Science.gov

Sample records for activity format includes

  1. Amending Miller's Pyramid to Include Professional Identity Formation.

    PubMed

    Cruess, Richard L; Cruess, Sylvia R; Steinert, Yvonne

    2016-02-01

    In 1990, George Miller published an article entitled "The Assessment of Clinical Skills/Competence/Performance" that had an immediate and lasting impact on medical education. In his classic article, he stated that no single method of assessment could encompass the intricacies and complexities of medical practice. To provide a structured approach to the assessment of medical competence, he proposed a pyramidal structure with four levels, each of which required specific methods of assessment. As is well known, the layers are "Knows," "Knows How," "Shows How," and "Does." Miller's pyramid has guided assessment since its introduction; it has also been used to assist in the assessment of professionalism.The recent emphasis on professional identity formation has raised questions about the appropriateness of "Does" as the highest level of aspiration. It is believed that a more reliable indicator of professional behavior is the incorporation of the values and attitudes of the professional into the identity of the aspiring physician. It is therefore proposed that a fifth level be added at the apex of the pyramid. This level, reflecting the presence of a professional identity, should be "Is," and methods of assessing progress toward a professional identity and the nature of the identity in formation should be guided by currently available methods.

  2. Activation of PAD4 in NET formation.

    PubMed

    Rohrbach, Amanda S; Slade, Daniel J; Thompson, Paul R; Mowen, Kerri A

    2012-01-01

    Peptidylarginine deiminases, or PADs, convert arginine residues to the non-ribosomally encoded amino acid citrulline in a variety of protein substrates. PAD4 is expressed in granulocytes and is essential for the formation of neutrophil extracellular traps (NETs) via PAD4-mediated histone citrullination. Citrullination of histones is thought to promote NET formation by inducing chromatin decondensation and facilitating the expulsion of chromosomal DNA that is coated with antimicrobial molecules. Numerous stimuli have been reported to lead to PAD4 activation and NET formation. However, how this signaling process proceeds and how PAD4 becomes activated in cells is largely unknown. Herein, we describe the various stimuli and signaling pathways that have been implicated in PAD4 activation and NET formation, including the role of reactive oxygen species generation. To provide a foundation for the above discussion, we first describe PAD4 structure and function, and how these studies led to the development of PAD-specific inhibitors. A comprehensive survey of the receptors and signaling pathways that regulate PAD4 activation will be important for our understanding of innate immunity, and the identification of signaling intermediates in PAD4 activation may also lead to the generation of pharmaceuticals to target NET-related pathogenesis. PMID:23264775

  3. Photogeneration of active formate decomposition catalysts to produce hydrogen from formate and water

    DOEpatents

    King, Jr., Allen D.; King, Robert B.; Sailers, III, Earl L.

    1983-02-08

    A process for producing hydrogen from formate and water by photogenerating an active formate decomposition catalyst from transition metal carbonyl precursor catalysts at relatively low temperatures and otherwise mild conditions is disclosed. Additionally, this process may be expanded to include the generation of formate from carbon monoxide and hydroxide such that the result is the water gas shift reaction.

  4. Everglades National Park Including Biscayne National Park. Activity Book.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ruehrwein, Dick

    Intended to help elementary school children learn about the resources of the Everglades and Biscayne National Parks, this activity book includes information, puzzles, games, and quizzes. The booklet deals with concepts related to: (1) the seasons; (2) fire ecology; (3) water; (4) fish; (5) mammals; (6) mosquitos; (7) birds; (8) venomous snakes;…

  5. Ab Initio Active Region Formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stein, Robert F.; Nordlund, A.

    2013-01-01

    The tachocline is not necessary to produce active regions with their global properties. Dynamo action within the convection zone can produce large scale reversing polarity magnetic fields as shown by ASH code and Charboneau et al simulations. Magneto-convection acting on this large scale field produces Omega-loops which emerge through the surface to produce active regions. The field first emerges as small bipoles with horizontal field over granules anchored in vertical fields in the intergranular lanes. The fields are quickly swept into the intergranular lanes and produce a mixed polarity "pepper and salt" pattern. The opposite polarities then migrate toward separate unipolar regions due to the underlying large scale loop structure. When sufficient flux concentrates, pores and sunspots form. We will show movies of magneto-convection simulations of the emerging flux, its migration, and concentration to form pores and spots, as well as the underlying magnetic field evolution. In addition, the same atmospheric data has been used as input to the LILIA Stokes Inversion code to calculate Stokes spectra for the Fe I 630 nm lines and then invert them to determine the magnetic field. Comparisons of the inverted field with the simulation field shows that small-scale, weak fields, less than 100 G, can not be accurately determined because of vertical gradients that are difficult to match in fitting the line profiles. Horizontal smoothing by telescope diffraction further degrades the inversion accuracy.

  6. Antiradical activity of gallic acid included in lipid interphases.

    PubMed

    Salcedo, C L; Frías, M A; Cutro, A C; Nazareno, M A; Disalvo, E A

    2014-10-01

    Polyphenols are well known as antioxidant agents and by their effects on the hydration layers of lipid interphases. Among them, gallic acid and its derivatives are able to decrease the dipole potential and to act in water as a strong antioxidant. In this work we have studied both effects on lipid interphases in monolayers and bilayers of dimyristoylphosphatidylcholine. The results show that gallic acid (GA) increases the negative surface charges of large unilamellar vesicles (LUVs) and decreases the dipole potential of the lipid interphase. As a result, positively charged radical species such as ABTS(+) are able to penetrate the membrane forming an association with GA. These results allow discussing the antiradical activity (ARA) of GA at the membrane phase which may be taking place in water spaces between the lipids.

  7. Composition of diesel exhaust with particular reference to particle bound organics including formation of artifacts.

    PubMed

    Lies, K H; Hartung, A; Postulka, A; Gring, H; Schulze, J

    1986-01-01

    For particulate emissions, standards were established by the US EPA in February 1980. Regulations limiting particulates from new light duty diesel vehicles are valid by model year 1982. The corresponding standards on a pure mass basis do not take into account any chemical character of the diesel particulate matter. Our investigation of the material composition shows that diesel particulates consist mainly of soot (up to 80% by weight) and adsorptively bound organics including polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAH). The qualitative and quantitative nature of hydrocarbon compounds associated with the particulates is dependent not only on the combustion parameters of the engine but also to an important degree on the sampling conditions when the particulates are collected (dilution ratio, temperature, filter material, sampling time etc.). Various methods for the analyses of PAH and their oxy- and nitro-derivatives are described including sampling, extraction, fractionation and chemical analysis. Quantitative comparison of PAH, nitro-PAH and oxy-PAH from different engines are given. For assessing mutagenicity of particulate matter, short-term biological tests are widely used. These biological tests often need a great amount of particulate matter requiring prolonged filter sampling times. Since it is well known that facile PAH oxidation can take place under the conditions used for sampling and analysis, the question rises if these PAH-derivates found in particle extracts partly or totally are produced during sampling (artifacts). Various results concerning nitro- and oxy-PAH are presented characterizing artifact formation as a minor problem under the conditions of the Federal Test Procedure. But results show that under other sampling conditions, e.g. electrostatic precipitation, higher NO2-concentrations and longer sampling times, artifact formation can become a bigger problem. The more stringent particulate standard of 0.2 g/mi for model years 1986 and 1987 respectively

  8. Star formation around active galactic nuclei

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Keel, William C.

    1987-01-01

    Active galactic nuclei (Seyfert nuclei and their relatives) and intense star formation can both deliver substantial amounts of energy to the vicinity of a galactic nucleus. Many luminous nuclei have energetics dominated by one of these mechanisms, but detailed observations show that some have a mixture. Seeing both phenomena at once raises several interesting questions: (1) Is this a general property of some kinds of nuclei? How many AGNs have surround starbursts, and vice versa? (2) As in 1, how many undiscovered AGNs or starbursts are hidden by a more luminous instance of the other? (3) Does one cause the other, and by what means, or do both reflect common influences such as potential well shape or level of gas flow? (4) Can surrounding star formation tell us anything about the central active nuclei, such as lifetimes, kinetic energy output, or mechanical disturbance of the ISM? These are important points in the understanding of activity and star formation in galactic nuclei. Unfortunately, the observational ways of addressing them are as yet not well formulated. Some preliminary studies are reported, aimed at clarifying the issues involved in study of the relationships between stellar and nonstellar excitement in galactic nuclei.

  9. Optimal design of active and semi-active suspensions including time delays and preview

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hac', A.; Youn, I.

    1993-10-01

    Several control laws for active and semi-active suspension based on a linear half car model are derived and investigated. The strategies proposed take full advantage of the fact that the road input to the rear wheels is a delayed version of that to the front wheels, which in turn can be obtained either from the measurements of the front wheels and body motions or by direct preview of road irregularities if preview sensors are available. The suspension systems are optimized with respect to ride comfort, road holding and suspension rattle space as expressed by the mean-square-values of body acceleration (including effects of heave and pitch), tire deflections and front and rear suspension travels. The optimal control laws that minimize the given performance index and include passivity constraints in the semi-active case are derived using calculus of variation. The optimal semi-active suspension becomes piecewise linear, varying between passive and fully active systems and combinations of them. The performances of active and semi-active systems with and without preview were evaluated by numerical simulation in the time and frequency domains. The results show that incorporation of time delay between the front and rear axles in controller design improves the dynamic behavior of the rear axle and control of body pitch motion, while additional preview improves front wheel dynamics and body heave.

  10. Pattern formation in Active Polar Fluids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gopinath, Arvind; Hagan, Michael; Baskaran, Aparna

    2011-03-01

    Systems such as bacterial suspensions or cytoskeletal filaments and motility assays can be described within the paradigm of active polar fluids. These systems have been shown to exhibit pattern formation raging from asters and vortices to traveling stripes. A coarse-grained description of such a fluid is given by a scalar density field and a vector polarization field. We study such a macroscopic description of the system using weakly nonlinear analysis and numerical simulations to map out the emergent pattern formation as a function of the hydrodynamic parameters in the context of two specific microscopic models - a quasi-2D suspension of cytoskeletal filaments and motor proteins and a system of self propelled hard rods that interact through excluded volume interactions. The authors thank the Brandeis MRSEC center for financial support.

  11. Inventory of Shale Formations in the US, Including Geologic, Hydrological, and Mechanical Characteristics

    SciTech Connect

    Dobson, Patrick; Houseworth, James

    2013-11-22

    The objective of this report is to build upon previous compilations of shale formations within many of the major sedimentary basins in the US by developing GIS data delineating isopach and structural depth maps for many of these units. These data are being incorporated into the LANL digital GIS database being developed for determining host rock distribution and depth/thickness parameters consistent with repository design. Methods were developed to assess hydrological and geomechanical properties and conditions for shale formations based on sonic velocity measurements.

  12. Stability and activity of alcohol dehydrogenases in W/O-microemulsions: enantioselective reduction including cofactor regeneration.

    PubMed

    Orlich, B; Berger, H; Lade, M; Schomäcker, R

    2000-12-20

    Microemulsions provide an interesting alternative to classical methods for the conversion of less water-soluble substrates by alcohol dehydrogenase, but until now stability and activity were too low for economically useful processes. The activity and stability of the enzymes are dependent on the microemulsion composition, mostly the water and the surfactant concentration. Therefore, it is necessary to know the exact phase behavior of a given microemulsion reaction system and the corresponding enzyme behavior therein. Because of their economic and ecologic suitability polyethoxylated fatty alcohols were investigated concerning their phase behavior and their compatibility with enzymes in ternary mixtures. The phase behavior of Marlipal O13-60 (C13EO6 in industrial quality)/cyclohexane/water and its effect on the activity and stability of alcohol dehydrogenase from Yeast (YADH) and horse liver (HLADH) and the carbonyl reductase from Candida parapsilosis (CPCR) is presented in this study. Beside the macroscopic phase behavior of the reaction system, the viscosity of the system indicates structural changes of aggregates in the microemulsion. The changes of the enzyme activities with the composition are discussed on the basis of transitions from reverse micelles to swollen reverse micelles and finally, the transition to the phase separation. The formate dehydrogenase from Candida boidinii was used for the NADH-regeneration during reduction reactions. While the formate dehydrogenase did not show any kinetic effect on the microemulsion composition, the other enzymes show significant changes of activity and stability varying the water or surfactant concentration of the microemulsion. Under certain conditions, stability could be maintained with HLADH for several weeks. Successful experiments with semi-batch processes including cofactor regeneration and product separation were performed.

  13. Activation of immobilized plasminogen by tissue activator. Multimolecular complex formation

    SciTech Connect

    Silverstein, R.L.; Nachman, R.L.; Leung, L.L.; Harpel, P.C.

    1985-08-25

    Ternary complex formation of tissue plasminogen activator (TPA) and plasminogen (Plg) with thrombospondin (TSP) or histidine-rich glycoprotein (HRGP) has been demonstrated using an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay, an affinity bead assay, and a rocket immunoelectrophoresis assay. The formation of these complexes was specific, concentration dependent, saturable, lysine binding site-dependent, and inhibitable by fluid phase plasminogen. Apparent Kd values were approximately 12-36 nM for the interaction of TPA with TSP-Plg complexes and 15-31 nM with HRGP-Plg complexes. At saturation the relative molar stoichiometry of Plg:TPA was 3:1 within the TSP-containing complexes and 1:1 within HRGP-containing complexes. The activation of Plg to plasmin by TPA on TSP- and HRGP-coated surfaces was studied using a synthetic fluorometric plasmin substrate (D-Val-Leu-Lys-7-amino-4-trifluoromethyl coumarin). Kinetic analysis demonstrated a marked increase in the affinity of TPA for plasminogen in the presence of surface-associated TSP or HRGP. Complex formation of locally released tissue plasminogen activator with Plg immobilized on TSP or HRGP surfaces may thus play an important role in effecting proteolytic events in nonfibrin-containing microenvironments.

  14. Two Leucobacter strains exert complementary virulence on Caenorhabditis including death by worm-star formation.

    PubMed

    Hodgkin, Jonathan; Félix, Marie-Anne; Clark, Laura C; Stroud, Dave; Gravato-Nobre, Maria J

    2013-11-01

    The nematode Caenorhabditis elegans has been much studied as a host for microbial infection. Some pathogens can infect its intestine, while others attack via its external surface. Cultures of Caenorhabditis isolated from natural environments have yielded new nematode pathogens, such as microsporidia and viruses. We report here a novel mechanism for bacterial attack on worms, discovered during investigation of a diseased and coinfected natural isolate of Caenorhabditis from Cape Verde. Two related coryneform pathogens (genus Leucobacter) were obtained from this isolate, which had complementary effects on C. elegans and related nematodes. One pathogen, Verde1, was able to cause swimming worms to stick together irreversibly by their tails, leading to the rapid formation of aggregated "worm-stars." Adult worms trapped in these aggregates were immobilized and subsequently died, with concomitant growth of bacteria. Trapped larval worms were sometimes able to escape from worm-stars by undergoing autotomy, separating their bodies into two parts. The other pathogen, Verde2, killed worms after rectal invasion, in a more virulent version of a previously studied infection. Resistance to killing by Verde2, by means of alterations in host surface glycosylation, resulted in hypersensitivity to Verde1, revealing a trade-off in bacterial susceptibility. Conversely, a sublethal surface infection of worms with Verde1 conferred partial protection against Verde2. The formation of worm-stars by Verde1 occurred only when worms were swimming in liquid but provides a striking example of asymmetric warfare as well as a bacterial equivalent to the trapping strategies used by nematophagous fungi.

  15. Two Leucobacter strains exert complementary virulence on Caenorhabditis including death by worm-star formation.

    PubMed

    Hodgkin, Jonathan; Félix, Marie-Anne; Clark, Laura C; Stroud, Dave; Gravato-Nobre, Maria J

    2013-11-01

    The nematode Caenorhabditis elegans has been much studied as a host for microbial infection. Some pathogens can infect its intestine, while others attack via its external surface. Cultures of Caenorhabditis isolated from natural environments have yielded new nematode pathogens, such as microsporidia and viruses. We report here a novel mechanism for bacterial attack on worms, discovered during investigation of a diseased and coinfected natural isolate of Caenorhabditis from Cape Verde. Two related coryneform pathogens (genus Leucobacter) were obtained from this isolate, which had complementary effects on C. elegans and related nematodes. One pathogen, Verde1, was able to cause swimming worms to stick together irreversibly by their tails, leading to the rapid formation of aggregated "worm-stars." Adult worms trapped in these aggregates were immobilized and subsequently died, with concomitant growth of bacteria. Trapped larval worms were sometimes able to escape from worm-stars by undergoing autotomy, separating their bodies into two parts. The other pathogen, Verde2, killed worms after rectal invasion, in a more virulent version of a previously studied infection. Resistance to killing by Verde2, by means of alterations in host surface glycosylation, resulted in hypersensitivity to Verde1, revealing a trade-off in bacterial susceptibility. Conversely, a sublethal surface infection of worms with Verde1 conferred partial protection against Verde2. The formation of worm-stars by Verde1 occurred only when worms were swimming in liquid but provides a striking example of asymmetric warfare as well as a bacterial equivalent to the trapping strategies used by nematophagous fungi. PMID:24206844

  16. Enzymatically active 2',5'-oligoadenylate synthetases are widely distributed among Metazoa, including protostome lineage.

    PubMed

    Päri, Mailis; Kuusksalu, Anne; Lopp, Annika; Kjaer, Karina Hansen; Justesen, Just; Kelve, Merike

    2014-02-01

    2',5'-Oligoadenylate synthetases (OASs) belong to the nucleotidyl transferase family together with poly(A) polymerases, CCA-adding enzymes and the recently discovered cyclic-GMP-AMP synthase (cGAS). Mammalian OASs have been thoroughly characterized as components of the interferon-induced antiviral system. The OAS activity and the respective genes were also discovered in marine sponges where the interferon system is absent. In this study the recombinant OASs from several multicellular animals and their closest unicellular relative, a choanoflagellate, were expressed in a bacterial expression system and their enzymatic activities were examined. We demonstrated 2-5A synthesizing activities of OASs from the marine sponge Tedania ignis, a representative of the phylogenetically oldest metazoan phylum (Porifera), from an invertebrate of the protostome lineage, the mollusk Mytilus californianus (Mollusca), and from a vertebrate species, a cartilaginous fish Leucoraja erinacea (Chordata). However, the expressed proteins from an amphibian, the salamander Ambystoma mexicanum (Chordata), and from a protozoan, the marine choanoflagellate Monosiga brevicollis (Choanozoa), did not show 2-5A synthesizing activity. Differently from other studied OASs, OAS from the marine sponge T. ignis was able to catalyze the formation of oligomers having both 2',5'- and 3',5'-phosphodiester linkages. Our data suggest that OASs from sponges and evolutionarily higher animals have similar activation mechanisms which still include different affinities and possibly different structural requirements for the activating RNAs. Considering their 2'- and 3'-specificities, sponge OASs could represent a link between evolutionarily earlier nucleotidyl transferases and 2'-specific OASs from higher animals.

  17. Enzymatically active 2',5'-oligoadenylate synthetases are widely distributed among Metazoa, including protostome lineage.

    PubMed

    Päri, Mailis; Kuusksalu, Anne; Lopp, Annika; Kjaer, Karina Hansen; Justesen, Just; Kelve, Merike

    2014-02-01

    2',5'-Oligoadenylate synthetases (OASs) belong to the nucleotidyl transferase family together with poly(A) polymerases, CCA-adding enzymes and the recently discovered cyclic-GMP-AMP synthase (cGAS). Mammalian OASs have been thoroughly characterized as components of the interferon-induced antiviral system. The OAS activity and the respective genes were also discovered in marine sponges where the interferon system is absent. In this study the recombinant OASs from several multicellular animals and their closest unicellular relative, a choanoflagellate, were expressed in a bacterial expression system and their enzymatic activities were examined. We demonstrated 2-5A synthesizing activities of OASs from the marine sponge Tedania ignis, a representative of the phylogenetically oldest metazoan phylum (Porifera), from an invertebrate of the protostome lineage, the mollusk Mytilus californianus (Mollusca), and from a vertebrate species, a cartilaginous fish Leucoraja erinacea (Chordata). However, the expressed proteins from an amphibian, the salamander Ambystoma mexicanum (Chordata), and from a protozoan, the marine choanoflagellate Monosiga brevicollis (Choanozoa), did not show 2-5A synthesizing activity. Differently from other studied OASs, OAS from the marine sponge T. ignis was able to catalyze the formation of oligomers having both 2',5'- and 3',5'-phosphodiester linkages. Our data suggest that OASs from sponges and evolutionarily higher animals have similar activation mechanisms which still include different affinities and possibly different structural requirements for the activating RNAs. Considering their 2'- and 3'-specificities, sponge OASs could represent a link between evolutionarily earlier nucleotidyl transferases and 2'-specific OASs from higher animals. PMID:24184688

  18. 78 FR 18457 - Definition of Form I-94 To Include Electronic Format

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-03-27

    ... CBP. Guidance from the Office of Management and Budget (OMB) states regulatory analyses should focus... statistical purposes, including use by the DOC Office of Travel and Tourism Industries to collect monthly... Tourism Organization recommendation for reporting arrivals to all countries. Current Paper Form...

  19. Pneumolysin activates neutrophil extracellular trap formation.

    PubMed

    G Nel, J; Theron, A J; Durandt, C; Tintinger, G R; Pool, R; Mitchell, T J; Feldman, C; Anderson, R

    2016-06-01

    The primary objective of the current study was to investigate the potential of the pneumococcal toxin, pneumolysin (Ply), to activate neutrophil extracellular trap (NET) formation in vitro. Isolated human blood neutrophils were exposed to recombinant Ply (5-20 ng ml(-1) ) for 30-90 min at 37°C and NET formation measured using the following procedures to detect extracellular DNA: (i) flow cytometry using Vybrant® DyeCycle™ Ruby; (ii) spectrofluorimetry using the fluorophore, Sytox(®) Orange (5 μM); and (iii) NanoDrop(®) technology. These procedures were complemented by fluorescence microscopy using 4', 6-diamino-2-phenylindole (DAPI) (nuclear stain) in combination with anti-citrullinated histone monoclonal antibodies to visualize nets. Exposure of neutrophils to Ply resulted in relatively rapid (detected within 30-60 min), statistically significant (P < 0·05) dose- and time-related increases in the release of cellular DNA impregnated with both citrullinated histone and myeloperoxidase. Microscopy revealed that NETosis appeared to be restricted to a subpopulation of neutrophils, the numbers of NET-forming cells in the control and Ply-treated systems (10 and 20 ng ml(-1) ) were 4·3 (4·2), 14.3 (9·9) and 16·5 (7·5), respectively (n = 4, P < 0·0001 for comparison of the control with both Ply-treated systems). Ply-induced NETosis occurred in the setting of retention of cell viability, and apparent lack of involvement of reactive oxygen species and Toll-like receptor 4. In conclusion, Ply induces vital NETosis in human neutrophils, a process which may either contribute to host defence or worsen disease severity, depending on the intensity of the inflammatory response during pneumococcal infection. PMID:26749379

  20. Hybrid (Vlasov-Fluid) simulation of ion-acoustic solitons chain formation including trapped electrons

    SciTech Connect

    Behjat, E.; Aminmansoor, F.; Abbasi, H.

    2015-08-15

    Disintegration of a Gaussian profile into ion-acoustic solitons in the presence of trapped electrons [H. Hakimi Pajouh and H. Abbasi, Phys. Plasmas 15, 082105 (2008)] is revisited. Through a hybrid (Vlasov-Fluid) model, the restrictions associated with the simple modified Korteweg de-Vries (mKdV) model are studied. For instance, the lack of vital information in the phase space associated with the evolution of electron velocity distribution, the perturbative nature of mKdV model which limits it to the weak nonlinear cases, and the special spatio-temporal scaling based on which the mKdV is derived. Remarkable differences between the results of the two models lead us to conclude that the mKdV model can only monitor the general aspects of the dynamics, and the precise picture including the correct spatio-temporal scales and the properties of solitons should be studied within the framework of hybrid model.

  1. The EMT-activator ZEB1 induces bone metastasis associated genes including BMP-inhibitors

    PubMed Central

    Mock, Kerstin; Preca, Bogdan-Tiberius; Brummer, Tilman; Brabletz, Simone; Stemmler, Marc P.; Brabletz, Thomas

    2015-01-01

    Tumor cell invasion, dissemination and metastasis is triggered by an aberrant activation of epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition (EMT), often mediated by the transcription factor ZEB1. Disseminating tumor cells must acquire specific features that allow them to colonize at different organ sites. Here we identify a set of genes that is highly expressed in breast cancer bone metastasis and activated by ZEB1. This gene set includes various secreted factors, e.g. the BMP-inhibitor FST, that are described to reorganize the bone microenvironment. By inactivating BMP-signaling, BMP-inhibitors are well-known to induce osteolysis in development and disease. We here demonstrate that the expression of ZEB1 and BMP-inhibitors is correlated with bone metastasis, but not with brain or lung metastasis of breast cancer patients. In addition, we show that this correlated expression pattern is causally linked, as ZEB1 induces the expression of the BMP-inhibitors NOG, FST and CHRDL1 both by directly increasing their gene transcription, as well as by indirectly suppressing their reduction via miR-200 family members. Consequently, ZEB1 stimulates BMP-inhibitor mediated osteoclast differentiation. These findings suggest that ZEB1 is not only driving EMT, but also contributes to the formation of osteolytic bone metastases in breast cancer. PMID:25973542

  2. Morphology, star formation, and nuclear activity in void galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wiedmann, Sophia; Miller, Brendan; Gallo, Elena; Pazar, Beni; Alfvin, Erik

    2015-01-01

    We report on new Chandra observations of six early-type galaxies located within cosmic voids, from a program examining the influence of Mpc-scale environment upon star formation and low-level supermassive black hole activity. Simple feedback prescriptions are predicted to operate independently of the surrounding density once outside the dark matter halo, and further link star formation quenching to black hole activity. Alternatively, mediation of the cold gas supply by the large-scale environment, for example through increased cold-stream accretion and reduced harassment or stripping within more isolated regions, could mutually enhance star formation and (perhaps indirectly) low-level supermassive black hole activity. The six targeted early-type galaxies have comparable stellar masses of 6-9e10 solar, chosen to be near the predicted "critical value" for efficient feedback, but span a wide range of star-formation rates. Specifically, they have SFRs of 6.5, 1.4, 0.45, 0.10, 0.04, and 0.03 solar masses per year. All galaxies are detected in the Chandra ACIS-S observations with 0.3-8 keV X-ray luminosities ranging from 2e39 to 1e41 erg/s. Specifically, they have log Lx values of 40.4, 41.1, 41.1, 39.3, 39.2, and 39.2, again ordered by decreasing SFR. The three galaxies with moderate-to-high star formation rates have nuclear X-ray luminosities that are significantly greater than those of the three galaxies with low star formation rates. This result is more consistent with a symbiotic relationship between current low-level star formation and supermassive black hole activity than with simple feedback quenching models. We additionally situate these galaxies in the context of void and cluster galaxies in the local universe, model their optical surface brightness profiles and color gradients, discuss caveats including the possibility of X-ray binary contamination, and consider other supermassive black hole activity indicators.

  3. STAR FORMATION ACTIVITY IN CLASH BRIGHTEST CLUSTER GALAXIES

    SciTech Connect

    Fogarty, Kevin; Postman, Marc; Connor, Thomas; Donahue, Megan; Moustakas, John

    2015-11-10

    The CLASH X-ray selected sample of 20 galaxy clusters contains 10 brightest cluster galaxies (BCGs) that exhibit significant (>5σ) extinction-corrected star formation rates (SFRs). Star formation activity is inferred from photometric estimates of UV and Hα+[N ii] emission in knots and filaments detected in CLASH Hubble Space Telescope ACS and WFC3 observations. UV-derived SFRs in these BCGs span two orders of magnitude, including two with a SFR ≳ 100 M{sub ⊙} yr{sup −1}. These measurements are supplemented with [O ii], [O iii], and Hβ fluxes measured from spectra obtained with the SOAR telescope. We confirm that photoionization from ongoing star formation powers the line emission nebulae in these BCGs, although in many BCGs there is also evidence of a LINER-like contribution to the line emission. Coupling these data with Chandra X-ray measurements, we infer that the star formation occurs exclusively in low-entropy cluster cores and exhibits a correlation with gas properties related to cooling. We also perform an in-depth study of the starburst history of the BCG in the cluster RXJ1532.9+3021, and create 2D maps of stellar properties on scales down to ∼350 pc. These maps reveal evidence for an ongoing burst occurring in elongated filaments, generally on ∼0.5–1.0 Gyr timescales, although some filaments are consistent with much younger (≲100 Myr) burst timescales and may be correlated with recent activity from the active galactic nucleus. The relationship between BCG SFRs and the surrounding intracluster medium gas properties provide new support for the process of feedback-regulated cooling in galaxy clusters and is consistent with recent theoretical predictions.

  4. FOXO1 mediates RANKL-induced osteoclast formation and activity.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yu; Dong, Guangyu; Jeon, Hyeran Helen; Elazizi, Mohamad; La, Lan B; Hameedaldeen, Alhassan; Xiao, E; Tian, Chen; Alsadun, Sarah; Choi, Yongwon; Graves, Dana T

    2015-03-15

    We have previously shown that the transcription factor FOXO1 is elevated in conditions with high levels of bone resorption. To investigate the role of FOXO1 in the formation of osteoclasts, we examined mice with lineage-specific deletion of FOXO1 in osteoclast precursors and by knockdown of FOXO1 with small interfering RNA. The receptor activator for NF-κB ligand (RANKL), a principal bone-resorbing factor, induced FOXO1 expression and nuclear localization 2 d after stimulation in bone marrow macrophages and RAW264.7 osteoclast precursors. RANKL-induced osteoclast formation and osteoclast activity was reduced in half in vivo and in vitro with lineage-specific FOXO1 deletion (LyzM.Cre(+)FOXO1(L/L)) compared with matched controls (LyzM.Cre(-)FOXO1(L/L)). Similar results were obtained by knockdown of FOXO1 in RAW264.7 cells. Moreover, FOXO1-mediated osteoclast formation was linked to regulation of NFATc1 nuclear localization and expression as well as a number of downstream factors, including dendritic cell-specific transmembrane protein, ATP6vod2, cathepsin K, and integrin αv. Lastly, FOXO1 deletion reduced M-CSF-induced RANK expression and migration of osteoclast precursors. In the present study, we provide evidence that FOXO1 plays a direct role in osteoclast formation by mediating the effect of RANKL on NFATc1 and several downstream effectors. This is likely to be significant because FOXO1 and RANKL are elevated in osteolytic conditions.

  5. Integrin activation and focal complex formation in cardiac hypertrophy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Laser, M.; Willey, C. D.; Jiang, W.; Cooper, G. 4th; Menick, D. R.; Zile, M. R.; Kuppuswamy, D.

    2000-01-01

    Cardiac hypertrophy is characterized by both remodeling of the extracellular matrix (ECM) and hypertrophic growth of the cardiocytes. Here we show increased expression and cytoskeletal association of the ECM proteins fibronectin and vitronectin in pressure-overloaded feline myocardium. These changes are accompanied by cytoskeletal binding and phosphorylation of focal adhesion kinase (FAK) at Tyr-397 and Tyr-925, c-Src at Tyr-416, recruitment of the adapter proteins p130(Cas), Shc, and Nck, and activation of the extracellular-regulated kinases ERK1/2. A synthetic peptide containing the Arg-Gly-Asp (RGD) motif of fibronectin and vitronectin was used to stimulate adult feline cardiomyocytes cultured on laminin or within a type-I collagen matrix. Whereas cardiocytes under both conditions showed RGD-stimulated ERK1/2 activation, only collagen-embedded cells exhibited cytoskeletal assembly of FAK, c-Src, Nck, and Shc. In RGD-stimulated collagen-embedded cells, FAK was phosphorylated only at Tyr-397 and c-Src association occurred without Tyr-416 phosphorylation and p130(Cas) association. Therefore, c-Src activation is not required for its cytoskeletal binding but may be important for additional phosphorylation of FAK. Overall, our study suggests that multiple signaling pathways originate in pressure-overloaded heart following integrin engagement with ECM proteins, including focal complex formation and ERK1/2 activation, and many of these pathways can be activated in cardiomyocytes via RGD-stimulated integrin activation.

  6. Improvements to the FATOLA computer program including added actively controlled landing gear subroutines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mall, G. H.

    1983-01-01

    Modifications to a multi-degree-of-freedom flexible aircraft take-off and landing analysis (FATOLA) computer program, including a provision for actively controlled landing gears to expand the programs simulation capabilities, are presented. Supplemental instructions for preparation of data and for use of the modified program are included.

  7. FORMATION OF CORONAL HOLES ON THE ASHES OF ACTIVE REGIONS

    SciTech Connect

    Karachik, Nina V.; Pevtsov, Alexei A.; Abramenko, Valentyna I. E-mail: apevtsov@nso.ed

    2010-05-10

    We investigate the formation of isolated non-polar coronal holes (CHs) on the remnants of decaying active regions (ARs) at the minimum/early ascending phase of sunspot activity. We follow the evolution of four bipolar ARs and measure several parameters of their magnetic fields including total flux, imbalance, and compactness. As regions decay, their leading and following polarities exhibit different dissipation rates: loose polarity tends to dissipate faster than compact polarity. As a consequence, we see a gradual increase in flux imbalance inside a dissipating bipolar region, and later a formation of a CH in place of more compact magnetic flux. Out of four cases studied in detail, two CHs had formed at the following polarity of the decaying bipolar AR, and two CHs had developed in place of the leading polarity field. All four CHs contain a significant fraction of magnetic field of their corresponding AR. Using potential field extrapolation, we show that the magnetic field lines of these CHs were closed on the polar CH at the North, which at the time of the events was in imbalance with the polar CH at the South. This topology suggests that the observed phenomenon may play an important role in transformation of toroidal magnetic field to poloidal field, which is a key step in transitioning from an old solar cycle to a new one. The timing of this observed transition may indicate the end of solar cycle 23 and the beginning of cycle 24.

  8. LIPID PEROXIDATION GENERATES BIOLOGICALLY ACTIVE PHOSPHOLIPIDS INCLUDING OXIDATIVELY N-MODIFIED PHOSPHOLIPIDS

    PubMed Central

    Davies, Sean S.; Guo, Lilu

    2014-01-01

    Peroxidation of membranes and lipoproteins converts “inert” phospholipids into a plethora of oxidatively modified phospholipids (oxPL) that can act as signaling molecules. In this review, we will discuss four major classes of oxPL: mildly oxygenated phospholipids, phospholipids with oxidatively truncated acyl chains, phospholipids with cyclized acyl chains, and phospholipids that have been oxidatively N-modified on their headgroups by reactive lipid species. For each class of oxPL we will review the chemical mechanisms of their formation, the evidence for their formation in biological samples, the biological activities and signaling pathways associated with them, and the catabolic pathways for their elimination. We will end by briefly highlighting some of the critical questions that remain about the role of oxPL in physiology and disease. PMID:24704586

  9. ON THE FORMATION OF ACTIVE REGIONS

    SciTech Connect

    Stein, Robert F.; Nordlund, Ake E-mail: aake@nbi.dk

    2012-07-01

    Magnetoconvection can produce an active region without an initial coherent flux tube. A simulation was performed where a uniform, untwisted, horizontal magnetic field of 1 kG strength was advected into the bottom of a computational domain 48 Mm wide by 20 Mm deep. The up and down convective motions produce a hierarchy of magnetic loops with a wide range of scales, with smaller loops riding 'piggy-back' in a serpentine fashion on larger loops. When a large loop approaches the surface, it produces a small active region with a compact leading spot and more diffuse following spots.

  10. Star Formation Activity in CLASH Brightest Cluster Galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fogarty, Kevin; Postman, Marc; Connor, Thomas; Donahue, Megan; Moustakas, John

    2015-11-01

    The CLASH X-ray selected sample of 20 galaxy clusters contains 10 brightest cluster galaxies (BCGs) that exhibit significant (>5σ) extinction-corrected star formation rates (SFRs). Star formation activity is inferred from photometric estimates of UV and Hα+[N ii] emission in knots and filaments detected in CLASH Hubble Space Telescope ACS and WFC3 observations. UV-derived SFRs in these BCGs span two orders of magnitude, including two with a SFR ≳ 100 M⊙ yr-1. These measurements are supplemented with [O ii], [O iii], and Hβ fluxes measured from spectra obtained with the SOAR telescope. We confirm that photoionization from ongoing star formation powers the line emission nebulae in these BCGs, although in many BCGs there is also evidence of a LINER-like contribution to the line emission. Coupling these data with Chandra X-ray measurements, we infer that the star formation occurs exclusively in low-entropy cluster cores and exhibits a correlation with gas properties related to cooling. We also perform an in-depth study of the starburst history of the BCG in the cluster RXJ1532.9+3021, and create 2D maps of stellar properties on scales down to ˜350 pc. These maps reveal evidence for an ongoing burst occurring in elongated filaments, generally on ˜0.5-1.0 Gyr timescales, although some filaments are consistent with much younger (≲100 Myr) burst timescales and may be correlated with recent activity from the active galactic nucleus. The relationship between BCG SFRs and the surrounding intracluster medium gas properties provide new support for the process of feedback-regulated cooling in galaxy clusters and is consistent with recent theoretical predictions. Based on observations obtained at the Southern Astrophysical Research (SOAR) telescope, which is a joint project of the Ministério da Ciência, Tecnologia, e Inovação (MCTI) da República Federativa do Brasil, the U.S. National Optical Astronomy Observatory (NOAO), the University of North Carolina at Chapel

  11. Blockade of mast cell activation reduces cutaneous scar formation.

    PubMed

    Chen, Lin; Schrementi, Megan E; Ranzer, Matthew J; Wilgus, Traci A; DiPietro, Luisa A

    2014-01-01

    Damage to the skin initiates a cascade of well-orchestrated events that ultimately leads to repair of the wound. The inflammatory response is key to wound healing both through preventing infection and stimulating proliferation and remodeling of the skin. Mast cells within the tissue are one of the first immune cells to respond to trauma, and upon activation they release pro-inflammatory molecules to initiate recruitment of leukocytes and promote a vascular response in the tissue. Additionally, mast cells stimulate collagen synthesis by dermal fibroblasts, suggesting they may also influence scar formation. To examine the contribution of mast cells in tissue repair, we determined the effects the mast cell inhibitor, disodium cromoglycate (DSCG), on several parameters of dermal repair including, inflammation, re-epithelialization, collagen fiber organization, collagen ultrastructure, scar width and wound breaking strength. Mice treated with DSCG had significantly reduced levels of the inflammatory cytokines IL-1α, IL-1β, and CXCL1. Although DSCG treatment reduced the production of inflammatory mediators, the rate of re-epithelialization was not affected. Compared to control, inhibition of mast cell activity caused a significant decrease in scar width along with accelerated collagen re-organization. Despite the reduced scar width, DSCG treatment did not affect the breaking strength of the healed tissue. Tryptase β1 exclusively produced by mast cells was found to increase significantly in the course of wound healing. However, DSCG treatment did not change its level in the wounds. These results indicate that blockade of mast cell activation reduces scar formation and inflammation without further weakening the healed wound.

  12. Population and Human Development: A Course Curriculum Including Lesson Plans, Activities, and Bibliography. Revised.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Murphy, Elaine M.; Long, Alison T.

    This course outline suggests materials and learning activities on the interrelated causes and consequences of population growth and other population matters. The document describes 15 class sessions which integrate information for sociology, anthropology, psychology, biology, animal behavior, and education. Topics include the history of human…

  13. 76 FR 10385 - Agency Information Collection Activities: Various Contract Related Forms That Will be Included in...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-02-24

    ... SECURITY Agency Information Collection Activities: Various Contract Related Forms That Will be Included in the Homeland Security Acquisition Regulation, DHS FORM 0700-01, DHS FORM 0700-02, DHS FORM 0700-03...: The Department of Homeland Security, Office of Chief Procurement Officer, Acquisition Policy...

  14. Bullous pemphigoid autoantibodies directly induce blister formation without complement activation.

    PubMed

    Ujiie, Hideyuki; Sasaoka, Tetsumasa; Izumi, Kentaro; Nishie, Wataru; Shinkuma, Satoru; Natsuga, Ken; Nakamura, Hideki; Shibaki, Akihiko; Shimizu, Hiroshi

    2014-11-01

    Complement activation and subsequent recruitment of inflammatory cells at the dermal/epidermal junction are thought to be essential for blister formation in bullous pemphigoid (BP), an autoimmune blistering disease induced by autoantibodies against type XVII collagen (COL17); however, this theory does not fully explain the pathological features of BP. Recently, the involvement of complement-independent pathways has been proposed. To directly address the question of the necessity of the complement activation in blister formation, we generated C3-deficient COL17-humanized mice. First, we show that passive transfer of autoantibodies from BP patients induced blister formation in neonatal C3-deficient COL17-humanized mice without complement activation. By using newly generated human and murine mAbs against the pathogenic noncollagenous 16A domain of COL17 with high (human IgG1, murine IgG2), low (murine IgG1), or no (human IgG4) complement activation abilities, we demonstrate that the deposition of Abs, and not complements, is relevant to the induction of blister formation in neonatal and adult mice. Notably, passive transfer of BP autoantibodies reduced the amount of COL17 in lesional mice skin, as observed in cultured normal human keratinocytes treated with the same Abs. Moreover, the COL17 depletion was associated with a ubiquitin/proteasome pathway. In conclusion, the COL17 depletion induced by BP autoantibodies, and not complement activation, is essential for the blister formation under our experimental system.

  15. Structural Basis for Glycyl Radical Formation By Pyruvate Formate-Lyase Activating Enzyme

    SciTech Connect

    Vey, J.L.; Yang, J.; Li, M.; Broderick, W.E.; Broderick, J.B.; Drennan, C.L.

    2009-05-26

    Pyruvate formate-lyase activating enzyme generates a stable and catalytically essential glycyl radical on G{sup 734} of pyruvate formate-lyase via the direct, stereospecific abstraction of a hydrogen atom from pyruvate formate-lyase. The activase performs this remarkable feat by using an iron-sulfur cluster and S-adenosylmethionine (AdoMet), thus placing it among the AdoMet radical superfamily of enzymes. We report here structures of the substrate-free and substrate-bound forms of pyruvate formate-lyase-activating enzyme, the first structures of an AdoMet radical activase. To obtain the substrate-bound structure, we have used a peptide substrate, the 7-mer RVSGYAV, which contains the sequence surrounding G{sup 734}. Our structures provide fundamental insights into the interactions between the activase and the G{sup 734} loop of pyruvate formate-lyase and provide a structural basis for direct and stereospecific H atom abstraction from the buried G{sup 734}4 of pyruvate formate-lyase.

  16. Unmaking old age: political and cognitive formats of active ageing.

    PubMed

    Lassen, Aske Juul; Moreira, Tiago

    2014-08-01

    Active ageing is a policy tool that dominates the way the ageing society has been constituted during the last decades. The authors argue that active ageing is an attempt at unmaking the concept of old age, by engaging in the plasticity of ageing in various ways. Through a document study of the different epistemes, models and forms used in the constitution of active ageing policies, the authors show how active ageing is not one coordinated set of policy instruments, but comes in different formats. In the WHO, active ageing configures individual lifestyle in order to expand the plasticity of ageing, based on epidemiological and public health conventions. In the EU, active ageing reforms the retirement behaviour of populations in order to integrate the plasticity of ageing into the institutions, based on social gerontological and demographic conventions. These conventional arrangements are cognitive and political in the way they aim at unmaking both the structures and the expectations that has made old age and format a new ideal of the 'good late life'. The paper examines the role of knowledge in policy and questions whether the formats of active ageing should be made to co-exist, or whether the diversity and comprehensiveness enable a local adaptation and translation of active ageing policies.

  17. Vanadium promotes hydroxyl radical formation by activated human neutrophils.

    PubMed

    Fickl, Heidi; Theron, Annette J; Grimmer, Heidi; Oommen, Joyce; Ramafi, Grace J; Steel, Helen C; Visser, Susanna S; Anderson, Ronald

    2006-01-01

    This study was undertaken to investigate the effects of vanadium in the +2, +3, +4, and +5 valence states on superoxide generation, myeloperoxidase (MPO) activity, and hydroxyl radical formation by activated human neutrophils in vitro, using lucigenin-enhanced chemiluminescence (LECL), autoiodination, and electron spin resonance with 5,5-dimethyl-l-pyrroline N-oxide as the spin trap, respectively. At concentrations of up to 25 microM, vanadium, in the four different valence states used, did not affect the LECL responses of neutrophils activated with either the chemoattractant, N-formyl-l-methionyl-l-leucyl-l-phenylalanine (1 microM), or the phorbol ester, phorbol 12-myristate 12-acetate (25 ng/ml). However, exposure to vanadium in the +2, +3, and +4, but not the +5, valence states was accompanied by significant augmentation of hydroxyl radical formation by activated neutrophils and attenuation of MPO-mediated iodination. With respect to hydroxyl radical formation, similar effects were observed using cell-free systems containing either hydrogen peroxide (100 microM) or xanthine/xanthine oxidase together with vanadium (+2, +3, +4), while the activity of purified MPO was inhibited by the metal in these valence states. These results demonstrate that vanadium in the +2, +3, and +4 valence states interacts prooxidatively with human neutrophils, competing effectively with MPO for hydrogen peroxide to promote formation of the highly toxic hydroxyl radical.

  18. Star Formation Activity in a z>4 Protocluster

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Menéndez-Delmestre, Karín; Capak, Peter; Sheth, Kartik

    2015-08-01

    Local studies show that galaxy properties are linked to the galaxy number density within their local environment. Galaxy clusters represent the most extreme density environments and are ideal laboratories to investigate the interplay between galaxy evolution and the environment. However, to understand the origin of the galaxy-environment relation, one needs to look back at the epoch of galaxy formation (z > 1), where the local high-density environments of well-established, virialized clusters give way to looser large-scale structures (LSS) extending over regions of several megaparsecs in size (protoclusters). Clustering analysis indicate that at z~2 submm-selected galaxies (SMGs) reside in very massive halos, suggesting that these may trace high-density environments that likely evolve into rich clusters of galaxies. Conversely, recent work has suggests that SMGs are tracers of a broader range of environments, including structures with more modest masses caught in highly active periods. This suggests that since galaxies in these structures are likely caught during episodes of peak starbursts, SMGs may be tracers of a wider range of environments beyond the progenitors of today’s very rich clusters, opening a window for a more complete exploration of the details underpinning the process of galaxy evolution in concert with the assembly of LSS. We undertook a large observing program comprising deep narrow-band Ly-alpha imaging and multi-object spectroscopy using the IMACS camera on Magellan (Las Campanas) to probe for the presence of a galaxy overdensity in the vicinity of a 4-member group of SMGs at z>4. With ~100 spectroscopically-confirmed Ly-alpha emitters, we are in a position to gauge the level of galaxy overdensity in this region. Furthermore, we have initiated a detailed follow-up study of these Ly-alpha emitters to obtain star-formation rates based on the IRAC and MIPS Spitzer archives, in an effort to probe for trends in the intra-LSS distribution.

  19. Active seat suspension for a small vehicle: considerations for control system including observer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Katsumata, Hiroyuki; Shiino, Hiroshi; Oshinoya, Yasuo; Ishibashi, Kazuhisa; Ozaki, Koichi; Ogino, Hirohiko

    2007-12-01

    We have examined the improvement of ride quality and the reduction of riding fatigue brought about by the active control of the seat suspension of small vehicles such as one-seater electric automobiles. A small active seat suspension, which is easy to install, was designed and manufactured for one-seater electric automobiles. For the actuator, a maintenance-free voice coil motor used as a direct drive was adopted. For fundamental considerations, we designed a one-degree-of-freedom model for the active seat suspension system. Then, we designed a disturbance cancellation control system that includes the observer for a two-degree-of-freedom model. In an actual driving test, a test road, in which the concavity and convexity of an actual road surface were simulated using hard rubber, was prepared and the control performance of vertical vibrations of the seat surface during driving was examined. As a result, in comparison with the one-degree-of-freedom control system, it was confirmed that the control performance was improved by the two-degree-of-freedom control system that includes the observer.

  20. Plants as sources of airborne bacteria, including ice nucleation-active bacteria.

    PubMed

    Lindemann, J; Constantinidou, H A; Barchet, W R; Upper, C D

    1982-11-01

    Vertical wind shear and concentration gradients of viable, airborne bacteria were used to calculate the upward flux of viable cells above bare soil and canopies of several crops. Concentrations at soil or canopy height varied from 46 colony-forming units per m over young corn and wet soil to 663 colony-forming units per m over dry soil and 6,500 colony-forming units per m over a closed wheat canopy. In simultaneous samples, concentrations of viable bacteria in the air 10 m inside an alfalfa field were fourfold higher than those over a field with dry, bare soil immediately upwind. The upward flux of viable bacteria over alfalfa was three- to fourfold greater than over dry soil. Concentrations of ice nucleation-active bacteria were higher over plants than over soil. Thus, plant canopies may constitute a major source of bacteria, including ice nucleation-active bacteria, in the air.

  1. Measuring and Reducing Off-Target Activities of Programmable Nucleases Including CRISPR-Cas9.

    PubMed

    Koo, Taeyoung; Lee, Jungjoon; Kim, Jin-Soo

    2015-06-01

    Programmable nucleases, which include zinc-finger nucleases (ZFNs), transcription activator-like effector nucleases (TALENs), and RNA-guided engineered nucleases (RGENs) repurposed from the type II clustered, regularly interspaced short palindromic repeats (CRISPR)-CRISPR-associated protein 9 (Cas9) system are now widely used for genome editing in higher eukaryotic cells and whole organisms, revolutionising almost every discipline in biological research, medicine, and biotechnology. All of these nucleases, however, induce off-target mutations at sites homologous in sequence with on-target sites, limiting their utility in many applications including gene or cell therapy. In this review, we compare methods for detecting nuclease off-target mutations. We also review methods for profiling genome-wide off-target effects and discuss how to reduce or avoid off-target mutations.

  2. Exploring Formative Assessment Using Cultural Historical Activity Theory

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Asghar, Mandy

    2013-01-01

    Formative assessment is a pedagogic practice that has been the subject of much research and debate, as to how it can be used most effectively to deliver enhanced student learning in the higher education setting. Often described as a complex concept it embraces activities that range from facilitating students understanding of assessment standards,…

  3. EXPLORING THE CONNECTION BETWEEN STAR FORMATION AND ACTIVE GALACTIC NUCLEUS ACTIVITY IN THE LOCAL UNIVERSE

    SciTech Connect

    LaMassa, Stephanie M.; Heckman, T. M.; Ptak, A.; Schiminovich, D.; Bertincourt, B.; O'Dowd, M.

    2012-10-10

    We study a combined sample of 264 star-forming, 51 composite, and 73 active galaxies using optical spectra from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) and mid-infrared (mid-IR) spectra from the Spitzer Infrared Spectrograph. We examine optical and mid-IR spectroscopic diagnostics that probe the amount of star formation and relative energetic contributions from star formation and an active galactic nucleus (AGN). Overall we find good agreement between optical and mid-IR diagnostics. Misclassifications of galaxies based on the SDSS spectra are rare despite the presence of dust obscuration. The luminosity of the [Ne II] 12.8 {mu}m emission line is well correlated with the star formation rate measured from the SDSS spectra, and this holds for the star-forming, composite, and AGN-dominated systems. AGNs show a clear excess of [Ne III] 15.6 {mu}m emission relative to star-forming and composite systems. We find good qualitative agreement between various parameters that probe the relative contributions of the AGN and star formation, including the mid-IR spectral slope, the ratio of the [Ne V] 14.3 {mu}m to [Ne II] {mu}m 12.8 fluxes, the equivalent widths of the 7.7 {mu}m, 11.3 {mu}m, and 17 {mu}m polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon (PAH) features, and the optical 'D' parameter which measures the distance at which a source lies from the locus of star-forming galaxies in the optical BPT emission-line diagnostic diagram. We also consider the behavior of the three individual PAH features by examining how their flux ratios depend upon the degree of AGN dominance. We find that the PAH 11.3 {mu}m feature is significantly suppressed in the most AGN-dominated systems.

  4. A Historical Perspective of Testing and Assessment Including the Impact of Summative and Formative Assessment on Student Achievement

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brink, Carole Sanger

    2011-01-01

    In 2007, Georgia developed a comprehensive framework to define what students need to know. One component of this framework emphasizes the use of both formative and summative assessments as part of an integral and specific component of the teachers. performance evaluation. Georgia administers the Criterion-Referenced Competency Test (CRCT) to every…

  5. Turing pattern formation in fractional activator-inhibitor systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Henry, B. I.; Langlands, T. A. M.; Wearne, S. L.

    2005-08-01

    Activator-inhibitor systems of reaction-diffusion equations have been used to describe pattern formation in numerous applications in biology, chemistry, and physics. The rate of diffusion in these applications is manifest in the single parameter of the diffusion constant, and stationary Turing patterns occur above a critical value of d representing the ratio of the diffusion constants of the inhibitor to the activator. Here we consider activator-inhibitor systems in which the diffusion is anomalous subdiffusion; the diffusion rates are manifest in both a diffusion constant and a diffusion exponent. A consideration of this problem in terms of continuous-time random walks with sources and sinks leads to a reaction-diffusion system with fractional order temporal derivatives operating on the spatial Laplacian. We have carried out an algebraic stability analysis of the homogeneous steady-state solution in fractional activator-inhibitor systems, with Gierer-Meinhardt reaction kinetics and with Brusselator reaction kinetics. For each class of reaction kinetics we identify a Turing instability bifurcation curve in the two-dimensional diffusion parameter space. The critical value of d , for Turing instabilities, decreases monotonically with the anomalous diffusion exponent between unity (standard diffusion) and zero (extreme subdiffusion). We have also carried out numerical simulations of the governing fractional activator-inhibitor equations and we show that the Turing instability precipitates the formation of complex spatiotemporal patterns. If the diffusion of the activator and inhibitor have the same anomalous scaling properties, then the surface profiles of these patterns for values of d slightly above the critical value varies from smooth stationary patterns to increasingly rough and nonstationary patterns as the anomalous diffusion exponent varies from unity towards zero. If the diffusion of the activator is anomalous subdiffusion but the diffusion of the inhibitor

  6. Turing pattern formation in fractional activator-inhibitor systems.

    PubMed

    Henry, B I; Langlands, T A M; Wearne, S L

    2005-08-01

    Activator-inhibitor systems of reaction-diffusion equations have been used to describe pattern formation in numerous applications in biology, chemistry, and physics. The rate of diffusion in these applications is manifest in the single parameter of the diffusion constant, and stationary Turing patterns occur above a critical value of d representing the ratio of the diffusion constants of the inhibitor to the activator. Here we consider activator-inhibitor systems in which the diffusion is anomalous subdiffusion; the diffusion rates are manifest in both a diffusion constant and a diffusion exponent. A consideration of this problem in terms of continuous-time random walks with sources and sinks leads to a reaction-diffusion system with fractional order temporal derivatives operating on the spatial Laplacian. We have carried out an algebraic stability analysis of the homogeneous steady-state solution in fractional activator-inhibitor systems, with Gierer-Meinhardt reaction kinetics and with Brusselator reaction kinetics. For each class of reaction kinetics we identify a Turing instability bifurcation curve in the two-dimensional diffusion parameter space. The critical value of d , for Turing instabilities, decreases monotonically with the anomalous diffusion exponent between unity (standard diffusion) and zero (extreme subdiffusion). We have also carried out numerical simulations of the governing fractional activator-inhibitor equations and we show that the Turing instability precipitates the formation of complex spatiotemporal patterns. If the diffusion of the activator and inhibitor have the same anomalous scaling properties, then the surface profiles of these patterns for values of d slightly above the critical value varies from smooth stationary patterns to increasingly rough and nonstationary patterns as the anomalous diffusion exponent varies from unity towards zero. If the diffusion of the activator is anomalous subdiffusion but the diffusion of the inhibitor

  7. The relation between star formation and active nuclei

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rieke, G. H.

    1987-01-01

    Three questions relevant to the relation between an active nucleus and surrounding star formation are discussed. The infrared stellar CO absorption bands can be used to identify galaxies with large populations of young, massive stars and thus can identify strong starburst unambiguously, such as in NGC 6240, and can help identify composite active/starburst systems such as Arp 220. An active nucleus is probably not required for LINER spectral characteristics; dusty starburst galaxies, particularly if they are nearly edge-on, can produce LINER spectra through the shock heating of their interstellar media by supernovae combined with the obscuration of their nuclei in the optical. The Galactic Center would be an ideal laboratory for studying the interaction of starbursts and active nuclei, if both could be demonstrated to occur there. Failure to detect a cusp in the stellar distribution raises questions about the presence of an active nucleus, which should be answered by additional observations in the near future.

  8. Bacterial Cyclic AMP-Phosphodiesterase Activity Coordinates Biofilm Formation

    PubMed Central

    Kalivoda, Eric J.; Brothers, Kimberly M.; Stella, Nicholas A.; Schmitt, Matthew J.; Shanks, Robert M. Q.

    2013-01-01

    Biofilm-related infections are a major contributor to human disease, and the capacity for surface attachment and biofilm formation are key attributes for the pathogenesis of microbes. Serratia marcescens type I fimbriae-dependent biofilms are coordinated by the adenylate cyclase, CyaA, and the cyclic 3′,5′-adenosine monophosphate (cAMP)-cAMP receptor protein (CRP) complex. This study uses S. marcescens as a model system to test the role of cAMP-phosphodiesterase activity in controlling biofilm formation. Herein we describe the characterization of a putative S. marcescens cAMP-phosphodiesterase gene (SMA3506), designated as cpdS, and demonstrated to be a functional cAMP-phosphodiesterase both in vitro and in vivo. Deletion of cpdS resulted in defective biofilm formation and reduced type I fimbriae production, whereas multicopy expression of cpdS conferred a type I fimbriae-dependent hyper-biofilm. Together, these results support a model in which bacterial cAMP-phosphodiesterase activity modulates biofilm formation. PMID:23923059

  9. Peleolakes and impact basins in southern Arabia Terra, including Meridiani Planum: Implications for the formation of hematite deposits on Mars

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Newsom, Horton E.; Barber, C.A.; Hare, T.M.; Schelble, R.T.; Sutherland, V.A.; Feldman, W.C.

    2003-01-01

    The hematite deposit in Meridiani Planum was selected for a Mars Exploration Rover (MER) landing site because water could be involved in the formation of hematite, and water is a key ingredient in the search for life. Our discovery of a chain of paleolake basins and channels along the southern margin of the hematite deposits in Meridiani Planum with the presence of the strongest hematite signature adjacent to a paleolake basin, supports the possible role of water in the formation of the hematite and the deposition of other layered materials in the region. The hematite may have formed by direct precipitation from lake water, as coatings precipitated from groundwater, or by oxidation of preexisting iron oxide minerals. The paleolake basins were fed by an extensive channel system, originating from an area larger than Texas and located south of the Schiaparelli impact basin. On the basis of stratigraphic relationships, the formation of channels in the region occurred over much of Mars' history, from before the layered materials in Meridiani Planum were deposited until recently. The location of the paleolake basins and channels is connected with the impact cratering history of the region. The earliest structure identified in this study is an ancient circular multiringed basin (800-1600 km diameter) that underlies the entire Meridiani Planum region. The MER landing site is located on the buried northern rim of a later 150 km diameter crater. This crater is partially filled with layered deposits that contained a paleolake in its southern portion. Copyright 2003 by the American Geophysical Union.

  10. Coagulation activity and white thrombus formation in the microminipig.

    PubMed

    Miura, Naoki; Kawaguchi, Hiroaki; Nagasato, Tomoka; Yamada, Tomonobu; Ito, Takashi; Izumi, Hiroyuki; Shameshima, Hisayo; Miyoshi, Noriaki; Tanimoto, Akihide; Maruyama, Ikuro

    2013-01-01

    Swine are becoming increasingly attractive as animal models for clinical research and the recently developed Microminipig (MMPig) has emerged as a possible experimental animal model. In this study, we demonstrated age-dependent changes in hematological parameters and coagulation activity in healthy MMPigs (58 male and 67 females, aged 0-34 months), and investigated white thrombus formation (WTF) using an in vitro microchip flow-chamber system (four males and four females, aged 22-23 months). There was no clear sex or age-dependent differences in any hematological parameters. While activated partial thromboplastin time (APTT) was shorter than prothrombin time (PT), with APTT:PT of 0.88:1, microchip flow-chamber system analysis showed that WTF time was shorter than that in humans, suggesting a possible thrombotic tendency in the MMPig. These results could be useful to life science researchers in the use of the MMPig as an experimental model animal for thrombus formation. PMID:23606691

  11. Star formation in quasar and active galaxy environments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Coldwell, Georgina V.; Lambas, Diego G.

    2003-09-01

    We use the 2dF public 100 K data release of galaxies and samples of quasars and active galaxies taken from the Véron-Cetty and Véron catalogue to study the nature of galaxies in the surroundings of active objects with redshifts in the range 0.1 < z < 0.2. We explore the distribution of neighbour 2dF galaxy spectral types, η, at different projected distances from the quasars and active galaxies with radial velocity difference ΔV= 500 km s-1. For comparison, we perform a similar analysis on the environment of typical galaxies in the 2dF catalogue, a sample of bright early-type galaxies, i.e. η < -1.4 and MbJ < -21, and also on a sample of 2dF galaxy groups. We find a higher relative fraction of emission-line galaxies, i.e. with 2dF spectral type indices η >3.5, in the vicinity of quasars and active galaxies compared to that in the neighbourhood of typical galaxies, bright early types and groups. This effect extends up to projected distance rp~ 1 h-1 Mpc for active galaxies and rp~ 3 h-1 Mpc for quasars. We also find a tendency for companion galaxies of quasars to be brighter than the neighbours of active galaxies within rp~ 3 h-1 Mpc. We estimate average star-formation rates for objects at different distances from quasars, active galaxies, galaxies and groups. We find a significantly higher star-formation activity within ~2.0 h-1 Mpc from quasars with respect to typical galaxies, which reinforces the idea that star formation is enhanced in the neighbourhood of quasars. Our tests with the group environment provide evidence against quasars being associated with groups. Also, our analysis of the neighbours of bright early types shows that although these galaxies are typical hosts of quasars, their companion galaxies are significantly different in terms of the star-formation activity.

  12. Foreign Body Giant Cell Formation Is Preceded by Lamellipodia Formation and Can Be Attenuated by Inhibition of Rac1 Activation

    PubMed Central

    Jay, Steven M.; Skokos, Eleni; Laiwalla, Farah; Krady, Marie-Marthe; Kyriakides, Themis R.

    2007-01-01

    Macrophages that are recruited to the site of implanted biomaterials undergo fusion to form surface-damaging foreign body giant cells. Exposure of peripheral blood monocytes to interleukin-4 can recapitulate the fusion process in vitro. In this study, we used interleukin-4 to induce multinucleation of murine bone marrow-derived macrophages and observed changes in cell shape, including elongation and lamellipodia formation, before fusion. Because cytoskeletal rearrangements are regulated by small GTPases, we examined the effects of inhibitors of Rho kinase (Y-32885) and Rac activation (NSC23766) on fusion. Y-32885 did not prevent cytoskeletal changes or fusion but limited the extent of multinucleation. NSC23766, on the other hand, inhibited lamellipodia formation and fusion in a dose-dependent manner. In addition, we found that in control cells, these changes were preceded by Rac1 activation. However, NSC23766 did not block the uptake of polystyrene microspheres. Likewise, short interfering RNA knockdown of Rac1 limited fusion without limiting phagocytosis. Thus, phagocytosis and fusion can be partially decoupled based on their susceptibility to NSC23766. Furthermore, poly(ethylene-co-vinyl acetate) scaffolds containing NSC23766 attenuated foreign body giant cell formation in vivo. These observations suggest that targeting Rac1 activation could protect biomaterials without compromising the ability of macrophages to perform beneficial phagocytic functions at implantation sites. PMID:17556592

  13. Foreign body giant cell formation is preceded by lamellipodia formation and can be attenuated by inhibition of Rac1 activation.

    PubMed

    Jay, Steven M; Skokos, Eleni; Laiwalla, Farah; Krady, Marie-Marthe; Kyriakides, Themis R

    2007-08-01

    Macrophages that are recruited to the site of implanted biomaterials undergo fusion to form surface-damaging foreign body giant cells. Exposure of peripheral blood monocytes to interleukin-4 can recapitulate the fusion process in vitro. In this study, we used interleukin-4 to induce multinucleation of murine bone marrow-derived macrophages and observed changes in cell shape, including elongation and lamellipodia formation, before fusion. Because cytoskeletal rearrangements are regulated by small GTPases, we examined the effects of inhibitors of Rho kinase (Y-32885) and Rac activation (NSC23766) on fusion. Y-32885 did not prevent cytoskeletal changes or fusion but limited the extent of multinucleation. NSC23766, on the other hand, inhibited lamellipodia formation and fusion in a dose-dependent manner. In addition, we found that in control cells, these changes were preceded by Rac1 activation. However, NSC23766 did not block the uptake of polystyrene microspheres. Likewise, short interfering RNA knockdown of Rac1 limited fusion without limiting phagocytosis. Thus, phagocytosis and fusion can be partially decoupled based on their susceptibility to NSC23766. Furthermore, poly(ethylene-co-vinyl acetate) scaffolds containing NSC23766 attenuated foreign body giant cell formation in vivo. These observations suggest that targeting Rac1 activation could protect biomaterials without compromising the ability of macrophages to perform beneficial phagocytic functions at implantation sites.

  14. Be BOLD: Encouraging Girls to Include Unstructured Bouts of Physical Activity into Daily Routines

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hill, Kory; Williams, Gwynne M.

    2014-01-01

    Adolescent girls are less active than their male counterparts and physical activity levels tend to decline as one ages. One of the goals of concerned physical educators is to promote a physically active lifestyle and to teach skills and promote behaviors that will allow students to be active both in and out of school. This article presents a…

  15. Formation and decomposition of chemically activated and stabilized hydrazine.

    PubMed

    Asatryan, Rubik; Bozzelli, Joseph W; da Silva, Gabriel; Swinnen, Saartje; Nguyen, Minh Tho

    2010-06-01

    Recombination of two amidogen radicals, NH(2) (X(2)B1), is relevant to hydrazine formation, ammonia oxidation and pyrolysis, nitrogen reduction (fixation), and a variety of other N/H/X combustion, environmental, and interstellar processes. We have performed a comprehensive analysis of the N(2)H(4) potential energy surface, using a variety of theoretical methods, with thermochemical kinetic analysis and master equation simulations used to treat branching to different product sets in the chemically activated NH(2) + NH(2) process. For the first time, iminoammonium ylide (NH(3)NH), the less stable isomer of hydrazine, is involved in the kinetic modeling of N(2)H(4). A new, low-energy pathway is identified for the formation of NH(3) plus triplet NH, via initial production of NH(3)NH followed by singlet-triplet intersystem crossing. This new reaction channel results in the formation of dissociated products at a relatively rapid rate at even moderate temperatures and above. A further novel pathway is described for the decomposition of activated N(2)H(4), which eventually leads to the formation of the simple products N(2) + 2H(2), via H(2) elimination to cis-N(2)H(2). This process, termed as "dihydrogen catalysis", may have significant implications in the formation and decomposition chemistry of hydrazine and ammonia in diverse environments. In this mechanism, stereoselective attack of cis-N(2)H(2) by molecular hydrogen results in decomposition to N(2) with a fairly low barrier. The reverse termolecular reaction leading to the gas-phase formation of cis-N(2)H(2) + H(2) achieves non-heterogeneous catalytic nitrogen fixation with a relatively low activation barrier (77 kcal mol(-1)), much lower than the 125 kcal mol(-1) barrier recently reported for bimolecular addition of H(2) to N(2). This termolecular reaction is an entropically disfavored path, but it does describe a new means of activating the notoriously unreactive N(2). We design heterogeneous analogues of this

  16. Formation and geochemical significance of micrometallic aggregates including fissiogenic platinum group elements in the Oklo natural reactor, Gabon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kikuchi, Makiko; Hidaka, Hiroshi; Gauthier-Lafaye, François

    2010-08-01

    Metallic aggregates with a size of a few tens μm and consisting mainly of Ru, Rh, Pd, Te, Pb, As, Sb, S and Bi were found in the acid residue of SD37-S2/CD uraninite taken from Oklo natural reactor zone (RZ) 13. Quantitative analyses of major elements using an electron probe microanalyzer and in situ isotopic analyses of Zr, Mo, Ru, Pb and U using a sensitive high-resolution ion microprobe were performed on the metallic aggregates to determine the geochemical behaviors of fission products and actinides and to ascertain the processes of formation of the aggregates in the RZs. The chemical compositions of the aggregates investigated in this study are significantly different from those reported previously, showing lower Pb content and no correlation between the contents of Pb and S in the individual grains. The 235U/ 238U ratios in metallic aggregates vary significantly from 0.00478 to 0.01466, indicating chemical fractionation between U and Pu during the formation of the aggregates. The Pb isotopic data indicate that most of the Pb in the aggregates decayed from 2.05 Ga-old uraninite that existed in the RZ originally and that there was chemical fractionation between U and Pb in some aggregates. The Zr and Mo isotopic ratios, 90Zr/ 91Zr and 95Mo/ 97Mo, for most of the aggregates had small variations, which can be simply explained by constant separate mixing of fissiogenic and nonfissiogenic components. On the other hand, a large variation in the 99Ru/ 101Ru ratio (0.324-1.73) cannot be explained only by a two component mixing theory; thus, chemical fractionation between Tc and Ru during the reactor criticality is suggested. The large variations in the 235U/ 238U and 99Ru/ 101Ru isotopic ratios suggest that the aggregates formed under various redox conditions owing to the radiolysis of water.

  17. Active control of environmental noise, VIII: increasing the response to primary source changes including unpredictable noise

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wright, S. E.; Atmoko, H.; Vuksanovic, B.

    2004-07-01

    Conventional adaptive cancellation systems using traditional transverse finite impulse response (FIR) filters, together with least mean square (LMS) adaptive algorithms, well known in active noise control, are slow to adapt to primary source changes. This makes them inappropriate for cancelling rapidly changing noise, including unpredictable noise such as speech and music. Secondly, the cancelling structures require considerable computational processing effort to adapt to primary source and plant changes, particularly for multi-channel systems. This paper describes methods to increase the adaptive speed to primary source changes in large enclosed spaces and outdoor environments. A method is described that increases the response to time varying periodic noise using traditional transverse FIR filters. Here a multi-passband filter, with individual variable adaptive step sizes for each passband is automatically adjusted according to the signal level in each band. This creates a similar adaptive response for all frequencies within the total pass-band, irrespective of amplitude, minimizing the signal distortion and increasing the combined adaptive speed. Unfortunately, there is a limit to the adaptive speed using the above method as classical transverse FIR filters have a finite adaptive speed given by the stability band zero bandwidth. For rapidly changing periodic noise and unpredictable non-stationary noise, a rapid to instantaneous response is required. In this case the on-line adaptive FIR filters are dispensed with and replaced by a time domain solution that gives virtually instantaneous cancellation response (infinite adaptive speed) to primary source changes, and is computationally efficient.

  18. Endocannabinoids Control Platelet Activation and Limit Aggregate Formation under Flow

    PubMed Central

    De Angelis, Valentina; Koekman, Arnold C.; Weeterings, Cees; Roest, Mark; de Groot, Philip G.; Herczenik, Eszter; Maas, Coen

    2014-01-01

    Background The endocannabinoid system has previously been implicated in the regulation of neurons and inflammatory cells. Additionally, it has been reported that endocannabinoid receptors are present on circulating platelets, but there has been conflicting evidence on their contribution to platelet function. Objectives Our aim was to examine the role of endocannabinoids in platelet function in vitro and in vivo. Methods and Results We studied the effects of the well-characterized endogenous endocannabinoid anandamide on platelet aggregation in suspension, α-granule release, calcium mobilization, Syk phosphorylation, as well as platelet spreading and aggregate formation under flow. Anandamide inhibits platelet aggregation and α-granule release by collagen, collagen-derived peptide CRP-XL, ADP, arachidonic acid and thromboxane A2 analogue U46619. However, activation via thrombin receptor PAR-1 stays largely unaffected. Calcium mobilization is significantly impaired when platelets are stimulated with collagen or CRP-XL, but remains normal in the presence of the other agonists. In line with this finding, we found that anandamide prevents collagen-induced Syk phosphorylation. Furthermore, anandamide-treated platelets exhibit reduced spreading on immobilized fibrinogen, have a decreased capacity for binding fibrinogen in solution and show perturbed platelet aggregate formation under flow over collagen. Finally, we investigated the influence of Cannabis sativa consumption by human volunteers on platelet activation. Similar to our in vitro findings with anandamide, ex vivo collagen-induced platelet aggregation and aggregate formation on immobilized collagen under flow were impaired in whole blood of donors that had consumed Cannabis sativa. Conclusions Endocannabinoid receptor agonists reduce platelet activation and aggregate formation both in vitro and ex vivo after Cannabis sativa consumption. Further elucidation of this novel regulatory mechanism for platelet function

  19. The suppression of star formation by powerful active galactic nuclei.

    PubMed

    Page, M J; Symeonidis, M; Vieira, J D; Altieri, B; Amblard, A; Arumugam, V; Aussel, H; Babbedge, T; Blain, A; Bock, J; Boselli, A; Buat, V; Castro-Rodríguez, N; Cava, A; Chanial, P; Clements, D L; Conley, A; Conversi, L; Cooray, A; Dowell, C D; Dubois, E N; Dunlop, J S; Dwek, E; Dye, S; Eales, S; Elbaz, D; Farrah, D; Fox, M; Franceschini, A; Gear, W; Glenn, J; Griffin, M; Halpern, M; Hatziminaoglou, E; Ibar, E; Isaak, K; Ivison, R J; Lagache, G; Levenson, L; Lu, N; Madden, S; Maffei, B; Mainetti, G; Marchetti, L; Nguyen, H T; O'Halloran, B; Oliver, S J; Omont, A; Panuzzo, P; Papageorgiou, A; Pearson, C P; Pérez-Fournon, I; Pohlen, M; Rawlings, J I; Rigopoulou, D; Riguccini, L; Rizzo, D; Rodighiero, G; Roseboom, I G; Rowan-Robinson, M; Sánchez Portal, M; Schulz, B; Scott, D; Seymour, N; Shupe, D L; Smith, A J; Stevens, J A; Trichas, M; Tugwell, K E; Vaccari, M; Valtchanov, I; Viero, M; Vigroux, L; Wang, L; Ward, R; Wright, G; Xu, C K; Zemcov, M

    2012-05-09

    The old, red stars that constitute the bulges of galaxies, and the massive black holes at their centres, are the relics of a period in cosmic history when galaxies formed stars at remarkable rates and active galactic nuclei (AGN) shone brightly as a result of accretion onto black holes. It is widely suspected, but unproved, that the tight correlation between the mass of the black hole and the mass of the stellar bulge results from the AGN quenching the surrounding star formation as it approaches its peak luminosity. X-rays trace emission from AGN unambiguously, whereas powerful star-forming galaxies are usually dust-obscured and are brightest at infrared and submillimetre wavelengths. Here we report submillimetre and X-ray observations that show that rapid star formation was common in the host galaxies of AGN when the Universe was 2-6 billion years old, but that the most vigorous star formation is not observed around black holes above an X-ray luminosity of 10(44) ergs per second. This suppression of star formation in the host galaxy of a powerful AGN is a key prediction of models in which the AGN drives an outflow, expelling the interstellar medium of its host and transforming the galaxy's properties in a brief period of cosmic time.

  20. The Suppression of Star Formation by Powerful Active Galactic Nuclei

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dwek, E.

    2012-01-01

    The old, red stars that constitute the bulges of galaxies, and the massive black holes at their centres, are the relics of a period in cosmic history when galaxies formed stars at remarkable rates and active galactic nuclei (AGN) shone brightly as a result of accretion onto black holes. It is widely suspected, but unproved, that the tight corre1ation between the mass of the black hole and the mas. of the stellar bulge results from the AGN quenching the surrounding star formation as it approaches its peak luminosity. X-rays trace emission from AGN unambiguously, whereas powerful star-forming ga1axies are usually dust-obscured and are brightest at infrared and submillimeter wavelengths. Here we report submillimetre and X-ray observations that show that rapid star formation was common in the host galaxies of AGN when the Universe was 2-6 billion years old, but that the most vigorous star formation is not observed around black holes above an X-ray luminosity of 10(exp 44) ergs per second. This suppression of star formation in the host galaxy of a powerful AGN is a key prediction of models in which the AGN drives an outflow, expe11ing the interstellar medium of its host and transforming the galaxy's properties in a brief period of cosmic time.

  1. 45 CFR 287.130 - Can NEW Program activities include job market assessments, job creation and economic development...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 45 Public Welfare 2 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Can NEW Program activities include job market assessments, job creation and economic development activities? 287.130 Section 287.130 Public Welfare... Program Design and Operations § 287.130 Can NEW Program activities include job market assessments,...

  2. 45 CFR 287.130 - Can NEW Program activities include job market assessments, job creation and economic development...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 45 Public Welfare 2 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Can NEW Program activities include job market assessments, job creation and economic development activities? 287.130 Section 287.130 Public Welfare... Program Design and Operations § 287.130 Can NEW Program activities include job market assessments,...

  3. 45 CFR 287.130 - Can NEW Program activities include job market assessments, job creation and economic development...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 45 Public Welfare 2 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Can NEW Program activities include job market assessments, job creation and economic development activities? 287.130 Section 287.130 Public Welfare... Program Design and Operations § 287.130 Can NEW Program activities include job market assessments,...

  4. 45 CFR 287.130 - Can NEW Program activities include job market assessments, job creation and economic development...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 45 Public Welfare 2 2014-10-01 2012-10-01 true Can NEW Program activities include job market assessments, job creation and economic development activities? 287.130 Section 287.130 Public Welfare... Program Design and Operations § 287.130 Can NEW Program activities include job market assessments,...

  5. 45 CFR 287.130 - Can NEW Program activities include job market assessments, job creation and economic development...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 45 Public Welfare 2 2013-10-01 2012-10-01 true Can NEW Program activities include job market assessments, job creation and economic development activities? 287.130 Section 287.130 Public Welfare... Program Design and Operations § 287.130 Can NEW Program activities include job market assessments,...

  6. Kinetics of acrylamide formation/elimination reactions as affected by water activity.

    PubMed

    De Vleeschouwer, Kristel; Van der Plancken, Iesel; Van Loey, Ann; Hendrickx, Marc E

    2007-01-01

    The influence of water activity on the kinetics of acrylamide formation and elimination reaction was investigated using low-moisture equimolar asparagine-glucose model systems, which were heated at temperatures between 120 and 200 degrees C for variable heating times. To determine the water content corresponding to the water activities tested, a sorption moisture isotherm was constructed experimentally. The acrylamide concentrations measured at different water activities could be modeled on the basis of a reaction scheme including not only acrylamide formation and elimination reactions but also an alternative Maillard reaction between both reactants. The corresponding rate constants and activation energies were estimated using nonlinear regression analysis. Whereas the rate constant for acrylamide formation varied only slightly with the initial water activity of the model system, the elimination rate constant showed a clear minimum around a water activity of 0.82. The opposite trend, namely, a maximum at a water activity of 0.82, was found for the Maillard reaction rate constant as a function of water activity, which confirms data from literature. The activation energies for the different reactions changed in a comparable way as the corresponding rate constant with water activity. PMID:17503764

  7. Active Transport Can Greatly Enhance Cdc20:Mad2 Formation

    PubMed Central

    Ibrahim, Bashar; Henze, Richard

    2014-01-01

    To guarantee genomic integrity and viability, the cell must ensure proper distribution of the replicated chromosomes among the two daughter cells in mitosis. The mitotic spindle assembly checkpoint (SAC) is a central regulatory mechanism to achieve this goal. A dysfunction of this checkpoint may lead to aneuploidy and likely contributes to the development of cancer. Kinetochores of unattached or misaligned chromosomes are thought to generate a diffusible “wait-anaphase” signal, which is the basis for downstream events to inhibit the anaphase promoting complex/cyclosome (APC/C). The rate of Cdc20:C-Mad2 complex formation at the kinetochore is a key regulatory factor in the context of APC/C inhibition. Computer simulations of a quantitative SAC model show that the formation of Cdc20:C-Mad2 is too slow for checkpoint maintenance when cytosolic O-Mad2 has to encounter kinetochores by diffusion alone. Here, we show that an active transport of O-Mad2 towards the spindle mid-zone increases the efficiency of Mad2-activation. Our in-silico data indicate that this mechanism can greatly enhance the formation of Cdc20:Mad2 and furthermore gives an explanation on how the “wait-anaphase” signal can dissolve abruptly within a short time. Our results help to understand parts of the SAC mechanism that remain unclear. PMID:25338047

  8. Active transport can greatly enhance Cdc20:Mad2 formation.

    PubMed

    Ibrahim, Bashar; Henze, Richard

    2014-01-01

    To guarantee genomic integrity and viability, the cell must ensure proper distribution of the replicated chromosomes among the two daughter cells in mitosis.The mitotic spindle assembly checkpoint (SAC) is a central regulatory mechanism to achieve this goal. A dysfunction of this checkpoint may lead to aneuploidy and likely contributes to the development of cancer. Kinetochores of unattached or misaligned chromosomes are thought to generate a diffusible ''wait-anaphase'' signal, which is the basis for downstream events to inhibit the anaphase promoting complex/cyclosome (APC/C). The rate of Cdc20:C-Mad2 complex formation at the kinetochore is a key regulatory factor in the context of APC/C inhibition. Computer simulations of a quantitative SAC model show that the formation of Cdc20:C-Mad2 is too slow for checkpoint maintenance when cytosolic O-Mad2 has to encounter kinetochores by diffusion alone. Here, we show that an active transport of O-Mad2 towards the spindle mid-zone increases the efficiency of Mad2-activation. Our data indicate that this mechanism can greatly enhance the formation of Cdc20:Mad2 and furthermore gives an explanation on how the ''wait-anaphase'' signal can dissolve abruptly within a short time. Our results help to understand parts of the SAC mechanism that remain unclear.

  9. Validation of a high throughput flow cytometric in vitro micronucleus assay including assessment of metabolic activation in TK6 cells.

    PubMed

    Thougaard, Annemette V; Christiansen, Joan; Mow, Tomas; Hornberg, Jorrit J

    2014-12-01

    Genotoxicity is an unacceptable property for new drug candidates and we employ three screening assays during the drug discovery process to identify genotoxicity early and optimize chemical series. One of these methods is the flow cytometric in vitro micronucleus assay for which protocol optimizations have been described recently. Here, we report further validation of the assay in TK6 cells including assessment of metabolic activation. We first optimized assay conditions to allow for testing with and without metabolic activation in parallel in a 96-well plate format. Then, we tested a set of 48 compounds carefully selected to contain known in vivo genotoxins, nongenotoxins and drugs. Avoidance of irrelevant positives, a known issue with mammalian cell-based genotoxicity assays, is important to prevent early deselection of potentially promising compounds. Therefore, we enriched the validation set with compounds that were previously reported to produce irrelevant positive results in mammalian cell-based genotoxicity assays. The resulting dataset was used to set the relevant cut-off values for scoring a compound positive or negative, such that we obtained an optimal balance of high sensitivity (88%) and high specificity (87%). Finally, we tested an additional set of 16 drugs to further probe assay performance and 14 of them were classified correctly. To our knowledge, the present study is the most comprehensive validation of the in vitro flow cytometric micronucleus assay and the first to report parallel assessment with metabolic activation in reasonable throughput. The assay allows for rapidly screening novel compounds for genotoxicity and is therefore well-suited for use in early drug discovery projects. Environ.

  10. Using Assistive Technology Adaptations To Include Students with Learning Disabilities in Cooperative Learning Activities.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bryant, Diane Pedrotty; Bryant, Brian R.

    1998-01-01

    Discusses a process for integrating technology adaptations for students with learning disabilities into cooperative-learning activities in terms of three components: (1) selecting adaptations; (2) monitoring use of adaptations during cooperative-learning activities; and (3) evaluating the adaptations' effectiveness. Barriers to and support systems…

  11. SIMULATION OF THE FORMATION OF A SOLAR ACTIVE REGION

    SciTech Connect

    Cheung, M. C. M.; Title, A. M.; Rempel, M.; Schuessler, M.

    2010-09-01

    We present a radiative magnetohydrodynamics simulation of the formation of an active region (AR) on the solar surface. The simulation models the rise of a buoyant magnetic flux bundle from a depth of 7.5 Mm in the convection zone up into the solar photosphere. The rise of the magnetic plasma in the convection zone is accompanied by predominantly horizontal expansion. Such an expansion leads to a scaling relation between the plasma density and the magnetic field strength such that B {proportional_to} rhov{sup 1/2}. The emergence of magnetic flux into the photosphere appears as a complex magnetic pattern, which results from the interaction of the rising magnetic field with the turbulent convective flows. Small-scale magnetic elements at the surface first appear, followed by their gradual coalescence into larger magnetic concentrations, which eventually results in the formation of a pair of opposite polarity spots. Although the mean flow pattern in the vicinity of the developing spots is directed radially outward, correlations between the magnetic field and velocity field fluctuations allow the spots to accumulate flux. Such correlations result from the Lorentz-force-driven, counterstreaming motion of opposite polarity fragments. The formation of the simulated AR is accompanied by transient light bridges between umbrae and umbral dots. Together with recent sunspot modeling, this work highlights the common magnetoconvective origin of umbral dots, light bridges, and penumbral filaments.

  12. Simulation of the Formation of a Solar Active Region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheung, M. C. M.; Rempel, M.; Title, A. M.; Schüssler, M.

    2010-09-01

    We present a radiative magnetohydrodynamics simulation of the formation of an active region (AR) on the solar surface. The simulation models the rise of a buoyant magnetic flux bundle from a depth of 7.5 Mm in the convection zone up into the solar photosphere. The rise of the magnetic plasma in the convection zone is accompanied by predominantly horizontal expansion. Such an expansion leads to a scaling relation between the plasma density and the magnetic field strength such that B vprop rhov1/2. The emergence of magnetic flux into the photosphere appears as a complex magnetic pattern, which results from the interaction of the rising magnetic field with the turbulent convective flows. Small-scale magnetic elements at the surface first appear, followed by their gradual coalescence into larger magnetic concentrations, which eventually results in the formation of a pair of opposite polarity spots. Although the mean flow pattern in the vicinity of the developing spots is directed radially outward, correlations between the magnetic field and velocity field fluctuations allow the spots to accumulate flux. Such correlations result from the Lorentz-force-driven, counterstreaming motion of opposite polarity fragments. The formation of the simulated AR is accompanied by transient light bridges between umbrae and umbral dots. Together with recent sunspot modeling, this work highlights the common magnetoconvective origin of umbral dots, light bridges, and penumbral filaments.

  13. Diffractive laser beam homogenizer including a photo-active material and method of fabricating the same

    SciTech Connect

    Bayramian, Andy J; Ebbers, Christopher A; Chen, Diana C

    2014-05-20

    A method of manufacturing a plurality of diffractive optical elements includes providing a partially transmissive slide, providing a first piece of PTR glass, and directing first UV radiation through the partially transmissive slide to impinge on the first piece of PTR glass. The method also includes exposing predetermined portions of the first piece of PTR glass to the first UV radiation and thermally treating the exposed first piece of PTR glass. The method further includes providing a second piece of PTR glass and directing second UV radiation through the thermally treated first piece of PTR glass to impinge on the second piece of PTR glass. The method additionally includes exposing predetermined portions of the second piece of PTR glass to the second UV radiation, thermally treating the exposed second piece of PTR glass, and repeating providing and processing of the second piece of PTR glass using additional pieces of PTR glass.

  14. In vitro and in vivo anti-plasmodial activity of essential oils, including hinokitiol.

    PubMed

    Fujisaki, Ryuichi; Kamei, Kiyoko; Yamamura, Mariko; Nishiya, Hajime; Inouye, Shigeharu; Takahashi, Miki; Abe, Shigeru

    2012-03-01

    Abstract. The anti-plasmodial activity of 47 essential oils and 10 of their constituents were screened for in vitro activity against Plasmodium falciparum. Five of these essential oils (sandalwood, caraway, monarda, nutmeg, and Thujopsis dolabrata var. hondai) and 2 constituents (thymoquinone and hinokitiol) were found to be active against P. falciparum in vitro, with 50% inhibitory concentration (IC50) values equal to or less than 1.0 microg/ml. Furthermore, in vivo analysis using a rodent model confirmed the anti-plasmodial potential of subcutaneously administered sandalwood oil, and percutaneously administered hinokitiol and caraway oil against rodent P. berghei. Notably, these oils showed no efficacy when administered orally, intraperitoneally or intravenously. Caraway oil and hinokitiol dissolved in carrier oil, applied to the skin of hairless mice caused high levels in the blood, with concentrations exceeding their IC50 values. PMID:23082579

  15. In vitro and in vivo anti-plasmodial activity of essential oils, including hinokitiol.

    PubMed

    Fujisaki, Ryuichi; Kamei, Kiyoko; Yamamura, Mariko; Nishiya, Hajime; Inouye, Shigeharu; Takahashi, Miki; Abe, Shigeru

    2012-03-01

    Abstract. The anti-plasmodial activity of 47 essential oils and 10 of their constituents were screened for in vitro activity against Plasmodium falciparum. Five of these essential oils (sandalwood, caraway, monarda, nutmeg, and Thujopsis dolabrata var. hondai) and 2 constituents (thymoquinone and hinokitiol) were found to be active against P. falciparum in vitro, with 50% inhibitory concentration (IC50) values equal to or less than 1.0 microg/ml. Furthermore, in vivo analysis using a rodent model confirmed the anti-plasmodial potential of subcutaneously administered sandalwood oil, and percutaneously administered hinokitiol and caraway oil against rodent P. berghei. Notably, these oils showed no efficacy when administered orally, intraperitoneally or intravenously. Caraway oil and hinokitiol dissolved in carrier oil, applied to the skin of hairless mice caused high levels in the blood, with concentrations exceeding their IC50 values.

  16. Electrode including porous particles with embedded active material for use in a secondary electrochemical cell

    DOEpatents

    Vissers, Donald R.; Nelson, Paul A.; Kaun, Thomas D.; Tomczuk, Zygmunt

    1978-04-25

    Particles of carbonaceous matrices containing embedded electrode active material are prepared for vibratory loading within a porous electrically conductive substrate. In preparing the particles, active materials such as metal chalcogenides, solid alloys of alkali or alkaline earth metals along with other metals and their oxides in powdered or particulate form are blended with a thermosetting resin and particles of a volatile to form a paste mixture. The paste is heated to a temperature at which the volatile transforms into vapor to impart porosity at about the same time as the resin begins to cure into a rigid, solid structure. The solid structure is then comminuted into porous, carbonaceous particles with the embedded active material.

  17. Conservative Mechanisms of Extracellular Trap Formation by Annelida Eisenia andrei: Serine Protease Activity Requirement

    PubMed Central

    Ortmann, Weronika; Kolaczkowska, Elzbieta

    2016-01-01

    Formation of extracellular traps (ETs) capturing and immobilizing pathogens is now a well-established defense mechanism added to the repertoire of vertebrate phagocytes. These ETs are composed of extracellular DNA (extDNA), histones and antimicrobial proteins. Formation of mouse and human ETs depends on enzymes (i) facilitating decondensation of chromatin by citrullination of histones, and (ii) serine proteases degrading histones. In invertebrates, initial reports revealed existence of ETs composed of extDNA and histones, and here we document for the first time that also coelomocytes, immunocompetent cells of an earthworm Eisenia andrei, cast ETs which successfully trap bacteria in a reactive oxygen species (ROS)-dependent and -independent manner. Importantly, the formation of ETs was observed not only when coelomocytes were studied ex vivo, but also in vivo, directly in the earthworm coelom. These ETs were composed of extDNA, heat shock proteins (HSP27) and H3 histones. Furthermore, the formation of E. andrei ETs depended on activity of serine proteases, including elastase-like activity. Moreover, ETs interconnected and hold together aggregating coelomocytes, a processes proceeding encapsulation. In conclusion, the study confirms ET formation by earthworms, and unravels mechanisms leading to ET formation and encapsulation in invertebrates. PMID:27416067

  18. Conservative Mechanisms of Extracellular Trap Formation by Annelida Eisenia andrei: Serine Protease Activity Requirement.

    PubMed

    Homa, Joanna; Ortmann, Weronika; Kolaczkowska, Elzbieta

    2016-01-01

    Formation of extracellular traps (ETs) capturing and immobilizing pathogens is now a well-established defense mechanism added to the repertoire of vertebrate phagocytes. These ETs are composed of extracellular DNA (extDNA), histones and antimicrobial proteins. Formation of mouse and human ETs depends on enzymes (i) facilitating decondensation of chromatin by citrullination of histones, and (ii) serine proteases degrading histones. In invertebrates, initial reports revealed existence of ETs composed of extDNA and histones, and here we document for the first time that also coelomocytes, immunocompetent cells of an earthworm Eisenia andrei, cast ETs which successfully trap bacteria in a reactive oxygen species (ROS)-dependent and -independent manner. Importantly, the formation of ETs was observed not only when coelomocytes were studied ex vivo, but also in vivo, directly in the earthworm coelom. These ETs were composed of extDNA, heat shock proteins (HSP27) and H3 histones. Furthermore, the formation of E. andrei ETs depended on activity of serine proteases, including elastase-like activity. Moreover, ETs interconnected and hold together aggregating coelomocytes, a processes proceeding encapsulation. In conclusion, the study confirms ET formation by earthworms, and unravels mechanisms leading to ET formation and encapsulation in invertebrates. PMID:27416067

  19. Physical Activity Programs in Higher Education: Modifying Net/Wall Games to Include Individuals with Disabilities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Braga, Luciana; Tracy, Julia F.; Taliaferro, Andrea R.

    2015-01-01

    The growing number of students with disabilities in higher education settings has presented challenges for instructors with regards to appropriate inclusion. Concerning physical activity courses in higher education, instructors may not have the knowledge or resources to make modifications and accommodations that will ultimately result in…

  20. Observing a fictitious stressful event: haematological changes, including circulating leukocyte activation.

    PubMed

    Mian, Rubina; Shelton-Rayner, Graham; Harkin, Brendan; Williams, Paul

    2003-03-01

    The aim of this study was to assess the effect of watching a psychological stressful event on the activation of leukocytes in healthy human volunteers. Blood samples were obtained from 32 healthy male and female subjects aged between 20 and 26 years before, during and after either watching an 83-minute horror film that none of the subjects had previously seen (The Texas Chainsaw Massacre, 1974) or by sitting quietly in a room (control group). Total differential cell counts, leukocyte activation as measured by the nitroblue tetrazolium (NBT) test, heart rate and blood pressure (BP) measurements were taken at defined time points. There were significant increases in peripheral circulating leukocytes, the number of activated circulating leukocytes, haemoglobin (Hb) concentration and haematocrit (Hct) in response to the stressor. These were accompanied by significant increases in heart rate, systolic and diastolic BP (P<0.05 from baseline). This is the first reported study on the effects of observing a psychologically stressful, albeit fictitious event on circulating leukocyte numbers and the state of leukocyte activation as determined by the nitrotetrazolium test.

  1. Sixty Minutes of Physical Activity per Day Included within Preschool Academic Lessons Improves Early Literacy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kirk, Stacie M.; Kirk, Erik P.

    2016-01-01

    Background: The effects of increases in physical activity (PA) on early literacy skills in preschool children are not known. Methods: Fifty-four African-American preschool children from a low socioeconomic urban Head Start participated over 8 months. A 2-group, quasi-experimental design was used with one preschool site participating in the PA…

  2. Population and Human Development: A Course Curriculum Including Lesson Plans, Activities and Bibliography.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Murphy, Elaine M.

    This course outline suggests materials and learning activities on the interrelated causes and consequences of population growth and other population concerns. Designed to educate general college audiences, it is also intended for use as a preservice course for teachers. In addition, the course can be modified for high school students. The course…

  3. 7 CFR 981.441 - Credit for market promotion activities, including paid advertising.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... AGRICULTURE ALMONDS GROWN IN CALIFORNIA Administrative Rules and Regulations § 981.441 Credit for market... each activity shall be to promote the sale, consumption or use of California almonds, and nothing... in California almond growing counties with more than 1,000 bearing acres: Provided, That...

  4. 7 CFR 981.441 - Credit for market promotion activities, including paid advertising.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... AGRICULTURE ALMONDS GROWN IN CALIFORNIA Administrative Rules and Regulations § 981.441 Credit for market... each activity shall be to promote the sale, consumption or use of California almonds, and nothing... in California almond growing counties with more than 1,000 bearing acres: Provided, That...

  5. 7 CFR 981.441 - Credit for market promotion activities, including paid advertising.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... AGRICULTURE ALMONDS GROWN IN CALIFORNIA Administrative Rules and Regulations § 981.441 Credit for market... each activity shall be to promote the sale, consumption or use of California almonds, and nothing... in California almond growing counties with more than 1,000 bearing acres: Provided, That...

  6. 7 CFR 981.441 - Credit for market promotion activities, including paid advertising.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... AGRICULTURE ALMONDS GROWN IN CALIFORNIA Administrative Rules and Regulations § 981.441 Credit for market... each activity shall be to promote the sale, consumption or use of California almonds, and nothing... in California almond growing counties with more than 1,000 bearing acres: Provided, That...

  7. Backyards and Butterflies: Ways to Include Children with Disabilities in Outdoor Activities.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Greenstein, Doreen; And Others

    This sourcebook is designed for children, parents, and families, detailing ideas for outdoor play and learning activities, with emphasis on involving children with disabilities in outdoor play. A rural perspective permeates the guide, although each chapter contains ideas for making outdoor environments more accessible and safer for all children,…

  8. Beyond Right or Wrong: Challenges of Including Creative Design Activities in the Classroom

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brennan, Karen

    2015-01-01

    In this article, we explore challenges encountered by K-12 educators in establishing classroom cultures that support creative learning activities with the Scratch programming language. Providing opportunities for students to understand and to build capacities for creative work was described by many of the teachers that we interviewed as a central…

  9. Formation of Tankyrase Inhibitor-Induced Degradasomes Requires Proteasome Activity

    PubMed Central

    Pedersen, Nina Marie; Thorvaldsen, Tor Espen; Schultz, Sebastian Wolfgang; Wenzel, Eva Maria; Stenmark, Harald

    2016-01-01

    In canonical Wnt signaling, the protein levels of the key signaling mediator β-catenin are under tight regulation by the multimeric destruction complex that mediates proteasomal degradation of β-catenin. In colorectal cancer, destruction complex activity is often compromised due to mutations in the multifunctional scaffolding protein Adenomatous Polyposis Coli (APC), leading to a stabilization of β-catenin. Recently, tankyrase inhibitors (TNKSi), a novel class of small molecule inhibitors, were shown to re-establish a functional destruction complex in APC-mutant cancer cell lines by stabilizing AXIN1/2, whose protein levels are usually kept low via poly(ADP-ribosyl)ation by the tankyrase enzymes (TNKS1/2). Surprisingly, we found that for the formation of the morphological correlates of destruction complexes, called degradasomes, functional proteasomes are required. In addition we found that AXIN2 is strongly upregulated after 6 h of TNKS inhibition. The proteasome inhibitor MG132 counteracted TNKSi-induced degradasome formation and AXIN2 stabilization, and this was accompanied by reduced transcription of AXIN2. Mechanistically we could implicate the transcription factor FoxM1 in this process, which was recently shown to be a transcriptional activator of AXIN2. We observed a substantial reduction in TNKSi-induced stabilization of AXIN2 after siRNA-mediated depletion of FoxM1 and found that proteasome inhibition reduced the active (phosphorylated) fraction of FoxM1. This can explain the decreased protein levels of AXIN2 after MG132 treatment. Our findings have implications for the design of in vitro studies on the destruction complex and for clinical applications of TNKSi. PMID:27482906

  10. Space Resources for Teachers: Biology, Including Suggestions for Classroom Activities and Laboratory Experiments.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lee, Tom E.; And Others

    This compilation of resource units concerns the latest developments in space biology. Some of the topics included are oxygen consumption, temperature, radiation, rhythms, weightlessness, acceleration and vibration stress, toxicity, and sensory and perceptual problems. Many of the topics are interdisciplinary and relate biology, physiology,…

  11. 7 CFR 981.441 - Credit for market promotion activities, including paid advertising.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... relations purposes, including E-commerce (mail ordering through the Internet): Provided, That Credit-Back...-Back is requested. (e) The following requirements shall apply to Credit-Back for all promotional... and Canada, paragraph (e)(5) of this section shall also apply. (2) The clear and evident purpose...

  12. In vitro bactericidal activity of aminoglycosides, including the next-generation drug plazomicin, against Brucella spp.

    PubMed

    Olsen, Steven C; Carlson, Steve A

    2015-01-01

    Plazomicin is a next-generation aminoglycoside with a potentially unique set of clinical characteristics compared with other aminoglycosides. This study assessed the minimum inhibitory concentrations (MICs) and minimum bactericidal concentrations (MBCs) of plazomicin against 15 clinical isolates as well as three reference strains representing Brucella abortus, Brucella melitensis and Brucella suis. These data were compared with those obtained for six other aminoglycosides and two aminocyclitols. Plazomicin and gentamicin were the only drugs demonstrating bactericidal activity towards two of the three Brucella spp., whilst plazomicin was the only drug exhibiting bactericidal activity against B. suis. This is the first study to assess the bactericidal nature of plazomicin against Brucella spp. in vitro. PMID:25459738

  13. Absorption spectrometric study of charge transfer complex formation between 4-acetamidophenol (paracetamol) and a series of quinones including Vitamin K 3

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saha, Avijit; Mukherjee, Asok K.

    2004-07-01

    The formation of charge transfer (CT) complexes of 4-acetamidophenol (commonly called 'paracetamol') and a series of quinones (including Vitamin K 3) has been studied spectrophotometrically in ethanol medium. The vertical ionisation potential of paracetamol and the degrees of charge transfer of the complexes in their ground state has been estimated from the trends in the charge transfer bands. The oscillator and transition dipole strengths of the complexes have been determined from the CT absorption spectra at 298 K. The complexes have been found by Job's method of continuous variation to have the uncommon 2:1 (paracetamol:quinone) stoichiometry in each case. The enthalpies and entropies of formation of the complexes have been obtained by determining their formation constants at five different temperatures.

  14. Activity of faropenem tested against Neisseria gonorrhoeae isolates including fluoroquinolone-resistant strains.

    PubMed

    Jones, Ronald N; Critchley, Ian A; Whittington, William L H; Janjic, Nebojsa; Pottumarthy, Sudha

    2005-12-01

    We evaluated the anti-gonococcal potency of faropenem along with 7 comparator reference antimicrobials against a preselected collection of clinical isolates. The 265 isolates were inclusive of 2 subsets: 1) 76 well-characterized resistant phenotypes of gonococcal strains (53 quinolone-resistant strains--31 with documented quinolone resistance-determining region changes from Japan, 15 strains resistant to penicillin and tetracycline, and 8 strains with intermediate susceptibility to penicillin) and 2) 189 recent isolates from clinical specimens in 2004 from 6 states across the United States where quinolone resistance is prevalent. Activity of faropenem was adversely affected by l-cysteine hydrochloride in IsoVitaleX (4-fold increase in [minimal inhibitory concentration] MIC50; 0.06 versus 0.25 microg/mL). The rank order of potency of the antimicrobials for the entire collection was ceftriaxone (MIC90, 0.06 microg/mL) > faropenem (0.25 microg/mL) > azithromycin (0.5 microg/mL) > cefuroxime (1 microg/mL) > tetracycline (2 microg/mL) > penicillin = ciprofloxacin = levofloxacin (4 microg/mL). Using MIC90 for comparison, faropenem was 4-fold more potent than cefuroxime (0.25 versus 1 microg/mL), but was 4-fold less active than ceftriaxone (0.25 versus 0.06 microg/mL). Although the activity of faropenem was not affected by either penicillinase production (MIC90, 0.12 microg/mL, penicillinase-positive) or increasing ciprofloxacin MIC (0.25 microg/mL, ciprofloxacin-resistant), increasing penicillin MIC was associated with an increase in MIC90 values (0.016 microg/mL for penicillin-susceptible to 0.25 microg/mL for penicillin-resistant strains). Among the recent (2004) clinical gonococcal isolates tested, reduced susceptibility to penicillins, tetracycline, and fluoroquinolones was high (28.0-94.2%). Geographic distribution of the endemic resistance rates of gonococci varied considerably, with 16.7-66.7% of the gonococcal isolates being ciprofloxacin-resistant in Oregon

  15. Phytophthora infestans Has a Plethora of Phospholipase D Enzymes Including a Subclass That Has Extracellular Activity

    PubMed Central

    Meijer, Harold J. G.; Hassen, Hussen Harrun; Govers, Francine

    2011-01-01

    In eukaryotes phospholipase D (PLD) is involved in many cellular processes. Currently little is known about PLDs in oomycetes. Here we report that the oomycete plant pathogen Phytophthora infestans has a large repertoire of PLDs divided over six subfamilies: PXPH-PLD, PXTM-PLD, TM-PLD, PLD-likes, and type A and B sPLD-likes. Since the latter have signal peptides we developed a method using metabolically labelled phospholipids to monitor if P. infestans secretes PLD. In extracellular medium of ten P. infestans strains PLD activity was detected as demonstrated by the production of phosphatidic acid and the PLD specific marker phosphatidylalcohol. PMID:21423760

  16. Phytophthora infestans has a plethora of phospholipase D enzymes including a subclass that has extracellular activity.

    PubMed

    Meijer, Harold J G; Hassen, Hussen Harrun; Govers, Francine

    2011-01-01

    In eukaryotes phospholipase D (PLD) is involved in many cellular processes. Currently little is known about PLDs in oomycetes. Here we report that the oomycete plant pathogen Phytophthora infestans has a large repertoire of PLDs divided over six subfamilies: PXPH-PLD, PXTM-PLD, TM-PLD, PLD-likes, and type A and B sPLD-likes. Since the latter have signal peptides we developed a method using metabolically labelled phospholipids to monitor if P. infestans secretes PLD. In extracellular medium of ten P. infestans strains PLD activity was detected as demonstrated by the production of phosphatidic acid and the PLD specific marker phosphatidylalcohol. PMID:21423760

  17. Pattern Formation on Networks: from Localised Activity to Turing Patterns

    PubMed Central

    McCullen, Nick; Wagenknecht, Thomas

    2016-01-01

    Networks of interactions between competing species are used to model many complex systems, such as in genetics, evolutionary biology or sociology and knowledge of the patterns of activity they can exhibit is important for understanding their behaviour. The emergence of patterns on complex networks with reaction-diffusion dynamics is studied here, where node dynamics interact via diffusion via the network edges. Through the application of a generalisation of dynamical systems analysis this work reveals a fundamental connection between small-scale modes of activity on networks and localised pattern formation seen throughout science, such as solitons, breathers and localised buckling. The connection between solutions with a single and small numbers of activated nodes and the fully developed system-scale patterns are investigated computationally using numerical continuation methods. These techniques are also used to help reveal a much larger portion of of the full number of solutions that exist in the system at different parameter values. The importance of network structure is also highlighted, with a key role being played by nodes with a certain so-called optimal degree, on which the interaction between the reaction kinetics and the network structure organise the behaviour of the system. PMID:27273339

  18. Pattern Formation on Networks: from Localised Activity to Turing Patterns

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McCullen, Nick; Wagenknecht, Thomas

    2016-06-01

    Networks of interactions between competing species are used to model many complex systems, such as in genetics, evolutionary biology or sociology and knowledge of the patterns of activity they can exhibit is important for understanding their behaviour. The emergence of patterns on complex networks with reaction-diffusion dynamics is studied here, where node dynamics interact via diffusion via the network edges. Through the application of a generalisation of dynamical systems analysis this work reveals a fundamental connection between small-scale modes of activity on networks and localised pattern formation seen throughout science, such as solitons, breathers and localised buckling. The connection between solutions with a single and small numbers of activated nodes and the fully developed system-scale patterns are investigated computationally using numerical continuation methods. These techniques are also used to help reveal a much larger portion of of the full number of solutions that exist in the system at different parameter values. The importance of network structure is also highlighted, with a key role being played by nodes with a certain so-called optimal degree, on which the interaction between the reaction kinetics and the network structure organise the behaviour of the system.

  19. Pattern Formation on Networks: from Localised Activity to Turing Patterns.

    PubMed

    McCullen, Nick; Wagenknecht, Thomas

    2016-01-01

    Networks of interactions between competing species are used to model many complex systems, such as in genetics, evolutionary biology or sociology and knowledge of the patterns of activity they can exhibit is important for understanding their behaviour. The emergence of patterns on complex networks with reaction-diffusion dynamics is studied here, where node dynamics interact via diffusion via the network edges. Through the application of a generalisation of dynamical systems analysis this work reveals a fundamental connection between small-scale modes of activity on networks and localised pattern formation seen throughout science, such as solitons, breathers and localised buckling. The connection between solutions with a single and small numbers of activated nodes and the fully developed system-scale patterns are investigated computationally using numerical continuation methods. These techniques are also used to help reveal a much larger portion of of the full number of solutions that exist in the system at different parameter values. The importance of network structure is also highlighted, with a key role being played by nodes with a certain so-called optimal degree, on which the interaction between the reaction kinetics and the network structure organise the behaviour of the system. PMID:27273339

  20. Chlorogenic Acid Inhibits Human Platelet Activation and Thrombus Formation

    PubMed Central

    Fuentes, Eduardo; Caballero, Julio; Alarcón, Marcelo; Rojas, Armando; Palomo, Iván

    2014-01-01

    Background Chlorogenic acid is a potent phenolic antioxidant. However, its effect on platelet aggregation, a critical factor in arterial thrombosis, remains unclear. Consequently, chlorogenic acid-action mechanisms in preventing platelet activation and thrombus formation were examined. Methods and Results Chlorogenic acid in a dose-dependent manner (0.1 to 1 mmol/L) inhibited platelet secretion and aggregation induced by ADP, collagen, arachidonic acid and TRAP-6, and diminished platelet firm adhesion/aggregation and platelet-leukocyte interactions under flow conditions. At these concentrations chlorogenic acid significantly decreased platelet inflammatory mediators (sP-selectin, sCD40L, CCL5 and IL-1β) and increased intraplatelet cAMP levels/PKA activation. Interestingly, SQ22536 (an adenylate cyclase inhibitor) and ZM241385 (a potent A2A receptor antagonist) attenuated the antiplatelet effect of chlorogenic acid. Chlorogenic acid is compatible to the active site of the adenosine A2A receptor as revealed through molecular modeling. In addition, chlorogenic acid had a significantly lower effect on mouse bleeding time when compared to the same dose of aspirin. Conclusions Antiplatelet and antithrombotic effects of chlorogenic acid are associated with the A2A receptor/adenylate cyclase/cAMP/PKA signaling pathway. PMID:24598787

  1. 77 FR 75198 - Standard Format and Content for Post-Shutdown Decommissioning Activities Report

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-12-19

    ... COMMISSION Standard Format and Content for Post-Shutdown Decommissioning Activities Report AGENCY: Nuclear... Format and Content for Post-shutdown Decommissioning Activities Report.'' This guide describes a method...) 1.185, ``Standard Format and Content for Post-shutdown Decommissioning Activities Report,''...

  2. A Methodology for Post Operational Clean Out of a Highly Active Facility Including Solids Behaviour - 12386

    SciTech Connect

    Edmondson, Michael J.; Ward, Tracy R.; Maxwell, Lisa J.

    2012-07-01

    The Highly Active Liquor Evaporation and Storage (HALES) plant at Sellafield handles acidic fission product containing liquor with typical activities of the order of 18x10{sup 9} Bq/ml. A strategy experimental feedback approach has been used to establish a wash regime for the Post Operational Clean Out (POCO) of the oldest storage tanks for this liquor. Two different wash reagents have been identified as being potentially suitable for removal of acid insoluble fission product precipitates. Ammonium carbamate and sodium carbonate yield similar products during the proposed wash cycle. The proposed wash reagents provide dissolution of caesium phosphomolybdate (CPM) and zirconium molybdate (ZM) solid phases but yields a fine, mobile precipitate of metal carbonates from the Highly Active Liquor (HAL) supernate. Addition of nitric acid to the wash effluent can cause CPM to precipitate where there is sufficient caesium and phosphorous available. Where they are not present (from ZM dissolution) the nitric acid addition initially produces a nitrate precipitate which then re-dissolves, along with the metal carbonates, to give a solid-free solution. The different behaviour of the two solids during the wash cycle has led to the proposal for an amended flowsheet. Additional studies on the potential to change the morphology of crystallising ZM have presented opportunities for changing the rheology of ZM sediments through doping with tellurium or particular organic acids. Two different wash reagents have been identified as being potentially suitable for the POCO of HALES Oldside HASTs. AC and SC both yield similar products during the proposed wash cycle. However, the different behaviour of the two principle HAL solids, CPM and ZM, during the wash cycle has led to the proposal for an amended flowsheet. Additional studies on the potential to change the morphology of crystallising ZM have presented opportunities for changing its rheology through doping with tellurium or certain

  3. Nickel-catalyzed Csp2-Csp3 bond formation by carbon-fluorine activation.

    PubMed

    Sun, Alex D; Leung, Kaylyn; Restivo, Anita D; LaBerge, Nicole A; Takasaki, Harumi; Love, Jennifer A

    2014-03-10

    We report herein a general catalytic method for Csp(2)-Csp(3) bond formation through C-F activation. The process uses an inexpensive nickel complex with either diorganozinc or alkylzinc halide reagents, including those with β-hydrogen atoms. A variety of fluorine substitution patterns and functional groups can be readily incorporated. Sequential reactions involving different precatalysts and coupling partners permit the synthesis of densely functionalized fluorinated building blocks.

  4. Nuclear Rocket Test Facility Decommissioning Including Controlled Explosive Demolition of a Neutron-Activated Shield Wall

    SciTech Connect

    Michael Kruzic

    2007-09-01

    Located in Area 25 of the Nevada Test Site, the Test Cell A Facility was used in the 1960s for the testing of nuclear rocket engines, as part of the Nuclear Rocket Development Program. The facility was decontaminated and decommissioned (D&D) in 2005 using the Streamlined Approach For Environmental Restoration (SAFER) process, under the Federal Facilities Agreement and Consent Order (FFACO). Utilities and process piping were verified void of contents, hazardous materials were removed, concrete with removable contamination decontaminated, large sections mechanically demolished, and the remaining five-foot, five-inch thick radiologically-activated reinforced concrete shield wall demolished using open-air controlled explosive demolition (CED). CED of the shield wall was closely monitored and resulted in no radiological exposure or atmospheric release.

  5. Hinokitiol inhibits platelet activation ex vivo and thrombus formation in vivo.

    PubMed

    Lin, Kuan H; Kuo, Jinn R; Lu, Wan J; Chung, Chi L; Chou, Duen S; Huang, Shih Y; Lee, Hsiu C; Sheu, Joen R

    2013-05-15

    Hinokitiol is a tropolone-related bioactive compound that has been used in hair tonics, cosmetics, and food as an antimicrobial agent. Recently, hinokitiol has attracted considerable interest because of its anticancer activities. Platelet activation plays a crucial role in atherothrombotic processes. We examined the effects of hinokitiol treatment on platelet activation using human platelets. In the present study, hinokitiol (1 and 2 μM) inhibited the collagen-induced aggregation of human platelets, but did not inhibit the activation of platelets by other agonists, including thrombin, arachidonic acid, and ADP. Hinokitiol inhibited the phosphorylation of phospholipase C (PLC)γ2, protein kinase C (PKC), mitogen-activated protein kinases (MAPKs), and Akt in collagen-activated human platelets, and significantly reduced intracellular calcium mobilization and hydroxyl radical (OH·) formation. Hinokitiol also reduced the PKC activation and platelet aggregation stimulated by PDBu. In addition, hinokitiol significantly prolonged thrombogenesis in mice. Hinokitiol did not influence the binding of a fluorescent triflavin probe to the αIIbβ3 integrin on platelet membrane, and neither ODQ nor SQ22536 significantly reversed the hinokitiol-mediated inhibition of platelet aggregation. In conclusion, hinokitiol may inhibit platelet activation by inhibiting the PLCγ2-PKC cascade and hydroxyl radical formation, followed by suppressing the activation of MAPKs and Akt. Our study suggests that hinokitiol may represent a potential therapeutic agent for the prevention or treatment of thromboembolic disorders. PMID:23473801

  6. Design of a high-lift experiment in water including active flow control

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beutel, T.; Sattler, S.; El Sayed, Y.; Schwerter, M.; Zander, M.; Büttgenbach, S.; Leester-Schädel, M.; Radespiel, R.; Sinapius, M.; Wierach, P.

    2014-07-01

    This paper describes the structural design of an active flow-control experiment. The aim of the experiment is to investigate the increase in efficiency of an internally blown Coanda flap using unsteady blowing. The system uses tailor-made microelectromechanical (MEMS) pressure sensors to determine the state of the oncoming flow and an actuated lip to regulate the mass flow and velocity of a stream near a wall over the internally blown flap. Sensors and actuators are integrated into a highly loaded system that is extremely compact. The sensors are connected to a bus system that feeds the data into a real-time control system. The piezoelectric actuators using the d 33 effect at a comparable low voltage of 120 V are integrated into a lip that controls the blowout slot height. The system is designed for closed-loop control that efficiently avoids flow separation on the Coanda flap. The setup is designed for water-tunnel experiments in order to reduce the free-stream velocity and the system’s control frequency by a factor of 10 compared with that in air. This paper outlines the function and verification of the system’s main components and their development.

  7. Fatty acid-releasing activities in Sinorhizobium meliloti include unusual diacylglycerol lipase

    PubMed Central

    Sahonero-Canavesi, Diana X.; Sohlenkamp, Christian; Sandoval-Calderón, Mario; Lamsa, Anne; Pogliano, Kit; López-Lara, Isabel M.; Geiger, Otto

    2016-01-01

    Summary Phospholipids are well known for their membrane forming properties and thereby delimit any cell from the exterior world. In addition, membrane phospholipids can act as precursors for signals and other biomolecules during their turnover. Little is known about phospholipid signalling, turnover and remodelling in bacteria. Recently, we showed that a FadD-deficient mutant of Sinorhizobium meliloti, unable to convert free fatty acids to their coenzyme A derivatives, accumulates free fatty acids during the stationary phase of growth. Enzymatic activities responsible for the generation of these free fatty acids were unknown in rhizobia. Searching the genome of S. meliloti, we identified a potential lysophospholipase (SMc04041) and two predicted patatin-like phospholipases A (SMc00930, SMc01003). Although SMc00930 as well as SMc01003 contribute to the release of free fatty acids in S. meliloti, neither one can use phospholipids as substrates. Here we show that SMc01003 converts diacylglycerol to monoacylglycerol and a fatty acid, and that monoacylglycerol can be further degraded by SMc01003 to another fatty acid and glycerol. A SMc01003-deficient mutant of S. meliloti transiently accumulates diacylglycerol, suggesting that SMc01003 also acts as diacylglycerol lipase (DglA) in its native background. Expression of the DglA lipase in Escherichia coli causes lysis of cells in stationary phase of growth. PMID:25711932

  8. Fatty acid-releasing activities in Sinorhizobium meliloti include unusual diacylglycerol lipase.

    PubMed

    Sahonero-Canavesi, Diana X; Sohlenkamp, Christian; Sandoval-Calderón, Mario; Lamsa, Anne; Pogliano, Kit; López-Lara, Isabel M; Geiger, Otto

    2015-09-01

    Phospholipids are well known for their membrane-forming properties and thereby delimit any cell from the exterior world. In addition, membrane phospholipids can act as precursors for signals and other biomolecules during their turnover. Little is known about phospholipid signalling, turnover and remodelling in bacteria. Recently, we showed that a FadD-deficient mutant of Sinorhizobium meliloti, unable to convert free fatty acids to their coenzyme A derivatives, accumulates free fatty acids during the stationary phase of growth. Enzymatic activities responsible for the generation of these free fatty acids were unknown in rhizobia. Searching the genome of S. meliloti, we identified a potential lysophospholipase (SMc04041) and two predicted patatin-like phospholipases A (SMc00930, SMc01003). Although SMc00930 as well as SMc01003 contribute to the release of free fatty acids in S. meliloti, neither one can use phospholipids as substrates. Here we show that SMc01003 converts diacylglycerol to monoacylglycerol and a fatty acid, and that monoacylglycerol can be further degraded by SMc01003 to another fatty acid and glycerol. A SMc01003-deficient mutant of S. meliloti transiently accumulates diacylglycerol, suggesting that SMc01003 also acts as diacylglycerol lipase (DglA) in its native background. Expression of the DglA lipase in Escherichia coli causes lysis of cells in stationary phase of growth.

  9. Modeling the development of biofilm density including active bacteria, inert biomass, and extracellular polymeric substances.

    PubMed

    Laspidou, Chrysi S; Rittmann, Bruce E

    2004-01-01

    We present the unified multi-component cellular automaton (UMCCA) model, which predicts quantitatively the development of the biofilm's composite density for three biofilm components: active bacteria, inert or dead biomass, and extracellular polymeric substances. The model also describes the concentrations of three soluble organic components (soluble substrate and two types of soluble microbial products) and oxygen. The UMCCA model is a hybrid discrete-differential mathematical model and introduces the novel feature of biofilm consolidation. Our hypothesis is that the fluid over the biofilm creates pressures and vibrations that cause the biofilm to consolidate, or pack itself to a higher density over time. Each biofilm compartment in the model output consolidates to a different degree that depends on the age of its biomass. The UMCCA model also adds a cellular automaton algorithm that identifies the path of least resistance and directly moves excess biomass along that path, thereby ensuring that the excess biomass is distributed efficiently. A companion paper illustrates the trends that the UMCCA model is able to represent and shows a comparison with experimental results. PMID:15276752

  10. Ozone control of biological activity during Earth's history, including the KT catastrophe

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sheldon, W. R.

    1994-01-01

    There have been brief periods since the beginning of the Cambrian some 600 m.y. ago when mass extinctions destroyed a significant fraction of living species. The most widely studied of these events is the catastrophe at the KT boundary that ended the long dominance of the dinosaurs. In addition to mass extinctions, there is another profound discontinuity in the history of Earth's biota, the explosion of life at the end of the Precambrian era which is an episode that is not explained well at all. For some 3 b.y. before the Cambrian, life had been present on Earth, but maintained a low level of activity which is an aspect of the biota that is puzzling, especially during the last two-thirds of that period. During the last 2 b.y. before the Cambrian, conditions at the Earth's surface were suitable for a burgeoning of the biota, according to most criteria: the oceans neither boiled nor were fozen solid during this time, and the atmosphere contained sufficient O for the development of animals. The purpose of this paper is to suggest that mass extinctions and the lackluster behavior of the Precambrian biota share a common cause: an inadequate amount of ozone in the atmosphere.

  11. Formation of proteasome-PA700 complexes directly correlates with activation of peptidase activity.

    PubMed

    Adams, G M; Crotchett, B; Slaughter, C A; DeMartino, G N; Gogol, E P

    1998-09-15

    The proteolytic activity of the eukaryotic 20S proteasome is stimulated by a multisubunit activator, PA700, which forms both 1:1 and 2:1 complexes with the proteasome. Formation of the complexes is enhanced by an additional protein assembly called modulator, which also stimulates the enzymatic activity of the proteasome only in the presence of PA700. Here we show that the binding of PA700 to the proteasome is cooperative, as is the activation of the proteasome's intrinsic peptidase activity. Modulator increases the extent of complex formation and peptidase activation, while preserving the cooperative kinetics. Furthermore, the increase in activity is not linear with the number of PA700 assemblies bound to the proteasome, but rather with the number of proteasome-PA700 complexes, regardless of the PA700:proteasome stoichiometry. Hence the stimulation of peptidase activity is fully (or almost fully) effected by the binding of a single PA700 to the 20S proteasome. The stimulation of peptidase by modulator is explained entirely by the increased number of proteasome-PA700 complexes formed in its presence, rather than by any substantial direct stimulation of catalysis. These observations are consistent with a model in which PA700, either alone or assisted by modulator, promotes conformational changes in the proteasome that activate the catalytic sites and/or facilitate access of peptide substrates to these sites. PMID:9737872

  12. Radio Properties of Low Redshift Broad Line Active Galactic Nuclei Including Multiple Component Radio Sources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rafter, Stephen E.

    2010-01-01

    We present results on the radio properties of a low redshift (z < 0.35) sample of 8434 broad line active galactic nuclei (AGNs) from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey after correlating the optical sources with radio sources in the Faint Images of the Radio Sky at Twenty-Centimeters survey. We find that 10% of our sample has radio emission < 4" away from the optical counterpart (core-only sources), and 1% has significant extended emission that must be taken into account when calculating the total radio luminosity (multi-component sources). Association of the extended radio emission is established by the proximity to the optical source, physical connection of jets and lobes, or large scale symmetry like in classic FRIIs. From these data we find an FRI/FRII luminosity dividing line like that found by Fanaroff & Riley (1974), where we use our core-only sources as proxies for FRIs, and our multi-component sources for the FRIIs. We find a bimodal distribution for the radio loudness (R = L(radio)/L(opt)) where the lower radio luminosity core-only sources appear as a population separate from the multi-component extended sources, compared with no evidence for bimodality when just the core-only sources are used. We also find that a log(R) value of 1.75 is well suited to separate the FRIs from the FRIIs, and that the R bimodality seen here is really a manifestation of the FRI/FRII break originally found by Fanaroff & Riley (1974). We find modest trends in the radio loud fraction as a function of Eddington ratio and black hole mass, where the fraction of RL AGNs decreases with increasing Eddington ratio, and increases when the black hole mass is above 2 x 108 solar masses.

  13. Formation of Golgi-derived active zone precursor vesicles.

    PubMed

    Maas, Christoph; Torres, Viviana I; Altrock, Wilko D; Leal-Ortiz, Sergio; Wagh, Dhananjay; Terry-Lorenzo, Ryan T; Fejtova, Anna; Gundelfinger, Eckart D; Ziv, Noam E; Garner, Craig C

    2012-08-01

    Vesicular trafficking of presynaptic and postsynaptic components is emerging as a general cellular mechanism for the delivery of scaffold proteins, ion channels, and receptors to nascent and mature synapses. However, the molecular mechanisms leading to the selection of cargos and their differential transport to subneuronal compartments are not well understood, in part because of the mixing of cargos at the plasma membrane and/or within endosomal compartments. In the present study, we have explored the cellular mechanisms of active zone precursor vesicle assembly at the Golgi in dissociated hippocampal neurons of Rattus norvegicus. Our studies show that Piccolo, Bassoon, and ELKS2/CAST exit the trans-Golgi network on a common vesicle that requires Piccolo and Bassoon for its proper assembly. In contrast, Munc13 and synaptic vesicle proteins use distinct sets of Golgi-derived transport vesicles, while RIM1α associates with vesicular membranes in a post-Golgi compartment. Furthermore, Piccolo and Bassoon are necessary for ELKS2/CAST to leave the Golgi in association with vesicles, and a core domain of Bassoon is sufficient to facilitate formation of these vesicles. While these findings support emerging principles regarding active zone differentiation, the cellular and molecular analyses reported here also indicate that the Piccolo-Bassoon transport vesicles leaving the Golgi may undergo further changes in protein composition before arriving at synaptic sites.

  14. MID-INFRARED SPECTRAL INDICATORS OF STAR FORMATION AND ACTIVE GALACTIC NUCLEUS ACTIVITY IN NORMAL GALAXIES

    SciTech Connect

    Treyer, Marie; Martin, Christopher D.; Wyder, Ted; Schiminovich, David; O'Dowd, Matt; Johnson, Benjamin D.; Charlot, Stephane; Heckman, Timothy; Martins, Lucimara; Seibert, Mark; Van der Hulst, J. M.

    2010-08-20

    We investigate the use of mid-infrared (MIR) polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon (PAH) bands, the continuum, and emission lines as probes of star formation (SF) and active galactic nucleus (AGN) activity in a sample of 100 'normal' and local (z {approx} 0.1) emission-line galaxies. The MIR spectra were obtained with the Spitzer Space Telescope Infrared Spectrograph as part of the Spitzer-SDSS-GALEX Spectroscopic Survey, which includes multi-wavelength photometry from the ultraviolet to the far-infrared and optical spectroscopy. The continuum and features were extracted using PAHFIT, a decomposition code which we find to yield PAH equivalent widths (EWs) up to {approx}30 times larger than the commonly used spline methods. Despite the lack of extreme objects in our sample (such as strong AGNs, low-metallicity galaxies, or ULIRGs), we find significant variations in PAH, continuum, and emission-line properties, and systematic trends between these MIR properties and optically derived physical properties, such as age, metallicity, and radiation field hardness. We revisit the diagnostic diagram relating PAH EWs and [Ne II]12.8 {mu}m/[O IV]25.9 {mu}m line ratios and find it to be in much better agreement with the standard optical SF/AGN classification than when spline decompositions are used, while also potentially revealing obscured AGNs. The luminosity of individual PAH components, of the continuum, and, with poorer statistics, of the neon emission lines and molecular hydrogen lines are found to be tightly correlated to the total infrared (TIR) luminosity, making individual MIR components good gauges of the total dust emission in SF galaxies. Like the TIR luminosity, these individual components can be used to estimate dust attenuation in the UV and in H{alpha} lines based on energy balance arguments. We also propose average scaling relations between these components and dust-corrected, H{alpha}-derived SF rates.

  15. Should Physical Activity Be Included in Nutrition Education? A Comparison of Nutrition Outcomes with and without In-Class Activities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Palmer-Keenan, Debra M.; Corda, Kirsten

    2014-01-01

    Limited-resource adults' dietary intakes and nutrition behaviors improve as a result of Expanded Food and Nutrition Education Program (EFNEP)/Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program Education (SNAP-Ed) participation; however, physical activity education is needed for improved health. The experimental study reported here assessed if spending…

  16. Acyl silicates and acyl aluminates as activated intermediates in peptide formation on clays

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    White, D. H.; Kennedy, R. M.; Macklin, J.

    1984-01-01

    Glycine reacts with heating on dried clays and other minerals to give peptides in much better yield than in the absence of mineral. This reaction was proposed to occur by way of an activated intermediate such as an acyl silicate or acyl aluminate analogous to acyl phosphates involved in several biochemical reactions including peptide bond synthesis. The proposed mechanism has been confirmed by trapping the intermediate, as well as by direct spectroscopic observation of a related intermediate. The reaction of amino acids on periodically dried mineral surfaces represents a widespead, geologically realistic setting for prebiotic peptide formation via in situ activation.

  17. Development of an oregano-based ointment with anti-microbial activity including activity against methicillin-resistant Staphlococcus aureus.

    PubMed

    Eng, William; Norman, Robert

    2010-04-01

    Increasing antibiotic resistance has prompted a search for new compounds with anti-microbial activity. In the authors' previous study, oregano extract was identified as one of the most potent anti-microbial compounds. The disk diffusion method was employed to assess the degree of inhibition against various microorganisms, and the bacteriostatic or bactericidal mechanism of action. Disk diffusion studies showed that oregano was found to be bacteriostatic for Staphylococcus aureus (S. aureus) and methicillin-resistant S. aureus, (MRSA) but bacteriocidal for seven other microorganisms. Pseudomonas aeruginosa could not be inhibited by oregano. An ointment consisting of 1-10% oregano could inhibit most organisms except for Proteus mirabilis and Proteus vulgaris, which required 20% and Pseudomonas which could not be inhibited even at the highest concentration of 80%. Oregano extracts can be formulated into an ointment that shows broad antimicrobial activity. Additional testing to assess tissue toxicity and other adverse reactions would be needed prior to human testing.

  18. Formation of disulfide bonds in insect prophenoloxidase enhances immunity through improving enzyme activity and stability.

    PubMed

    Lu, Anrui; Peng, Qin; Ling, Erjun

    2014-06-01

    Type 3 copper proteins, including insect prophenoloxidase (PPO), contain two copper atoms in the active site pocket and can oxidize phenols. Insect PPO plays an important role in immunity. Insects and other invertebrates show limited recovery from pathogen invasion and wounds if phenoloxidase (PO) activity is low. In most insect PPOs, two disulfide bonds are present near the C-terminus. However, in Pimpla hypochondriaca (a parasitoid wasp), each PPO contains one disulfide bond. We thus questioned whether the formation of two sulfide bonds in insect PPOs improved protein stability and/or increased insect innate immunity over time. Using Drosophila melanogaster PPO1 as a model, one or two disulfide bonds were deleted to evaluate the importance of disulfide bonds in insect immunity. rPPO1 and mutants lacking disulfide bonds could be expressed and showed PO activity. However, the PO activities of mutants lacking one or two disulfide bonds significantly decreased. Deletion of disulfide bonds also reduced PPO thermostability. Furthermore, antibacterial activities against Escherichia coli and Bacillus subtilis significantly decreased when disulfide bonds were deleted. Therefore, the formation of two disulfide bond(s) in insect PPO enhances antibacterial activity by increasing PO activity and stability.

  19. Simplifying healthful choices: a qualitative study of a physical activity based nutrition label format

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background This study used focus groups to pilot and evaluate a new nutrition label format and refine the label design. Physical activity equivalent labels present calorie information in terms of the amount of physical activity that would be required to expend the calories in a specified food item. Methods Three focus groups with a total of twenty participants discussed food choices and nutrition labeling. They provided information on comprehension, usability and acceptability of the label. A systematic coding process was used to apply descriptive codes to the data and to identify emerging themes and attitudes. Results Participants in all three groups were able to comprehend the label format. Discussion about label format focused on issues including gender of the depicted figure, physical fitness of the figure, preference for walking or running labels, and preference for information in miles or minutes. Feedback from earlier focus groups was used to refine the labels in an iterative process. Conclusions In contrast to calorie labels, participants shown physical activity labels asked and answered, “How does this label apply to me?” This shift toward personalized understanding may indicate that physical activity labels offer an advantage over currently available nutrition labels. PMID:23742678

  20. The star formation rates of active galactic nuclei host galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ellison, Sara L.; Teimoorinia, Hossen; Rosario, David J.; Mendel, J. Trevor

    2016-05-01

    Using artificial neural network predictions of total infrared luminosities (LIR), we compare the host galaxy star formation rates (SFRs) of ˜21 000 optically selected active galactic nuclei (AGN), 466 low-excitation radio galaxies (LERGs) and 721 mid-IR-selected AGN. SFR offsets (ΔSFR) relative to a sample of star-forming `main-sequence' galaxies (matched in M⋆, z and local environment) are computed for the AGN hosts. Optically selected AGN exhibit a wide range of ΔSFR, with a distribution skewed to low SFRs and a median ΔSFR = -0.06 dex. The LERGs have SFRs that are shifted to even lower values with a median ΔSFR = -0.5 dex. In contrast, mid-IR-selected AGN have, on average, SFRs enhanced by a factor of ˜1.5. We interpret the different distributions of ΔSFR amongst the different AGN classes in the context of the relative contribution of triggering by galaxy mergers. Whereas the LERGs are predominantly fuelled through low accretion rate secular processes which are not accompanied by enhancements in SFR, mergers, which can simultaneously boost SFRs, most frequently lead to powerful, obscured AGN.

  1. Traction force dynamics predict gap formation in activated endothelium.

    PubMed

    Valent, Erik T; van Nieuw Amerongen, Geerten P; van Hinsbergh, Victor W M; Hordijk, Peter L

    2016-09-10

    In many pathological conditions the endothelium becomes activated and dysfunctional, resulting in hyperpermeability and plasma leakage. No specific therapies are available yet to control endothelial barrier function, which is regulated by inter-endothelial junctions and the generation of acto-myosin-based contractile forces in the context of cell-cell and cell-matrix interactions. However, the spatiotemporal distribution and stimulus-induced reorganization of these integral forces remain largely unknown. Traction force microscopy of human endothelial monolayers was used to visualize contractile forces in resting cells and during thrombin-induced hyperpermeability. Simultaneously, information about endothelial monolayer integrity, adherens junctions and cytoskeletal proteins (F-actin) were captured. This revealed a heterogeneous distribution of traction forces, with nuclear areas showing lower and cell-cell junctions higher traction forces than the whole-monolayer average. Moreover, junctional forces were asymmetrically distributed among neighboring cells. Force vector orientation analysis showed a good correlation with the alignment of F-actin and revealed contractile forces in newly formed filopodia and lamellipodia-like protrusions within the monolayer. Finally, unstable areas, showing high force fluctuations within the monolayer were prone to form inter-endothelial gaps upon stimulation with thrombin. To conclude, contractile traction forces are heterogeneously distributed within endothelial monolayers and force instability, rather than force magnitude, predicts the stimulus-induced formation of intercellular gaps. PMID:27498166

  2. A conserved motif mediates both multimer formation and allosteric activation of phosphoglycerate mutase 5.

    PubMed

    Wilkins, Jordan M; McConnell, Cyrus; Tipton, Peter A; Hannink, Mark

    2014-09-01

    Phosphoglycerate mutase 5 (PGAM5) is an atypical mitochondrial Ser/Thr phosphatase that modulates mitochondrial dynamics and participates in both apoptotic and necrotic cell death. The mechanisms that regulate the phosphatase activity of PGAM5 are poorly understood. The C-terminal phosphoglycerate mutase domain of PGAM5 shares homology with the catalytic domains found in other members of the phosphoglycerate mutase family, including a conserved histidine that is absolutely required for catalytic activity. However, this conserved domain is not sufficient for maximal phosphatase activity. We have identified a highly conserved amino acid motif, WDXNWD, located within the unique N-terminal region, which is required for assembly of PGAM5 into large multimeric complexes. Alanine substitutions within the WDXNWD motif abolish the formation of multimeric complexes and markedly reduce phosphatase activity of PGAM5. A peptide containing the WDXNWD motif dissociates the multimeric complex and reduces but does not fully abolish phosphatase activity. Addition of the WDXNWD-containing peptide in trans to a mutant PGAM5 protein lacking the WDXNWD motif markedly increases phosphatase activity of the mutant protein. Our results are consistent with an intermolecular allosteric regulation mechanism for the phosphatase activity of PGAM5, in which the assembly of PGAM5 into multimeric complexes, mediated by the WDXNWD motif, results in maximal activation of phosphatase activity. Our results suggest the possibility of identifying small molecules that function as allosteric regulators of the phosphatase activity of PGAM5. PMID:25012655

  3. CD4 ligands inhibit the formation of multifunctional transduction complexes involved in T cell activation.

    PubMed

    Jabado, N; Pallier, A; Le Deist, F; Bernard, F; Fischer, A; Hivroz, C

    1997-01-01

    Ligands binding to the CD4 molecule can inhibit TCR-mediated T cell activation. We have previously reported that transcription factors regulating the expression of the IL-2 gene, NF-AT, NF-kappaB, and AP-1, are targets of this inhibitory effect in an in vitro model using peripheral human CD4+ T cells activated by a CD3 mAb. Two T cell activation pathways involved in the regulation of these transcription factors, calcium flux and the p21ras pathway, were investigated as potential targets. Binding of HIV envelope glycoprotein gp160/gp120 or a CD4 mAb to the CD4+ T cells, prior to TCR/CD3 activation, inhibited the intracellular calcium elevation. This event strongly suggested an inhibition of PLCgamma1 activity. Tyrosine phosphorylation of PLCgamma1, induced by CD3 activation, was not affected, but its association with tyrosine-phosphorylated proteins, including a 62-kDa protein, was disrupted. This PLCgamma1-associated p62 was found to be immunoreactive to p62-Sam68 Abs. The activation-induced phosphorylation of two p21ras effectors, Raf-1 and Erk2, was inhibited by the CD4 ligands, indirectly pointing to inhibition of the p21ras activation pathway. In addition, we demonstrate that TCR activation of normal CD4+ T cells induced the formation of p120GAP and PLCgamma1-containing complexes. These complexes also contain other unidentified proteins. CD4 ligand binding induced a defective formation of these transduction complexes. This may result in inefficient signaling, partially accounting for the inhibitory effects of the CD4 ligands on both p21ras and calcium-activation pathways.

  4. {sup 13}C-METHYL FORMATE: OBSERVATIONS OF A SAMPLE OF HIGH-MASS STAR-FORMING REGIONS INCLUDING ORION-KL AND SPECTROSCOPIC CHARACTERIZATION

    SciTech Connect

    Favre, Cécile; Bergin, Edwin A.; Crockett, Nathan R.; Neill, Justin L.; Carvajal, Miguel; Field, David; Jørgensen, Jes K.; Bisschop, Suzanne E.; Brouillet, Nathalie; Despois, Didier; Baudry, Alain; Kleiner, Isabelle; Margulès, Laurent; Huet, Thérèse R.; Demaison, Jean E-mail: miguel.carvajal@dfa.uhu.es

    2015-01-01

    We have surveyed a sample of massive star-forming regions located over a range of distances from the Galactic center for methyl formate, HCOOCH{sub 3}, and its isotopologues H{sup 13}COOCH{sub 3} and HCOO{sup 13}CH{sub 3}. The observations were carried out with the APEX telescope in the frequency range 283.4-287.4 GHz. Based on the APEX observations, we report tentative detections of the {sup 13}C-methyl formate isotopologue HCOO{sup 13}CH{sub 3} toward the following four massive star-forming regions: Sgr B2(N-LMH), NGC 6334 IRS 1, W51 e2, and G19.61-0.23. In addition, we have used the 1 mm ALMA science verification observations of Orion-KL and confirm the detection of the {sup 13}C-methyl formate species in Orion-KL and image its spatial distribution. Our analysis shows that the {sup 12}C/{sup 13}C isotope ratio in methyl formate toward the Orion-KL Compact Ridge and Hot Core-SW components (68.4 ± 10.1 and 71.4 ± 7.8, respectively) are, for both the {sup 13}C-methyl formate isotopologues, commensurate with the average {sup 12}C/{sup 13}C ratio of CO derived toward Orion-KL. Likewise, regarding the other sources, our results are consistent with the {sup 12}C/{sup 13}C in CO. We also report the spectroscopic characterization, which includes a complete partition function, of the complex H{sup 13}COOCH{sub 3} and HCOO{sup 13}CH{sub 3} species. New spectroscopic data for both isotopomers H{sup 13}COOCH{sub 3} and HCOO{sup 13}CH{sub 3}, presented in this study, have made it possible to measure this fundamentally important isotope ratio in a large organic molecule for the first time.

  5. Effects of Leisure Education Programme Including Sportive Activities on Perceived Freedom in Leisure of Adolescents with Intellectual Disabilities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ertuzun, Ezgi

    2015-01-01

    The objective of this experimental study is to determine the effect of leisure education programme including sportive activities on the perceived freedom in leisure of adolescents with mild intellectual disabilities. The research was designed with an experimental group (n = 37) and a control group (n = 34), and was conducted among a total of 71…

  6. 25 CFR 170.623 - How are IRR Program projects and activities included in a self-governance agreement?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... other information required under 25 CFR 1000 subpart K. ... self-governance agreement? 170.623 Section 170.623 Indians BUREAU OF INDIAN AFFAIRS, DEPARTMENT OF THE... self-governance agreement? To include an IRR Program project or activity in a self-governance...

  7. 25 CFR 170.623 - How are IRR Program projects and activities included in a self-governance agreement?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... other information required under 25 CFR 1000 subpart K. ... self-governance agreement? 170.623 Section 170.623 Indians BUREAU OF INDIAN AFFAIRS, DEPARTMENT OF THE... self-governance agreement? To include an IRR Program project or activity in a self-governance...

  8. 25 CFR 170.623 - How are IRR Program projects and activities included in a self-governance agreement?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... other information required under 25 CFR 1000 subpart K. ... self-governance agreement? 170.623 Section 170.623 Indians BUREAU OF INDIAN AFFAIRS, DEPARTMENT OF THE... self-governance agreement? To include an IRR Program project or activity in a self-governance...

  9. 25 CFR 170.623 - How are IRR Program projects and activities included in a self-governance agreement?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... other information required under 25 CFR 1000 subpart K. ... self-governance agreement? 170.623 Section 170.623 Indians BUREAU OF INDIAN AFFAIRS, DEPARTMENT OF THE... self-governance agreement? To include an IRR Program project or activity in a self-governance...

  10. 25 CFR 170.623 - How are IRR Program projects and activities included in a self-governance agreement?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... other information required under 25 CFR 1000 subpart K. ... self-governance agreement? 170.623 Section 170.623 Indians BUREAU OF INDIAN AFFAIRS, DEPARTMENT OF THE... self-governance agreement? To include an IRR Program project or activity in a self-governance...

  11. A lipid chemotactic factor from anaerobic coryneform bacteria including Corynebacterium parvum with activity for macrophages and monocytes.

    PubMed Central

    Russell, R J; McInroy, R J; Wilkinson, P C; White, R G

    1976-01-01

    A lipid with chemoattractant (chemotactic) activity for mouse and guinea-pig macrophages and for human blood monocytes is released by anaerobic coryneform bacteria (including Corynebacterium parvum). The active lipid is associated with fibrillar structures which lie on the outside of the bacterial cell and are released spontaneously during growth. The lipid can also be extracted easily by a number of methods. The fibrils are loosely associated with a capsule-like structure composed largely of polysaccharide. Purification of the active lipid was achieved by chloroform-methanol extraction of the whole organisms yielding a chloroform-soluble fraction attracting mononuclear phagocytes at concentrations around 10 microgram/ml. The infra-red spectrum of this material showed lipid but no peptide or sugar. Thin-layer chromatography yielded twelve spots of which three had chemoattractant properties. The most active of these gave staining reactions consistent with the presence of phospholipid, the other two probably contained free fatty acids and triglycerides. Thin-layer electrophoresis also yielded an active phosphorus-containing spot. Saturated fatty acids of chain lengths found in the anaerobic coryne forms had weak monocyte-attractant activity. As the active material was progressively purified, its activity as a monocyte attractant weakened. Images Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 4 PMID:1027716

  12. Compartmentalized calcium signaling triggers subpopulation formation upon platelet activation through PAR1.

    PubMed

    Sveshnikova, Anastasia N; Ataullakhanov, Fazoil I; Panteleev, Mikhail A

    2015-04-01

    Blood platelets need to undergo activation to carry out their function of stopping bleeding. Different activation degrees lead to a stepped hierarchy of responses: ability to aggregate, granule release, and, in a fraction of platelets, phosphatidylserine (PS) exposure. This suggests the existence of decision-making mechanisms in the platelet intracellular signaling network. To identify and investigate them, we developed a computational model of PAR1-stimulated platelet signal transduction that included a minimal set of major players in the calcium signaling network. The model comprised three intracellular compartments: cytosol, dense tubular system (DTS) and mitochondria and extracellular space. Computer simulations showed that the stable resting state of platelets is maintained via a balance between calcium pumps and leaks through the DTS and plasma membranes. Stimulation of PAR1 induced oscillations in the cytosolic calcium concentrations, in good agreement with experimental observations. Further increase in the agonist level activated the mitochondrial uniporter leading to calcium uptake by mitochondria, which caused the collapse of mitochondrial membrane potential in a fraction of platelets leading to the PS exposure. The formation of this subpopulation was shown to be a stochastic process determined by the small number of activated PAR1 receptors and by heterogeneity in the number of ion pumps. These results demonstrate how a gradual increase of the activation degree can be converted into a stepped response hierarchy ultimately leading to formation of two distinct subpopulations from an initially homogeneous population. PMID:25627921

  13. Preliminary stratigraphy and facies analysis of the Upper Cretaceous Kaguyak Formation, including a brief summary of newly discovered oil stain, upper Alaska Peninsula

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Wartes, Marwan A.; Decker, Paul L.; Stanley, Richard G.; Herriott, Trystan M.; Helmold, Kenneth P.; Gillis, Robert J.

    2013-01-01

    The Alaska Division of Geological and Geophysical Surveys has an ongoing program aimed at evaluating the Mesozoic forearc stratigraphy, structure, and petroleum systems of lower Cook Inlet. Most of our field studies have focused on the Jurassic component of the petroleum system (this report). However, in late July and early August of 2012, we initiated a study of the stratigraphy and reservoir potential of the Upper Cretaceous Kaguyak Formation. The Kaguyak Formation is locally well exposed on the upper Alaska Peninsula (fig. 25) and was named by Keller and Reiser (1959) for a sequence of interbedded siltstone and sandstone of upper Campanian to Maastrichtian age that they estimated to be 1,450 m thick.Subsequent work by Detterman and Miller (1985) examined 900 m of section and interpreted the unit as the record of a prograding submarine fan.This interpretation of deep-water deposition contrasts with other Upper Cretaceous rocks exposed along the Alaska Peninsula and lower Cook Inlet that are generally described as nonmarine to shallow marine (Detterman and others, 1996; LePain and others, 2012).Based on foraminifera and palynomorphs from the COST No. 1 well, Magoon (1986) concluded that the Upper Cretaceous rocks were deposited in a variety of water depths and environments ranging from upper bathyal to nonmarine. During our recent fieldwork west and south of Fourpeaked Mountain, we similarly encountered markedly varying lithofacies in the Kaguyak Formation (fig. 25), and we also found oil-stained rocks that are consistent with the existence of an active petroleum system in Upper Cretaceous rocks on the upper Alaska Peninsula and in lower Cook Inlet. These field observations are summarized below.

  14. Active star formation at intermediate Galactic latitude: the case of IRAS 06345-3023

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yun, J. L.; Palmeirim, P. M.

    2015-04-01

    We report the discovery of a small aggregate of young stars seen in high-resolution, deep near-infrared (JHKS) images towards IRAS 06345-3023 in the outer Galaxy and well below the mid-plane of the Galactic disc. The group of young stars is likely to be composed of low-mass stars, mostly Class I young stellar objects. The stars are seen towards a molecular cloud whose CO map peaks at the location of the IRAS source. The near-infrared images reveal, additionally, the presence of nebular emission with rich morphological features, including arcs in the vicinity of embedded stars, wisps and bright rims of a butterfly-shaped dark cloud. The location of this molecular cloud as a new star formation site well below the Galactic plane in the outer Galaxy indicates that active star formation is taking place at vertical distances larger than those typical of the (thin) disc.

  15. Active walker model for the formation of human and animal trail systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Helbing, Dirk; Schweitzer, Frank; Keltsch, Joachim; Molnár, Péter

    1997-09-01

    Active walker models have recently proved their great value for describing the formation of clusters, periodic patterns, and spiral waves as well as the development of rivers, dielectric breakdown patterns, and many other structures. It is shown that they also allow one to simulate the formation of trail systems by pedestrians and ants, yielding a better understanding of human and animal behavior. A comparison with empirical material shows a good agreement between model and reality. Our trail formation model includes an equation of motion, an equation for environmental changes, and an orientation relation. It contains some model functions, which are specified according to the characteristics of the considered animals or pedestrians. Not only the kind of environmental changes differs: Whereas pedestrians leave footprints on the ground, ants produce chemical markings for their orientation. Nevertheless, it is more important that pedestrians steer towards a certain destination, while ants usually find their food sources by chance, i.e., they reach their destination in a stochastic way. As a consequence, the typical structure of the evolving trail systems depends on the respective species. Some ant species produce a dendritic trail system, whereas pedestrians generate a minimal detour system. The trail formation model can be used as a tool for the optimization of pedestrian facilities: It allows urban planners to design convenient way systems which actually meet the route choice habits of pedestrians.

  16. The inhibitory activity of linalool against the filamentous growth and biofilm formation in Candida albicans.

    PubMed

    Hsu, Chih-Chieh; Lai, Wen-Lin; Chuang, Kuei-Chin; Lee, Meng-Hwan; Tsai, Ying-Chieh

    2013-07-01

    Candida spp. are part of the natural human microbiota, but they also represent important opportunistic human pathogens. Biofilm-associated Candida albicans infections are clinically relevant due to their high levels of resistance to traditional antifungal agents. In this study, we investigated the ability of linalool to inhibit the formation of C. albicans biofilms and reduce existing C. albicans biofilms. Linalool exhibited antifungal activity against C. albicans ATCC 14053, with a minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) of 8 mM. Sub-MIC concentrations of linalool also inhibited the formation of germ tubes and biofilms in that strain. The defective architecture composition of C. albicans biofilms exposed to linalool was characterized by scanning electron microscopy. The expression levels of the adhesin genes HWP1 and ALS3 were downregulated by linalool, as assessed by real-time RT-PCR. The expression levels of CYR1 and CPH1, which encode components of the cAMP-PKA and MAPK hyphal formation regulatory pathways, respectively, were also suppressed by linalool, as was the gene encoding their upstream regulator, Ras1. The expression levels of long-term hyphae maintenance associated genes, including UME6, HGC1, and EED1, were all suppressed by linalool. These results indicate that linalool may have therapeutic potential in the treatment of candidiasis associated with medical devices because it interferes with the morphological switch and biofilm formation of C. albicans.

  17. Using Magnetic Helicity Diagnostics to Determine the Nature of Solar Active-Region Formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Georgoulis, Manolis K.

    Employing a novel nonlinear force-free (NLFF) method that self-consistently infers instantaneous free magnetic-energy and relative magnetic-helicity budgets from single photospheric vector magnetograms, we recently constructed the magnetic energy-helicity (EH) diagram of solar active regions. The EH diagram implies dominant relative helicities of left-handed or right-handed chiralities for the great majority of active regions. The amplitude (budget) of these helicities scales monotonically with the free magnetic energy. This constructive, strongly preferential accumulation of a certain sense of magnetic helicity seems to disqualify recently proposed mechanisms relying on a largely random near-surface convection for the formation of the great majority of active regions. The existing qualitative formation mechanism for these regions remains the conventional Omega-loop emergence following a buoyant ascension from the bottom of the convection zone. However, exceptions to this rule include even eruptive active regions: NOAA AR 11283 is an obvious outlier to the EH diagram, involving significant free magnetic energy with a small relative magnetic helicity. Relying on a timeseries of vector magnetograms of this region, our methodology shows nearly canceling amounts of both senses of helicity and an overall course from a weakly left-handed to a weakly right-handed structure, in the course of which a major eruption occurs. For this and similarly behaving active regions the latest near-surface formation scenario might conceivably be employed successfully. Research partially supported by the EU Seventh Framework Programme under grant agreement No. PIRG07-GA-2010-268245 and by the European Union Social Fund (ESF) and Greek national funds through the Operational Program "Education and Lifelong Learning" of the National Strategic Reference Framework (NSRF) - Research Funding Program: Thales. Investing in knowledge society through the European Social Fund.

  18. Activation of Benznidazole by Trypanosomal Type I Nitroreductases Results in Glyoxal Formation

    PubMed Central

    Hall, Belinda S.

    2012-01-01

    Benznidazole, a 2-nitroimidazole, is the front-line treatment used against American trypanosomiasis, a parasitic infection caused by Trypanosoma cruzi. Despite nearly 40 years of use, the trypanocidal activity of this prodrug is not fully understood. It has been proposed that benznidazole activation leads to the formation of reductive metabolites that can cause a series of deleterious effects, including DNA damage and thiol depletion. Here, we show that the key step in benznidazole activation involves an NADH-dependent trypanosomal type I nitroreductase. This catalyzes an oxygen-insensitive reaction with the interaction of enzyme, reductant, and prodrug occurring through a ping-pong mechanism. Liquid chromatography/mass spectrometry (LC/MS) analysis of the resultant metabolites identified 4,5-dihydro-4,5-dihydroxyimidazole as the major product of a reductive pathway proceeding through hydroxylamine and hydroxy intermediates. The breakdown of this product released the reactive dialdehyde glyoxal, which, in the presence of guanosine, generated guanosine-glyoxal adducts. These experiments indicate that the reduction of benznidazole by type I nitroreductase activity leads to the formation of highly reactive metabolites and that the expression of this enzyme is key to the trypanocidal properties displayed by the prodrug. PMID:22037852

  19. Tetrameric assembly of hGBP1 is crucial for both stimulated GMP formation and antiviral activity.

    PubMed

    Pandita, Esha; Rajan, Sudeepa; Rahman, Safikur; Mullick, Ranajoy; Das, Saumitra; Sau, Apurba Kumar

    2016-06-15

    Interferon-γ inducible human guanylate binding protein-1 (hGBP1) shows a unique characteristic that hydrolyses GTP to a mixture of GDP and GMP through successive cleavages, with GMP being the major product. Like other large GTPases, hGBP1 undergoes oligomerization upon substrate hydrolysis, which is essential for the stimulation of activity. It also exhibits antiviral activity against many viruses including hepatitis C. However, which oligomeric form is responsible for the stimulated activity leading to enhanced GMP formation and its influence on antiviral activity, are not properly understood. Using mutant and truncated proteins, our data indicate that transition-state-induced tetramerization is associated with higher rate of GMP formation. This is supported by chimaeras that are defective in both tetramerization and enhanced GMP formation. Unlike wild-type protein, chimaeras did not show allosteric interactions, indicating that tetramerization and enhanced GMP formation are allosterically coupled. Hence, we propose that after the cleavage of the first phosphoanhydride bond GDP·Pi-bound protein dimers transiently associate to form a tetramer that acts as an allosteric switch for higher rate of GMP formation. Biochemical and biophysical studies reveal that sequential conformational changes and interdomain communications regulate tetramer formation via dimer. Our studies also show that overexpression of the mutants, defective in tetramer formation in Rep2a cells do not inhibit proliferation of hepatitis C virus, indicating critical role of a tetramer in the antiviral activity. Thus, the present study not only highlights the importance of hGBP1 tetramer in stimulated GMP formation, but also demonstrates its role in the antiviral activity against hepatitis C virus.

  20. 12 CFR Appendix I to Part 27 - Monthly Home Loan Activity Format

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 12 Banks and Banking 1 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Monthly Home Loan Activity Format I Appendix I to Part 27 Banks and Banking COMPTROLLER OF THE CURRENCY, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY FAIR HOUSING HOME LOAN DATA SYSTEM Pt. 27, App. I Appendix I to Part 27—Monthly Home Loan Activity Format...

  1. 12 CFR Appendix I to Part 27 - Monthly Home Loan Activity Format

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 12 Banks and Banking 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Monthly Home Loan Activity Format I Appendix I to Part 27 Banks and Banking COMPTROLLER OF THE CURRENCY, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY FAIR HOUSING HOME LOAN DATA SYSTEM Pt. 27, App. I Appendix I to Part 27—Monthly Home Loan Activity Format...

  2. Resolution-independent modelling of environmental effects in semi-analytic models of galaxy formation that include ram-pressure stripping of both hot and cold gas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luo, Yu; Kang, Xi; Kauffmann, Guinevere; Fu, Jian

    2016-05-01

    The quenching of star formation in satellite galaxies is observed over a wide range of dark matter halo masses and galaxy environments. In the recent Guo et al. and Fu et al. semi-analytic + N-body models, the gaseous environment of the satellite galaxy is governed by the properties of the dark matter subhalo in which it resides. This quantity depends of the resolution of the N-body simulation, leading to a divergent fraction of quenched satellites in high- and low-resolution simulations. Here, we incorporate an analytic model to trace the subhaloes below the resolution limit. We demonstrate that we then obtain better converged results between the Millennium I and II simulations, especially for the satellites in the massive haloes (log Mhalo = [14, 15]). We also include a new physical model for the ram-pressure stripping of cold gas in satellite galaxies. However, we find very clear discrepancies with observed trends in quenched satellite galaxy fractions as a function of stellar mass at fixed halo mass. At fixed halo mass, the quenched fraction of satellites does not depend on stellar mass in the models, but increases strongly with mass in the data. In addition to the overprediction of low-mass passive satellites, the models also predict too few quenched central galaxies with low stellar masses, so the problems in reproducing quenched fractions are not purely of environmental origin. Further improvements to the treatment of the gas-physical processes regulating the star formation histories of galaxies are clearly necessary to resolve these problems.

  3. Effect of phosphate activating group on oligonucleotide formation on montmorillonite: the regioselective formation of 3',5'-linked oligoadenylates

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Prabahar, K. J.; Cole, T. D.; Ferris, J. P.

    1994-01-01

    The effects of amine structure on the montmorillonite-catalyzed oligomerization of the 5'-phosphoramidates of adenosine are investigated. 4-Aminopyridine derivatives yielded oligoadenylates as long as dodecamers with a regioselectivity for 3',5'-phosphodiester bond formation averaging 88%. Linear and cyclic oligomers are obtained and no A5'ppA-containing products are detected. Oligomers as long as the hexanucleotide are obtained using 2-aminobenzimidazole as the activating group. A predominance of pA2'pA is detected in the dimer fraction along with cyclic 3',5'-trimer; no A5'ppA-containing oligomers were detected. Little or no oligomer formation was observed when morpholine, piperidine, pyrazole, 1,2,4-triazole, and 2-pyridone are used as phosphate-activating groups. The effects of the structure of the phosphate activating group on the oligomer structure and chain lengths are discussed.

  4. Mineral ecophysiological evidence for microbial activity in banded iron formation

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Dr. Yi-Liang; Konhauser, Dr, Kurt; Cole, David R; Phelps, Tommy Joe

    2011-01-01

    The phosphorus composition of banded-iron formations (BIFs) has been used as a proxy for Precambrian seawater composition and the paleoeredox state of Earth's surface environment. However, it is unclear whether the phosphorus in BIFs originally entered the sediment as a sorbed component of the iron oxyhydroxide particles, or whether it was incorporated into the biomass of marine phytoplankton. We conducted high-resolution mineral analyses and report here the first detection of an Fe(III) acetate salt, as well as nanocrystals of apatite in association with magnetite, in the 2.48 Ga Dales Gorge Member of the Brockman Iron Formation (a BIF), Hamersley, Western Australia. The clusters of apatite are similar in size and morphology to biogenic apatite crystals resulting from biomass decay in Phanerozoic marine sediments, while the formation of an Fe(III) acetate salt and magnetite not only implies the original presence of biomass in the BIF sediments, but also that organic carbon likely served as an electron donor during bacterial Fe(III) reduction. This study is important because it suggests that phytoplankton may have played a key role in the transfer of phosphorus (and other trace elements) from the photic zone to the seafloor.

  5. In Vitro Antimicrobial Activity of a Siderophore Cephalosporin, S-649266, against Enterobacteriaceae Clinical Isolates, Including Carbapenem-Resistant Strains.

    PubMed

    Kohira, Naoki; West, Joshua; Ito, Akinobu; Ito-Horiyama, Tsukasa; Nakamura, Rio; Sato, Takafumi; Rittenhouse, Stephen; Tsuji, Masakatsu; Yamano, Yoshinori

    2015-11-16

    S-649266 is a novel siderophore cephalosporin antibiotic with a catechol moiety on the 3-position side chain. Two sets of clinical isolate collections were used to evaluate the antimicrobial activity of S-649266 against Enterobacteriaceae. These sets included 617 global isolates collected between 2009 and 2011 and 233 β-lactamase-identified isolates, including 47 KPC-, 49 NDM-, 12 VIM-, and 8 IMP-producers. The MIC90 values of S-649266 against the first set of Escherichia coli, Klebsiella pneumoniae, Serratia marcescens, Citrobacter freundii, Enterobacter aerogenes, and Enterobacter cloacae isolates were all ≤1 μg/ml, and there were only 8 isolates (1.3%) among these 617 clinical isolates with MIC values of ≥8 μg/ml. In the second set, the MIC values of S-649266 were ≤4 μg/ml against 109 strains among 116 KPC-producing and class B (metallo) carbapenemase-producing strains. In addition, S-649266 showed MIC values of ≤2 μg/ml against each of the 13 strains that produced other types of carbapenemases such as SME, NMC, and OXA-48. The mechanisms of the decreased susceptibility of 7 class B carbapenemase-producing strains with MIC values of ≥16 μg/ml are uncertain. This is the first report to demonstrate that S-649266, a novel siderophore cephalosporin, has significant antimicrobial activity against Enterobacteriaceae, including strains that produce carbapenemases such as KPC and NDM-1.

  6. Exploring the Connection Between Star Formation and AGN Activity in the Local Universe

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    LaMassa, Stephanie M.; Heckman. T. M.; Ptak, Andrew; Schiminovich, D.; O'Dowd, M.; Bertincourt, B.

    2012-01-01

    We study a combined sample of 264 star-forming, 51 composite, and 73 active galaxies using optical spectra from SDSS and mid-infrared (mid-IR) spectra from the Spitzer Infrared Spectrograph. We examine optical and mid-IR spectroscopic diagnostics that probe the amount of star formation and relative energetic con- tributions from star formation and an active galactic nucleus (AGN). Overall we find good agreement between optical and mid-IR diagnostics. Misclassifications of galaxies based on the SDSS spectra are rare despite the presence of dust obscuration. The luminosity of the [NeII] 12.8 micron emission-line is well correlated with the star formation rate (SFR) measured from the SDSS spectra, and this holds for the star forming, composite, and AGN-dominated systems. AGN show a clear excess of [NeIII] 15.6 micron emission relative to star forming and composite systems. We find good qualitative agreement between various parameters that probe the relative contributions of the AGN and star formation, including: the mid-IR spectral slope, the ratio of the [NeV] 14.3 micron to [NeII] micron 12.8 fluxes, the equivalent widths of the 7.7, 11.3, and 17 micron PAH features, and the optical "D" parameter which measures the distance a source lies from the locus of star forming galaxies in the optical BPT emission-line diagnostic diagram. We also consider the behavior of the three individual PAH features by examining how their flux ratios depend upon the degree of AGN-dominance. We find that the PAH 11.3 micron feature is significantly suppressed in the most AGN-dominated systems.

  7. Activity of eravacycline against Enterobacteriaceae and Acinetobacter baumannii, including multidrug-resistant isolates, from New York City.

    PubMed

    Abdallah, Marie; Olafisoye, Olawole; Cortes, Christopher; Urban, Carl; Landman, David; Quale, John

    2015-03-01

    Eravacycline demonstrated in vitro activity against a contemporary collection of more than 4,000 Gram-negative pathogens from New York City hospitals, with MIC50/MIC90 values, respectively, for Escherichia coli of 0.12/0.5 μg/ml, Klebsiella pneumoniae of 0.25/1 μg/ml, Enterobacter aerogenes of 0.25/1 μg/ml, Enterobacter cloacae 0.5/1 μg/ml, and Acinetobacter baumannii of 0.5/1 μg/ml. Activity was retained against multidrug-resistant isolates, including those expressing KPC and OXA carbapenemases. For A. baumannii, eravacycline MICs correlated with increased expression of the adeB gene. PMID:25534744

  8. Disentangling Dominance: Obscured AGN Activity versus Star Formation in BPT-Composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Trouille, Laura

    2011-11-01

    Approximately 20% of SDSS emission-line galaxies (ELG) lie in the BPT-comp regime, between the Kauffmann et al. (2003) empirically determined SF-dominated regime and the Kewley et al. (2001) theoretically predicted AGN-dominated regime. BPT-AGN, on the other hand, make up only 11% of the ELG population. Whether to include the significant number of BPT-comp in samples of AGN or samples of star-forming galaxies is an open question and has important implications for galaxy evolution studies, metallicity studies, etc. Using a large pectroscopic sample of GOODS-N and LH galaxies with deep Chandra imaging, we perform an X-ray stacking analysis of BPT-comp. We find the stacked signal to be X-ray hard. This X-ray hardness can be indicative of obscured AGN activity or the presence of HMXBs associated with ongoing star formation. In order to distinguish between these scenarios, we perform an IR stacking analysis using Spitzer 24 micron data. The stacked BPT-comp lies well above the expected value for L_x/L_IR for pure star-forming galaxies; similarly for the X-ray detected BPT-comp. We also find that the BPT-comp lie in the AGN-dominated regime of our new TBT diagnostic, which uses [NeIII]/[OII] versus rest-frame g-z colour to identify AGN and star forming galaxies out to z=1.4. [NeIII], which has a higher ionisation potential than other commonly used forbidden emission lines, appears to foster a more reliable selection of AGN-dominated galaxies. These findings suggest that both the X-ray and optical signal in BPT-comp are dominated by obscured or low accretion rate AGN activity rather than star formation. This is in contrast to claims by previous optical emission-line studies that the signal in BPT-comp is dominated by star-formation activity. Therefore, we recommend that groups carefully consider the impact of excluding or including BPT-comp on the interpretation of their results. For example, for studies involving determining the bolometric contribution from AGN activity

  9. The Pliocene Yafo Formation in Israel: Hydrogeologically inert or active?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Avisar, D.; Rosenthal, E.; Shulman, H.; Zilberbrand, M.; Flexer, A.; Kronfeld, J.; Ben Avraham, Z.; Fleischer, L.

    For several decades the ``Saqiye beds'' (later renamed Yafo Formation) underlying the Coastal Plain aquifer (Kurkar Group) aquifer of Israel, were regarded as an extremely thick, tectonically undisturbed, and absolutely impervious aquiclude. Following intensive groundwater exploitation from the overlying Kurkar Group aquifer, brackish and saline waters were locally encountered in the lower parts of this aquifer and always at the contact with the underlying Yafo Formation aquiclude. The present study revealed that this aquiclude is not a uniform and impervious rock unit, but rather an alternation of pervious and impervious strata within the Yafo Formation containing highly pressured fluids of different - mostly high - salinities. The permeable beds are at an angular unconformity and in direct contact with the overlying Kurkar Group aquifer. The Yafo Formation and the underlying and overlying rock units are dislocated by numerous fault systems, which facilitate accessibility of brines into the Kurkar Group aquifer. The mobilization of the saline fluids and their injection into the Kurkar Group aquifer could be due either to diffusion of saline fluids occurring in the permeable horizons of the Petah Tiqva Member through the clays of the Yafo Formation or to their upconing following intensive pumping in the Coastal Plain aquifer. It could have also been caused by up-dip movement of saline water as the result of overpressure generated by major accumulation of gas in the permeable horizons. Another possible mechanism could be hydraulic contact with pressurized brines up-flowing along fault zones from deep-seated Jurassic or Cretaceous reservoirs. The squeezing of saline interstitial water from the clays of the Yafo Formation into the overlying Kurkar Group aquifer, is of secondary importance for groundwater salinization (its input is comparable with salt input from rain). Depuis longtemps, les «couches de Saqiye», nommées maintenant formation de Yafo, constituant le

  10. Product and rate determinations with chemically activated nucleotides in the presence of various prebiotic materials, including other mono- and polynucleotides

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kanavarioti, A.; Alberas, D. J.; Rosenbach, M. T.; Bernasconi, C. F.; Chang, S.

    1991-01-01

    We are investigating the reactions of ImpN's in the presence of a number of prebiotically plausible materials, such as metal ions, phosphate, amines and other nucleotides and hope to learn more about the stability/reactivity of ImpN's in a prebiotic aqueous environment. We find that, in the presence of phosphate, ImpN's form substantial amounts of diphosphate nucleotides. These diphosphate nucleotides are not very good substrates for template directed reactions, but are chemically activated and are known to revert to the phosphoimidazolides in the presence of imidazole under solid state conditions. With respect to our studies of the oligomerization reaction, the determination of the dimerization rate constant of a specific ImpN (guanosine 5'-phospho 2 methylimidazolide) both in the absence and the presence of the template leads to the conclusion that at 37 C the dimerization is not template directed, although the subsequent polymerization steps are. In other words, this specific polynucleotide synthesizing system favors the elongation of oligonucleotides as compared with the formation of dimers and trimers. This favoring of the synthesis of long as opposed to short oligonucleotides may be regarded as a rudimentary example of natural selection at the molecular level.

  11. Clustering and Pattern Formation in Chemorepulsive Active Colloids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liebchen, Benno; Marenduzzo, Davide; Pagonabarraga, Ignacio; Cates, Michael E.

    2015-12-01

    We demonstrate that migration away from self-produced chemicals (chemorepulsion) generates a generic route to clustering and pattern formation among self-propelled colloids. The clustering instability can be caused either by anisotropic chemical production, or by a delayed orientational response to changes of the chemical environment. In each case, chemorepulsion creates clusters of a self-limiting area which grows linearly with self-propulsion speed. This agrees with recent observations of dynamic clusters in Janus colloids (albeit not yet known to be chemorepulsive). More generally, our results could inform design principles for the self-assembly of chemorepulsive synthetic swimmers and/or bacteria into nonequilibrium patterns.

  12. Clustering and Pattern Formation in Chemorepulsive Active Colloids.

    PubMed

    Liebchen, Benno; Marenduzzo, Davide; Pagonabarraga, Ignacio; Cates, Michael E

    2015-12-18

    We demonstrate that migration away from self-produced chemicals (chemorepulsion) generates a generic route to clustering and pattern formation among self-propelled colloids. The clustering instability can be caused either by anisotropic chemical production, or by a delayed orientational response to changes of the chemical environment. In each case, chemorepulsion creates clusters of a self-limiting area which grows linearly with self-propulsion speed. This agrees with recent observations of dynamic clusters in Janus colloids (albeit not yet known to be chemorepulsive). More generally, our results could inform design principles for the self-assembly of chemorepulsive synthetic swimmers and/or bacteria into nonequilibrium patterns.

  13. Clustering and Pattern Formation in Chemorepulsive Active Colloids.

    PubMed

    Liebchen, Benno; Marenduzzo, Davide; Pagonabarraga, Ignacio; Cates, Michael E

    2015-12-18

    We demonstrate that migration away from self-produced chemicals (chemorepulsion) generates a generic route to clustering and pattern formation among self-propelled colloids. The clustering instability can be caused either by anisotropic chemical production, or by a delayed orientational response to changes of the chemical environment. In each case, chemorepulsion creates clusters of a self-limiting area which grows linearly with self-propulsion speed. This agrees with recent observations of dynamic clusters in Janus colloids (albeit not yet known to be chemorepulsive). More generally, our results could inform design principles for the self-assembly of chemorepulsive synthetic swimmers and/or bacteria into nonequilibrium patterns. PMID:26722949

  14. Active site remodeling accompanies thioester bond formation in the SUMO E1

    PubMed Central

    Olsen, Shaun K.; Capili, Allan D.; Lu, Xuequan; Tan, Derek S.; Lima, Christopher D.

    2009-01-01

    E1 enzymes activate ubiquitin (Ub) and ubiquitin-like (Ubl) proteins in two steps by carboxy-terminal adenylation and thioester bond formation to a conserved catalytic cysteine in the E1 Cys domain. The structural basis for these intermediates remains unknown. Here we report crystal structures for human SUMO E1 in complex with SUMO adenylate and tetrahedral intermediate analogs at 2.45 Å and 2.6 Å, respectively. These structures show that side chain contacts to ATP·Mg are released after adenylation to facilitate a 130 degree rotation of the Cys domain during thioester bond formation that is accompanied by remodeling of key structural elements including the helix that contains the E1 catalytic cysteine, the cross-over and re-entry loops, and refolding of two helices that are required for adenylation. These changes displace side chains required for adenylation with side chains required for thioester bond formation. Mutational and biochemical analyses suggest these mechanisms are conserved in other E1s. PMID:20164921

  15. Sonic Hedgehog-activated engineered blood vessels enhance bone tissue formation.

    PubMed

    Rivron, Nicolas C; Raiss, Christian C; Liu, Jun; Nandakumar, Anandkumar; Sticht, Carsten; Gretz, Norbert; Truckenmüller, Roman; Rouwkema, Jeroen; van Blitterswijk, Clemens A

    2012-03-20

    Large bone defects naturally regenerate via a highly vascularized tissue which progressively remodels into cartilage and bone. Current approaches in bone tissue engineering are restricted by delayed vascularization and fail to recapitulate this stepwise differentiation toward bone tissue. Here, we use the morphogen Sonic Hedgehog (Shh) to induce the in vitro organization of an endothelial capillary network in an artificial tissue. We show that endogenous Hedgehog activity regulates angiogenic genes and the formation of vascular lumens. Exogenous Shh further induces the in vitro development of the vasculature (vascular lumen formation, size, distribution). Upon implantation, the in vitro development of the vasculature improves the in vivo perfusion of the artificial tissue and is necessary to contribute to, and enhance, the formation of de novo mature bone tissue. Similar to the regenerating callus, the artificial tissue undergoes intramembranous and endochondral ossification and forms a trabecular-like bone organ including bone-marrow-like cavities. These findings open the door for new strategies to treat large bone defects by closely mimicking natural endochondral bone repair.

  16. Active site remodelling accompanies thioester bond formation in the SUMO E1

    SciTech Connect

    Olsen, Shaun K.; Capili, Allan D.; Lu, Xuequan; Tan, Derek S.; Lima, Christopher D.

    2010-03-30

    E1 enzymes activate ubiquitin (Ub) and ubiquitin-like (Ubl) proteins in two steps by carboxy-terminal adenylation and thioester bond formation to a conserved catalytic cysteine in the E1 Cys domain. The structural basis for these intermediates remains unknown. Here we report crystal structures for human SUMO E1 in complex with SUMO adenylate and tetrahedral intermediate analogues at 2.45 and 2.6 {angstrom}, respectively. These structures show that side chain contacts to ATP-Mg are released after adenylation to facilitate a 130 degree rotation of the Cys domain during thioester bond formation that is accompanied by remodelling of key structural elements including the helix that contains the E1 catalytic cysteine, the crossover and re-entry loops, and refolding of two helices that are required for adenylation. These changes displace side chains required for adenylation with side chains required for thioester bond formation. Mutational and biochemical analyses indicate these mechanisms are conserved in other E1s.

  17. Flavonoids and tyrosine nitration: structure-activity relationship correlation with enthalpy of formation.

    PubMed

    Sadeghipour, Mitra; Terreux, Raphael; Phipps, Jenny

    2005-03-01

    The ability of 11 flavonoids, naturally occurring polyphenols, and their related structure-activity relationships (SAR's) for inhibiting peroxynitrite-induced nitration of tyrosine was investigated. The flavonoids under study could be classified into four groups having very distinct in vitro inhibition effects. We also calculated the heat of formation (DeltaH(f)) of the corresponding flavonoids radicals which supported this finding. The most effective flavonoids included: catechin, taxifolin, luteolin, quercetin, and myricetin which have a common structural feature of ortho-dihydroxyl moiety (3',4'-OH substitution). Naringenin, kaempferol, and morin were 50% less effective inhibitors than the former group of flavonoid while their activities were in the range of trolox (an alpha-tocopherol analogue). The common structural aspect of this group of flavonoids is 4'-OH substitution. Therefore, these two groups of flavonoids may have similar mechanisms for their inhibition activity. No inhibition activity was observed by galangin. Apigenin behaved as a pro-oxidant in our in vitro study. Naringin was as effective as the second group at 4 mM tyrosine concentration while did not illustrate any inhibitory effect at 1 mM concentration of tyrosine. Our study provides further evidence for the importance of the catechol B ring and to a lesser effect the importance of 4'-OH substitution. Moreover, we observed very little or no influence on activity of flavonoids by 3-OH substitution and/or a C2-C3 double bond conjugated with 4-keto group within the subgroup containing the catechol moiety. Theoretical calculation of DeltaDeltaH(f) for tyrosyl radical repair by flavonoids (TyO*+FlOH-->TyOH+FlO*) correlated well with our in vitro results (inhibition% = -10 (DeltaDeltaH(f)), R2=0.906). Furthermore, this correlation was independent of tyrosine concentration. This model can be used to accurately predict the inhibitory effect of flavonoids on nitrotyrosine formation.

  18. Glaucocalyxin A inhibits platelet activation and thrombus formation preferentially via GPVI signaling pathway.

    PubMed

    Li, Wei; Tang, Xiaorong; Yi, Wenxiu; Li, Qiang; Ren, Lijie; Liu, Xiaohui; Chu, Chunjun; Ozaki, Yukio; Zhang, Jian; Zhu, Li

    2013-01-01

    Platelets play a pivotal role in atherothrombosis and the antiplatelet agents have been proved to be useful in preventing onset of acute clinical events including myocardial infarction and stroke. Increasing number of natural compounds has been identified to be potential antiplatelet agents. Here we report the antiplatelet effect of glaucocalyxin A (GLA), an ent-diterpenoid that we isolated and purified from the aerial parts of Rabdosia japonica (Burm. f.) var. glaucocalyx (Maxim.) Hara, and investigate the molecular mechanisms by which GLA inhibits platelet activation and thrombus formation. The effect of GLA on platelet activation was measured using platelets freshly isolated from peripheral blood of healthy donors. Results showed that pretreatment of human platelets with lower concentrations of GLA (0.01 μg/ml, 0.1 μg/ml) significantly inhibited platelet aggregation induced by collagen (P<0.001) and CRP (P<0.01), a synthetic GPVI ligand, but not by ADP and U46619. Accordingly, GLA inhibited collagen-stimulated tyrosine phosphorylation of Syk, LAT, and phospholipase Cγ2, the signaling events in collagen receptor GPⅥ pathway. GLA also inhibited platelet p-selectin secretion and integrin activation by convulxin, a GPVI selective ligand. Additionally, GLA was found to inhibit low-dose thrombin-induced platelet activation. Using a flow chamber device, GLA was found to attenuate platelet adhesion on collagen surfaces in high shear condition. In vivo studies showed that GLA administration increased the time for complete occlusion upon vascular injury in mice, but did not extend tail-bleeding time when mice were administered with relatively lower doses of GLA. Therefore, the present results provide the molecular basis for the inhibition effect of GLA on platelet activation and its in vivo effect on thrombus formation, suggesting that GLA could potentially be developed as an antiplatelet and antithrombotic agent. PMID:24386454

  19. Active zones of mammalian neuromuscular junctions: formation, density, and aging

    PubMed Central

    Nishimune, Hiroshi

    2012-01-01

    Presynaptic active zones are synaptic vesicle release sites that playessential roles in the function and pathology of mammalian neuromuscular junctions (NMJs). The molecular mechanisms of active zone organization utilize presynaptic voltage-dependent calcium channels (VDCCs) in NMJs as scaffolding proteins. VDCCs interact extracellularly with the muscle-derived synapse organizer, laminin β2, and interact intracellularly with active zone-specific proteins, such as Bassoon, CAST/Erc2/ELKS2alpha, ELKS, Piccolo, and RIMs. These molecular mechanisms are supported by studies in P/Q- and N-type VDCCs double-knockout mice, and they are consistent with the pathological conditions of Lambert-Eaton myasthenic syndrome and Pierson syndrome, which are caused by autoantibodies against VDCCs or by a laminin β2 mutation. During normal postnatal maturation, NMJs maintain the density of active zones, while NMJs triple their size. However, active zones become impaired during aging. Propitiously, muscle exercise ameliorates the active zone impairment in aged NMJs, which suggests the potential for therapeutic strategies. PMID:23252894

  20. The NLP toxin family in Phytophthora sojae includes rapidly evolving groups that lack necrosis-inducing activity.

    PubMed

    Dong, Suomeng; Kong, Guanghui; Qutob, Dinah; Yu, Xiaoli; Tang, Junli; Kang, Jixiong; Dai, Tingting; Wang, Hai; Gijzen, Mark; Wang, Yuanchao

    2012-07-01

    Necrosis- and ethylene-inducing-like proteins (NLP) are widely distributed in eukaryotic and prokaryotic plant pathogens and are considered to be important virulence factors. We identified, in total, 70 potential Phytophthora sojae NLP genes but 37 were designated as pseudogenes. Sequence alignment of the remaining 33 NLP delineated six groups. Three of these groups include proteins with an intact heptapeptide (Gly-His-Arg-His-Asp-Trp-Glu) motif, which is important for necrosis-inducing activity, whereas the motif is not conserved in the other groups. In total, 19 representative NLP genes were assessed for necrosis-inducing activity by heterologous expression in Nicotiana benthamiana. Surprisingly, only eight genes triggered cell death. The expression of the NLP genes in P. sojae was examined, distinguishing 20 expressed and 13 nonexpressed NLP genes. Real-time reverse-transcriptase polymerase chain reaction results indicate that most NLP are highly expressed during cyst germination and infection stages. Amino acid substitution ratios (Ka/Ks) of 33 NLP sequences from four different P. sojae strains resulted in identification of positive selection sites in a distinct NLP group. Overall, our study indicates that expansion and pseudogenization of the P. sojae NLP family results from an ongoing birth-and-death process, and that varying patterns of expression, necrosis-inducing activity, and positive selection suggest that NLP have diversified in function.

  1. Biomineral formation as a biosignature for microbial activities Precambrian cherts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rincón Tomás, Blanca; Mühlen, Dominik; Hoppert, Michael; Reitner, Joachim

    2015-04-01

    In recent anoxic sediments manganese(II)carbonate minerals (e.g., rhodochrosite, kutnohorite) derive mainly from the reduction of manganese(IV) compounds by microbial anaerobic respiration. Small particles of rhodochrosite in stromatolite-like features in the Dresser chert Fm (Pilbara supergroup, W-Australia), associated with small flakes of kerogen, account for biogenic formation of the mineral in this early Archaean setting. Contrastingly, the formation of huge manganese-rich (carbonate) deposits requires effective manganese redox cycling, also conducted by various microbial processes, mainly requiring conditions of the early and late Proterozoic (Kirschvink et al., 2000; Nealson and Saffrani 1994). However, putative anaerobic pathways like microbial nitrate-dependent manganese oxidation (Hulth et al., 1999), anoxygenic photosynthesis (Johnson et al., 2013) and oxidation in UV light may facilitate manganese cycling even in a reducing atmosphere. Thus manganese redox cycling might have been possible even before the onset of oxygenic photosynthesis. Hence, there are several ways how manganese carbonates could have been formed biogenically and deposited in Precambrian sediments. Thus, the minerals may be suitable biosignatures for microbial redox processes in many respects. The hyperthermophilic archaeon Pyrobaculum islandicum produces rhodochrosite during growth on hydrogen and organic compounds and may be a putative model organism for the reduction of Mn(IV). References Hulth S, Aller RC, Gilbert F. (1999) Geochim Cosmochim Acta, 63, 49-66. Johnson JE, Webb SM, Thomas K, Ono S, Kirschvink JL, Fischer WW. (2013) Proc Natl Acad Sci USA, 110, 11238-11243. Kirschvink JL, Gaidos EJ, Bertani LE, Beukes NJ, Gutzmer J, Maepa LN, Steinberger LE. (2000) Proc Natl Acad Sci USA, 97, 1400-1405. Nealson KH, Saffarini D. (1994). Annu Rev Microbiol, 48, 311-343.

  2. Sulfation mediates activity of zosteric acid against biofilm formation.

    PubMed

    Kurth, Caroline; Cavas, Levent; Pohnert, Georg

    2015-01-01

    Zosteric acid (ZA), a metabolite from the marine sea grass Zostera marina, has attracted much attention due to its attributed antifouling (AF) activity. However, recent results on dynamic transformations of aromatic sulfates in marine phototrophic organisms suggest potential enzymatic desulfation of metabolites like ZA. The activity of ZA was thus re-investigated using biofilm assays and simultaneous analytical monitoring by liquid chromatography/mass spectrometry (LC/MS). Comparison of ZA and its non-sulfated form para-coumaric acid (CA) revealed that the active substance was in all cases the non-sulfated CA while ZA was virtually inactive. CA exhibited a strong biofilm inhibiting activity against Escherichia coli and Vibrio natriegens. The LC/MS data revealed that the apparent biofilm inhibiting effects of ZA on V. natriegens can be entirely attributed to CA released from ZA by sulfatase activity. In the light of various potential applications, the (a)biotic transformation of ZA to CA has thus to be considered in future AF formulations.

  3. Formative evaluation of a motivational intervention for increasing physical activity in underserved youth.

    PubMed

    Wilson, Dawn K; Griffin, Sarah; Saunders, Ruth P; Evans, Alexandra; Mixon, Gary; Wright, Marcie; Beasley, Amelia; Umstattd, M Renee; Lattimore, Diana; Watts, Ashley; Freelove, Julie

    2006-08-01

    The present study was designed to develop an innovative motivational intervention (based on Self-Determination Theory and Social Cognitive Theory) to increase physical activity (PA) in underserved adolescents. Sixty-four adolescents (35 females, 29 males; 50% minority; 65% on reduced lunch program; ages 11-13 yr) participated in either an 8-week motivational intervention after-school (n = 32) or a typical after-school program (n = 32). The conceptual framework for the intervention targeted the social environment (perceived autonomy, perceived social support, participation, fun), cognitive mediators (perceived choice, self-efficacy, and relatedness/belongingness), and motivational orientation (intrinsic motivation, commitment, positive self-concept). Formative evaluation data was collected by staff through daily forms throughout the 8-week program and through observational data completed by independent objective observers during 2 weeks of the program. The major themes that were identified addressed theoretical concepts regarding the intervention and logistical issues in delivering the intervention. The data revealed information regarding the importance of the cognitive appropriateness of the PA and motivational activities, the environmental climate for promoting nurturing relationships, developing specific strategies for increasing intrinsic rather than extrinsic reinforcement, and developing methods for preventing social "cliques" and gender conflicts to maintain an appropriate level of support in the social climate. Themes for training staff included focusing on team building, leadership, and nurturing. This formative evaluation is being used to formalize a randomized trial to test the effects of a student-centered motivational intervention on increasing PA in underserved 6th graders.

  4. Bridge-bonded formate: active intermediate or spectator species in formic acid oxidation on a Pt film electrode?

    PubMed

    Chen, Y-X; Heinen, M; Jusys, Z; Behm, R J

    2006-12-01

    We present and discuss the results of an in situ IR study on the mechanism and kinetics of formic acid oxidation on a Pt film/Si electrode, performed in an attenuated total reflection (ATR) flow cell configuration under controlled mass transport conditions, which specifically aimed at elucidating the role of the adsorbed bridge-bonded formates in this reaction. Potentiodynamic measurements show a complex interplay between formation and desorption/oxidation of COad and formate species and the total Faradaic current. The notably faster increase of the Faradaic current compared to the coverage of bridge-bonded formate in transient measurements at constant potential, but with different formic acid concentrations, reveals that adsorbed formate decomposition is not rate-limiting in the dominant reaction pathway. If being reactive intermediate at all, the contribution of formate adsorption/decomposition to the reaction current decreases with increasing formic acid concentration, accounting for at most 15% for 0.2 M DCOOH at 0.7 VRHE. The rapid build-up/removal of the formate adlayer and its similarity with acetate or (bi-)sulfate adsorption/desorption indicate that the formate adlayer coverage is dominated by a fast dynamic adsorption-desorption equilibrium with the electrolyte, and that formate desorption is much faster than its decomposition. The results corroborate the proposal of a triple pathway reaction mechanism including an indirect pathway, a formate pathway, and a dominant direct pathway, as presented previously (Chen, Y. X.; et al. Angew. Chem. Int. Ed. 2006, 45, 981), in which adsorbed formates act as a site-blocking spectator in the dominant pathway rather than as an active intermediate.

  5. The Antimicrobial Activity of Gramicidin A Is Associated with Hydroxyl Radical Formation

    PubMed Central

    Liou, Je-Wen; Hung, Yu-Jiun; Yang, Chin-Hao; Chen, Yi-Cheng

    2015-01-01

    Gramicidin A is an antimicrobial peptide that destroys gram-positive bacteria. The bactericidal mechanism of antimicrobial peptides has been linked to membrane permeation and metabolism disruption as well as interruption of DNA and protein functions. However, the exact bacterial killing mechanism of gramicidin A is not clearly understood. In the present study, we examined the antimicrobial activity of gramicidin A on Staphylococcus aureus using biochemical and biophysical methods, including hydroxyl radical and NAD+/NADH cycling assays, atomic force microscopy, and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy. Gramicidin A induced membrane permeabilization and changed the composition of the membrane. The morphology of Staphylococcus aureus during gramicidin A destruction was divided into four stages: pore formation, water permeability, bacterial flattening, and lysis. Changes in membrane composition included the destruction of membrane lipids, proteins, and carbohydrates. Most interestingly, we demonstrated that gramicidin A not only caused membrane permeabilization but also induced the formation of hydroxyl radicals, which are a possible end product of the transient depletion of NADH from the tricarboxylic acid cycle. The latter may be the main cause of complete Staphylococcus aureus killing. This new finding may provide insight into the underlying bactericidal mechanism of gA. PMID:25622083

  6. A keratin scaffold regulates epidermal barrier formation, mitochondrial lipid composition, and activity

    PubMed Central

    Kumar, Vinod; Bouameur, Jamal-Eddine; Bär, Janina; Rice, Robert H.; Hornig-Do, Hue-Tran; Roop, Dennis R.; Schwarz, Nicole; Brodesser, Susanne; Thiering, Sören; Leube, Rudolf E.; Wiesner, Rudolf J.; Vijayaraj, Preethi; Brazel, Christina B.; Heller, Sandra; Binder, Hans; Löffler-Wirth, Henry; Seibel, Peter

    2015-01-01

    Keratin intermediate filaments (KIFs) protect the epidermis against mechanical force, support strong adhesion, help barrier formation, and regulate growth. The mechanisms by which type I and II keratins contribute to these functions remain incompletely understood. Here, we report that mice lacking all type I or type II keratins display severe barrier defects and fragile skin, leading to perinatal mortality with full penetrance. Comparative proteomics of cornified envelopes (CEs) from prenatal KtyI−/− and KtyII−/−K8 mice demonstrates that absence of KIF causes dysregulation of many CE constituents, including downregulation of desmoglein 1. Despite persistence of loricrin expression and upregulation of many Nrf2 targets, including CE components Sprr2d and Sprr2h, extensive barrier defects persist, identifying keratins as essential CE scaffolds. Furthermore, we show that KIFs control mitochondrial lipid composition and activity in a cell-intrinsic manner. Therefore, our study explains the complexity of keratinopathies accompanied by barrier disorders by linking keratin scaffolds to mitochondria, adhesion, and CE formation. PMID:26644517

  7. The antimicrobial activity of gramicidin A is associated with hydroxyl radical formation.

    PubMed

    Liou, Je-Wen; Hung, Yu-Jiun; Yang, Chin-Hao; Chen, Yi-Cheng

    2015-01-01

    Gramicidin A is an antimicrobial peptide that destroys gram-positive bacteria. The bactericidal mechanism of antimicrobial peptides has been linked to membrane permeation and metabolism disruption as well as interruption of DNA and protein functions. However, the exact bacterial killing mechanism of gramicidin A is not clearly understood. In the present study, we examined the antimicrobial activity of gramicidin A on Staphylococcus aureus using biochemical and biophysical methods, including hydroxyl radical and NAD+/NADH cycling assays, atomic force microscopy, and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy. Gramicidin A induced membrane permeabilization and changed the composition of the membrane. The morphology of Staphylococcus aureus during gramicidin A destruction was divided into four stages: pore formation, water permeability, bacterial flattening, and lysis. Changes in membrane composition included the destruction of membrane lipids, proteins, and carbohydrates. Most interestingly, we demonstrated that gramicidin A not only caused membrane permeabilization but also induced the formation of hydroxyl radicals, which are a possible end product of the transient depletion of NADH from the tricarboxylic acid cycle. The latter may be the main cause of complete Staphylococcus aureus killing. This new finding may provide insight into the underlying bactericidal mechanism of gA.

  8. Fear Appeals and the Formation of Active Publics.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Roser, Connie; Thompson, Margaret

    1995-01-01

    Examines the process through which a fear appeal transforms low-involvement audiences into active publics. Analyzes cognitive and emotional responses of uninvolved viewers to a film on environmental contamination, together with coping strategies used to deal with the threat. Concludes that cognition and affect mediate viewers' responses to a…

  9. Formation of continuous activated carbon fibers for barrier fabrics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liang, Ying

    1997-08-01

    Commercial protective suits made of active carbon granules or nonwoven fabrics are heavy, have low moisture vapor transport rate, and are uncomfortable. Inherent problems due to construction of barrier fabrics lead to severe heat stress when worn for even short time in warm environments. One proposed method to eliminate these problems is to facilitate the construction of a fabric made of continuous activated carbon fibers (CACF). This study is directed toward investigating the possibility of developing CAFC from two precursors: aramid and fibrillated PAN fiber. It was shown in this study that Kevlar-29 fibers could be quickly carbonized and activated to CACF with high adsorptivity and relatively low weight loss. CACF with high surface area (>500 msp2/g) and reasonable tenacity (≈1g/denier) were successfully prepared from Kevlar fibers through a three-step process: pretreatment, carbonization, and activation. X-ray diffraction, Fourier Transform Infrared Spectroscopy (FTIR), and thermal analysis were conducted to understand the evolution of physical and chemical properties during pretreatment. The influence of temperature, heating rate, and pyrolysis environment on the thermal behavior was determined by DSC and TGA/DTA and used as an indicator for optimizing the pyrolysis conditions. Surface analysis by nitrogen isotherms indicated that the resultant fibers had micropores and mesopores on the surface of CACF. This was also inferred by studies on the surface morphology through Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM) and Scanning Tunneling Microscopy (STM). An investigation of the surface chemical structure by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) before and after activation and elemental analysis confirmed that adsorption of Kevlar based CACF mainly arises due to the physisorption instead of chemisorption. A multistep stabilization along with carbonization and activation was used to prepare active carbon fiber from fibrillated PAN fiber. The resultant fiber retained

  10. 78 FR 38739 - Standard Format and Content for Post-Shutdown Decommissioning Activities Report

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-06-27

    ..., DG-1272, in the Federal Register on December 19, 2012 (77 FR 75198), for a 60-day public comment... COMMISSION Standard Format and Content for Post-Shutdown Decommissioning Activities Report AGENCY: Nuclear... (NRC) is issuing Revision 1 of Regulatory Guide (RG) 1.185, ``Standard Format and Content for...

  11. Active transport and cluster formation on 2D networks.

    PubMed

    Greulich, P; Santen, L

    2010-06-01

    We introduce a model for active transport on inhomogeneous networks embedded in a diffusive environment which is motivated by vesicular transport on actin filaments. In the presence of a hard-core interaction, particle clusters are observed that exhibit an algebraically decaying distribution in a large parameter regime, indicating the existence of clusters on all scales. The scale-free behavior can be understood by a mechanism promoting preferential attachment of particles to large clusters. The results are compared with a diffusion-limited aggregation model and active transport on a regular network. For both models we observe aggregation of particles to clusters which are characterized by a finite size scale if the relevant time scales and particle densities are considered. PMID:20556462

  12. A3 domain region 1803-1818 contributes to the stability of activated factor VIII and includes a binding site for activated factor IX.

    PubMed

    Bloem, Esther; Meems, Henriet; van den Biggelaar, Maartje; Mertens, Koen; Meijer, Alexander B

    2013-09-01

    A recent chemical footprinting study in our laboratory suggested that region 1803-1818 might contribute to A2 domain retention in activated factor VIII (FVIIIa). This site has also been implicated to interact with activated factor IX (FIXa). Asn-1810 further comprises an N-linked glycan, which seems incompatible with a role of the amino acids 1803-1818 for FIXa or A2 domain binding. In the present study, FVIIIa stability and FIXa binding were evaluated in a FVIII-N1810C variant, and two FVIII variants in which residues 1803-1810 and 1811-1818 are replaced by the corresponding residues of factor V (FV). Enzyme kinetic studies showed that only FVIII/FV 1811-1818 has a decreased apparent binding affinity for FIXa. Flow cytometry analysis indicated that fluorescent FIXa exhibits impaired complex formation with only FVIII/FV 1811-1818 on lipospheres. Site-directed mutagenesis revealed that Phe-1816 contributes to the interaction with FIXa. To evaluate FVIIIa stability, the FVIII/FV chimeras were activated by thrombin, and the decline in cofactor function was followed over time. FVIII/FV 1803-1810 and FVIII/FV 1811-1818 but not FVIII-N1810C showed a decreased FVIIIa half-life. However, when the FVIII variants were activated in presence of FIXa, only FVIII/FV 1811-1818 demonstrated an enhanced decline in cofactor function. Surface plasmon resonance analysis revealed that the FVIII variants K1813A/K1818A, E1811A, and F1816A exhibit enhanced dissociation after activation. The results together demonstrate that the glycan at 1810 is not involved in FVIII cofactor function, and that Phe-1816 of region 1811-1818 contributes to FIXa binding. Both regions 1803-1810 and 1811-1818 contribute to FVIIIa stability.

  13. A3 domain region 1803-1818 contributes to the stability of activated factor VIII and includes a binding site for activated factor IX.

    PubMed

    Bloem, Esther; Meems, Henriet; van den Biggelaar, Maartje; Mertens, Koen; Meijer, Alexander B

    2013-09-01

    A recent chemical footprinting study in our laboratory suggested that region 1803-1818 might contribute to A2 domain retention in activated factor VIII (FVIIIa). This site has also been implicated to interact with activated factor IX (FIXa). Asn-1810 further comprises an N-linked glycan, which seems incompatible with a role of the amino acids 1803-1818 for FIXa or A2 domain binding. In the present study, FVIIIa stability and FIXa binding were evaluated in a FVIII-N1810C variant, and two FVIII variants in which residues 1803-1810 and 1811-1818 are replaced by the corresponding residues of factor V (FV). Enzyme kinetic studies showed that only FVIII/FV 1811-1818 has a decreased apparent binding affinity for FIXa. Flow cytometry analysis indicated that fluorescent FIXa exhibits impaired complex formation with only FVIII/FV 1811-1818 on lipospheres. Site-directed mutagenesis revealed that Phe-1816 contributes to the interaction with FIXa. To evaluate FVIIIa stability, the FVIII/FV chimeras were activated by thrombin, and the decline in cofactor function was followed over time. FVIII/FV 1803-1810 and FVIII/FV 1811-1818 but not FVIII-N1810C showed a decreased FVIIIa half-life. However, when the FVIII variants were activated in presence of FIXa, only FVIII/FV 1811-1818 demonstrated an enhanced decline in cofactor function. Surface plasmon resonance analysis revealed that the FVIII variants K1813A/K1818A, E1811A, and F1816A exhibit enhanced dissociation after activation. The results together demonstrate that the glycan at 1810 is not involved in FVIII cofactor function, and that Phe-1816 of region 1811-1818 contributes to FIXa binding. Both regions 1803-1810 and 1811-1818 contribute to FVIIIa stability. PMID:23884417

  14. A3 Domain Region 1803–1818 Contributes to the Stability of Activated Factor VIII and Includes a Binding Site for Activated Factor IX

    PubMed Central

    Bloem, Esther; Meems, Henriet; van den Biggelaar, Maartje; Mertens, Koen; Meijer, Alexander B.

    2013-01-01

    A recent chemical footprinting study in our laboratory suggested that region 1803–1818 might contribute to A2 domain retention in activated factor VIII (FVIIIa). This site has also been implicated to interact with activated factor IX (FIXa). Asn-1810 further comprises an N-linked glycan, which seems incompatible with a role of the amino acids 1803–1818 for FIXa or A2 domain binding. In the present study, FVIIIa stability and FIXa binding were evaluated in a FVIII-N1810C variant, and two FVIII variants in which residues 1803–1810 and 1811–1818 are replaced by the corresponding residues of factor V (FV). Enzyme kinetic studies showed that only FVIII/FV 1811–1818 has a decreased apparent binding affinity for FIXa. Flow cytometry analysis indicated that fluorescent FIXa exhibits impaired complex formation with only FVIII/FV 1811–1818 on lipospheres. Site-directed mutagenesis revealed that Phe-1816 contributes to the interaction with FIXa. To evaluate FVIIIa stability, the FVIII/FV chimeras were activated by thrombin, and the decline in cofactor function was followed over time. FVIII/FV 1803–1810 and FVIII/FV 1811–1818 but not FVIII-N1810C showed a decreased FVIIIa half-life. However, when the FVIII variants were activated in presence of FIXa, only FVIII/FV 1811–1818 demonstrated an enhanced decline in cofactor function. Surface plasmon resonance analysis revealed that the FVIII variants K1813A/K1818A, E1811A, and F1816A exhibit enhanced dissociation after activation. The results together demonstrate that the glycan at 1810 is not involved in FVIII cofactor function, and that Phe-1816 of region 1811–1818 contributes to FIXa binding. Both regions 1803–1810 and 1811–1818 contribute to FVIIIa stability. PMID:23884417

  15. Psycho-Pedagogical Conditions of Formation of Professional Creative Activity of Future Professionals

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Askarovna, Uzakbayeva Sakypzhamal; Yertaevna, Abeltayeva Zhanel; Erhanovna, Sadykova Ayzhan; Rysbekova, R.

    2015-01-01

    Organizational, psychological and pedagogical conditions (the position of student in the educational process, the inclusion of students in active and independent activities, the creation of a positive creative environment and psychological climate, the active use of the forms, methods, technologies, adequate formation of professional creative…

  16. Comparing the validity of 2 physical activity questionnaire formats in African-American and Hispanic women

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The purpose of this study was to compare the validity of 2 physical activity questionnaire formats—one that lists activities (Checklist questionnaire) and one that assesses overall activities (Global questionnaire) by domain. Two questionnaire formats were validated among 260 African-American and Hi...

  17. A summary of present-day gully formation and activity on Mars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Diniega, Serina; Hansen, Candice; McEwen, Alfred; Dundas, Colin; Byrne, Shane

    2016-07-01

    Over the past decade, gully activity has been carefully monitored on a range of slopes, including dune slopes [1-3] and crater walls [2-4]. Within the southern mid-latitudes, substantial changes in gully morphology have been observed. On dune slopes, observed activity includes major incision (forming a new channel or expanding an existing channel), changes in channel sinuosity, expansion of alcoves, and deposition of an extensive new apron. On rockier slopes, observed activity has cut new channel segments and small terraces, abandoned other channels, and deposited boulder-rich lobate features. Many of these morphologies have been treated as indicative of fluvial processes. However, long-term monitoring campaigns with High Resolution Imaging Science Experiment (HiRISE) data [2-5] of almost 500 gully locations, have shown that the timing of this current activity is generally correlated with the presence of seasonal frost [1-5]. Moreover, the distribution of seasonal frost on slopes is similar to the orientation distribution of gullies [3,6]. Most seasonal frost is CO2, and this is likely the main cause of current activity. Recent modeling has shown that CO2 sublimation from within the regolith pores would be sufficient to create the types of geomorphology seen within martian gullies [7]. Water frost may be involved in some small-scale activity [5]. Liquid water is unlikely to be relevant, because the abundance of water frost is generally low [8] and melting is difficult. An additional current focus is on the north polar sand sea, where "gullies" (generally lacking a channel) have been observed to form on dune slopes over seasonal and annual timescales. There, we aim to differentiate between either a general aeolian [8] or seasonal frost driver [9,10] for the formation process. For these features, formation timing estimates are often less constrained because HiRISE images are not acquired during fall and winter, due to the polar hood and darkness. Thus, analysis of

  18. Design of a Website on Nutrition and Physical Activity for Adolescents: Results From Formative Research

    PubMed Central

    Cullen, Karen Weber; Boushey, Carol; Konzelmann, Karen

    2012-01-01

    Background Teens do not meet guidelines for healthy eating and physical activity. The Internet may be an effective method for delivering programs that help them adopt healthy behaviors. Objective To collect information to design content and structure for a teen-friendly website promoting healthy eating and physical activity behaviors. Methods Qualitative research, encompassing both focus group and interview techniques, were used to design the website. Participants were 12-17 year olds in Houston, Texas, and West Lafayette, Indiana. Results A total of 133 participants took part in 26 focus groups while 15 participated in one-on-one interviews to provide guidance for the development of teen-friendly content and structure for an online behavior change program promoting healthy eating and physical activity to 12-17 year olds. The youth made suggestions to overcome common barriers to healthy eating and physical activity. Their feedback was used to develop “Teen Choice: Food & Fitness,” a 12-week online behavior change program, populated by 4 cartoon character role models. Conclusions It is critical that members of the target audience be included in formative research to develop behavior change programs that are relevant, appealing, and address their needs and interests. PMID:22538427

  19. Minimal continuum theories of structure formation in dense active fluids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dunkel, Jörn; Heidenreich, Sebastian; Bär, Markus; Goldstein, Raymond E.

    2013-04-01

    Self-sustained dynamical phases of living matter can exhibit remarkable similarities over a wide range of scales, from mesoscopic vortex structures in microbial suspensions and motility assays of biopolymers to turbulent large-scale instabilities in flocks of birds or schools of fish. Here, we argue that, in many cases, the phenomenology of such active states can be efficiently described in terms of fourth- and higher-order partial differential equations. Structural transitions in these models can be interpreted as Landau-type kinematic transitions in Fourier (wavenumber) space, suggesting that microscopically different biological systems can share universal long-wavelength features. This general idea is illustrated through numerical simulations for two classes of continuum models for incompressible active fluids: a Swift-Hohenberg-type scalar field theory, and a minimal vector model that extends the classical Toner-Tu theory and appears to be a promising candidate for the quantitative description of dense bacterial suspensions. We discuss how microscopic symmetry-breaking mechanisms can enter macroscopic continuum descriptions of collective microbial motion near surfaces, and conclude by outlining future applications.

  20. Active plasma source formation in the MAP diode

    SciTech Connect

    Lamppa, K.P.; Stinnett, R.W.; Renk, T.J.

    1995-07-01

    The Ion Beam Surface Treatment (IBEST) program is exploring using ion beams to treat the surface of a wide variety of materials. These experiments have shown that improved corrosion resistance, surface hardening, grain size modification, polishing and surface cleaning can all be achieved using a pulsed 0.4-0.8 MeV ion beam delivering 1-10 J/cm{sup 2}. The Magnetically-confined Anode Plasma (MAP) diode, developed at Cornell University, produces an active plasma which can be used to treat the surfaces of materials. The diode consists of a fast puff valve as the source of gas to produce the desired ions and two capacitively driven B-fields. A slow magnetic field is used for electron insulation and a fast field is used to both ionize the puffed gas and to position the plasma in the proper spatial location in the anode prior to the accelerator pulse. The relative timing between subsystems is an important factor in the effective production of the active plasma source for the MAP diode system. The MAP diode has been characterized using a Langmuir probe to measure plasma arrival times at the anode annulus for hydrogen gas. This data was then used to determine the optimum operating point for the MAP diode on RHEPP-1 accelerator shots. Operation of the MAP diode system to produce an ion beam of 500 kV, 12 kA with 40% efficiency (measured at the diode) has been demonstrated.

  1. Inhibition of receptor activator of nuclear factor-κB ligand (RANKL)-induced osteoclast formation by pyrroloquinoline quinine (PQQ).

    PubMed

    Odkhuu, Erdenezaya; Koide, Naoki; Haque, Abedul; Tsolmongyn, Bilegtsaikhan; Naiki, Yoshikazu; Hashimoto, Shoji; Komatsu, Takayuki; Yoshida, Tomoaki; Yokochi, Takashi

    2012-02-29

    The effect of pyrroloquinoline quinine (PQQ) on receptor activator of nuclear factor-κB ligand (RANKL)-induced osteoclast formation was examined using RAW 264.7 macrophage-like cells. RANKL led to the formation of osteoclasts identified as tartrate-resistant acid phosphatase (TRAP)-positive multinucleated cells in the culture of RAW 264.7 cells. However, PQQ inhibited the appearance of osteoclasts and prevented the decrease of F4/80 macrophage maturation marker on RANKL-stimulated cells, suggesting a preventive action of PQQ on RANKL-induced osteoclast differentiation. PQQ inhibited the activation of nuclear factor of activated T cells (NFATc1), a key transcription factor of osteoclastogenesis, in RANKL-stimulated cells. On the other hand, PQQ did not inhibit the signaling pathway from RANK/RANKL binding to NFATc1 activation, including NF-κB and mitogen-activated protein kinases (MAPKs). PQQ augmented the expression of type I interferon receptor (IFNAR) and enhanced the IFN-β-mediated janus kinase (JAK1) and signal transducer and activator of transcription (STAT1) expression. Moreover, PQQ reduced the expression level of c-Fos leading to the activation of NFATc1. Taken together, PQQ was suggested to prevent RANKL-induced osteoclast formation via the inactivation of NFATc1 by reduced c-Fos expression. The reduced c-Fos expression might be mediated by the enhanced IFN-β signaling due to augmented IFNAR expression.

  2. Effects of Molecular Structure of the Oxidation Products of Reactive Atmospheric Hydrocarbons on the Formation of Secondary Organic Particular Matter, Including the Effects of Water

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Niakan, Negar

    Organic aerosols have significant effects on human health, air quality and climate. Secondary organic aerosols (SOA) are produced by the oxidation of primary-volatile organic compounds (VOC). For example, α-pinene reacts with oxidants such as hydroxyl radical (OH), ozone (O3), and nitrate radical (NO3), accounting for a significant portion of total organic aerosol in the atmosphere. Experimental studies have shown that the oxidation process between α-pinene and ozone has the most significant impact in the formation of SOA (Hoffmann et al., 1997). Most of the models used to predict SOA formation, however, are limited in that they neglect the role of water due to uncertainty about the structure and nature of organic compounds, in addition to uncertainty about the effect of varying relative humidity (RH) on atmospheric organic particulate matter (OPM) (Kanakidou et al., 2005). For this study, structures of organic compounds involved in the formation of SOA are estimated, and the role of water uptake is incorporated in the process. The Combinatorial Aerosol Formation Model (CAFM) is a deterministic model used to determine the amount of organic mass (M o µg m-3) formation based on the predicted structures. Results show that the amount of SOA that is formed is almost negligible when the amount of parent hydrocarbon involved in the reaction is low ( i.e. around 5 µg m-3), especially at lower RH. Observing compounds with a greater number of polar groups (alcohol and carboxylic acid) indicates that structure has a significant effect on organic mass formation. This observation is in agreement with the fact that the more hydrophilic the compound is, the higher RH, leading to more condensation into the PM phase.

  3. DISINFECTION BY-PRODUCT FORMATION BY ALTERNATIVE DISINFECTANTS AND REMOVAL BY GRANULAR ACTIVATED CARBON

    EPA Science Inventory

    The effects of the use of the alternative disinfectants on the formation of halogenated disinfection by–products (DBPs) including total organic halide, trihalomethanes, haloacetic acids, haloacetonitriles, haloketones, chloral hydrate, and chloropicrin, were examined along ...

  4. Titanium nanotubes activate genes related to bone formation in vitro

    PubMed Central

    Pozio, Alfonso; Palmieri, Annalisa; Girardi, Ambra; Cura, Francesca; Carinci, Francesco

    2012-01-01

    Background: Titanium is used worldwide to make osseointegrable devices, thanks to its favorable characteristics as mechanical proprieties and biocompatibility, demonstrated by in vivo studies with animal models and clinical trials over a forty-year period. However, the exact genetic effect of the titanium layer on cells is still not well characterized. Materials and Methods: To investigate how titanium nanotubes stimulate osteoblasts differentiation and proliferation, some osteoblast genes (SP7, RUNX2, COL3A1, COL1A1, ALPL, SPP1 and FOSL1) were analyzed by quantitative Real Time RT- PCR. Results: After 15 days, osteoblasts cultivated on titanium naotube showed the up-regulation of bone related genes SP7, ENG, FOSL1 and SPP1 and the down-regulation of RUNX2, COL3A1, COL1A1, and ALPL. After 30 days of treatment, the bone related genes SP7, ENG, FOSL1 and RUNX2 were up-regulated while COL3A1, COL1A1, ALPL and SPP1 were down-regulated. Conclusions: Our results, demonstrates that titanium nanotubes can lead to osteoblast differentiation and extracellular matrix deposition and mineralization in dental pulp stem cells by the activation of osteoblast related genes SPP1, FOSL1 and RUNX2. PMID:23814577

  5. The Impact of Oil and Natural Gas Activity on Ozone Formation in the Colorado Front Range

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hornbrook, R. S.; Apel, E. C.; Hills, A. J.; Blake, D. R.; Blake, N. J.; Schroeder, J.; Fried, A.; Weibring, P.; Richter, D.; Walega, J.; Mauldin, L.; Cantrell, C. A.; Hall, S. R.; Ullmann, K.; Weinheimer, A. J.; Montzka, D.; Orlando, J. J.; Tyndall, G. S.; Campos, T. L.; Stell, M. H.; Heikes, B.; Treadaway, V.; O'Sullivan, D. W.; Huey, L. G.; Tanner, D.; Cohen, R. C.; Flocke, F. M.; Pfister, G.; Knote, C. J.; Emmons, L. K.

    2014-12-01

    The 2014 Front Range Air Pollution and Photochemistry Experiment (FRAPPE) was a ground-based and airborne field study designed to characterize and understand air quality in the Colorado Front Range, where National Ambient Air Quality Standards (NAAQS) ozone levels are frequently exceeded during summertime. A primary goal of the study was to determine the factors controlling surface ozone in the Front Range. As part of the project, measurements of many trace gases were observed on board the NSF/NCAR C-130 by a suite of instrumentation, including the NCAR Trace Organic Gas Analyzer (TOGA), which made measurements of a set of volatile organic compounds (VOCs). VOCs are crucial for characterizing emissions and photochemical processing in the Front Range, as well as the air transported into the region. During recent years, oil and natural gas (O&NG) activity in the Front Range has been growing rapidly. Ratios of observed aromatic hydrocarbons, butanes and pentanes demonstrate distinct fingerprinting that can be used to distinguish both between different types of O&NG activities and between O&NG extraction regions in the FRAPPE study region and beyond. Using the observed hydrocarbon data along with other trace gas observations, we will compare contributions of O&NG emissions to OH reactivities in different regions in the Front Range, and present box model results demonstrating the impact of O&NG activities on ozone formation.

  6. The Impact of Oil and Natural Gas Activity on Ozone Formation in the Colorado Front Range

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hornbrook, R. S.; Apel, E. C.; Hills, A. J.; Blake, D. R.; Blake, N. J.; Schroeder, J.; Fried, A.; Weibring, P.; Richter, D.; Walega, J.; Mauldin, L.; Cantrell, C. A.; Hall, S. R.; Ullmann, K.; Weinheimer, A. J.; Montzka, D.; Orlando, J. J.; Tyndall, G. S.; Campos, T. L.; Stell, M. H.; Heikes, B.; Treadaway, V.; O'Sullivan, D. W.; Huey, L. G.; Tanner, D.; Cohen, R. C.; Flocke, F. M.; Pfister, G.; Knote, C. J.; Emmons, L. K.

    2015-12-01

    The 2014 Front Range Air Pollution and Photochemistry Experiment (FRAPPE) was a ground-based and airborne field study designed to characterize and understand air quality in the Colorado Front Range, where National Ambient Air Quality Standards (NAAQS) ozone levels are frequently exceeded during summertime. A primary goal of the study was to determine the factors controlling surface ozone in the Front Range. As part of the project, measurements of many trace gases were observed on board the NSF/NCAR C-130 by a suite of instrumentation, including the NCAR Trace Organic Gas Analyzer (TOGA), which made measurements of a set of volatile organic compounds (VOCs). VOCs are crucial for characterizing emissions and photochemical processing in the Front Range, as well as the air transported into the region. During recent years, oil and natural gas (O&NG) activity in the Front Range has been growing rapidly. Ratios of observed aromatic hydrocarbons, butanes and pentanes demonstrate distinct fingerprinting that can be used to distinguish both between different types of O&NG activities and between O&NG extraction regions in the FRAPPE study region and beyond. Using the observed hydrocarbon data along with other trace gas observations, we will compare contributions of O&NG emissions to OH reactivities in different regions in the Front Range, and present box model results demonstrating the impact of O&NG activities on ozone formation.

  7. Active Management of Integrated Geothermal-CO2 Storage Reservoirs in Sedimentary Formations: Data used in Geosphere Journal Article

    DOE Data Explorer

    Thomas A. Buscheck

    2015-06-01

    This data submission is for Phase 2 of Active Management of Integrated Geothermal-CO2 Storage Reservoirs in Sedimentary Formations, which focuses on multi-fluid (CO2 and brine) geothermal energy production and diurnal bulk energy storage in geologic settings that are suitable for geologic CO2 storage. This data submission includes all data used in the Geosphere Journal article by Buscheck et al (2016). All assumptions are discussed in that article.

  8. Extension of a PBPK model for ethylene glycol and glycolic acid to include the competitive formation and clearance of metabolites associated with kidney toxicity in rats and humans

    SciTech Connect

    Corley, R.A.; Saghir, S.A.; Bartels, M.J.; Hansen, S.C.; Creim, J.; McMartin, K.E.; Snellings, W.M.

    2011-02-01

    A previously developed PBPK model for ethylene glycol and glycolic acid was extended to include glyoxylic acid, oxalic acid, and the precipitation of calcium oxalate that is associated with kidney toxicity in rats and humans. The development and evaluation of the PBPK model was based upon previously published pharmacokinetic studies coupled with measured blood and tissue partition coefficients and rates of in vitro metabolism of glyoxylic acid to oxalic acid, glycine and other metabolites using primary hepatocytes isolated from male Wistar rats and humans. Precipitation of oxalic acid with calcium in the kidneys was assumed to occur only at concentrations exceeding the thermodynamic solubility product for calcium oxalate. This solubility product can be affected by local concentrations of calcium and other ions that are expressed in the model using an ion activity product estimated from toxicity studies such that calcium oxalate precipitation would be minimal at dietary exposures below the NOAEL for kidney toxicity in the sensitive male Wistar rat. The resulting integrated PBPK predicts that bolus oral or dietary exposures to ethylene glycol would result in typically 1.4-1.6-fold higher peak oxalate levels and 1.6-2-fold higher AUC's for calcium oxalate in kidneys of humans as compared with comparably exposed male Wistar rats over a dose range of 1-1000 mg/kg. The converse (male Wistar rats predicted to have greater oxalate levels in the kidneys than humans) was found for inhalation exposures although no accumulation of calcium oxalate is predicted to occur until exposures are well in excess of the theoretical saturated vapor concentration of 200 mg/m{sup 3}. While the current model is capable of such cross-species, dose, and route-of-exposure comparisons, it also highlights several areas of potential research that will improve confidence in such predictions, especially at low doses relevant for most human exposures.

  9. [Evaluation of an obesity prevention intervention which included nutrition education and physical activity applied in public schools of Santiago, Chile].

    PubMed

    Kain, Juliana; Leyton, Bárbara; Concha, Fernando; Weisstaub, Gerardo; Lobos, Luz; Bustos, Nelly; Vio, Fernando

    2012-03-01

    The main objective of this study was to assess the effectiveness of an obesity prevention intervention which included nutrition education and physical activity applied to low income Chilean children in a longitudinal three-year follow-up study. Participants included all 4-7 year old children from 7 public schools located in a low socioeconomic district of Santiago. The main aspects of the intervention were: training of teachers so they could apply an educational program on healthy eating, increase in physical education classes from 3 to 4 per week, and improvement of their quality. Weight, height, waist circumference (WC) and the 6-minute walk distance (6MWD) were assessed yearly in 597 children. We calculated BMI, BMI Z, % normal (N), overweight (OW) and obesity (OB), WC > 90th percentile (NHANES III) and fitness (6MWD/height). Annual changes in BMI Z, WC, 6MWD and fitness were assessed, using repeated measures ANOVA and the test of proportions. Knowledge in healthy eating was assessed during 2 of the 3 years. Results showed that % OB remained unchanged for 2 years (17%) but increased to 19.3% at follow-up. BMI Z increased from 0.3 to 0.38 (p = 0.052) in the N, remained unchanged in the OW, while decreasing significantly in the OB (2.73 to 2.41 p < 0.0001). % WC > 90 th percentile decreased in the OW and OB; 6 MWD was higher in the OW, but the increase in distance overtime was greater among the N. Overall fitness improved, however it was only significant among the N (p = 0.0002). There was a significant increase in food knowledge. We conclude that in spite of a decrease in BMI Z of the OB, an improvement in fitness in the N and food knowledge in all the children, obesity increased at follow-up. This study shows that in school-based obesity programs it is necessary to apply more intense interventions with another type of methodology; otherwise this condition will continue to rise.

  10. A physiologically based in silico model for trans-2-hexenal detoxification and DNA adduct formation in human including interindividual variation indicates efficient detoxification and a negligible genotoxicity risk.

    PubMed

    Kiwamoto, R; Spenkelink, A; Rietjens, I M C M; Punt, A

    2013-09-01

    A number of α,β-unsaturated aldehydes are present in food both as natural constituents and as flavouring agents. Their reaction with DNA due to their electrophilic α,β-unsaturated aldehyde moiety may result in genotoxicity as observed in some in vitro models, thereby raising a safety concern. A question that remains is whether in vivo detoxification would be efficient enough to prevent DNA adduct formation and genotoxicity. In this study, a human physiologically based kinetic/dynamic (PBK/D) model of trans-2-hexenal (2-hexenal), a selected model α,β-unsaturated aldehyde, was developed to examine dose-dependent detoxification and DNA adduct formation in humans upon dietary exposure. The kinetic model parameters for detoxification were quantified using relevant pooled human tissue fractions as well as tissue fractions from 11 different individual subjects. In addition, a Monte Carlo simulation was performed so that the impact of interindividual variation in 2-hexenal detoxification on the DNA adduct formation in the population as a whole could be examined. The PBK/D model revealed that DNA adduct formation due to 2-hexenal exposure was 0.039 adducts/10⁸ nucleotides (nt) at the estimated average 2-hexenal dietary intake (0.04 mg 2-hexenal/kg bw) and 0.18 adducts/10⁸ nt at the 95th percentile of the dietary intake (0.178 mg 2-hexenal/kg bw) in the most sensitive people. These levels are three orders of magnitude lower than natural background DNA adduct levels that have been reported in disease-free humans (6.8-110 adducts/10⁸ nt), suggesting that the genotoxicity risk for the human population at realistic dietary daily intakes of 2-hexenal may be negligible. PMID:23864024

  11. Rapid Conversion of Traditional Introductory Physics Sequences to an Activity-Based Format

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Yoder, Garett; Cook, Jerry

    2014-01-01

    The Department of Physics at EKU [Eastern Kentucky University] with support from the National Science Foundations Course Curriculum and Laboratory Improvement Program has successfully converted our entire introductory physics sequence, both algebra-based and calculus-based courses, to an activity-based format where laboratory activities,…

  12. Effect of viscous macromolecules on peritoneal plasminogen activator activity: a potential mechanism for their ability to reduce postoperative adhesion formation.

    PubMed

    Mayer, M; Yedgar, S; Hurwitz, A; Palti, Z; Finzi, Z; Milwidsky, A

    1988-10-01

    Activity of peritoneal plasminogen activator and its regulation by dextran and other macromolecules that clinically suppress postoperative adhesions was studied. Plasminogen activator activity was assayed by a two-stage globinolytic assay that monitors formation of plasmin, as well as by cleavage of a chromogenic peptide substrate (S-2444) in the presence of aprotinin (Trasylol). Plasminogen activator activity was located on the outer surface of human peritoneum. Incubation of peritoneal tissue with buffer in vitro (conditioning) prompted release of plasminogen activator into the conditioning medium. The released plasminogen activator formed a single band on sodium dodecyl sulfate-gel electrophoresis at an apparent molecular weight of 174,000 and was markedly suppressed by antiserum raised against human melanoma tissue-type plasminogen activator. Nonspecific proteolytic activity did not accumulate in the medium during conditioning. The presence of dextran 80 during conditioning of peritoneum reversibly suppressed tissue-bound plasminogen activator activity and reduced plasminogen activator activity in the spent medium. A similar inhibition of peritoneal plasminogen activator was induced by dextran 500, methyl cellulose, and polyvinylpyrrolidone. Dextran, when added to the medium after conditioning, had no direct inhibitory effect on plasminogen activator activity. Dextran did not induce peritoneal production of inhibitor(s) of trypsin, chymotrypsin, or urokinase. On the basis of these findings, two possible mechanisms for the effect of viscous polymers in the reduction of adhesion formation are proposed. These mechanisms consider the importance of peritoneal tissue-type plasminogen activator for removal of fibrin clots and suggest that polymer coating either prevents the shedding of plasminogen activator into the abdominal cavity or reduces the access of fibrin clots to the serosal surfaces. PMID:2459968

  13. An active carbon catalyst prevents coke formation from asphaltenes during the hydrocracking of vacuum residue

    SciTech Connect

    Fukuyama, H.; Terai, S.

    2007-07-01

    Active carbons were prepared by the steam activation of a brown coal char. The active carbon with mesopores showed greater adsorption selectivity for asphaltenes. The active carbon was effective at suppressing coke formation, even with the high hydrocracking conversion of vacuum residue. The analysis of the change in the composition of saturates, aromatics, resins, and asphaltenes in the cracked residue with conversion demonstrated the ability of active carbon to restrict the transformation of asphaltenes to coke. The active carbon that was richer in mesopores was presumably more effective at providing adsorption sites for the hydrocarbon free-radicals generated initially during thermal cracking to prevent them from coupling and polycondensing.

  14. Formative evaluation of a motivational intervention for increasing physical activity in underserved youth.

    PubMed

    Wilson, Dawn K; Griffin, Sarah; Saunders, Ruth P; Evans, Alexandra; Mixon, Gary; Wright, Marcie; Beasley, Amelia; Umstattd, M Renee; Lattimore, Diana; Watts, Ashley; Freelove, Julie

    2006-08-01

    The present study was designed to develop an innovative motivational intervention (based on Self-Determination Theory and Social Cognitive Theory) to increase physical activity (PA) in underserved adolescents. Sixty-four adolescents (35 females, 29 males; 50% minority; 65% on reduced lunch program; ages 11-13 yr) participated in either an 8-week motivational intervention after-school (n = 32) or a typical after-school program (n = 32). The conceptual framework for the intervention targeted the social environment (perceived autonomy, perceived social support, participation, fun), cognitive mediators (perceived choice, self-efficacy, and relatedness/belongingness), and motivational orientation (intrinsic motivation, commitment, positive self-concept). Formative evaluation data was collected by staff through daily forms throughout the 8-week program and through observational data completed by independent objective observers during 2 weeks of the program. The major themes that were identified addressed theoretical concepts regarding the intervention and logistical issues in delivering the intervention. The data revealed information regarding the importance of the cognitive appropriateness of the PA and motivational activities, the environmental climate for promoting nurturing relationships, developing specific strategies for increasing intrinsic rather than extrinsic reinforcement, and developing methods for preventing social "cliques" and gender conflicts to maintain an appropriate level of support in the social climate. Themes for training staff included focusing on team building, leadership, and nurturing. This formative evaluation is being used to formalize a randomized trial to test the effects of a student-centered motivational intervention on increasing PA in underserved 6th graders. PMID:21048891

  15. An evaluation of temperature scales for silica diagenesis in diatomaceous sequences including a new approach based on the Miocene Monterey Formation, California

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Keller, M.A.; Isaacs, C.M.

    1985-01-01

    Geologic relations indicate that silica phases transformed in the Monterey Formation in two zones that persist over a narrow depth/temperature range and do not stratigraphically overlap. The wide and overlapping range of reported temperatures of these transformations is mainly a result of the many uncertainties inherent in the different methods used to estimate temperature and does not indicate that phases transform throughout these ranges. Our approach to a reliable temperature scale for silica diagenesis combines as empirical zonation of silica phases with temperature calibration from a sequence at maximum temperature and depth of burial. ?? 1985 Springer-Verlag New York Inc.

  16. 25 CFR 170.137 - What types of activities can a recreation, tourism, and trails program include?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 25 Indians 1 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false What types of activities can a recreation, tourism, and... Eligibility Recreation, Tourism and Trails § 170.137 What types of activities can a recreation, tourism, and... may perform under a recreation, tourism, and trails program: (1) Transportation planning for...

  17. 25 CFR 170.137 - What types of activities can a recreation, tourism, and trails program include?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 25 Indians 1 2012-04-01 2011-04-01 true What types of activities can a recreation, tourism, and... Eligibility Recreation, Tourism and Trails § 170.137 What types of activities can a recreation, tourism, and... may perform under a recreation, tourism, and trails program: (1) Transportation planning for...

  18. 25 CFR 170.137 - What types of activities can a recreation, tourism, and trails program include?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 25 Indians 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false What types of activities can a recreation, tourism, and... Eligibility Recreation, Tourism and Trails § 170.137 What types of activities can a recreation, tourism, and... may perform under a recreation, tourism, and trails program: (1) Transportation planning for...

  19. 25 CFR 170.137 - What types of activities can a recreation, tourism, and trails program include?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 25 Indians 1 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false What types of activities can a recreation, tourism, and... Eligibility Recreation, Tourism and Trails § 170.137 What types of activities can a recreation, tourism, and... may perform under a recreation, tourism, and trails program: (1) Transportation planning for...

  20. 25 CFR 170.137 - What types of activities can a recreation, tourism, and trails program include?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 25 Indians 1 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false What types of activities can a recreation, tourism, and... Eligibility Recreation, Tourism and Trails § 170.137 What types of activities can a recreation, tourism, and... may perform under a recreation, tourism, and trails program: (1) Transportation planning for...

  1. HEPS Inventory Tool: An Inventory Tool Including Quality Assessment of School Interventions on Healthy Eating and Physical Activity

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dadaczynski, Kevin; Paulus, Peter; de Vries, Nanne; de Ruiter, Silvia; Buijs, Goof

    2010-01-01

    The HEPS Inventory Tool aims to support stakeholders working in school health promotion to promote high quality interventions on healthy eating and physical activity. As a tool it provides a step-by-step approach on how to develop a national or regional inventory of existing school based interventions on healthy eating and physical activity. It…

  2. In Vitro Evaluation of Bacteriocins Activity Against Listeria monocytogenes Biofilm Formation.

    PubMed

    Camargo, Anderson Carlos; de Paula, Otávio Almeida Lino; Todorov, Svetoslav Dimitrov; Nero, Luís Augusto

    2016-03-01

    The present study aimed to assess the activity of cell-free supernatant (CFS) containing bacteriocins on the formation and maintenance of biofilms developed by Listeria monocytogenes, and the associated effect of bacteriocins and ethylene-diamine-tetra-acetic acid (EDTA) on the formed biofilm. CFS from 9 lactic acid bacteria (LAB) strains was tested for inhibitory activity against 85 L. monocytogenes isolates and 21 LAB strains. Then, 12 L. monocytogenes strains were selected based on genetic profiles and sensitivity to CFS and were subjected to an in vitro assay to assess biofilm formation in microtiter plates, considering different culture media and incubation conditions. Based on these results, 6 L. monocytogenes strains were subjected to the same in vitro procedure to assess biofilm formation, being co-inoculated with CFS. In addition, these strains were subjected to the same in vitro procedure, modified by adding the CFS after biofilm formation. Relevant decrease in biofilm formation was observed in the first experiment, but CFS added after biofilm formation did not eliminate them. CFS from Lactobacillus curvatus ET31 were selected due to its anti-biofilm activity, being associated to EDTA at different concentrations and tested for biofilm control of three strains of L. monocytogenes, using the same in vitro procedure described previously. Concentrated bacteriocin presented poor performance in eliminating formed biofilms, and EDTA concentration presented no evident interference on biofilm elimination. Twelve selected L. monocytogenes strains were positive for investigated virulence makers and negative for luxS gene, recognized as being involved in biofilm formation. Selected L. monocytogenes strains were able to produce biofilms under different conditions. CFSs have the potential to prevent biofilm formation, but they were not able to destroy already formed biofilms. Nevertheless, low concentrations of CFS combined with EDTA caused a relevant reduction in

  3. Warm dust and aromatic bands as quantitative probes of star-formation activity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Förster Schreiber, N. M.; Roussel, H.; Sauvage, M.; Charmandaris, V.

    2004-05-01

    We combine samples of spiral galaxies and starburst systems observed with ISOCAM on board ISO to investigate the reliability of mid-infrared dust emission as a quantitative tracer of star formation activity. The total sample covers very diverse galactic environments and probes a much wider dynamic range in star formation rate density than previous similar studies. We find that both the monochromatic 15 μm continuum and the 5-8.5 μm emission constitute excellent indicators of the star formation rate as quantified by the Lyman continuum luminosity LLyc, within specified validity limits which are different for the two tracers. Normalized to projected surface area, the 15 μm continuum luminosity Σ15 μm,ct is directly proportional to ΣLyc over several orders of magnitude. Two regimes are distinguished from the relative offsets in the observed relationship: the proportionality factor increases by a factor of ≈5 between quiescent disks in spiral galaxies, and moderate to extreme star-forming environments in circumnuclear regions of spirals and in starburst systems. The transition occurs near ΣLyc ˜ 102 L⊙ pc-2 and is interpreted as due to very small dust grains starting to dominate the emission at 15 μm over aromatic species above this threshold. The 5-8.5 μm luminosity per unit projected area is also directly proportional to the Lyman continuum luminosity, with a single conversion factor from the most quiescent objects included in the sample up to ΣLyc ˜ 104 L⊙ pc-2, where the relationship then flattens. The turnover is attributed to depletion of aromatic band carriers in the harsher conditions prevailing in extreme starburst environments. The observed relationships provide empirical calibrations useful for estimating star formation rates from mid-infrared observations, much less affected by extinction than optical and near-infrared tracers in deeply embedded H II regions and obscured starbursts, as well as for theoretical predictions from evolutionary

  4. GOODS-HERSCHEL: IMPACT OF ACTIVE GALACTIC NUCLEI AND STAR FORMATION ACTIVITY ON INFRARED SPECTRAL ENERGY DISTRIBUTIONS AT HIGH REDSHIFT

    SciTech Connect

    Kirkpatrick, Allison; Pope, Alexandra; Alexander, David M.; Charmandaris, Vassilis; Daddi, Emmanuele; Elbaz, David; Gabor, Jared; Mullaney, James; Pannella, Maurilio; Aussel, Herve; Bournaud, Frederic; Dasyra, Kalliopi; Hwang, Ho Seong; Ivison, Rob; Scott, Douglas; Altieri, Bruno; Coia, Daniela; Buat, Veronique; Dannerbauer, Helmut; and others

    2012-11-10

    We explore the effects of active galactic nuclei (AGNs) and star formation activity on the infrared (0.3-1000 {mu}m) spectral energy distributions (SEDs) of luminous infrared galaxies from z = 0.5 to 4.0. We have compiled a large sample of 151 galaxies selected at 24 {mu}m (S {sub 24} {approx}> 100 {mu}Jy) in the GOODS-N and ECDFS fields for which we have deep Spitzer IRS spectroscopy, allowing us to decompose the mid-IR spectrum into contributions from star formation and AGN activity. A significant portion ({approx}25%) of our sample is dominated by an AGN (>50% of the mid-IR luminosity) in the mid-IR. Based on the mid-IR classification, we divide our full sample into four sub-samples: z {approx} 1 star-forming (SF) sources, z {approx} 2 SF sources, AGNs with clear 9.7 {mu}m silicate absorption, and AGNs with featureless mid-IR spectra. From our large spectroscopic sample and wealth of multi-wavelength data, including deep Herschel imaging at 100, 160, 250, 350, and 500 {mu}m, we use 95 galaxies with complete spectral coverage to create a composite SED for each sub-sample. We then fit a two-temperature component modified blackbody to the SEDs. We find that the IR SEDs have similar cold dust temperatures, regardless of the mid-IR power source, but display a marked difference in the warmer dust temperatures. We calculate the average effective temperature of the dust in each sub-sample and find a significant ({approx}20 K) difference between the SF and AGN systems. We compare our composite SEDs to local templates and find that local templates do not accurately reproduce the mid-IR features and dust temperatures of our high-redshift systems. High-redshift IR luminous galaxies contain significantly more cool dust than their local counterparts. We find that a full suite of photometry spanning the IR peak is necessary to accurately account for the dominant dust temperature components in high-redshift IR luminous galaxies.

  5. Effects of restricted feeding on daily fluctuations of hepatic functions including p450 monooxygenase activities in rats.

    PubMed

    Hirao, Jun; Arakawa, Shingo; Watanabe, Kyoko; Ito, Kazumi; Furukawa, Tadashi

    2006-02-10

    Hepatic P450 monooxygenase activities, assessed by measurement of 7-alkoxycoumarin O-dealkylase (ACD) activities, show obvious daily fluctuations in male rats with high values during the dark period and low values during the light period. We have already confirmed that the ACD activities are controlled by the suprachiasmatic nucleus (SCN), which is well known as the oscillator of circadian rhythm. Recently, it is reported that circadian oscillators exist not only in the SCN but also in peripheral organs. To date, it is unclear which circadian oscillators predominantly drive the daily fluctuations of hepatic ACD activities. To address this question, we examined the effects of restricted feeding, which uncouples the circadian oscillators in the liver from the central pacemaker in the SCN, on the daily fluctuations in hepatic ACD activities in male rats. Here we show that restricted feeding inverts the oscillation phase of the daily fluctuations in hepatic ACD activities. Regarding the hepatic P450 content, there were no fluctuations between the light and dark periods under ad libitum and restricted feeding conditions. Therefore, it is considered that the daily fluctuations in hepatic ACD activities are predominantly driven by the circadian factors in peripheral organs rather than by the oscillator in the SCN directly.

  6. Infection of Ustilaginoidea virens intercepts rice seed formation but activates grain‐filling‐related genes

    PubMed Central

    Fan, Jing; Guo, Xiao‐Yi; Li, Liang; Huang, Fu; Sun, Wen‐Xian; Li, Yan; Huang, Yan‐Yan; Xu, Yong‐Ju; Shi, Jun; Lei, Yang; Zheng, Ai‐Ping

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Rice false smut has become an increasingly serious disease in rice (Oryza sativa L.) production worldwide. The typical feature of this disease is that the fungal pathogen Ustilaginoidea virens (Uv) specifically infects rice flower and forms false smut ball, the ustiloxin‐containing ball‐like fungal colony, of which the size is usually several times larger than that of a mature rice seed. However, the underlying mechanisms of Uv‐rice interaction are poorly understood. Here, we applied time‐course microscopic and transcriptional approaches to investigate rice responses to Uv infection. The results demonstrated that the flower‐opening process and expression of associated transcription factors, including ARF6 and ARF8, were inhibited in Uv‐infected spikelets. The ovaries in infected spikelets were interrupted in fertilization and thus were unable to set seeds. However, a number of grain‐filling‐related genes, including seed storage protein genes, starch anabolism genes and endosperm‐specific transcription factors (RISBZ1 and RPBF), were highly transcribed as if the ovaries were fertilized. In addition, critical defense‐related genes like NPR1 and PR1 were downregulated by Uv infection. Our data imply that Uv may hijack host nutrient reservoir by activation of the grain‐filling network because of growth and formation of false smut balls. PMID:25319482

  7. Staphylokinase Control of Staphylococcus aureus Biofilm Formation and Detachment Through Host Plasminogen Activation.

    PubMed

    Kwiecinski, Jakub; Peetermans, Marijke; Liesenborghs, Laurens; Na, Manli; Björnsdottir, Halla; Zhu, Xuefeng; Jacobsson, Gunnar; Johansson, Bengt R; Geoghegan, Joan A; Foster, Timothy J; Josefsson, Elisabet; Bylund, Johan; Verhamme, Peter; Jin, Tao

    2016-01-01

    Staphylococcus aureus biofilms, a leading cause of persistent infections, are highly resistant to immune defenses and antimicrobial therapies. In the present study, we investigated the contribution of fibrin and staphylokinase (Sak) to biofilm formation. In both clinical S. aureus isolates and laboratory strains, high Sak-producing strains formed less biofilm than strains that lacked Sak, suggesting that Sak prevents biofilm formation. In addition, Sak induced detachment of mature biofilms. This effect depended on plasminogen activation by Sak. Host-derived fibrin, the main substrate cleaved by Sak-activated plasminogen, was a major component of biofilm matrix, and dissolution of this fibrin scaffold greatly increased susceptibility of biofilms to antibiotics and neutrophil phagocytosis. Sak also attenuated biofilm-associated catheter infections in mouse models. In conclusion, our results reveal a novel role for Sak-induced plasminogen activation that prevents S. aureus biofilm formation and induces detachment of existing biofilms through proteolytic cleavage of biofilm matrix components.

  8. Antiviral activity of human Vδ2 T-cells against WNV includes both cytolytic and non-cytolytic mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Agrati, Chiara; Castilletti, Concetta; Cimini, Eleonora; Romanelli, Antonella; Lapa, Daniele; Quartu, Serena; Martini, Federico; Capobianchi, Maria Rosaria

    2016-04-01

    West Nile virus (WNV) causes a severe central nervous system infection in humans, primarily in the elderly and immunocompromised subjects. Human γδ T-cells play a critical role in the immune response against viruses, and studies of WNV meningoencephalitis in laboratory mice described a role of γδ T-cells in the protective immune response. Aim of this study was to analyze the cytolytic and non-cytolytic antiviral activity of human Vδ2 T-cells against WNV replication. The anti-WNV activity of soluble factor released by zoledronic acid (ZA)-activated Vδ2 T-cell lines and the cytotoxic capability of Vδ2 T-cell lines against WNV-infected cells were tested in vitro. The activation of Vδ2 T-cell lines was able to inhibit WNV replication through the release of soluble factors. IFN-γ is massively released by activated Vδ2 T-cell lines and is involved in the anti-WNV activity. Moreover, the Vδ2 T-cell lines can efficiently kill WNV-infected cells possibly through perforin-mediated mechanism. Altogether, our results provide insight into the effector functions of human Vδ2 T-cells against WNV. The possibility to target these cells by ZA, a commercially available drug used in humans, could potentially offer a new immunotherapeutic strategy for WNV infection. PMID:27196553

  9. Active Management of Integrated Geothermal-CO2 Storage Reservoirs in Sedimentary Formations

    DOE Data Explorer

    Buscheck, Thomas A.

    2012-01-01

    Active Management of Integrated Geothermal–CO2 Storage Reservoirs in Sedimentary Formations: An Approach to Improve Energy Recovery and Mitigate Risk: FY1 Final Report The purpose of phase 1 is to determine the feasibility of integrating geologic CO2 storage (GCS) with geothermal energy production. Phase 1 includes reservoir analyses to determine injector/producer well schemes that balance the generation of economically useful flow rates at the producers with the need to manage reservoir overpressure to reduce the risks associated with overpressure, such as induced seismicity and CO2 leakage to overlying aquifers. Based on a range of well schemes, techno-economic analyses of the levelized cost of electricity (LCOE) are conducted to determine the economic benefits of integrating GCS with geothermal energy production. In addition to considering CO2 injection, reservoir analyses are conducted for nitrogen (N2) injection to investigate the potential benefits of incorporating N2 injection with integrated geothermal-GCS, as well as the use of N2 injection as a potential pressure-support and working-fluid option. Phase 1 includes preliminary environmental risk assessments of integrated geothermal-GCS, with the focus on managing reservoir overpressure. Phase 1 also includes an economic survey of pipeline costs, which will be applied in Phase 2 to the analysis of CO2 conveyance costs for techno-economics analyses of integrated geothermal-GCS reservoir sites. Phase 1 also includes a geospatial GIS survey of potential integrated geothermal-GCS reservoir sites, which will be used in Phase 2 to conduct sweet-spot analyses that determine where promising geothermal resources are co-located in sedimentary settings conducive to safe CO2 storage, as well as being in adequate proximity to large stationary CO2 sources.

  10. Role of Quorum Sensing and Antimicrobial Component Production by Serratia plymuthica in Formation of Biofilms, Including Mixed Biofilms with Escherichia coli▿

    PubMed Central

    Moons, Pieter; Van Houdt, Rob; Aertsen, Abram; Vanoirbeek, Kristof; Engelborghs, Yves; Michiels, Chris W.

    2006-01-01

    We have previously characterized the N-acyl-l-homoserine lactone-based quorum-sensing system of the biofilm isolate Serratia plymuthica RVH1. Here we investigated the role of quorum sensing and of quorum-sensing-dependent production of an antimicrobial compound (AC) on biofilm formation by RVH1 and on the cocultivation of RVH1 and Escherichia coli in planktonic cultures or in biofilms. Biofilm formation of S. plymuthica was not affected by the knockout of splI or splR, the S. plymuthica homologs of the luxI or luxR quorum-sensing gene, respectively, or by the knockout of AC production. E. coli grew well in mixed broth culture with RVH1 until the latter reached 8.5 to 9.5 log CFU/ml, after which the E. coli colony counts steeply declined. In comparison, only a very small decline occurred in cocultures with the S. plymuthica AC-deficient and splI mutants. Complementation with exogenous N-hexanoyl-l-homoserine lactone rescued the wild-type phenotype of the splI mutant. The splR knockout mutant also induced a steep decline of E. coli, consistent with its proposed function as a repressor of quorum-sensing-regulated genes. The numbers of E. coli in 3-day-old mixed biofilms followed a similar pattern, being higher with S. plymuthica deficient in SplI or AC production than with wild-type S. plymuthica, the splR mutant, or the splI mutant in the presence of N-hexanoyl-l-homoserine lactone. Confocal laser scanning microscopic analysis of mixed biofilms established with strains producing different fluorescent proteins showed that E. coli microcolonies were less developed in the presence of RVH1 than in the presence of the AC-deficient mutant. PMID:16997989

  11. Activity-dependent formation of perforated synapses in cultured hippocampal neurons.

    PubMed

    Neuhoff, H; Roeper, J; Schweizer, M

    1999-12-01

    The study investigated the formation of perforated synapses in rat hippocampal cell cultures. Perforated synapses are defined by their discontinuous postsynaptic densities (PSDs) and are believed to occur in parallel with changes in synaptic activity and possibly also synaptic efficacy. Several in vivo studies have demonstrated an increase in the frequency of perforated synapses induced by development and environmental stimulation as well as long-term potentiation (LTP). Also in in vitro brain slices, LTP was associated with an elevated number of perforated spine synapses. Our study demonstrated for the first time that the formation of perforated synapses can be induced by a short-term increase in spontaneous neural activity in a hippocampal cell culture model. Stimulation with the GABAA-antagonist picrotoxin (PTX) induced a significant increase in the percentage of perforated synapses. This strong increase was blocked when APV was added together with PTX, indicating that the formation of perforated synapses depended on the activation of NMDA receptors. We also showed that inhibition of the tissue type plasminogen activator (tPA-stop/PAI-1) significantly interfered with the activity-induced increase in perforated synapses. This implies that the proteolytic activities of tPA might be involved in steps which are downstream from the NMDA receptor-mediated synaptic plasticity leading to structural changes at synaptic contacts. In contrast, even long-term inhibition of electrical network activity by tetrodotoxin had no effect on the number of perforated synapses, but almost completely abolished the formation of spine synapses. These results indicate that a short-term increase in neural activity via NMDA receptors and a proteolytic cascade involving tPA lead to the formation of perforated synapses.

  12. The Inhibition of Macrophage Foam Cell Formation by 9-Cis β-Carotene Is Driven by BCMO1 Activity

    PubMed Central

    Zolberg Relevy, Noa; Bechor, Sapir; Harari, Ayelet; Ben-Amotz, Ami; Kamari, Yehuda; Harats, Dror; Shaish, Aviv

    2015-01-01

    Atherosclerosis is a major cause of morbidity and mortality in developed societies, and begins when activated endothelial cells recruit monocytes and T-cells from the bloodstream into the arterial wall. Macrophages that accumulate cholesterol and other fatty materials are transformed into foam cells. Several epidemiological studies have demonstrated that a diet rich in carotenoids is associated with a reduced risk of heart disease; while previous work in our laboratory has shown that the 9-cis β-carotene rich alga Dunaliella inhibits atherogenesis in mice. The effect of 9-cis β-carotene on macrophage foam cell formation has not yet been investigated. In the present work, we sought to study whether the 9-cis β-carotene isomer, isolated from the alga Dunaliella, can inhibit macrophage foam cell formation upon its conversion to retinoids. The 9-cis β-carotene and Dunaliella lipid extract inhibited foam cell formation in the RAW264.7 cell line, similar to 9-cis retinoic acid. Furthermore, dietary enrichment with the algal powder in mice resulted in carotenoid accumulation in the peritoneal macrophages and in the inhibition of foam cell formation ex-vivo and in-vivo. We also found that the β-carotene cleavage enzyme β-carotene 15,15’-monooxygenase (BCMO1) is expressed and active in macrophages. Finally, 9-cis β-carotene, as well as the Dunaliella extract, activated the nuclear receptor RXR in hepa1-6 cells. These results indicate that dietary carotenoids, such as 9-cis β-carotene, accumulate in macrophages and can be locally cleaved by endogenous BCMO1 to form 9-cis retinoic acid and other retinoids. Subsequently, these retinoids activate the nuclear receptor RXR that, along with additional nuclear receptors, can affect various metabolic pathways, including those involved in foam cell formation and atherosclerosis. PMID:25629601

  13. Communication: Activation energy of tension-induced pore formation in lipid membranes.

    PubMed

    Karal, Mohammad Abu Sayem; Yamazaki, Masahito

    2015-08-28

    Tension plays a vital role in pore formation in biomembranes, but the mechanism of pore formation remains unclear. We investigated the temperature dependence of the rate constant of constant tension (σ)-induced pore formation in giant unilamellar vesicles of lipid membranes using an experimental method we developed. By analyzing this result, we determined the activation energy (Ua) of tension-induced pore formation as a function of tension. A constant (U0) that does not depend on tension was found to contribute significantly to Ua. Analysis of the activation energy clearly indicated that the dependence of Ua on σ in the classical theory is correct, but that the classical theory of pore formation is not entirely correct due to the presence of U0. We can reasonably consider that U0 is a nucleation free energy to form a hydrophilic pre-pore from a hydrophobic pre-pore or a region with lower lateral lipid density. After obtaining U0, the evolution of a pre-pore follows a classical theory. Our data provide valuable information that help explain the mechanism of tension-induced pore formation in biomembranes and lipid membranes.

  14. A Multi-wavelength Study of Star Formation Activity in the S235 Complex

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dewangan, L. K.; Ojha, D. K.; Luna, A.; Anandarao, B. G.; Ninan, J. P.; Mallick, K. K.; Mayya, Y. D.

    2016-03-01

    We have carried out an extensive multi-wavelength study to investigate the star formation process in the S235 complex. The S235 complex has a spherelike shell appearance at wavelengths longer than 2 μm and harbors an O9.5V type star approximately at its center. A near-infrared extinction map of the complex traces eight subregions (having AV > 8 mag), and five of them appear to be distributed in an almost regularly spaced manner along the spherelike shell surrounding the ionized emission. This picture is also supported by the integrated 12CO and 13CO intensity maps and by Bolocam 1.1 mm continuum emission. The position-velocity analysis of CO reveals an almost semi-ringlike structure, suggesting an expanding H ii region. We find that the Bolocam clump masses increase as we move away from the location of the ionizing star. This correlation is seen only for those clumps that are distributed near the edges of the shell. Photometric analysis reveals 435 young stellar objects (YSOs), 59% of which are found in clusters. Six subregions (including five located near the edges of the shell) are very well correlated with the dust clumps, CO gas, and YSOs. The average values of Mach numbers derived using NH3 data for three (East 1, East 2, and Central E) out of these six subregions are 2.9, 2.3, and 2.9, indicating these subregions are supersonic. The molecular outflows are detected in these three subregions, further confirming the ongoing star formation activity. Together, all these results are interpreted as observational evidence of positive feedback of a massive star.

  15. Helicobacter pylori Resists the Antimicrobial Activity of Calprotectin via Lipid A Modification and Associated Biofilm Formation

    PubMed Central

    Gaddy, Jennifer A.; Radin, Jana N.; Cullen, Thomas W.; Chazin, Walter J.; Skaar, Eric P.; Trent, M. Stephen

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Helicobacter pylori is one of several pathogens that persist within the host despite a robust immune response. H. pylori elicits a proinflammatory response from host epithelia, resulting in the recruitment of immune cells which manifests as gastritis. Relatively little is known about how H. pylori survives antimicrobials, including calprotectin (CP), which is present during the inflammatory response. The data presented here suggest that one way H. pylori survives the nutrient sequestration by CP is through alteration of its outer membrane. CP-treated H. pylori demonstrates increased bacterial fitness in response to further coculture with CP. Moreover, CP-treated H. pylori cultures form biofilms and demonstrate decreased cell surface hydrophobicity. In response to CP, the H. pylori Lpx lipid A biosynthetic enzymes are not fully functional. The lipid A molecules observed in H. pylori cultures treated with CP indicate that the LpxF, LpxL, and LpxR enzyme functions are perturbed. Transcriptional analysis of lpxF, lpxL, and lpxR indicates that metal restriction by CP does not control this pathway through transcriptional regulation. Analyses of H. pylori lpx mutants reveal that loss of LpxF and LpxL results in increased fitness, similar to what is observed in the presence of CP; moreover, these mutants have significantly increased biofilm formation and reduced cell surface hydrophobicity. Taken together, these results demonstrate a novel mechanism of H. pylori resistance to the antimicrobial activity of CP via lipid A modification strategies and resulting biofilm formation. PMID:26646009

  16. Bromide oxidation by ferrate(VI): The formation of active bromine and bromate.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Yanjun; Goodwill, Joseph E; Tobiason, John E; Reckhow, David A

    2016-06-01

    Ferrate (VI) (abbreviated as Fe(VI)) has long been considered as a green oxidant that does not produce any known hazardous byproducts. However, this work shows that Fe(VI) can slowly oxidize bromide forming active bromine (HOBr/OBr(-)) and bromate, and in natural waters total organic bromine (TOBr) can also be detected. Results showed that the highest levels of active bromine and bromate were formed at lower pHs and in the absence of phosphate. Hydrogen peroxide, which forms from the reaction of Fe(VI) and water, plays an essential role in suppressing bromate formation by reducing active bromine back to bromide. Fe(VI) decomposition products (assumed to be particulate phase Fe(III)) can catalyze the decomposition of hydrogen peroxide by Fe(VI). Phosphate had a substantial inhibiting effect on the formation of active bromine, but less so on bromate formation. The presence of the raw water matrix in natural water suppressed bromate formation. For a natural water spiked with 0.1 mg/L of bromide, the bromate and TOBr concentrations after Fe(VI) oxidation were below 3.0 and 15 μg/L, respectively. No consistent trend regarding the effect of pH or buffer ions on TOBr formation was observed due to the competition between Fe(VI), hydrogen peroxide, and natural organic matter (NOM) for reaction with active bromine. Under environmentally relevant conditions, the formation of bromate and TOBr would not be a problem for Fe(VI) application as their concentration levels are quite low.

  17. Incorporation of RANKL promotes osteoclast formation and osteoclast activity on β-TCP ceramics.

    PubMed

    Choy, John; Albers, Christoph E; Siebenrock, Klaus A; Dolder, Silvia; Hofstetter, Wilhelm; Klenke, Frank M

    2014-12-01

    β-Tricalcium phosphate (β-TCP) ceramics are approved for the repair of osseous defects. In large defects, however, the substitution of the material by authentic bone is inadequate to provide sufficient long-term mechanical stability. We aimed to develop composites of β-TCP ceramics and receptor activator of nuclear factor κ-B ligand (RANKL) to enhance the formation of osteoclasts and promote cell mediated calcium phosphate resorption. RANKL was adsorbed superficially onto β-TCP ceramics or incorporated into a crystalline layer of calcium phosphate by the use of a co-precipitation technique. Murine osteoclast precursors were seeded onto the ceramics. After 15 days, the formation of osteoclasts was quantified cytologically and colorimetrically with tartrate-resistant acidic phosphatase (TRAP) staining and TRAP activity measurements, respectively. Additionally, the expression of transcripts encoding the osteoclast gene products cathepsin K, calcitonin receptor, and of the sodium/hydrogen exchanger NHA2 were quantified by real-time PCR. The activity of newly formed osteoclasts was evaluated by means of a calcium phosphate resorption assay. Superficially adsorbed RANKL did not induce the formation of osteoclasts on β-TCP ceramics. When co-precipitated onto β-TCP ceramics RANKL supported the formation of mature osteoclasts. The development of osteoclast lineage cells was further confirmed by the increased expression of cathepsin K, calcitonin receptor, and NHA2. Incorporated RANKL stimulated the cells to resorb crystalline calcium phosphate. Our in vitro study shows that RANKL incorporated into β-TCP ceramics induces the formation of active, resorbing osteoclasts on the material surface. Once formed, osteoclasts mediate the release of RANKL thereby perpetuating their differentiation and activation. In vivo, the stimulation of osteoclast-mediated resorption may contribute to a coordinated sequence of material resorption and bone formation. Further in vivo studies

  18. 14 CFR 440.11 - Duration of coverage for licensed launch, including suborbital launch, or permitted activities...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... LICENSING FINANCIAL RESPONSIBILITY Financial Responsibility for Licensed and Permitted Activities § 440.11...; modifications. (a) Insurance coverage required under § 440.9, or other form of financial responsibility, shall... recovery; or (ii) The FAA's determination that risk to third parties and Government property as a result...

  19. Activated Notch1 Target Genes during Embryonic Cell Differentiation Depend on the Cellular Context and Include Lineage Determinants and Inhibitors

    PubMed Central

    Meier-Stiegen, Franziska; Schwanbeck, Ralf; Bernoth, Kristina; Martini, Simone; Hieronymus, Thomas; Ruau, David; Zenke, Martin; Just, Ursula

    2010-01-01

    Background Notch receptor signaling controls developmental cell fates in a cell-context dependent manner. Although Notch signaling directly regulates transcription via the RBP-J/CSL DNA binding protein, little is known about the target genes that are directly activated by Notch in the respective tissues. Methodology/Principal Findings To analyze how Notch signaling mediates its context dependent function(s), we utilized a Tamoxifen-inducible system to activate Notch1 in murine embryonic stem cells at different stages of mesodermal differentiation and performed global transcriptional analyses. We find that the majority of genes regulated by Notch1 are unique for the cell type and vary widely dependent on other signals. We further show that Notch1 signaling regulates expression of genes playing key roles in cell differentiation, cell cycle control and apoptosis in a context dependent manner. In addition to the known Notch1 targets of the Hes and Hey families of transcriptional repressors, Notch1 activates the expression of regulatory transcription factors such as Sox9, Pax6, Runx1, Myf5 and Id proteins that are critically involved in lineage decisions in the absence of protein synthesis. Conclusion/Significance We suggest that Notch signaling determines lineage decisions and expansion of stem cells by directly activating both key lineage specific transcription factors and their repressors (Id and Hes/Hey proteins) and propose a model by which Notch signaling regulates cell fate commitment and self renewal in dependence of the intrinsic and extrinsic cellular context. PMID:20628604

  20. PREFACE: 9th International Fröhlich's Symposium: Electrodynamic Activity of Living Cells (Including Microtubule Coherent Modes and Cancer Cell Physics)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cifra, Michal; Pokorný, Jirí; Kucera, Ondrej

    2011-12-01

    This volume contains papers presented at the International Fröhlich's Symposium entitled 'Electrodynamic Activity of Living Cells' (1-3 July 2011, Prague, Czech Republic). The Symposium was the 9th meeting devoted to physical processes in living matter organized in Prague since 1987. The hypothesis of oscillation systems in living cells featured by non-linear interaction between elastic and electrical polarization fields, non-linear interactions between the system and the heat bath leading to energy downconversion along the frequency scale, energy condensation in the lowest frequency mode and creation of a coherent state was formulated by H Fröhlich, founder of the theory of dielectric materials. He assumed that biological activity is based not only on biochemical but also on biophysical mechanisms and that their disturbances form basic links along the cancer transformation pathway. Fröhlich outlined general ideas of non-linear physical processes in biological systems. The downconversion and the elastic-polarization interactions should be connected in a unified theory and the solution based on comprehensive non-linear characteristics. Biochemical and genetic research of biological systems are highly developed and have disclosed a variety of cellular and subcellular structures, chemical reactions, molecular information transfer, and genetic code sequences - including their pathological development. Nevertheless, the cancer problem is still a big challenge. Warburg's discovery of suppressed oxidative metabolism in mitochondria in cancer cells suggested the essential role of physical mechanisms (but his discovery has remained without impact on cancer research and on the study of physical properties of biological systems for a long time). Mitochondria, the power plants of the cell, have several areas of activity-oxidative energy production is connected with the formation of a strong static electric field around them, water ordering, and liberation of non

  1. Seasonal development of cambial activity in relation to xylem formation in Chinese fir.

    PubMed

    Wu, Hongyang; Xu, Huimin; Li, Hanyin; Wei, Dongmei; Lin, Jinxing; Li, Xiaojuan

    2016-05-20

    The vascular cambium is a lateral meristem which can differentiate into secondary phloem and xylem. The secondary growth of woody plants resulting from vascular cambium activity has been a focus of considerable attention, but the quantitative relationships between cambial activity and secondary xylem formation have been little studied. Our analysis of cytological changes in the cambium of Chinese fir (Cunninghamia lanceolata), revealed a significant positive correlation between vascular cambium cell numbers and cambium zone width through the seasonal cycle. Cambium cell numbers and the cambium cell radial diameter were closely related to xylem formation. Immuno-labeling showed that de-esterified homogalacturonan and (1-4)-β-d-galactan epitopes were highly abundant in cell walls of dormant-stage cambium, whereas high methylesterified homogalacturonan was strongly labeled in the active stage. Raman spectroscopy detected significant changes in the chemical composition of cell walls during the active-dormant stage transition. More pectin and less monolignols occurred in radial cell walls than in tangential walls during the dormant stage, but no significant changes were found in other stages, indicating that pectin accumulation facilitates cell wall expansion, with cambium activity transition. Our quantitative analysis of the relationship between cambial activity and xylem formation, as well as the cell wall modification during the active stage provides useful information about cambial characteristics and xylogenesis.

  2. THE FORMATION AND MAGNETIC STRUCTURES OF ACTIVE-REGION FILAMENTS OBSERVED BY NVST, SDO, AND HINODE

    SciTech Connect

    Yan, X. L.; Xue, Z. K.; Wang, J. C.; Xiang, Y. Y.; Kong, D. F.; Yang, L. H.; Pan, G. M.

    2015-08-15

    To better understand the properties of solar active-region filaments, we present a detailed study on the formation and magnetic structures of two active-region filaments in active region NOAA 11884 during a period of four days. It is found that the shearing motion of the opposite magnetic polarities and the rotation of the small sunspots with negative polarity play an important role in the formation of two active-region filaments. During the formation of these two active-region filaments, one foot of the filaments was rooted in a small sunspot with negative polarity. The small sunspot rotated not only around another small sunspot with negative polarity, but also around the center of its umbra. By analyzing the nonlinear force-free field extrapolation using the vector magnetic fields in the photosphere, twisted structures were found in the two active-region filaments prior to their eruptions. These results imply that the magnetic fields were dragged by the shearing motion between opposite magnetic polarities and became more horizontal. The sunspot rotation twisted the horizontal magnetic fields and finally formed the twisted active-region filaments.

  3. Odours stimulate neuronal activity in the dorsolateral area of the hippocampal formation during path integration.

    PubMed

    Jorge, P E; Phillips, J B; Gonçalves, A; Marques, P A M; Nĕmec, P

    2014-05-22

    The dorsolateral area of the hippocampal formation of birds is commonly assumed to play a central role in processing information needed for geographical positioning and homing. Previous work has interpreted odour-induced activity in this region as evidence for an 'olfactory map'. Here, we show, using c-Fos expression as a marker, that neuronal activation in the dorsolateral area of the hippocampal formation of pigeons is primarily a response to odour novelty, not to the spatial distribution of odour sources that would be necessary for an olfactory map. Pigeons exposed to odours had significantly more neurons activated in this area of the brain than pigeons exposed to filtered air with odours removed. This increased activity was observed only in response to unfamiliar odours. No change in activity was observed when pigeons were exposed to home odours. These findings are consistent with non-home odours activating non-olfactory components of the pigeon's navigation system. The pattern of neuronal activation in the triangular and dorsomedial areas of the hippocampal formation was, by contrast, consistent with the possibility that odours play a role in providing spatial information. PMID:24671977

  4. Odours stimulate neuronal activity in the dorsolateral area of the hippocampal formation during path integration

    PubMed Central

    Jorge, P. E.; Phillips, J. B.; Gonçalves, A.; Marques, P. A. M.; Nĕmec, P.

    2014-01-01

    The dorsolateral area of the hippocampal formation of birds is commonly assumed to play a central role in processing information needed for geographical positioning and homing. Previous work has interpreted odour-induced activity in this region as evidence for an ‘olfactory map’. Here, we show, using c-Fos expression as a marker, that neuronal activation in the dorsolateral area of the hippocampal formation of pigeons is primarily a response to odour novelty, not to the spatial distribution of odour sources that would be necessary for an olfactory map. Pigeons exposed to odours had significantly more neurons activated in this area of the brain than pigeons exposed to filtered air with odours removed. This increased activity was observed only in response to unfamiliar odours. No change in activity was observed when pigeons were exposed to home odours. These findings are consistent with non-home odours activating non-olfactory components of the pigeon's navigation system. The pattern of neuronal activation in the triangular and dorsomedial areas of the hippocampal formation was, by contrast, consistent with the possibility that odours play a role in providing spatial information. PMID:24671977

  5. Influence of roasting on the antioxidant activity and HMF formation of a cocoa bean model systems.

    PubMed

    Oliviero, Teresa; Capuano, Edoardo; Cämmerer, Bettina; Fogliano, Vincenzo

    2009-01-14

    During the roasting of cocoa beans chemical reactions lead to the formation of Maillard reaction (MR) products and to the degradation of catechin-containing compounds, which are very abundant in these seeds. To study the modifications occurring during thermal treatment of fat and antioxidant rich foods, such as cocoa, a dry model system was set up and roasted at 180 degrees C for different times. The role played in the formation of MR products and in the antioxidant activity of the system by proteins, catechin, and cocoa butter was investigated by varying the model system formulation. Results showed that the antioxidant activity decreased during roasting, paralleling catechin concentration, thus suggesting that this compound is mainly responsible for the antioxidant activity of roasted cocoa beans. Model system browning was significantly higher in the presence of catechin, which contributed to the formation of water-insoluble melanoidins, which are mainly responsible for browning. HMF concentration was higher in casein-containing systems, and its formation was strongly inhibited in the presence of catechin. No effects related to the degree of lipid oxidation could be observed. Data from model systems obtained by replacing fat with water showed a much lower rate of MR development and catechin degradation but the same inhibitory effect of catechin on HMF formation. PMID:19086900

  6. 7-hydroxycalamenene Effects on Secreted Aspartic Proteases Activity and Biofilm Formation of Candida spp.

    PubMed Central

    Azevedo, Mariana M. B.; Almeida, Catia A.; Chaves, Francisco C. M.; Rodrigues, Igor A.; Bizzo, Humberto R.; Alviano, Celuta S.; Alviano, Daniela S.

    2016-01-01

    Background: The 7-hydroxycalamenenene-rich essential oil (EO) obtained from the leaves of Croton cajucara (red morphotype) have been described as active against bacteria, protozoa, and fungi species. In this work, we aimed to evaluate the effectiveness of 7-hydroxycalamenenene against Candida albicans and nonalbicans species. Materials and Methods: C. cajucara EO was obtained by hydrodistillation and its major compound, 7-hydroxycalamenene, was purified using preparative column chromatography. The anti-candidal activity was investigated by minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) and secreted aspartic proteases (SAP) and biofilm inhibition assays. Results: 7-hydroxycalamenene (98% purity) displayed anti-candidal activity against all Candida species tested. Higher activity was observed against Candida dubliniensis, Candida parapsilosis and Candida albicans, showing MIC values ranging from 39.06 μg/ml to 78.12 μg/ml. The purified 7-hydroxycalamenene was able to inhibit 58% of C. albicans ATCC 36801 SAP activity at MIC concentration (pH 7.0). However, 7-hydroxycalamenene demonstrated poor inhibitory activity on C. albicans ATCC 10231 biofilm formation even at the highest concentration tested (2500 μg/ml). Conclusion: The bioactive potential of 7-hydroxycalamenene against planktonic Candida spp. further supports its use for the development of antimicrobials with anti-candidal activity. SUMMARY Croton cajucara Benth. essential oil provides high amounts of 7-hydroxycalamenene7-Hydroxycalameneneisolated from C. cajucarais active against Candida spp7-Hydroxycalameneneinhibits C. albicans aspartic protease activity7-Hydroxycalamenene was not active against C. albicans biofilm formation. Figure PMID:27019560

  7. Comparative genomics analyses on EPS biosynthesis genes required for floc formation of Zoogloea resiniphila and other activated sludge bacteria.

    PubMed

    An, Weixing; Guo, Feng; Song, Yulong; Gao, Na; Bai, Shijie; Dai, Jingcheng; Wei, Hehong; Zhang, Liping; Yu, Dianzhen; Xia, Ming; Yu, Ying; Qi, Ming; Tian, Chunyuan; Chen, Haofeng; Wu, Zhenbin; Zhang, Tong; Qiu, Dongru

    2016-10-01

    Activated sludge (AS) process has been widely utilized for municipal sewage and industrial wastewater treatment. Zoolgoea and its related floc-forming bacteria are required for formation of AS flocs which is the key to gravitational effluent-and-sludge separation and AS recycling. However, little is known about the genetics, biochemistry and physiology of Zoogloea and its related bacteria. This report deals with the comparative genomic analyses on two Zoogloea resiniphila draft genomes and the closely related proteobacterial species commonly found in AS. In particular, the metabolic processes involved in removal of organic matters, nitrogen and phosphorus were analyzed. Furthermore, it is revealed that a large gene cluster, encoding eight glycosyltransferases and other proteins involved in biosynthesis and export of extracellular polysaccharides (EPS), was required for floc formation. One of the two asparagine synthase paralogues, associated with this EPS biosynthesis gene cluster, was required for floc formation in Zoogloea. Similar EPS biosynthesis gene cluster(s) were identified in the genome of other AS proteobacteria including polyphosphate-accumulating Candidatus Accumulibacter phosphatis (CAP) and nitrifying Nitrosopira and Nitrosomonas bacteria, but the gene composition varies interspecifically and intraspecifically. Our results indicate that floc formation of desired AS bacteria, including CAP strains, facilitate their recruitment into AS and gradual enrichment via repeated AS settling and recycling processes. PMID:27403872

  8. Pattern formation in chemically interacting active rotors with self-propulsion.

    PubMed

    Liebchen, Benno; Cates, Michael E; Marenduzzo, Davide

    2016-09-21

    We demonstrate that active rotations in chemically signalling particles, such as autochemotactic E. coli close to walls, create a route for pattern formation based on a nonlinear yet deterministic instability mechanism. For slow rotations, we find a transient persistence of the uniform state, followed by a sudden formation of clusters contingent on locking of the average propulsion direction by chemotaxis. These clusters coarsen, which results in phase separation into a dense and a dilute region. Faster rotations arrest phase separation leading to a global travelling wave of rotors with synchronized roto-translational motion. Our results elucidate the physics resulting from the competition of two generic paradigms in active matter, chemotaxis and active rotations, and show that the latter provides a tool to design programmable self-assembly of active matter, for example to control coarsening.

  9. Pattern formation in chemically interacting active rotors with self-propulsion.

    PubMed

    Liebchen, Benno; Cates, Michael E; Marenduzzo, Davide

    2016-09-21

    We demonstrate that active rotations in chemically signalling particles, such as autochemotactic E. coli close to walls, create a route for pattern formation based on a nonlinear yet deterministic instability mechanism. For slow rotations, we find a transient persistence of the uniform state, followed by a sudden formation of clusters contingent on locking of the average propulsion direction by chemotaxis. These clusters coarsen, which results in phase separation into a dense and a dilute region. Faster rotations arrest phase separation leading to a global travelling wave of rotors with synchronized roto-translational motion. Our results elucidate the physics resulting from the competition of two generic paradigms in active matter, chemotaxis and active rotations, and show that the latter provides a tool to design programmable self-assembly of active matter, for example to control coarsening. PMID:27526180

  10. UV-photodegradation of desipramine: Impact of concentration, pH and temperature on formation of products including their biodegradability and toxicity.

    PubMed

    Khaleel, Nareman D H; Mahmoud, Waleed M M; Olsson, Oliver; Kümmerer, Klaus

    2016-10-01

    Desipramine (DMI) is a widely used tricyclic antidepressant, and it is the major metabolite of imipramine (IMI) and lofepramine (LMI); IMI and LMI are two of the most commonly used tricyclic antidepressants. If DMI enters the aquatic environment, it can be transformed by the environmental bacteria or UV radiation. Therefore, photolysis of DMI in water was performed using a simulated sunlight Xenon-lamp and a UV-lamp. Subsequently, the biodegradability of DMI and its photo-transformation products (PTPs) formed during its UV photolysis was studied. The influence of variable conditions, such as initial DMI concentration, solution pH, and temperature, on DMI UV photolysis behavior was also studied. The degree of mineralization of DMI and its PTPs was monitored. A Shimadzu HPLC-UV apparatus was used to follow the kinetic profile of DMI during UV-irradiation; after that, ion-trap and high-resolution mass spectrometry coupled with chromatography were used to monitor and identify the possible PTPs. The environmentally relevant properties and selected toxicity properties of DMI and the non-biodegradable PTPs were predicted using different QSAR models. DMI underwent UV photolysis with first-order kinetics. Quantum yields were very low. DOC values indicated that DMI formed new PTPs and was not completely mineralized. Analysis by means of high-resolution mass spectrometry revealed that the photolysis of DMI followed three main photolysis pathways: isomerization, hydroxylation, and ring opening. The photolysis rate was inversely proportional to initial DMI concentration. The pH showed a significant impact on the photolysis rate of DMI, and on the PTPs in terms of both formation kinetics and mechanisms. Although temperature was expected to increase the photolysis rate, it showed a non-significant impact in this study. Results from biodegradation tests and QSAR analysis revealed that DMI and its PTPs are not readily biodegradable and that some PTPs may be human and/or eco

  11. Loss of Drosophila Vps16A enhances autophagosome formation through reduced Tor activity

    PubMed Central

    Takáts, Szabolcs; Varga, Ágnes; Pircs, Karolina; Juhász, Gábor

    2015-01-01

    The HOPS tethering complex facilitates autophagosome-lysosome fusion by binding to Syx17 (Syntaxin 17), the autophagosomal SNARE. Here we show that loss of the core HOPS complex subunit Vps16A enhances autophagosome formation and slows down Drosophila development. Mechanistically, Tor kinase is less active in Vps16A mutants likely due to impaired endocytic and biosynthetic transport to the lysosome, a site of its activation. Tor reactivation by overexpression of Rheb suppresses autophagosome formation and restores growth and developmental timing in these animals. Thus, Vps16A reduces autophagosome numbers both by indirectly restricting their formation rate and by directly promoting their clearance. In contrast, the loss of Syx17 blocks autophagic flux without affecting the induction step in Drosophila. PMID:26061715

  12. Weight management including dietary and physical activity advice provided by Australian physiotherapists: a pilot cross-sectional survey.

    PubMed

    Snodgrass, Suzanne J; Carter, Amy E; Guest, Maya; Collins, Clare E; James, Carole; Kable, Ashley K; Ashby, Samantha E; Plotnikoff, Ronald C

    2014-08-01

    Physiotherapists may have an impact on obesity prevention and treatment by providing nutrition and physical activity advice to overweight or obese clients; yet little is known about physiotherapists' beliefs and practices related to client weight management. The aim of this pilot study was to determine the practices, beliefs, attitudes and knowledge of physiotherapists regarding the provision of weight management advice to overweight or obese clients. Physiotherapists (n = 65) working in multiple practice settings completed a self-administered questionnaire. Logistic regression determined factors associated with the provision of dietary and physical activity advice for weight management. The majority of physiotherapists (n = 53 [81.5%]) believed providing weight management advice was within their scope of practice, yet only a minority had received training during their professional entry level education (n = 13 [20%]) or through professional development (n = 7 [11%]). Most physiotherapists (n = 55 [84.6%]) provided physical activity advice for weight management, but a minority (n = 27 [41.5%]) provided dietary advice. Having received training in weight management during their professional entry level education was associated with providing dietary advice (Odds ratio 8.8, 95% confidence interval 2.0-38.9, p = 0.004). Training in weight management may increase the likelihood of physiotherapists providing dietary advice, improving physiotherapists' management of obesity.

  13. The MRX Complex Ensures NHEJ Fidelity through Multiple Pathways Including Xrs2-FHA–Dependent Tel1 Activation

    PubMed Central

    Iwasaki, Daichi; Hayashihara, Kayoko; Shima, Hiroki; Higashide, Mika; Terasawa, Masahiro; Gasser, Susan M.; Shinohara, Miki

    2016-01-01

    Because DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs) are one of the most cytotoxic DNA lesions and often cause genomic instability, precise repair of DSBs is vital for the maintenance of genomic stability. Xrs2/Nbs1 is a multi-functional regulatory subunit of the Mre11-Rad50-Xrs2/Nbs1 (MRX/N) complex, and its function is critical for the primary step of DSB repair, whether by homologous recombination (HR) or non-homologous end joining. In human NBS1, mutations result truncation of the N-terminus region, which contains a forkhead-associated (FHA) domain, cause Nijmegen breakage syndrome. Here we show that the Xrs2 FHA domain of budding yeast is required both to suppress the imprecise repair of DSBs and to promote the robust activation of Tel1 in the DNA damage response pathway. The role of the Xrs2 FHA domain in Tel1 activation was independent of the Tel1-binding activity of the Xrs2 C terminus, which mediates Tel1 recruitment to DSB ends. Both the Xrs2 FHA domain and Tel1 were required for the timely removal of the Ku complex from DSB ends, which correlates with a reduced frequency of imprecise end-joining. Thus, the Xrs2 FHA domain and Tel1 kinase work in a coordinated manner to maintain DSB repair fidelity. PMID:26990569

  14. The IKAROS Interaction with a Complex Including Chromatin Remodeling and Transcription Elongation Activities Is Required for Hematopoiesis

    PubMed Central

    Bottardi, Stefania; Mavoungou, Lionel; Pak, Helen; Daou, Salima; Bourgoin, Vincent; Lakehal, Yahia A.; Affar, El Bachir; Milot, Eric

    2014-01-01

    IKAROS is a critical regulator of hematopoietic cell fate and its dynamic expression pattern is required for proper hematopoiesis. In collaboration with the Nucleosome Remodeling and Deacetylase (NuRD) complex, it promotes gene repression and activation. It remains to be clarified how IKAROS can support transcription activation while being associated with the HDAC-containing complex NuRD. IKAROS also binds to the Positive-Transcription Elongation Factor b (P-TEFb) at gene promoters. Here, we demonstrate that NuRD and P-TEFb are assembled in a complex that can be recruited to specific genes by IKAROS. The expression level of IKAROS influences the recruitment of the NuRD-P-TEFb complex to gene regulatory regions and facilitates transcription elongation by transferring the Protein Phosphatase 1α (PP1α), an IKAROS-binding protein and P-TEFb activator, to CDK9. We show that an IKAROS mutant that is unable to bind PP1α cannot sustain gene expression and impedes normal differentiation of IkNULL hematopoietic progenitors. Finally, the knock-down of the NuRD subunit Mi2 reveals that the occupancy of the NuRD complex at transcribed regions of genes favors the relief of POL II promoter-proximal pausing and thereby, promotes transcription elongation. PMID:25474253

  15. Simultaneous BVI noise and vibration reduction in rotorcraft using actively-controlled flaps and including performance considerations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Patt, Daniel A.

    This work presents the development and application of an active control approach for reduction of both vibration and noise induced by helicopter rotor blade vortex interaction (BVI). Control is implemented through single or dual actively controlled flaps (ACFs) on each blade. Low-speed helicopter flight is prone to severe BVI, resulting in elevated vibration and noise levels. Existing research has suggested that when some form of active control is used to reduce vibration, noise will increase and vice versa. The present research achieves simultaneous reduction of noise and vibration, and also investigates the physical sources of the observed reduction. The initial portion of this work focused on developing a tool for simulating helicopter noise and vibrations in the BVI flight regime. A method for predicting compressible unsteady blade surface pressure distribution on rotor blades was developed and combined with an enhanced free-wake model and an acoustic prediction tool with provisions for blade flexibility. These elements were incorporated within an aeroelastic analysis featuring fully coupled flap-lag-torsional blade dynamics. Subsequently, control algorithms were developed that were effective for reducing noise and vibration even in the nonlinear BVI flight regime; saturation limits were incorporated constraining flap deflections to specified limits. The resulting simulation was also validated with a wide range of experimental data, achieving excellent correlation. Finally, a number of active control studies were performed. Multi-component vibration reductions of 40--80% could be achieved, while incurring a small noise penalty. Noise was reduced using an onboard feedback microphone; reductions of 4--10 dB on the advancing side were observed on a plane beneath the rotor when using dual flaps. Finally, simultaneous noise and vibration reduction was studied. A reduction of about 5 dB in noise on the advancing side combined with a 60% reduction in vibration was

  16. [The role of toxininduced autoimmune activity in formation of the endotoxemia during the lead exposure].

    PubMed

    Karlova, E A; Sheĭman, B S; Iavorovskiĭ, O P

    2014-01-01

    Here presented the features of formation of endotoxemia at microsaturnism. Here are the results of the retrospective study of toxininduced autoimmune activity and their role in toxemia depending on the degree of exposure of lead. Investigated the mechanisms of production of toxins and damaging potentials activity, molecular size toxins and parameters of their distribution and accumulation in the blood stream, due to the strength of toxinbearing fractions depending on the degree of microsaturnism.

  17. 76 FR 31927 - Agency Information Collection Activities: Proposed Collection; Comment Request-Formative Research...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-06-02

    ...; ] DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE Food and Nutrition Service Agency Information Collection Activities: Proposed Collection; Comment Request--Formative Research for the Pilot of a Garden-Related Nutrition Curriculum AGENCY: Food and Nutrition Service, Department of Agriculture. ACTION: Notice. SUMMARY: In accordance with...

  18. Are passive red spirals truly passive?. The current star formation activity of optically red disc galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cortese, L.

    2012-07-01

    We used GALEX ultraviolet and WISE 22 μm observations to investigate the current star formation activity of the optically red spirals recently identified as part of the Galaxy Zoo project. These galaxies were accurately selected from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey as pure discs with low or no current star formation activity, representing one of the best optically selected samples of candidate passive spirals. However, we show that these galaxies are not only still forming stars at a significant rate (≳1 M⊙ yr-1) but, more importantly, their star formation activity is not different from that of normal star-forming discs of the same stellar mass (M∗ ≳ 1010.2 M⊙). Indeed, these systems lie on the UV-optical blue sequence, even without any corrections for internal dust attenuation, and they follow the same specific star formation rate vs. stellar mass relation of star-forming galaxies. Our findings clearly show that at high stellar masses, optical colours do not allow to distinguish between actively star-forming and truly quiescent systems.

  19. Activation of Midbrain Structures by Associative Novelty and the Formation of Explicit Memory in Humans

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schott, Bjorn H.; Sellner, Daniela B.; Lauer, Corinna-J.; Habib, Reza; Frey, Julietta U.; Guderian, Sebastian; Heinze, Hans-Jochen; Duzel, Emrah

    2004-01-01

    Recent evidence suggests a close functional relationship between memory formation in the hippocampus and dopaminergic neuromodulation originating in the ventral tegmental area and medial substantia nigra of the midbrain. Here we report midbrain activation in two functional MRI studies of visual memory in healthy young adults. In the first study,…

  20. Maturation of suprathreshold auditory nerve activity involves cochlear CGRP-receptor complex formation.

    PubMed

    Dickerson, Ian M; Bussey-Gaborski, Rhiannon; Holt, Joseph C; Jordan, Paivi M; Luebke, Anne E

    2016-07-01

    In adult animals, the neuropeptide calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP) is contained in cochlear efferent fibers projecting out to the cochlea, and contributes to increased suprathreshold sound-evoked activity in the adult auditory nerve. Similarly, CGRP applied to the lateral-line organ (hair cell organ) increases afferent nerve activity in adult frogs (post-metamorphic day 30), yet this increase is developmentally delayed from post-metamorphic day 4-30. In this study, we discovered that there was also a developmental delay in increased suprathreshold sound-evoked activity auditory nerve between juvenile and adult mice similar to what had been observed previously in frog. Moreover, juvenile mice with a targeted deletion of the αCGRP gene [CGRP null (-/-)] did not show a similar developmental increase in nerve activity, suggesting CGRP signaling is involved. This developmental delay is not due to a delay in CGRP expression, but instead is due to a delay in receptor formation. We observed that the increase in sound-evoked nerve activity is correlated with increased formation of cochlear CGRP receptors, which require three complexed proteins (CLR, RAMP1, RCP) to be functional. CGRP receptor formation in the cochlea was incomplete at 1 month of age (juvenile), but complete by 3 months (adult), which corresponded to the onset of suprathreshold enhancement of sound-evoked activity in wild-type animals. Taken together, these data support a model for cochlear function that is enhanced by maturation of CGRP receptor complexes. PMID:27440744

  1. Interplay of magnetic interactions and active movements in the formation of magnetosome chains.

    PubMed

    Klumpp, Stefan; Faivre, Damien

    2012-01-01

    Magnetotactic bacteria assemble chains of magnetosomes, organelles that contain magnetic nano-crystals. A number of genetic factors involved in the controlled biomineralization of these crystals and the assembly of magnetosome chains have been identified in recent years, but how the specific biological regulation is coordinated with general physical processes such as diffusion and magnetic interactions remains unresolved. Here, these questions are addressed by simulations of different scenarios for magnetosome chain formation, in which various physical processes and interactions are either switched on or off. The simulation results indicate that purely physical processes of magnetosome diffusion, guided by their magnetic interactions, are not sufficient for the robust chain formation observed experimentally and suggest that biologically encoded active movements of magnetosomes may be required. Not surprisingly, the chain pattern is most resembling experimental results when both magnetic interactions and active movement are coordinated. We estimate that the force such active transport has to generate is compatible with forces generated by the polymerization or depolymerization of cytoskeletal filaments. The simulations suggest that the pleiotropic phenotypes of mamK deletion strains may be due to a defect in active motility of magnetosomes and that crystal formation in magneteosome vesicles is coupled to the activation of their active motility in M. gryphiswaldense, but not in M. magneticum.

  2. Learning improvement after PI3K activation correlates with de novo formation of functional small spines

    PubMed Central

    Enriquez-Barreto, Lilian; Cuesto, Germán; Dominguez-Iturza, Nuria; Gavilán, Elena; Ruano, Diego; Sandi, Carmen; Fernández-Ruiz, Antonio; Martín-Vázquez, Gonzalo; Herreras, Oscar; Morales, Miguel

    2014-01-01

    PI3K activation promotes the formation of synaptic contacts and dendritic spines, morphological features of glutamatergic synapses that are commonly known to be related to learning processes. In this report, we show that in vivo administration of a peptide that activates the PI3K signaling pathway increases spine density in the rat hippocampus and enhances the animals’ cognitive abilities, while in vivo electrophysiological recordings show that PI3K activation results in synaptic enhancement of Schaffer and stratum lacunosum moleculare inputs. Morphological characterization of the spines reveals that subjecting the animals to contextual fear-conditioning training per se promotes the formation of large spines, while PI3K activation reverts this effect and favors a general change toward small head areas. Studies using hippocampal neuronal cultures show that the PI3K spinogenic process is NMDA-dependent and activity-independent. In culture, PI3K activation was followed by mRNA upregulation of glutamate receptor subunits and of the immediate-early gene Arc. Time-lapse studies confirmed the ability of PI3K to induce the formation of small spines. Finally, we demonstrate that the spinogenic effect of PI3K can be induced in the presence of neurodegeneration, such as in the Tg2576 Alzheimer’s mouse model. These findings highlight that the PI3K pathway is an important regulator of neuronal connectivity and stress the relationship between spine size and learning processes. PMID:24427113

  3. UV-photodegradation of desipramine: Impact of concentration, pH and temperature on formation of products including their biodegradability and toxicity.

    PubMed

    Khaleel, Nareman D H; Mahmoud, Waleed M M; Olsson, Oliver; Kümmerer, Klaus

    2016-10-01

    Desipramine (DMI) is a widely used tricyclic antidepressant, and it is the major metabolite of imipramine (IMI) and lofepramine (LMI); IMI and LMI are two of the most commonly used tricyclic antidepressants. If DMI enters the aquatic environment, it can be transformed by the environmental bacteria or UV radiation. Therefore, photolysis of DMI in water was performed using a simulated sunlight Xenon-lamp and a UV-lamp. Subsequently, the biodegradability of DMI and its photo-transformation products (PTPs) formed during its UV photolysis was studied. The influence of variable conditions, such as initial DMI concentration, solution pH, and temperature, on DMI UV photolysis behavior was also studied. The degree of mineralization of DMI and its PTPs was monitored. A Shimadzu HPLC-UV apparatus was used to follow the kinetic profile of DMI during UV-irradiation; after that, ion-trap and high-resolution mass spectrometry coupled with chromatography were used to monitor and identify the possible PTPs. The environmentally relevant properties and selected toxicity properties of DMI and the non-biodegradable PTPs were predicted using different QSAR models. DMI underwent UV photolysis with first-order kinetics. Quantum yields were very low. DOC values indicated that DMI formed new PTPs and was not completely mineralized. Analysis by means of high-resolution mass spectrometry revealed that the photolysis of DMI followed three main photolysis pathways: isomerization, hydroxylation, and ring opening. The photolysis rate was inversely proportional to initial DMI concentration. The pH showed a significant impact on the photolysis rate of DMI, and on the PTPs in terms of both formation kinetics and mechanisms. Although temperature was expected to increase the photolysis rate, it showed a non-significant impact in this study. Results from biodegradation tests and QSAR analysis revealed that DMI and its PTPs are not readily biodegradable and that some PTPs may be human and/or eco

  4. Star formation and accretion in the circumnuclear disks of active galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wutschik, Stephanie; Schleicher, Dominik R. G.; Palmer, Thomas S.

    2013-12-01

    Aims: We explore the evolution of supermassive black holes (SMBH) centered in a circumnuclear disk (CND) as a function of the mass supply from the host galaxy and considering different star formation laws, which may give rise to a self-regulation via the injection of supernova-driven turbulence. Methods: A system of equations describing star formation, black hole accretion and angular momentum transport in the disk was solved self-consistently for an axisymmetric disk in which the gravitational potential includes contributions from the black hole, the disk and the hosting galaxy. Our model extends the framework provided by Kawakatu & Wada (2008, ApJ, 681, 73), by separately considering the inner and outer part of the disk, and by introducing a potentially non-linear dependence of the star formation rate on the gas surface density and the turbulent velocity. The star formation recipes are calibrated using observational data for NGC 1097, while the accretion model is based on turbulent viscosity as a source of angular momentum transport in a thin viscous accretion disk. Results: We find that current data provide no strong constraint on the star formation recipe, and can in particular not distinguish between models entirely regulated by the surface density, and models including a dependence on the turbulent velocity. The evolution of the black hole mass, on the other hand, strongly depends on the applied star formation law, as well as the mass supply from the host galaxy. We suggest to explore the star formation process in local AGN with high-resolution ALMA observations to break the degeneracy between different star formation models.

  5. Active Management of Integrated Geothermal-CO2 Storage Reservoirs in Sedimentary Formations

    DOE Data Explorer

    Buscheck, Thomas A.

    2012-01-01

    Active Management of Integrated Geothermal–CO2 Storage Reservoirs in Sedimentary Formations: An Approach to Improve Energy Recovery and Mitigate Risk : FY1 Final Report The purpose of phase 1 is to determine the feasibility of integrating geologic CO2 storage (GCS) with geothermal energy production. Phase 1 includes reservoir analyses to determine injector/producer well schemes that balance the generation of economically useful flow rates at the producers with the need to manage reservoir overpressure to reduce the risks associated with overpressure, such as induced seismicity and CO2 leakage to overlying aquifers. This submittal contains input and output files of the reservoir model analyses. A reservoir-model "index-html" file was sent in a previous submittal to organize the reservoir-model input and output files according to sections of the FY1 Final Report to which they pertain. The recipient should save the file: Reservoir-models-inputs-outputs-index.html in the same directory that the files: Section2.1.*.tar.gz files are saved in.

  6. Active Management of Integrated Geothermal-CO2 Storage Reservoirs in Sedimentary Formations

    DOE Data Explorer

    Buscheck, Thomas A.

    2000-01-01

    Active Management of Integrated Geothermal–CO2 Storage Reservoirs in Sedimentary Formations: An Approach to Improve Energy Recovery and Mitigate Risk: FY1 Final Report The purpose of phase 1 is to determine the feasibility of integrating geologic CO2 storage (GCS) with geothermal energy production. Phase 1 includes reservoir analyses to determine injector/producer well schemes that balance the generation of economically useful flow rates at the producers with the need to manage reservoir overpressure to reduce the risks associated with overpressure, such as induced seismicity and CO2 leakage to overlying aquifers. This submittal contains input and output files of the reservoir model analyses. A reservoir-model "index-html" file was sent in a previous submittal to organize the reservoir-model input and output files according to sections of the FY1 Final Report to which they pertain. The recipient should save the file: Reservoir-models-inputs-outputs-index.html in the same directory that the files: Section2.1.*.tar.gz files are saved in.

  7. The Influence of Organized Physical Activity (including Gymnastics) on Young Adult Skeletal Traits: Is Maturity Phase Important?

    PubMed Central

    Bernardoni, Brittney; Scerpella, Tamara A.; Rosenbaum, Paula F.; Kanaley, Jill A.; Raab, Lindsay N.; Li, Quefeng; Wang, Sijian; Dowthwaite, Jodi N.

    2015-01-01

    We prospectively evaluated adolescent organized physical activity (PA) as a factor in adult female bone traits. Annual DXA scans accompanied semi-annual records of anthropometry, maturity and PA for 42 participants in this preliminary analysis (criteria: appropriately timed DXA scans at ~1 year pre-menarche [predictor] and ~5 years post-menarche [dependent variable]). Regression analysis evaluated total adolescent inter-scan PA and PA over 3 maturity sub-phases as predictors of young adult bone outcomes: 1) bone mineral content (BMC), geometry and strength indices at non-dominant distal radius and femoral neck; 2) sub-head BMC; 3) lumbar spine BMC. Analyses accounted for baseline gynecological age (years pre- or post-menarche), baseline bone status, adult body size and inter-scan body size change. Gymnastics training was evaluated as a potentially independent predictor, but did not improve models for any outcomes (p<0.07). Pre-menarcheal bone traits were strong predictors of most adult outcomes (semi-partial r2 = 0.21-0.59, p≤0.001). Adult 1/3 radius and sub-head BMC were predicted by both total PA and PA 1-3 years post-menarche (p<0.03). PA 3-5 years post-menarche predicted femoral narrow neck width, endosteal diameter and buckling ratio (p<0.05). Thus, participation in organized physical activity programs throughout middle and high school may reduce lifetime fracture risk in females. PMID:25386845

  8. The Influence of Organized Physical Activity (Including Gymnastics) on Young Adult Skeletal Traits: Is Maturity Phase Important?

    PubMed

    Bernardoni, Brittney; Scerpella, Tamara A; Rosenbaum, Paula F; Kanaley, Jill A; Raab, Lindsay N; Li, Quefeng; Wang, Sijian; Dowthwaite, Jodi N

    2015-05-01

    We prospectively evaluated adolescent organized physical activity (PA) as a factor in adult female bone traits. Annual DXA scans accompanied semiannual records of anthropometry, maturity, and PA for 42 participants in this preliminary analysis (criteria: appropriately timed DXA scans at ~1 year premenarche [predictor] and ~5 years postmenarche [dependent variable]). Regression analysis evaluated total adolescent interscan PA and PA over 3 maturity subphases as predictors of young adult bone outcomes: 1) bone mineral content (BMC), geometry, and strength indices at nondominant distal radius and femoral neck; 2) subhead BMC; 3) lumbar spine BMC. Analyses accounted for baseline gynecological age (years pre- or postmenarche), baseline bone status, adult body size and interscan body size change. Gymnastics training was evaluated as a potentially independent predictor, but did not improve models for any outcomes (p > .07). Premenarcheal bone traits were strong predictors of most adult outcomes (semipartial r2 = .21-0.59, p ≤ .001). Adult 1/3 radius and subhead BMC were predicted by both total PA and PA 1-3 years postmenarche (p < .03). PA 3-5 years postmenarche predicted femoral narrow neck width, endosteal diameter, and buckling ratio (p < .05). Thus, participation in organized physical activity programs throughout middle and high school may reduce lifetime fracture risk in females. PMID:25386845

  9. Myristoleic acid inhibits osteoclast formation and bone resorption by suppressing the RANKL activation of Src and Pyk2.

    PubMed

    Kwon, Jun-Oh; Jin, Won Jong; Kim, Bongjun; Kim, Hong-Hee; Lee, Zang Hee

    2015-12-01

    Cytoskeletal changes in osteoclasts such as formation of actin ring is required for bone-resorbing activity. The tyrosine kinase Src is a key player in massive cytoskeletal change of osteoclasts, thereby in bone destruction. In order for Src to be activated, trafficking to the inner plasma membrane via myristoylation is of importance. A previous study reported that myristoleic acid derived from myristic acid, inhibited N-myristoyl-transferase, an essential enzyme for myristoylation process. This prompted us to investigate whether myristoleic acid could affect osteoclastogenesis. Indeed, we observed that myristoleic acid inhibited RANKL-induced osteoclast formation in vitro, especially, at later stages of differentiation. Myristoleic acid attenuated the tyrosine phosphorylation of c-Src and Pyk2, which associates with Src, by RANKL. When myristoleic acid was co-administered with soluble RANKL into mice, RANKL-induced bone loss was substantially prevented. Bone dissection clearly revealed that the number of multinucleated osteoclasts was significantly diminished by myristoleic acid. On the other hand, myristoleic acid treatment had little or no influence on early osteoclast differentiation markers, such as c-Fos and NFATc1, and proteins related to cytoskeletal rearrangement, including DC-STAMP, integrin αv and integrin β3 in vitro. Taken together, our data suggest that myristoleic acid is capable of blocking the formation of large multinucleated osteoclasts and bone resorption likely through suppressing activation of Src and Pyk2.

  10. Prostaglandin E{sub 2} regulates melanocyte dendrite formation through activation of PKC{zeta}

    SciTech Connect

    Scott, Glynis Fricke, Alex; Fender, Anne; McClelland, Lindy; Jacobs, Stacey

    2007-11-01

    Prostaglandins are lipid signaling intermediates released by keratinocytes in response to ultraviolet irradiation (UVR) in the skin. The main prostaglandin released following UVR is PGE{sub 2}, a ligand for 4 related G-protein-coupled receptors (EP{sub 1}, EP{sub 2}, EP{sub 3} and EP{sub 4}). Our previous work established that PGE{sub 2} stimulates melanocyte dendrite formation through activation of the EP{sub 1} and EP{sub 3} receptors. The purpose of the present report is to define the signaling intermediates involved in EP{sub 1}- and EP{sub 3}-dependent dendrite formation in human melanocytes. We recently showed that activation of the atypical PKC{zeta} isoform stimulates melanocyte dendricity in response to treatment with lysophosphatidylcholine. We therefore examined the potential contribution of PKC{zeta} activation on EP{sub 1}- and EP{sub 3}-dependent dendrite formation in melanocytes. Stimulation of the EP{sub 1} and EP{sub 3} receptors by selective agonists activated PKC{zeta}, and inhibition of PKC{zeta} activation abrogated EP{sub 1}- and EP{sub 3}-receptor-mediated melanocyte dendricity. Because of the importance of Rho-GTP binding proteins in the regulation of melanocyte dendricity, we also examined the effect of EP{sub 1} and EP{sub 3} receptor activation on Rac and Rho activity. Neither Rac nor Rho was activated upon treatment with EP{sub 1,3}-receptor agonists. We show that melanocytes express only the EP{sub 3A1} isoform, but not the EP{sub 3B} receptor isoform, previously associated with Rho activation, consistent with a lack of Rho stimulation by EP{sub 3} agonists. Our data suggest that PKC{zeta} activation plays a predominant role in regulation of PGE{sub 2}-dependent melanocyte dendricity.

  11. New Pyrrole Derivatives with Potent Tubulin Polymerization Inhibiting Activity As Anticancer Agents Including Hedgehog-Dependent Cancer

    PubMed Central

    La Regina, Giuseppe; Bai, Ruoli; Coluccia, Antonio; Famiglini, Valeria; Pelliccia, Sveva; Passacantilli, Sara; Mazzoccoli, Carmela; Ruggieri, Vitalba; Sisinni, Lorenza; Bolognesi, Alessio; Rensen, Whilelmina Maria; Miele, Andrea; Nalli, Marianna; Alfonsi, Romina; Di Marcotullio, Lucia; Gulino, Alberto; Brancale, Andrea; Novellino, Ettore; Dondio, Giulio; Vultaggio, Stefania; Varasi, Mario; Mercurio, Ciro; Hamel, Ernest; Lavia, Patrizia; Silvestri, Romano

    2014-01-01

    We synthesized 3-aroyl-1-arylpyrrole (ARAP) derivatives as potential anticancer agents having different substituents at the pendant 1-phenyl ring. Both the 1-phenyl ring and 3-(3,4,5-trimethoxyphenyl)carbonyl moieties were mandatory to achieve potent inhibition of tubulin polymerization, binding of colchicine to tubulin, and cancer cell growth. ARAP 22 showed strong inhibition of the P-glycoprotein-overexpressing NCI-ADR-RES and Messa/Dx5MDR cell lines. Compounds 22 and 27 suppressed in vitro the Hedgehog signaling pathway, strongly reducing luciferase activity in SAG treated NIH3T3 Shh-Light II cells, and inhibited the growth of medulloblastoma D283 cells at nanomolar concentrations. ARAPs 22 and 27 represent a new potent class of tubulin polymerization and cancer cell growth inhibitors with the potential to inhibit the Hedgehog signaling pathway. PMID:25025991

  12. Disentangling star formation and AGN activity in powerful infrared luminous radio galaxies at 1 < z < 4

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Drouart, G.; Rocca-Volmerange, B.; De Breuck, C.; Fioc, M.; Lehnert, M.; Seymour, N.; Stern, D.; Vernet, J.

    2016-09-01

    High-redshift radio galaxies present signs of both star formation and AGN activity, making them ideal candidates to investigate the connection and coevolution of AGN and star formation in the progenitors of present-day massive galaxies. We make use of a sample of 11 powerful radio galaxies spanning 1 formation by combining the galaxy evolution code PÉGASE.3 with an AGN torus model. We find that three components are necessary to reproduce the observed SEDs: an evolved and massive stellar component, a submm bright young starburst, and an AGN torus. We find that powerful radio galaxies form at very high-redshift, but experience episodic and important growth at 1 formation differ from source to source, indicating no general trend of the star formation properties in the most infrared luminous high-redshift radio galaxies and no correlation with the AGN bolometric luminosity. Moreover, we find that AGN scattered light have a very limited impact on broad-band SED fitting on our sample. Finally, our analysis also suggests a wide range in origins for the observed star formation,which we partially constrain for some sources.

  13. A Formative Study Investigating Interactive Reading and Activities to Develop Kindergartners' Science Vocabulary

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ward, Allison Elizabeth

    2009-01-01

    A formative intervention was employed to expose children to a variety of words to increase the breadth, or size of their vocabularies, and to repeatedly and supportively expose children to words to increase the depth, or semantic understanding of vocabulary. Science content words were selected since they are less likely to be included in an…

  14. Cortisol's effects on hippocampal activation in depressed patients are related to alterations in memory formation.

    PubMed

    Abercrombie, Heather C; Jahn, Allison L; Davidson, Richard J; Kern, Simone; Kirschbaum, Clemens; Halverson, Jerry

    2011-01-01

    Many investigators have hypothesized that brain response to cortisol is altered in depression. However, neural activation in response to exogenously manipulated cortisol elevations has not yet been directly examined in depressed humans. Animal research shows that glucocorticoids have robust effects on hippocampal function, and can either enhance or suppress neuroplastic events in the hippocampus depending on a number of factors. We hypothesized that depressed individuals would show 1) altered hippocampal response to exogenous administration of cortisol, and 2) altered effects of cortisol on learning. In a repeated-measures design, 19 unmedicated depressed and 41 healthy individuals completed two fMRI scans. Fifteen mg oral hydrocortisone (i.e., cortisol) or placebo (order randomized and double-blind) was administered 1 h prior to encoding of emotional and neutral words during fMRI scans. Data analysis examined the effects of cortisol administration on 1) brain activation during encoding, and 2) subsequent free recall for words. Cortisol affected subsequent recall performance in depressed but not healthy individuals. We found alterations in hippocampal response to cortisol in depressed women, but not in depressed men (who showed altered response to cortisol in other regions, including subgenual prefrontal cortex). In both depressed men and women, cortisol's effects on hippocampal function were positively correlated with its effects on recall performance assessed days later. Our data provide evidence that in depressed compared to healthy women, cortisol's effects on hippocampal function are altered. Our data also show that in both depressed men and women, cortisol's effects on emotional memory formation and hippocampal function are related.

  15. Formation of a Double-decker Magnetic Flux Rope in the Sigmoidal Solar Active Region 11520

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheng, X.; Ding, M. D.; Zhang, J.; Sun, X. D.; Guo, Y.; Wang, Y. M.; Kliem, B.; Deng, Y. Y.

    2014-07-01

    In this paper, we address the formation of a magnetic flux rope (MFR) that erupted on 2012 July 12 and caused a strong geomagnetic storm event on July 15. Through analyzing the long-term evolution of the associated active region observed by the Atmospheric Imaging Assembly and the Helioseismic and Magnetic Imager on board the Solar Dynamics Observatory, it is found that the twisted field of an MFR, indicated by a continuous S-shaped sigmoid, is built up from two groups of sheared arcades near the main polarity inversion line a half day before the eruption. The temperature within the twisted field and sheared arcades is higher than that of the ambient volume, suggesting that magnetic reconnection most likely works there. The driver behind the reconnection is attributed to shearing and converging motions at magnetic footpoints with velocities in the range of 0.1-0.6 km s-1. The rotation of the preceding sunspot also contributes to the MFR buildup. Extrapolated three-dimensional non-linear force-free field structures further reveal the locations of the reconnection to be in a bald-patch region and in a hyperbolic flux tube. About 2 hr before the eruption, indications of a second MFR in the form of an S-shaped hot channel are seen. It lies above the original MFR that continuously exists and includes a filament. The whole structure thus makes up a stable double-decker MFR system for hours prior to the eruption. Eventually, after entering the domain of instability, the high-lying MFR impulsively erupts to generate a fast coronal mass ejection and X-class flare; while the low-lying MFR remains behind and continuously maintains the sigmoidicity of the active region.

  16. Inhibitory activity of coumarins from Artemisia capillaris against advanced glycation endproduct formation.

    PubMed

    Jung, Hyun Ah; Park, Jin Ju; Islam, Md Nurul; Jin, Seung Eun; Min, Byung-Sun; Lee, Je-Hyun; Sohn, Hee Sook; Choi, Jae Sue

    2012-06-01

    Since glycation can lead to the onset of diabetic complications due to chronic hyperglycemia, several indigenous Artemisia species were evaluated as potential inhibitors of advanced glycation endproducts (AGE). Among them, the Artemisia capillaris plant demonstrated the highest AGE inhibitory activity. Repeated column chromatography was performed to isolate a new acylated flavonoid glycoside, acacetin-7-O-(6″-O-acetyl)-β-D-glucopyranosyl-(1→2)[α-L-rhamnopyranosyl]-(1→6)-β-D-glucopyranoside, along with 11 known flavonoids (acacetin-7-O-β-D-glucopyranosyl-(1→2)[α-L-rhamnopyranosyl]-(1→6)-β-D-glucopyranoside, linarin, quercetin, hyperoside, isorhamnetin, isorhamnetin 3-galactoside, isorhamnetin 3-glucoside, isorhamnetin 3-arabinoside, isorhamnetin 3-robinobioside, arcapillin, and cirsilineol), six coumarins (umbelliferone, esculetin, scopoletin, scopolin, isoscopolin, and scoparone), and two phenolic derivatives (4,5-di-O-caffeoylquinic acid and chlorogenic acid). In determining the structure-activity relationship (SAR), it was found that the presence and position of hydroxyl group of test coumarins (coumarin, esculin, isoscopoletin, daphnetin, 4-methylcoumarin, and six isolated coumarins) may play a crucial role in AGE inhibition. A free hydroxyl group at C-7 and a glucosyl group instead of a methoxyl group at C-6 are two important parameters for the inhibitory potential of coumarins on AGE formation. A. capillaris and five key AGE inhibitors, including 4,5-di-Ocaffeoylquinic acid, umbelliferone, esculetin, esculin, and scopoletin, were identified as potential candidates for use as therapeutic or preventive agents for diabetic complications and oxidative stress-related diseases. We understand this to be the first detailed study on the SAR of coumarins in AGE inhibition.

  17. Formation of a double-decker magnetic flux rope in the sigmoidal solar active region 11520

    SciTech Connect

    Cheng, X.; Ding, M. D.; Zhang, J.; Guo, Y.; Sun, X. D.; Wang, Y. M.; Kliem, B.; Deng, Y. Y.

    2014-07-10

    In this paper, we address the formation of a magnetic flux rope (MFR) that erupted on 2012 July 12 and caused a strong geomagnetic storm event on July 15. Through analyzing the long-term evolution of the associated active region observed by the Atmospheric Imaging Assembly and the Helioseismic and Magnetic Imager on board the Solar Dynamics Observatory, it is found that the twisted field of an MFR, indicated by a continuous S-shaped sigmoid, is built up from two groups of sheared arcades near the main polarity inversion line a half day before the eruption. The temperature within the twisted field and sheared arcades is higher than that of the ambient volume, suggesting that magnetic reconnection most likely works there. The driver behind the reconnection is attributed to shearing and converging motions at magnetic footpoints with velocities in the range of 0.1-0.6 km s{sup –1}. The rotation of the preceding sunspot also contributes to the MFR buildup. Extrapolated three-dimensional non-linear force-free field structures further reveal the locations of the reconnection to be in a bald-patch region and in a hyperbolic flux tube. About 2 hr before the eruption, indications of a second MFR in the form of an S-shaped hot channel are seen. It lies above the original MFR that continuously exists and includes a filament. The whole structure thus makes up a stable double-decker MFR system for hours prior to the eruption. Eventually, after entering the domain of instability, the high-lying MFR impulsively erupts to generate a fast coronal mass ejection and X-class flare; while the low-lying MFR remains behind and continuously maintains the sigmoidicity of the active region.

  18. Dissecting galaxies: spatial and spectral separation of emission excited by star formation and AGN activity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Davies, Rebecca L.; Groves, Brent; Kewley, Lisa J.; Dopita, Michael A.; Hampton, Elise J.; Shastri, Prajval; Scharwächter, Julia; Sutherland, Ralph; Kharb, Preeti; Bhatt, Harish; Jin, Chichuan; Banfield, Julie; Zaw, Ingyin; James, Bethan; Juneau, Stéphanie; Srivastava, Shweta

    2016-10-01

    The optical spectra of Seyfert galaxies are often dominated by emission lines excited by both star formation and active galactic nucleus (AGN) activity. Standard calibrations (such as for the star formation rate) are not applicable to such composite (mixed) spectra. In this paper, we describe how integral field data can be used to spectrally and spatially separate emission associated with star formation from emission associated with accretion on to an AGN. We demonstrate our method using integral field data for two AGN host galaxies (NGC 5728 and NGC 7679) from the Siding Spring Southern Seyfert Spectroscopic Snapshot Survey (S7). The spectra of NGC 5728 and NGC 7679 form clear sequences of AGN fraction on standard emission line ratio diagnostic diagrams. We show that the emission line luminosities of the majority (>85 per cent) of spectra along each AGN fraction sequence can be reproduced by linear superpositions of the emission line luminosities of one AGN dominated spectrum and one star formation dominated spectrum. We separate the Hα, Hβ, [N II]λ6583, [S II]λλ6716, 6731, [O III]λ5007 and [O II]λλ3726, 3729 luminosities of every spaxel into contributions from star formation and AGN activity. The decomposed emission line images are used to derive the star formation rates and AGN bolometric luminosities for NGC 5728 and NGC 7679. Our calculated values are mostly consistent with independent estimates from data at other wavelengths. The recovered star-forming and AGN components also have distinct spatial distributions which trace structures seen in high-resolution imaging of the galaxies, providing independent confirmation that our decomposition has been successful.

  19. Short-Range Temporal Interactions in Sleep; Hippocampal Spike Avalanches Support a Large Milieu of Sequential Activity Including Replay.

    PubMed

    Mahoney, J Matthew; Titiz, Ali S; Hernan, Amanda E; Scott, Rod C

    2016-01-01

    Hippocampal neural systems consolidate multiple complex behaviors into memory. However, the temporal structure of neural firing supporting complex memory consolidation is unknown. Replay of hippocampal place cells during sleep supports the view that a simple repetitive behavior modifies sleep firing dynamics, but does not explain how multiple episodes could be integrated into associative networks for recollection during future cognition. Here we decode sequential firing structure within spike avalanches of all pyramidal cells recorded in sleeping rats after running in a circular track. We find that short sequences that combine into multiple long sequences capture the majority of the sequential structure during sleep, including replay of hippocampal place cells. The ensemble, however, is not optimized for maximally producing the behavior-enriched episode. Thus behavioral programming of sequential correlations occurs at the level of short-range interactions, not whole behavioral sequences and these short sequences are assembled into a large and complex milieu that could support complex memory consolidation.

  20. Short-Range Temporal Interactions in Sleep; Hippocampal Spike Avalanches Support a Large Milieu of Sequential Activity Including Replay.

    PubMed

    Mahoney, J Matthew; Titiz, Ali S; Hernan, Amanda E; Scott, Rod C

    2016-01-01

    Hippocampal neural systems consolidate multiple complex behaviors into memory. However, the temporal structure of neural firing supporting complex memory consolidation is unknown. Replay of hippocampal place cells during sleep supports the view that a simple repetitive behavior modifies sleep firing dynamics, but does not explain how multiple episodes could be integrated into associative networks for recollection during future cognition. Here we decode sequential firing structure within spike avalanches of all pyramidal cells recorded in sleeping rats after running in a circular track. We find that short sequences that combine into multiple long sequences capture the majority of the sequential structure during sleep, including replay of hippocampal place cells. The ensemble, however, is not optimized for maximally producing the behavior-enriched episode. Thus behavioral programming of sequential correlations occurs at the level of short-range interactions, not whole behavioral sequences and these short sequences are assembled into a large and complex milieu that could support complex memory consolidation. PMID:26866597

  1. Short-Range Temporal Interactions in Sleep; Hippocampal Spike Avalanches Support a Large Milieu of Sequential Activity Including Replay

    PubMed Central

    Mahoney, J. Matthew; Titiz, Ali S.; Hernan, Amanda E.; Scott, Rod C.

    2016-01-01

    Hippocampal neural systems consolidate multiple complex behaviors into memory. However, the temporal structure of neural firing supporting complex memory consolidation is unknown. Replay of hippocampal place cells during sleep supports the view that a simple repetitive behavior modifies sleep firing dynamics, but does not explain how multiple episodes could be integrated into associative networks for recollection during future cognition. Here we decode sequential firing structure within spike avalanches of all pyramidal cells recorded in sleeping rats after running in a circular track. We find that short sequences that combine into multiple long sequences capture the majority of the sequential structure during sleep, including replay of hippocampal place cells. The ensemble, however, is not optimized for maximally producing the behavior-enriched episode. Thus behavioral programming of sequential correlations occurs at the level of short-range interactions, not whole behavioral sequences and these short sequences are assembled into a large and complex milieu that could support complex memory consolidation. PMID:26866597

  2. Protopopov's ideas on habit formation and their relation to the Pavlovian theory of higher nervous activity.

    PubMed

    Windholz, G

    1999-01-01

    In 1929 Viktor P. Protopopov began to replicate E. L. Thorndike's animal experiments on habit acquisition. To determine the conditions necessary for habit formation, Protopopov used the natural experiment method, in which dogs encountered environments that prevented them from reaching a stimulus-bait. Not all dogs acquired the behavior necessary for obtaining the bait. Explaining the results within the framework of the Pavlovian theory of higher nervous activity, Protopopov concluded that habits were acquired when an active animal provoked by a bait-stimulus encountered an environmental barrier. The dogs tried a series of phylogenetic behaviors until the stimulus-bait was reached. The latter movements were retained, forming an ontogenetic habit. The dogs also learned not to produce the unsuccessful movements. In accord with the Pavlovian theory, individual differences in habit formation were related to temperament types. A critique of the Thorndikian Law of Effect is provided in terms of the Pavlovian theory of higher nervous activity. PMID:10696273

  3. Structure and Activation of MuSK, a Receptor Tyrosine Kinase Central to Neuromuscular Junction Formation

    PubMed Central

    Hubbard, Stevan R.; Gnanasambandan, Kavitha

    2014-01-01

    MuSK (muscle-specific kinase) is a receptor tyrosine kinase that plays a central signaling role in formation of neuromuscular junctions (NMJs). MuSK is activated in a complex spatio-temporal manner to cluster acetylcholine receptors on the postsynaptic (muscle) side of the synapse and to induce differentiation of the nerve terminal on the presynaptic side. The ligand for MuSK is LRP4 (low-density lipoprotein receptor-related protein-4), a transmembrane protein in muscle, whose binding affinity for MuSK is potentiated by agrin, a neuronally derived heparan-sulfate proteoglycan. In addition, Dok7, a cytoplasmic adaptor protein, is also required for MuSK activation in vivo. This review focuses on the physical interplay between these proteins and MuSK for activation and downstream signaling, which culminates in NMJ formation. PMID:23467009

  4. Interactions and star-formation activity in Wolf-Rayet galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    López-Sánchez, Ángel R.; Esteban, César

    2009-12-01

    We present the main results of the Ph.D. thesis carried out by López-Sánchez (Ph.D. thesis, 2006), in which a detailed morphological, photometric and spectroscopic analysis of a sample of 20 Wolf-Rayet (WR) galaxies was performed. The main aims are the study of the star formation and O and WR stellar populations in these galaxies, and the role that interactions between low surface brightness companion objects have in the triggering of the bursts. We analyze the morphology, stellar populations, physical conditions, chemical abundances and kinematics of the ionized gas, as well as the star-formation activity of each system.

  5. U.S. Geological Survey Scientific Activities in the Exploration of Antarctica: Introduction to Antarctica (Including USGS Field Personnel: 1946-59)

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Tony K. Meunier Edited by Williams, Richard S.; Ferrigno, Jane G.

    2007-01-01

    3) significant changes that have occurred in Antarctic exploration and research since World War II will be discussed at the end of this report. Subsequent Open-File Reports will provide a year-by-year documentation of USGS scientific activities and accomplishments in Antarctica beginning with the post-IGY, 1959-60 research team. One Open-File Report is planned to be written for each field-based season. For an example of the series format, see Open-File Reports 2006-1113 (Meunier, 2007a) and 2006-1114 (Meunier, 2007b). This report is a companion document to Open-File Report 2006-1116 (Meunier, 2007c). The USGS mapping and science programs in Antarctica are among the longest continuously funded projects in the United States Antarctic Program (USAP). The 2005-06 field season is the 56th consecutive U.S. expedition in which USGS scientists have been participants, starting in 1946. USGS and the National Science Foundation (NSF) cooperation began with the establishment by NSF of the U.S. Antarctic (Research) Program [USA(R)P] in 1958-59 under Operation Deep Freeze IV (DF IV) and was given the responsibility for the principal coordination and management of all U.S. scientific activities in Antarctica in Deep Freeze 60 (DF 60) (1959-60). Financial support from NSF, mostly in the form of Memorandum of Understandings (MOUs) and Cooperative Agreements, extends back to this period and can be attributed to the need for accurate geologic, geophysical, and topographic base maps of specific field areas or regions where NSF-funded science projects were planned. The epoch of Antarctic exploration during the IGY was driven by science and, in a spirit of peaceful cooperation, the international scientific community wanted to limit military activities on the continent to logistical support (Meunier, 1979 [2007], p. 38). The USGS, a Federal civilian science agency in the Department of the Interior, has, since its founding in 1879, carried out numerous field-based national (and some

  6. A comparison of methods of assessment of body composition including neutron activation analysis of total body nitrogen.

    PubMed

    Lukaski, H C; Mendez, J; Buskirk, E R; Cohn, S H

    1981-08-01

    Fourteen healthy men underwent determinations of total body nitrogen (TBN) by prompt gamma neutron activation analysis and total body potassium (TBK) by whole body counting to estimate the muscle and nonmuscle components of the fat-free body mass (FFBM) and their protein contents. Comparison of FFBM estimated from TBN and TBK (60.6 +/- 6.9 kg, mean +/- SD), densitometry (62.3 +/- 7.1 kg), TBK alone (62.2 +/- 8.0 kg) and TBW (63.9 +/- 7.8 kg) showed no differences among the techniques. Similarly, there were neither differences in fat mass nor percent body fat among the methods. Analysis of the chemical composition of FFBM of this group showed TBK/FFBM = 62.6 +/- 2.3 mEq/kg, TBW/FFBM = 74.6 +/- 0.2%, TBN/FFBM = 32.74 +/- 1.09 g/kg, protein/FFBM = 20.5+/- 0.7%. The calculated mineral content of the FFBM was 6.4%. These values are strikingly similar to the values calculated by direct chemical analysis. It was concluded that the combined TBN-TBK method is a valid technique for estimating body composition in man.

  7. Noncyclic Notch activity in the presomitic mesoderm demonstrates uncoupling of somite compartmentalization and boundary formation

    PubMed Central

    Feller, Juliane; Schneider, Andre; Schuster-Gossler, Karin; Gossler, Achim

    2008-01-01

    To test the significance of cyclic Notch activity for somite formation in mice, we analyzed embryos expressing activated Notch (NICD) throughout the presomitic mesoderm (PSM). Embryos expressing NICD formed up to 18 somites. Expression in the PSM of Hes7, Lfng, and Spry2 was no longer cyclic, whereas Axin2 was expressed dynamically. NICD expression led to caudalization of somites, and loss of Notch activity to their rostralization. Thus, segmentation and anterior–posterior somite patterning can be uncoupled, differential Notch signaling is not required to form segment borders, and Notch is unlikely to be the pacemaker of the segmentation clock. PMID:18708576

  8. Identification of functional targets of the Zta transcriptional activator by formation of stable preinitiation complex intermediates.

    PubMed Central

    Lieberman, P

    1994-01-01

    Transcriptional activator proteins stimulate the formation of a preinitiation complex that may be distinct from a basal-level transcription complex in its composition and stability. Components of the general transcription factors that form activator-dependent stable intermediates were determined by the use of Sarkosyl and oligonucleotide challenge experiments. High-level transcriptional activation by the Epstein-Barr virus-encoded Zta protein required an activity in the TFIID fraction that is distinct from the TATA-binding protein (TBP) and the TBP-associated factors. This additional activity copurifies with and is likely to be identical to the previously defined coactivator, USA (M. Meisterernst, A. L. Roy, H. M. Lieu, and R. G. Roeder, Cell 66:981-994, 1991). The formation of a stable preinitiation complex intermediate resistant to Sarkosyl required the preincubation of the promoter DNA with Zta, holo-TFIID (TBP and TBP-associated factors), TFIIB, TFIIA, and the coactivator USA. The formation of a Zta response element-resistant preinitiation complex required the preincubation of promoter DNA with Zta, holo-TFIID, TFIIB, and TFIIA. Agarose gel electrophoretic mobility shift showed that a preformed Zta-holo-TFIID-TFIIA complex was resistant to Sarkosyl and to Zta response element oligonucleotide challenge. DNase I footprinting suggests that only Zta, holo-TFIID, and TFIIA make significant contacts with the promoter DNA. These results provide functional and physical evidence that the Zta transcriptional activator influences at least two distinct steps in preinitiation complex assembly, the formation of the stable holo-TFIID-TFIIA-promoter complex and the subsequent binding of TFIIB and a USA-like coactivator. Images PMID:7969171

  9. Computational study on the aminolysis of beta-hydroxy-alpha,beta-unsaturated ester via the favorable path including the formation of alpha-oxo ketene intermediate.

    PubMed

    Jin, Lu; Xue, Ying; Zhang, Hui; Kim, Chan Kyung; Xie, Dai Qian; Yan, Guo Sen

    2008-05-15

    The possible mechanisms of the aminolysis of N-methyl-3-(methoxycarbonyl)-4-hydroxy-2-pyridone (beta-hydroxy-alpha,beta-unsaturated ester) with dimethylamine are investigated at the hybrid density functional theory B3LYP/6-31G(d,p) level in the gas phase. Single-point computations at the B3LYP/6-311++G(d,p) and the Becke88-Becke95 1-parameter model BB1K/6-311++G(d,p) levels are performed for more precise energy predictions. Solvent effects are also assessed by single-point calculations at the integral equation formalism polarized continuum model IEFPCM-B3LYP/6-311++G(d,p) and IEFPCM-BB1K/6-311++G(d,p) levels on the gas-phase optimized geometries. Three possible pathways, the concerted pathway (path A), the stepwise pathway involving tetrahedral intermediates (path B), and the stepwise pathway via alpha-oxo ketene intermediate due to the participation of beta-hydroxy (path C), are taken into account for the title reaction. Moreover, path C includes two sequential processes. The first process is to generate alpha-oxo ketene intermediate via the decomposition of N-methyl-3-(methoxycarbonyl)-4-hydroxy-2-pyridone; the second process is the addition of dimethylamine to alpha-oxo ketene intermediate. Our results indicate that path C is more favorable than paths A and B both in the gas phase and in solvent (heptane). In path C, the first process is the rate-determining step, and the second process is revealed to be a [4+2] pseudopericyclic reaction without the energy barrier. Being independent of the concentration of amine, the first process obeys the first-order rate law. PMID:18402429

  10. Selective Non-nucleoside Inhibitors of Human DNA Methyltransferases Active in Cancer Including in Cancer Stem Cells

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    DNA methyltransferases (DNMTs) are important enzymes involved in epigenetic control of gene expression and represent valuable targets in cancer chemotherapy. A number of nucleoside DNMT inhibitors (DNMTi) have been studied in cancer, including in cancer stem cells, and two of them (azacytidine and decitabine) have been approved for treatment of myelodysplastic syndromes. However, only a few non-nucleoside DNMTi have been identified so far, and even fewer have been validated in cancer. Through a process of hit-to-lead optimization, we report here the discovery of compound 5 as a potent non-nucleoside DNMTi that is also selective toward other AdoMet-dependent protein methyltransferases. Compound 5 was potent at single-digit micromolar concentrations against a panel of cancer cells and was less toxic in peripheral blood mononuclear cells than two other compounds tested. In mouse medulloblastoma stem cells, 5 inhibited cell growth, whereas related compound 2 showed high cell differentiation. To the best of our knowledge, 2 and 5 are the first non-nucleoside DNMTi tested in a cancer stem cell line. PMID:24387159

  11. Novel stilbenoids, including cannabispiradienone glycosides, from Tragopogon tommasinii (Asteraceae, Cichorieae) and their potential anti-inflammatory activity.

    PubMed

    Granica, Sebastian; Piwowarski, Jakub P; Randazzo, Antonio; Schneider, Peter; Żyżyńska-Granica, Barbara; Zidorn, Christian

    2015-09-01

    A phytochemical investigation of Tragopogon tommasinii Sch.Bip. (Asteraceae, Cichorieae) yielded a total of 21 natural products, two simple phenolic acids (4-hydroxybenzoic acid and p-coumaric acid), four caffeic acid derivatives (chlorogenic acid, 3-O-caffeoylquinic acid, 3,5-O-dicaffeoylquinic acid, and 4,5-O-dicaffeoylquinic acid), six flavonoids (luteolin, luteolin 7-O-glucoside, vitexin, orientin, quercetin 3-O-glucoside, and isorhamnetin 3-O-glucoside), three simple bibenzyls [2-carboxyl-5-hydroxy-3-methoxy-4'-β-glucopyranosyl-oxybibenzyl, 3-caffeoyl-(9→5)-β-apiosyl-(1→6)-β-glucopyranosyloxy-5,4'-dihydroxy-3'-methoxybibenzyl, 3-caffeoyl-(9→5)-β-apiosyl-(1→6)-β-glucopyranosyloxy-4'-dihydroxy-5,3'-dimethoxybibenzyl], three phtalides [3-(4-β-glucopyranosyloxybenzyl)-7-hydroxy-5-methoxyphtalide, 7-β-glucopyranosyloxy-(S)-3-(4-hydroxybenzyl)-5-methoxyphtalide, and 7-(1→6)-α-rhamnosyl-β-glucopyranosyloxy-(S)-3-(4-hydroxybenzyl)-5-methoxyphtalide], two cannabispiradienone derivatives [3-O-β-glucopyranosyldemethoxycannabispiradienone and 3-caffeoyl-(9→5)-β-apiosyl-(1→6)-β-glucopyranosyloxydemethoxycannabispiradienone], and tetra-N-coumaroyl spermine. The three bibenzyls, the latter two benzylphthalides, and both cannabispiradienone derivatives represent new natural compounds and all compounds, except the caffeic acid derivatives and the flavonoids were new for T. tommasinii. The structures were established by HR mass spectrometry, extensive 1D and 2D NMR spectroscopy, and CD spectroscopy. Moreover, the potential anti-inflammatory activities of the new compounds were assayed using human neutrophils and their production of IL-1b, IL-8, TNF-α and MMP-9 as well as the expression of TLR-4, respectively.

  12. Island of the Sharks Activity Guide To Accompany the Large-Format Film.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gowell, Elizabeth Tayntor

    This document targets upper elementary and middle school students and provides activities to understand what the ocean floor looks like, the interactions of ocean communities, and the true nature of sharks. The activities are developed at three levels: beginner, intermediate, and advanced. The twelve activities include: (1) "Ocean Detectives"; (2)…

  13. The presynaptic active zone protein bassoon is essential for photoreceptor ribbon synapse formation in the retina.

    PubMed

    Dick, Oliver; tom Dieck, Susanne; Altrock, Wilko Detlef; Ammermüller, Josef; Weiler, Reto; Garner, Craig Curtis; Gundelfinger, Eckart Dieter; Brandstätter, Johann Helmut

    2003-03-01

    The photoreceptor ribbon synapse is a highly specialized glutamatergic synapse designed for the continuous flow of synaptic vesicles to the neurotransmitter release site. The molecular mechanisms underlying ribbon synapse formation are poorly understood. We have investigated the role of the presynaptic cytomatrix protein Bassoon, a major component of the photoreceptor ribbon, in a mouse retina deficient of functional Bassoon protein. Photoreceptor ribbons lacking Bassoon are not anchored to the presynaptic active zones. This results in an impaired photoreceptor synaptic transmission, an abnormal dendritic branching of neurons postsynaptic to photoreceptors, and the formation of ectopic synapses. These findings suggest a critical role of Bassoon in the formation and the function of photoreceptor ribbon synapses of the mammalian retina.

  14. IS256 abolishes gelatinase activity and biofilm formation in a mutant of the nosocomial pathogen Enterococcus faecalis V583.

    PubMed

    Perez, Marta; Calles-Enríquez, Marina; del Rio, Beatriz; Ladero, Victor; Martín, María Cruz; Fernández, María; Alvarez, Miguel A

    2015-07-01

    Enterococcus faecalis is one of the most controversial species of lactic acid bacteria. Some strains are used as probiotics, while others are associated with severe and life-threatening nosocomial infections. Their pathogenicity depends on the acquisition of multidrug resistance and virulence factors. Gelatinase, which is required in the first steps of biofilm formation, is an important virulence determinant involved in E. faecalis pathogenesis, including endocarditis and peritonitis. The gene that codes for gelatinase (gelE) is controlled by the Fsr quorum-sensing system, whose encoding genes (fsrA, fsrB, fsrC, and fsrD) are located immediately upstream of gelE. The integration of a DNA fragment into the fsr locus of a derived mutant of E. faecalis V583 suppressed the gelatinase activity and prevented biofilm formation. Sequence analysis indicated the presence of IS256 integrated into the fsrC gene at nucleotide position 321. Interestingly, IS256 is also associated with biofilm formation in Staphylococcus epidermidis and Staphylococcus aureus. This is the first description of an insertion sequence that prevents biofilm formation in E. faecalis.

  15. Inactivation of glutathione peroxidase activity contributes to UV-induced squamous cell carcinoma formation.

    PubMed

    Walshe, Jennifer; Serewko-Auret, Magdalena M; Teakle, Ngari; Cameron, Sarina; Minto, Kelly; Smith, Louise; Burcham, Philip C; Russell, Terry; Strutton, Geoffrey; Griffin, Anthony; Chu, Fong-Fong; Esworthy, Stephen; Reeve, Vivienne; Saunders, Nicholas A

    2007-05-15

    Cutaneous squamous cell carcinomas (CSCC) are a common malignancy of keratinocytes that arise in sites of the skin exposed to excessive UV radiation. In the present study, we show that human SCC cell lines, preneoplastic solar keratoses (SK), and CSCC are associated with perturbations in glutathione peroxidase (GPX) activity and peroxide levels. Specifically, we found that two of three SKs and four of five CSCCs, in vivo, were associated with decreased GPX activity and all SKs and CSCCs were associated with an elevated peroxide burden. Given the association of decreased GPX activity with CSCC, we examined the basis for the GPX deficiency in the CSCCs. Our data indicated that GPX was inactivated by a post-translational mechanism and that GPX could be inactivated by increases in intracellular peroxide levels. We next tested whether the decreased peroxidase activity coupled with an elevated peroxidative burden might contribute to CSCC formation in vivo. This was tested in Gpx1(-/-) and Gpx2(-/-) mice exposed to solar-simulated UV radiation. These studies showed that Gpx2 deficiency predisposed mice to UV-induced CSCC formation. These results suggest that inactivation of GPX2 in human skin may be an early event in UV-induced SCC formation.

  16. Changes in the spectrum and rates of extracellular enzyme activities in seawater following aggregate formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ziervogel, K.; Steen, A. D.; Arnosti, C.

    2010-03-01

    Marine snow aggregates are heavily colonized by heterotrophic microorganisms that express high levels of hydrolytic activities, making aggregates hotspots for carbon remineralization in the ocean. To assess how aggregate formation influences the ability of seawater microbial communities to access organic carbon, we compared hydrolysis rates of six polysaccharides in coastal seawater after aggregates had been formed (via incubation on a roller table) with hydrolysis rates in seawater from the same site that had not incubated on a roller table (referred to as whole seawater). Hydrolysis rates in the aggregates themselves were up to three orders of magnitude higher on a volume basis than in whole seawater. The enhancement of enzyme activity in aggregates relative to whole seawater differed by substrate, suggesting that the enhancement was under cellular control, rather than due to factors such as lysis or grazing. A comparison of hydrolysis rates in whole seawater with those in aggregate-free seawater, i.e. the fraction of water from the roller bottles that did not contain aggregates, demonstrated a nuanced microbial response to aggregate formation. Activities of laminarinase and xylanase enzymes in aggregate-free seawater were higher than in whole seawater, while activities of chondroitin, fucoidan, and arabinogalactan hydrolyzing enzymes were lower than in whole seawater. These data suggest that aggregate formation enhanced production of laminarinase and xylanase enzymes, and the enhancement also affected the surrounding seawater. Decreased activities of chondroitin, fucoidan, and arabinoglactan-hydrolyzing enzymes in aggregate-free seawaters relative to whole seawater are likely due to shifts in enzyme production by the aggregate-associated community, coupled with the effects of enzyme degradation. Enhanced activities of laminarin- and xylan-hydrolyzing enzymes in aggregate-free seawater were due at least in part to cell-free enzymes. Measurements of enzyme

  17. High water-stressed population estimated by world water resources assessment including human activities under SRES scenarios

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kiguchi, M.; Shen, Y.; Kanae, S.; Oki, T.

    2009-04-01

    In an argument of the reduction and the adaptation for the climate change, the evaluation of the influence by the climate change is important. When we argue in adaptation plan from a damage scale and balance with the cost, it is particularly important. Parry et al (2001) evaluated the risks in shortage of water, malaria, food, the risk of the coast flood by temperature function and clarified the level of critical climate change. According to their evaluation, the population to be affected by the shortage of water suddenly increases in the range where temperature increases from 1.5 to 2.0 degree in 2080s. They showed how much we need to reduce emissions in order to draw-down significantly the number at risk. This evaluation of critical climate change threats and targets of water shortage did not include the water withdrawal divided by water availability. Shen et al (2008a) estimated the water withdrawal of projection of future world water resources according to socio-economic driving factors predicted for scenarios A1b, A2, B1, and B2 of the Special Report on Emission Scenarios (SRES). However, these results were in function of not temperature but time. The assessment of the highly water-stressed population considered the socioeconomic development is necessary for a function of the temperature. Because of it is easy to understand to need to reduce emission. We present a multi-GCM analysis of the global and regional populations lived in highly water-stressed basin for a function of the temperature using the socioeconomic data and the outputs of GCMs. In scenario A2, the population increases gradually with warming. On the other hand, the future projection population in scenario A1b and B1 increase gradually until the temperature anomaly exceeds around from +1 to +1.5 degree. After that the population is almost constant. From Shen et al (2008b), we evaluated the HWSP and its ratio in the world with temperature function for scenarios A1B, A2, and B1 by the index of W

  18. ON MAGNETIC ACTIVITY BAND OVERLAP, INTERACTION, AND THE FORMATION OF COMPLEX SOLAR ACTIVE REGIONS

    SciTech Connect

    McIntosh, Scott W.; Leamon, Robert J.

    2014-11-20

    Recent work has revealed a phenomenological picture of the how the ∼11 yr sunspot cycle of the Sun arises. The production and destruction of sunspots is a consequence of the latitudinal-temporal overlap and interaction of the toroidal magnetic flux systems that belong to the 22 yr magnetic activity cycle and are rooted deep in the Sun's convective interior. We present a conceptually simple extension of this work, presenting a hypothesis on how complex active regions can form as a direct consequence of the intra- and extra-hemispheric interaction taking place in the solar interior. Furthermore, during specific portions of the sunspot cycle, we anticipate that those complex active regions may be particularly susceptible to profoundly catastrophic breakdown, producing flares and coronal mass ejections of the most severe magnitude.

  19. A SPITZER CENSUS OF STAR FORMATION ACTIVITY IN THE PIPE NEBULA

    SciTech Connect

    Forbrich, Jan; Lada, Charles J.; Muench, August A.; Alves, Joao

    2009-10-10

    The Pipe Nebula, a large nearby molecular cloud, lacks obvious signposts of star formation in all but one of more than 130 dust extinction cores that have been identified within it. In order to quantitatively determine the current level of star formation activity in the Pipe Nebula, we analyzed 13 deg{sup 2} of sensitive mid-infrared maps of the entire cloud, obtained with the Multiband Imaging Photometer for Spitzer at wavelengths of 24 mum and 70 mum, to search for candidate young stellar objects (YSOs) in the high-extinction regions. We argue that our search is complete for class I and typical class II YSOs with luminosities of L {sub bol} approx 0.2 L {sub sun} and greater. We find only 18 candidate YSOs in the high-extinction regions of the entire Pipe cloud. Twelve of these sources are previously known members of a small cluster associated with Barnard 59, the largest and most massive dense core in the cloud. With only six candidate class I and class II YSOs detected toward extinction cores outside of this cluster, our findings emphatically confirm the notion of an extremely low level of star formation activity in the Pipe Nebula. The resulting star formation efficiency for the entire cloud mass is only approx0.06%.

  20. Active Adoption of Void Formation in Metal-Oxide for All Transparent Super-Performing Photodetectors

    PubMed Central

    Patel, Malkeshkumar; Kim, Hong-Sik; Park, Hyeong-Ho; Kim, Joondong

    2016-01-01

    Could ‘defect-considered’ void formation in metal-oxide be actively used? Is it possible to realize stable void formation in a metal-oxide layer, beyond unexpected observations, for functional utilization? Herein we demonstrate the effective tailoring of void formation of NiO for ultra-sensitive UV photodetection. NiO was formed onto pre-sputtered ZnO for a large size and spontaneously formed abrupt p-NiO/n-ZnO heterojunction device. To form voids at an interface, rapid thermal process was performed, resulting in highly visible light transparency (85–95%). This heterojunction provides extremely low saturation current (<0.1 nA) with an extraordinary rectifying ratio value of over 3000 and works well without any additional metal electrodes. Under UV illumination, we can observe the fast photoresponse time (10 ms) along with the highest possible responsivity (1.8 A W−1) and excellent detectivity (2 × 1013 Jones) due to the existence of an intrinsic-void layer at the interface. We consider this as the first report on metal-oxide-based void formation (Kirkendall effect) for effective photoelectric device applications. We propose that the active adoption of ‘defect-considered’ Kirkendall-voids will open up a new era for metal-oxide based photoelectric devices. PMID:27151288

  1. Active Adoption of Void Formation in Metal-Oxide for All Transparent Super-Performing Photodetectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Patel, Malkeshkumar; Kim, Hong-Sik; Park, Hyeong-Ho; Kim, Joondong

    2016-05-01

    Could ‘defect-considered’ void formation in metal-oxide be actively used? Is it possible to realize stable void formation in a metal-oxide layer, beyond unexpected observations, for functional utilization? Herein we demonstrate the effective tailoring of void formation of NiO for ultra-sensitive UV photodetection. NiO was formed onto pre-sputtered ZnO for a large size and spontaneously formed abrupt p-NiO/n-ZnO heterojunction device. To form voids at an interface, rapid thermal process was performed, resulting in highly visible light transparency (85–95%). This heterojunction provides extremely low saturation current (<0.1 nA) with an extraordinary rectifying ratio value of over 3000 and works well without any additional metal electrodes. Under UV illumination, we can observe the fast photoresponse time (10 ms) along with the highest possible responsivity (1.8 A W‑1) and excellent detectivity (2 × 1013 Jones) due to the existence of an intrinsic-void layer at the interface. We consider this as the first report on metal-oxide-based void formation (Kirkendall effect) for effective photoelectric device applications. We propose that the active adoption of ‘defect-considered’ Kirkendall-voids will open up a new era for metal-oxide based photoelectric devices.

  2. Formation of distinct soluble microbial products by activated sludge: kinetic analysis and quantitative determination.

    PubMed

    Ni, Bing-Jie; Fang, Fang; Xie, Wen-Ming; Xu, Juan; Yu, Han-Qing

    2012-02-01

    Soluble microbial products (SMP) released by microorganisms in bioreactors are classified into two distinct groups according to their different chemical and degradation kinetics: utilization-associated products (UAP) and biomass-associated products (BAP). SMP are responsible for effluent chemical oxygen demand or for membrane fouling of membrane bioreactor. Here an effective and convenient approach, other than the complicated chemical methods or complex models, is developed to quantify the formation of UAP and BAP together with their kinetics in activated sludge process. In this approach, an integrated substrate utilization equation is developed and used to determine UAP and their production kinetics. On the basis of total SMP measurements, BAP formation is determined with an integrated BAP formation equation. The fraction of substrate electrons diverted to UAP, and the content of BAP derived from biomass can then be calculated. Dynamic quantification data are obtained for UAP and BAP separately and conveniently. The obtained kinetic parameters are found to be reasonable as they are generally bounded and comparable to the literature values. The validity of this approach is confirmed by independent SMP production tests in six different activated sludge systems, which demonstrates its applicability in a wide range of engineered system regarding SMP production. This work provides a widely applied approach to determine the formation of UAP and BAP conveniently, which may offer engineers with basis to optimize bioreactor operation to avoid a high effluent soluble organics from SMP or SMP-based membrane fouling in membrane bioreactors. PMID:22185635

  3. Active Adoption of Void Formation in Metal-Oxide for All Transparent Super-Performing Photodetectors.

    PubMed

    Patel, Malkeshkumar; Kim, Hong-Sik; Park, Hyeong-Ho; Kim, Joondong

    2016-05-06

    Could 'defect-considered' void formation in metal-oxide be actively used? Is it possible to realize stable void formation in a metal-oxide layer, beyond unexpected observations, for functional utilization? Herein we demonstrate the effective tailoring of void formation of NiO for ultra-sensitive UV photodetection. NiO was formed onto pre-sputtered ZnO for a large size and spontaneously formed abrupt p-NiO/n-ZnO heterojunction device. To form voids at an interface, rapid thermal process was performed, resulting in highly visible light transparency (85-95%). This heterojunction provides extremely low saturation current (<0.1 nA) with an extraordinary rectifying ratio value of over 3000 and works well without any additional metal electrodes. Under UV illumination, we can observe the fast photoresponse time (10 ms) along with the highest possible responsivity (1.8 A W(-1)) and excellent detectivity (2 × 10(13) Jones) due to the existence of an intrinsic-void layer at the interface. We consider this as the first report on metal-oxide-based void formation (Kirkendall effect) for effective photoelectric device applications. We propose that the active adoption of 'defect-considered' Kirkendall-voids will open up a new era for metal-oxide based photoelectric devices.

  4. Tissue Plasminogen Activator Coating on Implant Surfaces Reduces Staphylococcus aureus Biofilm Formation

    PubMed Central

    Na, Manli; Jarneborn, Anders; Jacobsson, Gunnar; Peetermans, Marijke; Verhamme, Peter

    2015-01-01

    Staphylococcus aureus biofilm infections of indwelling medical devices are a major medical challenge because of their high prevalence and antibiotic resistance. As fibrin plays an important role in S. aureus biofilm formation, we hypothesize that coating of the implant surface with fibrinolytic agents can be used as a new method of antibiofilm prophylaxis. The effect of tissue plasminogen activator (tPA) coating on S. aureus biofilm formation was tested with in vitro microplate biofilm assays and an in vivo mouse model of biofilm infection. tPA coating efficiently inhibited biofilm formation by various S. aureus strains. The effect was dependent on plasminogen activation by tPA, leading to subsequent local fibrin cleavage. A tPA coating on implant surfaces prevented both early adhesion and later biomass accumulation. Furthermore, tPA coating increased the susceptibility of biofilm infections to antibiotics. In vivo, significantly fewer bacteria were detected on the surfaces of implants coated with tPA than on control implants from mice treated with cloxacillin. Fibrinolytic coatings (e.g., with tPA) reduce S. aureus biofilm formation both in vitro and in vivo, suggesting a novel way to prevent bacterial biofilm infections of indwelling medical devices. PMID:26519394

  5. Active Adoption of Void Formation in Metal-Oxide for All Transparent Super-Performing Photodetectors.

    PubMed

    Patel, Malkeshkumar; Kim, Hong-Sik; Park, Hyeong-Ho; Kim, Joondong

    2016-01-01

    Could 'defect-considered' void formation in metal-oxide be actively used? Is it possible to realize stable void formation in a metal-oxide layer, beyond unexpected observations, for functional utilization? Herein we demonstrate the effective tailoring of void formation of NiO for ultra-sensitive UV photodetection. NiO was formed onto pre-sputtered ZnO for a large size and spontaneously formed abrupt p-NiO/n-ZnO heterojunction device. To form voids at an interface, rapid thermal process was performed, resulting in highly visible light transparency (85-95%). This heterojunction provides extremely low saturation current (<0.1 nA) with an extraordinary rectifying ratio value of over 3000 and works well without any additional metal electrodes. Under UV illumination, we can observe the fast photoresponse time (10 ms) along with the highest possible responsivity (1.8 A W(-1)) and excellent detectivity (2 × 10(13) Jones) due to the existence of an intrinsic-void layer at the interface. We consider this as the first report on metal-oxide-based void formation (Kirkendall effect) for effective photoelectric device applications. We propose that the active adoption of 'defect-considered' Kirkendall-voids will open up a new era for metal-oxide based photoelectric devices. PMID:27151288

  6. Common regulatory control of CTP synthase enzyme activity and filament formation

    PubMed Central

    Noree, Chalongrat; Monfort, Elena; Shiau, Andrew K.; Wilhelm, James E.

    2014-01-01

    The ability of enzymes to assemble into visible supramolecular complexes is a widespread phenomenon. Such complexes have been hypothesized to play a number of roles; however, little is known about how the regulation of enzyme activity is coupled to the assembly/disassembly of these cellular structures. CTP synthase is an ideal model system for addressing this question because its activity is regulated via multiple mechanisms and its filament-forming ability is evolutionarily conserved. Our structure–function studies of CTP synthase in Saccharomyces cerevisiae reveal that destabilization of the active tetrameric form of the enzyme increases filament formation, suggesting that the filaments comprise inactive CTP synthase dimers. Furthermore, the sites responsible for feedback inhibition and allosteric activation control filament length, implying that multiple regions of the enzyme can influence filament structure. In contrast, blocking catalysis without disrupting the regulatory sites of the enzyme does not affect filament formation or length. Together our results argue that the regulatory sites that control CTP synthase function, but not enzymatic activity per se, are critical for controlling filament assembly. We predict that the ability of enzymes to form supramolecular structures in general is closely coupled to the mechanisms that regulate their activity. PMID:24920825

  7. The mid-infrared emission of narrow-line active galactic nuclei: Star formation, nuclear activity, and two populations revealed by WISE

    SciTech Connect

    Rosario, David J.; Burtscher, Leonard; Davies, Richard; Genzel, Reinhard; Lutz, Dieter; Tacconi, Linda J.

    2013-12-01

    We explore the nature of the long-wavelength mid-infrared (MIR) emission of a sample of 13,000 local Type II (narrow-line) active galactic nuclei (AGNs) from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) using 12 μm and 22 μm photometry from the WISE all-sky survey. In combination with FIRST 1.4 GHz photometry, we show that AGNs divide into two relatively distinct populations or 'branches' in the plane of MIR and radio luminosity. Seyfert galaxies lie almost exclusively on an MIR-bright branch (Branch A), while low-ionization nuclear emission line galaxies (LINERs) are split evenly into Branch A and the MIR-faint Branch B. We devise various tests to constrain the processes that define the branches, including a comparison to the properties of pure star-forming inactive galaxies on the MIR-radio plane. We demonstrate that the total MIR emission of objects on Branch A, including most Seyfert galaxies, is governed primarily by host star formation, with ≈15% of the 22 μm luminosity coming from AGN-heated dust. This implies that ongoing dusty star formation is a general property of Seyfert host galaxies. We show that the 12 μm broadband luminosity of AGNs on Branch A is suppressed with respect to star-forming galaxies, possibly due to the destruction of PAHs or deeper 10 μm Si absorption in AGNs. We uncover a correlation between the MIR luminosity and [O III] λ5007 luminosity in AGNs. This suggests a relationship between the star formation rate and nuclear luminosity in the AGN population, but we caution on the importance of selection effects inherent to such AGN-dominated emission-line galaxies in driving such a correlation. We highlight the MIR-radio plane as a useful tool in comparative studies of star formation and nuclear activity in AGNs.

  8. Iron-chelating agent, deferasirox, inhibits neutrophil activation and extracellular trap formation.

    PubMed

    Kono, Mari; Saigo, Katsuyasu; Yamamoto, Shiori; Shirai, Kohei; Iwamoto, Shuta; Uematsu, Tomoko; Takahashi, Takayuki; Imoto, Shion; Hashimoto, Makoto; Minami, Yosuke; Wada, Atsushi; Takenokuchi, Mariko; Kawano, Seiji

    2016-10-01

    Iron-chelating agents, which are frequently prescribed to transfusion-dependent patients, have various useful biological effects in addition to chelation. Reactive oxygen species (ROS) produced by neutrophils can cause pulmonary endothelial cell damage, which can lead to acute lung injury (ALI). We previously reported that deferasirox (DFS), an iron-chelating agent, inhibits phorbol myristate acetate (PMA) or formyl-methionyl-leucyl-phenylalanine (fMLP)-induced ROS production in neutrophils, in vitro. Here, we investigate whether DFS inhibits vacuolization in neutrophils and neutrophil extracellular trap (NET) formation. Human neutrophils were incubated with DFS and stimulated with PMA or fMLP. Human neutrophils were separated from heparinized peripheral blood using density gradient centrifugation, and subsequently incubated with DFS. After 10 minutes, neutrophils were stimulated by PMA or fMLP. Vacuole formation was observed by electron microscopy. For observing NET formations using microscopes, immunohistological analyses using citrullinated histone H3 and myeloperoxidase antibodies, and SYTOX Green (an impermeable DNA detection dye) staining, were conducted. NET formation was measured as the quantity of double-stranded DNA (dsDNA), using the AccuBlue Broad Range dsDNA Quantitation Kit. DFS (50 μmol/L) inhibited vacuole formation in the cytoplasm and NET formation. Additionally, 5-100 μmol/L concentration of DFS inhibited the release of dsDNA in a dose-independent manner. We demonstrate that DFS inhibits not only ROS production but also vacuolization and NET formation in neutrophils. These results suggest the possibility of protective effects of DFS against NET-related adverse effects, including ALI and thrombosis. PMID:27333499

  9. Opinion formation in a social network: The role of human activity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grabowski, Andrzej

    2009-03-01

    The model of opinion formation in human population based on social impact theory is investigated numerically. On the basis of a database received from the on-line game server, we examine the structure of social network and human dynamics. We calculate the activity of individuals, i.e. the relative time devoted daily to interactions with others in the artificial society. We study the influence of correlation between the activity of an individual and its connectivity on the process of opinion formation. We find that such correlations have a significant influence on the temperature of the phase transition and the effect of the mass media, modeled as an external stimulation acting on the social network.

  10. ENVIRONMENTAL DEPENDENCE OF OTHER GALAXY PROPERTIES FOR THE SAME STAR FORMATION ACTIVITIES

    SciTech Connect

    Deng Xinfa; Bei Yang; He Jizhou; Tang Xiaoxun

    2010-01-01

    Using two volume-limited Main galaxy samples of the Sloan Digital Sky Survey Data Release 6 above and below the value of M*, we have investigated the environmental dependence of other galaxy properties for the same star formation activities. Only in the luminous passive class, a strong environmental dependence of the g - r color is observed, but the environmental dependence of other properties in this class is very weak. In other classes, we can conclude that the local density dependence of luminosity, g - r color, concentration index ci, and morphologies for star-forming galaxies and passive ones is much weaker than that obtained in the volume-limited Main galaxy samples. This suggests that star formation activity is a galaxy property very predictive of the local environment. In addition, we also note that passive galaxies are more luminous, redder, highly concentrated, and preferentially 'early type'.

  11. Mini-Lab Activities: Inquiry-Based Lab Activities for Formative Assessment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Branan, Daniel; Morgan, Matt

    2010-01-01

    Students everywhere love chemistry demonstrations, especially if they involve explosions. But have you ever wanted to move beyond the "wow" factor and find a way to incorporate active student learning into your demos? What if you could get them to think more deeply about what they're observing, and then find out if they really understand what…

  12. Periplasmic nitrate reductase and formate dehydrogenase: similar molecular architectures with very different enzymatic activities.

    PubMed

    Cerqueira, Nuno M F S A; Gonzalez, Pablo J; Fernandes, Pedro A; Moura, José J G; Ramos, Maria João

    2015-11-17

    It is remarkable how nature has been able to construct enzymes that, despite sharing many similarities, have simple but key differences that tune them for completely different functions in living cells. Periplasmic nitrate reductase (Nap) and formate dehydrogenase (Fdh) from the DMSOr family are representative examples of this. Both enzymes share almost identical three-dimensional protein foldings and active sites, in terms of coordination number, geometry and nature of the ligands. The substrates of both enzymes (nitrate and formate) are polyatomic anions that also share similar charge and stereochemistry. In terms of the catalytic mechanism, both enzymes have a common activation mechanism (the sulfur-shift mechanism) that ensures a constant coordination number around the metal ion during the catalytic cycle. In spite of these similarities, they catalyze very different reactions: Nap abstracts an oxygen atom from nitrate releasing nitrite, whereas FdH catalyzes a hydrogen atom transfer from formate and releases carbon dioxide. In this Account, a critical analysis of structure, function, and catalytic mechanism of the molybdenum enzymes periplasmic nitrate reductase (Nap) and formate dehydrogenase (Fdh) is presented. We conclude that the main structural driving force that dictates the type of reaction, catalyzed by each enzyme, is a key difference on one active site residue that is located in the top region of the active sites of both enzymes. In both enzymes, the active site is centered on the metal ion of the cofactor (Mo in Nap and Mo or W in Fdh) that is coordinated by four sulfur atoms from two pyranopterin guanosine dinucleotide (PGD) molecules and by a sulfido. However, while in Nap there is a Cys directly coordinated to the Mo ion, in FdH there is a SeCys instead. In Fdh there is also an important His that interacts very closely with the SeCys, whereas in Nap the same position is occupied by a Met. The role of Cys in Nap and SeCys in FdH is similar in both

  13. Changes in the spectrum and rates of extracellular enzyme activities in seawater following aggregate formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ziervogel, K.; Steen, A. D.; Arnosti, C.

    2009-12-01

    Marine snow aggregates are heavily colonized by heterotrophic microorganisms that express high levels of hydrolytic activities, making aggregates hotspots for carbon remineralization in the ocean. To assess how aggregate formation influences the ability of seawater microbial communities to access organic carbon, we compared hydrolysis rates of six polysaccharides in coastal seawater after aggregates had been formed (via incubation on a roller table) with hydrolysis rates in seawater from the same site that had not incubated on a roller table (referred to as whole seawater). Hydrolysis rates in the aggregates themselves were up to three orders of magnitude higher on a volume basis than in whole seawater. The enhancement of enzyme activity in aggregates relative to whole seawater differed by substrate, suggesting that the enhancement was under cellular control, rather than due to factors such as lysis or grazing. A comparison of hydrolysis rates in whole seawater with those in aggregate-free seawater, i.e. the fraction of water from the roller bottles that did not contain aggregates, demonstrated a nuanced microbial response to aggregate formation. Activities of laminarinase and xylanase enzymes in aggregate-free seawater were higher than in whole seawater, while activities of chondroitin, fucoidan, and arabinogalactan hydrolyzing enzymes were lower than in whole seawater. These data suggest that aggregate formation enhanced production of laminarinase and xylanase enzymes, and the enhancement also affected the surrounding seawater. Decreased activities of chondroitin, fucoidan, and arabinoglactan-hydrolyzing enzymes in aggregate-free seawater relative to whole seawater are likely due to shifts in enzyme production by the aggregate-associated community, coupled with the effects of enzyme degradation. Enhanced activities of laminarin- and xylan-hydrolyzing enzymes in aggregate-free seawater were due at least in part to cell-free enzymes. Measurements of enzyme lifetime

  14. Feedback in the local Universe: Relation between star formation and AGN activity in early type galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vaddi, Sravani; O'Dea, Christopher; Baum, Stefi; Jones, Christine; Forman, William; Whitmore, Samantha; Ahmed, Rabeea; Pierce, Katherine; Leary, Sara

    2015-08-01

    Aim: We address the relation between star formation and AGN activity in a large sample of nearby early type (E and S0) galaxies. The redshift range of the galaxies is 0.0002formation and thus the process of galaxy evolution and formation. Evidence of AGN feedback is found in massive galaxies in galaxy clusters. However, how common AGN feedback is in the local universe and in small scale systems is still not evident.Methods: To answer this question, we carried out a multiple wavelength study of a sample of 231 early type galaxies which were selected to have an apparent K-band magnitude brighter than 13.5 and whose positions correlate with Chandra ACIS-I and ACIS-S sources. The galaxies in the sample are unbiased regarding their star formation and radio source properties. Using the archival observations at radio, IR and UV from VLA, WISE and GALEX respectively, we obtained the radio power, estimate FUV star formation rate (SFR) and other galaxy properties to study AGN activity and ongoing star formation.Results: The relationship between radio power and stellar mass shows that there is an upper envelope of radio power that is a steep function of stellar luminosity. This suggests that less massive galaxies have low radio power while massive galaxies are capable of hosting powerful radio sources. The Radio-MIR relation shows that galaxies with P>=1022 WHz-1 are potential candidates for being AGN. About ~ 7% of the sample show evidence of ongoing star formation with SFR ranging from 10-3 to 1 M⊙yr-1. These are also less massive and radio faint suggesting the absence of active accretion. There is nearly equal fraction of star forming galaxies in radio faint (P<1022 WHz-1) and radio bright galaxies (P>=1022 WHz-1) . Only ~ 5% of the galaxies in our sample have P>=1022 WHz-1 and most of them do not show evidence of bright accretion disks. We see a weak correlation and a dispersion of

  15. Inhibitory effect of caffeic acid on ADP-induced thrombus formation and platelet activation involves mitogen-activated protein kinases

    PubMed Central

    Lu, Yu; Li, Quan; Liu, Yu-Ying; Sun, Kai; Fan, Jing-Yu; Wang, Chuan-She; Han, Jing-Yan

    2015-01-01

    Caffeic acid (CA), one of the active constituents of Radix Salvia miltiorrhizae, exhibits antioxidant and anti-inflammatory activities. However, few studies have assessed the ability of CA to inhibit platelet mediated thrombus generation in vivo. In this study, we investigated the antithrombotic effect of CA in mouse cerebral arterioles and venules using intravital microscopy. The antiplatelet activity of CA in ADP stimulated mouse platelets in vitro was also examined in attempt to explore the underlying mechanism. Our results demonstrated that CA (1.25–5 mg/kg) significantly inhibited thrombus formation in vivo. In vitro, CA (25–100 μM) inhibited ADP-induced platelet aggregation, P-selectin expression, ATP release, Ca2+ mobilization, and integrin αIIbβ3 activation. Additionally, CA attenuated p38, ERK, and JNK activation, and enhanced cAMP levels. Taken together, these data provide evidence for the inhibition of CA on platelet-mediated thrombosis in vivo, which is, at least partly, mediated by interference in phosphorylation of ERK, p38, and JNK leading to elevation of cAMP and down-regulation of P-selectin expression and αIIbβ3 activation. These results suggest that CA may have potential for the treatment of aberrant platelet activation-related diseases. PMID:26345207

  16. Antagonistic Gene Activities Determine the Formation of Pattern Elements along the Mediolateral Axis of the Arabidopsis Fruit

    PubMed Central

    González-Reig, Santiago; Ripoll, Juan José; Vera, Antonio; Yanofsky, Martin F.; Martínez-Laborda, Antonio

    2012-01-01

    The Arabidopsis fruit mainly consists of a mature ovary that shows three well defined territories that are pattern elements along the mediolateral axis: the replum, located at the medial plane of the flower, and the valve and the valve margin, both of lateral nature. JAG/FIL activity, which includes the combined functions of JAGGED (JAG), FILAMENTOUS FLOWER (FIL), and YABBY3 (YAB3), contributes to the formation of the two lateral pattern elements, whereas the cooperating genes BREVIPEDICELLUS (BP) and REPLUMLESS (RPL) promote replum development. A recent model to explain pattern formation along the mediolateral axis hypothesizes that JAG/FIL activity and BP/RPL function as antagonistic lateral and medial factors, respectively, which tend to repress each other. In this work, we demonstrate the existence of mutual exclusion mechanisms between both kinds of factors, and how this determines the formation and size of the three territories. Medial factors autonomously constrain lateral factors so that they only express outside the replum, and lateral factors negatively regulate the medially expressed BP gene in a non-autonomous fashion to ensure correct replum development. We also have found that ASYMMETRIC LEAVES1 (AS1), previously shown to repress BP both in leaves and ovaries, collaborates with JAG/FIL activity, preventing its repression by BP and showing synergistic interactions with JAG/FIL activity genes. Therefore AS gene function (the function of the interacting genes AS1 and AS2) has been incorporated in the model as a new lateral factor. Our model of antagonistic factors provides explanation for mutant fruit phenotypes in Arabidopsis and also may help to understand natural variation of fruit shape in Brassicaceae and other species, since subtle changes in gene expression may cause conspicuous changes in the size of the different tissue types. PMID:23133401

  17. Stochastic interaction between neural activity and molecular cues in the formation of topographic maps

    PubMed Central

    Owens, Melinda T.; Feldheim, David A.; Stryker, Michael P.; Triplett, Jason W.

    2015-01-01

    SUMMARY Topographic maps in visual processing areas maintain the spatial order of the visual world. Molecular cues and neuronal activity both play critical roles in map formation, but their interaction remains unclear. Here, we demonstrate that when molecular- and activity-dependent cues are rendered nearly equal in force, they drive topographic mapping stochastically. The functional and anatomical representation of azimuth in the superior colliculus of heterozygous Islet2-EphA3 knock-in (Isl2EphA3/+) mice is variable: maps may be single, duplicated, or a combination of the two. This heterogeneity is not due to genetic differences, since map organizations in individual mutant animals often differ between colliculi. Disruption of spontaneous waves of retinal activity resulted in uniform map organization in Isl2EphA3/+ mice, demonstrating that correlated spontaneous activity is required for map heterogeneity. Computational modeling replicates this heterogeneity, revealing that molecular- and activity-dependent forces interact simultaneously and stochastically during topographic map formation. PMID:26402608

  18. Identification of signal transduction pathways involved in the formation of platelet subpopulations upon activation.

    PubMed

    Topalov, Nikolai N; Kotova, Yana N; Vasil'ev, Sergey A; Panteleev, Mikhail A

    2012-04-01

    Platelets are formed elements of blood. Upon activation, they externalize phosphatidylserine, thus accelerating membrane-dependent reactions of blood coagulation. Activated platelets form two subpopulations, only one of which expresses phosphatidylserine. This study aimed to identify signalling pathways responsible for this segregation. Gel-filtered platelets, intact or loaded with calcium-sensitive dyes, were activated and labelled with annexin V and antibodies, followed by flow cytometric analysis. Calcium Green and Fura Red dyes were compared, and only the latter was able to detect calcium level differences in the platelet subpopulations. Phosphatidylserine-positive platelets produced by thrombin had stably high intracellular calcium level; addition of convulxin increased and stabilized calcium level in the phosphatidylserine-negative subpopulation. PAR1 agonist SFLLRN also induced calcium rise and subpopulation formation, but the resulting platelets were not coated with alpha-granule proteins. Adenylatecyclase activator forskolin inhibited phosphatidylserine-positive platelets formation several-fold, while its inhibitor SQ22536 had no effect. This suggests that adenylatecyclase inactivation is necessary, but not rate-limiting, for subpopulation segregation. Inhibition of mitogen-activated protein kinase kinase (U0126) and glycoprotein IIb-IIIa (Monafram(®)) was without effect, whereas inhibitors of phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (wortmannin) and Src tyrosine kinase (PP2) decreased the procoagulant subpopulation threefold. These data identify the principal signalling pathways controlling platelet heterogeneity. PMID:23379894

  19. Geldanamycin anisimycins activate Rho and stimulate Rho- and ROCK-dependent actin stress fiber formation.

    PubMed

    Amiri, Anahita; Noei, Farahnaz; Feroz, Tahir; Lee, Jonathan M

    2007-09-01

    Heat shock protein 90 (Hsp90) is a member of the heat shock family of molecular chaperones that regulate protein conformation and activity. Hsp90 regulates multiple cell signaling pathways by controlling the abundance and activity of several important protein kinases and cell cycle-related proteins. In this report, we show that inhibition of Hsp90 by geldanamycin or its derivative, 17-allylamino-17-desmethoxygeldamycin, leads to activation of the Rho GTPase and a dramatic increase in actin stress fiber formation in human tumor cell lines. Inactivation of Rho prevents geldanamycin-induced actin reorganization. Hsp90 inactivation does not alter the appearance of filopodia or lamellipodia and tubulin architecture is not visibly perturbed. Our observations suggest that Hsp90 has an important and specific role in regulating Rho activity and Rho-dependent actin cytoskeleton remodeling.

  20. U.S. Geological Survey Scientific Activities in the Exploration of Antarctica: Introduction to Antarctica (Including USGS Field Personnel: 1946-59)

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Tony K. Meunier Edited by Williams, Richard S.; Ferrigno, Jane G.

    2007-01-01

    3) significant changes that have occurred in Antarctic exploration and research since World War II will be discussed at the end of this report. Subsequent Open-File Reports will provide a year-by-year documentation of USGS scientific activities and accomplishments in Antarctica beginning with the post-IGY, 1959-60 research team. One Open-File Report is planned to be written for each field-based season. For an example of the series format, see Open-File Reports 2006-1113 (Meunier, 2007a) and 2006-1114 (Meunier, 2007b). This report is a companion document to Open-File Report 2006-1116 (Meunier, 2007c). The USGS mapping and science programs in Antarctica are among the longest continuously funded projects in the United States Antarctic Program (USAP). The 2005-06 field season is the 56th consecutive U.S. expedition in which USGS scientists have been participants, starting in 1946. USGS and the National Science Foundation (NSF) cooperation began with the establishment by NSF of the U.S. Antarctic (Research) Program [USA(R)P] in 1958-59 under Operation Deep Freeze IV (DF IV) and was given the responsibility for the principal coordination and management of all U.S. scientific activities in Antarctica in Deep Freeze 60 (DF 60) (1959-60). Financial support from NSF, mostly in the form of Memorandum of Understandings (MOUs) and Cooperative Agreements, extends back to this period and can be attributed to the need for accurate geologic, geophysical, and topographic base maps of specific field areas or regions where NSF-funded science projects were planned. The epoch of Antarctic exploration during the IGY was driven by science and, in a spirit of peaceful cooperation, the international scientific community wanted to limit military activities on the continent to logistical support (Meunier, 1979 [2007], p. 38). The USGS, a Federal civilian science agency in the Department of the Interior, has, since its founding in 1879, carried out numerous field-based national (and some

  1. Magnetically elevated accretion disks in active galactic nuclei: broad emission line regions and associated star formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Begelman, Mitchell C.; Silk, Joseph

    2016-10-01

    We propose that the accretion disks fueling active galactic nuclei are supported vertically against gravity by a strong toroidal (φ -direction) magnetic field that develops naturally as the result of an accretion disk dynamo. The magnetic pressure elevates most of the gas carrying the accretion flow at R to large heights z ˜ 0.1 R and low densities, while leaving a thin dense layer containing most of the mass - but contributing very little accretion - around the equator. We show that such a disk model leads naturally to the formation of a broad emission line region through thermal instability. Extrapolating to larger radii, we demonstrate that local gravitational instability and associated star formation are strongly suppressed compared to standard disk models for AGN, although star formation in the equatorial zone is predicted for sufficiently high mass supply rates. This new class of accretion disk models thus appears capable of resolving two longstanding puzzles in the theory of AGN fueling: the formation of broad emission line regions and the suppression of fragmentation thought to inhibit accretion at the required rates. We show that the disk of stars that formed in the Galactic Center a few million years ago could have resulted from an episode of magnetically elevated accretion at ˜0.1 of the Eddington limit.

  2. Glutathione-induced radical formation on lactoperoxidase does not correlate with the enzyme's peroxidase activity.

    PubMed

    Bonini, Marcelo G; Siraki, Arno G; Bhattacharjee, Suchandra; Mason, Ronald P

    2007-04-01

    Lactoperoxidase (LPO) is believed to serve as a mediator of host defense against invading pathogens. The protein is more abundant in body fluids such as milk, saliva, and tears. Lactoperoxidase is known to mediate the oxidation of halides and (pseudo)halides in the presence of hydrogen peroxide to reactive intermediates presumably involved in pathogen killing. More recently, LPO has been shown to oxidize a wide diversity of thiol compounds to thiyl free radicals, which ultimately lead to the formation of a protein radical characterized by DMPO-immunospin trapping. In the same study by our group the authors claimed that a consequence of this protein radical formation was the inactivation of LPO (Guo et al., J. Biol. Chem.279:13272-13283; 2004). Here we demonstrate that although thiyl radical formation does lead to LPO radical production, the formation of this radical is unrelated to the enzyme's activity. We suggest the source of this misleading interpretation to be the binding of GSH to ELISA plates, which interferes with ABTS and guaiacol oxidation. In addition, DMPO-GSH-nitrone adducts bind to ELISA plates, leading to ambiguities of interpretation since we have demonstrated that DMPO-GSH nitrone does not bind to LPO, and only LPO-protein-DMPO-nitrone adducts can be detected by Western blot.

  3. A Model for Variable Levee Formation Rates in an Active Lava Flow

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Glaze, L. S.; Baloga, S. M.; Mouginis-Mark, P.; Crisp, J.

    2004-01-01

    Channelized lava flows on Mars and the Earth often feature levees and collateral margins that change in volume along the path of the flow. Consistent with field observations of terrestrial flows, this suggests that the rate of levee formation varies with distance and other factors. Previous models have assumed a constant rate of levee growth, specified by a single parameter, lambda. The rate of levee formation for lava flows is a good indicator of the mass eruption rate and rheology of the flow. Insight into levee formation will help us better understand whether or not the effusion rate was constant during an eruption, and once local topography is considered, allows us to look at cooling and/or rheology changes downslope. Here we present a more realistic extension of the levee formation model that treats the rate of levee growth as a function of distance along the flow path. We show how this model can be used with a terrestrial flow and a long lava flow on Mars. The key statement of the new formulation is the rate of transfer from the active component to the levees (or other passive components) through an element dx along the path of the flow. This volumetric transfer equation is presented.

  4. [Formation of Halogenated By-products in Co²⁺ Activated Peroxymonosulfate Oxidation Process].

    PubMed

    Liu, Kuo; Jin, Hao; Dong, Wei; Ji, Yue-fei; Lu, Jun-he

    2016-05-15

    Sulfate radicals (SO₄·⁻) generated by Co²⁺ catalyzed activation of peroxymonosulfate (PMS) are highly oxidative and can be applied to degrade various organic pollutants. It was revealed in this research that bromide could be transformed in this process to reactive bromine species which reacted with phenol subsequently, leading to the formation of bromophenols and brominated by-products such as bromoform and dibromoacetic acid. The formation of the brominated by-products first increased and then decreased. The maximum yields of bromoform (10.3 µmol · L⁻¹) and dibromoacetic acid (14.6 µmol · L⁻¹) occurred at approximately 8 h with initial phenol, PMS, Br⁻, Co²⁺, concentrations of 0.05, 1.0, 0.2, and 5 µmol · L⁻¹, respectively. Formation of the brominated by-products decreased with increasing pH. With constant total halides, increasing Cl⁻/Br⁻ ratio decreased the total formation of halogenated by- products but generated more chlorinated byproducts. The findings of this research can provide valuable information in assessing the feasibility of SO₄·⁻ based oxidation technologies in real practice. PMID:27506036

  5. NRP1 Regulates CDC42 Activation to Promote Filopodia Formation in Endothelial Tip Cells.

    PubMed

    Fantin, Alessandro; Lampropoulou, Anastasia; Gestri, Gaia; Raimondi, Claudio; Senatore, Valentina; Zachary, Ian; Ruhrberg, Christiana

    2015-06-16

    Sprouting blood vessels are led by filopodia-studded endothelial tip cells that respond to angiogenic signals. Mosaic lineage tracing previously revealed that NRP1 is essential for tip cell function, although its mechanistic role in tip cells remains poorly defined. Here, we show that NRP1 is dispensable for genetic tip cell identity. Instead, we find that NRP1 is essential to form the filopodial bursts that distinguish tip cells morphologically from neighboring stalk cells, because it enables the extracellular matrix (ECM)-induced activation of CDC42, a key regulator of filopodia formation. Accordingly, NRP1 knockdown and pharmacological CDC42 inhibition similarly impaired filopodia formation in vitro and in developing zebrafish in vivo. During mouse retinal angiogenesis, CDC42 inhibition impaired tip cell and vascular network formation, causing defects that resembled those due to loss of ECM-induced, but not VEGF-induced, NRP1 signaling. We conclude that NRP1 enables ECM-induced filopodia formation for tip cell function during sprouting angiogenesis. PMID:26051942

  6. Using formative research to develop CHANGE!: a curriculum-based physical activity promoting intervention

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Low childhood physical activity levels are currently one of the most pressing public health concerns. Numerous school-based physical activity interventions have been conducted with varied success. Identifying effective child-based physical activity interventions are warranted. The purpose of this formative study was to elicit subjective views of children, their parents, and teachers about physical activity to inform the design of the CHANGE! (Children's Health, Activity, and Nutrition: Get Educated!) intervention programme. Methods Semi-structured mixed-gender interviews (group and individual) were conducted in 11 primary schools, stratified by socioeconomic status, with 60 children aged 9-10 years (24 boys, 36 girls), 33 parents (4 male, 29 female) and 10 teachers (4 male, 6 female). Questions for interviews were structured around the PRECEDE stage of the PRECEDE-PROCEDE model and addressed knowledge, attitudes and beliefs towards physical activity, as well as views on barriers to participation. All data were transcribed verbatim. Pen profiles were constructed from the transcripts in a deductive manner using the Youth Physical Activity Promotion Model framework. The profiles represented analysis outcomes via a diagram of key emergent themes. Results Analyses revealed an understanding of the relationship between physical activity and health, although some children had limited understanding of what constitutes physical activity. Views elicited by children and parents were generally consistent. Fun, enjoyment and social support were important predictors of physical activity participation, though several barriers such as lack of parental support were identified across all group interviews. The perception of family invested time was positively linked to physical activity engagement. Conclusions Families have a powerful and important role in promoting health-enhancing behaviours. Involvement of parents and the whole family is a strategy that could be

  7. The formation of active protoclusters in the Aquila rift: a millimeter continuum view

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maury, A. J.; André, P.; Men'shchikov, A.; Könyves, V.; Bontemps, S.

    2011-11-01

    While most stars are believed to form in stellar clusters, the formation and early evolution of young stellar clusters is still largely unknown. Improving our knowledge of the earliest phases of clustered star formation is crucial for understanding the origin of the stellar initial mass function and the efficiency of the star formation process, which both play a key role in the evolution of galaxies. Here, we present an analysis of the Aquila rift complex which addresses the questions of the star formation rate (SFR), star formation efficiency (SFE) and typical lifetime of the Class 0 protostellar phase in two nearby cluster-forming clumps: the Serpens South and W40 protoclusters. We carried out a 1.2 mm dust continuum mapping of the Aquila rift complex with the MAMBO bolometer array on the IRAM 30 m telescope. Using a multi-scale source extraction method, we perform a systematic source extraction in our millimeter continuum map. Based on complementary data from the Herschel Gould Belt survey and Spitzer maps, we characterize the spectral energy distributions (SEDs) of the 77 mm continuum sources detected with MAMBO and estimate their evolutionary stages. Taking advantage of the comprehensive dataset available for the Serpens South region, spanning wavelengths from 2 μm to 1.2 mm, we estimate the numbers of young stellar objects (YSOs) at different evolutionary stages and find a ratio of Class 0 to Class I protostars N(0)/N(I) = 0.19-0.27. This low ratio supports a scenario of relatively fast accretion at the beginning of the protostellar phase, and leads to a Class 0 lifetime of ~4-9 × 104 yr. We also show that both the Serpens South and W40 protoclusters are characterized by large fractions of protostars and high SFRs ~ 20-50M⊙ Myr-1 pc-2, in agreement with the idea that these two nearby clumps are active sites of clustered star formation currently undergoing bursts of star formation, and have the potential ability to form bound star clusters. While the

  8. Evaluation of in vivo immune complex formation and complement activation in patients receiving intravenous streptokinase.

    PubMed Central

    Freysdottir, J; Ormarsdottir, S; Sigfusson, A

    1993-01-01

    The usefulness of several different methods for detecting immune complex formation and complement activation in the circulation were applied to samples from patients receiving intravenous Streptokinase therapy for myocardial infarction. Streptokinase is a foreign antigen and can cause immune reactions. We collected samples from 13 patients, before Streptokinase administration (baseline), at the end of infusion (1 h), 12 h later and on day 7. We measured IgG containing immune complexes (IgG-IC), free C3d and antibodies to Streptokinase by ELISA, and CR1, C3d and C4d on erythrocytes by flow cytometric assay. Antibodies to Streptokinase are common, as all but two of the patients had measurable antibody levels. During Streptokinase treatment there was a drop in antibody levels, most prominent in those patients who had high baseline levels. At the same time increased levels of free C3d and erythrocyte-bound C3d were observed. After 12 h free C3d was usually back to baseline level, but C3d on erythrocytes was still raised. These data indicate the formation of Streptokinase immune complexes in patients with high Streptokinase antibody levels, and show that these complexes are cleared rapidly from the circulation, leaving more persistent signs of complement activation. We conclude that free C3d is a good indicator of ongoing complement activation, whereas C3d on erythrocytes indicates that complement activation has recently taken place. PMID:8222319

  9. Analysis of the Effect of Water Activity on Ice Formation Using a New Theory of Nucleation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barahona, Donifan

    2013-01-01

    In this work a new theory of nucleation is developed and used to investigate the effect of water activity on the formation of ice within super-cooled droplets. The new theory is based on a novel concept where the interface is assumed to be made of liquid molecules trapped by the solid matrix. Using this concept new expressions are developed for the critical ice germ size and the nucleation work, with explicit dependencies on temperature and water activity. However unlike previous approaches, the new theory does not depend on the interfacial tension between liquid and ice. Comparison against experimental results shows that the new theory is able to reproduce the observed effect of water activity on nucleation rate and freezing temperature. It allows for the first time a theoretical derivation of the constant shift in water activity between melting and nucleation. The new theory offers a consistent thermodynamic view of ice nucleation, simple enough to be applied in atmospheric models of cloud formation.

  10. Surfactin triggers biofilm formation of Bacillus subtilis in melon phylloplane and contributes to the biocontrol activity.

    PubMed

    Zeriouh, Houda; de Vicente, Antonio; Pérez-García, Alejandro; Romero, Diego

    2014-07-01

    The biocontrol activity of many Bacillus species has been traditionally related to the direct antagonism of pathogens. In previous works, we reported that B. subtilis strain UMAF6614 was an efficient biocontrol agent that produced bacillomycin, fengycin and surfactin lipopeptides. Bacillomycins and fengycins were shown to have antagonistic activity towards fungal and bacterial pathogens of cucurbits; however, the functionality of surfactin remained unclear. In this study, the role of surfactin in the biocontrol activity of this strain was investigated. We observed that a deficiency in surfactin production led to a partial reduction of disease suppression by this biocontrol agent, which coincided with a defect in biofilm formation and the colonization of the melon phylloplane. These effects were due to a dramatic reduction in the production of exopolysaccharide and the TasA protein, which are the two major components of the extracellular matrix. We propose that the biocontrol activity of this strain is the result of the coordinated action of the three families of lipopeptides. B. subtilis UMAF6614 produces surfactin to trigger biofilm formation on melon phylloplane, which ensures the long-term persistence and the adequate secretion of suppressive lipopeptides, bacillomycins and fengycins, which efficiently target pathogens.

  11. Structure and activation of MuSK, a receptor tyrosine kinase central to neuromuscular junction formation.

    PubMed

    Hubbard, Stevan R; Gnanasambandan, Kavitha

    2013-10-01

    MuSK (muscle-specific kinase) is a receptor tyrosine kinase that plays a central signaling role in the formation of neuromuscular junctions (NMJs). MuSK is activated in a complex spatio-temporal manner to cluster acetylcholine receptors on the postsynaptic (muscle) side of the synapse and to induce differentiation of the nerve terminal on the presynaptic side. The ligand for MuSK is LRP4 (low-density lipoprotein receptor-related protein-4), a transmembrane protein in muscle, whose binding affinity for MuSK is potentiated by agrin, a neuronally derived heparan-sulfate proteoglycan. In addition, Dok7, a cytoplasmic adaptor protein, is also required for MuSK activation in vivo. This review focuses on the physical interplay between these proteins and MuSK for activation and downstream signaling, which culminates in NMJ formation. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: Emerging recognition and activation mechanisms of receptor tyrosine kinases. PMID:23467009

  12. Trihalomethane formation potential of aquatic and terrestrial fulvic and humic acids: Sorption on activated carbon.

    PubMed

    Abouleish, Mohamed Y Z; Wells, Martha J M

    2015-07-15

    Humic substances (HSs) are precursors for the formation of hazardous disinfection by-products (DBPs) during chlorination of water. Various surrogate parameters have been used to investigate the generation of DBPs by HS precursors and the removal of these precursors by activated carbon treatment. Dissolved organic carbon (DOC)- and ultraviolet absorbance (UVA254)-based isotherms are commonly reported and presumed to be good predictors of the trihalomethane formation potential (THMFP). However, THMFP-based isotherms are rarely published such that the three types of parameters have not been compared directly. Batch equilibrium experiments on activated carbon were used to generate constant-initial-concentration sorption isotherms for well-characterized samples obtained from the International Humic Substances Society (IHSS). HSs representing type (fulvic acid [FA], humic acid [HA]), origin (aquatic, terrestrial), and geographical source (Nordic, Suwannee, Peat, Soil) were examined at pH6 and pH9. THMFP-based isotherms were generated and compared to determine if DOC- and UVA254-based isotherms were good predictors of the THMFP. The sorption process depended on the composition of the HSs and the chemical nature of the activated carbon, both of which were influenced by pH. Activated carbon removal of THM-precursors was pH- and HS-dependent. In some instances, the THMFP existed after UVA254 was depleted.

  13. Formation of Cr(III) hydroxides from chrome alum solutions. 1: Precipitation of active chromium hydroxide

    SciTech Connect

    Avena, M.J.; Giacomelli, C.E.; De Pauli, C.P.

    1996-06-25

    The hydrolysis of Cr(III) and precipitation of colloidal chromium hydroxides are important processes occurring in soils and natural waters. The formation of active chromium hydroxide, Cr(OH){sub 3}{center_dot}3H{sub 2}O, was studied through potentiometric titrations and turbidimetric measurements. UV-Vis and IR spectroscopies were also employed to characterize the synthesized solid. The rapid addition of NaOH solution to aqueous chrome alum (KCr(SO{sub 4}){sub 2}{center_dot}12H{sub 2}O) solutions caused the immediate precipitation of the active material. Only monomeric Cr(III) species seemed to be participating in the precipitation process; neither chromium polymers nor complexes with anions (SO{sub 4}{sup 2{minus}}, Cl{sup {minus}}, NO{sub 3}{sup {minus}}, ClO{sub 4}{sup {minus}}) influenced the fast formation of Cr(OH){sub 3}{center_dot}3H{sub 2}O. Titration studies allowed the determination of several hydrolysis and precipitation constants for Cr(III). Nevertheless, they cannot be used for the estimate of Cr(OH){sub 3}{sup 0} formation constant.

  14. Hippocampal PER1: a circadian sentinel controlling RSKy activity during memory formation.

    PubMed

    Yoo, Seung-Hee; Eckel-Mahan, Kristin

    2016-09-01

    Studies have demonstrated a pronounced dependence of memory formation on circadian time; however, the numerous mechanisms underlying this reliance are only beginning to be understood. While the 24-h cellular clock controls various aspects of hippocampal memory formation, its consolidation in particular (i.e., its conversion from short-term to long-term memory), appears to be heavily dependent on circadian activity in hippocampal neurons. Hippocampal memory consolidation requires phosphorylation of the cAMP Response Element-Binding protein, CREB, which upon phosphorylation promotes the transcription of genes necessary for long-term memory formation. Rhythmic cAMP/ERK-MAPK activity upstream of CREB is a necessary component. This Editorial highlights a study by Rawashdeh and coworkers, in which the authors establish the circadian clock gene Period1 (Per1) as a regulator of CREB phosphorylation in the mouse hippocampus, and thus reveal a functional link between circadian rhythms and learning efficiency. Read the highlighted article 'Period1 gates the circadian modulation of memory-relevant signaling in mouse hippocampus by regulating the nuclear shuttling of the CREB kinase pP90RSK' on page 731. PMID:27554418

  15. A connection between star formation activity and cosmic rays in the starburst galaxy M82.

    PubMed

    2009-12-10

    Although Galactic cosmic rays (protons and nuclei) are widely believed to be mainly accelerated by the winds and supernovae of massive stars, definitive evidence of this origin remains elusive nearly a century after their discovery. The active regions of starburst galaxies have exceptionally high rates of star formation, and their large size-more than 50 times the diameter of similar Galactic regions-uniquely enables reliable calorimetric measurements of their potentially high cosmic-ray density. The cosmic rays produced in the formation, life and death of massive stars in these regions are expected to produce diffuse gamma-ray emission through interactions with interstellar gas and radiation. M82, the prototype small starburst galaxy, is predicted to be the brightest starburst galaxy in terms of gamma-ray emission. Here we report the detection of >700-GeV gamma-rays from M82. From these data we determine a cosmic-ray density of 250 eV cm(-3) in the starburst core, which is about 500 times the average Galactic density. This links cosmic-ray acceleration to star formation activity, and suggests that supernovae and massive-star winds are the dominant accelerators.

  16. Low-level supermassive black hole activity and star formation in isolated ellipticals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martinkus, Charlotte; Miller, Brendan; Gallo, Elena

    2016-01-01

    We present and discuss Chandra ACIS-S X-ray observations of six early-type galaxies located within cosmic voids. The targeted galaxies have comparable stellar masses of 6-9e10 solar but span a wide range of star formation rates, from 0.03 to 6.5 solar masses per year. These data permit clean investigation of the link, if any, between star formation and low-level supermassive black hole activity. We isolate the nuclear X-ray emission associated with SMBH activity through analyzing the X-ray surface brightness profiles and calculating the predicted X-ray binary contamination within the extraction aperture. The galaxies with higher star formation rates also tend to have greater SMBH-associated X-ray luminosities, perhaps suggestive of a mutual dependence on cold gas. We also compare our void galaxies to cluster early-type galaxies of similar stellar mass, finding that the void galaxies have, on average, more compact optical surface brightness profiles along with greater X-ray luminosities.

  17. A connection between star formation activity and cosmic rays in the starburst galaxy M82

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    VERITAS Collaboration; Acciari, V. A.; Aliu, E.; Arlen, T.; Aune, T.; Bautista, M.; Beilicke, M.; Benbow, W.; Boltuch, D.; Bradbury, S. M.; Buckley, J. H.; Bugaev, V.; Byrum, K.; Cannon, A.; Celik, O.; Cesarini, A.; Chow, Y. C.; Ciupik, L.; Cogan, P.; Colin, P.; Cui, W.; Dickherber, R.; Duke, C.; Fegan, S. J.; Finley, J. P.; Finnegan, G.; Fortin, P.; Fortson, L.; Furniss, A.; Galante, N.; Gall, D.; Gibbs, K.; Gillanders, G. H.; Godambe, S.; Grube, J.; Guenette, R.; Gyuk, G.; Hanna, D.; Holder, J.; Horan, D.; Hui, C. M.; Humensky, T. B.; Imran, A.; Kaaret, P.; Karlsson, N.; Kertzman, M.; Kieda, D.; Kildea, J.; Konopelko, A.; Krawczynski, H.; Krennrich, F.; Lang, M. J.; Lebohec, S.; Maier, G.; McArthur, S.; McCann, A.; McCutcheon, M.; Millis, J.; Moriarty, P.; Mukherjee, R.; Nagai, T.; Ong, R. A.; Otte, A. N.; Pandel, D.; Perkins, J. S.; Pizlo, F.; Pohl, M.; Quinn, J.; Ragan, K.; Reyes, L. C.; Reynolds, P. T.; Roache, E.; Rose, H. J.; Schroedter, M.; Sembroski, G. H.; Smith, A. W.; Steele, D.; Swordy, S. P.; Theiling, M.; Thibadeau, S.; Varlotta, A.; Vassiliev, V. V.; Vincent, S.; Wagner, R. G.; Wakely, S. P.; Ward, J. E.; Weekes, T. C.; Weinstein, A.; Weisgarber, T.; Williams, D. A.; Wissel, S.; Wood, M.; Zitzer, B.

    2009-12-01

    Although Galactic cosmic rays (protons and nuclei) are widely believed to be mainly accelerated by the winds and supernovae of massive stars, definitive evidence of this origin remains elusive nearly a century after their discovery. The active regions of starburst galaxies have exceptionally high rates of star formation, and their large size-more than 50 times the diameter of similar Galactic regions-uniquely enables reliable calorimetric measurements of their potentially high cosmic-ray density. The cosmic rays produced in the formation, life and death of massive stars in these regions are expected to produce diffuse γ-ray emission through interactions with interstellar gas and radiation. M82, the prototype small starburst galaxy, is predicted to be the brightest starburst galaxy in terms of γ-ray emission. Here we report the detection of >700-GeV γ-rays from M82. From these data we determine a cosmic-ray density of 250eVcm-3 in the starburst core, which is about 500 times the average Galactic density. This links cosmic-ray acceleration to star formation activity, and suggests that supernovae and massive-star winds are the dominant accelerators.

  18. Head formation: OTX2 regulates Dkk1 and Lhx1 activity in the anterior mesendoderm.

    PubMed

    Ip, Chi Kin; Fossat, Nicolas; Jones, Vanessa; Lamonerie, Thomas; Tam, Patrick P L

    2014-10-01

    The Otx2 gene encodes a paired-type homeobox transcription factor that is essential for the induction and the patterning of the anterior structures in the mouse embryo. Otx2 knockout embryos fail to form a head. Whereas previous studies have shown that Otx2 is required in the anterior visceral endoderm and the anterior neuroectoderm for head formation, its role in the anterior mesendoderm (AME) has not been assessed specifically. Here, we show that tissue-specific ablation of Otx2 in the AME phenocopies the truncation of the embryonic head of the Otx2 null mutant. Expression of Dkk1 and Lhx1, two genes that are also essential for head formation, is disrupted in the AME of the conditional Otx2-deficient embryos. Consistent with the fact that Dkk1 is a direct target of OTX2, we showed that OTX2 can interact with the H1 regulatory region of Dkk1 to activate its expression. Cross-species comparative analysis, RT-qPCR, ChIP-qPCR and luciferase assays have revealed two conserved regions in the Lhx1 locus to which OTX2 can bind to activate Lhx1 expression. Abnormal development of the embryonic head in Otx2;Lhx1 and Otx2;Dkk1 compound mutant embryos highlights the functional intersection of Otx2, Dkk1 and Lhx1 in the AME for head formation.

  19. YB-1 regulates stress granule formation and tumor progression by translationally activating G3BP1

    PubMed Central

    Somasekharan, Syam Prakash; El-Naggar, Amal; Leprivier, Gabriel; Cheng, Hongwei; Hajee, Shamil; Grunewald, Thomas G.P.; Zhang, Fan; Ng, Tony; Delattre, Olivier; Evdokimova, Valentina; Wang, Yuzhuo; Gleave, Martin

    2015-01-01

    Under cell stress, global protein synthesis is inhibited to preserve energy. One mechanism is to sequester and silence mRNAs in ribonucleoprotein complexes known as stress granules (SGs), which contain translationally silent mRNAs, preinitiation factors, and RNA-binding proteins. Y-box binding protein 1 (YB-1) localizes to SGs, but its role in SG biology is unknown. We now report that YB-1 directly binds to and translationally activates the 5′ untranslated region (UTR) of G3BP1 mRNAs, thereby controlling the availability of the G3BP1 SG nucleator for SG assembly. YB-1 inactivation in human sarcoma cells dramatically reduces G3BP1 and SG formation in vitro. YB-1 and G3BP1 expression are highly correlated in human sarcomas, and elevated G3BP1 expression correlates with poor survival. Finally, G3BP1 down-regulation in sarcoma xenografts prevents in vivo SG formation and tumor invasion, and completely blocks lung metastasis in mouse models. Together, these findings demonstrate a critical role for YB-1 in SG formation through translational activation of G3BP1, and highlight novel functions for SGs in tumor progression. PMID:25800057

  20. Effect of Red Blood Cells on Platelet Activation and Thrombus Formation in Tortuous Arterioles

    PubMed Central

    Chesnutt, Jennifer K. W.; Han, Hai-Chao

    2013-01-01

    Thrombosis is a major contributor to cardiovascular disease, which can lead to myocardial infarction and stroke. Thrombosis may form in tortuous microvessels, which are often seen throughout the human body, but the microscale mechanisms and processes are not well understood. In straight vessels, the presence of red blood cells (RBCs) is known to push platelets toward walls, which may affect platelet aggregation and thrombus formation. However in tortuous vessels, the effects of RBC interactions with platelets in thrombosis are largely unknown. Accordingly, the objective of this work was to determine the physical effects of RBCs, platelet size, and vessel tortuosity on platelet activation and thrombus formation in tortuous arterioles. A discrete element computational model was used to simulate the transport, collision, adhesion, aggregation, and shear-induced platelet activation of hundreds of individual platelets and RBCs in thrombus formation in tortuous arterioles. Results showed that high shear stress near the inner sides of curved arteriole walls activated platelets to initiate thrombosis. RBCs initially promoted platelet activation, but then collisions of RBCs with mural thrombi reduced the amount of mural thrombus and the size of emboli. In the absence of RBCs, mural thrombus mass was smaller in a highly tortuous arteriole compared to a less tortuous arteriole. In the presence of RBCs however, mural thrombus mass was larger in the highly tortuous arteriole compared to the less tortuous arteriole. As well, smaller platelet size yielded less mural thrombus mass and smaller emboli, either with or without RBCs. This study shed light on microscopic interactions of RBCs and platelets in tortuous microvessels, which have implications in various pathologies associated with thrombosis and bleeding. PMID:25022613

  1. Ginsenoside-Rp1 inhibits platelet activation and thrombus formation via impaired glycoprotein VI signalling pathway, tyrosine phosphorylation and MAPK activation

    PubMed Central

    Endale, M; Lee, WM; Kamruzzaman, SM; Kim, SD; Park, JY; Park, MH; Park, TY; Park, HJ; Cho, JY; Rhee, MH

    2012-01-01

    BACKGROUND AND PURPOSE Ginsenosides are the main constituents for the pharmacological effects of Panax ginseng. Such effects of ginsenosides including cardioprotective and anti-platelet activities have shown stability and bioavailability limitations. However, information on the anti-platelet activity of ginsenoside-Rp1 (G-Rp1), a stable derivative of ginsenoside-Rg3, is scarce. We examined the ability of G-Rp1 to modulate agonist-induced platelet activation. EXPERIMENTAL APPROACH G-Rp1 in vitro and ex vivo effects on agonist-induced platelet-aggregation, granule-secretion, [Ca2+]i mobilization, integrin-αIIbβ3 activation were examined. Vasodilator-stimulated phosphoprotein (VASP) and MAPK expressions and levels of tyrosine phosphorylation of the glycoprotein VI (GPVI) signalling pathway components were also studied. G-Rp1 effects on arteriovenous shunt thrombus formation in rats or tail bleeding time and ex vivo coagulation time in mice were determined. KEY RESULT G-Rp1 markedly inhibited platelet aggregation induced by collagen, thrombin or ADP. While G-Rp1 elevated cAMP levels, it dose-dependently suppressed collagen-induced ATP-release, thromboxane secretion, p-selectin expression, [Ca2+]i mobilization and αIIbβ3 activation and attenuated p38MAPK and ERK2 activation. Furthermore, G-Rp1 inhibited tyrosine phosphorylation of multiple components (Fyn, Lyn, Syk, LAT, PI3K and PLCγ2) of the GPVI signalling pathway. G-Rp1 inhibited in vivo thrombus formation and ex vivo platelet aggregation and ATP secretion without affecting tail bleeding time and coagulation time, respectively. CONCLUSION AND IMPLICATIONS G-Rp1 inhibits collagen-induced platelet activation and thrombus formation through modulation of early GPVI signalling events, and this effect involves VASP stimulation, and ERK2 and p38-MAPK inhibition. These data suggest that G-Rp1 may have therapeutic potential for the treatment of cardiovascular diseases involving aberrant platelet activation. PMID

  2. Formation of the Ras dimer is essential for Raf-1 activation.

    PubMed

    Inouye, K; Mizutani, S; Koide, H; Kaziro, Y

    2000-02-11

    Although it is well established that Ras requires membrane localization for activation of its target molecule, Raf-1, the reason for this requirement is not fully understood. In this study, we found that modified Ras, which is purified from Sf9 cells, could activate Raf-1 in a cell-free system, when incorporated into liposome. Using a bifunctional cross-linker and a protein-fragmentation complementation assay, we detected dimer formation of Ras in the liposome and in the intact cells, respectively. These results suggest that dimerization of Ras in the lipid membrane is essential for activation of Raf-1. To support this, we found that, when fused to glutathione S-transferase (GST), unprocessed Ras expressed in Escherichia coli could bypass the requirement for liposome. A Ras-dependent Raf-1 activator, which we previously reported (Mizutani, S., Koide, H., and Kaziro, Y. (1998) Oncogene 16, 2781-2786), was still required for Raf-1 activation by GST-Ras. Furthermore, an enforced dimerization of unmodified oncogenic Ras mutant in human embryonic kidney (HEK) 293 cells, using a portion of gyrase B or estrogen receptor, also resulted in activation of Raf-1. From these results, we conclude that membrane localization allows Ras to form a dimer, which is essential, although not sufficient, for Raf-1 activation.

  3. Coordinated activation of the secretory pathway during notochord formation in the Xenopus embryo

    PubMed Central

    Tanegashima, Kosuke; Zhao, Hui; Rebbert, Martha L.; Dawid, Igor B.

    2009-01-01

    Summary We compared the transcriptome in the developing notochord of Xenopus laevis embryos with that of other embryonic regions. A coordinated and intense activation of a large set of secretory pathway genes was observed in the notochord, but not in notochord precursors in the axial mesoderm at early gastrula stage. The genes encoding Xbp1 and Creb3l2 were also activated in the notochord. These two transcription factors are implicated in the activation of secretory pathway genes during the unfolded protein response, where cells react to the stress of a build-up of unfolded proteins in their endoplasmic reticulum. Xbp1 and Creb3l2 are differentially expressed but not differentially activated in the notochord. Reduction of expression of Xbp1 or Creb3l2 by injection of antisense morpholinos led to strong deficits in notochord but not somitic muscle development. In addition, the expression of some, but not all, genes encoding secretory proteins was inhibited by injection of xbp1 morpholinos. Furthermore, expression of activated forms of Xbp1 or Creb3l2 in animal explants could activate a similar subset of secretory pathway genes. We conclude that coordinated activation of a battery of secretory pathway genes mediated by Xbp1 and Creb/ATF factors is a characteristic and necessary feature of notochord formation. PMID:19793890

  4. Preschool Curriculum: A Child Centered Curriculum of Concepts and Activities Including All of the CDA Functional Areas--Bi-lingual and Home Activities.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cunningham, Dorothy, Comp.

    This preschool resource curriculum, intended for use in a Head Start center, was written to correspond with a work plan and curriculum for children 3 to 5 years of age. The units included in the curriculum guide are aimed at integrating growth experiences with the learning of basic skills. Each of the 16 units contains material related to each of…

  5. Formation of the Thiol Conjugates and Active Metabolite of Clopidogrel by Human Liver Microsomes

    PubMed Central

    Lau, Wei C.; Hollenberg, Paul F.

    2012-01-01

    We reported previously the formation of a glutathionyl conjugate of the active metabolite (AM) of clopidogrel and the covalent modification of a cysteinyl residue of human cytochrome P450 2B6 in a reconstituted system (Mol Pharmacol 80:839–847, 2011). In this work, we extended our studies of the metabolism of clopidogrel to human liver microsomes in the presence of four reductants, namely, GSH, l-Cys, N-acetyl-l-cysteine (NAC), and ascorbic acid. Our results demonstrated that formation of the AM was greatly affected by the reductant used and the relative amounts of the AM formed were increased in the following order: NAC (17%) < l-Cys (53%) < ascorbic acid (61%) < GSH (100%). AM-thiol conjugates were observed in the presence of NAC, l-Cys, and GSH. In the case of GSH, the formation of both the AM and the glutathionyl conjugate was dependent on the GSH concentrations, with similar Km values of ∼0.5 mM, which indicates that formation of the thiol conjugates constitutes an integral part of the bioactivation processes for clopidogrel. It was observed that the AM was slowly converted to the thiol conjugate, with a half-life of ∼10 h. Addition of dithiothreitol to the reaction mixture reversed the conversion, which resulted in a decrease in AM-thiol conjugate levels and a concomitant increase in AM levels, whereas addition of NAC led to the formation of AM-NAC and a concomitant decrease in AM-GSH levels. These results not only confirm that the AM is formed through oxidative opening of the thiolactone ring but also suggest the existence of an equilibrium between the AM, the thiol conjugates, and the reductants. These factors may affect the effective concentrations of the AM in vivo. PMID:22584220

  6. ACTIVE GALACTIC NUCLEI AND THE TRUNCATION OF STAR FORMATION IN K+A GALAXIES

    SciTech Connect

    Brown, Michael J. I.; Palamara, David; Moustakas, John; Caldwell, Nelson; Cool, Richard J.; Zaritsky, Dennis; Dey, Arjun; Jannuzi, Buell T.; Hickox, Ryan C.; Murray, Stephen S.

    2009-09-20

    We have searched for active galactic nuclei (AGNs) in K+A galaxies, using multiwavelength imaging and spectroscopy in the Booetes field of the NOAO Deep Wide-Field Survey. The K+A galaxies, which have had their star formation rapidly truncated, are selected via their strong Balmer absorption lines and weak Halpha emission. Our sample consists of 24 K+A galaxies selected from 6594 0.10 < z < 0.35 galaxies brighter than I = 20 with optical spectroscopy from the AGN and Galaxy Evolution Survey. Two thirds of the K+A galaxies are likely ongoing galaxy mergers, with nearby companion galaxies or tidal tails. Galaxy mergers may be responsible for the truncation of star formation, or we are observing the aftermath of merger triggered starbursts. As expected, the optical colors of K+A galaxies largely fall between blue galaxies with ongoing star formation and red passive galaxies. However, only 1% of the galaxies with colors between the red and blue populations are K+A galaxies, and we conclude that the truncation of star formation in K+A galaxies must have been unusually abrupt ({approx}<100 Myr). We examined the AGN content of K+A galaxies with both optical emission-line ratios (BPT diagrams) and Chandra X-ray imaging. At least half of all K+A galaxies display the optical emission-line ratios of AGNs, and a third of M{sub R} < -22 K+A galaxies host AGNs with X-ray luminosities of {approx}10{sup 42} erg s{sup -1}. The faintest K+A galaxies do not show clear evidence for hosting AGNs, having emission-line ratios consistent with photoionization by massive stars and few X-ray detections. We speculate that two mechanisms may be responsible for the truncation of star formation in K+A galaxies, with AGN feedback only playing a role in M{sub R} {approx}< -20.5 galaxies.

  7. Sediment infilling and wetland formation dynamics in an active crevasse splay of the Mississippi River delta

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Cahoon, Donald R.; White, David A.; Lynch, James C.

    2011-01-01

    Crevasse splay environments provide a mesocosm for evaluating wetland formation and maintenance processes on a decadal time scale. Site elevation, water levels, vertical accretion, elevation change, shallow subsidence, and plant biomass were measured at five habitats along an elevation gradient to evaluate wetland formation and development in Brant Pass Splay; an active crevasse splay of the Balize delta of the Mississippi River. The processes of vertical development (vertical accretion, elevation change, and shallow subsidence) were measured with the surface elevation table–marker horizon method. There were three distinct stages to the accrual of elevation capital and wetland formation in the splay: sediment infilling, vegetative colonization, and development of a mature wetland community. Accretion, elevation gain, and shallow subsidence all decreased by an order of magnitude from the open water (lowest elevation) to the forest (highest elevation) habitats. Vegetative colonization occurred within the first growing season following emergence of the mud surface. An explosively high rate of below-ground production quickly stabilized the loosely consolidated sub-aerial sediments. After emergent vegetation colonization, vertical development slowed and maintenance of marsh elevation was driven both by sediment trapping by the vegetation and accumulation of plant organic matter in the soil. Continued vertical development and survival of the marsh then depended on the health and productivity of the plant community. The process of delta wetland formation is both complex and nonlinear. Determining the dynamics of wetland formation will help in understanding the processes driving the past building of the delta and in developing models for restoring degraded wetlands in the Mississippi River delta and other deltas around the world.

  8. Sediment infilling and wetland formation dynamics in an active crevasse splay of the Mississippi River delta

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cahoon, Donald R.; White, David A.; Lynch, James C.

    2011-08-01

    Crevasse splay environments provide a mesocosm for evaluating wetland formation and maintenance processes on a decadal time scale. Site elevation, water levels, vertical accretion, elevation change, shallow subsidence, and plant biomass were measured at five habitats along an elevation gradient to evaluate wetland formation and development in Brant Pass Splay; an active crevasse splay of the Balize delta of the Mississippi River. The processes of vertical development (vertical accretion, elevation change, and shallow subsidence) were measured with the surface elevation table-marker horizon method. There were three distinct stages to the accrual of elevation capital and wetland formation in the splay: sediment infilling, vegetative colonization, and development of a mature wetland community. Accretion, elevation gain, and shallow subsidence all decreased by an order of magnitude from the open water (lowest elevation) to the forest (highest elevation) habitats. Vegetative colonization occurred within the first growing season following emergence of the mud surface. An explosively high rate of below-ground production quickly stabilized the loosely consolidated sub-aerial sediments. After emergent vegetation colonization, vertical development slowed and maintenance of marsh elevation was driven both by sediment trapping by the vegetation and accumulation of plant organic matter in the soil. Continued vertical development and survival of the marsh then depended on the health and productivity of the plant community. The process of delta wetland formation is both complex and nonlinear. Determining the dynamics of wetland formation will help in understanding the processes driving the past building of the delta and in developing models for restoring degraded wetlands in the Mississippi River delta and other deltas around the world.

  9. Ethyl carbamate: analytical methodology, occurrence, formation, biological activity and risk assessment.

    PubMed

    Zimmerli, B; Schlatter, J

    1991-01-01

    Ethyl carbamate (EC) is a genotoxic compound in vitro and in vivo, it binds covalently to DNA and is an animal carcinogen. Today, EC is mainly found as a natural trace constituent in different alcoholic beverages and in fermented food items. Data on analytical methodology and the levels of EC in different food items are summarized and the daily burden of humans is estimated. Under normal dietary habits excluding alcoholic beverages, the unavoidable daily intake is 10-20 ng/kg b.w. On the basis of the evaluation of all toxicity data and its mode of action a conventional risk assessment of EC indicates that this level represents a negligible lifetime cancer risk (less than 0.0001%). Individual habits may greatly enhance the risk. Regular drinking of table wine (500 ml/day) would increase the risk up to 5 times, regular drinking of stone-fruit distillates (20-40 ml/day) would raise the calculated hypothetical tumor risk to near 0.01%. Human exposure to carcinogenic compounds should be as low as reasonably achievable. In order to take reliable measures to reduce EC levels in beverages and foods, it is crucial to know the mode of its formation. For its natural formation the presence of ethanol is absolutely required. In stone-fruit distillates hydrogen cyanide together with photochemically active substances are crucial to form EC. The main part of EC is formed after the distillation involving photochemical reactions. In wine (and probably bread) significant EC formation seems to depend on heat treatment. While in distillates hydrogen cyanide is the most important single precursor, in wine different carbamyl compounds, mainly urea, seem to be involved in EC formation. Despite this apparent difference a common EC formation pathway is discussed for all alcoholic beverages by assuming cyanic-/isocyanic acid as an important ultimate reactant with ethanol. Some ideas are presented as to the possible course of future work.

  10. Rapid binding of a cationic active site inhibitor to wild type and mutant mouse acetylcholinesterase: Brownian dynamics simulation including diffusion in the active site gorge.

    PubMed

    Tara, S; Elcock, A H; Kirchhoff, P D; Briggs, J M; Radic, Z; Taylor, P; McCammon, J A

    1998-12-01

    It is known that anionic surface residues play a role in the long-range electrostatic attraction between acetylcholinesterase and cationic ligands. In our current investigation, we show that anionic residues also play an important role in the behavior of the ligand within the active site gorge of acetylcholinesterase. Negatively charged residues near the gorge opening not only attract positively charged ligands from solution to the enzyme, but can also restrict the motion of the ligand once it is inside of the gorge. We use Brownian dynamics techniques to calculate the rate constant kon, for wild type and mutant acetylcholinesterase with a positively charged ligand. These calculations are performed by allowing the ligand to diffuse within the active site gorge. This is an extension of previously reported work in which a ligand was allowed to diffuse only to the enzyme surface. By setting the reaction criteria for the ligand closer to the active site, better agreement with experimental data is obtained. Although a number of residues influence the movement of the ligand within the gorge, Asp74 is shown to play a particularly important role in this function. Asp74 traps the ligand within the gorge, and in this way helps to ensure a reaction.

  11. Melatonin Reduces Cataract Formation and Aldose Reductase Activity in Lenses of Streptozotocin-induced Diabetic Rat

    PubMed Central

    Khorsand, Marjan; Akmali, Masoumeh; Sharzad, Sahab; Beheshtitabar, Mojtaba

    2016-01-01

    Background: The relationship between the high activity of aldose reductase (AR) and diabetic cataract formation has been previously investigated. The purpose of the present study was to determine the preventing effect of melatonin on streptozotocin (STZ)-induced diabetic cataract in rats. Methods: 34 adult healthy male Sprague-Dawely rats were divided into four groups. Diabetic control and diabetic+melatonin received a single dose of STZ (50 mg/kg, intraperitoneally), whereas the normal control and normal+melatonin received vehicle. The melatonin groups were gavaged with melatonin (5 mg/kg) daily for a period of 8 weeks, whereas the rats in the normal control and diabetic control groups received only the vehicle. The rats’ eyes were examined every week and cataract formation scores (0-4) were determined by slit-lamp microscope. At the end of the eighth week, the rats were sacrificed and markers of the polyol pathway and antioxidative (Glutathione, GSH) in their lens were determined. The levels of blood glucose, HbA1c and plasma malondialdhyde (MDA), as a marker of lipid peroxidation, were also measured. Results: Melatonin prevented STZ-induced hyperglycemia by decreased blood glucose and HbA1c levels. Slit lamp examination indicated that melatonin delayed cataract progression in diabetic rats. The results revealed that melatonin feeding increased the GSH levels, decreased the activities of AR and sorbitol dehydrogenase (SDH) and sorbitol formation in catractous lenses as well as plasma MDA content. Conclusion: In summary, for the first time we demonstrated that melatonin delayed the formation and progression of cataract in diabetic rat lenses. PMID:27365552

  12. Cementite Formation from Hematite-Graphite Mixture by Simultaneous Thermal-Mechanical Activation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ashrafzadeh, Milad; Soleymani, Amir Peyman; Panjepour, Masoud; Shamanian, Morteza

    2015-04-01

    In this study, the effect of simultaneous thermal-mechanical activation (STMA) process on carbothermic reduction of hematite and also on iron carbide formation has been investigated. For this purpose, the STMA process was performed for 3 and 6 hours at 973 K (700 °C) and 1073 K (800 °C) on hematite-graphite powder mixtures (with 22 wt pct C) in argon atmosphere. The XRD patterns showed that by performing this process at 973 K (700 °C), the initial hematite reduction led to the formation of wüstite in the presence of graphite. Metallic iron phase was also formed along with wüstite phase at 1073 K (800 °C) for 3 hours, and by increasing the process time to 6 hours, in addition to the metallic iron, iron carbide was also formed. The SEM images and EDS analysis obtained at 1073 K (800 °C)were also indicative of the formation of pearlite structure along with proeutectoid cementite phase and free carbon in the form of graphite in the structure of the samples. According to the results of the image analysis, the percentage of the carbon content was more than 2.22 wt pct in this process lasting for 6 hours at 1073 K (800 °C). Also, DTA results showed that the sample hot milled for 6 hours at 1073 K (800 °C) contained more than 2.1 wt pct carbon. The mechanism of metallic iron and cementite formation from hematite was proposed. Therefore, the STMA process led to an increase in the rate of carbothermic reduction of hematite to metallic iron and reduced its starting temperature relative to the non-simultaneous application of each of the thermal and mechanical activation. Finally, this process can be brought up as a new method for the production of iron carbide from iron oxides.

  13. EPISODIC STAR FORMATION COUPLED TO REIGNITION OF RADIO ACTIVITY IN 3C 236

    SciTech Connect

    Tremblay, Grant R.; O'Dea, Christopher P.; Baum, Stefi A.; Koekemoer, Anton M.; Sparks, William B.; De Bruyn, Ger; Schoenmakers, Arno P.

    2010-05-20

    We present Hubble Space Telescope Advanced Camera for Surveys and STIS FUV/NUV/optical imaging of the radio galaxy 3C 236, whose relic {approx}4 Mpc radio jet lobes and inner 2 kpc compact steep spectrum (CSS) radio source are evidence of multiple epochs of active galactic nucleus (AGN) activity. Consistent with previous results, our data confirm the presence of four bright knots of FUV emission in an arc along the edge of the inner circumnuclear dust disk in the galaxy's nucleus, as well as FUV emission cospatial with the nucleus itself. We interpret these to be sites of recent or ongoing star formation. We present photometry of these knots, as well as an estimate for the internal extinction in the source using line ratios from archival ground-based spectroscopy. We estimate the ages of the knots by comparing our extinction-corrected photometry with stellar population synthesis models. We find the four knots cospatial with the dusty disk to be young, of order {approx}10{sup 7} yr old. The FUV emission in the nucleus, to which we do not expect scattered light from the AGN to contribute significantly, is likely due to an episode of star formation triggered {approx}10{sup 9} yr ago. We argue that the young {approx}10{sup 7} yr old knots stem from an episode of star formation that was roughly coeval with the event resulting in reignition of radio activity, creating the CSS source. The {approx}10{sup 9} yr old stars in the nucleus may be associated with the previous epoch of radio activity that generated the 4 Mpc relic source, before being cut off by exhaustion or interruption. The ages of the knots, considered in the context of both the disturbed morphology of the nuclear dust and the double-double morphology of the 'old' and 'young' radio sources, present evidence for an AGN/starburst connection that is possibly episodic in nature. We suggest that the AGN fuel supply was interrupted for {approx}10{sup 7} yr due to a minor merger event and has now been restored. The

  14. Protective mechanisms of adenosine 5'-monophosphate in platelet activation and thrombus formation.

    PubMed

    Fuentes, E; Badimon, L; Caballero, J; Padró, T; Vilahur, G; Alarcón, M; Pérez, P; Palomo, I

    2014-03-01

    Platelet activation is relevant to a variety of acute thrombotic events. We sought to examine adenosine 5'-monophosphate (AMP) mechanisms of action in preventing platelet activation, thrombus formation and platelet-related inflammatory response. We assessed the effect of AMP on 1) P-selectin expression and GPIIb/IIIa activation by flow cytometry; 2) Platelet aggregation and ATP secretion induced by ADP, collagen, TRAP-6, convulxin and thrombin; 3) Platelet rolling and firm adhesion, and platelet-leukocyte interactions under flow-controlled conditions; and, 4) Platelet cAMP levels, sP-selectin, sCD40L, IL-1β, TGF-β1 and CCL5 release, PDE3A activity and PKA phosphorylation. The effect of AMP on in vivo thrombus formation was also evaluated in a murine model. The AMP docking with respect to A2 adenosine receptor was determined by homology. AMP concentration-dependently (0.1 to 3 mmol/l) inhibited P-selectin expression and GPIIb/IIIa activation, platelet secretion and aggregation induced by ADP, collagen, TRAP-6 and convulxin, and diminished platelet rolling and firm adhesion. Furthermore, AMP induced a marked increase in the rolling speed of leukocytes retained on the platelet surface. At these concentrations AMP significantly decreased inflammatory mediator from platelet, increased intraplatelet cAMP levels and inhibited PDE3A activity. Interestingly, SQ22536, ZM241385 and SCH58261 attenuated the antiplatelet effect of AMP. Docking experiments revealed that AMP had the same orientation that adenosine inside the A2 adenosine receptor binding pocket. These in vitro antithrombotic properties were further supported in an in vivo model of thrombosis. Considering the successful use of combined antiplatelet therapy, AMP may be further developed as a novel antiplatelet agent. PMID:24306059

  15. Ghrelin accelerates synapse formation and activity development in cultured cortical networks

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background While ghrelin was initially related to appetite stimulation and growth hormone secretion, it also has a neuroprotective effect in neurodegenerative diseases and regulates cognitive function. The cellular basis of those processes is related to synaptic efficacy and plasticity. Previous studies have shown that ghrelin not only stimulates synapse formation in cultured cortical neurons and hippocampal slices, but also alters some of the electrophysiological properties of neurons in the hypothalamus, amygdala and other subcortical areas. However, direct evidence for ghrelin’s ability to modulate the activity in cortical neurons is not available yet. In this study, we investigated the effect of acylated ghrelin on the development of the activity level and activity patterns in cortical neurons, in relation to its effect on synaptogenesis. Additionally, we quantitatively evaluated the expression of the receptor for acylated ghrelin – growth hormone secretagogue receptor-1a (GHSR-1a) during development. Results We performed electrophysiology and immunohistochemistry on dissociated cortical cultures from neonates, treated chronically with acylated ghrelin. On average 76 ± 4.6% of the cortical neurons expressed GHSR-1a. Synapse density was found to be much higher in ghrelin treated cultures than in controls across all age groups (1, 2 or 3 weeks). In all cultures (control and ghrelin treated), network activity gradually increased until it reached a maximum after approximately 3 weeks, followed by a slight decrease towards a plateau. During early developmental stages (1–2 weeks), the activity was much higher in ghrelin treated cultures and consequently, they reached the plateau value almost a week earlier than controls. Conclusions Acylated ghrelin leads to earlier network formation and activation in cultured cortical neuronal networks, the latter being a possibly consequence of accelerated synaptogenesis. PMID:24742241

  16. A poultry-intestinal isolate of Campylobacter jejuni produces a bacteriocin (CUV-3) active against a range of Gram positive bacterial pathogens including Clostridium perfringens

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    A newly isolated bacteriocin, CUV-3, produced by a poultry cecal isolate of Campylobacter jejuni strain CUV-3 had inhibitory activity against several Gram positive bacteria including Clostridium perfringens (38 strains), Staphylococcus aureus, Staph.epidermidis and Listeria monocytogenes. The pept...

  17. Including Youth with Intellectual Disabilities in Health Promotion Research: Development and Reliability of a Structured Interview to Assess the Correlates of Physical Activity among Youth

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Curtin, Carol; Bandini, Linda G.; Must, Aviva; Phillips, Sarah; Maslin, Melissa C. T.; Lo, Charmaine; Gleason, James M.; Fleming, Richard K.; Stanish, Heidi I.

    2016-01-01

    Background: The input of youth with intellectual disabilities in health promotion and health disparities research is essential for understanding their needs and preferences. Regular physical activity (PA) is vital for health and well-being, but levels are low in youth generally, including those with intellectual disabilities. Understanding the…

  18. Gas Phase Uranyl Activation: Formation of a Uranium Nitrosyl Complex from Uranyl Azide

    SciTech Connect

    Gong, Yu; De Jong, Wibe A.; Gibson, John K.

    2015-05-13

    Activation of the oxo bond of uranyl, UO22+, was achieved by collision induced dissociation (CID) of UO2(N3)Cl2– in a quadrupole ion trap mass spectrometer. The gas phase complex UO2(N3)Cl2– was produced by electrospray ionization of solutions of UO2Cl2 and NaN3. CID of UO2(N3)Cl2– resulted in the loss of N2 to form UO(NO)Cl2–, in which the “inert” uranyl oxo bond has been activated. Formation of UO2Cl2– via N3 loss was also observed. Density functional theory computations predict that the UO(NO)Cl2– complex has nonplanar Cs symmetry and a singlet ground state. Analysis of the bonding of the UO(NO)Cl2– complex shows that the side-on bonded NO moiety can be considered as NO3–, suggesting a formal oxidation state of U(VI). Activation of the uranyl oxo bond in UO2(N3)Cl2– to form UO(NO)Cl2– and N2 was computed to be endothermic by 169 kJ/mol, which is energetically more favorable than formation of NUOCl2– and UO2Cl2–. The observation of UO2Cl2– during CID is most likely due to the absence of an energy barrier for neutral ligand loss.

  19. Rho1 regulates adherens junction remodeling by promoting recycling endosome formation through activation of myosin II

    PubMed Central

    Yashiro, Hanako; Loza, Andrew J.; Skeath, James B.; Longmore, Gregory D.

    2014-01-01

    Once adherens junctions (AJs) are formed between polarized epithelial cells they must be maintained because AJs are constantly remodeled in dynamic epithelia. AJ maintenance involves endocytosis and subsequent recycling of E-cadherin to a precise location along the basolateral membrane. In the Drosophila pupal eye epithelium, Rho1 GTPase regulates AJ remodeling through Drosophila E-cadherin (DE-cadherin) endocytosis by limiting Cdc42/Par6/aPKC complex activity. We demonstrate that Rho1 also influences AJ remodeling by regulating the formation of DE-cadherin–containing, Rab11-positive recycling endosomes in Drosophila postmitotic pupal eye epithelia. This effect of Rho1 is mediated through Rok-dependent, but not MLCK-dependent, stimulation of myosin II activity yet independent of its effects upon actin remodeling. Both Rho1 and pMLC localize on endosomal vesicles, suggesting that Rho1 might regulate the formation of recycling endosomes through localized myosin II activation. This work identifies spatially distinct functions for Rho1 in the regulation of DE-cadherin–containing vesicular trafficking during AJ remodeling in live epithelia. PMID:25079692

  20. Disentangling AGN and Star Formation Activity at High Redshift Using Hubble Space Telescope Grism Spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bridge, Joanna S.; Zeimann, Gregory R.; Trump, Jonathan R.; Gronwall, Caryl; Ciardullo, Robin; Fox, Derek; Schneider, Donald P.

    2016-08-01

    Differentiating between active galactic nucleus (AGN) activity and star formation in z ˜ 2 galaxies is difficult because traditional methods, such as line-ratio diagnostics, change with redshift, while multi-wavelength methods (X-ray, radio, IR) are sensitive to only the brightest AGNs. We have developed a new method for spatially resolving emission lines using the Hubble Space Telescope/Wide Field Camera 3 G141 grism spectra and quantifying AGN activity through the spatial gradient of the [O iii]/Hβ line ratio. Through detailed simulations, we show that our novel line-ratio gradient approach identifies ˜40% more low-mass and obscured AGNs than obtained by classical methods. Based on our simulations, we developed a relationship that maps the stellar mass, star formation rate, and measured [O iii]/Hβ gradient to the AGN Eddington ratio. We apply our technique to previously studied stacked samples of galaxies at z ˜ 2 and find that our results are consistent with these studies. This gradient method will also be able to inform other areas of galaxy evolution science, such as inside-out quenching and metallicity gradients, and will be widely applicable to future spatially resolved James Webb Space Telescope data.

  1. Streptomyces-derived actinomycin D inhibits biofilm formation by Staphylococcus aureus and its hemolytic activity.

    PubMed

    Lee, Jin-Hyung; Kim, Yong-Guy; Lee, Kayeon; Kim, Chang-Jin; Park, Dong-Jin; Ju, Yoonjung; Lee, Jae-Chan; Wood, Thomas K; Lee, Jintae

    2016-01-01

    Staphylococcus aureus is a versatile human pathogen that produces diverse virulence factors, and its biofilm cells are difficult to eradicate due to their inherent ability to tolerate antibiotics. The anti-biofilm activities of the spent media of 252 diverse endophytic microorganisms were investigated using three S. aureus strains. An attempt was made to identify anti-biofilm compounds in active spent media and to assess their anti-hemolytic activities and hydrophobicities in order to investigate action mechanisms. Unlike other antibiotics, actinomycin D (0.5 μg ml(-1)) from Streptomyces parvulus significantly inhibited biofilm formation by all three S. aureus strains. Actinomycin D inhibited slime production in S. aureus and it inhibited hemolysis by S. aureus and caused S. aureus cells to become less hydrophobic, thus supporting its anti-biofilm effect. In addition, surface coatings containing actinomycin D prevented S. aureus biofilm formation on glass surfaces. Given these results, FDA-approved actinomycin D warrants further attention as a potential antivirulence agent against S. aureus infections. PMID:26785934

  2. Matrix stiffness modulates formation and activity of neuronal networks of controlled architectures.

    PubMed

    Lantoine, Joséphine; Grevesse, Thomas; Villers, Agnès; Delhaye, Geoffrey; Mestdagh, Camille; Versaevel, Marie; Mohammed, Danahe; Bruyère, Céline; Alaimo, Laura; Lacour, Stéphanie P; Ris, Laurence; Gabriele, Sylvain

    2016-05-01

    The ability to construct easily in vitro networks of primary neurons organized with imposed topologies is required for neural tissue engineering as well as for the development of neuronal interfaces with desirable characteristics. However, accumulating evidence suggests that the mechanical properties of the culture matrix can modulate important neuronal functions such as growth, extension, branching and activity. Here we designed robust and reproducible laminin-polylysine grid micropatterns on cell culture substrates that have similar biochemical properties but a 100-fold difference in Young's modulus to investigate the role of the matrix rigidity on the formation and activity of cortical neuronal networks. We found that cell bodies of primary cortical neurons gradually accumulate in circular islands, whereas axonal extensions spread on linear tracks to connect circular islands. Our findings indicate that migration of cortical neurons is enhanced on soft substrates, leading to a faster formation of neuronal networks. Furthermore, the pre-synaptic density was two times higher on stiff substrates and consistently the number of action potentials and miniature synaptic currents was enhanced on stiff substrates. Taken together, our results provide compelling evidence to indicate that matrix stiffness is a key parameter to modulate the growth dynamics, synaptic density and electrophysiological activity of cortical neuronal networks, thus providing useful information on scaffold design for neural tissue engineering.

  3. Raf-1 Activation Prevents Caspase 9 Processing Downstream of Apoptosome Formation

    PubMed Central

    Cagnol, Sébastien; Mansour, Anna; Van Obberghen-Schilling, Ellen; Chambard, Jean-Claude

    2011-01-01

    In many cell types, growth factor removal induces the release of cytochrome-c from mitochondria that leads to activation of caspase-9 in the apoptosome complex. Here, we show that sustained stimulation of the Raf-1/MAPK1,3 pathway prevents caspase-9 activation induced by serum depletion in CCL39/ΔRaf-1:ER fibroblasts. The protective effect mediated by Raf-1 is sensitive to MEK inhibition that is sufficient to induce caspase-9 cleavage in exponentially growing cells. Raf-1 activation does not inhibit the release of cytochrome-c from mitochondria while preventing caspase-9 activation. Gel filtration chromatography analysis of apoptosome formation in cells shows that Raf-1/MAPK1,3 activation does not interfere with APAF-1 oligomerization and recruitment of caspase 9. Raf-1-mediated caspase-9 inhibition is sensitive to emetine, indicating that the protective mechanism requires protein synthesis. However, the Raf/MAPK1,3 pathway does not regulate XIAP. Taken together, these results indicate that the Raf-1/MAPK1,3 pathway controls an apoptosis regulator that prevents caspase-9 activation in the apoptosome complex. PMID:21637382

  4. Deep Chandra observations of HCG 16. I. Active nuclei, star formation, and galactic winds

    SciTech Connect

    O'Sullivan, E.; Zezas, A.; Vrtilek, J. M.; David, L. P.; Giacintucci, S.; Trevisan, M.; Ponman, T. J.; Raychaudhury, S.; Mamon, G. A.

    2014-10-01

    We present new, deep Chandra X-ray and Giant Metrewave Radio Telescope 610 MHz observations of the spiral-galaxy-rich compact group HCG 16, which we use to examine nuclear activity, star formation, and high-luminosity X-ray binary populations in the major galaxies. We confirm the presence of obscured active nuclei in NGC 833 and NGC 835, and identify a previously unrecognized nuclear source in NGC 838. All three nuclei are variable on timescales of months to years, and for NGC 833 and NGC 835 this is most likely caused by changes in accretion rate. The deep Chandra observations allow us to detect for the first time an Fe Kα emission line in the spectrum of the Seyfert 2 nucleus of NGC 835. We find that NGC 838 and NGC 839 are both starburst-dominated systems, with only weak nuclear activity, in agreement with previous optical studies. We estimate the star formation rates in the two galaxies from their X-ray and radio emission, and compare these results with estimates from the infrared and ultraviolet bands to confirm that star formation in both galaxies is probably declining after galaxy-wide starbursts were triggered ∼400-500 Myr ago. We examine the physical properties of their galactic superwinds, and find that both have temperatures of ∼0.8 keV. We also examine the X-ray and radio properties of NGC 848, the fifth largest galaxy in the group, and show that it is dominated by emission from its starburst.

  5. Perceived benefits and barriers of physical activity: A social marketing formative study.

    PubMed

    Rundle-Thiele, Sharyn; Kubacki, Krzysztof; Gruneklee, Naomi

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this study was to gain formative research insights that can be used to design social marketing campaigns. One thousand four hundred fifty-nine people participated in an online survey. Factor analysis was undertaken to establish perceived benefits and barriers, and indexes were created for barriers, benefits, and healthy living knowledge. Four attitude groups were formed and analysis of variance was undertaken to explore group differences. Consumers with high perceived barriers report less physical activity than consumers with low perceived barriers to exercise. The current study provides evidence to suggest that exchange theory can offer important insights to inform social marketing intervention planning.

  6. Perceived benefits and barriers of physical activity: A social marketing formative study.

    PubMed

    Rundle-Thiele, Sharyn; Kubacki, Krzysztof; Gruneklee, Naomi

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this study was to gain formative research insights that can be used to design social marketing campaigns. One thousand four hundred fifty-nine people participated in an online survey. Factor analysis was undertaken to establish perceived benefits and barriers, and indexes were created for barriers, benefits, and healthy living knowledge. Four attitude groups were formed and analysis of variance was undertaken to explore group differences. Consumers with high perceived barriers report less physical activity than consumers with low perceived barriers to exercise. The current study provides evidence to suggest that exchange theory can offer important insights to inform social marketing intervention planning. PMID:27210584

  7. Monocytes Induce STAT3 Activation in Human Mesenchymal Stem Cells to Promote Osteoblast Formation

    PubMed Central

    Nicolaidou, Vicky; Wong, Mei Mei; Redpath, Andia N.; Ersek, Adel; Baban, Dilair F.; Williams, Lynn M.; Cope, Andrew P.; Horwood, Nicole J.

    2012-01-01

    A major therapeutic challenge is how to replace bone once it is lost. Bone loss is a characteristic of chronic inflammatory and degenerative diseases such as rheumatoid arthritis and osteoporosis. Cells and cytokines of the immune system are known to regulate bone turnover by controlling the differentiation and activity of osteoclasts, the bone resorbing cells. However, less is known about the regulation of osteoblasts (OB), the bone forming cells. This study aimed to investigate whether immune cells also regulate OB differentiation. Using in vitro cell cultures of human bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells (MSC), it was shown that monocytes/macrophages potently induced MSC differentiation into OBs. This was evident by increased alkaline phosphatase (ALP) after 7 days and the formation of mineralised bone nodules at 21 days. This monocyte-induced osteogenic effect was mediated by cell contact with MSCs leading to the production of soluble factor(s) by the monocytes. As a consequence of these interactions we observed a rapid activation of STAT3 in the MSCs. Gene profiling of STAT3 constitutively active (STAT3C) infected MSCs using Illumina whole human genome arrays showed that Runx2 and ALP were up-regulated whilst DKK1 was down-regulated in response to STAT3 signalling. STAT3C also led to the up-regulation of the oncostatin M (OSM) and LIF receptors. In the co-cultures, OSM that was produced by monocytes activated STAT3 in MSCs, and neutralising antibodies to OSM reduced ALP by 50%. These data indicate that OSM, in conjunction with other mediators, can drive MSC differentiation into OB. This study establishes a role for monocyte/macrophages as critical regulators of osteogenic differentiation via OSM production and the induction of STAT3 signalling in MSCs. Inducing the local activation of STAT3 in bone cells may be a valuable tool to increase bone formation in osteoporosis and arthritis, and in localised bone remodelling during fracture repair. PMID:22802946

  8. Environmental Effects on Star Formation Activity at z ~ 0.9 in the COSMOS Field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kajisawa, M.; Shioya, Y.; Aida, Y.; Ideue, Y.; Taniguchi, Y.; Nagao, T.; Murayama, T.; Matsubayashi, K.; Riguccini, L.

    2013-05-01

    We investigated the fraction of [O II] emitters in galaxies at z ~ 0.9 as a function of the local galaxy density in the Hubble Space Telescope (HST) COSMOS 2 deg2 field. [O II] emitters are selected by the narrowband excess technique with the NB711-band imaging data taken with Suprime-Cam on the Subaru telescope. We carefully selected 614 photo-z-selected galaxies with M U3500 < -19.31 at z = 0.901 - 0.920, which includes 195 [O II] emitters, to directly compare the results with our previous study at z ~ 1.2. We found that the fraction is almost constant at 0.3 Mpc-2 < Σ10th < 10 Mpc-2. We also checked the fraction of galaxies with blue rest-frame colors of NUV - R < 2 in our photo-z-selected sample, and found that the fraction of blue galaxies does not significantly depend on the local density. On the other hand, the semi-analytic model of galaxy formation predicted that the fraction of star-forming galaxies at z ~ 0.9 decreases with increasing projected galaxy density even if the effects of the projection and the photo-z error in our analysis were taken into account. The fraction of [O II] emitters decreases from ~60% at z ~ 1.2 to ~30% at z ~ 0.9 independent of galaxy environment. The decrease of the [O II] emitter fraction could be explained mainly by the rapid decrease of star formation activity in the universe from z ~ 1.2 to z ~ 0.9. Based on observations with the NASA/ESA Hubble Space Telescope, obtained at the Space Telescope Science Institute, which is operated by AURA Inc, under NASA contract NAS 5-26555. Also based on observations made with the Spitzer Space Telescope, which is operated by the Jet Propulsion Laboratory, California Institute of Technology, under NASA contract 1407. Also based on data collected at the Subaru Telescope, which is operated by the National Astronomical Observatory of Japan; the XMM-Newton, an ESA science mission with instruments and contributions directly funded by ESA Member States and NASA; the European Southern

  9. Herpesviral G protein-coupled receptors activate NFAT to induce tumor formation via inhibiting the SERCA calcium ATPase.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Junjie; He, Shanping; Wang, Yi; Brulois, Kevin; Lan, Ke; Jung, Jae U; Feng, Pinghui

    2015-03-01

    G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) constitute the largest family of proteins that transmit signal to regulate an array of fundamental biological processes. Viruses deploy diverse tactics to hijack and harness intracellular signaling events induced by GPCR. Herpesviruses encode multiple GPCR homologues that are implicated in viral pathogenesis. Cellular GPCRs are primarily regulated by their cognate ligands, while herpesviral GPCRs constitutively activate downstream signaling cascades, including the nuclear factor of activated T cells (NFAT) pathway. However, the roles of NFAT activation and mechanism thereof in viral GPCR tumorigenesis remain unknown. Here we report that GPCRs of human Kaposi's sarcoma-associated herpesvirus (kGPCR) and cytomegalovirus (US28) shortcut NFAT activation by inhibiting the sarcoplasmic reticulum calcium ATPase (SERCA), which is necessary for viral GPCR tumorigenesis. Biochemical approaches, entailing pharmacological inhibitors and protein purification, demonstrate that viral GPCRs target SERCA2 to increase cytosolic calcium concentration. As such, NFAT activation induced by vGPCRs was exceedingly sensitive to cyclosporine A that targets calcineurin, but resistant to inhibition upstream of ER calcium release. Gene expression profiling identified a signature of NFAT activation in endothelial cells expressing viral GPCRs. The expression of NFAT-dependent genes was up-regulated in tumors derived from tva-kGPCR mouse and human KS. Employing recombinant kGPCR-deficient KSHV, we showed that kGPCR was critical for NFAT-dependent gene expression in KSHV lytic replication. Finally, cyclosporine A treatment diminished NFAT-dependent gene expression and tumor formation induced by viral GPCRs. These findings reveal essential roles of NFAT activation in viral GPCR tumorigenesis and a mechanism of "constitutive" NFAT activation by viral GPCRs.

  10. Cosmic web and star formation activity in galaxies at z ∼ 1

    SciTech Connect

    Darvish, B.; Mobasher, B.; Sales, L. V.; Sobral, D.; Scoville, N. Z.; Best, P.; Smail, I.

    2014-11-20

    We investigate the role of the delineated cosmic web/filaments on star formation activity by exploring a sample of 425 narrow-band selected Hα emitters, as well as 2846 color-color selected underlying star-forming galaxies for a large-scale structure at z = 0.84 in the COSMOS field from the HiZELS survey. Using the scale-independent Multi-scale Morphology Filter algorithm, we are able to quantitatively describe the density field and disentangle it into its major components: fields, filaments, and clusters. We show that the observed median star formation rate (SFR), stellar mass, specific SFR, the mean SFR-mass relation, and its scatter for both Hα emitters and underlying star-forming galaxies do not strongly depend on different classes of environment, in agreement with previous studies. However, the fraction of Hα emitters varies with environment and is enhanced in filamentary structures at z ∼ 1. We propose mild galaxy-galaxy interactions as the possible physical agent for the elevation of the fraction of Hα star-forming galaxies in filaments. Our results show that filaments are the likely physical environments that are often classed as the 'intermediate' densities and that the cosmic web likely plays a major role in galaxy formation and evolution which has so far been poorly investigated.

  11. Src kinase activity is required for avoidance memory formation and recall.

    PubMed

    Bevilaqua, L R M; Rossato, J I; Medina, J H; Izquierdo, I; Cammarota, M

    2003-12-01

    Using 4-amino-5-(4-chlorophenyl)-7-(t-butyl)pyrazolo[3,4-D]pyrimidine (PP2), a specific inhibitor of the Src family of tyrosine kinases, here we show a direct involvement of these enzymes in memory formation and recall. When infused into the CA1 region of the dorsal hippocampus, immediately or 30 min after training rats in a one-trial inhibitory avoidance task, PP2 but not its inactive analog 4-amino-7-phenylpyrazol[3,4-D]pyrimidine (PP3), blocked short- (STM) and long-term memory (LTM) formation, as tested 2 or 24 h post-training, respectively. PP2 had no effect on STM when given at 60 min post-training or on LTM when administered at 60, 120 or 180 min after the training session, but blocked memory recall when infused into CA1 15 min before a LTM expression test. Hence, activity of the Src family of tyrosine kinases is required in the CA1 region of the rat dorsal hippocampus for the normal formation and retrieval of one-trial inhibitory avoidance memory.

  12. Measurement of factor VIII activity using one-stage clotting assay: a calibration curve has not to be systematically included in each run.

    PubMed

    Lattes, S; Appert-Flory, A; Fischer, F; Jambou, D; Toulon, P

    2011-01-01

    Coagulation factor VIII (FVIII) is usually evaluated using activated partial thromboplastin time-based one-stage clotting assays. Guidelines for clotting factor assays indicate that a calibration curve should be included each time the assay is performed. Therefore, FVIII measurement is expensive, reagent- and time-consuming. The aim of this study was to compare FVIII activities obtained using the same fully automated assay that was calibrated once (stored calibration curve) or each time the assay was performed. Unique lots of reagents were used throughout the study. We analysed 255 frozen plasma samples from patients who were prescribed FVIII measurement including treated and untreated haemophilia A patients. Twenty-six runs were performed on a 28-week period, each including four lyophilized control and at most 10 patient plasma samples. In control samples, FVIII activities were not significantly different when the assay was performed using the stored calibration curve or was daily calibrated. The same applied to FVIII activities in patient plasma samples that were not significantly different throughout the measuring range of activities [68.3% (<1-179) vs. 67.6% (<1-177), P=0.48] and no relevant bias could be demonstrated when data were compared according to Bland and Altman. These results suggest that in the studied technical conditions, performing the FVIII assay using a stored calibration curve is reliable, for at least 6 months. Therefore, as far as the same lots of reagents are used, it is not mandatory to include a calibration curve each time the FVIII assay was performed. However, this strategy has to be validated if the assay is performed in different technical conditions.

  13. Organic acid-catalyzed polyurethane formation via a dual-activated mechanism: unexpected preference of N-activation over O-activation of isocyanates.

    PubMed

    Sardon, Haritz; Engler, Amanda C; Chan, Julian M W; García, Jeannette M; Coady, Daniel J; Pascual, Ana; Mecerreyes, David; Jones, Gavin O; Rice, Julia E; Horn, Hans W; Hedrick, James L

    2013-10-30

    A systematic study of acid organocatalysts for the polyaddition of poly(ethylene glycol) to hexamethylene diisocyanate in solution has been performed. Among organic acids evaluated, sulfonic acids were found the most effective for urethane formations even when compared with conventional tin-based catalysts (dibutyltin dilaurate) or 1,8-diazabicyclo[5.4.0]undec-7-ene. In comparison, phosphonic and carboxylic acids showed considerably lower catalytic activities. Furthermore, sulfonic acids gave polyurethanes with higher molecular weights than was observed using traditional catalyst systems. Molecular modeling was conducted to provide mechanistic insight and supported a dual activation mechanism, whereby ternary adducts form in the presence of acid and engender both electrophilic isocyanate activation and nucleophilic alcohol activation through hydrogen bonding. Such a mechanism suggests catalytic activity is a function of not only acid strength but also inherent conjugate base electron density. PMID:24083673

  14. Dissociation of the functional relevance of different pre-stimulus oscillatory activity for memory formation.

    PubMed

    Salari, Neda; Rose, Michael

    2016-01-15

    The state of a neural assembly preceding an incoming stimulus modulates the processing of that subsequently presented stimuli. For human memory formation, the role of oscillatory brain activity within different frequency ranges has been discussed but a more functional relation could not be established. In the present Experiment I, an increase of pre-stimulus theta- (3-7Hz) and beta- (13-17Hz) band oscillations during encoding for later remembered stimuli was observed. To establish a more direct functional relation, we adopted a novel brain-computer-interface (BCI) method to selectively detect oscillatory activity in real-time combined with an adaptive stimulus presentation at different levels of activity. Therefore, in the second experiment the BCI was used to present the visual stimuli with a high temporal resolution directly within defined brain states of beta- or theta-band activity. The quality of the subsequent processing of the stimuli was assessed at the behavioral level with a surprise recognition task. Results revealed a variation of memory performance in direct relation to the amount of pre-stimulus beta- but not theta-band oscillations, suggesting a functional relevance of beta-band oscillations for memory encoding. Thus, the BCI method enabled a more functional differentiation of the effective role of ongoing oscillatory activity.

  15. Carbodiimide/NHS derivatization of COOH-terminated SAMs: activation or byproduct formation?

    PubMed

    Palazon, Francisco; Benavides, Cindy Montenegro; Léonard, Didier; Souteyrand, Éliane; Chevolot, Yann; Cloarec, Jean-Pierre

    2014-04-29

    COOH-terminated self-assembled monolayers (SAMs) are widely used in biosensor technology to bind different amine-containing biomolecules. A covalent amide bond, however, can be achieved only if the carboxylic acids are activated. This activation process usually consists of forming an N-hydroxysuccinimidyl ester (NHS-ester) by consecutively reacting carboxylic acids with a carbodiimide and NHS. Though many papers report using this method,1-8 the experimental conditions vary greatly between them and chemical characterization at this stage is often omitted. Evidence of an efficient activation is therefore rarely shown. Furthermore, recent publications9-11 have highlighted the complexity of this process, with the possible formation of different byproducts. In this paper, we have conducted a study on NHS activation under different conditions with chemical characterization by polarization-modulation infrared reflection-absorption spectroscopy (PM-IRRAS) and time-of-flight secondary ion mass spectroscopy (ToF-SIMS). Our results indicate that the nature of the solvent and carbodiimide and the reactant concentrations play crucial roles in activation kinetics and efficiency.

  16. Dissociation of the functional relevance of different pre-stimulus oscillatory activity for memory formation.

    PubMed

    Salari, Neda; Rose, Michael

    2016-01-15

    The state of a neural assembly preceding an incoming stimulus modulates the processing of that subsequently presented stimuli. For human memory formation, the role of oscillatory brain activity within different frequency ranges has been discussed but a more functional relation could not be established. In the present Experiment I, an increase of pre-stimulus theta- (3-7Hz) and beta- (13-17Hz) band oscillations during encoding for later remembered stimuli was observed. To establish a more direct functional relation, we adopted a novel brain-computer-interface (BCI) method to selectively detect oscillatory activity in real-time combined with an adaptive stimulus presentation at different levels of activity. Therefore, in the second experiment the BCI was used to present the visual stimuli with a high temporal resolution directly within defined brain states of beta- or theta-band activity. The quality of the subsequent processing of the stimuli was assessed at the behavioral level with a surprise recognition task. Results revealed a variation of memory performance in direct relation to the amount of pre-stimulus beta- but not theta-band oscillations, suggesting a functional relevance of beta-band oscillations for memory encoding. Thus, the BCI method enabled a more functional differentiation of the effective role of ongoing oscillatory activity. PMID:26484828

  17. Mechanism of formation of a dipole magnetic field in the central regions of active galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Andreasyan, R. R.

    1996-01-01

    A model of the formation of large-scale magnetic fields of dipole configuration in the central regions (r ≈ 100 pc) of active galaxies is studied. It is assumed that these regions contain a rapidly rotating, highly ionized gas (Ω ≈ 5·10-15 sec, Ne ≈ 103 cm-3). Ionized matter escapes from the center of the region with a velocity of several hundred km/sec and is entrained by the rotation of the surrounding medium. Biermann's "battery" effect [L. Biermann, Z. Naturforsch., 5a, 65 (1950)] operates under such conditions, and circular electric currents are formed in the medium, which amplify the dipole magnetic fields. During the active phase of a galaxy, about 108 years, the magnetic field strength at the boundary of this region may reach 10-4 10-3 G.

  18. Role of nanostructured gold surfaces on monocyte activation and Staphylococcus epidermidis biofilm formation.

    PubMed

    Svensson, Sara; Forsberg, Magnus; Hulander, Mats; Vazirisani, Forugh; Palmquist, Anders; Lausmaa, Jukka; Thomsen, Peter; Trobos, Margarita

    2014-01-01

    The role of material surface properties in the direct interaction with bacteria and the indirect route via host defense cells is not fully understood. Recently, it was suggested that nanostructured implant surfaces possess antimicrobial properties. In the current study, the adhesion and biofilm formation of Staphylococcus epidermidis and human monocyte adhesion and activation were studied separately and in coculture in different in vitro models using smooth gold and well-defined nanostructured gold surfaces. Two polystyrene surfaces were used as controls in the monocyte experiments. Fluorescent viability staining demonstrated a reduction in the viability of S. epidermidis close to the nanostructured gold surface, whereas the smooth gold correlated with more live biofilm. The results were supported by scanning electron microscopy observations, showing higher biofilm tower formations and more mature biofilms on smooth gold compared with nanostructured gold. Unstimulated monocytes on the different substrates demonstrated low activation, reduced gene expression of pro- and anti-inflammatory cytokines, and low cytokine secretion. In contrast, stimulation with opsonized zymosan or opsonized live S. epidermidis for 1 hour significantly increased the production of reactive oxygen species, the gene expression of tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α), interleukin-1β (IL-1β), IL-6, and IL-10, as well as the secretion of TNF-α, demonstrating the ability of the cells to elicit a response and actively phagocytose prey. In addition, cells cultured on the smooth gold and the nanostructured gold displayed a different adhesion pattern and a more rapid oxidative burst than those cultured on polystyrene upon stimulation. We conclude that S. epidermidis decreased its viability initially when adhering to nanostructured surfaces compared with smooth gold surfaces, especially in the bacterial cell layers closest to the surface. In contrast, material surface properties neither strongly

  19. Autoinducer-2 activity of gram-negative foodborne pathogenic bacteria and its influence on biofilm formation.

    PubMed

    Yoon, Y; Sofos, J N

    2008-04-01

    This study evaluated whether autoinducer-2 (AI-2) activity would be associated with biofilm formation by Salmonella and Escherichia coli O157:H7 strains on food contact surfaces. In study I, a Salmonella Typhimurium DT104 strain and an E. coli O157:H7 strain, both AI-2 positive, were individually inoculated into 50 mL of Luria-Bertani (LB) or LB + 0.5% glucose (LBG) broth, without or with stainless steel or polypropylene (Salmonella) coupons. At 0, 14 (Salmonella), 24, 48, and 72 h of storage (25 degrees C), cells in suspension and detached cells from the coupons, obtained by vortexing, were enumerated on tryptic soy agar. In study II, a Salmonella Thompson AI-2-positive strain and an AI-2-negative strain, and an E. coli O157:H7 AI-2-positive strain and an AI-2-negative strain were inoculated into LB broth with stainless steel coupons. Cells were enumerated as in study I. In both studies, AI-2 activity was determined in cell-free supernatants. Cell numbers of S. Typhimurium DT104 on biofilms were higher (P < 0.05) in LB than those in LBG, while the E. coli O157:H7 strain showed no difference (P>or= 0.05) in biofilm cell counts between LB and LBG after storage for 72 h. Both S. Typhimurium DT104 and E. coli O157:H7 strains produced higher (P < 0.05) AI-2 activity in LBG than LB cell suspensions. Cell counts of AI-2-positive and-negative S. Thompson and E. coli O157:H7 strains were not different (P>or= 0.05) within suspensions or coupons (study II). The results indicated that, under the conditions of this study, AI-2 activity of the pathogen strains tested may not have a major influence on biofilm formation on food contact surfaces, which was similar between AI-2-positive and -negative strains.

  20. DO MOST ACTIVE GALACTIC NUCLEI LIVE IN HIGH STAR FORMATION NUCLEAR CUSPS?

    SciTech Connect

    Mushotzky, Richard F.; Shimizu, T. Taro; Meléndez, Marcio; Koss, Michael

    2014-02-01

    We present early results of the Herschel PACS (70 and 160 μm) and SPIRE (250, 350, and 500 μm) survey of 313 low redshift (z < 0.05), ultra-hard X-ray (14-195 keV) selected active galactic nuclei (AGNs) from the 58 month Swift/Burst Alert Telescope catalog. Selection of AGNs from ultra-hard X-rays avoids bias from obscuration, providing a complete sample of AGNs to study the connection between nuclear activity and star formation in host galaxies. With the high angular resolution of PACS, we find that >35% and >20% of the sources are ''point-like'' at 70 and 160 μm respectively and many more have their flux dominated by a point source located at the nucleus. The inferred star formation rates (SFRs) of 0.1-100 M {sub ☉} yr{sup –1} using the 70 and 160 μm flux densities as SFR indicators are consistent with those inferred from Spitzer Ne II fluxes, but we find that 11.25 μm polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon data give ∼3× lower SFR. Using GALFIT to measure the size of the far-infrared emitting regions, we determined the SFR surface density (M {sub ☉} yr{sup –1} kpc{sup –2}) for our sample, finding that a significant fraction of these sources exceed the threshold for star formation driven winds (0.1 M {sub ☉} yr{sup –1} kpc{sup –2})

  1. Mechanistic studies of catechol generation from secondary quinone amines relevant to indole formation and tyrosinase activation.

    PubMed

    Land, Edward J; Ramsden, Christopher A; Riley, Patrick A; Yoganathan, Gnanamoly

    2003-08-01

    The biological significance of the spontaneous cyclization and redox reactions of ortho-quinone amines is that these appear to be the mechanism of formation of the indolic components of melanin and are also involved in the autoactivation of tyrosinase. We have previously shown that activation of tyrosinase is prevented by the formation of a cyclic betaine from a tertiary amine analogue. Evidence is presented to show that cyclization of ortho-quinones by Michael addition also occurs in the oxidation of secondary catecholamines. Three varieties of cyclic product have been detected and their formation is influenced by the nature of the N-substituent. Five-membered betaine rings form directly and, although six- and seven-membered rings also form, a transient spiro isomer of the ortho-quinone was in some cases detected as an intermediate. The heterocyclic products formed as betaines undergo redox exchange with residual quinone to form the corresponding aminochromes. We have established the kinetic constants of these reactions, either directly by pulse radiolysis measurements or by inference using a computer model of the reaction pathway to fit the observed data. To investigate the potential biological applications of this chemistry the system was also examined by tyrosinase-catalysed oxidation of the catecholamine substrates in which there is re-oxidation of the catechol formed by the redox exchange reaction and enables measurement of oxygen utilization stoichiometry. We show that the redox exchange reaction is unaffected by side-chain modification whereas cyclization is dependent on both electronic and steric factors. In the light of these studies we conclude that the failure of tertiary amine-derived betaines to undergo redox exchange, and thus block in vitro activation of tyrosinase, is due to the absence of a second exchangeable proton.

  2. Formation and emission of volatile polonium compound by microbial activity and polonium methylation with methylcobalamin.

    PubMed

    Momoshima, N; Song, L X; Osaki, S; Maeda, Y

    2001-07-15

    We observed biologically mediated emission of Po from culture solution inoculated sea sediment extract and incubated under natural light/dark cycle condition or dark condition the emitted Po compound would be lipophilic because of effective collection in organic solvent. Sterilization of the culture medium with antibiotics or CuSO4 completely suppressed growth of microorganisms and resulted in no emission of Po, indicating biological activity of microorganisms is responsible for formation and emission of volatile Po compound. Po emission also occurred when seawater was used as a culture medium. Our finding indicates a possibility of biotic source for atmospheric Po in the environment, which has been believed to be originated from abiotic sources. We compared emission behavior of Po and S in the culture experiments, the elements belong to XVI group in the Periodical Table, and consider that their emission mechanisms involved would be different though the emission of both elements is supported by biological activity of microorganisms. One of the chemical forms of S emitted was confirmed to be dimethyl sulfide (DMS) but that of Po is not known. Methylation experiments of Po with methylcobalamin demonstrated a formation and emission of volatile Po compound. The methylation of Po with methylcobalamin might be related to the observed Po emission in the culture experiments.

  3. Prophage spontaneous activation promotes DNA release enhancing biofilm formation in Streptococcus pneumoniae.

    PubMed

    Carrolo, Margarida; Frias, Maria João; Pinto, Francisco Rodrigues; Melo-Cristino, José; Ramirez, Mário

    2010-01-01

    Streptococcus pneumoniae (pneumococcus) is able to form biofilms in vivo and previous studies propose that pneumococcal biofilms play a relevant role both in colonization and infection. Additionally, pneumococci recovered from human infections are characterized by a high prevalence of lysogenic bacteriophages (phages) residing quiescently in their host chromosome. We investigated a possible link between lysogeny and biofilm formation. Considering that extracellular DNA (eDNA) is a key factor in the biofilm matrix, we reasoned that prophage spontaneous activation with the consequent bacterial host lysis could provide a source of eDNA, enhancing pneumococcal biofilm development. Monitoring biofilm growth of lysogenic and non-lysogenic pneumococcal strains indicated that phage-infected bacteria are more proficient at forming biofilms, that is their biofilms are characterized by a higher biomass and cell viability. The presence of phage particles throughout the lysogenic strains biofilm development implicated prophage spontaneous induction in this effect. Analysis of lysogens deficient for phage lysin and the bacterial major autolysin revealed that the absence of either lytic activity impaired biofilm development and the addition of DNA restored the ability of mutant strains to form robust biofilms. These findings establish that limited phage-mediated host lysis of a fraction of the bacterial population, due to spontaneous phage induction, constitutes an important source of eDNA for the S. pneumoniae biofilm matrix and that this localized release of eDNA favors biofilm formation by the remaining bacterial population. PMID:21187931

  4. Formation of recent Pb-Ag-Au mineralization by potential sub-surface microbial activity.

    PubMed

    Tornos, Fernando; Velasco, Francisco; Menor-Salván, César; Delgado, Antonio; Slack, John F; Escobar, Juan Manuel

    2014-08-06

    Las Cruces is a base-metal deposit in the Iberian Pyrite Belt, one of the world's best-known ore provinces. Here we report the occurrence of major Pb-Ag-Au mineralization resulting from recent sub-surface replacement of supergene oxyhydroxides by carbonate and sulphide minerals. This is probably the largest documented occurrence of recent microbial activity producing an ore assemblage previously unknown in supergene mineralizing environments. The presence of microbial features in the sulphides suggests that these may be the first-described natural bacteriomorphs of galena. The low δ(13)C values of the carbonate minerals indicate formation by deep anaerobic microbial processes. Sulphur isotope values of sulphides are interpreted here as reflecting microbial reduction in a system impoverished in sulphate. We suggest that biogenic activity has produced around 3.1 × 10(9) moles of reduced sulphur and 10(10) moles of CO2, promoting the formation of ca. 1.19 Mt of carbonates, 114,000 t of galena, 638 t of silver sulphides and 6.5 t of gold.

  5. Key amino acids of arabidopsis VKOR in the activity of phylloquinone reduction and disulfide bond formation.

    PubMed

    Yang, Xiao-Jian; Cui, Hao-Ran; Yu, Zhi-Bo; Du, Jia-Jia; Xu, Jia-Ning; Wang, Xiao-Yun

    2015-01-01

    Many proteins in chloroplast are regulated through the disulfide bond/thiol transformation to realize their activities. A homologue of VKOR (Vitamin K epoxide reductase) in Arabidopsis chloroplast is found to catalyze the disulfide bond formation in vivo and to mediate the specific phylloquinone reduction in vitro. It is also called LTO1 (Lumen Thiol Oxidoreductase 1). Investigations about functions and essential amino acid residues of AtVKOR have important theoretical significance to clarify the chloroplast redox regulation mechanism. In this study, several amino acids in the VKOR domain of AtVKOR were identified to be involved in binding of phylloquinone. Site-directed mutagenesis was used to study the function of these positions. The results suggested that residues Ser77, Leu87, Phe137 and Leu141 were quite important in the binding and catalyzing the reduction of phylloquinone. These residues were also involved in the electron transferring and disulfide bond formation of substrate proteins by motility assays in vivo, suggesting that the binding of phylloquinone not only affected the delivery of electrons to phylloquinone but also affected the whole electron transfer process. The conserved cysteines in the AtVKOR domain also played critical roles in phylloquinone reduction. When each of the four conserved cysteines was mutated to alanine, the mutants lost reduction activity entirely, suggesting that the four conserved cysteines played crucial roles in the electron transfer process. PMID:25267254

  6. Formation of recent Pb-Ag-Au mineralization by potential sub-surface microbial activity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tornos, Fernando; Velasco, Francisco; Menor-Salván, César; Delgado, Antonio; Slack, John F.; Escobar, Juan Manuel

    2014-08-01

    Las Cruces is a base-metal deposit in the Iberian Pyrite Belt, one of the world’s best-known ore provinces. Here we report the occurrence of major Pb-Ag-Au mineralization resulting from recent sub-surface replacement of supergene oxyhydroxides by carbonate and sulphide minerals. This is probably the largest documented occurrence of recent microbial activity producing an ore assemblage previously unknown in supergene mineralizing environments. The presence of microbial features in the sulphides suggests that these may be the first-described natural bacteriomorphs of galena. The low δ13C values of the carbonate minerals indicate formation by deep anaerobic microbial processes. Sulphur isotope values of sulphides are interpreted here as reflecting microbial reduction in a system impoverished in sulphate. We suggest that biogenic activity has produced around 3.1 × 109 moles of reduced sulphur and 1010 moles of CO2, promoting the formation of ca. 1.19 Mt of carbonates, 114,000 t of galena, 638 t of silver sulphides and 6.5 t of gold.

  7. Ionizing Radiation Induces Macrophage Foam Cell Formation and Aggregation Through JNK-Dependent Activation of CD36 Scavenger Receptors

    SciTech Connect

    Katayama, Ikuo; Hotokezaka, Yuka; Matsuyama, Toshifumi; Sumi, Tadateru; Nakamura, Takashi

    2008-03-01

    Purpose: Irradiated arteries of cancer patients can be associated with atherosclerosis-like lesions containing cholesterol-laden macrophages (foam cells). Endothelial cell damage by irradiation does not completely explain the foam cell formation. We investigated the possible underlying mechanisms for ionizing radiation (IR)-induced foam cell formation. Methods and Materials: Human peripheral blood monocytes were activated by macrophage colony-stimulating factor and then treated with varying doses of IR in vitro in the absence of endothelial cells. Scavenger receptor expression and foam cell formation of IR-treated macrophages were investigated in the presence or absence of oxidized low-density lipoprotein. We also assessed the importance of mitogen-activated protein kinase activity in the macrophage colony-stimulating factor-activated human monocytes (macrophages) for the foam cell formation. Results: We found that IR treatment of macrophage colony-stimulating factor-activated human peripheral blood monocytes resulted in the enhanced expression of CD36 scavenger receptors and that cholesterol accumulated in the irradiated macrophages with resultant foam cell formation in the presence of oxidized low-density lipoprotein. Furthermore, when cultured on collagen gels, human macrophages formed large foam cell aggregates in response to IR. Antibodies against CD36 inhibited the IR-induced foam cell formation and aggregation, indicating that the IR-induced foam cell formation and the subsequent aggregation are dependent on functional CD36. In addition, we found that IR of human macrophages resulted in c-Jun N-terminal kinase activation and that c-Jun N-terminal kinase inhibition suppressed IR-induced CD36 expression and the subsequent foam cell formation and aggregation. Conclusion: Taken together, these results suggest that IR-induced foam cell formation is mediated by c-Jun N-terminal kinase-dependent CD36 activation.

  8. Promotional Effects of Bismuth on the Formation of Platinum-Bismuth Nanowires Network and the Electrocatalytic Activity toward Ethanol Oxidation

    SciTech Connect

    Du, W.; Su, D.; Wang, Q.; Frenkel, A.I.; Teng, X.

    2011-01-11

    Electrocatalytic activities of Pt and their alloys toward small organic molecules oxidation are highly dependent on their morphology, chemical composition, and electronic structure. Here, we report the synthesis of dendrite-like Pt{sub 95}Bi{sub 5}, Pt{sub 83}Bi{sub 17}, and Pt{sub 76}Bi{sub 24} nanowires network with a high aspect ratio (up to 68). The electronic structure and heterogeneous crystalline structure have been studied using combined techniques, including aberration-corrected scanning transmission electron microscopy (STEM) and X-ray absorption near-edge structure (XANES) spectroscopy. Bismuth-oriented attachment growth mechanism has been proposed for the anisotropic growth of Pt/Bi. The electrochemical activities of Pt/Bi nanowires network toward ethanol oxidations have been tested. In particular, the as-made Pt{sub 95}Bi{sub 5} appears to have superior activity toward ethanol oxidation in comparison with the commercial Pt/C catalyst. The reported promotional effect of Bi on the formation of Pt/Bi and electrochemical activities will be important to design effective catalysts for ethanol fuel cell application.

  9. Promotional Effects of Bismuth on the Formation of Platinum-Bismuth Nanowires Network and the Electrocatalytic Activity toward Ethanol Oxidation

    SciTech Connect

    X Teng; W Du; D Su; Q Wang; A Frenkel

    2011-12-31

    Electrocatalytic activities of Pt and their alloys toward small organic molecules oxidation are highly dependent on their morphology, chemical composition, and electronic structure. Here, we report the synthesis of dendrite-like Pt{sub 95}Bi{sub 5}, Pt{sub 83}Bi{sub 17}, and Pt{sub 76}Bi{sub 24} nanowires network with a high aspect ratio (up to 68). The electronic structure and heterogeneous crystalline structure have been studied using combined techniques, including aberration-corrected scanning transmission electron microscopy (STEM) and X-ray absorption near-edge structure (XANES) spectroscopy. Bismuth-oriented attachment growth mechanism has been proposed for the anisotropic growth of Pt/Bi. The electrochemical activities of Pt/Bi nanowires network toward ethanol oxidations have been tested. In particular, the as-made Pt{sub 95}Bi{sub 5} appears to have superior activity toward ethanol oxidation in comparison with the commercial Pt/C catalyst. The reported promotional effect of Bi on the formation of Pt/Bi and electrochemical activities will be important to design effective catalysts for ethanol fuel cell application.

  10. Formation of marine snow and enhanced enzymatic activities in oil-contaminated seawater

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ziervogel, K.; McKay, L.; Yang, T.; Rhodes, B.; Nigro, L.; Gutierrez, T.; Teske, A.; Arnosti, C.

    2010-12-01

    The fate of oil spilled into the ocean depends on its composition, as well as on biological, chemical, and physical characteristics of the spill site. We investigated the effects of oil addition from the Deepwater Horizon (DH) spill on otherwise uncontaminated water collected close to the spill site. Incubation on a roller table mimicked the physical dynamics of natural seawater, leading to the formation of marine snow-oil aggregates. We measured the enzymatic activities of heterotrophic microbes associated with the aggregates and in the surrounding water, and assessed microbial population and community composition as oil-marine snow aggregates formed and aged in the water. Surface seawater taken near the spill site in May 2010 that had no visible crude oil was incubated in 1-l glass bottles with (oil-bottles) and without (no-oil bottles) a seawater-oil mixture collected from the same site. In the oil-bottles formation of brownish, densely packed marine snow (2-3 cm diameter) was observed within the first hour of the roller table incubation. In contrast no-oil bottles showed aggregate formation only after 3 days, and aggregates were almost transparent, less abundant, and smaller in size (< 1cm diameter). Subsamples of the water surrounding the aggregates were taken throughout 21 days of the roller table incubation, and analyzed for bacterial abundance and community structure as well as the activities of hydrolytic enzymes that are used by heterotrophic bacteria to degrade organic matter. We monitored oil-degrading activities with MUF-stearate and -butyrate, and also measured b-glucosidase, alkaline phosphatase, aminopeptidase, and six different polysaccharide hydrolase activities. Enzymatic activities were up to one order of magnitude higher in the oil-bottles compared with the no-oil bottles throughout the entire incubation time. Butyrate hydrolysis was elevated throughout the time course of the incubation, and stearate hydrolysis was particularly high over the

  11. Isoniazid-resistance conferring mutations in Mycobacterium tuberculosis KatG: Catalase, peroxidase, and INH-NADH adduct formation activities

    PubMed Central

    Cade, Christine E; Dlouhy, Adrienne C; Medzihradszky, Katalin F; Salas-Castillo, Saida Patricia; Ghiladi, Reza A

    2010-01-01

    Mycobacterium tuberculosis catalase-peroxidase (KatG) is a bifunctional hemoprotein that has been shown to activate isoniazid (INH), a pro-drug that is integral to frontline antituberculosis treatments. The activated species, presumed to be an isonicotinoyl radical, couples to NAD+/NADH forming an isoniazid-NADH adduct that ultimately confers anti-tubercular activity. To better understand the mechanisms of isoniazid activation as well as the origins of KatG-derived INH-resistance, we have compared the catalytic properties (including the ability to form the INH-NADH adduct) of the wild-type enzyme to 23 KatG mutants which have been associated with isoniazid resistance in clinical M. tuberculosis isolates. Neither catalase nor peroxidase activities, the two inherent enzymatic functions of KatG, were found to correlate with isoniazid resistance. Furthermore, catalase function was lost in mutants which lacked the Met-Tyr-Trp crosslink, the biogenic cofactor in KatG which has been previously shown to be integral to this activity. The presence or absence of the crosslink itself, however, was also found to not correlate with INH resistance. The KatG resistance-conferring mutants were then assayed for their ability to generate the INH-NADH adduct in the presence of peroxide (t-BuOOH and H2O2), superoxide, and no exogenous oxidant (air-only background control). The results demonstrate that residue location plays a critical role in determining INH-resistance mechanisms associated with INH activation; however, different mutations at the same location can produce vastly different reactivities that are oxidant-specific. Furthermore, the data can be interpreted to suggest the presence of a second mechanism of INH-resistance that is not correlated with the formation of the INH-NADH adduct. PMID:20054829

  12. The formation and activity of platinum adlayers on diamond electrodes for electrocatalysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bennett, Jason Alan

    The research described in this dissertation evaluates the potential of diamond as an advanced carbon electrocatalyst support material. This includes both assessing the physical and electrochemical properties of the material as well as a comprehensive investigation into the nature of metal adlayer formation on the material. The physical and electrochemical properties of boron-doped polycrystalline diamond thin films, prepared with varying levels of sp2-bonded nondiamond carbon impurity, were systematically investigated. This impurity was introduced through adjustment of the methane-to-hydrogen source gas ratio used for the deposition. Increasing the methane-to-hydrogen ratio resulted in an increase in the fraction of grain boundary, the extent of secondary nucleation, and the amount of sp2-bonded nondiamond carbon impurity. The effect of the source gas ratio on the electrochemical response towards several well known redox analytes and the oxygen reduction reaction in both acidic and alkaline media was also investigated. The results demonstrate that the grain boundaries, and the sp2-bonded nondiamond carbon impurity presumably residing there, can have a significant impact on the electrode reaction kinetics for certain redox systems and little influence for others. The morphological and microstructural stability of microcrystalline and nanocrystalline boron-doped diamond thin film electrodes under conditions observed in phosphoric acid fuel cells was investigated. The electrodes were exposed to a 2 h period of anodic polarization in 85% H3PO 4 at ˜180°C and 0.1 A/cm2. Catastrophic degradation was not observed for either type of diamond. The oxidation of the microcrystalline diamond was limited to the surface, and the effects could be reversed upon exposure to a hydrogen plasma. The nanocrystalline diamond exhibited similar responses to well known redox analytes after anodic polarization, however an irreversible increase in the film capacitance was also observed

  13. Matrix rigidity regulates spatiotemporal dynamics of Cdc42 activity and vacuole formation kinetics of endothelial colony forming cells.

    PubMed

    Kim, Seung Joon; Wan, Qiaoqiao; Cho, Eunhye; Han, Bumsoo; Yoder, Mervin C; Voytik-Harbin, Sherry L; Na, Sungsoo

    2014-01-24

    Recent evidence has shown that endothelial colony forming cells (ECFCs) may serve as a cell therapy for improving blood vessel formation in subjects with vascular injury, largely due to their robust vasculogenic potential. The Rho family GTPase Cdc42 is known to play a primary role in this vasculogenesis process, but little is known about how extracellular matrix (ECM) rigidity affects Cdc42 activity during the process. In this study, we addressed two questions: Does matrix rigidity affect Cdc42 activity in ECFC undergoing early vacuole formation? How is the spatiotemporal activation of Cdc42 related to ECFC vacuole formation? A fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET)-based Cdc42 biosensor was used to examine the effects of the rigidity of three-dimensional (3D) collagen matrices on spatiotemporal activity of Cdc42 in ECFCs. Collagen matrix stiffness was modulated by varying the collagen concentration and therefore fibril density. The results showed that soft (150 Pa) matrices induced an increased level of Cdc42 activity compared to stiff (1 kPa) matrices. Time-course imaging and colocalization analysis of Cdc42 activity and vacuole formation revealed that Cdc42 activity was colocalized to the periphery of cytoplasmic vacuoles. Moreover, soft matrices generated faster and larger vacuoles than stiff matrices. The matrix-driven vacuole formation was enhanced by a constitutively active Cdc42 mutant, but significantly inhibited by a dominant-negative Cdc42 mutant. Collectively, the results suggest that matrix rigidity is a strong regulator of Cdc42 activity and vacuole formation kinetics, and that enhanced activity of Cdc42 is an important step in early vacuole formation in ECFCs.

  14. [Quantitative determination of the infective activity of the human immunodeficiency virus by plaque formation using monolayer cultures].

    PubMed

    Nosik, M N; Stepanova, L G; Matsevich, G R

    1995-01-01

    A method for assessment of the infective activity of HIV using plaque formation method with human diploid cells (strains L-65, L-68, L-72) has been developed. This method is not inferior to plaque formation with poly-L-lysine in sensitivity, but superior to it in reproducibility of results and standardization of the test conditions. The method is fit for titration of HIV and virus-neutralizing antibodies, as well as for assessment of the activity of anti-HIV preparations.

  15. Results of PRISMA/FFIORD extended mission and applicability to future formation flying and active debris removal missions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Delpech, Michel; Berges, Jean-Claude; Karlsson, Thomas; Malbet, Fabien

    2013-07-01

    CNES performed several experiments during the extended PRISMA mission which started in August 2011. A first session in October 2011 addressed two objectives: 1) demonstrate angles-only navigation to rendezvous with a non-cooperative object; 2) exercise transitions between RF-based and vision-based control during final formation acquisition. A complementary experiment in September 2012 mimicked some future astrometry mission and implemented the manoeuvres required to point the two satellite axis to a celestial target and maintain it fixed during some observation period. In the first sections, the paper presents the experiment motivations, describes its main design features including the guidance and control algorithms evolutions and provides a synthesis of the most significant results along with a discussion of the lessons learned. In the last part, the paper evokes the applicability of these experiment results to some active debris removal mission concept that is currently being studied.

  16. Surface activity and film formation from the surface associated material of artificial surfactant preparations.

    PubMed

    Palmblad, M; Gustafsson, M; Curstedt, T; Johansson, J; Schürch, S

    2001-02-01

    Surfactant proteins B and C (SP-B and SP-C) are present in natural derived surfactant preparations used for treatment of respiratory distress syndrome. Herein the surface activity of an SP-C analogue (SP-C(LKS)), a hybrid peptide between SP-C and bacteriorhodopsin (SP-C/BR) and a model peptide (KL(4)) was studied with a captive bubble surfactometer (CBS). The peptides were mixed with either 1,2-dipalmitoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine (DPPC)/phosphatidylglycerol (PG) (7:3, by weight) or DPPC/PG/palmitic acid (68:22:9, by weight) at a concentration of 1 mg/ml in HEPES buffer, pH 6.9 and a polypeptide/lipid weight ratio of 0.02--0.03. In some lipid/peptide preparations also 2% of SP-B was included. Adsorption, monitored as surface tension vs. time for 10 min after bubble formation did not show discernible differences for the whole set of preparations. Equilibrium surface tensions of approximately 25 mN/m were reached after 5--10 min for all preparations, although those with SP-C/BR appeared not to reach end point of adsorption within 10 min. Area compression needed to reach minimum surface tension of 0.5--2.0 mN/m was least for the KL(4) preparation, about 13% in the first cycle. 3% SP-C(LKS) in DPPC:PG (7:3, by weight) reached minimum surface tension upon 27% compression in the first cycle. If DPPC:PG:PA (68:22:9, by weight) was used instead only 16% area compression was needed and 14% if also 2% SP-B was included. 3% SP-C(LKS) in DPPC:PG (7:3, by weight)+2% SP-B needed 34% compression to reach minimum surface tension. The replenishment of material from a surface associated surfactant reservoir was estimated with subphase depletion experiments. With the 2% KL(4) preparation incorporation of excess material took place at a surface tension of 25--35 mN/m during stepwise bubble expansion and excess material equivalent to 4.3 monolayers was found. When 2% SP-B was added to 3% SP-C(LKS) in DPPC:PG (7:3, by weight) the number of excess monolayers increased from 1.5 to 3

  17. Unfractionated Heparin Promotes Osteoclast Formation in Vitro by Inhibiting Osteoprotegerin Activity

    PubMed Central

    Li, Binghan; Lu, Dan; Chen, Yuqing; Zhao, Minghui; Zuo, Li

    2016-01-01

    Heparin has been proven to enhance bone resorption and induce bone loss. Since osteoclasts play a pivotal role in bone resorption, the effect of heparin on osteoclastogenesis needs to be clarified. Since osteocytes are the key modulator during osteoclastogenesis, we evaluated heparin’s effect on osteoclastogenesis in vitro by co-culturing an osteocyte cell line (MLO-Y4) and pre-osteoclasts (RAW264.7). In this co-culture system, heparin enhanced osteoclastogenesis and osteoclastic bone resorption while having no influence on the production of RANKL (receptor activator of NFκB ligand), M-CSF (macrophage colony-stimulating factor), and OPG (osteoprotegerin), which are three main regulatory factors derived from osteocytes. According to previous studies, heparin could bind specifically to OPG and inhibit its activity, so we hypothesized that this might be a possible mechanism of heparin activity. To test this hypothesis, osteoclastogenesis was induced using recombinant RANKL or MLO-Y4 supernatant. We found that heparin has no effect on RANKL-induced osteoclastogenesis (contains no OPG). However, after incubation with OPG, the capacity of MLO-Y4 supernatant for supporting osteoclast formation was increased. This effect disappeared after OPG was neutralized and reappeared after OPG was replenished. These results strongly suggest that heparin promotes osteocyte-modulated osteoclastogenesis in vitro, at least partially, through inhibiting OPG activity. PMID:27110777

  18. Unfractionated Heparin Promotes Osteoclast Formation in Vitro by Inhibiting Osteoprotegerin Activity.

    PubMed

    Li, Binghan; Lu, Dan; Chen, Yuqing; Zhao, Minghui; Zuo, Li

    2016-01-01

    Heparin has been proven to enhance bone resorption and induce bone loss. Since osteoclasts play a pivotal role in bone resorption, the effect of heparin on osteoclastogenesis needs to be clarified. Since osteocytes are the key modulator during osteoclastogenesis, we evaluated heparin's effect on osteoclastogenesis in vitro by co-culturing an osteocyte cell line (MLO-Y4) and pre-osteoclasts (RAW264.7). In this co-culture system, heparin enhanced osteoclastogenesis and osteoclastic bone resorption while having no influence on the production of RANKL (receptor activator of NFκB ligand), M-CSF (macrophage colony-stimulating factor), and OPG (osteoprotegerin), which are three main regulatory factors derived from osteocytes. According to previous studies, heparin could bind specifically to OPG and inhibit its activity, so we hypothesized that this might be a possible mechanism of heparin activity. To test this hypothesis, osteoclastogenesis was induced using recombinant RANKL or MLO-Y4 supernatant. We found that heparin has no effect on RANKL-induced osteoclastogenesis (contains no OPG). However, after incubation with OPG, the capacity of MLO-Y4 supernatant for supporting osteoclast formation was increased. This effect disappeared after OPG was neutralized and reappeared after OPG was replenished. These results strongly suggest that heparin promotes osteocyte-modulated osteoclastogenesis in vitro, at least partially, through inhibiting OPG activity. PMID:27110777

  19. Bubble Festival: Presenting Bubble Activities in a Learning Station Format. Teacher's Guide.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Barber, Jacqueline; Willard, Carolyn

    This learning station guide adapts the Bubble Festival, an all-school event, for individual classrooms. It presents students with a variety of different challenges at learning stations set up around the classroom. The activities are student-centered and involve open-ended investigations. Also included are ways to extend students' experiences at…

  20. Understanding the formation of CuS concave superstructures with peroxidase-like activity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    He, Weiwei; Jia, Huimin; Li, Xiaoxiao; Lei, Yan; Li, Jing; Zhao, Hongxiao; Mi, Liwei; Zhang, Lizhi; Zheng, Zhi

    2012-05-01

    Copper sulfide (CuS) concave polyhedral superstructures (CPSs) have been successfully prepared in an ethanolic solution by a simple solvothermal reaction without the use of surfactants or templates. Two typical well defined, high symmetry CuS concave polyhedrons, forming a concave truncated cuboctahedron and icosahedron were prepared. The effect of the reaction time, temperature and different Cu ion and sulfur sources on the formation of CuS CPSs were investigated and a possible formation mechanism was proposed and discussed based on gas chromatography-mass spectrometry. More importantly, we found, for the first time, that the CuS CPSs exhibit intrinsic peroxidase-like activity, as they can quickly catalyze the oxidation of typical horseradish peroxidase (HRP) substrates, 3,3',5,5'-tetramethylbenzidine (TMB) and o-phenylenediamine (OPD), in the presence of hydrogen peroxide. In addition to the recent discoveries regarding peroxidase mimetics on Fe3O4 NPs and carbon nanostructures, our findings suggest a new kind of candidate for peroxidase mimics. This may open up a new application field of CuS micro-nano structures in biodetection, biocatalysis and environmental monitoring.Copper sulfide (CuS) concave polyhedral superstructures (CPSs) have been successfully prepared in an ethanolic solution by a simple solvothermal reaction without the use of surfactants or templates. Two typical well defined, high symmetry CuS concave polyhedrons, forming a concave truncated cuboctahedron and icosahedron were prepared. The effect of the reaction time, temperature and different Cu ion and sulfur sources on the formation of CuS CPSs were investigated and a possible formation mechanism was proposed and discussed based on gas chromatography-mass spectrometry. More importantly, we found, for the first time, that the CuS CPSs exhibit intrinsic peroxidase-like activity, as they can quickly catalyze the oxidation of typical horseradish peroxidase (HRP) substrates, 3

  1. PHYSICAL PROPERTIES, STAR FORMATION, AND ACTIVE GALACTIC NUCLEUS ACTIVITY IN BALMER BREAK GALAXIES AT 0 < z < 1

    SciTech Connect

    Diaz Tello, J.; Donzelli, C.; Padilla, N.; Fujishiro, N.; Yoshikawa, T.; Hanami, H.; Hatsukade, B.

    2013-07-01

    We present a spectroscopic study with the derivation of the physical properties of 37 Balmer break galaxies, which have the necessary lines to locate them in star-forming-active galactic nuclei (AGNs) diagnostic diagrams. These galaxies span a redshift range from 0.045 to 0.93 and are somewhat less massive than similar samples of previous works. The studied sample has multiwavelength photometric data coverage from the ultraviolet to mid-infrared (MIR) Spitzer bands. We investigate the connection between star formation and AGN activity via optical, mass-excitation (MEx), and MIR diagnostic diagrams. Through optical diagrams, 31 (84%) star-forming galaxies, two (5%) composite galaxies, and three (8%) AGNs were classified, whereas from the MEx diagram only one galaxy was classified as AGN. A total of 19 galaxies have photometry available in all the IRAC/Spitzer bands. Of these, three AGN candidates were not classified as AGN in the optical diagrams, suggesting they are dusty/obscured AGNs, or that nuclear star formation has diluted their contributions. By fitting the spectral energy distribution of the galaxies, we derived the stellar masses, dust reddening E(B - V), ages, and UV star formation rates (SFRs). Furthermore, the relationship between SFR surface density ({Sigma}{sub SFR}) and stellar mass surface density per time unit ({Sigma}{sub M{sub */{tau}}}) as a function of redshift was investigated using the [O II] {lambda}3727, 3729, H{alpha} {lambda}6563 luminosities, which revealed that both quantities are larger for higher redshift galaxies. We also studied the SFR and specific SFR (SSFR) versus stellar mass and color relations, with the more massive galaxies having higher SFR values but lower SSFR values than less massive galaxies. These results are consistent with previous ones showing that, at a given mass, high-redshift galaxies have on average larger SFR and SSFR values than low-redshift galaxies. Finally, bluer galaxies have larger SSFR values than redder

  2. Local Luminous Infrared Galaxies. III. Co-evolution of Black Hole Growth and Star Formation Activity?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alonso-Herrero, Almudena; Pereira-Santaella, Miguel; Rieke, George H.; Diamond-Stanic, Aleksandar M.; Wang, Yiping; Hernán-Caballero, Antonio; Rigopoulou, Dimitra

    2013-03-01

    Local luminous infrared (IR) galaxies (LIRGs) have both high star formation rates (SFR) and a high AGN (Seyfert and AGN/starburst composite) incidence. Therefore, they are ideal candidates to explore the co-evolution of black hole (BH) growth and star formation (SF) activity, not necessarily associated with major mergers. Here, we use Spitzer/IRS spectroscopy of a complete volume-limited sample of local LIRGs (distances of <78 Mpc). We estimate typical BH masses of 3 × 107 M ⊙ using [Ne III] 15.56 μm and optical [O III] λ5007 gas velocity dispersions and literature stellar velocity dispersions. We find that in a large fraction of local LIRGs, the current SFR is taking place not only in the inner nuclear ~1.5 kpc region, as estimated from the nuclear 11.3 μm PAH luminosities, but also in the host galaxy. We next use the ratios between the SFRs and BH accretion rates (BHAR) to study whether the SF activity and BH growth are contemporaneous in local LIRGs. On average, local LIRGs have SFR to BHAR ratios higher than those of optically selected Seyferts of similar active galactic nucleus (AGN) luminosities. However, the majority of the IR-bright galaxies in the revised-Shapley-Ames Seyfert sample behave like local LIRGs. Moreover, the AGN incidence tends to be higher in local LIRGs with the lowest SFRs. All of this suggests that in local LIRGs there is a distinct IR-bright star-forming phase taking place prior to the bulk of the current BH growth (i.e., AGN phase). The latter is reflected first as a composite and then as a Seyfert, and later as a non-LIRG optically identified Seyfert nucleus with moderate SF in its host galaxy. This work is based on observations made with the Spitzer Space Telescope, which is operated by the Jet Propulsion Laboratory, California Institute of Technology under NASA contract 1407.

  3. Active Ankle Movements Prevent Formation of Lower-Extremity Deep Venous Thrombosis After Orthopedic Surgery

    PubMed Central

    Li, Ye; Guan, Xiang-Hong; Wang, Rui; Li, Bin; Ning, Bo; Su, Wei; Sun, Tao; Li, Hong-Yan

    2016-01-01

    Background The aim of this study was to assess the preventive value of active ankle movements in the formation of lower-extremity deep venous thrombosis (DVT), attempting to develop a new method for rehabilitation nursing after orthopedic surgery. Material/Methods We randomly assigned 193 patients undergoing orthopedic surgery in the lower limbs into a case group (n=96) and a control group (n=97). The control group received routine nursing while the case group performed active ankle movements in addition to receiving routine nursing. Maximum venous outflow (MVO), maximum venous capacity (MVC), and blood rheology were measured and the incidence of DVT was recorded. Results On the 11th and 14th days of the experiment, the case group had significantly higher MVO and MVC than the control group (all P<0.05). The whole-blood viscosity at high shear rate and the plasma viscosity were significantly lower in the case group than in the control group on the 14th day (both P<0.05). During the experiment, a significantly higher overall DVT incidence was recorded in the control group (8 with asymptomatic DVT) compared with the case group (1 with asymptomatic DVT) (P=0.034). During follow-up, the case group presented a significantly lower DVT incidence (1 with symptomatic DVT and 4 with asymptomatic DVT) than in the control group (5 with symptomatic DVT and 10 with asymptomatic DVT) (P=0.031). Conclusions Through increasing MVO and MVC and reducing blood rheology, active ankle movements may prevent the formation of lower-extremity DVT after orthopedic surgery. PMID:27600467

  4. LOCAL LUMINOUS INFRARED GALAXIES. III. CO-EVOLUTION OF BLACK HOLE GROWTH AND STAR FORMATION ACTIVITY?

    SciTech Connect

    Alonso-Herrero, Almudena; Hernan-Caballero, Antonio; Pereira-Santaella, Miguel; Rieke, George H.; Diamond-Stanic, Aleksandar M.; Wang Yiping; Rigopoulou, Dimitra

    2013-03-10

    Local luminous infrared (IR) galaxies (LIRGs) have both high star formation rates (SFR) and a high AGN (Seyfert and AGN/starburst composite) incidence. Therefore, they are ideal candidates to explore the co-evolution of black hole (BH) growth and star formation (SF) activity, not necessarily associated with major mergers. Here, we use Spitzer/IRS spectroscopy of a complete volume-limited sample of local LIRGs (distances of <78 Mpc). We estimate typical BH masses of 3 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 7} M{sub Sun} using [Ne III] 15.56 {mu}m and optical [O III] {lambda}5007 gas velocity dispersions and literature stellar velocity dispersions. We find that in a large fraction of local LIRGs, the current SFR is taking place not only in the inner nuclear {approx}1.5 kpc region, as estimated from the nuclear 11.3 {mu}m PAH luminosities, but also in the host galaxy. We next use the ratios between the SFRs and BH accretion rates (BHAR) to study whether the SF activity and BH growth are contemporaneous in local LIRGs. On average, local LIRGs have SFR to BHAR ratios higher than those of optically selected Seyferts of similar active galactic nucleus (AGN) luminosities. However, the majority of the IR-bright galaxies in the revised-Shapley-Ames Seyfert sample behave like local LIRGs. Moreover, the AGN incidence tends to be higher in local LIRGs with the lowest SFRs. All of this suggests that in local LIRGs there is a distinct IR-bright star-forming phase taking place prior to the bulk of the current BH growth (i.e., AGN phase). The latter is reflected first as a composite and then as a Seyfert, and later as a non-LIRG optically identified Seyfert nucleus with moderate SF in its host galaxy.

  5. Active Ankle Movements Prevent Formation of Lower-Extremity Deep Venous Thrombosis After Orthopedic Surgery.

    PubMed

    Li, Ye; Guan, Xiang-Hong; Wang, Rui; Li, Bin; Ning, Bo; Su, Wei; Sun, Tao; Li, Hong-Yan

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND The aim of this study was to assess the preventive value of active ankle movements in the formation of lower-extremity deep venous thrombosis (DVT), attempting to develop a new method for rehabilitation nursing after orthopedic surgery. MATERIAL AND METHODS We randomly assigned 193 patients undergoing orthopedic surgery in the lower limbs into a case group (n=96) and a control group (n=97). The control group received routine nursing while the case group performed active ankle movements in addition to receiving routine nursing. Maximum venous outflow (MVO), maximum venous capacity (MVC), and blood rheology were measured and the incidence of DVT was recorded. RESULTS On the 11th and 14th days of the experiment, the case group had significantly higher MVO and MVC than the control group (all P<0.05). The whole-blood viscosity at high shear rate and the plasma viscosity were significantly lower in the case group than in the control group on the 14th day (both P<0.05). During the experiment, a significantly higher overall DVT incidence was recorded in the control group (8 with asymptomatic DVT) compared with the case group (1 with asymptomatic DVT) (P=0.034). During follow-up, the case group presented a significantly lower DVT incidence (1 with symptomatic DVT and 4 with asymptomatic DVT) than in the control group (5 with symptomatic DVT and 10 with asymptomatic DVT) (P=0.031). CONCLUSIONS Through increasing MVO and MVC and reducing blood rheology, active ankle movements may prevent the formation of lower-extremity DVT after orthopedic surgery. PMID:27600467

  6. A model for the formation of the active region corona driven by magnetic flux emergence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, F.; Peter, H.; Bingert, S.; Cheung, M. C. M.

    2014-04-01

    Aims: We present the first model that couples the formation of the corona of a solar active region to a model of the emergence of a sunspot pair. This allows us to study when, where, and why active region loops form, and how they evolve. Methods: We use a 3D radiation magnetohydrodynamics (MHD) simulation of the emergence of an active region through the upper convection zone and the photosphere as a lower boundary for a 3D MHD coronal model. The coronal model accounts for the braiding of the magnetic fieldlines, which induces currents in the corona to heat up the plasma. We synthesize the coronal emission for a direct comparison to observations. Starting with a basically field-free atmosphere we follow the filling of the corona with magnetic field and plasma. Results: Numerous individually identifiable hot coronal loops form, and reach temperatures well above 1 MK with densities comparable to observations. The footpoints of these loops are found where small patches of magnetic flux concentrations move into the sunspots. The loop formation is triggered by an increase in upward-directed Poynting flux at their footpoints in the photosphere. In the synthesized extreme ultraviolet (EUV) emission these loops develop within a few minutes. The first EUV loop appears as a thin tube, then rises and expands significantly in the horizontal direction. Later, the spatially inhomogeneous heat input leads to a fragmented system of multiple loops or strands in a growing envelope. Animation associated with Fig. 2 is available in electronic form at http://www.aanda.org

  7. Effect of powdered activated carbon (PAC) on MBR performance and effluent trihalomethane formation: At the initial stage of PAC addition.

    PubMed

    Gao, Yue; Ma, Defang; Yue, Qinyan; Gao, Baoyu; Huang, Xia

    2016-09-01

    In this study, the MBR was used to treat municipal wastewater for reuse. Effects of powdered activated carbon (PAC) addition on MBR system in terms of effluent water quality, trihalomethane (THM) formation and membrane organic fouling tendency of MBR sludge supernatant at the initial stage of PAC addition were investigated. Effects of chlorine dose and contact time on THM formation and speciation were also studied. PAC addition enhanced the removal of organic matters, especially aromatic components, which improved the UV254 removal rate from 34% to 83%. PAC addition greatly reduced the membrane organic fouling tendency of MBR sludge supernatant. PAC addition reduced the MBR effluent trihalomethane formation potential (THMFP) from 351.29 to 241.95μg/L, while increased THM formation reactivity by 42%. PAC addition enhanced the formation of higher toxic bromine-containing THMs. High chlorine dose and contact time resulted in higher THM formation but lower proportion of bromine-containing THMs. PMID:27318162

  8. Numerical simulations of active region scale flux emergence: From spot formation to decay

    SciTech Connect

    Rempel, M.; Cheung, M. C. M.

    2014-04-20

    We present numerical simulations of active region scale flux emergence covering a time span of up to 6 days. Flux emergence is driven by a bottom boundary condition that advects a semi-torus of magnetic field with 1.7 × 10{sup 22} Mx flux into the computational domain. The simulations show that, even in the absence of twist, the magnetic flux is able the rise through the upper 15.5 Mm of the convection zone and emerge into the photosphere to form spots. We find that spot formation is sensitive to the persistence of upflows at the bottom boundary footpoints, i.e., a continuing upflow would prevent spot formation. In addition, the presence of a torus-aligned flow (such flow into the retrograde direction is expected from angular momentum conservation during the rise of flux ropes through the convection zone) leads to a significant asymmetry between the pair of spots, with the spot corresponding to the leading spot on the Sun being more axisymmetric and coherent, but also forming with a delay relative to the following spot. The spot formation phase transitions directly into a decay phase. Subsurface flows fragment the magnetic field and lead to intrusions of almost field free plasma underneath the photosphere. When such intrusions reach photospheric layers, the spot fragments. The timescale for spot decay is comparable to the longest convective timescales present in the simulation domain. We find that the dispersal of flux from a simulated spot in the first two days of the decay phase is consistent with self-similar decay by turbulent diffusion.

  9. NO CLEAR SUBMILLIMETER SIGNATURE OF SUPPRESSED STAR FORMATION AMONG X-RAY LUMINOUS ACTIVE GALACTIC NUCLEI

    SciTech Connect

    Harrison, C. M.; Alexander, D. M.; Mullaney, J. R.; Del Moro, A.; Rovilos, E.; Altieri, B.; Coia, D.; Charmandaris, V.; Daddi, E.; Le Floc'h, E.; Leiton, R.; Dasyra, K.; Dickinson, M.; Kartaltepe, J.; Hickox, R. C.; Ivison, R. J.; Magnelli, B.; Popesso, P.; Rosario, D.; and others

    2012-11-20

    Many theoretical models require powerful active galactic nuclei (AGNs) to suppress star formation in distant galaxies and reproduce the observed properties of today's massive galaxies. A recent study based on Herschel-SPIRE submillimeter observations claimed to provide direct support for this picture, reporting a significant decrease in the mean star formation rates (SFRs) of the most luminous AGNs (L{sub X} >10{sup 44} erg s{sup -1}) at z Almost-Equal-To 1-3 in the Chandra Deep Field-North (CDF-N). In this Letter, we extend these results using Herschel-SPIRE 250 {mu}m data in the COSMOS and Chandra Deep Field-South fields to achieve an order-of-magnitude improvement in the number of sources at L{sub X} >10{sup 44} erg s{sup -1}. On the basis of our analysis, we find no strong evidence for suppressed star formation in L{sub X} >10{sup 44} erg s{sup -1} AGNs at z Almost-Equal-To 1-3. The mean SFRs of the AGNs are constant over the broad X-ray luminosity range of L{sub X} Almost-Equal-To 10{sup 43}-10{sup 45} erg s{sup -1} (with mean SFRs consistent with typical star-forming galaxies at z Almost-Equal-To 2; (SFRs) Almost-Equal-To 100-200 M{sub Sun} yr{sup -1}). We suggest that the previous CDF-N results were likely due to low number statistics. We discuss our results in the context of current theoretical models.

  10. Numerical Simulations of Active Region Scale Flux Emergence: From Spot Formation to Decay

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rempel, M.; Cheung, M. C. M.

    2014-04-01

    We present numerical simulations of active region scale flux emergence covering a time span of up to 6 days. Flux emergence is driven by a bottom boundary condition that advects a semi-torus of magnetic field with 1.7 × 1022 Mx flux into the computational domain. The simulations show that, even in the absence of twist, the magnetic flux is able the rise through the upper 15.5 Mm of the convection zone and emerge into the photosphere to form spots. We find that spot formation is sensitive to the persistence of upflows at the bottom boundary footpoints, i.e., a continuing upflow would prevent spot formation. In addition, the presence of a torus-aligned flow (such flow into the retrograde direction is expected from angular momentum conservation during the rise of flux ropes through the convection zone) leads to a significant asymmetry between the pair of spots, with the spot corresponding to the leading spot on the Sun being more axisymmetric and coherent, but also forming with a delay relative to the following spot. The spot formation phase transitions directly into a decay phase. Subsurface flows fragment the magnetic field and lead to intrusions of almost field free plasma underneath the photosphere. When such intrusions reach photospheric layers, the spot fragments. The timescale for spot decay is comparable to the longest convective timescales present in the simulation domain. We find that the dispersal of flux from a simulated spot in the first two days of the decay phase is consistent with self-similar decay by turbulent diffusion.

  11. Verticillium transcription activator of adhesion Vta2 suppresses microsclerotia formation and is required for systemic infection of plant roots.

    PubMed

    Tran, Van-Tuan; Braus-Stromeyer, Susanna A; Kusch, Harald; Reusche, Michael; Kaever, Alexander; Kühn, Anika; Valerius, Oliver; Landesfeind, Manuel; Aßhauer, Kathrin; Tech, Maike; Hoff, Katharina; Pena-Centeno, Tonatiuh; Stanke, Mario; Lipka, Volker; Braus, Gerhard H

    2014-04-01

    Six transcription regulatory genes of the Verticillium plant pathogen, which reprogrammed nonadherent budding yeasts for adhesion, were isolated by a genetic screen to identify control elements for early plant infection. Verticillium transcription activator of adhesion Vta2 is highly conserved in filamentous fungi but not present in yeasts. The Magnaporthe grisea ortholog conidiation regulator Con7 controls the formation of appressoria which are absent in Verticillium species. Vta2 was analyzed by using genetics, cell biology, transcriptomics, secretome proteomics and plant pathogenicity assays. Nuclear Vta2 activates the expression of the adhesin-encoding yeast flocculin genes FLO1 and FLO11. Vta2 is required for fungal growth of Verticillium where it is a positive regulator of conidiation. Vta2 is mandatory for accurate timing and suppression of microsclerotia as resting structures. Vta2 controls expression of 270 transcripts, including 10 putative genes for adhesins and 57 for secreted proteins. Vta2 controls the level of 125 secreted proteins, including putative adhesins or effector molecules and a secreted catalase-peroxidase. Vta2 is a major regulator of fungal pathogenesis, and controls host-plant root infection and H2 O2 detoxification. Verticillium impaired in Vta2 is unable to colonize plants and induce disease symptoms. Vta2 represents an interesting target for controlling the growth and development of these vascular pathogens.

  12. Verticillium transcription activator of adhesion Vta2 suppresses microsclerotia formation and is required for systemic infection of plant roots.

    PubMed

    Tran, Van-Tuan; Braus-Stromeyer, Susanna A; Kusch, Harald; Reusche, Michael; Kaever, Alexander; Kühn, Anika; Valerius, Oliver; Landesfeind, Manuel; Aßhauer, Kathrin; Tech, Maike; Hoff, Katharina; Pena-Centeno, Tonatiuh; Stanke, Mario; Lipka, Volker; Braus, Gerhard H

    2014-04-01

    Six transcription regulatory genes of the Verticillium plant pathogen, which reprogrammed nonadherent budding yeasts for adhesion, were isolated by a genetic screen to identify control elements for early plant infection. Verticillium transcription activator of adhesion Vta2 is highly conserved in filamentous fungi but not present in yeasts. The Magnaporthe grisea ortholog conidiation regulator Con7 controls the formation of appressoria which are absent in Verticillium species. Vta2 was analyzed by using genetics, cell biology, transcriptomics, secretome proteomics and plant pathogenicity assays. Nuclear Vta2 activates the expression of the adhesin-encoding yeast flocculin genes FLO1 and FLO11. Vta2 is required for fungal growth of Verticillium where it is a positive regulator of conidiation. Vta2 is mandatory for accurate timing and suppression of microsclerotia as resting structures. Vta2 controls expression of 270 transcripts, including 10 putative genes for adhesins and 57 for secreted proteins. Vta2 controls the level of 125 secreted proteins, including putative adhesins or effector molecules and a secreted catalase-peroxidase. Vta2 is a major regulator of fungal pathogenesis, and controls host-plant root infection and H2 O2 detoxification. Verticillium impaired in Vta2 is unable to colonize plants and induce disease symptoms. Vta2 represents an interesting target for controlling the growth and development of these vascular pathogens. PMID:24433459

  13. Multi-Channel Microfluidic Biosensor Platform Applied for Online Monitoring and Screening of Biofilm Formation and Activity

    PubMed Central

    Bruchmann, Julia; Sachsenheimer, Kai; Rapp, Bastian E.; Schwartz, Thomas

    2015-01-01

    Bacterial colonization of surfaces and interfaces has a major impact on various areas including biotechnology, medicine, food industries, and water technologies. In most of these areas biofilm development has a strong impact on hygiene situations, product quality, and process efficacies. In consequence, biofilm manipulation and prevention is a fundamental issue to avoid adverse impacts. For such scenario online, non-destructive biofilm monitoring systems become important in many technical and industrial applications. This study reports such a system in form of a microfluidic sensor platform based on the combination of electrical impedance spectroscopy and amperometric current measurement, which allows sensitive online measurement of biofilm formation and activity. A total number of 12 parallel fluidic channels enable real-time online screening of various biofilms formed by different Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Stenotrophomonas maltophilia strains and complex mixed population biofilms. Experiments using disinfectant and antibiofilm reagents demonstrate that the biofilm sensor is able to discriminate between inactivation/killing of bacteria and destabilization of biofilm structures. The impedance and amperometric sensor data demonstrated the high dynamics of biofilms as a consequence of distinct responses to chemical treatment strategies. Gene expression of flagellar and fimbrial genes of biofilms grown inside the microfluidic system supported the detected biofilm growth kinetics. Thus, the presented biosensor platform is a qualified tool for assessing biofilm formation in specific environments and for evaluating the effectiveness of antibiofilm treatment strategies. PMID:25706987

  14. Radionuclides in detecting active granuloma formation. Gallium-67 scintigraphy and histopathology with autoradiographic findings

    SciTech Connect

    van Maarsseveen, A.; Alberts, C.; van der Schoot, J.; van Royen, E.; Hens, C.; Mullink, H.; de Groot, J.

    1986-01-01

    Granuloma formation studies were performed on lungs of guinea pigs sensitized with FCA over 2 to 17 months. Prolonged time of sensitization revealed more granulomatous pulmonary tissue. An intravenous booster of FCA in the animals that had been sensitized for 3 months yielded enhanced granuloma formation within 5 days. The histopathology of these lungs was comparable with that seen in lungs of animals after 17 months of sensitization without booster. Enhanced local proliferation of macrophages, measured by (/sup 3/H)thymidine incorporation and autoradiography, was seen in the lungs of the animals that had received boosters. Moreover, /sup 67/Ga scintigraphy was strongly positive in these animals. Scintigraphy of cell suspensions of pulmonary tissue from these animals showed that /sup 67/Ga was predominantly taken up (quantitatively as well as qualitatively) by the alveolar macrophages. Cell suspensions of sarcoidosis patients, prepared in the same way, showed only a low level of /sup 67/Ga uptake, one comparable to that of the pulmonary cell suspensions of the sensitized animals that had not received boosters. It is suggested that a negative scintigraphy in patients with chronic pulmonary granulomatous disorders could be (partly) explained by the absence of activated macrophages.

  15. Formation of phosgene during welding activities in an atmosphere containing chlorinated hydrocarbons.

    PubMed

    Nieuwenhuizen, M S; Groeneveld, F R

    2000-01-01

    The formation of phosgene During welding activities in an atmosphere containing chlorinated hydrocarbons was investigated. Four different chlorinated hydrocarbons were studied under laboratory conditions. Results are presented as time-averaged phosgene concentration in a total volume of 250 L of air being purged through a 52-L reaction vessel during 20 min. It was found that the formation of phosgene was in the order dichloromethane < Freon-22 < carbon tetrachloride < trichoroethylene. Local concentrations may be higher depending on dispersion phenomena. The interpretation in terms of occupational health was rather difficult because of the interaction with smoke particles and because of possible nonhomogeneous dispersion of phosgene around the workers. In the case of dichloromethane and carbon tetrachloride the short-term maximum allowable concentration (MAC) of phosgene was not attained at the respective MAC values of the chlorinated hydrocarbons themselves. In the case of trichloroethylene and Freon-22, however, the short-term MAC-value of phosgene was attained even when the concentration was still much below the respective MAC-values.

  16. Cyanate as an Active Precursor of Ethyl Carbamate Formation in Sugar Cane Spirit.

    PubMed

    Galinaro, Carlos A; Ohe, Thiago H K; da Silva, Augusto C H; da Silva, Sebastião C; Franco, Douglas W

    2015-08-26

    The thermodynamic and kinetic aspects of ethyl carbamate (EC) formation through the reaction between cyanate and ethanol were investigated. The rate constant values for cyanate ion decay and EC formation are (8.0 ± 0.4) × 10(-5) and (8.9 ± 0.4) × 10(-5) s(-1), respectively, at 25 °C in 48% aqueous ethanolic solution at pH 4.5. Under the investigated experimental conditions, the rate constants are independent of the ethanol and cyanate concentrations but increase as the temperature increases (ΔH1(⧧) = 19.4 ± 1 kcal/mol, ΔS1(⧧) = −12.1 ± 1 cal/K, and ΔG1(⧧) = 23.0 ± 1 kcal/mol) and decrease as the solution pH increases. According to molecular modeling (DFT) that was performed to analyze the reaction mechanism, the isocyanic acid (HNCO) is the active EC precursor. The calculated ΔG1(⧧), ΔH1(⧧), and ΔS1(⧧) values are in very good agreement with the experimental ones.

  17. E-cadherin junction formation involves an active kinetic nucleation process

    SciTech Connect

    Biswas, Kabir H.; Hartman, Kevin L.; Yu, Cheng -han; Harrison, Oliver J.; Song, Hang; Smith, Adam W.; Huang, William Y. C.; Lin, Wan -Chen; Guo, Zhenhuan; Padmanabhan, Anup; Troyanovsky, Sergey M.; Dustin, Michael L.; Shapiro, Lawrence; Honig, Barry; Zaidel-Bar, Ronen; Groves, Jay T.

    2015-08-19

    Epithelial (E)-cadherin-mediated cell–cell junctions play important roles in the development and maintenance of tissue structure in multicellular organisms. E-cadherin adhesion is thus a key element of the cellular microenvironment that provides both mechanical and biochemical signaling inputs. Here, we report in vitro reconstitution of junction-like structures between native E-cadherin in living cells and the extracellular domain of E-cadherin in a supported membrane. Junction formation in this hybrid live cell-supported membrane configuration requires both active processes within the living cell and a supported membrane with low E-cad-ECD mobility. The hybrid junctions recruit α-catenin and exhibit remodeled cortical actin. Observations suggest that the initial stages of junction formation in this hybrid system depend on the trans but not the cis interactions between E-cadherin molecules, and proceed via a nucleation process in which protrusion and retraction of filopodia play a key role.

  18. δ-SUNSPOT FORMATION IN SIMULATION OF ACTIVE-REGION-SCALE FLUX EMERGENCE

    SciTech Connect

    Fang, Fang; Fan, Yuhong

    2015-06-10

    δ-sunspots, with highly complex magnetic structures, are very productive in energetic eruptive events, such as X-class flares and homologous eruptions. We here study the formation of such complex magnetic structures by numerical simulations of magnetic flux emergence from the convection zone into the corona in an active-region-scale domain. In our simulation, two pairs of bipolar sunspots form on the surface, originating from two buoyant segments of a single subsurface twisted flux rope, following the approach of Toriumi et al. Expansion and rotation of the emerging fields in the two bipoles drive the two opposite polarities into each other with apparent rotating motion, producing a compact δ-sunspot with a sharp polarity inversion line. The formation of the δ-sunspot in such a realistic-scale domain produces emerging patterns similar to those formed in observations, e.g., the inverted polarity against Hale's law, the curvilinear motion of the spot, and strong transverse field with highly sheared magnetic and velocity fields at the polarity inversion line (PIL). Strong current builds up at the PIL, giving rise to reconnection, which produces a complex coronal magnetic connectivity with non-potential fields in the δ-spot overlaid by more relaxed fields connecting the two polarities at the two ends.

  19. Large-scale pattern formation in active particles suspensions: from interacting microtubules to swimming bacteria

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aranson, Igor

    2006-03-01

    We consider two biological systems of active particles exhibiting large-scale collective behavior: microtubules interacting with molecular motors and hydrodynamically entrained swimming bacteria. Starting from a generic stochastic microscopic model of inelastically colliding polar rods with an anisotropic interaction kernel, we derive set of equations for the local rods concentration and orientation. Above certain critical density of rods the model exhibits orientational instability and onset of large-scale coherence. For the microtubules and molecular motors system we demonstrate that the orientational instability leads to the formation of vortices and asters seen in recent experiments. Similar approach is applied to colonies of swimming bacteria Bacillus subtilis confined in thin fluid film. The model is formulated in term of two-dimensional equations for local density and orientation of bacteria coupled to the low Reynolds number Navier-Stokes equation for the fluid flow velocity. The collective swimming of bacteria is represented by additional source term in the Navier-Stokes equation. We demonstrate that this system exhibits formation of dynamic large-scale patterns with the typical scale determined by the density of bacteria.

  20. Effects of calcium-modified titanium implant surfaces on platelet activation, clot formation, and osseointegration.

    PubMed

    Anitua, Eduardo; Prado, Roberto; Orive, Gorka; Tejero, Ricardo

    2015-03-01

    The clinical success of load bearing dental and orthopedic implants relies on adequate osseointegration. Because of its favorable properties, titanium is generally considered as the material of choice. Following implant placement, titanium surfaces establish an ionic equilibrium with the surrounding tissues in which calcium plays major roles. Calcium is a cofactor of the coagulation cascade that mediates plasma protein adsorption and intervenes in a number of other intra and extracellular processes relevant for bone regeneration. In this study, titanium surfaces were modified with calcium ions (Ca(2+) surfaces) and their responses to in vitro and in vivo models were analyzed. Unlike unmodified surfaces, Ca(2+) surfaces were superhydrophilic and induced surface clot formation, platelet adsorption and activation when exposed to blood plasma. Interestingly, in vivo osseointegration using a peri-implant gap model in rabbit demonstrated that Ca(2+) surfaces significantly improved peri-implant bone volume and density at 2 weeks and bone implant contact at 8 weeks as compared to the unmodified controls. The combination of Ca(2+) surfaces with plasma rich in growth factors produced significantly more bone contact already at 2 weeks of implantation. These findings suggest the importance of the provisional matrix formation on tissue integration and highlight the clinical potential of Ca(2+) titanium surfaces as efficient stimulators of implant osseointegration.

  1. Transcription is Associated with Z-DNA Formation in Metabolically Active Permeabilized Mammalian Cell Nuclei

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wittig, Burghardt; Dorbic, Tomislav; Rich, Alexander

    1991-03-01

    Mammalian cells have been encapsulated in agarose microbeads, and from these cells metabolically active permeabilized nuclei were prepared. Previously, we showed that biotin-labeled monoclonal antibodies against Z-DNA can be diffused into the nuclei and, over a specific concentration range, they will bind to Z-DNA within the nucleus in a concentration-independent manner. By using radiolabeled streptavidin, we showed that the amount of Z-DNA antibody bound is related to the torsional strain of the DNA in the nucleus. Relaxation of the DNA results in a decrease of Z-DNA formation, whereas increasing torsional strain through inhibiting topoisomerase I results in increased Z-DNA formation. Here we measure the influence of RNA transcription and DNA replication. Transcription is associated with a substantial increase in the binding of anti-Z-DNA antibodies, paralleling the increased level of RNA synthesized as the level of ribonucleoside triphosphate in the medium is increased. DNA replication yields smaller increases in the binding of Z-DNA antibodies. Stopping RNA transcription with inhibitors results in a large loss of Z-DNA antibody binding, whereas only a small decrease is associated with inhibition of DNA replication.

  2. Cyanate as an Active Precursor of Ethyl Carbamate Formation in Sugar Cane Spirit.

    PubMed

    Galinaro, Carlos A; Ohe, Thiago H K; da Silva, Augusto C H; da Silva, Sebastião C; Franco, Douglas W

    2015-08-26

    The thermodynamic and kinetic aspects of ethyl carbamate (EC) formation through the reaction between cyanate and ethanol were investigated. The rate constant values for cyanate ion decay and EC formation are (8.0 ± 0.4) × 10(-5) and (8.9 ± 0.4) × 10(-5) s(-1), respectively, at 25 °C in 48% aqueous ethanolic solution at pH 4.5. Under the investigated experimental conditions, the rate constants are independent of the ethanol and cyanate concentrations but increase as the temperature increases (ΔH1(⧧) = 19.4 ± 1 kcal/mol, ΔS1(⧧) = −12.1 ± 1 cal/K, and ΔG1(⧧) = 23.0 ± 1 kcal/mol) and decrease as the solution pH increases. According to molecular modeling (DFT) that was performed to analyze the reaction mechanism, the isocyanic acid (HNCO) is the active EC precursor. The calculated ΔG1(⧧), ΔH1(⧧), and ΔS1(⧧) values are in very good agreement with the experimental ones. PMID:26248556

  3. E-cadherin junction formation involves an active kinetic nucleation process

    PubMed Central

    Biswas, Kabir H.; Hartman, Kevin L.; Yu, Cheng-han; Harrison, Oliver J.; Song, Hang; Smith, Adam W.; Huang, William Y. C.; Lin, Wan-Chen; Guo, Zhenhuan; Padmanabhan, Anup; Troyanovsky, Sergey M.; Dustin, Michael L.; Shapiro, Lawrence; Honig, Barry; Zaidel-Bar, Ronen; Groves, Jay T.

    2015-01-01

    Epithelial (E)-cadherin-mediated cell−cell junctions play important roles in the development and maintenance of tissue structure in multicellular organisms. E-cadherin adhesion is thus a key element of the cellular microenvironment that provides both mechanical and biochemical signaling inputs. Here, we report in vitro reconstitution of junction-like structures between native E-cadherin in living cells and the extracellular domain of E-cadherin (E-cad-ECD) in a supported membrane. Junction formation in this hybrid live cell-supported membrane configuration requires both active processes within the living cell and a supported membrane with low E-cad-ECD mobility. The hybrid junctions recruit α-catenin and exhibit remodeled cortical actin. Observations suggest that the initial stages of junction formation in this hybrid system depend on the trans but not the cis interactions between E-cadherin molecules, and proceed via a nucleation process in which protrusion and retraction of filopodia play a key role. PMID:26290581

  4. E-cadherin junction formation involves an active kinetic nucleation process

    DOE PAGES

    Biswas, Kabir H.; Hartman, Kevin L.; Yu, Cheng -han; Harrison, Oliver J.; Song, Hang; Smith, Adam W.; Huang, William Y. C.; Lin, Wan -Chen; Guo, Zhenhuan; Padmanabhan, Anup; et al

    2015-08-19

    Epithelial (E)-cadherin-mediated cell–cell junctions play important roles in the development and maintenance of tissue structure in multicellular organisms. E-cadherin adhesion is thus a key element of the cellular microenvironment that provides both mechanical and biochemical signaling inputs. Here, we report in vitro reconstitution of junction-like structures between native E-cadherin in living cells and the extracellular domain of E-cadherin in a supported membrane. Junction formation in this hybrid live cell-supported membrane configuration requires both active processes within the living cell and a supported membrane with low E-cad-ECD mobility. The hybrid junctions recruit α-catenin and exhibit remodeled cortical actin. Observations suggest thatmore » the initial stages of junction formation in this hybrid system depend on the trans but not the cis interactions between E-cadherin molecules, and proceed via a nucleation process in which protrusion and retraction of filopodia play a key role.« less

  5. The Gαo Activator Mastoparan-7 Promotes Dendritic Spine Formation in Hippocampal Neurons

    PubMed Central

    Ramírez, Valerie T.; Ramos-Fernández, Eva; Inestrosa, Nibaldo C.

    2016-01-01

    Mastoparan-7 (Mas-7), an analogue of the peptide mastoparan, which is derived from wasp venom, is a direct activator of Pertussis toxin- (PTX-) sensitive G proteins. Mas-7 produces several biological effects in different cell types; however, little is known about how Mas-7 influences mature hippocampal neurons. We examined the specific role of Mas-7 in the development of dendritic spines, the sites of excitatory synaptic contact that are crucial for synaptic plasticity. We report here that exposure of hippocampal neurons to a low dose of Mas-7 increases dendritic spine density and spine head width in a time-dependent manner. Additionally, Mas-7 enhances postsynaptic density protein-95 (PSD-95) clustering in neurites and activates Gαo signaling, increasing the intracellular Ca2+ concentration. To define the role of signaling intermediates, we measured the levels of phosphorylated protein kinase C (PKC), c-Jun N-terminal kinase (JNK), and calcium-calmodulin dependent protein kinase IIα (CaMKIIα) after Mas-7 treatment and determined that CaMKII activation is necessary for the Mas-7-dependent increase in dendritic spine density. Our results demonstrate a critical role for Gαo subunit signaling in the regulation of synapse formation. PMID:26881110

  6. Effects of cultural medium on the formation and antitumor activity of polysaccharides by Cordyceps gunnii.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Zhen-Yuan; Liu, Xiao-Cui; Tang, Ya-Li; Dong, Feng-Ying; Sun, Hui-Qing; Chen, Lu; Zhang, Yong-Min

    2016-10-01

    The effects of culture medium composition (i.e., carbon and nitrogen sources) on the growth of mycelia, molecular weight distribution and antitumor activity of intracellular polysaccharides (IPS) from Cordyceps gunnii were investigated. Sucrose and peptone were proved to be the best carbon and nitrogen sources for mycelia growth and remarkably improved IPS production. When the sucrose concentration was 2.0%, the mycelium yield reached up to 15.94±1.26 g/L, but with lower IPS yield; whereas the sucrose concentration was 4.5%, IPS yield reached to a maximum of 138.78±3.89 mg/100 mL. The effects of different carbon/nitrogen (C/N) ratios with equal amounts of carbon source matter on the mycelia and IPS formation were optimized. It found that the yield of mycelia and IPS were both reached to the highest at a C/N ratio of 10:3. In addition, the IPS had the highest macro molecular polysaccharide content and antitumor activity when sucrose concentration was 3.5% and the C/N ratio was 10:1.5. Thus, there was a positive correlation between molecular weight distribution and antitumor activity of IPS by C. gunnii. PMID:27074949

  7. The Gαo Activator Mastoparan-7 Promotes Dendritic Spine Formation in Hippocampal Neurons.

    PubMed

    Ramírez, Valerie T; Ramos-Fernández, Eva; Inestrosa, Nibaldo C

    2016-01-01

    Mastoparan-7 (Mas-7), an analogue of the peptide mastoparan, which is derived from wasp venom, is a direct activator of Pertussis toxin- (PTX-) sensitive G proteins. Mas-7 produces several biological effects in different cell types; however, little is known about how Mas-7 influences mature hippocampal neurons. We examined the specific role of Mas-7 in the development of dendritic spines, the sites of excitatory synaptic contact that are crucial for synaptic plasticity. We report here that exposure of hippocampal neurons to a low dose of Mas-7 increases dendritic spine density and spine head width in a time-dependent manner. Additionally, Mas-7 enhances postsynaptic density protein-95 (PSD-95) clustering in neurites and activates Gα(o) signaling, increasing the intracellular Ca(2+) concentration. To define the role of signaling intermediates, we measured the levels of phosphorylated protein kinase C (PKC), c-Jun N-terminal kinase (JNK), and calcium-calmodulin dependent protein kinase IIα (CaMKIIα) after Mas-7 treatment and determined that CaMKII activation is necessary for the Mas-7-dependent increase in dendritic spine density. Our results demonstrate a critical role for Gα(o) subunit signaling in the regulation of synapse formation. PMID:26881110

  8. High phosphorylase activity is correlated with increased potato minituber formation and starch content during extended clinorotation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nedukha, O. M.; Schnyukova, E. I.; Leach, J. E.

    2003-05-01

    The major purpose of these experiments were to investigate growth of potato storage organs and starch synthesis in minitubers at slow horizontal clinorotation (2 rpm), which partly mimics microgravity, and a secondary goal was to study the activity and localization of phosphorylase (EC 2.4.1.1) in storage parenchyma under these conditions. Miniplants of Solanum tuberosum L. (cv Adreta) were grown in culture for 30 days for both the vertical control and the horizontal clinorotation. During long-term clinorotation, an acceleration of minituber formation, and an increase of amyloplast number and size in storage parenchyma cells, as well as increased starch content, was observed in the minitubers. The differences among cytochemical reaction intensity, activity of phosphorylase, and carbohydrate content in storage parenchyma cells of minitubers grown in a horizontal clinostat were established by electron-cytochemical and biochemical methods. It is shown that high phosphorylase activity is correlated with increased starch content during extended clinorotation. The results demonstrate the increase in carbohydrate metabolism and possible accelerated growth of storage organs under the influence of microgravity, as mimicked by clinorotation; therefore, clinorotation can be used as a basis for future studies on mechanisms of starch synthesis under microgravity.

  9. Kank2 activates talin, reduces force transduction across integrins and induces central adhesion formation.

    PubMed

    Sun, Zhiqi; Tseng, Hui-Yuan; Tan, Steven; Senger, Fabrice; Kurzawa, Laetitia; Dedden, Dirk; Mizuno, Naoko; Wasik, Anita A; Thery, Manuel; Dunn, Alexander R; Fässler, Reinhard

    2016-09-01

    Integrin-based adhesions play critical roles in cell migration. Talin activates integrins and flexibly connects integrins to the actomyosin cytoskeleton, thereby serving as a 'molecular clutch' that transmits forces to the extracellular matrix to drive cell migration. Here we identify the evolutionarily conserved Kank protein family as novel components of focal adhesions (FAs). Kank proteins accumulate at the lateral border of FAs, which we term the FA belt, and in central sliding adhesions, where they directly bind the talin rod domain through the Kank amino-terminal (KN) motif and induce talin and integrin activation. In addition, Kank proteins diminish the talin-actomyosin linkage, which curbs force transmission across integrins, leading to reduced integrin-ligand bond strength, slippage between integrin and ligand, central adhesion formation and sliding, and reduced cell migration speed. Our data identify Kank proteins as talin activators that decrease the grip between the integrin-talin complex and actomyosin to regulate cell migration velocity. PMID:27548916

  10. Tumulus development on lava flows: insights from observations of active tumuli and analysis of formation models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anderson, Steven W.; Smrekar, Suzanne E.; Stofan, Ellen R.

    2012-05-01

    Here, we use observations of active flows along with detailed morphometric field measurements of more than 70 tumuli on flows at Mount Etna (Italy), Kilauea, and Hualalai (US) volcanoes to constrain a previously published model that estimates the pressure needed to form tumuli. In an attempt to discover the nature and magnitude of pressure variations within active lava flow interiors, we then consider how tumuli differ from idealized circular plates. We incorporate observations of active tumuli and find that they may grow asymmetrically yet produce a symmetrical tumulus and can form where the flow path significantly changes direction. Bending models of clamped edges provide the most reasonable head estimates for the tumuli in our study. Tumulus formation requires the proper combination of cooling and effusion rate. If cooling is too extensive and effusion rate too low, the crust will provide too much resistance to bending. If cooling is too limited and effusion rates too high, crusts will not develop or have insufficient strength to resist fracture and subsequent breakouts. We do not find it surprising that tumuli are rarely found over well-established lava tubes that typically have rigid, walls/overlying crusts that exceed 2 m in thickness and provide too much resistance to bending. Silicic flows lack tumuli because the viscosity gradients within the flow are insufficient to concentrate stress in a localized area.

  11. Host Kinase Activity is Required for Coxiella burnetii Parasitophorous Vacuole Formation.

    PubMed

    Hussain, S Kauser; Broederdorf, Laura J; Sharma, Uma M; Voth, Daniel E

    2010-01-01

    Coxiella burnetii is the etiologic agent of human Q fever and targets alveolar phagocytic cells in vivo wherein the pathogen generates a phagolysosome-like parasitophorous vacuole (PV) for replication. C. burnetii displays a prolonged growth cycle, making PV maintenance critical for bacterial survival. Previous studies showed that C. burnetii mediates activation of eukaryotic kinases to inhibit cell death, indicating the importance of host signaling during infection. In the current study, we examined the role of eukaryotic kinase signaling in PV establishment. A panel of 113 inhibitors was analyzed for their impact on C. burnetii infection of human THP-1 macrophage-like cells and HeLa cells. Inhibition of 11 kinases or two phosphatases altered PV formation and prevented pathogen growth, with most inhibitor-treated cells harboring organisms in tight-fitting phagosomes, indicating kinase/phosphatase activation is required for PV maturation. Five inhibitors targeted protein kinase C (PKC), suggesting a critical role for this protein during intracellular growth. The PKC-specific substrate MARCKS was phosphorylated at 24 h post-infection and remained phosphorylated through 5 days post-infection, indicating prolonged regulation of the PKC pathway by C. burnetii. Infection also altered the activation status of p38, myosin light chain kinase, and cAMP-dependent protein kinase, suggesting C. burnetii subverts numerous phosphorylation cascades. These results underscore the importance of intracellular host signaling for C. burnetii PV biogenesis.

  12. The Gαo Activator Mastoparan-7 Promotes Dendritic Spine Formation in Hippocampal Neurons.

    PubMed

    Ramírez, Valerie T; Ramos-Fernández, Eva; Inestrosa, Nibaldo C

    2016-01-01

    Mastoparan-7 (Mas-7), an analogue of the peptide mastoparan, which is derived from wasp venom, is a direct activator of Pertussis toxin- (PTX-) sensitive G proteins. Mas-7 produces several biological effects in different cell types; however, little is known about how Mas-7 influences mature hippocampal neurons. We examined the specific role of Mas-7 in the development of dendritic spines, the sites of excitatory synaptic contact that are crucial for synaptic plasticity. We report here that exposure of hippocampal neurons to a low dose of Mas-7 increases dendritic spine density and spine head width in a time-dependent manner. Additionally, Mas-7 enhances postsynaptic density protein-95 (PSD-95) clustering in neurites and activates Gα(o) signaling, increasing the intracellular Ca(2+) concentration. To define the role of signaling intermediates, we measured the levels of phosphorylated protein kinase C (PKC), c-Jun N-terminal kinase (JNK), and calcium-calmodulin dependent protein kinase IIα (CaMKIIα) after Mas-7 treatment and determined that CaMKII activation is necessary for the Mas-7-dependent increase in dendritic spine density. Our results demonstrate a critical role for Gα(o) subunit signaling in the regulation of synapse formation.

  13. Dasatinib inhibits both osteoclast activation and prostate cancer PC-3 cell-induced osteoclast formation

    PubMed Central

    Araujo, John C.; Poblenz, Ann; Corn, Paul G.; Parikh, Nila U.; Starbuck, Michael W.; Thompson, Jerry T.; Lee, Francis; Logothetis, Christopher J.; Darnay, Bryant G.

    2013-01-01

    Purpose Therapies to target prostate cancer bone metastases have only limited effects. New treatments are focused on the interaction between cancer cells, bone marrow cells and the bone matrix. Osteoclasts play an important role in the development of bone tumors caused by prostate cancer. Since Src kinase has been shown to be necessary for osteoclast function, we hypothesized that dasatinib, a Src family kinase inhibitor, would reduce osteoclast activity and prostate cancer (PC-3) cell-induced osteoclast formation. Results Dasatinib inhibited RANKL-induced osteoclast differentiation of bone marrow-derived monocytes with an EC50 of 7.5 nM. PC-3 cells, a human prostate cancer cell line, were able to differentiate RAW 264.7 cells, a murine monocytic cell line, into osteoclasts and dasatinib inhibited this differentiation. In addition, conditioned medium from PC-3 cell cultures was able to differentiate RAW 264.7 cells into osteoclasts and this too, was inhibited by dasatinib. Even the lowest concentration of dasatinib, 1.25 nmol, inhibited osteoclast differentiation by 29%. Moreover, dasatinib inhibited osteoclast activity by 58% as measured by collagen 1 release. Experimental design We performed in vitro experiments utilizing the Src family kinase inhibitor dasatinib to target osteoclast activation as a means of inhibiting prostate cancer bone metastases. Conclusion Dasatinib inhibits osteoclast differentiation of mouse primary bone marrow-derived monocytes and PC-3 cell-induced osteoclast differentiation. Dasatinib also inhibits osteoclast degradation activity. Inhibiting osteoclast differentiation and activity may be an effective targeted therapy in patients with prostate cancer bone metastases. PMID:19855158

  14. Hippocampal cannabinoid transmission modulates dopamine neuron activity: impact on rewarding memory formation and social interaction.

    PubMed

    Loureiro, Michael; Renard, Justine; Zunder, Jordan; Laviolette, Steven R

    2015-05-01

    Disturbances in cannabinoid type 1 receptor (CB1R) signaling have been linked to emotional and cognitive deficits characterizing neuropsychiatric disorders, including schizophrenia. Thus, there is growing interest in characterizing the relationship between cannabinoid transmission, emotional processing, and dopamine (DA)-dependent behavioral deficits. The CB1R is highly expressed in the mammalian nervous system, particularly in the hippocampus. Activation of the ventral hippocampal subregion (vHipp) is known to increase both the activity of DAergic neurons located in the ventral tegmental area (VTA) and DA levels in reward-related brain regions, particularly the nucleus accumbens (NAc). However, the possible functional relationship between hippocampal CB1R transmission and VTA DA neuronal activity is not currently understood. In this study, using in vivo neuronal recordings in rats, we demonstrate that activation of CB1R in the vHipp strongly increases VTA DA neuronal firing and bursting activity, while simultaneously decreasing the activity of VTA non-DA neurons. Furthermore, using a conditioned place preference procedure and a social interaction test, we report that intra-vHipp CB1R activation potentiates the reward salience of normally sub-threshold conditioning doses of opiates and induces deficits in natural sociability and social recognition behaviors. Finally, these behavioral effects were prevented by directly blocking NAc DAergic transmission. Collectively, these findings identify hippocampal CB1R transmission as a critical modulator of the mesolimbic DA pathway and in the processing of reward and social-related behavioral phenomena. PMID:25510937

  15. Pattern formation for active particles on optically created ordered and disordered substrates (Presentation Recording)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reichhardt, Charles M.; Ray, Dipanjan; Reichhardt, Cynthia J.

    2015-08-01

    There has been tremendous growth in the field of active matter, where the individual particles that comprise the system are self-driven. Examples of this class of system include biological systems such as swimming bacteria and crawling cells. More recently, non-biological swimmers have been created using colloidal Janus particles that undergo chemical reactions on one side to produce self-propulsion. These active matter systems exhibit a wide variety of behaviors that are absent in systems undergoing purely thermal fluctuations, such as transitions from uniform liquids to clusters or living crystals, pushing objects around, ratchet effects, and phase separation in mixtures of active and passive particles. Here we examine the collective effects of active matter disks in the presence of static or dynamic substrates. For colloids, such substrates could be created optically in the form of periodic, random, or quasiperiodic patterns. For thermal particles, increasing the temperature generally increases the diffusion or mobility of the particles when they move over a random or periodic substrates. We find that when the particles are active, increasing the activity can increase the mobility for smaller run lengths but decrease the mobility at large run lengths. Additionally we find that at large run lengths on a structured substrate, a variety of novel active crystalline states can form such as stripes, squares and triangular patterns.

  16. Applying the Model of Goal-Directed Behavior, Including Descriptive Norms, to Physical Activity Intentions: A Contribution to Improving the Theory of Planned Behavior.

    PubMed

    Esposito, Gabriele; van Bavel, René; Baranowski, Tom; Duch-Brown, Néstor

    2016-08-01

    The theory of planned behavior (TPB) has received its fair share of criticism lately, including calls for it to retire. We contribute to improving the theory by testing extensions such as the model of goal-directed behavior (MGDB, which adds desire and anticipated positive and negative emotions) applied to physical activity (PA) intention. We also test the inclusion of a descriptive norms construct as an addition to the subjective norms construct, also applied to PA, resulting in two additional models: TPB including descriptive norms (TPB + DN) and MGDB including descriptive norms (MGDB + DN). The study is based on an online survey of 400 young adult Internet users, previously enrolled in a subject pool. Confirmatory factor analysis (CFA) showed that TPB and TPB + DN were not fit for purpose, while MGDB and MGDB + DN were. Structural equation modelling (SEM) conducted on MGDB and MGDB + DN showed that the inclusion of descriptive norms took over the significance of injunctive norms, and increased the model's account of total variance in intention to be physically active. PMID:27229344

  17. Star Formation Activity in a Young Galaxy Cluster at Z = 0.866

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Laganá, T. F.; Ulmer, M. P.; Martins, L. P.; da Cunha, E.

    2016-07-01

    The galaxy cluster RX J1257+4738 at z = 0.866 is one of the highest redshift clusters with a richness of multi-wavelength data, and is thus a good target to study the star formation-density relation at early epochs. Using a sample of spectroscopically confirmed cluster members, we derive the star-formation rates (SFRs) of our galaxies using two methods: (1) the relation between SFR and total infrared luminosity extrapolated from the observed Spitzer Multiband Imaging Photometer for Spitzer 24 μm imaging data; and (2) spectral energy distribution fitting using the MAGPHYS code, including eight different bands. We show that, for this cluster, the SFR-density relation is very weak and seems to be dominated by the two central galaxies and the SFR presents a mild dependence on stellar mass, with more massive galaxies having higher SFR. However, the specific SFR (SSFR) decreases with stellar mass, meaning that more massive galaxies are forming fewer stars per unit of mass, and thus suggesting that the increase in star-forming members is driven by cluster assembly and infall. If the environment is somehow driving the star formation, one would expect a relation between the SSFR and the cluster centric distance, but that is not the case. A possible scenario to explain this lack of correlation is the contamination by infalling galaxies in the inner part of the cluster, which may be on their initial pass through the cluster center. As these galaxies have higher SFRs for their stellar mass, they enhance the mean SSFR in the center of the cluster.

  18. On the formation of dipolar magnetic fields in the central regions of active galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Andreasyan, R. R.

    A model of the formation of large-scale magnetic fields of dipolar configuration in the central regions of active galaxies is studied. It is assumed that these regions contain a rapidly rotating partly ionized gas. Ionized matter escapes with a high velocity from the center of this region and is entrained by the rotation of the surrounding medium. Biermann's "battery" effect (L.Biermann, Z. Naturforsch., 5a, 65, 1950) operates under such conditions, and circular electric curents are generated in the medium, which amplify the dipolar magnetic fields. Dipolar magnetic fields of opposite orientation with respect to the angular momentum of the central engine can be amplified where there is accretion of gaseous matter onto the rotating central part of a galaxy. The direction of the "Halo" magnetic field of our Galaxy is in accordance with the first model.

  19. [Distribution, formation, carcinogenic and mutagenic activities of nitro derivatives of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons].

    PubMed

    Khesina, A Ia; Makhover, M S; Khitrovo, I A

    1989-01-01

    Nitro-PAHs (nitro-substituted derivatives of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons) are a class of chemical compounds with high biologic activity. They have been detected in samples of air pollutants, diesel and gasoline engine exhausts, in airplane exhaust emissions, cigarette smoke condensate, emissions of coke ovens, wood-burning fireplaces, coal-fired plants, in food and tea. Concentrations of nitro-PAHs have been compared with those of PAHs present in air pollutant samples and emissions from different sources. Information on the environmental occurrence, formation, and decomposition of nitro-PAHs in the atmosphere is given. Biologic effects (carcinogenic and mutagenic) of pure nitro-PAHs and nitro-PAHs-containing complex mixtures are discussed.

  20. USP10 antagonizes c-Myc transcriptional activation through SIRT6 stabilization to suppress tumor formation.

    PubMed

    Lin, Zhenghong; Yang, Heeyoung; Tan, Can; Li, Jinping; Liu, Zhaojian; Quan, Qiu; Kong, Sinyi; Ye, Junsheng; Gao, Beixue; Fang, Deyu

    2013-12-26

    The reduced protein expression of SIRT6 tumor suppressor is involved in tumorigenesis. The molecular mechanisms underlying SIRT6 protein downregulation in human cancers remain unknown. Using a proteomic approach, we have identified the ubiquitin-specific peptidase USP10, another tumor suppressor, as one of the SIRT6-interacting proteins. USP10 suppresses SIRT6 ubiquitination to protect SIRT6 from proteasomal degradation. USP10 antagonizes the transcriptional activity of the c-Myc oncogene through SIRT6, as well as p53, to inhibit cell-cycle progression, cancer cell growth, and tumor formation. To support this conclusion, we detected significant reductions in both USP10 and SIRT6 protein expression in human colon cancers. Our study discovered crosstalk between two tumor-suppressive genes in regulating cell-cycle progression and proliferation and showed that dysregulated USP10 function promotes tumorigenesis through SIRT6 degradation.

  1. Formation and enhanced biocidal activity of water-dispersable organic nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Haifei; Wang, Dong; Butler, Rachel; Campbell, Neil L.; Long, James; Tan, Bien; Duncalf, David J.; Foster, Alison J.; Hopkinson, Andrew; Taylor, David; Angus, Doris; Cooper, Andrew I.; Rannard, Steven P.

    2008-08-01

    Water-insoluble organic compounds are often used in aqueous environments in various pharmaceutical and consumer products. To overcome insolubility, the particles are dispersed in a medium during product formation, but large particles that are formed may affect product performance and safety. Many techniques have been used to produce nanodispersions-dispersions with nanometre-scale dimensions-that have properties similar to solutions. However, making nanodispersions requires complex processing, and it is difficult to achieve stability over long periods. Here we report a generic method for producing organic nanoparticles with a combination of modified emulsion-templating and freeze-drying. The dry powder composites formed using this method are highly porous, stable and form nanodispersions upon simple addition of water. Aqueous nanodispersions of Triclosan (a commercial antimicrobial agent) produced with this approach show greater activity than organic/aqueous solutions of Triclosan.

  2. Hydroxyapatite coating for titanium fibre mesh scaffold enhances osteoblast activity and bone tissue formation.

    PubMed

    Hirota, Makoto; Hayakawa, Tohru; Yoshinari, Masao; Ametani, Akihiro; Shima, Takaki; Monden, Yuka; Ozawa, Tomomichi; Sato, Mitsunobu; Koyama, Chika; Tamai, Naoto; Iwai, Toshinori; Tohnai, Iwai

    2012-10-01

    This study investigated the bone regeneration properties of titanium fibre mesh as a tissue engineering material. A thin hydroxyapatite (HA) coating on the titanium fibre web was created using the developed molecular precursor method without losing the complex interior structure. HA-coated titanium fibre mesh showed apatite crystal formation in vitro in a human osteoblast culture. Titanium fibre mesh discs with or without a thin HA coating were implanted into rat cranial bone defects, and the animals were killed at 2 and 4 weeks. The in vivo experience revealed that the amount of newly formed bone was significantly higher in the HA-coated titanium fibre mesh than in the non-coated titanium fibre mesh 2 weeks after implantation. These results suggest that thin HA coating enhances osteoblast activity and bone regeneration in the titanium fibre mesh scaffold. Thin HA-coating improved the ability of titanium fibre mesh to act as a bone regeneration scaffold.

  3. Redox-Active-Ligand-Mediated Formation of an Acyclic Trinuclear Ruthenium Complex with Bridging Nitrido Ligands.

    PubMed

    Bagh, Bidraha; Broere, Daniël L J; Siegler, Maxime A; van der Vlugt, Jarl Ivar

    2016-07-11

    Coordination of a redox-active pyridine aminophenol ligand to Ru(II) followed by aerobic oxidation generates two diamagnetic Ru(III) species [1 a (cis) and 1 b (trans)] with ligand-centered radicals. The reaction of 1 a/1 b with excess NaN3 under inert atmosphere resulted in the formation of a rare bis(nitrido)-bridged trinuclear ruthenium complex with two nonlinear asymmetrical Ru-N-Ru fragments. The spontaneous reduction of the ligand centered radical in the parent 1 a/1 b supports the oxidation of a nitride (N(3-) ) to half an equivalent of N2 . The trinuclear omplex is reactive toward TEMPO-H, tin hydrides, thiols, and dihydrogen. PMID:27321547

  4. Transparent gels: study of their formation and assimilation of active ingredients through phase diagrams.

    PubMed

    Comelles, F; Caelles, J; Parra, J L; Leal, J S

    1992-08-01

    Synopsis Multicomponent gel formulations capable of assimilating, simultaneously, several active ingredients of potential application in the cosmetic field were studied. The possibility of formation of a transparent gel was determined using a method which consisted in the optimization of several lipophilic basic compositions, composed of oil, a mixture of surfactants, a sunscreen agent, several vitamins and antioxidants situated in the base of a regular tetrahedron that symbolized the considered system. To this, a polar phase made of water, a cosolvent and urea in appropriate proportions and situated in the fourth vertex, was progressively added. It may be concluded, that the use of phase diagrams on cosmetic systems, constitutes a useful way to select the components and their mutual ratios, allowing an adaptation to the specific requested conditions of formulation.

  5. Promotion of experimental thrombus formation by the procoagulant activity of breast cancer cells

    PubMed Central

    Berny-Lang, MA; Aslan, JE; Tormoen, GW; Patel, IA; Bock, PE; Gruber, A

    2011-01-01

    The routine observation of tumor emboli in the peripheral blood of patients with carcinomas raises questions about the clinical relevance of these circulating tumor cells. Thrombosis is a common clinical manifestation of cancer and circulating tumor cells may play a pathogenetic role in this process. The presence of coagulation-associated molecules on cancer cells has been described, but the mechanisms by which circulating tumor cells augment or alter coagulation remains unclear. In this study we utilized suspensions of a metastatic adenocarcinoma cell line, MDA-MB-231, and a non-metastatic breast epithelial cell line, MCF-10A, as models of circulating tumor cells to determine the thromobogenic activity of these blood-foreign cells. In human plasma, both metastatic MDA-MB-231 cells and non-metastatic MCF-10A cells significantly enhanced clotting kinetics. The effect of MDA-MB-231 and MCF-10A cells on clotting times was cell number-dependent and inhibited by a neutralizing antibody to tissue factor (TF) as well as inhibitors of activated factor X and thrombin. Using fluorescence microscopy, we found that both MDA-MB-231 and MCF-10A cells supported the binding of fluorescently-labeled thrombin. Furthermore, in a model of thrombus formation under pressure-driven flow, MDA-MB-231 and MCF-10A cells significantly decreased the time to occlusion. Our findings indicate that the presence of breast epithelial cells in blood can stimulate coagulation in a TF-dependent manner, suggesting that tumor cells that enter the circulation may promote the formation of occlusive thrombi under shear flow conditions. PMID:21301066

  6. High Resolution Simulations of Tearing and Flux-Rope Formation in Active Region Jets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wyper, P. F.; DeVore, C. R.; Karpen, J. T.

    2015-12-01

    Observations of coronal jets increasingly suggest that local fragmentation and the generation of small-scale structure plays an important role in the dynamics of these events. In the magnetically closed corona, jets most often occur near active regions and are associated with an embedded-bipole topology consisting of a 3D magnetic null point atop a domed fan separatrix surface at the base of a coronal loop. Impulsive reconnection in the vicinity of the null point between the magnetic fluxes inside and outside the dome launches the jet along the loop. Wyper & Pontin 2014 showed that the 3D current layers that facilitate such reconnection are explosively unstable to tearing, generating complex flux-rope structures. Utilizing the adaptive mesh capabilities of the Adaptively Refined Magnetohydrodynamics Solver, we investigate the generation of such fine-scale structure in high-resolution simulations of active-region jets. We observe the formation of multiple flux-rope structures forming across the fan separatrix surface and discuss the photospheric signatures of these flux ropes and the associated local topology change. We also introduce a new way of identifying such flux ropes in the magnetic field, based on structures observed in the magnetic squashing factor calculated on the photosphere. By tracking the position and number of new null points produced by the fragmentation, we also show that the formation of flux ropes can occur away from the main null region on the flanks of the separatrix dome and that the jet curtain has a highly complex magnetic structure. This work was funded through an appointment to the NASA Postdoctoral Program and by NASA's Living With a Star TR&T program.

  7. Promotion of experimental thrombus formation by the procoagulant activity of breast cancer cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Berny-Lang, M. A.; Aslan, J. E.; Tormoen, G. W.; Patel, I. A.; Bock, P. E.; Gruber, A.; McCarty, O. J. T.

    2011-02-01

    The routine observation of tumor emboli in the peripheral blood of patients with carcinomas raises questions about the clinical relevance of these circulating tumor cells. Thrombosis is a common clinical manifestation of cancer, and circulating tumor cells may play a pathogenetic role in this process. The presence of coagulation-associated molecules on cancer cells has been described, but the mechanisms by which circulating tumor cells augment or alter coagulation remains unclear. In this study we utilized suspensions of a metastatic adenocarcinoma cell line, MDA-MB-231, and a non-metastatic breast epithelial cell line, MCF-10A, as models of circulating tumor cells to determine the thromobogenic activity of these blood-foreign cells. In human plasma, both metastatic MDA-MB-231 cells and non-metastatic MCF-10A cells significantly enhanced clotting kinetics. The effect of MDA-MB-231 and MCF-10A cells on clotting times was cell number-dependent and inhibited by a neutralizing antibody to tissue factor (TF) as well as inhibitors of activated factor X and thrombin. Using fluorescence microscopy, we found that both MDA-MB-231 and MCF-10A cells supported the binding of fluorescently labeled thrombin. Furthermore, in a model of thrombus formation under pressure-driven flow, MDA-MB-231 and MCF-10A cells significantly decreased the time to occlusion. Our findings indicate that the presence of breast epithelial cells in blood can stimulate coagulation in a TF-dependent manner, suggesting that tumor cells that enter the circulation may promote the formation of occlusive thrombi under shear flow conditions.

  8. A PHYSICAL LINK BETWEEN JET FORMATION AND HOT PLASMA IN ACTIVE GALACTIC NUCLEI

    SciTech Connect

    Wu Qingwen; Wang Dingxiong; Cao Xinwu; Ho, Luis C. E-mail: dxwang@hust.edu.cn E-mail: lho@obs.carnegiescience.edu

    2013-06-10

    Recent observations suggest that in black hole X-ray binaries jet/outflow formation is related to the hot plasma in the vicinity of the black hole, either in the form of an advection-dominated accretion flow at low accretion rates or in a disk corona at high accretion rates. We test the viability of this scenario for supermassive black holes using two samples of active galactic nuclei distinguished by the presence (radio-strong) and absence (radio-weak) of well-collimated, relativistic jets. Each is centered on a narrow range of black hole mass but spans a very broad range of Eddington ratios, effectively simulating in a statistical manner the behavior of a single black hole evolving across a wide spread in accretion states. Unlike the relationship between the radio and optical luminosity, which shows an abrupt break between high- and low-luminosity sources at an Eddington ratio of {approx}1%, the radio emission-a measure of the jet power-varies continuously with the hard X-ray (2-10 keV) luminosity, roughly as L{sub R} {proportional_to} L{sub X}{sup 0.6-0.75}. This relation, which holds for both radio-weak and radio-strong active galaxies, is similar to the one seen in X-ray binaries. Jet/outflow formation appears to be closely linked to the conditions that give rise to the hot, optically thin coronal emission associated with accretion flows, both in the regime of low and high accretion rates.

  9. Verrucous carcinomas of the head and neck, including those with associated squamous cell carcinoma, lack transcriptionally active high-risk human papillomavirus.

    PubMed

    Patel, Kalyani R; Chernock, Rebecca D; Zhang, Tian R; Wang, Xiaowei; El-Mofty, Samir K; Lewis, James S

    2013-11-01

    Most oropharyngeal squamous cell carcinomas (SCC) and histologic variants harbor transcriptionally active human papillomavirus (HPV). While HPV DNA can be found in many non-oropharyngeal head and neck carcinomas, transcriptionally active HPV is rare. Verrucous carcinoma is a variant with bland cytology, warty appearance, locally destructive growth, and lack of metastasis when lacking a frankly invasive carcinoma component. Studies have shown variable rates of HPV DNA and p16 protein expression in such tumors but still have not clearly addressed if the virus has biological activity or clinical relevance in the positive cases. Department files were searched for verrucous neoplasms, including pure verrucous carcinoma, verrucous carcinoma with dysplasia or minimal invasion, and SCC arising in verrucous carcinoma (ie, having a major component of frankly invasive carcinoma). p16 immunohistochemistry, HPV DNA polymerase chain reaction (PCR) and E6/E7 mRNA reverse transcription PCR for high-risk HPV types were performed. Of the 49 cases, 6 (12.2%) showed strong (>50%) staining for p16. HPV DNA was detected in 7/49 (14.3%) cases, but only one case was positive for both p16, and HPV DNA. A total of 36 cases yielded sufficient RNA for RT-PCR (18 verrucous carcinomas, 13 atypical verrucous carcinomas, and 5 SCC arising in verrucous carcinoma). All 36 were negative, including the four p16-positive and three HPV DNA-positive tumors tested. Although a minority of verrucous carcinoma lesions are p16 and HPV DNA positive, transcriptionally active high-risk HPV is uniformly absent. These findings argue that verrucous carcinoma and its related squamous cell carcinomas are not HPV-driven tumors.

  10. Transforming Growth Factor-β-Activated Kinase 1 Is Required for Human FcγRIIIb-Induced Neutrophil Extracellular Trap Formation.

    PubMed

    Alemán, Omar Rafael; Mora, Nancy; Cortes-Vieyra, Ricarda; Uribe-Querol, Eileen; Rosales, Carlos

    2016-01-01

    Neutrophils (PMNs) are the most abundant leukocytes in the blood. PMN migrates from the circulation to sites of infection where they are responsible for antimicrobial functions. PMN uses phagocytosis, degranulation, and formation of neutrophil extracellular traps (NETs) to kill microbes. Several stimuli, including bacteria, fungi, and parasites, and some pharmacological compounds, such as Phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate (PMA), are efficient inducers of NETs. Antigen-antibody complexes are also capable of inducing NET formation. Recently, it was reported that FcγRIIIb cross-linking induced NET formation similarly to PMA stimulation. Direct cross-linking of FcγRIIA or integrins did not promote NET formation. FcγRIIIb-induced NET formation presented different kinetics from PMA-induced NET formation, suggesting differences in signaling. Because FcγRIIIb also induces a strong activation of extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK) and nuclear factor Elk-1, and the transforming growth factor-β-activated kinase 1 (TAK1) has recently been implicated in ERK signaling, in the present report, we explored the role of TAK1 in the signaling pathway activated by FcγRIIIb leading to NET formation. FcγRIIIb was stimulated by specific monoclonal antibodies, and NET formation was evaluated in the presence or absence of pharmacological inhibitors. The antibiotic LL Z1640-2, a selective inhibitor of TAK1 prevented FcγRIIIb-induced, but not PMA-induced NET formation. Both PMA and FcγRIIIb cross-linking induced phosphorylation of ERK. But, LL Z1640-2 only inhibited the FcγRIIIb-mediated activation of ERK. Also, only FcγRIIIb, similarly to transforming growth factor-β-induced TAK1 phosphorylation. A MEK (ERK kinase)-specific inhibitor was able to prevent ERK phosphorylation induced by both PMA and FcγRIIIb. These data show for the first time that FcγRIIIb cross-linking activates TAK1, and that this kinase is required for triggering the MEK/ERK signaling pathway to NETosis

  11. Transforming Growth Factor-β-Activated Kinase 1 Is Required for Human FcγRIIIb-Induced Neutrophil Extracellular Trap Formation

    PubMed Central

    Alemán, Omar Rafael; Mora, Nancy; Cortes-Vieyra, Ricarda; Uribe-Querol, Eileen; Rosales, Carlos

    2016-01-01

    Neutrophils (PMNs) are the most abundant leukocytes in the blood. PMN migrates from the circulation to sites of infection where they are responsible for antimicrobial functions. PMN uses phagocytosis, degranulation, and formation of neutrophil extracellular traps (NETs) to kill microbes. Several stimuli, including bacteria, fungi, and parasites, and some pharmacological compounds, such as Phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate (PMA), are efficient inducers of NETs. Antigen–antibody complexes are also capable of inducing NET formation. Recently, it was reported that FcγRIIIb cross-linking induced NET formation similarly to PMA stimulation. Direct cross-linking of FcγRIIA or integrins did not promote NET formation. FcγRIIIb-induced NET formation presented different kinetics from PMA-induced NET formation, suggesting differences in signaling. Because FcγRIIIb also induces a strong activation of extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK) and nuclear factor Elk-1, and the transforming growth factor-β-activated kinase 1 (TAK1) has recently been implicated in ERK signaling, in the present report, we explored the role of TAK1 in the signaling pathway activated by FcγRIIIb leading to NET formation. FcγRIIIb was stimulated by specific monoclonal antibodies, and NET formation was evaluated in the presence or absence of pharmacological inhibitors. The antibiotic LL Z1640-2, a selective inhibitor of TAK1 prevented FcγRIIIb-induced, but not PMA-induced NET formation. Both PMA and FcγRIIIb cross-linking induced phosphorylation of ERK. But, LL Z1640-2 only inhibited the FcγRIIIb-mediated activation of ERK. Also, only FcγRIIIb, similarly to transforming growth factor-β-induced TAK1 phosphorylation. A MEK (ERK kinase)-specific inhibitor was able to prevent ERK phosphorylation induced by both PMA and FcγRIIIb. These data show for the first time that FcγRIIIb cross-linking activates TAK1, and that this kinase is required for triggering the MEK/ERK signaling pathway to

  12. Postprandial VLDL lipolysis products increase monocyte adhesion and lipid droplet formation via activation of ERK2 and NFκB

    PubMed Central

    Altman, Robin; Norman, Jennifer E.; Rutledge, John C.

    2013-01-01

    Postprandial lipemia is characterized by a transient increase in circulating triglyceride-rich lipoproteins such as very low-density lipoprotein (VLDL) and has been shown to activate monocytes in vivo. Lipolysis of VLDL releases remnant particles, phospholipids, monoglycerides, diglycerides, and fatty acids in close proximity to endothelial cells and monocytes. We hypothesized that postprandial VLDL lipolysis products could activate and recruit monocytes by increasing monocyte expression of proinflammatory cytokines and adhesion molecules, and that such activation is related to the development of lipid droplets. Freshly isolated human monocytes were treated with VLDL lipolysis products (2.28 mmol/l triglycerides + 2 U/ml lipoprotein lipase), and monocyte adhesion to a primed endothelial monolayer was observed using a parallel plate flow chamber coupled with a CCD camera. Treated monocytes showed more rolling and adhesion than controls, and an increase in transmigration between endothelial cells. The increased adhesive events were related to elevated expression of key integrin complexes including Mac-1 [αm-integrin (CD11b)/β2-integrin (CD18)], CR4 [αx-integrin (CD11c)/CD18] and VLA-4 [α4-integrin (CD49d)/β1-integrin (CD29)] on treated monocytes. Treatment of peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) and THP-1 monocytes with VLDL lipolysis products increased expression of TNFα, IL-1β, and IL-8 over controls, with concurrent activation of NFkB and AP-1. NFκB and AP-1-induced cytokine and integrin expression was dependent on ERK and Akt phosphorylation. Additionally, fatty acids from VLDL lipolysis products induced ERK2-dependent lipid droplet formation in monocytes, suggesting a link to inflammatory signaling pathways. These results provide novel mechanisms for postprandial monocyte activation by VLDL lipolysis products, suggesting new pathways and biomarkers for chronic, intermittent vascular injury. PMID:24163071

  13. The Calmodulin-Binding Transcription Activator CAMTA1 Is Required for Long-Term Memory Formation in Mice

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bas-Orth, Carlos; Tan, Yan-Wei; Oliveira, Ana M. M.; Bengtson, C. Peter; Bading, Hilmar

    2016-01-01

    The formation of long-term memory requires signaling from the synapse to the nucleus to mediate neuronal activity-dependent gene transcription. Synapse-to-nucleus communication is initiated by influx of calcium ions through synaptic NMDA receptors and/or L-type voltage-gated calcium channels and involves the activation of transcription factors by…

  14. Formative Evaluation of MyFit: A Curriculum to Promote Self-Regulation of Physical Activity among Middle School Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Grim, Melissa; Petosa, Rick; Hortz, Brian; Hunt, Laura

    2013-01-01

    Background: Previous interventions to increase physical activity among middle school students have not produced long-term results. Often, students lack the self-regulation skills needed to support long-term adherence to physical activity. Purpose: The purpose of this study was to conduct a formative evaluation of a self-regulation based physical…

  15. Fab-based bispecific antibody formats with robust biophysical properties and biological activity.

    PubMed

    Wu, Xiufeng; Sereno, Arlene J; Huang, Flora; Lewis, Steven M; Lieu, Ricky L; Weldon, Caroline; Torres, Carina; Fine, Cody; Batt, Micheal A; Fitchett, Jonathan R; Glasebrook, Andrew L; Kuhlman, Brian; Demarest, Stephen J

    2015-01-01

    A myriad of innovative bispecific antibody (BsAb) platforms have been reported. Most require significant protein engineering to be viable from a development and manufacturing perspective. Single-chain variable fragments (scFvs) and diabodies that consist only of antibody variable domains have been used as building blocks for making BsAbs for decades. The drawback with Fv-only moieties is that they lack the native-like interactions with CH1/CL domains that make antibody Fab regions stable and soluble. Here, we utilize a redesigned Fab interface to explore 2 novel Fab-based BsAbs platforms. The redesigned Fab interface designs limit heavy and light chain mixing when 2 Fabs are co-expressed simultaneously, thus allowing the use of 2 different Fabs within a BsAb construct without the requirement of one or more scFvs. We describe the stability and activity of a HER2×HER2 IgG-Fab BsAb, and compare its biophysical and activity properties with those of an IgG-scFv that utilizes the variable domains of the same parental antibodies. We also generated an EGFR × CD3 tandem Fab protein with a similar format to a tandem scFv (otherwise known as a bispecific T cell engager or BiTE). We show that the Fab-based BsAbs have superior biophysical properties compared to the scFv-based BsAbs. Additionally, the Fab-based BsAbs do not simply recapitulate the activity of their scFv counterparts, but are shown to possess unique biological activity.

  16. Phorbol ester-induced activation of protein kinase C leads to increased formation of diacylglycerol in human neutrophils

    SciTech Connect

    Faellman, M.; Stendahl, O.; Andersson, T. )

    1989-03-01

    Human neutrophils stimulated with a phorbol ester (phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate or phorbol 12,13-dibutyrate) responded with an increase in diacylglycerol, considered the natural activator of protein kinase C. The amounts of diacylglycerol formed were considerable, reaching 700-900% of basal after 20 minutes. In contrast, 4-{alpha}-phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate did not induce any detectable formation of diacylglycerol. Simultaneously, phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate exposure caused increased breakdown of both phosphatidylcholine and phosphatidylinositol 4,5-bisphosphate. These results suggest that once activated, protein kinase C can positively modulate its own activity by inducing additional formation of diacylglycerol from at least two different sources.

  17. Optical modulator including grapene

    DOEpatents

    Liu, Ming; Yin, Xiaobo; Zhang, Xiang

    2016-06-07

    The present invention provides for a one or more layer graphene optical modulator. In a first exemplary embodiment the optical modulator includes an optical waveguide, a nanoscale oxide spacer adjacent to a working region of the waveguide, and a monolayer graphene sheet adjacent to the spacer. In a second exemplary embodiment, the optical modulator includes at least one pair of active media, where the pair includes an oxide spacer, a first monolayer graphene sheet adjacent to a first side of the spacer, and a second monolayer graphene sheet adjacent to a second side of the spacer, and at least one optical waveguide adjacent to the pair.

  18. ["E" rosette formation in "active" T lymphocytes: phenomenon modulated by intracellular level of cyclic AMP and GMP (author's transl)].

    PubMed

    Machado, J A; Antunes, L J; Silva, E N

    1977-08-01

    The rosette formation envolving the binding of sheep red blood cells (SRBC) with active T lymphocytes was activated when the lymphocytes were incubated with levamisole, acetylcholine or carbamylcholine. Similar activation was seen when to the incubation medium was added substances of glucose metabolism (lactate, fumarate or succinate) or triphosphate de adenosina--ATP. The lymphocytes incubation with aminophyline, isoproterenol or 2-4-dinitrofenol--DNP--inhibited the rosette formation. The inhibition promoted by aminophyline was reversed by levamisole, acetylcholine or carbamylcholine, but not when lactate or ATP was used. When the rosette formation inhibition was caused by DNP, the reversion was only possible by ATP and no affect occurred if guanil cyclase activators were added to the incubation medium.

  19. Activity of a long-acting echinocandin, CD101, determined using CLSI and EUCAST reference methods, against Candida and Aspergillus spp., including echinocandin- and azole-resistant isolates

    PubMed Central

    Pfaller, Michael A.; Messer, Shawn A.; Rhomberg, Paul R.; Jones, Ronald N.; Castanheira, Mariana

    2016-01-01

    Objectives The objective of this study was to evaluate the in vitro activity of CD101, a novel echinocandin with a long serum elimination half-life, and comparator (anidulafungin and caspofungin) antifungal agents against a collection of Candida and Aspergillus spp. isolates. Methods CD101 and comparator agents were tested against 106 Candida spp. and 67 Aspergillus spp. isolates, including 27 isolates of Candida harbouring fks hotspot mutations and 12 itraconazole non-WT Aspergillus, using CLSI and EUCAST reference susceptibility broth microdilution (BMD) methods. Results Against WT and fks mutant Candida albicans, Candida glabrata and Candida tropicalis, the activity of CD101 [MIC90 = 0.06, 0.12 and 0.03 mg/L, respectively (CLSI method values)] was comparable to that of anidulafungin (MIC90 = 0.03, 0.12 and 0.03 mg/L, respectively) and caspofungin (MIC90 = 0.12, 0.25 and 0.12 mg/L, respectively). WT Candida krusei isolates were very susceptible to CD101 (MIC = 0.06 mg/L). CD101 activity (MIC50/90 = 1/2 mg/L) was comparable to that of anidulafungin (MIC50/90 = 2/2 mg/L) against Candida parapsilosis. CD101 (MIC mode = 0.06 mg/L for C. glabrata) was 2- to 4-fold more active against fks hotspot mutants than caspofungin (MIC mode = 0.5 mg/L). CD101 was active against Aspergillus fumigatus, Aspergillus terreus, Aspergillus niger and Aspergillus flavus (MEC90 range = ≤0.008–0.03 mg/L). The essential agreement between CLSI and EUCAST methods for CD101 was 92.0%–100.0% among Candida spp. and 95.0%–100.0% among Aspergillus spp. Conclusions The activity of CD101 is comparable to that of other members of the echinocandin class for the prevention and treatment of serious fungal infections. Similar results for CD101 activity versus Candida and Aspergillus spp. may be obtained with either CLSI or EUCAST BMD methods. PMID:27287236

  20. Pair and Cluster Formation in Hybrid Active-Passive Matter Suspensions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krafnick, Ryan; Garcia, Angel

    2015-03-01

    Systems composed of self-propelling entities, dubbed active matter, are ubiquitous in nature, from flocks of birds and schools of fish to swarms of bacteria and catalytic nanomotors. These systems (both biological and industrial) have applications ranging from micron-scale cargo manipulation and directed transport to water remediation and material processing. When added to a solution with passive (non-self-propelling) particles, active matter leads to new and altered system properties. For example, the diffusion of passive particles increases by orders of magnitude in typical systems, leading to a raised effective temperature. Additionally, particles that normally repel each other exhibit effective attractions which can lead to pair formation and clustering. The nature of these effects depends on both the mechanical collisions of swimmers and the hydrodynamic flow fields they propagate. We computationally examine the effect and dependence of various system parameters, such as particle shape and density, on these properties. This work was funded by NIH grant GM086801 and NSF grant MCB-1050966.

  1. Coagulation activation by MC28 fibrosarcoma cells facilitates lung tumor formation.

    PubMed

    Amirkhosravi, M; Francis, J L

    1995-01-01

    Tumor cells interact with the hemostatic system in various ways and may thus influence malignant growth and spread. MC28 fibrosarcoma cells possess a potent procoagulant activity (PCA) and form lung tumors following intravenous injection. The aim of this work was to study the relationship between PCA, intravascular coagulation and lung seeding in the MC28 model. MC28 cells were injected into control, warfarinized and heparinized hooded Lister rats. Coagulation changes were monitored by thromboelastography (TEG) and Sonoclot analysis (SA), lung fibrin formation by light and electron microscopy, tumor seeding by macroscopic counting and tumor cell and platelet deposition in the lungs by radiolabelling. PCA was measured by chromogenic assay. MC28 PCA was characterized as a tissue factor-factor VIIa complex that probably arose during cell culture or disaggregation of solid tumors. Injection of tumor cells caused marked coagulopathy and was rapidly (within 30 min) followed by fibrin deposition in the lungs and accumulation of radiolabelled platelets. Heparin and warfarin significantly reduced lung seeding (p < 0.001) and reduced retention of radiolabelled tumor cells in the pulmonary circulation (p < 0.01). Inhibition of cellular PCA by prior treatment with concanavalin A markedly reduced intravascular coagulation and lung seeding. We conclude that MC28 cells cause intravascular coagulation as a direct result of their procoagulant activity. The data suggest that tumor cells form complexes with platelets and fibrin which are retained in the lungs long enough for extravasation and seeding to occur.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  2. RADIO OBSERVATIONS OF THE STAR FORMATION ACTIVITIES IN THE NGC 2024 FIR 4 REGION

    SciTech Connect

    Choi, Minho; Kang, Miju; Lee, Jeong-Eun

    2015-07-15

    Star formation activities in the NGC 2024 FIR 4 region were studied by imaging centimeter continuum sources and water maser sources using several archival data sets from the Very Large Array. The continuum source VLA 9 is elongated in the northwest–southeast direction, consistent with the FIR 4 bipolar outflow axis, and has a flat spectrum in the 6.2–3.6 cm interval. The three water maser spots associated with FIR 4 are also distributed along the outflow axis. One of the spots is located close to VLA 9, and another one is close to an X-ray source. Examinations of the positions of compact objects in this region suggest that the FIR 4 cloud core contains a single low-mass protostar. VLA 9 is the best indicator of the protostellar position. VLA 9 may be a radio thermal jet driven by this protostar, and it is unlikely that FIR 4 contains a high-mass young stellar object (YSO). A methanol 6.7 GHz maser source is located close to VLA 9, at a distance of about 100 AU. The FIR 4 protostar must be responsible for the methanol maser action, which suggests that methanol class II masers are not necessarily excited by high-mass YSOs. Also discussed are properties of other centimeter continuum sources in the field of view and the water masers associated with FIR 6n. Some of the continuum sources are radio thermal jets, and some are magnetically active young stars.

  3. Coagulation activation by MC28 fibrosarcoma cells facilitates lung tumor formation.

    PubMed

    Amirkhosravi, M; Francis, J L

    1995-01-01

    Tumor cells interact with the hemostatic system in various ways and may thus influence malignant growth and spread. MC28 fibrosarcoma cells possess a potent procoagulant activity (PCA) and form lung tumors following intravenous injection. The aim of this work was to study the relationship between PCA, intravascular coagulation and lung seeding in the MC28 model. MC28 cells were injected into control, warfarinized and heparinized hooded Lister rats. Coagulation changes were monitored by thromboelastography (TEG) and Sonoclot analysis (SA), lung fibrin formation by light and electron microscopy, tumor seeding by macroscopic counting and tumor cell and platelet deposition in the lungs by radiolabelling. PCA was measured by chromogenic assay. MC28 PCA was characterized as a tissue factor-factor VIIa complex that probably arose during cell culture or disaggregation of solid tumors. Injection of tumor cells caused marked coagulopathy and was rapidly (within 30 min) followed by fibrin deposition in the lungs and accumulation of radiolabelled platelets. Heparin and warfarin significantly reduced lung seeding (p < 0.001) and reduced retention of radiolabelled tumor cells in the pulmonary circulation (p < 0.01). Inhibition of cellular PCA by prior treatment with concanavalin A markedly reduced intravascular coagulation and lung seeding. We conclude that MC28 cells cause intravascular coagulation as a direct result of their procoagulant activity. The data suggest that tumor cells form complexes with platelets and fibrin which are retained in the lungs long enough for extravasation and seeding to occur.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:7740497

  4. Formation of beta-lactamase in Bacteroides fragilis: cell-bound and extracellular activity.

    PubMed

    Olsson, B; Nord, C E; Wadström, T

    1976-05-01

    Nine strains of Bacteroides fragilis were cultivated in stirred fermentors and tested for their ability to produce beta-lactamase. There was a correlation between formation of beta-lactamase and high values of the minimal inhibitory concentration against beta-lactam antibiotics. B. fragilis strain B70 was used for optimizing the production of beta-lactamase. The highest bacterial yield was obtained in a proteose peptone-yeast extract medium. Optimal conditions for growth and beta-lactamase production were obtained at 37 C and pH 7.0. The beta-lactamase was released into the surrounding medium during the growth period to about 50%. Osmotic shock released about 20% of the total activity, and remaining activity was found in the cytoplasmic fraction. Substrate profile studies on four beta-lactamase-producing strains showed that the enzymes were mainly cephalosporinases. They are inhibited by cloxacillin, p-chloromercuribenzoate, and iodine. Analytical isoelectric focusing in polyacrylamide gel gave an isoelectric point of 4.9 +/- 0.2 for three of the strains and 5.6 +/- 0.2 for one. Comparison with beta-lactamases from aerobic gram-negative species with regard to isoelectric points showed no similarities. Also the molecular weight of the beta-lactamase from strain B70 of 43,000 indicates that this is a new class of beta-lactamase.

  5. Cholesterol-Enriched Domain Formation Induced by Viral-Encoded, Membrane-Active Amphipathic Peptide.

    PubMed

    Hanson, Joshua M; Gettel, Douglas L; Tabaei, Seyed R; Jackman, Joshua; Kim, Min Chul; Sasaki, Darryl Y; Groves, Jay T; Liedberg, Bo; Cho, Nam-Joon; Parikh, Atul N

    2016-01-01

    The α-helical (AH) domain of the hepatitis C virus nonstructural protein NS5A, anchored at the cytoplasmic leaflet of the endoplasmic reticulum, plays a role in viral replication. However, the peptides derived from this domain also exhibit remarkably broad-spectrum virocidal activity, raising questions about their modes of membrane association. Here, using giant lipid vesicles, we show that the AH peptide discriminates between membrane compositions. In cholesterol-containing membranes, peptide binding induces microdomain formation. By contrast, cholesterol-depleted membranes undergo global softening at elevated peptide concentrations. Furthermore, in mixed populations, the presence of ∼100 nm vesicles of viral dimensions suppresses these peptide-induced perturbations in giant unilamellar vesicles, suggesting size-dependent membrane association. These synergistic composition- and size-dependent interactions explain, in part, how the AH domain might on the one hand segregate molecules needed for viral assembly and on the other hand furnish peptides that exhibit broad-spectrum virocidal activity.

  6. The Evolution of the Electric Current during the Formation and Eruption of Active-region Filaments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Jincheng; Yan, Xiaoli; Qu, Zhongquan; Xue, Zhike; Xiang, Yongyuan; Li, Hao

    2016-02-01

    We present a comprehensive study of the electric current related to the formation and eruption of active region filaments in NOAA AR 11884. The vertical current on the solar surface was investigated by using vector magnetograms (VMs) observed by HMI on board the Solar Dynamics Observatory. To obtain the electric current along the filament's axis, we reconstructed the magnetic fields above the photosphere by using nonlinear force-free field extrapolation based on photospheric VMs. Spatio-temporal evolutions of the vertical current on the photospheric surface and the horizontal current along the filament's axis were studied during the long-term evolution and eruption-related period, respectively. The results show that the vertical currents of the entire active region behaved with a decreasing trend and the magnetic fields also kept decreasing during the long-term evolution. For the eruption-related evolution, the mean transverse field strengths decreased before two eruptions and increased sharply after two eruptions in the vicinity of the polarity inversion lines underneath the filament. The related vertical current showed different behaviors in two of the eruptions. On the other hand, a very interesting feature was found: opposite horizontal currents with respect to the current of the filament's axis appeared and increased under the filament before the eruptions and disappeared after the eruptions. We suggest that these opposite currents were carried by the new flux emerging from the photosphere bottom and might be the trigger mechanism for these filament eruptions.

  7. Wounding induces changes in tuber polyamine content, polyamine metabolic gene expression, and enzyme activity during closing layer formation and initiation of wound periderm formation.

    PubMed

    Lulai, Edward C; Neubauer, Jonathan D; Olson, Linda L; Suttle, Jeffrey C

    2015-03-15

    Tuber wound-healing processes are complex, and the associated regulation and modulation of these processes are poorly understood. Polyamines (PA) are involved in modulating a variety of responses to biotic and abiotic plant stresses and have been suggested to be involved in tuber wound responses. However, the time course of wound-induced changes in tuber PA content, activity of key biosynthetic enzymes and associated gene expression has not been determined and coordinated with major wound-healing processes. The objective of this study was to determine these wound-induced changes and their coordination with wound-healing processes. Wounding induced increases in putrescine (Put) and spermidine (Spd), but had only minor effects on spermine (Spm) content during the 168 h time course which encompassed the initiation and completion of the closing layer formation, and the initiation of cell division and wound periderm formation. As determinants of the first committed step in PA biosynthesis, arginine and ornithine decarboxylase (ADC and ODC, respectively) activities were below levels of detectability in resting tubers and expression of genes encoding these two enzymes was low. Within 6h of wounding, increases in the in vitro activities of ADC and ODC and expression of their cognate genes were observed. Expression of a gene encoding S-adenosylmethionine decarboxylase, required for Spd and Spm biosynthesis, was also increased 6h after wounding and remained elevated throughout the time course. Expression of a polyamine catabolic gene, encoding polyamine oxidase, was down-regulated after wounding. Results indicated a rapid wound-induced increase in PA biosynthesis during closing layer formation and the time of nuclei entry and exit from S-phase. PA content remained elevated as wound-induced cells became meristematic and initiated formation of the wound periderm suggesting sustained involvement in wound-healing.

  8. Wounding induces changes in tuber polyamine content, polyamine metabolic gene expression, and enzyme activity during closing layer formation and initiation of wound periderm formation.

    PubMed

    Lulai, Edward C; Neubauer, Jonathan D; Olson, Linda L; Suttle, Jeffrey C

    2015-03-15

    Tuber wound-healing processes are complex, and the associated regulation and modulation of these processes are poorly understood. Polyamines (PA) are involved in modulating a variety of responses to biotic and abiotic plant stresses and have been suggested to be involved in tuber wound responses. However, the time course of wound-induced changes in tuber PA content, activity of key biosynthetic enzymes and associated gene expression has not been determined and coordinated with major wound-healing processes. The objective of this study was to determine these wound-induced changes and their coordination with wound-healing processes. Wounding induced increases in putrescine (Put) and spermidine (Spd), but had only minor effects on spermine (Spm) content during the 168 h time course which encompassed the initiation and completion of the closing layer formation, and the initiation of cell division and wound periderm formation. As determinants of the first committed step in PA biosynthesis, arginine and ornithine decarboxylase (ADC and ODC, respectively) activities were below levels of detectability in resting tubers and expression of genes encoding these two enzymes was low. Within 6h of wounding, increases in the in vitro activities of ADC and ODC and expression of their cognate genes were observed. Expression of a gene encoding S-adenosylmethionine decarboxylase, required for Spd and Spm biosynthesis, was also increased 6h after wounding and remained elevated throughout the time course. Expression of a polyamine catabolic gene, encoding polyamine oxidase, was down-regulated after wounding. Results indicated a rapid wound-induced increase in PA biosynthesis during closing layer formation and the time of nuclei entry and exit from S-phase. PA content remained elevated as wound-induced cells became meristematic and initiated formation of the wound periderm suggesting sustained involvement in wound-healing. PMID:25577734

  9. Determining if Active Learning through a Formative Assessment Process Translates to Better Performance in Summative Assessment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Grosas, Aidan Bradley; Raju, Shiwani Rani; Schuett, Burkhardt Siegfried; Chuck, Jo-Anne; Millar, Thomas James

    2016-01-01

    Formative assessment used in a level 2 unit, Immunology, gave outcomes that were both surprising and applicable across disciplines. Four formative tests were given and reviewed during class time. The students' attitudes to formative assessment were evaluated using questionnaires and its effectiveness in closing the gap was measured by the…

  10. An evolutionary model for collapsing molecular clouds and their star formation activity. II. Mass dependence of the star formation rate

    SciTech Connect

    Zamora-Avilés, Manuel; Vázquez-Semadeni, Enrique

    2014-10-01

    We discuss the evolution and dependence on cloud mass of the star formation rate (SFR) and efficiency (SFE) of star-forming molecular clouds (MCs) within the scenario that clouds are undergoing global collapse and that the SFR is controlled by ionization feedback. We find that low-mass clouds (M {sub max} ≲ 10{sup 4} M {sub ☉}) spend most of their evolution at low SFRs, but end their lives with a mini-burst, reaching a peak SFR ∼10{sup 4} M {sub ☉} Myr{sup –1}, although their time-averaged SFR is only (SFR) ∼ 10{sup 2} M {sub ☉} Myr{sup –1}. The corresponding efficiencies are SFE{sub final} ≲ 60% and (SFE) ≲ 1%. For more massive clouds (M {sub max} ≳ 10{sup 5} M {sub ☉}), the SFR first increases and then reaches a plateau because the clouds are influenced by stellar feedback since earlier in their evolution. As a function of cloud mass, (SFR) and (SFE) are well represented by the fits (SFR) ≈ 100(1 + M {sub max}/1.4 × 10{sup 5} M {sub ☉}){sup 1.68} M {sub ☉} Myr{sup –1} and (SFE) ≈ 0.03(M {sub max}/2.5 × 10{sup 5} M {sub ☉}){sup 0.33}, respectively. Moreover, the SFR of our model clouds follows closely the SFR-dense gas mass relation recently found by Lada et al. during the epoch when their instantaneous SFEs are comparable to those of the clouds considered by those authors. Collectively, a Monte Carlo integration of the model-predicted SFR(M) over a Galactic giant molecular cloud mass spectrum yields values for the total Galactic SFR that are within half an order of magnitude of the relation obtained by Gao and Solomon. Our results support the scenario that star-forming MCs may be in global gravitational collapse and that the low observed values of the SFR and SFE are a result of the interruption of each SF episode, caused primarily by the ionizing feedback from massive stars.

  11. Exchange Protein Activated by cAMP Enhances Long-Term Memory Formation Independent of Protein Kinase A

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ma, Nan; Abel, Ted; Hernandez, Pepe J.

    2009-01-01

    It is well established that cAMP signaling within neurons plays a major role in the formation of long-term memories--signaling thought to proceed through protein kinase A (PKA). However, here we show that exchange protein activated by cAMP (Epac) is able to enhance the formation of long-term memory in the hippocampus and appears to do so…

  12. Evaluating apatite formation and osteogenic activity of electrospun composites for bone tissue engineering.

    PubMed

    Patlolla, Ajitha; Arinzeh, Treena Livingston

    2014-05-01

    Significant interest has been in examining calcium phosphate ceramics, specifically β-tricalcium phosphate (β-TCP) (Ca3 (PO4)2 ) and synthetic hydroxyapatite (HA) (Ca10 (PO4)6 (OH)2 ), in composites and more recently, in fibrous composites formed using the electrospinning technique for bone tissue engineering applications. Calcium phosphate ceramics are sought because they can be bone bioactive, which means an apatite forms on their surface that facilitates bonding to bone tissue, and are osteoconductive. However, studies examining the bioactivity of electrospun composites containing calcium phosphates and their corresponding osteogenic activity have been limited. In this study, electrospun composites consisting of (20/80) HA/TCP nanoceramics and poly (ϵ-caprolactone) (PCL) were fabricated. Solvent and solvent combinations were evaluated to form scaffolds with a maximum concentration and dispersion of ceramic and pore sizes large enough for cell infiltration and tissue growth. PCL was dissolved in either methylene chloride (Composite-MC) or a combination of methylene chloride (80%) and dimethylformamide (20%; Composite-MC + DMF). Composites were evaluated in vitro for degradation, apatite formation, and osteogenic differentiation of human mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) with an emphasis on temporal gene expression of osteogenic markers and the pluripotent gene Sox-2. Apatite formation and the osteogenic differentiation was the greatest for Composite-MC as determined by gene expression, protein production and biochemical markers, even without the presence of osteoinductive factors in the media, in comparison to Composite-MC + DMF and unfilled PCL mats. Sox-2 levels also reduced over time. The results of this study demonstrate that the solvent or solvent combination used in preparing the electrospun composite mats plays a critical role in determining their bioactivity which may, in turn, affect cell behavior.

  13. Evaluating apatite formation and osteogenic activity of electrospun composites for bone tissue engineering.

    PubMed

    Patlolla, Ajitha; Arinzeh, Treena Livingston

    2014-05-01

    Significant interest has been in examining calcium phosphate ceramics, specifically β-tricalcium phosphate (β-TCP) (Ca3 (PO4)2 ) and synthetic hydroxyapatite (HA) (Ca10 (PO4)6 (OH)2 ), in composites and more recently, in fibrous composites formed using the electrospinning technique for bone tissue engineering applications. Calcium phosphate ceramics are sought because they can be bone bioactive, which means an apatite forms on their surface that facilitates bonding to bone tissue, and are osteoconductive. However, studies examining the bioactivity of electrospun composites containing calcium phosphates and their corresponding osteogenic activity have been limited. In this study, electrospun composites consisting of (20/80) HA/TCP nanoceramics and poly (ϵ-caprolactone) (PCL) were fabricated. Solvent and solvent combinations were evaluated to form scaffolds with a maximum concentration and dispersion of ceramic and pore sizes large enough for cell infiltration and tissue growth. PCL was dissolved in either methylene chloride (Composite-MC) or a combination of methylene chloride (80%) and dimethylformamide (20%; Composite-MC + DMF). Composites were evaluated in vitro for degradation, apatite formation, and osteogenic differentiation of human mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) with an emphasis on temporal gene expression of osteogenic markers and the pluripotent gene Sox-2. Apatite formation and the osteogenic differentiation was the greatest for Composite-MC as determined by gene expression, protein production and biochemical markers, even without the presence of osteoinductive factors in the media, in comparison to Composite-MC + DMF and unfilled PCL mats. Sox-2 levels also reduced over time. The results of this study demonstrate that the solvent or solvent combination used in preparing the electrospun composite mats plays a critical role in determining their bioactivity which may, in turn, affect cell behavior. PMID:24264603

  14. Mechanisms for quenching star formation activities in green valley galaxies and its depends on morphologies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kong, Xu; Pan, Zhizheng; Lian, Jianhui

    2015-08-01

    Galaxies are categorized into two main populations, red quiescent galaxies and blue star-forming galaxies. One of the key questions is which physical mechanisms are responsible for quenching star formation activities in blue galaxies and the resulting transformation? In this talk, we present research on the morphologies, spectra, and environments of "green valley" galaxies in the COSMOS field and low redshift "green valley" galaxies in SDSS. Our findings suggest that environmental conditions, most likely starvation and harassment, significantly affect the transformation of M* < 10^10.0 Msun blue galaxies into red galaxies, especially at z < 0.5. Using image from SDSS and GALEX, we analyze the radial ultraviolet-optical color distributions in a sample of low redshift green valley galaxies, and investigate how quenching is processing in a galaxy. The early-type "green valley" galaxies (ETGs) have dramatically different radial NUV-r color distributions compared to late-type "green valley" galaxies (LTGs), most of ETGs have blue cores, nearly all LTGs have uniform color profiles that can be well-interpreted as red bulges plus blue disk components. These results suggest that the LTGs follow a general model by which quenching first occurs in the core regions, and then finally extend to the rest of the galaxy; for ETGs, their star formations are centrally concentrated. Our results can be re-examined and have important implications for the IFU surveys, such as MaNGA and SAMI (2013ApJ...776...14P, 2014ApJ...792L...4P, 2015MNRAS.446.1449L).

  15. Chemically Activated Formation of Organic Acids in Reactions of the Criegee Intermediate with Aldehydes and Ketones

    SciTech Connect

    Jalan, Amrit; Allen, Joshua W.; Green, William H.

    2013-08-08

    Reactions of the Criegee intermediate (CI, .CH2OO.) are important in atmospheric ozonolysis models. In this work, we compute the rates for reactions between .CH2OO. and HCHO, CH3CHO and CH3COCH3 leading to the formation of secondary ozonides (SOZ) and organic acids. Relative to infinitely separated reactants, the SOZ in all three cases is found to be 48–51 kcal mol-1 lower in energy, formed via 1,3- cycloaddition of .CH2OO. across the CQO bond. The lowest energy pathway found for SOZ decomposition is intramolecular disproportionation of the singlet biradical intermediate formed from cleavage of the O–O bond to form hydroxyalkyl esters. These hydroxyalkyl esters undergo concerted decomposition providing a low energy pathway from SOZ to acids. Geometries and frequencies of all stationary points were obtained using the B3LYP/MG3S DFT model chemistry, and energies were refined using RCCSD(T)-F12a/cc-pVTZ-F12 single-point calculations. RRKM calculations were used to obtain microcanonical rate coefficients (k(E)) and the reservoir state method was used to obtain temperature and pressure dependent rate coefficients (k(T, P)) and product branching ratios. At atmospheric pressure, the yield of collisionally stabilized SOZ was found to increase in the order HCHO o CH3CHO o CH3COCH3 (the highest yield being 10-4 times lower than the initial .CH2OO. concentration). At low pressures, chemically activated formation of organic acids (formic acid in the case of HCHO and CH3COCH3, formic and acetic acid in the case of CH3CHO) was found to be the major product channel in agreement with recent direct measurements. Collisional energy transfer parameters and the barrier heights for SOZ reactions were found to be the most sensitive parameters determining SOZ and organic acid yield.

  16. Stages of change for physical activity and dietary habits in persons with type 2 diabetes included in a mobile health intervention: the Norwegian study in RENEWING HEALTH

    PubMed Central

    Holmen, Heidi; Wahl, Astrid; Torbjørnsen, Astrid; Jenum, Anne Karen; Småstuen, Milada Cvancarova; Ribu, Lis

    2016-01-01

    Objective The aim of this study was to investigate stages of change for physical activity and dietary habits using baseline data from persons with type 2 diabetes included in a mobile health intervention. We examined the associations between stages of change for physical activity change and dietary change, and between stages of change for each behavior and individual characteristics, health-related quality of life, self-management, depressive symptoms, and lifestyle. Research design and methods We examined 151 persons with type 2 diabetes with an glycated hemoglobin (HbA1c) level ≥7.1%, aged ≥18 years at baseline of a randomized controlled trial, before testing a mobile app with or without health counseling. Stages of change were dichotomized into ‘pre-action’ and ‘action’. Self-management was measured using the Health Education Impact Questionnaire (heiQ) where a higher score reflects increased self-management, and health-related quality of life was measured with the Short-Form-36 (SF-36). Logistic regression modeling was performed. Results The median HbA1c level was 7.9% (7.1–12.4), 90% were overweight or obese, and 20% had ≥3 comorbidities. 58% were in the preaction stage for physical activity change and 79% in the preaction stage for dietary change. Higher scores of self-management were associated with an increased chance of being in the action stage for both dietary change and physical activity change. Higher body mass index was associated with an 8% reduced chance of being in the action stage for physical activity change (OR 0.92, 95% CI 0.86 to 0.99). Conclusions Being in the action stage was associated with higher scores of self-management, crucial for type 2 diabetes. Over half of the participants were in the preaction stage for physical activity and dietary change, and many had a high disease burden with comorbidities and overweight. Trial registration number NCT01315756. PMID:27239317

  17. Systematic assessment of scaffold hopping versus activity cliff formation across bioactive compound classes following a molecular hierarchy.

    PubMed

    Stumpfe, Dagmar; Dimova, Dilyana; Bajorath, Jürgen

    2015-07-01

    Scaffold hopping and activity cliff formation define opposite ends of the activity landscape feature spectrum. To rationalize these events at the level of scaffolds, active compounds involved in scaffold hopping were required to contain topologically distinct scaffolds but have only limited differences in potency, whereas compounds involved in activity cliffs were required to share the same scaffold but have large differences in potency. A systematic search was carried out for compounds involved in scaffold hopping and/or activity cliff formation. Results obtained for compound data sets covering more than 300 human targets revealed clear trends. If scaffolds represented multiple but fewer than 10 active compounds, nearly 90% of all scaffolds were exclusively involved in hopping events. With increasing compound coverage, the fraction of scaffolds involved in both scaffold hopping and activity cliff formation significantly increased to more than 50%. However, ∼40% of the scaffolds representing large numbers of active compounds continued to be exclusively involved in scaffold hopping. More than 200 scaffolds with broad target coverage were identified that consistently represented potent compounds and yielded an abundance of scaffold hops in the low-nanomolar range. These and other subsets of scaffolds we characterized are of prime interest for structure-activity relationship (SAR) exploration and compound design. Therefore, the complete scaffold classification generated in the course of our analysis is made freely available.

  18. Organic Aerosol Formation in the Humid, Photochemically-Active Southeastern US: SOAS Experiments and Simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sareen, N.; Lim, Y. B.; Carlton, A. G.; Turpin, B. J.

    2013-12-01

    Aqueous multiphase chemistry in the atmosphere can lead to rapid transformation of organic compounds, forming highly oxidized low volatility organic aerosol and, in some cases, light absorbing (brown) carbon. Because liquid water is globally abundant, this chemistry could substantially impact climate, air quality, health, and the environment. Gas-phase precursors released from biogenic and anthropogenic sources are oxidized and fragmented forming water-soluble gases that can undergo reactions in the aqueous phase (in clouds, fogs, and wet aerosols) leading to the formation of secondary organic aerosol (SOAAQ). Recent studies have highlighted the role of certain precursors like glyoxal, methylglyoxal, glycolaldehyde, acetic acid, acetone, and epoxides in the formation of SOAAQ. The goal of this work is to identify other precursors that are atmospherically important. In this study, ambient mixtures of water-soluble gases were scrubbed from the atmosphere at Brent, Alabama during the Southern Oxidant and Aerosol Study (SOAS). Four mist chambers in parallel collected ambient gases in a DI water medium at 20-25 LPM with a 4 hr collection time. Total organic carbon (TOC) values in daily composited samples were 64-180 μM. Aqueous OH radical oxidation experiments were conducted with these mixtures in a newly designed cuvette chamber to understand the formation of SOA through gas followed by aqueous chemistry. OH radicals (3.5E-2 μM [OH] s-1) were formed in-situ in the chamber, continuously by H2O2 photolysis. Precursors and products of these aqueous OH experiments were characterized using ion chromatography (IC), electrospray ionization mass spectrometry (ESI-MS), and IC-ESI-MS. ESI-MS results from a June 12th, 2013 sample showed precursors to be primarily odd, positive mode ions, indicative of the presence of non-nitrogen containing alcohols, aldehydes, organic peroxides, or epoxides. Products were seen in the negative mode and included organic acid ions like pyruvate

  19. A Comparison of Brunt Criteria, the Non Alcoholic Fatty Liver Disease Activity Score (NAS) & a Proposed NAS-including fibrosis as Valid Diagnostic Scores for NASH

    PubMed Central

    Santiago-Rolón, Amarilys; Purcell, Dagmary; Rosado, Kathia; Toro, Doris H.

    2016-01-01

    Objective Non-alcoholic steatohepatitis (NASH) can result in cirrhosis and end stage liver disease. It is of utmost importance to differentiate NASH from simple steatosis. The aim of this study is to determine the prevalence of NASH in Latino veterans with metabolic syndrome and compare histologic grading using Brunt Criteria, the NAFLD activity score (NAS), and a proposed NAS score including fibrosis. Methods Veterans with metabolic syndrome, hepatic steatosis and elevation of ALT/AST who underwent a liver biopsy from 2004-2010 were included in this study. Biopsies were evaluated by a single blinded Hepatopathologist. Steatosis, lobular inflammation, ballooning and fibrosis were graded per specimen. Each biopsy was evaluated using Brunt criteria, NAS and NAS plus fibrosis. Results Sixty patients were included in this study, 88.3% men with a mean age of 50.4 (± 12.8). 50.0% met criteria for NASH according to the Brunt system. When classifying biopsies using NAS, only 30.0% (18/60) had a score ≥5, while when adding fibrosis, the number of patients with a score ≥5 increased to 33 (55.0%). When evaluating the predictive ability of the two scoring systems, we found that NAS including fibrosis had a higher sensitivity than NAS (86.7% vs. 40.0%) and a lower specificity (76.7% vs. 80.0%). Conclusion In our population with metabolic syndrome and altered liver function tests, about 50-55% had steatohepatitis. There were significant differences between the scoring systems. When using NAS-plus-fibrosis more patients were recognized and the sensitivity increased. Further validation studies are required to evaluate this proposed NAS scoring System. PMID:26602577

  20. Calcium-chelating alizarin and other anthraquinones inhibit biofilm formation and the hemolytic activity of Staphylococcus aureus

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Jin-Hyung; Kim, Yong-Guy; Yong Ryu, Shi; Lee, Jintae

    2016-01-01

    Staphylococcal biofilms are problematic and play a critical role in the persistence of chronic infections because of their abilities to tolerate antimicrobial agents. Thus, the inhibitions of biofilm formation and/or toxin production are viewed as alternative means of controlling Staphylococcus aureus infections. Here, the antibiofilm activities of 560 purified phytochemicals were examined. Alizarin at 10 μg/ml was found to efficiently inhibit biofilm formation by three S. aureus strains and a Staphylococcus epidermidis strain. In addition, two other anthraquinones purpurin and quinalizarin were found to have antibiofilm activity. Binding of Ca2+ by alizarin decreased S. aureus biofilm formation and a calcium-specific chelating agent suppressed the effect of calcium. These three anthraquinones also markedly inhibited the hemolytic activity of S. aureus, and in-line with their antibiofilm activities, increased cell aggregation. A chemical structure-activity relationship study revealed that two hydroxyl units at the C-1 and C-2 positions of anthraquinone play important roles in antibiofilm and anti-hemolytic activities. Transcriptional analyses showed that alizarin repressed the α-hemolysin hla gene, biofilm-related genes (psmα, rbf, and spa), and modulated the expressions of cid/lrg genes (the holin/antiholin system). These findings suggest anthraquinones, especially alizarin, are potentially useful for controlling biofilm formation and the virulence of S. aureus. PMID:26763935

  1. DsbA2 (27 kDa Com1-like protein) of Legionella pneumophila catalyses extracytoplasmic disulphide-bond formation in proteins including the Dot/Icm type IV secretion system.

    PubMed

    Jameson-Lee, Max; Garduño, Rafael A; Hoffman, Paul S

    2011-05-01

    In Gram-negative bacteria, thiol oxidoreductases catalyse the formation of disulphide bonds (DSB) in extracytoplasmic proteins. In this study, we sought to identify DSB-forming proteins required for assembly of macromolecular structures in Legionella pneumophila. Here we describe two DSB-forming proteins, one annotated as dsbA1 and the other annotated as a 27 kDa outer membrane protein similar to Com1 of Coxiella burnetii, which we designate as dsbA2. Both proteins are predicted to be periplasmic, and while dsbA1 mutants were readily isolated and without phenotype, dsbA2 mutants were not obtained. To advance studies of DsbA2, a cis-proline residue at position 198 was replaced with threonine that enables formation of stable disulphide-bond complexes with substrate proteins. Expression of DsbA2 P198T mutant protein from an inducible promoter produced dominant-negative effects on DsbA2 function that resulted in loss of infectivity for amoeba and HeLa cells and loss of Dot/Icm T4SS-mediated contact haemolysis of erythrocytes. Analysis of captured DsbA2 P198T-substrate complexes from L. pneumophila by mass spectrometry identified periplasmic and outer membrane proteins that included components of the Dot/Icm T4SS. More broadly, our studies establish a DSB oxidoreductase function for the Com1 lineage of DsbA2-like proteins which appear to be conserved among those bacteria also expressing T4SS. PMID:21375592

  2. DsbA2 (27-kDa Com1-Like Protein) of Legionella pneumophila Catalyses Extracytoplasmic Disulfide-Bond Formation in Proteins Including the Dot/Icm Type IV Secretion System

    PubMed Central

    Jameson-Lee, Max; Garduno, Rafael A.; Hoffman, Paul S.

    2011-01-01

    Summary In Gram negative bacteria, thiol oxidoreductases catalyze the formation of disulfide bonds (DSB) in extracytoplasmic proteins. In this study, we sought to identify DSB-forming proteins required for assembly of macromolecular structures in Legionella pneumophila. Here we describe two DSB forming proteins, one annotated as dsbA1 and the other annotated as a 27-kDa outer membrane protein similar to Com1 of Coxiella burnetii, which we designate as dsbA2. Both proteins are predicted to be periplasmic, and while dsbA1 mutants were readily isolated and without phenotype, dsbA2 mutants were not obtained. To advance studies of DsbA2, a cis-proline residue at position 198 was replaced with threonine that enables formation of stable disulfide-bond complexes with substrate proteins. Expression of DsbA2 P198T-mutant protein from an inducible promoter produced dominant-negative effects on DsbA2 function that resulted in loss of infectivity for amoeba and HeLa cells and loss of Dot/Icm T4SS-mediated contact hemolysis of erythrocytes. Analysis of captured DsbA2 P198T-substrate complexes from L. pneumophila by mass spectrometry identified periplasmic and outer membrane proteins that included components of the Dot/Icm T4SS. More broadly, our studies establish a DSB oxidoreductase function for the Com1 lineage of DsbA2-like proteins which appear to be conserved among those bacteria also expressing T4SS. PMID:21375592

  3. Formative Research Conducted in Rural Appalachia to Inform a Community Physical Activity Intervention

    PubMed Central

    Kruger, Tina M.; Swanson, Mark; Davis, Rian E.; Wright, Sherry; Dollarhide, Katie; Schoenberg, Nancy E.

    2011-01-01

    Purpose Despite the well-established benefits of physical activity (PA), most Americans, especially those in rural, traditionally underserved areas, engage in considerably less PA than recommended. This study examines perceived barriers to and facilitators of PA and promising organized PA programs among rural Appalachians. Design Eight focus groups and seven group key informant interviews were conducted. Setting This study was conducted in eastern Kentucky, in Central Appalachia. Subjects 114 rural Appalachian residents (74% female, 91% White) participated. Measures Open-ended, semi-structured, and structured questions regarding perceptions of, barriers to/facilitators of, and examples of successful/failed PA programs were asked. Analysis Qualitative data analysis was conducted, including codebook development and steps taken to ensure rigor and transferability. Interrater reliability was over 94%. Results In addition to barriers that are consistent with other populations, rural Appalachian residents indicated that travel time, family commitments, and inadequate community resources undermine PA. Suggested avenues to increase PA include partnership with churches and the U.S. Cooperative Extension Service; programs that include families, are well-advertised, focus on health rather than appearance; and, underlying all suggestions, culturally-relevant yet non-stereotyping activities. Conclusions When developing PA interventions in rural Appalachia, it is important to employ community-based participatory approaches that leverage unique assets of the population and show potential in overcoming challenges to PA. PMID:22208411

  4. Studies on chalcone derivatives: Complex formation, thermal behavior, stability constant and antioxidant activity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    El-Sayed, Yusif S.; Gaber, M.

    2015-02-01

    The chalcone 3-[4‧-dimethylaminophenyl]-1-(2-pyridyl) prop-2-en-1-one (DMAPP) and 3-(4‧-diethylaminophenyl)-1-(2-pyridinyl) prop-2-en-1-one abbreviated as DEAPP have been synthesized and characterized with IR, 1H NMR, 13C NMR spectroscopic techniques as described previously (El-Daly et al., 2008; Gaber et al., 2009; El-Sayed, 2013). By using UV visible spectroscopy method the mole fraction ratio for copper with DMAPP and DEAPP complexes were determined and it was found to be 1:1. The stability constants of this complex have been determined by Job's method. The stability constant (Kf) of copper with DMAPP and DEAPP complexes in universal buffer pH = 3.2 was determined to be 9.9 × 104 and 5.2 × 104 respectively. The effect of Cu(II) ion on the emission spectrum of the free chalcone is also assigned. Adherence to Beer's law and Ringbom optimum concentration ranges are determined. The thermal decomposition of the metal complexes is studied by TGA technique. The kinetic parameters like activation energy, pre-exponential factor and entropy of activation are estimated. The structure of complexes was energetically optimized through molecular mechanics applying MM+ force field coupled with molecular dynamics simulation. The bond lengths and bond angles have been calculated to confirm the geometry of the ligands and their Cu(II) complexes. The mode of interaction of the chalcone to copper nanoparticles was studied. The apparent association constants of the colloidal copper nanoparticles:chalcone complexes in solution were evaluated using the spectral method and compared with the formation constant of the Cu(II) chalcone complexes. Antioxidant activity of these chalcones was evaluated by using 1,1‧-diphenyl-2-picrylhydrazyl (DPPHrad) radicals scavenging method, which showed that the antioxidant activity of DMAPP has higher value than the DEAPP. Semi-empirical study results showed that DMAPP have higher dipole moment than DEAPP [1].

  5. High molecular weight hyaluronic acid limits astrocyte activation and scar formation after spinal cord injury

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khaing, Zin Z.; Milman, Brian D.; Vanscoy, Jennifer E.; Seidlits, Stephanie K.; Grill, Raymond J.; Schmidt, Christine E.

    2011-08-01

    A major hurdle for regeneration after spinal cord injury (SCI) is the ability of axons to penetrate and grow through the scar tissue. After SCI, inflammatory cells, astrocytes and meningeal cells all play a role in developing the glial scar. In addition, degradation of native high molecular weight (MW) hyaluronic acid (HA), a component of the extracellular matrix, has been shown to induce activation and proliferation of astrocytes. However, it is not known if the degradation of native HA actually enhances glial scar formation. We hypothesize that the presence of high MW HA (HA with limited degradation) after SCI will decrease glial scarring. Here, we demonstrate that high MW HA decreases cell proliferation and reduces chondroitin sulfate proteoglycan (CSPG) production in cultured neonatal and adult astrocytes. In addition, stiffness-matched high MW HA hydrogels crosslinked to resist degradation were implanted in a rat model of spinal dorsal hemisection injury. The numbers of immune cells (macrophages and microglia) detected at the lesion site in animals with HA hydrogel implants were significantly reduced at acute time points (one, three and ten days post-injury). Lesioned animals with HA implants also exhibited significantly lower CSPG expression at ten days post-injury. At nine weeks post-injury, animals with HA hydrogel implants exhibited a significantly decreased astrocytic response, but did not have significantly altered CSPG expression. Combined, these data suggest that high MW HA, when stabilized against degradation, mitigates astrocyte activation in vitro and in vivo. The presence of HA implants was also associated with a significant decrease in CSPG deposition at ten days after SCI. Therefore, HA-based hydrogel systems hold great potential for minimizing undesired scarring as part of future repair strategies after SCI.

  6. High molecular weight hyaluronic acid limits astrocyte activation and scar formation after spinal cord injury.

    PubMed

    Khaing, Zin Z; Milman, Brian D; Vanscoy, Jennifer E; Seidlits, Stephanie K; Grill, Raymond J; Schmidt, Christine E

    2011-08-01

    A major hurdle for regeneration after spinal cord injury (SCI) is the ability of axons to penetrate and grow through the scar tissue. After SCI, inflammatory cells, astrocytes and meningeal cells all play a role in developing the glial scar. In addition, degradation of native high molecular weight (MW) hyaluronic acid (HA), a component of the extracellular matrix, has been shown to induce activation and proliferation of astrocytes. However, it is not known if the degradation of native HA actually enhances glial scar formation. We hypothesize that the presence of high MW HA (HA with limited degradation) after SCI will decrease glial scarring. Here, we demonstrate that high MW HA decreases cell proliferation and reduces chondroitin sulfate proteoglycan (CSPG) production in cultured neonatal and adult astrocytes. In addition, stiffness-matched high MW HA hydrogels crosslinked to resist degradation were implanted in a rat model of spinal dorsal hemisection injury. The numbers of immune cells (macrophages and microglia) detected at the lesion site in animals with HA hydrogel implants were significantly reduced at acute time points (one, three and ten days post-injury). Lesioned animals with HA implants also exhibited significantly lower CSPG expression at ten days post-injury. At nine weeks post-injury, animals with HA hydrogel implants exhibited a significantly decreased astrocytic response, but did not have significantly altered CSPG expression. Combined, these data suggest that high MW HA, when stabilized against degradation, mitigates astrocyte activation in vitro and in vivo. The presence of HA implants was also associated with a significant decrease in CSPG deposition at ten days after SCI. Therefore, HA-based hydrogel systems hold great potential for minimizing undesired scarring as part of future repair strategies after SCI.

  7. High molecular weight hyaluronic acid limits astrocyte activation and scar formation after spinal cord injury.

    PubMed

    Khaing, Zin Z; Milman, Brian D; Vanscoy, Jennifer E; Seidlits, Stephanie K; Grill, Raymond J; Schmidt, Christine E

    2011-08-01

    A major hurdle for regeneration after spinal cord injury (SCI) is the ability of axons to penetrate and grow through the scar tissue. After SCI, inflammatory cells, astrocytes and meningeal cells all play a role in developing the glial scar. In addition, degradation of native high molecular weight (MW) hyaluronic acid (HA), a component of the extracellular matrix, has been shown to induce activation and proliferation of astrocytes. However, it is not known if the degradation of native HA actually enhances glial scar formation. We hypothesize that the presence of high MW HA (HA with limited degradation) after SCI will decrease glial scarring. Here, we demonstrate that high MW HA decreases cell proliferation and reduces chondroitin sulfate proteoglycan (CSPG) production in cultured neonatal and adult astrocytes. In addition, stiffness-matched high MW HA hydrogels crosslinked to resist degradation were implanted in a rat model of spinal dorsal hemisection injury. The numbers of immune cells (macrophages and microglia) detected at the lesion site in animals with HA hydrogel implants were significantly reduced at acute time points (one, three and ten days post-injury). Lesioned animals with HA implants also exhibited significantly lower CSPG expression at ten days post-injury. At nine weeks post-injury, animals with HA hydrogel implants exhibited a significantly decreased astrocytic response, but did not have significantly altered CSPG expression. Combined, these data suggest that high MW HA, when stabilized against degradation, mitigates astrocyte activation in vitro and in vivo. The presence of HA implants was also associated with a significant decrease in CSPG deposition at ten days after SCI. Therefore, HA-based hydrogel systems hold great potential for minimizing undesired scarring as part of future repair strategies after SCI. PMID:21753237

  8. Xylem formation can be modeled statistically as a function of primary growth and cambium activity.

    PubMed

    Huang, Jian-Guo; Deslauriers, Annie; Rossi, Sergio

    2014-08-01

    Primary (budburst, foliage and shoot) growth and secondary (cambium and xylem) growth of plants play a vital role in sequestering atmospheric carbon. However, their potential relationships have never been mathematically quantified and the underlying physiological mechanisms are unclear. We monitored primary and secondary growth in Picea mariana and Abies balsamea on a weekly basis from 2010 to 2013 at four sites over an altitudinal gradient (25-900 m) in the eastern Canadian boreal forest. We determined the timings of onset and termination through the fitted functions and their first derivative. We quantified the potential relationships between primary growth and secondary growth using the mixed-effects model. We found that xylem formation of boreal conifers can be modeled as a function of cambium activity, bud phenology, and shoot and needle growth, as well as species- and site-specific factors. Our model reveals that there may be an optimal mechanism to simultaneously allocate the photosynthetic products and stored nonstructural carbon to growth of different organs at different times in the growing season. This mathematical link can bridge phenological modeling, forest ecosystem productivity and carbon cycle modeling, which will certainly contribute to an improved prediction of ecosystem productivity and carbon equilibrium.

  9. Constitutive activation of Drosophila CncC transcription factor reduces lipid formation in the fat body.

    PubMed

    Karim, M Rezaul; Taniguchi, Hiroaki; Kobayashi, Akira

    2015-08-01

    Accumulating evidence indicates that the vertebrate stress-response transcription factors Nrf1 and Nrf2 are involved in hepatic lipid metabolism. However, the underlying molecular mechanisms of Nrf1-and Nrf2-mediated lipid metabolism remain unclear. To elucidate the precise roles of Nrfs in this process, we analyzed the physiological role of CncC in lipid metabolism as a Drosophila model for vertebrate Nrf1 and Nrf2. We first examined whether CncC activity is repressed under physiological conditions through a species-conserved NHB1 (N-terminal homology box 1) domain, similar to that observed for Nrf1. Deletion of the NHB1 domain (CncCΔN) led to CncC-mediated rough-eye phenotypes and the induced expression of the CncC target gene gstD1 both in vivo and in vitro. Thus, we decided to explore how CncCΔN overexpression affects the formation of the fat body, which is the major lipid storage organ. Intriguingly, CncCΔN caused a significant reduction in lipid droplet size and triglyceride (TG) levels in the fat body compared to wild type. We found that CncCΔN induced a number of genes related to innate immunity that might have an effect on the regulation of cellular lipid storage. Our study provides new insights into the regulatory mechanism of CncC and its role in lipid homeostasis.

  10. Star formation and AGN activity in the most luminous LINERs in the local universe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pović, Mirjana; Márquez, Isabel; Netzer, Hagai; Masegosa, Josefa; Nordon, Raanan; Pérez, Enrique; Schoenell, William

    2016-11-01

    This work presents the properties of 42 objects in the group of the most luminous, highest star formation rate (SFR) low-ionization nuclear emission-line regions (LINERs) at z = 0.04-0.11. We obtained long-slit spectroscopy of the nuclear regions for all sources, and FIR data (Herschel and IRAS) for 13 of them. We measured emission-line intensities, extinction, stellar populations, stellar masses, ages, active galactic nuclei (AGN) luminosities, and SFRs. We find considerable differences from other low-redshift LINERs, in terms of extinction, and general similarity to star-forming galaxies. We confirm the existence of such luminous LINERs in the local universe, after being previously detected at z ˜ 0.3 by Tommasin et al. The median stellar mass of these LINERs corresponds to 6-7 × 1010 M⊙ which was found in previous work to correspond to the peak of relative growth rate of stellar populations and therefore for the highest SFRs. Other LINERs although showing similar AGN luminosities have lower SFR. We find that most of these sources have LAGN ˜ LSF suggesting co-evolution of black hole and stellar mass. In general, the fraction of local LINERs on the main sequence of star-forming galaxies is related to their AGN luminosity.

  11. Dynamic formation of single-atom catalytic active sites on ceria-supported gold nanoparticles

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Yanggang; Mei, Donghai; Glezakou, Vassiliki Alexandra; Li, Jun; Rousseau, Roger J.

    2015-03-04

    Ab initio Molecular Dynamics simulations and static Density Functional Theory calculations have been performed to investigate the reaction mechanism of CO oxidation on Au/CeO2 catalyst. It is found that under reaction condition CO adsorption significantly labializes the surface atoms of the Au cluster and leads to the formation of isolated Au+-CO species that resides on the support in the vicinity of the Au particle. In this context, we identified a dynamic single-atom catalytic mechanism at the interfacial area for CO oxidation on Au/CeO2 catalyst, which is a lower energy pathway than that of CO oxidation at the interface with the metal particle. This results from the ability of the single atom site to strongly couple with the redox properties of the support in a synergistic manner thereby lowering the barrier for redox reactions. We find that the single Au+ ion, which only exists under reaction conditions, breaks away from the Au cluster to catalyze CO oxidation and returns to the Au cluster after the catalytic cycle is completed. Generally, our study highlights the importance of the dynamic creation of active sites under reaction conditions and their essential role in a catalytic process.

  12. Formation of radicals during heating lysine and glucose in solution with an intermediate water activity.

    PubMed

    Yin, J; Andersen, M L; Thomsen, M K; Skibsted, L H; Hedegaard, R V

    2013-08-01

    Heating glucose with lysine under alkaline conditions (pH 7.0-10.0) was found to take place with consumption of oxygen together with formation of brown-colored compounds. Highly reactive intermediary radicals were detected when lysine and glucose were heated at intermediate water activity at pH 7.0 and 8.0. The detection was based on initial trapping of highly reactive radicals by ethanol followed by spin trapping of 1-hydroxyethylradicals with α-(4-pyridyl N-oxide)-N-tert-butylnitrone (POBN) and Electron Spin Resonance (ESR) spectroscopy. The generation of reactive intermediary radicals from the Maillard reactions was favored by enhancing alkaline conditions (pH 8.0) and stimulated by presence of the transition metal ion Fe²⁺. The stability of the nitrone spin traps, N-tert-butyl-α-phenylnitrone and POBN was examined in buffered aqueous solutions within the pH range 1-12, and found to be less temperature dependent at acidic pH compared to alkaline conditions. A low rate (kobs) of hydrolysis of POBN was found at the used experimental conditions of 70°C and pH 7.0 and 8.0, which made this spin trap method suitable for the detection of radicals in the Maillard reaction system. PMID:23745613

  13. Transgenic activation of Ras in neurons increases synapse formation in mouse neocortex.

    PubMed

    Seeger, G; Gärtner, U; Arendt, Th

    2005-06-01

    The small G protein Ras, which is a molecular switch in neurotrophic signal transduction, is implicated in synaptic plasticity and synapse development during ontogeny and in the adult nervous system. To characterise the involvement of Ras-dependent signaling in synaptogenesis, the cortical synapse-to-neuron ratio was investigated in synRas mice overexpressing Val12-Ha-Ras in postmitotic neurons (introduced by Heumann, 2000). The number of synapses per neuron was analysed in cortical layers II/III of the somatosensory cortex at different stages of postnatal development by stereological methods. The synapse-to-neuron ratio was still identical in wild-type and synRas mice at postnatal day 4 before the onset of transgene expression. At P12, P47 and in the adult, analyses revealed a significant increase in the synapse-to-neuron ratio in synRas mice which correlated with the strength of transgene expression. The data presented here provide evidence that Ras activity might be profoundly involved in synaptogenesis by reinforcing the formation or maintenance of synapses during the development and in the adult.

  14. Unravelling the interactions among microbial populations found in activated sludge during biofilm formation.

    PubMed

    Liébana, Raquel; Arregui, Lucía; Santos, Antonio; Murciano, Antonio; Marquina, Domingo; Serrano, Susana

    2016-09-01

    Microorganisms colonize surfaces and develop biofilms through interactions that are not yet thoroughly understood, with important implications for water and wastewater systems. This study investigated the interactions between N-acyl homoserine lactone (AHL)-producing bacteria, yeasts and protists, and their contribution to biofilm development. Sixty-one bacterial strains were isolated from activated sludge and screened for AHL production, with Aeromonas sp. found to be the dominant AHL producer. Shewanella xiamenensis, Aeromonas allosaccharophila, Acinetobacter junii and Pseudomonas aeruginosa recorded the highest adherence capabilities, with S. xiamenensis being the most effective in surface colonization. Additionally, highly significant interactions (i.e. synergic or antagonistic) were described for dual and multistrain mixtures of bacterial strains (P. aeruginosa, S. xiamenensis, A. junii and Pseudomonas stutzeri), as well as for strongly adherent bacteria co-cultured with yeasts. In this last case, the adhered biomass in co-cultures was lower than the monospecific biofilms of bacteria and yeast, with biofilm observations by microscopy suggesting that bacteria had an antagonist effect on the whole or part of the yeast population. Finally, protist predation by Euplotes sp. and Paramecium sp. on Aeromonas hydrophila biofilms not only failed to reduce biofilm formation, but also recorded unexpected results leading to the development of aggregates of high density and complexity. PMID:27306553

  15. Harnessing redox activity for the formation of uranium tris(imido) compounds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anderson, Nickolas H.; Odoh, Samuel O.; Yao, Yiyi; Williams, Ursula J.; Schaefer, Brian A.; Kiernicki, John J.; Lewis, Andrew J.; Goshert, Mitchell D.; Fanwick, Phillip E.; Schelter, Eric J.; Walensky, Justin R.; Gagliardi, Laura; Bart, Suzanne C.

    2014-10-01

    Classically, late transition-metal organometallic compounds promote multielectron processes solely through the change in oxidation state of the metal centre. In contrast, uranium typically undergoes single-electron chemistry. However, using redox-active ligands can engage multielectron reactivity at this metal in analogy to transition metals. Here we show that a redox-flexible pyridine(diimine) ligand can stabilize a series of highly reduced uranium coordination complexes by storing one, two or three electrons in the ligand. These species reduce organoazides easily to form uranium-nitrogen multiple bonds with the release of dinitrogen. The extent of ligand reduction dictates the formation of uranium mono-, bis- and tris(imido) products. Spectroscopic and structural characterization of these compounds supports the idea that electrons are stored in the ligand framework and used in subsequent reactivity. Computational analyses of the uranium imido products probed their molecular and electronic structures, which facilitated a comparison between the bonding in the tris(imido) structure and its tris(oxo) analogue.

  16. Differential roles of phosphorylation in the formation of transcriptional active RNA polymerase I

    PubMed Central

    Fath, Stephan; Milkereit, Philipp; Peyroche, Gerald; Riva, Michel; Carles, Christophe; Tschochner, Herbert

    2001-01-01

    Regulation of rDNA transcription depends on the formation and dissociation of a functional complex between RNA polymerase I (pol I) and transcription initiation factor Rrn3p. We analyzed whether phosphorylation is involved in this molecular switch. Rrn3p is a phosphoprotein that is predominantly phosphorylated in vivo when it is not bound to pol I. In vitro, Rrn3p is able both to associate with pol I and to enter the transcription cycle in its nonphosphorylated form. By contrast, phosphorylation of pol I is required to form a stable pol I-Rrn3p complex for efficient transcription initiation. Furthermore, association of pol I with Rrn3p correlates with a change in the phosphorylation state of pol I in vivo. We suggest that phosphorylation at specific sites of pol I is a prerequisite for proper transcription initiation and that phosphorylation/dephosphorylation of pol I is one possibility to modulate cellular rDNA transcription activity. PMID:11717393

  17. Dynamic formation of single-atom catalytic active sites on ceria-supported gold nanoparticles

    DOE PAGES

    Wang, Yanggang; Mei, Donghai; Glezakou, Vassiliki Alexandra; Li, Jun; Rousseau, Roger J.

    2015-03-04

    Ab initio Molecular Dynamics simulations and static Density Functional Theory calculations have been performed to investigate the reaction mechanism of CO oxidation on Au/CeO2 catalyst. It is found that under reaction condition CO adsorption significantly labializes the surface atoms of the Au cluster and leads to the formation of isolated Au+-CO species that resides on the support in the vicinity of the Au particle. In this context, we identified a dynamic single-atom catalytic mechanism at the interfacial area for CO oxidation on Au/CeO2 catalyst, which is a lower energy pathway than that of CO oxidation at the interface with themore » metal particle. This results from the ability of the single atom site to strongly couple with the redox properties of the support in a synergistic manner thereby lowering the barrier for redox reactions. We find that the single Au+ ion, which only exists under reaction conditions, breaks away from the Au cluster to catalyze CO oxidation and returns to the Au cluster after the catalytic cycle is completed. Generally, our study highlights the importance of the dynamic creation of active sites under reaction conditions and their essential role in a catalytic process.« less

  18. Formation and removal of dissolved organic nitrogen (DON) in membrane bioreactor and conventional activated sludge processes.

    PubMed

    Han, Xiaomeng; Wang, Zhiwei; Ma, Jinxing; Zheng, Junjian; Wang, Pan; Wu, Zhichao

    2015-08-01

    Dissolved organic nitrogen (DON) has become a growing concern due to its contribution to eutrophication and nitrogenous disinfection byproducts (N-DBPs) formation. However, information of DON in membrane bioreactors (MBRs) is very limited. In this study, occurrence, transformation and fate of DON in an MBR system were systematically investigated. MBR sludge showed a larger hydrolysis rate of particle organic nitrogen (PON) and also a higher transformation rate of DON to nitrate compared to conventional activated sludge (CAS). For long-term experiments, MBR achieved higher DON removal efficiency at low temperature than CAS; however, at high temperature, the effluent DON concentrations were almost the same in both systems. Batch tests on DON biodegradability showed that DON concentration increased and large molecular weight DON accumulated after 3-h aeration at low temperature, while DON concentration continuously decreased with the increase of aeration time at high temperature. The obtained results provide insights in DON removal in MBRs for meeting increasingly stringent regulations in terms of nitrogen removal.

  19. Unravelling the interactions among microbial populations found in activated sludge during biofilm formation.

    PubMed

    Liébana, Raquel; Arregui, Lucía; Santos, Antonio; Murciano, Antonio; Marquina, Domingo; Serrano, Susana

    2016-09-01

    Microorganisms colonize surfaces and develop biofilms through interactions that are not yet thoroughly understood, with important implications for water and wastewater systems. This study investigated the interactions between N-acyl homoserine lactone (AHL)-producing bacteria, yeasts and protists, and their contribution to biofilm development. Sixty-one bacterial strains were isolated from activated sludge and screened for AHL production, with Aeromonas sp. found to be the dominant AHL producer. Shewanella xiamenensis, Aeromonas allosaccharophila, Acinetobacter junii and Pseudomonas aeruginosa recorded the highest adherence capabilities, with S. xiamenensis being the most effective in surface colonization. Additionally, highly significant interactions (i.e. synergic or antagonistic) were described for dual and multistrain mixtures of bacterial strains (P. aeruginosa, S. xiamenensis, A. junii and Pseudomonas stutzeri), as well as for strongly adherent bacteria co-cultured with yeasts. In this last case, the adhered biomass in co-cultures was lower than the monospecific biofilms of bacteria and yeast, with biofilm observations by microscopy suggesting that bacteria had an antagonist effect on the whole or part of the yeast population. Finally, protist predation by Euplotes sp. and Paramecium sp. on Aeromonas hydrophila biofilms not only failed to reduce biofilm formation, but also recorded unexpected results leading to the development of aggregates of high density and complexity.

  20. Modeling active galactic nucleus feedback in cool-core clusters: The formation of cold clumps

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Yuan; Bryan, Greg L.

    2014-07-10

    We perform high-resolution (15-30 pc) adaptive mesh simulations to study the impact of momentum-driven active galactic nucleus (AGN) feedback in cool-core clusters, focusing in this paper on the formation of cold clumps. The feedback is jet-driven with an energy determined by the amount of cold gas within 500 pc of the super-massive black hole. When the intracluster medium in the core of the cluster becomes marginally stable to radiative cooling, with the thermal instability to the free-fall timescale ratio t{sub TI}/t{sub ff} < 3-10, cold clumps of gas start to form along the propagation direction of the AGN jets. By tracing the particles in the simulations, we find that these cold clumps originate from low entropy (but still hot) gas that is accelerated by the jet to outward radial velocities of a few hundred km s{sup –1}. This gas is out of hydrostatic equilibrium and so can cool. The clumps then grow larger as they decelerate and fall toward the center of the cluster, eventually being accreted onto the super-massive black hole. The general morphology, spatial distribution, and estimated Hα morphology of the clumps are in reasonable agreement with observations, although we do not fully replicate the filamentary morphology of the clumps seen in the observations, probably due to missing physics.

  1. Modeling Active Galactic Nucleus Feedback in Cool-core Clusters: The Formation of Cold Clumps

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Yuan; Bryan, Greg L.

    2014-07-01

    We perform high-resolution (15-30 pc) adaptive mesh simulations to study the impact of momentum-driven active galactic nucleus (AGN) feedback in cool-core clusters, focusing in this paper on the formation of cold clumps. The feedback is jet-driven with an energy determined by the amount of cold gas within 500 pc of the super-massive black hole. When the intracluster medium in the core of the cluster becomes marginally stable to radiative cooling, with the thermal instability to the free-fall timescale ratio t TI/t ff < 3-10, cold clumps of gas start to form along the propagation direction of the AGN jets. By tracing the particles in the simulations, we find that these cold clumps originate from low entropy (but still hot) gas that is accelerated by the jet to outward radial velocities of a few hundred km s-1. This gas is out of hydrostatic equilibrium and so can cool. The clumps then grow larger as they decelerate and fall toward the center of the cluster, eventually being accreted onto the super-massive black hole. The general morphology, spatial distribution, and estimated Hα morphology of the clumps are in reasonable agreement with observations, although we do not fully replicate the filamentary morphology of the clumps seen in the observations, probably due to missing physics.

  2. Holocene ice dynamics and bottom-water formation associated with Cape Darnley polynya activity recorded in Burton Basin, East Antarctica

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Borchers, Andreas; Dietze, Elisabeth; Kuhn, Gerhard; Esper, Oliver; Voigt, Ines; Hartmann, Kai; Diekmann, Bernhard

    2016-03-01

    A multi-proxy study including sedimentological, mineralogical, biogeochemical and micropaleontological methods was conducted on sediment core PS69/849-2 retrieved from Burton Basin, MacRobertson Shelf, East Antarctica. The goal of this study was to depict the deglacial and Holocene environmental history of the MacRobertson Land-Prydz Bay region. A special focus was put on the timing of ice-sheet retreat and the variability of bottom-water formation due to sea ice formation through the Holocene. Results from site PS69/849-2 provide the first paleo-environmental record of Holocene variations in bottom-water production probably associated to the Cape Darnley polynya, which is the second largest polynya in the Antarctic. Methods included end-member modeling of laser-derived high-resolution grain size data to reconstruct the depositional regimes and bottom-water activity. The provenance of current-derived and ice-transported material was reconstructed using clay-mineral and heavy-mineral analysis. Conclusions on biogenic production were drawn by determination of biogenic opal and total organic carbon. It was found that the ice shelf front started to retreat from the site around 12.8 ka BP. This coincides with results from other records in Prydz Bay and suggests warming during the early Holocene optimum next to global sea level rise as the main trigger. Ice-rafted debris was then supplied to the site until 5.5 cal. ka BP, when Holocene global sea level rise stabilized and glacial isostatic rebound on MacRobertson Land commenced. Throughout the Holocene, three episodes of enhanced bottom-water activity probably due to elevated brine rejection in Cape Darnley polynya occured between 11.5 and 9 cal. ka BP, 5.6 and 4.5 cal. ka BP and since 1.5 cal. ka BP. These periods are related to shifts from warmer to cooler conditions at the end of Holocene warm periods, in particular the early Holocene optimum, the mid-Holocene warm period and at the beginning of the neoglacial. In

  3. A CLOSER VIEW OF THE RADIO-FIR CORRELATION: DISENTANGLING THE CONTRIBUTIONS OF STAR FORMATION AND ACTIVE GALACTIC NUCLEUS ACTIVITY

    SciTech Connect

    Moric, I.; Smolcic, V.; Riechers, D. A.; Scoville, N.; Kimball, A.; Ivezic, Z.

    2010-11-20

    We extend the Unified Radio Catalog, a catalog of sources detected by various (NVSS, FIRST, WENSS, GB6) radio surveys