H; Twisk, J; Dijkmans, B; Hack, C

    2005-01-01

    Background: Tumour necrosis factor (TNF) blocking agents decrease C reactive protein (CRP) levels in rheumatoid arthritis (RA). It has been shown that CRP may contribute to complement activation in RA. Objective: To assess the effect of intravenous infliximab treatment on complement activation, especially that mediated by CRP, in RA. Methods: 35 patients with active RA (28 joint count Disease Activity Score (DAS28) >4.4) were treated with intravenous injections of infliximab (3 mg/kg, at weeks 0, 2, 6, 14, and 22). Clinical response and plasma levels of complement activation products, of CRP and of CRP-complement complexes, which are specific markers for CRP mediated complement activation, were assessed at the indicated time points up to 22 weeks. The relationship between CRP and CRP-complement complexes was analysed by paired t test between two time points and by generalised estimated equation, to test differences of variables over time. Results: At 2 weeks after the first dose, infliximab significantly reduced overall C3 and C4 activation and plasma levels of CRP and CRP-complement complexes were also significantly reduced at this time point. The effects of infliximab on CRP and complement continued throughout the observation period and were more pronounced in patients with a good response to infliximab treatment. Conclusion: Treatment with infliximab decreases plasma levels of CRP and CRP dependent complement activation products and concomitantly may reduce complement activation in RA. Complement activation may be among the effector mechanisms of TNF in RA. PMID:15958758

  4. Effortful retrieval reduces hippocampal activity and impairs incidental encoding.

    PubMed

    Reas, Emilie T; Brewer, James B

    2013-05-01

    Functional imaging studies frequently report that the hippocampus is engaged by successful episodic memory retrieval. However, considering that concurrent encoding of the background environment occurs during retrieval and influences medial temporal lobe activity, it is plausible that hippocampal encoding functions are reduced with increased attentional engagement during effortful retrieval. Expanding upon evidence that retrieval efforts suppress activity in hippocampal regions implicated in encoding, this study examines the influence of retrieval effort on encoding performance and the interactive effects of encoding and retrieval on hippocampal and neocortical activity. Functional magnetic resonance imaging was conducted while subjects performed a word recognition task with incidental picture encoding. Both lower memory strength and increased search duration were associated with encoding failure and reduced hippocampal and default network activity. Activity in the anterior hippocampus tracked encoding, which was more strongly deactivated when incidental encoding was unsuccessful. These findings highlight potential contributions from background encoding processes to hippocampal activations during neuroimaging studies of episodic memory retrieval. PMID:23378272

  5. Reflectance spectroscopy of ferric sulfate-bearing montmorillonites as Mars soil analog materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bishop, J. L.; Pieters, C. M.; Burns, R. G.; Edwards, J. O.; Mancinelli, R. L.; Froschl, H.

    1995-01-01

    Spectroscopic analyses have shown that smectites enhanced in the laboratory with additional ferric species exhibit important similarities to those of the soils on Mars. Ferrihydrite in these chemically treated smectites has features in the visible to near-infrared region that resemble the energies and band strengths of features in reflectance spectra observed for several bright regions on Mars. New samples have been prepared with sulfate as well, because S was found by Viking to be a major component in the surface material on Mars. A suite of ferrihydrite-bearing and ferric sulfate-bearing montmorillonites, prepared with variable Fe3+ and S concentrations and variable pH conditions, has been analyzed using reflectance spectroscopy in the visible and infrared regions, Mossbauer spectroscopy at room temperature and 4 K, differential thermal analysis, and X-ray diffraction. These analyses support the formation of ferrihydrite of variable crystallinity in the ferrihydrite-bearing montmorillonites and a combination of schwertmannite and ferrihydrite in the ferric sulfate-bearing montmorillonites. Small quantities of poorly crystalline or nanophase forms of other ferric materials may also be present in these samples. The chemical formation conditions of the ferrihydrite-bearing and ferric sulfate-bearing montmorillonites influence the character of the low temperature Mossbauer sextets and the visible reflectance spectra. An absorption minimum is observed at 0.88-0.89 micrometers in spectra of the ferric sulfate-bearing samples, and at 0.89-0.92 micrometers in spectra of the ferrihydrate-bearing montmorillonites. Mossbauer spectra of the ferric sulfate-bearing montmorillonites indicate variable concentrations of ferrihydrite and schwertmannite in the interlaminar spaces and along grain surfaces. Dehydration under reduced atmospheric pressure conditions induces a greater effect on the adsorbed and interlayer water in ferrihydrite-bearing montmorillonite than on the water

  6. Sox11 Reduces Caspase-6 Cleavage and Activity

    PubMed Central

    Waldron-Roby, Elaine; Hoerauf, Janine; Arbez, Nicolas; Zhu, Shanshan; Kulcsar, Kirsten; Ross, Christopher A.

    2015-01-01

    The apoptotic cascade is an orchestrated event, whose final stages are mediated by effector caspases. Regulatory binding proteins have been identified for caspases such as caspase-3, -7, -8, and -9. Many of these proteins belong to the inhibitor of apoptosis (IAP) family. By contrast, caspase-6 is not believed to be influenced by IAPs, and little is known about its regulation. We therefore performed a yeast-two-hybrid screen using a constitutively inactive form of caspase-6 for bait in order to identify novel regulators of caspase-6 activity. Sox11 was identified as a potential caspase-6 interacting protein. Sox11 was capable of dramatically reducing caspase-6 activity, as well as preventing caspase-6 self- cleavage. Several regions, including amino acids 117–214 and 362–395 within sox11 as well as a nuclear localization signal (NLS) all contributed to the reduction in caspase-6 activity. Furthermore, sox11 was also capable of decreasing other effector caspase activity but not initiator caspases -8 and -9. The ability of sox11 to reduce effector caspase activity was also reflected in its capacity to reduce cell death following toxic insult. Interestingly, other sox proteins also had the ability to reduce caspase-6 activity but to a lesser extent than sox11. PMID:26505998

  7. Reduced Chitinase Activities in Ant Plants of the Genus Macaranga

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heil, Martin; Fiala, Brigitte; Linsenmair, K. Eduard; Boller, Thomas

    Many plant species have evolved mutualistic associations with ants, protecting their host against detrimental influences such as herbivorous insects. Letourneau (1998) reported in the case of Piper that ants defend their plants principally against stem-boring insects and also reduce fungal infections on inflorescences. Macaranga plants that were experimentally deprived of their symbiotic Crematogaster ants suffered heavily from shoot borers and pathogenic fungi (Heil 1998). Here we report that ants seem to reduce fungal infections actively in the obligate myrmecophyte Macarangatriloba (Euphorbiaceae), while ant-free plants can be easily infected. We also found extremely low chitinase activity in Macaranga plants. The plants' own biochemical defense seems to be reduced, and low chitinase activity perhaps may represent a predisposition for the evolution of myrmecophytism. These plants are therefore highly dependent on their ants, which obviously function not only as an antiherbivore defense but also as an effective agent against fungal pathogens.

  8. In vivo NMR study of yeast fermentative metabolism in the presence of ferric irons.

    PubMed

    Ricci, Maso; Martini, Silvia; Bonechi, Claudia; Braconi, Daniela; Santucci, Annalisa; Rossi, Claudio

    2011-03-01

    Mathematical modelling analysis of experimental data, obtained with in vivo NMR spectroscopy and 13C-labelled substrates, allowed us to describe how the fermentative metabolism in Saccharomyces cerevisiae, taken as eukaryotic cell model, is influenced by stress factors. Experiments on cellular cultures subject to increasing concentrations of ferric ions were conducted in order to study the effect of oxidative stress on the dynamics of the fermentative process. The developed mathematical model was able to simulate the cellular activity, the metabolic yield and the main metabolic fluxes occurring during fermentation and to describe how these are modulated by the presence of ferric ions. PMID:21451251

  9. Rapid kinetics investigations of peracid oxidation of ferric cytochrome P450cam: nature and possible function of compound ES.

    PubMed

    Spolitak, Tatyana; Dawson, John H; Ballou, David P

    2006-12-01

    Previously, we reported spectroscopic properties of cytochrome P450cam compound I, (ferryl iron plus a porphyrin pi-cation radical (Fe(IV)=O/Por(+))), as well as compound ES (Fe(IV)=O/Tyr()) in reactions of substrate-free ferric enzyme with m-chloroperbenzoic acid [T. Spolitak, J.H. Dawson, D.P. Ballou, J. Biol. Chem. 280 (2005) 20300-9]. Compound ES arises by intramolecular electron transfer from nearby tyrosines to the porphyrin pi-cation radical of Compound I, and has been characterized by rapid-freeze-quench-Mössbauer/EPR spectroscopy; the tyrosyl radical was assigned to Tyr96 for wild type or to Tyr75 for the Tyr96Phe variant [V. Schünemann, F. Lendzian, C. Jung, J. Contzen, A.L. Barra, S.G. Sligar, A.X. Trautwein, J. Biol. Chem. 279 (2004) 10919-10930]. Here we report rapid-scanning stopped-flow studies of the reactions of peracids with substrate-free ferric Y75F, Y96F, and Y96F/Y75F P450cam variants, showing how these active site changes influence electron transfer from nearby tyrosines and affect formation of intermediates. Curiously, rates of generation of Compounds I and ES for both single mutants were not very different from wild type. Contrasting with the earlier EPR results, the Y96F/Y75F variant was also shown to form an ES-like species, but more slowly. When substrate is not present, or is improperly bound, compound I rapidly converts to compound ES, which can be reduced to form H(2)O and ferric P450, thus avoiding the modification of nearby protein groups or release of reactive oxygen species. PMID:17095096

  10. Synthesis and characterization of akaganeite-like ferric oxyhydroxides

    SciTech Connect

    Linehan, J.C.; Darab, J.G.; Matson, D.W.; Chen, X.; Amonette, J.E.

    1997-08-01

    Iron-based powders have been used as catalytic and stoichiometric reactants in a variety of organic reactions and are receiving additional attention as ion exchange materials or once-through adsorbents for clean-up of toxic or radioactive waste streams. Recent efforts have been directed toward the design of iron-based products, in particular iron sulfides, capable of performing as hydrocracking catalysts for coal liquefaction and heavy crude or resid cracking. Here the authors present structural studies of new materials having akaganeite-like structures and of their use as hydrocracking catalyst precursors. Akaganeite, {beta}-FeOOH, a natural ferric oxyhydroxide mineral, has a structure containing tunnel-like cavities in which chloride ions reside. Analogs of akaganeite in which carbonate or sulfate groups replace the chloride ions have also been synthesized. Both akaganeite and its substituted analogs are known to be precursors for active hydrocracking catalysts. The authors present powder X-ray diffraction (XRD) and X-ray absorption fine-structure spectroscopy (XAFS) data confirming the synthesis of new ferric oxyhydroxides having structures similar to akaganeite, but contain molybdate and tungstate oxy-anions. They also present a new hydrothermal method to prepare this family of materials.

  11. The leaching of galena in ferric sulfate media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dutrizac, J. E.; Chen, T. T.

    1995-04-01

    The leaching of galena (PbS) in ferric sulfate media was investigated over the temperature range 55 °C to 95 °C and for various Fe(SO4)1.5, H2SO4, FeSO4, and MgSO4 concentrations. Relatively slow kinetics were consistently observed; in most instances, the 1-2/3α-(1-α)2/3 vs time relationship, indicative of a diffusion-controlled reaction, was closely obeyed. The diffusion-controlled kinetics were attributed to the formation of a tenacious layer of PbSO4 and S0 on the surface of the galena. The generation and morphology of the reaction products were systematically determined by scanning electron microscopy, and complex growth mechanisms were illustrated. The leaching rate increased rapidly with increasing temperature, and the apparent activation energy is 61.2 kJ/mol. The rate increases as the 0.5 power of the ferric ion concentration but is nearly independent of the concentration of the FeSO4 reaction product. The rate is insensitive to H2SO4 concentrations <0.1 M but increases at higher acid levels. The presence of neutral sulfates, such as MgSO4, decreases the leaching rate to a modest extent.

  12. Juvenile ferric iron prevents microbiota dysbiosis and colitis in adult rodents

    PubMed Central

    Ettreiki, Chourouk; Gadonna-Widehem, Pascale; Mangin, Irène; Coëffier, Moïse; Delayre-Orthez, Carine; Anton, Pauline M

    2012-01-01

    AIM: To assess whether juvenile chronic ferric iron ingestion limit colitis and dysbiosis at adulthood in rats and mice. METHODS: Two sets of experiments were designed. In the first set, recently weaned mice were either orally administered ferrous (Fe2+) iron salt or ferric (Fe3+) microencapsulated iron for 6 wk. The last week of experiments trinitrobenzene sulfonic acid (TNBS) colitis was induced. In the second set, juvenile rats received the microencapsulated ferric iron for 6 wk and were also submitted to TNBS colitis during the last week of experiments. In both sets of experiments, animals were sacrificed 7 d after TNBS instillation. Severity of the inflammation was assessed by scoring macroscopic lesions and quantifying colonic myeloperoxidase (MPO) activity. Alteration of the microflora profile was estimated using quantitative polymerase chain reaction (qPCR) by measuring the evolution of total caecal microflora, Bacteroidetes, Firmicutes and enterobacteria. RESULTS: Neither ferrous nor ferric iron daily exposures at the juvenile period result in any effect in control animals at adulthood although ferrous iron repeated administration in infancy limited weight gain. Ferrous iron was unable to limit the experimental colitis (1.71 ± 0.27 MPO U/mg protein vs 2.47 ± 0.22 MPO U/mg protein in colitic mice). In contrast, ferric iron significantly prevented the increase of MPO activity (1.64 ± 0.14 MPO U/mg protein) in TNBS-induced colitis. Moreover, this positive effect was observed at both the doses of ferric iron used (75 and 150 mg/kg per day po - 6 wk). In the study we also compared, in both rats and mice, the consequences of chronic repeated low level exposure to ferric iron (75 mg/kg per day po - 6 wk) on TNBS-induced colitis and its related dysbiosis. We confirmed that ferric iron limited the TNBS-induced increase of MPO activity in both the rodent species. Furthermore, we assessed the ferric iron incidence on TNBS-induced intestinal microbiota dysbiosis

  13. Reduced respiratory neural activity elicits phrenic motor facilitation.

    PubMed

    Mahamed, Safraaz; Strey, Kristi A; Mitchell, Gordon S; Baker-Herman, Tracy L

    2011-03-15

    We hypothesized that reduced respiratory neural activity elicits compensatory mechanisms of plasticity that enhance respiratory motor output. In urethane-anesthetized and ventilated rats, we reversibly reduced respiratory neural activity for 25-30 min using: hypocapnia (end tidal CO(2)=30 mmHg), isoflurane (~1%) or high frequency ventilation (HFV; ~100 breaths/min). In all cases, increased phrenic burst amplitude was observed following restoration of respiratory neural activity (hypocapnia: 92±22%; isoflurane: 65±22%; HFV: 54±13% baseline), which was significantly greater than time controls receiving the same surgery, but no interruptions in respiratory neural activity (3±5% baseline, p<0.05). Hypocapnia also elicited transient increases in respiratory burst frequency (9±2 versus 1±1bursts/min, p<0.05). Our results suggest that reduced respiratory neural activity elicits a unique form of plasticity in respiratory motor control which we refer to as inactivity-induced phrenic motor facilitation (iPMF). iPMF may prevent catastrophic decreases in respiratory motor output during ventilatory control disorders associated with abnormal respiratory activity. PMID:21167322

  14. Reduced respiratory neural activity elicits phrenic motor facilitation

    PubMed Central

    Mahamed, Safraaz; Strey, Kristi A.; Mitchell, Gordon S.; Baker-Herman, Tracy L.

    2011-01-01

    We hypothesized that reduced respiratory neural activity elicits compensatory mechanisms of plasticity that enhance respiratory motor output. In urethane-anesthetized and ventilated rats, we reversibly reduced respiratory neural activity for 25–30 min using: hypocapnia (end tidal CO2 = 30 mmHg), isoflurane (~ 1%) or high frequency ventilation (HFV; ~100 breaths/min). In all cases, increased phrenic burst amplitude was observed following restoration of respiratory neural activity (hypocapnia: 92 ± 22%; isoflurane: 65 ± 22%; HFV: 54 ± 13% baseline), which was significantly greater than time controls receiving the same surgery, but no interruptions in respiratory neural activity (3 ± 5% baseline, p<0.05). Hypocapnia also elicited transient increases in respiratory burst frequency (9 ± 2 versus 1 ± 1 bursts/min, p<0.05). Our results suggest that reduced respiratory neural activity elicits a unique form of plasticity in respiratory motor control which we refer to as inactivity-induced phrenic motor facilitation (iPMF). iPMF may prevent catastrophic decreases in respiratory motor output during ventilatory control disorders associated with abnormal respiratory activity. PMID:21167322

  15. The mammalian transferrin-independent iron transport system may involve a surface ferrireductase activity.

    PubMed Central

    Jordan, I; Kaplan, J

    1994-01-01

    Mammalian cells accumulate iron from ferric citrate or ferric nitrilotriacetate through the activity of a transferrin-independent iron transport system [Sturrock, Alexander, Lamb, Craven and Kaplan (1990) J. Biol. Chem. 265, 3139-3145]. The uptake system might recognize and transport ferric-anion complexes, or cells may reduce ferric iron at the surface and then transport ferrous iron. To distinguish between these possibilities we exposed cells to either [59Fe]ferric citrate or ferric [14C]citrate and determined whether accumulation of iron was accompanied by the obligatory accumulation of citrate. In HeLa cells and human skin fibroblasts the rate of accumulation of iron was three to five times greater than that of citrate. Incubation of fibroblasts with ferric citrate or ferric ammonium citrate resulted in an enhanced accumulation of iron and citrate; the molar ratio of accumulation approaching unity. A similar rate of citrate accumulation, however, was observed when ferric citrate-incubated cells were exposed to [14C]citrate alone. Further studies demonstrated the independence of iron and citrate accumulation: addition of unlabelled citrate to cells decreased the uptake of labelled citrate without affecting the accumulation of 59Fe; iron uptake was decreased by the addition of ferrous chelators whereas the uptake of citrate was unaffected; reduction of ferric iron by ascorbate increased the uptake of iron but had no effect on the uptake of citrate. When HeLa cells were depleted of calcium, iron uptake decreased, but there was little effect on citrate uptake. These results indicate that transport of iron does not require the obligatory transport of citrate and vice versa. The mammalian transferrin-independent iron transport system appears functionally similar to iron transport systems in both the bacterial and plant kingdoms which require the activities of both a surface reductase and a ferrous metal transporter. PMID:7945215

  16. Colour and stability assessment of blue ferric anthocyanin chelates in liquid pectin-stabilised model systems.

    PubMed

    Buchweitz, M; Brauch, J; Carle, R; Kammerer, D R

    2013-06-01

    The formation of blue coloured ferric anthocyanin chelates and their colour stability during storage and thermal treatment were monitored in a pH range relevant to food (3.6-5.0). Liquid model systems were composed of different types of Citrus pectins, juices (J) and the respective phenolic extracts (E) from elderberry (EB), black currant (BC), red cabbage (RC) and purple carrot (PC) in the presence of ferric ions. For EB, BC and PC, pure blue colours devoid of a violet tint were exclusively observed for the phenolic extracts and at pH values ≥ 4.5 in model systems containing high methoxylated and amidated pectins, respectively. Colour and its stability strongly depended on the amount of ferric ions and the plant source; however, colour decay could generally be described as a pseudo-first-order kinetics. Despite optimal colour hues for RC-E and RC-J, storage and heat stabilities were poor. Highest colour intensities and best stabilities were observed for model systems containing PC-E at a molar anthocyanin:ferric ion ratio of 1:2. Ascorbic and lactic acids interfered with ferric ions, thus significantly affecting blue colour evolution and stability. Colour loss strongly depended on heat exposure with activation energies ranging between 60.5 and 78.4 kJ/mol. The comprehensive evaluation of the interrelationship of pigment source, pH conditions and pectin type on chelate formation and stability demonstrated that ferric anthocyanin chelates are promising natural blue food colourants. PMID:23411339

  17. Low level laser therapy reduces inflammation in activated Achilles tendinitis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bjordal, Jan M.; Iversen, Vegard; Lopes-Martins, Rodrigo Alvaro B.

    2006-02-01

    Objective: Low level laser therapy (LLLT) has been forwarded as therapy for osteoarthritis and tendinopathy. Results in animal and cell studies suggest that LLLT may act through a biological mechanism of inflammatory modulation. The current study was designed to investigate if LLLT has an anti-inflammatory effect on activated tendinitis of the Achilles tendon. Methods: Seven patients with bilateral Achilles tendonitis (14 tendons) who had aggravated symptoms by pain-inducing activity immediately prior to the study. LLLT (1.8 Joules for each of three points along the Achilles tendon with 904nm infrared laser) and placebo LLLT were administered to either Achilles tendons in a random order to which patients and therapist were blinded. Inflammation was examined by 1) mini-invasive microdialysis for measuring the concentration of inflammatory marker PGE II in the peritendinous tissue, 2) ultrasound with Doppler measurement of peri- and intratendinous blood flow, 3) pressure pain algometry and 4) single hop test. Results: PGE 2- levels were significantly reduced at 75, 90 and 105 minutes after active LLLT compared both to pre-treatment levels (p=0.026) and to placebo LLLT (p=0.009). Changes in pressure pain threshold (PPT) were significantly different (P=0.012) between groups. PPT increased by a mean value of 0.19 kg/cm2 [95%CI:0.04 to 0.34] after treatment in the active LLLT group, while pressure pain threshold was reduced by -0.20 kg/cm2 [95%CI:-0.45 to 0.05] after placebo LLLT. Conclusion: LLLT can be used to reduce inflammatory musculskeletal pain as it reduces inflammation and increases pressure pain threshold levels in activity-induced pain episodes of Achilles tendinopathy.

  18. Recent approaches for reducing hemolytic activity of chemotherapeutic agents.

    PubMed

    Jeswani, Gunjan; Alexander, Amit; Saraf, Shailendra; Saraf, Swarnlata; Qureshi, Azra; Ajazuddin

    2015-08-10

    Drug induced hemolysis is a frequent complication associated with chemotherapy. It results from interaction of drug with erythrocyte membrane and leads to cell lysis. In recent past, various approaches were made to reduce drug-induced hemolysis, which includes drug polymer conjugation, drug delivery via colloidal carriers and hydrogels, co-administration of botanical agents and modification in molecular chemistry of drug molecules. The basic concept behind these strategies is to protect the red blood cells from membrane damaging effects of drugs. There are several examples of drug polymer conjugate that either are approved by Food and Drug Administration or are under clinical trial for delivering drugs with reduced toxicities. Likewise, colloidal carriers are also used successfully nowadays for the delivery of various chemotherapeutic agents like gemcitabine and amphotericin B with remarkable decrease in their hemolytic activity. Similarly, co-administration of botanical agents with drugs works as secondary system proving protection and strength to erythrocyte membranes. In addition to the above statement, interaction hindrance between RBC and drug molecule by molecular modification plays an important role in reducing hemolysis. This review predominantly describes the above recent approaches explored to achieve the reduced hemolytic activity of drugs especially chemotherapeutic agents. PMID:26047758

  19. Induction of the Root Cell Plasma Membrane Ferric Reductase (An Exclusive Role for Fe and Cu).

    PubMed Central

    Cohen, C. K.; Norvell, W. A.; Kochian, L. V.

    1997-01-01

    Induction of ferric reductase activity in dicots and nongrass monocots is a well-recognized response to Fe deficiency. Recent evidence has shown that Cu deficiency also induces plasma membrane Fe reduction. In this study we investigated whether other nutrient deficiencies could also induce ferric reductase activity in roots of pea (Pisum sativum L. cv Sparkle) seedlings. Of the nutrient deficiencies tested (K, Mg, Ca, Mn, Zn, Fe, and Cu), only Cu and Fe deficiencies elicited a response. Cu deficiency induced an activity intermediate between Fe-deficient and control plant activities. To ascertain whether the same reductase is induced by Fe and Cu deficiency, concentration- and pH-dependent kinetics of root ferric reduction were compared in plants grown under control, -Fe, and -Cu conditions. Additionally, rhizosphere acidification, another process induced by Fe deficiency, was quantified in pea seedlings grown under the three regimes. Control, Fe-deficient, and Cu-deficient plants exhibited no major differences in pH optima or Km for the kinetics of ferric reduction. However, the Vmax for ferric reduction was dramatically influenced by plant nutrient status, increasing 16- to 38-fold under Fe deficiency and 1.5- to 4-fold under Cu deficiency, compared with that of control plants. These results are consistent with a model in which varying amounts of the same enzyme are deployed on the plasma membrane in response to plant Fe or Cu status. Rhizosphere acidification rates in the Cu-deficient plants were similarly intermediate between those of the control and Fe-deficient plants. These results suggest that Cu deficiency induces the same responses induced by Fe deficiency in peas. PMID:12223760

  20. Low-chromium reduced-activation ferritic steels for fusion

    SciTech Connect

    Klueh, R.L.; Alexander, D.J.; Kenik, E.A.

    1996-04-01

    Development of reduced-activation ferritic steels has concentrated on high-chromium (8-10 wt% Cr) steels. However, there are advantages for a low-chromium steel, and initial ORNL studies on reduced-activation steels were on compositions with 2.25 to 12% Cr. Those studies showed an Fe-2.25Cr-2W-0.25V-0.1C (2 1/4Cr-2WV) steel to have the highest strenglth of the steels studied. Although this steel had the best strength, Charpy impact properties were inferior to those of an Fe-9Cr-2W-0.25V-0.07Ta-0.1C (9Cr-2WVTa) and an Fe-2.25Cr-2W-0.1C (2 1/4Cr-2W) steel. Therefore, further development of the low-chromium Cr-W steels was required. These results indicate that it is possible to develop low-chromium reduced-activation ferritic steels that have tensile and impact properties as good or better than those of high-chromium (7-9% Cr) steels. Further improvement of properties should be possible by optimizing the composition.

  1. A Ferric-Peroxo Intermediate in the Oxidation of Heme by IsdI.

    PubMed

    Takayama, Shin-Ichi J; Loutet, Slade A; Mauk, A Grant; Murphy, Michael E P

    2015-04-28

    The canonical heme oxygenases (HOs) catalyze heme oxidation via a heme-bound hydroperoxo intermediate that is stabilized by a water cluster at the active site of the enzyme. In contrast, the hydrophobic active site of IsdI, a heme-degrading enzyme from Staphylococcus aureus, lacks a water cluster and is expected to oxidize heme by an alternative mechanism. Reaction of the IsdI-heme complex with either H2O2 or m-chloroperoxybenzoic acid fails to produce a specific oxidized heme iron intermediate, suggesting that ferric-hydroperoxo or ferryl derivatives of IsdI are not involved in the catalytic mechanism of this enzyme. IsdI lacks a proton-donating group in the distal heme pocket, so the possible involvement of a ferric-peroxo intermediate has been evaluated. Density functional theory (DFT) calculations indicate that heme oxidation involving a ferric-peroxo intermediate is energetically accessible, whereas the energy barrier for a reaction involving a ferric-hydroperoxo intermediate is too great in the absence of a proton donor. We propose that IsdI catalyzes heme oxidation through nucleophilic attack by the heme-bound peroxo species. This proposal is consistent with our previous demonstration by nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy that heme ruffling increases the susceptibility of the meso-carbon of heme to nucleophilic attack. PMID:25853501

  2. Knee loading reduces MMP13 activity in the mouse cartilage

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Moderate loads with knee loading enhance bone formation, but its effects on the maintenance of the knee are not well understood. In this study, we examined the effects of knee loading on the activity of matrix metalloproteinase13 (MMP13) and evaluated the role of p38 MAPK and Rac1 GTPase in the regulation of MMP13. Methods Knee loading (0.5–3 N for 5 min) was applied to the right knee of surgically-induced osteoarthritis (OA) mice as well as normal (non-OA) mice, and MMP13 activity in the femoral cartilage was examined. The sham-loaded knee was used as a non-loading control. We also employed primary non-OA and OA human chondrocytes as well as C28/I2 chondrocyte cells, and examined MMP13 activity and molecular signaling in response to shear at 2–20 dyn/cm2. Results Daily knee loading at 1 N for 2 weeks suppressed cartilage destruction in the knee of OA mice. Induction of OA elevated MMP13 activity and knee loading at 1 N suppressed this elevation. MMP13 activity was also increased in primary OA chondrocytes, and this increase was attenuated by applying shear at 10 dyn/cm2. Load-driven reduction in MMP13 was associated with a decrease in the phosphorylation level of p38 MAPK (p-p38) and NFκB (p-NFκB). Molecular imaging using a fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET) technique showed that Rac1 activity was reduced by shear at 10 dyn/cm2 and elevated by it at 20 dyn/cm2. Silencing Rac1 GTPase significantly reduced MMP13 expression and p-p38 but not p-NFκB. Transfection of a constitutively active Rac1 GTPase mutant increased MMP13 activity, while a dominant negative mutant decreased it. Conclusions Knee loading reduces MMP13 activity at least in part through Rac1-mediated p38 MAPK signaling. This study suggests the possibility of knee loading as a therapy not only for strengthening bone but also preventing tissue degradation of the femoral cartilage. PMID:24180431

  3. Niobium Uptake and Release by Bacterial Ferric Ion Binding Protein

    PubMed Central

    Shi, Yanbo; Harvey, Ian; Campopiano, Dominic; Sadler, Peter J.

    2010-01-01

    Ferric ion binding proteins (Fbps) transport FeIII across the periplasm and are vital for the virulence of many Gram negative bacteria. Iron(III) is tightly bound in a hinged binding cleft with octahedral coordination geometry involving binding to protein side chains (including tyrosinate residues) together with a synergistic anion such as phosphate. Niobium compounds are of interest for their potential biological activity, which has been little explored. We have studied the binding of cyclopentadienyl and nitrilotriacetato NbV complexes to the Fbp from Neisseria gonorrhoeae by UV-vis spectroscopy, chromatography, ICP-OES, mass spectrometry, and Nb K-edge X-ray absorption spectroscopy. These data suggest that NbV binds strongly to Fbp and that a dinuclear NbV centre can be readily accommodated in the interdomain binding cleft. The possibility of designing niobium-based antibiotics which block iron uptake by pathogenic bacteria is discussed. PMID:20445753

  4. The biostimulation of anaerobic digestion with (semi)conductive ferric oxides: their potential for enhanced biomethanation.

    PubMed

    Baek, Gahyun; Kim, Jaai; Cho, Kyungjin; Bae, Hyokwan; Lee, Changsoo

    2015-12-01

    The effect of biostimulation with ferric oxides, semiconductive ferric oxyhydroxide, and conductive magnetite on the anaerobic digestion of dairy wastewater was examined in a batch mode. The reactors supplemented with ferric oxyhydroxide (R2) and magnetite (R3) showed significantly enhanced biomethanation performance compared with the control (R1). The removal of chemical oxygen demand (COD) after 30 days was 31.9, 59.3, and 82.5% in R1, R2, and R3, respectively. The consumed COD was almost fully recovered as biogas in R2 and R3, while only 79% was recovered in R1. The total energy production as biogas was accordingly 32.2, 71.0, and 97.7 kJ in R1, R2, and R3, respectively. The reactors also differed in the acid formation profile with more propionate and butyrate found in R1 and more acetate found in R3. The enhanced biomethanation seems to be associated with variations in the bacterial community structure supposedly induced by the ferric oxides added. In contrast, no evident variation was observed in the archaeal community structure among the reactors. The potential electric syntrophy formed between Methanosaeta concilii-like methanogens and electroactive iron-reducing bacteria, particularly Trichococcus, was likely responsible for the enhanced performance. The stimulated growth of fermentative iron reducers may also have contributed by altering the metabolic characteristics of the bacterial communities to produce more favorable acidogenic products for methanogenesis. The overall results suggest the potential of biostimulation with (semi)conductive ferric oxides to enhance the rate and efficiency of the biomethanation of organic wastes. This seems to be potentially attractive, as increasing attention is being paid to the energy self-sufficiency of waste/wastewater treatment processes today. PMID:26272096

  5. 46 CFR 151.50-75 - Ferric chloride solution.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 5 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Ferric chloride solution. 151.50-75 Section 151.50-75 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) CERTAIN BULK DANGEROUS CARGOES BARGES CARRYING BULK LIQUID HAZARDOUS MATERIAL CARGOES Special Requirements § 151.50-75 Ferric chloride...

  6. 46 CFR 151.50-75 - Ferric chloride solution.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 5 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Ferric chloride solution. 151.50-75 Section 151.50-75 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) CERTAIN BULK DANGEROUS CARGOES BARGES CARRYING BULK LIQUID HAZARDOUS MATERIAL CARGOES Special Requirements § 151.50-75 Ferric chloride...

  7. 46 CFR 151.50-75 - Ferric chloride solution.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 5 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Ferric chloride solution. 151.50-75 Section 151.50-75 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) CERTAIN BULK DANGEROUS CARGOES BARGES CARRYING BULK LIQUID HAZARDOUS MATERIAL CARGOES Special Requirements § 151.50-75 Ferric chloride solution. A containment system (cargo tank...

  8. 46 CFR 151.50-75 - Ferric chloride solution.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 5 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Ferric chloride solution. 151.50-75 Section 151.50-75 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) CERTAIN BULK DANGEROUS CARGOES BARGES CARRYING BULK LIQUID HAZARDOUS MATERIAL CARGOES Special Requirements § 151.50-75 Ferric chloride...

  9. 46 CFR 151.50-75 - Ferric chloride solution.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 5 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Ferric chloride solution. 151.50-75 Section 151.50-75 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) CERTAIN BULK DANGEROUS CARGOES BARGES CARRYING BULK LIQUID HAZARDOUS MATERIAL CARGOES Special Requirements § 151.50-75 Ferric chloride...

  10. 21 CFR 582.5306 - Ferric sodium pyrophosphate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Ferric sodium pyrophosphate. 582.5306 Section 582.5306 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) ANIMAL DRUGS, FEEDS, AND RELATED PRODUCTS SUBSTANCES GENERALLY RECOGNIZED AS SAFE Nutrients and/or Dietary Supplements 1 § 582.5306 Ferric...

  11. Blockade of Mast Cell Activation Reduces Cutaneous Scar Formation

    PubMed Central

    Ranzer, Matthew J.; Wilgus, Traci A.; DiPietro, Luisa A.

    2014-01-01

    Damage to the skin initiates a cascade of well-orchestrated events that ultimately leads to repair of the wound. The inflammatory response is key to wound healing both through preventing infection and stimulating proliferation and remodeling of the skin. Mast cells within the tissue are one of the first immune cells to respond to trauma, and upon activation they release pro-inflammatory molecules to initiate recruitment of leukocytes and promote a vascular response in the tissue. Additionally, mast cells stimulate collagen synthesis by dermal fibroblasts, suggesting they may also influence scar formation. To examine the contribution of mast cells in tissue repair, we determined the effects the mast cell inhibitor, disodium cromoglycate (DSCG), on several parameters of dermal repair including, inflammation, re-epithelialization, collagen fiber organization, collagen ultrastructure, scar width and wound breaking strength. Mice treated with DSCG had significantly reduced levels of the inflammatory cytokines IL-1α, IL-1β, and CXCL1. Although DSCG treatment reduced the production of inflammatory mediators, the rate of re-epithelialization was not affected. Compared to control, inhibition of mast cell activity caused a significant decrease in scar width along with accelerated collagen re-organization. Despite the reduced scar width, DSCG treatment did not affect the breaking strength of the healed tissue. Tryptase β1 exclusively produced by mast cells was found to increase significantly in the course of wound healing. However, DSCG treatment did not change its level in the wounds. These results indicate that blockade of mast cell activation reduces scar formation and inflammation without further weakening the healed wound. PMID:24465509

  12. Blockade of mast cell activation reduces cutaneous scar formation.

    PubMed

    Chen, Lin; Schrementi, Megan E; Ranzer, Matthew J; Wilgus, Traci A; DiPietro, Luisa A

    2014-01-01

    Damage to the skin initiates a cascade of well-orchestrated events that ultimately leads to repair of the wound. The inflammatory response is key to wound healing both through preventing infection and stimulating proliferation and remodeling of the skin. Mast cells within the tissue are one of the first immune cells to respond to trauma, and upon activation they release pro-inflammatory molecules to initiate recruitment of leukocytes and promote a vascular response in the tissue. Additionally, mast cells stimulate collagen synthesis by dermal fibroblasts, suggesting they may also influence scar formation. To examine the contribution of mast cells in tissue repair, we determined the effects the mast cell inhibitor, disodium cromoglycate (DSCG), on several parameters of dermal repair including, inflammation, re-epithelialization, collagen fiber organization, collagen ultrastructure, scar width and wound breaking strength. Mice treated with DSCG had significantly reduced levels of the inflammatory cytokines IL-1α, IL-1β, and CXCL1. Although DSCG treatment reduced the production of inflammatory mediators, the rate of re-epithelialization was not affected. Compared to control, inhibition of mast cell activity caused a significant decrease in scar width along with accelerated collagen re-organization. Despite the reduced scar width, DSCG treatment did not affect the breaking strength of the healed tissue. Tryptase β1 exclusively produced by mast cells was found to increase significantly in the course of wound healing. However, DSCG treatment did not change its level in the wounds. These results indicate that blockade of mast cell activation reduces scar formation and inflammation without further weakening the healed wound. PMID:24465509

  13. Strategies to reduce dendritic cell activation through functional biomaterial design

    PubMed Central

    Hume, Patrick S.; He, Jing; Haskins, Kathryn; Anseth, Kristi S.

    2012-01-01

    Dendritic cells play a key role in determining adaptive immunity, and there is growing interest in characterizing and manipulating the interactions between dendritic cells and biomaterial surfaces. Contact with several common biomaterials can induce the maturation of immature dendritic cells, but substrates that reduce dendritic cell maturation are of particular interest within the field of cell-based therapeutics where the goal is to reduce the immune response to cell-laden material carriers. In this study, we use a materials-based strategy to functionalize poly(ethylene glycol) hydrogels with immobilized immunosuppressive factors (TGF-β1 and IL-10) to reduce the maturation of immature dendritic cells. TGF-β1 and IL-10 are commonly employed as soluble factors to program dendritic cells in vitro, and we demonstrate that these proteins retain bioactivity towards dendritic cells when immobilized on hydrogel surfaces. Following stimulation with lipopolysaccharide (LPS) and/or cytokines, a dendritic cell line interacting with the surfaces of immunosuppressive hydrogels expressed reduced markers of maturation, including IL-12 and MHCII. The bioactivity of these immunomodulatory hydrogels was further confirmed with primary bone marrow dendritic cells (BMDCs) isolated from non-obese diabetic (NOD) mice, as quantified by a decrease in activation markers and a significantly reduced capacity to activate T cells. Furthermore, by introducing a second signal to promote BMDC-material interactions combined with the presentation of tolerizing signals, the mulitfunctional PEG hydrogels were found to further increase signaling towards BMDCs, as evidenced by greater reductions in maturation markers. PMID:22361099

  14. Arsenic removal from acidic solutions with biogenic ferric precipitates.

    PubMed

    Ahoranta, Sarita H; Kokko, Marika E; Papirio, Stefano; Özkaya, Bestamin; Puhakka, Jaakko A

    2016-04-01

    Treatment of acidic solution containing 5g/L of Fe(II) and 10mg/L of As(III) was studied in a system consisting of a biological fluidized-bed reactor (FBR) for iron oxidation, and a gravity settler for iron precipitation and separation of the ferric precipitates. At pH 3.0 and FBR retention time of 5.7h, 96-98% of the added Fe(II) precipitated (99.1% of which was jarosite). The highest iron oxidation and precipitation rates were 1070 and 28mg/L/h, respectively, and were achieved at pH 3.0. Subsequently, the effect of pH on arsenic removal through sorption and/or co-precipitation was examined by gradually decreasing solution pH from 3.0 to 1.6 (feed pH). At pH 3.0, 2.4 and 1.6, the highest arsenic removal efficiencies obtained were 99.5%, 80.1% and 7.1%, respectively. As the system had ferric precipitates in excess, decreased arsenic removal was likely due to reduced co-precipitation at pH<2.4. As(III) was partially oxidized to As(V) in the system. In shake flask experiments, As(V) sorbed onto jarosite better than As(III). Moreover, the sorption capacity of biogenic jarosite was significantly higher than that of synthetic jarosite. The developed bioprocess simultaneously and efficiently removes iron and arsenic from acidic solutions, indicating potential for mining wastewater treatment. PMID:26705889

  15. Large roads reduce bat activity across multiple species.

    PubMed

    Kitzes, Justin; Merenlender, Adina

    2014-01-01

    Although the negative impacts of roads on many terrestrial vertebrate and bird populations are well documented, there have been few studies of the road ecology of bats. To examine the effects of large roads on bat populations, we used acoustic recorders to survey bat activity along ten 300 m transects bordering three large highways in northern California, applying a newly developed statistical classifier to identify recorded calls to the species level. Nightly counts of bat passes were analyzed with generalized linear mixed models to determine the relationship between bat activity and distance from a road. Total bat activity recorded at points adjacent to roads was found to be approximately one-half the level observed at 300 m. Statistically significant road effects were also found for the Brazilian free-tailed bat (Tadarida brasiliensis), big brown bat (Eptesicus fuscus), hoary bat (Lasiurus cinereus), and silver-haired bat (Lasionycteris noctivagans). The road effect was found to be temperature dependent, with hot days both increasing total activity at night and reducing the difference between activity levels near and far from roads. These results suggest that the environmental impacts of road construction may include degradation of bat habitat and that mitigation activities for this habitat loss may be necessary to protect bat populations. PMID:24823689

  16. Conformational Preferences Underlying Reduced Activity of a Thermophilic Ribonuclease H

    PubMed Central

    Stafford, Kate A.; Trbovic, Nikola; Butterwick, Joel A.; Abel, Robert; Friesner, Richard A.; Palmer, Arthur G.

    2015-01-01

    The conformational basis for reduced activity of the thermophilic ribonuclease HI enzyme from Thermus thermophilus, compared to its mesophilic homolog from Escherichia coli, is elucidated using a combination of NMR spectroscopy and molecular dynamics (MD) simulations. Explicit-solvent all-atom MD simulations of the two wild-type proteins and an E. coli mutant in which a glycine residue is inserted after position 80 to mimic the T. thermophilus protein reproduce the differences in conformational dynamics determined from 15N spin-relaxation NMR spectroscopy of three loop regions that surround the active site and contain functionally important residues: the glycine-rich region, the handle region, and the β5/αE loop. Examination of the MD trajectories indicates that the thermophilic protein samples conformations productive for substrate binding and activity less frequently than the mesophilic enzyme, although these differences may manifest as either increased or decreased relative flexibility of the different regions. Additional MD simulations indicate that mutations increasing activity of the T. thermophilus enzyme at mesophilic temperatures do so by reconfiguring the local environments of the mutated sites to more closely resemble active conformations. Taken together, the results show that both locally increased and decreased flexibility contribute to an overall reduction in activity of T. thermophilus ribonuclease H compared to its mesophilic E. coli homolog. PMID:25550198

  17. Large Roads Reduce Bat Activity across Multiple Species

    PubMed Central

    Kitzes, Justin; Merenlender, Adina

    2014-01-01

    Although the negative impacts of roads on many terrestrial vertebrate and bird populations are well documented, there have been few studies of the road ecology of bats. To examine the effects of large roads on bat populations, we used acoustic recorders to survey bat activity along ten 300 m transects bordering three large highways in northern California, applying a newly developed statistical classifier to identify recorded calls to the species level. Nightly counts of bat passes were analyzed with generalized linear mixed models to determine the relationship between bat activity and distance from a road. Total bat activity recorded at points adjacent to roads was found to be approximately one-half the level observed at 300 m. Statistically significant road effects were also found for the Brazilian free-tailed bat (Tadarida brasiliensis), big brown bat (Eptesicus fuscus), hoary bat (Lasiurus cinereus), and silver-haired bat (Lasionycteris noctivagans). The road effect was found to be temperature dependent, with hot days both increasing total activity at night and reducing the difference between activity levels near and far from roads. These results suggest that the environmental impacts of road construction may include degradation of bat habitat and that mitigation activities for this habitat loss may be necessary to protect bat populations. PMID:24823689

  18. Energy transduction by anaerobic ferric iron respiration in Thiobacillus ferrooxidans

    SciTech Connect

    Pronk, J.T.; Liem, K.; Bos, P.; Kuenen, J.G. )

    1991-07-01

    Formate-grown cells of the obligately chemolithoautotrophic acidophile Thiobacillus ferrooxidans were capable of formate- and elemental sulfur-dependent reduction of ferric iron under anaerovic conditions. Under aerobic conditions, both oxygen and ferric iron could be simultaneously used as electron acceptors. To investigate whether anaerobic ferric iron respiration by T. ferrooxidans is an energy-transducing process, uptake of amino acids was studied. Glycine uptake by starved cells did not occur in the absence of an electron donor, neither under aerobic conditions nor under anaerobic conditions. Uptake of glycine could be driven by formate- and ferrous iron-dependent oxygen uptake. Under anaerobic conditions, ferric iron respiration with the electron donors formate and elemental sulfur could energize glycine uptake. Glycine uptake was inhibited by the uncoupler 2,4-dinitrophenol. The results indicate that anaerobic ferric iron respiration can contribute to the energy budget of T. ferrooxidans.

  19. Microwave drying of ferric oxide pellets

    SciTech Connect

    Pickles, C.A.; Xia, D.K.

    1997-12-31

    The application of microwave energy for the drying of ferric oxide pellets has been investigated and evaluated. It is shown that the microwave drying rates are much higher than those observed in the conventional process. Also there is some potential for improved quality of the product. As a stand-alone technology it is unlikely that microwave drying would be economical for pellets due to the low cost of conventional fuels. However, based on an understanding of the drying mechanisms in the conventional process and in the microwave process, it is shown that microwave-assisted drying offers considerable potential. In this hybrid process, the advantages of the two drying techniques are combined to provide an improved drying process.

  20. Reduced brain activation in violent adolescents during response inhibition

    PubMed Central

    Qiao, Yi; Mei, Yi; Du, XiaoXia; Xie, Bin; Shao, Yang

    2016-01-01

    Deficits in inhibitory control have been linked to aggression and violent behaviour. This study aimed to observe whether violent adolescents show different brain activation patterns during response inhibition and to ascertain the roles these brain regions play. A self-report method and modified overt aggression scale (MOAS) were used to evaluate violent behaviour. Functional magnetic resonance imaging was performed in 22 violent adolescents and 17 matched healthy subjects aged 12 to 18 years. While scanning, a go/no-go task was performed. Between-group comparisons revealed that activation in the bilateral middle and superior temporal gyrus, hippocampus, and right orbitofrontal area (BA11) regions were significantly reduced in the violent group compared with the control group. Meanwhile, the violent group had more widespread activation in the prefrontal cortex than that observed in the control group. Activation of the prefrontal cortex in the violent group was widespread but lacking in focus, failing to produce intensive activation in some functionally related regions during response inhibition. PMID:26888566

  1. Brown fat activation reduces hypercholesterolaemia and protects from atherosclerosis development

    PubMed Central

    Berbée, Jimmy F. P.; Boon, Mariëtte R; Khedoe, P. Padmini S. J.; Bartelt, Alexander; Schlein, Christian; Worthmann, Anna; Kooijman, Sander; Hoeke, Geerte; Mol, Isabel M.; John, Clara; Jung, Caroline; Vazirpanah, Nadia; Brouwers, Linda P.J.; Gordts, Philip L.S.M.; Esko, Jeffrey D.; Hiemstra, Pieter S.; Havekes, Louis M.; Scheja, Ludger; Heeren, Joerg; Rensen, Patrick C.N.

    2015-01-01

    Brown adipose tissue (BAT) combusts high amounts of fatty acids, thereby lowering plasma triglyceride levels and reducing obesity. However, the precise role of BAT in plasma cholesterol metabolism and atherosclerosis development remains unclear. Here we show that BAT activation by β3-adrenergic receptor stimulation protects from atherosclerosis in hyperlipidemic APOE*3-Leiden.CETP mice, a well-established model for human-like lipoprotein metabolism that unlike hyperlipidemic Apoe−/− and Ldlr−/− mice expresses functional apoE and LDLR. BAT activation increases energy expenditure and decreases plasma triglyceride and cholesterol levels. Mechanistically, we demonstrate that BAT activation enhances the selective uptake of fatty acids from triglyceride-rich lipoproteins into BAT, subsequently accelerating the hepatic clearance of the cholesterol-enriched remnants. These effects depend on a functional hepatic apoE-LDLR clearance pathway as BAT activation in Apoe−/− and Ldlr−/− mice does not attenuate hypercholesterolaemia and atherosclerosis. We conclude that activation of BAT is a powerful therapeutic avenue to ameliorate hyperlipidaemia and protect from atherosclerosis. PMID:25754609

  2. The Phosphate Binder Ferric Citrate and Mineral Metabolism and Inflammatory Markers in Maintenance Dialysis Patients: Results From Prespecified Analyses of a Randomized Clinical Trial

    PubMed Central

    Van Buren, Peter N.; Lewis, Julia B.; Dwyer, Jamie P.; Greene, Tom; Middleton, John; Sika, Mohammed; Umanath, Kausik; Abraham, Josephine D.; Arfeen, Shahabul S.; Bowline, Isai G.; Chernin, Gil; Fadem, Stephen Z.; Goral, Simin; Koury, Mark; Sinsakul, Marvin V.; Weiner, Daniel E.

    2016-01-01

    Background Phosphate binders are the cornerstone of hyperphosphatemia management in dialysis patients. Ferric citrate is an iron-based oral phosphate binder that effectively lowers serum phosphorus levels. Study Design 52-week, open-label, phase 3, randomized, controlled trial for safety-profile assessment. Setting & Participants Maintenance dialysis patients with serum phosphorus levels ≥6.0 mg/dL after washout of prior phosphate binders. Intervention 2:1 randomization to ferric citrate or active control (sevelamer carbonate and/or calcium acetate). Outcomes Changes in mineral bone disease, protein-energy wasting/inflammation, and occurrence of adverse events after 1 year. Measurements Serum calcium, intact parathyroid hormone, phosphorus, aluminum, white blood cell count, percentage of lymphocytes, serum urea nitrogen, and bicarbonate. Results There were 292 participants randomly assigned to ferric citrate, and 149, to active control. Groups were well matched. For mean changes from baseline, phosphorus levels decreased similarly in the ferric citrate and active control groups (−2.04 ± 1.99 [SD] vs −2.18 ± 2.25 mg/dL, respectively; P = 0.9); serum calcium levels increased similarly in the ferric citrate and active control groups (0.22 ± 0.90 vs 0.31 ± 0.95 mg/dL; P = 0.2). Hypercalcemia occurred in 4 participants receiving calcium acetate. Parathyroid hormone levels decreased similarly in the ferric citrate and active control groups (−167.1 ± 399.8 vs −152.7 ± 392.1 pg/mL; P = 0.8). Serum albumin, bicarbonate, serum urea nitrogen, white blood cell count and percentage of lymphocytes, and aluminum values were similar between ferric citrate and active control. Total and low-density lipoprotein cholesterol levels were lower in participants receiving sevelamer than those receiving ferric citrate and calcium acetate. Fewer participants randomly assigned to ferric citrate had serious adverse events compared with active control. Limitations Open

  3. Microbial reduction of ferric iron oxyhydroxides as a way for remediation of grey forest soils heavily polluted with toxic metals by infiltration of acid mine drainage

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Georgiev, Plamen; Groudev, Stoyan; Spasova, Irena; Nicolova, Marina

    2015-04-01

    The abandoned uranium mine Curilo is a permanent source of acid mine drainage (AMD) which steadily contaminated grey forest soils in the area. As a result, the soil pH was highly acidic and the concentration of copper, lead, arsenic, and uranium in the topsoil was higher than the relevant Maximum Admissible Concentration (MAC) for soils. The leaching test revealed that approximately half of each pollutant was presented as a reducible fraction as well as the ferric iron in horizon A was presented mainly as minerals with amorphous structure. So, the approach for remediation of the AMD-affected soils was based on the process of redoxolysis carried out by iron-reducing bacteria. Ferric iron hydroxides reduction and the heavy metals released into soil solutions was studied in the dependence on the source of organic (fresh or silage hay) which was used for growth and activity of soil microflora, initial soil pH (3.65; 4.2; and 5.1), and the ion content of irrigation solutions. The combination of limestone (2.0 g/ kg soil), silage addition (at rate of 45 g dry weight/ kg soil) in the beginning and reiterated at 6 month since the start of soil remediation, and periodical soil irrigation with slightly acidic solutions containing CaCl2 was sufficient the content of lead and arsenic in horizon A to be decreased to concentrations similar to the relevant MAC. The reducible, exchangeable, and carbonate mobile fractions were phases from which the pollutants was leached during the applied soil remediation. It determined the higher reduction of the pollutants bioavailability also as well as the process of ferric iron reduction was combined with neutralization of the soil acidity to pH (H2O) 6.2.

  4. Reduced Variability of Auditory Alpha Activity in Chronic Tinnitus

    PubMed Central

    Schecklmann, Martin; Kreuzer, Peter M.; Vielsmeier, Veronika; Poeppl, Timm B.; Langguth, Berthold

    2014-01-01

    Subjective tinnitus is characterized by the conscious perception of a phantom sound which is usually more prominent under silence. Resting state recordings without any auditory stimulation demonstrated a decrease of cortical alpha activity in temporal areas of subjects with an ongoing tinnitus perception. This is often interpreted as an indicator for enhanced excitability of the auditory cortex in tinnitus. In this study we want to further investigate this effect by analysing the moment-to-moment variability of the alpha activity in temporal areas. Magnetoencephalographic resting state recordings of 21 tinnitus subjects and 21 healthy controls were analysed with respect to the mean and the variability of spectral power in the alpha frequency band over temporal areas. A significant decrease of auditory alpha activity was detected for the low alpha frequency band (8–10 Hz) but not for the upper alpha band (10–12 Hz). Furthermore, we found a significant decrease of alpha variability for the tinnitus group. This result was significant for the lower alpha frequency range and not significant for the upper alpha frequencies. Tinnitus subjects with a longer history of tinnitus showed less variability of their auditory alpha activity which might be an indicator for reduced adaptability of the auditory cortex in chronic tinnitus. PMID:24967106

  5. Designation of alloy composition of reduced-activation martensitic steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kimura, A.; Kayano, H.; Misawa, T.; Matsui, H.

    1994-09-01

    An alloy composition of reduced-activation martensitic steel for fusion reactor is designed on the basis of the experimental results of postirradiation microstructure, mechanical properties, such as creep, fracture toughness and tensile properties, hydrogen effects and corrosion. At present, a desired composition of the steel is 0.1C-0.05Si-0.5Mn-9Cr-2W-0.25V-0.02Ti-0.05Ta- < 0.002S- < 0.002P by weight percent. Effects of the other minor elements such as Al, Zr and B are also inspected. An addition of 0.05 wt% Ta increases the high temperature strength but reduces the fracture toughness. Susceptibility to hydrogen-induced cracking is reduced by an addition of 0.03 wt% Al, though it results in a severe degradation of the fracture toughness. An addition of 30 wppm B together with the addition of 0.02 wt% Ti increases the fracture toughness. Void nucleation at grain boundaries, however, is enhanced by the B addition under the FFTF irradiation at 638 K in 10 dpa.

  6. Active fans and grizzly bears: Reducing risks for wilderness campers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sakals, M. E.; Wilford, D. J.; Wellwood, D. W.; MacDougall, S. A.

    2010-03-01

    Active geomorphic fans experience debris flows, debris floods and/or floods (hydrogeomorphic processes) that can be hazards to humans. Grizzly bears ( Ursus arctos) can also be a hazard to humans. This paper presents the results of a cross-disciplinary study that analyzed both hydrogeomorphic and grizzly bear hazards to wilderness campers on geomorphic fans along a popular hiking trail in Kluane National Park and Reserve in southwestern Yukon Territory, Canada. Based on the results, a method is proposed to reduce the risks to campers associated with camping on fans. The method includes both landscape and site scales and is based on easily understood and readily available information regarding weather, vegetation, stream bank conditions, and bear ecology and behaviour. Educating wilderness campers and providing a method of decision-making to reduce risk supports Parks Canada's public safety program; a program based on the principle of user self-sufficiency. Reducing grizzly bear-human conflicts complements the efforts of Parks Canada to ensure a healthy grizzly bear population.

  7. Lipoicmethylenedioxyphenol Reduces Experimental Atherosclerosis through Activation of Nrf2 Signaling

    PubMed Central

    Ying, Zhekang; Chen, Minjie; Xie, Xiaoyun; Wang, Xiaoke; Kherada, Nisharahmed; Desikan, Rajagopal; Mihai, Georgeta; Burns, Patrick; Sun, Qinghua; Rajagopalan, Sanjay

    2016-01-01

    Objective Oxidative stress is implicated in the pathogenesis of atherosclerosis, and Nrf2 is the transcriptional factor central in cellular antioxidant responses. In the present study, we investigate the effect of a dihydrolipoic acid derivative lipoicmethylenedioxyphenol (LMDP) on the progression of atherosclerosis and test whether its effect on atherosclerosis is mediated by Nrf2. Methods and Results Both magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) scanning and en face analysis reveal that 14 weeks of treatment with LMDP markedly reduced atherosclerotic burden in a rabbit balloon vascular injury model. Myograph analyses show decreased aortic contractile response to phenylephrine and increased aortic response to acetylcholine and insulin in LMDP-treated animals, suggesting that LMDP inhibits atherosclerosis through improving vascular function. A role of Nrf2 signaling in mediating the amelioration of vascular function by LMDP was supported by increased Nrf2 translocation into nuclear and increased expression of Nrf2 target genes. Furthermore, chemotaxis analysis with Boydem chamber shows that leukocytes isolated from LMDP-treated rabbits had reduced chemotaxis, and knock-down of Nrf2 significantly reduced the effect of LMDP on the chemotaxis of mouse macrophages. Conclusion Our results support that LMDP has an anti-atherosclerotic effect likely through activation of Nrf2 signaling and subsequent inhibition of macrophage chemotaxis. PMID:26859892

  8. Scutellarein Reduces Inflammatory Responses by Inhibiting Src Kinase Activity

    PubMed Central

    Sung, Nak Yoon

    2015-01-01

    Flavonoids are plant pigments that have been demonstrated to exert various pharmacological effects including anti-cancer, anti-diabetic, anti-atherosclerotic, anti-bacterial, and anti-inflammatory activities. However, the molecular mechanisms in terms of exact target proteins of flavonoids are not fully elucidated yet. In this study, we aimed to evaluate the anti-inflammatory mechanism of scutellarein (SCT), a flavonoid isolated from Erigeron breviscapus, Clerodendrum phlomidis and Oroxylum indicum Vent that have been traditionally used to treat various inflammatory diseases in China and Brazil. For this purpose, a nitric oxide (NO) assay, polymerase chain reaction (PCR), nuclear fractionation, immunoblot analysis, a kinase assay, and an overexpression strategy were employed. Scutellarein significantly inhibited NO production in a dose-dependent manner and reduced the mRNA expression levels of inducible NO synthase (iNOS) and tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α in lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-activated RAW264.7 cells. In addition, SCT also dampened nuclear factor (NF)-κB-driven expression of a luciferase reporter gene upon transfection of a TIR-domain-containing adapter-inducing interferon-β (TRIF) construct into Human embryonic kidney 293 (HEK 293) cells; similarly, NF-κ B nuclear translocation was inhibited by SCT. Moreover, the phosphorylation levels of various upstream signaling enzymes involved in NF-κB activation were decreased by SCT treatment in LPS-treated RAW264.7 cells. Finally, SCT strongly inhibited Src kinase activity and also inhibited the autophosphorylation of overexpressed Src. Therefore, our data suggest that SCT can block the inflammatory response by directly inhibiting Src kinase activity linked to NF-κB activation. PMID:26330757

  9. Meditation leads to reduced default mode network activity beyond an active task.

    PubMed

    Garrison, Kathleen A; Zeffiro, Thomas A; Scheinost, Dustin; Constable, R Todd; Brewer, Judson A

    2015-09-01

    Meditation has been associated with relatively reduced activity in the default mode network, a brain network implicated in self-related thinking and mind wandering. However, previous imaging studies have typically compared meditation to rest, despite other studies having reported differences in brain activation patterns between meditators and controls at rest. Moreover, rest is associated with a range of brain activation patterns across individuals that has only recently begun to be better characterized. Therefore, in this study we compared meditation to another active cognitive task, both to replicate the findings that meditation is associated with relatively reduced default mode network activity and to extend these findings by testing whether default mode activity was reduced during meditation, beyond the typical reductions observed during effortful tasks. In addition, prior studies had used small groups, whereas in the present study we tested these hypotheses in a larger group. The results indicated that meditation is associated with reduced activations in the default mode network, relative to an active task, for meditators as compared to controls. Regions of the default mode network showing a Group × Task interaction included the posterior cingulate/precuneus and anterior cingulate cortex. These findings replicate and extend prior work indicating that the suppression of default mode processing may represent a central neural process in long-term meditation, and they suggest that meditation leads to relatively reduced default mode processing beyond that observed during another active cognitive task. PMID:25904238

  10. Meditation leads to reduced default mode network activity beyond an active task

    PubMed Central

    Garrison, Kathleen A.; Zeffiro, Thomas A.; Scheinost, Dustin; Constable, R. Todd; Brewer, Judson A.

    2015-01-01

    Meditation has been associated with relatively reduced activity in the default mode network, a brain network implicated in self-related thinking and mind wandering. However, previous imaging studies have typically compared meditation to rest despite other studies reporting differences in brain activation patterns between meditators and controls at rest. Moreover, rest is associated with a range of brain activation patterns across individuals that has only recently begun to be better characterized. Therefore, this study compared meditation to another active cognitive task, both to replicate findings that meditation is associated with relatively reduced default mode network activity, and to extend these findings by testing whether default mode activity was reduced during meditation beyond the typical reductions observed during effortful tasks. In addition, prior studies have used small groups, whereas the current study tested these hypotheses in a larger group. Results indicate that meditation is associated with reduced activations in the default mode network relative to an active task in meditators compared to controls. Regions of the default mode showing a group by task interaction include the posterior cingulate/precuneus and anterior cingulate cortex. These findings replicate and extend prior work indicating that suppression of default mode processing may represent a central neural process in long-term meditation, and suggest that meditation leads to relatively reduced default mode processing beyond that observed during another active cognitive task. PMID:25904238

  11. Reduction of Ferric Leghemoglobin in Soybean Root Nodules 1

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Keuk-Ki; Klucas, Robert V.

    1984-01-01

    Reduction of ferric leghemoglobin to ferrous leghemoglobin in soybean nodules (Glycine max [L.] Merr. cv Woodworth) was studied using a spectrophotometer equipped with an in-cell space diffuse reflectance accessory. Nodule slices prepared and scanned under nitrogen gas showed a ferrous leghemoglobin absorption spectrum. Nodule slices equilibrated with 100% O2 or air exhibited two absorption bands characteristic of oxygenated leghemoglobin. The addition of CO shifted those bands to CO leghemoglobin absorption bands. Potassium ferricyanide was not effective in oxidizing ferrous to ferric leghemoglobin in nodule slices. However, ferric leghemoglobin was formed by treating the nodule slices with hydroxylamine, and this was confirmed by complexing the ferric leghemoglobin to acetate, fluoride, or nicotinic acid. The diminution of ferric leghemoglobin was monitored as a function of time, and in the presence of nicotinic acid, the conversion of ferric to ferrous leghemoglobin was monitored by the appearance of ferrous leghemoglobin nicotinate complex as a function of time. Ferric leghemoglobin reduction was also confirmed by direct transmission spectrophotometry. The evidence presented here suggests that ferrileghemoglobin reduction occurs in nodule slices. PMID:16663546

  12. Activation of Melatonin Receptors Reduces Relapse-Like Alcohol Consumption.

    PubMed

    Vengeliene, Valentina; Noori, Hamid R; Spanagel, Rainer

    2015-12-01

    Melatonin is an endogenous synchronizer of biological rhythms and a modulator of physiological functions and behaviors of all mammals. Reduced levels of melatonin and a delay of its nocturnal peak concentration have been found in alcohol-dependent patients and rats. Here we investigated whether the melatonergic system is a novel target to treat alcohol addiction. Male Wistar rats were subjected to long-term voluntary alcohol consumption with repeated abstinence phases. Circadian drinking rhythmicity and patterns were registered with high temporal resolution by a drinkometer system and analyzed by Fourier analysis. We examined potential antirelapse effect of the novel antidepressant drug agomelatine. Given that agomelatine is a potent MT1 and MT2 receptor agonist and a 5-HT2C antagonist we also tested the effects of melatonin itself and the 5-HT2C antagonist SB242084. All drugs reduced relapse-like drinking. Agomelatine and melatonin administered at the end of the light phase led to very similar changes on all measures of the post-abstinence drinking behavior, suggesting that effects of agomelatine on relapse-like behavior are mostly driven by its melatonergic activity. Both drugs caused a clear phase advance in the diurnal drinking pattern when compared with the control vehicle-treated group and a reduced frequency of approaches to alcohol bottles. Melatonin given at the onset of the light phase had no effect on the circadian phase and very small effects on alcohol consumption. We conclude that targeting the melatonergic system in alcohol-dependent individuals can induce a circadian phase advance, which may restore normal sleep architecture and reduce relapse behavior. PMID:25994077

  13. Ferric carboxymaltose: a review of its use in iron deficiency.

    PubMed

    Keating, Gillian M

    2015-01-01

    Ferric carboxymaltose (Ferinject(®), Injectafer(®)) is an intravenous iron preparation approved in numerous countries for the treatment of iron deficiency. A single high dose of ferric carboxymaltose (up to 750 mg of iron in the US and 1,000 mg of iron in the EU) can be infused in a short time frame (15 min). Consequently, fewer doses of ferric carboxymaltose may be needed to replenish iron stores compared with some other intravenous iron preparations (e.g. iron sucrose). Ferric carboxymaltose improved self-reported patient global assessment, New York Heart Association functional class and exercise capacity in patients with chronic heart failure and iron deficiency in two randomized, placebo-controlled trials (FAIR-HF and CONFIRM-HF). In other randomized controlled trials, ferric carboxymaltose replenished iron stores and corrected anaemia in various populations with iron-deficiency anaemia, including patients with chronic kidney disease, inflammatory bowel disease or heavy uterine bleeding, postpartum iron-deficiency anaemia and perioperative anaemia. Intravenous ferric carboxymaltose was generally well tolerated, with a low risk of hypersensitivity reactions. It was generally better tolerated than oral ferrous sulfate, mainly reflecting a lower incidence of gastrointestinal adverse effects. The most common laboratory abnormality seen in ferric carboxymaltose recipients was transient, asymptomatic hypophosphataemia. The higher acquisition cost of ferric carboxymaltose appeared to be offset by lower costs for other items, with the potential for cost savings. In conclusion, ferric carboxymaltose is an important option for the treatment of iron deficiency. PMID:25428711

  14. PARP1 Val762Ala polymorphism reduces enzymatic activity

    SciTech Connect

    Wang Xiaogan; Wang Zhaoqi; Tong Weimin . E-mail: tong@iarc.fr; Shen Yan

    2007-03-02

    Poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase 1 (PARP1) modifies a variety of nuclear proteins by poly(ADP-ribosyl)ation, and plays diverse roles in molecular and cellular processes. A common PARP1 single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) at codon 762, resulting in the substitution of alanine (Ala) for valine (Val) in the catalytic domain has been implicated in susceptibility to cancer. To characterize the functional effect of this polymorphism on PARP1, we performed in vitro enzymatic analysis on PARP1-Ala762 and PARP1-Val762. We found that PARP1-Ala762 displayed 57.2% of the activity of PARP1-Val762 for auto-poly(ADP-ribosyl)ation and 61.9% of the activity of PARP1-Val762 for trans-poly(ADP-ribosyl)ation of histone H1. The kinetic characterization revealed that the K {sub m} of PARP1-Ala762 was increased to a 1.2-fold of the K {sub m} of PARP1-Val762 for trans-poly(ADP-ribosyl)ation. Thus, the PARP1 Val762Ala polymorphism reduces the enzymatic activity of PARP1 by increasing K {sub m}. This finding suggests that different levels of poly(ADP-ribosyl)ation by PARP1 might aid in understanding Cancer risk of carriers of the PARP1 Val762Ala polymorphism.

  15. The crystal chemistry of ferric oxyhydroxyapatite.

    PubMed

    Low, H R; Phonthammachai, N; Maignan, A; Stewart, G A; Bastow, T J; Ma, L L; White, T J

    2008-12-15

    Ferric hydroxyapatites (Fe-HAp) and oxyapatites (Fe-OAp) of nominal composition [Ca(10-x)Fe(x)(3+)][(PO(4))(6)][(OH)(2-x)O(x)] (0 < or = x < or = 0.5) were synthesized from a coprecipitated precursor calcined under flowing nitrogen. The solid solubility of iron was temperature-dependent, varying from x = 0.5 after firing at 600 degrees C to x approximately 0.2 at 1000 degrees C, beyond which Fe-OAp was progressively replaced by tricalcium phosphate (Fe-TCP). Crystal size (13-116 nm) was controlled by iron content and calcination temperature. Ferric iron replaces calcium by two altervalent mechanisms in which carbonate and oxygen are incorporated as counterions. At low iron loadings, carbonate predominantly displaces hydroxyl in the apatite channels (Ca(2+) + OH(-) --> Fe(3+) + CO(3)(2-)), while at higher loadings, "interstitial" oxygen is tenanted in the framework (2Ca(2+) + (vac) --> 2Fe(3+) + O(2+)). Although Fe(3+) is smaller than Ca(2+), the unit cell dilates as iron enters apatite, providing evidence of oxygen injection that converts PO(4) tetrahedra to PO(5) trigonal bipyramids, leading to the crystal chemical formula [Ca(10-x)Fe(x)][(PO(4))(6-x/2)(PO(5))(x/2)][(OH)(2-y)O(2y)] (x < or = 0.5). A discontinuity in unit cell expansion at x approximately 0.2 combined with a substantial reduction of the carbonate FTIR fingerprint shows that oxygen infusion, rather than tunnel hydroxyl displacement, is dominant beyond this loading. This behavior is in contrast to ferrous-fluorapatite where Ca(2+) --> Fe(2+) aliovalent replacement does not require oxygen penetration and the cell volume contracts with iron loading. All of the materials were paramagnetic, but at low iron concentrations, a transition arising from crystallographic modification or a change in spin ordering is observed at 90 K. The excipient behavior of Fe-OAp was superior to that of HAp and may be linked to the crystalline component or mediated by a ubiquitous nondiffracting amorphous phase. Fe-HAp and Fe

  16. The fission yeast ferric reductase gene frp1+ is required for ferric iron uptake and encodes a protein that is homologous to the gp91-phox subunit of the human NADPH phagocyte oxidoreductase.

    PubMed Central

    Roman, D G; Dancis, A; Anderson, G J; Klausner, R D

    1993-01-01

    We have identified a cell surface ferric reductase activity in the fission yeast Schizosaccharomyces pombe. A mutant strain deficient in this activity was also deficient in ferric iron uptake, while ferrous iron uptake was not impaired. Therefore, reduction is a required step in cellular ferric iron acquisition. We have cloned frp1+, the wild-type allele of the mutant gene. frp1+ mRNA levels were repressed by iron addition to the growth medium. Fusion of 138 nucleotides of frp1+ promoter sequences to a reporter gene, the bacterial chloramphenicol acetyltransferase gene, conferred iron-dependent regulation upon the latter when introduced into S. pombe. The predicted amino acid sequence of the frp1+ gene exhibits hydrophobic regions compatible with transmembrane domains. It shows similarity to the Saccharomyces cerevisiae FRE1 gene product and the gp91-phox protein, a component of the human NADPH phagocyte oxidoreductase that is deficient in X-linked chronic granulomatous disease. Images PMID:8321236

  17. High-frequency TRNS reduces BOLD activity during visuomotor learning.

    PubMed

    Saiote, Catarina; Polanía, Rafael; Rosenberger, Konstantin; Paulus, Walter; Antal, Andrea

    2013-01-01

    Transcranial direct current stimulation (tDCS) and transcranial random noise stimulation (tRNS) consist in the application of electrical current of small intensity through the scalp, able to modulate perceptual and motor learning, probably by changing brain excitability. We investigated the effects of these transcranial electrical stimulation techniques in the early and later stages of visuomotor learning, as well as associated brain activity changes using functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI). We applied anodal and cathodal tDCS, low-frequency and high-frequency tRNS (lf-tRNS, 0.1-100 Hz; hf-tRNS 101-640 Hz, respectively) and sham stimulation over the primary motor cortex (M1) during the first 10 minutes of a visuomotor learning paradigm and measured performance changes for 20 minutes after stimulation ceased. Functional imaging scans were acquired throughout the whole experiment. Cathodal tDCS and hf-tRNS showed a tendency to improve and lf-tRNS to hinder early learning during stimulation, an effect that remained for 20 minutes after cessation of stimulation in the late learning phase. Motor learning-related activity decreased in several regions as reported previously, however, there was no significant modulation of brain activity by tDCS. In opposition to this, hf-tRNS was associated with reduced motor task-related-activity bilaterally in the frontal cortex and precuneous, probably due to interaction with ongoing neuronal oscillations. This result highlights the potential of lf-tRNS and hf-tRNS to differentially modulate visuomotor learning and advances our knowledge on neuroplasticity induction approaches combined with functional imaging methods. PMID:23527247

  18. Baicalein Reduces the Invasion of Glioma Cells via Reducing the Activity of p38 Signaling Pathway

    PubMed Central

    Lei, Xiaoming; Li, Siyuan; Zhang, Yong; Meng, Lihua; Xue, Rongliang; Li, Zongfang

    2014-01-01

    Baicalein, one of the major flavonids in Scutellaria baicalensis, has historically been used in anti-inflammatory and anti-cancer therapies. However, the anti-metastatic effect and related mechanism(s) in glioma are still unclear. In this study, we thus utilized glioma cell lines U87MG and U251MG to explore the effect of baicalein. We found that administration of baicalein significantly inhibited migration and invasion of glioma cells. In addition, after treating with baicalein for 24 h, there was a decrease in the levels of matrix metalloproteinase-2 (MMP-2) and MMP-9 expression as well as proteinase activity in glioma cells. Conversely, the expression of tissue inhibitor of metalloproteinase-1 (TIMP-1) and TIMP-2 was increased in a dose-dependent manner. Moreover, baicalein treatment significantly decreased the phosphorylated level of p38, but not ERK1/2, JNK1/2 and PI3K/Akt. Combined treatment with a p38 inhibitor (SB203580) and baicalein resulted in the synergistic reduction of MMP-2 and MMP-9 expression and then increase of TIMP-1 and TIMP-2 expression; and the invasive capabilities of U87MG cells were also inhibited. However, p38 chemical activator (anisomycin) could block these effects produced by baicalein, suggesting baicalein directly downregulate the p38 signaling pathway. In conclusion, baicalein inhibits glioma cells invasion and metastasis by reducing cell motility and migration via suppression of p38 signaling pathway, suggesting that baicalein is a potential therapeutic agent for glioma. PMID:24587321

  19. Application of granular ferric hydroxides for removal elevated concentrations of arsenic from mine waters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Szlachta, Małgorzata; Włodarczyk, Paweł; Wójtowicz, Patryk

    2015-04-01

    Arsenic is naturally occurring element in the environment. Over three hundred minerals are known to contain some form of arsenic and among them arsenopyrite is the most common one. Arsenic-bearing minerals are frequently associated with ores containing mined metals such as copper, tin, nickel, lead, uranium, zinc, cobalt, platinum and gold. In the aquatic environment arsenic is typically present in inorganic forms, mainly in two oxidation states (+5, +3). As(III) is dominant in more reduced conditions, whereas As(V) is mostly present in an oxidizing environment. However, due to certain human activities the elevated arsenic levels in aquatic ecosystems are arising to a serious environmental problem. High arsenic concentrations found in surface and groundwaters, in some regions originate from mining activities and ore processing. Therefore, the major concern of mining industry is to maintain a good quality of effluents discharged in large volumes. This requires constant monitoring of effluents quality that guarantee the efficient protection of the receiving waters and reacting to possible negative impact of contamination on local communities. A number of proven technologies are available for arsenic removal from waters and wastewaters. In the presented work special attention is given to the adsorption method as a technically feasible, commonly applied and effective technique for the treatment of arsenic rich mine effluents. It is know that arsenic has a strong affinity towards iron rich materials. Thus, in this study the granular ferric hydroxides (CFH 12, provided by Kemira Oyj, Finland) was applied to remove As(III) and As(V) from aqueous solutions. The batch adsorption experiments were carried out to assess the efficiency of the tested Fe-based material under various operating parameters, including composition of treated water, solution pH and temperature. The results obtained from the fixed bed adsorption tests demonstrated the benefits of applying granular

  20. Biological regeneration of ferric (Fe3+) solution during desulphurisation of gaseous streams: effect of nutrients and support material.

    PubMed

    Mulopo, Jean; Schaefer, L

    2015-01-01

    This paper evaluates the biological regeneration of ferric Fe3+ solution during desulphurisation of gaseous streams. Hydrogen sulphide (H2S) is absorbed into aqueous ferric sulphate solution and oxidised to elemental sulphur, while ferric ions Fe3+ are reduced to ferrous ions Fe2+. During the industrial regeneration of Fe3+, nutrients and trace minerals usually provided in a laboratory setup are not present and this depletion of nutrients may have a negative impact on the bacteria responsible for ferrous iron oxidation and may probably affect the oxidation rate. In this study, the effect of nutrients and trace minerals on ferrous iron oxidation have been investigated and the results showed that the presence of nutrients and trace minerals affects the efficiency of bacterial Fe2+oxidation. The scanning electron microscopy analysis of the geotextile support material was also conducted and the results showed that the iron precipitate deposits appear to play a direct role on the bacterial biofilm formation. PMID:26038932

  1. 21 CFR 73.2298 - Ferric ammonium ferrocyanide.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... LISTING OF COLOR ADDITIVES EXEMPT FROM CERTIFICATION Cosmetics § 73.2298 Ferric ammonium ferrocyanide. (a... ferrocyanide is safe for use in coloring externally applied cosmetics, including cosmetics applied to the...

  2. 21 CFR 73.2298 - Ferric ammonium ferrocyanide.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... LISTING OF COLOR ADDITIVES EXEMPT FROM CERTIFICATION Cosmetics § 73.2298 Ferric ammonium ferrocyanide. (a... ferrocyanide is safe for use in coloring externally applied cosmetics, including cosmetics applied to the...

  3. 21 CFR 73.2298 - Ferric ammonium ferrocyanide.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... LISTING OF COLOR ADDITIVES EXEMPT FROM CERTIFICATION Cosmetics § 73.2298 Ferric ammonium ferrocyanide. (a... ferrocyanide is safe for use in coloring externally applied cosmetics, including cosmetics applied to the...

  4. 21 CFR 73.2298 - Ferric ammonium ferrocyanide.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... LISTING OF COLOR ADDITIVES EXEMPT FROM CERTIFICATION Cosmetics § 73.2298 Ferric ammonium ferrocyanide. (a... ferrocyanide is safe for use in coloring externally applied cosmetics, including cosmetics applied to the...

  5. 21 CFR 73.2298 - Ferric ammonium ferrocyanide.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... LISTING OF COLOR ADDITIVES EXEMPT FROM CERTIFICATION Cosmetics § 73.2298 Ferric ammonium ferrocyanide. (a... ferrocyanide is safe for use in coloring externally applied cosmetics, including cosmetics applied to the...

  6. Functional Analysis of the Ferric Uptake Regulator Gene fur in Xanthomonas vesicatoria

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Huiqin; Dong, Chunling; Zhao, Tingchang; Han, Jucai; Wang, Tieling; Wen, Xiangzhen; Huang, Qi

    2016-01-01

    Iron is essential for the growth and survival of many organisms. Intracellular iron homeostasis must be maintained for cell survival and protection against iron toxicity. The ferric uptake regulator protein (Fur) regulates the high-affinity ferric uptake system in many bacteria. To investigate the function of the fur gene in Xanthomonas vesicatoria (Xv), we generated a fur mutant strain, fur-m, by site-directed mutagenesis. Whereas siderophore production increased in the Xv fur mutant, extracellular polysaccharide production, biofilm formation, swimming ability and quorum sensing signals were all significantly decreased. The fur mutant also had significantly reduced virulence in tomato leaves. The above-mentioned phenotypes significantly recovered when the Xv fur mutation allele was complemented with a wild-type fur gene. Thus, Fur either negatively or positively regulates multiple important physiological functions in Xv. PMID:26910324

  7. Method of inhibiting crosslinking of aqueous xanthan gums in the presence of ferric acid ions

    SciTech Connect

    Crowe, C.W.

    1982-03-02

    The cross linking of aqueous xanthan gums in the presence of ferric ions is inhibited or prevented by adding a soluble alkanoic and/or alkenoic acid having at least 4 carbon atoms and bearing at least 2 hydroxyl groups per molecule, and/or a soluble salt of ..gamma..-lactone. This combination of ingredients forms gelled acid compositions which are useful in acidizing treatments of wells. The gelled acid compositions are viscous fluids which have increased stability against shear and thermal degradation and other properties which result in retarded reaction rates and reduced fluid leak-off during acidizing treatments of subterranean formations surrounding well bores. The aqueous gelled acids have the further advantage of inhibiting or preventing the formation of insoluble compounds, such as ferric hydroxide, during such acidizing treatments. 13 claims.

  8. Carvedilol and trimetazidine attenuates ferric nitrilotriacetate-induced oxidative renal injury in rats.

    PubMed

    Singh, Devinder; Chander, Vikas; Chopra, Kanwaljit

    2003-09-30

    Intraperitoneal (i.p.) injection of ferric nitrilotriacetate (Fe-NTA) induces acute proximal tubular necrosis as a consequence of lipid peroxidation and oxidative tissue damage, which eventually leads to high incidence of renal adenocarcinoma in rodents. This study was designed to investigate the effect of carvedilol, an antihypertensive and trimetazidine, an antiischemic, both the drugs with additional antioxidative potentials, on Fe-NTA induced nephrotoxicity in rats. One hour after a single i.p. injection of Fe-NTA (8 mg iron per kg), a marked deterioration of renal architecture and renal function as evidenced by a sharp increase in blood urea nitrogen (BUN) and serum creatinine was observed. Fe-NTA induced a significant renal oxidative stress demonstrated by elevated thiobarbituric acid reacting substances (TBARS) and reduction in activities of renal catalase, superoxide dismutase (SOD) and glutathione reductase (GR). Pretreatment of animals with carvedilol (2 mg/kg, i.p.) as well as with trimetazidine (3 mg/kg, i.p.), 30 min before Fe-NTA administration markedly attenuated renal dysfunction, reduced elevated TBARS, restored the depleted renal antioxidant enzymes and normalised the renal morphological alterations. These results clearly demonstrate the role of oxidative stress and its relation to renal dysfunction, and suggest a protective effect of carvedilol and trimetazidine on Fe-NTA-induced nephrotoxicity in rats. PMID:12965117

  9. Cathepsin G activity lowers plasma LDL and reduces atherosclerosis

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Jing; Sjöberg, Sara; Tang, Ting-Ting; Öörni, Katariina; Wu, Wenxue; Liu, Conglin; Secco, Blandine; Tia, Viviane; Sukhova, Galina K.; Fernandes, Cleverson; Lesner, Adam; Kovanen, Petri T.; Libby, Peter; Cheng, Xiang; Shi, Guo-Ping

    2014-01-01

    Cathepsin G (CatG), a serine protease present in mast cells and neutrophils, can produce angiotensin-II (Ang-II) and degrade elastin. Here we demonstrate increased CatG expression in smooth muscle cells (SMCs), endothelial cells (ECs), macrophages, and T cells from human atherosclerotic lesions. In low-density lipoprotein (LDL) receptor-deficient (Ldlr−/−) mice, the absence of CatG reduces arterial wall elastin degradation and attenuates early atherosclerosis when mice consume a Western diet for 3 months. When mice consume this diet for 6 months, however, CatG deficiency exacerbates atherosclerosis in aortic arch without affecting lesion inflammatory cell content or extracellular matrix accumulation, but raises plasma total cholesterol and LDL levels without affecting high-density lipoprotein (HDL) or triglyceride levels. Patients with atherosclerosis also have significantly reduced plasma CatG levels that correlate inversely with total cholesterol (r= −0.535, P<0.0001) and LDL cholesterol (r= −0.559, P<0.0001), but not with HDL cholesterol (P=0.901) or triglycerides (P=0.186). Such inverse correlations with total cholesterol (r= −0.504, P<0.0001) and LDL cholesterol (r= −0.502, P<0.0001) remain significant after adjusting for lipid lowering treatments among this patient population. Human CatG degrades purified human LDL, but not HDL. This study suggests that CatG promotes early atherogenesis through its elastinolytic activity, but suppresses late progression of atherosclerosis by degrading LDL without affecting HDL or triglycerides. PMID:25092171

  10. Comparative proteomic analysis of sulfur-oxidizing Acidithiobacillus ferrooxidans CCM 4253 cultures having lost the ability to couple anaerobic elemental sulfur oxidation with ferric iron reduction.

    PubMed

    Kucera, Jiri; Sedo, Ondrej; Potesil, David; Janiczek, Oldrich; Zdrahal, Zbynek; Mandl, Martin

    2016-09-01

    In extremely acidic environments, ferric iron can be a thermodynamically favorable electron acceptor during elemental sulfur oxidation by some Acidithiobacillus spp. under anoxic conditions. Quantitative 2D-PAGE proteomic analysis of a resting cell suspension of a sulfur-grown Acidithiobacillus ferrooxidans CCM 4253 subculture that had lost its iron-reducing activity revealed 147 protein spots that were downregulated relative to an iron-reducing resting cell suspension of the antecedent sulfur-oxidizing culture and 111 that were upregulated. Tandem mass spectrometric analysis of strongly downregulated spots identified several physiologically important proteins that apparently play roles in ferrous iron oxidation, including the outer membrane cytochrome Cyc2 and rusticyanin. Other strongly repressed proteins were associated with sulfur metabolism, including heterodisulfide reductase, thiosulfate:quinone oxidoreductase and sulfide:quinone reductase. Transcript-level analyses revealed additional downregulation of other respiratory genes. Components of the iron-oxidizing system thus apparently play central roles in anaerobic sulfur oxidation coupled with ferric iron reduction in the studied microbial strain. PMID:27394989

  11. Hydrolysis of ferric chloride in solution

    SciTech Connect

    Lussiez, G.; Beckstead, L.

    1996-11-01

    The Detox{trademark} process uses concentrated ferric chloride and small amounts of catalysts to oxidize organic compounds. It is under consideration for oxidizing transuranic organic wastes. Although the solution is reused extensively, at some point it will reach the acceptable limit of radioactivity or maximum solubility of the radioisotopes. This solution could be cemented, but the volume would be increased substantially because of the poor compatibility of chlorides and cement. A process has been developed that recovers the chloride ions as HCl and either minimizes the volume of radioactive waste or permits recycling of the radioactive chlorides. The process involves a two-step hydrolysis at atmospheric pressure, or preferably under a slight vacuum, and relatively low temperature, about 200{degrees}C. During the first step of the process, hydrolysis occurs according to the reaction below: FeCl{sub 3 liquid} + H{sub 2}O {r_arrow} FeOCl{sub solid} + 2 HCl{sub gas} During the second step, the hot, solid, iron oxychloride is sprayed with water or placed in contact with steam, and hydrolysis proceeds to the iron oxide according to the following reaction: 2 FeOCl{sub solid} + H{sub 2}O {r_arrow} Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3 solid} + 2 HCl{sub gas}. The iron oxide, which contains radioisotopes, can then be disposed of by cementation or encapsulation. Alternately, these chlorides can be washed off of the solids and can then either be recycled or disposed of in some other way.

  12. Hydrogen and Ferric Iron in Mars Materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dyar, Melinda D.

    2004-01-01

    Knowledge of oxygen and hydrogen fugacity is of paramount importance in constraining phase equilibria and crystallization processes of melts, as well as understanding the partitioning of elements between the cope and silicate portions of terrestrial planets. H and Fe(3+) must both be analyzed in order to reconstruct hydrogen and oxygen fugacities on Mars. To date, SIMS data have elucidated D/H and H contents of hydrous phases in SNC meteorites, but until now anhydrous martian minerals have not been systematically examined for trace hydrogen. Ferric iron has been quantified using XANES in many martian phases, but integrated studies of both Fe(3+) and H on the same spots are really needed to address the H budget. Finally, the effects of shock on both Fe(3+) and H in hydrous and anhydrous phases must be quantified. Thus, the overall goal of this research was to understand the oxygen and hydrogen fugacities under which martian samples crystallized. In this research one-year project, we approached this problem by 1) characterizing Fe(3+) and H contents of SNC meteorites using both bulk (Mossbauer spectroscopy and uranium extraction, respectively) and microscale (synchrotron micro-XANES and SIMS) methods; 2) relating Fe(3+) and H contents of martian minerals to their oxygen and hydrogen fugacities through analysis of experimentally equilibrated phases (for pyroxene) and through study of volcanic rocks in which the oxygen and hydrogen fugacities can be independently constrained (for feldspar); and 3) studying the effects of shock processes on Fe(3+) and H contents of the phases of interest. Results have been used to assess quantitatively the distribution of H and Fe(3+) among phases in the martian interior, which will better constrain the geodynamic processes of the interior, as well as the overall hydrogen and water budgets on Mars. There were no inventions funded by this research.

  13. Tritium retention in reduced-activation ferritic/martensitic steels

    SciTech Connect

    Hatano, Y.; Abe, S.; Matsuyama, M.; Alimov, V.K.; Spitsyn, A.V.; Bobyr, N.P.; Cherkez, D.I.; Khripunov, B.I.; Golubeva, A.V.; Ogorodnikova, O.V.; Klimov, N.S.; Chernov, V.M.; Oyaidzu, M.; Yamanishi, T.

    2015-03-15

    Reduced-activation ferritic/martensitic (RAFM) steels are structural material candidates for breeding blankets of future fusion reactors. Therefore, tritium (T) retention in RAFM steels is an important problem in assessing the T inventory of blankets. In this study, specimens of RAFM steels were subjected to irradiation of 20 MeV W ions to 0.54 displacements per atom (dpa), exposure to high flux D plasmas at 400 and 600 K and that to pulsed heat loads. The specimens thus prepared were exposed to DT gas at 473 K. Despite severe modification in the surface morphology, heat loads had negligible effects on T retention. Significant increase in T retention at the surface and/or subsurface was observed after D plasma exposure. However, T trapped at the surface/subsurface layer was easily removed by maintaining the specimens in the air at about 300 K. Displacement damage led to increase in T retention in the bulk due to the trapping effects of defects, and T trapped was stable at 300 K. It was therefore concluded that displacement damages had the largest influence on T retention under the present conditions.

  14. Materials design data for reduced activation martensitic steel type EUROFER

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tavassoli, A.-A. F.; Alamo, A.; Bedel, L.; Forest, L.; Gentzbittel, J.-M.; Rensman, J.-W.; Diegele, E.; Lindau, R.; Schirra, M.; Schmitt, R.; Schneider, H. C.; Petersen, C.; Lancha, A.-M.; Fernandez, P.; Filacchioni, G.; Maday, M. F.; Mergia, K.; Boukos, N.; Baluc; Spätig, P.; Alves, E.; Lucon, E.

    2004-08-01

    Materials design limits derived so far from the data generated in Europe for the reduced activation ferritic/martensitic (RAFM) steel type Eurofer are presented. These data address the short-term needs of the ITER Test Blanket Modules and a DEMOnstration fusion reactor. Products tested include plates, bars, tubes, TIG and EB welds, as well as powder consolidated blocks and solid-solid HIP joints. Effects of thermal ageing and low dose neutron irradiation are also included. Results are sorted and screened according to design code requirements before being introduced in reference databases. From the physical properties databases, variations of magnetic properties, modulus of elasticity, density, thermal conductivity, thermal diffusivity, specific heat, mean and instantaneous linear coefficients of thermal expansion versus temperature are derived. From the tensile and creep properties databases design allowable stresses are derived. From the instrumented Charpy impact and fracture toughness databases, ductile to brittle transition temperature, toughness and behavior of materials in different fracture modes are evaluated. From the fatigue database, total strain range versus number of cycles to failure curves are plotted and used to derive fatigue design curves. Cyclic curves are also derived and compared with monotonic hardening curves. Finally, irradiated and aged materials data are compared to ensure that the safety margins incorporated in unirradiated design limits are not exceeded.

  15. Ferric chloride based downstream process for microalgae based biodiesel production.

    PubMed

    Seo, Yeong Hwan; Sung, Mina; Kim, Bohwa; Oh, You-Kwan; Kim, Dong Yeon; Han, Jong-In

    2015-04-01

    In this study, ferric chloride (FeCl3) was used to integrate downstream processes (harvesting, lipid extraction, and esterification). At concentration of 200 mg/L and at pH 3, FeCl3 exhibited an expected degree of coagulation and an increase in cell density of ten times (170 mg/10 mL). An iron-mediated oxidation reaction, Fenton-like reaction, was used to extract lipid from the harvested biomass, and efficiency of 80% was obtained with 0.5% H2O2 at 90 °C. The iron compound was also employed in the esterification step, and converted free fatty acids to fatty acid methyl esters under acidic conditions; thus, the fatal problem of saponification during esterification with alkaline catalysts was avoided, and esterification efficiency over 90% was obtained. This study clearly showed that FeCl3 in the harvesting process is beneficial in all downstream steps and have a potential to greatly reduce the production cost of microalgae-originated biodiesel. PMID:25647024

  16. Comparative Evaluation of Aluminum Sulfate and Ferric Sulfate-Induced Coagulations as Pretreatment of Microfiltration for Treatment of Surface Water

    PubMed Central

    Song, Yali; Dong, Bingzhi; Gao, Naiyun; Deng, Yang

    2015-01-01

    Two coagulants, aluminum sulfate and ferric chloride, were tested to reduce natural organic matter (NOM) as a pretreatment prior to polyvinylidene fluoride (PVDF) microfiltration (MF) membranes for potable water treatment. The results showed that the two coagulants exhibited different treatment performance in NOM removal. Molecular weight (MW) distributions of NOM in the tested surface raw water were concentrated at 3–5 kDa and approximately 0.2 kDa. Regardless of the coagulant species and dosages, the removal of 0.2 kDa NOM molecules was limited. In contrast, NOM at 3–5 kDa were readily removed with increasing coagulant dosages. In particular, aluminum sulfate favorably removed NOM near 5 kDa, whereas ferric chloride tended to reduce 3 kDa organic substances. Although aluminum sulfate and ferric chloride could improve the flux of the ensuing MF treatment, the optimal coagulant dosages to achieve effective pretreatment were different: 2–30 mg/L for aluminum sulfate and >15 mg/L for ferric chloride. The scanning electron microscope (SEM) image of the membrane-filtered coagulated raw water showed that coagulation efficiency dramatically affected membrane flux and that good coagulation properties can reduce membrane fouling. PMID:26075726

  17. Enhanced coagulation of ferric chloride aided by tannic acid for phosphorus removal from wastewater.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Yunan; Xing, Xin-Hui; Liu, Zehua; Cui, Liwen; Yu, Anfeng; Feng, Quan; Yang, Haijun

    2008-05-01

    Phosphorus removal from wastewater is of great importance. In the present study, ferric chloride was selected as the coagulant, and tannic acid (TA), a natural polymer, as the coagulant aid to develop an effective coagulation process with the emphasis of phosphorus recovery from different types of wastewater. The results showed that TA can accelerate the settling speed by forming flocs with large size, reduce the residual Fe(III) to eliminate the yellow color caused by Fe(III), and slightly increase the phosphorus removal efficiency. The precipitate formed by TA-aided coagulation showed the advantage of releasing phosphorus faster than ferric phosphate, indicating the possibility of phosphorus recovery from wastewater as slow release fertilizer. To further understand the structural characteristics of the precipitate, analytical techniques such as Raman spectroscopy, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy and matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization-time of flight mass spectrometry were employed. The analytical results indicated that TA-Fe-P complex was formed during the coagulation/flocculation processes. Solid phase in the precipitate consisted of TA-Fe-P complex, Fe-TA complex and/or ferric hydroxyphosphate. PMID:18395769

  18. Hydrocarbon microseepage detection based on normalized ferric and ferrous indices of Landsat imagery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, M.; Xie, H.; Liu, D.; Zhang, Y.

    2006-05-01

    Ferric index (TM 3/1) (Fe3), ferrous index (TM 5/4) (Fe2), and clay and/or carbonate index (TM 5/7) have been successfully applied in mapping hydrothermal-alteration minerals, soil types, organics abundance, and mine waste. However, the ferric/ferrous indices do not work well when they are applied to detect relative oxidation/reduction area in hydrocarbon microseepage regions where the total iron and iron ion types are different in background rocks or soils. For example, there is relative high ferrous in organic-rich sediments and basic igneous rock, such as in coal-bearing beds. Clearly, the high ferrous concentration is not resulted from exotic reduction. Usually, under a homogeneous exotic reduced condition, the higher the total iron in rock or soil, the more the transferred ferrous iron produced. In order to remove the effects of total iron difference in rocks and soils on hydrocarbon microseepage detection, a new method, referred to as normalized ferric and ferrous index, is developed in this study, i.e. the normalized ferric index (NFe3) = Fe3 / (Fe3 + Fe2) and the normalized ferrous index (NFe2) = Fe2 / (Fe3 + Fe2). The NFe3 and NFe2 are successfully applied and tested in two sites for hydrocarbon microseepage detection in oil/gas-bearing Ordos Basin and Eren Basin, China. The NFe3 and NFe2 index images can preserve not only the major information of the ratio 3/1 and 5/4 images, but also remove the effects of total iron in background. Comparing to the mineral composite image (TM 3/1, 5/4, and 5/7 in RGB), the normalized indices color composite image (NFe3, NFe2, and TM5/7 in RGB) shows hydrocarbon microseepage areas clearly in green color. In addition, the composite images of normalized index also remove the vegetation effect to some degree in the test sites.

  19. Constitutive adipocyte mTORC1 activation enhances mitochondrial activity and reduces visceral adiposity in mice.

    PubMed

    Magdalon, Juliana; Chimin, Patricia; Belchior, Thiago; Neves, Rodrigo X; Vieira-Lara, Marcel A; Andrade, Maynara L; Farias, Talita S; Bolsoni-Lopes, Andressa; Paschoal, Vivian A; Yamashita, Alex S; Kowaltowski, Alicia J; Festuccia, William T

    2016-05-01

    Mechanistic target of rapamycin complex 1 (mTORC1) loss of function reduces adiposity whereas partial mTORC1 inhibition enhances fat deposition. Herein we evaluated how constitutive mTORC1 activation in adipocytes modulates adiposity in vivo. Mice with constitutive mTORC1 activation in adipocytes induced by tuberous sclerosis complex (Tsc)1 deletion and littermate controls were evaluated for body mass, energy expenditure, glucose and fatty acid metabolism, mitochondrial function, mRNA and protein contents. Adipocyte-specific Tsc1 deletion reduced visceral, but not subcutaneous, fat mass, as well as adipocyte number and diameter, phenotypes that were associated with increased lipolysis, UCP-1 content (browning) and mRNA levels of pro-browning transcriptional factors C/EBPβ and ERRα. Adipocyte Tsc1 deletion enhanced mitochondrial oxidative activity, fatty acid oxidation and the expression of PGC-1α and PPARα in both visceral and subcutaneous fat. In brown adipocytes, however, Tsc1 deletion did not affect UCP-1 content and basal respiration. Adipocyte Tsc1 deletion also reduced visceral adiposity and enhanced glucose tolerance, liver and muscle insulin signaling and adiponectin secretion in mice fed with purified low- or high-fat diet. In conclusion, adipocyte-specific Tsc1 deletion enhances mitochondrial activity, induces browning and reduces visceral adiposity in mice. PMID:26923434

  20. Exfoliation of Hexagonal Boron Nitride via Ferric Chloride Intercalation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hung, Ching-cheh; Hurst, Janet; Santiago, Diana; Rogers, Richard B.

    2014-01-01

    Sodium fluoride (NaF) was used as an activation agent to successfully intercalate ferric chloride (FeCl3) into hexagonal boron nitride (hBN). This reaction caused the hBN mass to increase by approx.100 percent, the lattice parameter c to decrease from 6.6585 to between 6.6565 and 6.6569 ?, the x-ray diffraction (XRD) (002) peak to widen from 0.01deg to 0.05deg of the full width half maximum value, the Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectrum's broad band (1277/cm peak) to change shape, and new FTIR bands to emerge at 3700 to 2700 and 1600/cm. This indicates hBN's structural and chemical properties are significantly changed. The intercalated product was hygroscopic and interacted with moisture in the air to cause further structural and chemical changes (from XRD and FTIR). During a 24-h hold at room temperature in air with 100 percent relative humidity, the mass increased another 141 percent. The intercalated product, hydrated or not, can be heated to 750 C in air to cause exfoliation. Exfoliation becomes significant after two intercalation-air heating cycles, when 20-nm nanosheets are commonly found. Structural and chemical changes indicated by XRD and FTIR data were nearly reversed after the product was placed in hydrochloric acid (HCl), resulting in purified, exfoliated, thin hBN products.

  1. Dietary bioavailability of Cu adsorbed to colloidal hydrous ferric oxide

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Cain, Daniel J.; Croteau, Marie-Noële; Fuller, Christopher C.

    2013-01-01

    The dietary bioavailability of copper (Cu) adsorbed to synthetic colloidal hydrous ferric oxide (HFO) was evaluated from the assimilation of 65Cu by two benthic grazers, a gastropod and a larval mayfly. HFO was synthesized, labeled with 65Cu to achieve a Cu/Fe ratio comparable to that determined in naturally formed HFO, and then aged. The labeled colloids were mixed with a food source (the diatom Nitzschia palea) to yield dietary 65Cu concentrations ranging from 211 to 2204 nmol/g (dry weight). Animals were pulse fed the contaminated diet and assimilation of 65Cu from HFO was determined following 1–3 days of depuration. Mass transfer of 65Cu from HFO to the diatom was less than 1%, indicating that HFO was the source of 65Cu to the grazers. Estimates of assimilation efficiency indicated that the majority of Cu ingested as HFO was assimilated (values >70%), implying that colloidal HFO potentially represents a source of dietary Cu to benthic grazers, especially where there is active formation and infiltration of these particles into benthic substrates.

  2. Activation of protease-activated receptor 2 reduces glioblastoma cell apoptosis

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background The pathogenesis of glioma is unclear. The disturbance of the apoptosis process plays a critical role in glioma growth. Factors regulating the apoptosis process are to be further understood. This study aims to investigate the role of protease activated receptor-2 (PAR2) in regulation the apoptosis process in glioma cells. Results The results showed that U87 cells and human glioma tissue expressed PAR2. Exposure to tryptase, or the PAR2 active peptide, increased STAT3 phosphorylation in the radiated U87 cells, reduced U87 cell apoptosis, suppressed the expression of p53 in U87 cells. Conclusions Activation of PAR2 can reduce the radiated U87 cell apoptosis via modulating the expression of p53. The results implicate that PAR2 may be a novel therapeutic target in the treatment of glioma. PMID:24670244

  3. High Resolution Transmission Electron Microscopy (HRTEM) of nanophase ferric oxides

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Golden, D. C.; Morris, R. V.; Ming, D. W.; Lauer, H. V., Jr.

    1994-01-01

    Iron oxide minerals are the prime candidates for Fe(III) signatures in remotely sensed Martian surface spectra. Magnetic, Mossbauer, and reflectance spectroscopy have been carried out in the laboratory in order to understand the mineralogical nature of Martian analog ferric oxide minerals of submicron or nanometer size range. Out of the iron oxide minerals studied, nanometer sized ferric oxides are promising candidates for possible Martian spectral analogs. 'Nanophase ferric oxide (np-Ox)' is a generic term for ferric oxide/oxihydroxide particles having nanoscale (less than 10 nm) particle dimensions. Ferrihydrite, superparamagnetic particles of hematite, maghemite and goethite, and nanometer sized particles of inherently paramagnetic lepidocrocite are all examples of nanophase ferric oxides. np-Ox particles in general do not give X-ray diffraction (XRD) patterns with well defined peaks and would often be classified as X-ray amorphous. Therefore, different np-Oxs preparations should be characterized using a more sensitive technique e.g., high resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM). The purpose of this study is to report the particle size, morphology and crystalline order, of five np-Ox samples by HRTEM imaging and electron diffraction (ED).

  4. Rationale and study design of a three-period, 58-week trial of ferric citrate as a phosphate binder in patients with ESRD on dialysis.

    PubMed

    Umanath, Kausik; Sika, Mohammed; Niecestro, Robert; Connelly, Carolyn; Schulman, Gerald; Koury, Mark J; Lewis, Julia B; Dwyer, Jamie P

    2013-01-01

    Chronic kidney disease associated mineral and bone disorders arise as a result of aberrant bone mineral metabolism in patients with advancing levels of renal dysfunction and end-stage renal disease. One of the cornerstones of treatment is the use of phosphate-binding agents. We describe the rationale and study design for a clinical trial to assess the safety and efficacy of ferric citrate as a phosphate binder. This trial is a three-period, international, multicenter, randomized, controlled clinical trial to assess the safety and efficacy of ferric citrate as a phosphate binder, consisting of a 2-week washout period, a 52-week safety assessment period in which subjects are randomized to ferric citrate or active control, and a 4-week efficacy assessment period in which subjects randomized to ferric citrate in the safety assessment period are randomized to ferric citrate or placebo. Eligible subjects include end-stage renal disease patients who have been treated with thrice-weekly hemodialysis or peritoneal dialysis for at least 3 months in dialysis clinics in the United States and Israel. Primary outcome measure will be the effect of ferric citrate vs. placebo on the change in serum phosphorus. Safety assessments will be performed by monitoring adverse events, concomitant medication use, and sequential blood chemistries (including iron parameters, phosphorus, and calcium). This three-period trial will assess the efficacy of ferric citrate as a phosphate binder. If proven safe and efficacious, ferric citrate will likely provide an additional phosphate binder to treat chronic kidney disease associated mineral and bone disorders. PMID:22702490

  5. Piano Playing Reduces Stress More than Other Creative Art Activities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Toyoshima, Kumiko; Fukui, Hajime; Kuda, Kiyoto

    2011-01-01

    Few studies have been conducted on the physiological effects of creative art activities. In this study, the effects of creative art activities on human stress were investigated, and their effects were compared in 57 healthy college students (27 males and 30 females). Subjects were divided into four groups, each of which participated in 30-minute…

  6. Influence of Carbon Sources and Electron Shuttles on Ferric Iron Reduction by Cellulomonas sp. Strain ES6

    SciTech Connect

    Dr Robin Gerlach; Erin K. Field; Sridhar Viamajala; Brent M. Peyton; William A. Apel; Al B. Cunningham

    2011-09-01

    Microbially reduced iron minerals can reductively transform a variety of contaminants including heavy metals, radionuclides, chlorinated aliphatics, and nitroaromatics. A number of Cellulomonas spp. strains, including strain ES6, isolated from aquifer samples obtained at the U.S. Department of Energy's Hanford site in Washington, have been shown to be capable of reducing Cr(VI), TNT, natural organic matter, and soluble ferric iron [Fe(III)]. This research investigated the ability of Cellulomonas sp. strain ES6 to reduce solid phase and dissolved Fe(III) utilizing different carbon sources and various electron shuttling compounds. Results suggest that Fe(III) reduction by and growth of strain ES6 was dependent upon the type of electron donor, the form of iron present, and the presence of synthetic or natural organic matter, such as anthraquinone-2,6-disulfonate (AQDS) or humic substances. This research suggests that Cellulomonas sp. strain ES6 could play a significant role in metal reduction in the Hanford subsurface and that the choice of carbon source and organic matter addition can allow for independent control of growth and iron reduction activity.

  7. Managing hyperphosphatemia in patients with chronic kidney disease on dialysis with ferric citrate: latest evidence and clinical usefulness

    PubMed Central

    Fadem, Stephen Z.; Kant, Kotagal S.; Bhatt, Udayan; Sika, Mohammed; Lewis, Julia B.; Negoi, Dana

    2015-01-01

    Ferric citrate is a novel phosphate binder that allows the simultaneous treatment of hyperphosphatemia and iron deficiency in patients being treated for end-stage renal disease with hemodialysis (HD). Multiple clinical trials in HD patients have uniformly and consistently demonstrated the efficacy of the drug in controlling hyperphosphatemia with a good safety profile, leading the US Food and Drug Administration in 2014 to approve its use for that indication. A concurrent beneficial effect, while using ferric citrate as a phosphate binder, is its salutary effect in HD patients with iron deficiency being treated with an erythropoietin-stimulating agent (ESA) in restoring iron that becomes available for reversing chronic kidney disease (CKD)-related anemia. Ferric citrate has also been shown in several studies to diminish the need for intravenous iron treatment and to reduce the requirement for ESA. Ferric citrate is thus a preferred phosphate binder that helps resolve CKD-related mineral bone disease and iron-deficiency anemia. PMID:26336594

  8. Managing hyperphosphatemia in patients with chronic kidney disease on dialysis with ferric citrate: latest evidence and clinical usefulness.

    PubMed

    Yagil, Yoram; Fadem, Stephen Z; Kant, Kotagal S; Bhatt, Udayan; Sika, Mohammed; Lewis, Julia B; Negoi, Dana

    2015-09-01

    Ferric citrate is a novel phosphate binder that allows the simultaneous treatment of hyperphosphatemia and iron deficiency in patients being treated for end-stage renal disease with hemodialysis (HD). Multiple clinical trials in HD patients have uniformly and consistently demonstrated the efficacy of the drug in controlling hyperphosphatemia with a good safety profile, leading the US Food and Drug Administration in 2014 to approve its use for that indication. A concurrent beneficial effect, while using ferric citrate as a phosphate binder, is its salutary effect in HD patients with iron deficiency being treated with an erythropoietin-stimulating agent (ESA) in restoring iron that becomes available for reversing chronic kidney disease (CKD)-related anemia. Ferric citrate has also been shown in several studies to diminish the need for intravenous iron treatment and to reduce the requirement for ESA. Ferric citrate is thus a preferred phosphate binder that helps resolve CKD-related mineral bone disease and iron-deficiency anemia. PMID:26336594

  9. Ischemic preconditioning reduces hemodynamic response during metaboreflex activation.

    PubMed

    Mulliri, Gabriele; Sainas, Gianmarco; Magnani, Sara; Palazzolo, Girolamo; Milia, Nicola; Orrù, Andrea; Roberto, Silvana; Marongiu, Elisabetta; Milia, Raffaele; Crisafulli, Antonio

    2016-05-01

    Ischemic preconditioning (IP) has been shown to improve exercise performance and to delay fatigue. However, the precise mechanisms through which IP operates remain elusive. It has been hypothesized that IP lowers the sensation of fatigue by reducing the discharge of group III and IV nerve endings, which also regulate hemodynamics during the metaboreflex. We hypothesized that IP reduces the blood pressure response during the metaboreflex. Fourteen healthy males (age between 25 and 48 yr) participated in this study. They underwent the following randomly assigned protocol: postexercise muscle ischemia (PEMI) test, during which the metaboreflex was elicited after dynamic handgrip; control exercise recovery session (CER) test; and PEMI after IP (IP-PEMI) test. IP was obtained by occluding forearm circulation for three cycles of 5 min spaced by 5 min of reperfusion. Hemodynamics were evaluated by echocardiography and impedance cardiography. The main results were that after IP the mean arterial pressure response was reduced compared with the PEMI test (means ± SD +3.37 ± 6.41 vs. +9.16 ± 7.09 mmHg, respectively). This was the consequence of an impaired venous return that impaired the stroke volume during the IP-PEMI more than during the PEMI test (-1.43 ± 15.35 vs. +10.28 ± 10.479 ml, respectively). It was concluded that during the metaboreflex, IP affects hemodynamics mainly because it impairs the capacity to augment venous return and to recruit the cardiac preload reserve. It was hypothesized that this is the consequence of an increased nitric oxide production, which reduces the possibility to constrict venous capacity vessels. PMID:26936782

  10. Sensory stimuli reduce the dimensionality of cortical activity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mazzucato, Luca; Fontanini, Alfredo; La Camera, Giancarlo

    Neural ensembles in alert animals generate complex patterns of activity. Although cortical activity unfolds in a space whose dimension is equal to the number of neurons, it is often restricted to a lower dimensional subspace. Dimensionality is the minimal number of dimensions that accurately capture neural dynamics, and may be related to the computational tasks supported by the neural circuit. Here, we investigate the dimensionality of neural ensembles from the insular cortex of alert rats during periods of `ongoing' (spontaneous) and stimulus-evoked activity. We find that the dimensionality grows with ensemble size, and does so significantly faster during ongoing compared to evoked activity. We explain both results using a recurrent spiking network with clustered architecture, and obtain analytical results on the dependence of dimensionality on ensemble size, number of clusters, and pair-wise noise correlations. The theory predicts a characteristic scaling with ensemble size and the existence of an upper bound on dimensionality, which grows with the number of clusters and decreases with the amount of noise correlations. To our knowledge, this is the first mechanistic model of neural dimensionality in cortex during both spontaneous and evoked activity.

  11. Burnout Is Associated with Reduced Parasympathetic Activity and Reduced HPA Axis Responsiveness, Predominantly in Males

    PubMed Central

    de Vente, Wieke; van Amsterdam, Jan G. C.; Olff, Miranda; Kamphuis, Jan H.; Emmelkamp, Paul M. G.

    2015-01-01

    There is mounting evidence that burnout is a risk factor for cardiovascular disease (CVD). Stress-related dysregulation of the sympathetic and parasympathetic system and the hypothalamic pituitary adrenal (HPA) axis may explain the enhanced risk for CVD. To test this hypothesis, 55 patients (34 males and 21 females) with burnout on sickness absence and 40 healthy participants (16 males and 24 females) were exposed to a psychosocial stressor consisting of mental arithmetic and public speech. Physiological variables (i.e., blood pressure, heart rate, cardiac output, vascular resistance, cortisol, and alpha-amylase) were measured. Basal levels, reactivity, and recovery were compared between groups. In male patients, baseline systolic blood pressure was higher, whereas basal alpha-amylase and cortisol reactivity were lower than in healthy males. In female patients, a tendency for lower basal cortisol was found as compared to healthy females. Furthermore, reduced basal heart rate variability and a trend for elevated basal cardiac output were observed in both male and female patients. Burnout is characterised by dysregulation of the sympathetic and parasympathetic system and the HPA axis, which was more pronounced in males than in females. This study further supports burnout as being a risk factor for CVD through dysregulation of the sympathetic and parasympathetic system and the HPA axis. PMID:26557670

  12. Reduced Frontal Activation with Increasing 2nd Language Proficiency

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stein, Maria; Federspiel, Andrea; Koenig, Thomas; Wirth, Miranka; Lehmann, Christoph; Wiest, Roland; Strik, Werner; Brandeis, Daniel; Dierks, Thomas

    2009-01-01

    The factors influencing the degree of separation or overlap in the neuronal networks responsible for the processing of first and second language are still subject to investigation. This longitudinal study investigates how increasing second language proficiency influences activation differences during lexico-semantic processing of first and second…

  13. What ferric oxide/oxyhydroxide phases are present on Mars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Morris, Richard V.

    1988-01-01

    The weathering history of Mars can be deduced largely from the mineralogy and distribution of ferric oxide/oxyhydroxide phases. As discussed, some insights can be gained through spectrophotometric remote sensing, but absolute determinations must depend on direct laboratory analysis of returned Martian samples.

  14. 21 CFR 582.5306 - Ferric sodium pyrophosphate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Ferric sodium pyrophosphate. 582.5306 Section 582.5306 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) ANIMAL DRUGS, FEEDS, AND RELATED PRODUCTS SUBSTANCES GENERALLY RECOGNIZED AS SAFE Nutrients...

  15. 21 CFR 582.5306 - Ferric sodium pyrophosphate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Ferric sodium pyrophosphate. 582.5306 Section 582.5306 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) ANIMAL DRUGS, FEEDS, AND RELATED PRODUCTS SUBSTANCES GENERALLY RECOGNIZED AS SAFE Nutrients...

  16. 21 CFR 582.5306 - Ferric sodium pyrophosphate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Ferric sodium pyrophosphate. 582.5306 Section 582.5306 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) ANIMAL DRUGS, FEEDS, AND RELATED PRODUCTS SUBSTANCES GENERALLY RECOGNIZED AS SAFE Nutrients...

  17. Ligand Induced Spin Crossover in Penta-Coordinated Ferric Dithiocarbamates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ganguli, P.; Iyer, R. M.

    1981-09-01

    On addition of lewis bases to Fe(dtc)2X, ligand exchange takes place through a SN2 mechanism, with a parallel spin crossover in the ferric ion. The two species (S = 3/2 and S = 5/2) formed are in dynamic chemical equilibrium, and a slow decomposition is then initiated.

  18. 21 CFR 184.1296 - Ferric ammonium citrate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Ferric ammonium citrate. 184.1296 Section 184.1296 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) FOOD FOR HUMAN CONSUMPTION (CONTINUED) DIRECT FOOD SUBSTANCES AFFIRMED AS GENERALLY RECOGNIZED AS SAFE Listing of Specific Substances Affirmed as GRAS...

  19. 21 CFR 184.1296 - Ferric ammonium citrate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Ferric ammonium citrate. 184.1296 Section 184.1296 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) FOOD FOR HUMAN CONSUMPTION (CONTINUED) DIRECT FOOD SUBSTANCES AFFIRMED AS GENERALLY RECOGNIZED AS...

  20. 21 CFR 184.1296 - Ferric ammonium citrate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Ferric ammonium citrate. 184.1296 Section 184.1296 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) FOOD FOR HUMAN CONSUMPTION (CONTINUED) DIRECT FOOD SUBSTANCES AFFIRMED AS GENERALLY RECOGNIZED AS SAFE Listing of Specific Substances Affirmed as GRAS...

  1. 21 CFR 184.1296 - Ferric ammonium citrate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Ferric ammonium citrate. 184.1296 Section 184.1296 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) DIRECT FOOD SUBSTANCES AFFIRMED AS GENERALLY RECOGNIZED AS SAFE Listing of Specific Substances Affirmed...

  2. Effect of Fe-chelating complexes on a novel M2FC performance with ferric chloride and ferricyanide catholytes.

    PubMed

    Chung, Kyungmi; Lee, Ilgyu; Han, Jong-In

    2012-01-01

    As an effort to better utilize the microbial fuel cell (MFC) technology, we previously proposed an innovative MFC system named M2FC consisting of ferric-based MFC part and ferrous-based fuel cell (FC) part. In this reactor, ferric ion, the catholyte in the MFC part, was efficiently regenerated by the FC part with the generation of additional electricity. When both units were operated separately, the ferric-based MFC part produced approximately 1360 mW m(-2) of power density with FeCl(3) as catholyte and Fe-citrate as anolyte. The ferrous-based FC part with FeCl(3) as catholyte and Fe-EDTA as anolyte displayed the highest power density (1500 mW m(-2)), while that with ferricyanide as catholyte and Fe-noligand as anolyte had the lowest power density (380 mW m(-2)). The types of catholytes and chelating complexes as anolyte were found to play important roles in the reduction of ferric ions and oxidation of ferrous ion. Linear sweep voltammetry results supported that the cathode electrolytes were electrically active and these agreed well with the M2FC reactor performance. These results clearly showed that ligands played critical role in the efficiency and rate for recycling iron ion and thus the M2FC performance. PMID:22018860

  3. T Lymphocyte Activation Threshold is Increased in Reduced Gravity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Adams, Charley L.; Gonzalez, M.; Sams, C. F.

    2000-01-01

    There have been substantial advances in molecular and cellular biology that have provided new insight into the biochemical and genetic basis of lymphocyte recognition, activation and expression of distinct functional phenotypes. It has now become evident that for both T and B cells, stimuli delivered through their receptors can result in either clonal expansion or apoptosis. In the case of T cells, clonal expansion of helper cells is accompanied by differentiation into two major functional subsets which regulate the immune response. The pathways between the membrane and the nucleus and their molecular components are an area of very active investigation. This meeting will draw together scientists working on diverse aspects of this problem, including receptor ligand interactions, intracellular pathways that transmit receptor mediated signals and the effect of such signal transduction pathways on gene regulation. The aim of this meeting is to integrate the information from these various experimental approaches into a new synthesis and molecular explanation of T cell activation, differentiation and death.

  4. Textured bearing surface in artificial joints to reduce macrophage activation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nakanishi, Yoshitaka; Nishi, Naoki; Chikaura, Hiroto; Nakashima, Yuta; Miura, Hiromasa; Higaki, Hidehiko; Mizuta, Hiroshi; Iwamoto, Yukihide; Fujiwara, Yukio; Komohara, Yoshihiro; Takeya, Motohiro

    2015-12-01

    Micro slurry-jet erosion has been proposed as a precision machining technique for the bearing surfaces of artificial joints in order to reduce the total amount of polyethylene wear and to enlarge the size of the wear debris. The micro slurry-jet erosion method is a wet blasting technique which uses alumina particles as the abrasive medium along with compressed air and water to create an ideal surface. Pin-on-disc wear tests with multidirectional sliding motion on the textured surface of a \\text{Co}-\\text{Cr}-\\text{Mo} alloy counterface for polyethylene resulted in both a reduction of wear as well as enlargement of the polyethylene debris size. In this study, primary human peripheral blood mononuclear phagocytes were incubated with the debris, and it was elucidated that the wear debris generated on the textured surface regulated secretion of the proinflammatory cytokines IL-6 and TNF-α, indicating a reduction in the induced tissue reaction and joint loosening.

  5. Myostatin Attenuation In Vivo Reduces Adiposity, but Activates Adipogenesis.

    PubMed

    Li, Naisi; Yang, Qiyuan; Walker, Ryan G; Thompson, Thomas B; Du, Min; Rodgers, Buel D

    2016-01-01

    A potentially novel approach for treating obesity includes attenuating myostatin as this increases muscle mass and decreases fat mass. Notwithstanding, conflicting studies report that myostatin stimulates or inhibits adipogenesis and it is unknown whether reduced adiposity with myostatin attenuation results from changes in fat deposition or adipogenesis. We therefore quantified changes in the stem, transit amplifying and progenitor cell pool in white adipose tissue (WAT) and brown adipose tissue (BAT) using label-retaining wild-type and mstn(-/-) (Jekyll) mice. Muscle mass was larger in Jekyll mice, WAT and BAT mass was smaller and label induction was equal in all tissues from both wild-type and Jekyll mice. The number of label-retaining cells, however, dissipated quicker in WAT and BAT of Jekyll mice and was only 25% and 17%, respectively, of wild-type cell counts 1 month after induction. Adipose cell density was significantly higher in Jekyll mice and increased over time concomitant with label-retaining cell disappearance, which is consistent with enhanced expansion and differentiation of the stem, transit amplifying and progenitor pool. Stromal vascular cells from Jekyll WAT and BAT differentiated into mature adipocytes at a faster rate than wild-type cells and although Jekyll WAT cells also proliferated quicker in vitro, those from BAT did not. Differentiation marker expression in vitro, however, suggests that mstn(-/-) BAT preadipocytes are far more sensitive to the suppressive effects of myostatin. These results suggest that myostatin attenuation stimulates adipogenesis in vivo and that the reduced adiposity in mstn(-/-) animals results from nutrient partitioning away from fat and in support of muscle. PMID:26580671

  6. Recent Progress of R&D Activities on Reduced Activation Ferritic/Martensitic Steels

    SciTech Connect

    Huang, Q.; Baluc, N.; Dai, Y.; Jitsukawa, S.; Kimura, A.; Konys, J.; Kurtz, Richard J.; Lindau, R.; Muroga, T.; Odette, George R.; Raj, B.; Stoller, Roger E.; Tan, L.; Tanigawa, Hiroyasu; Tavassoli, A,-A.F.; Yamamoto, Takuya; Wan, F.; Wu, Y.

    2013-01-03

    Several types of reduced activation ferritic/martensitic (RAFM) steel have been developed over the past 30 years in China, Europe, India, Japan, Russia and the USA for application in ITER TBM and future fusion DEMO and power reactors. The progress has been particularly important during the past few years with evaluation of mechanical porperties of these steels before and after irradiation and in contact with different cooling media. This paper presents recent RAFM steel results obtained in ITER partner countries in relation with different TBM and DEMO options

  7. Barriers associated with reduced physical activity in COPD patients*

    PubMed Central

    Amorim, Priscila Batista; Stelmach, Rafael; Carvalho, Celso Ricardo Fernandes; Fernandes, Frederico Leon Arrabal; Carvalho-Pinto, Regina Maria; Cukier, Alberto

    2014-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To evaluate the ability of COPD patients to perform activities of daily living (ADL); to identify barriers that prevent these individuals from performing ADL; and to correlate those barriers with dyspnea severity, six-minute walk test (6MWT), and an ADL limitation score. METHODS: In COPD patients and healthy, age-matched controls, the number of steps, the distance walked, and walking time were recorded with a triaxial accelerometer, for seven consecutive days. A questionnaire regarding perceived barriers and the London Chest Activity of Daily Living (LCADL) scale were used in order to identify the factors that prevent the performance of ADL. The severity of dyspnea was assessed with two scales, whereas submaximal exercise capacity was determined on the basis of the 6MWT. RESULTS: We evaluated 40 COPD patients and 40 controls. In comparison with the control values, the mean walk time was significantly shorter for COPD patients (68.5 ± 25.8 min/day vs. 105.2 ± 49.4 min/day; p < 0.001), as was the distance walked (3.9 ± 1.9 km/day vs. 6.4 ± 3.2 km/day; p < 0.001). The COPD patients also walked fewer steps/day. The most common self-reported barriers to performing ADL were lack of infrastructure, social influences, and lack of willpower. The 6MWT distance correlated with the results obtained with the accelerometer but not with the LCADL scale results. CONCLUSIONS: Patients with COPD are less active than are healthy adults of a comparable age. Physical inactivity and the barriers to performing ADL have immediate implications for clinical practice, calling for early intervention measures. PMID:25410838

  8. 40 CFR 180.1191 - Ferric phosphate; exemption from the requirement of a tolerance.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 24 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Ferric phosphate; exemption from the... Exemptions From Tolerances § 180.1191 Ferric phosphate; exemption from the requirement of a tolerance. An..., ferric phosphate (FePO4, CAS No. 11045-86-0) in or on all food commodities....

  9. 40 CFR 180.1191 - Ferric phosphate; exemption from the requirement of a tolerance.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 23 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Ferric phosphate; exemption from the... Exemptions From Tolerances § 180.1191 Ferric phosphate; exemption from the requirement of a tolerance. An..., ferric phosphate (FePO4, CAS No. 11045-86-0) in or on all food commodities....

  10. 40 CFR 180.1191 - Ferric phosphate; exemption from the requirement of a tolerance.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 25 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Ferric phosphate; exemption from the... Exemptions From Tolerances § 180.1191 Ferric phosphate; exemption from the requirement of a tolerance. An..., ferric phosphate (FePO4, CAS No. 11045-86-0) in or on all food commodities....

  11. 40 CFR 180.1191 - Ferric phosphate; exemption from the requirement of a tolerance.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 25 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Ferric phosphate; exemption from the... Exemptions From Tolerances § 180.1191 Ferric phosphate; exemption from the requirement of a tolerance. An..., ferric phosphate (FePO4, CAS No. 11045-86-0) in or on all food commodities....

  12. 40 CFR 180.1191 - Ferric phosphate; exemption from the requirement of a tolerance.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 24 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Ferric phosphate; exemption from the... Exemptions From Tolerances § 180.1191 Ferric phosphate; exemption from the requirement of a tolerance. An..., ferric phosphate (FePO4, CAS No. 11045-86-0) in or on all food commodities....

  13. Nature experience reduces rumination and subgenual prefrontal cortex activation

    PubMed Central

    Bratman, Gregory N.; Hamilton, J. Paul; Hahn, Kevin S.; Daily, Gretchen C.; Gross, James J.

    2015-01-01

    Urbanization has many benefits, but it also is associated with increased levels of mental illness, including depression. It has been suggested that decreased nature experience may help to explain the link between urbanization and mental illness. This suggestion is supported by a growing body of correlational and experimental evidence, which raises a further question: what mechanism(s) link decreased nature experience to the development of mental illness? One such mechanism might be the impact of nature exposure on rumination, a maladaptive pattern of self-referential thought that is associated with heightened risk for depression and other mental illnesses. We show in healthy participants that a brief nature experience, a 90-min walk in a natural setting, decreases both self-reported rumination and neural activity in the subgenual prefrontal cortex (sgPFC), whereas a 90-min walk in an urban setting has no such effects on self-reported rumination or neural activity. In other studies, the sgPFC has been associated with a self-focused behavioral withdrawal linked to rumination in both depressed and healthy individuals. This study reveals a pathway by which nature experience may improve mental well-being and suggests that accessible natural areas within urban contexts may be a critical resource for mental health in our rapidly urbanizing world. PMID:26124129

  14. Nature experience reduces rumination and subgenual prefrontal cortex activation.

    PubMed

    Bratman, Gregory N; Hamilton, J Paul; Hahn, Kevin S; Daily, Gretchen C; Gross, James J

    2015-07-14

    Urbanization has many benefits, but it also is associated with increased levels of mental illness, including depression. It has been suggested that decreased nature experience may help to explain the link between urbanization and mental illness. This suggestion is supported by a growing body of correlational and experimental evidence, which raises a further question: what mechanism(s) link decreased nature experience to the development of mental illness? One such mechanism might be the impact of nature exposure on rumination, a maladaptive pattern of self-referential thought that is associated with heightened risk for depression and other mental illnesses. We show in healthy participants that a brief nature experience, a 90-min walk in a natural setting, decreases both self-reported rumination and neural activity in the subgenual prefrontal cortex (sgPFC), whereas a 90-min walk in an urban setting has no such effects on self-reported rumination or neural activity. In other studies, the sgPFC has been associated with a self-focused behavioral withdrawal linked to rumination in both depressed and healthy individuals. This study reveals a pathway by which nature experience may improve mental well-being and suggests that accessible natural areas within urban contexts may be a critical resource for mental health in our rapidly urbanizing world. PMID:26124129

  15. AIDing cancer treatment: Reducing AID activity via HSP90 inhibition.

    PubMed

    Rebhandl, Stefan; Geisberger, Roland

    2015-08-01

    The activation induced deaminase (AID) catalyses the two key events underlying humoral adaptive immunity: class switch recombination and somatic hypermutation of antibody genes in B lymphocytes. AID accomplishes this task by directly deaminating cytosines within the genomic immunoglobulin locus, thereby triggering a complex mutagenic process eventually leading to improved effector function of antibodies. However, it has long been noticed that AID can be aberrantly expressed in cancer and that its activity is not absolutely restricted to antibody genes, as substantial genome-wide off-target mutations have been observed, which contribute to tumorigenesis and clonal evolution of AID-expressing malignancies. In this issue of the European Journal of Immunology, Montamat-Sicotte et al. [Eur. J. Immunol. 2015. 45: 2365-2376] investigate the feasibility and efficacy of in vivo inhibition of AID with HSP90 inhibitors in a mouse model of B-cell leukemia and in vitro with a human breast cancer cell line, thereby demonstrating that cancer patients may benefit from preventing noncanonical AID functions. PMID:26151367

  16. Mobile Phone Interventions to Increase Physical Activity and Reduce Weight

    PubMed Central

    Stephens, Janna; Allen, Jerilyn

    2013-01-01

    Objective This systematic review was conducted to determine user satisfaction and effectiveness of smartphone applications and text messaging interventions to promote weight reduction and physical activity. Methods Studies of smartphone applications and text messaging interventions related to the cardiovascular risk factors of physical inactivity and overweight/obesity published between January 2005 and August 2010 were eligible. Studies related to disease management were excluded. Study characteristics and results were gathered and synthesized. Results A total of 36 citations from CINAHL, EMBASE, MEDLINE, PsyclNFO, and PubMed were identified; 7 articles were eligible for inclusion. The most frequent outcome measured in the studies was change in the weight of participants (57%). More than half of the studies (71%) reported statistically significant results in at least 1 outcome of weight loss, physical activity, dietary intake, decreased body mass index, decreased waist circumference, sugar-sweetened beverage intake, screen time, and satisfaction or acceptability outcomes. Conclusions All of the technology interventions that were supported by education or an additional intervention demonstrated a beneficial impact of text messaging or smartphone application for reduction of physical inactivity and/or overweight/obesity. More rigorous trials that determine what parts of the technology or intervention are effective as well as establishment of cost-effectiveness are necessary for further evaluation of smartphone and text messaging interventions. PMID:22635061

  17. Modelling precipitate distribution in reduced-activation steels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gaude-Fugarolas, D.; de Carlan, Y.

    2008-02-01

    The microstructure and carbide distribution in two commercial creep resistant, low-activation, martensitic alloys (F82H and JLF-1) have been modelled using a thermo-kinetic calculation package. The microstructures after manufacturing and after long unstrained thermal aging treatments (13 500 h) at various temperatures (250, 400 and 550 °C), considered to be representative of service temperatures, have been considered. In all cases, the calculated carbide size distributions match in order of magnitude experimental measurements, although the shape of the distribution differs. The obtained results are more accurate for alloy F82H than for alloy JLF-1. Nevertheless, this work shows that it is possible to obtain realistic estimates of the microstructure evolution of creep resistant alloys in long thermal ageing treatments at service-like temperatures.

  18. Analysing domestic activity to reduce household energy consumption.

    PubMed

    Fréjus, Myriam; Guibourdenche, Julien

    2012-01-01

    This paper presents our reflections on the issue of behavioral change according to energy conservation constraints and on the status of sustainability in the design of ambient interactive systems at home. We point out how ergonomics contributes to the study of human factors underlying energy consumption. Relating to situated cognition and human computer interaction, our approach relies both on the ergonomic evaluation of feedback consumption displays and on the modeling of domestic activities in order to identify household concerns in real settings. We present empirical results to illustrate this global approach. The results of those studies allow the design of interactive systems: informative and pedagogical systems as well as pervasive and adaptive ambient systems. In our approach, sustainability is taken into account as a design criterion, as security could be, whereas the main design purpose is to aid households in their daily life in order to build a "sustainable situation". PMID:22316779

  19. Immune Activation Reduces Sperm Quality in the Great Tit

    PubMed Central

    Losdat, Sylvain; Richner, Heinz; Blount, Jonathan D.; Helfenstein, Fabrice

    2011-01-01

    Mounting an immune response against pathogens incurs costs to organisms by its effects on important life-history traits, such as reproductive investment and survival. As shown recently, immune activation produces large amounts of reactive species and is suggested to induce oxidative stress. Sperm are highly susceptible to oxidative stress, which can negatively impact sperm function and ultimately male fertilizing efficiency. Here we address the question as to whether mounting an immune response affects sperm quality through the damaging effects of oxidative stress. It has been demonstrated recently in birds that carotenoid-based ornaments can be reliable signals of a male's ability to protect sperm from oxidative damage. In a full-factorial design, we immune-challenged great tit males while simultaneously increasing their vitamin E availability, and assessed the effect on sperm quality and oxidative damage. We conducted this experiment in a natural population and tested the males' response to the experimental treatment in relation to their carotenoid-based breast coloration, a condition-dependent trait. Immune activation induced a steeper decline in sperm swimming velocity, thus highlighting the potential costs of an induced immune response on sperm competitive ability and fertilizing efficiency. We found sperm oxidative damage to be negatively correlated with sperm swimming velocity. However, blood resistance to a free-radical attack (a measure of somatic antioxidant capacity) as well as plasma and sperm levels of oxidative damage (lipid peroxidation) remained unaffected, thus suggesting that the observed effect did not arise through oxidative stress. Towards the end of their breeding cycle, swimming velocity of sperm of more intensely colored males was higher, which has important implications for the evolution of mate choice and multiple mating in females because females may accrue both direct and indirect benefits by mating with males having better quality sperm

  20. Ferric saponite and serpentine in the nakhlite martian meteorites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hicks, L. J.; Bridges, J. C.; Gurman, S. J.

    2014-07-01

    Transmission electron microscopy and Fe-K X-ray absorption spectroscopy have been used to determine structure and ferric content of the secondary phase mineral assemblages in the nakhlite martian meteorites, NWA 998, Lafayette, Nakhla, GV, Y 000593, Y 000749, MIL 03346, NWA 817, and NWA 5790. The secondary phases are a rapidly cooled, metastable assemblage that has preserved Mg# and Ca fractionation related to distance from the fluid source, for most of the nakhlites, though one, NWA 5790, appears not to have experienced a fluid pathway. All nine nakhlite samples have also been analysed with scanning electron microscopy, electron probe micro analysis, Bright Field high-resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM) and selected area electron diffraction. By measuring the energy position of the Fe-K XANES 1s → 3d pre-edge transition centroid we calculate the ferric content of the minerals within the nakhlite meteorites. The crystalline phyllosilicates and amorphous silicate of the hydrothermal deposits filling the olivine fractures are found to have variable Fe3+/ΣFe values ranging from 0.4 to 0.9. In Lafayette, the central silicate gel parts of the veins are more ferric than the phyllosilicates around it, showing that the fluid became increasingly oxidised. The mesostasis of Lafayette and NWA 817 also have phyllosilicate, which have a higher ferric content than the olivine fracture deposits, with Fe3+/ΣFe values of up to 1.0. Further study, via TEM analyses, reveal the Lafayette and NWA 817 olivine phyllosilicates to have 2:1 T-O-T lattice structure with a the d001-spacing of 0.96 nm, whereas the Lafayette mesostasis phyllosilicates have 1:1 T-O structure with d001-spacings of 0.7 nm. Based on our analyses, the phyllosilicate found within the Lafayette olivine fractures is trioctahedral ferric saponite (Ca0.2K0.1)∑0.3(Mg2.6Fe2+1.3Fe3+1.7Mn0.1)∑5.7[(Si6.7AlIV0.9Fe3+0.4)∑8.0O20](OH)4·nH2O, and that found in the mesostasis fractures is an Fe

  1. Understanding Regeneration of Arsenate-Loaded Ferric Hydroxide-Based Adsorbents

    PubMed Central

    Chaudhary, Binod Kumar; Farrell, James

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Adsorbents comprising ferric hydroxide loaded on a variety of support materials are commonly used to remove arsenic from potable water. Although several studies have investigated the effects of support properties on arsenic adsorption, there have been no investigations of their effects on adsorbent regeneration. Furthermore, the effect of regenerant solution composition and the kinetics of regeneration have not been investigated. This research investigated the effects of adsorbent and regenerant solution properties on the kinetics and efficiency of regeneration of arsenate-loaded ferric hydroxide-based adsorbents. Solutions containing only 0.10–5.0 M NaOH or 0.10–1.0 M NaCl, as well as solutions containing both compounds, were used as regenerants. On all media, >99% of arsenate was adsorbed through complexation with ferric hydroxide. Arsenate recovery was controlled by both equilibrium and kinetic limitations. Adsorbents containing support material with weak base anion-exchange functionality or no anion-exchange functionality could be regenerated with NaOH solutions alone. Regeneration of media containing strong base anion (SBA)-exchange functionality was greatly enhanced by addition of 0.10 M NaCl to the NaOH regenerant solutions. Adsorbed silica had a significant effect on NaOH regeneration of media containing type I SBA-exchange functionality, but on other media, adsorbed silica had little impact on regeneration. On all media, 5–25% of arsenate was resistant to desorption in 1.0 M NaOH solutions. However, the use of 2.5–5.0 M NaOH solutions significantly reduced the desorption-resistant fraction. PMID:25873779

  2. Arterial chemoreceptor activation reduces the activity of parapyramidal serotonergic neurons in rats.

    PubMed

    Takakura, A C; Moreira, T S

    2013-05-01

    The parapyramidal (ppy) region targets primarily the intermediolateral cell column and is probably involved in breathing and thermoregulation. In the present study, we tested whether ppy serotonergic neurons respond to activation of central and peripheral chemoreceptors. Bulbospinal ppy neurons (n=30) were recorded extracellularly along with the phrenic nerve activity in urethane/α-chloralose-anesthetized, paralyzed, intact (n=7) or carotid body denervated (n=6) male Wistar rats. In intact animals, most of the ppy neurons were inhibited by hypoxia (n=14 of 19) (8% O2, 30s) (1.5 ± 0.03 vs. control: 2.4 ± 0.2 Hz) or hypercapnia (n=15 of 19) (10% CO2) (1.7 ± 0.1 vs. control: 2.2 ± 0.2 Hz), although some neurons were insensitive to hypoxia (n=3 of 19) or hypercapnia (n=4 of 19). Very few neurons (n=2 of 19) were activated after hypoxia, but not after hypercapnia. In carotid body denervated rats, all the 5HT-ppy neurons (n=11) were insensitive to hypercapnia (2.1 ± 0.1 vs. control: 2.3 ± 0.09 Hz). Biotinamide-labeled cells that were recovered after histochemistry were located in the ppy region. Most labeled cells (90%) showed strong tryptophan hydroxylase immunocytochemical reactivity, indicating that they were serotonergic. The present data reveal that peripheral chemoreceptors reduce the activity of the serotonergic premotor neurons located in the ppy region. It is plausible that the serotonergic neurons of the ppy region could conceivably regulate breathing automaticity and be involved in autonomic regulation. PMID:23403178

  3. First-principles study of spin transition and seismic properties of ferric iron-bearing post-perovskite with oxygen vacancy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gao, Benzhou; He, Kaihua; Chen, Qili; Wang, Xicheng; Wang, Qingbo; Wan, Miao; Ji, Guangfu

    2014-09-01

    The spin states, elastic properties and seismic velocities of ferric iron-bearing post-perovskite MgSiO3 (pPv) with single oxygen vacancy [Mg8(Si6,Fe2)O23 and Mg16(Si14,Fe2)O47] were calculated by first principles based on density functional theory. The effects of ferric iron and oxygen vacancy on seismic waves were studied for the host pPv subjected to a hydrostatic pressure. Calculations revealed a new spin transition from intermediate-spin to low-spin states with increasing pressure. As a result, the volume was reduced and the elastic constants were modified, producing a clear decrease in the seismic velocities of both compressive wave and shear wave due to the reduction of bulk modulus and shear modulus. The ferric iron and oxygen vacancy also had a minor effect on wave anisotropy.

  4. First-principles study of spin transition and seismic properties of ferric iron-bearing post-perovskite with oxygen vacancy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gao, Benzhou; He, Kaihua; Chen, Qili; Wang, Xicheng; Wang, Qingbo; Wan, Miao; Ji, Guangfu

    2015-02-01

    The spin states, elastic properties and seismic velocities of ferric iron-bearing post-perovskite MgSiO3 (pPv) with single oxygen vacancy [Mg8(Si6,Fe2)O23 and Mg16(Si14,Fe2)O47] were calculated by first principles based on density functional theory. The effects of ferric iron and oxygen vacancy on seismic waves were studied for the host pPv subjected to a hydrostatic pressure. Calculations revealed a new spin transition from intermediate-spin to low-spin states with increasing pressure. As a result, the volume was reduced and the elastic constants were modified, producing a clear decrease in the seismic velocities of both compressive wave and shear wave due to the reduction of bulk modulus and shear modulus. The ferric iron and oxygen vacancy also had a minor effect on wave anisotropy.

  5. Selective simplification and reinforcement of microbial community in autothermal thermophilic aerobic digestion to enhancing stabilization process of sewage sludge by conditioning with ferric nitrate.

    PubMed

    Jin, Ningben; Shou, Zongqi; Yuan, Haiping; Lou, Ziyang; Zhu, Nanwen

    2016-03-01

    The effect of ferric nitrate on microbial community and enhancement of stabilization process for sewage sludge was investigated in autothermal thermophilic aerobic digestion. The disinhibition of volatile fatty acids (VFA) was obtained with alteration of individual VFA concentration order. Bacterial taxonomic identification by 454 high-throughput pyrosequencing found the dominant phylum Proteobacteria in non-dosing group was converted to phylum Firmicutes in dosing group after ferric nitrate added and simplification of bacteria phylotypes was achieved. The preponderant Tepidiphilus sp. vanished, and Symbiobacterium sp. and Tepidimicrobium sp. were the most advantageous phylotypes with conditioning of ferric nitrate. Consequently, biodegradable substances in dissolved organic matters increased, which contributed to the favorable environment for microbial metabolism and resulted in acceleration of sludge stabilization. Ultimately, higher stabilization level was achieved as ratio of soluble chemical oxygen demand to total chemical oxygen demand (TCOD) decreased while TCOD reduced as well in dosing group comparing to non-dosing group. PMID:26773954

  6. Effects of electron transport inhibitors and uncouplers on the oxidation of ferrous iron and compounds interacting with ferric iron in Acidithiobacillus ferrooxidans.

    PubMed

    Chen, Yongqiang; Suzuki, Isamu

    2005-08-01

    Oxidation of Fe2+, ascorbic acid, propyl gallate, tiron, L-cysteine, and glutathione by Acidithiobacillus ferrooxidans was studied with respect to the effect of electron transport inhibitors and uncouplers on the rate of oxidation. All the oxidations were sensitive to inhibitors of cytochrome c oxidase, KCN, and NaN3. They were also partially inhibited by inhibitors of complex I and complex III of the electron transport system. Uncouplers at low concentrations stimulated the oxidation and inhibited it at higher concentrations. The oxidation rates of Fe2+ and L-cysteine inhibited by complex I and complex III inhibitors (amytal, rotenone, antimycin A, myxothiazol, and HQNO) were stimulated more extensively by uncouplers than the control rates. Atabrine, a flavin antagonist, was an exception, and atabrine-inhibited oxidation activities of all these compounds were further inhibited by uncouplers. A model for the electron transport pathways of A. ferrooxidans is proposed to account for these results. In the model these organic substrates reduce ferric iron on the surface of cells to ferrous iron, which is oxidized back to ferric iron through the Fe2+ oxidation pathway, leading to cytochrome oxidase to O2. Some of electrons enter the uphill (energy-requiring) electron transport pathway to reduce NAD+. Uncouplers at low concentrations stimulate Fe2+ oxidation by stimulating cytochrome oxidase by uncoupling. Higher concentrations lower deltap to the level insufficient to overcome the potentially uphill reaction at rusticyanin-cytochrome c4. Inhibition of uphill reactions at complex I and complex III leads to deltap accumulation and inhibition of cytochrome oxidase. Uncouplers remove the inhibition of deltap and stimulate the oxidation. Atabrine inhibition is not released by uncouplers, which implies a possibility of atabrine inhibition at a site other than complex I, but a site somehow involved in the Fe2+ oxidation pathway. PMID:16234867

  7. Oxytocin reduces amygdala activity, increases social interactions, and reduces anxiety-like behavior irrespective of NMDAR antagonism.

    PubMed

    Sobota, Rosanna; Mihara, Takuma; Forrest, Alexandra; Featherstone, Robert E; Siegel, Steven J

    2015-08-01

    Standard dopamine therapies for schizophrenia are not efficacious for negative symptoms of the disease, including asociality. This reduced social behavior may be due to glutamatergic dysfunction within the amygdala, leading to increased fear and social anxiety. Several studies have demonstrated the prosocial effects of oxytocin in schizophrenia patients. Therefore, this study evaluates the effect of subchronic oxytocin on EEG activity in amygdala of mice during performance of the three-chamber social choice and open field tests following acute ketamine as a model of glutamatergic dysfunction. Oxytocin did not restore social deficits introduced by ketamine but did significantly increase sociality in comparison to the control group. Ketamine had no effect on time spent in the center during the open field trials, whereas oxytocin increased overall center time across all groups, suggesting a reduction in anxiety. Amygdala activity was consistent across all drug groups during social and nonsocial behavioral trials. However, oxytocin reduced overall amygdala EEG power during the two behavioral tasks. Alternatively, ketamine did not significantly affect EEG power throughout the tasks. Decreased EEG power in the amygdala, as caused by oxytocin, may be related to both reduced anxiety and increased social behaviors. Data suggest that separate prosocial and social anxiety pathways may mediate social preference. PMID:26214213

  8. Oxytocin reduces amygdala activity, increases social interactions and reduces anxiety-like behavior irrespective of NMDAR antagonism

    PubMed Central

    Sobota, Rosanna; Mihara, Takuma; Forrest, Alexandra; Featherstone, Robert E.; Siegel, Steven J.

    2015-01-01

    Standard dopamine therapies for schizophrenia are not efficacious for negative symptoms of the disease, including asociality. This reduced social behavior may be due to glutamatergic dysfunction within the amygdala leading to increased fear and social anxiety. Several studies have demonstrated the pro-social effects of oxytocin in schizophrenia patients. Therefore, this study evaluates the effect of sub-chronic oxytocin on electroencephalographic (EEG) activity in amygdala of mice during performance of the three chamber social choice and open field tests following acute ketamine as a model of glutamatergic dysfunction. Oxytocin did not restore social deficits introduced by ketamine, but did significantly increase sociality in comparison to the control group. Ketamine had no effect on time spent in the center during the open field trials, while oxytocin increased overall center time across all groups, suggesting a reduction in anxiety. Amygdala activity was consistent across all drug groups during social and nonsocial behavioral trials. However, oxytocin reduced overall amygdala EEG power during the two behavioral tasks. Alternatively, ketamine did not significantly affect EEG power throughout the tasks. Decreased EEG power in the amygdala, as caused by oxytocin, may be related to both reduced anxiety and increased social behaviors. Data suggest that separate pro-social and social anxiety pathways may mediate social preference. PMID:26214213

  9. Quantitative determination of cesium binding to ferric hexacyanoferrate: Prussian blue.

    PubMed

    Faustino, Patrick J; Yang, Yongsheng; Progar, Joseph J; Brownell, Charles R; Sadrieh, Nakissa; May, Joan C; Leutzinger, Eldon; Place, David A; Duffy, Eric P; Houn, Florence; Loewke, Sally A; Mecozzi, Vincent J; Ellison, Christopher D; Khan, Mansoor A; Hussain, Ajaz S; Lyon, Robbe C

    2008-05-12

    Ferric hexacyanoferrate (Fe4III[FeII(CN)6]3), also known as insoluble Prussian blue (PB) is the active pharmaceutical ingredient (API) of the drug product, Radiogardase. Radiogardase is the first FDA approved medical countermeasure for the treatment of internal contamination with radioactive cesium (Cs) or thallium in the event of a major radiological incident such as a "dirty bomb". A number of pre-clinical and clinical studies have evaluated the use of PB as an investigational decorporation agent to enhance the excretion of metal cations. There are few sources of published in vitro data that detail the binding capacity of cesium to insoluble PB under various chemical and physical conditions. The study objective was to determine the in vitro binding capacity of PB APIs and drug products by evaluating certain chemical and physical factors such as medium pH, particle size, and storage conditions (temperature). In vitro experimental conditions ranged from pH 1 to 9, to cover the range of pH levels that PB may encounter in the gastrointestinal (GI) tract in humans. Measurements of cesium binding were made between 1 and 24h, to cover gastric and intestinal tract residence time using a validated atomic emission spectroscopy (AES) method. The results indicated that pH, exposure time, storage temperature (affecting moisture content) and particle size play significant roles in the cesium binding to both the PB API and the drug product. The lowest cesium binding was observed at gastric pH of 1 and 2, whereas the highest cesium binding was observed at physiological pH of 7.5. It was observed that dry storage conditions resulted in a loss of moisture from PB, which had a significant negative effect on the PB cesium binding capacity at time intervals consistent with gastric residence. Differences were also observed in the binding capacity of PB with different particle sizes. Significant batch to batch differences were also observed in the binding capacity of some PB API and

  10. Enhancement of Fenton oxidation for removing organic matter from hypersaline solution by accelerating ferric system with hydroxylamine hydrochloride and benzoquinone.

    PubMed

    Peng, Siwei; Zhang, Weijun; He, Jie; Yang, Xiaofang; Wang, Dongsheng; Zeng, Guisheng

    2016-03-01

    Fenton oxidation is generally inhibited in the presence of a high concentration of chloride ions. This study investigated the feasibility of using benzoquinone (BQ) and hydroxylamine hydrochloride (HA) as Fenton enhancers for the removal of glycerin from saline water under ambient temperature by accelerating the ferric system. It was found that organics removal was not obviously affected by chloride ions of low concentration (less than 0.1mol/L), while the mineralization rate was strongly inhibited in the presence of a large amount of chloride ions. In addition, ferric hydrolysis-precipitation was significantly alleviated in the presence of HA and BQ, and HA was more effective in reducing ferric ions into ferrous ions than HA, while the H2O2 decomposition rate was higher in the BQ-Fenton system. Electron spin resonance analysis revealed that OH production was reduced in high salinity conditions, while it was enhanced after the addition of HA and BQ (especially HA). This study provided a possible solution to control and alleviate the inhibitory effect of chloride ions on the Fenton process for organics removal. PMID:26969046

  11. Magnetotactic bacteria form magnetite from a phosphate-rich ferric hydroxide via nanometric ferric (oxyhydr)oxide intermediates.

    PubMed

    Baumgartner, Jens; Morin, Guillaume; Menguy, Nicolas; Perez Gonzalez, Teresa; Widdrat, Marc; Cosmidis, Julie; Faivre, Damien

    2013-09-10

    The iron oxide mineral magnetite (Fe3O4) is produced by various organisms to exploit magnetic and mechanical properties. Magnetotactic bacteria have become one of the best model organisms for studying magnetite biomineralization, as their genomes are sequenced and tools are available for their genetic manipulation. However, the chemical route by which magnetite is formed intracellularly within the so-called magnetosomes has remained a matter of debate. Here we used X-ray absorption spectroscopy at cryogenic temperatures and transmission electron microscopic imaging techniques to chemically characterize and spatially resolve the mechanism of biomineralization in those microorganisms. We show that magnetite forms through phase transformation from a highly disordered phosphate-rich ferric hydroxide phase, consistent with prokaryotic ferritins, via transient nanometric ferric (oxyhydr)oxide intermediates within the magnetosome organelle. This pathway remarkably resembles recent results on synthetic magnetite formation and bears a high similarity to suggested mineralization mechanisms in higher organisms. PMID:23980143

  12. Magnetotactic bacteria form magnetite from a phosphate-rich ferric hydroxide via nanometric ferric (oxyhydr)oxide intermediates

    PubMed Central

    Baumgartner, Jens; Morin, Guillaume; Menguy, Nicolas; Perez Gonzalez, Teresa; Widdrat, Marc; Cosmidis, Julie; Faivre, Damien

    2013-01-01

    The iron oxide mineral magnetite (Fe3O4) is produced by various organisms to exploit magnetic and mechanical properties. Magnetotactic bacteria have become one of the best model organisms for studying magnetite biomineralization, as their genomes are sequenced and tools are available for their genetic manipulation. However, the chemical route by which magnetite is formed intracellularly within the so-called magnetosomes has remained a matter of debate. Here we used X-ray absorption spectroscopy at cryogenic temperatures and transmission electron microscopic imaging techniques to chemically characterize and spatially resolve the mechanism of biomineralization in those microorganisms. We show that magnetite forms through phase transformation from a highly disordered phosphate-rich ferric hydroxide phase, consistent with prokaryotic ferritins, via transient nanometric ferric (oxyhydr)oxide intermediates within the magnetosome organelle. This pathway remarkably resembles recent results on synthetic magnetite formation and bears a high similarity to suggested mineralization mechanisms in higher organisms. PMID:23980143

  13. Unexpected superoxide dismutase antioxidant activity of ferric chloride in acetonitrile.

    PubMed

    Foti, Mario C; Ingold, K U

    2003-11-14

    The azobis(isobutyronitrile)-initiated autoxidation of gamma-terpinene in acetonitrile at 50 degrees C yields only p-cymene and hydrogen peroxide (1:1) in a chain reaction carried by the hydroperoxyl radical, HOO. (Foti, M. C.; Ingold, K. U. J. Agric. Food Chem. 2003, 51, 2758-2765). This reaction is retarded by very low (microM) concentrations of FeCl(3) and CuCl(2). The kinetics of the FeCl(3)-inhibited autoxidation are consistent with chain-termination via the following: Fe(3+) + HOO. <==>[Fe(IV)-OOH](3+) and [Fe(IV)-OOH](3+) + HOO. --> Fe(3+) + H2O2 + O2. Thus, FeCl(3) in acetonitrile can be regarded as a very effective (and very simple) superoxide dismutase. The kinetics of the CuCl(2)-inhibited autoxidation indicate that chain transfer occurs and becomes more and more important as the reaction proceeds, i.e., the inhibition is replaced by autocatalysis. These kinetics are consistent withreduction of Cu2+ to Cu+ by HOO. and then the reoxidation of Cu+ to Cu2+ by both HOO.and the H2O2 product. The latter reaction yields HO. radicals which continue the chain. PMID:14604404

  14. An Anesthetic Drug Demonstration and an Introductory Antioxidant Activity Experiment with "Eugene, the Sleepy Fish"

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Barcena, Homar; Chen, Peishan

    2016-01-01

    Students are introduced to spectrophotometry in comparing the antioxidant activity of pure eugenol and oil of cloves from a commercial source using a modified ferric reducing antioxidant power (FRAP) assay. The extraction of the essential oil from dried cloves is demonstrated to facilitate discussions on green chemistry. The anesthetic properties…

  15. Organic Matter Mineralization with Reduction of Ferric Iron in Anaerobic Sediments

    PubMed Central

    Lovley, Derek R.; Phillips, Elizabeth J. P.

    1986-01-01

    The potential for ferric iron reduction with fermentable substrates, fermentation products, and complex organic matter as electron donors was investigated with sediments from freshwater and brackish water sites in the Potomac River Estuary. In enrichments with glucose and hematite, iron reduction was a minor pathway for electron flow, and fermentation products accumulated. The substitution of amorphous ferric oxyhydroxide for hematite in glucose enrichments increased iron reduction 50-fold because the fermentation products could also be metabolized with concomitant iron reduction. Acetate, hydrogen, propionate, butyrate, ethanol, methanol, and trimethylamine stimulated the reduction of amorphous ferric oxyhydroxide in enrichments inoculated with sediments but not in uninoculated or heat-killed controls. The addition of ferric iron inhibited methane production in sediments. The degree of inhibition of methane production by various forms of ferric iron was related to the effectiveness of these ferric compounds as electron acceptors for the metabolism of acetate. The addition of acetate or hydrogen relieved the inhibition of methane production by ferric iron. The decrease of electron equivalents proceeding to methane in sediments supplemented with amorphous ferric oxyhydroxides was compensated for by a corresponding increase of electron equivalents in ferrous iron. These results indicate that iron reduction can outcompete methanogenic food chains for sediment organic matter. Thus, when amorphous ferric oxyhydroxides are available in anaerobic sediments, the transfer of electrons from organic matter to ferric iron can be a major pathway for organic matter decomposition. PMID:16347032

  16. Organic matter mineralization with reduction of ferric iron in anaerobic sediments

    SciTech Connect

    Lovley, D.R.; Phillips, E.J.P.

    1986-04-01

    The potential for ferric iron reduction with fermentable substrates, fermentation products, and complex organic matter as electron donors was investigated with sediments from freshwater and brackish water sites in the Potomac River Estuary. In enrichments with glucose and hematite, iron reduction was a minor pathway for electron flow, and fermentation products accumulated. The substitution of amorphous ferric oxyhydroxide for hematite in glucose enrichments increased iron reduction 50-fold because the fermentation products could also be metabolized with concomitant iron reduction. Acetate, hydrogen, propionate, butyrate, ethanol, methanol, and trimethylamine stimulated the reduction of amorphous ferric oxyhydroxide in enrichments inoculated with sediments but not in uninoculated or heat-killed controls. The addition of ferric iron inhibited methane production in sediments. The degree of inhibition of methane production by various forms of ferric iron was related to the effectiveness of these ferric compounds as electron acceptors for the metabolism of acetate. The addition of acetate or hydrogen relieved the inhibition of methane production by ferric iron. The decrease of electron equivalents proceeding to methane in sediments supplemented with amorphous ferric oxyhydroxides was compensated for by a corresponding increase of electron equivalents in ferrous iron. These results indicate that iron reduction can out compete methanogenic food chains for sediment organic matter. Thus, when amorphous ferric oxyhydroxides are available in anaerobic sediments, the transfer of electrons from organic matter to ferric iron can be a major pathway for organic matter decomposition.

  17. Organic matter mineralization with reduction of ferric iron in anaerobic sediments.

    PubMed

    Lovley, D R; Phillips, E J

    1986-04-01

    The potential for ferric iron reduction with fermentable substrates, fermentation products, and complex organic matter as electron donors was investigated with sediments from freshwater and brackish water sites in the Potomac River Estuary. In enrichments with glucose and hematite, iron reduction was a minor pathway for electron flow, and fermentation products accumulated. The substitution of amorphous ferric oxyhydroxide for hematite in glucose enrichments increased iron reduction 50-fold because the fermentation products could also be metabolized with concomitant iron reduction. Acetate, hydrogen, propionate, butyrate, ethanol, methanol, and trimethylamine stimulated the reduction of amorphous ferric oxyhydroxide in enrichments inoculated with sediments but not in uninoculated or heat-killed controls. The addition of ferric iron inhibited methane production in sediments. The degree of inhibition of methane production by various forms of ferric iron was related to the effectiveness of these ferric compounds as electron acceptors for the metabolism of acetate. The addition of acetate or hydrogen relieved the inhibition of methane production by ferric iron. The decrease of electron equivalents proceeding to methane in sediments supplemented with amorphous ferric oxyhydroxides was compensated for by a corresponding increase of electron equivalents in ferrous iron. These results indicate that iron reduction can outcompete methanogenic food chains for sediment organic matter. Thus, when amorphous ferric oxyhydroxides are available in anaerobic sediments, the transfer of electrons from organic matter to ferric iron can be a major pathway for organic matter decomposition. PMID:16347032

  18. Treatment of rheumatoid synovitis of the knee with intraarticular injection of dysprosium 165-ferric hydroxide macroaggregates

    SciTech Connect

    Sledge, C.B.; Zuckerman, J.D.; Zalutsky, M.R.; Atcher, R.W.; Shortkroff, S.; Lionberger, D.R.; Rose, H.A.; Hurson, B.J.; Lankenner, P.A. Jr.; Anderson, R.J.

    1986-02-01

    One hundred eight knees of 93 patients with seropositive rheumatoid arthritis and persistent synovitis of the knee were treated with an intraarticular injection of 270 mCi of dysprosium 165 bound to ferric hydroxide macroaggregate. Leakage of radioactivity from the injected joint was minimal. Mean leakage to the venous blood 3 hours after injection was 0.11% of the injected dose; this corresponds to a mean whole body dose of 0.2 rads. Mean leakage to the liver 24 hours after injection was 0.64% of the injected dose; this corresponds to a mean liver dose of 3.2 rads. In 7 additional patients examined, there was negligible or near negligible activity found in the draining inguinal lymph nodes. One-year followup was possible for 74 knees (63 patients). Sixty-one percent of the knees had good results, 23% had fair results, and 16% had poor results. There was a direct correlation between the radiographic stage and response to treatment. In knees with stage I radiographic changes, 72% showed good results; 93% showed improvement. In knees with stage II changes, 59% showed good results; 81% showed improvement. These preliminary results indicate that dysprosium 165-ferric hydroxide macroaggregate is an effective agent for radiation synovectomy. The low leakage rates observed offer a definite advantage over agents previously used.

  19. A Beverage Containing Fermented Black Soybean Ameliorates Ferric Nitrilotriacetate-Induced Renal Oxidative Damage in Rats

    PubMed Central

    Okazaki, Yasumasa; Iqbal, Mohammad; Kawakami, Norito; Yamamoto, Yorihiro; Toyokuni, Shinya; Okada, Shigeru

    2010-01-01

    It is beneficial to seek scientific basis for the effects of functional foods. Natural pigments derived from plants are widely known as possible antioxidants. Black soybean contains a larger amount of anthocyanins than regular soybean. Here we studied the antioxidative effect of a beverage obtained via citric acid fermentation of black soybean (BBS), using a rat model of renal oxidative injury induced by a renal carcinogen, ferric nitrilotriacetate. BBS (10 ml/kg) was orally administered 30 min before ferric nitrilotriacetate treatment. Renal lipid peroxidation was significantly suppressed in the BBS-pretreated animals concomitant with decrease in 4-hydroxy-2-nonenal-modified proteins and 8-hydroxy-2'-deoxyguanosine. Maintenance of renal activities of antioxidative enzymes including catalase, glutathione peroxidase, glutathione reductase, glutathione S-transferase, glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase and quinone reductase was significantly better in the BBS-pretreated rats. Elevation of serum creatinine and urea nitrogen was significantly suppressed in the BBS-pretreated rats. These data suggest that dietary intake of BBS is useful for the prevention of renal tubular oxidative damage mediate by iron, and warrant further investigation. PMID:21103028

  20. Regular physical activity has differential association with reduced obesity among diverse youth in the United States.

    PubMed

    Fradkin, Chris; Wallander, Jan L; Elliott, Marc N; Cuccaro, Paula; Schuster, Mark A

    2016-08-01

    This study examined whether daily or almost daily lower-intensity physical activity was associated with reduced obesity, among 4824 African American, Hispanic, and White youth assessed in fifth and seventh grades. Regular lower-intensity physical activity was associated with reduced obesity only among Hispanic and White males and only in seventh grade, and not among youth in fifth grade, females, or African American males or females. Findings from this study suggest that the reduced obesity risk generally attributed to physical activity may not be consistent across racial/ethnic and gender groups of early adolescents. PMID:25476573

  1. Impurity content of reduced-activation ferritic steels and a vanadium alloy

    SciTech Connect

    Klueh, R.L.; Grossbeck, M.L.; Bloom, E.E.

    1997-04-01

    Inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry was used to analyze a reduced-activation ferritic/martensitic steel and a vanadium alloy for low-level impurities that would compromise the reduced-activation characteristics of these materials. The ferritic steel was from the 5-ton IEA heat of modified F82H, and the vanadium alloy was from a 500-kg heat of V-4Cr-4Ti. To compare techniques for analysis of low concentrations of impurities, the vanadium alloy was also examined by glow discharge mass spectrometry. Two other reduced-activation steels and two commercial ferritic steels were also analyzed to determine the difference in the level of the detrimental impurities in the IEA heat and steels for which no extra effort was made to restrict some of the tramp impurities. Silver, cobalt, molybdenum, and niobium proved to be the tramp impurities of most importance. The levels observed in these two materials produced with present technology exceeded the limits for low activation for either shallow land burial or recycling. The chemical analyses provide a benchmark for the improvement in production technology required to achieve reduced activation; they also provide a set of concentrations for calculating decay characteristics for reduced-activation materials. The results indicate the progress that has been made and give an indication of what must still be done before the reduced-activation criteria can be achieved.

  2. Reaction mechanism for the ferric chloride leaching of sphalerite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Warren, G. W.; Henein, H.; Jin, Zuo-Mei

    1985-12-01

    Reaction mechanisms for the ferric chloride leaching of sphalerite are proposed based on data obtained in leaching and dual cell experiments presented in this work and in a previous study. The results from the leaching experiments show that at low concentrations the rate is proportional to [Fe3+]T 0.5 and [Cl-]T 0.43 but at higher concentrations the reaction order with respect to both [Fe3+]T and [Cl-]T decreases. Using dual cell experiments which allow the half cell reactions to be separated, increased rates are observed when NaCl is added to the anolyte and to the catholyte. The increase in rate is attributed to a direct, anodic electrochemical reaction of Cl- with the mineral. When NaCl is added only to the catholyte, a decrease in the rate is observed due to a decrease in the E 0 of the cathode which is attributed to the formation of ferric-chloro complexes. Several possible electrochemical mechanisms and mathematical models based on the Butler-Volmer relation are delineated, and of these, one model is selected which accounts for the experimentally observed changes in reaction order for both Fe3+ and Cl-. This analysis incorporates a charge transfer process for each ion and an adsorption step for ferric and chloride ions. The inhibiting effect of Fe2+ noted by previous investigators is also accounted for through a similar model which includes back reaction kinetics for Fe2+. The proposed models successfully provide a theoretical basis for describing the role of Cl-, Fe3+, and Fe2+ as well as their interrelationship in zinc sulfide leaching reactions. Possible applications of these results to chloride leaching systems involving other sulfides or complex sulfides are considered.

  3. Damping Control of Liquid Container by Swing-type Active Vibration Reducer on Mobile Robot

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hamaguchi, Masafumi; Taniguchi, Takao

    This paper proposes a damping control of sloshing in a cylindrical container with a swing-type active vibration reducer on a wheeled mobile robot (WMR). The WMR runs along a straight path on a horizontal plane. The container is mounted on the active vibration reducer. A laser displacement sensor is used to observe the liquid level in the container. The container can be tilted in the running direction by the active vibration reducer. A sloshing model is obtained from a spherical pendulum-type sloshing model, which approximately expresses (1, 1)-mode sloshing. The sloshing model is used to design a damping control system. The control system of the active vibration reducer is designed with an inverse model of sloshing and an optimal regulator with a Kalman filter. The WMR is driven by an acceleration pattern designed with an input shaping method. The usefulness of the proposed method is demonstrated through simulation and experimental results.

  4. Incresing antioxidant activity and reducing decay of blueberries by essential oils

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Several naturally occurring essential oils including carvacrol, anethole, cinnamaldehyde, cinnamic acid, perillaldehyde, linalool, and p-cymene were evaluated for their effectiveness in reducing decay and increasing antioxidant levels and activities in ‘Duke’ blueberries (Vaccinium corymbosum). Carv...

  5. Corynebactin and a Serine Trilactone Based Analogue-Chirality and Molecular Modeling of ferric Complexes

    SciTech Connect

    Bluhm, Martin E.; Hay, Benjamin P.; Kim, Sangoo S.; Dertz, Emily A.; Raymond, Kenneth N.

    2002-09-14

    The chirality of ferric siderophore complexes is a determinant for their cellular recognition and transport. Corynebactin (first isolated from a Gram-positive bacterium) contains L-threonine, unlike the closely related enterobactin, which contains L-serine. Also unlike enterobactin, ferric corynebactin is preferentially L at the iron center. Experimental (circular dichroism spectra and synthesis of a corynebactin/enterobactin hybrid) and theoretical (MM3 and density functional theory calculations) results explain ferric corynebactin's properties.

  6. U-EXTRACTION--IMPROVEMENTS IN ELIMINATION OF Mo BY USE OF FERRIC ION

    DOEpatents

    Clark, H.M.; Duffey, D.

    1958-06-10

    An improved solvent extraction process is described whereby U may be extracted by a water immiscible organic solvent from an aqueous solution of uranyl nitrate. It has been found that Mo in the presence of phosphate ions appears to form a complex with the phosphate which extracts along with the U. This extraction of Mo may be suppressed by providing ferric ion in the solution prior to the extraction step. The ferric ion is preferably provided in the form of ferric nitrate.

  7. Reaction of ferric heme proteins with nitrite and sulfite

    SciTech Connect

    Young, L.J.; Siegel, L.M.

    1988-04-19

    Optical and EPR spectroscopy of ferric heme proteins of the porphyrin, oxyporphyrin, and isobacteriochlorin classes has indicated that nitrite reacts with these proteins at the heme iron. Sulfite has been conclusively proven to react only with proteins containing the isobacteriochlorin macrocycle. Quantitative EPR spectroscopy of these nitrite and sulfite adducts showed that most contained a substantial quantity of undetectable heme. It is suggested that protein-induced autoreduction of nitrite (but not sulfite) and a strained and/or uniaxial g-tensor are the principal ways by which the silent state is produced.

  8. [Performance and Mechanism of Ferric Tannate in the Removal of Inorganic Nitrogen from Wastewater].

    PubMed

    Zhang, Rui-na; Li, Lin; Liu, Jun-xin

    2015-11-01

    A novel adsorbent material-ferric tannate was synthesized, and performances and mechanisms of NH4(+) -N, NO2(-) -N and NO3(-) -N were investigated via batch adsorption experiments. The results indicated that ferric tannate exhibited preferential adsorption for NH4(+) -N and NO2(-) -N. When the mass ratios of ferric tannate to NH4(+) -N and ferric tannate to NO2(-) -N were both 200, the removal efficiencies were both higher than 95%. The adsorption behaviors were analyzed with adsorption kinetic models, Langmuir and Freundlich isotherm adsorption models, and Weber-Morris equation. The results implied that NH4(+) -N and NO2(-) -N were adsorbed on the surface of ferric tannate in the forms of monolayer and multilayer, respectively. The pseudo-second order kinetic model was more suitable to describe the adsorption processes, and the external particle diffusion and surface adsorption played the key roles in the adsorption process. NH: -N could be combined with negative oxygen ions which distributed on the external surface of ferric tannate by the electrostatic interaction, whereas NO2(-) -N could be combined with ferric ions in ferric tannate by the electrostatic interaction and coordination. The present study provided scientific evidence for the application of ferric tannate as a potential adsorbent in the future. PMID:26911001

  9. Stability of ferric complexes with 3-hydroxyflavone (flavonol), 5,7-dihydroxyflavone (chrysin), and 3',4'-dihydroxyflavone.

    PubMed

    Engelmann, Mark D; Hutcheson, Ryan; Cheng, I Francis

    2005-04-20

    The acid dissociation and ferric stability constants for complexation by the flavonoids 3-hydroxyflavone (flavonol), 5,7-dihydroxyflavone (chrysin), and 3',4'-dihydroxyflavone in 50:50 (v/v) ethanol/water are determined by pH potentiometric and spectrophotometric titrations and the linear least-squares curve-fitting program Hyperquad. Over the entire range of pH and reagent concentrations spanning the titration experiments, the stoichiometry for iron-flavonoid complex formation was 1:1 for all three flavonoids examined. The three flavonoids were chosen for their hydroxy substitution pattern, with each possessing one of the three most commonly suggested sites for metal binding by the flavonoids. On the basis of the calculated stability constants, the intraflavonoid-binding site competition is illustrated as a function of pH via speciation curves. The curves indicate that the binding site comprised of the 3',4'-hydroxy substitutions, the catecholic site, is most influential for ferric complexation at the physiological pH of 7.4. The possibility for antioxidant activity by flavonoid chelation of ferric iron in the presence of other competitive physiological complexing agents is demonstrated through additional speciation calculations. PMID:15826045

  10. Reduced Maximal Force during Acute Anterior Knee Pain Is Associated with Deficits in Voluntary Muscle Activation

    PubMed Central

    Salomoni, Sauro; Tucker, Kylie; Hug, François; McPhee, Megan; Hodges, Paul

    2016-01-01

    Although maximal voluntary contraction (MVC) force is reduced during pain, studies using interpolated twitch show no consistent reduction of voluntary muscle drive. The present study aimed to test if the reduction in MVC force during acute experimental pain could be explained by increased activation of antagonist muscles, weak voluntary activation at baseline, or changes in force direction. Twenty-two healthy volunteers performed maximal voluntary isometric knee extensions before, during, and after the effects of hypertonic (pain) and isotonic (control) saline injections into the infrapatellar fat pad. The MVC force, voluntary activation, electromyographic (EMG) activity of agonist, antagonist, and auxiliary (hip) muscles, and pain cognition and anxiety scores were recorded. MVC force was 9.3% lower during pain than baseline (p < 0.001), but there was no systematic change in voluntary activation. Reduced MVC force during pain was variable between participants (SD: 14%), and was correlated with reduced voluntary activation (r = 0.90), baseline voluntary activation (r = − 0.62), and reduced EMG amplitude of agonist and antagonist muscles (all r > 0.52), but not with changes in force direction, pain or anxiety scores. Hence, reduced MVC force during acute pain was mainly explained by deficits in maximal voluntary drive. PMID:27559737

  11. Authigenic vivianite in Potomac River sediments: control by ferric oxy-hydroxides.

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hearn, P.P.; Parkhurst, D.L.; Callender, E.

    1983-01-01

    Sand-size aggregates of vivianite crystals occur in the uppermost sediments of the Potomac River estuary immediately downstream from the outfall of a sewage treatment plant at the southernmost boundary of the District of Columbia, USA. They are most abundant in a small area of coarse sand (dredge spoil) which contrasts with the adjacent, much finer sediments. The sewage outfall supplies both reducing conditions and abundant phosphate. Analyses and calculations indicate that the pore waters in all the adjacent sediments are supersaturated with respect to vivianite. Its concentration in the coarse sand is attributed to the absence there of amorphous ferric oxyhydroxides, which are present in the finer sediments and preferentially absorb the phosphate ion. -H.R.B.

  12. Effect of viscous macromolecules on peritoneal plasminogen activator activity: a potential mechanism for their ability to reduce postoperative adhesion formation.

    PubMed

    Mayer, M; Yedgar, S; Hurwitz, A; Palti, Z; Finzi, Z; Milwidsky, A

    1988-10-01

    Activity of peritoneal plasminogen activator and its regulation by dextran and other macromolecules that clinically suppress postoperative adhesions was studied. Plasminogen activator activity was assayed by a two-stage globinolytic assay that monitors formation of plasmin, as well as by cleavage of a chromogenic peptide substrate (S-2444) in the presence of aprotinin (Trasylol). Plasminogen activator activity was located on the outer surface of human peritoneum. Incubation of peritoneal tissue with buffer in vitro (conditioning) prompted release of plasminogen activator into the conditioning medium. The released plasminogen activator formed a single band on sodium dodecyl sulfate-gel electrophoresis at an apparent molecular weight of 174,000 and was markedly suppressed by antiserum raised against human melanoma tissue-type plasminogen activator. Nonspecific proteolytic activity did not accumulate in the medium during conditioning. The presence of dextran 80 during conditioning of peritoneum reversibly suppressed tissue-bound plasminogen activator activity and reduced plasminogen activator activity in the spent medium. A similar inhibition of peritoneal plasminogen activator was induced by dextran 500, methyl cellulose, and polyvinylpyrrolidone. Dextran, when added to the medium after conditioning, had no direct inhibitory effect on plasminogen activator activity. Dextran did not induce peritoneal production of inhibitor(s) of trypsin, chymotrypsin, or urokinase. On the basis of these findings, two possible mechanisms for the effect of viscous polymers in the reduction of adhesion formation are proposed. These mechanisms consider the importance of peritoneal tissue-type plasminogen activator for removal of fibrin clots and suggest that polymer coating either prevents the shedding of plasminogen activator into the abdominal cavity or reduces the access of fibrin clots to the serosal surfaces. PMID:2459968

  13. Ferric chloride graphite intercalation compounds prepared from graphite fluoride

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hung, Ching-Cheh

    1994-01-01

    The reaction between graphite fluoride and ferric chloride was observed in the temperature range of 300 to 400 C. The graphite fluorides used for this reaction have an sp3 electronic structure and are electrical insulators. They can be made by fluorinating either carbon fibers or powder having various degrees of graphitization. Reaction is fast and spontaneous and can occur in the presence of air. The ferric chloride does not have to be predried. The products have an sp2 electronic structure and are electrical conductors. They contain first stage FeCl3 intercalated graphite. Some of the products contain FeCl2*2H2O, others contain FeF3 in concentrations that depend on the intercalation condition. The graphite intercalated compounds (GIC) deintercalated slowly in air at room temperature, but deintercalated quickly and completely at 370 C. Deintercalation is accompanied by the disappearing of iron halides and the formation of rust (hematite) distributed unevenly on the fiber surface. When heated to 400 C in pure N2 (99.99 vol %), this new GIC deintercalates without losing its molecular structure. However, when the compounds are heated to 800 C in quartz tube, they lost most of its halogen atoms and formed iron oxides (other than hematite), distributed evenly in or on the fiber. This iron-oxide-covered fiber may be useful in making carbon-fiber/ceramic-matrix composites with strong bonding at the fiber-ceramic interface.

  14. Ferric chloride leach-electrolysis process for production of lead

    SciTech Connect

    Sandberg, R.G.; Wong, M.M.

    1980-01-01

    The U.S. Department of the Interior, Bureau of Mines, under a cost-sharing, cooperative research agreement with lead producers, is studying a process to eliminate sulfur oxide generation and to minimize lead emission in the production of lead. The new process consists of leaching lead sulfide concentrate with a ferric chloride-sodium chloride solution to produce lead chloride, and fused-salt electrolysis of lead chloride to produce lead metal and chlorine. The chlorine is used to regenerate ferric chloride in the leach solution. The study is being conducted in a process investigation unit which treats 750 lb of concentrate a day. This paper discusses the results of operation of the process investigation unit, data on lead monitoring, and the precautions employed to control lead levels in the workplace atmosphere. The monitoring data for the initial phase of the investigation show lead levels well within OSHA permissible exposure limits. Continued development is necessary before the process can be considered for implementation.

  15. Ion flotation and solvent extraction of ferric thiocyanate complexes

    SciTech Connect

    Jurkiewicz, K.

    1987-12-01

    The influence of thiocyanate and accompanying mineral acids concentration on the effectiveness of Fe(III) ion flotation, Fe(III) precipitation in cetyltrimethylammonium ferric-thiocyanate form (as sublate), and Fe(III) extraction using ethyl acetate was studied. The effectiveness of these processes improves with the extent of Fe(III) complexation by thiocyanates. In the presence of acids, flotation and precipitation are increased as follows: HClO/sub 4/ < HCl < HNO/sub 3/ < H/sub 2/SO/sub 4/. The position of H/sub 3/PO/sub 4/ in this series changes with changing thiocyanate concentration. Extraction effectiveness is increased in the series: H/sub 3/PO/sub 4/ < H/sub 2/SO/sub 4/ < HNO/sub 3/, HClO/sub 4/, HCl. The following points are discussed: (a) the influence of acid anions competing with thiocyanate anions in Fe(III) complexation; (b) the influence of the competition between acid anions and complex ferric-thiocyanate anions in sublate formation; (c) the influence of hydrogen ion concentration increase in thiocyanate medium on the results of Fe(III) flotation, precipitation, and extraction; and (d) the influence of anion affinity for a collector on the solution surface properties and on Fe(III) flotation.

  16. Particulate and THM precursor removal with ferric chloride

    SciTech Connect

    Childress, A.E.; Vrijenhoek, E.M.; Elimelech, M.; Tanaka, T.S.; Beuhler, M.D.

    1999-11-01

    Pilot-scale experiments were performed to investigate the effectiveness of enhanced coagulation in removing particles and trihalomethane (THM) precursors from two surface source waters: California State Project water and Colorado River water. The removal of suspended particles and natural organic matter at various ferric chloride doses and coagulation pHs was assessed through source water and filter effluent measurements of turbidity, particle count. UV{sub 254}, TOC, and THM formation potential. Overall, it was found that optimal removal of particles and THM precursors by enhanced coagulation with ferric chloride is obtained at high coagulant doses and low pH conditions. Generally, turbidity removal is more efficient and head loss is more moderate at ambient pH compared with pH 5.5. Additionally, filter effluent particle counts were found to be consistent with residual turbidity data. The removal of THM precursors by enhanced coagulation is significantly enhanced at pH 5.5 compared with ambient pH. The reduction in THM formation potential is consistent with the trends observed for the THM precursor removal data. Furthermore, specific UV absorbance was used to estimate the proportion of humic substances in the raw waters. Enhanced coagulation was found to be less effective for the source water with the lower specific UV absorbance.

  17. Intravenous ferric carboxymaltose for the treatment of iron deficiency anemia

    PubMed Central

    Friedrisch, João Ricardo; Cançado, Rodolfo Delfini

    2015-01-01

    Nutritional iron deficiency anemia is the most common deficiency disorder, affecting more than two billion people worldwide. Oral iron supplementation is usually the first choice for the treatment of iron deficiency anemia, but in many conditions, oral iron is less than ideal mainly because of gastrointestinal adverse events and the long course needed to treat the disease and replenish body iron stores. Intravenous iron compounds consist of an iron oxyhydroxide core, which is surrounded by a carbohydrate shell made of polymers such as dextran, sucrose or gluconate. The first iron product for intravenous use was the high molecular weight iron dextran. However, dextran-containing intravenous iron preparations are associated with an elevated risk of anaphylactic reactions, which made physicians reluctant to use intravenous iron for the treatment of iron deficiency anemia over many years. Intravenous ferric carboxymaltose is a stable complex with the advantage of being non-dextran-containing and a very low immunogenic potential and therefore not predisposed to anaphylactic reactions. Its properties permit the administration of large doses (15 mg/kg; maximum of 1000 mg/infusion) in a single and rapid session (15-minute infusion) without the requirement of a test dose. The purpose of this review is to discuss some pertinent issues in relation to the history, pharmacology, administration, efficacy, and safety profile of ferric carboxymaltose in the treatment of patients with iron deficiency anemia. PMID:26670403

  18. Intravenous ferric carboxymaltose for the treatment of iron deficiency anemia.

    PubMed

    Friedrisch, João Ricardo; Cançado, Rodolfo Delfini

    2015-01-01

    Nutritional iron deficiency anemia is the most common deficiency disorder, affecting more than two billion people worldwide. Oral iron supplementation is usually the first choice for the treatment of iron deficiency anemia, but in many conditions, oral iron is less than ideal mainly because of gastrointestinal adverse events and the long course needed to treat the disease and replenish body iron stores. Intravenous iron compounds consist of an iron oxyhydroxide core, which is surrounded by a carbohydrate shell made of polymers such as dextran, sucrose or gluconate. The first iron product for intravenous use was the high molecular weight iron dextran. However, dextran-containing intravenous iron preparations are associated with an elevated risk of anaphylactic reactions, which made physicians reluctant to use intravenous iron for the treatment of iron deficiency anemia over many years. Intravenous ferric carboxymaltose is a stable complex with the advantage of being non-dextran-containing and a very low immunogenic potential and therefore not predisposed to anaphylactic reactions. Its properties permit the administration of large doses (15mg/kg; maximum of 1000mg/infusion) in a single and rapid session (15-minute infusion) without the requirement of a test dose. The purpose of this review is to discuss some pertinent issues in relation to the history, pharmacology, administration, efficacy, and safety profile of ferric carboxymaltose in the treatment of patients with iron deficiency anemia. PMID:26670403

  19. Pleomorphism and acetylene-reducing activity of free-living rhizobia.

    PubMed Central

    Kaneshiro, T; Baker, F L; Johnson, D E

    1983-01-01

    Cowpea-type Rhizobium sp. strain 32H1 and Rhizobium japonicum USDA 26 and 110 grown on a glutamate-mannitol-gluconate agar medium showed increases in the number of pleomorphic cells coincident with their acetylene-reducing activity. Pleomorphs appeared to be inhibited in growth nonuniformly, because acetylene-reducing cultures were mixtures of rod, branched (V, Y, and T), and other irregularly shaped cells. In contrast, strain USDA 10 consistently failed to reduce acetylene, even though it also could grow and yield pleomorphic cells under various conditions. With minimal inhibitory supplements (5 micrograms per ml of medium) of nalidixic acid and novobiocin as cell division inhibitors, an increase in pleomorphic cells was observed, but the inhibited cultures displayed lower acetylene-reducing activity. A study of pleomorphic cells derived in different ways indicated that not all pleomorphs reduce acetylene. Images PMID:6822472

  20. Using Stable Isotopes to Assess Reduced Physical Activity of Individuals with Prader-Willi Syndrome.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Davies, Peter S. W.; Joughlin, C.

    1993-01-01

    This study found that the physical activity levels of 10 children with Prader-Willi syndrome were significantly reduced in comparison to children without the syndrome. Increasing activity levels in children with Prader-Willi syndrome is suggested as a way to raise total energy expenditure and control weight gain. (Author/JDD)

  1. Solid Waste Educational Resources and Activities: Let's Reduce, Reuse, and Recycle. [CD-ROM].

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Environmental Protection Agency, Washington, DC. Solid Waste and Emergency Response.

    This contains games, activities, publications, and resources for students and teachers on how to reduce, reuse, recycle, and properly manage waste. It also contains a screen saver featuring runners-up from the Earth Day 2000 art contest. Activities and games include titles such as "Planet Protectors,""Recycle City,""Trash and Climate Change," and…

  2. Recycle Alaska: Reduce, Reuse, Recycle. Activities Handbook, Teacher's Guide, and Student Worksheets.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Alaska State Dept. of Education, Juneau.

    Recycling is a very important aspect of conserving the environment for future generations. This guide addresses the topic of litter prevention for the Alaskan environment and contains 42 activities. Activity topics covered include Natural Cycles, Human Interruption of Natural Cycles, Reduce, Reuse, Recycle and Recycled Classroom. Grade level,…

  3. A novel technology to increase antioxidant activity of an antioxidant by reducing volatility

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    During frying, an antioxidant is lost by reaction with radicals for its antioxidant activity, but it is also lost by decomposition and evaporation before it is able to exert antioxidant activity. Some low molecular weight antioxidants are often so volatile that they show much reduced antioxidant act...

  4. Reduced serum inhibition of platelet-activating factor activity in preeclampsia.

    PubMed

    Benedetto, C; Massobrio, M; Bertini, E; Abbondanza, M; Enrieu, N; Tetta, C

    1989-01-01

    We determined in normal nonpregnant (group 1) women, normal pregnant (group 2) women, and patients with preeclampsia (group 3) the serum inhibition of platelet-activating factor activity, the presence of detectable amounts of platelet-activating factor in the blood, and platelet responsiveness in vitro to platelet-activating factor, and to other agonists (adenosine diphosphate, collagen, and ristocetin), and prostacyclin (prostaglandin I2). In patients with preeclampsia (group 3) the serum inhibition of platelet-activating factor activity was significantly lower than that in groups 1 and 2. However, no detectable amounts of platelet-activating factor were observed. The mean values of platelet aggregation induced by platelet-activating factor, adenosine diphosphate, collagen and ristocetin, and the prostaglandin I2-inhibitory concentration of 50% which is inversely correlated with platelet sensitivity to prostaglandin I2, were not significantly different between groups 2 and 3. It is suggested that in preeclampsia the defect in serum inhibitory potential of platelet-activating factor--induced platelet aggregation may contribute to the disturbance in the homeostatic balance between proaggregant and antiaggregant substances. PMID:2912073

  5. Subsurface injection of dissolved ferric chloride to form a chemical barrier: Laboratory investigations

    SciTech Connect

    Morrison, S.J.; Spangler, R.R.; Morris, S.A.

    1996-01-01

    A chemical barrier is a permeable zone of reactive materials emplaced in the subsurface to remove ground-water contaminants while allowing clean ground water to pass through. Because dissolved ferric chloride hydrolyzes to amorphous ferric oxyhydroxide when it contacts calcite (CaCO{sub 3}), it may be viable to emplace a zone of amorphous ferric oxyhydroxide (an absorbent for U, Mo, and other inorganic contaminants) into calcite-bearing geologic units by injecting ferric chloride through wells. For a chemical barrier to be successful, it must remain permeable and must be immobile. This investigation monitored chemical compositions, hydraulic conductivity, and iron mobility in laboratory columns and in a two-dimensional tank to determine the viability of injecting ferric chloride to form an amorphous ferric oxyhydroxide chemical barrier. The authors introduced a ferric chloride solution (1,345 mg/1[0.024 m] Fe) to calcite-bearing alluvial gravel to form a chemical barrier of amorphous ferric oxyhydroxide, followed by solutions contaminated with U and Mo. The simulated chemical barriers decreased U and Mo concentrations to less than 0.05 mg/l (2.1 {times} 10{sup {minus}7} m) and 0.01 (1.0 {times} 10{sup {minus}7} m), respectively; however, the breakthrough front is spread out with concentrations increasing to more than regulatory guideline values sooner than predicted. The hydraulic conductivity of calcite-bearing alluvial gravel decreased substantially during ferric chloride introduction because of the formation of carbon dioxide but increased to within factors of 1 to 5 of the original value as synthetic ground water flowed through the system. Amorphous ferric oxyhydroxide that formed in these experiments remained immobile at flow rates exceeding those typical of ground water. These laboratory results, in conjunction with site-specific characterization data, can be used to design chemical barriers emplaced by injection of ferric chloride.

  6. SIRT1 activating compounds reduce oxidative stress and prevent cell death in neuronal cells

    PubMed Central

    Khan, Reas S.; Fonseca-Kelly, Zoe; Callinan, Catherine; Zuo, Ling; Sachdeva, Mira M.; Shindler, Kenneth S.

    2012-01-01

    Activation of SIRT1, an NAD+-dependent deacetylase, prevents retinal ganglion cell (RGC) loss in optic neuritis, an inflammatory demyelinating optic nerve disease. While SIRT1 deacetylates numerous protein targets, downstream mechanisms of SIRT1 activation mediating this neuroprotective effect are unknown. SIRT1 increases mitochondrial function and reduces oxidative stress in muscle and other cells, and oxidative stress occurs in neuronal degeneration. We examined whether SIRT1 activators reduce oxidative stress and promote mitochondrial function in neuronal cells. Oxidative stress, marked by reactive oxygen species (ROS) accumulation, was induced in RGC-5 cells by serum deprivation, or addition of doxorubicin or hydrogen peroxide, and resulted in significant cell loss. SIRT1 activators resveratrol (RSV) and SRTAW04 reduced ROS levels and promoted cell survival in RGC-5 cells as well as primary RGC cultures. Effects were blocked by SIRT1 siRNA. SIRT1 activators also increased expression of succinate dehydrogenase (SDH), a mitochondrial enzyme, and promoted deacetylation of PGC-1α, a co-enzyme involved in mitochondrial function. Results show SIRT1 activators prevent cell loss by reducing oxidative stress and promoting mitochondrial function in a neuronal cell line. Results suggest SIRT1 activators can mediate neuroprotective effects during optic neuritis by these mechanisms, and they have the potential to preserve neurons in other neurodegenerative diseases that involve oxidative stress. PMID:23293585

  7. Reduced mitochondrial and ascorbate-glutathione activity after artificial ageing in soybean seed.

    PubMed

    Xin, Xia; Tian, Qian; Yin, Guangkun; Chen, Xiaoling; Zhang, Jinmei; Ng, Sophia; Lu, Xinxiong

    2014-01-15

    The effect of artificial ageing on the relationship between mitochondrial activities and the antioxidant system was studied in soybean seeds (Glycine max L. cv. Zhongdou No. 27). Ageing seeds for 18d and 41d at 40°C reduced germination from 99% to 52% and 0%, respectively. In comparison to the control, malondialdehyde content and leachate conductivity in aged seeds increased and were associated with membrane damage. Transmission electron microscopy and Percoll density gradient centrifugation showed that aged seeds mainly contained poorly developed mitochondria in which respiration and marker enzymes activities were significantly reduced. Heavy mitochondria isolated from the interface of the 21% and 40% Percoll were analyzed. Mitochondrial antioxidant enzymes activities including superoxide dismutase, ascorbate peroxidase, glutathione reductase, monodehydroascorbate reductase, and dehydroascorbate reductase were significantly reduced in aged seeds. A decrease in total ascorbic acid (ASC) and glutathione (GSH) content as well as the reduced/oxidized ratio of ASC and GSH in mitochondria with prolonged ageing showed that artificial ageing reduced ASC-GSH cycle activity. These results suggested an elevated reactive oxygen species (ROS) level in the aged seeds, which was confirmed by measurements of superoxide radical and hydrogen peroxide levels. We conclude that mitochondrial dysfunction in artificially aged seeds is due to retarded mitochondrial and ASC-GSH cycle activity and elevated ROS accumulation. PMID:24331429

  8. Impurity effects on reduced-activation ferritic steels developed for fusion applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Klueh, R. L.; Cheng, E. T.; Grossbeck, M. L.; Bloom, E. E.

    2000-08-01

    Reduced-activation steels are being developed for fusion applications by restricting alloying elements that produce long-lived radioactive isotopes when irradiated in the fusion neutron environment. Another source of long-lived isotopes is the impurities in the steel. To examine this, three heats of reduced-activation martensitic steel were analyzed by inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry for low-level impurities that compromise the reduced-activation characteristics: a 5-ton heat of modified F82H (F82H-Mod) for which an effort was made during production to reduce detrimental impurities, a 1-ton heat of JLF-1, and an 18-kg heat of ORNL 9Cr-2WVTa. Specimens from commercial heats of modified 9Cr-1Mo and Sandvik HT9 were also analyzed. The objective was to determine the difference in the impurity levels in the F82H-Mod and steels for which less effort was used to ensure purity. Silver, molybdenum, and niobium were found to be the tramp impurities of most importance. The F82H-Mod had the lowest levels, but in some cases the levels were not much different from the other heats. The impurity levels in the F82H-Mod produced with present technology did not achieve the low-activation limits for either shallow land burial or recycling. The results indicate the progress that has been made and what still must be done before the reduced-activation criteria can be achieved.

  9. Kinetics of the complexation of ferric iron with 8-hydroxyquinoline and KELEX 100

    SciTech Connect

    Ki, K.Y; Lemert, R.M.; Chang, H.K.

    1987-01-01

    The complexation reactions of ferric iron with 8-Hydroxyquinoline and KELEX-100 in both aqueous and methanol solutions were studied by using a stopped-flow spectrophotometer. In the aqueous solutions, the observed rate law was found to be first-order with respect to both iron(III) and oxine and inverse-first-order with respect to the hydrogen ion. While in the methanol solution, the rate law was first-order with respect to iron(III) and KELEX-100. Reaction pathes with the formation of the first complex, FeAS , from either FeT or Fe(OH)S were proposed to explain the observed rate law. The activation energies were found to be 5.5 kcal/g-mole and 15 kcal/g-mole for the aqueous and methanol solutions, respectively.

  10. Ferric chloride-induced murine carotid arterial injury: A model of redox pathology☆

    PubMed Central

    Li, Wei; McIntyre, Thomas M.; Silverstein, Roy L.

    2013-01-01

    Ferric chloride (FeCl3) induced vascular injury is a widely used model of occlusive thrombosis that reports platelet activation in the context of an aseptic closed vascular system. This model is based on redox-induced endothelial cell injury, which is simple and sensitive to both anticoagulant and anti-platelets drugs. The time required for platelet aggregation to occlude blood flow gives a quantitative measure of vascular damage that is pathologically relevant to thrombotic disease. We have refined the traditional FeCl3-induced carotid artery model making the data highly reproducible with lower variation. This paper will describe our artifices and report the role of varying the oxidative damage by varying FeCl3 concentrations and exposure. To explore a maximum difference between experimental groups, adjustment of the selected FeCl3 dose and exposure duration may be necessary. PMID:25101237

  11. Ferric iron budget of Kaapvaal cratonic mantle peridotite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Woodland, A.

    2012-04-01

    Oxidation fugacity plays an important role in many geochemical processes, such as partial melting and melt-rock interaction. How mantle peridotite responds during such processes is dependent on the amount of Fe2O3 present, since it occurs in much smaller quantities than Fe2+ and affects buffering capacity. This is particularly the case since redox reactions have been directly implicated in the rejuvenation and eventual breakup of cratons (e.g. Foley 2008, 2011). In addition, oxygen fugacity also influences the incorporation of OH in nominally anhydrous minerals, which can affect the mechanical integrity of cratonic blocks (Peslier et al. 2010). These issues are important for understanding the evolution of the upper mantle beneath the Kaapvaal craton. Canil and coworkers (1994, 1996) reported bulk ferric iron contents for 11 peridotites (10 garnet-bearing and 1 spinel-bearing) from the Kaapvaal. The purpose of this study is to build on their pioneering work to better assess the ferric iron budget of Kaapvaal cratonic mantle and to improve our understanding of how ferric iron is distributed within the peridotitic assemblage. Our data set includes more than 30 additional samples, predominantly garnet peridoites, from 7 localities in South Africa and Lesotho. Bulk Fe2O3 contents were determined by combining measured Fe3+ contents of individual minerals (by Mössbauer spectroscopy) with their respective modal proportion in each sample. Fe3+ contents of garnet and clinopyroxene reported in Woodland & Koch (2003), Lazarov et al. (2009) and Woodland (2009) were combined with new data for orthopyroxene (opx) and modal mineralogy to make this assessment. Opx has Fe3+/Fetot of 0.04-0.1 and Fe3+ contents are comparable between Opx and coexisting Cpx. Calculated whole rock Fe2O3 contents range from 0.02 to 0.29 wt % with contents systematically decreasing with increasing degrees of depletion (as indicated by increasing MgO and decreasing Al2O3 content). For a given MgO content

  12. Polarizability of the active site of cytochrome c reduces the activation barrier for electron transfer.

    PubMed

    Dinpajooh, Mohammadhasan; Martin, Daniel R; Matyushov, Dmitry V

    2016-01-01

    Enzymes in biology's energy chains operate with low energy input distributed through multiple electron transfer steps between protein active sites. The general challenge of biological design is how to lower the activation barrier without sacrificing a large negative reaction free energy. We show that this goal is achieved through a large polarizability of the active site. It is polarized by allowing a large number of excited states, which are populated quantum mechanically by electrostatic fluctuations of the protein and hydration water shells. This perspective is achieved by extensive mixed quantum mechanical/molecular dynamics simulations of the half reaction of reduction of cytochrome c. The barrier for electron transfer is consistently lowered by increasing the number of excited states included in the Hamiltonian of the active site diagonalized along the classical trajectory. We suggest that molecular polarizability, in addition to much studied electrostatics of permanent charges, is a key parameter to consider in order to understand how enzymes work. PMID:27306204

  13. Polarizability of the active site of cytochrome c reduces the activation barrier for electron transfer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dinpajooh, Mohammadhasan; Martin, Daniel R.; Matyushov, Dmitry V.

    2016-06-01

    Enzymes in biology’s energy chains operate with low energy input distributed through multiple electron transfer steps between protein active sites. The general challenge of biological design is how to lower the activation barrier without sacrificing a large negative reaction free energy. We show that this goal is achieved through a large polarizability of the active site. It is polarized by allowing a large number of excited states, which are populated quantum mechanically by electrostatic fluctuations of the protein and hydration water shells. This perspective is achieved by extensive mixed quantum mechanical/molecular dynamics simulations of the half reaction of reduction of cytochrome c. The barrier for electron transfer is consistently lowered by increasing the number of excited states included in the Hamiltonian of the active site diagonalized along the classical trajectory. We suggest that molecular polarizability, in addition to much studied electrostatics of permanent charges, is a key parameter to consider in order to understand how enzymes work.

  14. Polarizability of the active site of cytochrome c reduces the activation barrier for electron transfer

    PubMed Central

    Dinpajooh, Mohammadhasan; Martin, Daniel R.; Matyushov, Dmitry V.

    2016-01-01

    Enzymes in biology’s energy chains operate with low energy input distributed through multiple electron transfer steps between protein active sites. The general challenge of biological design is how to lower the activation barrier without sacrificing a large negative reaction free energy. We show that this goal is achieved through a large polarizability of the active site. It is polarized by allowing a large number of excited states, which are populated quantum mechanically by electrostatic fluctuations of the protein and hydration water shells. This perspective is achieved by extensive mixed quantum mechanical/molecular dynamics simulations of the half reaction of reduction of cytochrome c. The barrier for electron transfer is consistently lowered by increasing the number of excited states included in the Hamiltonian of the active site diagonalized along the classical trajectory. We suggest that molecular polarizability, in addition to much studied electrostatics of permanent charges, is a key parameter to consider in order to understand how enzymes work. PMID:27306204

  15. Hepcidin bound to α2-macroglobulin reduces ferroportin-1 expression and enhances its activity at reducing serum iron levels.

    PubMed

    Huang, Michael Li-Hsuan; Austin, Christopher J D; Sari, Marie-Agnès; Rahmanto, Yohan Suryo; Ponka, Prem; Vyoral, Daniel; Richardson, Des R

    2013-08-30

    Hepcidin regulates iron metabolism by down-regulating ferroportin-1 (Fpn1). We demonstrated that hepcidin is complexed to the blood transport protein, α2-macroglobulin (α2M) (Peslova, G., Petrak, J., Kuzelova, K., Hrdy, I., Halada, P., Kuchel, P. W., Soe-Lin, S., Ponka, P., Sutak, R., Becker, E., Huang, M. L., Suryo Rahmanto, Y., Richardson, D. R., and Vyoral, D. (2009) Blood 113, 6225-6236). However, nothing is known about the mechanism of hepcidin binding to α2M or the effects of the α2M·hepcidin complex in vivo. We show that decreased Fpn1 expression can be mediated by hepcidin bound to native α2M and also, for the first time, hepcidin bound to methylamine-activated α2M (α2M-MA). Passage of high molecular weight α2M·hepcidin or α2M-MA·hepcidin complexes (≈725 kDa) through a Sephadex G-25 size exclusion column retained their ability to decrease Fpn1 expression. Further studies using ultrafiltration indicated that hepcidin binding to α2M and α2M-MA was labile, resulting in some release from the protein, and this may explain its urinary excretion. To determine whether α2M-MA·hepcidin is delivered to cells via the α2M receptor (Lrp1), we assessed α2M uptake and Fpn1 expression in Lrp1(-/-) and Lrp1(+/+) cells. Interestingly, α2M·hepcidin or α2M-MA·hepcidin demonstrated similar activities at decreasing Fpn1 expression in Lrp1(-/-) and Lrp1(+/+) cells, indicating that Lrp1 is not essential for Fpn1 regulation. In vivo, hepcidin bound to α2M or α2M-MA did not affect plasma clearance of α2M/α2M-MA. However, serum iron levels were reduced to a significantly greater extent in mice treated with α2M·hepcidin or α2M-MA·hepcidin relative to unbound hepcidin. This effect could be mediated by the ability of α2M or α2M-MA to retard kidney filtration of bound hepcidin, increasing its half-life. A model is proposed that suggests that unlike proteases, which are irreversibly bound to activated α2M, hepcidin remains labile and available to down

  16. Switching Patients with Non-Dialysis Chronic Kidney Disease from Oral Iron to Intravenous Ferric Carboxymaltose: Effects on Erythropoiesis-Stimulating Agent Requirements, Costs, Hemoglobin and Iron Status

    PubMed Central

    Toblli, Jorge Eduardo; Di Gennaro, Federico

    2015-01-01

    Background Patients with non-dialysis-dependent chronic kidney disease (ND-CKD) often receive an erythropoiesis-stimulating agent (ESA) and oral iron treatment. This study evaluated whether a switch from oral iron to intravenous ferric carboxymaltose can reduce ESA requirements and improve iron status and hemoglobin in patients with ND-CKD. Methods This prospective, single arm and single-center study included adult patients with ND-CKD (creatinine clearance ≤40 mL/min), hemoglobin 11–12 g/dL and iron deficiency (ferritin <100 μg/L or transferrin saturation <20%), who were regularly treated with oral iron and ESA during 6 months prior to inclusion. Study patients received an intravenous ferric carboxymaltose dose of 1,000 mg iron, followed by a 6-months ESA/ ferric carboxymaltose maintenance regimen (target: hemoglobin 12 g/dL, transferrin saturation >20%). Outcome measures were ESA dose requirements during the observation period after initial ferric carboxymaltose treatment (primary endpoint); number of hospitalizations and transfusions, renal function before and after ferric carboxymaltose administration, number of adverse reactions (secondary endpoints). Hemoglobin, mean corpuscular volume, ferritin and transferrin saturation were measured monthly from baseline until end of study. Creatinine clearance, proteinuria, C-reactive protein, aspartate aminotransferase, alanine aminotransferase and alkaline phosphatase bimonthly from baseline until end of study. Results Thirty patients were enrolled (age 70.1±11.4 years; mean±SD). Mean ESA consumption was significantly reduced by 83.2±10.9% (from 41,839±3,668 IU/patient to 6,879±4,271 IU/patient; p<0.01). Hemoglobin increased by 0.7±0.3 g/dL, ferritin by 196.0±38.7 μg/L and transferrin saturation by 5.3±2.9% (month 6 vs. baseline; all p<0.01). No ferric carboxymaltose-related adverse events were reported and no patient withdrew or required transfusions during the study. Conclusion Among patients with ND

  17. Ferric and cobaltous hydroacid complexes for forward osmosis (FO) processes.

    PubMed

    Ge, Qingchun; Fu, Fengjiang; Chung, Tai-Shung

    2014-07-01

    Cupric and ferric hydroacid complexes have proven their advantages as draw solutes in forward osmosis in terms of high water fluxes, negligible reverse solute fluxes and easy recovery (Ge and Chung, 2013. Hydroacid complexes: A new class of draw solutes to promote forward osmosis (FO) processes. Chemical Communications 49, 8471-8473.). In this study, cobaltous hydroacid complexes were explored as draw solutes and compared with the ferric hydroacid complex to study the factors influencing their FO performance. The solutions of the cobaltous complexes produce high osmotic pressures due to the presence of abundant hydrophilic groups. These solutes are able to dissociate and form a multi-charged anion and Na(+) cations in water. In addition, these complexes have expanded structures which lead to negligible reverse solute fluxes and provide relatively easy approaches in regeneration. These characteristics make the newly synthesized cobaltous complexes appropriate as draw solutes. The FO performance of the cobaltous and ferric-citric acid (Fe-CA) complexes were evaluated respectively through cellulose acetate membranes, thin-film composite membranes fabricated on polyethersulfone supports (referred as TFC-PES), and polybenzimidazole and PES dual-layer (referred as PBI/PES) hollow fiber membranes. Under the conditions of DI water as the feed and facing the support layer of TFC-PES FO membranes (PRO mode), draw solutions at 2.0 M produced relatively high water fluxes of 39-48 LMH (L m(-2) hr(-1)) with negligible reverse solute fluxes. A water flux of 17.4 LMH was achieved when model seawater of 3.5 wt.% NaCl replaced DI water as the feed and 2.0 M Fe-CA as the draw solution under the same conditions. The performance of these hydroacid complexes surpasses those of the synthetic draw solutes developed in recent years. This observation, along with the relatively easy regeneration, makes these complexes very promising as a novel class of draw solutes. PMID:24768702

  18. Functional analysis of the ferric uptake requlator gene, fur, in Xanthomonas vesicatoria

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Iron is essential for the growth and survival of many organisms. Intracellular iron homeostasis must be maintained for cell survival and protection against iron toxicity. The ferric uptake regulator protein (Fur) regulates the high-affinity ferric uptake system in many bacteria. To investigate the f...

  19. Cross-person activity recognition using reduced kernel extreme learning machine.

    PubMed

    Deng, Wan-Yu; Zheng, Qing-Hua; Wang, Zhong-Min

    2014-05-01

    Activity recognition based on mobile embedded accelerometer is very important for developing human-centric pervasive applications such as healthcare, personalized recommendation and so on. However, the distribution of accelerometer data is heavily affected by varying users. The performance will degrade when the model trained on one person is used to others. To solve this problem, we propose a fast and accurate cross-person activity recognition model, known as TransRKELM (Transfer learning Reduced Kernel Extreme Learning Machine) which uses RKELM (Reduced Kernel Extreme Learning Machine) to realize initial activity recognition model. In the online phase OS-RKELM (Online Sequential Reduced Kernel Extreme Learning Machine) is applied to update the initial model and adapt the recognition model to new device users based on recognition results with high confidence level efficiently. Experimental results show that, the proposed model can adapt the classifier to new device users quickly and obtain good recognition performance. PMID:24513850

  20. Occurrence and activity of sulphate reducing bacteria in aerobic activated sludge systems.

    PubMed

    van den Brand, T P H; Roest, K; Chen, G H; Brdjanovic, D; van Loosdrecht, M C M

    2015-03-01

    In the sewage or wastewater treatment plant, biological sulphate reduction can occur spontaneously or be applied beneficially for its treatment. The results of this study can be applied to control SRB in the sewage and WWTP. Therefore, population diversity analyses of SRB for nine activated sludge wastewater treatment plants (WWTP) in the Netherlands and the effect of long-term (months) oxygen exposures on the SRB activity were carried out. T-RFLP and clone sequencing analyses of winter and summer samples revealed that (1) all WWTP have a similar SRB population, (2) there is no seasonal impact (10-20 °C) on the SRB population present in the WWTP and (3) Desulfobacter postgatei, Desulfovibrio desulfuricans and Desulfovibrio intestinalis were the most common and dominant SRB species observed in these samples, and origin from the sewage. Short term activity tests demonstrated that SRB were not active in the aerobic WWTP, but while flushed with N2-gas SRB became slightly active after 3 h. In a laboratory reactor at a dissolved oxygen concentration of <2 %, sulphate reduction occurred and 89 % COD removal was achieved. SRB grew in granules, in order to protect themselves for oxygen exposures. SRB are naturally present in aerobic WWTP, which is due to the formation of granules. PMID:25649202

  1. Polyphenols from Chilean Propolis and Pinocembrin Reduce MMP-9 Gene Expression and Activity in Activated Macrophages

    PubMed Central

    Saavedra, Nicolás; Cuevas, Alejandro; Cavalcante, Marcela F.; Dörr, Felipe A.; Saavedra, Kathleen; Zambrano, Tomás; Abdalla, Dulcineia S. P.; Salazar, Luis A.

    2016-01-01

    Polyphenols from diverse sources have shown anti-inflammatory activity. In the context of atherosclerosis, macrophages play important roles including matrix metalloproteinases synthesis involved in degradation of matrix extracellular components affecting the atherosclerotic plaque stability. We prepared a propolis extract and pinocembrin in ethanol solution. Propolis extract was chemically characterized using LC-MS. The effect of treatments on gene expression and proteolytic activity was measured in vitro using murine macrophages activated with LPS. Cellular toxicity associated with both treatments and the vehicle was determined using MTT and apoptosis/necrosis detection assays. MMP-9 gene expression and proteolytic activity were measured using qPCR and zymography, respectively. Thirty-two compounds were identified in the propolis extract, including pinocembrin among its major components. Treatment with either ethanolic extract of propolis or pinocembrin inhibits MMP-9 gene expression in a dose-dependent manner. Similarly, an inhibitory effect was observed in proteolytic activity. However, the effect showed by ethanolic extract of propolis was higher than the effect of pinocembrin, suggesting that MMP-9 inhibition results from a joint contribution between the components of the extract. These data suggest a potential role of polyphenols from Chilean propolis in the control of extracellular matrix degradation in atherosclerotic plaques. PMID:27119082

  2. Ferric oxide quantum dots in stable phosphate glass system and their magneto-optical study

    SciTech Connect

    Garaje, Sunil N.; Apte, Sanjay K.; Kumar, Ganpathy; Panmand, Rajendra P.; Naik, Sonali D.; Mahajan, Satish M.; Chand, Ramesh; Kale, Bharat B.

    2013-02-15

    Graphical abstract: We report synthesis of ferric oxide embedded low melting phosphate glass nanocomposite and also the effect of ferric oxide nanoparticles (NCs) content on the optical and magneto-optical properties of the glasses. Faraday rotation of the glass nanocomposites was measured and showed variation in Verdet constant with concentration of ferric oxide. Interestingly, the host glass itself showed fairly good Verdet constant (11.5°/T cm) and there is a threefold enhancement in the Verdet constant of ferric oxide quantum dot-glass nanocomposite. Highlights: ► We synthesize ferric oxide embedded low melting stable phosphate glass nanocomposite. ► Glasses doped with 0.25 and 2% ferric oxide show particle size in the range of 4–12 nm. ► The host phosphate glass itself shows fairly good Verdet constant (11.5°/T cm). ► Glasses doped with 0.25% ferric oxide show high Verdet constant (30.525°/T cm). ► The as synthesis glasses may have potential application in magneto optical devices. -- Abstract: Herein, we report the synthesis of ferric oxide embedded low melting phosphate glass nanocomposite and also the effect of ferric oxide nanoparticles content on the optical and magneto-optical properties of the glasses. The optical study clearly showed red shift in optical cut off with increasing ferric oxide concentration. The band gap of the host glass was observed to be 3.48 eV and it shifted to 3.14 eV after doping with ferric oxide. The glasses doped with 0.25 and 2% ferric oxide showed particle size of 4–6 nm and 8–12 nm, respectively. Faraday rotation of the glass nanocomposites was measured and showed variation in the Verdet constant as per increasing concentration of ferric oxide. Interestingly, the host glass itself showed fairly good Verdet constant (11.5°/T cm) and threefold enhancement was observed in the Verdet constant of ferric oxide quantum dot-glass nanocomposite.

  3. Sorption of ferric iron from ferrioxamine B to synthetic and biogenic layer type manganese oxides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Duckworth, Owen W.; Bargar, John R.; Sposito, Garrison

    2008-07-01

    Siderophores are biogenic chelating agents produced in terrestrial and marine environments that increase the bioavailability of ferric iron. Recent work has suggested that both aqueous and solid-phase Mn(III) may affect siderophore-mediated iron transport, but scant information appears to be available about the potential roles of layer type manganese oxides, which are relatively abundant in soils and the oligotrophic marine water column. To probe the effects of layer type manganese oxides on the stability of aqueous Fe-siderophore complexes, we studied the sorption of ferrioxamine B [Fe(III)HDFOB +, an Fe(III) chelate of the trihydroxamate siderophore desferrioxamine B (DFOB)] to two synthetic birnessites [layer type Mn(III,IV) oxides] and a biogenic birnessite produced by Pseudomonas putida GB-1. We found that all of these predominantly Mn(IV) oxides greatly reduced the aqueous concentration of Fe(III)HDFOB + at pH 8. Analysis of Fe K-edge EXAFS spectra indicated that a dominant fraction of Fe(III) associated with the Mn(IV) oxides is not complexed by DFOB as in solution, but instead Fe(III) is specifically adsorbed to the mineral structure at multiple sites, thus indicating that the Mn(IV) oxides displaced Fe(III) from the siderophore complex. These results indicate that layer type manganese oxides, including biogenic minerals, may sequester iron from soluble ferric complexes. We conclude that the sorption of iron-siderophore complexes may play a significant role in the bioavailability and biogeochemical cycling of iron in marine and terrestrial environments.

  4. Sorption of Ferric Iron from Ferrioxamine B to Synthetic and Biogenic Layer Type Manganese Oxides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Duckworth, O.; John, B.; Sposito, G.

    2006-12-01

    Siderophores are biogenic chelating agents produced in terrestrial and marine environments to increase the bioavailablity of ferric iron. Recent work has suggested that both aqueous and solid-phase Mn(III) may affect siderophore-mediated iron transport, but no information appears to be available about the effect of solid-phase Mn(IV). To probe the effects of predominantly Mn(IV) oxides, we studied the sorption reaction of ferrioxamine B [Fe(III)HDFOB+, an Fe(III) chelate of the trihydroxamate siderophore desferrioxamine B (DFOB)] with two synthetic birnessites [layer type Mn(III, IV) oxides] and a biogenic birnessite produced by Pseudomonas putida MnB1. We found that all of these predominantly Mn(IV) oxides greatly reduced the aqueous concentration of Fe(III)HDFOB+ over at pH 8. After 72 hours equilibration time, the sorption behavior for the synthetic birnessites could be accurately described by a Langmuir isotherm; for the biogenic oxide, a Freundlich isotherm was best utilized to model the sorption data. To study the molecular nature of the interaction between the Fe(III)HDFOB+ complex and the oxide surface, Fe K-edge extended X-ray absorption fine structure (EXAFS) spectroscopy was employed. Analysis of the EXAFS spectra indicated that Fe(III) associated with the Mn(IV) oxides is not complexed by DFOB as in solution, but instead Fe(III) is specifically adsorbed to into the mineral structure at multiple sites with no evidence of DFOB complexation, thus indicating that the Mn(IV) oxides displaced Fe(III) from the siderophore complex. These results indicate that manganese oxides, including biominerals, may strongly sequester iron from soluble ferric complexes and thus may play a significant role in the biogeochemical cycling of iron in marine and terrestrial environments.

  5. Differential responses of nitrate reducer community size, structure, and activity to tillage systems.

    PubMed

    Chèneby, D; Brauman, A; Rabary, B; Philippot, L

    2009-05-01

    The main objective of this study was to determine how the size, structure, and activity of the nitrate reducer community were affected by adoption of a conservative tillage system as an alternative to conventional tillage. The experimental field, established in Madagascar in 1991, consists of plots subjected to conventional tillage or direct-seeding mulch-based cropping systems (DM), both amended with three different fertilization regimes. Comparisons of size, structure, and activity of the nitrate reducer community in samples collected from the top layer in 2005 and 2006 revealed that all characteristics of this functional community were affected by the tillage system, with increased nitrate reduction activity and numbers of nitrate reducers under DM. Nitrate reduction activity was also stimulated by combined organic and mineral fertilization but not by organic fertilization alone. In contrast, both negative and positive effects of combined organic and mineral fertilization on the size of the nitrate reducer community were observed. The size of the nitrate reducer community was a significant predictor of the nitrate reduction rates except in one treatment, which highlighted the inherent complexities in understanding the relationships the between size, diversity, and structure of functional microbial communities along environmental gradients. PMID:19304827

  6. Differential Responses of Nitrate Reducer Community Size, Structure, and Activity to Tillage Systems▿ †

    PubMed Central

    Chèneby, D.; Brauman, A.; Rabary, B.; Philippot, L.

    2009-01-01

    The main objective of this study was to determine how the size, structure, and activity of the nitrate reducer community were affected by adoption of a conservative tillage system as an alternative to conventional tillage. The experimental field, established in Madagascar in 1991, consists of plots subjected to conventional tillage or direct-seeding mulch-based cropping systems (DM), both amended with three different fertilization regimes. Comparisons of size, structure, and activity of the nitrate reducer community in samples collected from the top layer in 2005 and 2006 revealed that all characteristics of this functional community were affected by the tillage system, with increased nitrate reduction activity and numbers of nitrate reducers under DM. Nitrate reduction activity was also stimulated by combined organic and mineral fertilization but not by organic fertilization alone. In contrast, both negative and positive effects of combined organic and mineral fertilization on the size of the nitrate reducer community were observed. The size of the nitrate reducer community was a significant predictor of the nitrate reduction rates except in one treatment, which highlighted the inherent complexities in understanding the relationships the between size, diversity, and structure of functional microbial communities along environmental gradients. PMID:19304827

  7. Comparison of two methods for assaying reducing sugars in the determination of carbohydrase activities.

    PubMed

    Gusakov, Alexander V; Kondratyeva, Elena G; Sinitsyn, Arkady P

    2011-01-01

    The Nelson-Somogyi (NS) and 3,5-dinitrosalicylic acid (DNS) assays for reducing sugars are widely used in measurements of carbohydrase activities against different polysaccharides. Using twelve commercial enzyme preparations, the comparison of the NS and DNS assays in determination of cellulase, β-glucanase, xylanase, and β-mannanase activities was carried out. When cellulase activities against CMC were measured, the DNS assay gave activity values, which were typically 40-50% higher than those obtained with the NS assay. In the analysis of the xylanase, β-mannanase, and β-glucanase activities, the overestimations by the DNS assay were much more pronounced (the observed differences in the activities were 3- to 13-fold). Reasons for preferential use of the NS assay for measuring activities of carbohydrases other than cellulases are discussed. PMID:21647284

  8. Selective adsorption of phosphoproteins on gel-immobilized ferric chelate

    SciTech Connect

    Muszynska, G.; Andersson, L.; Porath, J.

    1986-11-04

    Ferric ions are very strongly adsorbed to iminodiacetic acid substituted agarose. This firmly immobilized complex acts as a selective immobilized metal affinity adsorbent for phosphoproteins. Chromatography based on this principle is illustrated by the adsorption-desorption behavior of egg yolk phosvitin before and after dephosphorylation as well as by the change in the chromatographic pattern before and after enzymic phosphorylation of selected histones. The strength of binding is dependent on the phosphate content. The difference is binding before and after phosphorylation of a single amino acid residue is demonstrated. Affinity elution can be accomplished by inclusion in the buffer of (1) phosphoserine or (2) a displacing metal ion such as Mg/sup 2 +/.

  9. Synchrotron Characterization of Hydrogen and Ferric Iron in Martian Meteorites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dyar, Melinda D.

    2003-01-01

    The hydrogen budget of the Martian interior is distributed among several phases: melts, hydrous minerals, and nominally anhydrous minerals like olivine, pyroxene, and garnet. All these phases are vulnerable to loss of hydrogen during shock, excavation and transport via the mechanism of dehydrogenation, in which the charge on the H protons is left behind as polarons on Fe atoms. Thus, both H and F(3x) must be analyzed in order to reconstruct hydrogen and oxygen fugacities on Mars. To date, SIMS data have elucidated D/H and H contents of hydrous phases in SNC meteorites, but anhydrous martian minerals have not been systematically examined for trace hydrogen. Ferric iron has been quantified using XANES in many marital phases, but integrated studies of both Fe(3x) and H on the same spots are really needed to address the H budget. Here, we measure and profile H and Fe(3x) abundances in and across individual grains of glass and silicates in Martian meteorites. We use the new technology of synchrotron microFI'lR spectroscopy to measure the hydrogen contents of hydrous and nominally anhydrous minerals in martian meteorites on 30-100 microns thick, doubly polished thin sections on spots down to 3 x 3 microns. Synchrotron microXANES was used to analyze Fe(3x) on the same scale, and complementary SIMS D/H data will be collected where possible, though at a slightly larger scale. Development of this combination of techniques is critical because future sample return missions will generate only microscopic samples for study. Results have been used to quantitatively assess the distribution of hydrogen and ferric iron among phases in the martian interior, which will better constrain the geodynamic processes of the interior, as well as the overall hydrogen and water budgets on Mars.

  10. Evaluation of in vitro urease and lipoxygenase inhibition activity of weight reducing tablets.

    PubMed

    Jaffary, Syed Rashid Ali; Ahmed, Syed Waseemuddin; Shakeel, Sadia; Asif, Hafiz Muhammad; Usmanghani, Khan

    2016-07-01

    Enzyme inhibition is a significant part of research in pharmaceutical field in view of the fact that these studies have directed to the innovations of drugs having remarkable performance in diverse physiological conditions. The present study was aimed to assess urease and lipoxygenase inhibitory activity of weight reducing tablets. For evaluating the urease activity indophenol method was employed using Thiourea as the model urease inhibitor. The lipoxygenase inhibition was evaluated by measuring the hydroperoxides produced in lipoxygenation reaction using a purified lipoxygenase with lionoleic acid as substrate. When formulation of the weight reducing tablets was compared at various concentrations (50, 100 and 500µg/ml). The antiurease activity and lipoxygenase inhibition activity increased in a dose dependent manner. The formulations under test have an excellent antiurease and lipoxygenase inhibition potential and prospective to be used in the cure of a variety of complications associated with the production of urease and lipoxygenase enzymes. PMID:27592490

  11. Assessment of xylanase activity in dry storage as a potential method of reducing feedstock cost.

    PubMed

    Smith, William A; Thompson, David N; Thompson, Vicki S; Radtke, Corey W; Carter, Brady

    2009-05-01

    Enzymatic preprocessing of lignocellulosic biomass in dry storage systems has the potential to improve feedstock characteristics and lower ethanol production costs. To assess the potential for endoxylanase activity at low water contents, endoxylanase activity was tested using a refined wheat arabinoxylan substrate and three commercial endoxylanases over the water activity range 0.21-1.0, corresponding to water contents of 5% to >60% (dry basis). Homogeneously mixed dry samples were prepared at a fixed enzyme to substrate ratio and incubated in chambers at a variety of fixed water activities. Replicates were sacrificed periodically, and endoxylanase activity was quantified as an increase in reducing sugar relative to desiccant-stored controls. Endoxylanase activity was observed at water activities over 0.91 in all enzyme preparations in less than 4 days and at a water activity of 0.59 in less than 1 week in two preparations. Endoxylanase activity after storage was confirmed for selected desiccant-stored controls by incubation at 100% relative humidity. Water content to water activity relationships were determined for three lignocellulosic substrates, and results indicate that two endoxylanase preparations retained limited activity as low as 7% to 13% water content (dry basis), which is well within the range of water contents representative of dry biomass storage. Future work will examine the effects of endoxylanase activity toward substrates such as corn stover, wheat straw, and switchgrass in low water content environments. PMID:19096939

  12. Extensive sugar modification improves triple helix forming oligonucleotide activity in vitro but reduces activity in vivo.

    PubMed

    Alam, Md Rowshon; Majumdar, Alokes; Thazhathveetil, Arun Kalliat; Liu, Su-Ting; Liu, Ji-Lan; Puri, Nitin; Cuenoud, Bernard; Sasaki, Shigeki; Miller, Paul S; Seidman, Michael M

    2007-09-01

    We are developing triple helix forming oligonucleotides (TFOs) for gene targeting. Previously, we synthesized bioactive TFOs containing 2'-O-methylribose (2'-OMe) and 2'-O-aminoethylribose (2'-AE) residues. Active TFOs contained four contiguous 2'-AE residues and formed triplexes with high thermal stability and rapid association kinetics. In an effort to further improve bioactivity, we synthesized three series of TFOs containing the 2'-AE patch and additional ribose modifications distributed throughout the remainder of the oligonucleotide. These were either additional 2'-AE residues, the conformationally locked BNA/LNA ribose with a 2'-O,4'-C-methylene bridge, or the 2'-O,4'-C-ethylene analogue (ENA). The additionally modified TFOs formed triplexes with greater thermal stability than the reference TFO, and some had improved association kinetics. However, the most active TFOs in the biochemical and biophysical assays were the least active in the bioassay. We measured the thermal stability of triplexes formed by the TFOs in each series on duplex targets containing a change in sequence at a single position. The Tm value of the variant sequence triplexes increased as the number of all additional modifications increased. A simple explanation for the failure of the improved TFOs in the bioassay was that the increased affinity for nonspecific targets lowered the effective nuclear concentration. Enhancement of TFO bioactivity will require chemical modifications that improve interaction with the specific targets while retaining selectivity against mismatched sequences. PMID:17691818

  13. Oxidized Ferric and Ferryl Forms of Hemoglobin Trigger Mitochondrial Dysfunction and Injury in Alveolar Type I Cells.

    PubMed

    Chintagari, Narendranath Reddy; Jana, Sirsendu; Alayash, Abdu I

    2016-08-01

    Lung alveoli are lined by alveolar type (AT) 1 cells and cuboidal AT2 cells. The AT1 cells are likely to be exposed to cell-free hemoglobin (Hb) in multiple lung diseases; however, the role of Hb redox (reduction-oxidation) reactions and their precise contributions to AT1 cell injury are not well understood. Using mouse lung epithelial cells (E10) as an AT1 cell model, we demonstrate here that higher Hb oxidation states, ferric Hb (HbFe(3+)) and ferryl Hb (HbFe(4+)) and subsequent heme loss play a central role in the genesis of injury. Exposures to HbFe(2+) and HbFe(3+) for 24 hours induced expression of heme oxygenase (HO)-1 protein in E10 cells and HO-1 translocation in the purified mitochondrial fractions. Both of these effects were intensified with increasing oxidation states of Hb. Next, we examined the effects of Hb oxidation and free heme on mitochondrial bioenergetic function by measuring changes in the mitochondrial transmembrane potential and oxygen consumption rate. In contrast to HbFe(2+), HbFe(3+) reduced basal oxygen consumption rate, indicating compromised mitochondrial activity. However, HbFe(4+) exposure not only induced early expression of HO-1 but also caused mitochondrial dysfunction within 12 hours when compared with HbFe(2+) and HbFe(3+). Exposure to HbFe(4+) for 24 hours also caused mitochondrial depolarization in E10 cells. The deleterious effects of HbFe(3+) and HbFe(4+) were reversed by the addition of scavenger proteins, haptoglobin and hemopexin. Collectively, these data establish, for the first time, a central role for cell-free Hb in lung epithelial injury, and that these effects are mediated through the redox transition of Hb to higher oxidation states. PMID:26974230

  14. Reduced In-Plane, Low Frequency Helicopter Noise of an Active Flap Rotor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sim, Ben W.; Janakiram, Ram D.; Barbely, Natasha L.; Solis, Eduardo

    2009-01-01

    Results from a recent joint DARPA/Boeing/NASA/Army wind tunnel test demonstrated the ability to reduce in-plane, low frequency noise of the full-scale Boeing-SMART rotor using active flaps. Test data reported in this paper illustrated that acoustic energy in the first six blade-passing harmonics could be reduced by up to 6 decibels at a moderate airspeed, level flight condition corresponding to advance ratio of 0.30. Reduced noise levels were attributed to selective active flap schedules that modified in-plane blade airloads on the advancing side of the rotor, in a manner, which generated counteracting acoustic pulses that partially offset the negative pressure peaks associated with in-plane, steady thickness noise. These favorable reduced-noise operating states are a strong function of the active flap actuation amplitude, frequency and phase. The associated noise reductions resulted in reduced aural detection distance by up to 18%, but incurred significant vibratory load penalties due to increased hub shear forces. Small reductions in rotor lift-to-drag ratios, of no more than 3%, were also measured

  15. High salt reduces the activation of IL-4- and IL-13-stimulated macrophages.

    PubMed

    Binger, Katrina J; Gebhardt, Matthias; Heinig, Matthias; Rintisch, Carola; Schroeder, Agnes; Neuhofer, Wolfgang; Hilgers, Karl; Manzel, Arndt; Schwartz, Christian; Kleinewietfeld, Markus; Voelkl, Jakob; Schatz, Valentin; Linker, Ralf A; Lang, Florian; Voehringer, David; Wright, Mark D; Hubner, Norbert; Dechend, Ralf; Jantsch, Jonathan; Titze, Jens; Müller, Dominik N

    2015-11-01

    A high intake of dietary salt (NaCl) has been implicated in the development of hypertension, chronic inflammation, and autoimmune diseases. We have recently shown that salt has a proinflammatory effect and boosts the activation of Th17 cells and the activation of classical, LPS-induced macrophages (M1). Here, we examined how the activation of alternative (M2) macrophages is affected by salt. In stark contrast to Th17 cells and M1 macrophages, high salt blunted the alternative activation of BM-derived mouse macrophages stimulated with IL-4 and IL-13, M(IL-4+IL-13) macrophages. Salt-induced reduction of M(IL-4+IL-13) activation was not associated with increased polarization toward a proinflammatory M1 phenotype. In vitro, high salt decreased the ability of M(IL-4+IL-13) macrophages to suppress effector T cell proliferation. Moreover, mice fed a high salt diet exhibited reduced M2 activation following chitin injection and delayed wound healing compared with control animals. We further identified a high salt-induced reduction in glycolysis and mitochondrial metabolic output, coupled with blunted AKT and mTOR signaling, which indicates a mechanism by which NaCl inhibits full M2 macrophage activation. Collectively, this study provides evidence that high salt reduces noninflammatory innate immune cell activation and may thus lead to an overall imbalance in immune homeostasis. PMID:26485286

  16. High salt reduces the activation of IL-4– and IL-13–stimulated macrophages

    PubMed Central

    Binger, Katrina J.; Gebhardt, Matthias; Heinig, Matthias; Rintisch, Carola; Schroeder, Agnes; Neuhofer, Wolfgang; Hilgers, Karl; Manzel, Arndt; Schwartz, Christian; Kleinewietfeld, Markus; Voelkl, Jakob; Schatz, Valentin; Linker, Ralf A.; Lang, Florian; Voehringer, David; Wright, Mark D.; Hubner, Norbert; Dechend, Ralf; Jantsch, Jonathan; Titze, Jens; Müller, Dominik N.

    2015-01-01

    A high intake of dietary salt (NaCl) has been implicated in the development of hypertension, chronic inflammation, and autoimmune diseases. We have recently shown that salt has a proinflammatory effect and boosts the activation of Th17 cells and the activation of classical, LPS-induced macrophages (M1). Here, we examined how the activation of alternative (M2) macrophages is affected by salt. In stark contrast to Th17 cells and M1 macrophages, high salt blunted the alternative activation of BM-derived mouse macrophages stimulated with IL-4 and IL-13, M(IL-4+IL-13) macrophages. Salt-induced reduction of M(IL-4+IL-13) activation was not associated with increased polarization toward a proinflammatory M1 phenotype. In vitro, high salt decreased the ability of M(IL-4+IL-13) macrophages to suppress effector T cell proliferation. Moreover, mice fed a high salt diet exhibited reduced M2 activation following chitin injection and delayed wound healing compared with control animals. We further identified a high salt–induced reduction in glycolysis and mitochondrial metabolic output, coupled with blunted AKT and mTOR signaling, which indicates a mechanism by which NaCl inhibits full M2 macrophage activation. Collectively, this study provides evidence that high salt reduces noninflammatory innate immune cell activation and may thus lead to an overall imbalance in immune homeostasis. PMID:26485286

  17. Radical scavenging and antioxidant activities of essential oil components--an experimental and computational investigation.

    PubMed

    Sharopov, Farukh S; Wink, Michael; Setzer, William N

    2015-01-01

    The antioxidant activities of eighteen different essential oil components have been determined using the 2,2-diphenyl-1-picrylhydrazyl (DPPH) radical-scavenging assay, the 2,2'-azino-bis(3-ethylbenzothiazoline-6-sulphonic acid (ABTS) radical cation assay, and the ferric reducing antioxidant power (FRAP) assay. The phenolic compounds, carvacrol, thymol, and eugenol, showed the best antioxidant activities, while camphor, menthol, and menthone were the least active. The structural and electronic properties of the essential oil components were assessed using density functional theory (DFT) at the B3LYP/6-311++G** level. Correlations between calculated electronic properties and antioxidant activities were generally poor, but bond-dissociation energies (BDEs) seem to correlate with DPPH radical-scavenging activities, and the ferric reducing antioxidant power (FRAP) assay correlated with vertical ionization potentials calculated at the Hartree-Fock/6-311++G** level. PMID:25920239

  18. Initial Evaluation of Active Minds: A Student Organization Dedicated to Reducing the Stigma of Mental Illness

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McKinney, Kathleen G.

    2009-01-01

    This study examined whether a new student organization, Active Minds, aimed at increasing awareness of "mental illness" and reducing stigma had an impact on students' stigma and willingness to seek psychological help. Three classes were recruited to become involved in the organization. In a pretest/posttest design, stigma and willingness to seek…

  19. Integrated Health and Physical Education Program to Reduce Media Use and Increase Physical Activity in Youth

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Clocksin, Brian D.; Wattson, Doris L.; Williams, Daniel P.; Randsell, Lynda

    2009-01-01

    The purpose of this project was to compare an integrated health and physical education curriculum, focused on reducing media use and on increasing physical activity in middle school adolescents, to traditional and nonintegrated health and physical education curricula. Two middle schools' health and physical education classes were assigned to an…

  20. Seasonal composition and activity of sulfate-reducing prokaryotic communities in seagrass bed sediments

    EPA Science Inventory

    Sulfate-reducing prokaryotes (SRP) play a key role in the carbon and nutrient cycles of coastal marine, vegetated ecosystems, but the interactions of SRP communities with aquatic plants remain little studied. The abundance, activity, and community composition of SRP was studied i...

  1. Reduced Activity Restriction Buffers the Relations Between Chronic Stress and Sympathetic Nervous System Activation

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Objectives. Caregivers of dementia patients are at risk for developing cardiovascular disease (CVD), and this risk increases the longer they provide care. Greater perceptions that caregiving restricts social/recreational activities (i.e., activity restriction [AR]) has been associated with poorer health, and AR may exacerbate the relations between stress and health outcomes. The current study examined the interactive role of greater exposure to stress and increased AR on plasma catecholamine (CAT) levels: norepinephrine (NE) and epinephrine (EPI). Method. A total of 84 dementia caregivers completed a standard assessment battery, and a nurse collected blood, which was assayed for NE and EPI. Separate regressions for NE and EPI were used to determine whether the relations between years caregiving and CATs were greater in those with high versus low AR. Results. A significant interaction was found between years caregiving and AR in predicting resting EPI (p = .032) but not resting NE (p = .103). Post hoc analyses indicated that years caregiving was significantly associated with EPI when AR was high (p = .008) but not when AR was low (p = .799). Additionally, years caregiving was not significantly associated with NE when AR was high or low. Discussion. The subjective experience of AR can play an important role in determining risk for detrimental physical health outcomes, particularly CVD risk. PMID:23685924

  2. Defect-induced enhanced photocatalytic activities of reduced α-Fe2O3 nanoblades.

    PubMed

    Feng, Honglei; Wang, Yiqian; Wang, Chao; Diao, Feiyu; Zhu, Wenhui; Mu, Peng; Yuan, Lu; Zhou, Guangwen; Rosei, Federico

    2016-07-22

    Bicrystalline α-Fe2O3 nanoblades (NBs) synthesized by thermal oxidation of iron foils were reduced in vacuum, to study the effect of reduction treatment on microstructural changes and photocatalytic properties. After the vacuum reduction, most bicrystalline α-Fe2O3 NBs transform into single-layered NBs, which contain more defects such as oxygen vacancies, perfect dislocations and dense pores. By comparing the photodegradation capability of non-reduced and reduced α-Fe2O3 NBs over model dye rhodamine B (RhB) in the presence of hydrogen peroxide, we find that vacuum-reduction induced microstructural defects can significantly enhance the photocatalytic efficiency. Even after 10 cycles, the reduced α-Fe2O3 NBs still show a very high photocatalytic activity. Our results demonstrate that defect engineering is a powerful tool to enhance the photocatalytic performance of nanomaterials. PMID:27285480

  3. Activation of aluminum as an effective reducing agent by pitting corrosion for wet-chemical synthesis.

    PubMed

    Li, Wei; Cochell, Thomas; Manthiram, Arumugam

    2013-01-01

    Metallic aluminum (Al) is of interest as a reducing agent because of its low standard reduction potential. However, its surface is invariably covered with a dense aluminum oxide film, which prevents its effective use as a reducing agent in wet-chemical synthesis. Pitting corrosion, known as an undesired reaction destroying Al and is enhanced by anions such as F⁻, Cl⁻, and Br⁻ in aqueous solutions, is applied here for the first time to activate Al as a reducing agent for wet-chemical synthesis of a diverse array of metals and alloys. Specifically, we demonstrate the synthesis of highly dispersed palladium nanoparticles on carbon black with stabilizers and the intermetallic Cu₂Sb/C, which are promising candidates, respectively, for fuel cell catalysts and lithium-ion battery anodes. Atomic hydrogen, an intermediate during the pitting corrosion of Al in protonic solvents (e.g., water and ethylene glycol), is validated as the actual reducing agent. PMID:23390579

  4. Activation of Aluminum as an Effective Reducing Agent by Pitting Corrosion for Wet-chemical Synthesis

    PubMed Central

    Li, Wei; Cochell, Thomas; Manthiram, Arumugam

    2013-01-01

    Metallic aluminum (Al) is of interest as a reducing agent because of its low standard reduction potential. However, its surface is invariably covered with a dense aluminum oxide film, which prevents its effective use as a reducing agent in wet-chemical synthesis. Pitting corrosion, known as an undesired reaction destroying Al and is enhanced by anions such as F−, Cl−, and Br− in aqueous solutions, is applied here for the first time to activate Al as a reducing agent for wet-chemical synthesis of a diverse array of metals and alloys. Specifically, we demonstrate the synthesis of highly dispersed palladium nanoparticles on carbon black with stabilizers and the intermetallic Cu2Sb/C, which are promising candidates, respectively, for fuel cell catalysts and lithium-ion battery anodes. Atomic hydrogen, an intermediate during the pitting corrosion of Al in protonic solvents (e.g., water and ethylene glycol), is validated as the actual reducing agent. PMID:23390579

  5. Defect-induced enhanced photocatalytic activities of reduced α-Fe2O3 nanoblades

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feng, Honglei; Wang, Yiqian; Wang, Chao; Diao, Feiyu; Zhu, Wenhui; Mu, Peng; Yuan, Lu; Zhou, Guangwen; Rosei, Federico

    2016-07-01

    Bicrystalline α-Fe2O3 nanoblades (NBs) synthesized by thermal oxidation of iron foils were reduced in vacuum, to study the effect of reduction treatment on microstructural changes and photocatalytic properties. After the vacuum reduction, most bicrystalline α-Fe2O3 NBs transform into single-layered NBs, which contain more defects such as oxygen vacancies, perfect dislocations and dense pores. By comparing the photodegradation capability of non-reduced and reduced α-Fe2O3 NBs over model dye rhodamine B (RhB) in the presence of hydrogen peroxide, we find that vacuum-reduction induced microstructural defects can significantly enhance the photocatalytic efficiency. Even after 10 cycles, the reduced α-Fe2O3 NBs still show a very high photocatalytic activity. Our results demonstrate that defect engineering is a powerful tool to enhance the photocatalytic performance of nanomaterials.

  6. Retention of sedentary obese visceral white adipose tissue phenotype with intermittent physical activity despite reduced adiposity.

    PubMed

    Wainright, Katherine S; Fleming, Nicholas J; Rowles, Joe L; Welly, Rebecca J; Zidon, Terese M; Park, Young-Min; Gaines, T'Keaya L; Scroggins, Rebecca J; Anderson-Baucum, Emily K; Hasty, Alyssa H; Vieira-Potter, Victoria J; Padilla, Jaume

    2015-09-01

    Regular physical activity is effective in reducing visceral white adipose tissue (AT) inflammation and oxidative stress, and these changes are commonly associated with reduced adiposity. However, the impact of multiple periods of physical activity, intercalated by periods of inactivity, i.e., intermittent physical activity, on markers of AT inflammation and oxidative stress is unknown. In the present study, 5-wk-old male C57BL/6 mice were randomized into three groups (n = 10/group): sedentary, regular physical activity, and intermittent physical activity, for 24 wk. All animals were singly housed and fed a diet containing 45% kcal from fat. Regularly active mice had access to voluntary running wheels throughout the study period, whereas intermittently active mice had access to running wheels for 3-wk intervals (i.e., 3 wk on/3 wk off) throughout the study. At death, regular and intermittent physical activity was associated with similar reductions in visceral AT mass (approximately -24%, P < 0.05) relative to sedentary. However, regularly, but not intermittently, active mice exhibited decreased expression of visceral AT genes related to inflammation (e.g., monocyte chemoattractant protein 1), immune cell infiltration (e.g., CD68, CD11c, F4/80, CD11b/CD18), oxidative stress (e.g., p47 phagocyte oxidase), and endoplasmic reticulum stress (e.g., CCAAT enhancer-binding protein homologous protein; all P < 0.05). Furthermore, regular, but not intermittent, physical activity was associated with a trend toward improvement in glucose tolerance (P = 0.059). Collectively, these findings suggest that intermittent physical activity over a prolonged period of time may lead to a reduction in adiposity but with retention of a sedentary obese white AT and metabolic phenotype. PMID:26180183

  7. Suppressing Emotions Impairs Subsequent Stroop Performance and Reduces Prefrontal Brain Activation

    PubMed Central

    Luechinger, Roger; Boesiger, Peter; Rasch, Björn

    2013-01-01

    Abundant behavioral evidence suggests that the ability to self-control is limited, and that any exertion of self-control will increase the likelihood of subsequent self-control failures. Here we investigated the neural correlates underlying the aftereffects of self-control on future control processes using functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI). An initial act of self-control (suppressing emotions) impaired subsequent performance in a second task requiring control (Stroop task). On the neural level, increased activity during emotion suppression was followed by a relative decrease in activity during the Stroop task in a cluster in the right lateral prefrontal cortex (PFC) including the dorsolateral prefrontal cortex (DLPFC), an area engaged in the effortful implementation of control. There was no reliable evidence for reduced activity in the medial frontal cortex (MFC) including the anterior cingulate cortex (ACC), which is involved in conflict detection processes and has previously also been implicated in self-control. Follow-up analyses showed that the detected cluster in the right lateral PFC and an area in the MFC were involved in both the emotion suppression task and the Stroop task, but only the cluster in the right lateral PFC showed reduced activation after emotion suppression during the Stroop task. Reduced activity in lateral prefrontal areas relevant for the implementation of control may be a critical consequence of prior self-control exertion if the respective areas are involved in both self-control tasks. PMID:23565239

  8. Reducible poly(2-dimethylaminoethyl methacrylate): synthesis, cytotoxicity, and gene delivery activity.

    PubMed

    You, Ye-Zi; Manickam, Devika Soundara; Zhou, Qing-Hui; Oupický, David

    2007-10-01

    Reducible polycations represent promising carriers of therapeutic nucleic acids. Oligomers of 2-dimethylaminoethyl methacrylate (DMAEMA) containing terminal thiol groups were synthesized by reversible addition-fragmentation chain transfer (RAFT) polymerization using difunctional chain transfer agent. Reducible poly(DMAEMA) (rPDMAEMA) was synthesized by oxidation of the terminal thiol groups, forming a polymer with disulfide bonds in the backbone. Physico-chemical properties of DNA polyplexes of rPDMAEMA were evaluated by dynamic and static light scattering methods, revealing lower structural density and DNA content than control PDMAEMA polyplexes. Cytotoxicity and transfection activity of rPDMAEMA-based DNA polyplexes were evaluated in vitro. In comparison with control PDMAEMA, only minimum toxic effects of rPDMAEMA were observed in a panel of cell lines. Transfection activity was tested in B16F10 mouse melanoma and six human pancreatic cancer cell lines. rPDMAEMA polyplexes showed a comparable or better activity than control PDMAEMA polyplexes. PMID:17574292

  9. Reducible poly(2-dimethylaminoethyl methacrylate): Synthesis, cytotoxicity, and gene delivery activity

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Qing-Hui; Oupický, David

    2007-01-01

    Reducible polycations represent promising carriers of therapeutic nucleic acids. Oligomers of 2-dimethylaminoethyl methacrylate (DMAEMA) containing terminal thiol groups were synthesized by reversible addition-fragmentation chain transfer (RAFT) polymerization using difunctional chain transfer agent. Reducible poly(DMAEMA) (rPDMAEMA) was synthesized by oxidation of the terminal thiol groups, forming a polymer with disulfide bonds in the backbone. Physico-chemical properties of DNA polyplexes of rPDMAEMA were evaluated by dynamic and light scattering methods, revealing lower structural density and DNA content than control PDMAEMA polyplexes. Cytotoxicity and transfection activity of rPDMAEMA-based DNA polyplexes were evaluated in vitro. In comparison with control PDMAEMA, only minimum toxic effects of rPDMAEMA were observed in a panel of cell lines. Transfection activity was tested in B16F10 mouse melanoma and six human pancreatic cancer cell lines. rPDMAEMA polyplexes showed a comparable or better activity than control PDMAEMA polyplexes. PMID:17574292

  10. Solubility products of amorphous ferric arsenate and crystalline scorodite (FeAsO 4 · 2H 2O) and their application to arsenic behavior in buried mine tailings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Langmuir, Donald; Mahoney, John; Rowson, John

    2006-06-01

    Published solubility data for amorphous ferric arsenate and scorodite have been reevaluated using the geochemical code PHREEQC with a modified thermodynamic database for the arsenic species. Solubility product calculations have emphasized measurements obtained under conditions of congruent dissolution of ferric arsenate (pH < 3), and have taken into account ion activity coefficients, and ferric hydroxide, ferric sulfate, and ferric arsenate complexes which have association constants of 10 4.04 (FeH 2AsO 42+), 10 9.86 (FeHAsO 4+), and 10 18.9 (FeAsO 4). Derived solubility products of amorphous ferric arsenate and crystalline scorodite (as log Ksp) are -23.0 ± 0.3 and -25.83 ± 0.07, respectively, at 25 °C and 1 bar pressure. In an application of the solubility results, acid raffinate solutions (molar Fe/As = 3.6) from the JEB uranium mill at McClean Lake in northern Saskatchewan were neutralized with lime to pH 2-8. Poorly crystalline scorodite precipitated below pH 3, removing perhaps 98% of the As(V) from solution, with ferric oxyhydroxide (FO) phases precipitated starting between pH 2 and 3. Between pH 2.18 and 7.37, the apparent log Ksp of ferric arsenate decreased from -22.80 to -24.67, while that of FO (as Fe(OH) 3) increased from -39.49 to -33.5. Adsorption of As(V) by FO can also explain the decrease in the small amounts of As(V)(aq) that remain in solution above pH 2-3. The same general As(V) behavior is observed in the pore waters of neutralized tailings buried for 5 yr at depths of up to 32 m in the JEB tailings management facility (TMF), where arsenic in the pore water decreases to 1-2 mg/L with increasing age and depth. In the TMF, average apparent log Ksp values for ferric arsenate and ferric hydroxide are -25.74 ± 0.88 and -37.03 ± 0.58, respectively. In the laboratory tests and in the TMF, the increasing crystallinity of scorodite and the amorphous character of the coexisting FO phase increases the stability field of scorodite relative to that of

  11. Reduced hippocampal and amygdala activity predicts memory distortions for trauma reminders in combat-related PTSD.

    PubMed

    Hayes, Jasmeet Pannu; LaBar, Kevin S; McCarthy, Gregory; Selgrade, Elizabeth; Nasser, Jessica; Dolcos, Florin; Morey, Rajendra A

    2011-05-01

    Neurobiological models of posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) suggest that altered activity in the medial temporal lobes (MTL) during encoding of traumatic memories contribute to the development and maintenance of the disorder. However, there is little direct evidence in the PTSD literature to support these models. The goal of the present study was to examine MTL activity during trauma encoding in combat veterans using the subsequent memory paradigm. Fifteen combat veterans diagnosed with PTSD and 14 trauma-exposed control participants viewed trauma-related and neutral pictures while undergoing event-related fMRI. Participants returned one week after scanning for a recognition memory test. Region-of-interest (ROI) and voxel-wise whole brain analyses were conducted to examine the neural correlates of successful memory encoding. Patients with PTSD showed greater false alarm rates for novel lures than the trauma-exposed control group, suggesting reliance on gist-based representations in lieu of encoding contextual details. Imaging analyses revealed reduced activity in the amygdala and hippocampus in PTSD patients during successful encoding of trauma-related stimuli. Reduction in left hippocampal activity was associated with high arousal symptoms on the Clinician-Administered PTSD Scale (CAPS). The behavioral false alarm rate for traumatic stimuli co-varied with activity in the bilateral precuneus. These results support neurobiological theories positing reduced hippocampal activity under conditions of high stress and arousal. Reduction in MTL activity for successfully encoded stimuli and increased precuneus activity may underlie reduced stimulus-specific encoding and greater gist memory in patients with PTSD, leading to maintenance of the disorder. PMID:21047644

  12. Sequential activation of multiple grounding pads reduces skin heating during radiofrequency tumor ablation

    PubMed Central

    HAEMMERICH, DIETER; SCHUTT, DAVID JAMES

    2009-01-01

    Purpose Radiofrequency (RF) tumor ablation has become an accepted treatment modality for tumors not amenable to surgery. Skin burns due to ground pad heating may become a limiting factor for further increase in ablation zone dimensions and generator power. We investigated a method were groups of ground pads are sequentially activated to reduce skin heating. Methods We compared conventional operation (i.e. simultaneous connection of all pads) to sequentially switched activation of the pads where different pad combinations are active for periods of ∼0.3 − 8 s. The timing during sequential activation was adjusted to keep the leading edge temperature equal between the pads. We created Finite Element Method computer models of three pads (5 × 5 cm, 1 cm apart) placed in line with the RF electrode on a human thigh to determine differences in tissue heating during simultaneous and sequential ground pad activation. We performed experiments with three ground pads (5 × 10 cm, 4 cm apart) placed on a tissue phantom (1.5 A, 12 min) and measured pad surface and leading edge temperatures. Results Temperature rise below the leading edge for proximal, middle and distal ground pad in relation to active electrode location was 5.9°C ± 0.1°C, 0.8°C ± 0.1°C and 0.3°C ± 0.1°C for conventional operation, and 3.3°C ± 0.1°C, 3.4°C ± 0.2°C and 3.4°C ± 0.2°C for sequentially activated operation in the experiments (p < 0.001). Conclusion Sequential activation of multiple ground pads resulted in reduced maximum tissue temperature. This may reduce the incidence of ground pad burns and may allow higher power RF generators. PMID:18038286

  13. Synthesis of waste cooking oil based biodiesel via ferric-manganese promoted molybdenum oxide / zirconia nanoparticle solid acid catalyst: influence of ferric and manganese dopants.

    PubMed

    Alhassan, Fatah H; Rashid, Umer; Taufiq-Yap, Yun Hin

    2015-01-01

    The utilization of ferric-manganese promoted molybdenum oxide/zirconia (Fe-Mn- MoO3/ZrO2) (FMMZ) solid acid catalyst for production of biodiesel was demonstrated. FMMZ is produced through impregnation reaction followed by calcination at 600°C for 3 h. The characterization of FMMZ had been done using X-ray diffraction (XRD), X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), thermal gravimetric analysis (TGA), temperature programmed desorption of NH3 (TPD-NH3), transmission electron microscopy(TEM) and Brunner-Emmett-Teller (BET) surface area measurement. The effect of waste cooking oil methyl esters (WCOME's) yield on the reactions variables such as reaction temperature, catalyst loading, molar ratio of methanol/oil and reusability were also assessed. The catalyst was used to convert the waste cooking oil into corresponding methyl esters (95.6%±0.15) within 5 h at 200℃ reaction temperature, 600 rpm stirring speed, 1:25 molar ratio of oil to alcohol and 4% w/w catalyst loading. The reported catalyst was successfully recycled in six connective experiments without loss in activity. Moreover, the fuel properties of WCOME's were also reported using ASTM D 6751 methods. PMID:25843280

  14. Reduced Denitration Activity in Peripheral Lung of Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease

    PubMed Central

    Osoata, Grace O.; Ito, Misako; Elliot, Mark; Hogg, James; Barnes, Peter J.

    2012-01-01

    Background Accumulation of nitrated protein is seen in peripheral lung and cells from patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). Nitrated protein causes abnormal protein function, but the nitration was believed to be an irreversible process. However, there are accumulating evidences that this process is reversible by an active denitration pathway. The aim of this study is to detect denitration activity in protein extracts from peripheral lung tissue of COPD and to compare with those in healthy subjects. Materials and Methods Peripheral lung tissue from 4 healthy, 4 smokers without COPD, 4 GOLD stage 1 and 4 GOLD stage 2 were used for denitration assay. Denitration activity was determined as reduction of nitro-tyrosine level of nitrated histone protein after incubation with protein extracts from peripheral lung, which was determined by western blotting. In addition, RNA is extracted from peripheral lung of 8 healthy, 7 smoking control, 8 stage 1 and 2 COPD and 10 stage 3 and 4 COPD and nitrate reductase mRNA expression was determined by real time RT-PCR. Results Peripheral lung protein extracts from healthy subjects reduced nitro-tyrosine level of nitrated histone. Thus, we were able to show denitration activity in peripheral lungs. The denitration activity was slightly reduced in smoking controls, and significantly reduced in COPD patients. We also showed that the expression of the human homologue of nitrate reductase (chytochrome β2 reductase), a potential candidate of denitrase, was significanty reduced in COPD lung. Conclusion This study suggests that accumulation of nitrated protein in lung tissue of COPD may, at least in part, be induced by a reduction in denitration activity or nitrate reductase. PMID:25191434

  15. Nandrolone reduces activation of Notch signaling in denervated muscle associated with increased Numb expression.

    PubMed

    Liu, Xin-Hua; Yao, Shen; Qiao, Rui-Fang; Levine, Alice C; Kirschenbaum, Alexander; Pan, Jiangping; Wu, Yong; Qin, Weiping; Bauman, William A; Cardozo, Christopher P

    2011-10-14

    Nandrolone, an anabolic steroid, slows denervation-atrophy in rat muscle. The molecular mechanisms responsible for this effect are not well understood. Androgens and anabolic steroids activate Notch signaling in animal models of aging and thereby mitigate sarcopenia. To explore the molecular mechanisms by which nandrolone prevents denervation-atrophy, we investigated the effects of nandrolone on Notch signaling in denervated rat gastrocnemius muscle. Denervation significantly increased Notch activity reflected by elevated levels of nuclear Notch intracellular domain (NICD) and expression of Hey1 (a Notch target gene). Activation was greatest at 7 and 35 days after denervation but remained present at 56 days after denervation. Activation of Notch in denervated muscle was prevented by nandrolone associated with upregulated expression of Numb mRNA and protein. These data demonstrate that denervation activates Notch signaling, and that nandrolone abrogates this response associated with increased expression of Numb, suggesting a potential mechanism by which nandrolone reduces denervation-atrophy. PMID:21945932

  16. Thermally Reduced Graphene Oxide Electrochemically Activated by Bis-Spiro Quaternary Alkyl Ammonium for Capacitors.

    PubMed

    He, Tieshi; Meng, Xiangling; Nie, Junping; Tong, Yujin; Cai, Kedi

    2016-06-01

    Thermally reduced graphene oxide (RGO) electrochemically activated by a quaternary alkyl ammonium-based organic electrolytes/activated carbon (AC) electrode asymmetric capacitor is proposed. The electrochemical activation process includes adsorption of anions into the pores of AC in the positive electrode and the interlayer intercalation of cations into RGO in the negative electrode under high potential (4.0 V). The EA process of RGO by quaternary alkyl ammonium was investigated by X-ray diffraction and electrochemical measurements, and the effects of cation size and structure were extensively evaluated. Intercalation by quaternary alkyl ammonium demonstrates a small degree of expansion of the whole crystal lattice (d002) and a large degree of expansion of the partial crystal lattice (d002) of RGO. RGO electrochemically activated by bis-spiro quaternary alkyl ammonium in propylene carbonate/AC asymmetric capacitor exhibits good activated efficiency, high specific capacity, and stable cyclability. PMID:27180820

  17. Interleukin-1β biosynthesis inhibition reduces acute seizures and drug resistant chronic epileptic activity in mice.

    PubMed

    Maroso, Mattia; Balosso, Silvia; Ravizza, Teresa; Iori, Valentina; Wright, Christopher Ian; French, Jacqueline; Vezzani, Annamaria

    2011-04-01

    Experimental evidence and clinical observations indicate that brain inflammation is an important factor in epilepsy. In particular, induction of interleukin-converting enzyme (ICE)/caspase-1 and activation of interleukin (IL)-1β/IL-1 receptor type 1 axis both occur in human epilepsy, and contribute to experimentally induced acute seizures. In this study, the anticonvulsant activity of VX-765 (a selective ICE/caspase-1 inhibitor) was examined in a mouse model of chronic epilepsy with spontaneous recurrent epileptic activity refractory to some common anticonvulsant drugs. Moreover, the effects of this drug were studied in one acute model of seizures in mice, previously shown to involve activation of ICE/caspase-1. Quantitative analysis of electroencephalogram activity was done in mice exposed to acute seizures or those developing chronic epileptic activity after status epilepticus to assess the anticonvulsant effects of systemic administration of VX-765. Histological and immunohistochemical analysis of brain tissue was carried out at the end of pharmacological experiments in epileptic mice to evaluate neuropathology, glia activation and IL-1β expression, and the effect of treatment. Repeated systemic administration of VX-765 significantly reduced chronic epileptic activity in mice in a dose-dependent fashion (12.5-200 mg/kg). This effect was observed at doses ≥ 50 mg/kg, and was reversible with discontinuation of the drug. Maximal drug effect was associated with inhibition of IL-1β synthesis in activated astrocytes. The same dose regimen of VX-765 also reduced acute seizures in mice and delayed their onset time. These results support a new target system for anticonvulsant pharmacological intervention to control epileptic activity that does not respond to some common anticonvulsant drugs. PMID:21431948

  18. Stability of arsenate-bearing Fe(III)/Al(III) co-precipitates in the presence of sulfide as reducing agent under anoxic conditions.

    PubMed

    Doerfelt, Christoph; Feldmann, Thomas; Roy, Ranjan; Demopoulos, George P

    2016-05-01

    Currently, the co-precipitation of arsenate with ferric iron at molar ratios Fe(III)/As(V) ≥ 3 by lime neutralization produces tailings solids that are stable under oxic conditions. However not much is known about the stability of these hazardous co-precipitates under anoxic conditions. These can develop in tailings storage sites by the action of co-discharged reactive sulfides, organic reagent residuals or bacterial activity. The ferric matrix can then undergo reductive dissolution reactions, which could release arsenic into the pore water. Co-ions like aluminum could provide a redox-immune sink to scavenge any mobilized arsenic as a result of reduction of ferric. As such, in this work Fe(III)/As(V) = 4 and aluminum substituted Fe(III)/Al(III)/As(V) = 2/2/1 co-precipitates were produced in a mini continuous co-precipitation process circuit and subjected to excess sulfide addition under inert gas to evaluate their stability. It was found that the ferric-arsenate co-precipitate could retain up to 99% (30 mg/L in solution) of its arsenic content despite the high pH (10.5) and extremely reducing (Eh < -200 mV) environment. There was no significant reduction of arsenate and only 45% of ferric iron was reduced. Partial aluminum substitution was found to cut the amount of mobilized arsenic by 50% (down to 15 mg/L) hence mixed Fe(III)/Al(III)-arsenate co-precipitates may offer better resistance to reductive destabilization over the long term than all iron co-precipitates. PMID:26950022

  19. Neural correlates of reduced awareness in instrumental activities of daily living in frontotemporal dementia.

    PubMed

    Amanzio, Martina; D'Agata, Federico; Palermo, Sara; Rubino, Elisa; Zucca, Milena; Galati, Antonello; Pinessi, Lorenzo; Castellano, Giancarlo; Rainero, Innocenzo

    2016-10-01

    A decline in instrumental activities of daily living has been described as the earliest functional deficit in patients with neurodegenerative disease. It embraces specific competencies such as: "recalling the date and telephone calls, orienting to new places, remembering the location of objects at home, understanding conversation and the plot of a movie, keeping belongings in order, doing mental calculations and handling money, remembering appointments and shopping lists and performing clerical work". Since changes in instrumental daily living activities are one of the descriptors of behavioural-variant frontotemporal dementia, we decided to investigate the neural correlates of a reduced awareness in this specific domain in twenty-three consecutive behavioural-variant frontotemporal dementia patients. Gray matter volume changes associated with a reduced awareness for the instrumental domain, assessed using a validated caregiver-patient discrepancy questionnaire, were examined. Interestingly, we found disabilities in instrumental daily living activities and a reduced awareness of these to be related to medial prefrontal cortex atrophy, where the mid-cingulate cortices, dorsal anterior insula and cuneous play an important role. Importantly, if the executive system does not function correctly, the comparator mechanism of action self-monitoring does not detect mismatches between the current and previous performance states stored in the personal database, and produces a reduced awareness for the instrumental domain. PMID:27534380

  20. Buprenorphine Reduces Alcohol Drinking Through Activation of the Nociceptin/Orphanin FQ-NOP Receptor System

    PubMed Central

    Ciccocioppo, Roberto; Economidou, Daina; Rimondini, Roberto; Sommer, Wolfgang; Massi, Maurizio; Heilig, Markus

    2011-01-01

    Background Activation of the NOP receptor by its endogenous ligand nociceptin/orphanin FQ reduces ethanol intake in genetically selected alcohol preferring Marchigian Sardinian alcohol preferring (msP) rats. Here we evaluated whether buprenorphine, a partial agonist at μ-opioid and NOP receptors, would reduce ethanol consumption in msP rats via activation of NOP receptors. Methods Marchigian Sardinian alcohol preferring rats trained to drink 10% alcohol 2 hours/day were injected with buprenorphine (.03, .3, 3.0, or 6.0 mg/kg intraperitoneally [IP]) 90 min before access to ethanol. Results Similar to prototypical μ-agonists, the two lowest doses of buprenorphine significantly increased ethanol consumption (p < .01); in contrast, the two highest doses reduced it (p < .05). Pretreatment with naltrexone (.25 mg/kg IP) prevented the increase of ethanol intake induced by .03 mg/kg of buprenorphine (p < .001) but did not affect the inhibition of ethanol drinking induced by 3.0 mg/kg of buprenorphine. Conversely, pretreatment with the selective NOP receptor antagonist UFP-101 (10.0 or 20.0 μg/rat) abolished the suppression of ethanol drinking by 3.0 mg/kg of buprenorphine. Conclusions Buprenorphine has dualistic effects on ethanol drinking; low doses increase alcohol intake via stimulation of classic opioid receptors, whereas higher doses reduce it via activation of NOP receptors. We suggest that NOP agonistic properties of buprenorphine might be useful in the treatment of alcoholism. PMID:16533497

  1. Green synthesis of biphasic TiO₂-reduced graphene oxide nanocomposites with highly enhanced photocatalytic activity.

    PubMed

    Sher Shah, Md Selim Arif; Park, A Reum; Zhang, Kan; Park, Jong Hyeok; Yoo, Pil J

    2012-08-01

    A series of TiO(2)-reduced graphene oxide (RGO) nanocomposites were prepared by simple one-step hydrothermal reactions using the titania precursor, TiCl(4) and graphene oxide (GO) without reducing agents. Hydrolysis of TiCl(4) and mild reduction of GO were simultaneously carried out under hydrothermal conditions. While conventional approaches mostly utilize multistep chemical methods wherein strong reducing agents, such as hydrazine, hydroquinone, and sodium borohydride are employed, our method provides the notable advantages of a single step reaction without employing toxic solvents or reducing agents, thereby providing a novel green synthetic route to produce the nanocomposites of RGO and TiO(2). The as-synthesized nanocomposites were characterized by several crystallographic, microscopic, and spectroscopic characterization methods, which enabled confrimation of the robustness of the suggested reaction scheme. Notably, X-ray diffraction and transmission electron micrograph proved that TiO(2) contained both anatase and rutile phases. In addition, the photocatalytic activities of the synthesized composites were measured for the degradation of rhodamine B dye. The catalyst also can degrade a colorless dye such as benzoic acid under visible light. The synthesized nanocomposites of biphasic TiO(2) with RGO showed enhanced catalytic activity compared to conventional TiO(2) photocatalyst, P25. The photocatalytic activity is strongly affected by the concentration of RGO in the nanocomposites, with the best photocatalytic activity observed for the composite of 2.0 wt % RGO. Since the synthesized biphasic TiO(2)-RGO nanocomposites have been shown to effectively reduce the electron-hole recombination rate, it is anticipated that they will be utilized as anode materials in lithium ion batteries. PMID:22788800

  2. Enhanced Somatosensory Feedback Reduces Prefrontal Cortical Activity During Walking in Older Adults

    PubMed Central

    Christou, Evangelos A.; Ring, Sarah A.; Williamson, John B.; Doty, Leilani

    2014-01-01

    Background. The coordination of steady state walking is relatively automatic in healthy humans, such that active attention to the details of task execution and performance (controlled processing) is low. Somatosensation is a crucial input to the spinal and brainstem circuits that facilitate this automaticity. Impaired somatosensation in older adults may reduce automaticity and increase controlled processing, thereby contributing to deficits in walking function. The primary objective of this study was to determine if enhancing somatosensory feedback can reduce controlled processing during walking, as assessed by prefrontal cortical activation. Methods. Fourteen older adults (age 77.1±5.56 years) with mild mobility deficits and mild somatosensory deficits participated in this study. Functional near-infrared spectroscopy was used to quantify metabolic activity (tissue oxygenation index, TOI) in the prefrontal cortex. Prefrontal activity and gait spatiotemporal data were measured during treadmill walking and overground walking while participants wore normal shoes and under two conditions of enhanced somatosensation: wearing textured insoles and no shoes. Results. Relative to walking with normal shoes, textured insoles yielded a bilateral reduction of prefrontal cortical activity for treadmill walking (ΔTOI = −0.85 and −1.19 for left and right hemispheres, respectively) and for overground walking (ΔTOI = −0.51 and −0.66 for left and right hemispheres, respectively). Relative to walking with normal shoes, no shoes yielded lower prefrontal cortical activity for treadmill walking (ΔTOI = −0.69 and −1.13 for left and right hemispheres, respectively), but not overground walking. Conclusions. Enhanced somatosensation reduces prefrontal activity during walking in older adults. This suggests a less intensive utilization of controlled processing during walking. PMID:25112494

  3. Eculizumab reduces complement activation, inflammation, endothelial damage, thrombosis, and renal injury markers in aHUS

    PubMed Central

    Cofiell, Roxanne; Kukreja, Anjli; Bedard, Krystin; Yan, Yan; Mickle, Angela P.; Ogawa, Masayo; Bedrosian, Camille L.

    2015-01-01

    Atypical hemolytic uremic syndrome (aHUS) is a genetic, life-threatening disease characterized by uncontrolled complement activation, systemic thrombotic microangiopathy (TMA), and vital organ damage. We evaluated the effect of terminal complement blockade with the anti-C5 monoclonal antibody eculizumab on biomarkers of cellular processes involved in TMA in patients with aHUS longitudinally, during up to 1 year of treatment, compared with in healthy volunteers. Biomarker levels were elevated at baseline in most patients, regardless of mutational status, plasma exchange/infusion use, platelet count, or lactate dehydrogenase or haptoglobin levels. Eculizumab reduced terminal complement activation (C5a and sC5b-9) and renal injury markers (clusterin, cystatin-C, β2-microglobulin, and liver fatty acid binding protein-1) to healthy volunteer levels and reduced inflammation (soluble tumor necrosis factor receptor-1), coagulation (prothrombin fragment F1+2 and d-dimer), and endothelial damage (thrombomodulin) markers to near-normal levels. Alternative pathway activation (Ba) and endothelial activation markers (soluble vascular cell adhesion molecule-1) decreased but remained elevated, reflecting ongoing complement activation in aHUS despite complete terminal complement blockade. These results highlight links between terminal complement activation and inflammation, endothelial damage, thrombosis, and renal injury and underscore ongoing risk for systemic TMA and progression to organ damage. Further research regarding underlying complement dysregulation is warranted. This trial was registered at www.clinicaltrials.gov as #NCT01194973. PMID:25833956

  4. Toll-Like Receptor 4 Reduces Oxidative Injury via Glutathione Activity in Sheep.

    PubMed

    Deng, Shoulong; Yu, Kun; Wu, Qian; Li, Yan; Zhang, Xiaosheng; Zhang, Baolu; Liu, Guoshi; Liu, Yixun; Lian, Zhengxing

    2016-01-01

    Toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4) is an important sensor of Gram-negative bacteria and can trigger activation of the innate immune system. Increased activation of TLR4 can lead to the induction of oxidative stress. Herein, the pathway whereby TLR4 affects antioxidant activity was studied. In TLR4-overexpressing sheep, TLR4 expression was found to be related to the integration copy number when monocytes were challenged with lipopolysaccharide (LPS). Consequently, production of malondialdehyde (MDA) was increased, which could increase the activation of prooxidative stress enzymes. Meanwhile, activation of an antioxidative enzyme, glutathione peroxidase (GSH-Px), was increased. Real-time PCR showed that expression of activating protein-1 (AP-1) and the antioxidative-related genes was increased. By contrast, the expression levels of superoxide dismutase 1 (SOD1) and catalase (CAT) were reduced. In transgenic sheep, glutathione (GSH) levels were dramatically reduced. Furthermore, transgenic sheep were intradermally injected with LPS in each ear. The amounts of inflammatory infiltrates were correlated with the number of TLR4 copies that were integrated in the genome. Additionally, the translation of γ-glutamylcysteine synthetase (γ-GCS) was increased. Our findings indicated that overexpression of TLR4 in sheep could ameliorate oxidative injury through GSH secretion that was induced by LPS stimulation. Furthermore, TLR4 promoted γ-GCS translation through the AP-1 pathway, which was essential for GSH synthesis. PMID:26640618

  5. Toll-Like Receptor 4 Reduces Oxidative Injury via Glutathione Activity in Sheep

    PubMed Central

    Deng, Shoulong; Yu, Kun; Wu, Qian; Li, Yan; Zhang, Xiaosheng; Zhang, Baolu; Liu, Guoshi; Liu, Yixun; Lian, Zhengxing

    2016-01-01

    Toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4) is an important sensor of Gram-negative bacteria and can trigger activation of the innate immune system. Increased activation of TLR4 can lead to the induction of oxidative stress. Herein, the pathway whereby TLR4 affects antioxidant activity was studied. In TLR4-overexpressing sheep, TLR4 expression was found to be related to the integration copy number when monocytes were challenged with lipopolysaccharide (LPS). Consequently, production of malondialdehyde (MDA) was increased, which could increase the activation of prooxidative stress enzymes. Meanwhile, activation of an antioxidative enzyme, glutathione peroxidase (GSH-Px), was increased. Real-time PCR showed that expression of activating protein-1 (AP-1) and the antioxidative-related genes was increased. By contrast, the expression levels of superoxide dismutase 1 (SOD1) and catalase (CAT) were reduced. In transgenic sheep, glutathione (GSH) levels were dramatically reduced. Furthermore, transgenic sheep were intradermally injected with LPS in each ear. The amounts of inflammatory infiltrates were correlated with the number of TLR4 copies that were integrated in the genome. Additionally, the translation of γ-glutamylcysteine synthetase (γ-GCS) was increased. Our findings indicated that overexpression of TLR4 in sheep could ameliorate oxidative injury through GSH secretion that was induced by LPS stimulation. Furthermore, TLR4 promoted γ-GCS translation through the AP-1 pathway, which was essential for GSH synthesis. PMID:26640618

  6. Heat-treatment effect on impact properties of reduced-activation steels*1

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Klueh, R. L.; Maziasz, P. J.; Alexander, D. J.

    1991-03-01

    The effect of heat treatment on the impact behavior of eight experimental heats of reduced-activation ferritic steels was investigated. Steels with 2 {1}/{4}, 5, 9, and 12 wt% Cr and containing tungsten, vanadium, and tantalum were examined. Impact properties of steels with 2 {1}/{4} wt% Cr depended on microstructure, which was affected by cooling rate after austenitization. By heat-treating the 2 {1}/{4} wt% Cr steels to change the microstructure from a bainitic structure containing ferrite to one without ferrite, the ductile-brittle transition temperatures were reduced substantially. The cooling rate had essentially no effect on the high-chromium martensitic steels.

  7. Pertussis toxin analog with reduced enzymatic and biological activities is a protective immunogen.

    PubMed Central

    Kimura, A; Mountzouros, K T; Schad, P A; Cieplak, W; Cowell, J L

    1990-01-01

    Bordetella pertussis TOX3201 has a 12-base-pair insertion in the S1 subunit gene of pertussis toxin (PTX), which encodes for a 4-amino-acid insertion between residues 107 and 108 of the mature S1 subunit (Black et al., Science 240:656-659, 1988). This mutant strain has been shown to secrete a holotoxin analog of PTX, designated CRM3201, with reduced ADP-ribosyltransferase activity. In the present study, we evaluated the biochemical, biological, and immunoprotective activities of purified CRM3201. Assay of enzymatic activities showed that CRM3201 had 20 to 30% of the ADP-ribosyltransferase activity and 55 to 60% of the NAD glycohydrolase activity of native PTX. CRM3201, however, had only 2 to 6% of the activity of PTX in clustering CHO cells, promoting leukocytosis, inducing histamine sensitization, and potentiating an anaphylactic response to bovine serum albumin. In contrast, activities associated with the B oligomer (binding to fetuin, hemagglutination of goose erythrocytes, and lymphocyte mitogen activity) were comparable to those of native PTX. Injection of BALB/c mice with CRM3201 mixed with Al(OH)3 elicited high titers of antibody to PTX (as measured by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay), which neutralized a leukocytosis-promoting dose of PTX in these mice and neutralized PTX in a CHO cell assay. Passive transfer of the anti-CRM3201 antibody protected 20-day-old Swiss-Webster mice against a lethal aerosol challenge with B. pertussis 18323. Active immunization with CRM3201 significantly reduced lung colonization in adult BALB/c mice with a B. pertussis respiratory infection. These results demonstrate (i) that the reduced ADP-ribosyltransferase activity of CRM3201 is associated with reductions in certain biological and toxic activities of PTX (the enzymatic and biological activities are not, however, totally concordant); (ii) that CRM3201 possesses a functional B oligomer; and (iii) that CRM3201 can induce toxin-neutralizing antibodies which protect mice

  8. Mössbauer and infrared spectroscopy as a diagnostic tool for the characterization of ferric tannates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jaén, Juan A.; Navarro, César

    2009-07-01

    Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy and Mössbauer spectroscopy are use for the characterization and qualitative analysis of hydrolysable and condensed tannates. The two classes of tannates may be differentiated from the characteristic IR pattern. Mössbauer proof that a mixture of mono- and bis-type ferric tannate complexes, and an iron(II)-tannin complex are obtained from the interaction of hydrolysable tannins (tannic acid and chestnut tannin) and condensed tannins (mimosa and quebracho) with a ferric nitrate solution. At pH 7, a partially hydrolyzed ferric tannate complex was also obtained.

  9. AMP-activated Protein Kinase Suppresses Biosynthesis of Glucosylceramide by Reducing Intracellular Sugar Nucleotides*

    PubMed Central

    Ishibashi, Yohei; Hirabayashi, Yoshio

    2015-01-01

    The membrane glycolipid glucosylceramide (GlcCer) plays a critical role in cellular homeostasis. Its intracellular levels are thought to be tightly regulated. How cells regulate GlcCer levels remains to be clarified. AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK), which is a crucial cellular energy sensor, regulates glucose and lipid metabolism to maintain energy homeostasis. Here, we investigated whether AMPK affects GlcCer metabolism. AMPK activators (5-aminoimidazole-4-carboxamide 1-β-d-ribofuranoside and metformin) decreased intracellular GlcCer levels and synthase activity in mouse fibroblasts. AMPK inhibitors or AMPK siRNA reversed these effects, suggesting that GlcCer synthesis is negatively regulated by an AMPK-dependent mechanism. Although AMPK did not affect the phosphorylation or expression of GlcCer synthase, the amount of UDP-glucose, an activated form of glucose required for GlcCer synthesis, decreased under AMPK-activating conditions. Importantly, the UDP-glucose pyrophosphatase Nudt14, which degrades UDP-glucose, generating UMP and glucose 1-phosphate, was phosphorylated and activated by AMPK. On the other hand, suppression of Nudt14 by siRNA had little effect on UDP-glucose levels, indicating that mammalian cells have an alternative UDP-glucose pyrophosphatase that mainly contributes to the reduction of UDP-glucose under AMPK-activating conditions. Because AMPK activators are capable of reducing GlcCer levels in cells from Gaucher disease patients, our findings suggest that reducing GlcCer through AMPK activation may lead to a new strategy for treating diseases caused by abnormal accumulation of GlcCer. PMID:26048992

  10. Lysosomal Acid Lipase Activity Is Reduced Both in Cryptogenic Cirrhosis and in Cirrhosis of Known Etiology

    PubMed Central

    Vespasiani-Gentilucci, Umberto; Gallo, Paolo; Piemonte, Fiorella; Riva, Elisabetta; Porcari, Aldostefano; Vorini, Ferruccio; Tozzi, Giulia; Piccioni, Livia; Galati, Giovanni; De Vincentis, Antonio; Carotti, Simone; Morini, Sergio; D’Amico, Jessica; Angeletti, Silvia; Pedone, Claudio; Picardi, Antonio

    2016-01-01

    Lysosomal acid lipase deficiency (LAL-d) is a rare autosomal recessive disease in which LAL activity is almost absent, with consequent massive microvesicular steatosis evolving to cirrhosis and liver failure. We aimed to determine LAL-activity, and to investigate the most common single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) affecting the LIPA gene and responsible for 50–70% of LAL-d cases (rs116928232 c.894G>A), in patients with cryptogenic cirrhosis. Sixty-three patients with cryptogenic cirrhosis, 88 cirrhotics of known etiology, and 97 healthy subjects were enrolled. LAL-activity was determined in dried-blood-spot (DBS). The c.894G>A mutation was analyzed by pyrosequencing method in SNP mode. LAL-activity was severely reduced in patients with cryptogenic cirrhosis with respect to healthy subjects [0.62 (0.44–0.86) Vs 0.96 (0.75–1.25) nmol/spot/h, p<0.001)], but it was also reduced in known-etiology cirrhotics [0.54 (0.42–0.79) nmol/spot/h, p<0.001 Vs healthy subjects; p = 0.5 Vs cryptogenic cirrhotics]. Fourteen percent of cryptogenic cirrhotics and 20% of known-etiology cirrhotics showed a LAL-activity in the range of heterozygous carriers of LIPA gene mutations (0.15–0.40 nmol/spot/h). However, none of the subjects with reduced LAL-activity carried the c.894G>A SNP except for one patient with HCV cirrhosis. By multivariate analysis, LAL-activity was not associated with age, sex, liver enzymes, liver function or lipid parameters, while it was independently associated with white blood cell (β = 0.2; p<0.01) and platelet (β = 0.4; p<0.001) counts and with the condition of cirrhosis (β = -0.2; p = 0.04). Conclusion Liver cirrhosis is characterized by a severe acquired reduction of LAL-activity, the precise causes and consequences of which need to be further addressed. DBS-determined lysosomal enzyme activities seem to be affected by white blood cell and platelet counts, and the specificity of these tests can be reduced when applied to determined populations

  11. Antioxidant Activities of Extract and Fractions from the Hypocotyls of the Mangrove Plant Kandelia candel

    PubMed Central

    Wei, Shu-Dong; Zhou, Hai-Chao; Lin, Yi-Ming

    2010-01-01

    The antioxidant activities of 70% acetone extract (70% AE) from the hypocotyls of the mangrove plant Kandelia candel and its fractions of petroleum ether (PF), ethyl acetate (EF), water (WF), and the LF (WF fraction further purified through a Sephadex LH-20 column), were investigated by the 1,1-diphenyl-2-picrylhydrazyl (DPPH) free radical scavenging and ferric reducing/antioxidant power (FRAP) assays. The results showed that all the extract and fractions possessed potent antioxidant activity. There was a significant linear correlation between the total phenolics concentration and the ferric reducing power or free radical scavenging activity of the extract and fractions. Among the extract and fractions, the LF fraction exhibits the best antioxidant performance. The MALDT-TOF MS and HPLC analyses revealed that the phenolic compounds associated with the antioxidant activity of the LF fraction contains a large number of procyanidins and a small amount of prodelphinidins, and the epicatechin is the main extension unit. PMID:21152321

  12. Baroreflex Activation Therapy in Heart Failure With Reduced Ejection Fraction: Available Data and Future Perspective.

    PubMed

    Halbach, Marcel; Fritz, Thorsten; Madershahian, Navid; Pfister, Roman; Reuter, Hannes

    2016-04-01

    Progression of heart failure with reduced ejection fraction (HFrEF) is promoted by sympathovagal imbalance. Baroreflex activation therapy, i.e., electrical stimulation of baroreceptors at the carotid sinus, can restore sympathovagal balance. Large animal studies of baroreflex activation therapy revealed improvements in cardiac function, susceptibility to ventricular arrhythmias, and a survival benefit as compared to untreated controls. Recently, the first randomized and controlled trial of optimal medical and device therapy alone or plus baroreflex activation therapy in patients suffering from HFrEF was published. It demonstrated a reasonable safety profile in this severely ill patient population. Moreover, the study found significant improvements in New York Heart Association class, quality of life, 6-min walk distance, and NT-proBNP levels. This review provides an overview on baroreflex activation therapy for the treatment of HFrEF-from the concept and preclinical findings to most recent clinical data and upcoming trials. PMID:26879389

  13. Dioxin mediates downregulation of the reduced folate carrier transport activity via the arylhydrocarbon receptor signalling pathway

    SciTech Connect

    Halwachs, Sandra; Lakoma, Cathleen; Gebhardt, Rolf; Schaefer, Ingo; Seibel, Peter; Honscha, Walther

    2010-07-15

    Dioxins such as 2,3,7,8-tetrachlordibenzo-p-dioxin (TCDD) are common environmental contaminants known to regulate several genes via activation of the transcription factor aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AhR) associated with the development of numerous adverse biological effects. However, comparatively little is known about the molecular mechanisms by which dioxins display their toxic effects in vertebrates. The 5' untranslated region of the hepatocellular Reduced folate carrier (Rfc1; Slc19a1) exhibits AhR binding sites termed dioxin responsive elements (DRE) that have as yet only been found in the promoter region of prototypical TCDD target genes. Rfc1 mediated transport of reduced folates and antifolate drugs such as methotrexate (MTX) plays an essential role in physiological folate homeostasis and MTX cancer chemotherapy. In order to determine whether this carrier represents a target gene of dioxins we have investigated the influence of TCDD on functional Rfc1 activity in rat liver. Pre-treatment of rats with TCDD significantly diminished hepatocellular Rfc1 uptake activity in a time- and dose-dependent manner. In further mechanistic studies we demonstrated that this reduction was due to TCDD-dependent activation of the AhR signalling pathway. We additionally showed that binding of the activated receptor to DRE motifs in the Rfc1 promoter resulted in downregulation of Rfc1 gene expression and reduced carrier protein levels. As downregulation of pivotal Rfc1 activity results in functional folate deficiency associated with an elevated risk of cardiovascular diseases or carcinogenesis, our results indicate that deregulation of this essential transport pathway represents a novel regulatory mechanism how dioxins display their toxic effects through the Ah receptor.

  14. Application of Feedforward Adaptive Active-Noise Control for Reducing Blade Passing Noise in Centrifugal Fans

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    WU, J.-D.; BAI, M. R.

    2001-02-01

    This paper describes two configurations of feedforward adaptive active-noise control (ANC) technique for reducing blade passing noise in centrifugal fans. In one configuration, the control speaker is installed at the cut-off region of the fan, while in the other configuration at the exit duct. The proposed ANC system is based on the filtered-x least-mean-squares (FXLMS) algorithm with multi-sine synthesized reference signal and frequency counting and is implemented by using a digital signal processor (DSP). Experiments are carried out to evaluate the proposed system for reducing the noise at the blade passing frequency (BPF) and its harmonics at various flow speeds. The results of the experiment indicated that the ANC technique is effective in reducing the blade passing noise for two configurations by using the feedforward adaptive control.

  15. Synovial sarcoma cell lines showed reduced DNA repair activity and sensitivity to a PARP inhibitor.

    PubMed

    Yamasaki, Hiroyuki; Miyamoto, Mamiko; Yamamoto, Yuki; Kondo, Tadashi; Watanabe, Toshiki; Ohta, Tsutomu

    2016-08-01

    Synovial sarcoma is a soft-tissue sarcoma and a rare type of cancer. Unfortunately, effective chemotherapies for synovial sarcomas have not been established. In this report, we show that synovial sarcoma cell lines have reduced repair activity for DNA damage induced by ionizing radiation (IR) and a topoisomerase II inhibitor (etoposide). We also observed reduced recruitment of RAD51 homologue (S. cerevisiae; RAD51) at sites of double-strand breaks (DSBs) in synovial sarcoma cell lines that had been exposed to IR. These findings showed that synovial sarcoma cell lines are defective in homologous recombination (HR) repair. Furthermore, we found that a poly-(ADP-ribose) polymerase (PARP) inhibitor (AZD2281; olaparib) effectively reduced the growth of synovial sarcoma cell lines in the presence of an alkylating agent (temozolomide). Our findings offer evidence that treatment combining a PARP inhibitor and an alkylating agent could have therapeutic benefits in the treatment of synovial sarcoma. PMID:27353471

  16. Reduced cytochrome oxidase activity in the retrosplenial cortex after lesions to the anterior thalamic nuclei.

    PubMed

    Mendez-Lopez, Magdalena; Arias, Jorge L; Bontempi, Bruno; Wolff, Mathieu

    2013-08-01

    The anterior thalamic nuclei (ATN) make a critical contribution to hippocampal system functions. Growing experimental work shows that the effects of ATN lesions often resemble those of hippocampal lesions and both markedly reduce the expression of immediate-early gene markers in the retrosplenial cortex, which still appears normal by standard histological means. This study shows that moderate ATN damage was sufficient to produce severe spatial memory impairment as measured in a radial-arm maze. Furthermore, ATN rats exhibited reduced cytochrome oxidase activity in the most superficial cortical layers of the granular retrosplenial cortex, and, to a lesser extent, in the anterior cingulate cortex. By contrast, no change in cytochrome oxidase activity was observed in other limbic cortical regions or in the hippocampal formation. Altogether our results indicate that endogenous long-term brain metabolic capacity within the granular retrosplenial cortex is compromised by even limited ATN damage. PMID:23660649

  17. Shipwreck rates and tree rings suggest reduced North Atlantic tropical cyclone activity during the Maunder Minimum.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harley, G. L.; Trouet, V.; Dominguez Delmas, M.

    2014-12-01

    The observational record of North Atlantic TCs is too short to inform our understanding of decadal-scale climatic controls on TC regimes. We combined two new annual-resolution proxies of Atlantic storm activity to extend the observational TC record back to the 16th Century. A tree-growth suppression chronology (1707-2010 CE) from the Florida Keys, U.S.A. captures 91% of observed North Atlantic TCs (1850-2010 CE) and shares significant peak events with a documentary time series of Spanish shipwrecks in the Caribbean (1495-1820). Decadal-scale shipwreck rates were lowest during the Maunder Minimum (ca. 1645-1715), indicating that cooler Atlantic sea surface temperatures (SSTs) during this period reduced Caribbean TC activity. Our results support global-scale climate proxy data and suggest that cooler tropical Atlantic SSTs and a generally negative mode of the North Atlantic Oscillation during the Little Ice Age reduced TC frequency.

  18. Activated microglia in acute encephalopathy with biphasic seizures and late reduced diffusion.

    PubMed

    Fujita, Yuji; Takanashi, Jun-Ichi; Takei, Haruka; Ota, Setsuo; Fujii, Katsunori; Sakuma, Hiroshi; Hayashi, Masaharu

    2016-07-15

    Acute encephalopathy with biphasic seizures and late reduced diffusion (AESD) is the most common subtype of infectious pediatric encephalopathy in Japan. The exact pathogenesis of and the best therapeutic strategy for AESD are uncertain. We firstly performed a brain biopsy in a 2-year-old boy with AESD associated with RS viral infection, which revealed activated ameoboid microglia accumulation around degenerated neuron, and astrogliosis in the affected cortex. Glutamate released from activated microglia may play an important role in the pathogenesis of AESD, which is compatible with the previous report of magnetic resonance spectroscopy showing elevated glutamate. PMID:27288783

  19. Effect of Lead stress on phosphatase activity and reducing power assay of Triticum aestivum.

    PubMed

    Gubrelay, U; Agnihotri, R K; Shrotriya, S; Sharma, R

    2015-01-01

    Lead (Pb) is a highly toxic heavy metal for both plants and animals; the environment is increasingly polluted with heavy metals and reduces crop productivity. Plants possess homeostatic mechanisms that allow them to keep correct concentrations of essential metal ions in cellular compartments and to minimize the damaging effects of an excess of nonessential ones. One of their adverse effects on plants are the generation of harmful active oxygen species, leading to oxidative stress and the antioxidative activity seems to be of fundamental importance for adaptive response of plant against environmental stress. The present study explores the effects of lead (soil treated twice/ week) with (10, 30 and 60 mM) on the specific activities of phosphatases which might lead to reducing power assay in (Triticum aestivum PBW344) seedling. A significant decrease in the redox potential of shoot compared to root was observed at the similar concentration of lead. A similar trend on leaves was also noted. Acid and alkaline phosphatase activities were significantly higher in roots than in shoot at all the three concentration of lead i.e. 10, 30 and 60 mM, compared to controls. The above mentioned changes were more pronounced at 60 mM concentration of lead than two other concentrations. These results lead us to suggest that increased lead concentration in soil might lead to adverse effects on plant growth and phosphatase activities. PMID:26107501

  20. Reduced Cortical Activity Impairs Development and Plasticity after Neonatal Hypoxia Ischemia

    PubMed Central

    Ranasinghe, Sumudu; Or, Grace; Wang, Eric Y.; Ievins, Aiva; McLean, Merritt A.; Niell, Cristopher M.; Chau, Vann; Wong, Peter K. H.; Glass, Hannah C.; Sullivan, Joseph

    2015-01-01

    Survivors of preterm birth are at high risk of pervasive cognitive and learning impairments, suggesting disrupted early brain development. The limits of viability for preterm birth encompass the third trimester of pregnancy, a “precritical period” of activity-dependent development characterized by the onset of spontaneous and evoked patterned electrical activity that drives neuronal maturation and formation of cortical circuits. Reduced background activity on electroencephalogram (EEG) is a sensitive marker of brain injury in human preterm infants that predicts poor neurodevelopmental outcome. We studied a rodent model of very early hypoxic–ischemic brain injury to investigate effects of injury on both general background and specific patterns of cortical activity measured with EEG. EEG background activity is depressed transiently after moderate hypoxia–ischemia with associated loss of spindle bursts. Depressed activity, in turn, is associated with delayed expression of glutamate receptor subunits and transporters. Cortical pyramidal neurons show reduced dendrite development and spine formation. Complementing previous observations in this model of impaired visual cortical plasticity, we find reduced somatosensory whisker barrel plasticity. Finally, EEG recordings from human premature newborns with brain injury demonstrate similar depressed background activity and loss of bursts in the spindle frequency band. Together, these findings suggest that abnormal development after early brain injury may result in part from disruption of specific forms of brain activity necessary for activity-dependent circuit development. SIGNIFICANCE STATEMENT Preterm birth and term birth asphyxia result in brain injury from inadequate oxygen delivery and constitute a major and growing worldwide health problem. Poor outcomes are noted in a majority of very premature (<25 weeks gestation) newborns, resulting in death or life-long morbidity with motor, sensory, learning, behavioral

  1. Increased water activity reduces the thermal resistance of Salmonella enterica in peanut butter.

    PubMed

    He, Yingshu; Li, Ye; Salazar, Joelle K; Yang, Jingyun; Tortorello, Mary Lou; Zhang, Wei

    2013-08-01

    Increased water activity in peanut butter significantly (P < 0.05) reduced the heat resistance of desiccation-stressed Salmonella enterica serotypes treated at 90 °C. The difference in thermal resistance was less notable when strains were treated at 126 °C. Using scanning electron microscopy, we observed minor morphological changes of S. enterica cells resulting from desiccation and rehydration processes in peanut oil. PMID:23728806

  2. Thermophysical and mechanical properties of Fe-(8-9)%Cr reduced activation steels

    SciTech Connect

    Zinkle, S.J.; Robertson, J.P.; Klueh, R.L.

    1998-09-01

    The key thermophysical and mechanical properties for 8--9%Cr reduced activation ferritic/martensitic steels are summarized, including temperature-dependent tensile properties in the unirradiated and irradiated conditions, stress-rupture behavior, elastic constants, thermal conductivity, thermal expansion, specific heat, and ductile-to-brittle transition temperature. The estimated lower and upper temperatures limits for structural applications are 250 and 550 C due to radiation hardening/embrittlement and thermal creep considerations, respectively.

  3. Overexpression of α-synuclein simultaneously increases glutamate NMDA receptor phosphorylation and reduces glucocerebrosidase activity.

    PubMed

    Yang, Junfeng; Hertz, Ellen; Zhang, Xiaoqun; Leinartaité, Lina; Lundius, Ebba Gregorsson; Li, Jie; Svenningsson, Per

    2016-01-12

    Progressive accumulation of α-synuclein (α-syn)-containing protein aggregates throughout the nervous system is a pathological hallmark of Parkinson's disease (PD). The mechanisms whereby α-syn exerts neurodegeneration remain to be fully understood. Here we show that overexpression of α-syn in transgenic mice leads to increased phosphorylation of glutamate NMDA receptor (NMDAR) subunits NR1 and NR2B in substantia nigra and striatum as well as reduced glucocerebrosidase (GCase) levels. Similarly, molecular studies performed in mouse N2A cells stably overexpressing human α-syn ((α-syn)N2A) showed that phosphorylation states of the same NMDAR subunits were increased, whereas GCase levels and lysosomal GCase activity were reduced. (α-syn)N2A cells showed an increased sensitivity to neurotoxicity towards 6-hydroxydopamine and NMDA. However, wildtype N2A, but not (α-syn)N2A cells, showed a further reduction in viability when co-incubated with 6-hydroxydopamine and the lysosomal inhibitors NH4Cl and leupeptin, suggesting that α-syn per se perturbs lysosomal functions. NMDA treatment reduced lysosomal GCase activity to the same extent in (α-syn)N2A cells as in wildtype N2A cells, indicating that the α-syn-dependent difference in NMDA neurotoxicity is unrelated to an altered GCase activity. Nevertheless, these data provide molecular evidence that overexpression of α-syn simultaneously induces two potential neurotoxic hits by increasing glutamate NMDA receptor phosphorylation, consistent with increased NMDA receptors functionality, and reducing GCase activity. PMID:26610904

  4. Activation of innate immunity to reduce lung metastases in breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Jordan, Julie L; Nowak, A; Lee, T D G

    2010-05-01

    Breast cancer continues to be one of the leading causes of cancer death in women. Mortality is primarily due to the development of metastases. Although therapies exist, they lack efficacy in preventing metastatic growth. As a result, novel agents are being investigated. In particular, treatments that target the immune system are being examined as potential anti-neoplastic agents. Cordyceps sinensis (Cs) is a fungus that has been used for over 2,000 years in China as a treatment for a variety of conditions including neoplasms. The available evidence suggests that efficacy of Cs as an anti-neoplastic therapeutic agent is related to a role as an activator of innate immune responses. The objectives of this study were: to investigate the ability of Cs to activate macrophages to produce factors that will induce protective responses against tumour growth; to study the ability of Cs to reduce primary tumour growth in vivo; and to examine the ability of Cs to reduce lung metastasis growth in vivo. We found that oral Cs does not reduce primary tumour growth but can reduce lung metastasis occurrence in a surgical excision model of metastatic mammary carcinoma. The evidence we have shown to date suggests that the reduction in metastases growth may be due to the effects of macrophage-derived factors on tumour cell cycle. PMID:19956948

  5. Calcaneal Quantitative Ultrasound Indicates Reduced Bone Status Among Physically Active Adult Forager-Horticulturalists.

    PubMed

    Stieglitz, Jonathan; Madimenos, Felicia; Kaplan, Hillard; Gurven, Michael

    2016-03-01

    Sedentary lifestyle contributes to osteoporosis and fragility fracture risks among modern humans, but whether such risks are prevalent in physically active preindustrial societies with lower life expectancies is unclear. Osteoporosis should be readily observable in preindustrial societies if it was regularly experienced over human history. In this study of 142 older adult Tsimane forager-horticulturalists (mean age ± SD, 62.1 ± 8.6 years; range, 50 to 85 years; 51% female) we used calcaneal quantitative ultrasonography (qUS) to assess bone status, document prevalence of adults with reduced bone status, and identify factors (demographic, anthropometric, immunological, kinesthetic) associated with reduced bone status. Men (23%) are as likely as women (25%) to have reduced bone status, although age-related decline in qUS parameters is attenuated for men. Adiposity and fat-free mass positively co-vary with qUS parameters for women but not men. Leukocyte count is inversely associated with qUS parameters controlling for potential confounders; leukocyte count is positively correlated within adults over time, and adults with persistently low counts have higher adjusted qUS parameters (6% to 8%) than adults with a high count. Reduced bone status characteristic of osteoporosis is common among active Tsimane with minimal exposure to osteoporosis risk factors found in industrialized societies, but with energetic constraints and high pathogen burden. © 2015 American Society for Bone and Mineral Research. PMID:26460548

  6. Dissimilatory iron reduction in Escherichia coli: identification of CymA of Shewanella oneidensis and NapC of E. coli as ferric reductases.

    PubMed

    Gescher, Johannes S; Cordova, Carmen D; Spormann, Alfred M

    2008-05-01

    Over geological time scales, microbial reduction of chelated Fe(III) or Fe(III) minerals has profoundly affected today's composition of our bio- and geosphere. However, the electron transfer reactions that are specific and defining for dissimilatory iron(III)-reducing (DIR) bacteria are not well understood. Using a synthetic biology approach involving the reconstruction of the putative electron transport chain of the DIR bacterium Shewanella oneidensis MR-1 in Escherichia coli, we showed that expression of cymA was necessary and sufficient to convert E. coli into a DIR bacterium. In intact cells, the Fe(III)-reducing activity was limited to Fe(III) NTA as electron acceptor. In vitro biochemical analysis indicated that CymA, which is a cytoplasmic membrane-associated tetrahaem c-type cytochrome, carries reductase activity towards Fe(III) NTA, Fe(III) citrate, as well as to AQDS, a humic acid analogue. The in vitro specific activities of Fe(III) citrate reductase and AQDS reductase of E. coli spheroplasts were 10x and 30x higher, respectively, relative to the specific rates observed in intact cells, suggesting that access of chelated and insoluble forms of Fe(III) and AQDS is restricted in whole cells. Interestingly, the E. coli CymA orthologue NapC also carried ferric reductase activity. Our data support the argument that the biochemical mechanism of Fe(III) reduction per se was not the key innovation leading to environmental relevant DIR bacteria. Rather, the evolution of an extension of the electron transfer pathway from the Fe(III) reductase CymA to the cell surface via a system of periplasmic and outer membrane cytochrome proteins enabled access to diffusion-impaired electron acceptors. PMID:18394146

  7. Ferric Leghemoglobin in Plant-Attached Leguminous Nodules.

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Kk.; Shearman, L. L.; Erickson, B. K.; Klucas, R. V.

    1995-01-01

    Leghemoglobin (Lb) is essential for nitrogen fixation by intact leguminous nodules. To determine whether ferric Lb (Lb3+) was detectable in nodules under normal or stressed conditions, we monitored the status of Lb in intact nodules attached to sweet clover (Melilotus officinalis) and soybean (Glycine max [L.] Merr.) roots exposed to various conditions. The effects of N2 and O2 streams and elevated nicotinate levels on root-attached nodules were tested to determine whether the spectrophotometric technique was showing the predicted responses of Lb. The soybean and sweet clover nodules' Lb spectra indicated predominantly ferrous Lb and LbO2 in young (34 d) plants. As the nodule aged beyond 45 d, it was possible to induce Lb3+ with a 100% O2 stream (15 min). At 65 d without inducement, the nodule Lb status indicated the presence of some Lb3+ along with ferrous Lb and oxyferrous Lb. Nicotinate and fluoride were used as ligands to identify Lb3+. Computer-calculated difference spectra were used to demonstrate the changes in Lb spectra under different conditions. Some conditions that increased absorbance in the 626 nm region (indicating Lb3+ accumulation) were root-fed ascorbate and dehydroascorbate, plant exposure to darkness, and nodule water immersion. PMID:12228593

  8. Localized corrosion of candidate container materials in ferric chloride solutions

    SciTech Connect

    Roy, A.K.; Fleming, D.L.; Lum, B.Y.

    1999-07-01

    Localized corrosion behavior of candidate inner- and outer-container materials of current nuclear waste package design was evaluated in aqueous solutions of various concentrations of ferric chloride (FeCl{sub 3}) at 30 C, 60 C and 90 C using the electrochemical cyclic potentiodynamic polarization (CPP) technique. Materials tested include A 516 carbon steel (UNS K01800), and high-performance UNS N08825, UNS N06985, UNS N06030, UNS N06455, UNS N06625, UNS N06022, and UNS R53400. A 516 steel suffered from severe general and localized attack including pitting and crevice corrosion. High-nickel UNS N08825 and N06985 also became susceptible to severe pitting and crevice corrosion. The extent of localized attack was less pronounced in UNS N06030 and N06455. UNS N06625 experienced severe surface degradation including general corrosion crevice corrosion and intergranular attack. In contrast, only slight crevice corrosion tendency was observed with nickel-base UNS N06022 in solutions containing higher concentrations of FeCl{sub 3} at 60 C and 90 C. UNS R53400 was immune to localized attack in all tested environments. The test solutions showed a significant amount of precipitated particles, especially at higher temperatures.

  9. Localized corrosion of candidate container materials in ferric chloride solutions

    SciTech Connect

    Fleming, D L; Lum, B Y; Roy, A K

    1998-10-01

    Localized corrosion behavior of candidate inner and outer container materials of currently-designed nuclear waste package was evaluated in aqueous solutions of various concentrations of ferric chloride (FeCl{sub 3}) at 30 C, 60 C and 90 C using the electrochemical cyclic potentiodynamic polarization (CPP) technique. Materials tested include A 5 16 carbon steel and high-performance alloys 825, G-3, G-30, C-4, 625. C-22, and Ti Gr-12. A 516 steel suffered from severe general and localized attack including pitting and crevice corrosion. High-nickel alloys 825 and G-3 also became susceptible to severe pitting and crevice corrosion. The extent of localized attack was less pronounced in alloys G-30 and C-4. Alloy 625 experienced severe surface degradation including general corrosion, crevice corrosion and intergranular attack. In contrast, only a slight crevice corrosion tendency was observed with nickel-base alloy C-22 in solutions containing higher concentrations of FeCl{sub 3} at 60 C and 90 C. Ti Gr-12 was immune to localized attack in all tested environments. The test solutions showed significant amount of precipitated particles during and after testing especially at higher temperatures.

  10. Ferric Phosphate Hydroxide Microstructures Affect Their Magnetic Properties

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Junhong; Zhang, Youjuan; Run, Zhen; Li, Pengwei; Guo, Qifei; Pang, Huan

    2015-01-01

    Uniformly sized and shape-controlled nanoparticles are important due to their applications in catalysis, electrochemistry, ion exchange, molecular adsorption, and electronics. Several ferric phosphate hydroxide (Fe4(OH)3(PO4)3) microstructures were successfully prepared under hydrothermal conditions. Using controlled variations in the reaction conditions, such as reaction time, temperature, and amount of hexadecyltrimethylammonium bromide (CTAB), the crystals can be grown as almost perfect hyperbranched microcrystals at 180 °C (without CTAB) or relatively monodisperse particles at 220 °C (with CTAB). The large hyperbranched structure of Fe4(OH)3(PO4)3 with a size of ∼19 μm forms with the “fractal growth rule” and shows many branches. More importantly, the magnetic properties of these materials are directly correlated to their size and micro/nanostructure morphology. Interestingly, the blocking temperature (TB) shows a dependence on size and shape, and a smaller size resulted in a lower TB. These crystals are good examples that prove that physical and chemical properties of nano/microstructured materials are related to their structures, and the precise control of the morphology of such functional materials could allow for the control of their performance. PMID:26246988

  11. Iron fortification of flour with a complex ferric orthophosphate

    SciTech Connect

    Hallberg, L.; Rossander-Hulthen, L.; Gramatkovski, E.

    1989-07-01

    The unexpectedly low bioavailability in humans of elemental iron powder prompted us to search for other Fe compounds suitable for Fe fortification of flour that fulfill the two requirements of insolubility in water (due to high water content of flour) and good bioavailability in humans. Systematic studies of compatibility, solubility, and bioavailability led to this study of a microcrystalline complex ferric orthophosphate (CFOP), Fe/sub 3/H/sub 8/(NH/sub 4/)-(PO/sub 4/)6.6H/sub 2/O, a well-defined compound. This compound was labeled with /sup 59/Fe, and the native Fe in meals was labeled with /sup 55/FeCl3. The ratio of absorbed /sup 59/Fe to absorbed /sup 55/Fe is a direct measure of the fraction of CFOP that joins the nonheme Fe pool and that is made potentially available for absorption. The relative bioavailability of CFOP varied from 30% to 60% when labeled wheat rolls were served with different meals. The CFOP meets practical requirements of an Fe fortificant for flour well, with regard to both compatibility and bioavailability in humans.

  12. Arsenic sequestration by ferric iron plaque on cattail roots.

    PubMed

    Blute, Nicole Keon; Brabander, Daniel J; Hemond, Harold F; Sutton, Stephen R; Newville, Matthew G; Rivers, Mark L

    2004-11-15

    Typha latifolia (cattail) sequesters arsenic within predominantlyferric iron root coatings, thus decreasing mobility of this toxic element in wetland sediments. Element-specific XRF microtomographic imaging illustrated a high spatial correlation between iron and arsenic in root plaques, with little arsenic in the interior of the roots. XANES analyses demonstrated that the plaque was predominantly ferric iron and contained approximately 20% As(III) and 80% As(V), which is significant because the two oxidation states form species that differ in toxicity and mobility. For the first time, spatial distribution maps of As oxidation states were developed, indicating that As(III) and As(V) are both fairly heterogeneous throughoutthe plaque. Chemical extractions showed that As was strongly adsorbed in the plaque rather than coprecipitated. Iron and arsenic concentrations ranged from 0.03 to 0.8 g Fe g(-1) wet plaque and 30 to 1200 microg As g(-1) wet plaque, consistent with a mechanism of As adsorption onto Fe(III) oxyhydroxide plaque. Because this mechanism decreases the concentrations of both As(III) and As(V) in groundwater, we propose that disruption of vegetation could increase the concentrations of mobile arsenic. PMID:15573609

  13. Voluntary access to a warm plate reduces hyperactivity in activity-based anorexia.

    PubMed

    Hillebrand, Jacquelien J G; de Rijke, Corine E; Brakkee, Jan H; Kas, Martien J H; Adan, Roger A H

    2005-06-01

    Activity-based anorexia (ABA) is considered an animal model of anorexia nervosa. In ABA, scheduled feeding in combination with voluntary wheel running leads to hyperactivity, reduced food intake, severe body weight loss and hypothermia. In this study it was investigated whether hyperactivity in ABA could be reduced by introducing a warm plate (which was voluntary accessible and did not influence ambient temperature) into a part of the cage. In ad libitum fed rats, the presence of the warm plate did not influence body temperature, running wheel activity (RWA), body weight or food intake. During ABA, however, rats preferred the warm plate and hypothermia was prevented, while hyperactivity and body weight loss were significantly reduced when compared to ABA rats without a plate. Correlation analysis revealed a significant association between basal body temperature and RWA during the light phase in ABA rats. However, there was no evidence that initiation of light phase RWA was a result of hypothermia. These data suggest that ABA rats prefer to prevent hypothermia passively by choosing a warm plate rather than actively regulating body temperature by hyperactivity. PMID:15924912

  14. PGE2 Reduces MMP-14 and Increases Plasminogen Activator Inhibitor-1 in Cardiac Fibroblasts

    PubMed Central

    Kassem, Kamal M.; Clevenger, Margarette H.; Szandzik, David L.; Peterson, Edward; Harding, Pamela

    2014-01-01

    Prostaglandin E2 (PGE2) is elevated during cardiac injury and we have previously shown that mice lacking the PGE EP4 receptor display dilated cardiomyopathy (DCM) with increased expression of the membrane type matrix metalloproteinase, MMP-14. We thus hypothesized that PGE2 regulates expression of MMP-14 and also affects fibroblast migration. Primary cultures of neonatal rat ventricular fibroblasts (NVFs) were used to test the effects of PGE2. Gene and protein expression was assessed by real time RT-PCR and Western blot, MMP activity was determined by zymography and migration of NVF was assessed by motility in a transwell system. PGE2 reduced expression of MMP-14 and these effects were antagonized by an EP4 antagonist. An EP4 agonist mimicked the effect of PGE2. PGE2 also increased mRNA and protein levels of plasminogen activator inhibitor-1 (PAI-1), an inhibitor of MMP activation. However, PGE2-stimulation of PAI-1 was mediated by the EP1/EP3 receptor and not EP4. Migration of NVF was assessed by motility in a transwell system. Treatment of NVFs with PGE2 reduced the number of cells migrating towards 10% FCS. Treatment with the EP2 agonist also reduced migration but did not affect MMP-14 expression or PAI-1. Our results suggest that PGE2 utilizes different receptors and mechanisms to ultimately decrease MMP expression and NVF migration. PMID:25263346

  15. Cerium Oxide Nanoparticles Reduce Microglial Activation and Neurodegenerative Events in Light Damaged Retina

    PubMed Central

    Fiorani, Lavinia; Passacantando, Maurizio; Santucci, Sandro; Di Marco, Stefano; Bisti, Silvia; Maccarone, Rita

    2015-01-01

    The first target of any therapy for retinal neurodegeneration is to slow down the progression of the disease and to maintain visual function. Cerium oxide or ceria nanoparticles reduce oxidative stress, which is known to play a pivotal role in neurodegeneration. Our aim was to investigate whether cerium oxide nanoparticles were able to mitigate neurodegeneration including microglial activation and related inflammatory processes induced by exposure to high intensity light. Cerium oxide nanoparticles were injected intravitreally or intraveinously in albino Sprague-Dawley rats three weeks before exposing them to light damage of 1000 lux for 24 h. Electroretinographic recordings were performed a week after light damage. The progression of retinal degeneration was evaluated by measuring outer nuclear layer thickness and TUNEL staining to quantify photoreceptors death. Immunohistochemical analysis was used to evaluate retinal stress, neuroinflammatory cytokines and microglial activation. Only intravitreally injected ceria nanoparticles were detected at the level of photoreceptor outer segments 3 weeks after the light damage and electoretinographic recordings showed that ceria nanoparticles maintained visual response. Moreover, this treatment reduced neuronal death and “hot spot” extension preserving the outer nuclear layer morphology. It is noteworthy that in this work we demonstrated, for the first time, the ability of ceria nanoparticles to reduce microglial activation and their migration toward outer nuclear layer. All these evidences support ceria nanoparticles as a powerful therapeutic agent in retinal neurodegenerative processes. PMID:26469804

  16. PGE2 reduces MMP-14 and increases plasminogen activator inhibitor-1 in cardiac fibroblasts.

    PubMed

    Kassem, Kamal M; Clevenger, Margarette H; Szandzik, David L; Peterson, Edward; Harding, Pamela

    2014-10-01

    Prostaglandin E2 (PGE2) is elevated during cardiac injury and we have previously shown that mice lacking the PGE2 EP4 receptor display dilated cardiomyopathy (DCM) with increased expression of the membrane type matrix metalloproteinase, MMP-14. We thus hypothesized that PGE2 regulates expression of MMP-14 and also affects fibroblast migration. Primary cultures of neonatal rat ventricular fibroblasts (NVFs) were used to test the effects of PGE2. Gene and protein expression was assessed by real time RT-PCR and Western blot, MMP activity was determined by zymography and migration of NVF was assessed by motility in a transwell system. PGE2 reduced expression of MMP-14 and these effects were antagonized by an EP4 antagonist. An EP4 agonist mimicked the effect of PGE2. PGE2 also increased mRNA and protein levels of plasminogen activator inhibitor-1 (PAI-1), an inhibitor of MMP activation. However, PGE2-stimulation of PAI-1 was mediated by the EP1/EP3 receptor and not EP4. Migration of NVF was assessed by motility in a transwell system. Treatment of NVFs with PGE2 reduced the number of cells migrating toward 10% FCS. Treatment with the EP2 agonist also reduced migration but did not affect MMP-14 expression or PAI-1. Our results suggest that PGE2 utilizes different receptors and mechanisms to ultimately decrease MMP expression and NVF migration. PMID:25263346

  17. Evaluation on Fatigue Crack Propagation of Reduced Activation Ferritic Steel (JLF-1) at High Temperature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yoon, Han Ki; Kim, Sa Woong; Lee, Sang Pill; Katoh, Yutai; Kohyama, Akira

    Recently, reduced activation ferritic/martensitic steel, vanadium alloy and SiC/SiC composite are embossed for nuclear fusion reactor in accordance with the coolant. Especially, reduced activation ferritic/martensitic steel is very suitable material for nuclear fusion reactor, because it has low coefficient of thermal expansion and excellent heat conductivity. The objective of this study is to investigate fatigue crack propagation behavior in the Reduced Activation Ferritic Steel (JLF-1). The fatigue crack propagation behavior of the JLF-1 steel was investigated by the constant-amplitude loading test for the stress ratios R = 0.1, 0.3 and 0.5 respectively. The fatigue crack growth tests carried out at room temperature and 400°C for base metal and weld metal. The effects of stress ratio, test temperature, specimen size and TIG welding on the fatigue crack propagation behaviors for JLF-1 steel were discussed within the Paris law. Particularly, the fatigue crack propagation rate of a weld metal was similar to that of base metal at the stress ratio of 0.3. Also, the fatigue crack propagation rate of a half size specimen was similar to that of a full size specimen at the stress ratios of 0.1, 0.3 and 0.5 respectively. From this result, we can recognize that the fatigue crack propagation behavior of this material can be evaluated by using the half size specimens.

  18. Formation of ferric oxides from aqueous solutions: A polyhedral approach by X-ray absorption spectroscopy. I. Hydrolysis and formation of ferric gels

    SciTech Connect

    Combes, J.M.; Manceau, A.; Calas, G. ); Bottero, J.Y. )

    1989-03-01

    X-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS) was used to follow the evolution of local structural environments around ferric ions during the formation of ferric hydrous oxide gels from 1 M chloride and 0.1 M nitrate solutions. Fe K-XANES and EXAFS confirm that ferric ions remain 6-fold coordinated during this evolution. With increasing OH availability in the solution, Cl{sup {minus}} anions tend gradually to be exchanged for (O, OH, OH{sub 2}) ligands. Below OH/Fe = 1, no structural order is detected beyond the first coordination sphere. Above this ratio, two Fe-Fe distances at 3.05 {angstrom} and 3.44 {angstrom} are observed and correspond to the presence of edge- and vertex-sharing Fe-octahedra. XAS results show that ferric gels and highly polymerized aqueous species are short-range ordered. The main contribution to disorder in the gels arises from the small size of coherently scattering domains also responsible for their X-ray amorphous character. From the initial to the final stage of hydrolysis, particles possess a nearly spherical shape with a minimum average diameter ranging from 10-30 {angstrom} for polymers formed from chloride and nitrate solutions. As polymerization proceeds, the local order extends to several tens of angstroms and the particle structures becomes progressively closer to that of akaganeite ({beta}-FeOOH) or goethite ({alpha}-FeOOH). This local structure is distinct from that of the lepidocrocite ({gamma}-FeOOH)-like structure of ferric gels precipitated after oxidation of divalent Fe solutions. The growth of the crystalline Fe-oxyhydroxides from gels takes place by the progressive long-range ordering in the ferric polymers without modifying the short-range order around Fe.

  19. Total X-ray scattering, EXAFS, and Mössbauer spectroscopy analyses of amorphous ferric arsenate and amorphous ferric phosphate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mikutta, Christian; Schröder, Christian; Marc Michel, F.

    2014-09-01

    Amorphous ferric arsenate (AFA, FeAsO4·xH2O) is an important As precipitate in a range of oxic As-rich environments, especially acidic sulfide-bearing mine wastes. Its structure has been proposed to consist of small polymers of single corner-sharing FeO6 octahedra (rFe-Fe ∼3.6 Å) to which arsenate is attached as a monodentate binuclear 2C complex (‘chain model’). Here, we analyzed the structure of AFA and analogously prepared amorphous ferric phosphates (AFP, FePO4·xH2O) by a combination of high-energy total X-ray scattering, Fe K-edge X-ray absorption spectroscopy, and 57Fe Mössbauer spectroscopy. Pair distribution function (PDF) analysis of total X-ray scattering data revealed that the coherently scattering domain size of AFA and AFP is about 8 Å. The PDFs of AFA lacked Fe-Fe pair correlations at r ∼3.6 Å indicative of single corner-sharing FeO6 octahedra, which strongly supports a local scorodite (FeAsO4·2H2O) structure. Likewise, the PDFs and Fe K-edge extended X-ray absorption fine structure data of AFP were consistent with a local strengite (FePO4·2H2O) structure of isolated FeO6 octahedra being corner-linked to PO4 tetrahedra (rFe-P = 3.25(1) Å). Mössbauer spectroscopy analyses of AFA and AFP indicated a strong superparamagnetism. While AFA only showed a weak onset of magnetic hyperfine splitting at 5 K, magnetic ordering of AFP was completely absent at this temperature. Mössbauer spectroscopy may thus offer a convenient way to identify and quantify AFA and AFP in mineral mixtures containing poorly crystalline Fe(III)-oxyhydroxides. In summary, our results imply a close structural relationship between AFA and AFP and suggest that these amorphous materials serve as templates for the formation of scorodite and strengite (phosphosiderite) in strongly acidic low-temperature environments.

  20. Eugenol dilates mesenteric arteries and reduces systemic BP by activating endothelial cell TRPV4 channels

    PubMed Central

    Peixoto-Neves, Dieniffer; Wang, Qian; Leal-Cardoso, Jose H; Rossoni, Luciana V; Jaggar, Jonathan H

    2015-01-01

    Background and Purpose Eugenol, a vanilloid molecule found in some dietary plants, relaxes vasculature in part via an endothelium-dependent process; however, the mechanisms involved are unclear. Here, we investigated the endothelial cell-mediated mechanism by which eugenol modulates rat mesenteric artery contractility and systemic BP. Experimental Approach The isometric tension of rat mesenteric arteries (size 200–300 μm) was measured using wire myography; non-selective cation currents (ICat) were recorded in endothelial cells using patch clamp electrophysiology. Mean arterial pressure (MAP) and heart rate (HR) were determined in anaesthetized rats. Key Results Eugenol relaxed endothelium-intact arteries in a concentration-dependent manner and this effect was attenuated by endothelium denudation. L-NAME, a NOS inhibitor, a combination of TRAM-34 and apamin, selective blockers of intermediate and small conductance Ca2+-activated K+ channels, respectively, and HC-067047, a TRPV4 channel inhibitor, but not indomethacin, a COX inhibitor, reduced eugenol-induced relaxation in endothelium-intact arteries. Eugenol activated HC-067047-sensitive ICat in mesenteric artery endothelial cells. Short interfering RNA (siRNA)-mediated TRPV4 knockdown abolished eugenol-induced ICat activation. An i.v. injection of eugenol caused an immediate, transient reduction in both MAP and HR, which was followed by prolonged, sustained hypotension in anaesthetized rats. This sustained hypotension was blocked by HC-067047. Conclusions and Implications Eugenol activates TRPV4 channels in mesenteric artery endothelial cells, leading to vasorelaxation, and reduces systemic BP in vivo. Eugenol may be therapeutically useful as an antihypertensive agent and is a viable molecular candidate from which to develop second-generation TRPV4 channel activators that reduce BP. PMID:25832173

  1. Enzymatic activation of cellulose acetate membrane for reducing of protein fouling.

    PubMed

    Koseoglu-Imer, Derya Y; Dizge, Nadir; Koyuncu, Ismail

    2012-04-01

    In this study, the surface of cellulose acetate (CA) ultrafiltration membrane was activated with serine protease (Savinase) enzyme to reduce protein fouling. Enzyme molecules were covalently immobilized with glutaraldehyde (cross-linking agent) onto the surface of CA membranes. The membrane activation was verified using filtration experiments and morphological analysis. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) images and attenuated total reflectance Fourier transform infrared (ATR-FTIR) spectroscopy of the activated membrane when compared with raw membrane were confirmed that the enzyme was immobilized onto the membrane surface. The immobilization efficiencies changed from 13.2 to 41.2% according to the enzyme ratios from 2.5 to 10.0 mg/mL. However, the permeability values decreased from 232±6 to 121±4 L/m(2) h bar with increasing enzyme concentration from 2.5 to 10.0 mg/mL. In fouling experiments, bovine serum albumin (BSA) was used as the protein model solution and activated sludge was used as the model biological sludge. Enzyme-activated membranes exhibited good filtration performances and protein rejection efficiencies were compared with raw CA membrane. Also the relative flux reduction (RFR) ratios of membranes were calculated as 97% and 88% for raw CA and enzyme-activated membranes (5 mg/mL savinase), respectively. The membrane activated with Savinase enzyme could be proposed as a surface treatment method before filtration to mitigate protein fouling. PMID:22218336

  2. α-Mangostin Reduced ER Stress-mediated Tumor Growth through Autophagy Activation

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Sung-Jin; Hong, Eun-Hye; Lee, Bo-Ra; Park, Moon-Ho; Kim, Ji-Won; Pyun, A-Rim; Kim, Yeon-Jeong; Chang, Sun-Young; Chin, Young-Won

    2012-01-01

    α-Mangostin is a xanthon derivative contained in the fruit hull of mangosteen (Garcinia mangostana L.), and the administration of α-Mangostin inhibited the growth of transplanted colon cancer, Her/CT26 cells which expressed Her-2/neu as tumor antigen. Although α-Mangostin was reported to have inhibitory activity against sarco/endoplasmic reticulum Ca2+ ATPase like thapsigargin, it showed different activity for autophagy regulation. In the current study, we found that α-Mangostin induced autophagy activation in mouse intestinal epithelial cells, as GFP-LC3 transgenic mice were orally administered with 20 mg/kg of α-Mangostin daily for three days. However, the activation of autophagy by α-Mangostin did not significantly increase OVA-specific T cell proliferation. As we assessed ER stress by using XBP-1 reporter system and phosphorylation of eIF2α, thapsigargin-induced ER stress was significantly reduced by α-Mangostin. However, coadministration of thapsigargin with α-Mangostin completely blocked the antitumor activity of α-Mangostin, suggesting ER stress with autophagy blockade accelerated tumor growth in mouse colon cancer model. Thus the antitumor activity of α-Mangostin can be ascribable to the autophagy activation rather than ER stress induction. PMID:23396851

  3. Spectroscopic studies on the antioxidant activity of ellagic acid.

    PubMed

    Kilic, Ismail; Yeşiloğlu, Yeşim; Bayrak, Yüksel

    2014-09-15

    Ellagic acid (EA, C14H6O8) is a natural dietary polyphenol whose benefits in a variety of diseases shown in epidemiological and experimental studies involve anti-inflammation, anti-proliferation, anti-angiogenesis, anticarcinogenesis and anti-oxidation properties. In vitro radical scavenging and antioxidant capacity of EA were clarified using different analytical methodologies such as total antioxidant activity determination by ferric thiocyanate, hydrogen peroxide scavenging, 1,1-diphenyl-2-picryl-hydrazyl free radical (DPPH) scavenging, 2,2'-azino-bis(3-ethylbenzthiazoline-6-sulfonic acid) (ABTS) radical scavenging activity and superoxide anion radical scavenging, ferrous ions (Fe2+) chelating activity and ferric ions (Fe3+) reducing ability. EA inhibited 71.2% lipid peroxidation of a linoleic acid emulsion at 45 μg/mL concentration. On the other hand, butylated hydroxytoluene (BHT), butylated hydroxyanisole (BHA), α-tocopherol and ascorbic acid displayed 69.8%, 66.8%, 64.5% and 59.7% inhibition on the peroxidation of linoleic acid emulsion at the same concentration, respectively. In addition, EA had an effective DPPH• scavenging, ABTS+ scavenging, superoxide anion radical scavenging, hydrogen peroxide scavenging, ferric ions (Fe3+) reducing power and ferrous ions (Fe2+) chelating activities. Also, those various antioxidant activities were compared to BHA, BHT, α-tocopherol and ascorbic acid as references antioxidant compounds. These results suggested that EA can be used in the pharmacological, food industry and medicine because of these properties. PMID:24813273

  4. Spectroscopic studies on the antioxidant activity of ellagic acid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kilic, Ismail; Yeşiloğlu, Yeşim; Bayrak, Yüksel

    2014-09-01

    Ellagic acid (EA, C14H6O8) is a natural dietary polyphenol whose benefits in a variety of diseases shown in epidemiological and experimental studies involve anti-inflammation, anti-proliferation, anti-angiogenesis, anticarcinogenesis and anti-oxidation properties. In vitro radical scavenging and antioxidant capacity of EA were clarified using different analytical methodologies such as total antioxidant activity determination by ferric thiocyanate, hydrogen peroxide scavenging, 1,1-diphenyl-2-picryl-hydrazyl free radical (DPPH) scavenging, 2,2‧-azino-bis(3-ethylbenzthiazoline-6-sulfonic acid) (ABTS) radical scavenging activity and superoxide anion radical scavenging, ferrous ions (Fe2+) chelating activity and ferric ions (Fe3+) reducing ability. EA inhibited 71.2% lipid peroxidation of a linoleic acid emulsion at 45 μg/mL concentration. On the other hand, butylated hydroxytoluene (BHT), butylated hydroxyanisole (BHA), α-tocopherol and ascorbic acid displayed 69.8%, 66.8%, 64.5% and 59.7% inhibition on the peroxidation of linoleic acid emulsion at the same concentration, respectively. In addition, EA had an effective DPPH• scavenging, ABTSrad + scavenging, superoxide anion radical scavenging, hydrogen peroxide scavenging, ferric ions (Fe3+) reducing power and ferrous ions (Fe2+) chelating activities. Also, those various antioxidant activities were compared to BHA, BHT, α-tocopherol and ascorbic acid as references antioxidant compounds. These results suggested that EA can be used in the pharmacological, food industry and medicine because of these properties.

  5. RATES OF HYDROUS FERRIC OXIDE CRYSTALLIZATION AND THE INFLUENCE ON COPRECIPITATED ARSENATE: JOURNAL ARTICLE

    EPA Science Inventory

    NRMRL-ADA-02101 Ford*, R. Rates of Hydrous Ferric Oxide Crystallization and the Influence on Coprecipitated Arsenate. Environmental Science & Technology 36 (11):2459-2463 (2002). EPA/600/J-02/240. Arsenate coprecipitated with hydrous fer...

  6. Amelioration of ferric nitrilotriacetate-induced hepatotoxicity in Wistar rats by diallylsulfide.

    PubMed

    Ansar, S; Iqbal, M

    2016-03-01

    Garlic contains diallylsulfide (DAS) and other structurally related compounds that are widely believed to be active agents in preventing cancer. This study shows the effect of DAS (a phenolic antioxidant used in foods, cosmetics, and pharmaceutical products) on ferric nitrilotriacetate (Fe-NTA)-induced hepatotoxicity in rats. Male albino rats of Wistar strain weighing 125-150 g were given a single dose of Fe-NTA (9 mg kg(-1) body weight, intraperitoneally) after 1 week of treatment with 100 and 200 mg kg(-1) DAS in corn oil respectively administered through the gavage. Fe-NTA administration led to 2.5-fold increase in the values of both alanine transaminase and aspartate aminotransferase, respectively, and 3.2-fold increase in the activity of lactate dehydrogenase, microsomal lipid peroxidation to approximately 2.0-fold compared to saline-treated control. The activities of glutathione (GSH) and other antioxidant enzymes decreased to a range of 2.2-2.5-fold. These changes were reversed significantly (p < 0.001) in animals receiving a pretreatment of DAS. DAS protected against hepatic lipid peroxidation, hydrogen peroxide generation, preserved GSH levels, and GSH metabolizing enzymes to 60-80% as compared to Fe-NTA alone-treated group. Present data suggest that DAS can ameliorate the toxic effects of Fe-NTA and suppress oxidant-induced tissue injury and hepatotoxicity in rats. PMID:25904316

  7. A Forecast of Reduced Solar Activity and Its Implications for NASA

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schatten, Kenneth; Franz, Heather

    2005-01-01

    The "Solar Dynamo" method of solar activity forecasting is reviewed. Known generically as a 'precursor" method, insofar as it uses observations which precede solar activity generation, this method now uses the Solar Dynamo Amplitude (SODA) Index to estimate future long-term solar activity. The peak amplitude of the next solar cycle (#24), is estimated at roughly 124 in terms of smoothed F10.7 Radio Flux and 74 in terms of the older, more traditional smoothed international or Zurich Sunspot number (Ri or Rz). These values are significantly smaller than the amplitudes of recent solar cycles. Levels of activity stay large for about four years near the peak in smoothed activity, which is estimated to occur near the 2012 timeflame. Confidence is added to the prediction of low activity by numerous examinations of the Sun s weakened polar field. Direct measurements are obtained by the Mount Wilson Solar Observatory and the Wilcox Solar Observatory. Further support is obtained by examining the Sun s polar faculae (bright features), the shape of coronal soft X-ray "holes," and the shape of the "source surface" - a calculated coronal feature which maps the large scale structure of the Sun s field. These features do not show the characteristics of well-formed polar coronal holes associated with typical solar minima. They show stunted polar field levels, which are thought to result in stunted levels of solar activity during solar cycle #24. The reduced levels of solar activity would have concomitant effects upon the space environment in which satellites orbit. In particular, the largest influences would affect orbit determination of satellites in LEO (Low Earth Orbit), based upon the altered thermospheric and exospheric densities. A decrease in solar activity would result in smaller satellite decay rates, as well as fewer large solar events that can destroy satellite electronic functions. Other effects of reduced solar activity upon the space environment include enhanced

  8. Method of treating inflammatory diseases using a radiolabeled ferric hydroxide calloid

    DOEpatents

    Atcher, Robert W.; Hines, John J.

    1992-01-01

    A ferric hydroxide colloid having an alpha-emitting radionuclide essentially on the outer surfaces and a method of forming same. The method includes oxidizing a ferrous hydroxide to ferric hydroxide in the presence of a preselected radionuclide to form a colloid having the radionuclide on the outer surface thereof, and thereafter washing the colloid, and suspending the washed colloid in a suitable solution. The labelled colloid is useful in cancer therapy and for the treatment of inflamed joints.

  9. Nitrogenase Activity Is Affected by Reduced Partial Pressures of N2 and NO3- 1.

    PubMed Central

    Blumenthal, J. M.; Russelle, M. P.; Vance, C. P.

    1997-01-01

    Optimal use of legumes in cropping systems requires a thorough understanding of the interaction between inorganic N nutrition and symbiotic N2 fixation. Our objective was to test the hypothesis that increased NO3- uptake by alfalfa (Medicago sativa L.) would compensate for lower N2 fixation caused by low partial pressure of N2. Root systems of hydroponically grown alfalfa at 2 mg L-1 NO3--N were exposed to (a) 80% N2, (b) 7% N2, (c) 2% N2, or (d) 0% N2. Exposure to reduced partial pressures of N2 reduced total nitrogenase activity (TNA, measured as H2 production in 20% O2 and 80% Ar) by 40% within less than 30 min, followed by a recovery period over the next 30 min to initial activity. Five hours after treatments began, the TNA of plants exposed to 7 and 2% N2 was substantially higher than pretreatment activities, whereas the TNA of plants exposed either to 0 or 80% N2 did not differ from pretreatment values. The decline in TNA due to NO3- exposure over 4 d was not affected by reduced partial pressure of N2. During the 1st h the proportion of electrons used for the reduction of N2 fell from 0.52 to 0.23 for plants exposed to 7% N2, and to 0.09 for plants exposed to 2% N2, and remained unchanged for the rest of the experiment. Although the hypothesis that alfalfa compensated with increased NO3- uptake for lower N2 fixation was not validated by our results, we unexpectedly demonstrated that the decline in TNA upon exposure to NO3- was independent of the N2-fixing efficiency (i.e. the amount of N2 reduced by nitrogenase) of the symbiosis. PMID:12223779

  10. Greater positive schizotypy relates to reduced N100 activity during rejection scenes.

    PubMed

    Premkumar, Preethi; Onwumere, Juliana; Wilson, Daniel; Sumich, Alexander; Castro, Antonio; Kumari, Veena; Kuipers, Elizabeth

    2014-08-01

    Social anxiety due to rejection sensitivity (RS) exacerbates psychosis-like experiences in the general population. While reduced dorsal anterior cingulate cortex (dACC) activity during social rejection in high schizotypy has suggested self-distancing from rejection, earlier stages of mental processing such as feature encoding could also contribute to psychosis-like experiences. This study aimed to determine the stage of mental processing of social rejection that relates to positive schizotypy. Forty-one healthy participants were assessed for schizotypy and RS. Event-related potential amplitudes (ERPs) were measured at frontal, temporal and parieto-occipital sites and their cortical sources (dACC, temporal pole and lingual gyrus) at early (N100) and late (P300 and late slow wave, LSW) timeframes during rejection, acceptance and neutral scenes. ERPs were compared between social interaction types. Correlations were performed between positive schizotypy (defined as the presence of perceptual aberrations, hallucinatory experiences and magical thinking), RS and ERPs during rejection. Amplitude was greater during rejection than acceptance or neutral conditions at the dACC-P300, parieto-occipital-P300, dACC-LSW and frontal-LSW. RS correlated positively with positive schizotypy. Reduced dACC N100 activity during rejection correlated with greater positive schizotypy and RS. Reduced dACC N100 activity and greater RS independently predicted positive schizotypy. An N100 deficit that indicates reduced feature encoding of rejection scenes increases with greater positive schizotypy and RS. Higher RS shows that a greater tendency to misattribute ambiguous social situations as rejecting also increases with positive schizotypy. These two processes, namely primary bottom-up sensory processing and secondary misattribution of rejection, combine to increase psychosis-like experiences. PMID:25010933

  11. Darapladib, a Lipoprotein-Associated Phospholipase A2 Inhibitor, Reduces Rho Kinase Activity in Atherosclerosis

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Dong-Ling; Liu, Xiao-Bo; Bi, Shao-jie; Zhao, Tong; Sui, Shu-Jian; Ji, Xiao-Ping

    2016-01-01

    Purpose Increased lipoprotein-associated phospholipase A2 (Lp-PLA2) activity and Rho kinase activity may be associated with atherosclerosis. The principal aim of this study was to examine whether darapladib (a selective Lp-PLA2 inhibitor) could reduce the elevated Lp-PLA2 and Rho kinase activity in atherosclerosis. Materials and Methods Studies were performed in male Sprague-Dawley rats. The atherosclerosis rats were prepared by feeding them with a high-cholesterol diet for 10 weeks. Low-dose darapladib (25 mg·kg-1·d-1) and high-dose darapladib (50 mg·kg-1·d-1) interventions were then administered over the course of 2 weeks. Results The serum levels of triglycerides, total cholesterol (TC), low-density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDL-C), high-density lipoprotein cholesterol (HDL-C), high-sensitivity C-reactive protein (hs-CRP), and Lp-PLA2, significantly increased in atherosclerosis model groups, as did Rho kinase activity and cardiomyocyte apoptosis (p<0.05 vs. sham group), whereas nitric oxide (NO) production was reduced. Levels of TC, LDL-C, CRP, Lp-PLA2, and Rho kinase activity were respectively reduced in darapladib groups, whereas NO production was enhanced. When compared to the low-dose darapladib group, the reduction of the levels of TC, LDL-C, CRP, and Lp-PLA2 was more prominent in the high-dose darapladib group (p<0.05), and the increase of NO production was more prominent (p<0.05). Cardiomyocyte apoptosis of the high-dose darapladib group was also significantly reduced compared to the low-dose darapladib group (p<0.05). However, there was no significant difference in Rho kinase activity between the low-dose darapladib group and the high-dose darapladib group (p>0.05). Conclusion Darapladib, a Lp-PLA2 inhibitor, leads to cardiovascular protection that might be mediated by its inhibition of both Rho kinase and Lp-PLA2 in atherosclerosis. PMID:26847282

  12. Active shielding to reduce low frequency disturbances in direct current near biomagnetic measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Platzek, D.; Nowak, H.; Giessler, F.; Röther, J.; Eiselt, M.

    1999-05-01

    Measurements of dc near biomagnetic fields are disturbed by low frequency noise that is not reduced sufficiently by most of the magnetically shielded rooms or gradiometers. For this reason an active shielding system has been developed at the Biomagnetic Center of the University of Jena. This work describes the principle of the active shielding system and demonstrates its properties concerning the attenuation of disturbing fields, frequency range, and some applications in biomedical measurements. We achieved a reduction of external low frequency magnetic fields by more than 50 dB and an attenuation of the field gradient by about 25 dB. This active shielding enables measurements of near dc biomagnetic fields in investigations of periinfarct depolarizations after ischemic stroke and spreading depression in migraine patients.

  13. A transgenic apple callus showing reduced polyphenol oxidase activity and lower browning potential.

    PubMed

    Murata, M; Nishimura, M; Murai, N; Haruta, M; Homma, S; Itoh, Y

    2001-02-01

    Polyphenol oxidase (PPO) is responsible for enzymatic browning of apples. Apples lacking PPO activity might be useful not only for the food industry but also for studies of the metabolism of polyphenols and the function of PPO. Transgenic apple calli were prepared by using Agrobacterium tumefaciens carrying the kanamycin (KM) resistant gene and antisense PPO gene. Four KM-resistant callus lines were obtained from 356 leaf explants. Among these transgenic calli, three calli grew on the medium containing KM at the same rate as non-transgenic callus on the medium without KM. One callus line had an antisense PPO gene, in which the amount and activity of PPO were reduced to half the amount and activity in non-transgenic callus. The browning potential of this line, which was estimated by adding chlorogenic acid, was also half the browning potential of non-transgenic callus. PMID:11302173

  14. Carbamazepine-induced hemolytic and aplastic crises associated with reduced glutathione peroxidase activity of erythrocytes.

    PubMed

    Yamamoto, Masaki; Suzuki, Nobuhiro; Hatakeyama, Naoki; Kubo, Noriaki; Tachi, Nobutada; Kanno, Hitoshi; Fujii, Hisaichi; Tsutsumi, Hiroyuki

    2007-11-01

    Although pure red cell aplasia is a well-known side effect of carbamazepine treatment, intravascular hemolytic anemia is rare. We describe a 5-year-old boy who developed concurrent intravascular hemolytic anemia and erythroblastopenia, probably due to carbamazepine. Carbamazepine treatment was subsequently discontinued, and the patient was treated with red blood cell transfusions, haptoglobin, and methylprednisolone. His hematologic abnormalities were almost fully recovered within 2 weeks. Examination of the patient's and mother's erythrocyte enzyme activities revealed mildly decreased erythrocyte glutathione peroxidase (GSH-Px) activity. We speculate that patients with reduced GSH-Px activity are at a high risk of developing carbamazepine-induced hemolytic crisis and/or aplastic crisis. PMID:18055338

  15. Potential association of reduced cholinesterase activity with Trypanosoma evansi pathogenesis in buffaloes.

    PubMed

    Singh, Shanker K; Singh, Vivek K; Yadav, Brajesh K; Nakade, Udayraj P; Kumari, Priyambada; Srivastava, Mukesh K; Sharma, Abhishek; Choudhary, Soumen; Swain, Dilip; Garg, Satish K

    2016-07-30

    The present study aimed to investigate the association of cholinesterase activity with trypanosomosis in buffaloes. Thirty-three clinical cases of trypanosomosis in water buffaloes, found positive for trypomastigotes of T. evansi on blood smear examination, were divided into two groups based on clinical manifestations. Twenty diseased buffaloes revealing only common clinical signs were allocated to Group I, while the remaining 13 buffaloes showing common clinical manifestations along with neurological disturbances were allocated to Group II. Twelve clinically healthy buffaloes, free from any haemoprotozoa infection, were kept as healthy control (Group III). Blood samples were collected from buffaloes of all three groups to determine serum cholinesterase activity. Compared to buffaloes of healthy control group, cholinesterase activity in T. evansi-infected buffaloes of Group I and II was significantly (P<0.001) lower. However, no significant difference was observed in cholinesterase activity between the T. evansi-infected buffaloes exhibiting neurological disorders and no neurological disorders. Summing up, reduced cholinesterase activity seems to be associated with the pathogenesis of natural T. evansi infection and its clinical manifestations in buffaloes possibly by evading immune response. Further studies are warranted on association of cholinesterase activity in T. evansi-infected buffaloes with neurological disorders. PMID:27369572

  16. Adipose Mesenchymal Stromal Cells Isolated From Type 2 Diabetic Patients Display Reduced Fibrinolytic Activity

    PubMed Central

    Acosta, Lourdes; Hmadcha, Abdelkrim; Escacena, Natalia; Pérez-Camacho, Inmaculada; de la Cuesta, Antonio; Ruiz-Salmeron, Rafael; Gauthier, Benoit R.; Soria, Bernat

    2013-01-01

    Stem cells have been successfully used for the treatment of critical limb ischemia (CLI). We conducted a clinical trial to determine the feasibility of using autologous adipose-derived mesenchymal stromal cells (AdMSCs) for the treatment of CLI. Unexpectedly, two diabetic patients developed peripheral microthrombosis. This adverse effect, which contrasts with the reported antithrombotic properties of MSCs, may stem from the diabetic environment that alters the fibrinolytic activity of AdMSCs, thereby increasing the probability of developing thrombosis. Here, we confirm this premise by demonstrating that diabetic AdMSCs cultured in the presence of blood sera expressed and released higher levels of plasminogen activator inhibitor type 1, reduced levels of tissue plasminogen activator, and lower d-dimer formation compared with nondiabetic AdMSCs. Thus, to establish an appropriate cell therapy for diabetic patients, we recommend including new preclinical safety tests, such as the d-dimer and/or the tissue plasminogen activator-to-plasminogen activator inhibitor type 1 ratio tests, to assess fibrinolytic activity of cells before implantation. PMID:24043757

  17. Simulated microgravity alters multipotential differentiation of rat mesenchymal stem cells in association with reduced telomerase activity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Lianwen; Gan, Bo; Fan, Yubo; Xie, Tian; Hu, Qinghua; Zhuang, Fengyuan

    Microgravity is one of the most important characteristics in space flight. Exposure to microgravity results in extensive physiological changes in humans. Bone loss is one of the changes with serious consequences; however, the mechanism retains unclear. As the origin of osteoprogenitors, mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) may play an important role in it. After cultured under simulated microgravity (in a rotary cell culture system, RCCS), MSCs were stained using oil red O to identify adipocytes. The mRNA level of bone morphogenetic protein (BMP)-2 and peroxisome proliferators-activated receptor (PPAR) γ2 was determined by RT-PCR. Otherwise, MSCs were induced to osteogenic differentiation after microgravity culture, and then the activity of alkaline phosphatase (ALP) was determined by PNPP and the content of osteocalcin (OC) by ELISA. Furthermore, the telomerase activity in MSCs was measured by TRAP. The results showed that simulated microgravity inhibited osteoblastic differentiation and induced adipogenic differentiation accompanied by the change of gene expression of BMP-2 and PPARγ2 in MSCs. Meanwhile, the telomerase activity decreased significantly in MSCs under simulated microgravity. The reduced bone formation in space flight may partly be due to the altered potential differentiation of MSCs associated with telomerase activity which plays a key role in regulating the lifespan of cell proliferation and differentiation. Therefore, telomerase activation/replacement may act as a potential countermeasure for microgravity-induced bone loss.

  18. Characterization of Triosephosphate Isomerase Mutants with Reduced Enzyme Activity in Mus Musculus

    PubMed Central

    Merkle, S.; Pretsch, W.

    1989-01-01

    Four heterozygous triosephosphate isomerase (TPI) mutants with approximately 50% reduced activity in blood compared to wild type were detected in offspring of 1-ethyl-1-nitrosourea treated male mice. Breeding experiments displayed an autosomal, dominant mode of inheritance for the mutations. All mutations were found to be homozygous lethal at an early postimplantation stage of embryonic development, probably due to a total lack of TPI activity and consequently to the inability to utilize glucose as a source of metabolic energy. Although activity alteration was also found in liver, lung, kidney, spleen, heart, brain and muscle the TPI deficiency in heterozygotes has no influence on the following physiological traits: hematological parameters, plasma glucose, glucose consumption of blood cells, body weight and organo-somatic indices of liver, spleen, heart, kidney and lung. Biochemical investigations of TPI in the four mutant lines indicated no difference of physicochemical properties compared to the wild type. Results from immunoinactivation assays indicate that the decrease of enzyme activity corresponds to a decrease in the level of an immunologically active moiety. It is suggested that the mutations have affected the Tpi-1 structural locus and resulted in alleles which produce no detectable enzyme activity and no immunologically cross-reacting material. The study furthermore suggests one functional TPI gene per haploid genome in the erythrocyte and seven other tested organs of the mouse. PMID:2693209

  19. Ferric-Pyoverdine Recognition by Fpv Outer Membrane Proteins of Pseudomonas protegens Pf-5

    PubMed Central

    Hartney, Sierra L.; Mazurier, Sylvie; Girard, Maëva K.; Mehnaz, Samina; Davis, Edward W.; Gross, Harald; Lemanceau, Philippe

    2013-01-01

    The soil bacterium Pseudomonas protegens Pf-5 (previously called P. fluorescens Pf-5) produces two siderophores, enantio-pyochelin and a compound in the large and diverse pyoverdine family. Using high-resolution mass spectroscopy, we determined the structure of the pyoverdine produced by Pf-5. In addition to producing its own siderophores, Pf-5 also utilizes ferric complexes of some pyoverdines produced by other strains of Pseudomonas spp. as sources of iron. Previously, phylogenetic analysis of the 45 TonB-dependent outer membrane proteins in Pf-5 indicated that six are in a well-supported clade with ferric-pyoverdine receptors (Fpvs) from other Pseudomonas spp. We used a combination of phylogenetics, bioinformatics, mutagenesis, pyoverdine structural determinations, and cross-feeding bioassays to assign specific ferric-pyoverdine substrates to each of the six Fpvs of Pf-5. We identified at least one ferric-pyoverdine that was taken up by each of the six Fpvs of Pf-5. Functional redundancy of the Pf-5 Fpvs was also apparent, with some ferric-pyoverdines taken up by all mutants with a single Fpv deletion but not by a mutant having deletions in two of the Fpv-encoding genes. Finally, we demonstrated that phylogenetically related Fpvs take up ferric complexes of structurally related pyoverdines, thereby establishing structure-function relationships that can be employed in the future to predict the pyoverdine substrates of Fpvs in other Pseudomonas spp. PMID:23222724

  20. Ferric-pyoverdine recognition by Fpv outer membrane proteins of Pseudomonas protegens Pf-5.

    PubMed

    Hartney, Sierra L; Mazurier, Sylvie; Girard, Maëva K; Mehnaz, Samina; Davis, Edward W; Gross, Harald; Lemanceau, Philippe; Loper, Joyce E

    2013-02-01

    The soil bacterium Pseudomonas protegens Pf-5 (previously called P. fluorescens Pf-5) produces two siderophores, enantio-pyochelin and a compound in the large and diverse pyoverdine family. Using high-resolution mass spectroscopy, we determined the structure of the pyoverdine produced by Pf-5. In addition to producing its own siderophores, Pf-5 also utilizes ferric complexes of some pyoverdines produced by other strains of Pseudomonas spp. as sources of iron. Previously, phylogenetic analysis of the 45 TonB-dependent outer membrane proteins in Pf-5 indicated that six are in a well-supported clade with ferric-pyoverdine receptors (Fpvs) from other Pseudomonas spp. We used a combination of phylogenetics, bioinformatics, mutagenesis, pyoverdine structural determinations, and cross-feeding bioassays to assign specific ferric-pyoverdine substrates to each of the six Fpvs of Pf-5. We identified at least one ferric-pyoverdine that was taken up by each of the six Fpvs of Pf-5. Functional redundancy of the Pf-5 Fpvs was also apparent, with some ferric-pyoverdines taken up by all mutants with a single Fpv deletion but not by a mutant having deletions in two of the Fpv-encoding genes. Finally, we demonstrated that phylogenetically related Fpvs take up ferric complexes of structurally related pyoverdines, thereby establishing structure-function relationships that can be employed in the future to predict the pyoverdine substrates of Fpvs in other Pseudomonas spp. PMID:23222724

  1. Effect of liposome-albumin coatings on ferric ion retention and release from chitosan beads.

    PubMed

    Chandy, T; Sharma, C P

    1996-01-01

    Ferric chloride was embedded in a chitosan matrix to develop a prolonged-release form. The in vitro release profiles of ferric ions from chitosan beads were monitored in 0.1 M Tris-HCl buffer, pH 7.4, using a UV spectrophotometer. The amount of drug release was much higher initially, followed by a constant slow release profile for a prolonged period. The initial burst release was substantially modified with liposome and albumin coatings. From scanning electron microscope studies, it appears that the ferric ions diffuse out slowly to the dissolution medium through the micropores of the chitosan matrix. Further, the liposome forms a phospholipid membrane layer in the pores of chitosan beads and encapsulates the ferric ions within their vesicles and controls the release profile. The chitosan beads loaded with ferric ions substantially inhibited the polyurethane-associated calcification, in an in vitro model system. The released ferric ions, appeared to alter the protein-surface binding and improved the biocompatibility of the matrix. The results propose the possibility of modifying the polymer matrix to obtain a desired controlled release of the drug for a prolonged period. PMID:8962949

  2. Nitrogen doped carbon nanotubes with encapsulated ferric carbide as excellent electrocatalyst for oxygen reduction reaction in acid and alkaline media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhong, Guoyu; Wang, Hongjuan; Yu, Hao; Peng, Feng

    2015-07-01

    Nitrogen doped carbon nanotubes (NCNTs) with encapsulated Fe3C nanoparticles (Fe3C@NCNTs) are synthesized by a simple direct pyrolysis of melamine and ferric chloride. The characterization results reveal that Fe3C is mainly encapsulated in the interior of NCNTs and N species is mainly distributed on the outside surface of NCNTs. Iron and iron carbide catalyze the growth of NCNTs and are wrapped by carbon to form Fe3C@NCNTs. The as-prepared Fe3C@NCNTs catalyst exhibits superior oxygen reduction reaction (ORR) activity, excellent methanol tolerance and long-term stability in both acid and alkaline media. It is proven that the doped N is the main active site for ORR and the inner Fe3C with outside carbon form the synergetic active site to enhance ORR activity. The ORR mechanism of direct four electron transfer pathway is proved in acid and alkaline media.

  3. Hydrogen sulfide reduces serum triglyceride by activating liver autophagy via the AMPK-mTOR pathway.

    PubMed

    Sun, Li; Zhang, Song; Yu, Chengyuan; Pan, Zhenwei; Liu, Yang; Zhao, Jing; Wang, Xiaoyu; Yun, Fengxiang; Zhao, Hongwei; Yan, Sen; Yuan, Yue; Wang, Dingyu; Ding, Xue; Liu, Guangzhong; Li, Wenpeng; Zhao, Xuezhu; Liu, Zhaorui; Li, Yue

    2015-12-01

    Autophagy plays an important role in liver triglyceride (TG) metabolism. Inhibition of autophagy could reduce the clearance of TG in the liver. Hydrogen sulfide (H2S) is a potent stimulator of autophagic flux. Recent studies showed H2S is protective against hypertriglyceridemia (HTG) and noalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD), while the mechanism remains to be explored. Here, we tested the hypothesis that H2S reduces serum TG level and ameliorates NAFLD by stimulating liver autophagic flux by the AMPK-mTOR pathway. The level of serum H2S in patients with HTG was lower than that of control subjects. Sodium hydrosulfide (NaHS, H2S donor) markedly reduced serum TG levels of male C57BL/6 mice fed a high-fat diet (HFD), which was abolished by coadministration of chloroquine (CQ), an inhibitor of autophagic flux. In HFD mice, administration of NaSH increased the LC3BII-to-LC3BI ratio and decreased the p62 protein level. Meanwhile, NaSH increased the phosphorylation of AMPK and thus reduced the phosphorylation of mTOR in a Western blot study. In cultured LO2 cells, high-fat treatment reduced the ratio of LC3BII to LC3BI and the phosphorylation of AMPK, which were reversed by the coadministration of NaSH. Knockdown of AMPK by siRNA in LO2 cells blocked the autophagic enhancing effects of NaSH. The same qualitative effect was observed in AMPKα2(-/-) mice. These results for the first time demonstrated that H2S could reduce serum TG level and ameliorate NAFLD by activating liver autophagy via the AMPK-mTOR pathway. PMID:26442880

  4. Eleven-years-long record of ferric hydroxide sedimentation in Satsuma Iwo-Jima island, Kagoshima, Japan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ueshiba, T.; Kiyokawa, S.; Goto, S.; Oguri, K.; Ito, T.; Ikehara, M.; Yamaguchi, K. E.; Nagata, T.; Ninomiya, T.; Ikegami, F.

    2011-12-01

    Satsuma Iwo-Jima island is active in volcanic activity located about 40 km south of Kyushu Island, Japan. It has many hot springs, and is surrounded by patches of reddish brown and white colored seawater. Nagahama Bay, a small port located in the southern part of the island, retains reddish brown seawater and precipitates ferric hydroxide (Ninomiya and Kiyokawa, 2009). We conducted multidisciplinary study to investigate mechanisms and histories of precipitation of the sediments. From 2009 to 2011, we obtained 1.5m-long core samples in the bay that record sedimentation of mainly ferric hydroxide during the last 11~13 years since dredging in 1998. We compare their stratigraphy with (a) 11 years meteorological data and (b) volcanic activity record in that period. Stratigraphy: Thirteen short cores (<1m long) were collected from Nagahama Bay. The lower unit contains three layers of white and pink tuff beds (T1, T2 and T3) with thickness of 1~9cm. The upper unit mainly contains sand bed and reddish-brown mud. The tuff beds are mainly composed of volcanic glass. Sand bed is essentially a mixture of felsic rock fragments, volcanic glass, and ferric-rich fine materials. The reddish brown sediment between T1 and T2 has very fine orange-colored laminations (1~2mm thick/each). (a) Meteorological data: 11-years-long meteorological data of the Satsuma Iwo-Jima island suggest that heavy rainfalls (precipitation over 100mm/day) occurred in June 2000 (189mm/day), June 2001 (124.5mm/day), and June 2002 (122mm/day), and that three events of strong typhoon occurred in 2004 (maximum wind speed: 40.3m/s, 54.3m/s and 44.6m/s), 2005 (43.3m/s), and 2007 (50.2m/s). These meteorological events are reflected in, sometimes disturb, the sediment record. (b) Volcanic data: Volcanic activity has occurred from 1997 (Shinohara, 2002) to October 2004 (Japan Meteorological Agency, 2010). During that time, ash was spewed out from and deposited near the volcano. Tuffaceous beds in the sediments of

  5. Hyaluronan modulates TRPV1 channel opening, reducing peripheral nociceptor activity and pain

    PubMed Central

    Caires, Rebeca; Luis, Enoch; Taberner, Francisco J.; Fernandez-Ballester, Gregorio; Ferrer-Montiel, Antonio; Balazs, Endre A.; Gomis, Ana; Belmonte, Carlos; de la Peña, Elvira

    2015-01-01

    Hyaluronan (HA) is present in the extracellular matrix of all body tissues, including synovial fluid in joints, in which it behaves as a filter that buffers transmission of mechanical forces to nociceptor nerve endings thereby reducing pain. Using recombinant systems, mouse-cultured dorsal root ganglia (DRG) neurons and in vivo experiments, we found that HA also modulates polymodal transient receptor potential vanilloid subtype 1 (TRPV1) channels. HA diminishes heat, pH and capsaicin (CAP) responses, thus reducing the opening probability of the channel by stabilizing its closed state. Accordingly, in DRG neurons, HA decreases TRPV1-mediated impulse firing and channel sensitization by bradykinin. Moreover, subcutaneous HA injection in mice reduces heat and capsaicin nocifensive responses, whereas the intra-articular injection of HA in rats decreases capsaicin joint nociceptor fibres discharge. Collectively, these results indicate that extracellular HA reduces the excitability of the ubiquitous TRPV1 channel, thereby lowering impulse activity in the peripheral nociceptor endings underlying pain. PMID:26311398

  6. Dopamine D2/3 receptor antagonism reduces activity-based anorexia.

    PubMed

    Klenotich, S J; Ho, E V; McMurray, M S; Server, C H; Dulawa, S C

    2015-01-01

    Anorexia nervosa (AN) is an eating disorder characterized by severe hypophagia and weight loss, and an intense fear of weight gain. Activity-based anorexia (ABA) refers to the weight loss, hypophagia and paradoxical hyperactivity that develops in rodents exposed to running wheels and restricted food access, and provides a model for aspects of AN. The atypical antipsychotic olanzapine was recently shown to reduce both AN symptoms and ABA. We examined which component of the complex pharmacological profile of olanzapine reduces ABA. Mice received 5-HT(2A/2C), 5-HT3, dopamine D1-like, D2, D3 or D2/3 antagonist treatment, and were assessed for food intake, body weight, wheel running and survival in ABA. D2/3 receptor antagonists eticlopride and amisulpride reduced weight loss and hypophagia, and increased survival during ABA. Furthermore, amisulpride produced larger reductions in weight loss and hypophagia than olanzapine. Treatment with either D3 receptor antagonist SB277011A or D2 receptor antagonist L-741,626 also increased survival. All the other treatments either had no effect or worsened ABA. Overall, selective antagonism of D2 and/or D3 receptors robustly reduces ABA. Studies investigating the mechanisms by which D2 and/or D3 receptors regulate ABA, and the efficacy for D2/3 and/or D3 antagonists to treat AN, are warranted. PMID:26241351

  7. Dopamine D2/3 receptor antagonism reduces activity-based anorexia

    PubMed Central

    Klenotich, S J; Ho, E V; McMurray, M S; Server, C H; Dulawa, S C

    2015-01-01

    Anorexia nervosa (AN) is an eating disorder characterized by severe hypophagia and weight loss, and an intense fear of weight gain. Activity-based anorexia (ABA) refers to the weight loss, hypophagia and paradoxical hyperactivity that develops in rodents exposed to running wheels and restricted food access, and provides a model for aspects of AN. The atypical antipsychotic olanzapine was recently shown to reduce both AN symptoms and ABA. We examined which component of the complex pharmacological profile of olanzapine reduces ABA. Mice received 5-HT2A/2C, 5-HT3, dopamine D1-like, D2, D3 or D2/3 antagonist treatment, and were assessed for food intake, body weight, wheel running and survival in ABA. D2/3 receptor antagonists eticlopride and amisulpride reduced weight loss and hypophagia, and increased survival during ABA. Furthermore, amisulpride produced larger reductions in weight loss and hypophagia than olanzapine. Treatment with either D3 receptor antagonist SB277011A or D2 receptor antagonist L-741,626 also increased survival. All the other treatments either had no effect or worsened ABA. Overall, selective antagonism of D2 and/or D3 receptors robustly reduces ABA. Studies investigating the mechanisms by which D2 and/or D3 receptors regulate ABA, and the efficacy for D2/3 and/or D3 antagonists to treat AN, are warranted. PMID:26241351

  8. Bacteriophages of wastewater foaming-associated filamentous Gordonia reduce host levels in raw activated sludge

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Mei; Gill, Jason J.; Young, Ry; Summer, Elizabeth J.

    2015-01-01

    Filamentous bacteria are a normal and necessary component of the activated sludge wastewater treatment process, but the overgrowth of filamentous bacteria results in foaming and bulking associated disruptions. Bacteriophages, or phages, were investigated for their potential to reduce the titer of foaming bacteria in a mixed-microbial activated sludge matrix. Foaming-associated filamentous bacteria were isolated from activated sludge of a commercial wastewater treatment plan and identified as Gordonia species by 16S rDNA sequencing. Four representative phages were isolated that target G. malaquae and two un-named Gordonia species isolates. Electron microscopy revealed the phages to be siphophages with long tails. Three of the phages - GordTnk2, Gmala1, and GordDuk1 - had very similar ~76 kb genomes, with >93% DNA identity. These genomes shared limited synteny with Rhodococcus equi phage ReqiDocB7 and Gordonia phage GTE7. In contrast, the genome of phage Gsput1 was smaller (43 kb) and was not similar enough to any known phage to be placed within an established phage type. Application of these four phages at MOIs of 5–15 significantly reduced Gordonia host levels in a wastewater sludge model by approximately 10-fold as compared to non-phage treated reactors. Phage control was observed for nine days after treatment. PMID:26349678

  9. Quinone-mediated microbial synthesis of reduced graphene oxide with peroxidase-like activity.

    PubMed

    Liu, Guangfei; Zhang, Xin; Zhou, Jiti; Wang, Aijie; Wang, Jing; Jin, Ruofei; Lv, Hong

    2013-12-01

    The effects of different quinones on graphene oxide (GO) reduction by Shewanella oneidensis MR-1 and the peroxidase activity of the resultant reduced graphene oxide (QRGO) were studied. The presence of 100 μM anthraquinone-2-sulfonate (AQS), anthraquinone-2,6-disulfonate and 5-hydroxy-1,4-naphthoquinone could lead to 1.6-2.8-fold increase in GO reduction rate, whereas anthraquinone-2-carboxylate slowed down the reduction. The stimulating effects of AQS increased with the increase of its concentration (10-100 μM). The mediated effects were proved by direct GO reduction by microbially reduced AQS. The mediated reduction of GO to QRGO was characterized by UV-vis, XRD, FTIR, Raman spectra, XPS, TEM and AFM, respectively. The as-prepared QRGO possessed peroxidase-like activity, which could catalyze the oxidation of 3,3'5,5'-tetramethylbenzidine by H2O2, and followed Michealis-Menten kinetics. A colorimetric sensor for quantitative determination of glucose based on the peroxidase activity of QRGO was developed over a range of 1-120 μM with a detection limit of 1 μM. PMID:24140856

  10. Micro-structuring of polycarbonate-urethane surfaces in order to reduce platelet activation and adhesion.

    PubMed

    Clauser, Johanna; Gester, Kathrin; Roggenkamp, Jan; Mager, Ilona; Maas, Judith; Jansen, Sebastian V; Steinseifer, Ulrich

    2014-01-01

    In the development of new hemocompatible biomaterials, surface modification appears to be a suitable method in order to reduce the thrombogenetic potential of such materials. In this study, polycarbonate-urethane (PCU) tubes with different surface microstructures to be used for aortic heart valve models were investigated with regard to the thrombogenicity. The surface structures were produced by using a centrifugal casting process for manufacturing PCU tubes with defined casting mold surfaces which are conferred to the PCU surface during the process. Tubes with different structures defined by altering groove widths were cut into films and investigated under dynamic flow conditions in contact with porcine blood. The analysis was carried out by laser scanning microscopy which allowed for counting various morphological types of platelets with regard to the grade of activation. The comparison between plain and shaped PCU samples showed that the surface topography led to a decline of the activation of the coagulation cascade and thus to the reduction of the fibrin synthesis. Comparing different types of structures revealed that smooth structures with a small groove width (d ~ 3 μm) showed less platelet activation as well as less adhesion in contrast to a distinct wave structure (d ~ 90 μm). These results prove surface modification of polymer biomaterials to be a suitable method for reducing thrombogenicity and hence give reason for further alterations and improvements. PMID:24484511

  11. Mex3c mutation reduces adiposity partially through increasing physical activity.

    PubMed

    Han, Changjie; Jiao, Yan; Zhao, Qingguo; Lu, Baisong

    2014-06-01

    MEX3C is an RNA-binding protein with unknown physiological function. We have recently reported that a Mex3c mutation in mice causes growth retardation and reduced adiposity, but how adiposity is reduced remains unclear. Herein, we show that homozygous Mex3c gene trap mice have increased physical activity. The Mex3c mutation consistently conferred full protection from diet-induced obesity, hyperglycemia, insulin resistance, hyperlipidemia, and hepatic steatosis. In ob/ob mice with leptin deficiency, the Mex3c mutation also increased physical activity and improved glucose and lipid profiles. Expressing cre in the neurons of Mex3c gene trap mice, an attempt to partially restoring neuronal Mex3c expression, significantly increased white adipose tissue deposition, but had no effects on body length. Our data suggest that one way in which Mex3c regulates adiposity is through controlling physical activity, and that neuronal Mex3c expression could play an important role in this process. PMID:24741071

  12. Kank2 activates talin, reduces force transduction across integrins and induces central adhesion formation.

    PubMed

    Sun, Zhiqi; Tseng, Hui-Yuan; Tan, Steven; Senger, Fabrice; Kurzawa, Laetitia; Dedden, Dirk; Mizuno, Naoko; Wasik, Anita A; Thery, Manuel; Dunn, Alexander R; Fässler, Reinhard

    2016-09-01

    Integrin-based adhesions play critical roles in cell migration. Talin activates integrins and flexibly connects integrins to the actomyosin cytoskeleton, thereby serving as a 'molecular clutch' that transmits forces to the extracellular matrix to drive cell migration. Here we identify the evolutionarily conserved Kank protein family as novel components of focal adhesions (FAs). Kank proteins accumulate at the lateral border of FAs, which we term the FA belt, and in central sliding adhesions, where they directly bind the talin rod domain through the Kank amino-terminal (KN) motif and induce talin and integrin activation. In addition, Kank proteins diminish the talin-actomyosin linkage, which curbs force transmission across integrins, leading to reduced integrin-ligand bond strength, slippage between integrin and ligand, central adhesion formation and sliding, and reduced cell migration speed. Our data identify Kank proteins as talin activators that decrease the grip between the integrin-talin complex and actomyosin to regulate cell migration velocity. PMID:27548916

  13. Reduced expression of PNUTS leads to activation of Rb-phosphatase and caspase-mediated apoptosis.

    PubMed

    De Leon, Gabriel; Sherry, Tara C; Krucher, Nancy A

    2008-06-01

    There is abundant evidence that Retinoblastoma (Rb) activity is important in the control of cell proliferation and apoptosis. Reversible phosphorylation of the Rb protein that is carried out by cyclin dependent kinases and Protein phosphatase 1 (PP1) regulates its functions. A PP1 interacting protein, PNUTS (Phosphatase Nuclear Targeting Subunit) is proposed to be a regulator of Rb phosphorylation. In this study, PNUTS knockdown in MCF7, SKA and HCT116 cancer cells causes a reduction in viability due to increased apoptosis. However, normal cells (MCF10A breast and CCD-18Co colon) do not exhibit reduced viability when PNUTS expression is diminished. PNUTS knockdown has no effect in Rb-null Saos-2 cells. However, when Rb is stably expressed in Saos-2 cells, PNUTS knockdown reduces cell number. Knockdown of PNUTS in p53-/- HCT116 cells indicates that p53 is dispensable for the induction of apoptosis. Loss of PNUTS expression results in increased Rb-phosphatase activity and Rb dephosphorylation. E2F1 dissociates from Rb in cells depleted of PNUTS and the resulting apoptosis is dependent on caspase-8. These results indicate that Rb phosphorylation state can be manipulated by targeting Rb phosphatase activity and suggest that PNUTS may be a potential target for therapeutic pro-apoptotic strategies. PMID:18360108

  14. Nitroxyl (HNO) reduces endothelial and monocyte activation and promotes M2 macrophage polarization.

    PubMed

    Andrews, Karen L; Sampson, Amanda K; Irvine, Jennifer C; Shihata, Waled A; Michell, Danielle L; Lumsden, Natalie G; Lim, Chloe; Huet, Olivier; Drummond, Grant R; Kemp-Harper, Barbara K; Chin-Dusting, Jaye P F

    2016-09-01

    Nitroxyl anion (HNO) donors are currently being assessed for their therapeutic utility in several cardiovascular disorders including heart failure. Here, we examine their effect on factors that precede atherosclerosis including endothelial cell and monocyte activation, leucocyte adhesion to the endothelium and macrophage polarization. Similar to the NO donor glyceryl trinitrate (GTN), the HNO donors Angeli's salt (AS) and isopropylamine NONOate (IPA/NO) decreased leucocyte adhesion to activated human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs) and mouse isolated aorta. This reduction in adhesion was accompanied by a reduction in intercellular adhesion molecule-1 (ICAM-1) and the cytokines monocyte chemoattractant protein 1 (MCP-1) and interleukin 6 (IL-6) which was inhibitor of nuclear factor κB (NFκB) α (IκBα)- and subsequently NFκB-dependent. Intriguingly, the effects of AS on leucocyte adhesion, like those on vasodilation, were found to not be susceptible to pharmacological tolerance, unlike those observed with GTN. As well, HNO reduces monocyte activation and promotes polarization of M2 macrophages. Taken together, our data demonstrate that HNO donors can reduce factors that are associated with and which precede atherosclerosis and may thus be useful therapeutically. Furthermore, since the effects of the HNO donors were not subject to tolerance, this confers an additional advantage over NO donors. PMID:27231254

  15. Activated sludge as substrate for sulfate-reducing bacteria in acid mine drainage treatment

    SciTech Connect

    Al-Ani, W.A.G.; Henry, J.G.; Prasad, D.

    1996-11-01

    Acid mine drainage (AMD), characterized by high concentrations of sulfates and heavy metals and low pH, presents a potential hazard to the environment.Several treatment processes (chemical precipitation, ion exchange, reverse osmosis, electrodialysis and electrolytic recovery) are available, but these are often too expensive. Biological treatment of AMD, mediated by sulfate-reducing bacteria (SRB), seems promising. The objective of this study was to use activated sludge as a carbon source for the SRB and determine the most effective COD/sulfate ratio and hydraulic retention time (HRT) for reducing sulfate. Such information would be useful for the application of the proposed two-stage system to AMD treatment. Since the aim of this study was to obtain sulfate reduction and to avoid methane production, it was decided to operate the digesters initially at low COD/SO{sub 4}{sup 2{minus}} ratios of 1.0, 1.5, and 2.0.

  16. Microstructure and Mechanical Properties of a Nitride-Strengthened Reduced Activation Ferritic/Martensitic Steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Qiangguo; Zhang, Wenfeng; Yan, Wei; Wang, Wei; Sha, Wei; Shan, Yiyin; Yang, Ke

    2012-12-01

    Nitride-strengthened reduced activation ferritic/martensitic (RAFM) steels are developed taking advantage of the high thermal stability of nitrides. In the current study, the microstructure and mechanical properties of a nitride-strengthened RAFM steel with improved composition were investigated. Fully martensitic microstructure with fine nitrides dispersion was achieved in the steel. In all, 1.4 pct Mn is sufficient to suppress delta ferrite and assure the steel of the full martensitic microstructure. Compared to Eurofer97, the steel showed similar strength at room temperature but higher strength at 873 K (600 °C). The steel exhibited very high impact toughness and a low ductile-to-brittle transition temperature (DBTT) of 243 K (-30 °C), which could be further reduced by purification.

  17. Reduced lymphocyte activation in space - Role of cell-substratum interactions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gmuender, F. K.; Kiess, M.; Lee, J.; Cogoli, A.; Sonnenfeld, G.

    1992-01-01

    The effect of substratum adhesiveness on lymphocyte responsiveness was investigated by reducing and blocking cell adhesion with poly-HEMA in a simple on ground system. Cells grown on medium thick and thick poly-HEMA films were rounded in shape and displayed no signs of spreading. By contrast, on tissue culture plastic and very thin poly-HEMA films, they showed clear signs of spreading. The mitogenic response of lymphocytes grown on thick poly-HEMA films was reduced by up to 68 percent of the control (tissue culture plastic). Interferon gamma production was virtually nil when the cells were grown on the least adhesive substratum. These results show that activated lymphocytes need to anchor and spread prior to achieving an optimal proliferation response. It is concluded that decreased lymphocyte adhesion could contribute to the depressed in vitro lymphocyte responsiveness found in the microgravity conditions of space flight.

  18. Reduced lymphocyte activation in space: Role of cell-substratum interactions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gmuender, Felix K.; Kiess, M.; Sonnenfeld, Gerald; Lee, J.; Cogoli, Augusto

    1990-01-01

    The effect of substratum adhesiveness on lymphocyte responsiveness was investigated by reducing and blocking cell adhesion with poly-HEMA (poly (2-Hydroxyethyl Methacrylate)) in a simple on ground system. Cells grown on medium thick and thick poly-HEMA films were rounded in shape and displayed no signs of spreading. By contrast, on tissue culture plastic and very thin poly-HEMA films, they showed clear signs of spreading. The mitogenic response of lymphocytes grown on thick poly-HEMA films was reduced by up to 68 percent of the control (tissue culture plastic). Interferon gamma production was virtually nil when the cells were grown on the least adhesive substratum. These results show that activated lymphocytes need to anchor and spread prior to achieving an optimal proliferation response. It is concluded that decreased lymphocyte adhesion could contribute to the depressed in vitro lymphocyte responsiveness found in the microgravity conditions of space flight.

  19. Powered hip exoskeletons can reduce the user's hip and ankle muscle activations during walking.

    PubMed

    Lenzi, Tommaso; Carrozza, Maria Chiara; Agrawal, Sunil K

    2013-11-01

    In this paper, we study the human locomotor adaptation to the action of a powered exoskeleton providing assistive torque at the user's hip during walking. To this end, we propose a controller that provides the user's hip with a fraction of the nominal torque profile, adapted to the specific gait features of the user from Winter's reference data . The assistive controller has been implemented on the ALEX II exoskeleton and tested on ten healthy subjects. Experimental results show that when assisted by the exoskeleton, users can reduce the muscle effort compared to free walking. Despite providing assistance only to the hip joint, both hip and ankle muscles significantly reduced their activation, indicating a clear tradeoff between hip and ankle strategy to propel walking. PMID:23529105

  20. How the Ferric Iron Proportion in Basalts Changes Towards the Iceland Plume

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shorttle, O.; Moussallam, Y.; Hartley, M. E.; Edmonds, M.; Maclennan, J.; Murton, B. J.

    2014-12-01

    Planetary differentiation has been driven by the Earth's giant convective system, which has been redistributing heat, volatile elements and myriad other chemical species for 4.5 billion years. A key exchange in this transport process is between the mantle and the atmosphere through the volcanic degassing of sulfur, carbon and hydrogen from silicate melts forming in the deep Earth. The speciation and mobility of volatile elements during silicate melting is modulated by the oceanic mantle's oxygen fugacity (fO2), which away from subduction zones has long been considered uniform. However, a recent study has challenged this paradigm with new measurements of ferric iron proportions (Fe3+/Fe) in glasses from mid-ocean ridge basalts (Cottrell & Kelley, 2013). These new results suggest mantle domains containing material recycled from the Earth's surface are more reducing than ambient mantle and contain high concentrations of carbon. The pervasive mantle heterogeneity well documented in other geochemical indices may therefore be systematically associated with changes in oxidation state In this study we have produced a dataset of combined XANES, volatile element (C, S, F, Cl, H, B) and boron isotope analyses of 65 basalts from the Mid-Atlantic Ridge south of Iceland. These samples form a transect from 1000 km south of the Iceland plume to within 300 km of the plume centre, crossing into the zone experiencing the greatest geophysical and geochemical influence from the plume. Accordingly there are major changes in the isotopic and trace element composition of the basalts in this sample set, driven by both an increase in the proportion of recycled oceanic crustal components towards Iceland and a shift to a plume driven flow field. This suite of basalts therefore form an excellent test of the global correlations observed by Cottrell & Kelley (2013), where ferric iron contents anti-correlated with isotopic enrichment, with a high resolution regional dataset. By combining major

  1. The Associative Memory Deficit in Aging Is Related to Reduced Selectivity of Brain Activity during Encoding.

    PubMed

    Saverino, Cristina; Fatima, Zainab; Sarraf, Saman; Oder, Anita; Strother, Stephen C; Grady, Cheryl L

    2016-09-01

    Human aging is characterized by reductions in the ability to remember associations between items, despite intact memory for single items. Older adults also show less selectivity in task-related brain activity, such that patterns of activation become less distinct across multiple experimental tasks. This reduced selectivity or dedifferentiation has been found for episodic memory, which is often reduced in older adults, but not for semantic memory, which is maintained with age. We used fMRI to investigate whether there is a specific reduction in selectivity of brain activity during associative encoding in older adults, but not during item encoding, and whether this reduction predicts associative memory performance. Healthy young and older adults were scanned while performing an incidental encoding task for pictures of objects and houses under item or associative instructions. An old/new recognition test was administered outside the scanner. We used agnostic canonical variates analysis and split-half resampling to detect whole-brain patterns of activation that predicted item versus associative encoding for stimuli that were later correctly recognized. Older adults had poorer memory for associations than did younger adults, whereas item memory was comparable across groups. Associative encoding trials, but not item encoding trials, were predicted less successfully in older compared with young adults, indicating less distinct patterns of associative-related activity in the older group. Importantly, higher probability of predicting associative encoding trials was related to better associative memory after accounting for age and performance on a battery of neuropsychological tests. These results provide evidence that neural distinctiveness at encoding supports associative memory and that a specific reduction of selectivity in neural recruitment underlies age differences in associative memory. PMID:27082043

  2. Overproduction in Escherichia coli and Characterization of a Soybean Ferric Leghemoglobin Reductase.

    PubMed Central

    Ji, L.; Becana, M.; Sarath, G.; Shearman, L.; Klucas, R. V.

    1994-01-01

    We previously cloned and sequenced a cDNA encoding soybean ferric leghemoglobin reductase (FLbR), an enzyme postulated to play an important role in maintaining leghemoglobin in a functional ferrous state in nitrogen-fixing root nodules. This cDNA was sub-cloned into an expression plasmid, pTrcHis C, and overexpressed in Escherichia coli. The recombinant FLbR protein, which was purified by two steps of column chromatography, was catalytically active and fully functional. The recombinant FLbR cross-reacted with antisera raised against native FLbR purified from soybean root nodules. The recombinant FLbR, the native FLbR purified from soybean (Glycine max L.) root nodules, and dihydrolipoamide dehydrogenases from pig heart and yeast had similar but not identical ultraviolet-visible absorption and fluorescence spectra, cofactor binding, and kinetic properties. FLbR shared common structural features in the active site and prosthetic group binding sites with other pyridine nucleotide-disulfide oxidoreductases such as dihydrolipoamide dehydrogenases, but displayed different microenvironments for the prosthetic groups. PMID:12232320

  3. 5-Hydroxytryptamine does not reduce sympathetic nerve activity or neuroeffector function in the splanchnic circulation.

    PubMed

    Darios, Emma S; Barman, Susan M; Orer, Hakan S; Morrison, Shaun F; Davis, Robert P; Seitz, Bridget M; Burnett, Robert; Watts, Stephanie W

    2015-05-01

    Infusion of 5-hydroxytryptamine (5-HT) in conscious rats results in a sustained (up to 30 days) fall in blood pressure. This is accompanied by an increase in splanchnic blood flow. Because the splanchnic circulation is regulated by the sympathetic nervous system, we hypothesized that 5-HT would: 1) directly reduce sympathetic nerve activity in the splanchnic region; and/or 2) inhibit sympathetic neuroeffector function in splanchnic blood vessels. Moreover, removal of the sympathetic innervation of the splanchnic circulation (celiac ganglionectomy) would reduce 5-HT-induced hypotension. In anaesthetized Sprague-Dawley rats, mean blood pressure was reduced from 101±4 to 63±3mm Hg during slow infusion of 5-HT (25μg/kg/min, i.v.). Pre- and postganglionic splanchnic sympathetic nerve activity were unaffected during 5-HT infusion. In superior mesenteric arterial rings prepared for electrical field stimulation, neither 5-HT (3, 10, 30nM), the 5-HT1B receptor agonist CP 93129 nor 5-HT1/7 receptor agonist 5-carboxamidotryptamine inhibited neurogenic contraction compared to vehicle. 5-HT did not inhibit neurogenic contraction in superior mesenteric venous rings. Finally, celiac ganglionectomy did not modify the magnitude of fall or time course of 5-HT-induced hypotension when compared to animals receiving sham ganglionectomy. We conclude it is unlikely 5-HT interacts with the sympathetic nervous system at the level of the splanchnic preganglionic or postganglionic nerve, as well as at the neuroeffector junction, to reduce blood pressure. These important studies allow us to rule out a direct interaction of 5-HT with the splanchnic sympathetic nervous system as a cause of the 5-HT-induced fall in blood pressure. PMID:25732865

  4. 5-Hydroxytryptamine does not reduce sympathetic nerve activity or neuroeffector function in the splanchnic circulation

    PubMed Central

    Darios, Emma S.; Barman, Susan M.; Orer, Hakan S.; Morrison, Shaun F.; Davis, Robert P.; Seitz, Bridget M.; Burnett, Robert; Watts, Stephanie W.

    2015-01-01

    Infusion of 5-hydroxytryptamine (5-HT) in conscious rats results in a sustained (up to 30 days) fall in blood pressure. This is accompanied by an increase in splanchnic blood flow. Because the splanchnic circulation is regulated by the sympathetic nervous system, we hypothesized that 5-HT would: 1) directly reduce sympathetic nerve activity in the splanchnic region; and/or 2) inhibit sympathetic neuroeffector function in splanchnic blood vessels. Moreover, removal of the sympathetic innervation of the splanchnic circulation (celiac ganglionectomy) would reduce 5-HT-induced hypotension. In anaesthetized Sprague-Dawley rats, mean blood pressure was reduced from 101 ± 4 to 63 ± 3 mm Hg during slow infusion of 5-HT (25 μg/kg/min, i.v.). Pre- and postganglionic splanchnic sympathetic nerve activity was unaffected during 5-HT infusion. In superior mesenteric arterial rings prepared for electrical field stimulation, neither 5-HT (3, 10, 30 nM), the 5-HT1B receptor agonist CP 93129 nor 5-HT1/7 receptor agonist 5-carboxamidotryptamine inhibited neurogenic contraction compared to vehicle. 5-HT did not inhibit neurogenic contraction in superior mesenteric venous rings. Finally, celiac ganglionectomy did not modify the magnitude of fall or time course of 5-HT-induced hypotension when compared to animals receiving sham ganglionectomy. We conclude it is unlikely 5-HT interacts with the sympathetic nervous system at the level of the splanchnic preganglionic or postganglionic nerve, as well as at the neuroeffector junction, to reduce blood pressure. These important studies allow us to rule out a direct interaction of 5-HT with the splanchnic sympathetic nervous system as a cause of the 5-HT-induced fall in blood pressure. PMID:25732865

  5. Personalized Strategies to Activate and Empower Patients in Health Care and Reduce Health Disparities

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Jie; Mullins, C. Daniel; Novak, Priscilla; Thomas, Stephen B.

    2015-01-01

    Designing culturally-sensitive personalized interventions is essential to sustain patients’ involvement in their treatment, and encourage patients to take an active role in their own health and health care. We consider patient activation and empowerment as a cyclical process defined through patient accumulation of knowledge, confidence, and self-determination for their own health and health care. We propose a patient-centered, multi-level activation and empowerment framework (individual-, health care professional-, community-, and health care delivery system-level) to inform the development of culturally informed personalized patient activation and empowerment (P-PAE) interventions to improve population health, and reduce racial and ethnic disparities. We discuss relevant Affordable Care Act payment and delivery policy reforms, and how they impact patient activation and empowerment. Such policies include Accountable Care Organizations and Value Based Purchasing, Patient Centered Medical Homes, and the Community Health Benefit. Challenges and possible solutions to implementing the P-PAE are discussed. Comprehensive and longitudinal data sets with consistent P-PAE measures are needed to conduct comparative effectiveness analyses to evaluate the optimal P-PAE model. We believe the P-PAE model is timely and sustainable, and will be critical to engaging patients in their treatment, developing patients’ abilities to manage their health, helping patients to express concerns and preferences regarding treatment, empowering patients to ask questions about treatment options, and building up strategic patient-provider partnerships through shared decision making. PMID:25845376

  6. Effect of gait retraining for reducing ambulatory knee load on trunk biomechanics and trunk muscle activity.

    PubMed

    Nüesch, Corina; Laffer, Dominik; Netzer, Cordula; Pagenstert, Geert; Mündermann, Annegret

    2016-06-01

    The purpose of this study was to test the hypothesis that walking with increased medio-lateral trunk sway is associated with lower external knee adduction moment and lower extremity muscle activation, and higher external ipsilateral trunk moment and trunk muscle activity than walking with normal trunk sway in healthy participants. Fifteen participants performed walking trials with normal and increased medio-lateral trunk sway. Maximum trunk sway, first maximum knee adduction moment, lateral trunk bending moment, and bilateral vastus medialis, vastus lateralis, gluteus medius, rectus abdominis, external oblique and erector spinae muscle activity were computed. Walking with increased trunk sway was associated with lower maximum knee adduction moment (95% confidence interval (CI): 0.50-0.62Nm/kg vs. 0.62-0.76Nm/kg; P<.001) and ipsilateral gluteus medius (-17%; P=.014) and erector spinae muscle activity (-24%; P=.004) and greater maximum lateral trunk bending moment (+34%; P<.001) and contralateral external oblique muscle activity (+60%; P=.009). In all participants, maximum knee adduction moment was negatively correlated and maximum trunk moment was positively correlated with maximum trunk sway. The results of this study suggest that walking with increased trunk sway not only reduces the external knee adduction moment but also alters and possibly increases the load on the trunk. Hence, load-altering biomechanical interventions should always be evaluated not only regarding their effects on the index joint but on other load-bearing joints such as the spine. PMID:27264398

  7. Personalized Strategies to Activate and Empower Patients in Health Care and Reduce Health Disparities.

    PubMed

    Chen, Jie; Mullins, C Daniel; Novak, Priscilla; Thomas, Stephen B

    2016-02-01

    Designing culturally sensitive personalized interventions is essential to sustain patients' involvement in their treatment and encourage patients to take an active role in their own health and health care. We consider patient activation and empowerment as a cyclical process defined through patient accumulation of knowledge, confidence, and self-determination for their own health and health care. We propose a patient-centered, multilevel activation and empowerment framework (individual-, health care professional-, community-, and health care delivery system-level) to inform the development of culturally informed personalized patient activation and empowerment (P-PAE) interventions to improve population health and reduce racial and ethnic disparities. We discuss relevant Affordable Care Act payment and delivery policy reforms and how they affect patient activation and empowerment. Such policies include Accountable Care Organizations and value-based purchasing, patient-centered medical homes, and the community health benefit. Challenges and possible solutions to implementing the P-PAE are discussed. Comprehensive and longitudinal data sets with consistent P-PAE measures are needed to conduct comparative effectiveness analyses to evaluate the optimal P-PAE model. We believe the P-PAE model is timely and sustainable and will be critical to engaging patients in their treatment, developing patients' abilities to manage their health, helping patients express concerns and preferences regarding treatment, empowering patients to ask questions about treatment options, and building up strategic patient-provider partnerships through shared decision making. PMID:25845376

  8. Preferential PPAR-α activation reduces neuroinflammation, and blocks neurodegeneration in vivo.

    PubMed

    Esmaeili, Mohammad A; Yadav, Shilpi; Gupta, Ravi Kr; Waggoner, Garrett R; Deloach, Abigail; Calingasan, Noel Y; Beal, M Flint; Kiaei, Mahmoud

    2016-01-15

    Neuroinflammation, immune reactivity and mitochondrial abnormalities are considered as causes and/or contributors to neuronal degeneration. Peroxisome proliferator-activated receptors (PPARs) regulate both inflammatory and multiple other pathways that are implicated in neurodegeneration. In the present study, we investigated the efficacy of fenofibrate (Tricor), a pan-PPAR agonist that activates PPAR-α as well as other PPARs. We administered fenofibrate to superoxide dismutase 1 (SOD1(G93A)) mice daily prior to any detectable phenotypes and then animal behavior, pathology and longevity were assessed. Treated animals showed a significant slowing of the progression of disease with weight loss attenuation, enhanced motor performance, delayed onset and survival extension. Histopathological analysis of the spinal cords showed that neuronal loss was significantly attenuated in fenofibrate-treated mice. Mitochondria were preserved as indicated by Cytochrome c immunostaining in the spinal cord, which maybe partly due to increased expression of the PPAR-γ co-activator 1-α. The total mRNA analysis revealed that neuroprotective and anti-inflammatory genes were elevated, while neuroinflammatory genes were down-regulated. This study demonstrates that the activation of PPAR-α action via fenofibrate leads to neuroprotection by both reducing neuroinflammation and protecting mitochondria, which leads to a significant increase in survival in SOD1(G93A) mice. Therefore, the development of therapeutic strategies to activate PPAR-α as well as other PPARs may lead to new therapeutic agents to slow or halt the progression of amyotrophic lateral sclerosis. PMID:26604138

  9. relA over-expression reduces tumorigenicity and activates apoptosis in human cancer cells

    PubMed Central

    Ricca, A; Biroccio, A; Trisciuoglio, D; Cippitelli, M; Zupi, G; Bufalo, D Del

    2001-01-01

    We previously demonstrated that bcl-2 over-expression increases the malignant behaviour of the MCF7 ADR human breast cancer cell line and enhances nuclear factor-kappa B (NF-k B) transcriptional activity. Here, we investigated the direct effect of increased NF-k B activity on the tumorigenicity of MCF7 ADR cells by over-expressing the NF-k B subunit relA/p65. Surprisingly, our results demonstrated that over-expression of relA determines a considerable reduction of the tumorigenic ability in nude mice as indicated by the tumour take and the median time of tumour appearance. In vitro studies also evidenced a reduced cell proliferation and the activation of the apoptotic programme after relA over-expression. Apoptosis was associated with the production of reactive oxygen species, and the cleavage of the specific substrate Poly-ADP-ribose-polymerrase. Our data indicate that there is no general role for NF-k B in the regulation of apoptosis and tumorigenicity. In fact, even though inhibiting NF-k B activity has been reported to be lethal to tumour cells, our findings clearly suggest that an over-induction of nuclear NF-k B activity may produce the same effect. © 2001 Cancer Research Campaign http://www.bjcancer.com PMID:11747334

  10. Nandrolone reduces activation of Notch signaling in denervated muscle associated with increased Numb expression

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, Xin-Hua; Yao, Shen; Qiao, Rui-Fang; Levine, Alice C.; Kirschenbaum, Alexander; Pan, Jiangping; Wu, Yong; Qin, Weiping; Bauman, William A.; Cardozo, Christopher P.

    2011-10-14

    Highlights: {yields} Nerve transection increased Notch signaling in paralyzed muscle. {yields} Nandrolone prevented denervation-induced Notch signaling. {yields} Nandrolone induced the expression of an inhibitor of the Notch signaling, Numb. {yields} Reduction of denervation-induced Notch signaling by nandrolone is likely through upregulation of Numb. -- Abstract: Nandrolone, an anabolic steroid, slows denervation-atrophy in rat muscle. The molecular mechanisms responsible for this effect are not well understood. Androgens and anabolic steroids activate Notch signaling in animal models of aging and thereby mitigate sarcopenia. To explore the molecular mechanisms by which nandrolone prevents denervation-atrophy, we investigated the effects of nandrolone on Notch signaling in denervated rat gastrocnemius muscle. Denervation significantly increased Notch activity reflected by elevated levels of nuclear Notch intracellular domain (NICD) and expression of Hey1 (a Notch target gene). Activation was greatest at 7 and 35 days after denervation but remained present at 56 days after denervation. Activation of Notch in denervated muscle was prevented by nandrolone associated with upregulated expression of Numb mRNA and protein. These data demonstrate that denervation activates Notch signaling, and that nandrolone abrogates this response associated with increased expression of Numb, suggesting a potential mechanism by which nandrolone reduces denervation-atrophy.

  11. Reduced cerebral blood flow with orthostasis precedes hypocapnic hyperpnea, sympathetic activation, and postural tachycardia syndrome.

    PubMed

    Del Pozzi, Andrew T; Schwartz, Christopher E; Tewari, Deepali; Medow, Marvin S; Stewart, Julian M

    2014-06-01

    Hyperventilation and reduced cerebral blood flow velocity can occur in postural tachycardia syndrome (POTS). We studied orthostatically intolerant patients, with suspected POTS, with a chief complaint of upright dyspnea. On the basis of our observations of an immediate reduction of cerebral blood flow velocity with orthostasis, we hypothesize that the resulting ischemic hypoxia of the carotid body causes chemoreflex activation, hypocapnic hyperpnea, sympathetic activation, and increased heart rate and blood pressure in this subset of POTS. We compared 11 dyspneic POTS subjects with 10 healthy controls during a 70° head-up tilt. In POTS subjects during initial orthostasis before blood pressure recovery; central blood volume and mean arterial pressure were reduced (P<0.025), resulting in a significant (P<0.001) decrease in cerebral blood flow velocity, which temporally preceded (17±6 s; P<0.025) a progressive increase in minute ventilation and decrease in end tidal CO2 (P<0.05) when compared with controls. Sympathoexcitation, measured by muscle sympathetic nerve activity, was increased in POTS (P<0.01) and inversely proportional to end tidal CO2 and resulted in an increase in heart rate (P<0.001), total peripheral resistance (P<0.025), and a decrease in cardiac output (P<0.025). The decrease in cerebral blood flow velocity and mean arterial pressure during initial orthostasis was greater (P<0.025) in POTS. Our data suggest that exaggerated initial central hypovolemia during initial orthostatic hypotension in POTS results in reduced cerebral blood flow velocity and postural hypocapnic hyperpnea that perpetuates cerebral ischemia. We hypothesize that sustained hypocapnia and cerebral ischemia produce sympathoexcitation, tachycardia, and a statistically significant increase in blood pressure. PMID:24711524

  12. REDUCED CEREBRAL BLOOD FLOW WITH ORTHOSTASIS PRECEDES HYPOCAPNIC HYPERPNEA, SYMPATHETIC ACTIVATION AND POTS

    PubMed Central

    Del Pozzi, Andrew T.; Schwartz, Christopher E.; Tewari, Deepali; Medow, Marvin S.; Stewart, Julian M.

    2014-01-01

    Hyperventilation, and reduced cerebral blood flow velocity can occur in postural tachycardia syndrome (POTS). We studied orthostatically intolerant patients, with suspected POTS, with a chief complaint of upright dyspnea. Based on our observations of an immediate reduction of cerebral blood flow velocity with orthostasis, we hypothesize that the resulting ischemic hypoxia of the carotid body causes chemoreflex activation, hypocapnic hyperpnea, sympathetic activation, and increased heart rate and blood pressure in this subset of POTS. We compared 11 dyspneic POTS subjects to 10 healthy controls during a 70° head-up tilt. In POTS subjects during initial orthostasis prior to BP recovery; central blood volume and mean arterial pressure were reduced (P<0.025) resulting in a significant (P<0.001) decrease in cerebral blood flow velocity, which temporally preceded (17±6 s; P<0.025) a progressive increase in minute ventilation and decrease in end tidal CO2 (P<0.05), compared to controls. Sympathoexcitation, measured by muscle sympathetic nerve activity, was increased in POTS, (P<0.01), and inversely proportional to end tidal CO2 and resulted in an increase in heart rate, (P<0.001), total peripheral resistance (P<0.025), and a decrease in cardiac output (P<0.025). The decrease in cerebral blood flow velocity and mean arterial pressure during initial orthostasis was greater (P<0.025) in POTS. Our data suggest that exaggerated initial central hypovolemia during initial orthostatic hypotension in POTS results in reduced cerebral blood flow velocity and postural hypocapnic hyperpnea that perpetuates cerebral ischemia. We hypothesize that sustained hypocapnia and cerebral ischemia produce sympathoexcitation, tachycardia and a statistically significant increase in blood pressure. PMID:24711524

  13. Isolation of a Fusarium solani mutant reduced in cutinase activity and virulence.

    PubMed Central

    Dantzig, A H; Zuckerman, S H; Andonov-Roland, M M

    1986-01-01

    Fusarium solani isolate T-8 produces an extracellular enzyme, cutinase, which catalyzes the degradation of cutin in the plant cuticle. Cutinase activity can be measured by the hydrolysis of either the artifical substrate, p-nitrophenylbutyrate (PNB), or radioactive cutin containing [14C]palmitic acid. In the present study, the culture filtrate contained basal levels of cutinase when T-8 was grown on acetate as a sole source of carbon. After mutagenesis, a cutinase-defective mutant (PNB-1) was identified by screening acetate-grown colonies for a loss of PNBase activity. The mutant possessed an 80 to 90% reduction in cutinase activity when grown for 3 to 5 days on acetate- or cutin-containing medium. Induction of cutinase by cutin or hydrolyzed cutin after growth on glucose medium was similarly reduced. Kinetic analysis indicated that cutinase from the mutant possessed a near normal Km for PNB and a 92% reduction in Vmax. Fluorography and Western blotting of 15% sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gels of separated 35S-labeled proteins from cutin induction medium revealed that in the mutant the 22,000-molecular-weight band corresponding to cutinase was reduced approximately 85%. The virulence of the mutant in a pea stem bioassay was decreased by 55% and was restored to nearly the parental level by the addition of purified cutinase. The data suggest that the mutant synthesizes reduced quantities of a functional and immunoreactive cutinase enzyme and that cutinase plays a critical role in infection. The PNB1 mutation may be within a regulatory gene or a promoter for cutinase. Images PMID:3782031

  14. Isohumulones, bitter acids derived from hops, activate both peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor alpha and gamma and reduce insulin resistance.

    PubMed

    Yajima, Hiroaki; Ikeshima, Emiko; Shiraki, Maho; Kanaya, Tomoka; Fujiwara, Daisuke; Odai, Hideharu; Tsuboyama-Kasaoka, Nobuyo; Ezaki, Osamu; Oikawa, Shinichi; Kondo, Keiji

    2004-08-01

    The peroxisome proliferator-activated receptors (PPARs) are dietary lipid sensors that regulate fatty acid and carbohydrate metabolism. The hypolipidemic effects of fibrate drugs and the therapeutic benefits of the thiazolidinedione drugs are due to their activation of PPARalpha and -gamma, respectively. In this study, isohumulones, the bitter compounds derived from hops that are present in beer, were found to activate PPARalpha and -gamma in transient co-transfection studies. Among the three major isohumulone homologs, isohumulone and isocohumulone were found to activate PPARalpha and -gamma. Diabetic KK-Ay mice that were treated with isohumulones (isohumulone and isocohumulone) showed reduced plasma glucose, triglyceride, and free fatty acid levels (65.3, 62.6, and 73.1%, respectively, for isohumulone); similar reductions were found following treatment with the thiazolidinedione drug, pioglitazone. Isohumulone treatment did not result in significant body weight gain, although pioglitazone treatment did increase body weight (10.6% increase versus control group). C57BL/6N mice fed a high fat diet that were treated with isohumulones showed improved glucose tolerance and reduced insulin resistance. Furthermore, these animals showed increased liver fatty acid oxidation and a decrease in size and an increase in apoptosis of their hypertrophic adipocytes. A double-blind, placebo-controlled pilot study for studying the effect of isohumulones on diabetes suggested that isohumulones significantly decreased blood glucose and hemoglobin A1c levels after 8 weeks (by 10.1 and 6.4%, respectively, versus week 0). These results suggest that isohumulones can improve insulin sensitivity in high fat diet-fed mice with insulin resistance and in patients with type 2 diabetes. PMID:15178687

  15. Leaching of Arsenic from Granular Ferric Hydroxide Residuals under Mature Landfill Conditions

    PubMed Central

    Ghosh, Amlan; Mukiibi, Muhammed; Sáez, A. Eduardo; Ela, Wendell P.

    2008-01-01

    Most arsenic bearing solid residuals (ABSR) from water treatment will be disposed in non-hazardous landfills. The lack of an appropriate leaching test to predict arsenic mobilization from ABSR creates a need to evaluate the magnitude and mechanisms of arsenic release under landfill conditions. This work studies the leaching of arsenic and iron from a common ABSR, granular ferric hydroxide, in a laboratory-scale column that simulates the biological and physicochemical conditions of a mature, mixed solid waste landfill. The column operated for approximately 900 days and the mode of transport as well as chemical speciation of iron and arsenic changed with column age. Both iron and arsenic were readily mobilized under the anaerobic, reducing conditions. During the early stages of operation, most arsenic and iron leaching (80% and 65%, respectively) was associated with suspended particulate matter and iron was lost proportionately faster than arsenic. In later stages, while the rate of iron leaching declined, the arsenic leaching rate increased greater than 7-fold. The final phase was characterized by dissolved species leaching. Future work on the development of standard batch leaching tests should take into account the dominant mobilization mechanisms identified in this work: solid associated transport, reductive sorbent dissolution, and microbially mediated arsenic reduction. PMID:17051802

  16. Polyethyleneimine-templated copper nanoclusters via ascorbic acid reduction approach as ferric ion sensor.

    PubMed

    Feng, Jie; Ju, Yuyun; Liu, Juanjuan; Zhang, Huige; Chen, Xingguo

    2015-01-01

    In this report we reported a facile one-pot method for synthesis of water-soluble and stable fluorescent CuNCs at room temperature, in which branched polyethyleneimine (BPEI) served as capping scaffold and ascorbic acid as reducing agent. The prepared BPEI-CuNCs exhibited excellent properties such as good water-solubility, photostability and high stability toward high ionic strength. Based on the electron transfer induced fluorescence quenching mechanism, this fluorescence probe was used for the sensitive and selective determination of ferric ions (Fe(3+)) in aqueous solution. The limit of detection was 340 nM in the linear range of 0.5-1000 μM, which was lower than the maximum level of Fe(3+) permitted in drinking water by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency. The method was successfully applied to the detection of Fe(3+) in tap water, Yellow River water and human urine samples with the quantitative spike recoveries ranging from 95.3% to 112.0%. PMID:25479879

  17. Evidence of Ball-and-chain Transport of Ferric Enterobactin through FepA*

    PubMed Central

    Ma, Li; Kaserer, Wallace; Annamalai, Rajasekeran; Scott, Daniel C.; Jin, Bo; Jiang, Xiaoxu; Xiao, Qiaobin; Maymani, Hossein; Massis, Liliana Moura; Ferreira, Luiz C. S.; Newton, Salete M. C.; Klebba, Phillip E.

    2008-01-01

    The Escherichia coli iron transporter, FepA, has a globular N terminus that resides within a transmembrane β-barrel formed by its C terminus. We engineered 25 cysteine substitution mutations at different locations in FepA and modified their sulfhydryl side chains with fluorescein maleimide in live cells. The reactivity of the Cys residues changed, sometimes dramatically, during the transport of ferric enterobactin, the natural ligand of FepA. Patterns of Cys susceptibility reflected energy- and TonB-dependent motion in the receptor protein. During transport, a residue on the normally buried surface of the N-domain was labeled by fluorescein maleimide in the periplasm, providing evidence that the transport process involves expulsion of the globular domain from the β-barrel. Porin deficiency much reduced the fluoresceination of this site, confirming the periplasmic labeling route. These data support the previously proposed, but never demonstrated, ball-and-chain theory of membrane transport. Functional complementation between a separately expressed N terminus and C-terminal β-barrel domain confirmed the feasibility of this mechanism. PMID:17056600

  18. Success Rates of Ankaferd Blood Stopper and Ferric Sulfate as Pulpotomy Agents in Primary Molars

    PubMed Central

    Cantekin, Kenan; Gümüş, Hüsniye

    2014-01-01

    Purpose. The purpose of this study was to evaluate clinical and radiographic findings of treatments using a new hemostatic agent (Ankaferd blood stopper (ABS)), as compared to ferric sulfate (FS), when used as a pulpotomy medicament in primary teeth. Materials and Methods. The primary molars (70) were selected from 35 children aged 4 to 6 years. The teeth were randomized into two groups for pulpotomy with the ABS (n = 35) and the FS (n = 35) agents. The patients were recalled for clinical and radiographic evaluation at 3-, 6-, 9-, and 12-month intervals. Results. At the 3- and 6-month clinical and radiographic evaluations, total success rates of 100% were observed in each group. In ABS and FS groups, the clinical success rates, however, reduced to 90.9% and 93.9% at the 9-month examination and 84,8% and 90.9% at the 12-month examination, respectively. Similarly, the teeth in the ABS and FS groups had radiographic success rates of 90.9% and 93.9% at 9 months and 84.8% and 87.8% at 12 moths, respectively. Conclusion. Although the findings indicated that ABS agents may be useful agents for pulpotomy medicament, further long-term and comprehensive histological investigations of ABS treatments are necessary. PMID:27437463

  19. Microstructural development in reduced activation ferritic alloys irradiated to 200 dpa at 420$deg;C

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gelles, D. S.

    1994-09-01

    Density change and microstructural development are reported for nine reduced activation ferritic steels covering the range 2.3 to 12Cr with varying additions of V and/or W for hardening and up to 6.5 Mn for austenite stability. Specimens were examined following irradiation in FFTF/MOTA at 420°C to a dose exceeding 200 dpa. Void swelling was found, but the swelling remained at 5% or below, with the worst case in an alloy of 9Cr-2Mn-1WV. The carbide structure pinning martensite lath boundaries remained in place.

  20. Pharmacodynamic monitoring of immunosuppressive effects indicates reduced cyclosporine activity during telaprevir therapy.

    PubMed

    Roos, Katja; Gotthardt, Daniel; Giese, Thomas; Schnitzler, Paul; Stremmel, Wolfgang; Czock, David; Eisenbach, Christoph

    2014-09-01

    Drug interactions with immunosuppressive drugs are a major problem associated with protease inhibitor-based antiviral triple therapy for hepatitis C virus (HCV) reinfection after liver transplantation. In this retrospective cohort study, we analyzed biomarkers of the immunosuppressive effects of cyclosporine A (CSA) by quantifying nuclear factor of activated T cells (NFAT)-regulated gene expression during telaprevir (TVR) therapy in 5 liver transplant patients. Furthermore, dose adjustments and blood concentrations of CSA as well as the clinical course were analyzed. We observed a clear impact of TVR not only on doses and blood concentrations but also on the immunosuppressive effects of CSA. Despite apparently adequate CSA trough concentrations, the CSA peak concentration decreased to 68% (range = 44%-90%). This was associated with a 1.9-fold (1.6- to 4.1-fold) increase in the residual gene activity of NFAT-regulated genes, which indicated reduced immunosuppressive activity of CSA with TVR co-medication. The median dose of CSA was reduced to 25% (range = 16%-48%) and 31% (range = 22%-64%) after 1 and 2 weeks, respectively. The CSA drug clearance was reduced to 38.7% (range = 31.0%-49.4%). We report excellent antiviral efficacy. At the end of the observation period, all patients were HCV RNA-negative (1 patient at 18 weeks, 1 patient at 12 weeks, and 3 patients at 4 weeks after the end of therapy). Safety was acceptable, with mild acute rejection and reactivation of cytomegalovirus being the most serious adverse events. One patient with histologically proven recurrent cholestatic hepatitis before therapy underwent retransplantation during the course of antiviral therapy. In conclusion, the immunomonitoring of NFAT-regulated gene expression indicated reduced immunosuppressive activity of CSA during antiviral therapy with TVR in our cohort of liver transplant patients. Thus, the immunosuppressive effects of CSA may be overestimated if one is looking

  1. Mutations in LRP5 cause primary osteoporosis without features of OI by reducing Wnt signaling activity

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Primary osteoporosis is a rare childhood-onset skeletal condition whose pathogenesis has been largely unknown. We have previously shown that primary osteoporosis can be caused by heterozygous missense mutations in the Low-density lipoprotein receptor-related protein 5 (LRP5) gene, and the role of LRP5 is further investigated here. Methods LRP5 was analyzed in 18 otherwise healthy children and adolescents who had evidence of osteoporosis (manifested as reduced bone mineral density i.e. BMD, recurrent peripheral fractures and/or vertebral compression fractures) but who lacked the clinical features of osteogenesis imperfecta (OI) or other known syndromes linked to low BMD. Also 51 controls were analyzed. Methods used in the genetic analyses included direct sequencing and multiplex ligation-dependent probe amplification (MLPA). In vitro studies were performed using luciferase assay and quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction (qPCR) to examine the effect of two novel and three previously identified mutations on the activity of canonical Wnt signaling and on expression of tryptophan hydroxylase 1 (Tph1) and 5-hydroxytryptamine (5-Htr1b). Results Two novel LRP5 mutations (c.3446 T > A; p.L1149Q and c.3553 G > A; p.G1185R) were identified in two patients and their affected family members. In vitro analyses showed that one of these novel mutations together with two previously reported mutations (p.C913fs, p.R1036Q) significantly reduced the activity of the canonical Wnt signaling pathway. Such reductions may lead to decreased bone formation, and could explain the bone phenotype. Gut-derived Lrp5 has been shown to regulate serotonin synthesis by controlling the production of serotonin rate-limiting enzyme, Tph1. LRP5 mutations did not affect Tph1 expression, and only one mutant (p.L1149Q) reduced expression of serotonin receptor 5-Htr1b (p < 0.002). Conclusions Our results provide additional information on the role of LRP5 mutations and their effects on

  2. Irradiation-induced grain growth in nanocrystalline reduced activation ferrite/martensite steel

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, W. B.; Chen, L. Q.; Zhang, C. Yang, Z. G.; Ji, Y. Z.; Zang, H.; Shen, T. L.

    2014-09-22

    In this work, we investigate the microstructure evolution of surface-nanocrystallized reduced activation ferrite/martensite steels upon high-dose helium ion irradiation (24.3 dpa). We report a significant irradiation-induced grain growth in the irradiated buried layer at a depth of 300–500 nm, rather than at the peak damage region (at a depth of ∼840 nm). This phenomenon can be explained by the thermal spike model: minimization of the grain boundary (GB) curvature resulting from atomic diffusion in the cascade center near GBs.

  3. Concentration of MS2 phage in river water by a combined ferric colloid adsorption and foam separation-based method, with MS2 phage leaching from ferric colloid.

    PubMed

    Suzuki, Yoshihiro; Kobayashi, Takumi; Nishiyama, Masateru; Kono, Tomoya

    2016-08-01

    The concentration of MS2 phage as a model RNA virus in river water using a combined ferric colloid adsorption and foam separation-based method was examined. The MS2 phage concentrations were determined by the plaque-forming unit (PFU) method and reverse transcription quantitative PCR (RT-qPCR) analysis. When ferric colloid adsorption was performed prior to foam separation, MS2 phage was effectively removed from river water and concentrated in the generated foam within 7 min. The removal efficiency was >99% at the optimum iron and casein concentrations of 5 mg-Fe/L and 10 mg/L, respectively. Furthermore, based on the analysis of the collected ferric colloid dissolved using deferoxamine, the MS2 concentration in the colloid-dissolved solution was 190-fold higher than that found in raw water according to RT-qPCR analysis. This is a novel method for concentrating RNA viruses to facilitate their detection in river water using coagulation and foam separation combined with chelate dissolution of ferric flocs. PMID:26868517

  4. Nitric Oxide reduces NADPH oxidase 5 (Nox5) activity by reversible S-nitrosylation

    PubMed Central

    Qian, Jin; Chen, Feng; Kovalenkov, Yevgeniy; Pandey, Deepesh; Moseleley, M. Arthur; Foster, Matthew W.; Black, Stephen M.; Venema, Richard C.; Stepp, David W.; Fulton, David J.R.

    2012-01-01

    The NADPH oxidases (Nox) are a family of transmembrane oxidoreductases that produce superoxide and other reactive oxygen species (ROS). Nox5 was the last of the conventional Nox isoforms to be identified and is a calcium-dependent enzyme that does not depend on accessory subunits for activation. Recently, Nox5 was shown to be expressed in human blood vessels and therefore the goal of current study was to determine whether nitric oxide (NO) can modulate Nox5 activity. Endogenously produced NO potently inhibited basal and stimulated Nox5 activity and inhibition was reversible with chronic, but not acute exposure to L-NAME. Nox5 activity was reduced by NO donors, iNOS, eNOS and in endothelial cells and LPS-stimulated smooth muscle cells in a manner dependent on NO concentration. ROS production was diminished by NO in an isolated enzyme activity assay replete with surplus calcium and NADPH. There was no evidence for NO-dependent changes in tyrosine nitration, glutathiolation or phosphorylation of Nox5. In contrast, there was evidence for the increased nitrosylation of Nox5 as determined by the biotin-switch assay and mass spectrometry. Four S-nitrosylation sites were identified and of these, mutation of C694 dramatically lowered Nox5 activity, NO-sensitivity and biotin-labeling. Furthermore, co-expression of the denitrosylation enzymes thioredoxin (Trx1) and GSNO reductase (GSNOR) prevented NO-dependent inhibition of Nox5. The potency of NO against other Nox enzymes was Nox1≥Nox3>Nox5>Nox2 whereas Nox4 was refractory. Collectively, these results suggest that endogenously produced NO can directly S-nitrosylate and inhibit the activity of Nox5. PMID:22387196

  5. Successful implantation after reducing matrix metalloproteinase activity in the uterine cavity

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Recently, the concept of recurrent implantation failure (RIF) in assisted reproductive technology has been enlarged. Chronic uterine inflammation is a known cause of implantation failure and is associated with high matrix metalloproteinase (MMP) activity in uterine cavity flushing. MMP activity of women with RIF has been reported to be higher than that of fertile women. In the present retrospective study we evaluated the efficacy of treatment for high MMP activity in the uterine cavity of patients with RIF. Methods Of the 597 patients recruited to the study, 360 patients underwent MMP measurements and 237 patients did not (control group). All patients had failed to become pregnant, despite at least two transfers of good-quality embryos. Gelatinase MMP-2 and MMP-9 activity in uterine flushing fluid was detected by enzymology (MMP test). All samples were classified into two groups (positive or negative) based on the intensity of the bands on the enzyme zymogram, which represents the degree of MMP activity. Patients who tested positive on the initial test were treated for 2 weeks with a quinolone antibiotic and a corticosteroid, and subsequently underwent a second MMP test. Negative results on the second MMP tests after treatment and subsequent rates of pregnancy and miscarriage were used to evaluate the efficacy of treatment. Data were analyzed by the Mann–Whitney U-test and the chi-square test. Results Of the patients who underwent the MMP test, 15.6% had positive results (high MMP activity). After treatment, 89.3% of patients had negative results on the second MMP test. These patients had a significantly better pregnancy rate (42.0%) than the control group (26.6%), as well as a lower miscarriage rate (28.5% vs 36.5%, respectively). Conclusions A 2-week course of antibiotics and corticosteroids effectively improves the uterine environment underlying RIF by reducing MMP activity. PMID:23663265

  6. Detection of glucose based on the peroxidase-like activity of reduced state carbon dots.

    PubMed

    Long, Yijuan; Wang, Xiliang; Shen, Dongjun; Zheng, Huzhi

    2016-10-01

    It was found that reduced state carbon dots (r-CDs) possessed intrinsic peroxidase-like activity, and could catalytically oxidize 3,3',5,5'-tetramethylbenzidine (TMB) by H2O2 to produce a color reaction. The effects of temperature, pH, incubating time and the concentration of H2O2 and TMB on catalytic activity of r-CDs were investigated. Finally we calculated the kinetic constant was ca. 0.00729min(-1) and applied r-CDs to glucose sensing by coupling glucose oxidase. As low as 2µM H2O2 could be detected with a linear range from 0.010 to 0.40mM via this method. This study offered a simple, sensitive, and high selectivity method for glucose determination even in serum. PMID:27474288

  7. Reducing infection in chronic leg ulcers with an activated carbon cloth dressing.

    PubMed

    Murphy, Nina

    2016-06-23

    Zorflex is a new type of antimicrobial dressing composed of 100% activated carbon cloth. It attracts and binds bacteria to its surface, enabling them to be safely removed at dressing change. It has no reported toxic effects and can be used on either a short-or long-term basis. This article describes 4 case studies in which patients with recalcitrant chronic venous leg ulcers that were prone to recurrent infection were treated with the activated carbon cloth dressing. All of the wounds had failed to respond to antimicrobial dressings containing silver, iodine or polyhexamethylene biguanide (PHMB), and were heavily exuding and painful. In all cases, the signs of infection reduced significantly within 4 weeks, resulting in good patient outcomes. PMID:27345081

  8. Reduced activation martensitic steels as a structural material for ITER test blanket

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shiba, K.; Enoeda, M.; Jitsukawa, S.

    2004-08-01

    A Japanese ITER test blanket module (TBM) is planed to use reduced-activation martensitic steel F82H. Feasibility of F82H for ITER test blanket module is discussed in this paper. Several kinds of property data, including physical properties, magnetic properties, mechanical properties and neutron-irradiation data on F82H have been obtained, and these data are complied into a database to be used for the designing of the ITER TBM. Currently obtained data suggests F82H will not have serious problems for ITER TBM. Optimization of F82H improves the induced activity, toughness and HIP resistance. Furthermore, modified F82H is resistant to temperature instability during material production.

  9. Protease-activated receptor 1 and 4 signal inhibition reduces preterm neonatal hemorrhagic brain injury

    PubMed Central

    Lekic, Tim; Klebe, Damon; McBride, Devin W; Manaenko, Anatol; Rolland, William B.; Flores, Jerry J.; Altay, Orhan; Tang, Jiping; Zhang, John H.

    2015-01-01

    Background and Purpose This study examines the role of thrombin’s protease-activated receptors (PAR)-1,-4 in mediating cyclooxygenase (COX)-2 and mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) following germinal matrix hemorrhage (GMH). Methods GMH was induced by intraparenchymal infusion of bacterial collagenase into the right ganglionic eminence of P7 rat pups. Animals were treated with either PAR-1, -4, COX-2, or mTOR inhibitors by 1 hour, and up to five days. Results We found increased thrombin activity 6–24 hrs after GMH, and PAR-1, -4, inhibition normalized COX-2 and mTOR by 72 hrs. Early treatment with NS398 or rapamycin substantially improved long-term outcomes in juvenile animals. Conclusions Suppressing early PAR signal transduction, and postnatal NS398 or rapamycin treatment, may help reduce GMH severity in susceptible preterm infants. PMID:25931468

  10. Reduced peroxisomal citrate synthase activity increases substrate availability for polyhydroxyalkanoate biosynthesis in plant peroxisomes.

    PubMed

    Tilbrook, Kimberley; Poirier, Yves; Gebbie, Leigh; Schenk, Peer M; McQualter, Richard B; Brumbley, Stevens M

    2014-10-01

    Polyhydroxyalkanoates (PHAs) are bacterial carbon storage polymers used as renewable, biodegradable plastics. PHA production in plants may be a way to reduce industrial PHA production costs. We recently demonstrated a promising level of peroxisomal PHA production in the high biomass crop species sugarcane. However, further production strategies are needed to boost PHA accumulation closer to commercial targets. Through exogenous fatty acid feeding of Arabidopsis thaliana plants that contain peroxisome-targeted PhaA, PhaB and PhaC enzymes from Cupriavidus necator, we show here that the availability of substrates derived from the β-oxidation cycle limits peroxisomal polyhydroxybutyrate (PHB) biosynthesis. Knockdown of peroxisomal citrate synthase activity using artificial microRNA increased PHB production levels approximately threefold. This work demonstrates that reduction of peroxisomal citrate synthase activity may be a valid metabolic engineering strategy for increasing PHA production in other plant species. PMID:24944109

  11. p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase inhibitor reduces neurocan production in cultured spinal cord astrocytes.

    PubMed

    Yamaoka, Gotaro; Morino, Tadao; Morizane, Kei; Horiuchi, Hideki; Miura, Hiromasa; Ogata, Tadanori

    2012-06-20

    Chondroitin sulfate proteoglycans are formed in scar tissue after a spinal cord injury and inhibit axon regrowth. The production of neurocan, one of these chondroitin sulfate proteoglycans, in cultured spinal cord astrocytes increased after the addition of epidermal growth factor (EGF) in a dose-dependent manner (2-200 ng/ml). In astrocytes stimulated by 20 ng/ml of EGF, neurocan production was inhibited after the addition of the p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) inhibitor (SB203580: 3-10 μM) in a dose-dependent manner. These results suggest that the activation of p38 MAPK is one of the mechanisms of neurocan production in EGF-stimulated astrocytes. The p38 MAPK inhibitor may reduce neurocan production and accelerate axonal regrowth after a spinal cord injury. PMID:22525836

  12. Firing of antagonist small-diameter muscle afferents reduces voluntary activation and torque of elbow flexors.

    PubMed

    Kennedy, David S; McNeil, Chris J; Gandevia, Simon C; Taylor, Janet L

    2013-07-15

    During muscle fatigue, firing of small-diameter muscle afferents can decrease voluntary activation of the fatigued muscle. However, these afferents may have a more widespread effect on other muscles in the exercising limb. We examined if the firing of fatigue-sensitive afferents from elbow extensor muscles in the same arm reduces torque production and voluntary activation of elbow flexors. In nine subjects we examined voluntary activation of elbow flexors by measuring changes in superimposed twitches evoked by transcranial magnetic stimulation of the motor cortex during brief (2-3 s) maximal voluntary contractions (MVC). Inflation of a blood pressure cuff following a 2-min sustained MVC blocked blood flow to the fatigued muscle and maintained firing of small-diameter afferents. After a fatiguing elbow flexion contraction, maximal flexion torque was lower (26.0 ± 4.4% versus 67.9 ± 5.2% of initial maximal torque; means ± s.d.; P < 0.001) and superimposed twitches were larger (4.1 ± 1.1% versus 1.8 ± 0.2% ongoing MVC, P = 0.01) with than without ischaemia. After a fatiguing elbow extensor contraction, maximal flexion torque was also reduced (82.2 ± 4.9% versus 91.4 ± 2.3% of initial maximal torque; P = 0.007), superimposed twitches were larger (2.7 ± 0.7% versus 1.3 ± 0.2% ongoing MVC; P = 0.02) and voluntary activation lower (81.6 ± 8.2% versus 95.5 ± 6.9%; P = 0.04) with than without ischaemia. After a fatiguing contraction, voluntary drive to the fatigued muscles is reduced with continued input from small-diameter muscle afferents. Furthermore, fatigue of the elbow extensor muscles decreases voluntary drive to unfatigued elbow flexors of the same arm. Therefore, firing of small-diameter muscle afferents from one muscle can affect voluntary activation and hence torque generation of another muscle in the same limb. PMID:23652589

  13. Oxidative stress-mediated antibacterial activity of graphene oxide and reduced graphene oxide in Pseudomonas aeruginosa

    PubMed Central

    Gurunathan, Sangiliyandi; Han, Jae Woong; Dayem, Ahmed Abdal; Eppakayala, Vasuki; Kim, Jin-Hoi

    2012-01-01

    Background Graphene holds great promise for potential use in next-generation electronic and photonic devices due to its unique high carrier mobility, good optical transparency, large surface area, and biocompatibility. The aim of this study was to investigate the antibacterial effects of graphene oxide (GO) and reduced graphene oxide (rGO) in Pseudomonas aeruginosa. In this work, we used a novel reducing agent, betamercaptoethanol (BME), for synthesis of graphene to avoid the use of toxic materials. To uncover the impacts of GO and rGO on human health, the antibacterial activity of two types of graphene-based material toward a bacterial model P. aeruginosa was studied and compared. Methods The synthesized GO and rGO was characterized by ultraviolet-visible absorption spectroscopy, particle-size analyzer, X-ray diffraction, scanning electron microscopy and Raman spectroscopy. Further, to explain the antimicrobial activity of graphene oxide and reduced graphene oxide, we employed various assays, such as cell growth, cell viability, reactive oxygen species generation, and DNA fragmentation. Results Ultraviolet-visible spectra of the samples confirmed the transition of GO into graphene. Dynamic light-scattering analyses showed the average size among the two types of graphene materials. X-ray diffraction data validated the structure of graphene sheets, and high-resolution scanning electron microscopy was employed to investigate the morphologies of prepared graphene. Raman spectroscopy data indicated the removal of oxygen-containing functional groups from the surface of GO and the formation of graphene. The exposure of cells to GO and rGO induced the production of superoxide radical anion and loss of cell viability. Results suggest that the antibacterial activities are contributed to by loss of cell viability, induced oxidative stress, and DNA fragmentation. Conclusion The antibacterial activities of GO and rGO against P. aeruginosa were compared. The loss of P

  14. [Stabilization of Cadmium Contaminated Soils by Ferric Ion Modified Attapulgite (Fe/ATP)--Characterizations and Stabilization Mechanism].

    PubMed

    Rong, Yang; Li, Rong-bo; Zhou, Yong-li; Chen, Jing; Wang, Lin-ling; Lu, Xiao-hua

    2015-08-01

    Ferric ion modified attapulgite (Fe/ATP) was prepared by impregnation and its structure and morphology were characterized. The toxicity characteristic leaching procedure (TCLP) was used to evaluate the effect of Cadmium( Cd) stabilization in soil with the addition of attapulgite (ATP) and Fe/ATP. The stabilization mechanism of Cd was further elucidated by comparing the morphologies and structure of ATP and Fe/ATP before and after Cd adsorption. Fe/ATP exhibited much better adsorption capacity than ATP, suggesting different adsorption mechanisms occurred between ATP and Fe/ATP. The leaching concentrations of Cd in soil decreased by 45% and 91% respectively, with the addition of wt. 20% ATP and Fe/ATP. The former was attributed to the interaction between Cd2 and --OH groups by chemical binding to form inner-sphere complexes in ATP and the attachment between Cd2+ and the defect sites in ATP framework. Whereas Cd stabilization with Fe/ATP was resulted from the fact that the active centers (--OH bonds or O- sites) on ATP could react with Fe3+ giving Fe--O--Cd-- bridges, which helped stabilize Cd in surface soil. What'more, the ferric oxides and metal hydroxides on the surface of ATP could interact with Cd, probably by the formation of cadmium ferrite. In conclusion, Fe/ATP, which can be easily prepared, holds promise as a potential low-cost and environmental friendly stabilizing agent for remediation of soil contaminated with heavy metals. PMID:26592037

  15. Spectroscopic studies on the antioxidant activity of p-coumaric acid.

    PubMed

    Kiliç, Ismail; Yeşiloğlu, Yeşim

    2013-11-01

    p-coumaric acid (4-hydroxycinnamic acid), a phenolic acid, is a hydroxyl derivative of cinnamic acid. It decreases low density lipoprotein (LDL) peroxidation and reduces the risk of stomach cancer. In vitro radical scavenging and antioxidant capacity of p-coumaric acid were clarified using different analytical methodologies such as total antioxidant activity determination by ferric thiocyanate, hydrogen peroxide scavenging, 1,1-diphenyl-2-picryl-hydrazyl free radical (DPPH) scavenging, 2,2'-azino-bis(3-ethylbenzthiazoline-6-sulphonic acid) (ABTS) radical scavenging activity and superoxide anion radical scavenging, ferrous ions (Fe(2+)) chelating activity and ferric ions (Fe(3+)) reducing ability. p-Coumaric acid inhibited 71.2% lipid peroxidation of a linoleic acid emulsion at 45μg/mL concentration. On the other hand, butylated hydroxyanisole (BHA), butylated hydroxytoluene (BHT), α-tocopherol and ascorbic acid displayed 66.8%, 69.8%, 64.5% and 59.7% inhibition on the peroxidation of linoleic acid emulsion at the same concentration, respectively. In addition, p-coumaric acid had an effective DPPH scavenging, ABTS(+) scavenging, superoxide anion radical scavenging, hydrogen peroxide scavenging, ferric ions (Fe(3+)) reducing power and ferrous ions (Fe(2+)) chelating activities. Also, those various antioxidant activities were compared to BHA, BHT, α-tocopherol and ascorbic acid as references antioxidant compounds. These results suggested that p-coumaric acid can be used in the pharmacological and food industry because of these properties. PMID:23892112

  16. Spectroscopic studies on the antioxidant activity of p-coumaric acid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kiliç, Ismail; Yeşiloğlu, Yeşim

    2013-11-01

    p-coumaric acid (4-hydroxycinnamic acid), a phenolic acid, is a hydroxyl derivative of cinnamic acid. It decreases low density lipoprotein (LDL) peroxidation and reduces the risk of stomach cancer. In vitro radical scavenging and antioxidant capacity of p-coumaric acid were clarified using different analytical methodologies such as total antioxidant activity determination by ferric thiocyanate, hydrogen peroxide scavenging, 1,1-diphenyl-2-picryl-hydrazyl free radical (DPPH) scavenging, 2,2‧-azino-bis(3-ethylbenzthiazoline-6-sulphonic acid) (ABTS) radical scavenging activity and superoxide anion radical scavenging, ferrous ions (Fe2+) chelating activity and ferric ions (Fe3+) reducing ability. p-Coumaric acid inhibited 71.2% lipid peroxidation of a linoleic acid emulsion at 45 μg/mL concentration. On the other hand, butylated hydroxyanisole (BHA), butylated hydroxytoluene (BHT), α-tocopherol and ascorbic acid displayed 66.8%, 69.8%, 64.5% and 59.7% inhibition on the peroxidation of linoleic acid emulsion at the same concentration, respectively. In addition, p-coumaric acid had an effective DPPHrad scavenging, ABTSrad + scavenging, superoxide anion radical scavenging, hydrogen peroxide scavenging, ferric ions (Fe3+) reducing power and ferrous ions (Fe2+) chelating activities. Also, those various antioxidant activities were compared to BHA, BHT, α-tocopherol and ascorbic acid as references antioxidant compounds. These results suggested that p-coumaric acid can be used in the pharmacological and food industry because of these properties.

  17. Possible Association of Ferrous Phosphates and Ferric Sulfates in S-rich Soil on Mars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mao, J.; Schroeder, C.; Haderlein, S.

    2012-12-01

    NASA Mars Exploration Rover (MER) Spirit explored Gusev Crater to look for signs of ancient aqueous activity, assess past environmental conditions and suitability for life. Spirit excavated light-toned, S-rich soils at several locations. These are likely of hydrothermal, possibly fumarolic origin. At a location dubbed Paso Robles the light-toned soil was also rich in P - a signature from surrounding rock. While S is mainly bound in ferric hydrated sulfates [1], the mineralogy of P is ill-constrained [2]. P is a key element for life and its mineralogy constrains its availability. Ferrous phases observed in Paso Robles Mössbauer spectra may represent olivine and pyroxene from surrounding basaltic soil [1] or ferrous phosphate minerals [3]. Phosphate is well-known to complex and stabilize Fe 2+ against oxidation to Fe 3+ . Schröder et al. [3] proposed a formation pathway of ferrous phosphate/ferric sulfate associations: sulfuric acid reacts with basalt containing apatite, forming CaSO4 and phosphoric acid. The phosphoric and/or excess sulfuric acid reacts with olivine, forming Fe2+-phosphate and sulfate. The phosphate is less soluble and precipitates. Ferrous sulfate remains in solution and is oxidized as pH increases. To verify this pathway, we dissolved Fe2+-chloride and Na-phosphate salts in sulfuric acid inside an anoxic glovebox. The solution was titrated to pH 6 by adding NaOH when a first precipitate formed, which was ferrous phosphate according to Mössbauer spectroscopy (MB). At that point the solution was removed from the glovebox and allowed to evaporate in the presence of atmospheric oxygen, leading to the oxidation of Fe2+. The evaporation rate was controlled by keeping the suspensions at different temperatures; pH was monitored during the evaporation process. The final precipitates were analyzed by MB and X-Ray Fluorescence (XRF), comparable to MER MB and Alpha Particle X-ray Spectrometer instrument datasets, and complementary techniques such as X

  18. The crystal structures of the ferric and ferrous forms of the heme complex of HmuO, a heme oxygenase of Corynebacterium diphtheriae.

    PubMed

    Hirotsu, Shoko; Chu, Grace C; Unno, Masaki; Lee, Dong-Sun; Yoshida, Tadashi; Park, Sam-Yong; Shiro, Yoshitsugu; Ikeda-Saito, Masao

    2004-03-19

    Crystal structures of the ferric and ferrous heme complexes of HmuO, a 24-kDa heme oxygenase of Corynebacterium diphtheriae, have been refined to 1.4 and 1.5 A resolution, respectively. The HmuO structures show that the heme group is closely sandwiched between the proximal and distal helices. The imidazole group of His-20 is the proximal heme ligand, which closely eclipses the beta- and delta-meso axis of the porphyrin ring. A long range hydrogen bonding network is present, connecting the iron-bound water ligand to the solvent water molecule. This enables proton transfer from the solvent to the catalytic site, where the oxygen activation occurs. In comparison to the ferric complex, the proximal and distal helices move closer to the heme plane in the ferrous complex. Together with the kinked distal helix, this movement leaves only the alpha-meso carbon atom accessible to the iron-bound dioxygen. The heme pocket architecture is responsible for stabilization of the ferric hydroperoxo-active intermediate by preventing premature heterolytic O-O bond cleavage. This allows the enzyme to oxygenate selectively at the alpha-meso carbon in HmuO catalysis. PMID:14645223

  19. Comparative stability of the bioresorbable ferric crosslinked hyaluronic acid adhesion prevention solutions.

    PubMed

    Luu, Hoan-My Do; Chen, Angela; Isayeva, Irada S

    2013-08-01

    The Intergel® ferric crosslinked hyaluronate (FeHA) adhesion prevention solution (APS) (FDA) is associated with serious post-operative complications (Henley, http://www.lawyersandsettlements.com/features/gynecare-intergel/intergel-timeline.html, 2007; FDA, 2003; Roman et al., Fertil Steril 2005, 83 Suppl 1:1113-1118; Tang et al., Ann Surg 2006;243(4):449-455; Wiseman, Fertil Steril 2006;86(3):771; Wiseman, Fertil Steril 2006;85(4):e7). This prompted us to examine the in situ stability of crosslinked HA materials to hyaluronidase lyase degradation. Variables such as ferric ionic crosslink density, HA concentration, gel geometry, and molecular weight (MW) of HA polymer were studied. Various formulations of the crosslinked "in house" [Isayeva et al., J Biomed Mater Res: Part B - Appl Biomater 2010, 95B (1):9-18] FeHA (0.5%, w/v; 30, 50, 90% crosslinked), the Intergel® FeHA (0.5%, w/v; 90%), and the non-crosslinked HA (0.05-0.5%, w/v) were degraded at a fixed activity of hyaluronidase lyase from Streptomyces hyalurolyticus (Hyase) at 37°C over time according to the method [Payan et al., J Chrom B: Biomed Sci Appl 1991;566(1):9-18]. Under our conditions, the data show that the crosslink density affects degradation the most, followed by HA concentration and then gel geometry. We found that MW has no effect. Our results are one possible explanation of the observations that the Intergel® FeHA APS (0.5%, w/v; 90%) material persisted an order of magnitude longer than expected [t1/2 = 500 hrs vs. t1/2 = 50 hrs (FDA; Johns et al., Fertil Steril 1997;68(1):37-42)]. These data also demonstrate the sensitivity of the in vitro hyaluronidase assay to predict the in situ stability of crosslinked HA medical products as previously reported [Sall et al., Polym Degrad Stabil 2007;92(5):915-919]. PMID:23559362

  20. Reduced endogenous Ca2+ buffering speeds active zone Ca2+ signaling.

    PubMed

    Delvendahl, Igor; Jablonski, Lukasz; Baade, Carolin; Matveev, Victor; Neher, Erwin; Hallermann, Stefan

    2015-06-01

    Fast synchronous neurotransmitter release at the presynaptic active zone is triggered by local Ca(2+) signals, which are confined in their spatiotemporal extent by endogenous Ca(2+) buffers. However, it remains elusive how rapid and reliable Ca(2+) signaling can be sustained during repetitive release. Here, we established quantitative two-photon Ca(2+) imaging in cerebellar mossy fiber boutons, which fire at exceptionally high rates. We show that endogenous fixed buffers have a surprisingly low Ca(2+)-binding ratio (∼ 15) and low affinity, whereas mobile buffers have high affinity. Experimentally constrained modeling revealed that the low endogenous buffering promotes fast clearance of Ca(2+) from the active zone during repetitive firing. Measuring Ca(2+) signals at different distances from active zones with ultra-high-resolution confirmed our model predictions. Our results lead to the concept that reduced Ca(2+) buffering enables fast active zone Ca(2+) signaling, suggesting that the strength of endogenous Ca(2+) buffering limits the rate of synchronous synaptic transmission. PMID:26015575

  1. The Novel Antitubulin Agent TR-764 Strongly Reduces Tumor Vasculature and Inhibits HIF-1α Activation.

    PubMed

    Porcù, Elena; Persano, Luca; Ronca, Roberto; Mitola, Stefania; Bortolozzi, Roberta; Romagnoli, Romeo; Oliva, Paola; Basso, Giuseppe; Viola, Giampietro

    2016-01-01

    Tubulin binding agents (TBAs) are commonly used in cancer therapy as antimitotics. It has been described that TBAs, like combretastatin A-4 (CA-4), present also antivascular activity and among its derivatives we identified TR-764 as a new inhibitor of tubulin polymerization, based on the 2-(alkoxycarbonyl)-3-(3',4',5'-trimethoxyanilino)benzo[b]thiophene molecular skeleton. The antiangiogenic activity of TR-764 (1-10 nM) was tested in vitro on human umbilical endothelial cells (HUVECs), and in vivo, on the chick embryo chorioallantoic membrane (CAM) and two murine tumor models. TR-764 binding to tubulin triggers cytoskeleton rearrangement without affecting cell cycle and viability. It leads to capillary tube disruption, increased cell permeability, and cell motility reduction. Moreover it disrupts adherens junctions and focal adhesions, through mechanisms involving VE-cadherin/β-catenin and FAK/Src. Importantly, TR-764 is active in hypoxic conditions significantly reducing HIF-1α. In vivo TR-764 (1-100 pmol/egg) remarkably blocks the bFGF proangiogenic activity on CAM and shows a stronger reduction of tumor mass and microvascular density both in murine syngeneic and xenograft tumor models, compared to the lead compound CA-4P. Altogether, our results indicate that TR-764 is a novel TBA with strong potential as both antivascular and antitumor molecule that could improve the common anticancer therapies, by overcoming hypoxia-induced resistance mechanisms. PMID:27292568

  2. Reducing GBA2 Activity Ameliorates Neuropathology in Niemann-Pick Type C Mice

    PubMed Central

    Ottenhoff, Roelof; van Roomen, Cindy P. A. A.; Herrera Moro, Daniela; Claessen, Nike; Vinueza Veloz, María Fernanda; Zhou, Kuikui; Lin, Zhanmin; Mirzaian, Mina; Boot, Rolf G.; De Zeeuw, Chris I.; Overkleeft, Herman S.; Yildiz, Yildiz; Aerts, Johannes M. F. G.

    2015-01-01

    The enzyme glucocerebrosidase (GBA) hydrolyses glucosylceramide (GlcCer) in lysosomes. Markedly reduced GBA activity is associated with severe manifestations of Gaucher disease including neurological involvement. Mutations in the GBA gene have recently also been identified as major genetic risk factor for Parkinsonism. Disturbed metabolism of GlcCer may therefore play a role in neuropathology. Besides lysosomal GBA, cells also contain a non-lysosomal glucosylceramidase (GBA2). Given that the two β-glucosidases share substrates, we speculated that over-activity of GBA2 during severe GBA impairment might influence neuropathology. This hypothesis was studied in Niemann-Pick type C (Npc1-/-) mice showing secondary deficiency in GBA in various tissues. Here we report that GBA2 activity is indeed increased in the brain of Npc1-/- mice. We found that GBA2 is particularly abundant in Purkinje cells (PCs), one of the most affected neuronal populations in NPC disease. Inhibiting GBA2 in Npc1-/- mice with a brain-permeable low nanomolar inhibitor significantly improved motor coordination and extended lifespan in the absence of correction in cholesterol and ganglioside abnormalities. This trend was recapitulated, although not to full extent, by introducing a genetic loss of GBA2 in Npc1-/- mice. Our findings point to GBA2 activity as therapeutic target in NPC. PMID:26275242

  3. The Novel Antitubulin Agent TR-764 Strongly Reduces Tumor Vasculature and Inhibits HIF-1α Activation

    PubMed Central

    Porcù, Elena; Persano, Luca; Ronca, Roberto; Mitola, Stefania; Bortolozzi, Roberta; Romagnoli, Romeo; Oliva, Paola; Basso, Giuseppe; Viola, Giampietro

    2016-01-01

    Tubulin binding agents (TBAs) are commonly used in cancer therapy as antimitotics. It has been described that TBAs, like combretastatin A-4 (CA-4), present also antivascular activity and among its derivatives we identified TR-764 as a new inhibitor of tubulin polymerization, based on the 2-(alkoxycarbonyl)-3-(3′,4′,5′-trimethoxyanilino)benzo[b]thiophene molecular skeleton. The antiangiogenic activity of TR-764 (1–10 nM) was tested in vitro on human umbilical endothelial cells (HUVECs), and in vivo, on the chick embryo chorioallantoic membrane (CAM) and two murine tumor models. TR-764 binding to tubulin triggers cytoskeleton rearrangement without affecting cell cycle and viability. It leads to capillary tube disruption, increased cell permeability, and cell motility reduction. Moreover it disrupts adherens junctions and focal adhesions, through mechanisms involving VE-cadherin/β-catenin and FAK/Src. Importantly, TR-764 is active in hypoxic conditions significantly reducing HIF-1α. In vivo TR-764 (1–100 pmol/egg) remarkably blocks the bFGF proangiogenic activity on CAM and shows a stronger reduction of tumor mass and microvascular density both in murine syngeneic and xenograft tumor models, compared to the lead compound CA-4P. Altogether, our results indicate that TR-764 is a novel TBA with strong potential as both antivascular and antitumor molecule that could improve the common anticancer therapies, by overcoming hypoxia-induced resistance mechanisms. PMID:27292568

  4. Inhibition of histone deacetylase 6 activity reduces cyst growth in polycystic kidney disease.

    PubMed

    Cebotaru, Liudmila; Liu, Qiangni; Yanda, Murali K; Boinot, Clement; Outeda, Patricia; Huso, David L; Watnick, Terry; Guggino, William B; Cebotaru, Valeriu

    2016-07-01

    Abnormal proliferation of cyst-lining epithelium and increased intracystic fluid secretion via the cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) are thought to contribute to cyst growth in autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease (ADPKD). Histone deacetylase 6 (HDAC6) expression and activity are increased in certain cancers, neurodegenerative diseases, and in Pkd1-mutant renal epithelial cells. Inhibition of HDAC6 activity with specific inhibitors slows cancer growth. Here we studied the effect of tubacin, a specific HDAC6 inhibitor, on cyst growth in polycystic kidney disease. Treatment with tubacin prevented cyst formation in MDCK cells, an in vitro model of cystogenesis. Cyclic AMP stimulates cell proliferation and activates intracystic CFTR-mediated chloride secretion in ADPKD. Treatment with tubacin downregulated cyclic AMP levels, inhibited cell proliferation, and inhibited cyclic AMP-activated CFTR chloride currents in MDCK cells. We also found that tubacin reduced cyst growth by inhibiting proliferation of cyst-lining epithelial cells, downregulated cyclic AMP levels, and improved renal function in a Pkd1-conditional mouse model of ADPKD. Thus, HDAC6 could play a role in cyst formation and could serve as a potential therapeutic target in ADPKD. PMID:27165822

  5. Unfolded protein response activation reduces secretion and extracellular aggregation of amyloidogenic immunoglobulin light chain

    PubMed Central

    Cooley, Christina B.; Ryno, Lisa M.; Plate, Lars; Morgan, Gareth J.; Hulleman, John D.; Kelly, Jeffery W.; Wiseman, R. Luke

    2014-01-01

    Light-chain amyloidosis (AL) is a degenerative disease characterized by the extracellular aggregation of a destabilized amyloidogenic Ig light chain (LC) secreted from a clonally expanded plasma cell. Current treatments for AL revolve around ablating the cancer plasma cell population using chemotherapy regimens. Unfortunately, this approach is limited to the ∼70% of patients who do not exhibit significant organ proteotoxicity and can tolerate chemotherapy. Thus, identifying new therapeutic strategies to alleviate LC organ proteotoxicity should allow AL patients with significant cardiac and/or renal involvement to subsequently tolerate established chemotherapy treatments. Using a small-molecule screening approach, the unfolded protein response (UPR) was identified as a cellular signaling pathway whose activation selectively attenuates secretion of amyloidogenic LC, while not affecting secretion of a nonamyloidogenic LC. Activation of the UPR-associated transcription factors XBP1s and/or ATF6 in the absence of stress recapitulates the selective decrease in amyloidogenic LC secretion by remodeling the endoplasmic reticulum proteostasis network. Stress-independent activation of XBP1s, or especially ATF6, also attenuates extracellular aggregation of amyloidogenic LC into soluble aggregates. Collectively, our results show that stress-independent activation of these adaptive UPR transcription factors offers a therapeutic strategy to reduce proteotoxicity associated with LC aggregation. PMID:25157167

  6. Circuit formation and function in the olfactory bulb of mice with reduced spontaneous afferent activity.

    PubMed

    Lorenzon, Paolo; Redolfi, Nelly; Podolsky, Michael J; Zamparo, Ilaria; Franchi, Sira Angela; Pietra, Gianluca; Boccaccio, Anna; Menini, Anna; Murthy, Venkatesh N; Lodovichi, Claudia

    2015-01-01

    The type of neuronal activity required for circuit development is a matter of significant debate. We addressed this issue by analyzing the topographic organization of the olfactory bulb in transgenic mice engineered to have very little afferent spontaneous activity due to the overexpression of the inwardly rectifying potassium channel Kir2.1 in the olfactory sensory neurons (Kir2.1 mice). In these conditions, the topography of the olfactory bulb was unrefined. Odor-evoked responses were readily recorded in glomeruli with reduced spontaneous afferent activity, although the functional maps were coarser than in controls and contributed to altered olfactory discrimination behavior. In addition, overexpression of Kir2.1 in adults induced a regression of the already refined connectivity to an immature (i.e., coarser) status. Our data suggest that spontaneous activity plays a critical role not only in the development but also in the maintenance of the topography of the olfactory bulb and in sensory information processing. PMID:25568110

  7. Reduced endogenous Ca2+ buffering speeds active zone Ca2+ signaling

    PubMed Central

    Delvendahl, Igor; Jablonski, Lukasz; Baade, Carolin; Matveev, Victor; Neher, Erwin; Hallermann, Stefan

    2015-01-01

    Fast synchronous neurotransmitter release at the presynaptic active zone is triggered by local Ca2+ signals, which are confined in their spatiotemporal extent by endogenous Ca2+ buffers. However, it remains elusive how rapid and reliable Ca2+ signaling can be sustained during repetitive release. Here, we established quantitative two-photon Ca2+ imaging in cerebellar mossy fiber boutons, which fire at exceptionally high rates. We show that endogenous fixed buffers have a surprisingly low Ca2+-binding ratio (∼15) and low affinity, whereas mobile buffers have high affinity. Experimentally constrained modeling revealed that the low endogenous buffering promotes fast clearance of Ca2+ from the active zone during repetitive firing. Measuring Ca2+ signals at different distances from active zones with ultra-high-resolution confirmed our model predictions. Our results lead to the concept that reduced Ca2+ buffering enables fast active zone Ca2+ signaling, suggesting that the strength of endogenous Ca2+ buffering limits the rate of synchronous synaptic transmission. PMID:26015575

  8. Ag/ZnO heterostructures and their photocatalytic activity under visible light: effect of reducing medium.

    PubMed

    Liu, Yangsi; Wei, Shanghai; Gao, Wei

    2015-04-28

    Decoration of ZnO by Ag is a promising method to improve its photocatalytic activity and extend the photoreactivity to the visible light. In this paper, Ag/ZnO heterostructures have been synthesised by photoreduction in various reducing mediums. When the Ag/ZnO nanocomposite arrays were obtained in the air, only a small amount of Ag was reduced. Ag nanosheets and nanoparticles were formed in the water and attached on the top and side surfaces of ZnO nanorods, forming Ag/ZnO heterostructures with a nano(sheet-rod-particle) multi-level structure. In the mixture of water and ethanol, a large amount of Ag nanoclusters was produced and embedded in the ZnO nanorod arrays. The influence of reducing mediums on the microstructure, morphology, quantity and dispersion of Ag nanostructures was investigated; and the effect of Ag component on the optical properties and visible light driven photocatalytic behaviour of the Ag/ZnO heterostructures was discussed. PMID:25621832

  9. Pretreatment with alum or powdered activated carbon reduces bacterial predation-associated irreversible fouling of membranes.

    PubMed

    Kim, Eun-Ho; Dwidar, Mohammed; Kwon, Young-Nam; Mitchell, Robert J

    2014-01-01

    This study evaluated the co-application of bacterial predation by Bdellovibrio bacteriovorus and either alum coagulation or powdered activated carbon adsorption to reduce fouling caused by Escherichia coli rich feed solutions in dead-end microfiltration tests. The flux increased when the samples were predated upon or treated with 100 ppm alum or PAC, but co-treatment with alum and predation gave the best flux results. The total membrane resistance caused by the predated sample was reduced six-fold when treated with 100 ppm PAC, from 11.8 to 1.98 × 10(11) m(-1), while irreversible fouling (Rp) was 2.7-fold lower. Treatment with 100 ppm alum reduced the total resistance 14.9-fold (11.8 to 0.79 × 10(11) m(-1)) while the Rp decreased 4.25-fold. SEM imaging confirmed this, with less obvious fouling of the membrane after the combined process. This study illustrates that the combination of bacterial predation and the subsequent removal of debris using coagulation or adsorption mitigates membrane biofouling and improves membrane performance. PMID:25410737

  10. Shear stress reduces protease activated receptor-1 expression in human endothelial cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nguyen, K. T.; Eskin, S. G.; Patterson, C.; Runge, M. S.; McIntire, L. V.

    2001-01-01

    Shear stress has been shown to regulate several genes involved in the thrombotic and proliferative functions of endothelial cells. Thrombin receptor (protease-activated receptor-1: PAR-1) increases at sites of vascular injury, which suggests an important role for PAR-1 in vascular diseases. However, the effect of shear stress on PAR-1 expression has not been previously studied. This work investigates effects of shear stress on PAR-1 gene expression in both human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs) and microvascular endothelial cells (HMECs). Cells were exposed to different shear stresses using a parallel plate flow system. Northern blot and flow cytometry analysis showed that shear stress down-regulated PAR-1 messenger RNA (mRNA) and protein levels in both HUVECs and HMECs but with different thresholds. Furthermore, shear-reduced PAR-1 mRNA was due to a decrease of transcription rate, not increased mRNA degradation. Postshear stress release of endothelin-1 in response to thrombin was reduced in HUVECs and HMECs. Moreover, inhibitors of potential signaling pathways applied during shear stress indicated mediation of the shear-decreased PAR-1 expression by protein kinases. In conclusion, shear stress exposure reduces PAR-1 gene expression in HMECs and HUVECs through a mechanism dependent in part on protein kinases, leading to altered endothelial cell functional responses to thrombin.

  11. Laquinimod decreases Bax expression and reduces caspase-6 activation in neurons.

    PubMed

    Ehrnhoefer, Dagmar E; Caron, Nicholas S; Deng, Yu; Qiu, Xiaofan; Tsang, Michelle; Hayden, Michael R

    2016-09-01

    Laquinimod is an immunomodulatory compound that has shown neuroprotective benefits in clinical trials for multiple sclerosis. Laquinimod ameliorates both white and gray matter damage in human patients, and prevents axonal degeneration in animal models of multiple sclerosis. Axonal damage and white matter loss are a common feature shared between different neurodegenerative diseases. Caspase-6 activation plays an important role in axonal degeneration on the molecular level. Increased activity of caspase-6 has been demonstrated in brain tissue from presymptomatic Huntington disease mutation carriers, and it is an early marker of axonal dysfunction. Since laquinimod is currently undergoing a clinical trial in Huntington disease (LEGATO-HD, clinicaltrials.gov ID: NCT02215616), we set out to evaluate its impact on neuronal caspase-6 activation. We find that laquinimod ameliorates DNA-damage induced activation of caspase-6 in primary neuronal cultures. This is an indirect effect that is not mediated by direct inhibition of the enzyme. The investigation of potential caspase-6 activating mechanisms revealed that laquinimod reduces the expression of Bax, a pro-apoptotic molecule that causes mitochondrial cytochrome c release and caspase activation. Bax expression is furthermore increased in striatal tissues from the YAC128 mouse model of HD in an age-dependent manner. Our results demonstrate that laquinimod can directly downregulate neuronal apoptosis pathways relevant for axonal degeneration in addition to its known effects on astrocytes and microglia in the CNS. It targets a pathway that is relevant for the pathogenesis of HD, supporting the hypothesis that laquinimod may provide clinical benefit. PMID:27296315

  12. Dopamine Depletion Reduces Food-Related Reward Activity Independent of BMI.

    PubMed

    Frank, Sabine; Veit, Ralf; Sauer, Helene; Enck, Paul; Friederich, Hans-Christoph; Unholzer, Theresa; Bauer, Ute-Maria; Linder, Katarzyna; Heni, Martin; Fritsche, Andreas; Preissl, Hubert

    2016-05-01

    Reward sensitivity and possible alterations in the dopaminergic-reward system are associated with obesity. We therefore aimed to investigate the influence of dopamine depletion on food-reward processing. We investigated 34 female subjects in a randomized placebo-controlled, within-subject design (body mass index (BMI)=27.0 kg/m(2) ±4.79 SD; age=28 years ±4.97 SD) using an acute phenylalanine/tyrosine depletion drink representing dopamine depletion and a balanced amino acid drink as the control condition. Brain activity was measured with functional magnetic resonance imaging during a 'wanting' and 'liking' rating of food items. Eating behavior-related traits and states were assessed on the basis of questionnaires. Dopamine depletion resulted in reduced activation in the striatum and higher activation in the superior frontal gyrus independent of BMI. Brain activity during the wanting task activated a more distributed network than during the liking task. This network included gustatory, memory, visual, reward, and frontal regions. An interaction effect of dopamine depletion and the wanting/liking task was observed in the hippocampus. The interaction with the covariate BMI was significant in motor and control regions but not in the striatum. Our results support the notion of altered brain activity in the reward and prefrontal network with blunted dopaminergic action during food-reward processing. This effect is, however, independent of BMI, which contradicts the reward-deficiency hypothesis. This hints to the hypothesis suggesting a different or more complex mechanism underlying the dopaminergic reward function in obesity. PMID:26450814

  13. T396I Mutation of Mouse Sufu Reduces the Stability and Activity of Gli3 Repressor

    PubMed Central

    Makino, Shigeru; Zhulyn, Olena; Mo, Rong; Puviindran, Vijitha; Zhang, Xiaoyun; Murata, Takuya; Fukumura, Ryutaro; Ishitsuka, Yuichi; Kotaki, Hayato; Matsumaru, Daisuke; Ishii, Shunsuke; Hui, Chi-Chung; Gondo, Yoichi

    2015-01-01

    Hedgehog signaling is primarily transduced by two transcription factors: Gli2, which mainly acts as a full-length activator, and Gli3, which tends to be proteolytically processed from a full-length form (Gli3FL) to an N-terminal repressor (Gli3REP). Recent studies using a Sufu knockout mouse have indicated that Sufu is involved in regulating Gli2 and Gli3 activator and repressor activity at multiple steps of the signaling cascade; however, the mechanism of specific Gli2 and Gli3 regulation remains to be elucidated. In this study, we established an allelic series of ENU-induced mouse strains. Analysis of one of the missense alleles, SufuT396I, showed that Thr396 residue of Sufu played a key role in regulation of Gli3 activity. SufuT396I/T396I embryos exhibited severe polydactyly, which is indicative of compromised Gli3 activity. Concomitantly, significant quantitative reductions of unprocessed Gli3 (Gli3FL) and processed Gli3 (Gli3REP) were observed in vivo as well as in vitro. Genetic experiments showed that patterning defects in the limb buds of SufuT396I/T396I were rescued by a constitutive Gli3REP allele (Gli3∆699), strongly suggesting that SufuT396I reduced the truncated Gli3 repressor. In contrast, SufuT396I qualitatively exhibited no mutational effects on Gli2 regulation. Taken together, the results of this study show that the Thr396 residue of Sufu is specifically required for regulation of Gli3 but not Gli2. This implies a novel Sufu-mediated mechanism in which Gli2 activator and Gli3 repressor are differentially regulated. PMID:25760946

  14. Chemically active reduced graphene oxide with tunable C/O ratios.

    PubMed

    Compton, Owen C; Jain, Bonny; Dikin, Dmitriy A; Abouimrane, Ali; Amine, Khalil; Nguyen, Sonbinh T

    2011-06-28

    Organic dispersions of graphene oxide can be thermally reduced in polar organic solvents under reflux conditions to afford electrically conductive, chemically active reduced graphene oxide (CARGO) with tunable C/O ratios, dependent on the boiling point of the solvent. The reductions are achieved after only 1 h of reflux, and the corresponding C/O ratios do not change upon further thermal treatment. Hydroxyl and carboxyl groups can be removed when the reflux is carried out above 155 °C, while epoxides are removable only when the temperature is higher than 200 °C. The increasing hydrophobic nature of CARGO, as its C/O ratio increases, improves the dispersibility of the nanosheets in a polystyrene matrix, in contrast to the aggregates formed with CARGO having lower C/O ratios. The excellent processability of the obtained CARGO dispersions is demonstrated via free-standing CARGO papers that exhibit tunable electrical conductivity/chemical activity and can be used as lithium-ion battery anodes with enhanced Coulombic efficiency. PMID:21473647

  15. Reduced lymphocyte activation in space: role of cell-substratum interactions.

    PubMed

    Gmünder, F K; Kiess, M; Sonnenfeld, G; Lee, J; Cogoli, A

    1992-01-01

    We investigated the effect of substratum adhesiveness on stimulated lymphocyte blastogenesis by reducing and blocking cell adhesion with poly (2-hydroxyethyl methacrylate) (poly-HEMA) in a simple on-ground system. Cells grown on medium-thick and thick poly-HEMA films were rounded in shape and displayed no signs of spreading. By contrast, on tissue culture plastic and very thin poly-HEMA films, they showed clear signs of spreading. The mitogenic response of lymphocytes grown on thick poly-HEMA films was reduced by up to 68% of the control (tissue culture plastic). Interferon-gamma production was near zero when the cells were grown on the least adhesive substratum. On uncoated plastic, activated lymphocytes subjected to high gravity (20g) exhibited an increased proliferation rate (40%) compared with 1g. By contrast, on poly-HEMA, high gravity did not improve lymphocyte responsiveness. These results show that activated lymphocytes need to anchor and spread prior to achieving an optimal proliferation response. We conclude that decreased lymphocyte adhesion could contribute to the depressed in vitro lymphocyte responsiveness found in the microgravity conditions of space flight. PMID:11536989

  16. Exceptionally strong sorption of infochemicals to activated carbon reduces their bioavailability to fish.

    PubMed

    Jonker, Michiel T O; van Mourik, Louise

    2014-03-01

    The addition of activated carbon (AC) to sediments is a relatively new approach to remediate contaminated sites. Activated carbon strongly sorbs hydrophobic organic contaminants, thereby reducing their bioavailability and uptake in organisms. Because of its high sorption capacity, AC might, however, also sorb other chemicals that are not contaminants but instead have ecological functions. Examples of such compounds are infochemicals or pheromones (i.e., compounds serving as chemical inter- and intraspecies information vectors). The present study investigated the sorption of 2 known infochemicals, hypoxanthine-3-N-oxide (H3NO) and pyridine-N-oxide (PNO), to 5 different powdered ACs. Sorption isotherms of these low-molecular-weight, polar fish kairomone substances appeared highly nonlinear, with logarithmic Freundlich sorption coefficients of up to 7.6. At physiologically relevant concentrations, sorption was up to 7 to 9 orders of magnitude stronger than expected on the basis of hydrophobic forces only (i.e., the compounds' log octanol-water partition coefficient, being approximately -1), indicating exceptionally strong binding to specific sites. This binding effectively reduced the bioavailability of H3NO to Sarasa goldfish, as was shown in a behavioral assay. The present study demonstrates the previously unrecognized potential of AC to sorb ecologically relevant chemicals. Whether this potential may lead to subtle, unwanted ecological effects in the field will have to be investigated in more detail during future research. PMID:24272993

  17. Joining techniques for a reduced activation 12Cr steel for inertial fusion energy

    SciTech Connect

    Hunt, R. M.; El-Dasher, B.; Choi, B. W.; Torres, S. G.

    2014-10-01

    At Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, we are developing a reduced activation ferritic martensitic steel that is based on the ferritic martensitic steel HT-9. As a part of the development of this steel, we tested a series of welding processes for characterization, including conventional welds (electron beam, tungsten inert gas, and laser) as well as solid-state welds (hot isostatic pressing). We also heat treated the joints at various temperatures between 750 °C and 1050 °C to find a suitable normalization scheme. The modified HT-9 reduced activation ferritic martensitic steel appears highly suitable to welding and diffusion bonding. All welds showed good quality fusion zones with insignificant cracking or porosity. Additionally, a heat treatment schedule of 950 °C for one hour caused minimal grain growth while still converging the hardness of the base metal with that of the fusion and heat-affected zones. Also, modified HT-9 diffusion bonds that were created at temperatures of at least 950 °C for two hours at 103 MPa had interface tensile strengths of greater than 600 MPa. The diffusion bonds showed no evidence of increased hardness nor void formation at the diffusion bonded interface.

  18. ACE inhibition reduces infarction in normotensive but not hypertensive rats: correlation with cortical ACE activity

    PubMed Central

    Porritt, Michelle J; Chen, Michelle; Rewell, Sarah S J; Dean, Rachael G; Burrell, Louise M; Howells, David W

    2010-01-01

    Angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE) inhibition can reduce stroke risk by up to 43% in humans and reduce the associated disability, and hence understanding the mechanism of improvement is important. In animals and humans, these effects may be independent of the blood pressure-lowering effects of ACE inhibition. Normotensive (Wistar–Kyoto (WKY)) and hypertensive (spontaneously hypertensive rat (SHR)) animals were treated with the ACE inhibitors ramipril or lisinopril for 7 or 42 days before 2 hours of transient middle cerebral artery occlusion (MCAo). Blood pressure, serum ACE, and blood glucose levels were measured and stroke infarct volume was recorded 24 hours after stroke. Despite greater reductions in blood pressure, infarct size was not improved by ACE inhibition in hypertensive animals. Short-term ACE inhibition produced only a modest reduction in blood pressure, but WKY rats showed marked reductions in infarct volume. Long-term ACE inhibition had additional reductions in blood pressure; however, infarct volumes in WKY rats did not improve further but worsened. WKY rats differed from SHR in having marked cortical ACE activity that was highly sensitive to ACE inhibition. The beneficial effects of ACE inhibition on infarct volume in normotensive rats do not correlate with changes in blood pressure. However, WKY rats have ACE inhibitor-sensitive cortical ACE activity that is lacking in the SHR. PMID:20407464

  19. Reduced posterior parietal cortex activation after training on a visual search task.

    PubMed

    Bueichekú, Elisenda; Miró-Padilla, Anna; Palomar-García, María-Ángeles; Ventura-Campos, Noelia; Parcet, María-Antonia; Barrós-Loscertales, Alfonso; Ávila, César

    2016-07-15

    Gaining experience on a cognitive task improves behavioral performance and is thought to enhance brain efficiency. Despite the body of literature already published on the effects of training on brain activation, less research has been carried out on visual search attention processes under well controlled conditions. Thirty-six healthy adults divided into trained and control groups completed a pre-post letter-based visual search task fMRI study in one day. Twelve letters were used as targets and ten as distractors. The trained group completed a training session (840 trials) with half the targets between scans. The effects of training were studied at the behavioral and brain levels by controlling for repetition effects using both between-subjects (trained vs. control groups) and within-subject (trained vs. untrained targets) controls. The trained participants reduced their response speed by 31% as a result of training, maintaining their accuracy scores, whereas the control group hardly changed. Neural results revealed that brain changes associated with visual search training were circumscribed to reduced activation in the posterior parietal cortex (PPC) when controlling for group, and they included inferior occipital areas when controlling for targets. The observed behavioral and brain changes are discussed in relation to automatic behavior development. The observed training-related decreases could be associated with increased neural efficiency in specific key regions for task performance. PMID:27132048

  20. Oxytocin reduces neural activity in the pain circuitry when seeing pain in others

    PubMed Central

    Hermans, Erno J.; Keysers, Christian; van Honk, Jack

    2015-01-01

    Our empathetic abilities allow us to feel the pain of others. This phenomenon of vicarious feeling arises because the neural circuitry of feeling pain and seeing pain in others is shared. The neuropeptide oxytocin (OXT) is considered a robust facilitator of empathy, as intranasal OXT studies have repeatedly been shown to improve cognitive empathy (e.g. mind reading and emotion recognition). However, OXT has not yet been shown to increase neural empathic responses to pain in others, a core aspect of affective empathy. Effects of OXT on empathy for pain are difficult to predict, because OXT evidently has pain-reducing properties. Accordingly, OXT might paradoxically decrease empathy for pain. Here, using functional neuroimaging we show robust activation in the neural circuitry of pain (insula and sensorimotor regions) when subjects observe pain in others. Crucially, this empathy-related activation in the neural circuitry of pain is strongly reduced after intranasal OXT, specifically in the left insula. OXT on the basis of our neuroimaging data thus remarkably decreases empathy for pain, but further research including behavioral measures are necessary to draw definite conclusions. PMID:25818690